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Sample records for enzootic pneumonia respiratory

  1. A successful national control programme for enzootic respiratory diseases in pigs in Switzerland.

    PubMed

    Stärk, K D C; Miserez, R; Siegmann, S; Ochs, H; Infanger, P; Schmidt, J

    2007-12-01

    Before the start of systematic disease control, respiratory diseases in swine in Switzerland caused estimated losses of several million euros per year. In 1993, a national programme to control enzootic respiratory diseases in pigs was proposed, with the aim of reducing the incidence of clinical cases to less than 1%. Enzootic pneumonia (EP) caused by Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae and clinical cases of pleuropneumonia caused by any serotype of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae (APP) would be targeted, in addition to any cases with serological evidence of APP serotype 2. This control programme was initiated in 1996, region by region, and fully implemented by 2004. Clinical, epidemiological and laboratory test results were used to identify the appropriate disease control measures. Partial depopulation was used to control EP on breeding and breeding-finishing farms. Total depopulation was implemented on all farms affected with APP and finishing farms affected with EP Animal trade was strictly regulated during the programme and all suspected cases of respiratory disease in pigs were made notifiable. Continued monitoring is based on clinical suspicion of infection and/or the detection of gross pathological lesions at slaughter, followed by laboratory confirmation. In 2005, the incidence of clinical cases was less than 1%. Regulations have been introduced to control the international trade in live pigs and prevent the re-introduction of respiratory diseases into Switzerland.

  2. Use of tylvalosin in the control of porcine enzootic pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Pallarés, F. J.; Lasa, C.; Roozen, M.; Ramis, G.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this study was to investigate the efficacy of tylvalosin (Aivlosin Water Soluble Granules, ECO Animal Health) in drinking water for control of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae (M hyo) on a farm with chronic enzootic pneumonia (EP) problems and high prevalence of mycoplasma-like lesions at slaughter. Design On a 4000-sow farm in the southeast of Spain, 1500 animals of same age were randomly divided into two groups: 900 pigs in the treated group (TG) and 600 pigs in the non-treated control group (CG). TG was medicated for seven days with tylvalosin in drinking water (2.5 mg tylvalosin/kg bodyweight (BW)) at weaning (from 21st to 28th day of life) and a second treatment when moved to finisher barn (from 63rd to 70th day of life). Results In the TG, there was a significant reduction in the severity (P<0.001) and number of animals with lung lesions (P<0.001) compared with CG. TG had an increased average daily gain and decreased average number of days in finishing. TG had a lower average carcase weight, but improved homogeneity. M hyo was not detected by q-PCR in samples, taken from lungs with characteristic EP lesions in the TG (0/9), in contrast to the CG (8/9 positive). Conclusions A strategic medication with Aivlosin at 2.5 mg tylvalosin/kg BW in drinking water for seven days at weaning and when moved to finisher barn significantly reduces mycoplasma-like lung lesions and improves productivity parameters. PMID:26392896

  3. Molecular epidemiology of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae from outbreaks of enzootic pneumonia in domestic pig and the role of wild boar.

    PubMed

    Kuhnert, Peter; Overesch, Gudrun

    2014-11-07

    Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae is the major cause of enzootic pneumonia (EP) in domestic pigs, a disease with low mortality but high morbidity, having a great economic impact for producers. In Switzerland EP has been successfully eradicated, however, sporadic outbreaks are observed with no obvious source. Besides the possibility of recurrent outbreaks due to persisting M. hyopneumoniae strains within the pig population, there is suspicion that wild boars might introduce M. hyopneumoniae into swine herds. To elucidate possible links between domestic pig and wild boar, epidemiological investigations of recent EP outbreaks were initiated and lung samples of pig and wild boar were tested for the presence of specific genotypes by multilocus sequence typing (MLST). Despite generally different genotypes in wild boar, outbreak strains could be found in geographically linked wild boar lungs after, but so far not before the outbreak. Recurrent outbreaks in a farm were due to the same strain, indicating unsuccessful sanitation rather than reintroduction by wild boar. In another case outbreaks in six different farms were caused by the same strain never found in wild boar, confirming spread between farms due to hypothesized animal transport. Results indicate the presence of identical lineages of wild boar and domestic pig strains, and possible transmission of M. hyopneumoniae between wild boar and pig. However, the role of wild boar might be rather one as a recipient than a transmitter. More important than contact to wild boar for sporadic outbreaks in Switzerland is apparently persistence of M. hyopneumoniae within a farm as well as transmission between farms.

  4. Chlamydia pneumoniae respiratory infection after allogeneic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Geisler, William M; Corey, Lawrence

    2002-03-27

    Chlamydia pneumoniae is a common cause of upper and lower respiratory tract infections in immunocompetent patients; however, its role as a respiratory pathogen in immunocompromised hosts has been infrequently recognized. We describe C. pneumoniae lower respiratory tract infection in a 19-year-old male after allogeneic stem cell transplantation. The patient developed fever on day +14, and a subsequent computed tomography scan of the chest revealed a right lateral pleural-based opacity, which was then resected during thoracoscopy. Diagnosis was made by culture and staining of the resected tissue with C. pneumoniae-specific monoclonal antibodies, and azithromycin was administered. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of C. pneumoniae respiratory infection after stem cell or marrow transplantation. C. pneumoniae often coexists with other etiologic agents of pneumonia in immunocompromised patients. Considering the infrequency of infections from this organism in this clinical setting, one must still rule out other more likely respiratory pathogens.

  5. Respiratory syncytial virus infection in cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bovine respiratory syncytial virus (bRSV) is a cause of respiratory disease in cattle world-wide. It has an integral role in enzootic pneumonia in young dairy calves and summer pneumonia in nursing beef calves. Furthermore, bRSV infection can predispose calves to secondary bacterial infection by org...

  6. [Importance of Chlamydia pneumoniae as a new respiratory pathogen].

    PubMed

    Bartolomé, C; Mata, M; Bernárdez, I

    1996-03-01

    The incidence of Chlamydia pneumoniae as a cause of respiratory tract infection was evaluated in a one-year prospective study in 142 patients with community-acquired pneumonia. An indirect immunofluorescence method which detects antibodies in acute and convalescent serum samples was used. Serological evidence of current infection was a four-fold rise in IgG antibody titer or a positive IgM fraction. C. pneumoniae was the causative pathogen in nine patients. This result is similar to those obtained in other studies and suggests that C. pneumoniae is a common etiological agent of community-acquired pneumonia in the studied area.

  7. Neonatal calf infection with respiratory syncytial virus: drawing parallels to the disease in human infants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the most common viral cause of childhood acute lower respiratory tract infections. It is estimated that RSV infections result in more than 100,000 deaths annually worldwide. Bovine RSV is a cause of enzootic pneumonia in young dairy calves and summer pneumonia ...

  8. Modulation of respiratory dendritic cells during Klebsiella pneumonia infection

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Klebsiella pneumoniae is a leading cause of severe hospital-acquired respiratory tract infections and death but little is known regarding the modulation of respiratory dendritic cell (DC) subsets. Plasmacytoid DC (pDC) are specialized type 1 interferon producing cells and considered to be classical mediators of antiviral immunity. Method By using multiparameter flow cytometry analysis we have analysed the modulation of respiratory DC subsets after intratracheal Klebsiella pneumonia infection. Results Data indicate that pDCs and MoDC were markedly elevated in the post acute pneumonia phase when compared to mock-infected controls. Analysis of draining mediastinal lymph nodes revealed a rapid increase of activated CD103+ DC, CD11b+ DC and MoDC within 48 h post infection. Lung pDC identification during bacterial pneumonia was confirmed by extended phenotyping for 120G8, mPDCA-1 and Siglec-H expression and by demonstration of high Interferon-alpha producing capacity after cell sorting. Cytokine expression analysis of ex vivo-sorted respiratory DC subpopulations from infected animals revealed elevated Interferon-alpha in pDC, elevated IFN-gamma, IL-4 and IL-13 in CD103+ DC and IL-19 and IL-12p35 in CD11b+ DC subsets in comparison to CD11c+ MHC-class IIlow cells indicating distinct functional roles. Antigen-specific naive CD4+ T cell stimulatory capacity of purified respiratory DC subsets was analysed in a model system with purified ovalbumin T cell receptor transgenic naive CD4+ responder T cells and respiratory DC subsets, pulsed with ovalbumin and matured with Klebsiella pneumoniae lysate. CD103+ DC and CD11b+ DC subsets represented the most potent naive CD4+ T helper cell activators. Conclusion These results provide novel insight into the activation of respiratory DC subsets during Klebsiella pneumonia infection. The detection of increased respiratory pDC numbers in bacterial pneumonia may indicate possible novel pDC functions with respect to lung repair

  9. Dysbiosis of upper respiratory tract microbiota in elderly pneumonia patients.

    PubMed

    de Steenhuijsen Piters, Wouter A A; Huijskens, Elisabeth G W; Wyllie, Anne L; Biesbroek, Giske; van den Bergh, Menno R; Veenhoven, Reinier H; Wang, Xinhui; Trzciński, Krzysztof; Bonten, Marc J; Rossen, John W A; Sanders, Elisabeth A M; Bogaert, Debby

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial pneumonia is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in elderly. We hypothesize that dysbiosis between regular residents of the upper respiratory tract (URT) microbiome, that is balance between commensals and potential pathogens, is involved in pathogen overgrowth and consequently disease. We compared oropharyngeal microbiota of elderly pneumonia patients (n=100) with healthy elderly (n=91) by 16S-rRNA-based sequencing and verified our findings in young adult pneumonia patients (n=27) and young healthy adults (n=187). Microbiota profiles differed significantly between elderly pneumonia patients and healthy elderly (PERMANOVA, P<0.0005). Highly similar differences were observed between microbiota profiles of young adult pneumonia patients and their healthy controls. Clustering resulted in 11 (sub)clusters including 95% (386/405) of samples. We observed three microbiota profiles strongly associated with pneumonia (P<0.05) and either dominated by lactobacilli (n=11), Rothia (n=51) or Streptococcus (pseudo)pneumoniae (n=42). In contrast, three other microbiota clusters (in total n=183) were correlated with health (P<0.05) and were all characterized by more diverse profiles containing higher abundances of especially Prevotella melaninogenica, Veillonella and Leptotrichia. For the remaining clusters (n=99), the association with health or disease was less clear. A decision tree model based on the relative abundance of five bacterial community members in URT microbiota showed high specificity of 95% and sensitivity of 84% (89% and 73%, respectively, after cross-validation) for differentiating pneumonia patients from healthy individuals. These results suggest that pneumonia in elderly and young adults is associated with dysbiosis of the URT microbiome with bacterial overgrowth of single species and absence of distinct anaerobic bacteria. Whether the observed microbiome changes are a cause or a consequence of the development of pneumonia or merely coincide with

  10. Dysbiosis of upper respiratory tract microbiota in elderly pneumonia patients

    PubMed Central

    de Steenhuijsen Piters, Wouter A A; Huijskens, Elisabeth G W; Wyllie, Anne L; Biesbroek, Giske; van den Bergh, Menno R; Veenhoven, Reinier H; Wang, Xinhui; Trzciński, Krzysztof; Bonten, Marc J; Rossen, John W A; Sanders, Elisabeth A M; Bogaert, Debby

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial pneumonia is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in elderly. We hypothesize that dysbiosis between regular residents of the upper respiratory tract (URT) microbiome, that is balance between commensals and potential pathogens, is involved in pathogen overgrowth and consequently disease. We compared oropharyngeal microbiota of elderly pneumonia patients (n=100) with healthy elderly (n=91) by 16S-rRNA-based sequencing and verified our findings in young adult pneumonia patients (n=27) and young healthy adults (n=187). Microbiota profiles differed significantly between elderly pneumonia patients and healthy elderly (PERMANOVA, P<0.0005). Highly similar differences were observed between microbiota profiles of young adult pneumonia patients and their healthy controls. Clustering resulted in 11 (sub)clusters including 95% (386/405) of samples. We observed three microbiota profiles strongly associated with pneumonia (P<0.05) and either dominated by lactobacilli (n=11), Rothia (n=51) or Streptococcus (pseudo)pneumoniae (n=42). In contrast, three other microbiota clusters (in total n=183) were correlated with health (P<0.05) and were all characterized by more diverse profiles containing higher abundances of especially Prevotella melaninogenica, Veillonella and Leptotrichia. For the remaining clusters (n=99), the association with health or disease was less clear. A decision tree model based on the relative abundance of five bacterial community members in URT microbiota showed high specificity of 95% and sensitivity of 84% (89% and 73%, respectively, after cross-validation) for differentiating pneumonia patients from healthy individuals. These results suggest that pneumonia in elderly and young adults is associated with dysbiosis of the URT microbiome with bacterial overgrowth of single species and absence of distinct anaerobic bacteria. Whether the observed microbiome changes are a cause or a consequence of the development of pneumonia or merely coincide with

  11. Herd-level risk factors for the seropositivity to Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae and the occurrence of enzootic pneumonia among fattening pigs in areas of endemic infection and high pig density.

    PubMed

    Nathues, H; Chang, Y M; Wieland, B; Rechter, G; Spergser, J; Rosengarten, R; Kreienbrock, L; Grosse Beilage, E

    2014-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to identify potential risk factors for the occurrence of enzootic pneumonia (EP) in herds situated in a region of high pig density, where a majority of herds is endemically infected with Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae. Between 2006 and 2010, overall 100 herds were enrolled in a case-control study. Data were collected through personal interview with the farmers, clinical examination of pigs and their environments, and serological testing for M. hyopneumoniae, swine influenza virus and porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus. There were 40 case herds (coughing index high, seroprevalence high) with a mean coughing index of 4.3 and a seroprevalence of 86.6%. There were two control groups. Control group I consisted of 25 herds (coughing index low, seroprevalence low) with mean values of 0.7 and 11.2%, and 35 herds were allocated to control group II (coughing index low, seroprevalence high) where the mean coughing index was 0.9 and seroprevalence 86.3%. Case herds and control II herds had an increased age of piglets at weaning compared to control I herds. Any contact between fattening pigs of different age during restocking of compartments increased the risk for the occurrence of EP in a herd. Finally, farms that use living animals for the exposure to gilts during the acclimatization and farms that had increased number of weaned piglets per sow and year were less likely to test positive for M. hyopneumoniae and less likely to develop clinical symptoms of EP in fattening pigs.

  12. Immune responses elicited by Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae recombinant antigens and DNA constructs with potential for use in vaccination against porcine enzootic pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Virginio, Veridiana Gomes; Gonchoroski, Taylor; Paes, Jéssica Andrade; Schuck, Desirée Cigaran; Zaha, Arnaldo; Ferreira, Henrique Bunselmeyer

    2014-10-07

    Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae is the etiological agent of porcine enzootic pneumonia (PEP) and causes major economic losses to the pig industry worldwide. Commercially available vaccines provide only partial protection and are relatively expensive. In this study, we assessed the humoral and cellular immune responses to three recombinant antigens of M. hyopneumoniae. Immune responses to selected domains of the P46, HSP70 and MnuA antigens (P46102-253, HSP70212-601 and MnuA182-378), delivered as recombinant subunit or DNA vaccines, were evaluated in BALB/c mice. All purified recombinant antigens and two DNA vaccines, pcDNA3.1(+)/HSP70212-601 and pcDNA3.1(+)/MnuA182-378, elicited a strong humoral immune response, indicated by high IgG levels in the serum. The cellular immune response was assessed by detection of IFN-γ, IL-10 and IL-4 in splenocyte culture supernatants. The recombinant subunit and DNA vaccines induced Th1-polarized immune responses, as evidenced by increased levels of IFN-γ. All recombinant subunit vaccines and the pcDNA3.1(+)/MnuA182-378 vaccine also induced the secretion of IL-10, a Th2-type cytokine, in large quantities. The mixed Th1/Th2-type response may elicit an effective immune response against M. hyopneumoniae, suggesting that P46102-253, HSP70212-601 and MnuA182-378 are potential novel and promising targets for the development of vaccines against PEP.

  13. [Emergence of new pneumonia: besides severe acute respiratory syndrome].

    PubMed

    Mangiarotti, P; Pozzi, E

    2006-10-01

    Important epidemiological modifications have been registered in respiratory infections, both in immunocompetent and immunocompromised hosts. Pathogens with modified antibiotic susceptibility patterns have emerged, which display an increased antibiotic resistance, such as S. pneumoniae, S. aureus, H. influenzae. This trait has a strong impact on the therapeutic choices, particularly when an empiric antibiotic treatment is selected. The prevalence of bacterial species showing non-susceptibility to the most common prescribed antibiotics (betalactams, macrolides etc.) follows a different geographic distribution. Some pathogens have acquired a new epidemiological role in patients affected with immune deficiencies: among them P. carinii and other bacterial, fungal and viral pathogens. The emergence of new, previously unknown, species, has been registered, both bacteria (C. pneumoniae) and viruses (Metapneumovirus, Hantavirus etc.). Such aspects must be considered in the diagnosis of respiratory infections, which should include diagnostic tests for the identification of such pathogens. Among the new respiratory infections severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) has quickly become a health care emergency, so that efforts have been made to identify the aetiological agent as well as the main epidemiological and clinical characteristics of the disease. Avian influenza has raised great interest immediately after the first cases of human infection caused by the avian virus, especially after the outbreaks in Asian countries and in the Netherlands. A crucial step in containing infection is the prevention of the disease; efforts are directed toward this endpoint.

  14. Effect of Streptococcus pneumoniae on human respiratory epithelium in vitro.

    PubMed

    Steinfort, C; Wilson, R; Mitchell, T; Feldman, C; Rutman, A; Todd, H; Sykes, D; Walker, J; Saunders, K; Andrew, P W

    1989-07-01

    A total of 11 of 15 Streptococcus pneumoniae culture filtrates and all five bacterial autolysates produced by cell death in the stationary phase caused slowed ciliary beating and disruption of the surface integrity of human respiratory epithelium in organ culture. This effect was inhibited by cholesterol and was heat labile and reduced by standing at room temperature but was stable at -40 degrees C. The activity was detected at the late stationary phase of culture and was associated with the presence of hemolytic activity. Gel filtration of a concentrated culture filtrate and autolysate both yielded a single fraction of approximately 50 kilodaltons which slowed ciliary beating and were the only fractions with hemolytic activity. Rabbit antiserum to pneumolysin, a sulfhydryl-activated hemolytic cytotoxin released by S. pneumoniae during autolysis, neutralized the effect of the culture filtrate on respiratory epithelium. Both native and recombinant pneumolysin caused ciliary slowing and epithelial disruption. Electron microscopy showed a toxic effect of pneumolysin on epithelial cells: cytoplasmic blebs, mitochondrial swelling, cellular extrusion, and cell death, but no change in ciliary ultrastructure. Recombinant pneumolysin (10 micrograms/ml) caused ciliary slowing in the absence of changes in cell ultrastructure. Release of pneumolysin in the respiratory tract during infection may perturb host defenses, allowing bacterial proliferation and spread.

  15. High Prevalence of Mycoplasma pneumoniae and Chlamydia pneumoniae in Children with Acute Respiratory Infections from Lima, Peru

    PubMed Central

    del Valle-Mendoza, Juana; Orellana-Peralta, Fiorella; Marcelo-Rodríguez, Alvaro; Verne, Eduardo; Esquivel-Vizcarra, Mónica; Silva-Caso, Wilmer; Aguilar-Luis, Miguel Angel; Weilg, Pablo; Casabona-Oré, Verónica; Ugarte, Claudia; del Valle, Luis J.

    2017-01-01

    Background Mycoplasma pneumoniae and Chlamydia pneumoniae are atypical pathogens responsible for pneumonia and a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in low income countries. The study objective is to determine the prevalence of this pathogens in Peruvian children with acute respiratory infections. Methods A consecutive cross-sectional study was conducted in Lima, Peru from May 2009 to September 2010. A total of 675 children admitted with clinical diagnoses of acute respiratory infections were tested for Mycoplasma pneumoniae and Chlamydia pneumoniae detection by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and clinical symptoms were registered by the attending physician. Results Mycoplasma pneumonia was detected in 25.19% (170/675) of nasopharyngeal samples and Chlamydia pneumonia in 10.52% (71/675). The most common symptoms in patients with these atypical pathogens were rhinorrhea, cough and fever. A higher prevalence of Mycoplasma pneumoniae cases were registered in summer, between December 2009 and March 2010. Conclusions Mycoplasma pneumoniae and Chlamydia pneumonia are a significant cause of morbidity in Peruvian children with acute respiratory infections (ARI). Further studies should evaluate the use of reliable techniques such as PCR in Peru in order to avoid underdiagnoses of these atypical pathogens. PMID:28129377

  16. Contribution of viruses, Chlamydia spp. and Mycoplasma pneumoniae to acute respiratory infections in Iranian children.

    PubMed

    Naghipour, Mohammadreza; Cuevas, Luis E; Bakhshinejad, Tahereh; Mansour-Ghanaei, Fariborz; Noursalehi, Smaeil; Alavy, Ali; Dove, Winifred; Hart, Charles Anthony

    2007-06-01

    The study reports the frequency and clinical presentation of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), human metapneumovirus, influenza (Inf V), parainfluenza, adenovirus (Adv), Chlamydia spp. and Mycoplasma pneumoniae in children with acute respiratory infections (ARI) in Rasht, Iran. Nasopharyngeal aspirates and swabs were collected from 261 children in 2003 and 2004. Pathogens were detected using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR), confirmed with sequence analysis. Ninety-three pathogens were detected in 83 children. RSV was present in 39 (15%), Adv in 37 (14%), Inf A in 11 (4%), C. trachomatis in 4 (2%) and M. pneumoniae, in 2 (1%) children. Neither parainfluenza nor metapneumovirus were detected. RSV, Inf A and C. trachomatis were more frequent in children with lower respiratory infections. Adv presented more frequently as upper respiratory infection. All pathogens, except M. pneumoniae, were detected in children with severe pneumonia. Viruses play a significant role in Iranian children with community-acquired ARI.

  17. Mycoplasmal Pneumonia and Adult Respiratory Distress Syndrome: A Complication to be Recognized

    PubMed Central

    Dixon, Calvin

    1981-01-01

    Mycoplasma pneumoniae pneumonia is usually a mild, self-limited disease. Complications are rare. A patient is presented with adult respiratory distress syndrome. Recognition of this unusual complication, presenting as a common disease syndrome, is emphasized. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2 PMID:7241615

  18. Review of Non-Bacterial Infections in Respiratory Medicine: Viral Pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Galván, José María; Rajas, Olga; Aspa, Javier

    2015-11-01

    Although bacteria are the main pathogens involved in community-acquired pneumonia, a significant number of community-acquired pneumonia are caused by viruses, either directly or as part of a co-infection. The clinical picture of these different pneumonias can be very similar, but viral infection is more common in the pediatric and geriatric populations, leukocytes are not generally elevated, fever is variable, and upper respiratory tract symptoms often occur; procalcitonin levels are not generally affected. For years, the diagnosis of viral pneumonia was based on cell culture and antigen detection, but since the introduction of polymerase chain reaction techniques in the clinical setting, identification of these pathogens has increased and new microorganisms such as human bocavirus have been discovered. In general, influenza virus type A and syncytial respiratory virus are still the main pathogens involved in this entity. However, in recent years, outbreaks of deadly coronavirus and zoonotic influenza virus have demonstrated the need for constant alert in the face of new emerging pathogens. Neuraminidase inhibitors for viral pneumonia have been shown to reduce transmission in cases of exposure and to improve the clinical progress of patients in intensive care; their use in common infections is not recommended. Ribavirin has been used in children with syncytial respiratory virus, and in immunosuppressed subjects. Apart from these drugs, no antiviral has been shown to be effective. Prevention with anti-influenza virus vaccination and with monoclonal antibodies, in the case of syncytial respiratory virus, may reduce the incidence of pneumonia.

  19. A preliminary study on the potential of Mycoplasma pneumoniae to induce dyskaryotic change in respiratory epithelium in adult community-acquired pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    An, Shu-Chang; Yang, Dong-Hong; Luo, Chao-Feng; Chen, Xin; Liu, Guo-Tian; Weng, Yan; Liu, Jing-Zhe; Shang, Ying; Wang, Rui-Qin; Gao, Zhan-Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Background: This study aimed to explore the cellular morphology of respiratory epithelium in Mycoplasma pneumonia (MpP) patients. Materials and Methods: The cast-off cell morphological findings from bronchoscopic brushings in MpP and community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) caused by typical pathogens were reviewed. Results: Compared with the CAP group, cellular dysplasia in respiratory tract epithelial brushings was significantly greater in MpP patients (P = 0.033). Conclusion: Unique biological characteristics and mechanisms of pathogenesis of Mycoplasma pneumoniae (Mp) may result in dyskaryotic changes in respiratory epithelium in adult MpP. PMID:28163727

  20. Investigating the role of free-ranging wild boar (Sus scrofa) in the re-emergence of enzootic pneumonia in domestic pig herds: a pathological, prevalence and risk-factor study.

    PubMed

    Batista Linhares, Mainity; Belloy, Luc; Origgi, Francesco C; Lechner, Isabel; Segner, Helmut; Ryser-Degiorgis, Marie-Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Enzootic pneumonia (EP) caused by Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae has a significant economic impact on domestic pig production. A control program carried out from 1999 to 2003 successfully reduced disease occurrence in domestic pigs in Switzerland, but recurrent outbreaks suggested a potential role of free-ranging wild boar (Sus scrofa) as a source of re-infection. Since little is known on the epidemiology of EP in wild boar populations, our aims were: (1) to estimate the prevalence of M. hyopneumoniae infections in wild boar in Switzerland; (2) to identify risk factors for infection in wild boar; and (3) to assess whether infection in wild boar is associated with the same gross and microscopic lesions typical of EP in domestic pigs. Nasal swabs, bronchial swabs and lung samples were collected from 978 wild boar from five study areas in Switzerland between October 2011 and May 2013. Swabs were analyzed by qualitative real time PCR and a histopathological study was conducted on lung tissues. Risk factor analysis was performed using multivariable logistic regression modeling. Overall prevalence in nasal swabs was 26.2% (95% CI 23.3-29.3%) but significant geographical differences were observed. Wild boar density, occurrence of EP outbreaks in domestic pigs and young age were identified as risk factors for infection. There was a significant association between infection and lesions consistent with EP in domestic pigs. We have concluded that M. hyopneumoniae is widespread in the Swiss wild boar population, that the same risk factors for infection of domestic pigs also act as risk factors for infection of wild boar, and that infected wild boar develop lesions similar to those found in domestic pigs. However, based on our data and the outbreak pattern in domestic pigs, we propose that spillover from domestic pigs to wild boar is more likely than transmission from wild boar to pigs.

  1. Investigating the Role of Free-Ranging Wild Boar (Sus scrofa) in the Re-Emergence of Enzootic Pneumonia in Domestic Pig Herds: A Pathological, Prevalence and Risk-Factor Study

    PubMed Central

    Batista Linhares, Mainity; Belloy, Luc; Origgi, Francesco C.; Lechner, Isabel; Segner, Helmut; Ryser-Degiorgis, Marie-Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Enzootic pneumonia (EP) caused by Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae has a significant economic impact on domestic pig production. A control program carried out from 1999 to 2003 successfully reduced disease occurrence in domestic pigs in Switzerland, but recurrent outbreaks suggested a potential role of free-ranging wild boar (Sus scrofa) as a source of re-infection. Since little is known on the epidemiology of EP in wild boar populations, our aims were: (1) to estimate the prevalence of M. hyopneumoniae infections in wild boar in Switzerland; (2) to identify risk factors for infection in wild boar; and (3) to assess whether infection in wild boar is associated with the same gross and microscopic lesions typical of EP in domestic pigs. Nasal swabs, bronchial swabs and lung samples were collected from 978 wild boar from five study areas in Switzerland between October 2011 and May 2013. Swabs were analyzed by qualitative real time PCR and a histopathological study was conducted on lung tissues. Risk factor analysis was performed using multivariable logistic regression modeling. Overall prevalence in nasal swabs was 26.2% (95% CI 23.3–29.3%) but significant geographical differences were observed. Wild boar density, occurrence of EP outbreaks in domestic pigs and young age were identified as risk factors for infection. There was a significant association between infection and lesions consistent with EP in domestic pigs. We have concluded that M. hyopneumoniae is widespread in the Swiss wild boar population, that the same risk factors for infection of domestic pigs also act as risk factors for infection of wild boar, and that infected wild boar develop lesions similar to those found in domestic pigs. However, based on our data and the outbreak pattern in domestic pigs, we propose that spillover from domestic pigs to wild boar is more likely than transmission from wild boar to pigs. PMID:25747151

  2. Serological diagnosis of enzootic pneumonia of swine by a double-sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay using a monoclonal antibody and recombinant antigen (P46) of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Okada, Munenori; Asai, Tetsuo; Futo, Satoshi; Mori, Yasuyuki; Mukai, Tetsuya; Yazawa, Shigeto; Uto, Takehiko; Shibata, Isao; Sato, Shizuo

    2005-02-25

    To facilitate the control of enzootic pneumonia (EP) of swine caused by Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae, the complement fixation (CF) test has been used for the detection of M. hyopneumoniae antibodies. However, the CF test is a cumbersome and time-consuming technique and cross-reactivity are major drawbacks associated with this method. To circumvent these drawbacks, we have developed a double-sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), consisting of purified monoclonal antibody (Mab) against the 46 kDa surface antigen (P46) of M. hyopneumoniae and recombinant P46 protein expressed in Escherichia coli, for the detection of antibodies to M. hyopneumoniae in serum samples from pigs experimentally inoculated with M. hyopneumoniae and from naturally infected pigs, and compared the practical usefulness of ELISA using the CF test. In experimentally inoculated pigs, the CF and ELISA antibodies were detected at almost the same time, and a good correlation was demonstrated between the CF test and the ELISA. In a survey conducted on field samples, the seropositivity by ELISA in pigs of age 2-6 months was increased. At the time of slaughter, approximately 80% of the animals were seropositive for ELISA. However, a gradual decrease in the prevalence of ELISA positive samples was observed in sows with increasing parity. No correlation was seen between the results obtained with the two methods in the clinical samples. The CF test appears to have limited value for the diagnosis of EP in conventional herds because nonspecific reactions were frequently observed. Therefore, this ELISA is a useful alternative to the CF test currently used for the diagnosis of EP.

  3. Detection of Common Respiratory Viruses and Mycoplasma pneumoniae in Patient-Occupied Rooms in Pediatric Wards

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Gwo-Hwa; Huang, Chung-Guei; Chung, Fen-Fang; Lin, Tzou-Yien; Tsao, Kuo-Chien; Huang, Yhu-Chering

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Few studies have assessed viral contamination in the rooms of hospital wards. This cross-sectional study evaluated the air and objects in patient-occupied rooms in pediatric wards for the presence of common respiratory viruses and Mycoplasma pneumoniae. Air samplers were placed at a short (60–80 cm) and long (320 cm) distance from the head of the beds of 58 pediatric patients, who were subsequently confirmed to be infected with enterovirus (n = 17), respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) (n = 13), influenza A virus (n = 13), adenovirus (n = 9), or M pneumoniae (n = 6). Swab samples were collected from the surfaces of 5 different types of objects in the patients’ rooms. All air and swab samples were analyzed via real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction assay for the presence of the above pathogens. All pathogens except enterovirus were detected in the air, on the objects, or in both locations in the patients’ rooms. The detection rates of influenza A virus, adenovirus, and M pneumoniae for the long distance air sampling were 15%, 67%, and 17%, respectively. Both adenovirus and M pneumoniae were detected at very high rates, with high concentrations, on all sampled objects. The respiratory pathogens RSV, influenza A virus, adenovirus, and M pneumoniae were detected in the air and/or on the objects in the pediatric ward rooms. Appropriate infection control measures should be strictly implemented when caring for such patients. PMID:27057827

  4. Development of real-time multiplex nucleic acid sequence-based amplification for detection of Mycoplasma pneumoniae, Chlamydophila pneumoniae, and Legionella spp. in respiratory specimens.

    PubMed

    Loens, K; Beck, T; Ursi, D; Overdijk, M; Sillekens, P; Goossens, H; Ieven, M

    2008-01-01

    Real-time multiplex isothermal nucleic acid sequence-based amplification (NASBA) was developed to detect Mycoplasma pneumoniae, Chlamydophila pneumoniae, and Legionella spp. in respiratory specimens using the NucliSens Basic Kit (bioMérieux, Boxtel, The Netherlands). Oligonucleotide primers were derived from the M. pneumoniae, C. pneumoniae, and Legionella pneumophila 16S rRNA. For real-time detection, molecular beacons were used. Specificity was established on a panel of bacterial strains. The analytical sensitivity of the assay was determined by testing dilutions of wild-type in vitro-generated RNA in water and dilutions of reference strains in lysis buffer or added to pools of respiratory specimens. Subsequently, a limited number of M. pneumoniae-, C. pneumoniae-, and L. pneumophila-positive and -negative clinical specimens were analyzed. Specific detection of the 16S rRNA of the three organisms was achieved. The analytical sensitivity of the multiplex NASBA on spiked respiratory specimens was slightly diminished compared to the results obtained with the single-target (mono) real-time assays. We conclude that the proposed real-time multiplex NASBA assay, although less sensitive than the real-time mono NASBA assay, is a promising tool for the detection of M. pneumoniae, C. pneumoniae, and Legionella spp. in respiratory specimens, regarding handling, speed, and number of samples that can be analyzed in a single run.

  5. Role of bibersteinia trehalosi, respiratory syncytial virus, and parainfluenza-3 virus in bighorn sheep pneumonia

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pneumonic bighorn sheep (BHS) have been found to be culture- and/or sero-positive for Bibersteinia trehalosi, respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), and parainfluenza-3 virus (PI-3). The objective of this study was to determine whether these pathogens can cause fatal pneumonia in BHS. In the first study...

  6. Pneumonia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Emergency Room? What Happens in the Operating Room? Pneumonia KidsHealth > For Kids > Pneumonia A A A What's ... it from playing in the rain? What Is Pneumonia? Pneumonia (say: noo-MOW-nyuh) is an infection ...

  7. Pneumonia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Loss Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Pneumonia KidsHealth > For Teens > Pneumonia A A A What's ... having to go to the hospital. What Is Pneumonia? Pneumonia (pronounced: noo-MOW-nyuh) is an infection ...

  8. [A case of Legionella pneumophila pneumonia accompanied by acute respiratory distress syndrome and epilepsy].

    PubMed

    Saito, Nayuta; Shimizu, Kenichiro; Yoshii, Yutaka; Kojima, Jun; Ishikawa, Takeo; Saito, Keisuke; Kuwano, Kazuyoshi

    2013-05-01

    A 32-year-old female with epilepsy presented at our hospital with high-grade fever, seizures, and unconsciousness. She was initially treated for aspiration pneumonia with ampicillin/sulbactam. Despite antibiotic therapy, her chest X-ray findings dramatically worsened, showing extension to the bilateral lung field. Her PaO2/FiO2 ratio decreased to 70.6. Rapid progression of hypoxia, unconsciousness, and hyponatremia led to the suspicion of Legionella pneumonia; however, it was difficult to make a definitive diagnosis because she had denied using a whirlpool spa and the initial urinary Legionella antigen test results were negative. Therefore, we repeated the Legionella urinary antigen test, which was positive. On the basis of these results, sputum polymerase chain reaction findings, and the four-fold elevation of paired antibodies, the patient was diagnosed as having Legionella pneumonia accompanied by acute respiratory distress syndrome. We considered administering fluoroquinolone antibiotics, that are recommended for severe Legionella pneumonia, although quinolones have a potential risk for causing convulsions. In this case, we carefully administered ciprofloxacin. The patient recovered consciousness after treatment without any relapse of epileptic seizures. We also administered a corticosteroid for severe pneumonia with the expectation of clinical improvement and to avoid intubation. We emphasize the importance of aggressive workup and empirical therapy for patients with Legionella pneumonia with rapidly worsening symptoms and clinical features such as unconsciousness, epilepsy, and hyponatremia and in whom fluoroquinolone and corticosteroid therapy are effective despite the presence of epilepsy.

  9. Role of Bibersteinia trehalosi, respiratory syncytial virus, and parainfluenza-3 virus in bighorn sheep pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Dassanayake, Rohana P; Shanthalingam, Sudarvili; Subramaniam, Renuka; Herndon, Caroline N; Bavananthasivam, Jegarubee; Haldorson, Gary J; Foreyt, William J; Evermann, James F; Herrmann-Hoesing, Lynn M; Knowles, Donald P; Srikumaran, Subramaniam

    2013-02-22

    Pneumonic bighorn sheep (BHS) have been found to be culture- and/or sero-positive for Bibersteinia trehalosi, respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), and parainfluenza-3 virus (PI-3). The objective of this study was to determine whether these pathogens can cause fatal pneumonia in BHS. In the first study, two groups of four BHS each were intra-tracheally administered with leukotoxin-positive (Group I) or leukotoxin-negative (Group II) B. trehalosi. All four animals in Group I developed severe pneumonia, and two of them died within 3 days. The other two animals showed severe pneumonic lesions on euthanasia and necropsy. Animals in Group II neither died nor showed gross pneumonic lesions on necropsy, suggesting that leukotoxin-positive, but not leukotoxin-negative, B. trehalosi can cause fatal pneumonia in BHS. In the second study, two other groups of four BHS (Groups III and IV) were intra-nasally administered with a mixture of RSV and PI-3. Four days later, RSV/PI-3-inoculated Group IV and another group of four BHS (Group V, positive control) were intra-nasally administered with Mannheimia haemolytica, the pathogen that consistently causes fatal pneumonia in BHS. All four animals in group III developed pneumonia, but did not die during the study period. However all four animals in Group IV, and three animals in Group V developed severe pneumonia and died within two days of M. haemolytica inoculation. The fourth animal in Group V showed severe pneumonic lesions on euthanasia and necropsy. These findings suggest that RSV/PI-3 can cause non-fatal pneumonia, but are not necessary predisposing agents for M. haemolytica-caused pneumonia of BHS.

  10. Streptococcus pneumoniae Enhances Human Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infection In Vitro and In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, D. Tien; Louwen, Rogier; Elberse, Karin; van Amerongen, Geert; Yüksel, Selma; Luijendijk, Ad; Osterhaus, Albert D. M. E.; Duprex, W. Paul; de Swart, Rik L.

    2015-01-01

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV) and Streptococcus pneumoniae are important causative agents of respiratory tract infections. Both pathogens are associated with seasonal disease outbreaks in the pediatric population, and can often be detected simultaneously in infants hospitalized with bronchiolitis or pneumonia. It has been described that respiratory virus infections may predispose for bacterial superinfections, resulting in severe disease. However, studies on the influence of bacterial colonization of the upper respiratory tract on the pathogenesis of subsequent respiratory virus infections are scarce. Here, we have investigated whether pneumococcal colonization enhances subsequent HRSV infection. We used a newly generated recombinant subgroup B HRSV strain that expresses enhanced green fluorescent protein and pneumococcal isolates obtained from healthy children in disease-relevant in vitro and in vivo model systems. Three pneumococcal strains specifically enhanced in vitro HRSV infection of primary well-differentiated normal human bronchial epithelial cells grown at air-liquid interface, whereas two other strains did not. Since previous studies reported that bacterial neuraminidase enhanced HRSV infection in vitro, we measured pneumococcal neuraminidase activity in these cultures but found no correlation with the observed infection enhancement in our model. Subsequently, a selection of pneumococcal strains was used to induce nasal colonization of cotton rats, the best available small animal model for HRSV. Intranasal HRSV infection three days later resulted in strain-specific enhancement of HRSV replication in vivo. One S. pneumoniae strain enhanced HRSV both in vitro and in vivo, and was also associated with enhanced syncytium formation in vivo. However, neither pneumococci nor HRSV were found to spread from the upper to the lower respiratory tract, and neither pathogen was transmitted to naive cage mates by direct contact. These results demonstrate

  11. Streptococcus pneumoniae Enhances Human Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infection In Vitro and In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, D Tien; Louwen, Rogier; Elberse, Karin; van Amerongen, Geert; Yüksel, Selma; Luijendijk, Ad; Osterhaus, Albert D M E; Duprex, W Paul; de Swart, Rik L

    2015-01-01

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV) and Streptococcus pneumoniae are important causative agents of respiratory tract infections. Both pathogens are associated with seasonal disease outbreaks in the pediatric population, and can often be detected simultaneously in infants hospitalized with bronchiolitis or pneumonia. It has been described that respiratory virus infections may predispose for bacterial superinfections, resulting in severe disease. However, studies on the influence of bacterial colonization of the upper respiratory tract on the pathogenesis of subsequent respiratory virus infections are scarce. Here, we have investigated whether pneumococcal colonization enhances subsequent HRSV infection. We used a newly generated recombinant subgroup B HRSV strain that expresses enhanced green fluorescent protein and pneumococcal isolates obtained from healthy children in disease-relevant in vitro and in vivo model systems. Three pneumococcal strains specifically enhanced in vitro HRSV infection of primary well-differentiated normal human bronchial epithelial cells grown at air-liquid interface, whereas two other strains did not. Since previous studies reported that bacterial neuraminidase enhanced HRSV infection in vitro, we measured pneumococcal neuraminidase activity in these cultures but found no correlation with the observed infection enhancement in our model. Subsequently, a selection of pneumococcal strains was used to induce nasal colonization of cotton rats, the best available small animal model for HRSV. Intranasal HRSV infection three days later resulted in strain-specific enhancement of HRSV replication in vivo. One S. pneumoniae strain enhanced HRSV both in vitro and in vivo, and was also associated with enhanced syncytium formation in vivo. However, neither pneumococci nor HRSV were found to spread from the upper to the lower respiratory tract, and neither pathogen was transmitted to naive cage mates by direct contact. These results demonstrate

  12. Outbreak of acute respiratory disease caused by Mycoplasma pneumoniae on board a deployed U.S. navy ship.

    PubMed

    Sliman, Joseph A; Metzgar, David; Asseff, David C; Coon, Robert G; Faix, Dennis J; Lizewski, Stephen

    2009-12-01

    We identified 179 cases of acute respiratory illness including 50 cases of radiographically confirmed pneumonia over the course of 4 months on a deployed U.S. Navy vessel. Laboratory tests showed Mycoplasma pneumoniae to be the etiological agent. This report represents the first published description of a shipboard outbreak of this pathogen.

  13. Adhesion and invasion of Streptococcus pneumoniae to primary and secondary respiratory epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Novick, Sara; Shagan, Marilous; Blau, Karin; Lifshitz, Sarit; Givon-Lavi, Noga; Grossman, Nili; Bodner, Lipa; Dagan, Ron; Nebenzahl, Yaffa Mizrachi

    2016-01-01

    The interaction between Streptococcus pneumoniae (S. pneumoniae) and the mucosal epithelial cells of its host is a prerequisite for pneumococcal disease development, yet the specificity of this interaction between different respiratory cells is not fully understood. In the present study, three areas were examined: i) The capability of the encapsulated S. pneumoniae serotype 3 strain (WU2) to adhere to and invade primary nasal-derived epithelial cells in comparison to primary oral-derived epithelial cells, A549 adenocarcinoma cells and BEAS-2B viral transformed bronchial cells; ii) the capability of the unencapsulated 3.8DW strain (a WU2 derivative) to adhere to and invade the same cells over time; and iii) the ability of various genetically-unrelated encapsulated and unencapsulated S. pneumoniae strains to adhere to and invade A549 lung epithelial cells. The results of the present study demonstrated that the encapsulated WU2 strain adhesion to and invasion of primary nasal epithelial cells was greatest, followed by BEAS-2B, A549 and primary oral epithelial cells. By contrast, the unencapsulated 3.8-DW strain invaded oral epithelial cells significantly more efficiently when compared to the nasal epithelial cells. In addition, unencapsulated S. pneumoniae strains adhered to and invaded the A459 cells significantly more efficiently than the encapsulated strains; this is consistent with previously published data. In conclusion, the findings presented in the current study indicated that the adhesion and invasion of the WU2 strain to primary nasal epithelial cells was more efficient compared with the other cultured respiratory epithelial cells tested, which corresponds to the natural course of S. pneumoniae infection and disease development. The target cell preference of unencapsulated strains was different from that of the encapsulated strains, which may be due to the exposure of cell wall proteins. PMID:27922699

  14. Microbiological and pathological examination of fatal calf pneumonia cases induced by bacterial and viral respiratory pathogens.

    PubMed

    Szeredi, Levente; Jánosi, Szilárd; Pálfi, Vilmos

    2010-09-01

    The infectious origin of fatal cases of calf pneumonia was studied in 48 calves from 27 different herds on postmortem examination. Lung tissue samples were examined by pathological, histological, bacterial culture, virus isolation and immunohistochemical methods for the detection of viral and bacterial infections. Pneumonia was diagnosed in 47/48 cases and infectious agents were found in 40/47 (85%) of those cases. The presence of multiple respiratory pathogens in 23/40 (57.5%) cases indicated the complex origin of fatal calf pneumonia. The most important respiratory pathogens were Mannheimia-Pasteurella in 36/40 (90%) cases, followed by Arcanobacterium pyogenes in 16/40 (40%) cases, Mycoplasma bovis in 12/40 (30%) cases, and bovine respiratory syncytial virus in 4/40 (10%) cases. Histophilus somni was detected in 2/40 (5%) cases, while bovine herpesvirus-1, bovine viral diarrhoea virus and parainfluenza virus-3 were each found in 1/40 (2.5%) case. Mastadenovirus, bovine coronavirus, influenza A virus or Chlamydiaceae were not detected.

  15. Use of the respiratory fluoroquinolones for the outpatient management of community-acquired pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hans H.

    2004-01-01

    Background Approximately 4 million cases of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) occur in the United States each year, with the majority treated on an outpatient basis. The first fluoroquinolones (eg, ciprofloxacin) were used with caution for respiratory tract infections due to limited in vitro activity against common gram-positive pathogens. With the availability of levofloxacin, followed by gatifloxacin and moxifloxacin hydrochloride, which exhibited increased activity against gram-positive organisms, the fluoroquinolones have become a practical choice for the treatment of CAP. Objective The aim of this review was to compare the respiratory fluoroquinolones in the outpatient management of CAP. Methods We conducted a search for English-language articles (key terms: fluoroquinolone, levofloxacin, gatifloxacin, moxifloxacin, and pneumonia; years: 1996–2004). Data from published literature were reviewed regarding clinical and microbiologic efficacy and tolerability; pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties; and drug costs of levofloxacin, gatifloxacin, and moxifloxacin. Results The 3 fluoroquinolones reviewed showed comparable clinical and microbiologic efficacy for the treatment of CAP. In general, the fluoroquinolones were well tolerated, although some differences have been reported, including higher rates of gastrointestinal and other adverse events for gatifloxacin and moxifloxacin. Gatifloxacin and moxifloxacin exhibited greater in vitro potency than levofloxacin against Streptococcus pneumoniae. However, levofloxacin achieved a higher serum drug concentration than the other agents, allowing similar attainment of pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic targets required for effective treatment. Conclusions The respiratory fluoroquinolones provided appropriate first line treatment in select patients with CAP on the basis of their microbiologic and clinical efficacy and their safety profiles. PMID:24764589

  16. Detection and Characterization of Mycoplasma pneumoniae during an Outbreak of Respiratory Illness at a University

    PubMed Central

    Waller, Jessica L.; Diaz, Maureen H.; Petrone, Brianna L.; Benitez, Alvaro J.; Wolff, Bernard J.; Edison, Laura; Tobin-D'Angelo, Melissa; Moore, Ashley; Martyn, Audrey; Dishman, Hope; Drenzek, Cherie L.; Turner, Kim; Hicks, Lauri A.

    2014-01-01

    An outbreak at a university in Georgia was identified after 83 cases of probable pneumonia were reported among students. Respiratory specimens were obtained from 21 students for the outbreak investigation. The TaqMan array card (TAC), a quantitative PCR (qPCR)-based multipathogen detection technology, was used to initially identify Mycoplasma pneumoniae as the causative agent in this outbreak. TAC demonstrated 100% diagnostic specificity and sensitivity compared to those of the multiplex qPCR assay for this agent. All M. pneumoniae specimens (n = 12) and isolates (n = 10) were found through genetic analysis to be susceptible to macrolide antibiotics. The strain diversity of M. pneumoniae associated with this outbreak setting was identified using a variety of molecular typing procedures, resulting in two P1 genotypes (types 1 [60%] and 2 [40%]) and seven different multilocus variable-number tandem-repeat analysis (MLVA) profiles. Continued molecular typing of this organism, particularly during outbreaks, may enhance the current understanding of the epidemiology of M. pneumoniae and may ultimately lead to a more effective public health response. PMID:24371236

  17. Detection and characterization of Mycoplasma pneumoniae during an outbreak of respiratory illness at a university.

    PubMed

    Waller, Jessica L; Diaz, Maureen H; Petrone, Brianna L; Benitez, Alvaro J; Wolff, Bernard J; Edison, Laura; Tobin-D'Angelo, Melissa; Moore, Ashley; Martyn, Audrey; Dishman, Hope; Drenzek, Cherie L; Turner, Kim; Hicks, Lauri A; Winchell, Jonas M

    2014-03-01

    An outbreak at a university in Georgia was identified after 83 cases of probable pneumonia were reported among students. Respiratory specimens were obtained from 21 students for the outbreak investigation. The TaqMan array card (TAC), a quantitative PCR (qPCR)-based multipathogen detection technology, was used to initially identify Mycoplasma pneumoniae as the causative agent in this outbreak. TAC demonstrated 100% diagnostic specificity and sensitivity compared to those of the multiplex qPCR assay for this agent. All M. pneumoniae specimens (n=12) and isolates (n=10) were found through genetic analysis to be susceptible to macrolide antibiotics. The strain diversity of M. pneumoniae associated with this outbreak setting was identified using a variety of molecular typing procedures, resulting in two P1 genotypes (types 1 [60%] and 2 [40%]) and seven different multilocus variable-number tandem-repeat analysis (MLVA) profiles. Continued molecular typing of this organism, particularly during outbreaks, may enhance the current understanding of the epidemiology of M. pneumoniae and may ultimately lead to a more effective public health response.

  18. [Serotype distribution and antibiotic susceptibilities of Streptococcus pneumoniae causing acute exacerbations and pneumonia in children with chronic respiratory diseases].

    PubMed

    Altınkanat Gelmez, Gülşen; Soysal, Ahmet; Kuzdan, Canan; Karadağ, Bülent; Hasdemir, Ufuk; Bakır, Mustafa; Söyletir, Güner

    2013-10-01

    This study aimed to investigate serotype distribution and antimicrobial resistance of Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates obtained from children with chronic respiratory diseases admitted to hospital with a diagnosis of acute exacerbations between 2008-2010 at Marmara University Hospital, Istanbul, Turkey. Sixty one S.pneumoniae strains isolated from the respiratory samples of patients were studied for erythromycin, clindamycin, tetracyline, trimethoprim-sulphametoxazole (TMP-SMX), vancomycin, levofloxacin susceptibilities by disk diffusion method; MIC values of penicillin and ceftriaxone were determined by E-test (AB Biodisk, Sweden). Results were evaluated according to the CLSI standards. The erythromycin-clindamycin double disc method was applied for the detection of macrolide resistance phenotypes. The presence of macrolide resistance genes, ermB, mef(A)/(E), ermTR were determined by PCR using specific primers for each gene. The serotypes were determined by multiplex PCR using specific primers for 40 different serotypes. According to CLSI criteria, penicillin resistance in S.pneumoniae isolates were found to be 8.2% (5/61) and intermediate resistance rate was 54% (33/61) for oral penicillin. Penicillin resistance were found to be only 1.6% (1/61) for parenteral penicillin. Resistance rates of erythromycin, clindamycin, tetracyline, TMP-SMX were detected as 55.8%, 46%, 47.5% and 67.2%; respectively. No resistance was detected to vancomycin and levofloxacin. Constitutive macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B (cMLSB) phenotype and M phenotype were observed in 82.4% (n= 28) and 17.6% (n= 6) of the macrolide resistant isolates, respectively. Inducible macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B (iMLSB) phenotype was not detected. The macrolid resistance genotypes, ermB, mef(A)/(E), were positive 50% and 14.7%; respectively. Both ermB and mef(A)/(E) genes were detected 35.3% of the macrolid resistant isolates. None of the isolates were positive for ermTR gene. The most

  19. Pneumonia

    MedlinePlus

    ... and is often caused by a tiny microorganism, Mycoplasma pneumoniae (pronounced: my-co-PLAZ-ma noo-MO- ... help the doctor identify the type of pneumonia. Mycoplasma pneumoniae , for example, often causes headaches, sore throats, ...

  20. CPAP, effective respiratory support in patients with AIDS-related Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Prevedoros, H P; Lee, R P; Marriot, D

    1991-11-01

    Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) related Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia (PCP) associated with severe respiratory failure is an increasingly common problem in major centres and is associated with a high mortality in previous and recent studies. Early in the epidemic, alternatives to invasive intensive care treatment were utilized in our institution and found to be successful. When respiratory failure developed, mask CPAP was used instead of intubation and ventilation. A retrospective review of 175 cases of HIV infected patients with confirmed first presentation PCP was undertaken. Treatment with our protocol resulted in an overall hospital mortality of 9%. Those patients who did not require supplemental oxygen or respiratory support had no in-hospital mortality. The group who required supplemental oxygen had a mortality of 10%. If respiratory failure supervened (severe respiratory distress, PaO2 less than 50 mmHg, SaO2 less than 90% on mask oxygen), CPAP was introduced. The mortality in this group was 22%. Only two patients were admitted to the intensive care unit for respiratory support after failure of CPAP. Both patients were intubated and received intermittent positive pressure ventilation (IPPV). Both patients died.

  1. Development of a multiplex real-time PCR assay for detection of Mycoplasma pneumoniae, Chlamydia pneumoniae and mutations associated with macrolide resistance in Mycoplasma pneumoniae from respiratory clinical specimens.

    PubMed

    Nummi, Maaret; Mannonen, Laura; Puolakkainen, Mirja

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to improve detection of Mycoplasma pneumoniae and Chlamydia pneumoniae in clinical specimens by developing a multiplex real-time PCR assay that includes identification of macrolide-resistant M. pneumoniae. Novel assays targeting a M. pneumoniae conserved hypothetical protein gene, M. pneumoniae 23S rRNA gene mutations associated with macrolide resistance and human β-globin gene (an endogenous internal control) were designed and combined with a previously published C. pneumoniae PCR targeting ompA gene. The resulting quadraplex PCR was validated with a panel of clinical specimens supplemented with external quality assessment specimens, simulated specimens and various bacterial and viral strains. The obtained results were compared to those obtained by reference PCRs or confirmed by sequencing (typing of macrolide resistance). The novel multiplex PCR assay was in 100 % agreement with reference PCRs. Four M. pneumoniae strains with macrolide resistance-associated mutations were identified among 42 strains, which comprises 9.5 % of the study material. Amplification of an internal control excluded sample-derived inhibition possibly leading to false-negative reporting. In conclusion, we have developed a resources conserving multiplex real-time PCR assay for simultaneous detection of M. pneumoniae, C. pneumoniae and the most common mutations leading to macrolide resistance in M. pneumoniae. The assay is a widely useful tool for detection of these respiratory pathogens and will also shed light on the occurrence of macrolide resistance in M. pneumoniae.

  2. Pneumonia

    MedlinePlus

    Pneumonia Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff Pneumonia is an infection that inflames the air sacs in one or both lungs. The air sacs may fill with fluid or pus ( ... organisms, including bacteria, viruses and fungi, can cause pneumonia. Pneumonia can range in seriousness from mild to ...

  3. Diagnosis of ventilator-associated respiratory infections (VARI): microbiologic clues for tracheobronchitis (VAT) and pneumonia (VAP).

    PubMed

    Craven, Donald E; Hudcova, Jana; Lei, Yuxiu

    2011-09-01

    Intubated patients are at risk of bacterial colonization and ventilator-associated respiratory infection (VARI). VARI includes tracheobronchitis (VAT) or pneumonia (VAP). VAT and VAP caused by multidrug-resistant (MDR) pathogens are increasing in the United States and Europe. In patients with risk factors for MDR pathogens, empiric antibiotics are often initiated for 48 to 72 hours pending the availability of pathogen identification and antibiotic sensitivity data. Extensive data indicate that early, appropriate antibiotic therapy improves outcomes for patients with VAP. Recognizing and treating VARI may allow earlier appropriate therapy and improved patient outcomes.

  4. Treatment Failure and Mortality amongst Children with Severe Acute Malnutrition Presenting with Cough or Respiratory Difficulty and Radiological Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Chisti, Mohammod Jobayer; Salam, Mohammed Abdus; Bardhan, Pradip Kumar; Faruque, Abu S. G.; Shahid, Abu S. M. S. B.; Shahunja, K. M.; Das, Sumon Kumar; Hossain, Md Iqbal; Ahmed, Tahmeed

    2015-01-01

    Background Appropriate intervention is critical in reducing deaths among under-five, severe acutely malnourished (SAM) children with danger signs of severe pneumonia; however, there is paucity of data on outcome of World Health Organisation (WHO) recommended interventions of SAM children with severe pneumonia. We sought to evaluate outcome of the interventions in such children. Methods We prospectively enrolled SAM children aged 0–59 months, admitted to the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) or Acute Respiratory Infection (ARI) ward of the Dhaka Hospital of the International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh (icddr,b), between April 2011 and June 2012 with cough or respiratory difficulty and radiological pneumonia. All the enrolled children were treated with ampicillin and gentamicin, and micronutrients as recommended by the WHO. Comparison was made among pneumonic children with (n = 111) and without WHO defined danger signs of severe pneumonia (n = 296). The outcomes of interest were treatment failure (if a child required changing of antibiotics) and deaths during hospitalization. Further comparison was also made among those who developed treatment failure and who did not and among the survivors and deaths. Results SAM children with danger signs of severe pneumonia more often experienced treatment failure (58% vs. 20%; p<0.001) and fatal outcome (21% vs. 4%; p<0.001) compared to those without danger signs. Only 6/111 (5.4%) SAM children with danger signs of severe pneumonia and 12/296 (4.0%) without danger signs had bacterial isolates from blood. In log-linear binomial regression analysis, after adjusting for potential confounders, danger signs of severe pneumonia, dehydration, hypocalcaemia, and bacteraemia were independently associated both with treatment failure and deaths in SAM children presenting with cough or respiratory difficulty and radiological pneumonia (p<0.01). Conclusion and Significance The result suggests that SAM children with cough or

  5. Pneumonia Virus of Mice Severe Respiratory Virus Infection in a Natural Host

    PubMed Central

    Rosenberg, Helene F.; Domachowske, Joseph B.

    2008-01-01

    Pneumonia virus of mice (PVM; family Paramyxoviridae, genus Pneumovirus) is a natural mouse pathogen that is closely related to the human and bovine respiratory syncytial viruses. Among the prominent features of this infection, robust replication of PVM takes place in bronchial epithelial cells in response to a minimal virus inoculum. Virus replication in situ results in local production of proinflammatory cytokines (MIP-1α, MIP-2, MCP-1 and IFNγ) and granulocyte recruitment to the lung. If left unchecked, PVM infection and the ensuing inflammatory response ultimately lead to pulmonary edema, respiratory compromise and death. In this review, we consider the recent studies using the PVM model that have provided important insights into the role of the inflammatory response in the pathogenesis of severe respiratory virus infection. We also highlight several works that have elucidated acquired immune responses to this pathogen, including T cell responses and the development of humoral immunity. Finally, we consider several immunomodulatory strategies that have been used successfully to reduce morbidity and mortality when administered to PVM infected, symptomatic mice, and thus hold promise as realistic therapeutic strategies for severe respiratory virus infections in human subjects. PMID:18471897

  6. Pneumonia

    MedlinePlus

    ... or another health care facility such as a nursing home or rehab facility. Pneumonia that affects people in ... You can help prevent pneumonia by following the measures below. Wash your hands often, especially: Before preparing ...

  7. Respiratory microbiota dynamics following Streptococcus pneumoniae acquisition in young and elderly mice.

    PubMed

    Krone, Cassandra L; Biesbroek, Giske; Trzciński, Krzysztof; Sanders, Elisabeth A M; Bogaert, Debby

    2014-04-01

    The upper respiratory tract (URT) is a distinct microbial niche of low-density bacterial communities and, also, a portal of entry for many potential pathogens, including Streptococcus pneumoniae. Thus far, animal models have been used to study the dynamics of and interactions between limited numbers of different species in the URT. Here, we applied a deep sequencing approach to explore, for the first time, the impact of S. pneumoniae acquisition on URT microbiota in a mouse model, as well as potential age-dependent effects. Young-adult and elderly mice were inoculated intranasally with S. pneumoniae, and nasal lavage samples were collected for up to 28 days postcolonization. Bacterial DNA extracted from lavage samples was subjected to barcoded pyrosequencing of the V5-to-V7 hypervariable region of the small-subunit rRNA gene. We observed highly diverse microbial profiles, with the presence overall of 15 phyla and approximately 645 operational taxonomic units (OTUs). We noted differences in the composition of microbiota between young and elderly mice, with a significantly higher abundance of Bacteroidetes in the young mice. The introduction of S. pneumoniae into the URT led to a temporary dominance of pneumococci in the microbiota of all mice, accompanied by a significant decrease in microbial diversity. As mice gradually cleared the colonization, the diversity returned to baseline levels. Diversification was accompanied by an early expansion of Bacteroidetes, Staphylococcus spp., and Lachnospiraceae. Moreover, the Bacteroidetes expansion was significantly greater in young-adult than in elderly mice. In conclusion, we observed differences in URT microbiota composition between naive young-adult and elderly mice that were associated with differences in pneumococcal clearance over time.

  8. [Study of the probable role of the agent of enzootic ovine abortion in infectious human pathology. Preliminary report].

    PubMed

    Gnutov, I N; Erokhina, S G

    1980-01-01

    418 workers were surveyed at a meat-packing plant. The presence of complement-fixing antibodies to the causative agent of enzootic abortion of sheep (EAS) was detected in 59 workers (14.27%), brucellosis in 32 workers (7.64%) and Q fever in 5 workers (1.18%). EAS antibodies were found to reach titers of 1 : 10 to 1 : 40 and higher, changing dynamically. The persons found to be seropositive belonged mainly to the workers of the sausage-making, slaughtering, intestinal, subproduct and skin-salting departments, as well as to the workers of the sanitary slaughter-house. Such diseases as acute respiratory infections, pneumonia, arthralgia, arthritis, and in women inflammatory urogenital infections, as well as spontaneous abortions were more frequent among the workers seropositive to the causative agent of EAS than in the control groups. Enzootic halprovial abortion of sheep was suggested to be potentially dangerous for certain groups of workers at the meat-packing plant, but the results of the survey indicate that further research in the fields of the epidemiology, clinical picture and laboratory diagnostics of infectious pathology in persons having contacts with the animals infected with the causative agent of EAS is necessary.

  9. American Thoracic Society-European Respiratory Society Classification of the Idiopathic Interstitial Pneumonias: Advances in Knowledge since 2002.

    PubMed

    Sverzellati, Nicola; Lynch, David A; Hansell, David M; Johkoh, Takeshi; King, Talmadge E; Travis, William D

    2015-01-01

    In the updated American Thoracic Society-European Respiratory Society classification of the idiopathic interstitial pneumonias (IIPs), the major entities have been preserved and grouped into (a) "chronic fibrosing IIPs" (idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and idiopathic nonspecific interstitial pneumonia), (b) "smoking-related IIPs" (respiratory bronchiolitis-associated interstitial lung disease and desquamative interstitial pneumonia), (c) "acute or subacute IIPs" (cryptogenic organizing pneumonia and acute interstitial pneumonia), and (d) "rare IIPs" (lymphoid interstitial pneumonia and idiopathic pleuroparenchymal fibroelastosis). Furthermore, it has been acknowledged that a final diagnosis is not always achievable, and the category "unclassifiable IIP" has been proposed. The diagnostic interpretation of the IIPs is often challenging because other diseases with a known etiology (most notably, connective tissue disease and hypersensitivity pneumonitis) may show similar morphologic patterns. Indeed, more emphasis has been given to the integration of clinical, computed tomographic (CT), and pathologic findings for multidisciplinary diagnosis. Typical CT-based morphologic patterns are associated with the IIPs, and radiologists play an important role in diagnosis and characterization. Optimal CT quality and a systematic approach are both pivotal for evaluation of IIP. Interobserver variation for the various patterns encountered in the IIPs is an issue. It is important for radiologists to understand the longitudinal behavior of IIPs at serial CT examinations, especially for providing a framework for cases that are unclassifiable or in which a histologic diagnosis cannot be obtained.

  10. What is the role of respiratory viruses in community-acquired pneumonia?: What is the best therapy for influenza and other viral causes of community-acquired pneumonia?

    PubMed

    Pavia, Andrew T

    2013-03-01

    Respiratory viruses have long been appreciated as a cause of community acquired pneumonia (CAP), particularly among children, people with serious medical comorbidities, and military recruits. They are increasingly recognized as a cause of CAP among adults. Polymerase chain reaction-based testing has allowed detection of newer agents and improved the ability to detect such viral infections as influenza virus and rhinovirus. Coinfection with viruses and bacteria is common and it remains challenging to determine which patients have only viral infection as the cause of CAP. Better ways to diagnose viral CAP and to integrate detection into management, and better treatment options for noninfluenza respiratory viral infections are needed.

  11. Titanium dioxide nanoparticles exacerbate pneumonia in respiratory syncytial virus (RSV)-infected mice.

    PubMed

    Hashiguchi, Seiko; Yoshida, Hiroki; Akashi, Toshi; Komemoto, Keiji; Ueda, Tomoyuki; Ikarashi, Yoshiaki; Miyauchi, Aki; Konno, Katsuhiko; Yamanaka, Sayoko; Hirose, Akihiko; Kurokawa, Masahiko; Watanabe, Wataru

    2015-03-01

    To reveal the effects of TiO2 nanoparticles, used in cosmetics and building materials, on the immune response, a respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection mouse model was used. BALB/c mice were exposed once intranasally to TiO2 at 0.5mg/kg and infected intranasally with RSV five days later. The levels of IFN-γ and chemokine CCL5, representative markers of pneumonia, in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluids of RSV-infected mice had increased significantly in TiO2-exposed mice compared with the control on day 5 post-infection, but not in uninfected mice. While pulmonary viral titers were not affected by TiO2 exposure, an increase in the infiltration of lymphocytes into the alveolar septa in lung tissues was observed. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed aggregation of TiO2 nanoparticles near inflammatory cells in the severely affected region. Thus, a single exposure to TiO2 nanoparticles affected the immune system and exacerbated pneumonia in RSV-infected mice.

  12. An official European Respiratory Society/American Thoracic Society research statement: interstitial pneumonia with autoimmune features.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Aryeh; Antoniou, Katerina M; Brown, Kevin K; Cadranel, Jacques; Corte, Tamera J; du Bois, Roland M; Lee, Joyce S; Leslie, Kevin O; Lynch, David A; Matteson, Eric L; Mosca, Marta; Noth, Imre; Richeldi, Luca; Strek, Mary E; Swigris, Jeffrey J; Wells, Athol U; West, Sterling G; Collard, Harold R; Cottin, Vincent

    2015-10-01

    Many patients with an idiopathic interstitial pneumonia (IIP) have clinical features that suggest an underlying autoimmune process but do not meet established criteria for a connective tissue disease (CTD). Researchers have proposed differing criteria and terms to describe these patients, and lack of consensus over nomenclature and classification limits the ability to conduct prospective studies of a uniform cohort.The "European Respiratory Society/American Thoracic Society Task Force on Undifferentiated Forms of Connective Tissue Disease-associated Interstitial Lung Disease" was formed to create consensus regarding the nomenclature and classification criteria for patients with IIP and features of autoimmunity.The task force proposes the term "interstitial pneumonia with autoimmune features" (IPAF) and offers classification criteria organised around the presence of a combination of features from three domains: a clinical domain consisting of specific extra-thoracic features, a serologic domain consisting of specific autoantibodies, and a morphologic domain consisting of specific chest imaging, histopathologic or pulmonary physiologic features.A designation of IPAF should be used to identify individuals with IIP and features suggestive of, but not definitive for, a CTD. With IPAF, a sound platform has been provided from which to launch the requisite future research investigations of a more uniform cohort.

  13. Comprehensive Molecular Testing for Respiratory Pathogens in Community-Acquired Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Gadsby, Naomi J.; Russell, Clark D.; McHugh, Martin P.; Mark, Harriet; Conway Morris, Andrew; Laurenson, Ian F.; Hill, Adam T.; Templeton, Kate E.

    2016-01-01

    Background. The frequent lack of a microbiological diagnosis in community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) impairs pathogen-directed antimicrobial therapy. This study assessed the use of comprehensive multibacterial, multiviral molecular testing, including quantification, in adults hospitalized with CAP. Methods. Clinical and laboratory data were collected for 323 adults with radiologically-confirmed CAP admitted to 2 UK tertiary care hospitals. Sputum (96%) or endotracheal aspirate (4%) specimens were cultured as per routine practice and also tested with fast multiplex real-time polymerase-chain reaction (PCR) assays for 26 respiratory bacteria and viruses. Bacterial loads were also calculated for 8 bacterial pathogens. Appropriate pathogen-directed therapy was retrospectively assessed using national guidelines adapted for local antimicrobial susceptibility patterns. Results. Comprehensive molecular testing of single lower respiratory tract (LRT) specimens achieved pathogen detection in 87% of CAP patients compared with 39% with culture-based methods. Haemophilus influenzae and Streptococcus pneumoniae were the main agents detected, along with a wide variety of typical and atypical pathogens. Viruses were present in 30% of cases; 82% of these were codetections with bacteria. Most (85%) patients had received antimicrobials in the 72 hours before admission. Of these, 78% had a bacterial pathogen detected by PCR but only 32% were culture-positive (P < .0001). Molecular testing had the potential to enable de-escalation in number and/or spectrum of antimicrobials in 77% of patients. Conclusions. Comprehensive molecular testing significantly improves pathogen detection in CAP, particularly in antimicrobial-exposed patients, and requires only a single LRT specimen. It also has the potential to enable early de-escalation from broad-spectrum empirical antimicrobials to pathogen-directed therapy. PMID:26747825

  14. Nosocomial Outbreak of Drug-Resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae Serotype 9V in an Adult Respiratory Medicine Ward

    PubMed Central

    Khan-Orakzai, Zareena; Kapatai, Georgia; Bloch, Susannah; Singleton, Julie; Atkin, Sara; Shah, Victoria; Hatcher, James; Samarasinghe, Dunisha; Sheppard, Carmen

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Streptococcus pneumoniae infections arising in hospitalized patients are often assumed to be sporadic and linked to community acquisition. Here, whole-genome sequencing was used to demonstrate nosocomial acquisition of antimicrobial-resistant sequence type 156 (ST156) serotype 9V S. pneumoniae in 3 respiratory patients that resulted in two bacteremias and one lower respiratory tract infection. Two of the cases arose in patients who had recently been discharged from the hospital and were readmitted from the community. Nosocomial spread was suspected solely because of the highly unusual resistance pattern and case presentations within 24 h of one another. The outbreak highlights the potential for rapid transmission and the short incubation period in the respiratory ward setting. PMID:27974539

  15. Pneumonia

    MedlinePlus

    ... en español Pulmonía You're out in the rain, jumping around in puddles, and somebody yells, "Get ... you really catch it from playing in the rain? What Is Pneumonia? Pneumonia (say: noo-MOW-nyuh) ...

  16. Pneumonia, Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome, and Early Immune-Modulator Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kyung-Yil

    2017-01-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is caused by infectious insults, such as pneumonia from various pathogens or related to other noninfectious events. Clinical and histopathologic characteristics are similar across severely affected patients, suggesting that a common mode of immune reaction may be involved in the immunopathogenesis of ARDS. There may be etiologic substances that have an affinity for respiratory cells and induce lung cell injury in cases of ARDS. These substances originate not only from pathogens, but also from injured host cells. At the molecular level, these substances have various sizes and biochemical characteristics, classifying them as protein substances and non-protein substances. Immune cells and immune proteins may recognize and act on these substances, including pathogenic proteins and peptides, depending upon the size and biochemical properties of the substances (this theory is known as the protein-homeostasis-system hypothesis). The severity or chronicity of ARDS depends on the amount of etiologic substances with corresponding immune reactions, the duration of the appearance of specific immune cells, or the repertoire of specific immune cells that control the substances. Therefore, treatment with early systemic immune modulators (corticosteroids and/or intravenous immunoglobulin) as soon as possible may reduce aberrant immune responses in the potential stage of ARDS. PMID:28208675

  17. Pneumonia

    MedlinePlus

    ... the flu Your doctor will use your medical history, a physical exam, and lab tests to diagnose pneumonia. Treatment depends on what kind you have. If bacteria are the cause, antibiotics should help. If you ...

  18. [Control of latent enzootic Aujeszky's disease].

    PubMed

    Motovski, A; Iordanov, S

    1982-01-01

    An attempt was made on a swine-breeding complex, where the virus of Aujeski's disease was demonstrated to interrupt the inapparent epizootic process of the disease. The persistence of the virus on the complex was demonstrated via virologic investigations of organs of pigs with respiratory symptoms and studies of sera of various groups of animals. A batch of pigs was divided into three groups of which one was left untreated, one was vaccinated at the time of weaning, and one was vaccinated at the age of 14 days, using as many as 10 vaccinal doses with one dose of a live vaccine being used at the moment of weaning. During fattening the pigs were kept in isolation and under clinical observation with the study of organs and sera. Wild virus was demonstrated only in the group of twice vaccinated pigs. It was established that the manifold vaccinations of sucking pigs on farms that were enzootic in terms of Aujeszky's disease, using a live vaccines, with the isolation of the animals right after weaning could contribute to the interruption of the inapparent epizootic process.

  19. Acute interstitial pneumonia (AIP): relationship to Hamman-Rich syndrome, diffuse alveolar damage (DAD), and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS).

    PubMed

    Mukhopadhyay, Sanjay; Parambil, Joseph G

    2012-10-01

    Acute interstitial pneumonia (AIP) is a term used for an idiopathic form of acute lung injury characterized clinically by acute respiratory failure with bilateral lung infiltrates and histologically by diffuse alveolar damage (DAD), a combination of findings previously known as the Hamman-Rich syndrome. This review aims to clarify the diagnostic criteria of AIP, its relationship with DAD and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), key etiologies that need to be excluded before making the diagnosis, and the salient clinical features. Cases that meet clinical and pathologic criteria for AIP overlap substantially with those that fulfill clinical criteria for ARDS. The main differences between AIP and ARDS are that AIP requires a histologic diagnosis of DAD and exclusion of known etiologies. AIP should also be distinguished from "acute exacerbation of IPF," a condition in which acute lung injury (usually DAD) supervenes on underlying usual interstitial pneumonia (UIP)/idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF).

  20. Pneumonia associated with infection with pneumocystis, respiratory syncytial virus, chlamydia, mycoplasma, and cytomegalovirus in children in Papua New Guinea.

    PubMed Central

    Shann, F; Walters, S; Pifer, L L; Graham, D M; Jack, I; Uren, E; Birch, D; Stallman, N D

    1986-01-01

    Paired serum samples were collected from 94 children with pneumonia admitted to Goroka Hospital, Papua New Guinea. All but three of the children were aged 1-24 months. Only nine children were malnourished, with weight for age less than 70% of the Harvard median (three had weight for age less than 60% of the Harvard median). Pneumocystis carinii antigen was detected in the serum of 23 children. Twenty two children had serological evidence of recent infection with respiratory syncytial virus. Five children were probably infected with Chlamydia trachomatis at the time of the study, and there was less convincing serological evidence of current infection in a further 11 children. Five children showed a fourfold rise in antibody to Mycoplasma pneumoniae. Although only one child showed a fourfold rise in antibody to cytomegalovirus, 86 children had this antibody. No child showed a fourfold rise in antibody to Ureaplasma urealyticum or Legionella pneumophila. P carinii, respiratory syncytial virus, C trachomatis, M pneumoniae, and cytomegalovirus may be important causes of pneumonia in children in developing countries. PMID:3002538

  1. Emergency treatment and nursing of children with severe pneumonia complicated by heart failure and respiratory failure: 10 case reports

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wanli; An, Xinjiang; Fu, Mingyu; Li, Chunli

    2016-01-01

    Pneumonia refers to lung inflammation caused by different pathogens or other factors, and is a common pediatric disease occurring in infants and young children. It is closely related to the anatomical and physiological characteristics of infants and young children and is more frequent during winter and spring, or sudden changes in temperature. Pneumonia is a serious disease that poses a threat to children's health and its morbidity and mortality rank first, accounting for 24.5–65.2% of pediatric inpatients. Due to juvenile age, severe illness and rapid changes, children often suffer acute heart failure, respiratory failure and even toxic encephalopathy at the same time. The concurrence in different stages of the process of emergency treatment tends to relapse, which directly places the lives of these children at risk. Severe pneumonia constitutes one of the main causes of infant mortality. In the process of nursing children with severe pneumonia, intensive care was provided, including condition assessment and diagnosis, close observation of disease, keeping the airway unblocked, rational oxygen therapy, prevention and treatment of respiratory and circulatory failure, support of vital organs, complications, and health education. The inflammatory response was proactively controlled, to prevent suffocation and reduce mortality. In summary, positive and effective nursing can promote the rehabilitation of children patients, which can be reinforced with adequate communication with the parents and/or caretakers. PMID:27698703

  2. Emergency treatment and nursing of children with severe pneumonia complicated by heart failure and respiratory failure: 10 case reports.

    PubMed

    Li, Wanli; An, Xinjiang; Fu, Mingyu; Li, Chunli

    2016-10-01

    Pneumonia refers to lung inflammation caused by different pathogens or other factors, and is a common pediatric disease occurring in infants and young children. It is closely related to the anatomical and physiological characteristics of infants and young children and is more frequent during winter and spring, or sudden changes in temperature. Pneumonia is a serious disease that poses a threat to children's health and its morbidity and mortality rank first, accounting for 24.5-65.2% of pediatric inpatients. Due to juvenile age, severe illness and rapid changes, children often suffer acute heart failure, respiratory failure and even toxic encephalopathy at the same time. The concurrence in different stages of the process of emergency treatment tends to relapse, which directly places the lives of these children at risk. Severe pneumonia constitutes one of the main causes of infant mortality. In the process of nursing children with severe pneumonia, intensive care was provided, including condition assessment and diagnosis, close observation of disease, keeping the airway unblocked, rational oxygen therapy, prevention and treatment of respiratory and circulatory failure, support of vital organs, complications, and health education. The inflammatory response was proactively controlled, to prevent suffocation and reduce mortality. In summary, positive and effective nursing can promote the rehabilitation of children patients, which can be reinforced with adequate communication with the parents and/or caretakers.

  3. Seroepidemiological studies of Chlamydia pneumoniae infections in 1-36 months old children with respiratory tract infections and other diseases in Poland.

    PubMed

    Podsiadły, Edyta; Fracka, Beata; Szmigielska, Agnieszka; Tylewska-Wierzbanowska, Stanisława

    2005-01-01

    Presence of specific IgM, IgG and IgA antibodies against Chlamydia pneumoniae was evaluated in children aged 1 week to 36 months to investigate the role of C. pneumoniae in respiratory infections and other diseases. Serum samples were obtained from 150 hospitalized children, including 123 children presenting the clinical symptoms of various respiratory tract infections, two children with acute diarrhoea, two children with meningitis, 14 children with urinary tract infection, and 9 children with non-infectious diseases. Levels of specific C. pneumoniae IgM, IgG and IgA serum antibodies were measured by enzyme-linked immunoassay (ELISA). C. pneumoniae IgM antibodies were detected in 16 (13.0 %) of 123 children with respiratory tract infections. Specific IgG antibodies were found in sera of 11 children under 12 months old. Among 27 children without symptoms of a respiratory tract disease, specific C. pneumoniae IgM were found in two (7.4%) children, including one child with meningitis and another child with urinary tract infection. Specific IgA antibodies were not found in any tested child. All cases of C. pneumoniae infections were identified within two calendar years out of eight that were analyzed, i.e. in 1997 and 2000. The incidence of C. pneumoniae infections varied seasonally, with most children infected in autumn. C. pneumoniae IgM antibodies were detected more often in girls (17.9%) then in boys (7.2%). C. pneumoniae infections occur among small children in central Poland. The results of this study indicate that C. pneumoniae may play a role in the etiology of respiratory tract infections in infants and young children.

  4. Epidemiology of lower respiratory infection and pneumonia in South Africa (1997–2015): a systematic review protocol

    PubMed Central

    Roomaney, Rifqah A; Pillay-van Wyk, Victoria; Awotiwon, Oluwatoyin F; Dhansay, Ali; Groenewald, Pam; Joubert, Jané D; Nglazi, Mweete D; Nicol, Edward; Bradshaw, Debbie

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Lower respiratory infections (LRIs) and pneumonia are among the leading causes of death worldwide, especially in children aged under 5 years, and these patterns are reflected in the South African population. Local epidemiological data for LRIs and pneumonia are required to inform the Second National Burden of Disease Study underway in South Africa. The aim of this systematic review is to identify published studies reporting the prevalence, incidence, case fatality, duration or severity of LRI and pneumonia in adults and children in South Africa. Methods and analysis Electronic database searches will be conducted to obtain studies reporting on the prevalence, incidence, case fatality, duration and severity of LRI and pneumonia in South Africa between January 1997 and December 2015. Studies that are assessed to have moderate or low risk of bias will be included in a meta-analysis, if appropriate. Where meta-analysis is not possible, the articles will be described narratively. Subgroup analysis (eg, age groups) will also be conducted where enough information is available. Ethics and dissemination This systematic review will only include published data with no linked patient-level information; thus, no ethics approval is required. The findings will be used to calculate the burden of disease attributed to LRI and pneumonia in South Africa and will highlight the type of epidemiological data available in the country. The article will be disseminated in a peer-reviewed publication. PROSPERO registration number CRD42016036520. PMID:27633638

  5. A protein secreted by the respiratory pathogen Chlamydia pneumoniae impairs IL-17 signalling via interaction with human Act1.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Katerina; Plano, Gregory V; Fields, Kenneth A

    2009-05-01

    Chlamydia pneumoniae is a common respiratory pathogen that has been associated with a variety of chronic diseases including asthma and atherosclerosis. Chlamydiae are obligate intracellular parasites that primarily infect epithelial cells where they develop within a membrane-bound vacuole, termed an inclusion. Interactions between the microorganism and eukaryotic cell can be mediated by chlamydial proteins inserted into the inclusion membrane. We describe here a novel C. pneumoniae-specific inclusion membrane protein (Inc) CP0236, which contains domains exposed to the host cytoplasm. We demonstrate that, in a yeast two-hybrid screen, CP0236 interacts with the NFκB activator 1 (Act1) and this interaction was confirmed in HeLa 229 cells where ectopically expressed CP0236 was co-immunoprecipitated with endogenous Act1. Furthermore, we demonstrate that Act1 displays an altered distribution in the cytoplasm of HeLa cells infected with C. pneumoniae where it associates with the chlamydial inclusion membrane. This sequestration of Act1 by chlamydiae inhibited recruitment of the protein to the interleukin-17 (IL-17) receptor upon stimulation of C. pneumoniae-infected cells with IL-17A. Such inhibition of the IL-17 signalling pathway led to protection of Chlamydia-infected cells from NFκB activation in IL-17-stimulated cells. We describe here a unique strategy employed by C. pneumoniae to achieve inhibition of NFκB activation via interaction of CP0236 with mammalian Act1.

  6. Draft Genome Sequences of Streptococcus pneumoniae with High-Level Resistance to Respiratory Fluoroquinolones.

    PubMed

    Keness, Yoram; Bisharat, Naiel

    2016-03-31

    Streptococcus pneumoniaeis the leading cause of community-acquired pneumonia. Levofloxacin is a fluoroquinolone used for treatment of severe community-acquired pneumonia. Here, we describe the draft genome sequences ofS. pneumoniaewith emerging resistance to levofloxacin, resulting in failure of treatment of pneumococcal pneumonia.

  7. Viral pneumonia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Names Pneumonia - viral; Walking pneumonia - viral Images Lungs Respiratory system References Lee FE, Treanor JJ. Viral infections. In: Broaddus VC, Mason RJ, Ernst JD, et al, eds. Murray and Nadel's Textbook of Respiratory Medicine . 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2016: ...

  8. Pneumonia (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... kids under 6 years old. Take your child's temperature at least once each morning and each evening, ... Respiratory System Croup Fever and Taking Your Child's Temperature Influenza (Flu) Walking Pneumonia Word! Pneumonia Pneumonia Hib ...

  9. Impact of Candida spp. isolation in the respiratory tract in patients with intensive care unit-acquired pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Terraneo, S; Ferrer, M; Martín-Loeches, I; Esperatti, M; Di Pasquale, M; Giunta, V; Rinaudo, M; de Rosa, F; Li Bassi, G; Centanni, S; Torres, A

    2016-01-01

    In immunocompetent patients with nosocomial pneumonia, the relationship between Candida spp. isolation in respiratory samples and outcomes or association with other pathogens is controversial. We therefore compared the characteristics and outcomes of patients with intensive care unit-acquired pneumonia (ICUAP), with or without Candida spp. isolation in the respiratory tract. In this prospective non-interventional study, we assessed 385 consecutive immunocompetent patients with ICUAP, according to the presence or absence of Candida spp. in lower respiratory tract samples. Candida spp. was isolated in at least one sample in 82 (21%) patients. Patients with Candida spp. had higher severity scores and organ dysfunction at admission and at onset of pneumonia. In multivariate analysis, previous surgery, diabetes mellitus and higher Simplified Acute Physiology Score II at ICU admission independently predicted isolation of Candida spp. There were no significant differences in the rate of specific aetiological pathogens, the systemic inflammatory response, and length of stay between patients with and without Candida spp. Mortality was also similar, even adjusted for potential confounders in propensity-adjusted multivariate analyses (adjusted hazard ratio 1.08, 95% CI 0.57-2.05, p 0.80 for 28-day mortality and adjusted hazard ratio 1.38, 95% CI 0.81-2.35, p 0.24 for 90-day mortality). Antifungal therapy was more frequently prescribed in patients with Candida spp. in respiratory samples but did not influence outcomes. Candida spp. airway isolation in patients with ICUAP is associated with more initial disease severity but does not influence outcomes in these patients, regardless of the use or not of antifungal therapy.

  10. Mortality from infectious pneumonia in metal workers: a comparison with deaths from asthma in occupations exposed to respiratory sensitizers

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, Keith T; Cullinan, Paul; Rice, Simon; Brown, Terry; Coggon, David

    2012-01-01

    Introduction National analyses of mortality in England and Wales have repeatedly shown excess deaths from pneumonia in welders. During 1979-1990 the excess was attributable largely to deaths from lobar pneumonia and pneumonias other than bronchopneumonia, limited to working-aged men, and apparent in other metal fume-exposed occupations. We assessed findings for 1991-2000 and compared the mortality pattern with that from asthma in occupations exposed to known respiratory sensitizers. Methods The Office of National Statistics supplied data on deaths by underlying cause among men aged 16-74 years in England and Wales during 1991-2000, including age and last held occupation. We abstracted data on pneumonia for occupations with exposure to metal fume and on asthma for occupations commonly reported to surveillance schemes as at risk of occupational asthma. We estimated expected numbers of deaths by applying age-specific proportions of deaths by cause in the population to the total deaths by age in each occupational group. Observed and expected numbers were compared for each cause of death. Results Among working-aged men in metal fume-exposed occupations we found excesses of mortality from pneumococcal and lobar pneumonia (54 deaths vs. 27.3 expected) and from pneumonias other than bronchopneumonia (71 vs. 52.4), but no excess from these causes at older ages, or from bronchopneumonia at any age. The attributable mortality from metal fume (45.3 excess deaths) compared with an estimated 62.6 deaths from occupational asthma. Conclusion Exposure to metal fume is a material cause of occupational mortality. The hazard deserves far more attention than it presently receives. PMID:19703831

  11. Phenotyping community-acquired pneumonia according to the presence of acute respiratory failure and severe sepsis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Acute respiratory failure (ARF) and severe sepsis (SS) are possible complications in patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). The aim of the study was to evaluate prevalence, characteristics, risk factors and impact on mortality of hospitalized patients with CAP according to the presence of ARF and SS on admission. Methods This was a multicenter, observational, prospective study of consecutive CAP patients admitted to three hospitals in Italy, Spain, and Scotland between 2008 and 2010. Three groups of patients were identified: those with neither ARF nor SS (Group A), those with only ARF (Group B) and those with both ARF and SS (Group C) on admission. Results Among the 2,145 patients enrolled, 45% belonged to Group A, 36% to Group B and 20% to Group C. Patients in Group C were more severe than patients in Group B. Isolated ARF was correlated with age (p < 0.001), COPD (p < 0.001) and multilobar infiltrates (p < 0.001). The contemporary occurrence of ARF and SS was associated with age (p = 0.002), residency in nursing home (p = 0.007), COPD (p < 0.001), multilobar involvement (p < 0.001) and renal disease (p < 0.001). 4.2% of patients in Group A died, 9.3% in Group B and 26% in Group C, p < 0.001. After adjustment, the presence of only ARF had an OR for in-hospital mortality of 1.85 (p = 0.011) and the presence of both ARF and SS had an OR of 6.32 (p < 0.001). Conclusions The identification of ARF and SS on hospital admission can help physicians in classifying CAP patients into three different clinical phenotypes. PMID:24593040

  12. Community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus necrotizing pneumonia without evidence of antecedent viral upper respiratory infection

    PubMed Central

    Toro, Cristina Moran; Janvier, Jack; Zhang, Kunyan; Fonseca, Kevin; Gregson, Dan; Church, Deirdre; Laupland, Kevin; Rabin, Harvey; Elsayed, Sameer; Conly, John

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: USA300 community-associated (CA) methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strains causing necrotizing pneumonia have been reported in association with antecedent viral upper respiratory tract infections (URI). METHODS: A case series of necrotizing pneumonia presenting as a primary or coprimary infection, secondary to CA-MRSA without evidence of antecedent viral URI, is presented. Cases were identified through the infectious diseases consultation service records. Clinical and radiographic data were collected by chart review and electronic records. MRSA strains were isolated from sputum, bronchoalveolar lavage, pleural fluid or blood cultures and confirmed using standard laboratory procedures. MRSA strains were characterized by susceptibility testing, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, spa typing, agr typing and multilocus sequence typing. Testing for respiratory viruses was performed by appropriate serological testing of banked sera, or nucleic acid testing of nasopharyngeal or bronchoalveloar lavage specimens. RESULTS: Ten patients who presented or copresented with CA necrotizing pneumonia secondary to CA-MRSA from April 2004 to October 2011 were identified. The median length of stay was 22.5 days. Mortality was 20.0%. Classical risk factors for CA-MRSA were identified in seven of 10 (70.0%) cases. Chest tube placement occurred in seven of 10 patients with empyema. None of the patients had historical evidence of antecedent URI. In eight of 10 patients, serological or nucleic acid testing testing revealed no evidence of acute viral coinfection. Eight strains were CMRSA-10 (USA300). The remaining two strains were a USA300 genetically related strain and a USA1100 strain. CONCLUSION: Pneumonia secondary to CA-MRSA can occur in the absence of an antecedent URI. Infections due to CA-MRSA are associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Clinicians need to have an awareness of this clinical entity, particularly in patients who are in risk

  13. A comparison of human metapneumovirus and respiratory syncytial virus WHO-defined severe pneumonia in Moroccan children.

    PubMed

    Jroundi, I; Mahraoui, C; Benmessaoud, R; Moraleda, C; Tligui, H; Seffar, M; El Kettani, S E C; Benjelloun, B S; Chaacho, S; Muñoz-Almagro, C; Ruiz, J; Alonso, P L; Bassat, Q

    2016-02-01

    Acute respiratory infections remain the principal cause of morbidity and mortality in Moroccan children. Besides bacterial infections, respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and human metapneumovirus (hMPV) are prominent among other viruses due to their high prevalence and association with severe clinical episodes. We aimed to describe and compare RSV- and hMPV-associated cases of WHO-defined severe pneumonia in a paediatric population admitted to Morocco's reference hospital. Children aged 2-59 months admitted to the Hôpital d'Enfants de Rabat, Morocco meeting WHO-defined severe pneumonia criteria were recruited during 14 months and thoroughly investigated to ascertain a definitive diagnosis. Viral prevalence of RSV, hMPV and other viruses causing respiratory symptoms was investigated in nasopharyngeal aspirate samples through the use of molecular methods. Of the 683 children recruited and included in the final analysis, 61/683 (8·9%) and 124/683 (18·2%) were infected with hMPV and RSV, respectively. Besides a borderline significant tendency for higher age in hMPV cases, patients infected with either of the viruses behaved similarly in terms of demographics, patient history, past morbidity and comorbidity, vaccination history, socioeconomic background and family environment. Clinical presentation on arrival was also similar for both viruses, but hMPV cases were associated with more severity than RSV cases, had a higher risk of intensive care need, and received antibiotic treatment more frequently. RSV and hMPV are common and potentially life-threatening causes of WHO-defined pneumonia in Moroccan children. Both viruses show indistinctive clinical symptomatology, but in Moroccan children, hMPV was associated with a more severe evolution.

  14. Respiratory syncytial virus infection in cattle.

    PubMed

    Sacco, R E; McGill, J L; Pillatzki, A E; Palmer, M V; Ackermann, M R

    2014-03-01

    Bovine respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a cause of respiratory disease in cattle worldwide. It has an integral role in enzootic pneumonia in young dairy calves and summer pneumonia in nursing beef calves. Furthermore, bovine RSV infection can predispose calves to secondary bacterial infection by organisms such as Mannheimia haemolytica, Pasteurella multocida, and Histophilus somni, resulting in bovine respiratory disease complex, the most prevalent cause of morbidity and mortality among feedlot cattle. Even in cases where animals do not succumb to bovine respiratory disease complex, there can be long-term losses in production performance. This includes reductions in feed efficiency and rate of gain in the feedlot, as well as reproductive performance, milk production, and longevity in the breeding herd. As a result, economic costs to the cattle industry from bovine respiratory disease have been estimated to approach $1 billion annually due to death losses, reduced performance, and costs of vaccinations and treatment modalities. Human and bovine RSV are closely related viruses with similarities in histopathologic lesions and mechanisms of immune modulation induced following infection. Therefore, where appropriate, we provide comparisons between RSV infections in humans and cattle. This review article discusses key aspects of RSV infection of cattle, including epidemiology and strain variability, clinical signs and diagnosis, experimental infection, gross and microscopic lesions, innate and adaptive immune responses, and vaccination strategies.

  15. Laboratory diagnosis of Mycoplasma pneumoniae infection. 1. Direct detection of antigen in respiratory exudates by enzyme immunoassay.

    PubMed Central

    Kok, T. W.; Varkanis, G.; Marmion, B. P.; Martin, J.; Esterman, A.

    1988-01-01

    Direct and indirect antigen capture enzyme immunoassays (Ag-EIA) have been developed for the detection of Mycoplasma pneumoniae in nasopharyngeal aspirates or sputum from respiratory infection. The sensitivity of the two Ag-EIA were similar, but the indirect method using polyclonal rabbit and guinea-pig antisera was more convenient. The Ag-EIA had a detection limit of 10(4-4.5) colony-forming units/ml of sample. It was specific for M. pneumoniae and gave a low level response with M. genitalium. There were no cross-reactions with 10 other species of mycoplasmas. Tests with a wide range of bacteria and chlamydia group antigen, representing agents sometimes found in the respiratory tract, were also negative. At the current level of development, the Ag-EIA detected about 90% of specimens that were also positive for culture; 43% of specimens from culture-negative--seropositive patients gave a positive result. The overall pattern of results indicated that while antigen detection is a quick and effective substitute for the slow culture method, serological examination for specific IgM antibody is also necessary to give a complete diagnostic coverage. PMID:3145891

  16. Contributions of symptoms, signs, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, and C-reactive protein to a diagnosis of pneumonia in acute lower respiratory tract infection.

    PubMed Central

    Hopstaken, R M; Muris, J W; Knottnerus, J A; Kester, A D; Rinkens, P E; Dinant, G J

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Diagnostic tests enabling general practitioners (GPs) to differentiate rapidly between pneumonia and other lower respiratory tract infections (LRTIs) are needed to prevent increase of bacterial resistance by unjustified antibiotic prescribing. AIMS: To assess the diagnostic value of symptoms, signs, erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), and C-reactive protein (CRP) for pneumonia; to derive a prediction rule for the presence of pneumonia; and to identify a low-risk group of patients who do not require antibiotic treatment. DESIGN OF STUDY: Cross-sectional. SETTING: Fifteen GP surgeries in the southern part of The Netherlands. METHOD: Twenty-five GPs recorded clinical information and diagnosis in 246 adult patients presenting with LRTI. Venous blood samples for CRP and ESR were taken and chest radiographs (reference standard) were made. Odds ratios, describing the relationships between discrete diagnostic variables and reference standard (pneumonia or no pneumonia) were calculated. Receiver operating characteristic analysis of ESR, CRP, and final models for pneumonia was performed. Prediction rules for pneumonia were derived from multiple logistic regression analysis. RESULTS: Dry cough, diarrhoea, and a recorded temperature of > or = 38 degrees C were independent and statistically significant predictors of pneumonia, whereas abnormal pulmonary auscultation and clinical diagnosis of pneumonia by the GPs were not. ESR and CRP had higher diagnostic odds ratios than any of the symptoms and signs. Adding CRP to the final 'symptoms and signs' model significantly increased the probability of correct diagnosis. Applying a prediction rule for low-risk patients, including a CRP of < 20, 80 of the 193 antibiotic prescriptions could have been prevented with a maximum risk of 2.5% of missing a pneumonia case. CONCLUSION: Most symptoms and signs traditionally associated with pneumonia are not predictive of pneumonia in general practice. The prediction rule for low

  17. Analysis of Risk Factors for Severe Acute Respiratory Infection and Pneumonia and among Adult Patients with Acute Respiratory Illness during 2011-2014 Influenza Seasons in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Wie, Seong-Heon; Jeong, Hye Won; Kim, Young Keun; Park, Kyung Hwa; Kim, Shin Woo; Lee, Sun Hee

    2016-01-01

    Background The World Health Organization recommends the surveillance of influenza-like illness (ILI) and severe acute respiratory infection (SARI) to respond effectively to both seasonal influenza epidemics and pandemics. In Korea, the “Hospital-based Influenza Morbidity and Mortality (HIMM)” surveillance system has been operated to monitor ILI and SARI occurrences. Materials and Methods A multi-center prospective observational study was conducted. Adult patients with acute respiratory infection (ARI) were enrolled during the 2011-12, 2012-2013, and 2013-2014 influenza seasons at the 10 university hospitals using the HIMM surveillance system. With respect to SARI and pneumonia development, risk profiles were analyzed in patients with ARI in Korea. Results A total of 5,459 cases were eligible for this analysis. Among 5,459 cases with ARI, 2,887 cases (52.9%) were identified that they had influenza infection. Among enrolled cases, 750 cases belonged to the SARI group, while 4,709 cases belonged to the non-SARI group. With respect to pneumonia development, 317 cases were accompanied by pneumonia, and 5,142 cases were not. Multivariate analyses revealed that the following factors were associated with an increased risk of SARI: Old age (≥65 years) (odds ratio [OR] 2.69, 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.2-3.32), chronic heart disease (CHD) (OR 2.24, 95% CI 1.68-2.98), cerebrovascular disease (CVD) (OR 1.49, 95% CI 1.05-2.10), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) (OR 2.34, 95% CI 1.48-3.69), asthma (OR 2.33, 95% CI 1.62-3.36), chronic kidney disease (CKD) (OR 2.62, 95% CI 1.73-3.99), chronic liver disease (OR 1.71, 95% CI 1.04-2.81), and autoimmune diseases (OR 2.53, 1.57-4.08). Multivariate analyses revealed that the following factors were independent risk factors for pneumonia development: Old age (≥65 years) (OR 5.71, 95% CI 4.10-7.94), CHD (OR 1.54, 95% CI 1.07-2.22), COPD (OR 2.34, 95% CI 1.48-3.69), asthma (OR 2.33, 95% CI 1.62-3.36), CKD (OR 2.62, 95

  18. Role of Human Metapneumovirus, Influenza A Virus and Respiratory Syncytial Virus in Causing WHO-Defined Severe Pneumonia in Children in a Developing Country

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Asad; Khowaja, Asif Raza; Bashir, Maaman Zahoor; Aziz, Fatima; Mustafa, Sultan; Zaidi, Anita

    2013-01-01

    Objective The role of respiratory viruses in causing severe, life threatening pneumonia in children in developing countries is not well established. Our study aims to determine the role of human metapneumovirus (HMPV), influenza A virus and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) in children, aged 6 weeks to 2 years, hospitalized with WHO defined severe pneumonia (tachypnea plus any general danger sign or chest in-drawing) at a public sector hospital in Karachi, Pakistan. Methods This study was conducted from November 2010 to September 2011 at Abbassi Shaheed Hospital, a large public tertiary care hospital in Karachi, Pakistan. Children admitted with WHO-defined severe pneumonia were enrolled and throat swabs were obtained to detect respiratory viruses using real time RT-PCR. Chest x-rays of all subjects were obtained and independently interpreted by two radiologists to diagnose radiologic pneumonia. Results 169 children were enrolled. HMPV was detected in 24 (14.2%), influenza A virus in 9 (5.3%) and RSV in 30 (17.8%) children admitted with severe pneumonia. Of 9 patients with influenza A, 8 tested positive for H1N1. Viral etiology was found in 18% of radiologically confirmed pneumonia. HMPV infections peaked in February and April, influenza A was prevalent in January, June and November and RSV infections were most prevalent from June to September. Conclusion HMPV, influenza A and RSV are common causes of WHO-defined severe pneumonia in hospitalized children in Karachi. Knowledge regarding the viral etiology of pediatric pneumonia and individual viral seasonality can help in the recommendation and implementation of appropriate management strategies. PMID:24058625

  19. Pneumonia (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Dysplasia (BPD) Respiratory Syncytial Virus Coughing Lungs and Respiratory System Croup Fever and Taking Your Child's Temperature Influenza ( ... Haemophilus Influenzae Type b) Bronchitis Pneumonia Lungs and Respiratory System Contact Us Print Resources Send to a friend ...

  20. Hydrocarbon pneumonia

    MedlinePlus

    Pneumonia - hydrocarbon ... Coughing Fever Shortness of breath Smell of a hydrocarbon product on the breath Stupor (decreased level of ... Most children who drink or inhale hydrocarbon products and develop ... hydrocarbons may lead to rapid respiratory failure and death.

  1. Acute Eosinophilic Pneumonia with Respiratory Failure Induced by Synthetic Cannabinoid Inhalation

    PubMed Central

    Öcal, Nesrin; Doğan, Deniz; Çiçek, Ali Fuat; Yücel, Orhan; Tozkoparan, Ergun

    2016-01-01

    Background In recent days, synthetic cannabinoid derivatives have become life threatening for young people. Here, we want to share a case of acute eosinophilic pneumonia triggered by inhalation of synthetic cannabinoid, new side effects of which are being detected day by day. Case Report A 21-year-old male, who had no history of pulmonary diseases, was admitted to the clinic with shortness of breath. His oxygen saturation was measured as 85–86% in room air. Common irregular ground-glass opacities were observed in thorax radiology. His peripheral blood eosinophil count was 1100 cell/mm3 with a leukocyte differential of 12%. Sputum eosinophilia was also observed. The patient was diagnosed with acute eosinophilic pneumonia in terms of current clinical, radiological and laboratory findings. Rapid remission was achieved with corticosteroid therapy. Conclusion This is the first reported case of acute eosinophilic pneumonia induced by synthetic cannabinoid inhalation. PMID:27994925

  2. Respiratory Viral Detection in Children and Adults: Comparing Asymptomatic Controls and Patients With Community-Acquired Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Self, Wesley H.; Williams, Derek J.; Zhu, Yuwei; Ampofo, Krow; Pavia, Andrew T.; Chappell, James D.; Hymas, Weston C.; Stockmann, Chris; Bramley, Anna M.; Schneider, Eileen; Erdman, Dean; Finelli, Lyn; Jain, Seema; Edwards, Kathryn M.; Grijalva, Carlos G.

    2016-01-01

    Background. The clinical significance of viruses detected in patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is often unclear. Methods. We conducted a prospective study to identify the prevalence of 13 viruses in the upper respiratory tract of patients with CAP and concurrently enrolled asymptomatic controls with real-time reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. We compared age-stratified prevalence of each virus between patients with CAP and controls and used multivariable logistic regression to calculate attributable fractions (AFs). Results. We enrolled 1024 patients with CAP and 759 controls. Detections of influenza, respiratory syncytial virus, and human metapneumovirus were substantially more common in patients with CAP of all ages than in controls (AFs near 1.0). Parainfluenza and coronaviruses were also more common among patients with CAP (AF, 0.5–0.75). Rhinovirus was associated with CAP among adults (AF, 0.93) but not children (AF, 0.02). Adenovirus was associated with CAP only among children <2 years old (AF, 0.77). Conclusions. The probability that a virus detected with real-time reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction in patients with CAP contributed to symptomatic disease varied by age group and specific virus. Detections of influenza, respiratory syncytial virus, and human metapneumovirus among patients with CAP of all ages probably indicate an etiologic role, whereas detections of parainfluenza, coronaviruses, rhinovirus, and adenovirus, especially in children, require further scrutiny. PMID:26180044

  3. A review of infectious bovine rhinotracheitis, shipping fever pneumonia and viral-bacterial synergism in respiratory disease of cattle.

    PubMed Central

    Yates, W D

    1982-01-01

    Unanswered questions on the etiology and prevention of shipping fever pneumonia have allowed this disease to remain one of the most costly to the North American cattle industry. Research in this area has indirected that while Pasteurella haemolytica and, to a lesser extent, P. multocida are involved in most cases, they seem to require additional factors to help initiate the disease process. Bovine herpes virus 1 has been shown experimentally to be one such factor. This review examines in some detail the topics of infectious bovine rhinotracheitis, shipping fever, and viral-bacterial interactions in the production of respiratory disease in various species. It deals with history, definitions, etiologies, clinical signs and lesions, and considers exposure levels, transmission and various pathogenetic mechanisms that are postulated or known to occur. PMID:6290011

  4. CXCL14 displays antimicrobial activity against respiratory tract bacteria and contributes to clearance of Streptococcus pneumoniae pulmonary infection.

    PubMed

    Dai, Chen; Basilico, Paola; Cremona, Tiziana Patrizia; Collins, Paul; Moser, Bernhard; Benarafa, Charaf; Wolf, Marlene

    2015-06-15

    CXCL14 is a chemokine with an atypical, yet highly conserved, primary structure characterized by a short N terminus and high sequence identity between human and mouse. Although it induces chemotaxis of monocytic cells at high concentrations, its physiological role in leukocyte trafficking remains elusive. In contrast, several studies have demonstrated that CXCL14 is a broad-spectrum antimicrobial peptide that is expressed abundantly and constitutively in epithelial tissues. In this study, we further explored the antimicrobial properties of CXCL14 against respiratory pathogens in vitro and in vivo. We found that CXCL14 potently killed Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Streptococcus mitis, and Streptococcus pneumoniae in a dose-dependent manner in part through membrane depolarization and rupture. By performing structure-activity studies, we found that the activity against Gram-negative bacteria was largely associated with the N-terminal peptide CXCL141-13. Interestingly, the central part of the molecule representing the β-sheet also maintained ∼62% killing activity and was sufficient to induce chemotaxis of THP-1 cells. The C-terminal α-helix of CXCL14 had neither antimicrobial nor chemotactic effect. To investigate a physiological function for CXCL14 in innate immunity in vivo, we infected CXCL14-deficient mice with lung pathogens and we found that CXCL14 contributed to enhanced clearance of Streptococcus pneumoniae, but not Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Our comprehensive studies reflect the complex bactericidal mechanisms of CXCL14, and we propose that different structural features are relevant for the killing of Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. Taken together, our studies show that evolutionary-conserved features of CXCL14 are important for constitutive antimicrobial defenses against pneumonia.

  5. Respiratory care year in review 2010: part 1. asthma, COPD, pulmonary function testing, ventilator-associated pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Rubin, Bruce K; Dhand, Rajiv; Ruppel, Gregg L; Branson, Richard D; Hess, Dean R

    2011-04-01

    The purpose of this paper is to review the recent literature related to asthma, COPD, pulmonary function testing, and ventilator-associated pneumonia. Topics covered related to asthma include genetics and epigenetics; exposures; viruses; diet, obesity and exercise; exhaled nitric oxide; and drug therapy (β agonists, macrolides, tiotropium and monteleukast). Topics covered related to COPD include childhood disadvantage factors and COPD; vitamin D deficiency and COPD; β-blockers and COPD; corticosteroid therapy during COPD exacerbations; oxygen administration during pre-hospital transport of patients with COPD exacerbation; and prognosis of patients admitted to the hospital for COPD exacerbation. Topics related to pulmonary function testing include methods and techniques; predicted values; natural history, pulmonary function in health and disease; and the COPD controversy. Finally, the paper includes the following topics related to ventilator-associated pneumonia: the tube, the intubation route, and the cuff; mechanical ventilation; the bundle; and cost. These topics were chosen and reviewed in a manner that is most likely to have interest to the readers of Respiratory Care.

  6. Pneumonia and empyema caused by Streptococcus intermedius that shows the diagnostic importance of evaluating the microbiota in the lower respiratory tract.

    PubMed

    Noguchi, Shingo; Yatera, Kazuhiro; Kawanami, Toshinori; Yamasaki, Kei; Fukuda, Kazumasa; Naito, Keisuke; Akata, Kentarou; Nagata, Shuya; Ishimoto, Hiroshi; Taniguchi, Hatsumi; Mukae, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    The bacterial species in the Streptococcus anginosus group (S. constellatus, S. anginosus, S. intermedius) are important causative pathogens of bacterial pneumonia, pulmonary abscesses and empyema. However, the bacteria in this group are primarily oral resident bacteria and unable to grow significantly on ordinary aerobic culture media. We experienced a case of pneumonia and empyema caused by Streptococcus intermedius detected using a 16S rRNA gene sequencing analysis of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and pleural effusion, but not sputum. Even when applying the molecular method, sputum samples are occasionally unsuitable for identifying the causative pathogens of lower respiratory tract infections.

  7. Diagnostic delay of pulmonary tuberculosis in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome associated with aspiration pneumonia: Two case reports and a mini-review from Japan.

    PubMed

    Nakao, Makoto; Sone, Kazuki; Kagawa, Yusuke; Kurokawa, Ryota; Sato, Hidefumi; Kunieda, Takefumi; Muramatsu, Hideki

    2016-08-01

    Diagnosing active tuberculosis in elderly patients presents problems due to nonspecific symptoms and complications such as aspiration pneumonia. The current study presents two cases of pulmonary tuberculosis with bilateral pulmonary infiltrates associated with aspiration pneumonia. The two elderly patients developed acute respiratory distress syndrome as a result of aspiration pneumonia. The diagnoses of pulmonary tuberculosis were delayed in both cases, as the patients were diagnosed with active tuberculosis following discharge from hospital. The sputum test for acid-fast bacillus at the time of administration was smear-negative/culture-positive in these patients. They were treated with isoniazid, rifampicin and ethambutol, and nosocomial transmission of tuberculosis from these patients was not reported. The number of elderly patients with aspiration pneumonia is predicted to increase rapidly, and aspiration pneumonia combined with pulmonary tuberculosis is a major medical and healthcare concern in Japan. The present study concludes that physicians should always consider the complication of pulmonary tuberculosis when treating pneumonia patients, in particular in treating elderly patients with pulmonary infiltrates.

  8. Diagnostic delay of pulmonary tuberculosis in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome associated with aspiration pneumonia: Two case reports and a mini-review from Japan

    PubMed Central

    Nakao, Makoto; Sone, Kazuki; Kagawa, Yusuke; Kurokawa, Ryota; Sato, Hidefumi; Kunieda, Takefumi; Muramatsu, Hideki

    2016-01-01

    Diagnosing active tuberculosis in elderly patients presents problems due to nonspecific symptoms and complications such as aspiration pneumonia. The current study presents two cases of pulmonary tuberculosis with bilateral pulmonary infiltrates associated with aspiration pneumonia. The two elderly patients developed acute respiratory distress syndrome as a result of aspiration pneumonia. The diagnoses of pulmonary tuberculosis were delayed in both cases, as the patients were diagnosed with active tuberculosis following discharge from hospital. The sputum test for acid-fast bacillus at the time of administration was smear-negative/culture-positive in these patients. They were treated with isoniazid, rifampicin and ethambutol, and nosocomial transmission of tuberculosis from these patients was not reported. The number of elderly patients with aspiration pneumonia is predicted to increase rapidly, and aspiration pneumonia combined with pulmonary tuberculosis is a major medical and healthcare concern in Japan. The present study concludes that physicians should always consider the complication of pulmonary tuberculosis when treating pneumonia patients, in particular in treating elderly patients with pulmonary infiltrates. PMID:27446284

  9. Bilateral optic papillitis following mycoplasma pneumoniae pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Milla, E; Zografos, L; Piguet, B

    1998-01-01

    Mycoplasma pneumoniae is an atypical bacterium that can cause a great variety of respiratory infections and be responsible for ocular involvement such as conjunctivitis, anterior uveitis and very rarely optic neuropathy. We report herein an additional case of bilateral optic disc swelling with profound visual loss following Mycoplasma pneumoniae pneumonia and review the world literature on the ocular manifestations associated with this pathogen.

  10. Multiplex quantitative PCR for detection of lower respiratory tract infection and meningitis caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae and Neisseria meningitidis

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Streptococcus pneumoniae and Haemophilus influenzae cause pneumonia and as Neisseria meningitidis they are important agents of meningitis. Although several PCR methods have been described for these bacteria the specificity is an underestimated problem. Here we present a quantitative multiplex real-time PCR (qmPCR) for detection of S. pneumoniae (9802 gene fragment), H. influenzae (omp P6 gene) and N. meningitidis (ctrA gene). The method was evaluated on bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) samples from 156 adults with lower respiratory tract infection (LRTI) and 31 controls, and on 87 cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples from meningitis patients. Results The analytical sensitivity was not affected by using a combined mixture of reagents and a combined DNA standard (S. pneumoniae/H. influenzae/N. meningitidis) in single tubes. By blood- and BAL-culture and S. pneumoniae urinary antigen test, S. pneumoniae and H. influenzae were aetiological agents in 21 and 31 of the LTRI patients, respectively. These pathogens were identified by qmPCR in 52 and 72 of the cases, respectively, yielding sensitivities and specificities of 95% and 75% for S. pneumoniae, and 90% and 65% for H. influenzae, respectively. When using a cut-off of 105 genome copies/mL for clinical positivity the sensitivities and specificities were 90% and 80% for S. pneumoniae, and 81% and 85% for H. influenzae, respectively. Of 44 culture negative but qmPCR positive for H. influenzae, 41 were confirmed by fucK PCR as H. influenzae. Of the 103 patients who had taken antibiotics prior to sampling, S. pneumoniae and H. influenzae were identified by culture in 6% and 20% of the cases, respectively, and by the qmPCR in 36% and 53% of the cases, respectively. In 87 CSF samples S. pneumoniae and N. meningitidis were identified by culture and/or 16 S rRNA in 14 and 10 samples and by qmPCR in 14 and 10 samples, respectively, giving a sensitivity of 100% and a specificity of 100% for both bacteria. Conclusions The

  11. The utility of biomarkers in differentiating bacterial from non-bacterial lower respiratory tract infection in hospitalized children: difference of the diagnostic performance between acute pneumonia and bronchitis.

    PubMed

    Hoshina, Takayuki; Nanishi, Etsuro; Kanno, Shunsuke; Nishio, Hisanori; Kusuhara, Koichi; Hara, Toshiro

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the utility of several biomarkers in differentiating bacterial community-acquired lower respiratory tract infection (CA-LRTI) from non-bacterial CA-LRTI in children and the difference of their diagnostic performance between pneumonia and bronchitis. A retrospective cohort study composed of 108 pediatric patients hospitalized for CA-LRTI was performed during 2010-2013. Based on the findings of chest X-ray and sputum samples, patients were divided into 4 categories, group of bacterial pneumonia or bronchitis, and non-bacterial (viral or etiology-unknown) pneumonia or bronchitis. Peripheral white blood cell and neutrophil counts, and serum C-reactive protein (CRP) and procalcitonin (PCT) levels were compared among the 4 groups. Finally, 54 patients were the subject of this study. In the patients with pneumonia, serum CRP and PCT levels were significantly elevated in the group of bacterial pneumonia (CRP: p = 0.02, PCT: p = 0.0008). The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve for PCT for distinguishing between bacterial and non-bacterial pneumonia was the largest, and sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value of PCT were best among 4 markers. On the other hand, in the patients with bronchitis, neutrophil count was significantly decreased in non-bacterial bronchitis whereas no significant differences of WBC count, CRP level or PCT level were seen. In conclusion, PCT was the most useful marker to differentiate bacterial pneumonia whereas neutrophil count contributed most to the discrimination of bacterial bronchitis. The diagnostic performance of biomarkers may be different between pneumonia and bronchitis.

  12. Molecular Epidemiology of Macrolide-Resistant Isolates of Streptococcus pneumoniae Collected from Blood and Respiratory Specimens in Norway

    PubMed Central

    Littauer, P.; Sangvik, M.; Caugant, D. A.; Høiby, E. A.; Simonsen, G. S.; Sundsfjord, A.

    2005-01-01

    Norway has a low prevalence of antimicrobial resistance, including macrolide-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae (MRSP). In a nationwide surveillance program, a total of 2,200 S. pneumoniae isolates were collected from blood cultures and respiratory tract specimens. Macrolide resistance was detected in 2.7%. M-type macrolide resistance was found in 60% of resistant isolates, and these were mainly mef(A)-positive, serotype-14 invasive isolates. The erm(B)-encoded macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B (MLSB) type dominated among the noninvasive isolates. One strain had an A2058G mutation in the 23S rRNA gene. Coresistance to other antibiotics was seen in 96% of the MLSB-type isolates, whereas 92% of the M-type isolates were susceptible to other commonly used antimicrobial agents. Serotypes 14, 6B, and 19F accounted for 84% of the macrolide-resistant isolates, with serotype 14 alone accounting for 67% of the invasive isolates. A total of 29 different sequence types (STs) were detected by multilocus sequence typing. Twelve STs were previously reported international resistant clones, and 75% of the macrolide-resistant isolates had STs identical or closely related to these clones. Eleven isolates displayed 10 novel STs, and 7/11 of these “Norwegian strains” coexpressed MLSB and tetracycline resistance, indicating the presence of Tn1545. The invasive serotype-14 isolates were all classified as ST9 or single-locus variants of this clone. ST9 is a mef-positive M-type clone, commonly known as England14-9, reported from several European countries. These observations suggest that the import of major international MRSP clones and the local spread of Tn1545 are the major mechanisms involved in the evolution and dissemination of MRSP in Norway. PMID:15872231

  13. Immunoglobulin M-enriched intravenous polyclonal immunoglobulins reduce bacteremia following Klebsiella pneumoniae infection in an acute respiratory distress syndrome rat model.

    PubMed

    Lachmann, R A; van Kaam, A H L C; Haitsma, J J; Verbrugge, S J C; Delreu, F; Lachmann, B

    2004-06-01

    Mechanical ventilation is known to induce bacterial translocation from the lung into the systemic circulation. This study determined the effect of immunoglobulin M (IgM)-enriched polyclonal immunoglobulins on bacteremia due to ventilation-induced translocation in an acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) rat model with Klebsiella-induced pneumonia. After whole lung lavage, Sprague-Dawley rats intravenously received either a high dose or a low dose of an immunoglobulin preparation, or an albumin solution as control, followed by an intratracheal injection of a Klebsiella pneumoniae solution. Blood colony-forming units (CFUs) in the treatment groups were significantly lower during the 3-hour ventilation period compared to the control group. The authors conclude that IgM-enriched polyclonal immunoglobulins lead to a reduction of bacteria in blood of surfactant-deficient, ventilated rats infected with Klebsiella pneumoniae.

  14. A pilot study of respiratory muscle training to improve cough effectiveness and reduce the incidence of pneumonia in acute stroke: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background After stroke, pneumonia is a relevant medical complication that can be precipitated by aspiration of saliva, liquids, or solid food. Swallowing difficulty and aspiration occur in a significant proportion of stroke survivors. Cough, an important mechanism protecting the lungs from inhaled materials, can be impaired in stroke survivors, and the likely cause for this impairment is central weakness of the respiratory musculature. Thus, respiratory muscle training in acute stroke may be useful in the recovery of respiratory muscle and cough function, and may thereby reduce the risk of pneumonia. The present study is a pilot study, aimed at investigating the validity and feasibility of this approach by exploring effect size, safety, and patient acceptability of the intervention. Methods/design Adults with moderate to severe stroke impairment (National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) score 5 to 25 at the time of admission) are recruited within 2 weeks of stroke onset. Participants must be able to perform voluntary respiratory maneuvers. Excluded are patients with increased intracranial pressure, uncontrolled hypertension, neuromuscular conditions other than stroke, medical history of asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and recent cardiac events. Participants are randomized to receive inspiratory, expiratory, or sham respiratory training over a 4-week period, by using commercially available threshold resistance devices. Participants and caregivers, but not study investigators, are blind to treatment allocation. All participants receive medical care and stroke rehabilitation according to the usual standard of care. The following assessments are conducted at baseline, 4 weeks, and 12 weeks: Voluntary and reflex cough flow measurements, forced spirometry, respiratory muscle strength tests, incidence of pneumonia, assessments of safety parameters, and self-reported activity of daily living. The primary outcome is peak expiratory cough flow

  15. Hospital acquired pneumonia: comparison of culture and real-time PCR assays for detection of Legionella pneumophila from respiratory specimens at Tehran hospitals.

    PubMed

    Fard, Somayeh Yasliani; Nomanpour, Bizhan; Fatolahzadeh, Bahram; Mobarez, Ashraf Mohebati; Darban-Sarokhalil, Davood; Fooladi, Abbas Ali Imani; Leeuwen, Willem B; Feizabadi, Mohammad Mehdi

    2012-09-01

    Legionella pneumophila is an important etiological agent in both hospital and community acquired pneumonia. The sensitivity of culture for isolation of L. pneumophila from clinical specimens is low and time consuming. Similar problem also exists when the method of direct immunofluorescence is used. To detect this organism quantitatively from respiratory specimens, a Taq Man based real-time PCR targeting the mip sequence was developed. Both real-time PCR and culture methods were applied on 262 respiratory specimens from 262 ICU patients with pneumonia admitted to 5 different hospitals in Tehran. The results of real-time PCR were compared with those obtained by culture. Real-time PCR and culture found 12 and 4 specimens, respectively, as positive for L. pneumophila. Its technical specificity (100%) was checked against a panel of microorganisms consisting of both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Our real-time PCR assay showed high sensitivity (100%) and specificity (96.9%) and could detect 200 organisms per ml from respiratory specimens. Using real-time PCR as a screening method, the frequency of nosocomial pneumonia with L. pneumophila at Tehran hospitals was estimated as 4.58%.

  16. The Impacts of Cellular Senescence in Elderly Pneumonia and in Age-Related Lung Diseases That Increase the Risk of Respiratory Infections.

    PubMed

    Yanagi, Shigehisa; Tsubouchi, Hironobu; Miura, Ayako; Matsuo, Ayako; Matsumoto, Nobuhiro; Nakazato, Masamitsu

    2017-02-25

    Pneumonia generates considerable negative impacts on the elderly. Despite the widespread uses of vaccines and appropriate antibiotics, the morbidity and mortality of elderly pneumonia are significantly higher compared to the counterparts of young populations. The definitive mechanisms of high vulnerability in the elderly against pathogen threats are unclear. Age-associated, chronic low-grade inflammation augments the susceptibility and severity of pneumonia in the elderly. Cellular senescence, one of the hallmarks of aging, has its own characteristics, cell growth arrest and senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP). These properties are beneficial if the sequence of senescence-clearance-regeneration is transient in manner. However, persisting senescent cell accumulation and excessive SASP might induce sustained low-grade inflammation and disruption of normal tissue microenvironments in aged tissue. Emerging evidence indicates that cellular senescence is a key component in the pathogenesis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF), which are known to be age-related and increase the risk of pneumonia. In addition to their structural collapses, COPD and IPF might increase the vulnerability to pathogen insults through SASP. Here, we discuss the current advances in understanding of the impacts of cellular senescence in elderly pneumonia and in these chronic lung disorders that heighten the risk of respiratory infections.

  17. The Impacts of Cellular Senescence in Elderly Pneumonia and in Age-Related Lung Diseases That Increase the Risk of Respiratory Infections

    PubMed Central

    Yanagi, Shigehisa; Tsubouchi, Hironobu; Miura, Ayako; Matsuo, Ayako; Matsumoto, Nobuhiro; Nakazato, Masamitsu

    2017-01-01

    Pneumonia generates considerable negative impacts on the elderly. Despite the widespread uses of vaccines and appropriate antibiotics, the morbidity and mortality of elderly pneumonia are significantly higher compared to the counterparts of young populations. The definitive mechanisms of high vulnerability in the elderly against pathogen threats are unclear. Age-associated, chronic low-grade inflammation augments the susceptibility and severity of pneumonia in the elderly. Cellular senescence, one of the hallmarks of aging, has its own characteristics, cell growth arrest and senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP). These properties are beneficial if the sequence of senescence–clearance–regeneration is transient in manner. However, persisting senescent cell accumulation and excessive SASP might induce sustained low-grade inflammation and disruption of normal tissue microenvironments in aged tissue. Emerging evidence indicates that cellular senescence is a key component in the pathogenesis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF), which are known to be age-related and increase the risk of pneumonia. In addition to their structural collapses, COPD and IPF might increase the vulnerability to pathogen insults through SASP. Here, we discuss the current advances in understanding of the impacts of cellular senescence in elderly pneumonia and in these chronic lung disorders that heighten the risk of respiratory infections. PMID:28245616

  18. Deleted in malignant brain tumors 1 protein is a potential biomarker of acute respiratory distress syndrome induced by pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Ren, Shan; Chen, Xia; Jiang, Li; Zhu, Bo; Jiang, Qi; Xi, Xiuming

    2016-09-23

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is associated with high mortality and morbidity. Early diagnosis and risk stratification in patients with ARDS should improve prognosis. Unfortunately, no clinical biomarkers are available for use in early diagnosis. Quantitative proteomics is a powerful tool for biomarker discovery in cancer, autoimmune diseases, and ARDS. Here, we employed isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ) technology to identify potential biomarkers for early ARDS diagnosis and predict the risk for increased disease severity induced by pneumonia. We collected the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and plasma from ARDS patients with differing degrees of ARDS severity. We identified 338 proteins dysregulated in ARDS through iTRAQ, 18 of which showed significant differences with at least 1.5-fold differential expression in patients with mild or severe ARDS. Differential plasma expression of pulmonary surfactant associated protein A, apolipoprotein A1, and deleted in malignant brain tumors 1 protein (DMBT1) was verified in plasma samples. Our results indicate that DMBT1 can potentially serve as a biomarker for early ARDS diagnosis and disease severity assessment.

  19. Detection of Haemophilus influenzae in respiratory secretions from pneumonia patients by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Abdeldaim, Guma M K; Strålin, Kristoffer; Kirsebom, Leif A; Olcén, Per; Blomberg, Jonas; Herrmann, Björn

    2009-08-01

    A quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) based on the omp P6 gene was developed to detect Haemophilus influenzae. Its specificity was determined by analysis of 29 strains of 11 different Haemophilus spp. and was compared with PCR assays having other target genes: rnpB, 16S rRNA, and bexA. The method was evaluated on nasopharyngeal aspirates from 166 adult patients with community-acquired pneumonia. When 10(4) DNA copies/mL was used as cutoff limit for the method, P6 PCR had a sensitivity of 97.5% and a specificity of 96.0% compared with the culture. Of 20 culture-negative but P6 PCR-positive cases, 18 were confirmed by fucK PCR as H. influenzae. Five (5.9%) of 84 nasopharyngeal aspirates from adult controls tested PCR positive. We conclude that the P6 real-time PCR is both sensitive and specific for identification of H. influenzae in respiratory secretions. Quantification facilitates discrimination between disease-causing H. influenzae strains and commensal colonization.

  20. Correlated responses of respiratory disease and immune capacity traits of Landrace pigs selected for Mycoplasmal pneumonia of swine (MPS) lesion.

    PubMed

    Okamura, Toshihiro; Maeda, Kouki; Onodera, Wataru; Kadowaki, Hiroshi; Kojima-Shibata, Chihiro; Suzuki, Eisaku; Uenishi, Hirohide; Satoh, Masahiro; Suzuki, Keiichi

    2016-09-01

    Five generations of Landrace pigs selected for average daily gain, backfat thickness, Mycoplasmal pneumonia of swine (MPS) lesion score, and plasma cortisol levels, was executed to decrease the MPS lesion score. Genetic parameters and correlated genetic responses for respiratory disease and peripheral blood immune traits were estimated in 1395 Landrace pigs. We estimated the negative genetic correlation of MPS lesion score with phagocytic activity (PA) at 7 weeks of age (-0.67). The breeding values of PA at 7 weeks of age and 105 kg body weight and the correlated selection response of the ratio of granular leukocytes to lymphocytes at 105 kg body weight were significantly increased, and sheep red blood cell-specific antibody production (AP) was significantly decreased in a selection-dependent manner. Increasing of natural immunological indicators (e.g. PA) and decreasing of humoral immunological indicator (e.g. AP) were observed due to genetically decreasing MPS lesion score.

  1. [Antibiotic susceptibility of blood-borne Streptococcus pneumoniae and efficacy assessment of respiratory quinolones using Monte Carlo simulation].

    PubMed

    Kawamoto, Hiroshi; Nomura, Nobuhiko; Mitsuyama, Junichi; Yamaoka, Kazukiyo; Asano, Yuko; Sawamura, Haruki; Suematsu, Hiroyuki; Teraji, Mayumi; Hashido, Hikonori; Matsukawa, Yoko; Matsubara, Shigenori; Miyabe, Takanori; Mikamo, Hiroshige; Watanabe, Kunitomo

    2010-02-01

    We analyzed Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates from the bloodstream between April 2005 and February 2007. We analyzed isolates of 28 strains from medical facilities in Gifu prefecture to determine antibiotic susceptibility, genotype of penicillin-binding protein (PBP) genes and macrolide resistant genes. We also assessed the efficacy of respiratory quinolones using Monte Carlo simulation. Garenoxacin (GRNX) and moxifloxacin (MFLX) showed the lowest MIC90 value of 0.125 microg/mL, followed by MIC90 of imipenem (IPM) of 0.25 microg/mL and tosufloxacin (TFLX), MIC90 of meropenem (MEPM) and vancomycin (VCM) of 0.5 microg/mL. Twenty-two strains possessed at least one mutation in PBP-encoding genes pbp1a, pbp2x or pbp2b and seven strains possessed all three mutant alleles. Twenty-two strains possessed either of macrolide resistant genes ermB or mefA, and one strain possessed both. On efficacy assessment, we calculated the probability of target attainment for free-drug area under the curve (fAUC)/MIC ratio (fAUC/MIC). GRNX and MFLX showed a probability of 90% or more at fAUC/MIC of 30 and 125, each considered effective against Gram-positive bacteria and suppression of resistance development, furthermore, GRNX showed a probability of 89.7% at fAUC/MIC of 250.

  2. Swallowing disorders, pneumonia and respiratory tract infectious disease in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Puisieux, F; D'Andrea, C; Baconnier, P; Bui-Dinh, D; Castaings-Pelet, S; Crestani, B; Desrues, B; Ferron, C; Franco, A; Gaillat, J; Guenard, H; Housset, B; Jeandel, C; Jebrak, G; Leymarie-Saddles, A; Orvoen-Frija, E; Piette, F; Pinganaud, G; Salle, J-Y; Strubel, D; Vernejoux, J-M; de Wazières, B; Weil-Engerer, S

    2011-10-01

    Swallowing disorders (or dysphagia) are common in the elderly and their prevalence is often underestimated. They may result in serious complications including dehydration, malnutrition, airway obstruction, aspiration pneumonia (infectious process) or pneumonitis (chemical injury caused by the inhalation of sterile gastric contents). Moreover the repercussions of dysphagia are not only physical but also emotional and social, leading to depression, altered quality of life, and social isolation. While some changes in swallowing may be a natural result of aging, dysphagia in the elderly is mainly due to central nervous system diseases such as stroke, parkinsonism, dementia, medications, local oral and oesophageal factors. To be effective, management requires a multidisciplinary team approach and a careful assessment of the patient's oropharyngeal anatomy and physiology, medical and nutritional status, cognition, language and behaviour. Clinical evaluation can be completed by a videofluoroscopic study which enables observation of bolus movement and movements of the oral cavity, pharynx and larynx throughout the swallow. The treatment depends on the underlying cause, extent of dysphagia and prognosis. Various categories of treatment are available, including compensatory strategies (postural changes and dietary modification), direct or indirect therapy techniques (swallow manoeuvres, medication and surgical procedures).

  3. Knockdown of HMGN2 increases the internalization of Klebsiella pneumoniae by respiratory epithelial cells through the regulation of α5β1 integrin expression

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xinyuan; Li, Jingyu; Chen, Shanze; Shen, Xiaofei; Yang, Xiaolong; Teng, Yan; Deng, Luxia; Wang, Yi; Chen, Junli; Wang, Xiaoying; Huang, Ning

    2016-01-01

    Integrin receptors, a large family of adhesion receptors, are involved in the attachment of Klebsiella pneumoniae to respiratory epithelial cells, and subsequently cause the internalization of K. pneumoniae by host cells. Although a number of molecules have been reported to regulate the expression and activity of integrin receptors in respiratory epithelial cells, the specific underlying molecular mechanisms remain largely unknown. High mobility group nucleosomal binding domain 2 (HMGN2), a non-histone nuclear protein, is present in eukaryotic cells as a ubiquitous nuclear protein. Our previous studies have demonstrated that HMGN2 affects chromatin function and modulates the expression of antibacterial peptide in A549 cells exposed to lipopolysaccharide, which indicates the critical role of HMGN2 in innate immune responses. In addition, our cDNA microarray analysis suggested that HMGN2 knockdown induced the enhanced expression of α5β1 integrin in A549 cells. Therefore, we hypothesized that intercellular HMGN2 may mediate the internalization of K. pneumoniae by altering the expression of α5β1 integrin. Using the A549 cell line, we demonstrated that HMGN2 knockdown induced the increased expression of α5β1 integrin on cell membranes, which resulted in a significant increase in K. pneumoniae internalization. Further results revealed that HMGN2 silencing induced the expression of talin and the activation of α5β1 integrin, which led to actin polymerization following the phosphorylation of FAK and Src. This study suggests a possible therapeutic application for bacterial internalization by targeting HMGN2 in order to treat K. pneumoniae infection. PMID:27460641

  4. Use of an oscillatory PEP device to enhance bronchial hygiene in a patient of post-H1NI pneumonia and acute respiratory distress syndrome with pneumothorax.

    PubMed

    Narula, Deepali; Nangia, Vivek

    2014-03-07

    A 26-year-old, 14 week pregnant woman was admitted to our hospital with pneumonia with acute respiratory distress syndrome in an intubated and mechanically ventilated state. She was diagnosed to have polymicrobial infection and left-sided pneumothorax and was put on a ventilator for 2 weeks. Postextubation, she found it difficult to clear her respiratory secretions despite aggressive routine chest physiotherapy. She was planned to undergo a mini-tracheostomy for tracheobronchial toileting. However, before that, she was given a trial of Acapella, a hand-held oscillatory positive expiratory pressure (OPEP) therapy device, for facilitating airway clearance, with the aim to speed up the recovery. The patient found it easy to use and clear the secretions optimally, thus averting a mini-tracheostomy. This case report highlights the advantages of the OPEP therapy device in effective management of bronchial hygiene in patients with poor respiratory effort.

  5. Use of an oscillatory PEP device to enhance bronchial hygiene in a patient of post-H1NI pneumonia and acute respiratory distress syndrome with pneumothorax

    PubMed Central

    Narula, Deepali; Nangia, Vivek

    2014-01-01

    A 26-year-old, 14 week pregnant woman was admitted to our hospital with pneumonia with acute respiratory distress syndrome in an intubated and mechanically ventilated state. She was diagnosed to have polymicrobial infection and left-sided pneumothorax and was put on a ventilator for 2 weeks. Postextubation, she found it difficult to clear her respiratory secretions despite aggressive routine chest physiotherapy. She was planned to undergo a mini-tracheostomy for tracheobronchial toileting. However, before that, she was given a trial of Acapella, a hand-held oscillatory positive expiratory pressure (OPEP) therapy device, for facilitating airway clearance, with the aim to speed up the recovery. The patient found it easy to use and clear the secretions optimally, thus averting a mini-tracheostomy. This case report highlights the advantages of the OPEP therapy device in effective management of bronchial hygiene in patients with poor respiratory effort. PMID:24717858

  6. Characteristics of Streptococcus pneumoniae Strains Colonizing Upper Respiratory Tract of Healthy Preschool Children in Poland

    PubMed Central

    Korona-Glowniak, Izabela; Malm, Anna

    2012-01-01

    Antibiotic resistant and invasive pneumococci may spread temporally and locally in day care centers (DCCs). We examined 267 children attending four DCCs located in the same city and 70 children staying at home in three seasons (autumn, winter, and spring) to determine prevalence, serotype distribution, antibiotic resistance patterns, and transmission of pneumococcal strains colonizing upper respiratory tract of healthy children without antipneumococcal vaccination. By pheno- and genotyping, we determined clonality of pneumococci, including drug-resistant strains. The average carriage of pneumococci in three seasons was 38.2%. 73.4% and 80.4% of the isolates belonged to serotypes present in 10- and 13-valent conjugate vaccine, respectively. Among the pneumococcal strains, 33.3% were susceptible to all antimicrobial tested and 39.2% had decreased susceptibility to penicillin. Multidrug resistance was common (35.7%); 97.5% of drug-resistant isolates represented serotypes included to 10- and 13-valent conjugate vaccine. According to BOX-PCR, clonality definitely was observed only in case of serotype 14. Multivariate analysis determined DCC attendance as strongly related to pneumococcal colonization in all three seasons, but important seasonal differences were demonstrated. In children attending DCCs, we observed dynamic turnover of pneumococcal strains, especially penicillin nonsusceptible and multidrug resistant, which were mostly distributed among serotypes included to available pneumococcal conjugate vaccines. PMID:22927787

  7. [Pneumonia in the elderly].

    PubMed

    Catherinot, Emilie

    2012-01-01

    Pneumonia is a serious medical pathology frequent in elderly people. The physiological changes of the respiratory system linked with age reduce postural drainage capacities and increase the risk of acute respiratory failure. Associated with other comorbidities, chronic inhalation is a major risk factor of pneumonia in elderly people. Prevention is based on vaccination, nutrition, dental care and an adapted diet.

  8. Pneumocystis carinii causes a distinctive interstitial pneumonia in immunocompetent laboratory rats that had been attributed to "rat respiratory virus".

    PubMed

    Henderson, K S; Dole, V; Parker, N J; Momtsios, P; Banu, L; Brouillette, R; Simon, M A; Albers, T M; Pritchett-Corning, K R; Clifford, C B; Shek, W R

    2012-05-01

    A prevalent and distinctive infectious interstitial pneumonia (IIP) of immunocompetent laboratory rats was suspected to be caused by a putative virus, termed rat respiratory virus, but this was never substantiated. To study this disease, 2 isolators were independently populated with rats from colonies with endemic disease, which was perpetuated by the regular addition of naive rats. After Pneumocystis was demonstrated by histopathology and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in the lungs of rats from both isolators and an earlier bedding transmission study, the relationship between Pneumocystis and IIP was explored further by analyzing specimens from 3 contact transmission experiments, diagnostic submissions, and barrier room breeding colonies, including 1 with and 49 without IIP. Quantitative (q) PCR and immunofluorescence assay only detected Pneumocystis infection and serum antibodies in rats from experiments or colonies in which IIP was diagnosed by histopathology. In immunocompetent hosts, the Pneumocystis concentration in lungs corresponded to the severity and prevalence of IIP; seroconversion occurred when IIP developed and was followed by the concurrent clearance of Pneumocystis from lungs and resolution of disease. Experimentally infected immunodeficient RNU rats, by contrast, did not seroconvert to Pneumocystis or recover from infection. qPCR found Pneumocystis at significantly higher concentrations and much more often in lungs than in bronchial and nasal washes and failed to detect Pneumocystis in oral swabs. The sequences of a mitochondrial ribosomal large-subunit gene region for Pneumocystis from 11 distinct IIP sources were all identical to that of P. carinii. These data provide substantial evidence that P. carinii causes IIP in immunocompetent rats.

  9. Relationship between the Use of Inhaled Steroids for Chronic Respiratory Diseases and Early Outcomes in Community-Acquired Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Almirall, Jordi; Bolíbar, Ignasi; Serra-Prat, Mateu; Palomera, Elisabet; Roig, Jordi; Hospital, Imma; Carandell, Eugenia; Agustí, Mercè; Ayuso, Pilar; Estela, Andreu; Torres, Antoni

    2013-01-01

    Background The role of inhaled steroids in patients with chronic respiratory diseases is a matter of debate due to the potential effect on the development and prognosis of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). We assessed whether treatment with inhaled steroids in patients with chronic bronchitis, COPD or asthma and CAP may affect early outcome of the acute pneumonic episode. Methods Over 1-year period, all population-based cases of CAP in patients with chronic bronchitis, COPD or asthma were registered. Use of inhaled steroids were registered and patients were followed up to 30 days after diagnosis to assess severity of CAP and clinical course (hospital admission, ICU admission and mortality). Results Of 473 patients who fulfilled the selection criteria, inhaled steroids were regularly used by 109 (23%). In the overall sample, inhaled steroids were associated with a higher risk of hospitalization (OR=1.96, p = 0.002) in the bivariate analysis, but this effect disappeared after adjusting by other severity-related factors (adjusted OR=1.08, p=0.787). This effect on hospitalization also disappeared when considering only patients with asthma (OR=1.38, p=0.542), with COPD alone (OR=4.68, p=0.194), but a protective effect was observed in CB patients (OR=0.15, p=0.027). Inhaled steroids showed no association with ICU admission, days to clinical recovery and mortality in the overall sample and in any disease subgroup. Conclusions Treatment with inhaled steroids is not a prognostic factor in COPD and asthmatic patients with CAP, but could prevent hospitalization for CAP in patients with clinical criteria of chronic bronchitis. PMID:24039899

  10. Analysis of the drug-resistant characteristics of Klebsiella pneumoniae isolated from the respiratory tract and CTX-M ESBL genes.

    PubMed

    Huang, S Y; Pan, K Y; Liu, X Q; Xie, X Y; Dai, X L; Chen, B J; Wu, X Q; Li, H Y

    2015-10-05

    The main aim of this study was to understand the relationship between the drug-resistant characteristics of Klebsiella pneumoniae and CTX-M-type extended spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs), and to detect the distributions of CTX-M-type ESBLs in clinically isolated strains. CTX-M ESBL genes isolated from the clinical samples were amplified by polymerase chain reaction and identified by sequence analysis; the antibiotic susceptibility of the samples was determined using the Kirby-Bauer disc-diffusion method. One hundred and five strains among the 246 isolated strains of K. pneumoniae tested positive for ESBL production (42.68%); 92 of these produced CTX-M ESBLs. Of the 92 CTX-M ESBL strains, 81 produced CTX-M-1 ESBLs and 11 produced CTX-M-25 ESBLs. Fifty-seven of the CTX-M-1 ESBL- and six of the CTX-M-25 ESBL-producing bacteria had CTX-M ESBL genes that coexisted in the plasmid and chromosome. The Kirby-Bauer antibiotic susceptibility method revealed that CTX-M ESBL-positive strains showed a higher rate of resistance to cefazolin, cefoxitin, cefuroxime, ceftazidime, cefotaxime, aztreonam, levofloxacin, and cotrimoxazole, compared to the CTX-M ESBL-negative strains (P < 0.05). The CTX-M ESBL genes were commonly observed in the K. pneumoniae isolated from respiratory tract samples; these were significantly associated with the drug-resistant characteristics of K. pneumoniae to β-lactam antibiotics.

  11. Molecular Epidemiology of Streptococcus pneumoniae Isolates from Children with Recurrent Upper Respiratory Tract Infections

    PubMed Central

    Korona-Glowniak, Izabela; Maj, Maciej; Siwiec, Radosław; Niedzielski, Artur; Malm, Anna

    2016-01-01

    A total of 125 isolates were recovered from adenoids and/or nasopharynx of 170 children aged 2 to 5 from south-east Poland; they had undergone adenoidectomy for recurrent and/or persistent symptoms of upper respiratory tract infections. Pneumococcal isolates were analyzed by phenotyping (serotyping and antimicrobial resistance tests) and genotyping together with the clonality of the pneumococcal isolates based on resistance determinants, transposon distribution and multilocus sequence typing (MLST). Serotypes 19F, 6B and 23F constituted 44.8% of the isolates. Among all of the strains, 44.8% showed decreased susceptibility to penicillin and resistance to co-trimoxazole (52.8%), tetracycline (38.4%), erythromycin (53.6%), clindamycin (52.8%) and chloramphenicol (27.2%) was observed. Tn6002 was found in 34.8% of erythromycin-resistant isolates while composite Tn2010—in 16.7% of erm(B)-carrying isolates that harboured also mef(E) gene. Tn3872-related elements were detected in 27.3% of erythromycin-resistant strains. In the majority of chloramphenicol-resistant catpC194-carrying isolates (79.4%), ICESp23FST81-family elements were detected. The genotyping showed that pneumococcal population was very heterogeneous; 82 sequence types (STs) were identified, and the most frequent contributed to not more than 8% of the isolates. Nearly 44% STs were novel, each of them was recovered only from one child. Four STs belonged to one of the 43 worldwide spread resistant pneumococcal clones currently accepted by Pneumococcal Molecular Epidemiology Network (PMEN), i.e. Spain 9V-3, Spain 23F-1, Norway NT-42 and Poland 6B-20, accounting for 12 (16.7%) of the 75 nonususceptible isolates, and five STs were single-locus variants of PMEN resistant clones (England 14–9, Spain 9V-3, Spain 23F-1, Greece 21–30, Denmark 14–32), accounting 9 (12%) of nonsusceptible isolates. A few MDR clones belonging to 6B and 19F serotypes found among preschool children emphasizes rather the role of

  12. Carriage of Streptococcus pneumoniae and Other Respiratory Bacterial Pathogens in Low and Lower-Middle Income Countries: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Adegbola, Richard A.; DeAntonio, Rodrigo; Hill, Philip C.; Roca, Anna; Usuf, Effua; Hoet, Bernard; Greenwood, Brian M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Infection with Streptococcus pneumoniae is a major cause of childhood morbidity and mortality worldwide, especially in low income countries where pneumococcal conjugate vaccines (PCVs) are still underused. In countries where PCVs have been introduced, much of their efficacy has resulted from their impact on nasopharyngeal carriage in vaccinated children. Understanding the epidemiology of carriage for S. pneumoniae and other common respiratory bacteria in developing countries is crucial for implementing appropriate vaccination strategies and evaluating their impact. Methods and Findings We have systematically reviewed published studies reporting nasopharyngeal or oropharyngeal carriage of S. pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, Moraxella catarrhalis, Staphylococcus aureus, and Neisseria meningitidis in children and adults in low and lower-middle income countries. Studies reporting pneumococcal carriage for healthy children <5 years of age were selected for a meta-analysis. The prevalences of carriage for S. pneumoniae, H. influenzae, and M. catarrhalis were generally higher in low income than in lower-middle income countries and were higher in young children than in adults. The prevalence of S. aureus was high in neonates. Meta-analysis of data from young children before the introduction of PCVs showed a pooled prevalence estimate of 64.8% (95% confidence interval, 49.8%–76.1%) in low income countries and 47.8% (95% confidence interval, 44.7%–50.8%) in lower-middle income countries. The most frequent serotypes were 6A, 6B, 19A, 19F, and 23F. Conclusions In low and lower-middle income countries, pneumococcal carriage is frequent, especially in children, and the spectrum of serotypes is wide. However, because data are limited, additional studies are needed to adequately assess the impact of PCV introduction on carriage of respiratory bacteria in these countries. PMID:25084351

  13. Time-dependent changes in pulmonary surfactant function and composition in acute respiratory distress syndrome due to pneumonia or aspiration

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Reinhold; Markart, Philipp; Ruppert, Clemens; Wygrecka, Malgorzata; Kuchenbuch, Tim; Walmrath, Dieter; Seeger, Werner; Guenther, Andreas

    2007-01-01

    Background Alterations to pulmonary surfactant composition have been encountered in the Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS). However, only few data are available regarding the time-course and duration of surfactant changes in ARDS patients, although this information may largely influence the optimum design of clinical trials addressing surfactant replacement therapy. We therefore examined the time-course of surfactant changes in 15 patients with direct ARDS (pneumonia, aspiration) over the first 8 days after onset of mechanical ventilation. Methods Three consecutive bronchoalveolar lavages (BAL) were performed shortly after intubation (T0), and four days (T1) and eight days (T2) after intubation. Fifteen healthy volunteers served as controls. Phospholipid-to-protein ratio in BAL fluids, phospholipid class profiles, phosphatidylcholine (PC) molecular species, surfactant proteins (SP)-A, -B, -C, -D, and relative content and surface tension properties of large surfactant aggregates (LA) were assessed. Results At T0, a severe and highly significant reduction in SP-A, SP-B and SP-C, the LA fraction, PC and phosphatidylglycerol (PG) percentages, and dipalmitoylation of PC (DPPC) was encountered. Surface activity of the LA fraction was greatly impaired. Over time, significant improvements were encountered especially in view of LA content, DPPC, PG and SP-A, but minimum surface tension of LA was not fully restored (15 mN/m at T2). A highly significant correlation was observed between PaO2/FiO2 and minimum surface tension (r = -0.83; p < 0.001), SP-C (r = 0.64; p < 0.001), and DPPC (r = 0.59; p = 0.003). Outcome analysis revealed that non-survivors had even more unfavourable surfactant properties as compared to survivors. Conclusion We concluded that a profound impairment of pulmonary surfactant composition and function occurs in the very early stage of the disease and only gradually resolves over time. These observations may explain why former surfactant replacement

  14. Quorum-Sensing Systems LuxS/Autoinducer 2 and Com Regulate Streptococcus pneumoniae Biofilms in a Bioreactor with Living Cultures of Human Respiratory Cells

    PubMed Central

    Howery, Kristen E.; Ludewick, Herbert P.; Nava, Porfirio; Klugman, Keith P.

    2013-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae forms organized biofilms in the human upper respiratory tract that may play an essential role in both persistence and acute respiratory infection. However, the production and regulation of biofilms on human cells is not yet fully understood. In this work, we developed a bioreactor with living cultures of human respiratory epithelial cells (HREC) and a continuous flow of nutrients, mimicking the microenvironment of the human respiratory epithelium, to study the production and regulation of S. pneumoniae biofilms (SPB). SPB were also produced under static conditions on immobilized HREC. Our experiments demonstrated that the biomass of SPB increased significantly when grown on HREC compared to the amount on abiotic surfaces. Additionally, pneumococcal strains produced more early biofilms on lung cells than on pharyngeal cells. Utilizing the bioreactor or immobilized human cells, the production of early SPB was found to be regulated by two quorum-sensing systems, Com and LuxS/AI-2, since a mutation in either comC or luxS rendered the pneumococcus unable to produce early biofilms on HREC. Interestingly, while LuxS/autoinducer 2 (AI-2) regulated biofilms on both HREC and abiotic surfaces, Com control was specific for those structures produced on HREC. The biofilm phenotypes of strain D39-derivative ΔcomC and ΔluxS QS mutants were reversed by genetic complementation. Of note, SPB formed on immobilized HREC and incubated under static conditions were completely lysed 24 h postinoculation. Biofilm lysis was also regulated by the Com and LuxS/AI-2 quorum-sensing systems. PMID:23403556

  15. Quorum-sensing systems LuxS/autoinducer 2 and Com regulate Streptococcus pneumoniae biofilms in a bioreactor with living cultures of human respiratory cells.

    PubMed

    Vidal, Jorge E; Howery, Kristen E; Ludewick, Herbert P; Nava, Porfirio; Klugman, Keith P

    2013-04-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae forms organized biofilms in the human upper respiratory tract that may play an essential role in both persistence and acute respiratory infection. However, the production and regulation of biofilms on human cells is not yet fully understood. In this work, we developed a bioreactor with living cultures of human respiratory epithelial cells (HREC) and a continuous flow of nutrients, mimicking the microenvironment of the human respiratory epithelium, to study the production and regulation of S. pneumoniae biofilms (SPB). SPB were also produced under static conditions on immobilized HREC. Our experiments demonstrated that the biomass of SPB increased significantly when grown on HREC compared to the amount on abiotic surfaces. Additionally, pneumococcal strains produced more early biofilms on lung cells than on pharyngeal cells. Utilizing the bioreactor or immobilized human cells, the production of early SPB was found to be regulated by two quorum-sensing systems, Com and LuxS/AI-2, since a mutation in either comC or luxS rendered the pneumococcus unable to produce early biofilms on HREC. Interestingly, while LuxS/autoinducer 2 (AI-2) regulated biofilms on both HREC and abiotic surfaces, Com control was specific for those structures produced on HREC. The biofilm phenotypes of strain D39-derivative ΔcomC and ΔluxS QS mutants were reversed by genetic complementation. Of note, SPB formed on immobilized HREC and incubated under static conditions were completely lysed 24 h postinoculation. Biofilm lysis was also regulated by the Com and LuxS/AI-2 quorum-sensing systems.

  16. The effect of an upper respiratory care program on incidence of ventilator-associated pneumonia in mechanically ventilated patients hospitalized in intensive care units

    PubMed Central

    Bakhtiari, Soheila; Yazdannik, Ahmadreza; Abbasi, Saeid; Bahrami, Nasim

    2015-01-01

    Background: Ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) is a common side effect in patients with an endotracheal tube. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of an upper respiratory care program on the incidence of VAP in mechanically ventilated patients. Materials and Methods: In this clinical trial, 62 patients with endotracheal tube were selected and randomly allocated to intervention or control group. In the intervention group, an upper respiratory care program was performed and in the control group, routine care was done. Modified Clinical Pulmonary Infection Questionnaire was completed before, and on the third, fourth, and fifth day after intervention. Data were analyzed by repeated measure analysis of variance (ANOVA), chi-square, and independent t-test through SPSS 13. Results: The results of this study showed that until the fourth day, the incidence of VAP was similar in both intervention and control groups (P > 0.05), but on the fifth day, the incidence of VAP in the intervention group was significantly lower than in the control group (P < 0.05). Conclusions: The results of this study showed that in patients with an endotracheal tube, an upper respiratory care program may reduce the incidence of VAP. Therefore, in order to prevent VAP, nurses are recommended to perform this upper respiratory care program. PMID:26120336

  17. [The impact of viruses in lower respiratory tract infections of the adult. Part II: acute bronchitis, acute exacerbated COPD, pneumonia, and influenza].

    PubMed

    Ott, S R; Rohde, G; Lepper, P M; Hauptmeier, B; Bals, R; Pletz, M W R; Schumann, C; Steininger, C; Kleines, M; Geerdes-Fenge, H

    2010-01-01

    In industrialized countries respiratory tract infections are one of the most common reasons for medical consultations. It is assumed that almost one third of these infections affect the lower respiratory tract (LRTI), e. g. acute bronchitis, acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), community- or hospital-acquired pneumonia and influenza. Due to a lack of sufficient and valid investigations on the epidemiology of respiratory viruses, their impact on the pathogenesis of LRTI has probably been underestimated for a long time. Therefore, there might have been many cases of needless antibiotic treatment, particularly in cases of acute bronchitis or acute exacerbations of COPD, because of an assumed bacteriological aetiology. Following the introduction of diagnostic procedures with increased sensitivity, such as polymerase chain reaction, it is possible to reliably detect respiratory viruses and to illuminate their role in the pathogenesis of LRTI of the adult. We have reviewed the current literature to elucidate the role of viruses in the pathogenesis of LRTI. The first part of this series described frequent viral pathogens, pathogenesis of viral LRTI, and diagnostic procedures. In this 2 (nd) part the aetiological role of viruses in the most frequent forms of LRTI will be highlighted, and the third and last part will provide an overview of therapeutic and preventive options.

  18. The roles of epithelial cell contact, respiratory bacterial interactions and phosphorylcholine in promoting biofilm formation by Streptococcus pneumoniae and nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae.

    PubMed

    Krishnamurthy, Ajay; Kyd, Jennelle

    2014-08-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae and nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) often share a common niche within the nasopharynx, both associated with infections such as bronchitis and otitis media. This study investigated how the association between NTHi and S. pneumoniae and the host affects their propensity to form biofilms. We investigated a selection of bacterial strain and serotype combinations on biofilm formation, and the effect of contact with respiratory epithelial cells. Measurement of biofilm showed that co-infection with NTHi and S. pneumoniae increased biofilm formation following contact with epithelial cells compared to no contact demonstrating the role of epithelial cells in biofilm formation. Additionally, the influence of phosphorylcholine (ChoP) on biofilm production was investigated using the licD mutant strain of NTHi 2019 and found that ChoP had a role in mixed biofilm formation but was not the only requirement. The study highlights the complex interactions between microbes and the host epithelium during biofilm production, suggesting the importance of understanding why certain strains and serotypes differentially influence biofilm formation. A key contributor to increased biofilm formation was the upregulation of biofilm formation by epithelial cell factors.

  19. Severe pneumonia due to infection with Candida krusei in a case of suspected Middle East respiratory syndrome: A case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Mingming; Wang, Junwei; Hu, Peiyang; Wang, Bin; Xu, Wanghua; Chen, Jiao

    2016-01-01

    Candida krusei (C. krusei) pneumonia is a rare infection that is frequently associated with a poor outcome. The present study reports an unusual case of C. krusei pneumonia that was initially suspected to be a Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) case. A 64-year-old Saudi Arabian male patient was admitted to our hospital with complaints of cough and dyspnea that persisted for 6 days. The patient presented fever (oral temperature, 38.5°C) and slight tachypnea (25 respirations/min). A chest computerized tomography demonstrated unclear lung fields, diffuse pathological changes in the two lungs and multiple lymphadenectasis in the retrocaval and para-aortic arch area. The patient received 95–98% oxygen (6 l/min) for 24 h, as well as sulbactam sodium/cefoperazone sodium (1:1) injection (3.0 g) every 12 h, oral oseltamivir capsules (75 mg/time) twice a day, medaron injection (80 mg/time) and 750 ml fluid infusion; however, he succumbed to the disease on day 2 after admission. The infection was diagnosed by sputum smear and culture subsequent to patient mortality. A sputum smear showed a large fungal infection and sputum culture revealed the presence of C. krusei infection. Serum procalcitonin concentrations were 4.73 µg/l and 7.23 µg/l on days 2 and 3 after admission, respectively. In conclusion, the diagnosis of Candida pneumonia should be strongly considered in the presence of growth of Candida from a sputum culture and based on a suggestive computed tomography image. Tumescent diaphragmatic lymph nodes may also be an important symptom of Candida pneumonia. Treatment should be initiated immediately to improve tissue oxygenation, restore cardiovascular function and improve other organ functions. PMID:28101187

  20. Infectivity-Neutralizing and Hemagglutinin-Inhibiting Antibody Responses to Respiratory Coronavirus Infections of Cattle in Pathogenesis of Shipping Fever Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Xiaoqing; O'Reilly, Kathy L.; Burrell, Mamie L.; Storz, Johannes

    2001-01-01

    Respiratory bovine coronaviruses (RBCV) emerged as an infectious agent most frequently isolated from respiratory tract samples of cattle with acute respiratory tract diseases. Infectivity-neutralizing (IN) and hemagglutinin-inhibiting (HAI) antibodies induced by RBCV infections were monitored in sequential serum samples collected from cattle during a naturally evolving and experimentally monitored epizootic of shipping fever pneumonia (SFP). Cattle nasally shedding RBCV at the beginning of the epizootic started with low levels of serum IN and HAI antibodies. An increase in serum IN antibody after day 7 led to reduction of virus shedding in nasal secretions by the majority of the cattle between days 7 and 14. A substantial rise in the serum HAI antibody was observed during the initial phase among the sick but not the clinically normal cattle which were infected with RBCV. The RBCV isolation-positive cattle that developed fatal SFP had minimal serum IN and HAI antibodies during the course of disease development. Cattle that remained negative in RBCV isolation tests entered this epizootic with high levels of serum IN and HAI antibodies, which dramatically increased during the next two weeks. Protection against SFP was apparently associated with significantly higher levels of serum IN antibodies at the beginning of the epizootic. The RBCV-neutralizing activity is associated with serum immunoglobulin G (IgG), particularly the IgG2 subclass, while RBCV-specific HAI antibody is related to both serum IgG and IgM fractions. PMID:11238222

  1. Comparison of Luminex xTAG® RVP fast assay and real time RT-PCR for the detection of respiratory viruses in adults with community-acquired pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Luchsinger, Vivian; Prades, Yara; Ruiz, Mauricio; Pizarro, Rolando; Rossi, Patricio; Lizama, Luis; Garmendia, María Luisa; Meza, Angela; Larrañaga, Carmen; Avendaño, Luis F

    2016-07-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is the third cause of death worldwide. Viruses are frequently detected in adult CAP. Highly sensitive diagnostic techniques should be used due to poor viral shedding. Different sampling methods can affect viral detection, being necessary to establish the optimal type of sample for identifying respiratory viruses in adults. The detection rates of respiratory viruses by Luminex xTAG® RVP fast assay, real time RT-PCR (rtRT-PCR) (Sacace®), and immunofluorescence assay (IFA) in adult CAP were performed in nasopharyngeal swabs (NPS) and aspirates (NPA) from 179 hospitalized adults. Positivity was 47.5% for Luminex®, 42.5% for rtRT-PCR (P = 0.3), and 2.7% for IFA (2.7%) (P < 0.0). The sensitivity, specificity, and kappa coefficient of xTAG® RVP compared with rtRT-PCR were 84.2%, 79.6%, and 0.62%, respectively. Luminex® and rtRT-PCR detected 65 (58.0%) and 57 (50.9%) viruses in 112 NPA and 35 (34.3%) and 31 (30.4%) in 102 NPS, respectively (P < 0.01). xTAG® RVP is appropriate for detecting respiratory viruses in CAP adults. Both molecular techniques yielded better results with nasopharyngeal aspirate than swabs.

  2. Microfluidic Platform versus Conventional Real-time PCR for the Detection of Mycoplasma pneumoniae in Respiratory Specimens

    PubMed Central

    Wulff-Burchfield, Elizabeth; Schell, Wiley A.; Eckhardt, Allen E.; Pollack, Michael G.; Hua, Zhishan; Rouse, Jeremy L.; Pamula, Vamsee K.; Srinivasan, Vijay; Benton, Jonathan L.; Alexander, Barbara D.; Wilfret, David A.; Kraft, Monica; Cairns, Charles; Perfect, John R.; Mitchell, Thomas G.

    2010-01-01

    Rapid, accurate diagnosis of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) due to Mycoplasma pneumoniae is compromised by low sensitivity of culture and serology. PCR has emerged as a sensitive method to detect M. pneumoniae DNA in clinical specimens. However, conventional real-time PCR is not cost-effective for routine out-patient or implementation. Here, we evaluate a novel microfluidic real-time PCR platform (Advanced Liquid Logic, Inc.) that is rapid, portable, and fully automated. We enrolled patients with CAP and extracted DNA from nasopharyngeal wash (NPW) specimens using a biotinylated capture probe and streptavidin-coupled magnetic beads. Each extract was tested for M. pneumoniae-specific DNA by real-time PCR on both conventional and microfluidic platforms using Taqman probe and primers. Three of 59 (5.0%) NPWs were positive, and agreement between the methods was 98%. The microfluidic platform was equally sensitive but three times faster and offers an inexpensive and convenient diagnostic test for microbial DNA. PMID:20227222

  3. Branhamella catarrhalis Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Louie, Milton H.; Gabay, Elizabeth L.; Mathisen, Glenn E.; Finegold, Sydney M.

    1983-01-01

    The diagnosis of Branhamella catarrhalis pneumonia in five cases was established by culture of pulmonary secretions obtained by transtracheal aspiration. B catarrhalis caused an acute lobar pneumonia which usually responded promptly to appropriate antimicrobial therapy. Recognition that this organism may cause pneumonia in a nonimmunocompromised person should alert clinicians to consider it as a possible pathogen when Gramnegative diplococci are seen on smears of specimens from the lower respiratory tract. Images PMID:6837019

  4. Comparison of pyrosequencing, Sanger sequencing, and melting curve analysis for detection of low-frequency macrolide-resistant mycoplasma pneumoniae quasispecies in respiratory specimens.

    PubMed

    Chan, Kwok-Hung; To, Kelvin K W; Chan, Betsy W K; Li, Clara P Y; Chiu, Susan S; Yuen, Kwok-Yung; Ho, Pak-Leung

    2013-08-01

    Macrolide-resistant Mycoplasma pneumoniae (MRMP) is emerging worldwide and has been associated with treatment failure. In this study, we used pyrosequencing to detect low-frequency MRMP quasispecies in respiratory specimens, and we compared the findings with those obtained by Sanger sequencing and SimpleProbe PCR coupled with a melting curve analysis (SimpleProbe PCR). Sanger sequencing, SimpleProbe PCR, and pyrosequencing were successfully performed for 96.7% (88/91), 96.7% (88/91), and 93.4% (85/91) of the M. pneumoniae-positive specimens, respectively. The A-to-G transition at position 2063 was the only mutation identified. Pyrosequencing identified A2063G MRMP quasispecies populations in 78.8% (67/88) of the specimens. Only 38.8% (26/67) of these specimens with the A2063G quasispecies detected by pyrosequencing were found to be A2063G quasispecies by Sanger sequencing or SimpleProbe PCR. The specimens that could be detected by SimpleProbe PCR and Sanger sequencing had higher frequencies of MRMP quasispecies (51% to 100%) than those that could not be detected by those two methods (1% to 44%). SimpleProbe PCR correctly categorized all specimens that were identified as wild type or mutant by Sanger sequencing. The clinical characteristics of the patients were not significantly different when they were grouped by the presence or absence of MRMP quasispecies, while patients with MRMP identified by Sanger sequencing more often required a switch from macrolides to an alternative M. pneumoniae-targeted therapy. The clinical significance of mutant quasispecies should be investigated further with larger patient populations and with specimens obtained before and after macrolide therapy.

  5. Clinical efficacy of carbapenems on hospital-acquired pneumonia in accordance with the Japanese Respiratory Society Guidelines for management of HAP.

    PubMed

    Ito, Masaru; Kaneko, Takeshi; Goto, Hideto; Yamaguchi, Nobuhiro; Fujisawa, Shin; Ono, Shigeru; Morita, Satoshi; Miyazawa, Naoki; Kanamori, Heiwa; Watanuki, Yuji; Ishigatsubo, Yoshiaki

    2011-12-01

    Hospital-acquired pneumonia (HAP) is the second most common cause of hospital-acquired infection and is the leading cause of death. In 2002, the Japanese Respiratory Society (JRS) published guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of HAP (JRS GL 2002). In these guidelines, treatment with carbapenems is recommended for all disease types of HAP, excluding cases of mild or moderate pneumonia with no risk factors, and cases with early-onset ventilation-acquired pneumonia. To evaluate the efficacy of carbapenems on HAP in accordance with JRS GL 2002, we conducted a prospective study of HAP patients treated with carbapenems based on JRS GL 2002. The results of this study were also analyzed based on the revised guidelines published in June 2008 (JRS GL 2008), and the validity of the new guidelines was examined. Of the 33 subjects, 19 were judged as responders to the treatment, corresponding to a response rate of 57.6%. There were 3 deaths, corresponding to a mortality rate of 9.1%. The efficacy of carbapenems for the treatment of HAP based on JRS GL 2002 was confirmed. The severity rating system in JRS GL 2002 has a tendency to overestimate the severity of the cases and may lead to overtreatment in some cases. On the other hand, the severity rating system by JRS GL 2008 seemed to be more accurate and closely correlated with the efficacy of the treatment. It is suggested that JRS GL 2008 is more useful in clinical practice for accurately judging the severity of the disease and initiating appropriate subsequent antibiotic therapy.

  6. Effect of Ampicillin on the kinetics of colonization of Streptococcus pneumoniae and Lactobacillus fermentum in the respiratory tract of mice

    PubMed Central

    Cangemi de Gutiérrez, Rosa; Santos, Viviana; Cecilia, Marta; Silva, Clara; Nader-Macías, María Elena

    2004-01-01

    Ampicillin was selected to further study the effect of this antibiotic on the colonization capability of S. pneumoniae and L. fermentum intranasally inoculated in a mice experimental model. The sensitivity of S. pneumoniae and L. fermentum to antibiotics was evaluated by different "in vitro" techniques. The results showed that both microorganisms have a typical pattern of sensitivity to antibiotics in these assays. The "in vivo" experiments showed that the treatment with Ampicillin increased the number of lactobacilli and neumococci in the groups of mice treated only with one of the microorganisms. In those mice treated with Lactobacillus, challenged later with neumococci and treated with Ampicillin, the pathogen in lung decreased on the 4th day, disappearing completely after on. The histological studies showed that the antibiotic treatment decreased the inflammatory response produced by the pathogen at the lung and trachea levels. PMID:15509298

  7. Unique Pattern of Enzootic Primate Viruses in Gibraltar Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Engel, Gregory A.; Pizarro, Mark; Shaw, Eric; Cortes, John; Fuentes, Agustin; Barry, Peter; Lerche, Nicholas; Grant, Richard; Cohn, Douglas

    2008-01-01

    Because Gibraltar's macaques (Macaca sylvanus) have frequent contact with humans, we assayed 79 macaques for antibodies to enzootic primate viruses. All macaques were seronegative for herpesvirus B, simian T-cell lymphotropic virus, simian retrovirus, simian immunodeficiency virus, and rhesus cytomegalovirus. Seroprevalence of simian foamy virus reached 88% among adult animals. PMID:18598634

  8. Efficacy of a new fluoroquinolone, JNJ-Q2, in murine models of Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pneumoniae skin, respiratory, and systemic infections.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, Jeffrey; Hilliard, Jamese J; Morrow, Brian J; Melton, John L; Flamm, Robert K; Barron, Alfred M; Lynch, A Simon

    2011-12-01

    The in vivo efficacy of JNJ-Q2, a new broad-spectrum fluoroquinolone (FQ), was evaluated in a murine septicemia model with methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) and methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) and in a Streptococcus pneumoniae lower respiratory tract infection model. JNJ-Q2 and comparators were also evaluated in an acute murine skin infection model using a community-acquired MRSA strain and in an established skin infection (ESI) model using a hospital-acquired strain, for which the selection of resistant mutants was also determined. JNJ-Q2 demonstrated activity in the MSSA septicemia model that was comparable to that moxifloxacin (JNJ-Q2 50% effective dose [ED(50)], 0.2 mg/kg of body weight administered subcutaneously [s.c.] and 2 mg/kg administered orally [p.o.]) and activity in the MRSA septicemia model that was superior to that of vancomycin (JNJ-Q2 ED(50), 1.6 mg/kg administered s.c.). In an S. pneumoniae lower respiratory tract infection model, JNJ-Q2 displayed activity (ED(50), 1.9 mg/kg administered s.c. and 7.4 mg/kg administered p.o.) that was comparable to that of gemifloxacin and superior to that of moxifloxacin. In both MRSA skin infection models, treatment with JNJ-Q2 resulted in dose-dependent reductions in bacterial titers in the skin, with the response to JNJ-Q2 at each dose exceeding the responses of the comparators ciprofloxacin, moxifloxacin, linezolid, and vancomycin. Additionally, in the ESI model, JNJ-Q2 showed a low or nondetectable propensity for ciprofloxacin resistance selection, in contrast to the selection of ciprofloxacin-resistant mutants observed for both ciprofloxacin and moxifloxacin. JNJ-Q2 demonstrated activity that was comparable or superior to the activity of fluoroquinolone or antistaphylococcal comparators in several local and systemic skin infection models performed with both S. aureus and S. pneumoniae and is currently being evaluated in phase II human clinical trials.

  9. [Recurrent infections of the respiratory tract and staphylococcal pneumonia with septic shock and total respiratory failure in a patient with histiocytosis X].

    PubMed

    Wawrzyńska, L; Meleniewska-Maciszewska, A; Burakowski, J

    1994-01-01

    Disseminated pulmonary infiltrates, cutaneous lesions and diabetes insipidus in a female patients with a history of recurrent pneumothorax and persistent respiratory tract infections suggested the diagnosis of histiocytosis X. The pathological examination of a biopsy lung tissue specimen confirmed that diagnosis. In the course of treatment many dangerous complications were observed. The intensive therapy including artificial ventilation (24 days) was fully effective and settle the beneficial clinical outcome.

  10. A systematic review of the preventive effect of oral hygiene on pneumonia and respiratory tract infection in elderly people in hospitals and nursing homes: effect estimates and methodological quality of randomized controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Sjögren, Petteri; Nilsson, Erika; Forsell, Marianne; Johansson, Olle; Hoogstraate, Janet

    2008-11-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the preventive effect of oral hygiene on pneumonia and respiratory tract infection, focusing on elderly people in hospitals and nursing homes, by systematically reviewing effect estimates and methodological quality of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and to provide an overview of additional clinical studies in this area. Literature searches were conducted in the Medline database, the Cochrane library databases, and by hand-searching reference lists. Included publications were analyzed for intervention (or topic) studied, main conclusions, strength of evidence, and study design. RCTs were further analyzed for effect magnitudes and methodological details. Absolute risk reductions (ARRs) and numbers needed to treat (NNTs) were calculated. Fifteen publications fulfilled the inclusion criteria. There was a wide variation in the design and quality of the studies included. The RCTs revealed positive preventive effects of oral hygiene on pneumonia and respiratory tract infection in hospitalized elderly people and elderly nursing home residents, with ARRs from 6.6% to 11.7% and NNTs from 8.6 to 15.3 individuals. The non-RCT studies contributed to inconclusive evidence on the association and correlation between oral hygiene and pneumonia or respiratory tract infection in elderly people. Mechanical oral hygiene has a preventive effect on mortality from pneumonia, and non-fatal pneumonia in hospitalized elderly people and elderly nursing home residents. Approximately one in 10 cases of death from pneumonia in elderly nursing home residents may be prevented by improving oral hygiene. Future research in this area should be focused on high-quality RCTs with appropriate sample size calculations.

  11. Atypical pneumonia

    MedlinePlus

    Bacteria that cause atypical pneumonia include: Mycoplasma pneumonia is caused by the bacteria Mycoplasma pneumoniae . It often affects people younger than age 40. Pneumonia due to Chlamydophila pneumoniae bacteria ...

  12. Pneumocystis pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Gilroy, Shelley A; Bennett, Nicholas J

    2011-12-01

    Pneumocystis (carinii) jiroveci pneumonia can occur in immunocompromised individuals, especially hematopoietic stem and solid organ transplant recipients and those receiving immunosuppressive agents, and is the most common opportunistic infection in persons with advanced human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. The Pneumocystis genus was initially mistaken as a trypanosome and later as a protozoan. Genetic analysis identified the organism as a unicellular fungus. Pneumocystis jiroveci is the species responsible for human infections. A slow indolent time course with symptoms of pneumonia progressing over weeks to months is characteristic in HIV-infected patients. Fulminant respiratory failure associated with fever and dry cough is typical in non-HIV-infected patients. Definitive diagnosis relies on histopathological testing of sputum, induced or sampled by fiberoptic bronchoscopy with bronchoalveolar lavage. The first-line drug for treatment and prevention is trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole.

  13. [Nosocomial pneumonia].

    PubMed

    Díaz, Emili; Martín-Loeches, Ignacio; Vallés, Jordi

    2013-12-01

    The hospital acquired pneumonia (HAP) is one of the most common infections acquired among hospitalised patients. Within the HAP, the ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) is the most common nosocomial infection complication among patients with acute respiratory failure. The VAP and HAP are associated with increased mortality and increased hospital costs. The rise in HAP due to antibiotic-resistant bacteria also causes an increase in the incidence of inappropriate empirical antibiotic therapy, with an associated increased risk of hospital mortality. It is very important to know the most common organisms responsible for these infections in each hospital and each Intensive Care Unit, as well as their antimicrobial susceptibility patterns, in order to reduce the incidence of inappropriate antibiotic therapy and improve the prognosis of patients. Additionally, clinical strategies aimed at the prevention of HAP and VAP should be employed in hospital settings caring for patients at risk for these infections.

  14. In vitro sensitivities to antimicrobial drugs of ureaplasmas isolated from the bovine respiratory tract, genital tract and eye.

    PubMed

    Kishima, M; Hashimoto, K

    1979-09-01

    The sensitivity to 18 antimicrobial drugs was examined for 66 strains of Ureaplasma sp isolated from respiratory tracts of calves suffering from enzootic pneumonia, urinary tracts of bulls and eyes of cows suffering from infectious bovine kerato-conjunctivitis. Furamizole, tiamulin fumarate, erythromycin lactobionate, malidomycin C, doxycycline hydrochloride, kitasamycin tartrate, tylosin tartrate, T-2636C, tetracycline hydrochloride, oxytetracycline hydrochloride, chlortetracycline hydrochloride, oleandomycin phosphate, furazolidone, spiramycin adipate, chloramphenicol and thiophenicol showed strong inhibiting activity on all the test strains. Among them, furamizole, tiamulin fumarate and erythromycin lactobionate were most active. Kanamycin sulphate showed weak activity on all the strains tested. The differences in origin of the test strains did not affect their sensitivity to any of the drugs.

  15. Aspiration pneumonia

    MedlinePlus

    Anaerobic pneumonia; Aspiration of vomitus; Necrotizing pneumonia; Aspiration pneumonitis ... The type of bacteria that caused the pneumonia depends on: Your ... facility, for example) Whether you were recently hospitalized ...

  16. Comparison of Respiratory Disease Prevalence among Voluntary Monitoring Systems for Pig Health and Welfare in the UK.

    PubMed

    Eze, J I; Correia-Gomes, C; Borobia-Belsué, J; Tucker, A W; Sparrow, D; Strachan, D W; Gunn, G J

    2015-01-01

    Surveillance of animal diseases provides information essential for the protection of animal health and ultimately public health. The voluntary pig health schemes, implemented in the United Kingdom, are integrated systems which capture information on different macroscopic disease conditions detected in slaughtered pigs. Many of these conditions have been associated with a reduction in performance traits and consequent increases in production costs. The schemes are the Wholesome Pigs Scotland in Scotland, the BPEX Pig Health Scheme in England and Wales and the Pig Regen Ltd. health and welfare checks done in Northern Ireland. This report set out to compare the prevalence of four respiratory conditions (enzootic pneumonia-like lesions, pleurisy, pleuropneumonia lesions and abscesses in the lung) assessed by these three Pig Health Schemes. The seasonal variations and year trends associated with the conditions in each scheme are presented. The paper also highlights the differences in prevalence for each condition across these schemes and areas where further research is needed. A general increase in the prevalence of enzootic pneumonia like lesions was observed in Scotland, England and Wales since 2009, while a general decrease was observed in Northern Ireland over the years of the scheme. Pleurisy prevalence has increased since 2010 in all three schemes, whilst pleuropneumonia has been decreasing. Prevalence of abscesses in the lung has decreased in England, Wales and Northern Ireland but has increased in Scotland. This analysis highlights the value of surveillance schemes based on abattoir pathology monitoring of four respiratory lesions. The outputs at scheme level have significant value as indicators of endemic and emerging disease, and for producers and herd veterinarians in planning and evaluating herd health control programs when comparing individual farm results with national averages.

  17. Comparison of Respiratory Disease Prevalence among Voluntary Monitoring Systems for Pig Health and Welfare in the UK

    PubMed Central

    Eze, J. I.; Correia-Gomes, C.; Borobia-Belsué, J.; Tucker, A. W.; Sparrow, D.; Strachan, D. W.; Gunn, G. J.

    2015-01-01

    Surveillance of animal diseases provides information essential for the protection of animal health and ultimately public health. The voluntary pig health schemes, implemented in the United Kingdom, are integrated systems which capture information on different macroscopic disease conditions detected in slaughtered pigs. Many of these conditions have been associated with a reduction in performance traits and consequent increases in production costs. The schemes are the Wholesome Pigs Scotland in Scotland, the BPEX Pig Health Scheme in England and Wales and the Pig Regen Ltd. health and welfare checks done in Northern Ireland. This report set out to compare the prevalence of four respiratory conditions (enzootic pneumonia-like lesions, pleurisy, pleuropneumonia lesions and abscesses in the lung) assessed by these three Pig Health Schemes. The seasonal variations and year trends associated with the conditions in each scheme are presented. The paper also highlights the differences in prevalence for each condition across these schemes and areas where further research is needed. A general increase in the prevalence of enzootic pneumonia like lesions was observed in Scotland, England and Wales since 2009, while a general decrease was observed in Northern Ireland over the years of the scheme. Pleurisy prevalence has increased since 2010 in all three schemes, whilst pleuropneumonia has been decreasing. Prevalence of abscesses in the lung has decreased in England, Wales and Northern Ireland but has increased in Scotland. This analysis highlights the value of surveillance schemes based on abattoir pathology monitoring of four respiratory lesions. The outputs at scheme level have significant value as indicators of endemic and emerging disease, and for producers and herd veterinarians in planning and evaluating herd health control programs when comparing individual farm results with national averages. PMID:26020635

  18. Relationship Between the Inoculum Dose of Streptococcus pneumoniae and Pneumonia Onset in a Rabbit Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-04-01

    of ventilator- associated pneumonia and urinary tract infections . J Chemother 2003; 15: 536 542. PNEUMOCOCCI INOCULUM DOSE AND PNEUMONIA ONSET A.L. YERSHOV ET AL. 700 VOLUME 25 NUMBER 4 EUROPEAN RESPIRATORY JOURNAL

  19. A collaborative, systems-level approach to eliminating healthcare-associated MRSA, central-line-associated bloodstream infections, ventilator-associated pneumonia, and respiratory virus infections.

    PubMed

    Henderson, Donna M; Staiger, Thomas O; Peterson, Gene N; Sinanan, Mika N; Angiulo, Cindy L; Makarewicz, Vanessa A; Wild, Lorie M; Whimbey, Estella E

    2012-01-01

    To achieve sustainable reductions in healthcare-associated infections (HAIs), the University of Washington Medical Center (UWMC) deployed a collaborative, systems-level initiative. With the sponsorship of senior leadership, multidisciplinary teams were established to address healthcare-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), central-line-associated bloodstream infections (CLABSI), ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP), and respiratory virus infections. The goal of the initiative was to eliminate these four HAIs among medical center inpatients by 2012. In the first 24 months of the project, the number of healthcare-associated MRSA cases decreased 58%; CLABSI cases decreased 54%. Staff and provider compliance with infection prevention measures improved and remained strong, for example, 96% compliance with hand hygiene, 98% compliance with the recommended influenza vaccination program, and 100% compliance with the VAP bundle. Achieving these results required an array of coordinated, systems-level interventions. Critical project success factors were believed to include creating organizational alignment by declaring eliminating HAIs as an organizational breakthrough goal, having the organization's executive leadership highly engaged in the project, coordination by an experienced and effective project leader and manager, collaboration by multidisciplinary project teams, and promoting transparency of results across the organization.

  20. TARGETed surveillance: susceptibility of Streptococcus pneumoniae isolated from community-acquired respiratory tract infections in 2003 to fluoroquinolones and other agents.

    PubMed

    Morrissey, I; Colclough, A; Northwood, J

    2007-10-01

    We assessed antibiotic resistance in Streptococcus pneumoniae collected worldwide in 2003. Resistance to clarithromycin was the highest overall (34.1%) followed by penicillin G (22.1%). Patient age and/or country of origin had the greatest effect on susceptibility. Resistance was highest in children<6 years of age and in patients from South Africa or France. Resistance to penicillin or amoxicillin/clavulanic acid decreased in adults and was low in Germany. Fluoroquinolone resistance was very low overall, but 3.0% levofloxacin resistance (2.6% gatifloxacin and 0.4% moxifloxacin) was observed in Italy. Interestingly, many isolates with minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) at the top of the fluoroquinolone susceptibility breakpoints possessed single quinolone resistance-determining region (QRDR) mutations. Care should be taken when treating fluoroquinolone-susceptible isolates with a higher MIC, which are likely to harbour QRDR mutations and may become fully resistant and cause treatment failure. We concur with the conclusions of other recent studies that suggest fluoroquinolone breakpoints should be lowered to ensure these isolates are categorised as resistant. Fluoroquinolones would still remain an important alternative treatment for respiratory tract infections (albeit for adults only), with moxifloxacin being the most potent fluoroquinolone tested in this study.

  1. Mycoplasma pneumonia

    MedlinePlus

    Walking pneumonia; Community-acquired pneumonia - mycoplasma; Community-acquired pneumonia - atypical ... Mycoplasma pneumonia usually affects people younger than 40. People who live or work in crowded areas such ...

  2. Other Community Respiratory Viruses.

    PubMed

    Wunderink, Richard G

    2017-03-01

    Polymerase chain reaction-based diagnosis has become the standard for viral pneumonia and other respiratory tract infections. Expansion of respiratory viral panels (RVPs) outside of influenza and, possibly, respiratory syncytial virus has led to the ability to diagnose viral infections for which no approved specific antiviral treatment exists. Careful clinical evaluation of the patient with a positive RVP is, therefore, critical given the limited repertoire of treatments. Generic treatments with intravenous immunoglobulin, ribavirin, and interferons may benefit select severe viral pneumonia patients, whereas cidofovir has activity for severe adenoviral pneumonia.

  3. IL-23-Dependent IL-17 Production Is Essential in Neutrophil Recruitment and Activity in Mouse Lung Defense against Respiratory Mycoplasma pneumoniae Infection

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Qun; Martin, Richard J.; Rino, John G.; Breed, Rachel; Torres, Raul M.; Chu, Hong Wei

    2007-01-01

    IL-23 induces IL-17 production in activated CD4+ T cells and participates in host defense against many encapsulated bacteria. However, whether IL-23/IL-17 axis contributes to a Mycoplasma pneumoniae (Mp)-induced lung inflammation (e.g., neutrophils) has not been addressed. Using an acute respiratory Mp infection murine model, we found significantly up-regulated lung IL-23p19 mRNA in the early phase of infection (4 h), and alveolar macrophages were an important cell source of Mp-induced IL-23. We further showed that Mp significantly increased IL-17 protein levels in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL). Lung gene expression of IL-17, IL-17C and IL-17F was also markedly up-regulated by Mp in vivo. IL-17 and IL-17F were found to be derived mainly from lung CD4+ T cells, and were increased upon IL-23 stimulation in vitro. In vivo blocking of IL-23p19 alone or in combination with IL-23/IL-12p40 resulted in a significant reduction of Mp-induced IL-17 protein and IL-17/IL-17F mRNA expression, which was accompanied by a trend toward reduced lung neutrophil recruitment, BAL neutrophil activity, and Mp clearance. However, IL-23 neutralization had no effect on Mp-induced lung IL-17C mRNA expression. These results demonstrate that IL-17/IL-17F production is IL-23-dependent in an acute Mp infection, and contributes to neutrophil recruitment and activity in lung defense against the infection. PMID:17198762

  4. Genome Sequences of Human Adenovirus 14 Isolates from Mild Respiratory Cases and a Fatal Pneumonia, Isolated during 2006-2007 Epidemics in North America

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    serotypes of HAdV associated with FRI and pneumonia are grouped into 3 species, B (including sub- species B1 and B2), C and E, on the basis of...were many pneumonia hospitaliza- tions, several requiring ventilation assistance [22]. Whole-genome restriction enzyme analysis (genome typing [33...Base (303600 and 1986T, associated with mild FRI and fatal pneumonia , respectively, both from a severe outbreak) and one from Marine Corps Recruit Depot

  5. Emergence and Wide Dissemination of CTX-M-type ESBLs, and CMY-2- and DHA-1-type AmpC β-Lactamases in Korean Respiratory Isolates of Klebsiella pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Yum, Jong Hwa; Kim, Shinyoung; Lee, Hyukmin; Yong, Dongeun; Cho, Sang-Nae; Chong, Yunsop

    2005-01-01

    Respiratory isolates of Klebsiella pneumoniae in Korea during 2002-2003 were studied to determine the prevalence and types of extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs) and plasmid-mediated AmpC β-lactamases (PABLs). ESBL-production was tested by double-disk synergy, and genotypes of β-lactamases were determined by PCR and sequencing. ESBLs were detected in 28.4% of 373 isolates, and the most prevalent types were SHV-12 (63 isolates) and CTX-M-14 (9 isolates). Forty of 75 ESBL-producers (53.5%) also had PABLs: 21 isolates with CMY-2-like, 17 with DHA-1-like. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis showed 19 types and 25 of 74 isolates had an identical pattern, indicating nosocomial spread. Dissemination of ESBL- and PABL-producing K. pneumoniae strains in Korea is a particular concern, as it limits the choice of antimicrobial agents for treatment of infections. PMID:16361805

  6. A Compendium for Mycoplasma pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Parrott, Gretchen L.; Kinjo, Takeshi; Fujita, Jiro

    2016-01-01

    Historically, atypical pneumonia was a term used to describe an unusual presentation of pneumonia. Currently, it is used to describe the multitude of symptoms juxtaposing the classic symptoms found in cases of pneumococcal pneumonia. Specifically, atypical pneumonia is a syndrome resulting from a relatively common group of pathogens including Chlamydophila sp., and Mycoplasma pneumoniae. The incidence of M. pneumoniae pneumonia in adults is less than the burden experienced by children. Transmission rates among families indicate children may act as a reservoir and maintain contagiousness over a long period of time ranging from months to years. In adults, M. pneumoniae typically produces a mild, “walking” pneumonia and is considered to be one of the causes of persistent cough in patients. M. pneumoniae has also been shown to trigger the exacerbation of other lung diseases. It has been repeatedly detected in patients with bronchitis, asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disorder, and cystic fibrosis. Recent advances in technology allow for the rapid diagnosis of M. pneumoniae through the use of polymerase chain reaction or rapid antigen tests. With this, more effort has been afforded to identify the causative etiologic agent in all cases of pneumonia. However, previous practices, including the overprescribing of macrolide treatment in China and Japan, have created increased incidence of macrolide-resistant M. pneumoniae. Reports from these countries indicate that >85% of M. pneumoniae pneumonia pediatric cases are macrolide-resistant. Despite its extensively studied past, the smallest bacterial species still inspires some of the largest questions. The developments in microbiology, diagnostic features and techniques, epidemiology, treatment and vaccines, and upper respiratory conditions associated with M. pneumoniae in adult populations are included within this review. PMID:27148202

  7. Fungal diagnostics in pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Lease, Erika D; Alexander, Barbara D

    2011-12-01

    Fungal pneumonia is increasingly common, particularly in highly immunosuppressed patients, such as solid organ or hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients, and the diagnosis is evolving. Although standard techniques such as microscopy and culture remain the mainstays of diagnosis, relatively recent advances in serological and molecular testing are important additions to the field. This article reviews the laboratory tools used to diagnose fungal respiratory disease.

  8. Delineating Anaplasma phagocytophilum Ecotypes in Coexisting, Discrete Enzootic Cycles

    PubMed Central

    Bown, Kevin J.; Lambin, Xavier; Ogden, Nicholas H.; Begon, Michael; Telford, Gill; Woldehiwet, Zerai

    2009-01-01

    The emerging tick-borne pathogen Anaplasma phagocytophilum is under increasing scrutiny for the existence of subpopulations that are adapted to different natural cycles. Here, we characterized the diversity of A. phagocytophilum genotypes circulating in a natural system that includes multiple hosts and at least 2 tick species, Ixodes ricinus and the small mammal specialist I. trianguliceps. We encountered numerous genotypes, but only 1 in rodents, with the remainder limited to deer and host-seeking I. ricinus ticks. The absence of the rodent-associated genotype from host-seeking I. ricinus ticks was notable because we demonstrated that rodents fed a large proportion of the I. ricinus larval population and that these larvae were abundant when infections caused by the rodent-associated genotype were prevalent. These observations are consistent with the conclusion that genotypically distinct subpopulations of A. phagocytophilum are restricted to coexisting but separate enzootic cycles and suggest that this restriction may result from specific vector compatibility. PMID:19961674

  9. Enzootic bovine leukosis in a two-month-old calf.

    PubMed

    Oguma, Keisuke; Suzuki, Miho; Sentsui, Hiroshi

    2017-03-19

    A two-month-old calf was diagnosed with leukosis on the basis of the clinical sign of enlarged, superficial lymph nodes. Serological and genetic tests for bovine leukemia virus (BLV) were performed because the calf was born from a cow infected with BLV. The serum had a weakly positive BLV antibody, and the BLV provirus was detected within neoplastic cells on performing polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Analysis of the BLV provirus integration site using inverse PCR revealed that the BLV integration site location was identical on all chromosomes in all tumor tissues examined. Thus, the tumor cells monoclonally proliferated following BLV infection. The present study shows that enzootic bovine leukosis can occur in a young animal, as in the two-month-old calf in our study.

  10. [Electron microscopic studies in enzootic muscular dystrophy in cattle].

    PubMed

    Bergmann, V; Kursa, J

    1979-01-01

    Electron microscopy was used to examine the sekeletal muscles of young cattle, aged between 13 and 24 months, with spontaneous enzootic myodystrophy (nutritional myodegeneration due to selenium deficiency, white muscle disease). The animals had been received from Sumava District, Southern Bohemia, an area known for shortage of selenium. Outbreaks of clinical illness were recorded from them between four and 18 days from the beginning of grazing. Most of the ultrastructural changes included decomposition of myofibrils and hyalinisation of fibres as well as defective fibril synthesis (Z-striation abnormality), some of the latter phenomena recordable even from regenerating fibre. However, minor disorders only were established from the mitochondria, sarcoplasmic reticulum, components of sarcoplasm, and vessels. There were far-reaching ultrastructural similarities to nutritional myodegeneration of sheep. The changes recorded are likely to suggest a specific role played by selenium in the formation and preservation of myofibril proteins.

  11. Genetic and anatomic determinants of enzootic Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus infection of Culex (Melanoconion) taeniopus.

    PubMed

    Kenney, Joan L; Adams, A Paige; Gorchakov, Rodion; Leal, Grace; Weaver, Scott C

    2012-01-01

    Venezuelan equine encephalitis (VEE) is a re-emerging, mosquito-borne viral disease with the potential to cause fatal encephalitis in both humans and equids. Recently, detection of endemic VEE caused by enzootic strains has escalated in Mexico, Peru, Bolivia, Colombia and Ecuador, emphasizing the importance of understanding the enzootic transmission cycle of the etiologic agent, VEE virus (VEEV). The majority of work examining the viral determinants of vector infection has been performed in the epizootic mosquito vector, Aedes (Ochlerotatus) taeniorhynchus. Based on the fundamental differences between the epizootic and enzootic cycles, we hypothesized that the virus-vector interaction of the enzootic cycle is fundamentally different from that of the epizootic model. We therefore examined the determinants for VEEV IE infection in the enzootic vector, Culex (Melanoconion) taeniopus, and determined the number and susceptibility of midgut epithelial cells initially infected and their distribution compared to the epizootic virus-vector interaction. Using chimeric viruses, we demonstrated that the determinants of infection for the enzootic vector are different than those observed for the epizootic vector. Similarly, we showed that, unlike A. taeniorhynchus infection with subtype IC VEEV, C. taeniopus does not have a limited subpopulation of midgut cells susceptible to subtype IE VEEV. These findings support the hypothesis that the enzootic VEEV relationship with C. taeniopus differs from the epizootic virus-vector interaction in that the determinants appear to be found in both the nonstructural and structural regions, and initial midgut infection is not limited to a small population of susceptible cells.

  12. Yellow fever and Zika virus epizootics and enzootics in Uganda.

    PubMed

    McCrae, A W; Kirya, B G

    1982-01-01

    Data of monkey serology are presented which, together with past evidence, support the view that yellow fever (YF) virus circulates in its primary sylvan host populations, i.e., forest monkeys, in an enzootic state in Bwamba County in western Uganda but as series of epizootics in the forest-savanna mosaic zone of central Uganda. Evidence of an epizootic of Zika virus at the Zika Forest near Entebbe is described which occurred in two episodes, the first (in 1969) apparently following the build-up of non-immune monkey populations since a previous epizootic of 1962-63 and the second (in 1970) when Aedes africanus biting densities rose. This was followed only 18 months later by an intensive epizootic of YF virus, contradictory to the hypothesis that Zika virus alone would suppress subsequent epizootics of YF virus in nature, at least when redtail monkeys are involved. Conclusions are finally reviewed in the light of more recent evidence of transovarial flavivirus transmission in mosquitoes, pointing out that phlebotomine sandflies also require fresh attention.

  13. Ventilator-associated pneumonia.

    PubMed

    2009-11-01

    Ventilator-associated pneumonia is a pneumonia that develops initially more than 48 h from the start of tracheal intubation and mechanical ventilation. The route of infection is almost always through the respiratory tract. Intake of contaminants from outside the tracheal tube (silent aspiration) is considered a key route, and suctioning of secretions that have accumulated above the cuff of the endotracheal tubes is effective in preventing infection. The circuit is managed and heated-wire humidifiers and suction are manipulated based on appropriate infection control measures. To diagnose pathogens, efforts should be made to collect specimens from the pneumonia focus. Realistically, however, diagnosis can also be achieved based on the clinical course and from the results of culture of samples from tracheal aspirate. Use of prophylactic antimicrobials is not recommended, but once a diagnosis is made, antimicrobials are administered that combat the causative microorganism.

  14. Pneumonia (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Pneumonia is an inflammation of the lungs caused by an infection. Many different organisms can cause it, including bacteria, viruses, and fungi. Pneumonia is a common illness that affects millions of ...

  15. Physiological responses of Brazilian amphibians to an enzootic infection of the chytrid fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis.

    PubMed

    Bovo, Rafael P; Andrade, Denis V; Toledo, Luís Felipe; Longo, Ana V; Rodriguez, David; Haddad, Célio F B; Zamudio, Kelly R; Becker, C Guilherme

    2016-01-13

    Pathophysiological effects of clinical chytridiomycosis in amphibians include disorders of cutaneous osmoregulation and disruption of the ability to rehydrate, which can lead to decreased host fitness or mortality. Less attention has been given to physiological responses of hosts where enzootic infections of Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd) do not cause apparent population declines in the wild. Here, we experimentally tested whether an enzootic strain of Bd causes significant mortality and alters host water balance (evaporative water loss, EWL; skin resistance, R(s); and water uptake, WU) in individuals of 3 Brazilian amphibian species (Dendropsophus minutus, n = 19; Ischnocnema parva, n = 17; Brachycephalus pitanga, n = 15). Infections with enzootic Bd caused no significant mortality, but we found an increase in R(s) in 1 host species concomitant with a reduction in EWL. These results suggest that enzootic Bd infections can indeed cause sub-lethal effects that could lead to reduction of host fitness in Brazilian frogs and that these effects vary among species. Thus, our findings underscore the need for further assessment of physiological responses to Bd infections in different host species, even in cases of sub-clinical chytridiomycosis and long-term enzootic infections in natural populations.

  16. Ultrasound in Rheumatologic Interstitial Lung Disease: A Case Report of Nonspecific Interstitial Pneumonia in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Laria, A.; Lurati, A.; Scarpellini, M.

    2015-01-01

    According to the American Thoracic Society (ATS)/European Respiratory Society consensus classification, idiopathic interstitial pneumonias (IIPs) include several clinic-radiologic-pathologic entities: idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF), usual interstitial pneumonia (UIP), nonspecific interstitial pneumonia (NSIP), cryptogenic organizing pneumonia, acute interstitial pneumonia, respiratory bronchiolitis-associated ILD, desquamative interstitial pneumonia, and lymphoid interstitial pneumonia. Ultrasound Lung Comets (ULCs) are an echographic chest-sonography hallmark of pulmonary interstitial fibrosis. We describe the ultrasound (US) findings in the follow-up of a NSIP's case in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). PMID:26240772

  17. Natural enzootic vectors of Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus, Magdalena Valley, Colombia.

    PubMed

    Ferro, Cristina; Boshell, Jorge; Moncayo, Abelardo C; Gonzalez, Marta; Ahumada, Marta L; Kang, Wenli; Weaver, Scott C

    2003-01-01

    To characterize the transmission cycle of enzootic Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV) strains believed to represent an epizootic progenitor, we identified natural vectors in a sylvatic focus in the middle Magdalena Valley of Colombia. Hamster-baited traps were placed into an active forest focus, and mosquitoes collected from each trap in which a hamster became infected were sorted by species and assayed for virus. In 18 cases, a single, initial, high-titered mosquito pool representing the vector species was identified. These vectors included Culex (Melanoconion) vomerifer (11 transmission events), Cx. (Mel.) pedroi (5 transmissions) and Cx. (Mel.) adamesi (2 transmissions). These results extend the number of proven enzootic VEEV vectors to 7, all of which are members of the Spissipes section of the subgenus Melanoconion. Our findings contrast with previous studies, which have indicated that a single species usually serves as the principal enzootic VEEV vector at a given location.

  18. Lung VITAL: Rationale, design, and baseline characteristics of an ancillary study evaluating the effects of vitamin D and/or marine omega-3 fatty acid supplements on acute exacerbations of chronic respiratory disease, asthma control, pneumonia and lung function in adults

    PubMed Central

    Gold, Diane R; Litonjua, Augusto A.; Carey, Vincent J.; Manson, JoAnn E.; Buring, Julie E; Lee, I-Min; Gordon, David; Walter, Joseph; Friedenberg, Georgina; Hankinson, John L; Copeland, Trisha; Luttmann-Gibson, Heike

    2016-01-01

    Laboratory and observational research studies suggest that vitamin D and marine omega-3 fatty acids may reduce risk for pneumonia, acute exacerbations of respiratory diseases including chronic obstructive lung disease (COPD) or asthma, and decline of lung function, but prevention trials with adequate dosing, adequate power, and adequate time to follow-up are lacking. The ongoing Lung VITAL study is taking advantage of a large clinical trial—the VITamin D and OmegA-3 TriaL (VITAL)—to conduct the first major evaluation of the influences of vitamin D and marine omega-3 fatty acid supplementation on pneumonia risk, respiratory exacerbation episodes, asthma control and lung function in adults. VITAL is a 5-year U.S.-wide randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, 2×2 factorial trial of supplementation with vitamin D3 ([cholecalciferol], 2000 IU/day) and marine omega-3 FA (Omacor® fish oil, eicosapentaenoic acid [EPA] +docosahexaenoic acid [DHA], 1 g/day) for primary prevention of CVD and cancer among men and women, at baseline aged ≥50 and ≥55, respectively, with 5107 African Americans. In a subset of 1973 participants from 11 urban U.S. centers, lung function is measured before and two years after randomization. Yearly follow-up questionnaires assess incident pneumonia in the entire randomized population, and exacerbations of respiratory disease, asthma control and dyspnea in a subpopulation of 4314 randomized participants enriched, as shown in presentation of baseline characteristics, for respiratory disease, respiratory symptoms, and history of cigarette smoking. Self-reported pneumonia hospitalization will be confirmed by medical record review, and exacerbations will be confirmed by Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services data review. PMID:26784651

  19. Lung VITAL: Rationale, design, and baseline characteristics of an ancillary study evaluating the effects of vitamin D and/or marine omega-3 fatty acid supplements on acute exacerbations of chronic respiratory disease, asthma control, pneumonia and lung function in adults.

    PubMed

    Gold, Diane R; Litonjua, Augusto A; Carey, Vincent J; Manson, JoAnn E; Buring, Julie E; Lee, I-Min; Gordon, David; Walter, Joseph; Friedenberg, Georgina; Hankinson, John L; Copeland, Trisha; Luttmann-Gibson, Heike

    2016-03-01

    Laboratory and observational research studies suggest that vitamin D and marine omega-3 fatty acids may reduce risk for pneumonia, acute exacerbations of respiratory diseases including chronic obstructive lung disease (COPD) or asthma, and decline of lung function, but prevention trials with adequate dosing, adequate power, and adequate time to follow-up are lacking. The ongoing Lung VITAL study is taking advantage of a large clinical trial-the VITamin D and OmegA-3 TriaL (VITAL)--to conduct the first major evaluation of the influences of vitamin D and marine omega-3 fatty acid supplementation on pneumonia risk, respiratory exacerbation episodes, asthma control and lung function in adults. VITAL is a 5-year U.S.-wide randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, 2 × 2 factorial trial of supplementation with vitamin D3 ([cholecalciferol], 2000 IU/day) and marine omega-3 FA (Omacor® fish oil, eicosapentaenoic acid [EPA]+docosahexaenoic acid [DHA], 1g/day) for primary prevention of CVD and cancer among men and women, at baseline aged ≥50 and ≥55, respectively, with 5107 African Americans. In a subset of 1973 participants from 11 urban U.S. centers, lung function is measured before and two years after randomization. Yearly follow-up questionnaires assess incident pneumonia in the entire randomized population, and exacerbations of respiratory disease, asthma control and dyspnea in a subpopulation of 4314 randomized participants enriched, as shown in presentation of baseline characteristics, for respiratory disease, respiratory symptoms, and history of cigarette smoking. Self-reported pneumonia hospitalization will be confirmed by medical record review, and exacerbations will be confirmed by Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services data review.

  20. Experimental rabbit models of Chlamydia pneumoniae infection.

    PubMed Central

    Moazed, T. C.; Kuo, C.; Patton, D. L.; Grayston, J. T.; Campbell, L. A.

    1996-01-01

    Chlamydia pneumoniae (TWAR), a common cause of acute respiratory disease in humans, has recently been associated with coronary and aortic atherosclerosis. In this study, we evaluated rabbit models of chlamydial infection to investigate the pathogenesis of C. pneumoniae infection. New Zealand White rabbits were inoculated intranasally and intratracheally with C. pneumoniae, strain AR-39, and primary and repeated infection were assessed. After a single inoculation, lung pathology was characterized by a moderate self-resolving interstitial pneumonia with bronchiolitis of 21 days in duration. Chlamydial DNA was detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) intermittently in the upper respiratory tract and lung tissue through day 21 postinoculation, spleen tissue at day 14, and peripheral blood mononuclear cells at days 3 and 21. After repeated inoculations, chlamydial DNA was detected by PCR in the upper respiratory tract and lung tissue through day 42. Lung lesions consisted of multifocal interstitial mononuclear cell aggregates that persisted up to day 42. Watanabe heritable hyperlipidemic rabbits were less susceptible to C. pneumoniae infection. After multiple inoculations of Watanabe rabbits, C. pneumoniae was detected by PCR and/or immunocytochemistry until day 21. In conclusion, C. pneumoniae induced a moderate respiratory infection in these rabbit models. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:8579129

  1. Pathology of Idiopathic Interstitial Pneumonias

    PubMed Central

    Hashisako, Mikiko; Fukuoka, Junya

    2015-01-01

    The updated classification of idiopathic interstitial pneumonias (IIPs) in 2013 by American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society included several important revisions to the categories described in the 2002 classification. In the updated classification, lymphoid interstitial pneumonia (LIP) was moved from major to rare IIPs, pleuroparenchymal fibroelastosis (PPFE) was newly included in the rare IIPs, acute fibrinous and organizing pneumonia (AFOP) and interstitial pneumonias with a bronchiolocentric distribution are recognized as rare histologic patterns, and unclassifiable IIP (UCIP) was classified as an IIP. However, recent reports indicate the areas of concern that may require further evaluation. Here, we describe the histopathologic features of the updated IIPs and their rare histologic patterns and also point out some of the issues to be considered in this context. PMID:26949346

  2. [Pneumonia due to Pseudomonas aeruginosa].

    PubMed

    Vallés, Jordi; Mariscal, Dolors

    2005-12-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is one of the leading causes of Gram-negative nosocomial pneumonia. It is the most common cause of ventilator-associated pneumonia and carries the highest mortality among hospital-acquired infections. P. aeruginosa produces a large number of toxins and surface components that make it especially virulent compared with other microorganisms. These include pili, flagella, membrane bound lipopolysaccharide, and secreted products such as exotoxins A, S and U, elastase, alkaline protease, cytotoxins and phospholipases. The most common mechanism of infection in mechanically ventilated patients is through aspiration of upper respiratory tract secretions previously colonized in the process of routine nursing care or via contaminated hands of hospital personnel. Intravenous therapy with an antipseudomonal regimen should be started immediately when P. aeruginosa pneumonia is suspected or confirmed. Empiric therapy with drugs active against P. aeruginosa should be started, especially in patients who have received previous antibiotics or present late-onset pneumonia.

  3. Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV): animal to human interaction

    PubMed Central

    Omrani, Ali S.; Al-Tawfiq, Jaffar A.

    2015-01-01

    The Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) is a novel enzootic betacoronavirus that was first described in September 2012. The clinical spectrum of MERS-CoV infection in humans ranges from an asymptomatic or mild respiratory illness to severe pneumonia and multi-organ failure; overall mortality is around 35.7%. Bats harbour several betacoronaviruses that are closely related to MERS-CoV but more research is needed to establish the relationship between bats and MERS-CoV. The seroprevalence of MERS-CoV antibodies is very high in dromedary camels in Eastern Africa and the Arabian Peninsula. MERS-CoV RNA and viable virus have been isolated from dromedary camels, including some with respiratory symptoms. Furthermore, near-identical strains of MERS-CoV have been isolated from epidemiologically linked humans and camels, confirming inter-transmission, most probably from camels to humans. Though inter-human spread within health care settings is responsible for the majority of reported MERS-CoV cases, the virus is incapable at present of causing sustained human-to-human transmission. Clusters can be readily controlled with implementation of appropriate infection control procedures. Phylogenetic and sequencing data strongly suggest that MERS-CoV originated from bat ancestors after undergoing a recombination event in the spike protein, possibly in dromedary camels in Africa, before its exportation to the Arabian Peninsula along the camel trading routes. MERS-CoV serosurveys are needed to investigate possible unrecognized human infections in Africa. Amongst the important measures to control MERS-CoV spread are strict regulation of camel movement, regular herd screening and isolation of infected camels, use of personal protective equipment by camel handlers and enforcing rules banning all consumption of unpasteurized camel milk and urine. PMID:26924345

  4. A Processed Multidomain Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae Adhesin Binds Fibronectin, Plasminogen, and Swine Respiratory Cilia

    PubMed Central

    Seymour, Lisa M.; Deutscher, Ania T.; Jenkins, Cheryl; Kuit, Tracey A.; Falconer, Linda; Minion, F. Chris; Crossett, Ben; Padula, Matthew; Dixon, Nicholas E.; Djordjevic, Steven P.; Walker, Mark J.

    2010-01-01

    Porcine enzootic pneumonia is a chronic respiratory disease that affects swine. The etiological agent of the disease, Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae, is a bacterium that adheres to cilia of the swine respiratory tract, resulting in loss of cilia and epithelial cell damage. A M. hyopneumoniae protein P116, encoded by mhp108, was investigated as a potential adhesin. Examination of P116 expression using proteomic analyses observed P116 as a full-length protein and also as fragments, ranging from 17 to 70 kDa in size. A variety of pathogenic bacterial species have been shown to bind the extracellular matrix component fibronectin as an adherence mechanism. M. hyopneumoniae cells were found to bind fibronectin in a dose-dependent and saturable manner. Surface plasmon resonance was used to show that a recombinant C-terminal domain of P116 bound fibronectin at physiologically relevant concentrations (KD 24 ± 6 nm). Plasmin(ogen)-binding proteins are also expressed by many bacterial pathogens, facilitating extracellular matrix degradation. M. hyopneumoniae cells were found to also bind plasminogen in a dose-dependent and saturable manner; the C-terminal domain of P116 binds to plasminogen (KD 44 ± 5 nm). Plasminogen binding was abolished when the C-terminal lysine of P116 was deleted, implicating this residue as part of the plasminogen binding site. P116 fragments adhere to the PK15 porcine kidney epithelial-like cell line and swine respiratory cilia. Collectively these data suggest that P116 is an important adhesin and virulence factor of M. hyopneumoniae. PMID:20813843

  5. A processed multidomain mycoplasma hyopneumoniae adhesin binds fibronectin, plasminogen, and swine respiratory cilia.

    PubMed

    Seymour, Lisa M; Deutscher, Ania T; Jenkins, Cheryl; Kuit, Tracey A; Falconer, Linda; Minion, F Chris; Crossett, Ben; Padula, Matthew; Dixon, Nicholas E; Djordjevic, Steven P; Walker, Mark J

    2010-10-29

    Porcine enzootic pneumonia is a chronic respiratory disease that affects swine. The etiological agent of the disease, Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae, is a bacterium that adheres to cilia of the swine respiratory tract, resulting in loss of cilia and epithelial cell damage. A M. hyopneumoniae protein P116, encoded by mhp108, was investigated as a potential adhesin. Examination of P116 expression using proteomic analyses observed P116 as a full-length protein and also as fragments, ranging from 17 to 70 kDa in size. A variety of pathogenic bacterial species have been shown to bind the extracellular matrix component fibronectin as an adherence mechanism. M. hyopneumoniae cells were found to bind fibronectin in a dose-dependent and saturable manner. Surface plasmon resonance was used to show that a recombinant C-terminal domain of P116 bound fibronectin at physiologically relevant concentrations (K(D) 24 ± 6 nm). Plasmin(ogen)-binding proteins are also expressed by many bacterial pathogens, facilitating extracellular matrix degradation. M. hyopneumoniae cells were found to also bind plasminogen in a dose-dependent and saturable manner; the C-terminal domain of P116 binds to plasminogen (K(D) 44 ± 5 nm). Plasminogen binding was abolished when the C-terminal lysine of P116 was deleted, implicating this residue as part of the plasminogen binding site. P116 fragments adhere to the PK15 porcine kidney epithelial-like cell line and swine respiratory cilia. Collectively these data suggest that P116 is an important adhesin and virulence factor of M. hyopneumoniae.

  6. Antimicrobial Resistance of Streptococcus pneumoniae Recovered from Outpatients with Respiratory Tract Infections in Germany from 1998 to 1999: Results of a National Surveillance Study

    PubMed Central

    Reinert, Ralf René; Simic, Smiljana; Al-Lahham, Adnan; Reinert, Susanne; Lemperle, Maria; Lütticken, Rudolf

    2001-01-01

    Clinically significant pneumococcal isolates were prospectively collected from outpatients with respiratory tract infections by 19 different clinical microbiology laboratories in Germany. Resistance rates in a total of 961 isolates were as follows: penicillin, 6.6%; clarithromycin, 10.6%; tetracycline, 13.9%; and levofloxacin, 0.1%. Among 324 isolates from children, pneumococcal serotypes 19F (17.0%), 23F (13.0%), and 6B (11.7%) were the predominant types. PMID:11230456

  7. CMV - pneumonia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bone marrow transplant Breathing difficulty Chemotherapy CMV retinitis HIV/AIDS Immune response Mononucleosis Pneumonia - adults (community acquired) WBC count Patient Instructions Pneumonia in adults - discharge Review Date 12/10/2015 Updated by: Jatin M. Vyas, MD, PhD, Assistant ...

  8. Childhood recurrent pneumonia caused by endobronchial sutures

    PubMed Central

    Zan, Yiheng; Liu, Hanmin; Zhong, Lin; Qiu, Li; Tao, Qingfen; Chen, Lina

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: Recurrent pneumonia is defined as more than two episodes of pneumonia in one year or three or more episodes anytime in life. Common clinical scenarios leading to recurrent pneumonia include anatomical abnormalities of respiratory tract, immunodeficiency, congenital heart diseases, primary ciliary dyskinesia, etc. Case report: A school-aged girl suffered from 1-2 episodes of pneumonia each year after trachea connection and lung repair operation resulted from an accident of car crash. Bronchoscopy revealed the sutures twisted with granulation in the left main bronchus and the patient's symptoms relieved after removal of the sutures. Here we report for the first time that surgical suture was the cause of recurrent pneumonia. Conclusions: This case indicates that children with late and recurrent onset of pneumonia should undergo detailed evaluation including bronchoscopy. PMID:28121955

  9. Previous respiratory tract infections and antibiotic consumption in children with long- and short-term carriage of penicillin-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed Central

    Gunnarsson, O.; Ekdahl, K.

    1998-01-01

    Previous respiratory tract infections (RTI) and antibiotics consumption as possible risk factors for extended duration of PRP carriage were investigated in 24 children (cases) with previous carriage of penicillin-resistant pneumococci (PRP) for a duration exceeding 120 days (median 168 days) and a control group of 53 children with a duration of PRP carriage less than 90 days (median 21 days). The cases had experienced 0.99 episodes of acute otitis media (AOM) per life-year compared to 0.79 episodes in the controls (P = 0.32). For antibiotic-treated RTI other than AOM, the corresponding numbers were 0.49 and 0.29 episodes per life-year, respectively (P = 0.01). No differences in antibiotic consumption in the 3 months preceding the carriage, nor during the carriage period were noted. Other factors than impaired host defence to respiratory tract pathogens or antibiotics consumption seem to be more important in determining the duration of PRP carriage. PMID:10030700

  10. A cluster of primary pneumonic plague transmitted in a truck cab in a new enzootic focus in China.

    PubMed

    Luo, Huiming; Dong, Xingqi; Li, Furong; Xie, Xu; Song, Zhizhong; Shao, Zhujun; Li, Zhongjie; Tong, Zhaohui; Wang, Guangfa; Zhang, Hongtao; Yang, Tielong; He, Gao; He, Zeyuan; Fontaine, Robert E; Zeng, Guang

    2013-05-01

    We investigated a cluster of five cases of severe pneumonia from one village in Yunnan Province, China. We searched for severe pneumonia in the village and hospitals. We interviewed patients and family members about exposures. We tested acute and convalescent sera for antigen and antibody of severe acute respiratory syndrome, avian influenza, and plague. The only common exposure of the five patients was riding together in the enclosed cab of a truck for 1.5 hours while taking the first patient to the hospital. Seroconversion to plague F1 antigen confirmed plague in three survivors. Unfamiliarity of clinicians with plague and lack of sputum examination, blood culture, or postmortem examination delayed the diagnosis. No plague cases occurred among family and village contacts and health care workers. High infectivity in this cluster was limited to a crowded, poorly ventilated truck.

  11. Chlamydia pneumoniae Infection Among Basic Underwater Demolition/SEAL (BUD/S) Trainees, Coronado, California, July 2008

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-01

    including Streptococcus pneumoniae , Chlamydophila pneu- moniae, Mycoplasma pneumoniae , Legionella pneumophila, and Bordetella pertussis . 3 CAP...populations are adenovirus, infl uenza virus, group A streptococcus , and bacterial pneumonias . 5 Although this phenomenon is not completely understood...respiratory infections than benzathine penicillin G pro- phylaxis. 24 Immunity to C pneumoniae is often incomplete, and recurrence can occur with some

  12. Streptococcus pneumoniae nasopharyngeal colonisation in children aged under six years with acute respiratory tract infection in Lithuania, February 2012 to March 2013.

    PubMed

    Usonis, V; Stacevičienė, I; Petraitienė, S; Vaičiūnienė, D; Alasevičius, T; Kirslienė, J

    2015-04-02

    serotypes among children in Lithuania are limited. A prospective study was carried out from February 2012 to March 2013 to evaluate the circulation of SPn serotypes among young children in five cities of Lithuania before the introduction of universal vaccination with pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV). A total of 900 children under six years of age who presented to primary care centres or a hospital emergency department with acute respiratory tract infection (RTI) were enrolled in the study. The SPn colonisation rate was40.8% (367/900), with a peak at two and three years old(48.8% and 45.4%, respectively). Of the 367 SPn isolates, the most common serotypes were 6B (15.8%,n = 58), 19F (13.9%, n = 51), 23F (13.9%, n = 51), 15(10.1%, n = 37), 14 (9.5%, n = 35), 6A (9.3%, n= 34),11 (4.6%, n = 17), 3 (3.0%, n = 11) and 18C (3.0%, n =11); less frequent were 23 (non-23F) (2.7%, n = 10), 19A(2.2%, n = 8) and 9V (1.6%, n = 6). Serotypes 6A and 11 were more common in children under two years-old;18C was found only in children aged two to five years.The serotypes found might be an important predictor of the likely effectiveness of the PCVs currently available in Lithuania

  13. Clinical implications and treatment of multiresistant Streptococcus pneumoniae pneumonia.

    PubMed

    File, T M

    2006-05-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is the leading bacterial cause of community-acquired respiratory tract infections. Prior to the 1970s this pathogen was uniformly susceptible to penicillin and most other antimicrobials. However, since the 1990s there has been a significant increase in drug-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae (DRSP) due, in large part, to increased use of antimicrobials. The clinical significance of this resistance is not definitely established, but appears to be most relevant to specific MICs for specific antimicrobials. Certain beta-lactams (amoxicillin, cefotaxime, ceftriaxone), the respiratory fluoroquinolones, and telithromycin are among several agents that remain effective against DRSP. Continued surveillance studies, appropriate antimicrobial usage campaigns, stratification of patients based on known risk factors for resistance, and vaccination programmes are needed to appropriately manage DRSP and limit its spread.

  14. Susceptibility of Psorophora confinnis (Diptera: Culicidae) to infection with epizootic (subtype IC) and enzootic (subtype ID) Venezuelan Equine encephalitis viruses.

    PubMed

    Ortiz, Diana I; Anishchenko, Michael; Weaver, Scott C

    2005-09-01

    To test the hypothesis that adaptation to epizootic mosquito vectors mediates the emergence of Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (family Togaviridae, genus Alphavirus, VEEV) from enzootic progenitors, the susceptibility of the epizootic vector Psorophora confinnis (Lynch-Arribalzaga) to epizootic versus enzootic strains was evaluated. Artificial bloodmeals containing subtype IC strains isolated during the 1962-1964, 1992-1993, and 1995 Venezuelan/Colombian epizootics and closely related Venezuelan enzootic subtype ID strains were used to compare mosquito infectivity and transmission potential. Strains from the smaller 1992-1993 epizootic showed lower or equal infectivity and replication compared with enzootic viruses and to strains isolated during the larger 1962-1964 and 1995 epizootics. These experiments failed to provide evidence that Ps. confinnis selects for epizootic VEEV viruses with higher infectivity, as has been shown for Aedes (Ochlerotatus) taeniorhynchus (Wiedemann). Nonetheless, its high susceptibility, abundance in enzootic and epizootic regions, and feeding behavior suggest that Ps. confinnis is an important bridge vector for both enzootic and epizootic VEEV.

  15. Borrelia burgdorferi: Carbon Metabolism and the Tick-Mammal Enzootic Cycle.

    PubMed

    Corona, Arianna; Schwartz, Ira

    2015-06-01

    Borrelia burgdorferi, the spirochetal agent of Lyme disease, is a zoonotic pathogen that is maintained in a natural cycle that typically involves mammalian reservoir hosts and a tick vector of the Ixodes species. During each stage of the enzootic cycle, B. burgdorferi is exposed to environments that differ in temperature, pH, small molecules, and most important, nutrient sources. B. burgdorferi has a highly restricted metabolic capacity because it does not contain a tricarboxylic acid cycle, oxidative phosphorylation, or any pathways for de novo biosynthesis of carbohydrates, amino acids, or lipids. Thus, B. burgdorferi relies solely on glycolysis for ATP production and is completely dependent on the transport of nutrients and cofactors from extracellular sources. Herein, pathways for carbohydrate uptake and utilization in B. burgdorferi are described. Regulation of these pathways during the different phases of the enzootic cycle is discussed. In addition, a model for differential control of nutrient flux through the glycolytic pathway as the spirochete transits through the enzootic cycle is presented.

  16. Necrotizing Pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Nicolaou, Elitsa V; Bartlett, Allison H

    2017-02-01

    Necrotizing pneumonia refers to the development of necrosis, liquefication, and cavitation of the lung parenchyma from an infectious pathogen. Nearly 4% of all community-acquired pneumonias are necrotizing, although studies retrospectively evaluating the incidence have found it to be increasing during the past 20 years. Common presenting symptoms include fever, tachypnea, and cough, and most of those afflicted also develop complications such as parapneumonic effusions, empyemas, or bronchopleural fistulae. When compared to age-matched controls with parapneumonic effusions or severe pneumonias without a necrotizing component, those with necrotizing pneumonia have been shown to have more elevated white blood cell counts and inflammatory markers that take longer to normalize, a longer duration of symptoms despite initiation of therapy, and a longer hospital stay. Despite the high incidence of complications during the acute phase of illness, the overall prognosis of necrotizing pneumonia has been shown to be promising, with nearly all children surviving the illness. [Pediatr Ann. 2017;46(2):e65-e68.].

  17. Recognising and managing community-acquired pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Vanessa

    2015-11-18

    Pneumonia remains a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in the UK and yet the seriousness of the disease is underestimated. Pneumonia can be life-threatening because the delicate tissues of the alveoli and pulmonary capillaries are susceptible to damage from the inflammatory response. This damage leads to consolidation that prevents the diffusion of oxygen and carbon dioxide, and this in turn can lead to respiratory failure. This article summarises guidance on the diagnosis and management of community-acquired pneumonia, and also includes information on the prevention of pneumonia. This information should be valuable to nurses working in a variety of clinical areas since patients with community-acquired pneumonia are encountered in primary, intermediate, secondary and critical care.

  18. Vaccines in the Prevention of Viral Pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Fraser, Clementine S; Jha, Akhilesh; Openshaw, Peter J M

    2017-03-01

    Pneumonia is of great global public health importance. Viral infections play both direct and indirect parts in its cause across the globe. Influenza is a leading cause of viral pneumonia in both children and adults, and respiratory syncytial virus is increasingly recognized as causing disease at both extremes of age. Vaccination offers the best prospect for prevention but current influenza vaccines do not provide universal and durable protection, and require yearly reformulation. In the future, it is hoped that influenza vaccines will give better and universal protection, and that new vaccines can be found for other causes of viral pneumonia.

  19. Acute eosinophilic pneumonia: a hypersensitivity phenomenon?

    PubMed

    Badesch, D B; King, T E; Schwarz, M I

    1989-01-01

    A previously healthy young man presented with acute respiratory distress and diffuse bilateral infiltrates on chest radiograph. Eosinophilic pneumonia was diagnosed by bronchoalveolar lavage and confirmed by transbronchial lung biopsy. There was no evidence of an infectious etiology, and the patient rapidly improved with corticosteroid therapy. Most cases of eosinophilic pneumonia reported previously have followed a chronic course. The case presented here was acute in onset, suggesting a hypersensitivity reaction. High levels of bronchoalveolar lavage eosinophils indicate the diagnosis but not the etiology of eosinophilic pneumonia.

  20. Identification of Bacterial and Viral Codetections With Mycoplasma pneumoniae Using the TaqMan Array Card in Patients Hospitalized With Community-Acquired Pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Diaz, Maureen H; Cross, Kristen E; Benitez, Alvaro J; Hicks, Lauri A; Kutty, Preeta; Bramley, Anna M; Chappell, James D; Hymas, Weston; Patel, Anami; Qi, Chao; Williams, Derek J; Arnold, Sandra R; Ampofo, Krow; Self, Wesley H; Grijalva, Carlos G; Anderson, Evan J; McCullers, Jonathan A; Pavia, Andrew T; Wunderink, Richard G; Edwards, Kathryn M; Jain, Seema; Winchell, Jonas M

    2016-03-01

    Mycoplasma pneumoniae was detected in a number of patients with community-acquired pneumonia in a recent prospective study. To assess whether other pathogens were also detected in these patients, TaqMan Array Cards were used to test 216 M pneumoniae-positive respiratory specimens for 25 additional viral and bacterial respiratory pathogens. It is interesting to note that 1 or more codetections, predominantly bacterial, were identified in approximately 60% of specimens, with codetections being more common in children.

  1. Identification of Bacterial and Viral Codetections With Mycoplasma pneumoniae Using the TaqMan Array Card in Patients Hospitalized With Community-Acquired Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Diaz, Maureen H.; Cross, Kristen E.; Benitez, Alvaro J.; Hicks, Lauri A.; Kutty, Preeta; Bramley, Anna M.; Chappell, James D.; Hymas, Weston; Patel, Anami; Qi, Chao; Williams, Derek J.; Arnold, Sandra R.; Ampofo, Krow; Self, Wesley H.; Grijalva, Carlos G.; Anderson, Evan J.; McCullers, Jonathan A.; Pavia, Andrew T.; Wunderink, Richard G.; Edwards, Kathryn M.; Jain, Seema; Winchell, Jonas M.

    2016-01-01

    Mycoplasma pneumoniae was detected in a number of patients with community-acquired pneumonia in a recent prospective study. To assess whether other pathogens were also detected in these patients, TaqMan Array Cards were used to test 216 M pneumoniae-positive respiratory specimens for 25 additional viral and bacterial respiratory pathogens. It is interesting to note that 1 or more codetections, predominantly bacterial, were identified in approximately 60% of specimens, with codetections being more common in children. PMID:27191004

  2. Interpreting Assays for the Detection of Streptococcus pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is both an aggressive pathogen and a normal part of the human respiratory microbiome. Clinicians and microbiologists have struggled to develop tests that can identify pneumococcal respiratory infection and accurately distinguish colonization from invasive disease. Molecular methods hold the promise of an improved ability to rapidly detect microorganisms in respiratory secretions and to make an accurate diagnosis; however, interpretation of diagnostic testing for S. pneumoniae remains problematic. Molecular assays, such as those targeting the pneumolysin gene, may cross-react with other streptococcal species, confounding detection and quantification. Assays that target the autolysin gene appear to be more specific. Even when accurately identified, however, the significance of S. pneumoniae DNA detected in clinical samples is difficult to determine. Here we will discuss the challenges faced in the interpretation of molecular testing for S. pneumoniae, and some strategies that might be used to improve our ability to diagnose pneumococcal respiratory infection. PMID:21460292

  3. Acute eosinophilic pneumonia accompanied by mediastinal lymphadenopathy and thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed Central

    Esme, Hidir; Sahin, Onder; Sezer, Murat; Fidan, Fatma; Unlu, Mehmet

    2006-01-01

    Acute eosinophilic pneumonia, which was described in 1989, is thought to represent a hypersensitivity reaction to unidentified inhaled antigens. Here, we present a case of a marble mine worker with acute eosinophilic pneumonia complicated with mediastinal lymphadenopathy, neutrophilia, thrombocytopenia and acute respiratory distress syndrome. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:17128696

  4. Macrolide Resistance in Streptococcus pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Schroeder, Max R.; Stephens, David S.

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a common commensal and an opportunistic pathogen. Suspected pneumococcal upper respiratory infections and pneumonia are often treated with macrolide antibiotics. Macrolides are bacteriostatic antibiotics and inhibit protein synthesis by binding to the 50S ribosomal subunit. The widespread use of macrolides is associated with increased macrolide resistance in S. pneumoniae, and the treatment of pneumococcal infections with macrolides may be associated with clinical failures. In S. pneumoniae, macrolide resistance is due to ribosomal dimethylation by an enzyme encoded by erm(B), efflux by a two-component efflux pump encoded by mef (E)/mel(msr(D)) and, less commonly, mutations of the ribosomal target site of macrolides. A wide array of genetic elements have emerged that facilitate macrolide resistance in S. pneumoniae; for example erm(B) is found on Tn917, while the mef (E)/mel operon is carried on the 5.4- or 5.5-kb Mega element. The macrolide resistance determinants, erm(B) and mef (E)/mel, are also found on large composite Tn916-like elements most notably Tn6002, Tn2009, and Tn2010. Introductions of 7-valent and 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccines (PCV-7 and PCV-13) have decreased the incidence of macrolide-resistant invasive pneumococcal disease, but serotype replacement and emergence of macrolide resistance remain an important concern. PMID:27709102

  5. Respiratory System

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page from the NHLBI on Twitter. The Respiratory System The respiratory system is made up of organs ... vessels, and the muscles that enable breathing. The Respiratory System Figure A shows the location of the respiratory ...

  6. Outbreak of Pneumonia in the Setting of Fatal Pneumococcal Meningitis among US Army Trainees: Potential Role of Chlamydia pneumoniae Infection

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Compared to the civilian population, military trainees are often at increased risk for respiratory infections. We investigated an outbreak of radiologically-confirmed pneumonia that was recognized after 2 fatal cases of serotype 7F pneumococcal meningitis were reported in a 303-person military trainee company (Alpha Company). Methods We reviewed surveillance data on pneumonia and febrile respiratory illness at the training facility; conducted chart reviews for cases of radiologically-confirmed pneumonia; and administered surveys and collected nasopharyngeal swabs from trainees in the outbreak battalion (Alpha and Hotel Companies), associated training staff, and trainees newly joining the battalion. Results Among Alpha and Hotel Company trainees, the average weekly attack rates of radiologically-confirmed pneumonia were 1.4% and 1.2% (most other companies at FLW: 0-0.4%). The pneumococcal carriage rate among all Alpha Company trainees was 15% with a predominance of serotypes 7F and 3. Chlamydia pneumoniae was identified from 31% of specimens collected from Alpha Company trainees with respiratory symptoms. Conclusion Although the etiology of the outbreak remains unclear, the identification of both S. pneumoniae and C. pneumoniae among trainees suggests that both pathogens may have contributed either independently or as cofactors to the observed increased incidence of pneumonia in the outbreak battalion and should be considered as possible etiologies in outbreaks of pneumonia in the military population. PMID:21635754

  7. Incidence of Pneumonia After Videofluoroscopic Swallowing Study and Associated Factors.

    PubMed

    Jo, Hannae; Park, Jung-Gyoo; Min, David; Park, Hee-Won; Kang, Eun Kyoung; Lee, Kun-Jai; Baek, Sora

    2016-02-01

    Pneumonia after videofluoroscopic swallow study (VFSS) is sometimes considered to be caused by aspiration during VFSS; however, to our knowledge, a relationship between these events has not been clearly investigated. The aim of this study was to assess the incidence of VFSS-related pneumonia and related factors. Overall, 696 VFSS cases were retrospectively reviewed. Cases in which blood culture was performed within 3 days after VFSS due to newly developed infectious signs were considered as post-VFSS infection cases. Pneumonia was suspected when there was some evidence of respiratory infectious signs in clinical, radiological, and laboratory findings. The underlying disease, clinical signs, and VFSS findings of the pneumonia group were assessed. Among 696 cases, pneumonia was diagnosed in 15 patients. The patients in the pneumonia group tended to be older and had higher aspiration rate on VFSS than those in the non-pneumonia group. In the pneumonia group, 2 patients showed no aspiration during VFSS. In 6 patients, pneumonia developed after massive aspiration of gastric content in 5 patients and inappropriate oral feeding with risk of aspiration before VFSS in 1 patient. Only 7 patients (1.0 %) were finally determined as having VFSS-related pneumonia. In conclusion, the 72-h incidence of VFSS-related pneumonia was 1.0 %. Old age and severity of swallowing difficulty are associated with occurrence of pneumonia.

  8. Atypical pathogens and respiratory tract infections.

    PubMed

    Blasi, F

    2004-07-01

    The atypical respiratory pathogens Chlamydia pneumoniae, Mycoplasma pneumoniae and Legionella pneumophila are now recognised as a significant cause of acute respiratory-tract infections, implicated in community-acquired pneumonia, acute exacerbations of chronic bronchitis, asthma, and less frequently, upper respiratory-tract infections. Chronic infection with C. pneumoniae is common among patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and may also play a role in the natural history of asthma, including exacerbations. The lack of a gold standard for diagnosis of these pathogens still handicaps the current understanding of their true prevalence and role in the pathogenesis of acute and chronic respiratory infections. While molecular diagnostic techniques, such as polymerase chain reaction, offer improvements in sensitivity, specificity and rapidity over culture and serology, the need remains for a consistent and reproducible diagnostic technique, available to all microbiology laboratories. Current treatment guidelines for community-acquired pneumonia recognise the importance of atypical respiratory pathogens in its aetiology, for which macrolides are considered suitable first-line agents. The value of atypical coverage in antibiotic therapy for acute exacerbations of chronic bronchitis and exacerbations of asthma is less clear, while there is no evidence to suggest that atypical pathogens should be covered in antibiotic treatment of upper respiratory-tract infections.

  9. Update on the pathogenesis and management of pneumonia in the elderly-roles of aspiration pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Teramoto, Shinji; Yoshida, Kazufumi; Hizawa, Nobuyuki

    2015-09-01

    Pneumonia in the elderly results in the highest mortality among cases of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). The pathophysiology of pneumonia in the elderly is primarily due to aspiration pneumonia (ASP). ASP comprises two pathological conditions: airspace infiltration with bacterial pathogens and dysphagia-associated miss-swallowing. The first-line therapy for the treatment of bacterial pneumonia in the elderly is a narrow spectrum of antibiotics, including sulbactam/ampicillin, which are effective against major lower respiratory infection pathogens and anaerobes. The bacterial pathogens of ASP cases of pneumonia in the elderly are similar to those associated with adult CAP. In addition to an appropriate course of antibiotics, pharmacologic and non-pharmacologic approaches for dysphagia and upper airway management are necessary for the treatment and prevention of pneumonia. Swallowing rehabilitation, oral health care, pneumococcal vaccination, gastroesophageal reflux management, and a head-up position during the night are necessary for the treatment and prevention of repeated episodes of pneumonia in elderly patients. In addition, tuberculosis should always be considered for the differential diagnosis of pneumonia in this patient population.

  10. Enzootic plague reduces black-footed ferret (Mustela nigripes) survival in Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Matchett, Marc R.; Biggins, Dean E.; Carlson, Valerie; Powell, Bradford; Rocke, Tonie E.

    2010-01-01

    Black-footed ferrets (Mustela nigripes) require extensive prairie dog colonies (Cynomys spp.) to provide habitat and prey. Epizootic plague kills both prairie dogs and ferrets and is a major factor limiting recovery of the highly endangered ferret. In addition to epizootics, we hypothesized that enzootic plague, that is, presence of disease-causing Yersinia pestis without any noticeable prairie dog die off, may also affect ferret survival. We reduced risk of plague on portions of two ferret reintroduction areas by conducting flea control for 3 years. Beginning in 2004, about half of the ferrets residing on dusted and nondusted colonies were vaccinated against plague with an experimental vaccine (F1-V fusion protein). We evaluated 6-month reencounter rates (percentage of animals observed at the end of an interval that were known alive at the beginning of the interval), an index to survival, for ferrets in four treatment groups involving all combinations of vaccination and flea control. For captive-reared ferrets (115 individuals observed across 156 time intervals), reencounter rates were higher for vaccinates (0.44) than for nonvaccinates (0.23, p = 0.044) on colonies without flea control, but vaccination had no detectable effect on colonies with flea control (vaccinates = 0.41, nonvaccinates = 0.42, p = 0.754). Flea control resulted in higher reencounter rates for nonvaccinates (p = 0.026), but not for vaccinates (p = 0.508). The enhancement of survival due to vaccination or flea control supports the hypothesis that enzootic plague reduces ferret survival, even when there was no noticeable decline in prairie dog abundance. The collective effects of vaccination and flea control compel a conclusion that fleas are required for maintenance, and probably transmission, of plague at enzootic levels. Other studies have demonstrated similar effects of flea control on several species of prairie dogs and, when combined with this study, suggest

  11. Enzootic plague reduces black-footed ferret (Mustela nigripes) survival in Montana.

    PubMed

    Matchett, Marc R; Biggins, Dean E; Carlson, Valerie; Powell, Bradford; Rocke, Tonie

    2010-01-01

    Black-footed ferrets (Mustela nigripes) require extensive prairie dog colonies (Cynomys spp.) to provide habitat and prey. Epizootic plague kills both prairie dogs and ferrets and is a major factor limiting recovery of the highly endangered ferret. In addition to epizootics, we hypothesized that enzootic plague, that is, presence of disease-causing Yersinia pestis without any noticeable prairie dog die off, may also affect ferret survival. We reduced risk of plague on portions of two ferret reintroduction areas by conducting flea control for 3 years. Beginning in 2004, about half of the ferrets residing on dusted and nondusted colonies were vaccinated against plague with an experimental vaccine (F1-V fusion protein). We evaluated 6-month reencounter rates (percentage of animals observed at the end of an interval that were known alive at the beginning of the interval), an index to survival, for ferrets in four treatment groups involving all combinations of vaccination and flea control. For captive-reared ferrets (115 individuals observed across 156 time intervals), reencounter rates were higher for vaccinates (0.44) than for nonvaccinates (0.23, p = 0.044) on colonies without flea control, but vaccination had no detectable effect on colonies with flea control (vaccinates = 0.41, nonvaccinates = 0.42, p = 0.754). Flea control resulted in higher reencounter rates for nonvaccinates (p = 0.026), but not for vaccinates (p = 0.508). The enhancement of survival due to vaccination or flea control supports the hypothesis that enzootic plague reduces ferret survival, even when there was no noticeable decline in prairie dog abundance. The collective effects of vaccination and flea control compel a conclusion that fleas are required for maintenance, and probably transmission, of plague at enzootic levels. Other studies have demonstrated similar effects of flea control on several species of prairie dogs and, when combined with this study, suggest that the effects of enzootic

  12. O-Chlorobenzylidene Malononitrile (CS Riot Control Agent) Exposures and Associated Acute Respiratory Illnesses in a United States Army Basic Combat Training Cohort

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-03-14

    encompass a broad range of febrile and afebrile clinical diagnoses such the common cold, influenza, bronchitis, bronchiolitis, pneumonia and other...respiratory infections of unspecified site; 466.0 Bronchitis, acute; 486 Pneumonia , organism NOS; 487.0 Influenza with pneumonia ; 487.1 Influenza with...site; 466.0 Bronchitis, acute; 486 Pneumonia , organism NOS; 487.0 Influenza with pneumonia ; 487.1 Influenza with respiratory manifestation, not

  13. Pneumonia in the neutropenic cancer patient

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Scott E.; Ost, David E.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review Pneumonia is the leading cause of death among neutropenic cancer patients, particularly those with acute leukemia. Even with empiric therapy, case fatality rates of neutropenic pneumonias remain unacceptably high. However, recent advances in the management of neutropenic pneumonia offer hope for improved outcomes in the cancer setting. This review summarizes recent literature regarding the clinical presentation, microbiologic trends, diagnostic advances and therapeutic recommendations for cancer-related neutropenic pneumonia. Recent findings While neutropenic patients acquire pathogens both in community or nosocomial settings, patients’ obligate healthcare exposures result in the frequent identification of multidrug resistant bacterial organisms on conventional culture-based assessment of respiratory secretions. Modern molecular techniques, including expanded use of galactomannan testing, have further facilitated identification of fungal pathogens, allowing for aggressive interventions that appear to improve patient outcomes. Multiple interested societies have issued updated guidelines for antibiotic therapy of suspected neutropenic pneumonia. The benefit of antibiotic medications may be further enhanced by agents that promote host responses to infection. Summary Neutropenic cancer patients have numerous potential causes for pulmonary infiltrates and clinical deterioration, with lower respiratory tract infections among the most deadly. Early clinical suspicion, diagnosis and intervention for neutropenic pneumonia provide cancer patients’ best hope for survival. PMID:25784246

  14. Pneumocystis Pneumonia (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Pneumocystis Pneumonia KidsHealth > For Parents > Pneumocystis Pneumonia A A A What's in this article? About PCP Diagnosing PCP Treating PCP Pneumocystis pneumonia (PCP) is an infection caused by Pneumocystis jiroveci , ...

  15. How Is Pneumonia Treated?

    MedlinePlus

    ... to cure the infection and prevent complications. Bacterial pneumonia Bacterial pneumonia is treated with medicines called antibiotics. ... fewer symptoms such as cough and fever. Viral pneumonia Antibiotics don't work when the cause of ...

  16. What Is Pneumonia?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Share this page from the NHLBI on Twitter. Pneumonia Pneumonia is a bacterial, viral, or fungal infection of ... and trouble breathing. Many factors affect how serious pneumonia is, such as the type of germ causing ...

  17. [Hot topics in respiratory infections].

    PubMed

    de Souza-Galvao, M Luiza; García-Martínez, Miguel Ángel; Sanz, Francisco; Blanquer, José

    2011-01-01

    We review the most interesting articles on respiratory infections published in the last trimester of 2009 and in 2010. Notable publications in bronchiectasis were the Guidelines of the British Thoracic Society, as well as several articles on the natural course of the process, the impact of exacerbations on the course of the disease, and treatment with inhaled antibiotics. Other notable publications were the SEPAR-SEIMC consensus document for the management of tuberculosis and articles on the use of interferon-gamma in the diagnosis of tuberculosis infection. The new recommendations of the Spanish Society of Pneumology and Thoracic Surgery on community-acquired pneumonia have recently been published. Equally important are studies on the viral etiology of community-acquired pneumonia, the impact of corticosteroid treatment in pneumonia, the duration of antibiotic therapy and preventive measures in both community-acquired and nosocomial pneumonia.

  18. Pulmonary pathophysiology of pneumococcal pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Light, R B

    1999-09-01

    Respiratory failure is one of the most important causes of death in patients with acute pneumococcal pneumonia. There are two forms that may or may not coexist: ventilatory failure and hypoxemic respiratory failure. Ventilatory failure is principally caused by mechanical changes in the lungs resulting from pneumonia. Inflammatory exudate fills alveoli at slightly less than their normal functional residual capacity (FRC), causing a volume loss at FRC roughly proportional to the extent of the pulmonary infiltrate. Because this consolidated air space does not inflate easily at higher transpulmonary pressures, at higher lung volumes the volume loss is proportionally greater. This loss of volume reduces total lung compliance and increases the work of breathing. There is also evidence that the dynamic compliance of the remaining ventilated lung is reduced in pneumococcal pneumonia, possibly by reduction in surfactant activity, further increasing the work of breathing. Arterial hypoxemia early in acute pneumococcal pneumonia is principally caused by persistence of pulmonary artery blood flow to consolidated lung resulting in an intrapulmonary shunt, but also, to a varying degree, it is caused by intrapulmonary oxygen consumption by the lung during the acute phase and by ventilation-perfusion mismatch later. The persistence of pulmonary blood flow to consolidated lung appears to be caused by a relative failure of the hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction (HPV) mechanism during acute pneumonia, which is at least caused by endogenous vasodilator prostaglandins associated with the inflammatory process but also by other as yet undefined mechanisms. During convalescence, arterial oxygenation improves as blood flow to consolidated lung falls. The magnitude of the intrapulmonary shunt may be influenced by a number of factors that modify the distribution of pulmonary blood flow. Factors that tend to increase flow to consolidated lung and worsen shunt include endogenous vasodilator

  19. Specimen collection for the diagnosis of pediatric pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Hammitt, Laura L; Murdoch, David R; Scott, J Anthony G; Driscoll, Amanda; Karron, Ruth A; Levine, Orin S; O'Brien, Katherine L

    2012-04-01

    Diagnosing the etiologic agent of pneumonia has an essential role in ensuring the most appropriate and effective therapy for individual patients and is critical to guiding the development of treatment and prevention strategies. However, establishing the etiology of pneumonia remains challenging because of the relative inaccessibility of the infected tissue and the difficulty in obtaining samples without contamination by upper respiratory tract secretions. Here, we review the published and unpublished literature on various specimens available for the diagnosis of pediatric pneumonia. We discuss the advantages and limitations of each specimen, and discuss the rationale for the specimens to be collected for the Pneumonia Etiology Research for Child Health study.

  20. Flu Shot May Curb Respiratory Infections in People with Heart Failure

    MedlinePlus

    ... Shot May Curb Respiratory Infections in People With Heart Failure Doctors should consider high-dose vaccine for those ... HealthDay News) -- Flu and pneumonia vaccines may reduce heart failure patients' risk of dangerous respiratory infections, a new ...

  1. [National consensus for management of community acquired pneumonia in adults].

    PubMed

    Saldías P, Fernando; Pérez C, Carlos

    2005-01-01

    Community acquired pneumonia (CAP) is an acute respiratory infection that affects pulmonary parenchyma, and is caused by community acquired microorganisms. In Chile, pneumonia represents the main cause of death due to infectious diseases and is the third specific cause of mortality in adults. In 1999, an experts committee in representation of "Sociedad Chilena de Enfermedades Respiratorias", presented the first National Guidelines for the Treatment of Adult Community Acquired Pneumonia, mainly based in foreign experience and documents, and adapted it to our National Health System Organization. During the last decade, impressive epidemiological and technological changes have occurred, making the update of guidelines for treatment of NAC by several international scientific societies, necessary. These changes include: new respiratory pathogens that are being identified in CAP and affect adult patients (Mycoplasma pneumoniae, Chlamydia pneumoniae, Legionella pneumophila); the increasing senescent adult population that carries multiple co-morbidities; the emergence of antimicrobial resistance among respiratory pathogens associated to massive antibiotic prescription; the development by the pharmaceutical industry of new drugs that are effective for pneumonia treatment (macrolides, ketolides and respiratory fluorquinolones); and the development of new diagnostic techniques for detection of antigens, antibodies, and bacterial DNA by molecular biology, useful in respiratory infections. Based on these antecedents, an Advisory Committee of "Sociedad Chilena de Enfermedades Respiratorias" and "Sociedad Chilena de Infectología" has reviewed the national and international evidence about CAP management in adults in order to update clinical recommendations for our country.

  2. Foreign body aspiration pneumonia in an intravenous drug user

    PubMed Central

    Bhaskar, Balu; Andelkovic, Vladimir

    2012-01-01

    Heroin use is associated with several well described respiratory complications, including noncardiogenic pulmonary edema, aspiration pneumonitis, acute respiratory distress syndrome,pneumonia, lung abscess, septic pulmonary emboli, and atelectasis. We describe an interesting case of a young female patient, an intravenous heroin user who presented with progressive dyspnea, hypoxia, and left lung consolidation. PMID:22412782

  3. Acute Chlamydia pneumoniae and Mycoplasma pneumoniae infections in community-acquired pneumonia and exacerbations of COPD or asthma: therapeutic considerations.

    PubMed

    Meloni, F; Paschetto, E; Mangiarotti, P; Crepaldi, M; Morosini, M; Bulgheroni, A; Fietta, A

    2004-02-01

    Rates of acute Chlamydia pneumoniae and Mycoplasma pneumoniae infections were determined in 115 adults hospitalized for community-acquired pneumonia (CAP), purulent exacerbations of COPD and acute exacerbations of bronchial asthma, by means of serology and molecular methods. Results were compared with those obtained in a matched control group. Common respiratory pathogens were isolated by cultures in 22.5% and 22.2% of CAP and exacerbated COPD patients, respectively. Cultures from exacerbated asthma patients were always negative. Serological and molecular evidence of current C. pneumoniae infection was obtained in 10.0%, 8.9% and 3.3% of CAP, COPD and asthma cases. The corresponding rates of acute M. pneumoniae infection were 17.5%, 6.7% and 3.3%, respectively. Finally, no difference was found between typical and atypical pathogen rates. These findings highlight the importance of taking into account C. pneumoniae and M. pneumoniae infections in guiding the choice of empirical antibacterial treatment for CAP and purulent exacerbations of COPD.

  4. Lipoid Pneumonia in a Gas Station Attendant

    PubMed Central

    Yampara Guarachi, Gladis Isabel; Barbosa Moreira, Valeria; Santos Ferreira, Angela; Sias, Selma M. De A.; Rodrigues, Cristovão C.; Teixeira, Graça Helena M. do C.

    2014-01-01

    The exogenous lipoid pneumonia, uncommon in adults, is the result of the inhalation and/or aspiration of lipid material into the tracheobronchial tree. This is often confused with bacterial pneumonia and pulmonary tuberculosis due to a nonspecific clinical and radiologic picture. It presents acutely or chronically and may result in pulmonary fibrosis. We describe here a case of lipoid pneumonia in a gas station attendant who siphoned gasoline to fill motorcycles; he was hospitalized due to presenting with a respiratory infection that was hard to resolve. The patient underwent bronchoscopy with bronchoalveolar lavage, which, on cytochemical (oil red O) evaluation, was slightly positive for lipid material in the foamy cytoplasm of alveolar macrophages. Due to his occupational history and radiographic abnormalities suggestive of lipoid pneumonia, a lung biopsy was performed to confirm the diagnosis. The patient was serially treated with segmental lung lavage and showed clinical, functional, and radiological improvement. PMID:25374742

  5. Healthcare-associated Pneumonia and Aspiration Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Komiya, Kosaku; Ishii, Hiroshi; Kadota, Jun-ichi

    2015-01-01

    Healthcare-associated pneumonia (HCAP) is a new concept of pneumonia proposed by the American Thoracic Society/Infectious Diseases Society of America in 2005. This category is located between community-acquired pneumonia and hospital-acquired pneumonia with respect to the characteristics of the causative pathogens and mortality, and primarily targets elderly patients in healthcare facilities. Aspiration among such patients is recognized to be a primary mechanism for the development of pneumonia, particularly since the HCAP guidelines were published. However, it is difficult to manage patients with aspiration pneumonia because the definition of the condition is unclear, and the treatment is associated with ethical aspects. This review focused on the definition, prevalence and role of aspiration pneumonia as a prognostic factor in published studies of HCAP and attempted to identify problems associated with the concept of aspiration pneumonia. PMID:25657850

  6. High prevalence of respiratory viral infections in patients hospitalized in an intensive care unit for acute respiratory infections as detected by nucleic acid-based assays.

    PubMed

    Legoff, Jérôme; Guérot, Emmanuel; Ndjoyi-Mbiguino, Angélique; Matta, Mathieu; Si-Mohamed, Ali; Gutmann, Laurent; Fagon, Jean-Yves; Bélec, Laurent

    2005-01-01

    Forty-seven bronchoalveolar lavages (BAL) were obtained from 41 patients with acute pneumonia attending an intensive care unit. By molecular diagnosis, 30% of total BAL and 63% of bacteria-negative BAL were positive for respiratory viruses. Molecular detection allows for high-rate detection of respiratory viral infections in adult patients suffering from severe pneumonia.

  7. High Prevalence of Respiratory Viral Infections in Patients Hospitalized in an Intensive Care Unit for Acute Respiratory Infections as Detected by Nucleic Acid-Based Assays

    PubMed Central

    Legoff, Jérôme; Guérot, Emmanuel; Ndjoyi-Mbiguino, Angélique; Matta, Mathieu; Si-Mohamed, Ali; Gutmann, Laurent; Fagon, Jean-Yves; Bélec, Laurent

    2005-01-01

    Forty-seven bronchoalveolar lavages (BAL) were obtained from 41 patients with acute pneumonia attending an intensive care unit. By molecular diagnosis, 30% of total BAL and 63% of bacteria-negative BAL were positive for respiratory viruses. Molecular detection allows for high-rate detection of respiratory viral infections in adult patients suffering from severe pneumonia. PMID:15635014

  8. Levetiracetam-induced eosinophilic pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Fagan, Aisling; Fuld, Jonathan; Soon, Elaine

    2017-03-08

    Levetiracetam is widely regarded as a benign antiepileptic drug, compared to older antiepileptic medication. We report a case of eosinophilic pneumonia due to levetiracetam use in a non-smoking woman aged 59 years with no previous respiratory history. Our patient presented with exertional breathlessness and marked desaturation on exertion. She displayed 'reverse bat-wing' infiltrates on her chest radiograph and peripheral eosinophilia on a complete blood count. Her symptoms, radiology and peripheral eosinophilia resolved completely with cessation of levetiracetam and a course of prednisolone. This is the first report of isolated eosinophilic pneumonia due to levetiracetam. Other reports of levetiracetam-induced eosinophilia describe drug rash, eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS syndrome). Detection of pulmonary drug reactions requires a careful drug history and high index of suspicion. Identifying and reporting a causative agent is crucially important, as cessation of the drug is essential for resolution of the syndrome.

  9. Complicated secondary pneumonia after swine-origin influenza A virus infection in an immunocompetent patient.

    PubMed

    Igusa, Ryotaro; Sakakibara, Tomohiro; Shibahara, Taizo; Sakamoto, Kazuhiro; Nishimura, Hidekazu; Ota, Kozo

    2012-01-01

    The pandemic of the swine-origin influenza A virus (S-OIV) in 2009 demonstrated severe viral pneumonia followed by acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Although ARDS would be caused by the influenza virus pneumonia itself, it has remained unclear whether other respiratory viral or bacterial infections coexist with S-OIV pneumonia. We report an immunocompetent patient with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and Herpes simplex virus (HSV) pneumonia secondary to S-OIV infection. A 57-year-old man previously without major medical illness was admitted to our hospital with severe pneumonia accompanied by ARDS due to S-OIV. In his clinical course, anti-influenza treatment was not effective. Sputum culture revealed the presence of MRSA, and HSV was isolated in broncho-alveoler lavage (BAL) fluid. Administration of an antiviral agent (acyclovir), an antibacterial agent (linezolid), and a corticosteroid (methylprednisolone) successfully improved the pneumonia and ARDS. HSV pneumonia can scarcely be seen in healthy people. However recently it has been recognized as a ventilator-associated pneumonia. Although coexistence of Streptococcus pneumoniae and MRSA was reported in S-OIV pneumonia, secondary viral infection has not been reported. The present report is the first patient with HSV pneumonia secondary to S-OIV infection. We propose that a possibility of hidden HSV pneumonia should be taken into consideration in patients with prolonged severe pneumonia due to influenza infection.

  10. Characterization of enzootic foci of Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus in western Venezuela.

    PubMed

    Barrera, R; Torres, N; Freier, J E; Navarro, J C; García, C Z; Salas, R; Vasquez, C; Weaver, S C

    2001-01-01

    The distribution of the sylvatic subtype ID Venezuelan equine encephalitis (VEE) viruses in the lowland tropical forests of western Venezuela was investigated using remote sensing and geographic information system technologies. Landsat 5 Thematic Mapper satellite imagery was used to study the reflectance patterns of VEE endemic foci and to identify other locations with similar reflectance patterns. Enzootic VEE virus variants isolated during this study are the closest genetic relatives of the epizootic viruses that emerged in western Venezuela during 1992-1993. VEE virus surveillance was conducted by exposing sentinel hamsters to mosquito bites and trapping wild vertebrates in seven forests identified and located by means of the satellite image. We isolated VEE viruses from 48 of a total of 1,363 sentinel hamsters in two of the forests on six occasions, in both dry and wet seasons. None of the 12 small vertebrates captured in 8,190 trap-nights showed signs of previous VEE virus infection. The satellite image was classified into 13 validated classes of land use/vegetation using unsupervised and supervised techniques. Data derived from the image consisted of the raw digital values of near- and mid-infrared bands 4, 5, and 7, derived Tasseled Cap indices of wetness, greenness, and brightness, and the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index. Digitized maps provided ancillary data of elevation and soil geomorphology. Image enhancement was applied using Principal Component Analysis. A digital layer of roads together with georeferenced images was used to locate the study sites. A cluster analysis using the above data revealed two main groups of dense forests separated by spectral properties, altitude, and soil geomorphology. Virus was isolated more frequently from the forest type identified on flat flood plains of main rivers rather than the forest type found on the rolling hills of the study area. The spatial analysis suggests that mosquitoes carrying the enzootic viruses

  11. Nosocomial pneumonia: lessons learned.

    PubMed

    Nair, Girish B; Niederman, Michael S

    2013-07-01

    Nosocomial pneumonia remains a significant cause of hospital-acquired infection, imposing substantial economic burden on the health care system worldwide. Various preventive strategies have been increasingly used to prevent the development of pneumonia. It is now recognized that patients with health care-associated pneumonia are a heterogeneous population and that not all are at risk for infection with nosocomial pneumonia pathogens, with some being infected with the same organisms as in community-acquired pneumonia. This review discusses the risk factors for nosocomial pneumonia, controversies in its diagnosis, and approaches to the treatment and prevention of nosocomial and health care-associated pneumonia.

  12. Successful recovery of MERS CoV pneumonia in a patient with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome: a case report.

    PubMed

    Shalhoub, Sarah; AlZahrani, Abdulwahab; Simhairi, Raed; Mushtaq, Adnan

    2015-01-01

    Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus (MERS CoV) may cause severe pneumonia with significant morbidity and mortality, particularly in patients with multiple comorbid condition. MERS CoV pneumonia has not been previously reported in patients with Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV). Herein, we report a case of MERS CoV pneumonia with a successful outcome in a patient recently diagnosed with HIV.

  13. Etiology of severe pneumonia in Ecuadorian children

    PubMed Central

    Jonnalagadda, Sivani; Rodríguez, Oswaldo; Estrella, Bertha; Sabin, Lora L.; Sempértegui, Fernando

    2017-01-01

    Background In Latin America, community-acquired pneumonia remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality among children. Few studies have examined the etiology of pneumonia in Ecuador. Methods This observational study was part of a randomized, double blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial conducted among children aged 2–59 months with severe pneumonia in Quito, Ecuador. Nasopharyngeal and blood samples were tested for bacterial and viral etiology by polymerase chain reaction. Risk factors for specific respiratory pathogens were also evaluated. Results Among 406 children tested, 159 (39.2%) had respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), 71 (17.5%) had human metapneumovirus (hMPV), and 62 (15.3%) had adenovirus. Streptococcus pneumoniae was identified in 37 (9.2%) samples and Mycoplasma pneumoniae in three (0.74%) samples. The yearly circulation pattern of RSV (P = 0.0003) overlapped with S. pneumoniae, (P = 0.03) with most cases occurring in the rainy season. In multivariable analysis, risk factors for RSV included younger age (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] = 1.9, P = 0.01) and being underweight (aOR = 1.8, P = 0.04). Maternal education (aOR = 0.82, P = 0.003), pulse oximetry (aOR = 0.93, P = 0.005), and rales (aOR = 0.25, P = 0.007) were associated with influenza A. Younger age (aOR = 3.5, P = 0.007) and elevated baseline respiratory rate were associated with HPIV-3 infection (aOR = 0.94, P = 0.03). Conclusion These results indicate the importance of RSV and influenza, and potentially modifiable risk factors including undernutrition and future use of a RSV vaccine, when an effective vaccine becomes available. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT 00513929 PMID:28182741

  14. Clotting profile in cattle showing chronic enzootic haematuria (CEH) and bladder neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Di Loria, A; Piantedosi, D; Cortese, L; Roperto, S; Urraro, C; Paciello, O; Guccione, J; Britti, D; Ciaramella, P

    2012-08-01

    Primary haemostasis (bleeding and blood clotting time), activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT), prothrombin time (PT), antithrombin III (ATIII), protein C, protein S, fibrinogen and D-dimer were determined in 13 cattle affected by chronic enzootic haematuria (CEH) and bladder neoplasms and 10 healthy cattle (control group). Increases in antithrombin III and protein S activities (P<0.01) and protein C and fibrinogen plasma levels (P<0.05) were observed in sick animals, while activated partial thromboplastin time, prothrombin time, and D-dimer did not show significant differences when compared to healthy animals. The clotting profile observed does not seem responsible for the chronic bleeding typical of CEH. The observed modification of some coagulation markers may derive from multiple interactions among cancer, inflammation and viral infection status typical of this syndrome.

  15. A modeling approach to investigate epizootic outbreaks and enzootic maintenance of Rift Valley fever virus.

    PubMed

    Chamchod, Farida; Cantrell, Robert Stephen; Cosner, Chris; Hassan, Ali N; Beier, John C; Ruan, Shigui

    2014-08-01

    We propose a mathematical model to investigate the transmission dynamics of Rift Valley fever (RVF) virus among ruminants. Our findings indicate that in endemic areas RVF virus maintains at a very low level among ruminants after outbreaks and subsequent outbreaks may occur when new susceptible ruminants are recruited into endemic areas or abundant numbers of mosquitoes emerge when herd immunity decreases. Many factors have been shown to have impacts on the severity of RVF outbreaks; a higher probability of death due to RVF among ruminants, a higher mosquito:ruminant ratio, or a shorter lifespan of animals can amplify the magnitude of the outbreaks; vaccination helps to reduce the magnitude of RVF outbreaks and the loss of animals efficiently, and the maximum vaccination effort (a high vaccination rate and a larger number of vaccinated animals) is recommended before the commencement of an outbreak but can be reduced later during the enzootic.

  16. Serological characteristics of affected cattle during an outbreak of bovine enzootic encephalomyelitis caused by Akabane virus.

    PubMed

    Oem, Jae-Ku; Kim, Yeon-Hee; Kim, Seong-Hee; Lee, Myoung-Heon; Lee, Kyoung-Ki

    2014-01-01

    During an outbreak of bovine enzootic encephalomyelitis caused by the Akabane virus (AKAV) in 2010, 210 serum samples were collected from the affected cattle, and serological investigations for the AKAV were performed using a serum neutralization test (SNT) and an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The seropositive rates for SNT and ELISA were 90.0 and 85.2 %, respectively. The titers of SNT (log2) against the AKAV were higher than 4.0 in the highly affected cattle (80.0 %). This finding indicates that most affected cattle were infected with the AKAV and that strong immune responses against this virus were elicited in affected cattle. The strong immune response to the AKAV in cattle may provide insight into the occurrence of bovine encephalomyelitis caused by the AKAV.

  17. Isolation of Jamestown Canyon virus (California serogroup) from Aedes mosquitoes in an enzootic focus in Michigan.

    PubMed

    Heard, P B; Zhang, M B; Grimstad, P R

    1990-09-01

    Twenty isolates of Jamestown Canyon virus were obtained from adult females of 5 Aedes species collected at the Houghton Lake Wildlife Research Area, Missaukee County, in north-central Michigan between 1985 and 1989. Fourteen were from Aedes provocans, and 6 were from 4 other snowmelt Aedes species. One isolate of trivittatus virus and one Cache Valley-like virus were also obtained. Seasonal succession patterns for numerous mosquito species were recorded over 4 years. The temporal association of adult mosquito emergence, virus isolations, and infection and seroconversion of sentinel deer suggest that Ae. provocans is a primary enzootic vector of Jamestown Canyon virus in that focus. We hypothesize that Ae. provocans provides an overwintering reservoir for Jamestown Canyon virus at the study site. A large dry ice-baited "tent trap" was the most productive method for collecting numerous aedine and other mosquito species.

  18. Evaluation of the impact and control of enzootic abortion of ewes.

    PubMed

    Longbottom, David; Entrican, Gary; Wheelhouse, Nicholas; Brough, Helen; Milne, Catherine

    2013-02-01

    Despite the availability of effective management and treatment strategies, Chlamydia abortus remains the single most frequently diagnosed cause of infectious ovine abortion (enzootic abortion of ewes, EAE) in the UK and one of the most significant causes of lamb mortality world-wide. In 2007, a survey of UK farmers, veterinarians and other farm animal holders was conducted to gather information on their perceptions of the risk of acquiring infection and the management practices employed to control the disease. The survey indicated that the preferred options for controlling EAE are either through vaccination and/or keeping flocks closed. However, further analysis of data indicates that implementation of these strategies does not provide a guarantee of exclusion of disease from flocks and thus further work is required to improve on current intervention strategies.

  19. Genetic diversity of enzootic isolates of vesicular stomatitis virus New Jersey.

    PubMed Central

    Nichol, S T

    1988-01-01

    The RNA genomes of 43 vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) isolates of the New Jersey (NJ) serotype were T1-ribonuclease fingerprinted to compare the extent of genetic diversity of virus from regions of epizootic and enzootic disease activity. Forty of these viruses were obtained from Central America during 1982 to 1985. The other three were older isolates, including a 1970 isolate from Culex nigripalpus mosquitos in Guatemala, a 1960 bovine isolate from Panama, and a 1976 isolate from mosquitos (Mansonia indubitans) in Ecuador. The data indicate that extensive genetic diversity exists among virus isolates from this predominantly enzootic disease zone. Six distinct T1 fingerprint groups were identified for the Central American VSV NJ isolates from 1982 to 1985. The 1960 VSV NJ isolate from Panama and the 1976 isolate from Ecuador formed two additional distinct fingerprint groups. This finding is in sharp contrast to the relatively close genetic relationship existing among VSV NJ isolates obtained from predominantly epizootic disease areas of the United States and Mexico during the same period (S. T. Nichol, J. Virol. 61:1029-1036, 1987). In this previous study, RNA genome T1 fingerprint differences were observed among isolates from different epizootics; however, the isolates were all clearly members of one large T1 fingerprint group. The eight T1 fingerprint groups described here for Central American and Ecuadorian viruses are distinct from those characterized earlier for virus isolates from the United States and Mexico and for the common laboratory virus strains Ogden and Hazelhurst. Despite being isolated 14 years earlier, the 1970 insect isolate from Guatemala is clearly a member of one of the 1982 to 1985 Central American virus fingerprint groups. This indicates that although virus genetic diversity in the region is extensive, under certain natural conditions particular virus genotypes can be relatively stably maintained for an extended period. The implications of

  20. Potential Reservoirs and Risk Factors for VHSV IVb in an Enzootic System: Budd Lake, Michigan.

    PubMed

    Throckmorton, Elizabeth; Brenden, Travis; Peters, Amber K; Newcomb, Tammy J; Whelan, Gary E; Faisal, Mohamed

    2017-03-01

    Viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus genotype IVb (VHSV IVb) has caused major, sporadic fish die-offs in the Laurentian Great Lakes region of North America since 2005. Presently, factors affecting VHSV IVb persistence in enzootic systems are not well understood. Even with annual surveillance, the virus can go undetected for several years after an outbreak before again re-emerging, which suggests that the virus is maintained in the system either below detectable levels or in untested reservoirs. The aim of this study was to identify potential reservoirs of VHSV IVb in Budd Lake, Michigan; VHSV IVb was first detected in Budd Lake in 2007 but remained undetected until 2011. Additionally, we explored the susceptibility of naive fish introduced into a water body enzootic for VHSV IVb by stocking age-0 Largemouth Bass Micropterus salmoides at varying densities into enclosures in the lake. The virus was not detected among samples of the fishes Notropis spp. and Lepomis spp., cylindrical papershell mussels Anodontoides ferussacianus, leeches (subclass Hirudinea), sediment, or water. However, the virus was successfully isolated from amphipods (family Hyalellidae) and Largemouth Bass held in the enclosures. Our finding of VHSV IVb in Hyalellidae amphipods in combination with other research that has detected the virus in Diporeia spp., a large benthic amphipod important as a food resource to Great Lake fishes, suggests that benthic macroinvertebrates are a reservoir for VHSV IVb in infected systems. If there are environmental reservoirs for VHSV IVb in infected systems, they are likely unevenly distributed. Findings of this study add to our understanding of the seemingly complex ecology of this deadly and economically detrimental virus. Received February 22, 2016; accepted October 16, 2016.

  1. Latrogenic lipoid pneumonia in an adult horse

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    A 20-year-old gelding presented with a history of acute respiratory distress which began immediately after administration of a mineral oil and water mix, via nasogastric intubation, for treatment of suspected gastrointestinal dysfunction. An initial presumptive diagnosis of acute lipoid pneumonia was made; this was further supported by evidence of arterial hypoxaemia and oxygen desaturation on arterial blood gas analysis, ultrasonographic signs of bilateral ventral lung consolidation and a mixed bronchoalveolar-interstitial lung pattern seen on thoracic radiographs. Despite intensive supportive therapy the horse's condition continued to deteriorate and the decision was made for humane euthanasia. Gross necropsy findings supported the clinical diagnosis of lipoid pneumonia. PMID:21851746

  2. Respiratory acidosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Names Ventilatory failure; Respiratory failure; Acidosis - respiratory Images Respiratory system References Effros RM, Swenson ER. Acid-base balance. In: Broaddus VC, Mason RJ, Ernst JD, et al, eds. Murray and Nadel's Textbook of Respiratory Medicine . 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2016: ...

  3. Therapeutic potential of bacteriophage in treating Klebsiella pneumoniae B5055-mediated lobar pneumonia in mice.

    PubMed

    Chhibber, Sanjay; Kaur, Sandeep; Kumari, Seema

    2008-12-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae causes infections in humans especially in immunocompromised patients. About 80 % of nosocomial infections caused by K. pneumoniae are due to multidrug-resistant strains. The emergence of antibiotic-resistant bacterial strains necessitates the exploration of alternative antibacterial therapies, which led our group to study the ability of bacterial viruses (known as bacteriophages or simply phages) to treat mice challenged with K. pneumoniae. Phage SS specific for K. pneumoniae B5055 was isolated and characterized, and its potential as a therapeutic agent was evaluated in an experimental model of K. pneumoniae-mediated lobar pneumonia in mice. Mice were challenged by intranasal (i.n.) inoculation with bacteria (10(8) c.f.u. ml(-1)). A single intraperitoneal injection of 10(10) p.f.u. ml(-1) phage administered immediately after i.n. challenge was sufficient to rescue 100 % of animals from K. pneumoniae-mediated respiratory infections. Administration of the phage preparation 3 h prior to i.n. bacterial challenge provided significant protection in infected mice, while even 6 h delay of phage administration after the induction of infection rendered the phage treatment ineffective. The results of this study therefore suggest that the timing of starting the phage therapy after initiation of infection significantly contributes towards the success of the treatment.

  4. Coronavirus 229E-related pneumonia in immunocompromised patients.

    PubMed

    Pene, Frédéric; Merlat, Annabelle; Vabret, Astrid; Rozenberg, Flore; Buzyn, Agnès; Dreyfus, François; Cariou, Alain; Freymuth, François; Lebon, Pierre

    2003-10-01

    Coronaviruses strains 229E and OC43 have been associated with various respiratory illnesses ranging from the self-resolving common cold to severe pneumonia. Although chronic underlying conditions are major determinants of severe respiratory virus infections, few data about coronavirus-related pneumonia in immunocompromised patients are available. Here we report 2 well-documented cases of pneumonia related to coronavirus 229E, each with a different clinical presentation. Diagnosis was made on the basis of viral culture and electron microscopy findings that exhibited typical crown-like particles and through amplification of the viral genome by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. On the basis of this report, coronaviruses should be considered as potential causative microorganisms of pneumonia in immunocompromised patients.

  5. Respiratory papillomas

    PubMed Central

    Alagusundaramoorthy, Sayee Sundar; Agrawal, Abhinav

    2016-01-01

    Papillomas are known to occur in the lower respiratory tract. They are however, rare compared to their occurrence in the upper respiratory tract. These are generally exophytic tumors in the more proximal upper airways however cases with more distal location with an inverted growth pattern have also been described in the literature. These can be solitary or multiple and multifocality associated with multiple papillomas in the upper respiratory/aerodigestive tract. The four major types of respiratory papillomas are (1) Recurrent respiratory papillomas, (2) solitary squamous papillomas, (3) solitary glandular papillomas, (4) mixed papillomas. We review the incidence, etiopathology, diagnosis, and possible treatment modalities and algorithms for these respiratory papillomas. PMID:27625447

  6. Air pollution and infant mortality from pneumonia

    SciTech Connect

    Penna, M.L.; Duchiade, M.P. )

    1991-03-01

    This study examines the relationship between air pollution, measured as concentration of suspended particulates in the atmosphere, and infant mortality due to pneumonia in the metropolitan area of Rio de Janeiro. Multiple linear regression (progressive or stepwise method) was used to analyze infant mortality due to pneumonia, diarrhea, and all causes in 1980, by geographic area, income level, and degree of contamination. While the variable proportion of families with income equivalent to more than two minimum wages was included in the regressions corresponding to the three types of infant mortality, the average contamination index had a statistically significant coefficient (b = 0.2208; t = 2.670; P = 0.0137) only in the case of mortality due to pneumonia. This would suggest a biological association, but, as in any ecological study, such conclusions should be viewed with caution. The authors believe that air quality indicators are essential to consider in studies of acute respiratory infections in developing countries.

  7. Pneumocystis jiroveci pneumonia

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000671.htm Pneumocystis jiroveci pneumonia To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Pneumocystis jiroveci pneumonia is a fungal infection of the lungs. The ...

  8. Pneumonia - children - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000011.htm Pneumonia in children - discharge To use the sharing features ... this page, please enable JavaScript. Your child has pneumonia, which is an infection in the lungs. In ...

  9. Rothia mucilaginosa pneumonia in an immunocompetent patient.

    PubMed

    Baeza Martínez, Carlos; Zamora Molina, Lucia; García Sevila, Raquel; Gil Carbonell, Joan; Ramos Rincon, José Manuel; Martín Serrano, Concepción

    2014-11-01

    Rothia mucilaginosa is a gram-postive coccus that occurs as part of the normal flora of the oropharynx and upper respiratory tract. Lower respiratory tract infections caused by this organism are rare and usually occur in immunocompromised patients. This is the case of an immunocompetent 47-year-old woman with right upper lobe pneumonia in which R.mucilaginosa was isolated in sputum and bronchial aspirate. Infections caused by this agent in the last four years in our hospital were reviewed. The most common predisposing factor was COPD with bronchiectasis. R.mucilaginosa was identified as the causative agent for pneumonia in only two cases, of which one was our case and the other was a patient with lung cancer.

  10. Detection of pathogens in Boidae and Pythonidae with and without respiratory disease.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, V; Marschang, R E; Abbas, M D; Ball, I; Szabo, I; Helmuth, R; Plenz, B; Spergser, J; Pees, M

    2013-03-02

    Respiratory diseases in boid snakes are common in captivity, but little information is available on their aetiology. This study was carried out to determine the occurrence of lung associated pathogens in boid snakes with and without respiratory signs and/or pneumonia. In total, 80 boid snakes of the families Boidae (n = 30) and Pythonidae (n = 50) from 48 private and zoo collections were included in this survey. Husbandry conditions were evaluated using a detailed questionnaire. All snakes were examined clinically and grouped into snakes with or without respiratory signs. Tracheal wash samples from all snakes were examined bacteriologically as well as virologically. All snakes were euthanased, and a complete pathological examination was performed. Respiratory signs and pneumonia were detected more often in pythons than in boas. An acute catarrhal pneumonia was diagnosed more often in snakes without respiratory signs than in snakes with respiratory signs, which revealed fibrinous and fibrous pneumonia. Poor husbandry conditions are an important trigger for the development of respiratory signs and pneumonia. Different bacterial pathogens were isolated in almost all snakes with pneumonia, with Salmonella species being the most common. Ferlavirus (formerly known as ophidian paramyxovirus)-RNA was detected only in pythons. Inclusion body disease was rarely seen in pythons but often in boas. Adenovirus and Mycoplasma were other pathogens that were diagnosed in single snakes with pneumonia. In living boid snakes with respiratory signs, tracheal wash samples were found to be a useful diagnostic tool for the detection of viral and bacterial pathogens.

  11. Chlamydia pneumoniae and atherosclerosis: the role of mast cells.

    PubMed

    Di Pietro, M; Schiavoni, G; Del Piano, M; Shaik, Y; Boscolo, P; Caraffa, A; Grano, M; Teté, S; Conti, F; Sessa, R

    2009-01-01

    Chlamydia pneumoniae (C. pneumoniae), a respiratory pathogen, has been implicated in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis, an inflammatory progressive disease, characterized by the formation of atherosclerotic plaques. Among several types of inflammatory cells involved in the atherogenesis process, recently particular attention has been directed toward the mast cells. Experimental studies have provided several mechanisms by which C. pneumoniae and mast cells could play a role in all stages of atherosclerosis, from initial inflammatory lesions to plaque rupture. C. pneumoniae, as well as mast cells, may actively participate both through the production of cytokines and matrix-degrading metalloproteinases and by provoking apoptosis of atheroma-associated vascular cells, key events in plaque rupture. This mini-review provides a brief overview on adventitial inflammatory effects of C. pneumoniae and mast cells and their potential role in plaque instability. In addition, in this paper we review the role of mast cells in innate immunity.

  12. Respiratory Failure

    MedlinePlus

    Respiratory failure happens when not enough oxygen passes from your lungs into your blood. Your body's organs, ... brain, need oxygen-rich blood to work well. Respiratory failure also can happen if your lungs can' ...

  13. Respiratory system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartlett, R. G., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    The general anatomy and function of the human respiratory system is summarized. Breathing movements, control of breathing, lung volumes and capacities, mechanical relations, and factors relevant to respiratory support and equipment design are discussed.

  14. An Ixodes minor and Borrelia carolinensis enzootic cycle involving a critically endangered Mojave Desert rodent.

    PubMed

    Foley, Janet; Ott-Conn, Caitlin; Worth, Joy; Poulsen, Amanda; Clifford, Deana

    2014-03-01

    Microtus californicus scirpensis is an endangered, isolated subspecies of California vole. It requires water pools and riparian bulrush (Schoenoplectus americanus) and occupies some of the rarest habitat of any North American mammal. The minimally vegetated, extremely arid desert surrounding the pools is essentially uninhabitable for Ixodes species ticks. We describe an enzootic cycle of Borrelia carolinensis in Ixodes minor ticks at a site 3500 km distant from the region in which I. minor is known to occur in Tecopa Host Springs, Inyo County, eastern Mojave Desert, California. Voles were live-trapped, and ticks and blood samples queried by PCR and DNA sequencing for identification and determination of the presence of Borrelia spp. Between 2011-2013, we found 21 Ixodes minor ticks (prevalence 4-8%) on Amargosa voles and Reithrodontomys megalotis. DNA sequencing of 16S rRNA from ticks yielded 99% identity to I. minor. There was 92% identity with I. minor in the calreticulin gene fragment. Three ticks (23.1%), 15 (24%) voles, three (27%) house mice, and one (7%) harvest mice were PCR positive for Borrelia spp. Sequencing of the 5S-23S intergenic spacer region and flagellin gene assigned Amargosa vole Borrelia strains to B. carolinensis. Ixodes minor, first described in 1902 from a single Guatemalan record, reportedly occurs only in the southeast American on small mammals and birds. The source of this tick in the Mojave Desert and time scale for introduction is not known but likely via migratory birds. Borrelia strains in the Amargosa ecosystem most closely resemble B. carolinensis. B. carolinensis occurs in a rodent-I. minor enzootic cycle in the southeast U.S. although its epidemiological significance for people or rodents is unknown. The presence of a tick and Borrelia spp. only known from southeast U.S. in this extremely isolated habitat on the other side of the continent is of serious concern because it suggests that the animals in the ecosystem

  15. An Ixodes minor and Borrelia carolinensis enzootic cycle involving a critically endangered Mojave Desert rodent

    PubMed Central

    Foley, Janet; Ott-Conn, Caitlin; Worth, Joy; Poulsen, Amanda; Clifford, Deana

    2014-01-01

    Microtus californicus scirpensis is an endangered, isolated subspecies of California vole. It requires water pools and riparian bulrush (Schoenoplectus americanus) and occupies some of the rarest habitat of any North American mammal. The minimally vegetated, extremely arid desert surrounding the pools is essentially uninhabitable for Ixodes species ticks. We describe an enzootic cycle of Borrelia carolinensis in Ixodes minor ticks at a site 3500 km distant from the region in which I. minor is known to occur in Tecopa Host Springs, Inyo County, eastern Mojave Desert, California. Voles were live-trapped, and ticks and blood samples queried by PCR and DNA sequencing for identification and determination of the presence of Borrelia spp. Between 2011–2013, we found 21 Ixodes minor ticks (prevalence 4–8%) on Amargosa voles and Reithrodontomys megalotis. DNA sequencing of 16S rRNA from ticks yielded 99% identity to I. minor. There was 92% identity with I. minor in the calreticulin gene fragment. Three ticks (23.1%), 15 (24%) voles, three (27%) house mice, and one (7%) harvest mice were PCR positive for Borrelia spp. Sequencing of the 5S-23S intergenic spacer region and flagellin gene assigned Amargosa vole Borrelia strains to B. carolinensis. Ixodes minor, first described in 1902 from a single Guatemalan record, reportedly occurs only in the southeast American on small mammals and birds. The source of this tick in the Mojave Desert and time scale for introduction is not known but likely via migratory birds. Borrelia strains in the Amargosa ecosystem most closely resemble B. carolinensis. B. carolinensis occurs in a rodent-I. minor enzootic cycle in the southeast U.S. although its epidemiological significance for people or rodents is unknown. The presence of a tick and Borrelia spp. only known from southeast U.S. in this extremely isolated habitat on the other side of the continent is of serious concern because it suggests that the animals in the

  16. Biological characteristics of an enzootic subtype of western equine encephalomyelitis virus from Argentina.

    PubMed

    Bianchi, T I; Avilés, G; Sabattini, M S

    1997-02-01

    In order to expand our knowledge on the biological characteristics of an enzootic South American subtype of western equine encephalomyelitis (WEE) virus, strain AG80-646, we inoculated guinea pigs, rabbits, newborn chickens and Vero and chick embryo cell cultures with this and other WEE and Wee-related viruses. AG80-646 was found apathogenic for guinea pigs even when inoculated intracranially (i.e.) or intraperitoneally (i.p.), and the animals did not develop viraemia. AG80-646 killed rabbits and the animals developed high viraemia (peak titer was 7.0 log PFU/0.1 ml). These data and previous serological evidence led us to look for a mammal as a natural host. AG80-646 was found lethal for newborn chickens inoculated subcutaneously (s.c.) (peak viraemia titer was 6.6 log PFU/0.1 ml). AG80-646 produced plaques (diameter 0.8-1.0 mm) in Vero and chick embryo cells 3-4 days post infection (p.i.) A comparison of AG80-646 with other WEE complex virus strains led to the following observations: (1) The lethality for guinea pigs was high for the two epizootic Argentinian strains, Cba 87 and Cba CIV 180, zero for the two enzootic strains, AG80-646 and BeAr 10315 (virus Aura), and intermediate for the Russian strain Y62-33 (low by i.c. route and zero by i.p. route); (2) AG80-646 was more virulent for rabbits inoculated i.p. than the three epizootic strains Cba 87, Cba CIV 180 and McMillan; (3) AG80-646 was less virulent for new-born chickens than the Argentinian epizootic strain Cba CIV 180; (4) The viraemia level correlated always with the strain virulence in each animal host. This study provides tools for the differentiation of WEE complex viruses and strains in the future ecological work on WEE in South America.

  17. [Interstitial Pneumonia and Emphysema].

    PubMed

    Sawa, Teiji; Kato, Yuko; Ishii, Sachiyo

    2015-09-01

    Interstitial pneumonia (IP) and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are representative diseases of restrictive pulmonary dysfunction and obstructive pulmonary dysfunction, respectively. In the preoperative anesthesia clinic, anesthesiologists are frequently asked to assess the anesthesia management of patients with these diseases. In respiratory function tests, IP is detected as a decrease in % vital capacity (< 80%), and COPD as a decrease in % FEV1.0 (< 70%). Other key factors which affect the assessment are; 1) severity assessment that affects the safety of anesthesia management, 2) prognostic evaluation including the acute exacerbation in the postoperative period, and 3) patient-related factors (age, life degree of autonomy, other comorbidities, surgery-related factors, and anesthesia method). In the patients in the disease stage I or II, anesthesia management is relatively safe. On the other hand, the patients in the disease stage IV have no surgical indication except life-saving emergent situation. In another words, anesthesiologists are required to make the judgment for the anesthesia management of the patient in the disease stage III, based on the assessment of patient-related factors, surgery-related factors, and prognosis.

  18. Fatal pneumonia associated with temozolomide therapy in patients with malignant glioma.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Hiroki; Saito, Yoshinobu; Kokuho, Nariaki; Morimoto, Taisuke; Kobayashi, Kenichi; Tanaka, Toru; Abe, Shinji; Fujita, Kazue; Azuma, Arata; Gemma, Akihiko

    2012-07-01

    This report presents the cases of three patients with fatal pneumonia that was highly suspected to be Pneumocystis pneumonia (PCP) based on serological diagnosis. Their chest radiographs showed bilateral pneumonia and each had presented with severe respiratory failure requiring mechanical ventilation when they arrived at the hospital. Although bronchoscopical sampling could not be performed, their chest computed tomography imaging and a marked elevation of serum KL-6 and β-D-glucan levels were characteristic of Pneumocystis pneumonia. All three were found to have been treated with temozolomide after surgery for malignant glioma. Temozolomide can cause Pneumocystis pneumonia. The three patients did not receive prophylactic medication against Pneumocystis pneumonia during treatment with temozolomide, and their histories suggested that all had delayed seeking treatment. It may be difficult to diagnose Pneumocystis pneumonia because the symptoms are not specific for Pneumocystis pneumonia and they tend to be similar to those of common respiratory infectious diseases. Therefore, patients who receive temozolomide therapy have the potential to develop fatal pneumonia and should be carefully observed. The patients should also be adequately informed about Pneumocystis pneumonia, and prophylaxis against Pneumocystis pneumonia should be considered proactively before treatment with temozolomide is initiated.

  19. How Is Pneumonia Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... pneumonia. Pulse oximetry. For this test, a small sensor is attached to your finger or ear. The sensor uses light to estimate how much oxygen is ... to help find the cause of your pneumonia. Types of pneumonia Your doctor may also diagnosis you ...

  20. Respiratory diseases among U.S. military personnel: countering emerging threats.

    PubMed Central

    Gray, G. C.; Callahan, J. D.; Hawksworth, A. W.; Fisher, C. A.; Gaydos, J. C.

    1999-01-01

    Emerging respiratory disease agents, increased antibiotic resistance, and the loss of effective vaccines threaten to increase the incidence of respiratory disease in military personnel. We examine six respiratory pathogens (adenoviruses, influenza viruses, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Streptococcus pyogenes, Mycoplasma pneumoniae, and Bordetella pertussis) and review the impact of the diseases they cause, past efforts to control these diseases in U.S. military personnel, as well as current treatment and surveillance strategies, limitations in diagnostic testing, and vaccine needs. PMID:10341174

  1. Distinct Contributions of Neutrophils and CCR2+ Monocytes to Pulmonary Clearance of Different Klebsiella pneumoniae Strains.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Huizhong; Carter, Rebecca A; Leiner, Ingrid M; Tang, Yi-Wei; Chen, Liang; Kreiswirth, Barry N; Pamer, Eric G

    2015-09-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae is a common respiratory pathogen, with some strains having developed broad resistance to clinically available antibiotics. Humans can become infected with many different K. pneumoniae strains that vary in genetic background, antibiotic susceptibility, capsule composition, and mucoid phenotype. Genome comparisons have revealed differences between K. pneumoniae strains, but the impact of genomic variability on immune-mediated clearance of pneumonia remains unclear. Experimental studies of pneumonia in mice have used the rodent-adapted 43816 strain of K. pneumoniae and demonstrated that neutrophils are essential for optimal host defense. It remains unclear, however, whether CCR2(+) monocytes contribute to K. pneumoniae clearance from the lung. We selectively depleted neutrophils, CCR2(+) monocytes, or both from immunocompetent mice and determined susceptibility to infection by the 43816 strain and 4 newly isolated clinical K. pneumoniae strains. The clinical K. pneumoniae strains, including one carbapenem-resistant ST258 strain, are less virulent than 43816. Optimal clearance of each of the 5 strains required either neutrophils or CCR2(+) monocytes. Selective neutrophil depletion markedly worsened infection with K. pneumoniae strain 43816 and three clinical isolates but did not increase susceptibility of mice to infection with the carbapenem-resistant K. pneumoniae ST258 strain. Depletion of CCR2(+) monocytes delayed recovery from infection with each of the 5 K. pneumoniae strains, revealing a contribution of these cells to bacterial clearance from the lung. Our findings demonstrate strain-dependent variation in the contributions of neutrophils and CCR2(+) monocytes to clearance of K. pneumoniae pulmonary infection.

  2. PCR diagnosis of Pneumocystis pneumonia: a bivariate meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yuan; Ling, Guoya; Qiang, Chenyi; Ming, Qinshou; Wu, Cong; Wang, Ke; Ying, Zouxiao

    2011-12-01

    We undertook a bivariate meta-analysis to assess the overall accuracy of respiratory specimen PCR assays for diagnosing Pneumocystis pneumonia. The summary sensitivity and specificity were 0.99 (95% confidence interval, 0.96 to 1.00) and 0.90 (0.87 to 0.93). Subgroup analyses showed that quantitative PCR analysis and the major surface glycoprotein gene target had the highest specificity value (0.93). Respiratory specimen PCR results are sufficient to confirm or exclude the disease for at-risk patients suspected of having Pneumocystis pneumonia.

  3. Respiratory alkalosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... shortness of breath. Alternative Names Alkalosis - respiratory Images Respiratory system References Effros RM, Swenson ER. Acid-base balance. In: Broaddus VC, Mason RJ, Ernst JD, et al, eds. Murray and Nadel's Textbook of Respiratory Medicine . 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2016: ...

  4. Chlamydophila pneumoniae infection among Basic Underwater Demolition/SEAL (BUD/S) candidates, Coronado, California, July 2008.

    PubMed

    Coon, Robert G; Balansay, Melinda S; Faix, Dennis J; Hawksworth, Anthony W; Patterson, Matthew B; Blair, Patrick J

    2011-03-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia can compromise readiness of recruits and service members operating in confined spaces. Often respiratory pathogens are implicated in outbreaks. In July 2008, 5 Basic Underwater Demolition/SEAL students entering an intense period of training at Naval Amphibious Base Coronado reported with clinical symptoms and chest radiographs consistent with pneumonia. Throat and nasal swabs were tested for respiratory pathogens. Molecular evidence indicated that they were infected with the atypical bacterium Chlamydophila pneumoniae. Thirty contemporaneous Basic Underwater Demolition/SEAL students were tested to determine the extent of C pneumoniae infection burden. Five additional cases were captured within this group. The 10 individuals diagnosed with C pneumoniae were treated with a course of azithromycin, Avelox (moxifloxacin hydrochloride), and doxycycline. The cases ended following the isolation of cases and prophylaxis with oral antibiotics. This work highlights the importance of rapid respiratory disease diagnoses to guide the clinical response following the emergence of respiratory infections among military trainees.

  5. Utility of oropharyngeal real-time PCR for S. pneumoniae and H. influenzae for diagnosis of pneumonia in adults.

    PubMed

    Bjarnason, A; Lindh, M; Westin, J; Andersson, L-M; Baldursson, O; Kristinsson, K G; Gottfredsson, M

    2017-03-01

    A lack of sensitive tests and difficulties obtaining representative samples contribute to the challenge in identifying etiology in pneumonia. Upper respiratory tract swabs can be easily collected and analyzed with real-time PCR (rtPCR). Common pathogens such as S. pneumoniae and H. influenzae can both colonize and infect the respiratory tract, complicating the interpretation of positive results. Oropharyngeal swabs were collected (n = 239) prospectively from adults admitted to hospital with pneumonia. Analysis with rtPCR targeting S. pneumoniae and H. influenzae was performed and results compared with sputum cultures, blood cultures, and urine antigen testing for S. pneumoniae. Different Ct cutoff values were applied to positive tests to discern colonization from infection. Comparing rtPCR with conventional testing for S. pneumoniae in patients with all tests available (n = 57) resulted in: sensitivity 87 %, specificity 79 %, PPV 59 % and NPV 94 %, and for H. influenzae (n = 67): sensitivity 75 %, specificity 80 %, PPV 45 % and NPV 94 %. When patients with prior antimicrobial exposure were excluded sensitivity improved: 92 % for S. pneumoniae and 80 % for H. influenzae. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis demonstrated for S. pneumoniae: AUC = 0.65 (95 % CI 0.51-0.80) and for H. influenzae: AUC = 0.86 (95 % CI 0.72-1.00). Analysis of oropharyngeal swabs using rtPCR proved both reasonably sensitive and specific for diagnosing pneumonia caused by S. pneumoniae and H. influenzae. This method may be a useful diagnostic adjunct to other methods and of special value in patients unable to provide representative lower airway samples.

  6. [Clinical and radiological diagnosis of community-acquired pneumonia in adults].

    PubMed

    Gil D, Rodrigo; Fernández V, Patricia; Sabbagh P, Eduardo

    2005-01-01

    Community acquired pneumonia in adults is an acute disease characterized by worsening in general conditions, fever, chills, cough, mucopurulent sputum and dyspnea; associated with tachycardia, tachypnea, fever and focal signs in pulmonary examination. The probability of pneumonia in a patient with acute respiratory symptoms depends on the disease prevalence in the environment where it is acquired and on clinical features. It is estimated that pneumonia prevalence is 3-5% in patients with respiratory disease seen in outpatient facilities. Clinical diagnosis of pneumonia without radiological confirmation lacks specificity because clinical presentation (history and physical examination) does not allow to differentiate pneumonia from other acute respiratory diseases (upper respiratory infections, bronchitis, influenza). Diagnosis must be based in clinical-radiological findings: clinical history and physical examination suggest the presence of pulmonary infection but accurate diagnosis is established when chest X ray confirms the existence of pulmonary infiltrates. Clinical findings and chest X ray do not permit to predict with certainty the etiology of pulmonary infection. Radiology is useful to confirm clinical suspicion, it establishes pneumonia location, its extension and severity; furthermore, it allows differentiation between pneumonia and other diseases, to detect possible complications, and may be useful in follow up of high risk patients. The resolution of radiological infiltrates often ensues several weeks or months after clinical recovery, especially in the elderly and in multilobar pneumonia cared for in intensive care units.

  7. Corynebacterium bovis: epizootiologic features and environmental contamination in an enzootically infected rodent room.

    PubMed

    Burr, Holly N; Wolf, Felix R; Lipman, Neil S

    2012-03-01

    Corynebacterium bovis is a common pathogen in athymic nude mouse colonies. Control and eradication of the organism are challenging because depopulation and restricted colony access are often not options within vivaria. We evaluated potential sources and dissemination routes of C. bovis in an enzootically infected colony. Immunocompetent mice and personnel were evaluated for their potential to carry C. bovis, and husbandry and sanitation methods were evaluated for their efficacy in preventing cross-contamination. C. bovis was detected in furred immunocompetent mice previously exposed to infected athymic nude mice and in the nasopharynx of humans. Microisolation cages were not effective in maintaining athymic nude mice C. bovis-free when they were housed in a room known to contain immunodeficient mice with C. bovis infections. A tunnel washer that provided a ≥180 °F final rinse provided effective elimination of C. bovis from cage components. Passive and active air sampling techniques showed airborne dispersal of C. bovis despite the use of individually ventilated caging systems and stringent operational standards. Bacterial growth was not observed in settle plates placed inside autoclaved individually ventilated microisolation cages on various ventilated racks for 24-h periods. C. bovis aerosolization was shown to be a means of spread of the bacterium during cage-change procedures inside a class II type A2 biosafety cabinet. Our findings indicate that C. bovis can be a pervasive environmental contaminant in infected rodent holding rooms and successful eradication strategies must include environmental decontamination and attention to air quality.

  8. Spatial and temporal patterns of enzootic raccoon rabies adjusted for multiple covariates

    PubMed Central

    Recuenco, Sergio; Eidson, Millicent; Kulldorff, Martin; Johnson, Glen; Cherry, Bryan

    2007-01-01

    Background With the objective of identifying spatial and temporal patterns of enzootic raccoon variant rabies, a spatial scan statistic was utilized to search for significant terrestrial rabies clusters by year in New York State in 1997–2003. Cluster analyses were unadjusted for other factors, adjusted for covariates, and adjusted for covariates and large scale geographic variation (LSGV). Adjustments were intended to identify the unusual aggregations of cases given the expected distribution based on the observed locations. Results Statistically significant clusters were identified particularly in the Albany, Finger Lakes, and South Hudson areas. The clusters were generally persistent in the Albany area, but demonstrated cyclical changes in rabies activity every few years in the other areas. Cluster adjustments allowed the discussion of possible causes for the high risk raccoon rabies areas identified. Conclusion This study analyzed raccoon variant rabies spatial and temporal patterns in New York that have not been previously described at a focal (census tract) level. Comparisons across the type of spatial analysis performed with various degrees of adjustment allow consideration of the potential influence of geographical factors for raccoon rabies and possible reasons for the highest risk areas (statistically significant clusters). PMID:17428324

  9. Mechanism of cell entry and transformation by enzootic nasal tumor virus.

    PubMed

    Dirks, Clarissa; Duh, Fuh-Mei; Rai, Sharath K; Lerman, Michael I; Miller, A Dusty

    2002-03-01

    Enzootic nasal tumor virus (ENTV) induces nasal epithelial cancer in infected sheep, but it is a simple retrovirus lacking a known oncogene. ENTV is closely related to jaagsiekte sheep retrovirus (JSRV), which also causes cancer in sheep but in the epithelial cells of the lower airways and alveoli. Here we show that as with JSRV, the envelope (Env) protein of ENTV can transform cultured cells and thus is likely to be responsible for oncogenesis in animals. In addition, the ENTV Env protein mediates virus entry using the same receptor as does JSRV Env, the candidate tumor suppressor Hyal2. However, ENTV Env mediates entry into cells from a more restricted range of species than does JSRV, and based on this finding we have identified amino acid regions in the Env proteins that are important for virus entry. Also, because ENTV does not efficiently use human Hyal2 as a receptor, we cloned the ovine Hyal2 cDNA and show that the encoded protein functions as an efficient receptor for both ENTV and JSRV. In summary, although ENTV and JSRV use the same cell surface receptor for cell entry and apparently transform cells by the same mechanism, they induce cancer in different tissues of infected sheep, indicating that oncogenesis is regulated at some other level. The transcriptional regulatory elements in these viruses are quite different, indicating that tissue-specific oncogenesis is likely regulated at the level of viral gene expression.

  10. Oral health disparities in older adults: oral bacteria, inflammation, and aspiration pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Scannapieco, Frank A; Shay, Kenneth

    2014-10-01

    Poor oral hygiene has been suggested to be a risk factor for aspiration pneumonia in the institutionalized and disabled elderly. Control of oral biofilm formation in these populations reduces the numbers of potential respiratory pathogens in the oral secretions, which in turn reduces the risk for pneumonia. Together with other preventive measures, improved oral hygiene helps to control lower respiratory infections in frail elderly hospital and nursing home patients.

  11. Respiratory distress of the term newborn infant.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Martin O; Kotecha, Sarah J; Kotecha, Sailesh

    2013-03-01

    Respiratory distress is recognised as any signs of breathing difficulties in neonates. In the early neonatal period respiratory distress is common, occurring in up to 7% of newborn infants, resulting in significant numbers of term-born infants being admitted to neonatal units. Many risk factors are involved; the increasing number of term infants delivered by elective caesarean section has also increased the incidence. Additionally the risk decreases with each advancing week of gestation. At 37 weeks, the chances are three times greater than at 39-40 weeks gestation. Multiple conditions can present with features of respiratory distress. Common causes in term newborn infants include transient tachypnoea of the newborn, respiratory distress syndrome, pneumonia, meconium aspiration syndrome, persistent pulmonary hypertension of the neonate and pneumothorax. Early recognition of respiratory distress and initiation of appropriate treatment is important to ensure optimal outcomes. This review will discuss these common causes of respiratory distress in term-born infants.

  12. Draft Genome Sequences of Six Strains of Streptococcus pneumoniae from Serotypes 5, 6A, 6B, 18C, 19A, and 23F

    PubMed Central

    Jakobsson, Hedvig E.; Salvà-Serra, Francisco; Karlsson, Roger; Gonzales-Silès, Lucia; Boulund, Fredrik; Engstrand, Lars; Kristiansson, Erik

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Streptococcus pneumoniae is a pathogenic bacterium found most commonly in the respiratory tract of humans and is a common cause of pneumonia and bacterial meningitis. Here, we report the draft genome sequences of six S. pneumoniae strains: CCUG 1350, CCUG 7206, CCUG 11780, CCUG 33774, CCUG 35180, and CCUG 35272. PMID:28385844

  13. [Pneumococcal vaccine recommendations in chronic respiratory diseases].

    PubMed

    Casas Maldonado, F; Alfageme Michavila, I; Barchilón Cohen, V S; Peis Redondo, J I; Vargas Ortega, D A

    2014-09-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia is an acute respiratory infectious disease which has an incidence of 3-8 cases/1,000 inhabitants, and increases with age and comorbidities. The pneumococcus is the organism most frequently involved in community-acquired pneumonia in the adult (30-35%). Around 40% of patients with community-acquired pneumonia require hospital admission, and around 10% need to be admitted to an intensive care unit. The most serious forms of pneumococcal infection include invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD), which covers cases of bacteremia (associated or not to pneumonia), meningitis, pleuritis, arthritis, primary peritonitis and pericarditis. Currently, the biggest problem with the pneumococcus is the emergence of resistance to antimicrobial agents, and its high morbimortality, despite the use of appropriate antibiotics and proper medical treatment. Certain underlying medical conditions increase the risk of IPD and its complications, especially, from the respiratory diseases point of view, smoking and chronic respiratory diseases. Pneumococcal disease, according to the WHO, is the first preventable cause of death worldwide in children and adults. Among the strategies to prevent IPD is vaccination. WHO considers that its universal introduction and implementation against pneumococcus is essential and a priority in all countries. There are currently 2 pneumococcal vaccines for adults: the 23 serotypes polysaccharide and conjugate 13 serotypes. The scientific societies represented here have worked to develop some recommendations, based on the current scientific evidence, regarding the pneumococcal vaccination in the immunocompetent adult with chronic respiratory disease and smokers at risk of suffering from IPD.

  14. Increased Nasopharyngeal Density and Concurrent Carriage of Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, and Moraxella catarrhalis Are Associated with Pneumonia in Febrile Children

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background We assessed nasopharyngeal (NP) carriage of five pathogens in febrile children with and without acute respiratory infection (ARI) of the upper (URTI) or lower tract, attending health facilities in Tanzania. Methods NP swabs collected from children (N = 960) aged 2 months to 10 years, and with a temperature ≥38°C, were utilized to quantify bacterial density of S. pneumoniae (Sp), H. influenzae (Hi), M. catarrhalis (Mc), S. aureus (Sa), and N. meningitidis (Nm). We determined associations between presence of individual species, densities, or concurrent carriage of all species combination with respiratory diseases including clinical pneumonia, pneumonia with normal chest radiography (CXR) and endpoint pneumonia. Results Individual carriage, and NP density, of Sp, Hi, or Mc, but not Sa, or Nm, was significantly associated with febrile ARI and clinical pneumonia when compared to febrile non-ARI episodes. Density was also significantly increased in severe pneumonia when compared to mild URTI (Sp, p<0.002; Hi p<0.001; Mc, p = 0.014). Accordingly, concurrent carriage of Sp+, Hi+, and Mc+, in the absence of Sa- and Nm-, was significantly more prevalent in children with ARI (p = 0.03), or clinical pneumonia (p<0.001) than non-ARI, and in children with clinical pneumonia (p = 0.0007) than URTI. Furthermore, Sp+, Hi+, and Mc+ differentiated children with pneumonia with normal CXR, or endpoint pneumonia, from those with URTI, and non-ARI cases. Conclusions Concurrent NP carriage of Sp, Hi, and Mc was a predictor of clinical pneumonia and identified children with pneumonia with normal CXR and endpoint pneumonia from those with febrile URTI, or non-ARI episodes. PMID:27907156

  15. Nosocomial pneumonia in a newborn intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Petdachai, W

    2000-04-01

    Nosocomial pneumonia is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in hospitalized patients. The risk is especially high in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) particularly in infants with mechanically assisted ventilation. During the 5-year period of the study, 160 infants with problems including prematurity (60.6%), respiratory distress (55.6%) and birth asphyxia (45.0%) were admitted to the NICU. One hundred and thirty-three infants (83.1%) received mechanical ventilation. Nosocomial pneumonia was found in 65 infants (40.6%) or 88.3 cases per 1,000 ventilator-days. Low birth weight, prematurity, respiratory distress and hyperbilirubinemia were found more significantly in the pneumonia group. They underwent more manipulations such as the placement of an umbilical catheter and orogastric tube. Infants with pneumonia received mechanical ventilation at a higher percentage and for a longer period than those without pneumonia (96.9% vs 73.7%, odds ratio = 11.2, p = 0.000) with a mean duration of 11.7 and 3.5 days respectively (p = 0.000). The etiologic organisms recovered from hemoculture were Acinetobacter calcoaceticus var. anitratus 44.0 per cent, Enterobacter spp. 16.0 per cent, Klebsiella pneumoniae 16.0 per cent, coagulase-negative staphylococci 12.0 per cent. There was no concordance of the bacteriologic results in endotracheal aspirate culture and hemoculture in each infant. Leukocytosis and granulocytosis as well as blood gas values could not differentiate the presence of pneumonia. The mean hospital stay for the infants with pneumonia was longer (23.0 days vs 6.4 days, p = 0.000). Nosocomial pneumonia did not only prolong hospital stay but also contributed to mortality. Twenty-seven (41.5%) of the infants with pneumonia died, compared with 46 (48.4%) of the other group without pneumonia (p = 0.422). The risk of nosocomial pneumonia can be reduced by using infection control measures, including meticulous hand washing and gloving during respiratory

  16. Treatment of Adenoviral Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome Using Cidofovir With Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Minhyeok; Kim, Seulgi; Kwon, Oh Jung; Kim, Ji Hye; Jeong, Inbeom; Son, Ji Woong; Na, Moon Jun; Yoon, Yoo Sang; Park, Hyun Woong; Kwon, Sun Jung

    2017-03-01

    Adenovirus infections are associated with respiratory (especially upper respiratory) infection and gastrointestinal disease and occur primarily in infants and children. Although rare in adults, severe lower respiratory adenovirus infections including pneumonia are reported in specific populations, such as military recruits and immunocompromised patients. Antiviral treatment is challenging due to limited clinical experience and lack of well-controlled randomized trials. Several previously reported cases of adenoviral pneumonia showed promising efficacy of cidofovir. However, few reports discussed the efficacy of cidofovir in acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). We experienced 3 cases of adenoviral pneumonia associated with ARDS and treated with cidofovir and respiratory support, including extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO). All 3 patients showed a positive clinical response to cidofovir and survival at 28 days. Cidofovir with early ECMO therapy may be a therapeutic option in adenoviral ARDS. A literature review identified 15 cases of adenovirus pneumonia associated with ARDS.

  17. Respiratory alkalosis.

    PubMed

    Foster, G T; Vaziri, N D; Sassoon, C S

    2001-04-01

    Respiratory alkalosis is an extremely common and complicated problem affecting virtually every organ system in the body. This article reviews the various facets of this interesting problem. Respiratory alkalosis produces multiple metabolic abnormalities, from changes in potassium, phosphate, and calcium, to the development of a mild lactic acidosis. Renal handling of the above ions is also affected. The etiologies may be related to pulmonary or extrapulmonary disorders. Hyperventilation syndrome is a common etiology of respiratory alkalosis in the emergency department setting and is a diagnosis by exclusion. There are many cardiac effects of respiratory alkalosis, such as tachycardia, ventricular and atrial arrhythmias, and ischemic and nonischemic chest pain. In the lungs, vasodilation occurs, and in the gastrointestinal system there are changes in perfusion, motility, and electrolyte handling. Therapeutically, respiratory alkalosis is used for treatment of elevated intracranial pressure. Correction of a respiratory alkalosis is best performed by correcting the underlying etiology.

  18. Restricted Enzooticity of Hepatitis E Virus Genotypes 1 to 4 in the United States ▿

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Chen; Meng, Jihong; Dai, Xing; Liang, Jiu-Hong; Feagins, Alicia R.; Meng, Xiang-Jin; Belfiore, Natalia M.; Bradford, Carol; Corn, Joseph L.; Cray, Carolyn; Glass, Gregory E.; Gordon, Melvin L.; Hesse, Richard A.; Montgomery, Donald L.; Nicholson, William L.; Pilny, Anthony A.; Ramamoorthy, Sheela; Shaver, Douglas D.; Drobeniuc, Jan; Purdy, Michael A.; Fields, Howard A.; Kamili, Saleem; Teo, Chong-Gee

    2011-01-01

    Hepatitis E is recognized as a zoonosis, and swine are known reservoirs, but how broadly enzootic its causative agent, hepatitis E virus (HEV), is remains controversial. To determine the prevalence of HEV infection in animals, a serological assay with capability to detect anti-HEV-antibody across a wide variety of animal species was devised. Recombinant antigens comprising truncated capsid proteins generated from HEV-subgenomic constructs that represent all four viral genotypes were used to capture anti-HEV in the test sample and as an analyte reporter. To facilitate development and validation of the assay, serum samples were assembled from blood donors (n = 372), acute hepatitis E patients (n = 94), five laboratory animals (rhesus monkey, pig, New Zealand rabbit, Wistar rat, and BALB/c mouse) immunized with HEV antigens, and four pigs experimentally infected with HEV. The assay was then applied to 4,936 sera collected from 35 genera of animals that were wild, feral, domesticated, or otherwise held captive in the United States. Test positivity was determined in 457 samples (9.3%). These originated from: bison (3/65, 4.6%), cattle (174/1,156, 15%), dogs (2/212, 0.9%), Norway rats (2/318, 0.6%), farmed swine (267/648, 41.2%), and feral swine (9/306, 2.9%). Only the porcine samples yielded the highest reactivities. HEV RNA was amplified from one farmed pig and two feral pigs and characterized by nucleotide sequencing to belong to genotype 3. HEV infected farmed swine primarily, and the role of other animals as reservoirs of its zoonotic spread appears to be limited. PMID:21998412

  19. High Diversity of Rabies Viruses Associated with Insectivorous Bats in Argentina: Presence of Several Independent Enzootics

    PubMed Central

    Piñero, Carolina; Gury Dohmen, Federico; Beltran, Fernando; Martinez, Leila; Novaro, Laura; Russo, Susana; Palacios, Gustavo; Cisterna, Daniel M.

    2012-01-01

    Background Rabies is a fatal infection of the central nervous system primarily transmitted by rabid animal bites. Rabies virus (RABV) circulates through two different epidemiological cycles: terrestrial and aerial, where dogs, foxes or skunks and bats, respectively, act as the most relevant reservoirs and/or vectors. It is widely accepted that insectivorous bats are not important vectors of RABV in Argentina despite the great diversity of bat species and the extensive Argentinean territory. Methods We studied the positivity rate of RABV detection in different areas of the country, and the antigenic and genetic diversity of 99 rabies virus (RABV) strains obtained from 14 species of insectivorous bats collected in Argentina between 1991 and 2008. Results Based on the analysis of bats received for RABV analysis by the National Rabies system of surveillance, the positivity rate of RABV in insectivorous bats ranged from 3.1 to 5.4%, depending on the geographic location. The findings were distributed among an extensive area of the Argentinean territory. The 99 strains of insectivorous bat-related sequences were divided into six distinct lineages associated with Tadarida brasiliensis, Myotis spp, Eptesicus spp, Histiotus montanus, Lasiurus blosseviilli and Lasiurus cinereus. Comparison with RABV sequences obtained from insectivorous bats of the Americas revealed co-circulation of similar genetic variants in several countries. Finally, inter-species transmission, mostly related with Lasiurus species, was demonstrated in 11.8% of the samples. Conclusions This study demonstrates the presence of several independent enzootics of rabies in insectivorous bats of Argentina. This information is relevant to identify potential areas at risk for human and animal infection. PMID:22590657

  20. Cough sound analysis - a new tool for diagnosing pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Abeyratne, U R; Swarnkar, V; Triasih, Rina; Setyati, Amalia

    2013-01-01

    Pneumonia kills over 1,800,000 children annually throughout the world. Prompt diagnosis and proper treatment are essential to prevent these unnecessary deaths. Reliable diagnosis of childhood pneumonia in remote regions is fraught with difficulties arising from the lack of field-deployable imaging and laboratory facilities as well as the scarcity of trained community healthcare workers. In this paper, we present a pioneering class of enabling technology addressing both of these problems. Our approach is centered on automated analysis of cough and respiratory sounds, collected via microphones that do not require physical contact with subjects. We collected cough sounds from 91 patients suspected of acute respiratory illness such as pneumonia, bronchiolitis and asthma. We extracted mathematical features from cough sounds and used them to train a Logistic Regression classifier. We used the clinical diagnosis provided by the paediatric respiratory clinician as the gold standard to train and validate our classifier against. The methods proposed in this paper could separate pneumonia from other diseases at a sensitivity and specificity of 94% and 75% respectively, based on parameters extracted from cough sounds alone. Our method has the potential to revolutionize the management of childhood pneumonia in remote regions of the world.

  1. Community-Acquired Moraxella catarrhalis Bacteremic Pneumonia: Two Case Reports and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Ariza-Prota, Miguel Angel; Pando-Sandoval, Ana; García-Clemente, Marta; Fole-Vázquez, David; Casan, Pere

    2016-01-01

    Moraxella (formerly Branhamella) catarrhalis was discovered at the end of the nineteenth century, and for many decades it was considered to be a harmless commensal of the upper respiratory tract. It is a Gram-negative, aerobic diplococcus considered to be the third most common pathogen isolated in childhood sinusitis and otitis media and in adult chronic lower respiratory disease, as well as an etiological agent of pneumonia in immunosuppressed patients or those with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Moraxella catarrhalis pneumonia is rarely associated with bacteremia. Here, we present two cases of community-acquired Moraxella catarrhalis bacteremic pneumonia. PMID:26989548

  2. Climate Change and Respiratory Infections.

    PubMed

    Mirsaeidi, Mehdi; Motahari, Hooman; Taghizadeh Khamesi, Mojdeh; Sharifi, Arash; Campos, Michael; Schraufnagel, Dean E

    2016-08-01

    The rate of global warming has accelerated over the past 50 years. Increasing surface temperature is melting glaciers and raising the sea level. More flooding, droughts, hurricanes, and heat waves are being reported. Accelerated changes in climate are already affecting human health, in part by altering the epidemiology of climate-sensitive pathogens. In particular, climate change may alter the incidence and severity of respiratory infections by affecting vectors and host immune responses. Certain respiratory infections, such as avian influenza and coccidioidomycosis, are occurring in locations previously unaffected, apparently because of global warming. Young children and older adults appear to be particularly vulnerable to rapid fluctuations in ambient temperature. For example, an increase in the incidence in childhood pneumonia in Australia has been associated with sharp temperature drops from one day to the next. Extreme weather events, such as heat waves, floods, major storms, drought, and wildfires, are also believed to change the incidence of respiratory infections. An outbreak of aspergillosis among Japanese survivors of the 2011 tsunami is one such well-documented example. Changes in temperature, precipitation, relative humidity, and air pollution influence viral activity and transmission. For example, in early 2000, an outbreak of Hantavirus respiratory disease was linked to a local increase in the rodent population, which in turn was attributed to a two- to threefold increase in rainfall before the outbreak. Climate-sensitive respiratory pathogens present challenges to respiratory health that may be far greater in the foreseeable future.

  3. Encephalitis-Associated Human Metapneumovirus Pneumonia in Adult, Australia.

    PubMed

    Fok, Anthony; Mateevici, Cristina; Lin, Belinda; Chandra, Ronil V; Chong, Victor H T

    2015-11-01

    Human metapneumovirus pneumonia, most commonly found in children, was diagnosed in an adult with encephalitis. This case suggests that testing for human metapneumovirus RNA in nasopharyngeal aspirate and cerebrospinal fluid samples should be considered in adults with encephalitis who have a preceding respiratory infection.

  4. Bordetella bronchiseptica pneumonia in a patient with AIDS.

    PubMed Central

    de la Fuente, J; Albo, C; Rodríguez, A; Sopeña, B; Martínez, C

    1994-01-01

    Bordetella bronchiseptica is recognised as a respiratory tract pathogen in many mammalian species, but has rarely been implicated in human infection. A case is reported of pneumonia caused by B bronchiseptica in a patient suffering from acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Images PMID:8066571

  5. Prevention of aspiration pneumonia (AP) with oral care.

    PubMed

    Tada, Akio; Miura, Hiroko

    2012-01-01

    AP is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in elderly patients, especially frail elderly patients. The aim of this article is to review effect of oral care, including oral hygiene and improvement of oral function, on the prevention of AP among elderly people in hospitals and nursing homes. There is now a substantial body of work studying the effect of oral care on the prevention of respiratory diseases. Oral hygiene, consisting of oral decontamination and mechanical cleaning by dental professionals, has resulted in significant clinical effects (decreased incidence of pneumonia and decreased mortality from respiratory diseases) in clinical randomized trials. Moreover, studies examining oral colonization by pneumonia pathogens have shown the effect of oral hygiene on eliminating these pathogens. In addition, swallowing training has been shown to improve the movement and function of swallowing-related muscles, also resulting in decreased incidence of pneumonia. These findings support the contention that oral care is effective in the prevention of AP.

  6. Evaluation of the Importance of VlsE Antigenic Variation for the Enzootic Cycle of Borrelia burgdorferi.

    PubMed

    Rogovskyy, Artem S; Casselli, Timothy; Tourand, Yvonne; Jones, Cami R; Owen, Jeb P; Mason, Kathleen L; Scoles, Glen A; Bankhead, Troy

    2015-01-01

    Efficient acquisition and transmission of Borrelia burgdorferi by the tick vector, and the ability to persistently infect both vector and host, are important elements for the life cycle of the Lyme disease pathogen. Previous work has provided strong evidence implicating the significance of the vls locus for B. burgdorferi persistence. However, studies involving vls mutant clones have thus far only utilized in vitro-grown or host-adapted spirochetes and laboratory strains of mice. Additionally, the effects of vls mutation on tick acquisition and transmission has not yet been tested. Thus, the importance of VlsE antigenic variation for persistent infection of the natural reservoir host, and for the B. burgdorferi enzootic life cycle in general, has not been examined to date. In the current work, Ixodes scapularis and Peromyscus maniculatus were infected with different vls mutant clones to study the importance of the vls locus for the enzootic cycle of the Lyme disease pathogen. The findings highlight the significance of the vls system for long-term infection of the natural reservoir host, and show that VlsE antigenic variability is advantageous for efficient tick acquisition of B. burgdorferi from the mammalian reservoir. The data also indicate that the adaptation state of infecting spirochetes influences B. burgdorferi avoidance from host antibodies, which may be in part due to its respective VlsE expression levels. Overall, the current findings provide the most direct evidence on the importance of VlsE for the enzootic cycle of Lyme disease spirochetes, and underscore the significance of VlsE antigenic variation for maintaining B. burgdorferi in nature.

  7. Recognition of Streptococcus pneumoniae by the innate immune system.

    PubMed

    Koppe, Uwe; Suttorp, Norbert; Opitz, Bastian

    2012-04-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is both a frequent colonizer of the upper respiratory tract and a leading cause of life-threatening infections such as pneumonia, meningitis and sepsis. The innate immune system is critical for the control of colonization and for defence during invasive disease. Initially, pneumococci are recognized by different sensors of the innate immune system called pattern recognition receptors (PRRs), which control most subsequent host defence pathways. These PRRs include the transmembrane Toll-like receptors (TLRs) as well as the cytosolic NOD-like receptors (NLRs) and DNA sensors. Recognition of S. pneumoniae by members of these PRR families regulates the production of inflammatory mediators that orchestrate the following immune response of infected as well as neighbouring non-infected cells, stimulates the recruitment of immune cells such as neutrophils and macrophages, and shapes the adaptive immunity. This review summarizes the current knowledge of the function of different PRRs in S. pneumoniae infection.

  8. Fungal, Viral, and Parasitic Pneumonias Associated with Human Immunodeficiency Virus.

    PubMed

    Skalski, Joseph H; Limper, Andrew H

    2016-04-01

    Respiratory illness is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). The spectrum of pulmonary disease that can affect patients with HIV is wide and includes opportunistic infection with many fungal, viral, and parasitic organisms. This article reviews the clinical presentation; approach to diagnosis; and management of fungal, viral, and parasitic pneumonias that can develop in patients with HIV including respiratory disease caused by Aspergillus, Cryptococcus, Histoplasma, Coccidioides, Cytomegalovirus, Toxoplasma, and Strongyloides. Because clinical symptoms and radiographic patterns are often insensitive at distinguishing these pulmonary infections, this review particularly focuses on specific host risk factors and diagnostic testing to consider when approaching HIV patients with respiratory illness.

  9. Animal model of Mycoplasma fermentans respiratory infection

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Mycoplasma fermentans has been associated with respiratory, genitourinary tract infections and rheumatoid diseases but its role as pathogen is controversial. The purpose of this study was to probe that Mycoplasma fermentans is able to produce respiratory tract infection and migrate to several organs on an experimental infection model in hamsters. One hundred and twenty six hamsters were divided in six groups (A-F) of 21 hamsters each. Animals of groups A, B, C were intratracheally injected with one of the mycoplasma strains: Mycoplasma fermentans P 140 (wild strain), Mycoplasma fermentans PG 18 (type strain) or Mycoplasma pneumoniae Eaton strain. Groups D, E, F were the negative, media, and sham controls. Fragments of trachea, lungs, kidney, heart, brain and spleen were cultured and used for the histopathological study. U frequency test was used to compare recovery of mycoplasmas from organs. Results Mycoplasmas were detected by culture and PCR. The three mycoplasma strains induced an interstitial pneumonia; they also migrated to several organs and persisted there for at least 50 days. Mycoplasma fermentans P 140 induced a more severe damage in lungs than Mycoplasma fermentans PG 18. Mycoplasma pneumoniae produced severe damage in lungs and renal damage. Conclusions Mycoplasma fermentans induced a respiratory tract infection and persisted in different organs for several weeks in hamsters. This finding may help to explain the ability of Mycoplasma fermentans to induce pneumonia and chronic infectious diseases in humans. PMID:23298636

  10. Community-acquired pneumonia among smokers.

    PubMed

    Almirall, Jordi; Blanquer, José; Bello, Salvador

    2014-06-01

    Recent studies have left absolutely no doubt that tobacco increases susceptibility to bacterial lung infection, even in passive smokers. This relationship also shows a dose-response effect, since the risk reduces spectacularly 10 years after giving up smoking, returning to the level of non-smokers. Streptococcus pneumoniae is the causative microorganism responsible for community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) most frequently associated with smoking, particularly in invasive pneumococcal disease and septic shock. It is not clear how it acts on the progress of pneumonia, but there is evidence to suggest that the prognosis for pneumococcal pneumonia is worse. In CAP caused by Legionella pneumophila, it has also been observed that smoking is the most important risk factor, with the risk rising 121% for each pack of cigarettes smoked a day. Tobacco use may also favor diseases that are also known risk factors for CAP, such as periodontal disease and upper respiratory viral infections. By way of prevention, while giving up smoking should always be proposed, the use of the pneumococcal vaccine is also recommended, regardless of the presence of other comorbidities.

  11. Detection of Mycoplasma pneumoniae in the airways of adults with chronic asthma.

    PubMed

    Kraft, M; Cassell, G H; Henson, J E; Watson, H; Williamson, J; Marmion, B P; Gaydos, C A; Martin, R J

    1998-09-01

    Infection with Mycoplasma pneumoniae has been shown to exacerbate asthma in humans. However, the role of M. pneumoniae in the pathogenesis of chronic asthma has not been defined. Eighteen asthmatics with chronic, stable asthma and 11 nonasthmatic control subjects underwent evaluation of the upper and lower airways and serologic analysis to determine the presence of M. pneumoniae, Chlamydia pneumoniae, and seven respiratory viruses through culture, enzyme-linked immunoassay (EIA) and polymerase chain reaction (PCR). M. pneumoniae was detected by PCR in 10 of 18 asthmatics and one of 11 control subjects (p = 0.02). In nine of the 10 patients, the organism was detected in bronchoalveolar lavage or bronchial biopsies. Seven of 18 asthmatics and one of 11 control subjects were also positive for M. fermentans and M. genitalium by PCR. All patients' cultures, EIAs, and serology were negative for M. pneumoniae. All PCR and cultures were negative for C. pneumoniae, and all EIAs for respiratory viruses were negative in all subjects. Nine asthmatics and one control subject exhibited positive serology for C. pneumoniae (p = 0.05). M. pneumoniae was present in the lower airways of chronic, stable asthmatics with greater frequency than control subjects, and may play a role in the pathogenesis of chronic asthma.

  12. Burden of respiratory viruses in patients with acute respiratory failure.

    PubMed

    Schnell, David; Gits-Muselli, Maud; Canet, Emmanuel; Lemiale, Virginie; Schlemmer, Benoît; Simon, François; Azoulay, Elie; Legoff, Jérôme

    2014-07-01

    Respiratory viruses (RVs) are ubiquitous pathogens that represent a major cause of community-acquired pneumonia and chronic pulmonary diseases exacerbations. However, their contribution to acute respiratory failure events requiring intensive care unit admission in the era of rapid multiplex molecular assay deserves further evaluation. This study investigated the burden of viral infections in non immunocompromised patients admitted to the intensive care unit for acute respiratory failure using a multiplex molecular assay. Patients were investigated for RVs using immunofluoresence testing and a commercial multiplex molecular assay, and for bacteria using conventional culture. Half the patients (34/70, 49%) had a documented RVs infection. No other pathogen was found in 24 (71%) patients. Viral infection was detected more frequently in patients with obstructive respiratory diseases (64% vs. 29%; P = 0.0075). Multiplex molecular assay should be considered as an usefull diagnostic tool in patients admitted to the intensive care unit with acute respiratory failure, especially those with acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and asthma.

  13. Guidelines for prevention of nosocomial pneumonia. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

    PubMed

    1997-01-03

    This document updates and replaces CDC's previously published "Guideline for Prevention of Nosocomial Pneumonia" (Infect Control 1982;3:327-33, Respir Care 1983;28:221-32, and Am J Infect Control 1983;11:230-44). This revised guideline is designed to reduce the incidence of nosocomial pneumonia and is intended for use by personnel who are responsible for surveillance and control of infections in acute-care hospitals; the information may not be applicable in long-term-care facilities because of the unique characteristics of such settings. This revised guideline addresses common problems encountered by infection-control practitioners regarding the prevention and control of nosocomial pneumonia in U.S. hospitals. Sections on the prevention of bacterial pneumonia in mechanically ventilated and/or critically ill patients, care of respiratory-therapy devices, prevention of cross-contamination, and prevention of viral lower respiratory tract infections (e.g., respiratory syncytial virus [RSV] and influenza infections) have been expanded and updated. New sections on Legionnaires disease and pneumonia caused by Aspergillus sp. have been included. Lower respiratory tract infection caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis is not addressed in this document. Part I, "An Overview of the Prevention of Nosocomial Pneumonia, 1994, provides the background information for the consensus recommendations of the Hospital Infection Control Practices Advisory Committee (HICPAC) in Part II, Recommendations for Prevention of Nosocomial Pneumonia." Pneumonia is the second most common nosocomial infection in the United States and is associated with substantial morbidity and mortality. Most patients who have nosocomial pneumonia are infants, young children, and persons > 65 years of age; persons who have severe underlying disease, immunosuppression, depressed sensorium, and/or cardiopulmonary disease and persons who have had thoracoabdominal surgery. Although patients receiving mechanically

  14. Bronchitis and Pneumonia

    MedlinePlus

    ... by a health care provider. How serious are bronchitis and pneumonia? Both conditions are more serious if a child has a chronic health condition or if the condition is caused by a bacteria, in which case antibiotics are the treatment of choice. When pneumonia is caused by bacteria, ...

  15. Aspiration pneumonia. Pathophysiological aspects, prevention and management. A review.

    PubMed

    Petroianni, A; Ceccarelli, D; Conti, V; Terzano, C

    2006-12-01

    Aspiration pneumonias occur more frequently than reported and, in many cases, the disease is not recognised. In hospitalised and institutionalised patients with predisposing diseases prompt diagnosis of this complication and correct preventive measures can drastically reduce the worsening of clinical conditions and the deaths due to aspiration pneumonia. Normal airway structure, effective defence mechanisms, and preventive measures are decisive in reducing aspiration episodes. An increased aspiration risk for food, fluids, medications, or secretions may lead to the development of pneumonia. Pneumonia is the most common respiratory complication in all stroke deaths and in mechanical ventilation patients. In addition, the increased incidence of aspiration pneumonia with aging may be a consequence of impairment of swallowing and the cough reflex. Dysphagia, compromised consciousness, invasive procedures, anaesthesia, insufficient oral care, sleep disorders, and vomiting are all risk factors. Aspiration pneumonia includes different characteristic syndromes based on the amount (massive, acute, chronic) and physical character of the aspirated material (acid, infected, lipoid), needing a different therapeutic approach. Chronic patients education and correct health care practices are the keys for preventing the events of aspiration. In patients at risk a clinical and instrumental assessment of dysphagia should be evaluated. Management includes the removal of etiologic factors (drugs, tubes, mobilisation, oral hygiene), supportive care, and in bacterial pneumonias a specific antibiotic therapy for community-acquired or nosocomial events.

  16. New insights in the outbreak pattern of Mycoplasma pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Enno; Ehrhardt, Ingrid; Dumke, Roger

    2015-10-01

    Since a well-documented incidence peak in 2011/12 in European countries, infections due to the cell wall-less bacterium Mycoplasma pneumoniae have gained the increased attention of clinicians, microbiologists and health authorities. Despite the mild or asymptomatic clinical course of most M. pneumoniae infections, the microorganism is responsible for severe interstitial pneumonia and extra-pulmonary complications. Here, we report the time-dependence of 5545 notified cases of laboratory-confirmed M. pneumoniae disease in Saxony from 2001 until June 2014 as measured by serodiagnosis. In parallel, from 2003 until 2012 467 M. pneumoniae-positive respiratory samples or isolated strains were analysed by molecular typing based on sequence differences in the main P1 adhesin of M. pneumoniae. The epidemiological data showed a prolonged outbreak especially in the period 2011-2013. The typing of circulating strains during the outbreak did not support predominance of one of the two major P1 subtypes (mean proportion of subtype 1: 57%) or a change of one to the other subtype during the endemic situation before and during the outbreak period. From the last major outbreak in Europe, we conclude that the notification of M. pneumoniae-positive cases, which is legally required only in Saxony, should be expanded to the whole country, to optimise awareness of this human pathogen and to reflect upon antibiotic therapy.

  17. Epizootic and enzootic aspects of Minchinia nelsoni (Haplosporida) disease in Maryland oysters.

    PubMed

    Farley, C A

    1975-08-01

    Minichinia nelsoni disease in oysters (Crassostrea virginica) from Marumsco Bar, Pocomoke Sound, Maryland (an estuarine tributary of Chesapeake Bay) was studied for 8 years (1961-68) to determine epizootiologic relationships concerning life cycle of the parasite, pathologic effects on the host, and effects of physical factors on population density and recruitment of the host and parasite. The study period covered pre-epizootic, epizootic, and post-epizootic disease conditions. Data on the native oyster population as well as annual introductions of previously unexposed, susceptible populations of juvenile oysters from 1965-68 were included. Salinity, water temperature, mortality, prevalence, incidence, life cycle stages, gross pathology, and histopathologic relationships were observed. Mortality was high (45-55% per year) during the first 3 years of the study; however, M. nelsoni prevalences were low (less than 25%) and did not clearly imply a cause and effect relationship. Drought conditions that began in the summer of 1963 and continued through 1967 caused higher salinities, and apparently initiated epizootic disease in the native oyster populations. The epizootic peaked in May 1965 with a diagnosed prevalence in native oysters of 70%. Enzootic levels of annual mortality (40% in 1966, 30% in 1967, and 2% in 1968) and fall prevalence (16%, 24%, and 4%) developed after that time. Introduced populations had a typical epizootiologic pattern in 1965 55% annual mortality, 82% incidence) and 1966 (55% annual mortality, 66% incidence) which declined in 1967 (30% annual mortality, 44% incidence) followed by a disappearance of the disease in 1968. Epizootiologic differences noted between native oysters (adult and juvenile) and the introduced juvenile populations were also evident from the stages of the disease. Infections in native animals tended to be less serious, and in many cases were delayed or attentuated, while infections in introduced oysters progressed to advanced

  18. Protease activated receptor 4 limits bacterial growth and lung pathology during late stage Streptococcus pneumoniae induced pneumonia in mice.

    PubMed

    de Stoppelaar, S F; Van't Veer, C; van den Boogaard, F E; Nieuwland, R; Hoogendijk, A J; de Boer, O J; Roelofs, J J T H; van der Poll, T

    2013-09-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a common causative pathogen of pneumonia and sepsis. Pneumonia and sepsis are associated with enhanced activation of coagulation, resulting in the production of several host-derived proteases at the primary site of infection and in the circulation. Serine proteases cleave protease activated receptors (PARs), which form a molecular link between coagulation and inflammation. PAR4 is one of four subtypes of PARs and is widely expressed by multiple cell types in the respiratory tract implicated in pulmonary inflammation, by immune cells and by platelets. In mice, mouse (m)PAR4 is the only thrombin receptor expressed by platelets. We here sought to determine the contribution of mPAR4 to the host response during pneumococcal pneumonia. Pneumonia was induced by intranasal inoculation with S. pneumoniae in mPAR4-deficient (par4-/-) and wild-type mice. Mice were sacrificed after 6, 24 or 48 hours (h). Blood, lungs, liver and spleen were collected for analyses. Ex vivo stimulation assays were performed with S. pneumoniae and mPAR4 activating peptides. At 48 h after infection, higher bacterial loads were found in the lungs and blood of par4-/- mice (p < 0.05), accompanied by higher histopathology scores and increased cytokine levels (p < 0.05) in the lungs. Ex vivo, co-stimulation with mPAR4 activating peptide enhanced the whole blood cytokine response to S. pneumoniae. Thrombin inhibition resulted in decreased cytokine release after S. pneumoniae stimulation in human whole blood. Our findings suggest that mPAR4 contributes to antibacterial defence during murine pneumococcal pneumonia.

  19. [Summary of the Consensus for management of community acquired pneumonia in adults].

    PubMed

    2005-08-01

    This is an update of the Consensus for treatment of community acquired pneumonia in adults, prepared by the Chilean Society of Respiratory Diseases and the Chilean Society of Infectious Diseases. These norms were prepared by thirty specialists in respiratory diseases, internal medicine, infectious diseases, microbiology, intensive medicine and radiology. The purpose of the document is to norm the management of immunocompetent adults with community acquired pneumonia, by the public and private health systems of our country. The complete document will be published in June, in the respective journals of the Societies of Respiratory and Infectious Diseases. This is a summary to obtain a better diffusion of these norms among internists and general practitioners.

  20. Antibody responses of Chlamydophila pneumoniae pneumonia: Why is the diagnosis of C. pneumoniae pneumonia difficult?

    PubMed

    Miyashita, Naoyuki; Kawai, Yasuhiro; Tanaka, Takaaki; Akaike, Hiroto; Teranishi, Hideto; Wakabayashi, Tokio; Nakano, Takashi; Ouchi, Kazunobu; Okimoto, Niro

    2015-07-01

    The ELNAS Plate Chlamydophila pneumoniae commercial test kit for the detection of anti-C. pneumoniae-specific immunoglobulin M (IgM), IgA and IgG antibodies has become available in Japan recently. To determine the optimum serum collection point for the ELNAS plate in the diagnosis of C. pneumoniae pneumonia, we analyzed the kinetics of the antibody response in patients with laboratory-confirmed C. pneumoniae pneumonia. We enrolled five C. pneumoniae pneumonia cases and collected sera from patients for several months. The kinetics of the IgM and IgG antibody responses were similar among the five patients. Significant increases in IgM and IgG antibody titer between paired sera were observed in all patients. IgM antibodies appeared approximately 2-3 weeks after the onset of illness, reached a peak after 4-5 weeks, and were generally undetectable after 3-5 months. IgG antibodies developed slowly for the first 30 days and reached a plateau approximately 3-4 months after the onset of illness. The kinetics of IgA antibody responses were different among the five patients, and significant increases in IgA antibody titer between paired sera were observed in only two patients. Although the sample size was small, the best serum collection time seemed to be approximately 3-6 weeks after onset of illness when using a single serum sample for the detection of IgM antibodies. Paired sera samples should be obtained at least 4 weeks apart. IgA antibody analysis using ELNAS may not be a useful marker for acute C. pneumoniae pneumonia.

  1. EXPERIMENTAL INFECTION WITH MYCOPLASMA PNEUMONIAE (EATON'S AGENT)

    PubMed Central

    Dajani, Adnan S.; Clyde, Wallace A.; Denny, Floyd W.

    1965-01-01

    The pathogenesis of Mycoplasma pneumoniae infection was studied in the Syrian hamster with qualitative and quantitative culture methods and special histopathologic techniques. The animals were readily infected with the mycoplasma, which multiplied throughout the respiratory tract. Sensitivity of this experimental host to infection was indicated by the 50 per cent infective dose, which was 10 colony-forming units of the organism. Inoculation consistently resulted in the production of peribronchial pneumonitis which was induced by the mycoplasma. The organisms were visualized in a superficial location in the mucosa of involved bronchi, by means of indirect fluorescent antibody staining and by a modification of the Brown and Brenn technique. The data indicate applicability of the hamster to the study of problems concerned with M. pneumoniae disease which are impractical or impossible to resolve in the human host. PMID:14319403

  2. Development and evaluation of a multiplex test for the detection of atypical bacterial DNA in community-acquired pneumonia during childhood.

    PubMed

    Carrillo, J A; Gutiérrez, J; García, F; Muñoz, A; Villegas, E; Rojas, J; Sorlózano, A; Rojas, A

    2009-05-01

    An incorrect or late diagnosis can lead to an increase in the morbidity and mortality caused by pneumonia, and the availability of a rapid and accurate microbiological test to verify the aetiology is imperative. This study evaluated a molecular test for the identification of the bacterial cause of atypical community-acquired pneumonia (ACAP). Fifty-four children with pneumonia were studied using bacteriological cultures, Mycoplasma pneumoniae, Coxiella burnetii, Chlamydophila pneumoniae and Legionella spp. serology, and Streptococcus pneumoniae and Legionella antigens. Simultaneously, the presence of bacterial and fungal DNA was tested for in respiratory secretion samples using the Vircell SL kit, including multiplex PCR and amplicon detection by means of line blots. There were 14 cases of ACAP caused by M. pneumoniae, with positive kit results for 13 of them, and two cases of Q-fever, with negative kit results for Coxiella burnetii. The test was negative in the remaining 38 cases (one staphylococcal pneumonia, 20 Streptococcus pneumoniae pneumonias, and 17 probable viral pneumonias). The sensitivity of the test for the detection of M. pneumoniae was 92.8% and the specificity was 100%. The Vircell SL kit allows detection of M. pneumoniae DNA in respiratory secretion samples from children with ACAP.

  3. Respiratory Therapists

    MedlinePlus

    ... programs typically include courses in human anatomy and physiology, chemistry, physics, microbiology, pharmacology, and math. Other courses ... and math skills. Respiratory therapists must understand anatomy, physiology, and other sciences and be able to calculate ...

  4. [Respiratory distress].

    PubMed

    Galili, D; Garfunkel, A; Elad, S; Zusman, S P; Malamed, S F; Findler, M; Kaufman, E

    2002-01-01

    Dental treatment is usually conducted in the oral cavity and in very close proximity to the upper respiratory airway. The possibility of unintentionally compromising this airway is high in the dental environment. The accumulation of fluid (water or blood) near to the upper respiratory airway or the loosening of teeth fragmentations and fallen dental instruments can occur. Also, some of the drugs prescribed in the dental practice are central nervous system depressants and some are direct respiratory drive depressors. For this reason, awareness of the respiratory status of the dental patient is of paramount importance. This article focuses on several of the more common causes of respiratory distress, including airway obstruction, hyperventilation, asthma, bronchospasm, pulmonary edema, pulmonary embolism and cardiac insufficiency. The common denominator to all these conditions described here is that in most instances the patient is conscious. Therefore, on the one hand, valuable information can be retrieved from the patient making diagnosis easier than when the patient is unconscious. On the other hand, the conscious patient is under extreme apprehension and stress under such situations. Respiratory depression which occurs during conscious sedation or following narcotic analgesic medication will not be dealt with in this article. Advanced pain and anxiety control techniques such as conscious sedation and general anesthesia should be confined only to operators who undergo special extended training.

  5. mPneumonia: Development of an Innovative mHealth Application for Diagnosing and Treating Childhood Pneumonia and Other Childhood Illnesses in Low-Resource Settings

    PubMed Central

    Ginsburg, Amy Sarah; Delarosa, Jaclyn; Brunette, Waylon; Levari, Shahar; Sundt, Mitch; Larson, Clarice; Tawiah Agyemang, Charlotte; Newton, Sam; Borriello, Gaetano; Anderson, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Pneumonia is the leading infectious cause of death in children worldwide. Each year, pneumonia kills an estimated 935,000 children under five years of age, with most of these deaths occurring in developing countries. The current approach for pneumonia diagnosis in low-resource settings—using the World Health Organization Integrated Management of Childhood Illness (IMCI) paper-based protocols and relying on a health care provider’s ability to manually count respiratory rate—has proven inadequate. Furthermore, hypoxemia—a diagnostic indicator of the presence and severity of pneumonia often associated with an increased risk of death—is not assessed because pulse oximetry is frequently not available in low-resource settings. In an effort to address childhood pneumonia mortality and improve frontline health care providers’ ability to diagnose, classify, and manage pneumonia and other childhood illnesses, PATH collaborated with the University of Washington to develop “mPneumonia,” an innovative mobile health application using an Android tablet. mPneumonia integrates a digital version of the IMCI algorithm with a software-based breath counter and a pediatric pulse oximeter. We conducted a design-stage usability field test of mPneumonia in Ghana, with the goal of creating a user-friendly diagnostic and management tool for childhood pneumonia and other childhood illnesses that would improve diagnostic accuracy and facilitate adherence by health care providers to established guidelines in low-resource settings. The results of the field test provided valuable information for understanding the usability and acceptability of mPneumonia among health care providers, and identifying approaches to iterate and improve. This critical feedback helped ascertain the common failure modes related to the user interface design, navigation, and accessibility of mPneumonia and the modifications required to improve user experience and create a tool aimed at decreasing mortality

  6. Bacteriology of the Upper Respiratory Tract: What is Important?

    PubMed Central

    Cimolai, Nevio

    1988-01-01

    Oropharyngeal and nasopharyngeal swabs are commonly collected from patients with a variety of respiratory infections. Unfortunately, the significance of potential pathogens in such specimens is clouded by the prevalence of these organisms in asymptomatic patients and in patients with non-bacterial upper respiratory tract illnesses. Specimens from the oro-and nasopharynx seldom predict the flora in other parts of the respiratory tract, and empiric antibiotic therapy for infections such as acute otitis media, sinusitis, and pneumonia is usually inevitable. The author of this article reviews the bacteriology of the upper respiratory tract and makes recommendations for diagnosis and treatment. PMID:21253244

  7. Community-acquired pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Falguera, M; Ramírez, M F

    2015-11-01

    This article not only reviews the essential aspects of community-acquired pneumonia for daily clinical practice, but also highlights the controversial issues and provides the newest available information. Community-acquired pneumonia is considered in a broad sense, without excluding certain variants that, in recent years, a number of authors have managed to delineate, such as healthcare-associated pneumonia. The latter form is nothing more than the same disease that affects more frail patients, with a greater number of risk factors, both sharing an overall common approach.

  8. Pneumonia - weakened immune system

    MedlinePlus

    ... treatments to remove fluid and mucus from the respiratory system are often needed. Outlook (Prognosis) Factors that may ... immunocompromised host Images Pneumococci organism Lungs The lungs Respiratory system References Donnelly JP, Blijlevens NMA, van der Velden ...

  9. Neurological complications of Mycoplasma pneumoniae infection.

    PubMed

    Hely, M A; Williamson, P M; Terenty, T R

    1984-01-01

    This study documents five patients with neurological disease associated with evidence of recent Mycoplasma pneumoniae infection. Four patients had encephalitis associated with coma. Two of these had hemiparesis (one with dysphasia), one had seizures, and one had cerebellar and brainstem involvement. Two also had evidence of a radiculopathy and peripheral neuropathy. One patient had aseptic meningitis with later transverse myelitis. Three patients had multiple sites of neurological involvement. Respiratory infections preceded the neurological syndromes in four cases. Antibiotic therapy did not appear to alter the course of the disease. All patients had a favourable outcome.

  10. Discovery and Validation of Biomarkers to Guide Clinical Management of Pneumonia in African Children

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Honglei; Ideh, Readon C.; Gitau, Evelyn; Thézénas, Marie L.; Jallow, Muminatou; Ebruke, Bernard; Chimah, Osaretin; Oluwalana, Claire; Karanja, Henri; Mackenzie, Grant; Adegbola, Richard A.; Kwiatkowski, Dominic; Kessler, Benedikt M.; Berkley, James A.; Howie, Stephen R. C.; Casals-Pascual, Climent

    2014-01-01

    Background. Pneumonia is the leading cause of death in children globally. Clinical algorithms remain suboptimal for distinguishing severe pneumonia from other causes of respiratory distress such as malaria or distinguishing bacterial pneumonia and pneumonia from others causes, such as viruses. Molecular tools could improve diagnosis and management. Methods. We conducted a mass spectrometry–based proteomic study to identify and validate markers of severity in 390 Gambian children with pneumonia (n = 204) and age-, sex-, and neighborhood-matched controls (n = 186). Independent validation was conducted in 293 Kenyan children with respiratory distress (238 with pneumonia, 41 with Plasmodium falciparum malaria, and 14 with both). Predictive value was estimated by the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC). Results. Lipocalin 2 (Lpc-2) was the best protein biomarker of severe pneumonia (AUC, 0.71 [95% confidence interval, .64–.79]) and highly predictive of bacteremia (78% [64%–92%]), pneumococcal bacteremia (84% [71%–98%]), and “probable bacterial etiology” (91% [84%–98%]). These results were validated in Kenyan children with severe malaria and respiratory distress who also met the World Health Organization definition of pneumonia. The combination of Lpc-2 and haptoglobin distinguished bacterial versus malaria origin of respiratory distress with high sensitivity and specificity in Gambian children (AUC, 99% [95% confidence interval, 99%–100%]) and Kenyan children (82% [74%–91%]). Conclusions. Lpc-2 and haptoglobin can help discriminate the etiology of clinically defined pneumonia and could be used to improve clinical management. These biomarkers should be further evaluated in prospective clinical studies. PMID:24696240

  11. Acute Respiratory Infections in Children

    PubMed Central

    Laxdal, Oliver E.; Robertson, H. E.; Braaten, Virgil; Walker, W. Alan

    1963-01-01

    During a seven-month period from November 1960 to May 1961, 181 infants and children, hospitalized because of acute respiratory infections, were studied intensively to determine the responsible etiologic agents. Forty-two per cent of the illnesses in this group appeared to be caused by bacterial agents, either primary or secondary to virus. Parainfluenza viruses were identified as causes of laryngotracheobronchitis in nearly 50% of the cases. Adenoviruses were also found to be important pathogens, particularly as causes of pneumonia in infants. The over-all infection rate attributed to adenoviruses was 11.6%. An epidemic due to Influenza B virus affected approximately 40% of children in this city just following the hospital study. This study was conducted as the first step in a long-term project undertaken at the Regina General Hospital to determine the effectiveness of vaccines in the prevention and treatment of respiratory infections in children. PMID:20327546

  12. Simkania negevensis: Is it a real respiratory pathogen?

    PubMed

    Kose, Mehmet; Ekinci, Duygu; Gokahmetoglu, Selma; Elmas, Tuba; Öztürk, Mustafa Kürşad

    2015-06-01

    Simkania negevensis, a recently discovered Chlamydia-like organism, has been associated with respiratory infections such as pneumonia, bronchiolitis and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in children and adults. The aim of the present study was to evaluate S. negevensis in the etiology of pediatric community-acquired pneumonia, bronchiolitis and asthma exacerbation in our region. Overall, 102 patients and 46 healthy controls were included in the study. S. negevensis was investigated by real time PCR (Primer Design, UK) in nasopharyngeal swab samples. It failed to be detected in either the study or control group. In conclusion, our results suggest that S. negevensis is not an important respiratory pathogen in our region.

  13. Catalase Enhances Growth and Biofilm Production of Mycoplasma pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Simmons, Warren L.; Dybvig, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    Mycoplasma pneumoniae causes chronic respiratory disease in humans. Factors thought to be important for colonization include the ability of the mycoplasma to form a biofilm on epithelial surfaces and the production of hydrogen peroxide to damage host tissue. Almost all of the mycoplasmas, including M. pneumoniae, lack superoxide dismutase and catalase and a balance should exist between peroxide production and growth. We show here that the addition of catalase to cultures enhanced the formation of biofilms and altered the structure. The incorporation of catalase in agar increased the number of colony-forming units detected and hence could improve the clinical diagnosis of mycoplasmal diseases. PMID:25894997

  14. Pneumocystis pneumonia: an update.

    PubMed

    Sritangratanakul, Sureeporn; Nuchprayoon, Surang; Nuchprayoon, Issarang

    2004-09-01

    Pneumocystis pneumonia is a major cause of illness and death in immunocompromised hosts. The numbers of pneumocystis pneumonia cases in Thailand have increased each year from 1992 to 2000 and peaked in 2000 at 6,255 cases. The microbe that causes pneumocystis pneumonia in humans is called Pneumocystis jirovecii. Pneumocystis sp. was discovered nearly a century ago, but the knowledge of Pneumocystis sp. remained poorly understood, until the molecular biology techniques help scientists verify it fungus nature. In the past, Pneumocystis sp. was misclassified as protozoan due to its morphologic features. Later, it was reclassified as fungus due to DNA analysis. Cotrimaxazole, the combination of trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, is the drug of choice for treatment and prophylaxis of pneumocystis pneumonia. However, increasing evidence of mutations in the enzyme dihydropteroate synthase (DHPS), the target of sulfa drugs represent emergence of sulfa resistance.

  15. What Is Walking Pneumonia?

    MedlinePlus

    ... M.D. References Goldman L, et al., eds. Mycoplasma infections. In: Goldman-Cecil Medicine. 25th ed. Philadelphia, ... for Medical Education and Research; 2014. Baum SG. Mycoplasma pneumoniae infection in adults. http://www.uptodate.com/ ...

  16. Pneumonia in adults - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2015:chap 69. Mandell LA. Streptococcus pneumoniae infections. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's Cecil Medicine . 25th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2016:chap 289.

  17. Activity of grepafloxacin and other fluoroquinones and newer macrolides against recent clinical isolates of Chlamydia pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Roblin, P M; Kutlin, A; Reznik, T; Hammerschlag, M R

    1999-07-01

    Chlamydia pneumoniae is a frequent cause of community-acquired respiratory tract infection including pneumonia and bronchitis. Quinolones have attracted interest as potential therapy for community-acquired respiratory tract infections because they are active against a wide range of pathogens including C. pneumoniae and Mycoplasma pneumoniae. The in vitro susceptibilities of C. pneumoniae were determined for grepafloxacin, levofloxacin, moxifloxacin, trovafloxacin, clarithromycin and azithromycin. Isolates of C. pneumoniae tested included two reference strains, TW-183 and CM-1, and 12 recent clinical isolates from adults with community-acquired pneumonia. Susceptibility testing was performed in HEp-2 cells grown in 96-well microtiter plates. The MIC was the lowest antibiotic concentration at which no inclusions were seen. The MBC was the lowest concentration which resulted in no inclusions after passage in antibiotic-free medium. Grepafloxacin was the most active quinolone tested with an MIC50 of 0.125 mg/l, MIC90 and MBC90 of 0.5 mg/l. Grepafloxacin may have a role in the treatment of C. pneumoniae infections, but prospective clinical studies utilizing culture are lacking.

  18. Community-based estimates of incidence and risk factors for childhood pneumonia in Western Sydney.

    PubMed Central

    MacIntyre, C. R.; McIntyre, P. B.; Cagney, M.

    2003-01-01

    The aim was to estimate the community incidence and risk factors for all-cause pneumonia in children in Western Sydney, Australia. A cross-sectional randomized computer-assisted telephone interview was conducted in July 2000, in Western Sydney. Parents of 2020 children aged between 5 and 14 years were interviewed about their child's respiratory health since birth. No verification of reported diagnosis was available. Logistic regression analysis was used to determine risk factors for pneumonia. A lifetime diagnosis of pneumonia was reported in 137/2020 (68%) children, giving an estimated incidence in the study sample of 7.6/1000 person-years. Radiological confirmation was reported in 85% (117/137). Hospitalization was reported in 41% (56/137) and antibiotic therapy in 93% (127/137) of cases. Using logistic regression modelling, statistically significant associations with pneumonia were a reported history of either asthma, bronchitis or other lung problems and health problems affecting other systems. In most cases, the diagnosis of asthma preceded the diagnosis of pneumonia. The community incidence of all causes of pneumonia is not well enumerated, either in adults or in children. This study provides community-based incidence data. The incidence of hospitalization for pneumonia in this study is comparable to estimates from studies in comparable populations, suggesting that retrospective parental report for memorable events is likely to be valid. We found a relationship between pneumonia and childhood respiratory diseases such as asthma, which has implications for targeted vaccination strategies. PMID:14959775

  19. Prospective Evaluation for Respiratory Pathogens in Children With Sickle Cell Disease and Acute Respiratory Illness

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Ashok; Wang, Winfred C.; Gaur, Aditya; Smith, Teresa; Gu, Zhengming; Kang, Guolian; Leung, Wing; Hayden, Randall T.

    2015-01-01

    Background Human rhinovirus (HRV), human coronavirus (hCoV), human bocavirus (hBoV), and human metapneumovirus (hMPV) infections in children with sickle cell disease have not been well studied. Procedure Nasopharyngeal wash specimens were prospectively collected from 60 children with sickle cell disease and acute respiratory illness, over a 1-year period. Samples were tested with multiplexed-PCR, using an automated system for nine respiratory viruses, Chlamydophila pneumoniae, Mycoplasma pneumoniae, and Bordetella pertussis. Clinical characteristics and distribution of respiratory viruses in patients with and without acute chest syndrome (ACS) were evaluated. Results A respiratory virus was detected in 47 (78%) patients. Nine (15%) patients had ACS; a respiratory virus was detected in all of them. The demographic characteristics of patients with and without ACS were similar. HRV was the most common virus, detected in 29 of 47 (62%) patients. Logistic regression showed no association between ACS and detection of HRV, hCoV, hBoV, hMPV, and other respiratory pathogens. Co-infection with at least one additional respiratory virus was seen in 14 (30%) infected patients, and was not significantly higher in patients with ACS (P=0.10). Co-infections with more than two respiratory viruses were seen in seven patients, all in patients without ACS. Bacterial pathogens were not detected. Conclusion HRV was the most common virus detected in children with sickle cell disease and acute respiratory illness, and was not associated with increased morbidity. Larger prospective studies with asymptomatic controls are needed to study the association of these emerging respiratory viruses with ACS in children with sickle cell disease. PMID:24123899

  20. Pneumocystis Pneumonia Presenting as an Enlarging Solitary Pulmonary Nodule.

    PubMed

    Patel, Krunal Bharat; Gleason, James Benjamin; Diacovo, Maria Julia; Martinez-Galvez, Nydia

    2016-01-01

    Pneumocystis pneumonia is a life threatening infection that usually presents with diffuse bilateral ground-glass infiltrates in immunocompromised patients. We report a case of a single nodular granulomatous Pneumocystis pneumonia in a male with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma after R-CHOP therapy. He presented with symptoms of productive cough, dyspnea, and right-sided pleuritic chest pain that failed to resolve despite treatment with multiple antibiotics. Chest X-ray revealed right lower lobe atelectasis and CT of chest showed development of 2 cm nodular opacity with ground-glass opacities. Patient underwent bronchoscopy and biopsy that revealed granulomatous inflammation in a background of organizing pneumonia pattern with negative cultures. Respiratory symptoms resolved but the solitary nodular opacity increased in size prompting a surgical wedge resection which revealed granulomatous Pneumocystis pneumonia infection. This case is the third documented report of Pneumocystis pneumonia infection within a solitary pulmonary nodule in an individual with hematologic neoplasm. Although Pneumocystis pneumonia most commonly occurs in patients with HIV/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome and with diffuse infiltrates, the diagnosis should not be overlooked when only a solitary nodule is present.

  1. Pneumocystis Pneumonia Presenting as an Enlarging Solitary Pulmonary Nodule

    PubMed Central

    Diacovo, Maria Julia; Martinez-Galvez, Nydia

    2016-01-01

    Pneumocystis pneumonia is a life threatening infection that usually presents with diffuse bilateral ground-glass infiltrates in immunocompromised patients. We report a case of a single nodular granulomatous Pneumocystis pneumonia in a male with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma after R-CHOP therapy. He presented with symptoms of productive cough, dyspnea, and right-sided pleuritic chest pain that failed to resolve despite treatment with multiple antibiotics. Chest X-ray revealed right lower lobe atelectasis and CT of chest showed development of 2 cm nodular opacity with ground-glass opacities. Patient underwent bronchoscopy and biopsy that revealed granulomatous inflammation in a background of organizing pneumonia pattern with negative cultures. Respiratory symptoms resolved but the solitary nodular opacity increased in size prompting a surgical wedge resection which revealed granulomatous Pneumocystis pneumonia infection. This case is the third documented report of Pneumocystis pneumonia infection within a solitary pulmonary nodule in an individual with hematologic neoplasm. Although Pneumocystis pneumonia most commonly occurs in patients with HIV/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome and with diffuse infiltrates, the diagnosis should not be overlooked when only a solitary nodule is present. PMID:27648318

  2. Lipoid pneumonia--a case of refractory pneumonia in a child treated with ketogenic diet.

    PubMed

    Buda, Piotr; Wieteska-Klimczak, Anna; Własienko, Anna; Mazur, Agnieszka; Ziołkowski, Jerzy; Jaworska, Joanna; Kościesza, Andrzej; Dunin-Wąsowicz, Dorota; Książyk, Janusz

    2013-01-01

    Lipoid pneumonia (LP) is a chronic inflammation of the lung parenchyma with interstitial involvement due to the accumulation of endogenous or exogenous lipids. Exogenous LP (ELP) is associated with the aspiration or inhalation of oil present in food, oil-based medications or radiographic contrast media. The clinical manifestations of LP range from asymptomatic cases to severe pulmonary involvement, with respiratory failure and death, according to the quantity and duration of the aspiration. The diagnosis of exogenous lipoid pneumonia is based on a history of exposure to oil and the presence of lipid-laden macrophages on sputum or bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) analysis. High-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) is the imaging technique of choice for evaluation of patients with suspected LP. The best therapeutic strategy is to remove the oil as early as possible through bronchoscopy with multiple BALs and interruption in the use of mineral oil. Steroid therapy remains controversial, and should be reserved for severe cases. We describe a case of LP due to oil aspiration in 3-year-old girl with intractable epilepsy on ketogenic diet. Diagnostic problems were due to non-specific symptoms that were mimicking serious infectious pneumonia. A high index of suspicion and precise medical history is required in cases of refractory pneumonia and fever unresponsive to conventional therapy. Gastroesophageal reflux and a risk of aspiration may be regarded as relative contraindications to the ketogenic diet. Conservative treatment, based on the use of oral steroids, proved to be an efficient therapeutic approach in this case.

  3. Poor growth and pneumonia seasonality in infants in the Philippines: cohort and time series studies.

    PubMed

    Paynter, Stuart; Ware, Robert S; Lucero, Marilla G; Tallo, Veronica; Nohynek, Hanna; Simões, Eric A F; Weinstein, Philip; Sly, Peter D; Williams, Gail

    2013-01-01

    Children with poor nutrition are at increased risk of pneumonia. In many tropical settings seasonal pneumonia epidemics occur during the rainy season, which is often a period of poor nutrition. We have investigated whether seasonal hunger may be a driver of seasonal pneumonia epidemics in children in the tropical setting of the Philippines. In individual level cohort analysis, infant size and growth were both associated with increased pneumonia admissions, consistent with findings from previous studies. A low weight for age z-score in early infancy was associated with an increased risk of pneumonia admission over the following 12 months (RR for infants in the lowest quartile of weight for age z-scores 1.28 [95% CI 1.08 to 1.51]). Poor growth in smaller than average infants was also associated with an increased risk of pneumonia (RR for those in the lowest quartile of growth in early infancy 1.31 [95%CI 1.02 to 1.68]). At a population level, we found that seasonal undernutrition preceded the seasonal increase in pneumonia and respiratory syncytial virus admissions by approximately 10 weeks (pairwise correlation at this lag was -0.41 [95%CI -0.53 to -0.27] for pneumonia admissions, and -0.63 [95%CI -0.72 to -0.51] for respiratory syncytial virus admissions). This lag appears biologically plausible. These results suggest that in addition to being an individual level risk factor for pneumonia, poor nutrition may act as a population level driver of seasonal pneumonia epidemics in the tropics. Further investigation of the seasonal level association, in particular the estimation of the expected lag between seasonal undernutrition and increased pneumonia incidence, is recommended.

  4. Respiratory disease surveillance in Hungary

    SciTech Connect

    Agocs, M.M.; Rudnai, P.; Etzel, R.A. )

    1992-08-28

    In October 1989, the Hungarian National Institute of Hygiene initiated the Children's Acute Respiratory Morbidity (CHARM) Surveillance System to assess the association between nine reportable respiratory diseases and air pollution. The weekly number of physician-diagnosed, reportable respiratory diseases among four age groups of children (less than 1, 1-2, 3-5, and 6-14 years) was tabulated for Sopron, a city with 60,000 residents. We calculated the proportion of diseases occurring during weeks with low, moderate, and high sulfur dioxide (SO2) and nitrogen dioxide (NO2) concentrations. The weekly averages of the 24-hour median SO2 concentrations were divided into thirds at less than or equal to 17.6, greater than 17.6 to less than or equal to 26.3, and greater than 26.3 micrograms/m3 (range: 0.9-79.6 micrograms/m3), and the NO2 concentrations at less than or equal to 29.8, greater than 29.8 to less than or equal to 44.1, and greater than 44.1 micrograms/m3 (range: 4.2-90.1 micrograms/m3). During 1990, 11,474 respiratory disease cases occurred among the 4,020 children less than 15 years of age living in Sopron and monitored by the CHARM system. The two most frequently reported disease categories were rhinitis/tonsillitis/pharyngitis (71.5%) and acute bronchitis (8.5%). Sixty-seven percent of pneumonia cases occurred when SO2 concentrations were highest. We found no association between levels of NO2 and respiratory diseases. The CHARM Surveillance System may characterize more fully which groups of children develop particular respiratory diseases following exposure to air pollution.

  5. Unencapsulated Streptococcus pneumoniae from conjunctivitis encode variant traits and belong to a distinct phylogenetic cluster.

    PubMed

    Valentino, Michael D; McGuire, Abigail Manson; Rosch, Jason W; Bispo, Paulo J M; Burnham, Corinna; Sanfilippo, Christine M; Carter, Robert A; Zegans, Michael E; Beall, Bernard; Earl, Ashlee M; Tuomanen, Elaine I; Morris, Timothy W; Haas, Wolfgang; Gilmore, Michael S

    2014-11-12

    Streptococcus pneumoniae, an inhabitant of the upper respiratory mucosa, causes respiratory and invasive infections as well as conjunctivitis. Strains that lack the capsule, a main virulence factor and the target of current vaccines, are often isolated from conjunctivitis cases. Here we perform a comparative genomic analysis of 271 strains of conjunctivitis-causing S. pneumoniae from 72 postal codes in the United States. We find that the vast majority of conjunctivitis strains are members of a distinct cluster of closely related unencapsulated strains. These strains possess divergent forms of pneumococcal virulence factors (such as CbpA and neuraminidases) that are not shared with other unencapsulated nasopharyngeal S. pneumoniae. They also possess putative adhesins that have not been described in encapsulated pneumococci. These findings suggest that the unencapsulated strains capable of causing conjunctivitis utilize a pathogenesis strategy substantially different from that described for S. pneumoniae at other infection sites.

  6. Ultrasonographic diagnosis of an endocarditis valvularis in a Burmese python (Python molurus bivittatus) with pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Schroff, Sandra; Schmidt, Volker; Kiefer, Ingmar; Krautwald-Junghanns, Maria-Elisabeth; Pees, Michael

    2010-12-01

    An 11-yr-old Burmese python (Python molurus bivittatus) was presented with a history of respiratory symptoms. Computed tomography and an endoscopic examination of the left lung were performed and revealed severe pneumonia. Microbiologic examination of a tracheal wash sample and an endoscopy-guided sample from the lung confirmed infection with Salmonella enterica ssp. IV, Enterobacter cloacae, and Klebsiella pneumoniae. Computed tomographic examination demonstrated a hyperattenuated structure within the heart. Echocardiographic examination revealed a hyperechoic mass at the pulmonic valve as well as a dilated truncus pulmonalis. As therapy for pneumonia was ineffective, the snake was euthanized. Postmortem examination confirmed pneumonia and infective endocarditis of the pulmonic valve caused by septicemia with Salmonella enterica ssp. IV. Focal arteriosclerosis of the pulmonary trunk was also diagnosed. The case presented here demonstrates the possible connection between respiratory and cardiovascular diseases in snakes.

  7. Unencapsulated Streptococcus pneumoniae from conjunctivitis encode variant traits and belong to a distinct phylogenetic cluster

    PubMed Central

    Valentino, Michael D.; McGuire, Abigail Manson; Rosch, Jason W.; Bispo, Paulo J. M.; Burnham, Corinna; Sanfilippo, Christine M.; Carter, Robert A.; Zegans, Michael E.; Beall, Bernard; Earl, Ashlee M.; Tuomanen, Elaine I.; Morris, Timothy W.; Haas, Wolfgang; Gilmore, Michael S.

    2014-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae, an inhabitant of the upper respiratory mucosa, causes respiratory and invasive infections as well as conjunctivitis. Strains that lack the capsule, a main virulence factor and the target of current vaccines, are often isolated from conjunctivitis cases. Here we perform a comparative genomic analysis of 271 strains of conjunctivitis-causing S. pneumoniae from 72 postal codes in the US. We find that the vast majority of conjunctivitis strains are members of a distinct cluster of closely related unencapsulated strains. These strains possess divergent forms of pneumococcal virulence factors (such as CbpA and neuraminidases) that are not shared with other unencapsulated nasopharyngeal S. pneumoniae. They also possess putative adhesins that have not been described in encapsulated pneumococci. These findings suggest that the unencapsulated strains capable of causing conjunctivitis utilize a pathogenesis strategy substantially different from that described for S. pneumoniae at other infection sites. PMID:25388376

  8. The upper respiratory tract microbiome and its potential role in bovine respiratory disease and otitis media

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Svetlana F.; Teixeira, Andre Gustavo V.; Higgins, Catherine H.; Lima, Fabio S.; Bicalho, Rodrigo C.

    2016-01-01

    The upper respiratory tract (URT) hosts a complex microbial community of commensal microorganisms and potential pathogens. Analyzing the composition and nature of the healthy URT microbiota and how it changes over time will contribute to a better understanding of the pathogenesis of pneumonia and otitis. A longitudinal study was conducted including 174 Holstein calves that were divided in four groups: healthy calves, calves diagnosed with pneumonia, otitis or both diseases. Deep pharyngeal swabs were collected on days 3, 14, 28, and 35 of life, and next-generation sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene as well as quantitative PCR was performed. The URT of Holstein dairy calves aged 3 to 35 days revealed to host a highly diverse bacterial community. The relative abundances of the bacterial genera Mannheimia, Moraxella, and Mycoplasma were significantly higher in diseased versus healthy animals, and the total bacterial load of newborn calves at day 3 was higher for animals that developed pneumonia than for healthy animals. Our results corroborate the existing knowledge that species of Mannheimia and Mycoplasma are important pathogens in pneumonia and otitis. Furthermore, they suggest that species of Moraxella can potentially cause the same disorders (pneumonia and otitis), and that high neonatal bacterial load is a key contributor to the development of pneumonia. PMID:27363739

  9. Rare idiopathic intestinal pneumonias (IIPs) and histologic patterns in new ATS/ERS multidisciplinary classification of the IIPs.

    PubMed

    Johkoh, Takeshi; Fukuoka, Junya; Tanaka, Tomonori

    2015-03-01

    The new American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society (ATS/ERS) update to the multidisciplinary classification of idiopathic interstitial pneumonias (IIPs) defines both rare IIPs and rare histologic patterns of IIPs. Although these diseases are rare, each has some distinguishing imaging and pathologic characteristics. Common findings for IIPs in computed tomography (CT) include cysts in lymphoid interstitial pneumonia (LIP), upper lobe subpleural consolidation in pleuropulmonary fibroelastosis (PPFE), symmetrical consolidation in acute fibrinous organizing pneumonia (AFOP), and peribronchovascular consolidation or centrilobular nodules in bronchiolocentric pattern of interstitial pneumonia.

  10. Community-acquired pneumonia. A prospective outpatient study.

    PubMed

    Bochud, P Y; Moser, F; Erard, P; Verdon, F; Studer, J P; Villard, G; Cosendai, A; Cotting, M; Heim, F; Tissot, J; Strub, Y; Pazeller, M; Saghafi, L; Wenger, A; Germann, D; Matter, L; Bille, J; Pfister, L; Francioli, P

    2001-03-01

    We initiated a prospective study with a group of practitioners to assess the etiology, clinical presentation, and outcome of community-acquired pneumonia in patients diagnosed in the outpatient setting. All patients with signs and symptoms suggestive of pneumonia and an infiltrate on chest X-ray underwent an extensive standard workup and were followed over 4 weeks. Over a 4-year period, 184 patients were eligible, of whom 170 (age range, 15-96 yr; median, 43 yr) were included and analyzed. In 78 (46%), no etiologic agent could be demonstrated. In the remaining 92 patients, 107 etiologic agents were implicated: 43 were due to "pyogenic" bacteria (39 Streptococcus pneumoniae, 3 Haemophilus spp., 1 Streptococcus spp.), 39 were due to "atypical" bacteria (24 Mycoplasma pneumoniae, 9 Chlamydia pneumoniae, 4 Coxiella burnetii, 2 Legionella spp.), and 25 were due to viruses (20 influenza viruses and 5 other respiratory viruses). There were only a few statistically significant clinical differences between the different etiologic categories (higher age and comorbidities in viral or in episodes of undetermined etiology, higher neutrophil counts in "pyogenic" episodes, more frequent bilateral and interstitial infiltrates in viral episodes). There were 2 deaths, both in patients with advanced age (83 and 86 years old), and several comorbidities. Only 14 patients (8.2%) required hospitalization. In 6 patients (3.4%), the pneumonia episode uncovered a local neoplasia. This study shows that most cases of community-acquired pneumonia have a favorable outcome and can be successfully managed in an outpatient setting. Moreover, in the absence of rapid and reliable clinical or laboratory tests to establish a definite etiologic diagnosis at presentation, the spectrum of the etiologic agents suggest that initial antibiotic therapy should cover both S. pneumoniae and atypical bacteria, as well as possible influenza viruses during the epidemic season.

  11. Stunting is associated with poor outcomes in childhood pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Moschovis, Peter P.; Addo-Yobo, Emmanuel O. D.; Banajeh, Salem; Chisaka, Noel; Christiani, David C.; Hayden, Douglas; Jeena, Prakash; MacLeod, William B.; Mino, Greta; Patel, Archana; Qazi, Shamim; Santosham, Mathuram; Thea, Donald M.; Hibberd, Patricia L.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Stunting affects 26.7% of children worldwide, and little is known about its effects on the outcomes of childhood pneumonia. We evaluated the effect of stunting on the outcomes of pneumonia among children enrolled in two large clinical trials. Methods We analyzed data from two WHO and USAID-sponsored inpatient treatment trials, the Severe Pneumonia Evaluation Antimicrobial Research study (n=958) and the Amoxicillin Penicillin Pneumonia International Study (n=1702), which enrolled children aged 2–59 months across 16 sites in LMICs. We assessed the effect of stunting (height-for-age Z score < −2) on treatment outcome and time to resolution of hypoxemic pneumonia. Results Among 2542 (96%) children with valid data for height, 28% were stunted and 12.8% failed treatment by 5 days. The failure rate among stunted patients was 16.0% vs. 11.5% among non-stunted patients (unadjusted RR = 1.24 [95% CI 1.08, 1.41]; adjusted RR = 1.28 [95% CI 1.10, 1.48]). An inverse relationship was observed between height and failure rates, even among non-stunted children. Among 845 patients with hypoxemic pneumonia, stunting was associated with a lower probability of normalization of respiratory rate (HR = 0.63 [95% CI 0.52, 0.75]) and oxygen saturation (HR = 0.74 [95% CI 0.61, 0.89]). Conclusions Stunting increases the risk of treatment failure and is associated with a longer course of recovery in children with pneumonia. Strategies to decrease stunting may decrease the burden of adverse outcomes in childhood pneumonia in low-resource settings. PMID:26083963

  12. Respiratory disease trends in the Pulmonary Complications of HIV Infection Study cohort. Pulmonary Complications of HIV Infection Study Group.

    PubMed

    Wallace, J M; Hansen, N I; Lavange, L; Glassroth, J; Browdy, B L; Rosen, M J; Kvale, P A; Mangura, B T; Reichman, L B; Hopewell, P C

    1997-01-01

    We examined trends in the incidence of specific respiratory disorders in a multicenter cohort with progressive human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) disease during a 5-yr period. Individuals with a wide range of HIV disease severity belonging to three transmission categories were evaluated at regular intervals and for episodic respiratory symptoms using standard diagnostic algorithms. Yearly incidence rates of respiratory diagnoses were assessed in the cohort as a whole and according to CD4 count or HIV transmission category. The most frequent respiratory disorders were upper respiratory tract infections, but the incidence of lower respiratory tract infections increased as CD4 counts declined. Specific lower respiratory infections followed distinctive patterns according to study-entry CD4 count and transmission category. Acute bronchitis was the predominant lower respiratory infection of cohort members with entry CD4 counts > or = 200 cells/mm3. In cohort members with entry CD4 counts of 200 to 499 cells/mm3, the incidence of bacterial and Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia each increased an average of 40% per year. In members with entry CD4 counts < 200 cells/mm3, acute bronchitis, bacterial pneumonia, and P. carinii pneumonia occurred at high rates without discernible time trends, despite chemoprophylaxis in more than 80% after Year 1, and the rate of other pulmonary opportunistic infections increased over time. Each year, injecting drug users had a higher incidence of bacterial pneumonia than did homosexual men. The yearly rate of tuberculosis was < 3 episodes/100 person-yr in each entry CD4 and HIV-transmission group. We conclude that the time trends of HIV-associated respiratory disorders are determined by HIV disease stage and influenced by transmission category. Whereas acute bronchitis is prevalent during all stages of HIV infection, incidence rates of bacterial pneumonia and P. carinii pneumonia rise continuously during progression to advanced disease. In

  13. Respiratory Home Health Care

    MedlinePlus

    ... Healthy Living > Living With Lung Disease > Respiratory Home Health Care Font: Aerosol Delivery Oxygen Resources Immunizations Pollution Nutrition ... Disease Articles written by Respiratory Experts Respiratory Home Health Care Respiratory care at home can contribute to improved ...

  14. MRI appearances of the CNS manifestations of Mycoplasma pneumoniae: a report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Francis, D A; Brown, A; Miller, D H; Wiles, C M; Bennett, E D; Leigh, N

    1988-09-01

    Two patients are reported with Mycoplasma pneumoniae-related cervical myelitis. Magnetic resonance imaging in each case demonstrated clinically silent lesions suggesting more extensive neurological involvement. This supports the concept of widespread immunologically mediated disease occurring as a remote effect of initial M. pneumoniae respiratory infection. Differences from the MRI appearances of a patient with mycoplasma-related Guillian-Barré syndrome imply that more than one antigenic determinant is involved.

  15. Fluoroquinolones in the management of community-acquired pneumonia in primary care.

    PubMed

    Wispelwey, Brian; Schafer, Katherine R

    2010-11-01

    A literature search was conducted to evaluate the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic profile of the respiratory fluoroquinolones (gemifloxacin, levofloxacin and moxifloxacin) and their efficacy and safety in the management of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). Data show that CAP is a common presentation in primary care practice, and is associated with high rates of morbidity and mortality, particularly in the elderly. Although the causative pathogens differ depending on treatment setting and patient factors, Streptococcus pneumoniae is the primary pathogen in all treatment settings. As a class, the respiratory fluoroquinolones have a very favorable pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic profile. Pharmacodynamic criteria suggest that moxifloxacin and gemifloxacin are more potent against S. pneumoniae, which may have the added benefit of reducing resistance selection and enhancing bacterial eradication. The respiratory fluoroquinolones are also generally well tolerated, and are first-line options for outpatient treatment of CAP in patients with comorbidities or previous antibiotic use.

  16. Pediatric round pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yen-Lin; Wu, Ping-Sheng; Tsai, Li-Ping; Tsai, Wen-Hsin

    2014-12-01

    "Round pneumonia" or "spherical pneumonia" is a well-characterized clinical entity that seems to be less addressed by pediatricians in Taiwan. We herein report the case of a 7-year-old boy who presented with prolonged fever, cough, and chest X-rays showing a well-demarcated round mass measuring 5.9 × 5.6 × 4.3 cm in the left lower lung field, findings which were typical for round pneumonia. The urinary pneumococcal antigen test was positive, and serum anti-Mycoplasma pneumoniae antibody titer measurement using a microparticle agglutination method was 1:160 (+). After oral administration of antibiotics including azithromycin and amoxicillin/clavulanate, which was subsequently replaced by ceftibuten due to moderate diarrhea, the fever subsided 2 days later and the round patch had completely resolved on the 18th day after the diagnosis. Recent evidence suggests treating classical round pneumonia with antibiotics first and waiving unwarranted advanced imaging studies, while alternative etiologies such as abscesses, tuberculosis, nonbacterial infections, congenital malformations, or neoplasms should still be considered in patients with atypical features or poor treatment response.

  17. Genome-wide association of porcine lung lesions using DNA pooling

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Respiratory disease in swine is a primary health concern for producers. Pleuropneumonia and enzootic pneumonia occur at a high incidence on most farms and have a negative effect on feed efficiency, growth, and animal welfare. Mycoplasma pneumonia is one of the most important because it increases sus...

  18. Recent advances in the diagnosis and treatment of influenza pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Marzoratti, Lucia; Iannella, Hernán A; Gómez, Victoria Fernández; Figueroa, Sandra B

    2012-06-01

    A potentially fatal complication of influenza infection is the development of pneumonia, caused either directly by the influenza virus, or by secondary bacterial infection. Pneumonia related to the 2009 influenza A pandemic was found to be underestimated by commonly used pneumonia severity scores in many cases, and to be rapidly progressive, leading to respiratory failure. Confirmation of etiology by laboratory testing is warranted in such cases. Rapid antigen and immunofluorescence testing are useful screening tests, but have limited sensitivity. Confirmation of pandemic H1N1 influenza A infection can only be made by real-time reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (rRT-PCR) or viral culture. The most effective preventive measure is annual influenza vaccination in selected individuals. Decisions to administer antiviral medications for influenza treatment or chemoprophylaxis should be based upon clinical and epidemiological factors, and should not be delayed by confirmatory laboratory testing results. Neuraminidase inhibitors (NI) are the agents of choice.

  19. Community-Acquired Pneumonia in Latin America.

    PubMed

    Iannella, Hernán A; Luna, Carlos M

    2016-12-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is associated with significant morbidity and mortality in Latin America and the Caribbean (LAC) region. Poverty, socioeconomic factors, and malnutrition influence the incidence and outcome of CAP in LAC. In LAC, Streptococcus pneumoniae is the most frequent microorganism responsible for CAP, (incidence: 24-78%); the incidence of atypical microorganisms is similar to other regions of the world. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) is a growing problem in the LAC region, with the Caribbean being the second most affected area worldwide after Sub-Saharan Africa. Pneumococcal pneumonia remains the most common cause of CAP in HIV-infected patients, but Pneumocystis jirovecii and tuberculosis (TB) are also common in this population. The heterogeneity of the health care systems and social inequity between different countries in LAC, and even between different settings inside the same country, is a difficult issue. TB, including multidrug-resistant TB, is several times more common in South American and Central American countries compared with North America. Furthermore, hantaviruses circulating in the Americas (new world hantaviruses) generate a severe respiratory disease called hantavirus pulmonary syndrome, with an associated mortality as high as 50%. More than 30 hantaviruses have been reported in the Western Hemisphere, with more frequent cases registered in the southern cone (Argentina, Chile, Uruguay, Paraguay, Bolivia, and Brazil). Respiratory viruses (particularly influenza) remain an important cause of morbidity and mortality, particularly in the elderly. Low rates of vaccination (against influenza as well as pneumococcus) may heighten the risk of these infections in low- and middle-income countries.

  20. A Neonatal Murine Model of MRSA Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Shrestha, Bishwas; Siefker, David; Patel, Vivek S.; Yadav, Nikki; Jaligama, Sridhar; Cormier, Stephania A.

    2017-01-01

    Pneumonia due to methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in infants particularly following lower respiratory tract viral infections such as Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV). However, the mechanisms by which co-infection of infants by MRSA and RSV cause increased lung pathology are unknown. Because the infant immune system is qualitatively and quantitatively different from adults we developed a model of infant MRSA pneumonia which will allow us to investigate the effects of RSV co-infection on disease severity. We infected neonatal and adult mice with increasing doses of MRSA and demonstrate that neonatal mice have delayed kinetics in clearing the bacteria in comparison to adult mice. There were differences in recruitment of immune cells into the lung following infection. Adult mice exhibited an increase in neutrophil recruitment that coincided with reduced bacterial titers followed by an increase in macrophages. Neonatal mice, however, exhibited an early increase in neutrophils that did not persist despite continued presence of the bacteria. Unlike the adult mice, neonatal mice failed to exhibit an increase in macrophages. Neonates exhibited a decrease in phagocytosis of MRSA suggesting that the decrease in clearance was partially due to deficient phagocytosis of the bacteria. Both neonates and adults responded with an increase in pro-inflammatory cytokines following infection. However, in contrast to the adult mice, neonates did not express constitutive levels of the anti-microbial peptide Reg3γ in the lung. Infection of neonates did not stimulate expression of the co-stimulatory molecule CD86 by dendritic cells and neonates exhibited a diminished T cell response compared to adult mice. Overall, we have developed a neonatal model of MRSA pneumonia that displays a similar delay in bacterial clearance as is observed in the neonatal intensive care unit and will be useful for performing co

  1. How Can Pneumonia Be Prevented?

    MedlinePlus

    ... t last as long Fewer serious complications Pneumococcal pneumonia vaccines Two vaccines are available to prevent pneumococcal ... Vaccination Web page. Other ways to help prevent pneumonia You also can take the following steps to ...

  2. Isolated optic neuritis associated with Mycoplasma pneumoniae infection: report of two cases and literature review.

    PubMed

    Choi, Seo-Young; Choi, You-Jin; Choi, Jae-Hwan; Choi, Kwang-Dong

    2017-03-20

    Mycoplasma pneumonia is a major pathogen of primary atypical pneumonia and has been known to cause various kinds of extrapulmonary manifestations involving almost all organs of the human body. Optic neuritis associated with M. pneumoniae infection has rarely been described and mostly, it combined other neurological complications including meningitis, meningoencephalitis, myelitis, and peripheral neuropathy. We report two patients who presented with isolated optic neuritis due to M. pneumoniae infection, and reviewed the literatures on five additional patients. All patients are child or young adults, and optic neuritis was unilateral (n = 3) or bilateral (n = 4). Remarkably, four patients did not have preceding history of respiratory M. pneumonia infection, and ocular pain or headache was accompanied in only three. Although initial visual acuities were severely reduced in most cases, visual outcome was excellent after systemic steroid and/or antibiotics treatment. M. pneumonia infection should be considered in the differential diagnosis of isolated optic neuritis, especially when occurring in a child or young adults, even though there was no preceding pneumonia, accompanying ocular pain, or headache. Various mechanisms including direct local inflammation, vascular occlusion, or indirect immune modulation due to M. pneumonia infection can lead to isolated neurological manifestations without pneumonia.

  3. Mycoplasma pneumoniae: Current Knowledge on Nucleic Acid Amplification Techniques and Serological Diagnostics

    PubMed Central

    Loens, Katherine; Ieven, Margareta

    2016-01-01

    Mycoplasma pneumoniae (M. pneumoniae) belongs to the class Mollicutes and has been recognized as a common cause of respiratory tract infections (RTIs), including community-acquired pneumonia (CAP), that occur worldwide and in all age groups. In addition, M. pneumoniae can simultaneously or sequentially lead to damage in the nervous system and has been associated with a wide variety of other acute and chronic diseases. During the past 10 years, the proportion of LRTI in children and adults, associated with M. pneumoniae infection has ranged from 0 to more than 50%. This variation is due to the age and the geographic location of the population examined but also due to the diagnostic methods used. The true role of M. pneumoniae in RTIs remains a challenge given the many limitations and lack of standardization of the applied diagnostic tool in most cases, with resultant wide variations in data from different studies. Correct and rapid diagnosis and/or management of M. pneumoniae infections is, however, critical to initiate appropriate antibiotic treatment and is nowadays usually done by PCR and/or serology. Several recent reviews, have summarized current methods for the detection and identification of M. pneumoniae. This review will therefore provide a look at the general principles, advantages, diagnostic value, and limitations of the most currently used detection techniques for the etiological diagnosis of a M. pneumoniae infection as they evolve from research to daily practice. PMID:27064893

  4. Multiparameter respiratory rate estimation from the photoplethysmogram.

    PubMed

    Karlen, Walter; Raman, Srinivas; Ansermino, J Mark; Dumont, Guy A

    2013-07-01

    We present a novel method for estimating respiratory rate in real time from the photoplethysmogram (PPG) obtained from pulse oximetry. Three respiratory-induced variations (frequency, intensity, and amplitude) are extracted from the PPG using the Incremental-Merge Segmentation algorithm. Frequency content of each respiratory-induced variation is analyzed using fast Fourier transforms. The proposed Smart Fusion method then combines the results of the three respiratory-induced variations using a transparent mean calculation. It automatically eliminates estimations considered to be unreliable because of detected presence of artifacts in the PPG or disagreement between the different individual respiratory rate estimations. The algorithm has been tested on data obtained from 29 children and 13 adults. Results show that it is important to combine the three respiratory-induced variations for robust estimation of respiratory rate. The Smart Fusion showed trends of improved estimation (mean root mean square error 3.0 breaths/min) compared to the individual estimation methods (5.8, 6.2, and 3.9 breaths/min). The Smart Fusion algorithm is being implemented in a mobile phone pulse oximeter device to facilitate the diagnosis of severe childhood pneumonia in remote areas.

  5. Respiratory tract infections in the military environment.

    PubMed

    Korzeniewski, Krzysztof; Nitsch-Osuch, Aneta; Konior, Monika; Lass, Anna

    2015-04-01

    Military personnel fighting in contemporary battlefields as well as those participating in combat training are at risk of contracting respiratory infections. Epidemiological studies have demonstrated that soldiers deployed to the harsh environment have higher rates of newly reported respiratory symptoms than non-deployers. Acute respiratory diseases are the principle reason for outpatient treatment and hospitalization among military personnel, with an incidence exceeding that of the adult civilian population by up to three-fold. Adenoviruses, influenza A and B viruses, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Streptococcus pyogenes, coronaviruses and rhinoviruses have been identified as the main causes of acute respiratory infections among the military population. Although infective pathogens have been extensively studied, a significant proportion of illnesses (over 40%) have been due to unknown causative agents. Other health hazards, which can lead to respiratory illnesses among troops, are extreme air temperatures, desert dust, emissions from burn pits, industrial pollutants, and airborne contaminants originating from degraded soil. Limited diagnostic capabilities, especially inside the area of operations, make it difficult to accurately estimate the exact number of respiratory diseases in the military environment. The aim of the study was to discuss the occurrence of respiratory tract infections in army personnel, existing risk factors and preventive measures.

  6. Outbreak of lower respiratory tract illness associated with human enterovirus 68 among American Indian children.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, Lara M; Redd, John T; Schneider, Eileen; Lu, Xiaoyan; Chern, Shur-Wern W; Oberste, M Steven; Erdman, Dean D; Fischer, Gayle E; Armstrong, Gregory L; Kodani, Maja; Montoya, Jennifer; Magri, Julie M; Cheek, James E

    2012-03-01

    Human enterovirus 68 (EV68) infections are rarely reported. We describe a respiratory outbreak associated with EV68 among 18 children admitted to a remote Indian Health Service facility during August 11, 2010 through September 14, 2010. Clinical illness was characterized by pneumonia and wheezing. EV68 should be considered as an etiology in outbreaks of lower respiratory tract illness.

  7. CHILDHOOD RESPIRATORY SYMPTOMS, HOSPITAL ADMISSIONS, AND LONG-TERM EXPOSURE TO AIRBORNE PARTICULATE MATTER

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effects of long-term exposure to air pollution on respiratory symptoms and respiratory hospitalization (for asthma, bronchitis or pneumonia) were assessed in a cross-sectional study of children (ages 7--11 years, N=667) living in a moderately industrialized city in Central Sl...

  8. Detection of Chlamydia pneumoniae on cytospin preparations from bronchoalveolar lavage in COPD patients and in lung tissue from advanced emphysema.

    PubMed

    Brandén, Eva; Gnarpe, Judy; Hillerdal, Gunnar; Orre, Lotta; Sköld, C Magnus; Löfdahl, Magnus; Koyi, Hirsh; Tornling, Göran

    2007-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is associated with smoking but other etiological factors contribute. Chlamydia pneumoniae is an obligate intracellular bacterium causing both acute and chronic respiratory tract infections. Studies have revealed an association between chronic C. pneumoniae infection and COPD, asthma and lung cancer but there have been difficulties detecting C. pneumoniae in the bronchial tree. Cytospin slides prepared from bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid from 14 patients with COPD, 10 healthy smokers (S) and 7 non smokers (NS) were analyzed with a fluorescein isothiocyanate labeled monoclonal antibody to C. pneumoniae. Lung tissue from 24 patients with advanced emphysema who had undergone lung volume reduction surgery (LVRS) was examined with immunohistochemistry for C. pneumoniae. Archived serum samples for detection of specific C. pneumoniae antibodies by microimmunofluorescence were available for 30 of the BAL subjects and 11 of LVRS patients. C. pneumoniae elementary body like structures were found in 29% of cytospin specimens from COPD patients, 14% of NS and 10% of HS. C. pneumoniae was detected in lung tissue in 8%. COPD patients had higher titres of IgG and IgA than NS and S. There was no association between occurrence of C. pneumoniae in BAL fluid and antibody titres. In conclusion, the assays used for detection of C. pneumoniae in lung tissue are feasible, and could be adapted in adequately powered studies to further confirm an association between C. pneumoniae infection and COPD.

  9. Human metapneumovirus associated with community-acquired pneumonia in children in Beijing, China.

    PubMed

    Lu, Guilan; Li, Jianguo; Xie, Zhengde; Liu, Chunyan; Guo, Li; Vernet, Guy; Shen, Kunling; Wang, Jianwei

    2013-01-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in children worldwide. However, few studies have been conducted on the infection of human metapneumovirus (hMPV) associated with pediatric community-acquired pneumonia in China. Nasopharyngeal aspirates were collected between July 2008 and June 2010 from 1,028 children, aged ≤16.5 years, who were diagnosed with community-acquired pneumonia in Beijing, China. Reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction was used to screen the samples for hMPV and common respiratory viruses. hMPV was detected in 6.3% of the patients with community-acquired pneumonia. This detection rate is the third highest for a respiratory virus in children with community-acquired pneumonia, after that of rhinovirus (30.9%) and respiratory syncytial virus (30.7%). The detection rate of hMPV in 2008/2009 (42/540, 7.8%) was significantly higher than in 2009/2010 (23/488, 4.7%; χ(2)  = 4.065, P = 0.044). The hMPV subtypes A2, B1, and B2 were found to co-circulate, with A2 being most prevalent. These results indicate that hMPV plays a substantial role in pediatric community-acquired pneumonia in China. Overall, these findings provide a better understanding of the epidemiological and clinical features of hMPV infections.

  10. Respiratory Management in the Patient with Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Galeiras Vázquez, Rita; Rascado Sedes, Pedro; Montoto Marqués, Antonio; Ferreiro Velasco, M. Elena

    2013-01-01

    Spinal cord injuries (SCIs) often lead to impairment of the respiratory system and, consequently, restrictive respiratory changes. Paresis or paralysis of the respiratory muscles can lead to respiratory insufficiency, which is dependent on the level and completeness of the injury. Respiratory complications include hypoventilation, a reduction in surfactant production, mucus plugging, atelectasis, and pneumonia. Vital capacity (VC) is an indicator of overall pulmonary function; patients with severely impaired VC may require assisted ventilation. It is best to proceed with intubation under controlled circumstances rather than waiting until the condition becomes an emergency. Mechanical ventilation can adversely affect the structure and function of the diaphragm. Early tracheostomy following short orotracheal intubation is probably beneficial in selected patients. Weaning should start as soon as possible, and the best modality is progressive ventilator-free breathing (PVFB). Appropriate candidates can sometimes be freed from mechanical ventilation by electrical stimulation. Respiratory muscle training regimens may improve patients' inspiratory function following a SCI. PMID:24089664

  11. [Eosinophilic pneumonia caused by mesalazine. Report of one case].

    PubMed

    Pérez, Carlos; Errázuriz, Isabel; Brockmann, Pablo; González, Sergio; Cofré, Cecilia

    2003-01-01

    A 50 years old male with a diagnosis of ulcerative colitis treated with mesalazine, developed after 2 months of treatment, cough, fever and progressive dyspnea. Chest X ray examination and CT scan showed pulmonary infiltrates in the right upper lobe that subsequently involved both lower lobes. A biopsy, made through videothoracoscopy, showed an eosinophilic pneumonia. After the discontinuation of mesalazine and the use of glucocorticoids, the respiratory involvement resolved, and pulmonary infiltrates regressed. Mesalazine is widely used in the treatment of inflammatory bowel diseases. Pulmonary toxicity is an uncommon complication of mesalazine treatment. Nevertheless, this complication should be considered in patients that use it and develop respiratory symptoms.

  12. Incidence of Pneumococcal Pneumonia among Adults in Rural Thailand, 2006–2011: Implications for Pneumococcal Vaccine Considerations

    PubMed Central

    Piralam, Barameht; Tomczyk, Sara M.; Rhodes, Julia C.; Thamthitiwat, Somsak; Gregory, Christopher J.; Olsen, Sonja J.; Praphasiri, Prabda; Sawatwong, Pongpun; Naorat, Sathapana; Chantra, Somrak; Areerat, Peera; Hurst, Cameron P.; Moore, Matthew R.; Muangchana, Charung; Baggett, Henry C.

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of pneumococcal pneumonia among adults is a key driver for the cost-effectiveness of pneumococcal conjugate vaccine used among children. We sought to obtain more accurate incidence estimates among adults by including results of pneumococcal urine antigen testing (UAT) from population-based pneumonia surveillance in two Thai provinces. Active surveillance from 2006 to 2011 identified acute lower respiratory infection (ALRI)–related hospital admissions. Adult cases of pneumococcal pneumonia were defined as hospitalized ALRI patients aged ≥ 18 years with isolation of Streptococcus pneumoniae from blood or with positive UAT. Among 39,525 adult ALRI patients, we identified 481 pneumococcal pneumonia cases (105 by blood culture, 376 by UAT only). Estimated incidence of pneumococcal pneumonia hospitalizations was 30.5 cases per 100,000 persons per year (2.2 and 28.3 cases per 100,000 persons per year by blood culture and UAT, respectively). Incidence varied between 22.7 in 2007 and 43.5 in 2010, and increased with age to over 150 per 100,000 persons per year among persons aged ≥ 70 years. Viral coinfections including influenza A/B, respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), and adenovirus occurred in 11% (44/409) of pneumococcal pneumonia cases tested. Use of UAT to identify cases of pneumococcal pneumonia among adults in rural Thailand substantially increases estimates of pneumococcal pneumonia burden, thereby informing cost-effectiveness analyses and vaccine policy decisions. PMID:26503277

  13. Respiratory Distress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The University of Miami School of Medicine asked the Research Triangle Institute for assistance in improvising the negative pressure technique to relieve respiratory distress in infants. Marshall Space Flight Center and Johnson Space Center engineers adapted this idea to the lower-body negative-pressure system seals used during the Skylab missions. Some 20,000 babies succumb to respiratory distress in the U.S. each year, a condition in which lungs progressively lose their ability to oxygenate blood. Both positive and negative pressure techniques have been used - the first to force air into lungs, the second to keep infant's lungs expanded. Negative pressure around chest helps the baby expand his lungs and maintain proper volume of air. If doctors can keep the infant alive for four days, the missing substance in the lungs will usually form in sufficient quantity to permit normal breathing. The Skylab chamber and its leakproof seals were adapted for medical use.

  14. Eosinophilic infiltrate in a patient with severe Legionella pneumonia as a levofloxacin-related complication: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Legionella pneumonia can appear with different levels of severity and it can often present with complications such as acute respiratory distress syndrome. Case presentation We report the case of a 44-year-old Caucasian man with Legionella pneumonia with successive development of severe acute respiratory distress syndrome. During his stay in intensive care the clinical and radiological situation of the previously observed acute respiratory distress syndrome unexpectedly worsened due to acute pulmonary eosinophilic infiltrate of iatrogenic origin. Conclusion Levofloxacin treatment caused the occurrence of acute eosinophilic infiltrate. Diagnosis was possible following bronchoscopic examination using bronchoaspirate and transbronchial biopsy. PMID:21070648

  15. Lung Ultrasound in Early Diagnosis of Neonatal Ventilator Associated Pneumonia before Any Radiographic or Laboratory Changes

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, Mohammed; Ibrahim, Mostafa; Bioumy, Nouran; El-Sharkawy, Sonya

    2016-01-01

    Neonatal pneumonia is reported to be the primary cause of neonatal respiratory failure and one of the common causes of neonatal hospitalization and death in developing countries. Chest X-ray was considered the gold standard for diagnosis of neonatal pneumonia. Lung ultrasonography has been described as a valuable noninvasive tool for the diagnosis of many neonatal pulmonary diseases. We report a case of ventilation associated neonatal pneumonia with very early diagnosis using lung ultrasound before any significant radiographic changes in chest X-ray or laboratory findings suggestive of infection. PMID:27891280

  16. A case of vildagliptin-induced interstitial pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Kuse, Naoyuki; Abe, Shinji; Kuribayashi, Hidehiko; Inomata, Minoru; Saito, Hitoshi; Fukuda, Yuh; Gemma, Akihiko

    2016-01-01

    A 65-year-old Japanese male with type 2 diabetes mellitus was admitted to our hospital with a productive cough and worsening dyspnea. He had started receiving vildagliptin, which is one of the dipeptideylpeptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors, several days before the appearance of his symptoms. Laboratory findings revealed markedly elevated levels of immunoglobulin E and Krebs von den Lungen-6. Chest computed tomography revealed ground-glass opacity with irregular reticulation throughout both lungs. Biopsy specimens by transbronchial lung biopsy showed subacute interstitial pneumonia and an organizing pneumonia pattern with acute alveolar injury. The drug lymphocyte stimulation test showed a positive result for vildagliptin. Withdrawal of vildagliptin and administration of glucocorticoid treatment improved his respiratory condition and radiological findings. Therefore, we diagnosed the patient with vildagliptin-induced interstitial pneumonia based on both his clinical course and pathological findings. Interstitial pneumonia as a side effect of vildagliptin is rare. It may be necessary to monitor the respiratory condition of patients upon administration of DPP-4 inhibitors until further evidence is obtained.

  17. A serological investigation of Mycoplasma pneumoniae infection on the Witwatersrand.

    PubMed

    Joosting, A C; Harwin, R M; Coppin, A; Battaglia, P; van der Hoef, P

    1976-12-18

    Sera from patients with respiratory disease were examined for antibody to Mycoplasma pneumoniae by complement fixation test. During the study period of about 6 years, a 3-year cycle of infection was observed, which coincided with some epidemics in the UK and USA, suggesting the possibility of an approximately simultaneous world-wide spread. The epidemics lasted about 18 months each, during which the incidence of infection was over 10 times that of the interepidemic periods.

  18. Clinical Features and Courses of Adenovirus Pneumonia in Healthy Young Adults during an Outbreak among Korean Military Personnel

    PubMed Central

    Park, Ji Young; Kim, Bong-Joon; Lee, Eun Jung; Park, Kwi Sung; Park, Hee Sun; Jung, Sung Soo; Kim, Ju Ock

    2017-01-01

    Background The number of pneumonia patients increased suddenly in Korean military hospitals in late December 2014, indicating the urgent need for an epidemic outbreak investigation. Methods We conducted a prospective study of pneumonia etiology among immunocompetent young adults admitted to Daejeon Armed Forces hospital. Patient blood and sputum samples were subjected to conventional culture, serology, and polymerase chain reaction tests for respiratory viruses and atypical pathogens. Results From January to May 2015, we enrolled 191 (189 male) adults with pneumonia; the mean age was 20.1 ± 1.3 years. Five patients had severe pneumonia, and one died. Pathogenic human adenoviruses were most common (HAdV, 153/191 [80.1%]), indicating a HAdV pneumonia outbreak. Genotyping of 35 isolates indicated that 34 matched HAdV-55 and one matched HAdV-2. HAdV pneumonia infected recruit trainees most frequently. High and prolonged fever, nasal congestion, sore throat, and pharyngeal inflammation were significantly more common in the HAdV pneumonia group, compared to patients with other or unknown causes of pneumonia. Only 12% of HAdV pneumonia patients displayed leukocytosis, whereas febrile leukopenia (62.7%) and thrombocytopenia (41%) were commonly observed. HAdV pneumonia patient chest CT scans displayed ground glass opacity (with or without septal thickness) with consolidation in 50.0% of patients. Conclusions An outbreak of HAdV respiratory infection occurred at the Korean military training center. HAdV pneumonia exhibited specific laboratory and clinical features, and although most patients were cured without complication, some progressed to respiratory failure and fatality. Therefore, HAdV vaccine should be provided to military trainees in Korea. PMID:28114362

  19. Guideline for prevention of nosocomial pneumonia. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

    PubMed

    1994-12-01

    Pneumonia is the second most common nosocomial infection in the United States and is associated with substantial morbidity and mortality. Most patients with nosocomial pneumonia are those with extremes of age, severe underlying disease, immunosuppression, depressed sensorium, and cardiopulmonary disease, and those who have had thoracoabdominal surgery. Although patients with mechanically assisted ventilation do not comprise a major proportion of patients with nosocomial pneumonia, they have the highest risk of developing the infection. Most bacterial nosocomial pneumonias occur by aspiration of bacteria colonizing the oropharynx or upper gastrointestinal tract of the patient. Intubation and mechanical ventilation greatly increase the risk of nosocomial bacterial pneumonia because they alter first-line patient defenses. Pneumonias due to Legionella spp., Aspergillus spp., and influenza virus are often caused by inhalation of contaminated aerosols. Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection usually follows viral inoculation of the conjunctivae or nasal mucosa by contaminated hands. Traditional preventive measures for nosocomial pneumonia include decreasing aspiration by the patient, preventing cross-contamination or colonization via hands of personnel, appropriate disinfection or sterilization or respiratory therapy devices, use of available vaccines to protect against particular infections, and education of hospital staff and patients. New measures under investigation involve reducing oropharyngeal and gastric colonization by pathogenic microorganisms.

  20. The antibiotic treatment of community-acquired, atypical, and nosocomial pneumonias.

    PubMed

    Cunha, B A

    1995-05-01

    Optimal antibiotic regimens and duration of treatment are not universally agreed on for community-acquired or nosocomial pneumonias. Experience suggests that community-acquired pneumonias may be treated for less than 2 weeks with a combination of intravenous and oral antibiotics of appropriate spectrum that penetrate the lung, have a good safety profile, do not foster the development of resistance, and are cost-effective. After initial intravenous therapy, oral switch therapy may be begun as soon as the patient defervesces clinically, which is usually 3 days after admission. Switching to oral therapy does not invariably lead to earlier hospital discharge. There is no "standard of care" for pneumonias, but guidelines for empiric use have existed for decades. The least expensive beta-lactamase stable antibiotic should be used as monotherapy for the empiric treatment of community-acquired pneumonia. Because community-acquired atypical pneumonias are clinically distinct from bacterial pneumonias owing to their extrapulmonary features, clinicians should be able to differentiate atypical pneumonias from bacterial pneumonias, which permits prompt and appropriate treatment. Nosocomial pneumonias remain a difficult diagnostic challenge. Therapeutically the most important principle in treating nosocomial pneumonia is to provide for double-drug coverage against P. aeruginosa. Differentiation of respiratory tract colonization from respiratory tract invasion remains the central key issue in patients with pulmonary infiltrates acquired during hospitalization. Most patients complete their course of intravenous therapy for nosocomial pneumonia leaving little or no time for completion of their therapy by oral antibiotics. Hospital-acquired atypical pneumonias are largely limited to legionnaires' disease, which is a more difficult diagnosis than in the community-acquired setting. Clinicians taking care of patients with pneumonia should employ a simplified therapeutic approach using

  1. Dual infection with Bordetella pertussis and Mycoplasma pneumoniae in three infants: case reports.

    PubMed

    Zouari, A; Touati, A; Smaoui, H; Brun, D; Kasdaghli, K; Menif, K; Ben Jaballah, N; Ben Hassen, E; Guiso, N; Kechrid, A

    2012-04-01

    Studying pertussis-like respiratory infections, we report the cases of three infants with evidence of both Bordetella pertussis and Mycoplasma pneumoniae. Bordetella infection was identified by the real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) of nasopharyngeal specimens. Neither B. pertussis nor B. parapertussis were recovered on the culture of nasopharyngeal aspirates (NPAs) from any subjects. M. pneumoniae etiology was diagnosed by culture and RT-PCR. The evolution was fatal for all of the subjects. We conclude that, among patients with Bordetella infection, co-infection with another respiratory pathogen is often probable, and these mixed infections might cause a more severe form of illness, sometimes leading to death.

  2. Global estimate of the incidence of clinical pneumonia among children under five years of age.

    PubMed Central

    Rudan, Igor; Tomaskovic, Lana; Boschi-Pinto, Cynthia; Campbell, Harry

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Clinical pneumonia (defined as respiratory infections associated with clinical signs of pneumonia, principally pneumonia and bronchiolitis) in children under five years of age is still the leading cause of childhood mortality in the world. In this paper we aim to estimate the worldwide incidence of clinical pneumonia in young children. METHODS: Our estimate for the developing world is based on an analysis of published data on the incidence of clinical pneumonia from community based longitudinal studies. Among more than 2000 studies published since 1961, we identified 46 studies that reported the incidence of clinical pneumonia, and 28 of these met pre-defined quality criteria. FINDINGS: The estimate of the median incidence from those studies was 0.28 episodes per child-year (e/cy). The 25-75% interquartile range was 0.21-0.71. We assessed the plausibility of this estimate using estimates of global mortality from acute respiratory infections and reported case fatality rates for all episodes of clinical pneumonia reported in community-based studies or the case-fatality rate reported only for severe cases and estimates of the proportion of severe cases occurring in a defined population or community. CONCLUSION: The overlap between the ranges of the estimates implies that a plausible incidence estimate of clinical pneumonia for developing countries is 0.29 e/cy. This equates to an annual incidence of 150.7 million new cases, 11-20 million (7-13%) of which are severe enough to require hospital admission. In the developed world no comparable data are available. However, large population-based studies report that the incidence of community-acquired pneumonia among children less than five years old is approximately 0.026 e/cy, suggesting that more than 95% of all episodes of clinical pneumonia in young children worldwide occur in developing countries. PMID:15654403

  3. Prospective Detection of Respiratory Pathogens in Symptomatic Children with Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Ashok; Gu, Zhengming; Smith, Teresa; Morgenstern, Markus; Sunkara, Anusha; Kang, Guolian; Srivastava, Deo K.; Gaur, Aditya H.; Leung, Wing; Hayden, Randall T.

    2016-01-01

    Background The data on human rhinovirus (HRV), coronavirus (hCoV), bocavirus (hBoV), metapneumovirus (hMPV), Chlamydophila pneumoniae, Mycoplasma pneumoniae and Bordetella pertussis infections in children with cancer is limited. Methods We sought to determine prospectively the prevalence of respiratory pathogens in these children, using multiplexed-PCR. Results We enrolled 253 children with upper, or lower respiratory tract infection (URTI/LRTI) during a one year period. A respiratory virus was detected in 193 (76%) patients; 156 (81%) patients had URTI. Human rhinovirus was the most common virus detected in 97 (62%) and 24 (65%) patients with URTI and LRTI, respectively. Leukemia or lymphoma (LL) was the most common underlying diagnosis in 95 (49%) patients followed by solid tumor 47 (24%), post-hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HCT) 28 (15%), and brain tumor in 23 (12%) patients. By multiple logistic regression analysis hBoV was the most commonly detected respiratory virus in patients with LRTI (P = 0.008; odds ratio, 4.52; 95% confidence interval, 1.48-13.79). Co-infection with more than 1 virus was present in 47 (24%) patients, and did not increase the risk for LRTI. Two (0.7%) patients succumbed to LRTI from parainfluenza virus (PIV)-3 and respiratory syncytial virus/HRV infection, respectively. C.pneumoniae and M.pneumoniae were detected in 4 and 3 patients, respectively. Conclusions HRV was the most common virus detected in children with cancer and post-HCT hospitalized with an acute respiratory illness, and was not associated with increased morbidity. Prospective studies with viral load determination and asymptomatic controls are needed to study the association of these emerging respiratory viruses with LRTI in children with cancer and post-HCT. PMID:23190778

  4. Acute otitis media and respiratory viruses.

    PubMed

    Bulut, Yunus; Güven, Mehmet; Otlu, Bariş; Yenişehirli, Gülgün; Aladağ, Ibrahim; Eyibilen, Ahmet; Doğru, Salim

    2007-03-01

    The present study was performed to elucidate the clinical outcome, and etiology of acute otitis media (AOM) in children based on virologic and bacteriologic tests. The study group consisted of 120 children aged 6 to 144 months with AOM. Middle ear fluid (MEF) was tested for viral pathogens by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and for bacteria by gram-staining and culture. Clinical response was assessed on day 2 to 4, 11 to 13, 26 to 28. Respiratory viruses were isolated in 39 patients (32.5%). Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) (46.5%) was the most common virus identified in MEF samples, followed by human rhinovirus (HRV) (25.6%), human coronavirus (HCV) (11.6%), influenza (IV) type A (9.3%), adenovirus type sub type A (AV) (4%), and parainfluenza (PIV) type -3 (2%) by RT-PCR. In total 69 bacterial species were isolated from 65 (54.8%) of 120 patients. Streptococcus pneumoniae (S. pneumoniae) was the most frequently isolated bacteria. Viral RNA was detected in 31 (56.3%) of 55 bacteria-negative specimens and in 8 (12.3%) of 65 bacteria-positive MEF samples. No significant differences were found between children representing viral infection alone, combined viral and bacterial infection, bacterial infection alone, and neither viral nor bacterial infection, regarding clinical cure, relapse and reinfection rates. A significantly higher rate of secretory otitis media (SOM) was observed in alone or combined RSV infection with S. pneumonia or Haemophilus influenzae (H. influenzae) than in other viruses infection. Conclusion. This study provides information about etiologic agents and diagnosis of AOM in Turkish children. The findings highlight the importance of common respiratory viruses and bacterial pathogens, particularly RSV, HRV, S. pneumoniae and H. influenzae, in predisposing to and causing AOM in children.

  5. Respiratory infections in patients undergoing mechanical ventilation.

    PubMed

    Rello, Jordi; Lisboa, Thiago; Koulenti, Despoina

    2014-09-01

    Lower respiratory tract infections in mechanically ventilated patients are a frequent cause of antibiotic treatment in intensive-care units. These infections present as severe sepsis or septic shock with respiratory dysfunction in intubated patients. Purulent respiratory secretions are needed for diagnosis, but distinguishing between pneumonia and tracheobronchitis is not easy. Both presentations are associated with longlasting mechanical ventilation and extended intensive-care unit stay, providing a rationale for antibiotic treatment initiation. Differentiation of colonisers from true pathogens is difficult, and microbiological data show Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa to be of great concern because of clinical outcomes and therapeutic challenges. Key management issues include identification of the pathogen, choice of initial empirical antibiotic, and decisions with regard to the resolution pattern.

  6. Respiratory syncytial virus infection: an innate perspective

    PubMed Central

    Johansson, Cecilia

    2016-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a common cause of upper respiratory tract infection in children and adults. However, infection with this virus sometimes leads to severe lower respiratory disease and is the major cause of infant hospitalisations in the developed world. Several risk factors such as baby prematurity and congenital heart disease are known to predispose towards severe disease but previously healthy, full-term infants can also develop bronchiolitis and viral pneumonia during RSV infection. The causes of severe disease are not fully understood but may include dysregulation of the immune response to the virus, resulting in excessive recruitment and activation of innate and adaptive immune cells that can cause damage. This review highlights recent discoveries on the balancing act of immune-mediated virus clearance versus immunopathology during RSV infection. PMID:28105323

  7. Pulmonary surfactant for neonatal respiratory disorders.

    PubMed

    Merrill, Jeffrey D; Ballard, Roberta A

    2003-04-01

    Surfactant therapy has revolutionized neonatal care and is used routinely for preterm infants with respiratory distress syndrome. Recent investigation has further elucidated the function of surfactant-associated proteins and their contribution toward surfactant and lung immune defense functions. As the field of neonatology moves away from intubation and mechanical ventilation of preterm infants at birth toward more aggressive use of nasal continuous positive airway pressure, the optimal timing of exogenous surfactant therapy remains unclear. Evidence suggests that preterm neonates with bronchopulmonary dysplasia and prolonged mechanical ventilation also experience surfactant dysfunction; however, exogenous surfactant therapy beyond the first week of life has not been well studied. Surfactant replacement therapy has been studied for use in other respiratory disorders, including meconium aspiration syndrome and pneumonia. Commercial surfactant preparations currently available are not optimal, given the variability of surfactant protein content and their susceptibility to inhibition. Further progress in the treatment of neonatal respiratory disorders may include the development of "designer" surfactant preparations.

  8. In-vitro activity of sparfloxacin in comparison with currently available antimicrobials against respiratory tract pathogens.

    PubMed

    Baquero, F; Cantón, R

    1996-05-01

    Bacterial resistance to antimicrobial agents is an ever-increasing problem. The in-vitro activity of sparfloxacin compared with that of currently available antimicrobial agents against pathogens implicated in respiratory tract infections is reviewed. Sparfloxacin is a fluoroquinolone active against both penicillin-susceptible and -resistant strains of Streptococcus pneumoniae. It is also active against many other respiratory tract pathogens and may be a suitable alternative for empirical therapy of community-acquired respiratory tract infections.

  9. Radiologic features of Rhodococcus equi pneumonia in AIDS.

    PubMed

    Muntaner, L; Leyes, M; Payeras, A; Herrera, M; Gutierrez, A

    1997-01-01

    This report outlines the radiological features observed in three cases of Rhodococcus equi (R. equi) pneumonia in AIDS (acquired immunodeficiency syndrome) and reviews another 45 radiological reports published of this emerging opportunistic pneumonia in Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infected patients. The clinical signs in our three patients consisted in a subacute onset of respiratory symptoms and fever. A low lymphocyte count (< 200 cells/mm3), pulmonary infiltrates, and pleural effusion was present in all three cases. Cavitary pneumonia was observed in two patients, and pericardial effusion in another. In this series CD4 lymphocyte count < 200/mm3 was seen in 29 of the 48 patients (60.4%). All 48 patients had abnormal findings on chest radiographs. Abnormalities involved the upper lobes in 26 of the 48 patients (55%). Cavitation was reported in 37 of the 48 cases (77%). R. equi pneumonia may not be as the paucity of case reports suggest. Consequently, a cavitary pneumonia in HIV infected patients with a low CD4 lymphocyte count (< 200 mm3) with a subacute onset, an upper lobe predilection, and/or a poor response to conventional antibiotic therapy should be considered as suspect of R. equi infection.

  10. The management of community-acquired pneumonia in the elderly

    PubMed Central

    Faverio, Paola; Aliberti, Stefano; Bellelli, Giuseppe; Suigo, Giulia; Lonni, Sara; Pesci, Alberto; Restrepo, Marcos I.

    2014-01-01

    Pneumonia is one of the main causes of morbidity and mortality in the elderly. The elderly population has exponentially increased in the last decades and the current epidemiological trends indicate that it is expected to further increase. Therefore, recognizing the special needs of older people is of paramount importance. In this review we address the main differences between elderly and adult patients with pneumonia. We focus on several aspects, including the atypical clinical presentation of pneumonia in the elderly, the methods to assess severity of illness, the appropriate setting of care, and the management of comorbidities. We also discuss how to approach the common complications of severe pneumonia, including acute respiratory failure and severe sepsis. Moreover, we debate whether or not elderly patients are at higher risk of infection due to multi-drug resistant pathogens and which risk factors should be considered when choosing the antibiotic therapy. We highlight the differences in the definition of clinical stability and treatment failure between adults and elderly patients. Finally, we review the main outcomes, preventive and supportive measures to be considered in elderly patients with pneumonia. PMID:24360244

  11. The management of community-acquired pneumonia in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Faverio, Paola; Aliberti, Stefano; Bellelli, Giuseppe; Suigo, Giulia; Lonni, Sara; Pesci, Alberto; Restrepo, Marcos I

    2014-04-01

    Pneumonia is one of the main causes of morbidity and mortality in the elderly. The elderly population has exponentially increased in the last decades and the current epidemiological trends indicate that it is expected to further increase. Therefore, recognizing the special needs of older people is of paramount importance. In this review we address the main differences between elderly and adult patients with pneumonia. We focus on several aspects, including the atypical clinical presentation of pneumonia in the elderly, the methods to assess severity of illness, the appropriate setting of care, and the management of comorbidities. We also discuss how to approach the common complications of severe pneumonia, including acute respiratory failure and severe sepsis. Moreover, we debate whether or not elderly patients are at higher risk of infection due to multi-drug resistant pathogens and which risk factors should be considered when choosing the antibiotic therapy. We highlight the differences in the definition of clinical stability and treatment failure between adults and elderly patients. Finally, we review the main outcomes, preventive and supportive measures to be considered in elderly patients with pneumonia.

  12. Pneumocystis Jiroveci Pneumonia

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-10-01

    Pneumocystis jiroveci (formerly P. carinii) Pneumonia (PJP). A 60 year old HIV+ male with a CD4+ count of 144 cells/mm3 complaining of cough ...case the lucency is too wide and irregular for a Mach band. Clinically, patients with PJP demonstrate nonspecific complaints. Fever, cough

  13. Vaccinating welders against pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, Keith T; Cosgrove, Martin P

    2013-01-01

    Background In 2011 the Department of Health in England recommended that welders should each receive a single dose of the 23-valent pneumococcal vaccine (PPV23). This review assesses the evidence behind the advice and its practical implications. Method The review was informed by a systematic search in Medline, which related pneumonia to welding and/or exposure to metal fume, and was supplemented using the personal libraries of the authors. Findings There is consistent evidence that welders die more often of pneumonia, especially lobar pneumonia, are hospitalised more often with lobar and pneumococcal pneumonia, and more often develop invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD). It is estimated that one case of IPD may be prevented over a 10-year period by vaccinating 588 welders against pneumococcal infection. Conclusions A good case exists that employers should offer PPV23 vaccination to welders and other employees exposed to metal fume. Additionally, reasonable measures must be taken to minimise exposure to welding fume and welders should be encouraged not to smoke. PMID:22764269

  14. Multiple pathogens in adult patients admitted with community-acquired pneumonia: a one year prospective study of 346 consecutive patients.

    PubMed Central

    Lieberman, D.; Schlaeffer, F.; Boldur, I.; Lieberman, D.; Horowitz, S.; Friedman, M. G.; Leiononen, M.; Horovitz, O.; Manor, E.; Porath, A.

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The purpose of this study was to assess the causes of community-acquired pneumonia in adult patients admitted to hospital. METHODS: A prospective study was performed on 346 consecutive adult patients (54% men) of mean (SD) 49.3 (19.5) years (range 17-94) admitted to a university affiliated regional hospital in southern Israel with community-acquired pneumonia over a period of one year. Convalescent serum samples were obtained from 308 patients (89%). The aetiological diagnosis for community-acquired pneumonia was based on positive blood cultures and/or significant changes in antibody titres to Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, Moraxella catarrhalis, respiratory viruses, Coxiella burnetii, Mycoplasma pneumoniae, Chlamydia pneumoniae, and Legionella sp. RESULTS: The aetiology of community-acquired pneumonia was identified in 279 patients (80.6%). The distribution of causal agents was as follows: S pneumoniae, 148 patients (42.8%); M pneumoniae, 101 (29.2%); C pneumoniae, 62 (17.9%); Legionella sp, 56 (16.2%); respiratory viruses, 35 (10.1%); C burnetii, 20 (5.8%); H influenzae 19 (5.5%); and other causes, 21 patients (6.0%). In patients above the age of 55 years C pneumoniae was the second most frequent aetiological agent (25.5%). In 133 patients (38.4%) more than one causal agent was found. CONCLUSIONS: The causal agents for community-acquired pneumonia in Israel are different from those described in other parts of the world. In many of the patients more than one causal agent was found. In all these patients treatment should include a macrolide antibiotic, at least in the first stage of their illness. PMID:8711652

  15. Long-term mortality of hospitalized pneumonia in the EPIC-Norfolk cohort.

    PubMed

    Myint, P K; Hawkins, K R; Clark, A B; Luben, R N; Wareham, N J; Khaw, K-T; Wilson, A M

    2016-03-01

    Little is known about cause-specific long-term mortality beyond 30 days in pneumonia. We aimed to compare the mortality of patients with hospitalized pneumonia compared to age- and sex-matched controls beyond 30 days. Participants were drawn from the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer (EPIC)-Norfolk prospective population study. Hospitalized pneumonia cases were identified from record linkage (ICD-10: J12-J18). For this study we excluded people with hospitalized pneumonia who died within 30 days. Each case identified was matched to four controls and followed up until the end June 2012 (total 15 074 person-years, mean 6·1 years, range 0·08-15·2 years). Cox regression models were constructed to examine the all-cause, respiratory and cardiovascular mortality using date of pneumonia onset as baseline with binary pneumonia status as exposure. A total of 2465 men and women (503 cases, 1962 controls) [mean age (s.d.) 64·5 (8·3) years] were included in the study. Between a 30-day to 1-year period, hazard ratios (HRs) of all-cause and cardiovascular mortality were 7·3 [95% confidence interval (CI) 5·4-9·9] and 5·9 (95% CI 3·5-9·7), respectively (with very few respiratory deaths within the same period) in cases compared to controls after adjusting for age, sex, asthma, smoking status, pack years, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, diabetes, physical activity, waist-to-hip ratio, prevalent cardiovascular and respiratory diseases. All outcomes assessed also showed increased risk of death in cases compared to controls after 1 year; respiratory cause of death being the most significant during that period (HR 16·4, 95% CI 8·9-30·1). Hospitalized pneumonia was associated with increased all-cause and specific-cause mortality beyond 30 days.

  16. Osteopathic Manipulative Treatment as a Useful Adjunctive Tool for Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Sheldon; Hassani, John; Gagne, Martin; George, Gebe; Gilliar, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    Pneumonia, the inflammatory state of lung tissue primarily due to microbial infection, claimed 52,306 lives in the United States in 20071 and resulted in the hospitalization of 1.1 million patients2. With an average length of in-patient hospital stay of five days2, pneumonia and influenza comprise significant financial burden costing the United States $40.2 billion in 20053. Under the current Infectious Disease Society of America/American Thoracic Society guidelines, standard-of-care recommendations include the rapid administration of an appropriate antibiotic regiment, fluid replacement, and ventilation (if necessary). Non-standard therapies include the use of corticosteroids and statins; however, these therapies lack conclusive supporting evidence4. (Figure 1) Osteopathic Manipulative Treatment (OMT) is a cost-effective adjunctive treatment of pneumonia that has been shown to reduce patients’ length of hospital stay, duration of intravenous antibiotics, and incidence of respiratory failure or death when compared to subjects who received conventional care alone5. The use of manual manipulation techniques for pneumonia was first recorded as early as the Spanish influenza pandemic of 1918, when patients treated with standard medical care had an estimated mortality rate of 33%, compared to a 10% mortality rate in patients treated by osteopathic physicians6. When applied to the management of pneumonia, manual manipulation techniques bolster lymphatic flow, respiratory function, and immunological defense by targeting anatomical structures involved in the these systems7,8, 9, 10. The objective of this review video-article is three-fold: a) summarize the findings of randomized controlled studies on the efficacy of OMT in adult patients with diagnosed pneumonia, b) demonstrate established protocols utilized by osteopathic physicians treating pneumonia, c) elucidate the physiological mechanisms behind manual manipulation of the respiratory and lymphatic systems

  17. Rare idiopathic interstitial pneumonias: LIP and PPFE and rare histologic patterns of interstitial pneumonias: AFOP and BPIP.

    PubMed

    Kokosi, Maria A; Nicholson, Andrew G; Hansell, David M; Wells, Athol U

    2016-05-01

    In the 2013 reclassification of the idiopathic interstitial pneumonias (IIPs), two rare IIPs (idiopathic lymphoid interstitial pneumonia (LIP), idiopathic pleuroparenchymal fibroelastosis (IPPFE)) and two rare histologic patterns (acute fibrinous and organizing pneumonia (AFOP), bronchiolocentric pattern of interstitial pneumonia (BPIP)) are described. All these entities are rare with small series published to date, mostly containing primary and secondary forms of disease. LIP is histologically characterized by diffuse polyclonal lymphoid cell infiltrate surrounding the airways and expanding the interstitium. Thin-walled cysts and diffuse ground glass are considered the typical radiologic features. The clinical course is highly variable with corticosteroid responsiveness evident in approximately half of cases. IPPFE is defined histologically by coexisting upper lobe pleural and intra-alveolar fibrosis with elastosis. Dense subpleural irregular fibrosis and consolidation are the cardinal radiologic features. A history of recurrent lower respiratory tract infection is frequent. Responses to immunomodulation have not been reported and the rate of progression appears to be highly variable. AFOP is a rare histologic pattern lying within the spectrum of acute/subacute lung injury, characterized by organizing pneumonia and intra-alveolar fibrin deposition without hyaline membranes. BPIP is characterized histologically by fibrosis and/or inflammation confined to the alveolar interstitium around bronchovascular bundles, overlapping with peribronchial metaplasia and fibrosis in some series. Currently, AFOP and BPIP are both best viewed as histological entities rather than true clinical disorders, in the absence of characteristic associated imaging patterns and clinical features.

  18. The polysaccharide capsule of Streptococcus pneumonia partially impedes MyD88-mediated immunity during pneumonia in mice.

    PubMed

    de Vos, Alex F; Dessing, Mark C; Lammers, Adriana J J; de Porto, Alexander P N A; Florquin, Sandrine; de Boer, Onno J; de Beer, Regina; Terpstra, Sanne; Bootsma, Hester J; Hermans, Peter W; van 't Veer, Cornelis; van der Poll, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLR) and the downstream adaptor protein MyD88 are considered crucial for protective immunity during bacterial infections. Streptococcus (S.) pneumoniae is a human respiratory pathogen and a large majority of clinical pneumococcal isolates expresses an external polysaccharide capsule. We here sought to determine the role of pneumococcal capsule in MyD88-mediated antibacterial defense during S. pneumonia pneumonia. Wild type (WT) and Myd88(-/-) mice were inoculated intranasally with serotype 2 S. pneumoniae D39 or with an isogenic capsule locus deletion mutant (D39∆cps), and analysed for bacterial outgrowth and inflammatory responses in the lung. As compared to WT mice, Myd88(-/-) mice infected with D39 demonstrated a modestly impaired bacterial clearance accompanied by decreased inflammatory responses in the lung. Strikingly, while WT mice rapidly cleared D39∆cps, Myd88(-/-) mice showed 105-fold higher bacterial burdens in their lungs and dissemination to blood 24 hours after infection. These data suggest that the pneumococcal capsule impairs recognition of TLR ligands expressed by S. pneumoniae and thereby partially impedes MyD88-mediated antibacterial defense.

  19. Community-Acquired Pneumonia Requiring Hospitalization among U.S. Children

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Seema; Williams, Derek J.; Arnold, Sandra R.; Ampofo, Krow; Bramley, Anna M.; Reed, Carrie; Stockmann, Chris; Anderson, Evan J.; Grijalva, Carlos G.; Self, Wesley H.; Zhu, Yuwei; Patel, Anami; Hymas, Weston; Chappell, James D.; Kaufman, Robert A.; Kan, J. Herman; Dansie, David; Lenny, Noel; Hillyard, David R.; Haynes, Lia M.; Levine, Min; Lindstrom, Stephen; Winchell, Jonas M.; Katz, Jacqueline M.; Erdman, Dean; Schneider, Eileen; Hicks, Lauri A.; Wunderink, Richard G.; Edwards, Kathryn M.; Pavia, Andrew T.; McCullers, Jonathan A.; Finelli, Lyn

    2015-01-01

    Background U.S. incidence estimates of pediatric community-acquired pneumonia hospitalizations based on prospective data collection are limited. Updated estimates with radiographic confirmation and current laboratory diagnostics are needed. Methods We conducted active population-based surveillance for community-acquired pneumonia requiring hospitalization among children <18 years in three hospitals in Memphis, Nashville, and Salt Lake City. We excluded children with recent hospitalization and severe immunosuppression. Blood and respiratory specimens were systematically collected for pathogen detection by multiple modalities. Chest radiographs were independently reviewed by study radiologists. We calculated population-based incidence rates of community-acquired pneumonia hospitalizations, overall and by age and pathogen. Results From January 2010-June 2012, we enrolled 2638 (69%) of 3803 eligible children; 2358 (89%) had radiographic pneumonia. Median age was 2 years (interquartile range 1-6); 497 (21%) children required intensive care, and three (<1%) died. Among 2222 children with radiographic pneumonia and specimens available for both bacterial and viral testing, a viral and/or bacterial pathogen was detected in 1802 (81%); ≥1 virus in 1472 (66%), bacteria in 175 (8%), and bacterial-viral co-detection in 155 (7%). Annual pneumonia incidence was 15.7/10,000 children [95% confidence interval (CI) 14.9-16.5], with highest rates among children <2 years [62.2/10,000 (CI 57.6-67.1)]. Respiratory syncytial virus (37% vs. 8%), adenovirus (15% vs. 3%), and human metapneumovirus (15% vs. 8%) were more commonly detected in children <5 years compared with older children; Mycoplasma pneumoniae (19% vs. 3%) was more common in children ≥5 years. Conclusions Pediatric community-acquired pneumonia hospitalization burden was highest among the very young, with respiratory viruses most commonly detected. PMID:25714161

  20. [Ventilator-associated pneumonia and other infections].

    PubMed

    Bobik, Piotr; Siemiątkowski, Andrzej

    2014-01-01

    One of the fundamental elements of therapy in patients hospitalised in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) is mechanical ventilation (MV). MV enables sufficient gas exchange in patients with severe respiratory insufficiency, thus preserving the proper functioning of organs and systems. However, clinical and experimental studies show that mechanical ventilation may cause severe complications, e.g. lung injury (VALI, VILI), systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS), and, on rare occasions, multiple organ failure (MOF). Mechanical ventilation and especially endotracheal intubation are associated also with higher risk of infectious complications of the respiratory system: ventilator-associated respiratory infection (VARI) and ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP). The complications of the MV listed above have a significant influence on the length of treatment and also on the increase of the costs of therapy and mortality of patients who stay in an ICU. These negative effects of supported breathing are the reasons for intensive research to find new biological markers of inflammation and lung injury, more sensitive and specific diagnostic instruments, more effective methods of therapy, and programs of prevention. The purpose of this article is the presentation of current knowledge concerning VAP-related infections, to allow pulmonologists and general practitioners to become more familiar with the problem. Basic and the most important data concerning the definition, epidemiology, pathophysiology, microbiology, diagnostics, treatment, and prevention of VAP have been included. Additionally, ventilator-associated tracheobronchitis (VAT) was discussed.

  1. A prospective comparison of nursing- and healthcare-associated pneumonia (NHCAP) with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP).

    PubMed

    Fukuyama, Hajime; Yamashiro, Shin; Tamaki, Hitoshi; Kishaba, Tomoo

    2013-08-01

    Nursing- and healthcare-associated pneumonia (NHCAP) has been proposed by the Japanese Respiratory Society as a new category of pneumonia considering the characteristics of the Japanese medical care environment. It is necessary to ascertain the epidemiology and clinical outcomes of NHCAP. A prospective study was conducted of patients with pneumonia who were hospitalized at our hospital from August 2011 to July 2012. We compared 192 cases of NHCAP with 114 cases of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). Compared with CAP, NHCAP had a higher disease severity, higher 30-day mortality rate (10.9 vs. 3.5 %, P = 0.022), and longer length of hospital stay (median, 12 vs. 8 days, P < 0.001). Streptococcus pneumoniae was the most frequent causative pathogen in both NHCAP and CAP (33.9 vs. 34.8 %, P = 0.896). The incidence of atypical pathogens in NHCAP was low (1.7 %). Multidrug-resistant (MDR) pathogens were isolated more frequently in NHCAP than in CAP, but there was no significant difference (11.0 vs. 4.5 %, P = 0.135). Among 192 NHCAP patients, 122 (63.5 %) were aspiration pneumonia. Aspiration pneumonia was associated with poor outcomes and was considered a major characteristic of NHCAP. Our study suggested that many patients with NHCAP do not need broad-spectrum antibiotic therapy targeting MDR pathogens. Excess mortality in NHCAP patients is the result of patient backgrounds or disease severity rather than the presence of MDR pathogens.

  2. Healthcare-Associated Pneumonia among United States Combat Casualties, 2009–2010

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Heather C.; Weintrob, Amy C.; Conger, Nicholas G.; Li, Ping; Lu, Dan; Tribble, David R.; Murray, Clinton K.

    2014-01-01

    Although there is literature evaluating infectious complications associated with combat-related injuries from Iraq and Afghanistan, none have evaluated pneumonia specifically. Therefore, we assessed a series of pneumonia cases among wounded military personnel admitted to Landstuhl Regional Medical Center, and then evacuated further to participating U.S. military hospitals. Of the 423 casualties evacuated to the U.S., 36 developed pneumonia (8.5%) and 30 of these (83.3%) were ventilator-associated. Restricting to 162 subjects admitted to intensive care, 30 patients had pneumonia (18.5%). The median Injury Severity Score was higher among subjects with pneumonia (23.0, versus 6.0; p<0.01). There were 61 first-isolate respiratory specimens recovered from 31 pneumonia subjects, of which 56.1% were gram-negative, 18.2% were gram-positive, and 18.2% were fungal. Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were most commonly recovered (10.6%, and 9.1%, respectively). Thirteen bacterial isolates (26.5%) were multidrug-resistant. Outcome data were available for 32 patients, of which 26 resolved their infection without progression, 5 resolved after initial progression, and 1 died. Overall, combat-injured casualties suffer a relatively high rate of pneumonia, particularly those requiring mechanical ventilation. Although gram-negative pathogens were common, S. aureus was most frequently isolated. Continued focus on pneumonia prevention strategies is necessary for improving combat care. PMID:25562865

  3. Acute Chlamydia pneumoniae infections in asthmatic and non-asthmatic military conscripts during a non-epidemic period.

    PubMed

    Juvonen, R; Bloigu, A; Paldanius, M; Peitso, A; Silvennoinen-Kassinen, S; Harju, T; Leinonen, M; Saikku, P

    2008-03-01

    Chlamydia pneumoniae respiratory tract infections were studied in 512 male military conscripts (123 asthmatic and 389 non-asthmatic) taking part in 180-day service between July 2004 and July 2005 in Kajaani, Finland. Respiratory tract infections requiring a medical consultation were analysed prospectively. At baseline, at end of service, and during each episode of respiratory infection, blood samples were obtained for measurement of C. pneumoniae antibodies. Data concerning the clinical features of each infection episode were collected. Serological evidence of acute C. pneumoniae infection was found in 34 of the 512 conscripts with antibody data available, including 9.8% of the asthmatic subjects and 5.7% of the non-asthmatic subjects (p 0.111). A serological diagnosis could be made for 25 clinical episodes in 24 conscripts. The spectrum of respiratory tract infections included 13 episodes of mild upper respiratory tract infection and seven episodes of sinusitis, with five episodes involving asthma exacerbation. Two of three pneumonias were primary infections. Primary infections were diagnosed in five subjects, and re-infection/reactivation in 19 subjects, with the latter comprising 12 non-asthmatic subjects and seven asthmatic subjects (p 0.180). Prolonged infections were present in six asthmatic subjects and one non-asthmatic subject (p 0.001). A wide variety of respiratory tract infections, ranging from common cold to pneumonia, were associated with serologically confirmed C. pneumoniae infections. Infections were often mild, with common cold and sinusitis being the most common manifestations. Acute, rapidly resolved C. pneumoniae infections were equally common among asthmatic subjects and non-asthmatic subjects, whereas prolonged infections were more common among subjects with asthma.

  4. An investigation of enzootic Glasser's disease in a specific-pathogen-free grower-finisher facility using restriction endonuclease analysis.

    PubMed

    Smart, N L; Hurnik, D; Macinnes, J I

    1993-08-01

    Enzootic Glassers's disease was investigated to study the epidemiology of the disease strains on a farm where it presented a problem. Restriction endonuclease fingerprinting (REF) analysis technique was used, as all strains of Haemophilus parasuis are biochemically similar and many strains are biochemically untypable. After young weaned pigs were moved from farm A to farm B, Glasser's disease routinely occurred despite the use of antibiotics and a commercial bacterin. Isolates were taken from the nasal passages and from carcasses of clinically affected cases and subjected to REF analysis. Haemophilus parasuis was not isolated from any of the pigs on farm A, but it was isolated from 7/10 and 5/10 nasal swabs taken from farm B. Two H. parasuis strains isolated from clinical cases of Glasser's disease from farm B had an identical REF pattern, but were different from the nasal swabs and the H. parasuis strain contained in the bacterin. The subsequent use of a custom autogenous bacterin made from a clinical isolate of H. parasuis reduced the mortality rate on farm B. This investigation indicates that nasal isolates of H. parasuis are different than those causing clinical disease, and not all bacterin strains are cross protective for other strains.

  5. Detection and typing by molecular techniques of respiratory viruses in children hospitalized for acute respiratory infection in Rome, Italy.

    PubMed

    Pierangeli, Alessandra; Gentile, Massimo; Di Marco, Paola; Pagnotti, Paolo; Scagnolari, Carolina; Trombetti, Simona; Lo Russo, Lelia; Tromba, Valeria; Moretti, Corrado; Midulla, Fabio; Antonelli, Guido

    2007-04-01

    Detection of a broad number of respiratory viruses is not undertaken currently for the diagnosis of acute respiratory infection due to the large and always increasing list of pathogens involved. A 1-year study was undertaken on children hospitalized consecutively for acute respiratory infection in a Pediatric Department in Rome to characterize the viruses involved. Two hundred twenty-seven children were enrolled in the study with a diagnosis of asthma, bronchiolitis, bronchopneumonia, or laringo-tracheo bronchitis. A molecular approach was adopted using specific reverse transcription (RT)-PCR assays detecting 13 respiratory viruses including metapneumovirus (hMPV) and the novel coronaviruses NL63 and HKU1; most amplified fragments were sequenced to confirm positive results and differentiate the strain. Viral pathogens were detected in 97 samples (42.7%), with 4.8% of dual infections identified; respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) was detected in 17.2% of children, followed by rhinovirus (9.7%), parainfluenza virus type 3 (PIV3) (7.5%), and influenza type A (4.4%). Interestingly, more than half the patients (9/17) that have rhinovirus as the sole respiratory pathogen had pneumonia. HMPV infected children below 3 years in two peaks in March and June causing bronchiolitis and pneumonia. One case of NL63 infection is described, documenting NL63 circulation in central Italy. In conclusion, the use of a comprehensive number of PCR-based tests is recommended to define the burden of viral pathogens in patients with respiratory tract infection.

  6. MyD88 is pivotal for the early inflammatory response and subsequent bacterial clearance and survival in a mouse model of Chlamydia pneumoniae pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Naiki, Yoshikazu; Michelsen, Kathrin S; Schröder, Nicolas W J; Alsabeh, Randa; Slepenkin, Anatoly; Zhang, Wenxuan; Chen, Shuang; Wei, Bo; Bulut, Yonca; Wong, Michelle H; Peterson, Ellena M; Arditi, Moshe

    2005-08-12

    Chlamydia pneumoniae is the causative agent of respiratory tract infections and a number of chronic diseases. Here we investigated the involvement of the common TLR adaptor molecule MyD88 in host responses to C. pneumoniae-induced pneumonia in mice. MyD88-deficient mice were severely impaired in their ability to mount an acute early inflammatory response toward C. pneumoniae. Although the bacterial burden in the lungs was comparable 5 days after infection, MyD88-deficient mice exhibited only minor signs of pneumonia and reduced expression of inflammatory mediators. MyD88-deficient mice were unable to up-regulate proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines, demonstrated delayed recruitment of CD8+ and CD4+ T cells to the lungs, and were unable to clear the pathogen from their lungs at day 14. At day 14 the MyD88-deficent mice developed a severe, chronic lung inflammation with elevated IL-1beta and IFN-gamma leading to increased mortality, whereas wild-type mice as well as TLR2- or TLR4-deficient mice recovered from acute pneumonia and did not show delayed bacterial clearance. Thus, MyD88 is essential to recognize C. pneumoniae infection and initiate a prompt and effective immune host response against this organism leading to clearance of bacteria from infected lungs.

  7. Investigation of a Chlamydia pneumoniae Outbreak in a Federal Correctional Facility in Texas

    PubMed Central

    Conklin, Laura; Adjemian, Jennifer; Loo, Jennifer; Mandal, Sema; Davis, Carol; Parks, Sharyn; Parsons, Tina; McDonough, Brian; Partida, Jorge; Thurman, Kathleen; Diaz, Maureen H.; Benitez, Alvaro; Pondo, Tracy; Whitney, Cynthia G.; Winchell, Jonas M.; Kendig, Newton; Van Beneden, Chris

    2015-01-01

    Background Chlamydia pneumoniae illness is poorly characterized, particularly as a sole causative pathogen. We investigated a C. pneumoniae outbreak at a federal correctional facility. Methods We identified inmates with acute respiratory illness (ARI) from 1 November 2009 to 24 February 2010 through clinic self-referral and active case finding. We tested oropharyngeal and/or nasopharyngeal swabs for C. pneumoniae by real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) and serum samples by microimmunofluorescence. Cases were inmates with ARI and radiologically confirmed pneumonia, positive qPCR, or serological evidence of recent infection. Swabs from 7 acutely ill inmates were tested for 18 respiratory pathogens using qPCR TaqMan Array Cards (TACs). Follow-up swabs from case patients were collected for up to 8 weeks. Results Among 33 self-referred and 226 randomly selected inmates, 52 (20.1%) met the case definition; pneumonia was confirmed in 4 by radiology only, in 9 by qPCR only, in 17 by serology only, and in 22 by both qPCR and serology. The prison attack rate was 10.4% (95% confidence interval, 7.0%–13.8%). White inmates and residents of housing unit Y were at highest risk. TAC testing detected C. pneumoniae in 4 (57%) inmates; no other causative pathogens were identified. Among 40 inmates followed prospectively, C. pneumoniae was detected for up to 8 weeks. Thirteen (52%) of 25 inmates treated with azithromycin continued to be qPCR positive >2 weeks after treatment. Conclusions Chlamydia pneumoniae was the causative pathogen of this outbreak. Higher risk among certain groups suggests that social interaction contributed to transmission. Persistence of C. pneumoniae in the oropharynx creates challenges for outbreak control measures. PMID:23723194

  8. Recognition and management of respiratory dysfunction in children with tetraplegia.

    PubMed

    Porth, Susan C

    2004-01-01

    Children less than 15 years of age comprise approximately 3% to 5% of all new spinal injuries each year. Approximately one third of these children sustain injuries to the cervical spine. Respiratory complications of spinal cord injuries at the level of C5 and above may include diaphragm dysfunction, retained airway secretions, recurrent aspiration, nocturnal hypoventilation, and respiratory failure. Although most newly injured children with cervical injuries above the level of C5 will require mechanical ventilation acutely, many eventually will be able to be weaned from technology. Despite their ability to breathe without mechanical support, these children often develop ongoing issues associated with respiratory compromise, which interfere with daily activities and can negatively affect quality of life. Poor endurance, failure to thrive, recurrent pneumonia, and sleep-disordered breathing all may be indications of significant respiratory dysfunction. This article describes assessment tools and management strategies aimed at supporting optimal health and preventing recurrent complications associated with unrecognized or untreated respiratory dysfunction.

  9. [Respiratory allergies].

    PubMed

    Chiriac, Anca Mirela; Demoly, Pascal

    2013-04-01

    Respiratory allergies represent a global and public health problem, due to their prevalence (still increasing), morbidity, impact on the quality of life and costs for the society. They mainly concern rhinitis (or rhinoconjunctivitis) and asthma. The diagnosis of allergy is dependent on a history of symptoms on exposure to an allergen together with the detection of allergen-specific IgE. Accurate diagnosis of allergies opens up therapeutic options that are otherwise not appropriate, such as allergen immunotherapy and allergen avoidance, that are prescribed following a stepwise approach. It has been a century since the first trial in specific immunotherapy was performed and this still remains the only disease modifying treatment for allergic individuals. In terms of route of administration, sublingual immunotherapy represents a good alternative to subcutaneous immunotherapy, considering its proven efficacy and better safety profile.

  10. Detection of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae by polymerase chain reaction in swine presenting respiratory problems

    PubMed Central

    Yamaguti, M.; Muller, E.E.; Piffer, A.I.; Kich, J.D.; Klein, C.S.; Kuchiishi, S.S.

    2008-01-01

    Since Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae isolation in appropriate media is a difficult task and impractical for daily routine diagnostics, Nested-PCR (N-PCR) techniques are currently used to improve the direct diagnostic sensitivity of Swine Enzootic Pneumonia. In a first experiment, this paper describes a N-PCR technique optimization based on three variables: different sampling sites, sample transport media, and DNA extraction methods, using eight pigs. Based on the optimization results, a second experiment was conducted for testing validity using 40 animals. In conclusion, the obtained results of the N-PCR optimization and validation allow us to recommend this test as a routine monitoring diagnostic method for Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae infection in swine herds. PMID:24031248

  11. Lungs and Respiratory System

    MedlinePlus

    ... Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Lungs and Respiratory System KidsHealth > For Parents > Lungs and Respiratory System Print ... ll have taken at least 600 million breaths. Respiratory System Basics All of this breathing couldn't happen ...

  12. Lungs and Respiratory System

    MedlinePlus

    ... Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Lungs and Respiratory System KidsHealth > For Parents > Lungs and Respiratory System A ... ll have taken at least 600 million breaths. Respiratory System Basics All of this breathing couldn't happen ...

  13. Osteopontin promotes host defense during Klebsiella pneumoniae-induced pneumonia.

    PubMed

    van der Windt, G J W; Hoogerwerf, J J; de Vos, A F; Florquin, S; van der Poll, T

    2010-12-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae is a common cause of nosocomial pneumonia. Osteopontin (OPN) is a phosphorylated glycoprotein involved in inflammatory processes, some of which is mediated by CD44. The aim of this study was to determine the role of OPN during K. pneumoniae-induced pneumonia. Wild-type (WT) and OPN knockout (KO) mice were intranasally infected with 10⁴ colony forming units of K. pneumoniae, or administered Klebsiella lipopolysaccharides (LPS). In addition, recombinant OPN (rOPN) was intranasally administered to WT and CD44 KO mice. During Klebsiella pneumonia, WT mice displayed elevated pulmonary and plasma OPN levels. OPN KO and WT mice showed similar pulmonary bacterial loads 6 h after infection; thereafter, Klebsiella loads were higher in lungs of OPN KO mice and the mortality rate in this group was higher than in WT mice. Early neutrophil recruitment into the bronchoalveolar space was impaired in the absence of OPN after intrapulmonary delivery of either Klebsiella bacteria or Klebsiella LPS. Moreover, rOPN induced neutrophil migration into the bronchoalveolar space, independent from CD44. In vitro, OPN did not affect K. pneumoniae growth or neutrophil function. In conclusion, OPN levels were rapidly increased in the bronchoalveolar space during K. pneumoniae pneumonia, where OPN serves a chemotactic function towards neutrophils, thereby facilitating an effective innate immune response.

  14. Idiopathic endogenous lipoid pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Aman; Ohri, Shivani; Bambery, Pradeep; Singh, Surjit

    2006-01-01

    Lipoid pneumonia is a rare pulmonary disorder having no classical radiological appearance. We report a 33-year-old male, ex-smoker who was referred to us with history of cough, mild mucoid expectoration and progressively increasing dyspnoea since one year. He was investigated at local hospital and was treated with 30 mg prednisolone per day for 6 months for sarcoidosis without any response. On examination, he was normal except for fine basal crepitations in chest. Pulmonary function test (PFT) revealed mild airway obstruction. High resolution computerised tomographic scan (HRCT scan) revealed bilateral reticulonodular shadows and bronchiectasis in lower zones. Open lung biopsy revealed lipoid pneumonia. As there was no history of nasal distillation of oils, it was diagnosed to be idiopathic. The relevant literature is reviewed.

  15. Aspiration Pneumonia After Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Armstrong, John R.; Mosher, Benjamin D.

    2011-01-01

    Fifteen million strokes occur worldwide each year with 5 million associated deaths and an additional 5 million people left permanently disabled. In the United States, about 780 000 people suffer a new or recurrent stroke each year. There were an estimated total 5.8 million stroke survivors as of 2008. Mortality from stroke is the third leading cause of death in America following heart disease and cancer. Chest infection may affect up to as many as one-third of stroke patients. This increases the morbidity and mortality of this patient population. Pneumonia causes the highest attributable mortality of all medical complications following stroke. A comprehensive multidisciplinary team approach is required at the hospital level. This requires active administrative commitment and participation. Implementation of evidence-based management strategies can improve outcomes and reduce costs. We sought to review the problem of post-stroke pneumonia and discuss strategies for prevention and intervention. PMID:23983842

  16. Pneumonia in renal transplant patients.

    PubMed Central

    Bowie, D. M.; Marrie, T. J.; Janigan, D. T.; MacKeen, A. D.; Belitsky, P.; MacDonald, A. S.; Lannon, S. G.; Cohen, A. D.

    1983-01-01

    Between January 1976 and March 1982, 28 episodes of pneumonia occurred in 26 renal transplant patients. The overall mortality rate was 46%. Of the 16 patients with nosocomial pneumonia 9 (56%) died, whereas of the 12 patients with community-acquired pneumonia 4 (33%) died. In all 9 cases of unknown cause the response to empiric treatment was prompt, whereas in 4 of the 10 cases of monomicrobial pneumonia and 8 of the 9 cases of polymicrobial pneumonia the patient died. Cytomegalovirus was the sole cause of the pneumonia in two patients and a contributing cause, along with aerobic gram-negative bacteria, in another five, four of whom also had a fungal infection. Two patients, both of whom survived, had nosocomial Legionnaires' disease. PMID:6342741

  17. Electrocardiogram in pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Stein, Paul D; Matta, Fadi; Ekkah, Maan; Saleh, Tarek; Janjua, Muhammad; Patel, Yash R; Khadra, Helmi

    2012-12-15

    Findings on electrocardiogram may hint that pulmonary embolism (PE) is present when interpreted in the proper context and lead to definitive imaging tests. However, it would be useful to know if electrocardiographic (ECG) abnormalities also occur in patients with pneumonia and whether these are similar to ECG changes with PE. The purpose of this investigation was to determine ECG findings in patients with pneumonia. We retrospectively evaluated 62 adults discharged with a diagnosis of pneumonia who had no previous cardiopulmonary disease and had electrocardiogram obtained during hospitalization. The most prevalent ECG abnormality, other than sinus tachycardia, was minor nonspecific ST-segment or T-wave changes occurring in 13 of 62 (21%). Right atrial enlargement occurred in 4 of 62 (6.5%). QRS abnormalities were observed in 24 of 62 (39%). Right-axis deviation and S(1)S(2)S(3) were the most prevalent QRS abnormalities, which occurred in 6 of 62 (9.7%). Complete right bundle branch block and S(1)Q(3)T(3) pattern occurred in 3 of 62 (4.8%). ECG abnormalities that were not present within 1 month previously or abnormalities that disappeared within 1 month included left-axis deviation, right-axis deviation, right atrial enlargement, right ventricular hypertrophy, S(1)S(2)S(3), S(1)Q(3)T(3), low-voltage QRS complexes, and nonspecific ST-segment or T-wave abnormalities. In conclusion, electrocardiogram in patients with pneumonia often shows QRS abnormalities or nonspecific ST-segment or T-wave changes. ECG findings are similar to ECG abnormalities in PE and electrocardiogram cannot assist in the differential diagnosis.

  18. Acinetobacter Pneumonia: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Hartzell, Joshua D.; Kim, Andrew S.; Kortepeter, Mark G.; Moran, Kimberly A.

    2007-01-01

    Acinetobacter species are becoming a major cause of nosocomial infections, including hospital-acquired and ventilator-associated pneumonia. Acinetobacter species have become increasingly resistant to antibiotics over the past several years and currently present a significant challenge in treating these infections. Physicians now rely on older agents, such as polymyxins (colistin), for treatment. This paper reviews the epidemiology, treatment, and prevention of this emerging pathogen. PMID:18092011

  19. Motility of Mycoplasma pneumoniae.

    PubMed Central

    Radestock, U; Bredt, W

    1977-01-01

    Cell of Mycoplasma pneumoniae FH gliding on a glass surface in liquid medium were examined by microscopic observation and quantitatively by microcinematography (30 frames per min). Comparisons were made only within the individual experiments. The cells moved in an irregular pattern with numerous narrow bends and circles. They never changed their leading end. The average speed (without pauses) was relatively constant between o.2 and 0.5 mum/s. The maximum speed was about 1.5 to 2.0 mum/s. The movements were interrupted by resting periods of different lengths and frequency. Temperature, viscosity, pH, and the presence of yeast extract in the medium influenced the motility significantly; changes in glucose, calcium ions, and serum content were less effective. The movements were affected by iodoacetate, p-mercuribenzoate, and mitomycin C at inhibitory or subinhibitory concentrations. Sodium fluoride, sodium cyanide, dinitrophenol, chloramphenicol, puromycin, cholchicin, and cytochalasin B at minimal inhibitory concentrations did not affect motility. The movements were effectively inhibited by anti-M. pneumoniae antiserum. Studies with absorbed antiserum suggested that the surface components involved in motility are heat labile. The gliding of M. pneumoniae cells required an intact energy metabolism and the proteins involved seemed to have a low turnover. Images PMID:14925

  20. The Lignan-containing Extract of Schisandra chinensis Berries Inhibits the Growth of Chlamydia pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Hakala, Elina; Hanski, Leena L; Yrjönen, Teijo; Vuorela, Heikki J; Vuorela, Pia M

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect and selectivity of an extract of Schisandra chinensis berries against Chlamydia pneumoniae and C. trachomatis. Among the ethnopharmacological uses of the extract from Schisandrae fructus are cough and pneumonia. Therefore we focused on respiratory pathogens. The extract completely inhibited the growth of C. pneumoniae strain CV6 at 250 μg/mL concentration. The inhibition of C. pneumoniae and C. trachomatis growth was dose dependent and established with three different strains. The extract inhibited C. pneumoniae production of infectious progeny in a dose dependent manner. Chlamydia selectivity was elucidated with growth inhibition measurements of three other respiratory bacterial species. A pure compound found in Schisandra chinensis berries, schisandrin B at 20.0 μg/mL concentration inhibited the growth of both C. pneumoniae and C. trachomatis. The extract was found to be non-toxic to the human host cells. These findings highlight the potential of the extract from Schisandra chinensis berries as a source for antichlamydial compounds.

  1. Fluoroquinolones in community-acquired pneumonia: guide to selection and appropriate use.

    PubMed

    Frei, Christopher R; Labreche, Matthew J; Attridge, Russell T

    2011-04-16

    Fluoroquinolone use has dramatically increased since the introduction of the first respiratory fluoroquinolone in the late 1990s. Over a relatively brief period of time, the respiratory fluoroquinolones have supplanted other first-line options as the predominant community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) therapy in hospitals. This article discusses the rise of the fluoroquinolone era, debates the comparative effectiveness of fluoroquinolones for CAP therapy, examines fluoroquinolone resistance and adverse drug reactions, and discusses new trends in pneumonia epidemiology and outcomes assessment. Overall, published data suggest that fluoroquinolone monotherapy is associated with improved patient survival compared with β-lactam monotherapy and similar survival to β-lactam plus macrolide combination therapy. Fluoroquinolone monotherapy may be associated with shorter hospital length of stay compared with β-lactam plus macrolide combination therapy, particularly in severe pneumonia or with high-dose therapy. There is insufficient evidence to conclude that any individual fluoroquinolone therapy is better than another with regards to patient mortality. Fluoroquinolones are generally well tolerated and Streptococcus pneumoniae resistance remains low; however, rare but serious adverse effects have been reported. Some members of the fluoroquinolone class have been removed from the market amidst safety concerns. Pneumonia classifications have changed and antipseudomonal fluoroquinolones may have a role in healthcare-associated pneumonia when administered in combination with other antipseudomonal and anti-methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus therapies.

  2. Bronchiolitis Obliterans with Organizing Pneumonia (BOOP)

    MedlinePlus

    ... What can you tell me about cryptogenic organizing pneumonia? Answers from Teng Moua, M.D. Previously called bronchiolitis obliterans with organizing pneumonia, cryptogenic organizing pneumonia (COP) is a rare lung ...

  3. Coma blisters with hypoxemic respiratory failure.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Abhishek; Bansal, Meghana; Conner, Kelly

    2012-03-15

    A 24-year-old woman with quadriplegia was admitted with respiratory failure because of pneumonia. She was on multiple medications including diazepam, oxycodone, and amitriptyline, known to be associated with coma blisters, though she did not overdose on any of them. On hospital day 2, she developed multiple blisters on both sides of her right forearm and hand. Skin biopsy showed eccrine gland degeneration consistent with coma blisters. It was felt that hypoxemia from her pneumonia contributed to the development of these blisters, which occurred on both pressure and non-pressure bearing areas of the arm. Coma blisters are self-limited skin lesions that occur at sites of maximal pressure, mostly in the setting of drug overdose. However, coma blisters may occur with metabolic and neurological conditions resulting in coma.

  4. Phylogenetic clades of ovine progressive pneumonia virus (OPPV) associate with sheep TMEM154 genotypes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ovine progressive pneumonia virus (OPPV) is a lentivirus within the Retroviridae family that infects sheep. OPPV-induced clinical disease progresses slowly over time and manifests primarily in the lungs and central nervous system. Symptoms include weight loss, respiratory distress, and inevitably ...

  5. Identification of Bordetella bronchseptica in fatal pneumonia of dogs and cats

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Infection with Bordetella bronchiseptica is a common cause of tracheobronchitis and upper respiratory disease in dogs and cats, but it can also lead to fatal pneumonia. Identification of this pathogen is important due the risk of transmission to other animals, availability of vaccines and potential...

  6. Molecular Epidemiology of Colonizing and Infecting Isolates of Klebsiella pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Rebekah M.; Cao, Jie; Brisse, Sylvain; Passet, Virginie; Wu, Weisheng; Zhao, Lili; Malani, Preeti N.; Rao, Krishna

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Klebsiella pneumoniae is among the most common causes of hospital-acquired infections and has emerged as an urgent threat to public health due to carbapenem antimicrobial resistance. K. pneumoniae commonly colonizes hospitalized patients and causes extraintestinal infections such as urinary tract infection, bloodstream infection (septicemia), and pneumonia. If colonization is an intermediate step before infection, then detection and characterization of colonizing isolates could enable strategies to prevent or empirically treat K. pneumoniae infections in hospitalized patients. However, the strength of the association between colonization and infection is unclear. To test the hypothesis that hospitalized patients become infected with their colonizing strain, 1,765 patients were screened for rectal colonization with K. pneumoniae, and extraintestinal isolates from these same patients were collected over a 3-month period in a cohort study design. The overall colonization prevalence was 23.0%. After adjustment for other patient factors, colonization was significantly associated with subsequent infection: 21 of 406 (5.2%) colonized patients later had extraintestinal infection, compared to 18 of 1,359 (1.3%) noncolonized patients (adjusted odds ratio [OR], 4.01; 95% confidence interval, 2.08 to 7.73; P < 0.001). Despite a high diversity of colonizing isolates, 7/7 respiratory, 4/4 urinary, and 2/5 bloodstream isolates from colonized patients matched the patient corresponding rectal swab isolates, based on wzi capsular typing, multilocus sequence typing (MLST), and whole-genome sequence analysis. These results suggest that K. pneumoniae colonization is directly associated with progression to extraintestinal infection. IMPORTANCE K. pneumoniae commonly infects hospitalized patients, and these infections are increasingly resistant to carbapenems, the antibiotics of last resort for life-threatening bacterial infections. To prevent and treat these infections, we

  7. Krypton-81m ventilation scanning: acute respiratory disease

    SciTech Connect

    Lavender, J.P.; Irving, H.; Armstrong, J.D. II

    1981-02-01

    From experience with 700 patients undergoing ventilation and perfusion lung scanning with krypton-81m/technetium-99m technique, 34 patients suffering from nonembolic acute respiratory disease were selected for review. In 16 patients with pneumonia, all had defects of ventilation corresponding to, or larger than, the radiologic consolidation. In 13 patients there was some preservation of perfusion in the consolidated region. In two of the three patients with matched defects, the pneumonia was of long standing. In seven patients with collapse or atelectasis and in 11 patients with acute reversible bronchial obstruction and normal volume lungs, a similar pattern or ventillation and perfusion was observed.

  8. Imaging of cavitary necrosis in complicated childhood pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Hodina, M; Hanquinet, S; Cotting, J; Schnyder, P; Gudinchet, F

    2002-02-01

    The aim of this study was to illustrate the chest radiographs (CR) and CT imaging features and sequential findings of cavitary necrosis in complicated childhood pneumonia. Among 30 children admitted in the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit for persistent or progressive pneumonia, respiratory distress or sepsis despite adequate antibiotic therapy, a study group of 9 children (5 girls and 4 boys; mean age 4 years) who had the radiographic features and CT criteria for cavitary necrosis complicated pneumonia was identified. The pathogens identified were Streptococcus pneumoniae( n=4), Aspergillus( n=2), Legionella( n=1), and Staphylococcus aureus( n=1). Sequential CR and CT scans were retrospectively reviewed. Follow-up CR and CT were evaluated for persistent abnormalities. Chest radiographs showed consolidations in 8 of the 9 patients. On CT examination, cavitary necrosis was localized to 1 lobe in 2 patients and 7 patients showed multilobar or bilateral areas of cavitary necrosis. In 3 patients of 9, the cavitary necrosis was initially shown on CT and visualization by CR was delayed by a time span varying from 5 to 9 days. In all patients with cavities, a mean number of five cavities were seen on antero-posterior CR, contrasting with the multiple cavities seen on CT. Parapneumonic effusions were shown by CR in 3 patients and in 5 patients by CT. Bronchopleural fistulae were demonstrated by CT alone ( n=3). No purulent pericarditis was demonstrated. The CT scan displayed persistent residual pneumatoceles of the left lower lobe in 2 patients. Computed tomography is able to define a more specific pattern of abnormalities than conventional CR in children with necrotizing pneumonia and allows an earlier diagnosis of this rapidly progressing condition. Lung necrosis and cavitation may also be associated with Aspergillus or Legionella pneumonia in the pediatric population.

  9. Dog Bite Histories and Response to Incidents in Canine Rabies-Enzootic KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Hergert, Melinda; Nel, Louis H.

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to report evaluated observations from survey records captured through a cross-sectional observational study regarding canine populations and dog owners in rabies enzootic KwaZulu-Natal province, South Africa. Our aim was to evaluate respondent knowledge of canine rabies and response to dog bite incidents towards improved rabies control. Six communities consisting of three land use types were randomly sampled from September 2009 to January 2011, using a cluster design. A total of 1992 household records were analyzed using descriptive statistics and regression modeling to evaluate source of rabies knowledge, experiences with dog bites, and factors affecting treatment received within respective households that occurred within the 365 day period prior to the surveys. 86% of the population surveyed had heard of rabies. Non-dog owners were 1.6 times more likely to have heard of rabies than dog owners; however, fear of rabies was not a reason for not owning a dog. Government veterinary services were reported most frequently as respondent source of rabies knowledge. Nearly 13% of households had a member bitten by a dog within the year prior to the surveys with 82% of the victims visiting a clinic as a response to the bite. 35% of these clinic visitors received at least one rabies vaccination. Regression modeling determined that the only response variable that significantly reflected the likelihood of a patient receiving rabies vaccination or not was the term for the area surveyed. Overall the survey showed that most respondents have heard of dog associated rabies and seek medical assistance at a clinic in response to a dog bite regardless of offending dog identification. An in-depth study involving factors associated within area clinics may highlight the area dependency for patients receiving rabies post exposure prophylaxis shown by this model. PMID:23593511

  10. Dog bite histories and response to incidents in canine rabies-enzootic KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa.

    PubMed

    Hergert, Melinda; Nel, Louis H

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to report evaluated observations from survey records captured through a cross-sectional observational study regarding canine populations and dog owners in rabies enzootic KwaZulu-Natal province, South Africa. Our aim was to evaluate respondent knowledge of canine rabies and response to dog bite incidents towards improved rabies control. Six communities consisting of three land use types were randomly sampled from September 2009 to January 2011, using a cluster design. A total of 1992 household records were analyzed using descriptive statistics and regression modeling to evaluate source of rabies knowledge, experiences with dog bites, and factors affecting treatment received within respective households that occurred within the 365 day period prior to the surveys. 86% of the population surveyed had heard of rabies. Non-dog owners were 1.6 times more likely to have heard of rabies than dog owners; however, fear of rabies was not a reason for not owning a dog. Government veterinary services were reported most frequently as respondent source of rabies knowledge. Nearly 13% of households had a member bitten by a dog within the year prior to the surveys with 82% of the victims visiting a clinic as a response to the bite. 35% of these clinic visitors received at least one rabies vaccination. Regression modeling determined that the only response variable that significantly reflected the likelihood of a patient receiving rabies vaccination or not was the term for the area surveyed. Overall the survey showed that most respondents have heard of dog associated rabies and seek medical assistance at a clinic in response to a dog bite regardless of offending dog identification. An in-depth study involving factors associated within area clinics may highlight the area dependency for patients receiving rabies post exposure prophylaxis shown by this model.

  11. Vector control improves survival of three species of prairie dogs (Cynomys) in areas considered enzootic for plague

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Biggins, Dean E.; Godbey, Jerry L.; Gage, Kenneth L.; Carter, Leon G.; Montenieri, John A.

    2010-01-01

    Plague causes periodic epizootics that decimate populations of prairie dogs (PDs) (Cynomys), but the means by which the causative bacterium (Yersinia pestis) persists between epizootics are poorly understood. Plague epizootics in PDs might arise as the result of introductions of Y. pestis from sources outside PD colonies. However, it remains possible that plague persists in PDs during interepizootic periods and is transmitted at low rates among highly susceptible individuals within and between their colonies. If this is true, application of vector control to reduce flea numbers might reduce mortality among PDs. To test whether vector control enhances PD survival in the absence of obvious plague epizootics, we reduced the numbers of fleas (vectors for Y. pestis) 96–98% (1 month posttreatment) on 15 areas involving three species of PDs (Cynomys leucurus, Cynomys parvidens in Utah, and Cynomys ludovicianus in Montana) during 2000–2004 using deltamethrin dust delivered into burrows as a pulicide. Even during years without epizootic plague, PD survival rates at dusted sites were 31–45% higher for adults and 2–34% higher for juveniles compared to survival rates at nondusted sites. Y. pestis was cultured from 49 of the 851 flea pools tested (6882 total fleas) and antibodies against Y. pestis were identified in serum samples from 40 of 2631 PDs. Although other explanations are possible, including transmission of other potentially fatal pathogens by fleas, ticks, or other ectoparasites, our results suggest that plague might be maintained indefinitely in PD populations in the absence of free epizootics and widespread mortality among these animals. If PDs and their fleas support enzootic cycles of plague transmission, there would be important implications for the conservation of these animals and other species.

  12. Repeated emergence of epidemic/epizootic Venezuelan equine encephalitis from a single genotype of enzootic subtype ID virus.

    PubMed Central

    Powers, A M; Oberste, M S; Brault, A C; Rico-Hesse, R; Schmura, S M; Smith, J F; Kang, W; Sweeney, W P; Weaver, S C

    1997-01-01

    Venezuelan equine encephalitis (VEE) epidemics and equine epizootics occurred periodically in the Americas from the 1920s until the early 1970s, when the causative viruses, subtypes IAB and IC, were postulated to have become extinct. Recent outbreaks in Columbia and Venezuela have renewed interest in the source of epidemic/epizootic viruses and their mechanism of interepizootic maintenance. We performed phylogenetic analyses of VEE virus isolates spanning the entire temporal and geographic range of strains available, using 857-nucleotide reverse transcription-PCR products including the E3 and E2 genes. Analyses indicated that epidemic/epizootic viruses are closely related to four distinct, enzootic subtype ID-like lineages. One of these lineages, which occurs in Columbia, Peru, and Venezuela, also included all of the epidemic/epizootic isolates; the remaining three ID-like lineages, which occur in Panama, Peru, Florida, coastal Ecuador, and southwestern Columbia, were apparently not associated with epizootic VEE emergence. Within the Columbia/Peru/Venezuela lineage, three distinct monophyletic groups of epidemic/epizootic viruses were delineated, indicating that VEE emergence has occurred independently at least three times (convergent evolution). Representative, complete E2 amino acid sequences were compared to identify potential determinants of equine virulence and epizootic emergence. Amino acids implicated previously in laboratory mouse attenuation generally did not vary among the natural isolates that we examined, indicating that they probably are not involved in equine virulence changes associated with VEE emergence. Most informative amino acids correlated with phylogenetic relationships rather than phenotypic characteristics, suggesting that VEE emergence has resulted from several distinct combinations of mutations that generate viruses with similar antigenic and equine virulence phenotypes. PMID:9261393

  13. Respiratory syncytial virus infection in adults.

    PubMed

    Falsey, Ann R

    2007-04-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a common winter time respiratory virus that affects persons of all ages and is the major cause of serious lower respiratory tract infections in young children. However, RSV is also an important pathogen in adults, particularly in the elderly, patients with chronic lung disease, or those with impaired immunity. Clinical features of RSV infections overlap with other respiratory viruses, so laboratory tests are required to establish the diagnosis. Reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) of samples from nasal swabs, sputum, or bronchoalveolar lavage is a sensitive test to substantiate the diagnosis. Serologies are useful in epidemiological surveys. The clinical course of RSV infections is variable. In infants, RSV presents as bronchiolitis. In adults, mild to moderate upper respiratory tract illness is characteristic. However, severe pneumonia can occur, particularly in the elderly with comorbidities or compromised immune status. Humoral antibodies confer partial immunity to RSV infection and disease severity; cellular immunity is important to eradicate RSV in established infections. Treatment of RSV infections is often supportive. Aerosolized ribavirin is approved for RSV infections in infants; its role in adults is controversial. Infection control measures are critical to limit spread of RSV. Currently, RSV vaccines are not available, but candidate vaccines are being developed.

  14. Klebsiella pneumoniae FimK Promotes Virulence in Murine Pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Rosen, David A; Hilliard, Julia K; Tiemann, Kristin M; Todd, Elizabeth M; Morley, S Celeste; Hunstad, David A

    2016-02-15

    Klebsiella pneumoniae, a chief cause of nosocomial pneumonia, is a versatile and commonly multidrug-resistant human pathogen for which further insight into pathogenesis is needed. We show that the pilus regulatory gene fimK promotes the virulence of K. pneumoniae strain TOP52 in murine pneumonia. This contrasts with the attenuating effect of fimK on urinary tract virulence, illustrating that a single factor may exert opposing effects on pathogenesis in distinct host niches. Loss of fimK in TOP52 pneumonia was associated with diminished lung bacterial burden, limited innate responses within the lung, and improved host survival. FimK expression was shown to promote serum resistance, capsule production, and protection from phagocytosis by host immune cells. Finally, while the widely used K. pneumoniae model strain 43816 produces rapid dissemination and death in mice, TOP52 caused largely localized pneumonia with limited lethality, thereby providing an alternative tool for studying K. pneumoniae pathogenesis and control within the lung.

  15. Bacteremic pneumonia caused by extensively drug-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Kang, Cheol-In; Baek, Jin Yang; Jeon, Kyeongman; Kim, So Hyun; Chung, Doo Ryeon; Peck, Kyong Ran; Lee, Nam Yong; Song, Jae-Hoon

    2012-12-01

    The emergence of antimicrobial resistance threatens the successful treatment of pneumococcal infections. Here we report a case of bacteremic pneumonia caused by an extremely drug-resistant strain of Streptococcus pneumoniae, nonsusceptible to at least one agent in all classes but vancomycin and linezolid, posing an important new public health threat in our region.

  16. mPneumonia, an Innovation for Diagnosing and Treating Childhood Pneumonia in Low-Resource Settings: A Feasibility, Usability and Acceptability Study in Ghana

    PubMed Central

    Ginsburg, Amy Sarah; Tawiah Agyemang, Charlotte; Ambler, Gwen; Delarosa, Jaclyn; Brunette, Waylon; Levari, Shahar; Larson, Clarice; Sundt, Mitch; Newton, Sam; Borriello, Gaetano; Anderson, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Pneumonia is the leading cause of infectious disease mortality in children. Currently, health care providers (HCPs) are trained to use World Health Organization Integrated Management of Childhood Illness (IMCI) paper-based protocols and manually assess respiratory rate to diagnose pneumonia in low-resource settings (LRS). However, this approach of relying on clinical signs alone has proven problematic. Hypoxemia, a diagnostic indicator of pneumonia severity associated with an increased risk of death, is not assessed because pulse oximetry is often not available in LRS. To improve HCPs’ ability to diagnose, classify, and manage pneumonia and other childhood illnesses, “mPneumonia” was developed. mPneumonia is a mobile health application that integrates a digital version of the IMCI algorithm with a software-based breath counter and a pulse oximeter. A design-stage qualitative pilot study was conducted to assess feasibility, usability, and acceptability of mPneumonia in six health centers and five community-based health planning and services centers in Ghana. Nine health administrators, 30 HCPs, and 30 caregivers were interviewed. Transcribed interview audio recordings were coded and analyzed for common themes. Health administrators reported mPneumonia would be feasible to implement with approval and buy-in from national and regional decision makers. HCPs felt using the mPneumonia application would be feasible to integrate into their work with the potential to improve accurate patient care. They reported it was “easy to use” and provided confidence in diagnosis and treatment recommendations. HCPs and caregivers viewed the pulse oximeter and breath counter favorably. Challenges included electricity requirements for charging and the time needed to complete the application. Some caregivers saw mPneumonia as a sign of modernity, increasing their trust in the care received. Other caregivers were hesitant or confused about the new technology. Overall, this

  17. Fusobacterium necrophorum in North American Bighorn Sheep ( Ovis canadensis ) Pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Shanthalingam, Sudarvili; Narayanan, Sanjeevkumar; Batra, Sai Arun; Jegarubee, Bavananthasivam; Srikumaran, Subramaniam

    2016-07-01

    Fusobacterium necrophorum has been detected in pneumonic bighorn sheep (BHS; Ovis canadensis ) lungs, in addition to the aerobic respiratory pathogens Mannheimia haemolytica , Bibersteinia trehalosi , Pasteurella multocida , and Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae . Similar to M. haemolytica , F. necrophorum produces a leukotoxin. Leukotoxin-induced lysis and degranulation of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) and macrophages are responsible for acute inflammation and lung tissue damage characteristic of M. haemolytica -caused pneumonia. As one approach in elucidating the role of F. necrophorum in BHS pneumonia, we determined the frequency of the presence of F. necrophorum in archived pneumonic BHS lung tissues, and susceptibility of BHS leukocytes to F. necrophorum leukotoxin. A species-specific PCR assay detected F. necrophorum in 37% of pneumonic BHS lung tissues (total tested n=70). Sequences of PCR amplicons were similar to the less virulent F. necrophorum subsp. funduliforme. Fusobacterium necrophorum leukotoxin exhibited cytotoxicity to BHS PMNs and peripheral blood mononuclear cells. As with the M. haemolytica leukotoxin, F. necrophorum leukotoxin was more toxic to BHS PMNs than domestic sheep PMNs. It is likely that F. necrophorum enters the lungs after M. haemolytica and other aerobic respiratory pathogens enter the lungs and initiate tissue damage, thereby creating a microenvironment that is conducive for anaerobic bacterial growth. In summary, Fusobacterium leukotoxin is highly toxic for BHS leukocytes; however, based on the PCR findings, it is unlikely to play a direct role in the development of BHS pneumonia.

  18. Association between pneumonia and oral care in nursing home residents.

    PubMed

    El-Solh, Ali A

    2011-06-01

    Pneumonia remains the leading cause of death in nursing home residents. The accumulation of dental plaque and colonization of oral surfaces and dentures with respiratory pathogens serves as a reservoir for recurrent lower respiratory tract infections. Control of gingivitis and dental plaques has been effective in reducing the rate of pneumonia but the provision of dental care for institutionalized elderly is inadequate, with treatment often sought only when patients experience pain or denture problems. Direct mechanical cleaning is thwarted by the lack of adequate training of nursing staff and residents' uncooperativeness. Chlorhexidine-based interventions are advocated as alternative methods for managing the oral health of frail older people; however, efficacy is yet to be demonstrated in randomized controlled trials. Development and maintenance of an oral hygiene program is a critical step in the prevention of pneumonia. While resources may be limited in long-term-care facilities, incorporating oral care in daily routine practice helps to reduce systemic diseases and to promote overall quality of life in nursing home residents.

  19. Suppression of Pulmonary Host Defenses and Enhanced Susceptibility to Respiratory bacterial Infection in mice Following Inhalation Exposure to Trichloroethylene and Chloroform

    EPA Science Inventory

    Numerous epidemiologic studies have associated episodes of increased air pollution with increased incidence of respiratory disease, including pneumonia, croup, and bronchitis. Trichloroethylene (TCE) and chloroform are among 33 hazardous air pollutants identified by the U.S. Env...

  20. Smoking-Induced Acute Eosinophilic Pneumonia in a 15-year-old Girl: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Youn, Ji-Seok; Kwon, Ji-Won; Kim, Byoung-Ju

    2010-01-01

    Acute eosinophilic pneumonia is a very rare disease that is characterized by acute febrile respiratory failure, diffuse bilateral infiltrates on chest X-ray, and eosinophilia in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid in the absence of infection. We present the case of a 15-year-old girl diagnosed with smoking-induced acute eosinophilic pneumonia. A previously healthy young girl with a 1-day history of fever presented with cough, dyspnea, and diffuse bilateral infiltrates on chest X-ray. She had started smoking only 3 weeks before presentation. She was diagnosed by bronchoalveolar lavage fluid tests and lung biopsy and dramatically improved after steroid treatment. We emphasize that acute eosinophilic pneumonia must be considered when acute pneumonia does not respond to broad-spectrum antibiotics. Effective treatment and prompt institution of therapy can obviate unnecessary morbidity and mortality. PMID:20358030

  1. Nonvalue of sputum culture in the management of lower respiratory tract infections.

    PubMed Central

    Lentino, J R; Lucks, D A

    1987-01-01

    Establishment of the microbiological etiology of bacterial pneumonia by sputum culture is confounded by both lack of recovery of fastidious pathogens and contamination of specimens with oropharyngeal flora. We reviewed the clinical records from 249 patients over a 3-month period for evidence of pneumonia. Gram staining and cultures were performed on 381 specimens isolated from this population of patients. Recovery of respiratory tract pathogens was accomplished with 354 specimens from 226 patients; 27 specimens yielded normal flora in culture but were smear positive. An additional 256 specimens submitted to our microbiology laboratory did not meet smear criteria for purulence nor did they yield respiratory tract pathogens in culture. A total of 637 specimens submitted to the microbiology laboratory were evaluated for sputum purulence by the criteria of Bartlett. Of the total 354 specimens which were positive in culture for a pathogen, 182 (52%) were submitted from 150 patients with no objective evidence of pneumonia. The majority of specimens obtained from patients without pneumonia were nonpurulent. However, 71 of 182 culture-positive specimens obtained from 50 patients without pneumonia were purulent. Approximately half of these patients (31 of 50) had other pulmonary or upper respiratory tract pathology which could account for the sputum purulence. Among the 172 culture-positive specimens from 76 patients with pneumonia, only 100 (58%) were acceptable by smear criteria. An additional 23 patients provided expectorated purulent sputum from which no respiratory tract pathogen could be isolated. Of these 23, 7 had pneumonia. We conclude that sputum culture and Gram staining are neither specific nor sensitive as diagnostic tools. Objective criteria for purulence of Gram-stained specimens must be applied before their inoculation into culture media. Specimens should be sought only from patients with objective evidence of pneumonia. PMID:2438299

  2. Pneumonia caused by Pittsburgh pneumonia agent: radiologic manifestations

    SciTech Connect

    Muder, R.R.; Reddy, S.C.; Yu, V.L.; Kroboth, F.J.

    1984-03-01

    Using an objective scoring system, chest radiographs were reviewed in 23 cases of pneumonia due to the Pittsburgh pneumonia agent (PPA, Tatlockia micdadei, Legionella micdadei), including six cases of pneumonia with simultaneous isolation of PPA and L pneumophila (Legionnaires' disease). Infiltrates were typically segmental to lobar; nodular infiltrates were noted in three cases. Spread to additional lobes after presentation occurred in four of 17 PPA infections. Pneumonia caused by both PPA and L pneumophila was unusually severe, with involvement of all lobes occurring in four of six cases, compared with one of 17 cases of PPA infection (p>0.02). Radiographic severity did not correlate with underlying disease, immune status, or outcome. The majority of patients receiving erythromycin demonstrated objective radiologic improvement. In a patients, population that included nonimmunosuppressed patient, nodule formation and rapid radiologic progression were not found to be characteristic of PPA pneumonia.

  3. Garenoxacin activity against isolates form patients hospitalized with community-acquired pneumonia and multidrug-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Jones, Ronald N; Sader, Helio S; Stilwell, Matthew G; Fritsche, Thomas R

    2007-05-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) continues to cause significant morbidity worldwide, and the principal bacterial pathogens (Streptococcus pneumoniae and Haemophilus influenzae) have acquired numerous resistance mechanisms over the last few decades. CAP treatment guidelines have suggested the use of broader spectrum agents, such as antipneumococcal fluoroquinolones as the therapy for at-risk patient population. In this report, we studied 3087 CAP isolates from the SENTRY Antimicrobial Surveillance Program (1999-2005) worldwide and all respiratory tract infection (RTI) isolate population of pneumococci (14665 strains) grouped by antibiogram patterns against a new des-F(6)-quinolone, garenoxacin. Results indicated that garenoxacin was highly active against CAP isolates of S. pneumoniae (MIC(90), 0.06 microg/mL) and H. influenzae (MIC(90), < or =0.03 microg/mL). This garenoxacin potency was 8- to 32-fold greater than gatifloxacin, levofloxacin, and ciprofloxacin against the pneumococci and >99.9% of strains were inhibited at < or =1 microg/mL (proposed susceptible breakpoint). Garenoxacin MIC values were not affected by resistances among S. pneumoniae strains to penicillin or erythromycin; however, coresistances were high among the beta-lactams (penicillins and cephalosporins), macrolides, tetracyclines, and trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole. Analysis of S. pneumoniae isolates with various antimicrobial resistance patterns to 6 drug classes demonstrated that garenoxacin was active against >99.9% (MIC, < or =1 microg/mL) of strains, and the most resistant pneumococci (6-drug resistance, 1051 strains or 7.2% of all isolates) were completely susceptible (100.0% at < or =1 microg/mL) to garenoxacin (MIC(90), 0.06 microg/mL). These results illustrate the high activity of garenoxacin against contemporary CAP isolates and especially against multidrug-resistant (MDR) S. pneumoniae that have created therapeutic dilemmas for all RTI presentations. Garenoxacin appears to be a

  4. A case of Clostridium difficile infection complicated by acute respiratory distress syndrome treated with fecal microbiota transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji Eun; Gweon, Tae-Geun; Yeo, Chang Dong; Cho, Young-Seok; Kim, Gi Jun; Kim, Jae Young; Kim, Jong Wook; Kim, Hyunho; Lee, Hye Won; Lim, Taeseok; Ham, Hyoju; Oh, Hyun Jin; Lee, Yeongbok; Byeon, Jaeho; Park, Sung Soo

    2014-09-21

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome is a life-threatening disorder caused mainly by pneumonia. Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is a common nosocomial diarrheal disease. Disruption of normal intestinal flora by antibiotics is the main risk factor for CDI. The use of broad-spectrum antibiotics for serious medical conditions can make it difficult to treat CDI complicated by acute respiratory distress syndrome. Fecal microbiota transplantation is a highly effective treatment in patients with refractory CDI. Here we report on a patient with refractory CDI and acute respiratory distress syndrome caused by pneumonia who was treated with fecal microbiota transplantation.

  5. Mycoplasma pneumoniae outbreak at a university - Georgia, 2012.

    PubMed

    2013-08-02

    On October 17, 2012, the Georgia Department of Public Health (DPH) was notified by the Fulton County Department of Health and Wellness that a local university, the Georgia Institute of Technology, was experiencing a pneumonia outbreak among students. DPH epidemiologists investigated to identify the etiology, find additional cases, and recommend control measures. Respiratory swabs collected from students with pneumonia and tested at CDC using a quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assay were positive for Mycoplasma pneumoniae. The university alerted students, faculty, and staff members to the outbreak and recommended prevention measures by e-mail, social media, and posters. A survey administered to students assessed illness prevention behaviors, outbreak awareness, and communication preferences. Eighty-three cases were diagnosed among students during September 1-December 4, 2012, making this outbreak the largest reported at a U.S. university in 35 years. No cases were reported among faculty or staff members. Of the 83 patients, 19 had specimens tested by qPCR, of which 12 (63%) were positive for M. pneumoniae. Despite university communication efforts, approximately half of students surveyed were unaware of the outbreak when surveyed in December. DPH recommendations included implementing university policies that facilitate students staying home and seeking medical care when ill and refining health messages and communication methods to improve awareness of disease outbreaks among students.

  6. Mycoplasma pneumoniae and Its Role as a Human Pathogen

    PubMed Central

    Waites, Ken B.; Talkington, Deborah F.

    2004-01-01

    Mycoplasma pneumoniae is a unique bacterium that does not always receive the attention it merits considering the number of illnesses it causes and the degree of morbidity associated with it in both children and adults. Serious infections requiring hospitalization, while rare, occur in both adults and children and may involve multiple organ systems. The severity of disease appears to be related to the degree to which the host immune response reacts to the infection. Extrapulmonary complications involving all of the major organ systems can occur in association with M. pneumoniae infection as a result of direct invasion and/or autoimmune response. The extrapulmonary manifestations are sometimes of greater severity and clinical importance than the primary respiratory infection. Evidence for this organism's contributory role in chronic lung conditions such as asthma is accumulating. Effective management of M. pneumoniae infections can usually be achieved with macrolides, tetracyclines, or fluoroquinolones. As more is learned about the pathogenesis and immune response elicited by M. pneumoniae, improvement in methods for diagnosis and prevention of disease due to this organism may occur. PMID:15489344

  7. Rationalised prescribing for community acquired pneumonia: a closed loop audit

    PubMed Central

    Clements, H.; Stephenson, T.; Gabriel, V.; Harrison, T.; Millar, M.; Smyth, A.; Tong, W.; Linton, C.

    2000-01-01

    AIMS—To audit the management of community acquired pneumonia before and after the introduction of a protocol. To determine the aetiology of pneumonia using routine investigations and polymerase chain reaction (PCR).
METHODS—Retrospective and prospective audit following the introduction of a management protocol. Prospective cases were investigated routinely and with PCR on blood and nasopharyngeal aspirate.
RESULTS—There was a significant increase in rational prescribing following introduction of the protocol with 75% of children receiving intravenous penicillin or erythromycin compared with 26% beforehand. Of 89 children in the prospective group, 51 microbiological diagnoses were achieved in 48 children. Seven children had Streptococcus pneumoniae infection, 14 had Mycoplasma infection, six had pertussis, and one had Chlamydia pneumoniae infection. Twenty three children had a viral cause of which respiratory syncytial virus was commonest.
CONCLUSIONS—Introduction of the protocol led to improved prescribing. PCR increased the diagnostic yield and the results support the management protocol.

 PMID:10999868

  8. Enteral Tube Feeding and Pneumonia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gray, David Sheridan; Kimmel, David

    2006-01-01

    To determine the effects of enteral tube feeding on the incidence of pneumonia, we performed a retrospective review of all clients at our institution who had gastrostomy or jejunostomy tubes placed over a 10-year period. Ninety-three subjects had a history of pneumonia before feeding tube insertion. Eighty had gastrostomy and 13, jejunostomy…

  9. Virus infection facilitates the development of severe pneumonia in transplant patients with hematologic malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Duorong; Wu, Jim; Pan, Yujia; Yan, JinSong; Liu, Min; Liu, Quentin

    2016-01-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is an effective therapy for patients with hematologic malignancies. Severe pneumonia is associated with high mortality rate in HSCT recipients. Viral co-infection indicates a poor prognosis of HSCT recipients. In this study, a total of 68 allogeneic HSCT recipients were included. Cytomegalovirus (CMV) and Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection was assessed by testing peripheral blood and oropharynx swabs, respectively, collected in the first 180 days after transplantation. We analysed the correlation of CMV and RSV co-infection with severe pneumonia and mortality. The incidence of CMV and RSV co-infection was 26.5% (18/68). Severe pneumonia was diagnosed in 61% (11/18) cases with co-infection compared to only 10% (5/50) cases with mono-infection or no infection. The analysis of potential risk factors for severe pneumonia showed that CMV and RSV co-infection was significantly associated with severe pneumonia (p < 0.001). The 5 patients who died of severe pneumonia were all co-infected with CMV and RSV. In conclusion, CMV and RSV co-infection appears to be an important factor and facilitates the development of severe pneumonia in allogeneic HSCT patients with hematologic malignancies. PMID:27340772

  10. MicroRNA-155 is required for clearance of Streptococcus pneumoniae from the nasopharynx.

    PubMed

    Verschoor, Chris P; Dorrington, Michael G; Novakowski, Kyle E; Kaiser, Julie; Radford, Katherine; Nair, Parameswaran; Anipindi, Varun; Kaushic, Charu; Surette, Michael G; Bowdish, Dawn M E

    2014-11-01

    Pneumonia caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae is a major cause of death and an economic burden worldwide. S. pneumoniae is an intermittent colonizer of the human upper respiratory tract, and the ability to control asymptomatic colonization determines the likelihood of developing invasive disease. Recognition of S. pneumoniae by resident macrophages via Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR-2) and the macrophage receptor with collagenous structure (MARCO) and the presence of interleukin-17 (IL-17)-secreting CD4(+) T cells are required for macrophage recruitment and bacterial clearance. Despite the fact that the primary cellular effectors needed for bacterial clearance have been identified, much of the underlying regulatory mechanisms are unknown. Herein, we demonstrate that the small, noncoding RNA microRNA-155 (mir-155) is critical for the effective clearance of S. pneumoniae. Our studies show that mir-155-deficient mice maintain the ability to prevent acute invasive pneumococcal infection but have significantly higher bacterial burdens following colonization, independently of macrophage recognition by TLR-2, MARCO expression, or bactericidal capacity. The observed defects in bacterial clearance parallel reduced IL-17A and gamma interferon CD4(+) T-cell responses in vivo, lower IL-17A mRNA levels in the nasopharynx, and a reduced capacity to induce Th17 cell polarization. Given that knockout mice are also limited in the capacity to generate high-titer S. pneumoniae-specific antibodies, we conclude that mir-155 is a critical mediator of the cellular effectors needed to clear primary and secondary S. pneumoniae colonizations.

  11. Role of carriers in the transmission of pneumonia in bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis)

    PubMed Central

    Raghavan, Bindu; Erickson, Kayla; Kugadas, Abirami; Batra, Sai A.; Call, Douglas R.; Davis, Margaret A.; Foreyt, William J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT In the absence of livestock contact, recurring lamb mortality in bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis) populations previously exposed to pneumonia indicates the likely presence of carriers of pneumonia-causing pathogens, and possibly inadequate maternally derived immunity. To investigate this problem we commingled naïve, pregnant ewes (n=3) with previously exposed rams (n=2). Post-commingling, all ewes and lambs born to them acquired pneumonia-causing pathogens (leukotoxin-producing Pasteurellaceae and Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae), with subsequent lamb mortality between 4-9 weeks of age. Infected ewes became carriers for two subsequent years and lambs born to them succumbed to pneumonia. In another experiment, we attempted to suppress the carriage of leukotoxin-producing Pasteurellaceae by administering an antibiotic to carrier ewes, and evaluated lamb survival. Lambs born to both treatment and control ewes (n=4 each) acquired pneumonia and died. Antibody titers against leukotoxin-producing Pasteurellaceae in all eight ewes were ‘protective’ (>1:800 and no apparent respiratory disease); however their lambs were either born with comparatively low titers, or with high (but non-protective) titers that declined rapidly within 2-8 weeks of age, rendering them susceptible to fatal disease. Thus, exposure to pneumonia-causing pathogens from carrier ewes, and inadequate titers of maternally derived protective antibodies, are likely to render bighorn lambs susceptible to fatal pneumonia. PMID:27185269

  12. Bacterial pneumonia following cytotoxic chemotherapy for lung cancer: clinical features, treatment outcome and prognostic factors.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Seung Soo; Cha, Seung-Ick; Shin, Kyung-Min; Lee, Shin-Yup; Kim, Chang-Ho; Park, Jae-Yong; Jung, Tae-Hoon

    2010-10-01

    Data regarding treatment outcomes and prognosis in pneumonia that occurs after lung cancer chemotherapy are lacking. We performed a retrospective study of 84 patients with clinically suspected bacterial pneumonia after cytotoxic chemotherapy for lung cancer. Small cell carcinoma was the most common histological type (36.9%, n = 31), followed by squamous cell carcinoma (35.7%, n = 30) and adenocarcinoma (21.4%, n = 18). The most frequent pathogen was Streptococcus pneumoniae (n = 14), followed by Klebsiella pneumoniae (n = 10), Staphylococcus aureus (n = 8), and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (n = 7). Of 84 patients, treatment outcome was determined for 80; the outcome was success in 52 (61.9%) and failure in 28 (33.3%); outcome remained undetermined for 4 patients (4.8%). Based on multivariate analysis, tachypnoea (respiratory rate ≥20/min) was the only significant predictor of treatment failure (odds ratio 4.79, 95% confidence interval 1.17-19.70; p = 0.030). In conclusion, bacterial pneumonia after cytotoxic chemotherapy for lung cancer was found to be caused more often by S. pneumoniae and K. pneumoniae than P. aeruginosa, and treatment failure leading to death was found to be high. Tachypnoea was independently associated with treatment failure in this population.

  13. Pneumonia Hospitalization Risk in the Elderly Attributable to Cold and Hot Temperatures in Hong Kong, China.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Hong; Sun, Shengzhi; Tang, Robert; Chan, King-Pan; Tian, Linwei

    2016-10-15

    The growth of pathogens potentially relevant to respiratory tract infection may be triggered by changes in ambient temperature. Few studies have examined the association between ambient temperature and pneumonia incidence, and no studies have focused on the susceptible elderly population. We aimed to examine the short-term association between ambient temperature and geriatric pneumonia and to assess the disease burden attributable to cold and hot temperatures in Hong Kong, China. Daily time-series data on emergency hospital admissions for geriatric pneumonia, mean temperature, relative humidity, and air pollution concentrations between January 2005 and December 2012 were collected. Distributed-lag nonlinear modeling integrated in quasi-Poisson regression was used to examine the exposure-lag-response relationship between temperature and pneumonia hospitalization. Measures of the risk attributable to nonoptimal temperature were calculated to summarize the disease burden. Subgroup analyses were conducted to examine the sex difference. We observed significant nonlinear and delayed associations of both cold and hot temperatures with pneumonia in the elderly, with cold temperatures having stronger effect estimates. Among the 10.7% of temperature-related pneumonia hospitalizations, 8.7% and 2.0% were attributed to cold and hot temperatures, respectively. Most of the temperature-related burden for pneumonia hospitalizations in Hong Kong was attributable to cold temperatures, and elderly men had greater susceptibility.

  14. Streptococcus pneumoniae, le transformiste.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Calum; Campo, Nathalie; Bergé, Matthieu J; Polard, Patrice; Claverys, Jean-Pierre

    2014-03-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae (the pneumococcus) is an important human pathogen. Natural genetic transformation, which was discovered in this species, involves internalization of exogenous single-stranded DNA and its incorporation into the chromosome. It allows acquisition of pathogenicity islands and antibiotic resistance and promotes vaccine escape via capsule switching. This opinion article discusses how recent advances regarding several facets of pneumococcal transformation support the view that the process has evolved to maximize plasticity potential in this species, making the pneumococcus le transformiste of the bacterial kingdom and providing an advantage in the constant struggle between this pathogen and its host.

  15. Lymphocytic Interstitial Pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Panchabhai, Tanmay S; Farver, Carol; Highland, Kristin B

    2016-09-01

    Lymphocytic interstitial pneumonia (LIP) is a rare lung disease on the spectrum of benign pulmonary lymphoproliferative disorders. LIP is frequently associated with connective tissue diseases or infections. Idiopathic LIP is rare; every attempt must be made to diagnose underlying conditions when LIP is diagnosed. Computed tomography of the chest in patients with LIP may reveal ground-glass opacities, centrilobular and subpleural nodules, and randomly distributed thin-walled cysts. Demonstrating polyclonality with immunohistochemistry is the key to differentiating LIP from lymphoma. The 5-year mortality remains between 33% and 50% and is likely to vary based on the underlying disease process.

  16. Animal models of polymicrobial pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Hraiech, Sami; Papazian, Laurent; Rolain, Jean-Marc; Bregeon, Fabienne

    2015-01-01

    Pneumonia is one of the leading causes of severe and occasionally life-threatening infections. The physiopathology of pneumonia has been extensively studied, providing information for the development of new treatments for this condition. In addition to in vitro research, animal models have been largely used in the field of pneumonia. Several models have been described and have provided a better understanding of pneumonia under different settings and with various pathogens. However, the concept of one pathogen leading to one infection has been challenged, and recent flu epidemics suggest that some pathogens exhibit highly virulent potential. Although “two hits” animal models have been used to study infectious diseases, few of these models have been described in pneumonia. Therefore the aims of this review were to provide an overview of the available literature in this field, to describe well-studied and uncommon pathogen associations, and to summarize the major insights obtained from this information. PMID:26170617

  17. Efficacy of moxifloxacin for treatment of penicillin-, macrolide- and multidrug-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae in community-acquired pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Fogarty, C; Torres, A; Choudhri, S; Haverstock, D; Herrington, J; Ambler, J

    2005-11-01

    This pooled analysis of six prospective, multicentre trials aimed to determine the efficacy of moxifloxacin in community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) due to penicillin-, macrolide- and multidrug-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae (MDRSP). At a central laboratory, isolates were identified and antimicrobial susceptibility determined (microbroth dilution). MDRSP was defined as resistance > or =3 drug classes. Patients received oral or sequential intravenous/oral 400 mg moxifloxacin once daily for 7-14 days. The primary endpoint was clinical success at test-of-cure for efficacy-valid patients with proven pretherapy S. pneumoniae infection. Of 140 S. pneumoniae isolated (112 respiratory, 28 blood), 23 (16.4%) were penicillin resistant, 26 (18.6%) macrolide resistant and 31 (22.1%) MDRSP. The moxifloxacin MIC90 was 0.25 microg/ml. Clinical cure with moxifloxacin was 95.4% (125/131) overall, and 100% (21/21) for penicillin-, 95.7% (22/23) for macrolide- and 96.4% (27/28) for multidrug-resistant strains. Moxifloxacin provided excellent clinical and bacteriological cure rates in CAP due to drug-resistant pneumococci.

  18. Alternative approaches to ventilator-associated pneumonia prevention.

    PubMed

    Berra, L; Sampson, J; Fumagalli, J; Panigada, M; Kolobow, T

    2011-03-01

    Ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP), which develops in patients receiving mechanical ventilation, is the most common nosocomial infection in patients with acute respiratory failure. The major mechanism of lower respiratory tract colonization is aspiration of bacteria-colonized secretions from the oropharynx into the lower airways. The hydrostatic pressure of the secretions that collect in the subglottic space, which is the area above the endotracheal tube (ETT) cuff, or aerosolization of bacteria from the secretions collected within the respiratory tubing may facilitate the leakage into the lower airways. Ideally, the elimination of the mechanisms responsible for aspiration would decrease the incidence of VAP. Several preventive measures have been tested in clinical trials with little success.Here we present the results of our efforts to develop novel approaches for the prevention of VAP. Specifically, we found that keeping ventilated patients in a lateral position, which eliminates gravitational forces, is feasible and possibly advantageous. Additionally, several novel medical devices have been recently developed to prevent bacterial biofilm formation from the ETT and breathing tubing. These devices include coated ETTs, mucus shavers and mucus slurpers. Prevention of ETT bacterial colonization showed decreased bacterial colonization of the respiratory circuit and of the lower respiratory tract in laboratory studies and clinical trials. Future large studies should be designed to test the hypothesis that VAP can be prevented with these novel strategies. While there is a current focus on the use of respiratory devices to prevent biofilm formation and microaspiration, it is important to remember that lower respiratory tract colonization is multifactorial. Prevention of VAP cannot be achieved solely by eliminating bacterial biofilm on respiratory devices, and more comprehensive care of the intubated patient needs to be implemented.

  19. The role of the PM2.5-associated metals in pathogenesis of child Mycoplasma Pneumoniae infections: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Hou, Wei; Xu, Xijin; Lei, Yongge; Cao, Junjun; Zhang, Yu; Chen, Liang; Huo, Xia

    2016-06-01

    The peak occurrence of Mycoplasma pneumoniae (M. pneumoniae) infections in childhood and haze episodes is concurrent. Together, the prevalence of macrolide-resistant M. pneumoniae varies among countries might also be related to the concentration of ambient fine particulate mass (aerodynamic diameter ≤2.5 μm, PM2.5). Numerous cohort studies have identified consistent associations between ambient PM2.5 and cardiorespiratory morbidity and mortality. PM2.5 is a carrier of the heavy metals. The relationship between PM2.5-associated metals and M. pneumoniae infections in childhood has been increasingly drawing public attention. First, we reviewed original articles and review papers in Pubmed and Web of Science regarding M. pneumoniae and PM2.5-associated metal and analyzed the structural basis of PM2.5-associated metal interaction with M. pneumoniae. Then, the possible mechanisms of action between them were conjectured. Mechanisms of oxidative stress induction and modulation of the host immune system and inflammatory responses via Toll-like receptors (TLRs) and/or the nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) pathway are postulated to be the result of PM2.5-associated metal complex interaction with M. pneumoniae. In addition, a heavy metal effect on M. pneumoniae-expressed community-acquired respiratory distress syndrome (CARDS) toxin, and activation of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) and TLRs to induce the differentiation of T helper (Th) cells are also regarded as important reasons for the influence of the heavy metals on the severity of M. pneumoniae pneumonia and the initial onset and exacerbation of M. pneumoniae associated asthma. PM2.5-associated metals via complex mechanisms can exert a great impact on the host through interaction with M. pneumoniae.

  20. Toll-like receptor 4 agonistic antibody promotes innate immunity against severe pneumonia induced by coinfection with influenza virus and Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Akitaka; Nakamura, Shigeki; Seki, Masafumi; Fukudome, Kenji; Iwanaga, Naoki; Imamura, Yoshifumi; Miyazaki, Taiga; Izumikawa, Koichi; Kakeya, Hiroshi; Yanagihara, Katsunori; Kohno, Shigeru

    2013-07-01

    Coinfection with bacteria is a major cause of mortality during influenza epidemics. Recently, Toll-like receptor (TLR) agonists were shown to have immunomodulatory functions. In the present study, we investigated the effectiveness and mechanisms of the new TLR4 agonistic monoclonal antibody UT12 against secondary pneumococcal pneumonia induced by coinfection with influenza virus in a mouse model. Mice were intranasally inoculated with Streptococcus pneumoniae 2 days after influenza virus inoculation. UT12 was intraperitoneally administered 2 h before each inoculation. Survival rates were significantly increased and body weight loss was significantly decreased by UT12 administration. Additionally, the production of inflammatory mediators was significantly suppressed by the administration of UT12. In a histopathological study, pneumonia in UT12-treated mice was very mild compared to that in control mice. UT12 increased antimicrobial defense through the acceleration of macrophage recruitment into the lower respiratory tract induced by c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and nuclear factor kappaB (NF-κB) pathway-dependent monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1) production. Collectively, these findings indicate that UT12 promoted pulmonary innate immunity and may reduce the severity of severe pneumonia induced by coinfection with influenza virus and S. pneumoniae. This immunomodulatory effect of UT12 improves the prognosis of secondary pneumococcal pneumonia and makes UT12 an attractive candidate for treating severe infectious diseases.

  1. Emergence of HA mutants during influenza virus pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Manríquez, Maria Eugenia Vázquez; Makino, Akiko; Tanaka, Motoko; Abe, Yasuhisa; Yoshida, Hiroyuki; Morioka, Ichiro; Arakawa, Soichi; Takeshima, Yasuhiro; Iwata, Kentaro; Takasaki, Jin; Manabe, Toshie; Nakaya, Takaaki; Nakamura, Shota; Iglesias, Anjarath Lorena Higuera; Rossales, Rosa Maria Rivera; Mirabal, Erika Pena; Ito, Tateki; Kitazawa, Toshio; Oka, Teruaki; Yamashita, Makoto; Kudo, Koichiro; Shinya, Kyoko

    2012-01-01

    During the influenza pandemic of 2009, the number of viral pneumonia cases showed a marked increase in comparison with seasonal influenza viruses. Mutations at amino acid 222 (D222G mutations) in the virus hemagglutinin (HA) molecule, known to alter the receptor-recognition properties of the virus, were detected in a number of the more severely-affected patients in the early phases of the pandemic. To understand the background for the emergence of the mutant amino acid D222G in human lungs, we conducted histological examinations on lung specimens of patients from Mexico who had succumbed in the pandemic. Prominent regenerative and hyperplastic changes in the alveolar type II pneumocytes, which express avian-type sialoglycan receptors in the respiratory tract of severely affected individuals, were observed in the Mexican patients. An infection model utilizing guinea pigs, which was chosen in order to best simulate the sialic acid distribution of severe pneumonia in human patients, demonstrated an increase of D222G mutants and a delay in the diminution of mutants in the lower respiratory tract in comparison to the upper respiratory tract. Our data suggests that the predominance of avian-type sialoglycan receptors in the pneumonic lungs may contribute to the emergence of viral HA mutants. This data comprehensively illustrates the mechanisms for the emergence of mutants in the clinical samples.

  2. Late Onset Combined Immunodeficiency Presenting with Recurrent Pneumocystis jiroveci Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Baraboutis, Ioannis G.; Karnesis, Lazaros

    2014-01-01

    Late onset combined immunodeficiency (LOCID) is a recently described variant of common variable immunodeficiency (CVID), involving adult patients presenting with opportunistic infections and/or low CD4+ lymphocyte counts. A 36-year-old male with unremarkable past medical history presented with fever, respiratory failure, and lymphocytopenia. He was found to have Pneumocystis jiroveci pneumonia (PJP), subsequently complicated by recurrent hospital-acquired Pseudomonas aeruginosa pneumonia and immune reconstitution phenomena, attributed to restoration of immunoglobulin levels. Clinicians should be aware of LOCID, which could be confused with HIV infection/AIDS or idiopathic CD4 lymphocytopenia. In the English bibliography there is only one case report, where PJP was the initial presentation of CVID (that case would probably be classified as LOCID). Phenomena of immune reconstitution are described in various settings, including primary immunodeficiency, manifesting as temporary clinical and radiologic deterioration and leading to misperceptions of therapeutic failure and/or presence of alternative/additional diagnoses. PMID:24799913

  3. Smoking-related idiopathic interstitial pneumonia: A review.

    PubMed

    Margaritopoulos, George A; Harari, Sergio; Caminati, Antonella; Antoniou, Katerina M

    2016-01-01

    For many years, cigarette smoking has been considered as the leading cause of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and lung cancer. Recently, however, it has also been associated with the development of diffuse interstitial lung diseases. In the latest classification of the major idiopathic interstitial pneumonias (IIP), the term smoking-related IIP has been introduced, including two entities, namely desquamative interstitial pneumonia (DIP) and respiratory bronchiolitis-interstitial lung disease (RB-ILD). Other entities in which smoking has a definite or suggested role include pulmonary Langerhan's cell histiocytosis, smoking-related interstitial fibrosis, combined pulmonary fibrosis and emphysema syndrome and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. In this review, we will focus on the mechanisms of smoking-related lung damage and on the clinical aspects of these disorders with the exception of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, which will be reviewed elsewhere in this review series.

  4. MYCOBACTERIUM ABSCESSUS PNEUMONIA IN AN ATLANTIC BOTTLENOSE DOLPHIN (TURSIOPS TRUNCATUS)

    PubMed Central

    Clayton, Leigh Ann; Stamper, M. Andrew; Whitaker, Brent R.; Hadfield, Catherine A.; Simons, Brian; Mankowski, Joseph L.

    2013-01-01

    Mycobacterium abscessus pneumonia was diagnosed antemortem in a 23-yr-old male Atlantic bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus). Clinical signs included lethargy, hyporexia, coughing, and bloody respiratory discharge. Diagnostic findings included neutrophilic leukocytosis, anemia, elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate, and repeated forceful exhaled breath (sputum) cytology, with acute inflammatory cells and acid-fast positive beaded rods. The bacteria were initially identified free in the sputum sample and subsequently were seen within neutrophils. A culture was positive for a rapidly growing, white, colony-forming organism confirmed as M. abscessus by polymerase chain reaction and DNA sequencing. Clinical signs initially resolved with multidrug therapy. Concurrent Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection complicated clinical management and contributed to terminal decline. The dolphin was euthanized 5 mo after initial diagnosis. Necropsy results demonstrated acid-fast positive bacteria in lung tissue and supported the diagnosis of M. abscessus pneumonia. Acid-fast stains and mycobacteria cultures should be considered when evaluating ill dolphins. PMID:23272373

  5. Aspiration pneumonia in an infant with neurological sequelae - case report.

    PubMed

    Dop, Dalia; Gheonea, Cristian; Stănescu, Georgeta Ligia; Moroşanu, Aritina Elvira; Diaconu, Radu; Niculescu, Elena Carmen; Ognean, Maria Livia; Niculescu, Dragoş

    2015-01-01

    Aspiration pneumonia is a frequent cause of morbidity and mortality in children with neurological deficits. We present the case of a 4-month-old infant from the Foster Care Center, with severe psychomotor retardation, blindness, and associated cardiac malformation, who was admitted to the Pediatrics Clinic of the Emergency County Hospital of Craiova, Romania, presenting aspiration pneumonia and moderate respiratory insufficiency. Under sustained, early instituted treatment, the evolution was towards death. The chest radiography and histopathological examination of the pulmonary tissue confirmed the diagnosis. The neurological impairment was not only a favoring factor for aspiration, through the deglutition disorders, but it was also an aggravating one, through the bacterial colonization of the lungs.

  6. Granzyme A impairs host defense during Streptococcus pneumoniae pneumonia.

    PubMed

    van den Boogaard, Florry E; van Gisbergen, Klaas P J M; Vernooy, Juanita H; Medema, Jan P; Roelofs, Joris J T H; van Zoelen, Marieke A D; Endeman, Henrik; Biesma, Douwe H; Boon, Louis; Van't Veer, Cornelis; de Vos, Alex F; van der Poll, Tom

    2016-08-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is the most common causative pathogen in community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). Granzyme A (GzmA) is a serine protease produced by a variety of cell types involved in the immune response. We sought to determine the role of GzmA on the host response during pneumococcal pneumonia. GzmA was measured in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) harvested from CAP patients from the infected and contralateral uninfected side and in lung tissue slides from CAP patients and controls. In CAP patients, GzmA levels were increased in BALF obtained from the infected lung. Human lungs showed constitutive GzmA expression by both parenchymal and nonparenchymal cells. In an experimental setting, pneumonia was induced in wild-type (WT) and GzmA-deficient (GzmA(-/-)) mice by intranasal inoculation of S. pneumoniae In separate experiments, WT and GzmA(-/-) mice were treated with natural killer (NK) cell depleting antibodies. Upon infection with S. pneumoniae, GzmA(-/-) mice showed a better survival and lower bacterial counts in BALF and distant body sites compared with WT mice. Although NK cells showed strong GzmA expression, NK cell depletion did not influence bacterial loads in either WT or GzmA(-/-) mice. These results implicate that GzmA plays an unfavorable role in host defense during pneumococcal pneumonia by a mechanism that does not depend on NK cells.

  7. Bacterial Respiratory Infections Complicating Human Immunodeficiency Virus.

    PubMed

    Feldman, Charles; Anderson, Ronald

    2016-04-01

    Opportunistic bacterial and fungal infections of the lower respiratory tract, most commonly those caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae (the pneumococcus), Mycobacterium tuberculosis, and Pneumocystis jirovecii, remain the major causes of mortality in those infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Bacterial respiratory pathogens most prevalent in those infected with HIV, other than M. tuberculosis, represent the primary focus of the current review with particular emphasis on the pneumococcus, the leading cause of mortality due to HIV infection in the developed world. Additional themes include (1) risk factors; (2) the predisposing effects of HIV-mediated suppression on pulmonary host defenses, possibly intensified by smoking; (3) clinical and laboratory diagnosis, encompassing assessment of disease severity and outcome; and (4) antibiotic therapy. The final section addresses current recommendations with respect to pneumococcal immunization in the context of HIV infection, including an overview of the rationale underpinning the current "prime-boost" immunization strategy based on sequential administration of pneumococcal conjugate vaccine 13 and pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine 23.

  8. S-nitrosothiol signaling in respiratory biology.

    PubMed

    Gaston, Benjamin; Singel, David; Doctor, Allan; Stamler, Jonathan S

    2006-06-01

    Genetic and biochemical data demonstrate a pivotal role for S-nitrosothiols (SNOs) in mediating the actions of nitric oxide synthases (NOSs). SNOs serve to convey NO bioactivity and to regulate protein function. This understanding is of immediate interest to the pulmonary clinical and research communities. This article reviews the following: (1) biochemical and cellular evidence that SNOs in amino acids, peptides, and proteins elicit NOS-dependent signaling in the respiratory system and (2) studies that link SNO signaling to pulmonary medicine. SNO-mediated signaling is involved in the regulation of minute ventilation, ventilation-perfusion matching, pulmonary arterial pressure, basal airway tone, and respiratory and peripheral muscle function. Derangements in SNO signaling are implicated in many disorders relevant to pulmonary and critical care medicine, including apnea, hypoxemia, pulmonary hypertension, asthma, cystic fibrosis, pneumonia, and septic shock.

  9. Face and/or neck burns: a risk factor for respiratory infection?

    PubMed Central

    Costa Santos, D.; Barros, F.; Gomes, N.; Guedes, T.; Maia, M.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Infections are a common cause of morbidity and mortality in burn patients, and almost 50% of infection-related deaths in burn patients are caused by pneumonia. The proportion of facial and/or neck burns (FNB) in burn centre admissions is high, and these patients have a well known respiratory risk. However, it is not well established in the literature if the occurrence of a FNB is a risk factor for respiratory infection during hospitalization. A retrospective, single-centre trial at the burn unit of the Prelada Hospital was conducted, including patients admitted between January 2011 and December 2014. The primary objective was to investigate the existence of a relation between face and/or neck burns and occurrence of respiratory infection. A total of 229 patients were included in the study, 126 with FNB and 103 without FNB. Higher total body surface area (TBSA) burned, inhalation injury and early endotracheal intubation were statistically more frequent in the FNB group. These variables were also more prevalent in the group that developed respiratory infection during the burn unit stay. Concerning FNB patients, the most frequent microbiological strains isolated in respiratory secretion cultures were Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Streptococcus pneumonia, while in nFNB patients it was Klebsiella pneumoniae. In our population, only early ETI, inhalation injury and higher TBSA appear to be independent risk factors for respiratory infection in FNB patients, although age, male sex and co-morbidities are also known risk factors for respiratory infection in burn patients. PMID:28149229

  10. Face and/or neck burns: a risk factor for respiratory infection?

    PubMed

    Costa Santos, D; Barros, F; Gomes, N; Guedes, T; Maia, M

    2016-06-30

    Infections are a common cause of morbidity and mortality in burn patients, and almost 50% of infection-related deaths in burn patients are caused by pneumonia. The proportion of facial and/or neck burns (FNB) in burn centre admissions is high, and these patients have a well known respiratory risk. However, it is not well established in the literature if the occurrence of a FNB is a risk factor for respiratory infection during hospitalization. A retrospective, single-centre trial at the burn unit of the Prelada Hospital was conducted, including patients admitted between January 2011 and December 2014. The primary objective was to investigate the existence of a relation between face and/or neck burns and occurrence of respiratory infection. A total of 229 patients were included in the study, 126 with FNB and 103 without FNB. Higher total body surface area (TBSA) burned, inhalation injury and early endotracheal intubation were statistically more frequent in the FNB group. These variables were also more prevalent in the group that developed respiratory infection during the burn unit stay. Concerning FNB patients, the most frequent microbiological strains isolated in respiratory secretion cultures were Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Streptococcus pneumonia, while in nFNB patients it was Klebsiella pneumoniae. In our population, only early ETI, inhalation injury and higher TBSA appear to be independent risk factors for respiratory infection in FNB patients, although age, male sex and co-morbidities are also known risk factors for respiratory infection in burn patients.

  11. Mycoplasma Pneumoniae Infections of Adults and Children

    PubMed Central

    Cherry, James D.; Welliver, Robert C.

    1976-01-01

    Although the hallmark of Mycoplasma pneumoniae infection is pneumonia, the organism is also responsible for a protean array of other symptoms. With an increased awareness of the board clinical spectrum of M. pneumoniae disease and the ready availability of the cold agglutinin and M. pneumoniae complement-fixation tests, interested clinicians will note additional clinical-mycoplasmal associations in their patients. PMID:782043

  12. Spatial prevalence and associations among respiratory diseases in Maine.

    PubMed

    Farah, Christopher; Hosgood, H Dean; Hock, Janet M

    2014-10-01

    Chronic respiratory diseases rank among the leading global disease burdens. Maine's respiratory disease prevalence exceeds the US average, despite limited urbanization/industrialization. To provide insight into potential etiologic factors among this unique, rural population, we analyzed the spatial distributions of, and potential associations among asthma, COPD, pneumonia, and URI adult outpatient data (n=47,099) from all outpatient transactions (n=5,052,900) in 2009 for Maine hospitals and affiliate clinics, using spatial scan statistic, geographic weighted regression (GWR), and a Delaunay graph algorithm. Non-random high prevalence regions were identified, the majority of which (84% of the population underlying all regions) exhibited clusters for all four respiratory diseases. GWR provided further evidence of spatial correlation (R(2)=0.991) between the communicable and noncommunicable diseases under investigation, suggesting spatial interdependence in risk. Sensitivity analyses of known respiratory disease risks did not fully explain our results. Prospective epidemiology studies are needed to clarify all contributors to risk.

  13. Molecular diagnosis of Pneumocystis pneumonia in dogs.

    PubMed

    Danesi, Patrizia; Ravagnan, Silvia; Johnson, Lynelle R; Furlanello, Tommaso; Milani, Adelaide; Martin, Patricia; Boyd, Susan; Best, Matthew; Galgut, Bradley; Irwin, Peter; Canfield, Paul J; Krockenberger, Mark B; Halliday, Catriona; Meyer, Wieland; Malik, Richard

    2017-02-23

    Pneumocystis pneumonia (PCP) is a life-threatening fungal disease that can occur in dogs. The aim of this study was to provide a preliminary genetic characterisation of Pneumocystis carinii f.sp.'canis' (P. canis) in dogs and thereby develop a reliable molecular protocol to definitively diagnose canine PCP. We investigated P. canis in a variety of lung specimens from dogs with confirmed or strongly suspected PCP (Group 1, n = 16), dogs with non-PCP lower respiratory tract problems (Group 2, n = 65) and dogs not suspected of having PCP or other lower respiratory diseases (Group 3, n = 11). Presence of Pneumocystis DNA was determined by nested PCR of the large and small mitochondrial subunit rRNA loci and by a real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assay developed using a new set of primers. Molecular results were correlated with the presence of Pneumocystis morphotypes detected in cytological/histological preparations. Pneumocystis DNA was amplified from 13/16 PCP-suspected dogs (Group 1) and from 4/76 dogs of control Groups 2 and 3 (combined). The latter four dogs were thought to have been colonized by P. canis. Comparison of CT values in 'infected' versus 'colonized' dogs was consistent with this notion, with a distinct difference in molecular burden between groups (CT ≤ 26 versus CT range (26 respiratory tract and a CT value can be interpreted to distinguish infection versus colonization.

  14. Non-diphtheriae Corynebacterium species: an emerging respiratory pathogen.

    PubMed

    Díez-Aguilar, M; Ruiz-Garbajosa, P; Fernández-Olmos, A; Guisado, P; Del Campo, R; Quereda, C; Cantón, R; Meseguer, M A

    2013-06-01

    The purpose of the study was to describe the microbiological and clinical features of ten cases of lower respiratory tract infection due to Corynebacterium striatum, Corynebacterium propinquum and Corynebacterium pseudodiphtheriticum. Respiratory samples were recovered from hospitalised patients who were diagnosed of pneumonia and exacerbations of chronic respiratory infections. The samples were Gram-stained and seeded on conventional bacterial growing media. Bacteria were identified by matrix-assisted linear desorption/ionisation-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). Antibiotic susceptibility was tested by the disk diffusion method. All patients presented an acute respiratory onset, most of them in the context of an underlying disease and/or immunosuppression. In all patients, the microscopical examination of Gram-stained respiratory samples showed numerous polymorphonuclear cells and Gram-positive bacilli, suggestive of the Corynebacterium morphotype. A pure culture growth of Corynebacterium was obtained in the majority (72 %) of samples. The conclusions are that non-diphtheriae Corynebacterium species are an emerging cause of respiratory infection among patients with chronic respiratory disease and/or immunosuppression, and cannot always be considered as mere colonisers. The microorganism's predominance in Gram-stained purulent respiratory samples together with abundant growth in the culture is the key for the microbiological diagnosis.

  15. Diagnosis and management of pneumonia and bronchitis in outpatient primary care practices

    PubMed Central

    Evertsen, Jennifer; Baumgardner, Dennis J; Regnery, Ann; Banerjee, Indrani

    2011-01-01

    Aims To understand which clinical criteria physicians use to diagnose pneumonia compared to bronchitis and upper respiratory tract infection (URTI). Methods Retrospective chart review of adults diagnosed with pneumonia, bronchitis, or URTI. Results Logistic regression analysis identified rales, a temperature ≥ 100°F (37.8°C), chest pain, dyspnoea, rhonchi, heart rate, respiratory rate, and rhinorrhoea, as the best explanation for the variation in diagnosis of pneumonia compared to either of the alternative diagnoses (R2 = 59.3), with rales and a temperature ≥ 100°F explaining 30% of the variation. Rales, chest pain, and a temperature ≥ 100°F best predicted the ordering of a chest x-ray (R2 = 20.0). However, 35% (59/175) of patients diagnosed with pneumonia had a negative chest x-ray. Abnormal breath sounds were the best predictors for prescribing antibiotics (R2 = 38%). A significant number of patients with acute bronchitis (93% excluding sinusitis) and URTI (42%) were given antibiotics. Conclusions The presence of abnormal breath sounds and a temperature ≥ 100°F were the best predictors of a diagnosis of pneumonia. PMID:20490437

  16. Afebrile pneumonia (whooping cough) syndrome in infants at Hospital Universitario del Valle, Cali, 2001-2007

    PubMed Central

    Villegas, Dolly; Echandía-Villegas, Connie Alejandra

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Afebrile pneumonia syndrome in infants, also called infant pneumonitis, pneumonia caused by atypical pathogens or whooping cough syndrome is a major cause of severe lower respiratory infection in young infants, both in developing countries and in developed countries. Objective: To describe children with afebrile pneumonia syndrome. Methods: Through a cross-sectional study, we reviewed the medical records of children diagnosed with afebrile pneumonia treated at Hospital Universitario del Valle, a reference center in southwestern Colombia, between June 2001 and December 2007. We obtained data on maternal age and origin, prenatal care, the childs birth, breastfeeding, vaccination status, symptoms, signs, diagnosis, treatment, and complications. Results: We evaluated 101 children with this entity, noting a stationary presentation: June-August and November- December. A total of 73% of the children were under 4 months of age; the most common symptoms were: cyanotic and spasmodic cough (100%), respiratory distress (70%), and unquantified fever (68%). The most common findings: rales (crackles) (50%), wheezing and expiratory stridor (37%); 66% were classified as mild and of the remaining 33%, half of them required attention in the intensive care unit. In all, there was clinical diagnosis of afebrile pneumonia syndrome in infants, but no etiologic diagnosis was made and despite this, 94% of the children received macrolides. Conclusions: These data support the hypothesis that most of these patients acquired the disease by airway, possibly caused by viral infection and did not require the indiscriminate use of macrolides. PMID:24893051

  17. Asthmatic persons are prone to the persistence of Chlamydia pneumoniae antibodies.

    PubMed

    Paldanius, Mika; Juvonen, Raija; Leinonen, Maija; Bloigu, Aini; Silvennoinen-Kassinen, Sylvi; Saikku, Pekka

    2007-10-01

    Acute Chlamydia pneumoniae infection may initiate asthma or worsen asthmatic symptoms. In crowded conditions, such as military service, young men are susceptible to respiratory infections, including C. pneumoniae. We recruited 127 asthmatic and 391 nonasthmatic military conscripts, followed up their respiratory tract infections and the kinetics of serum C. pneumoniae antibodies, and assessed the association between C. pneumoniae and asthma during 6 months of military service in 2 intake groups. During the 6-month period, in the July intake group, IgG antibody prevalence decreased from 60.3% to 43.8% in asthmatic and from 55.6% to 22.6% in nonasthmatic conscripts. In the January intake group, IgG antibody prevalence increased from 38.3% to 48.4% in asthmatic and from 37.2% to 43% in nonasthmatic recruits. IgG and IgA antibodies persisted more often in the asthmatic groups. In conclusion, the prevalence of IgG antibodies showed seasonal variation. Military recruits seem to be most vulnerable to C. pneumoniae infections during the period from January to June. The antibody titer changes were more rapid than previously thought.

  18. Comparison of Mycoplasma pneumoniae Genome Sequences from Strains Isolated from Symptomatic and Asymptomatic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Spuesens, Emiel B. M.; Brouwer, Rutger W. W.; Mol, Kristin H. J. M.; Hoogenboezem, Theo; Kockx, Christel E. M.; Jansen, Ruud; Van IJcken, Wilfred F. J.; Van Rossum, Annemarie M. C.; Vink, Cornelis

    2016-01-01

    Mycoplasma pneumoniae is a common cause of respiratory tract infections (RTIs) in children. We recently demonstrated that this bacterium can be carried asymptomatically in the respiratory tract of children. To identify potential genetic differences between M. pneumoniae strains that are carried asymptomatically and those that cause symptomatic infections, we performed whole-genome sequence analysis of 20 M. pneumoniae strains. The analyzed strains included 3 reference strains, 3 strains isolated from asymptomatic children, 13 strains isolated from clinically well-defined patients suffering from an upper (n = 4) or lower (n = 9) RTI, and one strain isolated from a follow-up patient who recently recovered from an RTI. The obtained sequences were each compared to the sequences of the reference strains. To find differences between strains isolated from asymptomatic and symptomatic individuals, a variant comparison was performed between the different groups of strains. Irrespective of the group (asymptomatic vs. symptomatic) from which the strains originated, subtype 1 and subtype 2 strains formed separate clusters. We could not identify a specific genotype associated with M. pneumoniae virulence. However, we found marked genetic differences between clinical isolates and the reference strains, which indicated that the latter strains may not be regarded as appropriate representatives of circulating M. pneumoniae strains. PMID:27833597

  19. Pulmonary Surfactant Phosphatidylglycerol Inhibits Mycoplasma pneumoniae-stimulated Eicosanoid Production from Human and Mouse Macrophages*

    PubMed Central

    Kandasamy, Pitchaimani; Zarini, Simona; Chan, Edward D.; Leslie, Christina C.; Murphy, Robert C.; Voelker, Dennis R.

    2011-01-01

    Mycoplasma pneumoniae is a human pathogen causing respiratory infections that are also associated with serious exacerbations of chronic lung diseases. Membranes and lipoproteins from M. pneumoniae induced a 4-fold increase in arachidonic acid (AA) release from RAW264.7 and a 2-fold increase in AA release from primary human alveolar macrophages. The bacterial lipoprotein mimic and TLR2/1 agonist Pam3Cys and the TLR2/6 agonist MALP-2 produced effects similar to those elicited by M. pneumoniae in macrophages by inducing the phosphorylation of p38MAPK and p44/42ERK1/2 MAP kinases and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression. M. pneumoniae induced the generation of prostaglandins PGD2 and PGE2 from RAW264.7 cells and thromboxane B2 (TXB2) from human alveolar macrophages. Anti-TLR2 antibody completely abolished M. pneumoniae-induced AA release and TNFα secretion from RAW264.7 cells and human alveolar macrophages. Disruption of the phosphorylation of p44/42ERK1/2 or inactivation of cytosolic phospholipase A2α (cPLA2α) completely inhibited M. pneumoniae-induced AA release from macrophages. The minor pulmonary surfactant phospholipid, palmitoyl-oleoyl-phosphatidylglycerol (POPG), antagonized the proinflammatory actions of M. pneumoniae, Pam3Cys, and MALP-2 by reducing the production of AA metabolites from macrophages. The effect of POPG was specific, insofar as saturated PG, and saturated and unsaturated phosphatidylcholines did not have significant effect on M. pneumoniae-induced AA release. Collectively, these data demonstrate that M. pneumoniae stimulates the production of eicosanoids from macrophages through TLR2, and POPG suppresses this pathogen-induced response. PMID:21205826

  20. Linkages of Weather and Climate With Ixodes scapularis and Ixodes pacificus (Acari: Ixodidae), Enzootic Transmission of Borrelia burgdorferi, and Lyme Disease in North America.

    PubMed

    Eisen, Rebecca J; Eisen, Lars; Ogden, Nicholas H; Beard, Charles B

    2016-03-01

    Lyme disease has increased both in incidence and geographic extent in the United States and Canada over the past two decades. One of the underlying causes is changes during the same time period in the distribution and abundance of the primary vectors: Ixodes scapularis Say and Ixodes pacificus Cooley and Kohls in eastern and western North America, respectively. Aside from short periods of time when they are feeding on hosts, these ticks exist in the environment where temperature and relative humidity directly affect their development, survival, and host-seeking behavior. Other important factors that strongly influence tick abundance as well as the proportion of ticks infected with the Lyme disease spirochete, Borrelia burgdorferi, include the abundance of hosts for the ticks and the capacity of tick hosts to serve as B. burgdorferi reservoirs. Here, we explore the linkages between climate variation and: 1) duration of the seasonal period and the timing of peak activity; 2) geographic tick distributions and local abundance; 3) enzootic B. burgdorferi transmission cycles; and 4) Lyme disease cases. We conclude that meteorological variables are most influential in determining host-seeking phenology and development, but, while remaining important cofactors, additional variables become critical when exploring geographic distribution and local abundance of ticks, enzootic transmission of B. burgdorferi, and Lyme disease case occurrence. Finally, we review climate change-driven projections for future impact on vector ticks and Lyme disease and discuss knowledge gaps and research needs.

  1. Linkages of Weather and Climate With Ixodes scapularis and Ixodes pacificus (Acari: Ixodidae), Enzootic Transmission of Borrelia burgdorferi, and Lyme Disease in North America

    PubMed Central

    Eisen, Rebecca J.; Eisen, Lars; Ogden, Nicholas H.; Beard, Charles B.

    2016-01-01

    Lyme disease has increased both in incidence and geographic extent in the United States and Canada over the past two decades. One of the underlying causes is changes during the same time period in the distribution and abundance of the primary vectors: Ixodes scapularis Say and Ixodes pacificus Cooley and Kohls in eastern and western North America, respectively. Aside from short periods of time when they are feeding on hosts, these ticks exist in the environment where temperature and relative humidity directly affect their development, survival, and host-seeking behavior. Other important factors that strongly influence tick abundance as well as the proportion of ticks infected with the Lyme disease spirochete, Borrelia burgdorferi, include the abundance of hosts for the ticks and the capacity of tick hosts to serve as B. burgdorferi reservoirs. Here, we explore the linkages between climate variation and: 1) duration of the seasonal period and the timing of peak activity; 2) geographic tick distributions and local abundance; 3) enzootic B. burgdorferi transmission cycles; and 4) Lyme disease cases. We conclude that meteorological variables are most influential in determining host-seeking phenology and development, but, while remaining important cofactors, additional variables become critical when exploring geographic distribution and local abundance of ticks, enzootic transmission of B. burgdorferi, and Lyme disease case occurrence. Finally, we review climate change-driven projections for future impact on vector ticks and Lyme disease and discuss knowledge gaps and research needs. PMID:26681789

  2. Demonstration of early-phase transmission of Yersinia pestis by the mouse flea, Aetheca wagneri (Siphonaptera: Ceratophylidae), and implications for the role of deer mice as enzootic reservoirs.

    PubMed

    Eisen, Rebecca J; Holmes, Jennifer L; Schotthoefer, Anna M; Vetter, Sara M; Montenieri, John A; Gage, Kenneth L

    2008-11-01

    The role of deer mice and other species of Peromyscus as enzootic reservoirs for plague remains controversial. In this study, we evaluated early-phase vector efficiency of Aetheca wagneri Baker, a common flea species infesting deer mice, to determine the likelihood that Y. pestis could be spread mouse to mouse by this species. We showed that A. wagneri could transmit plague bacteria to laboratory mice as early as 3 d postinfection (p.i.), but transmission efficiency was quite low (1.03%; 95% CI: 0.19-3.34%) 1-4 d p.i. compared with that for the established plague vector Oropsylla montana Baker (10.63%; 95% CI: 4.18-25.91). Using this early-phase transmission efficiency estimate, we determined through parameterization of a simple predictive model that at least 68 A. wagneri per deer mouse would be required to support levels of transmission adequate for enzootic maintenance. Because deer mice typically harbor fewer than three A. wagneri per host, our data do not support the notion of an independent deer mouse--A. wagneri transmission cycle.

  3. Isolated pulmonary valve endocarditis masquerading as community-acquired pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Nazir, Salik; Lohani, Saroj; Tachamo, Niranjan; Siddiqui, Anam; Patel, Nitin

    2016-01-01

    Isolated pulmonary valve endocarditis in intravenous drug users is a rarely reported phenomenon. We present the case of a 25-year-old male with history of intravenous drug use who presented with respiratory symptoms after failing outpatient treatment for community-acquired pneumonia. Further investigations identified multiple lung lesions with early cavitation, concerning for septic pulmonary embolism on computerized tomography scan, positive blood cultures with methicillin-susceptible staphylococcus aureus, and isolated vegetation of the pulmonic valve on transthoracic echocardiography. The patient had a complete recovery after being treated medically with intravenous oxacillin for a total of 6 weeks. PMID:27802862

  4. An Unusual Suspect Causing Hypoxemic Respiratory Failure

    PubMed Central

    Aqeel, Masooma; Batdorf, Bjorn; Olteanu, Horatiu; Patel, Jayshil J.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Antisynthetase syndrome (ASS) is characterized by the presence of anti-Jo-1 antibodies in conjunction with clinical findings of fever, polymyositis-dermatomyositis, and interstitial lung disease (ILD). Inflammatory myopathies carry a high risk of malignancy, but this association is less well outlined in ASS. We present the case of a patient with ASS who developed non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma with acute hypoxemic respiratory failure. Case Presentation: A 44-year-old female with ASS presented with acute hypoxemic respiratory failure. She was empirically treated with broad-spectrum antibiotics for a health care–associated pneumonia; however, she failed to improve. Chest computed tomography revealed extensive bilateral ground glass opacities as well as extensive mediastinal and axillary lymphadenopathy. Infectious workup was negative. A surgical lung biopsy revealed peripheral T-cell lymphoma (PTCL). The patient was started on chemotherapy with complete resolution of hypoxemic respiratory failure. Conclusions: Malignancy is very rare in the setting of ASS; and our case illustrates the unique presentation of PTCL in ASS. In addition, lung involvement in PTCL is variable (incidence ranging from 8% to 20%); and in this case, bilateral multifocal consolidation was biopsied and proven to be PTCL involving the lungs. This case highlights the rare noninfectious conditions that can present as acute hypoxemic respiratory failure in the setting of ASS. PMID:28210638

  5. An Unusual Suspect Causing Hypoxemic Respiratory Failure.

    PubMed

    Aqeel, Masooma; Batdorf, Bjorn; Olteanu, Horatiu; Patel, Jayshil J

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Antisynthetase syndrome (ASS) is characterized by the presence of anti-Jo-1 antibodies in conjunction with clinical findings of fever, polymyositis-dermatomyositis, and interstitial lung disease (ILD). Inflammatory myopathies carry a high risk of malignancy, but this association is less well outlined in ASS. We present the case of a patient with ASS who developed non-Hodgkin's lymphoma with acute hypoxemic respiratory failure. Case Presentation: A 44-year-old female with ASS presented with acute hypoxemic respiratory failure. She was empirically treated with broad-spectrum antibiotics for a health care-associated pneumonia; however, she failed to improve. Chest computed tomography revealed extensive bilateral ground glass opacities as well as extensive mediastinal and axillary lymphadenopathy. Infectious workup was negative. A surgical lung biopsy revealed peripheral T-cell lymphoma (PTCL). The patient was started on chemotherapy with complete resolution of hypoxemic respiratory failure. Conclusions: Malignancy is very rare in the setting of ASS; and our case illustrates the unique presentation of PTCL in ASS. In addition, lung involvement in PTCL is variable (incidence ranging from 8% to 20%); and in this case, bilateral multifocal consolidation was biopsied and proven to be PTCL involving the lungs. This case highlights the rare noninfectious conditions that can present as acute hypoxemic respiratory failure in the setting of ASS.

  6. Salivary and serum analysis in children diagnosed with pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Klein Kremer, Adi; Kuzminsky, Ela; Bentur, Lea; Nagler, Rafael M

    2014-06-01

    The aim of the current study was to evaluate specific markers for pneumonia by using a non-invasive assessment of inflammatory/oxidative biomarkers in saliva accompanying a routine serum analysis. No study evaluating saliva of children with pneumonia has been published previously. Salivary analysis was performed in 15 children diagnosed with lobar pneumonia and in a parallel group of 16 children matching in age and gender in whom there was no respiratory illness, and compared to the serum analysis obtained routinely in both groups of children. Salivary flow rate was lower in the patients' group as was uric acid concentration (by 60%). Increase in salivary concentrations of almost all parameters analyzed was found: Ca, P, and Mg concentrations were higher in the patients' group by 23%, 55%, and 33%, respectively, while LDH, total protein amylase and albumin concentrations were higher by 275%, 79%, and 42%, respectively. In the serum, white cell counts and neutrophils were significantly higher, and sodium level significantly lower in the patients' group. Compositional changes were in the range of 3-80% while the saliva alterations were more profound, in the range of 42-275%. The results demonstrated in the current study indicate salivary analysis as a potentially novel tool for children with pneumonia. Human salivary collection and analysis is a non-invasive tool that could provide additional information for diagnosis and follow-up of pneumonia, especially in children. This is especially beneficial for pediatric patients, as salivary collection is simple, non-invasive, and patient-friendly.

  7. Early non-invasive ventilation treatment for severe influenza pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Masclans, J R; Pérez, M; Almirall, J; Lorente, L; Marqués, A; Socias, L; Vidaur, L; Rello, J

    2013-03-01

    The role of non-invasive ventilation (NIV) in acute respiratory failure caused by viral pneumonia remains controversial. Our objective was to evaluate the use of NIV in a cohort of (H1N1)v pneumonia. Usefulness and success of NIV were assessed in a prospective, observational registry of patients with influenza A (H1N1) virus pneumonia in 148 Spanish intensive care units (ICUs) in 2009-10. Significant variables for NIV success were included in a multivariate analysis. In all, 685 patients with confirmed influenza A (H1N1)v viral pneumonia were admitted to participating ICUs; 489 were ventilated, 177 with NIV. The NIV was successful in 72 patients (40.7%), the rest required intubation. Low Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II, low Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) and absence of renal failure were associated with NIV success. Success of NIV was independently associated with fewer than two chest X-ray quadrant opacities (OR 3.5) and no vasopressor requirement (OR 8.1). However, among patients with two or more quadrant opacities, a SOFA score ≤7 presented a higher success rate than those with SOFA score >7 (OR 10.7). Patients in whom NIV was successful required shorter ventilation time, shorter ICU stay and hospital stay than NIV failure. In patients in whom NIV failed, the delay in intubation did not increase mortality (26.5% versus 24.2%). Clinicians used NIV in 25.8% of influenza A (H1N1)v viral pneumonia admitted to ICU, and treatment was effective in 40.6% of them. NIV success was associated with shorter hospital stay and mortality similar to non-ventilated patients. NIV failure was associated with a mortality similar to those who were intubated from the start.

  8. Oral and airway microbiota in HIV-infected pneumonia patients.

    PubMed

    Iwai, Shoko; Fei, Matthew; Huang, Delphine; Fong, Serena; Subramanian, Anuradha; Grieco, Katherine; Lynch, Susan V; Huang, Laurence

    2012-09-01

    Despite the increased frequency of recurrent pneumonia in HIV-infected patients and recent studies linking the airway bacterial community (microbiota) to acute and chronic respiratory infection, little is known of the oral and airway microbiota that exist in these individuals and their propensity to harbor pathogens despite antimicrobial treatment for acute pneumonia. This pilot study compared paired samples of the oral and airway microbiota from 15 hospitalized HIV-infected patients receiving antimicrobial treatment for acute pneumonia. Total DNA was extracted, bacterial burden was assessed by quantitative PCR, and amplified 16S rRNA was profiled for microbiome composition using a phylogenetic microarray (16S rRNA PhyloChip). Though the bacterial burden of the airway was significantly lower than that of the oral cavity, microbiota in both niches were comparably diverse. However, oral and airway microbiota exhibited niche specificity. Oral microbiota were characterized by significantly increased relative abundance of multiple species associated with the mouth, including members of the Bacteroides, Firmicutes, and TM7 phyla, while airway microbiota were primarily characterized by a relative expansion of the Proteobacteria. Twenty-two taxa were detected in both niches, including Streptococcus bovis and Chryseobacterium species, pathogens associated with HIV-infected populations. In addition, we compared the airway microbiota of five of these patients to those of five non-HIV-infected pneumonia patients from a previous study. Compared to the control population, HIV-infected patients exhibited relative increased abundance of a large number of phylogenetically distinct taxa, which included several known or suspected pathogenic organisms, suggesting that recurrent pneumonia in HIV-infected populations may be related to the presence of these species.

  9. A severe Mycoplasma pneumoniae pneumonia inducing an acute antibody-mediated pulmonary graft rejection

    PubMed Central

    Démir, Sarah; Saison, Julien; Sénéchal, Agathe; Mornex, Jean-Francois

    2017-01-01

    A 40-year-old cystic fibrosis woman with a history of double-lung transplantation 2 years previously was admitted for a progressive respiratory distress. Physical examination revealed fever (39°C) and diffuse bilateral lung crackles. Laboratory findings included severe hypoxemia and inflammatory syndrome. Bronchoalveolar lavage and serological test were positive for mycoplasma pneumonia. As the patient did not improve after 3 days of antibiotics and donor-specific HLA antibodies had been detected, an acute antibody-mediated graft rejection was treated with high-dose corticosteroids, plasma exchange, intravenous immunoglobulin, and rituximab. The patient rapidly improved. Unfortunately, 6 months after this episode, she developed a bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome with a dependence to noninvasive ventilator leading to the indication of retransplantation. This case illustrates the possible relationship between infection and humoral rejection. These two diagnoses should be promptly investigated and systematically treated in lung transplant recipients. PMID:28144069

  10. Enzootic plague foci, Algeria

    PubMed Central

    Malek, M.A.; Hammani, A.; Beneldjouzi, A.; Bitam, I.

    2014-01-01

    In Algeria, PCR sequencing of pla, glpD and rpoB genes found Yersinia pestis in 18/237 (8%) rodents of five species, including Apodemus sylvaticus, previously undescribed as pestiferous; and disclosed three new plague foci. Multiple spacer typing confirmed a new Orientalis variant. Rodent survey should be reinforced in this country hosting reemerging plague. PMID:25834736

  11. Crystal Structures of Respiratory Pathogen Neuraminidases

    SciTech Connect

    Hsiao, Y.; Parker, D; Ratner, A; Prince, A; Tong, L

    2009-01-01

    Currently there is pressing need to develop novel therapeutic agents for the treatment of infections by the human respiratory pathogens Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Streptococcus pneumoniae. The neuraminidases of these pathogens are important for host colonization in animal models of infection and are attractive targets for drug discovery. To aid in the development of inhibitors against these neuraminidases, we have determined the crystal structures of the P. aeruginosa enzyme NanPs and S. pneumoniae enzyme NanA at 1.6 and 1.7 {angstrom} resolution, respectively. In situ proteolysis with trypsin was essential for the crystallization of our recombinant NanA. The active site regions of the two enzymes are strikingly different. NanA contains a deep pocket that is similar to that in canonical neuraminidases, while the NanPs active site is much more open. The comparative studies suggest that NanPs may not be a classical neuraminidase, and may have distinct natural substrates and physiological functions. This work represents an important step in the development of drugs to prevent respiratory tract colonization by these two pathogens.

  12. Clinical Features of Severe or Fatal Mycoplasma pneumoniae Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Izumikawa, Koichi

    2016-01-01

    Mycoplasma pneumoniae is one of the most common causes of community-acquired pneumonia in children and young adults. The incidence of fulminant M. pneumoniae pneumonia (MPP) is relatively rare despite the high prevalence of M. pneumoniae infection. This literature review highlights the clinical features of fulminant MPP by examining the most recent data in epidemiology, clinical presentation, pathogenesis, and treatment. Fulminant MPP accounts for 0.5–2% of all MPP cases and primarily affects young adults with no underlying disease. Key clinical findings include a cough, fever, and dyspnea along with diffuse abnormal findings in radiological examinations. Levels of inflammatory markers such as white blood cells and C-reactive protein are elevated, as well as levels of lactate dehydrogenase, IL-18, aspartate transaminase, and alanine transaminase. The exact pathogenesis of fulminant MPP remains unclear, but theories include a delayed hypersensitivity reaction to M. pneumoniae and the contribution of delayed antibiotic administration to disease progression. Treatment options involve pairing the appropriate anti-mycoplasma agent with a corticosteroid that will downregulate the hypersensitivity response, and mortality rates are quite low in this treatment group. Further research is necessary to determine the exact pathogenesis of severe and fulminant types of MPP. PMID:27313568

  13. Respiratory Complications of Organophosphorus Nerve Agent and Insecticide Poisoning. Implications for Respiratory and Critical Care

    PubMed Central

    Hulse, Elspeth J.; Davies, James O. J.; Simpson, A. John; Sciuto, Alfred M.

    2014-01-01

    Organophosphorus (OP) compound poisoning is a major global public health problem. Acute OP insecticide self-poisoning kills over 200,000 people every year, the majority from self-harm in rural Asia. Highly toxic OP nerve agents (e.g., sarin) are a significant current terrorist threat, as shown by attacks in Damascus during 2013. These anticholinesterase compounds are classically considered to cause an acute cholinergic syndrome with decreased consciousness, respiratory failure, and, in the case of insecticides, a delayed intermediate syndrome that requires prolonged ventilation. Acute respiratory failure, by central and peripheral mechanisms, is the primary cause of death in most cases. However, preclinical and clinical research over the last two decades has indicated a more complex picture of respiratory complications after OP insecticide poisoning, including onset of delayed neuromuscular junction dysfunction during the cholinergic syndrome, aspiration causing pneumonia and acute respiratory distress syndrome, and the involvement of solvents in OP toxicity. The treatment of OP poisoning has not changed over the last 50 years. However, a better understanding of the multiple respiratory complications of OP poisoning offers additional therapeutic opportunities. PMID:25419614

  14. Virulent Clones of Klebsiella pneumoniae: Identification and Evolutionary Scenario Based on Genomic and Phenotypic Characterization

    PubMed Central

    Brisse, Sylvain; Fevre, Cindy; Passet, Virginie; Issenhuth-Jeanjean, Sylvie; Tournebize, Régis; Diancourt, Laure; Grimont, Patrick

    2009-01-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae is found in the environment and as a harmless commensal, but is also a frequent nosocomial pathogen (causing urinary, respiratory and blood infections) and the agent of specific human infections including Friedländer's pneumonia, rhinoscleroma and the emerging disease pyogenic liver abscess (PLA). The identification and precise definition of virulent clones, i.e. groups of strains with a single ancestor that are associated with particular infections, is critical to understand the evolution of pathogenicity from commensalism and for a better control of infections. We analyzed 235 K. pneumoniae isolates of diverse environmental and clinical origins by multilocus sequence typing, virulence gene content, biochemical and capsular profiling and virulence to mice. Phylogenetic analysis of housekeeping genes clearly defined clones that differ sharply by their clinical source and biological features. First, two clones comprising isolates of capsular type K1, clone CC23K1 and clone CC82K1, were strongly associated with PLA and respiratory infection, respectively. Second, only one of the two major disclosed K2 clones was highly virulent to mice. Third, strains associated with the human infections ozena and rhinoscleroma each corresponded to one monomorphic clone. Therefore, K. pneumoniae subsp. ozaenae and K. pneumoniae subsp. rhinoscleromatis should be regarded as virulent clones derived from K. pneumoniae. The lack of strict association of virulent capsular types with clones was explained by horizontal transfer of the cps operon, responsible for the synthesis of the capsular polysaccharide. Finally, the reduction of metabolic versatility observed in clones Rhinoscleromatis, Ozaenae and CC82K1 indicates an evolutionary process of specialization to a pathogenic lifestyle. In contrast, clone CC23K1 remains metabolically versatile, suggesting recent acquisition of invasive potential. In conclusion, our results reveal the existence of important virulent

  15. Coinfection with Streptococcus pneumoniae modulates the B cell response to influenza virus.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Amaya I; Strauman, Maura C; Mozdzanowska, Krystyna; Whittle, James R R; Williams, Katie L; Sharpe, Arlene H; Weiser, Jeffrey N; Caton, Andrew J; Hensley, Scott E; Erikson, Jan

    2014-10-01

    Pathogen-specific antibodies (Abs) protect against respiratory infection with influenza A virus (IAV) and Streptococcus pneumoniae and are the basis of effective vaccines. Sequential or overlapping coinfections with both pathogens are common, yet the impact of coinfection on the generation and maintenance of Ab responses is largely unknown. We report here that the B cell response to IAV is altered in mice coinfected with IAV and S. pneumoniae and that this response differs, depending on the order of pathogen exposure. In mice exposed to S. pneumoniae prior to IAV, the initial virus-specific germinal center (GC) B cell response is significantly enhanced in the lung-draining mediastinal lymph node and spleen, and there is an increase in CD4(+) T follicular helper (TFH) cell numbers. In contrast, secondary S. pneumoniae infection exaggerates early antiviral antibody-secreting cell formation, and at later times, levels of GCs, TFH cells, and antiviral serum IgG are elevated. Mice exposed to S. pneumoniae prior to IAV do not maintain the initially robust GC response in secondary lymphoid organs and exhibit reduced antiviral serum IgG with diminished virus neutralization activity a month after infection. Our data suggest that the history of pathogen exposures can critically affect the generation of protective antiviral Abs and may partially explain the differential susceptibility to and disease outcomes from IAV infection in humans. Importance: Respiratory tract coinfections, specifically those involving influenza A viruses and Streptococcus pneumoniae, remain a top global health burden. We sought to determine how S. pneumoniae coinfection modulates the B cell immune response to influenza virus since antibodies are key mediators of protection.

  16. Respiratory Viruses and Bacteria among Pilgrims during the 2013 Hajj

    PubMed Central

    Benkouiten, Samir; Charrel, Rémi; Belhouchat, Khadidja; Drali, Tassadit; Nougairede, Antoine; Salez, Nicolas; Memish, Ziad A.; al Masri, Malak; Fournier, Pierre-Edouard; Raoult, Didier; Brouqui, Philippe; Parola, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    Pilgrims returning from the Hajj might contribute to international spreading of respiratory pathogens. Nasal and throat swab specimens were obtained from 129 pilgrims in 2013 before they departed from France and before they left Saudi Arabia, and tested by PCR for respiratory viruses and bacteria. Overall, 21.5% and 38.8% of pre-Hajj and post-Hajj specimens, respectively, were positive for ≥1 virus (p = 0.003). One third (29.8%) of the participants acquired ≥1 virus, particularly rhinovirus (14.0%), coronavirus E229 (12.4%), and influenza A(H3N2) virus (6.2%) while in Saudi Arabia. None of the participants were positive for the Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus. In addition, 50.0% and 62.0% of pre-Hajj and post-Hajj specimens, respectively, were positive for Streptococcus pneumoniae (p = 0.053). One third (36.3%) of the participants had acquired S. pneumoniae during their stay. Our results confirm high acquisition rates of rhinovirus and S. pneumoniae in pilgrims and highlight the acquisition of coronavirus E229. PMID:25341199

  17. Respiratory viruses and bacteria among pilgrims during the 2013 Hajj.

    PubMed

    Benkouiten, Samir; Charrel, Rémi; Belhouchat, Khadidja; Drali, Tassadit; Nougairede, Antoine; Salez, Nicolas; Memish, Ziad A; Al Masri, Malak; Fournier, Pierre-Edouard; Raoult, Didier; Brouqui, Philippe; Parola, Philippe; Gautret, Philippe

    2014-11-01

    Pilgrims returning from the Hajj might contribute to international spreading of respiratory pathogens. Nasal and throat swab specimens were obtained from 129 pilgrims in 2013 before they departed from France and before they left Saudi Arabia, and tested by PCR for respiratory viruses and bacteria. Overall, 21.5% and 38.8% of pre-Hajj and post-Hajj specimens, respectively, were positive for ≥1 virus (p = 0.003). One third (29.8%) of the participants acquired ≥1 virus, particularly rhinovirus (14.0%), coronavirus E229 (12.4%), and influenza A(H3N2) virus (6.2%) while in Saudi Arabia. None of the participants were positive for the Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus. In addition, 50.0% and 62.0% of pre-Hajj and post-Hajj specimens, respectively, were positive for Streptococcus pneumoniae (p = 0.053). One third (36.3%) of the participants had acquired S. pneumoniae during their stay. Our results confirm high acquisition rates of rhinovirus and S. pneumoniae in pilgrims and highlight the acquisition of coronavirus E229.

  18. Acute respiratory disease in Spain: seven years of experience.

    PubMed

    Tellez, A; Perez-Breña, P; Fernandez-Patiño, M V; León, P; Anda, P; Nájera, R

    1990-01-01

    The clinical and epidemiologic features of viral and nonviral pathogens involved in acute respiratory diseases are described in the context of cases of infection (especially atypical pneumonia and bronchiolitis) studied at the Centro Nacional de Microbiología, Virología e Immunología Sanitarias in Madrid during a 7-year period (1979-1986). These etiologies were demonstrated in 1,637 (36.2%) of 4,521 cases. Among viruses, respiratory syncytial virus most frequently infected children; influenza virus showed the same pattern of circulation as in other European countries. Of nonviral agents, Mycoplasma pneumoniae and C. burnetii were most often involved in lower respiratory tract infections, with a variable predominance in patients of different ages. A high proportion of cases of M. pneumoniae infection occurred in infants and children aged less than 1 year, and most of these cases occurred during spring and summer. The majority of Q fever cases, including those observed in two outbreaks, occurred in the northern region.

  19. Acute Fibrinous and Organizing Pneumonia with Myelodysplastic Syndrome: Corticosteroid Monotherapy Led to Successful Ventilator Weaning

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Mari; Murata, Kengo; Kiriu, Takahiro; Kouzai, Yasuji; Takamori, Mikio

    2016-01-01

    A 62-year-old man with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) presented to our hospital with a high fever. Although treatment with broad-spectrum antibiotics was initiated, his respiratory status worsened to the point that he required mechanical ventilation. However, he was successfully treated with a corticosteroid without immunosuppression. Sequential transbronchial lung biopsies revealed abundant fibrin exudate in the alveolar spaces, which was subsequently replaced by fibroblasts, showing that acute fibrinous and organizing pneumonia (AFOP) gradually changes into organizing pneumonia. Our case demonstrated both the efficacy of corticosteroid-monotherapy and the histological course of AFOP. PMID:27803411

  20. Mycoplasma pneumoniae: an aetiological agent of acute haemorrhagic oedema of infancy.

    PubMed

    Di Lernia, Vito

    2014-11-01

    Acute haemorrhagic oedema of infancy (AHEI) is considered a separate clinical entity among cutaneous small vessel vasculitis of childhood. It usually occurs in children younger than 2 years of age, with spontaneous recovery occurring within a few weeks. A history of recent upper respiratory or urinary tract infections or immunisation is found in most patients. Although Mycoplasma pneumoniae has been linked to a wide array of skin eruptions or diseases, it is not recognised as a possible cause of acute haemorrhagic oedema of infancy. The authors report a child with AHEI and a concurrent M. pneumoniae infection.

  1. Mesalazine-induced eosinophilic pneumonia with bone marrow infiltration: a case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yunjian; Luo, Ling; Wang, Xiaofang; Liu, Xiaoyang; Wang, Xiaoyan; Ding, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Mesalazine-induced eosinophilic pneumonia has been rarely reported. We reported a case of mesalazine-induced eosinophilic pneumonia in a 56-year-old female who took mesalazine without a prescription for suspected ulcerative colitis. She had an elevated eosinophil count in peripheral blood and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Eosinophil infiltration was also noted in bone marrow aspirates. Chest radiograph and computed tomography demonstrated bilateral upper lung predominant infiltrates and spirometry showed a restrictive ventilatory defect with a reduced diffusion capacity. The patient recovered after cessation of mesalazine therapy. Mesalazine-induced lung damage should be considered in patients who develop unexplained respiratory symptoms while taking this agent. PMID:27366075

  2. Consumption patterns and in vitro resistance of Streptococcus pneumoniae to fluoroquinolones.

    PubMed

    Simoens, Steven; Verhaegen, Jan; van Bleyenbergh, Pascal; Peetermans, Willy E; Decramer, Marc

    2011-06-01

    This article analyzes patterns of consumption of fluoroquinolones and documents the in vitro resistances of Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates to fluoroquinolones in the ambulatory care setting in Belgium over time. The volume of fluoroquinolone consumption has fallen consistently since 2003. Fluoroquinolones were used primarily for their registered indications (i.e., urinary tract infections and lower respiratory tract infections). The MIC distributions of moxifloxacin and levofloxacin in S. pneumoniae isolates remained stable during 2004 to 2009, and the level of resistance to moxifloxacin and levofloxacin was low (≤1%).

  3. Mycoplasma pneumoniae associated stroke in a 3-year-old girl

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Gun-Ha; Seo, Won Hee; Je, Bo-Kyung

    2013-01-01

    Infectious diseases precede a significant proportion of acute ischemic strokes in children. Here, we report a case of acute ischemic stroke in a 3-year-old girl with a Mycoplasma pneumonia-associated respiratory tract infection. She developed an acquired prothrombotic state of protein S deficiency and had increased fibrinogen and fibrinogen degradation product levels and increased titer of antinuclear antibodies. However, these conditions were completely alleviated at the 1-month follow-up examination. Infection with M. pneumoniae may cause a transient prothrombotic state that can potentially cause a thrombus. PMID:24223604

  4. Severe pneumonia due to Nocardia otitidiscaviarum identified by mass spectroscopy in a cotton farmer

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chen; Feng, Mei; Zhu, Jing; Tao, Ye; Kang, Mei; Chen, Lei

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: Nocardia species are aerobic saprophytic bacilli. Among Nocardia species, Nocardia otitidiscaviarum (N otitidiscaviarum) is rarely reported in pulmonary infection. Patient concerns: We reported a case of N otitidiscaviarum pneumonia in a cotton farmer. Diagnoses: N otitidiscaviarum pneumonia was identified by mass spectroscopy. Interventions: Combined treatments (amikacin, imipenem and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole) were administered after identification of N otitidiscaviarum. Outcomes: The patient eventually died from severe respiratory insufficiency in the hospital. Lessons: Early precise diagnosis and prompt combined therapy are of vital importance in severe Nocardia pulmonary infection. PMID:28353613

  5. Upper respiratory tract (image)

    MedlinePlus

    The major passages and structures of the upper respiratory tract include the nose or nostrils, nasal cavity, mouth, throat (pharynx), and voice box (larynx). The respiratory system is lined with a mucous membrane that ...

  6. Avian respiratory system disorders

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olsen, G.H.

    1989-01-01

    Diagnosing and treating respiratory diseases in avian species requires a basic knowledge about the anatomy and physiology of this system in birds. Differences between mammalian and avian respiratory system function, diagnosis, and treatment are highlighted.

  7. MSFC Respiratory Protection Services

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    CoVan, James P.

    1999-01-01

    An overview of the Marshall Space Flight Center Respiratory Protection program is provided in this poster display. Respiratory protection personnel, building, facilities, equipment, customers, maintenance and operational activities, and Dynatech fit testing details are described and illustrated.

  8. Fatal respiratory distress syndrome due to coronavirus infection in a child with severe combined immunodeficiency.

    PubMed

    Szczawinska-Poplonyk, Aleksandra; Jonczyk-Potoczna, Katarzyna; Breborowicz, Anna; Bartkowska-Sniatkowska, Alicja; Figlerowicz, Magdalena

    2013-09-01

    Coronaviruses have been demonstrated to contribute substantially to respiratory tract infections among the child population. Though infected children commonly present mild upper airway symptoms, in high-risk patients with underlying conditions, particularly in immunocompromised children these pathogens may lead to severe lung infection and extrapulmonary disorders. In this paper, we provide the first report of the case of a 15-month-old child with severe combined immunodeficiency and coronavirus HKU1-related pneumonia with fatal respiratory distress syndrome.

  9. [Idiopathic interstitial pneumonias in 2016].

    PubMed

    Debray, M-P; Borie, R; Danel, C; Khalil, A; Majlath, M; Crestani, B

    2017-02-01

    Idiopathic interstitial pneumonias comprise 8 clinicopathological entities, most of them with a chronic course and various prognosis. Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis is the most frequent and most severe of these. Computed tomography has an important role for its diagnosis. It can identify the corresponding pathological pattern of usual interstitial pneumonia in about 50 percent of cases. It can suggest differential diagnosis in other cases, most frequently fibrosing nonspecific interstitial pneumonia and chronic hypersensitivity pneumonitis. Imaging features should be integrated to clinical and available pathologic data during multidisciplinary team meetings involving physicians with a good knowledge of interstitial diseases. Some cases may be unclassifiable, but these could later be reclassified as new data may occur or imaging features may change. Surgical lung biopsy is being less frequently performed and an emerging less invasive technique, lung cryobiopsy, is under evaluation. Pleuroparenchymal fibroelastosis is a distinct entity only recently described, with uncertain prevalence and prognosis that seems being quite often associated to another pattern of interstitial pneumonia.

  10. Community-Acquired Pneumonia Requiring Hospitalization among U.S. Adults

    PubMed Central

    Jain, S.; Self, W.H.; Wunderink, R.G.; Fakhran, S.; Balk, R.; Bramley, A.M.; Reed, C.; Grijalva, C.G.; Anderson, E.J.; Courtney, D.M.; Chappell, J.D.; Qi, C.; Hart, E.M.; Carroll, F.; Trabue, C.; Donnelly, H.K.; Williams, D.J.; Zhu, Y.; Arnold, S.R.; Ampofo, K.; Waterer, G.W.; Levine, M.; Lindstrom, S.; Winchell, J.M.; Katz, J.M.; Erdman, D.; Schneider, E.; Hicks, L.A.; McCullers, J.A.; Pavia, A.T.; Edwards, K.M.; Finelli, L.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Community-acquired pneumonia is a leading infectious cause of hospitalization and death among U.S. adults. Incidence estimates of pneumonia confirmed radio-graphically and with the use of current laboratory diagnostic tests are needed. METHODS We conducted active population-based surveillance for community-acquired pneumonia requiring hospitalization among adults 18 years of age or older in five hospitals in Chicago and Nashville. Patients with recent hospitalization or severe immunosuppression were excluded. Blood, urine, and respiratory specimens were systematically collected for culture, serologic testing, antigen detection, and molecular diagnostic testing. Study radiologists independently reviewed chest radiographs. We calculated population-based incidence rates of community-acquired pneumonia requiring hospitalization according to age and pathogen. RESULTS From January 2010 through June 2012, we enrolled 2488 of 3634 eligible adults (68%). Among 2320 adults with radiographic evidence of pneumonia (93%), the median age of the patients was 57 years (interquartile range, 46 to 71); 498 patients (21%) required intensive care, and 52 (2%) died. Among 2259 patients who had radio-graphic evidence of pneumonia and specimens available for both bacterial and viral testing, a pathogen was detected in 853 (38%): one or more viruses in 530 (23%), bacteria in 247 (11%), bacterial and viral pathogens in 59 (3%), and a fungal or mycobacterial pathogen in 17 (1%). The most common pathogens were human rhinovirus (in 9% of patients), influenza virus (in 6%), and Streptococcus pneumoniae (in 5%). The annual incidence of pneumonia was 24.8 cases (95% confidence interval, 23.5 to 26.1) per 10,000 adults, with the highest rates among adults 65 to 79 years of age (63.0 cases per 10,000 adults) and those 80 years of age or older (164.3 cases per 10,000 adults). For each pathogen, the incidence increased with age. CONCLUSIONS The incidence of community-acquired pneumonia

  11. Detection of Mycoplasma pneumoniae, Chlamydia pneumoniae, and Legionella spp. in clinical specimens using a single-tube multiplex real-time PCR assay.

    PubMed

    Thurman, Kathleen A; Warner, Agnes K; Cowart, Kelley C; Benitez, Alvaro J; Winchell, Jonas M

    2011-05-01

    A multiplex real-time PCR assay for the detection of Mycoplasma pneumoniae (MP181), Chlamydia (Chlamydophila) pneumoniae (CP-Arg), Legionella spp. (Pan-Leg), and the human RNase P (RNase P) gene was developed for rapid testing of atypical bacterial respiratory pathogens in clinical specimens. This method uses 4 distinct hydrolysis probes to detect 3 leading causes of community-acquired pneumonia. The assay was evaluated for specificity and sensitivity by testing against 35 related organisms, a dilution series of each specific target and 197 clinical specimens. Specificity testing demonstrated no cross-reactivity. A comparison to previously validated singleplex real-time PCR assays for each agent was also performed. The analytical sensitivity for specific pathogen targets in both the singleplex and multiplex was identical (50 fg), while efficiencies ranged from 82% to 97% for the singleplex assays and from 90% to 100% for the multiplex assay. The clinical sensitivity of the multiplex assay was improved for the Pan-Leg and CP-Arg targets when compared to the singleplex. The MP181 assay displayed equivalent performance. This multiplex assay provides an overall improvement in the diagnostic capability for these agents by demonstrating a sensitive, high-throughput and rapid method. This procedure may allow for a practical and efficient means to test respiratory clinical specimens for atypical pneumonia agents in health care settings and facilitate an appropriate public health response to outbreaks.

  12. Respiratory Syncytial Virus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Respiratory Syncytial Virus KidsHealth > For Parents > Respiratory Syncytial Virus A A A What's in this article? About ... RSV When to Call the Doctor en español Virus respiratorio sincitial About RSV Respiratory syncytial (sin-SISH- ...

  13. Lungs and Respiratory System

    MedlinePlus

    ... A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Lungs and Respiratory System KidsHealth > For Teens > Lungs and Respiratory System Print ... didn't breathe, you couldn't live. Lungs & Respiratory System Basics Each day we breathe about 20,000 ...

  14. Lungs and Respiratory System

    MedlinePlus

    ... A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Lungs and Respiratory System KidsHealth > For Teens > Lungs and Respiratory System A ... didn't breathe, you couldn't live. Lungs & Respiratory System Basics Each day we breathe about 20,000 ...

  15. Update on the diagnosis and treatment of Pneumocystis pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Carmona, Eva M; Limper, Andrew H

    2011-02-01

    Pneumocystis is an opportunistic fungal pathogen that causes an often-lethal pneumonia in immunocompromised hosts. Although the organism was discovered in the early 1900s, the first cases of Pneumocystis pneumonia in humans were initially recognized in Central Europe after the Second World War in premature and malnourished infants. This unusual lung infection was known as plasma cellular interstitial pneumonitis of the newborn, and was characterized by severe respiratory distress and cyanosis with little or no fever and no pathognomic physical signs. At that time, only anecdotal cases were reported in adults and usually these patients had a baseline malignancy that led to a malnourished state. In the 1960-1970s additional cases were described in adults and children with hematological malignancies, but Pneumocystis pneumonia was still considered a rare disease. However, in the 1980s, with the onset of the HIV epidemic, Pneumocystis prevalence increased dramatically and became widely recognized as an opportunistic infection that caused potentially life-treating pneumonia in patients with impaired immunity. During this time period, prophylaxis against this organism was more generally instituted in high-risk patients. In the 1990s, with widespread use of prophylaxis and the initiation of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) in the treatment of HIV-infected patients, the number of cases in this specific population decreased. However, Pneumocystis pneumonia still remains an important cause of severe pneumonia in patients with HIV infection and is still considered a principal AIDS-defining illness. Despite the decreased number of cases among HIV-infected patients over the past decade, Pneumocystis pneumonia continues to be a serious problem in immunodeficient patients with other immunosuppressive conditions. This is mostly due to increased use of immunosuppressive medications to treat patients with autoimmune diseases, following bone marrow and solid organ

  16. PEGylated liposomal vancomycin: a glimmer of hope for improving treatment outcomes in MRSA pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Pumerantz, Andrew S

    2012-12-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) plays a significant role in the pandemic of multidrug resistant bacterial infections and is a major cause of hospital-acquired pneumonia. MRSA pneumonia carries a high morbidity and mortality rate especially in elderly diabetics with chronic kidney disease. S. aureus is highly virulent and successful respiratory pathogen. Vancomycin and linezolid are the only two antimicrobial agents FDA-approved to treat MRSA pneumonia. Standard vancomycin dosing is associated with high clinical failure rates and higher dosages are associated with increased nephrotoxicity. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic limitations are major contributors to poor outcomes with vancomycin. New agents are needed to improve treatment outcomes with MRSA pneumonia. Recently released antimicrobials with in vitro activity are not FDA-approved for treating MRSA pneumonia. Other novel agents are being investigated though none are in late-stage development. Pharmaceutical industry perception of low returns on investment, a Sisyphean regulatory environment, and obstacles to patentability have contributed to declining interest in both the development of novel antibiotics and the improvement of existing generic formulations. Despite decades of investigation into liposomal encapsulation as a drug delivery system that would increase efficacy and decrease toxicity, only liposomal amphotericin B and doxorubicin are commercially available. In this article, the pharmacokinetics and biodistribution of a novel PEGylated liposomal vancomycin formulation along with passive targeting and the enhanced permeability and retention effect of liposomal drug delivery; the pathogenesis of MRSA pneumonia; and recent patents of novel anti-MRSA agents, including inhalational liposomal vancomycin, are reviewed.

  17. Meteorological factors on the incidence of MP and RSV pneumonia in children

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Dan-dan; Jiang, Rong; Chen, Xue-jun; Ye, Qing

    2017-01-01

    Background Pneumonia is common in children and mostly caused by many pathogens. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the incidence of pediatric mycoplasma pneumoniae (MP) pneumonia and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) pneumonia was associated with meteorological factors in Hangzhou, China. Methods A total of 36500 pneumonia patients were recruited to participate in the study. Nasopharyngeal swabs were collected for the detection of MP and RSV using real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and direct immunofluorescence (DIF) assays, respectively. We used a distributed lag non-linear model (DLNM) to evaluate the correlations between the MP/RSV incidence and meteorological factors. Results The detection rates of MP and RSV were 18.4% and 10.4%, respectively. There was a positive correlation between temperature and the MP infection rate, but RSV infection rate was negatively associated with temperature. Moreover, the impact of temperature on infection with RSV presented evident lag and cumulative effects. There was also an evident lag effect of temperature on the infection rate of MP; however, there was no evident cumulative effect. Conclusions In this study, the results showed meteorological factors play an important role in the incidence of these two pathogens. All these results can provide the laboratory basis for the early diagnosis and treatment of pneumonia in children. PMID:28282391

  18. Etiologic factors in long-term respiratory function abnormalities following esophageal atresia repair.

    PubMed

    LeSouëf, P N; Myers, N A; Landau, L I

    1987-10-01

    Recurrent respiratory illnesses are frequent in infants following repair of esophageal atresia and functional abnormalities of respiratory and esophageal function are often seen in older children. Recurrent aspiration is a potential cause of these respiratory abnormalities, but a relationship between abnormalities of gastrointestinal and respiratory mechanics has not been adequately investigated. We sought an association between lower esophageal sphincter (LES) incompetence, gastroesophageal reflux (GER), and respiratory function abnormalities in 18 subjects (age 12 to 21 years) following repair of esophageal atresia (Vogt type 111B). In each subject, measurements were made of spirometry, lung volumes assessed by plethysmography, esophageal manometry recorded using a constantly infused fluid-filled trilumen catheter to assess LES pressure and esophageal motility, and esophageal pH monitoring to detect GER. Subjects were grouped according to the presence or absence of a radiologically supported diagnosis of pneumonia in the first 4 years of life. Lung volumes were mildly but significantly decreased in the "pneumonia" group compared with the "nonpneumonia" group. There was no association between abnormalities of respiratory function and abnormal LES pressure or the presence of GER. These data suggest that pneumonia in esophageal atresia infants is associated with mild long-term lung damage. LES dysfunction and GER do not appear to play a major role in this process.

  19. Venovenous Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation in Pediatric Respiratory Failure.

    PubMed

    Ham, P Benson; Hwang, Brice; Wise, Linda J; Walters, K Christian; Pipkin, Walter L; Howell, Charles G; Bhatia, Jatinder; Hatley, Robyn

    2016-09-01

    Conventional treatment of respiratory failure involves positive pressure ventilation that can worsen lung damage. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) is typically used when conventional therapy fails. In this study, we evaluated the use of venovenous (VV)-ECMO for the treatment of severe pediatric respiratory failure at our institution. A retrospective analysis of pediatric patients (age 1-18) placed on ECMO in the last 15 years (1999-2014) by the pediatric surgery team for respiratory failure was performed. Five pediatric patients underwent ECMO (mean age 10 years; range, 2-16). All underwent VV-ECMO. Diagnoses were status asthmaticus (2), acute respiratory distress syndrome due to septic shock (1), aspergillus pneumonia (1), and respiratory failure due to parainfluenza (1). Two patients had severe barotrauma prior to ECMO initiation. Average oxygenation index (OI) prior to cannulation was 74 (range 23-122). No patients required conversion to VA-ECMO. The average ECMO run time was 4.4 days (range 2-6). The average number of days on the ventilator was 15 (range 4-27). There were no major complications due to the procedure. Survival to discharge was 100%. Average follow up is 4.4 years (range 1-15). A short run of VV-ECMO can be lifesaving for pediatric patients in respiratory failure. Survival is excellent despite severely elevated oxygen indices. VV-ECMO may be well tolerated and can be considered for severe pediatric respiratory failure.

  20. Predictors for mortality from respiratory failure in a general population

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Maki; Shibata, Yoko; Inoue, Sumito; Igarashi, Akira; Sato, Kento; Sato, Masamichi; Nemoto, Takako; Abe, Yuki; Nunomiya, Keiko; Nishiwaki, Michiko; Tokairin, Yoshikane; Kimura, Tomomi; Daimon, Makoto; Makino, Naohiko; Watanabe, Tetsu; Konta, Tsuneo; Ueno, Yoshiyuki; Kato, Takeo; Kayama, Takamasa; Kubota, Isao

    2016-01-01

    Risk factors for death from respiratory failure in the general population are not established. The aim of this study was to determine the characteristics of individuals who die of respiratory failure in a Japanese general population. In total, 3253 adults aged 40 years or older participated in annual health check in Takahata, Yamagata, Japan from 2004 to 2006. Subject deaths through the end of 2010 were reviewed; 27 subjects died of respiratory failure (pneumonia, n = 22; COPD, n = 1; pulmonary fibrosis, n = 3; and bronchial asthma, n = 1). Cox proportional hazard analysis revealed that male sex; higher age, high levels of D-dimer and fibrinogen; lower body mass index (BMI) and total cholesterol; and history of stroke and gastric ulcer were independent risk factors for respiratory death. On analysis with C-statistics, net reclassification improvement, and integrated discrimination improvement, addition of the disease history and laboratory data significantly improved the model prediction for respiratory death using age and BMI. In conclusion, we identified risk factors for mortality from respiratory failure in a prospective cohort of a Japanese general population. Men who were older, underweight, hypocholesterolemic, hypercoagulo-fibrinolytic, and had a history of stroke or gastric ulcer had a higher risk of mortality due to respiratory failure. PMID:27180927

  1. [Predictive value of history and physical examination for the diagnosis of community-acquired pneumonia in adults: a literature review].

    PubMed

    Saldías, Fernando; Méndez, J Ignacio; Ramírez, David; Díaz, Orlando

    2007-04-01

    Distinguishing pneumonia from other causes of respiratory illnesses, such as bronchitis, influenza and upper respiratory tract infections, has important therapeutic and prognostic implications. This decision is usually made by clinical assessment alone or by performing a chest x-ray. The reference standard for diagnosing pneumonia is chest radiography, but many physicians rely on history and physical examination to diagnose or exclude this disease. A review of published studies of patients suspected of having pneumonia reveals that there are no individual clinical findings, or combination of findings, that can predict with certainty the diagnosis of pneumonia. Prediction rules have been recommended to guide the order of diagnostic tests, to maximize their clinical utility. Thus, some studies have shown that the absence of any vital sign abnormalities or any abnormalities on chest auscultation substantially reduces the likelihood of pneumonia to a point where further diagnostic evaluation may be unnecessary. This article reviews the literature on the appropriate use of the history and physical examination in diagnose community-acquired pneumonia.

  2. [Music and respiratory pathology].

    PubMed

    Herer, B

    2001-04-01

    Musical performance, especially in singers and wind instrument players, depends on an effective pulmonary function. Performing artists may be seriously impaired by respiratory diseases that, comparatively, may produce only modest inconvenience for non-musicians. The report of two cases of respiratory diseases occurring in musicians herein provides an introduction to a review of the interactions between music and the human respiratory system. The following points are considered: epidemiological data; pulmonary function in musicians; favorable effects of music on the respiratory system; description of the main respiratory problems that may affect musicians.

  3. Use of a serotype-specific urine immunoassay to determine the course of a hospital outbreak of Streptococcus pneumoniae complicated by influenza A

    PubMed Central

    Clark, John; Slack, Mary P. E.; Fry, Norman K.; Harrison, Timothy G.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: An outbreak of Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococcal) infection complicated by concomitant influenza A on an elderly care ward was detected. Case presentation: Thirteen patients with hospital-acquired respiratory infections were investigated during the course of the outbreak investigation. Six had a positive BinaxNOW S. pneumoniae urinary antigen test and two patients had culture-confirmed pneumococcal bacteraemia and a positive urine antigen test. Five patients gave positive influenza A PCR results of which two were also positive for S. pneumoniae antigen. Conclusion: The concurrence of influenza and pneumococcal infections made tracking the course of the infection difficult. This case study shows how the use of a sensitive, S. pneumoniae serotype-specific urine antigen assay, in the absence of cultured isolates, helped determine whether patients were infected with the same pneumococcal serotype. This was particularly useful when additional respiratory symptoms were seen following the administration of chemoprophylaxis. PMID:28348745

  4. Potential impact of climate variability on respiratory diseases in infant and children in Semarang

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budiyono; Rismawati; Jati, S. P.; Ginandjar, P.

    2017-02-01

    Temperature, humidity, and rainfall may influence respiratory disease, including acute respiratory infection (ARI) and pneumonia. In Semarang, the temperature and humidity has increased 0.1°C and 1.6% respectively during 2002-2011. ARI and pneumonia in children under 5 years had increased during 2012-2014. This study aimed to analyze the relationship of climate variability and ARI and pneumonia incidence. It was an ecological study. Subject consisted of patients visited primary health care of Bandarharjo from 2011 to 2015. Pneumonia was related to infants (<1-year-old) and children (1-4 years old), while ARI was related to children (≥5 years old). Data of climate was obtained from Agency for Meteorology, Climatology and Geophysics (BMKG) Semarang. Pearson correlation (α=0.05) was used to analyse the correlation of the 60 samples. Mean of temperature was 27.96° C, relative humidity was 74.73%, and rainfall was 179.98 mm/month. The total of ARI was 38523 cases and pneumonia was 1558 cases. Temperature, humidity, and rainfall had no correlation to pneumonia. Humidity had a significant correlation to ARI on female children and total ARI (r=0.3 and r=0.26; p–value=0.02 and 0.04 respectively). Rainfall and temperature had no correlation to total ARI. This study concluded humidity has potential impact to ARI.

  5. Pneumocystis pneumonia in HIV patients: a diagnostic challenge till date.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Ravinder; Wadhwa, Anupriya; Bhalla, Preena; Dhakad, Megh Singh

    2015-08-01

    HIV has become a major health problem in India, patients commonly succumb to opportunistic infections (OIs), respiratory infections being an important cause of morbidity and their accurate diagnosis is still a challenge. Our aim was to study the occurrence of Pneumocystis pneumonia (PCP) in HIV/AIDS patients with respiratory complaints attending ART clinic and to compare various diagnostic methodologies. One hundred and twenty five HIV/AIDS patients presenting with respiratory symptoms like cough, fever, breathlessness etc, were enrolled, and induced sputum samples were collected. Samples were homogenized using glass beads and Dithiothretol. Smears were prepared and examined by Immunoflourescent staining (IFAT), Gomori methanamine silver staining (GMSS), Toludine blue O staining (TBO) and Giemsa staining for Pneumocystis jiroveci. Among the 125 patients who presented with respiratory complaints, 34 cases (27.2%) were diagnosed as having PCP. All 34 cases were detected by IFAT followed by GMSS, Giemsa and Toludine blue O staining in decreasing order. The mean CD4 count was 67.27cells/μl. PCP has become an important health problem in HIV/AIDS patients with low CD4 counts in India. IFAT remains the most sensitive method for the detection of this uncultivable organism. In resource poor settings where an immunoflourecent microscope is not available, diagnosis of PCP still remains problematic.

  6. Inhaled corticosteroids and the increased risk of pneumonia: what's new? A 2015 updated review.

    PubMed

    Iannella, Hernan; Luna, Carlos; Waterer, Grant

    2016-06-01

    There is a considerable amount of evidence that supports the possibility of an increased risk of pneumonia associated with prolonged use of inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). However, as yet, no statistically significant increase in pneumonia-related 30-day mortality in patients on ICS has been demonstrated. The lack of objective pneumonia definitions and radiological confirmations have been a major source of bias, because of the similarities in clinical presentation between pneumonia and acute exacerbations of COPD. One of the newer fluticasone furoate studies overcomes these limitations and also provides an assessment of a range of doses, suggesting that the therapeutic window is quite narrow and that conventional dosing has probably been too high, although the absolute risk may be different compared to other drugs. Newer studies were not able to rule out budesonide as responsible for pneumonia, as previous evidence suggested, and there is still need for evidence from head-to-head comparisons in order to better assess possible intra-class differences. Although the exact mechanisms by which ICS increase the risk of pneumonia are not fully understood, the immunosuppressive effects of ICS on the respiratory epithelium and the disruption of the lung microbiome are most likely to be implicated. Given that COPD represents such a complex and heterogeneous disease, attempts are being made to identify clinical phenotypes with clear therapeutic implications, in order to optimize the pharmacological treatment of COPD and avoid the indiscriminate use of ICS. If deemed necessary, gradual withdrawal of ICS appears to be well tolerated. Vaccination against pneumococcus and influenza should be emphasized in patients with COPD receiving ICS. Physicians should keep in mind that signs and symptoms of pneumonia in COPD patients may be initially indistinguishable from those of an exacerbation, and that patients with COPD

  7. R-roscovitine reduces lung inflammation induced by lipoteichoic acid and Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Hoogendijk, Arie J; Roelofs, Joris J T H; Duitman, Janwillem; van Lieshout, Miriam H P; Blok, Dana C; van der Poll, Tom; Wieland, Catharina W

    2012-09-25

    Bacterial pneumonia remains associated with high morbidity and mortality. The gram-positive pathogen Streptococcus pneumoniae is the most common cause of community-acquired pneumonia. Lipoteichoic acid (LTA) is an important proinflammatory component of the gram-positive bacterial cell wall. R-roscovitine, a purine analog, is a potent cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK)-1, -2, -5 and -7 inhibitor that has the ability to inhibit the cell cycle and to induce polymorphonuclear cell (PMN) apoptosis. We sought to investigate the effect of R-roscovitine on LTA-induced activation of cell lines with relevance for lung inflammation in vitro and on lung inflammation elicited by either LTA or viable S. pneumoniae in vivo. In vitro R-roscovitine enhanced apoptosis in PMNs and reduced tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and keratinocyte chemoattractant (KC) production in MH-S (alveolar macrophage) and MLE-12/MLE-15 (respiratory epithelial) cell lines. In vivo R-roscovitine treatment reduced PMN numbers in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid during LTA-induced lung inflammation; this effect was reversed by inhibiting apoptosis. Postponed treatment with R-roscovitine (24 and 72 h) diminished PMN numbers in lung tissue during gram-positive pneumonia; this step was associated with a transient increase in pulmonary bacterial loads. R-roscovitine inhibits proinflammatory responses induced by the gram-positive stimuli LTA and S. pneumoniae. R-roscovitine reduces PMN numbers in lungs upon LTA administration by enhancing apoptosis. The reduction in PMN numbers caused by R-roscovitine during S. pneumoniae pneumonia may hamper antibacterial defense.

  8. Extended release amoxicillin/clavulanate: optimizing a product for respiratory infections based on pharmacodynamic principles.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Michael R

    2005-06-01

    Acute bacterial respiratory tract infections cause a great deal of human morbidity and mortality. Treatment guidelines for these infections include macrolides, doxycycline, beta-lactams and beta-lactam/beta-lactamase inhibitor combinations such as amoxicillin/clavulanic acid to provide coverage for the common respiratory pathogens, including penicillin and macrolide nonsusceptible Streptococcus pneumoniae, as well as beta-lactamase-producing Haemophilus influenzae and Moraxella catarrhalis. In response to recent guidelines recommending higher dose amoxicillin to extend coverage to a higher percentage of S. pneumoniae, a new formulation of amoxicillin/clavulanic acid was developed. This formulation includes a higher amoxicillin dose, with part of the amoxicillin dose being in an extended release formulation, without increasing the clavulanate dose, for twice-daily oral treatment of these infections. Clinical studies of community-acquired pneumonia and acute rhinosinusitis have shown that the new formulation is well tolerated and highly efficacious, with clinical outcomes equivalent to comparators.

  9. Etiology and Factors Associated with Pneumonia in Children under 5 Years of Age in Mali: A Prospective Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Messaoudi, Mélina; Sánchez Picot, Valentina; Telles, Jean-Noël; Diakite, Abdoul-Aziz; Komurian-Pradel, Florence; Endtz, Hubert; Diallo, Souleymane; Paranhos-Baccalà, Gláucia; Vanhems, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Background There are very limited data on children with pneumonia in Mali. The objective was to assess the etiology and factors associated with community-acquired pneumonia in hospitalized children <5 years of age in Mali. Methods A prospective hospital-based case-control study was implemented in the Pediatric department of Gabriel Touré University Hospital at Bamako, Mali, between July 2011-December 2012. Cases were children with radiologically-confirmed pneumonia; Controls were hospitalized children without respiratory features, matched for age and period. Respiratory specimens, were collected to identify 19 viruses and 5 bacteria. Whole blood was collected from cases only. Factors associated with pneumonia were assessed by multivariate logistic regression. Results Overall, 118 cases and 98 controls were analyzed; 44.1% were female, median age was 11 months. Among pneumonia cases, 30.5% were hypoxemic at admission, mortality was 4.2%. Pneumonia cases differed from the controls regarding clinical signs and symptoms but not in terms of past medical history. Multivariate analysis of nasal swab findings disclosed that S. pneumoniae (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] = 3.4, 95% confidence interval [95% CI]: 1.6–7.0), human metapneumovirus (aOR = 17.2, 95% CI: 2.0–151.4), respiratory syncytial virus [RSV] (aOR = 7.4, 95% CI: 2.3–23.3), and influenza A virus (aOR = 10.7, 95% CI: 1.0–112.2) were associated with pneumonia, independently of patient age, gender, period, and other pathogens. Distribution of S. pneumoniae and RSV differed by season with higher rates of S. pneumoniae in January-June and of RSV in July-September. Pneumococcal serotypes 1 and 5 were more frequent in pneumonia cases than in the controls (P = 0.009, and P = 0.04, respectively). Conclusions In this non-PCV population from Mali, pneumonia in children was mainly attributed to S. pneumoniae, RSV, human metapneumovirus, and influenza A virus. Increased pneumococcal conjugate vaccine coverage in

  10. [Mortality due to respiratory diseases in Spain (1977-1985)].

    PubMed

    Morales Suárez-Varela, M M; Llopis González, A; Sancho Izquierdo, E

    1993-09-01

    A descriptive and comparative epidemiological is made of mortality due to respiratory disease by provinces in Spain. The study period covers 1977 to 1985, this being the last year reported by the Natural Movement of the Spanish Population (Movimiento Natural de la Población Española). In particular, 5 causes of death were analyzed in accordance to the International Classification of Disease (IX Revision): respiratory tuberculosis, influenza, chronic pulmonary disease, pneumonia and other pathologies of the respiratory apparatus. The results reveal an annual increase in these diseases. Standardized mortality ratio in turn reflects the provinces with increased mortality, the distribution of which varies for each pathology studied as a result of the different factors involved. Variation is also seen in terms of sex. Thus, influenza predominates among women, whereas males are more frequent as regards the remaining pathologies. Mortality due to pneumonia is similar in both sexes, this being the disease exhibiting the greatest increase during the study period. The results obtained may be of use in protocolizing resources for better control and prevention of respiratory disease in this country.

  11. A Prospective Study of Agents Associated with Acute Respiratory Infection among Young American Indian Children

    PubMed Central

    Bhat, Niranjan; Tokarz, Rafal; Jain, Komal; Haq, Saddef; Weatherholtz, Robert; Chandran, Aruna; Karron, Ruth; Reid, Raymond; Santosham, Mathuram; O’Brien, Katherine L.; Lipkin, W. Ian

    2013-01-01

    Background Native American children have higher rates of morbidity associated with acute respiratory infection than children in the general United States population, yet detailed information is lacking regarding their principal clinical presentations and infectious etiologies. Methods We pursued a comprehensive molecular survey of bacteria and viruses in nasal wash specimens from children with acute respiratory disease collected prospectively over one year (January 1 through December 31, 2009) from 915 Navajo and White Mountain Apache children in their second or third year of life who had been enrolled in an efficacy study of an RSV monoclonal antibody in the first year of life. Results During the surveillance period, 1476 episodes of disease were detected in 669 children. Rates of outpatient and inpatient lower respiratory tract illness were 391 and 79 per 1000 child-years, respectively, and were most commonly diagnosed as pneumonia. Potential pathogens were detected in 88% of specimens. Viruses most commonly detected were respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and human rhinovirus (HRV); 2009 pandemic influenza A (H1N1) illnesses primarily occurred in the fall. Streptococcus pneumoniae was detected in 60% of subjects; only HRV was significantly associated with S. pneumoniae carriage. The presence of influenza virus, HRV, or S. pneumoniae was not associated with increased risk for lower respiratory tract involvement or hospitalization. Conclusions Acute lower respiratory illnesses occur at disproportionately high rates among young American Indian children, and are associated with a range of common pathogens. This study provides critical evidence to support reducing the disproportionate burden of acute respiratory disease among young Native Americans. PMID:23470677

  12. [Fatal pneumonia caused by carbapenem resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae].

    PubMed

    van Apeldoorn, Marjan; Lettinga, Kamilla; Bernards, Alexandra; Paltansing, Sunita; alNaiemi, Nashwan; Kalpoe, Jayant

    2010-01-01

    A 63-year-old Dutch man became colonized with a carbapenem resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae during a period of hospitalization in India. His recovery in the Netherlands was complicated by pneumonia due to this difficult-to-control multiresistant bacteria to which he eventually succumbed. Carbapenem resistance in Enterobacteriaceae, such as K. pneumoniae, is usually caused by carbapenemase (a betalactamase) production. Carbapenemase producing Enterobacteriaceae (CPE) are spreading throughout the world and cause difficult-to-treat infections that are associated with high mortality. This case report illustrates the clinical challenges associated with infection with these multiresistant Enterobacteriaceae. In the Netherlands, there are no guidelines for detection of CPE and carbapenemase production can frequently go undetected in clinical microbiology laboratories. As a consequence, adequate treatment of CPE infections and infection control measures to prevent the spread of CPE can be delayed. Expeditious development and implementation of existing Dutch draft guidelines for detection methods of CPE is therefore warranted.

  13. Interstitial pneumonia with autoimmune features (IPAF) and radiological findings suggestive of lymphocytic interstitial pneumonia (LIP) - case report.

    PubMed

    Płóciniczak, Alicja; Goździk-Spychalska, Joanna; Batura-Gabryel, Halina Batura-Gabryel

    2017-01-01

    Interstitial pneumonia with autoimmune features (IPAF) is a term to describe individuals with both interstitial lung disease (ILD) and combinations of other clinical, serologic, and/or pulmonary morphologic f