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Sample records for enzymatic phosphoryl transfer

  1. Characterizing Active Site Conformational Heterogeneity along the Trajectory of an Enzymatic Phosphoryl Transfer Reaction.

    PubMed

    Zeymer, Cathleen; Werbeck, Nicolas D; Zimmermann, Sabine; Reinstein, Jochen; Hansen, D Flemming

    2016-09-12

    States along the phosphoryl transfer reaction catalyzed by the nucleoside monophosphate kinase UmpK were captured and changes in the conformational heterogeneity of conserved active site arginine side-chains were quantified by NMR spin-relaxation methods. In addition to apo and ligand-bound UmpK, a transition state analog (TSA) complex was utilized to evaluate the extent to which active site conformational entropy contributes to the transition state free energy. The catalytically essential arginine side-chain guanidino groups were found to be remarkably rigid in the TSA complex, indicating that the enzyme has evolved to restrict the conformational freedom along its reaction path over the energy landscape, which in turn allows the phosphoryl transfer to occur selectively by avoiding side reactions. PMID:27534930

  2. Characterizing Active Site Conformational Heterogeneity along the Trajectory of an Enzymatic Phosphoryl Transfer Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Zeymer, Cathleen; Werbeck, Nicolas D.; Zimmermann, Sabine

    2016-01-01

    Abstract States along the phosphoryl transfer reaction catalyzed by the nucleoside monophosphate kinase UmpK were captured and changes in the conformational heterogeneity of conserved active site arginine side‐chains were quantified by NMR spin‐relaxation methods. In addition to apo and ligand‐bound UmpK, a transition state analog (TSA) complex was utilized to evaluate the extent to which active site conformational entropy contributes to the transition state free energy. The catalytically essential arginine side‐chain guanidino groups were found to be remarkably rigid in the TSA complex, indicating that the enzyme has evolved to restrict the conformational freedom along its reaction path over the energy landscape, which in turn allows the phosphoryl transfer to occur selectively by avoiding side reactions. PMID:27534930

  3. Environmental effects on phosphoryl group bonding probed by vibrational spectroscopy: implications for understanding phosphoryl transfer and enzymatic catalysis.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Hu; Nikolic-Hughes, Ivana; Wang, Jianghua H; Deng, Hua; O'Brien, Patrick J; Wu, Li; Zhang, Zhong-Yin; Herschlag, Daniel; Callender, Robert

    2002-09-25

    We have used vibrational spectroscopy to study bonding in monosubstituted dianionic phosphates, both to learn more about basic properties intrinsic to this important class of biological substrates and to assess the ability of vibrational spectroscopy to provide a "sensor" or probe of the local environment experienced by the phosphoryl group. We examined the bonding properties of the phosphoryl group via vibrational spectroscopy for a series of compounds in which the phosphoryl substituent was varied systematically and extensively. A broad linear correlation of the bridging P-O(R) bond length and the pK(a) of the substituent alcohol was observed. The results indicate that the P-O(R) bond changes by only approximately 0.04 A with alcohol substituents that vary in pK(a) by approximately 12 units, suggesting that phosphoryl group bonding responds in a subtle but regular manner to changes in the local environment. We also determined the effect on the phosphoryl bonding from changes in the solvent environment. Addition of dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) elongates the bridging bond, presumably as a result of lessened solvation to the nonbridging oxygens and conservation of bond order to phosphorus. Finally, we have addressed the relationship between ground-state bonding properties and reactivity, as changing the leaving group substituent and adding DMSO have large rate effects, and it was previously proposed that lengthening of the bond to be broken is the cause of the increased reactivity. The results herein suggest, however, that the change in the bridging bond energy is small compared to the changes in energy that accompany the observed reactivity differences. Further analysis indicates that electrostatic interactions can provide a common driving force underlying both bond lengthening and the observed rate increases. We suggest that ground-state distortions of substrates bound to enzymes can provide a readout of the electrostatic active site environment, an environment that

  4. Arginine Coordination in Enzymatic Phosphoryl Transfer: Evaluation of the Effect of Arg166 Mutations in Escherichia Coli Alkaline Phosphatase

    SciTech Connect

    O'Brien, P.J.; Lassila, J.K.; Fenn, T.D.; Zalatan, J.G.; Herschlag, D.

    2009-05-22

    Arginine residues are commonly found in the active sites of enzymes catalyzing phosphoryl transfer reactions. Numerous site-directed mutagenesis experiments establish the importance of these residues for efficient catalysis, but their role in catalysis is not clear. To examine the role of arginine residues in the phosphoryl transfer reaction, we have measured the consequences of mutations to arginine 166 in Escherichia coli alkaline phosphatase on hydrolysis of ethyl phosphate, on individual reaction steps in the hydrolysis of the covalent enzyme-phosphoryl intermediate, and on thio substitution effects. The results show that the role of the arginine side chain extends beyond its positive charge, as the Arg166Lys mutant is as compromised in activity as Arg166Ser. Through measurement of individual reaction steps, we construct a free energy profile for the hydrolysis of the enzyme-phosphate intermediate. This analysis indicates that the arginine side chain strengthens binding by {approx}3 kcal/mol and provides an additional 1-2 kcal/mol stabilization of the chemical transition state. A 2.1 {angstrom} X-ray diffraction structure of Arg166Ser AP is presented, which shows little difference in enzyme structure compared to the wild-type enzyme but shows a significant reorientation of the bound phosphate. Altogether, these results support a model in which the arginine contributes to catalysis through binding interactions and through additional transition state stabilization that may arise from complementarity of the guanidinum group to the geometry of the trigonal bipyramidal transition state.

  5. Theoretical Investigation of the Enzymatic Phosphoryl Transfer of β-phosphoglucomutase: Revisiting Both Steps of the Catalytic Cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Elsasser, Brigitta M.; Dohmeier-Fischer, Silvia; Fels, Gregor

    2012-07-12

    Enzyme catalyzed phosphate transfer is a part of almost all metabolic processes. Such reactions are of central importance for the energy balance in all organisms and play important roles in cellular control at all levels. Mutases transfer a phosphoryl group while nucleases cleave the phosphodiester linkages between two nucleotides. The subject of our present study is the Lactococcus lactis β-phosphoglucomutase (β-PGM), which effectively catalyzes the interconversion of β-D-glucose-1-phosphate (β-G1P) to β- D-glucose-6-phosphate (β-G6P) and vice versa via stabile intermediate β-D-glucose-1,6-(bis)phosphate (β-G1,6diP) in the presence of Mg2+. In this paper we revisited the reaction mechanism of the phosphoryl transfer starting from the bisphosphate β-G1,6diP in both directions (toward β-G1P and β-G6P) combining docking techniques and QM/MM theoretical method at the DFT/PBE0 level of theory. In addition we performed NEB (nudged elastic band) and free energy calculations to optimize the path and to identify the transition states and the energies involved in the catalytic cycle. Our calculations reveal that both steps proceed via dissociative pentacoordinated phosphorane, which is not a stabile intermediate but rather a transition state. In addition to the Mg2+ ion, Ser114 and Lys145 also play important roles in stabilizing the large negative charge on the phosphate through strong coordination with the phosphate oxygens and guiding the phosphate group throughout the catalytic process. The calculated energy barrier of the reaction for the β-G1P to β-G1,6diP step is only slightly higher than for the β-G1,6diP to β-G6P step (16.10 kcal mol-1 versus 15.10 kcal mol-1) and is in excellent agreement with experimental findings (14.65 kcal mol-1).

  6. Phosphoryl Transfer Reaction Snapshots in Crystals

    PubMed Central

    Gerlits, Oksana; Tian, Jianhui; Das, Amit; Langan, Paul; Heller, William T.; Kovalevsky, Andrey

    2015-01-01

    To study the catalytic mechanism of phosphorylation catalyzed by cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) a structure of the enzyme-substrate complex representing the Michaelis complex is of specific interest as it can shed light on the structure of the transition state. However, all previous crystal structures of the Michaelis complex mimics of the PKA catalytic subunit (PKAc) were obtained with either peptide inhibitors or ATP analogs. Here we utilized Ca2+ ions and sulfur in place of the nucleophilic oxygen in a 20-residue pseudo-substrate peptide (CP20) and ATP to produce a close mimic of the Michaelis complex. In the ternary reactant complex, the thiol group of Cys-21 of the peptide is facing Asp-166 and the sulfur atom is positioned for an in-line phosphoryl transfer. Replacement of Ca2+ cations with Mg2+ ions resulted in a complex with trapped products of ATP hydrolysis: phosphate ion and ADP. The present structural results in combination with the previously reported structures of the transition state mimic and phosphorylated product complexes complete the snapshots of the phosphoryl transfer reaction by PKAc, providing us with the most thorough picture of the catalytic mechanism to date. PMID:25925954

  7. Biological phosphoryl-transfer reactions: understanding mechanism and catalysis.

    PubMed

    Lassila, Jonathan K; Zalatan, Jesse G; Herschlag, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Phosphoryl-transfer reactions are central to biology. These reactions also have some of the slowest nonenzymatic rates and thus require enormous rate accelerations from biological catalysts. Despite the central importance of phosphoryl transfer and the fascinating catalytic challenges it presents, substantial confusion persists about the properties of these reactions. This confusion exists despite decades of research on the chemical mechanisms underlying these reactions. Here we review phosphoryl-transfer reactions with the goal of providing the reader with the conceptual and experimental background to understand this body of work, to evaluate new results and proposals, and to apply this understanding to enzymes. We describe likely resolutions to some controversies, while emphasizing the limits of our current approaches and understanding. We apply this understanding to enzyme-catalyzed phosphoryl transfer and provide illustrative examples of how this mechanistic background can guide and deepen our understanding of enzymes and their mechanisms of action. Finally, we present important future challenges for this field. PMID:21513457

  8. Path Sampling Methods for Enzymatic Quantum Particle Transfer Reactions.

    PubMed

    Dzierlenga, M W; Varga, M J; Schwartz, S D

    2016-01-01

    The mechanisms of enzymatic reactions are studied via a host of computational techniques. While previous methods have been used successfully, many fail to incorporate the full dynamical properties of enzymatic systems. This can lead to misleading results in cases where enzyme motion plays a significant role in the reaction coordinate, which is especially relevant in particle transfer reactions where nuclear tunneling may occur. In this chapter, we outline previous methods, as well as discuss newly developed dynamical methods to interrogate mechanisms of enzymatic particle transfer reactions. These new methods allow for the calculation of free energy barriers and kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) with the incorporation of quantum effects through centroid molecular dynamics (CMD) and the full complement of enzyme dynamics through transition path sampling (TPS). Recent work, summarized in this chapter, applied the method for calculation of free energy barriers to reaction in lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and yeast alcohol dehydrogenase (YADH). We found that tunneling plays an insignificant role in YADH but plays a more significant role in LDH, though not dominant over classical transfer. Additionally, we summarize the application of a TPS algorithm for the calculation of reaction rates in tandem with CMD to calculate the primary H/D KIE of YADH from first principles. We found that the computationally obtained KIE is within the margin of error of experimentally determined KIEs and corresponds to the KIE of particle transfer in the enzyme. These methods provide new ways to investigate enzyme mechanism with the inclusion of protein and quantum dynamics.

  9. Path Sampling Methods for Enzymatic Quantum Particle Transfer Reactions.

    PubMed

    Dzierlenga, M W; Varga, M J; Schwartz, S D

    2016-01-01

    The mechanisms of enzymatic reactions are studied via a host of computational techniques. While previous methods have been used successfully, many fail to incorporate the full dynamical properties of enzymatic systems. This can lead to misleading results in cases where enzyme motion plays a significant role in the reaction coordinate, which is especially relevant in particle transfer reactions where nuclear tunneling may occur. In this chapter, we outline previous methods, as well as discuss newly developed dynamical methods to interrogate mechanisms of enzymatic particle transfer reactions. These new methods allow for the calculation of free energy barriers and kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) with the incorporation of quantum effects through centroid molecular dynamics (CMD) and the full complement of enzyme dynamics through transition path sampling (TPS). Recent work, summarized in this chapter, applied the method for calculation of free energy barriers to reaction in lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and yeast alcohol dehydrogenase (YADH). We found that tunneling plays an insignificant role in YADH but plays a more significant role in LDH, though not dominant over classical transfer. Additionally, we summarize the application of a TPS algorithm for the calculation of reaction rates in tandem with CMD to calculate the primary H/D KIE of YADH from first principles. We found that the computationally obtained KIE is within the margin of error of experimentally determined KIEs and corresponds to the KIE of particle transfer in the enzyme. These methods provide new ways to investigate enzyme mechanism with the inclusion of protein and quantum dynamics. PMID:27497161

  10. Structure/function studies of phosphoryl transfer by phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase.

    PubMed

    Delbaere, Louis T J; Sudom, Athena M; Prasad, Lata; Leduc, Yvonne; Goldie, Hughes

    2004-03-11

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PCK) catalyzes the conversion of oxaloacetate (OAA) to PEP and carbon dioxide with the subsequent conversion of nucleoside triphosphate to nucleoside diphosphate (NDP). The 1.9 A resolution structure of Escherichia coli PCK consisted of a 275-residue N-terminal domain and a 265-residue C-terminal domain with the active site located in a cleft between these domains. Each domain has an alpha/beta topology and the overall structure represents a new protein fold. Furthermore, PCK has a unique mononucleotide-binding fold. The 1.8 A resolution structure of the complex of ATP/Mg(2+)/oxalate with PCK revealed a 20 degrees hinge-like rotation of the N- and C-terminal domains, which closed the active site cleft. The ATP was found in the unusual syn conformation as a result of binding to the enzyme. Along with the side chain of Lys254, Mg(2+) neutralizes charges on the P beta and P gamma oxygen atoms of ATP and stabilizes an extended, eclipsed conformation of the P beta and P gamma phosphoryl groups. The sterically strained high-energy conformation likely lowers the free energy of activation for phosphoryl transfer. Additionally, the gamma-phosphoryl group becomes oriented in-line with the appropriate enolate oxygen atom, which strongly supports a direct S(N)2-type displacement of this gamma-phosphoryl group by the enolate anion. In the 2.0 A resolution structure of the complex of PCK/ADP/Mg(2+)/AlF(3), the AlF(3) moiety represents the phosphoryl group being transferred during catalysis. There are three positively charged groups that interact with the fluorine atoms, which are complementary to the three negative charges that would occur for an associative transition state. PMID:15023367

  11. Enzymatic Catalysis of Proton Transfer and Decarboxylation Reactions.

    PubMed

    Richard, John P

    2011-07-01

    Deprotonation of carbon and decarboxylation at enzyme active sites proceed through the same carbanion intermediates as for the uncatalyzed reactions in water. The mechanism for the enzymatic reactions can be studied at the same level of detail as for nonenzymatic reactions, using the mechanistic tools developed by physical organic chemists. Triosephosphate isomerase (TIM) catalyzed interconversion of D-glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate and dihydroxyacetone phosphate is being studied as a prototype for enzyme catalyzed proton transfer, and orotidine monophosphate decarboxylase (OMPDC) catalyzed decarboxylation of orotidine 5'-monophosphate is being studied as a prototype for enzyme-catalyzed decarboxylation. (1)H NMR spectroscopy is an excellent analytical method to monitor proton transfer to and from carbon catalyzed by these enzymes in D2O. Studies of these partial enzyme-catalyzed exchange reactions provide novel insight into the stability of carbanion reaction intermediates, that is not accessible in studies of the full enzymatic reaction. The importance of flexible enzyme loops and the contribution of interactions between these loops and the substrate phosphodianion to the enzymatic rate acceleration are discussed. The similarity in the interactions of OMPDC and TIM with the phosphodianion of bound substrate is emphasized.

  12. Promiscuity in the Enzymatic Catalysis of Phosphate and Sulfate Transfer

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The enzymes that facilitate phosphate and sulfate hydrolysis are among the most proficient natural catalysts known to date. Interestingly, a large number of these enzymes are promiscuous catalysts that exhibit both phosphatase and sulfatase activities in the same active site and, on top of that, have also been demonstrated to efficiently catalyze the hydrolysis of other additional substrates with varying degrees of efficiency. Understanding the factors that underlie such multifunctionality is crucial both for understanding functional evolution in enzyme superfamilies and for the development of artificial enzymes. In this Current Topic, we have primarily focused on the structural and mechanistic basis for catalytic promiscuity among enzymes that facilitate both phosphoryl and sulfuryl transfer in the same active site, while comparing this to how catalytic promiscuity manifests in other promiscuous phosphatases. We have also drawn on the large number of experimental and computational studies of selected model systems in the literature to explore the different features driving the catalytic promiscuity of such enzymes. Finally, on the basis of this comparative analysis, we probe the plausible origins and determinants of catalytic promiscuity in enzymes that catalyze phosphoryl and sulfuryl transfer. PMID:27187273

  13. Promiscuity in the Enzymatic Catalysis of Phosphate and Sulfate Transfer.

    PubMed

    Pabis, Anna; Duarte, Fernanda; Kamerlin, Shina C L

    2016-06-01

    The enzymes that facilitate phosphate and sulfate hydrolysis are among the most proficient natural catalysts known to date. Interestingly, a large number of these enzymes are promiscuous catalysts that exhibit both phosphatase and sulfatase activities in the same active site and, on top of that, have also been demonstrated to efficiently catalyze the hydrolysis of other additional substrates with varying degrees of efficiency. Understanding the factors that underlie such multifunctionality is crucial both for understanding functional evolution in enzyme superfamilies and for the development of artificial enzymes. In this Current Topic, we have primarily focused on the structural and mechanistic basis for catalytic promiscuity among enzymes that facilitate both phosphoryl and sulfuryl transfer in the same active site, while comparing this to how catalytic promiscuity manifests in other promiscuous phosphatases. We have also drawn on the large number of experimental and computational studies of selected model systems in the literature to explore the different features driving the catalytic promiscuity of such enzymes. Finally, on the basis of this comparative analysis, we probe the plausible origins and determinants of catalytic promiscuity in enzymes that catalyze phosphoryl and sulfuryl transfer. PMID:27187273

  14. Phosphoryl transfer reaction catalyzed by membrane diacylglycerol kinase: a theoretical mechanism study.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yafei; Tan, Hongwei; Zheng, Jimin; Li, Xichen; Chen, Guangju; Jia, Zongchao

    2015-10-14

    Diacylglycerol kinase is an integral membrane protein which catalyzes phosphoryl transfer from ATP to diacylglycerol. As the smallest kinase known, it shares no sequence homology with conventional kinases and possesses a distinct trimer structure. Thus far, its catalytic mechanism remains elusive. Using molecular dynamics and quantum mechanics calculations, we investigated the co-factor and the substrate binding and phosphoryl transfer mechanism. Based on the analysis of density functional theory calculations, we reveal that the phosphorylation reaction of diacylglycerol kinase features the same phosphoryl transfer mechanism as other kinases, despite its unique structural properties. Our results further show that the active site is relatively open and able to accommodate ligands in multiple orientations, suggesting that the optimization of binding orientations and conformational changes would occur prior to actual phosphoryl transfer.

  15. Phosphoryl transfer from α-d-glucose 1-phosphate catalyzed by Escherichia coli sugar-phosphate phosphatases of two protein superfamily types.

    PubMed

    Wildberger, Patricia; Pfeiffer, Martin; Brecker, Lothar; Rechberger, Gerald N; Birner-Gruenberger, Ruth; Nidetzky, Bernd

    2015-03-01

    The Cori ester α-d-glucose 1-phosphate (αGlc 1-P) is a high-energy intermediate of cellular carbohydrate metabolism. Its glycosidic phosphomonoester moiety primes αGlc 1-P for flexible exploitation in glucosyl and phosphoryl transfer reactions. Two structurally and mechanistically distinct sugar-phosphate phosphatases from Escherichia coli were characterized in this study for utilization of αGlc 1-P as a phosphoryl donor substrate. The agp gene encodes a periplasmic αGlc 1-P phosphatase (Agp) belonging to the histidine acid phosphatase family. Had13 is from the haloacid dehydrogenase-like phosphatase family. Cytoplasmic expression of Agp (in E. coli Origami B) gave a functional enzyme preparation (kcat for phosphoryl transfer from αGlc 1-P to water, 40 s(-1)) that was shown by mass spectrometry to exhibit no free cysteines and the native intramolecular disulfide bond between Cys(189) and Cys(195). Enzymatic phosphoryl transfer from αGlc 1-P to water in H2 (18)O solvent proceeded with complete (18)O label incorporation into the phosphate released, consistent with catalytic reaction through O-1-P, but not C-1-O, bond cleavage. Hydrolase activity of both enzymes was not restricted to a glycosidic phosphomonoester substrate, and d-glucose 6-phosphate was converted with a kcat similar to that of αGlc 1-P. By examining phosphoryl transfer from αGlc 1-P to an acceptor substrate other than water (d-fructose or d-glucose), we discovered that Agp exhibited pronounced synthetic activity, unlike Had13, which utilized αGlc 1-P mainly for phosphoryl transfer to water. By applying d-fructose in 10-fold molar excess over αGlc 1-P (20 mM), enzymatic conversion furnished d-fructose 1-phosphate as the main product in a 55% overall yield. Agp is a promising biocatalyst for use in transphosphorylation from αGlc 1-P. PMID:25527541

  16. Vibrationally enhanced tunneling as a mechanism for enzymatic hydrogen transfer.

    PubMed Central

    Bruno, W J; Bialek, W

    1992-01-01

    We present a theory of enzymatic hydrogen transfer in which hydrogen tunneling is mediated by thermal fluctuations of the enzyme's active site. These fluctuations greatly increase the tunneling rate by shortening the distance the hydrogen must tunnel. The average tunneling distance is shown to decrease when heavier isotopes are substituted for the hydrogen or when the temperature is increased, leading to kinetic isotope effects (KIEs)--defined as the factor by which the reaction slows down when isotopically substituted substrates are used--that need be no larger than KIEs for nontunneling mechanisms. Within this theory we derive a simple KIE expression for vibrationally enhanced ground state tunneling that is able to fit the data for the bovine serum amine oxidase (BSAO) system, correctly predicting the large temperature dependence of the KIEs. Because the KIEs in this theory can resemble those for nontunneling dynamics, distinguishing the two possibilities requires careful measurements over a range of temperatures, as has been done for BSAO. PMID:1420907

  17. PLD2 has both enzymatic and cell proliferation-inducing capabilities, that are differentially regulated by phosphorylation and dephosphorylation

    SciTech Connect

    Henkels, Karen M.; Short, Stephen; Peng, Hong-Juan; Fulvio, Mauricio Di; Gomez-Cambronero, Julian

    2009-11-13

    Phospholipase D2 (PLD2) overexpression in mammalian cells results in cell transformation. We have hypothesized that this is due to an increase of de novo DNA synthesis. We show here that overexpression of PLD2-WT leads to an increased DNA synthesis, as measured by the expression levels of the proliferation markers PCNA, p27{sup KIP1} and phospho-histone-3. The enhancing effect was even higher with phosphorylation-deficient PLD2-Y179F and PLD2-Y511F mutants. The mechanism for this did not involve the enzymatic activity of the lipase, but, rather, the presence of the protein tyrosine phosphatase CD45, as silencing with siRNA for CD45 abrogated the effect. The two Y{yields}F mutants had in common a YxN consensus site that, in the phosphorylated counterparts, could be recognized by SH2-bearing proteins, such as Grb2. Even though Y179F and Y511F cannot bind Grb2, they could still find other protein partners, one of which, we have reasoned, could be CD45 itself. Affinity purified PLD2 is indeed activated by Grb2 and deactivated by CD45 in vitro. We concluded that phosphorylated PLD2, aided by Grb2, mediates lipase activity, whereas dephosphorylated PLD2 mediates an induction of cell proliferation, and the specific residues involved in this newly discovered regulation of PLD2 are Y{sup 179} and Y{sup 511}.

  18. Mechanism of phosphoryl transfer and protein-protein interaction in the PTS system-an NMR study

    SciTech Connect

    Rajagopal, P.; Klevit, R.E.

    1994-12-01

    HPr and Enzyme IIA{sup Glc} are two of the components of the bacterial PTS (phosphoenolpyruvate: sugar phosphotranferase system) and are involved in the phosphorylation and concomitant translocation of sugars across the membrane. These PTS protein complexes also regulate sugar transport. HPr, phosphorylated at a histidine N1 site by Enzyme I and phosphoenol pyruvate, transfers the phosphoryl group to a histidine N3 position in Enzyme IIA{sup Glc}. HPrs from Gram-positive bacteria undergo regulatory phosphorylation at Ser{sup 46}, whereby phosphorylation of the histidine residue is inhibited. Conversely, histidine phosphorylation inhibits phosphorylation at Ser{sup 46}. HPrs from Gram-negative bacteria possess a serine residue at position 46, but do not undergo regulatory phosphorylation. HPr forms an open-faced sandwich structure with a four-strand S-sheet and 2 to 3 helices lying on top of the sheet. The active-site histidine and Ser{sup 46} occur in conformationally flexible regions. P-His-HPr from the Gram-positive bacterium Bacillus subtilus has been investigated by both homonuclear and heteronuclear two-dimensional and three-dimensional NMR experiments using an in-situ enzymatic regeneration system to maintain a constant level of P-His-HPr. The results show that localized conformational changes occur in the vicinity of the active-site histidine and also near Ser{sup 46}. HPr-Enzyme IIA{sup Glc} complexes from both Bacillus subtilis and Gram-negative Escherichia coli were also studied by a variety of {sup 15}N-edited two-dimensional NMR experiments, which were performed on uniformly {sup 15}N-labeled HPr complexed to unlabeled Enzyme IIA{sup Glc}. The complex is in fast exchange with a molecular weight of about 27 kDa. The focus of our work is to assess the changes undergone by HPr (the smaller of the two components), and so all the experiments were performed with excess Enzyme IIA present in the system.

  19. Phosphoryl Transfer from α-d-Glucose 1-Phosphate Catalyzed by Escherichia coli Sugar-Phosphate Phosphatases of Two Protein Superfamily Types

    PubMed Central

    Wildberger, Patricia; Pfeiffer, Martin; Brecker, Lothar; Rechberger, Gerald N.; Birner-Gruenberger, Ruth

    2014-01-01

    The Cori ester α-d-glucose 1-phosphate (αGlc 1-P) is a high-energy intermediate of cellular carbohydrate metabolism. Its glycosidic phosphomonoester moiety primes αGlc 1-P for flexible exploitation in glucosyl and phosphoryl transfer reactions. Two structurally and mechanistically distinct sugar-phosphate phosphatases from Escherichia coli were characterized in this study for utilization of αGlc 1-P as a phosphoryl donor substrate. The agp gene encodes a periplasmic αGlc 1-P phosphatase (Agp) belonging to the histidine acid phosphatase family. Had13 is from the haloacid dehydrogenase-like phosphatase family. Cytoplasmic expression of Agp (in E. coli Origami B) gave a functional enzyme preparation (kcat for phosphoryl transfer from αGlc 1-P to water, 40 s−1) that was shown by mass spectrometry to exhibit no free cysteines and the native intramolecular disulfide bond between Cys189 and Cys195. Enzymatic phosphoryl transfer from αGlc 1-P to water in H218O solvent proceeded with complete 18O label incorporation into the phosphate released, consistent with catalytic reaction through O-1–P, but not C-1–O, bond cleavage. Hydrolase activity of both enzymes was not restricted to a glycosidic phosphomonoester substrate, and d-glucose 6-phosphate was converted with a kcat similar to that of αGlc 1-P. By examining phosphoryl transfer from αGlc 1-P to an acceptor substrate other than water (d-fructose or d-glucose), we discovered that Agp exhibited pronounced synthetic activity, unlike Had13, which utilized αGlc 1-P mainly for phosphoryl transfer to water. By applying d-fructose in 10-fold molar excess over αGlc 1-P (20 mM), enzymatic conversion furnished d-fructose 1-phosphate as the main product in a 55% overall yield. Agp is a promising biocatalyst for use in transphosphorylation from αGlc 1-P. PMID:25527541

  20. Phosphoryl transfer reaction snapshots in crystals: Insights into the mechanism of protein kinase a catalytic subunit

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Amit; Gerlits, Oksana O.; Heller, William T.; Kovalevskyi, Andrii Y.; Langan, Paul; Tian, Jianhui

    2015-06-19

    To study the catalytic mechanism of phosphorylation catalyzed by cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) a structure of the enzyme-substrate complex representing the Michaelis complex is of specific interest as it can shed light on the structure of the transition state. However, all previous crystal structures of the Michaelis complex mimics of the PKA catalytic subunit (PKAc) were obtained with either peptide inhibitors or ATP analogs. Here we utilized Ca2+ ions and sulfur in place of the nucleophilic oxygen in a 20-residue pseudo-substrate peptide (CP20) and ATP to produce a close mimic of the Michaelis complex. In the ternary reactant complex, the thiol group of Cys-21 of the peptide is facing Asp-166 and the sulfur atom is positioned for an in-line phosphoryl transfer. Replacement of Ca2+ cations with Mg2+ ions resulted in a complex with trapped products of ATP hydrolysis: phosphate ion and ADP. As a result, the present structural results in combination with the previously reported structures of the transition state mimic and phosphorylated product complexes complete the snapshots of the phosphoryl transfer reaction by PKAc, providing us with the most thorough picture of the catalytic mechanism to date.

  1. Phosphoryl transfer reaction snapshots in crystals: Insights into the mechanism of protein kinase a catalytic subunit

    DOE PAGES

    Das, Amit; Gerlits, Oksana O.; Heller, William T.; Kovalevskyi, Andrii Y.; Langan, Paul; Tian, Jianhui

    2015-06-19

    To study the catalytic mechanism of phosphorylation catalyzed by cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) a structure of the enzyme-substrate complex representing the Michaelis complex is of specific interest as it can shed light on the structure of the transition state. However, all previous crystal structures of the Michaelis complex mimics of the PKA catalytic subunit (PKAc) were obtained with either peptide inhibitors or ATP analogs. Here we utilized Ca2+ ions and sulfur in place of the nucleophilic oxygen in a 20-residue pseudo-substrate peptide (CP20) and ATP to produce a close mimic of the Michaelis complex. In the ternary reactant complex, themore » thiol group of Cys-21 of the peptide is facing Asp-166 and the sulfur atom is positioned for an in-line phosphoryl transfer. Replacement of Ca2+ cations with Mg2+ ions resulted in a complex with trapped products of ATP hydrolysis: phosphate ion and ADP. As a result, the present structural results in combination with the previously reported structures of the transition state mimic and phosphorylated product complexes complete the snapshots of the phosphoryl transfer reaction by PKAc, providing us with the most thorough picture of the catalytic mechanism to date.« less

  2. A redox beginning: Which came first phosphoryl, acyl, or electron transfer ?. [Abstract only

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weber, Arthur L.

    1994-01-01

    Thermodynamic and kinetic information available on the synthesis of prebiotic monomers and polymers will be examined in order to illuminate the prebiotic plausibility of polymer syntheses based on (a) phosphoryl transfer that yields phosphodiester polymers, (b) acyl transfer that gives polyamides, and (c) electron transfer that produces polydisulfide or poly(thio)ester polymers. New experimental results on the oxidative polymerization of 2,3-dimercaptopropanol by ferric ions on the surface of ferric hydroxide oxide will be discussed as a chemical model of polymerization by electron transfer. This redox polymerization that yields polymers with a polydisulfide backbone was found to give oligomers up to the 15-mer from 1 mM of 2,3-dimercaptopropanol after one day at 25 C. High pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis of the oligomers was carried out on an Alltech OH-100 column eluted with acetonitrile-water.

  3. Enzymatic cellulose oxidation is linked to lignin by long-range electron transfer

    PubMed Central

    Westereng, Bjørge; Cannella, David; Wittrup Agger, Jane; Jørgensen, Henning; Larsen Andersen, Mogens; Eijsink, Vincent G.H.; Felby, Claus

    2015-01-01

    Enzymatic oxidation of cell wall polysaccharides by lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases (LPMOs) plays a pivotal role in the degradation of plant biomass. While experiments have shown that LPMOs are copper dependent enzymes requiring an electron donor, the mechanism and origin of the electron supply in biological systems are only partly understood. We show here that insoluble high molecular weight lignin functions as a reservoir of electrons facilitating LPMO activity. The electrons are donated to the enzyme by long-range electron transfer involving soluble low molecular weight lignins present in plant cell walls. Electron transfer was confirmed by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy showing that LPMO activity on cellulose changes the level of unpaired electrons in the lignin. The discovery of a long-range electron transfer mechanism links the biodegradation of cellulose and lignin and sheds new light on how oxidative enzymes present in plant degraders may act in concert. PMID:26686263

  4. Influence of fluid dynamic conditions on enzymatic hydrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass: Effect of mass transfer rate.

    PubMed

    Wojtusik, Mateusz; Zurita, Mauricio; Villar, Juan C; Ladero, Miguel; Garcia-Ochoa, Felix

    2016-09-01

    The effect of fluid dynamic conditions on enzymatic hydrolysis of acid pretreated corn stover (PCS) has been assessed. Runs were performed in stirred tanks at several stirrer speed values, under typical conditions of temperature (50°C), pH (4.8) and solid charge (20% w/w). A complex mixture of cellulases, xylanases and mannanases was employed for PCS saccharification. At low stirring speeds (<150rpm), estimated mass transfer coefficients and rates, when compared to chemical hydrolysis rates, lead to results that clearly show low mass transfer rates, being this phenomenon the controlling step of the overall process rate. However, for stirrer speed from 300rpm upwards, the overall process rate is controlled by hydrolysis reactions. The ratio between mass transfer and overall chemical reaction rates changes with time depending on the conditions of each run.

  5. Influence of fluid dynamic conditions on enzymatic hydrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass: Effect of mass transfer rate.

    PubMed

    Wojtusik, Mateusz; Zurita, Mauricio; Villar, Juan C; Ladero, Miguel; Garcia-Ochoa, Felix

    2016-09-01

    The effect of fluid dynamic conditions on enzymatic hydrolysis of acid pretreated corn stover (PCS) has been assessed. Runs were performed in stirred tanks at several stirrer speed values, under typical conditions of temperature (50°C), pH (4.8) and solid charge (20% w/w). A complex mixture of cellulases, xylanases and mannanases was employed for PCS saccharification. At low stirring speeds (<150rpm), estimated mass transfer coefficients and rates, when compared to chemical hydrolysis rates, lead to results that clearly show low mass transfer rates, being this phenomenon the controlling step of the overall process rate. However, for stirrer speed from 300rpm upwards, the overall process rate is controlled by hydrolysis reactions. The ratio between mass transfer and overall chemical reaction rates changes with time depending on the conditions of each run. PMID:27233094

  6. Rates and Routes of Electron Transfer of [NiFe]-Hydrogenase in an Enzymatic Fuel Cell.

    PubMed

    Petrenko, Alexander; Stein, Matthias

    2015-10-29

    Hydrogenase enzymes are being used in enzymatic fuel cells immobilized on a graphite or carbon electrode surface, for example. The enzyme is used for the anodic oxidation of molecular hydrogen (H2) to produce protons and electrons. The association and orientation of the enzyme at the anode electrode for a direct electron transfer is not completely resolved. The distal FeS-cluster in [NiFe]-hydrogenases contains a histidine residue which is known to play a critical role in the intermolecular electron transfer between the enzyme and the electrode surface. The [NiFe]-hydrogenase graphite electrode association was investigated using Brownian Dynamics simulations. Residues that were shown to be in proximity to the electrode surface were identified (His184, Ser196, Glu461, Glu464), and electron transfer routes connecting the distal FeS-cluster with the surface residues were investigated. Several possible pathways for electron transfer between the distal FeS-cluster and the terminal amino acid residues were probed in terms of their rates of electron transfer using DFT methods. The reorganization energies λ of the distal iron-sulfur cluster and coronene as a molecular model for graphite were calculated. The reorganization energy of the distal (His)(Cys)3 cluster was found to be not very different from that of a standard cubane clusters with a (Cys)4 coordination. Electronic coupling matrix elements and rates of electron transfer for the different pathways were calculated according to the Marcus equation. The rates for glutamate-mediated electrode binding were found to be incompatible with experimental data. A direct electron transfer from the histidine ligand of the distal FeS-cluster to the electrode yielded rates of electron transfer in excellent agreement with experiment. A second pathway, however, from the distal FeS-cluster to the Ser196 residue was found to be equally efficient and feasible. PMID:26218232

  7. A computational study of the phosphoryl transfer reaction between ATP and Dha in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Bordes, I; Ruiz-Pernía, J J; Castillo, R; Moliner, V

    2015-10-28

    Phosphoryl transfer reactions are ubiquitous in biology, being involved in processes ranging from energy and signal transduction to the replication genetic material. Dihydroxyacetone phosphate (Dha-P), an intermediate of the synthesis of pyruvate and a very important building block in nature, can be generated by converting free dihydroxyacetone (Dha) through the action of the dihydroxyacetone kinase enzyme. In this paper the reference uncatalyzed reaction in solution has been studied in order to define the foundations of the chemical reaction and to determine the most adequate computational method to describe this electronically complex reaction. In particular, the phosphorylation reaction mechanism between adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and Dha in aqueous solution has been studied by means of quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations with the QM subset of atoms described with semi-empirical and DFT methods. The results appear to be strongly dependent on the level of calculation, which will have to be taken into account for future studies of the reaction catalyzed by enzymes. In particular, PM3/MM renders lower free energy barriers and a less endergonic process than AM1d/MM and PM6/MM methods. Nevertheless, the concerted pathway was not located with the former combination of potentials. PMID:26303076

  8. Non-enzymatic synthesis of the coenzymes, uridine diphosphate glucose and cytidine diphosphate choline, and other phosphorylated metabolic intermediates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mar, A.; Dworkin, J.; Oro, J.

    1987-01-01

    Using urea and cyanamide, the two condensing agents considered to have been present on the primitive earth, uridine diphosphate glucose (UDPG), cytidine diphosphate choline (CDP-choline), glucose-1-phosphate (G1P), and glucose-6-phosphate (G6P) were synthesized under simulated prebiotic conditions. The reaction products were separated and identified using paper chromatography, thin layer chromatography, enzymatic analyses, and ion-pair reverse-phase high performance liquid chromatography. The possibility of nonenzymatic synthesis of metabolic intermediates on the primitive earth from simple precursors was thus demonstrated.

  9. Application of Electron Transfer Dissociation Mass Spectrometry in Analyses of Non-enzymatically Glycated Peptides

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Qibin; Frolov, Andrej; Tang, Ning; Hoffman, Ralf; van der Goor, Tom; Metz, Thomas O.; Smith, Richard D.

    2007-03-15

    Non-enzymatic glycation of peptides and proteins by D-glucose has important implications in diabetes mellitus research, particularly in the context of development of diabetic complications. The fragmentation behavior of glycated peptides produced from reaction of D-glucose with lysine residues was investigated by electron transfer dissociation (ETD) and collision induced dissociation (CID) tandem mass spectrometry. It was found that high abundance ions corresponding to various degrees of neutral water losses, as well as furylium ion production, dominate the CID spectra, and that the sequence informative b and y ions were rarely observed when Amadori-modified peptides were fragmented. Contrary to what was observed under CID conditions, ions corresponding to neutral losses of water or furylium ion production were not observed in the ETD spectra. Instead, abundant and almost complete series of c and z type ions were observed regardless of whether the modification site was located in the middle of the sequence or close to the N-terminus, greatly facilitating the peptide sequencing. This study strongly suggests that ETD is a better technique for proteomics studies of non-enzymatically glycated peptides and proteins.

  10. Novel Architectures for Achieving Direct Electron Transfer in Enzymatic Biofuel Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blaik, Rita A.

    Enzymatic biofuel cells are a promising source of alternative energy for small device applications, but still face the challenge of achieving direct electron transfer with high enzyme concentrations in a simple system. In this dissertation, methods of constructing electrodes consisting of enzymes attached to nanoparticle-enhanced substrates that serve as high surface area templates are evaluated. In the first method described, glucose oxidase is covalently attached to gold nanoparticles that are assembled onto genetically engineered M13 bacteriophage. The resulting anodes achieve a high peak current per area and a significant improvement in enzyme surface coverage. In the second system, fructose dehydrogenase, a membrane-bound enzyme that has the natural ability to achieve direct electron transfer, is immobilized into a matrix consisting of binders and carbon nanotubes to extend the lifetime of the anode. For the cathode, bilirubin oxidase is immobilized in a carbon nanotube and sol-gel matrix to achieve direct electron transfer. Finally, a full fuel cell consisting of both an anode and cathode is constructed and evaluated with each system described.

  11. Ground state destabilization by anionic nucleophiles contributes to the activity of phosphoryl transfer enzymes.

    PubMed

    Andrews, Logan D; Fenn, Tim D; Herschlag, Daniel

    2013-07-01

    Enzymes stabilize transition states of reactions while limiting binding to ground states, as is generally required for any catalyst. Alkaline Phosphatase (AP) and other nonspecific phosphatases are some of Nature's most impressive catalysts, achieving preferential transition state over ground state stabilization of more than 10²²-fold while utilizing interactions with only the five atoms attached to the transferred phosphorus. We tested a model that AP achieves a portion of this preference by destabilizing ground state binding via charge repulsion between the anionic active site nucleophile, Ser102, and the negatively charged phosphate monoester substrate. Removal of the Ser102 alkoxide by mutation to glycine or alanine increases the observed Pi affinity by orders of magnitude at pH 8.0. To allow precise and quantitative comparisons, the ionic form of bound P(i) was determined from pH dependencies of the binding of Pi and tungstate, a P(i) analog lacking titratable protons over the pH range of 5-11, and from the ³¹P chemical shift of bound P(i). The results show that the Pi trianion binds with an exceptionally strong femtomolar affinity in the absence of Ser102, show that its binding is destabilized by ≥10⁸-fold by the Ser102 alkoxide, and provide direct evidence for ground state destabilization. Comparisons of X-ray crystal structures of AP with and without Ser102 reveal the same active site and P(i) binding geometry upon removal of Ser102, suggesting that the destabilization does not result from a major structural rearrangement upon mutation of Ser102. Analogous Pi binding measurements with a protein tyrosine phosphatase suggest the generality of this ground state destabilization mechanism. Our results have uncovered an important contribution of anionic nucleophiles to phosphoryl transfer catalysis via ground state electrostatic destabilization and an enormous capacity of the AP active site for specific and strong recognition of the phosphoryl group in

  12. The cellular and compartmental profile of mouse retinal glycolysis, tricarboxylic acid cycle, oxidative phosphorylation, and ~P transferring kinases

    PubMed Central

    Rueda, Elda M.; Johnson, Jerry E.; Giddabasappa, Anand; Swaroop, Anand; Brooks, Matthew J.; Sigel, Irena; Chaney, Shawnta Y.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The homeostatic regulation of cellular ATP is achieved by the coordinated activity of ATP utilization, synthesis, and buffering. Glucose is the major substrate for ATP synthesis through glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS), whereas intermediary metabolism through the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle utilizes non-glucose-derived monocarboxylates, amino acids, and alpha ketoacids to support mitochondrial ATP and GTP synthesis. Cellular ATP is buffered by specialized equilibrium-driven high-energy phosphate (~P) transferring kinases. Our goals were twofold: 1) to characterize the gene expression, protein expression, and activity of key synthesizing and regulating enzymes of energy metabolism in the whole mouse retina, retinal compartments, and/or cells and 2) to provide an integrative analysis of the results related to function. Methods mRNA expression data of energy-related genes were extracted from our whole retinal Affymetrix microarray data. Fixed-frozen retinas from adult C57BL/6N mice were used for immunohistochemistry, laser scanning confocal microscopy, and enzymatic histochemistry. The immunoreactivity levels of well-characterized antibodies, for all major retinal cells and their compartments, were obtained using our established semiquantitative confocal and imaging techniques. Quantitative cytochrome oxidase (COX) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity was determined histochemically. Results The Affymetrix data revealed varied gene expression patterns of the ATP synthesizing and regulating enzymes found in the muscle, liver, and brain. Confocal studies showed differential cellular and compartmental distribution of isozymes involved in glucose, glutamate, glutamine, lactate, and creatine metabolism. The pattern and intensity of the antibodies and of the COX and LDH activity showed the high capacity of photoreceptors for aerobic glycolysis and OXPHOS. Competition assays with pyruvate revealed that LDH-5 was localized in the photoreceptor

  13. Enzymatic catalysis of proton transfer at carbon: activation of triosephosphate isomerase by phosphite dianion.

    PubMed

    Amyes, Tina L; Richard, John P

    2007-05-15

    More than 80% of the rate acceleration for enzymatic catalysis of the aldose-ketose isomerization of (R)-glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate (GAP) by triosephosphate isomerase (TIM) can be attributed to the phosphodianion group of GAP [Amyes, T. L., O'Donoghue, A. C., and Richard, J. P. (2001) J. Am. Chem. Soc. 123, 11325-11326]. We examine here the necessity of the covalent connection between the phosphodianion and triose sugar portions of the substrate by "carving up" GAP into the minimal neutral two-carbon sugar glycolaldehyde and phosphite dianion pieces. This "two-part substrate" preserves both the alpha-hydroxycarbonyl and oxydianion portions of GAP. TIM catalyzes proton transfer from glycolaldehyde in D2O, resulting in deuterium incorporation that can be monitored by 1H NMR spectroscopy, with kcat/Km = 0.26 M-1 s-1. Exogenous phosphite dianion results in a very large increase in the observed second-order rate constant (kcat/Km)obsd for turnover of glycolaldehyde, and the dependence of (kcat/Km)obsd on [HPO32-] exhibits saturation. The data give kcat/Km = 185 M-1 s-1 for turnover of glycolaldehyde by TIM that is saturated with phosphite dianion so that the separate binding of phosphite dianion to TIM results in a 700-fold acceleration of proton transfer from carbon. The binding of phosphite dianion to the free enzyme (Kd = 38 mM) is 700-fold weaker than its binding to the fleeting complex of TIM with the altered substrate in the transition state (Kd = 53 muM); the total intrinsic binding energy of phosphite dianion in the transition state is 5.8 kcal/mol. We propose a physical model for catalysis by TIM in which the intrinsic binding energy of the substrate phosphodianion group is utilized to drive closing of the "mobile loop" and a protein conformational change that leads to formation of an active site environment that is optimally organized for stabilization of the transition state for proton transfer from alpha-carbonyl carbon.

  14. Asymmetric phosphorylation through catalytic P(III) phosphoramidite transfer: Enantioselective synthesis of d-myo-inositol-6-phosphate

    PubMed Central

    Jordan, Peter A.; Kayser-Bricker, Katherine J.; Miller, Scott J.

    2010-01-01

    Despite the ubiquitous use of phosphoramidite chemistry in the synthesis of biophosphates, catalytic asymmetric phosphoramidite transfer remains largely unexplored for phosphate ester synthesis. We have discovered that a tetrazole-functionalized peptide, in the presence of 10-Å molecular sieves, functions as an enantioselective catalyst for phosphite transfer. This chemistry in turn has been used as the key step in a streamlined synthesis of myo-inositol-6-phosphate. Mechanistic insights implicate phosphate as a directing group for a highly selective kinetic resolution of a protected inositol monophosphate. This work represents a distinct and efficient method for the selective catalytic phosphorylation of natural products. PMID:20439750

  15. Protein kinase D negatively regulates hepatitis C virus secretion through phosphorylation of oxysterol-binding protein and ceramide transfer protein.

    PubMed

    Amako, Yutaka; Syed, Gulam H; Siddiqui, Aleem

    2011-04-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) RNA replicates its genome on specialized endoplasmic reticulum modified membranes termed membranous web and utilizes lipid droplets for initiating the viral nucleocapsid assembly. HCV maturation and/or the egress pathway requires host sphingolipid synthesis, which occur in the Golgi. Ceramide transfer protein (CERT) and oxysterol-binding protein (OSBP) play a crucial role in sphingolipid biosynthesis. Protein kinase D (PKD), a serine/threonine kinase, is recruited to the trans-Golgi network where it influences vesicular trafficking to the plasma membrane by regulation of several important mediators via phosphorylation. PKD attenuates the function of both CERT and OSBP by phosphorylation at their respective Ser(132) and Ser(240) residues (phosphorylation inhibition). Here, we investigated the functional role of PKD in HCV secretion. Our studies show that HCV gene expression down-regulated PKD activation. PKD depletion by shRNA or inhibition by pharmacological inhibitor Gö6976 enhanced HCV secretion. Overexpression of a constitutively active form of PKD suppressed HCV secretion. The suppression by PKD was subverted by the ectopic expression of nonphosphorylatable serine mutant CERT S132A or OSBP S240A. These observations imply that PKD negatively regulates HCV secretion/release by attenuating OSBP and CERT functions by phosphorylation inhibition. This study identifies the key role of the Golgi components in the HCV maturation process. PMID:21285358

  16. Trimethylamine oxide respiration in Proteus sp. strain NTHC153: electron transfer-dependent phosphorylation and L-serine transport.

    PubMed Central

    Stenberg, E; Styrvold, O B; Strøm, A R

    1982-01-01

    Cells of Proteus sp. strains NTHC153 grown anaerobically with glucose and trimethylamine oxide (TMAO) were converted to spheroplasts by the penicillin method. The spheroplasts were lysed by osmotic shock, and the membrane vesicles were purified by sucrose gradient centrifugation. Vesicles energized electron transfer from formate to TMAO displayed active anaerobic transport of serine. An anaerobic cell-free extract of Proteus sp. disrupted in a French pressure cell reduced TMAO with formate and NADH with the concomitant formation of organic phosphate. The net P/2e- ratios determined were 0.1 and 0.3, respectively. The NADH- and TMAO-dependent phosphorylation was sensitive to uncouplers of oxidative phosphorylation (protonophores), and the formate- and TMAO-dependent serine transport was sensitive to ionophores and protonophores. We conclude that TMAO reduction in Proteus sp. fulfills the essential features of anaerobic respiration. PMID:6798018

  17. Phosphorylation-induced conformational changes in short peptides probed by fluorescence resonance energy transfer in the 10A domain.

    PubMed

    Sahoo, Harekrushna; Nau, Werner M

    2007-03-26

    Phosphorylation-induced conformational changes in short polypeptides were probed by a fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) method by employing a short-distance FRET pair (R(0) approximately 10 A) based on tryptophan as natural donor and a 2,3-diazabicyclo[2.2.2]oct-2-ene-labeled asparagine (Dbo) as synthetic acceptor. Two substrates for kinases, LeuArgArgTrpSerLeuGly-Dbo (peptide I) and TrpLysArgThrLeuArgArg-Dbo (peptide II), were investigated, with serine and threonine, respectively, as phosphorylation sites. Steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence experiments in H(2)O revealed a decrease in FRET efficiency for peptide I and an increase for peptide II; this suggested that the effective distances between donor and acceptor increased and decreased, respectively. The same trends and similar absolute variations in effective donor-acceptor distances were observed in propylene glycol, a less polar and highly viscous solvent; this suggested that the variations are due to intrinsic structural preferences. Fitting of the time-resolved decay traces according to a distribution function model (Gaussian distribution) provided the mean donor-acceptor distances, which showed an increase upon phosphorylation for peptide I (from 9.7 to 10.5 A) and a decrease for peptide II (from 10.9 to 9.3 A) in H(2)O. The broadness (half-width) of the distributions, which provides a measure of the rigidity of the peptides, remained similar upon phosphorylation of peptide I (3.0 versus 3.1 A), but decreased for peptide II (from 3.1 to 0.73 A in H(2)O); this suggests a more compact, structured conformation upon phosphorylation of the latter peptide. The elongation of the peptide backbone (by ca. 0.7 A) for peptide I is attributed to an increase in steric demand upon phosphorylation, which favors an extended conformation. The contraction (by ca. 1.4 A) and structural rigidification of peptide II is attributed to attractive Coulombic interactions and hydrogen bonding between the

  18. Structural insight into partner specificity and phosphoryl transfer in two-component signal transduction.

    PubMed

    Casino, Patricia; Rubio, Vicente; Marina, Alberto

    2009-10-16

    The chief mechanism used by bacteria for sensing their environment is based on two conserved proteins: a sensor histidine kinase (HK) and an effector response regulator (RR). The signal transduction process involves highly conserved domains of both proteins that mediate autokinase, phosphotransfer, and phosphatase activities whose output is a finely tuned RR phosphorylation level. Here, we report the structure of the complex between the entire cytoplasmic portion of Thermotoga maritima class I HK853 and its cognate, RR468, as well as the structure of the isolated RR468, both free and BeF(3)(-) bound. Our results provide insight into partner specificity in two-component systems, recognition of the phosphorylation state of each partner, and the catalytic mechanism of the phosphatase reaction. Biochemical analysis shows that the HK853-catalyzed autokinase reaction proceeds by a cis autophosphorylation mechanism within the HK subunit. The results suggest a model for the signal transduction mechanism in two-component systems.

  19. The guanidinium unit in the catalysis of phosphoryl transfer reactions: from molecular spacers to nanostructured supports.

    PubMed

    Salvio, Riccardo

    2015-07-27

    Examples of guanidinium-based artificial phosphodiesterases are illustrated in this review article. A wide set of collected catalytic systems are presented, from the early examples to the most recent developments of the use of this unit in the design of supramolecular catalysts. Special attention is dedicated to illustrate the operating catalytic mechanism and the role of guanidine/ium units in the catalysis. One or more of these units can act by themselves or in conjunction with other active units. The analogy with the mechanism of enzymatic systems is presented and discussed. In the last part of this overview, recent examples of guanidinophosphodiesterases based on nanostructured supports are reported, namely gold-monolayer-protected clusters and polymer brushes grafted to silica nanoparticles. The issue of the dependence of the catalytic performance on the preorganization of the spacer is tackled and discussed in terms of effective molarity, a parameter that can be taken as a quantitative measurement of this preorganization for both conventional molecular linker and nanosized supports.

  20. Lewis acid catalysis of phosphoryl transfer from a copper(II)-NTP complex in a kinase ribozyme

    PubMed Central

    Biondi, Elisa; Poudyal, Raghav R.; Forgy, Joshua C.; Sawyer, Andrew W.; Maxwell, Adam W. R.; Burke, Donald H.

    2013-01-01

    The chemical strategies used by ribozymes to enhance reaction rates are revealed in part from their metal ion and pH requirements. We find that kinase ribozyme K28(1-77)C, in contrast with previously characterized kinase ribozymes, requires Cu2+ for optimal catalysis of thiophosphoryl transfer from GTPγS. Phosphoryl transfer from GTP is greatly reduced in the absence of Cu2+, indicating a specific catalytic role independent of any potential interactions with the GTPγS thiophosphoryl group. In-line probing and ATPγS competition both argue against direct Cu2+ binding by RNA; rather, these data establish that Cu2+ enters the active site within a Cu2+•GTPγS or Cu2+•GTP chelation complex, and that Cu2+•nucleobase interactions further enforce Cu2+ selectivity and position the metal ion for Lewis acid catalysis. Replacing Mg2+ with [Co(NH3)6]3+ significantly reduced product yield, but not kobs, indicating that the role of inner-sphere Mg2+ coordination is structural rather than catalytic. Replacing Mg2+ with alkaline earths of increasing ionic radii (Ca2+, Sr2+ and Ba2+) gave lower yields and approximately linear rates of product accumulation. Finally, we observe that reaction rates increased with pH in log-linear fashion with an apparent pKa = 8.0 ± 0.1, indicating deprotonation in the rate-limiting step. PMID:23358821

  1. Kinetic Isotope Effects as a Probe of Hydrogen Transfers to and from Common Enzymatic Cofactors

    PubMed Central

    Roston, Daniel; Islam, Zahidul; Kohen, Amnon

    2013-01-01

    Enzymes use a number of common cofactors as sources of hydrogen to drive biological processes, but the physics of the hydrogen transfers to and from these cofactors is not fully understood. Researchers study the mechanistically important contributions from quantum tunneling and enzyme dynamics and connect those processes to the catalytic power of enzymes that use these cofactors. Here we describe some progress that has been made in studying these reactions, particularly through the use of kinetic isotope effects (KIEs). We first discuss the general theoretical framework necessary to interpret experimental KIEs, and then describe practical uses for KIEs in the context of two case studies. The first example is alcohol dehydrogenase, which uses a nicotinamide cofactor to catalyze a hydride transfer, and the second example is thymidylate synthase, which uses a folate cofactor to catalyze both a hydride and a proton transfer. PMID:24161942

  2. Kinetic isotope effects as a probe of hydrogen transfers to and from common enzymatic cofactors.

    PubMed

    Roston, Daniel; Islam, Zahidul; Kohen, Amnon

    2014-02-15

    Enzymes use a number of common cofactors as sources of hydrogen to drive biological processes, but the physics of the hydrogen transfers to and from these cofactors is not fully understood. Researchers study the mechanistically important contributions from quantum tunneling and enzyme dynamics and connect those processes to the catalytic power of enzymes that use these cofactors. Here we describe some progress that has been made in studying these reactions, particularly through the use of kinetic isotope effects (KIEs). We first discuss the general theoretical framework necessary to interpret experimental KIEs, and then describe practical uses for KIEs in the context of two case studies. The first example is alcohol dehydrogenase, which uses a nicotinamide cofactor to catalyze a hydride transfer, and the second example is thymidylate synthase, which uses a folate cofactor to catalyze both a hydride and a proton transfer.

  3. The role of the C8 proton of ATP in the regulation of phosphoryl transfer within kinases and synthetases

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The kinome comprises functionally diverse enzymes, with the current classification indicating very little about the extent of conserved regulatory mechanisms associated with phosphoryl transfer. The apparent Km of the kinases ranges from less than 0.4 μM to in excess of 1000 μM for ATP. It is not known how this diverse range of enzymes mechanistically achieves the regulation of catalysis via an affinity range for ATP varying by three-orders of magnitude. Results We have demonstrated a previously undiscovered mechanism in kinase and synthetase enzymes where the overall rate of reaction is regulated via the C8-H of ATP. Using ATP deuterated at the C8 position (C8D-ATP) as a molecular probe it was shown that the C8-H plays a direct role in the regulation of the overall rate of reaction in a range of kinase and synthetase enzymes. Using comparative studies on the effect of the concentration of ATP and C8D-ATP on the activity of the enzymes we demonstrated that not only did C8D-ATP give a kinetic isotope effect (KIE) but the KIE's obtained are clearly not secondary KIE effects as the magnitude of the KIE in all cases was at least 2 fold and in most cases in excess of 7 fold. Conclusions Kinase and synthetase enzymes utilise C8D-ATP in preference to non-deuterated ATP. The KIE obtained at low ATP concentrations is clearly a primary KIE demonstrating strong evidence that the bond to the isotopically substituted hydrogen is being broken. The effect of the ATP concentration profile on the KIE was used to develop a model whereby the C8H of ATP plays a role in the overall regulation of phosphoryl transfer. This role of the C8H of ATP in the regulation of substrate binding appears to have been conserved in all kinase and synthetase enzymes as one of the mechanisms associated with binding of ATP. The induction of the C8H to be labile by active site residues coordinated to the ATP purine ring may play a significant role in explaining the broad range of Km associated

  4. Parallel pathways and free-energy landscapes for enzymatic hydride transfer probed by hydrostatic pressure.

    PubMed

    Pudney, Christopher R; McGrory, Tom; Lafite, Pierre; Pang, Jiayun; Hay, Sam; Leys, David; Sutcliffe, Michael J; Scrutton, Nigel S

    2009-05-25

    Mutation of an active-site residue in morphinone reductase leads to a conformationally rich landscape that enhances the rate of hydride transfer from NADH to FMN at standard pressure (1 bar). Increasing the pressure causes interconversion between different conformational substates in the mutant enzyme. While high pressure reduces the donor-acceptor distance in the wild-type enzyme, increased conformational freedom "dampens" its effect in the mutant.We show that hydride transfer from NADH to FMN catalysed by the N189A mutant of morphinone reductase occurs along parallel "chemical" pathways in a conformationally rich free-energy landscape. We have developed experimental kinetic and spectroscopic tools by using hydrostatic pressure to explore this free-energy landscape. The crystal structure of the N189A mutant enzyme in complex with the unreactive coenzyme analogue NADH(4) indicates that the nicotinamide moiety of the analogue is conformationally less restrained than the corresponding structure of the wild-type NADH(4) complex. This increased degree of conformational freedom in the N189A enzyme gives rise to the concept of multiple reactive configurations (MRCs), and we show that the relative population of these states across the free-energy landscape can be perturbed experimentally as a function of pressure. Specifically, the amplitudes of individual kinetic phases that were observed in stopped-flow studies of the hydride transfer reaction are sensitive to pressure; this indicates that pressure drives an altered distribution across the energy landscape. We show by absorbance spectroscopy that the loss of charge-transfer character of the enzyme-coenzyme complex is attributed to the altered population of MRCs on the landscape. The existence of a conformationally rich landscape in the N189A mutant is supported by molecular dynamics simulations at low and high pressure. The work provides firm experimental and computational support for the existence of parallel pathways

  5. Muscle oxidative phosphorylation quantitation using creatine chemical exchange saturation transfer (CrCEST) MRI in mitochondrial disorders

    PubMed Central

    DeBrosse, Catherine; Nanga, Ravi Prakash Reddy; Wilson, Neil; D’Aquilla, Kevin; Elliott, Mark; Yan, Felicia; Wade, Kristin; Nguyen, Sara; Worsley, Diana; Parris-Skeete, Chevonne; McCormick, Elizabeth; Xiao, Rui; Cunningham, Zuela Zolkipli; Fishbein, Lauren; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Lynch, David R.; Stallings, Virginia A.; Yudkoff, Marc; Falk, Marni J.; Reddy, Ravinder; McCormack, Shana E.

    2016-01-01

    Systemic mitochondrial energy deficiency is implicated in the pathophysiology of many age-related human diseases. Currently available tools to estimate mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) capacity in skeletal muscle in vivo lack high anatomic resolution. Muscle groups vary with respect to their contractile and metabolic properties. Therefore, muscle group–specific estimates of OXPHOS would be advantageous. To address this need, a noninvasive creatine chemical exchange saturation transfer (CrCEST) MRI technique has recently been developed, which provides a measure of free creatine. After exercise, skeletal muscle can be imaged with CrCEST in order to make muscle group–specific measurements of OXPHOS capacity, reflected in the recovery rate (τCr) of free Cr. In this study, we found that individuals with genetic mitochondrial diseases had significantly (P = 0.026) prolonged postexercise τCr in the medial gastrocnemius muscle, suggestive of less OXPHOS capacity. Additionally, we observed that lower resting CrCEST was associated with prolonged τPCr, with a Pearson’s correlation coefficient of –0.42 (P = 0.046), consistent with previous hypotheses predicting that resting creatine levels may correlate with 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy–based estimates of OXPHOS capacity. We conclude that CrCEST can noninvasively detect changes in muscle creatine content and OXPHOS capacity, with high anatomic resolution, in individuals with mitochondrial disorders. PMID:27812541

  6. Time-Resolved Fluorescence Energy Transfer Measurements Between Site-Specific Probes On The Ca-Atpase Of Sarcoplasmic Reticulum In Different Enzymatic States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Squier, Thomas C.; Bigelow, Diana J.; Garcia de Ancos, Jorge; Bishop, James E.; Inesi, Giuseppe

    1988-06-01

    We have measured resonance energy transfer between two donor-acceptor pairs localized on different domains of the Ca-ATPase of sarcoplasmic reticulum in order to determine whether changes in tertiary structure accompany active calcium transport. Energy transfer was determined from both steady state intensities and time-resolved lifetimes of 5-(2-((acety1)- amino)ethyDaminonaphthalene-l-sulfonic acid (IAEDANS), specifically bound to the B tryptic fragment, using two acceptors: (1) fluorescein 5'-isothiocyanate (FITC), covalently bound at the nucleotide site, also on the B fragment, and (2) 4-dimethylaminophenylazopheny1-4'- maleimide (DABMI), bound on the Al subfragment. Neither binding of calcium to the high affinity sites nor phosphorylation by inorganic phosphate is accompanied by detectable changes in the distance between IAEDANS and FITC, suggesting that the B fragment does not undergo any large-scale (>1 A) physical distortion under these conditions. On the other hand, measurements of energy transfer from IAEDANS to the acceptor DABMI, on the Al subfragment, demonstrate that phosphorylation with inorganic phosphate or addition of pM VO4 results in increased energy transfer, that is reversible with subsequent addition of calcium. Addition of calcium to the nonphosphorylated enzyme results in no detectable change in energy transfer. The presence of the detergent lysolecithin prevents the phosphate dependent increase in fluorescence energy transfer, suggesting that protein-protein interactions may contribute to the observed change in energy transfer. A direct relationship between an increased degree of protein-protein interactions and phosphoenzyme formation is confirmed by investigations using a reconstituted preparation containing a mixed popu Lation of Ca-ATPase polypeptide chains labeled either with IAEDANS or with DABMI. These results suggest a phosphorylation dependent change in either the affinity or orientation of Ca-ATPase polypeptide chains with respect

  7. Enzymic phosphoryl transfer to carbon and oxygen acceptors: An investigation of the biosynthesis of 2-aminoethylphosphonic acid in Tetrahymena pyriformis W. and the kinetic mechanism and cofactor controlled substrate specificity of yeast inorganic pyrophosphatase

    SciTech Connect

    Barry, R.J.

    1987-01-01

    This research is concerned with the study of two enzymatic systems which catalyze phosphoryl transfer reactions to carbon and oxygen acceptors. The first portion of this study is concerned with the elucidation of the T. pyriformis 2-aminoethylphosphonate (AEP) biosynthetic pathway. The de novo formation of AEP from exogenously added precursors in Tetrahymena cell-free preparations was evaluated by using radioisotopic techniques and NMR spectral analysis. Incubation of ({sup 32}P)-phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) with cell-free preparations yielded ({sup 32}P)-labelled material that was chromatographically identical to authentic phosphonopyruvate (p-pry). A reexamination of AEP biosynthesis was initiated. In the second portion of this study the kinetic mechanism of yeast inorganic pyrophosphatase (PPase) was examined by carrying-out initial velocity studies. Ca{sup 2+} and Rh(H{sub 2}O){sub 4} (methylenediphosphonate) (Rh(H{sub 2}O){sub 4}PCP) were used as dead-end inhibitors to study the order of binding of Cr(H{sub 2}O){sub 4}PP to the substrate site and Mg{sup 2+} to the low affinity activator site on the enzyme.

  8. Vibrational studies of phosphoryl transfer enzymes: ras- p21(*)magnesium-GTP and Myosin S1(*)magnesium-ADP- vanadate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jianghua

    1999-07-01

    between the attacking and leaving group oxygens with the central vanadium ion in the S1•MgADP -Vi complex was found to increase only slightly compared with the bond order of the ester V-O bond of a monoester vanadate model compound in solution, suggesting an SN2 like mechanism for the phosphoryl transfer reaction catalyzed by myosin.

  9. Enzymatic regeneration of adenosine triphosphate cofactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, D. L.

    1974-01-01

    Regenerating adenosine triphosphate (ATP) from adenosine diphosphate (ADP) by enzymatic process which utilizes carbamyl phosphate as phosphoryl donor is technique used to regenerate expensive cofactors. Process allows complex enzymatic reactions to be considered as candidates for large-scale continuous processes.

  10. Histone phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Rossetto, Dorine; Avvakumov, Nikita; Côté, Jacques

    2012-01-01

    Histone posttranslational modifications are key components of diverse processes that modulate chromatin structure. These marks function as signals during various chromatin-based events, and act as platforms for recruitment, assembly or retention of chromatin-associated factors. The best-known function of histone phosphorylation takes place during cellular response to DNA damage, when phosphorylated histone H2A(X) demarcates large chromatin domains around the site of DNA breakage. However, multiple studies have also shown that histone phosphorylation plays crucial roles in chromatin remodeling linked to other nuclear processes. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge of histone phosphorylation and describe the many kinases and phosphatases that regulate it. We discuss the key roles played by this histone mark in DNA repair, transcription and chromatin compaction during cell division and apoptosis. Additionally, we describe the intricate crosstalk that occurs between phosphorylation and other histone modifications and allows for sophisticated control over the chromatin remodeling processes. PMID:22948226

  11. Modifications on the hydrogen bond network by mutations of Escherichia coli copper efflux oxidase affect the process of proton transfer to dioxygen leading to alterations of enzymatic activities

    SciTech Connect

    Kajikawa, Takao; Kataoka, Kunishige; Sakurai, Takeshi

    2012-05-25

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Proton transfer pathway to dioxygen in CueO was identified. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Glu506 is the key amino acid to transport proton. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The Ala mutation at Glu506 formed a compensatory proton transfer pathway. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The Ile mutation at Glu506 shut down the hydrogen bond network. -- Abstract: CueO has a branched hydrogen bond network leading from the exterior of the protein molecule to the trinuclear copper center. This network transports protons in the four-electron reduction of dioxygen. We replaced the acidic Glu506 and Asp507 residues with the charged and uncharged amino acid residues. Peculiar changes in the enzyme activity of the mutants relative to the native enzyme indicate that an acidic amino acid residue at position 506 is essential for effective proton transport. The Ala mutation resulted in the formation of a compensatory hydrogen bond network with one or two extra water molecules. On the other hand, the Ile mutation resulted in the complete shutdown of the hydrogen bond network leading to loss of enzymatic activities of CueO. In contrast, the hydrogen bond network without the proton transport function was constructed by the Gln mutation. These results exerted on the hydrogen bond network in CueO are discussed in comparison with proton transfers in cytochrome oxidase.

  12. An enzymatically-sensitized sequential and concentric energy transfer relay self-assembled around semiconductor quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samanta, Anirban; Walper, Scott A.; Susumu, Kimihiro; Dwyer, Chris L.; Medintz, Igor L.

    2015-04-01

    The ability to control light energy within de novo nanoscale structures and devices will greatly benefit their continuing development and ultimate application. Ideally, this control should extend from generating the light itself to its spatial propagation within the device along with providing defined emission wavelength(s), all in a stand-alone modality. Here we design and characterize macromolecular nanoassemblies consisting of semiconductor quantum dots (QDs), several differentially dye-labeled peptides and the enzyme luciferase which cumulatively demonstrate many of these capabilities by engaging in multiple-sequential energy transfer steps. To create these structures, recombinantly-expressed luciferase and the dye-labeled peptides were appended with a terminal polyhistidine sequence allowing for controlled ratiometric self-assembly around the QDs via metal-affinity coordination. The QDs serve to provide multiple roles in these structures including as central assembly platforms or nanoscaffolds along with acting as a potent energy harvesting and transfer relay. The devices are activated by addition of coelenterazine H substrate which is oxidized by luciferase producing light energy which sensitizes the central 625 nm emitting QD acceptor by bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET). The sensitized QD, in turn, acts as a relay and transfers the energy to a first peptide-labeled Alexa Fluor 647 acceptor dye displayed on its surface. This dye then transfers energy to a second red-shifted peptide-labeled dye acceptor on the QD surface through a second concentric Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) process. Alexa Fluor 700 and Cy5.5 are both tested in the role of this terminal FRET acceptor. Photophysical analysis of spectral profiles from the resulting sequential BRET-FRET-FRET processes allow us to estimate the efficiency of each of the transfer steps. Importantly, the efficiency of each step within this energy transfer cascade can be controlled to

  13. Structure of NDP-forming Acetyl-CoA synthetase ACD1 reveals a large rearrangement for phosphoryl transfer

    PubMed Central

    Weiße, Renato H.-J.; Faust, Annette; Schmidt, Marcel; Schönheit, Peter; Scheidig, Axel J.

    2016-01-01

    The NDP-forming acyl-CoA synthetases (ACDs) catalyze the conversion of various CoA thioesters to the corresponding acids, conserving their chemical energy in form of ATP. The ACDs are the major energy-conserving enzymes in sugar and peptide fermentation of hyperthermophilic archaea. They are considered to be primordial enzymes of ATP synthesis in the early evolution of life. We present the first crystal structures, to our knowledge, of an ACD from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Candidatus Korachaeum cryptofilum. These structures reveal a unique arrangement of the ACD subunits alpha and beta within an α2β2-heterotetrameric complex. This arrangement significantly differs from other members of the superfamily. To transmit an activated phosphoryl moiety from the Ac-CoA binding site (within the alpha subunit) to the NDP-binding site (within the beta subunit), a distance of 51 Å has to be bridged. This transmission requires a larger rearrangement within the protein complex involving a 21-aa-long phosphohistidine-containing segment of the alpha subunit. Spatial restraints of the interaction of this segment with the beta subunit explain the necessity for a second highly conserved His residue within the beta subunit. The data support the proposed four-step reaction mechanism of ACDs, coupling acyl-CoA thioesters with ATP synthesis. Furthermore, the determined crystal structure of the complex with bound Ac-CoA allows first insight, to our knowledge, into the determinants for acyl-CoA substrate specificity. The composition and size of loops protruding into the binding pocket of acyl-CoA are determined by the individual arrangement of the characteristic subdomains. PMID:26787904

  14. An enzymatically-sensitized sequential and concentric energy transfer relay self-assembled around semiconductor quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Samanta, Anirban; Walper, Scott A; Susumu, Kimihiro; Dwyer, Chris L; Medintz, Igor L

    2015-05-01

    The ability to control light energy within de novo nanoscale structures and devices will greatly benefit their continuing development and ultimate application. Ideally, this control should extend from generating the light itself to its spatial propagation within the device along with providing defined emission wavelength(s), all in a stand-alone modality. Here we design and characterize macromolecular nanoassemblies consisting of semiconductor quantum dots (QDs), several differentially dye-labeled peptides and the enzyme luciferase which cumulatively demonstrate many of these capabilities by engaging in multiple-sequential energy transfer steps. To create these structures, recombinantly-expressed luciferase and the dye-labeled peptides were appended with a terminal polyhistidine sequence allowing for controlled ratiometric self-assembly around the QDs via metal-affinity coordination. The QDs serve to provide multiple roles in these structures including as central assembly platforms or nanoscaffolds along with acting as a potent energy harvesting and transfer relay. The devices are activated by addition of coelenterazine H substrate which is oxidized by luciferase producing light energy which sensitizes the central 625 nm emitting QD acceptor by bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET). The sensitized QD, in turn, acts as a relay and transfers the energy to a first peptide-labeled Alexa Fluor 647 acceptor dye displayed on its surface. This dye then transfers energy to a second red-shifted peptide-labeled dye acceptor on the QD surface through a second concentric Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) process. Alexa Fluor 700 and Cy5.5 are both tested in the role of this terminal FRET acceptor. Photophysical analysis of spectral profiles from the resulting sequential BRET-FRET-FRET processes allow us to estimate the efficiency of each of the transfer steps. Importantly, the efficiency of each step within this energy transfer cascade can be controlled to

  15. On the mechanism of phosphoenolpyruvate synthetase (PEPs) and its inhibition by sodium fluoride: potential magnesium and aluminum fluoride complexes of phosphoryl transfer.

    PubMed

    McCormick, Nicole E; Jakeman, David L

    2015-06-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate synthase (PEPs) catalyzes the conversion of pyruvate to phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) using a two-step mechanism invoking a phosphorylated-His intermediate. Formation of PEP is an initial step in gluconeogenesis, and PEPs is essential for growth of Escherichia coli on 3-carbon sources such as pyruvate. The production of PEPs has also been linked to bacterial virulence and antibiotic resistance. As such, PEPs is of interest as a target for antibiotic development, and initial investigations of PEPs have indicated inhibition by sodium fluoride. Similar inhibition has been observed in a variety of phospho-transfer enzymes through the formation of metal fluoride complexes within the active site. Herein we quantify the inhibitory capacity of sodium fluoride through a coupled spectrophotometric assay. The observed inhibition provides indirect evidence for the formation of a MgF3(-) complex within the enzyme active site and insight into the phospho-transfer mechanism of PEPs. The effect of AlCl3 on PEPs enzyme activity was also assessed and found to decrease substrate binding and turnover. PMID:25707819

  16. On the mechanism of phosphoenolpyruvate synthetase (PEPs) and its inhibition by sodium fluoride: potential magnesium and aluminum fluoride complexes of phosphoryl transfer.

    PubMed

    McCormick, Nicole E; Jakeman, David L

    2015-06-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate synthase (PEPs) catalyzes the conversion of pyruvate to phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) using a two-step mechanism invoking a phosphorylated-His intermediate. Formation of PEP is an initial step in gluconeogenesis, and PEPs is essential for growth of Escherichia coli on 3-carbon sources such as pyruvate. The production of PEPs has also been linked to bacterial virulence and antibiotic resistance. As such, PEPs is of interest as a target for antibiotic development, and initial investigations of PEPs have indicated inhibition by sodium fluoride. Similar inhibition has been observed in a variety of phospho-transfer enzymes through the formation of metal fluoride complexes within the active site. Herein we quantify the inhibitory capacity of sodium fluoride through a coupled spectrophotometric assay. The observed inhibition provides indirect evidence for the formation of a MgF3(-) complex within the enzyme active site and insight into the phospho-transfer mechanism of PEPs. The effect of AlCl3 on PEPs enzyme activity was also assessed and found to decrease substrate binding and turnover.

  17. An enzymatically-sensitized sequential and concentric energy transfer relay self-assembled around semiconductor quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samanta, Anirban; Walper, Scott A.; Susumu, Kimihiro; Dwyer, Chris L.; Medintz, Igor L.

    2015-04-01

    The ability to control light energy within de novo nanoscale structures and devices will greatly benefit their continuing development and ultimate application. Ideally, this control should extend from generating the light itself to its spatial propagation within the device along with providing defined emission wavelength(s), all in a stand-alone modality. Here we design and characterize macromolecular nanoassemblies consisting of semiconductor quantum dots (QDs), several differentially dye-labeled peptides and the enzyme luciferase which cumulatively demonstrate many of these capabilities by engaging in multiple-sequential energy transfer steps. To create these structures, recombinantly-expressed luciferase and the dye-labeled peptides were appended with a terminal polyhistidine sequence allowing for controlled ratiometric self-assembly around the QDs via metal-affinity coordination. The QDs serve to provide multiple roles in these structures including as central assembly platforms or nanoscaffolds along with acting as a potent energy harvesting and transfer relay. The devices are activated by addition of coelenterazine H substrate which is oxidized by luciferase producing light energy which sensitizes the central 625 nm emitting QD acceptor by bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET). The sensitized QD, in turn, acts as a relay and transfers the energy to a first peptide-labeled Alexa Fluor 647 acceptor dye displayed on its surface. This dye then transfers energy to a second red-shifted peptide-labeled dye acceptor on the QD surface through a second concentric Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) process. Alexa Fluor 700 and Cy5.5 are both tested in the role of this terminal FRET acceptor. Photophysical analysis of spectral profiles from the resulting sequential BRET-FRET-FRET processes allow us to estimate the efficiency of each of the transfer steps. Importantly, the efficiency of each step within this energy transfer cascade can be controlled to

  18. Summarizing lecture: factors influencing enzymatic H-transfers, analysis of nuclear tunnelling isotope effects and thermodynamic versus specific effects

    PubMed Central

    Marcus, R.A

    2006-01-01

    In the articles in this Discussion, a wide variety of topics are treated, including reorganization energy, initially introduced for electron transfers (‘environmentally assisted tunnelling’), nuclear tunnelling, H/D and C12/C13 kinetic isotope effects (KIEs), the effect of changes of distal and nearby amino acid residues using site-directed mutagenesis, and dynamics versus statistical effects. A coordinate-free form of semi-classical theory is used to examine topics on data such as tunnelling versus ‘over-the-barrier’ paths and temperature and pressure effects on KIEs. The multidimensional semi-classical theory includes classically allowed and classically forbidden transitions. More generally, we address the question of relating kinetic to thermodynamic factors, as in the electron transfer field, so learning about specific versus thermodynamic effects in enzyme catalysis and KIEs. PMID:16873131

  19. Insights into the phosphoryl transfer catalyzed by cAMP-dependent protein kinase: an X-ray crystallographic study of complexes with various metals and peptide substrate SP20.

    PubMed

    Gerlits, Oksana; Waltman, Mary Jo; Taylor, Susan; Langan, Paul; Kovalevsky, Andrey

    2013-05-28

    X-ray structures of several ternary substrate and product complexes of the catalytic subunit of cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKAc) have been determined with different bound metal ions. In the PKAc complexes, Mg(2+), Ca(2+), Sr(2+), and Ba(2+) metal ions could bind to the active site and facilitate the phosphoryl transfer reaction. ATP and a substrate peptide (SP20) were modified, and the reaction products ADP and the phosphorylated peptide were found trapped in the enzyme active site. Finally, we determined the structure of a pseudo-Michaelis complex containing Mg(2+), nonhydrolyzable AMP-PCP (β,γ-methyleneadenosine 5'-triphosphate) and SP20. The product structures together with the pseudo-Michaelis complex provide snapshots of different stages of the phosphorylation reaction. Comparison of these structures reveals conformational, coordination, and hydrogen bonding changes that might occur during the reaction and shed new light on its mechanism, roles of metals, and active site residues.

  20. Enzymatic reactions in confined environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Küchler, Andreas; Yoshimoto, Makoto; Luginbühl, Sandra; Mavelli, Fabio; Walde, Peter

    2016-05-01

    Within each biological cell, surface- and volume-confined enzymes control a highly complex network of chemical reactions. These reactions are efficient, timely, and spatially defined. Efforts to transfer such appealing features to in vitro systems have led to several successful examples of chemical reactions catalysed by isolated and immobilized enzymes. In most cases, these enzymes are either bound or adsorbed to an insoluble support, physically trapped in a macromolecular network, or encapsulated within compartments. Advanced applications of enzymatic cascade reactions with immobilized enzymes include enzymatic fuel cells and enzymatic nanoreactors, both for in vitro and possible in vivo applications. In this Review, we discuss some of the general principles of enzymatic reactions confined on surfaces, at interfaces, and inside small volumes. We also highlight the similarities and differences between the in vivo and in vitro cases and attempt to critically evaluate some of the necessary future steps to improve our fundamental understanding of these systems.

  1. Cellular regulation by protein phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Edmond H

    2013-01-11

    A historical account of the discovery of reversible protein phosphorylation is presented. This process was uncovered in the mid 1950s in a study undertaken with Edwin G. Krebs to elucidate the complex hormonal regulation of skeletal muscle glycogen phosphorylase. Contrary to the known activation of this enzyme by AMP which serves as an allosteric effector, its hormonal regulation results from a phosphorylation of the protein by phosphorylase kinase following the activation of the latter by Ca(2+) and ATP. The study led to the establishment of the first hormonal cascade of successive enzymatic reactions, kinases acting on kinases, initiated by cAMP discovered by Earl Sutherland. It also showed how two different physiological processes, carbohydrate metabolism and muscle contraction, could be regulated in concert.

  2. Structural Characterizations of Glycerol Kinase: Unraveling Phosphorylation-Induced Long-Range Activation

    SciTech Connect

    Yeh, Joanne I.; Kettering, Regina; Saxl, Ruth; Bourand, Alexa; Darbon, Emmanuelle; Joly, Nathalie; Briozzo, Pierre; Deutscher, Josef

    2009-09-11

    Glycerol metabolism provides a central link between sugar and fatty acid catabolism. In most bacteria, glycerol kinase plays a crucial role in regulating channel/facilitator-dependent uptake of glycerol into the cell. In the firmicute Enterococcus casseliflavus, this enzyme's activity is enhanced by phosphorylation of the histidine residue (His232) located in its activation loop, approximately 25 A from its catalytic cleft. We reported earlier that some mutations of His232 altered enzyme activities; we present here the crystal structures of these mutant GlpK enzymes. The structure of a mutant enzyme with enhanced enzymatic activity, His232Arg, reveals that residues at the catalytic cleft are more optimally aligned to bind ATP and mediate phosphoryl transfer. Specifically, the position of Arg18 in His232Arg shifts by approximately 1 A when compared to its position in wild-type (WT), His232Ala, and His232Glu enzymes. This new conformation of Arg18 is more optimally positioned at the presumed gamma-phosphate location of ATP, close to the glycerol substrate. In addition to structural changes exhibited at the active site, the conformational stability of the activation loop is decreased, as reflected by an approximately 35% increase in B factors ('thermal factors') in a mutant enzyme displaying diminished activity, His232Glu. Correlating conformational changes to alteration of enzymatic activities in the mutant enzymes identifies distinct localized regions that can have profound effects on intramolecular signal transduction. Alterations in pairwise interactions across the dimer interface can communicate phosphorylation states over 25 A from the activation loop to the catalytic cleft, positioning Arg18 to form favorable interactions at the beta,gamma-bridging position with ATP. This would offset loss of the hydrogen bonds at the gamma-phosphate of ATP during phosphoryl transfer to glycerol, suggesting that appropriate alignment of the second substrate of glycerol kinase

  3. Suppression of Akt1 phosphorylation by adenoviral transfer of the PTEN gene inhibits hypoxia-induced proliferation of rat pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Chunxia; Yi, Bin; Bai, Li; Xia, Yongzhi; Wang, Guansong; Qian, Guisheng; Feng, Hua

    2010-07-02

    Recent findings identify the role of proliferation of pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) in pulmonary vascular remodeling. Phosphoinositide 3 kinase (PI3K) and serine/threonine kinase (Akt) proteins are expressed in vascular smooth muscle cells. In addition, phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN) has been identified as a negative regulator of cytokine signaling that inhibits the PI3K-Akt pathway. However, little is known about the role of PTEN/Akt signaling in hypoxia-associated vascular remodeling. In this study, we found that hypoxia-induced the expression of Akt1 mRNA and phosphorylated protein by at least twofold in rat PASMCs. Phospho-PTEN significantly decreased in the nuclei of PASMCs after hypoxic stimulation. After forcing over-expression of PTEN by adenovirus-mediated PTEN (Ad-PTEN) transfection, the expression of phospho-Akt1 was significantly suppressed in PASMCs at all time-points measured. Additionally, we showed here that hypoxia increased proliferation of PASMCs by nearly twofold and over-expression of PTEN significantly inhibited hypoxia-induced PASMCs proliferation. These findings suggest that phospho-PTEN loss in the nuclei of PASMCs under hypoxic conditions may be the major cause of aberrant activation of Akt1 and may, therefore, play an important role in hypoxia-associated pulmonary arterial remodeling. Finally, the fact that transfection with Ad-PTEN inhibits the phosphorylation of Akt1 in PASMCs suggests a potential therapeutic effect on hypoxia-associated pulmonary arterial remodeling.

  4. A strategy to quantitate global phosphorylation of bone matrix proteins.

    PubMed

    Sroga, Grażyna E; Vashishth, Deepak

    2016-04-15

    Current studies of protein phosphorylation focus primarily on the importance of specific phosphoproteins and their landscapes of phosphorylation in the regulation of different cellular functions. However, global changes in phosphorylation of extracellular matrix phosphoproteins measured "in bulk" are equally important. For example, correct global phosphorylation of different bone matrix proteins is critical to healthy tissue biomineralization. To study changes of bone matrix global phosphorylation, we developed a strategy that combines a procedure for in vitro phosphorylation/dephosphorylation of fully mineralized bone in addition to quantitation of the global phosphorylation levels of bone matrix proteins. For the first time, we show that it is possible to enzymatically phosphorylate/dephosphorylate fully mineralized bone originating from either cadaveric human donors or laboratory animals (mice). Using our strategy, we detected the difference in the global phosphorylation levels of matrix proteins isolated from wild-type and osteopontin knockout mice. We also observed that the global phosphorylation levels of matrix proteins isolated from human cortical bone were lower than those isolated from trabecular bone. The developed strategy has the potential to open new avenues for studies on the global phosphorylation of bone matrix proteins and their role in biomineralization as well for other tissues/cells and protein-based materials.

  5. What’s New in Enzymatic Halogenations

    PubMed Central

    Fujimori, Danica Galoniæ; Walsh, Christopher T.

    2007-01-01

    Summary The halogenation of thousands of natural products occurs during biosynthesis and often confers important functional properties. While haloperoxidases had been the default paradigm for enzymatic incorporation of halogens, via X+ equivalents into organic scaffolds, a combination of microbial genome sequencing, enzymatic studies and structural biology have provided deep new insights into enzymatic transfer of halide equivalents in three oxidation states. These are: (1) the halide ions (X−) abundant in nature, (2) halogen atoms (X•), and (3) the X+ equivalents. The mechanism of halogen incorporation is tailored to the electronic demands of specific substrates and involves enzymes with distinct redox coenzyme requirements. PMID:17881282

  6. Toward a systems-level view of dynamic phosphorylation networks

    PubMed Central

    Newman, Robert H.; Zhang, Jin; Zhu, Heng

    2014-01-01

    To better understand how cells sense and respond to their environment, it is important to understand the organization and regulation of the phosphorylation networks that underlie most cellular signal transduction pathways. These networks, which are composed of protein kinases, protein phosphatases and their respective cellular targets, are highly dynamic. Importantly, to achieve signaling specificity, phosphorylation networks must be regulated at several levels, including at the level of protein expression, substrate recognition, and spatiotemporal modulation of enzymatic activity. Here, we briefly summarize some of the traditional methods used to study the phosphorylation status of cellular proteins before focusing our attention on several recent technological advances, such as protein microarrays, quantitative mass spectrometry, and genetically-targetable fluorescent biosensors, that are offering new insights into the organization and regulation of cellular phosphorylation networks. Together, these approaches promise to lead to a systems-level view of dynamic phosphorylation networks. PMID:25177341

  7. Enzymatic synthesis of farnesyl laurate in organic solvent: initial water activity, kinetics mechanism, optimization of continuous operation using packed bed reactor and mass transfer studies.

    PubMed

    Rahman, N K; Kamaruddin, A H; Uzir, M H

    2011-08-01

    The influence of water activity and water content was investigated with farnesyl laurate synthesis catalyzed by Lipozyme RM IM. Lipozyme RM IM activity depended strongly on initial water activity value. The best results were achieved for a reaction medium with an initial water activity of 0.11 since it gives the best conversion value of 96.80%. The rate constants obtained in the kinetics study using Ping-Pong-Bi-Bi and Ordered-Bi-Bi mechanisms with dead-end complex inhibition of lauric acid were compared. The corresponding parameters were found to obey the Ordered-Bi-Bi mechanism with dead-end complex inhibition of lauric acid. Kinetic parameters were calculated based on this model as follows: V (max) = 5.80 mmol l(-1) min(-1) g enzyme(-1), K (m,A) = 0.70 mmol l(-1) g enzyme(-1), K (m,B) = 115.48 mmol l(-1) g enzyme(-1), K (i) = 11.25 mmol l(-1) g enzyme(-1). The optimum conditions for the esterification of farnesol with lauric acid in a continuous packed bed reactor were found as the following: 18.18 cm packed bed height and 0.9 ml/min substrate flow rate. The optimum molar conversion of lauric acid to farnesyl laurate was 98.07 ± 0.82%. The effect of mass transfer in the packed bed reactor has also been studied using two models for cases of reaction limited and mass transfer limited. A very good agreement between the mass transfer limited model and the experimental data obtained indicating that the esterification in a packed bed reactor was mass transfer limited.

  8. A Simple Hydraulic Analog Model of Oxidative Phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Willis, Wayne T; Jackman, Matthew R; Messer, Jeffrey I; Kuzmiak-Glancy, Sarah; Glancy, Brian

    2016-06-01

    Mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation is the primary source of cellular energy transduction in mammals. This energy conversion involves dozens of enzymatic reactions, energetic intermediates, and the dynamic interactions among them. With the goal of providing greater insight into the complex thermodynamics and kinetics ("thermokinetics") of mitochondrial energy transduction, a simple hydraulic analog model of oxidative phosphorylation is presented. In the hydraulic model, water tanks represent the forward and back "pressures" exerted by thermodynamic driving forces: the matrix redox potential (ΔGredox), the electrochemical potential for protons across the mitochondrial inner membrane (ΔGH), and the free energy of adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) (ΔGATP). Net water flow proceeds from tanks with higher water pressure to tanks with lower pressure through "enzyme pipes" whose diameters represent the conductances (effective activities) of the proteins that catalyze the energy transfer. These enzyme pipes include the reactions of dehydrogenase enzymes, the electron transport chain (ETC), and the combined action of ATP synthase plus the ATP-adenosine 5'-diphosphate exchanger that spans the inner membrane. In addition, reactive oxygen species production is included in the model as a leak that is driven out of the ETC pipe by high pressure (high ΔGredox) and a proton leak dependent on the ΔGH for both its driving force and the conductance of the leak pathway. Model water pressures and flows are shown to simulate thermodynamic forces and metabolic fluxes that have been experimentally observed in mammalian skeletal muscle in response to acute exercise, chronic endurance training, and reduced substrate availability, as well as account for the thermokinetic behavior of mitochondria from fast- and slow-twitch skeletal muscle and the metabolic capacitance of the creatine kinase reaction.

  9. A Simple Hydraulic Analog Model of Oxidative Phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Willis, Wayne T; Jackman, Matthew R; Messer, Jeffrey I; Kuzmiak-Glancy, Sarah; Glancy, Brian

    2016-06-01

    Mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation is the primary source of cellular energy transduction in mammals. This energy conversion involves dozens of enzymatic reactions, energetic intermediates, and the dynamic interactions among them. With the goal of providing greater insight into the complex thermodynamics and kinetics ("thermokinetics") of mitochondrial energy transduction, a simple hydraulic analog model of oxidative phosphorylation is presented. In the hydraulic model, water tanks represent the forward and back "pressures" exerted by thermodynamic driving forces: the matrix redox potential (ΔGredox), the electrochemical potential for protons across the mitochondrial inner membrane (ΔGH), and the free energy of adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) (ΔGATP). Net water flow proceeds from tanks with higher water pressure to tanks with lower pressure through "enzyme pipes" whose diameters represent the conductances (effective activities) of the proteins that catalyze the energy transfer. These enzyme pipes include the reactions of dehydrogenase enzymes, the electron transport chain (ETC), and the combined action of ATP synthase plus the ATP-adenosine 5'-diphosphate exchanger that spans the inner membrane. In addition, reactive oxygen species production is included in the model as a leak that is driven out of the ETC pipe by high pressure (high ΔGredox) and a proton leak dependent on the ΔGH for both its driving force and the conductance of the leak pathway. Model water pressures and flows are shown to simulate thermodynamic forces and metabolic fluxes that have been experimentally observed in mammalian skeletal muscle in response to acute exercise, chronic endurance training, and reduced substrate availability, as well as account for the thermokinetic behavior of mitochondria from fast- and slow-twitch skeletal muscle and the metabolic capacitance of the creatine kinase reaction. PMID:26807634

  10. Regulation of protein phosphorylation in oat mitochondria

    SciTech Connect

    Pike, C.; Kopeck, K.; Sceppa, E. )

    1989-04-01

    We sought to identify phosphorylated proteins in isolated oat mitocchondria and to characterize the enzymatic and regulatory properties of the protein kinase(s). Mitochondria from oats (Avena sativa L. cv. Garry) were purified on Percoll gradients. Mitochondria were incubated with {sup 32}P-{gamma}-ATP; proteins were separated by SDS-PAGE. A small number of bands was detected on autoradiograms, most prominently at 70 kD and 42 kD; the latter band has been tentatively identified as a subunit of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex, a well-known phosphoprotein. The protein kinase(s) could also phosphorylate casein, but not histone. Spermine enhanced the phosphorylation of casein and inhibited the phosphorylation of the 42 kD band. These studies were carried out on both intact and burst mitochondria. Control by calcium and other ions was investigated. The question of the action of regulators on protein kinase or protein phosphatase was studied by the use of {sup 35}S-adenosine thiotriphosphate.

  11. Phosphorylation Modulates Catalytic Activity of Mycobacterial Sirtuins

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Ghanshyam S.; Ravala, Sandeep K.; Malhotra, Neha; Chakraborti, Pradip K.

    2016-01-01

    Sirtuins are NAD+-dependent deacetylases involved in the regulation of diverse cellular processes and are conserved throughout phylogeny. Here we report about in vitro transphosphorylation of the only NAD+-dependent deacetylase (mDAC) present in the genome of Mycobacterium tuberculosis by eukaryotic-type Ser/Thr kinases, particularly PknA. The phosphorylated mDAC displayed decreased deacetylase activity compared to its unphosphorylated counterpart. Mass-spectrometric study identified seven phosphosites in mDAC; however, mutational analysis highlighted major contribution of Thr-214 for phosphorylation of the protein. In concordance to this observation, variants of mDAC substituting Thr-214 with either Ala (phospho-ablated) or Glu (phosphomimic) exhibited significantly reduced deacetylase activity suggesting phosphorylation mediated control of enzymatic activity. To assess the role of phosphorylation towards functionality of mDAC, we opted for a sirtuin knock-out strain of Escherichia coli (Δdac), where interference of endogenous mycobacterial kinases could be excluded. The Δdac strain in nutrient deprived acetate medium exhibited compromised growth and complementation with mDAC reversed this phenotype. The phospho-ablated or phosphomimic variant, on the other hand, was unable to restore the functionality of mDAC indicating the role of phosphorylation per se in the process. We further over-expressed mDAC or mDAC-T214A as His-tagged protein in M. smegmatis, where endogenous eukaryotic-type Ser/Thr kinases are present. Anti-phosphothreonine antibody recognized both mDAC and mDAC-T214A proteins in western blotting. However, the extent of phosphorylation as adjudged by scanning the band intensity, was significantly low in the mutant protein (mDAC-T214A) compared to that of the wild-type (mDAC). Furthermore, expression of PknA in the mDAC complemented Δdac strain was able to phosphorylate M. tuberculosis sirtuin. The growth profile of this culture in acetate medium was

  12. Effect of ageing and ischemia on enzymatic activities linked to Krebs' cycle, electron transfer chain, glutamate and aminoacids metabolism of free and intrasynaptic mitochondria of cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    Villa, Roberto Federico; Gorini, Antonella; Hoyer, Siegfried

    2009-12-01

    The effect of ageing and the relationships between the catalytic properties of enzymes linked to Krebs' cycle, electron transfer chain, glutamate and aminoacid metabolism of cerebral cortex, a functional area very sensitive to both age and ischemia, were studied on mitochondria of adult and aged rats, after complete ischemia of 15 minutes duration. The maximum rate (Vmax) of the following enzyme activities: citrate synthase, malate dehydrogenase, succinate dehydrogenase for Krebs' cycle; NADH-cytochrome c reductase as total (integrated activity of Complex I-III), rotenone sensitive (Complex I) and cytochrome oxidase (Complex IV) for electron transfer chain; glutamate dehydrogenase, glutamate-oxaloacetate-and glutamate-pyruvate transaminases for glutamate metabolism were assayed in non-synaptic, perikaryal mitochondria and in two populations of intra-synaptic mitochondria, i.e., the light and heavy mitochondrial fraction. The results indicate that in normal, steady-state cerebral cortex, the value of the same enzyme activity markedly differs according (a) to the different populations of mitochondria, i.e., non-synaptic or intra-synaptic light and heavy, (b) and respect to ageing. After 15 min of complete ischemia, the enzyme activities of mitochondria located near the nucleus (perikaryal mitochondria) and in synaptic structures (intra-synaptic mitochondria) of the cerebral tissue were substantially modified by ischemia. Non-synaptic mitochondria seem to be more affected by ischemia in adult and particularly in aged animals than the intra-synaptic light and heavy mitochondria. The observed modifications in enzyme activities reflect the metabolic state of the tissue at each specific experimental condition, as shown by comparative evaluation with respect to the content of energy-linked metabolites and substrates. The derangements in enzyme activities due to ischemia is greater in aged than in adult animals and especially the non-synaptic and the intra-synaptic light

  13. The Enzymatic Paradox of Yeast Arginyl-tRNA Synthetase: Exclusive Arginine Transfer Controlled by a Flexible Mechanism of tRNA Recognition

    PubMed Central

    Eriani, Gilbert; Geslain, Renaud

    2016-01-01

    Identity determinants are essential for the accurate recognition of transfer RNAs by aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases. To date, arginine determinants in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae have been identified exclusively in vitro and only on a limited number of tRNA Arginine isoacceptors. In the current study, we favor a full cellular approach and expand the investigation of arginine determinants to all four tRNA Arg isoacceptors. More precisely, this work scrutinizes the relevance of the tRNA nucleotides at position 20, 35 and 36 in the yeast arginylation reaction. We built 21 mutants by site-directed mutagenesis and tested their functionality in YAL5, a previously engineered yeast knockout deficient for the expression of tRNA Arg CCG. Arginylation levels were also monitored using Northern blot. Our data collected in vivo correlate with previous observations. C35 is the prominent arginine determinant followed by G36 or U36 (G/U36). In addition, although there is no major arginine determinant in the D loop, the recognition of tRNA Arg ICG relies to some extent on the nucleotide at position 20. This work refines the existing model for tRNA Arg recognition. Our observations indicate that yeast Arginyl-tRNA synthetase (yArgRS) relies on distinct mechanisms to aminoacylate the four isoacceptors. Finally, according to our refined model, yArgRS is able to accommodate tRNA Arg scaffolds presenting N34, C/G35 and G/A/U36 anticodons while maintaining specificity. We discuss the mechanistic and potential physiological implications of these findings. PMID:26844776

  14. Microwave-mediated enzymatic modifications of DNA.

    PubMed

    Das, Rakha Hari; Ahirwar, Rajesh; Kumar, Saroj; Nahar, Pradip

    2015-02-15

    Here we report microwave-induced specific cleavage, ligation, dephosphorylation, and phosphorylation of nucleic acids catalyzed by restriction endonucleases, T4 DNA ligase, T4 polynucleotide kinase, and calf intestinal alkaline phosphatase. The microwave-mediated method has dramatically reduced the reaction time to 20 to 50s. In control experiments, the same reactions failed to give the desired reaction products when carried out in the same time periods but without microwave irradiation. Because the microwave method is rapid, it could be a useful alternative to the time-consuming conventional procedure for enzymatic modification of DNA. PMID:25447491

  15. Isolation of 3-phosphohistidine from phosphorylated pyruvate, phosphate dikinase.

    PubMed Central

    Spronk, A M; Yoshida, H; Wood, H G

    1976-01-01

    Pyruvate, phosphate dikinase (EC 2-7-9-1) catalyzes formation of phosphoenolpyruvate, AMP, and inorganic pyrophosphate from pyruvate, ATP, and orthophosphate. A pyrophosphoryl and phosphoryl form of the enzyme is involved in this transfer. The [32P]phosphoryl form of pyruvate, phosphate dikinase was prepared with enzyme isolated from Bacteroides symbiosus. The [32P]phosphoryl enzyme was found to have properties corresponding to a phosphoramidate linkage and this was confirmed by isolation of 3-[32P]phosphohistidine from alkaline hydrolysates of the enzyme. The histidyl residue is considered to be the pyrophosphoryl- and phosphoryl-carrier between the three substrate sites of this enzyme. PMID:12506

  16. Mining Conditional Phosphorylation Motifs.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoqing; Wu, Jun; Gong, Haipeng; Deng, Shengchun; He, Zengyou

    2014-01-01

    Phosphorylation motifs represent position-specific amino acid patterns around the phosphorylation sites in the set of phosphopeptides. Several algorithms have been proposed to uncover phosphorylation motifs, whereas the problem of efficiently discovering a set of significant motifs with sufficiently high coverage and non-redundancy still remains unsolved. Here we present a novel notion called conditional phosphorylation motifs. Through this new concept, the motifs whose over-expressiveness mainly benefits from its constituting parts can be filtered out effectively. To discover conditional phosphorylation motifs, we propose an algorithm called C-Motif for a non-redundant identification of significant phosphorylation motifs. C-Motif is implemented under the Apriori framework, and it tests the statistical significance together with the frequency of candidate motifs in a single stage. Experiments demonstrate that C-Motif outperforms some current algorithms such as MMFPh and Motif-All in terms of coverage and non-redundancy of the results and efficiency of the execution. The source code of C-Motif is available at: https://sourceforge. net/projects/cmotif/. PMID:26356863

  17. Chemoselective synthesis and analysis of naturally occurring phosphorylated cysteine peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertran-Vicente, Jordi; Penkert, Martin; Nieto-Garcia, Olaia; Jeckelmann, Jean-Marc; Schmieder, Peter; Krause, Eberhard; Hackenberger, Christian P. R.

    2016-09-01

    In contrast to protein O-phosphorylation, studying the function of the less frequent N- and S-phosphorylation events have lagged behind because they have chemical features that prevent their manipulation through standard synthetic and analytical methods. Here we report on the development of a chemoselective synthetic method to phosphorylate Cys side-chains in unprotected peptides. This approach makes use of a reaction between nucleophilic phosphites and electrophilic disulfides accessible by standard methods. We achieve the stereochemically defined phosphorylation of a Cys residue and verify the modification using electron-transfer higher-energy dissociation (EThcD) mass spectrometry. To demonstrate the use of the approach in resolving biological questions, we identify an endogenous Cys phosphorylation site in IICBGlc, which is known to be involved in the carbohydrate uptake from the bacterial phosphotransferase system (PTS). This new chemical and analytical approach finally allows further investigating the functions and significance of Cys phosphorylation in a wide range of crucial cellular processes.

  18. Calcium Activation of the Ca-ATPase Enhances Conformational Heterogeneity Between Nucleotide Binding and Phosphorylation Domains

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Baowei; Squier, Thomas C.; Bigelow, Diana J.

    2004-04-13

    High-resolution crystal structures obtained in two conformations of the Ca-ATPase suggest that a large-scale rigid-body domain reorientation of approximately 50 involving the nucleotide-binding (N) domain is required to permit the transfer of the -phosphoryl group of ATP to Asp351 in the phosphorylation (P) domain during coupled calcium transport. However, variability observed in the orientation of the N-domain relative to the P-domain in both different crystal structures of the Ca-ATPase following calcium activation, and structures of other P-type ATPases, suggests the presence of conformational heterogeneity in solution which may be modulated by contact interactions within the crystal. Therefore, to address the extent of conformational heterogeneity between these domains in solution, we have used fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) to measure the spatial separation and conformational heterogeneity between donor (i.e., 5-[[2-[(iodoacetyl)amino]ethyl]amino] naphthalene-1-sulfonic acid) and acceptor (i.e., fluorescein 5-isothiocyanate) chromophores covalently bound to the P- and N-domains, respectively, within the Ca-ATPase stabilized in different enzymatic states associated with the transport cycle. In comparison to the unliganded enzyme, the spatial separation and conformational heterogeneity between these domains is unaffected by enzyme phosphorylation. However, calcium-activation results in a 3.4 increase in the average spatial separation, which increases from 29.4 to 32.8 , in good agreement with the high-resolution structures where these sites are respectively separated by 31.6 (1 IWO.pdb) and 35.9 (1EUL.pdb). Thus, the crystal structures accurately reflect the average solution structures of the Ca-ATPase. However, there is substantial conformational heterogeneity for all enzyme states measured, indicating that formation of catalytically important transition states involves a subpopulation of enzyme intermediates. These results suggest that the

  19. Enzymatic desulfurization of coal

    SciTech Connect

    Marquis, J.K. . School of Medicine); Kitchell, J.P. )

    1988-10-07

    Our current efforts to develop clean coal technology, emphasize the advantages of enzymatic desulfurization techniques and have specifically addressed the potential of using partially-purified extracellular microbial enzymes or commercially available enzymes. Our work is focused on the treatment of model'' organic sulfur compounds such as dibenzothiophene (DBT) and ethylphenylsulfide (EPS). Furthermore, we are designing experiments to facilitate the enzymatic process by means of a hydrated organic solvent matrix.

  20. Enzymatic desulfurization of coal

    SciTech Connect

    Boyer, Y.N.; Crooker, S.C.; Kitchell, J.P.; Nochur, S.V. ); Marquis, J.K. . School of Medicine)

    1989-06-16

    Our current efforts to develop clean coal technology emphasize the advantages of enzymatic desulfurization techniques and have specifically addressed the potential of using partially-purified extracellular microbial enzymes as well as commercially available enzymes. Our work is focused on the treatment of model'' organic sulfur compounds such as dibenzothiophene (DBT) and ethylphenylsulfide (EPS). Furthermore, we are designing experiments to facilitate the enzymatic process by means of a hydrated organic solvent matrix.

  1. Enzymatic desulfurization of coal

    SciTech Connect

    Marquis, J.K. . School of Medicine); Kitchell, J.P. )

    1988-12-15

    Our current efforts to develop clean coal technology emphasize the advantages of enzymatic desulfurization techniques and have specifically addressed the potential of using partially-purified extracellular microbial enzymes or commercially available enzymes. Our work is focused on the treatment of model'' organic sulfur compounds such as dibenzothiophene (DBT) and ethylphenylsulfide (EPS). Furthermore, we are designing experiments to facilitate the enzymatic process by means of a hydrated organic solvent matrix.

  2. HMA6 and HMA8 are two chloroplast Cu+-ATPases with different enzymatic properties

    PubMed Central

    Sautron, Emeline; Mayerhofer, Hubert; Giustini, Cécile; Pro, Danièle; Crouzy, Serge; Ravaud, Stéphanie; Pebay-Peyroula, Eva; Rolland, Norbert; Catty, Patrice; Seigneurin-Berny, Daphné

    2015-01-01

    Copper (Cu) plays a key role in the photosynthetic process as cofactor of the plastocyanin (PC), an essential component of the chloroplast photosynthetic electron transfer chain. Encoded by the nuclear genome, PC is translocated in its apo-form into the chloroplast and the lumen of thylakoids where it is processed to its mature form and acquires Cu. In Arabidopsis, Cu delivery into the thylakoids involves two transporters of the PIB-1 ATPases family, heavy metal associated protein 6 (HMA6) located at the chloroplast envelope and HMA8 at the thylakoid membrane. To gain further insight into the way Cu is delivered to PC, we analysed the enzymatic properties of HMA8 and compared them with HMA6 ones using in vitro phosphorylation assays and phenotypic tests in yeast. These experiments reveal that HMA6 and HMA8 display different enzymatic properties: HMA8 has a higher apparent affinity for Cu+ but a slower dephosphorylation kinetics than HMA6. Modelling experiments suggest that these differences could be explained by the electrostatic properties of the Cu+ releasing cavities of the two transporters and/or by the different nature of their cognate Cu+ acceptors (metallochaperone/PC). PMID:26182363

  3. Synthesis of Isomeric Phosphoubiquitin Chains Reveals that Phosphorylation Controls Deubiquitinase Activity and Specificity.

    PubMed

    Huguenin-Dezot, Nicolas; De Cesare, Virginia; Peltier, Julien; Knebel, Axel; Kristaryianto, Yosua Adi; Rogerson, Daniel T; Kulathu, Yogesh; Trost, Matthias; Chin, Jason W

    2016-07-26

    Ubiquitin is post-translationally modified by phosphorylation at several sites, but the consequences of these modifications are largely unknown. Here, we synthesize multi-milligram quantities of ubiquitin phosphorylated at serine 20, serine 57, and serine 65 via genetic code expansion. We use these phosphoubiquitins for the enzymatic assembly of 20 isomeric phosphoubiquitin dimers, with different sites of isopeptide linkage and/or phosphorylation. We discover that phosphorylation of serine 20 on ubiquitin converts UBE3C from a dual-specificity E3 ligase into a ligase that primarily synthesizes K48 chains. We profile the activity of 31 deubiquitinases on the isomeric phosphoubiquitin dimers in 837 reactions, and we discover that phosphorylation at distinct sites in ubiquitin can activate or repress cleavage of a particular linkage by deubiquitinases and that phosphorylation at a single site in ubiquitin can control the specificity of deubiquitinases for distinct ubiquitin linkages. PMID:27425610

  4. Enzymatic Synthesis of Magnetic Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Kolhatkar, Arati G.; Dannongoda, Chamath; Kourentzi, Katerina; Jamison, Andrew C.; Nekrashevich, Ivan; Kar, Archana; Cacao, Eliedonna; Strych, Ulrich; Rusakova, Irene; Martirosyan, Karen S.; Litvinov, Dmitri; Lee, T. Randall; Willson, Richard C.

    2015-01-01

    We report the first in vitro enzymatic synthesis of paramagnetic and antiferromagnetic nanoparticles toward magnetic ELISA reporting. With our procedure, alkaline phosphatase catalyzes the dephosphorylation of l-ascorbic-2-phosphate, which then serves as a reducing agent for salts of iron, gadolinium, and holmium, forming magnetic precipitates of Fe45±14Gd5±2O50±15 and Fe42±4Ho6±4O52±5. The nanoparticles were found to be paramagnetic at 300 K and antiferromagnetic under 25 K. Although weakly magnetic at 300 K, the room-temperature magnetization of the nanoparticles found here is considerably greater than that of analogous chemically-synthesized LnxFeyOz (Ln = Gd, Ho) samples reported previously. At 5 K, the nanoparticles showed a significantly higher saturation magnetization of 45 and 30 emu/g for Fe45±14Gd5±2O50±15 and Fe42±4Ho6±4O52±5, respectively. Our approach of enzymatically synthesizing magnetic labels reduces the cost and avoids diffusional mass-transfer limitations associated with pre-synthesized magnetic reporter particles, while retaining the advantages of magnetic sensing. PMID:25854425

  5. Enzymatic synthesis of magnetic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Kolhatkar, Arati G; Dannongoda, Chamath; Kourentzi, Katerina; Jamison, Andrew C; Nekrashevich, Ivan; Kar, Archana; Cacao, Eliedonna; Strych, Ulrich; Rusakova, Irene; Martirosyan, Karen S; Litvinov, Dmitri; Lee, T Randall; Willson, Richard C

    2015-01-01

    We report the first in vitro enzymatic synthesis of paramagnetic and antiferromagnetic nanoparticles toward magnetic ELISA reporting. With our procedure, alkaline phosphatase catalyzes the dephosphorylation of l-ascorbic-2-phosphate, which then serves as a reducing agent for salts of iron, gadolinium, and holmium, forming magnetic precipitates of Fe45±14Gd5±2O50±15 and Fe42±4Ho6±4O52±5. The nanoparticles were found to be paramagnetic at 300 K and antiferromagnetic under 25 K. Although weakly magnetic at 300 K, the room-temperature magnetization of the nanoparticles found here is considerably greater than that of analogous chemically-synthesized LnxFeyOz (Ln = Gd, Ho) samples reported previously. At 5 K, the nanoparticles showed a significantly higher saturation magnetization of 45 and 30 emu/g for Fe45±14Gd5±2O50±15 and Fe42±4Ho6±4O52±5, respectively. Our approach of enzymatically synthesizing magnetic labels reduces the cost and avoids diffusional mass-transfer limitations associated with pre-synthesized magnetic reporter particles, while retaining the advantages of magnetic sensing. PMID:25854425

  6. Enzymatic synthesis of magnetic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Kolhatkar, Arati G; Dannongoda, Chamath; Kourentzi, Katerina; Jamison, Andrew C; Nekrashevich, Ivan; Kar, Archana; Cacao, Eliedonna; Strych, Ulrich; Rusakova, Irene; Martirosyan, Karen S; Litvinov, Dmitri; Lee, T Randall; Willson, Richard C

    2015-01-01

    We report the first in vitro enzymatic synthesis of paramagnetic and antiferromagnetic nanoparticles toward magnetic ELISA reporting. With our procedure, alkaline phosphatase catalyzes the dephosphorylation of l-ascorbic-2-phosphate, which then serves as a reducing agent for salts of iron, gadolinium, and holmium, forming magnetic precipitates of Fe45±14Gd5±2O50±15 and Fe42±4Ho6±4O52±5. The nanoparticles were found to be paramagnetic at 300 K and antiferromagnetic under 25 K. Although weakly magnetic at 300 K, the room-temperature magnetization of the nanoparticles found here is considerably greater than that of analogous chemically-synthesized LnxFeyOz (Ln = Gd, Ho) samples reported previously. At 5 K, the nanoparticles showed a significantly higher saturation magnetization of 45 and 30 emu/g for Fe45±14Gd5±2O50±15 and Fe42±4Ho6±4O52±5, respectively. Our approach of enzymatically synthesizing magnetic labels reduces the cost and avoids diffusional mass-transfer limitations associated with pre-synthesized magnetic reporter particles, while retaining the advantages of magnetic sensing.

  7. Struvite and prebiotic phosphorylation.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Handschuh, G. J.; Orgel, L. E.

    1973-01-01

    Struvite rather than apatite or amorphous calcium phosphate is precipitated when phosphate is added to seawater containing more than 0.01M NH4+ ions. Struvite may have precipitated from evaporating seawater on the primitive earth, and may have been important for prebiotic phosphorylation.

  8. Mumps Virus Nucleoprotein Enhances Phosphorylation of the Phosphoprotein by Polo-Like Kinase 1

    PubMed Central

    Pickar, Adrian; Zengel, James; Xu, Pei; Li, Zhuo

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerases (vRdRps) of nonsegmented, negative-sense viruses (NNSVs) consist of the enzymatic large protein (L) and the phosphoprotein (P). P is heavily phosphorylated, and its phosphorylation plays a critical role in viral RNA synthesis. Since NNSVs do not encode kinases, P is phosphorylated by host kinases. In this study, we investigate the roles that viral proteins play in the phosphorylation of mumps virus (MuV) P. We found that nucleoprotein (NP) enhances the phosphorylation of P. We have identified the serine/threonine kinase Polo-like kinase 1 (PLK1) as a host kinase that phosphorylates P and have found that phosphorylation of P by PLK1 is enhanced by NP. The PLK1 binding site in MuV P was mapped to residues 146 to 148 within the S(pS/T)P motif, and the phosphorylation site was identified as residues S292 and S294. IMPORTANCE It has previously been shown that P acts as a chaperone for NP, which encapsidates viral genomic RNA to form the NP-RNA complex, the functional template for viral RNA synthesis. Thus, it is assumed that phosphorylation of P may regulate NP's ability to form the NP-RNA complex, thereby regulating viral RNA synthesis. Our work demonstrates that MuV NP affects phosphorylation of P, suggesting that NP can regulate viral RNA synthesis by regulating phosphorylation of P. PMID:26608325

  9. Charge changing phosphorylated polymers: Proof of in situ mucoadhesive properties.

    PubMed

    Bonengel, Sonja; Jelkmann, Max; Oh, Sejin; Mahmood, Arshad; Ijaz, Muhammad; Bernkop-Schnürch, Andreas

    2016-08-01

    The objective of this study was to design a novel polyethylene glycol (PEG) derivative exhibiting mucus permeating and mucoadhesive properties. Therefore, the enzymatically degradable phosphate ester, phosphotyrosine (Ptyr) was covalently attached to PEG-diamine. The synthesized PEG-Ptyr was studied in terms of enzymatic degradability on Caco 2 cells and by isolated intestinal alkaline phosphatase (IAP). Furthermore, the influence of enzymatic degradation on charge distribution of the polymer as well as on mucus diffusion and mucoadhesion was investigated. Within this study, the phosphate ester in PEG-Ptyr could be cleaved on the cell monolayer and by the isolated IAP, whereby the degradation rate was 10-fold higher utilizing the isolated enzyme. Implementation of negative charges on PEG due to modification with Ptyr led to an increased electrophoretic mobility, which was reduced after enzymatic degradation of the phosphate ester, most likely due to the alterations in charge distribution on the polymeric backbone. Interactions with mucus components were determined within mucus diffusion studies and rheological investigations. Herein, PEG-Ptyr showed a 3-fold lower mucus diffusion, after incubation with IAP. Within rheological investigations, dynamic viscosities increased by the factor of 3, after the phosphate ester in PEG-Ptyr was degraded by IAP. Results obtained within these experiments provided evidence for the in situ mucoadhesive properties of charge changing phosphorylated polymers. The combination of mucus permeating and mucoadhesive features of phosphorylated PEGs could be a highly interesting tool for future applications, such as for coating nanoparticles. PMID:27320696

  10. Oxidative phosphorylation revisited.

    PubMed

    Nath, Sunil; Villadsen, John

    2015-03-01

    The fundamentals of oxidative phosphorylation and photophosphorylation are revisited. New experimental data on the involvement of succinate and malate anions respectively in oxidative phosphorylation and photophosphorylation are presented. These new data offer a novel molecular mechanistic explanation for the energy coupling and ATP synthesis carried out in mitochondria and chloroplast thylakoids. The mechanism does not suffer from the flaws in Mitchell's chemiosmotic theory that have been pointed out in many studies since its first appearance 50 years ago, when it was hailed as a ground-breaking mechanistic explanation of what is perhaps the most important process in cellular energetics. The new findings fit very well with the predictions of Nath's torsional mechanism of energy transduction and ATP synthesis. It is argued that this mechanism, based on at least 15 years of experimental and theoretical work by Sunil Nath, constitutes a fundamentally different theory of the energy conversion process that eliminates all the inconsistencies in Mitchell's chemiosmotic theory pointed out by other authors. It is concluded that the energy-transducing complexes in oxidative phosphorylation and photosynthesis are proton-dicarboxylic acid anion cotransporters and not simply electrogenic proton translocators. These results necessitate revision of previous theories of biological energy transduction, coupling, and ATP synthesis. The novel molecular mechanism is extended to cover ATP synthesis in prokaryotes, in particular to alkaliphilic and haloalkaliphilic bacteria, essentially making it a complete theory addressing mechanistic, kinetic, and thermodynamic details. Finally, based on the new interpretation of oxidative phosphorylation, quantitative values for the P/O ratio, the amount of ATP generated per redox package of the reduced substrates, are calculated and compared with experimental values for fermentation on different substrates. It is our hope that the presentation of

  11. Enzymatic characterization of recombinant nitrate reductase expressed and purified from Neurospora crassa.

    PubMed

    Ringel, Phillip; Probst, Corinna; Dammeyer, Thorben; Buchmeier, Sabine; Jänsch, Lothar; Wissing, Josef; Tinnefeld, Philip; Mendel, Ralf R; Jockusch, Brigitte M; Kruse, Tobias

    2015-07-01

    We established an expression and purification procedure for recombinant protein production in Neurospora crassa (N. crassa). This Strep-tag® based system was successfully used for purifying recombinant N. crassa nitrate reductase (NR), whose enzymatic activity was compared to recombinant N. crassa NR purified from Escherichia coli. The purity of the two different NR preparations was similar but NR purified from N. crassa showed a significantly higher nitrate turnover rate. Two phosphorylation sites were identified for NR purified from the endogenous expression system. We conclude that homologous expression of N. crassa NR yields a higher active enzyme and propose that NR phosphorylation causes enhanced enzymatic activity. PMID:25914160

  12. Enzymatic characterization of recombinant nitrate reductase expressed and purified from Neurospora crassa.

    PubMed

    Ringel, Phillip; Probst, Corinna; Dammeyer, Thorben; Buchmeier, Sabine; Jänsch, Lothar; Wissing, Josef; Tinnefeld, Philip; Mendel, Ralf R; Jockusch, Brigitte M; Kruse, Tobias

    2015-07-01

    We established an expression and purification procedure for recombinant protein production in Neurospora crassa (N. crassa). This Strep-tag® based system was successfully used for purifying recombinant N. crassa nitrate reductase (NR), whose enzymatic activity was compared to recombinant N. crassa NR purified from Escherichia coli. The purity of the two different NR preparations was similar but NR purified from N. crassa showed a significantly higher nitrate turnover rate. Two phosphorylation sites were identified for NR purified from the endogenous expression system. We conclude that homologous expression of N. crassa NR yields a higher active enzyme and propose that NR phosphorylation causes enhanced enzymatic activity.

  13. Enzymatic DNA molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joyce, Gerald F. (Inventor); Breaker, Ronald R. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    The present invention discloses deoxyribonucleic acid enzymes--catalytic or enzymatic DNA molecules--capable of cleaving nucleic acid sequences or molecules, particularly RNA, in a site-specific manner, as well as compositions including same. Methods of making and using the disclosed enzymes and compositions are also disclosed.

  14. Phosphorylation of Ser-204 and Tyr-405 in human malonyl-CoA decarboxylase expressed in silkworm Bombyx mori regulates catalytic decarboxylase activity.

    PubMed

    Hwang, In-Wook; Makishima, Yu; Suzuki, Tomohiro; Kato, Tatsuya; Park, Sungjo; Terzic, Andre; Chung, Shin-Kyo; Park, Enoch Y

    2015-11-01

    Decarboxylation of malonyl-CoA to acetyl-CoA by malonyl-CoA decarboxylase (MCD; EC 4.1.1.9) is a vital catalytic reaction of lipid metabolism. While it is established that phosphorylation of MCD modulates the enzymatic activity, the specific phosphorylation sites associated with the catalytic function have not been documented due to lack of sufficient production of MCD with proper post-translational modifications. Here, we used the silkworm-based Bombyx mori nucleopolyhedrovirus (BmNPV) bacmid system to express human MCD (hMCD) and mapped phosphorylation effects on enzymatic function. Purified MCD from silkworm displayed post-translational phosphorylation and demonstrated coherent enzymatic activity with high yield (-200 μg/silkworm). Point mutations in putative phosphorylation sites, Ser-204 or Tyr-405 of hMCD, identified by bioinformatics and proteomics analyses reduced the catalytic activity, underscoring the functional significance of phosphorylation in modulating decarboxylase-based catalysis. Identified phosphorylated residues are distinct from the decarboxylation catalytic site, implicating a phosphorylation-induced global conformational change of MCD as responsible in altering catalytic function. We conclude that phosphorylation of Ser-204 and Tyr-405 regulates the decarboxylase function of hMCD leveraging the silkworm-based BmNPV bacmid expression system that offers a fail-safe eukaryotic production platform implementing proper post-translational modification such as phosphorylation.

  15. Determining in vivo Phosphorylation Sites using Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Breitkopf, Susanne B.; Asara, John M.

    2012-01-01

    Phosphorylation is the most studied protein post-translational modification (PTM) in biological systems since it controls cell growth, proliferation, survival, etc. High resolution/high mass accuracy mass spectrometers are used to identify protein phosphorylation sites due to their speed, sensitivity, selectivity and throughput. The protocol described here focuses on two common strategies: 1) Identifying phosphorylation sites from individual proteins and small protein complexes, and 2) Identifying global phosphorylation sites from whole cell and tissue extracts. For the first, endogenous or epitope tagged proteins are typically immunopurified (IP) from cell lysates, purified via gel electrophoresis or precipitation and enzymatically digested into peptides. Samples can be optionally enriched for phosphopeptides using immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC) or titanium dioxide (TiO2) and then analyzed by microcapillary liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Global phosphorylation site analyses that capture pSer/pThr/pTyr sites from biological sources sites are more resource and time-consuming and involve digesting the whole cell lysate, followed by peptide fractionation by strong cation exchange chromatography (SCX), phosphopeptide enrichment by IMAC or TiO2 and LC-MS/MS. Alternatively, one can fractionate the protein lysate by SDS-PAGE, followed by digestion, phosphopeptide enrichment and LC-MS/MS. One can also IP only phospho-tyrosine peptides using a pTyr antibody followed by LC-MS/MS. PMID:22470061

  16. Enzymatic desulfurization of coal

    SciTech Connect

    Boyer, Y.N.; Crooker, S.C.; Kitchell, J.P.; Nochur, S.V.

    1991-05-16

    The overall objective of this program was to investigate the feasibility of an enzymatic desulfurization process specifically intended for organic sulfur removal from coal. Toward that end, a series of specific objectives were defined: (1) establish the feasibility of (bio)oxidative pretreatment followed by biochemical sulfate cleavage for representative sulfur-containing model compounds and coals using commercially-available enzymes; (2) investigate the potential for the isolation and selective use of enzyme preparations from coal-utilizing microbial systems for desulfurization of sulfur-containing model compounds and coals; and (3) develop a conceptual design and economic analysis of a process for enzymatic removal of organic sulfur from coal. Within the scope of this program, it was proposed to carry out a portion of each of these efforts concurrently. (VC)

  17. Enzymatic gallic acid esterification.

    PubMed

    Weetal, H H

    1985-02-01

    Gallic acid esters of n-propyl and amyl alcohols have been produced by enzymatic synthesis in organic solvents using immobilized tannase. Studies indicate that maximum esterification of gallic acid occurs with amyl alcohol. The enzyme shows broad alcohol specificity. However, the enzyme exhibits absolute specificity for the acid portion of the ester. Studies were carried out on K(m), V(max), pH, and temperature optima.

  18. Graphene based enzymatic bioelectrodes and biofuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karimi, Anahita; Othman, Ali; Uzunoglu, Aytekin; Stanciu, Lia; Andreescu, Silvana

    2015-04-01

    The excellent electrical conductivity and ease of functionalization make graphene a promising material for use in enzymatic bioelectrodes and biofuel cells. Enzyme based biofuel cells have attracted substantial interest due to their potential to harvest energy from organic materials. This review provides an overview of the functional properties and applications of graphene in the construction of biofuel cells as alternative power sources. The review covers the current state-of-the-art research in graphene based nanomaterials (physicochemical properties and surface functionalities), the role of these parameters in enhancing electron transfer, the stability and activity of immobilized enzymes, and how enhanced power density can be achieved. Specific examples of enzyme immobilization methods, enzyme loading, stability and function on graphene, functionalized graphene and graphene based nanocomposite materials are discussed along with their advantages and limitations. Finally, a critical evaluation of the performance of graphene based enzymatic biofuel cells, the current status, challenges and future research needs are provided.

  19. Graphene based enzymatic bioelectrodes and biofuel cells.

    PubMed

    Karimi, Anahita; Othman, Ali; Uzunoglu, Aytekin; Stanciu, Lia; Andreescu, Silvana

    2015-04-28

    The excellent electrical conductivity and ease of functionalization make graphene a promising material for use in enzymatic bioelectrodes and biofuel cells. Enzyme based biofuel cells have attracted substantial interest due to their potential to harvest energy from organic materials. This review provides an overview of the functional properties and applications of graphene in the construction of biofuel cells as alternative power sources. The review covers the current state-of-the-art research in graphene based nanomaterials (physicochemical properties and surface functionalities), the role of these parameters in enhancing electron transfer, the stability and activity of immobilized enzymes, and how enhanced power density can be achieved. Specific examples of enzyme immobilization methods, enzyme loading, stability and function on graphene, functionalized graphene and graphene based nanocomposite materials are discussed along with their advantages and limitations. Finally, a critical evaluation of the performance of graphene based enzymatic biofuel cells, the current status, challenges and future research needs are provided. PMID:25832672

  20. Protein phosphorylation in stomatal movement

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Tong; Chen, Sixue; Harmon, Alice C

    2014-01-01

    As research progresses on how guard cells perceive and transduce environmental cues to regulate stomatal movement, plant biologists are discovering key roles of protein phosphorylation. Early research efforts focused on characterization of ion channels and transporters in guard cell hormonal signaling. Subsequent genetic studies identified mutants of kinases and phosphatases that are defective in regulating guard cell ion channel activities, and recently proteins regulated by phosphorylation have been identified. Here we review the essential role of protein phosphorylation in ABA-induced stomatal closure and in blue light-induced stomatal opening. We also highlight evidence for the cross-talk between different pathways, which is mediated by protein phosphorylation. PMID:25482764

  1. Phosphorylation of yeast hexokinases.

    PubMed

    Vojtek, A B; Fraenkel, D G

    1990-06-20

    We show by the use of 32P-labeling in vivo that hexokinase 2 and hexokinase 1 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae are phosphoproteins. The highest labeling was after incubation in medium with a low concentration of glucose, when labeling appears to be predominant even without use of immunoprecipitation. The nature of the modification is not known, but it has properties consistent with a phosphomonoester of serine or threonine. The cAMP-dependent protein kinase plays a negative role in hexokinase phosphorylation, in that there was reduced labeling in strains (bcy1) lacking a regulatory subunit, and increased labeling during growth with high concentrations of glucose in a strain attenuated in the catalytic subunit (tpk1w1). The function of the modification is not known, but there was a correlation between the extent of labeling and the expression of kinase-dependent high-affinity glucose uptake.

  2. Structural basis of enzymatic benzene ring reduction.

    PubMed

    Weinert, Tobias; Huwiler, Simona G; Kung, Johannes W; Weidenweber, Sina; Hellwig, Petra; Stärk, Hans-Joachim; Biskup, Till; Weber, Stefan; Cotelesage, Julien J H; George, Graham N; Ermler, Ulrich; Boll, Matthias

    2015-08-01

    In chemical synthesis, the widely used Birch reduction of aromatic compounds to cyclic dienes requires alkali metals in ammonia as extremely low-potential electron donors. An analogous reaction is catalyzed by benzoyl-coenzyme A reductases (BCRs) that have a key role in the globally important bacterial degradation of aromatic compounds at anoxic sites. Because of the lack of structural information, the catalytic mechanism of enzymatic benzene ring reduction remained obscure. Here, we present the structural characterization of a dearomatizing BCR containing an unprecedented tungsten cofactor that transfers electrons to the benzene ring in an aprotic cavity. Substrate binding induces proton transfer from the bulk solvent to the active site by expelling a Zn(2+) that is crucial for active site encapsulation. Our results shed light on the structural basis of an electron transfer process at the negative redox potential limit in biology. They open the door for biological or biomimetic alternatives to a basic chemical synthetic tool.

  3. Enzymatic cascade bioreactor

    DOEpatents

    Simmons, Blake A.; Volponi, Joanne V.; Ingersoll, David; Walker, Andrew

    2007-09-04

    Disclosed is an apparatus and method for continuously converting sucrose to .beta.-D-glucose. The method comprises a three stage enzymatic reactor in which an aqueous solution of sucrose is first converted into a solution of fructose and .alpha.-D-glucose by passing it through a porous, packed column containing an inert media on which invertase is immobilized. This solution is then sent through a second packed column containing glucose isomerase and finally a third packed column containing mutarotase. Solution temperature and pH are adjusted to maximize glucose output.

  4. Enzymatic temperature change indicator

    DOEpatents

    Klibanov, Alexander M.; Dordick, Jonathan S.

    1989-01-21

    A temperature change indicator is described which is composed of an enzyme and a substrate for that enzyme suspended in a solid organic solvent or mixture of solvents as a support medium. The organic solvent or solvents are chosen so as to melt at a specific temperature or in a specific temperature range. When the temperature of the indicator is elevated above the chosen, or critical temperature, the solid organic solvent support will melt, and the enzymatic reaction will occur, producing a visually detectable product which is stable to further temperature variation.

  5. Biocatalytic functionalization of hydroxyalkyl acrylates and phenoxyethanol via phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Tasnádi, Gábor; Hall, Mélanie; Baldenius, Kai; Ditrich, Klaus; Faber, Kurt

    2016-09-10

    The enzymatic phosphorylation of phenoxyethanol, 2-hydroxyethyl acrylate and 4-hydroxybutyl acrylate catalyzed by acid phosphatases PhoN-Sf and PiACP at the expense of inorganic di-, tri-, hexameta- or polyphosphate was applied to the preparative-scale synthesis of phosphorylated compounds. The reaction conditions were optimized with respect to enzyme immobilization, substrate concentration, pH and type of phosphate donor. The mild reaction conditions prevented undesired polymerization and hydrolysis of the acrylate ester moiety. Application of a continuous flow system allowed facile scale-up and mono-phosphates were obtained in up to 26% isolated yield with space-time yields of 0.89kgL(-1)h(-1). PMID:27422352

  6. Biocatalytic functionalization of hydroxyalkyl acrylates and phenoxyethanol via phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Tasnádi, Gábor; Hall, Mélanie; Baldenius, Kai; Ditrich, Klaus; Faber, Kurt

    2016-09-10

    The enzymatic phosphorylation of phenoxyethanol, 2-hydroxyethyl acrylate and 4-hydroxybutyl acrylate catalyzed by acid phosphatases PhoN-Sf and PiACP at the expense of inorganic di-, tri-, hexameta- or polyphosphate was applied to the preparative-scale synthesis of phosphorylated compounds. The reaction conditions were optimized with respect to enzyme immobilization, substrate concentration, pH and type of phosphate donor. The mild reaction conditions prevented undesired polymerization and hydrolysis of the acrylate ester moiety. Application of a continuous flow system allowed facile scale-up and mono-phosphates were obtained in up to 26% isolated yield with space-time yields of 0.89kgL(-1)h(-1).

  7. Coordination of Protein Phosphorylation and Dephosphorylation in Synaptic Plasticity.

    PubMed

    Woolfrey, Kevin M; Dell'Acqua, Mark L

    2015-11-27

    A central theme in nervous system function is equilibrium: synaptic strengths wax and wane, neuronal firing rates adjust up and down, and neural circuits balance excitation with inhibition. This push/pull regulatory theme carries through to the molecular level at excitatory synapses, where protein function is controlled through phosphorylation and dephosphorylation by kinases and phosphatases. However, these opposing enzymatic activities are only part of the equation as scaffolding interactions and assembly of multi-protein complexes are further required for efficient, localized synaptic signaling. This review will focus on coordination of postsynaptic serine/threonine kinase and phosphatase signaling by scaffold proteins during synaptic plasticity.

  8. The synthesis of methylated, phosphorylated, and phosphonated 3'-aminoacyl-tRNA(Sec) mimics.

    PubMed

    Rigger, Lukas; Schmidt, Rachel L; Holman, Kaitlyn M; Simonović, Miljan; Micura, Ronald

    2013-11-18

    The twenty first amino acid, selenocysteine (Sec), is the only amino acid that is synthesized on its cognate transfer RNA (tRNA(Sec)) in all domains of life. The multistep pathway involves O-phosphoseryl-tRNA:selenocysteinyl-tRNA synthase (SepSecS), an enzyme that catalyzes the terminal chemical reaction during which the phosphoseryl-tRNA(Sec) intermediate is converted into selenocysteinyl-tRNA(Sec). The SepSecS architecture and the mode of tRNA(Sec) recognition have been recently determined at atomic resolution. The crystal structure provided valuable insights that gave rise to mechanistic proposals that could not be validated because of the lack of appropriate molecular probes. To further improve our understanding of the mechanism of the biosynthesis of selenocysteine in general and the mechanism of SepSecS in particular, stable tRNA(Sec) substrates carrying aminoacyl moieties that mimic particular reaction intermediates are needed. Here, we report on the accurate synthesis of methylated, phosphorylated, and phosphonated serinyl-derived tRNA(Sec) mimics that contain a hydrolysis-resistant ribose 3'-amide linkage instead of the natural ester bond. The procedures introduced allow for efficient site-specific methylation and/or phosphorylation directly on the solid support utilized in the automated RNA synthesis. For the preparation of (S)-2-amino-4-phosphonobutyric acid-oligoribonucleotide conjugates, a separate solid support was generated. Furthermore, we developed a three-strand enzymatic ligation protocol to obtain the corresponding full-length tRNA(Sec) derivatives. Finally, we developed an electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) for rapid, qualitative characterization of the SepSecS-tRNA interactions. The novel tRNA(Sec) mimics are promising candidates for further elucidation of the biosynthesis of selenocysteine by X-ray crystallography and other biochemical approaches, and could be attractive for similar studies on other tRNA-dependent enzymes.

  9. Phosphorylation by PINK1 Releases the UBL Domain and Initializes the Conformational Opening of the E3 Ubiquitin Ligase Parkin

    PubMed Central

    Moussaud-Lamodière, Elisabeth L.; Dourado, Daniel F. A. R.; Flores, Samuel C.; Springer, Wolfdieter

    2014-01-01

    Loss-of-function mutations in PINK1 or PARKIN are the most common causes of autosomal recessive Parkinson's disease. Both gene products, the Ser/Thr kinase PINK1 and the E3 Ubiquitin ligase Parkin, functionally cooperate in a mitochondrial quality control pathway. Upon stress, PINK1 activates Parkin and enables its translocation to and ubiquitination of damaged mitochondria to facilitate their clearance from the cell. Though PINK1-dependent phosphorylation of Ser65 is an important initial step, the molecular mechanisms underlying the activation of Parkin's enzymatic functions remain unclear. Using molecular modeling, we generated a complete structural model of human Parkin at all atom resolution. At steady state, the Ub ligase is maintained inactive in a closed, auto-inhibited conformation that results from intra-molecular interactions. Evidently, Parkin has to undergo major structural rearrangements in order to unleash its catalytic activity. As a spark, we have modeled PINK1-dependent Ser65 phosphorylation in silico and provide the first molecular dynamics simulation of Parkin conformations along a sequential unfolding pathway that could release its intertwined domains and enable its catalytic activity. We combined free (unbiased) molecular dynamics simulation, Monte Carlo algorithms, and minimal-biasing methods with cell-based high content imaging and biochemical assays. Phosphorylation of Ser65 results in widening of a newly defined cleft and dissociation of the regulatory N-terminal UBL domain. This motion propagates through further opening conformations that allow binding of an Ub-loaded E2 co-enzyme. Subsequent spatial reorientation of the catalytic centers of both enzymes might facilitate the transfer of the Ub moiety to charge Parkin. Our structure-function study provides the basis to elucidate regulatory mechanisms and activity of the neuroprotective Parkin. This may open up new avenues for the development of small molecule Parkin activators through

  10. Enzymatic Biofuel Cells on Porous Nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Wen, Dan; Eychmüller, Alexander

    2016-09-01

    Biofuel cells (BFCs) that utilize enzymes as catalysts represent a new sustainable and renewable energy technology. Numerous efforts have been directed to improve the performance of the enzymatic BFCs (EBFCs) with respect to power output and operational stability for further applications in portable power sources, self-powered electrochemical sensing, implantable medical devices, etc. The latest advances in EBFCs based on porous nanoarchitectures over the past 5 years are detailed here. Porous matrices from carbon, noble metals, and polymers promote the development of EBFCs through the electron transfer and mass transport benefits. Some key issues regarding how these nanostructured porous media improve the performance of EBFCs are also discussed. PMID:27377976

  11. OXIDATIVE PHOSPHORYLATION AND ULTRASTRUCTURAL TRANSFORMATION IN MITOCHONDRIA IN THE INTACT ASCITES TUMOR CELL

    PubMed Central

    Hackenbrock, Charles R.; Rehn, Terry G.; Weinbach, Eugene C.; Lemasters, John J.

    1971-01-01

    We have examined the ultrastructure of mitochondria as it relates to energy metabolism in the intact cell. Oxidative phosphorylation was induced in ultrastructurally intact Ehrlich ascites tumor cells by rapidly generating intracellular adenosine diphosphate from endogenous adenosine triphosphate by the addition of 2-deoxyglucose. The occurrence of oxidative phosphorylation was ascertained indirectly by continuous and synchronous monitoring of respiratory rate, fluorescence of pyridine nucleotide, and 90° light-scattering. Oxidative phosphorylation was confirmed by direct enzymatic analysis of intracellular adenine nucleotides and by determination of intracellular inorganic orthophosphate. Microsamples of cells rapidly fixed for electron microscopy revealed that, in addition to oxidative phosphorylation, an orthodox → condensed ultrastructural transformation occurred in the mitochondria of all cells in less than 6 sec after the generation of adenosine diphosphate by 2-deoxyglucose. A 90° light-scattering increase, which also occurs at this time, showed a t ½ of only 25 sec which agreed temporally with a slower orthodox → maximally condensed mitochondrial transformation. Neither oxidative phosphorylation nor ultrastructural transformation could be initiated in mitochondria in intact cells by the intracellular generation of adenosine diphosphate in the presence of uncouplers of oxidative phosphorylation. Partial and complete inhibition of oxidative phosphorylation by oligomycin resulted in a positive relationship to partial and complete inhibition of 2-deoxyglucose-induced ultrastructural transformation in the mitochondria in these cells. The data presented reveal that an orthodox → condensed ultrastructural transformation is linked to induced oxidative phosphorylation in mitochondria in the intact ascites tumor cell. PMID:5111873

  12. How Phosphotransferase System-Related Protein Phosphorylation Regulates Carbohydrate Metabolism in Bacteria†

    PubMed Central

    Deutscher, Josef; Francke, Christof; Postma, Pieter W.

    2006-01-01

    The phosphoenolpyruvate(PEP):carbohydrate phosphotransferase system (PTS) is found only in bacteria, where it catalyzes the transport and phosphorylation of numerous monosaccharides, disaccharides, amino sugars, polyols, and other sugar derivatives. To carry out its catalytic function in sugar transport and phosphorylation, the PTS uses PEP as an energy source and phosphoryl donor. The phosphoryl group of PEP is usually transferred via four distinct proteins (domains) to the transported sugar bound to the respective membrane component(s) (EIIC and EIID) of the PTS. The organization of the PTS as a four-step phosphoryl transfer system, in which all P derivatives exhibit similar energy (phosphorylation occurs at histidyl or cysteyl residues), is surprising, as a single protein (or domain) coupling energy transfer and sugar phosphorylation would be sufficient for PTS function. A possible explanation for the complexity of the PTS was provided by the discovery that the PTS also carries out numerous regulatory functions. Depending on their phosphorylation state, the four proteins (domains) forming the PTS phosphorylation cascade (EI, HPr, EIIA, and EIIB) can phosphorylate or interact with numerous non-PTS proteins and thereby regulate their activity. In addition, in certain bacteria, one of the PTS components (HPr) is phosphorylated by ATP at a seryl residue, which increases the complexity of PTS-mediated regulation. In this review, we try to summarize the known protein phosphorylation-related regulatory functions of the PTS. As we shall see, the PTS regulation network not only controls carbohydrate uptake and metabolism but also interferes with the utilization of nitrogen and phosphorus and the virulence of certain pathogens. PMID:17158705

  13. Chemoselective synthesis and analysis of naturally occurring phosphorylated cysteine peptides

    PubMed Central

    Bertran-Vicente, Jordi; Penkert, Martin; Nieto-Garcia, Olaia; Jeckelmann, Jean-Marc; Schmieder, Peter; Krause, Eberhard; Hackenberger, Christian P. R.

    2016-01-01

    In contrast to protein O-phosphorylation, studying the function of the less frequent N- and S-phosphorylation events have lagged behind because they have chemical features that prevent their manipulation through standard synthetic and analytical methods. Here we report on the development of a chemoselective synthetic method to phosphorylate Cys side-chains in unprotected peptides. This approach makes use of a reaction between nucleophilic phosphites and electrophilic disulfides accessible by standard methods. We achieve the stereochemically defined phosphorylation of a Cys residue and verify the modification using electron-transfer higher-energy dissociation (EThcD) mass spectrometry. To demonstrate the use of the approach in resolving biological questions, we identify an endogenous Cys phosphorylation site in IICBGlc, which is known to be involved in the carbohydrate uptake from the bacterial phosphotransferase system (PTS). This new chemical and analytical approach finally allows further investigating the functions and significance of Cys phosphorylation in a wide range of crucial cellular processes. PMID:27586301

  14. Chemoselective synthesis and analysis of naturally occurring phosphorylated cysteine peptides.

    PubMed

    Bertran-Vicente, Jordi; Penkert, Martin; Nieto-Garcia, Olaia; Jeckelmann, Jean-Marc; Schmieder, Peter; Krause, Eberhard; Hackenberger, Christian P R

    2016-01-01

    In contrast to protein O-phosphorylation, studying the function of the less frequent N- and S-phosphorylation events have lagged behind because they have chemical features that prevent their manipulation through standard synthetic and analytical methods. Here we report on the development of a chemoselective synthetic method to phosphorylate Cys side-chains in unprotected peptides. This approach makes use of a reaction between nucleophilic phosphites and electrophilic disulfides accessible by standard methods. We achieve the stereochemically defined phosphorylation of a Cys residue and verify the modification using electron-transfer higher-energy dissociation (EThcD) mass spectrometry. To demonstrate the use of the approach in resolving biological questions, we identify an endogenous Cys phosphorylation site in IICB(Glc), which is known to be involved in the carbohydrate uptake from the bacterial phosphotransferase system (PTS). This new chemical and analytical approach finally allows further investigating the functions and significance of Cys phosphorylation in a wide range of crucial cellular processes. PMID:27586301

  15. Oxidative and Photosynthetic Phosphorylation Mechanisms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Jui H.

    1970-01-01

    Proposes a molecular mechanism for the coupling of phosphorylation to electron transport in both mitochondria and chloroplasts. Justifies the proposed reaction schemes in terms of thermodynamics and biochemical data. Suggests how areobic respiration could have evolved. (EB)

  16. Enzymatic and regulatory properties of the trehalose-6-phosphate synthase from the thermoacidophilic archaeon Thermoplasma acidophilum.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yanyan; Jiang, Ying; Liu, Qiulei; Wang, Ruiming; Liu, Xinli; Liu, Bo

    2014-06-01

    Trehalose-6-phosphate synthase plays an important role in trehalose metabolism. It catalyzes the transfer of glucose from UDP-glucose (UDPG) to glucose 6-phosphate to produce trehalose-6-phosphate. Herein we describe the characterization of a trehalose-6-phosphate synthase from the thermoacidophilic archaeon Thermoplasma acidophilum. The dimeric enzyme could utilize UDPG, ADP-Glucose (ADPG) and GDP-Glucose (GDPG) as glycosyl donors and various phosphorylated monosaccharides as glycosyl acceptors. The optimal temperature and pH were found to be 60 °C and pH 6, and the enzyme exhibited notable pH and thermal stability. The enzymatic activity could be stimulated by divalent metal ions and polyanions heparin and chondroitin sulfate. Moreover, the protein was considerably resistant to additives ethanol, EDTA, urea, DTT, SDS, β-mercaptoethanol, methanol, isopropanol and n-butanol. Molecular modeling and mutagenesis analysis revealed that the N-loop region was important for the catalytic efficiency of the enzyme, indicating different roles of N-loop sequences in different trehalose-6-phosphate synthases. PMID:24508535

  17. Properties of phosphorylated thymidylate synthase.

    PubMed

    Frączyk, Tomasz; Ruman, Tomasz; Wilk, Piotr; Palmowski, Paweł; Rogowska-Wrzesinska, Adelina; Cieśla, Joanna; Zieliński, Zbigniew; Nizioł, Joanna; Jarmuła, Adam; Maj, Piotr; Gołos, Barbara; Wińska, Patrycja; Ostafil, Sylwia; Wałajtys-Rode, Elżbieta; Shugar, David; Rode, Wojciech

    2015-12-01

    Thymidylate synthase (TS) may undergo phosphorylation endogenously in mammalian cells, and as a recombinant protein expressed in bacterial cells, as indicated by the reaction of purified enzyme protein with Pro-Q® Diamond Phosphoprotein Gel Stain (PGS). With recombinant human, mouse, rat, Trichinella spiralis and Caenorhabditis elegans TSs, expressed in Escherichia coli, the phosphorylated, compared to non-phosphorylated recombinant enzyme forms, showed a decrease in Vmax(app), bound their cognate mRNA (only rat enzyme studied), and repressed translation of their own and several heterologous mRNAs (human, rat and mouse enzymes studied). However, attempts to determine the modification site(s), whether endogenously expressed in mammalian cells, or recombinant proteins, did not lead to unequivocal results. Comparative ESI-MS/analysis of IEF fractions of TS preparations from parental and FdUrd-resistant mouse leukemia L1210 cells, differing in sensitivity to inactivation by FdUMP, demonstrated phosphorylation of Ser(10) and Ser(16) in the resistant enzyme only, although PGS staining pointed to the modification of both L1210 TS proteins. The TS proteins phosphorylated in bacterial cells were shown by (31)P NMR to be modified only on histidine residues, like potassium phosphoramidate (KPA)-phosphorylated TS proteins. NanoLC-MS/MS, enabling the use of CID and ETD peptide fragmentation methods, identified several phosphohistidine residues, but certain phosphoserine and phosphothreonine residues were also implicated. Molecular dynamics studies, based on the mouse TS crystal structure, allowed one to assess potential of several phosphorylated histidine residues to affect catalytic activity, the effect being phosphorylation site dependent.

  18. Phosphorylation of lymphocyte myosin catalyzed in vitro and in intact cells

    PubMed Central

    1982-01-01

    Myosin has been isolated from guinea pig B-lymphocytic leukemia cells (L2C). The myosin has been enzymatically phosphorylated and dephosphorylated in vitro using both heterologous and lymphocyte- derived enzymes. Both the heavy chain and 20,000-dalton light chain of lymphocyte myosin are phosphorylated in vitro. Phosphorylation of myosin enhances actin-activated ATPase activity. Phosphorylation of myosin in murine lymphocytes was analyzed by use of a novel technique for rapid immunoprecipitation of myosin from cell extracts. Both the heavy chain and 20,000-dalton light chain of myosin are phosphorylated in intact cells. Addition of antibody reactive with cell-surface immunoglobulin to lymphocyte populations enriched for B cells stimulates locomotion of these cells and also increases the quantity of 32P isolated in association with the 20,000-dalton light chain of lymphocyte myosin, when 32Pi was present in the medium. In addition, an unidentified, phosphorylated polypeptides with a molecular mass of 22,000 daltons is co-isolated with myosin from cells by rapid immunoprecipitation. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that phosphorylation of myosin may contribute to regulation of movements performed by lymphocytes which are related to their participation in immunologic reactions. PMID:6212588

  19. Homogeneous, Heterogeneous, and Enzymatic Catalysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oyama, S. Ted; Somorjai, Gabor A.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses three areas of catalysis: homegeneous, heterogeneous, and enzymatic. Explains fundamentals and economic impact of catalysis. Lists and discusses common industrial catalysts. Provides a list of 107 references. (MVL)

  20. Proton transfer at carbon.

    PubMed

    Richard, J P; Amyes, T L

    2001-12-01

    The viability of living systems requires that C--H bonds of biological molecules be stable in water, but that there also be a mechanism for shortening the timescale for their heterolytic cleavage through enzymatic catalysis of a variety of catabolic and metabolic reactions. An understanding of the mechanism of enzymatic catalysis of proton transfer at carbon requires the integration of results of studies to determine the structure of the enzyme-substrate complex with model studies on the mechanism for the non-enzymatic reaction in water, and the effect of the local protein environment on the stability of the transition state for this reaction. A common theme is the importance of electrostatic interactions in providing stabilization of bound carbanion intermediates of enzyme-catalyzed proton-transfer reactions.

  1. Protein phosphorylation in chloroplasts - a survey of phosphorylation targets.

    PubMed

    Baginsky, Sacha

    2016-06-01

    The development of new software tools, improved mass spectrometry equipment, a suite of optimized scan types, and better-quality phosphopeptide affinity capture have paved the way for an explosion of mass spectrometry data on phosphopeptides. Because phosphoproteomics achieves good sensitivity, most studies use complete cell extracts for phosphopeptide enrichment and identification without prior enrichment of proteins or subcellular compartments. As a consequence, the phosphoproteome of cell organelles often comes as a by-product from large-scale studies and is commonly assembled from these in meta-analyses. This review aims at providing some guidance on the limitations of meta-analyses that combine data from analyses with different scopes, reports on the current status of knowledge on chloroplast phosphorylation targets, provides initial insights into phosphorylation site conservation in different plant species, and highlights emerging information on the integration of gene expression with metabolism and photosynthesis by means of protein phosphorylation. PMID:26969742

  2. Phosphorylation mechanisms in chemical evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoffstall, Allen M.; Laing, Euton M.

    1985-06-01

    An objective of this work is to elucidate the mechanism of phosphorylation of nucleosides in amide solvents and in urea. A second objective is to assess the importance of phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of nucleotide derivatives in amide environments. Although the most complex amide studied here was N-methylacetamide, inferences are made on the importance of dephosphorylation for nucleotides in oligopeptide environments. Phosphorylations in amide solvents and in urea are suggested to proceed through monomeric metaphosphate, which was first postulated as a reaction intermediate thirty years ago (Butcher and Westheimer, 1955). Phosphorylation of nucleosides and nucleotides and dephosphorylation of nucleotide derivatives have been studied in formamide, N-methylformamide, urea and N-methylacetamide. Hydrated forms of 5'-ADP and 5'ATP are unstable in hot amide solvents and in urea. They decompose to a mixture of adenosine and its phosphorylated derivatives. The rate of decomposition is much slower in N-methylacetamide than in formamide or urea. Experiments designed to prepare oligonucleotides in the presence of oligopeptides have been reported (White, 1983). According to the present study, it is not unreasonable to expect that nucleotide derivatives can be condensed with nucleosides to form oligonucleotides in a peptide environment. However, nucleotide monomers such as 5'-ATP, 5'-ADP or 5'AMP will suffer isomerization or decomposition during condensation use of activated phosphate derivatives is preferable. Monomeric metaphosphate has not been isolated or characterized in amide solvents. It is proposed here as a reaction intermediate, probably in a complexed form with the amide.

  3. Glycogen phosphorylation and Lafora disease.

    PubMed

    Roach, Peter J

    2015-12-01

    Covalent phosphorylation of glycogen, first described 35 years ago, was put on firm ground through the work of the Whelan laboratory in the 1990s. But glycogen phosphorylation lay fallow until interest was rekindled in the mid 2000s by the finding that it could be removed by a glycogen-binding phosphatase, laforin, and that mutations in laforin cause a fatal teenage-onset epilepsy, called Lafora disease. Glycogen phosphorylation is due to phosphomonoesters at C2, C3 and C6 of glucose residues. Phosphate is rare, ranging from 1:500 to 1:5000 phosphates/glucose depending on the glycogen source. The mechanisms of glycogen phosphorylation remain under investigation but one hypothesis to explain C2 and perhaps C3 phosphate is that it results from a rare side reaction of the normal synthetic enzyme glycogen synthase. Lafora disease is likely caused by over-accumulation of abnormal glycogen in insoluble deposits termed Lafora bodies in neurons. The abnormality in the glycogen correlates with elevated phosphorylation (at C2, C3 and C6), reduced branching, insolubility and an enhanced tendency to aggregate and become insoluble. Hyperphosphorylation of glycogen is emerging as an important feature of this deadly childhood disease.

  4. Nucleoside phosphorylation by phosphate minerals.

    PubMed

    Costanzo, Giovanna; Saladino, Raffaele; Crestini, Claudia; Ciciriello, Fabiana; Di Mauro, Ernesto

    2007-06-01

    In the presence of formamide, crystal phosphate minerals may act as phosphate donors to nucleosides, yielding both 5'- and, to a lesser extent, 3'-phosphorylated forms. With the mineral Libethenite the formation of 5'-AMP can be as high as 6% of the adenosine input and last for at least 10(3) h. At high concentrations, soluble non-mineral phosphate donors (KH(2)PO(4) or 5'-CMP) afford 2'- and 2':3'-cyclic AMP in addition to 5'-and 3'-AMP. The phosphate minerals analyzed were Herderite Ca[BePO(4)F], Hureaulite Mn(2+)(5)(PO(3)(OH)(2)(PO(4))(2)(H(2)O)(4), Libethenite Cu(2+)(2)(PO(4))(OH), Pyromorphite Pb(5)(PO(4))(3)Cl, Turquoise Cu(2+)Al(6)(PO(4))(4)(OH)(8)(H(2)O)(4), Fluorapatite Ca(5)(PO(4))(3)F, Hydroxylapatite Ca(5)(PO(4))(3)OH, Vivianite Fe(2+)(3)(PO(4))(2)(H(2)O)(8), Cornetite Cu(2+)(3)(PO(4))(OH)(3), Pseudomalachite Cu(2+)(5)(PO(4))(2)(OH)(4), Reichenbachite Cu(2+)(5)(PO(4))(2)(OH)(4), and Ludjibaite Cu(2+)(5)(PO(4))(2)(OH)(4)). Based on their behavior in the formamide-driven nucleoside phosphorylation reaction, these minerals can be characterized as: 1) inactive, 2) low level phosphorylating agents, or 3) active phosphorylating agents. Instances were detected (Libethenite and Hydroxylapatite) in which phosphorylation occurs on the mineral surface, followed by release of the phosphorylated compounds. Libethenite and Cornetite markedly protect the beta-glycosidic bond. Thus, activated nucleic monomers can form in a liquid non-aqueous environment in conditions compatible with the thermodynamics of polymerization, providing a solution to the standard-state Gibbs free energy change (DeltaG degrees ') problem, the major obstacle for polymerizations in the liquid phase in plausible prebiotic scenarios.

  5. Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Cellulosic Biomass

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Bin; Dai, Ziyu; Ding, Shi-You; Wyman, Charles E.

    2011-08-22

    Biological conversion of cellulosic biomass to fuels and chemicals offers the high yields to products vital to economic success and the potential for very low costs. Enzymatic hydrolysis that converts lignocellulosic biomass to fermentable sugars may be the most complex step in this process due to substrate-related and enzyme-related effects and their interactions. Although enzymatic hydrolysis offers the potential for higher yields, higher selectivity, lower energy costs, and milder operating conditions than chemical processes, the mechanism of enzymatic hydrolysis and the relationship between the substrate structure and function of various glycosyl hydrolase components are not well understood. Consequently, limited success has been realized in maximizing sugar yields at very low cost. This review highlights literature on the impact of key substrate and enzyme features that influence performance to better understand fundamental strategies to advance enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulosic biomass for biological conversion to fuels and chemicals. Topics are summarized from a practical point of view including characteristics of cellulose (e.g., crystallinity, degree of polymerization, and accessible surface area) and soluble and insoluble biomass components (e.g., oligomeric xylan, lignin, etc.) released in pretreatment, and their effects on the effectiveness of enzymatic hydrolysis. We further discuss the diversity, stability, and activity of individual enzymes and their synergistic effects in deconstructing complex lignocellulosic biomass. Advanced technologies to discover and characterize novel enzymes and to improve enzyme characteristics by mutagenesis, post-translational modification, and over-expression of selected enzymes and modifications in lignocellulosic biomass are also discussed.

  6. Herpes simplex virus 2 VP22 phosphorylation induced by cellular and viral kinases does not influence intracellular localization

    SciTech Connect

    Geiss, Brian J.; Cano, Gina L.; Tavis, John E.; Morrison, Lynda A. . E-mail: morrisla@slu.edu

    2004-12-05

    Phosphorylation of the herpes simplex virus (HSV) VP22 protein is regulated by cellular kinases and the UL13 viral kinase, but the sites at which these enzymes induce phosphorylation of HSV-2 VP22 are not known. Using serine-to-alanine mutants to map phosphorylation sites on HSV-2 VP22 in cells, we made three major observations. First, phosphorylation by a cellular kinase mapped to serines 70, 71, and/or 72 within CKII consensus sites analogous to previously identified phosphorylation sites in HSV-1 VP22. Second, we mapped UL13-mediated phosphorylation of HSV-2 VP22 to serines 28 and 34, describing for the first time UL13-dependent phosphorylation sites on VP22. Third, previously identified VP22-associated cellular kinase sites in HSV-1 VP22 (serines 292 and 294) were not phosphorylated in HSV-2 VP22 (serines 291 and 293). VP22 expressed alone accumulated in the cytoplasm and to a lesser extent in the nucleus. Phosphorylation by endogenous cellular kinase(s) did not alter the localization of VP22. Co-expression of HSV-2 VP22 with active UL13, but not with enzymatically inactive UL13, resulted in nuclear accumulation of VP22 and altered nuclear morphology. Surprisingly, redistribution of VP22 to the nucleus occurred independently of UL13-induced phosphorylation of VP22. The altered nuclear morphology of UL13-expressing cells was not due to apoptosis. These results demonstrate that phosphorylation of HSV-2 VP22 at multiple serine residues is induced by UL13 and cellular kinase(s), and that the nuclear/cytoplasmic distribution of VP22 is independent of its phosphorylation status but is controlled indirectly by UL13 kinase activity.

  7. SYMPOSIUM ON PLANT PROTEIN PHOSPHORYLATION

    SciTech Connect

    JOHN C WALKER

    2011-11-01

    Protein phosphorylation and dephosphorylation play key roles in many aspects of plant biology, including control of cell division, pathways of carbon and nitrogen metabolism, pattern formation, hormonal responses, and abiotic and biotic responses to environmental signals. A Symposium on Plant Protein Phosphorylation was hosted on the Columbia campus of the University of Missouri from May 26-28, 2010. The symposium provided an interdisciplinary venue at which scholars studying protein modification, as it relates to a broad range of biological questions and using a variety of plant species, presented their research. It also provided a forum where current international challenges in studies related to protein phosphorylation could be examined. The symposium also stimulated research collaborations through interactions and networking among those in the research community and engaged students and early career investigators in studying issues in plant biology from an interdisciplinary perspective. The proposed symposium, which drew 165 researchers from 13 countries and 21 States, facilitated a rapid dissemination of acquired knowledge and technical expertise regarding protein phosphorylation in plants to a broad range of plant biologists worldwide.

  8. Regulation of the filament structure and assembly of Acanthamoeba myosin II by phosphorylation of serines in the heavy-chain nonhelical tailpiece.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiong; Hong, Myoung-Soon; Shu, Shi; Yu, Shuhua; Korn, Edward D

    2013-01-01

    Acanthamoeba myosin II (AMII) has two heavy chains ending in a 27-residue nonhelical tailpiece and two pairs of light chains. In a companion article, we show that five, and only five, serine residues can be phosphorylated both in vitro and in vivo: Ser639 in surface loop 2 of the motor domain and serines 1489, 1494, 1499, and 1504 in the nonhelical tailpiece of the heavy chains. In that paper, we show that phosphorylation of Ser639 down-regulates the actin-activated MgATPase activity of AMII and that phosphorylation of the serines in the nonhelical tailpiece has no effect on enzymatic activity. Here we show that bipolar tetrameric, hexameric, and octameric minifilaments of AMII with the nonhelical tailpiece serines either phosphorylated or mutated to glutamate have longer bare zones and more tightly clustered heads than minifilaments of unphosphorylated AMII, irrespective of the phosphorylation state of Ser639. Although antiparallel dimers of phosphorylated and unphosphorylated myosins are indistinguishable, phosphorylation inhibits dimerization and filament assembly. Therefore, the different structures of tetramers, hexamers, and octamers of phosphorylated and unphosphorylated AMII must be caused by differences in the longitudinal stagger of phosphorylated and unphosphorylated bipolar dimers and tetramers. Thus, although the actin-activated MgATPase activity of AMII is regulated by phosphorylation of Ser639 in loop 2 of the motor domain, the structure of AMII minifilaments is regulated by phosphorylation of one or more of four serines in the nonhelical tailpiece of the heavy chain. PMID:23248285

  9. Dynamic phosphorylation of Histone Deacetylase 1 by Aurora kinases during mitosis regulates zebrafish embryos development.

    PubMed

    Loponte, Sara; Segré, Chiara V; Senese, Silvia; Miccolo, Claudia; Santaguida, Stefano; Deflorian, Gianluca; Citro, Simona; Mattoscio, Domenico; Pisati, Federica; Moser, Mirjam A; Visintin, Rosella; Seiser, Christian; Chiocca, Susanna

    2016-01-01

    Histone deacetylases (HDACs) catalyze the removal of acetyl molecules from histone and non-histone substrates playing important roles in chromatin remodeling and control of gene expression. Class I HDAC1 is a critical regulator of cell cycle progression, cellular proliferation and differentiation during development; it is also regulated by many post-translational modifications (PTMs). Herein we characterize a new mitosis-specific phosphorylation of HDAC1 driven by Aurora kinases A and B. We show that this phosphorylation affects HDAC1 enzymatic activity and it is critical for the maintenance of a proper proliferative and developmental plan in a complex organism. Notably, we find that Aurora-dependent phosphorylation of HDAC1 regulates histone acetylation by modulating the expression of genes directly involved in the developing zebrafish central nervous system. Our data represent a step towards the comprehension of HDAC1 regulation by its PTM code, with important implications in unravelling its roles both in physiology and pathology.

  10. Dynamic phosphorylation of Histone Deacetylase 1 by Aurora kinases during mitosis regulates zebrafish embryos development

    PubMed Central

    Loponte, Sara; Segré, Chiara V.; Senese, Silvia; Miccolo, Claudia; Santaguida, Stefano; Deflorian, Gianluca; Citro, Simona; Mattoscio, Domenico; Pisati, Federica; Moser, Mirjam A.; Visintin, Rosella; Seiser, Christian; Chiocca, Susanna

    2016-01-01

    Histone deacetylases (HDACs) catalyze the removal of acetyl molecules from histone and non-histone substrates playing important roles in chromatin remodeling and control of gene expression. Class I HDAC1 is a critical regulator of cell cycle progression, cellular proliferation and differentiation during development; it is also regulated by many post-translational modifications (PTMs). Herein we characterize a new mitosis-specific phosphorylation of HDAC1 driven by Aurora kinases A and B. We show that this phosphorylation affects HDAC1 enzymatic activity and it is critical for the maintenance of a proper proliferative and developmental plan in a complex organism. Notably, we find that Aurora-dependent phosphorylation of HDAC1 regulates histone acetylation by modulating the expression of genes directly involved in the developing zebrafish central nervous system. Our data represent a step towards the comprehension of HDAC1 regulation by its PTM code, with important implications in unravelling its roles both in physiology and pathology. PMID:27458029

  11. Click conjugation of a binuclear terbium(III) complex for real-time detection of tyrosine phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Akiba, Hiroki; Sumaoka, Jun; Tsumoto, Kouhei; Komiyama, Makoto

    2015-04-01

    Phosphorylation of proteins is closely associated with various diseases, and, therefore, its detection is vitally important in molecular biology and drug discovery. Previously, we developed a binuclear Tb(III) complex, which emits notable luminescence only in the presence of phosphotyrosine. In this study, we conjugated a newly synthesized binuclear Tb(III) complex to substrate peptides by using click chemistry. Using these conjugates, we were able to detect tyrosine phosphorylation in real time. These conjugates were superior to nonconjugated Tb(III) complexes for the detection of tyrosine phosphorylation, especially when the substrate peptides used were positively charged. Luminescence intensity upon phosphorylation was enhanced 10-fold, making the luminescence intensity of this system one of the largest among lanthanide luminescence-based systems. We also determined Michaelis-Menten parameters for the phosphorylation of various kinase/peptide combinations and quantitatively analyzed the effects of mutations in the peptide substrates. Furthermore, we successfully monitored the inhibition of enzymatic phosphorylation by inhibitors in real time. Advantageously, this system detects only the phosphorylation of tyrosine (phosphorylated serine and threonine are virtually silent) and is applicable to versatile peptide substrates. Our study thus demonstrates the applicability of this system for the analysis of kinase activity, which could lead to drug discovery.

  12. Phosphorylation stoichiometry determination in plant photosynthetic membranes.

    PubMed

    Ingelsson, Björn; Fristedt, Rikard; Turkina, Maria V

    2015-01-01

    This chapter describes different strategies for the study of phosphorylation dynamics and stoichiometry in photosynthetic membranes. Detailed procedures for the detection, large-scale identification, and quantification of phosphorylated proteins optimized for plant thylakoid proteins are given. PMID:25930698

  13. A protein kinase from wheat germ that phosphorylates the largest subunit of RNA polymerase II.

    PubMed Central

    Guilfoyle, T J

    1989-01-01

    A protein kinase from wheat germ that phosphorylates the largest subunit of RNA polymerase IIA has been partially purified and characterized. The kinase has a native molecular weight of about 200 kilodaltons. This kinase utilizes Mg2+ and ATP and transfers about 20 phosphates to the heptapeptide repeats Pro-Thr-Ser-Pro-Ser-Tyr-Ser in the carboxyl-terminal domain of the 220-kilodalton subunit of soybean RNA polymerase II. This phosphorylation results in a mobility shift of the 220-kilodalton subunits of a variety of eukaryotic RNA polymerases to polypeptides ranging in size from greater than 220 kilodaltons to 240 kilodaltons on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels. The phosphorylation is highly specific to the heptapeptide repeats since a degraded subunit polypeptide of 180 kilodaltons that lacks the heptapeptide repeats is poorly phosphorylated. Synthetic heptapeptide repeat multimers inhibit the phosphorylation of the 220-kilodalton subunit. PMID:2535525

  14. Bioluminescence methods for enzymatic determinations

    DOEpatents

    Bostick, William D.; Denton, Mark S.; Dinsmore, Stanley R.

    1982-01-01

    An enzymatic method for continuous, on-line and rapid detection of diagnostically useful biomarkers, which are symptomatic of disease or trauma-related tissue damage, is disclosed. The method is characterized by operability on authentic samples of complex biological fluids which contain the biomarkers.

  15. Bioluminescence methods for enzymatic determinations

    SciTech Connect

    Bostick, W.D.; Denton, M.S.; Dinsmore, S.R.

    1982-11-02

    An enzymatic method for continuous, on-line and rapid detection of diagnostically useful biomarkers, which are symptomatic of disease or trauma-related tissue damage, is disclosed. The method is characterized by operability on authentic samples of complex biological fluids which contain the biomarkers.

  16. Recent advances in carbon nanotube-based enzymatic fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Cosnier, Serge; Holzinger, Michael; Le Goff, Alan

    2014-01-01

    This review summarizes recent trends in the field of enzymatic fuel cells. Thanks to the high specificity of enzymes, biofuel cells can generate electrical energy by oxidation of a targeted fuel (sugars, alcohols, or hydrogen) at the anode and reduction of oxidants (O2, H2O2) at the cathode in complex media. The combination of carbon nanotubes (CNT), enzymes and redox mediators was widely exploited to develop biofuel cells since the electrons involved in the bio-electrocatalytic processes can be efficiently transferred from or to an external circuit. Original approaches to construct electron transfer based CNT-bioelectrodes and impressive biofuel cell performances are reported as well as biomedical applications.

  17. Tyrosine phosphorylation of WW proteins

    PubMed Central

    Reuven, Nina; Shanzer, Matan

    2015-01-01

    A number of key regulatory proteins contain one or two copies of the WW domain known to mediate protein–protein interaction via proline-rich motifs, such as PPxY. The Hippo pathway components take advantage of this module to transduce tumor suppressor signaling. It is becoming evident that tyrosine phosphorylation is a critical regulator of the WW proteins. Here, we review the current knowledge on the involved tyrosine kinases and their roles in regulating the WW proteins. PMID:25627656

  18. Phosphorylation of Enoyl-Acyl Carrier Protein Reductase InhA Impacts Mycobacterial Growth and Survival*

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Shazia; Nagarajan, Sathya Narayanan; Parikh, Amit; Samantaray, Sharmishtha; Singh, Albel; Kumar, Devanand; Roy, Rajendra P.; Bhatt, Apoorva; Nandicoori, Vinay Kumar

    2010-01-01

    InhA, the primary target for the first line anti-tuberculosis drug isoniazid, is a key enzyme of the fatty-acid synthase II system involved in mycolic acid biosynthesis in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. In this study, we show that InhA is a substrate for mycobacterial serine/threonine protein kinases. Using a novel approach to validate phosphorylation of a substrate by multiple kinases in a surrogate host (Escherichia coli), we have demonstrated efficient phosphorylation of InhA by PknA, PknB, and PknH, and to a lower extent by PknF. Additionally, the sites targeted by PknA/PknB have been identified and shown to be predominantly located at the C terminus of InhA. Results demonstrate in vivo phosphorylation of InhA in mycobacteria and validate Thr-266 as one of the key sites of phosphorylation. Significantly, our studies reveal that the phosphorylation of InhA by kinases modulates its biochemical activity, with phosphorylation resulting in decreased enzymatic activity. Co-expression of kinase and InhA alters the growth dynamics of Mycobacterium smegmatis, suggesting that InhA phosphorylation in vivo is an important event in regulating its activity. An InhA-T266E mutant, which mimics constitutive phosphorylation, is unable to rescue an M. smegmatis conditional inhA gene replacement mutant, emphasizing the critical role of Thr-266 in mediating post-translational regulation of InhA activity. The involvement of various serine/threonine kinases in modulating the activity of a number of enzymes of the mycolic acid synthesis pathway, including InhA, accentuates the intricacies of mycobacterial signaling networks in parallel with the changing environment. PMID:20864541

  19. Tyrosine phosphorylation and bacterial virulence

    PubMed Central

    Whitmore, Sarah E; Lamont, Richard J

    2012-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation on tyrosine has emerged as a key device in the control of numerous cellular functions in bacteria. In this article, we review the structure and function of bacterial tyrosine kinases and phosphatases. Phosphorylation is catalyzed by autophosphorylating adenosine triphosphate-dependent enzymes (bacterial tyrosine (BY) kinases) that are characterized by the presence of Walker motifs. The reverse reaction is catalyzed by three classes of enzymes: the eukaryotic-like phosphatases (PTPs) and dual-specific phosphatases; the low molecular weight protein-tyrosine phosphatases (LMW-PTPs); and the polymerase–histidinol phosphatases (PHP). Many BY kinases and tyrosine phosphatases can utilize host cell proteins as substrates, thereby contributing to bacterial pathogenicity. Bacterial tyrosine phosphorylation/dephosphorylation is also involved in biofilm formation and community development. The Porphyromonas gingivalis tyrosine phosphatase Ltp1 is involved in a restraint pathway that regulates heterotypic community development with Streptococcus gordonii. Ltp1 is upregulated by contact with S. gordonii and Ltp1 activity controls adhesin expression and levels of the interspecies signal AI-2. PMID:22388693

  20. Assay development for the determination of phosphorylation stoichiometry using multiple reaction monitoring methods with and without phosphatase treatment: application to breast cancer signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Domanski, Dominik; Murphy, Leigh C; Borchers, Christoph H

    2010-07-01

    We have developed a phosphatase-based phosphopeptide quantitation (PPQ) method for determining phosphorylation stoichiometry in complex biological samples. This PPQ method is based on enzymatic dephosphorylation, combined with specific and accurate peptide identification and quantification by multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) with stable-isotope-labeled standard peptides. In contrast with classical MRM methods for the quantitation of phosphorylation stoichiometry, the PPQ-MRM method needs only one nonphosphorylated SIS (stable isotope-coded standard) and two analyses (one for the untreated sample and one for the phosphatase-treated sample), from which the expression and modification levels can accurately be determined. From these analyses, the percent phosphorylation can be determined. In this manuscript, we compare the PPQ-MRM method with an MRM method without phosphatase and demonstrate the application of these methods to the detection and quantitation of phosphorylation of the classic phosphorylated breast cancer biomarkers (ERalpha and HER2), and for phosphorylated RAF and ERK1, which also contain phosphorylation sites of biological importance. Using synthetic peptides spiked into a complex protein digest, we were able to use our PPQ-MRM method to accurately determine the total phosphorylation stoichiometry on specific peptides as well as the absolute amount of the peptide and phosphopeptide present. Analyses of samples containing ERalpha protein revealed that the PPQ-MRM method is capable of determining phosphorylation stoichiometry in proteins from cell lines, and is in good agreement with determinations obtained using the direct MRM approach in terms of phosphorylation and total protein amount.

  1. Phosphorylation Alters the Interaction of the Arabidopsis Phosphotransfer Protein AHP1 with Its Sensor Kinase ETR1

    PubMed Central

    Scharein, Benjamin; Groth, Georg

    2011-01-01

    The ethylene receptor ethylene response 1 (ETR1) and the Arabidopsis histidine-containing phosphotransfer protein 1 (AHP1) form a tight complex in vitro. According to our current model ETR1 and AHP1 together with a response regulator form a phosphorelay system controlling the gene expression response to the plant hormone ethylene, similar to the two-component signaling in bacteria. The model implies that ETR1 functions as a sensor kinase and is autophosphorylated in the absence of ethylene. The phosphoryl group is then transferred onto a histidine at the canonical phosphorylation site in AHP1. For phosphoryl group transfer both binding partners need to form a tight complex. After ethylene binding the receptor is switched to the non-phosphorylated state. This switch is accompanied by a conformational change that decreases the affinity to the phosphorylated AHP1. To test this model we used fluorescence polarization and examined how the phosphorylation status of the proteins affects formation of the suggested ETR1−AHP1 signaling complex. We have employed various mutants of ETR1 and AHP1 mimicking permanent phosphorylation or preventing phosphorylation, respectively. Our results show that phosphorylation plays an important role in complex formation as affinity is dramatically reduced when the signaling partners are either both in their non-phosphorylated form or both in their phosphorylated form. On the other hand, affinity is greatly enhanced when either protein is in the phosphorylated state and the corresponding partner in its non-phosphorylated form. Our results indicate that interaction of ETR1 and AHP1 requires that ETR1 is a dimer, as in its functional state as receptor in planta. PMID:21912672

  2. The variable surface glycoproteins of Trypanosoma equiperdum are phosphorylated.

    PubMed Central

    Baltz, T; Giroud, C; Baltz, D; Duvillier, G; Degand, P; Demaille, J; Pautrizel, R

    1982-01-01

    The phosphoproteins from three Trypanosoma equiperdum variants were studied by labelling the parasites in vivo with 32P. Phosphoprotein analysis reveals the presence of a 58 000 mol. wt. phosphoprotein ( pp58 ) which is absent when live trypanosomes are pre-treated with proteinase K under conditions where only the surface coat containing the variable surface glycoprotein (VSG) is removed. Immunological and fingerprint analysis on labelled pp58 , purified from these variants by affinity chromatography on Concanavalin A-Sepharose, clearly identify this component as the VSG. Furthermore, the VSGs seem to be phosphorylated to the extent of 1 mol phosphate per mol glycoprotein. The phosphorylated region is located in the extreme C-terminal region representing approximately 10% of the total molecule. The phosphorylated residue is not an aliphatic or aromatic ester of serine, threonine, or tyrosine, nor an acyl phosphate involving an aspartyl or glutamyl residue, nor phosphohistidine. The evidence that VSGs are phosphorylated could have considerable implications for the transfer and function of these structures. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. PMID:6821334

  3. The Enzymatic Oxidation of Graphene Oxide

    PubMed Central

    Kotchey, Gregg P.; Allen, Brett L.; Vedala, Harindra; Yanamala, Naveena; Kapralov, Alexander A.; Tyurina, Yulia Y.; Klein-Seetharaman, Judith; Kagan, Valerian E.; Star, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    Two-dimensional graphitic carbon is a new material with many emerging applications, and studying its chemical properties is an important goal. Here, we reported a new phenomenon – the enzymatic oxidation of a single layer of graphitic carbon by horseradish peroxidase (HRP). In the presence of low concentrations of hydrogen peroxide (~40 µM), HRP catalyzed the oxidation of graphene oxide, which resulted in the formation of holes on its basal plane. During the same period of analysis, HRP failed to oxidize chemically reduced graphene oxide (RGO). The enzymatic oxidation was characterized by Raman, UV-Vis, EPR and FT-IR spectroscopy, TEM, AFM, SDS-PAGE, and GC-MS. Computational docking studies indicated that HRP was preferentially bound to the basal plane rather than the edge for both graphene oxide and RGO. Due to the more dynamic nature of HRP on graphene oxide, the heme active site of HRP was in closer proximity to graphene oxide compared to RGO, thereby facilitating the oxidation of the basal plane of graphene oxide. We also studied the electronic properties of the reduced intermediate product, holey reduced graphene oxide (hRGO), using field-effect transistor (FET) measurements. While RGO exhibited a V-shaped transfer characteristic similar to a single layer of graphene that was attributed to its zero band gap, hRGO demonstrated a p-type semiconducting behavior with a positive shift in the Dirac points. This p-type behavior rendered hRGO, which can be conceptualized as interconnected graphene nanoribbons, as a potentially attractive material for FET sensors. PMID:21344859

  4. The structural requirements of glucose for phosphorylation by phosphoglucomutase.

    PubMed

    Layne, P P; Najjar, V A

    1978-10-12

    During catalysis, the phosphoryl group of phosphoglucomutase (alpha-D-glucose-1,6-bisphosphate:alpha-D-glucose-1-phosphate phosphotransferase, EC 2.7.5.1) is transferred through a nucleophilic displacement reaction to the monophosphate substrates to form the diphosphate. Some non-phosphorylated analogs of glucose have been shown to serve as effective acceptors of the active phosphate albeit at a much reduced rate. Several other analogs exhibit little or no reactivity. The relative reaction rates of the reactive analogs follow the order: thioglucose greater than alpha- or beta-D-glucose greater than D-xylose, greater than L-arabinose greater than myo-inositol. The rate of transfer increased with the increased concentration of glucose or its analogs. The products of the reaction may be acid stable ester phosphate or acid labile glycosyl phosphate as well as inorganic phosphate. S-phosphoryl (hemiacetal) thioglucose was identified as a product of the 1-thioglucose reaction. It was possible to define certain steric requirements for the orientation of the hydroxyl groups in all the reacting sugars. These requirements are limited to 3 hydroxyl groups and pertain to loci or receptors on the active site of the enzyme. These would correspond in topography to carbons 2, 3 and 4 of the glucose molecule in the enzyme substrate complex. These hydroxyl groups should be oriented equatorially and project below, above and below the plane of the pyranose ring for C-2, C-3 and C-4, respectively.

  5. Phosphorylation of Single Stranded RNA Virus Proteins and Potential for Novel Therapeutic Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Keck, Forrest; Ataey, Pouya; Amaya, Moushimi; Bailey, Charles; Narayanan, Aarthi

    2015-01-01

    Post translational modification of proteins is a critical requirement that regulates function. Among the diverse kinds of protein post translational modifications, phosphorylation plays essential roles in protein folding, protein:protein interactions, signal transduction, intracellular localization, transcription regulation, cell cycle progression, survival and apoptosis. Protein phosphorylation is also essential for many intracellular pathogens to establish a productive infection cycle. Preservation of protein phosphorylation moieties in pathogens in a manner that mirrors the host components underscores the co-evolutionary trajectory of pathogens and hosts, and sheds light on how successful pathogens have usurped, either in part or as a whole, the host enzymatic machinery. Phosphorylation of viral proteins for many acute RNA viruses including Flaviviruses and Alphaviruses has been demonstrated to be critical for protein functionality. This review focuses on phosphorylation modifications that have been documented to occur on viral proteins with emphasis on acutely infectious, single stranded RNA viruses. The review additionally explores the possibility of repurposing Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved inhibitors as antivirals for the treatment of acute RNA viral infections. PMID:26473910

  6. Molecular characterization of recombinant mouse adenosine kinase and evaluation as a target for protein phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Sahin, Bogachan; Kansy, Janice W; Nairn, Angus C; Spychala, Jozef; Ealick, Steven E; Fienberg, Allen A; Greene, Robert W; Bibb, James A

    2004-09-01

    The regulation of adenosine kinase (AK) activity has the potential to control intracellular and interstitial adenosine (Ado) concentrations. In an effort to study the role of AK in Ado homeostasis in the central nervous system, two isoforms of the enzyme were cloned from a mouse brain cDNA library. Following overexpression in bacterial cells, the corresponding proteins were purified to homogeneity. Both isoforms were enzymatically active and found to possess K(m) and V(max) values in agreement with kinetic parameters described for other forms of AK. The distribution of AK in discrete brain regions and various peripheral tissues was defined. To investigate the possibility that AK activity is regulated by protein phosphorylation, a panel of protein kinases was screened for ability to phosphorylate recombinant mouse AK. Data from these in vitro phosphorylation studies suggest that AK is most likely not an efficient substrate for PKA, PKG, CaMKII, CK1, CK2, MAPK, Cdk1, or Cdk5. PKC was found to phosphorylate recombinant AK efficiently in vitro. Further analysis revealed, however, that this PKC-dependent phosphorylation occurred at one or more serine residues associated with the N-terminal affinity tag used for protein purification.

  7. Electrochemical enzymatic biosensors using carbon nanofiber nanoelectrode arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jun; Li, Yi-fen; Swisher, Luxi Z.; Syed, Lateef U.; Prior, Allan M.; Nguyen, Thu A.; Hua, Duy H.

    2012-10-01

    The reduction of electrode size down to nanometers could dramatically enhance detection sensitivity and temporal resolution. Nanoelectrode arrays (NEAs) are of particular interest for ultrasensitive biosensors. Here we report the study of two types of biosensors for measuring enzyme activities using NEAs fabricated with vertically aligned carbon nanofibers (VACNFs). VACNFs of ~100 nm in average diameter and 3-5 μm in length were grown on conductive substrates as uniform vertical arrays which were then encapsulated in SiO2 matrix leaving only the tips exposed. We demonstrate that such VACNF NEAs can be used in profiling enzyme activities through monitoring the change in electrochemical signals induced by enzymatic reactions to the peptides attached to the VACNF tip. The cleavage of the tetrapeptide with a ferrocene tag by a cancerrelated protease (legumain) was monitored with AC voltammetry. Real-time electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (REIS) was used for fast label-free detection of two reversible processes, i.e. phosphorylation by c-Src tyrosine kinase and dephosphorylation by protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B). The REIS data of phosphorylation were slow and unreliable, but those of dephosphorylation showed large and fast exponential decay due to much higher activity of phosphatase PTP1B. The kinetic data were analyzed with a heterogeneous Michaelis-Menten model to derive the "specificity constant" kcat/Km, which is 8.2x103 M-1s-1 for legumain and (2.1 ± 0.1) x 107 M-1s-1 for phosphatase (PTP1B), well consistent with literature. It is promising to develop VACNF NEA based electrochemical enzymatic biosensors as portable multiplex electronic techniques for rapid cancer diagnosis and treatment monitoring.

  8. Comprehensive Characterization of Heat Shock Protein 27 Phosphorylation in Human Endothelial Cells Stimulated by the Microbial Dithiole Thiolutin

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Shujia; Jia, Yifeng; Wu, Shiaw-Lin; Isenberg, Jeff S.; Ridnour, Lisa A.; Bandle, Russell W.; Wink, David A.; Roberts, David D.; Karger, Barry L.

    2009-01-01

    Thiolutin is a sulfur-based microbial compound with known activity as an angiogenesis inhibitor. Relative to previously studied angiogenesis inhibitors, thiolutin is a remarkably potent inducer of heat shock protein 27 (Hsp27) phosphorylation. This phosphorylation requires p38 kinase but is independent of increased p38 phosphorylation. To elucidate how thiolutin regulates Hsp27 phosphorylation and ultimately angiogenesis, Hsp27 was immunoprecipitated using nonphosphorylated and phospho-Ser78 specific antibodies from lysates of thiolutin treated and untreated human umbilical vein endothelial cells and analyzed by LC–MS. Separate LC–MS analyses of Lys-C, Lys-C plus trypsin, and Lys-C plus Glu-C digests provided 100% sequence coverage, including the identification of a very large 13 kDa Lys-C fragment using a special sample handling procedure (4 M guanidine HCl) prior to the LC–MS analysis to improve the large peptide recovery. The analysis revealed a novel post-translational modification of Hsp27 involving truncation of the N-terminal Met and acetylation of the penultimate Thr. Analysis of a Glu-C fragment containing two phosphorylation sites, Ser78 and Ser82, and a tryptic fragment containing the other phosphorylation site, Ser15, enabled quantitative stoichiometry of Hsp27 phosphorylation by LC–MS. The strategy revealed details of Hsp27 phosphorylation, including significant di-phosphorylation at both Ser78 and Ser82, that would be difficult to obtain by traditional approaches because oligomerization of the hydrophobic N-terminal region of the molecule prevents efficient enzymatic cleavage. The combination of Western blotting, immunoprecipation, and LC–MS provides a quantitative analysis of thiolutin-stimulated Hsp27 phosphorylation and further defines the role of Hsp27 in the antiangiogenic activities of thiolutin and related dithiolethiones. PMID:18720982

  9. Phosphorylated nano-diamond/ Polyimide Nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beyler-Çiǧil, Asli; Çakmakçi, Emrah; Vezir Kahraman, Memet

    2014-08-01

    In this study, a novel route to synthesize polyimide (PI)/phosphorylated nanodiamond films with improved thermal and mechanical properties was developed. Surface phosphorylation of nano-diamond was performed in dichloromethane. Phosphorylation dramatically enhanced the thermal stability of nano-diamond. Poly(amic acid) (PAA), which is the precursor of PI, was successfully synthesized with 3,3',4,4'-Benzophenonetetracarboxylic dianhydride (BTDA) and 4,4'-oxydianiline (4,4'-ODA) in the solution of N,N- dimethylformamide (DMF). Pure BTDA-ODA polyimide films and phosphorylated nanodiamond containing BTDA-ODA PI films were prepared. The PAA displayed good compatibility with phosphorylated nano-diamond. The morphology of the polyimide (PI)/phosphorylated nano-diamond was characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Chemical structure of polyimide and polyimide (PI)/phosphorylated nano-diamond was characterized by FTIR. SEM and FTIR results showed that the phosphorylated nano-diamond was successfully prepared. Thermal properties of the polyimide (PI)/phosphorylated nanodiamond was characterized by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). TGA results showed that the thermal stability of (PI)/phosphorylated nano-diamond film was increased.

  10. Regulation of Xenopus laevis DNA topoisomerase I activity by phosphorylation in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Kaiserman, H.B.; Ingebritsen, T.S.; Benbow, R.M.

    1988-05-03

    DNA topoisomerase I has been purified to electrophoretic homogeneity from ovaries of the frog Xenopus laevis. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of the most purified fraction revealed a single major band at 110 kDa and less abundant minor bands centered at 62 kDa. Incubation of the most purified fraction with immobilized calf intestinal alkaline phosphatase abolished all DNA topoisomerase enzymatic activity in a time-dependent reaction. Treatment of the dephosphorylated X. laevis DNA topoisomerase I with a X. laevis casein kinase type II activity and ATP restored DNA topoisomerase activity to a level higher than that observed in the most purified fraction. In vitro labeling experiments which employed the most purified DNA topoisomerase I fraction, (..gamma..-/sup 32/P)ATP, and the casein kinase type II enzyme showed that both the 110- and 62-kDa bands became phosphorylated in approximately molar proportions. Phosphoamino acid analysis showed that only serine residues became phosphorylated. Phosphorylation was accompanied by an increase in DNA topoisomerase activity in vitro. Dephosphorylation of DNA topoisomerase I appears to block formation of the initial enzyme-substrate complex on the basis of the failure of the dephosphorylated enzyme to nick DNA in the presence of camptothecin. The authors conclude that X. laevis DNA topoisomerase I is partially phosphorylated as isolated and that this phosphorylation is essential for expression of enzymatic activity in vitro. On the basis of the ability of the casein kinase type II activity to reactivate dephosphorylated DNA topoisomerase I, they speculate that this kinase may contribute to the physiological regulation of DNA topoisomerase I activity.

  11. Salt stress-induced protein phosphorylation

    SciTech Connect

    Godoy, J.A.; Torres-Schumann, S.; Llobell, A.; Pintor-Toro, J.A.

    1989-04-01

    Protein phosphorylation induced by salt stress in tomato germinating seeds were investigated by two-dimensional polyacrilamide gel electrophoresis of proteins labeled in vivo with ({sup 32}P)-Phosphate. NaCl induced the phosphorylation of a 14 Kd polypeptide. Pulse-chase experiments revealed that the phosphorylated molecules of this polypeptide are only stable while the stress is present. Phosphorylated 14 Kd polypeptides could be detected in radicles of salt-shocked seedlings after 6 hours stress period. 14 Kd polypeptide phosphorylation was also observed in seeds germinating in the presence of abscisic acid (ABA). The amount of phosphorylated 14 Kd polypeptide was significantly increased in seeds treated simultaneously with NaCl and ABA.

  12. Proline-Directed Androgen Receptor Phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Yanfei; Chen, Shaoyong

    2015-01-01

    The androgen receptor (AR) has been identified for decades and mediates essential steroid functions. Like most of biological molecules, AR functional activities are modulated by post-translational modifications. This review is focused on the reported activities and significance of AR phosphorylation, with particular emphasis on proline-directed serine/threonine phosphorylation that occurs predominantly on the receptor. The marked enrichment of AR phosphorylation in the most diverse N-terminal domain suggests that targeting AR phosphorylation can be synergistic to antagonizing the C-terminal domain by clinical antiandrogens. PMID:25866551

  13. FT-IR analysis of phosphorylated protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishii, Katsunori; Yoshihashi, Sachiko S.; Chihara, Kunihiro; Awazu, Kunio

    2004-09-01

    Phosphorylation and dephosphorylation, which are the most remarkable posttranslational modifications, are considered to be important chemical reactions that control the activation of proteins. We examine the phosphorylation analysis method by measuring the infrared absorption peak of phosphate group that observed at about 1070cm-1 (9.4μm) with Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrometer (FT-IR). This study indicates that it is possible to identify a phosphorylation by measuring the infrared absorption peak of phosphate group observed at about 1070 cm-1 with FT-IR method. As long as target peptides have the same amino acid sequence, it is possible to identify the phosphorylated sites (threonine, serine and tyrosine).

  14. Enzymatically triggered rupture of polymersomes.

    PubMed

    Jang, Woo-Sik; Park, Seung Chul; Reed, Ellen H; Dooley, Kevin P; Wheeler, Samuel F; Lee, Daeyeon; Hammer, Daniel A

    2016-01-28

    Polymersomes are robust vesicles made from amphiphilic block co-polymers. Large populations of uniform giant polymersomes with defined, entrapped species can be made by templating of double-emulsions using microfluidics. In the present study, a series of two enzymatic reactions, one inside and the other outside of the polymersome, were designed to induce rupture of polymersomes. We measured how the kinetics of rupture were affected by altering enzyme concentration. These results suggest that protocells with entrapped enzymes can be engineered to secrete contents on cue.

  15. Enzymatic reaction paths as determined by transition path sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masterson, Jean Emily

    Enzymes are biological catalysts capable of enhancing the rates of chemical reactions by many orders of magnitude as compared to solution chemistry. Since the catalytic power of enzymes routinely exceeds that of the best artificial catalysts available, there is much interest in understanding the complete nature of chemical barrier crossing in enzymatic reactions. Two specific questions pertaining to the source of enzymatic rate enhancements are investigated in this work. The first is the issue of how fast protein motions of an enzyme contribute to chemical barrier crossing. Our group has previously identified sub-picosecond protein motions, termed promoting vibrations (PVs), that dynamically modulate chemical transformation in several enzymes. In the case of human heart lactate dehydrogenase (hhLDH), prior studies have shown that a specific axis of residues undergoes a compressional fluctuation towards the active site, decreasing a hydride and a proton donor--acceptor distance on a sub-picosecond timescale to promote particle transfer. To more thoroughly understand the contribution of this dynamic motion to the enzymatic reaction coordinate of hhLDH, we conducted transition path sampling (TPS) using four versions of the enzymatic system: a wild type enzyme with natural isotopic abundance; a heavy enzyme where all the carbons, nitrogens, and non-exchangeable hydrogens were replaced with heavy isotopes; and two versions of the enzyme with mutations in the axis of PV residues. We generated four separate ensembles of reaction paths and analyzed each in terms of the reaction mechanism, time of barrier crossing, dynamics of the PV, and residues involved in the enzymatic reaction coordinate. We found that heavy isotopic substitution of hhLDH altered the sub-picosecond dynamics of the PV, changed the favored reaction mechanism, dramatically increased the time of barrier crossing, but did not have an effect on the specific residues involved in the PV. In the mutant systems

  16. Charge environments around phosphorylation sites in proteins

    PubMed Central

    Kitchen, James; Saunders, Rebecca E; Warwicker, Jim

    2008-01-01

    Background Phosphorylation is a central feature in many biological processes. Structural analyses have identified the importance of charge-charge interactions, for example mediating phosphorylation-driven allosteric change and protein binding to phosphopeptides. Here, we examine computationally the prevalence of charge stabilisation around phosphorylated sites in the structural database, through comparison with locations that are not phosphorylated in the same structures. Results A significant fraction of phosphorylated sites appear to be electrostatically stabilised, largely through interaction with sidechains. Some examples of stabilisation across a subunit interface are evident from calculations with biological units. When considering the immediately surrounding environment, in many cases favourable interactions are only apparent after conformational change that accompanies phosphorylation. A simple calculation of potential interactions at longer-range, applied to non-phosphorylated structures, recovers the separation exhibited by phosphorylated structures. In a study of sites in the Phospho.ELM dataset, for which structural annotation is provided by non-phosphorylated proteins, there is little separation of the known phospho-acceptor sites relative to background, even using the wider interaction radius. However, there are differences in the distributions of patch polarity for acceptor and background sites in the Phospho.ELM dataset. Conclusion In this study, an easy to implement procedure is developed that could contribute to the identification of phospho-acceptor sites associated with charge-charge interactions and conformational change. Since the method gives information about potential anchoring interactions subsequent to phosphorylation, it could be combined with simulations that probe conformational change. Our analysis of the Phospho.ELM dataset also shows evidence for mediation of phosphorylation effects through (i) conformational change associated with

  17. Relationships between histone phosphorylation and cell proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Gurley, L.R.; D'Anna, J.A.; Halleck, M.S.; Barham, S.S.; Walters, R.A.; Jett, J.H.; Tobey, R.A.

    1980-01-01

    From studies with various Peromyscus cell lines, correlations were made which led to the proposal that H2A phosphorylation is most active in constitutive heterochromatin. Recent studies on the two H2A variants found in these cells have revealed that the high level of H2A phosphorylation associated with heterochromatin is not the result of an increase in H2A phosphorylation rate or an increase in the number of phosphorylation sites, but rather, is due to an increase in the proportion of one of the H2A variants which is more highly phosphorylated than the other. If H2A phosphorylation is necessary for the constitutive heterochromatin state, it is reasonable that the cell would accomplish the generation of this structure by permanently installing a more highly phosphorylated H2A in the heterochromatin nucleosome rather than by trying to modulate the phosphorylation rate in such a condensed structure. The proposal that histone phosphorylation is involved with the condensed structures of chromatin is based primarily on correlations between histone phosphorylation measurements and cellular phenomena. One proof that this concept is correct ultimately rests in the ability to demonstrate these correlations in isolated chromosomes and chromatin fractions. This demonstration is presently limited by the excessive dephosphorylation of histones which occurs during the isolation of chromosomes and chromatin fractions. Thus, the demonstration of an effective inhibitor of histone dephosphorylation which is compatible with the isolation of nuclear structures and chromatin fractions having native morphologies is essential for future studies on the biological function of histone phosphorylation. (ERB)

  18. Method for the enzymatic production of hydrogen

    DOEpatents

    Woodward, J.; Mattingly, S.M.

    1999-08-24

    The present invention is an enzymatic method for producing hydrogen comprising the steps of: (a) forming a reaction mixture within a reaction vessel comprising a substrate capable of undergoing oxidation within a catabolic reaction, such as glucose, galactose, xylose, mannose, sucrose, lactose, cellulose, xylan and starch; the reaction mixture also comprising an amount of glucose dehydrogenase in an amount sufficient to catalyze the oxidation of the substrate, an amount of hydrogenase sufficient to catalyze an electron-requiring reaction wherein a stoichiometric yield of hydrogen is produced, an amount of pH buffer in an amount sufficient to provide an environment that allows the hydrogenase and the glucose dehydrogenase to retain sufficient activity for the production of hydrogen to occur and also comprising an amount of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate sufficient to transfer electrons from the catabolic reaction to the electron-requiring reaction; (b) heating the reaction mixture at a temperature sufficient for glucose dehydrogenase and the hydrogenase to retain sufficient activity and sufficient for the production of hydrogen to occur, and heating for a period of time that continues until the hydrogen is no longer produced by the reaction mixture, wherein the catabolic reaction and the electron-requiring reactions have rates of reaction dependent upon the temperature; and (c) detecting the hydrogen produced from the reaction mixture. 8 figs.

  19. Method for the enzymatic production of hydrogen

    DOEpatents

    Woodward, Jonathan; Mattingly, Susan M.

    1999-01-01

    The present invention is an enzymatic method for producing hydrogen comprising the steps of: a) forming a reaction mixture within a reaction vessel comprising a substrate capable of undergoing oxidation within a catabolic reaction, such as glucose, galactose, xylose, mannose, sucrose, lactose, cellulose, xylan and starch. The reaction mixture further comprises an amount of glucose dehydrogenase in an amount sufficient to catalyze the oxidation of the substrate, an amount of hydrogenase sufficient to catalyze an electron-requiring reaction wherein a stoichiometric yield of hydrogen is produced, an amount of pH buffer in an amount sufficient to provide an environment that allows the hydrogenase and the glucose dehydrogenase to retain sufficient activity for the production of hydrogen to occur and also comprising an amount of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate sufficient to transfer electrons from the catabolic reaction to the electron-requiring reaction; b) heating the reaction mixture at a temperature sufficient for glucose dehydrogenase and the hydrogenase to retain sufficient activity and sufficient for the production of hydrogen to occur, and heating for a period of time that continues until the hydrogen is no longer produced by the reaction mixture, wherein the catabolic reaction and the electron-requiring reactions have rates of reaction dependent upon the temperature; and c) detecting the hydrogen produced from the reaction mixture.

  20. Correlation between persistent forms of zeaxanthin-dependent energy dissipation and thylakoid protein phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Ebbert, V; Demmig-Adams, B; Adams, W W; Mueh, K E; Staehelin, L A

    2001-01-01

    High light stress induced not only a sustained form of xanthophyll cycle-dependent energy dissipation but also sustained thylakoid protein phosphorylation. The effect of protein phosphatase inhibitors (fluoride and molybdate ions) on recovery from a 1-h exposure to a high PFD was examined in leaf discs of Parthenocissus quinquefolia (Virginia creeper). Inhibition of protein dephosphorylation induced zeaxanthin retention and sustained energy dissipation (NPQ) upon return to low PFD for recovery, but had no significant effects on pigment and Chl fluorescence characteristics under high light exposure. In addition, whole plants of Monstera deliciosa and spinach grown at low to moderate PFDs were transferred to high PFDs, and thylakoid protein phosphorylation pattern (assessed with anti-phosphothreonine antibody) as well as pigment and Chl fluorescence characteristics were examined over several days. A correlation was obtained between dark-sustained D1/D2 phosphorylation and dark-sustained zeaxanthin retention and maintenance of PS II in a state primed for energy dissipation in both species. The degree of these dark-sustained phenomena was more pronounced in M. deliciosa compared with spinach. Moreover, M. deliciosa but not spinach plants showed unusual phosphorylation patterns of Lhcb proteins with pronounced dark-sustained Lhcb phosphorylation even under low PFD growth conditions. Subsequent to the transfer to a high PFD, dark-sustained Lhcb protein phosphorylation was further enhanced. Thus, phosphorylation patterns of D1/D2 and Lhcb proteins differed from each other as well as among plant species. The results presented here suggest an association between dark-sustained D1/D2 phosphorylation and sustained retention of zeaxanthin and energy dissipation (NPQ) in light-stressed, and particularly 'photoinhibited', leaves. Functional implications of these observations are discussed.

  1. Mitochondrial respiratory control and early defects of oxidative phosphorylation in the failing human heart.

    PubMed

    Lemieux, Hélène; Semsroth, Severin; Antretter, Herwig; Höfer, Daniel; Gnaiger, Erich

    2011-12-01

    Heart failure is a consequence of progressive deterioration of cardiac performance. Little is known about the role of impaired oxidative phosphorylation in the progression of the disease, since previous studies of mitochondrial injuries are restricted to end-stage chronic heart failure. The present study aimed at evaluating the involvement of mitochondrial dysfunction in the development of human heart failure. We measured the control of oxidative phosphorylation with high-resolution respirometry in permeabilized myocardial fibres from donor hearts (controls), and patients with no or mild heart failure but presenting with heart disease, or chronic heart failure due to dilated or ischemic cardiomyopathy. The capacity of the phosphorylation system exerted a strong limitation on oxidative phosphorylation in the human heart, estimated at 121 pmol O(2)s(-1)mg(-1) in the healthy left ventricle. In heart disease, a specific defect of the phosphorylation system, Complex I-linked respiration, and mass-specific fatty acid oxidation were identified. These early defects were also significant in chronic heart failure, where the capacities of the oxidative phosphorylation and electron transfer systems per cardiac tissue mass were decreased with all tested substrate combinations, suggesting a decline of mitochondrial density. Oxidative phosphorylation and electron transfer system capacities were higher in ventricles compared to atria, but the impaired mitochondrial quality was identical in the four cardiac chambers of chronic heart failure patients. Coupling was preserved in heart disease and chronic heart failure, in contrast to the mitochondrial dysfunction observed after prolonged cold storage of cardiac tissue. Mitochondrial defects in the phosphorylation system, Complex I respiration and mass-specific fatty acid oxidation occurred early in the development of heart failure. Targeting these mitochondrial injuries with metabolic therapy may offer a promising approach to delay

  2. Multiple Peroxisomal Enzymatic Deficiency Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Vamecq, Joseph; Draye, Jean-Pierre; Van Hoof, François; Misson, Jean-Paul; Evrard, Philippe; Verellen, Gaston; Eyssen, Hendrik J.; Van Eldere, Johan; Schutgens, Ruud B. H.; Wanders, Ronald J. A.; Roels, Frank; Goldfischer, Sidney L.

    1986-01-01

    Biologic, morphologic, and biochemical investigations performed in 2 patients demonstrate multiple peroxisomal deficiencies in the cerebrohepatorenal syndrome of Zellweger (CHRS) and neonatal adrenoleukodystrophy (NALD). Very long chain fatty acids, abnormal bile acids, including bile acid precursors (di- and trihydroxycoprostanoic acids), and C29-dicarboxylic acid accumulated in plasma in both patients. Generalized hyperaminoaciduria was also present. Peroxisomes could not be detected in CHRS liver and kidney; however, in the NALD patient, small and sparse cytoplasmic bodies resembling altered peroxisomes were found in hepatocytes. Hepatocellular and Kupffer cell lysosomes were engorged with ferritin and contained clefts and trilaminar structures believed to represent very long chain fatty acids. Enzymatic deficiencies reflected the peroxisomal defects. Hepatic glycolate oxidase and palmitoyl-CoA oxidase activities were deficient. No particle-bound catalase was found in cultured fibroblasts, and ether glycerolipid (plasmalogen) biosynthesis was markedly reduced. Administration of phenobarbital and clofibrate, an agent that induces peroxisomal proliferation and enzymatic activities, to the NALD patient did not bring about any changes in plasma metabolites, liver peroxisome population, or oxidizing activities. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5 PMID:2879480

  3. Enzymatic biotransformation of synthetic dyes.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Couto, S

    2009-11-01

    Environmental pollution by discharge of dye-containing effluents represents a serious ecological concern in many countries. Public demands for colour-free discharges to receiving waters have made decolouration of a variety of industrial wastewater a top priority. The current existing techniques for dye removal have several drawbacks such as high cost, low efficiency, use of large amounts of chemicals and formation of toxic sub-products. This has impelled the search for alternative methods such as those based on oxidative enzymes. This approach is believed to be a promising technology since it is cost-effective, environmentally friendly and does not produce sludge. Enzymatic transformation of synthetic dyes can be described as the conversion of dye molecules by enzymes into simpler and generally colourless molecules. Detailed characterisation of the metabolites produced during enzymatic transformation of synthetic dyes as well as ecotoxicity studies is of great importance to assess the effectiveness of the biodegradation process. However, most reports on the biotreatment of dyes mainly deal with decolouration and there are few reports on the reduction in toxicity or on the identification of the biodegradation products. This implies a limitation to assess their true technical potential.

  4. Enzymatic biotransformation of synthetic dyes.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Couto, S

    2009-11-01

    Environmental pollution by discharge of dye-containing effluents represents a serious ecological concern in many countries. Public demands for colour-free discharges to receiving waters have made decolouration of a variety of industrial wastewater a top priority. The current existing techniques for dye removal have several drawbacks such as high cost, low efficiency, use of large amounts of chemicals and formation of toxic sub-products. This has impelled the search for alternative methods such as those based on oxidative enzymes. This approach is believed to be a promising technology since it is cost-effective, environmentally friendly and does not produce sludge. Enzymatic transformation of synthetic dyes can be described as the conversion of dye molecules by enzymes into simpler and generally colourless molecules. Detailed characterisation of the metabolites produced during enzymatic transformation of synthetic dyes as well as ecotoxicity studies is of great importance to assess the effectiveness of the biodegradation process. However, most reports on the biotreatment of dyes mainly deal with decolouration and there are few reports on the reduction in toxicity or on the identification of the biodegradation products. This implies a limitation to assess their true technical potential. PMID:20214593

  5. Enzymatic approach to biodiesel production.

    PubMed

    Akoh, Casimir C; Chang, Shu-Wei; Lee, Guan-Chiun; Shaw, Jei-Fu

    2007-10-31

    The need for alternative energy sources that combine environmental friendliness with biodegradability, low toxicity, renewability, and less dependence on petroleum products has never been greater. One such energy source is referred to as biodiesel. This can be produced from vegetable oils, animal fats, microalgal oils, waste products of vegetable oil refinery or animal rendering, and used frying oils. Chemically, they are known as monoalkyl esters of fatty acids. The conventional method for producing biodiesel involves acid and base catalysts to form fatty acid alkyl esters. Downstream processing costs and environmental problems associated with biodiesel production and byproducts recovery have led to the search for alternative production methods and alternative substrates. Enzymatic reactions involving lipases can be an excellent alternative to produce biodiesel through a process commonly referred to alcoholysis, a form of transesterification reaction, or through an interesterification (ester interchange) reaction. Protein engineering can be useful in improving the catalytic efficiency of lipases as biocatalysts for biodiesel production. The use of recombinant DNA technology to produce large quantities of lipases, and the use of immobilized lipases and immobilized whole cells, may lower the overall cost, while presenting less downstream processing problems, to biodiesel production. In addition, the enzymatic approach is environmentally friendly, considered a "green reaction", and needs to be explored for industrial production of biodiesel.

  6. Phosphorylation of the multidrug resistance associated glycoprotein

    SciTech Connect

    Mellado, W.; Horwitz, S.B.

    1987-11-03

    Drug-resistant cell lines derived from the mouse macrophage-like cell line J774.2 express the multidrug resistant phenotype which includes the overexpression of a membrane glycoprotein (130-140 kilodaltons). Phosphorylation of this resistant-specific glycoprotein (P-glycoprotein) in intact cells and in cell-free membrane fractions has been studied. The phosphorylated glycoprotein can be immunoprecipitated by a rabbit polyclonal antibody specific for the glycoprotein. Phosphorylation studies done with partially purified membrane fractions derived from colchicine-resistant cells indicated that (a) phosphorylation of the glycoprotein in 1 mM MgCl/sub 2/ was enhanced a minimum of 2-fold by 10 ..mu..M cAMP and (b) the purified catalytic subunit of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase (protein kinase A) phosphorylated partially purified glycoprotein that was not phosphorylated by (..gamma..-/sup 32/P)ATP alone, suggesting that autophosphorylation was not involved. These results indicate that the glycoprotein is a phosphoprotein and that at least one of the kinases responsible for its phosphorylation is a membrane-associated protein kinase A. The state of phosphorylation of the glycoprotein, which is a major component of the multidrug resistance phenotype, may be related to the role of the glycoprotein in maintaining drug resistance.

  7. Effect of resveratrol on cultured skin fibroblasts from patients with oxidative phosphorylation defects.

    PubMed

    De Paepe, Boel; Vandemeulebroecke, Katrien; Smet, Joél; Vanlander, Arnaud; Seneca, Sara; Lissens, Willy; Van Hove, Johan Lk; Deschepper, Ellen; Briones, Paz; Van Coster, Rudy

    2014-02-01

    Few therapeutic options are available to patients with oxidative phosphorylation disorders. Administering pharmacological agents that are able to stimulate mitochondrial biogenesis have been put forward as a possible treatment, yet the approach remains in need of thorough testing. We investigated the effect of resveratrol in an in vitro setting. Mitochondrial enzymatic activities were tested in cultured skin fibroblasts from patients harboring a nuclear defect in either complex II or complex IV (n = 11), and in fibroblasts from healthy controls (n = 11). In the latter, preincubation with resveratrol resulted in a significant increase of citrate synthase, complex II and complex IV enzyme activity. In patients with complex II or complex IV deficiency, however, activity of the deficient complex could not be substantially augmented, and response was dependent upon the residual activity. We conclude that resveratrol is not capable of normalizing oxidative phosphorylation activities in deficient cell lines.

  8. beta. -Sulfopyruvate: chemical and enzymatic syntheses and enzymatic assay

    SciTech Connect

    Weinstein, C.L.; Griffith, O.W.

    1986-01-01

    BETA-Sulfopyruvic acid (2-carboxy-2-oxoethanesulfonic acid) is prepared in greater than 90% yield by reaction of bromopyruvic acid with sodium sulfite. ..beta..-(/sup 35/S)Sulfopyruvate is prepared by transamination between (/sup 35/)cysteinesulfonate (cysteate) and ..cap alpha..-ketoglutarate using mitochondrial aspartate aminotransferase isolated from rat liver. Following either chemical or enzymatic synthesis the crude reaction product is conveniently purified by chromatography on Dowex 1; ..beta..-sulfopyruvate is isolated as the stable, water-soluble dilithium salt. ..beta..-Sulfopyruvate is shown to be an alternative substrate of mitochondrial malate dehydrogenase; in the presence of 0.25 mM NADH, ..beta..-sulfopyruvate is reduced with an apparent K/sub m/ of 6.3 mM and a V/sub max/ equal to about 40% of that observed with oxaloacetate. This finding forms the basis of a convenient spectrophotometric assay of ..beta..-sulfopyruvate.

  9. Cisplatin stimulates protein tyrosine phosphorylation in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Kumar, R; Shrivastava, A; Sodhi, A

    1995-03-01

    Cisplatin [cis-dichlorodiamine platinum (II)], a potent anti-tumor compound, stimulates immune responses by activating monocyte-macrophages and other cells of the immune system. The mechanism by which cisplatin activates these cells is poorly characterized. Since protein tyrosine phosphorylation appears to be a major intracellular signalling event that mediates cellular responses, we examined whether cisplatin alters tyrosine phosphorylation in macrophages. We found that cisplatin increased tyrosine phosphorylation of several proteins in peritoneal macrophages and in P388D1 and IC-21 macrophage cell lines. Treatment of macrophages with tyrosine kinase inhibitors, genestein and lavendustin A, inhibited cisplatin-stimulated protein tyrosine phosphorylation in macrophages. Macrophages treated with cisplatin also exhibit increased fluorescence with anti-phosphotyrosine-FITC antibody. These data indicate that protein tyrosine phosphorylation plays a role in cisplatin-induced activation of macrophages. PMID:7539662

  10. Microbial Transformation of Antibiotics: Phosphorylation of Clindamycin by Streptomyces coelicolor Müller1

    PubMed Central

    Coats, John H.; Argoudelis, Alexander D.

    1971-01-01

    Addition of clindamycin to whole-cell cultures of Streptomyces coelicolor Müller resulted in the loss of in vitro activity against organisms sensitive to clindamycin. Incubation of such culture filtrates with alkaline phosphatase generated a biologically active material identified as clindamycin. Fermentation broths containing inactivated clindamycin yielded clindamycin 3-phosphate, the structure of which was established by physical-chemical and enzymatic studies. Clindamycin was phosphorylated by lysates and partially purified enzyme preparations from S. coelicolor Müller. These reactions require a ribonucleoside triphosphate and Mg2+. The product of the cell-free reactions was identified as clindamycin 3-phosphate. PMID:5166238

  11. CK2 phosphorylation of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 5 potentiates cell cycle progression

    PubMed Central

    Homma, Miwako Kato; Wada, Ikuo; Suzuki, Toshiyuki; Yamaki, Junko; Krebs, Edwin G.; Homma, Yoshimi

    2005-01-01

    Casein kinase 2 (CK2) is a ubiquitous eukaryotic Ser/Thr protein kinase that plays an important role in cell cycle progression. Although its function in this process remains unclear, it is known to be required for the G1 and G2/M phase transitions in yeast. Here, we show that CK2 activity changes notably during cell cycle progression and is increased within 3 h of serum stimulation of quiescent cells. During the time period in which it exhibits high enzymatic activity, CK2 associates with and phosphorylates a key molecule for translation initiation, eukaryotic translation initiation factor (eIF) 5. Using MS, we show that Ser-389 and -390 of eIF5 are major sites of phosphorylation by CK2. This is confirmed using eIF5 mutants that lack CK2 sites; the phosphorylation levels of mutant eIF5 proteins are significantly reduced, relative to WT eIF5, both in vitro and in vivo. Expression of these mutants reveals that they have a dominant-negative effect on phosphorylation of endogenous eIF5, and that they perturb synchronous progression of cells through S to M phase, resulting in a significant reduction in growth rate. Furthermore, the formation of mature eIF5/eIF2/eIF3 complex is reduced in these cells, and, in fact, restricted diffusional motion of WT eIF5 was almost abolished in a GFP-tagged eIF5 mutant lacking CK2 phosphorylation sites, as measured by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy. These results suggest that CK2 may be involved in the regulation of cell cycle progression by associating with and phosphorylating a key molecule for translation initiation. PMID:16227438

  12. The abnormal phosphorylation of tau protein at Ser-202 in Alzheimer disease recapitulates phosphorylation during development.

    PubMed Central

    Goedert, M; Jakes, R; Crowther, R A; Six, J; Lübke, U; Vandermeeren, M; Cras, P; Trojanowski, J Q; Lee, V M

    1993-01-01

    Tau is a neuronal phosphoprotein whose expression is developmentally regulated. A single tau isoform is expressed in fetal human brain but six isoforms are expressed in adult brain, with the fetal isoform corresponding to the shortest of the adult isoforms. Phosphorylation of tau is also developmentally regulated, as fetal tau is phosphorylated at more sites than adult tau. In Alzheimer disease, the six adult tau isoforms become abnormally phosphorylated and form the paired helical filament, the major fibrous component of the characteristic neurofibrillary lesions. We show here that Ser-202 (in the numbering of the longest human brain tau isoform) is a phosphorylation site that distinguishes fetal from adult tau and we identify it as one of the abnormal phosphorylation sites in Alzheimer disease. The abnormal phosphorylation of tau at Ser-202 in Alzheimer disease thus recapitulates normal phosphorylation during development. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:8506352

  13. Modulation of P1798 lymphosarcoma proliferation by protein phosphorylation

    SciTech Connect

    Michnoff, C.A.H.

    1983-01-01

    The role of protein kinases in modulating cell proliferation was examined. Studies characterized the regulation of cell proliferation by adenosine 3':5'-monophosphate-dependent protein kinase (cA-Pk). Calcium/calmodulin-dependent myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) was isolated and examined as a potential substrate regulated by cA-PK in the rapidly proliferating P1798 lymphosarcoma. Modulation of cell proliferation by cA-PK was characterized by quantitating cell division by (methyl-/sup 3/H) thymidine ((/sup 3/H)-dT) incorporation into DNA, cAMP accumulations, and activation of cA-PK using P1798 lymphosarcoma cells. Epinephrine and prostaglandin E/sub 1/ (PGE/sub 1/) were demonstrated to suppress (/sup 3/H)-dT incorporation into DNA, to stimulate cAMP accumulation, and to activate cA-PK with dose-dependency. Calcium/calmodulin-dependent MLCK was partially purified from P1798 lymphosarcoma. P1798 MLCK phosphorylated myosin regulatory light chains (P-LC) from thymus, cardiac and skeletal muscles. One mol (/sup 32/Pi) was transferred into one mol cardiac or skeletal P-LC by P1798 MLCK. Apparent Km values of 65 ..mu..M and 51 ..mu..M were determined for ATP and cardiac P-LC, respectively. The apparent molecular weight of P1798 MLCK was 135,000. P1798 MLCK was phosphorylated by cA-PK. Phosphorylated MLCK showed a 41% decrease in calcium-dependent activity. Two additional protein kinases from P1798 lymphosarcoma phosphorylated cardiac and skeletal light chains (MLC).

  14. Monitoring enzymatic ATP hydrolysis by EPR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Hacker, Stephan M; Hintze, Christian; Marx, Andreas; Drescher, Malte

    2014-07-14

    An adenosine triphosphate (ATP) analogue modified with two nitroxide radicals is developed and employed to study its enzymatic hydrolysis by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy. For this application, we demonstrate that EPR holds the potential to complement fluorogenic substrate analogues in monitoring enzymatic activity.

  15. Oxidative phosphorylation and lacunar stroke

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Christopher D.; Hurford, Robert; Bevan, Steve; Markus, Hugh S.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: We investigated whether oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) abnormalities were associated with lacunar stroke, hypothesizing that these would be more strongly associated in patients with multiple lacunar infarcts and leukoaraiosis (LA). Methods: In 1,012 MRI-confirmed lacunar stroke cases and 964 age-matched controls recruited from general practice surgeries, we investigated associations between common genetic variants within the OXPHOS pathway and lacunar stroke using a permutation-based enrichment approach. Cases were phenotyped using MRI into those with multiple infarcts or LA (MLI/LA) and those with isolated lacunar infarcts (ILI) based on the number of subcortical infarcts and degree of LA, using the Fazekas grading. Using gene-level association statistics, we tested for enrichment of genes in the OXPHOS pathway with all lacunar stroke and the 2 subtypes. Results: There was a specific association with strong evidence of enrichment in the top 1% of genes in the MLI/LA (subtype p = 0.0017) but not in the ILI subtype (p = 1). Genes in the top percentile for the all lacunar stroke analysis were not significantly enriched (p = 0.07). Conclusions: Our results implicate the OXPHOS pathway in the pathogenesis of lacunar stroke, and show the association is specific to patients with the MLI/LA subtype. They show that MRI-based subtyping of lacunar stroke can provide insights into disease pathophysiology, and imply that different radiologic subtypes of lacunar stroke subtypes have distinct underlying pathophysiologic processes. PMID:26674331

  16. Oxidative phosphorylation in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Solaini, Giancarlo; Sgarbi, Gianluca; Baracca, Alessandra

    2011-06-01

    Evidence suggests that mitochondrial metabolism may play a key role in controlling cancer cells life and proliferation. Recent evidence also indicates how the altered contribution of these organelles to metabolism and the resistance of cancer mitochondria against apoptosis-associated permeabilization are closely related. The hallmarks of cancer growth, increased glycolysis and lactate production in tumours, have raised attention due to recent observations suggesting a wide spectrum of oxidative phosphorylation deficit and decreased availability of ATP associated with malignancies and tumour cell expansion. More specifically, alteration in signal transduction pathways directly affects mitochondrial proteins playing critical roles in controlling the membrane potential as UCP2 and components of both MPTP and oxphos complexes, or in controlling cells life and death as the Bcl-2 proteins family. Moreover, since mitochondrial bioenergetics and dynamics, are also involved in processes of cells life and death, proper regulation of these mitochondrial functions is crucial for tumours to grow. Therefore a better understanding of the key pathophysiological differences between mitochondria in cancer cells and in their non-cancer surrounding tissue is crucial to the finding of tools interfering with these peculiar tumour mitochondrial functions and will disclose novel approaches for the prevention and treatment of malignant diseases. Here, we review the peculiarity of tumour mitochondrial bioenergetics and the mode it is linked to the cell metabolism, providing a short overview of the evidence accumulated so far, but highlighting the more recent advances.

  17. Enzymatic characteristics of the c-Raf-1 protein kinase.

    PubMed

    Force, T; Bonventre, J V; Heidecker, G; Rapp, U; Avruch, J; Kyriakis, J M

    1994-02-15

    The c-Raf-1 protein kinase plays a central role in the mitogenic response of cells to growth factors, cytokines, and many oncogenes. Despite the critical importance of this enzyme, very little is known of its biochemical properties or mechanisms of regulation. In these experiments, we used the only candidate physiologic substrate identified as yet for c-Raf-1, mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MAPKK), to examine enzymatic characteristics and candidate modulators of c-Raf-1, c-Raf-1 was purified from Sf9 cells infected with recombinant baculovirus encoding a histidine-tagged c-Raf-1. The Km values of c-Raf-1 for ATP and MAPKK were 11.6 microM and 0.8 microM, respectively, and the stoichiometry of phosphorylation of MAPKK by c-Raf-1 was 1.67 mol of phosphate per mol of MAPKK. In contrast to prior reports, Mg2+ was the preferred cation at Mg2+ and Mn2+ concentrations > 5 mM. c-Raf-1 substrate specificity was extremely restricted, consistent with the identification of only one candidate physiologic substrate to date and highlighting the necessity of using MAPKK rather than artificial substrates in c-Raf-1 activity assays. Of multiple potential substrates tested, the only one phosphorylated to > 20% of the level of MAPKK phosphorylation was myelin basic protein (22%). Heat-denatured MAPKK was phosphorylated at only 2% the level of native MAPKK, indicating that the restricted substrate specificity may be due to tertiary-structural requirements. We also examined whether c-Raf-1 activity is modulated by lipid binding to the cysteine finger region in its regulatory domain. Of multiple mitogen-stimulated or cell-membrane lipids tested, only phosphatidylserine and diacylglycerol in the presence of Ca2+ (2.5 mM) increased c-Raf-1 kinase activity significantly (1.5-fold). The increase is probably not of physiologic significance because it was about two orders of magnitude less than the stimulation of protein kinase C by these lipids. On gel-filtration chromatography, the

  18. Enzymatic characteristics of the c-Raf-1 protein kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Force, T; Bonventre, J V; Heidecker, G; Rapp, U; Avruch, J; Kyriakis, J M

    1994-01-01

    The c-Raf-1 protein kinase plays a central role in the mitogenic response of cells to growth factors, cytokines, and many oncogenes. Despite the critical importance of this enzyme, very little is known of its biochemical properties or mechanisms of regulation. In these experiments, we used the only candidate physiologic substrate identified as yet for c-Raf-1, mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MAPKK), to examine enzymatic characteristics and candidate modulators of c-Raf-1, c-Raf-1 was purified from Sf9 cells infected with recombinant baculovirus encoding a histidine-tagged c-Raf-1. The Km values of c-Raf-1 for ATP and MAPKK were 11.6 microM and 0.8 microM, respectively, and the stoichiometry of phosphorylation of MAPKK by c-Raf-1 was 1.67 mol of phosphate per mol of MAPKK. In contrast to prior reports, Mg2+ was the preferred cation at Mg2+ and Mn2+ concentrations > 5 mM. c-Raf-1 substrate specificity was extremely restricted, consistent with the identification of only one candidate physiologic substrate to date and highlighting the necessity of using MAPKK rather than artificial substrates in c-Raf-1 activity assays. Of multiple potential substrates tested, the only one phosphorylated to > 20% of the level of MAPKK phosphorylation was myelin basic protein (22%). Heat-denatured MAPKK was phosphorylated at only 2% the level of native MAPKK, indicating that the restricted substrate specificity may be due to tertiary-structural requirements. We also examined whether c-Raf-1 activity is modulated by lipid binding to the cysteine finger region in its regulatory domain. Of multiple mitogen-stimulated or cell-membrane lipids tested, only phosphatidylserine and diacylglycerol in the presence of Ca2+ (2.5 mM) increased c-Raf-1 kinase activity significantly (1.5-fold). The increase is probably not of physiologic significance because it was about two orders of magnitude less than the stimulation of protein kinase C by these lipids. On gel-filtration chromatography, the

  19. In the Beginning, There Was Protein Phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Kyriakis, John M.

    2014-01-01

    The importance of reversible protein phosphorylation to cellular regulation cannot be overstated. In eukaryotic cells, protein kinase/phosphatase signaling pathways regulate a staggering number of cellular processes, including cell proliferation, cell death (apoptosis, necroptosis, necrosis), metabolism (at both the cellular and organismal levels), behavior and neurological function, development, and pathogen resistance. Although protein phosphorylation as a mode of eukaryotic cell regulation is familiar to most biochemists, many are less familiar with protein kinase/phosphatase signaling networks that function in prokaryotes. In this thematic minireview series, we present four minireviews that cover the important field of prokaryotic protein phosphorylation. PMID:24554697

  20. Growth factor-induced activation of a kinase activity which causes regulatory phosphorylation of p42/microtubule-associated protein kinase.

    PubMed Central

    L'Allemain, G; Her, J H; Wu, J; Sturgill, T W; Weber, M J

    1992-01-01

    p42/microtubule-associated protein kinase (p42mapk) is activated by tyrosine and threonine phosphorylation, and its regulatory phosphorylation is likely to be important in signalling pathways involved in growth control, secretion, and differentiation. Here we show that treatment of quiescent 3T3 cells with diverse agonists results in the appearance of an activity capable of causing the in vitro phosphorylation of p42mapk on the regulatory tyrosine and to a lesser extent on the regulatory threonine, resulting in enzymatic activation of the p42mapk. This p42mapk-activating activity is capable of phosphorylating a kinase-defective p42mapk mutant, thus confirming its activity as a kinase. Images PMID:1314951

  1. Site-Specific Connexin Phosphorylation Is Associated with Reduced Heterocellular Communication between Smooth Muscle and Endothelium

    PubMed Central

    Straub, Adam C.; Johnstone, Scott R.; Heberlein, Katherine R.; Rizzo, Michael J.; Best, Angela K.; Boitano, Scott; Isakson, Brant E.

    2010-01-01

    Background/Aims Myoendothelial junctions (MEJs) represent a specialized signaling domain between vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) and endothelial cells (EC). The functional consequences of phosphorylation state of the connexins (Cx) at the MEJ have not been explored. Methods/Results: Application of adenosine 3′,5′-cyclic monophosphate sodium (pCPT) to mouse cremasteric arterioles reduces the detection of connexin 43 (Cx43) phosphorylated at its carboxyl terminal serine 368 site (S368) at the MEJ in vivo. After single-cell microinjection of a VSMC in mouse cremaster arterioles, only in the presence of pCPT was dye transfer to EC observed. We used a vascular cell co-culture (VCCC) and applied the phorbol ester 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate (PMA) or fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2) to induce phosphorylation of Cx43 S368. This phosphorylation event was associated with a significant reduction in dye transfer and calcium communication. Using a novel method to monitor increases in intracellular calcium across the in vitro MEJ, we noted that PMA and FGF-2 both inhibited movement of inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate (IP3), but to a lesser extent Ca2+. Conclusion These data indicate that site-specific connexin phosphorylation at the MEJ can potentially regulate the movement of solutes between EC and VSMC in the vessel wall. PMID:20016202

  2. Selective Sensing of Tyrosine Phosphorylation in Peptides Using Terbium(III) Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Sumaoka, Jun; Akiba, Hiroki; Komiyama, Makoto

    2016-01-01

    Phosphorylation of tyrosine residues in proteins, as well as their dephosphorylation, is closely related to various diseases. However, this phosphorylation is usually accompanied by more abundant phosphorylation of serine and threonine residues in the proteins and covers only 0.05% of the total phosphorylation. Accordingly, highly selective detection of phosphorylated tyrosine in proteins is an urgent subject. In this review, recent developments in this field are described. Monomeric and binuclear TbIII complexes, which emit notable luminescence only in the presence of phosphotyrosine (pTyr), have been developed. There, the benzene ring of pTyr functions as an antenna and transfers its photoexcitation energy to the TbIII ion as the emission center. Even in the coexistence of phosphoserine (pSer) and phosphothreonine (pThr), pTyr can be efficintly detected with high selectivity. Simply by adding these TbIII complexes to the solutions, phosphorylation of tyrosine in peptides by protein tyrosine kinases and dephosphorylation by protein tyrosine phosphatases can be successfully visualized in a real-time fashion. Furthermore, the activities of various inhibitors on these enzymes are quantitatively evaluated, indicating a strong potential of the method for efficient screening of eminent inhibitors from a number of candidates. PMID:27375742

  3. Lignin hydrolysis and phosphorylation mechanism during phosphoric acid-acetone pretreatment: a DFT study.

    PubMed

    Qin, Wu; Wu, Lingnan; Zheng, Zongming; Dong, Changqing; Yang, Yongping

    2014-12-18

    The study focused on the structural sensitivity of lignin during the phosphoric acid-acetone pretreatment process and the resulting hydrolysis and phosphorylation reaction mechanisms using density functional theory calculations. The chemical stabilities of the seven most common linkages (β-O-4, β-β, 4-O-5, β-1, 5-5, α-O-4, and β-5) of lignin in H3PO4, CH3COCH3, and H2O solutions were detected, which shows that α-O-4 linkage and β-O-4 linkage tend to break during the phosphoric acid-acetone pretreatment process. Then α-O-4 phosphorylation and β-O-4 phosphorylation follow a two-step reaction mechanism in the acid treatment step, respectively. However, since phosphorylation of α-O-4 is more energetically accessible than phosphorylation of β-O-4 in phosphoric acid, the phosphorylation of α-O-4 could be controllably realized under certain operational conditions, which could tune the electron and hole transfer on the right side of β-O-4 in the H2PO4- functionalized lignin. The results provide a fundamental understanding for process-controlled modification of lignin and the potential novel applications in lignin-based imprinted polymers, sensors, and molecular devices.

  4. The impact of N-terminal phosphorylation on LHCII conformation in state transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Jin-Hong; Li, Ning; Wang, Man-Liu; Zhang, Yan; Lü, Shou-Qin; Long, Mian

    2014-06-01

    State transition is an important protection mechanism of plants for maintaining optimal efficiency through redistributing unbalanced excitation energy between photo-system II (PSII) and photosystem I (PSI). This process depends on the reversible phosphorylation/dephosphorylation of the major light-harvesting complex II (LHCII) and its bi-directional migration between PSII and PSI. But it remains unclear how phosphorylation/dephosphorylation modulates the LHCII conformation and further regulates its reversible migration. Here molecular dynamics simulations (MDS) were employed to elucidate the impact of phosphorylation on LHCII conformation. The results indicated that N-terminal phosphorylation loosened LHCII trimer with decreased hydrogen bond (H-bond) interactions and extended the distances between neighboring monomers, which stemmed from the conformational adjustment of each monomer itself. Global conformational change of LHCII monomer started from its stromal Nterminal (including the phosphorylation sites) by enhancing its interaction to lipid membrane and by adjusting the interaction network with surrounded inter-monomer and intra-monomer transmembrane helixes of B, C, and A, and finally triggered the reorientation of transmembrane helixes and transferred the conformational change to luminal side helixes and loops. These results further our understanding in molecular mechanism of LHCII migration during state transition from the phosphorylation-induced microstructural feature of LHCII.

  5. Recent Advances in Carbon Nanotube-Based Enzymatic Fuel Cells

    PubMed Central

    Cosnier, Serge; Holzinger, Michael; Le Goff, Alan

    2014-01-01

    This review summarizes recent trends in the field of enzymatic fuel cells. Thanks to the high specificity of enzymes, biofuel cells can generate electrical energy by oxidation of a targeted fuel (sugars, alcohols, or hydrogen) at the anode and reduction of oxidants (O2, H2O2) at the cathode in complex media. The combination of carbon nanotubes (CNT), enzymes and redox mediators was widely exploited to develop biofuel cells since the electrons involved in the bio-electrocatalytic processes can be efficiently transferred from or to an external circuit. Original approaches to construct electron transfer based CNT-bioelectrodes and impressive biofuel cell performances are reported as well as biomedical applications. PMID:25386555

  6. The Chemical Biology of Protein Phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Tarrant, Mary Katherine; Cole, Philip A.

    2011-01-01

    The explosion of scientific interest in protein kinase-mediated signaling networks has led to the infusion of new chemical methods and their applications related to the analysis of phosphorylation pathways. We highlight some of these chemical biology approaches across three areas. First, we discuss the development of chemical tools to modulate the activity of protein kinases to explore kinase mechanisms and their contributions to phosphorylation events and cellular processes. Second, we describe chemical techniques developed in the past few years to dissect the structural and functional effects of phosphate modifications at specific sites in proteins. Third, we cover newly developed molecular imaging approaches to elucidate the spatiotemporal aspects of phosphorylation cascades in live cells. Exciting advances in our understanding of protein phosphorylation have been obtained with these chemical biology approaches, but continuing opportunities for technological innovation remain. PMID:19489734

  7. The chemical biology of protein phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Tarrant, Mary Katherine; Cole, Philip A

    2009-01-01

    The explosion of scientific interest in protein kinase-mediated signaling networks has led to the infusion of new chemical methods and their applications related to the analysis of phosphorylation pathways. We highlight some of these chemical biology approaches across three areas. First, we discuss the development of chemical tools to modulate the activity of protein kinases to explore kinase mechanisms and their contributions to phosphorylation events and cellular processes. Second, we describe chemical techniques developed in the past few years to dissect the structural and functional effects of phosphate modifications at specific sites in proteins. Third, we cover newly developed molecular imaging approaches to elucidate the spatiotemporal aspects of phosphorylation cascades in live cells. Exciting advances in our understanding of protein phosphorylation have been obtained with these chemical biology approaches, but continuing opportunities for technological innovation remain.

  8. The relationships among bovine αS-casein phosphorylation isoforms suggest different phosphorylation pathways.

    PubMed

    Fang, Z H; Visker, M H P W; Miranda, G; Delacroix-Buchet, A; Bovenhuis, H; Martin, P

    2016-10-01

    Casein (CN) phosphorylation is an important posttranslational modification and is one of the key factors responsible for constructing and stabilizing casein micelles. Variation in phosphorylation degree of αS-CN is of great interest because it is suggested to affect milk technological properties. This study aimed to investigate the variation in phosphorylation degree of αS-CN among milk of individual cows and to explore relationships among different phosphorylation isoforms of αS-CN. For this purpose, we analyzed morning milk samples from 529 French Montbéliarde cows using liquid chromatography coupled with electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. We detected 3 new phosphorylation isoforms: αS2-CN-9P, αS2-CN-14P, and αS2-CN-15P in bovine milk, in addition to the known isoforms αS1-CN-8P, αS1-CN-9P, αS2-CN-10P, αS2-CN-11P, αS2-CN-12P, and αS2-CN-13P. The relative concentrations of each αS-CN phosphorylation isoform varied considerably among individual cows. Furthermore, the phenotypic correlations and hierarchical clustering suggest at least 2 regulatory systems for phosphorylation of αS-CN: one responsible for isoforms with lower levels of phosphorylation (αS1-CN-8P, αS2-CN-10P, and αS2-CN-11P), and another responsible for isoforms with higher levels of phosphorylation (αS1-CN-9P, αS2-CN-12P, αS2-CN-13P, and αS2-CN-14P). Identifying all phosphorylation sites of αS2-CN and investigating the genetic background of different αS2-CN phosphorylation isoforms may provide further insight into the phosphorylation mechanism of caseins.

  9. The relationships among bovine αS-casein phosphorylation isoforms suggest different phosphorylation pathways.

    PubMed

    Fang, Z H; Visker, M H P W; Miranda, G; Delacroix-Buchet, A; Bovenhuis, H; Martin, P

    2016-10-01

    Casein (CN) phosphorylation is an important posttranslational modification and is one of the key factors responsible for constructing and stabilizing casein micelles. Variation in phosphorylation degree of αS-CN is of great interest because it is suggested to affect milk technological properties. This study aimed to investigate the variation in phosphorylation degree of αS-CN among milk of individual cows and to explore relationships among different phosphorylation isoforms of αS-CN. For this purpose, we analyzed morning milk samples from 529 French Montbéliarde cows using liquid chromatography coupled with electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. We detected 3 new phosphorylation isoforms: αS2-CN-9P, αS2-CN-14P, and αS2-CN-15P in bovine milk, in addition to the known isoforms αS1-CN-8P, αS1-CN-9P, αS2-CN-10P, αS2-CN-11P, αS2-CN-12P, and αS2-CN-13P. The relative concentrations of each αS-CN phosphorylation isoform varied considerably among individual cows. Furthermore, the phenotypic correlations and hierarchical clustering suggest at least 2 regulatory systems for phosphorylation of αS-CN: one responsible for isoforms with lower levels of phosphorylation (αS1-CN-8P, αS2-CN-10P, and αS2-CN-11P), and another responsible for isoforms with higher levels of phosphorylation (αS1-CN-9P, αS2-CN-12P, αS2-CN-13P, and αS2-CN-14P). Identifying all phosphorylation sites of αS2-CN and investigating the genetic background of different αS2-CN phosphorylation isoforms may provide further insight into the phosphorylation mechanism of caseins. PMID:27522420

  10. Compartment-Specific Phosphorylation of Squid Neurofilaments.

    PubMed

    Grant, Philip; Pant, Harish C

    2016-01-01

    Studies of the giant axon and synapse of third-order neurons in the squid stellate ganglion have provided a vast literature on neuronal physiology and axon transport. Large neuronal size also lends itself to comparative biochemical studies of cell body versus axon. These have focused on the regulation of synthesis, assembly, posttranslational modification and function of neuronal cytoskeletal proteins (microtubules (MTs) and neurofilaments (NFs)), the predominant proteins in axoplasm. These contribute to axonal organization, stability, transport, and impulse transmission responsible for rapid contractions of mantle muscles underlying jet propulsion. Studies of vertebrate NFs have established an extensive literature on NF structure, organization, and function; studies of squid NFs, however, have made it possible to compare compartment-specific regulation of NF synthesis, assembly, and function in soma versus axoplasm. Since NFs contain over 100 eligible sites for phosphorylation by protein kinases, the compartment-specific patterns of phosphorylation have been a primary focus of biochemical studies. We have learned that NF phosphorylation is tightly compartmentalized; extensive phosphorylation occurs only in the axonal compartment in squid and in vertebrate neurons. This extensive phosphorylation plays a key role in organizing NFs, in association with microtubules (MTs), into a stable, dynamic functional lattice that supports axon growth, diameter, impulse transmission, and synaptic activity. To understand how cytoskeletal phosphorylation is topographically regulated, the kinases and phosphatases, bound to NFs isolated from cell bodies and axoplasm, have also been studied.

  11. Phosphorylation of human skeletal muscle myosin

    SciTech Connect

    Houston, M.E.; Lingley, M.D.; Stuart, D.S.; Hoffman-Goetz, L.

    1986-03-01

    Phosphorylation of the P-light chains (phosphorylatable light chains) in human skeletal muscle myosin was studied in vitro and in vivo under resting an d contracted conditions. biopsy samples from rested vastus lateralis muscle of male and female subjects were incubated in oxygenated physiological solution at 30/sup 0/C. Samples frozen following a quiescent period showed the presence of only unphosphorylated P-light chains designated LC2f (light chain two of fast myosin) CL2s and LC2s'(light chains two of slow myosin). Treatment with caffeine (10 mM) or direct electrical stimulation resulted in the appearance of three additional bands which were identified as the phosphorylated forms of the P-light chains i.e. LC2f-P, LC2s-P and LC2s'-P. The presence of phosphate was confirmed by prior incubation with (/sup 30/P) orthophosphate. Muscle samples rapidly frozen from resting vastus lateralis muscle revealed the presence of unphosphorylated and phosphorylated P-light chains in approximately equal ratios. Muscle samples rapidly frozen following a maximal 10 second isometric contraction showed virtually only phosphorylated fast and slow P-light chains. These results reveal that the P-light chains in human fast and slow myosin may be rapidly phosphorylated, but the basal level of phosphorylation in rested human muscle considerably exceeds that observed in animal muscles studied in vitro or in situ.

  12. Long-term dynamics of multisite phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Rubinstein, Boris Y.; Mattingly, Henry H.; Berezhkovskii, Alexander M.; Shvartsman, Stanislav Y.

    2016-01-01

    Multisite phosphorylation cycles are ubiquitous in cell regulation systems and are studied at multiple levels of complexity, from molecules to organisms, with the ultimate goal of establishing predictive understanding of the effects of genetic and pharmacological perturbations of protein phosphorylation in vivo. Achieving this goal is essentially impossible without mathematical models, which provide a systematic framework for exploring dynamic interactions of multiple network components. Most of the models studied to date do not discriminate between the distinct partially phosphorylated forms and focus on two limiting reaction regimes, distributive and processive, which differ in the number of enzyme–substrate binding events needed for complete phosphorylation or dephosphorylation. Here we use a minimal model of extracellular signal-related kinase regulation to explore the dynamics of a reaction network that includes all essential phosphorylation forms and arbitrary levels of reaction processivity. In addition to bistability, which has been studied extensively in distributive mechanisms, this network can generate periodic oscillations. Both bistability and oscillations can be realized at high levels of reaction processivity. Our work provides a general framework for systematic analysis of dynamics in multisite phosphorylation systems. PMID:27226482

  13. Long-term dynamics of multisite phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Rubinstein, Boris Y; Mattingly, Henry H; Berezhkovskii, Alexander M; Shvartsman, Stanislav Y

    2016-07-15

    Multisite phosphorylation cycles are ubiquitous in cell regulation systems and are studied at multiple levels of complexity, from molecules to organisms, with the ultimate goal of establishing predictive understanding of the effects of genetic and pharmacological perturbations of protein phosphorylation in vivo. Achieving this goal is essentially impossible without mathematical models, which provide a systematic framework for exploring dynamic interactions of multiple network components. Most of the models studied to date do not discriminate between the distinct partially phosphorylated forms and focus on two limiting reaction regimes, distributive and processive, which differ in the number of enzyme-substrate binding events needed for complete phosphorylation or dephosphorylation. Here we use a minimal model of extracellular signal-related kinase regulation to explore the dynamics of a reaction network that includes all essential phosphorylation forms and arbitrary levels of reaction processivity. In addition to bistability, which has been studied extensively in distributive mechanisms, this network can generate periodic oscillations. Both bistability and oscillations can be realized at high levels of reaction processivity. Our work provides a general framework for systematic analysis of dynamics in multisite phosphorylation systems. PMID:27226482

  14. Protein phosphorylation: Localization in regenerating optic axons

    SciTech Connect

    Larrivee, D. )

    1990-09-01

    A number of axonal proteins display changes in phosphorylation during goldfish optic nerve regeneration. (1) To determine whether the phosphorylation of these proteins was closely linked to their synthesis in the retinal ganglion cell body, cycloheximide was injected intraocularly into goldfish whose optic nerves had been regenerating for 3 weeks. Cycloheximide reduced the incorporation of (3H)proline and 32P orthophosphate into total nerve protein by 84% and 46%, respectively. Of the 20 individual proteins examined, 17 contained less than 15% of the (3H)proline label measured in corresponding controls, whereas 18 proteins contained 50% or more of the 32P label, suggesting that phosphorylation was largely independent of synthesis. (2) To determine whether the proteins were phosphorylated in the ganglion cell axons, axonal transport of proteins was blocked by intraocular injection of vincristine. Vincristine reduced (3H)proline labeling of total protein by 88% and 32P labeling by 49%. Among the individual proteins (3H)proline labeling was reduced by 90% or more in 18 cases but 32P labeling was reduced only by 50% or less. (3) When 32P was injected into the cranial cavity near the ends of the optic axons, all of the phosphoproteins were labeled more intensely in the optic tract than in the optic nerve. These results suggest that most of the major phosphoproteins that undergo changes in phosphorylation in the course of regeneration are phosphorylated in the optic axons.

  15. Protein phosphorylation in neurodegeneration: friend or foe?

    PubMed Central

    Tenreiro, Sandra; Eckermann, Katrin; Outeiro, Tiago F.

    2014-01-01

    Protein misfolding and aggregation is a common hallmark in neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's disease (PD), and fronto-temporal dementia (FTD). In these disorders, the misfolding and aggregation of specific proteins occurs alongside neuronal degeneration in somewhat specific brain areas, depending on the disorder and the stage of the disease. However, we still do not fully understand the mechanisms governing protein aggregation, and whether this constitutes a protective or detrimental process. In PD, alpha-synuclein (aSyn) forms protein aggregates, known as Lewy bodies, and is phosphorylated at serine 129. Other residues have also been shown to be phosphorylated, but the significance of phosphorylation in the biology and pathophysiology of the protein is still controversial. In AD and in FTD, hyperphosphorylation of tau protein causes its misfolding and aggregation. Again, our understanding of the precise consequences of tau phosphorylation in the biology and pathophysiology of the protein is still limited. Through the use of a variety of model organisms and technical approaches, we are now gaining stronger insight into the effects of phosphorylation in the behavior of these proteins. In this review, we cover recent findings in the field and discuss how targeting phosphorylation events might be used for therapeutic intervention in these devastating diseases of the nervous system. PMID:24860424

  16. PKA regulates calcineurin function through the phosphorylation of RCAN1: Identification of a novel phosphorylation site

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Seon Sook; Lee, Eun Hye; Lee, Kooyeon; Jo, Su-Hyun; Seo, Su Ryeon

    2015-04-17

    Calcineurin is a calcium/calmodulin-dependent phosphatase that has been implicated in T cell activation through the induction of nuclear factors of activated T cells (NFAT). We have previously suggested that endogenous regulator of calcineurin (RCAN1, also known as DSCR1) is targeted by protein kinase A (PKA) for the control of calcineurin activity. In the present study, we characterized the PKA-mediated phosphorylation site in RCAN1 by mass spectrometric analysis and revealed that PKA directly phosphorylated RCAN1 at the Ser 93. PKA-induced phosphorylation and the increase in the half-life of the RCAN1 protein were prevented by the substitution of Ser 93 with Ala (S93A). Furthermore, the PKA-mediated phosphorylation of RCAN1 at Ser 93 potentiated the inhibition of calcineurin-dependent pro-inflammatory cytokine gene expression by RCAN1. Our results suggest the presence of a novel phosphorylation site in RCAN1 and that its phosphorylation influences calcineurin-dependent inflammatory target gene expression. - Highlights: • We identify novel phosphorylation sites in RCAN1 by LC-MS/MS analysis. • PKA-dependent phosphorylation of RCAN1 at Ser 93 inhibits calcineurin-mediated intracellular signaling. • We show the immunosuppressive function of RCAN1 phosphorylation at Ser 93 in suppressing cytokine expression.

  17. Light-driven Enzymatic Decarboxylation.

    PubMed

    Köninger, Katharina; Grote, Marius; Zachos, Ioannis; Hollmann, Frank; Kourist, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Oxidoreductases belong to the most-applied industrial enzymes. Nevertheless, they need external electrons whose supply is often costly and challenging. Recycling of the electron donors NADH or NADPH requires the use of additional enzymes and sacrificial substrates. Interestingly, several oxidoreductases accept hydrogen peroxide as electron donor. While being inexpensive, this reagent often reduces the stability of enzymes. A solution to this problem is the in situ generation of the cofactor. The continuous supply of the cofactor at low concentration drives the reaction without impairing enzyme stability. This paper demonstrates a method for the light-catalyzed in situ generation of hydrogen peroxide with the example of the heme-dependent fatty acid decarboxylase OleTJE. The fatty acid decarboxylase OleTJE was discovered due to its unique ability to produce long-chain 1-alkenes from fatty acids, a hitherto unknown enzymatic reaction. 1-alkenes are widely used additives for plasticizers and lubricants. OleTJE has been shown to accept electrons from hydrogen peroxide for the oxidative decarboxylation. While addition of hydrogen peroxide damages the enzyme and results in low yields, in situ generation of the cofactor circumvents this problem. The photobiocatalytic system shows clear advantages regarding enzyme activity and yield, resulting in a simple and efficient system for fatty acid decarboxylation.

  18. Light-driven Enzymatic Decarboxylation

    PubMed Central

    Köninger, Katharina; Grote, Marius; Zachos, Ioannis; Hollmann, Frank; Kourist, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Oxidoreductases belong to the most-applied industrial enzymes. Nevertheless, they need external electrons whose supply is often costly and challenging. Recycling of the electron donors NADH or NADPH requires the use of additional enzymes and sacrificial substrates. Interestingly, several oxidoreductases accept hydrogen peroxide as electron donor. While being inexpensive, this reagent often reduces the stability of enzymes. A solution to this problem is the in situ generation of the cofactor. The continuous supply of the cofactor at low concentration drives the reaction without impairing enzyme stability. This paper demonstrates a method for the light-catalyzed in situ generation of hydrogen peroxide with the example of the heme-dependent fatty acid decarboxylase OleTJE. The fatty acid decarboxylase OleTJE was discovered due to its unique ability to produce long-chain 1-alkenes from fatty acids, a hitherto unknown enzymatic reaction. 1-alkenes are widely used additives for plasticizers and lubricants. OleTJE has been shown to accept electrons from hydrogen peroxide for the oxidative decarboxylation. While addition of hydrogen peroxide damages the enzyme and results in low yields, in situ generation of the cofactor circumvents this problem. The photobiocatalytic system shows clear advantages regarding enzyme activity and yield, resulting in a simple and efficient system for fatty acid decarboxylation. PMID:27286035

  19. Enzymatic modification of flaxseed fibers.

    PubMed

    Maijala, Pekka; Mäkinen, Marliina; Galkin, Sari; Fagerstedt, Kurt; Härkäsalmi, Tiina; Viikari, Liisa

    2012-11-01

    Flaxseed (Linum usitatissimum L.) fibers were modified by oxidoreductive and cellulolytic enzymes. The lignin amount and intrinsic plant peroxidase activity was evaluated by histochemical and spectrophotometric assays. Peroxidase activity was not found from bast fibers. The flaxseed fibers were further separated and treated with laccase to conjugate the model compounds, that is, the hydrophobic gallate molecules on fiber surfaces. Laccase was able to slowly oxidize fiber-conjugated phenolics, but no fundamental changes in fiber cell surface structure or notable coupling of the applied hydrophobic gallate molecules onto the fibers occurred, as revealed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The reactivity of the mature fibers was further investigated using cellulolytic enzymes. Cellobiohydrolase (CBH) and endoglucanase (EG)-rich enzyme preparations were applied to reach a hydrolysis degree of 1-6% (of the fiber dry matter) using a standard enzyme dosage. The CBH mixture altered the fiber surface morphology distinctly, and SEM images illustrated fibers in which the cellulose fibrils seemed to be loosened and partially hydrolyzed. In contrast, the effect of the EG-rich preparation without CBH activity was notable on the fiber surface, polishing the surfaces. The cellulolytic treatments were potentially interesting for specific enzymatic modifications of flax fiber surfaces, whereas the approach to use oxidoreductive enzyme treatments on mature linseed fibers offered little potential, obviously due to the low lignin content of the fibers.

  20. Light-driven Enzymatic Decarboxylation.

    PubMed

    Köninger, Katharina; Grote, Marius; Zachos, Ioannis; Hollmann, Frank; Kourist, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Oxidoreductases belong to the most-applied industrial enzymes. Nevertheless, they need external electrons whose supply is often costly and challenging. Recycling of the electron donors NADH or NADPH requires the use of additional enzymes and sacrificial substrates. Interestingly, several oxidoreductases accept hydrogen peroxide as electron donor. While being inexpensive, this reagent often reduces the stability of enzymes. A solution to this problem is the in situ generation of the cofactor. The continuous supply of the cofactor at low concentration drives the reaction without impairing enzyme stability. This paper demonstrates a method for the light-catalyzed in situ generation of hydrogen peroxide with the example of the heme-dependent fatty acid decarboxylase OleTJE. The fatty acid decarboxylase OleTJE was discovered due to its unique ability to produce long-chain 1-alkenes from fatty acids, a hitherto unknown enzymatic reaction. 1-alkenes are widely used additives for plasticizers and lubricants. OleTJE has been shown to accept electrons from hydrogen peroxide for the oxidative decarboxylation. While addition of hydrogen peroxide damages the enzyme and results in low yields, in situ generation of the cofactor circumvents this problem. The photobiocatalytic system shows clear advantages regarding enzyme activity and yield, resulting in a simple and efficient system for fatty acid decarboxylation. PMID:27286035

  1. The identification and analysis of phosphorylation sites on the Atg1 protein kinase

    PubMed Central

    Yeh, Yuh-Ying; Shah, Khyati H; Chou, Chi-Chi; Hsiao, He-Hsuan; Wrasman, Kristie M; Stephan, Joseph S; Stamatakos, Demetra; Khoo, Kay-Hooi

    2011-01-01

    Autophagy is a conserved, degradative process that has been implicated in a number of human diseases and is a potential target for therapeutic intervention. It is therefore important that we develop a thorough understanding of the mechanisms regulating this trafficking pathway. The Atg1 protein kinase is a key element of this control as a number of signaling pathways target this enzyme and its associated protein partners. These studies have established that Atg1 activities are controlled, at least in part, by protein phosphorylation. To further this understanding, we used a combined mass spectrometry and molecular biology approach to identify and characterize additional sites of phosphorylation in the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Atg1. Fifteen candidate sites of phosphorylation were identified, including nine that had not been noted previously. Interestingly, our data suggest that the phosphorylation at one of these sites, Ser-34, is inhibitory for both Atg1 kinase activity and autophagy. This site is located within a glycine-rich loop that is highly conserved in protein kinases. Phosphorylation at this position in several cyclin-dependent kinases has also been shown to result in diminished enzymatic activity. In addition, these studies identified Ser-390 as the site of autophosphorylation responsible for the anomalous migration exhibited by Atg1 on SDS-polyacrylamide gels. Finally, a mutational analysis suggested that a number of the sites identified here are important for full autophagy activity in vivo. In all, these studies identified a number of potential sites of regulation within Atg1 and will serve as a framework for future work with this enzyme. PMID:21460632

  2. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Exotoxin Y Is a Promiscuous Cyclase That Increases Endothelial Tau Phosphorylation and Permeability*

    PubMed Central

    Ochoa, Cristhiaan D.; Alexeyev, Mikhail; Pastukh, Viktoriya; Balczon, Ron; Stevens, Troy

    2012-01-01

    Exotoxin Y (ExoY) is a type III secretion system effector found in ∼ 90% of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates. Although it is known that ExoY causes inter-endothelial gaps and vascular leak, the mechanisms by which this occurs are poorly understood. Using both a bacteria-delivered and a codon-optimized conditionally expressed ExoY, we report that this toxin is a dual soluble adenylyl and guanylyl cyclase that results in intracellular cAMP and cGMP accumulation. The enzymatic activity of ExoY caused phosphorylation of endothelial Tau serine 214, accumulation of insoluble Tau, inter-endothelial cell gap formation, and increased macromolecular permeability. To discern whether the cAMP or cGMP signal was responsible for Tau phosphorylation and barrier disruption, pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells were engineered for the conditional expression of either wild-type guanylyl cyclase, which synthesizes cGMP, or a mutated guanylyl cyclase, which synthesizes cAMP. Sodium nitroprusside stimulation of the cGMP-generating cyclase resulted in transient Tau serine 214 phosphorylation and gap formation, whereas stimulation of the cAMP-generating cyclase induced a robust increase in Tau serine 214 phosphorylation, gap formation, and macromolecular permeability. These results indicate that the cAMP signal is the dominant stimulus for Tau phosphorylation. Hence, ExoY is a promiscuous cyclase and edema factor that uses cAMP and, to some extent, cGMP to induce the hyperphosphorylation and insolubility of endothelial Tau. Because hyperphosphorylated and insoluble Tau are hallmarks in neurodegenerative tauopathies such as Alzheimer disease, acute Pseudomonas infections cause a pathophysiological sequela in endothelium previously recognized only in chronic neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:22637478

  3. The negative impact of α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complex deficiency on matrix substrate-level phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Kiss, Gergely; Konrad, Csaba; Doczi, Judit; Starkov, Anatoly A.; Kawamata, Hibiki; Manfredi, Giovanni; Zhang, Steven F.; Gibson, Gary E.; Beal, M. Flint; Adam-Vizi, Vera; Chinopoulos, Christos

    2013-01-01

    A decline in α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complex (KGDHC) activity has been associated with neurodegeneration. Provision of succinyl-CoA by KGDHC is essential for generation of matrix ATP (or GTP) by substrate-level phosphorylation catalyzed by succinyl-CoA ligase. Here, we demonstrate ATP consumption in respiration-impaired isolated and in situ neuronal somal mitochondria from transgenic mice with a deficiency of either dihydrolipoyl succinyltransferase (DLST) or dihydrolipoyl dehydrogenase (DLD) that exhibit a 20–48% decrease in KGDHC activity. Import of ATP into the mitochondrial matrix of transgenic mice was attributed to a shift in the reversal potential of the adenine nucleotide translocase toward more negative values due to diminished matrix substrate-level phosphorylation, which causes the translocase to reverse prematurely. Immunoreactivity of all three subunits of succinyl-CoA ligase and maximal enzymatic activity were unaffected in transgenic mice as compared to wild-type littermates. Therefore, decreased matrix substrate-level phosphorylation was due to diminished provision of succinyl-CoA. These results were corroborated further by the finding that mitochondria from wild-type mice respiring on substrates supporting substrate-level phosphorylation exhibited ∼30% higher ADP-ATP exchange rates compared to those obtained from DLST+/− or DLD+/− littermates. We propose that KGDHC-associated pathologies are a consequence of the inability of respiration-impaired mitochondria to rely on “in-house” mitochondrial ATP reserves.—Kiss, G., Konrad, C., Doczi, J., Starkov, A. A., Kawamata, H., Manfredi, G., Zhang, S. F., Gibson, G. E., Beal, M. F., Adam-Vizi, V., Chinopoulos, C. The negative impact of α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complex deficiency on matrix substrate-level phosphorylation. PMID:23475850

  4. Phosphoproteomic analysis of Methanohalophilus portucalensis FDF1T identified the role of protein phosphorylation in methanogenesis and osmoregulation

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Wan-Ling; Lai, Shu-Jung; Yang, Jhih-Tian; Chern, Jeffy; Liang, Suh-Yuen; Chou, Chi-Chi; Kuo, Chih-Horng; Lai, Mei-Chin; Wu, Shih-Hsiung

    2016-01-01

    Methanogens have gained much attention for their metabolic product, methane, which could be an energy substitute but also contributes to the greenhouse effect. One factor that controls methane emission, reversible protein phosphorylation, is a crucial signaling switch, and phosphoproteomics has become a powerful tool for large-scale surveying. Here, we conducted the first phosphorylation-mediated regulation study in halophilic Methanohalophilus portucalensis FDF1T, a model strain for studying stress response mechanisms in osmoadaptation. A shotgun approach and MS-based analysis identified 149 unique phosphoproteins. Among them, 26% participated in methanogenesis and osmolytes biosynthesis pathways. Of note, we uncovered that protein phosphorylation might be a crucial factor to modulate the pyrrolysine (Pyl) incorporation and Pyl-mediated methylotrophic methanogenesis. Furthermore, heterologous expression of glycine sarcosine N-methyltransferase (GSMT) mutant derivatives in the osmosensitive Escherichia coli MKH13 revealed that the nonphosphorylated T68A mutant resulted in increased salt tolerance. In contrast, mimic phosphorylated mutant T68D proved defective in both enzymatic activity and salinity tolerance for growth. Our study provides new insights into phosphorylation modification as a crucial role of both methanogenesis and osmoadaptation in methanoarchaea, promoting biogas production or reducing future methane emission in response to global warming and climate change. PMID:27357474

  5. The condensing activities of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis type II fatty acid synthase are differentially regulated by phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Molle, Virginie; Brown, Alistair K; Besra, Gurdyal S; Cozzone, Alain J; Kremer, Laurent

    2006-10-01

    Phosphorylation of proteins by Ser/Thr protein kinases (STPKs) has recently become of major physiological importance because of its possible involvement in virulence of bacterial pathogens. Although Mycobacterium tuberculosis has eleven STPKs, the nature and function of the substrates of these enzymes remain largely unknown. In this work, we have identified for the first time STPK substrates in M. tuberculosis forming part of the type II fatty acid synthase (FAS-II) system involved in mycolic acid biosynthesis: the malonyl-CoA::AcpM transacylase mtFabD, and the beta-ketoacyl AcpM synthases KasA and KasB. All three enzymes were phosphorylated in vitro by different kinases, suggesting a complex network of interactions between STPKs and these substrates. In addition, both KasA and KasB were efficiently phosphorylated in M. bovis BCG each at different sites and could be dephosphorylated by the M. tuberculosis Ser/Thr phosphatase PstP. Enzymatic studies revealed that, whereas phosphorylation decreases the activity of KasA in the elongation process of long chain fatty acids synthesis, this modification enhances that of KasB. Such a differential effect of phosphorylation may represent an unusual mechanism of FAS-II system regulation, allowing pathogenic mycobacteria to produce full-length mycolates, which are required for adaptation and intracellular survival in macrophages. PMID:16873379

  6. Phosphoproteomic analysis of Methanohalophilus portucalensis FDF1(T) identified the role of protein phosphorylation in methanogenesis and osmoregulation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wan-Ling; Lai, Shu-Jung; Yang, Jhih-Tian; Chern, Jeffy; Liang, Suh-Yuen; Chou, Chi-Chi; Kuo, Chih-Horng; Lai, Mei-Chin; Wu, Shih-Hsiung

    2016-01-01

    Methanogens have gained much attention for their metabolic product, methane, which could be an energy substitute but also contributes to the greenhouse effect. One factor that controls methane emission, reversible protein phosphorylation, is a crucial signaling switch, and phosphoproteomics has become a powerful tool for large-scale surveying. Here, we conducted the first phosphorylation-mediated regulation study in halophilic Methanohalophilus portucalensis FDF1(T), a model strain for studying stress response mechanisms in osmoadaptation. A shotgun approach and MS-based analysis identified 149 unique phosphoproteins. Among them, 26% participated in methanogenesis and osmolytes biosynthesis pathways. Of note, we uncovered that protein phosphorylation might be a crucial factor to modulate the pyrrolysine (Pyl) incorporation and Pyl-mediated methylotrophic methanogenesis. Furthermore, heterologous expression of glycine sarcosine N-methyltransferase (GSMT) mutant derivatives in the osmosensitive Escherichia coli MKH13 revealed that the nonphosphorylated T68A mutant resulted in increased salt tolerance. In contrast, mimic phosphorylated mutant T68D proved defective in both enzymatic activity and salinity tolerance for growth. Our study provides new insights into phosphorylation modification as a crucial role of both methanogenesis and osmoadaptation in methanoarchaea, promoting biogas production or reducing future methane emission in response to global warming and climate change. PMID:27357474

  7. IMPORTANCE OF ENZYMATIC BIOTRANSFORMATION IN IMMUNOTOXICOLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Many immunotoxic compounds, such as benzene and other organic solvents, pesticides, mycotoxins and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, can alter immune function only after undergoing enzyme-mediated reactions within various tissues. In the review that follows, the role of enzymatic...

  8. Chemo-Enzymatic Synthesis of Oligoglycerol Derivatives.

    PubMed

    Singh, Abhishek K; Nguyen, Remi; Galy, Nicolas; Haag, Rainer; Sharma, Sunil K; Len, Christophe

    2016-08-09

    A cleaner and greener method has been developed and used to synthesize 14 different functionalized oligomer derivatives of glycerol in moderate 29%-39% yields over three steps. After successive regioselective enzymatic acylation of the primary hydroxyl groups, etherification or esterification of the secondary hydroxyl groups and chemoselective enzymatic saponification, the target compounds can efficiently be used as versatile building blocks in organic and supramolecular chemistry.

  9. Chemo-Enzymatic Synthesis of Oligoglycerol Derivatives.

    PubMed

    Singh, Abhishek K; Nguyen, Remi; Galy, Nicolas; Haag, Rainer; Sharma, Sunil K; Len, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    A cleaner and greener method has been developed and used to synthesize 14 different functionalized oligomer derivatives of glycerol in moderate 29%-39% yields over three steps. After successive regioselective enzymatic acylation of the primary hydroxyl groups, etherification or esterification of the secondary hydroxyl groups and chemoselective enzymatic saponification, the target compounds can efficiently be used as versatile building blocks in organic and supramolecular chemistry. PMID:27517886

  10. Isotope Effects on the Enzymatic and Non-Enzymatic Reactions of Chorismate

    PubMed Central

    Wright, S. Kirk; DeClue, Michael S.; Mandal, Ajay; Lee, Lac; Wiest, Olaf; Cleland, W. Wallace; Hilvert, Donald

    2008-01-01

    The important biosynthetic intermediate chorismate reacts thermally by two competitive pathways, one leading to 4-hydroxybenzoate via elimination of the enolpyruvyl side chain, and the other to prephenate by a facile Claisen rearrangement. Measurements with isotopically labeled chorismate derivatives indicate that both are concerted sigmatropic processes, controlled by the orientation of the enolpyruvyl group. In the elimination reaction of [4-2H]chorismate, roughly 60% of the label was found in pyruvate after 3 h at 60 °C. Moreover, a 1.846±0.057 2H isotope effect for the transferred hydrogen atom and a 1.0374±0.0005 18O isotope effect for the ether oxygen show that the transition state for this process is highly asymmetric, with hydrogen atom transfer from C4 to C9 significantly less advanced than C—O bond cleavage. In the competing Claisen rearrangement, a very large 18O isotope effect at the bond-breaking position (1.0482±0.0005) and a smaller 13C isotope effect at the bond-making position (1.0118±0.0004) were determined. Isotope effects of similar magnitude characterized the transformations catalyzed by evolutionarily unrelated chorismate mutases from Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis. The enzymatic reactions, like their solution counterpart, are thus concerted [3,3]-sigmatropic processes in which C—C bond formation lags behind C—O bond cleavage. However, as substantially larger 18O and smaller 13C isotope effects were observed for a mutant enzyme in which chemistry is fully rate determining, the ionic active site may favor a somewhat more polarized transition state than that seen in solution. PMID:16159290

  11. Visualizing an ultra-weak protein-protein interaction in phosphorylation signaling.

    PubMed

    Xing, Qiong; Huang, Peng; Yang, Ju; Sun, Jian-Qiang; Gong, Zhou; Dong, Xu; Guo, Da-Chuan; Chen, Shao-Min; Yang, Yu-Hong; Wang, Yan; Yang, Ming-Hui; Yi, Ming; Ding, Yi-Ming; Liu, Mai-Li; Zhang, Wei-Ping; Tang, Chun

    2014-10-20

    Proteins interact with each other to fulfill their functions. The importance of weak protein-protein interactions has been increasingly recognized. However, owing to technical difficulties, ultra-weak interactions remain to be characterized. Phosphorylation can take place via a K(D)≈25 mM interaction between two bacterial enzymes. Using paramagnetic NMR spectroscopy and with the introduction of a novel Gd(III)-based probe, we determined the structure of the resulting complex to atomic resolution. The structure accounts for the mechanism of phosphoryl transfer between the two enzymes and demonstrates the physical basis for their ultra-weak interaction. Further, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations suggest that the complex has a lifetime in the micro- to millisecond regimen. Hence such interaction is termed a fleeting interaction. From mathematical modeling, we propose that an ultra-weak fleeting interaction enables rapid flux of phosphoryl signal, providing a high effective protein concentration.

  12. Systematic Discovery of In Vivo Phosphorylation Networks

    PubMed Central

    Linding, Rune; Jensen, Lars Juhl; Ostheimer, Gerard J.; van Vugt, Marcel A.T.M.; Jørgensen, Claus; Miron, Ioana M.; Diella, Francesca; Colwill, Karen; Taylor, Lorne; Elder, Kelly; Metalnikov, Pavel; Nguyen, Vivian; Pasculescu, Adrian; Jin, Jing; Park, Jin Gyoon; Samson, Leona D.; Woodgett, James R.; Russell, Robert B.; Bork, Peer; Yaffe, Michael B.; Pawson, Tony

    2009-01-01

    Summary Protein kinases control cellular decision processes by phosphorylating specific substrates. Proteome-wide mapping has identified thousands of in vivo phosphorylation sites. However, systematically resolving which kinase targets each site is presently infeasible, due to the limited specificity of consensus motifs and the potential influence of contextual factors, such as protein scaffolds, localisation and expression, on cellular substrate specificity. We have therefore developed a computational method, NetworKIN, that augments motifs with context for kinases and phosphoproteins. This can pinpoint individual kinases responsible for specific in vivo phosphorylation events and yields a 2.5-fold improvement in the accuracy with which phosphorylation networks can be constructed. We show that context provides 60–80% of the computational capability to assign in vivo substrate specificity. Applying this approach to a DNA damage signalling network, we extend its cell-cycle regulation by showing that 53BP1 is a CDK1 substrate, show that Rad50 is phosphorylated by ATM kinase under genotoxic stress, and suggest novel roles of ATM in apoptosis. Finally, we present a scalable strategy to validate our predictions and use it to support the prediction that BCLAF1 is a GSK3 substrate. PMID:17570479

  13. Motor Domain Phosphorylation Modulates Kinesin-1 Transport*

    PubMed Central

    DeBerg, Hannah A.; Blehm, Benjamin H.; Sheung, Janet; Thompson, Andrew R.; Bookwalter, Carol S.; Torabi, Seyed F.; Schroer, Trina A.; Berger, Christopher L.; Lu, Yi; Trybus, Kathleen M.; Selvin, Paul R.

    2013-01-01

    Disruptions in microtubule motor transport are associated with a variety of neurodegenerative diseases. Post-translational modification of the cargo-binding domain of the light and heavy chains of kinesin has been shown to regulate transport, but less is known about how modifications of the motor domain affect transport. Here we report on the effects of phosphorylation of a mammalian kinesin motor domain by the kinase JNK3 at a conserved serine residue (Ser-175 in the B isoform and Ser-176 in the A and C isoforms). Phosphorylation of this residue has been implicated in Huntington disease, but the mechanism by which Ser-175 phosphorylation affects transport is unclear. The ATPase, microtubule-binding affinity, and processivity are unchanged between a phosphomimetic S175D and a nonphosphorylatable S175A construct. However, we find that application of force differentiates between the two. Placement of negative charge at Ser-175, through phosphorylation or mutation, leads to a lower stall force and decreased velocity under a load of 1 piconewton or greater. Sedimentation velocity experiments also show that addition of a negative charge at Ser-175 favors the autoinhibited conformation of kinesin. These observations imply that when cargo is transported by both dynein and phosphorylated kinesin, a common occurrence in the cell, there may be a bias that favors motion toward the minus-end of microtubules. Such bias could be used to tune transport in healthy cells when properly regulated but contribute to a disease state when misregulated. PMID:24072715

  14. Protein phosphorylation systems in postmortem human brain

    SciTech Connect

    Walaas, S.I.; Perdahl-Wallace, E.; Winblad, B.; Greengard, P. )

    1989-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation systems regulated by cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cyclic AMP), or calcium in conjunction with calmodulin or phospholipid/diacylglycerol, have been studied by phosphorylation in vitro of particulate and soluble fractions from human postmortem brain samples. One-dimensional or two-dimensional gel electrophoretic protein separations were used for analysis. Protein phosphorylation catalyzed by cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase was found to be highly active in both particulate and soluble preparations throughout the human CNS, with groups of both widely distributed and region-specific substrates being observed in different brain nuclei. Dopamine-innervated parts of the basal ganglia and cerebral cortex contained the phosphoproteins previously observed in rodent basal ganglia. In contrast, calcium/phospholipid-dependent and calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein phosphorylation systems were less prominent in human postmortem brain than in rodent brain, and only a few widely distributed substrates for these protein kinases were found. Protein staining indicated that postmortem proteolysis, particularly of high-molecular-mass proteins, was prominent in deeply located, subcortical regions in the human brain. Our results indicate that it is feasible to use human postmortem brain samples, when obtained under carefully controlled conditions, for qualitative studies on brain protein phosphorylation. Such studies should be of value in studies on human neurological and/or psychiatric disorders.

  15. Phosphorylation regulates myo-inositol-3-phosphate synthase: a novel regulatory mechanism of inositol biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Deranieh, Rania M; He, Quan; Caruso, Joseph A; Greenberg, Miriam L

    2013-09-13

    myo-Inositol-3-phosphate synthase (MIPS) plays a crucial role in inositol homeostasis. Transcription of the coding gene INO1 is highly regulated. However, regulation of the enzyme is not well defined. We previously showed that MIPS is indirectly inhibited by valproate, suggesting that the enzyme is post-translationally regulated. Using (32)Pi labeling and phosphoamino acid analysis, we show that yeast MIPS is a phosphoprotein. Mass spectrometry analysis identified five phosphosites, three of which are conserved in the human MIPS. Analysis of phosphorylation-deficient and phosphomimetic site mutants indicated that the three conserved sites in yeast (Ser-184, Ser-296, and Ser-374) and humans (Ser-177, Ser-279, and Ser-357) affect MIPS activity. Both S296A and S296D yeast mutants and S177A and S177D human mutants exhibited decreased enzymatic activity, suggesting that a serine residue is critical at that location. The phosphomimetic mutations S184D (human S279D) and S374D (human S357D) but not the phosphodeficient mutations decreased activity, suggesting that phosphorylation of these two sites is inhibitory. The double mutation S184A/S374A caused an increase in MIPS activity, conferred a growth advantage, and partially rescued sensitivity to valproate. Our findings identify a novel mechanism of regulation of inositol synthesis by phosphorylation of MIPS.

  16. Phosphorylation mediates the nuclear targeting of the maize Rab17 protein.

    PubMed

    Jensen, A B; Goday, A; Figueras, M; Jessop, A C; Pagès, M

    1998-03-01

    The maize abscisic acid-responsive Rab17 protein localizes to the nucleus and cytoplasm in maize cells. In-frame fusion of Rab17 to the reporter protein beta-glucuronidase (GUS) directed GUS to the nucleus and cytoplasm in transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana and in transiently transformed onion cells. Analysis of chimeric constructs identified one region between amino acid positions 66-96, which was necessary for targeting GUS to the nucleus. This region contains a serine cluster followed by a putative consensus site for protein kinase CK2 phosphorylation, and a stretch of basic amino acids resembling the simian virus 40 large T antigen-type nuclear localization signal (NLS). Mutation of two basic amino acids in the putative NLS had a weak effect on nuclear targeting in the onion cell system and did not modify the percentage of nuclear fusion protein in the Arabidopsis cells. The mutation of three amino acids in the consensus site for CK2 recognition resulted in the absence of in vitro phosphorylated forms of Rab17 and in a strong decrease of GUS enzymatic activity in isolated nuclei of transgenic Arabidopsis. These results suggest that phosphorylation of Rab17 by protein kinase CK2 is the relevant step for its nuclear location, either by facilitating binding to specific proteins or as a direct part of the nuclear targeting apparatus. PMID:9681011

  17. Multi-parametric MRI characterization of enzymatically degraded articular cartilage.

    PubMed

    Nissi, Mikko J; Salo, Elli-Noora; Tiitu, Virpi; Liimatainen, Timo; Michaeli, Shalom; Mangia, Silvia; Ellermann, Jutta; Nieminen, Miika T

    2016-07-01

    Several laboratory and rotating frame quantitative MRI parameters were evaluated and compared for detection of changes in articular cartilage following selective enzymatic digestion. Bovine osteochondral specimens were subjected to 44 h incubation in control medium or in collagenase or chondroitinase ABC to induce superficial collagen or proteoglycan (glycosaminoglycan) alterations. The samples were scanned at 9.4 T for T1 , T1 Gd (dGEMRIC), T2 , adiabatic T1 ρ , adiabatic T2 ρ , continuous-wave T1 ρ , TRAFF2 , and T1 sat relaxation times and for magnetization transfer ratio (MTR). For reference, glycosaminoglycan content, collagen fibril orientation and biomechanical properties were determined. Changes primarily in the superficial cartilage were noted after enzymatic degradation. Most of the studied parameters were sensitive to the destruction of collagen network, whereas glycosaminoglycan depletion was detected only by native T1 and T1 Gd relaxation time constants throughout the tissue and by MTR superficially. T1 , adiabatic T1 ρ , adiabatic T2 ρ , continuous-wave T1 ρ , and T1 sat correlated significantly with the biomechanical properties while T1 Gd correlated with glycosaminoglycan staining. The findings indicated that most of the studied MRI parameters were sensitive to both glycosaminoglycan content and collagen network integrity, with changes due to enzymatic treatment detected primarily in the superficial tissue. Strong correlation of T1 , adiabatic T1ρ , adiabatic T2 ρ , continuous-wave T1 ρ , and T1 sat with the altered biomechanical properties, reflects that these parameters were sensitive to critical functional properties of cartilage. © 2015 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 34:1111-1120, 2016. PMID:26662555

  18. Phosphorylation state-dependent interaction between AKAP7δ/γ and phospholamban increases phospholamban phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Rigatti, Marc; Le, Andrew V.; Gerber, Claire; Moraru, Ion I.; Dodge-Kafka, Kimberly L.

    2016-01-01

    Changes in heart rate and contractility in response to sympathetic stimulation occur via activation of cAMP dependent protein kinase A (PKA), leading to phosphorylation of numerous substrates that alter Ca2+ cycling. Phosphorylation of these substrates is coordinated by A-kinase anchoring proteins (AKAPs), which recruit PKA to specific substrates [1]. Phosphorylation of the PKA substrate phospholamban (PLB) is a critical determinant of Ca2+ re-entry into the sarcoplasmic reticulum and is coordinated by AKAP7δ/γ [2,3]. Here, we further these findings by showing that phosphorylation of PLB requires interaction with AKAP7δ/γ and that this interaction occurs only when PLB is unphosphorylated. Additionally, we find that two mutants of PLB (R9C and Δ14), which are associated with dilated cardiomyopathy in humans, prevent association with AKAP7δ/γ and display reduced phosphorylation in vitro. This finding implicates the AKAP7δ/γ-PLB interaction in the pathology of the disease phenotype. Further exploration of the AKAP7δ/γ-PLB association demonstrated a phosphorylation state-dependence of the interaction. Computational modeling revealed that this mode of interaction allows for small amounts of AKAP and PKA (100–200nM) to regulate the phosphorylation of large quantities of PLB (50µM). Our results confirm that AKAP7γ/δ binding to PLB is important for phosphorylation of PLB, and describe a novel phosphorylation state-dependent binding mechanism that explains how phosphorylation of highly abundant PKA substrates can be regulated by AKAPs present at ~100–200 fold lower concentrations. PMID:26027516

  19. Phosphorylation of RACK1 in plants

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Jay -Gui

    2015-08-31

    Receptor for Activated C Kinase 1 (RACK1) is a versatile scaffold protein that interacts with a large, diverse group of proteins to regulate various signaling cascades. RACK1 has been shown to regulate hormonal signaling, stress responses and multiple processes of growth and development in plants. However, little is known about the molecular mechanism underlying these regulations. Recently, it has been demonstrated that Arabidopsis RACK1 is phosphorylated by an atypical serine/threonine protein kinase, WITH NO LYSINE 8 (WNK8). Furthermore, RACK1 phosphorylation by WNK8 negatively regulates RACK1 function by influencing its protein stability. In conclusion, these findings promote a new regulatory system in which the action of RACK1 is controlled by phosphorylation and subsequent protein degradation.

  20. Phosphorylation of RACK1 in plants

    DOE PAGES

    Chen, Jay -Gui

    2015-08-31

    Receptor for Activated C Kinase 1 (RACK1) is a versatile scaffold protein that interacts with a large, diverse group of proteins to regulate various signaling cascades. RACK1 has been shown to regulate hormonal signaling, stress responses and multiple processes of growth and development in plants. However, little is known about the molecular mechanism underlying these regulations. Recently, it has been demonstrated that Arabidopsis RACK1 is phosphorylated by an atypical serine/threonine protein kinase, WITH NO LYSINE 8 (WNK8). Furthermore, RACK1 phosphorylation by WNK8 negatively regulates RACK1 function by influencing its protein stability. In conclusion, these findings promote a new regulatory systemmore » in which the action of RACK1 is controlled by phosphorylation and subsequent protein degradation.« less

  1. Src kinase regulation by phosphorylation and dephosphorylation

    SciTech Connect

    Roskoski, Robert . E-mail: biocrr@lsuhsc.edu

    2005-05-27

    Src and Src-family protein-tyrosine kinases are regulatory proteins that play key roles in cell differentiation, motility, proliferation, and survival. The initially described phosphorylation sites of Src include an activating phosphotyrosine 416 that results from autophosphorylation, and an inhibiting phosphotyrosine 527 that results from phosphorylation by C-terminal Src kinase (Csk) and Csk homologous kinase. Dephosphorylation of phosphotyrosine 527 increases Src kinase activity. Candidate phosphotyrosine 527 phosphatases include cytoplasmic PTP1B, Shp1 and Shp2, and transmembrane enzymes include CD45, PTP{alpha}, PTP{epsilon}, and PTP{lambda}. Dephosphorylation of phosphotyrosine 416 decreases Src kinase activity. Thus far PTP-BL, the mouse homologue of human PTP-BAS, has been shown to dephosphorylate phosphotyrosine 416 in a regulatory fashion. The platelet-derived growth factor receptor protein-tyrosine kinase mediates the phosphorylation of Src Tyr138; this phosphorylation has no direct effect on Src kinase activity. The platelet-derived growth factor receptor and the ErbB2/HER2 growth factor receptor protein-tyrosine kinases mediate the phosphorylation of Src Tyr213 and activation of Src kinase activity. Src kinase is also a substrate for protein-serine/threonine kinases including protein kinase C (Ser12), protein kinase A (Ser17), and CDK1/cdc2 (Thr34, Thr46, and Ser72). Of the three protein-serine/threonine kinases, only phosphorylation by CDK1/cdc2 has been demonstrated to increase Src kinase activity. Although considerable information on the phosphoprotein phosphatases that catalyze the hydrolysis of Src phosphotyrosine 527 is at hand, the nature of the phosphatases that mediate the hydrolysis of phosphotyrosine 138 and 213, and phosphoserine and phosphothreonine residues has not been determined.

  2. Phosphorylation and actin activation of brain myosin.

    PubMed Central

    Barylko, B; Sobieszek, A

    1983-01-01

    A method is described for obtaining brain myosin that shows significant actin activation, after phosphorylation with chicken gizzard myosin light chain kinase. Myosin with this activity could be obtained only via the initial purification of brain actomyosin. The latter complex, isolated by a method similar to that used for smooth muscle, contained actin, myosin, tropomyosin of the non-muscle type and another actin-binding protein of approximately 100,000 daltons. From the presence of a specific myosin light chain kinase and phosphatase in brain tissue it is suggested that the regulation of actin-myosin interaction operates via phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of myosin. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 3. PMID:11894951

  3. Presence of glycerol masks the effects of phosphorylation on the catalytic efficiency of cytosolic phospholipase A2.

    PubMed

    Burke, J R; Guenther, M G; Witmer, M R; Tredup, J A; Hail, M E; Micanovic, R; Villafranca, J J

    1997-05-01

    Cytosolic phospholipase A2 catalyzes the selective release of arachidonic acid from the sn-2 position of phospholipids and is believed to play a key cellular role in the generation of arachidonic acid. The enzymatic activity of cPLA2 is affected by several mechanisms, including substrate presentation and the phosphorylation state of the enzyme. Using covesicles of 1-palmitoy1-2-arachidonoyl-[arachidonoyl-1-14C]-8n-glycero-3 -phosphocholine and 1,2-dimyristoyl-phosphatidylmethanol as substrate, the effects of phosphorylation on the interfacial binding and catalytic constants were investigated. Phosphorylated and dephosphorylated enzyme forms were shown to have identical values of 2.6 microM for KMapp, an equilibrium dissociation constant which consists of the intrinsic dissociation constant from the lipid/water interface (Ks) and the dissociation constant for phospholipid from the active site (KM*). Moreover, the values of KM* for phosphorylated and dephosphorylated enzyme did not differ significantly (0.4 +/- 0.1 and 0.2 +/- 0.1, respectively). However, dephosphorylation of the enzyme reduced the value of kcat by 39%. The phosphorylation state of the enzyme had no effect on either the cooperativity shown by this enzyme or the thermal stability of the enzyme. Surprisingly, the presence of glycerol (4 M) masks the effect of phosphorylation on kcat. Instead, glycerol increased the value of kcat by 440% for the phosphorylated enzyme and by 760% for the dephosphorylated form. Moreover, addition of glycerol had only small effects on KMapp. the increase in the kcat upon addition of glycerol results from a substantial decrease in the activation energy from 29.4 to 14.8 kcal. mol-1. To determine whether the effects of phosphorylation of the enzyme or addition of glycerol are unique to this artificial substrate, membranes from U937 cells were isolated and used as substrate. With these membranes, the dephosphorylated enzyme was only 21% less active than the phosphorylated

  4. Review: Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Cellulosic Biomass

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Bin; Dai, Ziyu; Ding, Shi-You; Wyman, Charles E.

    2011-07-16

    Biological conversion of cellulosic biomass to fuels and chemicals offers the high yields to products vital to economic success and the potential for very low costs. Enzymatic hydrolysis that converts lignocellulosic biomass to fermentable sugars may be the most complex step in this process due to substrate-related and enzyme-related effects and their interactions. Although enzymatic hydrolysis offers the potential for higher yields, higher selectivity, lower energy costs, and milder operating conditions than chemical processes, the mechanism of enzymatic hydrolysis and the relationship between the substrate structure and function of various glycosyl hydrolase components are not well understood. Consequently, limited success has been realized in maximizing sugar yields at very low cost. This review highlights literature on the impact of key substrate and enzyme features that influence performance to better understand fundamental strategies to advance enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulosic biomass for biological conversion to fuels and chemicals. Topics are summarized from a practical point of view including characteristics of cellulose (e.g., crystallinity, degree of polymerization, and accessible surface area) and soluble and insoluble biomass components (e.g., oligomeric xylan, lignin, etc.) released in pretreatment, and their effects on the effectiveness of enzymatic hydrolysis. We further discuss the diversity, stability, and activity of individual enzymes and their synergistic effects in deconstructing complex lignocellulosic biomass. Advanced technologies to discover and characterize novel enzymes and to improve enzyme characteristics by mutagenesis, post-translational modification, and over-expression of selected enzymes and modifications in lignocellulosic biomass are also discussed.

  5. Structural Perspective on Enzymatic Halogenation

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Simple halogen substituents frequently afford key structural features that account for the potency and selectivity of natural products, including antibiotics and hormones. For example, when a single chlorine atom on the antibiotic vancomycin is replaced by hydrogen, the resulting antibacterial activity decreases by up to 70% (HarrisC. M.; KannanR.; KopeckaH.; HarrisT. M.J. Am. Chem. Soc.1985, 107, 6652−6658). This Account analyzes how structure underlies mechanism in halogenases, the molecular machines designed by nature to incorporate halogens into diverse substrates. Traditional synthetic methods of integrating halogens into complex molecules are often complicated by a lack of specificity and regioselectivity. Nature, however, has developed a variety of elegant mechanisms for halogenating specific substrates with both regio- and stereoselectivity. An improved understanding of the biological routes toward halogenation could lead to the development of novel synthetic methods for the creation of new compounds with enhanced functions. Already, researchers have co-opted a fluorinase from the microorganism Streptomyces cattleya to produce 18F-labeled molecules for use in positron emission tomography (PET) (DengH.; CobbS. L.; GeeA. D.; LockhartA.; MartarelloL.; McGlincheyR. P.; O’HaganD.; OnegaM.Chem. Commun.2006, 652−654). Therefore, the discovery and characterization of naturally occurring enzymatic halogenation mechanisms has become an active area of research. The catalogue of known halogenating enzymes has expanded from the familiar haloperoxidases to include oxygen-dependent enzymes and fluorinases. Recently, the discovery of a nucleophilic halogenase that catalyzes chlorinations has expanded the repertoire of biological halogenation chemistry (DongC.; HuangF.; DengH.; SchaffrathC.; SpencerJ. B.; O’HaganD.; NaismithJ. H.Nature2004, 427, 561−56514765200). Structural characterization has provided a basis toward a mechanistic understanding of the specificity

  6. Enzymatic aerobic ring rearrangement of optically active furylcarbinols.

    PubMed

    Thiel, Daniel; Doknić, Diana; Deska, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Biogenic furans are currently discussed as highly attractive alternative feedstock in a post-fossil society; thus, also the creation of sustainable furan valorization pathways appears of great importance. Here an artificial Achmatowicz monooxygenase activity for the aerobic ring expansion of furans is achieved by the combination of commercial glucose oxidase as oxygen-activating biocatalyst and wild-type chloroperoxidase as oxygen-transfer mediator, providing a biological ready-to-use solution for this truly synthetic furan rearrangement. In concert with enzymatic transformations for the enantioselective preparation of optically active furylcarbinols, purely biocatalytic reaction cascades for the stereocontrolled construction of complex pyranones are obtained, exhibiting high functional group tolerance even to oxidation-sensitive moieties. PMID:25335580

  7. Radical-Mediated Enzymatic Polymerizations.

    PubMed

    Zavada, Scott R; Battsengel, Tsatsral; Scott, Timothy F

    2016-01-01

    Polymerization reactions are commonly effected by exposing monomer formulations to some initiation stimulus such as elevated temperature, light, or a chemical reactant. Increasingly, these polymerization reactions are mediated by enzymes--catalytic proteins--owing to their reaction efficiency under mild conditions as well as their environmental friendliness. The utilization of enzymes, particularly oxidases and peroxidases, for generating radicals via reduction-oxidation mechanisms is especially common for initiating radical-mediated polymerization reactions, including vinyl chain-growth polymerization, atom transfer radical polymerization, thiol-ene step-growth polymerization, and polymerization via oxidative coupling. While enzyme-mediated polymerization is useful for the production of materials intended for subsequent use, it is especially well-suited for in situ polymerizations, where the polymer is formed in the place where it will be utilized. Such polymerizations are especially useful for biomedical adhesives and for sensing applications. PMID:26848652

  8. Radical-Mediated Enzymatic Polymerizations

    PubMed Central

    Zavada, Scott R.; Battsengel, Tsatsral; Scott, Timothy F.

    2016-01-01

    Polymerization reactions are commonly effected by exposing monomer formulations to some initiation stimulus such as elevated temperature, light, or a chemical reactant. Increasingly, these polymerization reactions are mediated by enzymes―catalytic proteins―owing to their reaction efficiency under mild conditions as well as their environmental friendliness. The utilization of enzymes, particularly oxidases and peroxidases, for generating radicals via reduction-oxidation mechanisms is especially common for initiating radical-mediated polymerization reactions, including vinyl chain-growth polymerization, atom transfer radical polymerization, thiol–ene step-growth polymerization, and polymerization via oxidative coupling. While enzyme-mediated polymerization is useful for the production of materials intended for subsequent use, it is especially well-suited for in situ polymerizations, where the polymer is formed in the place where it will be utilized. Such polymerizations are especially useful for biomedical adhesives and for sensing applications. PMID:26848652

  9. Nucleoside phosphorylation by the mineral schreibersite

    PubMed Central

    Gull, Maheen; Mojica, Mike A.; Fernández, Facundo M.; Gaul, David A.; Orlando, Thomas M.; Liotta, Charles L.; Pasek, Matthew A.

    2015-01-01

    Phosphorylation of the nucleosides adenosine and uridine by the simple mixing and mild heating of aqueous solutions of the organic compounds with synthetic analogs of the meteoritic mineral schreibersite, (Fe,Ni)3P under slightly basic conditions (pH ~9) is reported. These results suggest a potential role for meteoritic phosphorus in the origin and development of early life. PMID:26606901

  10. Ion channels, phosphorylation and mammalian sperm capacitation.

    PubMed

    Visconti, Pablo E; Krapf, Dario; de la Vega-Beltrán, José Luis; Acevedo, Juan José; Darszon, Alberto

    2011-05-01

    Sexually reproducing animals require an orchestrated communication between spermatozoa and the egg to generate a new individual. Capacitation, a maturational complex phenomenon that occurs in the female reproductive tract, renders spermatozoa capable of binding and fusing with the oocyte, and it is a requirement for mammalian fertilization. Capacitation encompasses plasma membrane reorganization, ion permeability regulation, cholesterol loss and changes in the phosphorylation state of many proteins. Novel tools to study sperm ion channels, image intracellular ionic changes and proteins with better spatial and temporal resolution, are unraveling how modifications in sperm ion transport and phosphorylation states lead to capacitation. Recent evidence indicates that two parallel pathways regulate phosphorylation events leading to capacitation, one of them requiring activation of protein kinase A and the second one involving inactivation of ser/thr phosphatases. This review examines the involvement of ion transporters and phosphorylation signaling processes needed for spermatozoa to achieve capacitation. Understanding the molecular mechanisms leading to fertilization is central for societies to deal with rising male infertility rates, to develop safe male gamete-based contraceptives and to preserve biodiversity through better assisted fertilization strategies.

  11. Identification of extracellularly phosphorylated membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Burghoff, Sandra; Willberg, Wibke; Schrader, Jürgen

    2015-10-01

    Ecto-protein kinases phosphorylate extracellular membrane proteins and exhibit similarities to casein kinases and protein kinases A and C. However, the identification of their protein substrates still remains a challenge because a clear separation from intracellular phosphoproteins is difficult. Here, we describe a straightforward method for the identification of extracellularly phosphorylated membrane proteins in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and K562 cells which used the protease bromelain to selectively remove ectoproteins from intact cells and combined this with the subsequent analysis using IMAC and LC-MS/MS. A "false-positive" strategy in which cells without protease treatment served as controls was applied. Using this approach we identified novel phosphorylation sites on five ectophosphoproteins (NOTCH1, otopetrin 1, regulator of G-protein signalling 13 (RGS13), protein tyrosine phosphatase receptor type D isoform 3 (PTPRD), usherin isoform B (USH2A)). Use of bromelain appears to be a reliable technique for the further identification of phosphorylated surface-exposed peptides when extracellular adenosine-5'-triphosphate is elevated during purinergic signalling.

  12. Nucleoside phosphorylation by the mineral schreibersite.

    PubMed

    Gull, Maheen; Mojica, Mike A; Fernández, Facundo M; Gaul, David A; Orlando, Thomas M; Liotta, Charles L; Pasek, Matthew A

    2015-01-01

    Phosphorylation of the nucleosides adenosine and uridine by the simple mixing and mild heating of aqueous solutions of the organic compounds with synthetic analogs of the meteoritic mineral schreibersite, (Fe,Ni)3P under slightly basic conditions (pH ~9) is reported. These results suggest a potential role for meteoritic phosphorus in the origin and development of early life. PMID:26606901

  13. Phosphorylation of plastoglobular proteins in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Lohscheider, Jens N.; Friso, Giulia; van Wijk, Klaas J.

    2016-01-01

    Plastoglobules (PGs) are plastid lipid–protein particles with a small specialized proteome and metabolome. Among the 30 core PG proteins are six proteins of the ancient ABC1 atypical kinase (ABC1K) family and their locations in an Arabidopsis mRNA-based co-expression network suggested central regulatory roles. To identify candidate ABC1K targets and a possible ABC1K hierarchical phosphorylation network within the chloroplast PG proteome, we searched Arabidopsis phosphoproteomics data from publicly available sources. Evaluation of underlying spectra and/or associated information was challenging for a variety of reasons, but supported pSer sites and a few pThr sites in nine PG proteins, including five FIBRILLINS. PG phosphorylation motifs are discussed in the context of possible responsible kinases. The challenges of collection and evaluation of published Arabidopsis phosphorylation data are discussed, illustrating the importance of deposition of all mass spectrometry data in well-organized repositories such as PRIDE and ProteomeXchange. This study provides a starting point for experimental testing of phosho-sites in PG proteins and also suggests that phosphoproteomics studies specifically designed toward the PG proteome and its ABC1K are needed to understand phosphorylation networks in these specialized particles. PMID:26962209

  14. Ion channels, phosphorylation and mammalian sperm capacitation

    PubMed Central

    Visconti, Pablo E; Krapf, Dario; de la Vega-Beltrán, José Luis; Acevedo, Juan José; Darszon, Alberto

    2011-01-01

    Sexually reproducing animals require an orchestrated communication between spermatozoa and the egg to generate a new individual. Capacitation, a maturational complex phenomenon that occurs in the female reproductive tract, renders spermatozoa capable of binding and fusing with the oocyte, and it is a requirement for mammalian fertilization. Capacitation encompasses plasma membrane reorganization, ion permeability regulation, cholesterol loss and changes in the phosphorylation state of many proteins. Novel tools to study sperm ion channels, image intracellular ionic changes and proteins with better spatial and temporal resolution, are unraveling how modifications in sperm ion transport and phosphorylation states lead to capacitation. Recent evidence indicates that two parallel pathways regulate phosphorylation events leading to capacitation, one of them requiring activation of protein kinase A and the second one involving inactivation of ser/thr phosphatases. This review examines the involvement of ion transporters and phosphorylation signaling processes needed for spermatozoa to achieve capacitation. Understanding the molecular mechanisms leading to fertilization is central for societies to deal with rising male infertility rates, to develop safe male gamete-based contraceptives and to preserve biodiversity through better assisted fertilization strategies. PMID:21540868

  15. Phosphorylation Reaction in cAPK Protein Kinase - Free Energy Quantum Mechanic/Molecular Mechanics Simulations.

    SciTech Connect

    Valiev, Marat; Yang, Jie; Adams, Joseph; Taylor, Susan S.; Weare, John H.

    2007-11-29

    Protein kinases catalyze the transfer of the γ-phosphoryl group from ATP, a key regulatory process governing signalling pathways in eukaryotic cells. The structure of the active site in these enzymes is highly conserved implying common catalytic mechanism. In this work we investigate the reaction process in cAPK protein kinase (PKA) using a combined quantum mechanics and molecular mechanics approach. The novel computational features of our work include reaction pathway determination with nudged elastic band methodology and calculation of free energy profiles of the reaction process taking into account finite temperature fluctuations of the protein environment. We find that the transfer of the γ-phosphoryl group in the protein environment is an exothermic reaction with the reaction barrier of 15 kcal/mol.

  16. ATP-driven transhydrogenation and ionization of water in a reconstituted glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenases (phosphorylating and non-phosphorylating) model system.

    PubMed

    Serrano, A; Mateos, M I; Losada, M

    1993-12-30

    In an unbuffered medium, an intense acidification occurs during the oxidation of D-glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate (G3P) to 3-phospho-D-glycerate (PGA) catalyzed by NADP(+)-specific non-phosphorylating G3P dehydrogenase, an enzyme that photosynthetic eukaryotic cells contain exclusively in their cytosol. The true enzymatic character of this proton release is the consequence of the following redox/acid-base reaction: G3P + NADP+ + H2O-->PGA + NADPH + 2H+. When the well-established ATP-dependent reduction of PGA to G3P, catalyzed by PGA kinase and NAD(+)-specific phosphorylating G3P dehydrogenase, was coupled through the intermediate G3P to the above reverse oxidation reaction, a transient alkalinization of the medium followed by its acidification accompanied transhydrogenation from NADH to NADP+. The significance of the observed endergonic transhydrogenation and ionization of water at the expense of the chemical energy of ATP in this reconstituted enzyme system as well as its relevance for the export of reducing power (H-) across the chloroplast membrane and the maintenance of the pH gradient that exists between the stroma and the cytosol are discussed. PMID:8280152

  17. Protein Synthesis Initiation Factors: Phosphorylation and Regulation

    SciTech Connect

    Karen S. Browning

    2009-06-15

    The initiation of the synthesis of proteins is a fundamental process shared by all living organisms. Each organism has both shared and unique mechanisms for regulation of this vital process. Higher plants provide for a major amount of fixation of carbon from the environment and turn this carbon into food and fuel sources for our use. However, we have very little understanding of how plants regulate the synthesis of the proteins necessary for these metabolic processes. The research carried out during the grant period sought to address some of these unknowns in the regulation of protein synthesis initiation. Our first goal was to determine if phosphorylation plays a significant role in plant initiation of protein synthesis. The role of phosphorylation, although well documented in mammalian protein synthesis regulation, is not well studied in plants. We showed that several of the factors necessary for the initiation of protein synthesis were targets of plant casein kinase and showed differential phosphorylation by the plant specific isoforms of this kinase. In addition, we identified and confirmed the phosphorylation sites in five of the plant initiation factors. Further, we showed that phosphorylation of one of these factors, eIF5, affected the ability of the factor to participate in the initiation process. Our second goal was to develop a method to make initiation factor 3 (eIF3) using recombinant methods. To date, we successfully cloned and expressed 13/13 subunits of wheat eIF3 in E. coli using de novo gene construction methods. The final step in this process is to place the subunits into three different plasmid operons for co-expression. Successful completion of expression of eIF3 will be an invaluable tool to the plant translation community.

  18. Calcineurin B homologous protein 3 negatively regulates cardiomyocyte hypertrophy via inhibition of glycogen synthase kinase 3 phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Soushi; Nakamura, Tomoe Y; Wakabayashi, Shigeo

    2015-07-01

    Cardiac hypertrophy is a leading cause of serious heart diseases. Although many signaling molecules are involved in hypertrophy, the functions of some proteins in this process are still unknown. Calcineurin B homologous protein 3 (CHP3)/tescalcin is an EF-hand Ca(2+)-binding protein that is abundantly expressed in the heart; however, the function of CHP3 is unclear. Here, we aimed to identify the cardiac functions of CHP3. CHP3 was expressed in hearts at a wide range of developmental stages and was specifically detected in neonatal rat ventricular myocytes (NRVMs) but not in cardiac fibroblasts in culture. Moreover, knockdown of CHP3 expression using adenoviral-based RNA interference in NRVMs resulted in enlargement of cardiomyocyte size, concomitant with increased expression of a pathological hypertrophy marker ANP. This same treatment elevated glycogen synthase kinase (GSK3α/β) phosphorylation, which is known to inhibit GSK3 function. In contrast, CHP3 overexpression blocked the insulin-induced phosphorylation of GSK3α/β without affecting the phosphorylation of Akt, which is an upstream kinase of GSK3α/β, in HEK293 cells, and it inhibited both IGF-1-induced phosphorylation of GSK3β and cardiomyocyte hypertrophy in NRVMs. Co-immunoprecipitation experiments revealed that GSK3β interacted with CHP3. However, a Ca(2+)-binding-defective mutation of CHP3 (CHP3-D123A) also interacted with GSK3β and had the same inhibitory effect on GSK3α/β phosphorylation, suggesting that the action of CHP3 was independent of Ca(2+). These findings suggest that CHP3 functions as a novel negative regulator of cardiomyocyte hypertrophy via inhibition of GSK3α/β phosphorylation and subsequent enzymatic activation of GSK3α/β. PMID:25935310

  19. Calcineurin B homologous protein 3 negatively regulates cardiomyocyte hypertrophy via inhibition of glycogen synthase kinase 3 phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Soushi; Nakamura, Tomoe Y; Wakabayashi, Shigeo

    2015-07-01

    Cardiac hypertrophy is a leading cause of serious heart diseases. Although many signaling molecules are involved in hypertrophy, the functions of some proteins in this process are still unknown. Calcineurin B homologous protein 3 (CHP3)/tescalcin is an EF-hand Ca(2+)-binding protein that is abundantly expressed in the heart; however, the function of CHP3 is unclear. Here, we aimed to identify the cardiac functions of CHP3. CHP3 was expressed in hearts at a wide range of developmental stages and was specifically detected in neonatal rat ventricular myocytes (NRVMs) but not in cardiac fibroblasts in culture. Moreover, knockdown of CHP3 expression using adenoviral-based RNA interference in NRVMs resulted in enlargement of cardiomyocyte size, concomitant with increased expression of a pathological hypertrophy marker ANP. This same treatment elevated glycogen synthase kinase (GSK3α/β) phosphorylation, which is known to inhibit GSK3 function. In contrast, CHP3 overexpression blocked the insulin-induced phosphorylation of GSK3α/β without affecting the phosphorylation of Akt, which is an upstream kinase of GSK3α/β, in HEK293 cells, and it inhibited both IGF-1-induced phosphorylation of GSK3β and cardiomyocyte hypertrophy in NRVMs. Co-immunoprecipitation experiments revealed that GSK3β interacted with CHP3. However, a Ca(2+)-binding-defective mutation of CHP3 (CHP3-D123A) also interacted with GSK3β and had the same inhibitory effect on GSK3α/β phosphorylation, suggesting that the action of CHP3 was independent of Ca(2+). These findings suggest that CHP3 functions as a novel negative regulator of cardiomyocyte hypertrophy via inhibition of GSK3α/β phosphorylation and subsequent enzymatic activation of GSK3α/β.

  20. Motexafin gadolinium modulates levels of phosphorylated Akt and synergizes with inhibitors of Akt phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Jason; Sirisawad, Mint; Miller, Richard; Naumovski, Louie

    2006-05-01

    Motexafin gadolinium (MGd, Xcytrin) is a tumor-selective expanded porphyrin that targets oxidative stress-related proteins. MGd treatment of the follicular lymphoma-derived cell line HF-1 resulted in growth suppression and apoptosis whereas MGd treatment of the Burkitt's lymphoma-derived cell line Ramos resulted in growth suppression but not apoptosis. Because phosphorylation status of Akt/protein kinase B is regulated by oxidative stress, we monitored total and phosphorylated Akt (pAkt) in MGd-treated HF-1 and Ramos cells. Levels of pAkt increased within 30 minutes after MGd treatment of HF-1 but after 4 hours began to show a progressive decline to below baseline levels before cells underwent apoptosis. In MGd-treated Ramos cells, pAkt increased approximately 2-fold within 4 hours and remained persistently elevated. Because pAkt activates survival pathways, we determined if MGd-induced cell death could be enhanced by inhibiting phosphorylation of Akt. The addition of specific inhibitors of Akt phosphorylation (Akt inhibitor 1 or SH-5) reduced pAkt levels in MGd-treated HF-1 and Ramos cells and synergistically enhanced MGd-induced cell death. MGd was also evaluated in combination with celecoxib, an inhibitor of Akt phosphorylation, or docetaxel, a microtubule inhibitor that can decrease Akt phosphorylation. The combination of MGd/celecoxib or MGd/docetaxel resulted in decreased Akt phosphorylation and in synergistic cytotoxicity compared with either agent alone. These data point to a potential protective role for pAkt in MGd-induced apoptosis and suggest that MGd activity may be enhanced by combining it with agents that inhibit Akt phosphorylation.

  1. Enzymatic Kinetic Isotope Effects from First-Principles Path Sampling Calculations.

    PubMed

    Varga, Matthew J; Schwartz, Steven D

    2016-04-12

    In this study, we develop and test a method to determine the rate of particle transfer and kinetic isotope effects in enzymatic reactions, specifically yeast alcohol dehydrogenase (YADH), from first-principles. Transition path sampling (TPS) and normal mode centroid dynamics (CMD) are used to simulate these enzymatic reactions without knowledge of their reaction coordinates and with the inclusion of quantum effects, such as zero-point energy and tunneling, on the transferring particle. Though previous studies have used TPS to calculate reaction rate constants in various model and real systems, it has not been applied to a system as large as YADH. The calculated primary H/D kinetic isotope effect agrees with previously reported experimental results, within experimental error. The kinetic isotope effects calculated with this method correspond to the kinetic isotope effect of the transfer event itself. The results reported here show that the kinetic isotope effects calculated from first-principles, purely for barrier passage, can be used to predict experimental kinetic isotope effects in enzymatic systems.

  2. Phosphorylation of Mycobacterium tuberculosis protein tyrosine kinase A PtkA by Ser/Thr protein kinases.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Peifu; Wong, Dennis; Li, Wu; Xie, Jianping; Av-Gay, Yossef

    2015-11-13

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), the causative agent of tuberculosis (TB), has inflicted about one third of mankind and claims millions of deaths worldwide annually. Signalling plays an important role in Mtb pathogenesis and persistence, and thus represents attractive resource for drug target candidates. Here, we show that protein tyrosine kinase A (PtkA) can be phosphorylated by Mtb endogenous eukaryotic-like Ser/Thr protein kinases (eSTPKs). Kinase assays showed that PknA, PknD, PknF, and PknK can phosphorylate PtkA in dose- and time-dependent manner. Enzyme kinetics suggests that PknA has the highest affinity and enzymatic efficiency towards PtkA. Furthermore, protein-protein interaction assay in surrogate host showed that PtkA interacts with multi-eSTPKs in vivo, including PknA. Lastly, we show that PtkA phosphorylation by eSTPKs occurs on threonine residues and may effect tyrosine phosphorylation levels and thus PtkA activity in vitro. These results demonstrate that PtkA can serve as a substrate to many eSTPKs and suggests that's its activity can be regulated. PMID:26417687

  3. Protein phosphorylation in isolated human adipocytes - Adrenergic control of the phosphorylation of hormone-sensitive lipase

    SciTech Connect

    Smiley, R.M. Columbia Univ College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York, NY ); Paul, S.; Browning, M.D.; Leibel, R.L.; Hirsch, J. )

    1990-01-01

    The effect of adrenergic agents on protein phosphorylation in human adipocytes was examined. Freshly isolated human fat cells were incubated with {sup 32}PO{sub 4} in order to label intracellular ATP, then treated with a variety of adrenergic and other pharmacologic agents. Treatment with the {beta}-adrenergic agonist isoproterenol led to a significant increase in phosphate content of at least five protein bands (M{sub r} 52, 53, 63, 67, 84 kDa). The increase in phosphorylation was partially inhibited by the {alpha}-2 agonist clonidine. Epinephrine, a combined {alpha} and {beta} agonist, was less effective at increasing phosphate content of the proteins than was isoproterenol. Neither insulin nor the {alpha}-1 agonist phenylephrine had any discernible effect on the pattern of protein phosphorylation. The 84 kDa phosphorylated peptide band appears to contain hormone-sensitive lipase, a key enzyme in the lipolytic pathway which is activated by phosphorylation. These results are somewhat different than previously reported results for rat adipocytes, and represent the first report of overall pattern and adrenergic modulation of protein phosphorylation in human adipocytes.

  4. Neurofilament Phosphorylation during Development and Disease: Which Came First, the Phosphorylation or the Accumulation?

    PubMed Central

    Dale, Jeffrey M.; Garcia, Michael L.

    2012-01-01

    Posttranslational modification of proteins is a ubiquitous cellular mechanism for regulating protein function. Some of the most heavily modified neuronal proteins are cytoskeletal proteins of long myelinated axons referred to as neurofilaments (NFs). NFs are type IV intermediate filaments (IFs) that can be composed of four subunits, neurofilament heavy (NF-H), neurofilament medium (NF-M), neurofilament light (NF-L), and α-internexin. Within wild type axons, NFs are responsible for mediating radial growth, a process that determines axonal diameter. NFs are phosphorylated on highly conserved lysine-serine-proline (KSP) repeats located along the C-termini of both NF-M and NF-H within myelinated axonal regions. Phosphorylation is thought to regulate aspects of NF transport and function. However, a key pathological hallmark of several neurodegenerative diseases is ectopic accumulation and phosphorylation of NFs. The goal of this review is to provide an overview of the posttranslational modifications that occur in both normal and diseased axons. We review evidence that challenges the role of KSP phosphorylation as essential for radial growth and suggests an alternative role for NF phosphorylation in myelinated axons. Furthermore, we demonstrate that regulation of NF phosphorylation dynamics may be essential to avoiding NF accumulations. PMID:22570767

  5. pH & Rate of Enzymatic Reactions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clariana, Roy B.

    1991-01-01

    A quantitative and inexpensive way to measure the rate of enzymatic reaction is provided. The effects of different pH levels on the reaction rate of an enzyme from yeast are investigated and the results graphed. Background information, a list of needed materials, directions for preparing solutions, procedure, and results and discussion are…

  6. Starch: chemistry, microstructure, processing and enzymatic degradation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Starch is recognized as one of the most abundant and important commodities containing value added attributes for a vast number of industrial applications. Its chemistry, structure, property and susceptibility to various chemical, physical and enzymatic modifications offer a high technological value ...

  7. Inhibition of enzymatic cellulolysis by phenolic compounds.

    PubMed

    Tejirian, Ani; Xu, Feng

    2011-03-01

    Phenolics derived from lignin and other plant components can pose significant inhibition on enzymatic conversion of cellulosic biomass materials to useful chemicals. Understanding the mechanism of such inhibition is of importance for the development of viable biomass conversion technologies. In native plant cell wall, most of the phenolics and derivatives are found in polymeric lignin. When biomass feedstocks are pretreated (prior to enzymatic hydrolysis), simple or oligomeric phenolics and derivatives are often generated from lignin modification/degradation, which can inhibit biomass-converting enzymes. To further understand how such phenolic substances may affect cellulase reaction, we carried out a comparative study on a series of simple and oligomeric phenolics representing or mimicking the composition of lignin or its degradation products. Consistent to previous studies, we observed that oligomeric phenolics could exert more inhibition on enzymatic cellulolysis than simple phenolics. Oligomeric phenolics could inactivate cellulases by reversibly complexing them. Simple and oligomeric phenolics could also inhibit enzymatic cellulolysis by adsorbing onto cellulose. Individual cellulases showed different susceptibility toward these inhibitions. Polyethylene glycol and tannase could respectively bind and degrade the studied oligomeric phenolics, and by doing so mitigate the oligomeric phenolic's inhibition on cellulolysis. PMID:22112906

  8. Frank Westheimer's Early Demonstration of Enzymatic Specificity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ault, Addison

    2008-01-01

    In this article I review one of the most significant accomplishments of Frank H. Westheimer, one of the most respected chemists of the 20th century. This accomplishment was a series of stereospecific enzymatic oxidation and reduction experiments that led chemists to recognize what we now call the enantiotopic and diastereotopic relationships of…

  9. Ultrasonic acceleration of enzymatic processing of cotton

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Enzymatic bio-processing of cotton generates significantly less hazardous wastewater effluents, which are readily biodegradable, but it also has several critical shortcomings that impede its acceptance by industries: expensive processing costs and slow reaction rates. It has been found that the intr...

  10. Syntheses and insulin-like activity of phosphorylated galactose derivatives.

    PubMed

    Caro, H N; Martín-Lomas, M; Bernabé, M

    1993-02-24

    The syntheses of the poly-phosphorylated galactosides 6, 8, 10, 13, 16, and 20, isolated as sodium salts, have been performed. The non-phosphorylated disaccharide 17 and trisaccharide 21 have been prepared via glycosylation of the 2-(trimethylsilyl)ethyl galactosides 3 and 2, respectively, and subsequent complete deprotection. Preliminary insulin-like activity of the phosphorylated derivatives is reported. PMID:8458006

  11. Prediction of functional phosphorylation sites by incorporating evolutionary information.

    PubMed

    Niu, Shen; Wang, Zhen; Ge, Dongya; Zhang, Guoqing; Li, Yixue

    2012-09-01

    Protein phosphorylation is a ubiquitous protein post-translational modification, which plays an important role in cellular signaling systems underlying various physiological and pathological processes. Current in silico methods mainly focused on the prediction of phosphorylation sites, but rare methods considered whether a phosphorylation site is functional or not. Since functional phosphorylation sites are more valuable for further experimental research and a proportion of phosphorylation sites have no direct functional effects, the prediction of functional phosphorylation sites is quite necessary for this research area. Previous studies have shown that functional phosphorylation sites are more conserved than non-functional phosphorylation sites in evolution. Thus, in our method, we developed a web server by integrating existing phosphorylation site prediction methods, as well as both absolute and relative evolutionary conservation scores to predict the most likely functional phosphorylation sites. Using our method, we predicted the most likely functional sites of the human, rat and mouse proteomes and built a database for the predicted sites. By the analysis of overall prediction results, we demonstrated that protein phosphorylation plays an important role in all the enriched KEGG pathways. By the analysis of protein-specific prediction results, we demonstrated the usefulness of our method for individual protein studies. Our method would help to characterize the most likely functional phosphorylation sites for further studies in this research area.

  12. Solid polymer electrolyte from phosphorylated chitosan

    SciTech Connect

    Fauzi, Iqbal Arcana, I Made

    2014-03-24

    Recently, the need of secondary battery application continues to increase. The secondary battery which using a liquid electrolyte was indicated had some weakness. A solid polymer electrolyte is an alternative electrolytes membrane which developed in order to replace the liquid electrolyte type. In the present study, the effect of phosphorylation on to polymer electrolyte membrane which synthesized from chitosan and lithium perchlorate salts was investigated. The effect of the component’s composition respectively on the properties of polymer electrolyte, was carried out by analyzed of it’s characterization such as functional groups, ion conductivity, and thermal properties. The mechanical properties i.e tensile resistance and the morphology structure of membrane surface were determined. The phosphorylation processing of polymer electrolyte membrane of chitosan and lithium perchlorate was conducted by immersing with phosphoric acid for 2 hours, and then irradiated on a microwave for 60 seconds. The degree of deacetylation of chitosan derived from shrimp shells was obtained around 75.4%. Relative molecular mass of chitosan was obtained by viscometry method is 796,792 g/mol. The ionic conductivity of chitosan membrane was increase from 6.33 × 10{sup −6} S/cm up to 6.01 × 10{sup −4} S/cm after adding by 15 % solution of lithium perchlorate. After phosphorylation, the ionic conductivity of phosphorylated lithium chitosan membrane was observed 1.37 × 10{sup −3} S/cm, while the tensile resistance of 40.2 MPa with a better thermal resistance. On the strength of electrolyte membrane properties, this polymer electrolyte membrane was suggested had one potential used for polymer electrolyte in field of lithium battery applications.

  13. Unlimited multistability in multisite phosphorylation systems.

    PubMed

    Thomson, Matthew; Gunawardena, Jeremy

    2009-07-01

    Reversible phosphorylation on serine, threonine and tyrosine is the most widely studied posttranslational modification of proteins. The number of phosphorylated sites on a protein (n) shows a significant increase from prokaryotes, with n /= 150 sites. Multisite phosphorylation has many roles and site conservation indicates that increasing numbers of sites cannot be due merely to promiscuous phosphorylation. A substrate with n sites has an exponential number (2(n)) of phospho-forms and individual phospho-forms may have distinct biological effects. The distribution of these phospho-forms and how this distribution is regulated have remained unknown. Here we show that, when kinase and phosphatase act in opposition on a multisite substrate, the system can exhibit distinct stable phospho-form distributions at steady state and that the maximum number of such distributions increases with n. Whereas some stable distributions are focused on a single phospho-form, others are more diffuse, giving the phospho-proteome the potential to behave as a fluid regulatory network able to encode information and flexibly respond to varying demands. Such plasticity may underlie complex information processing in eukaryotic cells and suggests a functional advantage in having many sites. Our results follow from the unusual geometry of the steady-state phospho-form concentrations, which we show to constitute a rational algebraic curve, irrespective of n. We thereby reduce the complexity of calculating steady states from simulating 3 x 2(n) differential equations to solving two algebraic equations, while treating parameters symbolically. We anticipate that these methods can be extended to systems with multiple substrates and multiple enzymes catalysing different modifications, as found in posttranslational modification 'codes' such as the histone code. Whereas simulations struggle with exponentially increasing molecular complexity

  14. Mixed mechanisms of multi-site phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Suwanmajo, Thapanar; Krishnan, J

    2015-06-01

    Multi-site phosphorylation is ubiquitous in cell biology and has been widely studied experimentally and theoretically. The underlying chemical modification mechanisms are typically assumed to be distributive or processive. In this paper, we study the behaviour of mixed mechanisms that can arise either because phosphorylation and dephosphorylation involve different mechanisms or because phosphorylation and/or dephosphorylation can occur through a combination of mechanisms. We examine a hierarchy of models to assess chemical information processing through different mixed mechanisms, using simulations, bifurcation analysis and analytical work. We demonstrate how mixed mechanisms can show important and unintuitive differences from pure distributive and processive mechanisms, in some cases resulting in monostable behaviour with simple dose-response behaviour, while in other cases generating new behaviour-like oscillations. Our results also suggest patterns of information processing that are relevant as the number of modification sites increases. Overall, our work creates a framework to examine information processing arising from complexities of multi-site modification mechanisms and their impact on signal transduction. PMID:25972433

  15. Phosphorylation-dephosphorylation of yeast pyruvate dehydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    Uhlinger, D.J.; Reed, L.J.

    1986-05-01

    Pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC) was purified to homogeneity from baker's yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae). No pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) kinase activity was detected at any stage of the purification. However, the purified PDC was phosphorylated and inactivated by purified PDH kinase from bovine kidney mitochondria, Mg/sup 2 +/, and (..gamma..-/sup 32/P)ATP. The protein-bound radioactivity was localized in the PDH ..cap alpha.. subunit. The phosphorylated, inactivated PDC was dephosphorylated and reactivated with purified bovine PDH phosphatase, Mg/sup 2 +/, and Ca/sup 2 +/. From a tryptic digest of phosphorylated yeast PDC a radioactive peptide was isolated by anion and reverse phase HPLC. The sequence of this tetradecapeptide is Tyr-Gly-Gly-His-Ser(P)-Met-Ser-Asp-Pro-Gly-Thr-Thr-Tyr-Arg. This sequence is very similar to the sequence of a tryptic phosphopeptide derived from the ..cap alpha.. subunit of bovine kidney and heart PDH: Tyr-His-Gly-His-Ser(P)-Met-Ser-Asp-Pro-Gly-Val-Ser-Tyr-Arg.

  16. Regulation of peroxisome dynamics by phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Oeljeklaus, Silke; Schummer, Andreas; Mastalski, Thomas; Platta, Harald W; Warscheid, Bettina

    2016-05-01

    Peroxisomes are highly dynamic organelles that can rapidly change in size, abundance, and protein content in response to alterations in nutritional and other environmental conditions. These dynamic changes in peroxisome features, referred to as peroxisome dynamics, rely on the coordinated action of several processes of peroxisome biogenesis. Revealing the regulatory mechanisms of peroxisome dynamics is an emerging theme in cell biology. These mechanisms are inevitably linked to and synchronized with the biogenesis and degradation of peroxisomes. To date, the key players and basic principles of virtually all steps in the peroxisomal life cycle are known, but regulatory mechanisms remained largely elusive. A number of recent studies put the spotlight on reversible protein phosphorylation for the control of peroxisome dynamics and highlighted peroxisomes as hubs for cellular signal integration and regulation. Here, we will present and discuss the results of several studies performed using yeast and mammalian cells that convey a sense of the impact protein phosphorylation may have on the modulation of peroxisome dynamics by regulating peroxisomal matrix and membrane protein import, proliferation, inheritance, and degradation. We further put forward the idea to make use of current data on phosphorylation sites of peroxisomal and peroxisome-associated proteins reported in advanced large-scale phosphoproteomic studies.

  17. Function of platelet 47K protein phosphorylation

    SciTech Connect

    Imaoka, T.

    1987-05-01

    To provide insight into the biochemical pathway of platelet activation, they purified both unphosphorylated and phosphorylated P47 to homogeneity from human platelets. This study represents the first demonstration of a change of physiological action of P47 in response to phosphorylation in platelet activation. SVI labelled unphosphorylated P47 had an ability to bind with platelet membrane fraction in the presence of phosphatidylserine. Effect of diacylglycerol was inhibitory in this PS dependent P47 binding with membrane. Unphosphorylated P47 had an inhibitory activity in platelet actin polymerization. Molar ratio to inhibit actin polymerization was 1:8 (P47:actin). These activities were Ca independent. Purified TSP-labelled P47 lost the binding ability with membrane, also the inhibitory activity in actin polymerization. Therefore, they propose the hypothesis that unphosphorylated P47 may loosely bind with the inside of plasma membrane of platelet and inhibit actin polymerization as a modulator, when stimulated, protein Kinase C rapidly phosphorylate P47 and induce the activation of cytoskeletal network and subsequently release reaction.

  18. Specific and sustainable bioelectro-reduction of carbon dioxide to formate on a novel enzymatic cathode.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lijuan; Liu, Junyi; Ong, Jacky; Li, Sam Fong Yau

    2016-11-01

    To specifically convert waste CO2 into renewable chemicals, enzymatic electrosynthesis (EES) of formate from CO2 reduction was investigated in a bioelectrochemical system (BES). A novel cathode with immobilized enzyme and electropolymerized mediator-regenerator was fabricated for such bioelectrocatalytic EES. Formate dehydrogenase from Candida boidinii (CbFDH) was set as a new model enzyme in BES. Modified Nafion micelles with appropriate pore size were found to be suitable for immobilization of CbFDH and protection of its enzymatic activity and lifetime at optimal pH of 6.0. The enzymatic electrosynthesis activity of immobilized CbFDH was characterized systematically. Quite a small overpotential was required in the bioelectrochemical EES reaction. A two-electron transfer process was confirmed in the CbFDH-catalyzed reduction of bicarbonate to formate. With electro-polymerized neutral red (PolyNR) as a NADH (mediator)-regenerator, efficient formate production could be achieved at a maximum rate of 159.89 mg L(-1) h(-1) under poised potential of -0.80 V (vs. SHE). The immobilized CbFDH and electropolymerized PolyNR on an enzymatic cathode contributed greatly to sustainable EES, giving energy-rich formate as the only catalysis product. PMID:27501309

  19. Specific and sustainable bioelectro-reduction of carbon dioxide to formate on a novel enzymatic cathode.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lijuan; Liu, Junyi; Ong, Jacky; Li, Sam Fong Yau

    2016-11-01

    To specifically convert waste CO2 into renewable chemicals, enzymatic electrosynthesis (EES) of formate from CO2 reduction was investigated in a bioelectrochemical system (BES). A novel cathode with immobilized enzyme and electropolymerized mediator-regenerator was fabricated for such bioelectrocatalytic EES. Formate dehydrogenase from Candida boidinii (CbFDH) was set as a new model enzyme in BES. Modified Nafion micelles with appropriate pore size were found to be suitable for immobilization of CbFDH and protection of its enzymatic activity and lifetime at optimal pH of 6.0. The enzymatic electrosynthesis activity of immobilized CbFDH was characterized systematically. Quite a small overpotential was required in the bioelectrochemical EES reaction. A two-electron transfer process was confirmed in the CbFDH-catalyzed reduction of bicarbonate to formate. With electro-polymerized neutral red (PolyNR) as a NADH (mediator)-regenerator, efficient formate production could be achieved at a maximum rate of 159.89 mg L(-1) h(-1) under poised potential of -0.80 V (vs. SHE). The immobilized CbFDH and electropolymerized PolyNR on an enzymatic cathode contributed greatly to sustainable EES, giving energy-rich formate as the only catalysis product.

  20. Effects of Phosphorylation of β Subunits of Phycocyanins on State Transition in the Model Cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhuo; Zhan, Jiao; Chen, Ying; Yang, Mingkun; He, Chenliu; Ge, Feng; Wang, Qiang

    2015-10-01

    Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 (hereafter Synechocystis) is a model cyanobacterium and has been used extensively for studies concerned with photosynthesis and environmental adaptation. Although dozens of protein kinases and phosphatases with specificity for Ser/Thr/Tyr residues have been predicted, only a few substrate proteins are known in Synechocystis. In this study, we report 194 in vivo phosphorylation sites from 149 proteins in Synechocystis, which were identified using a combination of peptide pre-fractionation, TiO(2) enrichment and liquid chromatograpy-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) analysis. These phosphorylated proteins are implicated in diverse biological processes, such as photosynthesis. Among all identified phosphoproteins involved in photosynthesis, the β subunits of phycocyanins (CpcBs) were found to be phosphorylated on Ser22, Ser49, Thr94 and Ser154. Four non-phosphorylated mutants were constructed by using site-directed mutagenesis. The in vivo characterization of the cpcB mutants showed a slower growth under high light irradiance and displayed fluorescence quenching to a lower level and less efficient energy transfer inside the phycobilisome (PBS). Notably, the non-phosphorylated mutants exhibited a slower state transition than the wild type. The current results demonstrated that the phosphorylation status of CpcBs affects the energy transfer and state transition of photosynthesis in Synechocystis. This study provides novel insights into the molecular mechanisms of protein phosphorylation in the regulation of photosynthesis in cyanobacteria and may facilitate the elucidation of the entire regulatory network by linking kinases to their physiological substrates. PMID:26315596

  1. Enzymatic induction of supramolecular order and bioactivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Chengbiao; Ren, Xinrui; Ding, Dan; Wang, Ling; Yang, Zhimou

    2016-05-01

    We showed in this study that enzymatic triggering is a totally different pathway for the preparation of self-assembling nanomaterials to the heating-cooling process. Because the molecules were under lower energy levels and the molecular conformation was more ordered during the enzymatic triggeration under mild conditions, nanomaterials with higher supramolecular order could be obtained through biocatalytic control. In this study, nanoparticles were obtained by an enzymatic reaction and nanofibers were observed through the heating-cooling process. We observed a distinct trough at 318 nm from the CD spectrum of a particle sample but not a fiber sample, suggesting the long range arrangement of molecules and helicity in the nanoparticles. The nanoparticles with higher supramolecular order possessed much better potency as a protein vaccine adjuvant because it accelerated the DC maturation and elicited stronger T-cells cytokine production than the nanofibers. Our study demonstrated that biocatalytic triggering is a useful method for preparing supramolecular nanomaterials with higher supramolecular order and probably better bioactivity.We showed in this study that enzymatic triggering is a totally different pathway for the preparation of self-assembling nanomaterials to the heating-cooling process. Because the molecules were under lower energy levels and the molecular conformation was more ordered during the enzymatic triggeration under mild conditions, nanomaterials with higher supramolecular order could be obtained through biocatalytic control. In this study, nanoparticles were obtained by an enzymatic reaction and nanofibers were observed through the heating-cooling process. We observed a distinct trough at 318 nm from the CD spectrum of a particle sample but not a fiber sample, suggesting the long range arrangement of molecules and helicity in the nanoparticles. The nanoparticles with higher supramolecular order possessed much better potency as a protein vaccine

  2. Promotion of PDGF-induced endothelial cell migration by phosphorylated VASP depends on PKA anchoring via AKAP.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Deling; Ouyang, Jingping; Wang, Nian; Zhang, Yahui; Bie, Jinghua; Zhang, Yemin

    2010-02-01

    Vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP), an important substrate of PKA, plays a critical role in remodeling of actin cytoskeleton and actin-based cell motility. However, how PKA accurately transfers extracellular signals to VASP and then how phosphorylation of VASP regulates endothelial cell migration have not been clearly defined. Protein kinase A anchoring proteins (AKAPs) are considered to regulate intracellular-specific signal targeting of PKA via AKAP-mediated PKA anchoring. Thus, our study investigated the relationship among AKAP anchoring of PKA, PKA activity, and VASP phosphorylation, which is to clarify the exact role of VASP and its upstream regulatory mechanism in PKA-dependent migration. Our results show that chemotactic factor PDGF activated PKA, increased phosphorylation of VASP at Ser157, and enhanced ECV304 endothelial cell migration. However, phosphorylation site-directed mutation of VASP at Ser157 attenuated the chemotactic effect of PDGF on endothelial cells, suggesting phosphorylation of VASP at Ser157 promotes PKA-mediated endothelial cell migration. Furthermore, disrupting PKA anchoring to AKAP or PKA activity significantly attenuated the PKA activity, VASP phosphorylation, and subsequent cell migration. Meanwhile, disrupting PKA anchoring to AKAP abolished PDGF-induced lamellipodia formation and special VASP accumulation at leading edge of lamellipodia. These results indicate that PKA activation and PKA-mediated substrate responses in VASP phosphorylation and localization depend on PKA anchoring via AKAP in PDGF-induced endothelial cell migration. In conclusion, AKAP anchoring of PKA is an essential upstream event in regulation of PKA-mediated VASP phosphorylation and subsequent endothelial cell migration, which contributes to explore new methods for controlling endothelial cell migration related diseases and angiogenesis.

  3. Calcium regulation of oxidative phosphorylation in rat skeletal muscle mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Kavanagh, N I; Ainscow, E K; Brand, M D

    2000-02-24

    Activation of oxidative phosphorylation by physiological levels of calcium in mitochondria from rat skeletal muscle was analysed using top-down elasticity and regulation analysis. Oxidative phosphorylation was conceptually divided into three subsystems (substrate oxidation, proton leak and phosphorylation) connected by the membrane potential or the protonmotive force. Calcium directly activated the phosphorylation subsystem and (with sub-saturating 2-oxoglutarate) the substrate oxidation subsystem but had no effect on the proton leak kinetics. The response of mitochondria respiring on 2-oxoglutarate at two physiological concentrations of free calcium was quantified using control and regulation analysis. The partial integrated response coefficients showed that direct stimulation of substrate oxidation contributed 86% of the effect of calcium on state 3 oxygen consumption, and direct activation of the phosphorylation reactions caused 37% of the increase in phosphorylation flux. Calcium directly activated phosphorylation more strongly than substrate oxidation (78% compared to 45%) to achieve homeostasis of mitochondrial membrane potential during large increases in flux.

  4. A systems model of phosphorylation for inflammatory signaling events.

    PubMed

    Sadreev, Ildar I; Chen, Michael Z Q; Welsh, Gavin I; Umezawa, Yoshinori; Kotov, Nikolay V; Valeyev, Najl V

    2014-01-01

    Phosphorylation is a fundamental biochemical reaction that modulates protein activity in cells. While a single phosphorylation event is relatively easy to understand, multisite phosphorylation requires systems approaches for deeper elucidation of the underlying molecular mechanisms. In this paper we develop a mechanistic model for single- and multi-site phosphorylation. The proposed model is compared with previously reported studies. We compare the predictions of our model with experiments published in the literature in the context of inflammatory signaling events in order to provide a mechanistic description of the multisite phosphorylation-mediated regulation of Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription 3 (STAT3) and Interferon Regulatory Factor 5 (IRF-5) proteins. The presented model makes crucial predictions for transcription factor phosphorylation events in the immune system. The model proposes potential mechanisms for T cell phenotype switching and production of cytokines. This study also provides a generic framework for the better understanding of a large number of multisite phosphorylation-regulated biochemical circuits.

  5. Ethanol-induced phosphorylation of cytokeratin in cultured hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Kawahara, Hiromu; Cadrin, M.; French, S.W. )

    1990-01-01

    The authors studied the effect of ethanol on the phosphorylation of cytokeratins (CKs) in cultured hepatocytes since CK filaments are resulted by phosphorylation and they are abnormal in alcoholic liver disease. Hepatocytes were obtained from 14-day-old rats and cultured for 48 hrs. The hepatocytes were exposed to ethanol for 30 min. The residual insoluble cytoskeletons were analyzed by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and autoradiography. 2D gel electrophoresis showed CK 55 and CK 49 or 8 and 18 and actin. The CKs had several isoelectric variants. The most basic spot was the dominant protein which was not phosphorylated. The more acidic spots were phosphorylated. After ethanol treatment, the phosphorylation of CK 55 and CK 49 were markedly increased over controls. They compared these results, with the effect of vasopressin, TPA and db-cAMP on the phosphorylation of CKs. Vasopressin and TPA caused the phosphorylation of CK 55 and 49 but db-cAMP did not.

  6. Multi-site Phosphorylation Regulates Bim Stability and Apoptotic Activity

    PubMed Central

    Hübner, Anette; Barrett, Tamera; Flavell, Richard A.; Davis, Roger J.

    2008-01-01

    The pro-apoptotic BH3-only protein Bim is established to be an important mediator of signaling pathways that induce cell death. Multi-site phosphorylation of Bim by several members of the MAP kinase group is implicated as a regulatory mechanism that controls the apoptotic activity of Bim. To test the role of Bim phosphorylation in vivo, we constructed mice with a series of mutant alleles that express phosphorylation-defective Bim proteins. We show that mutation of the phosphorylation site Thr-112 causes decreased binding of Bim to the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl2 and can increase cell survival. In contrast, mutation of the phosphorylation sites Ser-55, Ser-65, and Ser-73 can cause increased apoptosis because of reduced proteasomal degradation of Bim. Together, these data indicate that phosphorylation can regulate Bim by multiple mechanisms and that the phosphorylation of Bim on different sites can contribute to the sensitivity of cellular apoptotic responses. PMID:18498746

  7. Evidence of 5-HT components in human sperm: implications for protein tyrosine phosphorylation and the physiology of motility

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez-Trejo, Francisco; Tapia-Rodríguez, Miguel; Cerbón, Marco; Kuhn, Donald M; Manjarrez-Gutiérrez, Gabriel; Mendoza-Rodríguez, C Adriana; Picazo, Ofir

    2016-01-01

    Serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine; C10H12N2O (5-HT)) is produced in the CNS and in some cells of peripheral tissues. In the mammalian male reproductive system, both 5-HT and tryptophan hydroxylase (TPH) have been described in Leydig cells of the testis and in principal cells of the caput epididymis. In capacitated hamster sperm, it has been shown that 5-HT promotes the acrosomal reaction. The aim of this work was to explore the existence of components of the serotoninergic system and their relevance in human sperm physiology. We used both immunocytochemistry and western blot to detect serotoninergic markers such as 5-HT, TPH1, MAOA, 5-HT1B, 5-HT3, and 5HTT; HPLC for TPH enzymatic activity; Computer Assisted Semen Analysis assays to measure sperm motility parameters and pharmacological approaches to show the effect of 5-HT in sperm motility and tyrosine phosphorylation was assessed by western blot. We found the presence of serotoninergic markers (5-HT, TPH1, MAOA, 5-HT1B, 5-HT2A, 5-HT3, 5-HTT, and TPH enzymatic activity) in human sperm. In addition, we observed a significant increase in tyrosine phosphorylation and changes in sperm motility after 5-HT treatment. In conclusion, our data demonstrate the existence of components of a serotoninergic system in human sperm and support the notion for a functional role of 5-HT in mammalian sperm physiology, which can be modulated pharmacologically. PMID:23028123

  8. Enzymatic polymerization of dihydroquercetin using bilirubin oxidase.

    PubMed

    Khlupova, M E; Vasil'eva, I S; Shumakovich, G P; Morozova, O V; Chertkov, V A; Shestakova, A K; Kisin, A V; Yaropolov, A I

    2015-02-01

    Dihydroquercetin (or taxifolin) is one of the most famous flavonoids and is abundant in Siberian larch (Larix sibirica). The oxidative polymerization of dihydroquercetin (DHQ) using bilirubin oxidase as a biocatalyst was investigated and some physicochemical properties of the products were studied. DHQ oligomers (oligoDHQ) with molecular mass of 2800 and polydispersity of 8.6 were obtained by enzymatic reaction under optimal conditions. The oligomers appeared to be soluble in dimethylsulfoxide, dimethylformamide, and methanol. UV-visible spectra of oligoDHQ in dimethylsulfoxide indicated the presence of highly conjugated bonds. The synthesized oligoDHQ was also characterized by FTIR and (1)H and (13)C NMR spectroscopy. Comparison of NMR spectra of oligoDHQ with DHQ monomer and the parent flavonoids revealed irregular structure of a polymer formed via the enzymatic oxidation of DHQ followed by nonselective radical polymerization. As compared with the monomer, oligoDHQ demonstrated higher thermal stability and high antioxidant activity.

  9. Biofunctional Properties of Enzymatic Squid Meat Hydrolysate

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Joon Hyuk; Kim, Kyung-Tae; Kim, Sang Moo

    2015-01-01

    Squid is one of the most important commercial fishes in the world and is mainly utilized or consumed as sliced raw fish or as processed products. The biofunctional activities of enzymatic squid meat hydrolysate were determined to develop value-added products. Enzymatic squid hydrolysate manufactured by Alcalase effectively quenched 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl radical, hydroxyl radical, and hydrogen peroxide radical with IC50 values of 311, 3,410, and 111.5 μg/mL, respectively. Angiotensin I-converting enzyme inhibitory activity of squid hydrolysate was strong with an IC50 value of 145.1 μg/mL, while tyrosinase inhibitory activity with an IC50 value of 4.72 mg/mL was moderately low. Overall, squid meat hydrolysate can be used in food or cosmetic industries as a bioactive ingredient and possibly be used in the manufacture of seasoning, bread, noodle, or cosmetics. PMID:25866752

  10. A Networks Approach to Modeling Enzymatic Reactions.

    PubMed

    Imhof, P

    2016-01-01

    Modeling enzymatic reactions is a demanding task due to the complexity of the system, the many degrees of freedom involved and the complex, chemical, and conformational transitions associated with the reaction. Consequently, enzymatic reactions are not determined by precisely one reaction pathway. Hence, it is beneficial to obtain a comprehensive picture of possible reaction paths and competing mechanisms. By combining individually generated intermediate states and chemical transition steps a network of such pathways can be constructed. Transition networks are a discretized representation of a potential energy landscape consisting of a multitude of reaction pathways connecting the end states of the reaction. The graph structure of the network allows an easy identification of the energetically most favorable pathways as well as a number of alternative routes.

  11. Reactor optimization for enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Y.H.; Gharpuray, M.M.; Fan, L.T.

    1982-01-01

    Enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose furnishes sugar which can be subsequently fermented to ethanol. The production of such sugar at relatively low cost is essential for commercially viable production of ethanol. Many processes have been developed for converting cellulosic materials to sugar, and their economic feasibility has been analyzed; however, relatively little has been done to optimize such processes. A comprehensive mechanistic kinetic model for enzymatic degradation was established previously; it takes into account the structure of cellulose, mode of action of celluloytic enzyme, and mode of interaction between the enzyme and the cellulosic substrate. In the present work this model has been applied to the optimal design of cellulose hydrloysis reactors. Both batch and continously stirred reactors have been considered for this purpose. The fractional contributions of various cost parameters to the production cost have been estimated. The sensitivity of sugar cost to the important cost parameters, such as raw material and enzyme costs, have been examined. 8 figures, 7 tables.

  12. Enzymatic intracrine regulation of white adipose tissue

    PubMed Central

    DiSilvestro, David; Petrosino, Jennifer; Aldoori, Ayat; Melgar-Bermudez, Emiliano; Wells, Alexandra; Ziouzenkova, Ouliana

    2015-01-01

    Abdominal fat formation has become a permanent risk factor for metabolic syndrome and various cancers in one-third of the world's population of obese and even lean patients. Formation of abdominal fat involves additional mechanisms beyond an imbalance in energy intake and expenditure, which explains systemic obesity. In this review, we briefly summarized autonomous regulatory circuits that locally produce hormones from inactive precursors or nutrients for intra-/auto-/paracrine signaling in white adipose depots. Enzymatic pathways activating steroid and thyroid hormones in adipose depots were compared with enzymatic production of retinoic acid from vitamin A. We discussed the role of intracrine circuits in fat-depot functions and strategies to reduce abdominal adiposity through thermogenic adipocytes with interrupted generation of retinoic acid. PMID:25390015

  13. Enzymatic hydrolysis of poly(ethylene furanoate).

    PubMed

    Pellis, Alessandro; Haernvall, Karolina; Pichler, Christian M; Ghazaryan, Gagik; Breinbauer, Rolf; Guebitz, Georg M

    2016-10-10

    The urgency of producing new environmentally-friendly polyesters strongly enhanced the development of bio-based poly(ethylene furanoate) (PEF) as an alternative to plastics like poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) for applications that include food packaging, personal and home care containers and thermoforming equipment. In this study, PEF powders of various molecular weights (6, 10 and 40kDa) were synthetized and their susceptibility to enzymatic hydrolysis was investigated for the first time. According to LC/TOF-MS analysis, cutinase 1 from Thermobifida cellulosilytica liberated both 2,5-furandicarboxylic acid and oligomers of up to DP4. The enzyme preferentially hydrolyzed PEF with higher molecular weights but was active on all tested substrates. Mild enzymatic hydrolysis of PEF has a potential both for surface functionalization and monomers recycling. PMID:26854948

  14. Production of MAG via enzymatic glycerolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamlus, Norul Naziraa Ahmad; Derawi, Darfizzi; Salimon, Jumat

    2015-09-01

    Enzymatic glycerolysis of a medium chain methyl ester, methyl laurate was performed using lipase Candida antarctica (Novozyme 435) for 6 hours at 55°C. The percentage of components mixture of product were determined by using gas chromatography technique. The enzymatic reaction was successfully produced monolaurin (45.9 %), dilaurin (47.1 %) and trilaurin (7.0 %) respectively. Thin layer chromatography (TLC) plate also showed a good separation of component spots. Fourier transformation infra-red (FTIR) spectrum showed the presence of ester carbonyl at wavenumber 1739.99 cm-1 and hydrogen bonded O-H at 3512.03 cm-1. The product is potentially to be used as emulsifier and additive in food industry, pharmaceutical, as well as antibacterial.

  15. Molecular crowding and protein enzymatic dynamics.

    PubMed

    Echeverria, Carlos; Kapral, Raymond

    2012-05-21

    The effects of molecular crowding on the enzymatic conformational dynamics and transport properties of adenylate kinase are investigated. This tridomain protein undergoes large scale hinge motions in the course of its enzymatic cycle and serves as prototype for the study of crowding effects on the cyclic conformational dynamics of proteins. The study is carried out at a mesoscopic level where both the protein and the solvent in which it is dissolved are treated in a coarse grained fashion. The amino acid residues in the protein are represented by a network of beads and the solvent dynamics is described by multiparticle collision dynamics that includes effects due to hydrodynamic interactions. The system is crowded by a stationary random array of hard spherical objects. Protein enzymatic dynamics is investigated as a function of the obstacle volume fraction and size. In addition, for comparison, results are presented for a modification of the dynamics that suppresses hydrodynamic interactions. Consistent with expectations, simulations of the dynamics show that the protein prefers a closed conformation for high volume fractions. This effect becomes more pronounced as the obstacle radius decreases for a given volume fraction since the average void size in the obstacle array is smaller for smaller radii. At high volume fractions for small obstacle radii, the average enzymatic cycle time and characteristic times of internal conformational motions of the protein deviate substantially from their values in solution or in systems with small density of obstacles. The transport properties of the protein are strongly affected by molecular crowding. Diffusive motion adopts a subdiffusive character and the effective diffusion coefficients can change by more than an order of magnitude. The orientational relaxation time of the protein is also significantly altered by crowding. PMID:22476233

  16. Blocking c-Met-mediated PARP1 phosphorylation enhances anti-tumor effects of PARP inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Du, Yi; Yamaguchi, Hirohito; Wei, Yongkun; Hsu, Jennifer L.; Wang, Hung-Ling; Hsu, Yi-Hsin; Lin, Wan-Chi; Yu, Wen-Hsuan; Leonard, Paul G.; Lee, Gilbert R.; Chen, Mei-Kuang; Nakai, Katsuya; Hsu, Ming-Chuan; Chen, Chun-Te; Sun, Ye; Wu, Yun; Chang, Wei-Chao; Huang, Wen-Chien; Liu, Chien-Liang; Chang, Yuan-Ching; Chen, Chung-Hsuan; Park, Morag; Jones, Philip; Hortobagyi, Gabriel N.; Hung, Mien-Chie

    2016-01-01

    Poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitors have emerged as promising therapeutics for many diseases, including cancer, in clinical trials1. One PARP inhibitor, olaparib (Lynparza™, AstraZeneca), was recently approved by the FDA to treat ovarian cancer with BRCA mutations. BRCA1 and BRCA2 play essential roles in repairing DNA double strand breaks, and a deficiency of BRCA proteins sensitizes cancer cells to PARP inhibition2,3. Here we show that receptor tyrosine kinase c-Met associates with and phosphorylates PARP1 at Tyr907. Phosphorylation of PARP1 Tyr907 increases PARP1 enzymatic activity and reduces binding to a PARP inhibitor, thereby rendering cancer cells resistant to PARP inhibition. Combining c-Met and PARP1 inhibitors synergized to suppress growth of breast cancer cells in vitro and xenograft tumor models. Similar synergistic effects were observed in a lung cancer xenograft tumor model. These results suggest that PARP1 pTyr907 abundance may predict tumor resistance to PARP inhibitors, and that treatment with a combination of c-Met and PARP inhibitors may benefit patients bearing tumors with high c-Met expression who do not respond to PARP inhibition alone. PMID:26779812

  17. Ligand stimulation of CD95 induces activation of Plk3 followed by phosphorylation of caspase-8

    PubMed Central

    Helmke, Christina; Raab, Monika; Rödel, Franz; Matthess, Yves; Oellerich, Thomas; Mandal, Ranadip; Sanhaji, Mourad; Urlaub, Henning; Rödel, Claus; Becker, Sven; Strebhardt, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    Upon interaction of the CD95 receptor with its ligand, sequential association of the adaptor molecule FADD (MORT1), pro-forms of caspases-8/10, and the caspase-8/10 regulator c-FLIP leads to the formation of a death-inducing signaling complex. Here, we identify polo-like kinase (Plk) 3 as a new interaction partner of the death receptor CD95. The enzymatic activity of Plk3 increases following interaction of the CD95 receptor with its ligand. Knockout (KO) or knockdown of caspase-8, CD95 or FADD prevents activation of Plk3 upon CD95 stimulation, suggesting a requirement of a functional DISC for Plk3 activation. Furthermore, we identify caspase-8 as a new substrate for Plk3. Phosphorylation occurs on T273 and results in stimulation of caspase-8 proapoptotic function. Stimulation of CD95 in cells expressing a non-phosphorylatable caspase-8-T273A mutant in a rescue experiment or in Plk3-KO cells generated by CRISPR/Cas9 reduces the processing of caspase-8 prominently. Low T273 phosphorylation correlates significantly with low Plk3 expression in a cohort of 95 anal tumor patients. Our data suggest a novel mechanism of kinase activation within the Plk family and propose a new model for the stimulation of the extrinsic death pathway in tumors with high Plk3 expression. PMID:27325299

  18. Evaluation of butyrate-induced production of a mannose-6-phosphorylated therapeutic enzyme using parallel bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Madhavarao, Chikkathur N; Agarabi, Cyrus D; Wong, Lily; Müller-Loennies, Sven; Braulke, Thomas; Khan, Mansoor; Anderson, Howard; Johnson, Gibbes R

    2014-01-01

    Bioreactor process changes can have a profound effect on the yield and quality of biotechnology products. Mannose-6-phosphate (M6P) glycan content and the enzymatic catalytic kinetic parameters are critical quality attributes (CQAs) of many therapeutic enzymes used to treat lysosomal storage diseases (LSDs). Here, we have evaluated the effect of adding butyrate to bioreactor production cultures of human recombinant β-glucuronidase produced from CHO-K1 cells, with an emphasis on CQAs. The β-glucuronidase produced in parallel bioreactors was quantified by capillary electrophoresis, the catalytic kinetic parameters were measured using steady-state analysis, and mannose-6-phosphorylation status was assessed using an M6P-specific single-chain antibody fragment. Using this approach, we found that butyrate treatment increased β-glucuronidase production up to approximately threefold without significantly affecting the catalytic properties of the enzyme. However, M6P content in β-glucuronidase was inversely correlated with the increased enzyme production induced by butyrate treatment. This assessment demonstrated that although butyrate dramatically increased β-glucuronidase production in bioreactors, it adversely impacted the mannose-6-phosphorylation of this LSD therapeutic enzyme. This strategy may have utility in evaluating manufacturing process changes to improve therapeutic enzyme yields and CQAs.

  19. Ligand stimulation of CD95 induces activation of Plk3 followed by phosphorylation of caspase-8.

    PubMed

    Helmke, Christina; Raab, Monika; Rödel, Franz; Matthess, Yves; Oellerich, Thomas; Mandal, Ranadip; Sanhaji, Mourad; Urlaub, Henning; Rödel, Claus; Becker, Sven; Strebhardt, Klaus

    2016-08-01

    Upon interaction of the CD95 receptor with its ligand, sequential association of the adaptor molecule FADD (MORT1), pro-forms of caspases-8/10, and the caspase-8/10 regulator c-FLIP leads to the formation of a death-inducing signaling complex. Here, we identify polo-like kinase (Plk) 3 as a new interaction partner of the death receptor CD95. The enzymatic activity of Plk3 increases following interaction of the CD95 receptor with its ligand. Knockout (KO) or knockdown of caspase-8, CD95 or FADD prevents activation of Plk3 upon CD95 stimulation, suggesting a requirement of a functional DISC for Plk3 activation. Furthermore, we identify caspase-8 as a new substrate for Plk3. Phosphorylation occurs on T273 and results in stimulation of caspase-8 proapoptotic function. Stimulation of CD95 in cells expressing a non-phosphorylatable caspase-8-T273A mutant in a rescue experiment or in Plk3-KO cells generated by CRISPR/Cas9 reduces the processing of caspase-8 prominently. Low T273 phosphorylation correlates significantly with low Plk3 expression in a cohort of 95 anal tumor patients. Our data suggest a novel mechanism of kinase activation within the Plk family and propose a new model for the stimulation of the extrinsic death pathway in tumors with high Plk3 expression. PMID:27325299

  20. Criticality and Adaptivity in Enzymatic Networks.

    PubMed

    Steiner, Paul J; Williams, Ruth J; Hasty, Jeff; Tsimring, Lev S

    2016-09-01

    The contrast between the stochasticity of biochemical networks and the regularity of cellular behavior suggests that biological networks generate robust behavior from noisy constituents. Identifying the mechanisms that confer this ability on biological networks is essential to understanding cells. Here we show that queueing for a limited shared resource in broad classes of enzymatic networks in certain conditions leads to a critical state characterized by strong and long-ranged correlations between molecular species. An enzymatic network reaches this critical state when the input flux of its substrate is balanced by the maximum processing capacity of the network. We then consider enzymatic networks with adaptation, when the limiting resource (enzyme or cofactor) is produced in proportion to the demand for it. We show that the critical state becomes an attractor for these networks, which points toward the onset of self-organized criticality. We suggest that the adaptive queueing motif that leads to significant correlations between multiple species may be widespread in biological systems. PMID:27602735

  1. Enzymatic transformation of nonfood biomass to starch.

    PubMed

    You, Chun; Chen, Hongge; Myung, Suwan; Sathitsuksanoh, Noppadon; Ma, Hui; Zhang, Xiao-Zhou; Li, Jianyong; Zhang, Y-H Percival

    2013-04-30

    The global demand for food could double in another 40 y owing to growth in the population and food consumption per capita. To meet the world's future food and sustainability needs for biofuels and renewable materials, the production of starch-rich cereals and cellulose-rich bioenergy plants must grow substantially while minimizing agriculture's environmental footprint and conserving biodiversity. Here we demonstrate one-pot enzymatic conversion of pretreated biomass to starch through a nonnatural synthetic enzymatic pathway composed of endoglucanase, cellobiohydrolyase, cellobiose phosphorylase, and alpha-glucan phosphorylase originating from bacterial, fungal, and plant sources. A special polypeptide cap in potato alpha-glucan phosphorylase was essential to push a partially hydrolyzed intermediate of cellulose forward to the synthesis of amylose. Up to 30% of the anhydroglucose units in cellulose were converted to starch; the remaining cellulose was hydrolyzed to glucose suitable for ethanol production by yeast in the same bioreactor. Next-generation biorefineries based on simultaneous enzymatic biotransformation and microbial fermentation could address the food, biofuels, and environment trilemma.

  2. Criticality and Adaptivity in Enzymatic Networks.

    PubMed

    Steiner, Paul J; Williams, Ruth J; Hasty, Jeff; Tsimring, Lev S

    2016-09-01

    The contrast between the stochasticity of biochemical networks and the regularity of cellular behavior suggests that biological networks generate robust behavior from noisy constituents. Identifying the mechanisms that confer this ability on biological networks is essential to understanding cells. Here we show that queueing for a limited shared resource in broad classes of enzymatic networks in certain conditions leads to a critical state characterized by strong and long-ranged correlations between molecular species. An enzymatic network reaches this critical state when the input flux of its substrate is balanced by the maximum processing capacity of the network. We then consider enzymatic networks with adaptation, when the limiting resource (enzyme or cofactor) is produced in proportion to the demand for it. We show that the critical state becomes an attractor for these networks, which points toward the onset of self-organized criticality. We suggest that the adaptive queueing motif that leads to significant correlations between multiple species may be widespread in biological systems.

  3. Enzymatic transformation of nonfood biomass to starch

    PubMed Central

    You, Chun; Chen, Hongge; Myung, Suwan; Sathitsuksanoh, Noppadon; Ma, Hui; Zhang, Xiao-Zhou; Li, Jianyong; Zhang, Y.-H. Percival

    2013-01-01

    The global demand for food could double in another 40 y owing to growth in the population and food consumption per capita. To meet the world’s future food and sustainability needs for biofuels and renewable materials, the production of starch-rich cereals and cellulose-rich bioenergy plants must grow substantially while minimizing agriculture’s environmental footprint and conserving biodiversity. Here we demonstrate one-pot enzymatic conversion of pretreated biomass to starch through a nonnatural synthetic enzymatic pathway composed of endoglucanase, cellobiohydrolyase, cellobiose phosphorylase, and alpha-glucan phosphorylase originating from bacterial, fungal, and plant sources. A special polypeptide cap in potato alpha-glucan phosphorylase was essential to push a partially hydrolyzed intermediate of cellulose forward to the synthesis of amylose. Up to 30% of the anhydroglucose units in cellulose were converted to starch; the remaining cellulose was hydrolyzed to glucose suitable for ethanol production by yeast in the same bioreactor. Next-generation biorefineries based on simultaneous enzymatic biotransformation and microbial fermentation could address the food, biofuels, and environment trilemma. PMID:23589840

  4. Eukaryotic-Type Ser/Thr Protein Kinase Mediated Phosphorylation of Mycobacterial Phosphodiesterase Affects its Localization to the Cell Wall.

    PubMed

    Malhotra, Neha; Chakraborti, Pradip K

    2016-01-01

    Phosphodiesterase enzymes, involved in cAMP hydrolysis reaction, are present throughout phylogeny and their phosphorylation mediated regulation remains elusive in prokaryotes. In this context, we focused on this enzyme from Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The gene encoded by Rv0805 was PCR amplified and expressed as a histidine-tagged protein (mPDE) utilizing Escherichia coli based expression system. In kinase assays, upon incubation with mycobacterial Clade I eukaryotic-type Ser/Thr kinases (PknA, PknB, and PknL), Ni-NTA purified mPDE protein exhibited transphosphorylation ability albeit with varying degree. When mPDE was co-expressed one at a time with these kinases in E. coli, it was also recognized by an anti-phosphothreonine antibody, which further indicates its phosphorylating ability. Mass spectrometric analysis identified Thr-309 of mPDE as a phosphosite. In concordance with this observation, anti-phosphothreonine antibody marginally recognized mPDE-T309A mutant protein; however, such alteration did not affect the enzymatic activity. Interestingly, mPDE expressed in Mycobacterium smegmatis yielded a phosphorylated protein that preferentially localized to cell wall. In contrast, mPDE-T309A, the phosphoablative variant of mPDE, did not show such behavior. On the other hand, phosphomimics of mPDE (T309D or T309E), exhibited similar cell wall anchorage as was observed with the wild-type. Thus, our results provide credence to the fact that eukaryotic-type Ser/Thr kinase mediated phosphorylation of mPDE renders negative charge to the protein, promoting its localization on cell wall. Furthermore, multiple sequence alignment revealed that Thr-309 is conserved among mPDE orthologs of M. tuberculosis complex, which presumably emphasizes evolutionary significance of phosphorylation at this residue.

  5. Eukaryotic-Type Ser/Thr Protein Kinase Mediated Phosphorylation of Mycobacterial Phosphodiesterase Affects its Localization to the Cell Wall

    PubMed Central

    Malhotra, Neha; Chakraborti, Pradip K.

    2016-01-01

    Phosphodiesterase enzymes, involved in cAMP hydrolysis reaction, are present throughout phylogeny and their phosphorylation mediated regulation remains elusive in prokaryotes. In this context, we focused on this enzyme from Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The gene encoded by Rv0805 was PCR amplified and expressed as a histidine-tagged protein (mPDE) utilizing Escherichia coli based expression system. In kinase assays, upon incubation with mycobacterial Clade I eukaryotic-type Ser/Thr kinases (PknA, PknB, and PknL), Ni-NTA purified mPDE protein exhibited transphosphorylation ability albeit with varying degree. When mPDE was co-expressed one at a time with these kinases in E. coli, it was also recognized by an anti-phosphothreonine antibody, which further indicates its phosphorylating ability. Mass spectrometric analysis identified Thr-309 of mPDE as a phosphosite. In concordance with this observation, anti-phosphothreonine antibody marginally recognized mPDE-T309A mutant protein; however, such alteration did not affect the enzymatic activity. Interestingly, mPDE expressed in Mycobacterium smegmatis yielded a phosphorylated protein that preferentially localized to cell wall. In contrast, mPDE-T309A, the phosphoablative variant of mPDE, did not show such behavior. On the other hand, phosphomimics of mPDE (T309D or T309E), exhibited similar cell wall anchorage as was observed with the wild-type. Thus, our results provide credence to the fact that eukaryotic-type Ser/Thr kinase mediated phosphorylation of mPDE renders negative charge to the protein, promoting its localization on cell wall. Furthermore, multiple sequence alignment revealed that Thr-309 is conserved among mPDE orthologs of M. tuberculosis complex, which presumably emphasizes evolutionary significance of phosphorylation at this residue. PMID:26904001

  6. Binding to serine 65-phosphorylated ubiquitin primes Parkin for optimal PINK1-dependent phosphorylation and activation.

    PubMed

    Kazlauskaite, Agne; Martínez-Torres, R Julio; Wilkie, Scott; Kumar, Atul; Peltier, Julien; Gonzalez, Alba; Johnson, Clare; Zhang, Jinwei; Hope, Anthony G; Peggie, Mark; Trost, Matthias; van Aalten, Daan M F; Alessi, Dario R; Prescott, Alan R; Knebel, Axel; Walden, Helen; Muqit, Miratul M K

    2015-08-01

    Mutations in the mitochondrial protein kinase PINK1 are associated with autosomal recessive Parkinson disease (PD). We and other groups have reported that PINK1 activates Parkin E3 ligase activity both directly via phosphorylation of Parkin serine 65 (Ser(65))--which lies within its ubiquitin-like domain (Ubl)--and indirectly through phosphorylation of ubiquitin at Ser(65). How Ser(65)-phosphorylated ubiquitin (ubiquitin(Phospho-Ser65)) contributes to Parkin activation is currently unknown. Here, we demonstrate that ubiquitin(Phospho-Ser65) binding to Parkin dramatically increases the rate and stoichiometry of Parkin phosphorylation at Ser(65) by PINK1 in vitro. Analysis of the Parkin structure, corroborated by site-directed mutagenesis, shows that the conserved His302 and Lys151 residues play a critical role in binding of ubiquitin(Phospho-Ser65), thereby promoting Parkin Ser(65) phosphorylation and activation of its E3 ligase activity in vitro. Mutation of His302 markedly inhibits Parkin Ser(65) phosphorylation at the mitochondria, which is associated with a marked reduction in its E3 ligase activity following mitochondrial depolarisation. We show that the binding of ubiquitin(Phospho-Ser65) to Parkin disrupts the interaction between the Ubl domain and C-terminal region, thereby increasing the accessibility of Parkin Ser(65). Finally, purified Parkin maximally phosphorylated at Ser(65) in vitro cannot be further activated by the addition of ubiquitin(Phospho-Ser65). Our results thus suggest that a major role of ubiquitin(Phospho-Ser65) is to promote PINK1-mediated phosphorylation of Parkin at Ser(65), leading to maximal activation of Parkin E3 ligase activity. His302 and Lys151 are likely to line a phospho-Ser(65)-binding pocket on the surface of Parkin that is critical for the ubiquitin(Phospho-Ser65) interaction. This study provides new mechanistic insights into Parkin activation by ubiquitin(Phospho-Ser65), which could aid in the development of Parkin

  7. Binding to serine 65-phosphorylated ubiquitin primes Parkin for optimal PINK1-dependent phosphorylation and activation

    PubMed Central

    Kazlauskaite, Agne; Martínez-Torres, R Julio; Wilkie, Scott; Kumar, Atul; Peltier, Julien; Gonzalez, Alba; Johnson, Clare; Zhang, Jinwei; Hope, Anthony G; Peggie, Mark; Trost, Matthias; van Aalten, Daan MF; Alessi, Dario R; Prescott, Alan R; Knebel, Axel; Walden, Helen; Muqit, Miratul MK

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in the mitochondrial protein kinase PINK1 are associated with autosomal recessive Parkinson disease (PD). We and other groups have reported that PINK1 activates Parkin E3 ligase activity both directly via phosphorylation of Parkin serine 65 (Ser65)—which lies within its ubiquitin-like domain (Ubl)—and indirectly through phosphorylation of ubiquitin at Ser65. How Ser65-phosphorylated ubiquitin (ubiquitinPhospho-Ser65) contributes to Parkin activation is currently unknown. Here, we demonstrate that ubiquitinPhospho-Ser65 binding to Parkin dramatically increases the rate and stoichiometry of Parkin phosphorylation at Ser65 by PINK1 in vitro. Analysis of the Parkin structure, corroborated by site-directed mutagenesis, shows that the conserved His302 and Lys151 residues play a critical role in binding of ubiquitinPhospho-Ser65, thereby promoting Parkin Ser65 phosphorylation and activation of its E3 ligase activity in vitro. Mutation of His302 markedly inhibits Parkin Ser65 phosphorylation at the mitochondria, which is associated with a marked reduction in its E3 ligase activity following mitochondrial depolarisation. We show that the binding of ubiquitinPhospho-Ser65 to Parkin disrupts the interaction between the Ubl domain and C-terminal region, thereby increasing the accessibility of Parkin Ser65. Finally, purified Parkin maximally phosphorylated at Ser65 in vitro cannot be further activated by the addition of ubiquitinPhospho-Ser65. Our results thus suggest that a major role of ubiquitinPhospho-Ser65 is to promote PINK1-mediated phosphorylation of Parkin at Ser65, leading to maximal activation of Parkin E3 ligase activity. His302 and Lys151 are likely to line a phospho-Ser65-binding pocket on the surface of Parkin that is critical for the ubiquitinPhospho-Ser65 interaction. This study provides new mechanistic insights into Parkin activation by ubiquitinPhospho-Ser65, which could aid in the development of Parkin activators that mimic the effect of

  8. Genetic Manipulation of Neurofilament Protein Phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Jones, Maria R; Villalón, Eric; Garcia, Michael L

    2016-01-01

    Neurofilament biology is important to understanding structural properties of axons, such as establishment of axonal diameter by radial growth. In order to study the function of neurofilaments, a series of genetically modified mice have been generated. Here, we describe a brief history of genetic modifications used to study neurofilaments, as well as an overview of the steps required to generate a gene-targeted mouse. In addition, we describe steps utilized to analyze neurofilament phosphorylation status using immunoblotting. Taken together, these provide comprehensive analysis of neurofilament function in vivo, which can be applied to many systems.

  9. Cold enzymatic bleaching of fluid whey.

    PubMed

    Campbell, R E; Drake, M A

    2013-01-01

    Chemical bleaching of fluid whey and retentate with hydrogen peroxide (HP) alone requires high concentrations (100-500 mg of HP/kg) and recent studies have demonstrated that off-flavors are generated during chemical bleaching that carry through to spray-dried whey proteins. Bleaching of fluid whey and retentate with enzymes such as naturally present lactoperoxidase or an exogenous commercial peroxidase (EP) at cold temperatures (4°C) may be a viable alternative to traditional chemical bleaching of whey. The objective of this study was to determine the optimum level of HP for enzymatic bleaching (both lactoperoxidase and EP) at 4°C and to compare bleaching efficacy and sensory characteristics to HP chemical bleaching at 4°C. Selected treatments were subsequently applied for whey protein concentrate with 80% protein (WPC80) manufacture. Fluid Cheddar whey and retentate (80% protein) were manufactured in triplicate from pasteurized whole milk. The optimum concentration of HP (0 to 250 mg/kg) to activate enzymatic bleaching at 4°C was determined by quantifying the loss of norbixin. In subsequent experiments, bleaching efficacy, descriptive sensory analysis, and volatile compounds were monitored at selected time points. A control with no bleaching was also evaluated. Enzymatic bleaching of fluid whey and retentate at 4°C resulted in faster bleaching and higher bleaching efficacy (color loss) than bleaching with HP alone at 250 mg/kg. Due to concentrated levels of naturally present lactoperoxidase, retentate bleached to completion (>80% norbixin destruction in 30 min) faster than fluid whey at 4°C (>80% norbixin destruction in 12h). In fluid whey, the addition of EP decreased bleaching time. Spray-dried WPC80 from bleached wheys, regardless of bleaching treatment, were characterized by a lack of sweet aromatic and buttery flavors, and the presence of cardboard flavor concurrent with higher relative abundance of 1-octen-3-ol and 1-octen-3-one. Among enzymatically

  10. Quantification of gel-separated proteins and their phosphorylation sites by LC-MS using unlabeled internal standards: analysis of phosphoprotein dynamics in a B cell lymphoma cell line.

    PubMed

    Cutillas, Pedro R; Geering, Barbara; Waterfield, Mike D; Vanhaesebroeck, Bart

    2005-08-01

    Protein phosphorylation plays a critical role in normal cellular function and is often subverted in disease. Although major advances have recently been made in identification and quantitation of protein phosphorylation sites by MS, current methodological limitations still preclude routine, easily usable, and comprehensive quantitative analysis of protein phosphorylation. Here we report a simple LC-MS method to quantify gel-separated proteins and their sites of phosphorylation; in this approach, integrated chromatographic peak areas of peptide analytes from proteins under study are normalized to those of a non-isotopically labeled internal standard protein spiked into the excised gel samples just prior to in-gel digestion. The internal standard intensities correct for differences in enzymatic activities and sample losses that may occur during the processes of in-gel digestion and peptide extraction from the gel pieces. We used this method of peak area measurement with an internal standard to investigate the effects of pervanadate on protein phosphorylation in the WEHI-231 B cell lymphoma cell line and to assess the role of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) in these phosphorylation events. Phosphoproteins, isolated from total cell lysates using IMAC or by immunoprecipitation using Tyr(P) antibodies, were analyzed using this method, leading to identification of >400 proteins, several of which were found at higher levels in phosphoprotein fractions after pervanadate treatment. Pretreatment of cells with the PI3K inhibitor wortmannin reduced the phosphorylation level of certain proteins (e.g. STAT1 and phospholipase Cgamma2) while increasing the phosphorylation of several others. Peak area measurement with an internal standard was also used to follow the dynamics of PI3K-dependent and -independent changes in the post-translational modification of both known and novel phospholipase Cgamma2 phosphorylation sites. Our results illustrate the capacity of this conceptually

  11. Phosphorylation of Simian Cytomegalovirus Assembly Protein Precursor (pAPNG.5) and Proteinase Precursor (pAPNG1): Multiple Attachment Sites Identified, Including Two Adjacent Serines in a Casein Kinase II Consensus Sequence

    PubMed Central

    Plafker, Scott M.; Woods, Amina S.; Gibson, Wade

    1999-01-01

    The assembly protein precursor (pAP) of cytomegalovirus (CMV), and its homologs in other herpesviruses, functions at several key steps during the process of capsid formation. This protein, and the genetically related maturational proteinase, is distinguished from the other capsid proteins by posttranslational modifications, including phosphorylation. The objective of this study was to identify sites at which pAP is phosphorylated so that the functional significance of this modification and the enzyme(s) responsible for it can be determined. In the work reported here, we used peptide mapping, mass spectrometry, and site-directed mutagenesis to identify two sets of pAP phosphorylation sites. One is a casein kinase II (CKII) consensus sequence that contains two adjacent serines, both of which are phosphorylated. The other site(s) is in a different domain of the protein, is phosphorylated less frequently than the CKII site, does not require preceding CKII-site phosphorylation, and causes an electrophoretic mobility shift when phosphorylated. Transfection/expression assays for proteolytic activity showed no gross effect of CKII-site phosphorylation on the enzymatic activity of the proteinase or on the substrate behavior of pAP. Evidence is presented that both the CKII sites and the secondary sites are phosphorylated in virus-infected cells and plasmid-transfected cells, indicating that these modifications can be made by a cellular enzyme(s). Apparent compartmental differences in phosphorylation of the CKII-site (cytoplasmic) and secondary-site (nuclear) serines suggest the involvement of more that one enzyme in these modifications. PMID:10516011

  12. The role of myosin phosphorylation in anaphase chromosome movement.

    PubMed

    Sheykhani, Rozhan; Shirodkar, Purnata V; Forer, Arthur

    2013-01-01

    This work deals with the role of myosin phosphorylation in anaphase chromosome movement. Y27632 and ML7 block two different pathways for phosphorylation of the myosin regulatory light chain (MRLC). Both stopped or slowed chromosome movement when added to anaphase crane-fly spermatocytes. To confirm that the effects of the pharmacological agents were on the presumed targets, we studied cells stained with antibodies against mono- or bi-phosphorylated myosin. For all chromosomes whose movements were affected by a drug, the corresponding spindle fibres of the affected chromosomes had reduced levels of 1P- and 2P-myosin. Thus the drugs acted on the presumed target and myosin phosphorylation is involved in anaphase force production. Calyculin A, an inhibitor of MRLC dephosphorylation, reversed and accelerated the altered movements caused by Y27632 and ML-7, suggesting that another phosphorylation pathway is involved in phosphorylation of spindle myosin. Staurosporine, a more general phosphorylation inhibitor, also reduced the levels of MRLC phosphorylation and caused anaphase chromosomes to stop or slow. The effects of staurosporine on chromosome movements were not reversed by Calyculin A, confirming that another phosphorylation pathway is involved in phosphorylation of spindle myosin. PMID:23566798

  13. Mitotic phosphorylation of histone H3 threonine 80

    PubMed Central

    Hammond, Sharra L; Byrum, Stephanie D; Namjoshi, Sarita; Graves, Hillary K; Dennehey, Briana K; Tackett, Alan J; Tyler, Jessica K

    2014-01-01

    The onset and regulation of mitosis is dependent on phosphorylation of a wide array of proteins. Among the proteins that are phosphorylated during mitosis is histone H3, which is heavily phosphorylated on its N-terminal tail. In addition, large-scale mass spectrometry screens have revealed that histone H3 phosphorylation can occur at multiple sites within its globular domain, yet detailed analyses of the functions of these phosphorylations are lacking. Here, we explore one such histone H3 phosphorylation site, threonine 80 (H3T80), which is located on the nucleosome surface. Phosphorylated H3T80 (H3T80ph) is enriched in metazoan cells undergoing mitosis. Unlike H3S10 and H3S28, H3T80 is not phosphorylated by the Aurora B kinase. Further, mutations of T80 to either glutamic acid, a phosphomimetic, or to alanine, an unmodifiable residue, result in an increase in cells in prophase and an increase in anaphase/telophase bridges, respectively. SILAC-coupled mass spectrometry shows that phosphorylated H3T80 (H3T80ph) preferentially interacts with histones H2A and H4 relative to non-phosphorylated H3T80, and this result is supported by increased binding of H3T80ph to histone octamers in vitro. These findings support a model where H3T80ph, protruding from the nucleosome surface, promotes interactions between adjacent nucleosomes to promote chromatin compaction during mitosis in metazoan cells. PMID:24275038

  14. Mitotic phosphorylation of histone H3 threonine 80.

    PubMed

    Hammond, Sharra L; Byrum, Stephanie D; Namjoshi, Sarita; Graves, Hillary K; Dennehey, Briana K; Tackett, Alan J; Tyler, Jessica K

    2014-01-01

    The onset and regulation of mitosis is dependent on phosphorylation of a wide array of proteins. Among the proteins that are phosphorylated during mitosis is histone H3, which is heavily phosphorylated on its N-terminal tail. In addition, large-scale mass spectrometry screens have revealed that histone H3 phosphorylation can occur at multiple sites within its globular domain, yet detailed analyses of the functions of these phosphorylations are lacking. Here, we explore one such histone H3 phosphorylation site, threonine 80 (H3T80), which is located on the nucleosome surface. Phosphorylated H3T80 (H3T80ph) is enriched in metazoan cells undergoing mitosis. Unlike H3S10 and H3S28, H3T80 is not phosphorylated by the Aurora B kinase. Further, mutations of T80 to either glutamic acid, a phosphomimetic, or to alanine, an unmodifiable residue, result in an increase in cells in prophase and an increase in anaphase/telophase bridges, respectively. SILAC-coupled mass spectrometry shows that phosphorylated H3T80 (H3T80ph) preferentially interacts with histones H2A and H4 relative to non-phosphorylated H3T80, and this result is supported by increased binding of H3T80ph to histone octamers in vitro. These findings support a model where H3T80ph, protruding from the nucleosome surface, promotes interactions between adjacent nucleosomes to promote chromatin compaction during mitosis in metazoan cells.

  15. Regulation of cytosolic phospholipase A2 phosphorylation and eicosanoid production by colony-stimulating factor 1.

    PubMed

    Xu, X X; Rock, C O; Qiu, Z H; Leslie, C C; Jackowski, S

    1994-12-16

    A colony-stimulating factor 1 (CSF-1)-dependent murine macrophage cell line (BAC1.2F5) and peritoneal macrophages were used to investigate the relationship between growth factor-dependent phosphorylation/activation of the 85-kDa cytosolic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2) and arachidonic acid metabolism. The addition of CSF-1 to quiescent BAC1.2F5 cells was followed by the rapid phosphorylation, electrophoretic gel retardation, and stable increase in the specific activity of cPLA2 that correlated with the activation of ERK kinases. cPLA2 phosphorylation depended on the presence of growth factor and persisted throughout the cell cycle. CSF-1 inhibited prostaglandin E2 production and did not enhance arachidonic acid release or increase the levels of lysophosphatidylcholine or glycerophosphocholine. Treatment of BAC1.2F5 cells with the calcium ionophore A23187 plus CSF-1 did not stimulate eicosanoid release. Instead, CSF-1 enhanced the rate of exogenous arachidonic acid incorporation into phosphatidylcholine and its subsequent transfer to phosphatidylethanolamine suggesting that higher rates of arachidonic acid acylation may contribute to the suppression of prostaglandin production. In peritoneal macrophages, ERK kinase activity was stimulated and cPLA2 was phosphorylated and activated in response to CSF-1. However, CSF-1 did not trigger eicosanoid release but did augment arachidonic acid mobilization and prostaglandin E2 production elicited by zymosan and A23187. Thus, cPLA2 phosphorylation/activation and calcium mobilization are not the only determinants for eicosanoid release, and additional components in differentiated tissue macrophages are also required.

  16. Prebiotic Phosphorylation Reactions on the Early Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gull, Maheen

    2014-07-01

    Phosphorus (P) is an essential element for life. It occurs in living beings in the form of phosphate, which is ubiquitous in biochemistry, chiefly in the form of C-O-P (carbon, oxygen and phosphorus), C-P, or P-O-P linkages to form life. Within prebiotic chemistry, several key questions concerning phosphorus chemistry have developed: what were the most likely sources of P on the early Earth? How did it become incorporated into the biological world to form the P compounds that life employs today? Can meteorites be responsible for the delivery of P? What were the most likely solvents on the early Earth and out of those which are favorable for phosphorylation? Or, alternatively, were P compounds most likely produced in relatively dry environments? What were the most suitable temperature conditions for phosphorylation? A route to efficient formation of biological P compounds is still a question that challenges astrobiologists. This article discusses these important issues related to the origin of biological P compounds.

  17. Interaction of diphtheria toxin with phosphorylated molecules.

    PubMed Central

    Proia, R L; Hart, D A; Eidels, L

    1979-01-01

    The binding of diphtheria toxin to 125I-labeled cell surface glycoproteins from hamster thymocytes was shown to be inhibited by nucleotides. The relative effectiveness of the nucleotides (at 5 mM) was found to be thymidine triphosphate greater than adenosine triphosphate greater than guanosine triphosphate greater than uridine triphosphate greater than cytidine triphosphate. When adenine-containing compounds were used, the relative effectiveness was determined to be adenosine tetraphosphate greater than adenosine triphosphate greater than adenosine diphosphate greater than adenosine monophosphate. In addition, tetrapolyphosphate, tripolyphosphate, inositol hexaphosphate (phytic acid), and the highly phosphorylated proteins casein and phosvitin were also shown to be potent inhibitors of the binding of diphtheria toxin to 125I-labeled cell surface glycoproteins. Diphtheria toxin was shown to bind directly to 125I-casein; this binding was also inhibited by the highly phosphorylated compounds and was decreased by pretreatment of the 125I-casein with alkaline phosphatase. These results suggest that diphtheria toxin binds to regions of high phosphate density and raise the possibility that the site on the cell surface glycoproteins to which diphtheria toxin binds might be polyanionic in nature. PMID:528059

  18. Modelling the Krebs cycle and oxidative phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Korla, Kalyani; Mitra, Chanchal K

    2014-01-01

    The Krebs cycle and oxidative phosphorylation are the two most important sets of reactions in a eukaryotic cell that meet the major part of the total energy demands of a cell. In this paper, we present a computer simulation of the coupled reactions using open source tools for simulation. We also show that it is possible to model the Krebs cycle with a simple black box with a few inputs and outputs. However, the kinetics of the internal processes has been modelled using numerical tools. We also show that the Krebs cycle and oxidative phosphorylation together can be combined in a similar fashion - a black box with a few inputs and outputs. The Octave script is flexible and customisable for any chosen set-up for this model. In several cases, we had no explicit idea of the underlying reaction mechanism and the rate determining steps involved, and we have used the stoichiometric equations that can be easily changed as and when more detailed information is obtained. The script includes the feedback regulation of the various enzymes of the Krebs cycle. For the electron transport chain, the pH gradient across the membrane is an essential regulator of the kinetics and this has been modelled empirically but fully consistent with experimental results. The initial conditions can be very easily changed and the simulation is potentially very useful in a number of cases of clinical importance.

  19. Regulation of cardiac C-protein phosphorylation

    SciTech Connect

    Titus, F.L.

    1985-01-01

    Molecular mechanisms of cardiac sympathetic and parasympathetic responses were addressed by studying subcellular changes in protein phosphorylation, cAMP-dependent protein kinase activity and protein phosphatase activity in frog hearts. B-adrenergic agonists increased and muscarinic cholinergic agonists decreased (/sup 32/P)phosphate incorporation into C-protein, a thick filament component. Regulation of protein phosphatase activity by Iso and methacholine (MCh) was assayed using extracts of drug treated frog hearts and (/sup 32/P)phospho-C-protein as substrate. Total phosphatase activity decreased 21% in extracts from hearts perfused with 0.1 ..mu..M Iso and 17% in hearts exposed to Iso plus 1 ..mu..M methacholine. This decrease reflected decreased phosphatase-2A activity. No changes in total phosphatase activity were measurable in broken cells treated with Iso or MCh. The results suggest adrenergic stimulation changes contractile activity in frog hearts by activating cAMP-dependent protein kinase associated with particulate cellular elements and inactivating soluble protein phosphatase-2A. This is the first demonstration of coordinated regulation of these enzymes by B-adrenergic agonists favoring phosphorylation of effector proteins. Coordinated regulation by methacholine in the presence of Iso was not observed.

  20. Stat5a serine phosphorylation. Serine 779 is constitutively phosphorylated in the mammary gland, and serine 725 phosphorylation influences prolactin-stimulated in vitro DNA binding activity.

    PubMed

    Beuvink, I; Hess, D; Flotow, H; Hofsteenge, J; Groner, B; Hynes, N E

    2000-04-01

    The activity of transcription factors of the Stat family is controlled by phosphorylation of a conserved, carboxyl-terminal tyrosine residue. Tyrosine phosphorylation is essential for Stat dimerization, nuclear translocation, DNA binding, and transcriptional activation. Phosphorylation of Stats on specific serine residues has also been described. We have previously shown that in HC11 mammary epithelial cells Stat5a is phosphorylated on Tyr(694) in a prolactin-sensitive manner, whereas serine phosphorylation is constitutive (Wartmann, M., Cella, N., Hofer, P., Groner, B., Xiuwen, L., Hennighausen, L., and Hynes, N. E. (1996) J. Biol. Chem. 271, 31863-31868). By using mass spectrometry and site-directed mutagenesis, we have now identified Ser(779), located in a unique Stat5a SP motif, as the site of serine phosphorylation. By using phospho-Ser(779)-specific antiserum, we have determined that Ser(779) is constitutively phosphorylated in mammary glands taken from different developmental stages. Stat5a isolated from spleen, heart, brain, and lung was also found to be phosphorylated on Ser(779). Ser(725) in Stat5a has also been identified as a phosphorylation site (Yamashita, H., Xu, J., Erwin, R. A., Farrar, W. L., Kirken, R. A., and Rui, H. (1998) J. Biol. Chem. 273, 30218-30224). Here we show that mutagenesis of Ser(725), Ser(779), or a combination of Ser(725/779) to an Ala had no effect on prolactin-induced transcriptional activation of a beta-casein reporter construct. However, following prolactin induction the Ser(725) mutant displayed sustained DNA binding activity compared with that of wild type Stat5a. The results suggest that Ser(725) phosphorylation has an impact on signal duration. PMID:10744710

  1. Stat5a serine phosphorylation. Serine 779 is constitutively phosphorylated in the mammary gland, and serine 725 phosphorylation influences prolactin-stimulated in vitro DNA binding activity.

    PubMed

    Beuvink, I; Hess, D; Flotow, H; Hofsteenge, J; Groner, B; Hynes, N E

    2000-04-01

    The activity of transcription factors of the Stat family is controlled by phosphorylation of a conserved, carboxyl-terminal tyrosine residue. Tyrosine phosphorylation is essential for Stat dimerization, nuclear translocation, DNA binding, and transcriptional activation. Phosphorylation of Stats on specific serine residues has also been described. We have previously shown that in HC11 mammary epithelial cells Stat5a is phosphorylated on Tyr(694) in a prolactin-sensitive manner, whereas serine phosphorylation is constitutive (Wartmann, M., Cella, N., Hofer, P., Groner, B., Xiuwen, L., Hennighausen, L., and Hynes, N. E. (1996) J. Biol. Chem. 271, 31863-31868). By using mass spectrometry and site-directed mutagenesis, we have now identified Ser(779), located in a unique Stat5a SP motif, as the site of serine phosphorylation. By using phospho-Ser(779)-specific antiserum, we have determined that Ser(779) is constitutively phosphorylated in mammary glands taken from different developmental stages. Stat5a isolated from spleen, heart, brain, and lung was also found to be phosphorylated on Ser(779). Ser(725) in Stat5a has also been identified as a phosphorylation site (Yamashita, H., Xu, J., Erwin, R. A., Farrar, W. L., Kirken, R. A., and Rui, H. (1998) J. Biol. Chem. 273, 30218-30224). Here we show that mutagenesis of Ser(725), Ser(779), or a combination of Ser(725/779) to an Ala had no effect on prolactin-induced transcriptional activation of a beta-casein reporter construct. However, following prolactin induction the Ser(725) mutant displayed sustained DNA binding activity compared with that of wild type Stat5a. The results suggest that Ser(725) phosphorylation has an impact on signal duration.

  2. Phosphorylation of Tip60 Tyrosine 327 by Abl Kinase Inhibits HAT Activity through Association with FE65

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Sung Hwa; Kang, Sang Sun

    2013-01-01

    The transfer of acetyl groups from acetyl coenzyme A to the ε amino group of internal lysine residues is catalyzed by Tip60, which is in the MYST family of nuclear histone acetyltransferases (HATs). The tyrosine phosphorylation of Tip60 seems to be a unique modification. We present evidence that Tip60 is modified on tyrosine 327 by Abl kinase. We show that this causes functional changes in HAT activity and the subcellular localization of TIP60, which forms a complex with Abl kinase. The Tip60 mutation Y327F abolished tyrosine phosphorylation, reduced the inhibition of Tip60 HAT activity, and caused G0-G1 arrest and association with FE65. Thus, our findings for the first time suggested a novel regulation mechanism of Tip60. Regulation was through phosphorylation of tyrosine 327 by Abl tyrosine kinase and depended on environmental conditions, suggesting that the tyrosine residue of Tip60 is important for the activation process. PMID:24044023

  3. Enhancement of enzymatic digestion of Antarctic krill and successive extraction of selenium organic compounds by ultrasound treatment.

    PubMed

    Siwek, Mariana; Bari Noubar, Amir; Bergmann, Jan; Niemeyer, Bernd; Galunsky, Boris

    2006-01-01

    In a previous work we described the isolation of selenium organic species from Antarctic krill after enzymatic hydrolysis. In this paper we present the results of the influence of ultrasonication on the enzymatic treatment and the successive isolation of selenomethionine. We showed that ultrasound-assisted enzymatic digestion leads to quantitative release of selenium in the soluble fraction and recovery of selenomethionine from the krill protein within a time 2 orders of magnitude shorter. The solubilised sample was analysed by size-exclusion chromatography and the selenomethionine content was quantified by high-performance liquid chromatography-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. In total, 99% of the selenomethionine in the krill hydrolysate was recovered from the chromatographic fractions. It corresponds to 35% of the total selenium content in Antarctic krill. Monitoring by microscopy of the changes in the structure of the krill samples during ultrasonication suggested that the enhancement of the ultrasound-assisted enzymatic reaction was mainly due to decrease of mass transfer limitations. A reference experiment for ultrasound-assisted enzymatic digestion of cell-free protein in a homogeneous system does not exclude direct influence of the ultrasound energy on the enzyme-substrate interaction.

  4. Tyrosine phosphorylation of clathrin heavy chain under oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Ihara, Yoshito; Yasuoka, Chie; Kageyama, Kan; Wada, Yoshinao; Kondo, Takahito

    2002-09-20

    In mouse pancreatic insulin-producing betaTC cells, oxidative stress due to H(2)O(2) causes tyrosine phosphorylation in various proteins. To identify proteins bearing phosphotyrosine under stress, the proteins were affinity purified using an anti-phosphotyrosine antibody-conjugated agarose column. A protein of 180kDa was identified as clathrin heavy chain (CHC) by electrophoresis and mass spectrometry. Immunoprecipitated CHC showed tyrosine phosphorylation upon H(2)O(2) treatment and the phosphorylation was suppressed by the Src kinase inhibitor, PP2. The phosphorylation status of CHC affected the intracellular localization of CHC and the clathrin-dependent endocytosis of transferrin under oxidative stress. In conclusion, CHC is a protein that is phosphorylated at tyrosine by H(2)O(2) and this phosphorylation status is implicated in the intracellular localization and functions of CHC under oxidative stress. The present study demonstrates that oxidative stress affects intracellular vesicular trafficking via the alteration of clathrin-dependent vesicular trafficking.

  5. Phosphorylation modifies the molecular stability of β-amyloid deposits

    PubMed Central

    Rezaei-Ghaleh, Nasrollah; Amininasab, Mehriar; Kumar, Sathish; Walter, Jochen; Zweckstetter, Markus

    2016-01-01

    Protein aggregation plays a crucial role in neurodegenerative diseases. A key feature of protein aggregates is their ubiquitous modification by phosphorylation. Little is known, however, about the molecular consequences of phosphorylation of protein aggregates. Here we show that phosphorylation of β-amyloid at serine 8 increases the stability of its pathogenic aggregates against high-pressure and SDS-induced dissociation. We further demonstrate that phosphorylation results in an elevated number of hydrogen bonds at the N terminus of β-amyloid, the region that is critically regulated by a variety of post-translational modifications. Because of the increased lifetime of phosphorylated β-amyloid aggregates, phosphorylation can promote the spreading of β-amyloid in Alzheimer pathogenesis. Our study suggests that regulation of the molecular stability of protein aggregates by post-translational modifications is a crucial factor for disease progression in the brain. PMID:27072999

  6. Phosphorylation modifies the molecular stability of β-amyloid deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezaei-Ghaleh, Nasrollah; Amininasab, Mehriar; Kumar, Sathish; Walter, Jochen; Zweckstetter, Markus

    2016-04-01

    Protein aggregation plays a crucial role in neurodegenerative diseases. A key feature of protein aggregates is their ubiquitous modification by phosphorylation. Little is known, however, about the molecular consequences of phosphorylation of protein aggregates. Here we show that phosphorylation of β-amyloid at serine 8 increases the stability of its pathogenic aggregates against high-pressure and SDS-induced dissociation. We further demonstrate that phosphorylation results in an elevated number of hydrogen bonds at the N terminus of β-amyloid, the region that is critically regulated by a variety of post-translational modifications. Because of the increased lifetime of phosphorylated β-amyloid aggregates, phosphorylation can promote the spreading of β-amyloid in Alzheimer pathogenesis. Our study suggests that regulation of the molecular stability of protein aggregates by post-translational modifications is a crucial factor for disease progression in the brain.

  7. Nanocelluloses and their phosphorylated derivatives for selective adsorption of Ag(+), Cu(2+) and Fe(3+) from industrial effluents.

    PubMed

    Liu, Peng; Borrell, Pere Ferrer; Božič, Mojca; Kokol, Vanja; Oksman, Kristiina; Mathew, Aji P

    2015-08-30

    The potential of nanoscaled cellulose and enzymatically phosphorylated derivatives as bio-adsorbents to remove metal ions (Ag(+), Cu(2+) and Fe(3+)) from model water and industrial effluents is demonstrated. Introduction of phosphate groups onto nanocelluloses significantly improved the metal sorption velocity and sorption capacity. The removal efficiency was considered to be driven by the high surface area of these nanomaterials as well as the nature and density of functional groups on the nanocellulose surface. Generally, in the solutions containing only single types of metal ions, the metal ion selectivity was in the order Ag(+)>Cu(2+)>Fe(3+), while in the case of mixtures of ions, the order changed to Ag(+)>Fe(3+)>Cu(2+), irrespective of the surface functionality of the nanocellulose. In the case of industrial effluent from the mirror making industry, 99% removal of Cu(2+) and Fe(3+) by phosphorylated nanocellulose was observed. The study showed that phosphorylated nanocelluloses are highly efficient biomaterials for scavenging multiple metal ions, simultaneously, from industrial effluents.

  8. Evolutionary constraints of phosphorylation in eukaryotes, prokaryotes, and mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Gnad, Florian; Forner, Francesca; Zielinska, Dorota F; Birney, Ewan; Gunawardena, Jeremy; Mann, Matthias

    2010-12-01

    High accuracy mass spectrometry has proven to be a powerful technology for the large scale identification of serine/threonine/tyrosine phosphorylation in the living cell. However, despite many described phosphoproteomes, there has been no comparative study of the extent of phosphorylation and its evolutionary conservation in all domains of life. Here we analyze the results of phosphoproteomics studies performed with the same technology in a diverse set of organisms. For the most ancient organisms, the prokaryotes, only a few hundred proteins have been found to be phosphorylated. Applying the same technology to eukaryotic species resulted in the detection of thousands of phosphorylation events. Evolutionary analysis shows that prokaryotic phosphoproteins are preferentially conserved in all living organisms, whereas-site specific phosphorylation is not. Eukaryotic phosphosites are generally more conserved than their non-phosphorylated counterparts (with similar structural constraints) throughout the eukaryotic domain. Yeast and Caenorhabditis elegans are two exceptions, indicating that the majority of phosphorylation events evolved after the divergence of higher eukaryotes from yeast and reflecting the unusually large number of nematode-specific kinases. Mitochondria present an interesting intermediate link between the prokaryotic and eukaryotic domains. Applying the same technology to this organelle yielded 174 phosphorylation sites mapped to 74 proteins. Thus, the mitochondrial phosphoproteome is similarly sparse as the prokaryotic phosphoproteomes. As expected from the endosymbiotic theory, phosphorylated as well as non-phosphorylated mitochondrial proteins are significantly conserved in prokaryotes. However, mitochondrial phosphorylation sites are not conserved throughout prokaryotes, consistent with the notion that serine/threonine phosphorylation in prokaryotes occurred relatively recently in evolution. Thus, the phosphoproteome reflects major events in the

  9. Constitutive phosphorylation of cardiac myosin regulatory light chain in vivo.

    PubMed

    Chang, Audrey N; Battiprolu, Pavan K; Cowley, Patrick M; Chen, Guohua; Gerard, Robert D; Pinto, Jose R; Hill, Joseph A; Baker, Anthony J; Kamm, Kristine E; Stull, James T

    2015-04-24

    In beating hearts, phosphorylation of myosin regulatory light chain (RLC) at a single site to 0.45 mol of phosphate/mol by cardiac myosin light chain kinase (cMLCK) increases Ca(2+) sensitivity of myofilament contraction necessary for normal cardiac performance. Reduction of RLC phosphorylation in conditional cMLCK knock-out mice caused cardiac dilation and loss of cardiac performance by 1 week, as shown by increased left ventricular internal diameter at end-diastole and decreased fractional shortening. Decreased RLC phosphorylation by conventional or conditional cMLCK gene ablation did not affect troponin-I or myosin-binding protein-C phosphorylation in vivo. The extent of RLC phosphorylation was not changed by prolonged infusion of dobutamine or treatment with a β-adrenergic antagonist, suggesting that RLC is constitutively phosphorylated to maintain cardiac performance. Biochemical studies with myofilaments showed that RLC phosphorylation up to 90% was a random process. RLC is slowly dephosphorylated in both noncontracting hearts and isolated cardiac myocytes from adult mice. Electrically paced ventricular trabeculae restored RLC phosphorylation, which was increased to 0.91 mol of phosphate/mol of RLC with inhibition of myosin light chain phosphatase (MLCP). The two RLCs in each myosin appear to be readily available for phosphorylation by a soluble cMLCK, but MLCP activity limits the amount of constitutive RLC phosphorylation. MLCP with its regulatory subunit MYPT2 bound tightly to myofilaments was constitutively phosphorylated in beating hearts at a site that inhibits MLCP activity. Thus, the constitutive RLC phosphorylation is limited physiologically by low cMLCK activity in balance with low MLCP activity.

  10. Comparative performance of enzymatic and combined alkaline-enzymatic pretreatments on methane production from ensiled sorghum forage.

    PubMed

    Rollini, Manuela; Sambusiti, Cecilia; Musatti, Alida; Ficara, Elena; Retinò, Isabella; Malpei, Francesca

    2014-12-01

    This study investigated the effect of enzymatic and combined alkaline-enzymatic pretreatments on chemical composition and methane production from ensiled sorghum forage. Four commercial enzymatic preparations were tested and the two yielding the highest sugars release were added to evaluate any hydrolytic effect on both untreated and alkaline pretreated samples. In the combined alkaline-enzymatic pretreatment trials, the highest sugar release was found with Primafast and BGL preparations (added at a final concentration 0.12 and 0.20 mL/g TS, respectively), with a total monomeric content of 12 and 6.5 g/L. Fibre composition analysis confirmed that the combined alkaline-enzymatic pretreatment led to cellulose (up to 32 %) and hemicelluloses (up to 56 %) solubilisation, compared to the enzymatic pretreatment alone. BMP tests were performed on both untreated and pretreated samples, and time courses of methane production were fitted. Both enzymatic and combined alkaline-enzymatic pretreatment led to a methane production increase (304 and 362 mL CH4/g VS), compared to that of untreated sorghum (265 mL CH4/g VS), as  +15 and  +37 %, respectively. Moreover, higher specific methane production rates, compared to that of untreated sorghum (20.31 mL CH4/g VS/d), were obtained by applying the enzymatic and combined alkaline-enzymatic pretreatment (33.94 and 31.65 mL CH4/g VS/d), respectively.

  11. Single-molecule spectroscopy exposes hidden states in an enzymatic electron relay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grossman, Iris; Yuval Aviram, Haim; Armony, Gad; Horovitz, Amnon; Hofmann, Hagen; Haran, Gilad; Fass, Deborah

    2015-10-01

    The ability to query enzyme molecules individually is transforming our view of catalytic mechanisms. Quiescin sulfhydryl oxidase (QSOX) is a multidomain catalyst of disulfide-bond formation that relays electrons from substrate cysteines through two redox-active sites to molecular oxygen. The chemical steps in electron transfer have been delineated, but the conformational changes accompanying these steps are poorly characterized. Here we use single-molecule Förster resonance energy transfer (smFRET) to probe QSOX conformation in resting and cycling enzyme populations. We report the discovery of unanticipated roles for conformational changes in QSOX beyond mediating electron transfer between redox-active sites. In particular, a state of the enzyme not previously postulated or experimentally detected is shown to gate, via a conformational transition, the entrance into a sub-cycle within an expanded QSOX kinetic scheme. By tightly constraining mechanistic models, smFRET data can reveal the coupling between conformational and chemical transitions in complex enzymatic cycles.

  12. Continuous enzymatic liquefaction of starch for saccharification

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, M.E.; Black, L.T.; Bagby, M.O.

    1982-01-01

    A process was explored for continuous enzymatic liquefaction of corn starch at high concentration and subsequent saccharification to glucose. The process appears to be quite efficient for conversion of starch to glucose and enzymatic liquefaction and should be readily adaptable to industrial fermentation processes. Preliminary work indicated that milled corn or other cereal grains also can be suitably converted by such a process. Essentially, the process involved incorporation of a thermostable, bacterial alpha-amylase for liquefaction and, subsequently, of a glucoamylase into the continuous mixer under conditions conductive to rapid enzymatic hydrolyses. Also studied was the effect on substrate liquefaction of variables such as starch concentration (40-70%), level of alpha-amylase (0.14-0.4%, dry starch basis), temperature (70-100 degrees C), pH (5.8-7.1), and residence time (6 and 12 minutes). The degree of liquefaction was assessed by determining 1) the Brookfield viscosity, 2) the amount of reducing groups, and 3) the rate and extent of glucose formed after glucoamylase treatment. Best liquefaction processing conditions were achieved by using 50-60% starch concentration, at 95 degrees C, with 0.4% alpha-amylase, and a 6 minute residence period in the mixer. Under these conditions, rates and extents of glucose obtained after glucoamylase treatment approached those obtained in longer laboratory batch liquefactions. The amount of glucose formed in 24 hours with the use of 0.4% glucoamylase was 86% of theory after a 6-min continuous liquefaction, compared to 90% for a 30-min laboratory batch liquefaction (95 degrees C, 0.4% alpha-amylase). (Refs. 15).

  13. Mutations affecting enzymatic activity in liver arginase

    SciTech Connect

    Vockley, J.G.; Tabor, D.E.; Goodman, B.K.

    1994-09-01

    The hydrolysis of arginine to ornithine and urea is catalyzed by arginase in the last step of the urea cycle. We examined a group of arginase deficient patients by PCR-SSCP analysis to characterize the molecular basis of this disorder. A heterogeneous population of nonsense mutations, microdeletions, and missense mutations has been identified in our cohort. Microdeletions which introduce premature stop codons downstream of the deletion and nonsense mutations result in no arginase activity. These mutations occur randomly along the gene. The majority of missense mutations identified appear to occur in regions of high cross-species homology. To test the effect of these missense mutations on arginase activity, site-directed mutagenesis was used to re-create the patient mutations for in vivo expression studies in a prokaryotic fusion-protein expression system. Of 4 different missense mutations identified in 6 individuals, only one was located outside of a conserved region. The three substitution mutations within the conserved regions had a significant effect on enzymatic activity (0-3.1 nmole/30min, normal is 1300-1400 nmoles/30min, as determined by in vitro arginase assay), while the fourth mutation, a T to S substitution, did not. In addition, site-directed mutagenesis was utilized to create mutations not in residues postulated to play a significant role in the enzymatic function or active site formation in manganese-binding proteins such as arginase. We have determined that the substitution of glycine for a histidine residue, located in a very highly conserved region of exon 3, and the substitution of a histidine and an aspartic acid residue within a similarly conserved region in exon 4, totally abolishes enzymatic activity. Mutations substituting glycine for an additional histidine and aspartic acid residue in exon 4 and two aspartic acid residues in exon 7 have also been created. We are currently in the process of characterizing these mutations.

  14. Enzymatic quantification of sphingosine in the picomole range in cultured cells

    SciTech Connect

    Van Veldhoven, P.P.; Bishop, W.R.; Bell, R.M. )

    1989-11-15

    An enzymatic method to quantify the mass levels of free sphingosine in cellular lipid extracts was developed. The assay is based upon the observation that ceramide is phosphorylated by Escherichia coli diacylglycerol kinase. Although sphingosine is not recognized by the enzyme, it can be converted to a substrate by acylation with hexanoic anhydride. Using a mixed micellar assay, previously reported for the mass quantification of diacylglycerol, the short-chain ceramide (N-C6-sphingosine), generated by acylation, is quantitatively phosphorylated to N-C6-(32P)sphingosine phosphate. This assay allows quantification of sphingosine over a broad range from 25 to 5000 pmol. When this assay was applied to standard compounds, reverse-phase thin-layer chromatography of the reaction products was adequate to separate the phosphorylated derivatives of long-chain ceramide and N-C6-sphingosine. However, the presence of other lipids in extracts from biological samples (mainly monoalkylglycerols which are also a substrate for the diacylglycerol kinase) interfered and necessitated an additional purification step. The most efficient purification step devised was a combination of anion- and cation-exchange chromatography. The mass levels of free sphingoid bases in different cultured cells were quantified using this assay. Levels varied between 8 to 20 pmol/10(6) cells. When normalized to phospholipids, sphingosine levels varied between 0.01 and 0.04 mol%. The lowest levels were found in L929 cells, while Schwann cells derived from Twitcher mice contained the highest levels. These levels were significantly higher than those of Schwann cells derived from normal mice.

  15. Altered phosphorylation of rhodopsin in retinal dystrophic Irish Setters

    SciTech Connect

    Cunnick, J.; Takemoto, D.J.; Takemoto, L.J.

    1986-03-05

    The carboxyl-terminus of rhodopsin in retinal dystrophic (rd) Irish Setters is altered near a possible phosphorylation site. To determine if this alteration affects ATP-mediated phosphorylation they compared the phosphorylation of rhodopsin from rd affected Irish Setters and normal unaffected dogs. Retinas from 8-week-old Irish Setters were phosphorylated with ..gamma..-/sup 32/P-ATP and separated on SDS-PAGE. Compared to unaffected normal retinas, equalized for rhodopsin content, phosphorylation of rd rhodopsin was drastically reduced. When rd retinas were mixed with normal dog retinas, phosphorylation of the latter was inhibited. Inhibition also occurred when bovine retinas were mixed with rd retinas. The rd-mediated inhibition of phosphorylation was prevented by including 1mM NaF in the reaction mixture. Likewise, 1mM NaF restored phosphorylation of rd rhodopsin to normal levels. Phosphopeptide maps of rd and normal rhodopsin were identical and indicated 5 phosphopeptides present in each. Results suggest that one cause of the depressed rd rhodopsin phosphorylation is an increased phosphatase activity.

  16. Prioritizing functional phosphorylation sites based on multiple feature integration

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Qingyu; Miao, Benpeng; Bi, Jie; Wang, Zhen; Li, Yixue

    2016-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation is an important type of post-translational modification that is involved in a variety of biological activities. Most phosphorylation events occur on serine, threonine and tyrosine residues in eukaryotes. In recent years, many phosphorylation sites have been identified as a result of advances in mass-spectrometric techniques. However, a large percentage of phosphorylation sites may be non-functional. Systematically prioritizing functional sites from a large number of phosphorylation sites will be increasingly important for the study of their biological roles. This study focused on exploring the intrinsic features of functional phosphorylation sites to predict whether a phosphosite is likely to be functional. We found significant differences in the distribution of evolutionary conservation, kinase association, disorder score, and secondary structure between known functional and background phosphorylation datasets. We built four different types of classifiers based on the most representative features and found that their performances were similar. We also prioritized 213,837 human phosphorylation sites from a variety of phosphorylation databases, which will be helpful for subsequent functional studies. All predicted results are available for query and download on our website (Predict Functional Phosphosites, PFP, http://pfp.biosino.org/). PMID:27090940

  17. Phosphorylation of adenosine with trimetaphosphate under simulated prebiotic conditions.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Changmei; Fan, Chang; Wan, Rong; Tong, Chunyuan; Miao, Zhiwei; Chen, Jing; Zhao, Yufen

    2002-06-01

    The phosphorylation of adenosine with trimetaphosphate in solution, in solid phase and using wet-dry cycles was carried out and it was found that wet-dry cycles were the most efficient. The catalytic effects of some metal ions on the phosphorylation were also studied and it was discovered that Ni(II) is the most effective. The combination of wet-dry cycles (4 cycles) and catalysis by Ni(II) led to an unprecedented high conversion of adenosine to phosphorylated products (30%) near neutral pH. The main phosphorylated products were 2',3'-cyclic AMP (10.4%) and 5'-ATP (13.0%). PMID:12227426

  18. Phosphorylation of Dopamine Transporter Serine 7 Modulates Cocaine Analog Binding*

    PubMed Central

    Moritz, Amy E.; Foster, James D.; Gorentla, Balachandra K.; Mazei-Robison, Michelle S.; Yang, Jae-Won; Sitte, Harald H.; Blakely, Randy D.; Vaughan, Roxanne A.

    2013-01-01

    As an approach to elucidating dopamine transporter (DAT) phosphorylation characteristics, we examined in vitro phosphorylation of a recombinant rat DAT N-terminal peptide (NDAT) using purified protein kinases. We found that NDAT becomes phosphorylated at single distinct sites by protein kinase A (Ser-7) and calcium-calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (Ser-13) and at multiple sites (Ser-4, Ser-7, and Ser-13) by protein kinase C (PKC), implicating these residues as potential sites of DAT phosphorylation by these kinases. Mapping of rat striatal DAT phosphopeptides by two-dimensional thin layer chromatography revealed basal and PKC-stimulated phosphorylation of the same peptide fragments and comigration of PKC-stimulated phosphopeptide fragments with NDAT Ser-7 phosphopeptide markers. We further confirmed by site-directed mutagenesis and mass spectrometry that Ser-7 is a site for PKC-stimulated phosphorylation in heterologously expressed rat and human DATs. Mutation of Ser-7 and nearby residues strongly reduced the affinity of rat DAT for the cocaine analog (−)-2β-carbomethoxy-3β-(4-fluorophenyl) tropane (CFT), whereas in rat striatal tissue, conditions that promote DAT phosphorylation caused increased CFT affinity. Ser-7 mutation also affected zinc modulation of CFT binding, with Ala and Asp substitutions inducing opposing effects. These results identify Ser-7 as a major site for basal and PKC-stimulated phosphorylation of native and expressed DAT and suggest that Ser-7 phosphorylation modulates transporter conformational equilibria, shifting the transporter between high and low affinity cocaine binding states. PMID:23161550

  19. [Enzymatic utilization of cotton soap stock].

    PubMed

    Davranov, K D; Guliamova, K A; Alimova, B Kh; Turapova, N M

    2000-01-01

    Enzymatic hydrolysis of neutral fat of cotton oil soap stock with a nonspecific lipase produced by Oospora lactis F-500 was designed. The culture liquid and a preparation of enzyme obtained by precipitation with isopropanol from a filtrate of the culture liquid were used. Utilization of cotton oil soap stock as the only source of carbon during cultivation of the fungus was studied. The rate of hydrolysis of soap stock fat strongly depended on the way of biological conversion of cotton oil soap stock. The most effective utilization was observed during cultivation of the fungus in the medium containing soap stock.

  20. Enzymatic Catalytic Beds For Oxidation Of Alcohols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jolly, Clifford D.; Schussel, Leonard J.

    1993-01-01

    Modules containing beds of enzymatic material catalyzing oxidation of primary alcohols and some other organic compounds developed for use in wastewater-treatment systems of future spacecraft. Designed to be placed downstream of multifiltration modules, which contain filters and sorbent beds removing most of non-alcoholic contaminants but fail to remove significant amounts of low-molecular-weight, polar, nonionic compounds like alcohols. Catalytic modules also used on Earth to oxidize primary alcohols and other compounds in wastewater streams and industrial process streams.

  1. TRANSFER STUDY.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    GREIVE, DONALD E.

    THIS 1967 STUDY AT LORAIN COUNTY COMMUNITY COLLEGE (LCCC) WAS UNDERTAKEN TO DISCOVER (1) THE PERCENTAGE OF CREDIT HOURS IN A UNIVERSITY PARALLEL PROGRAM ACCEPTED BY TRANSFER INSTITUTIONS, (2) THE STUDENT'S GPA BEFORE AND AFTER TRANSFER, AND (3) HOW MANY COLLEGES ACCEPTED LCCC'S TRANSFERS. INSTITUTIONS TO WHICH LCCC STUDENTS HAD HAD THEIR…

  2. The Bacterial Phosphoenolpyruvate:Carbohydrate Phosphotransferase System: Regulation by Protein Phosphorylation and Phosphorylation-Dependent Protein-Protein Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Aké, Francine Moussan Désirée; Derkaoui, Meriem; Zébré, Arthur Constant; Cao, Thanh Nguyen; Bouraoui, Houda; Kentache, Takfarinas; Mokhtari, Abdelhamid; Milohanic, Eliane; Joyet, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY The bacterial phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP):carbohydrate phosphotransferase system (PTS) carries out both catalytic and regulatory functions. It catalyzes the transport and phosphorylation of a variety of sugars and sugar derivatives but also carries out numerous regulatory functions related to carbon, nitrogen, and phosphate metabolism, to chemotaxis, to potassium transport, and to the virulence of certain pathogens. For these different regulatory processes, the signal is provided by the phosphorylation state of the PTS components, which varies according to the availability of PTS substrates and the metabolic state of the cell. PEP acts as phosphoryl donor for enzyme I (EI), which, together with HPr and one of several EIIA and EIIB pairs, forms a phosphorylation cascade which allows phosphorylation of the cognate carbohydrate bound to the membrane-spanning EIIC. HPr of firmicutes and numerous proteobacteria is also phosphorylated in an ATP-dependent reaction catalyzed by the bifunctional HPr kinase/phosphorylase. PTS-mediated regulatory mechanisms are based either on direct phosphorylation of the target protein or on phosphorylation-dependent interactions. For regulation by PTS-mediated phosphorylation, the target proteins either acquired a PTS domain by fusing it to their N or C termini or integrated a specific, conserved PTS regulation domain (PRD) or, alternatively, developed their own specific sites for PTS-mediated phosphorylation. Protein-protein interactions can occur with either phosphorylated or unphosphorylated PTS components and can either stimulate or inhibit the function of the target proteins. This large variety of signal transduction mechanisms allows the PTS to regulate numerous proteins and to form a vast regulatory network responding to the phosphorylation state of various PTS components. PMID:24847021

  3. Phosphorylation Signals in Striatal Medium Spiny Neurons.

    PubMed

    Nagai, Taku; Yoshimoto, Junichiro; Kannon, Takayuki; Kuroda, Keisuke; Kaibuchi, Kozo

    2016-10-01

    Dopamine signaling in the brain is a complex phenomenon that strongly contributes to emotional behaviors. Medium spiny neurons (MSNs) play a major role in dopamine signaling through dopamine D1 receptors (D1Rs) or dopamine D2 receptors (D2Rs) in the striatum. cAMP/protein kinase A (PKA) regulates phosphorylation signals downstream of D1Rs, which affects the excitability of MSNs, leading to reward-associated emotional expression and memory formation. A combination of phosphoproteomic approaches and the curated KANPHOS database can be used to elucidate the physiological and pathophysiological functions of dopamine signaling and other monoamines. Emerging evidence from these techniques suggests that the Rap1 pathway plays a crucial role in the excitability of MSNs, leading to the expression of emotional behaviors. PMID:27546785

  4. Phosphorylation Signals in Striatal Medium Spiny Neurons.

    PubMed

    Nagai, Taku; Yoshimoto, Junichiro; Kannon, Takayuki; Kuroda, Keisuke; Kaibuchi, Kozo

    2016-10-01

    Dopamine signaling in the brain is a complex phenomenon that strongly contributes to emotional behaviors. Medium spiny neurons (MSNs) play a major role in dopamine signaling through dopamine D1 receptors (D1Rs) or dopamine D2 receptors (D2Rs) in the striatum. cAMP/protein kinase A (PKA) regulates phosphorylation signals downstream of D1Rs, which affects the excitability of MSNs, leading to reward-associated emotional expression and memory formation. A combination of phosphoproteomic approaches and the curated KANPHOS database can be used to elucidate the physiological and pathophysiological functions of dopamine signaling and other monoamines. Emerging evidence from these techniques suggests that the Rap1 pathway plays a crucial role in the excitability of MSNs, leading to the expression of emotional behaviors.

  5. The regulation of STIM1 by phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Pozo-Guisado, Eulalia; Martin-Romero, Francisco Javier

    2013-01-01

    Calcium ion (Ca2+) concentration plays a key role in cell signaling in eukaryotic cells. At the cellular level, Ca2+ directly participates in such diverse cellular events as adhesion and migration, differentiation, contraction, secretion, synaptic transmission, fertilization, and cell death. As a consequence of these diverse actions, the cytosolic concentration of free Ca2+ is tightly regulated by the coordinated activity of Ca2+ channels, Ca2+ pumps, and Ca2+-binding proteins. Although many of these regulators have been studied in depth, other proteins have been described recently, and naturally far less is known about their contribution to cell physiology. Within this last group of proteins, STIM1 has emerged as a major contributor to Ca2+ signaling by means of its activity as Ca2+ channel regulator. STIM1 is a protein resident mainly, but not exclusively, in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), and activates a set of plasma membrane Ca2+ channels termed store-operated calcium channels (SOCs) when the concentration of free Ca2+ within the ER drops transiently as a result of Ca2+ release from this compartment. Knowledge regarding the molecular architecture of STIM1 has grown considerably during the last years, and several structural domains within STIM1 have been reported to be required for the specific molecular interactions with other important players in Ca2+ signaling, such as Ca2+ channels and microtubules. Within the modulators of STIM1, phosphorylation has been shown to both activate and inactivate STIM1-dependent Ca2+ entry depending on the cell type, cell cycle phase, and the specific residue that becomes modified. Here we shall review current knowledge regarding the modulation of STIM1 by phosphorylation. PMID:24505502

  6. Technology transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Handley, Thomas

    1992-01-01

    The requirements for a successful technology transfer program and what such a program would look like are discussed. In particular, the issues associated with technology transfer in general, and within the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) environment specifically are addressed. The section on background sets the stage, identifies the barriers to successful technology transfer, and suggests actions to address the barriers either generally or specifically. The section on technology transfer presents a process with its supporting management plan that is required to ensure a smooth transfer process. Viewgraphs are also included.

  7. Effect of non-enzymatic proteins on enzymatic hydrolysis and simultaneous saccharification and fermentation of different lignocellulosic materials.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui; Kobayashi, Shinichi; Mochidzuki, Kazuhiro

    2015-08-01

    Non-enzymatic proteins were added during hydrolysis of cellulose and simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) of different biomass materials. Bovine serum albumin (BSA), a model non-enzymatic protein, increased cellulose and xylose conversion efficiency and also enhanced the ethanol yield during SSF of rice straw subjected to varied pretreatments. Corn steep liquor, yeast extract, and peptone also exerted a similar effect as BSA and enhanced the enzymatic hydrolysis of rice straw. Compared to the glucose yields obtained after enzymatic hydrolysis of rice straw in the absence of additives, the glucose yields after 72h of hydrolysis increased by 12.7%, 13.5%, and 13.7% after addition of the corn steep liquor, yeast extract, and peptone, respectively. This study indicated the use of BSA as an alternative to intensive pretreatment of lignocellulosic materials for enhancing enzymatic digestibility. The utilization of non-enzymatic protein additives is promising for application in glucose and ethanol production from lignocellulosic materials.

  8. Simplified enzymatic assay of angiotensin-converting enzyme in serum.

    PubMed

    Groff, J L; Harp, J B; DiGirolamo, M

    1993-03-01

    We report a simple, enzymatic method for determining angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE; EC 3.4.15.1) in serum. The proposed method features coupling an established reaction catalyzed by gamma-glutamyltransferase (GGT; EC 2.3.2.2) to the ACE reaction, which releases glycylglycine from the artificial substrate hippuryl-glycyl-glycine. The glycyl-glycine released by the ACE reaction becomes rate-limiting in the GGT reaction, in which it participates as a receptor substrate for a gamma-glutamyl group transferred from a donor substrate, L-gamma-glutamyl-3-carboxy-4-nitroanilide. The reaction releases 3-carboxy-4-nitroaniline, which is monitored spectrophotometrically at 410 nm. The resulting rate of change in absorbance is linearly related to the glycyl-glycine concentration and therefore to the activity of ACE. The linear range of the method extends from ACE values < 50 to at least 1300 U/L of serum. Good precision is indicated by a low CV for replicate analyses (3.6% and 4.6% for within-run and day-to-day assays, respectively, for normal ACE activity, and 3.1% within-run for high ACE activity). Results also correlate well with those of an established colorimetric method (r = 0.978). The major advantages of the method are its procedural simplicity, limited cost, use of readily available reagents, applicability to isoenzyme studies, and adaptability to automation.

  9. Enzymatic and bacterial conversions during sourdough fermentation.

    PubMed

    Gänzle, Michael G

    2014-02-01

    Enzymatic and microbial conversion of flour components during bread making determines bread quality. Metabolism of sourdough microbiota and the activity of cereal enzymes are interdependent. Acidification, oxygen consumption, and thiols accumulation by microbial metabolism modulate the activity of cereal enzymes. In turn, cereal enzymes provide substrates for bacterial growth. This review highlights the role of cereal enzymes and the metabolism of lactic acid bacteria in conversion of carbohydrates, proteins, phenolic compounds and lipids. Heterofermentative lactic acid bacteria prevailing in wheat and rye sourdoughs preferentially metabolise sucrose and maltose; the latter is released by cereal enzymes during fermentation. Sucrose supports formation of acetate by heterofermentative lactobacilli, and the formation of exopolysaccharides. The release of maltose and glucose by cereal enzymes during fermentation determines the exopolysaccharide yield in sourdough fermentations. Proteolysis is dependent on cereal proteases. Peptidase activities of sourdough lactic acid bacteria determine the accumulation of (bioactive) peptides, amino acids, and amino acid metabolites in dough and bread. Enzymatic conversion and microbial metabolism of phenolic compounds is relevant in sorghum and millet containing high levels of phenolic compounds. The presence of phenolic compounds with antimicrobial activity in sorghum selects for fermentation microbiota that are resistant to the phenolic compounds.

  10. Dual Enzymatic Detection by Bulk Electrogenerated Chemiluminescence.

    PubMed

    de Poulpiquet, Anne; Diez-Buitrago, Beatriz; Dumont Milutinovic, Milena; Sentic, Milica; Arbault, Stéphane; Bouffier, Laurent; Kuhn, Alexander; Sojic, Neso

    2016-06-21

    The combination of enzymes, as recognition elements for specific analytes, and of electrogenerated chemiluminescence (ECL) as a readout method has proven to be a valuable strategy for sensitive and specific analytical detection. However, ECL is intrinsically a 2D process which could potentially limit the analysis of inhomogeneous samples. Here, we show how a bulk ECL signal, generated by thousands of carbon microbeads remotely addressed via bipolar electrochemistry, are implemented as a powerful tool for the concomitant ECL sensing and imaging of two enzymatic substrates. We selected two enzymes (glucose dehydrogenase and choline oxidase) that react with their respective model substrates and produce in situ chemical species (β-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) and H2O2) acting as coreactants for the ECL emission of different luminophores ([Ru(bpy)3](2+) at λ = 620 nm and luminol at λ = 425 nm, respectively). Both enzymes are spatially separated in the same capillary. We demonstrate thus the simultaneous quantitative determination of both glucose and choline over a wide concentration range. The originality of this remote approach is to provide a global chemical view through one single ECL image of inhomogeneous samples such as a biochemical concentration gradient in a capillary configuration. Finally, we report the first proof-of-concept of dual biosensing based on this bulk ECL method for the simultaneous imaging of both enzymatic analytes at distinct wavelengths. PMID:27213503

  11. Categorization of some oscillatory enzymatic reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Schreiber, I.; Hung, Y.F.; Ross, J.

    1996-05-16

    We investigate the categorization of two or more proposed reaction mechanisms for each of the following oscillatory enzymatic reactions: (1) the peroxidase-oxidase reaction; (2) glycolytic oscillations; (3) oscillations of cyclic AMP in smile mold cells; (4) enzymatic pH oscillations; (5) calcium spiking in cytosol. We use prior work in stoichiometric network analysis and categorization of oscillatory reactions to identify in each proposed reaction mechanism essential and nonessential species, the specific role of each essential species, the connectivity of the essential species, including the identification of the reactions leading to oscillatory instabilities, and the category. For each model, we predict the result of several experiments including relative amplitudes, quench amplitudes, phase shifts, and sign symbolic concentration shifts and compare them with those from available experiments. These and several other experiments such as bifurcation analysis, phase response curves, entrainment experiments, qualitative and quantitative pulsed species response, delay experiments, and external periodic perturbation provide stringent tests of proposed reaction mechanisms, and appropriate ones are suggested to discriminate among competing mechanisms for a given reaction. We find the necessity for introducing a new subcategory in our categorization of oscillatory reactions. 45 refs., 6 figs., 6 tabs.

  12. Enzymatically Controlled Vacancies in Nanoparticle Crystals.

    PubMed

    Barnaby, Stacey N; Ross, Michael B; Thaner, Ryan V; Lee, Byeongdu; Schatz, George C; Mirkin, Chad A

    2016-08-10

    In atomic systems, the mixing of metals results in distinct phase behavior that depends on the identity and bonding characteristics of the atoms. In nanoscale systems, the use of oligonucleotides as programmable "bonds" that link nanoparticle "atoms" into superlattices allows for the decoupling of atom identity and bonding. While much research in atomic systems is dedicated to understanding different phase behavior of mixed metals, it is not well understood on the nanoscale how changes in the nanoscale "bond" affect the phase behavior of nanoparticle crystals. In this work, the identity of the atom is kept the same, but the chemical nature of the bond is altered, which is not possible in atomic systems, through the use of DNA and RNA bonding elements. These building blocks assemble into single crystal nanoparticle superlattices with mixed DNA and RNA bonding elements throughout. The nanoparticle crystals can be dynamically changed through the selective and enzymatic hydrolysis of the RNA bonding elements, resulting in superlattices that retain their crystalline structure and habit, while incorporating up to 35% random vacancies generated from the nanoparticles removed. Therefore, the bonding elements of nanoparticle crystals can be enzymatically and selectively addressed without affecting the nature of the atom.

  13. Recycling of cellulosic fibers by enzymatic process.

    PubMed

    Shojaei, K M; Dadashian, F; Montazer, M

    2012-02-01

    In this research, enzymatic treatment as an environmental friendly process has been used for recycling process of old cellulosic wastes such as cotton, viscose, and lyocell. Cellulase hydrolyses cellulosic chains and shortens cellulosic fibers. This study investigates to detect the optimum enzyme concentration and time of treatments for suitable changes of length and weight loss. The main purposes of this article are shortening of cellulosic fibers and evaluating of enzymatic treatment in different kind of cellulosic fibers. According to the data of experiments, with the increase of enzyme concentration and the treatment time, the length and weight loss percentage of the cellulosic fibers has been decreased. The length and weight loss percentage of treated viscose is more than that of lyocell and cotton fibers. Optimized condition, reaction time, and enzyme concentration have been determined by mean length of treated cellulosic samples. Suitable longitudinal distribution of fiber for papermaking industries is in the range of 0 to 4 mm. Optimum enzyme concentration and treatment time for recycling cotton, lyocell, and viscose fibers are 2% and 48 h for cotton and lyocell and 0.5% and 48 h for viscose, respectively. According to the data of experiment, the length of treated fibers is appropriate for its usage as a raw material in papermaking industries.

  14. Determination of lactose by an enzymatic method.

    PubMed

    Kleyn, D H

    1985-10-01

    The general methodology used for the determination of lactose in milk is considered, namely, polarimetry, gravimetry, infrared, colorimetry, gas-liquid chromatography, and high pressure liquid chromatography. The criteria for selecting an ideal analytical method followed by the relevance of most of these criteria in enzymatic methodology are discussed. The principle of the Boehringer-Mannheim method is presented, i.e., lactose is hydrolyzed to glucose and beta-galactose in the presence of beta-galactosidase and water. beta-Galactose is then oxidized by nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide to galactonic acid in the presence of beta-galactose dehydrogenase. The amount of reduced nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide formed is stoichiometric with the amount of lactose and is measured at 340 nm in a spectrophotometer possessing a slit width of less than or equal to 10 nm. The results of a recent Association of Official Analytical Chemists collaborative study of the B-M method are presented. From the overall mean of results on all samples, determinations by the enzymatic method averaged .49% lower than by the Association of Official Analytical Chemists gravimetric method. Standard deviations were similar for three sets of blind duplicates, which ranged between 3.67 and 4.55% lactose. F-Values revealed that variations between means obtained by laboratories differed significantly as compared with variations within laboratory means. The method has received Official First Action recognition by Association of Official Analytical Chemists.

  15. Enzymatic and bacterial conversions during sourdough fermentation.

    PubMed

    Gänzle, Michael G

    2014-02-01

    Enzymatic and microbial conversion of flour components during bread making determines bread quality. Metabolism of sourdough microbiota and the activity of cereal enzymes are interdependent. Acidification, oxygen consumption, and thiols accumulation by microbial metabolism modulate the activity of cereal enzymes. In turn, cereal enzymes provide substrates for bacterial growth. This review highlights the role of cereal enzymes and the metabolism of lactic acid bacteria in conversion of carbohydrates, proteins, phenolic compounds and lipids. Heterofermentative lactic acid bacteria prevailing in wheat and rye sourdoughs preferentially metabolise sucrose and maltose; the latter is released by cereal enzymes during fermentation. Sucrose supports formation of acetate by heterofermentative lactobacilli, and the formation of exopolysaccharides. The release of maltose and glucose by cereal enzymes during fermentation determines the exopolysaccharide yield in sourdough fermentations. Proteolysis is dependent on cereal proteases. Peptidase activities of sourdough lactic acid bacteria determine the accumulation of (bioactive) peptides, amino acids, and amino acid metabolites in dough and bread. Enzymatic conversion and microbial metabolism of phenolic compounds is relevant in sorghum and millet containing high levels of phenolic compounds. The presence of phenolic compounds with antimicrobial activity in sorghum selects for fermentation microbiota that are resistant to the phenolic compounds. PMID:24230468

  16. Mapping the Reaction Coordinates of Enzymatic Defluorination

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Peter W. Y.; Yakunin, Alexander F.; Edwards, Elizabeth A.; Pai, Emil F.

    2011-01-01

    The carbon-fluorine bond is the strongest covalent bond in organic chemistry, yet fluoroacetate dehalogenases can readily hydrolyze this bond under mild physiological conditions. Elucidating the molecular basis of this rare biocatalytic activity will provide the fundamental chemical insights of how this formidable feat is achieved. Here, we present a series of high-resolution (1.15–1.80 Å) crystal structures of a fluoroacetate dehalogenase, capturing snapshots along the defluorination reaction: the free enzyme, enzyme-fluoroacetate Michaelis complex, glycolyl-enzyme covalent intermediate and enzyme-product complex. We demonstrate that enzymatic defluorination requires a halide pocket that not only supplies three hydrogen bonds to stabilize the fluoride ion, but is also finely tailored for the smaller fluorine halogen atom to establish selectivity towards fluorinated substrates. We have further uncovered dynamics near the active site which may play pivotal roles in enzymatic defluorination. These findings may ultimately lead to the development of novel defluorinases that will enable the biotransformation of more complex fluorinated organic compounds, which in turn will assist the synthesis, detoxification, biodegradation, disposal, recycling and regulatory strategies for the growing markets of organofluorines across major industrial sectors. PMID:21510690

  17. Enzymatic activities in coniferous leaf litter

    SciTech Connect

    Spalding, B.P.

    1980-07-01

    Assays for measuring the activities of cellulase, xylanase, mannase, amylase, ..beta..-glucosidase, invertase, and protease employing buffered suspensions of ground coniferous and deciduous leaf litter exhibited zero-order kinetics. Only a small percentage of the whole-litter activities of invertase, ..beta..-glucosidase, and protease were extractable into 0.05M potassium acetate, pH 5.0; however, extractable activities of cellulase and xylanase represented from 39 to 174% of the whole-litter activities indicating their soluble exocellar nature. Extractable protease and amylase activities were best correlated with the average daily rates of CO/sub 2/ evolution in a group of 90 leaf litter samples equally representing 18 coniferous species. Enzymatic activities were readily detectable in extracts of all samples but classification of the samples by species provided little differentiation in the distribution of either enzymatic activities or rates of CO/sub 2/ evolution. Mannase, cellulase, and xylanase activities were well-correlated with each other in all samples. Assays attempting to measure a pool of readily-metabolizable substances in litter by extractable reducing substances, ninhydrin-positive substances, glucose, and phenolics failed to show correlation coefficients >0.41 with rates of CO/sub 2/ evolution. Addition of D-(+)-catechin to litter extracts, up to levels equivalent to those observed in the group of samples, did not inhibit any carbohydrase thus suggesting the lack of inhibition of litter-decomposing enzymes by the concentrations of phenolics present in these coniferous leaf litters.

  18. Mapping the Reaction Coordinates of Enzymatic Defluorination

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, Peter W.Y.; Yakunin, Alexander F.; Edwards, Elizabeth A.; Pai, Emil F.

    2011-09-28

    The carbon-fluorine bond is the strongest covalent bond in organic chemistry, yet fluoroacetate dehalogenases can readily hydrolyze this bond under mild physiological conditions. Elucidating the molecular basis of this rare biocatalytic activity will provide the fundamental chemical insights into how this formidable feat is achieved. Here, we present a series of high-resolution (1.15-1.80 {angstrom}) crystal structures of a fluoroacetate dehalogenase, capturing snapshots along the defluorination reaction: the free enzyme, enzyme-fluoroacetate Michaelis complex, glycolyl-enzyme covalent intermediate, and enzyme-product complex. We demonstrate that enzymatic defluorination requires a halide pocket that not only supplies three hydrogen bonds to stabilize the fluoride ion but also is finely tailored for the smaller fluorine halogen atom to establish selectivity toward fluorinated substrates. We have further uncovered dynamics near the active site which may play pivotal roles in enzymatic defluorination. These findings may ultimately lead to the development of novel defluorinases that will enable the biotransformation of more complex fluorinated organic compounds, which in turn will assist the synthesis, detoxification, biodegradation, disposal, recycling, and regulatory strategies for the growing markets of organofluorines across major industrial sectors.

  19. A grammar inference approach for predicting kinase specific phosphorylation sites.

    PubMed

    Datta, Sutapa; Mukhopadhyay, Subhasis

    2015-01-01

    Kinase mediated phosphorylation site detection is the key mechanism of post translational mechanism that plays an important role in regulating various cellular processes and phenotypes. Many diseases, like cancer are related with the signaling defects which are associated with protein phosphorylation. Characterizing the protein kinases and their substrates enhances our ability to understand the mechanism of protein phosphorylation and extends our knowledge of signaling network; thereby helping us to treat such diseases. Experimental methods for predicting phosphorylation sites are labour intensive and expensive. Also, manifold increase of protein sequences in the databanks over the years necessitates the improvement of high speed and accurate computational methods for predicting phosphorylation sites in protein sequences. Till date, a number of computational methods have been proposed by various researchers in predicting phosphorylation sites, but there remains much scope of improvement. In this communication, we present a simple and novel method based on Grammatical Inference (GI) approach to automate the prediction of kinase specific phosphorylation sites. In this regard, we have used a popular GI algorithm Alergia to infer Deterministic Stochastic Finite State Automata (DSFA) which equally represents the regular grammar corresponding to the phosphorylation sites. Extensive experiments on several datasets generated by us reveal that, our inferred grammar successfully predicts phosphorylation sites in a kinase specific manner. It performs significantly better when compared with the other existing phosphorylation site prediction methods. We have also compared our inferred DSFA with two other GI inference algorithms. The DSFA generated by our method performs superior which indicates that our method is robust and has a potential for predicting the phosphorylation sites in a kinase specific manner.

  20. Mechanistic and physiological consequences of HPr(ser) phosphorylation on the activities of the phosphoenolpyruvate:sugar phosphotransferase system in gram-positive bacteria: studies with site-specific mutants of HPr.

    PubMed Central

    Reizer, J; Sutrina, S L; Saier, M H; Stewart, G C; Peterkofsky, A; Reddy, P

    1989-01-01

    The bacterial phosphotransferase system (PTS) catalyzes the transport and phosphorylation of its sugar substrates. The protein-kinase-catalyzed phosphorylation of serine 46 in the phosphocarrier protein, HPr, inhibits PTS activity, but neither the mechanism of this inhibition nor its physiological significance is known. Site-specific HPr mutants were constructed in which serine 46 was replaced by alanine (S46A), threonine (S46T), tyrosine (S46Y) or aspartate (S46D). The purified S46D protein exhibited markedly lower Vmax and higher Km values than the wild-type, S46T or S46A protein for the phosphoryl transfer reactions involving HPr(His approximately P). Interactions of HPr with the enzymes catalyzing phosphoryl transfer to and from HPr regulated the kinase-catalyzed reaction. These results establish the inhibitory effect of a negative charge at position 46 on PTS-mediated phosphoryl transfer and suggest that HPr is phosphorylated on both histidyl and seryl residues by enzymes that recognize its tertiary rather than its primary structure. In vivo studies showed that a negative charge on residue 46 of HPr strongly inhibits PTS-mediated sugar uptake, but that competition of two PTS permeases for HPr(His approximately P) is quantitatively more important to the regulation of PTS function than serine 46 phosphorylation. Images PMID:2507315

  1. Small quinolinium-based enzymatic probes via blue-to-red ratiometric fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Wang, Pan; Du, Jiajun; Liu, Huijing; Bi, Guoqiang; Zhang, Guoqing

    2016-02-21

    A small fluorescence ratiometric probe consisting of a single dye species, N-methyl-6-hydroxyquinolinium (MHQ), and coupled enzymatic substrates, exhibits a dramatic colour change (deep blue to red) and possesses a huge response ratio (over 2000 fold) upon specific recognition of target enzymes. Such dramatic responses are attributed to the excited-state proton transfer processes of MHQ molecules in water. Here the detection of β-galactosidase and porcine pancreatic lipase is successfully demonstrated and this class of molecules has the potential to be developed as a "naked-eye" probe in vitro. PMID:26788553

  2. P(3)DB: An Integrated Database for Plant Protein Phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Yao, Qiuming; Bollinger, Curtis; Gao, Jianjiong; Xu, Dong; Thelen, Jay J

    2012-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation is widely recognized as the most widespread, enzyme-catalyzed post-translational modification in eukaryotes. In particular, plants have appropriated this signaling mechanism as evidenced by the twofold higher frequency of protein kinases within the genome compared to other eukaryotes. While all aspects of plant protein phosphorylation research have grown in the past 10 years; phosphorylation site mapping using high-resolution mass spectrometry has grown exponentially. In Arabidopsis alone there are thousands of experimentally determined phosphorylation sites. To archive these events in a user-intuitive format we have developed P(3)DB, the Plant Protein Phosphorylation Database (p3db.org). This database is a repository for plant protein phosphorylation site data, currently hosting information on 32,963 non-redundant sites collated from 23 experimental studies from six plant species. These data can be queried for a protein-of-interest using an integrated BLAST module to query similar sequences with known phosphorylation sites among the multiple plants currently investigated. The paper demonstrates how this resource can help identify functionally conserved phosphorylation sites in plants using a multi-system approach.

  3. Phosphorylation Regulates Functions of ZEB1 Transcription Factor.

    PubMed

    Llorens, M Candelaria; Lorenzatti, Guadalupe; Cavallo, Natalia L; Vaglienti, Maria V; Perrone, Ana P; Carenbauer, Anne L; Darling, Douglas S; Cabanillas, Ana M

    2016-10-01

    ZEB1 transcription factor is important in both development and disease, including many TGFβ-induced responses, and the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) by which many tumors undergo metastasis. ZEB1 is differentially phosphorylated in different cell types; however the role of phosphorylation in ZEB1 activity is unknown. Luciferase reporter studies and electrophoresis mobility shift assays (EMSA) show that a decrease in phosphorylation of ZEB1 increases both DNA-binding and transcriptional repression of ZEB1 target genes. Functional analysis of ZEB1 phosphorylation site mutants near the second zinc finger domain (termed ZD2) show that increased phosphorylation (due to either PMA plus ionomycin, or IGF-1) can inhibit transcriptional repression by either a ZEB1-ZD2 domain clone, or full-length ZEB1. This approach identifies phosphosites that have a substantial effect regulating the transcriptional and DNA-binding activity of ZEB1. Immunoprecipitation with anti-ZEB1 antibodies followed by western analysis with a phospho-Threonine-Proline-specific antibody indicates that the ERK consensus site at Thr-867 is phosphorylated in ZEB1. In addition to disrupting in vitro DNA-binding measured by EMSA, IGF-1-induced MEK/ERK phosphorylation is sufficient to disrupt nuclear localization of GFP-ZEB1 fusion clones. These data suggest that phosphorylation of ZEB1 integrates TGFβ signaling with other signaling pathways such as IGF-1. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 2205-2217, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26868487

  4. Phosphorylation of eukaryotic aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases

    SciTech Connect

    Pendergast, A.M.

    1986-01-01

    The phosphorylation of the highly purified aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase complex from rabbit reticulocytes was examined. The synthetase complex contained, in addition to eight aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, three unidentified proteins and was free of endogenous protein kinase activity. Incubation of the complex with casein kinase I in the presence of ATP resulted in the phosphorylation of four synthetases, the glutamyl-, isoleucyl-, methionyl-, and lysyl-tRNA synthetases. Phosphorylation by casein kinase I altered binding to tRNA-Sepharose such that the phosphorylated complex eluted at 190 mM NaCl instead of the 275 mM salt observed for the nonphosphorylated form. Phosphorylation by casein kinase I resulted in a significant inhibition of aminoacylation with the four synthetases; the activities of the nonphosphorylated synthetases were unchanged. One of the unidentified proteins in the complex (M/sub r/ 37,000) was also an excellent substrate for casein kinase I. A comparison of the properties and two-dimensional phosphopeptide pattern of this protein with that of casein kinase I suggest that the 37,000 dalton protein in the synthetase complex is an inactive form of casein kinase I. Two other protein kinases were shown to phosphorylate aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases in the complex. The phosphorylation of threonyl-tRNA synthetase was also investigated. Five aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases in the high molecular weight complex were shown to be phosphorylated in rabbit reticulocytes following labeling with (/sup 32/P)orthophosphate.

  5. Phosphorylation Regulates Functions of ZEB1 Transcription Factor.

    PubMed

    Llorens, M Candelaria; Lorenzatti, Guadalupe; Cavallo, Natalia L; Vaglienti, Maria V; Perrone, Ana P; Carenbauer, Anne L; Darling, Douglas S; Cabanillas, Ana M

    2016-10-01

    ZEB1 transcription factor is important in both development and disease, including many TGFβ-induced responses, and the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) by which many tumors undergo metastasis. ZEB1 is differentially phosphorylated in different cell types; however the role of phosphorylation in ZEB1 activity is unknown. Luciferase reporter studies and electrophoresis mobility shift assays (EMSA) show that a decrease in phosphorylation of ZEB1 increases both DNA-binding and transcriptional repression of ZEB1 target genes. Functional analysis of ZEB1 phosphorylation site mutants near the second zinc finger domain (termed ZD2) show that increased phosphorylation (due to either PMA plus ionomycin, or IGF-1) can inhibit transcriptional repression by either a ZEB1-ZD2 domain clone, or full-length ZEB1. This approach identifies phosphosites that have a substantial effect regulating the transcriptional and DNA-binding activity of ZEB1. Immunoprecipitation with anti-ZEB1 antibodies followed by western analysis with a phospho-Threonine-Proline-specific antibody indicates that the ERK consensus site at Thr-867 is phosphorylated in ZEB1. In addition to disrupting in vitro DNA-binding measured by EMSA, IGF-1-induced MEK/ERK phosphorylation is sufficient to disrupt nuclear localization of GFP-ZEB1 fusion clones. These data suggest that phosphorylation of ZEB1 integrates TGFβ signaling with other signaling pathways such as IGF-1. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 2205-2217, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. The enzymatic reaction-induced configuration change of the prosthetic group PQQ of methanol dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Li, Jie; Gan, Jian-Hua; Mathews, F Scott; Xia, Zong-Xiang

    2011-03-25

    Methanol dehydrogenase is a heterotetrameric enzyme containing the prosthetic group pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ), which catalyzes the oxidation of methanol to formaldehyde. The crystal structure of methanol dehydrogenase from Methylophilus W3A1, previously determined at high resolution, exhibits a non-planar configuration of the PQQ ring system and lends support for a hydride transfer mechanism of the enzymatic reaction catalyzed by the enzyme. To investigate why PQQ is in the C5-reduced form and to better understand the catalytic mechanism of the enzyme, three structures of this enzyme in a new crystal form have been determined at higher resolution. Two of the three crystals were grown in the presence of 1 and 50 mM methanol, respectively, both structures of which show non-planar configurations of the PQQ ring system, confirming the previous conclusion; the other was crystallized in the presence of 50 mM ethanol, the structure of which displays a planar ring system for PQQ. Comparison of these structures reveals that the configuration change of PQQ is induced by the enzymatic reaction. The reaction takes place and the C5-reduced PQQ intermediate is produced when the enzyme co-crystallizes with methanol, but the enzymatic reaction does not take place and the PQQ ring retains a planar configuration of the oxidized orthoquinone form when ethanol instead of methanol is present in the crystallization solution.

  7. Sensitive Electrochemical Detection of Enzymatically-generated Thiocholine at Carbon Nanotube Modified Glassy Carbon Electrode

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Guodong; Riechers, Shawn L.; Mellen, Maria C.; Lin, Yuehe

    2005-11-01

    A carbon nanotube modified glassy-carbon (CNT/GC) electrode was used for enhancing the sensitivity of electrochemical measurements of enzymatically-generated thiocholine. Cyclic voltammetric and amperometric characteristics of thiocholine at CNT/GC, glassy carbon, carbon paste, and gold electrodes were compared. The CNT layer leads to a greatly improved anodic detection of enzymatically generated thiocholine product including lower oxidation overpotential (0.15 V) and higher sensitivity because of its electrocatalytic activity, fast electron transfer and large surface area. The sensor performance was optimized with respect to the operating conditions. Under the optimal batch conditions, a detection limit of 5 ?10 -6 mol/L was obtained with good precision (RSD = 5.2%, n=10). Furthermore, the attractive response of thiocholine on a CNT/GC electrode has allowed it to be used for constant-potential flow injection analysis. The detection limit was greatly improved to 0.3 ?10-6 mol/L. The high sensitivity electrochemical detection of enzymatically generated thiocholine with a CNT sensing platform holds great promise to prepare an acetylcholinesterase biosensor for monitoring organophosphate pesticides and nerve agents.

  8. High-sensitivity determination of tyrosine-phosphorylated peptides by on-line enzyme reactor and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed Central

    Amankwa, L. N.; Harder, K.; Jirik, F.; Aebersold, R.

    1995-01-01

    We describe a simple, fast, sensitive, and nonisotopic bioanalytical technique for the detection of tyrosine-phosphorylated peptides and the determination of sites of protein tyrosine phosphorylation. The technique employs a protein tyrosine phosphatase micro enzyme reactor coupled on-line to either capillary electrophoresis or liquid chromatography and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry instruments. The micro enzyme reactor was constructed by immobilizing genetically engineered, metabolically biotinylated human protein tyrosine phosphatase beta onto the inner surface of a small piece of a 50-microns inner diameter, 360-microns outer diameter fused silica capillary or by immobilization of the phosphatase onto 40-90-microns avidin-activated resins. By coupling these reactors directly to either a capillary electrophoresis column or a liquid chromatography column, we were able to rapidly perform enzymatic dephosphorylation and separation of the reaction products. Detection and identification of the components of the reaction mixture exiting these reactors were done by mass analysis with an on-line electrospray ionization mass spectrometer. Tyrosine-phosphorylated peptides, even if present in a complex peptide mixture, were identified by subtractive analysis of peptide patterns generated with or without phosphatase treatment. Two criteria, namely a phosphatase-induced change in hydropathy and charge, respectively, and a change in molecular mass by 80 Da, were used jointly to identify phosphopeptides. We demonstrate that, with this technique, low picomole amounts of a tyrosine-phosphorylated peptide can be detected in a complex peptide mixture generated by proteolysis of a protein and that even higher sensitivities can be realized if more sensitive detection systems are applied. PMID:7539661

  9. Altered protein phosphorylation as a resource for potential AD biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Henriques, Ana Gabriela; Müller, Thorsten; Oliveira, Joana Machado; Cova, Marta; da Cruz e Silva, Cristóvão B.; da Cruz e Silva, Odete A. B.

    2016-01-01

    The amyloidogenic peptide, Aβ, provokes a series of events affecting distinct cellular pathways regulated by protein phosphorylation. Aβ inhibits protein phosphatases in a dose-dependent manner, thus it is expected that the phosphorylation state of specific proteins would be altered in response to Aβ. In fact several Alzheimer’s disease related proteins, such as APP and TAU, exhibit pathology associated hyperphosphorylated states. A systems biology approach was adopted and the phosphoproteome, of primary cortical neuronal cells exposed to Aβ, was evaluated. Phosphorylated proteins were recovered and those whose recovery increased or decreased, upon Aβ exposure across experimental sets, were identified. Significant differences were evident for 141 proteins and investigation of their interactors revealed key protein clusters responsive to Aβ treatment. Of these, 73 phosphorylated proteins increased and 68 decreased upon Aβ addition. These phosphorylated proteins represent an important resource of potential AD phospho biomarkers that should be further pursued. PMID:27466139

  10. Phosphorylation as a method of regulating the activity of yeast inorganic pyrophosphatase. I. Activation of inorganic pyrophosphatase under the action of ATP

    SciTech Connect

    Vener, A.V.; Nazarova, T.I.; Avaeva, S.M.

    1986-04-01

    ATP activates in a noncompetitive manner the hydrolysis of magnesium pyrophosphate catalyzed by baker's yeast inorganic pyrophosphatase. On the other hand, ATP causes a fall in the amount of pyrophosphate bound with enzyme that is formed by synthesis from phosphate, which confirms the fact of an increase in the catalytic rate constant of the enzymatic hydrolysis of pyrophosphate. The reason for the activation of the inorganic pyrophosphatase is the phosphorylation of its regulatory center under the action of ATP with the inclusion of the ..gamma..-phosphate group of the ATP in the protein.

  11. Pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corredor, Deisy Y.

    The performance of soybean hulls and forage sorghum as feedstocks for ethanol production was studied. The main goal of this research was to increase fermentable sugars' yield through high-efficiency pretreatment technology. Soybean hulls are a potential feedstock for production of bio-ethanol due to their high carbohydrate content (≈50%) of nearly 37% cellulose. Soybean hulls could be the ideal feedstock for fuel ethanol production, because they are abundant and require no special harvesting and additional transportation costs as they are already in the plant. Dilute acid and modified steam-explosion were used as pretreatment technologies to increase fermentable sugars yields. Effects of reaction time, temperature, acid concentration and type of acid on hydrolysis of hemicellulose in soybean hulls and total sugar yields were studied. Optimum pretreatment parameters and enzymatic hydrolysis conditions for converting soybean hulls into fermentable sugars were identified. The combination of acid (H2SO4, 2% w/v) and steam (140°C, 30 min) efficiently solubilized the hemicellulose, giving a pentose yield of 96%. Sorghum is a tropical grass grown primarily in semiarid and dry parts of the world, especially in areas too dry for corn. The production of sorghum results in about 30 million tons of byproducts mainly composed of cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin. Forage sorghum such as brown midrib (BMR) sorghum for ethanol production has generated much interest since this trait is characterized genetically by lower lignin concentrations in the plant compared with conventional types. Three varieties of forage sorghum and one variety of regular sorghum were characterized and evaluated as feedstock for fermentable sugar production. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), scanning electron microscope (SEM) and X-Ray diffraction were used to determine changes in structure and chemical composition of forage sorghum before and after pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis

  12. PKCβ-dependent phosphorylation of the glycine transporter 1.

    PubMed

    Vargas-Medrano, Javier; Castrejon-Tellez, Vicente; Plenge, Fernando; Ramirez, Ivan; Miranda, Manuel

    2011-12-01

    The extracellular levels of the neurotransmitter glycine in the brain are tightly regulated by the glycine transporter 1 (GlyT1) and the clearance rate for glycine depends on its rate of transport and the levels of cell surface GlyT1. Over the years, it has been shown that PKC tightly regulates the activity of several neurotransmitter transporters. In the present work, by stably expressing three N-terminus GlyT1 isoforms in porcine aortic endothelial cells and assaying for [(32)P]-orthophosphate metabolic labeling, we demonstrated that the isoforms GlyT1a, GlyT1b, and GlyT1c were constitutively phosphorylated, and that phosphorylation was dramatically enhanced, in a time dependent fashion, after PKC activation by phorbol ester. The phosphorylation was PKC-dependent, since pre-incubation of the cells with bisindolylmaleimide I, a selective PKC inhibitor, abolished the phorbol ester-induced phosphorylation. Blotting with specific anti-phospho-tyrosine antibodies did not yield any signal that could correspond to GlyT1 tyrosine phosphorylation, suggesting that the phosphorylation occurs at serine and/or threonine residues. In addition, a 23-40%-inhibition on V(max) was obtained by incubation with phorbol ester without a significant change on the apparent Km value. Furthermore, pre-incubation of the cells with the selective PKCα/β inhibitor Gö6976 abolished the downregulation effect of phorbol ester on uptake and phosphorylation, whereas the selective PKCβ inhibitors (PKCβ inhibitor or LY333531) prevented the phosphorylation without affecting glycine uptake, defining a specific role of classical PKC on GlyT1 uptake and phosphorylation. Taken together, these data suggest that conventional PKCα/β regulates the uptake of glycine, whereas PKCβ is responsible for GlyT1 phosphorylation.

  13. A cytosolic Arabidopsis D-xylulose kinase catalyzes the phosphorylation of 1-deoxy-D-xylulose into a precursor of the plastidial isoprenoid pathway.

    PubMed

    Hemmerlin, Andréa; Tritsch, Denis; Hartmann, Michael; Pacaud, Karine; Hoeffler, Jean-François; van Dorsselaer, Alain; Rohmer, Michel; Bach, Thomas J

    2006-10-01

    Plants are able to integrate exogenous 1-deoxy-D-xylulose (DX) into the 2C-methyl-D-erythritol 4-phosphate pathway, implicated in the biosynthesis of plastidial isoprenoids. Thus, the carbohydrate needs to be phosphorylated into 1-deoxy-D-xylulose 5-phosphate and translocated into plastids, or vice versa. An enzyme capable of phosphorylating DX was partially purified from a cell-free Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) protein extract. It was identified by mass spectrometry as a cytosolic protein bearing D-xylulose kinase (XK) signatures, already suggesting that DX is phosphorylated within the cytosol prior to translocation into the plastids. The corresponding cDNA was isolated and enzymatic properties of a recombinant protein were determined. In Arabidopsis, xylulose kinases are encoded by a small gene family, in which only two genes are putatively annotated. The additional gene is coding for a protein targeted to plastids, as was proved by colocalization experiments using green fluorescent protein fusion constructs. Functional complementation assays in an Escherichia coli strain deleted in xk revealed that the cytosolic enzyme could exclusively phosphorylate xylulose in vivo, not the enzyme that is targeted to plastids. xk activities could not be detected in chloroplast protein extracts or in proteins isolated from its ancestral relative Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. The gene encoding the plastidic protein annotated as "xylulose kinase" might in fact yield an enzyme having different phosphorylation specificities. The biochemical characterization and complementation experiments with DX of specific Arabidopsis knockout mutants seedlings treated with oxo-clomazone, an inhibitor of 1-deoxy-D-xylulose 5-phosphate synthase, further confirmed that the cytosolic protein is responsible for the phosphorylation of DX in planta.

  14. A Cytosolic Arabidopsis d-Xylulose Kinase Catalyzes the Phosphorylation of 1-Deoxy-d-Xylulose into a Precursor of the Plastidial Isoprenoid Pathway1

    PubMed Central

    Hemmerlin, Andréa; Tritsch, Denis; Hartmann, Michael; Pacaud, Karine; Hoeffler, Jean-François; van Dorsselaer, Alain; Rohmer, Michel; Bach, Thomas J.

    2006-01-01

    Plants are able to integrate exogenous 1-deoxy-d-xylulose (DX) into the 2C-methyl-d-erythritol 4-phosphate pathway, implicated in the biosynthesis of plastidial isoprenoids. Thus, the carbohydrate needs to be phosphorylated into 1-deoxy-d-xylulose 5-phosphate and translocated into plastids, or vice versa. An enzyme capable of phosphorylating DX was partially purified from a cell-free Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) protein extract. It was identified by mass spectrometry as a cytosolic protein bearing d-xylulose kinase (XK) signatures, already suggesting that DX is phosphorylated within the cytosol prior to translocation into the plastids. The corresponding cDNA was isolated and enzymatic properties of a recombinant protein were determined. In Arabidopsis, xylulose kinases are encoded by a small gene family, in which only two genes are putatively annotated. The additional gene is coding for a protein targeted to plastids, as was proved by colocalization experiments using green fluorescent protein fusion constructs. Functional complementation assays in an Escherichia coli strain deleted in xk revealed that the cytosolic enzyme could exclusively phosphorylate xylulose in vivo, not the enzyme that is targeted to plastids. xk activities could not be detected in chloroplast protein extracts or in proteins isolated from its ancestral relative Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. The gene encoding the plastidic protein annotated as “xylulose kinase” might in fact yield an enzyme having different phosphorylation specificities. The biochemical characterization and complementation experiments with DX of specific Arabidopsis knockout mutants seedlings treated with oxo-clomazone, an inhibitor of 1-deoxy-d-xylulose 5-phosphate synthase, further confirmed that the cytosolic protein is responsible for the phosphorylation of DX in planta. PMID:16920870

  15. Inhibition of enzymatic browning in foods and beverages.

    PubMed

    McEvily, A J; Iyengar, R; Otwell, W S

    1992-01-01

    Enzymatic browning is a major factor contributing to quality loss in foods and beverages. Sulfiting agents are used commonly to control browning; however, several negative attributes associated with sulfites have created the need for functional alternatives. Recent advances in the development of nonsulfite inhibitors of enzymatic browning are reviewed. The review focuses on compositions that are of practical relevance to food use.

  16. Enzymatic Products from Modified Soybean Oil Containing Hydrazinoester

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We use soybean oil to produce new, non-petroleum based products. The starting material is the ene reaction product of soybean oil and diethyl azodicarboxylate (DEAD), which can then be hydrolyzed chemically and enzymatically. Chemical hydrolysis gives hydrazino-fatty acids, whereas enzymatic hydro...

  17. Enzymatic browning and its control in fresh-cut produce

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Enzymatic browning of damaged tissues of fruits and vegetables during postharvest handling and processing degrades the sensory properties and nutritional value and discourages the consumer purchase of fresh-cut products. Consequently, enzymatic browning results in significant economic losses for the...

  18. A sensitive and robust method for automated on-line monitoring of enzymatic activities in water and water resources.

    PubMed

    Ryzinska-Paier, G; Lendenfeld, T; Correa, K; Stadler, P; Blaschke, A P; Mach, R L; Stadler, H; Kirschner, A K T; Farnleitner, A H

    2014-01-01

    The realisation of a novel concept for automated on-line monitoring of enzymatic activities in water was successfully demonstrated by long-term field testing at two remote Austrian ground water resources. The β-D-glucuronidase (GLUC) activity was selected as a representative enzymatic model parameter for the on-line determination. But the device can be adapted for any enzymatic reaction with diagnostic relevance for microbial water quality monitoring, as demonstrated for the β-D-galactosidase activity. Automated filtration of volumes up to 5 litres supports sensitive quantification of enzymatic activities. Internet-based data transfer, using internal control parameters for verification and a dynamic determination of the limit of quantification, enabled robust enzymatic on-line monitoring during a 2-year period. A proportion of 5,313 out of 5,506 GLUC activity measurements (96.5%) could be positively verified. Hydrological (discharge, gauge, turbidity, temperature, pH, electric conductivity, spectral absorbance coefficient at 254 nm) as well as microbiological parameters (Escherichia coli, coliforms) were concurrently determined to characterise the investigated ground water resources. The enzymatic on-line measurements closely reflected the different hydrological conditions and contamination patterns of the test sites. Contrary to expectations, GLUC did not qualify as a proxy-parameter for the occurrence of cultivation-based E. coli contamination and warrants further detailed investigations on its indication capacity as a rapid means for microbial faecal pollution detection in such aquatic habitats. Microbial on-line monitoring is likely to become more important in the future, complementing existing surveillance strategies for water safety management. Further perspectives on the application of such analytical on-line technologies, such as their connection with event-triggered sampling and standardised diagnostics, are discussed.

  19. Activation of p70s6k is associated with phosphorylation of four clustered sites displaying Ser/Thr-Pro motifs.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, S; Bannwarth, W; Morley, S J; Totty, N F; Thomas, G

    1992-08-01

    Partial amino acid sequences were obtained from 22 internal tryptic peptides of rat liver p70s6k (M(r) 70,000 ribosomal protein S6 kinase), 3 of which were found to contain phosphorylated residues. To determine whether these sites were associated with p70s6k activation, the kinase was labeled to high specific activity with 32P(i) in Swiss mouse 3T3 cells. By sequential cleavage with CNBr and endoproteinase Lys-C followed by two-dimensional tryptic peptide analysis, it could be shown that all of the sites were located in a small endoproteinase Lys-C peptide of M(r) 2400. Analysis of the p70s6k protein sequence revealed a single candidate that could represent this peptide. Three tryptic peptides derived from the endoproteinase Lys-C fragment were chosen by a newly described computer program as the most likely candidates to contain the in vivo sites of phosphorylation. Synthetic peptides based on these sequences were phosphorylated either chemically or enzymatically and found to comigrate by two-dimensional thin-layer electrophoresis/chromatography with the four major in vivo labeled tryptic phosphopeptides. Three of the phosphorylation sites in these peptides were equivalent to those sequenced in the rat liver p70s6k. In addition, all four sites display the motif Ser/Thr-Pro, typical of cell cycle-regulated sites, and are clustered in a putative autoinhibitory domain of the enzyme.

  20. Recent development of miniatured enzymatic biofuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Yin; Penmatsa, Varun; Wang, Chunlei

    2011-06-01

    Enzymatic biofuel cells (EBFCs) that oxidize biological fuels using enzyme-modified electrodes are considered a promising candidate for implantable power sources. However, there are still challenges to overcome before biofuel cells become competitive in any practical applications. Currently, the short lifespan of the catalytic enzymes and poor power density are the most critical issues in developing EBFCs. In this paper, we will review the recent development of biofuel cells and highlight the progress in Carbon-microelectromechanical system (C-MEMS) based micro biofuel cells by both computational modeling and experimental work. Also, our effort on utilizing a covalent immobilization technique for the attachment of enzymes onto the substrate which is expected to increase the enzyme loading efficiency and the power density of devices is discussed in this paper.

  1. Zinc oxide inverse opal enzymatic biosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, Xueqiu; Pikul, James H.; King, William P.; Pak, James J.

    2013-06-01

    We report ZnO inverse opal- and nanowire (NW)-based enzymatic glucose biosensors with extended linear detection ranges. The ZnO inverse opal sensors have 0.01-18 mM linear detection range, which is 2.5 times greater than that of ZnO NW sensors and 1.5 times greater than that of other reported ZnO sensors. This larger range is because of reduced glucose diffusivity through the inverse opal geometry. The ZnO inverse opal sensors have an average sensitivity of 22.5 μA/(mM cm2), which diminished by 10% after 35 days, are more stable than ZnO NW sensors whose sensitivity decreased by 10% after 7 days.

  2. Enzymatic Hydrogen Production from Starch and Water

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Y.-H. Percival; Evans, Barbara R; Mielenz, Jonathan R; Hopkins, Robert C.; Adams, Michael W. W.

    2007-01-01

    A novel enzymatic reaction was conducted for producing hydrogen from starch and water at 30oC. The overall reaction comprised of 13 enzymes, 1 cofactor (NADP+), and phosphate was driven by energy stored in carbohydrate starch according to the overall stoichiometry stoichiometric reaction of C6H10O5 (l) + 7 H2O (l) --> 12 H2 (g) + 6 CO2 (g). It is spontaneous and unidirectional because of negative Gibbs free energy and the removal of gaseous products from the aqueous reaction solution. With technology improvement and integration with fuel cells, this technology would be suitable for mobile applications and also solve the challenges associated with hydrogen storage, distribution, and infrastructure in a hydrogen economy.

  3. Heavy atom isotope effects on enzymatic reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paneth, Piotr

    1994-05-01

    The theory of isotope effects, which has proved to be extremely useful in providing geometrical details of transition states in a variety of chemical reactions, has recently found an application in studies of enzyme-catalyzed reactions. These reactions are multistep in nature with few steps being partially rate-limiting, thus interpretation of these isotope effects is more complex. The theoretical framework of heavy-atom isotope effects on enzymatic reactions is critically analyzed on the basis of recent results of: carbon kinetic isotope effects on carbonic anhydrase and catalytic antibodies; multiple carbon, deuterium isotope effects on reactions catalyzed by formate decarboxylase; oxygen isotope effects on binding processes in reactions catalyzed by pyruvate kinase; and equilibrium oxygen isotope effect on binding an inhibitor to lactate dehydrogenase. The advantages and disadvantages of reaction complexity in learning details of formal and molecular mechanisms are discussed in the examples of reactions catalyzed by phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase, orotidine decarboxylase and glutamine synthetase.

  4. Isothermal Titration Calorimetry to Characterize Enzymatic Reactions.

    PubMed

    Mazzei, Luca; Ciurli, Stefano; Zambelli, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) is a technique that measures the heat released or absorbed during a chemical reaction as an intrinsic probe to characterize any chemical process that involves heat changes spontaneously occurring during the reaction. The general features of this method to determine the kinetic and thermodynamic parameters of enzymatic reactions (kcat, KM, ΔH) are described and discussed here together with some detailed applications to specific cases. ITC does not require any modification or labeling of the system under analysis, can be performed in solution, and needs only small amounts of enzyme. These properties make ITC an invaluable, powerful, and unique tool to extend the knowledge of enzyme kinetics to drug discovery.

  5. Thermal stability of bioactive enzymatic papers.

    PubMed

    Khan, Mohidus Samad; Li, Xu; Shen, Wei; Garnier, Gil

    2010-01-01

    The thermal stability of two enzymes adsorbed on paper, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and horseradish peroxidase (HRP), was measured using a colorimetric technique quantifying the intensity of the product complex. The enzymes adsorbed on paper retained their functionality and selectivity. Adsorption on paper increased the enzyme thermal stability by 2-3 orders of magnitude compared to the same enzyme in solution. ALP and HRP enzymatic papers had half-lives of 533 h and 239 h at 23 degrees C, respectively. The thermal degradation of adsorbed enzyme was found to follow two sequential first-order reactions, indication of a reaction system. A complex pattern of enzyme was printed on paper using a thermal inkjet printer. Paper and inkjet printing are ideal material and process to manufacture low-cost-high volume bioactive surfaces.

  6. Fungal biodegradation and enzymatic modification of lignin

    PubMed Central

    Dashtban, Mehdi; Schraft, Heidi; Syed, Tarannum A.; Qin, Wensheng

    2010-01-01

    Lignin, the most abundant aromatic biopolymer on Earth, is extremely recalcitrant to degradation. By linking to both hemicellulose and cellulose, it creates a barrier to any solutions or enzymes and prevents the penetration of lignocellulolytic enzymes into the interior lignocellulosic structure. Some basidiomycetes white-rot fungi are able to degrade lignin efficiently using a combination of extracellular ligninolytic enzymes, organic acids, mediators and accessory enzymes. This review describes ligninolytic enzyme families produced by these fungi that are involved in wood decay processes, their molecular structures, biochemical properties and the mechanisms of action which render them attractive candidates in biotechnological applications. These enzymes include phenol oxidase (laccase) and heme peroxidases [lignin peroxidase (LiP), manganese peroxidase (MnP) and versatile peroxidase (VP)]. Accessory enzymes such as H2O2-generating oxidases and degradation mechanisms of plant cell-wall components in a non-enzymatic manner by production of free hydroxyl radicals (·OH) are also discussed. PMID:21968746

  7. Cascade enzymatic reactions for efficient carbon sequestration.

    PubMed

    Xia, Shunxiang; Zhao, Xueyan; Frigo-Vaz, Benjamin; Zheng, Wenyun; Kim, Jungbae; Wang, Ping

    2015-04-01

    Thermochemical processes developed for carbon capture and storage (CCS) offer high carbon capture capacities, but are generally hampered by low energy efficiency. Reversible cascade enzyme reactions are examined in this work for energy-efficient carbon sequestration. By integrating the reactions of two key enzymes of RTCA cycle, isocitrate dehydrogenase and aconitase, we demonstrate that intensified carbon capture can be realized through such cascade enzymatic reactions. Experiments show that enhanced thermodynamic driving force for carbon conversion can be attained via pH control under ambient conditions, and that the cascade reactions have the potential to capture 0.5 mol carbon at pH 6 for each mole of substrate applied. Overall it manifests that the carbon capture capacity of biocatalytic reactions, in addition to be energy efficient, can also be ultimately intensified to approach those realized with chemical absorbents such as MEA.

  8. Extracellular enzymatic activities of Bipolaris sorokiniana isolates.

    PubMed

    Geimba, Mercedes P; Brandelli, Adriano

    2002-01-01

    Several enzymatic activities were investigated in six isolates of the fungus Bipolaris sorokiniana, originating from different areas of Brazil. Among the glycosidases studied, beta-glucosidase, beta-N-acetylglucosaminidase, beta-xylosidase, cellobiohydrolase, and chitobiohydrolase were the major activities. In some isolates, beta-glucuronidase, beta-galactosidase, and alpha-mannosidase activities were also present. Polysaccharide-hydrolyzing enzymes, such as pectin lyase and carboxymethyl cellulase were detected in significant amounts, and their activities were variable among the different isolates. Other enzymes, namely phosphatases, proteinases and phenol oxidase, were also examined, showing variable amounts depending on the isolate. The pH dependence of all enzymes tested was investigated. Endoproteinase, carboxymethyl cellulase, and phenoloxidase had maximum activity in the pH range of 6-8, whilst all other enzymes showed maximum activity at pH 4-6.

  9. Pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis of corn fiber

    SciTech Connect

    Grohmann, K.; Bothast, R.J.

    1996-10-01

    Corn fiber is a co-product of the corn wet milling industry which is usually marketed as a low value animal feed ingredient. Approximately 1.2 x 10{sup 6} dry tons of this material are produced annually in the United States. The fiber is composed of kernel cell wall fractions and a residual starch which can all be potentially hydrolyzed to a mixture of glucose, xylose, arabinose and galactose. We have investigated a sequential saccharification of polysaccharides in corn fiber by a treatment with dilute sulfuric acid at 100 to 160{degrees}C followed by partial neutralization and enzymatic hydrolysis with mixed cellulose and amyloglucosidase enzymes at 45{degrees}C. The sequential treatment achieved a high (approximately 85%) conversion of all polysaccharides in the corn fiber to monomeric sugars, which were in most cases fermentable to ethanol by the recombinant bacterium Escherichia coli KOll.

  10. Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Hydrotropic Pulps at Different Substrate Loadings.

    PubMed

    Denisova, Marina N; Makarova, Ekaterina I; Pavlov, Igor N; Budaeva, Vera V; Sakovich, Gennady V

    2016-03-01

    Enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulosic raw materials to produce nutrient broths for microbiological synthesis of ethanol and other valuable products is an important field of modern biotechnology. Biotechnological processing implies the selection of an effective pretreatment technique for raw materials. In this study, the hydrotropic treatment increased the reactivity of the obtained substrates toward enzymatic hydrolysis by 7.1 times for Miscanthus and by 7.3 times for oat hulls. The hydrotropic pulp from oat hulls was more reactive toward enzymatic hydrolysis compared to that from Miscanthus, despite that the substrates had similar compositions. As the initial substrate loadings were raised during enzymatic hydrolysis of the hydrotropic Miscanthus and oat hull pulps, the concentration of reducing sugars increased by 34 g/dm(3) and the yield of reducing sugars decreased by 31 %. The findings allow us to predict the efficiency of enzymatic hydrolysis of hydrotropic pulps from Miscanthus and oat hulls when scaling up the process by volume. PMID:26634840

  11. Aurora A Kinase Amplifies a Midzone Phosphorylation Gradient to Promote High-Fidelity Cytokinesis.

    PubMed

    Ye, Anna A; Torabi, Julia; Maresca, Thomas J

    2016-08-01

    During cytokinesis, aurora B kinase (ABK) relocalizes from centromeres to the spindle midzone, where it is thought to provide a spatial cue for cytokinesis. While global ABK inhibition in Drosophila S2 cells results in macro- and multi-nucleated large cells, mislocalization of midzone ABK (mABK) by depletion of Subito (Drosophila MKLP2) does not cause notable cytokinesis defects. Subito depletion was, therefore, used to investigate the contribution of other molecules and redundant pathways to cytokinesis in the absence of mABK. Inhibiting potential polar relaxation pathways via removal of centrosomes (CNN RNAi) or a kinetochore-based phosphatase gradient (Sds22 RNAi) did not result in cytokinesis defects on their own or in combination with loss of mABK. Disruption of aurora A kinase (AAK) activity resulted in midzone assembly defects, but did not significantly affect contractile ring positioning or cytokinesis. Live-cell imaging of a Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based aurora kinase phosphorylation sensor revealed that midzone substrates were less phosphorylated in AAK-inhibited cells, despite the fact that midzone levels of active phosphorylated ABK (pABK) were normal. Interestingly, in the absence of mABK, an increased number of binucleated cells were observed following AAK inhibition. The data suggest that equatorial stimulation rather than polar relaxation mechanisms is the major determinant of contractile ring positioning and high-fidelity cytokinesis in Drosophila S2 cells. Furthermore, we propose that equatorial stimulation is mediated primarily by the delivery of factors to the cortex by noncentrosomal microtubules (MTs), as well as a midzone-derived phosphorylation gradient that is amplified by the concerted activities of mABK and a soluble pool of AAK. PMID:27638695

  12. Comparison of alternative MS/MS and bioinformatics approaches for confident phosphorylation site localization.

    PubMed

    Wiese, Heike; Kuhlmann, Katja; Wiese, Sebastian; Stoepel, Nadine S; Pawlas, Magdalena; Meyer, Helmut E; Stephan, Christian; Eisenacher, Martin; Drepper, Friedel; Warscheid, Bettina

    2014-02-01

    Over the past years, phosphoproteomics has advanced to a prime tool in signaling research. Since then, an enormous amount of information about in vivo protein phosphorylation events has been collected providing a treasure trove for gaining a better understanding of the molecular processes involved in cell signaling. Yet, we still face the problem of how to achieve correct modification site localization. Here we use alternative fragmentation and different bioinformatics approaches for the identification and confident localization of phosphorylation sites. Phosphopeptide-enriched fractions were analyzed by multistage activation, collision-induced dissociation and electron transfer dissociation (ETD), yielding complementary phosphopeptide identifications. We further found that MASCOT, OMSSA and Andromeda each identified a distinct set of phosphopeptides allowing the number of site assignments to be increased. The postsearch engine SLoMo provided confident phosphorylation site localization, whereas different versions of PTM-Score integrated in MaxQuant differed in performance. Based on high-resolution ETD and higher collisional dissociation (HCD) data sets from a large synthetic peptide and phosphopeptide reference library reported by Marx et al. [Nat. Biotechnol. 2013, 31 (6), 557-564], we show that an Andromeda/PTM-Score probability of 1 is required to provide an false localization rate (FLR) of 1% for HCD data, while 0.55 is sufficient for high-resolution ETD spectra. Additional analyses of HCD data demonstrated that for phosphotyrosine peptides and phosphopeptides containing two potential phosphorylation sites, PTM-Score probability cutoff values of <1 can be applied to ensure an FLR of 1%. Proper adjustment of localization probability cutoffs allowed us to significantly increase the number of confident sites with an FLR of <1%.Our findings underscore the need for the systematic assessment of FLRs for different score values to report confident modification site

  13. Can collision-induced negative-ion fragmentations of [M-H](-) anions be used to identify phosphorylation sites in peptides?

    PubMed

    Tran, T T Nha; Wang, Tianfang; Hack, Sandra; Hoffmann, Peter; Bowie, John H

    2011-12-15

    A joint experimental and theoretical investigation of the fragmentation behaviour of energised [M-H](-) anions from selected phosphorylated peptides has confirmed some of the most complex rearrangement processes yet to be reported for peptide negative ions. In particular: pSer and pThr (like pTyr) may transfer phosphate groups to C-terminal carboxyl anions and to the carboxyl anion side chains of Asp and Glu, and characteristic nucleophilic/cleavage reactions accompany or follow these rearrangements. pTyr may transfer phosphate to the side chains of Ser and Thr. The reverse reaction, namely transfer of a phosphate group from pSer or pThr to Tyr, is energetically unfavourable in comparison. pSer can transfer phosphate to a non-phosphorylated Ser. The non-rearranged [M-H](-) species yields more abundant product anions than its rearranged counterpart. If a peptide containing any or all of Ser, Thr and Tyr is not completely phosphorylated, negative-ion cleavages can determine the number of phosphated residues, and normally the positions of Ser, Thr and Tyr, but not which specific residues are phosphorylated. This is in accord with comments made earlier by Lehmann and coworkers.

  14. Mimicking respiratory phosphorylation using purified enzymes.

    PubMed

    von Ballmoos, Christoph; Biner, Olivier; Nilsson, Tobias; Brzezinski, Peter

    2016-04-01

    The enzymes of oxidative phosphorylation is a striking example of the functional association of multiple enzyme complexes, working together to form ATP from cellular reducing equivalents. These complexes, such as cytochrome c oxidase or the ATP synthase, are typically investigated individually and therefore, their functional interplay is not well understood. Here, we present methodology that allows the co-reconstitution of purified terminal oxidases and ATP synthases in synthetic liposomes. The enzymes are functionally coupled via proton translocation where upon addition of reducing equivalents the oxidase creates and maintains a transmembrane electrochemical proton gradient that energizes the synthesis of ATP by the F1F0 ATP synthase. The method has been tested with the ATP synthases from Escherichia coli and spinach chloroplasts, and with the quinol and cytochrome c oxidases from E. coli and Rhodobacter sphaeroides, respectively. Unlike in experiments with the ATP synthase reconstituted alone, the setup allows in vitro ATP synthesis under steady state conditions, with rates up to 90 ATP×s(-1)×enzyme(-1). We have also used the novel system to study the phenomenon of "mild uncoupling" as observed in mitochondria upon addition of low concentrations of ionophores (e.g. FCCP, SF6847) and the recoupling effect of 6-ketocholestanol. While we could reproduce the described effects, our data with the in vitro system does not support the idea of a direct interaction between a mitochondrial protein and the uncoupling agents as proposed earlier. PMID:26707617

  15. Phosphorylation site on yeast pyruvate dehydrogenase complex

    SciTech Connect

    Uhlinger, D.J.

    1986-01-01

    The pyruvate dehydrogenase complex was purified to homogeneity from baker's yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae). Yeast cells were disrupted in a Manton-Gaulin laboratory homogenizer. The pyruvate dehydrogenase complex was purified by fractionation with polyethylene glycol, isoelectric precipitation, ultracentrifugation and chromatography on hydroxylapatite. Final purification of the yeast pyruvate dehydrogenase complex was achieved by cation-exchange high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC). No endogenous pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase activity was detected during the purification. However, the yeast pyruvate dehydrogenase complex was phosphorylated and inactivated with purified pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase from bovine kidney. Tryptic digestion of the /sup 32/P-labeled complex yielded a single phosphopeptide which was purified to homogeniety. The tryptic digest was subjected to chromatography on a C-18 reverse phase HPLC column with a linear gradient of acetonitrile. Radioactive fractions were pooled, concentrated, and subjected to anion-exchange HPLC. The column was developed with a linear gradient of ammonium acetate. Final purification of the phosphopeptide was achieved by chromatography on a C-18 reverse phase HPLC column developed with a linear gradient of acetonitrile. The amino acid sequence of the homogeneous peptide was determined by manual modified Edman degradation.

  16. Maltodextrin-powered enzymatic fuel cell through a non-natural enzymatic pathway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Zhiguang; Wang, Yiran; Minteer, Shelley D.; Percival Zhang, Y.-H.

    Enzymatic fuel cells (EFCs) use a variety of fuels to generate electricity through oxidoreductase enzymes, such as oxidases or dehydrogenases, as catalysts on electrodes. We have developed a novel synthetic enzymatic pathway containing two free enzymes (maltodextrin phosphorylase and phosphoglucomutase) and one immobilized glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase that can utilize an oligomeric substrate maltodextrin for producing electrons mediated via a diaphorase and vitamin K 3 electron shuttle system. Three different enzyme immobilization approaches were compared based on electrostatic force entrapment, chemical cross-linking, and cross-linking with the aid of carbon nanotubes. At 10 mM glucose-6-phosphate (G6P) as a substrate concentration, the maximum power density of 0.06 mW cm -2 and retaining 42% of power output after 11 days were obtained through the method of chemical cross-linking with carbon nanotubes, approximately 6-fold and 3.5-fold better than those of the electrostatic force-based method, respectively. When changed to maltodextrin (degree of polymerization = 19) as the substrate, the EFC achieved a maximum power density of 0.085 mW cm -2. With the advantages of stable, low cost, high energy density, non-inhibitor to enzymes, and environmental friendly, maltodextrin is suggested to be an ideal fuel to power enzymatic fuel cells.

  17. Altered phosphorylation of Bacillus subtilis DegU caused by single amino acid changes in DegS.

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, T; Kawata, M; Mukai, K

    1991-01-01

    The Bacillus subtilis sacU locus consists of the degS and degU genes, which play a major role in controlling the production of degradative enzymes including extracellular proteases. DegS has been shown to be autophosphorylated and to transfer the phosphoryl group to DegU. In this study, we partially purified the DegS proteins which carry amino acid changes resulting from various mutations and examined the phosphorylation reaction. The mutations used were degS42, causing a reduction in exoprotease production, and degS100(Hy) and degS200(Hy), causing overproduction of the enzymes. The following results were obtained. The DegS protein derived from degS42 was deficient in both autophosphorylation and subsequent phosphate transfer to DegU. Compared with wild-type DegS, the DegS proteins derived from the overproduction mutations, degS100(Hy) and degS200(Hy), were less active in the autophosphorylation and phosphorylation of DegU. However, the DegU phosphates produced by the mutant DegS proteins were more stable than that produced by the wild-type DegS. These results suggest that phosphorylation is tightly linked to exoprotease production and that the prolonged retention of the phosphoryl moiety on DegU activates the genes for the extracellular proteases. It was also shown that the rate of dephosphorylation of DegU-phosphate was increased as the amount of DegS was increased. All of these results suggest that DegS is involved in the dephosphorylation of DegU-phosphate. Images PMID:1909319

  18. Biochemical and functional characterization of phosphoserine aminotransferase from Entamoeba histolytica, which possesses both phosphorylated and non-phosphorylated serine metabolic pathways.

    PubMed

    Ali, Vahab; Nozaki, Tomoyoshi

    2006-01-01

    The enteric protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica is a unicellular eukaryote that possesses both phosphorylated and non-phosphorylated serine metabolic pathways. In the present study, we described enzymological and functional characterization of phosphoserine aminotransferase (PSAT) from E. histolytica. E. histolytica PSAT (EhPSAT) showed maximum activity for the forward reaction at basic pH, dissimilar to mammalian PSAT, which showed sharp neutral optimum pH. EhPSAT activity was significantly inhibited by substrate analogs, O-phospho-d-serine, O-phospho-l-threonine, and O-acetylserine, suggesting possible regulation of the amoebic PSAT by these metabolic intermediates. Fractionation of the whole parasite lysate and rEhPSAT by anion exchange chromatography verified that EhPSAT represents a dominant PSAT activity. EhPSAT showed a close kinship to PSAT from bacteroides based on amino acid alignment and phylogenetic analyses, suggesting that E. histolytica gained this gene from bacteroides by lateral gene transfer. Comparisons of kinetic properties of recombinant PSAT from E. histolytica and Arabidopsis thaliana showed that EhPSAT possesses significantly higher affinity toward glutamate than the A. thaliana counterpart, which may be explained by significant differences in the isoelectric point and the substitution of arginine, which is involved the binding to the gamma-carboxylate moiety of glutamate, in Escherichia coli PSAT, to serine or threonine in E. histolytica or A. thaliana PSAT, respectively. Heterologous expression of EhPSAT successfully rescued growth defect of a serine-auxotrophic E. coli strain KL282, where serC was deleted, confirming its in vivo role in serine biosynthesis. Together with our previous demonstration of phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase, the present study reinforces physiological significance of the phosphorylated pathway in amoeba.

  19. Phosphorylation of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex isolated from Ascaris suum

    SciTech Connect

    Thissen, J.; Komuniecki, R.

    1987-05-01

    The pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC) from body wall muscle of the porcine nematode, Ascaris suum, plays a pivotal role in anaerobic mitochondrial metabolism. As in mammalian mitochondria, PDC activity is inhibited by the phosphorylation of the ..cap alpha..PDH subunit, catalyzed by an associated PDH/sub a/ kinase. However, in contrast to PDC's isolated from all other eukaryotic sources, phosphorylation decreases the mobility of the ..cap alpha..PDH subunit on SDS-PAGE and permits the separation of the phosphorylated and nonphosphorylated ..cap alpha..PDH's. Phosphorylation and the inactivation of the Ascaris PDC correspond directly, and the additional phosphorylation that occurs after complete inactivation in mammalian PDC's is not observed. The purified ascarid PDC incorporates 10 nmoles /sup 32/P/mg P. Autoradiography of the radiolabeled PDC separated by SDS-PAGE yields a band which corresponds to the phosphorylated ..cap alpha..PDH and a second, faint band which is present only during the first three minutes of PDC inactivation, intermediate between the phosphorylated and nonphosphorylated ..cap alpha..PDH subunit. Tryptic digests of the /sup 32/P-PDC yields one major phosphopeptide, when separated by HPLC, and its amino acid sequence currently is being determined.

  20. Comprehensive Analysis of Phosphorylated Proteins of E. coli Ribosomes

    PubMed Central

    Soung, George Y.; Miller, Jennifer L.; Koc, Hasan; Koc, Emine C.

    2009-01-01

    Phosphorylation of bacterial ribosomal proteins has been known for decades; however, there is still very limited information available on specific locations of the phosphorylation sites in ribosomal proteins and the role they might play in protein synthesis. In this study, we have mapped the specific phosphorylation sites in twenty-four E. coli ribosomal proteins by tandem mass spectrometry. Specific detection of phosphorylation was achieved by either phosphorylation specific visualization techniques, ProQ staining and antibodies for phospho-Ser, Thr, and Tyr, or by mass spectrometry equipped with a capability to detect addition and the loss of the phosphate moiety. Enrichment by immobilized metal affinity and/or strong cation exchange chromatography was used to improve the success of detection of the low abundance phosphopeptides. We found the small subunit (30S) proteins S3, S4, S5, S7, S11, S12, S13, S18, and S21 and the large subunit (50S) proteins L1, L2, L3, L5, L6, L7/L12, L13, L14, L16, L18, L19, L21, L22, L28, L31 to be phosphorylated at one or more residues. Potential roles for each specific site in ribosome function were deduced through careful evaluation of the given site of the phosphorylation in 3D-crystal structure models of ribosomes and the previous mutational studies of E. coli ribosomal proteins. PMID:19469554

  1. Signal processing by protein tyrosine phosphorylation in plants

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation is a reversible post-translational modification controlling many biological processes. Most phosphorylation occurs on serine and threonine, and to a less extend on tyrosine (Tyr). In animals, Tyr phosphorylation is crucial for the regulation of many responses such as growth or differentiation. Only recently with the development of mass spectrometry, it has been reported that Tyr phosphorylation is as important in plants as in animals. The genes encoding protein Tyr kinases and protein Tyr phosphatases have been identified in the Arabidopsis thaliana genome. Putative substrates of these enzymes, and thus Tyr-phosphorylated proteins have been reported by proteomic studies based on accurate mass spectrometry analysis of the phosphopeptides and phosphoproteins. Biochemical approaches, pharmacology and genetic manipulations have indicated that responses to stress and developmental processes involve changes in protein Tyr phosphorylation. The aim of this review is to present an update on Tyr phosphorylation in plants in order to better assess the role of this post-translational modification in plant physiology. PMID:21628997

  2. How Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases Recognize and Phosphorylate Their Targets: A QM/MM Study

    PubMed Central

    Turjanski, Adrian Gustavo; Hummer, Gerhard; Gutkind, J. Silvio

    2009-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathways play an essential role in the transduction of environmental stimuli to the nucleus, thereby regulating a variety of cellular processes, including cell proliferation, differentiation and programmed cell death. The components of the MAPK extracellular activated protein kinase (ERK) cascade represent attractive targets for cancer therapy as their aberrant activation is a frequent event among highly prevalent human cancers. To understand how MAPKs recognize and phosphorylate their targets is key to unravel their function. However, these events are still poorly understood due to the lack of complex structures of MAPKs with their bound targets in the active site. Here, we have modeled the interaction of ERK with a target peptide and analyzed the specificity towards Ser/Thr-Pro motifs. By using a Quantum Mechanics/Molecular Mechanics (QM/MM) approach we propose a mechanism for the phosphoryl transfer catalyzed by ERK that offers new insights into MAPK function. Our results suggest that 1) the proline residue has a role both in specificity and phospho transfer efficiency; 2) the reaction occurs in one step with ERK2 Asp147 acting as the catalytic base; 3) a conserved Lys in the kinase superfamily usually mutated to check kinase activity strongly stabilizes the transition state; and 4) the reaction mechanism is similar with either one or two Mg2+ ions in the active site. Taken together, our results provide a detailed description of the molecular events involved in the phosphorylation reaction catalyzed by MAPK and contributes to the general understanding of kinase activity. PMID:19361221

  3. L1 modulates PKD1 phosphorylation in cerebellar granule neurons.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shuang-xi; Hu, Cheng-liang; Liao, Yong-hong; Zhao, Wei-jiang

    2015-01-01

    The neural cell adhesion molecule L1 (L1CAM) is crucial for the development of the nervous system, with an essential role in regulating multiple cellular activities. Protein kinase D1 (PKD1) serves as a key kinase given its diverse array of functions within the cell. Here, we investigated various aspects of the functional relationship between L1 and phosphorylated PKD1 (pPKD1) in cerebellar granule neurons. To study the relationship between L1 and PKD1 phosphorylation, human cerebellar tissue microarrays were subject to immunofluorescence staining. We observed a positive correlation between L1 protein levels and PKD1 phosphorylation. In addition, L1 also co-localized with pPKD1. To analyze the regulatory role of L1 on PKD1 phosphorylation, primary mouse cerebellar granule neurons were treated with various concentrations of rL1 for 48 h. Using Western blot, we revealed that L1 significantly increased PKD1 phosphorylation compared with vehicle control, with the maximal effect observed at 5 nM. ERK1/2 phosphorylation was significantly increased by 2.5 nM and 10nM L1, with no apparent change in SRC phosphorylation. However, SRC expression was markedly reduced by 10nM rL1. AKT1 expression and phosphorylation levels were significantly increased by rL1, with the maximal effect observed at 2.5 and 5 nM, respectively. Our combined data revealed a positive relationship between L1 and pPKD1 in both cultured cerebellar neurons and human cerebellar tissue, suggesting that L1 functions in the modulation of PKD1 phosphorylation. PMID:25445362

  4. Acute exercise modifies titin phosphorylation and increases cardiac myofilament stiffness

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Anna E.; Kreiner, Matthias; Kötter, Sebastian; Lassak, Philipp; Bloch, Wilhelm; Suhr, Frank; Krüger, Martina

    2014-01-01

    Titin-based myofilament stiffness is largely modulated by phosphorylation of its elastic I-band regions N2-Bus (decreases passive stiffness, PT) and PEVK (increases PT). Here, we tested the hypothesis that acute exercise changes titin phosphorylation and modifies myofilament stiffness. Adult rats were exercised on a treadmill for 15 min, untrained animals served as controls. Titin phosphorylation was determined by Western blot analysis using phosphospecific antibodies to Ser4099 and Ser4010 in the N2-Bus region (PKG and PKA-dependent. respectively), and to Ser11878 and Ser 12022 in the PEVK region (PKCα and CaMKIIδ-dependent, respectively). Passive tension was determined by step-wise stretching of isolated skinned cardiomyocytes to sarcomere length (SL) ranging from 1.9 to 2.4 μm and showed a significantly increased PT from exercised samples, compared to controls. In cardiac samples titin N2-Bus phosphorylation was significantly decreased by 40% at Ser4099, however, no significant changes were observed at Ser4010. PEVK phosphorylation at Ser11878 was significantly increased, which is probably mediated by the observed exercise-induced increase in PKCα activity. Interestingly, relative phosphorylation of Ser12022 was substantially decreased in the exercised samples. Surprisingly, in skeletal samples from acutely exercised animals we detected a significant decrease in PEVK phosphorylation at Ser11878 and an increase in Ser12022 phosphorylation; however, PKCα activity remained unchanged. In summary, our data show that a single exercise bout of 15 min affects titin domain phosphorylation and titin-based myocyte stiffness with obviously divergent effects in cardiac and skeletal muscle tissues. The observed changes in titin stiffness could play an important role in adapting the passive and active properties of the myocardium and the skeletal muscle to increased physical activity. PMID:25477822

  5. Predicting and analyzing protein phosphorylation sites in plants using musite.

    PubMed

    Yao, Qiuming; Gao, Jianjiong; Bollinger, Curtis; Thelen, Jay J; Xu, Dong

    2012-01-01

    Although protein phosphorylation sites can be reliably identified with high-resolution mass spectrometry, the experimental approach is time-consuming and resource-dependent. Furthermore, it is unlikely that an experimental approach could catalog an entire phosphoproteome. Computational prediction of phosphorylation sites provides an efficient and flexible way to reveal potential phosphorylation sites and provide hypotheses in experimental design. Musite is a tool that we previously developed to predict phosphorylation sites based solely on protein sequence. However, it was not comprehensively applied to plants. In this study, the phosphorylation data from Arabidopsis thaliana, B. napus, G. max, M. truncatula, O. sativa, and Z. mays were collected for cross-species testing and the overall plant-specific prediction as well. The results show that the model for A. thaliana can be extended to other organisms, and the overall plant model from Musite outperforms the current plant-specific prediction tools, Plantphos, and PhosphAt, in prediction accuracy. Furthermore, a comparative study of predicted phosphorylation sites across orthologs among different plants was conducted to reveal potential evolutionary features. A bipolar distribution of isolated, non-conserved phosphorylation sites, and highly conserved ones in terms of the amino acid type was observed. It also shows that predicted phosphorylation sites conserved within orthologs do not necessarily share more sequence similarity in the flanking regions than the background, but they often inherit protein disorder, a property that does not necessitate high sequence conservation. Our analysis also suggests that the phosphorylation frequencies among serine, threonine, and tyrosine correlate with their relative proportion in disordered regions. Musite can be used as a web server (http://musite.net) or downloaded as an open-source standalone tool (http://musite.sourceforge.net/).

  6. Cyanogen induced phosphorylation of D-fructose. [prebiotic modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Degani, CH.; Kawatsuji, M.; Halmann, M.

    1975-01-01

    It has been demonstrated that a phosphorylated sugar, identified as alpha-D-fructopyranose, can be formed as the result of cyanogen-induced phosphorylation of D-fructose at pH 8.8. The product was isolated from barium and cyclohexylammonium salts and identified on the basis of its chromatographic and electrophoretic properties, its lability to hydrolysis by alkaline phosphatase, the rate of its acid-catalyzed hydrolysis, and the results of periodate oxidation and optical rotatory measurements. These results support the suggestion that the cyanogen-induced phosphorylation of free sugars could be a possible process for formation of sugar phosphates under prebiotic conditions (Halman et al., 1969).

  7. COMPARTMENTALIZED PHOSPHORYLATION OF IAP BY PROTEIN KINASE A REGULATES CYTOPROTECTION

    PubMed Central

    Dohi, Takehiko; Xia, Fang; Altieri, Dario C.

    2007-01-01

    SUMMARY Cell death pathways are likely regulated in specialized subcellular microdomains, but how this occurs is not understood. Here, we show that cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA) phosphorylates the Inhibitor of Apoptosis (IAP) protein survivin on Ser20 in the cytosol, but not in mitochondria. This phosphorylation event disrupts the binding interface between survivin and its antiapoptotic cofactor, XIAP. Conversely, mitochondrial survivin or a non-PKA phosphorylatable survivin mutant binds XIAP avidly, enhances XIAP stability, synergistically inhibits apoptosis, and accelerates tumor growth, in vivo. Therefore, differential phosphorylation of survivin by PKA in subcellular microdomains regulates tumor cell apoptosis via its interaction with XIAP. PMID:17612487

  8. Rosamines Targeting the Cancer Oxidative Phosphorylation Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Siang Hui; Wu, Liangxing; Kiew, Lik Voon; Chung, Lip Yong; Burgess, Kevin; Lee, Hong Boon

    2014-01-01

    Reprogramming of energy metabolism is pivotal to cancer, so mitochondria are potential targets for anticancer therapy. A prior study has demonstrated the anti-proliferative activity of a new class of mitochondria-targeting rosamines. This present study describes in vitro cytotoxicity of second-generation rosamine analogs, their mode of action, and their in vivo efficacies in a tumor allografted mouse model. Here, we showed that these compounds exhibited potent cytotoxicity (average IC50<0.5 µM), inhibited Complex II and ATP synthase activities of the mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation pathway and induced loss of mitochondrial transmembrane potential. A NCI-60 cell lines screen further indicated that rosamine analogs 4 and 5 exhibited potent antiproliferative effects with Log10GI50 = −7 (GI50 = 0.1 µM) and were more effective against a colorectal cancer sub-panel than other cell lines. Preliminary in vivo studies on 4T1 murine breast cancer-bearing female BALB/c mice indicated that treatment with analog 5 in a single dosing of 5 mg/kg or a schedule dosing of 3 mg/kg once every 2 days for 6 times (q2d×6) exhibited only minimal induction of tumor growth delay. Our results suggest that rosamine analogs may be further developed as mitochondrial targeting agents. Without a doubt proper strategies need to be devised to enhance tumor uptake of rosamines, i.e. by integration to carrier molecules for better therapeutic outcome. PMID:24622277

  9. Myeloperoxidase is synthesized as larger phosphorylated precursor.

    PubMed Central

    Hasilik, A; Pohlmann, R; Olsen, R L; von Figura, K

    1984-01-01

    Synthesis and processing of myeloperoxidase were examined in metabolically labeled cells of the human promyelocyte line HL-60 and in an in vitro rabbit reticulocyte lysate system directed with HL-60 mRNA. Radioactivity labeled products were isolated by immunoprecipitation and analyzed by gel electrophoresis and fluorography. In vivo, myeloperoxidase was labeled initially as a 85-K glycosylated polypeptide (75 K after treatment with endo-beta-N-acetylglucosaminidase H). This polypeptide was soon processed to an 81-K intermediate and to smaller mature fragments of 60 K and 13 K within approximately 1 day. A minor portion of the precursor was converted to fragments of 40 K and 43 K. The pattern of labeled polypeptides of mature myeloperoxidase was similar to that of the enzyme purified from human leucocytes. The modifications of the polypeptide and of the oligosaccharide side chains in myeloperoxidase resembled those known to occur during the processing of lysosomal enzymes. In the absence or presence of dog pancreas membranes, myeloperoxidase was synthesized in vitro as a 76-K polypeptide or a 87-K glycosylated polypeptide, respectively. In HL-60 cells [32P]phosphate was incorporated into endo-beta-N-acetylglucosaminidase H-sensitive oligosaccharides. The presence of phosphorylated oligosaccharides was inferred from the fact that endocytosis of leucocyte myeloperoxidase in fibroblasts was sensitive to mannose 6-phosphate. It is suggested that myeloperoxidase is synthesized in the rough endoplasmic reticulum as a precursor of larger molecular mass and that the oligosaccharide side chains in the precursor are modified to contain mannose 6-phosphate residues which may be involved in the segregation and transport of the precursor. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. PMID:6096138

  10. "Transfer Shock" or "Transfer Ecstasy?"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nickens, John M.

    The alleged characteristic drop in grade point average (GPA) of transfer students and the subsequent rise in GPA was investigated in this study. No statistically significant difference was found in first term junior year GPA between junior college transfers and native Florida State University students after the variance accounted for by the…

  11. Enzymatic Analysis of PTEN Ubiquitylation by WWP2 and NEDD4-1 E3 Ligases.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zan; Thomas, Stefani N; Bolduc, David M; Jiang, Xuejun; Zhang, Xiangbin; Wolberger, Cynthia; Cole, Philip A

    2016-07-01

    PTEN is a lipid phosphatase that converts phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-phosphate (PIP3) to phosphatidylinositol 4,5-phosphate (PIP2) and plays a critical role in the regulation of tumor growth. PTEN is subject to regulation by a variety of post-translational modifications, including phosphorylation on a C-terminal cluster of four Ser/Thr residues (380, 382, 383, and 385) and ubiquitylation by various E3 ligases, including NEDD4-1 and WWP2. It has previously been shown that C-terminal phosphorylation of PTEN can increase its cellular half-life. Using in vitro ubiquitin transfer assays, we show that WWP2 is more active than NEDD4-1 in ubiquitylating unphosphorylated PTEN. The mapping of ubiquitylation sites in PTEN by mass spectrometry showed that both NEDD4-1 and WWP2 can target a broad range of Lys residues in PTEN, although NEDD4-1 versus WWP2 showed a stronger preference for ubiquitylating PTEN's C2 domain. Whereas tetraphosphorylation of PTEN did not significantly affect its ubiquitylation by NEDD4-1, it inhibited PTEN ubiquitylation by WWP2. Single-turnover and pull-down experiments suggested that tetraphosphorylation of PTEN appears to weaken its interaction with WWP2. These studies reveal how the PTEN E3 ligases WWP2 and NEDD4-1 exhibit distinctive properties in Lys selectivity and sensitivity to PTEN phosphorylation. Our findings also provide a molecular mechanism for the connection between PTEN Ser/Thr phosphorylation and PTEN's cellular stability.

  12. Two-Photon Small Molecule Enzymatic Probes.

    PubMed

    Qian, Linghui; Li, Lin; Yao, Shao Q

    2016-04-19

    Enzymes are essential for life, especially in the development of disease and on drug effects, but as we cannot yet directly observe the inside interactions and only partially observe biochemical outcomes, tools "translating" these processes into readable information are essential for better understanding of enzymes as well as for developing effective tools to fight against diseases. Therefore, sensitive small molecule probes suitable for direct in vivo monitoring of enzyme activities are ultimately desirable. For fulfilling this desire, two-photon small molecule enzymatic probes (TSMEPs) producing amplified fluorescent signals based on enzymatic conversion with better photophysical properties and deeper penetration in intact tissues and whole animals have been developed and demonstrated to be powerful in addressing the issues described above. Nonetheless, currently available TSMEPs only cover a small portion of enzymes despite the distinct advantages of two-photon fluorescence microscopy. In this Account, we would like to share design principles for TSMEPs as potential indicators of certain pathology-related biomarkers together with their applications in disease models to inspire more elegant work to be done in this area. Highlights will be addressed on how to equip two-photon fluorescent probes with features amenable for direct assessment of enzyme activities in complex pathological environments. We give three recent examples from our laboratory and collaborations in which TSMEPs are applied to visualize the distribution and activity of enzymes at cellular and organism levels. The first example shows that we could distinguish endogenous phosphatase activity in different organelles; the second illustrates that TSMEP is suitable for specific and sensitive detection of a potential Parkinson's disease marker (monoamine oxidase B) in a variety of biological systems from cells to patient samples, and the third identifies that TSMEPs can be applied to other enzyme

  13. Enzymatic detection of troponin C and melittin bee

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeetender, Amritsar; Stiharu, Ion; Packirisamy, Muthukumaran

    2005-04-01

    One of the major goals of biosensor technology is to detect and quantify in detail analytes with very high accuracy. To achieve this, much of the emphasis in sensor fabrication has been laid on antibody-antigen interaction. The consequence of this focus of enzyme biosensor studies is the development of critical techniques which can be extended in the detection of Acute Myocardial Infarction (AMI). Biosensors for AMI have attracted considerable interest in the last few years since the monitoring of a specific substance is central in enzymatic reactions. This interest has led to the investigation of biochemical markers of myocardial injury. These biomarkers facilitate the diagnosis and treatment of patients with AMI. Serial measurements of biochemical markers are now universally accepted as an important determinant in AMI diagnosis. Due to their high sensitivity and specificity over other biomarkers, the troponins are the markers of choice for the diagnosis or exclusion of AMI. The present techniques used in the identification of the troponins are lengthy and require large amount of specimen solution. The present research is directed towards the identification of optical detection procedures that are compatible to the miniaturization. In the present study an effort has been made to study the antigen-antibody reaction of rabbit skeletal muscle troponin C (TnC) and bee venom melittin (ME). Fluorescence energy transfer experiments were done to investigate the Ca 2+ -dependant interaction of TnC-ME in a 1:1 complex. Experiments were also conducted on TnC-ME binding at different ratios. These results validate the biosensor technology and illustrate how a biosensor can be developed based on the study of interaction between monoclonal antibody and antigen reaction in real time. The reported experimental results provide valuable information that will be useful in the development of a biosensor for the detection of AMI.

  14. Effect of Ultrasonic Frequency on Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Cellulose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasuda, Keiji; Kato, Daiki; Xu, Zheng; Sakka, Makiko; Sakka, Kazuo

    2010-07-01

    The effect of ultrasonic frequency on the enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose was examined. As the cellulose and enzyme, needle unbleached kraft pulp and cellulase were used. In the cases of the horn-type transducer at 20 kHz and the plate-type transducer at 28 kHz, the enzymatic hydrolysis was accelerated by ultrasonic irradiation. Total sugar concentration linearly increased with ultrasonic intensity. On the other hand, in the case of the plate-type transducer at 500 kHz, the enzymatic hydrolysis was inhibited. Total sugar concentration decreased with increasing ultrasonic intensity.

  15. Ca/sup + +/- and cyclic AMP-induced changes in intact cell phosphorylation of ileal microvillus membrane proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Sharp, G.W.G.; Hannah, C.M.; Cohen, M.; Donowitz, M.

    1986-03-05

    Pieces of rabbit distal ileal mucosa, with the muscularis propria and serosa removed, were incubated for 90 minutes in Krebs-Ringer bicarborate buffer (KRB) with /sup 32/PO/sub 4/ to label the intracellular nucleotide pools. After rinsing, the mucosal pieces were transferred to KRB in the absence and presence of 10 ..mu..M A23187 or 10 mM theophylline. After a further 10 minutes the cells were scraped off and microvillus membranes prepared. The membranes were solubilized, subjected to two dimensional gel electrophoresis and autoradiography, and analyzed by densitometry. A23187 increased the phosphorylation of four microvillus membrane proteins with M/sub r/ of 32, 52, 110 and 116K. Increased phosphorylation of the 52 and 116K proteins has also been detected in microvillus membranes subjected to Ca/sup + +/ and calmodulin in the presence of ..gamma..-/sup 32/P-ATP. Theophylline increased the phosphorylation of the same 32 and 52K proteins and, additionally, of a second 32K peptide. While any of these proteins could be involved in the control of electrolyte transport, it is noteworthy that increased Ca/sup + +/, and increased cyclic AMP levels exert similar effects upon intestinal electrolyte transport. That A23187 and theophylline both increase the phosphorylation of the 32 and 52K proteins increases the possibility that these are involved in ion transport.

  16. Methods for generating phosphorylation site-specific immunological reagents

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Carl W.; Appella, Ettore; Sakaguchi, Kazuyasu

    2001-01-01

    The present invention provides methods for generating phosphorylation site-specific immunological reagents. More specifically, a phosphopeptide mimetic is incorporated into a polypeptide in place of a phosphorylated amino acid. The polypeptide is used as antigen by standard methods to generate either monoclonal or polyclonal antibodies which cross-react with the naturally phosphorylated polypeptide. The phosphopeptide mimetic preferably contains a non-hydrolyzable linkage from the appropriate carbon atom of the amino acid residue to a phosphate group. A preferred linkage is a CF.sub.2 group. Such a linkage is used to generate the phosphoserine mimetic F.sub.2 Pab, which is incorporated into a polypeptide sequence derived from p53 to produce antibodies which recognize a specific phosphorylation state of p53. A CF.sub.2 group linkage is also used to produce the phosphothreonine mimetic F.sub.2 Pmb, and to produce the phosphotyrosine mimetic, F.sub.2 Pmp.

  17. Evidence of histidine phosphorylation in isocitrate lyase from Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Roberston, E.F.; Hoyt, J.C.; Reeves, H.C.

    1987-05-01

    Escherichia coli isocitrate lyase can be phosphorylated in vitro in an ATP-dependent reaction. Partially purified extracts were incubated with ..gamma..-/sup 32/P-ATP and analyzed by two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis followed by a Western blot and autoradiography. Radioactivity was associated with the lyase only when blotting was performed under alkaline conditions. This suggests that phosphate groups are attached to the lyase via an acid-labile P-N bond rather than a more stable P-O bond. Treatment of the lyase with diethyl pyrocarbonate, a histidine modifying agent, blocks incorporation of /sup 32/P-phosphate. Treatment with phosphoramidate, a histidine phosphorylating agent, alters the isoelectric point of the lyase suggesting that the enzyme can be phosphorylated at histidine residues. Loss of catalytic activity after treatment with potato acid phosphatase indicates that isocitrate lyase activity may be modulated by phosphorylation.

  18. Phosphorylation of a neuronal-specific beta-tubulin isotype

    SciTech Connect

    Diaz-Nido, J.; Serrano, L.; Lopez-Otin, C.; Vandekerckhove, J.; Avila, J. )

    1990-08-15

    Adult rats were intracraneally injected with ({sup 32}P) phosphate and brain microtubules isolated. The electrophoretically purified, in vivo phospholabeled, beta-tubulin was digested with the V8-protease and the labeled peptide purified by reversed-phase liquid chromatography. Its amino acid sequence corresponds to the COOH-terminal sequence of a minor neuronal beta 3-tubulin isoform from chicken and human. The phosphorylation site was at serine 444. A synthetic peptide with sequence EMYEDDEEESESQGPK, corresponding to that of the COOH terminus of beta 3-tubulin, was efficiently phosphorylated in vitro by casein kinase II at the same serine 444. The functional meaning of tubulin phosphorylation is still unclear. However, the modification of the protein takes place after microtubule assembly, and phosphorylated tubulin is mainly present in the assembled microtubule protein fraction.

  19. Phosphorylation of Mad controls competition between wingless and BMP signaling.

    PubMed

    Eivers, Edward; Demagny, Hadrien; Choi, Renee H; De Robertis, Edward M

    2011-01-01

    Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) and Wnts are growth factors that provide essential patterning signals for cell proliferation and differentiation. Here, we describe a molecular mechanism by which the phosphorylation state of the Drosophila transcription factor Mad determines its ability to transduce either BMP or Wingless (Wg) signals. Previously, Mad was thought to function in gene transcription only when phosphorylated by BMP receptors. We found that the unphosphorylated form of Mad was required for canonical Wg signaling by interacting with the Pangolin-Armadillo transcriptional complex. Phosphorylation of the carboxyl terminus of Mad by BMP receptor directed Mad toward BMP signaling, thereby preventing Mad from functioning in the Wg pathway. The results show that Mad has distinct signal transduction roles in the BMP and Wnt pathways depending on its phosphorylation state. PMID:21990430

  20. Phosphorylation of Mad controls competition between wingless and BMP signaling.

    PubMed

    Eivers, Edward; Demagny, Hadrien; Choi, Renee H; De Robertis, Edward M

    2011-10-11

    Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) and Wnts are growth factors that provide essential patterning signals for cell proliferation and differentiation. Here, we describe a molecular mechanism by which the phosphorylation state of the Drosophila transcription factor Mad determines its ability to transduce either BMP or Wingless (Wg) signals. Previously, Mad was thought to function in gene transcription only when phosphorylated by BMP receptors. We found that the unphosphorylated form of Mad was required for canonical Wg signaling by interacting with the Pangolin-Armadillo transcriptional complex. Phosphorylation of the carboxyl terminus of Mad by BMP receptor directed Mad toward BMP signaling, thereby preventing Mad from functioning in the Wg pathway. The results show that Mad has distinct signal transduction roles in the BMP and Wnt pathways depending on its phosphorylation state.

  1. Enrichment of phosphorylated peptides and proteins by selective precipitation methods.

    PubMed

    Rainer, Matthias; Bonn, Günther K

    2015-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation is one of the most prominent post-translational modifications involved in the regulation of cellular processes. Fundamental understanding of biological processes requires appropriate bioanalytical methods for selectively enriching phosphorylated peptides and proteins. Most of the commonly applied enrichment approaches include chromatographic materials including Fe(3+)-immobilized metal-ion affinity chromatography or metal oxides. In the last years, the introduction of several non-chromatographic isolation technologies has increasingly attracted the interest of many scientists. Such approaches are based on the selective precipitation of phosphorylated peptides and proteins by applying various metal cations. The excellent performance of precipitation-based enrichment methods can be explained by the absence of any stationary phase, resin or sorbent, which usually leads to unspecific binding. This review provides an overview of recently published methods for the selective precipitation of phosphorylated peptides and proteins. PMID:25587840

  2. Starch phosphorylation: a new front line in starch research.

    PubMed

    Blennow, Andreas; Nielsen, Tom H; Baunsgaard, Lone; Mikkelsen, René; Engelsen, Søren B

    2002-10-01

    Starch is the primary energy reserve in higher plants and is, after cellulose, the second most abundant carbohydrate in the biosphere. It is also the most important energy source in the human diet and, being a biodegradable polymer with well-defined chemical properties, has an enormous potential as a versatile renewable resource. The only naturally occurring covalent modification of starch is phosphorylation. Starch phosphate esters were discovered a century ago but were long regarded as a curiosity, receiving little attention. Indeed, the mechanism for starch phosphorylation remained completely unknown until recently. The starch-phosphorylating enzyme is an alpha-glucan water dikinase. It is now known that starch phosphorylation plays a central role in starch metabolism.

  3. Aging effects on oxidative phosphorylation in rat adrenocortical mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Solinas, Paola; Fujioka, Hisashi; Radivoyevitch, Tomas; Tandler, Bernard; Hoppel, Charles L

    2014-06-01

    Does aging in itself lead to alteration in adrenocortical mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation? Mitochondria from Fischer 344 (F344) rats (6 and 24 months old), Brown Norway rats (6 and 32 months old) and F344-Brown Norway hybrid rats (6 and 30 months old) were compared. Mitochondria were isolated from extirpated adrenal cortex. The yields of mitochondria were quantitatively similar in all rat strains irrespective of age. In order to assess the activity of each mitochondrial complex, several different substrates were tested and the rate of oxidative phosphorylation measured. Aging does not affect mitochondrial activity except in the F344 rat adrenal cortex where the maximal ADP-stimulated oxidative phosphorylation decreased with age. We hypothesize that impaired synthesis of steroid hormones by the adrenal cortex with age in F344 rats might be due to decreased adrenocortical mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation. We conclude that aging results in adrenocortical mitochondria effects that are non-uniform across different rat strains.

  4. Microfluidic IEF technique for sequential phosphorylation analysis of protein kinases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Nakchul; Song, Simon; Choi, Hoseok; Lim, Bu-Taek; Kim, Young-Pil

    2015-11-01

    Sequential phosphorylation of protein kinases play the important role in signal transduction, protein regulation, and metabolism in living cells. The analysis of these phosphorylation cascades will provide new insights into their physiological functions in many biological functions. Unfortunately, the existing methods are limited to analyze the cascade activity. Therefore, we suggest a microfluidic isoelectric focusing technique (μIEF) for the analysis of the cascade activity. Using the technique, we show that the sequential phosphorylation of a peptide by two different kinases can be successfully detected on a microfluidic chip. In addition, the inhibition assay for kinase activity and the analysis on a real sample have also been conducted. The results indicate that μIEF is an excellent means for studies on phosphorylation cascade activity.

  5. On Stationary States in the Double Phosphorylation-dephosphorylation Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bersani, Alberto Maria; Dell'Acqua, Guido; Tomassetti, Giovanna

    2011-09-01

    In this paper we study the double phosphorylation-dephosphorylation cycle, which is a special case of multiple futile cycle. We study the stationary states, finding some classes of explicit solutions.

  6. Doubling down on phosphorylation as a variable peptide modification.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Bret

    2016-09-01

    Some mass spectrometrists believe that searching for variable PTMs like phosphorylation of serine or threonine when using database-search algorithms to interpret peptide tandem mass spectra will increase false-positive matching. The basis for this is the premise that the algorithm compares a spectrum to both a nonphosphorylated peptide candidate and a phosphorylated candidate, which is double the number of candidates compared to a search with no possible phosphorylation. Hence, if the search space doubles, false-positive matching could increase accordingly as the algorithm considers more candidates to which false matches could be made. In this study, it is shown that the search for variable phosphoserine and phosphothreonine modifications does not always double the search space or unduly impinge upon the FDR. A breakdown of how one popular database-search algorithm deals with variable phosphorylation is presented.

  7. Regulation of ERK2 phosphorylation by histamine in splenocytes.

    PubMed

    Dandekar, Radhika D; Khan, Manzoor M

    2011-06-01

    Histamine is implicated in allergic disease and asthma and ERK1/2 is involved in allergic inflammation including Th2 differentiation and proliferation. This study was designed to study the effects of histamine on ERK1/2 phosphorylation in splenocytes. C57/BL6 splenocytes were treated with different concentrations of histamine (10(-4) to 10(-11) M). Histamine (10(-4) M) increased ERK2 phosphorylation. There was, however, no significant effect seen at other concentrations (10(-11) to 10(-6) M). Surprisingly, H1 receptor agonist β-histine (10(-5) M), H2 agonist amthamine (10(-5) M), H3 agonist methimepip (10(-6) M), and H4 agonist 4-methyl histamine (10(-6) M), all increased ERK2 phosphorylation. H1R antagonist pyrilamine (10(-6) M), H2R antagonist ranitidine (10(-5) M), H3/H4R antagonist thioperamide (10(-6) M), and H3R antagonist clobenpropit (10(-5) M) inhibited histamine-mediated ERK2 phosphorylation suggesting that all four histamine receptor subtypes played some role in this phosphorylation. Because tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) causes phosphorylation of ERK1/2, we investigated whether histamine acted via secretion of TNF-α to affect ERK1/2 phosphorylation. As a consequence, TNF-α knockout mice were used and we found that there was inhibition of ERK1 and ERK2 phosphorylation by H2, H3, and H4 agonists. This was in contrast to the wild-type splenocytes where histamine augmented the phosphorylation of ERK2 via H2, H3, and H4 receptors. In TNF-α knockout mice histamine did not affect the phosphorylation of ERK2 via H1 receptors. The results suggested that histamine indirectly caused the ERK2 phosphorylation via its effects on the secretion of TNF-α and these effects were mediated via H1, H2, H3, and H4 receptors.

  8. The Plastid Casein Kinase 2 Phosphorylates Rubisco Activase at the Thr-78 Site but Is Not Essential for Regulation of Rubisco Activation State

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sang Y.; Bender, Kyle W.; Walker, Berkley J.; Zielinski, Raymond E.; Spalding, Martin H.; Ort, Donald R.; Huber, Steven C.

    2016-01-01

    Rubisco activase (RCA) is essential for the activation of Rubisco, the carboxylating enzyme of photosynthesis. In Arabidopsis, RCA is composed of a large RCAα and small RCAβ isoform that are formed by alternative splicing of a single gene (At2g39730). The activity of Rubisco is controlled in response to changes in irradiance by regulation of RCA activity, which is known to involve a redox-sensitive disulfide bond located in the carboxy-terminal extension of the RCAα subunit. Additionally, phosphorylation of RCA threonine-78 (Thr-78) has been reported to occur in the dark suggesting that phosphorylation may also be associated with dark-inactivation of RCA and deactivation of Rubisco. In the present study, we developed site-specific antibodies to monitor phosphorylation of RCA at the Thr-78 site and used non-reducing SDS-PAGE to monitor the redox status of the RCAα subunit. By immunoblotting, phosphorylation of both RCA isoforms occurred at low light and in the dark and feeding peroxide or DTT to leaf segments indicated that redox status of the chloroplast stroma was a critical factor controlling RCA phosphorylation. Use of a knockout mutant identified the plastid-targeted casein kinase 2 (cpCK2α) as the major protein kinase involved in RCA phosphorylation. Studies with recombinant cpCK2α and synthetic peptide substrates identified acidic residues at the –1, +2, and +3 positions surrounding Thr-78 as strong positive recognition elements. The cpck2 knockout mutant had strongly reduced phosphorylation at the Thr-78 site but was similar to wild type plants in terms of induction kinetics of photosynthesis following transfer from darkness or low light to high light, suggesting that if phosphorylation of RCA Thr-78 plays a direct role it would be redundant to redox regulation for control of Rubisco activation state under normal conditions. PMID:27064346

  9. G Protein-coupled Receptor Kinase-mediated Phosphorylation Regulates Post-endocytic Trafficking of the D2 Dopamine Receptor*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Namkung, Yoon; Dipace, Concetta; Javitch, Jonathan A.; Sibley, David R.

    2009-01-01

    We investigated the role of G protein-coupled receptor kinase (GRK)-mediated phosphorylation in agonist-induced desensitization, arrestin association, endocytosis, and intracellular trafficking of the D2 dopamine receptor (DAR). Agonist activation of D2 DARs results in rapid and sustained receptor phosphorylation that is solely mediated by GRKs. A survey of GRKs revealed that only GRK2 or GRK3 promotes D2 DAR phosphorylation. Mutational analyses resulted in the identification of eight serine/threonine residues within the third cytoplasmic loop of the receptor that are phosphorylated by GRK2/3. Simultaneous mutation of these eight residues results in a receptor construct, GRK(-), that is completely devoid of agonist-promoted GRK-mediated receptor phosphorylation. We found that both wild-type (WT) and GRK(-) receptors underwent a similar degree of agonist-induced desensitization as assessed using [35S]GTPγS binding assays. Similarly, both receptor constructs internalized to the same extent in response to agonist treatment. Furthermore, using bioluminescence resonance energy transfer assays to directly assess receptor association with arrestin3, we found no differences between the WT and GRK(-) receptors. Thus, phosphorylation is not required for arrestin-receptor association or agonist-induced desensitization or internalization. In contrast, when we examined recycling of the D2 DARs to the cell surface, subsequent to agonist-induced endocytosis, the GRK(-) construct exhibited less recycling in comparison with the WT receptor. This impairment appears to be due to a greater propensity of the GRK(-) receptors to down-regulate once internalized. In contrast, if the receptor is highly phosphorylated, then receptor recycling is promoted. These results reveal a novel role for GRK-mediated phosphorylation in regulating the post-endocytic trafficking of a G protein-coupled receptor. PMID:19332542

  10. Identification of Phosphorylation Sites Regulating sst3 Somatostatin Receptor Trafficking.

    PubMed

    Lehmann, Andreas; Kliewer, Andrea; Günther, Thomas; Nagel, Falko; Schulz, Stefan

    2016-06-01

    The human somatostatin receptor 3 (sst3) is expressed in about 50% of all neuroendocrine tumors and hence a promising target for multireceptor somatostatin analogs. The sst3 receptor is unique among ssts in that it exhibits a very long intracellular C-terminal tail containing a huge number of potential phosphate acceptor sites. Consequently, our knowledge about the functional role of the C-terminal tail in sst3 receptor regulation is very limited. Here, we have generated a series of phosphorylation-deficient mutants that enabled us to determine crucial sites for its agonist-induced β-arrestin mobilization, internalization, and down-regulation. Based on this information, we generated phosphosite-specific antibodies for C-terminal Ser(337)/Thr(341), Thr(348), and Ser(361) that enabled us to investigate the temporal patterns of sst3 phosphorylation and dephosphorylation. We found that the endogenous ligand somatostatin induced a rapid and robust phosphorylation that was completely blocked by the sst3 antagonist NVP-ACQ090. The stable somatostatin analogs pasireotide and octreotide promoted clearly less phosphorylation compared with somatostatin. We also show that sst3 phosphorylation occurred within seconds to minutes, whereas dephosphorylation of the sst3 receptor occurred at a considerable slower rate. In addition, we also identified G protein-coupled receptor kinases 2 and 3 and protein phosphatase 1α and 1β as key regulators of sst3 phosphorylation and dephosphorylation, respectively. Thus, we here define the C-terminal phosphorylation motif of the human sst3 receptor that regulates its agonist-promoted phosphorylation, β-arrestin recruitment, and internalization of this clinically relevant receptor.

  11. Enzymatic production of hydrogen from glucose

    SciTech Connect

    Woodward, J.; Mattingly, S.M.

    1995-06-01

    The objective of this research is to optimize conditions for the enzymatic production of hydrogen gas from biomass-derived glucose. This new project is funded at 0.5 PY level of effort for FY 1995. The rationale for the work is that cellulose is, potentially, a vast source of hydrogen and that enzymes offer a specific and efficient method for its extraction with minimal environmental impact. This work is related to the overall hydrogen program goal of technology development and validation. The approach is based on knowledge that glucose is oxidized by the NADP{sup +} requiring enzyme glucose dehydrogenase (GDH) and that the resulting NADPH can donate its electrons to hydrogenase (H{sub 2}ase) which catalyzes the evolution of H{sub 2}. Thus hydrogen production from glucose was achieved using calf liver GDH and Pyrococcus furiosus H{sub 2}ase yielding 17% of theoretical maximum expected. The cofactor NADP{sup +} for this reaction was regenerated and recycled. Current and future work includes understanding the rate limiting steps of this process and the stabilization/immobilization of the enzymes for long term hydrogen production. Cooperative interactions with the Universities of Georgia and Bath for obtaining thermally stable enzymes are underway.

  12. Natural Product Sugar Biosynthesis and Enzymatic Glycodiversification**

    PubMed Central

    Thibodeaux, Christopher J.; Melançon, Charles E.; Liu, Hung-wen

    2009-01-01

    Many biologically active small molecule natural products produced by microorganisms derive their activities from sugar substituents. Changing the structures of these sugars can have a profound impact on the biological properties of the parent compounds. This realization has inspired attempts to derivatize the sugar moieties of these natural products through exploitation of the sugar biosynthetic machinery. This approach requires an understanding of the biosynthetic pathway of each target sugar and detailed mechanistic knowledge of the key enzymes. Scientists have begun to unravel the biosynthetic logic behind the assembly of many glycosylated natural products, and have found that a core set of enzyme activities is mixed and matched to synthesize the diverse sugar structures observed in nature. Remarkably, many of these sugar biosynthetic enzymes and glycosyltransferases also exhibit relaxed substrate specificity. The promiscuity of these enzymes has prompted efforts to modify the sugar structures and/or alter the glycosylation patterns of natural products via metabolic pathway engineering and/or enzymatic glycodiversification. In applied biomedical research, these studies will enable the development of new glycosylation tools and generate novel glycoforms of secondary metabolites with useful biological activity. PMID:19058170

  13. Enzymatic hydrolysis of biomass from wood.

    PubMed

    Álvarez, Consolación; Reyes-Sosa, Francisco Manuel; Díez, Bruno

    2016-03-01

    Current research and development in cellulosic ethanol production has been focused mainly on agricultural residues and dedicated energy crops such as corn stover and switchgrass; however, woody biomass remains a very important feedstock for ethanol production. The precise composition of hemicellulose in the wood is strongly dependent on the plant species, therefore different types of enzymes are needed based on hemicellulose complexity and type of pretreatment. In general, hardwood species have much lower recalcitrance to enzymes than softwood. For hardwood, xylanases, beta-xylosidases and xyloglucanases are the main hemicellulases involved in degradation of the hemicellulose backbone, while for softwood the effect of mannanases and beta-mannosidases is more relevant. Furthermore, there are different key accessory enzymes involved in removing the hemicellulosic fraction and increasing accessibility of cellulases to the cellulose fibres improving the hydrolysis process. A diversity of enzymatic cocktails has been tested using from low to high densities of biomass (2-20% total solids) and a broad range of results has been obtained. The performance of recently developed commercial cocktails on hardwoods and softwoods will enable a further step for the commercialization of fuel ethanol from wood. PMID:26833542

  14. Enzymatic conversion of sucrose to hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Woodward, J.; Orr, M.

    1998-11-01

    The enzymatic conversion of sugars to hydrogen could be a promising method for alternative fuel production. Maple tree sap is a source of environmental sugar (e.g., sucrose) that has the potential to be converted into hydrogen using the enzymes invertase, glucose dehydrogenase (GDH), hydrogenase, and glucose isomerase (GI) and the cofactor NADP{sup +}/NADPH. The kinetics of hydrogen production have been studied, and optimal conditions for hydrogen production are described. At low initial sucrose concentrations, in the absence of glucose isomerase, stoichiometric yields of mol of H{sub 2}/mol of sucrose were achieved. At higher sucrose concentrations, the yield of hydrogen declined so that at an initial sucrose concentration of 292 mM only 7% yield of hydrogen was obtained. The reason for this low yield was studied and shown not to be caused by enzyme inactivation or a pH drop during the reaction but due to an instability of the cofactor NADP{sup +}. Although gluconic and inhibited both NADPH production and oxidation of GDH and hydrogenase, respectively, it was not the major cause of NADP{sup +} instability. Fructose was also shown to be converted to hydrogen if GI was present in the reaction mixture. Also, by starting with sucrose, 1.34 mol of H{sub 2}/mol of sucrose was obtained if GI was present in the reaction mixture.

  15. Enzymatic production of hydrogen from glucose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodward, J.; Mattingly, S. M.

    The objective of this research is to optimize conditions for the enzymatic production of hydrogen gas from biomass-derived glucose. This new project is funded at 0.5 PY level of effort for FY 1995. The rationale for the work is that cellulose is, potentially, a vast source of hydrogen and that enzymes offer a specific and efficient method for its extraction with minimal environmental impact. This work is related to the overall hydrogen program goal of technology development and validation. The approach is based on knowledge that glucose is oxidized by the NADP(sup +) requiring enzyme glucose dehydrogenase (GDH) and that the resulting NADPH can donate its electrons to hydrogenase (H2ase) which catalyzes the evolution of H2. Thus hydrogen production from glucose was achieved using calf liver GDH and Pyrococcus furiosus H2ase yielding 17% of theoretical maximum expected. The cofactor NADP(sup +) for this reaction was regenerated and recycled. Current and future work includes understanding the rate limiting steps of this process and the stabilization/immobilization of the enzymes for long term hydrogen production. Cooperative interactions with the Universities of Georgia and Bath for obtaining thermally sta

  16. Aqueous enzymatic extraction of Moringa oleifera oil.

    PubMed

    Mat Yusoff, Masni; Gordon, Michael H; Ezeh, Onyinye; Niranjan, Keshavan

    2016-11-15

    This paper reports on the extraction of Moringa oleifera (MO) oil by using aqueous enzymatic extraction (AEE) method. The effect of different process parameters on the oil recovery was discovered by using statistical optimization, besides the effect of selected parameters on the formation of its oil-in-water cream emulsions. Within the pre-determined ranges, the use of pH 4.5, moisture/kernel ratio of 8:1 (w/w), and 300stroke/min shaking speed at 40°C for 1h incubation time resulted in highest oil recovery of approximately 70% (goil/g solvent-extracted oil). These optimized parameters also result in a very thin emulsion layer, indicating minute amount of emulsion formed. Zero oil recovery with thick emulsion were observed when the used aqueous phase was re-utilized for another AEE process. The findings suggest that the critical selection of AEE parameters is key to high oil recovery with minimum emulsion formation thereby lowering the load on the de-emulsification step. PMID:27283648

  17. Enzymatic Activity of Xyloglucan Xylosyltransferase 51[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Culbertson, Alan T.; Chou, Yi-Hsiang; Smith, Adrienne L.; Young, Zachary T.; Tietze, Alesia A.; Cottaz, Sylvain

    2016-01-01

    Xyloglucan, the most abundant hemicellulosic component of the primary cell wall of flowering plants, is composed of a β-(1,4)-glucan backbone decorated with d-xylosyl residues. Three xyloglucan xylosyltransferases (XXTs) participate in xyloglucan biosynthesis in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Two of these, XXT1 and XXT2, have been shown to be active in vitro, whereas the catalytic activity of XXT5 has yet to be demonstrated. By optimizing XXT2 expression in a prokaryotic system and in vitro activity assay conditions, we demonstrate that nonglycosylated XXT2 lacking its cytosolic amino-terminal and transmembrane domain displays high catalytic activity. Using this optimized procedure for the expression of XXT5, we report, to our knowledge for the first time, that recombinant XXT5 shows enzymatic activity in vitro, although at a significantly slower rate than XXT1 and XXT2. Kinetic analysis showed that XXT5 has a 7-fold higher Km and 9-fold lower kcat compared with XXT1 and XXT2. Activity assays using XXT5 in combination with XXT1 or XXT2 indicate that XXT5 is not specific for their products. In addition, mutagenesis experiments showed that the in vivo function and in vitro catalytic activity of XXT5 require the aspartate-serine-aspartate motif. These results demonstrate that XXT5 is a catalytically active xylosyltransferase involved in xylosylation of the xyloglucan backbone. PMID:27208276

  18. Aqueous enzymatic extraction of Moringa oleifera oil.

    PubMed

    Mat Yusoff, Masni; Gordon, Michael H; Ezeh, Onyinye; Niranjan, Keshavan

    2016-11-15

    This paper reports on the extraction of Moringa oleifera (MO) oil by using aqueous enzymatic extraction (AEE) method. The effect of different process parameters on the oil recovery was discovered by using statistical optimization, besides the effect of selected parameters on the formation of its oil-in-water cream emulsions. Within the pre-determined ranges, the use of pH 4.5, moisture/kernel ratio of 8:1 (w/w), and 300stroke/min shaking speed at 40°C for 1h incubation time resulted in highest oil recovery of approximately 70% (goil/g solvent-extracted oil). These optimized parameters also result in a very thin emulsion layer, indicating minute amount of emulsion formed. Zero oil recovery with thick emulsion were observed when the used aqueous phase was re-utilized for another AEE process. The findings suggest that the critical selection of AEE parameters is key to high oil recovery with minimum emulsion formation thereby lowering the load on the de-emulsification step.

  19. Non-eluting Enzymatic Antibiofilm Coatings

    PubMed Central

    Pavlukhina, Svetlana V.; Kaplan, Jeffrey B.; Xu, Li; Chang, Wei; Yu, Xiaojun; Madhyastha, Srinivasa; Yakandawala, Nandadeva; Mentbayeva, Almagul; Khan, Babar; Sukhishvili, Svetlana A.

    2012-01-01

    We developed a highly efficient, biocompatible surface coating that disperses bacterial biofilms through enzymatic cleavage of the extracellular biofilm matrix. The coating was fabricated by binding the naturally existing enzyme dispersin B (DspB) to surface-attached polymer matrices constructed via a layer-by-layer (LbL) deposition technique. LbL matrices were assembled through electrostatic interactions of poly(allylamine hydrochloride) (PAH) and poly(methacrylic acid) (PMAA), followed by chemical crosslinking with glutaraldehyde and pH triggered removal of PMAA, producing a stable PAH hydrogel matrix used for DspB loading. The amount of DspB loaded increased linearly with the number of PAH layers in surface hydrogels. DspB was retained within these coatings in the pH range from 4 to 7.5. DspB-loaded coatings inhibited biofilm formation by two clinical strains of Staphylococcus epidermidis. Biofilm inhibition was ≥ 98% compared to mock-loaded coatings as determined by CFU enumeration. In addition, DspB-loaded coatings did not inhibit attachment or growth of cultured human osteoblast cells. We suggest that the use of DspB-loaded multilayer coatings presents a promising method for creating biocompatible surfaces with high antibiofilm efficiency, especially when combined with conventional antimicrobial treatment of dispersed bacteria. PMID:22909396

  20. Computational Investigations on Enzymatic Catalysis and Inhibition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simard, Daniel

    Enzymes are the bimolecular "workhorses" of the cell due to their range of functions and their requirement for cellular success. The atomistic details of how they function can provide key insights into the fundamentals of catalysis and in turn, provide a blueprint for biotechnological advances. A wide range of contemporary computational techniques has been applied with the aim to characterize recently discovered intermediates or to provide insights into enzymatic mechanisms and inhibition. More specifically, an assessment of methods was conducted to evaluate the presence of the growing number 3-- and 4--coordinated sulfur intermediates in proteins/enzymes. Furthermore, two mechanisms have been investigated, the mu-OH mechanism of the hydrolysis of dimethylphosphate in Glycerophosphodiesterase (GpdQ) using five different homonuclear metal combinations Zn(II)/Zn(II), Co(II)/Co(II), Mn(II)/Mn(II), Cd(II)/Cd(II) and Ca(II)/Ca(II) as well as a preliminary study into the effectivness of boron as an inhibitor in the serine protease reaction of class A TEM-1 beta-lactamases.

  1. Bak apoptotic function is not directly regulated by phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Tran, V H; Bartolo, R; Westphal, D; Alsop, A; Dewson, G; Kluck, R M

    2013-01-01

    During apoptosis, Bak and Bax permeabilize the mitochondrial outer membrane by undergoing major conformational change and oligomerization. This activation process in Bak is reported to require dephosphorylation of tyrosine-108 close to an activation trigger site. To investigate how dephosphorylation of Bak contributes to its activation and conformational change, one-dimensional isoelectric focusing (1D-IEF) and mutagenesis was used to monitor Bak phosphorylation. On 1D-IEF, Bak extracted from a range of cell types migrated as a single band near the predicted isoelectric point of 5.6 both before and after phosphatase treatment, indicating that Bak is not significantly phosphorylated at any residue. In contrast, three engineered 'phosphotagged' Bak variants showed a second band at lower pI, indicating phosphorylation. Apoptosis induced by several stimuli failed to alter Bak pI, indicating little change in phosphorylation status. In addition, alanine substitution of tyrosine-108 and other putative phosphorylation sites failed to enhance Bak activation or pro-apoptotic function. In summary, Bak is not significantly phosphorylated at any residue, and Bak activation during apoptosis does not require dephosphorylation. PMID:23303126

  2. Protein phosphorylation in isolated hepatocytes of septic and endotoxemic rats

    SciTech Connect

    Deaciuc, I.V.; Spitzer, J.A. )

    1989-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate possible alterations induced by sepsis and endotoxicosis in the late phase of Ca2+-dependent signaling in rat liver. Hepatocytes isolated from septic or chronically endotoxin (ET)-treated rats were labeled with (32P)H3PO4 and stimulated with various agents. Proteins were resolved by one-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and autoradiographed. Vasopressin (VP)- and phenylephrine (PE)-induced responses were attenuated in both septic and ET-treated rats for cytosolic and membrane proteins compared with their respective controls. Glucagon and 12-O-myristate phorbol-13-acetate (TPA) affected only the phosphorylation of membrane proteins. Glucagon-induced changes in the phosphorylation of membrane proteins were affected by both sepsis and endotoxicosis, whereas TPA-stimulated phosphorylation was lowered only in endotoxicosis. Response to the Ca2+ ionophore A23187 was depressed in septic rats for cytosolic proteins. The phosphorylation of two cytosolic proteins, i.e., 93 and 61 kDa (previously identified as glycogen phosphorylase and pyruvate kinase, respectively), in response to VP, PE, and A23187 was severely impaired by endotoxicosis and sepsis. TPA did not affect the phosphorylation state of these two proteins. The results show that sepsis and endotoxicosis produce perturbations of the phosphorylation step in Ca2+ transmembrane signaling. Such changes can explain alterations of glycogenolysis and gluconeogenesis associated with sepsis and endotoxicosis.

  3. Structural basis for Mep2 ammonium transceptor activation by phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    van den Berg, Bert; Chembath, Anupama; Jefferies, Damien; Basle, Arnaud; Khalid, Syma; Rutherford, Julian C

    2016-04-18

    Mep2 proteins are fungal transceptors that play an important role as ammonium sensors in fungal development. Mep2 activity is tightly regulated by phosphorylation, but how this is achieved at the molecular level is not clear. Here we report X-ray crystal structures of the Mep2 orthologues from Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Candida albicans and show that under nitrogen-sufficient conditions the transporters are not phosphorylated and present in closed, inactive conformations. Relative to the open bacterial ammonium transporters, non-phosphorylated Mep2 exhibits shifts in cytoplasmic loops and the C-terminal region (CTR) to occlude the cytoplasmic exit of the channel and to interact with His2 of the twin-His motif. The phosphorylation site in the CTR is solvent accessible and located in a negatively charged pocket ∼30 Å away from the channel exit. The crystal structure of phosphorylation-mimicking Mep2 variants from C. albicans show large conformational changes in a conserved and functionally important region of the CTR. The results allow us to propose a model for regulation of eukaryotic ammonium transport by phosphorylation.

  4. Tyrosine phosphorylation of clathrin heavy chain under oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Ihara, Yoshito; Yasuoka, Chie; Kageyama, Kan; Wada, Yoshinao; Kondo, Takahito

    2002-09-20

    In mouse pancreatic insulin-producing betaTC cells, oxidative stress due to H(2)O(2) causes tyrosine phosphorylation in various proteins. To identify proteins bearing phosphotyrosine under stress, the proteins were affinity purified using an anti-phosphotyrosine antibody-conjugated agarose column. A protein of 180kDa was identified as clathrin heavy chain (CHC) by electrophoresis and mass spectrometry. Immunoprecipitated CHC showed tyrosine phosphorylation upon H(2)O(2) treatment and the phosphorylation was suppressed by the Src kinase inhibitor, PP2. The phosphorylation status of CHC affected the intracellular localization of CHC and the clathrin-dependent endocytosis of transferrin under oxidative stress. In conclusion, CHC is a protein that is phosphorylated at tyrosine by H(2)O(2) and this phosphorylation status is implicated in the intracellular localization and functions of CHC under oxidative stress. The present study demonstrates that oxidative stress affects intracellular vesicular trafficking via the alteration of clathrin-dependent vesicular trafficking. PMID:12237126

  5. Protein phosphorylation and its role in archaeal signal transduction.

    PubMed

    Esser, Dominik; Hoffmann, Lena; Pham, Trong Khoa; Bräsen, Christopher; Qiu, Wen; Wright, Phillip C; Albers, Sonja-Verena; Siebers, Bettina

    2016-09-01

    Reversible protein phosphorylation is the main mechanism of signal transduction that enables cells to rapidly respond to environmental changes by controlling the functional properties of proteins in response to external stimuli. However, whereas signal transduction is well studied in Eukaryotes and Bacteria, the knowledge in Archaea is still rather scarce. Archaea are special with regard to protein phosphorylation, due to the fact that the two best studied phyla, the Euryarchaeota and Crenarchaeaota, seem to exhibit fundamental differences in regulatory systems. Euryarchaeota (e.g. halophiles, methanogens, thermophiles), like Bacteria and Eukaryotes, rely on bacterial-type two-component signal transduction systems (phosphorylation on His and Asp), as well as on the protein phosphorylation on Ser, Thr and Tyr by Hanks-type protein kinases. Instead, Crenarchaeota (e.g. acidophiles and (hyper)thermophiles) only depend on Hanks-type protein phosphorylation. In this review, the current knowledge of reversible protein phosphorylation in Archaea is presented. It combines results from identified phosphoproteins, biochemical characterization of protein kinases and protein phosphatases as well as target enzymes and first insights into archaeal signal transduction by biochemical, genetic and polyomic studies.

  6. Structural basis for Mep2 ammonium transceptor activation by phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    van den Berg, Bert; Chembath, Anupama; Jefferies, Damien; Basle, Arnaud; Khalid, Syma; Rutherford, Julian C.

    2016-01-01

    Mep2 proteins are fungal transceptors that play an important role as ammonium sensors in fungal development. Mep2 activity is tightly regulated by phosphorylation, but how this is achieved at the molecular level is not clear. Here we report X-ray crystal structures of the Mep2 orthologues from Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Candida albicans and show that under nitrogen-sufficient conditions the transporters are not phosphorylated and present in closed, inactive conformations. Relative to the open bacterial ammonium transporters, non-phosphorylated Mep2 exhibits shifts in cytoplasmic loops and the C-terminal region (CTR) to occlude the cytoplasmic exit of the channel and to interact with His2 of the twin-His motif. The phosphorylation site in the CTR is solvent accessible and located in a negatively charged pocket ∼30 Å away from the channel exit. The crystal structure of phosphorylation-mimicking Mep2 variants from C. albicans show large conformational changes in a conserved and functionally important region of the CTR. The results allow us to propose a model for regulation of eukaryotic ammonium transport by phosphorylation. PMID:27088325

  7. Protein phosphorylation and its role in archaeal signal transduction.

    PubMed

    Esser, Dominik; Hoffmann, Lena; Pham, Trong Khoa; Bräsen, Christopher; Qiu, Wen; Wright, Phillip C; Albers, Sonja-Verena; Siebers, Bettina

    2016-09-01

    Reversible protein phosphorylation is the main mechanism of signal transduction that enables cells to rapidly respond to environmental changes by controlling the functional properties of proteins in response to external stimuli. However, whereas signal transduction is well studied in Eukaryotes and Bacteria, the knowledge in Archaea is still rather scarce. Archaea are special with regard to protein phosphorylation, due to the fact that the two best studied phyla, the Euryarchaeota and Crenarchaeaota, seem to exhibit fundamental differences in regulatory systems. Euryarchaeota (e.g. halophiles, methanogens, thermophiles), like Bacteria and Eukaryotes, rely on bacterial-type two-component signal transduction systems (phosphorylation on His and Asp), as well as on the protein phosphorylation on Ser, Thr and Tyr by Hanks-type protein kinases. Instead, Crenarchaeota (e.g. acidophiles and (hyper)thermophiles) only depend on Hanks-type protein phosphorylation. In this review, the current knowledge of reversible protein phosphorylation in Archaea is presented. It combines results from identified phosphoproteins, biochemical characterization of protein kinases and protein phosphatases as well as target enzymes and first insights into archaeal signal transduction by biochemical, genetic and polyomic studies. PMID:27476079

  8. Protein phosphorylation and its role in archaeal signal transduction

    PubMed Central

    Esser, Dominik; Hoffmann, Lena; Pham, Trong Khoa; Bräsen, Christopher; Qiu, Wen; Wright, Phillip C.; Albers, Sonja-Verena; Siebers, Bettina

    2016-01-01

    Reversible protein phosphorylation is the main mechanism of signal transduction that enables cells to rapidly respond to environmental changes by controlling the functional properties of proteins in response to external stimuli. However, whereas signal transduction is well studied in Eukaryotes and Bacteria, the knowledge in Archaea is still rather scarce. Archaea are special with regard to protein phosphorylation, due to the fact that the two best studied phyla, the Euryarchaeota and Crenarchaeaota, seem to exhibit fundamental differences in regulatory systems. Euryarchaeota (e.g. halophiles, methanogens, thermophiles), like Bacteria and Eukaryotes, rely on bacterial-type two-component signal transduction systems (phosphorylation on His and Asp), as well as on the protein phosphorylation on Ser, Thr and Tyr by Hanks-type protein kinases. Instead, Crenarchaeota (e.g. acidophiles and (hyper)thermophiles) only depend on Hanks-type protein phosphorylation. In this review, the current knowledge of reversible protein phosphorylation in Archaea is presented. It combines results from identified phosphoproteins, biochemical characterization of protein kinases and protein phosphatases as well as target enzymes and first insights into archaeal signal transduction by biochemical, genetic and polyomic studies. PMID:27476079

  9. Environmentally modulated phosphorylation and dynamics of proteins in photosynthetic membranes.

    PubMed

    Vener, Alexander V

    2007-06-01

    Recent advances in vectorial proteomics of protein domains exposed to the surface of photosynthetic thylakoid membranes of plants and the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii allowed mapping of in vivo phosphorylation sites in integral and peripheral membrane proteins. In plants, significant changes of thylakoid protein phosphorylation are observed in response to stress, particularly in photosystem II under high light or high temperature stress. Thylakoid protein phosphorylation in the algae is much more responsive to the ambient redox and light conditions, as well as to CO(2) availability. The light-dependent multiple and differential phosphorylation of CP29 linker protein in the green algae is suggested to control photosynthetic state transitions and uncoupling of light harvesting proteins from photosystem II under high light. The similar role for regulation of the dynamic distribution of light harvesting proteins in plants is proposed for the TSP9 protein, which together with other recently discovered peripheral proteins undergoes specific environment- and redox-dependent phosphorylation at the thylakoid surface. This review focuses on the environmentally modulated reversible phosphorylation of thylakoid proteins related to their membrane dynamics and affinity towards particular photosynthetic protein complexes. PMID:17184728

  10. Small molecules that target phosphorylation dependent protein-protein interaction.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Nobumoto; Osada, Hiroyuki

    2016-08-01

    Protein-protein interaction is one of the key events in the signal transduction pathway. The interaction changes the conformations, activities, localization and stabilities of the proteins, and transduces the signal to the next step. Frequently, this interaction occurs upon the protein phosphorylation. When upstream signals are stimulated, protein kinase(s) is/are activated and phosphorylate(s) their substrates, and induce the phosphorylation dependent protein-protein interaction. For this interaction, several domains in proteins are known to specifically recognize the phosphorylated residues of target proteins. These specific domains for interaction are important in the progression of the diseases caused by disordered signal transduction such as cancer. Thus small molecules that modulate this interaction are attractive lead compounds for the treatment of such diseases. In this review, we focused on three examples of phosphorylation dependent protein-protein interaction modules (14-3-3, polo box domain of Plk1 and F-box proteins in SCF ubiquitin ligases) and summarize small molecules that modulate their interaction. We also introduce our original screening system to identify such small molecules.

  11. Multisite phosphorylation of spinach leaf sucrose-phosphate synthase

    SciTech Connect

    Huber, J.L.; Huber, S.C. )

    1990-05-01

    Spinach leaf sucrose-phosphate synthase is phosphorylated both in vivo and in vitro on serine residues. Phosphorylation of SPS in vivo yields twelve major phosphopeptides after a tryptic digest and two dimensional mapping. The in vivo labeling of three of these SPS P-peptides is reduced in illuminated leaves where the extracted enzyme is activated relative to that of dark leaves. Two of these inhibitory sites are phosphorylated as well when SPS is inactivated in vitro using ({sup 32}P)ATP. In vivo phosphorylation of two other sites is enhanced during mannose feeding of the leaves (in light or dark) which produces the highest activation state of SPS. Overall, the results confirm that light-dark regulation of SPS activity occurs as a result of regulatory seryl-phosphorylation and involves a balance between phosphorylation of sites which inhibit or stimulate activity. Regulation of the SPS protein kinase that inhibits activity is relatively unaffected by phosphate but inhibited by G1c 6-P (IC{sub 50}{approx}5 mM), which may explain the control of SPS activation state by light-dark signals.

  12. Structural basis for Mep2 ammonium transceptor activation by phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    van den Berg, Bert; Chembath, Anupama; Jefferies, Damien; Basle, Arnaud; Khalid, Syma; Rutherford, Julian C

    2016-01-01

    Mep2 proteins are fungal transceptors that play an important role as ammonium sensors in fungal development. Mep2 activity is tightly regulated by phosphorylation, but how this is achieved at the molecular level is not clear. Here we report X-ray crystal structures of the Mep2 orthologues from Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Candida albicans and show that under nitrogen-sufficient conditions the transporters are not phosphorylated and present in closed, inactive conformations. Relative to the open bacterial ammonium transporters, non-phosphorylated Mep2 exhibits shifts in cytoplasmic loops and the C-terminal region (CTR) to occlude the cytoplasmic exit of the channel and to interact with His2 of the twin-His motif. The phosphorylation site in the CTR is solvent accessible and located in a negatively charged pocket ∼30 Å away from the channel exit. The crystal structure of phosphorylation-mimicking Mep2 variants from C. albicans show large conformational changes in a conserved and functionally important region of the CTR. The results allow us to propose a model for regulation of eukaryotic ammonium transport by phosphorylation. PMID:27088325

  13. Formation and Dissociation of Phosphorylated Peptide Radical Cations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Ricky P. W.; Quan, Quan; Hao, Qiang; Lai, Cheuk-Kuen; Siu, Chi-Kit; Chu, Ivan K.

    2012-12-01

    In this study, we generated phosphoserine- and phosphothreonine-containing peptide radical cations through low-energy collision-induced dissociation (CID) of the ternary metal-ligand phosphorylated peptide complexes [CuII(terpy) p M]·2+ and [CoIII(salen) p M]·+ [ p M: phosphorylated angiotensin III derivative; terpy: 2,2':6',2''-terpyridine; salen: N, N '-ethylenebis(salicylideneiminato)]. Subsequent CID of the phosphorylated peptide radical cations ( p M·+) revealed fascinating gas-phase radical chemistry, yielding (1) charge-directed b- and y-type product ions, (2) radical-driven product ions through cleavages of peptide backbones and side chains, and (3) different degrees of formation of [M - H3PO4]·+ species through phosphate ester bond cleavage. The CID spectra of the p M·+ species and their non-phosphorylated analogues featured fragment ions of similar sequence, suggesting that the phosphoryl group did not play a significant role in the fragmentation of the peptide backbone or side chain. The extent of neutral H3PO4 loss was influenced by the peptide sequence and the initial sites of the charge and radical. A preliminary density functional theory study, at the B3LYP 6-311++G(d,p) level of theory, of the neutral loss of H3PO4 from a prototypical model— N-acetylphosphorylserine methylamide—revealed several factors governing the elimination of neutral phosphoryl groups through charge- and radical-induced mechanisms.

  14. Enzymatic treatment of duck hepatitis B virus: Topology of the surface proteins for virions and noninfectious subviral particles

    SciTech Connect

    Franke, Claudia; Matschl, Urte; Bruns, Michael . E-mail: mbruns@hpi.uni-hamburg.de

    2007-03-01

    The large surface antigen L of duck hepatitis B virus exhibits a mixed topology with the preS domains of the protein alternatively exposed to the particles' interior or exterior. After separating virions from subviral particles (SVPs), we compared their L topologies and showed that both particle types exhibit the same amount of L with the following differences: 1-preS of intact virions was enzymatically digested with chymotrypsin, whereas in SVPs only half of preS was accessible, 2-phosphorylation of L at S118 was completely removed by phosphatase treatment only in virions, 3-iodine-125 labeling disclosed a higher ratio of exposed preS to S domains in virions compared to SVPs. These data point towards different surface architectures of virions and SVPs. Because the preS domain acts in binding to a cellular receptor of hepatocytes, our findings implicate the exclusion of SVPs as competitors for the receptor binding and entry of virions.

  15. The effective molarity of the substrate phosphoryl group in the transition state for yeast OMP decarboxylase.

    PubMed

    Sievers, Annette; Wolfenden, Richard

    2005-02-01

    The second order rate constant (k(cat)/K(m)) for decarboxylation of orotidine by yeast OMP decarboxylase (ODCase), measured by trapping (14)CO(2) released during the reaction, is 2 x 10(-4)M(-1)s(-1). This very low activity may be compared with a value of 3 x 10(7)M(-1)s(-1) for the action of yeast OMP decarboxylase on the normal substrate OMP. Both activities are strongly inhibited by 6-hydroxy UMP (BMP), and abrogated by mutation of Asp-96 to alanine. These results, in conjunction with the binding affinity of inorganic phosphate as a competitive inhibitor (K(i)=7 x 10(-4)M), imply an effective concentration of 1.1 x 10(9)M for the substrate phosphoryl group in stabilizing the transition state for enzymatic decarboxylation of OMP. The observed difference in rate (1.5 x 10(11)-fold) is the largest effect of a simple substituent that appears to have been reported for an enzyme reaction.

  16. EZH2 phosphorylation by JAK3 mediates a switch to noncanonical function in natural killer/T-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Yan, Junli; Li, Boheng; Lin, Baohong; Lee, Pei Tsung; Chung, Tae-Hoon; Tan, Joy; Bi, Chonglei; Lee, Xue Ting; Selvarajan, Viknesvaran; Ng, Siok-Bian; Yang, Henry; Yu, Qiang; Chng, Wee-Joo

    2016-08-18

    The best-understood mechanism by which EZH2 exerts its oncogenic function is through polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2)-mediated gene repression, which requires its histone methyltransferase activity. However, small-molecule inhibitors of EZH2 that selectively target its enzymatic activity turn out to be potent only for lymphoma cells with EZH2-activating mutation. Intriguingly, recent discoveries, including ours, have placed EZH2 into the category of transcriptional coactivators and thus raised the possibility of noncanonical signaling pathways. However, it remains unclear how EZH2 switches to this catalytic independent function. In the current study, using natural killer/T-cell lymphoma (NKTL) as a disease model, we found that phosphorylation of EZH2 by JAK3 promotes the dissociation of the PRC2 complex leading to decreased global H3K27me3 levels, while it switches EZH2 to a transcriptional activator, conferring higher proliferative capacity of the affected cells. Gene expression data analysis also suggests that the noncanonical function of EZH2 as a transcriptional activator upregulates a set of genes involved in DNA replication, cell cycle, biosynthesis, stemness, and invasiveness. Consistently, JAK3 inhibitor was able to significantly reduce the growth of NKTL cells, in an EZH2 phosphorylation-dependent manner, whereas various compounds recently developed to inhibit EZH2 methyltransferase activity have no such effect. Thus, pharmacological inhibition of JAK3 activity may provide a promising treatment option for NKTL through the novel mechanism of suppressing noncanonical EZH2 activity. PMID:27297789

  17. Enzymatic hydrolysis of plant polysaccharides: substrates for fermentation.

    PubMed

    Dekker, R F

    1989-01-01

    The enzymatic hydrolysis of plant carbohydrate polymers is discussed with particular emphasis on lignocellulose. The polysaccharides include starch, inulin, cellulose and the hemicelluloses, i.e., the heteroxylans and glucomannans. Commercial operations exist for the enzymatic hydrolysis of starch and its fermentation into chemicals such as ethanol. Enzymatic hydrolysis of lignocellulose is more complex and the enzymes are rather expensive to produce, which currently precludes the commercial processing of lignocellulosic materials. The bioconversion of lignocellulose consists of 4 process steps: pretreatment, enzyme production, enzymatic saccharification and fermentation. Except for the last step, each of these process steps is discussed. The discussion is highlighted with examples of lignocellulosic waste materials (e.g., sugar cane and a hardwood and softwood sawdust) which are of potential use in a bioconversion process for providing sugar hydrolysates that can serve as fermentation substrates.

  18. Recent insights in enzymatic synthesis of fructooligosaccharides from inulin.

    PubMed

    Singh, Ram Sarup; Singh, Rupinder Pal; Kennedy, John F

    2016-04-01

    In the past few years, people are paying more attention to their dietary habits, and functional foods are playing a key role in maintaining the health of man. Prebiotics are considered as a main component of the functional foods which are usually composed of short chains of carbohydrates. Fructooligosaccharides (FOSs) are considered as one of the main group of prebiotics which have recognisable bifidogenic properties. FOSs are obtained either by extraction from various plant materials or by enzymatic synthesis from different substrates. Enzymatically, these can be obtained either from sucrose using fructosyltransferase or from inulin by endoinulinase. Inulin is a potent substrate for the enzymatic production of FOSs. This review article will provide an overview on the inulin as potent substrate, microbial sources of endoinulinases, enzymatic synthesis of FOSs from inulin, commercial status of FOSs, and their future perspectives.

  19. Isomerization of 1-O-indol-3-ylacetyl-beta-D-glucose. Enzymatic hydrolysis of 1-O, 4-O, and 6-O-indol-3-ylacetyl-beta-D-glucose and the enzymatic synthesis of indole-3-acetyl glycerol by a hormone metabolizing complex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kowalczyk, S.; Bandurski, R. S.

    1990-01-01

    The first compound in the series of reactions leading to the ester conjugates of indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) in kernels of Zea mays sweet corn is the acyl alkyl acetal, 1-O-indol-3-ylacetyl-beta-D-glucose (1-O-IAGlu). The enzyme catalyzing the synthesis of this compound is UDP-glucose:indol-3-ylacetate glucosyl-transferase (IAGlu synthase). The IAA moiety of the high energy compound 1-O-IAGlu may be enzymatically transferred to myo-inositol or to glycerol or the 1-O-IAGlu may be enzymatically hydrolyzed. Alternatively, nonenzymatic acyl migration may occur to yield the 2-O, 4-O, and 6-O esters of IAA and glucose. The 4-O and 6-O esters may then be enzymatically hydrolyzed to yield free IAA and glucose. This work reports new enzymatic activities, the transfer of IAA from 1-O-IAGlu to glycerol, and the enzyme-catalyzed hydrolysis of 4-O and 6-O-IAGlu. Data is also presented on the rate of non-enzymatic acyl migration of IAA from the 1-O to the 4-O and 6-O positions of glucose. We also report that enzymes catalyzing the synthesis of 1-O-IAGlu and the hydrolysis of 1-O, 4-O, and 6-O-IAGlu fractionate as a hormone metabolizing complex. The association of synthetic and hydrolytic capabilities in enzymes which cofractionate may have physiological significance.

  20. Modification of layered atelocollagen: enzymatic degradation and cytotoxicity evaluation.

    PubMed

    Vizárová, K; Bakos, D; Rehákova, M; Petríkova, M; Panáková, E; Koller, J

    1995-11-01

    Two kinds of layered atelocollagen materials cross-linked with hexamethylene diisocyanate (HMDIC), starch dialdehyde and glyoxal were enzymatically treated by bacterial collagenase. Evaluating collagenase digestion assay for these material showed progressive differences, particularly in the group of samples cross-linked with HMDIC. This should offer the possibility of programmed enzymatic degradation. These materials may be toxicologically acceptable as proven by the short-term test used for cytotoxicity evaluation.

  1. Anti-inflammatory effect of enzymatic hydrolysates from Styela clava flesh tissue in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated RAW 264.7 macrophages and in vivo zebrafish model

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Seok-Chun

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES In this study, potential anti-inflammatory effect of enzymatic hydrolysates from Styela clava flesh tissue was assessed via nitric oxide (NO) production in lipopolysaccahride (LPS) induced RAW 264.7 macrophages and in vivo zebrafish model. MATERIALS/METHODS We investigated the ability of enzymatic hydrolysates from Styela clava flesh tissue to inhibit LPS-induced expression of pro-inflammatory mediators in RAW 264.7 macrophages, and the molecular mechanism through which this inhibition occurred. In addition, we evaluated anti-inflammatory effect of enzymatic hydrolysates against a LPS-exposed in in vivo zebrafish model. RESULTS Among the enzymatic hydrolysates, Protamex-proteolytic hydrolysate exhibited the highest NO inhibitory effect and was fractionated into three ranges of molecular weight by using ultrafiltration (UF) membranes (MWCO 5 kDa and 10 kDa). The above 10 kDa fraction down-regulated LPS-induced expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), thereby reducing production of NO and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) in LPS-activated RAW 264.7 macrophages. The above 10 kDa fraction suppressed LPS-induced production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, including interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α. In addition, the above 10 kDa fraction inhibited LPS-induced phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERKs), c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), and p38. Furthermore, NO production in live zebrafish induced by LPS was reduced by addition of the above 10 kDa fraction from S. clava enzymatic hydrolysate. CONCLUSION The results of this study suggested that hydrolysates derived from S. clava flesh tissue would be new anti-inflammation materials in functional resources. PMID:26060532

  2. Structural Basis for Inactivation of the Human Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Complex by Phosphorylation: Role of Disordered Phosphorylation Loops

    SciTech Connect

    Kato, Masato; Wynn, R. Max; Chuang, Jacinta L.; Tso, Shih-Chia; Machius, Mischa; Li, Jun; Chuang, David T.

    2009-09-11

    We report the crystal structures of the phosporylated pyruvate dehydrogenase (E1p) component of the human pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC). The complete phosphorylation at Ser264-{alpha} (site 1) of a variant E1p protein was achieved using robust pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 4 free of the PDC core. We show that unlike its unmodified counterpart, the presence of a phosphoryl group at Ser264-{alpha} prevents the cofactor thiamine diphosphate-induced ordering of the two loops carrying the three phosphorylation sites. The disordering of these phosphorylation loops is caused by a previously unrecognized steric clash between the phosphoryl group at site 1 and a nearby Ser266-{alpha}, which nullifies a hydrogen-bonding network essential for maintaining the loop conformations. The disordered phosphorylation loops impede the binding of lipoyl domains of the PDC core to E1p, negating the reductive acetylation step. This results in the disruption of the substrate channeling in the PDC, leading to the inactivation of this catalytic machine.

  3. Enzymatically induced motion at nano- and micro-scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gáspár, Szilveszter

    2014-06-01

    In contrast to adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-dependent motor enzymes, other enzymes are little-known as ``motors'' or ``pumps'', that is, for their ability to induce motion. The enhanced diffusive movement of enzyme molecules, the self-propulsion of enzyme-based nanomotors, and liquid pumping with enzymatic micropumps were indeed only recently reported. Enzymatically induced motion can be achieved in mild conditions and without the use of external fields. It is thus better suited for use in living systems (from single-cell to whole-body) than most other ways to achieve motion at small scales. Enzymatically induced motion is thus not only new but also important. Therefore, the present work reviews the most significant discoveries in enzymatically induced motion. As we will learn, freely diffusing enzymes enhance their diffusive movement by nonreciprocal conformational changes which parallel their catalytic cycles. Meanwhile, enzyme-modified nano- and micro-objects turn chemical energy into kinetic energy through mechanisms such as bubble recoil propulsion, self-electrophoresis, and self-diffusiophoresis. Enzymatically induced motion of small objects ranges from enhanced diffusive movement to directed motion at speeds as high as 1 cm s-1. In spite of the progress made in understanding how the energy of enzyme reactions is turned into motion, most enzymatically powered devices remain inefficient and need improvements before we will witness their application in real world environments.

  4. Enzymatically induced motion at nano- and micro-scales.

    PubMed

    Gáspár, Szilveszter

    2014-07-21

    In contrast to adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-dependent motor enzymes, other enzymes are little-known as "motors" or "pumps", that is, for their ability to induce motion. The enhanced diffusive movement of enzyme molecules, the self-propulsion of enzyme-based nanomotors, and liquid pumping with enzymatic micropumps were indeed only recently reported. Enzymatically induced motion can be achieved in mild conditions and without the use of external fields. It is thus better suited for use in living systems (from single-cell to whole-body) than most other ways to achieve motion at small scales. Enzymatically induced motion is thus not only new but also important. Therefore, the present work reviews the most significant discoveries in enzymatically induced motion. As we will learn, freely diffusing enzymes enhance their diffusive movement by nonreciprocal conformational changes which parallel their catalytic cycles. Meanwhile, enzyme-modified nano- and micro-objects turn chemical energy into kinetic energy through mechanisms such as bubble recoil propulsion, self-electrophoresis, and self-diffusiophoresis. Enzymatically induced motion of small objects ranges from enhanced diffusive movement to directed motion at speeds as high as 1 cm s(-1). In spite of the progress made in understanding how the energy of enzyme reactions is turned into motion, most enzymatically powered devices remain inefficient and need improvements before we will witness their application in real world environments.

  5. Inhibition of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 integrase by the Fab fragment of a specific monoclonal antibody suggests that different multimerization states are required for different enzymatic functions.

    PubMed

    Barsov, E V; Huber, W E; Marcotrigiano, J; Clark, P K; Clark, A D; Arnold, E; Hughes, S H

    1996-07-01

    We have characterized a murine monoclonal antibody (MAb 35), which was raised against human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) integration protein (IN), and the corresponding Fab 35. Although MAb 35 does not inhibit HIV-1 IN, Fab 35 does. MAb 35 (and Fab 35) binds to an epitope in the C-terminal region of HIV-1 IN. Fab 35 inhibits 3'-end processing, strand transfer, and disintegration; however, DNA binding is not affected. The available data suggest that Fab 35 inhibits enzymatic activities of IN by interfering with the ability of IN to form multimers that are enzymatically active. This implies that the C-terminal region of HIV-1 IN participates in interactions that are essential for the multimerization of IN. Titration of the various IN-mediated enzymatic activities suggests that different degrees of multimerization are required for different activities of HIV-1 IN.

  6. Cell survival after UV radiation stress in the unicellular chlorophyte Dunaliella tertiolecta is mediated by DNA repair and MAPK phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    García-Gómez, Candela; Segovia, María

    2012-01-01

    Ultraviolet radiation (UVR) induces damage in a variety of organisms, and cells may adapt by developing repair or tolerance mechanisms to counteract such damage; otherwise, the cellular fate is cell death. Here, the effect of UVR-induced cell damage and the associated signalling and repair mechanisms by which cells are able to survive was studied in Dunaliella tertiolecta. UVR did not cause cell death, as shown by the absence of SYTOX Green-positive labelling cells. Ultrastructure analysis by transmission electron microscopy demonstrated that the cells were alive but were subjected to morphological changes such as starch accumulation, chromatin disaggregation, and chloroplast degradation. This behaviour paralleled a decrease in F v/F m and the formation of cyclobutane–pyrimidine dimers, showing a 10-fold increase at the end of the time course. There was a high accumulation of the repressor of transcriptional gene silencing (ROS1), as well as the cell proliferation nuclear antigen (PCNA) in UVR-treated cells, revealing activation of DNA repair mechanisms. The degree of phosphorylation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and p38-like mitogen-activated protein kinases was higher in UVR-exposed cells; however, the opposite occurred with the phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK). This confirmed that both JNK and p38 need to be phosphorylated to trigger the stress response, as well as the fact that cell division is arrested when an ERK is dephosphorylated. In parallel, both DEVDase and WEHDase caspase-like enzymatic activities were active even though the cells were not dead, suggesting that these proteases must be considered within a wider frame of stress proteins, rather than specifically being involved in cell death in these organisms. PMID:22859678

  7. Effects of cadmium on enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidative defences of rice (Oryza sativa L.).

    PubMed

    Yu, Fangming; Liu, Kehui; Li, Mingshun; Zhou, Zhenming; Deng, Hua; Chen, Bin

    2013-01-01

    The effects of 60-d cadmium (Cd) exposure on enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidative system of Oryza sativa L. seedlings at tillering stage were studied using soil culture experiment. Research findings showed that chlorophyll content of Oryza sativa L. declined with the increase in soil metal concentration. Cd pollution induced the antioxidant stress by inducing O2(-1) and H2O2, which increased in plants; at the same time, MDA as the final product of peroxidation of membrane lipids, accumulated in plant. The antioxidant enzyme system was initiated under the Cd exposure, i.e. almost all the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), peroxidase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase, and ascorbate peroxidase were elevated both in leaves and roots. The non-protein thiols including phytochelatins and glutathione to scavenge toxic free radicals caused by Cd stress was also studied. The contents of phytochelatins and glutathione were about 3.12-6.65-fold and 3.27-10.73-fold in leaves, against control; and the corresponding values were about 3.53-9.37-fold and 1.41-5.11-fold in roots, accordingly.

  8. Enzymatic reduction of azo and indigoid compounds.

    PubMed

    Pricelius, S; Held, C; Murkovic, M; Bozic, M; Kokol, V; Cavaco-Paulo, A; Guebitz, G M

    2007-11-01

    A customer- and environment-friendly method for the decolorization azo dyes was developed. Azoreductases could be used both to bleach hair dyed with azo dyes and to reduce dyes in vat dyeing of textiles. A new reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide-dependent azoreductase of Bacillus cereus, which showed high potential for reduction of these dyes, was purified using a combination of ammonium sulfate precipitation and chromatography and had a molecular mass of 21.5 kDa. The optimum pH of the azoreductase depended on the substrate and was within the range of pH 6 to 7, while the maximum temperature was reached at 40 degrees C. Oxygen was shown to be an alternative electron acceptor to azo compounds and must therefore be excluded during enzymatic dye reduction. Biotransformation of the azo dyes Flame Orange and Ruby Red was studied in more detail using UV-visible spectroscopy, high-performance liquid chromatography, and mass spectrometry (MS). Reduction of the azo bonds leads to cleavage of the dyes resulting in the cleavage product 2-amino-1,3 dimethylimidazolium and N approximately 1 approximately ,N approximately 1 approximately -dimethyl-1,4-benzenediamine for Ruby Red, while only the first was detected for Flame Orange because of MS instability of the expected 1,4-benzenediamine. The azoreductase was also found to reduce vat dyes like Indigo Carmine (C.I. Acid Blue 74). Hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) as an oxidizing agent was used to reoxidize the dye into the initial form. The reduction and oxidation mechanism of Indigo Carmine was studied using UV-visible spectroscopy.

  9. Nanocrystal Bioassembly: Asymmetry, Proximity, and Enzymatic Manipulation

    SciTech Connect

    Claridge, Shelley A.

    2008-05-01

    Research at the interface between biomolecules and inorganic nanocrystals has resulted in a great number of new discoveries. In part this arises from the synergistic duality of the system: biomolecules may act as self-assembly agents for organizing inorganic nanocrystals into functional materials; alternatively, nanocrystals may act as microscopic or spectroscopic labels for elucidating the behavior of complex biomolecular systems. However, success in either of these functions relies heavily uponthe ability to control the conjugation and assembly processes.In the work presented here, we first design a branched DNA scaffold which allows hybridization of DNA-nanocrystal monoconjugates to form discrete assemblies. Importantly, the asymmetry of the branched scaffold allows the formation of asymmetric2assemblies of nanocrystals. In the context of a self-assembled device, this can be considered a step toward the ability to engineer functionally distinct inputs and outputs.Next we develop an anion-exchange high performance liquid chromatography purification method which allows large gold nanocrystals attached to single strands of very short DNA to be purified. When two such complementary conjugates are hybridized, the large nanocrystals are brought into close proximity, allowing their plasmon resonances to couple. Such plasmon-coupled constructs are of interest both as optical interconnects for nanoscale devices and as `plasmon ruler? biomolecular probes.We then present an enzymatic ligation strategy for creating multi-nanoparticle building blocks for self-assembly. In constructing a nanoscale device, such a strategy would allow pre-assembly and purification of components; these constructs can also act as multi-label probes of single-stranded DNA conformational dynamics. Finally we demonstrate a simple proof-of-concept of a nanoparticle analog of the polymerase chain reaction.

  10. Enzymatic reduction of azo and indigoid compounds.

    PubMed

    Pricelius, S; Held, C; Murkovic, M; Bozic, M; Kokol, V; Cavaco-Paulo, A; Guebitz, G M

    2007-11-01

    A customer- and environment-friendly method for the decolorization azo dyes was developed. Azoreductases could be used both to bleach hair dyed with azo dyes and to reduce dyes in vat dyeing of textiles. A new reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide-dependent azoreductase of Bacillus cereus, which showed high potential for reduction of these dyes, was purified using a combination of ammonium sulfate precipitation and chromatography and had a molecular mass of 21.5 kDa. The optimum pH of the azoreductase depended on the substrate and was within the range of pH 6 to 7, while the maximum temperature was reached at 40 degrees C. Oxygen was shown to be an alternative electron acceptor to azo compounds and must therefore be excluded during enzymatic dye reduction. Biotransformation of the azo dyes Flame Orange and Ruby Red was studied in more detail using UV-visible spectroscopy, high-performance liquid chromatography, and mass spectrometry (MS). Reduction of the azo bonds leads to cleavage of the dyes resulting in the cleavage product 2-amino-1,3 dimethylimidazolium and N approximately 1 approximately ,N approximately 1 approximately -dimethyl-1,4-benzenediamine for Ruby Red, while only the first was detected for Flame Orange because of MS instability of the expected 1,4-benzenediamine. The azoreductase was also found to reduce vat dyes like Indigo Carmine (C.I. Acid Blue 74). Hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) as an oxidizing agent was used to reoxidize the dye into the initial form. The reduction and oxidation mechanism of Indigo Carmine was studied using UV-visible spectroscopy. PMID:17891390

  11. Integrin Ligation Results in Nephrin Tyrosine Phosphorylation In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Rakesh; Venkatareddy, Madhusudan; Kalinowski, Anne; Patel, Sanjeevkumar R.; Garg, Puneet

    2016-01-01

    Nephrin is expressed at the basolateral aspect of podocytes and is an important signaling protein at the glomerular slit diaphragm. In vitro studies have demonstrated that Nephrin phosphorylation-dependent signaling is able to assemble a protein complex that is able to polymerize actin. However, proximal signaling events that result in nephrin tyrosine phosphorylation are not well understood. Nephrin deletion in mice and human nephrin mutations result in developmental failure of the podocyte intercellular junction resutling in proteinuria. This has been presumed to be due to a failure to respond to an external polarized cue in the absence of nephrin or a failure to transduce an outside-in signal in patients with nephrin mutations. The nephrin extracellular domain binds to itself or neph1 across the foot process intercellular junction. Nephrin is tyrosine phosphorylation-silent in healthy glomeruli when presumably the nephrin extracellular domain is in an engaged state. These observations raise the possibility of an alternate proximal signaling mechanism that might be responsible for nephrin tyrosine phosphorylation. Here we present data showing that integrin engagement at the basal aspect of cultured podocytes results in nephrin tyrosine phosphorylation. This is abrogated by incubating podocytes with an antibody that prevents integrin β1 ligation and activation in response to binding to extracellular matrix. Furthermore, nephrin tyrosine phosphorylation was observed in podocytes expressing a membrane-targeted nephrin construct that lacks the extracellular domain. We propose, integrin-activation based signaling might be responsible for nephrin phosphorylation rather than engagment of the nephrin extracellular domain by a ligand. PMID:26848974

  12. Abundant protein phosphorylation potentially regulates Arabidopsis anther development

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Juanying; Zhang, Zaibao; You, Chenjiang; Zhang, Xumin; Lu, Jianan; Ma, Hong

    2016-01-01

    As the male reproductive organ of flowering plants, the stamen consists of the anther and filament. Previous studies on stamen development mainly focused on single gene functions by genetic methods or gene expression changes using comparative transcriptomic approaches, especially in model plants such as Arabidopsis thaliana. However, studies on Arabidopsis anther protein expression and post-translational modifications are still lacking. Here we report proteomic and phosphoproteomic studies on developing Arabidopsis anthers at stages 4–7 and 8–12. We identified 3908 high-confidence phosphorylation sites corresponding to 1637 phosphoproteins. Among the 1637 phosphoproteins, 493 were newly identified, with 952 phosphorylation sites. Phosphopeptide enrichment prior to LC-MS analysis facilitated the identification of low-abundance proteins and regulatory proteins, thereby increasing the coverage of proteomic analysis, and facilitated the analysis of more regulatory proteins. Thirty-nine serine and six threonine phosphorylation motifs were uncovered from the anther phosphoproteome and further analysis supports that phosphorylation of casein kinase II, mitogen-activated protein kinases, and 14-3-3 proteins is a key regulatory mechanism in anther development. Phosphorylated residues were preferentially located in variable protein regions among family members, but they were they were conserved across angiosperms in general. Moreover, phosphorylation might reduce activity of reactive oxygen species scavenging enzymes and hamper brassinosteroid signaling in early anther development. Most of the novel phosphoproteins showed tissue-specific expression in the anther according to previous microarray data. This study provides a community resource with information on the abundance and phosphorylation status of thousands of proteins in developing anthers, contributing to understanding post-translational regulatory mechanisms during anther development. PMID:27531888

  13. dimerization and DNA binding alter phosphorylation of Fos and Jun

    SciTech Connect

    Abate, C.; Baker, S.J.; Curran, T. ); Lees-Miller, S.P.; Anderson, C.W. ); Marshak, D.R. )

    1993-07-15

    Fos and Jun form dimeric complexes that bind to activator protein 1 (AP-1) DNA sequences and regulate gene expression. The levels of expression and activities of these proteins are regulated by a variety of extracellular stimuli. They are thought to function in nuclear signal transduction processes in many different cell types. The role of Fos and Jun in gene transcription is complex and may be regulated in several ways including association with different dimerization partners, interactions with other transcription factors, effects on DNA topology, and reduction/oxidation of a conserved cysteine residue in the DNA-binding domain. In addition, phosphorylation has been suggested to control the activity of Fos and Jun. Here the authors show that phosphorylation of Fos and Jun by several protein kinases is affected by dimerization and binding to DNA. Jun homodimers are phosphorylated efficiently by casein kinase II, whereas Fos-Jun heterodimers are not. DNA binding also reduces phosphorylation of Jun by casein kinase II, p34[sup cdc2] (cdc2) kinase, and protein kinase C. Phosphorylation of Fos by cAMP-dependent protein kinase and cdc2 is relatively insensitive to dimerization and DNA binding, whereas phosphorylation of Fos and Jun by DNA-dependent protein kinase is dramatically stimulated by binding to the AP-1 site. These results imply that different protein kinases can distinguish among Fos and Jun proteins in the form of monomers, homodimers, and heterodimers and between DNA-bound and non-DNA-bound proteins. Thus, potentially, these different states of Fos and Jun can be recognized and regulated independently by phosphorylation. 44 refs., 4 figs.

  14. Phosphorylation of ATPase subunits of the 26S proteasome.

    PubMed

    Mason, G G; Murray, R Z; Pappin, D; Rivett, A J

    1998-07-01

    The 26S proteasome complex plays a major role in the non-lysosomal degradation of intracellular proteins. Purified 26S proteasomes give a pattern of more than 40 spots on 2D-PAGE gels. The positions of subunits have been identified by mass spectrometry of tryptic peptides and by immunoblotting with subunit-specific antipeptide antibodies. Two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of proteasomes immunoprecipitated from [32P]phosphate-labelled human embryo lung L-132 cells revealed the presence of at least three major phosphorylated polypeptides among the regulatory subunits as well as the C8 and C9 components of the core 20S proteasome. Comparison with the positions of the regulatory polypeptides revealed a minor phosphorylated form to be S7 (MSS1). Antibodies against S4, S6 (TBP7) and S12 (MOV34) all cross-reacted at the position of major phosphorylated polypeptides suggesting that several of the ATPase subunits may be phosphorylated. The phosphorylation of S4 was confirmed by double immunoprecipitation experiments in which 26S proteasomes were immunoprecipitated as above and dissociated and then S4 was immunoprecipitated with subunit-specific antibodies. Antibodies against the non-ATPase subunit S10, which has been suggested by others to be phosphorylated, did not coincide with the position of a phosphorylated polypeptide. Some differences were observed in the 2D-PAGE pattern of proteasomes immunoprecipitated from cultured cells compared to purified rat liver 26S proteasomes suggesting possible differences in subunit compositions of 26S proteasomes.

  15. Abundant protein phosphorylation potentially regulates Arabidopsis anther development.

    PubMed

    Ye, Juanying; Zhang, Zaibao; You, Chenjiang; Zhang, Xumin; Lu, Jianan; Ma, Hong

    2016-09-01

    As the male reproductive organ of flowering plants, the stamen consists of the anther and filament. Previous studies on stamen development mainly focused on single gene functions by genetic methods or gene expression changes using comparative transcriptomic approaches, especially in model plants such as Arabidopsis thaliana However, studies on Arabidopsis anther protein expression and post-translational modifications are still lacking. Here we report proteomic and phosphoproteomic studies on developing Arabidopsis anthers at stages 4-7 and 8-12. We identified 3908 high-confidence phosphorylation sites corresponding to 1637 phosphoproteins. Among the 1637 phosphoproteins, 493 were newly identified, with 952 phosphorylation sites. Phosphopeptide enrichment prior to LC-MS analysis facilitated the identification of low-abundance proteins and regulatory proteins, thereby increasing the coverage of proteomic analysis, and facilitated the analysis of more regulatory proteins. Thirty-nine serine and six threonine phosphorylation motifs were uncovered from the anther phosphoproteome and further analysis supports that phosphorylation of casein kinase II, mitogen-activated protein kinases, and 14-3-3 proteins is a key regulatory mechanism in anther development. Phosphorylated residues were preferentially located in variable protein regions among family members, but they were they were conserved across angiosperms in general. Moreover, phosphorylation might reduce activity of reactive oxygen species scavenging enzymes and hamper brassinosteroid signaling in early anther development. Most of the novel phosphoproteins showed tissue-specific expression in the anther according to previous microarray data. This study provides a community resource with information on the abundance and phosphorylation status of thousands of proteins in developing anthers, contributing to understanding post-translational regulatory mechanisms during anther development. PMID:27531888

  16. Possible involvement of phosphorylation of occludin in tight junction formation.

    PubMed

    Sakakibara, A; Furuse, M; Saitou, M; Ando-Akatsuka, Y; Tsukita, S

    1997-06-16

    Occludin is an integral membrane protein localizing at tight junctions in epithelial and endothelial cells. Occludin from confluent culture MDCK I cells resolved as several (>10) bands between 62 and 82 kD in SDS-PAGE, of which two or three bands of the lowest Mr were predominant. Among these bands, the lower predominant bands were essentially extracted with 1% NP-40, whereas the other higher Mr bands were selectively recovered in the NP-40-insoluble fraction. Alkaline phosphatase treatment converged these bands of occludin both in NP-40-soluble and -insoluble fractions into the lowest Mr band, and phosphoamino acid analyses identified phosphoserine (and phosphothreonine weakly) in the higher Mr bands of occludin. These findings indicated that phosphorylation causes an upward shift of occludin bands and that highly phosphorylated occludin resists NP-40 extraction. When cells were grown in low Ca medium, almost all occludin was NP-40 soluble. Switching from low to normal Ca medium increased the amount of NP-40-insoluble occludin within 10 min, followed by gradual upward shift of bands. This insolubilization and the band shift correlated temporally with tight junction formation detected by immunofluorescence microscopy. Furthermore, we found that the anti-chicken occludin mAb, Oc-3, did not recognize the predominant lower Mr bands of occludin (non- or less phosphorylated form) but was specific to the higher Mr bands (phosphorylated form) on immunoblotting. Immunofluorescence microscopy revealed that this mAb mainly stained the tight junction proper of intestinal epithelial cells, whereas other anti-occludin mAbs, which can recognize the predominant lower Mr bands, labeled their basolateral membranes (and the cytoplasm) as well as tight junctions. Therefore, we conclude that non- or less phosphorylated occludin is distributed on the basolateral membranes and that highly phosphorylated occludin is selectively concentrated at tight juctions as the NP-40-insoluble form

  17. Biofabricated film with enzymatic and redox-capacitor functionalities to harvest and store electrons.

    PubMed

    Liba, Benjamin D; Kim, Eunkyoung; Martin, Alexandra N; Liu, Yi; Bentley, William E; Payne, Gregory F

    2013-03-01

    Exciting opportunities in bioelectronics will be facilitated by materials that can bridge the chemical logic of biology and the digital logic of electronics. Here we report the fabrication of a dual functional hydrogel film that can harvest electrons from its chemical environment and store these electrons by switching the film's redox-state. The hydrogel scaffold was formed by the anodic deposition of the aminopolysaccharide chitosan. Electron-harvesting function was conferred by co-depositing the enzyme glucose dehydrogenase (GDH) with chitosan. GDH catalyzes the transfer of electrons from glucose to the soluble redox-shuttle NADP(+). Electron-storage function was conferred by the redox-active food phenolic chlorogenic acid (CA) that was enzymatically grafted to the chitosan scaffold using tyrosinase. The grafted CA undergoes redox-cycling reactions with NADPH resulting in the net transfer of electrons to the film where they are stored in the reduced state of CA. The individual and dual functionalities of these films were demonstrated experimentally. There are three general conclusions from this proof-of-concept study. First, enzymatically-grafted catecholic moieties confer redox-capacitor function to the chitosan scaffold. Second, biological materials (i.e. chitosan and CA) and mechanisms (i.e. tyrosinase-mediated grafting) allow the reagentless fabrication of functional films that should be environmentally-friendly, safe and potentially even edible. Finally, the film's ability to mediate the transfer of electrons from a biological metabolite to an electrode suggests an approach to bridge the chemical logic of biology with the digital logic of electronics.

  18. The Importance of the Interaction of CheD with CheC and the Chemoreceptors Compared to Its Enzymatic Activity during Chemotaxis in Bacillus subtilis

    PubMed Central

    Allen, George M.; Walukiewicz, Hanna E.; Rao, Christopher V.; Ordal, George W.

    2012-01-01

    Bacillus subtilis use three systems for adaptation during chemotaxis. One of these systems involves two interacting proteins, CheC and CheD. CheD binds to the receptors and increases their ability to activate the CheA kinase. CheD also binds CheC, and the strength of this interaction is increased by phosphorylated CheY. CheC is believed to control the binding of CheD to the receptors in response to the levels of phosphorylated CheY. In addition to their role in adaptation, CheC and CheD also have separate enzymatic functions. CheC is a CheY phosphatase and CheD is a receptor deamidase. Previously, we demonstrated that CheC’s phosphatase activity plays a minor role in chemotaxis whereas its ability to bind CheD plays a major one. In the present study, we demonstrate that CheD’s deamidase activity also plays a minor role in chemotaxis whereas its ability to bind CheC plays a major one. In addition, we quantified the interaction between CheC and CheD using surface plasmon resonance. These results suggest that the most important features of CheC and CheD are not their enzymatic activities but rather their roles in adaptation. PMID:23226535

  19. Neuronal uptake and propagation of a rare phosphorylated high-molecular-weight tau derived from Alzheimer's disease brain.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Shuko; Wegmann, Susanne; Cho, Hansang; DeVos, Sarah L; Commins, Caitlin; Roe, Allyson D; Nicholls, Samantha B; Carlson, George A; Pitstick, Rose; Nobuhara, Chloe K; Costantino, Isabel; Frosch, Matthew P; Müller, Daniel J; Irimia, Daniel; Hyman, Bradley T

    2015-10-13

    Tau pathology is known to spread in a hierarchical pattern in Alzheimer's disease (AD) brain during disease progression, likely by trans-synaptic tau transfer between neurons. However, the tau species involved in inter-neuron propagation remains unclear. To identify tau species responsible for propagation, we examined uptake and propagation properties of different tau species derived from postmortem cortical extracts and brain interstitial fluid of tau-transgenic mice, as well as human AD cortices. Here we show that PBS-soluble phosphorylated high-molecular-weight (HMW) tau, though very low in abundance, is taken up, axonally transported, and passed on to synaptically connected neurons. Our findings suggest that a rare species of soluble phosphorylated HMW tau is the endogenous form of tau involved in propagation and could be a target for therapeutic intervention and biomarker development.

  20. Neuronal uptake and propagation of a rare phosphorylated high-molecular-weight tau derived from Alzheimer's disease brain

    PubMed Central

    Takeda, Shuko; Wegmann, Susanne; Cho, Hansang; DeVos, Sarah L.; Commins, Caitlin; Roe, Allyson D.; Nicholls, Samantha B.; Carlson, George A.; Pitstick, Rose; Nobuhara, Chloe K.; Costantino, Isabel; Frosch, Matthew P.; Müller, Daniel J.; Irimia, Daniel; Hyman, Bradley T.

    2015-01-01

    Tau pathology is known to spread in a hierarchical pattern in Alzheimer's disease (AD) brain during disease progression, likely by trans-synaptic tau transfer between neurons. However, the tau species involved in inter-neuron propagation remains unclear. To identify tau species responsible for propagation, we examined uptake and propagation properties of different tau species derived from postmortem cortical extracts and brain interstitial fluid of tau-transgenic mice, as well as human AD cortices. Here we show that PBS-soluble phosphorylated high-molecular-weight (HMW) tau, though very low in abundance, is taken up, axonally transported, and passed on to synaptically connected neurons. Our findings suggest that a rare species of soluble phosphorylated HMW tau is the endogenous form of tau involved in propagation and could be a target for therapeutic intervention and biomarker development. PMID:26458742

  1. Proinflammatory actions of visfatin/nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (Nampt) involve regulation of insulin signaling pathway and Nampt enzymatic activity.

    PubMed

    Jacques, Claire; Holzenberger, Martin; Mladenovic, Zvezdana; Salvat, Colette; Pecchi, Emilie; Berenbaum, Francis; Gosset, Marjolaine

    2012-04-27

    Visfatin (also termed pre-B-cell colony-enhancing factor (PBEF) or nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (Nampt)) is a pleiotropic mediator acting on many inflammatory processes including osteoarthritis. Visfatin exhibits both an intracellular enzymatic activity (nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase, Nampt) leading to NAD synthesis and a cytokine function via the binding to its hypothetical receptor. We recently reported the role of visfatin in prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) synthesis in chondrocytes. Here, our aim was to characterize the signaling pathways involved in this response in exploring both the insulin receptor (IR) signaling pathway and Nampt activity. IR was expressed in human and murine chondrocytes, and visfatin triggered Akt phosphorylation in murine chondrocytes. Blocking IR expression with siRNA or activity using the hydroxy-2-naphthalenyl methyl phosphonic acid tris acetoxymethyl ester (HNMPA-(AM)(3)) inhibitor diminished visfatin-induced PGE(2) release in chondrocytes. Moreover, visfatin-induced IGF-1R(-/-) chondrocytes released higher concentration of PGE(2) than IGF-1R(+/+) cells, a finding confirmed with an antibody that blocked IGF-1R. Using RT-PCR, we found that visfatin did not regulate IR expression and that an increased insulin release was also unlikely to be involved because insulin was unable to increase PGE(2) release. Inhibition of Nampt activity using the APO866 inhibitor gradually decreased PGE(2) release, whereas the addition of exogenous nicotinamide increased it. We conclude that the proinflammatory actions of visfatin in chondrocytes involve regulation of IR signaling pathways, possibly through the control of Nampt enzymatic activity.

  2. Technology Transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Nanette R.

    1995-01-01

    The objective of this summer's work was to attempt to enhance Technology Application Group (TAG) ability to measure the outcomes of its efforts to transfer NASA technology. By reviewing existing literature, by explaining the economic principles involved in evaluating the economic impact of technology transfer, and by investigating the LaRC processes our William & Mary team has been able to lead this important discussion. In reviewing the existing literature, we identified many of the metrics that are currently being used in the area of technology transfer. Learning about the LaRC technology transfer processes and the metrics currently used to track the transfer process enabled us to compare other R&D facilities to LaRC. We discuss and diagram impacts of technology transfer in the short run and the long run. Significantly, it serves as the basis for analysis and provides guidance in thinking about what the measurement objectives ought to be. By focusing on the SBIR Program, valuable information regarding the strengths and weaknesses of this LaRC program are to be gained. A survey was developed to ask probing questions regarding SBIR contractors' experience with the program. Specifically we are interested in finding out whether the SBIR Program is accomplishing its mission, if the SBIR companies are providing the needed innovations specified by NASA and to what extent those innovations have led to commercial success. We also developed a survey to ask COTR's, who are NASA employees acting as technical advisors to the SBIR contractors, the same type of questions, evaluating the successes and problems with the SBIR Program as they see it. This survey was developed to be implemented interactively on computer. It is our hope that the statistical and econometric studies that can be done on the data collected from all of these sources will provide insight regarding the direction to take in developing systematic evaluations of programs like the SBIR Program so that they can

  3. Neurofilament subunit (NFL) head domain phosphorylation regulates axonal transport of neurofilaments.

    PubMed

    Yates, Darran M; Manser, Catherine; De Vos, Kurt J; Shaw, Christopher E; McLoughlin, Declan M; Miller, Christopher C J

    2009-04-01

    Neurofilaments are the intermediate filaments of neurons and are synthesised in neuronal cell bodies and then transported through axons. Neurofilament light chain (NFL) is a principal component of neurofilaments, and phosphorylation of NFL head domain is believed to regulate the assembly of neurofilaments. However, the role that NFL phosphorylation has on transport of neurofilaments is poorly understood. To address this issue, we monitored axonal transport of phosphorylation mutants of NFL. We mutated four known phosphorylation sites in NFL head domain to either preclude phosphorylation, or mimic permanent phosphorylation. Mutation to preclude phosphorylation had no effect on transport but mutation of three sites to mimic permanent phosphorylation inhibited transport. Mutation of all four sites together to mimic permanent phosphorylation proved especially potent at inhibiting transport and also disrupted neurofilament assembly. Our results suggest that NFL head domain phosphorylation is a regulator of neurofilament axonal transport.

  4. A comparison of glucose oxidase and aldose dehydrogenase as mediated anodes in printed glucose/oxygen enzymatic fuel cells using ABTS/laccase cathodes.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, Peter; Tuurala, Saara; Vaari, Anu; Valkiainen, Matti; Smolander, Maria; Leech, Dónal

    2012-10-01

    Current generation by mediated enzyme electron transfer at electrode surfaces can be harnessed to provide biosensors and redox reactions in enzymatic fuel cells. A glucose/oxygen enzymatic fuel cell can provide power for portable and implantable electronic devices. High volume production of enzymatic fuel cell prototypes will likely require printing of electrode and catalytic materials. Here we report on preparation and performance of, completely enzymatic, printed glucose/oxygen biofuel cells. The cells are based on filter paper coated with conducting carbon inks, enzyme and mediator. A comparison of cell performance using a range of mediators for either glucose oxidase (GOx) or aldose dehydrogenase (ALDH) oxidation of glucose at the anode and ABTS and a fungal laccase, for reduction of oxygen at the cathode, is reported. Highest power output, although of limited stability, is observed for ALDH anodes mediated by an osmium complex, providing a maximum power density of 3.5 μW cm(-2) at 0.34 V, when coupled to a laccase/ABTS cathode. The stability of cell voltage in a biobattery format, above a threshold of 200 mV under a moderate 75 kΩ load, is used to benchmark printed fuel cell performance. Highest stability is obtained for printed fuel cells using ALDH, providing cell voltages over the threshold for up to 74 h, compared to only 2 h for cells with anodes using GOx. These results provide promising directions for further development of mass-producible, completely enzymatic, printed biofuel cells.

  5. A comparison of glucose oxidase and aldose dehydrogenase as mediated anodes in printed glucose/oxygen enzymatic fuel cells using ABTS/laccase cathodes.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, Peter; Tuurala, Saara; Vaari, Anu; Valkiainen, Matti; Smolander, Maria; Leech, Dónal

    2012-10-01

    Current generation by mediated enzyme electron transfer at electrode surfaces can be harnessed to provide biosensors and redox reactions in enzymatic fuel cells. A glucose/oxygen enzymatic fuel cell can provide power for portable and implantable electronic devices. High volume production of enzymatic fuel cell prototypes will likely require printing of electrode and catalytic materials. Here we report on preparation and performance of, completely enzymatic, printed glucose/oxygen biofuel cells. The cells are based on filter paper coated with conducting carbon inks, enzyme and mediator. A comparison of cell performance using a range of mediators for either glucose oxidase (GOx) or aldose dehydrogenase (ALDH) oxidation of glucose at the anode and ABTS and a fungal laccase, for reduction of oxygen at the cathode, is reported. Highest power output, although of limited stability, is observed for ALDH anodes mediated by an osmium complex, providing a maximum power density of 3.5 μW cm(-2) at 0.34 V, when coupled to a laccase/ABTS cathode. The stability of cell voltage in a biobattery format, above a threshold of 200 mV under a moderate 75 kΩ load, is used to benchmark printed fuel cell performance. Highest stability is obtained for printed fuel cells using ALDH, providing cell voltages over the threshold for up to 74 h, compared to only 2 h for cells with anodes using GOx. These results provide promising directions for further development of mass-producible, completely enzymatic, printed biofuel cells. PMID:22200380

  6. Chemical and enzymatic methodologies for the synthesis of enantiomerically pure glyceraldehyde 3-phosphates.

    PubMed

    Gauss, Dominik; Schoenenberger, Bernhard; Wohlgemuth, Roland

    2014-05-01

    Glyceraldehyde 3-phosphates are important intermediates of many central metabolic pathways in a large number of living organisms. d-Glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate (d-GAP) is a key intermediate during glycolysis and can as well be found in a variety of other metabolic pathways. The opposite enantiomer, l-glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate (l-GAP), has been found in a few exciting new pathways. Here, improved syntheses of enantiomerically pure glyceraldehyde 3-phosphates are reported. While d-GAP was synthesized by periodate cleavage of d-fructose 6-phosphate, l-GAP was obtained by enzymatic phosphorylation of l-glyceraldehyde. (1)H- and (31)P NMR spectroscopy was applied in order to examine pH-dependent behavior of GAP over time and to identify potential degradation products. It was found that GAP is stable in acidic aqueous solution below pH 4. At pH 7, methylglyoxal is formed, whereas under alkaline conditions, the formation of lactic acid could be observed.

  7. Taking electrons out of bioelectronics: bioprotonic memories and enzymatic logic gates (Presentation Recording)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rolandi, Marco

    2015-10-01

    In living systems, protonic and ionic currents are the basis for all information processing. As such, artificial devices based on protonic and ionic currents offer an exciting opportunity for bioelectronics. Proton transport in nature is important for ATP oxidative phosphorylation, the HCVN1 voltage gated proton channel, light activated proton pumping in bacteriorhodopsin, and the proton conducting single water file of the antibiotic gramicidin. In these systems, protons move along hydrogen bond networks formed by water and the hydrated biomolecules (proton wires). We have previously demonstrated complementary H+- and OH-- FETs with acid and base doped biopolymer proton wires and PdHx proton conducting contacts. Here, I will discuss proton-conducting devices based oh highly conductive proton wires that emulate brain synapses, display memristive behaviour, and are connected to form shift registries. Furthermore, I will present the integration of these devices with enzymatic logic gates for integrated biotic-abiotic protonic information processing. Preliminary results on using these devices to affect biological function will be discussed.

  8. Phosphorylation of CD18 in response to neutrophil stimulation

    SciTech Connect

    Jakes, S.; Schembri-King, J.; Wallace, R.W. )

    1991-03-11

    Leukocyte integrins containing the common {beta}-subunit (CD18) mediate the adhesion of leukocytes to endothelial cells. It has been shown that the CD18 is phosphorylated in response to the phorbol ester PMA and proposed that phosphorylation of CD18 triggers the enhanced avidity of leukocyte integrins. The purpose of this study was to determine if CD18 in human neutrophils is also phosphorylated in response to physiological stimuli, i.e. receptor mediated activation. After labeling freshly isolated human neutrophils with {sup 32}p it was found that CD18 was phosphorylated in response to PMA in a time dependent manner that corresponded to the rate of PMA induced homotypic aggregation. The receptor mediated stimuli fMLP, LTB{sub 4}, IL-8, and C5a were also effective at initiating rapid CD18 dependent homotypic aggregation of neutrophils. However, in none of the receptor mediated responses was the level of CD18 phosphorylation increased at any time from the addition of stimuli to the peak of homotypic aggregation. Though not conclusive, this study suggests that in human neutrophils, activation of the leukocyte integrins by PMA may involve signaling pathways distinct from those involved in activation through receptor mediated stimulation.

  9. Phosphorylation of actopaxin regulates cell spreading and migration

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, Dominic M.; Brown, Michael C.; LaLonde, David P.; Turner, Christopher E.

    2004-01-01

    Actopaxin is an actin and paxillin binding protein that localizes to focal adhesions. It regulates cell spreading and is phosphorylated during mitosis. Herein, we identify a role for actopaxin phosphorylation in cell spreading and migration. Stable clones of U2OS cells expressing actopaxin wild-type (WT), nonphosphorylatable, and phosphomimetic mutants were developed to evaluate actopaxin function. All proteins targeted to focal adhesions, however the nonphosphorylatable mutant inhibited spreading whereas the phosphomimetic mutant cells spread more efficiently than WT cells. Endogenous and WT actopaxin, but not the nonphosphorylatable mutant, were phosphorylated in vivo during cell adhesion/spreading. Expression of the nonphosphorylatable actopaxin mutant significantly reduced cell migration, whereas expression of the phosphomimetic increased cell migration in scrape wound and Boyden chamber migration assays. In vitro kinase assays demonstrate that extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase phosphorylates actopaxin, and treatment of U2OS cells with the MEK1 inhibitor UO126 inhibited adhesion-induced phosphorylation of actopaxin and also inhibited cell migration. PMID:15353548

  10. Evidence for phosphorylation and oligomeric assembly of presenilin 1

    PubMed Central

    Seeger, Mary; Nordstedt, Christer; Petanceska, Suzana; Kovacs, Dora M.; Gouras, Gunnar K.; Hahne, Solveig; Fraser, Paul; Levesque, Lyne; Czernik, Andrew J.; George-Hyslop, Peter St; Sisodia, Sangram S.; Thinakaran, Gopal; Tanzi, Rudolph E.; Greengard, Paul; Gandy, Sam

    1997-01-01

    Pathogenic mutations in presenilin 1 (PS1) are associated with ≈50% of early-onset familial Alzheimer disease. PS1 is endoproteolytically cleaved to yield a 30-kDa N-terminal fragment (NTF) and an 18-kDa C-terminal fragment (CTF). Using COS7 cells transfected with human PS1, we have found that phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate and forskolin increase the state of phosphorylation of serine residues of the human CTF. Phosphorylation of the human CTF resulted in a shift in electrophoretic mobility from a single major species of 18 kDa to a doublet of 20–23 kDa. This mobility shift was also observed with human PS1 that had been transfected into mouse neuroblastoma (N2a) cells. Treatment of the phosphorylated CTF doublet with phage λ protein phosphatase eliminated the 20- to 23-kDa doublet while enhancing the 18-kDa species, consistent with the interpretation that the electrophoretic mobility shift was due to the addition of phosphate to the 18-kDa species. The NTF and CTF eluted from a gel filtration column at an estimated mass of over 100 kDa, suggesting that these fragments exist as an oligomerized species. Upon phosphorylation of the PS1 CTF, the apparent mass of the NTF- or CTF-containing oligomers was unchanged. Thus, the association of PS1 fragments may be maintained during cycles of phosphorylation/dephosphorylation of the PS1 CTF. PMID:9144195

  11. Tau phosphorylation affects its axonal transport and degradation

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Martín, Teresa; Cuchillo-Ibáñez, Inmaculada; Noble, Wendy; Nyenya, Fanon; Anderton, Brian H.; Hanger, Diane P.

    2013-01-01

    Phosphorylated forms of microtubule-associated protein tau accumulate in neurofibrillary tangles in Alzheimer's disease. To investigate the effects of specific phosphorylated tau residues on its function, wild type or phosphomutant tau was expressed in cells. Elevated tau phosphorylation decreased its microtubule binding and bundling, and increased the number of motile tau particles, without affecting axonal transport kinetics. In contrast, reducing tau phosphorylation enhanced the amount of tau bound to microtubules and inhibited axonal transport of tau. To determine whether differential tau clearance is responsible for the increase in phosphomimic tau, we inhibited autophagy in neurons which resulted in a 3-fold accumulation of phosphomimic tau compared with wild type tau, and endogenous tau was unaffected. In autophagy-deficient mouse embryonic fibroblasts, but not in neurons, proteasomal degradation of phosphomutant tau was also reduced compared with wild type tau. Therefore, autophagic and proteasomal pathways are involved in tau degradation, with autophagy appearing to be the primary route for clearing phosphorylated tau in neurons. Defective autophagy might contribute to the accumulaton of tau in neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:23601672

  12. Role of phosphorylation in the mammalian circadian clock.

    PubMed

    Vanselow, K; Kramer, A

    2007-01-01

    Circadian clocks regulate a wide variety of processes ranging from gene expression to behavior. At the molecular level, circadian rhythms are thought to be produced by a set of clock genes and proteins interconnected to form transcriptional-translational feedback loops. Rhythmic gene expression was formerly regarded as the major drive for rhythms in clock protein abundance, but recent findings underline the crucial importance of posttranslational mechanisms for both the generation and dynamics of circadian rhythms. In particular, the reversible phosphorylation of PER proteins-essential components within the negative feedback loop in Drosophila and mammals-seems to have a key role for the correct timing of nuclear repression. To understand how PER protein phosphorylation regulates the dynamics of the circadian oscillator, we have mapped endogenous phosphorylation sites in mPER2. Detailed investigation of the functional role of one particular phosphorylation site (Ser-659, which is mutated in the familial advanced sleep phase syndrome [FASPS]) led us propose a model of functionally different phosphorylation sites in PER2. This concept explains not only the FASPS phenotype, but also the effect of the tau mutation in hamster. PMID:18419274

  13. Phosphorylation of vaccinia virus core proteins during transcription in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Moussatche, N; Keller, S J

    1991-01-01

    The phosphorylation of vaccinia virus core proteins has been studied in vitro during viral transcription. The incorporation of [gamma-32P]ATP into protein is linear for the first 2 min of the reaction, whereas incorporation of [3H]UTP into RNA lags for 1 to 2 min before linear synthesis. At least 12 different proteins are phosphorylated on autoradiograms of acrylamide gels, and the majority of label is associated with low-molecular-weight proteins. If the transcription reaction is reduced by dropping the pH to 7 from its optimal of 8.5, two proteins (70 and 80 kDa) are no longer phosphorylated. RNA isolated from the pH 7 transcription reaction hybridized primarily to the vaccinia virus HindIII DNA fragments D to F, whereas the transcripts synthesized at pH 8.5 hybridized to almost all of the HindIII-digested vaccinia virus DNA fragments. The differences between the pH 7.0 and 8.5 transcription reactions in phosphorylation and transcription could be eliminated by preincubating the viral cores with 2 mM ATP. In sum, the results suggest that the phosphorylation of the 70- and 80-kDa peptides may contribute to the regulation of early transcription. Images PMID:2016772

  14. RNA polymerase II subunit composition, stoichiometry, and phosphorylation.

    PubMed Central

    Kolodziej, P A; Woychik, N; Liao, S M; Young, R A

    1990-01-01

    RNA polymerase II subunit composition, stoichiometry, and phosphorylation were investigated in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by attaching an epitope coding sequence to a well-characterized RNA polymerase II subunit gene (RPB3) and by immunoprecipitating the product of this gene with its associated polypeptides. The immunopurified enzyme catalyzed alpha-amanitin-sensitive RNA synthesis in vitro. The 10 polypeptides that immunoprecipitated were identical in size and number to those previously described for RNA polymerase II purified by conventional column chromatography. The relative stoichiometry of the subunits was deduced from knowledge of the sequence of the subunits and from the extent of labeling with [35S]methionine. Immunoprecipitation from 32P-labeled cell extracts revealed that three of the subunits, RPB1, RPB2, and RPB6, are phosphorylated in vivo. Phosphorylated and unphosphorylated forms of RPB1 could be distinguished; approximately half of the RNA polymerase II molecules contained a phosphorylated RPB1 subunit. These results more precisely define the subunit composition and phosphorylation of a eucaryotic RNA polymerase II enzyme. Images PMID:2183013

  15. An allosteric model of circadian KaiC phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    van Zon, Jeroen S.; Lubensky, David K.; Altena, Pim R. H.; ten Wolde, Pieter Rein

    2007-01-01

    In a recent series of ground-breaking experiments, Nakajima et al. [Nakajima M, Imai K, Ito H, Nishiwaki T, Murayama Y, Iwasaki H, Oyama T, Kondo T (2005) Science 308:414–415] showed that the three cyanobacterial clock proteins KaiA, KaiB, and KaiC are sufficient in vitro to generate circadian phosphorylation of KaiC. Here, we present a mathematical model of the Kai system. At its heart is the assumption that KaiC can exist in two conformational states, one favoring phosphorylation and the other dephosphorylation. Each individual KaiC hexamer then has a propensity to be phosphorylated in a cyclic manner. To generate macroscopic oscillations, however, the phosphorylation cycles of the different hexamers must be synchronized. We propose a novel synchronization mechanism based on differential affinity: KaiA stimulates KaiC phosphorylation, but the limited supply of KaiA dimers binds preferentially to those KaiC hexamers that are falling behind in the oscillation. KaiB sequesters KaiA and stabilizes the dephosphorylating KaiC state. We show that our model can reproduce a wide range of published data, including the observed insensitivity of the oscillation period to variations in temperature, and that it makes nontrivial predictions about the effects of varying the concentrations of the Kai proteins. PMID:17460047

  16. Control of Host Cell Phosphorylation by Legionella Pneumophila

    PubMed Central

    Haenssler, Eva; Isberg, Ralph R.

    2011-01-01

    Phosphorylation is one of the most frequent modifications in intracellular signaling and is implicated in many processes ranging from transcriptional control to signal transduction in innate immunity. Many pathogens modulate host cell phosphorylation pathways to promote growth and establish an infectious disease. The intracellular pathogen Legionella pneumophila targets and exploits the host phosphorylation system throughout the infection cycle as part of its strategy to establish an environment beneficial for replication. Key to this manipulation is the L. pneumophila Icm/Dot type IV secretion system, which translocates bacterial proteins into the host cytosol that can act directly on phosphorylation cascades. This review will focus on the different stages of L. pneumophila infection, in which host kinases and phosphatases contribute to infection of the host cell and promote intracellular survival of the pathogen. This includes the involvement of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinases during phagocytosis as well as the role of phosphoinositide metabolism during the establishment of the replication vacuole. Furthermore, L. pneumophila infection modulates the NF-κB and mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways, two signaling pathways that are central to the host innate immune response and involved in regulation of host cell survival. Therefore, L. pneumophila infection manipulates host cell signal transduction by phosphorylation at multiple levels. PMID:21747787

  17. Phosphorylation of Cysteine String Protein Triggers a Major Conformational Switch.

    PubMed

    Patel, Pryank; Prescott, Gerald R; Burgoyne, Robert D; Lian, Lu-Yun; Morgan, Alan

    2016-08-01

    Cysteine string protein (CSP) is a member of the DnaJ/Hsp40 chaperone family that localizes to neuronal synaptic vesicles. Impaired CSP function leads to neurodegeneration in humans and model organisms as a result of misfolding of client proteins involved in neurotransmission. Mammalian CSP is phosphorylated in vivo on Ser10, and this modulates its protein interactions and effects on neurotransmitter release. However, there are no data on the structural consequences of CSP phosphorylation to explain these functional effects. We show that Ser10 phosphorylation causes an order-to-disorder transition that disrupts CSP's extreme N-terminal α helix. This triggers the concomitant formation of a hairpin loop stabilized by ionic interactions between phosphoSer10 and the highly conserved J-domain residue, Lys58. These phosphorylation-induced effects result in significant changes to CSP conformation and surface charge distribution. The phospho-switch revealed here provides structural insight into how Ser10 phosphorylation modulates CSP function and also has potential implications for other DnaJ phosphoproteins.

  18. XGef Mediates Early CPEB Phosphorylation during Xenopus Oocyte Meiotic Maturation

    PubMed Central

    Martínez, Susana E.; Yuan, Lei; Lacza, Charlemagne; Ransom, Heather; Mahon, Gwendolyn M.; Whitehead, Ian P.; Hake, Laura E.

    2005-01-01

    Polyadenylation-induced translation is an important regulatory mechanism during metazoan development. During Xenopus oocyte meiotic progression, polyadenylation-induced translation is regulated by CPEB, which is activated by phosphorylation. XGef, a guanine exchange factor, is a CPEB-interacting protein involved in the early steps of progesterone-stimulated oocyte maturation. We find that XGef influences early oocyte maturation by directly influencing CPEB function. XGef and CPEB interact during oogenesis and oocyte maturation and are present in a c-mos messenger ribonucleoprotein (mRNP). Both proteins also interact directly in vitro. XGef overexpression increases the level of CPEB phosphorylated early during oocyte maturation, and this directly correlates with increased Mos protein accumulation and acceleration of meiotic resumption. To exert this effect, XGef must retain guanine exchange activity and the interaction with CPEB. Overexpression of a guanine exchange deficient version of XGef, which interacts with CPEB, does not enhance early CPEB phosphorylation. Overexpression of a version of XGef that has significantly reduced interaction with CPEB, but retains guanine exchange activity, decreases early CPEB phosphorylation and delays oocyte maturation. Injection of XGef antibodies into oocytes blocks progesterone-induced oocyte maturation and early CPEB phosphorylation. These findings indicate that XGef is involved in early CPEB activation and implicate GTPase signaling in this process. PMID:15635100

  19. Structural changes accompanying phosphorylation of tarantula muscle myosin filaments

    PubMed Central

    1987-01-01

    Electron microscopy has been used to study the structural changes that occur in the myosin filaments of tarantula striated muscle when they are phosphorylated. Myosin filaments in muscle homogenates maintained in relaxing conditions (ATP, EGTA) are found to have nonphosphorylated regulatory light chains as shown by urea/glycerol gel electrophoresis and [32P]phosphate autoradiography. Negative staining reveals an ordered, helical arrangement of crossbridges in these filaments, in which the heads from axially neighboring myosin molecules appear to interact with each other. When the free Ca2+ concentration in a homogenate is raised to 10(-4) M, or when a Ca2+-insensitive myosin light chain kinase is added at low Ca2+ (10(-8) M), the regulatory light chains of myosin become rapidly phosphorylated. Phosphorylation is accompanied by potentiation of the actin activation of the myosin Mg- ATPase activity and by loss of order of the helical crossbridge arrangement characteristic of the relaxed filament. We suggest that in the relaxed state, when the regulatory light chains are not phosphorylated, the myosin heads are held down on the filament backbone by head-head interactions or by interactions of the heads with the filament backbone. Phosphorylation of the light chains may alter these interactions so that the crossbridges become more loosely associated with the filament backbone giving rise to the observed changes and facilitating crossbridge interaction with actin. PMID:2958483

  20. Phosphorylation of Cysteine String Protein Triggers a Major Conformational Switch.

    PubMed

    Patel, Pryank; Prescott, Gerald R; Burgoyne, Robert D; Lian, Lu-Yun; Morgan, Alan

    2016-08-01

    Cysteine string protein (CSP) is a member of the DnaJ/Hsp40 chaperone family that localizes to neuronal synaptic vesicles. Impaired CSP function leads to neurodegeneration in humans and model organisms as a result of misfolding of client proteins involved in neurotransmission. Mammalian CSP is phosphorylated in vivo on Ser10, and this modulates its protein interactions and effects on neurotransmitter release. However, there are no data on the structural consequences of CSP phosphorylation to explain these functional effects. We show that Ser10 phosphorylation causes an order-to-disorder transition that disrupts CSP's extreme N-terminal α helix. This triggers the concomitant formation of a hairpin loop stabilized by ionic interactions between phosphoSer10 and the highly conserved J-domain residue, Lys58. These phosphorylation-induced effects result in significant changes to CSP conformation and surface charge distribution. The phospho-switch revealed here provides structural insight into how Ser10 phosphorylation modulates CSP function and also has potential implications for other DnaJ phosphoproteins. PMID:27452402

  1. High throughput, high resolution enzymatic lithography process: effect of crystallite size, moisture, and enzyme concentration.

    PubMed

    Mao, Zhantong; Ganesh, Manoj; Bucaro, Michael; Smolianski, Igor; Gross, Richard A; Lyons, Alan M

    2014-12-01

    By bringing enzymes into contact with predefined regions of a surface, a polymer film can be selectively degraded to form desired patterns that find a variety of applications in biotechnology and electronics. This so-called "enzymatic lithography" is an environmentally friendly process as it does not require actinic radiation or synthetic chemicals to develop the patterns. A significant challenge to using enzymatic lithography has been the need to restrict the mobility of the enzyme in order to maintain control of feature sizes. Previous approaches have resulted in low throughput and were limited to polymer films only a few nanometers thick. In this paper, we demonstrate an enzymatic lithography system based on Candida antartica lipase B (CALB) and poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) that can resolve fine-scale features, (<1 μm across) in thick (0.1-2.0 μm) polymer films. A Polymer Pen Lithography (PPL) tool was developed to deposit an aqueous solution of CALB onto a spin-cast PCL film. Immobilization of the enzyme on the polymer surface was monitored using fluorescence microscopy by labeling CALB with FITC. The crystallite size in the PCL films was systematically varied; small crystallites resulted in significantly faster etch rates (20 nm/min) and the ability to resolve smaller features (as fine as 1 μm). The effect of printing conditions and relative humidity during incubation is also presented. Patterns formed in the PCL film were transferred to an underlying copper foil demonstrating a "Green" approach to the fabrication of printed circuit boards. PMID:25346335

  2. High throughput, high resolution enzymatic lithography process: effect of crystallite size, moisture, and enzyme concentration.

    PubMed

    Mao, Zhantong; Ganesh, Manoj; Bucaro, Michael; Smolianski, Igor; Gross, Richard A; Lyons, Alan M

    2014-12-01

    By bringing enzymes into contact with predefined regions of a surface, a polymer film can be selectively degraded to form desired patterns that find a variety of applications in biotechnology and electronics. This so-called "enzymatic lithography" is an environmentally friendly process as it does not require actinic radiation or synthetic chemicals to develop the patterns. A significant challenge to using enzymatic lithography has been the need to restrict the mobility of the enzyme in order to maintain control of feature sizes. Previous approaches have resulted in low throughput and were limited to polymer films only a few nanometers thick. In this paper, we demonstrate an enzymatic lithography system based on Candida antartica lipase B (CALB) and poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) that can resolve fine-scale features, (<1 μm across) in thick (0.1-2.0 μm) polymer films. A Polymer Pen Lithography (PPL) tool was developed to deposit an aqueous solution of CALB onto a spin-cast PCL film. Immobilization of the enzyme on the polymer surface was monitored using fluorescence microscopy by labeling CALB with FITC. The crystallite size in the PCL films was systematically varied; small crystallites resulted in significantly faster etch rates (20 nm/min) and the ability to resolve smaller features (as fine as 1 μm). The effect of printing conditions and relative humidity during incubation is also presented. Patterns formed in the PCL film were transferred to an underlying copper foil demonstrating a "Green" approach to the fabrication of printed circuit boards.

  3. [Technology Transfer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Latker, Norman J.

    Some authorities on technolgoy transfer feel that industry is not fully capitalizing on the inventive output of universities and nonprofit organizations. From the point of view of the government, the stakes are high. The magnitude of federal support of research and development in these organizations demands evidence of useful results if it is to…

  4. Ion-radical mechanism of enzymatic ATP synthesis: DFT calculations and experimental control.

    PubMed

    Buchachenko, Anatoly L; Kuznetsov, Dmitry A; Breslavskaya, Natalia N

    2010-02-18

    A new, ion-radical mechanism of enzymatic ATP synthesis was recently discovered by using magnesium isotopes. It functions at a high concentration of MgCl(2) and includes electron transfer from the Mg(H(2)O)(m)(2+)(ADP(3-)) complex (m = 0-4) to the Mg(H(2)O)(n)(2+) complex as a primary reaction of ATP synthesis in catalytic sites of ATP synthase and kinases. Here, the structures and electron transfer reaction energies of magnesium complexes related to ATP synthesis are calculated in terms of DFT. ADP is modeled by pyrophosphate anions, protonated (HP(2)O(7)H(2-), HP(2)O(7)CH(3)(2-)) and deprotonated (HP(2)O(7)(3-), CH(3)P(2)O(7)(3-)). The reaction generates an ion-radical pair, composed of Mg(H(2)O)(n)(+) ion and pyrophosphate anion-radical coordinated to Mg(2+) ion. The addition of the latter to the substrate P=O bond results in ATP formation. Populations of the singlet and triplet states and singlet-triplet spin conversion in the pair are controlled by hyperfine coupling of unpaired electrons with magnetic (25)Mg and (31)P nuclei and by Zeeman interaction. Due to these two interactions, the yield of ATP is a function of nuclear magnetic moment and magnetic field; both of these effects were experimentally detected. Electron transfer reaction does not depend on m but strongly depends on n. It is exoergic and energy allowed at 0 < or = n < infinity for the deprotonated pyrophosphate anions and at 0 < or = n < 4 for the protonated ones; for other values of n, the reaction is energy deficient and forbidden. The boundary between exoergic and endoergic regimes corresponds to the trigger magnitude n* (n* = 4 for protonated anions and 6 < n* < infinity for deprotonated ones). These results explain why ATP synthesis occurs only in special devices, molecular enzymatic machines, but not in water (n = infinity). Biomedical consequences of the ion-radical enzymatic ATP synthesis are also discussed.

  5. Redox polymer mediation for enzymatic biofuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallaway, Joshua

    Mediated biocatalytic cathodes prepared from the oxygen-reducing enzyme laccase and redox-conducting osmium hydrogels were characterized for use as cathodes in enzymatic biofuel cells. A series of osmium-based redox polymers was synthesized with redox potentials spanning the range from 0.11 V to 0.85 V (SHE), and the resulting biocatalytic electrodes were modeled to determine reaction kinetic constants using the current response, measured osmium concentration, and measured apparent electron diffusion. As in solution-phase systems, the bimolecular rate constant for mediation was found to vary greatly with mediator potential---from 250 s-1M-1 when mediator and enzyme were close in potential to 9.4 x 10 4 s-1M-1 when this overpotential was large. Optimum mediator potential for a cell operating with a non-limiting platinum anode and having no mass transport limitation from bulk solution was found to be 0.66 V (SHE). Redox polymers were synthesized under different concentrations, producing osmium variation. An increase from 6.6% to 7.2% osmium increased current response from 1.2 to 2.1 mA/cm2 for a planar film in 40°C oxygen-saturated pH 4 buffer, rotating at 900 rpm. These results translated to high surface area electrodes, nearly doubling current density to 13 mA/cm2, the highest to date for such an electrode. The typical fungal laccase from Trametes versicolor was replaced by a bacterially-expressed small laccase from Streptomyces coelicolor, resulting in biocatalytic films that reduced oxygen at increased pH, with full functionality at pH 7, producing 1.5 mA/cm 2 in planar configuration. Current response was biphasic with pH, matching the activity profile of the free enzyme in solution. The mediated enzyme electrode system was modeled with respect to apparent electron diffusion, mediator concentration, and transport of oxygen from bulk solution, all of which are to some extent controlled by design. Each factor was found to limit performance in certain circumstances

  6. Functionalized Graphene Oxide as a Nanocarrier in a Multienzyme Labeling Amplification Strategy for Ultrasensitive Electrochemical Immunoassay of Phosphorylated p53 (S392)

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Dan; Wang, Limin; Shao, Yuyan; Wang, Jun; Engelhard, Mark H.; Lin, Yuehe

    2011-01-06

    P53 phosphorylation plays an important role in many biological processes and might be used as a potential biomarker in clinical diagnoses. We report a new electrochemical immunosensor for ultrasensitive detection of phosphorylated p53 at Ser392 (phospho-p53-392) based on graphene oxide (GO) as a nanocarrier in multienzymes amplification strategy. Greatly enhanced sensitivity was achieved by using the bioconjugates featuring horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and p53392 signal antibody (p53Ab2) linked to functionalized GO (HRP-p53Ab2-GO) at high ratio of HRP/p53Ab2. After a sandwich immunoreaction, the HRP-p53Ab2-GO captured onto the electrode surface produced an amplified electrocatalytic response by the reduction of enzymatically oxidized thionine in the presence of hydrogen peroxide. The increase of response current was proportional to the phospho-p53 concentration in the range of 0.02 to 2 nM with the detection limit of 0.01 nM, which was 10-fold lower than that of traditional sandwich electrochemical measurement for p53. The amplified immunoassay developed in this work shows acceptable stability and reproducibility and the assay results for phospho-p53 spiked in human plasma also show good recovery (92%~103.8%). This simple and low-cost immunosensor shows great promise for detection of other phosphorylated proteins and clinical applications.

  7. Regulation of oxidative phosphorylation: the flexible respiratory network of Paracoccus denitrificans.

    PubMed

    Van Spanning, R J; de Boer, A P; Reijnders, W N; De Gier, J W; Delorme, C O; Stouthamer, A H; Westerhoff, H V; Harms, N; van der Oost, J

    1995-10-01

    Paracoccus denitrificans is a facultative anaerobic bacterium that has the capacity to adjust its metabolic infrastructure, quantitatively and/or qualitatively, to the prevailing growth condition. In this bacterium the relative activity of distinct catabolic pathways is subject to a hierarchical control. In the presence of oxygen the aerobic respiration, the most efficient way of electron transfer-linked phosphorylation, has priority. At high oxygen tensions P. denitrificans synthesizes an oxidase with a relatively low affinity for oxygen, whereas under oxygen limitation a high-affinity oxidase appears specifically induced. During anaerobiosis, the pathways with lower free energy-transducing efficiency are induced. In the presence of nitrate, the expression of a number of dehydrogenases ensures the continuation of oxidative phosphorylation via denitrification. After identification of the structural components that are involved in both the aerobic and the anaerobic respiratory networks of P. denitrificans, the intriguing next challenge is to get insight in its regulation. Two transcription regulators have recently been demonstrated to be involved in the expression of a number of aerobic and/or anaerobic respiratory complexes in P. denitrificans. Understanding of the regulation machinery is beginning to emerge and promises much excitement in discovery. PMID:8718455

  8. Control of APC/C-dependent ubiquitin chain elongation by reversible phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Craney, Allison; Kelly, Aileen; Jia, Luying; Fedrigo, Indro; Yu, Hongtao; Rape, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Most metazoan E3 ligases contain a signature RING domain that promotes the transfer of ubiquitin from the active site of E2 conjugating enzymes to lysine residues in substrates. Although these RING-E3s depend on E2 enzymes for catalysis, how they turn on their E2s at the right time and place remains poorly understood. Here we report a phosphorylation-dependent mechanism that ensures timely activation of the E2 Ube2S by its RING-E3, the anaphase-promoting complex (APC/C); while phosphorylation of a specific serine residue in the APC/C coactivator Cdc20 prevents delivery of Ube2S to the APC/C, removal of this mark by PP2AB56 allows Ube2S to bind the APC/C and catalyze ubiquitin chain elongation. PP2AB56 also stabilizes kinetochore–microtubule attachments to shut off the spindle checkpoint, suggesting that cells regulate the E2–E3 interplay to coordinate ubiquitination with critical events during cell division. PMID:26811472

  9. Graphene-based immunosensor for electrochemical quantification of phosphorylated p53 (S15)

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Yunying; Chen, Aiqiong; Du, Dan; Lin, Yuehe

    2011-08-01

    We reported a graphene-based immunosensor for electrochemical quantification of phosphorylated p53 on serine 15 (phospho-p5315), a potential biomarker of gamma-radiation exposure. The principle is based on sandwich immunoassay and the resulting immunocomplex is formed among phospho-p53 capture antibody, phospho-p5315 antigen, biotinylated phospho-p5315 detection antibody and horseradish peroxidase (HRP)-labeled streptavidin. The introduced HRP results in an electrocatalytic response to reduction of hydrogen peroxide in the presence of thionine. Graphene served as sensor platform not only promotes electron transfer, but also increases the surface area to introduce a large amount of capture antibody, thus increasing the detection sensitivity. The experimental conditions including blocking agent, immunoreaction time and substrate concentration have been optimized. Under the optimum conditions, the increase of response current is proportional to the phospho-p5315 concentration in the range of 0.2–10 ng mL-1, with the detection limit of 0.1 ng mL-1. The developed immunosensor exhibits acceptable stability and reproducibility and the assay results for phospho-p5315 are in good correlation with the known values. This easily fabricated immunosensor provides a new promising tool for analysis of phospho-p5315 and other phosphorylated proteins.

  10. Functional characterization of alpha-glucan,water dikinase, the starch phosphorylating enzyme.

    PubMed

    Mikkelsen, René; Baunsgaard, Lone; Blennow, Andreas

    2004-01-15

    GWD (alpha-glucan,water dikinase) is the enzyme that catalyses the phosphorylation of starch by a dikinase-type reaction in which the beta-phosphate of ATP is transferred to either the C-6 or the C-3 position of the glycosyl residue of amylopectin. GWD shows similarity in both sequence and reaction mechanism to bacterial PPS (pyruvate,water dikinase) and PPDK (pyruvate,phosphate dikinase). Amino acid sequence alignments identified a conserved histidine residue located in the putative phosphohistidine domain of potato GWD. Site-directed mutagenesis of this histidine residue resulted in an inactive enzyme and loss of autophosphorylation. Native GWD is a homodimer and shows a strict requirement for the presence of alpha-1,6 branch points in its polyglucan substrate, and exhibits a sharp 20-fold increase in activity when the degree of polymerization is increased from 27.8 to 29.5. In spite of the high variability in the degree of starch phosphorylation, GWD proteins are ubiquitous in plants. The overall reaction mechanism of GWD is similar to that of PPS and PPDK, but the GWD family appears to have arisen after divergence of the plant kingdom. The nucleotide-binding domain of GWD exhibits a closer phylogenetic relationship to prokaryotic PPSs than to PPDKs. PMID:14525539

  11. Enzymatic accessibility of fiber hemp is enhanced by enzymatic or chemical removal of pectin.

    PubMed

    Pakarinen, A; Zhang, J; Brock, T; Maijala, P; Viikari, L

    2012-03-01

    Pectinolytic enzymes, steam explosion and alkaline treatment were used to assess the role of pectin for the accessibility of hydrolytic enzymes in the enzymatic hydrolysis of biomass. Hemp (Cannabis sativa L.), a potential energy crop especially in boreal climate with a low need of fertilizers, was used in the study either as untreated or anaerobically preserved raw material. Addition of pectinases increased the hydrolysis yield by 26%, 54%, and 64% from the theoretical carbohydrates of untreated, acid, and alkali-preserved materials, respectively. Steam explosion and hot alkali treatment increased the conversion of the total carbohydrates by 78% and 60%, respectively, compared to the untreated hemp. Elevated separation of cells within the hemp stalk tissues and an increased surface area was revealed after hot alkali or pectinase treatments, contributing to the increased conversion to sugars by commercial enzymes.

  12. Phosphorylation of Izumo1 and its role in male infertility

    PubMed Central

    Young, Samantha AM; Aitken, John; Baker, Mark A

    2015-01-01

    Izumo1 is a testis-specific gene product, whose function is essential for sperm-egg fusion. Throughout its lifespan, Izumo1 is posttranslationally modified, being both N-linked glycosylated on its extracellular domain and phosphorylated on the intracellular C-terminal tail. Within the caput regions of the rat epididymis, two phosphorylation events have been documented. However, as sperm pass through the epididymis, this cytoplasmic portion of Izumo1 has been shown to contain up to seven phosphorylation sites. Remarkably, in the rat, in correlation with these events, Izumo1 undergoes sub-cellular re-location, moving from the head/tail regions of the spermatozoa, to a predominantly equatorial segment location once they have reached the caudal end of the epididymis. PMID:25994654

  13. CONNEXIN 43 PHOSPHORYLATION – STRUCTURAL CHANGES AND BIOLOGICAL EFFECTS

    PubMed Central

    Solan, Joell L.; Lampe, Paul D.

    2009-01-01

    SYNOPSIS Vertebrate gap junctions, composed of proteins from the connexin gene family, play critical roles in embryonic development, coordinated contraction of excitable cells, tissue homeostasis, normal cell growth and differentiation. Phosphorylation of connexin43, the most abundant and ubiquitously expressed connexin, has been implicated in the regulation of gap junctional communication at several stages of the connexin “life cycle” including hemichannel oligomerization, export of the protein to the plasma membrane, hemichannel activity, gap junction assembly, gap junction channel gating and connexin degradation. Consistent with a short (1−5 h) protein half-life, connexin43 phosphorylation is dynamic and changes in response to activation of many different kinases. This review assesses our current understanding of the effects of phosphorylation on connexin43 structure and function that in turn regulate gap junction biology with an emphasis on events occurring in heart and skin. PMID:19309313

  14. Crystal Structure of a Phosphorylation-coupled Saccharide Transporter

    SciTech Connect

    Y Cao; X Jin; E Levin; H Huang; Y Zong; W Hendrickson; J Javitch; K Rajashankar; M Zhou; et al.

    2011-12-31

    Saccharides have a central role in the nutrition of all living organisms. Whereas several saccharide uptake systems are shared between the different phylogenetic kingdoms, the phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent phosphotransferase system exists almost exclusively in bacteria. This multi-component system includes an integral membrane protein EIIC that transports saccharides and assists in their phosphorylation. Here we present the crystal structure of an EIIC from Bacillus cereus that transports diacetylchitobiose. The EIIC is a homodimer, with an expansive interface formed between the amino-terminal halves of the two protomers. The carboxy-terminal half of each protomer has a large binding pocket that contains a diacetylchitobiose, which is occluded from both sides of the membrane with its site of phosphorylation near the conserved His250 and Glu334 residues. The structure shows the architecture of this important class of transporters, identifies the determinants of substrate binding and phosphorylation, and provides a framework for understanding the mechanism of sugar translocation.

  15. Sensing core histone phosphorylation — A matter of perfect timing☆

    PubMed Central

    Sawicka, Anna; Seiser, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Systematic analysis of histone modifications has revealed a plethora of posttranslational modifications that mediate changes in chromatin structure and gene expression. Histone phosphorylation is a transient histone modification that becomes induced by extracellular signals, DNA damage or entry into mitosis. Importantly, phosphorylation of histone proteins does lead not only to the binding of specific reader proteins but also to changes in the affinity for readers or writers of other histone modifications. This induces a cross-talk between different chromatin modifications that allows the spatio-temporal control of chromatin-associated events. In this review we will summarize the progress in our current knowledge of factors sensing reversible histone phosphorylation in different biological scenarios. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Molecular mechanisms of histone modification function. PMID:24747175

  16. Signal integration by chloroplast phosphorylation networks: an update

    PubMed Central

    Schönberg, Anna; Baginsky, Sacha

    2012-01-01

    Forty years after the initial discovery of light-dependent protein phosphorylation at the thylakoid membrane system, we are now beginning to understand the roles of chloroplast phosphorylation networks in their function to decode and mediate information on the metabolic status of the organelle to long-term adaptations in plastid and nuclear gene expression. With the help of genetics and functional genomics tools, chloroplast kinases and several hundred phosphoproteins were identified that now await detailed functional characterization. The regulation and the target protein spectrum of some kinases are understood, but this information is fragmentary with respect to kinase and target protein crosstalk in a changing environment. In this review, we will highlight the most recent advances in the field and discuss approaches that might lead to a comprehensive understanding of plastid signal integration by protein phosphorylation. PMID:23181067

  17. Phosphorylation of lamins determine their structural properties and signaling functions.

    PubMed

    Torvaldson, Elin; Kochin, Vitaly; Eriksson, John E

    2015-01-01

    Lamin A/C is part of the nuclear lamina, a meshwork of intermediate filaments underlying the inner nuclear membrane. The lamin network is anchoring a complex set of structural and linker proteins and is either directly or through partner proteins also associated or interacting with a number of signaling protein and transcription factors. During mitosis the nuclear lamina is dissociated by well established phosphorylatio