Science.gov

Sample records for environmental stress cracking

  1. Environmental stress cracking of polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mahan, K. I.

    1980-01-01

    A two point bending method for use in studying the environmental stress cracking and crazing phenomena is described and demonstrated for a variety of polymer/solvent systems. Critical strain values obtained from these curves are reported for various polymer/solvent systems including a considerable number of systems for which critical strain values have not been previously reported. Polymers studied using this technique include polycarbonate (PC), ABS, high impact styrene (HIS), polyphenylene oxide (PPO), and polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA). Critical strain values obtained using this method compared favorably with available existing data. The major advantage of the technique is the ability to obtain time vs. strain curves over a short period of time. The data obtained suggests that over a short period of time the transition in most of the polymer solvent systems is more gradual than previously believed.

  2. Environmental Crack Driving Force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, M. M.

    2013-03-01

    The effect of environment on the crack driving force is considered, first by assuming quasistatic extension of a stationary crack and second, by use of stress corrosion cracking (SCC) crack growth rate models developed previously by this author and developed further here. A quasistatic thermodynamic energy balance approach, of the Griffith-Irwin type, is used to develop stationary crack threshold expressions, tilde{J}_c , which represent the conjoint mechanical and electrochemical conditions, below which stationary cracks are stable. Expressions for the electrochemical crack driving force (CDF) were derived using an analysis that is analogous to that used by Irwin to derive his "strain energy release rate," G, which Rice showed as being equivalent to his mechanical CDF, J. The derivations show that electrochemical CDFs both for active path dissolution (APD) and hydrogen embrittlement (HE) mechanisms of SCC are simply proportional to Tafel's electrochemical anodic and cathodic overpotentials, η a and η c, respectively. Phenomenological SCC models based on the kinetics of APD and HE crack growth are used to derive expressions for the kinetic threshold, J scc, below which crack growth cannot be sustained. These models show how independent mechanical and environmental CDFs may act together to drive SCC crack advance. Development of a user-friendly computational tool for calculating Tafel's overpotentials is advocated.

  3. Environmental stress-corrosion cracking of fiberglass: lessons learned from failures in the chemical industry.

    PubMed

    Myers, T J; Kytömaa, H K; Smith, T R

    2007-04-11

    Fiberglass reinforced plastic (FRP) composite materials are often used to construct tanks, piping, scrubbers, beams, grating, and other components for use in corrosive environments. While FRP typically offers superior and cost effective corrosion resistance relative to other construction materials, the glass fibers traditionally used to provide the structural strength of the FRP can be susceptible to attack by the corrosive environment. The structural integrity of traditional FRP components in corrosive environments is usually dependent on the integrity of a corrosion-resistant barrier, such as a resin-rich layer containing corrosion resistant glass fibers. Without adequate protection, FRP components can fail under loads well below their design by an environmental stress-corrosion cracking (ESCC) mechanism when simultaneously exposed to mechanical stress and a corrosive chemical environment. Failure of these components can result in significant releases of hazardous substances into plants and the environment. In this paper, we present two case studies where fiberglass components failed due to ESCC at small chemical manufacturing facilities. As is often typical, the small chemical manufacturing facilities relied largely on FRP component suppliers to determine materials appropriate for the specific process environment and to repair damaged in-service components. We discuss the lessons learned from these incidents and precautions companies should take when interfacing with suppliers and other parties during the specification, design, construction, and repair of FRP components in order to prevent similar failures and chemical releases from occurring in the future. PMID:16950568

  4. Aqueous chloride stress corrosion cracking of titanium - A comparison with environmental hydrogen embrittlement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, H. G.

    1974-01-01

    The physical characteristics of stress corrosion cracking of titanium in an aqueous chloride environment are compared with those of embrittlement of titanium by a gaseous hydrogen environment in an effort to help contribute to the understanding of the possible role of hydrogen in the complex stress corrosion cracking process. Based on previous studies, the two forms of embrittlement are shown to be similar at low hydrogen pressures (100 N/sq m) but dissimilar at higher hydrogen pressures. In an effort to quantify this comparison, tests were conducted in an aqueous chloride solution using the same material and test techniques as had previously been employed in a gaseous hydrogen environment. The results of these tests strongly support models based on hydrogen as the embrittling species in an aqueous chloride environment.

  5. Environmentally assisted cracking of LWR materials

    SciTech Connect

    Chopra, O.K.; Chung, H.M.; Kassner, T.F.; Shack, W.J.

    1995-12-01

    Research on environmentally assisted cracking (EAC) of light water reactor materials has focused on (a) fatigue initiation in pressure vessel and piping steels, (b) crack growth in cast duplex and austenitic stainless steels (SSs), (c) irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) of austenitic SSs, and (d) EAC in high- nickel alloys. The effect of strain rate during different portions of the loading cycle on fatigue life of carbon and low-alloy steels in 289{degree}C water was determined. Crack growth studies on wrought and cast SSs have been completed. The effect of dissolved-oxygen concentration in high-purity water on IASCC of irradiated Type 304 SS was investigated and trace elements in the steel that increase susceptibility to intergranular cracking were identified. Preliminary results were obtained on crack growth rates of high-nickel alloys in water that contains a wide range of dissolved oxygen and hydrogen concentrations at 289 and 320{degree}C. The program on Environmentally Assisted Cracking of Light Water Reactor Materials is currently focused on four tasks: fatigue initiation in pressure vessel and piping steels, fatigue and environmentally assisted crack growth in cast duplex and austenitic SS, irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking of austenitic SSs, and environmentally assisted crack growth in high-nickel alloys. Measurements of corrosion-fatigue crack growth rates (CGRs) of wrought and cast stainless steels has been essentially completed. Recent progress in these areas is outlined in the following sections.

  6. Environmental Degradation of Materials: Surface Chemistry Related to Stress Corrosion Cracking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwarz, J. A.

    1985-01-01

    Parallel experiments have been performed in order to develop a comprehensive model for stress cracking (SCC) in structural materials. The central objective is to determine the relationship between the activity and selectivity of the microstructure of structural materials to their dissolution kinetics and experimentally measured SCC kinetics. Zinc was chosen as a prototype metal system. The SCC behavior of two oriented single-crystal disks of zinc in a chromic oxide/sodium sulfate solution (Palmerton solution) were determined. It was found that: (1) the dissolution rate is strongly (hkil)-dependent and proportional to the exposure time in the aggressive environment; and (2) a specific slip system is selectively active to dissolution under applied stress and this slip line controls crack initiation and propagation. As a precursor to potential microgrvity experiments, electrophoretic mobility measurements of zinc particles were obtained in solutions of sodium sulfate (0.0033 M) with concentrations of dissolved oxygen from 2 to 8 ppm. The equilibrium distribution of exposed oriented planes as well as their correlation will determine the particle mobility.

  7. Aqueous chloride stress corrosion cracking of titanium: A comparison with environmental hydrogen embrittlement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, H. G.

    1973-01-01

    The physical characteristics of stress corrosion cracking of titanium in an aqueous chloride environment are compared with those of embrittlement of titanium by a gaseous hydrogen environment in an effort to help contribute to the understanding of the possible role of hydrogen in the complex stress corrosion cracking process. Based on previous studies, the two forms of embrittlement are shown to be similar at low hydrogen pressures (100 N/sqm) but dissimilar at higher hydrogen pressures. In an effort to quantify this comparison, tests were conducted in an aqueous chloride solution using the same material and test techniques as had previously been employed in a gaseous hydrogen environment. The results of these tests strongly support models based on hydrogen as the embrittling species in an aqueous chloride environment. Further, it is shown that if hydrogen is the causal species, the effective hydrogen fugacity at the surface of titanium exposed to an aqueous chloride environment is equivalent to a molecular hydrogen pressure of approximately 10 N/sqm.

  8. Environmentally assisted cracking in light water reactors.

    SciTech Connect

    Chopra, O. K.; Chung, H. M.; Clark, R. W.; Gruber, E. E.; Shack, W. J.; Soppet, W. K.; Strain, R. V.

    2007-11-06

    This report summarizes work performed by Argonne National Laboratory on fatigue and environmentally assisted cracking (EAC) in light water reactors (LWRs) from January to December 2002. Topics that have been investigated include: (a) environmental effects on fatigue crack initiation in carbon and low-alloy steels and austenitic stainless steels (SSs), (b) irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) of austenitic SSs in BWRs, (c) evaluation of causes and mechanisms of irradiation-assisted cracking of austenitic SS in PWRs, and (d) cracking in Ni-alloys and welds. A critical review of the ASME Code fatigue design margins and an assessment of the conservation in the current choice of design margins are presented. The existing fatigue {var_epsilon}-N data have been evaluated to define the effects of key material, loading, and environmental parameters on the fatigue lives of carbon and low-alloy steels and austenitic SSs. Experimental data are presented on the effects of surface roughness on fatigue crack initiation in these materials in air and LWR environments. Crack growth tests were performed in BWR environments on SSs irradiated to 0.9 and 2.0 x 10{sup 21} n x cm{sup -2}. The crack growth rates (CGRs) of the irradiated steels are a factor of {approx}5 higher than the disposition curve proposed in NUREG-0313 for thermally sensitized materials. The CGRs decreased by an order of magnitude in low-dissolved oxygen (DO) environments. Slow-strain-rate tensile (SSRT) tests were conducted in high-purity 289 C water on steels irradiated to {approx}3 dpa. The bulk S content correlated well with the susceptibility to intergranular SCC in 289 C water. The IASCC susceptibility of SSs that contain >0.003 wt. % S increased drastically. bend tests in inert environments at 23 C were conducted on broken pieces of SSRT specimens and on unirradiated specimens of the same materials after hydrogen charging. The results of the tests and a review of other data in the literature

  9. Stress Corrosion Cracking of Carbon Steel Weldments

    SciTech Connect

    POH-SANG, LAM

    2005-01-13

    An experiment was conducted to investigate the role of weld residual stress on stress corrosion cracking in welded carbon steel plates prototypic to those used for nuclear waste storage tanks. Carbon steel specimen plates were butt-joined with Gas Metal Arc Welding technique. Initial cracks (seed cracks) were machined across the weld and in the heat affected zone. These specimen plates were then submerged in a simulated high level radioactive waste chemistry environment. Stress corrosion cracking occurred in the as-welded plate but not in the stress-relieved duplicate. A detailed finite element analysis to simulate exactly the welding process was carried out, and the resulting temperature history was used to calculate the residual stress distribution in the plate for characterizing the observed stress corrosion cracking. It was shown that the cracking can be predicted for the through-thickness cracks perpendicular to the weld by comparing the experimental KISCC to the calculated stress intensity factors due to the welding residual stress. The predicted crack lengths agree reasonably well with the test data. The final crack lengths appear to be dependent on the details of welding and the sequence of machining the seed cracks, consistent with the prediction.

  10. Stress-corrosion cracking in metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    Criteria and recommended practices for preventing stress-corrosion cracking from impairing the structural integrity and flightworthiness of space vehicles are presented. The important variables affecting stress-corrosion cracking are considered to be the environment, including time and temperature; metal composition, and structure; and sustained tensile stress. For designing spacecraft structures that are free of stress-corrosion cracking for the service life of the vehicle the following rules apply: (1) identification and control of the environments to which the structure will be exposed during construction, storage, transportation, and use; (2) selection of alloy compositions and tempers which are resistant to stress-corrosion cracking in the identified environment; (3) control of fabrication and other processes which may introduce residual tensile stresses or damage the material; (4) limitation of the combined residual and applied tensile stresses to below the threshold stress level for the onset of cracking throughout the service life of the vehicle; and (5) establishment of a thorough inspection program.

  11. Stress intensity and crack displacement for small edge cracks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orange, Thomas W.

    1988-01-01

    The weight function method was used to derive stress intensity factors and crack mouth displacement coefficients for small edge cracks (less than 20 percent of the specimen width) in common fracture specimen configurations. Contact stresses due to point application of loads were found to be small but significant for three-point bending and insignificant for four-point bending. The results are compared with available equations and numerical solutions from the literature and with unpublished boundary collocation results.

  12. Stress analysis for structures with surface cracks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, J. C.

    1978-01-01

    Two basic forms of analysis, one treating stresses around arbitrarily loaded circular cracks, the other treating stresses due to loads arbitrarily distributed on the surface of a half space, are united by a boundary-point least squares method to obtain analyses for stresses from surface cracks in places or bars. Calculations were for enough cases to show how effects from the crack vary with the depth-to-length ratio, the fractional penetration ratio, the obliquity of the load, and to some extent the fractional span ratio. The results include plots showing stress intensity factors, stress component distributions near the crack, and crack opening displacement patterns. Favorable comparisons are shown with two kinds of independent experiments, but the main method for confirming the results is by wide checking of overall satisfaction of boundary conditions, so that external confirmation is not essential. Principles involved in designing analyses which promote dependability of the results are proposed and illustrated.

  13. Environmentally assisted cracking in light water reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Chopra, O.K.; Chung, H.M.; Gruber, E.E.

    1996-07-01

    This report summarizes work performed by Argonne National Laboratory on fatigue and environmentally assisted cracking (EAC) in light water reactors (LWRs) from April 1995 to December 1995. Topics that have been investigated include fatigue of carbon and low-alloy steel used in reactor piping and pressure vessels, EAC of Alloy 600 and 690, and irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) of Type 304 SS. Fatigue tests were conducted on ferritic steels in water that contained various concentrations of dissolved oxygen (DO) to determine whether a slow strain rate applied during different portions of a tensile-loading cycle are equally effective in decreasing fatigue life. Crack-growth-rate tests were conducted on compact-tension specimens from several heats of Alloys 600 and 690 in simulated LWR environments. Effects of fluoride-ion contamination on susceptibility to intergranular cracking of high- and commercial- purity Type 304 SS specimens from control-tensile tests at 288 degrees Centigrade. Microchemical changes in the specimens were studied by Auger electron spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy to determine whether trace impurity elements may contribute to IASCC of these materials.

  14. Strain rate effects in stress corrosion cracking

    SciTech Connect

    Parkins, R.N. . Dept. of Metallurgy and Engineering Materials)

    1990-03-01

    Slow strain rate testing (SSRT) was initially developed as a rapid, ad hoc laboratory method for assessing the propensity for metals an environments to promote stress corrosion cracking. It is now clear, however, that there are good theoretical reasons why strain rate, as opposed to stress per se, will often be the controlling parameter in determining whether or not cracks are nucleated and, if so, are propagated. The synergistic effects of the time dependence of corrosion-related reactions and microplastic strain provide the basis for mechanistic understanding of stress corrosion cracking in high-pressure pipelines and other structures. However, while this may be readily comprehended in the context of laboratory slow strain tests, its extension to service situations may be less apparent. Laboratory work involving realistic stressing conditions, including low-frequency cyclic loading, shows that strain or creep rates give good correlation with thresholds for cracking and with crack growth kinetics.

  15. Mean stress effect in fatigue crack propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabeshfar, K.; Williams, T. R. G.

    1980-01-01

    Crack propagation rates in three different grades of mild steel and two types of age hardening aluminium alloys have been measured for different stress ratios. The results show a pronounced stress ratio effect for all these materials. A model of fatigue crack propagation is formulated in terms of the size of the cyclic plastic instability zone at the crack tip rather than the zone of plastic yielding. The micro-plastic instability zone is measured by a parameter involving the ratio of the maximum stress intensity and the stress level at which macro-plastic instability occurs in the {S}/{N} curve of plain fatigue test pieces. Such a parameter provides a means of normalizing crack propagation results obtained for various stress ratios.

  16. STRESS CORROSION CRACKING IN TEAR DROP SPECIMENS

    SciTech Connect

    Lam, P; Philip Zapp, P; Jonathan Duffey, J; Kerry Dunn, K

    2009-05-01

    Laboratory tests were conducted to investigate the stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of 304L stainless steel used to construct the containment vessels for the storage of plutonium-bearing materials. The tear drop corrosion specimens each with an autogenous weld in the center were placed in contact with moist plutonium oxide and chloride salt mixtures. Cracking was found in two of the specimens in the heat affected zone (HAZ) at the apex area. Finite element analysis was performed to simulate the specimen fabrication for determining the internal stress which caused SCC to occur. It was found that the tensile stress at the crack initiation site was about 30% lower than the highest stress which had been shifted to the shoulders of the specimen due to the specimen fabrication process. This finding appears to indicate that the SCC initiation took place in favor of the possibly weaker weld/base metal interface at a sufficiently high level of background stress. The base material, even subject to a higher tensile stress, was not cracked. The relieving of tensile stress due to SCC initiation and growth in the HAZ and the weld might have foreclosed the potential for cracking at the specimen shoulders where higher stress was found.

  17. Seacoast stress corrosion cracking of aluminum alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humphries, T. S.; Nelson, E. E.

    1981-01-01

    The stress corrosion cracking resistance of high strength, wrought aluminum alloys in a seacoast atmosphere was investigated and the results were compared with those obtained in laboratory tests. Round tensile specimens taken from the short transverse grain direction of aluminum plate and stressed up to 100 percent of their yield strengths were exposed to the seacoast and to alternate immersion in salt water and synthetic seawater. Maximum exposure periods of one year at the seacoast, 0.3 or 0.7 of a month for alternate immersion in salt water, and three months for synthetic seawater were indicated for aluminum alloys to avoid false indications of stress corrosion cracking failure resulting from pitting. Correlation of the results was very good among the three test media using the selected exposure periods. It is concluded that either of the laboratory test media is suitable for evaluating the stress corrosion cracking performance of aluminum alloys in seacoast atmosphere.

  18. Survey updates amine stress corrosion cracking data

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-13

    The final report by National Association of Corrosion Engineers (NACE) task group T-8-14 has been published, revising and expanding the information on stress information on stress corrosion cracking of carbon steel in diethanolamine and diisopropanolamine service. A major conclusion of the survey was that cracking frequency was more prevalent in monoethanolamine (MEA) than in other amines. This paper reports that further examination of the DEA data indicated that some units were previously in MEA service and the reported cracks were actually associated with that period. A detailed follow-up review of the DEA data also revealed that some cases were caused by processes other than amine cracking. In many cases, further inspection or testing had been done after the original survey was submitted.

  19. Cause of stress-corrosion cracking in pipe

    SciTech Connect

    Christman, T.K.; Beavers, J.A.

    1987-01-05

    Carbonate-bicarbonate has been identified as the environmental species responsible for stress-corrosion cracking (SCC) in the majority of studied field failures of natural-gas pipelines. Battelle Columbus Division, Columbus, Ohio, studied approximately 30 SCC field failures of natural-gas pipelines form a 20-year period beginning in 1965. The results of the study also reject hydroxide (caustic) as a significant factor in these failures. Stress-corrosion cracking in natural-gas transmission pipelines has been recognized as a serious problem for a number of years. But there remains considerable controversy concerning the environmental species responsible for the cracking. One opinion has held that carbonate-bicarbonate promotes cracking, while another attributes the cracking to hydroxide (caustic). This issue is important because the feasibility of mitigation procedures based on potential control depend upon the chemical species responsible for the cracking. Moreover, it is important for the laboratory studies aimed at SCC mitigation to simulate closely the field failures. Both carbonate/bicarbonate and caustic environments can result from application of cathodic protection to a pipeline. The cathodic current applied to the pipeline accelerates the rate of the reduction reactions occurring on the pipe surface, promoting generation of hydroxide.

  20. Stress corrosion cracking of candidate waste container materials

    SciTech Connect

    Maiya, P.S.; Soppet, W.K.; Park, J.Y.; Kassner, T.F.; Shack, W.J.; Diercks, D.R.

    1990-11-01

    Six alloys have been selected as candidate container materials for the storage of high-level nuclear waste at the proposed Yucca Mountain site in Nevada. These materials are Type 304L stainless steel (SS), Type 316L SS, Incology 825, P-deoxidized Cu, Cu-30%Ni, and Cu-7% Al. The present program has been initiated to determine whether any of these materials can survive for 300 years in the site environment without developing through-wall stress corrosion cracks, and to assess the relative resistance of these materials to stress corrosion cracking (SCC). A series of slow-strain-rate tests (SSRTs) in simulated Well J-13 water which is representative of the groundwater present at the Yucca Mountain site has been completed, and crack-growth-rate (CGR) tests are also being conducted under the same environmental conditions. 13 refs., 60 figs., 22 tabs.

  1. Environmentally assisted cracking in light water reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Shack, W.J.; Kassner, T.F.; Maiya, P.S.; Park, J.Y.; Ruther, W.E.

    1988-10-01

    Research during the past year focused on (1) stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of austentitic stainless steels (SS), (2) fatigue of Type 316NG SS, and (3) SCC of ferritic steels used in reactor piping, pressure vessels, and steam generators. Stress corrosion cracking studies on austentitic SS explored the critical strains required for crack initiation, the effects of crevice conditions on SCC susceptibility, heat-to-heat variations in SCC susceptibility of Type 316NG and modified Type 347 SS, the effect of heat treatment on the susceptibility of Type 347 SS, threshold stress intensity values for crack growth in Type 316NG SS, and the effects of cuprous ion and several organic salts on the SCC of sensitized Type 304 SS. Crevice conditions were observed to strongly promote SCC. Significant heat-to-heat variations were observed in SCC susceptibility of Types 316NG and 347 SS. No correlation was found between SCC behavior and minor variations in chemical composition. A significant effect of heat treatment was observed in Type 347 SS. A heat that was extremely resistant to SCC after heat treatment at 650/degree/C for 24 h was susceptible to transgranular stress corrosion cracking (TGSCC) in the solution-annealed condition. Although there was no sensitization in either condition, the presence or absence of precipitates and differences in precipitate morphology appear to influence the SCC behavior. 20 refs., 20 figs., 11 tabs.

  2. Stress corrosion cracking of duplex stainless steels in caustic solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, Ananya

    Duplex stainless steels (DSS) with roughly equal amount of austenite and ferrite phases are being used in industries such as petrochemical, nuclear, pulp and paper mills, de-salination plants, marine environments, and others. However, many DSS grades have been reported to undergo corrosion and stress corrosion cracking in some aggressive environments such as chlorides and sulfide-containing caustic solutions. Although stress corrosion cracking of duplex stainless steels in chloride solution has been investigated and well documented in the literature but the SCC mechanisms for DSS in caustic solutions were not known. Microstructural changes during fabrication processes affect the overall SCC susceptibility of these steels in caustic solutions. Other environmental factors, like pH of the solution, temperature, and resulting electrochemical potential also influence the SCC susceptibility of duplex stainless steels. In this study, the role of material and environmental parameters on corrosion and stress corrosion cracking of duplex stainless steels in caustic solutions were investigated. Changes in the DSS microstructure by different annealing and aging treatments were characterized in terms of changes in the ratio of austenite and ferrite phases, phase morphology and intermetallic precipitation using optical micrography, SEM, EDS, XRD, nano-indentation and microhardness methods. These samples were then tested for general and localized corrosion susceptibility and SCC to understand the underlying mechanisms of crack initiation and propagation in DSS in the above-mentioned environments. Results showed that the austenite phase in the DSS is more susceptible to crack initiation and propagation in caustic solutions, which is different from that in the low pH chloride environment where the ferrite phase is the more susceptible phase. This study also showed that microstructural changes in duplex stainless steels due to different heat treatments could affect their SCC

  3. Finite element microscopic stress analysis of cracked composite systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ko, W. L.

    1978-01-01

    This paper considers the stress concentration problems of two types of cracked composite systems: (1) a composite system with a broken fiber (a penny-shaped crack problem), and (2) a composite system with a cracked matrix (an annular crack problem). The cracked composite systems are modeled with triangular and trapezoidal ring finite elements. Using NASTRAN (NASA Structural Analysis) finite element computer program, the stress and deformation fields in the cracked composite systems are calculated. The effect of fiber-matrix material combination on the stress concentrations and on the crack opening displacements is studied.

  4. Environmentally assisted cracking in LWR materials

    SciTech Connect

    Chopra, O.K.; Chung, H.M.; Kassner, T.F.; Park, J.H.; Shack, W.J.; Zhang, J.; Brust, F.W.; Dong, P.

    1998-03-01

    The effect of dissolved oxygen level on fatigue life of austenitic stainless steels is discussed and the results of a detailed study of the effect of the environment on the growth of cracks during fatigue initiation are presented. Initial test results are given for specimens irradiated in the Halden reactor. Impurities introduced by shielded metal arc welding that may affect susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking are described. Results of calculations of residual stresses in core shroud weldments are summarized. Crack growth rates of high-nickel alloys under cyclic loading with R ratios from 0.2--0.95 in water that contains a wide range of dissolved oxygen and hydrogen concentrations at 289 and 320 C are summarized.

  5. Environmentally assisted cracking of LWR materials.

    SciTech Connect

    Chopra, O. K.; Chung, H. M.; Kassner, T. F.; Park, J. H.; Shack, W. J.; Zhang, J.; Brust, F. W.; Dong, P.

    1997-12-05

    The effect of dissolved oxygen level on fatigue life of austenitic stainless steels is discussed and the results of a detailed study of the effect of the environment on the growth of cracks during fatigue initiation are presented. Initial test results are given for specimens irradiated in the Halden reactor. Impurities introduced by shielded metal arc welding that may affect susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking are described. Results of calculations of residual stresses in core shroud weldments are summarized. Crack growth rates of high-nickel alloys under cyclic loading with R ratios from 0.2-0.95 in water that contains a wide range of dissolved oxygen and hydrogen concentrations at 289 and 320 C are summarized.

  6. Early stages in the development of stress corrosion cracks

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, R.H.; Simonen, E.P.

    1993-12-01

    Processes in growth of short cracks and stage I of long stress corrosion cracks were identified and evaluated. There is evidence that electrochemical effects can cause short stress corrosion cracks to grow at rates faster or slower than long cracks. Short cracks can grow at faster rates than long cracks for a salt film dissolution growth mechanism or from reduced oxygen inhibition of hydrolytic acidification. An increasing crack growth rate with increasing crack length could result from a process of increasing crack tip concentration of a critical anion, such as Cl{sup {minus}}, with increasing crack length in a system where the crack velocity is dependent on the Cl{sup {minus}} or some other anion concentration. An increasing potential drop between crack tip and mouth would result in an increased anion concentration at the crack tip and hence an increasing crack velocity. Stage I behavior of long cracks is another early development stage in the life of a stress corrosion crack which is poorly understood. This stage can be described by da/dt = AK{sup m} where da/dt is crack velocity, A is a constant, K is stress intensity and m ranges from 2 to 24 for a variety of materials and environments. Only the salt film dissolution model was found to quantitatively describe this stage; however, the model was only tested on one material and its general applicability is unknown.

  7. Apollo experience report: The problem of stress-corrosion cracking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, R. E.

    1973-01-01

    Stress-corrosion cracking has been the most common cause of structural-material failures in the Apollo Program. The frequency of stress-corrosion cracking has been high and the magnitude of the problem, in terms of hardware lost and time and money expended, has been significant. In this report, the significant Apollo Program experiences with stress-corrosion cracking are discussed. The causes of stress-corrosion cracking and the corrective actions are discussed, in terminology familiar to design engineers and management personnel, to show how stress-corrosion cracking can be prevented.

  8. Stress-corrosion cracking of titanium alloys.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blackburn, M. J.; Feeney, J. A.; Beck, T. R.

    1973-01-01

    In the light of research material published up to May 1970, the current understanding of the experimental variables involved in the stress-corrosion cracking (SCC) behavior of titanium and its alloys is reviewed. Following a brief summary of the metallurgy and electrochemistry of titanium alloys, the mechanical, electrochemical, and metallurgical parameters influencing SCC behavior are explored with emphasis on crack growth kinetics. Macro- and microfeatures of fractures are examined, and it is shown that many transgranular SCC failures exhibit morphological and crystallographic features similar to mechanical cleavage failures. Current SCC models are reviewed with respect to their ability to explain the observed SCC behavior of titanium and its alloys. Possible methods for eliminating or minimizing stress corrosion hazards in titanium or titanium alloy components are described.

  9. Corrosion Product Film-Induced Stress Facilitates Stress Corrosion Cracking

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wenwen; Zhang, Zhiliang; Ren, Xuechong; Guan, Yongjun; Su, Yanjing

    2015-01-01

    Finite element analyses were conducted to clarify the role of corrosion product films (CPFs) in stress corrosion cracking (SCC). Flat and U-shaped edge-notched specimens were investigated in terms of the CPF-induced stress in the metallic substrate and the stress in the CPF. For a U-shaped edge-notched specimen, the stress field in front of the notch tip is affected by the Young’s modulus of the CPF and the CPF thickness and notch geometry. The CPF-induced tensile stress in the metallic substrate is superimposed on the applied load to increase the crack tip strain and facilitate localized plasticity deformation. In addition, the stress in the CPF surface contributes to the rupture of the CPFs. The results provide physical insights into the role of CPFs in SCC. PMID:26066367

  10. Stress corrosion cracking evaluation of martensitic precipitation hardening stainless steels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humphries, T. S.; Nelson, E. E.

    1980-01-01

    The resistance of the martensitic precipitation hardening stainless steels PH13-8Mo, 15-5PH, and 17-4PH to stress corrosion cracking was investigated. Round tensile and c-ring type specimens taken from several heats of the three alloys were stressed up to 100 percent of their yield strengths and exposed to alternate immersion in salt water, to salt spray, and to a seacoast environment. The results indicate that 15-5PH is highly resistant to stress corrosion cracking in conditions H1000 and H1050 and is moderately resistant in condition H900. The stress corrosion cracking resistance of PH13-8Mo and 17-4PH stainless steels in conditions H1000 and H1050 was sensitive to mill heats and ranged from low to high among the several heats included in the tests. Based on a comparison with data from seacoast environmental tests, it is apparent that alternate immersion in 3.5 percent salt water is not a suitable medium for accelerated stress corrosion testing of these pH stainless steels.

  11. Computational modeling of the mechanism of hydrogen embrittlement (HE) and stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cendales, E. D.; Orjuela, F. A.; Chamarraví, O.

    2016-02-01

    In this article theoretical models and some existing data sets were examined in order to model the two main causes (hydrogen embrittlement and corrosion-cracking under stress) of the called environmentally assisted cracking phenomenon (EAC). Additionally, a computer simulation of flat metal plate subject to mechanical stress and cracking due both to hydrogen embrittlement and corrosion was developed. The computational simulation was oriented to evaluate the effect on the stress-strain behavior, elongation percent and the crack growth rate of AISI SAE 1040 steel due to three corrosive enviroments (H2 @ 0.06MPa; HCl, pH=1.0; HCl, pH=2.5). From the computer simulation we conclude that cracking due to internal corrosion of the material near to the crack tip limits affects more the residual strength of the flat plate than hydrogen embrittlement and generates a failure condition almost imminent of the mechanical structural element.

  12. Resistance to biodegradative stress cracking in microporous vascular access grafts.

    PubMed

    Carson, R J; Edwards, A; Szycher, M

    1996-10-01

    Degradative cracking, more commonly known as "environmental stress cracking" (ESC) has been observed in many implanted polyetherurethane elastomers. This phenomenon has been attributed to biochemical and cellular interactions at the surface of the implanted material causing polymer chain cleavage. This may result in surface fissuring followed by the deep cracking associated with considerable biodegradation of the polymer, resulting in loss of mechanical strength and the formation of aneurysms in an in vivo situation. These cracking effects are believed to be due to mechanical stress combined with the oxidising actions of macrophages and giant cells, as surface cracking has been observed to occur directly under adherent macrophages on a polyetherurethane implant. These cells form part of the body's immune response which uses enzymes and reactive oxygen species (O2, O2-, and HO. and H2O2) to degrade foreign material. We describe a modification of an in vitro test method developed by Zaho et al. [1] using glass wool and a Hydrogen Peroxide/Cobalt (II) Chloride (H2O2/CoCl2) mixture to replicate the oxidising effects of macrophages in vivo. The modifications were made to establish a routine testing system for resistance to biodegradation which could be used to screen a range of polymers designed for use in microporous vascular grafts. The grafts are pre-stressed by a method devised by Stokes et al. [2] where each graft is stretched to a predetermined elongation over a mandrel and the strain is fixed by tying PTFE tape around each end of the mandrel. PMID:8913848

  13. Fatigue Crack Growth Analysis Under Spectrum Loading in Various Environmental Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikheevskiy, S.; Glinka, G.; Lee, E.

    2013-03-01

    The fatigue process consists, from the engineering point of view, of three stages: crack initiation, fatigue crack growth, and the final failure. It is also known that the fatigue process near notches and cracks is governed by local strains and stresses in the regions of maximum stress and strain concentrations. Therefore, the fatigue crack growth can be considered as a process of successive crack increments, and the fatigue crack initiation and subsequent growth can be modeled as one repetitive process. The assumptions mentioned above were used to derive a fatigue crack growth model based, called later as the UniGrow model, on the analysis of cyclic elastic-plastic stresses-strains near the crack tip. The fatigue crack growth rate was determined by simulating the cyclic stress-strain response in the material volume adjacent to the crack tip and calculating the accumulated fatigue damage in a manner similar to fatigue analysis of stationary notches. The fatigue crack growth driving force was derived on the basis of the stress and strain history at the crack tip and the Smith-Watson-Topper (SWT) fatigue damage parameter, D = σmaxΔɛ/2. It was subsequently found that the fatigue crack growth was controlled by a two-parameter driving force in the form of a weighted product of the stress intensity range and the maximum stress intensity factor, Δ K p K {max/1- p }. The effect of the internal (residual) stress induced by the reversed cyclic plasticity has been accounted for and therefore the two-parameter driving force made it possible to predict the effect of the mean stress including the influence of the applied compressive stress, tensile overloads, and variable amplitude spectrum loading. It allows estimating the fatigue life under variable amplitude loading without using crack closure concepts. Several experimental fatigue crack growth datasets obtained for the Al 7075 aluminum alloy were used for the verification of the proposed unified fatigue crack growth

  14. The effects of crack surface friction and roughness on crack tip stress fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ballarini, Roberto; Plesha, Michael E.

    1987-01-01

    A model is presented which can be used to incorporate the effects of friction and tortuosity along crack surfaces through a constitutive law applied to the interface between opposing crack surfaces. The problem of a crack with a saw-tooth surface in an infinite medium subjected to a far-field shear stress is solved and the ratios of Mode-I stress intensity to Mode-II stress intensity are calculated for various coefficients of friction and material properties. The results show that tortuosity and friction lead to an increase in fracture loads and alter the direction of crack propagation.

  15. Mixed mode stress intensity factors for semielliptical surface cracks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, F. W.; Sorensen, D. R.

    1974-01-01

    The three-dimensional equations of elasticity are solved for a flat elliptical crack which has nonuniform shear stresses applied to its surfaces. An alternating method is used to determine the mode two and mode three stress intensity factors for a semielliptical surface crack in the surface of a finite thickness solid. These stress intensity factors are presented as a function of position along the crack border for a number of crack shapes and crack depths. This same technique is followed to determine the mode one stress intensity factors for the semielliptical surface crack which has normal loading applied to its surface. Mode one stress intensity factors are presented and compared with the results obtained from previous work.

  16. Residual stresses and stress corrosion cracking in pipe fittings

    SciTech Connect

    Parrington, R.J.; Scott, J.J.; Torres, F.

    1994-06-01

    Residual stresses can play a key role in the SCC performance of susceptible materials in PWR primary water applications. Residual stresses are stresses stored within the metal that develop during deformation and persist in the absence of external forces or temperature gradients. Sources of residual stresses in pipe fittings include fabrication processes, installation and welding. There are a number of methods to characterize the magnitude and orientation of residual stresses. These include numerical analysis, chemical cracking tests, and measurement (e.g., X-ray diffraction, neutron diffraction, strain gage/hole drilling, strain gage/trepanning, strain gage/section and layer removal, and acoustics). This paper presents 400 C steam SCC test results demonstrating that residual stresses in as-fabricated Alloy 600 pipe fittings are sufficient to induce SCC. Residual stresses present in as-fabricated pipe fittings are characterized by chemical cracking tests (stainless steel fittings tested in boiling magnesium chloride solution) and by the sectioning and layer removal (SLR) technique.

  17. Combined environmental stresses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murray, R. H.; Mccally, M.

    1973-01-01

    Tolerance levels, physiological effects, and performance degradation during simultaneous or sequential exposures to two environmental stresses, and also three or more simultaneous stresses are described. Environmental stress combinations are characterized by four descriptors: order of occurrence, duration of exposure, severity of exposure, and type of interaction. Combined stress data and facilities for combined stress study are briefly mentioned.

  18. Crack shapes and stress intensity factors for edge-cracked specimens.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orange, T. W.

    1972-01-01

    A simple stress intensity factor expression is given for a deep edge crack in a plate in tension. The shapes of cracks opened by tension or bending are approximated by conic sections, and the conic section coefficients are related to plate geometry by very simple empirical equations. The magnitude of the crack displacement is a function of applied load, plate geometry, and the elastic constants of the plate material. The shape of a loaded crack in a semiinfinite plate is, approximately, a portion of an ellipse whose semimajor axis is about three times the crack length. As the crack length (relative to the plate width) increases, the crack shape becomes parabolic, then hyperbolic, the acuity of the hyperbola increasing with the relative crack length.

  19. Surface aspects of pitting and stress corrosion cracking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Truhan, J. S., Jr.; Hehemann, R. F.

    1977-01-01

    The pitting and stress corrosion cracking of a stable austenitic stainless steel in aqueous chloride environments were investigated using a secondary ion mass spectrometer as the primary experimental technique. The surface concentration of hydrogen, oxygen, the hydroxide, and chloride ion, magnesium or sodium, chromium and nickel were measured as a function of potential in both aqueous sodium chloride and magnesium chloride environments at room temperature and boiling temperatures. It was found that, under anodic conditions, a sharp increase in the chloride concentration was observed to occur for all environmental conditions. The increase may be associated with the formation of an iron chloride complex. Higher localized chloride concentrations at pits and cracks were also detected with an electron microprobe.

  20. A comparison of stress in cracked fibrous tissue specimens with varied crack location, loading, and orientation using finite element analysis.

    PubMed

    Peloquin, John M; Elliott, Dawn M

    2016-04-01

    Cracks in fibrous soft tissue, such as intervertebral disc annulus fibrosus and knee meniscus, cause pain and compromise joint mechanics. A crack concentrates stress at its tip, making further failure and crack extension (fracture) more likely. Ex vivo mechanical testing is an important tool for studying the loading conditions required for crack extension, but prior work has shown that it is difficult to reproduce crack extension. Most prior work used edge crack specimens in uniaxial tension, with the crack 90° to the edge of the specimen. This configuration does not necessarily represent the loading conditions that cause in vivo crack extension. To find a potentially better choice for experiments aiming to reproduce crack extension, we used finite element analysis to compare, in factorial combination, (1) center crack vs. edge crack location, (2) biaxial vs. uniaxial loading, and (3) crack-fiber angles ranging from 0° to 90°. The simulated material was annulus fibrosus fibrocartilage with a single fiber family. We hypothesized that one of the simulated test cases would produce a stronger stress concentration than the commonly used uniaxially loaded 90° crack-fiber angle edge crack case. Stress concentrations were compared between cases in terms of fiber-parallel stress (representing risk of fiber rupture), fiber-perpendicular stress (representing risk of matrix rupture), and fiber shear stress (representing risk of fiber sliding). Fiber-perpendicular stress and fiber shear stress concentrations were greatest in edge crack specimens (of any crack-fiber angle) and center crack specimens with a 90° crack-fiber angle. However, unless the crack is parallel to the fiber direction, these stress components alone are insufficient to cause crack opening and extension. Fiber-parallel stress concentrations were greatest in center crack specimens with a 45° crack-fiber angle, either biaxially or uniaxially loaded. We therefore recommend that the 45° center crack case be

  1. Aircraft crash caused by stress corrosion cracking

    SciTech Connect

    Kolkman, H.J.; Kool, G.A.; Wanhill, R.J.H.

    1996-01-01

    An aircraft crash in the Netherlands was caused by disintegration of a jet engine. Fractography showed that the chain of events started with stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of a pin attached to a lever arm of the compressor variable vane system. Such a lever arm-pin assembly costs only a few dollars. Investigation of hundreds of pins from the accident and a number of identical engines revealed that this was not an isolated case. Many pins exhibited various amounts of SCC. The failed pin in the accident engine happened to be the first fractured one. SCC requires the simultaneous presence of tensile stress, a corrosive environment, and a susceptible material. In this case the stress was a residual stress arising from the production method. There was a clear correlation between the presence of salt deposits on the levers and SCC of the pins. It was shown that these deposits were able to reach the internal space between the pin and lever arm, thereby initiating SCC in this space. The corrosive environment in Western Europe explains why the problem manifested itself in the Netherlands at a relatively early stage in engine life. The main point is, however, that the manufacturer selected an SCC-prone material in the design stage. The solution has been to change the pin material.

  2. Stress corrosion cracking evaluation of precipitation-hardening stainless steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humphries, T. S.; Nelson, E. E.

    1970-01-01

    Accelerated test program results show which precipitation hardening stainless steels are resistant to stress corrosion cracking. In certain cases stress corrosion susceptibility was found to be associated with the process procedure.

  3. Crack growth behavior of AISI-4340 steel during environmental exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Giannuzzi, L.A.

    1995-11-01

    AISI-4340 is observed to undergo stress corrosion cracking when subjected to a constant load during exposure to a 3.5% NaCl solution. Crack initiation, nucleation, and growth has been monitored as a function of time. Stepped regions consisting of fast and slow crack growth periods are shown to correspond to microstructural changes observed in the fracture surface of the steel. These regions of fast and slow crack rate variations with time show that the crack growth rates do not increase continuously with an increase in the stress intensity.

  4. Propagation of stress corrosion cracks in alpha-brasses

    SciTech Connect

    Beggs, Dennis Vinton

    1981-01-01

    Transgranular and intergranular stress corrosion cracks were investigated in alpha-brasses in a tarnishing ammoniacal solution. Surface observation indicated that the transgranular cracks propagated discontinuously by the sudden appearance of a fine crack extending several microns ahead of the previous crack tip, often associated with the detection of a discrete acoustic emission (AE). By periodically increasing the deflection, crack front markings were produced on the resulting fracture surfaces, showing that the discontinuous propagation of the crack trace was representative of the subsurface cracking. The intergranular crack trace appeared to propagate continuously at a relatively blunt crack tip and was not associated with discrete AE. Under load pulsing tests with a time between pulses, ..delta..t greater than or equal to 3 s, the transgranular fracture surfaces always exhibited crack front markings which corresponded with the applied pulses. The spacing between crack front markings, ..delta..x, decreased linearly with ..delta..t. With ..delta..t less than or equal to 1.5 s, the crack front markings were in a one-to-one correspondence with applied pulses only at relatively long crack lengths. In this case, ..delta..x = ..delta..x* which approached a limiting value of 1 ..mu..m. No crack front markings were observed on intergranular fracture surfaces produced during these tests. It is concluded that transgranular cracking occurs by discontinuous mechanical fracture of an embrittled region around the crack tip, while intergranular cracking results from a different mechanism with cracking occurring via the film-rupture mechanism.

  5. Fatigue and environmentally assisted cracking in light water reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Kassner, T.F.; Ruther, W.E.; Chung, H.M.; Hicks, P.D.; Hins, A.G.; Park, J.Y.; Shack, W.J.

    1991-12-01

    Fatigue and environmentally assisted cracking of piping, pressure vessels, and core components in light water reactors (LWRs) are important concerns as extended reactor lifetimes are envisaged. The degradation processes include intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) of austenitic stainless steel (SS) piping in boiling water reactors (BWRs), and propagation of fatigue or SCC cracks (which initiate in sensitized SS cladding) into low-alloy ferritic steels in BWR pressure vessels. Similar cracking has also occurred in upper shell-to-transition cone girth welds in pressurized water reactor (PWR) steam generator vessels. Another concern is failure of reactor-core internal components after accumulation of relatively high fluence, which has occurred in both BWRs and PWRs. Research during the past year focused on (1) fatigue and SCC of ferritic steels used in piping and in steam generator and reactor pressure vessels, (2) role of chromate and sulfate in simulated BWR water in SCC of sensitized Type 304 SS, and (3) irradiation-assisted SCC in high- and commercial-purity Type 304 SS specimens from control-blade absorber tubes used in two operating BWRs. Failure after accumulation of relatively high fluence has been attributed to radiation-induced segregation (RIS) of elements such as Si, P, Ni, and Cr. This document provides a summary of research progress in these areas.

  6. Mechanism of hydrogen generation in the stress corrosion crack

    SciTech Connect

    Li, R.; Ferreira, M.G.S.

    1995-10-01

    Based on the mass transport in the stress corrosion crack, a mathematical expression of potential distribution along the stress corrosion crack is deduced. From this mathematical expression and the E-pH diagram for H{sub 2}O, a new mechanism for hydrogen generation in the stress corrosion crack i.e. H{sup +} partial potential drop mechanism, is proposed. Following this mechanism, the relationship between hydrogen generation and affecting factors, such as current density of anodic dissolution inside the crack, pH value, partial resistivity of H{sup +} ion, dimension of the crack and potential of the metal, is discussed. The mechanism is verified by experimental measurement results of the H{sup +} partial potential drop with microelectrodes placed in an artificial crack on AISI 410 stainless steel in 3%NaCl solution.

  7. Stress ratio contributes to fatigue crack growth in dentin.

    PubMed

    Arola, D; Zheng, W; Sundaram, N; Rouland, J A

    2005-05-01

    An experimental study of fatigue crack growth in dentin was conducted, and the influence of stress ratio (R) on the crack growth rate and mechanisms of cyclic extension were examined. Double Cantilever Beam (DCB) fatigue specimens were sectioned from bovine molars and then subjected to high cycle fatigue loading (10(5) < N < 10(6)) under hydrated conditions. The evaluation consisted of Mode I loads with stress ratios that ranged from -0.5 to 0.5. The fatigue crack growth rates were measured and used to estimate the crack growth exponent (m) and coefficient (C) according to the Paris Law model. The fatigue crack growth rates for steady-state extension (Region II) ranged from 1E-7 to 1E-4 mm/cycle. It was found that the rate of cyclic extension increased significantly with increasing R, and that the highest average crack growth rate occurred at a stress ratio of 0.5. However, the crack growth exponent decreased with increasing R from an average of 4.6 (R = 0.10) to 2.7 (R = 0.50). The stress intensity threshold for crack growth decreased with increasing R as well. Results from this study suggest that an increase in the cyclic stress ratio facilitates fatigue crack growth in dentin and increases the rate of cyclic extension, both of which are critical concerns in minimizing tooth fractures and maintaining lifelong oral health.

  8. Cyclic stress effect on stress corrosion cracking of duplex stainless steel in chloride and caustic solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Di

    Duplex stainless steel (DSS) is a dual-phase material with approximately equal volume amount of austenite and ferrite. It has both great mechanical properties (good ductility and high tensile/fatigue strength) and excellent corrosion resistance due to the mixture of the two phases. Cyclic loadings with high stress level and low frequency are experienced by many structures. However, the existing study on corrosion fatigue (CF) study of various metallic materials has mainly concentrated on relatively high frequency range. No systematic study has been done to understand the ultra-low frequency (˜10-5 Hz) cyclic loading effect on stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of DSSs. In this study, the ultra-low frequency cyclic loading effect on SCC of DSS 2205 was studied in acidified sodium chloride and caustic white liquor (WL) solutions. The research work focused on the environmental effect on SCC of DSS 2205, the cyclic stress effect on strain accumulation behavior of DSS 2205, and the combined environmental and cyclic stress effect on the stress corrosion crack initiation of DSS 2205 in the above environments. Potentiodynamic polarization tests were performed to investigate the electrochemical behavior of DSS 2205 in acidic NaCl solution. Series of slow strain rate tests (SSRTs) at different applied potential values were conducted to reveal the optimum applied potential value for SCC to happen. Room temperature static and cyclic creep tests were performed in air to illustrate the strain accumulation effect of cyclic stresses. Test results showed that cyclic loading could enhance strain accumulation in DSS 2205 compared to static loading. Moreover, the strain accumulation behavior of DSS 2205 was found to be controlled by the two phases of DSS 2205 with different crystal structures. The B.C.C. ferrite phase enhanced strain accumulation due to extensive cross-slips of the dislocations, whereas the F.C.C. austenite phase resisted strain accumulation due to cyclic strain

  9. Environmental Effects on Fatigue Crack Growth in 7075 Aluminum Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonakdar, A.; Wang, F.; Williams, J. J.; Chawla, N.

    2012-08-01

    The fatigue behavior of aluminum alloys is greatly influenced by the environmental conditions. In this article, fatigue crack growth rates were measured for 7075-T651 Al alloy under ultrahigh vacuum (UHV, ~10-10 Torr), dry air, and water vapor. Standard compact tension (CT) specimens were tested along the L-T orientation under various load ratios of 0.1, 0.5, and 0.8. Fracture surfaces and crack morphologies were studied using scanning electron microscopy and crack deflection analysis. The crack growth behavior under vacuum was affected by friction and possible rewelding of crack surfaces, causing an asymmetry in the crack growth behavior, from load shedding to constant load. The enhancement of crack growth at higher moisture levels was observed and is discussed in terms of moisture decreasing friction between the crack faces. The effect of crack deflection as a function of R ratio and environment is also presented.

  10. Transient thermal stress problem for a circumferentially cracked hollow cylinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nied, H. F.; Erdogan, F.

    1982-01-01

    The transient thermal stress problem for a hollow elasticity cylinder containing an internal circumferential edge crack is considered. It is assumed that the problem is axisymmetric with regard to the crack geometry and the loading, and that the inertia effects are negligible. The problem is solved for a cylinder which is suddenly cooled from inside. First the transient temperature and stress distributions in an uncracked cylinder are calculated. By using the equal and opposite of this thermal stress as the crack surface traction in the isothermal cylinder the crack problem is then solved and the stress intensity factor is calculated. The numerical results are obtained as a function of the Fourier number tD/b(2) representing the time for various inner-to-outer radius ratios and relative crack depths, where D and b are respectively the coefficient of diffusivity and the outer radius of the cylinder.

  11. Cracking of coated materials under transient thermal stresses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rizk, A. A.; Erdogan, F.

    1989-01-01

    The crack problem for a relatively thin layer bonded to a very thick substrate under thermal shock conditions is considered. The effect of surface cooling rate is studied by assuming the temperature boundary condition to be a ramp function. Among the crack geometries considered are the edge crack in the coating layer, the broken layer, the edge crack going through the interface, the undercoat crack in the substrate and the embedded crack crossing the interface. The primary calculated quantity is the stress intensity factor at various singular points and the main variables are the relative sizes and locations of cracks, the time, and the duration of the cooling ramp. The problem is solved and rather extensive results are given for two material pairs, namely a stainless steel layer welded on a ferritic medium and a ceramic coating on a steel substrate.

  12. Cracking of coated materials under transient thermal stresses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rizk, A. A.; Erdogan, Fazil

    1988-01-01

    The crack problem for a relatively thin layer bonded to a very thick substrate under thermal shock conditions is considered. The effect of surface cooling rate is studied by assuming the temperature boundary condition to be a ramp function. Among the crack geometries considered are the edge crack in the coating layer, the broken layer, the edge crack going through the interface, the undercoat crack in the substrate and the embedded crack crossing the interface. The primary calculated quantity is the stress intensity factor at various singular points and the main variables are the relative sizes and locations of cracks, the time, and the duration of the cooling ramp. The problem is solved and rather extensive results are given for two material pairs, namely a stainless steel layer welded on a ferritic medium and a ceramic coating on a steel substrate.

  13. Slow Crack Growth of Brittle Materials With Exponential Crack-Velocity Formulation. Part 3; Constant Stress and Cyclic Stress Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sung R.; Nemeth, Noel N.; Gyekenyesi, John P.

    2002-01-01

    The previously determined life prediction analysis based on an exponential crack-velocity formulation was examined using a variety of experimental data on advanced structural ceramics tested under constant stress and cyclic stress loading at ambient and elevated temperatures. The data fit to the relation between the time to failure and applied stress (or maximum applied stress in cyclic loading) was very reasonable for most of the materials studied. It was also found that life prediction for cyclic stress loading from data of constant stress loading in the exponential formulation was in good agreement with the experimental data, resulting in a similar degree of accuracy as compared with the power-law formulation. The major limitation in the exponential crack-velocity formulation, however, was that the inert strength of a material must be known a priori to evaluate the important slow-crack-growth (SCG) parameter n, a significant drawback as compared with the conventional power-law crack-velocity formulation.

  14. Fundamental understanding and life prediction of stress corrosion cracking in BWRs and energy systems

    SciTech Connect

    Andresen, P.L.; Ford, F.P.

    1998-03-01

    The objective of this paper is to present an approach for design and lifetime evaluation of environmental cracking based on experimental and fundamental modeling of the underlying processes operative in crack advance. In detailed this approach and its development and quantification for energy (hot water) systems, the requirements for a life prediction methodology will be highlighted and the shortcomings of the existing design and lifetime evaluation codes reviewed. Examples are identified of its use in a variety of cracking systems, such as stainless steels, low alloy steels, nickel base alloys, and irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking in boiling water reactor (BWR) water, as well as preliminary use for low alloy steel and Alloy 600 in pressurized water reactors (PWRs) and turbine steels in steam turbines. Identification of the common aspects with environmental cracking in other hot water systems provides a secure basis for its extension to related energy systems. 166 refs., 49 figs.

  15. Environmentally assisted cracking of light-water reactor materials

    SciTech Connect

    Chopra, O.K.; Chung, H.M.; Kassner, T.F.; Shack, W.J.

    1996-02-01

    Environmentally assisted cracking (EAC) of lightwater reactor (LWR) materials has affected nuclear reactors from the very introduction of the technology. Corrosion problems have afflicted steam generators from the very introduction of pressurized water reactor (PWR) technology. Shippingport, the first commercial PWR operated in the United States, developed leaking cracks in two Type 304 stainless steel (SS) steam generator tubes as early as 1957, after only 150 h of operation. Stress corrosion cracks were observed in the heat-affected zones of welds in austenitic SS piping and associated components in boiling-water reactors (BRWs) as early as 1965. The degradation of steam generator tubing in PWRs and the stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of austenitic SS piping in BWRs have been the most visible and most expensive examples of EAC in LWRs, and the repair and replacement of steam generators and recirculation piping has cost hundreds of millions of dollars. However, other problems associated with the effects of the environment on reactor structures and components am important concerns in operating plants and for extended reactor lifetimes. Cast duplex austenitic-ferritic SSs are used extensively in the nuclear industry to fabricate pump casings and valve bodies for LWRs and primary coolant piping in many PWRs. Embrittlement of the ferrite phase in cast duplex SS may occur after 10 to 20 years at reactor operating temperatures, which could influence the mechanical response and integrity of pressure boundary components during high strain-rate loading (e.g., seismic events). The problem is of most concern in PWRs where slightly higher temperatures are typical and cast SS piping is widely used.

  16. Stress Ratio Effects on Crack Opening Loads and Crack Growth Rates in Aluminum Alloy 2024

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riddell, William T.; Piascik, Robert S.

    1998-01-01

    The effects of stress ratio (R) and crack opening behavior on fatigue crack growth rates (da/dN) for aluminum alloy (AA) 2024-T3 were investigated using constant-delta K testing, closure measurements, and fractography. Fatigue crack growth rates were obtained for a range of delta K and stress ratios. Results show that constant delta K fatigue crack growth for R ranging from near 0 to 1 is divided into three regions. In Region 1, at low R, da/dN increases with increasing R. In Region 2, at intermediate R, fatigue crack growth rates are relatively independent of R. In Region 3, at high R, further increases in da/dN are observed with increasing R.

  17. Evaluation of Stress Corrosion Cracking Susceptibility Using Fracture Mechanics Techniques, Part 1. [environmental tests of aluminum alloys, stainless steels, and titanium alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sprowls, D. O.; Shumaker, M. B.; Walsh, J. D.; Coursen, J. W.

    1973-01-01

    Stress corrosion cracking (SSC) tests were performed on 13 aluminum alloys, 13 precipitation hardening stainless steels, and two titanium 6Al-4V alloy forgings to compare fracture mechanics techniques with the conventional smooth specimen procedures. Commercially fabricated plate and rolled or forged bars 2 to 2.5-in. thick were tested. Exposures were conducted outdoors in a seacoast atmosphere and in an inland industrial atmosphere to relate the accelerated tests with service type environments. With the fracture mechanics technique tests were made chiefly on bolt loaded fatigue precracked compact tension specimens of the type used for plane-strain fracture toughness tests. Additional tests of the aluminum alloy were performed on ring loaded compact tension specimens and on bolt loaded double cantilever beams. For the smooth specimen procedure 0.125-in. dia. tensile specimens were loaded axially in constant deformation type frames. For both aluminum and steel alloys comparative SCC growth rates obtained from tests of precracked specimens provide an additional useful characterization of the SCC behavior of an alloy.

  18. Stress corrosion crack tip microstructure in nickel-based alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Shei, S.A.; Yang, W.J.

    1994-04-01

    Stress corrosion cracking behavior of several nickel-base alloys in high temperature caustic environments has been evaluated. The crack tip and fracture surfaces were examined using Auger/ESCA and Analytical Electron Microscopy (AEM) to determine the near crack tip microstructure and microchemistry. Results showed formation of chromium-rich oxides at or near the crack tip and nickel-rich de-alloying layers away from the crack tip. The stress corrosion resistance of different nickel-base alloys in caustic may be explained by the preferential oxidation and dissolution of different alloying elements at the crack tip. Alloy 600 (UNS N06600) shows good general corrosion and intergranular attack resistance in caustic because of its high nickel content. Thermally treated Alloy 690 (UNS N06690) and Alloy 600 provide good stress corrosion cracking resistance because of high chromium contents along grain boundaries. Alloy 625 (UNS N06625) does not show as good stress corrosion cracking resistance as Alloy 690 or Alloy 600 because of its high molybdenum content.

  19. Corrosion pitting and environmentally assisted small crack growth

    PubMed Central

    Turnbull, Alan

    2014-01-01

    In many applications, corrosion pits act as precursors to cracking, but qualitative and quantitative prediction of damage evolution has been hampered by lack of insights into the process by which a crack develops from a pit. An overview is given of recent breakthroughs in characterization and understanding of the pit-to-crack transition using advanced three-dimensional imaging techniques such as X-ray computed tomography and focused ion beam machining with scanning electron microscopy. These techniques provided novel insights with respect to the location of crack development from a pit, supported by finite-element analysis. This inspired a new concept for the role of pitting in stress corrosion cracking based on the growing pit inducing local dynamic plastic strain, a critical factor in the development of stress corrosion cracks. Challenges in quantifying the subsequent growth rate of the emerging small cracks are then outlined with the potential drop technique being the most viable. A comparison is made with the growth rate for short cracks (through-thickness crack in fracture mechanics specimen) and long cracks and an electrochemical crack size effect invoked to rationalize the data. PMID:25197249

  20. Corrosion pitting and environmentally assisted small crack growth.

    PubMed

    Turnbull, Alan

    2014-09-01

    In many applications, corrosion pits act as precursors to cracking, but qualitative and quantitative prediction of damage evolution has been hampered by lack of insights into the process by which a crack develops from a pit. An overview is given of recent breakthroughs in characterization and understanding of the pit-to-crack transition using advanced three-dimensional imaging techniques such as X-ray computed tomography and focused ion beam machining with scanning electron microscopy. These techniques provided novel insights with respect to the location of crack development from a pit, supported by finite-element analysis. This inspired a new concept for the role of pitting in stress corrosion cracking based on the growing pit inducing local dynamic plastic strain, a critical factor in the development of stress corrosion cracks. Challenges in quantifying the subsequent growth rate of the emerging small cracks are then outlined with the potential drop technique being the most viable. A comparison is made with the growth rate for short cracks (through-thickness crack in fracture mechanics specimen) and long cracks and an electrochemical crack size effect invoked to rationalize the data. PMID:25197249

  1. Transient thermal stress problem for a circumferentially cracked hollow cylinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nied, H. F.; Erdogan, F.

    1983-01-01

    The paper is concerned with the transient thermal stress problem for a long hollow circular cylinder containing an internal axisymmetric circumferential edge crack that is suddenly cooled from inside. It is assumed that the transient thermal stress problem is quasi-static, i.e., the inertial effects are negligible. Also, all thermoelastic coupling effects and the possible temperature dependence of the thermoelastic constants are neglected. The problem is considered in two parts. The first part is the evaluation of transient thermal stresses in an uncracked cylinder; the second part is the isothermal perturbation problem for the cracked cylinder in which the crack surface tractions, equal and opposite to the thermal stresses obtained from the first problem, are the only external loads. The superposition of the two solutions gives results for the cracked cylinder.

  2. Titanium alloy stress corrosion cracking in presence of dinitrogen tetroxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conner, A. Z.; Clarke, J. F. G., Jr.; Gailey, J. A.; Orr, A. A.

    1972-01-01

    Study resulting in a satisfactory stress corrosion cracking test with extremely consistent results produced six new analytical methods. Methods detect and determine differences in the minor constituent composition of different types of dinitrogen tetroxide.

  3. Stress-Corrosion Cracking in Martensitic PH Stainless Steels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humphries, T.; Nelson, E.

    1984-01-01

    Precipitation-hardening alloys evaluated in marine environment tests. Report describes marine-environment stress-corrosion cracking (SCC) tests of three martensitic precipitation hardening (PH) stainless-steel alloys.

  4. Near tip stress and strain fields for short elastic cracks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soediono, A. H.; Kardomateas, G. A.; Carlson, R. L.

    1994-01-01

    Recent experimental fatigue crack growth studies have concluded an apparent anomalous behavior of short cracks. To investigate the reasons for this unexpected behavior, the present paper focuses on identifying the crack length circumstances under which the requirements for a single parameter (K(sub I) or delta K(sub I) if cyclic loading is considered) characterization are violated. Furthermore, an additional quantity, the T stress, as introduced by Rice, and the related biaxiality ratio, B, are calculated for several crack lengths and two configurations, the single-edge-cracked and the centrally-cracked specimen. It is postulated that a two-parameter characterization by K and T (or B) is needed for the adequate description of the stress and strain field around a short crack. To further verify the validity of this postulate, the influence of the third term of the Williams series on the stress, strain and displacement fields around the crack tip and in particular on the B parameter is also examined. It is found that the biaxiality ratio would be more negative if the third term effects are included in both geometries. The study is conducted using the finite element method with linearly elastic material and isoparametric elements and axial (mode I) loading. Moreover, it is clearly shown that it is not proper to postulate the crack size limits for 'short crack' behavior as a normalized ratio with the specimen width, a/w; it should instead be stated as an absolute, or normalized with respect to a small characteristic dimension such as the grain size. Finally, implications regarding the prediction of cyclic (fatigue) growth of short cracks are discussed.

  5. Effect of Measured Welding Residual Stresses on Crack Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hampton, Roy W.; Nelson, Drew; Doty, Laura W. (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Welding residual stresses in thin plate A516-70 steel and 2219-T87 aluminum butt weldments were measured by the strain-gage hole drilling and X-ray diffraction methods. The residual stress data were used to construct 3D strain fields which were modeled as thermally induced strains. These 3D strain fields were then analyzed with the WARP31) FEM fracture analysis code in order to predict their effect on fatigue and on fracture. For analyses of fatigue crack advance and subsequent verification testing, fatigue crack growth increments were simulated by successive saw-cuts and incremental loading to generate, as a function of crack length, effects on crack growth of the interaction between residual stresses and load induced stresses. The specimen experimental response was characterized and compared to the WARM linear elastic and elastic-plastic fracture mechanics analysis predictions. To perform the fracture analysis, the plate material's crack tearing resistance was determined by tests of thin plate M(T) specimens. Fracture analyses of these specimen were performed using WARP31D to determine the critical Crack Tip Opening Angle [CTOA] of each material. These critical CTOA values were used to predict crack tearing and fracture in the weldments. To verify the fracture predictions, weldment M(T) specimen were tested in monotonic loading to fracture while characterizing the fracture process.

  6. Crack-tip chemistry modeling of stage I stress corrosion cracking

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, R.H.; Simonen, E.P.

    1991-10-01

    Stage I stress corrosion cracking usually exhibits a very strong K dependence with Paris law exponents of up to 30. 2 Model calculations indicate that the crack velocity in this regime is controlled by transport through a salt film and that the K dependence results from crack opening controlled salt film dissolution. An ionic transport model that accounts for both electromigration through the resistive salt film and Fickian diffusion through the aqueous solution was used for these predictions. Predicted crack growth rates are in excellent agreement with measured values for Ni with P segregated to the grain boundaries and tested in IN H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} at +900 mV. This salt film dissolution may be applicable to stage I cracking of other materials.

  7. Initiation of environmentally-assisted cracking in low-alloy steels

    SciTech Connect

    Wire, G.L.; Li, Y.Y.

    1996-06-01

    Environmentally-Assisted Cracking (EAC) in low alloy steels is activated by a critical level of sulfide ions at the crack tip, which is produced from dissolution of sulfide inclusions (MnS, FeS, etc.) in the steel following exposure by a growing crack. EAC of concern herein is the increase of fatigue crack growth rate of up to 40 to 100 times the rate in air that occurs at 240--300 C in high temperature LWR or boiler water environments. The initiation of EAC is the onset of the higher fatigue crack growth rates in fully developed cracks already presumed to be present due to fatigue, stress corrosion cracking, or induced by fabrication. Initiation of EAC is induced by a change in loading parameters causing the fatigue crack growth rate to increase from a small multiple (2--4) to 40--100 times the air rate. A steady state theory developed by Combrade, suggests that EAC will initiate only above a critical crack velocity and cease below this same velocity. However, more recent tests show that EAC can persist down to much lower velocities (100 times lower) in low oxygen water at slightly lower temperatures. A special set of experiments on high sulfur plate material demonstrate that EAC will not initiate from surface cracks with low sulfide inventories at low crack tip velocities. Transient diffusion calculations show that a finite crack extension at a high crack tip velocity is necessary to initiate EAC, providing a possible explanation for the lack of high crack growth observations reported in low alloy steels in structural applications involving low oxygen environments.

  8. Tritium distribution at the crack tip of high-strength steels submitted to stress corrosion cracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brass, A. M.; Chêne, J.; Gonzalez, J.

    1994-06-01

    The experimental results presented in this article are the first direct evidence of hydrogen diffusion in 4120 and 4130 high-strength steels undergoing a stress corrosion cracking (SCC) test with an enhancement of the hydrogen concentration at the crack tip. The hydrogen entry is evidenced by electrochemical permeation experiments performed either at the corrosion potential or under cathodic polarization in selected microstructures. The autoradiography of tritium associated with microdensitometric measurements allows measurement of the hydrogen distribution and local concentration at the crack tip of specimens undergoing SCC in a tritiated aqueous medium. The small enhancement in the tritium concentration measured at the crack tip of the 4120 steel may be a consequence of a strong contribution of trapping sites throughout the microstructure, prevailing on the effect of the stress state on the local concentration of tritium.

  9. Stress corrosion cracking of carbon steel in amine systems

    SciTech Connect

    Richert, J.P.; Bagdasarian, A.J.; Shargay, C.A.

    1988-01-01

    NACE Task Group T-8-14 was formed by Group Committee T-8 on Refining Industry Corrosion to conduct a survey on stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of existing amine units. The main purpose of the survey was to determine the extent of cracking problems in such units and to examine possible correlations between cracked and noncracked locations to establish possible cause(s) for cracking. A total of 294 completed survey forms were received and analyzed. Cracking was reported in monoethanolamine (MEA), diethanolamine, methyldiethanolamine, and diisopropanolamine solutions but was most prevalent in MEA units. Cracking occurs in all types of equipment and piping operating at all common temperatures. Cracking has been reported in all typical refinery streams containing H/sub 2/S, CO/sub 2/, or a combination of the two. The use of corrosion inhibitors, soda ash, caustic, filters, or reclaimers has no indicated effect on cracking tendencies. The survey results confirmed that stress relieving is a highly effective means of preventing amine SCC.

  10. Validation of Stress Corrosion Cracking Model for High Level Radioactive-Waste Packages

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, S; Gordon, G; Andresen, P

    2004-04-22

    A stress corrosion cracking (SCC) model has been adapted for performance prediction of high level radioactive-waste packages to be emplaced in the proposed Yucca Mountain radioactive-waste repository. SCC is one form of environmentally assisted cracking resulting from the presence of three factors: metallurgical susceptibility, critical environment, and tensile stresses. For waste packages of the proposed Yucca Mountain repository, the outer barrier material is the highly corrosion-resistant Alloy UNS-N06022, the environment is represented by the water film present on the surface of the waste package from dripping or deliquescence of soluble salts present in any surface deposits, and the stress is principally the weld induced residual stress. SCC has historically been separated into 'initiation' and 'propagation' phases. Initiation of SCC will not occur on a smooth surface if the surface stress is below a threshold value defined as the threshold stress. Cracks can also initiate at and propagate from flaws (or defects) resulting from manufacturing processes (such as welding). To account for crack propagation, the slip dissolution/film rupture (SDFR) model is adopted to provide mathematical formulae for prediction of the crack growth rate. Once the crack growth rate at an initiated SCC is determined, it can be used by the performance assessment (not in the scope of this paper) to determine the time to through-wall penetration for the waste package. This paper presents the development and validation of the SDFR crack growth rate model based on technical information in the literature as well as experimentally determined crack growth rates developed specifically for Alloy UNS- N06022 in environments relevant to high level radioactive-waste packages of the proposed Yucca Mountain radioactive-waste repository.

  11. Stress-corrosion fatigue-crack growth in a Zr-based bulk amorphousmetal

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, V.; Ritchie, R.O.

    2005-09-21

    Electrochemical and mechanical experiments were conducted to analyze the environmentally-influenced cracking behavior of a bulk amorphous metal, Zr41.2Ti13.8Cu12.5Ni10Be22.5. This study was motivated by a scientific interest in mechanisms of fatigue-crack propagation in an amorphous metal, and by a practical interest in the use of this amorphous metal in applications that take advantage of its unique properties, including high specific strength, large elastic strains and low damping. The objective of the work was to determine the rate and mechanisms of subcritical crack growth in this metallic glass in an aggressive environment. Specifically, fatigue-crack propagation behavior was investigated at a range of stress intensities in air and aqueous salt solutions by examining the effects of loading cycle, stress-intensity range, solution concentration, anion identity, solution de-aeration, and bulk electrochemical potential. Results indicate that crack growth in aqueous solution in this alloy is driven by a stress-assisted anodic reaction at the crack tip. Rate-determining steps for such behavior are reasoned to be electrochemical, stress-dependent reaction at near-threshold levels, and mass transport at higher (steady-state) growth rates.

  12. Elastostatic stress analysis of orthotropic rectangular center-cracked plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gyekenyesi, G. S.; Mendelson, A.

    1972-01-01

    A mapping-collocation method was developed for the elastostatic stress analysis of finite, anisotropic plates with centrally located traction-free cracks. The method essentially consists of mapping the crack into the unit circle and satisfying the crack boundary conditions exactly with the help of Muskhelishvili's function extension concept. The conditions on the outer boundary are satisfied approximately by applying the method of least-squares boundary collocation. A parametric study of finite-plate stress intensity factors, employing this mapping-collocation method, is presented. It shows the effects of varying material properties, orientation angle, and crack-length-to-plate-width and plate-height-to-plate-width ratios for rectangular orthotropic plates under constant tensile and shear loads.

  13. Analysis of Alloy 600 and X-750 stress corrosion cracks

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, C.D.; Lewis, N.; Krasodomski, H.

    1993-06-01

    A few months ago, KAPL evidence supported the view that Primary or Pure Water Stress Corrosion Cracking (PWSCC) of Alloy 600 results from a hydrogen mechanism. Figure 1 shows an Analytical Electron Microscope (AEM) analysis of a stress corrosion crack (SCC) crack in an A600 split tube U-bend specimen exposed to primary water at 338{degree}C (640{degrees}F) for 462 days. The features which appear to confirm a hydrogen mechanism are: (1) A very narrow (< 200 {angstrom}) crack with a sharp tip, nearly free of deposits. (2) No evidence of severe plastic deformation in the region immediately ahead of the crack tip. (3) A line of small voids preceding the main crack tip, of which the largest is about 5 x 10{sup {minus}6} cm in length. Shen and Shewmon proposed that PWSCC of Alloy 600 occurs due to small microvoids ahead of a main crack tip. The hypothesis is that such voids result from pockets of methane gas formed by the reaction of atomic hydrogen with carbon in the base metal. The voids are about 10 x 10{sup {minus}6} cm diameter, approximately a factor of 2 larger than the largest voids.

  14. Stress analysis and stress-intensity factors for finite geometry solids containing rectangular surface cracks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gyekenyesi, J. P.; Mendelson, A.

    1977-01-01

    The line method of analysis is applied to the Navier-Cauchy equations of elastic equilibrium to calculate the displacement field in a finite geometry bar containing a variable depth rectangular surface crack under extensionally applied uniform loading. The application of this method to these equations leads to coupled sets of simultaneous ordinary differential equations whose solutions are obtained along sets of lines in a discretized region. Using the obtained displacement field, normal stresses, and the stress-intensity factor variation along the crack periphery are calculated for different crack depth to bar thickness ratios. Crack opening displacements and stress-intensity factors are also obtained for a through-thickness, center-cracked bar with variable thickness. The reported results show a considerable potential for using this method in calculating stress-intensity factors for commonly encountered surface crack geometries in finite solids

  15. Stress analysis and stress intensity factors for finite geometry solids containing rectangular surface cracks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gyekenyesi, J. P.; Mendelson, A.

    1975-01-01

    The line method of analysis is applied to the Navier-Cauchy equations of elastic equilibrium to calculate the displacement field in a finite geometry bar containing a variable depth rectangular surface crack under extensionally applied uniform loading. The application of this method to these equations leads to coupled sets of simultaneous ordinary differential equations whose solutions are obtained along sets of lines in a discretized region. Using the obtained displacement field, normal stresses and the stress intensity factor variation along the crack periphery are calculated for different crack depth to bar thickness ratios. Crack opening displacements and stress intensity factors are also obtained for a through-thickness, center cracked bar with variable thickness. The reported results show a considerable potential for using this method in calculating stress intensity factors for commonly encountered surface crack geometries in finite solids.

  16. Environmental Stress Screening 2000

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibbel, Mark

    1997-01-01

    The following identifies the authors of this report and the organizations that sponsored the effort conducted under the National Center for Manufacturing Sciences (NCMS) Environmental Stress Screening (ESS) 2000 Project.

  17. Stress-intensity factor equations for cracks in three-dimensional finite bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, J. C., Jr.; Raju, I. S.

    1981-01-01

    Empirical stress intensity factor equations are presented for embedded elliptical cracks, semi-elliptical surface cracks, quarter-elliptical corner cracks, semi-elliptical surface cracks at a hole, and quarter-elliptical corner cracks at a hole in finite plates. The plates were subjected to remote tensile loading. Equations give stress intensity factors as a function of parametric angle, crack depth, crack length, plate thickness, and where applicable, hole radius. The stress intensity factors used to develop the equations were obtained from three dimensional finite element analyses of these crack configurations.

  18. Remote field eddy current detection of stress-corrosion cracks

    SciTech Connect

    Nestleroth, J.B.

    1990-02-01

    The feasibility of detecting stress-corrosion cracks (SSC) using the Remote Field Eddy Current (RFEC) technique was demonstrated. The RFEC technique interrogates the entire thickness of the pipe and is applicable for in-line inspection. If it can be shown that the RFEC technique is effective in detecting SSC, then the technique is an ideal method for detecting the defects of interest. A defect detection model is proposed for explaining the mechanism for crack detection. For axially oriented, closed cracks, such as SCC, the conventional defect detection model proved to be too simplistic and not applicable. Therefore, a new detection mode that examines the flow of circumferential eddy currents was developed based on experimental results. This model, though not rigorous, provides a general understanding of the applicability of the RFEC technique for finding SSC. The data from the cracks and various artificial defects is presented in three formats: isometric projections, pseudocolor images and line-of-sight data. Though only two cracks were found, the experimental results correlate well with the circumferential eddy current theory. A theoretical analysis of the effects of motion on the output signal of the receiver is presented. This analysis indicates that inspection speed of simple implementations may be limited to a few miles per hour. Remote field eddy current inspection has excellent potential for inspection of gas transmission lines for detecting stress corrosion cracks that should be further developed.

  19. Stress corrosion cracking of candidate materials for nuclear waste containers

    SciTech Connect

    Maiya, P.S.; Shack, W.J.; Kassner, T.F.

    1989-09-01

    Types 304L and 316L stainless steel (SS), Incoloy 825, Cu, Cu-30%Ni, and Cu-7%Al have been selected as candidate materials for the containment of high-level nuclear waste at the proposed Yucca Mountain Site in Nevada. The susceptibility of these materials to stress corrosion cracking has been investigated by slow-strain-rate tests (SSRTs) in water which simulates that from well J-13 (J-13 water) and is representative of the groundwater present at the Yucca Mountain site. The SSRTs were performed on specimens exposed to simulated J-13 water at 93{degree}C and at a strain rate 10{sup {minus}7} s{sup {minus}1} under crevice conditions and at a strain rate of 10{sup {minus}8} s{sup {minus}1} under both crevice and noncrevice conditions. All the tests were interrupted after nominal elongation strains of 1--4%. Examination by scanning electron microscopy showed some crack initiation in virtually all specimens. Optical microscopy of metallographically prepared transverse sections of Type 304L SS suggests that the crack depths are small (<10 {mu}m). Preliminary results suggest that a lower strain rate increases the severity of cracking of Types 304L and 316L SS, Incoloy 825, and Cu but has virtually no effect on Cu-30%Ni and Cu-7%Al. Differences in susceptibility to cracking were evaluated in terms of a stress ratio, which is defined as the ratio of the increase in stress after local yielding in the environment to the corresponding stress increase in an identical test in air, both computed at the same strain. On the basis of this stress ratio, the ranking of materials in order of increasing resistance to cracking is: Types 304L SS < 316L SS < Incoloy 825 {congruent} Cu-30%Ni < Cu {congruent} Cu-7%Al. 9 refs., 12 figs., 7 tabs.

  20. Stress corrosion cracking of austenitic stainless steel core internal welds.

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, H. M.; Park, J.-H.; Ruther, W. E.; Sanecki, J. E.; Strain, R. V.; Zaluzec, N. J.

    1999-04-14

    Microstructural analyses by several advanced metallographic techniques were conducted on austenitic stainless steel mockup and core shroud welds that had cracked in boiling water reactors. Contrary to previous beliefs, heat-affected zones of the cracked Type 304L, as well as 304 SS core shroud welds and mockup shielded-metal-arc welds, were free of grain-boundary carbides, which shows that core shroud failure cannot be explained by classical intergranular stress corrosion cracking. Neither martensite nor delta-ferrite films were present on the grain boundaries. However, as a result of exposure to welding fumes, the heat-affected zones of the core shroud welds were significantly contaminated by oxygen and fluorine, which migrate to grain boundaries. Significant oxygen contamination seems to promote fluorine contamination and suppress thermal sensitization. Results of slow-strain-rate tensile tests also indicate that fluorine exacerbates the susceptibility of irradiated steels to intergranular stress corrosion cracking. These observations, combined with previous reports on the strong influence of weld flux, indicate that oxygen and fluorine contamination and fluorine-catalyzed stress corrosion play a major role in cracking of core shroud welds.

  1. Laboratory stress corrosion cracking studies in polythionic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Baylor, V.B.; Newsome, J.F.

    1984-08-01

    Stress corrosion cracking caused by polythionic acid and/or chlorides is a problem in coal liquefaction pilot plants. This problem is also common in refineries and has been the subject of extensive research. This study examines (1) the relationship of the ASTM standard ferric sulfate-sulfuric acid test for determining sensitization to resistance to polythionic stress corrosion cracking, (2) the cracking resistance of higher-alloy Fe-Ni-Cr materials in addition to the common austenitic stainless steels, and (3) the effect of chloride concentrations up to 1% in polythionic acid solutions on cracking behavior. We found that the ferric sulfate-sulfuric acid test can be used as an acceptance test for materials resistant to polythionic acid stress corrosion cracking because of its severity. The more highly alloyed materials were more resistant to sensitization than most of the austenitic stainless steels and were virtually unattacked in polythionic acid solutions containing up to 1% chloride. Chloride increased the corrosion rate and caused localized pitting, but it did not affect significantly the number of failures or the failure mode.

  2. Dynamical instabilities of quasistatic crack propagation under thermal stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouchbinder, Eran; Hentschel, H. George; Procaccia, Itamar

    2003-09-01

    We address the theory of quasistatic crack propagation in a strip of glass that is pulled from a hot oven towards a cold bath. This problem had been carefully studied in a number of experiments that offer a wealth of data to challenge the theory. We improve upon previous theoretical treatments in a number of ways. First, we offer a technical improvement of the discussion of the instability towards the creation of a straight crack. This improvement consists in employing Padé approximants to solve the relevant Wiener-Hopf factorization problem that is associated with this transition. Next we improve the discussion of the onset of oscillatory instability towards an undulating crack. We offer a way of considering the problem as a sum of solutions of a finite strip without a crack and an infinite medium with a crack. This allows us to present a closed form solution of the stress intensity factors in the vicinity of the oscillatory instability. Most importantly we develop a dynamical description of the actual trajectory in the regime of oscillatory crack. This theory is based on the dynamical law for crack propagation proposed by Hodgdon and Sethna. We show that this dynamical law results in a solution of the actual crack trajectory in post-critical conditions; we can compute from first principles the critical value of the control parameters, and the characteristics of the solution such as the wavelength of the oscillations. We present detailed comparison with experimental measurements without any free parameters. The comparison appears quite excellent. Finally we show that the dynamical law can be translated to an equation for the amplitude of the oscillatory crack; this equation predicts correctly the scaling exponents observed in experiments.

  3. A demonstration of mitigation of environmentally-assisted cracking by the application of a tensile overload

    SciTech Connect

    James, L.A.

    1997-02-01

    Environmentally-assisted cracking (EAC) of low-alloy steels in high-temperature aqueous environments typical of those employed in light-water reactor (LWR) systems has been a subject of considerable interest since the pioneering work of Kondo et al demonstrated significantly higher fatigue crack propagation (FCP) rates in water than would be expected in an air environment under similar conditions. Here, environmentally-assisted cracking (EAC) of low-alloy steels in elevated temperature aqueous environments is readily observed in many laboratory experiments conducted in autoclaves, yet the observation of EAC in actual components operating in the same environments is quite rare. Mass transport of sulfides from the crack enclave by diffusion and convection occurring in operating components provides one plausible explanation to this apparent paradox. Another contribution to EAC mitigation may also arise from the non-constant stress amplitudes typical for many operating components. This paper provides a demonstration of how a single tensile overload to 40% above a steady-state maximum fatigue stress can retard subsequent crack growth at the steady-state level for a sufficient period of time that diffusion mass transport can reduce the crack-tip sulfide concentration to a level below that necessary to sustain EAC.

  4. Nanoscale void nucleation and growth and crack tip stress evolution ahead of a growing crack in a single crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Shaowen; Deng, Xiaomin

    2008-03-01

    A constrained three-dimensional atomistic model of a cracked aluminum single crystal has been employed to investigate the growth behavior of a nanoscale crack in a single crystal using molecular dynamics simulations with the EAM potential. This study is focused on the stress field around the crack tip and its evolution during fast crack growth. Simulation results of the observed nanoscale fracture behavior are presented in terms of atomistic stresses. Major findings from the simulation results are the following: (a) crack growth is in the form of void nucleation, growth and coalescence ahead of the crack tip, thus resembling that of ductile fracture at the continuum scale; (b) void nucleation occurs at a certain distance ahead of the current crack tip or the forward edge of the leading void ahead of the crack tip; (c) just before void nucleation the mean atomic stress (or equivalently its ratio to the von Mises effective stress, which is called the stress constraint or triaxiality) has a high concentration at the site of void nucleation; and (d) the stress field ahead of the current crack tip or the forward edge of the leading void is more or less self-similar (so that the forward edge of the leading void can be viewed as the effective crack tip).

  5. Stress-corrosion cracking in BWR and PWR piping

    SciTech Connect

    Weeks, R.W.

    1983-07-01

    Intergranular stress-corrosion cracking of weld-sensitized wrought stainless steel piping has been an increasingly ubiquitous and expensive problem in boiling-water reactors over the last decade. In recent months, numerous cracks have been found, even in large-diameter lines. A number of potential remedies have been developed. These are directed at providing more resistant materials, reducing weld-induced stresses, or improving the water chemistry. The potential remedies are discussed, along with the capabilities of ultrasonic testing to find and size the cracks and related safety issues. The problem has been much less severe to date in pressurized-water reactors, reflecting the use of different materials and much lower coolant oxygen levels.

  6. Accelerated crack growth, residual stress, and a cracked zinc coated pressure shell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dittman, Daniel L.; Hampton, Roy W.; Nelson, Howard G.

    1987-01-01

    During a partial inspection of a 42 year old, operating, pressurized wind tunnel at NASA-Ames Research Center, a surface connected defect 114 in. long having an indicated depth of a 0.7 in. was detected. The pressure shell, constructed of a medium carbon steel, contains approximately 10 miles of welds and is cooled by flowing water over its zinc coated external surface. Metallurgical and fractographic analysis showed that the actual detect was 1.7 in. deep, and originated from an area of lack of weld penetration. Crack growth studies were performed on the shell material in the laboratory under various loading rates, hold times, and R-ratios with a simulated shell environment. The combination of zinc, water with electrolyte, and steel formed an electrolytic cell which resulted in an increase in cyclic crack growth rate by as much as 500 times over that observed in air. It was concluded that slow crack growth occurred in the pressure shell by a combination of stress corrosion cracking due to the welding residual stress and corrosion fatigue due to the cyclic operating stress.

  7. Chemical milling solution reveals stress corrosion cracks in titanium alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braski, D. N.

    1967-01-01

    Solution of hydrogen flouride, hydrogen peroxide, and water reveals hot salt stress corrosion cracks in various titanium alloys. After the surface is rinsed in water, dried, and swabbed with the solution, it can be observed by the naked eye or at low magnification.

  8. STRESS CRACKING BEHAVIOR OF HDPE GEOMEMBRANES AND ITS PREVENTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Geomembranes made from high density polyethylene (HOPE) have a high percent crystallinity and are therefore of concern with regard to stress cracking. A review of the literature plus our field exhuming of various sites-of-opportunity gave rise to twenty-five (25) situations wh...

  9. Strengthening, Crack Arrest And Multiple Cracking In Brittle Materials Using Residual Stresses.

    DOEpatents

    Green, David J.; Sglavo, Vincenzo M.; Tandon, Rajan

    2003-02-11

    Embodiments include a method for forming a glass which displays visible cracking prior to failure when subjected to predetermined stress level that is greater than a predetermined minimum stress level and less than a failure stress level. The method includes determining a critical flaw size in the glass and introducing a residual stress profile to the glass so that a plurality of visible cracks are formed prior to failure when the glass is subjected to a stress that is greater than the minimum stress level and lower than the critical stress. One method for forming the residual stress profile includes performing a first ion exchange so that a first plurality of ions of a first element in the glass are exchanged with a second plurality of ions of a second element that have a larger volume than the first ions. A second ion exchange is also performed so that a plurality of the second ions in the glass are exchanged back to ions of the first element.

  10. External stress corrosion cracking (ESCC) of austenitic stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Takemoto, M.; Shinogaya, T.; Shirai, M.; Shonohara, T.

    1985-06-01

    Failure case studies, field inspections, and simulation tests were carried out to elucidate the following key parameters associated with widespread external stress corrosion cracking (ESCC): (1) effect of insulating material on ESCC frequency, (2) temperature range of ESCC susceptibility, (3) detrimental ions and their sources, (4) critical allowable ion concentration in insulation, and (5) effect of residual and thermal stresses on ESCC susceptibility. Countermeasures to ESCC, which are applicable to plants in service or planning, have been proposed.

  11. Crack propagation and fracture in silicon wafers under thermal stress

    PubMed Central

    Danilewsky, Andreas; Wittge, Jochen; Kiefl, Konstantin; Allen, David; McNally, Patrick; Garagorri, Jorge; Elizalde, M. Reyes; Baumbach, Tilo; Tanner, Brian K.

    2013-01-01

    The behaviour of microcracks in silicon during thermal annealing has been studied using in situ X-ray diffraction imaging. Initial cracks are produced with an indenter at the edge of a conventional Si wafer, which was heated under temperature gradients to produce thermal stress. At temperatures where Si is still in the brittle regime, the strain may accumulate if a microcrack is pinned. If a critical value is exceeded either a new or a longer crack will be formed, which results with high probability in wafer breakage. The strain reduces most efficiently by forming (hhl) or (hkl) crack planes of high energy instead of the expected low-energy cleavage planes like {111}. Dangerous cracks, which become active during heat treatment and may shatter the whole wafer, can be identified from diffraction images simply by measuring the geometrical dimensions of the strain-related contrast around the crack tip. Once the plastic regime at higher temperature is reached, strain is reduced by generating dislocation loops and slip bands and no wafer breakage occurs. There is only a small temperature window within which crack propagation is possible during rapid annealing. PMID:24046487

  12. Stress intensity factors in bonded half planes containing inclined cracks and subjected to antiplane shear loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bassani, J. L.; Erdogan, F.

    1978-01-01

    The antiplane shear problem for two bonded dissimilar half planes containing a semi-infinite crack or two arbitrarily located collinear cracks was considered. For the semi-infinite crack the problem was solved for a concentrated wedge load and the stress intensity factor and the angular distribution of stresses were calculated. For finite cracks the problem was reduced to a pair of integral equations. Numerical results were obtained for cracks fully imbedded in a homogeneous medium, one crack tip touching the interface, and a crack crossing the interface for various crack angles.

  13. Stress intensity factors in bonded half planes containing inclined cracks and subjected to antiplane shear loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bassani, J. L.; Erdogan, F.

    1979-01-01

    The antiplane shear problem for two bonded dissimilar half planes containing a semi-infinite crack or two arbitrarily located collinear cracks is considered. For the semi-infinite crack the problem is solved for a concentrated wedge load and the stress intensity factor and the angular distribution of stresses are calculated. For finite cracks the problem is reduced to a pair of integral equations. Numerical results are obtained for cracks fully imbedded in a homogeneous medium, one crack tip touching the interface, and a crack crossing the interface for various crack angles.

  14. Stress Corrosion Cracking in Al-Zn-Mg-Cu Aluminum Alloys in Saline Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holroyd, N. J. Henry; Scamans, G. M.

    2013-03-01

    Stress corrosion cracking of Al-Zn-Mg-Cu (AA7xxx) aluminum alloys exposed to saline environments at temperatures ranging from 293 K to 353 K (20 °C to 80 °C) has been reviewed with particular attention to the influences of alloy composition and temper, and bulk and local environmental conditions. Stress corrosion crack (SCC) growth rates at room temperature for peak- and over-aged tempers in saline environments are minimized for Al-Zn-Mg-Cu alloys containing less than ~8 wt pct Zn when Zn/Mg ratios are ranging from 2 to 3, excess magnesium levels are less than 1 wt pct, and copper content is either less than ~0.2 wt pct or ranging from 1.3 to 2 wt pct. A minimum chloride ion concentration of ~0.01 M is required for crack growth rates to exceed those in distilled water, which insures that the local solution pH in crack-tip regions can be maintained at less than 4. Crack growth rates in saline solution without other additions gradually increase with bulk chloride ion concentrations up to around 0.6 M NaCl, whereas in solutions with sufficiently low dichromate (or chromate), inhibitor additions are insensitive to the bulk chloride concentration and are typically at least double those observed without the additions. DCB specimens, fatigue pre-cracked in air before immersion in a saline environment, show an initial period with no detectible crack growth, followed by crack growth at the distilled water rate, and then transition to a higher crack growth rate typical of region 2 crack growth in the saline environment. Time spent in each stage depends on the type of pre-crack ("pop-in" vs fatigue), applied stress intensity factor, alloy chemistry, bulk environment, and, if applied, the external polarization. Apparent activation energies ( E a) for SCC growth in Al-Zn-Mg-Cu alloys exposed to 0.6 M NaCl over the temperatures ranging from 293 K to 353 K (20 °C to 80 °C) for under-, peak-, and over-aged low-copper-containing alloys (<0.2 wt pct) are typically ranging from

  15. Factors affecting stress assisted corrosion cracking of carbon steel under industrial boiler conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Dong

    Failure of carbon steel boiler tubes from waterside has been reported in the utility boilers and industrial boilers for a long time. In industrial boilers, most waterside tube cracks are found near heavy attachment welds on the outer surface and are typically blunt, with multiple bulbous features indicating a discontinuous growth. These types of tube failures are typically referred to as stress assisted corrosion (SAC). For recovery boilers in the pulp and paper industry, these failures are particularly important as any water leak inside the furnace can potentially lead to smelt-water explosion. Metal properties, environmental variables, and stress conditions are the major factors influencing SAC crack initation and propagation in carbon steel boiler tubes. Slow strain rate tests (SSRT) were conducted under boiler water conditions to study the effect of temperature, oxygen level, and stress conditions on crack initation and propagation on SA-210 carbon steel samples machined out of boiler tubes. Heat treatments were also performed to develop various grain size and carbon content on carbon steel samples, and SSRTs were conducted on these samples to examine the effect of microstructure features on SAC cracking. Mechanisms of SAC crack initation and propagation were proposed and validated based on interrupted slow strain tests (ISSRT). Water chemistry guidelines are provided to prevent SAC and fracture mechanics model is developed to predict SAC failure on industrial boiler tubes.

  16. Environmentally enhanced crack growth in nickle-based superalloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Zhifan Frank

    film of surface oxides of Nb, Ti and Al along grain boundaries and interfaces ahead of the crack tip; not from Fe and Ni as previously proposed. Crack growth is controlled by the rate of stress-enhanced diffusion of oxygen along the grain boundaries.

  17. Stress Corrosion Crack Detection on HU-25 Guardian Aircraft

    SciTech Connect

    Blackmon, R.; Huffman, J.; Mello, C.W.; Moore, D.G.; Walkington, P.D.

    1999-02-17

    Several ultrasonic inspection methods were developed at the Federal Aviation Administration's Airworthiness Assurance NDI Validation Center (AANC) to easily and rapidly detect hidden stress corrosion cracks in all vertical windshield posts on the US Coast Guard (USCG) HU-25 Guardian aircraft. The inspection procedure locates cracks as small as 2.0 millimeters emanating from internal fastener holes and determines their length. A test procedure was developed and a baseline assessment of the USCG fleet was conducted. Inspection results on twenty-five aircraft revealed a good correlation with results made during subsequent structural disassembly and visual inspection.

  18. Stress corrosion cracking of welded Alloy 600 penetration mockups

    SciTech Connect

    Sarver, J.M.; Pathania, R.S.; Stuckey, K.; Fyfitch, S.; Gelpi, A.; Foucault, M.; Hunt, E.S.

    1995-12-31

    The primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) of Alloy 600 in components other than steam generators is a problem of increasing concern for nuclear power plants. Of greatest concern at the present time is the PWSCC of Alloy 600 vessel head penetrations. The common elements of these components are threefold: (1) the Alloy 600 material has a susceptible microstructure, (2) the Alloy 600 material is either a thick-walled tube or a bar which has been machined into a thick-walled tube, and (3) the Alloy 600 material has been welded into a structure such that high residual welding stresses exist in the postwelded Alloy 600 material. The objectives of the present program were to evaluate the PWSCC behavior of various configurations of welded Alloy 600 penetrations, and possible remedial measures which would prevent or retard PWSCC in these components. Mockups were instrumented to permit instantaneous remote sensing of through-wall cracking and were autoclave tested along with control C-rings in a doped steam environment. Following the test exposures, the mockups were split and examined to characterize the cracking morphology and the material microstructure. A Weibull distribution was used to analyze the time-to-failure results, and the observed cracking locations were compared to residual stress levels predicted by an elastic-plastic finite element analysis of the mockups.

  19. Sulfide stress cracking susceptibility of nickel containing steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Payer, J. H.; Pednekar, S. P.; Boyd, W. K.

    1986-09-01

    A systematic evaluation of the sulfide-stress cracking (SSC) behavior of five steels with nickel contents ranging from 0 to 3 pct was conducted in an acidified chloride solution saturated with H2S at room temperature (NACE solution). All of the steels were low-alloy, structural, or pressure vessel steels that are heat treatable to high strength levels with high toughness. All of the steels were heat treated to yield strength of approximately 690 MPa (100 ksi) and evaluated by identical test methods. The relative cracking susceptibility of the steels was determined from threshold stresses in constant-load tension tests and threshold stress intensities shown by precracked double-cantilever-beam specimens. Tempering treatment was a decisive factor in SSC susceptibility of low-nickel steels. When double tempered, low-Ni steels with greater than 1 pct Ni can be equivalent in SSC resistance to nominally nickel-free 4130 steel.

  20. Environmentally assisted cracking in light water reactors. Semiannual report, July 1998-December 1998.

    SciTech Connect

    Chopra, O. K.; Chung, H. M.; Gruber, E. E.; Kassner, T. F.; Ruther, W. E.; Shack, W. J.; Smith, J. L.; Soppet, W. K.; Strain; R. V.

    1999-10-01

    This report summarizes work performed by Argonne National Laboratory on fatigue and environmentally assisted cracking (EAC) in light water reactors from July 1998 to December 1998. Topics that have been investigated include (a) environmental effects on fatigue S-N behavior of primary pressure boundary materials, (b) irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking of austenitic stainless steels (SSs), and (c) EAC of Alloys 600 and 690. Fatigue tests have been conducted to determine the crack initiation and crack growth characteristics of austenitic SSs in LWR environments. Procedures are presented for incorporating the effects of reactor coolant environments on the fatigue life of pressure vessel and piping steels. Slow-strain-rate tensile tests and posttest fractographic analyses were conducted on several model SS alloys irradiated to {approx}0.3 and 0.9 x 10{sup 21} n {center_dot} cm{sup -2} (E > 1 MeV) in helium at 289 C in the Halden reactor. The results have been used to determine the influence of alloying and impurity elements on the susceptibility of these steels to irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking. Fracture toughness J-R curve tests were also conducted on two heats of Type 304 SS that were irradiated to {approx}0.3 x 10{sup 21} n {center_dot} cm{sup -2} in the Halden reactor. Crack-growth-rate tests have been conducted on compact-tension specimens of Alloys 600 and 690 under constant load to evaluate the resistance of these alloys to stress corrosion cracking in LWR environments.

  1. Frequency domain stress intensity calibration of damped cracked panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doyle, James F.; Rizzi, Stephen A.

    1993-01-01

    This paper discusses two schemes for doing finite element K calibration in the frequency domain. The baseline scheme uses the definition of K as a limit toward the crack tip. The limiting process requires using a very fine mesh around the crack tip making the scheme computationally very expensive. It is shown that the behavior of K as a function of frequency is very similar to a modal response. Taking advantage of this, a more efficient scheme involves a modal analysis of the cracked sheet and scaling the response to that of the static stress intensity. In this way, only a static K calibration need be performed. All the examples shown are for a frequency range spanning multiple resonances and with two levels of damping.

  2. Relationships between stress corrosion cracking tests and utility operating experience

    SciTech Connect

    Baum, Allen

    1999-10-22

    Several utility steam generator and stress corrosion cracking databases are synthesized with the view of identifying the crevice chemistry that is most consistent with the plant cracking data. Superheated steam and neutral solution environments are found to be inconsistent with the large variations in the observed SCC between different plants, different support plates within a plant, and different crevice locations. While the eddy current response of laboratory tests performed with caustic chemistries approximates the response of the most extensively affected steam generator tubes, the crack propagation kinetics in these tests differ horn plant experience. The observations suggest that there is a gradual conversion of the environment responsible for most steam generator ODSCC from a concentrated, alkaline-forming solution to a progressively more steam-enriched environment.

  3. Stress intensity, stress concentration and fatigue crack growth along evacuators of pressurized, autofrettaged tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, A.P.; Underwood, J.H.

    1995-11-01

    The geometry analyzed consists of a thick-walled cylinder having a small diameter evacuator hole penetrating radially through the wall. The loading involves pressure acting on the ID of the tube and all or part of this pressure acting on the evacuator hole. In addition the tube may be fully or partially autofrettaged. Total hoop stress concentrations are determined for a range of radial locations along the evacuator, as are stress intensity factors along a crack emanating from the evacuator hole. Fatigue crack growth rates, and hence crack profiles, are predicted at each of the radial locations. These predictions indicate that the critical location for the crack in a non-autofrettaged tube is at the ID whereas in a fully autofrettaged tube it is located approximately half way through the wall thickness. Taking account of the influence of stress ratio, minimum value of direct stress/maximum value of direct stress has a significantly influence on crack shape in autofrettaged tubes, but a limited effect upon lifetime. The effect upon fatigue lifetime of axial residual stresses due to the autofrettage process is described and it is demonstrated that an insignificant reduction in lifetime results from the presence of such stresses. Finally the predicted profiles are compared with experimental observations of fatigue cracked evacuators and a limited comparison of predicted and actual lifetimes is presented. Agreement is considered good.

  4. Design Criteria for Controlling Stress Corrosion Cracking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Franklin, D. B.

    1987-01-01

    This document sets forth the criteria to be used in the selection of materials for space vehicles and associated equipment and facilities so that failure resulting from stress corrosion will be prevented. The requirements established herein apply to all metallic components proposed for use in space vehicles and other flight hardware, ground support equipment, and facilities for testing. These requirements are applicable not only to items designed and fabricated by MSFC (Marshall Space Flight Center) and its prime contractors, but also to items supplied to the prime contractor by subcontractors and vendors.

  5. Stress corrosion cracking of titanium alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Statler, G. R.; Spretnak, J. W.; Beck, F. H.; Fontana, M. G.

    1974-01-01

    The effect of hydrogen on the properties of metals, including titanium and its alloys, was investigated. The basic theories of stress corrosion of titanium alloys are reviewed along with the literature concerned with the effect of absorbed hydrogen on the mechanical properties of metals. Finally, the basic modes of metal fracture and their importance to this study is considered. The experimental work was designed to determine the effects of hydrogen concentration on the critical strain at which plastic instability along pure shear directions occurs. The materials used were titanium alloys Ti-8Al-lMo-lV and Ti-5Al-2.5Sn.

  6. Separating the Influence of Environment from Stress Relaxation Effects on Dwell Fatigue Crack Growth in a Nickel-Base Disk Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Telesman, J.; Gabb, T. P.; Ghosn, L. J.

    2016-01-01

    Both environmental embrittlement and crack tip visco-plastic stress relaxation play a significant role in determining the dwell fatigue crack growth (DFCG) resistance of nickel-based disk superalloys. In the current study performed on the Low Solvus High Refractory (LSHR) disk alloy, the influence of these two mechanisms were separated so that the effects of each could be quantified and modeled. Seven different microstructural variations of LSHR were produced by controlling the cooling rate and the subsequent aging and thermal exposure heat treatments. Through cyclic fatigue crack growth testing performed both in air and vacuum, it was established that four out of the seven LSHR heat treatments evaluated, possessed similar intrinsic environmental resistance to cyclic crack growth. For these four heat treatments, it was further shown that the large differences in dwell crack growth behavior which still persisted, were related to their measured stress relaxation behavior. The apparent differences in their dwell crack growth resistance were attributed to the inability of the standard linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM) stress intensity parameter to account for visco-plastic behavior. Crack tip stress relaxation controls the magnitude of the remaining local tensile stresses which are directly related to the measured dwell crack growth rates. It was hypothesized that the environmentally weakened grain boundary crack tip regions fail during the dwells when their strength is exceeded by the remaining local crack tip tensile stresses. It was shown that the classical creep crack growth mechanisms such as grain boundary sliding did not contribute to crack growth, but the local visco-plastic behavior still plays a very significant role by determining the crack tip tensile stress field which controls the dwell crack growth behavior. To account for the influence of the visco-plastic behavior on the crack tip stress field, an empirical modification to the LEFM stress

  7. Stress concentration, stress intensity, and fatigue crack growth along evacuators of pressurized, autofrettaged tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, A. P.; Underwood, J. H.

    1994-12-01

    A stress analysis has been conducted on a pressurized, fully or partially autofrettaged cylinder with a small diameter evacuator hole penetrating radially through the wall. Pressure was applied on the inside diameter (ID) of the tube, and all or part of this pressure was applied on the evacuator hole surfaces. Total hoop stress concentrations have been determined for a range of radial locations along the evacuator and stress intensity factors have been determined along a crack emanating from the evacuator hole. Fatigue crack growth rates. and hence crack profiles, were predicted at each of the radial locations. These predictions indicate that the critical location for the crack in a non-autofrettaged tube is at the ID, whereas in a fully autofrettaged tube, it is located approximately halfway through the wall thickness. Stress ratio has a significant influence on crack shape in autofrettaged tubes, however, it has a limited effect upon lifetime. The effect of axial residual stresses upon fatigue lifetime due to the autofrettage process has been described and an insignificant reduction in lifetime was a result of such stresses. Finally, the predicted profiles are compared with experimental observations of fatigue crack evacuators, and a limited comparison of predicted and actual lifetimes is presented. Good agreement has been observed in both comparisons.

  8. Comparison of Stress Corrosion Cracking Susceptibility of Laser Machined and Milled 304 L Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, R. K.; Kumar, Aniruddha; Nagpure, D. C.; Rai, S. K.; Singh, M. K.; Khooha, Ajay; Singh, A. K.; Singh, Amrendra; Tiwari, M. K.; Ganesh, P.; Kaul, R.; Singh, B.

    2016-07-01

    Machining of austenitic stainless steel components is known to introduce significant enhancement in their susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking. The paper compares stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of laser machined 304 L stainless steel specimens with conventionally milled counterpart in chloride environment. With respect to conventionally milled specimens, laser machined specimens displayed more than 12 times longer crack initiation time in accelerated stress corrosion cracking test in boiling magnesium chloride as per ASTM G36. Reduced stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of laser machined surface is attributed to its predominantly ferritic duplex microstructure in which anodic ferrite phase was under compressive stress with respect to cathodic austenite.

  9. Instantaneous crack detection under changing operational and environmental variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Seung Bum; Sohn, Hoon

    2007-04-01

    A new methodology of guided wave based nondestructive testing (NDT) is developed to detect crack damage in a thin metal structure without using prior baseline data or a predetermined decision boundary. In conventional guided wave based techniques, damage is often identified by comparing the "current" data obtained from a potentially damaged condition of a structure with the "past" baseline data collected at the pristine condition of the structure. However, it has been reported that this type of pattern comparison with the baseline data can lead to increased false alarms due to its susceptibility to varying operational and environmental conditions of the structure. To develop a more robust damage diagnosis technique, a new concept of NDT is conceived so that cracks can be detected even when the system being monitored is subjected to changing operational and environmental conditions. The proposed NDT technique utilizes the polarization characteristics of the piezoelectric wafers attached on the both sides of the thin metal structure. Crack formation creates Lamb wave mode conversion due to a sudden change in the thickness of the structure. Then, the proposed technique instantly detects the appearance of the crack by extracting this mode conversion from the measured Lamb waves, and the threshold value from damage classification is also obtained only from the current data set. Numerical and experimental results are presented to demonstrate the applicability of the proposed technique to instantaneous crack detection.

  10. Controlling stress corrosion cracking in mechanism components of ground support equipment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Majid, W. A.

    1988-01-01

    The selection of materials for mechanism components used in ground support equipment so that failures resulting from stress corrosion cracking will be prevented is described. A general criteria to be used in designing for resistance to stress corrosion cracking is also provided. Stress corrosion can be defined as combined action of sustained tensile stress and corrosion to cause premature failure of materials. Various aluminum, steels, nickel, titanium and copper alloys, and tempers and corrosive environment are evaluated for stress corrosion cracking.

  11. Stress corrosion cracking of candidate waste container materials; Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Park, J.Y.; Maiya, P.S.; Soppet, W.K.; Diercks, D.R.; Shack, W.J.; Kassner, T.F.

    1992-06-01

    Six alloys have been selected as candidate container materials for the storage of high-level nuclear waste at the proposed Yucca mountain site in Nevada. These materials are Type 304L stainless steel (SS). Type 316L SS, Incoloy 825, phosphorus-deoxidized Cu, Cu-30%Ni, and Cu-7%Al. The present program has been initiated to determine whether any of these materials can survive for 300 years in the site environment without developing through-wall stress corrosion cracks. and to assess the relative resistance of these materials to stress corrosion cracking (SCC)- A series of slow-strain-rate tests (SSRTs) and fracture-mechanics crack-growth-rate (CGR) tests was performed at 93{degree}C and 1 atm of pressure in simulated J-13 well water. This water is representative, prior to the widespread availability of unsaturated-zone water, of the groundwater present at the Yucca Mountain site. Slow-strain-rate tests were conducted on 6.35-mm-diameter cylindrical specimens at strain rates of 10-{sup {minus}7} and 10{sup {minus}8} s{sup {minus}1} under crevice and noncrevice conditions. All tests were interrupted after nominal elongation strain of 1--4%. Scanning electron microscopy revealed some crack initiation in virtually all the materials, as well as weldments made from these materials. A stress- or strain-ratio cracking index ranks these materials, in order of increasing resistance to SCC, as follows: Type 304 SS < Type 316L SS < Incoloy 825 < Cu-30%Ni < Cu and Cu-7%Al. Fracture-mechanics CGR tests were conducted on 25.4-mm-thick compact tension specimens of Types 304L and 316L stainless steel (SS) and Incoloy 825. Crack-growth rates were measured under various load conditions: load ratios M of 0.5--1.0, frequencies of 10{sup {minus}3}-1 Hz, rise nines of 1--1000s, and peak stress intensities of 25--40 MPa{center_dot}m {sup l/2}.

  12. Stress corrosion cracking properties of 15-5PH steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosa, Ferdinand

    1993-01-01

    Unexpected occurrence of failures, due to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of structural components, indicate a need for improved characterization of materials and more advanced analytical procedures for reliably predicting structures performance. Accordingly, the purpose of this study was to determine the stress corrosion susceptibility of 15-5PH steel over a wide range of applied strain rates in a highly corrosive environment. The selected environment for this investigation was a highly acidified sodium chloride (NaCl) aqueous solution. The selected alloy for the study was a 15-5PH steel in the H900 condition. The slow strain rate technique was selected to test the metals specimens.

  13. Role of Slip Mode on Stress Corrosion Cracking Behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasudevan, A. K.; Sadananda, K.

    2011-02-01

    In this article, we examine the effect of aging treatment and the role of planarity of slip on stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behavior in precipitation-hardened alloys. With aging, the slip mode can change from a planar slip in the underage (UA) to a wavy slip in the overage (OA) region. This, in turn, results in sharpening the crack tip in the UA compared to blunting in the OA condition. We propose that the planar slip enhances the stress concentration effects by making the alloys more susceptible to SCC. In addition, the planarity of slip enhances plateau velocities, reduces thresholds for SCC, and reduces component life. We show that the effect of slip planarity is somewhat similar to the effects of mechanically induced stress concentrations such as due to the presence of sharp notches. Aging treatment also causes variations in the matrix and grain boundary (GB) microstructures, along with typical mechanical and SCC properties. These properties include yield stress, work hardening rate, fracture toughness K IC , thresholds K Iscc, and steady-state plateau velocity ( da/ dt). The SCC data for a wide range of ductile alloys including 7050, 7075, 5083, 5456 Al, MAR M steels, and solid solution copper-base alloys are collected from the literature. Our assertion is that slip mode and the resulting stress concentration are important factors in SCC behavior. This is further supported by similar observations in many other systems including some steels, Al alloys, and Cu alloys.

  14. Ultrasonic inspection reliability for intergranular stress corrosion cracks

    SciTech Connect

    Heasler, P G; Taylor, T T; Spanner, J C; Doctor, S R; Deffenbaugh, J D

    1990-07-01

    A pipe inspection round robin entitled Mini-Round Robin'' was conducted at Pacific Northwest Laboratory from May 1985 through October 1985. The research was sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research under a program entitled Evaluation and Improvement of NDE Reliability for Inservice Inspection of Light Water Reactors.'' The Mini-Round Robin (MRR) measured the intergranular stress corrosion (GSC) crack detection and sizing capabilities of inservice inspection (ISI) inspectors that had passed the requirements of IEB 83-02 and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) sizing training course. The MRR data base was compared with an earlier Pipe Inspection Round Robin (PIRR) that had measured the performance of inservice inspection prior to 1982. Comparison of the MRR and PIRR data bases indicates no significant change in the inspection capability for detecting IGSCC. Also, when comparing detection of long and short cracks, no difference in detection capability was measured. An improvement in the ability to differentiate between shallow and deeper IGSCC was found when the MRR sizing capability was compared with an earlier sizing round robin conducted by the EPRI. In addition to the pipe inspection round robin, a human factors study was conducted in conjunction with the Mini-Round Robin. The most important result of the human factors study is that the Relative Operating Characteristics (ROC) curves provide a better methodology for describing inspector performance than only probability of detection (POD) or single-point crack/no crack data. 6 refs., 55 figs., 18 tabs.

  15. Computer Simulation of Intergranular Stress Corrosion Cracking via Hydrogen Embrittlement

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R.W.

    2000-04-01

    Computer simulation has been applied to the investigation of intergranular stress corrosion cracking in Ni-based alloys based on a hydrogen embrittlement mechanism. The simulation employs computational modules that address (a) transport and reactions of aqueous species giving rise to hydrogen generation at the liquid-metal interface, (b) solid state transport of hydrogen via intergranular and transgranular diffusion pathways, and (c) fracture due to the embrittlement of metallic bonds by hydrogen. A key focus of the computational model development has been the role of materials microstructure (precipitate particles and grain boundaries) on hydrogen transport and embrittlement. Simulation results reveal that intergranular fracture is enhanced as grain boundaries are weakened and that microstructures with grains elongated perpendicular to the stress axis are more susceptible to cracking. The presence of intergranular precipitates may be expected to either enhance or impede cracking depending on the relative distribution of hydrogen between the grain boundaries and the precipitate-matrix interfaces. Calculations of hydrogen outgassing and in gassing demonstrate a strong effect of charging method on the fracture behavior.

  16. Environmental fatigue of an Al-Li-Cu alloy. Part 3: Modeling of crack tip hydrogen damage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piascik, Robert S.; Gangloff, Richard P.

    1992-01-01

    Environmental fatigue crack propagation rates and microscopic damage modes in Al-Li-Cu alloy 2090 (Parts 1 and 2) are described by a crack tip process zone model based on hydrogen embrittlement. Da/dN sub ENV equates to discontinuous crack advance over a distance, delta a, determined by dislocation transport of dissolved hydrogen at plastic strains above a critical value; and to the number of load cycles, delta N, required to hydrogenate process zone trap sites that fracture according to a local hydrogen concentration-tensile stress criterion. Transgranular (100) cracking occurs for process zones smaller than the subgrain size, and due to lattice decohesion or hydride formation. Intersubgranular cracking dominates when the process zone encompasses one or more subgrains so that dislocation transport provides hydrogen to strong boundary trapping sites. Multi-sloped log da/dN-log delta K behavior is produced by process zone plastic strain-hydrogen-microstructure interactions, and is determined by the DK dependent rates and proportions of each parallel cracking mode. Absolute values of the exponents and the preexponential coefficients are not predictable; however, fractographic measurements theta sub i coupled with fatigue crack propagation data for alloy 2090 established that the process zone model correctly describes fatigue crack propagation kinetics. Crack surface films hinder hydrogen uptake and reduce da/dN and alter the proportions of each fatigue crack propagation mode.

  17. Quasi-static intergranular cracking in a Cu-Sn alloy: An analog of stress relief cracking of steels

    SciTech Connect

    Barrera, E.V.; Menyhard, M.; Bika, D.; Rothman, B.; McMahon, C.J. Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Intergranular cracking in a laboratory-made Cu-8wt%Sn alloy at 265 to 300{degree}C in vacuum was studied in order to explore the hypothesis that this could serve as an analog to the brittle mode of stress-relief cracking in steels and to test the mechanism proposed earlier to explain that phenomenon. This mechanism involves the stress-induced intergranular penetration along grain boundaries of a surface-adsorbed embrittling element. Sulfur is the active element in this regard in steels, and tin was envisioned as playing the same role in Cu-Sn alloys. Auger spectroscopy was used to confirm earlier reports of the surface activity of tin and to determine the segregation kinetics in the present polycrystals; no other elements were found to segregate to surfaces to any significant degree in the present alloy. Crack growth measurements showed that intergranular cracking occurs in an intermittent manner at an average rate on the order of 0.1 {mu}m/sec over a range of crack length. Crack initiation was found to be remarkably sensitive to the stress intensity, implying the existence of a threshold. The fracture appearance in the regions of slow crack growth was similar to that observed in steels undergoing stress-relief cracking at 500--600{degree}C. It was concluded that the quasi-static intergranular cracking in the steels and in the Cu-Sn alloy represent two aspects of the same generic phenomenon and that the proposed mechanism of stress-induced intergranular impurity penetration is valid. It is believed that liquid-and solid-metal embrittlement are closely related to the type of intergranular cracking described here.

  18. Quasi-static intergranular cracking in a Cu-Sn alloy: An analog of stress relief cracking of steels

    SciTech Connect

    Barrera, E.V.; Menyhard, M.; Bika, D.; Rothman, B.; McMahon, C.J. Jr.

    1991-12-31

    Intergranular cracking in a laboratory-made Cu-8wt%Sn alloy at 265 to 300{degree}C in vacuum was studied in order to explore the hypothesis that this could serve as an analog to the brittle mode of stress-relief cracking in steels and to test the mechanism proposed earlier to explain that phenomenon. This mechanism involves the stress-induced intergranular penetration along grain boundaries of a surface-adsorbed embrittling element. Sulfur is the active element in this regard in steels, and tin was envisioned as playing the same role in Cu-Sn alloys. Auger spectroscopy was used to confirm earlier reports of the surface activity of tin and to determine the segregation kinetics in the present polycrystals; no other elements were found to segregate to surfaces to any significant degree in the present alloy. Crack growth measurements showed that intergranular cracking occurs in an intermittent manner at an average rate on the order of 0.1 {mu}m/sec over a range of crack length. Crack initiation was found to be remarkably sensitive to the stress intensity, implying the existence of a threshold. The fracture appearance in the regions of slow crack growth was similar to that observed in steels undergoing stress-relief cracking at 500--600{degree}C. It was concluded that the quasi-static intergranular cracking in the steels and in the Cu-Sn alloy represent two aspects of the same generic phenomenon and that the proposed mechanism of stress-induced intergranular impurity penetration is valid. It is believed that liquid-and solid-metal embrittlement are closely related to the type of intergranular cracking described here.

  19. Surface Cracking and Interface Reaction Associated Delamination Failure of Thermal and Environmental Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dong-Ming; Choi, Sung R.; Eldridge, Jeffrey I.; Lee, Kang N.; Miller, Robert A.

    2003-01-01

    In this paper, surface cracking and interface reactions of a BSAS coating and a multi-layer ZrO2-8wt%Y2O3 and mullite/BSAS/Si thermal and environmental barrier coating system on SiC/SiC ceramic matrix composites were characterized after long-term combined laser thermal gradient and furnace cyclic tests in a water vapor containing environment. The surface cracking was analyzed based on the coating thermal gradient sintering behavior and thermal expansion mismatch stress characteristics under the thermal cyclic conditions. The interface reactions, which were largely enhanced by the coating surface cracking in the water vapor environment, were investigated in detail, and the reaction phases were identified for the coating system after the long-term exposure. The accelerated coating delamination failure was attributed to the increased delamination driving force under the thermal gradient cyclic loading and the reduced interface adhesion due to the detrimental interface reactions.

  20. Surface Cracking and Interface Reaction Associated Delamination Failure of Thermal and Environmental Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dongming; Choi, Sung R.; Eldridge, Jeffrey I.; Lee, Kang N.; Miller, Robert A.

    2003-01-01

    In this paper, surface cracking and interface reactions of a BSAS coating and a multi-layer ZTO2-8wt%Y2O3 and mullite/BSAS/Si thermal and environmental barrier coating system on SiC/SiC ceramic matrix composites were characterized after long-term combined laser thermal gradient and furnace cyclic tests in a water vapor containing environment. The surface cracking was analyzed based on the coating thermal gradient sintering behavior and thermal expansion mismatch stress characteristics under the thermal cyclic conditions. The interface reactions, which were largely enhanced by the coating surface cracking in the water vapor environment, were investigated in detail, and the reaction phases were identified for the coating system after the long- term exposure. The accelerated coating delamination failure was attributed to the increased delamination driving force under the thermal gradient cyclic loading and the reduced interface adhesion due to the detrimental interface reactions.

  1. Thermally activated dislocation creep model for primary water stress corrosion cracking of NiCrFe alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, M.M., Jr

    1995-12-31

    There is a growing awareness that awareness that environmentally assisted creep plays an important role in integranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) of NiCrFe alloys in the primary coolant water environment of a pressurized water reactor (PWR). The expected creep mechanism is the thermally activated glide of dislocations. This mode of deformation is favored by the relatively low temperature of PWR operation combined with the large residual stresses that are most often identified as responsible for the SCC failure of plant components. Stress corrosion crack growth rate (CGR) equations that properly reflect the influence of this mechanism of crack tip deformation are required for accurate component life predictions. A phenomenological IGSCC-CGR model, which is based on an apriori assumption that the IGSCC-CGR is controlled by a low temperature dislocation creep mechanism, is developed in this report. Obstacles to dislocation creep include solute atoms such as carbon, which increase the lattice friction force, and forest dislocations, which can be introduced by cold prestrain. Dislocation creep also may be environmentally assisted due to hydrogen absorption at the crack tip. The IGSCC-CGR model developed here is based on an assumption that crack growth occurs by repeated fracture events occurring within an advancing crack-tip creep-fracture zone. Thermal activation parameters for stress corrosion cracking are obtained by fitting the CGR model to IGSCC-CGR data obtained on NiCrFe alloys, Alloy X-750 and Alloy 600. These IGSCC-CGR activation parameters are compared to activation parameters obtained from creep and stress relaxation tests. Recently reported CGR data, which exhibit an activation energy that depends on yield stress and the applied stress intensity factor, are used to benchmark the model. Finally, the effects of matrix carbon concentration, grain boundary carbides and absorbed hydrogen concentration are discussed within context of the model.

  2. Effect of corrosion and stress-corrosion cracking on pipe integrity and remaining life

    SciTech Connect

    Jaske, C.E.; Beavers, J.A.

    1996-07-01

    Process piping is often exposed to corrosive fluids. During service, such exposure may cause localized corrosion or stress-corrosion cracking that affects structural integrity. This paper presents a model that quantifies the effect of localized corrosion and stress-corrosion cracking on pipe failure stress. The model is an extension of those that have been developed for oil and gas pipelines. It accounts for both axial and hoop stress. Cracks are modeled using inelastic fracture mechanics. Both flow-stress and fracture-toughness dependent failure modes are addressed. Corrosion and crack-growth rates are used to predict remaining service life.

  3. Low-pH stress corrosion crack propagation in API X-65 line pipe steel

    SciTech Connect

    Harle, B.A.; Beavers, J.A. )

    1993-10-01

    Preliminary results of ongoing crack growth studies being performed on an API X-65 line pipe steel in a low-pH cracking environment were reported. Objectives were to reproduce low-pH crack propagation in the laboratory, to identify a crack driving force parameter, and to evaluate the influence of environmental and mechanical parameters on crack growth. A J-integral test technique was used in the study. Significant crack growth was observed. The parameter J appeared to be a good driving force parameter to describe crack growth.

  4. Stress corrosion cracking of admiralty brass condenser tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Howell, A.G. ); Kendall, D. )

    1993-12-01

    Sodium sulfite is used routinely for removing traces of oxygen from the water in low- and moderate-pressure boilers. Sodium sulfite is unacceptable for use in higher pressure boilers because it will decompose, which will release acidic gases into the steam and increase corrosion of after-boiler components. However, even in moderate-pressure boilers, one of the products of sulfite decomposition, moist sulfur dioxide, can cause stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of copper alloys. Monitoring the degree of sulfite decomposition in a specific boiler and controlling the factors that promote decomposition will reduce the likelihood and severity of SCC.

  5. FITNESS-FOR-SERVICE ASSESSMENT FOR A RADIOACTIVE WASTE TANK THAT CONTAINS STRESS CORROSION CRACKS

    SciTech Connect

    Wiersma, B; James Elder, J; Rodney Vandekamp, R; Charles Mckeel, C

    2009-04-23

    Radioactive wastes are confined in 49 underground storage tanks at the Savannah River Site. The tanks are examined by ultrasonic (UT) methods for thinning, pitting, and stress corrosion cracking in order to assess fitness-for-service. During an inspection in 2002, ten cracks were identified on one of the tanks. Given the location of the cracks (i.e., adjacent to welds, weld attachments, and weld repairs), fabrication details (e.g., this tank was not stress-relieved), and the service history the degradation mechanism was stress corrosion cracking. Crack instability calculations utilizing API-579 guidance were performed to show that the combination of expected future service condition hydrostatic and weld residual stresses do not drive any of the identified cracks to instability. The cracks were re-inspected in 2007 to determine if crack growth had occurred. During this re-examination, one indication that was initially reported as a 'possible perpendicular crack <25% through wall' in 2002, was clearly shown not to be a crack. Additionally, examination of a new area immediately adjacent to other cracks along a vertical weld revealed three new cracks. It is not known when these new cracks formed as they could very well have been present in 2002 as well. Therefore, a total of twelve cracks were evaluated during the re-examination. Comparison of the crack lengths measured in 2002 and 2007 revealed that crack growth had occurred in four of the nine previously measured cracks. The crack length extension ranged from 0.25 to 1.8 inches. However, in all cases the cracks still remained within the residual stress zone (i.e., within two to three inches of the weld). The impact of the cracks that grew on the future service of Tank 15 was re-assessed. API-579 crack instability calculations were again performed, based on expected future service conditions and trended crack growth rates for the future tank service cycle. The analysis showed that the combined hydrostatic and weld

  6. Assessment of NDE methods for detecting cracks and damage in environmental barrier coated CMC tested under tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdul-Aziz, Ali; Wroblewski, Adam C.; Bhatt, Ramakrishna T.; Jaskowiak, Martha H.; Gorican, Daniel; Rauser, Richard W.

    2015-03-01

    For validating physics based analytical models predicting spallation life of environmental barrier coating (EBC) on fiber reinforced ceramic matrix composites, the fracture strength of EBC and kinetics of crack growth in EBC layers need to be experimentally determined under engine operating conditions. In this study, a multi layered barium strontium aluminum silicate (BSAS) based EBC-coated, melt infiltrated silicon carbide fiber reinforced silicon carbide matrix composite (MI SiC/SiC) specimen was tensile tested at room temperature. Multiple tests were performed on a single specimen with increasing predetermined stress levels until final failure. During loading, the damage occurring in the EBC was monitored by digital image correlation (DIC). After unloading from the predetermined stress levels, the specimen was examined by optical microscopy and computed tomography (CT). Results indicate both optical microscopy and CT could not resolve the primary or secondary cracks developed during tensile loading until failure. On the other hand, DIC did show formation of a primary crack at ~ 50% of the ultimate tensile strength and this crack grew with increasing stress and eventually led to final failure of the specimen. Although some secondary cracks were seen in the DIC strain plots prior to final failure, the existence of these cracks were not confirmed by other methods. By using a higher resolution camera, it is possible to improve the capability of DIC in resolving secondary cracks and damage in coated specimen tested at room temperature, but use of DIC at high temperature requires significant development. Based on the current data, it appears that both optical microscopy and CT do not offer any hope for detecting crack initiation or determining crack growth in EBC coated CMC tested at room or high temperatures after the specimen has been unloaded. Other methods such as, thermography and optical/SEM of the polished cross section of EBC coated CMC specimens stressed to

  7. Effects of loading on the growth rates of deep stress-corrosion cracks

    SciTech Connect

    Beavers, J.A.; Christman, T.K.

    1990-08-01

    The goal of this research program was to determine the effects of loading on growth of stress-corrosion cracks (SCC) in line pipe steel and whether special loading procedures could actually inhibit crack growth. Of particular interest was the effect of hydrostatic retesting on the subsequent growth of existing cracks. The growth rate experiments showed that the slow-strain rate loading could successfully nucleate a group of fine cracks with depths up to 0.025 inches (0.64 mm). However, the subsequent cyclic loading at typical operating stress levels (lower than experienced during the slow- strain rate loading) produced minimal crack growth and stopped soon after the test was started. The limited growth is believed to be a real phenomenon which means this is not a suitable procedure for the measurement of average crack growth rates. These experiments indicate that cracks grown at high stress (as in the slow-strain rate phase) do not readily propagate at lower stress levels. This may be because of crack closure (compressive crack tip residual stress) induced by the initial higher stress level. If that is true, then hydrostatic retests could inhibit the growth of existing stress-corrosion cracks, especially if the hydrostatic tests are conducted at high stress levels. 15 figures, 3 tabs.

  8. Fatigue Crack Growth Rate and Stress-Intensity Factor Corrections for Out-of-Plane Crack Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forth, Scott C.; Herman, Dave J.; James, Mark A.

    2003-01-01

    Fatigue crack growth rate testing is performed by automated data collection systems that assume straight crack growth in the plane of symmetry and use standard polynomial solutions to compute crack length and stress-intensity factors from compliance or potential drop measurements. Visual measurements used to correct the collected data typically include only the horizontal crack length, which for cracks that propagate out-of-plane, under-estimates the crack growth rates and over-estimates the stress-intensity factors. The authors have devised an approach for correcting both the crack growth rates and stress-intensity factors based on two-dimensional mixed mode-I/II finite element analysis (FEA). The approach is used to correct out-of-plane data for 7050-T7451 and 2025-T6 aluminum alloys. Results indicate the correction process works well for high DeltaK levels but fails to capture the mixed-mode effects at DeltaK levels approaching threshold (da/dN approximately 10(exp -10) meter/cycle).

  9. Stress cracking potential of HDPE geogrids. Final report, April 1993--July 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Elias, V.; Carlson, D.; Bachus, R.; Giroud, J.P.

    1998-08-01

    The report presents the development of a testing protocol to measure the potential for stress cracking of high-density polyethylene (HDPE) geogrids used for soil reinforcement. The developed data demonstrate that local stress cracking in the unoriented transverse node of HDPE geogrids can occur as a result of construction-induced damage. Undamaged geogrids are not prone to stress cracking at load levels below their 100-year limiting creep load.

  10. Stress corrosion cracking of several high strength ferrous and nickel alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, E. E.

    1971-01-01

    The stress corrosion cracking resistance of several high strength ferrous and nickel base alloys has been determined in a sodium chloride solution. Results indicate that under these test conditions Multiphase MP35N, Unitemp L605, Inconel 718, Carpenter 20Cb and 20Cb-3 are highly resistant to stress corrosion cracking. AISI 410 and 431 stainless steels, 18 Ni maraging steel (250 grade) and AISI 4130 steel are susceptible to stress corrosion cracking under some conditions.

  11. Environmentally assisted cracking in light water reactors. Semiannual report July 1996--December 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Chopra, O.K.; Chung, H.M.; Gavenda, D.J.

    1997-10-01

    This report summarizes work performed by Argonne National Laboratory on fatigue and environmentally assisted cracking (EAC) in light water reactors from July 1996 to December 1996. Topics that have been investigated include (a) fatigue of carbon, low-alloy, and austenitic stainless steels (SSs) used in reactor piping and pressure vessels, (b) irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking of Type 304 SS, (c) EAC of Alloy 600, and (d) characterization of residual stresses in welds of boiling water reactor (BWR) core shrouds by numerical models. Fatigue tests were conducted on ferritic and austenitic SSs in water that contained various concentrations of dissolved oxygen to determine whether a slow strain rate applied during various portions of a tensile-loading cycle are equally effective in decreasing fatigue life. Slow-strain-rate-tensile tests were conducted in simulated BWR water at 288 C on SS specimens irradiated to a low fluence in the Halden reactor and the results were compared with similar data from a control-blade sheath and neutron-absorber tubes irradiated in BWRs to the same fluence level. Crack-growth-rate tests were conducted on compact-tension specimens from a low-carbon content heat of Alloy 600 in high-purity oxygenated water at 289 C. Residual stresses and stress intensity factors were calculated for BWR core shroud welds.

  12. Environmental fatigue of an Al-Li-Cu alloy. Part 2: Microscopic hydrogen cracking processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piascik, Robert S.; Gangloff, Richard P.

    1992-01-01

    Based on a fractographic analysis of fatigue crack propagation (FCP) in Al-Li-Cu alloy 2090 stressed in a variety of inert and embrittling environments, microscopic crack paths are identified and correlated with intrinsic da/dN-delta K kinetics. FCP rates in 2090 are accelerated by hydrogen producing environments (pure water vapor, moist air, and aqueous NaCl), as defined in Part 1. For these cases, subgrain boundary fatigue cracking (SGC) dominates for delta K values where the crack tip process zone, a significant fraction of the cyclic plastic zone, is sufficiently large to envelop 5 micron subgrains in the unrecrystallized microstructure. SGC may be due to strong hydrogen trapping at T1 precipitates concentrated at sub-boundaries. At low delta K, the plastic zone diameter is smaller than the subgrain size and FCP progresses along (100) planes due to either local lattice decohesion or aluminum-lithium hydride cracking. For inert environments (vacuum, helium, and oxygen), or at high delta K where the hydrogen effect on da/dN is small, FCP is along (111) slip planes; this mode does not transition with increasing delta K and plastic zone size. The SGC and (100) crystallographic cracking modes, and the governing influence of the crack tip process zone volume (delta K), support hydrogen embrittlement rather than a surface film rupture and anodic dissolution mechanism for environmental FCP. Multi-sloped log da/dN-log delta K behavior is produced by changes in process zone hydrogen-microstructure interactions, and not by purely micromechanical-microstructure interactions, in contradiction to microstructural distance-based fatigue models.

  13. Effects of weld residual stresses on crack-opening area analysis of pipes for LBB applications

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, P.; Rahman, S.; Wilkowski, G.

    1997-04-01

    This paper summarizes four different studies undertaken to evaluate the effects of weld residual stresses on the crack-opening behavior of a circumferential through-wall crack in the center of a girth weld. The effect of weld residual stress on the crack-opening-area and leak-rate analyses of a pipe is not well understood. There are no simple analyses to account for these effects, and, therefore, they are frequently neglected. The four studies involved the following efforts: (1) Full-field thermoplastic finite element residual stress analyses of a crack in the center of a girth weld, (2) A comparison of the crack-opening displacements from a full-field thermoplastic residual stress analysis with a crack-face pressure elastic stress analysis to determine the residual stress effects on the crack-opening displacement, (3) The effects of hydrostatic testing on the residual stresses and the resulting crack-opening displacement, and (4) The effect of residual stresses on crack-opening displacement with different normal operating stresses.

  14. A Hybrid Laser Surface Treatment for Refurbishment of Stress Corrosion Cracking Damaged 304L Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, R. K.; Sundar, R.; Kumar, B. Sunil; Ganesh, P.; Kaul, R.; Ranganathan, K.; Bindra, K. S.; Kain, V.; Oak, S. M.; Kukreja, L. M.

    2015-06-01

    The paper describes a new hybrid laser surface treatment approach, combining laser surface melting and laser shock peening treatments, for refurbishment stress corrosion cracking damaged type 304L stainless steel specimens. Hybrid laser surface treatment produced crack-free compressively stressed surface. With respect to as-machined specimens, laser-rejuvenated specimens demonstrated significantly reduced susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking in chloride environment with minor increase in mean surface roughness. The results of the study, although particularly applicable to shallow stress corrosion cracking damage, are important for life extension of in-service stainless steel components operating in corrosive chloride environment.

  15. Susceptibility of Inconel X-750 to stress corrosion cracking

    SciTech Connect

    Mishra, B.

    1986-01-01

    High strength, age hardenable Ni-base superalloy Inconel X-750 in susceptible to severe intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) when used in the triple heat treated condition. In this research, constant strain rate technique was employed to evaluate the stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of alloy X-750 under simulated pressurized water reactor conditions in a nuclear power plant using an automated autoclave system at 8 x 10/sup 6/ N/m/sup 2/ pressure and 289/sup 0/C temperature. The alloy produced via ESR and VAR processing routes containing .004% and .011% sulfur, respectively, were solution annealed at 1075 and 1240/sup 0/C for 2 hours and water quenched followed by aging in the 704 to 871/sup 0/C temperature range up to 200 hours and cooled in air as well as the furnace. Complete grain boundary chemistry and precipitation morphology was studied, supported by observations made using Charpy impact and modified Huey tests. Results showed Inconel X-750 processed through electroslag refining, solution annealed at 1240/sup 0/C for 2 hours and water quenched followed by aging at 871/sup 0/C for 200 hours and furnace cooling, provides the best combination of strength, ductility, and resistance to SCC.

  16. OBSERVATIONS AND IMPLICATIONS OF INTERGRANULAR STRESS CORROSION CRACK GROWTH OF ALLOY 152 WELD METALS IN SIMULATED PWR PRIMARY WATER

    SciTech Connect

    Toloczko, Mychailo B.; Olszta, Matthew J.; Overman, Nicole R.; Bruemmer, Stephen M.

    2013-08-15

    Significant intergranular (IG) crack growth during stress corrosion cracking (SCC) tests has been documented during tests in simulated PWR primary water on two alloy 152 specimens cut from a weldment produced by ANL. The cracking morphology was observed to change from transgranular (TG) to mixed mode (up to ~60% IG) during gentle cycling and cycle + hold loading conditions. Measured crack growth rates under these conditions often suggested a moderate degree of environmental enhancement consistent with faster growth on grain boundaries. However, overall SCC propagation rates at constant stress intensity (K) or constant load were very low in all cases. Initial SCC rates up to 6x10-9 mm/s were occasionally measured, but constant K/load growth rates dropped below ~1x10-9 mm/s with time even when significant IG engagement existed. Direct comparisons were made among loading conditions, measured crack growth response and cracking morphology during each test to assess IGSCC susceptibility of the alloy 152 specimens. These results were analyzed with respect to our previous SCC crack growth rate measurements on alloy 152/52 welds.

  17. Ambient temperature stress-corrosion cracking of sensitized stainless steels. [PWR

    SciTech Connect

    Sieradzki, K.; Isaacs, H.S.; Newman, R.C.

    1982-01-01

    Stress-corrosion cracking of sensitized Type 304 steel in low temperature borated water has been observed. The probable role of low levels of chloride ions or sulfur-containing ions is described, including the relationship of the phenomenon to polythionic acid cracking. The mechanism of the sulfur-induced cracking and its usefulness as a test for sensitization are outlined.

  18. Local delamination in laminates with angle ply matrix cracks. Part 1: Tension tests and stress analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Obrien, T. Kevin; Hooper, S. J.

    1991-01-01

    Quasi-static tension tests were conducted on AS4/3501-6 graphite epoxy laminates. Dye penetrant enhanced x-radiography was used to document the onset of matrix cracking and the onset of local delaminations at the intersection of the matrix cracks and the free edge. Edge micrographs taken after the onset of damage were used to verify the location of the matrix cracks and local delamination through the laminate thickness. A quasi-3D finite element analysis was conducted to calculate the stresses responsible for matrix cracking in the off-axis plies. Laminated plate theory indicated that the transverse normal stresses were compressive. However, the finite element analysis yielded tensile transverse normal stresses near the free edge. Matrix cracks formed in the off-axis plies near the free edge where in-plane transverse stresses were tensile and had their greatest magnitude. The influence of the matrix crack on interlaminar stresses is also discussed.

  19. Environmentally assisted cracking in light water reactors. Semiannual report, October 1993--March 1994. Volume 18

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, H.M.; Chopra, O.K.; Erck, R.A.; Kassner, T.F.; Michaud, W.F.; Ruther, W.E.; Sanecki, J.E.; Shack, W.J.; Soppet, W.K.

    1995-03-01

    This report summarizes work performed by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) on fatigue and environmentally assisted cracking (EAC) in light water reactors (LWRs) during the six months from October 1993 to March 1994. EAC and fatigue of piping, pressure vessels, and core components in LWRs are important concerns in operating plants and as extended reactor lifetimes are envisaged. Topics that have been investigated include (a) fatigue of low-alloy steel used in piping, steam generators, and reactor pressure vessels, (b) EAC of wrought and cast austenitic stainless steels (SSs), and (c) radiation-induced segregation and irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) of Type 304 SS after accumulation of relatively high fluence. Fatigue tests have been conducted on A302-Gr B low-alloy steel to verify whether the current predictions of modest decreases of fatigue life in simulated pressurized water reactor water are valid for high-sulfur heats that show environmentally enhanced fatigue crack growth rates. Additional crack growth data were obtained on fracture-mechanics specimens of austenitic SSs to investigate threshold stress intensity factors for EAC in high-purity oxygenated water at 289{degrees}C. The data were compared with predictions based on crack growth correlations for wrought austenitic SS in oxygenated water developed at ANL and rates in air from Section XI of the ASME Code. Microchemical and microstructural changes in high- and commercial-purity Type 304 SS specimens from control-blade absorber tubes and a control-blade sheath from operating boiling water reactors were studied by Auger electron spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy to determine whether trace impurity elements, which are not specified in the ASTM specifications, may contribute to IASCC of solution-annealed materials.

  20. Environmentally Assisted Cracking of Nickel Alloys - A Review

    SciTech Connect

    Rebak, R

    2004-07-12

    Nickel can dissolve a large amount of alloying elements while still maintaining its austenitic structure. That is, nickel based alloys can be tailored for specific applications. The family of nickel alloys is large, from high temperature alloys (HTA) to corrosion resistant alloys (CRA). In general, CRA are less susceptible to environmentally assisted cracking (EAC) than stainless steels. The environments where nickel alloys suffer EAC are limited and generally avoidable by design. These environments include wet hydrofluoric acid and hot concentrated alkalis. Not all nickel alloys are equally susceptible to cracking in these environments. For example, commercially pure nickel is less susceptible to EAC in hot concentrated alkalis than nickel alloyed with chromium (Cr) and molybdenum (Mo). The susceptibility of nickel alloys to EAC is discussed by family of alloys.

  1. Slow Crack Growth of Brittle Materials With Exponential Crack-Velocity Formulation. Part 2; Constant Stress Rate Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sung R.; Nemeth, Noel N.; Gyekenyesi, John P.

    2002-01-01

    The previously determined life prediction analysis based on an exponential crack-velocity formulation was examined using a variety of experimental data on glass and advanced structural ceramics in constant stress rate and preload testing at ambient and elevated temperatures. The data fit to the relation of strength versus the log of the stress rate was very reasonable for most of the materials. Also, the preloading technique was determined equally applicable to the case of slow-crack-growth (SCG) parameter n greater than 30 for both the power-law and exponential formulations. The major limitation in the exponential crack-velocity formulation, however, was that the inert strength of a material must be known a priori to evaluate the important SCG parameter n, a significant drawback as compared with the conventional power-law crack-velocity formulation.

  2. Stress Corrosion Cracking and Fatigue Crack Growth Studies Pertinent to Spacecraft and Booster Pressure Vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, L. R.; Finger, R. W.

    1972-01-01

    This experimental program was divided into two parts. The first part evaluated stress corrosion cracking in 2219-T87 aluminum and 5Al-2.5Sn (ELI) titanium alloy plate and weld metal. Both uniform height double cantilever beam and surface flawed specimens were tested in environments normally encountered during the fabrication and operation of pressure vessels in spacecraft and booster systems. The second part studied compatibility of material-environment combinations suitable for high energy upper stage propulsion systems. Surface flawed specimens having thicknesses representative of minimum gage fuel and oxidizer tanks were tested. Titanium alloys 5Al-2.5Sn (ELI), 6Al-4V annealed, and 6Al-4V STA were tested in both liquid and gaseous methane. Aluminum alloy 2219 in the T87 and T6E46 condition was tested in fluorine, a fluorine-oxygen mixture, and methane. Results were evaluated using modified linear elastic fracture mechanics parameters.

  3. Stress-intensity factor equations for cracks in three-dimensional finite bodies subjected to tension and bending loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, J. C., Jr.; Raju, I. S.

    1984-01-01

    Stress intensity factor equations are presented for an embedded elliptical crack, a semielliptical surface crack, a quarter elliptical corner crack, a semielliptical surface crack along the bore of a circular hole, and a quarter elliptical corner crack at the edge of a circular hole in finite plates. The plates were subjected to either remote tension or bending loads. The stress intensity factors used to develop these equations were obtained from previous three dimensional finite element analyses of these crack configurations. The equations give stress intensity factors as a function of parametric angle, crack depth, crack length, plate thickness, and, where applicable, hole radius. The ratio of crack depth to plate thickness ranged from 0 to 1, the ratio of crack depth to crack length ranged from 0.2 to 2, and the ratio of hole radius to plate thickness ranged from 0.5 to 2. The effects of plate width on stress intensity variation along the crack front were also included.

  4. Prediction of pure water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) in nickel base alloys using crack growth rate models

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, C.D.; Krasodomski, H.T.; Lewis, N.; Makar, G.L.

    1995-02-22

    The Ford/Andresen slip dissolution SCC model, originally developed for stainless steel components in BWR environments, has been applied to Alloy 600 and Alloy X-750 tested in deaerated pure water chemistry. A method is described whereby the crack growth rates measured in compact tension specimens can be used to estimate crack growth in a component. Good agreement was found between model prediction and measured SCC in X-750 threaded fasteners over a wide range of temperatures, stresses, and material condition. Most data support the basic assumption of this model that cracks initiate early in life. The evidence supporting a particular SCC mechanism is mixed. Electrochemical repassivation data and estimates of oxide fracture strain indicate that the slip dissolution model can account for the observed crack growth rates, provided primary rather than secondary creep rates are used. However, approximately 100 cross-sectional TEM foils of SCC cracks including crack tips reveal no evidence of enhanced plasticity or unique dislocation patterns at the crack tip or along the crack to support a classic slip dissolution mechanism. No voids, hydrides, or microcracks are found in the vicinity of the crack tips creating doubt about classic hydrogen related mechanisms. The bulk oxide films exhibit a surface oxide which is often different than the oxides found within a crack. Although bulk chromium concentration affects the rate of SCC, analytical data indicates the mechanism does not result from chromium depletion at the grain boundaries. The overall findings support a corrosion/dissolution mechanism but not one necessarily related to slip at the crack tip.

  5. Extreme stress gradient effects on microstructural fatigue crack propagation rates in Ni microbeams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadeghi-Tohidi, F.; Pierron, O. N.

    2015-05-01

    The fatigue crack propagation behavior of microstructurally small cracks growing under extreme stress gradients was investigated in Ni microbeams under fully reversed cyclic loading. A technique to calculate the crack growth rates in microbeams with two different normalized stress gradients (17% and 50% μm-1) is developed and validated. Decreasing crack propagation rates are observed over the first 2 μm, and the rates are more than 1 order of magnitude slower for the devices with 50% μm-1 stress gradients. This fundamental knowledge is critical to predict the fatigue reliability of advanced metallic microcomponents under bending such as in microelectromechanical systems or flexible/stretchable electronics.

  6. Stress corrosion cracking on irradiated 316 stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furutani, Gen; Nakajima, Nobuo; Konishi, Takao; Kodama, Mitsuhiro

    2001-02-01

    Tests on irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) were carried out by using cold-worked (CW) 316 stainless steel (SS) in-core flux thimble tubes which were irradiated up to 5×10 26 n/m 2 ( E>0.1 MeV) at 310°C in a Japanese PWR. Unirradiated thimble tube was also tested for comparison with irradiated tubes. Mechanical tests such as the tensile, hardness tests and metallographic observations were performed. The susceptibility to SCC was examined by the slow strain rate test (SSRT) under PWR primary water chemistry condition and compositional analysis on the grain boundary segregation was made. Significant changes in the mechanical properties due to irradiation such as a remarkable increase of strength and hardness, and a considerable reduction of elongation were seen. SSRT results revealed that the intergranular fracture ratio (%IGSCC) increased as dissolved hydrogen (DH) increased. In addition, SSRT results in argon gas atmosphere showed a small amount of intergranular cracking. The depletion of Fe, Cr, Mo and the enrichment of Ni and Si were observed in microchemical analyses on the grain boundary.

  7. 49 CFR 192.929 - What are the requirements for using Direct Assessment for Stress Corrosion Cracking (SCCDA)?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Assessment for Stress Corrosion Cracking (SCCDA)? 192.929 Section 192.929 Transportation Other Regulations... requirements for using Direct Assessment for Stress Corrosion Cracking (SCCDA)? (a) Definition. Stress... operator using direct assessment as an integrity assessment method to address stress corrosion cracking...

  8. 49 CFR 192.929 - What are the requirements for using Direct Assessment for Stress Corrosion Cracking (SCCDA)?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Assessment for Stress Corrosion Cracking (SCCDA)? 192.929 Section 192.929 Transportation Other Regulations... requirements for using Direct Assessment for Stress Corrosion Cracking (SCCDA)? (a) Definition. Stress... operator using direct assessment as an integrity assessment method to address stress corrosion cracking...

  9. 49 CFR 192.929 - What are the requirements for using Direct Assessment for Stress Corrosion Cracking (SCCDA)?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Assessment for Stress Corrosion Cracking (SCCDA)? 192.929 Section 192.929 Transportation Other Regulations... requirements for using Direct Assessment for Stress Corrosion Cracking (SCCDA)? (a) Definition. Stress... operator using direct assessment as an integrity assessment method to address stress corrosion cracking...

  10. 49 CFR 192.929 - What are the requirements for using Direct Assessment for Stress Corrosion Cracking (SCCDA)?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Assessment for Stress Corrosion Cracking (SCCDA)? 192.929 Section 192.929 Transportation Other Regulations... requirements for using Direct Assessment for Stress Corrosion Cracking (SCCDA)? (a) Definition. Stress... operator using direct assessment as an integrity assessment method to address stress corrosion cracking...

  11. Stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of 18 Ni maraging steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humphries, T. S.; Nelson, E. E.

    1974-01-01

    The stress corrosion cracking (SCC) resistance of 18Ni maraging steel (grades 200, 250, 300, and 350) was determined in 3.5 percent salt (NaCl) solution, synthetic sea water, high humidity, and outside MSFC atmosphere. All grades of the maraging steel were found to be susceptible to SCC in varying degrees according to their strengths, with the lowest strength steel (grade 200) being the least susceptible and the highest strength steel (grade 350), the most susceptible to SCC. The SCC resistance of 250 grade maraging steel was also evaluated in salt and salt-chromate solutions using fracture mechanics techniques. The threshold value, K sub SCC, was found to be approximately 44 MN/sq m square root m, (40 ksi square root in.) or 40 percent of the K sub Q value.

  12. Laser Peening of Alloy 600 to Improve Intergranular Stress Corrosion Cracking Resistance in Power Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, H; Rankin, J; Hackel, L; Frederick, G; Hickling, J; Findlan, S

    2004-04-20

    Laser peening is an emerging modern process that impresses a compressive stress into the surface of metals or alloys. This treatment can reduce the rate of intergranular stress corrosion cracking and fatigue cracking in structural metals or Alloy 600 needed for nuclear power plants.

  13. Correlation of the crack initiation stress with epoxy network topology

    SciTech Connect

    Adolf, D.; Weeks, T.; McCoy, J.

    1997-03-01

    Much controversy surrounds the dependence of stress intensity factor of glassy thermosets, epoxies in particular, with crosslink density. One could scan the literature and find references that claim K{sub Ic} increases with crosslink density, decreases with crosslink density, or is independent of crosslink density. The authors feel that two factors contribute to this confusion. First, a typical method for assessing this dependence relies on modifying the crosslink density by changing the precursor epoxy molecular weight. On the other hand, one could change stoichiometry or quench the reaction at intermediate extents of reaction to obtain large changes in crosslink density. However, most studies have not measured the resulting stress intensity factor of these partially cured systems at constant T-T{sub g}, where T{sub g} is the glass transition temperature of the epoxy. Since T{sub g} can change significantly with cure and since fracture processes at the crack tip are dissipative, they must work at constant T-T{sub g} to ensure that the nonlinear viscoelastic mechanisms are fairly compared. In this study, they quenched the reaction of the diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A (DGEBA) and diethanolamine (DEA) at various stages past the gel point and measured the three-point-bend stress intensity factor at a constant T-T{sub g} = {minus}50 C. The trend is clear and significant; increasing crosslink density directly increases the load-to-fail.

  14. Environmentally assisted cracking in Light Water Reactors: Semiannual report, April 1993--September 1993. Volume 17

    SciTech Connect

    Chopra, O.K.; Chung, H.M.; Karlsen, T.; Kassner, T.F.; Michaud, W.F.; Ruther, W.E.; Sanecki, J.E.; Shack, W.J.; Soppet, W.K.

    1994-06-01

    This report summarizes work performed by Argonne National Laboratory on fatigue and environmentally assisted cracking (EAC) in light water reactors (LWRS) during the six months from April 1993 to September 1993. EAC and fatigue of piping, pressure vessels, and core components in LWRs are important concerns as extended reactor lifetimes are envisaged. Topics that have been investigated include (a) fatigue of low-alloy steel used in piping, steam generators, and reactor pressure vessels; (b) EAC of cast stainless steels (SSs); and (c) radiation-induced segregation and irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking of Type 304 SS after accumulation of relatively high fluence. Fatigue tests were conducted on medium-sulfur-content A106-Gr B piping and A533-Gr B pressure vessel steels in simulated PWR water and in air. Additional crack growth data were obtained on fracture-mechanics specimens of cast austenitic SSs in the as-received and thermally aged conditions in simulated boiling-water reactor (BWR) water at 289{degree}C. The data were compared with predictions based on crack growth correlations for wrought austenitic SS in oxygenated water developed at ANL and rates in air from Section 11 of the ASME Code. Microchemical and microstructural changes in high- and commercial-purity Type 304 SS specimens from control-blade absorber tubes and a control-blade sheath from operating BWRs were studied by Auger electron spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy.

  15. Environmentally assisted cracking in light water reactors. Semiannual report, April 1994--September 1994, Volume 19

    SciTech Connect

    Chopra, O.K.; Chung, H.M.; Gavenda, D.J.

    1995-09-01

    This report summarizes work performed by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) on fatigue and environmentally assisted cracking (EAC) in light water reactors from April to September 1994. Topics that have been investigated include (a) fatigue of carbon and low-alloy steel used in piping and reactor pressure vessels, (b) EAC of austenitic stainless steels (SSs) and Alloy 600, and (c) irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) of Type 304 SS. Fatigue tests have been conducted on A106-Gr B and A533-Gr B steels in oxygenated water to determine whether a slow strain rate applied during different portions of a tensile-loading cycle are equally effective in decreasing fatigue life. Crack growth data were obtained on fracture-mechanics specimens of SSs and Alloy 600 to investigate EAC in simulated boiling water reactor (BWR) and pressurized water reactor environments at 289{degrees}C. The data were compared with predictions from crack growth correlations developed at ANL for SSs in water and from rates in air from Section XI of the ASME Code. Microchemical changes in high- and commercial-purity Type 304 SS specimens from control-blade absorber tubes and a control-blade sheath from operating BWRs were studied by Auger electron spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy to determine whether trace impurity elements may contribute to IASCC of these materials.

  16. The influence of microstructure on environmentally assisted cracking of alloy 718. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Ballinger, R.

    1996-03-01

    The goal of this project was to understand the effects of microstructure on the behavior of alloy 718 in aqueous environments. To achieve this goal the microstructure and resultant environmental properties of modified heat treatments were characterized. The role of grain boundary microstructure was emphasized. The performance of alloy 718, in both conventional and modified heat treatments, is also compared to existing data for the behavior of alloy X-750 in light water reactor environments. These comparisons were made with the goal of understanding the effects of alloy microstructure on performance. Four thermal treatments were investigated. Each condition was given an identical aging treatment (720 C/8h, furnace cool, 620 C/8h) to maintain equivalent precipitation of the strengthening precipitate, {gamma}{prime}. Annealing treatments were varied to control grain boundary precipitation. Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) resistance was determined using fatigue pre-cracked, bolt loaded specimens in high purity, deaerated water at 288 C. Reduced grain boundary precipitation substantially increases resistance to SCC for both grain sizes. The ADA condition showed no evidence of SCC for the environmental conditions studied. Alloy 718 direct aged (DA) also has superior SCC resistance relative to alloy X-750, an alloy more commonly used in light water reactor applications today. In corrosion fatigue crack growth experiments in high purity, deaerated water it was found that under all conditions studied the crack path was transgranular. Alloy 718 is not susceptible to accelerated, intergranular, corrosion fatigue crack growth at temperatures near 100 C as is alloy X-750 in some thermal treatments. This is most likely due to superior resistance to hydrogen embrittlement.

  17. Low-pH stress corrosion cracking of natural gas pipelines

    SciTech Connect

    Harle, B.A.; Beavers, J.A.; Jaske, C.E.

    1994-12-31

    Stress corrosion cracking of natural gas pipelines in low-pH environments is a serious problem for the gas transmission industry. To date, researchers have experienced significant difficulties in reproducing cracking in the laboratory. This paper describes results of an ongoing program investigating crack growth of an API X-65 line pipe steel in a low-pH cracking environment using a J-integral technique. The primary objectives of this research are to reproduce the cracking observed in the field and identify an appropriate crack driving force parameter. Significant crack growth has been observed in the testing and the J-integral appears to be a good parameter for characterizing crack growth behavior.

  18. Environmentally assisted cracking in light water reactors : semiannual report, July 2000 - December 2000.

    SciTech Connect

    Chopra, O. K.; Chung, H. M.; Gruber, E. E.; Shack, W. J.; Soppet, W. K.; Strain, R. V.; Energy Technology

    2002-04-01

    This report summarizes work performed by Argonne National Laboratory on fatigue and environmentally assisted cracking (EAC) in light water reactors (LWRs) from July 2000 to December 2000. Topics that have been investigated include (a) environmental effects on fatigue S-N behavior of primary pressure boundary materials, (b) irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) of austenitic stainless steels (SSs), and (c) EAC of Alloys 600 and 690. The fatigue strain-vs.-life data are summarized for the effects of various material, loading, and environmental parameters on the fatigue lives of carbon and low-alloy steels and austenitic SSs. Effects of the reactor coolant environment on the mechanism of fatigue crack initiation are discussed. Two methods for incorporating the effects of LWR coolant environments into the ASME Code fatigue evaluations are presented. Slow-strain-rate tensile tests and posttest fractographic analyses were conducted on several model SS alloys irradiated to {approx}0.9 x 10{sup 21} n {center_dot} cm{sup -2} (E > 1 MeV) in He at 289 C in the Halden reactor. The results were used to determine the influence of alloying and impurity elements on the susceptibility of these steels to IASCC. A fracture toughness J-R curve test was conducted on a commercial heat of Type 304 SS that was irradiated to {approx}2.0 x 10{sup 21} n {center_dot} cm{sup -2} in the Halden reactor. The results were compared with the data obtained earlier on steels irradiated to 0.3 and 0.9 x 10{sup 21} n {center_dot} cm{sup -2} (E > 1 MeV) (0.45 and 1.35 dpa). Neutron irradiation at 288 C was found to decrease the fracture toughness of austenitic SSs. Tests were conducted on compact-tension specimens of Alloy 600 under cyclic loading to evaluate the enhancement of crack growth rates in LWR environments. Then, the existing fatigue crack growth data on Alloys 600 and 690 were analyzed to establish the effects of temperature, load ratio, frequency, and stress intensity range

  19. Subcritical crack growth of Ti-6Al-4V at room temperature under high stress-ratio loading

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, J.P.

    1998-11-13

    Ti-6Al-4V is a two phase {alpha}-{beta} titanium alloy commonly used for turbine fan and compressor components. The crack growth behavior of Ti-6Al-4V and the role played by various material, mechanical, and environmental factors has been thoroughly investigated. This alloy is also susceptible to crack growth under sustained loading in air (SLC), and both hydrogen assisted cracking and low temperature creep mechanisms have been used to explain this susceptibility. Very little information is available on high R-ratio fatigue crack growth of Ti-6Al-4V and the role played by SLC on the fatigue process. In order to gain better understanding of the cracking behavior of this alloy under ripple loading conditions, room temperature, high stress-ratio (R {ge} 0.9) fatigue and SLC experiments have been conducted on a Ti-6Al-4V plate forging material in the duplex-annealed (DA) condition. The results of this investigation,namely, fatigue crack growth rates (CGR) as a function of stress intensity; SLC data; and scanning electron microscopy of the fatigue and SLC fracture surfaces are reported below.

  20. Computational two-dimensional modeling of the stress intensity factor in a cracked metallic material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rolón, J. E.; Cendales, E. D.; Cruz, I. M.

    2016-02-01

    Cracking of metallic engineering materials is of great importance due cost of replacing mechanical elements cracked and the danger of sudden structural failure of these elements. One of the most important parameters during consideration of the mechanical behavior of machine elements having cracking and that are subject to various stress conditions is the stress intensity factor near the crack tip called factor Kic. In this paper a computational model is developed for the direct assessment of stress concentration factor near to the crack tip and compared with the results obtained in the literature in which other models have been established, which consider continuity of the displacement of the crack tip (XBEM). Based on this numerical approximation can be establish that computational XBEM method has greater accuracy in Kic values obtained than the model implemented by the method of finite elements for the virtual nodal displacement through plateau function.

  1. A plane stress finite element model for elastic-plastic mode I/II crack growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, Mark Anthony

    A finite element program has been developed to perform quasi-static, elastic-plastic crack growth simulations. The model provides a general framework for mixed-mode I/II elastic-plastic fracture analysis using small strain assumptions and plane stress, plane strain, and axisymmetric finite elements. Cracks are modeled explicitly in the mesh. As the cracks propagate, automatic remeshing algorithms delete the mesh local to the crack tip, extend the crack, and build a new mesh around the new tip. State variable mapping algorithms transfer stresses and displacements from the old mesh to the new mesh. The von Mises material model is implemented in the context of a non-linear Newton solution scheme. The fracture criterion is the critical crack tip opening displacement, and crack direction is predicted by the maximum tensile stress criterion at the crack tip. The implementation can accommodate multiple curving and interacting cracks. An additional fracture algorithm based on nodal release can be used to simulate fracture along a horizontal plane of symmetry. A core of plane strain elements can be used with the nodal release algorithm to simulate the triaxial state of stress near the crack tip. Verification and validation studies compare analysis results with experimental data and published three-dimensional analysis results. Fracture predictions using nodal release for compact tension, middle-crack tension, and multi-site damage test specimens produced accurate results for residual strength and link-up loads. Curving crack predictions using remeshing/mapping were compared with experimental data for an Arcan mixed-mode specimen. Loading angles from 0 degrees to 90 degrees were analyzed. The maximum tensile stress criterion was able to predict the crack direction and path for all loading angles in which the material failed in tension. Residual strength was also accurately predicted for these cases.

  2. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Investigation of the Stress Corrosion Cracking in Nickel-Base Alloys, Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    Bruemmer, Stephen M.; Toloczko, Mychailo B.; Olszta, Matthew J.

    2012-03-01

    The objective of this program is to evaluate the primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) susceptibility of high chromium alloy 690 and its weld metals, establish quantitative measurements of crack-growth rates and determine relationships among cracking susceptibility, environmental conditions and metallurgical characteristics. Stress-corrosion, crack-growth rates have been determined for 12 alloy 690 specimens, 11 alloy 152/52/52M weld metal specimens, 4 alloy 52M/182 overlay specimens and 2 alloy 52M/82 inlay specimens in simulated PWR primary water environments. The alloy 690 test materials included three different heats of extruded control-rod-drive mechanism (CRDM) tubing with variations in the initial material condition and degree of cold work for one heat. Two cold-rolled (CR) alloy 690 plate heats were also obtained and evaluated enabling comparisons to the CR CRDM materials. Weld metal, overlay and inlay specimens were machined from industry mock ups to provide plant-representative materials for testing. Specimens have been tested for one alloy 152 weld, two alloy 52 welds and three alloy 52M welds. The overlay and inlay specimens were prepared to propagate stress-corrosion cracks from the alloy 182 or 82 material into the more resistant alloy 52M. In all cases, crack extension was monitored in situ by direct current potential drop (DCPD) with length resolution of about +1 µm making it possible to measure extremely low growth rates approaching 5x10-10 mm/s. Most SCC tests were performed at 325-360°C with hydrogen concentrations from 11-29 cc/kg; however, environmental conditions were modified during a few experiments to evaluate the influence of temperature, water chemistry or electrochemical potential on propagation rates. In addition, low-temperature (~50°C) cracking behavior was examined for selected alloy 690 and weld metal specimens. Extensive characterizations have been performed on material microstructures and stress-corrosion cracks by

  3. Three-Orthogonal-Direction Stress Mapping around a Fatigue-Crack Tip Using Neutron Diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, E.-Wen; Lee, Soo Yeol; Woo, Wanchuck; Lee, Kuan-Wei

    2012-08-01

    Quantitative determination of the stress fields around the crack tip is a challenging and important subject to understand the fatigue crack-growth mechanism. In the current study, we measured the distribution of residual stresses and the evolution of the stress fields around a fatigue crack tip subjected to the constant-amplitude cyclic loading in a 304L stainless steel compact-tension (CT) specimen. The three orthogonal stress components ( i.e., crack growth, crack opening, and through thickness) of the CT specimen were determined as a function of distance from the crack tip with 1-mm spatial resolution along the crack-propagation direction. In-situ neutron-diffraction results show that the enlarged tensile stresses were developed during loading along the through-thickness direction at a localized volume close to the crack tip, resulting in the lattice expansion in all three orthogonal directions during P max. The current study suggests that the atypical plane strainlike behavior observed at the midthickness position might be the reason for the mechanism of the faster crack-growth rate inside the interior than that near the surface.

  4. Crack

    MedlinePlus

    ... sound the drug makes as it heats up. Short-Term Effects Crack is a stimulant that is absorbed through ... quickly, after about 5 or 10 minutes. Other short-term effects include: higher heart rate, breathing rate, blood pressure , ...

  5. Effect of stress corrosion cracking on integrity and remaining life of natural gas pipelines

    SciTech Connect

    Jaske, C.E.; Beavers, J.A.; Harle, B.A.

    1996-08-01

    External stress-corrosion cracking of pipelines is a serious problem for the gas transmission industry. Longitudinal cracks initiate on the outside surface of the pipe and link up to form flaws that, in some cases, can lead to pipe rupture. This paper presents a model that quantifies the effect of stress-corrosion cracking on pipe failure stress. The model is an extension of those that have been developed for oil and gas pipelines and considers both flow-stress and fracture-toughness dependent failure modes. A methodology also is presented to calculate the remaining life of a pipeline containing flaws of known size.

  6. Environmentally assisted cracking in light water reactors annual report January - December 2005.

    SciTech Connect

    Alexandreanu, B.; Chen, Y.; Chopra, O. K.; Chung, H. M.; Gruber, E. E.; Shack, W. J.; Soppet, W. K.

    2007-08-31

    This report summarizes work performed from January to December 2005 by Argonne National Laboratory on fatigue and environmentally assisted cracking in light water reactors (LWRs). Existing statistical models for estimating the fatigue life of carbon and low-alloy steels and austenitic stainless steels (SSs) as a function of material, loading, and environmental conditions were updated. Also, the ASME Code fatigue adjustment factors of 2 on stress and 20 on life were critically reviewed to assess the possible conservatism in the current choice of the margins. An approach, based on an environmental fatigue correction factor, for incorporating the effects of LWR environments into ASME Section III fatigue evaluations is discussed. The susceptibility of austenitic stainless steels and their welds to irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) is being evaluated as a function of the fluence level, water chemistry, material chemistry, and fabrication history. For this task, crack growth rate (CGR) tests and slow strain rate tensile (SSRT) tests are being conducted on various austenitic SSs irradiated in the Halden boiling water reactor. The SSRT tests are currently focused on investigating the effects of the grain boundary engineering process on the IASCC of the austenitic SSs. The CGR tests were conducted on Type 316 SSs irradiated to 0.45-3.0 dpa, and on sensitized Type 304 SS and SS weld heat-affected-zone material irradiated to 2.16 dpa. The CGR tests on materials irradiated to 2.16 dpa were followed by a fracture toughness test in a water environment. The effects of material composition, irradiation, and water chemistry on growth rates are discussed. The susceptibility of austenitic SS core internals to IASCC and void swelling is also being evaluated for pressurized water reactors. Both SSRT tests and microstructural examinations are being conducted on specimens irradiated in the BOR-60 reactor in Russia to doses up to 20 dpa. Crack growth rate data

  7. EFFECT OF UNBROKEN LIGAMENTS ON STRESS CORROSION CRACKING BEHAVIOR OF ALLOY 82H WELDS

    SciTech Connect

    Mills, W.J. and Brown, C.M.

    2003-02-20

    Previously reported stress corrosion cracking (SCC) rates for Alloy 82H gas-tungsten-arc welds tested in 360 C water showed tremendous variability. The excessive data scatter was attributed to the variations in microstructure, mechanical properties and residual stresses that are common in welds. In the current study, however, re-evaluation of the SCC data revealed that the large data scatter was an anomaly due to erroneous crack growth rates inferred from crack mouth opening displacement (CMOD) measurements. Apparently, CMOD measurements provided reasonably accurate SCC rates for some specimens, but grossly overestimated rates in others. The overprediction was associated with large unbroken ligaments that often form in welds in the wake of advancing crack fronts. When ligaments were particularly large, they prevented crack mouth deflection, so apparent crack incubation times (i.e. period of time before crack advance commences) based on CMOD measurements were unrealistically long. During the final states of testing, ligaments began to separate allowing the crack mouth to open rather quickly. This behavior was interpreted as a rapid crack advance, but it actually reflects the ligament separation rate, not the SCC rate. Revised crack growth rates obtained in this study exhibit substantially less scatter than that previously reported. The effects of crack orientation and fatigue flutter loading on SCC rates in 82H welds are also discussed.

  8. Avalanche structural rearrangement through cracking-healing in weakly stressed cold dusty plasma liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Chi; Wang, Wen; I, Lin

    2016-01-01

    We experimentally investigate the spatiotemporal dynamical behaviors of the avalanche structural rearrangement through micro-cracking-healing in weakly stressed cold dusty plasma liquids, and the kinetic origins for their different spatial and temporal classifications. The crystalline ordered domains can be cracked or temporarily sustain and transfer the weak stress to remote regions for cracking-healing. It is found that cracking sites form a fractal network with cluster size following power law distribution in the x y t space. The histograms of the persistent times for sustaining regional ordered and disordered structure, the temporal cracking burst width, and quiescent time between two bursts all follow power law decays with fast descending tails. Cracking can be classified into a single temporal burst with simple line like spatial patterns and the successive cracking fluctuation with densely packed cracking clusters. For an ordered region, whether the Burgers vectors of the incoming dislocations from the boundary allow direct dislocation reduction is the key for the above two classifications through cracking a large ordered domain into medium scale corotating ordered domains or small patches. The low regional structural order at the end of a cracking burst can be regarded as an alarm for predicting the short quiescent period before the next cracking burst.

  9. Defenseive Structuring and Environmental Stress

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siegel, Bernard J.

    1970-01-01

    This essay explores a kind of adaptation, referred to as defenseive structuring, that recurs with great regularity among groups that perceive themselves as exposed to environmental stress of long duration with which they cannot cope directly and aggressively." (Author)

  10. The Sulfide Stress Corrosion Cracking Characteristics of the Pipe Weld in the Petrochemical Plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Gyu Young; Bae, Dong Ho

    Sulfide stress corrosion cracking (SSCC) in crude oil field environment including hydrogen sulfide (H2S) has been recognized as a materials failure mechanism. Welding residual stress generation and metallurgical change by fusion welding process increase the cracking driving force and reduce the resistance of brittle fracture as well as environmental fracture. On the base of this understanding, firstly, we analyzed welding residual stresses of welded ASTM A106 Gr B steel pipe using in the petrochemical plant. And next, SSCC tests were conducted to assess SSCC resistance of the weld with smooth specimens. From the result, influence of temperature on corrosion rate was sensitive in order of HAZ, base metal and weld metal. Therefore, the most sensitive region in the weld is HAZ, and its corrosion rate increases with the temperature of corrosion environment increase. And failure positions of the most cases among failed specimens were at HAZ of the weld. Low limit (σSSCC) of A106 Gr B steel pipe was assessed as 0.6 σy (7271.6N)

  11. Microstructural and Microchemical Characterization of Dual Step Aged Alloy X-750 and its Relationship to Environmentally Assisted Cracking

    SciTech Connect

    G.A. Young; N. Lewis; M. Hanson; W. Matuszyk; B. Wiersma; S. Gonzalez

    2001-05-08

    When exposed to deaerated high purity water, Alloy X-750 is susceptible to both high temperature (> 249 C) intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) and intergranular low temperature (< 149 C) fracture (LTF). However, the microstructural and microchemical factors that govern environmentally assisted cracking (EAC) susceptibility are poorly understood. The present study seeks to characterize the grain boundary microstructure and microchemistry in order to gain a better mechanistic understanding of stress corrosion crack initiation, crack growth rate, and low temperature fracture. Light microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, orientation imaging microscopy, scanning Auger microscopy, and thermal desorption spectroscopy were performed on selected heats of Alloy X-750 AH. These data were correlated to EAC tests performed in 338 C deaerated water. Results show that grain boundary MC-type [(Ti,Nb)C] carbides and increased levels of grain boundary phosphorus correlate with an increase in LTF susceptibility but have little effect on the number of initiation sites or the SCC crack growth rate. Thermal desorption data show that multiple hydrogen trapping states exist in Alloy X-750 condition AH. Moreover, it appears that exposure to high temperature (> 249 C), hydrogen deaerated water increases the hydrogen concentration in strong hydrogen trap states and degrades the resistance of the material to low temperature fracture. These findings are consistent with a hydrogen embrittlement based mechanism of LTF where intergranular fracture occurs ahead of a crack tip and is exacerbated by phosphorus segregation to grain boundaries and grain boundary hydrogen trap states.

  12. Glass wool-H2O2/CoCl2 test system for in vitro evaluation of biodegradative stress cracking in polyurethane elastomers.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Q; Casas-Bejar, J; Urbanski, P; Stokes, K

    1995-04-01

    Environmental stress cracking (ESC) in polyetherurethanes has been demonstrated in animal models. However, duplication of this phenomenon in vitro has been a challenge. The glass wool-H2O2/CoCl2 test system was designed to provide oxidation components found in vivo, i.e., hydroxyl radical (HO.), molecular oxygen (O2), and superoxide (O2-.) required for auto-oxidation of polyetherurethanes. The in vitro test is not only reliable in duplicating the characteristics of in vivo stress cracking in polyetherurethanes at 37 degrees C, but also accelerates ESC as much as seven times. The test results on several types of polyurethanes showed that Tecothane 80A was as vulnerable to biodegradative stress cracking in vitro as Pellethane 2363-80A, while the new generation of polyurethanes, Corethane, demonstrated great resistance against stress cracking. PMID:7622531

  13. Measuring Environmental Stress

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, John E.; Dahm, Douglas B.

    1975-01-01

    Infrared remote sensors, plus photometric interpretation and digital data analysis are being used to record the stresses on air, water, vegetation and soil. Directly recorded photographic information has been the most effective recording media for remote sensing. (BT)

  14. Temperature and environmentally assisted cracking in low alloy steel

    SciTech Connect

    Auten, T.A.; Monter, J.V.

    1995-04-01

    Environmental assisted cracking (EAC) can be defined as the propagation of fatigue cracks in water at rates from 3 to over 40 times the growth rates in air. For low alloy steels with sulfur contents > 0.0125% by weight, EAC is normal behavior in the 240 to 290C range. However, literature yields mixed results for low alloy steels with compositions just below this sulfur level; some reports indicate EAC while others do not. Also, several authors have reported an increased tendency toward EAC when the water temperatures were lowered. In the present work, five ASTM A 508 Class 2 forgings with ladle and check analyses that ranged from 0.010 to 0.019 wt% S were tested in high purity deaerated water in the temperature range of 93 to 260C. At 260C these forgings did not exhibit EAC, reinforcing earlier results for two similar forgings. This broad sampling indicates strong resistance to EAC for this class of forging at 260C. On the other hand, EAC occurred consistently in the three of these forgings that were tested below 204C, provided the test conditions (loading frequency, {Delta}K, and R) were high enough to produce a high baseline fatigue crack growth rate (FCGR), where the baseline FCGR is that expected in air. At 149C, EAC occurred at test conditions that combined to yield a baseline FCGR greater than {approx}2E-6 mm/s. At 204, 121, and 93C, this critical crack growth rate appeared to shift to lower baseline values. The EAC that occurred at lower temperatures was a factor of 3 to 12 times higher than baseline air rates, which was not as strong as the effect for higher sulfur steels at 240 to 290C. Also, no plateau in the growth rates occurred as it does with the higher sulfur steels. In another approach, EAC was induced at 93 and at 260C by raising the dissolved oxygen content of the water from <10 to >15 ppb.

  15. Stress intensity factors of eccentric cracks in bi-materials plate under mode I loading

    SciTech Connect

    Ismail, A. E.

    2015-05-15

    Bi-material plates were generally used to joint electronic devices or mechanical components requiring dissimilar materials to be attached. During services, mechanical failure can be occurred due to the formation of cracks at the interfacial joint or away from the centre. Generally, linear elastic fracture mechanics approach is used to characterize these cracks based on stress intensity factors (SIF). Based on the literature survey, the SIFs for the central cracks were easily available. However, the SIFs for eccentric cracks were difficult to obtain. Therefore, this paper presented the SIFs for eccentric cracks subjected to mode I tension loading. Three important parameters were used such as relative crack depth, a/L, relative offset distance, b/L and elastic mismatch, E{sub 1}/E{sub 2} or α. It was found that such parameters significantly affected the characteristic of SIFs and it was depend on the location of cracks.

  16. A metallurgical evaluation of stress corrosion cracking in large diameter stainless steel piping

    SciTech Connect

    Wheeler, D.A.; Rawl, D.E. Jr.; Louthan, M.R. Jr.

    1990-01-01

    Ultrasonic testing (UT) of the stainless steel piping in the primary coolant water system of SRS reactors indicates the presence of short, partly-through-wall stress corrosion cracks in the heat-affected zone of approximately 7% of the circumferential pipe welds. These cracks are thought to develop by intergranular nucleation and mixed mode propagation. Metallographic evaluations have confirmed the UT indications of crack size and provided evidence that crack growth involved the accumulation of chloride inside the growing crack. It is postulated that the development of an oxygen depletion cell inside the crack results in the migration of chloride ions to the crack tip to balance the accumulation of positively charged metallic ions. The results of this metallurgicial evaluation, combined with structural assessments of system integrity, support the existence of leak-before-break conditions in the SRS reactor piping system. 13 refs., 9 figs.

  17. Influence of stress intensity and loading mode on intergranular stress corrosion cracking of Alloy 600 in primary waters of pressurized water reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Rebak, R.B.; Szklarska-Smialowska, Z. . Fontana Corrosion Center)

    1994-05-01

    The steam generator in a pressurized water reactor (PWR) of a nuclear power plant consists mainly of a shell made of carbon (C) steel and tubes made of alloy 600 (UNS N06600). However, alloy 600 suffers environmentally induced cracking with exposure to high-temperature primary water. The susceptibility of alloy 600 to integranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) was investigated as a function of the level of applied stresses and mode of loading. Constant load tests were conducted with specimens prepared from thin wall tubes, and constant deformation tests were conducted using specimens prepared from plates. With tubes exposed to primary water at 330 C, the crack propagation rate (CPR) was found to increase from 1 [times] 10[sup [minus]11] m/s at a stress intensity (K[sub i]) of 10 MPa[radical]m to 1 [times] 10[sup [minus]9] at K[sub i] = 60 MPa[radical]m. CPR obtained using compact specimens prepared from plates were 1 order of magnitude lower than values measured in tubes at the same temperature and in the same solution at each stress intensity. The corollary was that values of crack propagation and threshold stress intensities obtained using compact specimens could not be extrapolated to the behavior of thin wall tubes.

  18. Cessation of environmentally-assisted cracking in a low-alloy steel: Theoretical analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Wire, G.L.

    1997-02-01

    Environmentally Assisted Cracking (EAC) can cause increases in fatigue crack growth rates of 40 to 100 times the rate in air for low alloy steels. The increased rates can lead to very large predicted crack growth. EAC is activated by a critical level of dissolved sulfides at the crack tip. Sulfide inclusions (MnS) in the steel produce corrosive sulfides in solution following exposure by a growing crack. In stagnant, low oxygen water conditions considered here, diffusion is the dominant mass transport mechanism acting to change the sulfide concentration within the crack. The average crack tip velocity is below the level required to produce the critical crack tip sulfide ion concentration required for EAC. Crack extension analyses also consider the breakthrough of large, hypothetical embedded defects with the attendant large freshly exposed sulfide inventory. Combrade et al. noted that a large inventory of undissolved metallurgical sulfides on crack flanks could trigger EAC, but did not quantify the effects. Diffusion analysis is extended herein to cover breakthrough of embedded defects with large sulfide inventories. The mass transport via diffusion is limited by the sulfide solubility. As a result, deep cracks in high sulfur steels are predicted to retain undissolved sulfides for extended but finite periods of time t{sub diss} which increase with the crack length and the metallurgical sulfide content in the steel. The analysis shows that the duration of EAC is limited to t{sub diss} providing V{sub eac}, the crack tip velocity associated with EAC is less than V{sub In}, the crack tip velocity below which EAC will not occur in an initially sulfide free crack. This condition on V{sub eac} need only be met for a short time following crack cleanup to turn off EAC. The predicted crack extension due to limited duration of EAC is a small fraction of the initial embedded defect size and would not greatly change calculated crack depths.

  19. POTENTIAL FOR STRESS CORROSION CRACKING OF A537 CARBON STEEL NUCLEAR WASTE TANKS CONTAINING HIGHLY CAUSTIC SOLUTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Lam, P.; Stripling, C.; Fisher, D.; Elder, J.

    2010-04-26

    The evaporator recycle streams of nuclear waste tanks may contain waste in a chemistry and temperature regime that exceeds the current corrosion control program, which imposes temperature limits to mitigate caustic stress corrosion cracking (CSCC). A review of the recent service history found that two of these A537 carbon steel tanks were operated in highly concentrated hydroxide solution at high temperature. Visual inspections, experimental testing, and a review of the tank service history have shown that CSCC has occurred in uncooled/un-stress relieved tanks of similar construction. Therefore, it appears that the efficacy of stress relief of welding residual stress is the primary corrosion-limiting mechanism. The objective of this experimental program is to test A537 carbon steel small scale welded U-bend specimens and large welded plates (30.48 x 30.38 x 2.54 cm) in a caustic solution with upper bound chemistry (12 M hydroxide and 1 M each of nitrate, nitrite, and aluminate) and temperature (125 C). These conditions simulate worst-case situations in these nuclear waste tanks. Both as-welded and stress-relieved specimens have been tested. No evidence of stress corrosion cracking was found in the U-bend specimens after 21 days of testing. The large plate test was completed after 12 weeks of immersion in a similar solution at 125 C except that the aluminate concentration was reduced to 0.3 M. Visual inspection of the plate revealed that stress corrosion cracking had not initiated from the machined crack tips in the weld or in the heat affected zone. NDE ultrasonic testing also confirmed subsurface cracking did not occur. Based on these results, it can be concluded that the environmental condition of these tests was unable to develop stress corrosion cracking within the test periods for the small welded U-bends and for the large plates, which were welded with an identical procedure as used in the construction of the actual nuclear waste tanks in the 1960s. The

  20. The initiation of environmentally-assisted cracking in semi-elliptical surface cracks

    SciTech Connect

    James, L.A.

    1997-02-01

    A criterion to predict under what conditions EAC would Initiate In cracks In a high-sulfur steel in contact with low-oxygen water was recently proposed by Wire and U. This EAC Initiation Criterion was developed using transient analyses for the diffusion of sulfides plus experimental test results. The experiments were conducted mainly on compact tension-type specimens with initial crack depths of about 2.54 mm. The present paper expands upon the work of Wire and U by presenting results for significantly deeper initial semi-elliptical surface cracks. In addition, in one specimen, the surface crack penetrated weld-deposited cladding into the high-sulfur steel. The results for the semi-elliptical surface cracks agreed quite well with the EAC Initiation Criterion, and provide confirmation of the applicability of the criterion to crack configurations with more restricted access to water.

  1. Cooling-dominated cracking in thermally stressed volcanic rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Browning, John; Meredith, Philip; Gudmundsson, Agust

    2016-08-01

    Most studies of thermally induced cracking in rocks have focused on the generation of cracks formed during heating and thermal expansion. Both the nature and the mechanism of crack formation during cooling are hypothesized to be different from those formed during heating. We present in situ acoustic emission data recorded as a proxy for crack damage evolution in a series of heating and cooling experiments on samples of basalt and dacite. Results show that both the rate and the energy of acoustic emission are consistently much higher during cooling than during heating. Seismic velocity comparisons and crack morphology analysis of our heated and cooled samples support the contemporaneous acoustic emission data and also indicate that thermal cracking is largely isotropic. These new data are important for assessing the contribution of cooling-induced damage within volcanic structures and layers such as dikes, sills, and lava flows.

  2. Effect of surface stress on stress intensity factors of a nanoscale crack via double cantilever beam model.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hua; Li, Xianfang; Tang, Guojin; Shen, Zhibin

    2013-01-01

    This paper studies the influence of surface elasticity on crack growth for a nanoscale crack advance. A crack is modeled as a double cantilever beam with consideration of surface stress. Using the Euler-Bernoulli beam theory incorporating with surface effects, a governing equation of static bending is derived and bending solution of a cantilever nanowire is obtained for a concentrated force at the free end. Based on the viewpoint of energy balance, the elastic strain energy is given and energy release rate is determined. The influences of the Surface stress and the surface elasticity on crack growth are discussed. Obtained results indicate that consideration of the surface effects decreases stress intensity factors or energy release rates. The residual surface tension impedes propagation of a nanoscale crack and apparent fracture toughness of nanoscale materials is effectively enhanced. PMID:23646757

  3. Transient thermal stresses in a reinforced hollow disk or cylinder containing a radial crack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tang, R.; Erdogan, F.

    1983-01-01

    The transient thermal stress problem in a hollow cylinder or a disk containing a radial crack is considered. It is assumed that the cylinder is reinforced on its inner boundary by a membrane which has thermoelastic constants different than those of the base material. The transient temperature, thermal stresses and the crack tip stress intensity factors are calculated in a cylinder which is subjected to a sudden change of temperature on the inside surface. The results are obtained for various dimensionless parameters and material constants. The special cases of the crack terminating at the cylinder-membrane interface and of the broken membrane are separately considered and some examples are given.

  4. Transient thermal stresses in a reinforced hollow disk or cylinder containing a radial crack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tang, R.; Erdogan, F.

    1984-01-01

    The transient thermal stress problem in a hollow cylinder or a disk containing a radial crack is considered. It is assumed that the cylinder is reinforced on its inner boundary by a membrane which has thermoelastic constants different than those of the base material. The transient temperature, thermal stresses and the crack tip stress intensity factors are calculated in a cylinder which is subjected to a sudden change of temperature on the inside surface. The results are obtained for various dimensionless parameters and material constants. The special cases of the crack terminating at the cylinder-membrane interface and of the broken membrane are separately considered and some examples are given.

  5. Three-dimensional elastic stress and displacement analysis of finite geometry solids containing cracks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kring, J.; Gyekenyesi, J.; Mendelson, A.

    1977-01-01

    The line method of analysis is applied to the Navier-Cauchy equations of elastic equilibrium to calculate the displacement fields in finite geometry bars containing central, surface, and double-edge cracks under extensionally applied uniform loading. The application of this method to these equations leads to coupled sets of simultaneous ordinary differential equations whose solutions are obtained along sets of lines in a discretized region. Normal stresses and the stress intensity factor variation along the crack periphery are calculated using the obtained displacement field. The reported results demonstrate the usefulness of this method in calculating stress intensity factors for commonly encountered crack geometries in finite solids.

  6. Stress Corrosion Cracking Behavior at Inconel and Low Alloy Steel Weld Interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomota, Yo; Daikuhara, Shin; Nagayama, Shun; Sugawara, Masanori; Ozawa, Norihiko; Adachi, Yoshitaka; Harjo, Stefanus; Hattori, Shigeo

    2014-12-01

    Three-dimensional microstructure observations, macro- to micro-scopic residual stress measurements by three methods and creviced bent beam SCC tests were performed for Inconel/low alloy steel (LAS) weld samples. The possible reasons for the suppression of SCC crack propagation near the weld interface found at a nuclear power plant were estimated to include the crack branching at the grain boundary (GB) parallel to the interface, i.e., Type II GB, compressive residual stresses in the LAS region and crack tip oxidation in the LAS at the interface. The formation mechanism of Type II GB and stress gradient in individual grains in the Inconel are also discussed.

  7. Stress Corrosion Cracking Behavior at Inconel and Low Alloy Steel Weld Interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomota, Yo; Daikuhara, Shin; Nagayama, Shun; Sugawara, Masanori; Ozawa, Norihiko; Adachi, Yoshitaka; Harjo, Stefanus; Hattori, Shigeo

    2014-09-01

    Three-dimensional microstructure observations, macro- to micro-scopic residual stress measurements by three methods and creviced bent beam SCC tests were performed for Inconel/low alloy steel (LAS) weld samples. The possible reasons for the suppression of SCC crack propagation near the weld interface found at a nuclear power plant were estimated to include the crack branching at the grain boundary (GB) parallel to the interface, i.e., Type II GB, compressive residual stresses in the LAS region and crack tip oxidation in the LAS at the interface. The formation mechanism of Type II GB and stress gradient in individual grains in the Inconel are also discussed.

  8. The Evolution of Stress Intensity Factors and the Propagation of Cracks in Elastic Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedman, Avner; Hu, Bei; Velazquez, Juan J. L.

    When a crack Γs propagates in an elastic medium the stress intensity factors evolve with the tip x(s) of Γs. In this paper we derive formulae which describe the evolution of these stress intensity factors for a homogeneous isotropic elastic medium under plane strain conditions. Denoting by ψ=ψ(x,s) the stress potential (ψ is biharmonic and has zero traction along the crack Γs) and by κ(s) the curvature of the crack at the tip x(s), we prove that the stress intensity factors A1(s), A2(s), as functions of s, satisfy: where , are stress intensity factors of the tangential derivative of in the polar coordinate system at x(s) with θ=0 in the direction of the crack at x(s). The case of antiplane shearing is also briefly considered; in this case ψ is harmonic.

  9. Stress intensity factors in a cracked infinite elastic wedge loaded by a rigid punch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erdogan, F.; Civelek, M. B.

    1978-01-01

    A plane elastic wedge-shaped solid was split through the application of a rigid punch. It was assumed that the coefficient of friction on the the contact area was constant, and the problem had a plane of symmetry with respect to loading and geometry, with the crack in the plane of symmetry. The problem was formulated in terms of a system of integral equations with the contact stress and the derivative of the crack surface displacement as the unknown functions. The solution was obtained for an internal crack and for an edge crack. The results include primarily the stress intensity factors at the crack tips, and the measure of the stress singularity at the wedge apex, and at the end points of the contact area.

  10. Numerical simulation of stress amplification induced by crack interaction in human femur bone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alia, Noor; Daud, Ruslizam; Ramli, Mohammad Fadzli; Azman, Wan Zuki; Faizal, Ahmad; Aisyah, Siti

    2015-05-01

    This research is about numerical simulation using a computational method which study on stress amplification induced by crack interaction in human femur bone. Cracks in human femur bone usually occur because of large load or stress applied on it. Usually, the fracture takes longer time to heal itself. At present, the crack interaction is still not well understood due to bone complexity. Thus, brittle fracture behavior of bone may be underestimated and inaccurate. This study aims to investigate the geometrical effect of double co-planar edge cracks on stress intensity factor (K) in femur bone. This research focuses to analyze the amplification effect on the fracture behavior of double co-planar edge cracks, where numerical model is developed using computational method. The concept of fracture mechanics and finite element method (FEM) are used to solve the interacting cracks problems using linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM) theory. As a result, this study has shown the identification of the crack interaction limit (CIL) and crack unification limit (CUL) exist in the human femur bone model developed. In future research, several improvements will be made such as varying the load, applying thickness on the model and also use different theory or method in calculating the stress intensity factor (K).

  11. Three dimensional observations and modelling of intergranular stress corrosion cracking in austenitic stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marrow, T. J.; Babout, L.; Jivkov, A. P.; Wood, P.; Engelberg, D.; Stevens, N.; Withers, P. J.; Newman, R. C.

    2006-06-01

    Stress corrosion cracking is a life-limiting factor in many components of nuclear power plant in which failure of structural components presents a substantial hazard to both safety and economic performance. Uncertainties in the kinetics of short crack behaviour can have a strong influence on lifetime prediction, and arise due both to the complexity of the underlying mechanisms and to the difficulties of making experimental observations. This paper reports on an on-going research programme into the dynamics and morphology of intergranular stress corrosion cracking in austenitic stainless steels in simulated light water environments, which makes use of recent advances in high resolution X-ray microtomography. In particular in situ, three dimensional X-ray tomographic images of intergranular stress corrosion crack nucleation and growth in sensitised austenitic stainless steel provide evidence for the development of crack bridging ligaments, caused by the resistance of non-sensitised special grain boundaries. In parallel a simple grain bridging model, introduced to quantify the effect of crack bridging on crack development, has been assessed for thermo-mechanically processed microstructures via statically loaded room temperature simulant solution tests and as well as high temperature/pressure autoclave studies. Thermo-mechanical treatments have been used to modify the grain size, grain boundary character and triple junction distributions, with a consequent effect on crack behaviour. Preliminary three-dimensional finite element models of intergranular crack propagation have been developed, with the aim of investigating the development of crack bridging and its effects on crack propagation and crack coalescence.

  12. Hydrogen Cracking and Stress Corrosion of Pressure Vessel Steel ASTM A543

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    AlShawaf, Ali Hamad

    The purpose of conducting this research is to develop fundamental understanding of the weldability of the modern Quenched and Tempered High Strength Low Alloy (Q&T HSLA) steel, regarding the cracking behavior and susceptibility to environmental cracking in the base metal and in the heat affected zone (HAZ) when welded. A number of leaking cracks developed in the girth welds of the pressure vessel after a short time of upgrading the material from plain carbon steel to Q&T HSLA steel. The new vessels were constructed to increase the production of the plant and also to save weight for the larger pressure vessel. The results of this research study will be used to identify safe welding procedure and design more weldable material. A standardized weldability test known as implant test was constructed and used to study the susceptibility of the Q&T HSLA steel to hydrogen cracking. The charged hydrogen content for each weld was recorded against the applied load during weldability testing. The lack of understanding in detail of the interaction between hydrogen and each HAZ subzone in implant testing led to the need of developing the test to obtain more data about the weldability. The HAZ subzones were produced using two techniques: standard furnace and GleebleRTM machine. These produced subzones were pre-charged with hydrogen to different levels of concentration. The hydrogen charging on the samples simulates prior exposure of the material to high humidity environment during welding process. Fractographical and microstructural characterization of the HAZ subzones were conducted using techniques such as SEM (Scanning Electron Microscopy). A modified implant test using the mechanical tensile machine was also used to observe the effects of the hydrogen on the cracking behavior of each HAZ subzone. All the experimental weldability works were simulated and validated using a commercial computational software, SYSWELD. The computational simulation of implant testing of Q&T HSLA

  13. Surface Cracking and Interface Reaction Associated Delamination Failure of Thermal and Environmental Barrier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dongming; Choi, Sung R.; Eldridge, Jeffrey I.; Lee, Kang N.; Miller, Robert A.

    1990-01-01

    In this paper, surface cracking and interface reactions of a ZrO2-8wt%Y2O3 and mullite/BSAS/Si thermal and environmental barrier coating system on SiC/SiC ceramic matrix composites were characterized after long-term combined laser thermal gradient and furnace cyclic tests in a water vapor containing environment. The surface cracking was analyzed based on the coating thermal gradient sintering behavior and thermal expansion mismatch stress characteristics under the thermal cyclic conditions. The interface reactions that were largely enhanced by the coating surface cracking in the water vapor environment were investigated in detail, and the reaction phases were identified for the coating system after the long-term exposure. The accelerated coating delamination failure was attributed to the increased delamination driving force under the thermal gradient cyclic loading and the reduced interface adhesion due to the detrimental interface reactions. The coating design issues will also be discussed based on the observed failure mechanisms under the high-heat-flux test conditions.

  14. Environmentally assisted cracking in light water reactors. Semiannual progress report, January 1996--June 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Chopra, O.K.; Chung, H.M.; Gruber, E.E.

    1997-05-01

    This report summarizes work performed by Argonne National Laboratory on fatigue and environmentally assisted cracking (EAC) in light water reactors from January 1996 to June 1996. Topics that have been investigated include (a) fatigue of carbon, low-alloy, and austenitic stainless steels (SSs) used in reactor piping and pressure vessels, (b) irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking of Type 304 SS, and (c) EAC of Alloys 600 and 690. Fatigue tests were conducted on ferritic and austenitic SSs in water that contained various concentrations of dissolved oxygen (DO) to determine whether a slow strain rate applied during various portions of a tensile-loading cycle are equally effective in decreasing fatigue life. Slow-strain-rate-tensile tests were conducted in simulated boiling water reactor (BWR) water at 288{degrees}C on SS specimens irradiated to a low fluence in the Halden reactor and the results were compared with similar data from a control-blade sheath and neutron-absorber tubes irradiated in BWRs to the same fluence level. Crack-growth-rate tests were conducted on compact-tension specimens from several heats of Alloys 600 and 690 in air and high-purity, low-DO water. 83 refs., 60 figs., 14 tabs.

  15. Environmentally assisted cracking in Light Water Reactors: Semiannual report, October 1994--March 1995. Volume 20

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, H.M.; Chopra, O.K.; Gavenda, D.J.; Hins, A.G.; Kassner, T.F.; Ruther, W.E.; Shack, W.J.; Soppet, W.K.

    1996-01-01

    This report summarizes work performed by Argonne National Laboratory on fatigue and environmentally assisted cracking (EAC) in light water reactors (LWRS) from October 1994 to March 1995. Topics that have been investigated include (a) fatigue of carbon and low-alloy steel used in reactor piping and pressure vessels, (b) EAC of Alloy 600 and 690, and (c) irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) of Type 304 SS. Fatigue tests were conducted on ferritic steels in water with several dissolvedoxygen (DO) concentrations to determine whether a slow strain rate applied during different portions of a tensile-loading cycle are equally effective in decreasing fatigue life. Tensile properties and microstructures of several heats of Alloy 600 and 690 were characterized for correlation with EAC of the alloys in simulated LWR environments. Effects of DO and electrochemical potential on susceptibility to intergranular cracking of high- and commercial-purity Type 304 SS specimens from control-blade absorber tubes and a control-blade sheath irradiated in boiling water reactors were determined in slow-strain-rate-tensile tests at 289{degrees}C. Microchemical changes in the specimens were studied by Auger electron spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy to determine whether trace impurity elements may contribute to IASCC of these materials.

  16. Development of a novel technique to assess the vulnerability of micro-mechanical system components to environmentally assisted cracking.

    SciTech Connect

    Enos, David George; Goods, Steven Howard

    2006-11-01

    Microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) will play an important functional role in future DOE weapon and Homeland Security applications. If these emerging technologies are to be applied successfully, it is imperative that the long-term degradation of the materials of construction be understood. Unlike electrical devices, MEMS devices have a mechanical aspect to their function. Some components (e.g., springs) will be subjected to stresses beyond whatever residual stresses exist from fabrication. These stresses, combined with possible abnormal exposure environments (e.g., humidity, contamination), introduce a vulnerability to environmentally assisted cracking (EAC). EAC is manifested as the nucleation and propagation of a stable crack at mechanical loads/stresses far below what would be expected based solely upon the materials mechanical properties. If not addressed, EAC can lead to sudden, catastrophic failure. Considering the materials of construction and the very small feature size, EAC represents a high-risk environmentally induced degradation mode for MEMS devices. Currently, the lack of applicable characterization techniques is preventing the needed vulnerability assessment. The objective of this work is to address this deficiency by developing techniques to detect and quantify EAC in MEMS materials and structures. Such techniques will allow real-time detection of crack initiation and propagation. The information gained will establish the appropriate combinations of environment (defining packaging requirements), local stress levels, and metallurgical factors (composition, grain size and orientation) that must be achieved to prevent EAC.

  17. Estimation of crack closure stresses for in situ toughened silicon nitride with 8 wt pct scandia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sung R.; Salem, Jonathan A.; Sanders, William A.

    1992-01-01

    An 8-wt pct-scandia silicon nitride with an elongated grain structure was fabricated. The material exhibited high fracture toughness and a rising R-curve as measured by the indentation strength technique. The 'toughening' exponent m was found to be m about 0.1. The high fracture toughness and R-curve behavior was attributed mainly to bridging of the crack faces by the elongated grains. The crack closure (bridging) stress distribution in the wake region of the crack tip was estimated as a function of crack size from the R-curve data, with an arbitrarily assumed distribution function.

  18. High-Temperature Slow Crack Growth of Silicon Carbide Determined by Constant-Stress-Rate and Constant-Stress Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sung H.; Salem, J. A.; Nemeth, N. N.

    1998-01-01

    High-temperature slow-crack-growth behaviour of hot-pressed silicon carbide was determined using both constant-stress-rate ("dynamic fatigue") and constant-stress ("static fatigue") testing in flexure at 1300 C in air. Slow crack growth was found to be a governing mechanism associated with failure of the material. Four estimation methods such as the individual data, the Weibull median, the arithmetic mean and the median deviation methods were used to determine the slow crack growth parameters. The four estimation methods were in good agreement for the constant-stress-rate testing with a small variation in the slow-crack-growth parameter, n, ranging from 28 to 36. By contrast, the variation in n between the four estimation methods was significant in the constant-stress testing with a somewhat wide range of n= 16 to 32.

  19. Development of a Fatigue Crack Growth Coupon for Highly Plastic Stress Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Phillip A.; Aggarwal, Pravin K.; Swanson, Gregory R.

    2003-01-01

    The analytical approach used to develop a novel fatigue crack growth coupon for highly plastic stress field condition is presented in this paper. The flight hardware investigated is a large separation bolt that has a deep notch, which produces a large plastic zone at the notch root when highly loaded. Four test specimen configurations are analyzed in an attempt to match the elastic-plastic stress field and crack constraint conditions present in the separation bolt. Elastic-plastic finite element analysis is used to compare the stress fields and critical fracture parameters. Of the four test specimens analyzed, the modified double-edge notch tension - 3 (MDENT-3) most closely approximates the stress field, J values, and crack constraint conditions found in the flight hardware. The MDENT-3 is also most insensitive to load misalignment and/or load redistribution during crack growth.

  20. Calculation of Stress Intensity Factors for Interfacial Cracks in Fiber Metal Laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, John T.

    2009-01-01

    Stress intensity factors for interfacial cracks in Fiber Metal Laminates (FML) are computed by using the displacement ratio method recently developed by Sun and Qian (1997, Int. J. Solids. Struct. 34, 2595-2609). Various FML configurations with single and multiple delaminations subjected to different loading conditions are investigated. The displacement ratio method requires the total energy release rate, bimaterial parameters, and relative crack surface displacements as input. Details of generating the energy release rates, defining bimaterial parameters with anisotropic elasticity, and selecting proper crack surface locations for obtaining relative crack surface displacements are discussed in the paper. Even though the individual energy release rates are nonconvergent, mesh-size-independent stress intensity factors can be obtained. This study also finds that the selection of reference length can affect the magnitudes and the mode mixity angles of the stress intensity factors; thus, it is important to report the reference length used with the calculated stress intensity factors.

  1. Stress corrosion cracking of X-60 line pipe steel in a carbonate-bicarbonate solution

    SciTech Connect

    Pilkey, A.K.; Lambert, S.B.; Plumtree, A. . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering)

    1995-02-01

    An experimental system was developed to reproduce stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of API X-60 line pipe steels in highly alkaline (pH = 10) carbonate-bicarbonate (1 N sodium carbonate [Na[sub 2]CO[sub 3

  2. Microstructural investigation of vintage pipeline steels highly susceptible to stress corrosion cracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres, Monica

    The use of pipelines for the transmission of gas offers not only efficiency, but a number of economic advantages. Nevertheless, pipelines are subject to aggressive operating conditions and environments which can lead to in-service degradation [1] and thus to failures. These failures can have catastrophic consequences, such as environmental damage and loss of life [2]. One of the most dangerous threats to pipeline integrity is stress corrosion cracking (SCC). Despite the substantial progress that has been achieved in the field, due to the complex nature of this phenomenon there is still not a complete understanding of this form of external corrosion. This makes its detection and prevention a challenge and therefore a risk to pipeline integrity, and most importantly, to the safety of the population. SCC cracks are the result of the interaction between a corrosive environment, applied stresses, and a susceptible microstructure. To date, what defines a susceptible microstructure remains ambiguous, as SCC has been observed in a range of steel grades, microstructures, chemical composition, and grain sizes. Therefore, in order to be able to accurately predict and prevent this hazardous form of corrosion, it is imperative to advance our knowledge on the subject and gain a better understanding on the microstructural features of highly susceptible pipeline materials, especially in the subsurface zone where crack nucleation must take place. Therefore, a microstructural characterization of the region near the surface layer was carried-out utilizing TEM. TEM analysis revealed the dislocation character, ferrite morphology, and apparent carbide precipitation in some grain boundaries. Furthermore, light microscopy, SEM, and hardness testing were performed to expand our knowledge on the microscopical features of highly SCC susceptible service components. This investigation presents a new approach to SCC characterization, which exposed the sub-surface region microscopical

  3. The fatigue problems of cracks subjected to obliquely incident stress waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weng, I.-Chung

    Catastrophic failure of aircraft and other structures are often caused by undetected cracks. Fracture mechanics has been developed to augment traditional static and fatigue design. In the static theory of fracture mechanics, extensive treatment has been given to the stress distribution around sharp cracks and notches under various loading conditions. Previous works on the problems of dynamic loadings are not accurate in dealing with singularities at high frequencies. The numerical solutions become unrealistic at high frequencies in many practical applications. To address the need to obtain the stress intensity factor in high frequency dynamic loading situations, we studied the use of dislocation to represent a crack by a continuous distribution of dislocation singularities. This study focused on the configuration of finite crack located in an infinite isotropic elastic solid which is subjected to harmonic shear waves. The most important contribution of this thesis is a new approach which is based on the development of dynamic dislocation model to investigate the dynamic problems of cracks, particularly the dynamic interaction between a surface crack and screw dislocations; dynamic interaction between a free surface and an internal crack; crack propagation under dynamic loadings. With this approach, we are able to derive the exact analytical expression for stress intensity factor at any given frequencies. Results of the present investigation show the dynamic stress intensity factors will increase as the wave number (a measure of frequency of loadings) increases and the maximum value is about 25% more than the static stress intensity factor. At relatively high frequencies, the stress intensity factor drops rapidly beyond the first maximum value and exhibits oscillations of approximately constant period as wave number increases. This conclusion can be used to predict the useful life of a component at which consists of the crack propagation phase. The stress intensity

  4. Environmentally assisted cracking in light water reactors - annual report, January-December 2001.

    SciTech Connect

    Chopra, O. K.; Chung, H. M.; Clark, R. W.; Gruber, E. E; Hiller, R. W.; Shack, W. J.; Soppet, W. K.; Strain, R. V.; Energy Technology

    2003-06-01

    This report summarizes work performed by Argonne National Laboratory on fatigue and environmentally assisted cracking (EAC) in light water reactors (LWRs) from January to December 2001. Topics that have been investigated include (a) environmental effects on fatigue S-N behavior of austenitic stainless steels (SSs), (b) irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) of austenitic SSs, and (c) EAC of Alloy 600. The effects of key material and loading variables, such as strain amplitude, strain rate, temperature, dissolved oxygen (DO) level in water, and material heat treatment, on the fatigue lives of wrought and cast austenitic SSs in air and LWR environments have been evaluated. The mechanism of fatigue crack initiation in austenitic SSs in LWR environments has also been examined. The results indicate that the presence of a surface oxide film or difference in the characteristics of the oxide film has no effect on fatigue crack initiation in austenitic SSs in LWR environments. Slow-strain-rate tensile tests and post-test fractographic analyses were conducted on several model SS alloys irradiated to {approx}2 x 10{sup 21} n {center_dot} cm{sup -2} (E > 1 MeV) ({approx}3 dpa) in He at 289 C in the Halden reactor. The results were used to determine the influence of alloying and impurity elements on the susceptibility of these steels to IASCC. Corrosion fatigue tests were conducted on nonirradiated austenitic SSs in high-purity water at 289 C to establish the test procedure and conditions that will be used for the tests on irradiated materials. A comprehensive irradiation experiment was initiated to obtain many tensile and disk specimens irradiated under simulated pressurized water reactor conditions at {approx}325 C to 5, 10, 20, and 40 dpa. Crack growth tests were completed on 30% cold-worked Alloy 600 in high-purity water under various environmental and loading conditions. The results are compared with data obtained earlier on several heats of Alloy 600

  5. Assessment of chances for external stress corrosion cracking in submarine pipelines

    SciTech Connect

    Mollan, R.; Eliassen, S.; Holt, T.; Ratkje, S.K.

    1982-11-08

    The possibility for stress corrosion cracking due to external environments to occur in submarine pipelines can not be excluded. The probability for stress corrosion to occur in submarine pipelines, however, considered to be for onshore pipelines mainly because calcareous deposits are expected to prevent buildup of the corrosive environment. Also the fact that the quality of surface preparation prior to coating for submarine pipelines normally is of a relatively high standard, contributes to reduce the probability for stresscorrosion cracking to occur.

  6. Characterization of Residual Stress Effects on Fatigue Crack Growth of a Friction Stir Welded Aluminum Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, John A.; Smith, Stephen W.; Seshadri, Banavara R.; James, Mark A.; Brazill, Richard L.; Schultz, Robert W.; Donald, J. Keith; Blair, Amy

    2015-01-01

    An on-line compliance-based method to account for residual stress effects in stress-intensity factor and fatigue crack growth property determinations has been evaluated. Residual stress intensity factor results determined from specimens containing friction stir weld induced residual stresses are presented, and the on-line method results were found to be in excellent agreement with residual stress-intensity factor data obtained using the cut compliance method. Variable stress-intensity factor tests were designed to demonstrate that a simple superposition model, summing the applied stress-intensity factor with the residual stress-intensity factor, can be used to determine the total crack-tip stress-intensity factor. Finite element, VCCT (virtual crack closure technique), and J-integral analysis methods have been used to characterize weld-induced residual stress using thermal expansion/contraction in the form of an equivalent delta T (change in local temperature during welding) to simulate the welding process. This equivalent delta T was established and applied to analyze different specimen configurations to predict residual stress distributions and associated residual stress-intensity factor values. The predictions were found to agree well with experimental results obtained using the crack- and cut-compliance methods.

  7. Stress intensity factors for an inclined crack in an orthotropic strip

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delale, F.; Bakirtas, I.; Erdogan, F.

    1978-01-01

    The elastostatic problem for an infinite orthotropic strip containing a crack is considered. It is assumed that the orthogonal axes of material orthotropy may have an arbitrary angular orientation with respect to the orthogonal axes of geometric symmetry of the uncracked strip. The crack is located along an axis of orthotropy, hence at an arbitrary angle with respect to the sides of the strip. The general problem is formulated in terms of a system of singular integral equations for arbitrary crack surface tractions. As examples Modes I and II stress intensity factors are calculated for the strip having an internal or an edge crack with various lengths and angular orientations. In most calculations uniform tension or uniform bending away from the crack region is used as the external load. Limited results are also given for uniform normal or shear tractions on the crack surface.

  8. INVESTIGATION OF THE POTENTIAL FOR CAUSTIC STRESS CORROSION CRACKING OF A537 CARBON STEEL NUCLEAR WASTE TANKS

    SciTech Connect

    Lam, P.

    2009-10-15

    The evaporator recycle streams contain waste in a chemistry and temperature regime that may be outside of the current waste tank corrosion control program, which imposes temperature limits to mitigate caustic stress corrosion cracking (CSCC). A review of the recent service history (1998-2008) of Tanks 30 and 32 showed that these tanks were operated in highly concentrated hydroxide solution at high temperature. Visual inspections, experimental testing, and a review of the tank service history have shown that CSCC has occurred in uncooled/un-stress relieved F-Area tanks. Therefore, for the Type III/IIIA waste tanks the efficacy of the stress relief of welding residual stress is the only corrosion-limiting mechanism. The objective of this experimental program is to test carbon steel small scale welded U-bend specimens and large welded plates (12 x 12 x 1 in.) in a caustic solution with upper bound chemistry (12 M hydroxide and 1 M each of nitrate, nitrite, and aluminate) and temperature (125 C). These conditions simulate worst-case situations in Tanks 30 and 32. Both as-welded and stress-relieved specimens have been tested. No evidence of stress corrosion cracking was found in the U-bend specimens after 21 days of testing. The large plate test is currently in progress, but no cracking has been observed after 9 weeks of immersion. Based on the preliminary results, it appears that the environmental conditions of the tests are unable to develop stress corrosion cracking within the duration of these tests.

  9. Effect of crack curvature on stress intensity factors for ASTM standard compact tension specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alam, J.; Mendelson, A.

    1983-01-01

    The stress intensity factors (SIF) are calculated using the method of lines for the compact tension specimen in tensile and shear loading for curved crack fronts. For the purely elastic case, it was found that as the crack front curvature increases, the SIF value at the center of the specimen decreases while increasing at the surface. For the higher values of crack front curvatures, the maximum value of the SIF occurs at an interior point located adjacent to the surface. A thickness average SIF was computed for parabolically applied shear loading. These results were used to assess the requirements of ASTM standards E399-71 and E399-81 on the shape of crack fronts. The SIF is assumed to reflect the average stress environment near the crack edge.

  10. Stress-Intensity Factors for Corner Cracks at the Edge of a Hole

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raju, I. S.; Newman, J. C., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    Stress-intensity factors, calculated by a three-dimensional finite-element analysis, for shallow or deep quarter-elliptical corner cracks at the edge of a hole in a finite-thickness plate are presented. The plate was subjected to remote uniform tension, remote bending, or simulated pin loading in the hole. The crack depth-to-plate thickness ranged from 0.2 to 0.8, while the ratio of crack depth-to-plate crack length ranged from 0.2 to 2. The ratio of hole radius-to-plate thickness was held at 0.5. To verify the accuracy of the three-dimensional finite-element models empolyed, convergence studies were conducted (number of degrees of freedom ranged from 4400 to 9300). The stress-intensity factor variations along the crack front are presented and compared with other solutions from the literature.

  11. Analysis of Interface Properties of Hybrid Pre-stressed Strengthening RC Beams with Crack

    SciTech Connect

    Xie Zhihong; Huang Peiyan; Guo Yongchang; Deng Jun; Zhong Genquan

    2010-05-21

    A finite element (FE) analysis model of interface layer is established for the pre-stressed CFS-GFS hybrid strengthened beams. An elastic solution for the interfacial stress in the adhesive layer of the retrofitted beams is developed as well. The analytical results were compared with the FE results of interfacial stresses in the beams with different thickness of the adhesive and the fibre sheet. Different heights of Cracks in the interfacial layer of the concrete beam are considered in FE Model. Analysis results show the strengthening pattern is of excellent interface performance and the strength of the fiber sheet can be effectively utilized. The results also indicate the shear and normal stresses in the interfacial layer of the concrete beam release at the locations of the cracks and reach the maximal value before the concrete cracked. The shear and normal stresses in the adhesive layer increase abruptly, and the cracks in the adhesive layer then appear. The axial stresses of hybrid fiber sheet near the cracks decrease locally at the sites of the concrete cracks.

  12. Analysis of Interface Properties of Hybrid Pre-stressed Strengthening RC Beams with Crack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    zhihong, Xie; Peiyan, Huang; Yongchang, Guo; Jun, Deng; Genquan, Zhong

    2010-05-01

    A finite element (FE) analysis model of interface layer is established for the pre-stressed CFS-GFS hybrid strengthened beams. An elastic solution for the interfacial stress in the adhesive layer of the retrofitted beams is developed as well. The analytical results were compared with the FE results of interfacial stresses in the beams with different thickness of the adhesive and the fibre sheet. Different heights of Cracks in the interfacial layer of the concrete beam are considered in FE Model. Analysis results show the strengthening pattern is of excellent interface performance and the strength of the fiber sheet can be effectively utilized. The results also indicate the shear and normal stresses in the interfacial layer of the concrete beam release at the locations of the cracks and reach the maximal value before the concrete cracked. The shear and normal stresses in the adhesive layer increase abruptly, and the cracks in the adhesive layer then appear. The axial stresses of hybrid fiber sheet near the cracks decrease locally at the sites of the concrete cracks.

  13. Environmentally assisted cracking in Light Water Reactors. Volume 16: Semiannual report, October 1992--March 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, H.M.; Chopra, O.K.; Ruther, W.E.; Kassner, T.F.; Michaud, W.F.; Park, J.Y.; Sanecki, J.E.; Shack, W.J.

    1993-09-01

    This report summarizes work performed by Argonne National Laboratory on fatigue and environmentally assisted cracking (EAC) in light water reactors (LWRs) during the six months from October 1992 to March 1993. Fatigue and EAC of piping, pressure vessels, and core components in LWRs are important concerns as extended reactor lifetimes are envisaged. Topics that have been investigated include (1) fatigue of low-alloy steel used in piping, steam generators, and reactor pressure vessels. (2) EAC of cast stainless steels (SSs), (3) radiation-induced segregation and irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking of Type 304 SS after accumulation of relatively high fluence, and (4) EAC of low-alloy steels. Fatigue tests were conducted on medium-sulfur-content A106-Gr B piping and A533-Gr B pressure vessel steels in simulated PWR water and in air. Additional crack growth data were obtained on fracture-mechanics specimens of cast austenitic SSs in the as-received and thermally aged conditions and chromium-nickel-plated A533-Gr B steel in simulated boiling-water reactor (BWR) water at 289{degrees}C. The data were compared with predictions based on crack growth correlations for ferritic steels in oxygenated water and correlations for wrought austenitic SS in oxygenated water developed at ANL and rates in air from Section XI of the ASME Code. Microchemical and microstructural changes in high- and commercial-purity Type 304 SS specimens from control-blade absorber tubes and a control-blade sheath from operating BWRs were studied by Auger electron spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy.

  14. Use of Slow Strain Rate Tensile Testing to Assess the Ability of Several Superalloys to Resist Environmentally-Assisted Intergranular Cracking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gabb, Timothy P.; Telesman, Jack; Banik, Anthony; McDevitt, Erin

    2014-01-01

    Intergranular fatigue crack initiation and growth due to environmental degradation, especially at notched features, can often limit the fatigue life of disk superalloys at high temperatures. For clear comparisons, the effects of alloy composition on cracking in air needs to be understood and compared separately from variables associated with notches and cracks such as effective stress concentration, plastic flow, stress relaxation, and stress redistribution. The objective of this study was to attempt using simple tensile tests of specimens with uniform gage sections to compare the effects of varied alloy composition on environment-assisted cracking of several powder metal and cast and wrought superalloys including ME3, LSHR, Udimet 720(TradeMark) ATI 718Plus(Registered TradeMark) alloy, Haynes 282(Trademark), and Inconel 740(TradeMark) Slow and fast strain-rate tensile tests were found to be a useful tool to compare propensities for intergranular surface crack initiation and growth. The effects of composition and heat treatment on tensile fracture strain and associated failure modes were compared. Environment interactions were determined to often limit ductility, by promoting intergranular surface cracking. The response of various superalloys and heat treatments to slow strain rate tensile testing varied substantially, showing that composition and microstructure can significantly influence environmental resistance to cracking.

  15. Thermodynamic analysis on the role of hydrogen in anodic stress corrosion cracking

    SciTech Connect

    Qiao, L.; Mao, X.

    1995-11-01

    A synergistic effect of hydrogen and stress on a corrosion rate was analyzed with thermodynamics. The results showed that an interaction of stress and hydrogen could increase the corrosion rate remarkably. Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of austenitic stainless steel (ASS) was investigated in boiling chloride solution to confirm the analysis. Hydrogen could be introduced into the specimen concentrated at the crack tip during SCC in boiling LiCl solution (143 C). The concentrating factor is about 3 which is consistent with calculated results according to stress induced diffusion.

  16. On the measurement of the crack tip stress field as a means of determining Delta K(sub eff) under conditions of fatigue crack closure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wallhead, Ian R.; Edwards, Lyndon; Poole, Peter

    1994-01-01

    The optical method of caustics has been successfully extended to enable stress intensity factors as low as 1MPa square root of m to be determined accurately for central fatigue cracks in 2024-T3 aluminium alloy test panels. The feasibility of using this technique to study crack closure, and to determine the effective stress intensity factor range, Delta K(sub eff), has been investigated. Comparisons have been made between the measured values of stress intensity factor, K(sub caus), and corresponding theoretical values, K(sub theo), for a range of fatigue cracks grown under different loading conditions. The values of K(sub caus) and K(sub theo) were in good agreement at maximum stress, where the cracks are fully open, while K(sub caus) exceeded K(sub theo) at minimum stress, due to crack closure. However, the levels of crack closure and values of Delta K(sub eff) obtained could not account for the variations of crack growth rate with loading conditions. It is concluded that the values of Delta K(sub eff), based on caustic measurements in a 1/square root of r stress field well outside the plastic zone, do not fully reflect local conditions which control crack tip behavior.

  17. EPRI-NASA Cooperative Project on Stress Corrosion Cracking of Zircaloys. [nuclear fuel failures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cubicciotti, D.; Jones, R. L.

    1978-01-01

    Examinations of the inside surface of irradiated fuel cladding from two reactors show the Zircaloy cladding is exposed to a number of aggressive substances, among them iodine, cadmium, and iron-contaminated cesium. Iodine-induced stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of well characterized samples of Zircaloy sheet and tubing was studied. Results indicate that a threshold stress must be exceeded for iodine SCC to occur. The existence of a threshold stress indicates that crack formation probably is the key step in iodine SCC. Investigation of the crack formation process showed that the cracks responsible for SCC failure nucleated at locations in the metal surface that contained higher than average concentrations of alloying elements and impurities. A four-stage model of iodine SCC is proposed based on the experimental results and the relevance of the observations to pellet cladding interaction failures is discussed.

  18. Extreme stress gradient effects on microstructural fatigue crack propagation rates in Ni microbeams

    SciTech Connect

    Sadeghi-Tohidi, F.; Pierron, O. N.

    2015-05-18

    The fatigue crack propagation behavior of microstructurally small cracks growing under extreme stress gradients was investigated in Ni microbeams under fully reversed cyclic loading. A technique to calculate the crack growth rates in microbeams with two different normalized stress gradients (17% and 50% μm{sup −1}) is developed and validated. Decreasing crack propagation rates are observed over the first 2 μm, and the rates are more than 1 order of magnitude slower for the devices with 50% μm{sup −1} stress gradients. This fundamental knowledge is critical to predict the fatigue reliability of advanced metallic microcomponents under bending such as in microelectromechanical systems or flexible/stretchable electronics.

  19. Kinetic studies of the stress corrosion cracking of D6AC steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noronha, P. J.

    1975-01-01

    The effect of load interactions on the crack growth velocity of D6AC steel under stress corrosion cracking conditions was determined. The environment was a 3.5 percent salt solution. The modified-wedge opening load specimens were fatigue precracked and subjected to a deadweight loading in creep machines. The effects of load shedding on incubation times and crack growth rates were measured using high-sensitivity compliance measurement techniques. Load shedding results in an incubation time, the length of which depends on the amount of load shed and the baseline stress intensity. The sequence of unloading the specimen also controls the subsequent incubation period. The incubation period is shorter when load shedding passes through zero load than when it does not if the specimen initially had the same baseline stress intensity. The crack growth rates following the incubation period are also different from the steady-state crack growth rate at the operating stress intensity. These data show that the susceptibility of this alloy system to stress corrosion cracking depends on the plane-strain fracture toughness and on the yield strength of the material.

  20. The effects of microstructure, strength level, and crack propagation mode on stress corrosion cracking behavior of 4135 steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González, J.; Gutiérrez-Solana, F.; Varona, J. M.

    1996-02-01

    The stress corrosion cracking (SCC) susceptibility of 4135 steel in a simulated sea water solution has been analyzed in an attempt to understand the effect that microstructural changes associated with the corresponding changes in strength level have on both intergranular (IG) and transgranular (TG) crack propagation modes. After a selection of heat treatments, the following different microstructural variables were studied: the effect of grain size on IG fracture processes; the influence of the grade of tempering on the SCC resistance and crack propagation mode; and the effect of type and content of bainite and the effect of ferrite in mixed microstructures. A global analysis shows that the typical SCC resistance-strength level inverse relationship can only be applied when the microstructure re-mains invariable. An important microstructural control of SCC behavior was found for TG processes at moderate and low strength levels. The data analysis showed the following: a beneficial effect of increasing the grain size when crack propagates at grain boundaries without precipitates; the existence of a critical tempering temperature so that a sudden IG-TG change happens without any apparent relation to microstructural changes; the beneficial effect of bainite presence as a substitute for mar-tensite and high SCC resistance of structures containing over 50 pct ferrite, associated with their low strength levels.

  1. Environmental Crack Growth Behavior Affected by Thickness/Geometry Constraint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kujawski, Daniel

    2013-03-01

    This article gives a short review on the effects of thickness/constraint and environment on crack growth behavior under cyclic and static loadings. Fatigue crack growth data taken from the literature, corresponding to different environments, ranging from vacuum to air and NaCl solution for a number of alloys and different specimens geometries are presented and analyzed. Reported results indicate that for relatively inert material/environment systems, there is a weak thickness/constraint effect on fatigue crack growth behavior. On the other hand, for corrosive material/environment systems, there is a significant thickness/constraint effect on crack growth rate behavior under both cyclic and static loadings. Some implications related to crack growth modeling are suggested.

  2. Intergranular stress corrosion cracking: A rationalization of apparent differences among stress corrosion cracking tendencies for sensitized regions in the process water piping and in the tanks of SRS reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Louthan, M.R.

    1990-09-28

    The frequency of stress corrosion cracking in the near weld regions of the SRS reactor tank walls is apparently lower than the cracking frequency near the pipe-to-pipe welds in the primary cooling water system. The difference in cracking tendency can be attributed to differences in the welding processes, fabrication schedules, near weld residual stresses, exposure conditions and other system variables. This memorandum discusses the technical issues that may account the differences in cracking tendencies based on a review of the fabrication and operating histories of the reactor systems and the accepted understanding of factors that control stress corrosion cracking in austenitic stainless steels.

  3. The influence of stress ratio and temperature on the fatigue crack growth rate behavior of ARALL

    SciTech Connect

    Salivar, G.C.; Gardini, C.A. Pratt Whitney Group, West Palm Beach, FL )

    1993-01-01

    The fatigue crack growth rate behavior of ARALL (aramid-reinforced aluminum laminate) was investigated as a function of stress ratio and temperature. The particular material was ARALL-3, a 7475-T76 aluminum alloy laminate. Tests were conducted for stress ratios of 0.1 and 0.5 at temperatures of 21, 82, and 93 C (70, 180, and 200 F) using a center-cracked panel geometry (measurements were made in English units and converted to SI units). The objective was to examine the contributions of the effects of crack closure and fiber bridging of the crack on the material behavior. Crack closure was monitored throughout the tests using compliance measurements. Fractography was used to investigate the influence of temperature on the integrity of the aluminum to epoxy/fiber bond to try to identify the effects of fiber bridging. Some crack closure, in the traditional metallic material sense, was evident through compliance measurements. However, the crack tip bridging by the fibers appears to be the dominant mechanism influencing the fatigue crack growth rate behavior in this material under these test conditions. Fractography indicates a considerable difference in fiber-bridging behavior between the room temperature and the elevated temperature tests. 19 refs.

  4. Neutron diffraction determination of the residual stress redistribution in cracked autofrettaged tubing

    SciTech Connect

    Bourke, M.A. ); McGillivray, H.J.; Webster, G.A. . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering); Webster, P.J. . Dept. of Civil Engineering)

    1991-01-01

    Neutron diffraction has been used to measure the residual stress distributions in uncracked and fatigue cracked rings taken from a high strength, low alloy steel autofrettage tube with a bore diameter of 60mm and a wall thickness of 32mm. Stresses were determined to a precision of {plus minus} 10MPa. Three crack sixes were examines. No appreciable stress redistribution was observed until the crack was grown into a region which originally contained tensile residual hoop stress. When this occurred an increase in residual hoop tension was observed ahead of the crick tip. Qualitative agreement was achieved between the measured hoop stress distribution and values predicted using a boundary element method. 9 refs., 12 figs.

  5. In situ measurements of stress-corrosion crack growth using laser ultrasonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kacmar, Chris; Blackshire, James L.

    2003-07-01

    A detailed microscopic characterization of stress-corrosion cracking (SCC) processes has been conducted for electro-chemically pitted AA 2024-T3 aluminum dogbone specimens in a high-cycle fatigue environment. The measurements were done in-situ using scanning laser ultrasonic detection of Rayleigh waves propagating along the material surface. Detailed microscopic NDE evaluations of crack extent and position, crack growth rates, and local crack depth were made based on near-field ultrasonic scattering signatures. A variety of electro-chemically generated corrosion pits were studied, where variations of pit depth, pitting surface area, and pit volume loss were correlated to fatigue life, crack initiation, and crack growth rates. The measurement technique provided an advanced crack 'imaging' capability that proved to be a very useful NDE tool for the micro-characterization of crack growth processes, and provided a wealth of information regarding the micro-features of the cracks whcih are currently not available with any other advanced NDE technique.

  6. Stress corrosion cracking and life prediction evaluation of austenitic stainless steels in calcium chloride solution

    SciTech Connect

    Leinonen, H.

    1996-05-01

    The stress corrosion cracking (SCC) susceptibility of austenitic stainless steels (SS) in calcium chloride solutions was studied using a constant-load method. Initiation and propagation of stress corrosion cracks were examined using fractography. The distribution of cracks was classified. A physical cracking was introduced, and creep deformation measurements were performed. The steady-state strain rate obtained from the corrosion elongation curve (elongation-vs-time curve) showed a linear function of time to failure (t{sub f}). This implied that {var_epsilon}{sub ss} can be applied as a parameter for prediction of t{sub f}. Furthermore, {var_epsilon}{sub ss} below which no failure occurs within a laboratory time scale was estimated. Based on results obtained, the critical values of stress below which no SCC occurred were evaluated. Based upon creep measurements in a noncorrosive environment, the influence of environment on {var_epsilon}{sub ss} was more than fivefold. Cracking characteristics were divided into three categories according to the crack initiation distribution. Transgranular cracking predominated at relatively low {sigma} and {var_epsilon}{sub ss}.

  7. Analysis of stress corrosion cracking in alloy 718 following commercial reactor exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Leonard, Keith J.; Gussev, Maxim N.; Stevens, Jacqueline N.; Busby, Jeremy T.

    2015-08-24

    Alloy 718 is generally considered a highly corrosion-resistant material but can still be susceptible to stress corrosion cracking (SCC). The combination of factors leading to SCC susceptibility in the alloy is not always clear enough. In this paper, alloy 718 leaf spring (LS) materials that suffered stress corrosion damage during two 24-month cycles in pressurized water reactor service, operated to >45 MWd/mtU burn-up, was investigated. Compared to archival samples fabricated through the same processing conditions, little microstructural and property changes occurred in the material with in-service irradiation, contrary to high dose rate laboratory-based experiments reported in literature. Though the lack of delta phase formation along grain boundaries would suggest a more SCC resistant microstructure, grain boundary cracking in the material was extensive. Crack propagation routes were explored through focused ion beam milling of specimens near the crack tip for transmission electron microscopy as well as in polished plan view and cross-sectional samples for electron backscatter diffraction analysis. It has been shown in this study that cracks propagated mainly along random high-angle grain boundaries, with the material around cracks displaying a high local density of dislocations. The slip lines were produced through the local deformation of the leaf spring material above their yield strength. Also, the cause for local SCC appears to be related to oxidation of both slip lines and grain boundaries, which under the high in-service stresses resulted in crack development in the material.

  8. Analysis of stress corrosion cracking in alloy 718 following commercial reactor exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonard, Keith J.; Gussev, Maxim N.; Stevens, Jacqueline N.; Busby, Jeremy T.

    2015-11-01

    Alloy 718 is generally considered a highly corrosion-resistant material but can still be susceptible to stress corrosion cracking (SCC). The combination of factors leading to SCC susceptibility in the alloy is not always clear enough. In the present work, alloy 718 leaf spring (LS) materials that suffered stress corrosion damage during two 24-month cycles in pressurized water reactor service, operated to >45 MWd/mtU burn-up, was investigated. Compared to archival samples fabricated through the same processing conditions, little microstructural and property changes occurred in the material with in-service irradiation, contrary to high dose rate laboratory-based experiments reported in literature. Though the lack of delta phase formation along grain boundaries would suggest a more SCC resistant microstructure, grain boundary cracking in the material was extensive. Crack propagation routes were explored through focused ion beam milling of specimens near the crack tip for transmission electron microscopy as well as in polished plan view and cross-sectional samples for electron backscatter diffraction analysis. It has been shown in this study that cracks propagated mainly along random high-angle grain boundaries, with the material around cracks displaying a high local density of dislocations. The slip lines were produced through the local deformation of the leaf spring material above their yield strength. The cause for local SCC appears to be related to oxidation of both slip lines and grain boundaries, which under the high in-service stresses resulted in crack development in the material.

  9. Peak Stress Intensity Factor Governs Crack Propagation Velocity In Crosslinked UHMWPE

    PubMed Central

    Sirimamilla, P. Abhiram; Furmanski, Jevan; Rimnac, Clare

    2013-01-01

    Ultra high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) has been successfully used as a bearing material in total joint replacement components. However, these bearing materials can fail as a result of in vivo static and cyclic loads. Crack propagation behavior in this material has been considered using the Paris relationship which relates fatigue crack growth rate, da/dN (mm/cycle) versus the stress intensity factor range, ΔK (Kmax-Kmin, MPa√m). However, recent work suggests that the crack propagation velocity of conventional UHMWPE is driven by the peak stress intensity (Kmax), not ΔK. The hypothesis of this study is that the crack propagation velocity of highly crosslinked and remelted UHMWPE is also driven by the peak stress intensity, Kmax, during cyclic loading, rather than by ΔK. To test this hypothesis, two highly crosslinked (65 kGy and 100 kGy) and remelted UHMWPE materials were examined. Frequency, waveform and R-ratio were varied between test conditions to determine the governing factor for fatigue crack propagation. It was found that the crack propagation velocity in crosslinked UHMWPE is also driven by Kmax and not ΔK, and is dependent on loading waveform and frequency in a predictable quasi-static manner. The current study supports that crack growth in crosslinked UHMWPE materials, even under cyclic loading conditions, can be described by a relationship between the velocity of crack growth, da/dt and the peak stress intensity, Kmax. The findings suggest that stable crack propagation can occur as a result of static loading only and this should be taken into consideration in design of UHMWPE total joint replacement components. PMID:23165898

  10. Peak stress intensity factor governs crack propagation velocity in crosslinked ultrahigh-molecular-weight polyethylene.

    PubMed

    Sirimamilla, Abhiram; Furmanski, Jevan; Rimnac, Clare

    2013-04-01

    Ultrahigh-molecular-weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) has been successfully used as a bearing material in total joint replacement components. However, these bearing materials can fail as a result of in vivo static and cyclic loads. Crack propagation behavior in this material has been considered using the Paris relationship which relates fatigue crack growth rate, da/dN (mm/cycle) versus the stress intensity factor range, ΔK (Kmax - Kmin , MPa√m). However, recent work suggests that the crack propagation velocity of conventional UHMWPE is driven by the peak stress intensity (Kmax ), not ΔK. The hypothesis of this study is that the crack propagation velocity of highly crosslinked and remelted UHMWPE is also driven by the peak stress intensity, Kmax , during cyclic loading. To test this hypothesis, two highly crosslinked (65 kGy and 100 kGy) and remelted UHMWPE materials were examined. Frequency, waveform, and R-ratio were varied between test conditions to determine the governing factor for fatigue crack propagation. It was found that the crack propagation velocity in crosslinked UHMWPE is also driven by Kmax and not ΔK, and is dependent on loading waveform and frequency in a predictable quasistatic manner. This study supports that crack growth in crosslinked UHMWPE materials, even under cyclic loading conditions, can be described by a relationship between the velocity of crack growth, da/dt and the peak stress intensity, Kmax . The findings suggest that stable crack propagation can occur as a result of static loading only and this should be taken into consideration in design of UHMWPE total joint replacement components.

  11. Thermally activated low temperature creep and primary water stress corrosion cracking of NiCrFe alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, M.M. Jr.

    1993-10-01

    A phenomenological SCC-CGR model is developed based on an apriori assumption that the SCC-CGR is controlled by low temperature creep (LTC). This mode of low temperature time dependent deformation occurs at stress levels above the athermal flow stress by a dislocation glide mechanism that is thermally activated and may be environmentally assisted. The SCC-CGR model equations developed contain thermal activation parameters descriptive of the dislocation creep mechanism. Thermal activation parameters are obtained by fitting the CGR model to SCC-CGR data obtained on Alloy 600 and Alloy X-750. These SCC-CGR activation parameters are compared to LTC activation parameters obtained from stress relaxation tests. When the high concentration of hydrogen at the tip of an SCC crack is considered, the SCC-CGR activation energies and rate sensitivities are shown to be quantitatively consistent with hydrogen reducing the activation energy and increasing the strain rate sensitivity in LTC stress relaxation tests. Stress dependence of SCC-CGR activation energy consistent with that found for the LTC activation energy. Comparisons between temperature dependence of the SCC-CGR stress sensitivity and LTC stress sensitivity provide a basis for speculation on effects of hydrogen and solute carbon on SCC crack growth rates.

  12. Assessment of rock mechanical behavior considering stress dependent stiffness of the cracked domain within crack tensor-based approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takemura, T.; Panaghi, K.; Golshani, A.; Takahashi, M.; Sato, M.

    2015-12-01

    The analyses dedicated to media with prevalent discontinuities such as rocks has mostly been limited to inevitable simplifications to make engineering judgments on the material behavior feasible. Such assumptions, though favorable in numerical simulations, usually lead to overestimations in aseismic design of earthen structures. One of the forbidding tasks in modeling rock behavior is taking the stress dependency of stiffness into consideration which implies more complicated formulations. Although the theoretical relationship for such computations has already been proposed by scholars, there still remains some gaps in the real-world application of the aforementioned. The crack tensor-based formulation in describing stress-strain behavior of cracked rock is a case in point in which the fourth-rank crack tensor effect is usually ignored due to adopting equal normal and shear stiffnesses for the medium. Once the stiffnesses were distinguished in different values, the accompanying condition imposed by the formulation requires computation of fourth rank tensor which has not been obtained in a practical manner so far. In the present study, we aim to acquire the values via experimental measurements and implement the results to further improve the accuracy of the formulation used in characterizing mechanical behavior of rock samples.

  13. Mitigation of Stress Corrosion Cracking Susceptibility of Machined 304L Stainless Steel Through Laser Peening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundar, R.; Ganesh, P.; Kumar, B. Sunil; Gupta, R. K.; Nagpure, D. C.; Kaul, R.; Ranganathan, K.; Bindra, K. S.; Kain, V.; Oak, S. M.; Singh, Bijendra

    2016-09-01

    The paper describes an experimental study aimed at suppressing stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of machined 304L stainless steel specimens through laser shock peening. The study also evaluates a new approach of oblique laser shock peening to suppress stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of internal surface of type 304L stainless steel tube. The results of the study, performed with an indigenously developed 2.5 J/7 ns Nd:YAG laser, demonstrated that laser shock peening effectively suppresses chloride stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of machined surface of type 304L stainless steel. In the investigated range of incident laser power density (3.2-6.4 GW/cm2), machined specimens peened with power density of 4.5 and 6.4 GW/cm2 displayed lower stress corrosion cracking susceptibility considerably than those treated with 3.2 and 3.6 GW/cm2 in boiling magnesium chloride test. Oblique laser shock peening, performed on machined internal surface of a type 304L stainless steel tube (OD = 111 mm; ID = 101 mm), was successful in introducing residual compressive surface stresses which brought about significant suppression of its stress corrosion cracking susceptibility. The technique of oblique laser shock peening, in spite of its inherent limitations on the length of peened region being limited by tube internal diameter and the need for access from both the sides, presents a simplified approach for peening internal surface of small tubular components.

  14. Influence of texture on iodine-induced stress corrosion cracking of Zircaloy-4 cladding tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuster, I.; Lemaignan, C.

    1992-07-01

    A specific study was carried out to measure the influence of texture on the behaviour of Zircaloy-4 under iodine-induced stress corrosion cracking. The aim was to determine the relative effects of various metallurgical parameters involved in fuel rod fracture by pellet-clad interaction (PCI). Cladding tubes of different geometries were manufactured from a given Zircaloy-4 ingot. In this way tubes with different textures were obtained. Rings from these tubes were then subjected to slow tensile tests in an inert atmosphere and in an iodine vapour atmosphere. The sensitivity of the tubes to stress corrosion cracking is quantified by the loss of ductility on fracture between the tests in each atmosphere. Combined with the findings of other studies, the results showed that: (a) texture has a strong effect on the stress corrosion cracking behaviour of Zircaloy-4, (b) the mechanical properties do not have any bearing on the material behaviour under stress corrosion cracking, and that the better behaviour of a recrystallized material — compared to the same material in a stress-relieved state — can be explained solely by the texture effect, (c) texture is a more important parameter than chemical composition of Zircaloy-4, on condition that this composition remains within the ASTM specification. The conflict between the various mechanisms involved in stress corrosion crack propagation may explain these observations. Preliminary extrapolation of these conclusions to the irradiated material shows that a more specific study is needed using appropriate parameters.

  15. Mitigation of Stress Corrosion Cracking Susceptibility of Machined 304L Stainless Steel Through Laser Peening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundar, R.; Ganesh, P.; Kumar, B. Sunil; Gupta, R. K.; Nagpure, D. C.; Kaul, R.; Ranganathan, K.; Bindra, K. S.; Kain, V.; Oak, S. M.; Singh, Bijendra

    2016-07-01

    The paper describes an experimental study aimed at suppressing stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of machined 304L stainless steel specimens through laser shock peening. The study also evaluates a new approach of oblique laser shock peening to suppress stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of internal surface of type 304L stainless steel tube. The results of the study, performed with an indigenously developed 2.5 J/7 ns Nd:YAG laser, demonstrated that laser shock peening effectively suppresses chloride stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of machined surface of type 304L stainless steel. In the investigated range of incident laser power density (3.2-6.4 GW/cm2), machined specimens peened with power density of 4.5 and 6.4 GW/cm2 displayed lower stress corrosion cracking susceptibility considerably than those treated with 3.2 and 3.6 GW/cm2 in boiling magnesium chloride test. Oblique laser shock peening, performed on machined internal surface of a type 304L stainless steel tube (OD = 111 mm; ID = 101 mm), was successful in introducing residual compressive surface stresses which brought about significant suppression of its stress corrosion cracking susceptibility. The technique of oblique laser shock peening, in spite of its inherent limitations on the length of peened region being limited by tube internal diameter and the need for access from both the sides, presents a simplified approach for peening internal surface of small tubular components.

  16. On the variation in crack-opening stresses at different locations in a three-dimensional body

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chermahini, R. G.; Blom, Anders F.

    1990-01-01

    Crack propagation and closure behavior of thin, and thick middle crack tension specimens under constant amplitude loading were investigated using a three dimensional elastic plastic finite element analysis of fatigue crack propagation and closure. In the thin specimens the crack front closed first on the exterior (free) surface and closed last in the interior during the unloading portion of cyclic loading; a load reduced displacement technique was used to determine crack opening stresses at specified locations in the plate from the displacements calculated after the seven cycle. All the locations were on the plate external surface and were located near the crack tip, behind the crack tip, at the centerline of the crack. With this technique, the opening stresses at the specified points were found to be 0.52, 0.42, and 0.39 times the maximum applied stress.

  17. Real-time Observations of Rock Cracking and Weather Provide Insights into Thermal Stress-Related Processes of Mechanical Weathering.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eppes, M. C.; Magi, B. I.; Keanini, R.

    2015-12-01

    The environmental conditions (weather and/or climate) that limit or drive mechanical weathering via thermal stress are poorly understood. Here we examine acoustic emission (AE) records of rock cracking in boulders sitting on the ground in humid-temperate (~1 year of data) and semi-arid (~3 years) locations. We compare on-site average ambient daily temperature for days in which cracking occurs to the average temperatures for those dates derived from local climate records. The temperatures characterizing days on which cracking occurs is similar for both stations (range = -10 C to +30 C); where 21% and 73% of cracking occurs on hot days (> 20C) in the humid and semi-arid climates respectively while 17% and 0.1% occurs on very cold days (-8C to -3C). When days during which cracking occurs are compared to climate averages, 81% (NC) and 51% (NM) of all cracking occurs on days with absolute temperature anomalies >1, regardless of the temperature. The proportion of cracking that occurs on anomalously hot or cold days rises to 92% and 77% when the data is normalized to account for uneven sampling of the days with extreme temperatures. In order to determine to what extent this trend holds true in a more complex setting, we examined an existing 100+ year record of rock falls from Yosemite Valley. Preliminary results, although more equivocal, are consistent with the boulder cracking AE data. We examine the AE datasets in the context of our previous numerical modeling of insolation-driven thermal stress in rock and hypothesize that there is an increased potential for fracture on days with extreme temperatures because 1) thermal-stress is dependent on temperature variance from far-field and/or average rock temperatures and 2) that days with climatologically extreme air temperatures result in maximums in such variance. An implication of our results is that environments with extreme weather variability may have higher thermal breakdown rates, including certain locations today and

  18. Comparison of methods for predicting fiber stresses in a cracked Kevlar/epoxy monolayer

    SciTech Connect

    Reedy, E.D. Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Shear-lag and 3-D finite element predictions for the fiber stresses in a cracked Kevlar 49/epoxy monolayer are compared. Results are given for a 5-fiber wide monolayer containing a single broken fiber. Both methods of analysis are found to predict nearly the same fiber stress distribution along the crack-tip fiber when the monolayer is fully elastic. Results for highly loaded monolayers with extensive matrix yielding are not in quite as good agreement, but even then the predicted stress distributions are within 5%. These calculations show that a shear-lag analysis is accurate even though the Kevlar 49 fiber is highly anisotropic.

  19. Effects of surface condition on the stress corrosion cracking of line pipe steel

    SciTech Connect

    Beavers, J.A.; Christman, T.K.; Parkins, R.N.

    1988-04-01

    The relationship between surface properties of line pipe steels and external stress corrosion cracking (SCC) is reviewed. Surface factors discussed include mill scale, surface pitting, decarburization, surface residual stresses, and near-surface stress state. Recent research results have demonstrated that the susceptibility of a line pipe steel to SCC initiation is dependent on complicated interaction among these properties. However, these studies also show that relatively simple surface preparation procedures such as grit blasting can be effective in reducing the susceptibility of pipelines to crack initiation.

  20. Aqueous stress-corrosion cracking of high-toughness D6AC steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbreath, W. P.; Adamson, M. J.

    1976-01-01

    The crack growth behavior of D6AC steel as a function of stress intensity, stress and corrosion history, and test technique, under sustained load in filtered natural seawater, 3.3 per cent sodium chloride solution, and distilled water, was investigated. Reported investigations of D6AC were considered in terms of the present study with emphasis on thermal treatment, specimen configuration, fracture toughness, crack-growth rates, initiation period, and threshold. Both threshold and growth kinetics were found to be relatively insensitive to these test parameters. The apparent incubation period was dependent on technique, both detection sensitivity and precracking stress intensity level.

  1. Stress intensity magnification factors for fully circumferential cracks in valve bodies (thick cylinders)

    SciTech Connect

    Toor, P.M.

    1998-11-01

    The stress intensity solutions presented herein were obtained using an energy method in conjunction with a two-dimensional finite element program in order to explicitly account for curvature effect for fully circumferential cracks. The magnification factors for a specific crack depth were calculated by successively loading the crack surface by a uniform, linear, quadratic, and a cubic loading distribution. The magnification factors can be used to calculate the stress intensity factors by superposition method. The functions for each load condition in terms of radius to thickness ratio (R/t) and a fractional distance in terms of crack depth to thickness ratio (a/t) were developed. The validity of these functions is R/t = 1.5 to 10.0 and for 0.0125 {le} a/t {le} 0.8125. The functions agree to within 1% of the finite elements solutions for most magnification factors.

  2. Influence of oxide films on primary water stress corrosion cracking initiation of alloy 600

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panter, J.; Viguier, B.; Cloué, J.-M.; Foucault, M.; Combrade, P.; Andrieu, E.

    2006-01-01

    In the present study alloy 600 was tested in simulated pressurised water reactor (PWR) primary water, at 360 °C, under an hydrogen partial pressure of 30 kPa. These testing conditions correspond to the maximum sensitivity of alloy 600 to crack initiation. The resulting oxidised structures (corrosion scale and underlying metal) were characterised. A chromium rich oxide layer was revealed, the underlying metal being chromium depleted. In addition, analysis of the chemical composition of the metal close to the oxide scale had allowed to detect oxygen under the oxide scale and particularly in a triple grain boundary. Implication of such a finding on the crack initiation of alloy 600 is discussed. Significant diminution of the crack initiation time was observed for sample oxidised before stress corrosion tests. In view of these results, a mechanism for stress corrosion crack initiation of alloy 600 in PWR primary water was proposed.

  3. Failure Pressure and Leak Rate of Steam Generator Tubes With Stress Corrosion Cracks

    SciTech Connect

    Majumdar, S.; Kasza, K.; Park, J.Y.; Bakhitiari, S.

    2002-07-01

    This paper illustrates the use of an 'equivalent rectangular crack' approach to predict leak rates through laboratory generated stress corrosion cracks. A comparison between predicted and observed test data on rupture and leak rate from laboratory generated stress corrosion cracks are provided. Specimen flaws were sized by post-test fractography in addition to pre-test advanced eddy current technique. The test failure pressures and leak rates are shown to be closer to those predicted on the basis of fractography than on NDE. However, the predictions based on NDE results are encouraging, particularly because they have the potential to determine a more detailed geometry of ligamentous cracks from which more accurate predictions of failure pressure and leak rate can be made in the future. (authors)

  4. Stress corrosion cracking of Ti-8Al-1 Mo-1V in molten salts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smyrl, W. H.; Blackburn, M. J.

    1975-01-01

    The stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behavior of Ti-8Al-1 Mo-1V has been studied in several molten salt environments. Extensive data are reported for the alloy in highly pure LiCl-KCl. The influence of the metallurgical heat treatment and texture, and the mechanical microstructure show similarities with aqueous solutions at lower temperature. The fracture path and cracking modes are also similar to that found in other environments. The influence of H2O and H(-) in molten LiCl-KCl lead to the conclusion that hydrogen does not play a major role in crack extension in this environment.

  5. Factors affecting the measurement of fatigue crack stress intensity factors using photoelastic coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Nurse, A.D.; Patterson, E.A.

    1995-12-31

    Photoelastic procedures to determine the stress intensity factors at the tip of a fatigue crack during dynamic and cyclic loading are described. To illustrate the techniques, tests were performed on a centered-cracked tensile panel under cyclic load. The measured SIFs were found to agree to within about 5% of an elastic solution. Finally, factors affecting the application of the procedures to more complex structures are considered.

  6. Three-dimensional elastic stress and displacement analysis of finite circular geometry solids containing cracks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gyekenyesi, J. P.; Mendelson, A.; Kring, J.

    1973-01-01

    A seminumerical method is presented for solving a set of coupled partial differential equations subject to mixed and coupled boundary conditions. The use of this method is illustrated by obtaining solutions for two circular geometry and mixed boundary value problems in three-dimensional elasticity. Stress and displacement distributions are calculated in an axisymmetric, circular bar of finite dimensions containing a penny-shaped crack. Approximate results for an annular plate containing internal surface cracks are also presented.

  7. Stress corrosion cracking of AISI 321 stainless steel in acidic seawater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yan-Liang; Hou, Bao-Rong; Cao, Chu-Nan; Lin, Hai-Chao

    1997-12-01

    The stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of AISI 321 stainless steel in acidic in acidic seawater was studied by slow strain rate (SSR) technique and fracture mechanics method. The fractured surface was characterized by cleavage fracture. The inhibiting effects of KI on SCC behavior were also covered in this detailed study which showed that they were mainly attributable to their inhibition on anodic reaction. The SCC mechanism study supported the unified mechanism of SCC and corrosion fatigue cracking (CFC).

  8. Stress corrosion cracking behavior of Nd:YAG laser-treated aluminum alloy 7075

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, T. M.; Yan, L. J.; Chan, C. P.

    2006-05-01

    Nd-YAG laser surface treatment was conducted on 7075-T651 aluminum alloy with the aim of improving the stress corrosion cracking resistance of the alloy. Laser surface treatment was performed under two different gas environments, air and nitrogen. After the laser treatment, coarse constituent particles were removed and fine cellular/dendritic structures had formed. In addition, for the N 2-treated specimen, an AlN phase was detected. The results of the stress corrosion test showed that after 30 days of immersion, the untreated specimen had been severely attacked by corrosion, with intergranular cracks having formed along the planar grain boundaries of the specimen. For the air-treated specimen, some relatively long stress corrosion cracks and a small number of relatively large corrosion pits were found. The cracks mainly followed the interdendritic boundaries; the fusion boundary was found to be acting as an arrestor to corrosion attacks. In contrast, only few short stress corrosion cracks appeared in the N 2-treated specimen, indicating an improvement in corrosion initiation resistance. The superior corrosion resistance was attributed to the formation of the AlN phase in the surface of the laser-melted layer, which is an electrical insulator. The electrochemical impedance measurements taken during the stress corrosion test showed that the film resistance of the laser-treated specimens was always higher than that of the untreated specimen, with the N 2-treated specimen showing the highest resistance.

  9. Mechanical and metallurgical effects on low-pH stress corrosion cracking of natural gas pipelines

    SciTech Connect

    Harle, B.A.; Beavers, J.A.; Jaske, C.E.

    1995-12-01

    Stress corrosion cracking of natural gas pipelines in low-pH environments is a serious problem for the gas transmission industry. This paper describes results of an ongoing research program investigating crack growth of API X-65 and X-52 line pipe steels in a low-pH cracking environment using a J-integral technique. The overall objective of the work is to estimate crack growth rates on operating pipelines. In previous work, it was demonstrated that the technique could be utilized to reproduce the cracking observed in the field and that the J integral is a good parameter for characterizing crack growth behavior. Recent work has focused on the evaluation of the influence of loading parameters, such as displacement rate, and metallurgy, on crack growth. Testing has also been performed in which loading sequences involved: (a) a constant displacement rate, until cracking was detected, followed by maintaining a constant displacement; and, (b) slowly loading a specimen to fifty percent of its tensile strength in an inert, non-aqueous environment followed by loading in the low-pH environment.

  10. Mechanisms of stress relief cracking in titanium stabilised austenitic stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chabaud-Reytier, M.; Allais, L.; Caes, C.; Dubuisson, P.; Pineau, A.

    2003-11-01

    The heat affected zone (HAZ) of AISI 321 welds may exhibit a serious form of cracking during service at high temperature. This form of damage, called 'stress relief cracking', is known to be due to work hardening but also to aging due to Ti(C,N) precipitation on dislocations which modifies the mechanical behaviour of the HAZ. The present study aims to analyse the latter embrittlement mechanism in one specific heat of 321 stainless steel. To this end, different HAZs are simulated using an annealing heat-treatment, followed by various cold rolling and aging conditions. Then, we study the effects of work hardening and aging on Ti(C,N) precipitation, on the mechanical (hardness, tensile and creep) behaviour of the simulated HAZs and on their sensitivity to intergranular crack propagation through stress relaxation tests performed on pre-cracked CT type specimens tested at 600 °C. It is shown that work hardening is the main parameter of the involved mechanism but that aging does not promote crack initiation although it leads to titanium carbide precipitation. Therefore, the role of Ti(C,N) precipitation on stress relief cracking mechanisms is discussed. An attempt is made to show that solute drag effects are mainly responsible for this form of intergranular damage, rather than Ti(C,N) precipitation.

  11. Crack initiation observation and local stress analysis in shear fracture tests of ultra-high strength steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Ninshu; Takada, Kenji; Sugimoto, Nao

    2016-08-01

    To investigate the local strain and stress at the crack initiation position in shear fracture test pieces of ultra-high strength steels, a butterfly shear fracture specimen was employed. The crack initiation position and propagation direction were observed during shear fracture tests by high speed cameras and investigated through analysing the fracture surface by scanning electron microscope. Further, the finite element method was employed and the stress-triaxiality at the crack initiation position was investigated. It can be obtained that the crack initiated at the position where the stress state is close to uniaxial tensile state or plane strain state more than pure shear stress state.

  12. Environmentally assisted cracking in light water reactors. Semiannual report, April--September 1991: Volume 13

    SciTech Connect

    Kassner, T F; Ruther, W E; Chung, H M; Hicks, P D; Hins, A G; Park, J Y; Soppet, W K; Shack, W J

    1992-03-01

    This report summarizes work performed by Argonne National Laboratory on fatigue and environmentally assisted cracking in high water reactors during the six months from April 1991 through September 1991. Topics that have been investigated during this period include (1) fatigue and stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of low-alloy steel used in piping and in steam generator and reactor pressure vessels; (2) role of chromate and sulfate in simulated boiling water reactor (BWR) water on SCC of sensitized Type 304 SS; and (3) radiation-induced segregation (RIS) and irradiation-assisted SCC of Type 304 SS after accumulation of relatively high fluence. Fatigue data were obtained on medium-S-content A533-Gr B and A106-Gr B steels in high-purity (HP) deoxygenated water, in simulated pressurized water reactor (PWR) water, and in air. Crack-growth-rates (CGRs) of composite specimens of A533-Gr B/Inconel-182/Inconel-600 (plated with nickel) and homogeneous specimens of A533-Gr B were determined under small- amplitude cyclic loading in HP water with {approx} 300 ppb dissolved oxygen. CGR tests on sensitized Type 304 SS indicate that low chromate concentrations in BWR water (25--35 ppb) may actually have a beneficial effect on SCC if the sulfate concentration is below a critical level. Microchemical and microstructural changes in HP and commercial-purity Type 304 SS specimens from control-blade absorber tubes used in two operating BWRs were studied by Auger electron spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy, and slow-strain,rate- tensile tests were conducts on tubular specimens in air and in simulated BWR water at 289{degrees}C.

  13. Cessation of environmentally-assisted cracking in a low-alloy steel: Experimental results

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Y.Y.

    1997-01-01

    The presence of dissolved metallurgical sulfides in pressure vessel and piping steels has been linked to Environmentally-Assisted Cracking (EAC), a phenomenon observed in laboratory tests that results in fatigue crack growth rates as high as 100 times that in air. Previous experimental and analytical work based on diffusion as the mass transport process has shown that surface cracks that are initially clean of sulfides will not initiate EAC in most applications. This is because the average crack tip velocity would not be sufficiently high to expose enough metallurgical sulfides per unit time and produce the sulfide concentration required for EAC. However, there is a potential concern for the case of a relatively large embedded crack breaking through to the wetted surface. Such a crack would not be initially clean of sulfides, and EAC could initiate. This paper presents the results of a series of experiments conducted on two heats of an EAC susceptible, high-sulfur, low-alloy steel in 243{degrees}C low-oxygen water to further study the phenomenon of EAC persistence at low crack tip velocities. A load cycle profile that incorporated a significant load dwell period at minimum load was used. In one experiment, the fatigue cycling history was such that relatively high crack tip velocities at the start of the experiment produced a persistent case of EAC even when crack tip velocities were later reduced to levels below the EAC initiation velocity. The other series of experiments used initial crack tip velocities that were much lower and probably more realistic. Air precracking of the compact tension specimens produced an initial inventory of undissolved sulfides on the crack flanks that directly simulates the array of sulfides expected from the breakthrough of an embedded crack. In all cases, results showed EAC ceased after several hundred hours of cycling.

  14. Intergranular stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of neutron-irradiated, thermally sensitized type 304 stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Onchi, T.; Hide, K.; Mayuzumi, M.; Hoshiya, T.

    2000-05-01

    Austenitic stainless steels (SS) have been used as core component materials for light water reactors. As reactors age, however, the material tends to suffer from degradation primarily resulting from irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) as well as intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC). Neutron-irradiated, thermally sensitized Type 304 (UNS S30400) stainless steels (SS) were examined by slow strain rate (SSR) stress corrosion cracking (SCC) tests in 290 C water of 0.2 ppm dissolved oxygen concentration (DO) and by SSR tensile tests in 290 C inert gas environment. Neutron fluences ranged from 4 x 10{sup 22} n/m{sup 2} to 3 x 10{sup 25} n/m{sup 2} (energy [E] > 1 MeV). percent intergranular (%IG) cracking, which has been used as an intergranular (IG) cracking susceptibility indicator in the SSR SCC tests, changes anomalously with neutron fluence in spite of the strain-to-failure rate decreasing with an increase of neutron fluence. Apparently, %IG is a misleading indicator for the irradiated, thermally sensitized Type 304 SS and for the irradiated, nonsensitized SS when IG cracking susceptibility is compared at different neutron fluences, test temperatures, DO, and strain rates. These test parameters may affect deformation and fracture behaviors of the irradiated SS during the SSR SCC tests, resulting in changing %IG, which is given by the ratio of the total IG cracking area to the entire fracture surface area. It is suggested that strain-to-IG crack initiation for the irradiated, thermally sensitized SS and for the irradiated, nonsensitized SS is the alternative indicator in the SSR SCC tests. An engineering expedient to determine the IG crack initiation strain is given by a deviating point on superposed stress-strain curves in inert gas and in oxygenated water. The strain-to-IG crack initiation becomes smaller with an increase of neutron fluence and DO. The SSR tensile tests in inert gas are needed to obtain strain-to-IG crack initiation in

  15. The contribution of activated processes to Q. [stress corrosion cracking in seismic wave attenuation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spetzler, H. A.; Getting, I. C.; Swanson, P. L.

    1980-01-01

    The possible role of activated processes in seismic attenuation is investigated. In this study, a solid is modeled by a parallel and series configuration of dashpots and springs. The contribution of stress and temperature activated processes to the long term dissipative behavior of this system is analyzed. Data from brittle rock deformation experiments suggest that one such process, stress corrosion cracking, may make a significant contribution to the attenuation factor, Q, especially for long period oscillations under significant tectonic stress.

  16. Effect of Stress on Corrosion at Crack Tip on Pipeline Steel in a Near-Neutral pH Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yao; Cheng, Y. Frank

    2016-10-01

    In this work, the local corrosion at crack tip on an API 5L X46 pipeline steel specimens was investigated under various applied loads in a near-neutral pH solution. Electrochemical measurements, including potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, combined with micro-electrochemical technique and surface characterization, were conducted to investigate the effect of stress on local anodic solution of the steel at the crack tip. The stress corrosion cracking of the steel was dominated by an anodic dissolution mechanism, while the effect of hydrogen was negligible. The applied load (stress) increased the corrosion rate at the crack tip, contributing to crack propagation. The deposit of corrosion products at the crack tip could protect somewhat from further corrosion. At sufficiently large applied loads such as 740 N in the work, it was possible to generate separated cathode and anode, further accelerating the crack growth.

  17. Corrosion fatigue crack propagation in metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gangloff, Richard P.

    1990-01-01

    This review assesses fracture mechanics data and mechanistic models for corrosion fatigue crack propagation in structural alloys exposed to ambient temperature gases and electrolytes. Extensive stress intensity-crack growth rate data exist for ferrous, aluminum and nickel based alloys in a variety of environments. Interactive variables (viz., stress intensity range, mean stress, alloy composition and microstructure, loading frequency, temperature, gas pressure and electrode potential) strongly affect crack growth kinetics and complicate fatigue control. Mechanistic models to predict crack growth rates were formulated by coupling crack tip mechanics with occluded crack chemistry, and from both the hydrogen embrittlement and anodic dissolution/film rupture perspectives. Research is required to better define: (1) environmental effects near threshold and on crack closure; (2) damage tolerant life prediction codes and the validity of similitude; (3) the behavior of microcrack; (4) probes and improved models of crack tip damage; and (5) the cracking performance of advanced alloys and composites.

  18. Stress-corrosion cracking issues related to a water-cooled ITER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, R. H.; Bruemmer, S. M.; Henager, C. H.

    1991-03-01

    A review of water impurity and temperature effects on stress-corrosion cracking of austenitic stainless steel is presented. These results demonstrate that stress-corrosion crack growth can occur at ITER relevant temperatures for certain water chemistries and material conditions. A model developed at PNL to calculate the degree of sensitization was used to estimate the potential for sensitization of Type 316 SS and US PCA. This analysis shows that both materials can be severely sensitized but, with proper processing and fabrication, sensitization should be avoidable.

  19. Remote field eddy current detection of stress-corrosion cracks. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Nestleroth, J.B.

    1990-02-01

    The feasibility of detecting stress-corrosion cracks (SSC) using the Remote Field Eddy Current (RFEC) technique was demonstrated. The RFEC technique interrogates the entire thickness of the pipe and is applicable for in-line inspection. If it can be shown that the RFEC technique is effective in detecting SSC, then the technique is an ideal method for detecting the defects of interest. A defect detection model is proposed for explaining the mechanism for crack detection. For axially oriented, closed cracks, such as SCC, the conventional defect detection model proved to be too simplistic and not applicable. Therefore, a new detection mode that examines the flow of circumferential eddy currents was developed based on experimental results. This model, though not rigorous, provides a general understanding of the applicability of the RFEC technique for finding SSC. The data from the cracks and various artificial defects is presented in three formats: isometric projections, pseudocolor images and line-of-sight data. Though only two cracks were found, the experimental results correlate well with the circumferential eddy current theory. A theoretical analysis of the effects of motion on the output signal of the receiver is presented. This analysis indicates that inspection speed of simple implementations may be limited to a few miles per hour. Remote field eddy current inspection has excellent potential for inspection of gas transmission lines for detecting stress corrosion cracks that should be further developed.

  20. Effect of film thickness and particle size on cracking stresses in drying latex films.

    PubMed

    Yow, Huai Nyin; Goikoetxea, Monika; Goehring, Lucas; Routh, Alexander F

    2010-12-15

    The stress at which latex films crack during drying was investigated using beam bending. Two systems were investigated: (i) poly(methyl methacrylate/butyl acrylate) particles cast as thin films to examine the effect of film thickness on cracking film stress and (ii) polystyrene particles dried as drops to investigate the effect of particle size. Results indicated an inverse relationship between film thickness and film stress, whilst film stress was shown to be independent of the original particle size. These outcomes were in good agreement with Tirumkudulu and Russel's theoretical analysis [M.S. Tirumkudulu and W.B. Russel, Langmuir 21 (2005) 4938], albeit the measured stress values were almost twice the theoretical estimation.

  1. Stress-corrosion cracking of sensitized stainless steel by sulfur-containing compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Isaacs, H.S.; Vyas, B.; Kendig, M.W.

    1981-01-01

    The stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of sensitized Type 304 stainless steel in thiosulfate solutions has been studied using constant extension rate tests. Very low concentrations of about 6.10/sup -7/M Na/sub 2/S/sub 2/O/sub 3/ (0.1ppm) gave cracking. With boric acid added, higher concentrations (1ppm) were required. The SCC was shown to be electrochemically controlled. Below -0.5v/sub SCE/ (-0.75/sub SHE/) no SCC took place; above this potential the rate of SCC increased with potential. An induction period was required before SCC continued above -0.5v if the potential was held at or below this value for extended times. This period was associated with the build up of an aggressive solution of thiosulfate decomposition products within the crack. The cracking process has been considered to be controlled by rupture of a salt layer and not a passivating oxide.

  2. Stress corrosion cracking of stainless steels in NaCl solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Speidel, Markus O.

    1981-05-01

    The metallurgical influences on the stress corrosion resistance of many commercial stainless steels have been studied using the fracture mechanics approach. The straight-chromium ferritic stainless steels, two-phase ferritic-austenitic stainless steels and high-nickel solid solutions (like alloys 800 and 600) investigated are all fully resistant to stress corrosion cracking at stress intensity (K1) levels ≤ MN • m-3/2 in 22 pct NaCl solutions at 105 °C. Martensitic stainless steels, austenitic stainless steels and precipitation hardened superalloys, all with about 18 pct chromium, may be highly susceptible to stress corrosion cracking, depending on heat treatment and other alloying elements. Molybdenum additions improve the stress corrosion cracking resistance of austenitic stainless steels significantly. The fracture mechanics approach to stress corrosion testing of stainless steels yields results which are consistent with both the service experience and the results from testing with smooth specimens. In particular, the well known “Copson curve” is reproduced by plotting the stress corrosion threshold stress intensity (ATISCC) vs the nickel content of stainless steels with about 18 pct chromium.

  3. Crack Arrest and Stress Dependence of Laser-Induced Surface Damage in Fused-Silica and Borosilicate Glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahmani, Faiz; Lambropoulos, John C.; Schmid, Ansgar W.; Papernov, Semyon; Burns, Stephen J.

    1999-11-01

    Results of experiments on stress-inhibited laser-driven crack growth and stress-delayed laser-damage initiation thresholds in fused silica, borosilicate glass (BK-7), and cleaved bulk silica are presented. A numerical model is developed to explain the crack arrest in fused silica. Good agreement is obtained between the model and a finite-element code. The crack arrest is demonstrated to be the result of the breaking of a hoop-stress symmetry that is responsible for crack propagation in fused silica.

  4. Characterization of damage due to stress corrosion cracking in carbon steel using nonlinear surface acoustic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeitvogel, D. T.; Matlack, K. H.; Kim, J.-Y.; Jacobs, L. J.; Singh, P. M.; Qu, J.

    2013-01-01

    Cold rolled carbon steel 1018C is widely used in pressurized fuel pipelines. In these structures, stress corrosion cracking (SCC) can pose a significant problem because cracks initiate late in the lifetime and often unexpectedly, but grow fast once they get started. To ensure a safe operation it is crucial that any damage can be detected before the structural stability is reduced by large cracks. In the early stages of SCC, microstructural changes occur which in many cases increase the acoustic nonlinearity of the material. Therefore, an initially monochromatic Rayleigh wave is distorted and measurable higher harmonics are generated. Different levels of stress corrosion cracking is induced in five specimens. For each specimen, nonlinear ultrasonic measurements are performed before and after inducing the damage. For the measurements, oil coupled wedge transducers are used to generate and detect tone burst Rayleigh wave signals. The amplitudes of the received fundamental and second harmonic waves are measured at varying propagation distances to obtain a measure for the acoustic nonlinearity of the specimens. The results show a damage-dependent increase in nonlinearity for early stages of damage, indicating the feasibility of this nonlinear ultrasonic method to detect the initiation of stress corrosion cracking.

  5. Mechanisms of stress-corrosion cracking of alloy X-750 in high-purity water

    SciTech Connect

    Grove, C.A.; Petzold, L.D.

    1985-09-01

    The high-strength, nickel-base alloy X-750 is susceptible to stress-corrosion cracking (SCC) in high-purity, deaerated water. Crack initiation occurs at high temperatures (>400F (204C)). Crack propagation occurs in both high-temperature and lowtemperature (<300F(149C)) water. High-temperature crack growth rates are on the order of mils per day. Low-temperature cracking is extremely rapid (approx. =100 in. (250 cm) per day). Three heat treatments of Alloy X-750 are investigated: stress equalized1625F (885C)/24 hours + 1300F (704C)/20 hours, direct aged-1300F (704C)/24 hours, and solution annealed and direct aged-2000F (1093C)/ 1 hour + 1300F (704C)/20 hours. Stress-equalized Alloy X-750 is most susceptible to SCC; solution-annealed and direct-aged Alloy X-750 is least susceptible. A hydrogen embrittlement model of SCC is developed that predicts SCC performance on the basis of grain boundary chemistry and grain boundary carbides. Phosphorus segregates to the grain boundary in concentrations of up to approx. =100 times the bulk concentration during processing and heat treatment. Phosphorus at the grain boundaries increases susceptibility to high- and low-temperature SCC. The presence of M23C6-type carbides and/or the absence of MC-type carbides at the grain boundaries improves SCC performance in high-temperature water.

  6. Mechanism of stress-corrosion cracking of Alloy X-750 in high purity water

    SciTech Connect

    Grove, C.A.; Petzold, L.D.

    1985-11-01

    The high strength Ni-base Alloy X-750 is susceptible to stress-corrosion cracking (SCC) in high purity, deaerated water. Crack initiation occurs at high temperatures (>400F). Crack propagation occurs in both high-temperature and low-temperature (<300F) water. High-temperature crack growth rates are on the order of mils/day. Low-temperature cracking is extremely rapid (approx.100 in./day). Three heat treatments of Alloy X-750 are investigated: (1) Stress Equalized - 1625F/24 hr + 1300F/20 hr, (2) Direct Aged - 1300F/24 hr, and (3) Solution Annealed and Direct Aged - 2000F/1 hr + 1300F/20 hr. Stress-equalized Alloy X-750 is most susceptible to SCC; solution-annealed and direct-aged Alloy X-750 is least susceptible. A Hydrogen Embrittlement Model of SCC is developed that predicts SCC performance on the basis of grain boundary chemistry and grain boundary carbides. Phosphorus segregates to the grain boundary in concentrations of up to approx.100 times the bulk concentration during processing and heat treatment. Phosphorus at the grain boundaries increases susceptibility to high- and low-temperature SCC. The presence of M23C6-type carbides and/or the absence of MC-type carbides at the grain boundaries improves SCC performance in high-temperature water. 18 figs., 5 tabs.

  7. Contraction stresses in dental composites adjacent to and at the bonded interface as measured by crack analysis.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Takatsugu; Nishide, Akihito; Swain, Michael V; Ferracane, Jack L; Sakaguchi, Ronald L; Momoi, Yasuko

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to calculate stresses produced by polymerization contraction in regions surrounding a dental resin composite restoration. Initial cracks were made with a Vickers indenter at various distances from the edge of a cylindrical hole in a soda-lime glass disk. Indentation crack lengths were measured parallel to tangents to the hole edge. Resin composites (three brands) were placed in the hole and polymerized (two light irradiation protocols) at equal radiation exposures. The crack lengths were re-measured at 2 and 10 min after irradiation. Radial tensile stresses due to polymerization contraction at the location of the cracks (σ(crack)) were calculated from the incremental crack lengths and the fracture toughness K(c) of the glass. Contraction stresses at the composite-glass bonded interface (σ(interface)) were calculated from σ(crack) on the basis of the simple mechanics of an internally pressurized thick-walled cylinder. The greater the distance or the shorter the time following polymerization, the smaller was σ(crack). Distance, material, irradiation protocol and time significantly affected σ(crack). Two-step irradiation resulted in a significant reduction in the magnitude of σ(interface) for all resin composites. The contraction stress in soda-lime glass propagated indentation cracks at various distances from the cavity, enabling calculation of the contraction stresses.

  8. Residual stress and crack propagation in laminated composites

    SciTech Connect

    Yttergren, R.M.F.; Zeng, K.; Rowcliffe, D.J.

    1994-12-31

    Residual stress distributions in several laminated ceramic composites were measured by an indentation technique. The material included alumina-zirconia laminated composites, containing strong interfaces, and alumina-porcelain laminated composites with both weak and strong interfaces. The residual stress in these material originates from the mismatch of the thermal properties, differences in elastic properties, and different shrinkage of the laminates during sintering. An experimental technique is presented which gives a direct view of the residual stress state in the materials. Values of residual tensile stress are presented as a function of position relative to the interface in each material.

  9. Irradiation-Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking of Austenitic Stainless Steels in BWR Environments

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Y.; Chopra, O. K.; Gruber, Eugene E.; Shack, William J.

    2010-06-01

    The internal components of light water reactors are exposed to high-energy neutron irradiation and high-temperature reactor coolant. The exposure to neutron irradiation increases the susceptibility of austenitic stainless steels (SSs) to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) because of the elevated corrosion potential of the reactor coolant and the introduction of new embrittlement mechanisms through radiation damage. Various nonsensitized SSs and nickel alloys have been found to be prone to intergranular cracking after extended neutron exposure. Such cracks have been seen in a number of internal components in boiling water reactors (BWRs). The elevated susceptibility to SCC in irradiated materials, commonly referred to as irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC), is a complex phenomenon that involves simultaneous actions of irradiation, stress, and corrosion. In recent years, as nuclear power plants have aged and irradiation dose increased, IASCC has become an increasingly important issue. Post-irradiation crack growth rate and fracture toughness tests have been performed to provide data and technical support for the NRC to address various issues related to aging degradation of reactor-core internal structures and components. This report summarizes the results of the last group of tests on compact tension specimens from the Halden-II irradiation. The IASCC susceptibility of austenitic SSs and heat-affected-zone (HAZ) materials sectioned from submerged arc and shielded metal arc welds was evaluated by conducting crack growth rate and fracture toughness tests in a simulated BWR environment. The fracture and cracking behavior of HAZ materials, thermally sensitized SSs and grain-boundary engineered SSs was investigated at several doses (≤3 dpa). These latest results were combined with previous results from Halden-I and II irradiations to analyze the effects of neutron dose, water chemistry, alloy compositions, and welding and processing conditions on IASCC

  10. Analysis of stress corrosion cracking in alloy 718 following commercial reactor exposure

    DOE PAGES

    Leonard, Keith J.; Gussev, Maxim N.; Stevens, Jacqueline N.; Busby, Jeremy T.

    2015-08-24

    Alloy 718 is generally considered a highly corrosion-resistant material but can still be susceptible to stress corrosion cracking (SCC). The combination of factors leading to SCC susceptibility in the alloy is not always clear enough. In this paper, alloy 718 leaf spring (LS) materials that suffered stress corrosion damage during two 24-month cycles in pressurized water reactor service, operated to >45 MWd/mtU burn-up, was investigated. Compared to archival samples fabricated through the same processing conditions, little microstructural and property changes occurred in the material with in-service irradiation, contrary to high dose rate laboratory-based experiments reported in literature. Though the lackmore » of delta phase formation along grain boundaries would suggest a more SCC resistant microstructure, grain boundary cracking in the material was extensive. Crack propagation routes were explored through focused ion beam milling of specimens near the crack tip for transmission electron microscopy as well as in polished plan view and cross-sectional samples for electron backscatter diffraction analysis. It has been shown in this study that cracks propagated mainly along random high-angle grain boundaries, with the material around cracks displaying a high local density of dislocations. The slip lines were produced through the local deformation of the leaf spring material above their yield strength. Also, the cause for local SCC appears to be related to oxidation of both slip lines and grain boundaries, which under the high in-service stresses resulted in crack development in the material.« less

  11. Cracking and Stress-Strain Behavior of Rock-Like Material Containing Two Flaws Under Uniaxial Compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yanlin; Zhang, Lianyang; Wang, Weijun; Pu, Chengzhi; Wan, Wen; Tang, Jingzhou

    2016-07-01

    This paper investigates the cracking and stress-strain behavior, especially the local strain concentration near the flaw tips, of rock-like material containing two flaws. A series of uniaxial compression tests were carried out on rock-like specimens containing two flaws, with strain gauges mounted near the flaw tips to measure the local strain concentration under the uniaxial compressive loading. Four different types of cracks (wing cracks, anti-wing cracks, coplanar shear cracks and oblique shear cracks) and seven patterns of crack coalescences (T1 and T2; S1 and S2; and TS1, TS2 and TS3) are observed in the experiments. The type of crack coalescence is related to the geometry of the flaws. In general, the crack coalescence varies from the S-mode to the TS-mode and then to the T-mode with the increase of the rock bridge ligament angle. The stress-strain curves of the specimens containing two flaws are closely related to the crack development and coalescence process. The strain measurements indicate that the local tensile strain concentration below or above the pre-existing flaw tip causes wing or anti-wing cracks, while the local compressive strain concentration near the flaw tip is related to the shear crack. The measured local tensile strain shows a jump at the initiation of wing- and anti-wing cracks, reflecting the instant opening of the wing- and anti-wing crack propagating through the strain gauge. During the propagation of wing- and anti-wing cracks, the measured local tensile strain gradually increases with few jumps, implying that the opening deformation of wing- and anti-wing cracks occurs in a stable manner. The shear cracks initiate followed by a large and abrupt compressive strain jump and then quickly propagate in an unstable manner resulting in the failure of specimens.

  12. An investigation of the effects of stress ratio on the micromechanisms of long and short fatigue crack growth in Ti-6Al-4V

    SciTech Connect

    Sinha, V.; Mercer, C.; Soboyejo, W.O.

    1999-07-01

    This paper presents the results of a recent study of the effects of positive stress ratios on the propagation of long and short fatigue cracks in mill annealed Ti-6Al-4V. Differences between the long fatigue crack growth rates at positive stress ratios (R = K{sub min}/K{sub max} = 0.02--0.8) are attributed largely to the effects of crack closure. Microstructurally short fatigue cracks are shown to grow at stress intensity factor ranges below the long crack fatigue threshold. Anomalously high fatigue crack growth rates and crack retardation are also shown to occur in the short crack regime until the short crack data merge with the long crack growth rate data in the Paris regime. Differences between the long and the short crack behavior are associated with differences in fatigue crack growth mechanisms.

  13. A STUDY OF CORROSION AND STRESS CORROSION CRACKING OF CARBON STEEL NUCLEAR WASTE STORAGE TANKS

    SciTech Connect

    BOOMER, K.D.

    2007-08-21

    The Hanford reservation Tank Farms in Washington State has 177 underground storage tanks that contain approximately 50 million gallons of liquid legacy radioactive waste from cold war plutonium production. These tanks will continue to store waste until it is treated and disposed. These nuclear wastes were converted to highly alkaline pH wastes to protect the carbon steel storage tanks from corrosion. However, the carbon steel is still susceptible to localized corrosion and stress corrosion cracking. The waste chemistry varies from tank to tank, and contains various combinations of hydroxide, nitrate, nitrite, chloride, carbonate, aluminate and other species. The effect of each of these species and any synergistic effects on localized corrosion and stress corrosion cracking of carbon steel have been investigated with electrochemical polarization, slow strain rate, and crack growth rate testing. The effect of solution chemistry, pH, temperature and applied potential are all considered and their role in the corrosion behavior will be discussed.

  14. Stress corrosion cracking of type 304L stainless steel core shroud welds.

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, H. M.; Park, J.-H.; Sanecki, J. E.; Zaluzec, N. J.; Yu, M. S.; Yang, T. T.

    1999-10-26

    Microstructural analyses by advanced metallographic techniques were conducted on mockup welds and a cracked BWR core shroud weld fabricated from Type 304L stainless steel. heat-affected zones of the shroud weld and mockup shielded-metal-arc welds were free of grain-boundary carbide, martensite, delta ferrite, or Cr depletion near grain boundaries. However, as a result of exposure to welding fumes, the heat-affected zones of the welds were significantly contaminated by fluorine and oxygen which migrate to grain boundaries. Significant oxygen contamination promotes fluorine contamination and suppresses classical thermal sensitization, even in Type 304 steels. Results of slow-strain-rate tensile tests indicate that fluorine exacerbates the susceptibility of irradiated steels to intergranular stress corrosion cracking. These observations, combined with previous reports on the strong influence of weld flux, indicate that oxygen and fluorine contamination and fluorine-catalyzed stress corrosion play a major role in cracking of Type 304L stainless steel core shroud welds.

  15. Internal stresses at the crystalline scale in textured ZrO2 films before lateral cracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berdin, Clotilde; Pascal, Serge; Tang, Yan

    2015-05-01

    Zirconium oxide layers are submitted to internal stresses that play a role in damage of the layer. Lateral cracking is often observed during Zr alloys oxidation. In this paper, we investigated the influence of the microstresses at the crystalline scale on the lateral cracking within a growing oxide on a plane substrate. A parametric study was carried out taking into account the crystallographic texture of the oxide and the presence of a tetragonal zirconia at the metal-oxide interface. Macroscopic computations and polycrystalline aggregate computations were performed. The result indicating the (1 0 6 bar) fiber texture as the most favorable was recovered. It was found that under macroscopic compressive stresses parallel to the plane metal-oxide interface, positive microstresses perpendicular to the interface develops. They can trigger the lateral cracking and the phenomenon is promoted by the presence of tetragonal zirconia at the metal-oxide interface.

  16. Grain-boundary structure effects on intergranular stress corrosion cracking of Alloy X-750

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Y.; Adams, B.L.; Olson, T.; Panayotou, N.

    1996-12-01

    It is well known that the properties and behavior of grain boundaries are strongly affected by local chemistry and atomic structure. This paper focuses on the mesoscale description of grain boundary structure (i.e., the five crystallographic degrees of freedom) and correlations with intergranular stress corrosion cracking observed in Alloy X-750. Orientation imaging microscopy, coupled with serial polishing, is used to reveal mesoscale structure and the connectivity of the grain boundary network. The propensity for cracking is correlated with the coincident site lattice (CSL) classification of grain boundary geometry, coupled with information about the orientation of the grain boundary plane. The data is interpreted to show that low-CSL boundaries (defined by the more restrictive Palumbo-Aust criterion), low-angle boundaries, and general boundaries with plane normals well off the principal stress axis, have low vulnerability to cracking.

  17. Ultrasonic Impact Treatment to Improve Stress Corrosion Cracking Resistance of Welded Joints of Aluminum Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, J.; Gou, G.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, W.; Chen, H.; Yang, Y. P.

    2016-07-01

    Stress corrosion cracking is one of the major issues for welded joints of 6005A-T6 aluminum alloy in high-speed trains. High residual stress in the welded joints under corrosion results in stress corrosion cracking. Ultrasonic impact treatment was used to control the residual stress of the welded joints of 6005A-T6 aluminum alloy. Experimental tests show that ultrasonic impact treatment can induce compressive longitudinal and transverse residual stress in the welded joint, harden the surface, and increase the tensile strength of welded joints. Salt-fog corrosion tests were conducted for both an as-welded sample and an ultrasonic impact-treated sample. The surface of the treated sample had far fewer corrosion pits than that of the untreated sample. The treated sample has higher strength and lower tensile residual stress than the untreated sample during corrosion. Therefore, ultrasonic impact treatment is an effective technique to improve the stress corrosion cracking resistance of the welded joints of 6005A-T6 aluminum alloy.

  18. SLiM-cut thin silicon wafering with enhanced crack and stress control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaes, Jan; Masolin, Alex; Pesquera, Amaia; Dross, Frédéric

    2010-08-01

    The 'Stress induced LIft-off Method' (SLiM-Cut) is a kerf-free method for thin silicon fabrication, being developed at imec for photovoltaic applications [1]. This method makes particularly efficient use of bulk material, thus cutting down the Si cost. SLIM-Cut uses a metallic layer on top of thick silicon substrate. The bonding is achieved at high temperature. Quenching the assembly down to room temperature builds up stress inside the material. The system relaxes by propagating a crack parallel to the metal-silicon interface. The propagation of this crack over the entire surface allows the formation of a silicon foil. The choice of the stress inducing layer is of the utmost importance: (1) the interfacial strength has to be high enough for the crack to grow in the Si lattice, (2) the metal migration has to be limited in order not to compromise the PV conversion efficiency, and (3) the deposition method of the stressing layer should be compatible with PV cell processing. The focus is laid on the two main compromises of the technology today: the precise control of the stress applied to the substrate, and the metal-Si interface. Regarding the control of the stress applied, we have intentionally initiated the crack. Better control of the crack propagation was demonstrated. Tuning of the temperature becomes therefore possible and lift-off was achieved for temperature processing as low as 700°C. Although all crystal orientations (including <100>) have been successfully lifted-off, the choice of the crystal orientation influences strongly the final result. Regarding the metal-Si interface, a detail elemental study has enabled us to identify the composition of the interface layers responsible for good adhesion to the Si. This investigation is also the first step to the engineering of specific paste and cleaning solutions.

  19. Determination of Stress Intensity Factor Distributions for "Interface" Cracks in Incompressible, Dissimilar Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, C. W.

    1997-01-01

    The present study was undertaken in order to develop test methods and procedures for measuring the variation of the stress intensity factor through the thickness in bimaterial specimens containing cracks within and parallel to the bond line using the frozen stress photoelastic method. Since stress freezing materials are incompressible above critical temperature, and since thick plates are to be employed which tend to produce a state of plane strain near the crack tip, the interface near tip fracture equations reduce to the classic form for homogeneous materials. Moreover, zero thickness interfaces do not exist when materials are bonded together. It was decided early on that it would be important to insure a uniform straight and accurate crack tip region through the thickness of the body to reduce scatter in the SIF distribution through the thickness. It was also observed that rubberlike materials which were desired to be modeled exhibited significant tip blunting prior to crack extension and that some blunting of the tip would provide a more realistic model. It should be noted that, in normal stress freezing photoelastic work, it is considered good practice to avoid utilizing data near bond lines in photoelastic models due to the bond line stresses which inevitably develop when two parts are bonded together. Thus, the present study involves certain exploratory aspects in deviating from standard practice in stress freezing work. With the above ideas in mind, several different test methods were investigated and are described in the following sections and appendices. The geometry selected for the program was a thick, edge cracked specimen containing a bond line.

  20. Stress corrosion cracking in canistered waste package containers: Welds and base metals

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, J.S.

    1998-03-01

    The current design of waste package containers include outer barrier using corrosion allowable material (CAM) such as A516 carbon steel and inner barrier of corrosion resistant material (CRM) such as alloy 625 and C22. There is concern whether stress corrosion cracking would occur at welds or base metals. The current memo documents the results of our analysis on this topic.

  1. A review and assessment of the stress-intensity factors for surface cracks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, J. C., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    The stress-intensity factor solutions proposed for a surface crack in a finite plate subjected to uniform tension are reviewed. Fourteen different solutions for the stress-intensity factors are compared. These solutions were obtained over the past 16 years using approximate analytical methods, experimental methods, and engineering estimates. The accuracy is assessed of the various solutions by correlating fracture data on surface-cracked tension specimens made of a brittle epoxy material. Fracture of the epoxy material was characterized by a constant value of stress-intensity factor at failure. Thus, the correctness of the various solutions is judged by the variations in the stress-intensity factors at failure. The solutions were ranked in order of minimum standard deviation. The highest ranking solutions correlated 95 percent of data analyzed within + or - 10 percent, whereas the lowest ranking solutions correlated 95 percent of data analyzed within + or - 20 percent. However, some solutions could be applied to all data considered, whereas others are limited with respect to crack shapes and crack sizes that could be analyzed.

  2. Overview of corrosion, corrosion protection, and stress-corrosion cracking of uranium and uranium alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Koger, J.W.

    1981-12-14

    This paper covers some basic definitions and provides some data. The 51 slides illustrates these definitions, crack initiation and propagation, sources of stress, types of specimens used for SCC, potentiostatic polarization, data for Mulberry and U-Nb alloys, effects of environment, and data for U-0.75 Ti and U-Mo alloys. (DLC)

  3. Overlapping double etch technique for evaluation of metallic alloys to stress corrosion cracking

    DOEpatents

    Steeves, Arthur F.; Stewart, James C.

    1981-01-01

    A double overlapping etch zone technique for evaluation of the resistance of metallic alloys to stress corrosion cracking. The technique involves evaluating the metallic alloy along the line of demarcation between an overlapping double etch zone and single etch zone formed on the metallic alloy surface.

  4. Overlapping double etch technique for evaluation of metallic alloys to stress corrosion cracking

    DOEpatents

    Not Available

    1980-05-28

    A double overlapping etch zone technique for evaluation of the resistance of metallic alloys to stress corrosion cracking is described. The technique involves evaluating the metallic alloy along the line of demarcation between an overlapping double etch zone and single etch zone formed on the metallic alloy surface.

  5. Stress-corrosion crack growth of Si-Na-K-Mg-Ca-P-O bioactive glasses in simulated human physiological environment

    PubMed Central

    Bloyer, D. R.; McNaney, J. M.; Cannon, R. M.; Saiz, E.; Tomsia, A. P.; Ritchie, R. O.

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes research on the stress-corrosion crack growth (SCCG) behavior of a new series of bioactive glasses designed to fabricate coatings on Ti and Co-Cr-based implant alloys. These glasses should provide improved implant fixation between implant and exhibit good mechanical stability in vivo. It is then important to develop an understanding of the mechanisms that control environmentally-assisted crack growth in this new family of glasses and its effect on their reliability. Several compositions have been tested in both static and cyclic loading in simulated body fluid. These show only small dependences of stress-corrosion crack growth behavior on the composition. Traditional SCCG mechanisms for silicate glasses appear to be operative for the new bioactive glasses studied here. At higher velocities, hydrodynamic effects reduce growth rates under conditions that would rarely pertain for small natural flaws in devices. PMID:17714778

  6. The structure of tempered martensite and its susceptibility to hydrogen stress cracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craig, Bruce D.; Krauss, George

    1980-11-01

    A series of 4130 steels modified with 0.50 pct Mo and 0.75 pct Mo were tempered at temperatures between 300 and 700 °C for one hour. The changes in the carbide dispersion and matrix substructure produced by tempering were measured by transmission electron microscopy. These measurements were correlated with resistance to hydrogen stress cracking produced by cathodic charging of specimens in three-point bending. Scanning electron microscopy showed that specimens tempered between 300 and 500 °C failed by intergranular cracking while those tempered at higher temperatures failed by a transgranular fracture mode. Auger electron spectroscopy showed that the intergranular fracture was associated with hydrogen interaction with P segregation and carbide formation at prior austenite grain boundaries. Transgranular cracking was initiated at inclusion particles from which cracks propagated to produce flat fracture zones extending over several prior austenite grains. The 4130 steels modified with higher Mo content resisted tempering and showed better hydrogen stress cracking resistance than did the unmodified 4130 steel. The transition in fracture mode is attributed to a decohesion mechanism in the low temperature tempered samples and a pressure mechanism in the highly tempered samples.

  7. Thermal Stress Cracking of Slide-Gate Plates in Steel Continuous Casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hyoung-Jun; Thomas, Brian G.; Kim, Seon-Hyo

    2016-04-01

    The slide-gate plates in a cassette assembly control the steel flow through the tundish nozzle, and may experience through-thickness cracks, caused by thermal expansion and/or mechanical constraint, leading to air aspiration and safety concerns. Different mechanisms for common and rare crack formation are investigated with the aid of a three-dimensional finite-element model of thermal mechanical behavior of the slide-gate plate assembly during bolt pretensioning, preheating, tundish filling, casting, and cooling stages. The model was validated with previous plant temperature measurements of a ladle plate during preheating and casting, and then applied to a typical tundish-nozzle slide-gate assembly. The formation mechanisms of different types of cracks in the slide-gate plates are investigated using the model and evaluated with actual slide-gate plates at POSCO. Common through-thickness radial cracks, found in every plate, are caused during casting by high tensile stress on the outside surfaces of the plates, due to internal thermal expansion. In the upper plate, these cracks may also arise during preheating or tundish filling. Excessive bolt tightening, combined with thermal expansion during casting may cause rare radial cracks in the upper and lower plates. Rare radial and transverse cracks in middle plate appear to be caused during tundish filling by impingement of molten steel on the middle of the middle plate that generates tensile stress in the surrounding refractory. The mechanical properties of the refractory, the bolt tightening conditions, and the cassette/plate design are all important to service life.

  8. Free-edge stress analysis of glass-epoxy laminates with matrix cracks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fish, John C.; O'Brien, T. K.

    1992-01-01

    The effect of matrix cracks on the composite delamination and interlaminar stresses is investigated in (+15/90n/-15)s glass-epoxy laminates (with values of n equal to 0, 1, 2, or 3) subjected to monotonically increasing tension loads. Three-dimensional (3D) and quasi-3D (Q3D) finite-element analyses are used to model the free-edge stress states in the laminates with and without a matrix crack, respectively. The Q3D results show that in-plane transverse tensile stresses exist in the +15 deg plies near the free edges of all of the laminates used and that only the interlaminar shear stress is high at the +15/theta interface. The results of 3D analysis indicate that large tensile interlaminar normal as well as shear stresses develop at the intersection of the matrix crack and the free edge. This suggests that the interlaminar normal stress plays a significant role in the failure of these laminates.

  9. Human plasma alpha 2-macroglobulin promotes in vitro oxidative stress cracking of Pellethane 2363-80A: in vivo and in vitro correlations.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Q H; McNally, A K; Rubin, K R; Renier, M; Wu, Y; Rose-Caprara, V; Anderson, J M; Hiltner, A; Urbanski, P; Stokes, K

    1993-03-01

    It is hypothesized in this study that the phenomenon of environmental stress cracking (ESC) in polyetherurethane is caused by a synergistic action of biological components in the body fluids, oxidative agents, and stress. An in vitro system is designed to mimic the in vivo system; human plasma contains certain biological components that can act as a stress cracking promoter, while H2O2 (Co) solution provides an oxidative reaction comparable to that observed in the respiratory burst of adherent macrophages and foreign-body giant cells. It is demonstrated that the phenomenon of in vivo stress cracking in Pellethane 2363-80A is duplicated by an in vitro system that involves a pretreatment of prestressed specimens with human plasma at 37 degrees C for 7 days followed by oxidation in 10% hydrogen peroxide with 0.10M cobalt chloride at 50 degrees C for 10 days. The pretreatment with plasma has a synergistic effect with the oxidation by H2O2 (Co) treatment to produce ESC. A plasma component responsible for promoting stress cracking in Pellethane polyurethane is identified to be alpha 2-macroglobulin (alpha 2M). PMID:7689567

  10. Threshold velocity for environmentally-assisted cracking in low alloy steels

    SciTech Connect

    Wire, G.L.; Kandra, J.T.

    1997-04-01

    Environmentally Assisted Cracking (EAC) in low alloy steels is generally believed to be activated by dissolution of MnS inclusions at the crack tip in high temperature LWR environments. EAC is the increase of fatigue crack growth rate of up to 40 to 100 times the rate in air that occurs in high temperature LWR environments. A steady state theory developed by Combrade, suggested that EAC will initiate only above a critical crack velocity and cease below this same velocity. A range of about twenty in critical crack tip velocities was invoked by Combrade, et al., to describe data available at that time. This range was attributed to exposure of additional sulfides above and below the crack plane. However, direct measurements of exposed sulfide densities on cracked specimens were performed herein and the results rule out significant additional sulfide exposure as a plausible explanation. Alternatively, it is proposed herein that localized EAC starting at large sulfide clusters reduces the calculated threshold velocity from the value predicted for a uniform distribution of sulfides. Calculations are compared with experimental results where the threshold velocity has been measured, and the predicted wide range of threshold values for steels of similar sulfur content but varying sulfide morphology is observed. The threshold velocity decreases with the increasing maximum sulfide particle size, qualitatively consistent with the theory. The calculation provides a basis for a conservative minimum velocity threshold tied directly to the steel sulfur level, in cases where no details of sulfide distribution are known.

  11. An Experimental Study of Fatigue Crack Growth in Aluminum Sheet Subjected to Combined Bending and Membrane Stresses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, Edward P.

    1997-01-01

    An experimental study was conducted to determine the effects of combined bending and membrane cyclic stresses on the fatigue crack growth behavior of aluminum sheet material. The materials used in the tests were 0.040-in.- thick 2024-T3 alclad and 0.090-in.-thick 2024-T3 bare sheet. In the tests, the membrane stresses were applied as a constant amplitude loading at a stress ratio (minimum to maximum stress) of 0.02, and the bending stresses were applied as a constant amplitude deflection in phase with the membrane stresses. Tests were conducted at ratios of bending to membrane stresses (B/M) of 0, 0.75, and 1.50. The general trends of the results were for larger effects of bending for the higher B/M ratios, the lower membrane stresses, and the thicker material. The addition of cyclic bending stresses to a test with cyclic membrane stresses had only a small effect on the growth rates of through-thickness cracks in the thin material, but had a significant effect on the crack growth rates of through-thickness cracks in the thick material. Adding bending stresses to a test had the most effect on the initiation and early growth of cracks and had less effect on the growth of long through-thickness cracks.

  12. FEM simulation of oxidation induced stresses with a coupled crack propagation in a TBC model system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seiler, P.; Bäker, M.; Rösier, J.

    2010-06-01

    Plasma sprayed thermal barrier coating systems are used on top of highly stressed components, e.g. on gas turbine blades, to protect the underlying substrate from the high surrounding temperatures. A typical coating system consists of the bond-coat (BC), the thermal barrier coating (TBC), and the thermally grown oxide (TGO) between the BC and the TBC. This study examines the failure mechanisms which are caused by the diffusion of oxygen through the TBC and the resulting growth of the TGO. To study the behaviour of the complex failure mechanisms in thermal barrier coatings, a simplified model system is used to reduce the number of system parameters. The model system consists of a bond-coat material (fast creeping Fecralloy or slow creeping MA956) as the substrate with a Y2O3 partially stabilised plasma sprayed zircon oxide TBC on top and a TGO between the two layers. Alongside the experimental studies a FEM simulation was developed to calculate the stress distribution inside the simplified coating system [1]. The simulation permits the identification of compression and tension areas which are established by the growth of the oxide layer. Furthermore a 2-dimensional finite element model of crack propagation was developed in which the crack direction is calculated by using short trial cracks in different directions. The direction of the crack in the model system is defined as the crack direction with the maximum energy release rate [2,3]. The simulated stress distributions and the obtained crack path provide an insight into the possible failure mechanisms in the coating and allow to draw conclusions for optimising real thermal barrier coating systems. The simulated growth stresses of the TGO show that a slow creeping BC may reduce lifetime. This is caused by stress concentration and cracks under the TGO. A slow creeping BC on the other hand reduces the stresses in the TBC. The different failure mechanisms emphasise the existence of a lifetime optimum which depends on

  13. In-situ stress analysis of multilayer environmental barrier coatings.

    SciTech Connect

    Harder, B. J.; Almer, J.; Lee, K. N.; Faber, K. T.; Northwestern Univ.; Rolls-Royce Corp.

    2009-06-01

    The biaxial stress and thermal expansion of multilayer doped-aluminosilicate environmental barrier coatings were measured in situ during cooling using microfocused high-energy X-rays in transmission. Coating stresses during cooling from 1000 C were measured for as-sprayed and thermally cycled samples. In the as-sprayed state, tensile stresses as high as 75 MPa were measured in the doped-aluminosilicate topcoat at 375 C, after which a drop in the stress occurred accompanied by through-thickness cracking of the two outermost layers. After thermally cycling the samples, the stress in the topcoat was reduced to approximately 50 MPa, and there was no drop in stress upon cooling. This stress reduction was attributed to a crystallographic phase transformation of the topcoat and the accompanying change in thermal expansion coefficient. The addition of a doped aluminosilicate to the mullite layer did not lower the stress in the topcoat, but may offer increased durability due to an increased compressive stress.

  14. Stress-Induced Martensite in Front of Crack Tips in NiTi Shape Memory Alloys: Modeling Versus Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maletta, C.; Young, M. L.

    2011-07-01

    NiTi-based shape memory alloys (SMAs) exhibit an unusual stress distribution at the crack tip as compared to common engineering materials, due to a stress-induced martensitic transformation resulting from highly localized stresses. Understanding the fracture mechanics of NiTi-based SMAs is critical to many of their applications. Here, we develop an analytical model, which predicts the boundaries of the transformation region in the crack tip vicinity of NiTi-based SMAs. The proposed model is based on a recent analytical approach which uses modified linear elastic fracture mechanics concepts to predict the crack tip stress distribution and transformation region in SMAs but, unfortunately, it applies only to the plane stress condition. To overcome this limitation, the proposed model accounts for stress triaxiality, which plays an important role in restricting crack tip plastic deformations in common ductile metals as well as the stress-induced martensite in NiTi SMAs. The effects of triaxial stress at the crack tip are taken into account by including a new parameter, the transformation constraint factor, which is based on the plastic constraint factor of elasto-plastic materials. The predictions of the model are compared with synchrotron x-ray micro-diffraction observations and satisfactory agreement is observed between the two results. Finally, the evolution of crack tip transformation boundaries during fracture tests of miniature compact tension specimens is predicted and the effects of applied load and crack length are discussed.

  15. Stress-ratio effect on mode II propagation of interlaminar fatigue cracks in graphite/epoxy composites

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, Keisuke; Tanaka, Hiroshi

    1997-12-31

    The effect of the stress ratio on the propagation behavior of Mode II interlaminar fatigue cracks was studied with unidirectional graphite/epoxy laminates, Toray T800H/{number_sign}3631. End-notched flexure (ENF) specimens were used for fatigue tests under the stress ratios of R = 0.2, 0.5, and 0.6; and end-loaded split (ELS) specimens were used for tests under R = {minus}1.0, {minus}0.5, and 0.2. For each stress ratio, the crack propagation rate was given by a power function of the stress intensity range, {Delta}K{sub 11}, in the region of rates above 10{sup {minus}9} m/cycle. Below this region, there exists the threshold for fatigue crack propagation. The threshold condition is given by a constant value of the stress intensity range, {Delta}K{sub 11th} = 1.8 MPa{radical}m. The crack propagation rate is determined by {Delta}K{sub 11} near the threshold, while by the maximum stress identity factor, K{sub 11max}, at high rates. A fracture mechanics equation is proposed for predicting the propagation rate of Mode II fatigue cracks under various stress ratios. The effect of the stress ratio on the micromechanism of Mode II fatigue crack propagation was discussed on the basis of the microscopic observations of fracture surfaces and near-crack-tip regions.

  16. Effects of Processing Residual Stresses on Fatigue Crack Growth Behavior of Structural Materials: Experimental Approaches and Microstructural Mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lammi, Christopher J.; Lados, Diana A.

    2012-01-01

    Fatigue crack growth mechanisms of long cracks through fields with low and high residual stresses were investigated for a common structural aluminum alloy, 6061-T61. Bulk processing residual stresses were introduced in the material by quenching during heat treatment. Compact tension (CT) specimens were fatigue crack growth (FCG) tested at varying stress ratios to capture the closure and K max effects. The changes in fatigue crack growth mechanisms at the microstructural scale are correlated to closure, stress ratio, and plasticity, which are all dependent on residual stress. A dual-parameter Δ K- K max approach, which includes corrections for crack closure and residual stresses, is used uniquely to connect fatigue crack growth mechanisms at the microstructural scale with changes in crack growth rates at various stress ratios for low- and high-residual-stress conditions. The methods and tools proposed in this study can be used to optimize existing materials and processes as well as to develop new materials and processes for FCG limited structural applications.

  17. Three-dimensional hybrid-stress finite element analysis of composite laminates with cracks and cutouts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, S. S.

    1985-01-01

    A three-dimensional hybrid-stress finite element analysis of composite laminates containing cutouts and cracks is presented. Fully three-dimensional, hexahedral isoparametric elements of the hybrid-stress model are formulated on the basis of the Hellinger-Reissner variational principle. Traction-free edges, cutouts, and crack surfaces are modeled by imposition of exact traction boundary conditions along element surfaces. Special boundary and surface elements are constructed by introducing proper constraints on assumed stress functions. The Lagrangian multiplier technique is used to enforce ply-interface continuity conditions in hybrid bimaterial composite elements for modeling the interface region in a composite laminate. Two examples are given to illustrate the capability of the present method of approach: (1) the well-known delamination problem in an angle-ply laminate, and (2) the important problem of a composite laminate containing a circular hole. Results are presented in detail for each case. Implications of interlaminar and intralaminar crack initiation, growth and fracture in composites containing cracks and cutouts are discussed.

  18. Recent developments in analysis of crack propagation and fracture of practical materials. [stress analysis in aircraft structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hardrath, H. F.; Newman, J. C., Jr.; Elber, W.; Poe, C. C., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    The limitations of linear elastic fracture mechanics in aircraft design and in the study of fatigue crack propagation in aircraft structures are discussed. NASA-Langley research to extend the capabilities of fracture mechanics to predict the maximum load that can be carried by a cracked part and to deal with aircraft design problems are reported. Achievements include: (1) improved stress intensity solutions for laboratory specimens; (2) fracture criterion for practical materials; (3) crack propagation predictions that account for mean stress and high maximum stress effects; (4) crack propagation predictions for variable amplitude loading; and (5) the prediction of crack growth and residual stress in built-up structural assemblies. These capabilities are incorporated into a first generation computerized analysis that allows for damage tolerance and tradeoffs with other disciplines to produce efficient designs that meet current airworthiness requirements.

  19. Determination of Stress-Corrosion Cracking in Aluminum-Lithium Alloy ML377

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valek, Bryan C.

    1995-01-01

    The use of aluminum-lithium alloys for aerospace applications is currently being studied at NASA Langley Research Center's Metallic Materials Branch. The alloys in question will operate under stress in a corrosive environment. These conditions are ideal for the phenomena of Stress-Corrosion Cracking (SCC) to occur. The test procedure for SCC calls for alternate immersion and breaking load tests. These tests were optimized for the lab equipment and materials available in the Light Alloy lab. Al-Li alloy ML377 specimens were then subjected to alternate immersion and breaking load tests to determine residual strength and resistance to SCC. Corrosion morphology and microstructure were examined under magnification. Data shows that ML377 is highly resistant to stress-corrosion cracking.

  20. Stress Corrosion Crack Growth Rate Testing and Analytical Electron Microscopy of Alloy 600 as a Function of Pourbaix Space and Microstructure

    SciTech Connect

    N. Lewis; S.A. Attanasio; D.S. Morton; G.A. Young

    2000-10-04

    Stress corrosion crack (SCC) growth rate tests and analytical electron microscopy (AEM) studies were performed over a broad range of environments and heat treatments of Alloy 600. This effort was conducted to correlate bulk environmental conditions such as pH and electrochemical potential (EcP) with the morphology of the SCC crack. Development of a library of AEM morphologies formed by SCC in different environments is an important step in identifying the conditions that lead to SCC in components. Additionally, AEM examination of stress corrosion cracks formed in different environments and microstructures lends insight into the mechanism(s) of stress corrosion cracking. Testing was conducted on compact tension specimens in three environments: a mildly acidic oxidizing environment containing sulfate ions, a caustic environment containing 10% NaOH, and hydrogenated near-neutral buffered water. Additionally, stress corrosion cracking testing of a smooth specimen was conducted in hydrogenated steam. The following heat treatments of Alloy 600 were examined: mill annealed at 980 C (near-neutral water), mill annealed at 1010 C (steam), sensitized (acid and caustic), and mill annealed + healed to homogenize the grain boundary Cr concentration (caustic). Crack growth rate (CGR) testing showed that sensitized Alloy 600 tested in the mildly acidic, oxidizing environment containing sulfate ions produced the fastest cracking ({approx} 8.8 {micro}m/hr at 260 C), and AEM examination revealed evidence of sulfur segregation to the crack tip. The caustic environment produced slower cracking ({approx} 0.4 {micro}m/hr at 307 C) in the mill annealed + healed heat treatment but no observed cracking in the sensitized condition. In the caustic environment, fully oxidized carbides were present in the crack wake but not ahead of the crack tip. In near-neutral buffered water at 338 C, the CGR was a function of dissolved hydrogen in the water and exhibited a maximum (0.17 {micro}m/hr) near the

  1. The relative stress-corrosion-cracking susceptibility of candidate aluminum-lithium alloys for aerospace applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pizzo, P. P.

    1982-01-01

    Stress corrosion tests of Al-Li-Cu powder metallurgy alloys are described. Alloys investigated were Al-2.6% Li-1.4% and Al-2.6% Li-1.4% Cu-1.6% Mg. The base properties of the alloys were characterized. Process, heat treatment, and size/orientational effects on the tensile and fracture behavior were investigated. Metallurgical and electrochemical conditions are identified which provide reproducible and controlled parameters for stress corrosion evaluation. Preliminary stress corrosion test results are reported. Both Al-Li-Cu alloys appear more susceptible to stress corrosion crack initiation than 7075-T6 aluminum, with the magnesium bearing alloy being the most susceptible. Tests to determine the threshold stress intensity for the base and magnesium bearing alloys are underway. Twelve each, bolt loaded DCB type specimens are under test (120 days) and limited crack growth in these precracked specimens has been observed. General corrosion in the aqueous sodium chloride environment is thought to be obscuring results through crack tip blunting.

  2. Evaluation of the stress corrosion cracking resistance of several high strength low alloy steels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humphries, T. S.; Nelson, E. E.

    1980-01-01

    The stress corrosion cracking resistance was studied for high strength alloy steels 4130, 4340, for H-11 at selected strength levels, and for D6AC and HY140 at a single strength. Round tensile and C-ring type specimens were stressed up to 100 percent of their yield strengths and exposed to alternate immersion in salt water, salt spray, the atmosphere at Marshall Space Flight Center, and the seacoast at Kennedy Space Center. Under the test conditions, 4130 and 4340 steels heat treated to a tensile strength of 1240 MPa (180 ksi), H-11 and D6AC heat treated to a tensile strength of 1450 MPa (210 ksi), and HY140 (1020 MPa, 148 ksi) are resistant to stress corrosion cracking because failures were not encountered at stress levels up to 75 percent of their yield strengths. A maximum exposure period of one month for alternate immersion in salt water or salt spray and three months for seacoast is indicated for alloy steel to avoid false indications of stress corrosion cracking because of failure resulting from severe pitting.

  3. Ultrasonic inspection of austenitic stainless steel welds with artificially produced stress corrosion cracks

    SciTech Connect

    Dugan, Sandra; Wagner, Sabine

    2014-02-18

    Austenitic stainless steel welds and nickel alloy welds, which are widely used in nuclear power plants, present major challenges for ultrasonic inspection due to the grain structure in the weld. Large grains in combination with the elastic anisotropy of the material lead to increased scattering and affect sound wave propagation in the weld. This results in a reduced signal-to-noise ratio, and complicates the interpretation of signals and the localization of defects. Mechanized ultrasonic inspection was applied to study austenitic stainless steel test blocks with different types of flaws, including inter-granular stress corrosion cracks (IGSCC). The results show that cracks located in the heat affected zone of the weld are easily detected when inspection from both sides of the weld is possible. In cases of limited accessibility, when ultrasonic inspection can be carried out only from one side of a weld, it may be difficult to distinguish between signals from scattering in the weld and signals from cracks.

  4. High-Performance Laser Peening for Effective Mitigation of Stress Corrosion Cracking

    SciTech Connect

    Hackel, L; Hao-Lin, C; Wong, F; Hill, M

    2002-10-02

    Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in the Yucca Mountain waste package closure welds is believed to be the greatest threat to long-term containment. Use of stress mitigation to eliminate tensile stresses resulting from welding can prevent SCC. A laser technology with sufficient average power to achieve high throughput has been developed and commercially deployed with high peak power and sufficiently high average power to be an effective laser peening system. An appropriately applied version of this process could be applied to eliminate SCC in the waste package closure welds.

  5. Effect of Loading History on Stress Corrosion Cracking of 7075-T651 Aluminum Alloy in Saline Aqueous Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jixi; Kalnaus, Sergiy; Behrooz, Majid; Jiang, Yanyao

    2011-02-01

    An experimental study of stress corrosion cracking (SCC) was conducted on 7075-T651 aluminum alloy in a chromate-inhibited, acidic 3.5 pct sodium chloride aqueous solution using compact tension specimens with a thickness of 3.8 mm under permanent immersion conditions. The effects of loading magnitude, overload, underload, and two-step high-low sequence loading on incubation time and crack growth behavior were investigated. The results show that the SCC process consists of three stages: incubation, transient crack growth, and stable crack growth. The incubation time is highly dependent on the load level. Tensile overload or compressive underload applied prior to SCC significantly altered the initiation time of corrosion cracking. Transition from a high to a low loading magnitude resulted in a second incubation but much shorter or disappearing transient stage. The stable crack growth rate is independent of stress intensity factor in the range of 10 to 22 MPa sqrt {{m}}.

  6. On stress analysis of a crack-layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chudnovsky, A.; Dolgopolsky, A.; Kachanov, M.

    1984-01-01

    This work considers the problem of elastic interaction of a macrocrack with an array of microcracks in the vicinity of the macrocrack tip. Using the double layer potential techniques, the solution to the problem within the framework of the plane problem of elastostatics has been obtained. Three particular problems of interest to fracture mechanics have been analyzed. It follows from analysis that microcrack array can either amplify or reduce the resulting stress field of the macrocrack-microcrack array system depending on the array's configuration. Using the obtained elastic solution the energy release rate associated with the translational motion of the macrocrack-microcrack array system has been evaluated.

  7. Prediction of fatigue crack growth kinetics in the plane structural elements of aircraft in the biaxial stress state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shanyavskij, A. A.; Karaev, K. Z.; Grigor'ev, V. M.; Koronov, M. Z.; Orlov, E. F.

    1991-07-01

    The kinetics of fatigue crack growth in the case of a complex stress state is investigated with particular reference to D16T aluminum alloy. By using simulation models in the form of plane cruciform specimens, the characteristics of fatigue crack growth are investigated under conditions of uniaxial and biaxial tension-compression, with the ratio of the main stresses varying from -1 to 1.5. An algorithm is developed which makes it possible to predict the kinetics of fatigue crack growth and the equivalent stress level under conditions of multiparametric loading.

  8. The effect of heat treatment and test parameters on the aqueous stress corrosion cracking of D6AC steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbreath, W. P.; Adamson, M. J.

    1974-01-01

    The crack growth behavior of D6AC steel as a function of stress intensity, stress and corrosion history and test technique, under sustained load in natural seawater, 3.3 percent NaCl solution, distilled water, and high humidity air was investigated. Reported investigations of D6AC were considered with emphasis on thermal treatment, specimen configuration, fracture toughness, crack-growth rates, initiation period, threshold, and the extension of corrosion fatigue data to sustained load conditions. Stress history effects were found to be most important in that they controlled incubation period, initial crack growth rates, and apparent threshold.

  9. Analysis of corner cracks at hole by a 3-D weight function method with stresses from finite element method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhao, W.; Newman, J. C., Jr.; Sutton, M. A.; Wu, X. R.; Shivakumar, K. N.

    1995-01-01

    Stress intensity factors for quarter-elliptical corner cracks emanating from a circular hole are determined using a 3-D weight function method combined with a 3-D finite element method. The 3-D finite element method is used to analyze uncracked configuration and provide stress distribution in the region where crack is to occur. Using this stress distribution as input, the 3-D weight function method is used to determine stress intensity factors. Three different loading conditions, i.e. remote tension, remote bending and wedge loading, are considered for a wide range in geometrical parameters. The significance in using 3-D uncracked stress distribution and the difference between single and double corner cracks are studied. Typical crack opening displacements are also provided. Comparisons are made with solutions available in the literature.

  10. Experimental and numerical study of fatigue crack propagation in a thick-walled cylinder under cyclic hoop stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salam, I.; Malik, M. A.; Abid, M.; Farooque, M.

    2014-06-01

    In present work, after finding the anisotropy resulting in dissimilar properties in different orientations of a thick-walled cylinder, experimental and numerical study was performed to reveal the fatigue crack growth behavior of the cylinder under cyclic hoop stress. Fatigue crack growth experiments were conducted on middle tension M(T) samples prepared in an orientation to simulate the hoop stress on the cylinder. The tests were conducted under constant amplitude loading at R ratio 0.1. The fatigue crack growth data was compiled and applied to simulate and predict the crack growth process using two dimensional parametric finite element technique. The fatigue crack propagation was simulated, based on linear elastic fracture mechanics and stress intensity factor determination. Both the experimental and numerical results of crack growth data, at stress levels of 10 to 40 per cent of the yield stress of the material, were found in close agreement. The disparity observed was concluded in the range of statistical scatter in the experimental data. The crack growth rate and the fatigue life of the samples obtained from the experiments and the simulation were also in good agreement at all the stress levels analyzed.

  11. The role of local strains from prior cold work on stress corrosion cracking of α-brass in Mattsson's solution

    SciTech Connect

    Ulaganathan, Jaganathan Newman, Roger C.

    2014-06-01

    The dynamic strain rate ahead of a crack tip formed during stress corrosion cracking (SCC) under a static load is assumed to arise from the crack propagation. The strain surrounding the crack tip would be redistributed as the crack grows, thereby having the effect of dynamic strain. Recently, several studies have shown cold work to cause accelerated crack growth rates during SCC, and the slip-dissolution mechanism has been widely applied to account for this via a supposedly increased crack-tip strain rate in cold worked material. While these interpretations consider cold work as a homogeneous effect, dislocations are generated inhomogeneously within the microstructure during cold work. The presence of grain boundaries results in dislocation pile-ups that cause local strain concentrations. The local strains generated from cold working α-brass by tensile elongation were characterized using electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD). The role of these local strains in SCC was studied by measuring the strain distributions from the same regions of the sample before cold work, after cold work, and after SCC. Though, the cracks did not always initiate or propagate along boundaries with pre-existing local strains from the applied cold work, the local strains surrounding the cracked boundaries had contributions from both the crack propagation and the prior cold work. - Highlights: • Plastic strain localization has a complex relationship with SCC susceptibility. • Surface relief created by cold work creates its own granular strain localization. • Cold work promotes crack growth but several other factors are involved.

  12. STRESS CORROSION CRACK GROWTH RESPONSE FOR ALLOY 152/52 DISSIMILAR METAL WELDS IN PWR PRIMARY WATER

    SciTech Connect

    Toloczko, Mychailo B.; Olszta, Matthew J.; Overman, Nicole R.; Bruemmer, Stephen M.

    2015-08-15

    As part of ongoing research into primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) susceptibility of alloy 690 and its welds, SCC tests have been conducted on alloy 152/52 dissimilar metal (DM) welds with cracks positioned with the goal to assess weld dilution and fusion line effects on SCC susceptibility. No increased crack growth rate was found when evaluating a 20% Cr dilution zone in alloy 152M joined to carbon steel (CS) that had not undergone a post-weld heat treatment (PWHT). However, high SCC crack growth rates were observed when the crack reached the fusion line of that material where it propagated both on the fusion line and in the heat affected zone (HAZ) of the carbon steel. Crack surface and crack profile examinations of the specimen revealed that cracking in the weld region was transgranular (TG) with weld grain boundaries not aligned with the geometric crack growth plane of the specimen. The application of a typical pressure vessel PWHT on a second set of alloy 152/52 – carbon steel DM weld specimens was found to eliminate the high SCC susceptibility in the fusion line and carbon steel HAZ regions. PWSCC tests were also performed on alloy 152-304SS DM weld specimens. Constant K crack growth rates did not exceed 5x10-9 mm/s in this material with post-test examinations revealing cracking primarily on the fusion line and slightly into the 304SS HAZ.

  13. Internal Crack Propagation in a Continuously Cast Austenitic Stainless Steel Analyzed by Actual Residual Stress Tensor Distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Youichi; Tanaka, Shun-Ichiro

    2016-04-01

    Initiation, propagation, and termination of internal cracks in a continuously cast austenitic stainless steel has been investigated with emphasis on stress loading of the solidified shell during casting. Cracks were formed at the center of the slab, parallel to the width of the cast, and were observed near the narrow faces. Optimized two-dimensional X-ray diffraction method was employed to measure residual stress tensor distributions around the cracks in the as-cast slab with coarse and strongly preferentially oriented grains. The tensor distributions had a sharp peak, as high as 430 MPa, at the crack end neighboring the columnar grains. On the other hand, lower values were measured at the crack end neighboring the equiaxed grains, where the local temperatures were higher during solidification. The true residual stress distributions were determined by evaluating the longitudinal elastic constant for each measured position, resulting in more accurate stress values than before. Electron probe micro-analysis at the terminal crack position showed that Ni, Ti, and Si were concentrated at the boundaries of the equiaxed grains, where the tensile strength was estimated to be lower than at the primary grains. A model of the crack formation and engineering recommendations to reduce crack formation are proposed.

  14. The role of hydrogen in hot-salt stress corrosion cracking of titanium-aluminum alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ondrejcin, R. S.

    1971-01-01

    Additional support is presented for the previously proposed role of hydrogen as an embrittling agent in hot-salt stress corrosion cracking of titanium-aluminum alloys. The main source of hydrogen formed during the reactions of titanium alloys with hot salt was identified as water associated with the salt. Hydrogen is produced by the reaction of an intermediate (hydrogen halide) with the alloy rather than from metal-water reactions. The fracture mode of precracked tensile specimens was ductile when the specimens were tested in air, and brittle when tests were made in high-pressure hydrogen. Stressed titanium-aluminum alloys also were cracked by bombardment with hydrogen ions produced in a proton accelerator. The approximate concentrations of the hydrogen ions in the alloys were calculated.

  15. Stress corrosion cracking tests on high-level-waste container materials in simulated tuff repository environments

    SciTech Connect

    Abraham, T.; Jain, H.; Soo, P.

    1986-06-01

    Types 304L, 316L, and 321 austenitic stainless steel and Incoloy 825 are being considered as candidate container materials for emplacing high-level waste in a tuff repository. The stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of these materials under simulated tuff repository conditions was evaluated by using the notched C-ring method. The tests were conducted in boiling synthetic groundwater as well as in the steam/air phase above the boiling solutions. All specimens were in contact with crushed Topopah Spring tuff. The investigation showed that microcracks are frequently observed after testing as a result of stress corrosion cracking or intergranular attack. Results showing changes in water chemistry during test are also presented.

  16. Scanning electron acoustic microscopy of indentation-induced cracks and residual stresses in ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cantrell, John H.; Qian, Menglu; Ravichandran, M. V.; Knowles, K. M.

    1990-01-01

    The ability of scanning electron acoustic microscopy (SEAM) to characterize ceramic materials is assessed. SEAM images of Vickers indentations in SiC whisker-reinforced alumina clearly reveal not only the radial cracks, the length of which can be used to estimate the fracture toughness of the material, but also reveal strong contrast, interpreted as arising from the combined effects of lateral cracks and the residual stress field left in the SiC whisker-reinforced alumina by the indenter. The strong contrast is removed after the material is heat treated at 1000 C to relieve the residual stresses around the indentations. A comparison of these observations with SEAM and reflected polarized light observations of Vickers indentations in soda-lime glass both before and after heat treatment confirms the interpretation of the strong contrast.

  17. Environmentally assisted cracking in light-water reactors: Semi-annual report, January--June 1997. Volume 24

    SciTech Connect

    Chopra, O.K.; Chung, H.M.; Gruber, E.E.

    1998-04-01

    This report summarizes work performed by Argonne National Laboratory on fatigue and environmentally assisted cracking (EAC) in light water reactors from January 1997 to June 1997. Topics that have been investigated include (a) fatigue of carbon, low-alloy, and austenitic stainless steels (SSs) used in reactor piping and pressure vessels, (b) irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking of Types 304 and 304L SS, and (c) EAC of Alloys 600 and 690. Fatigue tests were conducted on ferritic and austenitic SSs in water that contained various concentrations of dissolved oxygen (DO) to determine whether a slow strain rate applied during various portions of a tensile-loading cycle is equally effective in decreasing fatigue life. Slow-strain-rate-tensile tests were conducted in simulated boiling water reactor (BWR) water at 288 C on SS specimens irradiated to a low fluence in the Halden reactor and the results were compared with similar data from a control-blade sheath and neutron-absorber tubes irradiated in BWRs to the same fluence level. Crack-growth-rate tests were conducted on compact-tension specimens from several heats of Alloys 600 and 690 in low-DO, simulated pressurized water reactor environments.

  18. Crack prediction in EB-PVD thermal barrier coatings based on the simulation of residual stresses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, J. W.; Zhao, Y.; Liu, S.; Zhang, Z. Z.; Ma, J.

    2016-07-01

    Thermal barrier coatings systems (TBCs) are widely used in the field of aerospace. The durability and insulating ability of TBCs are highly dependent on the residual stresses of top coatings, thus the investigation of the residual stresses is helpful to understand the failure mechanisms of TBCs. The simulation of residual stresses evolution in electron beam physical vapor deposition (EB-PVD) TBCs is described in this work. The interface morphology of TBCs subjected to cyclic heating and cooling is observed using scanning electron microscope (SEM). An interface model of TBCs is established based on thermal elastic-plastic finite method. Residual stress distributions in TBCs are obtained to reflect the influence of interfacial roughness. Both experimental and simulation results show that it is feasible to predict the crack location by stress analysis, which is crucial to failure prediction.

  19. Hierarchical Petascale Simulation Framework For Stress Corrosion Cracking

    SciTech Connect

    Grama, Ananth

    2013-12-18

    A number of major accomplishments resulted from the project. These include: • Data Structures, Algorithms, and Numerical Methods for Reactive Molecular Dynamics. We have developed a range of novel data structures, algorithms, and solvers (amortized ILU, Spike) for use with ReaxFF and charge equilibration. • Parallel Formulations of ReactiveMD (Purdue ReactiveMolecular Dynamics Package, PuReMD, PuReMD-GPU, and PG-PuReMD) for Messaging, GPU, and GPU Cluster Platforms. We have developed efficient serial, parallel (MPI), GPU (Cuda), and GPU Cluster (MPI/Cuda) implementations. Our implementations have been demonstrated to be significantly better than the state of the art, both in terms of performance and scalability. • Comprehensive Validation in the Context of Diverse Applications. We have demonstrated the use of our software in diverse systems, including silica-water, silicon-germanium nanorods, and as part of other projects, extended it to applications ranging from explosives (RDX) to lipid bilayers (biomembranes under oxidative stress). • Open Source Software Packages for Reactive Molecular Dynamics. All versions of our soft- ware have been released over the public domain. There are over 100 major research groups worldwide using our software. • Implementation into the Department of Energy LAMMPS Software Package. We have also integrated our software into the Department of Energy LAMMPS software package.

  20. Combined effect of matrix cracking and stress-free edge on delamination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salpekar, S. A.; Obrien, T. K.

    1990-01-01

    The effect of the stress-free edge on the growth of local delaminations initiating from a matrix crack in (0 sub 2/90 sub 4) sub s and (+ or - 45.90 sub 4) sub s glass epoxy laminates is investigated using 3-D finite element analysis. The presence of high interlaminar normal stresses at the intersection (corner) of the matrix crack with the stress-free edge, suggests that a mode I delamination may initiate at the corners. The strain energy release rates (G) were calculated by modeling a uniform through-width delamination and two inclined delaminations at 10.6 deg and 45 deg to the matrix crack. All components of G have high values near the free edges. The mode I component of G is high at small delamination length and becomes zero for a delamination length of one-ply thickness. The total G values near the free edge agreed well with previously derived closed form solution. The quasi-3D solutions agreed well with the 3-D interior solutions.

  1. Combined effect of matrix cracking and stress-free edge on delamination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salpekar, Satish A.; O'Brien, T. K.

    1991-01-01

    The effect of the stress-free edge on the growth of local delaminations initiating from a matrix crack in (O sub 2/90 sub 4) sub s and (+/- 45.90 sub 4) sub s glass epoxy laminates is investigated using 3D finite element analysis. The presence of high interlaminar normal stresses at the intersection (corner) of the matrix crack with the stress-free edge, suggests that a mode I delamination may initiate at the corners. The strain energy release rates (G) were calculated by modeling a uniform through-width delamination and two inclined delaminations at 10.6 deg and 45 deg to the matrix crack. All components of G have high values near the free edges. The mode I component of G is high at small delamination length and becomes zero for a delamination length of one-ply thickness. The total G values near the free edge agreed well with previously derived closed form solution. The quasi-3D solutions agreed well with the 3D interior solutions.

  2. Dietary antioxidants and environmental stress.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Frank J

    2004-11-01

    Air is one of our most important natural resources; however, it is also in the front line for receiving environmental pollution. Air quality decreased markedly following the industrial revolution, but it was not until the great London Smog in 1952 that air quality made it onto the political agenda. The introduction of the Clean Air Act in 1956 led to dramatic decreases in black smoke and SO2 concentrations over the next two decades, as domestic and industrial coal-burning activities ceased. However, as these improvements progressed, a new threat to public health was being released into the air in ever-increasing quantities. Rapid motorisation of society from the 1960s onwards has led to the increased release of atmospheric pollutants such as tiny particles (particulate matter of <10 microm in aerodynamic diameter) and oxides of N, and the generation of the secondary pollutant O3. These primary and secondary traffic-related pollutants have all proved to be major risks factors to public health. Recently, oxidative stress has been identified as a unifying feature underlying the toxic actions of these pollutants. Fortunately, the surface of the lung is covered with a thin layer of fluid containing a range of antioxidants that appear to provide the first line of defence against oxidant pollutants. As diet is the only source of antioxidant micronutrients, a plausible link now exists between the sensitivity to air pollution and the quality of the food eaten. However, many questions remain unanswered in relation to inter-individual sensitivity to ambient air pollution, and extent to which this sensitivity is modified by airway antioxidant defences. PMID:15831130

  3. Dietary antioxidants and environmental stress.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Frank J

    2004-11-01

    Air is one of our most important natural resources; however, it is also in the front line for receiving environmental pollution. Air quality decreased markedly following the industrial revolution, but it was not until the great London Smog in 1952 that air quality made it onto the political agenda. The introduction of the Clean Air Act in 1956 led to dramatic decreases in black smoke and SO2 concentrations over the next two decades, as domestic and industrial coal-burning activities ceased. However, as these improvements progressed, a new threat to public health was being released into the air in ever-increasing quantities. Rapid motorisation of society from the 1960s onwards has led to the increased release of atmospheric pollutants such as tiny particles (particulate matter of <10 microm in aerodynamic diameter) and oxides of N, and the generation of the secondary pollutant O3. These primary and secondary traffic-related pollutants have all proved to be major risks factors to public health. Recently, oxidative stress has been identified as a unifying feature underlying the toxic actions of these pollutants. Fortunately, the surface of the lung is covered with a thin layer of fluid containing a range of antioxidants that appear to provide the first line of defence against oxidant pollutants. As diet is the only source of antioxidant micronutrients, a plausible link now exists between the sensitivity to air pollution and the quality of the food eaten. However, many questions remain unanswered in relation to inter-individual sensitivity to ambient air pollution, and extent to which this sensitivity is modified by airway antioxidant defences.

  4. Accurate Critical Stress Intensity Factor Griffith Crack Theory Measurements by Numerical Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, Richard C.

    2014-01-01

    Critical stress intensity factor (KIc) has been an approximation for fracture toughness using only load-cell measurements. However, artificial man-made cracks several orders of magnitude longer and wider than natural flaws have required a correction factor term (Y) that can be up to about 3 times the recorded experimental value [1-3]. In fact, over 30 years ago a National Academy of Sciences advisory board stated that empirical KIc testing was of serious concern and further requested that an accurate bulk fracture toughness method be found [4]. Now that fracture toughness can be calculated accurately by numerical integration from the load/deflection curve as resilience, work of fracture (WOF) and strain energy release (SIc) [5, 6], KIc appears to be unnecessary. However, the large body of previous KIc experimental test results found in the literature offer the opportunity for continued meta analysis with other more practical and accurate fracture toughness results using energy methods and numerical integration. Therefore, KIc is derived from the classical Griffith Crack Theory [6] to include SIc as a more accurate term for strain energy release rate (𝒢Ic), along with crack surface energy (γ), crack length (a), modulus (E), applied stress (σ), Y, crack-tip plastic zone defect region (rp) and yield strength (σys) that can all be determined from load and deflection data. Polymer matrix discontinuous quartz fiber-reinforced composites to accentuate toughness differences were prepared for flexural mechanical testing comprising of 3 mm fibers at different volume percentages from 0-54.0 vol% and at 28.2 vol% with different fiber lengths from 0.0-6.0 mm. Results provided a new correction factor and regression analyses between several numerical integration fracture toughness test methods to support KIc results. Further, bulk KIc accurate experimental values are compared with empirical test results found in literature. Also, several fracture toughness mechanisms

  5. Environmental stress and epigenetic transgenerational inheritance.

    PubMed

    Skinner, Michael K

    2014-09-05

    Previous studies have shown a wide variety of environmental toxicants and abnormal nutrition can promote the epigenetic transgenerational inheritance of disease. More recently a number of studies have indicated environmental stress can also promote epigenetic alterations that are transmitted to subsequent generations to induce pathologies. A recent study by Yao and colleagues demonstrated gestational exposure to restraint stress and forced swimming promoted preterm birth risk and adverse newborn outcomes generationally. This ancestral stress promoted the epigenetic transgenerational inheritance of abnormalities in the great-grand offspring of the exposed gestating female. Several studies now support the role of environmental stress in promoting the epigenetic transgenerational inheritance of disease. Observations suggest ancestral environmental stress may be a component of disease etiology in the current population.

  6. Aqueous environmental crack propagation in high-strength beta titanium alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Young, L.M.; Young, G.A. Jr.; Scully, J.R.; Gangloff, R.P.

    1995-05-01

    The aqueous environment-assisted cracking (EAC) behavior of two peak-aged beta-titanium was characterized with a fracture mechanics method. Beta-21S is susceptible to EAC under rising load in neutral 3.5 pct NaCi at 25 C and {minus}600 mV{sub SCE}, as indicated by a reduced threshold for subcritical crack growth (K{sub TH}), an average crack growth rate of up to 10 {mu}m s, and intergranular fracture compared to microvoid rupture in air. In contrast, the initiation fracture toughness (K{sub ICi}) of Ti-15-3 in moist air is lower than that of Beta-21S at similar high {sigma}{sub YS} (1,300 MPa) but is not degraded by chloride, and cracking is by transgranular microvoid formation. The intergranular EAC susceptibility of Beta-21S correlates with both {alpha}-colonies precipitated at {beta} grain boundaries and intense slip localization; however, the causal factor is not defined. Data suggest that both features, and EAC, are promoted by prolonged solution treatment at high temperature. In a hydrogen environment embrittlement (HEE) scenario, crack-tip H could be transported by planar slip bands to strongly binding trap sites and stress/strain concentrations at {alpha} colony or {beta} grain boundaries. The EAC in Beta-21S is eliminated by cathodic polarization (to {minus}1,000 mV{sub SCE}), as well as by static loading for times that otherwise produce rising-load EAC.

  7. Slow Crack Growth Analysis of Brittle Materials with Finite Thickness Subjected to Constant Stress-Rate Flexural Loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chio, S. R.; Gyekenyesi, J. P.

    1999-01-01

    A two-dimensional, numerical analysis of slow crack growth (SCG) was performed for brittle materials with finite thickness subjected to constant stress-rate ("dynamic fatigue") loading in flexure. The numerical solution showed that the conventional, simple, one-dimensional analytical solution can be used with a maximum error of about 5% in determining the SCG parameters of a brittle material with the conditions of a normalized thickness (a ratio of specimen thickness to initial crack size) T > 3.3 and of a SCG parameter n > 10. The change in crack shape from semicircular to elliptical configurations was significant particularly at both low stress rate and low T, attributed to predominant difference in stress intensity factor along the crack front. The numerical solution of SCG parameters was supported within the experimental range by the data obtained from constant stress-rate flexural testing for soda-lime glass microslides at ambient temperature.

  8. Transverse shear effects on the stress-intensity factor for a circumferentially cracked, specially orthotropic cylindrical shell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delale, F.; Erdogan, F.

    1977-01-01

    The problem of a cylindrical shell containing a circumferential through crack is considered by taking into account the effect of transverse shear deformations. The formulation is given for a specially orthotropic material within the confines of a linearized shallow shell theory. The particular theory used permits the consideration of all five boundary conditions regarding moment and stress resultants on the crack surface. Consequently, aside from multiplicative constants representing the stress intensity factors, the membrane and bending components of the asymptotic stress fields near the crack tip are found to be identical. The stress intensity factors are calculated separately for a cylinder under a uniform membrane load, and that under a uniform bending moment. Sample results showing the nature of the out-of-plane crack surface displacement and the effect of the Poisson's ratio are presented.

  9. Microscopic study of stress effects around micro-crack tips using a non-contact stress-induced light scattering method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakata, Y.; Terasaki, N.; Nonaka, K.

    2016-09-01

    Fine-polishing techniques may cause micro-cracks under glass substrate surfaces. According to highly requirement from production field, a thermal stress-induced light scattering method (T-SILSM) was successfully developed for a non-contact inspection to detect the micro-cracks through changing in the intensity of light scattering accompanied by applying thermal stress at the responding position of the micro-cracks. In this study, in order to investigate that the origin of the measuring principle in microscopic order, a newly developed microscopic T-SILSM system with a rotation stage and a numerical simulation analysis were used to investigate the following; (1) the scattering points and surface in the micro-crack, (2) the stress concentration points in the micro-crack, and (3) the relationship between these information and the point in which intensity of the light scattering changes in the micro-crack through T-SILSM. Light scattering was observed at the responding position of the micro-crack with selectivity in the direction of laser irradiation even in the microscopic order. In addition, the position of the changes in the light scattering in was at both tips in the micro-crack, and it was consistent with the stress concentration point in the micro-crack. Therefore, it can be concluded that the intentional change in light scattering though T-SILSM is originated from light scattering at micro-crack and also from stress concentration and consecutive change in refractive index at both tips in micro-crack.

  10. Stress diagnostics and crack detection in full-size silicon wafers using resonance ultrasonic vibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byelyayev, Anton

    Non-destructive monitoring of residual elastic stress in silicon wafers is a matter of strong concern for modern photovoltaic industry. The excess stress can generate cracks within the crystalline structure, which further may lead to wafer breakage. Cracks diagnostics and reduction in multicrystalline silicon, for example, are ones of the most important issues in photovoltaics now. The industry is intent to improve the yield of solar cells fabrication. There is a number of techniques to measure residual stress in semiconductor materials today. They include Raman spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and infrared polariscopy. None of these methods are applicable for in-line diagnostics of residual elastic stress in silicon wafers for solar cells. Moreover, the method has to be fast enough to fit in solar cell sequential production line. In photovoltaics, fast in-line quality control has to be performed within two seconds per wafer to match the throughput of the production lines. During this Ph.D. research we developed the resonance ultrasonic vibration (RUV) approach to diagnose residual stress non-destructively in full-size multicrystalline silicon wafers used in solar cell manufacturing. This method is based on excitation of longitudinal resonance ultrasonic vibrations in the material using an external piezoelectric transducer combined with high sensitive ultrasonic probe and data acquisition of the frequency response to make the method suitable for in-line diagnostics during wafer and cell manufacturing. Theoretical and experimental analyses of the vibration mode in single crystal and multicrystalline silicon wafers were used to provide a benchmark reference analysis and validation of the approach. Importantly, we observed a clear trend of increasing resonance frequency of the longitudinal vibration mode with higher average in-plane stress obtained with scanning infrared polariscopy. Using the same experimental approach we assessed a fast crack detection and length

  11. Stress corrosion cracking behavior of Ni28Mo-alloys: Recent research data

    SciTech Connect

    Koehler, M.; Heubner, U.

    1994-12-31

    Nickel-molybdenum alloys of the type Ni28Mo/alloy B-2 may fail in service due to stress corrosion cracking in components, where a high heat input during manufacturing or repair such as repeated welding operations may have occurred. Therefore, various tests in solution annealed and aged condition on different alloy compositions have been done with respect to stress corrosion resistance, uniform and intergranular corrosion and time-temperature-sensitization behavior. Stress corrosion sensitivity of the Ni28Mo materials in the aged condition is dependent on the alloys degree of ordering which is delayed by increasing alloying additions of iron and chromium. Therefore, in order to improve the stress corrosion resistance these alloying additions have to be increased beyond the limits being set for the current alloy B-2 grade. Consequently, a new Ni28Mo alloy type, alloy B-4 is proposed being alloyed with 2--5 wt % Fe and 0.5--1.5 wt % Cr. This new Ni28Mo alloy exhibits a considerably improved resistance to stress corrosion cracking which is achieved without impairing the resistance to overall uniform and to intergranular corrosion. Resistance to sensitization is also improved.

  12. Crack initiation testing of thimble tube material under PWR conditions to determine a stress threshold for IASCC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosch, R. W.; Vankeerberghen, M.; Gérard, R.; Somville, F.

    2015-06-01

    IASCC (Irradiation Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking) crack initiation tests have been carried out on thimble tube material retrieved from a Belgian PWR. The crack initiation tests were carried out by constant load testing of thimble tube specimens at different stress levels. The time-to-failure was determined as a function of the applied stress to find a stress threshold under which no stress corrosion cracking will take place. The thimble tube was made of 316L cold-worked stainless steel and the dose profile along the thimble tube ranges from 45 to 80 dpa. This allows adding crack initiation data for dose values that have not been significantly reported, i.e. in the range of 45-55 dpa and at 80 dpa. The results can be used to determine whether the stress under which no IASCC occurs saturates for a dose larger than 30 dpa or whether a small further threshold decrease with dose can be observed. Over a period of four years, more than 40 specimens have been tested with doses ranging from 45 to 80 dpa at stress levels between 40% and 70% of the irradiated yield stress. Fracture occurred at all stress levels (but not all specimens) although the time-to-failure increased with decreasing stress. The results show that intergranular cracking was the main fracture mode in all failed O-rings. Three of six 80 dpa O-rings subjected to 40% and 45% of the yield stress did not fail after six months of testing. Based on these results and a comparison with literature data, an apparent stress limit for IASCC could be estimated at 40% of the irradiated yield stress.

  13. Effect of dissolved oxygen content on stress corrosion cracking of a cold worked 316L stainless steel in simulated pressurized water reactor primary water environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Litao; Wang, Jianqiu

    2014-03-01

    Stress corrosion crack growth tests of a cold worked nuclear grade 316L stainless steel were conducted in simulated pressurized water reactor (PWR) primary water environment containing various dissolved oxygen (DO) contents but no dissolved hydrogen. The crack growth rate (CGR) increased with increasing DO content in the simulated PWR primary water. The fracture surface exhibited typical intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) characteristics.

  14. Stress-corrosion cracking of alpha-brass without copper oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Shahrabi, T.; Newman, R.C. ); Sieradzki, K. )

    1993-02-01

    Transgranular stress-corrosion cracking without copper oxidation has been demonstrated in [alpha]-brass, confirming the findings of Bertocci, Thomas, and Pugh (1984). Cracks continued to propagate in monocrystals at potentials as low as [minus]40 mV vs. a copper reference electrode in 15 M NH[sub 3] + 0.04M Cu(I) solutions. Residual Cu(II) in these solutions was no more than 1 [mu]M and polarized the reference electrode by no more than 3 mV from the Cu/Cu(I)[sub aq] equilibrium potential. Polycrystals showed similar behavior except that cracking was intergranular at [minus]40 mV and transgranular at 0 mV or at the open-circuit potential ([minus]10 to [minus]20 mV). Arsenical brass showed more rapid dezincification and possibly more rapid cracking than arsenic-free brass. Impedance characteristics of copper and brass electrodes were measured, and the latter displayed pseudoinductive features due to the dezincification reaction.

  15. Estimation and Simulation of Slow Crack Growth Parameters from Constant Stress Rate Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salem, Jonathan A.; Weaver, Aaron S.

    2003-01-01

    Closed form, approximate functions for estimating the variances and degrees-of-freedom associated with the slow crack growth parameters n, D, B, and A(sup *) as measured using constant stress rate ('dynamic fatigue') testing were derived by using propagation of errors. Estimates made with the resulting functions and slow crack growth data for a sapphire window were compared to the results of Monte Carlo simulations. The functions for estimation of the variances of the parameters were derived both with and without logarithmic transformation of the initial slow crack growth equations. The transformation was performed to make the functions both more linear and more normal. Comparison of the Monte Carlo results and the closed form expressions derived with propagation of errors indicated that linearization is not required for good estimates of the variances of parameters n and D by the propagation of errors method. However, good estimates variances of the parameters B and A(sup *) could only be made when the starting slow crack growth equation was transformed and the coefficients of variation of the input parameters were not too large. This was partially a result of the skewered distributions of B and A(sup *). Parametric variation of the input parameters was used to determine an acceptable range for using closed form approximate equations derived from propagation of errors.

  16. Cracking Process and Stress Field Evolution in Specimen Containing Combined Flaw Under Uniaxial Compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ting; Lin, Baiquan; Yang, Wei; Zou, Quanle; Kong, Jia; Yan, Fazhi

    2016-08-01

    Hydraulic slotting, an efficient technique for underground enhanced coal bed methane (ECBM) recovery, has been widely used in China. However, its pressure relief mechanism is unclear. Thus far, only limited research has been conducted on the relationships among the mechanical properties, flaw parameters, and crack propagation patterns of coal after hydraulic slotting. In addition, because of the limitations of test methods, an in-depth information is not available for this purpose. In this work, numerical models of specimens containing combined flaws are established based on particle flow code method. Our results provide insights into the effects of flaw inclination angle on the mechanical properties, crack propagation patterns, and temporal and spatial evolution rules of stress field in specimens containing combined flaws during the loading process. Besides, based on the initiation position and underlying mechanism, three types of crack initiation modes are identified from the failure processes of specimens. Finally, the crack propagation pattern is quantitatively described by the fractal dimension, which is found to be inversely proportional to the uniaxial compressive strength and elastic modulus of the specimen. To verify the rationality of the numerical simulation results, laboratory tests were conducted and their results match well with those obtained from the numerical simulation.

  17. Effect of layerwise structural inhomogeneity on stress- corrosion cracking of steel tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perlovich, Yu A.; Krymskaya, O. A.; Isaenkova, M. G.; Morozov, N. S.; Fesenko, V. A.; Ryakhovskikh, I. V.; Esiev, T. S.

    2016-04-01

    Based on X-ray texture and structure analysis data of the material of main gas pipelines it was shown that the layerwise inhomogeneity of tubes is formed during their manufacturing. The degree of this inhomogeneity affects on the tendency of tubes to stress- corrosion cracking under exploitation. Samples of tubes were cut out from gas pipelines located under various operating conditions. Herewith the study was conducted both for sections with detected stress-corrosion defects and without them. Distributions along tube wall thickness for lattice parameters and half-width of X-ray lines were constructed. Crystallographic texture analysis of external and internal tube layers was also carried out. Obtained data testifies about considerable layerwise inhomogeneity of all samples. Despite the different nature of the texture inhomogeneity of gas pipeline tubes, the more inhomogeneous distribution of texture or structure features causes the increasing of resistance to stress- corrosion. The observed effect can be explained by saturation with interstitial impurities of the surface layer of the hot-rolled sheet and obtained therefrom tube. This results in rising of lattice parameters in the external layer of tube as compared to those in underlying metal. Thus, internal layers have a compressive effect on external layers in the rolling plane that prevents cracks opening at the tube surface. Moreover, the high mutual misorientation of grains within external and internal layers of tube results in the necessity to change the moving crack plane, so that the crack growth can be inhibited when reaching the layer with a modified texture.

  18. External stress-corrosion cracking of a 1.22-m-diameter type 316 stainless steel air valve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Thomas J.; Telesman, Jack; Moore, Allan S.; Johnson, Dereck F.; Kuivinen, David E.

    1993-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to determine the cause of the failure of a massive AISI Type 316 stainless steel valve which controlled combustion air to a jet engine test facility. Several through-the-wall cracks were present near welded joints in the valve skirt. The valve had been in outdoor service for 18 years. Samples were taken in the cracked regions for metallographic and chemical analyses. Insulating material and sources of water mist in the vicinity of the failed valve were analyzed for chlorides. A scanning electron microscope was used to determine whether foreign elements were present in a crack. On the basis of the information generated, the failure was characterized as external stress-corrosion cracking. The cracking resulted from a combination of residual tensile stress from welding and the presence of aqueous chlorides. Recommended countermeasures are included.

  19. Effects of some little noticed water impurities on stress corrosion cracking of BWR construction materials

    SciTech Connect

    Ljungberg, L.G.; Cubicciotti, D.; Trolle, M.

    1988-01-01

    The effects of some little noticed dissolved impurities in simulated BWR water on environmental cracking for some BWR pressure bearing construction materials were studied by constant elongation rate tensile (CERT) tests. Fluoride, silica and thiosulfate were found to be harmful. Phosphate and perchlorate in concentration up to 1 ppm had no effect in simulated hydrogen water chemistry. Organic acids and zinc were found to be generally beneficial, except when they occurred in combination.

  20. Implementation of thermal residual stresses in the analysis of fiber bridged matrix crack growth in titanium matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bakuckas, John G., Jr.; Johnson, W. Steven

    1994-01-01

    In this research, thermal residual stresses were incorporated in an analysis of fiber-bridged matrix cracks in unidirectional and cross-ply titanium matrix composites (TMC) containing center holes or center notches. Two TMC were investigated, namely, SCS-6/Timelal-21S laminates. Experimentally, matrix crack initiation and growth were monitored during tension-tension fatigue tests conducted at room temperature and at an elevated temperature of 200 C. Analytically, thermal residual stresses were included in a fiber bridging (FB) model. The local R-ratio and stress-intensity factor in the matrix due to thermal and mechanical loadings were calculated and used to evaluate the matrix crack growth behavior in the two materials studied. The frictional shear stress term, tau, assumed in this model was used as a curve-fitting parameter to matrix crack growth data. The scatter band in the values of tau used to fit the matrix crack growth data was significantly reduced when thermal residual stresses were included in the fiber bridging analysis. For a given material system, lay-up and temperature, a single value of tau was sufficient to analyze the crack growth data. It was revealed in this study that thermal residual stresses are an important factor overlooked in the original FB models.

  1. Analysis of surface cracks at hole by a 3-D weight function method with stresses from finite element method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhao, W.; Newman, J. C., Jr.; Sutton, M. A.; Shivakumar, K. N.; Wu, X. R.

    1995-01-01

    Parallel with the work in Part-1, stress intensity factors for semi-elliptical surface cracks emanating from a circular hole are determined. The 3-D weight function method with the 3D finite element solutions for the uncracked stress distribution as in Part-1 is used for the analysis. Two different loading conditions, i.e. remote tension and wedge loading, are considered for a wide range in geometrical parameters. Both single and double surface cracks are studied and compared with other solutions available in the literature. Typical crack opening displacements are also provided.

  2. User's manual for FRAC3D: Supplement to report on stress analysis for structures with surface cracks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, J. C.; Hopper, A. T.; Hayes, P. A.

    1978-01-01

    The FRAC3D computer program, designed for use in analyzing stresses in structures (including plates, bars, or blocks) which may contain part-circular surface cracks or embedded circular cracks is described. Instructions are provided for preparing input, including that for the supporting programs LATTICE and MATSOL as well as for FRAC3D. The course of a substantial illustrative calculation is shown with both input and output. The formulas underlying the calculations are summarized and related to the subroutines in which they are used. Many issues of strategy in using this program for analysing stresses around surface cracks are elucidated.

  3. Growth and stability of stress corrosion cracks in large-diameter BWR piping. Volume 2: appendixes. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Hale, D A; Heald, J D; Horn, R M; Jewett, C W; Kass, J N; Mehta, H S; Ranganath, S; Sharma, S R

    1982-07-01

    This report presents the results of a research program conducted to evaluate the behavior of hypothetical stress corrosion cracks in large diameter austenitic piping. The program included major tasks, a design margin assessment, an evaluation of crack growth and crack arrest, and development of a predictive model. As part of the margin assessment, the program developed diagrams which predicted net section collapse as a function of crack size. In addition, plasticity and dynamic load effects were also considered in evaluating collapse. Analytical methods for evaluating these effects were developed and were benchmarked by dynamic tests of 4-in.-diameter piping. The task of evaluating the growth behavior of stress corrosion cracks focused on developing constant load and cyclic growth rate data that could be used with the predictive model. Secondly, laboratory tests were performed to evaluate the conditions under which growing stress corrosion cracks would arrest when they intersected stress corrosion resistant weld metal. The third task successfully developed a model to predict the behavior of cracks in austenitic piping.

  4. The effect of water flow rate upon the environmentally-assisted cracking response of a low-alloy steel

    SciTech Connect

    James, L.A.; Wire, G.L.; Cullen, W.H.

    1994-09-01

    Effect of water flow rate on the environmentally-assisted cracking (EAC) response of a high-sulfur ferritic steel was studied at 243C. In contrast to earlier studies with compact-type specimens, this study employed relatively large tight semi-elliptical surface cracks tested under generally linear-elastic conditions. Flow velocities parallel to the crack as low as 1.68 {minus} 1.84 m/s were effective in mitigating EAC.

  5. Phenomenon analysis of stress corrosion cracking in the vessel head penetrations of French PWR`s

    SciTech Connect

    Pichon, C.; Buisine, D.; Faidy, C.; Gelpi, A.; Vaindirlis, M.

    1995-12-31

    During a hydrotest in 1991, a leak was detected on,a reactor vessel head (RVH) penetration of a French PWR. This leak was due to a phenomenon of Primary Water Stress Corrosion Cracking (PWSCC) affecting these penetrations in Alloy 600. The destructive and non-destructive examinations undertaken during the following months highlighted the generic nature of the degradations. In order to well understand this phenomenon and implement the most suitable maintenance policy, a large scale scientific program was decided and performed jointly by Electricite de France and FRAMATOME. The paper will present all the results obtained in this program concerning the parameters governing the PWSCC. In particular the following fields will be developed: (1) the material, its microstructure in line with the manufacturing and its susceptibility to PWSCC; (2) the stresses and their evaluations by measurements, mock up corrosion tests and Finite Element Analysis (FEA); (3) the effect of surface finish on crack initiation; and (4) the crack growth rate. This phenomenon analysis will be useful for evaluating the risk of PWSCC on other Alloy 600 areas in PWR`s primary system.

  6. Effects of iodine concentration on iodine-induced stress corrosion cracking of zircaloy-4 tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woo, Seog Ryu; Young, Hwan Kang; Lee, Jai-Young

    1988-05-01

    Iodine-induced stress corrosion cracking (I-SCC) experiments on Zircaloy-4 tube were undertaken in the iodine concentration range of 0-4 mg/cm 2, the temperature range of 330-400 ° C and a nominal hoop stress of 475 MPa, using the internal pressurization method. The time-to-failure, failure strain and strain rate were measured as a function of the iodine concentration. An apparent activation energy for I-SCC was calculated from the temperature dependence of I-SCC. A fractographic interpretation was also made through scanning electron microscopic examination. The results suggest that the iodine concentration has an influence on the crack propagation step to increase the propagation rate of I-SCC, promoting the I-SCC susceptibility. It is found that the critical iodine concentration means the phenomenological value to show the iodine concentration dependence of I-SCC susceptibility, not the critical value to determine the occurrence of I-SCC. The I-SCC behavior of Zircaloy is discussed from the viewpoint of the crack initiation and propagation process.

  7. Inspection indications, stress corrosion cracks and repair of process piping in nuclear materials production reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Louthan, M.R. Jr.; West, S.L.; Nelson, D.Z.

    1991-12-31

    Ultrasonic inspection of Schedule 40 Type 304 stainless steel piping in the process water system of the Savannah River Site reactors has provided indications of discontinuities in less than 10% of the weld heat affected zones. Pipe sections containing significant indications are replaced with Type 304L components. Post removal metallurgical evaluation showed that the indications resulted from stress corrosion cracking in weld heat-affected zones and that the overall weld quality was excellent. The evaluation also revealed weld fusion zone discontinuities such as incomplete penetration, incomplete fusion, inclusions, underfill at weld roots and hot cracks. Service induced extension of these discontinuities was generally not significant although stress corrosion cracking in one weld fusion zone was noted. One set of UT indications was caused by metallurgical discontinuities at the fusion boundary of an extra weld. This extra weld, not apparent on the outer pipe surface, was slightly overlapping and approximately parallel to the weld being inspected. This extra weld was made during a pipe repair, probably associated with initial construction processes. The two nearly parallel welds made accurate assessment of the UT signal difficult. The implications of these observations to the inspection and repair of process water systems of nuclear reactors is discussed.

  8. Inspection indications, stress corrosion cracks and repair of process piping in nuclear materials production reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Louthan, M.R. Jr.; West, S.L.; Nelson, D.Z.

    1991-01-01

    Ultrasonic inspection of Schedule 40 Type 304 stainless steel piping in the process water system of the Savannah River Site reactors has provided indications of discontinuities in less than 10% of the weld heat affected zones. Pipe sections containing significant indications are replaced with Type 304L components. Post removal metallurgical evaluation showed that the indications resulted from stress corrosion cracking in weld heat-affected zones and that the overall weld quality was excellent. The evaluation also revealed weld fusion zone discontinuities such as incomplete penetration, incomplete fusion, inclusions, underfill at weld roots and hot cracks. Service induced extension of these discontinuities was generally not significant although stress corrosion cracking in one weld fusion zone was noted. One set of UT indications was caused by metallurgical discontinuities at the fusion boundary of an extra weld. This extra weld, not apparent on the outer pipe surface, was slightly overlapping and approximately parallel to the weld being inspected. This extra weld was made during a pipe repair, probably associated with initial construction processes. The two nearly parallel welds made accurate assessment of the UT signal difficult. The implications of these observations to the inspection and repair of process water systems of nuclear reactors is discussed.

  9. Stress Corrosion Cracking Response of 304 Stainless Steel in ASerated and Dearated Water

    SciTech Connect

    Mills, W. J.

    2007-04-30

    Scoping stress corrosion cracking (SCC) tests of 304 stainless steel (SS) were performed in 75 C and 250 C aerated pressurized water (APW) and 250 C deaerated pressurized water (DPW). The 250 C APW environment was used to initiate intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) and then the water was deaerated and hydrogenated to see if IGSCC continued in 250 C DPW. Tests were performed with and without 200 ppb SO{sub 4}{sup =}. The 304 SS test materials were evaluated in either the as-received, heavily sensitized (649 C for 1 h), fully sensitized (1099 C for 1 h/water quench/621 C for 17 h) or 20% cold rolled condition. At the beginning of each test sequence, specimens were subjected to continuous cycling with a 500s rise/500s fall or a 5000s rise/500s fall to promote the transition from a transgranular (TG) precrack to an IG crack. After generating a uniform crack under continuous cycling conditions, a trapezoidal waveform with 500s rise/9000s hold/500s fall was used to characterize the SCC behavior. Crack growth rates (CGRs) were monitored continuously with the electric potential drop (EPD) method and were corrected based on physical crack length measurements obtained when specimens were destructively evaluated. Continuous cycling with a 500s or 5000s rise time was found to produce both TG faceting and IGSCC in fully sensitized 304 SS tested in 75 C APW with 7 ppm O{sub 2} and 200 ppb SO{sub 4}{sup =}. However, no measurable crack extension occurred when a 9000 s hold time was introduced. Extensive IGSCC occurred in heavily sensitized and fully sensitized 304 SS in 250 C APW with 1 ppm O{sub 2} and 200 ppb SO{sub 4}{sup =}. IGSCC initiated under continuous cycling conditions with a 500 s rise time, and rapid IGSCC occurred when a 9000 s hold time was introduced. During the trapezoidal waveform test with a 9000 s hold, CGRs ranged from 1 to 3 mils/day for the heavily sensitized material and 5 to 10 mils/day for the fully sensitized material. When the test

  10. Environmentally Assisted Cracking of Alloy 7050-T7451 Exposed to Aqueous Chloride Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, Reinhold

    2016-03-01

    The stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behavior of 7050-T7451 plate material was investigated in short-transverse direction performing constant load and constant extension rate tests. Smooth and notched tensile specimens were permanently immersed in substitute ocean water and in an aqueous solution of 0.6 M NaCl + 0.06 M (NH4)2SO4. Alloy 7050-T7451 exhibited high SCC resistance in both synthetic environments. However, conducting cyclic loading tests, environment-induced cracking was observed. Applying a sawtooth waveform, notched tensile specimens were strained under constant load amplitude conditions at constant displacement rates ranging from 2 × 10-6 to 2 × 10-4 mms-1. The stress ratio R = σ min/ σ max was 0.1 with maximum stresses of 300 and 400 MPa. When cyclically loaded in substitute ocean water, notched specimens failed predominantly by transgranular environment-induced cracking. Striations were observed on the cleavage-like facets. The number of cycles-to-failure decreased with decreasing displacement rate. A slope of 0.5 was obtained by fitting the logarithmic plot of number of cycles-to-failure vs nominal loading frequency, indicating a hydrogen embrittlement mechanism controlled by diffusion.

  11. Stability of cracked pipe under inertial stresses. Subtask 1.1 final report

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, P.; Wilson, M.; Olson, R.; Marschall, C.; Schmidt, R.; Wilkowski, G.

    1994-08-01

    This report presents the results of the pipe fracture experiments, analyses, and material characterization efforts performed within Subtask 1.1 of the IPIRG Program. The objective of Subtask 1.1 was to experimentally verify the analysis methodologies for circumferentially cracked pipe subjected primarily to inertial stresses. Eight cracked-pipe experiments were conducted on 6-inch nominal diameter TP304 and A106B pipe. The experimental procedure was developed using nonlinear time-history finite element analyses which included the nonlinear behavior due to the crack. The model did an excellent job of predicting the displacements, forces, and times to maximum moment. The comparison of the experimental loads to the predicted loads by the Net-Section-Collapse (NSC), Dimensionless Plastic-Zone Parameter, J-estimation schemes, R6, and ASME Section XI in-service flaw assessment criteria tended to underpredict the measured bending moments except for the NSC analysis of the A106B pipe. The effects of flaw geometry and loading history on toughness were evaluated by calculating the toughness from the pipe tests and comparing these results to C(l) values. These effects were found to be variable. The surface-crack geometry tended to increase the toughness (relative to CM results), whereas a negative load-ratio significantly decreased the TP304 stainless steel surface-cracked pipe apparent toughness. The inertial experiments tended to achieve complete failure within a few cycles after reaching maximum load in these relatively small diameter pipe experiments. Hence, a load-controlled fracture mechanics analysis may be more appropriate than a displacement-controlled analysis for these tests.

  12. Laplace-SGBEM analysis of the dynamic stress intensity factors and the dynamic T-stress for the interaction between a crack and auxetic inclusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Kibum

    A dynamic analysis of the interaction between a crack and an auxetic (negative Poisson ratio)/non-auxetic inclusion is presented. The two most important fracture parameters, namely the stress intensity factors and the T-stress are analyzed by using the symmetric Galerkin boundary element method in the Laplace domain for three different models of crack-inclusion interaction. To investigate the effects of auxetic inclusions on the fracture behavior of composites reinforced by this new type of material, comparisons of the dynamic stress intensity factors and the dynamic T-stress are made between the use of auxetic inclusions as opposed to the use of traditional inclusions. Furthermore, the technique presented in this research can be employed to analyze for the interaction between a crack and a cluster of auxetic/non-auxetic inclusions. Results from the latter models can be employed in crack growth analysis in auxetic-fiber-reinforced composites.

  13. Development of a Fatigue Crack Growth Coupon for Highly Plastic Stress Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Phillip A.; Aggarwal, Pravin K.; Swanson, Gregory R.

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents an analytical approach used to develop a novel fatigue crack growth coupon for a highly plastic 3-D stress field condition. The flight hardware investigated in this paper is a large separation bolt that fractures using pyrotechnics at the appointed time during the flight sequence. The separation bolt has a deep notch that produces a severe stress concentration and a large plastic zone when highly loaded. For this geometry, linear-elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM) techniques are not valid due to the large nonlinear stress field. Unfortunately, industry codes that are generally available for fracture mechanics analysis and fatigue crack growth (e.g. NASGRO (11) are limited to LEFM and are available for only a limited number of geometries. The results of LEFM based codes are questionable when used on geometries with significant plasticity. Therefore elastic-plastic fracture mechanics (EPFM) techniques using the finite element method (FEM) were used to analyze the bolt and test coupons. scale flight hardware is very costly in t e r n of assets, laboratory resources, and schedule. Therefore to alleviate some of these problems, a series of novel test coupons were developed to simulate the elastic-plastic stress field present in the bolt.

  14. The elastostatic plane strain mode I crack tip stress and displacement fields in a generalized linear neo-Hookean elastomer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Begley, Matthew R.; Creton, Costantino; McMeeking, Robert M.

    2015-11-01

    A general asymptotic plane strain crack tip stress field is constructed for linear versions of neo-Hookean materials, which spans a wide variety of special cases including incompressible Mooney elastomers, the compressible Blatz-Ko elastomer, several cases of the Ogden constitutive law and a new result for a compressible linear neo-Hookean material. The nominal stress field has dominant terms that have a square root singularity with respect to the distance of material points from the crack tip in the undeformed reference configuration. At second order, there is a uniform tension parallel to the crack. The associated displacement field in plane strain at leading order has dependence proportional to the square root of the same coordinate. The relationship between the amplitude of the crack tip singularity (a stress intensity factor) and the plane strain energy release rate is outlined for the general linear material, with simplified relationships presented for notable special cases.

  15. Stress Corrosion and Corrosion Fatigue Crack Growth of Zr-Based Bulk Metallic Glass in Aqueous Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakai, Y.; Yoshioka, Y.

    2010-07-01

    Crack-propagation tests on a bulk metallic glass (BMG), Zr55Cu30Ni5Al10, were conducted either in aqueous sodium chloride (NaCl) solutions or in high-purity water under sinusoidal cyclic loading or sustained loading. Although the crack growth rate in high-purity water was almost identical to that in air, the rate in the NaCl solution was much higher than that in air, even in a very low concentration of NaCl such as 0.01 mass pct. In a 3.5 mass pct NaCl solution, the time-based crack growth rate during cyclic loading, da/ dt, was determined by the maximum stress-intensity factor, K max, but was almost independent of the loading frequency and the stress ratio, and the rate was close to that of stress corrosion cracking (SCC) under a sustained loading.

  16. Stress-corrosion cracking of low-strength carbon steels in candidate high-level waste repository environments

    SciTech Connect

    Beavers, J.A.; Thompson, N.G.; Parkins, R.N.

    1987-02-01

    A survey of the literature was performed to identify potential stress-corrosion cracking agents for low-strength carbon and low alloy steels in repository environments. It was found that a number of potent cracking agents are present, but stress-corrosion cracking is relatively unlikely in the bulk repository environments because of their low concentration. On the other hand, concentration of these species may occur by a number of mechanisms, and thus it is conceivable that the waste package could fail prematurely by stress corrosion. Accordingly, it is recommended that the lower concentration limits for potential cracking agents be identified under typical repository environments, in conjunction with modeling studies to assess the likelihood that the concentrating mechanisms will operate and to bound the upper limits of concentration for each mechanism. 82 refs.

  17. Off-axis impact of unidirectional composites with cracks: Dynamic stress intensification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sih, G. C.; Chen, E. P.

    1979-01-01

    The dynamic response of unidirectional composites under off axis (angle loading) impact is analyzed by assuming that the composite contains an initial flaw in the matrix material. The analytical method utilizes Fourier transform for the space variable and Laplace transform for the time variable. The off axis impact is separated into two parts, one being symmetric and the other skew-symmetric with reference to the crack plane. Transient boundary conditions of normal and shear tractions are applied to a crack embedded in the matrix of the unidirectional composite. The two boundary conditions are solved independently and the results superimposed. Mathematically, these conditions reduce the problem to a system of dual integral equations which are solved in the Laplace transform plane for the transformation of the dynamic stress intensity factor. The time inversion is carried out numerically for various combinations of the material properties of the composite and the results are displayed graphically.

  18. Role of pH on the stress corrosion cracking of titanium alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khokhar, M. I.; Beck, F. H.; Fontana, M. G.

    1973-01-01

    Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) experiments were conducted on Ti-8-1-1 wire specimens in hydrochloric and sulfuric acids of variable pH in order to determine the effect of pH on the susceptibility to cracking. The alloy exhibited increasing susceptibility with decreasing pH. By varying the applied potential, it was observed that susceptibility zones exist both in the cathodic and the anodic ranges. In the cathodic range, susceptibility also increased with decreasing applied potential. Corrosion potential-time data in hydrochloric acid (pH 1.7) and sulfuric acid (pH 1.7) indicate that chloride ions lower the corrosion potential of the specimen which, in turn, increases the susceptibility.

  19. Stress Corrosion Cracking of Ferritic Materials for Fossil Power Generation Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Pawel, Steven J; Siefert, John A.

    2014-01-01

    Creep strength enhanced ferritic (CSEF) steels Grades 23, 24, 91, and 92 have been widely implemented in the fossil fired industry for over two decades. The stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behavior of these materials with respect to mainstay Cr-Mo steels (such as Grades 11, 12 and 22) has not been properly assessed, particularly in consideration of recent reported issues of SCC in CSEF steels. This report details the results of Jones test exposures of a wide range of materials (Grades 11, 22, 23, 24, and 92), material conditions (as-received, improper heat treatments, normalized, weldments) and environments (salt fog; tube cleaning environments including decreasing, scale removal, and passivation; and high temperature water) to compare the susceptibility to cracking of these steels. In the as-received (normalized and tempered) condition, none of these materials are susceptible to SCC in the environments examined. However, in the hardened condition, certain combinations of environment and alloy reveal substantial SCC susceptibility.

  20. Evaluation of the current status of hydrogen embrittlement and stress-corrosion cracking in steels

    SciTech Connect

    Moody, N.R.

    1981-12-01

    A review of recent studies on hydrogen embrittlement and stress-corrosion cracking in steels shows there are several critical areas where data is either ambiguous, contradictory, or non-existent. A relationship exists between impurity segregation and hydrogen embrittlement effects but it is not known if the impurities sensitize a preferred crack path for hydrogen-induced failure or if impurity and hydrogen effects are additive. Furthermore, grain boundary impurities may enhance susceptibility through interactions with some environments. Some studies show that an increase in grain size increases susceptibility; at least one study shows an opposite effect. Recent work also shows that fracture initiates at different locations for external and internal hydrogen environments. How this influences susceptibility is unknown.

  1. A cylindrical shell with a stress-free end which contains an axial part-through or through crack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erdogan, F.; Yahsi, O. S.

    1983-01-01

    The interaction problem of a through or a part through crack with a stress free boundary in a semi-infinite cylindrical shell is considered. It is assumed that the crack lies in a meridional plane which is a plane of symmetry with respect to the external loads as well as the geometry. The circular boundary of the semi-infinite cylinder is assumed to be stress free. By using a transverse shear theory the problem is formulated in terms of a system of singular integral equations. The line spring model is used to treat the part through crack problem. In the case of a through crack the interaction between the perturbed stress fields due to the crack and the free boundary is quite strong and there is a considerable increase in the stress intensity factors caused by the interaction. On the other hand in the problem of a surface crack the interaction appears to be much weaker and consequently the magnification in the stress intensity factors is much less significant.

  2. In situ investigation of high humidity stress corrosion cracking of 7075 aluminum alloy by three-dimensional (3D) X-ray synchrotron tomography

    DOE PAGES

    Singh, S. S.; Williams, J. J.; Lin, M. F.; Xiao, X.; De Carlo, F.; Chawla, N.

    2014-05-14

    In situ X-ray synchrotron tomography was used to investigate the stress corrosion cracking behavior of under-aged Al–Zn–Mg–Cu alloy in moisture. The discontinuous surface cracks (crack jumps) mentioned in the literature are actually a single continuous and tortuous crack when observed in three dimension (3D). Contrary to 2D measurements made at the surface which suggest non-uniform crack growth rates, 3D measurements of the crack length led to a much more accurate measurement of crack growth rates.

  3. In situ investigation of high humidity stress corrosion cracking of 7075 aluminum alloy by three-dimensional (3D) X-ray synchrotron tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, S. S.; Williams, J. J.; Lin, M. F.; Xiao, X.; De Carlo, F.; Chawla, N.

    2014-05-14

    In situ X-ray synchrotron tomography was used to investigate the stress corrosion cracking behavior of under-aged Al–Zn–Mg–Cu alloy in moisture. The discontinuous surface cracks (crack jumps) mentioned in the literature are actually a single continuous and tortuous crack when observed in three dimension (3D). Contrary to 2D measurements made at the surface which suggest non-uniform crack growth rates, 3D measurements of the crack length led to a much more accurate measurement of crack growth rates.

  4. Stress Corrosion Cracking of the Drip Shield, the Waste Package Outer Barrier, and the Stainless Steel Structural Material

    SciTech Connect

    G. Gordon

    2004-10-13

    Stress corrosion cracking is one of the most common corrosion-related causes for premature breach of metal structural components. Stress corrosion cracking is the initiation and propagation of cracks in structural components due to three factors that must be present simultaneously: metallurgical susceptibility, critical environment, and static (or sustained) tensile stresses. This report was prepared according to ''Technical Work Plan for: Regulatory Integration Modeling and Analysis of the Waste Form and Waste Package'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 171583]). The purpose of this report is to provide an evaluation of the potential for stress corrosion cracking of the engineered barrier system components (i.e., the drip shield, waste package outer barrier, and waste package stainless steel inner structural cylinder) under exposure conditions consistent with the repository during the regulatory period of 10,000 years after permanent closure. For the drip shield and waste package outer barrier, the critical environment is conservatively taken as any aqueous environment contacting the metal surfaces. Appendix B of this report describes the development of the SCC-relevant seismic crack density model (SCDM). The consequence of a stress corrosion cracking breach of the drip shield, the waste package outer barrier, or the stainless steel inner structural cylinder material is the initiation and propagation of tight, sometimes branching, cracks that might be induced by the combination of an aggressive environment and various tensile stresses that can develop in the drip shields or the waste packages. The Stainless Steel Type 316 inner structural cylinder of the waste package is excluded from the stress corrosion cracking evaluation because the Total System Performance Assessment for License Application (TSPA-LA) does not take credit for the inner cylinder. This document provides a detailed description of the process-level models that can be applied to assess the performance of Alloy 22

  5. Origins of Negative Strain Rate Dependence of Stress Corrosion Cracking Initiation in Alloy 690, and Intergranular Crack Formation in Thermally Treated Alloy 690

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Young Suk; Kim, Sung Soo

    2016-09-01

    We show that enhanced stress corrosion cracking (SCC) initiation in cold-rolled Alloy 690 with decreasing strain rate is related to the rate of short-range ordering (SRO) but not to the time-dependent corrosion process. Evidence for SRO is provided by aging tests on cold-rolled Alloy 690 at 623 K and 693 K (350 °C and 420 °C), respectively, which demonstrate its enhanced lattice contraction and hardness increase with aging temperature and time, respectively. Secondary intergranular cracks formed only in thermally treated and cold-rolled Alloy 690 during SCC tests, which are not SCC cracks, are caused by its lattice contraction by SRO before SCC tests but not by the orientation effect.

  6. Stress influences environmental donation behavior in men.

    PubMed

    Sollberger, Silja; Bernauer, Thomas; Ehlert, Ulrike

    2016-01-01

    Stress has been found to have both positive and negative effects on prosocial behavior, suggesting the involvement of moderating factors such as context and underlying motives. In the present study, we investigated the conditions under which acute stress leads to an increase vs. decrease in environmental donation behavior as an indicator of prosocial behavior. In particular, we examined whether the effects of stress depended on preexisting pro-environmental orientation and stage of the donation decision (whether or not to donate vs. the amount to be donated). Male participants with either high (N=40) or low (N=39) pro-environmental orientation were randomly assigned to a social stress test or a control condition. Salivary cortisol was assessed repeatedly before and after stress induction. At the end of the experiment, all subjects were presented with an opportunity to donate a portion of their monetary compensation to a climate protection foundation. We found that stress significantly increased donation frequency, but only in subjects with low pro-environmental orientation. Congruously, their decision to donate was positively associated with cortisol response to the stress test and the emotion regulation strategy mood repair, as well as accompanied by an increase in subjective calmness. In contrast, among the participants who decided to donate, stress significantly reduced the donated amount of money, regardless of pro-environmental orientation. In conclusion, our findings suggest that acute stress might generally activate more self-serving motivations, such as making oneself feel better and securing one's own material interests. Importantly, however, a strong pro-environmental orientation partially prevented these effects. PMID:26546784

  7. Growth of Matrix Cracks During Intermediate Temperature Stress Rupture of a SiC/SiC Composite in Air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morscher, Gregory N.

    2000-01-01

    The crack density of woven Hi-Nicalon(sup TM) (Nippon Carbon, Japan) fiber, BN interphase, melt-infiltrated SiC matrix composites was determined for specimens subjected to tensile stress rupture at 815 C. A significant amount of matrix cracking occurs due to the growth of fiber-bridged microcracks even at stresses below the run-out condition. This increased cracking corresponded to time dependent strain accumulation and acoustic emission activity during the constant load test. However, the portion of the rupture specimens subjected to cooler temperatures (< 600 C than the hot section had significantly lower crack densities compared to the hotter regions. From the acoustic emission and time dependent strain data it can be inferred that most of the matrix crack growth occurred within the first few hours of the tensile rupture experiment. The crack growth was attributed to an interphase recession mechanism that is enhanced by the presence of a thin carbon layer between the fiber and the matrix as a result of the composite fabrication process. One important consequence of matrix crack growth at the lower stresses is poor retained strength at room temperature for specimens that did not fail.

  8. Stress Corrosion Cracking Behavior of Interstitial Free Steel Via Slow Strain Rate Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murkute, Pratik; Ramkumar, J.; Mondal, K.

    2016-07-01

    An interstitial free steel is subjected to slow strain rate tests to investigate the stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behavior at strain rates ranging from 10-4 to 10-6s-1 in air and 3.5 wt.% NaCl solution. The ratios of time to failure, failure strain, and ultimate tensile stress at different strain rates in air to that in corrosive were considered as SCC susceptibility. Serrated stress-strain curve observed at lowest strain rate is explained by the Portevin-Le Chatelier effect. Maximum susceptibility to SCC at lowest strain rate is attributed to the soluble γ-FeOOH in the rust analyzed by Fourier Transformed Infrared spectroscopy. Mechanism for SCC relates to the anodic dissolution forming the groove, where hydrogen embrittlement can set in and finally fracture happens due to triaxiality.

  9. In vivo biostability of polyether polyurethanes with fluoropolymer surface modifying endgroups: resistance to biologic oxidation and stress cracking.

    PubMed

    Ward, Bob; Anderson, James; McVenes, Rick; Stokes, Ken

    2006-12-15

    A series of Shore 80A polyether polyurethanes were synthesized with from 0 to 6% fluoropolymer surface modifying endgroups (SME) to provide the bulk properties of the polyurethane with the surface properties of the fluoropolymer. It was theorized that the fluoropolymer would migrate to the surface, forming a monolayer barrier to the oxidants and crack-driving agents released by macrophages and foreign body giant cells in vivo. In a 12-week biostability screening test, samples strained to 400% elongation appeared to be highly stable. In a longer-term study, the fluoropolymer SME significantly delayed, but did not completely prevent the onset of microcracking and the development of environmental stress cracking in strained samples. Even so, the 4 and 6% SME polymers explanted at 2 years performed significantly better than the control. FTIR analysis did not correlate with SME concentration, but increased hydrogen-bonding index and loss of aliphatic ether (autoxidation) did correlate with the visual appearance and density of microcracks. Significant molecular weight reductions were seen for the SME-free control, but were small (within instrumental error) for the polymers with SME. The use of fluoropolymer as a SME does appear to be warranted as a means to improve polyether polyurethane biostability. PMID:16886223

  10. The chloride stress-corrosion cracking behavior of stainless steels under different test methods

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, L.Z. . Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering)

    1994-12-01

    Chloride-induced stress-corrosion cracking (SCC) is one of the failure modes of stainless steels. Highly alloyed austenitic stainless steels S32654, S31254, and N08028, and duplex grades S32750 and S31803 possess much improved resistance to SCC compared with S30400 and S31600 steels. With the development of a database, SSData, experimental data collected from calcium chloride tests, autoclave tests, and drop evaporation tests were evaluated. Stress-corrosion cracking data generated by autoclave tests agreed well with the practical service conditions and can be used to discriminate alloys for SCC resistance in sodium chloride solution. Drop evaporation test data can be used in situations where evaporation may occur and cyclic loading may be involved. The SCC resistance of alloys under each method increased with increasing molybdenum equivalent Mo + 0.25Cr + 0.1Ni. For a given alloy, the testing result depends on the stress state and environment; different test methods can give different ranking orders concerning SCC resistance. The performance of duplex stainless steels in a chloride-containing environment at higher temperatures was not as good as expected when dynamic loading was involved.

  11. Stress corrosion cracking of candidate structural materials under simulated first-wall/aqueous coolant environments

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, M.R.; Hull, A.B.; Kassner, T.F.

    1990-10-01

    Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) susceptibility of Types 316NG, 316, and 304 stainless steels (SS) was investigated in slow-strain-rate tests (SSRTs) in oxygenated water that simulates important parameters anticipated in first-wall/blanket systems. The water chemistry was based on a computer code which yielded the nominal concentrations of radiolytic species produced in an aqueous environment under ITER-type conditions. Actual SSRTs were performed in a less benign, more oxidizing reference environment at temperatures from 52 to 150{degree}C. Predominantly ductile fracture was observed in Type 316NG and nonsensitized Types 316 SS and 304 SS SSRT specimens strained to failure in a reference ITER water chemistry. The failure behavior of Type 304 SS specimens heat-treated to yield sensitization values of 2, 3, or 20 Coulomb (C)/cm{sup 2} by the electrochemical potentiokinetic reactivation (EPR) technique, demonstrated that the degree of sensitization had a dramatic effect on intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) susceptibility. Ranking for resistance to SCC in simulated ITER water by electron microscopy and SSRT parameters, i.e., failure time, ultimate strength, total elongation and stress ratio is 304 SS (EPR = 20 <2 C/cm{sup 2}) < 316NG SS. 11 refs., 6 figs., 7 tabs.

  12. The Effect of Phosphorus Content on the Hydrogen Stress Cracking of High Strength 4130 Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craig, Bruce D.

    1982-05-01

    A series of four 4130 base steels with various phosphorus concentrations was subjected to cathodic charging to determine the effect of P on hydrogen stress cracking resistance. Static fatigue curves for several different yield strengths were obtained for each alloy. At high yield strengths under applied loads of 60 to 80 pct of the yield, 50 ppm P (bulk concentration) was enough to provide sufficient grain boundary P for an impurity-hydrogen interaction which produced intergranular fracture along prior austenite grain boundaries. Decreasing yield strength and applied stress caused a transition in fracture mode to transgranular while the resistance to hydrogen stress cracking increased with decreasing P. Microhardness measurements of prior austenite grain boundaries were made to establish the role of P. The role of P is not apparently related to its capacity as a strengthening element but more probably as a hydrogen recombination poison. Grain boundary hardness measurements for low temperature tempers (200 °C) appear to be valid while those at 500 °C were not.

  13. Residual stress analysis of multilayer environmental barrier coatings.

    SciTech Connect

    Harder, B.; Almer, J.; Weyant, C.; Lee, K.; Faber, K.; Northwestern Univ.; Rolls-Royce Corp.

    2009-02-01

    Silicon-based ceramics (SiC, Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}) are promising materials systems for high-temperature structural applications in gas turbine engines. However, the silica layer that forms on these materials is susceptible to attack from water vapor present in combustion environments. To protect against this degradation, environmental barrier coatings (EBCs) have been developed to shield the underlying substrate and prevent degradation. Here we report on elastic and thermal properties, as well as internal stresses of candidate multilayer coatings, as measured in situ using microfocused high-energy X-rays in a transmission diffraction geometry. Doped aluminosilicate coatings were investigated for their stability on a SiC/SiC melt-infiltrated substrate. The coatings consisted of a Ba{sub 1-x}Sr{sub x}Al{sub 2}Si{sub 2}O{sub 8} topcoat with a mullite or mullite+SrAl{sub 2}Si{sub 2}O{sub 8} interlayer, and a silicon bond coat. A numerical model was used to compare the stress results with an ideal coating system. Experiments were carried out on as-sprayed and heat-treated samples in order to analyze the strain and phase evolution as a function of multilayer depth and temperature. The phase transformation of the topcoat promoted healing of cracks in the EBC and reduced stresses in the underlying layers and the addition of SAS to the interlayer reduced stresses in thermally cycled coatings, but did not stop cracks from forming.

  14. INHIBITION OF STRESS CORROSION CRACKING OF CARBON STEEL STORAGE TANKS AT HANFORD

    SciTech Connect

    BOOMER, K.D.

    2007-01-31

    The stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behavior of A537 tank steel was investigated in a series of environments designed to simulate the chemistry of legacy nuclear weapons production waste. Tests consisted of both slow strain rate tests using tensile specimens and constant load tests using compact tension specimens. Based on the tests conducted, nitrite was found to be a strong SCC inhibitor. Based on the test performed and the tank waste chemistry changes that are predicted to occur over time, the risk for SCC appears to be decreasing since the concentration of nitrate will decrease and nitrite will increase.

  15. EXPERT PANEL OVERSIGHT COMMITTEE ASSESSMENT OF FY2008 CORROSION AND STRESS CORROSION CRACKING SIMULANT TESTING PROGRAM

    SciTech Connect

    BOOMER KD

    2009-01-08

    The Expert Panel Oversight Committee (EPOC) has been overseeing the implementation of selected parts of Recommendation III of the final report, Expert Panel workshop for Hanford Site Double-Shell Tank Waste Chemistry Optimization, RPP-RPT-22126. Recommendation III provided four specific requirements necessary for Panel approval of a proposal to revise the chemistry control limits for the Double-Shell Tanks (DSTs). One of the more significant requirements was successful performance of an accelerated stress corrosion cracking (SCC) experimental program. This testing program has evaluated the optimization of the chemistry controls to prevent corrosion in the interstitial liquid and supernatant regions of the DSTs.

  16. Photoelectrochemical protection of stainless alloys from the stress-corrosion cracking in BWR primary coolant environment

    SciTech Connect

    Akashi, Masatsune; Iso-o, Hiroyuki; Kubota, Nobuhiko; Fukuda, Takanori; Ayabe, Muneo; Hirano, Kenji

    1995-12-31

    The feasibility of counteracting or preventing the stress-corrosion cracking in the BWR core internals by the photoelectrochemical method has been examined. For the purpose TiO{sub 2} semiconductor is noted for its capability of photo electrochemically inducing the water-oxidizing anodic reaction in low enough potential domain if supplied with a light of a wavelength shorter than 410 nm. This paper offers an empirical proof by showing that Type 304 stainless steel and Alloy 600 stainless alloy that have been plasma-spray coated with TiO{sub 2} film will do quite well in environments of BWR primary coolant.

  17. Metallurgical, chemical, and stress corrosion cracking characterization of high oxygen alpha+beta titanium-15Molybdenum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williamson, Randall Scott

    Titanium and its alloys are used as biomaterials due to their excellent corrosion resistance, mechanical properties, superior biocompatibility, metallurgical properties and fatigue characteristics. Titanium implants, like all biomaterials, can have failures in-vivo during their service life. The predominant mechanism observed for titanium implant/device failures is corrosion fatigue. However, other failure mechanisms can be observed. One such failure mechanism is stress corrosion cracking. Stress corrosion cracking and its presence or absence in in-vivo failures of titanium and titanium alloys has historically been debated. Several researchers have stated that titanium and titanium alloys can fail due to stress corrosion cracking under physiological conditions when the oxygen weight percent exceeds 0.20. The purpose of this research was to evaluate and to compare metallurgical, chemical, and stress corrosion cracking (SCC) properties of two heats of alpha+beta Ti-15Mo with oxygen weight concentrations of approximately 0.18% (Heat UC30) and 0.73% (Heat UC32B). The results were compared to previous findings for beta Ti-15Mo, Grade 4 CP Ti, Ti-6A1-4V ELI and another low oxygen weight percent alpha+beta Ti-15Mo. Metallurgical evaluations showed that Heat UC30 had an inhomogeneous distribution of alpha and beta phases while Heat UC32B exhibited a homogenous microstructure. Heat treatment processes (annealing and aging) were completed on both heats to homogenize and to optimize the microstructures. Smooth and notched tensile test results showed that both heats had equal or superior tensile properties compared to CPTi and other Ti alloys. Corrosion resistance testing showed a variance in Heat UC30 samples while little variance was shown in Heat UC32B samples. Chemical composition results found that both alloys were within specification and internal melt limits. Smooth and notched samples for both Heat UC30 and Heat UC32B showed no evidence of SCC failure mechanisms in

  18. Stress corrosion cracking of alloy 600 using the constant strain rate test

    SciTech Connect

    Bulischeck, T. S.; van Rooyen, D.

    1980-01-01

    The most recent corrosion problems experienced in nuclear steam generators tubed with Inconel alloy 600 is a phenomenon labeled ''denting''. Denting has been found in various degrees of severity in many operating pressurized water reactors. Laboratory investigations have shown that Inconel 600 exhibits intergranular SCC when subjected to high stresses and exposed to deoxygenated water at elevated temperatures. A research project was initiated at Brookhaven National Laboratory in an attempt to improve the qualitative and quantitative understanding of factors influencing SCC in high temperature service-related environments. An effort is also being made to develop an accelerated test method which could be used to predict the service life of tubes which have been deformed or are actively denting. Several heats of commercial Inconel 600 tubing were procured for testing in deaerated pure and primary water at temperatures from 290 to 365/sup 0/C. U-bend type specimens were used to determine crack initiation times which may be expected for tubes where denting has occurred but is arrested and provide baseline data for judging the accelerating effects of the slow strain rate method. Constant extension rate tests were employed to determine the crack velocities experienced in the crack propagation stage and predict failure times of tubes which are actively denting. 8 refs., 17 figs., 5 tabs.

  19. Stress corrosion cracking of austenitic weld deposits in a salt spray environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, J. B.; Yu, C.; Shiue, R. K.; Tsay, L. W.

    2015-10-01

    ER 308L and 309LMo were utilized as the filler metals for the groove and overlay welds of a 304L stainless steel substrate, which was prepared via a gas tungsten arc-welding process in multiple passes. U-bend and weight-loss tests were conducted by testing the welds in a salt spray containing 10 wt% NaCl at 120 °C. The dissolution of the skeletal structure in the fusion zone (FZ) caused the stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of the weld. The FZ in the cold-rolled condition showed the longest single crack length in the U-bend tests. Moreover, sensitization treatment at 650 °C for 10 h promoted the formation of numerous fine cracks, which resulted in a high SCC susceptibility. The weight loss of the deposits was consistent with the SCC susceptibility of the welds in a salt spray. The 309LMo deposit was superior to the 308L deposit in the salt spray.

  20. Environmental Cracking of Corrosion Resistant Alloys in the Chemical Process Industry - A Review

    SciTech Connect

    Rebak, R B

    2006-12-04

    A large variety of corrosion resistant alloys are used regularly in the chemical process industry (CPI). The most common family of alloys include the iron (Fe)-based stainless steels, nickel (Ni) alloys and titanium (Ti) alloys. There also other corrosion resistant alloys but their family of alloys is not as large as for the three groups mentioned above. All ranges of corrosive environments can be found in the CPI, from caustic solutions to hot acidic environments, from highly reducing to highly oxidizing. Stainless steels are ubiquitous since numerous types of stainless steels exist, each type tailored for specific applications. In general, stainless steels suffer stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in hot chloride environments while high Ni alloys are practically immune to this type of attack. High nickel alloys are also resistant to caustic cracking. Ti alloys find application in highly oxidizing solutions. Solutions containing fluoride ions, especially acid, seem to be aggressive to almost all corrosion resistant alloys.

  1. The effect of alloy composition on the mechanism of stress corrosion cracking of titanium alloys in aqueous environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyd, J. D.; Williams, D. N.; Wood, R. A.; Jaffee, R. I.

    1972-01-01

    The effects of alloy composition on the aqueous stress corrosion of titanium alloys were studied with emphasis on determining the interrelations among composition, phase structure, and deformation and fracture properties of the alpha phase in alpha-beta alloys. Accomplishments summarized include the effects of alloy composition on susceptibility, and metallurgical mechanisms of stress-corrosion cracking.

  2. Assessment of Initial Test Conditions for Experiments to Assess Irradiation Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking Mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Busby, Jeremy T; Gussev, Maxim N

    2011-04-01

    Irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking is a key materials degradation issue in today s nuclear power reactor fleet and affects critical structural components within the reactor core. The effects of increased exposure to irradiation, stress, and/or coolant can substantially increase susceptibility to stress-corrosion cracking of austenitic steels in high-temperature water environments. . Despite 30 years of experience, the underlying mechanisms of IASCC are unknown. Extended service conditions will increase the exposure to irradiation, stress, and corrosive environment for all core internal components. The objective of this effort within the Light Water Reactor Sustainability program is to evaluate the response and mechanisms of IASCC in austenitic stainless steels with single variable experiments. A series of high-value irradiated specimens has been acquired from the past international research programs, providing a valuable opportunity to examine the mechanisms of IASCC. This batch of irradiated specimens has been received and inventoried. In addition, visual examination and sample cleaning has been completed. Microhardness testing has been performed on these specimens. All samples show evidence of hardening, as expected, although the degree of hardening has saturated and no trend with dose is observed. Further, the change in hardening can be converted to changes in mechanical properties. The calculated yield stress is consistent with previous data from light water reactor conditions. In addition, some evidence of changes in deformation mode was identified via examination of the microhardness indents. This analysis may provide further insights into the deformation mode under larger scale tests. Finally, swelling analysis was performed using immersion density methods. Most alloys showed some evidence of swelling, consistent with the expected trends for this class of alloy. The Hf-doped alloy showed densification rather than swelling. This observation may be

  3. The effect of stress rate on crack damage evolution in polystyrene and PEEK. Ph.D. Thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Gregory, B.L.

    1993-01-01

    The effects of stress rate on fatigue crack propagation (FCP) in polystyrene (PS) and polyetheretherketone (PEEK) were examined emphasizing damage evolution during fatigue fracture. Extruded and compression molded PS were studied. Craze distributions along trailing edges of successive process zone configurations in each material were self-similar. A core of dense crazing was observed in the extruded PS; no core was observed in the compression molded material. These results have important implications for the kinematics of process zone evolution in compression molded PS. Crack growth kinetics were treated as dl/dn and dl/dt. Consideration of the loading waveform and the load-time-area (LTA) revealed that LTA and rate effects couldn`t be decoupled. However, by treating the data as dl/dt the contribution of LTA constant, and the effect of stress rate was determined. Attempts were made to quantify the contributions of fatigue and creep LTA on total FCP kinetics by linear summation. While these failed, it was subsequently determined that two linear regimes separated by a characteristic period could approximate the data. The contributions of both stress rate and LTA varied above and below this characteristic period. From this analysis, the contributions of time and cycle reversal could be evaluated. Crack growth due to creep exhibited strong correlation with an exponential function compatible with stress-temperature activated processes. The crack damage evolution of PEEK as a function of stress rate during fatigue was also investigated. A brittle-ductile transition was observed characterized by a transformation at the crack tip from a rounded to a triangular (90 deg angle) crack front. The results showed that the damaged material ahead of the crack tip behaved as an elastic perfectly plastic material (plane stress conditions). This damage zone was further characterized as a volume of transformed material.

  4. Stress Corrosion Cracking of Ni-Fe-Cr Alloys Relevant to Nuclear Power Plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Persaud, Suraj

    Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of Ni-Fe-Cr alloys and weld metals was investigated in simulated environments representative of high temperature water used in the primary and secondary circuits of nuclear power plants. The mechanism of primary water SCC (PWSCC) was studied in Alloys 600, 690, 800 and Alloy 82 dissimilar metal welds using the internal oxidation model as a guide. Initial experiments were carried out in a 480°C hydrogenated steam environment considered to simulate high temperature reducing primary water. Ni alloys underwent classical internal oxidation intragranularly resulting in the expulsion of the solvent metal, Ni, to the surface. Selective intergranular oxidation of Cr in Alloy 600 resulted in embrittlement, while other alloys were resistant owing to their increased Cr contents. Atom probe tomography was used to determine the short-circuit diffusion path used for Ni expulsion at a sub-nanometer scale, which was concluded to be oxide-metal interfaces. Further exposures of Alloys 600 and 800 were done in 315°C simulated primary water and intergranular oxidation tendency was comparable to 480°C hydrogenated steam. Secondary side work involved SCC experiments and electrochemical measurements, which were done at 315°C in acid sulfate solutions. Alloy 800 C-rings were found to undergo acid sulfate SCC (AcSCC) to a depth of up to 300 microm in 0.55 M sulfate solution at pH 4.3. A focused-ion beam was used to extract a crack tip from a C-ring and high resolution analytical electron microscopy revealed a duplex oxide structure and the presence of sulfur. Electrochemical measurements were taken on Ni alloys to complement crack tip analysis; sulfate was concluded to be the aggressive anion in mixed sulfate and chloride systems. Results from electrochemical measurements and crack tip analysis suggested a slip dissolution-type mechanism to explain AcSCC in Ni alloys.

  5. Modeling of stresses at grain boundaries with respect to occurrence of stress corrosion cracking

    SciTech Connect

    Kozaczek, K.J.; Sinharoy, A.; Ruud, C.O.; McIlree, A.R.

    1995-12-31

    The distributions of elastic stresses/strains in the grain boundary regions were studied by the analytical and the finite element models. The grain boundaries represent the sites where stress concentration occurs as a result of discontinuity of elastic properties across the grain boundary and the presence of second phase particles elastically different from the surrounding matrix grains. A quantitative analysis of those stresses for steels and nickel based alloys showed that the stress concentrations in the grain boundary regions are high enough to cause a local microplastic deformation even when the material is in the macroscopic elastic regime. The stress redistribution as a result of such a plastic deformation was discussed.

  6. Effects of stress rate and calculation method on subcritical crack growth parameters deduced from constant stress-rate flexural testing

    PubMed Central

    Griggs, Jason A.; Alaqeel, Samer M.; Zhang, Yunlong; Miller, Amp W.; Cai, Zhuo

    2011-01-01

    Objectives To more efficiently determine the subcritical crack growth (SCG) parameters of dental ceramics, the effects of stressing rate and choice of statistical regression model on estimates of SCG parameters were assessed. Methods Two dental ceramic materials, a veneering material having a single critical flaw population (S) and a framework material having partially concurrent flaw populations (PC), were analyzed using constant stress-rate testing, or “dynamic fatigue”, with a variety of testing protocols. For each material, 150 rectangular beam specimens were prepared and tested in four-point flexure according to ISO6872 and ASTM1368. A full-factorial study was conducted on the following factors: material, stress rate assumed vs. calculated, number of stress rates, and statistical regression method. Results The proportion of specimens for which the statistical models over-estimated reliability was not significantly different based on regression method for Material S (P = 0.96, power = 94%) and was significantly different based on regression method for Material PC (P < 0.001). The standard method resulted in SCG parameters, n and ln B, of 35.9 and -11.1 MPa2s for Material S and 12.4 and 9.61 MPa2s for Material PC. Significance The method of calculation that uses only the median strength value at each stress rate provided the most robust SCG parameter estimates. Using only two stress rates resulted in fatigue parameters comparable to those estimated using four stress rates having the same range. The stress rate of each specimen can be assumed to be the target stress rate with negligible difference in SCG parameter estimates. PMID:21167586

  7. Formation and evaluation of closed stress corrosion cracks in Ni-based alloy weld metal for nuclear power plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohara, Yoshikazu; Shintaku, Yohei; Horinouchi, Satoshi; Yamanaka, Kazushi

    2012-09-01

    Closed stress corrosion cracks (SCCs) have been generated in nuclear power plants, resulting in the underestimation and nondetection. To solve this problem, we have developed closed-crack imaging method, the subharmonic phased array for crack evaluation (SPACE), on the basis of subharmonic waves and phased array technique. Here, after verifying the SPACE in a realistic SCC specimen, we present a two-step method for forming deep closed SCC for a reasonable amount of time. The SCC closure was verified by SPACE. This significantly contributes to the improvement of nondestructive evaluation methods and training/educating of inspection engineers.

  8. Inoculation Stress Hypothesis of Environmental Enrichment

    PubMed Central

    Crofton, Elizabeth J.; Zhang, Yafang; Green, Thomas A.

    2014-01-01

    One hallmark of psychiatric conditions is the vast continuum of individual differences in susceptibility vs. resilience resulting from the interaction of genetic and environmental factors. The environmental enrichment paradigm is an animal model that is useful for studying a range of psychiatric conditions, including protective phenotypes in addiction and depression models. The major question is how environmental enrichment, a non-drug and non-surgical manipulation, can produce such robust individual differences in such a wide range of behaviors. This paper draws from a variety of published sources to outline a coherent hypothesis of inoculation stress as a factor producing the protective enrichment phenotypes. The basic tenet suggests that chronic mild stress from living in a complex environment and interacting non-aggressively with conspecifics can inoculate enriched rats against subsequent stressors and/or drugs of abuse. This paper reviews the enrichment phenotypes, mulls the fundamental nature of environmental enrichment vs. isolation, discusses the most appropriate control for environmental enrichment, and challenges the idea that cortisol/corticosterone equals stress. The intent of the inoculation stress hypothesis of environmental enrichment is to provide a scaffold with which to build testable hypotheses for the elucidation of the molecular mechanisms underlying these protective phenotypes and thus provide new therapeutic targets to treat psychiatric/neurological conditions. PMID:25449533

  9. Inoculation stress hypothesis of environmental enrichment.

    PubMed

    Crofton, Elizabeth J; Zhang, Yafang; Green, Thomas A

    2015-02-01

    One hallmark of psychiatric conditions is the vast continuum of individual differences in susceptibility vs. resilience resulting from the interaction of genetic and environmental factors. The environmental enrichment paradigm is an animal model that is useful for studying a range of psychiatric conditions, including protective phenotypes in addiction and depression models. The major question is how environmental enrichment, a non-drug and non-surgical manipulation, can produce such robust individual differences in such a wide range of behaviors. This paper draws from a variety of published sources to outline a coherent hypothesis of inoculation stress as a factor producing the protective enrichment phenotypes. The basic tenet suggests that chronic mild stress from living in a complex environment and interacting non-aggressively with conspecifics can inoculate enriched rats against subsequent stressors and/or drugs of abuse. This paper reviews the enrichment phenotypes, mulls the fundamental nature of environmental enrichment vs. isolation, discusses the most appropriate control for environmental enrichment, and challenges the idea that cortisol/corticosterone equals stress. The intent of the inoculation stress hypothesis of environmental enrichment is to provide a scaffold with which to build testable hypotheses for the elucidation of the molecular mechanisms underlying these protective phenotypes and thus provide new therapeutic targets to treat psychiatric/neurological conditions.

  10. Acoustic detection of stress-corrosion cracking of nitrogen austenitic steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filippov, Yu. I.; Sagaradze, V. V.; Zavalishin, V. A.; Pecherkina, N. L.; Kataeva, N. V.; Mushnikova, S. Yu.; Kostin, S. K.; Kalinin, G. Yu.

    2014-06-01

    Structural changes and resistance to the stress-corrosion cracking of the nitrogen-bearing austenitic steels 04Kh20N6G11M2AFB and 09Kh20N6G11M2AFB (with 0.04 and 0.09 wt % C, respectively) after different treatments, including thermomechanical action, quenching from 1200°C, and aging at 700°C for 2 and 10 h, have been studied. It has been shown that aging at 700°C of the air-melted austenitic steel 09Kh20N6G11M2AFB leads to a decrease in the strength of samples with an induced crack upon the cantilever bending in air and in a 3.5% aqueous solution of NaCl as compared to the strength of the steel 04Kh20N6G11M2AFB-EShP with a smaller carbon content after high-temperature mechanical treatment or quenching from 1200°C. The smallest resistance to stress-corrosion cracking is observed in the samples of 09Kh20N6G11M2AFB steel after 10 h of aging, which is accompanied by the most intense acoustic emission and by brittle intergranular fracture. This is explained by the high rate of the anodic dissolution of the metal near chromium-depleted grain boundaries due to the formation of continuous chains of grain-boundary chromium-containing precipitates of carbides and nitrides.

  11. Mixed-Mode Stress Intensity Factors for an Embedded Crack in an Orthotropic FGM Coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dag, S.; Ilhan, K. A.; Erdogan, F.

    2008-02-01

    Analytical and computational methods are developed to examine mixed-mode fracture behaviour of an orthotropic FGM coating bonded to a homogeneous substrate through a layer of a bond-coat. The coating is assumed to contain an embedded crack perpendicular to the direction of the material property gradation. First, an analytical solution is developed considering a perturbation problem. Using Fourier transform, the problem is reduced to a system of singular integral equations which are solved by means of an expansion-collocation technique. Then, finite element method is utilized to investigate the same problem using the displacement correlation technique (DCT). By using the developed finite element method, mixed-mode stress intensity factors are also evaluated for an FGM coating-bond coat-substrate structure that is subjected to thermal stresses.

  12. Environmentally Assisted Cracking of Commercial Ni-Cr-Mo Alloys - A Review

    SciTech Connect

    Rebak, R B

    2004-11-09

    Nickel-Chromium-Molybdenum alloys (Ni-Cr-Mo) are highly resistant to general corrosion, localized corrosion and environmentally assisted cracking (EAC). Cr acts as a beneficial element under oxidizing acidic conditions and Mo under reducing conditions. All three elements (Ni, Cr and Mo) act synergistically to provide resistance to EAC in environments such as hot concentrated chloride solutions. Ni-Cr-Mo alloys may suffer EAC in environments such as hot caustic solutions, hot wet hydrofluoric acid (HF) solutions and in super critical water oxidation (SCWO) applications. Not all the Ni-Cr-Mo alloys have the same susceptibility to cracking in the mentioned environments. Most of the available data regarding EAC is for the oldest Ni-Cr-Mo alloys such as N10276 and N06625.

  13. Irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking of HTH Alloy X-750 and Alloy 625

    SciTech Connect

    Mills, W.J.; Lebo, M.R.; Bajaj, R.; Kearns, J.J.; Hoffman, R.C.; Korinko, J.J.

    1994-06-01

    In-reactor testing of bolt-loaded precracked compact tension specimens was performed in 360{degree}C water to determine effect of irradiation on the SCC behavior of HTH Alloy X-750 and direct aged Alloy 625. Out-of-flux and autoclave control specimens provided baseline data. Primary test variables were stress intensity factor, fluence, chemistry, processing history, prestrain. Results for the first series of experiments were presented at a previous conference. Data from two more recent experiments are compared with previous results; they confirm that high irradiation levels significantly reduce SCC resistance in HTH Alloy X-750. Heat-to-heat differences in IASCC were related to differences in boron content, with low boron heats showing improved SCC resistance. The in-reactor SCC performance of Alloy 625 was superior to that for Alloy X-750, as no cracking was observed in any Alloy 625 specimens even though they were tested at very high K{sub 1} and fluence levels. A preliminary SCC usage model developed for Alloy X-750 indicates that in-reactor creep processes, which relax stresses but also increase crack tip strain rates, and radiolysis effects accelerate SCC. Hence, in-reactor SCC damage under high flux conditions may be more severe than that associated with postirradiation tests. In addition, preliminary mechanism studies were performed to determine the cause of IASCC In Alloy X-750.

  14. Stress-corrosion cracking of steels in ammonia with consideration given to OTEC design: a survey

    SciTech Connect

    Teel, R.B.

    1980-03-01

    Carbon steel, alloy steel, and high-strength, quenched and tempered steel, when under applied or residual stress and especially when cold formed and/or welded without subsequent thermal stress relief, are subject to failure by stress-corrosion cracking (SCC) in air-contaminated dry ammonia. Water as well as hydrazine when present in small amounts have been shown to be effective inhibitors in an all steel system. Galvanic corrosion between dissimilar metals and/or accelerated failure by SCC of stressed steel as a result of galvanic coupling may be of concern. Where water has proven effective as an inhibitor of SCC in an all steel system, it may not be adequate in a mixed metal system. With aluminum tubes, the tube sheet will either have to be solid aluminum, aluminum clad steel or some nonconductive coating will be necessary to effectively remove the cathodic alloy from the galvanic circuit. Research is required to determine the severity of the coupling effect between dissimilar alloys in ammonia under OTEC conditions; especially the possibility of accelerated SCC failures of stressed steel where the presence of an inhibitor in the ammonia may not be sufficient to override the galvanic coupling effect.

  15. Effects of temperature on stress corrosion cracking behavior of stainless steel and outer oxide distribution in cracks due to exposure to high-temperature water containing hydrogen peroxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakano, Junichi; Sato, Tomonori; Kato, Chiaki; Yamamoto, Masahiro; Tsukada, Takashi; Kaji, Yoshiyuki

    2014-01-01

    Cracking growth tests were conducted in high-temperature water containing hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) at 561-423 K to evaluate the effects of H2O2 on stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of stainless steel (SS) at temperature lower than the boiling water reactor (BWR) operating temperature. Small compact tension (CT) specimens were prepared from thermally sensitized type 304 SS. Despite the observation of only a small portion intergranular SCC (IGSCC) near the side groove of the CT specimen at 561 K in high-temperature water containing 100 ppb H2O2, the IGSCC area expanded to the central region of the CT specimens at 423 and 453 K. Effects of H2O2 on SCC appeared intensely at temperature lower than the BWR operating temperature because of a reduction in the thermal decomposition of H2O2. To estimate the environment in the cracks, outer oxide distribution on the fracture surface and the fatigue pre-crack were examined by laser Raman spectroscopy and thermal equilibrium calculation was performed.

  16. Interference of wedge-shaped protrusions on the faces of a Griffith crack in biaxial stress. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Boulet, J.A.M.

    1992-04-01

    An initial investigation of the influence of protrusion interference on the fracture toughness required to prevent unstable propagation of a Griffith crack in a brittle material is described. The interference is caused by relative shear displacement of the crack faces when subjected to remote biaxial stress with neither principal stress parallel to the crack. It is shown that for room temperature cracks smaller than about one centimeter in silicon carbide, or about one millimeter in silicon nitride, the presence of interference changes the fracture stress. A mathematical model based on linear elasticity solutions and including multiple interference sites at arbitrarily specified positions on the crack is presented. Computations of the change in required fracture toughness and its dependence on wedge geometry (size and vertex angle), applied stresses (orientation and magnitude), and location of the interference site are discussed. Results indicate that a single interference site has only a slight effect on required toughness. However, the influence of interference increases monotonically with the number of interference sites. The two-dimensional model described herein is not accurate when the interference sites are closely spaced.

  17. Oxidation products of Inconel alloys 600 and 690 in hydrogenated steam environments and their role in stress corrosion cracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferguson, J. Bryce

    Inconel Alloys 600 and 690 are used extensively in components of Nuclear Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR) in the primary water loop which consists of H2 supersaturated steam. Alloy 600 has been found to crack intergranularly when exposed to primary water conditions. Alloy 690 was designed as a replacement and is generally regarded as immune to cracking. There is no consensus as to the mechanism which is responsible for cracking or the lack thereof in these alloys. In this work thermodynamic arguments for the stability of Ni and Cr compounds developed under pressurized water reactor environments ( PH2O and PH2 ) were experimentally tested. A mechanism is proposed to explain crack initiation and propagation alloy 600 along the grain boundaries where Cr2O3 has formed from the leaching of Cr from the matrix leaving behind a porous Ni-rich region. The mechanism is based on the thermodynamic potential for the transformation of a protective NiO surface layer into an amorphous non-protective Ni(OH)2 gel. This gel would also form along the grain boundaries and when hydrogenated steam reaches the porous Ni-rich regions. Crack initiation is then favored by tensile stressing of the grain boundary regions which can easily rupture the gelatinous film. The leaching of matrix Cr to form non-protective CrOOH gel at the crack tip followed by the exposure of fresh porous Ni to the environment also explains crack propagation in inconel alloy 600. The proposed crack initiation mechanism is not expected to occur in alloy 690 where a protective Cr2O 3 film covers the entire metal surface. However, crack propagation along the grain boundaries in alloy 600 and pre-cracked alloy 690 is expected to be active as hydroxide-forming reactions weaken the material at the grain boundaries.

  18. Inhibition of environmental fatigue crack propagation in age-hardenable aluminum alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warner, Jenifer S.

    Age-hardenable aluminum alloys, such as C47A-T86 (Al-Cu-Li) and 7075-T651 (Al-Zn-Mg-Cu), used in aerospace structures are susceptible to environment assisted fatigue crack propagation (EFCP) by hydrogen environment embrittlement. This research demonstrates effective inhibition of EFCP in C47A-T86 and 7075-T651 under both full immersion in aqueous chloride solution and atmospheric exposure which more accurately describes aircraft service conditions. Inhibition is attributed to the presence of a crack tip passive film reducing H production and uptake, as explained by the film rupture-hydrogen embrittlement mechanism, and can be accomplished through both addition of a passivating ion (ion-assisted inhibition) and localized-alloy corrosion creating passivating conditions (self inhibition). Addition of molybdate to both bulk chloride solution and surface chloride droplets eliminates the effect of environment on fatigue crack propagation in C47A-T86 and 7075-1651 at sufficiently low loading frequencies and high stress ratio by yielding crack growth rates equivalent to those for fatigue in ultra high vacuum. The preeminent corrosion inhibitor, chromate, has not been reported to produce such complete inhibition. Inhibition is promoted by reduced loading frequency, increased crack tip molybdate concentration, and potential at or anodic to free corrosion; each of which favors passivity. The inhibiting effect of molybdate parallels chromate, establishing molybdate as a viable chromate replacement inhibitor. The ability of molybdate to inhibit EFCP is enhanced by atmospheric exposures producing surface electrolyte droplets; crack growth rates are reduced by an order of magnitude under loading frequencies as high as 30 Hz, a frequency at which inhibition was not possible under full immersion. Al-Cu-Mg/Li alloys, including 2024-T351, are capable of self inhibition of EFCP. This behavior is attributed to localized corrosion through dealloying of anodic Al2CuMg or Al2Cu

  19. Inhibitory effect of boric acid on intergranular attack and stress corrosion cracking of Alloy 600 in high temperature water

    SciTech Connect

    Kawamura, H.; Hirano, H.; Koike, M.; Suda, M.

    1995-09-01

    The inhibitory effect of boric acid on the Intergranular Attack and Stress Corrosion Cracking (IGA/SCC) propagation behavior of steam generator (SG) tubing was studied under accelerated test conditions. Based on the analysis results of stress intensity factors at IGA/SCC crack tips, the notched C-ring tests were carried out to evaluate the effect of stress intensity and boric acid on the IGA/SCC crack propagation. The A.C. impedance measurement and Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) were also conducted to clarify the inhibitory effect of boric acid. Notched C-ring test results indicated that IGA/SCC crack velocity of alloy 600 increased gradually with increasing stress intensity factor in the range 4 to about 26 MPa{center_dot}m{sup 1/2}, which might be loaded on the IGA/SCC crack tips of actual SG tubes under PWR secondary conditions. Adding boric acid slightly retarded the crack velocity in both all volatile treatment (AVT) water and caustic solutions. IGA/SCC crack velocities were lower in nearly neutral solutions than in alkali or acidic solutions. Furthermore, A.C. impedance studies showed that the polarization resistances of oxide films formed in boric acid solutions were higher than those of films formed in acidic and alkali solutions. AES analysis revealed that boron content in the oxide films formed in acidic solution containing boric acid was lowest. Good agreement was obtained between the IGA/SCC inhibitory effect of boric acid and the formation of the stable oxide films containing boron.

  20. Crack tip field and fatigue crack growth in general yielding and low cycle fatigue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minzhong, Z.; Liu, H. W.

    1984-01-01

    Fatigue life consists of crack nucleation and crack propagation periods. Fatigue crack nucleation period is shorter relative to the propagation period at higher stresses. Crack nucleation period of low cycle fatigue might even be shortened by material and fabrication defects and by environmental attack. In these cases, fatigue life is largely crack propagation period. The characteristic crack tip field was studied by the finite element method, and the crack tip field is related to the far field parameters: the deformation work density, and the product of applied stress and applied strain. The cyclic carck growth rates in specimens in general yielding as measured by Solomon are analyzed in terms of J-integral. A generalized crack behavior in terms of delta is developed. The relations between J and the far field parameters and the relation for the general cyclic crack growth behavior are used to analyze fatigue lives of specimens under general-yielding cyclic-load. Fatigue life is related to the applied stress and strain ranges, the deformation work density, crack nucleus size, fracture toughness, fatigue crack growth threshold, Young's modulus, and the cyclic yield stress and strain. The fatigue lives of two aluminum alloys correlate well with the deformation work density as depicted by the derived theory. The general relation is reduced to Coffin-Manson low cycle fatigue law in the high strain region.

  1. Phase transformations and residual stresses in environmental barrier coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harder, Bryan J.

    Silicon-based ceramics (SiC, Si3N4) are promising materials for high-temperature structural applications in turbine engines. However, the silica layer that forms on these materials is susceptible to attack from water vapor present in combustion environments. To protect against this degradation, environmental barrier coatings (EBCs) were developed to protect the underlying substrate. In the case of silicon carbide (SiC), multilayer coating systems consist of a Ba1-xSrxAl2Si 2O8 (BSAS) topcoat, a mullite or mullite + SrAl2Si 2O8 (SAS) interlayer, and a silicon bond coat. In this work, biaxial strains were measured on as-sprayed and heat-treated samples to analyze the stress and phase evolution in the coating system as a function of depth and temperature. Models were used to compare the results with an ideal coating system. In the assprayed state, tensile stresses as high as 175 MPa were measured, and cracking was observed. After thermally cycling the samples, stresses were significantly reduced and cracks in the topcoat had closed. The addition of SAS to the interlayer increased the compressive stress in the BSAS topcoat in thermally-cycled samples, which was desirable for EBC applications. The BSAS topcoat transformed from the as-deposited hexacelsian state to the stable celsian above 1200°C. This phase transformation is accompanied by a CTE reduction. The kinetics of the hexacelsian-to-celsian transformation were quantified for freestanding plasma-sprayed BSAS. Activation energies for bulk bars and crushed powder were determined to be ˜340 kJ/mol and ˜500 kJ/mol, respectively. X-ray diffraction and electron backscatter diffraction were used to establish how microstructural constraints reduce the transformation energy. Barrier coating lifetime and stability are also influenced by exposure to reactive, low-melting point calcium-magnesium-aluminosilicate (CMAS) deposits formed from dust and sand. Multilayer doped aluminosilicate coatings and bulk BSAS material were

  2. Simulated Service and Stress Corrosion Cracking Testing for Friction Stir Welded Spun Formed Domes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, Thomas J.; Torres, Pablo D.; Caratus, Andrei A.; Curreri, Peter A.

    2010-01-01

    Simulated service testing (SST) development was required to help qualify a new 2195 aluminum lithium (Al-Li) alloy spin forming dome fabrication process for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Exploration Development Technology Program. The application for the technology is to produce high strength low weight tank components for NASA s next generation launch vehicles. Since plate material is not currently manufactured large enough to fabricate these domes, two plates are joined by means of friction stir welding. The plates are then pre-contour machined to near final thicknesses allowing for a thicker weld land and anticipating the level of stretch induced by the spin forming process. The welded plates are then placed in a spin forming tool and hot stretched using a trace method producing incremental contours. Finally the dome receives a room temperature contour stretch to final dimensions, heat treatment, quenching, and artificial aging to emulate a T-8 condition of temper. Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) tests were also performed by alternate immersion in a sodium chloride (NaCl) solution using the typical double beam assembly and with 4-point loaded specimens and use of bent-beam stress-corrosion test specimens under alternate immersion conditions. In addition, experiments were conducted to determine the threshold stress intensity factor for SCC (K(sub ISCC)) which to our knowledge has not been determined previously for Al-Li 2195 alloy. The successful simulated service and stress corrosion testing helped to provide confidence to continue to Ares 1 scale dome fabrication

  3. Linking Grain Boundary Microstructure to Stress Corrosion Cracking of Cold Rolled Alloy 690 in PWR Primary Water

    SciTech Connect

    Bruemmer, Stephen M.; Olszta, Matthew J.; Toloczko, Mychailo B.; Thomas, Larry E.

    2012-10-01

    Grain boundary microstructures and microchemistries are examined in cold-rolled alloy 690 tubing and plate materials and comparisons are made to intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) behavior in PWR primary water. Chromium carbide precipitation is found to be a key aspect for materials in both the mill annealed and thermally treated conditions. Cold rolling to high levels of reduction was discovered to produce small IG voids and cracked carbides in alloys with a high density of grain boundary carbides. The degree of permanent grain boundary damage from cold rolling was found to depend directly on the initial IG carbide distribution. For the same degree of cold rolling, alloys with few IG precipitates exhibited much less permanent damage. Although this difference in grain boundary damage appears to correlate with measured SCC growth rates, crack tip examinations reveal that cracked carbides appeared to blunt propagation of IGSCC cracks in many cases. Preliminary results suggest that the localized grain boundary strains and stresses produced during cold rolling promote IGSCC susceptibility and not the cracked carbides and voids.

  4. Stress intensity factors in two bonded elastic layers containing cracks perpendicular to and on the interface. I Analysis. II - Solution and results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, M.-C.; Erdogan, F.

    1983-01-01

    The basic crack problem which is essential for the study of subcritical crack propagation and fracture of layered structural materials is considered. Because of the apparent analytical difficulties, the problem is idealized as one of plane strain or plane stress. An additional simplifying assumption is made by restricting the formulation of the problem to crack geometries and loading conditions which have a plane of symmetry perpendicular to the interface. The general problem is formulated in terms of a coupled systems of four integral equations. For each relevant crack configuration of practical interest, the singular behavior of the solution near and at the ends and points of intersection of the cracks is investigated and the related characteristic equations are obtained. The edge crack terminating at and crossing the interface, the T-shaped crack consisting of a broken layer and a delamination crack, the cross-shaped crack which consists of a delamination crack intersecting a crack which is perpendicular to the interface, and a delamination crack initiating from a stress-free boundary of the bonded layers are some of the practical crack geometries considered. Previously announced in STAR as N80-18428 and N80-18429

  5. Effects of laser peening on residual stresses and fatigue crack growth properties of Ti-6Al-4V titanium alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, J. Z.; Huang, S.; Zuo, L. D.; Meng, X. K.; Sheng, J.; Tian, Q.; Han, Y. H.; Zhu, W. L.

    2014-01-01

    The effects of laser peening (LP) with different laser peening coverage rates on residual stresses and fatigue crack growth (FCG) properties of Ti-6Al-4V titanium alloy were investigated. Residual stresses after LP and micro-structure with different fatigue striation patterns on fracture cross-sections were analyzed. Compressive residual stresses and dense dislocation arrangements can be obtained in the superficial layer after LP. The influence of compressive residual stresses induced under different LP coverage rates on FCG properties was revealed. LP coverage rate had an apparent influence on FCG properties as confirmed by the fatigue striation spacing on fracture cross-sections. Moreover, FCG rate decreased with the increase of compressive residual stresses perpendicular to the crack growth direction, which indicated that LP had an obvious inhibitory effects on FCG.

  6. Environmental stress, facilitation, competition, and coexistence.

    PubMed

    Hart, Simon P; Marshall, Dustin J

    2013-12-01

    The major theories regarding the combined influence of the environment and species interactions on population and community dynamics appear to conflict. Stress/ disturbance gradient models of community organization, such as the stress gradient hypothesis, emphasize a diminished role for competition in harsh environments whereas modern coexistence theory does not. Confusion about the role of species interactions in harsh environments is perpetuated by a disconnect between population dynamics theory and data. We linked theory and data using response surface experiments done in the field to parameterize mathematical, population-dynamic competition models. We replicated our experiment across two environments that spanned a common and important environmental stress gradient for determining community structure in benthic marine systems. We generated quantitative estimates of the effects of environmental stress on population growth rates and the direction and strength of intra- and interspecific interactions within each environment. Our approach directly addressed a perpetual blind spot in this field by showing how the effects of competition can be intensified in stressful environments even though the apparent strength of competition remains unchanged. Furthermore, we showed how simultaneous, reciprocal competitive and facilitative effects can stabilize population dynamics in multispecies communities in stressful environments.

  7. Environmental stress, facilitation, competition, and coexistence.

    PubMed

    Hart, Simon P; Marshall, Dustin J

    2013-12-01

    The major theories regarding the combined influence of the environment and species interactions on population and community dynamics appear to conflict. Stress/ disturbance gradient models of community organization, such as the stress gradient hypothesis, emphasize a diminished role for competition in harsh environments whereas modern coexistence theory does not. Confusion about the role of species interactions in harsh environments is perpetuated by a disconnect between population dynamics theory and data. We linked theory and data using response surface experiments done in the field to parameterize mathematical, population-dynamic competition models. We replicated our experiment across two environments that spanned a common and important environmental stress gradient for determining community structure in benthic marine systems. We generated quantitative estimates of the effects of environmental stress on population growth rates and the direction and strength of intra- and interspecific interactions within each environment. Our approach directly addressed a perpetual blind spot in this field by showing how the effects of competition can be intensified in stressful environments even though the apparent strength of competition remains unchanged. Furthermore, we showed how simultaneous, reciprocal competitive and facilitative effects can stabilize population dynamics in multispecies communities in stressful environments. PMID:24597219

  8. Effect of irradiation on the stress corrosion cracking behavior of Alloy X-750 and Alloy 625

    SciTech Connect

    Mills, W.J.; Lebo, M.R.; Kearns, J.J.; Hoffman, R.C.; Korinko, J.J.; Luther, R.F.; Sykes, G.B.

    1993-10-01

    In-reactor testing of bolt-loaded precracked and as-notched compact tension specimens was performed in 360{degrees}C water to determine effect of irradiation on SCC of Condition HTH and Condition BH Alloy X-750 and age-hardened Alloy 625. Variables were stress intensity factor (K{sub I}) level, fluence, grade of HTH material, prestraining and material chemistry. Effects of irradiation on high temperature SCC and the rapid cracking that occurs during cooldown below 150{degrees}C were characterized. Significant degradation in the in-reactor SCC resistance of HTH material was observed at initial K{sub I} levels above 30 MPa{radical}m and fluences greater than 10{sup 19} n/cm{sup 2} (E > 1 MeV). A small degradation in SCC resistance of HTH material was observed at low fluences (<10{sup 16} n/cm{sup 2}). As-notched specimens displayed less degradation in SCC resistance than precracked specimens. Prestraining greatly improved in-flux and out-of-flux SCC resistance of HTH material, as little or no SCC was observed in precracked specimens prestrained 20 to 30%, whereas extensive cracking was observed in nonprestrained specimens. Condition HTH heats with low boron (10 ppM or less) had improved in-reactor SCC resistance compared to heats with high and intermediate boron (>20 ppM). Age-hardened Alloy 625 exhibited superior in-reactor SCC behavior compared to HTH material as no crack extension occurred in any of the precracked Alloy 625 specimens tested at initial K{sub I} levels up to 80 MPa{radical}m.

  9. Environmental crack-growth behavior of high strength pressure vessel alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forman, R. G.

    1975-01-01

    Results of sustained-load environmental crack growth threshold tests performed on six spacecraft pressure vessel alloys are presented. The alloys were Inconel 718, 6Al-4V titanium, A-286 steel, AM-350 stainless steel, cryoformed AISI 301 stainless steel; and cryoformed AISI 304L steel. The test environments for the program were air, pressurized gases of hydrogen, oxygen, nitrogen, and carbon dioxide, and liquid environments of distilled water, sea water, nitrogen tetroxide, hydrazine, aerozine 50, monomethyl hydrazine, and hydrogen peroxide. Surface flaw type specimens were used with flaws located in both base metal and weld metal.

  10. Irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking behavior of austenitic stainless steels applicable to LWR core internals.

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, H. M.; Shack, W. J.; Energy Technology

    2006-01-31

    This report summarizes work performed at Argonne National Laboratory on irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) of austenitic stainless steels that were irradiated in the Halden reactor in simulation of irradiation-induced degradation of boiling water reactor (BWR) core internal components. Slow-strain-rate tensile tests in BWR-like oxidizing water were conducted on 27 austenitic stainless steel alloys that were irradiated at 288 C in helium to 0.4, 1.3, and 3.0 dpa. Fractographic analysis was conducted to determine the fracture surface morphology. Microchemical analysis by Auger electron spectroscopy was performed on BWR neutron absorber tubes to characterize grain-boundary segregation of important elements under BWR conditions. At 0.4 and 1.4 dpa, transgranular fracture was mixed with intergranular fracture. At 3 dpa, transgranular cracking was negligible, and fracture surface was either dominantly intergranular, as in field-cracked core internals, or dominantly ductile or mixed. This behavior indicates that percent intergranular stress corrosion cracking determined at {approx}3 dpa is a good measure of IASCC susceptibility. At {approx}1.4 dpa, a beneficial effect of a high concentration of Si (0.8-1.5 wt.%) was observed. At {approx}3 dpa, however, such effect was obscured by a deleterious effect of S. Excellent resistance to IASCC was observed up to {approx}3 dpa for eight heats of Types 304, 316, and 348 steel that contain very low concentrations of S. Susceptibility of Types 304 and 316 steels that contain >0.003 wt.% S increased drastically. This indicates that a sulfur related critical phenomenon plays an important role in IASCC. A sulfur content of <0.002 wt.% is the primary material factor necessary to ensure good resistance to IASCC. However, for Types 304L and 316L steel and their high-purity counterparts, a sulfur content of <0.002 wt.% alone is not a sufficient condition to ensure good resistance to IASCC. This is in distinct contrast to

  11. Initial report on stress-corrosion-cracking experiments using Zircaloy-4 spent fuel cladding C-rings

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, H.D.

    1988-09-01

    The Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations (NNWSI) Project is sponsoring C-ring stress corrosion cracking scoping experiments as a first step in evaluating the potential for stress corrosion cracking of spent fuel cladding in a potential tuff repository environment. The objective is to scope the approximate behavior so that more precise pressurized tube testing can be performed over an appropriate range of stress, without expanding the long-term effort needlessly. The experiment consists of stressing, by compression with a dead weight load, C-rings fabricated from spent fuel cladding exposed to an environment of Well J-13 water held at 90{degree}C. The results indicate that stress corrosion cracking occurs at the high stress levels employed in the experiments. The cladding C-rings, tested at 90% of the stress at which elastic behavior is obtained in these specimens, broke in 25 to 64 d when tested in water. This was about one third of the time required for control tests to break in air. This is apparently the first observation of stress corrosion under the test conditions of relatively low temperature, benign environment but very high stress. The 150 ksi test stress could be applied as a result of the particular specimen geometry. By comparison, the uniaxial tensile yield stress is about 100 to 120 ksi and the ultimate stress is about 150 ksi. When a general model that fits the high stress results is extrapolated to lower stress levels, it indicates that the C-rings in experiments now running at {approximately}80% of the yield strength should take 200 to 225 d to break. 21 refs., 24 figs., 5 tabs.

  12. Stress intensity factors for deep cracks emanating from the corner formed by a hole intersecting a plate surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgowan, J. J.; Smith, C. W.

    1974-01-01

    A technique consisting of a marriage between stress freezing photoelasticity and a numerical method was used to obtain stress intensity factors for natural cracks emanating from the corner at which a hole intersects a plate surface. Geometrics studied were: crack depth to thickness ratios of approximately 0.2, 0.5, and 0.75; crack depth to crack length ratios of approximately 1.0 to 2.0. All final crack geometries were grown under monotonic loading and growth was not self similar with most of the growth occurring through the thickness under remote extension. Stress intensity plate surface K sub s factors were determined at the intersection of the flaw border with the plate surface K sub s and with the edge of the hole K sub h. Results showed that for the relatively shallow flaws K sub h approximately equal to 1.5 K sub s, for the moderately deep flaws K sub h approximately equal to K sub s, and for the deep flaws K sub h approximately equal to 0.5 K sub s, revealing a severe sensitivity of K to flaw geometry.

  13. Reconstruction of stress corrosion cracks using signals of pulsed eddy current testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Li; Xie, Shejuan; Chen, Zhenmao; Li, Yong; Wang, Xiaowei; Takagi, Toshiyuki

    2013-06-01

    A scheme to apply signals of pulsed eddy current testing (PECT) to reconstruct a deep stress corrosion crack (SCC) is proposed on the basis of a multi-layer and multi-frequency reconstruction strategy. First, a numerical method is introduced to extract conventional eddy current testing (ECT) signals of different frequencies from the PECT responses at different scanning points, which are necessary for multi-frequency ECT inversion. Second, the conventional fast forward solver for ECT signal simulation is upgraded to calculate the single-frequency pickup signal of a magnetic field by introducing a strategy that employs a tiny search coil. Using the multiple-frequency ECT signals and the upgraded fast signal simulator, we reconstructed the shape profiles and conductivity of an SCC at different depths layer-by-layer with a hybrid inversion scheme of the conjugate gradient and particle swarm optimisation. Several modelled SCCs of rectangular or stepwise shape in an SUS304 plate are reconstructed from simulated PECT signals with artificial noise. The reconstruction results show better precision in crack depth than the conventional ECT inversion method, which demonstrates the validity and efficiency of the proposed PECT inversion scheme.

  14. Assessment of NDE Technologies for Detection and Characterization of Stress Corrosion Cracking in LWRs

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, Ryan M.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Toloczko, Mychailo B.; Bond, Leonard J.; Montgomery, Robert O.

    2012-12-31

    Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in light water reactors (LWRs) has been a persistent form of degradation in the nuclear industry. Examples of SCC can be found for a range of materials in boiling and pressurized water reactor environments, including carbon steels, stainless steels, and nickel-base stainless alloys. The evolution of SCC is often characterized by a long initiation stage followed by a phase of more rapid crack growth to failure. This provides a relatively short window of opportunity to detect the start of observable SCC, and it is conceivable that SCC could progress from initiation to failure between subsequent examinations when managed by applying periodic in-service inspection techniques. Implementation of advanced aging management paradigms in the current fleet of LWRs will require adaptation of existing measurement technologies and development of new technologies to perform on-line measurements during reactor operation to ensure timely detection of material degradation and to support the implementation of advanced diagnostics and prognostics. This paper considers several non-destructive examination (NDE) technologies with known sensitivity to detection of indicators for SCC initiation and/or propagation, and assesses these technologies with respect to their ability to detect and accurately characterize the significance of an SCC flaw. Potential strategies to improve SCC inspection or monitoring performance are offered to benefit management of SCC degradation in LWRs.

  15. Sulfide Stress Cracking and Electrochemical Corrosion of Precipitation Hardening Steel After Plasma Oxy-Nitriding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granda-Gutiérrez, E. E.; Díaz-Guillén, J. C.; Díaz-Guillén, J. A.; González, M. A.; García-Vázquez, F.; Muñóz, R.

    2014-11-01

    In this paper, we present the results of a duplex plasma nitriding followed by an oxidizing stage process (which is also referred as oxy-nitriding) on the corrosion behavior of a 17-4PH precipitation hardening stainless steel. The formation of both, expanded martensite (b.c.t. α'N-phase) and chromium oxide (type Cr2O3) in the subsurface of oxy-nitrided samples at specific controlled conditions, leads in a noticeable increasing in the time-to-rupture during the sulfide stress cracking test, in comparison with an untreated reference sample. Oxy-nitriding improves the corrosion performance of the alloy when it is immersed in solutions saturated by sour gas, which extends the application potential of this type of steel in the oil and gas extraction and processing industry. The presence of the oxy-nitrided layer inhibits the corrosion process that occurs in the near-surface region, where hydrogen is liberated after the formation of iron sulfides, which finally produces a fragile fracture by micro-crack propagation; the obtained results suggest that oxy-nitriding slows this process, thus delaying the rupture of the specimen. Moreover, oxy-nitriding produces a hard, sour gas-resistant surface, but do not significantly affect the original chloride ion solution resistance of the material.

  16. Sulfide Stress Cracking and Electrochemical Corrosion of Precipitation Hardening Steel After Plasma Oxy-Nitriding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granda-Gutiérrez, E. E.; Díaz-Guillén, J. C.; Díaz-Guillén, J. A.; González, M. A.; García-Vázquez, F.; Muñóz, R.

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, we present the results of a duplex plasma nitriding followed by an oxidizing stage process (which is also referred as oxy-nitriding) on the corrosion behavior of a 17-4PH precipitation hardening stainless steel. The formation of both, expanded martensite (b.c.t. α'N-phase) and chromium oxide (type Cr2O3) in the subsurface of oxy-nitrided samples at specific controlled conditions, leads in a noticeable increasing in the time-to-rupture during the sulfide stress cracking test, in comparison with an untreated reference sample. Oxy-nitriding improves the corrosion performance of the alloy when it is immersed in solutions saturated by sour gas, which extends the application potential of this type of steel in the oil and gas extraction and processing industry. The presence of the oxy-nitrided layer inhibits the corrosion process that occurs in the near-surface region, where hydrogen is liberated after the formation of iron sulfides, which finally produces a fragile fracture by micro-crack propagation; the obtained results suggest that oxy-nitriding slows this process, thus delaying the rupture of the specimen. Moreover, oxy-nitriding produces a hard, sour gas-resistant surface, but do not significantly affect the original chloride ion solution resistance of the material.

  17. Status report: Intergranular stress corrosion cracking of BWR core shrouds and other internal components

    SciTech Connect

    1996-03-01

    On July 25, 1994, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) issued Generic Letter (GL) 94-03 to obtain information needed to assess compliance with regulatory requirements regarding the structural integrity of core shrouds in domestic boiling water reactors (BWRs). This report begins with a brief description of the safety significance of intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) as it relates to the design and function of BWR core shrouds and other internal components. It then presents a brief history of shroud cracking events both in the US and abroad, followed by an indepth summary of the industry actions to address the issue of IGSCC in BWR core shrouds and other internal components. This report summarizes the staff`s basis for issuing GL 94-03, as well as the staff`s assessment of plant-specific responses to GL 94-03. The staff is continually evaluating the licensee inspection programs and the results from examinations of BWR core shrouds and other internal components. This report is representative of submittals to and evaluations by the staff as of September 30, 1995. An update of this report will be issued at a later date.

  18. Studies on Stress Corrosion Cracking of Super 304H Austenitic Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prabha, B.; Sundaramoorthy, P.; Suresh, S.; Manimozhi, S.; Ravishankar, B.

    2009-12-01

    Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) is a common mode of failure encountered in boiler components especially in austenitic stainless steel tubes at high temperature and in chloride-rich water environment. Recently, a new type of austenitic stainless steels called Super304H stainless steel, containing 3% copper is being adopted for super critical boiler applications. The SCC behavior of this Super 304H stainless steel has not been widely reported in the literature. Many researchers have studied the SCC behavior of steels as per various standards. Among them, the ASTM standard G36 has been widely used for evaluation of SCC behavior of stainless steels. In this present work, the SCC behavior of austenitic Fe-Cr-Mn-Cu-N stainless steel, subjected to chloride environments at varying strain conditions as per ASTM standard G36 has been studied. The environments employed boiling solution of 45 wt.% of MgCl2 at 155 °C, for various strain conditions. The study reveals that the crack width increases with increase in strain level in Super 304H stainless steels.

  19. Finite strain stress fields near the tip of an interface crack between a soft incompressible elastic material and a rigid substrate.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, V R; Hui, C-Y

    2009-05-01

    We present a numerical study of finite strain stress fields near the tip of an interface crack between a rigid substrate and an incompressible hyperelastic solid using the finite element method (FEM). The finite element (FE) simulations make use of a remeshing scheme to overcome mesh distortion. Analyses are carried out by assuming that the crack tip is either pinned, i.e., the elastic material is perfectly bonded (no slip) to the rigid substrate, or the crack lies on a frictionless interface. We focus on a material which hardens exponentially. To explore the effect of geometric constraint on the near tip stress fields, simulations are carried out under plane stress and plane strain conditions. For both the frictionless interface and the pinned crack under plane stress deformation, we found that the true stress field directly ahead of the crack tip is dominated by the normal opening stress and the crack face opens up smoothly. This is also true for an interface crack along a frictionless boundary in plane strain deformation. However, for a pinned interface crack under plane strain deformation, the true opening normal stress is found to be lower than the shear stress and the transverse normal stress. Also, the crack opening profile for a pinned crack under plane strain deformation is completely different from those seen in plane stress and in plane strain (frictionless interface). The crack face flips over and the tip angle is almost tangential to the interface. Our results suggest that interface friction can play a very important role in interfacial fracture of soft materials on hard substrates. PMID:19437055

  20. Laser Peening--Strengthening Metals to Improve Fatigue Lifetime and Retard Stress-Induced Corrosion Cracking in Gears, Bolts and Cutter

    SciTech Connect

    Hackel, L A; Chen, H-L

    2003-08-20

    Laser peening is an emerging modern process that impresses a compressive stress into the surfaces of metals. Treatment can reduce the rate of fatigue cracking and stress-corrosion-cracking in metals (such as gears, bolts and cutters) needed for tunnel boring and other construction & mining applications. Laser peening could also be used to form metals or alloys into a precise shape without yielding and leaving both sulfates in a crack resistant compressive state.

  1. Microstructure Instability of Candidate Fuel Cladding Alloys: Corrosion and Stress Corrosion Cracking Implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiao, Yinan; Zheng, Wenyue; Guzonas, David; Kish, Joseph

    2016-02-01

    This paper addresses some of the overarching aspects of microstructure instability expected from both high temperature and radiation exposure that could affect the corrosion and stress corrosion cracking (SCC) resistance of the candidate austenitic Fe-Cr-Ni alloys being considered for the fuel cladding of the Canadian supercritical water-cooled reactor (SCWR) concept. An overview of the microstructure instability expected by both exposures is presented prior to turning the focus onto the implications of such instability on the corrosion and SCC resistance. Results from testing conducted using pre-treated (thermally-aged) Type 310S stainless steel to shed some light on this important issue are included to help identify the outstanding corrosion resistance assessment needs.

  2. Corrosion and stress corrosion cracking of ferritic/martensitic steel in super critical pressurized water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirose, T.; Shiba, K.; Enoeda, M.; Akiba, M.

    2007-08-01

    A water-cooled solid breeder (WCSB) blanket cooled by high temperature SCPW (super critical pressurized water) is a practical option of DEMO reactor. Therefore, it is necessary to check the compatibility of the steel with SCPW. In this work, reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel, F82H has been tested through slow strain rate tests (SSRT) in 23.5 MPa SCPW. And weight change behavior was measured up to 1000 h. F82H did not demonstrated stress corrosion cracking and its weight simply increased with surface oxidation. The weight change of F82H was almost same as commercial 9%-Cr steels. According to a cross-sectional analysis and weight change behavior, corrosion rate of F82H in the 823 K SCPW is estimated to be 0.04 mm/yr.

  3. Stress analysis of the cracked lap shear specimens: An ASTM round robin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, W. S.

    1986-01-01

    This ASTM Round Robin was conducted to evaluate the state of the art in stress analysis of adhesively bonded joint specimens. Specifically, the participants were asked to calculate the strain-energy-release rate for two different geometry cracked lap shear (CLS) specimens at four different debond lengths. The various analytical techniques consisted of 2- and 3-dimensional finite element analysis, beam theory, plate theory, and a combination of beam theory and finite element analysis. The results were examined in terms of the total strain-energy-release rate and the mode I to mode II ratio as a function of debond length for each specimen geometry. These results basically clustered into two groups: geometric linear or geometric nonlinear analysis. The geometric nonlinear analysis is required to properly analyze the CLS specimens. The 3-D finite element analysis gave indications of edge closure plus some mode III loading. Each participant described his analytical technique and results. Nine laboratories participated.

  4. Stress analysis of the cracked-lap-shear specimen - An ASTM round-robin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, W. S.

    1987-01-01

    This ASTM Round Robin was conducted to evaluate the state of the art in stress analysis of adhesively bonded joint specimens. Specifically, the participants were asked to calculate the strain-energy-release rate for two different geometry cracked lap shear (CLS) specimens at four different debond lengths. The various analytical techniques consisted of 2- and 3-dimensional finite element analysis, beam theory, plate theory, and a combination of beam theory and finite element analysis. The results were examined in terms of the total strain-energy-release rate and the mode I to mode II ratio as a function of debond length for each specimen geometry. These results basically clustered into two groups: geometric linear or geometric nonlinear analysis. The geometric nonlinear analysis is required to properly analyze the CLS specimens. The 3-D finite element analysis gave indications of edge closure plus some mode III loading. Each participant described his analytical technique and results. Nine laboratories participated.

  5. Localized Deformation as a Primary Cause of Irradiation Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking

    SciTech Connect

    Gary S. Was

    2009-03-31

    The objective of this project is to determine whether deformation mode is a primary factor in the mechanism of irradiation assisted intergranular stress corrosion cracking of austenitic alloys in light watert reactor core components. Deformation mode will be controlled by both the stacking fault energy of the alloy and the degree of irradiation. In order to establish that localized deformation is a major factor in IASCC, the stacking fault energies of the alloys selected for study must be measured. Second, it is completely unknown how dose and SFE trade-off in terms of promoting localized deformation. Finally, it must be established that it is the localized deformation, and not some other factor that drives IASCC.

  6. Investigation of intergranular stress corrosion cracking in the fuel pool at Three Mile Island Unit 1

    SciTech Connect

    Czajkowski, C.J.

    1985-01-01

    An intergranular stress corrosion cracking failure of 304 stainless steel pipe in 2000 ppM B as H/sub 3/BO/sub 3/ + H/sub 2/O at 100/sup 0/C has been investigated. Constant extension rate testing has produced an intergranular type failure in material in air. Chemical analysis was performed on both the base metal and weld material, in addition to fractography, EPR testing and optical microscopy in discerning the mode of failure. Various effects of Cl/sup -/, O/sub 2/, and MnS are discussed. The results have indicated that the cause of failure was the severe sensitization coupled with probable contamination by S and possibly by Cl ions.

  7. Irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking of HTH Alloy X-750 and Alloy 625

    SciTech Connect

    Bajaj, R.; Mills, W.J.; Lebo, M.R.; Hyatt, B.Z.; Burke, M.G.

    1995-07-01

    In-reactor testing of bolt-loaded compact tension specimens was performed in 360 C water. New data confirms previous results that high irradiation levels reduce SCC resistance in Alloy X-750. Low boron heats show improved IASCC (irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking). Alloy 625 is resistant to IASCC. Microstructural, microchemical, and deformation studies were carried out. Irradiation of X-750 caused significant strengthening and ductility loss associated with formation of cavities and dislocation loops. High irradiation did not cause segregation in X-750. Irradiation of 625 resulted in formation of small dislocation loops and a fine body-centered-orthorhombic phase. The strengthening due to loops and precipitates was apparently offset in 625 by partial dissolution of {gamma} precipitates. Transmutation of boron to helium at grain boundaries, coupled with matrix strengthening, is believed to be responsible for IASCC in X-750, and the absence of these two effects results in superior IASCC resistance in 625.

  8. Stress corrosion cracking of sensitized type 304 stainless steel in doped high-temperature water

    SciTech Connect

    Congleton, J.; Berrisford, R.A.; Yang, W.

    1995-12-01

    The susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of a sensitized, wrought type 304 (UNS S30400) stainless steel (SS) was assessed using the slow strain rate test (SSRT) technique under applied potential control. Data was obtained in lithium hydroxide (LiOH)-doped water with the addition of sulfate (SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}}) and/or chloride (Cl{sup {minus}}) ions. Test were performed over the temperature range from 50 C to 250 C. Intergranular SCC (IGSCC) was observed at temperatures from 150 C to 250 C. The effects of SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}} and Cl{sup {minus}} on the critical potential for IGSCC varied with temperature. Results were compared with literature data for IGSCC in pure water and in water containing other concentrations of dopants.

  9. Modelling of iodine-induced stress corrosion cracking in CANDU fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, B. J.; Thompson, W. T.; Kleczek, M. R.; Shaheen, K.; Juhas, M.; Iglesias, F. C.

    2011-01-01

    Iodine-induced stress corrosion cracking (I-SCC) is a recognized factor for fuel-element failure in the operation of nuclear reactors requiring the implementation of mitigation measures. I-SCC is believed to depend on certain factors such as iodine concentration, oxide layer type and thickness on the fuel sheath, irradiation history, metallurgical parameters related to sheath like texture and microstructure, and the mechanical properties of zirconium alloys. This work details the development of a thermodynamics and mechanistic treatment accounting for the iodine chemistry and kinetics in the fuel-to-sheath gap and its influence on I-SCC phenomena. The governing transport equations for the model are solved with a finite-element technique using the COMSOL Multiphysics® commercial software platform. Based on this analysis, this study also proposes potential remedies for I-SCC.

  10. Irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking of model austenitic stainless steel.

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, H. M.; Ruther, W. E.; Strain, R. V.; Shack, W. J.; Karlsen, T. M.

    1999-10-26

    Slow-strain-rate tensile (SSRT) tests were conducted on model austenitic stainless steel (SS) alloys that were irradiated at 289 C in He. After irradiation to {approx}0.3 x 10{sup 21} n {center_dot} cm{sup 2} and {approx} 0.9 x 10{sup 21} n {center_dot} cm{sup -2} (E > 1 MeV), significant heat-to-heat variations in the degree of intergranular and transgranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC and TGSCC) were observed. At {approx}0.3 x 10{sup 21} n {center_dot} cm{sup -2}, a high-purity heat of Type 316L SS that contains a very low concentration of Si exhibited the highest susceptibility to IGSCC. In unirradiated state, Types 304 and 304L SS did not exhibit a systematic effect of Si content on alloy strength. However, at {approx}0.3 x 10{sup 21} n {center_dot} cm{sup -2}, yield and maximum strengths decreased significantly as Si content was increased to >0.9 wt.%. Among alloys that contain low concentrations of C and N, ductility and resistance to TGSCC and IGSCC were significantly greater for alloys with >0.9 wt.% Si than for alloys with <0.47 wt.% Si. Initial data at {approx}0.9 x 10{sup 21} n {center_dot} cm{sup -2} were also consistent with the beneficial effect of high Si content. This indicates that to delay onset of and reduce susceptibility to irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC), at least at low fluence levels, it is helpful to ensure a certain minimum concentration of Si. High concentrations of Cr were also beneficial; alloys that contain <15.5 wt.% Cr exhibited greater susceptibility to IASCC than alloys with {approx}18 wt.% Cr, whereas an alloy that contains >21 wt.% Cr exhibited less susceptibility than the lower-Cr alloys under similar conditions.

  11. Nonlinear ultrasonic assessment of stress corrosion cracking damage in sensitized 304 stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Morlock, Florian Jacobs, Laurence J. Kim, Jin-Yeon; Singh, Preet; Wall, James J.

    2015-03-31

    This research uses nonlinear Rayleigh surface waves to characterize stress corrosion cracking (SCC) damage in welded 304 Stainless Steel (304 SS). 304 SS is widely used in reactor pressure vessels, where a corrosive environment in combination with applied stress due to high internal pressures can cause SCC. Welds and the nearby heat affected zones (HAZ) in the vessel material are especially sensitive to SCC damage. SCC damage results in microstructural changes such as dislocation formation and microcrack initiation that in the long term lead to reduced structural integrity and material failure. Therefore, the early detection of SCC is crucial to ensure safe operation. It has been shown that the microstructural changes caused by SCC can generate higher harmonic waves when excited harmonically. This research considers different levels of SCC damage induced in samples of welded 304 SS by applying stress to a specimen held in a corrosive medium (Sodium Thiosulfate). A nonlinear Rayleigh surface wave is introduced in the material and the fundamental and the second harmonic waves are measured using wedge detection. The nonlinearity parameter that relates the fundamental and the second harmonic amplitudes, is computed to quantify the SCC damage in each sample. These results are used to demonstrate the feasibility of using nonlinear Rayleigh waves to characterize SCC damage.

  12. Nonlinear ultrasonic assessment of stress corrosion cracking damage in sensitized 304 stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morlock, Florian; Jacobs, Laurence J.; Kim, Jin-Yeon; Singh, Preet; Wall, James J.

    2015-03-01

    This research uses nonlinear Rayleigh surface waves to characterize stress corrosion cracking (SCC) damage in welded 304 Stainless Steel (304 SS). 304 SS is widely used in reactor pressure vessels, where a corrosive environment in combination with applied stress due to high internal pressures can cause SCC. Welds and the nearby heat affected zones (HAZ) in the vessel material are especially sensitive to SCC damage. SCC damage results in microstructural changes such as dislocation formation and microcrack initiation that in the long term lead to reduced structural integrity and material failure. Therefore, the early detection of SCC is crucial to ensure safe operation. It has been shown that the microstructural changes caused by SCC can generate higher harmonic waves when excited harmonically. This research considers different levels of SCC damage induced in samples of welded 304 SS by applying stress to a specimen held in a corrosive medium (Sodium Thiosulfate). A nonlinear Rayleigh surface wave is introduced in the material and the fundamental and the second harmonic waves are measured using wedge detection. The nonlinearity parameter that relates the fundamental and the second harmonic amplitudes, is computed to quantify the SCC damage in each sample. These results are used to demonstrate the feasibility of using nonlinear Rayleigh waves to characterize SCC damage.

  13. Hydrogen embrittlement, grain boundary segregation, and stress corrosion cracking of alloy X-750 in low- and high-temperature water

    SciTech Connect

    Mills, W. J.; Lebo, M. R.; Kearns, J. J.

    1997-04-01

    The nature of intergranular stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of alloy X-750 was characterized in low- and high-temperature water by testing as-notched and precracked fracture mechanics specimens. Materials given the AH, BH, and HTH heat treatments were studied. While all heat treatments were susceptible to rapid low-temperature crack propagation (LTCP) below 150 C, conditions AH and BH were particularly susceptible. Low-temperature tests under various loading conditions (e.g., constant displacement, constant load, and increasing load) revealed that the maximum stress intensity factors (K{sub P{sub max}}) from conventional rising load tests provide conservative estimates of the critical loading conditions in highly susceptible heats, regardless of the load path history. For resistant heats, K{sub P{sub max}} provides a reasonable, but not necessarily conservative, estimate of the critical stress intensity factor for LTCP. Testing of as-notched specimens showed that LTCP will not initiate at a smooth surface or notch, but will readily occur if a cracklike defect is present. Comparison of the cracking response in water with that for hydrogen-precharged specimens tested in air demonstrated that LTCP is associated with hydrogen embrittlement of grain boundaries. The stress corrosion crack initiation and growth does occur in high-temperature water (>250 C), but crack growth rates are orders of magnitude lower than LTCP rates. The SCC resistance of HTH heats is far superior to that of AH heats as crack initiation times are two to three orders of magnitude greater and growth rates are one to two orders of magnitude lower.

  14. 49 CFR 192.929 - What are the requirements for using Direct Assessment for Stress Corrosion Cracking (SCCDA)?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false What are the requirements for using Direct Assessment for Stress Corrosion Cracking (SCCDA)? 192.929 Section 192.929 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED)...

  15. Development of an ultralow frequency eddy current instrument for the detection and sizing of stress corrosion cracks

    SciTech Connect

    Hayford, D.T.

    1988-01-01

    This book describes an investigation of the potential to use remote field eddy currents at low frequencies that would permit penetration of pipeline steels and use this technique to detect stress corrosion cracking on coated pipelines without requiring coating to be removed. The report describes development of a prototype eddy current instrument.

  16. Effects of environmental variables on the crack initiation stages of corrosion fatigue of high strength aluminum alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poteat, L. E.

    1981-01-01

    Fatigue initiation in six aluminum alloys used in the aircraft industry was investigated. Cyclic loading superimposed on a constant stress was alternated with atmospheric corrosion. Tests made at different stress levels revealed that a residual stress as low as 39% of the yield strength caused stress corrosion cracking in some of the alloys. An atmospheric corrosion rate meter developed to measure the corrosivity of the atmosphere is described. An easily duplicated hole in the square test specimen with a self-induced residual stress was developed.

  17. The effects of cold rolling orientation and water chemistry on stress corrosion cracking behavior of 316L stainless steel in simulated PWR water environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Junjie; Lu, Zhanpeng; Xiao, Qian; Ru, Xiangkun; Han, Guangdong; Chen, Zhen; Zhou, Bangxin; Shoji, Tetsuo

    2016-04-01

    Stress corrosion cracking behaviors of one-directionally cold rolled 316L stainless steel specimens in T-L and L-T orientations were investigated in hydrogenated and deaerated PWR primary water environments at 310 °C. Transgranular cracking was observed during the in situ pre-cracking procedure and the crack growth rate was almost not affected by the specimen orientation. Locally intergranular stress corrosion cracks were found on the fracture surfaces of specimens in the hydrogenated PWR water. Extensive intergranular stress corrosion cracks were found on the fracture surfaces of specimens in deaerated PWR water. More extensive cracks were found in specimen T-L orientation with a higher crack growth rate than that in the specimen L-T orientation with a lower crack growth rate. Crack branching phenomenon found in specimen L-T orientation in deaerated PWR water was synergistically affected by the applied stress direction as well as the preferential oxidation path along the elongated grain boundaries, and the latter was dominant.

  18. The effect of weld stresses on weld quality. [stress fields and metal cracking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chihoski, R. A.

    1972-01-01

    A narrow heat source raises the temperature of a spot on a solid piece of material like metal. The high temperature of the spot decreases with distance from the spot. This is true whether the heat source is an arc, a flame, an electron beam, a plasma jet, a laser beam, or any other source of intense, narrowly defined heat. Stress and strain fields around a moving heat source are organized into a coherent visible system. It is shown that five stresses act across the weld line in turn as an arc passes. Their proportions and positions are considerably altered by weld parameters or condition changes. These pushes and pulls affect the metallurgical character and integrity of the weld area even when there is no apparent difference between after-the-fact examples.

  19. Residual stress effect on fatigue crack growth in thick wall cylinders

    SciTech Connect

    Kiciak, A.; Glinka, G.; Burns, D.J.

    1995-11-01

    Recently derived weight functions for a single, semi-elliptical, longitudinal crack in a thick wall cylinder with the diameter ratio D{sub 0}/D{sub i} = 2, have been used to analyze fatigue crack propagation in autofrettaged and non-autofrettaged, pressurized cylinders. Two levels of autofrettage, 30 and 60%, have been considered. The influences of the level of autofrettage, surface crack closure, and different sets of parameters of crack closure, and different sets of parameters of crack propagation relation have been investigated. The development of cracks has been compared to the experimental results. The results of analyses confirm beneficial influence of autofrettage. It has been shown that the discrepancies between the observed and calculated crack developments cannot be ascribed to the influence of surface crack closure. The comparison of the experiments and predictions unveils the need for an additional series of experiments.

  20. NASA flight electronics environmental stress screening survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marian, E. J. (Compiler)

    1983-01-01

    Data compiled by the Institute of Environmental Sciences were used to establish guidelines for identifying defective, abnormal, or marginal parts as well as manufacturing defects. These data are augmented with other available sources of similar information in conjunction with NASA centers' data and presented in a form that may be useful to all NASA centers in planning and developing effective environmental stress screens. Information relative to thermal and vibration screens as the most effective methods for surfacing latent failures in electronic equipment at the component level is considered.

  1. The effect of alloy composition on the mechanism of stress corrosion cracking of titanium alloys in aqueous environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, D. N.

    1971-01-01

    Emphasis has been placed on determining the interrelations among the composition, phase structure, deformation, and fracture properties of the alpha phase in susceptible alpha-beta alloys. The program is divided into two parts: (1) evaluation of the aqueous stress corrosion susceptibility of a series of alloys that contain various alpha-soluble elements; and (2) investigations of the metallurgical aspects of the mechanism of aqueous stress corrosion cracking.

  2. Evaluation of Closed Stress Corrosion Cracks in Ni-Based Alloy Weld Metal Using Subharmonic Phased Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horinouchi, Satoshi; Ikeuchi, Masako; Shintaku, Yohei; Ohara, Yoshikazu; Yamanaka, Kazushi

    2012-07-01

    Closed stress corrosion cracks (SCCs) have been generated in Ni-based alloy weld metal in nuclear power plants. The ultrasonic inspection is difficult because of the crack closure. For the application of new inspection methods and training/educating of inspection engineers, realistic closed SCC specimens are required. However, there is no means for forming such SCC specimens in a reasonable amount of time. Here, we present a two-step method. The first step is to form an open SCC in chemical solution. The second step is to close the SCC by generating oxide films between the crack faces in high-temperature pressurized water (HTPW). To verify the crack closure, we used a closed-crack imaging apparatus, the subharmonic phased array for crack evaluation (SPACE). Consequently, we found that parts of the SCC after 1321 h immersion were closed in the HTPW. Thus, we verified the two-step method for forming realistic closed SCC specimens in a reasonable amount of time.

  3. Characterization of the Resistance of Alloy 22 to Stress Corrosion Cracking

    SciTech Connect

    King, K J; Estill, J C; Rebak, R B

    2002-05-30

    In its current design, the high-level nuclear waste containers include an external layer of Alloy 22 (Ni-22Cr-13Mo-3W-3Fe). Since over their lifetime, the containers may be exposed to multi-ionic aqueous environments, a potential degradation mode of the outer layer could be environmentally assisted cracking (EAC). The objective of the current research was to characterize the effect of applied potential and temperature on the susceptibility of Alloy 22 to EAC in simulated concentrated water (SCW) using the slow strain rate test (SSRT). Results show that Alloy 22 may suffer EAC at applied potentials approximately 400 mV more anodic than the corrosion potential (E{sub corr}).

  4. Selective Internal Oxidation as a Mechanism for Intergranular Stress Corrosion Cracking of Ni-Cr-Fe Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capell, Brent M.; Was, Gary S.

    2007-06-01

    The mechanism of selective internal oxidation (SIO) for intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) of nickel-base alloys has been investigated through a series of experiments using high-purity alloys and a steam environment to control the formation of NiO on the surface. Five alloys (Ni-9Fe, Ni-5Cr, Ni-5Cr-9Fe, Ni-16Cr-9Fe, and Ni-30Cr-9Fe) were used to investigate oxidation and intergranular cracking behavior for hydrogen-to-water vapor partial pressure ratios (PPRs) between 0.001 and 0.9. The Ni-9Fe, Ni-5Cr, and Ni-5Cr-9Fe alloys formed a uniform Ni(OH)2 film at PPRs less than 0.09, and the higher chromium alloys formed chromium-rich oxide films over the entire PPR range studied. Corrosion coupon results show that grain boundary oxides extended for significant depths (>150 nm) below the sample surface for all but the highest Cr containing alloy. Constant extension rate tensile (CERT) test results showed that intergranular cracking varied with PPR and cracking was more pronounced at a PPR value where nonprotective Ni(OH)2 was able to form and a link between the nonprotective Ni(OH)2 film and the formation of grain boundary oxides is suggested. The observation of grain boundary oxides in stressed and unstressed samples as well as the influence of alloy content on IG cracking and oxidation support SIO as a mechanism for IGSCC.

  5. Irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking of materials from commercial BWRs: Role of grain-boundary microchemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, H.M.; Ruther, W.E.; Sanecki, J.E.; Hins, A.G.; Kassner, T.F.

    1993-12-01

    Constant-extension-rate tensile tests and grain-boundary analysis by Auger electron spectroscopy which were conducted on high- and commercial-purity (HP and CP) Type 304 stainless steel (SS) specimens from irradiated boiling-water reactor (BWR) components to determine susceptibility to irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) and to identify the mechanisms of intergranular failure. The susceptibility of HP neutron absorber tubes to intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) was higher than that of CP absorber tubes or CP control blade sheath. Contrary to previous beliefs, susceptibility to intergranular fracture could not be correlated with radiation-induced segregation of impurities such as Si, P, C, N, or S, but a correlation was obtained with grain-boundary Cr concentration, indicating a role for Cr depletion that promotes IASCC. Detailed analysis of grain-boundary chemistry was conducted on neutron absorber tubes that were fabricated from two similar heats of HP Type 304 SS of virtually identical bulk chemical composition but exhibiting a significant difference in susceptibility to IGSCC for similar fluence. Grain-boundary concentrations of Cr, Ni, Si, P, S, and C in the crack-resistant and susceptible HP heats were virtually identical. However, grain boundaries of the cracking-resistant material contained less N and more B and Li (transmutation product from B) than those of the crack-susceptible material, indicating beneficial effects of low N and high B contents.

  6. Initiation of Stress Corrosion Cracks in X80 and X100 Pipe Steels in Near-Neutral pH Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Jidong; Zheng, Wenyue; Bibby, Darren; Amirkhiz, Babak Shalchi; Li, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Tests were conducted on X80 and X100 pipe steels at 95% specified minimum yield stress in NS4 solution mixed with soil using specimens machined along the transverse direction of the pipes. Crack initiation in X100 is much easier than in X80. With test time increasing from 110 to 220 days, less numerous but deeper cracks were found in both pipe steels. Cracks showed higher growth rates in the transverse specimens than those in longitudinal ones. TEM results revealed concentration of Ni or Cr elements, formation of oxide layer at crack walls, and TiN-related dissolution at the crack tip.

  7. Environmental fatigue of an Al-Li-Cu alloy. Part 1: Intrinsic crack propagation kinetics in hydrogenous environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piascik, Robert S.; Gangloff, Richard P.

    1991-01-01

    Deleterious environmental effects on steady-state, intrinsic fatigue crack propagation (FCP) rates (da/dN) in peak aged Al-Li-Cu alloy 2090 are established by electrical potential monitoring of short cracks with programmed constant delta K and K(sub max) loading. The da/dN are equally unaffected by vacuum, purified helium, and oxygen but are accelerated in order of decreasing effectiveness by aqueous 1 percent NaCl with anodic polarization, pure water vapor, moist air, and NaCl with cathodic polarization. While da/dN depends on delta K(sup 4.0) for the inert gases, water vapor and chloride induced multiple power-laws, and a transition growth rate 'plateau'. Environmental effects are strongest at low delta K. Crack tip damage is ascribed to hydrogen embrittlement because of the following: (1) accelerated da/dN due to part-per-million levels of H2O without condensation; (2) impeded molecular flow model predictions of the measured water vapor pressure dependence of da/dN as affected by mean crack opening; (3) the lack of an effect of film-forming O2; (4) the likelihood for crack tip hydrogen production in NaCl, and (5) the environmental and delta K-process zone volume dependencies of the microscopic cracking modes. For NaCl, growth rates decrease with decreasing loading frequency, with the addition of passivating Li2CO3, and upon cathodic polarization. These variables increase crack surface film stability to reduce hydrogen entry efficiency. The hydrogen environmental FCP resistance of 2090 is similar to other 2000 series alloys and is better than 7075.

  8. Environmental fatigue of an Al-Li-Cu alloy. I - Intrinsic crack propagation kinetics in hydrogenous environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piascik, Robert S.; Gangloff, Richard P.

    1991-01-01

    Deleterious environmental effects on steady-state, intrinsic fatigue crack propagation (FCP) rates (da/dN) in peak aged Al-Li-Cu alloy 2090 are established by electrical potential monitoring of short cracks with programmed constant delta K and K(sub max) loading. The da/dN are equally unaffected by vacuum, purified helium, and oxygen but are accelerated in order of decreasing effectiveness of aqueous 1 percent NaCl with anodic polarization, pure water vapor, moist air, and NaCl with cathodic polarization. While da/dN depends on delta K(sup 4.0) for the inert gases, water vapor and chloride induced multiple power-laws, and a transition growth rate 'plateau'. Environmental effects are strongest at low delta K. Crack tip damage is ascribed to hydrogen embrittlement because of the following: (1) accelerated da/dN due to part-per-million levels of H2O without condensation; (2) impeded molecular flow model predictions of the measured water vapor pressure dependence of da/dN as affected by mean crack opening; (3) the lack of an effect of film-forming O2; (4) the likelihood for crack tip hydrogen production in NaCl; and (5) the environmental and delta K-process zone volume dependencies of the microscopic cracking modes. For NaCl, growth rates decrease with decreasing loading frequency, with the addition of passivating Li2CO3, and upon cathodic polarization. These variables increase crack surface film stability to reduce hydrogen entry efficiency. The hydrogen environmental FCP resistance of 2090 is similar to other 2000 series alloys and is better than 7075.

  9. Simulated Service and Stress Corrosion Cracking Testing for Friction Stir Welded Spun Form Domes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, Thomas J.; Torres, Pablo D.; Caratus, Andrei A.; Curreri, Peter A.

    2010-01-01

    Damage tolerance testing development was required to help qualify a new spin forming dome fabrication process for the Ares 1 program at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). One challenge of the testing was due to the compound curvature of the dome. The testing was developed on a sub-scale dome with a diameter of approximately 40 inches. The simulated service testing performed was based on the EQTP1102 Rev L 2195 Aluminum Lot Acceptance Simulated Service Test and Analysis Procedure generated by Lockheed Martin for the Space Shuttle External Fuel Tank. This testing is performed on a specimen with an induced flaw of elliptical shape generated by Electrical Discharge Machining (EDM) and subsequent fatigue cycling for crack propagation to a predetermined length and depth. The specimen is then loaded in tension at a constant rate of displacement at room temperature until fracture occurs while recording load and strain. An identical specimen with a similar flaw is then proof tested at room temperature to imminent failure based on the critical offset strain achieved by the previous fracture test. If the specimen survives the proof, it is then subjected to cryogenic cycling with loads that are a percentage of the proof load performed at room temperature. If all cryogenic cycles are successful, the specimen is loaded in tension to failure at the end of the test. This standard was generated for flat plate, so a method of translating this to a specimen of compound curvature was required. This was accomplished by fabricating a fixture that maintained the curvature of the specimen rigidly with the exception of approximately one-half inch in the center of the specimen containing the induced flaw. This in conjunction with placing the center of the specimen in the center of the load train allowed for successful testing with a minimal amount of bending introduced into the system. Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) tests were performed using the typical double beam assembly and with 4

  10. Irradiation-Assisted Stress-Corrosion Cracking of Nitinol During eBeam Sterilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Stuart A.; Gause, Brock; Plumley, David; Drexel, Masao J.

    2012-12-01

    Medical device fractures during gamma and electron beam (eBeam) sterilization have been reported. Two common factors in these device fractures were a constraining force and the presence of fluorinated ethylene propylene (FEP). This study investigated the effects of eBeam sterilization on constrained light-oxide nitinol wires in FEP. The goal was to recreate these fractures and determine their root cause. Superelastic nitinol wires were placed inside FEP tubes and constrained with nominal outer fiber strains of 10, 15, and 20%. These samples were then subjected to a range of eBeam sterilization doses up to 400 kGy and compared with unconstrained wires also subjected to sterilization. Fractures were observed at doses of >100 kGy. Analysis of the fracture surfaces indicated that the samples failed due to irradiation-assisted stress-corrosion cracking (IASCC). This same effect was also observed to occur with PTFE at 400 kGy. These results suggest that nitinol is susceptible to IASCC when in the presence of a constraining stress, fluorinated polymers, and irradiation.

  11. Electrochemical investigation on the hydrogen permeation behavior of 7075-T6 Al alloy and its influence on stress corrosion cracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Chuan-bo; Yan, Bing-hao; Zhang, Ke; Yi, Guo

    2015-07-01

    The hydrogen permeation behavior and stress corrosion cracking (SCC) susceptibility of precharged 7075-T6 Al alloy were investigated in this paper. Devanthan-Stachurski (D-S) cell tests were used to measure the apparent hydrogen diffusivity and hydrogen permeation current density of specimens immersed in 3.5wt% NaCl solution. Electrochemical experiment results show that the SCC susceptibility is low during anodic polarization. Both corrosion pits and hydrogen-induced cracking are evident in scanning electron microscope images after the specimens have been charging for 24 h.

  12. Effect of carbon on stress corrosion cracking and anodic oxidation of iron in NaOH solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Flis, J.; Ziomek-Moroz, Margaret

    2008-06-01

    Anodic behaviour of decarburised iron and of quenched Fe–C materials with up to 0.875 wt% C was examined in 8.5 M NaOH at 100 °C to explain the role of carbon in caustic stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of plain steels. Removal of carbon from Armco iron strongly reduced its intergranular SCC. Slip steps on grains did not initiate cracks. It has been shown that carbon at low contents deteriorates the passivation of iron, whereas at high contents it promotes the formation of magnetite. High resistance to SCC of high carbon steels can be explained by an intense formation of magnetite on these steels.

  13. Irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking in HTH Alloy X-750 and Alloy 625

    SciTech Connect

    Bajaj, R.; Mills, W.J.; Lebo, M.R.; Hyatt, B.Z.; Burke, M.G.

    1995-12-31

    In-reactor testing of bolt-loaded compact tension specimens was performed in 360 C water to determine the irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) behavior of HTH Alloy X-750 and direct-aged Alloy 625. New data confirm previous results showing that high irradiation levels reduce SCC resistance in Alloy X-750. Heat-to-heat variability correlates with boron content, with low boron heats showing improved IASCC properties. Alloy 625 is resistant to IASCC, as no cracking was observed in any Alloy 625 specimens. Microstructural, microchemical and deformation studies were performed to characterize the mechanisms responsible for IASCC in Alloy X-750 and the lack of an effect in Alloy 625. The mechanisms under investigation are: boron transmutation effects, radiation-induced changes in microstructure and deformation characteristics, and radiation-induced segregation. Irradiation of Alloy X-750 caused significant strengthening and ductility loss that was associated with the formation of cavities and dislocation loops. High irradiation levels did not cause significant segregation of alloying or trace elements in Alloy X-750. Irradiation of Alloy 625 resulted in the formation of small dislocation loops and a fine body-centered-orthorhombic phase. The strengthening due to the loops and precipitates was apparently offset by a partial dissolution of {gamma}{double_prime} precipitates, as Alloy 625 showed no irradiation-induced strengthening or ductility loss. In the nonirradiated condition, an IASCC susceptible HTH heat containing 28 ppm B showed grain boundary segregation of boron, whereas a nonsusceptible HTH heat containing 2 ppm B and Alloy 625 with 20 ppm B did not show significant boron segregation. Transmutation of boron to helium at grain boundaries, coupled with matrix strengthening, is believed to be responsible for IASCC in Alloy X-750, and the absence of these two effects results in the superior IASCC resistance displayed by Alloy 625.

  14. Environmentally assisted cracking behavior of dissimilar metal weldments in simulated BWR coolant environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, J. Y.; Chiang, M. F.; Jeng, S. L.; Huang, J. S.; Kuo, R. C.

    2013-01-01

    The environmentally assisted cracking behavior of dissimilar metal (DM) welds, including Alloy 52-A 508 and Alloy 82-A508, under simulated BWR coolant conditions was studied. Effects of postweld heat treatment and sulfur content of the base metal on the corrosion fatigue and SCC growth rates of DM welds were evaluated. The crack growth rates for the DM weld heat-treated at 621 °C for 24 h were observed to be faster than those for the as-welded. But the DM weld heat-treated at 621 °C for 8 h + 400 °C for 200 h showed better SCC resistance than the as-welded. The longer the heat treatment at 621 °C, the higher the chromium carbides density along the grain boundary was observed. Sulfur could diffuse out of the base metal and segregate along the grain boundaries of the dilution zone, leading to weakening the grain boundary strength and the SCC resistance of the Alloy 52-A508 weld.

  15. Visualizing In Situ Microstructure Dependent Crack Tip Stress Distribution in IN-617 Using Nano-mechanical Raman Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yang; Mohanty, Debapriya P.; Tomar, Vikas

    2016-09-01

    Inconel 617 (IN-617) is a solid solution alloy, which is widely used in applications that require high-temperature component operation due to its high-temperature stability and strength as well as strong resistance to oxidation and carburization. The current work focuses on in situ measurements of stress distribution under 3-point bending at elevated temperature in IN-617. A nanomechanical Raman spectroscopy measurement platform was designed and built based on a combination of a customized open Raman spectroscopy (NMRS) system incorporating a motorized scanning and imaging system with a nanomechanical loading platform. Based on the scanning of the crack tip notch area using the NMRS notch tip, stress distribution under applied load with micron-scale resolution for analyzed microstructures is predicted. A finite element method-based formulation to predict crack tip stresses is presented and validated using the presented experimental data.

  16. Irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking of austenitic stainless steels: Recent progress and new approaches

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, H.M.; Ruther, W.E.; Sanecki, J.E.; Hins, A.; Zaluzec, N.J.; Kassner, T.F.

    1996-09-01

    Irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) of several types of BWR field components fabricated from solution-annealed austenitic stainless steels (SSs), including a core internal weld, were investigated by means of slow-strain-rate test (SSRT), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), and field-emission-gun advanced analytical electron microscopy (FEG-AAEM). Based on the results of the tests and analyses, separate effects of neutron fluence, tensile properties, alloying elements and major impurities identified in the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) specifications, minor impurities, water chemistry, and fabrication-related variables were determined. The results indicate strongly that minor impurities not specified by the ASTM-specifications play important roles, probably through a complex synergism with grain-boundary Cr depletion. These impurities, typically associated with steelmaking and component fabrication processes, are very low or negligible in solubility in steels and are the same impurities that have been known to promote intergranular SCC significantly when they are present in water as ions or soluble compounds. It seems obvious that IASCC is a complex integral problem which involves many variables that are influenced strongly by not only irradiation conditions, water chemistry, and stress but also iron and steelmaking processes, fabrication of the component, and joining and welding. Therefore, for high-stress components in particular, it would be difficult to mitigate IASCC problems at high fluence based on the consideration of water chemistry alone, and other considerations based on material composition and fabrication procedure would be necessary as well.

  17. Evaluation and Repair of Primary Water Stress Corrosion Cracking in Alloy 600/182 Control Rod Drive Mechanism Nozzles

    SciTech Connect

    Frye, Charles R.; Arey, Melvin L. Jr.; Robinson, Michael R.; Whitaker, David E.

    2002-07-01

    In February 2001, a routine visual inspection of the reactor vessel head of Oconee Nuclear Station Unit 3 identified boric acid crystals at nine of sixty-nine locations where control rod drive mechanism housings (CRDM nozzles) penetrate the head. The boric acid deposits resulted from primary coolant leaking from cracks in the nozzle attachment weld and from through-thickness cracks in the nozzle wall. A general overview of the inspection and repair process is presented and results of the metallurgical analysis are discussed in more detail. The analysis confirmed that primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) is the mechanism of failure of both the Alloy 182 weld filler material and the alloy 600 wrought base material. (authors)

  18. UNDERSTANDING THE MECHANISMS CONTROLLING ENVIRONMENTALLY-ASSISTED INTERGRANULAR CRACKING OF NICKEL-BASE ALLOYS

    SciTech Connect

    Gary S. Was

    2004-02-13

    Creep and IG cracking of nickel-base alloys depend principally on two factors--the deformation behavior and the effect of the environment. We have shown that both contribute to the observed degradation in primary water. The understanding of cracking does not lie wholly within the environmental effects arena, nor can it be explained only by intrinsic mechanical behavior. Rather, both processes contribute to the observed behavior in primary water. In this project, we had three objectives: (1) to verify that grain boundaries control deformation in Ni-16Cr-9Fe at 360 C, (2) to identify the environmental effect on IGSCC, and (3) to combine CSLBs and GBCs to maximize IGSCC resistance in Ni-Cr-Fe in 360 C primary water. Experiments performed in hydrogen gas at 360 C confirm an increase in the primary creep rate in Ni-16Cr-9Fe at 360 C due to hydrogen. The creep strain transients caused by hydrogen are proposed to be due to the collapse of dislocation pile-ups, as confirmed by observations in HVEM. The observations only partially support the hydrogen-enhanced plasticity model, but also suggest a potential role of vacancies in the accelerate creep behavior in primary water. In high temperature oxidation experiments designed to examine the potential for selective internal oxidation in the IGSCC process, cracking is greatest in the more oxidizing environments compared to the low oxygen potential environments where nickel metal is stable. In Ni-Cr-Fe alloys, chromium oxides form preferentially along the grain boundaries, even at low oxygen potential, supporting a potential role in grain boundary embrittlement due to preferential oxidation. Experiments designed to determine the role of grain boundary deformation on intergranular cracking have established, for the first time, a cause-and-effect relationship between grain boundary deformation and IGSCC. That is, grain boundary deformation in Ni-16Cr-9Fe in 360 C primary water leads to IGSCC of the deformed boundaries. As well

  19. Stress-corrosion cracking and surface-pitting tests of NiCrFe alloy bolts (LWBR development program)

    SciTech Connect

    Keller, K.L.

    1983-02-01

    Accelerated corrosion tests confirmed the adequate resistance to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of the specific heats of NiCrFe X-750 and NiCrFe 600 used as bolts in the LWBR. SCC acceleration was achieved by running autoclave corrosion tests at 680/sup 0/F (well above the LWBR core operating temperatures of approximately 525/sup 0/F to 560/sup 0/F). Component stress levels were representative of maximum service stresses. No specimens from heats of either alloy suffered SCC.

  20. The effect of ion plated silver and sliding friction on tensile stress-induced cracking in aluminum oxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sliney, Harold E.; Spalvins, Talivaldis

    1991-01-01

    A Hertzian analysis of the effect of sliding friction on contact stresses in alumina is used to predict the critical load for crack generation. The results for uncoated alumina and alumina coated with ion plated silver are compared. Friction coefficient inputs to the analysis are determined experimentally with a scratch test instrument employing an 0.2 mm radius diamond stylus. A series of scratches were made at constant load increments on coated and uncoated flat alumina surfaces. Critical loads for cracking are detected by microscopic examination of cross sections of scratches made at various loads and friction coefficients. Acoustic emission (AE) and friction trends were also evaluated as experimental techniques for determining critical loads for cracking. Analytical predictions correlate well with micrographic evidence and with the lowest load at which AE is detected in multiple scratch tests. Friction/load trends are not good indicators of early crack formation. Lubrication with silver films reduced friction and thereby increased the critical load for crack initiation in agreement with analytical predictions.

  1. The effect of ion-plated silver and sliding friction on tensile stress-induced cracking in aluminum oxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sliney, Harold E.; Spalvins, Talivaldis

    1993-01-01

    A Hertzian analysis of the effect of sliding friction on contact stresses in alumina is used to predict the critical load for crack generation. The results for uncoated alumina and alumina coated with ion plated silver are compared. Friction coefficient inputs to the analysis are determined experimentally with a scratch test instrument employing an 0.2 mm radius diamond stylus. A series of scratches were made at constant load increments on coated and uncoated flat alumina surfaces. Critical loads for cracking are detected by microscopic examination of cross sections of scratches made at various loads and friction coefficients. Acoustic emission (AE) and friction trends were also evaluated as experimental techniques for determining critical loads for cracking. Analytical predictions correlate well with micrographic evidence and with the lowest load at which AE is detected in multiple scratch tests. Friction/load trends are not good indicators of early crack formation. Lubrication with silver films reduced friction and thereby increased the critical load for crack initiation in agreement with analytical predictions.

  2. Crack size effects on the chemical driving force for aqueous corrosion fatigue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gangloff, R. P.

    1985-05-01

    Small crack size accelerates corrosion fatigue propagation through high strength 4130 steel in aqueous 3 pct NaCl. The size effect is attributed to crack geometry dependent mass transport and electrochemical reaction processes which govern embrittlement. For vacuum or moist air, growth rates are defined by stress intensity range independent of crack size (0.1 to 40 mm) and applied maximum stress (0.10 to 0.95 Φys). In contrast small (0.1 to 2 mm) surface elliptical and edge cracks in saltwater grow up to 500 times faster than long (15 to 40 mm) cracks at constant δK. Small cracks grow along prior austenite grain boundaries, while long cracks propagate by a brittle transgranular mode associated with tempered martensite. The small crack acceleration is maximum at low δK levels and decreases with increasing crack length at constant stress, or with increasing stress at constant small crack size. Reductions in corrosion fatigue growth rate correlate with increased brittle transgranular cracking. Crack mouth opening, proportional to the crack solution volume to surface area ratio, determines the environmental enhancement of growth rate and the proportions of inter- and transgranular cracking. Small cracks grow at rapid rates because of enhanced hydrogen production, traceable to increased hydrolytic acidification and reduced oxygen inhibition within the occluded cell.

  3. Results of u-bend stress-corrosion-cracking specimen exposures in coal-liquefaction pilot plants

    SciTech Connect

    Baylor, V.B.; Keiser, J.R.; Allen, M.D.; Howell, M.; Newsome, J.F.

    1982-04-01

    Pilot plants with capacities of up to 600 tons/d are currently demonstrating the engineering feasibility of several coal liquefaction processes including Solvent Refined Coal (SRC), Exxon Donor Solvent (EDS), and H-Coal. These plants are the first step toward commercial production of synthetic fuels. Among other factors, development of the technology depends on reliable materials performance. A concern is the application of those austenitic stainless steels necessary for general corrosion resistance, because they are susceptible to stress corrosion cracking. This cracking results from tensile stresses in combination with offensive agents such as polythionic acids, chlorides, and caustics. To screen candidate construction materials for resistance to stress corrosion cracking, we exposed racks of stressed U-bend specimens in welded and as-wrought conditions at four coal liquefaction pilot plants. Results from exposures through June 1980 were described in a previous report for exposures in the SRC plants. This report summarizes the on-site test results from June 1980 through October 1981 for the two SRC pilot plants and the H-Coal and Exxon coal liquefaction pilot plants.

  4. Determination of Stress Coefficient Terms in Cracked Solids for Monoclinic Materials with Plane Symmetry at x3 = 0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yuan, F. G.

    1998-01-01

    Determination of all the coefficients in the crack tip field expansion for monoclinic materials under two-dimensional deformation is presented in this report. For monoclinic materials with a plane of material symmetry at x(sub 3) = 0, the in-plane deformation is decoupled from the anti-plane deformation. In the case of in-plane deformation, utilizing conservation laws of elasticity and Betti's reciprocal theorem, together with selected auxiliary fields, T-stress and third-order stress coefficients near the crack tip are evaluated first from path-independent line integrals. To determine the T-stress terms using the J-integral and Betti's reciprocal work theorem, auxiliary fields under a concentrated force and moment acting at the crack tip are used respectively. Through the use of Stroh formalism in anisotropic elasticity, analytical expressions for all the coefficients including the stress intensity factors are derived in a compact form that has surprisingly simple structure in terms of the Barnett-Lothe tensors, L. The solution forms for degenerated materials, orthotropic, and isotropic materials are presented.

  5. Effect of solution treatment on stress corrosion cracking behavior of an as-forged Mg-Zn-Y-Zr alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, S. D.; Xu, D. K.; Wang, B. J.; Sheng, L. Y.; Han, E. H.; Dong, C.

    2016-07-01

    Effect of solid solution treatment (T4) on stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behavior of an as-forged Mg-6.7%Zn-1.3%Y-0.6%Zr (in wt.%) alloy has been investigated using slow strain rate tensile (SSRT) testing in 3.5 wt.% NaCl solution. The results demonstrated that the SCC susceptibility index (ISCC) of as-forged samples was 0.95 and its elongation-to-failure (εf) was only 1.1%. After T4 treatment, the SCC resistance was remarkably improved. The ISCC and εf values of T4 samples were 0.86 and 3.4%, respectively. Fractography and surface observation indicated that the stress corrosion cracking mode for as-forged samples was dominated by transgranular and partially intergranular morphology, whereas the cracking mode for T4 samples was transgranular. In both cases, the main cracking mechanism was associated with hydrogen embrittlement (HE). Through alleviating the corrosion attack of Mg matrix, the influence of HE on the SCC resistance of T4 samples can be greatly suppressed.

  6. Effect of solution treatment on stress corrosion cracking behavior of an as-forged Mg-Zn-Y-Zr alloy.

    PubMed

    Wang, S D; Xu, D K; Wang, B J; Sheng, L Y; Han, E H; Dong, C

    2016-07-08

    Effect of solid solution treatment (T4) on stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behavior of an as-forged Mg-6.7%Zn-1.3%Y-0.6%Zr (in wt.%) alloy has been investigated using slow strain rate tensile (SSRT) testing in 3.5 wt.% NaCl solution. The results demonstrated that the SCC susceptibility index (ISCC) of as-forged samples was 0.95 and its elongation-to-failure (εf) was only 1.1%. After T4 treatment, the SCC resistance was remarkably improved. The ISCC and εf values of T4 samples were 0.86 and 3.4%, respectively. Fractography and surface observation indicated that the stress corrosion cracking mode for as-forged samples was dominated by transgranular and partially intergranular morphology, whereas the cracking mode for T4 samples was transgranular. In both cases, the main cracking mechanism was associated with hydrogen embrittlement (HE). Through alleviating the corrosion attack of Mg matrix, the influence of HE on the SCC resistance of T4 samples can be greatly suppressed.

  7. Effect of solution treatment on stress corrosion cracking behavior of an as-forged Mg-Zn-Y-Zr alloy.

    PubMed

    Wang, S D; Xu, D K; Wang, B J; Sheng, L Y; Han, E H; Dong, C

    2016-01-01

    Effect of solid solution treatment (T4) on stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behavior of an as-forged Mg-6.7%Zn-1.3%Y-0.6%Zr (in wt.%) alloy has been investigated using slow strain rate tensile (SSRT) testing in 3.5 wt.% NaCl solution. The results demonstrated that the SCC susceptibility index (ISCC) of as-forged samples was 0.95 and its elongation-to-failure (εf) was only 1.1%. After T4 treatment, the SCC resistance was remarkably improved. The ISCC and εf values of T4 samples were 0.86 and 3.4%, respectively. Fractography and surface observation indicated that the stress corrosion cracking mode for as-forged samples was dominated by transgranular and partially intergranular morphology, whereas the cracking mode for T4 samples was transgranular. In both cases, the main cracking mechanism was associated with hydrogen embrittlement (HE). Through alleviating the corrosion attack of Mg matrix, the influence of HE on the SCC resistance of T4 samples can be greatly suppressed. PMID:27387817

  8. Effect of solution treatment on stress corrosion cracking behavior of an as-forged Mg-Zn-Y-Zr alloy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, S. D.; Xu, D. K.; Wang, B. J.; Sheng, L. Y.; Han, E. H.; Dong, C.

    2016-01-01

    Effect of solid solution treatment (T4) on stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behavior of an as-forged Mg-6.7%Zn-1.3%Y-0.6%Zr (in wt.%) alloy has been investigated using slow strain rate tensile (SSRT) testing in 3.5 wt.% NaCl solution. The results demonstrated that the SCC susceptibility index (ISCC) of as-forged samples was 0.95 and its elongation-to-failure (εf) was only 1.1%. After T4 treatment, the SCC resistance was remarkably improved. The ISCC and εf values of T4 samples were 0.86 and 3.4%, respectively. Fractography and surface observation indicated that the stress corrosion cracking mode for as-forged samples was dominated by transgranular and partially intergranular morphology, whereas the cracking mode for T4 samples was transgranular. In both cases, the main cracking mechanism was associated with hydrogen embrittlement (HE). Through alleviating the corrosion attack of Mg matrix, the influence of HE on the SCC resistance of T4 samples can be greatly suppressed. PMID:27387817

  9. Stress corrosion cracking of stainless-steel canister for concrete cask storage of spent fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tani, Jun-ichi; Mayuzumi, Masami; Hara, Nobuyoshi

    2008-09-01

    Resistance to external stress corrosion cracking (ESCC) and crevice corrosion were examined for various candidate canister materials in the spent fuel dry storage condition using concrete casks. A constant load ESCC test was conducted on the candidate materials in air after deposition of simulated sea salt particles on the specimen gage section. Highly corrosion resistant stainless steels (SS), S31260 and S31254, did not fail for more than 46 000 h at 353 K with relative humidity of 35%, although the normal stainless steel, S30403 SS failed within 500 h by ESCC. Crevice corrosion potentials of S31260 and S31254 SS became larger than 0.9 V (SCE) in synthetic sea water at temperatures below 298 K, while those of S30403 and S31603 SS were less than 0 V (SCE) at the same temperature range. No rust was found on S31260 and S31254 SS specimens at temperatures below 298 K in the atmospheric corrosion test, which is consistent with the temperature dependency of crevice corrosion potential. From the test result, the critical temperature of atmospheric corrosion was estimated to be 293 K for both S31260 and S31254 SS. Utilizing the ESCC test result and the critical temperature, together with the weather station data and the estimated canister wall temperature, the integrity of canister was assessed from the view point of ESCC.

  10. Stress corrosion cracking and hydrogen embrittlement of an Al-Zn-Mg-Cu alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Song, R.G.; Dietzel, W.; Zhang, B.J.; Liu, W.J.; Tseng, M.K.; Atrens, A

    2004-09-20

    The age hardening, stress corrosion cracking (SCC) and hydrogen embrittlement (HE) of an Al-Zn-Mg-Cu 7175 alloy were investigated experimentally. There were two peak-aged states during ageing. For ageing at 413 K, the strength of the second peak-aged state was slightly higher than that of the first one, whereas the SCC susceptibility was lower, indicating that it is possible to heat treat 7175 to high strength and simultaneously to have high SCC resistance. The SCC susceptibility increased with increasing Mg segregation at the grain boundaries. Hydrogen embrittlement (HE) increased with increased hydrogen charging and decreased with increasing ageing time for the same hydrogen charging conditions. Computer simulations were carried out of (a) the Mg grain boundary segregation using the embedded atom method and (b) the effect of Mg and H segregation on the grain boundary strength using a quasi-chemical approach. The simulations showed that (a) Mg grain boundary segregation in Al-Zn-Mg-Cu alloys is spontaneous, (b) Mg segregation decreases the grain boundary strength, and (c) H embrittles the grain boundary more seriously than does Mg. Therefore, the SCC mechanism of Al-Zn-Mg-Cu alloys is attributed to the combination of HE and Mg segregation induced grain boundary embrittlement.

  11. From monoscale to multiscale modeling of fatigue crack growth: Stress and energy density factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sih, G. C.

    2014-01-01

    The formalism of the earlier fatigue crack growth models is retained to account for multiscaling of the fatigue process that involves the creation of macrocracks from the accumulation of micro damage. The effects of at least two scales, say micro to macro, must be accounted for. The same data can thus be reinterpreted by the invariancy of the transitional stress intensity factors such that the microcracking and macrocracking data would lie on a straight line. The threshold associated with the sigmoid curve disappears. Scale segmentation is shown to be a necessity for addressing multiscale energy dissipative processes such as fatigue and creep. Path independency and energy release rate are monoscale criteria that can lead to unphysical results, violating the first principles. Application of monoscale failure or fracture criteria to nanomaterials is taking toll at the expense of manufacturing super strength and light materials and structural components. This brief view is offered in the spirit of much needed additional research for the reinforcement of materials by creating nanoscale interfaces with sustainable time in service. The step by step consideraton at the different scales may offer a better understanding of the test data and their limitations with reference to space and time.

  12. Corrosion, stress corrosion cracking, and electrochemistry of the iron and nickel base alloys in caustic environments

    SciTech Connect

    Koehler, R.; Beck, F. H.; Agrawal, A. K.; Soendjasmono, B.; Staehle, R. W.

    1980-02-01

    The electrochemical behavior of high purity (99.95% to 99.99%) iron in 0.6M NaCl and 1.0M Na/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ containing H/sub 2/S (50 ppM to 34,000 ppM) was studied using cyclic voltammetry, chronoamperometry, and slow scan rate polarization. Results have indicated that iron does undergo passivation in sulfate solutions containing H/sub 2/S. Iron dissolution depends on the presence of Cl/sup -/, the concentration of H/sub 2/S and solution pH. An equation is given that describes the anodic Tafel current densities. The slow strain rate test was used to evaluate the effect of electrode potential on the susceptibility of 2-1/4Cr, Mo steel to stress corrosion cracking in boiling 50% NaOH solution. Susceptibility decreased and general corrosion increased with increasing potentials. Failures contained a combination of ductile and brittle fracture. Time-to-failure was longest for controlled potentials of -700 and -600mV (Hg/HgO reference) in the -1100 to -400mV range used in this study.

  13. Stress-corrosion-cracking studies on candidate container alloys for the Tuff Repository

    SciTech Connect

    Beavers, J.A.; Durr, C.L.

    1992-05-01

    Cortest Columbus Technologies, Inc. (CC Technologies) investigated the long-term performance of container materials used for high-level waste package as part of the information needed by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to assess the Department of Energy`s application to construct to geologic repository for high-level radioactive waste. At the direction of the NRC, the program focused on the Tuff Repository. This report summarizes the results of Stress-Corrosion-Cracking (SCC) studies performed in Tasks 3, 5, and 7 of the program. Two test techniques were used; U-bend exposures and Slow-Strain-Rate (SSR) tests. The testing was performed on two copper-base alloys (Alloy CDA 102 and Alloy CDA 175) and two Fe-Cr-Ni alloys (Alloy 304L and Alloy 825) in simulated J-13 groundwater and other simulated solutions for the Tuff Repository. These solutions were designed to simulate the effects of concentration and irradiation on the groundwater composition. All SCC testing on the Fe-Cr-Ni Alloys was performed on solution-annealed specimens and thus issues such as the effect of sensitization on SCC were not addressed.

  14. STRESS CORROSION CRACKING SUSCEPTIBILITY OF HIGH LEVEL WASTE TANKS DURING SLUDGE MASS REDUCTION

    SciTech Connect

    Subramanian, K

    2007-10-18

    Aluminum is a principal element in alkaline nuclear sludge waste stored in high level waste (HLW) tanks at the Savannah River Site. The mass of sludge in a HLW tank can be reduced through the caustic leaching of aluminum, i.e. converting aluminum oxides (gibbsite) and oxide-hydroxides (boehmite) into soluble hydroxides through reaction with a hot caustic solution. The temperature limits outlined by the chemistry control program for HLW tanks to prevent caustic stress corrosion cracking (CSCC) in concentrated hydroxide solutions will potentially be exceeded during the sludge mass reduction (SMR) campaign. Corrosion testing was performed to determine the potential for CSCC under expected conditions. The experimental test program, developed based upon previous test results and expected conditions during the current SMR campaign, consisted of electrochemical and mechanical testing to determine the susceptibility of ASTM A516 carbon steel to CSCC in the relevant environment. Anodic polarization test results indicated that anodic inhibition at the temperatures and concentrations of interest for SMR is not a viable, consistent technical basis for preventing CSCC. However, the mechanical testing concluded that CSCC will not occur under conditions expected during SMR for a minimum of 35 days. In addition, the stress relief for the Type III/IIIA tanks adds a level of conservatism to the estimates. The envelope for corrosion control is recommended during the SMR campaign is shown in Table 1. The underlying assumption is that solution time-in-tank is limited to the SMR campaign. The envelope recommends nitrate/aluminate intervals for discrete intervals of hydroxide concentrations, although it is recognized that a continuous interval may be developed. The limits also sets temperature limits.

  15. Structural zooming research and development of an interactive computer graphical interface for stress analysis of cracks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerstle, Walter

    1989-01-01

    Engineering problems sometimes involve the numerical solution of boundary value problems over domains containing geometric feature with widely varying scales. Often, a detailed solution is required at one or more of these features. Small details in large structures may have profound effects upon global performance. Conversely, large-scale conditions may effect local performance. Many man-hours and CPU-hours are currently spent in modeling such problems. With the structural zooming technique, it is now possible to design an integrated program which allows the analyst to interactively focus upon a small region of interest, to modify the local geometry, and then to obtain highly accurate responses in that region which reflect both the properties of the overall structure and the local detail. A boundary integral equation analysis program, called BOAST, was recently developed for the stress analysis of cracks. This program can accurately analyze two-dimensional linear elastic fracture mechanics problems with far less computational effort than existing finite element codes. An interactive computer graphical interface to BOAST was written. The graphical interface would have several requirements: it would be menu-driven, with mouse input; all aspects of input would be entered graphically; the results of a BOAST analysis would be displayed pictorially but also the user would be able to probe interactively to get numerical values of displacement and stress at desired locations within the analysis domain; the entire procedure would be integrated into a single, easy to use package; and it would be written using calls to the graphic package called HOOPS. The program is nearing completion. All of the preprocessing features are working satisfactorily and were debugged. The postprocessing features are under development, and rudimentary postprocessing should be available by the end of the summer. The program was developed and run on a VAX workstation, and must be ported to the SUN

  16. SRNL SHELF LIFE STUDIES - SCC STUDIES AT ROOM TEMPERTURE [stress corrosion cracking

    SciTech Connect

    Mickalonis, J.; Duffey, J.

    2014-11-12

    Phase II, Series 2 corrosion testing performed by the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) for the Department of Energy 3013 container has been completed. The corrosion tests are part of an integrated plan conducted jointly by Los Alamos National Laboratory and the Savannah River Site. SRNL was responsible for conducting corrosion studies in small-scale vessels to address the influence of salt composition, water loading, and type of oxide/salt contact on the relative humidity inside a 3013 container and on the resulting corrosion of Type 304L and 316L stainless steel (304L and 316L). This testing was conducted in two phases: Phase I evaluated a broad spectrum of salt compositions and initial water loadings on the salt mixtures exposed to 304L and 316L and the resulting corrosion; Phase II evaluated the corrosion of 304L at specific water loadings and a single salt composition. During Phase I testing at high initial moisture levels (0.35 to 1.24 wt%)a, the roomtemperature corrosion of 304L exposed to a series of plutonium oxide/chloride salt mixtures ranged from superficial staining to pitting and stress corrosion cracking (SCC). 304L teardrop coupons that exhibited SCC were directly exposed to a mixture composed of 98 wt % PuO2, 0.9 wt % NaCl, 0.9 wt % KCl, and 0.2 wt % CaCl2. Cracking was not observed in a 316L teardrop coupon. Pitting was also observed in this environment for both 304L and 316L with depths ranging from 20 to 100 μm. Neither pitting nor SCC was observed in mixtures with a greater chloride salt concentration (5 and 28 wt%). These results demonstrated that for a corrosive solution to form a balance existed between the water loading and the salt chloride concentration. This chloride solution results from the interaction of loaded water with the hydrating CaCl2 salt. In Phase II, Series 1 tests, the SCC results were shown to be reproducible with cracking occurring in as little as 85 days. The approximate 0.5 wt% moisture level was found to

  17. Fatigue Life and Short Crack Behavior in Ti-6Al-4V Alloy; Interactions of Foreign Object Damage, Stress, and Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majidi, Behzad

    2008-04-01

    High-cycle fatigue (HCF) failures associated with foreign object damage (FOD) in turbine engines of military aircrafts have been of major concern for the aeronautic industry in recent years. The present work is focused on characterizing the effects of FOD on crack initiation and small crack growth of a Ti-6Al-4V alloy at ambient and also elevated temperatures. Results show that the preferred crack initiation site depends on applied stress and temperature as maximum fractions of cracks emanating from the simulated damage site, and naturally initiated cracks are observed at 25 °C under the maximum stress of 700 MPa and at 300 °C under the maximum stress of 300 MPa. The fatigue crack growth rate is influenced by increasing temperature, and the FCG rate at 300 °C is higher than that at room temperature under the same Δ K, whereas this effect for FOD-site initiated cracks is not so remarkable. This observation seems to be due to the effect of stress relaxation at 300 °C. Results also indicate that fatigue crack initiation life ( N i ) and fatigue life ( N f ) are expressed by three-parameter Weibull distribution function.

  18. Initiation and propagation of stress-corrosion cracking of Alloy 600 in high-temperature water. [PWR

    SciTech Connect

    Bandy, R.; van Rooyen, D.

    1983-01-01

    Results of stress-corrosion cracking data are presented for Inconel 600 steam-generator tubing. U-bend, constant-load, and slow extension-rate tests are included. Arrhenius plots are presented for failure times vs inverse temperature for crack initiation and propagation. Effect of applied load is expressed in terms of log-log curves for failure times vs stress, and variations in environment and cold work are included. Microstructure and composition of oxide films on Inconel 600 surfaces were examined after exposure to pure water at 365/sup 0/C, and stripping with the bromine-methanol method. Results are discussed in terms of transient creep, film rupture and a mass-transport-limited anodic process.

  19. Eigenspectra and orders of stress singularity at a mode I crack tip for a power-law medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepanova, Larisa

    2008-01-01

    In this Note eigenspectra and orders of singularity of the stress field near a mode I crack tip in a power-law material are discussed. The perturbation theory technique is employed to pose the required asymptotic solution. The whole set of eigenvalues is obtained. It is shown that the eigenvalues of the nonlinear problem are fully determined by the corresponding eigenvalues of the linear problem and by the hardening exponent. To cite this article: L. Stepanova, C. R. Mecanique 336 (2008).

  20. Characterization of spontaneous magnetic signals induced by cyclic tensile stress in crack propagation stage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Haihong; Jiang, Shilin; Wang, Yan; Zhang, Lei; Liu, Zhifeng

    2014-09-01

    Influenced by the geomagnetic field, crack can induce spontaneous magnetic signals in ferromagnetic steels. The normal component of surface spontaneous magnetic signals of the center-cracked sheet specimens, Hp(y), was measured throughout the tension-tension fatigue tests. The variation of Hp(y) and its maximum gradient Kmax in the crack propagation stage were studied. It shows that Hp(y) began to change its polarity, just right on the crack position, in the intermediate stage of crack propagation. The cause for this phenomenon was also discussed. The peak-to-peak value, ΔHp(y), of the magnetic signal when Hp(y) changing its polarity was collected, and discrete wavelet transform (DWT) was further used to acquire high frequency components of the Hp(y) signal. The results show that the Kmax increased exponentially with the increase of loading cycles; an approximate linear relationship was found between Kmax and crack length 2a in the intermediate stage of crack propagation; and the high-frequency component of Hp(y) can be used to identify the late stage of crack propagation.

  1. The study of stress application and corrosion cracking on Ni-16 Cr-9 Fe (Alloy 600) C-ring samples by polychromatic X-ray microdiffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Chao, Jing; Fuller, Marina L Suominen; McIntyre, N Stewart; Carcea, Anatolie G; Newman, Roger C; Kunz, Martin; Tamura, Nobumichi

    2012-03-27

    Microscopic strains associated with stress corrosion cracks have been investigated in stressed C-rings of Ni-16 Cr-9 Fe (Alloy 600) boiler tubing. Polychromatic X-ray microdiffraction was used to measure deviatoric strain tensors and the distribution of dislocations near cracks that had been propagated in electrochemically accelerated corrosion tests. An associated investigation of the C-ring-induced strains prior to corrosion showed significant tensile strain in the stress axis direction by the torsional closure of the alloy tube section in the C-ring test. Significant grain lattice rotation and pronounced plastic strain at some grain boundaries were noted. Stress-corrosion-cracking-generated intergranular cracks were produced in two Alloy 600 specimens after 6 h and 18 h tests. The diffraction patterns and resultant strain tensors were mapped around the cracked area to a 1 μm spatial resolution. The strain tensor transverse to the crack growth direction showed tensile strain at the intergranular region just ahead of the crack tip for both specimens. Both cracks were found to follow grain boundary pathways that had the lowest angle of misorientation. Dislocation distributions within each grain were qualitatively obtained from the shapes of the diffraction spots and the effect of 'hard' and 'soft' grains on the crack pathway was explored for both 6 h and 18 h specimens. The Schmid factor of one of the grains adjacent to the crack at the 6 h and 18 h initiation sites was found to be the lowest, compared to Schmid factors calculated for surface grains away from the initiation site, and also along the crack path into the bulk.

  2. Irradiation Programs and Test Plans to Assess High-Fluence Irradiation Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking Susceptibility.

    SciTech Connect

    Teysseyre, Sebastien

    2015-03-01

    . Irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) is a known issue in current reactors. In a 60 year lifetime, reactor core internals may experience fluence levels up to 15 dpa for boiling water reactors (BWR) and 100+ dpa for pressurized water reactors (PWR). To support a safe operation of our fleet of reactors and maintain their economic viability it is important to be able to predict any evolution of material behaviors as reactors age and therefore fluence accumulated by reactor core component increases. For PWR reactors, the difficulty to predict high fluence behavior comes from the fact that there is not a consensus of the mechanism of IASCC and that little data is available. It is however possible to use the current state of knowledge on the evolution of irradiated microstructure and on the processes that influences IASCC to emit hypotheses. This report identifies several potential changes in microstructure and proposes to identify their potential impact of IASCC. The susceptibility of a component to high fluence IASCC is considered to not only depends on the intrinsic IASCC susceptibility of the component due to radiation effects on the material but to also be related to the evolution of the loading history of the material and interaction with the environment as total fluence increases. Single variation type experiments are proposed to be performed with materials that are representative of PWR condition and with materials irradiated in other conditions. To address the lack of IASCC propagation and initiation data generated with material irradiated in PWR condition, it is proposed to investigate the effect of spectrum and flux rate on the evolution of microstructure. A long term irradiation, aimed to generate a well-controlled irradiation history on a set on selected materials is also proposed for consideration. For BWR, the study of available data permitted to identify an area of concern for long term performance of component. The efficiency of

  3. Preserving cell shape under environmental stress

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Boaz; Hardy, Robert W.; McConnaughey, William B.; Zuker, Charles S.

    2008-01-01

    Maintaining cell shape and tone is crucial for the function and survival of cells and tissues. Mechanotransduction relies on the transformation of minuscule mechanical forces into high-fidelity electrical responses1 2 3. When mechanoreceptors are stimulated, mechanically sensitive cation channels open and produce an inward transduction current that depolarizes the cell. For this process to operate effectively, the transduction machinery has to retain integrity and remain unfailingly independent of environmental changes. This is particularly challenging for poikilothermic organisms, where changes in temperature in the environment may impact the function of mechanoreceptor neurons. Thus, we wondered how insects whose habitat might quickly vary over several tens of degrees of temperature manage to maintain highly effective mechanical senses. We screened for Drosophila mutants with defective mechanical responses at elevated ambient temperatures, and identified a gene, spam, whose role is to protect the mechanosensory organ from massive cellular deformation caused by heat-induced osmotic imbalance. Here, we show that Spam protein forms an extracellular shield that guards mechanosensory neurons from environmental insult. Remarkably, heterologously expressed Spam protein also endowed other cells with superb defense against physically- and chemically-induced deformation. We studied the mechanical impact of Spam-coating and show that spam-coated cells are up to ten times stiffer than uncoated-controls. Together, these results help explain how poikilothermic organisms preserve the architecture of critical cells during environmental stress, and illustrate an elegant and simple solution to such challenge. PMID:18297055

  4. Comparative Stress Corrosion Cracking and General Corrosion Resistance of Annealed and Hardened 440 C Stainless Steel - New Techniques in Stress Corrosion Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mendreck, M. J.; Hurless, B. E.; Torres, P. D.; Danford, M. D.

    1998-01-01

    The corrosion and stress corrosion cracking (SCC) characteristics of annealed and hardened 440C stainless steel were evaluated in high humidity and 3.5-percent NaCl solution. Corrosion testing consisted of an evaluation of flat plates, with and without grease, in high humidity, as well as electrochemical testing in 3.5-percent NaCl. Stress corrosion testing consisted of conventional, constant strain, smooth bar testing in high humidity in addition to two relatively new techniques under evaluation at MSFC. These techniques involve either incremental or constant rate increases in the load applied to a precracked SE(B) specimen, monitoring the crack-opening-displacement response for indications of crack growth. The electrochemical corrosion testing demonstrated an order of magnitude greater general corrosion rate in the annealed 440C. All techniques for stress corrosion testing showed substantially better SCC resistance in the annealed material. The efficacy of the new techniques for stress corrosion testing was demonstrated both by the savings in time and the ability to better quantify SCC data.

  5. Fracture mechanics and surface chemistry investigations of environment-assisted crack growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wei, R. P.; Klier, K.; Simmons, G. W.; Chou, Y. T.

    1984-01-01

    It is pointed out that environment-assisted subcritical crack growth in high-strength steels and other high-strength alloys (particularly in hydrogen and in hydrogenous environments) is an important technological problem of long standing. This problem is directly related to issues of structural integrity, durability, and reliability. The terms 'hydrogen embrittlement' and 'stress corrosion cracking' have been employed to describe the considered phenomenon. This paper provides a summary of contributions made during the past ten years toward the understanding of environmentally assisted crack growth. The processes involved in crack growth are examined, and details regarding crack growth and chemical reactions are discussed, taking into account crack growth in steels exposed to water/water vapor, the effect of hydrogen, reactions involving hydrogen sulfide, and aspects of fracture surface morphology and composition. Attention is also given to the modeling of crack growth response, crack growth in gas mixtures, and the interaction of solute atoms with the crack-tip stress field.

  6. The unusual near-threshold FCG behavior of a single crystal superalloy and the resolved shear stress as the crack driving force

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Telesman, Jack; Ghosn, Louis J.

    1989-01-01

    An investigation of the fatigue growth (FCG) behavior of PWA 1480 single crystal nickel base superalloy was conducted. Typical Paris region behavior was observed above a Delta-K of 8 MPa sq rt m. However, below that stress intensity range, the alloy exhibted highly unusual behavior. The behavior consisted of a region where the crack growth rate became essentially independent of the applied stress intensity. The transition in the FCG behavior was related to a change in the observed crack growth mechanisms.

  7. Environmentally Asisted Cracking Behavior of Nickel Alloys in Simulated Acidic and Alkaline Ground Waters Using U-bend Specimens

    SciTech Connect

    Fix, D V; Estill, J C; Hust, G A; Wong, L L; Rebak, R B

    2003-10-17

    The model for the degradation of the containers for nuclear waste includes three modes of corrosion, namely general corrosion, localized corrosion and environmentally assisted cracking (EAC). The objective of the current research was to quantify the susceptibility of five nickel alloys to EAC in several environmental conditions with varying solution composition, temperature and electrochemical potential. These alloys included: Alloy 22 (N06022), Alloy C-4 (N06455), Alloy 625 (N06625), Alloy G-3 (N06985) and Alloy 825 (N08825). The susceptibility to EAC was evaluated using constant deformation (deflection) U-bend specimens in both the non-welded (wrought) and welded conditions. Results show that after more than five years exposure in the vapor and liquid phases of alkaline (pH {approx} 10) and acidic (pH {approx} 3) multi-ionic environments at 60 C and 90 C, none of the tested alloys suffered environmentally assisted cracking.

  8. Effects of heat treatment on stress corrosion cracking of a discontinuously reinforced aluminum (DRA) 7XXX alloy during slow strain rate testing

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, P.M.; Lewandowski, J.J.

    1995-11-01

    Discontinuously reinforced aluminum (DRA) alloys are being developed as candidate materials for the automotive and aerospace industry. Although the corrosion and stress corrosion cracking (SCC) susceptibility of aluminum alloys have been extensively studied, comparatively little is known about the corrosion and SCC behavior of DRA materials. The intent of the present work was to study the effects of changes in microstructure/heat treatment on the crack nucleation mechanisms in DRAs and their monolithic atrices on the overall slow strain rate SCC performance in a 3.5% NaCl solution (pH = 3.0). For a given heat treatment, MB78 DRA materials show more susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking than the equivalent monolithic material. For the MB78 composite, the UAII material exhibited the maximum susceptibility to SCC. Both the UAI and UAII material were more susceptible to SCC than the OA material. MB78 DRA and monolithic specimens which have been shown to have a continuous ({eta} and {eta}{prime}) layer along the grain boundaries also showed higher susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking. Significantly more crack coalescence to form larger cracks was observed for the DRA specimens tested in the NaCl solution compared to the DRA specimens tested in dry-air. Monolithic specimens (OA as well as UA) did not exhibit visible micro-cracks or significant crack coalescence on the surfaces.

  9. A model emitting dislocation group from crack tip with stress singularity and its application to brittle-ductile transition

    SciTech Connect

    Yokobori, Toshimitsu A.Jr. . Dept. of Mechatronics and Precision Engineering); Isogai, Takeshi; Yokobori, Takeo . School of Science and Engineering)

    1993-05-01

    Taking into account the stress singularity near the crack tip, computer simulation of dislocation emission and motion has been carried out. A model is proposed in which the source emitting the dislocation group is located near by the crack tip. The numerical method has been used by programming to adjust time increment automatically. By this model and the analytical method, the converged solution has been obtained. The main results are as follows: The region where any dislocation does not exist along the slip plane near the stressed source, namely, dislocation free zone (DFZ) is found to appear. Also it has been found that inverse pile-up of dislocation against the tip of DFZ will appear. The formula is obtained correlating the maximum dislocation density with DFZ length. With increase of stress rate and decrease of the value of [mu]/[tau][sup *][sub 0], the inverse pile-up at the tip of DFZ becomes more significant. Based on these results, a new fracture criterion for brittle fracture is proposed assuming critical local stress requisite within DFZ, where high stress concentration is induced by dynamic inverse pile-up of dislocations.

  10. Development of Eddy Current Technique for the Detection of Stress Corrosion Cracking in Space Shuttle Primary Reaction Control Thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wincheski, Buzz; Simpson, John; Koshti, Ajay

    2006-01-01

    A recent identification of stress corrosion cracking in the Space Shuttle Primary Reaction Control System (PRCS) thrusters triggered an extensive nondestructive evaluation effort to develop techniques capable of identifying such damage on installed shuttle hardware. As a part of this effort, specially designed eddy current probes inserted into the acoustic cavity were explored for the detection of such flaws and for evaluation of the remaining material between the crack tip and acoustic cavity. The technique utilizes two orthogonal eddy current probes which are scanned under stepper motor control in the acoustic cavity to identify cracks hidden with as much as 0.060 remaining wall thickness to the cavity. As crack growth rates in this area have been determined to be very slow, such an inspection provides a large safety margin for continued operation of the critical shuttle hardware. Testing has been performed on thruster components with both actual and fabricated defects. This paper will review the design and performance of the developed eddy current inspection system. Detection of flaws as a function of remaining wall thickness will be presented along with the proposed system configuration for depot level or on-vehicle inspection capabilities.

  11. Stress corrosion cracking and corrosion fatigue on 316L stainless steel in boric acid concentrated media at 320 C

    SciTech Connect

    Herms, E.; Olive, J.M.; Puiggali, M.; Boursier, J.M.

    1999-07-01

    Stress Corrosion Cracking (SCC) and Corrosion-Fatigue (CF) tests were performed in autoclave at 320 C in concentrated boric acid chlorinated media in presence of oxygen or hydrogen on type 316L austenitic stainless steel. Crack Growth Rates (CGR) are higher in non deaerated solutions for both SCC and CF than in hydrogenated solutions. CGR are relatively similar in CF and in SCC, excepted for high load ratio in CF where CGR are higher than in SCC. Detailed analysis of the fracture surface shows some distinct features between SCC and CF. Intergranular and transgranular mode of fracture are observed on SCC and CF. Fracture modes depend on the chemistry of solution in SCC and on frequency in CF. Traces of slip bands and crack front marking associated with oxide scale present on fracture surfaces exist in SCC and CF. Fatigue striations appear for low load ratio and high frequency. Secondary intergranular and transgranular cracking is observed only on SCC fracture surfaces and ligament morphology can be different in SCC relative to FC.

  12. Assessment of susceptibility of Type 304 stainless steel to intergranular stress corrosion cracking in simulated Savannah River Reactor environments

    SciTech Connect

    Ondrejcin, R.S.; Caskey, C.R. Jr.

    1989-12-01

    Intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) of Type 304 stainless steel rate tests (CERT) of specimens machined was evaluated by constant extension from Savannah River Plant (SRP) decontaminated process water piping. Results from 12 preliminary CERT tests verified that IGSCC occurred over a wide range of simulated SRP envirorments. 73 specimens were tested in two statistical experimental designs of the central composite class. In one design, testing was done in environments containing hydrogen peroxide; in the other design, hydrogen peroxide was omitted but oxygen was added to the environment. Prediction equations relating IGSCC to temperature and environmental variables were formulated. Temperature was the most important independent variable. IGSCC was severe at 100 to 120C and a threshold temperature between 40C and 55C was identified below which IGSCC did not occur. In environments containing hydrogen peroxide, as in SRP operation, a reduction in chloride concentration from 30 to 2 ppB also significantly reduced IGSCC. Reduction in sulfate concentration from 50 to 7 ppB was effective in reducing IGSCC provided the chloride concentration was 30 ppB or less and temperature was 95C or higher. Presence of hydrogen peroxide in the environment increased IGSCC except when chloride concentration was 11 ppB or less. Actual concentrations of hydrogen peroxide, oxygen and carbon dioxide did not affect IGSCC. Large positive ECP values (+450 to +750 mV Standard Hydrogen Electrode (SHE)) in simulated SRP environments containing hydrogen peroxide and were good agreement with ECP measurements made in SRP reactors, indicating that the simulated environments are representative of SRP reactor environments. Overall CERT results suggest that the most effective method to reduce IGSCC is to reduce chloride and sulfate concentrations.

  13. Stress corrosion cracking behavior of irradiated model austenitic stainless steel alloys.

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, H. M.; Karlsen, T. M.; Ruther, W. E.; Shack, W. J.; Strain, R. V.

    1999-07-16

    Slow-strain-rate tensile tests (SSRTs) and posttest fractographic analyses by scanning electron microscopy were conducted on 16 austenitic stainless steel (SS) alloys that were irradiated at 289 C in He. After irradiation to {approx}0.3 x 10{sup 21} n{center_dot}cm{sup {minus}2} and {approx}0.9 x 10{sup 21} n{center_dot}cm{sup {minus}2} (E >1 MeV), significant heat-to-heat variations in the degree of intergranular and transgranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC and TGSCC) were observed. Following irradiation to a fluence of {approx}0.3 x 10{sup 21} n{center_dot}cm{sup {minus}2}, a high-purity laboratory heat of Type 316L SS (Si {approx} 0.024 wt%) exhibited the highest susceptibility to IGSCC. The other 15 alloys exhibited negligible susceptibility to IGSCC at this low fluence. The percentage of TGSCC on the fracture surfaces of SSRT specimens of the 16 alloys at {approx}0.3 x 10{sup 21} n{center_dot}cm{sup {minus}2} (E > 1 MeV) could be correlated well with N and Si concentrations; all alloys that contained <0.01 wt.% N and <1.0 wt. % Si were susceptible, whereas all alloys that contained >0.01 wt.% N or >1.0 wt.% Si were relatively resistant. High concentrations of Cr were beneficial. Alloys that contain <15.5 wt.% Cr exhibited greater percentages of TGSCC and IGSCC than those alloys with {approx}18 wt.% Cr, whereas an alloy that contains >21 wt.% Cr exhibited less susceptibility than the lower-Cr alloys under similar conditions.

  14. Gear crack propagation investigations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewicki, David G.; Ballarini, Roberto

    1996-01-01

    Analytical and experimental studies were performed to investigate the effect of gear rim thickness on crack propagation life. The FRANC (FRacture ANalysis Code) computer program was used to simulate crack propagation. The FRANC program used principles of linear elastic fracture mechanics, finite element modeling, and a unique re-meshing scheme to determine crack tip stress distributions, estimate stress intensity factors, and model crack propagation. Various fatigue crack growth models were used to estimate crack propagation life based on the calculated stress intensity factors. Experimental tests were performed in a gear fatigue rig to validate predicted crack propagation results. Test gears were installed with special crack propagation gages in the tooth fillet region to measure bending fatigue crack growth. Good correlation between predicted and measured crack growth was achieved when the fatigue crack closure concept was introduced into the analysis. As the gear rim thickness decreased, the compressive cyclic stress in the gear tooth fillet region increased. This retarded crack growth and increased the number of crack propagation cycles to failure.

  15. Environmental stress and evolvability in microbial systems.

    PubMed

    Baquero, F

    2009-01-01

    The sustainability of life on the planet depends on the preservation of the existing microbial systems, which constitutes our major "biological atmosphere". The detection of variations in microbial systems as a result of anthropogenic or natural changes is critical both to detect and assess risks and to programme specific interventions. Changes in microbial systems provokes stress, probably altering the local evolutionary time by changing evolvability (the possibilities of microbes to evolve). Methods should be refined to properly assess diversity in microbial systems. We propose that such diversity estimations should be done on a multi-hierarchical scale, encompassing not only organisms, but sub-cellular entities (e.g. chromosomal domains, plasmids, transposons, integrons, genes, gene modules) and supra-cellular organizations (e.g. clones, populations, communities, ecosystems), applying Hamiltonian criteria of inclusive fitness for the different ensembles. In any of these entities, we can generally identify, in a fractal manner, constant and variable parts. Variation in these entities and ensembles is probably both reduced and increased by environmental stress. Because of that, variation in microbial systems might serve as mirrors or symptoms of the health of the planet. PMID:19220344

  16. Effects of hydrogen on electropotential monitoring of stress corrosion crack growth

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, C.D.; Carey, D.M.; Perazzo, N.L.

    1997-08-01

    Electropotential monitoring (EPM) has a crack growth measurement resolution that is an order of magnitude greater than methods that rely on crack mouth opening displacement. However, two phenomena have been identified that compromise the accuracy of the EPM technique. Coolant hydrogen concentrations above those needed to chemically reduce nickel oxide to metallic nickel cause EPM to underestimate the true crack length. The metallic nickel provides an electrical conduction path at contact points across the irregular crack surface thereby lowering the EPM potential. The coolant hydrogen concentration at which this reduction occurs is temperature dependent and correlates with an abrupt decrease in the rate of SCC crack growth. It was also found that EPM can indicate large crack growth when none actually exists. At temperatures > 315 C (600 F) the electrical resistivity of mill annealed Alloy 600 increased by as much as 5% in a period of weeks or months. Each 1% increase in resistivity results in a bias in the EPM indicated cracklength of about 0.2 mm (0.008 inches). Smaller changes in the electrical resistivity of other alloys have been measured which rank as EN52> X-750> 304SS> nickel. It has been shown that these resistivity changes occur during exposure to high temperature water or inert gas. Strategies to minimize the effects of these two phenomena on EPM measurement are discussed.

  17. How should environmental stress affect the population dynamics of disease?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lafferty, Kevin D.; Holt, Robert D.

    2003-01-01

    We modelled how stress affects the population dynamics of infectious disease. We were specifically concerned with stress that increased susceptibility of uninfected hosts when exposed to infection. If such stresses also reduced resources, fecundity and/or survivorship, there was a reduction in the host carrying capacity. This lowered the contact between infected and uninfected hosts, thereby decreasing transmission. In addition, stress that increased parasite mortality decreased disease. The opposing effects of stress on disease dynamics made it difficult to predict the response of disease to environmental stress. We found analytical solutions with negative, positive, convex and concave associations between disease and stress. Numerical simulations with randomly generated parameter values suggested that the impact of host-specific diseases generally declined with stress while the impact of non-specific (or open) diseases increased with stress. These results help clarify predictions about the interaction between environmental stress and disease in natural populations.

  18. Stress Corrosion Cracking of the Drip Shield, The Waste Package Outer Barrier and the Stainless Steel Structural Material

    SciTech Connect

    C. Stephen

    2000-04-17

    One of the potential failure modes of the drip shield (DS), the waste package (WP) outer barrier, and the stainless structural material is the initiation and propagation of stress corrosion cracking (SCC) induced by the WP environment and various types of stresses that can develop in the DSs or the WPs. For the current design of the DS and WP, however, the DS will be excluded from the SCC evaluation because stresses that are relevant to SCC are insignificant in the DS. The major sources of stresses in the DS are loadings due to backfill and earthquakes. These stresses will not induce SCC because the stress caused by backfill is generally compressive stress and the stress caused by earthquakes is temporary in nature. The 316NG stainless steel inner barrier of the WP will also be excluded from the SCC evaluation because the SCC performance assessment will not take credit from the inner barrier. Therefore, the purpose of this document is to provide a detailed description of the process-level models that can be applied to assess the performance of the material (i.e., Alloy 22) used for the WP outer barrier subjected to the effects of SCC. As already mentioned in the development plan for the WP PMR (CRWMS M and O 1999e), this Analyses and Models Report (AMR) is to serve as a feed to the Waste Package Degradation (WPD) Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) and Process Model Report (PMR).

  19. DEVELOPMENT OF AN EMAT IN-LINE INSPECTION SYSTEM FOR DETECTION, DISCRIMINATION, AND GRADING OF STRESS CORROSION CRACKING IN PIPELINES

    SciTech Connect

    Jeff Aron; Jon Gore, Roger Dalton; Stuart Eaton; Adrian Bowles; Owen Thomas; Tim Jarman

    2003-07-01

    This report describes progress, experiments, and results for a project to develop a pipeline inline inspection tool that uses electromagnetic acoustic transducers (EMATs) to detect and grade stress corrosion cracking (SCC). There is a brief introduction that gives background material about EMATs and relevant previous Tuboscope work toward a tool. This work left various choices about the modes and transducers for this project. The experimental section then describes the lab systems, improvements to these systems, and setups and techniques to narrow the choices. Improvements, which involved transducer matching networks, better magnetic biasing, and lower noise electronics, led to improved signal to noise (SNR) levels. The setups permitted transducer characterizations and interaction measurements in plates with man-made cracks, pipeline sections with SCC, and a full pipe with SCC. The latter were done with a moveable and compact EMAT setup, called a lab mouse, which is detailed. Next, the results section justifies the mode and transducer choices. These were for magnetostrictive EMATs and the use of EMAT launched modes: SH0 (at 2.1 MHz-mm) and SV1 (at 3.9 MHz-mm). This section then gives details of measurements on these modes. The measurements consisted of signal to noise ratio, insertion loss, magnetic biasing sensitivities crack reflection and transmission coefficients, beam width, standoff and tilt sensitivities. For most of the measurements the section presents analysis curves, such as reflection coefficient versus crack depth. Some notable results for the chosen modes are: that acceptable SNRs were generated in a pipe with magnetostrictive EMATs, that optimum bias for magnetostrictive transmitters and receivers is magnetic saturation, that crack reflection and transmission coefficients from crack interactions agree with 2 D simulations and seem workable for crack grading, and that the mouse has good waveform quality and so is ready for exhaustive measurement EMAT

  20. Effects of temperature and pressure on stress corrosion cracking behavior of 310S stainless steel in chloride solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Yunpan; Zhou, Cheng; Chen, Songying; Wang, Ruiyan

    2016-06-01

    310S is an austenitic stainless steel for high temperature applications, having strong resistance of oxidation, hydrogen embrittlement and corrosion. Stress corrosion cracking(SCC) is the main corrosion failure mode for 310S stainless steel. Past researched about SCC of 310S primarily focus on the corrosion mechanism and influence of temperature and corrosive media, but few studies concern the combined influence of temperature, pressure and chloride. For a better understanding of temperature and pressure's effects on SCC of 310S stainless steel, prepared samples are investigated via slow strain rate tensile test(SSRT) in different temperature and pressure in NACE A solution. The result shows that the SCC sensibility indexes of 310S stainless steel increase with the rise of temperature and reach maximum at 10MPa and 160°C, increasing by 22.3% compared with that at 10 MPa and 80 °C. Instead, the sensibility decreases with the pressure up. Besides, the fractures begin to transform from the ductile fracture to the brittle fracture with the increase of temperature. 310S stainless steel has an obvious tendency of stress corrosion at 10MPa and 160°C and the fracture surface exists cleavage steps, river patterns and some local secondary cracks, having obvious brittle fracture characteristics. The SCC cracks initiate from inclusions and tiny pits in the matrix and propagate into the matrix along the cross section gradually until rupture. In particular, the oxygen and chloride play an important role on the SCC of 310S stainless steel in NACE A solution. The chloride damages passivating film, causing pitting corrosion, concentrating in the cracks and accelerated SSC ultimately. The research reveals the combined influence of temperature, pressure and chloride on the SCC of 310S, which can be a guide to the application of 310S stainless steel in super-heater tube.