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Sample records for enzyme ace gene

  1. Angiotensin-converting enzyme gene (ACE) insertion/deletion polymorphism in Mexican populations.

    PubMed

    Vargas-Alarcón, Gilberto; Hernández-Pacheco, Guadalupe; Rodríguez-Pérez, José Manuel; Pérez-Hernández, Nonanzit; Pavón, Zinnia; Fragoso, José Manuel; Juarez-Cedillo, Teresa; Villarreal-Garza, Cynthia; Granados, Julio

    2003-12-01

    The angiotensin-converting enzyme gene (ACE) insertion/deletion polymorphism was determined in 211 Mexican healthy individuals belonging to different Mexican ethnic groups (98 Mestizos, 64 Teenek, and 49 Nahuas). ACE polymorphism differed among Mexicans with a high frequency of the D allele and the D/D genotype in Mexican Mestizos. The D/D genotype was absent in Teenek and present in only one Nahua individual (2.0%). When comparisons were made, we observed that Caucasian, African, and Asian populations presented the highest frequencies of the D allele, whereas Amerindian (Teenek and Pima) and Australian Aboriginals showed the highest frequencies of the I allele. The distribution of I/D genotype was heterogeneous in all populations: Australian Aboriginals presented the lowest frequency (4.9%), whereas Nahuas presented the highest (73.4%). The present study shows the frequencies of a polymorphism not analyzed previously in Mexican populations and establishes that this polymorphism distinguishes the Amerindian populations of other groups. On the other hand, since ACE alleles have been associated with genetic susceptibility to developing cardiovascular diseases and hypertension, knowledge of the distribution of these alleles could help to define the true significance of ACE polymorphism as a genetic susceptibility marker in the Amerindian populations.

  2. Identification of new polymorphisms of the angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) gene, and study of their relationship to plasma ACE levels by two-QTL segregation-linkage analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Villard, E.; Soubrier, F.; Tiret, L.; Rakotovao, R. Cambien, F.; Visvikis, S.

    1996-06-01

    Plasma angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) levels are highly genetically determined. A previous segregation-linkage analysis suggested the existence of a functional mutation located within or close to the ACE locus, in almost complete linkage disequilibrium (LD) with the ACE insertion/deletion (I/D) polymorphism and accounting for half the ACE variance. In order to identify the functional variant at the molecular level, we compared ACE gene sequences between four subjects selected for having contrasted ACE levels and I/D genotypes. We identified 10 new polymorphisms, among which 8 were genotyped in 95 healthy nuclear families, in addition to the I/D polymorphism. These polymorphisms could be divided into two groups: five polymorphisms in the 5{prime} region and three in the coding sequence and the 3{prime} UTR. Within each group, polymorphisms were in nearly complete association, whereas polymorphisms from the two groups were in strong negative LD. After adjustment for the I/D polymorphism, all polymorphisms of the 5{prime} group remained significantly associated with ACE levels, which suggests the existence of two quantitative trait loci (QTL) acting additively on ACE levels. Segregation-linkage analyses including one or two ACE-linked QTLs in LD with two ACE markers were performed to test this hypothesis. The two QTLs and the two markers were assumed to be in complete LD. Results supported the existence of two ACE-linked QTLs, which would explain 38% and 49% of the ACE variance in parents and offspring, respectively. One of these QTLs might be the I/D polymorphism itself or the newly characterized 4656(CT){sub 2/3} polymorphism. The second QTL would have a frequency of {approximately}.20, which is incompatible with any of the yet-identified polymorphisms. More extensive sequencing and extended analyses in larger samples and in other populations will be necessary to characterize definitely the functional variants. 30 refs., 1 fig., 6 tabs.

  3. No contribution of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) gene variants to severe obesity: a model for comprehensive case/control and quantitative cladistic analysis of ACE in human diseases.

    PubMed

    Bell, Christopher G; Meyre, David; Petretto, Enrico; Levy-Marchal, Claire; Hercberg, Serge; Charles, Marie Aline; Boyle, Cliona; Weill, Jacques; Tauber, Maïte; Mein, Charles A; Aitman, Timothy J; Froguel, Philippe; Walley, Andrew J

    2007-03-01

    Candidate gene analyses are often inconclusive owing to genetic or phenotypic heterogeneity, low statistical power, selection of nonfunctional SNPs, and inadequate statistical analysis of the genetic architecture. Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) is involved in adipocyte growth and function and the ACE-processed angiotensin II inhibits adipocyte differentiation. Associations between body mass index (BMI) and ACE polymorphisms have been reported in general populations, but the contribution to severe obesity of this gene, which is located under an obesity genome-scan linkage peak on 17q23, is unknown. ACE is one of the most studied genes and markers responsible for variation in circulating ACE enzyme levels have been extensively characterised. Eight of these variants were genotyped in 1054 severely obese cases and 918 nonobese controls, as well as 116 nuclear families from the genome scan (n=447), enabling the known clades to be inferred. Qualitative analysis of individual single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), haplotypes, clades, and diploclades demonstrated no significant associations (P<0.05) after minimal correction for multiple testing. Quantitative analysis of clades and diploclades for BMI, waist-to-hip ratio, or ZBMI in children were also not significant. This rigorous, large-scale study of common, well-defined, severe polygenic obesity provides strong evidence that functionally relevant sequence variation in ACE, whether it is defined at the level of SNPs, haplotypes, or clades, is not associated with severe obesity in French Caucasians. Such a study design exemplifies the strategy needed to clearly define the contribution of the ACE gene to the plethora of complex genetic diseases where weak associations have been previously reported.

  4. Angiotensinogen (AGT) M235T, AGT T174M and Angiotensin-1-Converting Enzyme (ACE) I/D Gene Polymorphisms in Essential Hypertension: Effects on Ramipril Efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Kolovou, Vana; Lagou, Evangelia; Mihas, Constantinos; Vasiliki, Giannakopoulou; Katsiki, Niki; Kollia, Aikaterini; Triposkiadis, Filippos; Degiannis, Dimitris; Mavrogeni, Sophie; Kolovou, Genovefa

    2015-01-01

    Background: Hypertension, one of the most important risk factors for premature cardiovascular disease, is a major worldwide public health problem. Angiotensin-1-converting enzyme (ACE) and angiotensinogen (AGT) gene polymorphisms are thought to be associated with primary hypertension. In the present study, we examined the frequency of these gene polymorphisms in an adult population with and without essential hypertension. Furthermore, we evaluated the effect of ACE and AGT gene polymorphisms on ramipril treatment efficacy in the hypertensive patients. Methods: A total of 166 adults (83 hypertensives and 83 normotensives) were involved in the study and genotyped for AGTM235T (rs699), AGTT174M (rs4762) and ACEI/D (rs1799752) gene polymorphisms. Results: The genotype and allele distribution of the AGTM235T variant significantly differed between hypertensives and normotensives [odds ratio (OR) = 1.57% (T vs M allele), 95% confidence intervals (CIs): 1.01 - 2.44; p=0.045 for hypertensives]. However, none of the 3 studied Simple Nucleotide Polymorphisms were associated with the blood pressure-lowering response to ramipril. Conclusion: These results suggest that AGTM235T gene polymorphism is associated with essential hypertension. However, none of the AGTM235T, AGTT174M and ACEI/D gene polymorphisms influenced ramipril effectiveness. PMID:27006715

  5. Pathological Ace2-to-Ace enzyme switch in the stressed heart is transcriptionally controlled by the endothelial Brg1-FoxM1 complex.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jin; Feng, Xuhui; Zhou, Qiong; Cheng, Wei; Shang, Ching; Han, Pei; Lin, Chiou-Hong; Chen, Huei-Sheng Vincent; Quertermous, Thomas; Chang, Ching-Pin

    2016-09-20

    Genes encoding angiotensin-converting enzymes (Ace and Ace2) are essential for heart function regulation. Cardiac stress enhances Ace, but suppresses Ace2, expression in the heart, leading to a net production of angiotensin II that promotes cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis. The regulatory mechanism that underlies the Ace2-to-Ace pathological switch, however, is unknown. Here we report that the Brahma-related gene-1 (Brg1) chromatin remodeler and forkhead box M1 (FoxM1) transcription factor cooperate within cardiac (coronary) endothelial cells of pathologically stressed hearts to trigger the Ace2-to-Ace enzyme switch, angiotensin I-to-II conversion, and cardiac hypertrophy. In mice, cardiac stress activates the expression of Brg1 and FoxM1 in endothelial cells. Once activated, Brg1 and FoxM1 form a protein complex on Ace and Ace2 promoters to concurrently activate Ace and repress Ace2, tipping the balance to Ace2 expression with enhanced angiotensin II production, leading to cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis. Disruption of endothelial Brg1 or FoxM1 or chemical inhibition of FoxM1 abolishes the stress-induced Ace2-to-Ace switch and protects the heart from pathological hypertrophy. In human hypertrophic hearts, BRG1 and FOXM1 expression is also activated in endothelial cells; their expression levels correlate strongly with the ACE/ACE2 ratio, suggesting a conserved mechanism. Our studies demonstrate a molecular interaction of Brg1 and FoxM1 and an endothelial mechanism of modulating Ace/Ace2 ratio for heart failure therapy.

  6. Pathological Ace2-to-Ace enzyme switch in the stressed heart is transcriptionally controlled by the endothelial Brg1-FoxM1 complex.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jin; Feng, Xuhui; Zhou, Qiong; Cheng, Wei; Shang, Ching; Han, Pei; Lin, Chiou-Hong; Chen, Huei-Sheng Vincent; Quertermous, Thomas; Chang, Ching-Pin

    2016-09-20

    Genes encoding angiotensin-converting enzymes (Ace and Ace2) are essential for heart function regulation. Cardiac stress enhances Ace, but suppresses Ace2, expression in the heart, leading to a net production of angiotensin II that promotes cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis. The regulatory mechanism that underlies the Ace2-to-Ace pathological switch, however, is unknown. Here we report that the Brahma-related gene-1 (Brg1) chromatin remodeler and forkhead box M1 (FoxM1) transcription factor cooperate within cardiac (coronary) endothelial cells of pathologically stressed hearts to trigger the Ace2-to-Ace enzyme switch, angiotensin I-to-II conversion, and cardiac hypertrophy. In mice, cardiac stress activates the expression of Brg1 and FoxM1 in endothelial cells. Once activated, Brg1 and FoxM1 form a protein complex on Ace and Ace2 promoters to concurrently activate Ace and repress Ace2, tipping the balance to Ace2 expression with enhanced angiotensin II production, leading to cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis. Disruption of endothelial Brg1 or FoxM1 or chemical inhibition of FoxM1 abolishes the stress-induced Ace2-to-Ace switch and protects the heart from pathological hypertrophy. In human hypertrophic hearts, BRG1 and FOXM1 expression is also activated in endothelial cells; their expression levels correlate strongly with the ACE/ACE2 ratio, suggesting a conserved mechanism. Our studies demonstrate a molecular interaction of Brg1 and FoxM1 and an endothelial mechanism of modulating Ace/Ace2 ratio for heart failure therapy. PMID:27601681

  7. The influence of a polymorphism in the gene encoding angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) on treatment outcomes in late-onset Pompe patients receiving alglucosidase alfa.

    PubMed

    Baek, Rena C; Palmer, Rachel; Pomponio, Robert J; Lu, Yuefeng; Ma, Xiwen; McVie-Wylie, Alison J

    2016-09-01

    Correlations between angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) genotype (I/I, I/D, D/D), disease severity at baseline and response to enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) were assessed in the Pompe disease Late-Onset Treatment Study (LOTS). No correlations were observed between ACE genotype and disease severity at baseline. However, D/D patients appeared to have a reduced response to alglucosidase alfa treatment than I/I or I/D patients, suggesting that ACE polymorphisms may influence the response to alglucosidase alfa treatment and warrants further investigation. PMID:27489778

  8. Rediscovering ACE: Novel insights into the many roles of the angiotensin-converting enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Villalobos, Romer A.; Shen, Xiao Z.; Bernstein, Ellen A.; Janjulia, Tea; Taylor, Brian; Giani, Jorge F.; Blackwell, Wendell-Lamar B.; Shah, Kandarp H.; Shi, Peng D.; Fuchs, Sebastien; Bernstein, Kenneth E.

    2013-01-01

    Angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) is best known for the catalytic conversion of angiotensin I to angiotensin II. However, the use of gene-targeting techniques has led to mouse models highlighting many other biochemical properties and actions of this enzyme. This review discusses recent studies examining the functional significance of ACE tissue-specific expression and the presence in ACE of two independent catalytic sites with distinct substrates and biological effects. It is these features which explain why ACE makes important contributions to many different physiological processes including renal development, blood pressure control, inflammation and immunity. PMID:23686164

  9. Effect of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) gene polymorphism on progression of renal disease and the influence of ACE inhibition in IDDM patients: findings from the EUCLID Randomized Controlled Trial. EURODIAB Controlled Trial of Lisinopril in IDDM.

    PubMed

    Penno, G; Chaturvedi, N; Talmud, P J; Cotroneo, P; Manto, A; Nannipieri, M; Luong, L A; Fuller, J H

    1998-09-01

    We examined whether the ACE gene insertion/deletion (I/D) polymorphism modulates renal disease progression in IDDM and how ACE inhibitors influence this relationship. The EURODIAB Controlled Trial of Lisinopril in IDDM is a multicenter randomized placebo-controlled trial in 530 nonhypertensive, mainly normoalbuminuric IDDM patients aged 20-59 years. Albumin excretion rate (AER) was measured every 6 months for 2 years. Genotype distribution was 15% II, 58% ID, and 27% DD. Between genotypes, there were no differences in baseline characteristics or in changes in blood pressure and glycemic control throughout the trial. There was a significant interaction between the II and DD genotype groups and treatment on change in AER (P = 0.05). Patients with the II genotype showed the fastest rate of AER progression on placebo but had an enhanced response to lisinopril. AER at 2 years (adjusted for baseline AER) was 51.3% lower on lisinopril than placebo in the II genotype patients (95% CI, 15.7 to 71.8; P = 0.01), 14.8% in the ID group (-7.8 to 32.7; P = 0.2), and 7.7% in the DD group (-36.6 to 37.6; P = 0.7). Absolute differences in AER between placebo and lisinopril at 2 years were 8.1, 1.7, and 0.8 microg/min in the II, ID, and DD groups, respectively. The significant beneficial effect of lisinopril on AER in the II group persisted when adjusted for center, blood pressure, and glycemic control, and also for diastolic blood pressure at 1 month into the study. Progression from normoalbuminuria to microalbuminuria (lisinopril versus placebo) was 0.27 (0.03-2.26; P = 0.2) in the II group, and 1.30 (0.33-5.17; P = 0.7) in the DD group (P = 0.6 for interaction). Knowledge of ACE genotype may be of value in determining the likely impact of ACE inhibitor treatment.

  10. Angiotensin Converting Enzyme (ACE) Inhibitor Extends Caenorhabditis elegans Life Span.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sandeep; Dietrich, Nicholas; Kornfeld, Kerry

    2016-02-01

    Animal aging is characterized by progressive, degenerative changes in many organ systems. Because age-related degeneration is a major contributor to disability and death in humans, treatments that delay age-related degeneration are desirable. However, no drugs that delay normal human aging are currently available. To identify drugs that delay age-related degeneration, we used the powerful Caenorhabditis elegans model system to screen for FDA-approved drugs that can extend the adult lifespan of worms. Here we show that captopril extended mean lifespan. Captopril is an angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor used to treat high blood pressure in humans. To explore the mechanism of captopril, we analyzed the acn-1 gene that encodes the C. elegans homolog of ACE. Reducing the activity of acn-1 extended the mean life span. Furthermore, reducing the activity of acn-1 delayed age-related degenerative changes and increased stress resistance, indicating that acn-1 influences aging. Captopril could not further extend the lifespan of animals with reduced acn-1, suggesting they function in the same pathway; we propose that captopril inhibits acn-1 to extend lifespan. To define the relationship with previously characterized longevity pathways, we analyzed mutant animals. The lifespan extension caused by reducing the activity of acn-1 was additive with caloric restriction and mitochondrial insufficiency, and did not require sir-2.1, hsf-1 or rict-1, suggesting that acn-1 functions by a distinct mechanism. The interactions with the insulin/IGF-1 pathway were complex, since the lifespan extensions caused by captopril and reducing acn-1 activity were additive with daf-2 and age-1 but required daf-16. Captopril treatment and reducing acn-1 activity caused similar effects in a wide range of genetic backgrounds, consistent with the model that they act by the same mechanism. These results identify a new drug and a new gene that can extend the lifespan of worms and suggest new

  11. 21 CFR 862.1090 - Angiotensin converting enzyme (A.C.E.) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Angiotensin converting enzyme (A.C.E.) test system... Test Systems § 862.1090 Angiotensin converting enzyme (A.C.E.) test system. (a) Identification. An angiotensin converting enzyme (A.C.E.) test system is a device intended to measure the activity of...

  12. 21 CFR 862.1090 - Angiotensin converting enzyme (A.C.E.) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Angiotensin converting enzyme (A.C.E.) test system... Test Systems § 862.1090 Angiotensin converting enzyme (A.C.E.) test system. (a) Identification. An angiotensin converting enzyme (A.C.E.) test system is a device intended to measure the activity of...

  13. 21 CFR 862.1090 - Angiotensin converting enzyme (A.C.E.) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Angiotensin converting enzyme (A.C.E.) test system... Test Systems § 862.1090 Angiotensin converting enzyme (A.C.E.) test system. (a) Identification. An angiotensin converting enzyme (A.C.E.) test system is a device intended to measure the activity of...

  14. 21 CFR 862.1090 - Angiotensin converting enzyme (A.C.E.) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Angiotensin converting enzyme (A.C.E.) test system... Test Systems § 862.1090 Angiotensin converting enzyme (A.C.E.) test system. (a) Identification. An angiotensin converting enzyme (A.C.E.) test system is a device intended to measure the activity of...

  15. 21 CFR 862.1090 - Angiotensin converting enzyme (A.C.E.) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Angiotensin converting enzyme (A.C.E.) test system... Test Systems § 862.1090 Angiotensin converting enzyme (A.C.E.) test system. (a) Identification. An angiotensin converting enzyme (A.C.E.) test system is a device intended to measure the activity of...

  16. Angiotensin Converting Enzyme (ACE) Inhibitor Extends Caenorhabditis elegans Life Span

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Sandeep; Dietrich, Nicholas; Kornfeld, Kerry

    2016-01-01

    Animal aging is characterized by progressive, degenerative changes in many organ systems. Because age-related degeneration is a major contributor to disability and death in humans, treatments that delay age-related degeneration are desirable. However, no drugs that delay normal human aging are currently available. To identify drugs that delay age-related degeneration, we used the powerful Caenorhabdtitis elegans model system to screen for FDA-approved drugs that can extend the adult lifespan of worms. Here we show that captopril extended mean lifespan. Captopril is an angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor used to treat high blood pressure in humans. To explore the mechanism of captopril, we analyzed the acn-1 gene that encodes the C. elegans homolog of ACE. Reducing the activity of acn-1 extended the mean life span. Furthermore, reducing the activity of acn-1 delayed age-related degenerative changes and increased stress resistance, indicating that acn-1 influences aging. Captopril could not further extend the lifespan of animals with reduced acn-1, suggesting they function in the same pathway; we propose that captopril inhibits acn-1 to extend lifespan. To define the relationship with previously characterized longevity pathways, we analyzed mutant animals. The lifespan extension caused by reducing the activity of acn-1 was additive with caloric restriction and mitochondrial insufficiency, and did not require sir-2.1, hsf-1 or rict-1, suggesting that acn-1 functions by a distinct mechanism. The interactions with the insulin/IGF-1 pathway were complex, since the lifespan extensions caused by captopril and reducing acn-1 activity were additive with daf-2 and age-1 but required daf-16. Captopril treatment and reducing acn-1 activity caused similar effects in a wide range of genetic backgrounds, consistent with the model that they act by the same mechanism. These results identify a new drug and a new gene that can extend the lifespan of worms and suggest new

  17. Angiotensin Converting Enzyme (ACE) Inhibitor Extends Caenorhabditis elegans Life Span.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sandeep; Dietrich, Nicholas; Kornfeld, Kerry

    2016-02-01

    Animal aging is characterized by progressive, degenerative changes in many organ systems. Because age-related degeneration is a major contributor to disability and death in humans, treatments that delay age-related degeneration are desirable. However, no drugs that delay normal human aging are currently available. To identify drugs that delay age-related degeneration, we used the powerful Caenorhabditis elegans model system to screen for FDA-approved drugs that can extend the adult lifespan of worms. Here we show that captopril extended mean lifespan. Captopril is an angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor used to treat high blood pressure in humans. To explore the mechanism of captopril, we analyzed the acn-1 gene that encodes the C. elegans homolog of ACE. Reducing the activity of acn-1 extended the mean life span. Furthermore, reducing the activity of acn-1 delayed age-related degenerative changes and increased stress resistance, indicating that acn-1 influences aging. Captopril could not further extend the lifespan of animals with reduced acn-1, suggesting they function in the same pathway; we propose that captopril inhibits acn-1 to extend lifespan. To define the relationship with previously characterized longevity pathways, we analyzed mutant animals. The lifespan extension caused by reducing the activity of acn-1 was additive with caloric restriction and mitochondrial insufficiency, and did not require sir-2.1, hsf-1 or rict-1, suggesting that acn-1 functions by a distinct mechanism. The interactions with the insulin/IGF-1 pathway were complex, since the lifespan extensions caused by captopril and reducing acn-1 activity were additive with daf-2 and age-1 but required daf-16. Captopril treatment and reducing acn-1 activity caused similar effects in a wide range of genetic backgrounds, consistent with the model that they act by the same mechanism. These results identify a new drug and a new gene that can extend the lifespan of worms and suggest new

  18. ACE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lumia, R.

    1999-01-01

    This document describes the progress made during the fourth year of the Center for Autonomous Control Engineering (ACE). We currently support 30 graduate students, 52 undergraduate students, 9 faculty members, and 4 staff members. Progress will be divided into two categories. The first category explores progress for ACE in general. The second describes the results of each specific project supported within ACE.

  19. Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) genotypes and disability in hospitalized older patients.

    PubMed

    Seripa, Davide; Paroni, Giulia; Matera, Maria G; Gravina, Carolina; Scarcelli, Carlo; Corritore, Michele; D'Ambrosio, Luigi P; Urbano, Maria; D'Onofrio, Grazia; Copetti, Massimiliano; Kehoe, Patrick G; Panza, Francesco; Pilotto, Alberto

    2011-09-01

    The association between angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) genotypes and functional decline in older adults remains controversial. To assess if ACE gene variations influences functional abilities at older age, the present study explored the association between the common ACE insertion/deletion (I/D) polymorphism and disability measured with activities of daily living (ADL) in hospitalized older patients. We analyzed the frequency of the ACE genotypes (I/I, I/D, and D/D) in a population of 2,128 hospitalized older patients divided according to presence or absence of ADL disability. Logistic regression analysis adjusted for possible confounding factors, identified an association between the I/I genotype with ADL disability (OR=1.54, 95% CI 1.04-2.29). This association was significant in men (OR=2.01, 95% CI 1.07-3.78), but not in women (OR=1.36, 95% CI 0.82-2.25). These results suggested a possible role of the ACE polymorphism as a genetic marker for ADL disability in hospitalized older patients.

  20. Evaluation of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE), its homologue ACE2 and neprilysin in angiotensin peptide metabolism

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    In the RAS (renin–angiotensin system), Ang I (angiotensin I) is cleaved by ACE (angiotensin-converting enzyme) to form Ang II (angiotensin II), which has effects on blood pressure, fluid and electrolyte homoeostasis. We have examined the kinetics of angiotensin peptide cleavage by full-length human ACE, the separate N- and C-domains of ACE, the homologue of ACE, ACE2, and NEP (neprilysin). The activity of the enzyme preparations was determined by active-site titrations using competitive tight-binding inhibitors and fluorogenic substrates. Ang I was effectively cleaved by NEP to Ang (1–7) (kcat/Km of 6.2×105 M−1·s−1), but was a poor substrate for ACE2 (kcat/Km of 3.3×104 M−1·s−1). Ang (1–9) was a better substrate for NEP than ACE (kcat/Km of 3.7×105 M−1·s−1 compared with kcat/Km of 6.8×104 M−1·s−1). Ang II was cleaved efficiently by ACE2 to Ang (1–7) (kcat/Km of 2.2×106 M−1·s−1) and was cleaved by NEP (kcat/Km of 2.2×105 M−1·s−1) to several degradation products. In contrast with a previous report, Ang (1–7), like Ang I and Ang (1–9), was cleaved with a similar efficiency by both the N- and C-domains of ACE (kcat/Km of 3.6×105 M−1·s−1 compared with kcat/Km of 3.3×105 M−1·s−1). The two active sites of ACE exhibited negative co-operativity when either Ang I or Ang (1–7) was the substrate. In addition, a range of ACE inhibitors failed to inhibit ACE2. These kinetic data highlight that the flux of peptides through the RAS is complex, with the levels of ACE, ACE2 and NEP dictating whether vasoconstriction or vasodilation will predominate. PMID:15283675

  1. The Ace locus of Drosophila melanogaster: structural gene for acetylcholinesterase with an unusual 5' leader.

    PubMed Central

    Hall, L M; Spierer, P

    1986-01-01

    The Ace locus of Drosophila melanogaster has been mapped at the molecular level. cDNA clones from the locus have been isolated and their sequence determined, confirming that Ace forms the structural gene for acetylcholinesterase (AChE). The cDNAs have a 1950 nucleotide open reading frame from which the complete amino acid sequence of AChE has been deduced. The Drosophila enzyme is found to have extensive homology to the known sequence of Torpedo AChE. Ace cDNAs have an unusual structure with a long 5' leader and several short upstream open reading frames. Images Fig. 2. PMID:3024971

  2. Angiotensin I-Converting Enzyme (ACE) Inhibitory Activity and ACE Inhibitory Peptides of Salmon (Salmo salar) Protein Hydrolysates Obtained by Human and Porcine Gastrointestinal Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Darewicz, Małgorzata; Borawska, Justyna; Vegarud, Gerd E.; Minkiewicz, Piotr; Iwaniak, Anna

    2014-01-01

    The objectives of the present study were two-fold: first, to detect whether salmon protein fractions possess angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory properties and whether salmon proteins can release ACE inhibitory peptides during a sequential in vitro hydrolysis (with commercial porcine enzymes) and ex vivo digestion (with human gastrointestinal enzymes). Secondly, to evaluate the ACE inhibitory activity of generated hydrolysates. A two-step ex vivo and in vitro model digestion was performed to simulate the human digestion process. Salmon proteins were degraded more efficiently by porcine enzymes than by human gastrointestinal juices and sarcoplasmic proteins were digested/hydrolyzed more easily than myofibrillar proteins. The ex vivo digested myofibrillar and sarcoplasmic duodenal samples showed IC50 values (concentration required to decrease the ACE activity by 50%) of 1.06 and 2.16 mg/mL, respectively. The in vitro hydrolyzed myofibrillar and sarcoplasmic samples showed IC50 values of 0.91 and 1.04 mg/mL, respectively. Based on the results of in silico studies, it was possible to identify 9 peptides of the ex vivo hydrolysates and 7 peptides of the in vitro hydrolysates of salmon proteins of 11 selected peptides. In both types of salmon hydrolysates, ACE-inhibitory peptides IW, IY, TVY and VW were identified. In the in vitro salmon protein hydrolysates an ACE-inhibitory peptides VPW and VY were also detected, while ACE-inhibitory peptides ALPHA, IVY and IWHHT were identified in the hydrolysates generated with ex vivo digestion. In our studies, we documented ACE inhibitory in vitro effects of salmon protein hydrolysates obtained by human and as well as porcine gastrointestinal enzymes. PMID:25123137

  3. Angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory activity and ACE inhibitory peptides of salmon (Salmo salar) protein hydrolysates obtained by human and porcine gastrointestinal enzymes.

    PubMed

    Darewicz, Małgorzata; Borawska, Justyna; Vegarud, Gerd E; Minkiewicz, Piotr; Iwaniak, Anna

    2014-08-13

    The objectives of the present study were two-fold: first, to detect whether salmon protein fractions possess angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory properties and whether salmon proteins can release ACE inhibitory peptides during a sequential in vitro hydrolysis (with commercial porcine enzymes) and ex vivo digestion (with human gastrointestinal enzymes). Secondly, to evaluate the ACE inhibitory activity of generated hydrolysates. A two-step ex vivo and in vitro model digestion was performed to simulate the human digestion process. Salmon proteins were degraded more efficiently by porcine enzymes than by human gastrointestinal juices and sarcoplasmic proteins were digested/hydrolyzed more easily than myofibrillar proteins. The ex vivo digested myofibrillar and sarcoplasmic duodenal samples showed IC50 values (concentration required to decrease the ACE activity by 50%) of 1.06 and 2.16 mg/mL, respectively. The in vitro hydrolyzed myofibrillar and sarcoplasmic samples showed IC50 values of 0.91 and 1.04 mg/mL, respectively. Based on the results of in silico studies, it was possible to identify 9 peptides of the ex vivo hydrolysates and 7 peptides of the in vitro hydrolysates of salmon proteins of 11 selected peptides. In both types of salmon hydrolysates, ACE-inhibitory peptides IW, IY, TVY and VW were identified. In the in vitro salmon protein hydrolysates an ACE-inhibitory peptides VPW and VY were also detected, while ACE-inhibitory peptides ALPHA, IVY and IWHHT were identified in the hydrolysates generated with ex vivo digestion. In our studies, we documented ACE inhibitory in vitro effects of salmon protein hydrolysates obtained by human and as well as porcine gastrointestinal enzymes.

  4. The role of IL-4 gene 70 bp VNTR and ACE gene I/D variants in Familial Mediterranean fever.

    PubMed

    Yigit, Serbülent; Tural, Sengul; Tekcan, Akın; Tasliyurt, Turker; Inanir, Ahmet; Uzunkaya, Süheyla; Kismali, Gorkem

    2014-05-01

    Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) is characterized by recurrent attacks of fever and inflammation in the peritoneum, synovium, or pleura, accompanied by pain. It is an autosomal recessive disease caused by mutations in the MEFV (MEditerranean FeVer) gene. Patients with similar genotypes exhibit phenotypic diversity. As a result, the variations in different genes could be responsible for the clinical findings of this disease. In previous studies genes encoding Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme (ACE) and IL-4 (Interleukin-4) were found to be associated with rheumatologic and autoimmune diseases. In the present study we hypothesized whether ACE I/D or IL-4 70 bp variable tandem repeats (VNTR) genes are associated with FMF and its clinical findings in Turkish patients. Genomic DNA obtained from 670 persons (339 patients with FMF and 331 healthy controls) was used in the study. Genotypes for an ACE gene I/D polymorphism and IL-4 gene 70 bp VNTR were determined by polymerase chain reaction with specific primers. To our knowledge, this is the first study examining ACE gene I/D polymorphism and IL-4 gene 70 bp VNTR polymorphism in FMF patients. As a result, there was a statistically significant difference between the groups with respect to genotype distribution (p<0.001). According to our results, ACE gene DD genotype was associated with an increased risk in FMF [p<0.001; OR (95%): 7.715 (4.503-13.22)]. When we examined ACE genotype frequencies according to the clinical characteristics, we found a statistically significant association between DD+ID genotype and fever (p=0.04). In addition IL-4 gene P1P1 genotype was associated with FMF (p<0.001). We propose that D allele or DD genotype of ACE gene and P1 allele or P1P1 genotype of IL-4 gene may be important molecular markers for susceptibility of FMF.

  5. Affinity purification of angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitory peptides using immobilized ACE.

    PubMed

    Megías, Cristina; Pedroche, Justo; Yust, María del Mar; Alaiz, Manuel; Girón-Calle, Julio; Millan, Francisco; Vioque, Javier

    2006-09-20

    A lung extract rich in angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) and pure ACE were immobilized by reaction with the activated support 4 BCL glyoxyl-agarose. These immobilized ACE derivatives were used for purification of ACE inhibitory peptides by affinity chromatography. The immobilized lung extract was used to purify inhibitory peptides from sunflower and rapeseed protein hydrolysates that had been obtained by treatment of protein isolates with alcalase. The ACE binding peptides that were retained by the derivatives were specifically released by treatment with the ACE inhibitor captopril and further purified by reverse-phase C18 HPLC chromatography. Inhibitory peptides with IC50 50 and 150 times lower than those of the original sunflower and rapeseed hydrolysates, respectively, were obtained. The derivative prepared using pure ACE was used for purification of ACE inhibitory peptides from the same type of sunflower protein hydrolysate. ACE binding peptides were released from the ACE-agarose derivatives by treatment with 1 M NaCl and had an IC50 a little higher than those obtained using immobilized extract and elution with captopril. Affinity chromatography facilitated the purification of ACE inhibitory peptides and potentially other bioactive peptides present in food proteins.

  6. Congenital renal tubular dysplasia and skull ossification defects similar to teratogenic effects of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors.

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, D; Moss, G; Primhak, R; Coombs, R

    1997-01-01

    An apparently autosomal recessive syndrome of congenital renal tubular dysplasia and skull ossification defects is described in five infants from two separate, consanguineous, Pakistani Muslim kindreds. The clinical, pathological, and radiological features are similar to the phenotype associated with fetal exposure to angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors: intrauterine growth retardation, skull ossification defects, and fetal/ neonatal anuric renal failure associated with renal tubular dysplasia. There was no fetal exposure to ACE inhibitors in the affected infants. Phenotypic similarities between these familial cases and those associated with ACE inhibition suggest an abnormality of the "renin-angiotensin-aldosterone" system (RAS). It is postulated that the molecular pathology in this uncommon autosomal recessive proximal renal tubular dysgenesis could be related to mutations of the gene systems governing the RAS. Images PMID:9222960

  7. Hypertension and ace gene insertion/deletion polymorphism in pediatric renal transplant patients.

    PubMed

    Serdaroglu, Erkin; Mir, Sevgi; Berdeli, Afig

    2005-10-01

    The objective of the present study was to define the risk factors for hypertension and to analyze the influence of insertion/deletion (I/D) polymorphism of the angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) on hypertension in pediatric renal transplant recipients. Twenty-six pediatric renal transplant recipients with stable renal function and treated with the same immunosuppression protocol were included in the study. Their mean age was 12.5 +/- 3.3 yr and mean time after transplantation was 38.5 +/- 39.8 month. Twenty-four hour ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) was performed by SpaceLabs (90207) device. The I/D polymorphism of the ACE was determined by PCR and ACE serum level was analyzed by colorimetric method. Hypertension was present in 15 patients (57.7%) by causal blood pressure measurements and 19 patients (73.1%) by ABPM. Twenty-two patients (84.6%) were found to be non-dipper and eight of them had reverse dipping. Only time after transplantation (38 +/- 31 vs. 79 +/-49 month, p = 0.016) and cyclosporin A trough plasma levels (206 +/-78 vs. 119 +/- 83 ng/mL, p = 0.020) influenced the presence of hypertension by multiple logistic regression analysis. The distribution of genotypes were II = 2 (7.7%), ID = 8 (30.8%), DD = 16 (61.5%). There was no effect of ACE gene I/D polymorphism or serum ACE levels on hypertension prevalence and circadian variability of blood pressures. Hypertension was related to the time after transplantation and cyclosporin A levels. The ACE gene I/D polymorphism and serum ACE levels did not influence the blood pressure values or circadian variability of blood pressure among pediatric renal transplant patients. PMID:16176418

  8. Isolation, hyperexpression, and sequencing of the aceA gene encoding isocitrate lyase in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Matsuoka, M; McFadden, B A

    1988-01-01

    A structural gene for isocitrate lyase was isolated from a cosmid containing an ace locus of the Escherichia coli chromosome. Cloning and expression under control of the tac promoter in a multicopy plasmid showed that a 1.7-kilobase-pair DNA segment was sufficient for complementation of an aceA deletion mutation and overproduction of isocitrate lyase. DNA sequence analysis of the cloned gene and N-terminal protein sequencing of the cloned and wild-type enzymes revealed an entire aceA gene which encodes a 429-amino-acid residue polypeptide whose C-terminus is histidine. The deduced amino acid sequence for the 47.2-kilodalton subunit of E. coli isocitrate lyase could be aligned with that for the 64.8-kilodalton subunit of the castor bean enzyme with 39% identity except for limited N- and C-terminal regions and a 103-residue stretch that was unique for the plant enzyme and started approximately in the middle of that peptide. Images PMID:3049537

  9. Atrial overexpression of angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 improves the canine rapid atrial pacing-induced structural and electrical remodeling. Fan, ACE2 improves atrial substrate remodeling.

    PubMed

    Fan, Jinqi; Zou, Lili; Cui, Kun; Woo, Kamsang; Du, Huaan; Chen, Shaojie; Ling, Zhiyu; Zhang, Quanjun; Zhang, Bo; Lan, Xianbin; Su, Li; Zrenner, Bernhard; Yin, Yuehui

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether atrial overexpression of angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) by homogeneous transmural atrial gene transfer can reverse atrial remodeling and its mechanisms in a canine atrial-pacing model. Twenty-eight mongrel dogs were randomly divided into four groups: Sham-operated, AF-control, gene therapy with adenovirus-enhanced green fluorescent protein (Ad-EGFP) and gene therapy with Ad-ACE2 (Ad-ACE2) (n = 7 per subgroup). AF was induced in all dogs except the Sham-operated group by rapid atrial pacing at 450 beats/min for 2 weeks. Ad-EGFP and Ad-ACE2 group then received epicardial gene painting. Three weeks after gene transfer, all animals except the Sham group underwent rapid atrial pacing for another 3 weeks and then invasive electrophysiological, histological and molecular studies. The Ad-ACE2 group showed an increased ACE2 and Angiotensin-(1-7) expression, and decreased Angiotensin II expression in comparison with Ad-EGFP and AF-control group. ACE2 overexpression attenuated rapid atrial pacing-induced increase in activated extracellular signal-regulated kinases and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) levels, and decrease in MAPK phosphatase 1(MKP-1) level, resulting in attenuation of atrial fibrosis collagen protein markers and transforming growth factor-β1. Additionally, ACE2 overexpression also modulated the tachypacing-induced up-regulation of connexin 40, down-regulation of connexin 43 and Kv4.2, and significantly decreased the inducibility and duration of AF. ACE2 overexpression could shift the renin-angiotensin system balance towards the protective axis, attenuate cardiac fibrosis remodeling associated with up-regulation of MKP-1 and reduction of MAPKs activities, modulate tachypacing-induced ion channels and connexin remodeling, and subsequently reduce the inducibility and duration of AF.

  10. What is the impact of the ACE gene insertion/deletion (I/D) polymorphism on the clinical effectiveness and adverse events of ACE inhibitors? – Protocol of a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Scharplatz, M; Puhan, MA; Steurer, J; Bachmann, LM

    2004-01-01

    Background The Angiotensin Converting Enzyme (ACE) insertion/deletion (I/D) polymorphism has received much attention in pharmacogenetic research because observed variations in response to ACE inhibitors might be associated with this polymorphism. Pharmacogenetic testing raises the hope to individualise ACE inhibitor therapy in order to optimise its effectiveness and to reduce adverse effects for genetically different subgroups. However, the extent of its effect modification in patients treated with ACE inhibitors remains inconclusive. Therefore our objective is to quantify the effect modification of the insertion/deletion polymorphism of the angiotensin converting enzyme gene on any surrogate and clinically relevant parameters in patients with cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, renal transplantation and/or renal failure. Methods Systematic Review. We will perform literature searches in six electronic databases to identify randomised controlled trials comparing the effectiveness and occurrence of adverse events of ACE inhibitor therapy against placebo or any active treatment stratified by the I/D gene polymorphism. In addition, authors of trials, experts in pharmacogenetics and pharmaceutical companies will be contacted for further published or unpublished data. Hand searching will be accomplished by reviewing the reference lists of all included studies. The methodological quality of included papers will be assessed. Data analyses will be performed in clinically and methodologically cogent subgroups. The results of the quantitative assessment will be pooled statistically where appropriate to produce an estimate of the differences in the effect of ACE inhibitors observed between the three ACE genotypes. Discussion This protocol describes a strategy to quantify the effect modification of the ACE polymorphism on ACE inhibitors in relevant clinical domains using meta-epidemiological research methods. The results may provide evidence for the usefulness of pharmacogenetic

  11. ACE and ACTN3 genes polymorphisms among female Hungarian athletes in the aspect of sport disciplines.

    PubMed

    Bosnyák, E; Trájer, E; Udvardy, A; Komka, Z; Protzner, A; Kováts, T; Györe, I; Tóth, M; Pucsok, J; Szmodis, M

    2015-12-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the importance of two sport-associated gene polymorphisms, alpha-actinin-3 R577X (ACTN3) and angiotensin-converting enzyme I/D (ACE), among Hungarian athletes in different sports. The examination was carried out only on women (n = 100). Sport-specific groups were formed in order to guarantee the most homogeneous clusters. Human genomic DNA was isolated from blood, and genotyping was performed by polymerase chain reaction. To measure the differences between the participating groups, Chi-squared test was performed using Statistica 9.0 for Windows® (significance level: p < 0.05). In comparing the ACE I/D allele frequencies, significant difference was detected between water polo (I = 61.11%; D = 38.89%) and combat sports (I = 35.71%, D = 64.29%) athletes (p < 0.03). There was no statistical difference when ACE I/D alleles in combat sports and kayaking/rowing (p > 0.05) were compared. A similarity was detectable in the I allele frequencies of the water polo (61.11%) and kayaking/rowing (56.67%) groups. The ACTN3 R/X polymorphism showed no differences in comparison with the sport groups. R allele frequencies were higher in every group compared to the X allele. The potential significance of the ACE I allele in sports of an aerobic nature was not clearly confirmed among Hungarian athletes. PMID:26690037

  12. Egg ovotransferrin‐derived ACE inhibitory peptide IRW increases ACE2 but decreases proinflammatory genes expression in mesenteric artery of spontaneously hypertensive rats

    PubMed Central

    Majumder, Kaustav; Liang, Guanxiang; Chen, Yanhong; Guan, LeLuo; Davidge, Sandra T.

    2015-01-01

    Scope Egg ovotransferrin‐derived angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory peptide IRW was previously shown to reduce blood pressure in spontaneously hypertensive rats through reduced vascular inflammation and increased nitric oxide‐mediated vasorelaxation. The main objective of the present study was to investigate the molecular mechanism of this peptide through transcriptome analysis by RNAseq technique. Methods and results Total RNA was extracted from kidney and mesenteric arteries; the RNAseq libraries (from untreated and IRW‐treated groups) were constructed and subjected to sequence using HiSeq 2000 system (Illumina) system. A total of 12 764 and 13 352 genes were detected in kidney and mesenteric arteries, respectively. The differentially expressed (DE) genes between untreated and IRW‐treated groups were identified and the functional analysis through ingenuity pathway analysis revealed a greater role of DE genes identified from mesenteric arteries than that of kidney in modulating various cardiovascular functions. Subsequent qPCR analysis further confirmed that IRW significantly increased the expression of ACE‐2, ABCB‐1, IRF‐8, and CDH‐1 while significantly decreased the expression ICAM‐1 and VCAM‐1 in mesenteric arteries. Conclusion Our research showed for the first time that ACE inhibitory peptide IRW could contribute to its antihypertensive activity through increased ACE2 and decreased proinflammatory genes expression. PMID:26016560

  13. Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE-I/D) polymorphism frequency in Brazilian soccer players.

    PubMed

    Coelho, Daniel Barbosa; Pimenta, Eduardo; Rosse, Izinara Cruz; Veneroso, Christiano; Pussieldi, Guilherme; Becker, Lenice Kapes; Carvalho, Maria-Raquel; Silami-Garcia, Emerson

    2016-06-01

    This study aimed to analyze the angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE-I/D) allelic and genotypic frequencies in Brazilian soccer players of different ages. The study group comprised 353 players from first-division clubs in the under (U)-14, U-15, U-17, U-20, and professional categories. The allelic and genotypic frequencies did not differ significantly in any of the categories between the group of players and the control group. This was the first study of ACE-I/D polymorphism in Brazilian soccer players. PMID:27232187

  14. Deletion of the aceE gene (encoding a component of pyruvate dehydrogenase) attenuates Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis.

    PubMed

    Pang, Ervinna; Tien-Lin, Chang; Selvaraj, Madhan; Chang, Jason; Kwang, Jimmy

    2011-10-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis) is a major food-borne pathogen. From a transposon insertion mutant library created previously using S. Enteritidis 10/02, one of the mutants was identified to have a 50% lethal dose (LD(50) ) at least 100 times that of the parental strain in young chicks, with an attenuation in a poorly studied gene encoding a component of pyruvate dehydrogenase, namely the aceE gene. Evaluation of the in vitro virulence characteristics of the ΔaceE∷kan mutant revealed that it was less able to invade epithelial cells, less resistant to reactive oxygen intermediate, less able to survive within a chicken macrophage cell line and had a retarded growth rate compared with the parental strain. Young chicks vaccinated with 2 × 10(9) CFU of the ΔaceE∷kan mutant were protected from the subsequent challenge of the parental strain, with the mutant colonized in the liver and spleen in a shorter time than the group infected with the parental strain. In addition, compared with the parental strain, the ΔaceE∷kan mutant did not cause persistent eggshell contamination of vaccinated hens.

  15. Angiotensin converting enzyme gene polymorphism in familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy patients

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, B; Peric, S.; Ross, D.

    1994-09-01

    An insertion/deletion (I/D) polymorphism of the angiotensin I converting enzyme (ACE) gene is a useful predictor of human plasma ACE levels. ACE levels tend to be lowest in subjects with ACE genotype DD and intermediate in subjects with ACE genotype ID. Angiotensin II (Ang II) as a product of ACE is a cardiac growth factor and produces a marked hypertrophy of the chick myocyte in cell culture. Rat experiments also suggest that a small dose of ACE inhibitor that does not affect the afterload results in prevention or regression of cardiac hypertrophy. In order to study the relationship of ACE and the severity of hypertrophy, the ACE genotype has been determined in 28 patients with a clinical diagnosis of familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (FHC) and 51 normal subjects. The respective frequencies of I and D alleles were: 0.52 and 0.48 (in FHC patients) and 0.44 and 0.56 (in the normal controls). There was no significant difference in the allele frequencies between FHC and normal subjects ({chi}{sup 2}=0.023, p>0.05). The II, ID, and DD genotypes were present in 7, 15, and 6 FHC patients, respectively. The averages of maximal thickness of the interventricular septum measured by echocardiography or at autopsy were 18 {plus_minus}3, 19{plus_minus}4, and 19{plus_minus}3 mm in II, ID and DD genotypes, respectively. The ACE gene polymorphism did not correlate with the severity of left ventricular hypertrophy in FHC patients (r{sub s}=0.231, p>0.05). These results do not necessarily exclude the possible effect of Ang II on the hypertrophy since the latter may be produced through the action of chymase in the human ventricles. However, ACE gene polymorphism is not a useful predictor of the severity of myocardial hypertrophy in FHC patients.

  16. New Perspectives in the Renin-Angiotensin-Aldosterone System (RAAS) II: Albumin Suppresses Angiotensin Converting Enzyme (ACE) Activity in Human

    PubMed Central

    Fagyas, Miklós; Úri, Katalin; Siket, Ivetta M.; Fülöp, Gábor Á.; Csató, Viktória; Daragó, Andrea; Boczán, Judit; Bányai, Emese; Szentkirályi, István Elek; Maros, Tamás Miklós; Szerafin, Tamás; Édes, István; Papp, Zoltán; Tóth, Attila

    2014-01-01

    About 8% of the adult population is taking angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors to treat cardiovascular disease including hypertension, myocardial infarction and heart failure. These drugs decrease mortality by up to one-fifth in these patients. We and others have reported previously that endogenous inhibitory substances suppress serum ACE activity, in vivo, similarly to the ACE inhibitor drugs. Here we have made an effort to identify this endogenous ACE inhibitor substance. ACE was crosslinked with interacting proteins in human sera. The crosslinked products were immunoprecipitated and subjected to Western blot. One of the crosslinked products was recognized by both anti-ACE and anti-HSA (human serum albumin) antibodies. Direct ACE-HSA interaction was confirmed by binding assays using purified ACE and HSA. HSA inhibited human purified (circulating) and human recombinant ACE with potencies (IC50) of 5.7±0.7 and 9.5±1.1 mg/mL, respectively. Effects of HSA on the tissue bound native ACE were tested on human saphenous vein samples. Angiotensin I evoked vasoconstriction was inhibited by HSA in this vascular tissue (maximal force with HSA: 6.14±1.34 mN, without HSA: 13.54±2.63 mN), while HSA was without effects on angiotensin II mediated constrictions (maximal force with HSA: 18.73±2.17 mN, without HSA: 19.22±3.50 mN). The main finding of this study is that HSA was identified as a potent physiological inhibitor of the ACE. The enzymatic activity of ACE appears to be almost completely suppressed by HSA when it is present in its physiological concentration. These data suggest that angiotensin I conversion is limited by low physiological ACE activities, in vivo. PMID:24691203

  17. Automated multi-step purification protocol for Angiotensin-I-Converting-Enzyme (ACE).

    PubMed

    Eisele, Thomas; Stressler, Timo; Kranz, Bertolt; Fischer, Lutz

    2012-12-12

    Highly purified proteins are essential for the investigation of the functional and biochemical properties of proteins. The purification of a protein requires several steps, which are often time-consuming. In our study, the Angiotensin-I-Converting-Enzyme (ACE; EC 3.4.15.1) was solubilised from pig lung without additional detergents, which are commonly used, under mild alkaline conditions in a Tris-HCl buffer (50mM, pH 9.0) for 48h. An automation of the ACE purification was performed using a multi-step protocol in less than 8h, resulting in a purified protein with a specific activity of 37Umg(-1) (purification factor 308) and a yield of 23.6%. The automated ACE purification used an ordinary fast-protein-liquid-chromatography (FPLC) system equipped with two additional switching valves. These switching valves were needed for the buffer stream inversion and for the connection of the Superloop™ used for the protein parking. Automated ACE purification was performed using four combined chromatography steps, including two desalting procedures. The purification methods contained two hydrophobic interaction chromatography steps, a Cibacron 3FG-A chromatography step and a strong anion exchange chromatography step. The purified ACE was characterised by sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and native-PAGE. The estimated monomer size of the purified glycosylated ACE was determined to be ∼175kDa by SDS-PAGE, with the dimeric form at ∼330kDa as characterised by a native PAGE using a novel activity staining protocol. For the activity staining, the tripeptide l-Phe-Gly-Gly was used as the substrate. The ACE cleaved the dipeptide Gly-Gly, releasing the l-Phe to be oxidised with l-amino acid oxidase. Combined with peroxidase and o-dianisidine, the generated H(2)O(2) stained a brown coloured band. This automated purification protocol can be easily adapted to be used with other protein purification tasks. PMID:23217308

  18. An ace-1 gene duplication resorbs the fitness cost associated with resistance in Anopheles gambiae, the main malaria mosquito

    PubMed Central

    Assogba, Benoît S.; Djogbénou, Luc S.; Milesi, Pascal; Berthomieu, Arnaud; Perez, Julie; Ayala, Diego; Chandre, Fabrice; Makoutodé, Michel; Labbé, Pierrick; Weill, Mylène

    2015-01-01

    Widespread resistance to pyrethroids threatens malaria control in Africa. Consequently, several countries switched to carbamates and organophophates insecticides for indoor residual spraying. However, a mutation in the ace-1 gene conferring resistance to these compounds (ace-1R allele), is already present. Furthermore, a duplicated allele (ace-1D) recently appeared; characterizing its selective advantage is mandatory to evaluate the threat. Our data revealed that a unique duplication event, pairing a susceptible and a resistant copy of the ace-1 gene spread through West Africa. Further investigations revealed that, while ace-1D confers less resistance than ace-1R, the high fitness cost associated with ace-1R is almost completely suppressed by the duplication for all traits studied. ace-1 duplication thus represents a permanent heterozygote phenotype, selected, and thus spreading, due to the mosaic nature of mosquito control. It provides malaria mosquito with a new evolutionary path that could hamper resistance management. PMID:26434951

  19. Role of ACE and AGT gene polymorphisms in genetic susceptibility to diabetes mellitus type 2 in a Brazilian sample.

    PubMed

    Wollinger, L M; Dal Bosco, S M; Rempe, C; Almeida, S E M; Berlese, D B; Castoldi, R P; Arndt, M E; Contini, V; Genro, J P

    2015-12-29

    The aim of the current study was to investigate the association between the InDel polymorphism in the angiotensin I-converting enzyme gene (ACE) and the rs699 polymorphism in the angiotensinogen gene (AGT) and diabetes mellitus type 2 (DM2) in a sample population from Southern Brazil. A case-control study was conducted with 228 patients with DM2 and 183 controls without DM2. The ACE InDel polymorphism was genotyped by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with specific primers, followed by electrophoresis on 1.5% agarose gel. The AGT rs699 polymorphism was genotyped using a real-time PCR assay. No significant association between the ACE InDel polymorphism and DM2 was detected (P = 0.97). However, regarding the AGT rs699 polymorphism, DM2 patients had a significantly higher frequency of the AG genotype and lower frequency of the GG genotype when compared to the controls (P = 0.03). Our results suggest that there is an association between the AGT rs699 polymorphism and DM2 in a Brazilian sample.

  20. Synthesis and biological studies of highly concentrated lisinopril-capped gold nanoparticles for CT tracking of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghann, William E.; Aras, Omer; Fleiter, Thorsten; Daniel, Marie-Christine

    2011-05-01

    For patients with a history of heart attack or stroke, the prevention of another cardiovascular or cerebrovascular event is crucial. The development of cardiac and pulmonary fibrosis has been associated with overexpression of tissue angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE). Recently, gold nanoparticles (GNPs) have shown great potential as X-ray computed tomography (CT) contrast agents. Since lisinopril is an ACE inhibitor, it has been used as coating on GNPs for targeted imaging of tissue ACE in prevention of fibrosis. Herein, lisinopril-capped gold nanoparticles (LIS-GNPs) were synthesized up to a concentration of 55 mgAu/mL. Their contrast was measured using CT and the results were compared to Omnipaque, a commonly used iodine-based contrast agent. The targeting ability of these LIS-GNPs was also assessed.

  1. Angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) mediates influenza H7N9 virus-induced acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Yang, Penghui; Gu, Hongjing; Zhao, Zhongpeng; Wang, Wei; Cao, Bin; Lai, Chengcai; Yang, Xiaolan; Zhang, LiangYan; Duan, Yueqiang; Zhang, Shaogeng; Chen, Weiwen; Zhen, Wenbo; Cai, Maosheng; Penninger, Josef M; Jiang, Chengyu; Wang, Xiliang

    2014-11-13

    Since March 2013, the emergence of an avian-origin influenza A (H7N9) virus has raised concern in China. Although most infections resulted in respiratory illness, some severe cases resulted in acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), which is a severe form of acute lung injury (ALI) that further contributes to morbidity. To date, no effective drugs that improve the clinical outcome of influenza A (H7N9) virus-infected patients have been identified. Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) and ACE2 are involved in several pathologies such as cardiovascular functions, renal disease, and acute lung injury. In the current study, we report that ACE2 could mediate the severe acute lung injury induced by influenza A (H7N9) virus infection in an experimental mouse model. Moreover, ACE2 deficiency worsened the disease pathogenesis markedly, mainly by targeting the angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1). The current findings demonstrate that ACE2 plays a critical role in influenza A (H7N9) virus-induced acute lung injury, and suggest that might be a useful potential therapeutic target for future influenza A (H7N9) outbreaks.

  2. Lysozyme and bilirubin bind to ACE and regulate its conformation and shedding

    PubMed Central

    Danilov, Sergei M.; Lünsdorf, Heinrich; Akinbi, Henry T.; Nesterovitch, Andrew B.; Epshtein, Yuliya; Letsiou, Eleftheria; Kryukova, Olga V.; Piegeler, Tobias; Golukhova, Elena Z.; Schwartz, David E.; Dull, Randal O.; Minshall, Richard D.; Kost, Olga A.; Garcia, Joe G. N.

    2016-01-01

    Angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) hydrolyzes numerous peptides and is a critical participant in blood pressure regulation and vascular remodeling. Elevated tissue ACE levels are associated with increased risk for cardiovascular and respiratory disorders. Blood ACE concentrations are determined by proteolytic cleavage of ACE from the endothelial cell surface, a process that remains incompletely understood. In this study, we identified a novel ACE gene mutation (Arg532Trp substitution in the N domain of somatic ACE) that increases blood ACE activity 7-fold and interrogated the mechanism by which this mutation significantly increases blood ACE levels. We hypothesized that this ACE mutation disrupts the binding site for blood components which may stabilize ACE conformation and diminish ACE shedding. We identified the ACE-binding protein in the blood as lysozyme and also a Low Molecular Weight (LMW) ACE effector, bilirubin, which act in concert to regulate ACE conformation and thereby influence ACE shedding. These results provide mechanistic insight into the elevated blood level of ACE observed in patients on ACE inhibitor therapy and elevated blood lysozyme and ACE levels in sarcoidosis patients. PMID:27734897

  3. Shedding of the germinal angiotensin I-converting enzyme (gACE) involves a serine protease and is activated by epididymal fluid.

    PubMed

    Thimon, Véronique; Métayer, Sonia; Belghazi, Maya; Dacheux, Françoise; Dacheux, Jean-Louis; Gatti, Jean-Luc

    2005-11-01

    The present report describes how the soluble germinal angiotensin I-converting enzyme (gACE) appears in the epididymal fluid, where it has been identified in some laboratory rodents and domestic ungulates. We showed that this gACE results from an active proteolytic process that releases the enzyme's extracellular domain from sperm in a precise spatiotemporal location during epididymal transit and that this process involves serine protease activity. Using polyclonal antibodies against the C-terminal intracellular sequence of ACE, a fragment of approximately 10 kDa was detected on the sperm extract only in the epididymal region, where the gACE release occurs. The fluid enzyme was purified, and the cleavage site was determined by mass spectrometry to be between Arg622 and Leu623 of the mature sheep gACE sequence (equivalent to Arg627 and Arg1203 of the human mature gACE and somatic ACE sequences, respectively). Thereafter, the C-terminal Arg was removed, leaving Ala621 as a C-terminal. Using an in vitro assay, gACE cleavage from sperm was strongly increased by the presence of epididymal fluid from the release zone, and this increase was inhibited specifically by the serine protease-inhibitor AEBSF but not by para-aminobenzamidine. None of the other inhibitors tested, such as metallo- or cystein-protease inhibitors, had a similar effect on release. It was also found that this process did not involve changes in gACE phosphorylation. PMID:15987822

  4. The association between ace gene variation and aerobic capacity in winter endurance disciplines.

    PubMed

    Orysiak, J; Zmijewski, P; Klusiewicz, A; Kaliszewski, P; Malczewska-Lenczowska, J; Gajewski, J; Pokrywka, A

    2013-12-01

    The aim of the study was to examine the possible relationship between I/D polymorphism of ACE gene and selected indices of aerobic capacity among male and female athletes practising winter endurance sports. Sixty-six well-trained athletes (female n = 26, male n = 40), aged 18.4 ± 2.8 years, representing winter endurance sports (cross-country skiing, n = 48; biathlon, n = 8; Nordic combined, n = 10) participated in the study. Genotyping for ACE I/D polymorphism was performed using polymerase chain reaction. Maximal oxygen consumption (VO2max), maximal running velocity (Vmax) and running velocity at anaerobic threshold (VAT4) were determined in an incremental test to volitional exhaustion on a motorized treadmill. The ACE genotype had no significant effect on absolute VO2max, relative VO2max (divided by body mass or fat free body mass), VAT4 or Vmax. No interaction effect of gender x ACE genotype was found for each of the examined aerobic capacity indices. ACE gene variation was not found to be a determinant of aerobic capacity in either female or male Polish, well-trained endurance athletes participating in winter sports.

  5. Angiotensin-I Converting Enzyme (ACE) Inhibitory and Anti-Oxidant Activities of Sea Cucumber (Actinopyga lecanora) Hydrolysates.

    PubMed

    Ghanbari, Raheleh; Zarei, Mohammad; Ebrahimpour, Afshin; Abdul-Hamid, Azizah; Ismail, Amin; Saari, Nazamid

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, food protein-derived hydrolysates have received considerable attention because of their numerous health benefits. Amongst the hydrolysates, those with anti-hypertensive and anti-oxidative activities are receiving special attention as both activities can play significant roles in preventing cardiovascular diseases. The present study investigated the angiotensin-I converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory and anti-oxidative activities of Actinopyga lecanora (A. lecanora) hydrolysates, which had been prepared by alcalase, papain, bromelain, flavourzyme, pepsin, and trypsin under their optimum conditions. The alcalase hydrolysate showed the highest ACE inhibitory activity (69.8%) after 8 h of hydrolysis while the highest anti-oxidative activities measured by 2,2-diphenyl 1-1-picrylhydrazyl radical scavenging (DPPH) (56.00%) and ferrous ion-chelating (FIC) (59.00%) methods were exhibited after 24 h and 8 h of hydrolysis, respectively. The ACE-inhibitory and anti-oxidative activities displayed dose-dependent trends, and increased with increasing protein hydrolysate concentrations. Moreover, strong positive correlations between angiotensin-I converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory and anti-oxidative activities were also observed. This study indicates that A. lecanora hydrolysate can be exploited as a source of functional food owing to its anti-oxidant as well as anti-hypertension functions. PMID:26690117

  6. Angiotensin-I Converting Enzyme (ACE) Inhibitory and Anti-Oxidant Activities of Sea Cucumber (Actinopyga lecanora) Hydrolysates

    PubMed Central

    Ghanbari, Raheleh; Zarei, Mohammad; Ebrahimpour, Afshin; Abdul-Hamid, Azizah; Ismail, Amin; Saari, Nazamid

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, food protein-derived hydrolysates have received considerable attention because of their numerous health benefits. Amongst the hydrolysates, those with anti-hypertensive and anti-oxidative activities are receiving special attention as both activities can play significant roles in preventing cardiovascular diseases. The present study investigated the angiotensin-I converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory and anti-oxidative activities of Actinopyga lecanora (A. lecanora) hydrolysates, which had been prepared by alcalase, papain, bromelain, flavourzyme, pepsin, and trypsin under their optimum conditions. The alcalase hydrolysate showed the highest ACE inhibitory activity (69.8%) after 8 h of hydrolysis while the highest anti-oxidative activities measured by 2,2-diphenyl 1-1-picrylhydrazyl radical scavenging (DPPH) (56.00%) and ferrous ion-chelating (FIC) (59.00%) methods were exhibited after 24 h and 8 h of hydrolysis, respectively. The ACE-inhibitory and anti-oxidative activities displayed dose-dependent trends, and increased with increasing protein hydrolysate concentrations. Moreover, strong positive correlations between angiotensin-I converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory and anti-oxidative activities were also observed. This study indicates that A. lecanora hydrolysate can be exploited as a source of functional food owing to its anti-oxidant as well as anti-hypertension functions. PMID:26690117

  7. Tissue and plasma angiotensin converting enzyme and the response to ACE inhibitor drugs.

    PubMed Central

    MacFadyen, R J; Lees, K R; Reid, J L

    1991-01-01

    1. There is a body of circumstantial and direct evidence supporting the existence and functional importance of a tissue based RAS at a variety of sites. 2. The relation between circulatory and tissue based systems is complex. The relative importance of the two in determining haemodynamic effects is unknown. 3. Despite the wide range of ACE inhibitors already available, it remains unclear whether there are genuine differences related to tissue specificity. 4. Pathological states such as chronic cardiac failure need to be explored with regard to the contribution of tissue based ACE activities in generating acute and chronic haemodynamic responses to ACE inhibitors. 5. The role of tissue vs plasma ACE activity may be clarified by study of the relation between drug concentration and haemodynamic effect, provided that the temporal dissociation is examined and linked to circulating and tissue based changes in ACE activity, angiotensin peptides and sympathetic hormones. PMID:1849731

  8. Discovery of new angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors from medicinal plants to treat hypertension using an in vitro assay

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background and purpose of the study Angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors plays a critical role in treating hypertension. The purpose of the present investigation was to evaluate ACE inhibition activity of 50 Iranian medicinal plants using an in vitro assay. Methods The ACE activity was evaluated by determining the hydrolysis rate of substrate, hippuryl-L-histidyl-L-leucine (HHL), using reverse phase high performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC). Total phenolic content and antioxidant activity were determined by Folin-Ciocalteu colorimetric method and DPPH radical scavenging assay respectively. Results Six extracts revealed > 50% ACE inhibition activity at 330 μg/ml concentration. They were Berberis integerrima Bunge. (Berberidaceae) (88.2 ± 1.7%), Crataegus microphylla C. Koch (Rosaceae) (80.9 ± 1.3%), Nymphaea alba L. (Nymphaeaceae) (66.3 ± 1.2%), Onopordon acanthium L. (Asteraceae) (80.2 ± 2.0%), Quercus infectoria G. Olivier. (Fagaceae) (93.9 ± 2.5%) and Rubus sp. (Rosaceae) (51.3 ± 1.0%). Q. infectoria possessed the highest total phenolic content with 7410 ± 101 mg gallic acid/100 g dry plant. Antioxidant activity of Q. infectoria (IC50 value 1.7 ± 0.03 μg/ml) was more than that of BHT (IC50 value of 10.3 ± 0.15 μg/ml) and Trolox (IC50 value of 3.2 ± 0.06 μg/ml) as the positive controls. Conclusions In this study, we introduced six medicinal plants with ACE inhibition activity. Despite the high ACE inhibition and antioxidant activity of Q. infectoria, due to its tannin content (tannins interfere in ACE activity), another plant, O. acanthium, which also had high ACE inhibition and antioxidant activity, but contained no tannin, could be utilized in further studies for isolation of active compounds. PMID:24359711

  9. Yeasts from Colombian Kumis as source of peptides with Angiotensin I converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory activity in milk.

    PubMed

    Chaves-López, Clemencia; Tofalo, Rosanna; Serio, Annalisa; Paparella, Antonello; Sacchetti, Giampiero; Suzzi, Giovanna

    2012-09-17

    This study investigated the possibility of using yeast strains in fermented milks to obtain products with high Angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory activity and low bitter taste. Ninety-three yeast strains isolated from Colombian Kumis in different geographic regions were molecularly identified, and their milk fermentation performances were determined. Molecular identification evidenced that Galactomyces geotrichum, Pichia kudriavzevii, Clavispora lusitaniae and Candida tropicalis, were the dominant species. Eighteen out of 93 strains produced fermented milk with ACE-inhibitory (ACEI) activity values ranging from 8.69 to 88.19%. Digestion of fermented milk samples by pepsin and pancreatin demonstrated an increase in ACEI activity, with C. lusitaniae KL4A as the best producer of ACEI peptides. Moreover, sensory analysis of the products containing the major ACE-inhibitory activity pointed out that P. kudriavzevii KL84A and Kluyveromyces marxianus KL26A could be selected as potential adjunct starter cultures in Kumis, since they made a considerable contribution to the ACE inhibitory activity and produced fermented milk without bitter taste. In this study we observed that Colombian Kumis can be an excellent vehicle for the isolation of yeasts with a potential to enhance bioactive peptides produced during milk fermentation. PMID:22938834

  10. Angiotensin I converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory activity of hetero-chitooligosaccharides prepared from partially different deacetylated chitosans.

    PubMed

    Park, Pyo-Jam; Je, Jae-Young; Kim, Se-Kwon

    2003-08-13

    Angiotensin I converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory activity of hetero-chitooligosaccharides (hetero-COSs) prepared from partially different deacetylated chitosans was investigated. Partially deacetylated chitosans, 90, 75, and 50% deacetylated chitosan, were prepared from crab chitin by N-deacetylation with 40% sodium hydroxide solution for durations. In addition, nine kinds of hetero-COSs with relatively high molecular masses (5000-10 000 Da; 90-HMWCOSs, 75-HMWCOSs, and 50-HMWCOSs), medium molecular masses (1000-5000 Da; 90-MMWCOSs, 75-MMWCOSs, and 50-MMWCOSs), and low molecular masses (below 1000 Da; 90-LMWCOSs, 75-LMWCOSs, and 50-LMWCOSs) were prepared using an ultrafiltration membrane bioreactor system. ACE inhibitory activity of hetero-COSs was dependent on the degree of deacetylation of chitosans. 50-MMWCOSs that are COSs hydrolyzed from 50% deacetylated chitosan, the relatively lowest degree of deacetylation, exhibited the highest ACE inhibitory activity, and the IC(50) value was 1.22 +/- 0.13 mg/mL. In addition, the ACE inhibition pattern of the 50-MMWCOSs was investigated by Lineweaver-Burk plots, and the inhibition pattern was found to be competitive.

  11. The role of ACE2 in cardiovascular physiology.

    PubMed

    Oudit, Gavin Y; Crackower, Michael A; Backx, Peter H; Penninger, Josef M

    2003-04-01

    The renin-angiotensin system (RAS) is critically involved in cardiovascular and renal function and in disease conditions, and has been shown to be a far more complex system than initially thought. A recently discovered homologue of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE)--ACE2--appears to negatively regulate the RAS. ACE2 cleaves Ang I and Ang II into the inactive Ang 1-9 and Ang 1-7, respectively. ACE2 is highly expressed in kidney and heart and is especially confined to the endothelium. With quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping, ACE2 was defined as a QTL on the X chromosome in rat models of hypertension. In these animal models, kidney ACE2 messenger RNA and protein expression were markedly reduced, making ACE2 a candidate gene for this QTL. Targeted disruption of ACE2 in mice failed to elicit hypertension, but resulted in severe impairment in myocardial contractility with increased angiotensin II levels. Genetic ablation of ACE in the ACE2 null mice rescued the cardiac phenotype. These genetic data show that ACE2 is an essential regulator of heart function in vivo. Basal renal morphology and function were not altered by the inactivation of ACE2. The novel role of ACE2 in hydrolyzing several other peptides-such as the apelin peptides, opioids, and kinin metabolites-raises the possibility that peptide systems other than angiotensin and its derivatives also may have an important role in regulating cardiovascular and renal function.

  12. Association of ACE Gene I/D polymorphism with migraine in Kashmiri population

    PubMed Central

    Wani, Irfan Yousuf; Sheikh, Saleem; Shah, Zafar Amin; Pandith, Arshid A.; Wani, Mushtaq; Asimi, Ravouf; Wani, Maqbool; Sheikh, Shahnawaz; Mehraj, Iqra

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Migraine is a complex, recurrent headache disorder that is one of the most common complaints in neurology practice. The role of various genes in its pathogenesis is being studied. We did this study to see whether an association exists between ACE gene I/D polymorphism and migraine in our region. Materials and Methods: The study included 100 patients diagnosed with migraine and 121 healthy controls. The study subject were age and gender matched. The analysis was based on Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) and included following steps: DNA extraction from blood, PCR and Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (RFLP). Results: Out of 100 cases, 69 were females and 31 were males. Fifty-seven were having migraine without aura and 43 had migraine with aura. 45 of the cases had II polymorphism, 40 had ID polymorphism and 15 had DD polymorphism in ACE gene. Conclusion: We were not able to find a statistically significant association between ACE gene I/D polymorphism with migraine. The reason for difference in results between our study and other studies could be because of different ethnicity in study populations. So a continuous research is needed in this regard in order to find the genes and different polymorphism that increase the susceptibility of Kashmiri population to migraine. PMID:27011636

  13. Expression of Magnaporthe grisea Avirulence Gene ACE1 Is Connected to the Initiation of Appressorium-Mediated Penetration▿

    PubMed Central

    Fudal, Isabelle; Collemare, Jérôme; Böhnert, Heidi U.; Melayah, Delphine; Lebrun, Marc-Henri

    2007-01-01

    Magnaporthe grisea is responsible for a devastating fungal disease of rice called blast. Current control of this disease relies on resistant rice cultivars that recognize M. grisea signals corresponding to specific secreted proteins encoded by avirulence genes. The M. grisea ACE1 avirulence gene differs from others, since it controls the biosynthesis of a secondary metabolite likely recognized by rice cultivars carrying the Pi33 resistance gene. Using a transcriptional fusion between ACE1 promoter and eGFP, we showed that ACE1 is only expressed in appressoria during fungal penetration into rice and barley leaves, onion skin, and cellophane membranes. ACE1 is almost not expressed in appressoria differentiated on Teflon and Mylar artificial membranes. ACE1 expression is not induced by cellophane and plant cell wall components, demonstrating that it does not require typical host plant compounds. Cyclic AMP (cAMP) signaling mutants ΔcpkA and Δmac1 sum1-99 and tetraspanin mutant Δpls1::hph differentiate melanized appressoria with normal turgor but are unable to penetrate host plant leaves. ACE1 is normally expressed in these mutants, suggesting that it does not require cAMP signaling or a successful penetration event. ACE1 is not expressed in appressoria of the buf1::hph mutant defective for melanin biosynthesis and appressorial turgor. The addition of hyperosmotic solutes to buf1::hph appressoria restores appressorial development and ACE1 expression. Treatments of young wild-type appressoria with actin and tubulin inhibitors reduce both fungal penetration and ACE1 expression. These experiments suggest that ACE1 appressorium-specific expression does not depend on host plant signals but is connected to the onset of appressorium-mediated penetration. PMID:17142568

  14. Evaluation of Association of ADRA2A rs553668 and ACE I/D Gene Polymorphisms with Obesity Traits in the Setapak Population, Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    Shunmugam, Vicneswari; Say, Yee-How

    2016-01-01

    Background α-adrenergic receptor 2A (ADRA2A) and angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) genes have been variably associated with obesity and its related phenotypes in different populations worldwide. Objectives This cross-sectional study aims to investigate the association of adrenergic receptor α2A (ADRA2A) rs553668 and angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) I/D single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with obesity traits (body mass index-BMI; waist-hip ratio-WHR; total body fat percentage - TBF) in a Malaysian population. Materials and Methods Demographic and clinical variables were initially collected from 230 subjects via convenience sampling among residents and workers in Setapak, Malaysia, but in the end only 214 multi-ethnic Malaysians (99 males; 45 Malays, 116 ethnic Chinese, and 53 ethnic Indians) were available for statistical analysis. Genotyping was performed by polymerase chain reaction using DNA extracted from mouthwash samples. Results The overall minor allele frequencies (MAFs) for ADRA2A rs553668 and ACE I/D were 0.55 and 0.56, respectively. Allele distribution of ACE I/D was significantly associated with ethnicity and WHR class. Logistic regression analysis showed that subjects with the ACE II genotype and I allele were, respectively, 2.15 and 1.55 times more likely to be centrally obese, but when adjusted for age and ethnicity, this association was abolished. Covariate analysis controlling for age, gender, and ethnicity also showed similar results, where subjects carrying the II genotype or I allele did not have significantly higher WHR. Combinatory genotype and allele analysis for ADRA2A rs553668 and ACE I/D showed that subjects with both ADRA2A rs553668 GG and ACE I/D II genotypes had significant lowest WHR compared to other genotype combinations. Conclusions The ACE II genotype might be a protective factor against central adiposity risk among the Malaysian population when in combination with the ADRA2A rs553668 GG genotype. PMID:27186390

  15. Nephroprotective effects of b-carotene on ACE gene expression, oxidative stress and antioxidant status in thioacetamide induced renal toxicity in rats.

    PubMed

    Fazal, Yumna; Fatima, Syeda Nuzhat; Shahid, Syed Muhammad; Mahboob, Tabassum

    2016-07-01

    β -carotene is one of carotenoid natural pigments, which are produced by plants and are accountable for the bright colors of various fruits and vegetables. These pigments have been widely studied for their ability to prevent chronic diseases and toxicities. This study was designed to evaluate the effects of β-carotene on angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) gene expression, oxidative stress and antioxidant status in thioacetamide induced renal toxicity. Total 24 albino wistar rats of male sex (200-250gm) were divided into 6 groups as Group-1: The control remained untreated; Group-2: Received thioacetamide (200mg/kg b.w; i.p) for 12 weeks; Group-3: Received β-carotene orally (200mg/kg b.w), for 24 weeks; and Group-4: Received thioacetamide (200mg/kg b.w; i.p) for 12 weeks + received β-carotene orally (200mg/kg b.w), for further 12 weeks. The expression of ACE gene in thioacetamide induced renal toxicity in rats as well as supplemented with β-carotene was investigated and compared their level with control groups by using the quantitative RT-PCR method. The ACE gene expression was significantly increase in TAA rats as compare to control rats specifies that TAA induced changes in ACE gene of kidney, elevated renal ACE has been correlated with increase hypertensive end organ renal damage. The quantity of ACE gene were diminish in our rats who received β-Carotene after TAA is administered, for this reason they seemed to be defended against increased ACE levels in kidney bought by TAA. In pre- and post-treatment groups, we studied the role of β-Carotene against thioacetamide in the kidney of Wistar rats. Experimental confirmation from our study illustrates that β-Carotene can certainly work as a successful radical-trapping antioxidant our results proved that TAA injury increased lipid peroxidation and diminish antioxidant GSH, SOD and CAT in renal tissue. Since β-Carotene administration recover renal lipid peroxidation and antioxidants, it give the impression that

  16. Association of polymorphisms in angiotensin-converting enzyme gene with gestational diabetes mellitus in Indian women

    PubMed Central

    Aggarwal, Parul; Agarwal, Nutan; Das, Nibhriti; Dalal, Krishna

    2016-01-01

    Background: Numerous genes have been reported in relation with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), but the findings were not consistently replicated across populations, or there have been no detailed studies on them. Previous literatures suggested that, out of all angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) gene polymorphisms, only ACE insertion/deletion (I/D) gene polymorphism has a strong association with GDM in Asian Indian women. Aim: This study was devoted to evaluate the association of four single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) ACE A240T, C1237T, G2350A and I/D with GDM and Type 2 diabetes mellitus. Materials and Methods: This study recruited 105 GDM cases, 119 Type 2 diabetes mellitus subjects and 120 controls. PCR-RFLP was used for identifying genotypes of ACE A240T, C1237T and G2350A and PCR was performed in the case of ACE I/D. Results: Significant associations of ACE SNP's, C1237T, and G2350A with GDM were observed. Haplotype analysis revealed the remarkably significant evidence of association with SNP combination ACE A240T, C1237T, G2350A, and I/D with GDM patients (P = 0.024). Individuals possessing haplotype “TTAI” (frequency 30% in GDM and 0 in controls) derived from these SNPs had 185 fold increased risk of developing GDM (95% of confidence interval: 11.13–3102.15), which was highest when compared with other 15 haplotypes. Conclusion: Shorter-range haplotypes were also significant, but the only consistently associated alleles were found to be in ACE C1237T, G2350A, and I/D. These results suggested that the variant in close proximity to ACE C1237T, G2350A and/or I/D modulates susceptibility to GDM and noninsulin dependent diabetes mellitus in Indian women. PMID:26958520

  17. Relationship between angiotensin I-converting enzyme insertion/deletion gene polymorphism and retinal vein occlusion

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the association between angiotensin I-converting enzyme insertion/deletion (ACE I/D) gene polymorphism and retinal vein occlusion (RVO). A total of 80 patients with retinal vein occlusion who was admitted to the Eye Department of Kartal Training and Research Hospital between 2008 and 2011, and 80 subjects were enrolled in this retrospective case–control study. Patients who experienced RVO within one week to six months of study enrolment were included, and those with coronary artery diseases, prior myocardial infarction history and coagulation disturbances were excluded from the study. The diagnosis was made by ophthalmoscopic fundus examination and fluorescein angiography. The ACE gene I/D polymorphism was determined by polymerase chain reaction, and the ACE gene was classified into three types: I/I, I/D and D/D. In multivariate logistic regression analysis, ACE D/D genotype (p = 0.035), diabetes-mellitus (p = 0.019) and hypertension (p = 0.001) were found to be independent predictive factors for RVO. The results of the present study reveal that ACE D/D polymorphism is an independent predictive factor for RVO. However, one cannot definitely conclude that ACE gene polymorphism is a risk factor for retinal vein occlusion. PMID:25161389

  18. Hypotensive, Angiotensin Converting Enzyme (ACE) Inhibitory and Diuretic Activities of the Aqueous-methanol Extract of Ipomoea reniformis

    PubMed Central

    Jabeen, Qaiser; Aslam, Naveed

    2013-01-01

    Ipomoea reniformis Roxb. (Convolvulaceae) is a small, weedy herb used for the management of cardiac problems in traditional systems of medicine in India and Pakistan. Objective of the present study was to investigate the hypotensive, diuretic and angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory activities of the aqueous-methanol (30:70) crude extract of the dried aerial parts of I. reniformis (Ir.Cr.) in rats. To record blood pressure lowering effects of the Ir.Cr, different doses of the extract were administered through jugular vein to the ketamine-diazepam anesthetized normotensive rats and blood pressure was recorded via carotid artery. ACE inhibitory activity of the extract was studied in-vitro; using hippuryl-l-histidyl-l-leucine as substrate, the product hippurate was quantified spectrophotometrically after reacting with cyanuric chloride/dioxane reagent. Effects of intraperitoneal administration of the extract on urine and urinary electrolyte excretion were also investigated in rats. The extract (Ir.Cr.) produced 21.51 ± 3.41, 28.99 ± 2.30, 53.34 ± 0.88 and 61.71 ± 3.37% fall in mean arterial blood pressure of the anesthetized rats at the doses of 0.1, 0.3, 1.0 and 3.0 mg/Kg, respectively. Ir.Cr. was found to have serum ACE inhibitory activity, with IC50 value of 422 ± 21.16 μg/mL. The extract also increased urine volume and urinary Na+ excretion significantly at the doses of 30 and 50 mg/Kg in rats. The study concludes that the crude extract of Ipomoea reniformis (Ir.Cr.) has hypotensive, ACE inhibitory and diuretic activities, which provide the scientific justification for the traditional uses of the plant as cardioprotective, antihypertensive and diuretic remedy. PMID:24523757

  19. ACE blood test

    MedlinePlus

    Serum angiotensin-converting enzyme; SACE ... Chernecky CC, Berger BJ. Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) - blood. In: Chernecky CC, Berger BJ, eds. Laboratory Tests and Diagnostic Procedures . 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2013:138-139.

  20. Functional study on the mutations in the silkworm (Bombyx mori) acetylcholinesterase type 1 gene (ace1) and its recombinant proteins.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ju-mei; Wang, Bin-bin; Xie, Yi; Sun, Shan-shan; Gu, Zhi-ya; Ma, Lie; Li, Fan-chi; Zhao, Yi-fan; Yang, Bin; Shen, Wei-de; Li, Bing

    2014-01-01

    The acetylcholinesterase of Lepidoptera insects is encoded by two genes, ace1 and ace2. The expression of the ace1 gene is significantly higher than that of the ace2 gene, and mutations in ace1 are one of the major reasons for pesticide resistance in insects. In order to investigate the effects of the mutations in ace1's characteristic sites on pesticide resistance, we generated mutations for three amino acids using site-directed mutagenesis, which were Ala(GCG)303Ser(TCG), Gly(GGA)329Ala(GCA) and Leu (TCT)554Ser(TTC). The Baculovirus expression system was used for the eukaryotic expression of the wild type ace1 (wace1) and the mutant ace1 (mace1). SDS-PAGE and Western blotting were used to detect the targeting proteins with expected sizeof about 76 kDa. The expression products were purified for the determination of AChE activity and the inhibitory effects of physostigmine and phoxim. We observed no significant differences in the overall activity of the wild type and mutant AChEs. However, with 10 min of physostigmine (10 μM) inhibition, the remaining activity of the wild type AChE was significantly lower than that of the mutant AChE. Ten min inhibition with 33.4 μM phoxim also resulted in significantly lower remaining activity of the wild type AChE than that of the mutant AChE. These results indicated that mutations for the three amino acids reduced the sensitivity of AChE to physostigmine and phoxim, which laid the foundation for future in vivo studies on AChE's roles in pesticide resistance.

  1. The binding of metal ions and angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor by 13C NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakamoto, Yohko; Sakamoto, Yuko; Ishii, Tomoko; Ohmoto, Taichi

    1991-06-01

    Enalaprilat (MK-422, 1- [ N- [1 (S)-carboxy-3-phenylpropyl]- L-alanyl]- L-proline (1)) and Lisinopril (MK521, N- N- [ (s)-l-carboxy-3- phenylpropyl]- L-lysyl- L-proline, (2)) exhibit the capacity to act as a chelate, unidentate or bridge towards metal ions in aqueous solution, as determined by 13C NMR. By adding metal ions, in the series of Zn 2+, Ni 2+, Pb 2+, Pd 2+ and Cd 2+, the active site of the ACE inhibitor was well defined. MK-521 was more influenced by nuclei that were distant from the active site than MK-422.

  2. Insertion/deletion polymorphism in intron 16 of ACE gene in idiopathic recurrent spontaneous abortion: case-control study, systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Pereza, Nina; Ostojić, Saša; Zdravčević, Matea; Volk, Marija; Kapović, Miljenko; Peterlin, Borut

    2016-02-01

    The insertion/deletion (I/D) polymorphism in intron 16 of the angiotensin I-converting enzyme gene (ACE) has been extensively studied as a predisposing factor for idiopathic recurrent spontaneous abortion (IRSA). A case-control study including 149 women with ≥3 spontaneous abortions and 149 controls was performed to test the association of ACE I/D polymorphism with IRSA. A systematic review was conducted of previous case-control studies, with strict selection criteria for meta-analyses. We also aimed to evaluate the potential differences in summary estimates between studies defining IRSA as ≥2 and ≥3 spontaneous abortions. Genotyping was performed by PCR, and systematic review conducted using PubMed and Scopus. There was no association of the polymorphism with IRSA in Slovenian women. Sixteen case-control studies, showing substantial differences regarding IRSA definition and selection criteria for women were identified. Meta-analysis was performed and included four studies defining IRSA as ≥2 spontaneous abortions and the current study, which defined IRSA as ≥3 spontaneous abortions. Based on random effects model, meta-analysis conducted on 1192 patients and 736 controls showed no association with IRSA under dominant(DD+IDvsII) and recessive(DDvsID+II) genetic models. Well-designed studies are needed to evaluate the role of ACE I/D polymorphism in IRSA defined as ≥3 spontaneous abortions. PMID:26673102

  3. Insertion/deletion polymorphism in intron 16 of ACE gene in idiopathic recurrent spontaneous abortion: case-control study, systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Pereza, Nina; Ostojić, Saša; Zdravčević, Matea; Volk, Marija; Kapović, Miljenko; Peterlin, Borut

    2016-02-01

    The insertion/deletion (I/D) polymorphism in intron 16 of the angiotensin I-converting enzyme gene (ACE) has been extensively studied as a predisposing factor for idiopathic recurrent spontaneous abortion (IRSA). A case-control study including 149 women with ≥3 spontaneous abortions and 149 controls was performed to test the association of ACE I/D polymorphism with IRSA. A systematic review was conducted of previous case-control studies, with strict selection criteria for meta-analyses. We also aimed to evaluate the potential differences in summary estimates between studies defining IRSA as ≥2 and ≥3 spontaneous abortions. Genotyping was performed by PCR, and systematic review conducted using PubMed and Scopus. There was no association of the polymorphism with IRSA in Slovenian women. Sixteen case-control studies, showing substantial differences regarding IRSA definition and selection criteria for women were identified. Meta-analysis was performed and included four studies defining IRSA as ≥2 spontaneous abortions and the current study, which defined IRSA as ≥3 spontaneous abortions. Based on random effects model, meta-analysis conducted on 1192 patients and 736 controls showed no association with IRSA under dominant(DD+IDvsII) and recessive(DDvsID+II) genetic models. Well-designed studies are needed to evaluate the role of ACE I/D polymorphism in IRSA defined as ≥3 spontaneous abortions.

  4. Interactions of angiotensin-converting enzyme, kinins and nitric oxide in circulation and the beneficial effects of ACE inhibitors in cardiovascular diseases.

    PubMed

    Magen, E; Viskoper, R J

    2000-12-01

    Renin-angiotensin-aldosterone systems play a critical role in the development and progression of cardiovascular diseases, and inhibitors of angiotensin-converting enzyme have proven effective for the treatment of these diseases. Since angiotensin II receptor antagonists can inhibit the effects of angiotensin II via ACE-independent pathways, e.g., chymase, they were considered to be more effective than ACEIs. On the other hand, ACE inhibitors can increase bradykinin, and thus, nitric oxide, which may cause potent cardioprotection, inhibition of smooth muscle proliferation and attenuation of inflammation mechanisms. It appears that angiotensin II receptor antagonists and ACEIs may mediate cardioprotection in different ways. This is the rationale to explore the possibility of a combined administration of both drugs for the treatment of chronic heart failure and other cardiovascular pathology. In this review we try to analyze the role of ACE, kinins and chymase inhibition in the pathophysiology and treatment of cardiovascular diseases.

  5. ACE and AGTR1 polymorphisms in elite rhythmic gymnastics.

    PubMed

    Di Cagno, Alessandra; Sapere, Nadia; Piazza, Marina; Aquino, Giovanna; Iuliano, Enzo; Intrieri, Mariano; Calcagno, Giuseppe

    2013-02-01

    In the angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) gene, Alu deletion, in intron 16, is associated with higher concentrations of ACE serum activity and this may be associated with elite sprint and power performance. The Alu insertion is associated with lower ACE levels and this could lead to endurance performance. Moreover, recent studies have identified a single-nucleotide polymorphism of the angiotensin type 1 receptor gene AGTR1, which seems to be related to ACE activity. The aim of this study was to examine the involvement of the ACE and the AGTR1 gene polymorphisms in 28 Italian elite rhythmic gymnasts (age range 21 ± 7.6 years), and compare them to 23 middle level rhythmic gymnasts (age range 17 ± 10.9 years). The ACE D allele was significantly more frequent in elite athletes than in the control population (χ(2)=4.07, p=0.04). Comparisons between the middle level and elite athletes revealed significant differences (p<0.0001) for the ACE DD genotype (OR=6.48, 95% confidence interval=1.48-28.34), which was more frequent in elite athletes. There were no significant differences in the AGTR1 A/C genotype or allele distributions between the middle level and elite athletes. In conclusion, the ACE D allele genotype could be a contributing factor to high-performance rhythmic gymnastics that should be considered in athlete development and could help to identify which skills should be trained for talent promotion. PMID:23145508

  6. Transgenic rose lines harboring an antimicrobial protein gene, Ace-AMP1, demonstrate enhanced resistance to powdery mildew ( Sphaerotheca pannosa).

    PubMed

    Li, Xiangqian; Gasic, Ksenjia; Cammue, Bruno; Broekaert, Willem; Korban, Schuyler S

    2003-12-01

    An antimicrobial protein gene, Ace-AMP1, was introduced into Rosa hybrida cv. Carefree Beauty via Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. A total of 500 putative transgenic plants were obtained from 100 primary embryogenic calli co-cultivated with A. tumefaciens following selection on a regeneration medium containing 100 mg/l kanamycin. Polymerase chain reaction analysis of these putative transgenic lines, using primers for both Ace-AMP1 and neomycin phosphotransferase ( npt II) genes, showed that 62% of these plants were positive for both transgenes. These lines were further confirmed for stable integration of Ace-AMP1 and npt II genes by Southern blotting. Transcription of the Ace-AMP1 transgene in various transgenic rose lines was determined using Northern blotting. Transgenic rose lines inoculated with conidial spores of Sphaerotheca pannosa (Wallr.: Fr.) Lev. var. rosae showed enhanced resistance to powdery mildew using both a detached-leaf assay and an in vivo greenhouse whole-plant assay. PMID:14508687

  7. Screening of Zulu medicinal plants for angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Duncan, A C; Jäger, A K; van Staden, J

    1999-12-15

    Twenty plants used by traditional healers in South Africa for the treatment of high blood pressure were investigated for their anti-hypertensive properties, utilizing the angiotensin converting enzyme assay. A hit rate of 65% was achieved, with the highest inhibition (97%) obtained by Adenopodia spicata leaves. A further seven plants exhibited an inhibition greater than 70% and five more over 50%. The leaves of the plants showed the greatest levels of inhibition. There was little difference in the overall hit rate between ethanolic and aqueous extracts, although in most cases there was a marked difference in activity between aqueous and ethanolic extracts from the same species. Plants exhibiting inhibition levels greater than 50% were further tested for the presence of tannins in order to eliminate possible false positives. Active plants that did not contain tannins were Agapanthus africanus, Agave americana, Clausena anisata, Dietes iridioides, Mesembruanthemum spp., Stangeria eriopus and Tulbaghia violacea.

  8. Angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory activity and structural properties of oven- and freeze-dried protein hydrolysate from fresh water fish (Cirrhinus mrigala).

    PubMed

    Elavarasan, K; Shamasundar, B A; Badii, Faraha; Howell, Nazlin

    2016-09-01

    The angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory activity and structural properties of oven-dried (OD-FPH) and freeze-dried (FD-FPH) protein hydrolysates derived from fresh water fish (Cirrhinus mrigala) muscle, using papain, were investigated. Amino acid profiles indicated a higher proportion of hydrophobic residues in OD-FPH and hydrophilic residues in FD-FPH samples. Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectra revealed random coil structure in OD-FPH and β-sheet in FD-FPH samples. The approximate molecular weight of peptides in OD-FPH and FD-FPH was in the range of 7030-339Da. The IC50 values for ACE inhibition by OD-FPH and FD-FPH samples were found to be 1.15 and 1.53mg of proteinml(-1), respectively. The ACE-inhibitory activity of OD-FPH was more stable (during sequential digestion, using pepsin and pancreatin) than that of FD-FPH sample. The study suggested that the ACE inhibitory activity of protein hydrolysate was not affected by oven-drying. PMID:27041318

  9. Angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory activity and structural properties of oven- and freeze-dried protein hydrolysate from fresh water fish (Cirrhinus mrigala).

    PubMed

    Elavarasan, K; Shamasundar, B A; Badii, Faraha; Howell, Nazlin

    2016-09-01

    The angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory activity and structural properties of oven-dried (OD-FPH) and freeze-dried (FD-FPH) protein hydrolysates derived from fresh water fish (Cirrhinus mrigala) muscle, using papain, were investigated. Amino acid profiles indicated a higher proportion of hydrophobic residues in OD-FPH and hydrophilic residues in FD-FPH samples. Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectra revealed random coil structure in OD-FPH and β-sheet in FD-FPH samples. The approximate molecular weight of peptides in OD-FPH and FD-FPH was in the range of 7030-339Da. The IC50 values for ACE inhibition by OD-FPH and FD-FPH samples were found to be 1.15 and 1.53mg of proteinml(-1), respectively. The ACE-inhibitory activity of OD-FPH was more stable (during sequential digestion, using pepsin and pancreatin) than that of FD-FPH sample. The study suggested that the ACE inhibitory activity of protein hydrolysate was not affected by oven-drying.

  10. Malathion Resistance Status and Mutations in Acetylcholinesterase Gene (Ace) in Japanese Encephalitis and Filariasis Vectors from Endemic Area in India.

    PubMed

    Misra, Brij Ranjan; Gore, Milind

    2015-05-01

    Japanese encephalitis (JE) and lymphatic filariasis (LF) are endemic in estern part of Uttar Pradesh in India and transmitted by Culex mosquitoes (Diptera: Culicidae). JE vaccination and mass drug administration for JE and LF management is being undertaken respectively. In addition to this, indoor residual spraying and fogging are used for the control of mosquito vectors. Organophosphate resistance in mosquito is dependent on alteration in acetylcholinesterase (Ace) gene. Hence, it is important to evaluate organophosphate resistance in Culex tritaeniorhynchus Giles (JE vector) and Culex quinquefasciatus Say (LF vector). The current study showed the presence of resistant populations and F331W mutation in Cx. tritaeniorhynchus and G119S mutation in Cx. quinquefasciatus insensitive Ace genes. Resistant populations of these two vectors increase the chances of spreading of resistance in the natural population and may cause failure of intervention programs that include organophosphates against these two vectors in future.

  11. The higher exercise intensity and the presence of allele I of ACE gene elicit a higher post-exercise blood pressure reduction and nitric oxide release in elderly women: an experimental study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The absence of the I allele of the angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) gene has been associated with higher levels of circulating ACE, lower nitric oxide (NO) release and hypertension. The purposes of this study were to analyze the post-exercise salivary nitrite (NO2-) and blood pressure (BP) responses to different exercise intensities in elderly women divided according to their ACE genotype. Methods Participants (n = 30; II/ID = 20 and DD = 10) underwent three experimental sessions: incremental test - IT (15 watts workload increase/3 min) until exhaustion; 20 min exercise 90% anaerobic threshold (90% AT); and 20 min control session without exercise. Volunteers had their BP and NO2- measured before and after experimental sessions. Results Despite both intensities showed protective effect on preventing the increase of BP during post-exercise recovery compared to control, post-exercise hypotension and increased NO2- release was observed only for carriers of the I allele (p < 0.05). Conclusion Genotypes of the ACE gene may exert a role in post-exercise NO release and BP response. PMID:22136292

  12. Expression of angiotensin-converting enzyme mRNA gene in the kidneys of patients with glomerulonephrites.

    PubMed

    Alnahal, Alsayed Ahmed; Khalil, Usama Ahmed; Diab, Magada Alsayed; Zanaty, Ali Fahmy

    2012-09-01

    A little is known about the behavior of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) in glomerulo-nephritis (GN), although it is activated in other models of injury. To study renal angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) gene expression in patients with GN to determine its role in the disease process and other factors that may influence the course of the disease and the prognosis, e.g. treatment with ACE inhibitor (ACEI) drugs, we studied 20 patients with GN allocated to two groups: ten patients received an ACEI drug and ten patients did not receive ACEI in addition to a control group of ten healthy subjects. Routine and special laboratory investigation, histopathological studies and quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis for renal ACE mRNA were done for both the study and the control groups. There was a statistically significant increase in ACE mRNA gene expression in the GN groups than in control group, but no statistically significant difference in ACE mRNA gene expression between the patients group that received and the group that did not receive ACEI. A significant correlation was found between the ACE mRNA gene expression and the mean blood pressure, serum creatinine, blood urea nitrogen and 24-h urinary protein. In conclusion, a higher level of ACE mRNA gene expression in patients suffering from GN may suggest a role of the RAS in the process of GN, perhaps contributing to glomerular hypertrophy and matrix overproduction. The use of ACEI drugs possibly slows the rate of progression of renal failure and plays a role in controlling the pathophysiology.

  13. Angiotensin-converting enzyme gene polymorphisms and hypertension in occupational noise exposure in Egypt

    PubMed Central

    Zawilla, Nermin; Shaker, Dalia; Abdelaal, Amaal; Aref, Wael

    2014-01-01

    Background: The gene–environment interaction in the pathogenesis of hypertension has not been extensively studied in occupational noise. Objectives: The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between noise and hypertension in Egyptian workers, the interaction of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) gene polymorphisms as modifiers, and the possible relationship between noise hearing impairment and hypertension. Methods: Study subjects were divided into two groups depending on noise exposure level. The control group (n = 161) was exposed to noise intensity <85 dB and the exposed group (n = 217) was exposed to noise intensity ≧85 dB. A polymerase chain reaction was used to differentiate the various genotypes of ACE insertion/deletion (I/D) and ACE G2350A. Results: Noise significantly increased the likelihood of hypertension. Carriers of the genotypes AG, GG, and DD were vulnerable to hypertension on noise exposure. No association between hypertension and hearing impairment or noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) was found. Conclusion: Our results support the association between ACE gene polymorphisms and occurrence of hypertension in noise-exposed workers. PMID:25000107

  14. Endothelial nitric oxide synthase, angiotensin-converting enzyme and angiotensinogen gene polymorphisms in hypertensive disorders of pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Pardeep Kumar; Jain, Vanita; Jha, Vivekanand

    2010-05-01

    We investigated the variations in genes encoding endothelial nitric oxide synthase (NOS3), angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) and angiotensinogen (AGT) in hypertensive disorders of pregnancy and the relationship between the polymorphisms and circulating nitric oxide (NO) and ACE levels in pregnant north Indian women. Frequencies of NOS3 G894T, 4b/a and T(-786) --> C, AGT T704C and ACE ins/del polymorphisms were studied in 342 subjects: 120 with preeclampsia (PE), 104 with gestational hypertension and 118 normotensive pregnant women. Variations were evaluated by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism. NO and ACE levels were determined using ELISA. There was no difference in the distribution of individual NOS3 and ACE polymorphisms in the study groups. Haplotype analysis showed a global difference in the NOS3 haplotype distribution between the PE and non-PE subjects (P=0.03). The presence of AGT 704C allele was associated with a reduced risk of developing PE (odds ratio: 0.33, 95% CI: 0.19-0.59 in recessive mode). Circulating total NO and ACE levels were similar in three groups. No relationship was found between circulating NO levels and any of the NOS3 polymorphisms, but the circulating ACE levels were higher in those with DD genotype (P<0.05). In conclusion, there was no association between individual NOS3 and the ACE gene polymorphisms and hypertensive disorders of pregnancy in north Indian women. The presence of minor alleles at all the three sites in NOS3 seemed to increase the risk of PE, and AGT 704C allele was associated with a reduced PE risk. The complexity of interaction between these genetic abnormalities requires further studies. PMID:20186148

  15. Angiotensin-I Converting Enzyme (ACE) Inhibitory and Anti-Hypertensive Effect of Protein Hydrolysate from Actinopyga lecanora (Sea Cucumber) in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Sadegh Vishkaei, Mahdokht; Ebrahimpour, Afshin; Abdul-Hamid, Azizah; Ismail, Amin; Saari, Nazamid

    2016-01-01

    Food protein hydrolysates are known to exhibit angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory properties and can be used as a novel functional food for prevention of hypertension. This study evaluated the ACE inhibitory potentials of Actinopyga lecanora proteolysate (ALP) in vivo. The pre-fed rats with ALP at various doses (200, 400, 800 mg/kg body weight) exhibited a significant (p ≤ 0.05) suppression effect after inducing hypertension. To determine the optimum effective dose that will produce maximal reduction in blood pressure, ALP at three doses was fed to the rats after inducing hypertension. The results showed that the 800 mg/kg body weight dose significantly reduced blood pressure without noticeable negative physiological effect. In addition, there were no observable changes in the rats’ heart rate after oral administration of the ALP. It was concluded that Actinopyga lecanora proteolysate could potentially be used for the development of functional foods and nutraceuticals for prevention and treatment of hypertension. PMID:27706040

  16. Simulated digestion of proanthocyanidins in grape skin and seed extracts and the effects of digestion on the angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory activity.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Katherina; Labra, Javiera

    2013-08-15

    This study investigated the effect of in vitro gastrointestinal digestion on the stability and composition of flavan-3-ols from red grape skin and seed extracts (raw and purified, which are high in proanthocyanidins (PAs)). In addition, the effects of digestion on the angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory activities of these extracts were evaluated. The extracts were digested with a mixture of pepsin-HCl for 2 h, followed by a 2 h incubation with pancreatin and bile salts including a cellulose dialysis tubing (molecular weight cut-off 12 kDa) at 37°C with shaking in the dark and under N2. Under gastric conditions, the mean degree of polymerisation (mDP) of seed extracts, raw (mDP≈6, p<0.05), and purified (mDP≈10, p<0.05) was stable. The mDP of the raw skin extracts increased from 19 to 25 towards the end of the digestion. The PAs were significantly degraded (up to 80%) during the pancreatic digestion, yielding low-molecular-weight compounds that diffused into the serum-available fraction (mDP≈2). The overall mass transfer coefficient (K) of the seed extracts was 10(-7) m(2)/s. After simulated gastrointestinal digestion, over 80% of ACE inhibition by raw seed and skin extracts was preserved. However, the purified seed and skin extracts lost their ability to inhibit ACE after intestinal digestion.

  17. In Vitro and In Vivo Assessment of Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme (ACE) Inhibitory Activity of Fermented Soybean Milk by Lactobacillus casei Strains.

    PubMed

    Bao, Zhijie; Chi, Yujie

    2016-08-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory activity of fermented soybean milk (FSM) by Lactobacillus casei strains in vitro was investigated in this study. Effects of fermented soybean milk administration by gavage on systolic blood pressure and diastolic blood pressure was also evaluated in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) rats and Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats. Results showed that, CICC 20280 and CICC 23184 FSM showed high ACE inhibitory activity in vitro test and ACE inhibitory activity of CICC 23184 FSM was higher than CICC 20280 FSM. The bioactive substances of FSM were peptide and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA). Their contents in CICC 20280 FSM and CICC 23184 FSM were 3.97 ± 0.67 mg/ml (peptide), 1.71 ± 0.36 mg/ml (GABA) and 5.17 ± 0.22 mg/ml (peptide), 1.57 ± 0.21 mg/ml (GABA), respectively. Moreover, CICC 20280 and CICC 23184 FSM administration by gavage could effectively lower the blood pressure of SHR to a normal level, while there was no effect on blood pressure of WKY rats. This result indicated that the bioactive substances could play an antihypertensive role when the blood pressure was not within the normal levels (high levels). PMID:27139252

  18. Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2 (ACE2) Activator Diminazene Aceturate Ameliorates Endotoxin-Induced Uveitis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Yiguo; Shil, Pollob Kumar; Zhu, Ping; Yang, Hongxia; Verma, Amrisha; Lei, Bo; Li, Qiuhong

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. Uveitis is a common cause of vision loss. The renin angiotensin system (RAS), which plays a vital role in cardiovascular system, is a potent mediator of inflammation and has been implicated in the pathogenesis of uveitis. A newly identified axis of RAS, ACE2/Ang-(1-7)/Mas, has emerged as a novel target because it counteracts the deleterious effect of angiotensin II. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of endogenous ACE2 activation in preventing endotoxin-induced uveitis (EIU) in mice. Methods. ACE2 activator diminazene aceturate (DIZE) was administered both systemically and locally. For systemic administration, female BALB/c mice received intraperitoneal injection of DIZE (60 mg/kg body weight [BW]) for 2 days prior to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) intravitreal injection (125 ng) to induce uveitis. For local study, DIZE was given at 0.5, 0.1, and 0 mg/mL as eyedrops six times per day for 2 days before LPS injection. The anterior segment of the mice was examined at 12, 24, 48, and 72 hours after LPS injection, and clinical scores were determined at the same time. Morphology and infiltrating inflammatory cells were evaluated after 24 hours. The mRNA levels of inflammatory cytokines were analyzed by real-time RT-PCR. ACE2 activity was determined using a self-quenching fluorescent substrate. Results. At 24 hours, the clinical score of mice treated with DIZE systemically was significantly lower (mean, ∼1.75) than the saline vehicle group (mean, ∼4) (P < 0.001). Histological examination showed 63.4% reduction of infiltrating inflammatory cells in the anterior segment and 57.4% reduction in the posterior segment of DIZE-treated eyes. The number of CD45+ inflammatory cells in the vitreous of the DIZE-treated group was decreased (43.3%) compared to the vehicle group (P < 0.01). The mRNA levels of inflammatory cytokines were significantly reduced in the DIZE-treated group (P < 0.01, P < 0.001). The number of infiltrating inflammatory cells was

  19. Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Gene Polymophism in Adult Primary Focal Segmental Glomerulosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Mohd, Rozita; Wahab, Zaimi Abdul; Cader, Rizna; Gafor, Halim A.; Radzi, Azizah Md; Shah, Shamsul Azhar; Tong, Norella Kong Chiew

    2014-01-01

    Background Primary focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS) accounts for a third of biopsy-proven primary glomerulonephritis in Malaysia. Pediatric studies have found the insertion/deletion (I/D) polymorphism of the angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) gene to be associated with renal disease progression. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of the ACE (I/D) genotypes in adult primary FSGS and its association with renal outcome on follow-up. Methods Prospective observational study involving primary FSGS patients was conducted. Biochemical and urine tests at the time of study were compared to the time of the diagnosis and disease progression analyzed. ACE gene polymorphism was identified using polymerase chain reaction amplification technique and categorized into II, ID and DD genotypes. Results Forty-five patients with a median follow-up of 3.8 years (interquartile range: 1.8 - 5.6) were recruited. The commonest genotype was II (n = 23, 51.1%) followed by ID (n = 19, 42.2%) and DD (n = 3, 6.7%). The baseline characteristics were comparable between the II and non-II groups at diagnosis and at study recruitment except that the median urine protein-creatinine index was significantly lower in the II group compared to the non-II group (0.02 vs. 0.04 g/mmol (P = 0.03). Regardless of genotypes, all parameters of renal outcome improved after treatment. Conclusion The II followed by ID genotypes were the predominant ACE gene alleles in our FSGS. Although the D allele has been reported to have a negative impact on renal outcome, treatment appeared to be more important than genotype in preserving renal function in this cohort. PMID:24883149

  20. Angiotensin-converting enzymes modulate aphid–plant interactions

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei; Luo, Lan; Lu, Hong; Chen, Shaoliang; Kang, Le; Cui, Feng

    2015-01-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzymes (ACEs) are key components of the renin–angiotensin system in mammals. However, the function of ACE homologs in insect saliva is unclear. Aphids presumably deliver effector proteins via saliva into plant cells to maintain a compatible insect–plant interaction. In this study, we showed that ACE modulates aphid–plant interactions by affecting feeding behavior and survival of aphids on host plants. Three ACE genes were identified from the pea aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum genome. ACE1 and ACE2 were highly expressed in the salivary glands and are predicted to function as secretory proteins. The ACE2 transcript level decreased in aphids fed on artificial diet compared with aphids fed on Vicia faba. The knockdown of the expression of each ACE by RNAi failed to affect aphid survival. When ACE1 and ACE2 were simultaneously knocked down, aphid feeding was enhanced. Aphids required less time to find the phloem sap and showed longer passive ingestion. However, the simultaneous knockdown of ACE1 and ACE2 resulted in a higher mortality rate than the control group when aphids were fed on plants. These results indicated that ACE1 and ACE2 function together to modulate A. pisum feeding and survival on plants. PMID:25744345

  1. Human intestine luminal ACE2 and amino acid transporter expression increased by ACE-inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Vuille-dit-Bille, Raphael N; Camargo, Simone M; Emmenegger, Luca; Sasse, Tom; Kummer, Eva; Jando, Julia; Hamie, Qeumars M; Meier, Chantal F; Hunziker, Schirin; Forras-Kaufmann, Zsofia; Kuyumcu, Sena; Fox, Mark; Schwizer, Werner; Fried, Michael; Lindenmeyer, Maja; Götze, Oliver; Verrey, François

    2015-04-01

    Sodium-dependent neutral amino acid transporter B(0)AT1 (SLC6A19) and imino acid (proline) transporter SIT1 (SLC6A20) are expressed at the luminal membrane of small intestine enterocytes and proximal tubule kidney cells where they exert key functions for amino acid (re)absorption as documented by their role in Hartnup disorder and iminoglycinuria, respectively. Expression of B(0)AT1 was shown in rodent intestine to depend on the presence of the carboxypeptidase angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2). This enzyme belongs to the renin-angiotensin system and its expression is induced by treatment with ACE-inhibitors (ACEIs) or angiotensin II AT1 receptor blockers (ARBs) in many rodent tissues. We show here in the Xenopus laevis oocyte expression system that human ACE2 also functionally interacts with SIT1. To investigate in human intestine the potential effect of ACEIs or ARBs on ACE2, we analysed intestinal biopsies taken during routine gastroduodenoscopy and ileocolonoscopy from 46 patients of which 9 were under ACEI and 13 ARB treatment. Analysis of transcript expression by real-time PCR and of proteins by immunofluorescence showed a co-localization of SIT1 and B(0)AT1 with ACE2 in the brush-border membrane of human small intestine enterocytes and a distinct axial expression pattern of the tested gene products along the intestine. Patients treated with ACEIs displayed in comparison with untreated controls increased intestinal mRNA levels of ACE2, peptide transporter PEPT1 (SLC15A1) and AA transporters B(0)AT1 and PAT1 (SLC36A1). This study unravels in human intestine the localization and distribution of intestinal transporters involved in amino acid absorption and suggests that ACEIs impact on their expression.

  2. Increased angiotensin-I converting enzyme gene expression in the failing human heart. Quantification by competitive RNA polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed Central

    Studer, R; Reinecke, H; Müller, B; Holtz, J; Just, H; Drexler, H

    1994-01-01

    Local activation of the components of the renin angiotensin system in the heart is regarded as an important modulator of cardiac phenotype and function; however, little is known about their presence, regulation, and potential activation in the human heart. To investigate the gene expression of major angiotensin-II-forming enzymes in left ventricles of normal (n = 9) and failing human hearts (n = 20), we established a competitive RNA-polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for mRNA quantification of angiotensin-I converting enzyme (ACE) and human heart chymase. For each gene, competitor RNA targets with small internal deletions were used as internal standards to quantify the original number of transcripts and to control reverse transcription and PCR. In PCR, each target and the corresponding competitor were amplified by competing for the same primer oligonucleotides. The variability of ACE RNA-PCR was 11% indicating a high reproducibility of this method. In addition, ACE mRNA levels obtained by competitive RNA-PCR correlated favorably with traditional slot blot hybridization (r = 0.69, n = 10; P < 0.05). Compared with nonfailing hearts, the number of ACE transcripts referred to 100 ng of total RNA was increased threefold in patients with chronic heart failure (4.2 +/- 2.5 vs. 12.8 +/- 6 x 10(5); P < 0.0005). In contrast, no significant difference was found in chymase gene expression between normal and failing hearts. Thus, the expression of the cardiac ACE but not of human heart chymase is upregulated in failing human heart indicating an activation of the cardiac renin-angiotensin system in patients with advanced heart failure. Images PMID:8040271

  3. SY 12-1 RENIN ANGIOTENSIN PATHWAY BEYOND ACE AND ANGIOTENSIN II RECEPTORS: HOW IT RELATES TO THE PATHOPHYSIOLOGY OF HYPERTENSION.

    PubMed

    Burrell, Louise

    2016-09-01

    The renin-angiotensin system (RAS) plays a major role in the pathogenesis of hypertension, a major risk factor for stroke, coronary events, heart failure and kidney disease. Within the RAS, angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) converts angiotensin (Ang) I into the vasoconstrictor Ang II, which mediates its effects via the angiotensin type 1 receptor (AT1R). An "alternate" arm of the RAS is now known to exist in which the monocarboxypeptidase ACE2 counterbalances the effects of the classic RAS through degradation of the vasoconstrictor peptide, Ang II, and generation of the vasodilatory peptide, Ang 1-7. ACE2 is highly expressed in tissues of cardiovascular relevance including the heart, blood vessels and kidney. The catalytically active ectodomain of ACE2 undergoes shedding resulting in ACE2 in the circulation. The finding that the ACE2 gene maps to a quantitative trait locus on the X chromosome in three strains of genetically hypertensive rats suggests that the ACE2 gene may be a candidate gene for hypertension. It is hypothesised that disruption of tissue ACE/ACE2 balance results in changes in blood pressure, with increased ACE2 expression protecting against increased blood pressure, and ACE2 deficiency contributing to hypertension. Studies in experimental models of hypertension have measured ACE2 gene, protein and/or activity, in either the heart or kidney and/or plasma, usually at one time point, and most commonly in animals with established hypertension. As experimental studies report that deletion or inhibition of ACE2 leads to hypertension, whilst enhancing ACE2 protects against the development of hypertension, increasing or activating ACE2 may be a therapeutic option for the management of high blood pressure in man. There have been relatively few studies of ACE2, either at the gene or the circulating level in patients with hypertension. The available data indicates that plasma ACE2 activity is low in healthy subjects, but elevated in patients with

  4. Absence of cell surface expression of human ACE leads to perinatal death.

    PubMed

    Michaud, Annie; Acharya, K Ravi; Masuyer, Geoffrey; Quenech'du, Nicole; Gribouval, Olivier; Morinière, Vincent; Gubler, Marie-Claire; Corvol, Pierre

    2014-03-15

    Renal tubular dysgenesis (RTD) is a recessive autosomal disease characterized most often by perinatal death. It is due to the inactivation of any of the major genes of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS), one of which is the angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE). ACE is present as a tissue-bound enzyme and circulates in plasma after its solubilization. In this report, we present the effect of different ACE mutations associated with RTD on ACE intracellular trafficking, secretion and enzymatic activity. One truncated mutant, R762X, responsible for neonatal death was found to be an enzymatically active, secreted form, not inserted in the plasma membrane. In contrast, another mutant, R1180P, was compatible with life after transient neonatal renal insufficiency. This mutant was located at the plasma membrane and rapidly secreted. These results highlight the importance of tissue-bound ACE versus circulating ACE and show that the total absence of cell surface expression of ACE is incompatible with life. In addition, two missense mutants (W594R and R828H) and two truncated mutants (Q1136X and G1145AX) were also studied. These mutants were neither inserted in the plasma membrane nor secreted. Finally, the structural implications of these ACE mutations were examined by molecular modelling, which suggested some important structural alterations such as disruption of intra-molecular non-covalent interactions (e.g. salt bridges).

  5. The Pharmacogenetic Footprint of ACE Inhibition: A Population-Based Metabolomics Study

    PubMed Central

    Altmaier, Elisabeth; Menni, Cristina; Heier, Margit; Meisinger, Christa; Thorand, Barbara; Quell, Jan; Kobl, Michael; Römisch-Margl, Werner; Valdes, Ana M.; Mangino, Massimo; Waldenberger, Melanie; Strauch, Konstantin; Illig, Thomas; Adamski, Jerzy; Spector, Tim; Gieger, Christian; Suhre, Karsten; Kastenmüller, Gabi

    2016-01-01

    Angiotensin-I-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors are an important class of antihypertensives whose action on the human organism is still not fully understood. Although it is known that ACE especially cleaves COOH-terminal dipeptides from active polypeptides, the whole range of substrates and products is still unknown. When analyzing the action of ACE inhibitors, effects of genetic variation on metabolism need to be considered since genetic variance in the ACE gene locus was found to be associated with ACE-concentration in blood as well as with changes in the metabolic profiles of a general population. To investigate the interactions between genetic variance at the ACE-locus and the influence of ACE-therapy on the metabolic status we analyzed 517 metabolites in 1,361 participants from the KORA F4 study. We replicated our results in 1,964 individuals from TwinsUK. We observed differences in the concentration of five dipeptides and three ratios of di- and oligopeptides between ACE inhibitor users and non-users that were genotype dependent. Such changes in the concentration affected major homozygotes, and to a lesser extent heterozygotes, while minor homozygotes showed no or only small changes in the metabolite status. Two of these resulting dipeptides, namely aspartylphenylalanine and phenylalanylserine, showed significant associations with blood pressure which qualifies them—and perhaps also the other dipeptides—as readouts of ACE-activity. Since so far ACE activity measurement is substrate specific due to the usage of only one oligopeptide, taking several dipeptides as potential products of ACE into account may provide a broader picture of the ACE activity. PMID:27120469

  6. The Pharmacogenetic Footprint of ACE Inhibition: A Population-Based Metabolomics Study.

    PubMed

    Altmaier, Elisabeth; Menni, Cristina; Heier, Margit; Meisinger, Christa; Thorand, Barbara; Quell, Jan; Kobl, Michael; Römisch-Margl, Werner; Valdes, Ana M; Mangino, Massimo; Waldenberger, Melanie; Strauch, Konstantin; Illig, Thomas; Adamski, Jerzy; Spector, Tim; Gieger, Christian; Suhre, Karsten; Kastenmüller, Gabi

    2016-01-01

    Angiotensin-I-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors are an important class of antihypertensives whose action on the human organism is still not fully understood. Although it is known that ACE especially cleaves COOH-terminal dipeptides from active polypeptides, the whole range of substrates and products is still unknown. When analyzing the action of ACE inhibitors, effects of genetic variation on metabolism need to be considered since genetic variance in the ACE gene locus was found to be associated with ACE-concentration in blood as well as with changes in the metabolic profiles of a general population. To investigate the interactions between genetic variance at the ACE-locus and the influence of ACE-therapy on the metabolic status we analyzed 517 metabolites in 1,361 participants from the KORA F4 study. We replicated our results in 1,964 individuals from TwinsUK. We observed differences in the concentration of five dipeptides and three ratios of di- and oligopeptides between ACE inhibitor users and non-users that were genotype dependent. Such changes in the concentration affected major homozygotes, and to a lesser extent heterozygotes, while minor homozygotes showed no or only small changes in the metabolite status. Two of these resulting dipeptides, namely aspartylphenylalanine and phenylalanylserine, showed significant associations with blood pressure which qualifies them-and perhaps also the other dipeptides-as readouts of ACE-activity. Since so far ACE activity measurement is substrate specific due to the usage of only one oligopeptide, taking several dipeptides as potential products of ACE into account may provide a broader picture of the ACE activity. PMID:27120469

  7. ACE and UCP2 gene polymorphisms and their association with baseline and exercise-related changes in the functional performance of older adults.

    PubMed

    Keogh, Justin W L; Palmer, Barry R; Taylor, Denise; Kilding, Andrew E

    2015-01-01

    Maintaining high levels of physical function is an important aspect of successful ageing. While muscle mass and strength contribute to functional performance in older adults, little is known about the possible genetic basis for the heterogeneity of physical function in older adults and in how older adults respond to exercise. Two genes that have possible roles in determining levels of muscle mass, strength and function in young and older adults are angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) and mitochondrial uncoupling protein 2 (UCP2). This study examined whether polymorphisms in these two individual genes were associated with baseline functional performance levels and/or the training-related changes following exercise in previously untrained older adults. Five-eight Caucasian older adults (mean age 69.8 years) with no recent history of resistance training enrolled in a 12 week program of resistance, balance and cardiovascular exercises aimed at improving functional performance. Performance in 6 functional tasks was recorded at baseline and after 12 weeks. Genomic DNA was assayed for the ACE intron 16 insertion/deletion (I/D) and the UCP2 G-866A polymorphism. Baseline differences among genotype groups were tested using analysis of variance. Genotype differences in absolute and relative changes in physical function among the exercisers were tested using a general linear model, adjusting for age and gender. The genotype frequencies for each of the studied polymorphisms conformed to the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. The ACE I/D genotype was significantly associated with mean baseline measures of handgrip strength (II 30.9 ± 3.01 v. ID 31.7 ± 1.48 v. DD 29.3 ± 2.18 kg, p < 0.001), 8ft Up and Go time (II 6.45 ± 0.48 v. ID/DD 4.41 ± 0.19 s, p < 0.001) and 6 min walk distance (II 458 ± 28.7 v. ID/DD 546 ± 12.1m, p = 0.008). The UCP2 G-866A genotype was also associated with baseline 8ft Up and Go time (GG 5.45 ± 0.35 v. GA 4.47 ± 0.26 v. AA 3.89 ± 0.71 s, p = 0

  8. Interaction between angiotensin-converting enzyme gene insertion/deletion polymorphism and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibition on survival in hemodialyzed patients.

    PubMed

    Kiss, István; Ambrus, Csaba; Kulcsár, Imre; Szegedi, János; Kerkovits, Lóránt; Tislér, András; Kiss, Zoltán

    2014-12-01

    The association between ACE (angiotensin-converting enzyme) gene insertion/deletion (I/D) polymorphism and mortality has been inconsistently observed in earlier studies in patients on maintenance hemodialysis. We hypothesized that the effect of ACE gene I/D polymorphism on mortality may be influenced by concurrent ACE inhibitor therapy in this population. In this prospective, multicenter cohort, observational study, data was collected from 716 prevalent chronic hemodialysis patients, blood samples were genotyped for I/D single nucleotide polymorphism. Patient mortality was assessed in tree genotype groups insertion/insertion, insertion/deletion and deletion/deletion (I/I, I/D, and D/D) using multivariate Cox proportional hazard models. The most frequent genotype was I/D (42.6%), followed by D/D (37.7%) and I/I (19.7%) genotypes. The mean age was 54.9±15.5 years, 53.2% of all patients were male and in the total group the prevalence of diabetes was 19.3%. ACE inhibitor therapy was prescribed for 47.9% of all patients. The median duration of dialysis before blood sampling was 23.8 months (IQR 11.2-47.1). Patients were followed for 10 years, the median follow-up time was 29.8 months (IQR 12.6-63.4). Patient characteristics were well balanced among the genotype groups. D/D genotype, was associated with inferior survival (I/I vs D/D: log-rank test: P=0.04) in patients not receiving ACE inhibitor therapy, and the presence of this therapy diminished this difference. There was no difference in survival among unselected patients with different genotypes. In multivariate Cox regression models, D/D genotype (compared to I/I) was a significant predictor of mortality only in patients without ACE inhibitor therapy (HR 0.67, 95% CI 0.46-0.97, P=0.03). Our data suggests that hemodialyzed patients with the deletion/deletion (D/D) genotype might have inferior outcome, and ACE inhibitor therapy may be associated with improved survival in this subgroup. PMID:25526485

  9. The association between the angiotensin-converting enzyme-2 gene and blood pressure in a cohort study of adolescents

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme-2 (ACE2) gene, located on chromosome X, is believed to be implicated in blood pressure regulation. However the few studies that have examined this association have yielded mixed results. The objective of this study was to assess the association between tag single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the angiotensin-converting enzyme-2 gene with blood pressure and blood pressure change in adolescents. Methods Participants in the Nicotine Dependence in Teens (NDIT) cohort study with blood or saliva samples and at least 3 blood pressure measurements over 5 years were included in the analytic sample (n = 555). Linear growth curve models stratified on sex and ethnicity were used to assess the association between four tag SNPs in the ACE2 gene and systolic (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP), and blood pressure change. Results In males of European descent, rs2074192 and rs233575 were significantly associated with SBP and DBP, and rs2158083 was associated with SBP. In French Canadian males, rs233575 and rs2158083 were significantly associated with DBP. Among females of European descent, rs2074192, rs233575, and rs2158083 were significantly associated with change in SBP over 5 years. Conclusions This is the first study to assess the association between the ACE2 gene with blood pressure and blood pressure change in a cohort of adolescents. Results indicate that several ACE2 gene SNPs are associated with blood pressure or blood pressure change in persons of European descent. However the therapeutic potential of these SNPs should be explored. PMID:24191856

  10. [ANALYSIS OF THE ASSOCIATIONS BETWEEN ANGIOTENSIN-CONVERTING ENZYME GENE POLYMORPHISM AND ARTERIAL HYPOTENSION IN PREMATURE INFANTS WITH EARLY ONSET BACTERIAL INFECTIONS].

    PubMed

    Kovaleva, E; Pokhylko, V; Chernyavskaya, Yu; Kalyuzka, E; Poltoropavlov, V

    2015-11-01

    The rate of neonatal sepsis is not reduced varying inversely proportional to the gestational age at birth, and may reach 60% in the most immature infants. The high mortality rate of this disease and adverse neurological effects are associated with the development of cardiovascular changes and shock. The main leadership role in the regulation of blood pressure and blood volume in the body plays a renin-angiotensin system. Synthesis of angiotensin-converting enzyme is regulated by the ACE gene. The aim of the study was to identify and analyze the associations between the development of arterial hypotension in premature infants and insertion-deletion (I/D) polymorphism of the ACE gene. We conducted a prospective cohort study, which included 118 prematurely born children with early onset bacterial infections (n=57 with clinical manifestations in the form of hypotension, n=61 without hypotension). Both groups were genotyped to determine the insertion-deletion polymorphism ACE gene. We compared the clinical, laboratory and instrumental parameters in premature infants with hypotension and II, ID, DD genotype of the ACE gene. Also an analysis of the associations between different genotypes of ACE gene and the development of arterial hypotension in prematurely born children was conducted. The distribution of neonates in relation to the three polymorphic variants of ACE gene with respect to I/D polymorphism was identical among the study groups. The study found that children with a variety of I/D polymorphic variants of ACE gene had no significant differences in hemodynamic parameters. The rate of hemodynamic support use did not differ in both groups. The study of the associations between the ACE gene polymorphism and major ultrasound, Doppler indices that characterized both systemic and organ hemodynamics, revealed no significant differences in mean values of all the criteria that have been studied. It can be concluded no effect of I/D polymorphism of ACE gene on the

  11. AAV8-Mediated Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2 Gene Delivery Prevents Experimental Autoimmune Uveitis by Regulating MAPK, NF-κB and STAT3 Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Yiguo; Tao, Lifei; Zheng, Shijie; Lin, Ru; Fu, Xinyu; Chen, Zihe; Lei, Chunyan; Wang, Jiaming; Li, Hongwei; Li, Qiuhong; Lei, Bo

    2016-01-01

    Renin angiotensin system (RAS) is a key hormonal system which regulates the cardiovascular function and is implicated in several autoimmune diseases. With the discovery of the angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2), a protective axis of RAS namely ACE2/Ang-(1–7)/Mas that counteracts the deleterious ACE/AngII/AT1R axis has been established. This axis is emerging as a novel target to attenuate ocular inflammation. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms remain unclear. We investigated the hypothesis that enhancing the activity of the protective axis of RAS by subretinal delivery of an AAV8 (Y733F)-ACE2 vector would protect against the ocular inflammation in experimental autoimmune uveitis (EAU) mice through regulating the local immune responses. Our studies demonstrated that increased ACE2 expression exerts protective effects on inflammation in EAU mouse by modulating ocular immune responses, including the differentiation of Th1/Th17 cells and the polarization of M1/M2 macrophages; whereas the systemic immune responses appeared not affected. These effects were mediated by activating the Ang-(1–7)/Mas and inhibiting the MAPK, NF-κB and STAT3 signaling pathways. This proof-of-concept study suggests that activation of ocular ACE2/Ang-(1–7)/Mas axis with AAV gene transfer modulates local immune responses and may be a promising, long-lasting therapeutic strategy for refractory and recurrent uveitis, as well as other inflammatory eye diseases. PMID:27558087

  12. Angiotensin I - Converting Enzyme Gene Polymorphism and Activity in Patients with Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Stankovic, Aleksandra; Asanin, Milika; Jovanovic-Markovic, Zagorka; Alavantic, Dragan; Majkic-Singh, Nada

    2011-01-01

    The possible association of ACE polymorphism with ischemic stroke (IS) was evaluated in 65 patients with IS and 330 age and BMI-matched controls. ACE genotypes were determined by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). There was no significant difference in ACE genotype/allele frequencies between case and control group (p>0.05). Patients with D allele had 4,7 times higher risk for large vessel IS than healthy persons D allele possessors. Persons with D allele had 9.2 times higher risk for large vessel disease than small vessel disease. These data suggest a possible association of ACE gene polymorphism with pathogenesis of large vessel IS.

  13. Early genes induction in spontaneously hypertensive rats left ventricle with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors but not hydralazine

    SciTech Connect

    Susic, D.; Aristizabal, D.J.; Prakash, O.; Nunez, E.; Frohlich, E.D.

    1995-12-01

    Spontaneously hypertensive rats were given an angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor (benazepril or quinapril) or hydralazine and were left for up to 6 hr. To examine whether administration of antihypertensive agents affects expression of immediate early genes in left ventricular myocardium, groups of rats were sacrificed at 1, 3, and 6 hr after dosing; total RNA was extracted from left ventricular tissue and analyzed by blot hybridization technique using labeled probes for c-myc, c-fos, and GAPDH mRNA. All three antihypertensive agents reduced pressure similarly, and treatment with the two ACE inhibitors increased c-fos and c-myc mRNA expression in left ventriculum. By contrast, hydralazine did not increase steady-state mRNA expression of either proto-oncogene. Thus, in parallel with the pressure fall, acute administration of the ACE inhibitors induced expression of c-fos and c-myc mRNAs in the left ventricle. Since the equidepressor dose of hyralazine did not affect expression of these proto-oncogenes, this effect of ACE inhibitors is independent of their hemodynamic action. 27 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  14. Association analysis of ACE, ACTN3 and PPARGC1A gene polymorphisms in two cohorts of European strength and power athletes

    PubMed Central

    Jakaitiene, A; Aksenov, MO; Aksenova, AV; Druzhevskaya, AM; Astratenkova, IV; Egorova, ES; Gabdrakhmanova, LJ; Tubelis, L; Kucinskas, V; Utkus, A

    2016-01-01

    The performance of professional strength and power athletes is influenced, at least partly, by genetic components. The main aim of this study was to investigate individually and in combination the association of ACE (I/D), ACTN3 (R577X) and PPARGC1A (Gly482Ser) gene polymorphisms with strength/power-oriented athletes’ status in two cohorts of European athletes. A cohort of European Caucasians from Russia and Lithuania (161 athletes: by groups – weightlifters (87), powerlifters (60), throwers (14); by elite status – ‘elite’ (104), ‘sub-elite’ (57); and 1,202 controls) were genotyped for ACE, ACTN3 and PPARGC1A polymorphisms. Genotyping was performed by polymerase chain reaction and/or restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis. Statistically significant differences in ACTN3 (R577X) allele/genotype distribution were not observed in the whole cohort of athletes or between analysed groups separately when compared with controls. The odds ratio for athletes compared to controls of the ACE I/I genotype was 1.71 (95% CI 1.01-2.92) in the Russian cohort and for the ACE I/D genotype it was 2.35 (95% CI 1.10-5.06) in the Lithuanian cohort. The odds ratio of being a powerlifter in PPARGC1A Ser/Ser genotype carriers was 2.11 (95% CI: 1.09-4.09, P = 0.026). The ACTN3 (R577X) polymorphism is not associated with strength/power athletic status in two cohorts of European athletes. The ACE I/I genotype is probably the ‘preferable genotype’ for Russian athletes and the ACE I/D genotype for Lithuanian strength/power athletes. We found that the PPARGC1A (Gly482Ser) polymorphism is associated with strength/power athlete status. Specifically, the PPARGC1A Ser/Ser genotype is more favourable for powerlifters compared to controls. PMID:27601773

  15. Association analysis of ACE, ACTN3 and PPARGC1A gene polymorphisms in two cohorts of European strength and power athletes.

    PubMed

    Gineviciene, V; Jakaitiene, A; Aksenov, M O; Aksenova, A V; Druzhevskaya, A M; Astratenkova, I V; Egorova, E S; Gabdrakhmanova, L J; Tubelis, L; Kucinskas, V; Utkus, A

    2016-09-01

    The performance of professional strength and power athletes is influenced, at least partly, by genetic components. The main aim of this study was to investigate individually and in combination the association of ACE (I/D), ACTN3 (R577X) and PPARGC1A (Gly482Ser) gene polymorphisms with strength/power-oriented athletes' status in two cohorts of European athletes. A cohort of European Caucasians from Russia and Lithuania (161 athletes: by groups - weightlifters (87), powerlifters (60), throwers (14); by elite status - 'elite' (104), 'sub-elite' (57); and 1,202 controls) were genotyped for ACE, ACTN3 and PPARGC1A polymorphisms. Genotyping was performed by polymerase chain reaction and/or restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis. Statistically significant differences in ACTN3 (R577X) allele/genotype distribution were not observed in the whole cohort of athletes or between analysed groups separately when compared with controls. The odds ratio for athletes compared to controls of the ACE I/I genotype was 1.71 (95% CI 1.01-2.92) in the Russian cohort and for the ACE I/D genotype it was 2.35 (95% CI 1.10-5.06) in the Lithuanian cohort. The odds ratio of being a powerlifter in PPARGC1A Ser/Ser genotype carriers was 2.11 (95% CI: 1.09-4.09, P = 0.026). The ACTN3 (R577X) polymorphism is not associated with strength/power athletic status in two cohorts of European athletes. The ACE I/I genotype is probably the 'preferable genotype' for Russian athletes and the ACE I/D genotype for Lithuanian strength/power athletes. We found that the PPARGC1A (Gly482Ser) polymorphism is associated with strength/power athlete status. Specifically, the PPARGC1A Ser/Ser genotype is more favourable for powerlifters compared to controls. PMID:27601773

  16. Association analysis of ACE, ACTN3 and PPARGC1A gene polymorphisms in two cohorts of European strength and power athletes

    PubMed Central

    Jakaitiene, A; Aksenov, MO; Aksenova, AV; Druzhevskaya, AM; Astratenkova, IV; Egorova, ES; Gabdrakhmanova, LJ; Tubelis, L; Kucinskas, V; Utkus, A

    2016-01-01

    The performance of professional strength and power athletes is influenced, at least partly, by genetic components. The main aim of this study was to investigate individually and in combination the association of ACE (I/D), ACTN3 (R577X) and PPARGC1A (Gly482Ser) gene polymorphisms with strength/power-oriented athletes’ status in two cohorts of European athletes. A cohort of European Caucasians from Russia and Lithuania (161 athletes: by groups – weightlifters (87), powerlifters (60), throwers (14); by elite status – ‘elite’ (104), ‘sub-elite’ (57); and 1,202 controls) were genotyped for ACE, ACTN3 and PPARGC1A polymorphisms. Genotyping was performed by polymerase chain reaction and/or restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis. Statistically significant differences in ACTN3 (R577X) allele/genotype distribution were not observed in the whole cohort of athletes or between analysed groups separately when compared with controls. The odds ratio for athletes compared to controls of the ACE I/I genotype was 1.71 (95% CI 1.01-2.92) in the Russian cohort and for the ACE I/D genotype it was 2.35 (95% CI 1.10-5.06) in the Lithuanian cohort. The odds ratio of being a powerlifter in PPARGC1A Ser/Ser genotype carriers was 2.11 (95% CI: 1.09-4.09, P = 0.026). The ACTN3 (R577X) polymorphism is not associated with strength/power athletic status in two cohorts of European athletes. The ACE I/I genotype is probably the ‘preferable genotype’ for Russian athletes and the ACE I/D genotype for Lithuanian strength/power athletes. We found that the PPARGC1A (Gly482Ser) polymorphism is associated with strength/power athlete status. Specifically, the PPARGC1A Ser/Ser genotype is more favourable for powerlifters compared to controls.

  17. A Modern Understanding of the Traditional and Nontraditional Biological Functions of Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Ong, Frank S.; Blackwell, Wendell-Lamar B.; Shah, Kandarp H.; Giani, Jorge F.; Gonzalez-Villalobos, Romer A.; Shen, Xiao Z.; Fuchs, Sebastien

    2013-01-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) is a zinc-dependent peptidase responsible for converting angiotensin I into the vasoconstrictor angiotensin II. However, ACE is a relatively nonspecific peptidase that is capable of cleaving a wide range of substrates. Because of this, ACE and its peptide substrates and products affect many physiologic processes, including blood pressure control, hematopoiesis, reproduction, renal development, renal function, and the immune response. The defining feature of ACE is that it is composed of two homologous and independently catalytic domains, the result of an ancient gene duplication, and ACE-like genes are widely distributed in nature. The two ACE catalytic domains contribute to the wide substrate diversity of ACE and, by extension, the physiologic impact of the enzyme. Several studies suggest that the two catalytic domains have different biologic functions. Recently, the X-ray crystal structure of ACE has elucidated some of the structural differences between the two ACE domains. This is important now that ACE domain-specific inhibitors have been synthesized and characterized. Once widely available, these reagents will undoubtedly be powerful tools for probing the physiologic actions of each ACE domain. In turn, this knowledge should allow clinicians to envision new therapies for diseases not currently treated with ACE inhibitors. PMID:23257181

  18. The Association Analysis between ACE and ACTN3 Genes Polymorphisms and Endurance Capacity in Young Cross-Country Skiers: Longitudinal Study

    PubMed Central

    Mägi, Agnes; Unt, Eve; Prans, Ele; Raus, Liina; Eha, Jaan; Veraksitš, Alar; Kingo, Külli; Kõks, Sulev

    2016-01-01

    Endurance performance depends on the integration of several phenotypic traits influenced by multiple environmental and genetic factors. Objectives of the study were: (1) to examine the genotypic frequencies of the ACE I/D, ACTN3 R577X polymorphisms and endurance performance-related phenotypes, (2) to evaluate the dynamics of endurance performance parameters during a 5-year period in relation to ACE I/D and ACTN3 R577X genotypes in Estonian young skiers. Determination of VO2peak was performed in 58 skiers aged 15-19 years (41 males, 17 females) during a 5-year period. The control group consisted of 322 healthy non-athletic subjects (145 males, 177 females). The study groups were genotyped for the ACE I/D and ACTN3 R577X variants. Frequencies of the ACE ID and ACTN3 RR genotypes were significantly higher (p = 0.047 and p = 0.003, respectively) and the RX genotype was lower (p = 0.008) in young male skiers compared with controls. A significant relationship was found between change (Δ) of training volume and ΔVO2peak (mL·kg-1·min-1) (r = 0.475, p = 0.002). No significant main effect was detected between VO2peak (mL·kg-1·min-1) dynamics (comparison with the previous age group data) and ACE I/D and ACTN3 R577X genotypes interactions (F = 0.571, p = 0.770 and F = 0.650 and p = 0.705, respectively) in all young skiers. Study results indicated a significantly higher frequency of the ACE ID and ACTN3 RR genotypes among Estonian young male skiers compared with the male control group. Significant genotype-related differences in dynamics of VO2peak during a 5-year period were not found. In the future, longitudinal research including different gene variants may contribute to a better understanding of the nature of endurance performance. Key points Significantly higher prevalence of the ACE ID and the ACTN3 RR genotypes were found among Estonian young male skiers compared with the male control group, which may be an advantage for the explosive speed and power capacity in

  19. The Association Analysis between ACE and ACTN3 Genes Polymorphisms and Endurance Capacity in Young Cross-Country Skiers: Longitudinal Study.

    PubMed

    Mägi, Agnes; Unt, Eve; Prans, Ele; Raus, Liina; Eha, Jaan; Veraksitš, Alar; Kingo, Külli; Kõks, Sulev

    2016-06-01

    Endurance performance depends on the integration of several phenotypic traits influenced by multiple environmental and genetic factors. Objectives of the study were: (1) to examine the genotypic frequencies of the ACE I/D, ACTN3 R577X polymorphisms and endurance performance-related phenotypes, (2) to evaluate the dynamics of endurance performance parameters during a 5-year period in relation to ACE I/D and ACTN3 R577X genotypes in Estonian young skiers. Determination of VO2peak was performed in 58 skiers aged 15-19 years (41 males, 17 females) during a 5-year period. The control group consisted of 322 healthy non-athletic subjects (145 males, 177 females). The study groups were genotyped for the ACE I/D and ACTN3 R577X variants. Frequencies of the ACE ID and ACTN3 RR genotypes were significantly higher (p = 0.047 and p = 0.003, respectively) and the RX genotype was lower (p = 0.008) in young male skiers compared with controls. A significant relationship was found between change (Δ) of training volume and ΔVO2peak (mL·kg(-1)·min(-1)) (r = 0.475, p = 0.002). No significant main effect was detected between VO2peak (mL·kg(-1)·min(-1)) dynamics (comparison with the previous age group data) and ACE I/D and ACTN3 R577X genotypes interactions (F = 0.571, p = 0.770 and F = 0.650 and p = 0.705, respectively) in all young skiers. Study results indicated a significantly higher frequency of the ACE ID and ACTN3 RR genotypes among Estonian young male skiers compared with the male control group. Significant genotype-related differences in dynamics of VO2peak during a 5-year period were not found. In the future, longitudinal research including different gene variants may contribute to a better understanding of the nature of endurance performance. Key pointsSignificantly higher prevalence of the ACE ID and the ACTN3 RR genotypes were found among Estonian young male skiers compared with the male control group, which may be an advantage for the explosive speed and power

  20. Genes Encoding Enzymes Involved in Ethanol Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Hurley, Thomas D.; Edenberg, Howard J.

    2012-01-01

    The effects of beverage alcohol (ethanol) on the body are determined largely by the rate at which it and its main breakdown product, acetaldehyde, are metabolized after consumption. The main metabolic pathway for ethanol involves the enzymes alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH). Seven different ADHs and three different ALDHs that metabolize ethanol have been identified. The genes encoding these enzymes exist in different variants (i.e., alleles), many of which differ by a single DNA building block (i.e., single nucleotide polymorphisms [SNPs]). Some of these SNPs result in enzymes with altered kinetic properties. For example, certain ADH1B and ADH1C variants that are commonly found in East Asian populations lead to more rapid ethanol breakdown and acetaldehyde accumulation in the body. Because acetaldehyde has harmful effects on the body, people carrying these alleles are less likely to drink and have a lower risk of alcohol dependence. Likewise, an ALDH2 variant with reduced activity results in acetaldehyde buildup and also has a protective effect against alcoholism. In addition to affecting drinking behaviors and risk for alcoholism, ADH and ALDH alleles impact the risk for esophageal cancer. PMID:23134050

  1. High Incidence of ACE/PAI-1 in Association to a Spectrum of Other Polymorphic Cardiovascular Genes Involving PBMCs Proinflammatory Cytokines in Hypertensive Hypercholesterolemic Patients: Reversibility with a Combination of ACE Inhibitor and Statin

    PubMed Central

    Mouawad, Charbel; Haddad, Katia; Hamoui, Samar; Azar, Albert; Fajloun, Ziad; Makdissy, Nehman

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) are significantly high in the Lebanese population with the two most predominant forms being atherosclerosis and venous thrombosis. The purpose of our study was to assess the association of a spectrum of CVD related genes and combined state of hypertension hypercholesterolemia (HH) in unrelated Lebanese. Twelve polymorphisms were studied by multiplex PCR and reverse hybridization of DNA from 171 healthy individuals and 144 HH subjects. Two genes were significantly associated with HH: ACE (OR: 9.20, P<0.0001) and PAI-1 (OR: 2.29, P = 0.007), respectively with the occurrence of the risky alleles “Del” and “4G”. The frequencies of the Del and 4G alleles were found to be 0.98 and 0.90 in the HH group versus 0.84 and 0.79 in the healthy group, respectively. Serum ACE activity and PAI-I increased significantly with Del/Del and 4G/5G genotypes. The co-expression of Del/4G(+/+) was detected in 113 out of 171 (66.0%) controls and 125 out of 144 (86.8%) HH subjects. Del/4G(-/-) was detected in only 6 (3.5%) controls and undetected in the HH group. Three venous thrombosis related genes [FV(Leiden), MTHFR(A1298C) and FXIII(V34L)] were significantly related to the prominence of the co-expression of Del/4G(+/+). A range of 2 to 8 combined polymorphisms co-expressed per subject where 5 mutations were the most detected. In Del/4G(+/+) subjects, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) produced significant elevated levels of IFN-γ and TNF-α contrary to IL-10, and no variations occurred for IL-4. ACE inhibitor (ramipril) in combination with statin (atorvastatin) and not alone reversed significantly the situation. This first report from Lebanon sheds light on an additional genetic predisposition of a complex spectrum of genes involved in CVD and suggests that the most requested gene FVL by physicians may not be sufficient to diagnose eventual future problems that can occur in the cardiovascular system. Subjects expressing the double mutations

  2. Membrane-associated zinc peptidase families: comparing ACE and ACE2.

    PubMed

    Guy, J L; Lambert, D W; Warner, F J; Hooper, N M; Turner, A J

    2005-08-01

    In contrast to the relatively ubiquitous angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE), expression of the mammalian ACE homologue, ACE2, was initially described in the heart, kidney and testis. ACE2 is a type I integral membrane protein with its active site domain exposed to the extracellular surface of endothelial cells and the renal tubular epithelium. Here ACE2 is poised to metabolise circulating peptides which may include angiotensin II, a potent vasoconstrictor and the product of angiotensin I cleavage by ACE. To this end, ACE2 may counterbalance the effects of ACE within the renin-angiotensin system (RAS). Indeed, ACE2 has been implicated in the regulation of heart and renal function where it is proposed to control the levels of angiotensin II relative to its hypotensive metabolite, angiotensin-(1-7). The recent solution of the structure of ACE2, and ACE, has provided new insight into the substrate and inhibitor profiles of these two key regulators of the RAS. As the complexity of this crucial pathway is unravelled, there is a growing interest in the therapeutic potential of agents that modulate the activity of ACE2.

  3. Genetic and biochemical evidence that recombinant Enterococcus spp. strains expressing gelatinase (GelE) produce bovine milk-derived hydrolysates with high angiotensin converting enzyme-inhibitory activity (ACE-IA).

    PubMed

    Gútiez, Loreto; Borrero, Juan; Jiménez, Juan J; Gómez-Sala, Beatriz; Recio, Isidra; Cintas, Luis M; Herranz, Carmen; Hernández, Pablo E

    2014-06-18

    In this work, genes encoding gelatinase (gelE) and serine proteinase (sprE), two extracellular proteases produced by Enterococcus faecalis DBH18, were cloned in the protein expression vector pMG36c, containing the constitutive P32 promoter, generating the recombinant plasmids pCG, pCSP, and pCGSP encoding gelE, sprE, and gelE-sprE, respectively. Transformation of noncaseinolytic E. faecalis P36, E. faecalis JH2-2, E. faecium AR24, and E. hirae AR14 strains with these plasmids permitted detection of caseinolytic activity only in the strains transformed with pCG or pCGSP. Complementation of a deletion (knockout) mutant of E. faecalis V583 for production of gelatinase (GelE) with pCG unequivocally supported that gelE is responsible for the caseinolytic activity of the transformed strain grown in bovine skim milk (BSM). RP-HPLC-MS/MS analysis of hydrolysates of transformed Enterococcus spp. strains grown in BSM permitted the identification of 38 major peptide fragments including peptides with previously reported angiotensin converting enzyme-inhibitory activity (ACE-IA), antihypertensive activity, and antioxidant activity.

  4. Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Gene Insertion/Deletion Polymorphism and Small Vessel Cerebral Stroke in Indian Population

    PubMed Central

    Prabhakar, Puttachandra; De, Tanima; Nagaraja, Dindagur

    2014-01-01

    Background. Hypertension is an established risk factor for small-vessel cerebral stroke and the renin-angiotensin system plays an important role in the maintenance of blood pressure. We aimed at evaluating the contribution of the angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) gene insertion/deletion (I/D) polymorphism to the risk of small-vessel stroke in south Indian population. Materials and Methods. We investigated 128 patients diagnosed with small-vessel stroke and 236 age, and gender-matched healthy controls. ACE I/D polymorphism was detected by polymerase chain reaction. Results. Hypertension was significantly more prevalent in the patient group and was associated with 6-fold increase in risk for stroke. ACE genotypes were in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium in both patients and controls. Prevalence of DD, ID, and II genotypes in cases (34.4%, 43.7%, and 28%) did not differ significantly from controls (31.8%, 43.2%, and 25%). The polymorphism was not associated with small-vessel stroke (OR: 1.34; 95% CI: 0.52–1.55). However, diastolic blood pressure was associated with the ACE I/D genotypes in the patients. (DD; 90.2 ± 14.2> ID; 86.2 ± 11.9> II; 82.3 ± 7.8 mm Hg,  P = 0.047). Conclusion. Our study showed that hypertension, but not ACE I/D polymorphism, increased the risk of small-vessel stroke. PMID:24523965

  5. Angiotensin converting enzyme 2 abrogates bleomycin-induced lung injury.

    PubMed

    Rey-Parra, G J; Vadivel, A; Coltan, L; Hall, A; Eaton, F; Schuster, M; Loibner, H; Penninger, J M; Kassiri, Z; Oudit, G Y; Thébaud, B

    2012-06-01

    Despite substantial progress, mortality and morbidity of the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), a severe form of acute lung injury (ALI), remain unacceptably high. There is no effective treatment for ARDS/ALI. The renin-angiotensin system (RAS) through Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE)-generated Angiotensin II contributes to lung injury. ACE2, a recently discovered ACE homologue, acts as a negative regulator of the RAS and counterbalances the function of ACE. We hypothesized that ACE2 prevents Bleomycin (BLM)-induced lung injury. Fourteen to 16-week-old ACE2 knockout mice-male (ACE2(-/y)) and female (ACE2(-/-))-and age-matched wild-type (WT) male mice received intratracheal BLM (1.5U/kg). Male ACE2(-/y) BLM injured mice exhibited poorer exercise capacity, worse lung function and exacerbated lung fibrosis and collagen deposition compared with WT. These changes were associated with increased expression of the profibrotic genes α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) and Transforming Growth Factor ß1. Compared with ACE2(-/y) exposed to BLM, ACE2(-/-) exhibited better lung function and architecture and decreased collagen deposition. Treatment with intraperitoneal recombinant human (rh) ACE2 (2 mg/kg) for 21 days improved survival, exercise capacity, and lung function and decreased lung inflammation and fibrosis in male BLM-WT mice. Female BLM WT mice had mild fibrosis and displayed a possible compensatory upregulation of the AT2 receptor. We conclude that ACE2 gene deletion worsens BLM-induced lung injury and more so in males than females. Conversely, ACE2 protects against BLM-induced fibrosis. rhACE2 may have therapeutic potential to attenuate respiratory morbidity in ALI/ARDS. PMID:22246130

  6. Melatonin regulation of antioxidant enzyme gene expression.

    PubMed

    Mayo, J C; Sainz, R M; Antoli, I; Herrera, F; Martin, V; Rodriguez, C

    2002-10-01

    Antioxidant enzymes (AOEs) are part of the primary cellular defense against free radicals induced by toxins and/or spontaneously formed in cells. Melatonin (MLT) has received much attention in recent years due to its direct free radical scavenging and antioxidant properties. In the present work we report that MLT, at physiological serum concentrations (1 nM), increases the mRNA of both superoxide dismutases (SODs) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) in two neuronal cell lines. The MLT effect on both SODs and GPx mRNA was mediated by a de novo synthesized protein. MLT alters mRNA stability for Cu-Zn SOD and GPx. Experiments with a short time treatment (pulse action) of MLT suggest that the regulation of AOE gene expression is likely to be receptor mediated, because 1-h treatment with MLT results in the same response as a 24-h treatment.

  7. MTHFR and ACE Gene Polymorphisms and Risk of Vascular and Degenerative Dementias in the Elderly

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pandey, Pratima; Pradhan, Sunil; Modi, Dinesh Raj; Mittal, Balraj

    2009-01-01

    Focal lacunar infarctions due to cerebral small vessel atherosclerosis or single/multiple large cortical infarcts lead to vascular dementia, and different genes and environmental factors have been implicated in causation or aggravation of the disease. Previous reports suggest that some of the risk factors may be common to both vascular as well as…

  8. Fosinopril and zofenopril, two angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, potentiate the anticonvulsant activity of antiepileptic drugs against audiogenic seizures in DBA/2 mice.

    PubMed

    Sarro, Giovambattista De; Paola, Eugenio Donato Di; Gratteri, Santo; Gareri, Pietro; Rispoli, Vincenzo; Siniscalchi, Antonio; Tripepi, Giovanni; Gallelli, Luca; Citraro, Rita; Russo, Emilio

    2012-03-01

    The renin-angiotensin system (RAS) exists in the brain and it may be involved in pathogenesis of neurological and psychiatric disorders including seizures. The aim of the present research was to evaluate the effects of some angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEi; captopril, enalapril, fosinopril and zofenopril), commonly used as antihypertensive agents, in the DBA/2 mice animal model of generalized tonic-clonic seizures. Furthermore, the co-administration of these compounds with some antiepileptic drugs (AEDs; carbamazepine, diazepam, felbamate, gabapentin, lamotrigine, phenobarbital, phenytoin, topiramate and valproate) was studied in order to identify possible positive interactions in the same model. All ACEi were able to decrease the severity of audiogenic seizures with the exception of enalapril up to the dose of 100mg/kg, the rank order of activity was as follows: fosinopril>zofenopril>captopril. The co-administration of ineffective doses of all ACE inhibitors with AEDs, generally increased the potency of the latter. Fosinopril was the most active in potentiating the activity of AEDs and the combination of ACEi with lamotrigine and valproate was the most favorable, whereas, the co-administrations with diazepam and phenobarbital seemed to be neutral. The increase in potency was generally associated with an enhancement of motor impairment, however, the therapeutic index of combined treatment of AEDs with ACEi was predominantly more favorable than control. ACEi administration did not influence plasma and brain concentrations of the AEDs studied excluding pharmacokinetic interactions and concluding that it is of pharmacodynamic nature. In conclusion, fosinopril, zofenopril, enalapril and captopril showed an additive anticonvulsant effect when co-administered with some AEDs, most notably carbamazepine, felbamate, lamotrigine, topiramate and valproate, implicating a possible therapeutic relevance of such drug combinations.

  9. Assessment of the angiotensin-I-converting enzyme (ACE-I) inhibitory and antioxidant activities of hydrolysates of bovine brisket sarcoplasmic proteins produced by papain and characterisation of associated bioactive peptidic fractions.

    PubMed

    Di Bernardini, Roberta; Mullen, Anne Maria; Bolton, Declan; Kerry, Joseph; O'Neill, Eileen; Hayes, Maria

    2012-01-01

    The main objective was to investigate the angiotensin-I-converting enzyme (ACE-I) inhibitory and antioxidant activities of sarcoplasmic proteins isolated from the brisket muscle (Pectoralis profundus) of 3 (Bos taurus) cattle and hydrolysed with papain for 24 h at 37°C. Sarcoplasmic protein hydrolysates were ultra-filtered using molecular weight cut off (MWCO) membranes and 10-kDa and 3-kDa filtrates were obtained. The total sarcoplasmic protein extracts and the 3-kDa filtrates were tested for angiotensin I-converting enzyme inhibitory (ACE-I) activities. The total hydrolysates, 10-kDa and 3-kDa filtrates were also tested for their associated antioxidant activities using the 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging activity assay, the ferric ion reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) assay and the Fe(2+) metal chelating ability assay. The peptidic content of the total hydrolysates, the 10-kDa and the 3-kDa filtrates were analysed using an ORBITRAP mass spectrometer, and mass spectral data obtained were analysed using TurboSEQUEST. Eleven peptides were characterised from the total hydrolysates, fifteen from the 10-kDa filtrate fractions, whilst nine peptides were characterised from the 3-kDa filtrate fractions. Similarities between the amino acid sequences of the peptides identified in this study and previously identified antioxidant and ACE-I inhibitory peptides detailed in the BIOPEP database were outlined. PMID:21880436

  10. Characterization of the mammalian DNA polymerase gene(s) and enzyme(s). Annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Mishra, N.C.

    1994-01-01

    Consistent with the long term goal of our research to understand the nature of the key enzymes in eukaryotic DNA replication we have characterized the properties of the wild type DNA polymerases of the {alpha}-family and their mutants. We have also provided evidence for the role of aphidicolin in the elongation process of the in vivo DNA replication in eukaryotic cells. We also developed a technology for planned prep from a large numbers of clones for direct screening by size or restriction digestion in order to facilitate our goals to clone the DNA polymerase gene.

  11. A novel angiotensin-І converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory peptide from gastrointestinal protease hydrolysate of silkworm pupa (Bombyx mori) protein: Biochemical characterization and molecular docking study.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qiongying; Jia, Junqiang; Yan, Hui; Du, Jinjuan; Gui, Zhongzheng

    2015-06-01

    Silkworm pupa (Bombyx mori) protein was hydrolyzed using gastrointestinal endopeptidases (pepsin, trypsin and α-chymotrypsin). Then, the hydrolysate was purified sequentially by ultrafiltration, gel filtration chromatography and RP-HPLC. A novel ACE inhibitory peptide, Ala-Ser-Leu, with the IC50 value of 102.15μM, was identified by IT-MS/MS. This is the first report of Ala-Ser-Leu from natural protein. Lineweaver-Burk plots suggest that the peptide is a competitive inhibitor against ACE. The molecular docking studies revealed that the ACE inhibition of Ala-Ser-Leu is mainly attributed to forming very strong hydrogen bonds with the S1 pocket (Ala354) and the S2 pocket (Gln281 and His353). The results indicate that silkworm pupa (B. mori) protein or its gastrointestinal protease hydrolysate could be used as a functional ingredient in auxiliary therapeutic foods against hypertension.

  12. Individualised therapy of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors in stable coronary artery disease: overview of the primary results of the PERindopril GENEtic association (PERGENE) study.

    PubMed

    Brugts, J J; de Maat, M P M; Danser, A H J; Boersma, E; Simoons, M L

    2012-01-01

    In patients with stable coronary artery disease (CAD) without overt heart failure, ACE inhibitors are among the most commonly used drugs as these agents have been proven effective in reducing the risk of cardiovascular events. Considerable individual variations in the blood pressure response to ACE inhibitors are observed and as such heterogeneity in clinical treatment effect would be likely as well. Assessing the consistency of treatment benefit is essential for the rational and cost-effective prescription of ACE inhibitors. Information on heterogeneities in treatment effect between subgroups of patients could be used to develop an evidence-based guidance for the installation of ACE-inhibitor therapy. Obviously, therapy should only be applied in those patients who most likely will benefit. Attempts to develop such treatment guidance by using clinical characteristics have been unsuccessful. No heterogeneity in risk reduction by ACE inhibitors has been observed in relation to relevant clinical characteristics. A new approach to such 'guided-therapy' could be to integrate more patient-specific characteristics such as the patients' genetic information. If proven feasible, pharmacogenetic profiling could optimise patients' benefit of treatment and reduce unnecessary treatment of patients. Cardiovascular pharmacogenetic research of ACE inhibitors in coronary artery disease patients is in a formative stage and studies are limited. The PERGENE study is a large pharmacogenetic substudy of the EUROPA trial, aimed to assess the achievability of pharmacogenetic profiling. We provide an overview of the main results of the PERGENE study in terms of the genetic determinants of treatment benefit and blood pressure response. The main results of the PERGENE study show a pharmacogenetic profile related to the treatment benefit of perindopril identifying responders and non-responders to treatment. PMID:21688035

  13. Molecular evidence for the expression of angiotensin converting enzyme in hemocytes of Locusta migratoria: stimulation by bacterial lipopolysaccharide challenge.

    PubMed

    Macours, N; Hens, K; Francis, C; De Loof, A; Huybrechts, R

    2003-08-01

    The presence of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) in insects has been reported many times, but numerous questions about the functional role of this enzyme in insects remain. Here we show by RT-PCR experiments that ACE has a wide tissue distribution in Locusta migratoria, suggesting diverse roles for this enzyme in the locust. Immune challenge through injection of bacterial lipopolysaccharides resulted in a tenfold increase of ACE gene transcripts in the hemocytes and is suggestive for a role of ACE in the cellular defense of the locust. However, phenotypic knockout experiments with the ACE inhibitor captopril showed that ACE is not essential for the efficient clearance of injected E. coli bacteria. PMID:12880654

  14. An SNP within the angiotensin-converting enzyme distinguishes between sprint and distance performing Alaskan sled dogs in a candidate gene analysis.

    PubMed

    Huson, Heather J; Byers, Alexandra M; Runstadler, Jonathan; Ostrander, Elaine A

    2011-01-01

    The Alaskan sled dog offers a unique mechanism for studying the genetics of elite athletic performance. They are a group of mixed breed dogs, comprised of multiple common breeds, and a unique breed entity seen only as a part of the sled dog mix. Alaskan sled dogs are divided into 2 primary groups as determined by their racing skills. Distance dogs are capable of running over 1000 miles in 10 days, whereas sprint dogs run much shorter distances, approximately 30 miles, but in faster times, that is, 18-25 mph. Finding the genes that distinguish these 2 types of performers is likely to illuminate genetic contributors to human athletic performance. In this study, we tested for association between polymorphisms in 2 candidate genes; angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) and myostatin (MSTN) and enhanced speed and endurance performance in 174 Alaskan sled dogs. We observed 81 novel genetic variants within the ACE gene and 4 within the MSTN gene, including a polymorphism within the ACE gene that significantly (P value 2.38 × 10(-5)) distinguished the sprint versus distance populations.

  15. An SNP within the Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Distinguishes between Sprint and Distance Performing Alaskan Sled Dogs in a Candidate Gene Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Huson, Heather J.; Byers, Alexandra M.; Runstadler, Jonathan

    2011-01-01

    The Alaskan sled dog offers a unique mechanism for studying the genetics of elite athletic performance. They are a group of mixed breed dogs, comprised of multiple common breeds, and a unique breed entity seen only as a part of the sled dog mix. Alaskan sled dogs are divided into 2 primary groups as determined by their racing skills. Distance dogs are capable of running over 1000 miles in 10 days, whereas sprint dogs run much shorter distances, approximately 30 miles, but in faster times, that is, 18–25 mph. Finding the genes that distinguish these 2 types of performers is likely to illuminate genetic contributors to human athletic performance. In this study, we tested for association between polymorphisms in 2 candidate genes; angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) and myostatin (MSTN) and enhanced speed and endurance performance in 174 Alaskan sled dogs. We observed 81 novel genetic variants within the ACE gene and 4 within the MSTN gene, including a polymorphism within the ACE gene that significantly (P value 2.38 × 10−5) distinguished the sprint versus distance populations. PMID:21846742

  16. Angiotensin-converting enzyme gene insertion/deletion, not bradykinin B2 receptor -58T/C gene polymorphism, associated with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor-related cough in Chinese female patients with non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Lee, Y J; Tsai, J C

    2001-11-01

    To investigate the genetic susceptibility associated with cough related to angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor (ACEI) therapy in patients with type 2 diabetes, 189 non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) patients with proteinuria or hypertension treated with perindopril were studied. Cough was considered to be present if the patients had been bothered by a cough during treatment and if they had had related symptoms for at least 2 weeks without an identifiable cause. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) coupled with single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) was used to detect polymorphisms of ACE and bradykinin B2-receptor genes. After 8 weeks of treatment, 49.2% (93 of 189) of our NIDDM patients were found to be suffering from ACEI-related cough. ACEI-related cough was mainly associated with female patients, with 71.7% (76 of 106) of female and only 20.5% (17 of 83) of male patients experiencing cough after ACEI treatment. There was a significant association of ACE II genotype with ACEI-related cough. The genotype frequencies were 58.2% for II, 47.8% for ID, and 16.7% for DD in patients with ACEI-associated cough and 41.8% for II, 52.2% for ID, and 83.3% for DD in subjects without ACEI-associated cough (chi(2) = 10.268; df = 2, P =.006). As female patients made up the majority of the subjects suffering from ACEI-related cough, we further analyzed the association of ACE I/D genotype with ACEI-related cough separately by sex. Male patients with ACEI-related cough were not associated with ACE I/D genotype distribution, while female patients were strongly associated with ACE I/D genotype polymorphism (chi(2) = 16.12; df = 2; P <.001). There was no association between the bradykinin B2 receptor gene -58T/C polymorphism with ACEI-related cough. In conclusion, our results indicate that Chinese diabetic female subjects are susceptible to ACEI-related cough, and this susceptibility may be genetically predetermined. PMID:11699055

  17. IMAGE cDNA Clones, UniGene Clustering, and ACeDB: An Integrated Resource for Expressed Sequence Information

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Greg; Fuchs, Rainer; Lai, Eric

    1997-01-01

    In this study we describe a new information resource that provides integrated access to information on IMAGE (integrated molecular analysis of genomes and their expression) cDNA library clones and derived expressed sequence tags (ESTs). We have developed an automated procedure that collates data from various public sources into a single ACeDB database. This database is a valuable tool for electronic cloning experiments and gene expression studies. It allows researchers to find information about cDNA libraries, plate addresses, insert sizes, and sequence data for IMAGE clones, the assignment of ESTs to UniGene clusters, and the chromosomal location of those genes in an efficient, graphically oriented manner. PMID:9331373

  18. Association between angiotensin converting enzyme gene insertion/deletion polymorphism and renal scar risk in children vesicoureteral reflex: a reappraise meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ai, Jin-Wei; Zeng, Xian-Tao; Liu, Ying; Fu, Yu; Liu, Tong-Zu; Pei, Bin

    2016-01-01

    Vesicoureteral reflex(VUR) is a common disease in children. Some studies indicated that the angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) gene insertion/deletion (I/D) polymorphism associated with the renal scar in VUR, but not all researchers agreed with it. To clarify the effect of ACE I/D polymorphism on renal scar risk in children with VUR, we performed the present meta-analysis. PubMed, CNKI, CBM, and Embase databases were searched for studies that examined the relationship between ACE I/D polymorphism and renal scar risk in children with VUR. The Stata 12.0 software was used for statistical analyses. 11 case-control studies with 1,032 VUR patients were analyzed. The results showed that the DD genotype and D allele were associated with renal scar risk in overall VUR patients, DD vs. DI + II: OR = 1.61, 95% CI = 1.04–2.49, P = 0.03; DD vs. II: OR = 1.78, 95% CI = 1.20–2.65, P < 0.01; D vs. I: OR = 1.38, 95% CI = 1.02–1.86, P = 0.04. Similar results were revealed in Turks, but not in Caucasians and Asians. Our meta-analysis indicated that the ACE DD genotype may increase the risk of renal scar in children with VUR. PMID:27506878

  19. Association between angiotensin converting enzyme gene insertion/deletion polymorphism and renal scar risk in children vesicoureteral reflex: a reappraise meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Ai, Jin-Wei; Zeng, Xian-Tao; Liu, Ying; Fu, Yu; Liu, Tong-Zu; Pei, Bin

    2016-08-10

    Vesicoureteral reflex(VUR) is a common disease in children. Some studies indicated that the angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) gene insertion/deletion (I/D) polymorphism associated with the renal scar in VUR, but not all researchers agreed with it. To clarify the effect of ACE I/D polymorphism on renal scar risk in children with VUR, we performed the present meta-analysis. PubMed, CNKI, CBM, and Embase databases were searched for studies that examined the relationship between ACE I/D polymorphism and renal scar risk in children with VUR. The Stata 12.0 software was used for statistical analyses. 11 case-control studies with 1,032 VUR patients were analyzed. The results showed that the DD genotype and D allele were associated with renal scar risk in overall VUR patients, DD vs. DI + II: OR = 1.61, 95% CI = 1.04-2.49, P = 0.03; DD vs. II: OR = 1.78, 95% CI = 1.20-2.65, P < 0.01; D vs. I: OR = 1.38, 95% CI = 1.02-1.86, P = 0.04. Similar results were revealed in Turks, but not in Caucasians and Asians. Our meta-analysis indicated that the ACE DD genotype may increase the risk of renal scar in children with VUR.

  20. Gene cloned for enzyme used to make cheese

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-02-15

    Scientists at Collaborative Research in Waltham, Mass., working under a contract with Dow Chemical, Midland, Mich. are reported to have cloned the gene rennin, an enzyme used in the production of cheese. The gene was cloned in both yeast and the bacterium Escherichia coli using standard recombinant DNA techniques. Rennin is the first enzyme of industrial importance to be cloned and it is hoped that rennin will be commercially available by the mid-1980's.

  1. The Evaluation of Dipeptidyl Peptidase (DPP)-IV, α-Glucosidase and Angiotensin Converting Enzyme (ACE) Inhibitory Activities of Whey Proteins Hydrolyzed with Serine Protease Isolated from Asian Pumpkin (Cucurbita ficifolia).

    PubMed

    Konrad, Babij; Anna, Dąbrowska; Marek, Szołtysik; Marta, Pokora; Aleksandra, Zambrowicz; Józefa, Chrzanowska

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, whey protein concentrate (WPC-80) and β-lactoglobulin were hydrolyzed with a noncommercial serine protease isolated from Asian pumpkin (Cucurbita ficifolia). Hydrolysates were further fractionated by ultrafiltration using membranes with cut-offs equal 3 and 10 kDa. Peptide fractions of molecular weight lower than 3 and 3-10 kDa were further subjected to the RP-HPLC. Separated preparations were investigated for their potential as the natural inhibitors of dipeptidyl peptidase (DPP-IV), α-glucosidase and angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE). WPC-80 hydrolysate showed higher inhibitory activities against the three tested enzymes than β-lactoglobulin hydrolysate. Especially high biological activities were exhibited by peptide fractions of molecular weight lower than 3 kDa, with ACE IC50 <0.64 mg/mL and DPP-IV IC50 <0.55 mg/mL. This study suggests that peptides generated from whey proteins may support postprandial glycemia regulation and blood pressure maintenance, and could be used as functional food ingredients in the diet of patients with type 2 diabetes.

  2. Quantitative assessment of the association between the angiotensin-converting enzyme gene insertion/deletion polymorphism and digestive system cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Wang, J; Yang, S; Guo, F H; Mao, X; Zhou, H; Dong, Y Q; Wang, Z M; Luo, F

    2015-01-01

    The angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) gene insertion/deletion (I/D) polymorphism has been reported to be associated with digestive system cancer; however, the results from previous studies have been conflicting. The present study aimed to investigate the association between the ACE I/D polymorphism and the risk of digestive system cancer using a meta-analysis of previously published studies. Databases were systematically searched to identify relevant studies published prior to December 2014. We estimated the pooled OR with its 95%CI to assess the association. The meta-analysis consisted of thirteen case-control studies that included 2557 patients and 4356 healthy controls. Meta-analysis results based on all the studies showed no significant association between the ACE I/D polymorphism and the risk of digestive system cancer (DD vs II: OR = 0.85, 95%CI = 0.59-1.24; DI vs II: OR = 0.94, 95%CI = 0.78-1.15; dominant model: OR = 0.96, 95%CI = 0.81- 1.15; recessive model: OR = 1.06, 95%CI = 0.76-1.48). Subgroup analyses by race and cancer type did not detect an association between the ACE I/D polymorphism and digestive system cancer risk. However, when the analyses were restricted to smaller studies (N < 500 patients), the summary OR of DI vs II was 0.80 (95%CI = 0.66-0.97). Our analyses detected a possibility of publication bias with a misestimate of the true association by smaller studies. Overall, meta-analysis results suggest the ACE I/D polymorphism might not be associated with susceptibility to digestive system cancer. Further large and well-designed studies are needed to confirm these conclusions.

  3. Enzymes to die for: exploiting nucleotide metabolizing enzymes for cancer gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Ardiani, Andressa; Johnson, Adam J; Ruan, Hongmei; Sanchez-Bonilla, Marilyn; Serve, Kinta; Black, Margaret E

    2012-04-01

    Suicide gene therapy is an attractive strategy to selectively destroy cancer cells while minimizing unnecessary toxicity to normal cells. Since this idea was first introduced more than two decades ago, numerous studies have been conducted and significant developments have been made to further its application for mainstream cancer therapy. Major limitations of the suicide gene therapy strategy that have hindered its clinical application include inefficient directed delivery to cancer cells and the poor prodrug activation capacity of suicide enzymes. This review is focused on efforts that have been and are currently being pursued to improve the activity of individual suicide enzymes towards their respective prodrugs with particular attention to the application of nucleotide metabolizing enzymes in suicide cancer gene therapy. A number of protein engineering strategies have been employed and our discussion here will center on the use of mutagenesis approaches to create and evaluate nucleotide metabolizing enzymes with enhanced prodrug activation capacity and increased thermostability. Several of these studies have yielded clinically important enzyme variants that are relevant for cancer gene therapy applications because their utilization can serve to maximize cancer cell killing while minimizing the prodrug dose, thereby limiting undesirable side effects.

  4. Microdiversity of extracellular enzyme genes among sequenced prokaryotic genomes

    PubMed Central

    Zimmerman, Amy E; Martiny, Adam C; Allison, Steven D

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the relationship between prokaryotic traits and phylogeny is important for predicting and modeling ecological processes. Microbial extracellular enzymes have a pivotal role in nutrient cycling and the decomposition of organic matter, yet little is known about the phylogenetic distribution of genes encoding these enzymes. In this study, we analyzed 3058 annotated prokaryotic genomes to determine which taxa have the genetic potential to produce alkaline phosphatase, chitinase and β-N-acetyl-glucosaminidase enzymes. We then evaluated the relationship between the genetic potential for enzyme production and 16S rRNA phylogeny using the consenTRAIT algorithm, which calculated the phylogenetic depth and corresponding 16S rRNA sequence identity of clades of potential enzyme producers. Nearly half (49.2%) of the genomes analyzed were found to be capable of extracellular enzyme production, and these were non-randomly distributed across most prokaryotic phyla. On average, clades of potential enzyme-producing organisms had a maximum phylogenetic depth of 0.008004–0.009780, though individual clades varied broadly in both size and depth. These values correspond to a minimum 16S rRNA sequence identity of 98.04–98.40%. The distribution pattern we found is an indication of microdiversity, the occurrence of ecologically or physiologically distinct populations within phylogenetically related groups. Additionally, we found positive correlations among the genes encoding different extracellular enzymes. Our results suggest that the capacity to produce extracellular enzymes varies at relatively fine-scale phylogenetic resolution. This variation is consistent with other traits that require a small number of genes and provides insight into the relationship between taxonomy and traits that may be useful for predicting ecological function. PMID:23303371

  5. Characterization of the mammalian DNA polymerase gene(s) and enzyme(s). Annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Mishra, N.C.

    1995-01-01

    Two Genes for DNA polymerase delta were identified from the wild type Chinese hamster ovary cells. These genes were cloned via RT-PCR from mRNA prepared the Chinese hamster ovary cells using primers specific to conserved sequences of the DNA polymerase {delta} gene. The first gene encodes a PCNA dependent DNA polymerase {delta} gene whereas the second gene encodes a PCNA independent DNA polymerase {delta} gene. Methods were developed to clone these genes in expression vector and host systems. The role of the two genes in DNA replication and repair was determined.

  6. Marketing ACE in Victoria.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2001

    This publication presents options raised through various forums for marketing adult and community education (ACE) in Victoria, Australia, and suggested strategies. After an introduction (chapter 1), chapters 2 and 3 provide a broad view of the current situation for marketing ACE. Chapter 2 discusses general issues in the current position--ACE…

  7. Angiotensin-converting enzyme 2/angiotensin-(1-7)/Mas axis activates Akt signaling to ameliorate hepatic steatosis.

    PubMed

    Cao, Xi; Yang, Fangyuan; Shi, Tingting; Yuan, Mingxia; Xin, Zhong; Xie, Rongrong; Li, Sen; Li, Hongbing; Yang, Jin-Kui

    2016-01-01

    The classical axis of renin-angiotensin system (RAS), angiotensin (Ang)-converting enzyme (ACE)/Ang II/AT1, contributes to the development of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). However, the role of bypass axis of RAS (Angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2)/Ang-(1-7)/Mas) in hepatic steatosis is still unclear. Here we showed that deletion of ACE2 aggravates liver steatosis, which is correlated with the increased expression of hepatic lipogenic genes and the decreased expression of fatty acid oxidation-related genes in the liver of ACE2 knockout (ACE2(-/y)) mice. Meanwhile, oxidative stress and inflammation were also aggravated in ACE2(-/y) mice. On the contrary, overexpression of ACE2 improved fatty liver in db/db mice, and the mRNA levels of fatty acid oxidation-related genes were up-regulated. In vitro, Ang-(1-7)/ACE2 ameliorated hepatic steatosis, oxidative stress and inflammation in free fatty acid (FFA)-induced HepG2 cells, and what's more, Akt inhibitors reduced ACE2-mediated lipid metabolism. Furthermore, ACE2-mediated Akt activation could be attenuated by blockade of ATP/P2 receptor/Calmodulin (CaM) pathway. These results indicated that Ang-(1-7)/ACE2/Mas axis may reduce liver lipid accumulation partly by regulating lipid-metabolizing genes through ATP/P2 receptor/CaM signaling pathway. Our findings support the potential role of ACE2/Ang-(1-7)/Mas axis in prevention and treatment of hepatic lipid metabolism. PMID:26883384

  8. Segregation and linkage analysis of serum angiotensin I-converting enzyme levels: Evidence for two quantitative-trait loci

    SciTech Connect

    McKenzie, C.A.; Keavney, B.; Farrall, M.

    1995-12-01

    Human serum angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) levels vary substantially between individuals and are highly heritable. Segregation analysis in European families has shown that more than half of the total variability in ACE levels is influenced by quantitative-trait loci (QTL). One of these QTLs is located within or close to the ACE locus itself. Combined segregation/linkage analysis in a series of African Caribbean families from Jamaica shows that the ACE insertion-deletion polymorphism is in moderate linkage disequilibrium with an ACE-linked QTL. Linkage analysis with a highly informative polymorphism at the neighboring growth hormone gene (GH) shows surprisingly little support for linkage (LOD score [Z] = 0.12). An extended analysis with a two-QTL model, where an ACE-linked QTL interacts additively with an unlinked QTL, significantly improves both the fit of the model (P = .002) and the support for linkage between the ACE-linked QTL and GH polymorphism (Z = 5.0). We conclude that two QTLs jointly influence serum ACE levels in this population. One QTL is located within or close to the ACE locus and explains 27% of the total variability; the second QTL is unlinked to the ACE locus and explains 52% of the variability. The identification of the molecular mechanisms underlying both QTLs is necessary in order to interpret the role of ACE in cardiovascular disease. 44 refs., 7 tabs.

  9. Cardiac and renal distribution of ACE and ACE-2 in rats with heart failure.

    PubMed

    Cohen-Segev, Ravit; Francis, Bahaa; Abu-Saleh, Niroz; Awad, Hoda; Lazarovich, Aviva; Kabala, Aviva; Aronson, Doron; Abassi, Zaid

    2014-10-01

    Congestive heart failure is often associated with impaired kidney function. Over-activation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) contributes to avid salt and water retention in heart failure. While the expression of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE), a key enzyme in the synthesis of angiotensin II (Ang II), is well established, the expression of angiotensin converting enzyme-2 (ACE-2), an enzyme responsible for angiotensin 1-7 generation, is largely unknown. This issue is of a special interest since angiotensin 1-7 counteracts many of the proliferative and hypertensive effects of angiotensin II. Therefore, the present study was designed to investigate the expression of both enzymes in the kidney and heart of rats with heart failure. Heart failure (CHF) was induced in male Sprague Dawley rats (n=9) by the creation of a surgical aorto-caval fistula. Sham-operated rats served as controls (n=8). Two weeks after surgery, the animals were sacrificed and their hearts and kidneys were harvested for assessment of cardiac remodeling and ACE and ACE-2 immunoreactivity by immunohistochemical staining. ACE immunostaining was significantly increased in the kidneys (4.34 ± 0.39% vs. 2.96 ± 0.40%, P<0.05) and hearts (4.57 ± 0.54% vs. 2.19 ± 0.37%, P<0.01) of CHF rats as compared with their sham controls. In a similar manner, ACE-2 immunoreactivity was also elevated in the kidneys (4.65 ± 1.17% vs. 1.75 ± 0.29%, P<0.05) and hearts (5.48 ± 1.11% vs. 1.13 ± 0.26%, P<0.01) of CHF rats as compared with their healthy controls. This study showed that both ACE and ACE-2 are overexpressed in the cardiac and renal tissues of animals with heart failure as compared with their sham controls. The increased expression of the beneficial ACE-2 in heart failure may serve as a compensatory response to the over-activity of the deleterious isoform, namely, angiotensin converting enzyme 1(ACE-1).

  10. A Single Nucleotide Polymorphism Uncovers a Novel Function for the Transcription Factor Ace2 during Candida albicans Hyphal Development

    PubMed Central

    Orellana-Muñoz, Sara; Gutiérrez-Escribano, Pilar; Arnáiz-Pita, Yolanda; Dueñas-Santero, Encarnación; Suárez, M. Belén; Bougnoux, Marie-Elisabeth; del Rey, Francisco; Sherlock, Gavin; d’Enfert, Christophe; Correa-Bordes, Jaime; de Aldana, Carlos R. Vázquez

    2015-01-01

    Candida albicans is a major invasive fungal pathogen in humans. An important virulence factor is its ability to switch between the yeast and hyphal forms, and these filamentous forms are important in tissue penetration and invasion. A common feature for filamentous growth is the ability to inhibit cell separation after cytokinesis, although it is poorly understood how this process is regulated developmentally. In C. albicans, the formation of filaments during hyphal growth requires changes in septin ring dynamics. In this work, we studied the functional relationship between septins and the transcription factor Ace2, which controls the expression of enzymes that catalyze septum degradation. We found that alternative translation initiation produces two Ace2 isoforms. While full-length Ace2, Ace2L, influences septin dynamics in a transcription-independent manner in hyphal cells but not in yeast cells, the use of methionine-55 as the initiation codon gives rise to Ace2S, which functions as the nuclear transcription factor required for the expression of cell separation genes. Genetic evidence indicates that Ace2L influences the incorporation of the Sep7 septin to hyphal septin rings in order to avoid inappropriate activation of cell separation during filamentous growth. Interestingly, a natural single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) present in the C. albicans WO-1 background and other C. albicans commensal and clinical isolates generates a stop codon in the ninth codon of Ace2L that mimics the phenotype of cells lacking Ace2L. Finally, we report that Ace2L and Ace2S interact with the NDR kinase Cbk1 and that impairing activity of this kinase results in a defect in septin dynamics similar to that of hyphal cells lacking Ace2L. Together, our findings identify Ace2L and the NDR kinase Cbk1 as new elements of the signaling system that modify septin ring dynamics in hyphae to allow cell-chain formation, a feature that appears to have evolved in specific C. albicans lineages

  11. Isolated gene encoding an enzyme with UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylase and phosphoglucomutase activities from Cyclotella cryptica

    DOEpatents

    Jarvis, E.E.; Roessler, P.G.

    1999-07-27

    The present invention relates to a cloned gene which encodes an enzyme, the purified enzyme, and the applications and products resulting from the use of the gene and enzyme. The gene, isolated from Cyclotella cryptica, encodes a multifunctional enzyme that has both UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylase and phosphoglucomutase activities. 8 figs.

  12. Isolated gene encoding an enzyme with UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylase and phosphoglucomutase activities from Cyclotella cryptica

    DOEpatents

    Jarvis, Eric E.; Roessler, Paul G.

    1999-01-01

    The present invention relates to a cloned gene which encodes an enzyme, the purified enzyme, and the applications and products resulting from the use of the gene and enzyme. The gene, isolated from Cyclotella cryptica, encodes a multifunctional enzyme that has both UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylase and phosphoglucomutase activities.

  13. Molecular and recombinational mapping of mutations in the Ace locus of Drosophila melanogaster

    SciTech Connect

    Nagoshi, R.N.; Gelbart, W.M.

    1987-11-01

    The Ace locus in Drosophila melanogaster is known to be the structural gene for acetylcholinesterase. Ace is located in a region of chromosome arm 3R which has been subjected to intensive genetic and molecular analysis. Previous deletion mapping studies have identified a 40-kb region with which the Ace gene resides. This report focuses on the further localization of Ace within this 40-kb interval. Within this region, selective fine structure recombinational analysis was employed to localize three recessive Ace lethals relative to unselected restriction site variations. These three mutations fall into a segment of 7 kb within the Ace interval. Fine structure recombinational analysis was also used to confirm that the Ace/sup -/ phenotype of one deletion, Df(3R)Ace/sup HD1/, co-segregated with the molecular deletion. This deletion does not fully remove Ace activity, but it behaves as a recessive Ace lethal. Df(3R)Ace/sup HD1/ is the most distal Ace lesion identified and indicates that the Ace locus must extend at least 16 kb. Several poly(A)transcripts are detectable in the region defined by the Ace lesions. The position and extent of the Ace locus, as well as the types of transcripts found, is consistent with the recent findings which identified Torpedo-AChE homologous cDNA sequences in this region.

  14. ACES: Final performance report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baxter, V. D.

    1981-04-01

    The performance of the ACES in a single family residence near Knoxville, Tennessee was compared with that of two different air to air heat pumps in an identical house. Results show that energy was saved for the testing years. In addition to reducing consumption, the ACES significantly reduced integrated peak utility demands. Reinsulation of the ice storage bin reduced heat leakage rates by about 40 percent and resulted in increasing ground temperatures by an average of 5.60 C over first year levels. The demonstration project and the ACES concept are described. Data acquisition procedures, system modifications, steady state performance, annual cycle performance, and effects of modifications are discussed.

  15. Library Screen Identifies Enterococcus faecalis CcpA, the Catabolite Control Protein A, as an Effector of Ace, a Collagen Adhesion Protein Linked to Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Peng; Pinkston, Kenneth L.; Bourgogne, Agathe; Cruz, Melissa R.; Garsin, Danielle A.; Murray, Barbara E.

    2013-01-01

    The Enterococcus faecalis cell wall-anchored protein Ace is an important virulence factor involved in cell adhesion and infection. Expression of Ace on the cell surface is affected by many factors, including stage of growth, culture temperature, and environmental components, such as serum, urine, and collagen. However, the mechanisms that regulate or modulate Ace display are not well understood. With interest in identifying genes associated with Ace expression, we utilized a whole-cell enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA)-based screening method to identify mutants from a transposon insertion mutant library which exhibited distinct Ace surface expression profiles. We identified a ccpA insertion mutant which showed significantly decreased levels of Ace surface expression at early growth phase versus those of wild-type OG1RF. Confirmation of the observation was achieved through flow cytometry and complementation analysis. Compared to the wild type, the E. faecalis ccpA mutant had an impaired ability to adhere to collagen when grown to early exponential phase, consistent with the lack of Ace expression in the early growth phase. As a key component of carbon catabolite regulation, CcpA has been previously reported to play a critical role in regulating expression of proteins involved in E. faecalis carbohydrate uptake and utilization. Our discovery is the first to associate CcpA with the production of a major E. faecalis virulence factor, providing new insights into the regulation of E. faecalis pathogenesis. PMID:23974022

  16. Library screen identifies Enterococcus faecalis CcpA, the catabolite control protein A, as an effector of Ace, a collagen adhesion protein linked to virulence.

    PubMed

    Gao, Peng; Pinkston, Kenneth L; Bourgogne, Agathe; Cruz, Melissa R; Garsin, Danielle A; Murray, Barbara E; Harvey, Barrett R

    2013-10-01

    The Enterococcus faecalis cell wall-anchored protein Ace is an important virulence factor involved in cell adhesion and infection. Expression of Ace on the cell surface is affected by many factors, including stage of growth, culture temperature, and environmental components, such as serum, urine, and collagen. However, the mechanisms that regulate or modulate Ace display are not well understood. With interest in identifying genes associated with Ace expression, we utilized a whole-cell enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA)-based screening method to identify mutants from a transposon insertion mutant library which exhibited distinct Ace surface expression profiles. We identified a ccpA insertion mutant which showed significantly decreased levels of Ace surface expression at early growth phase versus those of wild-type OG1RF. Confirmation of the observation was achieved through flow cytometry and complementation analysis. Compared to the wild type, the E. faecalis ccpA mutant had an impaired ability to adhere to collagen when grown to early exponential phase, consistent with the lack of Ace expression in the early growth phase. As a key component of carbon catabolite regulation, CcpA has been previously reported to play a critical role in regulating expression of proteins involved in E. faecalis carbohydrate uptake and utilization. Our discovery is the first to associate CcpA with the production of a major E. faecalis virulence factor, providing new insights into the regulation of E. faecalis pathogenesis.

  17. Association of GSTM1, GSTT1, GSTP1-ILE105VAL and ACE I/D polymorphisms with ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    İnal, Esra Erkol; Görükmez, Orhan; Eroğlu, Selma; Görükmez, Özlem; Solak, Özlem; Topak, Ali; Yakut, Tahsin

    2016-01-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is a chronic inflammatory disease of unknown origin. The aim of this study is to clarify the relationships between susceptibility and severity of AS and GST-mu1 (GSTM1), GST-theta1 (GSTT1), GST-pi1 (GSTP1)-Ile105Val and angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) I/D polymorphisms in AS patients. One hundred thirty-eight AS patients and seventy-one healthy controls were enrolled in this study. Erythrocyte sedimentation rate and C-reactive protein (CRP) levels of the AS patients were recorded. The scores of the numeric rating scale (NRS) pain, the Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Activity Index, the Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Metrology Index and the Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Functional Index were calculated. The genotypes distributions and allele frequencies of GSTM1, GSTT1, GSTP1-Ile105Val and ACE I/D polymorphisms were compared between patients and healthy controls. The Multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and the PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism methods were used to detect the polymorphisms of ACE I/D, the GSTT1 and GSTM1 genes and the GSTP1-Ile105Val polymorphism, respectively. There were significantly higher levels of the GSTT1 null and the ACE II genotypes in AS patients compared to those in healthy controls (p = 0.002 and 0.005, respectively). We found significantly higher levels of CRP and the NRS pain scores in the patients with ACE ID or DD genotypes compared to those in the patients with ACE II genotypes (p = 0.005 and 0.035, respectively). The present results showed that genes involved in protection from oxidative stress and ACE gene may influence disease development and course in AS.

  18. Sex Hormones Promote Opposite Effects on ACE and ACE2 Activity, Hypertrophy and Cardiac Contractility in Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats

    PubMed Central

    Dalpiaz, P. L. M.; Lamas, A. Z.; Caliman, I. F.; Ribeiro, R. F.; Abreu, G. R.; Moyses, M. R.; Andrade, T. U.; Gouvea, S. A.; Alves, M. F.; Carmona, A. K.; Bissoli, N. S.

    2015-01-01

    Background There is growing interest in sex differences and RAS components. However, whether gender influences cardiac angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) and angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) activity is still unknown. In the present work, we determined the relationship between ACE and ACE2 activity, left ventricular function and gender in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs). Methodology / Principal Findings Twelve-week-old female (F) and male (M) SHRs were divided into 2 experimental groups (n = 7 in each group): sham (S) and gonadectomized (G). Fifty days after gonadectomy, we measured positive and negative first derivatives (dP/dt maximum left ventricle (LV) and dP/dt minimum LV, respectively), hypertrophy (morphometric analysis) and ACE and ACE2 catalytic activity (fluorimetrically). Expression of calcium handling proteins was measured by western blot. Male rats exhibited higher cardiac ACE and ACE2 activity as well as hypertrophy compared to female rats. Orchiectomy decreased the activity of these enzymes and hypertrophy, while ovariectomy increased hypertrophy and ACE2, but did not change ACE activity. For cardiac function, the male sham group had a lower +dP/dt than the female sham group. After gonadectomy, the +dP/dt increased in males and reduced in females. The male sham group had a lower -dP/dt than the female group. After gonadectomy, the -dP/dt increased in the male and decreased in the female groups when compared to the sham group. No difference was observed among the groups in SERCA2a protein expression. Gonadectomy increased protein expression of PLB (phospholamban) and the PLB to SERCA2a ratio in female rats, but did not change in male rats. Conclusion Ovariectomy leads to increased cardiac hypertrophy, ACE2 activity, PLB expression and PLB to SERCA2a ratio, and worsening of hemodynamic variables, whereas in males the removal of testosterone has the opposite effects on RAS components. PMID:26010093

  19. Role of ACE and PAI-1 Polymorphisms in the Development and Progression of Diabetic Retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Saleem, Saba; Azam, Aisha; Maqsood, Sundus Ijaz; Muslim, Irfan; Bashir, Shaheena; Fazal, Nosheen; Riaz, Moeen; Ali, Syeda Hafiza Benish; Niazi, Muhammad Khizar; Ishaq, Mazhar; Waheed, Nadia Khalida; Qamar, Raheel; Azam, Maleeha

    2015-01-01

    In the present study we determined the association of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) gene polymorphisms with diabetic retinopathy (DR) and its sub-clinical classes in Pakistani type 2 diabetic patients. A total of 353 diabetic subjects including 160 DR and 193 diabetic non retinopathy (DNR) as well as 198 healthy controls were genotyped by allele specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for ACE Insertion/Deletion (ID) polymorphism, rs4646994 in intron 16 and PAI-1 4G/5G (deletion/insertion) polymorphism, rs1799768 in promoter region of the gene. To statistically assess the genotype-phenotype association, multivariate logistic regression analysis was applied to the genotype data of DR, DNR and control individuals as well as the subtypes of DR. The ACE genotype ID was found to be significantly associated with DR (p = 0.009, odds ratio (OR) 1.870 [95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.04-3.36]) and its sub-clinical class non-proliferative DR (NPDR) (p = 0.006, OR 2.250 [95% CI = 1.098-4.620]), while PAI polymorphism did not show any association with DR in the current cohort. In conclusion in Pakistani population the ACE ID polymorphism was observed to be significantly associated with DR and NPDR, but not with the severe form of the disease i.e. proliferative DR (PDR). PMID:26658948

  20. Unraveling the Pivotal Role of Bradykinin in ACE Inhibitor Activity.

    PubMed

    Taddei, Stefano; Bortolotto, L

    2016-10-01

    Historically, the first described effect of an angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor was an increased activity of bradykinin, one of the substrates of ACE. However, in the subsequent years, molecular models describing the mechanism of action of ACE inhibitors in decreasing blood pressure and cardiovascular risk have focused mostly on the renin-angiotensin system. Nonetheless, over the last 20 years, the importance of bradykinin in regulating vasodilation, natriuresis, oxidative stress, fibrinolysis, inflammation, and apoptosis has become clearer. The affinity of ACE appears to be higher for bradykinin than for angiotensin I, thereby suggesting that ACE inhibitors may be more effective inhibitors of bradykinin degradation than of angiotensin II production. Data describing the effect of ACE inhibition on bradykinin signaling support the hypothesis that the most cardioprotective benefits attributed to ACE inhibition may be due to increased bradykinin signaling rather than to decreased angiotensin II signaling, especially when high dosages of ACE inhibitors are considered. In particular, modulation of bradykinin in the endothelium appears to be a major target of ACE inhibition. These new mechanistic concepts may lead to further development of strategies enhancing the bradykinin signaling. PMID:27260014

  1. Macrophage mediated PCI enhanced gene-directed enzyme prodrug therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christie, Catherine E.; Zamora, Genesis; Kwon, Young J.; Berg, Kristian; Madsen, Steen J.; Hirschberg, Henry

    2015-03-01

    Photochemical internalization (PCI) is a photodynamic therapy-based approach for improving the delivery of macromolecules and genes into the cell cytosol. Prodrug activating gene therapy (suicide gene therapy) employing the transduction of the E. coli cytosine deaminase (CD) gene into tumor cells, is a promising method. Expression of this gene within the target cell produces an enzyme that converts the nontoxic prodrug, 5-FC, to the toxic metabolite, 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). 5-FC may be particularly suitable for brain tumors, because it can readily cross the bloodbrain barrier (BBB). In addition the bystander effect, where activated drug is exported from the transfected cancer cells into the tumor microenvironment, plays an important role by inhibiting growth of adjacent tumor cells. Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) are frequently found in and around glioblastomas. Monocytes or macrophages (Ma) loaded with drugs, nanoparticles or photosensitizers could therefore be used to target tumors by local synthesis of chemo attractive factors. The basic concept is to combine PCI, to enhance the ex vivo transfection of a suicide gene into Ma, employing specially designed core/shell NP as gene carrier.

  2. Organochlorine pesticides and antioxidant enzymes are inversely correlated with liver enzyme gene expression in Cyprinus carpio.

    PubMed

    Karaca, Melis; Varışlı, Lokman; Korkmaz, Kemal; Özaydın, Okan; Perçin, Fatih; Orhan, Hilmi

    2014-10-15

    The present study was designed to investigate the association between levels of organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) and liver enzyme responses in Cyprinus carpio. Fish were caught at three stations in the Büyük Menderes River (BMR): the origin, the Sarayköy station, and the estuary. Seventeen OCPs were quantified in liver tissue, as well as in river water by gas chromatography (GC)-electron capture detection, and structures were confirmed by negative chemical ionization-GC-mass spectrometry. The activities of CYP1A, GST, Se-GPx, CAT, and SODs were determined by spectrophotometry or fluorimetry. The mRNA levels of CYP1A, GST, and SOD1 were quantified by real-time RT-PCR. CYP1A and antioxidant enzyme activities were dramatically higher at the Sarayköy station, where OCP pollution is higher than the other two stations. Mn-SOD is responsible for the increase in total SOD activity in the Sarayköy samples. However, gene expression levels of certain enzymes were heavily suppressed. Our findings show that the transcriptional and functional responses of CYP1A and antioxidant enzymes are inversely correlated. PMID:24583044

  3. Essential fatty acids and their metabolites could function as endogenous HMG-CoA reductase and ACE enzyme inhibitors, anti-arrhythmic, anti-hypertensive, anti-atherosclerotic, anti-inflammatory, cytoprotective, and cardioprotective molecules.

    PubMed

    Das, Undurti N

    2008-01-01

    Lowering plasma low density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C), blood pressure, homocysteine, and preventing platelet aggregation using a combination of a statin, three blood pressure lowering drugs such as a thiazide, a beta blocker, and an angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor each at half standard dose; folic acid; and aspirin-called as polypill- was estimated to reduce cardiovascular events by approximately 80%. Essential fatty acids (EFAs) and their long-chain metabolites: gamma-linolenic acid (GLA), dihomo-GLA (DGLA), arachidonic acid, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and other products such as prostaglandins E1 (PGE1), prostacyclin (PGI2), PGI3, lipoxins (LXs), resolvins, protectins including neuroprotectin D1 (NPD1) prevent platelet aggregation, lower blood pressure, have anti-arrhythmic action, reduce LDL-C, ameliorate the adverse actions of homocysteine, show anti-inflammatory actions, activate telomerase, and have cytoprotective properties. Thus, EFAs and their metabolites show all the classic actions expected of the "polypill". Unlike the proposed "polypill", EFAs are endogenous molecules present in almost all tissues, have no significant or few side effects, can be taken orally for long periods of time even by pregnant women, lactating mothers, and infants, children, and adults; and have been known to reduce the incidence cardiovascular diseases including stroke. In addition, various EFAs and their long-chain metabolites not only enhance nitric oxide generation but also react with nitric oxide to yield their respective nitroalkene derivatives that produce vascular relaxation, inhibit neutrophil degranulation and superoxide formation, inhibit platelet activation, and possess PPAR-gamma ligand activity and release NO, thus prevent platelet aggregation, thrombus formation, atherosclerosis, and cardiovascular diseases. Based on these evidences, I propose that a rational combination of omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids and the

  4. Genes and enzymes of ectoine biosynthesis in halotolerant methanotrophs.

    PubMed

    Reshetnikov, Alexander S; Khmelenina, Valentina N; Mustakhimov, Ildar I; Trotsenko, Yuri A

    2011-01-01

    Ectoine (1,4,5,6-tetrahydro-2-methyl-4-pyrimidine carboxylic acid) is a widely distributed compatible solute accumulated by halophilic and halotolerant microorganisms to prevent osmotic stress in highly saline environments. Ectoine as a highly water keeping compound stabilizing biomolecules and whole cells can be used in scientific work, cosmetics, and medicine. Detailed understanding of the organization/regulation of the ectoine biosynthetic pathway in various producers is an active area of research. Here we review current knowledge on some genetic and enzymatic aspects of ectoine biosynthesis in halophilic and halotolerant methanotrophs. By using PCR methodology, the genes coding for the specific enzymes of ectoine biosynthesis, diaminobutyric acid (DABA) aminotransferase (EctB), DABA acetyltransferase (EctA), and ectoine synthase (EctC), were identified in several methanotrophic species. Organization of these genes in either ectABC or ectABC-ask operons, the latter additionally encoding aspartate kinase isozyme (Ask), correlated well with methanotroph halotolerance and intracellular ectoine level. A new gene, ectR1 encoding the MarR-like transcriptional regulatory protein EctR1, negatively controlling transcription of ectoine biosynthetic genes was found upstream of ectABC-ask operon in Methylomicrobium alcaliphilum 20Z. The ectR-like genes were also found in halotolerant methanol utilizers Methylophaga alcalica and Methylophaga thalassica as well as in several genomes of nonmethylotrophic species. The His(6)-tagged DABA acetyltransferases from Mm. alcaliphilum, M. alcalica, and M. thalassica were purified and the enzyme properties were found to correlate with the ecophysiologies of these bacteria. All these discoveries should be very helpful for better understanding the biosynthetic mechanism of this important natural compound, and for the targeted metabolic engineering of its producers.

  5. Necessity of angiotensin-converting enzyme-related gene for cardiac functions and longevity of Drosophila melanogaster assessed by optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Fang-Tsu; Chang, Cheng-Yi; Su, Ming-Tsan; Kuo, Wen-Chuan

    2014-01-01

    Prior studies have established the necessity of an angiotensin-converting enzyme-related (ACER) gene for heart morphogenesis of Drosophila. Nevertheless, the physiology of ACER has yet to be comprehensively understood. Herein, we employed RNA interference to down-regulate the expression of ACER in Drosophila's heart and swept source optical coherence tomography to assess whether ACER is required for cardiac functions in living adult flies. Several contractile parameters of Drosophila heart, including the heart rate (HR), end-diastolic diameter (EDD), end-systolic diameter (ESD), percent fractional shortening (%FS), and stress-induced cardiac performance, are shown, which are age dependent. These age-dependent cardiac functions declined significantly when ACER was down-regulated. Moreover, the lifespans of ACER knock-down flies were significantly shorter than those of wild-type control flies. Thus, we posit that ACER, the Drosophila ortholog of mammalian angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2), is essential for both heart physiology and longevity of animals. Since mammalian ACE2 controls many cardiovascular physiological features and is implicated in cardiomyopathies, our findings that ACER plays conserved roles in genetically tractable animals will pave the way for uncovering the genetic pathway that controls the renin-angiotensin system.

  6. Inhibition of ACE Retards Tau Hyperphosphorylation and Signs of Neuronal Degeneration in Aged Rats Subjected to Chronic Mild Stress.

    PubMed

    AbdAlla, Said; El Hakim, Ahmed; Abdelbaset, Ahmed; Elfaramawy, Yasser; Quitterer, Ursula

    2015-01-01

    With increasing life expectancy, Alzheimer's disease (AD) and other types of age-associated dementia are on the rise worldwide. Treatment approaches for dementia are insufficient and novel therapies are not readily available. In this context repurposing of established drugs appears attractive. A well-established class of cardiovascular drugs, which targets the angiotensin II system, is such a candidate, which currently undergoes a paradigm shift with regard to the potential benefit for treatment of neurodegenerative symptoms. In search for additional evidence, we subjected aged rats to chronic unpredictable mild stress, which is known to enhance the development of AD-related neuropathological features. We report here that four weeks of chronic mild stress induced a strong upregulation of the hippocampal angiotensin-converting enzyme (Ace) at gene expression and protein level. Concomitantly, tau protein hyperphosphorylation developed. Signs of neurodegeneration were detected by the significant downregulation of neuronal structure proteins such as microtubule-associated protein 2 (Map2) and synuclein-gamma (Sncg). Ace was involved in neurodegenerative symptoms because treatment with the brain-penetrating ACE inhibitor, captopril, retarded tau hyperphosphorylation and signs of neurodegeneration. Moreover, ACE inhibitor treatment could counteract glutamate neurotoxicity by preventing the downregulation of glutamate decarboxylase 2 (Gad2). Taken together, ACE inhibition targets neurodegeneration triggered by environmental stress. PMID:26697495

  7. Inhibition of ACE Retards Tau Hyperphosphorylation and Signs of Neuronal Degeneration in Aged Rats Subjected to Chronic Mild Stress

    PubMed Central

    AbdAlla, Said; el Hakim, Ahmed; Abdelbaset, Ahmed; Elfaramawy, Yasser; Quitterer, Ursula

    2015-01-01

    With increasing life expectancy, Alzheimer's disease (AD) and other types of age-associated dementia are on the rise worldwide. Treatment approaches for dementia are insufficient and novel therapies are not readily available. In this context repurposing of established drugs appears attractive. A well-established class of cardiovascular drugs, which targets the angiotensin II system, is such a candidate, which currently undergoes a paradigm shift with regard to the potential benefit for treatment of neurodegenerative symptoms. In search for additional evidence, we subjected aged rats to chronic unpredictable mild stress, which is known to enhance the development of AD-related neuropathological features. We report here that four weeks of chronic mild stress induced a strong upregulation of the hippocampal angiotensin-converting enzyme (Ace) at gene expression and protein level. Concomitantly, tau protein hyperphosphorylation developed. Signs of neurodegeneration were detected by the significant downregulation of neuronal structure proteins such as microtubule-associated protein 2 (Map2) and synuclein-gamma (Sncg). Ace was involved in neurodegenerative symptoms because treatment with the brain-penetrating ACE inhibitor, captopril, retarded tau hyperphosphorylation and signs of neurodegeneration. Moreover, ACE inhibitor treatment could counteract glutamate neurotoxicity by preventing the downregulation of glutamate decarboxylase 2 (Gad2). Taken together, ACE inhibition targets neurodegeneration triggered by environmental stress. PMID:26697495

  8. Radiation Exposure Alters Expression of Metabolic Enzyme Genes In Mice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wotring, Virginia E.; Mangala, L. S.; Zhang, Y.; Wu, H.

    2010-01-01

    Most pharmaceuticals are metabolized by the liver. The health of the liver, especially the rate of its metabolic enzymes, determines the concentration of circulating drugs as well as the duration of their efficacy. Because of the importance of the liver in drug metabolism it is important to understand the effects of spaceflight on the enzymes of the liver. Exposure to cosmic radiation is one aspect of spaceflight that can be modeled in ground experiments. This study is an effort to examine the effects of adaptive mechanisms that may be triggered by early exposure to low radiation doses. Using procedures approved by the JSC Animal Care & Use Committee, C57 male mice were exposed to Cs-137 in groups: controls, low dose (50 mGy), high dose (6Gy) and a fourth group that received both radiation doses separated by 24 hours. Animals were anesthetized and sacrificed 4 hours after their last radiation exposure. Livers were removed immediately and flash-frozen in liquid nitrogen. Tissue was homogenized, RNA extracted and purified (Absolutely RNA, Agilent). Quality of RNA samples was evaluated (Agilent Bioanalyzer 2100). Complementary DNA was prepared from high-quality RNA samples, and used to run RT-qPCR screening arrays for DNA Repair and Drug Metabolism (SuperArray, SABiosciences/Qiagen; BioRad Cfx96 qPCR System). Of 91 drug metabolism genes examined, expression of 7 was altered by at least one treatment condition. Genes that had elevated expression include those that metabolize promethazine and steroids (4-8-fold), many that reduce oxidation products, and one that reduces heavy metal exposure (greater than 200-fold). Of the 91 DNA repair and general metabolism genes examined, expression of 14 was altered by at least one treatment condition. These gene expression changes are likely homeostatic and could lead to development of new radioprotective countermeasures.

  9. Genetically-reduced serum ACE activity might be a causal risk factor for obstructive sleep apnea syndrome: A meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    He, Lan; Wang, Bin; Lang, Wei-Ya; Xue, Jing; Zhao, Da-Long; Li, Guo-Feng; Zheng, Li-Hong; Pan, Hong-Ming

    2015-01-01

    We meta-analytically summarized the associations of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) gene insertion/deletion (I/D) polymorphism with ACE activity and obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) to see whether ACE activity is causally associated with OSAS. Literature search and data abstraction were done in duplicate. Sixteen articles including 2060 OSAS patients and 1878 controls were summarized. Overall, no significance was observed for the association of I/D polymorphism with OSAS, whereas carriers of II genotype (weighted mean difference or WMD, 95% confidence interval or CI, P: -11.976, -17.168 to -6.783, <0.001) or I allele (-9.842, -14.766 to -4.918, <0.001) had a lower level of serum ACE activity compared with DD genotype carriers, respectively. In subgroup analyses, carriers of II genotype were 3.806 times more likely to develop OSAS (95% CI, P: 1.865 to 7.765, <0.001) in OSAS patients with hypertension, without heterogeneity. Mendelian randomization analysis indicated there was 37.4% (95% CI: 1.115 to 3.142) and 32.4% (1.106 to 2.845) increased risk of OSAS by a reduction of 1 U/L in ACE activity for the II genotype and I allele carriers versus DD genotype carriers, respectively. There was no observable publication bias. Collectively, genetically-reduced serum ACE activity might be a causal risk factor for OSAS. PMID:26486181

  10. ACE Inhibitor in the treatment of cutaneous and lymphatic sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Kaura, Vinod; Kaura, Samantha H; Kaura, Claire S

    2007-01-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme is used as a marker for sarcoid activity. We describe a case of remission of cutaneous and lymphatic sarcoidosis in a patient treated with an ACE inhibitor for congestive heart failure and hypertension; the remission has continued over 4 years of follow-up. Because this is a report of only one case, there is a possibility of sampling error. Whether the patient's remission in this case was a serendipitous spontaneous remission that happened to occur during ACE inhibitor therapy or whether ACE inhibitor therapy can play a role in the treatment of sarcoidosis needs to be determined in a large clinical trial.

  11. ACE inhibition can improve orthostatic proteinuria associated with nutcracker syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ha, Tae-Sun; Lee, Eun-Ju

    2006-11-01

    Left renal vein entrapment syndrome (nutcracker syndrome) was documented by magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) as a cause of orthostatic proteinuria in a 14-year-old girl female adolescent. Because of continuous proteinuria we performed a left renal biopsy which showed moderate mesangial hypercellularity. Her overt orthostatic proteinuria disappeared after a treatment of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibition. Nutcracker syndrome remains a rare but important cause of elevated protein excretion, which can induce mesangial changes and be improved by ACE inhibitor treatment.

  12. Cardiac protective effects of irbesartan via the PPAR-gamma signaling pathway in angiotensin-converting enzyme 2-deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2), a monocarboxypeptidase which metabolizes angiotensin II (Ang II) to generate Ang-(1–7), has been shown to prevent cardiac hypertrophy and injury but the mechanism remains elusive. Irbesartan has the dual actions of angiotensin receptor blockade and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARγ) activation. We hypothesized that irbesartan would exert its protective effects on ACE2 deficiency-mediated myocardial fibrosis and cardiac injury via the PPARγ signaling. Methods 10-week-old ACE2 knockout (ACE2KO; Ace2-/y) mice received daily with irbesartan (50 mg/kg) or saline for 2 weeks. The wild-type mice (Ace2+/y) were used to the normal controls. We examined changes in myocardial ultrastructure, fibrosis-related genes and pathological signaling by real-time PCR gene array, Western blotting, Masson trichrome staining and transmission electron microscope analyses, respectively. Results Compared with the Ace2+/y mice, cardiac expression of PPARα and PPARγ were reduced in Ace2-/y mice and the myocardial collagen volume fraction (CVF) and expression of fibrosis-related genes were increased, including transforming growth factor-β1 (TGFβ1), connective tissue growth factor (CTGF), collagen I and collagen III. Moreover, ACE2 deficiency triggered cardiac hypertrophy, increased myocardial fibrosis and adverse ultrastructure injury in ACE2KO hearts with higher levels of atrial natriuretic factor (ANF) and phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2), without affecting cardiac systolic function. Intriguingly, treatment with irbesartan significantly reversed ACE2 deficiency-mediated pathological hypertrophy and myocardial fibrosis in Ace2-/y mice linked with enhancement of plasma Ang-(1–7) level and downregulation of AT1 receptor in heart. Consistent with attenuation of myocardial fibrosis and ultrastructure injury, the myocardial CVF and levels of ANF, TGFβ1, CTGF, collagen I, collagen III

  13. Enzyme

    MedlinePlus

    Enzymes are complex proteins that cause a specific chemical change in all parts of the body. For ... use them. Blood clotting is another example of enzymes at work. Enzymes are needed for all body ...

  14. Perinatally administered losartan augments renal ACE2 expression but not cardiac or renal Mas receptor in spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Klimas, Jan; Olvedy, Michael; Ochodnicka-Mackovicova, Katarina; Kruzliak, Peter; Cacanyiova, Sona; Kristek, Frantisek; Krenek, Peter; Ochodnicky, Peter

    2015-08-01

    Since the identification of the alternative angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE)2/Ang-(1-7)/Mas receptor axis, renin-angiotensin system (RAS) is a new complex target for a pharmacological intervention. We investigated the expression of RAS components in the heart and kidney during the development of hypertension and its perinatal treatment with losartan in young spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). Expressions of RAS genes were studied by the RT-PCR in the left ventricle and kidney of rats: normotensive Wistar, untreated SHR, SHR treated with losartan since perinatal period until week 9 of age (20 mg/kg/day) and SHR treated with losartan only until week 4 of age and discontinued until week 9. In the hypertrophied left ventricle of SHR, cardiac expressions of Ace and Mas were decreased while those of AT1 receptor (Agtr1a) and Ace2 were unchanged. Continuous losartan administration reduced LV weight (0.43 ± 0.02; P < 0.05 versus SHR) but did not influence altered cardiac RAS expression. Increased blood pressure in SHR (149 ± 2 in SHR versus 109 ± 2 mmHg in Wistar; P < 0.05) was associated with a lower renal expressions of renin, Agtr1a and Mas and with an increase in ACE2. Continuous losartan administration lowered blood pressure to control levels (105 ± 3 mmHg; P < 0.05 versus SHR), however, only renal renin and ACE2 were significantly up-regulated (for both P < 0.05 versus SHR). Conclusively, prevention of hypertension and LV hypertrophy development by losartan was unrelated to cardiac or renal expression of Mas. Increased renal Ace2, and its further increase by losartan suggests the influence of locally generated Ang-(1-7) in organ response to the developing hypertension in SHRs.

  15. ACEE composite structures technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klotzsche, M. (Compiler)

    1984-01-01

    The NASA Aircraft Energy Efficiency (ACEE) Composite Primary Aircraft Structures Program has made significant progress in the development of technology for advanced composites in commercial aircraft. Commercial airframe manufacturers have demonstrated technology readiness and cost effectiveness of advanced composites for secondary and medium primary components and have initiated a concerted program to develop the data base required for efficient application to safety-of-flight wing and fuselage structures. Oral presentations were compiled into five papers. Topics addressed include: damage tolerance and failsafe testing of composite vertical stabilizer; optimization of composite multi-row bolted joints; large wing joint demonstation components; and joints and cutouts in fuselage structure.

  16. Gene Cloning, Expression and Enzyme Activity of Vitis vinifera Vacuolar Processing Enzymes (VvVPEs)

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Peijie; Li, Shuxiu; Wang, Yuejin; Zhang, Chaohong

    2016-01-01

    Vacuolar processing enzymes (VPEs) have received considerable attention due to their caspase-1-like activity and ability to regulate programmed cell death (PCD), which plays an essential role in the development of stenospermocarpic seedless grapes ovules. To characterize VPEs and the relationship between stenospermocarpic grapes and the VPE gene family, we identified 3 Vitis vinifera VPE genes (VvβVPE, VvγVPE, and VvδVPE) from the PN40024 grape genome and cloned the full-length complementary DNAs (cDNAs) from the ‘Vitis vinifera cv. Pinot Noir’ and ‘Vitis vinifera cv. Thompson Seedless’ varietals. Each of the VPEs contained a typical catalytic dyad [His (177), Cys (219)] and substrate binding pocket [Arg (112), Arg (389), Ser (395)], except that Ser (395) in the VvγVPE protein sequence was replaced with alanine. Phylogenetic analysis of 4 Arabidopsis thaliana and 6 Vitis vinifera VPEs revealed that the 10 VPEs form 3 major branches. Furthermore, the 6 grapevine VPEs share a similar gene structure, with 9 exons and 8 introns. The 6 grapevine VPEs are located on 3 different chromosomes. We also tested the enzymatic activity of recombinant VPEs expressed in the Pichia Pastoris expression system and found that the VvVPEs exhibit cysteine peptidase activity. Tissue-specific expression analysis showed that VvδVPE is only expressed in flowers, buds and ovules, that VvγVPE is expressed in various tissues, and that VvβVPE was expressed in roots, flowers, buds and ovules. The results of quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) suggested that VvβVPE in seeded grapes increased significantly at 30 days after full-bloom (DAF), close to the timing of endosperm abortion at 32 DAF. These results suggested that VvβVPE is related to ovule abortion in seedless grapes. Our experiments provide a new perspective for understanding the mechanism of stenospermocarpic seedlessness and represent a useful reference for the further study of VPEs. PMID:27551866

  17. Gene Cloning, Expression and Enzyme Activity of Vitis vinifera Vacuolar Processing Enzymes (VvVPEs).

    PubMed

    Tang, Yujin; Wang, Ruipu; Gong, Peijie; Li, Shuxiu; Wang, Yuejin; Zhang, Chaohong

    2016-01-01

    Vacuolar processing enzymes (VPEs) have received considerable attention due to their caspase-1-like activity and ability to regulate programmed cell death (PCD), which plays an essential role in the development of stenospermocarpic seedless grapes ovules. To characterize VPEs and the relationship between stenospermocarpic grapes and the VPE gene family, we identified 3 Vitis vinifera VPE genes (VvβVPE, VvγVPE, and VvδVPE) from the PN40024 grape genome and cloned the full-length complementary DNAs (cDNAs) from the 'Vitis vinifera cv. Pinot Noir' and 'Vitis vinifera cv. Thompson Seedless' varietals. Each of the VPEs contained a typical catalytic dyad [His (177), Cys (219)] and substrate binding pocket [Arg (112), Arg (389), Ser (395)], except that Ser (395) in the VvγVPE protein sequence was replaced with alanine. Phylogenetic analysis of 4 Arabidopsis thaliana and 6 Vitis vinifera VPEs revealed that the 10 VPEs form 3 major branches. Furthermore, the 6 grapevine VPEs share a similar gene structure, with 9 exons and 8 introns. The 6 grapevine VPEs are located on 3 different chromosomes. We also tested the enzymatic activity of recombinant VPEs expressed in the Pichia Pastoris expression system and found that the VvVPEs exhibit cysteine peptidase activity. Tissue-specific expression analysis showed that VvδVPE is only expressed in flowers, buds and ovules, that VvγVPE is expressed in various tissues, and that VvβVPE was expressed in roots, flowers, buds and ovules. The results of quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) suggested that VvβVPE in seeded grapes increased significantly at 30 days after full-bloom (DAF), close to the timing of endosperm abortion at 32 DAF. These results suggested that VvβVPE is related to ovule abortion in seedless grapes. Our experiments provide a new perspective for understanding the mechanism of stenospermocarpic seedlessness and represent a useful reference for the further study of VPEs.

  18. Gene Cloning, Expression and Enzyme Activity of Vitis vinifera Vacuolar Processing Enzymes (VvVPEs).

    PubMed

    Tang, Yujin; Wang, Ruipu; Gong, Peijie; Li, Shuxiu; Wang, Yuejin; Zhang, Chaohong

    2016-01-01

    Vacuolar processing enzymes (VPEs) have received considerable attention due to their caspase-1-like activity and ability to regulate programmed cell death (PCD), which plays an essential role in the development of stenospermocarpic seedless grapes ovules. To characterize VPEs and the relationship between stenospermocarpic grapes and the VPE gene family, we identified 3 Vitis vinifera VPE genes (VvβVPE, VvγVPE, and VvδVPE) from the PN40024 grape genome and cloned the full-length complementary DNAs (cDNAs) from the 'Vitis vinifera cv. Pinot Noir' and 'Vitis vinifera cv. Thompson Seedless' varietals. Each of the VPEs contained a typical catalytic dyad [His (177), Cys (219)] and substrate binding pocket [Arg (112), Arg (389), Ser (395)], except that Ser (395) in the VvγVPE protein sequence was replaced with alanine. Phylogenetic analysis of 4 Arabidopsis thaliana and 6 Vitis vinifera VPEs revealed that the 10 VPEs form 3 major branches. Furthermore, the 6 grapevine VPEs share a similar gene structure, with 9 exons and 8 introns. The 6 grapevine VPEs are located on 3 different chromosomes. We also tested the enzymatic activity of recombinant VPEs expressed in the Pichia Pastoris expression system and found that the VvVPEs exhibit cysteine peptidase activity. Tissue-specific expression analysis showed that VvδVPE is only expressed in flowers, buds and ovules, that VvγVPE is expressed in various tissues, and that VvβVPE was expressed in roots, flowers, buds and ovules. The results of quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) suggested that VvβVPE in seeded grapes increased significantly at 30 days after full-bloom (DAF), close to the timing of endosperm abortion at 32 DAF. These results suggested that VvβVPE is related to ovule abortion in seedless grapes. Our experiments provide a new perspective for understanding the mechanism of stenospermocarpic seedlessness and represent a useful reference for the further study of VPEs. PMID:27551866

  19. γ-Aminobutyric Acid (GABA) Production and Angiotensin-I Converting Enzyme (ACE) Inhibitory Activity of Fermented Soybean Containing Sea Tangle by the Co-Culture of Lactobacillus brevis with Aspergillus oryzae.

    PubMed

    Jang, Eun Kyeong; Kim, Nam Yeun; Ahn, Hyung Jin; Ji, Geun Eog

    2015-08-01

    To enhance the γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) content, the optimized fermentation of soybean with added sea tangle extract was evaluated at 30°C and pH 5.0. The medium was first inoculated with Aspergillus oryzae strain FMB S46471 and fermented for 3 days, followed by the subsequent inoculation with Lactobacillus brevis GABA 100. After fermentation for 7 days, the fermented soybean showed approximately 1.9 g/kg GABA and exhibited higher ACE inhibitory activity than the traditional soybean product. Furthermore, several peptides in the fraction containing the highest ACE inhibitory activity were identified. The novel fermented soybean enriched with GABA and ACE inhibitory components has great pharmaceutical and functional food values.

  20. Cutaneous allergy to insulin: could statins and ACE inhibitors play a role? A case report.

    PubMed

    Pitrola, D; MacIver, C; Mallipedhi, A; Udiawar, M; Price, D E; Stephens, J W

    2014-04-01

    Insulin allergy is rare. Both statins and angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors may cause local urticarial skin reactions and have been implicated to precipitate local reactions to insulin. We describe a case of a localised urticarial allergic reaction related to insulin use in a patient co-prescribed an ACE inhibitor and statin. PMID:24534533

  1. Convergent evidences from human and animal studies implicate angiotensin I-converting enzyme activity in cognitive performance in schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Gadelha, A; Vendramini, A M; Yonamine, C M; Nering, M; Berberian, A; Suiama, M A; Oliveira, V; Lima-Landman, M T; Breen, G; Bressan, R A; Abílio, V; Hayashi, M A F

    2015-01-01

    In schizophrenia (SCZ), higher angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) levels have been reported in patient's blood and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Hereby, we propose to explore whether the ACE activity levels are associated to cognitive performance in SCZ. Seventy-two patients with SCZ or schizoaffective disorder diagnosis, and 69 healthy controls (HCs) underwent a cognitive battery with parallel collection of peripheral blood samples to measure ACE activity. Significant higher ACE activity levels were confirmed in the plasma of SCZ patients compared with HCs (Student's t=−5.216; P<0.001). ACE activity significantly correlated to Hopkins delayed recall measures (r=−0.247; P=0.004) and Hopkins total (r=−0.214; P=0.012). Subjects grouped as high ACE activity (above average) had worse performance compared with low ACE activity level group for Hopkins delayed recall measure, even after correction for clinical condition, age, gender and years of education (P=0.029). The adjusted R squared for this final model was 0.343. This result was evident only comparing extreme groups for ACE activity, when splitting the sample in three groups with similar number of subjects. To clarify this finding, we performed an evaluation of the cognitive performance of transgenic mice with three copies of ACE gene in novel object recognition (NOR) test, which showed that such animals presented impairment in NOR (P<0.05) compared with two copies of wild-type animals. The results observed in SCZ patients and animal model suggest both the association of ACE to cognitive deficits in SCZ. This finding may support the evaluation of novel treatment protocols and/or of innovative drugs for specific intervention of cognitive deficits in SCZ envisioning concomitant ACE activity and behavior evaluations. PMID:26645626

  2. Nine novel angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory peptides from cuttlefish (Sepia officinalis) muscle protein hydrolysates and antihypertensive effect of the potent active peptide in spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Balti, Rafik; Bougatef, Ali; Sila, Assaâd; Guillochon, Didier; Dhulster, Pascal; Nedjar-Arroume, Naima

    2015-03-01

    This study aimed to identify novel ACE inhibitory peptides from the muscle of cuttlefish. Proteins were hydrolyzed and the hydrolysates were then subjected to various types of chromatography to isolate the active peptides. Nine ACE inhibitory peptides were isolated and their molecular masses and amino acid sequences were determined using ESI-MS and ESI-MS/MS, respectively. The structures of the most potent peptides were identified as Val-Glu-Leu-Tyr-Pro, Ala-Phe-Val-Gly-Tyr-Val-Leu-Pro and Glu-Lys-Ser-Tyr-Glu-Leu-Pro. The first peptide displayed the highest ACE inhibitory activity with an IC50 of 5.22μM. Lineweaver-Burk plots suggest that Val-Glu-Leu-Tyr-Pro acts as a non-competitive inhibitor against ACE. Furthermore, antihypertensive effects in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) also revealed that oral administration of Val-Glu-Leu-Tyr-Pro can decrease systolic blood pressure significantly (p<0.01). These results suggest that the Val-Glu-Leu-Tyr-Pro would be a beneficial ingredient for nutraceuticals and pharmaceuticals acting against hypertension and its related diseases.

  3. Nine novel angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory peptides from cuttlefish (Sepia officinalis) muscle protein hydrolysates and antihypertensive effect of the potent active peptide in spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Balti, Rafik; Bougatef, Ali; Sila, Assaâd; Guillochon, Didier; Dhulster, Pascal; Nedjar-Arroume, Naima

    2015-03-01

    This study aimed to identify novel ACE inhibitory peptides from the muscle of cuttlefish. Proteins were hydrolyzed and the hydrolysates were then subjected to various types of chromatography to isolate the active peptides. Nine ACE inhibitory peptides were isolated and their molecular masses and amino acid sequences were determined using ESI-MS and ESI-MS/MS, respectively. The structures of the most potent peptides were identified as Val-Glu-Leu-Tyr-Pro, Ala-Phe-Val-Gly-Tyr-Val-Leu-Pro and Glu-Lys-Ser-Tyr-Glu-Leu-Pro. The first peptide displayed the highest ACE inhibitory activity with an IC50 of 5.22μM. Lineweaver-Burk plots suggest that Val-Glu-Leu-Tyr-Pro acts as a non-competitive inhibitor against ACE. Furthermore, antihypertensive effects in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) also revealed that oral administration of Val-Glu-Leu-Tyr-Pro can decrease systolic blood pressure significantly (p<0.01). These results suggest that the Val-Glu-Leu-Tyr-Pro would be a beneficial ingredient for nutraceuticals and pharmaceuticals acting against hypertension and its related diseases. PMID:25306378

  4. Effect of ace inhibitors and TMOF on growth, development, and trypsin activity of larval Spodoptera littoralis.

    PubMed

    Lemeire, Els; Borovsky, Dov; Van Camp, John; Smagghe, Guy

    2008-12-01

    Angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) is a zinc metallopeptidase capable of cleaving dipeptide or dipeptideamide moieties at the C-terminal end of peptides. ACE is present in the hemolymph and reproductive tissues of insects. The presence of ACE in the hemolymph and its broad substrate specificity suggests an important role in processing of bioactive peptides. This study reports the effects of ACE inhibitors on larval growth in the cotton leafworm Spodoptera littoralis. Feeding ACE inhibitors ad lib decreased the growth rate, inhibited ACE activity in the larval hemolymph, and down-regulated trypsin activity in the larval gut. These results indicate that S. littoralis ACE may influence trypsin biosynthesis in the larval gut by interacting with a trypsin-modulating oostatic factor (TMOF). Injecting third instar larvae with a combination of Aea-TMOF and the ACE inhibitor captopril, down-regulated trypsin biosynthesis in the larval gut indicating that an Aea-TMOF gut receptor analogue could be present. Injecting captopril and enalapril into newly molted fifth instar larvae stopped larval feeding and decreased weight gain. Together, these results indicate that ACE inhibitors are efficacious in stunting larval growth and ACE plays an important role in larval growth and development. PMID:18949805

  5. Correlation Index-Based Responsible-Enzyme Gene Screening (CIRES), a Novel DNA Microarray-Based Method for Enzyme Gene Involved in Glycan Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Harumi; Takematsu, Hiromu; Fujinawa, Reiko; Naito, Yuko; Okuno, Yasushi; Tsujimoto, Gozoh; Suzuki, Akemi; Kozutsumi, Yasunori

    2007-01-01

    Background Glycan biosynthesis occurs though a multi-step process that requires a variety of enzymes ranging from glycosyltransferases to those involved in cytosolic sugar metabolism. In many cases, glycan biosynthesis follows a glycan-specific, linear pathway. As glycosyltransferases are generally regulated at the level of transcription, assessing the overall transcriptional profile for glycan biosynthesis genes seems warranted. However, a systematic approach for assessing the correlation between glycan expression and glycan-related gene expression has not been reported previously. Methodology To facilitate genetic analysis of glycan biosynthesis, we sought to correlate the expression of genes involved in cell-surface glycan formation with the expression of the glycans, as detected by glycan-recognizing probes. We performed cross-sample comparisons of gene expression profiles using a newly developed, glycan-focused cDNA microarray. Cell-surface glycan expression profiles were obtained using flow cytometry of cells stained with plant lectins. Pearson's correlation coefficients were calculated for these profiles and were used to identify enzyme genes correlated with glycan biosynthesis. Conclusions This method, designated correlation index-based responsible-enzyme gene screening (CIRES), successfully identified genes already known to be involved in the biosynthesis of certain glycans. Our evaluation of CIRES indicates that it is useful for identifying genes involved in the biosynthesis of glycan chains that can be probed with lectins using flow cytometry. PMID:18043739

  6. The Angiotensin Converting Enzyme Insertion/Deletion Polymorphism Modifies Exercise-Induced Muscle Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Vaughan, David; Brogioli, Michael; Maier, Thomas; White, Andy; Waldron, Sarah; Rittweger, Jörn; Toigo, Marco; Wettstein, Jessica; Laczko, Endre; Flück, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Objective A silencer region (I-allele) within intron 16 of the gene for the regulator of vascular perfusion, angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE), is implicated in phenotypic variation of aerobic fitness and the development of type II diabetes. We hypothesised that the reportedly lower aerobic performance in non-carriers compared to carriers of the ACE I-allele, i.e. ACE-DD vs. ACE-ID/ACE-II genotype, is associated with alterations in activity-induced glucose metabolism and capillarisation in exercise muscle. Methods Fifty-three, not-specifically trained Caucasian men carried out a one-legged bout of cycling exercise to exhaustion and/or participated in a marathon, the aim being to identify and validate genotype effects on exercise metabolism. Respiratory exchange ratio (RER), serum glucose and lipid concentration, glycogen, and metabolite content in vastus lateralis muscle based on ultra-performance lipid chromatography-mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS), were assessed before and after the cycling exercise in thirty-three participants. Serum metabolites were measured in forty subjects that completed the marathon. Genotype effects were assessed post-hoc. Results Cycling exercise reduced muscle glycogen concentration and this tended to be affected by the ACE I-allele (p = 0.09). The ACE-DD genotype showed a lower maximal RER and a selective increase in serum glucose concentration after exercise compared to ACE-ID and ACE-II genotypes (+24% vs. +2% and –3%, respectively). Major metabolites of mitochondrial metabolism (i.e. phosphoenol pyruvate, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate, L-Aspartic acid, glutathione) were selectively affected in vastus lateralis muscle by exercise in the ACE-DD genotype. Capillary-to-fibre ratio was 24%-lower in the ACE-DD genotype. Individuals with the ACE-DD genotype demonstrated an abnormal increase in serum glucose to 7.7 mM after the marathon. Conclusion The observations imply a genetically modulated role for ACE in control of

  7. Assembly and multiple gene expression of thermophilic enzymes in Escherichia coli for in vitro metabolic engineering.

    PubMed

    Ninh, Pham Huynh; Honda, Kohsuke; Sakai, Takaaki; Okano, Kenji; Ohtake, Hisao

    2015-01-01

    In vitro reconstitution of an artificial metabolic pathway is an emerging approach for the biocatalytic production of industrial chemicals. However, several enzymes have to be separately prepared (and purified) for the construction of an in vitro metabolic pathway, thereby limiting the practical applicability of this approach. In this study, genes encoding the nine thermophilic enzymes involved in a non-ATP-forming chimeric glycolytic pathway were assembled in an artificial operon and co-expressed in a single recombinant Escherichia coli strain. Gene expression levels of the thermophilic enzymes were controlled by their sequential order in the artificial operon. The specific activities of the recombinant enzymes in the cell-free extract of the multiple-gene-expression E. coli were 5.0-1,370 times higher than those in an enzyme cocktail prepared from a mixture of single-gene-expression strains, in each of which a single one of the nine thermophilic enzymes was overproduced. Heat treatment of a crude extract of the multiple-gene-expression cells led to the denaturation of indigenous proteins and one-step preparation of an in vitro synthetic pathway comprising only a limited number of thermotolerant enzymes. Coupling this in vitro pathway with other thermophilic enzymes including the H2 O-forming NADH oxidase or the malate/lactate dehydrogenase facilitated one-pot conversion of glucose to pyruvate or lactate, respectively.

  8. Association of ACTN3 R577X but not ACE I/D gene variants with elite rugby union player status and playing position

    PubMed Central

    Kilduff, L. P.; Erskine, R. M.; Day, S. H.; McPhee, J. S.; McMahon, G. E.; Stebbings, G. K.; Neale, J. P. H.; Lockey, S. J.; Ribbans, W. J.; Cook, C. J.; Vance, B.; Raleigh, S. M.; Roberts, C.; Bennett, M. A.; Wang, G.; Collins, M.; Pitsiladis, Y. P.; Williams, A. G.

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to quantify the ACE I/D and ACTN3 R577X (rs1815739) genetic variants in elite rugby athletes (rugby union and league) and compare genotype frequencies to controls and between playing positions. The rugby athlete cohort consisted of 507 Caucasian men, including 431 rugby union athletes that for some analyses were divided into backs and forwards and into specific positional groups: front five, back row, half backs, centers, and back three. Controls were 710 Caucasian men and women. Real-time PCR of genomic DNA was used to determine genotypes using TaqMan probes and groups were compared using χ2 and odds ratio (OR) statistics. Correction of P values for multiple comparisons was according to Benjamini-Hochberg. There was no difference in ACE I/D genotype between groups. ACTN3 XX genotype tended to be underrepresented in rugby union backs (15.7%) compared with forwards (24.8%, P = 0.06). Interestingly, the 69 back three players (wings and full backs) in rugby union included only six XX genotype individuals (8.7%), with the R allele more common in the back three (68.8%) than controls (58.0%; χ2 = 6.672, P = 0.04; OR = 1.60) and forwards (47.5%; χ2 = 11.768, P = 0.01; OR = 2.00). Association of ACTN3 R577X with playing position in elite rugby union athletes suggests inherited fatigue resistance is more prevalent in forwards, while inherited sprint ability is more prevalent in backs, especially wings and full backs. These results also demonstrate the advantage of focusing genetic studies on a large cohort within a single sport, especially when intrasport positional differences exist, instead of combining several sports with varied demands and athlete characteristics. PMID:26757799

  9. Association of ACTN3 R577X but not ACE I/D gene variants with elite rugby union player status and playing position.

    PubMed

    Heffernan, S M; Kilduff, L P; Erskine, R M; Day, S H; McPhee, J S; McMahon, G E; Stebbings, G K; Neale, J P H; Lockey, S J; Ribbans, W J; Cook, C J; Vance, B; Raleigh, S M; Roberts, C; Bennett, M A; Wang, G; Collins, M; Pitsiladis, Y P; Williams, A G

    2016-03-01

    We aimed to quantify the ACE I/D and ACTN3 R577X (rs1815739) genetic variants in elite rugby athletes (rugby union and league) and compare genotype frequencies to controls and between playing positions. The rugby athlete cohort consisted of 507 Caucasian men, including 431 rugby union athletes that for some analyses were divided into backs and forwards and into specific positional groups: front five, back row, half backs, centers, and back three. Controls were 710 Caucasian men and women. Real-time PCR of genomic DNA was used to determine genotypes using TaqMan probes and groups were compared using χ(2) and odds ratio (OR) statistics. Correction of P values for multiple comparisons was according to Benjamini-Hochberg. There was no difference in ACE I/D genotype between groups. ACTN3 XX genotype tended to be underrepresented in rugby union backs (15.7%) compared with forwards (24.8%, P = 0.06). Interestingly, the 69 back three players (wings and full backs) in rugby union included only six XX genotype individuals (8.7%), with the R allele more common in the back three (68.8%) than controls (58.0%; χ(2) = 6.672, P = 0.04; OR = 1.60) and forwards (47.5%; χ(2) = 11.768, P = 0.01; OR = 2.00). Association of ACTN3 R577X with playing position in elite rugby union athletes suggests inherited fatigue resistance is more prevalent in forwards, while inherited sprint ability is more prevalent in backs, especially wings and full backs. These results also demonstrate the advantage of focusing genetic studies on a large cohort within a single sport, especially when intrasport positional differences exist, instead of combining several sports with varied demands and athlete characteristics.

  10. Distribution of Angiotensin-1 Converting Enzyme Insertion/Deletion and α-Actinin-3 Codon 577 Polymorphisms in Turkish Male Soccer Players

    PubMed Central

    Ulucan, Korkut; Sercan, Canan; Biyikli, Türker

    2015-01-01

    Angiotensin-1 converting enzyme (ACE) gene and α-actinin-3 (ACTN3) gene polymorphisms are considered to be the most important candidate genes for genetic predisposition to human athletic performance. In the present study, we aimed to analyze the distribution of ACE and ACTN3 polymorphisms for the first time in male Turkish soccer players. In this prospective study, our cohort consisted of 25 professional players, all with Turkish ancestry. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-restriction length polymorphism was used for the characterization of the genotype of ACTN3 and single PCR for ACE. For ACE genotype, 16%, 44%, and 40% of the players had insertion/insertion (II), insertion/deletion (ID), and deletion/deletion (DD) genotypes, respectively, whereas 20% had XX, 36% had RX, and 44% had RR genotypes for ACTN3. When we examined the allelic percentages, for ACE, D allele was recorded as 62 and I as 38, and for ACTN3, R allele was 62 and X was 38. Our results were in agreement with the previous reports, indicating the presence of ACTN3 D and ACE X allele in soccer players. We suggest that ACE and ACTN3 genotypes are important biomarkers for genetic counseling for the individuals who are prone to be successful soccer players. PMID:26448692

  11. Reconstruction of Ancestral Metabolic Enzymes Reveals Molecular Mechanisms Underlying Evolutionary Innovation through Gene Duplication

    PubMed Central

    Vanneste, Kevin; van der Zande, Elisa; Voet, Arnout; Maere, Steven; Verstrepen, Kevin J.

    2012-01-01

    Gene duplications are believed to facilitate evolutionary innovation. However, the mechanisms shaping the fate of duplicated genes remain heavily debated because the molecular processes and evolutionary forces involved are difficult to reconstruct. Here, we study a large family of fungal glucosidase genes that underwent several duplication events. We reconstruct all key ancestral enzymes and show that the very first preduplication enzyme was primarily active on maltose-like substrates, with trace activity for isomaltose-like sugars. Structural analysis and activity measurements on resurrected and present-day enzymes suggest that both activities cannot be fully optimized in a single enzyme. However, gene duplications repeatedly spawned daughter genes in which mutations optimized either isomaltase or maltase activity. Interestingly, similar shifts in enzyme activity were reached multiple times via different evolutionary routes. Together, our results provide a detailed picture of the molecular mechanisms that drove divergence of these duplicated enzymes and show that whereas the classic models of dosage, sub-, and neofunctionalization are helpful to conceptualize the implications of gene duplication, the three mechanisms co-occur and intertwine. PMID:23239941

  12. Prodrug converting enzyme gene delivery by L. monocytogenes

    PubMed Central

    Stritzker, Jochen; Pilgrim, Sabine; Szalay, Aladar A; Goebel, Werner

    2008-01-01

    Background Listeria monocytogenes is a highly versatile bacterial carrier system for introducing protein, DNA and RNA into mammalian cells. The delivery of tumor antigens with the help of this carrier into tumor-bearing animals has been successfully carried out previously and it was recently reported that L. monocytogenes is able to colonize and replicate within solid tumors after local or even systemic injection. Methods Here we report on the delivery of two prodrug converting enzymes, purine-deoxynucleoside phosphorylase (PNP) and a fusion protein consisting of yeast cytosine deaminase and uracil phosphoribosyl transferase (FCU1) into cancer cells in culture by L. monocytogenes. Transfer of the prodrug converting enzymes was achieved by bacterium mediated transfer of eukaryotic expression plasmids or by secretion of the proteins directly into the host cell cytosol by the infecting bacteria. Results The results indicate that conversion of appropriate prodrugs to toxic drugs in the cancer cells occured after both procedures although L. monocytogenes-mediated bactofection proved to be more efficient than enzyme secretion 4T1, B16 and COS-1 tumor cells. Exchanging the constitutively PCMV-promoter with the melanoma specific P4xTETP-promoter resulted in melanoma cell-specific expression of the prodrug converting enzymes but reduced the efficiencies. Conclusion These experiments open the way for bacterium mediated tumor specific activation of prodrugs in live animals with tumors. PMID:18402662

  13. Human Genetic Disorders Caused by Mutations in Genes Encoding Biosynthetic Enzymes for Sulfated Glycosaminoglycans*

    PubMed Central

    Mizumoto, Shuji; Ikegawa, Shiro; Sugahara, Kazuyuki

    2013-01-01

    A number of genetic disorders are caused by mutations in the genes encoding glycosyltransferases and sulfotransferases, enzymes responsible for the synthesis of sulfated glycosaminoglycan (GAG) side chains of proteoglycans, including chondroitin sulfate, dermatan sulfate, and heparan sulfate. The phenotypes of these genetic disorders reflect disturbances in crucial biological functions of GAGs in human. Recent studies have revealed that mutations in genes encoding chondroitin sulfate and dermatan sulfate biosynthetic enzymes cause various disorders of connective tissues. This minireview focuses on growing glycobiological studies of recently described genetic diseases caused by disturbances in biosynthetic enzymes for sulfated GAGs. PMID:23457301

  14. Prevalence of the angiotensin I converting enzyme insertion/deletion polymorphism, plasma angiotensin converting enzyme activity, and left ventricular mass in a normotensive Chilean population.

    PubMed

    Jalil, J E; Piddo, A M; Cordova, S; Chamorro, G; Braun, S; Jalil, R; Vega, J; Jadue'P, L; Lavandero, S; Lastra, P

    1999-07-01

    The aim of this study was to estimate the prevalence of the different alleles of the angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) gene insertion/deletion (I/D) polymorphism and associated plasma ACE activity, as well as cardiac echocardiographic structure, in a healthy Chilean population. We selected 117 healthy normotensive subjects (aged 45 to 60 years, middle socioeconomic status, nonobese, and nondiabetic) from a population-based study concerning the prevalence of risk factors for chronic diseases (Conjunto de Acciones Para la Reducción Multifactorial de las Enfermedades no Transmisibles [CARMEN]). The frequencies of the I and D alleles were 0.57 and 0.43, respectively. Mean plasma ACE activity was 15.3 +/- 3.9 U/mL. Compared with subjects with the II genotype, plasma ACE activity was significantly higher in subjects with the ID and DD genotypes with no difference between them. No correlation was observed between blood pressure and plasma ACE activity. Among the three different genotypes there was no difference in left ventricular (LV) dimensions or in LV mass. No correlation between plasma ACE activity and LV mass was observed for either gender or different genotypes. Multivariate linear regression analysis using LV mass and LV mass index as dependent variables showed independent effects (P < .05) for gender (higher LV mass in men) and diastolic blood pressure, but not for the DD genotype. In conclusion, in this population, the presence of the D allele on the ACE gene determined higher circulating ACE activity. However, in this normotensive healthy population, male gender and diastolic blood pressure, but not the presence of the D allele, were associated with increased LV mass.

  15. Gene-targeted metagenomic analysis of glucan-branching enzyme gene profiles among human and animal fecal microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sunghee; Cantarel, Brandi; Henrissat, Bernard; Gevers, Dirk; Birren, Bruce W; Huttenhower, Curtis; Ko, GwangPyo

    2014-01-01

    Glycoside hydrolases (GHs), the enzymes that breakdown complex carbohydrates, are a highly diversified class of key enzymes associated with the gut microbiota and its metabolic functions. To learn more about the diversity of GHs and their potential role in a variety of gut microbiomes, we used a combination of 16S, metagenomic and targeted amplicon sequencing data to study one of these enzyme families in detail. Specifically, we employed a functional gene-targeted metagenomic approach to the 1-4-α-glucan-branching enzyme (gBE) gene in the gut microbiomes of four host species (human, chicken, cow and pig). The characteristics of operational taxonomic units (OTUs) and operational glucan-branching units (OGBUs) were distinctive in each of hosts. Human and pig were most similar in OTUs profiles while maintaining distinct OGBU profiles. Interestingly, the phylogenetic profiles identified from 16S and gBE gene sequences differed, suggesting the presence of different gBE genes in the same OTU across different vertebrate hosts. Our data suggest that gene-targeted metagenomic analysis is useful for an in-depth understanding of the diversity of a particular gene of interest. Specific carbohydrate metabolic genes appear to be carried by distinct OTUs in different individual hosts and among different vertebrate species' microbiomes, the characteristics of which differ according to host genetic background and/or diet. PMID:24108330

  16. Gene polymorphisms of fibrinolytic enzymes in coal workers' pneumoconiosis

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, L.C.; Tseng, J.C.; Hua, C.C.; Liu, Y.C.; Shieh, W.B.; Wu, H.P.

    2006-03-15

    The authors assessed the gene polymorphisms of missense C/T polymorphism in exon 6 of the urokinase-plasminogen activator (PLAU) gene (PLAU P141L), A/u-repeat in intron 8 of the tissue-type plasminogen activator (PLAT) gene (PLAT TPA25 Alu insertion), and 4G/5G in the promoter region of the serine proteinase inhibitor, clade E (SERPINE) or plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 gene (SERPINE1 -675 4G/5G) in 153 healthy volunteers and 154 retired coal miners with coal miners' pneumoconiosis (CWP). The CWP subjects included 94 individuals with simple pneumoconiosis and 60 individuals with progressive massive fibrosis presenting with worse pulmonary function. The distributions of genotypes of these three genes did not differ between the control and CWP subjects or between subjects with simple pneumoconiosis and those with progressive massive fibrosis. However, by assessing duration of work and its interaction with genotypes by means of logistic regression, the authors found the missense C/T polymorphism in exon 6 of the PLAU gene to be an effect modifier of the association between work duration and the development of progressive massive fibrosis.

  17. Organization and control of genes encoding catabolic enzymes in Rhizobiaceae

    SciTech Connect

    Parke, D.; Ornston, L.N.

    1993-03-01

    Rhizobiaceae, a diverse bacterial group comprising rhizobia and agrobacteria, symbiotic partnership with plants form nitrogen-fixing nodules on plant roots or are plant pathogens. Phenolic compounds produced by plants serve as inducers of rhizobial nodulation genes and agrobacterial virulence genes reflect their capacity to utilize numerous aromatics, including phenolics, as a source of carbon and energy. In many microbes the aerobic degradation of numerous aromatic compounds to tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates is achieved by the [beta]-ketoadipate pathway. Our initial studies focused on the organization and regulation of the ketoadipate pathway in Agrobacterium tumefaciens. We have cloned, identified and characterized a novel regulatory gene that modulates expression of an adjacent pca (protocatechuate) structural gene, pcaD. Regulation of pcaD is mediated by the regulatory gene, termed pcaQ, in concert with the intermediate [beta]-carboxy-cis,cis-muconate. [beta]-carboxy-cis,cismuconate is an unstable chemical, not marketed commercially, and it is unlikely to permeate Escherichia coli cells if supplied in media. Because of these factors, characterization of pcaQ in E. coli required an in vivo delivery system for [beta]-carboxycis,cis-muconate. This was accomplished by designing an E. coli strain that expressed an Acinetobacter calcoaceticus pcaA gene for conversion of protocatechuate to [beta]-carboxy-cis,cis-muconate.

  18. ACE inhibition, ACE2 and angiotensin-(1-7) axis in kidney and cardiac inflammation and fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Simões E Silva, Ana Cristina; Teixeira, Mauro Martins

    2016-05-01

    The Renin Angiotensin System (RAS) is a pivotal physiological regulator of heart and kidney homeostasis, but also plays an important role in the pathophysiology of heart and kidney diseases. Recently, new components of the RAS have been discovered, including angiotensin converting enzyme 2 (ACE2), Angiotensin(Ang)-(1-7), Mas receptor, Ang-(1-9) and Alamandine. These new components of RAS are formed by the hydrolysis of Ang I and Ang II and, in general, counteract the effects of Ang II. In experimental models of heart and renal diseases, Ang-(1-7), Ang-(1-9) and Alamandine produced vasodilation, inhibition of cell growth, anti-thrombotic, anti-inflammatory and anti-fibrotic effects. Recent pharmacological strategies have been proposed to potentiate the effects or to enhance the formation of Ang-(1-7) and Ang-(1-9), including ACE2 activators, Ang-(1-7) in hydroxypropyl β-cyclodextrin, cyclized form of Ang-(1-7) and nonpeptide synthetic Mas receptor agonists. Here, we review the role and effects of ACE2, ACE2 activators, Ang-(1-7) and synthetic Mas receptor agonists in the control of inflammation and fibrosis in cardiovascular and renal diseases and as counter-regulators of the ACE-Ang II-AT1 axis. We briefly comment on the therapeutic potential of the novel members of RAS, Ang-(1-9) and alamandine, and the interactions between classical RAS inhibitors and new players in heart and kidney diseases. PMID:26995300

  19. REBASE--enzymes and genes for DNA restriction and modification.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Richard J; Vincze, Tamas; Posfai, Janos; Macelis, Dana

    2007-01-01

    REBASE is a comprehensive database of information about restriction enzymes, DNA methyltransferases and related proteins involved in the biological process of restriction-modification. It contains fully referenced information about recognition and cleavage sites, isoschizomers, neoschizomers, commercial availability, methylation sensitivity, crystal and sequence data. Experimentally characterized homing endonucleases are also included. All newly sequenced genomes are analyzed for the presence of putative restriction systems and these data are included within the REBASE. The contents or REBASE may be browsed from the web (http://rebase.neb.com/rebase/rebase.ftp.html) and selected compilations can be downloaded by ftp (ftp.neb.com). Additionally, monthly updates can be requested via email.

  20. ACE to Ulysses Coherences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomson, D. J.; Maclennan, C. G.; Lanzerotti, L. J.

    2006-12-01

    The EPAM charged particle instrument on ACE is the backup for the HISCALE instrument on Ulysses making the two ideally suited for spatial coherence studies over large heliosphere distances. Fluxes of low-energy ( ~50 - 200 keV) electrons are detected in eight spatial sectors on both spacecraft. A spherical harmonic description of the particle flux as a function of time using only the l=0 and l=1 degree coefficients describes most of the observed flux. Here we concentrate on the three l=1 coefficients for the 60--100 kev electrons.Between the two spacecraft these result in nine coherence estimates that are all typically moderately coherent, but the fact that the different coefficients at each spacecraft are also coherent with each other makes interpretation difficult. To avoid this difficulty we estimated the canonical coherences between the two groups of three series. This, in effect, chooses an optimum coordinate system at each spacecraft and for each frequency and estimates the coherence in this frame. Using one--minute data, we find that the canonical coherences are generally larger at high frequencies (3 mHz and above) than they are at low frequencies. This appears to be generally true and does not depend particularly on time, range, etc. However, if the data segment is chosen too long, say > 30 days with 1--minute sampling, the coherence at high frequencies drops. This may be because the spatial and temporal features of the mode are confounded, or possibly because the solar modes p--modes are known to change frequency with solar activity, so do not appear coherent on long blocks.The coherences are not smooth functions of frequency, but have a bimodal distribution particularly in the 100 μHz to 5 mHz range. Classifying the data at frequencies where the canonical coherences are high in terms of apparent polarization and orientation, we note two major families of modes that appear to be organized by the Parker spiral. The magnetic field data on the two

  1. Halloween genes encode P450 enzymes that mediate steroid hormone biosynthesis in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Lawrence I

    2004-02-27

    Mutation of members of the Halloween gene family results in embryonic lethality. We have shown that two of these genes code for enzymes responsible for specific steps in the synthesis of ecdysone, a polyhydroxylated sterol that is the precursor of the major molting hormone of all arthropods, 20-hydroxyecdysone. These two mitochondrial P450 enzymes, coded for by disembodied (dib) (CYP302A1) and shadow (sad) (CYP315A1), are the C22 and C2 hydroxylases, respectively, as shown by transfection of the gene into S2 cells and subsequent biochemical analysis. These are the last two enzymes in the ecdysone biosynthetic pathway. A third enzyme, necessary for the critical conversion of ecdysone to 20-hydroxyecdysone, the 20-monooxygenase, is encoded by shade (shd) (CYP314A1). All three enzymes are mitochondrial although shade has motifs suggesting both mitochondrial and microsomal locations. By tagging these enzymes, their subcellular location has been confirmed by confocal microscopy. Shade is present in several tissues as expected while disembodied and shadow are restricted to the ring gland. The paradigm used should allow us to define the enzymes mediating the entire ecdysteroid biosynthetic pathway. PMID:15026169

  2. Halloween genes encode P450 enzymes that mediate steroid hormone biosynthesis in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Lawrence I

    2004-02-27

    Mutation of members of the Halloween gene family results in embryonic lethality. We have shown that two of these genes code for enzymes responsible for specific steps in the synthesis of ecdysone, a polyhydroxylated sterol that is the precursor of the major molting hormone of all arthropods, 20-hydroxyecdysone. These two mitochondrial P450 enzymes, coded for by disembodied (dib) (CYP302A1) and shadow (sad) (CYP315A1), are the C22 and C2 hydroxylases, respectively, as shown by transfection of the gene into S2 cells and subsequent biochemical analysis. These are the last two enzymes in the ecdysone biosynthetic pathway. A third enzyme, necessary for the critical conversion of ecdysone to 20-hydroxyecdysone, the 20-monooxygenase, is encoded by shade (shd) (CYP314A1). All three enzymes are mitochondrial although shade has motifs suggesting both mitochondrial and microsomal locations. By tagging these enzymes, their subcellular location has been confirmed by confocal microscopy. Shade is present in several tissues as expected while disembodied and shadow are restricted to the ring gland. The paradigm used should allow us to define the enzymes mediating the entire ecdysteroid biosynthetic pathway.

  3. Radiation Exposure Alters Expression of Metabolic Enzyme Genes in Mice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wotring, V. E.; Mangala, L. S.; Zhang, Y.; Wu, H.

    2011-01-01

    Most administered pharmaceuticals are metabolized by the liver. The health of the liver, especially the rate of its metabolic enzymes, determines the concentration of circulating drugs as well as the duration of their efficacy. Most pharmaceuticals are metabolized by the liver, and clinically-used medication doses are given with normal liver function in mind. A drug overdose can result in the case of a liver that is damaged and removing pharmaceuticals from the circulation at a rate slower than normal. Alternatively, if liver function is elevated and removing drugs from the system more quickly than usual, it would be as if too little drug had been given for effective treatment. Because of the importance of the liver in drug metabolism, we want to understand the effects of spaceflight on the enzymes of the liver and exposure to cosmic radiation is one aspect of spaceflight that can be modeled in ground experiments. Additionally, it has been previous noted that pre-exposure to small radiation doses seems to confer protection against later and larger radiation doses. This protective power of pre-exposure has been called a priming effect or radioadaptation. This study is an effort to examine the drug metabolizing effects of radioadaptation mechanisms that may be triggered by early exposure to low radiation doses.

  4. Molecular genetics of aminoglycoside resistance genes and familial relationships of the aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes.

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, K J; Rather, P N; Hare, R S; Miller, G H

    1993-01-01

    The three classes of enzymes which inactivate aminoglycosides and lead to bacterial resistance are reviewed. DNA hybridization studies have shown that different genes can encode aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes with identical resistance profiles. Comparisons of the amino acid sequences of 49 aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes have revealed new insights into the evolution and relatedness of these proteins. A preliminary assessment of the amino acids which may be important in binding aminoglycosides was obtained from these data and from the results of mutational analysis of several of the genes encoding aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes. Recent studies have demonstrated that aminoglycoside resistance can emerge as a result of alterations in the regulation of normally quiescent cellular genes or as a result of acquiring genes which may have originated from aminoglycoside-producing organisms or from other resistant organisms. Dissemination of these genes is aided by a variety of genetic elements including integrons, transposons, and broad-host-range plasmids. As knowledge of the molecular structure of these enzymes increases, progress can be made in our understanding of how resistance to new aminoglycosides emerges. Images PMID:8385262

  5. ALTUS Cumulus Electrification Study (ACES)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Tony; Blakeslee, Richard; Russell, Larry W. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The ALTUS Cumulus Electrification Study (ACES) is an uninhabited aerial vehicle (UAV)-based project that will investigate thunderstorms in the vicinity of the Florida Everglades in August 2002. ACES is being conducted to both investigate storm electrical activity and its relationship to storm morphology, and validate Tropical Rainfall Measurement Mission (TRMM) satellite measurements. In addition, as part of NASA's UAV-based science demonstration program, this project will provide a scientifically useful demonstration of the utility and promise of UAV platforms for Earth science and applications observations. Part of the demonstration involves getting approvals from the Federal Aviation Administration and the NASA airworthiness flight safety review board. ACES will employ the ALTUS II aircraft, built by General Atomics - Aeronautical Systems, Inc. Key science objectives simultaneously addressed by ACES are to: (1) investigate lightning-storm relationships, (2) study storm electrical budgets, and (3) provide Lightning Imaging Sensor validation. The ACES payload, already developed and flown on ALTUS, includes electrical, magnetic, and optical sensors to remotely characterize the lightning activity and the electrical environment within and around thunderstorms. ACES will contribute important electrical and optical measurements not available from other sources. Also, the high altitude vantage point of the UAV observing platform (up to 55,000 feet) offers a useful 'cloud-top' perspective. By taking advantage of its slow flight speed (70 to 100 knots), long endurance, and high altitude flight, the ALTUS will be flown near, and when possible, above (but never into) thunderstorms for long periods of time, allowing investigations to be conducted over entire storm life cycles. In addition, concurrent ground-based observations will enable the UAV measurements to be more completely interpreted and evaluated in the context of the thunderstorm structure, evolution, and

  6. ACE2 overexpression inhibits acquired platinum resistance-induced tumor angiogenesis in NSCLC.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Qijian; Zhou, Ling; Zhou, Jianping; Wan, Huanying; Li, Qingyun; Feng, Yun

    2016-09-01

    Angiotensin II (AngII) is a multifunctional bioactive peptide in the renin-angiotensin system (RAS). Angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) is a newly identified component of RAS. We previously reported that ACE2 overexpression may inhibit cell growth and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) production in vitro and in vivo. In the present study, we investigated the effect of ACE2 on tumor-associated angiogen-esis after the development of acquired platinum resistance in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Four NSCLC cell lines, A549, LLC, A549-DDP and LLC-DDP, were used in vitro, while A549 and A549-DDP cells were used in vivo. A549-DDP and LLC-DDP cells were newly established at our institution as acquired platinum-resistant sublines by culturing the former parent cells in cisplatin (CDDP)-containing conditioned medium for 6 months. These platinum-resistant cells showed significantly higher angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R), ACE and VEGF production and lower ACE2 expression than their corresponding parent cells. We showed that ACE2 overexpression inhibited the production of VEGF in vitro and in vivo compared to their corresponding parent cells. We also found that ACE2 overexpression reduced the expression of AT1R and ACE. Additionally, we confirmed that ACE2 overexpres-sion inhibited cell growth and VEGF production while simultaneously suppressing ACE and AT1R expression in human lung cancer xenografts. Our findings indicate that ACE2 overexpression may potentially suppress angiogenesis in NSCLC after the development of acquired platinum resistance. PMID:27460845

  7. The human chitotriosidase gene. Nature of inherited enzyme deficiency.

    PubMed

    Boot, R G; Renkema, G H; Verhoek, M; Strijland, A; Bliek, J; de Meulemeester, T M; Mannens, M M; Aerts, J M

    1998-10-01

    The human chitinase, named chitotriosidase, is a member of family 18 of glycosylhydrolases. Following the cloning of the chitotriosidase cDNA (Boot, R. G., Renkema, G. H., Strijland, A., van Zonneveld, A. J., and Aerts, J. M. F. G. (1995) J. Biol. Chem. 270, 26252-26256), the gene and mRNA have been investigated. The chitotriosidase gene is assigned to chromosome 1q31-q32. The gene consists of 12 exons and spans about 20 kilobases. The nature of the common deficiency in chitotriosidase activity is reported. A 24-base pair duplication in exon 10 results in activation of a cryptic 3' splice site, generating a mRNA with an in-frame deletion of 87 nucleotides. All chitotriosidase-deficient individuals tested were homozygous for the duplication. The observed carrier frequency of about 35% indicates that the duplication is the predominant cause of chitotriosidase deficiency. The presence of the duplication in individuals from various ethnic groups suggests that this mutation is relatively old.

  8. Bioinformatic analysis reveals high diversity of bacterial genes for laccase-like enzymes.

    PubMed

    Ausec, Luka; Zakrzewski, Martha; Goesmann, Alexander; Schlüter, Andreas; Mandic-Mulec, Ines

    2011-01-01

    Fungal laccases have been used in various fields ranging from processes in wood and paper industries to environmental applications. Although a few bacterial laccases have been characterized in recent years, prokaryotes have largely been neglected as a source of novel enzymes, in part due to the lack of knowledge about the diversity and distribution of laccases within Bacteria. In this work genes for laccase-like enzymes were searched for in over 2,200 complete and draft bacterial genomes and four metagenomic datasets, using the custom profile Hidden Markov Models for two- and three-domain laccases. More than 1,200 putative genes for laccase-like enzymes were retrieved from chromosomes and plasmids of diverse bacteria. In 76% of the genes, signal peptides were predicted, indicating that these bacterial laccases may be exported from the cytoplasm, which contrasts with the current belief. Moreover, several examples of putatively horizontally transferred bacterial laccase genes were described. Many metagenomic sequences encoding fragments of laccase-like enzymes could not be phylogenetically assigned, indicating considerable novelty. Laccase-like genes were also found in anaerobic bacteria, autotrophs and alkaliphiles, thus opening new hypotheses regarding their ecological functions. Bacteria identified as carrying laccase genes represent potential sources for future biotechnological applications.

  9. Molecular characterization of tobacco sulfite reductase: enzyme purification, gene cloning, and gene expression analysis.

    PubMed

    Yonekura-Sakakibara, K; Ashikari, T; Tanaka, Y; Kusumi, T a; Hase, T

    1998-09-01

    A cDNA clone, NtSiR1, that encodes the precursor of ferredoxin-dependent sulfite reductase (Fd-SiR) has been isolated from a cDNA library of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum cv. SR1). The identity of the cDNA was established by comparison of the purified protein and the predicted structure with the nucleotide sequence. The amino terminus of the purified enzyme was Thr62 of the precursor protein, and the mature region of NtSiR1 consisted of 632 amino acids. Tobacco Fd-SiR is 82, 77, and 48% identical with Fd-SiRs from Zea mays, Arabidopsis thaliana, and a cyanobacterium, respectively. Significant similarity was also found with Escherichia coli NADPH-SiR in the region involved in ligation of siroheme and the [4Fe-4S] cluster. On Northern blot analysis, a transcript of NtSiR1 was detected in leaves, stems, roots, and petals in similar amounts. We also isolated a genomic SiR clone named gNtSiR1. It consists of 8 exons and 7 introns. Genomic Southern blot analysis indicated that at least two SiR genes are present in the tobacco genome. PMID:9722674

  10. ACEE program rationale and implementation

    SciTech Connect

    Aiken, W.S. Jr.; Petersen, R.H.

    1982-08-01

    The impact of the Aircraft Energy Efficiency program (ACEE) on commercial aviation is examined. In addition to the emphasis on air transport fuel efficiency, topics such as airline operating costs, air transport effects on U.S. trade, and fuel price forecasts are addressed. An overview of the program and its contribution to aviation technology is included.

  11. Occurrence and fate of ACE-inhibitor peptides in cheeses and in their digestates following in vitro static gastrointestinal digestion.

    PubMed

    Stuknytė, Milda; Cattaneo, Stefano; Masotti, Fabio; De Noni, Ivano

    2015-02-01

    The occurrence of the casein-derived angiotensin converting enzyme-inhibitor (ACE-I) peptides VPP, IPP, RYLGY, RYLG, AYFYPEL, AYFYPE, LHLPLP and HLPLP were investigated in 12 different cheese samples by Ultra Performance Liquid Chromatography/High-Resolution Mass Spectrometry. The total amount of ACE-I peptides was in the range 0.87-331mgkg(-1). VPP and IPP largely prevailed in almost all cheeses. Following in vitro static gastrointestinal digestion of Cheddar, Gorgonzola, Maasdam and Grana Padano cheeses, type and amount of ACE-I peptides changed, and only VPP, IPP, HLPLP and LHLPLP were detected in the intestinal digestates. The results evidenced that the degree of proteolysis itself cannot be regarded as a promoting or hindering factor for ACE-I peptide release during cheese digestion. Moreover, the data indicated that the ACE-I potential of cheeses cannot be inferred based on the type and amount of ACE-I peptides present in undigested samples.

  12. The four aldehyde oxidases of Drosophila melanogaster have different gene expression patterns and enzyme substrate specificities.

    PubMed

    Marelja, Zvonimir; Dambowsky, Miriam; Bolis, Marco; Georgiou, Marina L; Garattini, Enrico; Missirlis, Fanis; Leimkühler, Silke

    2014-06-15

    In the genome of Drosophila melanogaster, four genes coding for aldehyde oxidases (AOX1-4) were identified on chromosome 3. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the AOX gene cluster evolved via independent duplication events in the vertebrate and invertebrate lineages. The functional role and the substrate specificity of the distinct Drosophila AOX enzymes is unknown. Two loss-of-function mutant alleles in this gene region, low pyridoxal oxidase (Po(lpo)) and aldehyde oxidase-1 (Aldox-1(n1)) are associated with a phenotype characterized by undetectable AOX enzymatic activity. However, the genes involved and the corresponding mutations have not yet been identified. In this study we characterized the activities, substrate specificities and expression profiles of the four AOX enzymes in D. melanogaster. We show that the Po(lpo)-associated phenotype is the consequence of a structural alteration of the AOX1 gene. We identified an 11-bp deletion in the Po(lpo) allele, resulting in a frame-shift event, which removes the molybdenum cofactor domain of the encoded enzyme. Furthermore, we show that AOX2 activity is detectable only during metamorphosis and characterize a Minos-AOX2 insertion in this developmental gene that disrupts its activity. We demonstrate that the Aldox-1(n1) phenotype maps to the AOX3 gene and AOX4 activity is not detectable in our assays.

  13. The four aldehyde oxidases of Drosophila melanogaster have different gene expression patterns and enzyme substrate specificities

    PubMed Central

    Marelja, Zvonimir; Dambowsky, Miriam; Bolis, Marco; Georgiou, Marina L.; Garattini, Enrico; Missirlis, Fanis; Leimkühler, Silke

    2014-01-01

    In the genome of Drosophila melanogaster, four genes coding for aldehyde oxidases (AOX1–4) were identified on chromosome 3. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the AOX gene cluster evolved via independent duplication events in the vertebrate and invertebrate lineages. The functional role and the substrate specificity of the distinct Drosophila AOX enzymes is unknown. Two loss-of-function mutant alleles in this gene region, low pyridoxal oxidase (Polpo) and aldehyde oxidase-1 (Aldox-1n1) are associated with a phenotype characterized by undetectable AOX enzymatic activity. However, the genes involved and the corresponding mutations have not yet been identified. In this study we characterized the activities, substrate specificities and expression profiles of the four AOX enzymes in D. melanogaster. We show that the Polpo-associated phenotype is the consequence of a structural alteration of the AOX1 gene. We identified an 11-bp deletion in the Polpo allele, resulting in a frame-shift event, which removes the molybdenum cofactor domain of the encoded enzyme. Furthermore, we show that AOX2 activity is detectable only during metamorphosis and characterize a Minos-AOX2 insertion in this developmental gene that disrupts its activity. We demonstrate that the Aldox-1n1 phenotype maps to the AOX3 gene and AOX4 activity is not detectable in our assays. PMID:24737760

  14. Enzymes and genes involved in aerobic alkane degradation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wanpeng; Shao, Zongze

    2013-01-01

    Alkanes are major constituents of crude oil. They are also present at low concentrations in diverse non-contaminated because many living organisms produce them as chemo-attractants or as protecting agents against water loss. Alkane degradation is a widespread phenomenon in nature. The numerous microorganisms, both prokaryotic and eukaryotic, capable of utilizing alkanes as a carbon and energy source, have been isolated and characterized. This review summarizes the current knowledge of how bacteria metabolize alkanes aerobically, with a particular emphasis on the oxidation of long-chain alkanes, including factors that are responsible for chemotaxis to alkanes, transport across cell membrane of alkanes, the regulation of alkane degradation gene and initial oxidation. PMID:23755043

  15. Gene expression for peroxisome-associated enzymes in hepatocellular carcinomas induced by ciprofibrate, a hypolipidemic compound

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, M.S.; Nemali, M.R.; Reddy, J.K.

    1986-03-05

    Administration of hypolipidemic compounds leads to marked proliferation of peroxisomes and peroxisome-associated enzymes (PAE) in the livers of rodents and non-rodent species. The increase peroxisome-associated enzymes such as fatty acid ..beta..-oxidation system and catalase is shown to be due to an increase in the levels of mRNA. In this experiment they have examined hepatocellular carcinomas (HCC), induced in male F-344 rats by ciprofibrate (0.025%, w/w for 60 weeks), for gene expression of PAE. Total RNA was purified from HCC as well as from control and ciprofibrate (0.025% for 2 weeks) fed rat livers. Northern blot analysis was performed using (32/sub p/)cDNA probes for albumin, fatty acetyl-CoA oxidase, enoyl-CoA hydratase 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase bifunctional enzyme and catalase. mRNA levels in HCC for albumin, fatty acid ..beta..-oxidation enzymes and catalase were comparable with those levels observed in the livers of rats given ciprofibrate for 2 weeks. In control livers the mRNAs for ..beta..-oxidation enzymes were low. Albumin mRNA levels in all the 3 groups were comparable. Additional studies are necessary to determine whether the increased level of mRNAs for the ..beta..-oxidation enzymes in HCC is due to the effect of ciprofibrate or to the gene amplification.

  16. Poplar Carbohydrate-Active Enzymes. Gene Identification and Expression Analyses1[W

    PubMed Central

    Geisler-Lee, Jane; Geisler, Matt; Coutinho, Pedro M.; Segerman, Bo; Nishikubo, Nobuyuki; Takahashi, Junko; Aspeborg, Henrik; Djerbi, Soraya; Master, Emma; Andersson-Gunnerås, Sara; Sundberg, Björn; Karpinski, Stanislaw; Teeri, Tuula T.; Kleczkowski, Leszek A.; Henrissat, Bernard; Mellerowicz, Ewa J.

    2006-01-01

    Over 1,600 genes encoding carbohydrate-active enzymes (CAZymes) in the Populus trichocarpa (Torr. & Gray) genome were identified based on sequence homology, annotated, and grouped into families of glycosyltransferases, glycoside hydrolases, carbohydrate esterases, polysaccharide lyases, and expansins. Poplar (Populus spp.) had approximately 1.6 times more CAZyme genes than Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Whereas most families were proportionally increased, xylan and pectin-related families were underrepresented and the GT1 family of secondary metabolite-glycosylating enzymes was overrepresented in poplar. CAZyme gene expression in poplar was analyzed using a collection of 100,000 expressed sequence tags from 17 different tissues and compared to microarray data for poplar and Arabidopsis. Expression of genes involved in pectin and hemicellulose metabolism was detected in all tissues, indicating a constant maintenance of transcripts encoding enzymes remodeling the cell wall matrix. The most abundant transcripts encoded sucrose synthases that were specifically expressed in wood-forming tissues along with cellulose synthase and homologs of KORRIGAN and ELP1. Woody tissues were the richest source of various other CAZyme transcripts, demonstrating the importance of this group of enzymes for xylogenesis. In contrast, there was little expression of genes related to starch metabolism during wood formation, consistent with the preferential flux of carbon to cell wall biosynthesis. Seasonally dormant meristems of poplar showed a high prevalence of transcripts related to starch metabolism and surprisingly retained transcripts of some cell wall synthesis enzymes. The data showed profound changes in CAZyme transcriptomes in different poplar tissues and pointed to some key differences in CAZyme genes and their regulation between herbaceous and woody plants. PMID:16415215

  17. Recombinant Expression and Characterization of Human and Murine ACE2: Species-Specific Activation of the Alternative Renin-Angiotensin-System

    PubMed Central

    Poglitsch, Marko; Domenig, Oliver; Schwager, Cornelia; Stranner, Stefan; Peball, Bernhard; Janzek, Evelyne; Wagner, Bettina; Jungwirth, Helmut; Loibner, Hans; Schuster, Manfred

    2012-01-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) is a monocarboxypeptidase of the renin-angiotensin-system (RAS) which is known to cleave several substrates among vasoactive peptides. Its preferred substrate is Angiotensin II, which is tightly involved in the regulation of important physiological functions including fluid homeostasis and blood pressure. Ang 1–7, the main enzymatic product of ACE2, became increasingly important in the literature in recent years, as it was reported to counteract hypertensive and fibrotic actions of Angiotensin II via the MAS receptor. The functional connection of ACE2, Ang 1–7, and the MAS receptor is also referred to as the alternative axis of the RAS. In the present paper, we describe the recombinant expression and purification of human and murine ACE2 (rhACE2 and rmACE2). Furthermore, we determined the conversion rates of rhACE2 and rmACE2 for different natural peptide substrates in plasma samples and discovered species-specific differences in substrate specificities, probably leading to functional differences in the alternative axis of the RAS. In particular, conversion rates of Ang 1–10 to Ang 1–9 were found to be substantially different when applying rhACE2 or rmACE2 in vitro. In contrast to rhACE2, rm ACE2 is substantially less potent in transformation of Ang 1–10 to Ang 1–9. PMID:22518284

  18. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae YPR184w gene encodes the glycogen debranching enzyme.

    PubMed

    Teste, M A; Enjalbert, B; Parrou, J L; François, J M

    2000-12-01

    The YPR184w gene encodes a 1536-amino acid protein that is 34-39% identical to the mammal, Drosophila melanogaster and Caenorhabditis elegans glycogen debranching enzyme. The N-terminal part of the protein possesses the four conserved sequences of the alpha-amylase superfamily, while the C-terminal part displays 50% similarity with the C-terminal of other eukaryotic glycogen debranching enzymes. Reliable measurement of alpha-1,4-glucanotransferase and alpha-1, 6-glucosidase activity of the yeast debranching enzyme was determined in strains overexpressing YPR184w. The alpha-1, 4-glucanotransferase activity of a partially purified preparation of debranching enzyme preferentially transferred maltosyl units than maltotriosyl. Deletion of YPR184w prevents glycogen degradation, whereas overexpression had no effect on the rate of glycogen breakdown. In response to stress and growth conditions, the transcriptional control of YPR184w gene, renamed GDB1 (for Glycogen DeBranching gene), is strictly identical to that of other genes involved in glycogen metabolism.

  19. Coordinated Changes in Xenobiotic Metabolizing Enzyme Gene Expression in Aging Male Rats

    EPA Science Inventory

    In order to gain better insight on aging and susceptibility, we characterized the expression of xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes (XMEs) from the livers of rats to evaluate the change in capacity to respond to xenobiotics across the adult lifespan. Gene expression profiles for XMEs...

  20. Isolation, Purification and Molecular Mechanism of a Peanut Protein-Derived ACE-Inhibitory Peptide

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Aimin; Liu, Hongzhi; Liu, Li; Hu, Hui; Wang, Qiang; Adhikari, Benu

    2014-01-01

    Although a number of bioactive peptides are capable of angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory effects, little is known regarding the mechanism of peanut peptides using molecular simulation. The aim of this study was to obtain ACE inhibiting peptide from peanut protein and provide insight on the molecular mechanism of its ACE inhibiting action. Peanut peptides having ACE inhibitory activity were isolated through enzymatic hydrolysis and ultrafiltration. Further chromatographic fractionation was conducted to isolate a more potent peanut peptide and its antihypertensive activity was analyzed through in vitro ACE inhibitory tests and in vivo animal experiments. MALDI-TOF/TOF-MS was used to identify its amino acid sequence. Mechanism of ACE inhibition of P8 was analyzed using molecular docking and molecular dynamics simulation. A peanut peptide (P8) having Lys-Leu-Tyr-Met-Arg-Pro amino acid sequence was obtained which had the highest ACE inhibiting activity of 85.77% (half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50): 0.0052 mg/ml). This peanut peptide is a competitive inhibitor and show significant short term (12 h) and long term (28 days) antihypertensive activity. Dynamic tests illustrated that P8 can be successfully docked into the active pocket of ACE and can be combined with several amino acid residues. Hydrogen bond, electrostatic bond and Pi-bond were found to be the three main interaction contributing to the structural stability of ACE-peptide complex. In addition, zinc atom could form metal-carboxylic coordination bond with Tyr, Met residues of P8, resulting into its high ACE inhibiting activity. Our finding indicated that the peanut peptide (P8) having a Lys-Leu-Tyr-Met-Arg-Pro amino acid sequence can be a promising candidate for functional foods and prescription drug aimed at control of hypertension. PMID:25347076

  1. Novel method to load multiple genes onto a mammalian artificial chromosome.

    PubMed

    Tóth, Anna; Fodor, Katalin; Praznovszky, Tünde; Tubak, Vilmos; Udvardy, Andor; Hadlaczky, Gyula; Katona, Robert L

    2014-01-01

    Mammalian artificial chromosomes are natural chromosome-based vectors that may carry a vast amount of genetic material in terms of both size and number. They are reasonably stable and segregate well in both mitosis and meiosis. A platform artificial chromosome expression system (ACEs) was earlier described with multiple loading sites for a modified lambda-integrase enzyme. It has been shown that this ACEs is suitable for high-level industrial protein production and the treatment of a mouse model for a devastating human disorder, Krabbe's disease. ACEs-treated mutant mice carrying a therapeutic gene lived more than four times longer than untreated counterparts. This novel gene therapy method is called combined mammalian artificial chromosome-stem cell therapy. At present, this method suffers from the limitation that a new selection marker gene should be present for each therapeutic gene loaded onto the ACEs. Complex diseases require the cooperative action of several genes for treatment, but only a limited number of selection marker genes are available and there is also a risk of serious side-effects caused by the unwanted expression of these marker genes in mammalian cells, organs and organisms. We describe here a novel method to load multiple genes onto the ACEs by using only two selectable marker genes. These markers may be removed from the ACEs before therapeutic application. This novel technology could revolutionize gene therapeutic applications targeting the treatment of complex disorders and cancers. It could also speed up cell therapy by allowing researchers to engineer a chromosome with a predetermined set of genetic factors to differentiate adult stem cells, embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells into cell types of therapeutic value. It is also a suitable tool for the investigation of complex biochemical pathways in basic science by producing an ACEs with several genes from a signal transduction pathway of interest.

  2. Novel Method to Load Multiple Genes onto a Mammalian Artificial Chromosome

    PubMed Central

    Tóth, Anna; Fodor, Katalin; Praznovszky, Tünde; Tubak, Vilmos; Udvardy, Andor; Hadlaczky, Gyula; Katona, Robert L.

    2014-01-01

    Mammalian artificial chromosomes are natural chromosome-based vectors that may carry a vast amount of genetic material in terms of both size and number. They are reasonably stable and segregate well in both mitosis and meiosis. A platform artificial chromosome expression system (ACEs) was earlier described with multiple loading sites for a modified lambda-integrase enzyme. It has been shown that this ACEs is suitable for high-level industrial protein production and the treatment of a mouse model for a devastating human disorder, Krabbe’s disease. ACEs-treated mutant mice carrying a therapeutic gene lived more than four times longer than untreated counterparts. This novel gene therapy method is called combined mammalian artificial chromosome-stem cell therapy. At present, this method suffers from the limitation that a new selection marker gene should be present for each therapeutic gene loaded onto the ACEs. Complex diseases require the cooperative action of several genes for treatment, but only a limited number of selection marker genes are available and there is also a risk of serious side-effects caused by the unwanted expression of these marker genes in mammalian cells, organs and organisms. We describe here a novel method to load multiple genes onto the ACEs by using only two selectable marker genes. These markers may be removed from the ACEs before therapeutic application. This novel technology could revolutionize gene therapeutic applications targeting the treatment of complex disorders and cancers. It could also speed up cell therapy by allowing researchers to engineer a chromosome with a predetermined set of genetic factors to differentiate adult stem cells, embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells into cell types of therapeutic value. It is also a suitable tool for the investigation of complex biochemical pathways in basic science by producing an ACEs with several genes from a signal transduction pathway of interest. PMID:24454889

  3. Evolution of substrate specificity in a recipient's enzyme following horizontal gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Noda-García, Lianet; Camacho-Zarco, Aldo R; Medina-Ruíz, Sofía; Gaytán, Paul; Carrillo-Tripp, Mauricio; Fülöp, Vilmos; Barona-Gómez, Francisco

    2013-09-01

    Despite the prominent role of horizontal gene transfer (HGT) in shaping bacterial metabolism, little is known about the impact of HGT on the evolution of enzyme function. Specifically, what is the influence of a recently acquired gene on the function of an existing gene? For example, certain members of the genus Corynebacterium have horizontally acquired a whole l-tryptophan biosynthetic operon, whereas in certain closely related actinobacteria, for example, Mycobacterium, the trpF gene is missing. In Mycobacterium, the function of the trpF gene is performed by a dual-substrate (βα)8 phosphoribosyl isomerase (priA gene) also involved in l-histidine (hisA gene) biosynthesis. We investigated the effect of a HGT-acquired TrpF enzyme upon PriA's substrate specificity in Corynebacterium through comparative genomics and phylogenetic reconstructions. After comprehensive in vivo and enzyme kinetic analyses of selected PriA homologs, a novel (βα)8 isomerase subfamily with a specialized function in l-histidine biosynthesis, termed subHisA, was confirmed. X-ray crystallography was used to reveal active-site mutations in subHisA important for narrowing of substrate specificity, which when mutated to the naturally occurring amino acid in PriA led to gain of function. Moreover, in silico molecular dynamic analyses demonstrated that the narrowing of substrate specificity of subHisA is concomitant with loss of ancestral protein conformational states. Our results show the importance of HGT in shaping enzyme evolution and metabolism. PMID:23800623

  4. Characterization of the Promoter Region of Biosynthetic Enzyme Genes Involved in Berberine Biosynthesis in Coptis japonica

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Yasuyuki; Yoshimoto, Tadashi; Yoshida, Sayumi T.; Sato, Fumihiko

    2016-01-01

    The presence of alkaloids is rather specific to certain plant species. However, berberine, an isoquinoline alkaloid, is relatively broadly distributed in the plant kingdom. Thus, berberine biosynthesis has been intensively investigated, especially using Coptis japonica cell cultures. Almost all biosynthetic enzyme genes have already been characterized at the molecular level. Particularly, two transcription factors (TFs), a plant-specific WRKY-type TF, CjWRKY1, and a basic helix-loop-helix TF, CjbHLH1, were shown to comprehensively regulate berberine biosynthesis in C. japonica cells. In this study, we characterized the promoter region of some biosynthetic enzyme genes and associated cis-acting elements involved in the transcriptional regulation via two TFs. The promoter regions of three berberine biosynthetic enzyme genes (CYP80B2, 4′OMT and CYP719A1) were isolated, and their promoter activities were dissected by a transient assay involving the sequentially truncated promoter::luciferase (LUC) reporter constructs. Furthermore, transactivation activities of CjWRKY1 were determined using the truncated promoter::LUC reporter constructs or constructs with mutated cis-elements. These results suggest the involvement of a putative W-box in the regulation of biosynthetic enzyme genes. Direct binding of CjWRKY1 to the W-box DNA sequence was also confirmed by an electrophoresis mobility shift assay and by a chromatin immunoprecipitation assay. In addition, CjbHLH1 also activated transcription from truncated 4′OMT and CYP719A1 promoters independently of CjWRKY1, suggesting the involvement of a putative E-box. Unexpected transcriptional activation of biosynthetic enzyme genes via a non-W-box sequence and by CjWRKY1 as well as the possible involvement of a GCC-box in berberine biosynthesis in C. japonica are discussed. PMID:27642289

  5. Characterization of the Promoter Region of Biosynthetic Enzyme Genes Involved in Berberine Biosynthesis in Coptis japonica.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Yasuyuki; Yoshimoto, Tadashi; Yoshida, Sayumi T; Sato, Fumihiko

    2016-01-01

    The presence of alkaloids is rather specific to certain plant species. However, berberine, an isoquinoline alkaloid, is relatively broadly distributed in the plant kingdom. Thus, berberine biosynthesis has been intensively investigated, especially using Coptis japonica cell cultures. Almost all biosynthetic enzyme genes have already been characterized at the molecular level. Particularly, two transcription factors (TFs), a plant-specific WRKY-type TF, CjWRKY1, and a basic helix-loop-helix TF, CjbHLH1, were shown to comprehensively regulate berberine biosynthesis in C. japonica cells. In this study, we characterized the promoter region of some biosynthetic enzyme genes and associated cis-acting elements involved in the transcriptional regulation via two TFs. The promoter regions of three berberine biosynthetic enzyme genes (CYP80B2, 4'OMT and CYP719A1) were isolated, and their promoter activities were dissected by a transient assay involving the sequentially truncated promoter::luciferase (LUC) reporter constructs. Furthermore, transactivation activities of CjWRKY1 were determined using the truncated promoter::LUC reporter constructs or constructs with mutated cis-elements. These results suggest the involvement of a putative W-box in the regulation of biosynthetic enzyme genes. Direct binding of CjWRKY1 to the W-box DNA sequence was also confirmed by an electrophoresis mobility shift assay and by a chromatin immunoprecipitation assay. In addition, CjbHLH1 also activated transcription from truncated 4'OMT and CYP719A1 promoters independently of CjWRKY1, suggesting the involvement of a putative E-box. Unexpected transcriptional activation of biosynthetic enzyme genes via a non-W-box sequence and by CjWRKY1 as well as the possible involvement of a GCC-box in berberine biosynthesis in C. japonica are discussed. PMID:27642289

  6. Characterization of the Promoter Region of Biosynthetic Enzyme Genes Involved in Berberine Biosynthesis in Coptis japonica

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Yasuyuki; Yoshimoto, Tadashi; Yoshida, Sayumi T.; Sato, Fumihiko

    2016-01-01

    The presence of alkaloids is rather specific to certain plant species. However, berberine, an isoquinoline alkaloid, is relatively broadly distributed in the plant kingdom. Thus, berberine biosynthesis has been intensively investigated, especially using Coptis japonica cell cultures. Almost all biosynthetic enzyme genes have already been characterized at the molecular level. Particularly, two transcription factors (TFs), a plant-specific WRKY-type TF, CjWRKY1, and a basic helix-loop-helix TF, CjbHLH1, were shown to comprehensively regulate berberine biosynthesis in C. japonica cells. In this study, we characterized the promoter region of some biosynthetic enzyme genes and associated cis-acting elements involved in the transcriptional regulation via two TFs. The promoter regions of three berberine biosynthetic enzyme genes (CYP80B2, 4′OMT and CYP719A1) were isolated, and their promoter activities were dissected by a transient assay involving the sequentially truncated promoter::luciferase (LUC) reporter constructs. Furthermore, transactivation activities of CjWRKY1 were determined using the truncated promoter::LUC reporter constructs or constructs with mutated cis-elements. These results suggest the involvement of a putative W-box in the regulation of biosynthetic enzyme genes. Direct binding of CjWRKY1 to the W-box DNA sequence was also confirmed by an electrophoresis mobility shift assay and by a chromatin immunoprecipitation assay. In addition, CjbHLH1 also activated transcription from truncated 4′OMT and CYP719A1 promoters independently of CjWRKY1, suggesting the involvement of a putative E-box. Unexpected transcriptional activation of biosynthetic enzyme genes via a non-W-box sequence and by CjWRKY1 as well as the possible involvement of a GCC-box in berberine biosynthesis in C. japonica are discussed.

  7. Characterization of angiotensin I-converting enzyme from anterior gills of the mangrove crab Ucides cordatus.

    PubMed

    Bersanetti, Patrícia A; Nogueira, Regina F; Marcondes, Marcelo F; Paiva, Paulo B; Juliano, Maria A; Juliano, Luiz; Carmona, Adriana K; Zanotto, Flavia P

    2015-03-01

    Angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) is a well-known metallopeptidase that is found in vertebrates, invertebrates and bacteria. We isolated from the anterior gill of the crab Ucides cordatus an isoform of ACE, here named crab-ACE, which presented catalytic properties closely resembling to those of mammalian ACE. The enzyme was purified on Sepharose-lisinopril affinity chromatography to apparent homogeneity and a band of about 72 kDa could be visualized after silver staining and Western blotting. Assays performed with fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) selective ACE substrates Abz-FRK(Dnp)P-OH, Abz-SDK(Dnp)P-OH and Abz-LFK(Dnp)-OH, allowed us to verify that crab-ACE has hydrolytic profile very similar to that of the ACE C-domain. In addition, we observed that crab-ACE can hydrolyze the ACE substrates, angiotensin I and bradykinin. The enzyme was strongly inhibited by the specific ACE inhibitor lisinopril (Ki of 1.26 nM). However, in contrast to other ACE isoforms, crab-ACE presented a very particular optimum pH, being the substrate Abz-FRK(Dnp)-P-OH hydrolyzed efficiently at pH 9.5. Other interesting characteristic of crab-ACE was that the maximum hydrolytic activity was reached at around 45°C. The description of an ACE isoform in Ucides cordatus is challenging and may contribute to a better understanding of the biochemical function of this enzyme in invertebrates.

  8. Advanced Collaborative Emissions Study (ACES)

    SciTech Connect

    Greenbaum, Daniel; Costantini, Maria; Van Erp, Annemoon; Shaikh, Rashid; Bailey, Brent; Tennant, Chris; Khalek, Imad; Mauderly, Joe; McDonald, Jacob; Zielinska, Barbara; Bemis, Jeffrey; Storey, John; Hallberg, Lance; Clark, Nigel

    2013-12-31

    The objective of the Advanced Collaborative Emissions Study (ACES) was to determine before widespread commercial deployment whether or not the new, energy-efficient, heavy duty diesel engines (2007 and 2010 EPA Emissions Standards Compliant) may generate anticipated toxic emissions that could adversely affect the environment and human health. ACES was planned to take place in three phases. In Phase 1, extensive emissions characterization of four production-intent prototype engine and control systems designed to meet 2007 standards for nitrogen oxides (NOx) and particulate matter (PM) was conducted at an existing emissions characterization facility: Southwest Research Institute (SwRI). One of the tested engines was selected (at random, after careful comparison of results) for health testing in Phase 3. In Phase 2, extensive emission characterization of three production-intent prototype engine and control systems meeting the 2010 standards (including more advanced NOx controls to meet the more stringent 2010 NOx standards) was conducted at the same test facility. In Phase 3, one engine/aftertreatment system selected from Phase 1 was further characterized during health effects studies (at an existing inhalation toxicology laboratory: Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute, [LRRI]) to form the basis of the ACES safety assessment. The Department of Energy (DOE) award provided funding for emissions characterization in Phases 1 and 2 as well as exposure characterization in Phase 3. The main health analyses in Phase 3 were funded separately and are not reported here.

  9. Analysis of a polygalacturonase gene of Ustilago maydis and characterization of the encoded enzyme.

    PubMed

    Castruita-Domínguez, José P; González-Hernández, Sandra E; Polaina, Julio; Flores-Villavicencio, Lérida L; Alvarez-Vargas, Aurelio; Flores-Martínez, Alberto; Ponce-Noyola, Patricia; Leal-Morales, Carlos A

    2014-05-01

    Ustilago maydis is a pathogenic fungus that produces the corn smut. It is a biotrophic parasite that depends on living plant tissues for its proliferation and development. Polygalacturonases are secreted by pathogens to solubilize the plant cell-wall and are required for pathogen virulence. In this paper, we report the isolation of a U. maydis polygalacturonase gene (Pgu1) and the functional and structural characterization of the encoded enzyme. The U. maydis Pgu1 gene is expressed when the fungus is grown in liquid culture media containing different carbon sources. In plant tissue, the expression increased as a function of incubation time. Pgu1 gene expression was detected during plant infection around 10 days post-infection with U. maydis FB-D12 strain in combination with teliospore formation. Synthesis and secretion of active recombinant PGU1 were achieved using Pichia pastoris, the purified enzyme had a optimum temperature of 34 °C, optimum pH of 4.5, a Km of 57.84 g/L for polygalacturonic acid, and a Vmax of 28.9 µg/min mg. Structural models of PGU1 based on homologous enzymes yielded a typical right-handed β-helix fold of pectinolytic enzymes classified in the glycosyl hydrolases family 28, and the U. maydis PGU1 is related with endo rather than exo polygalacturonases.

  10. Identification and molecular characterization of the aco genes encoding the Pelobacter carbinolicus acetoin dehydrogenase enzyme system.

    PubMed Central

    Oppermann, F B; Steinbüchel, A

    1994-01-01

    Use of oligonucleotide probes, which were deduced from the N-terminal sequences of the purified enzyme components, identified the structural genes for the alpha and beta subunits of E1 (acetoin:2,6-dichlorophenolindophenol oxidoreductase), E2 (dihydrolipoamide acetyltransferase), and E3 (dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase) of the Pelobacter carbinolicus acetoin dehydrogenase enzyme system, which were designated acoA, acoB, acoC, and acoL, respectively. The nucleotide sequences of acoA (979 bp), acoB (1,014 bp), acoC (1,353 bp), and acoL (1,413 bp) as well as of acoS (933 bp), which encodes a protein with an M(r) of 34,421 exhibiting 64.7% amino acid identity to the Escherichia coli lipA gene product, were determined. These genes are clustered on a 6.1-kbp region. Heterologous expression of acoA, acoB, acoC, acoL, and acoS in E. coli was demonstrated. The amino acid sequences deduced from acoA, acoB, acoC, and acoL for E1 alpha (M(r), 34,854), E1 beta (M(r), 36,184), E2 (M(r), 47,281), and E3 (M(r), 49,394) exhibited striking similarities to the amino acid sequences of the components of the Alcaligenes eutrophus acetoin-cleaving system. Homologies of up to 48.7% amino acid identity to the primary structures of the enzyme components of various 2-oxo acid dehydrogenase complexes also were found. In addition, the respective genes of the 2-oxo acid dehydrogenase complexes and of the acetoin dehydrogenase enzyme system were organized very similarly, indicating a close relationship of the P. carbinolicus acetoin dehydrogenase enzyme system to 2-oxo acid dehydrogenase complexes. Images PMID:8110297

  11. Distribution of genes encoding aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes among clinical isolates of methicillin-resistant staphylococci.

    PubMed

    Perumal, N; Murugesan, S; Krishnan, P

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the distribution of genes encoding aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes (AMEs) and staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) elements among clinical isolates of methicillin-resistant staphylococci (MRS). Antibiotic susceptibility test was done using Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion method. The presence of SCCmec types and AME genes, namely, aac (6')-Ie-aph (2''), aph (3')-IIIa and ant (4')-Ia was determined using two different multiplex polymerase chain reaction. The most encountered AME genes were aac (6')-Ie-aph (2'') (55.4%) followed by aph (3')-IIIa (32.3%) and ant (4')-Ia gene (9%). SCCmec type I (34%) was predominant in this study. In conclusion, the aac (6')-Ie-aph (2'') was the most common AME gene and SCCmec type I was most predominant among the MRS isolates. PMID:27514959

  12. ACE2 Deficiency Worsens Epicardial Adipose Tissue Inflammation and Cardiac Dysfunction in Response to Diet-Induced Obesity.

    PubMed

    Patel, Vaibhav B; Mori, Jun; McLean, Brent A; Basu, Ratnadeep; Das, Subhash K; Ramprasath, Tharmarajan; Parajuli, Nirmal; Penninger, Josef M; Grant, Maria B; Lopaschuk, Gary D; Oudit, Gavin Y

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is increasing in prevalence and is strongly associated with metabolic and cardiovascular disorders. The renin-angiotensin system (RAS) has emerged as a key pathogenic mechanism for these disorders; angiotensin (Ang)-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) negatively regulates RAS by metabolizing Ang II into Ang 1-7. We studied the role of ACE2 in obesity-mediated cardiac dysfunction. ACE2 null (ACE2KO) and wild-type (WT) mice were fed a high-fat diet (HFD) or a control diet and studied at 6 months of age. Loss of ACE2 resulted in decreased weight gain but increased glucose intolerance, epicardial adipose tissue (EAT) inflammation, and polarization of macrophages into a proinflammatory phenotype in response to HFD. Similarly, human EAT in patients with obesity and heart failure displayed a proinflammatory macrophage phenotype. Exacerbated EAT inflammation in ACE2KO-HFD mice was associated with decreased myocardial adiponectin, decreased phosphorylation of AMPK, increased cardiac steatosis and lipotoxicity, and myocardial insulin resistance, which worsened heart function. Ang 1-7 (24 µg/kg/h) administered to ACE2KO-HFD mice resulted in ameliorated EAT inflammation and reduced cardiac steatosis and lipotoxicity, resulting in normalization of heart failure. In conclusion, ACE2 plays a novel role in heart disease associated with obesity wherein ACE2 negatively regulates obesity-induced EAT inflammation and cardiac insulin resistance.

  13. Effects of interaction between angiotensin I-converting enzyme polymorphisms and lifestyle on adiposity in adolescent Greeks.

    PubMed

    Moran, Colin N; Vassilopoulos, Christos; Tsiokanos, Athanasios; Jamurtas, Athanasios Z; Bailey, Mark E S; Wilson, Richard H; Pitsiladis, Yannis P

    2005-09-01

    Genetic variation in the human angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) gene has been associated with many heritable traits, including obesity. Herein, we report the results of a study of obesity-related phenotypes and lifestyle in 1016 teen-aged Greeks. We show that there is a strong association (p = 0.001) between subcutaneous fat and the ACE insertion/deletion (I/D) polymorphism in females, possession of genotypes containing the D allele being associated with increased fat thickness. This association is strongest in females who participate in no extra exercise and accounts for 6.5% of the phenotypic variance in fat thickness by ANOVA. The association is additive, with the mean phenotypic values in heterozygotes intermediate between the means of the two homozygotes, and the association acts at both extremes of the fat thickness distribution in a classical polygenic manner. Other ACE polymorphisms (rs4424958, rs4311) that define major haplotypes in European populations fail to provide stronger associations with the subcutaneous fat phenotype. Because ACE I/D is the polymorphism most strongly associated with circulating ACE levels in European populations, we propose that the functional allelic differences that influence circulating ACE levels also mediate the associations with the obesity-related phenotypes studied here.

  14. Altered cardiac bradykinin metabolism in experimental diabetes caused by the variations of angiotensin-converting enzyme and other peptidases.

    PubMed

    Adam, Albert; Leclair, Patrick; Montpas, Nicolas; Koumbadinga, Gérémy Abdull; Bachelard, Hélène; Marceau, François

    2010-04-01

    The peptidases angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) and neutral endopeptidase 24.11 (NEP) mediate most of the kinin catabolism in normal cardiac tissue and are the molecular targets of inhibitory drugs that favorably influence diabetic complications. We studied the variations of those kininases in the myocardium of rats in experimental diabetes. ACE and NEP activities were significantly decreased in heart membranes 4-8weeks post-streptozotocin (STZ) injection. However, insulin-dependent diabetes did not modify significantly bradykinin (BK) half-life (t(1/2)) while the effect of both ACE (enalaprilat) and ACE and NEP (omapatrilat) inhibitors on BK degradation progressively decreased, which may be explained by the upregulation of other unidentified metallopeptidase(s). In vivo insulin treatment restored the activities of both ACE and NEP. ACE and NEP activities were significantly higher in hearts of young Zucker rats than in those of Sprague-Dawley rats. BK t(1/2) and the effects of peptidase inhibitors on t(1/2) varied accordingly. It is concluded that kininase activities are subjected to large and opposite variations in rat cardiac tissue in type I and II diabetes models. A number of tissue or molecular factors may determine these variations, such as remodeling of cardiac tissue, ectoenzyme shedding to the extracellular fluid and the pathologic regulation of peptidase gene expression.

  15. Intrarenal alterations of the angiotensin-converting enzyme type 2/angiotensin 1-7 complex of the renin-angiotensin system do not alter the course of malignant hypertension in Cyp1a1-Ren-2 transgenic rats.

    PubMed

    Husková, Zuzana; Kopkan, Libor; Červenková, Lenka; Doleželová, Šárka; Vaňourková, Zdeňka; Škaroupková, Petra; Nishiyama, Akira; Kompanowska-Jezierska, Elzbieta; Sadowski, Janusz; Kramer, Herbert J; Červenka, Luděk

    2016-04-01

    The role of the intrarenal renin-angiotensin system (RAS) in the pathophysiology of malignant hypertension is not fully understood. Accumulating evidence indicates that the recently discovered vasodilator axis of the RAS, angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) type 2 (ACE2)/angiotensin 1-7 (ANG 1-7), constitutes an endogenous system counterbalancing the hypertensiogenic axis, ACE/angiotensin II (ANG II)/AT1 receptor. This study aimed to evaluate the role of the intrarenal vasodilator RAS axis in the pathophysiology of ANG II-dependent malignant hypertension in Cyp1a1-Ren-2 transgenic rats. ANG II-dependent malignant hypertension was induced by 13 days' dietary administration of indole-3-carbinol (I3C), a natural xenobiotic that activates the mouse renin gene in Cyp1a1-Ren-2 transgenic rats. It was hypothesized that pharmacologically-induced inhibition of the ACE2/ANG 1-7 complex should aggravate, and activation of this axis should attenuate, the course of ANG II-dependent malignant hypertension. Blood pressure (BP) was monitored by radiotelemetry. ACE2 inhibitor (DX 600, 0.2 μg/day) and ACE2 activator (DIZE, 1 mg/day) were administrated via osmotic minipumps. Even though ACE2 inhibitor significantly decreased and ACE2 activator increased intrarenal ANG 1-7 concentrations, the course of BP, as well as of albuminuria, cardiac hypertrophy and renal glomerular damage, were not altered. It was shown that intrarenal alterations in the ACE2/ANG 1-7 complex did not significantly modify the course of malignant hypertension in I3C-induced Cyp1a1-Ren-2 transgenic rats. Thus, in our experimental setting alterations of this intrarenal vasodilator complex of the RAS do not significantly modify the form of malignant hypertension that clearly depends on the inappropriately increased activity of the ACE/ANG II/AT1 receptor axis.

  16. Key enzymes and proteins of crop insects as candidate for RNAi based gene silencing.

    PubMed

    Kola, Vijaya Sudhakara Rao; Renuka, P; Madhav, Maganti Sheshu; Mangrauthia, Satendra K

    2015-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is a mechanism of homology dependent gene silencing present in plants and animals. It operates through 21-24 nucleotides small RNAs which are processed through a set of core enzymatic machinery that involves Dicer and Argonaute proteins. In recent past, the technology has been well appreciated toward the control of plant pathogens and insects through suppression of key genes/proteins of infecting organisms. The genes encoding key enzymes/proteins with the great potential for developing an effective insect control by RNAi approach are actylcholinesterase, cytochrome P450 enzymes, amino peptidase N, allatostatin, allatotropin, tryptophan oxygenase, arginine kinase, vacuolar ATPase, chitin synthase, glutathione-S-transferase, catalase, trehalose phosphate synthase, vitellogenin, hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase, and hormone receptor genes. Through various studies, it is demonstrated that RNAi is a reliable molecular tool which offers great promises in meeting the challenges imposed by crop insects with careful selection of key enzymes/proteins. Utilization of RNAi tool to target some of these key proteins of crop insects through various approaches is described here. The major challenges of RNAi based insect control such as identifying potential targets, delivery methods of silencing trigger, off target effects, and complexity of insect biology are very well illustrated. Further, required efforts to address these challenges are also discussed. PMID:25954206

  17. Key enzymes and proteins of crop insects as candidate for RNAi based gene silencing

    PubMed Central

    Kola, Vijaya Sudhakara Rao; Renuka, P.; Madhav, Maganti Sheshu; Mangrauthia, Satendra K.

    2015-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is a mechanism of homology dependent gene silencing present in plants and animals. It operates through 21–24 nucleotides small RNAs which are processed through a set of core enzymatic machinery that involves Dicer and Argonaute proteins. In recent past, the technology has been well appreciated toward the control of plant pathogens and insects through suppression of key genes/proteins of infecting organisms. The genes encoding key enzymes/proteins with the great potential for developing an effective insect control by RNAi approach are actylcholinesterase, cytochrome P450 enzymes, amino peptidase N, allatostatin, allatotropin, tryptophan oxygenase, arginine kinase, vacuolar ATPase, chitin synthase, glutathione-S-transferase, catalase, trehalose phosphate synthase, vitellogenin, hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase, and hormone receptor genes. Through various studies, it is demonstrated that RNAi is a reliable molecular tool which offers great promises in meeting the challenges imposed by crop insects with careful selection of key enzymes/proteins. Utilization of RNAi tool to target some of these key proteins of crop insects through various approaches is described here. The major challenges of RNAi based insect control such as identifying potential targets, delivery methods of silencing trigger, off target effects, and complexity of insect biology are very well illustrated. Further, required efforts to address these challenges are also discussed. PMID:25954206

  18. Phage-mediated transfer of a dextranase gene in Lactobacillus sanfranciscensis and characterization of the enzyme.

    PubMed

    Picozzi, Claudia; Meissner, Daniel; Chierici, Margherita; Ehrmann, Matthias A; Vigentini, Ileana; Foschino, Roberto; Vogel, Rudi F

    2015-06-01

    While phages of lactobacilli are extensively studied with respect to their structure and role in the dairy environment, knowledge about phages in bacteria residing in sourdough fermentation is limited. Based on the previous finding that the Lactobacillus sanfranciscensis phage EV3 carries a putative dextranase gene (dex), we have investigated the distribution of similar dex(+) phages in L. sanfranciscensis, the chance of gene transfer and the properties of the dextranase encoded by phage EV3. L. sanfranciscensis H2A (dex(-)), originally isolated from a wheat sourdough, expressed a Dex(+) phenotype upon infection with EV3. The dextranase gene was isolated from the transductant and heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli. The gene encoded a protein of 801 amino acids with a calculated molecular weight (Mw) of 89.09 kDa and a calculated pI of 5.62. Upon purification aided by a 6-His tag, enzyme kinetic parameters were determined. The Km value was 370 mM, and the Vmax was calculated in about 16 μmol of glucose released from dextran by 1 mg of enzyme in 1 min in a buffer solution at pH 5.0. The optimum conditions were 60 °C and pH 4.5. The enzyme retained its activity for >3h at 60 °C and exhibited only 40% activity at 30 °C; the highest homology of 72% was found to a dextranase gene from Lactobacillus fermentum phage φPYB5. Within 25 L. sanfransiscensis isolates tested, the strain 4B5 carried a similar prophage encoding a dextranase gene. Our data suggest a phage-mediated transfer of dextranase genes in the sourdough environment resulting in superinfection-resistant L. sanfranciscensis Dex(+) strains with a possible ecological advantage in dextran-containing sourdoughs. PMID:25771219

  19. Phage-mediated transfer of a dextranase gene in Lactobacillus sanfranciscensis and characterization of the enzyme.

    PubMed

    Picozzi, Claudia; Meissner, Daniel; Chierici, Margherita; Ehrmann, Matthias A; Vigentini, Ileana; Foschino, Roberto; Vogel, Rudi F

    2015-06-01

    While phages of lactobacilli are extensively studied with respect to their structure and role in the dairy environment, knowledge about phages in bacteria residing in sourdough fermentation is limited. Based on the previous finding that the Lactobacillus sanfranciscensis phage EV3 carries a putative dextranase gene (dex), we have investigated the distribution of similar dex(+) phages in L. sanfranciscensis, the chance of gene transfer and the properties of the dextranase encoded by phage EV3. L. sanfranciscensis H2A (dex(-)), originally isolated from a wheat sourdough, expressed a Dex(+) phenotype upon infection with EV3. The dextranase gene was isolated from the transductant and heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli. The gene encoded a protein of 801 amino acids with a calculated molecular weight (Mw) of 89.09 kDa and a calculated pI of 5.62. Upon purification aided by a 6-His tag, enzyme kinetic parameters were determined. The Km value was 370 mM, and the Vmax was calculated in about 16 μmol of glucose released from dextran by 1 mg of enzyme in 1 min in a buffer solution at pH 5.0. The optimum conditions were 60 °C and pH 4.5. The enzyme retained its activity for >3h at 60 °C and exhibited only 40% activity at 30 °C; the highest homology of 72% was found to a dextranase gene from Lactobacillus fermentum phage φPYB5. Within 25 L. sanfransiscensis isolates tested, the strain 4B5 carried a similar prophage encoding a dextranase gene. Our data suggest a phage-mediated transfer of dextranase genes in the sourdough environment resulting in superinfection-resistant L. sanfranciscensis Dex(+) strains with a possible ecological advantage in dextran-containing sourdoughs.

  20. Olmesartan Inhibits Cardiac Hypertrophy in Mice Overexpressing Renin Independently of Blood Pressure: Its Beneficial Effects on ACE2/Ang(1-7)/Mas Axis and NADPH Oxidase Expression.

    PubMed

    Tanno, Tomohiro; Tomita, Hirofumi; Narita, Ikuyo; Kinjo, Takahiko; Nishizaki, Kimitaka; Ichikawa, Hiroaki; Kimura, Yoshihiro; Tanaka, Makoto; Osanai, Tomohiro; Okumura, Ken

    2016-06-01

    Enhanced renin-angiotensin activity causes hypertension and cardiac hypertrophy. The angiotensin (Ang)-converting enzyme (ACE)2/Ang(1-7)/Mas axis pathway functions against Ang II type 1 receptor (AT1R) signaling. We investigated whether olmesartan (Olm), an AT1R blocker, inhibits cardiac hypertrophy independently of blood pressure, and evaluated the potential mechanisms. The 3- to 4-month-old male mice overexpressing renin in the liver (Ren-Tg) were given Olm (5 mg/kg/d) and hydralazine (Hyd) (3.5 mg/kg/d) orally for 2 months. Systolic blood pressure was higher in the Ren-Tg mice than in wild-type littermates. Olm and Hyd treatments lowered systolic blood pressure to the same degree. However, cardiac hypertrophy, evaluated by echocardiography, heart weight, cross-sectional area of cardiomyocytes, and gene expression, was inhibited by only Olm treatment, but not by Hyd. Olm treatment reversed decreased gene expressions of ACE2 and Mas receptor of Ren-Tg mice and inhibited enhanced NADPH oxidase (Nox)4 expression and reactive oxygen species, whereas Hyd treatment had no influence on them. These findings indicate that Olm treatment inhibits cardiac hypertrophy independently of blood pressure, not only through its original AT1R blockade but partly through enhancement of ACE2/Ang(1-7)/Mas axis and suppression of Nox4 expression. PMID:26886190

  1. Reporter enzyme inhibitor study to aid assembly of orthogonal reporter gene assays.

    PubMed

    Ho, Pei-i; Yue, Kimberley; Pandey, Pramod; Breault, Lyne; Harbinski, Fred; McBride, Aaron J; Webb, Brian; Narahari, Janaki; Karassina, Natasha; Wood, Keith V; Hill, Adam; Auld, Douglas S

    2013-05-17

    Reporter gene assays (RGAs) are commonly used to measure biological pathway modulation by small molecules. Understanding how such compounds interact with the reporter enzyme is critical to accurately interpret RGA results. To improve our understanding of reporter enzymes and to develop optimal RGA systems, we investigated eight reporter enzymes differing in brightness, emission spectrum, stability, and substrate requirements. These included common reporter enzymes such as firefly luciferase (Photinus pyralis), Renilla reniformis luciferase, and β-lactamase, as well as mutated forms of R. reniformis luciferase emitting either blue- or green-shifted luminescence, a red-light emitting form of Luciola cruciata firefly luciferase, a mutated form of Gaussia princeps luciferase, and a proprietary luciferase termed "NanoLuc" derived from the luminescent sea shrimp Oplophorus gracilirostris. To determine hit rates and structure-activity relationships, we screened a collection of 42,460 PubChem compounds at 10 μM using purified enzyme preparations. We then compared hit rates and chemotypes of actives for each enzyme. The hit rates ranged from <0.1% for β-lactamase to as high as 10% for mutated forms of Renilla luciferase. Related luciferases such as Renilla luciferase mutants showed high degrees of inhibitor overlap (40-70%), while unrelated luciferases such as firefly luciferases, Gaussia luciferase, and NanoLuc showed <10% overlap. Examination of representative inhibitors in cell-based assays revealed that inhibitor-based enzyme stabilization can lead to increases in bioluminescent signal for firefly luciferase, Renilla luciferase, and NanoLuc, with shorter half-life reporters showing increased activation responses. From this study we suggest strategies to improve the construction and interpretation of assays employing these reporter enzymes.

  2. Two genes encoding new carotenoid-modifying enzymes in the green sulfur bacterium Chlorobium tepidum.

    PubMed

    Maresca, Julia A; Bryant, Donald A

    2006-09-01

    The green sulfur bacterium Chlorobium tepidum produces chlorobactene as its primary carotenoid. Small amounts of chlorobactene are hydroxylated by the enzyme CrtC and then glucosylated and acylated to produce chlorobactene glucoside laurate. The genes encoding the enzymes responsible for these modifications of chlorobactene, CT1987, and CT0967, have been identified by comparative genomics, and these genes were insertionally inactivated in C. tepidum to verify their predicted function. The gene encoding chlorobactene glucosyltransferase (CT1987) has been named cruC, and the gene encoding chlorobactene lauroyltransferase (CT0967) has been named cruD. Homologs of these genes are found in the genomes of all sequenced green sulfur bacteria and filamentous anoxygenic phototrophs as well as in the genomes of several nonphotosynthetic bacteria that produce similarly modified carotenoids. The other bacteria in which these genes are found are not closely related to green sulfur bacteria or to one another. This suggests that the ability to synthesize modified carotenoids has been a frequently transferred trait.

  3. Evaluation of renal function in elderly heart failure patients on ACE inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Jolobe, O

    1999-01-01

    A total of 187 heart failure patients aged 65-92 years, with pretreatment serum creatinine levels below 200 µmol/l, were monitored for more than 12 months on angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor therapy. Optimal ACE inhibitor dosage was found in 27% of patients, while a significant deterioration in renal function, characterised by >20% increase in serum creatinine to >200 µmol/l, occurred in 25 patients. This was most closely attributable to ACE inhibitor treatment per se (implying co-existence of bilateral renal artery stenosis) in only four cases, including one in whom renal deterioration was reproducible on inadvertent rechallenge. In the other 21, renal deterioration was attributable to diuretic-related blood volume depletion (two cases), nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (two cases), obstructive uropathy (two cases), preterminal renal shutdown (two cases), and the interaction between diuretic and ACE inhibitor dosage (including long-acting vs short-acting drugs) (13 cases). This study could serve as the basis for future comparisons of ACE-inhibitor-related renal deterioration when the entry requirement is optimal ACE inhibitor dosage.


Keywords: heart failure; elderly patients; angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors; renal deterioration PMID:10533630

  4. Differential regulation of the cellulase transcription factors XYR1, ACE2, and ACE1 in Trichoderma reesei strains producing high and low levels of cellulase.

    PubMed

    Portnoy, Thomas; Margeot, Antoine; Seidl-Seiboth, Verena; Le Crom, Stéphane; Ben Chaabane, Fadhel; Linke, Rita; Seiboth, Bernhard; Kubicek, Christian P

    2011-02-01

    Due to its capacity to produce large amounts of cellulases, Trichoderma reesei is increasingly being investigated for second-generation biofuel production from lignocellulosic biomass. The induction mechanisms of T. reesei cellulases have been described recently, but the regulation of the genes involved in their transcription has not been studied thoroughly. Here we report the regulation of expression of the two activator genes xyr1 and ace2, and the corepressor gene ace1, during the induction of cellulase biosynthesis by the inducer lactose in T. reesei QM 9414, a strain producing low levels of cellulase (low producer). We show that all three genes are induced by lactose. xyr1 was also induced by d-galactose, but this induction was independent of d-galactose metabolism. Moreover, ace1 was carbon catabolite repressed, whereas full induction of xyr1 and ace2 in fact required CRE1. Significant differences in these regulatory patterns were observed in the high-producer strain RUT C30 and the hyperproducer strain T. reesei CL847. These observations suggest that a strongly elevated basal transcription level of xyr1 and reduced upregulation of ace1 by lactose may have been important for generating the hyperproducer strain and that thus, these genes are major control elements of cellulase production.

  5. Association of Genetic polymorphism of PPARγ-2, ACE, MTHFR, FABP-2 and FTO genes in risk prediction of type 2 diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a non-autoimmune, complex, heterogeneous and polygenic metabolic disease condition characterized by persistent elevated blood glucose levels (hyperglycemia). India as said to be the diabetic capital of the world is likely to experience the largest increase in T2DM and a greater number of diabetic individuals in the world by the year 2030. Identification of specific genetic variations in a particular ethnic group has a critical role in understanding the risk of developing T2DM in a much efficient way in future. These genetic variations include numerous types of polymorphisms among which single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) is the most frequent. SNPs are basically located within the regulatory elements of several gene sequences. There are scores of genes interacting with various environmental factors affecting various pathways and sometimes even the whole signalling network that cause diseases like T2DM. This review discusses the biomarkers for early risk prediction of T2DM. Such predictions could be used in order to understand the pathogenesis of T2DM and to better diagnostics, treatment, and eventually prevention. PMID:24156506

  6. Angiotensin-converting enzyme insertion/deletion polymorphism and gastric cancer: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Gan, Lu; Liu, Xinyang; Wu, Zhenhua; Huang, Mingzu; Zhang, Xiaowei; Guo, Weijian

    2015-01-01

    Previous case-control studies on the association of the angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) gene insertion/deletion (I/D) polymorphism with gastric cancer were controversial. A meta-analysis was conducted to further evaluate the association between polymorphism in the ACE gene I/D and gastric cancer. We searched MEDLINE (PubMed), EMBASE, Web of Science, and CBM without language restrictions to Nov 20, 2014. Odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were used to assess the strength of association. Eight studies involving 1480 gastric cancer cases and 3773 cancer-free controls were included. Overall, no significant association between ACE I/D polymorphism and gastric cancer risk was observed (OR = 1.15; 95% CI 0.90-1.46, P = 0.26). The subgroup analysis on the basis of H. Pylori status showed the decreased gastric cancer risk in H. Pylori negative subgroup (OR = 0.40; 95% CI: 0.27-0.59; P < 0.00001) rather than in H. Pylori positive subgroup (OR = 1.82, 95% CI: 0.87-3.82, P = 0.11). Subgroup analysis was performed according to ethnicity (Caucasian and Asian). The results showed no genetic effects between ACE I/D polymorphism and gastric cancer risk. This meta-analysis suggested that the ACE gene I/D polymorphism was associated gastric cancer risk in H. Pylori negative subjects. PMID:26131166

  7. Sequence Analysis of the Gene Encoding Amylosucrase from Neisseria polysaccharea and Characterization of the Recombinant Enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Potocki De Montalk, G.; Remaud-Simeon, M.; Willemot, R. M.; Planchot, V.; Monsan, P.

    1999-01-01

    The Neisseria polysaccharea gene encoding amylosucrase was subcloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. Sequencing revealed that the deduced amino acid sequence differs significantly from that previously published. Comparison of the sequence with that of enzymes of the α-amylase family predicted a (β/α)8-barrel domain. Six of the eight highly conserved regions in amylolytic enzymes are present in amylosucrase. Among them, four constitute the active site in α-amylases. These sites were also conserved in the sequence of glucosyltransferases and dextransucrases. Nevertheless, the evolutionary tree does not show strong homology between them. The amylosucrase was purified by affinity chromatography between fusion protein glutathione S-transferase–amylosucrase and glutathione-Sepharose 4B. The pure enzyme linearly elongated some branched chains of glycogen, to an average degree of polymerization of 75. PMID:9882648

  8. Tissue Specificity of Human Angiotensin I-Converting Enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Kryukova, Olga V.; Tikhomirova, Victoria E.; Golukhova, Elena Z.; Evdokimov, Valery V.; Kalantarov, Gavreel F.; Trakht, Ilya N.; Schwartz, David E.; Dull, Randal O.; Gusakov, Alexander V.; Uporov, Igor V.; Kost, Olga A.; Danilov, Sergei M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE), which metabolizes many peptides and plays a key role in blood pressure regulation and vascular remodeling, as well as in reproductive functions, is expressed as a type-1 membrane glycoprotein on the surface of endothelial and epithelial cells. ACE also presents as a soluble form in biological fluids, among which seminal fluid being the richest in ACE content - 50-fold more than that in blood. Methods/Principal Findings We performed conformational fingerprinting of lung and seminal fluid ACEs using a set of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) to 17 epitopes of human ACE and determined the effects of potential ACE-binding partners on mAbs binding to these two different ACEs. Patterns of mAbs binding to ACEs from lung and from seminal fluid dramatically differed, which reflects difference in the local conformations of these ACEs, likely due to different patterns of ACE glycosylation in the lung endothelial cells and epithelial cells of epididymis/prostate (source of seminal fluid ACE), confirmed by mass-spectrometry of ACEs tryptic digests. Conclusions Dramatic differences in the local conformations of seminal fluid and lung ACEs, as well as the effects of ACE-binding partners on mAbs binding to these ACEs, suggest different regulation of ACE functions and shedding from epithelial cells in epididymis and prostate and endothelial cells of lung capillaries. The differences in local conformation of ACE could be the base for the generation of mAbs distingushing tissue-specific ACEs. PMID:26600189

  9. Daily rhythms of digestive enzyme activity and gene expression in gilthead seabream (Sparus aurata) during ontogeny.

    PubMed

    Mata-Sotres, José Antonio; Moyano, Francisco Javier; Martínez-Rodríguez, Gonzalo; Yúfera, Manuel

    2016-07-01

    In order to identify daily changes in digestive physiology in developing gilthead seabream larvae, the enzyme activity (trypsin, lipases and α-amylase) and gene expression (trypsinogen-try, chymotrypsinogen-ctrb, bile salt-activated lipase-cel1b, phospholipase A2-pla2 and α-amylase-amy2a) were measured during a 24h cycle in larvae reared under a 12h light/12h dark photoperiod. Larvae were sampled at 10, 18, 30 and 60days post-hatch. In each sampling day, larvae were sampled every 3h during a complete 24h cycle. The enzyme activity and gene expression exhibited a marked dependent behavior to the light/darkness cycle in all tested ages. The patterns of activity and expression of all tested enzymes were compared to the feeding pattern found in the same larvae, which showed a rhythmic feeding pattern with a strong light synchronization. In the four tested ages, the activities of trypsin, and to a lesser extent lipases and amylase, were related to feeding activity. Molecular expression of the pancreatic enzymes tended to increase during the night, probably as an anticipation of the forthcoming ingestion of food that will take place during the next light period. It follows that the enzymatic activities are being regulated at translational and/or post-translational level. The potential variability of enzyme secretion along the whole day is an important factor to take into account in future studies. A particularly striking consequence of the present results is the reliability of studies based in only one daily sample taken at the same hour of the day, as those focused to assess ontogeny of digestive enzymes.

  10. Systematic knockdown of morphine pathway enzymes in opium poppy using virus-induced gene silencing.

    PubMed

    Wijekoon, Champa P; Facchini, Peter J

    2012-03-01

    Opium poppy (Papaver somniferum) remains the sole commercial source for several pharmaceutical alkaloids including the narcotic analgesics codeine and morphine, and the semi-synthetic drugs oxycodone, buprenorphine and naltrexone. Although most of the biosynthetic genes have been identified, the post-transcriptional regulation of the morphinan alkaloid pathway has not been determined. We have used virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) as a functional genomics tool to investigate the regulation of morphine biosynthesis via a systematic reduction in enzyme levels responsible for the final six steps in the pathway. Specific gene silencing was confirmed at the transcript level by real-time quantitative PCR (polymerase chain reaction), and at the protein level by immunoblot analysis using antibodies raised against salutaridine synthase (SalSyn), salutaridine reductase (SalR), salutaridine 7-O-acetyltransferase (SalAT), thebaine 6-O-demethylase (T6ODM), codeinone reductase (COR), and codeine O-demethylase (CODM). In some cases, silencing a specific biosynthetic gene resulted in a predictable accumulation of the substrate for the corresponding enzyme. Reduced SalSyn, SalR, T6ODM and CODM protein levels correlated with lower morphine levels and a substantial increase in the accumulation of reticuline, salutaridine, thebaine and codeine, respectively. In contrast, the silencing of genes encoding SalAT and COR resulted in the accumulation of salutaridine and reticuline, respectively, which are not the corresponding enzymatic substrates. The silencing of alkaloid biosynthetic genes using VIGS confirms the physiological function of enzymes previously characterized in vitro, provides insight into the biochemical regulation of morphine biosynthesis, and demonstrates the immense potential for metabolic engineering in opium poppy.

  11. Transcription of metabolic enzyme genes during the excystation of Giardia lamblia.

    PubMed

    Niño, Carlos A; Wasserman, Moises

    2003-12-01

    The present study evaluates the expression of genes of Giardia lamblia, one of the most simple and most early diverging eukaryotes, that encode the metabolic enzymes pyruvate: ferredoxin oxidoreductase (PFOR), acetyl-CoA synthetase (ACS), alcohol dehydrogenase E (ADHE) and glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) and the cyst wall protein (CWP1) gene in trophozoites, cysts and during the excystation process. Primers were designed to amplify mRNA fragments through quantitative reverse-transcriptase-polymerase-chain-reaction. In trophozoites, all transcripts of the enzymes studied were present. In cysts, three of the transcripts were detected: CWP1, GDH and ACS; but the relative levels of the mRNA of GDH and ACS were very different between trophozoites and cysts. During excystation, PFOR and ADHE transcripts appeared after the first induction phase, and the mRNAs of ACS and GDH increased throughout the process. PMID:14665385

  12. Nitroreductase gene-directed enzyme prodrug therapy: insights and advances toward clinical utility.

    PubMed

    Williams, Elsie M; Little, Rory F; Mowday, Alexandra M; Rich, Michelle H; Chan-Hyams, Jasmine V E; Copp, Janine N; Smaill, Jeff B; Patterson, Adam V; Ackerley, David F

    2015-10-15

    This review examines the vast catalytic and therapeutic potential offered by type I (i.e. oxygen-insensitive) nitroreductase enzymes in partnership with nitroaromatic prodrugs, with particular focus on gene-directed enzyme prodrug therapy (GDEPT; a form of cancer gene therapy). Important first indications of this potential were demonstrated over 20 years ago, for the enzyme-prodrug pairing of Escherichia coli NfsB and CB1954 [5-(aziridin-1-yl)-2,4-dinitrobenzamide]. However, it has become apparent that both the enzyme and the prodrug in this prototypical pairing have limitations that have impeded their clinical progression. Recently, substantial advances have been made in the biodiscovery and engineering of superior nitroreductase variants, in particular development of elegant high-throughput screening capabilities to enable optimization of desirable activities via directed evolution. These advances in enzymology have been paralleled by advances in medicinal chemistry, leading to the development of second- and third-generation nitroaromatic prodrugs that offer substantial advantages over CB1954 for nitroreductase GDEPT, including greater dose-potency and enhanced ability of the activated metabolite(s) to exhibit a local bystander effect. In addition to forging substantial progress towards future clinical trials, this research is supporting other fields, most notably the development and improvement of targeted cellular ablation capabilities in small animal models, such as zebrafish, to enable cell-specific physiology or regeneration studies.

  13. Effects of overexpression of PKAc genes on expressions of lignin-modifying enzymes by Pleurotus ostreatus.

    PubMed

    Toyokawa, Chihana; Shobu, Misaki; Tsukamoto, Rie; Okamura, Saki; Honda, Yoichi; Kamitsuji, Hisatoshi; Izumitsu, Kousuke; Suzuki, Kazumi; Irie, Toshikazu

    2016-09-01

    We studied the role of genes encoding the cAMP-dependent protein kinase A catalytic subunit (PKAc) in the ligninolytic system in Pleurotus ostreatus. The wild-type P. ostreatus strain PC9 has two PKAc-encoding genes: PKAc1 and PKAc2 (protein ID 114122 and 85056). In the current study, PKAc1 and PKAc2 were fused with a β-tubulin promoter and introduced into strain PC9 to produce the overexpression strains PKAc1-97 and PKAc2-69. These strains showed significantly higher transcription levels of isozyme genes encoding lignin-modifying enzymes than strain PC9, but the specific gene expression patterns differed between the two recombinant strains. Both recombinants showed 2.05-2.10-fold faster degradation of beechwood lignin than strain PC9. These results indicate that PKAc plays an important role in inducing the wood degradation system in P. ostreatus. PMID:26979984

  14. Linked genes for calmodulin and E2 ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme in Trichomonas vaginalis.

    PubMed

    Keeling, P J; Doherty-Kirby, A L; Teh, E M; Doolittle, W F

    1996-01-01

    In searching the genomes of early-diverging protists to study whether the possession of calmodulin is ancestral to all eukaryotes, the gene for calmodulin was identified in Trichomonas vaginalis. This flagellate is a member of the Parabasalia, one of the earliest lineages of recognized eukaryotes to have diverged. This sequence was used to isolate a homologous 1.250-kb fragment from the T. vaginalis genome by inverse polymerase chain reaction. This fragment was also completely sequenced and shown to contain the 3' end of the single-copy calmodulin gene and the 3' end of a gene encoding a protein with high similarity to E2 ubiquitin-conjugating enzymes, a family which has previously only been identified in animals, plants, and fungi. Phylogenetic analysis of 50 members of the E2 family distinguishes at least nine separate subfamilies one of which includes the T. vaginalis E2-homologue and an uncharacterized gene from yeast chromosome XII.

  15. Circadian oscillation of starch branching enzyme gene expression in the sorghum endosperm

    PubMed Central

    Mutisya, Joel; Sun, Chuanxin

    2009-01-01

    Expression of the three SBE genes, encoding starch branching enzymes, in the sorghum endosperm exhibited a diurnal rhythm during a 24-h cycle. Remarkably, the oscillation in SBE expression was maintained in cultured spikes after a 48-h dark treatment, also when fed a continuous solution of sucrose or abscisic acid. Our findings suggest that the rhythmicity in SBE expression in the endosperm is independent of cues from the photosynthetic source and that the oscillator resides within the endosperm itself. PMID:19847113

  16. Circadian oscillation of starch branching enzyme gene expression in the sorghum endosperm

    SciTech Connect

    Mutisya, J.; Sun, C.; Jansson, C.

    2009-08-31

    Expression of the three SBE genes, encoding starch branching enzymes, in the sorghum endosperm exhibited a diurnal rhythm during a 24-h cycle. Remarkably, the oscillation in SBE expression was maintained in cultured spikes after a 48-h dark treatment, also when fed a continuous solution of sucrose or abscisic acid. Our findings suggest that the rhythmicity in SBE expression in the endosperm is independent of cues from the photosynthetic source and that the oscillator resides within the endosperm itself.

  17. The SNF2H chromatin remodeling enzyme has opposing effects on cytokine gene expression.

    PubMed

    Precht, Patricia; Wurster, Andrea L; Pazin, Michael J

    2010-07-01

    Cytokine gene expression is a key control point in the function of the immune system. Cytokine gene regulation is linked to changes in chromatin structure; however, little is known about the remodeling enzymes mediating these changes. Here we investigated the role of the ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling enzyme SNF2H in mouse T cells; to date, SNF2H has not been investigated in T cells. We found that SNF2H repressed expression of IL-2 and other cytokines in activated cells. By contrast, SNF2H activated expression of IL-3. The ISWI components SNF2H and ACF1 bound to the tested loci, suggesting the regulation was direct. SNF2H decreased accessibility at some binding sites within the IL2 locus, and increased accessibility within some IL3 binding sites. The changes in gene expression positively correlated with accessibility changes, suggesting a simple model that accessibility enables transcription. We also found that loss of the ISWI ATPase SNF2H reduced binding to target genes and protein expression of ACF1, a binding partner for SNF2H, suggesting complex formation stabilized ACF1. Together, these findings reveal a direct role for SNF2H in both repression and activation of cytokine genes.

  18. The SNF2H Chromatin Remodeling Enzyme Has Opposing Effects on Cytokine Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Precht, Patricia; Wurster, Andrea L.; Pazin, Michael J.

    2010-01-01

    Cytokine gene expression is a key control point in the function of the immune system. Cytokine gene regulation is linked to changes in chromatin structure; however, little is known about the remodeling enzymes mediating these changes. Here we investigated the role of the ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling enzyme SNF2H in mouse T cells; to date, SNF2H has not been investigated in T cells. We found that SNF2H repressed expression of IL-2 and other cytokines in activated cells. By contrast, SNF2H activated expression of IL-3. The ISWI components SNF2H and ACF1 bound to the tested loci, suggesting the regulation was direct. SNF2H decreased accessibility at some binding sites within the IL2 locus, and increased accessibility within some IL3 binding sites. The changes in gene expression positively correlated with accessibility changes, suggesting a simple model that accessibility enables transcription. We also found that loss of the ISWI ATPase SNF2H reduced binding to target genes and protein expression of ACF1, a binding partner for SNF2H, suggesting complex formation stabilized ACF1. Together, these findings reveal a direct role for SNF2H in both repression and activation of cytokine genes. PMID:20471682

  19. Chimeric phage-bacterial enzymes: a clue to the modular evolution of genes.

    PubMed Central

    Díaz, E; López, R; García, J L

    1990-01-01

    Pneumococcal peptidoglycan amidase (N-acetylmuramoyl-L-alanine amidase, EC 3.5.1.28) and phage CPL1 lysozyme degrade a common substrate (choline-containing pneumococcal cell walls); the former hydrolyzes the bond between muramic acid and alanine, whereas the latter breaks down the linkage between muramic acid and glucosamine. The amino acid sequences of their C-terminal domains are homologous. Chimeric genes were constructed by site-directed mutagenesis: a unique SnaBI restriction site in the cpl1 gene, coding for the phage lysozyme, was introduced at a location equivalent to the SnaBI site present in the lytA gene, which codes for the pneumococcal amidase. The resulting genes expressed lytic activities at levels similar to those of the parental genes. The gene products, which have been purified to electrophoretical homogeneity, exhibited unusual combined biochemical properties--e.g., by exchange of protein domains, we have switched the regulatory properties of these enzymes without altering their catalytic activities. Chimeric gene construction in Streptococcus pneumoniae and its bacteriophages is an excellent model to study the modular organization of genes and proteins and to help to establish evolutionary relationships between phage and bacteria. These constructions provide an experimental approach to the molecular processes involved in cassette recruitment during evolution and contribute support to the concept of bacteria as adaptable chimeras. Images PMID:1978320

  20. Associations between endothelial nitric oxide synthase A/B, angiotensin converting enzyme I/D and serotonin transporter L/S gene polymorphisms with pulmonary hypertension in COPD patients.

    PubMed

    Ulasli, Sevinc Sarinc; Eyuboglu, Fusun Oner; Verdi, Hasibe; Atac, Fatma Belgin

    2013-10-01

    Different biochemical pathways and cellular mechanisms play role in the pathogenesis of pulmonary hypertension (PH) in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Alveolar hypoxia is not the only determinant of vascular remodeling, genetic factors are thought to have additive effects. We aimed to investigate the effects of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS A/B), angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE I/D) and serotonin transporter (5-HTT L/S) gene polymorphisms on development and severity of PH in COPD patients. 50 COPD patients without PH (group 1); 30 COPD patients with PH confirmed with echocardiography (group 2) and 49 healthy subjects (group 3) as control group were included to the study. eNOS A/B, ACE I/D and 5-HTT L/S gene polymorphisms and allele frequencies of COPD patients with and without PH and healthy subjects were determined. Functional parameters and echocardiographic measurements were recorded. Patients with PH were also assessed in two subgroups according to the severity of pulmonary arterial pressure (PAP). Significant differences among three groups in the distribution of 5-HTT genotype and allele frequency were present (respectively p = 0.002; p = 0.021). In group 2, LL and LS genotype rate was 93.3 % with a frequency of 71.2 % L allele and 28.3 % of S allele. 5-HTT LL genotype was present in 88.9 % of patients with PAP ≥50 mmHg significantly (p = 0.012). Other genotype distributions were not significantly different between two subgroups. The results of this study can suggest that COPD patients with L allele of 5-HTT may have higher risk for the development of PH and patients with LL genotype of 5-HTT may present higher PAP. We also demonstrated that eNOS and ACE gene polymorphisms were not associated with the development and severity of PH in our study population. Further studies with larger numbers of patients are needed to explore these relationships. PMID:24057178

  1. Targeted in-vivo computed tomography (CT) imaging of tissue ACE using concentrated lisinopril-capped gold nanoparticle solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniel, Marie-Christine; Aras, Omer; Smith, Mark F.; Nan, Anjan; Fleiter, Thorsten

    2010-04-01

    The development of cardiac and pulmonary fibrosis have been associated with overexpression of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE). Moreover, ACE inhibitors, such as lisinopril, have shown a benificial effect for patients diagnosed with heart failure or systemic hypertension. Thus targeted imaging of the ACE is of crucial importance for monitoring of the tissue ACE activity as well as the treatment efficacy in heart failure. In this respect, lisinopril-capped gold nanoparticles were prepared to provide a new type of probe for targeted molecular imaging of ACE by tuned K-edge computed tomography (CT) imaging. Concentrated solutions of these modified gold nanoparticles, with a diameter around 16 nm, showed high contrast in CT imaging. These new targeted imaging agents were thus used for in vivo imaging on rat models.

  2. The Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (ACE): MLT Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernath, Peter

    2010-05-01

    ACE (also known as SCISAT) is making a comprehensive set of simultaneous measurements of numerous trace gases, thin clouds, aerosols and temperature by solar occultation from a satellite in low earth orbit. A high inclination (74 degrees) low earth orbit (650 km) gives ACE coverage of tropical, mid-latitudes and polar regions. The primary instrument is a high-resolution (0.02 cm-1) infrared Fourier Transform Spectrometer (FTS) operating from 2 to 13 microns (750-4400 cm-1). ACE was launched by NASA on 12 August 2003 for a nominal 2-year mission; after 6 years on orbit the ACE-FTS performance is still excellent. The first results of ACE have been presented in a special issue of Geophysics Research Letters (http://www.agu.org/journals/ss/ACECHEM1/) in 2005 and recently a special issue on ACE validation has been prepared for Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics (http://www.atmos-chem-phys.net/special_issue114.html) by K. Walker and K. Strong; more information can be found at http://www.ace.uwaterloo.ca. The ACE mission goals were initially focussed mainly on polar ozone chemistry, and more recently have shifted more to the troposphere where organic pollutants such as methanol and formaldehyde have been detected. ACE makes limb observations from about 5 km (cloud free scenes) up to nearly 150 km in the lower thermosphere, where CO2 absorption is still weakly detectable. This talk will review ACE-FTS results in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere. Topics covered will include the mesospheric descent of NOx in the polar winter, spectra of polar mesospheric clouds, concentration profiles of CO2 (which do not match model predictions), and combined Odin-Osiris/ACE-FTS observations.

  3. Modelling of the production of ACE inhibitory hydrolysates of horse mackerel using proteases mixtures.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Gálvez, R; Morales-Medina, R; Espejo-Carpio, F; Guadix, A; Guadix, E M

    2016-09-14

    Fish protein hydrolysates from Mediterranean horse mackerel were produced by using a mixture of two commercial endoproteases (i.e. subtilisin and trypsin) at different levels of substrate concentration (2.5 g L(-1), 5 g L(-1), and 7.5 g L(-1) of protein), temperature (40 °C, 47.5 °C, and 55 °C) and percentage of subtilisin in the enzyme mixture (0%, 25%, 50%, 75% and 100%). A crossed mixture process model was employed to predict the degree of hydrolysis (DH) and the ACE inhibitory activity of the final hydrolysates as a function of the experimental factors. Both models were optimized for a maximum DH and ACE inhibition. A maximum DH (17.1%) was predicted at 2.54 g L(-1) of substrate concentration, 40 °C and an enzyme mixture comprising 38.3% of subtilisin and 61.7% of trypsin. Although its proteolytic activity is limited, the presence of trypsin in the enzyme mixture allowed obtaining higher degrees of hydrolysis at low temperatures, which is desirable to minimize thermal deactivation of the proteins. Similarly, a percentage of ACE inhibition above 48% was attained at 2.5 g L(-1) of protein, 40 °C and a 1 : 1 mixture of both proteases. Higher values of ACE inhibition could be attained by increasing both the temperature and the amount of trypsin in the enzyme mixture (e.g. 50% ACE inhibition at 55 °C and 81.5% of trypsin). Finally, those hydrolysates exhibiting the highest levels of ACE inhibition were subjected to simulated gastrointestinal digestion. These assays confirmed the resistance of active fractions against their degradation by digestive enzymes. PMID:27526864

  4. Resolution of refractory hypotension and anuria in a premature newborn with loss-of-function of ACE.

    PubMed

    Richer, Julie; Daoud, Hussein; Geier, Pavel; Jarinova, Olga; Carson, Nancy; Feberova, Jana; Ben Fadel, Nadya; Fadfel, Nadya Ben; Unrau, Jennifer; Bareke, Eric; Khatchadourian, Karine; Bulman, Dennis E; Majewski, Jacek; Boycott, Kym M; Dyment, David A

    2015-07-01

    We present the investigation and management of a premature, hypotensive neonate born after a pregnancy complicated by anhydramnios to highlight the impact of early and informed management for rare kidney disease. Vasopressin was used to successfully treat refractory hypotension and anuria in the neonate born at 27 weeks of gestation. Next generation sequencing of a targeted panel of genes was then performed in the neonate and parents. Subsequently, two compound heterozygous deletions leading to frameshift mutations were identified in the angiotensin 1-converting enzyme gene ACE; exon 5:c.820_821delAG (p.Arg274Glyfs*117) and exon24: c.3521delG (p.Gly1174Alafs*12), consistent with a diagnosis of renal tubular dysgenesis. In light of the molecular diagnosis, identification, and treatment of associated low aldosterone level resulted in further improvement in renal function and only mild residual chronic renal failure is present at 14 months of age. Truncating alterations in ACE most often result in fetal demise during gestation or in the first days of life and typically as a result of the Potter sequence. The premature delivery, and serendipitous early treatment with vasopressin, and then later fludrocortisone, resulted in an optimal outcome in an otherwise lethal condition.

  5. Administration of 17β-estradiol to ovariectomized obese female mice reverses obesity-hypertension through an ACE2-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu; Shoemaker, Robin; Thatcher, Sean E; Batifoulier-Yiannikouris, Frederique; English, Victoria L; Cassis, Lisa A

    2015-06-15

    We recently demonstrated that female mice are resistant to the development of obesity-induced hypertension through a sex hormone-dependent mechanism that involved adipose angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2). In this study, we hypothesized that provision of 17β-estradiol (E2) to ovariectomized (OVX) high-fat (HF)-fed female hypertensive mice would reverse obesity-hypertension through an ACE2-dependent mechanism. Pilot studies defined dose-dependent effects of E2 in OVX female mice on serum E2 concentrations and uterine weights. An E2 dose of 36 μg/ml restored normal serum E2 concentrations and uterine weights. Therefore, HF-fed OVX female Ace2(+/+) and Ace2(-/-) mice were administered vehicle or E2 (36 μg/ml) for 16 wk. E2 administration significantly decreased body weights of HF-fed OVX female Ace2(+/+) and Ace2(-/-) mice of either genotype. At 15 wk, E2 administration decreased systolic blood pressure (SBP) of OVX HF-fed Ace2(+/+) but not Ace2(-/-) females during the light but not the dark cycle. E2-mediated reductions in SBP in Ace2(+/+) females were associated with significant elevations in adipose ACE2 mRNA abundance and activity and reduced plasma ANG II concentrations. In contrast to females, E2 administration had no effect on any parameter quantified in HF-fed male hypertensive mice. In 3T3-L1 adipocytes, E2 promoted ACE2 mRNA abundance through effects at estrogen receptor-α (ERα) and resulted in ERα-mediated binding at the ACE2 promoter. These results demonstrate that E2 administration to OVX females reduces obesity-induced elevations in SBP (light cycle) through an ACE2-dependent mechanism. Beneficial effects of E2 to decrease blood pressure in OVX obese females may result from stimulation of adipose ACE2.

  6. The Halloween genes code for cytochrome P450 enzymes mediating synthesis of the insect moulting hormone.

    PubMed

    Rewitz, K F; Rybczynski, R; Warren, J T; Gilbert, L I

    2006-12-01

    The developmental events occurring during moulting and metamorphosis of insects are controlled by precisely timed changes in levels of ecdysteroids, the moulting hormones. The final four sequential hydroxylations of steroid precursors into the active ecdysteroid of insects, 20E (20-hydroxyecdysone), are mediated by four cytochrome P450 (P450) enzymes, encoded by genes in the Halloween family. Orthologues of the Drosophila Halloween genes phantom (phm; CYP306A1), disembodied (dib; CYP302A1), shadow (sad; CYP315A1) and shade (shd; CYP314A1) were obtained from the endocrinological model insect, the tobacco hornworm Manduca sexta. Expression of these genes was studied and compared with changes in the ecdysteroid titre that controls transition from the larval to pupal stage. phm, dib and sad, which encode P450s that mediate the final hydroxylations in the biosynthesis of ecdysone, were selectively expressed in the prothoracic gland, the primary source of ecdysone during larval and pupal development. Changes in their expression correlate with the haemolymph ecdysteroid titre during the fifth (final) larval instar. Shd, the 20-hydroxylase, which converts ecdysone into the more active 20E, is expressed in tissues peripheral to the prothoracic glands during the fifth instar. Transcript levels of shd in the fat body and midgut closely parallel the enzyme activity measured in vitro. The results indicate that these Halloween genes are transcriptionally regulated to support the high biosynthetic activity that produces the cyclic ecdysteroid pulses triggering moulting. PMID:17073797

  7. The Halloween genes code for cytochrome P450 enzymes mediating synthesis of the insect moulting hormone.

    PubMed

    Rewitz, K F; Rybczynski, R; Warren, J T; Gilbert, L I

    2006-12-01

    The developmental events occurring during moulting and metamorphosis of insects are controlled by precisely timed changes in levels of ecdysteroids, the moulting hormones. The final four sequential hydroxylations of steroid precursors into the active ecdysteroid of insects, 20E (20-hydroxyecdysone), are mediated by four cytochrome P450 (P450) enzymes, encoded by genes in the Halloween family. Orthologues of the Drosophila Halloween genes phantom (phm; CYP306A1), disembodied (dib; CYP302A1), shadow (sad; CYP315A1) and shade (shd; CYP314A1) were obtained from the endocrinological model insect, the tobacco hornworm Manduca sexta. Expression of these genes was studied and compared with changes in the ecdysteroid titre that controls transition from the larval to pupal stage. phm, dib and sad, which encode P450s that mediate the final hydroxylations in the biosynthesis of ecdysone, were selectively expressed in the prothoracic gland, the primary source of ecdysone during larval and pupal development. Changes in their expression correlate with the haemolymph ecdysteroid titre during the fifth (final) larval instar. Shd, the 20-hydroxylase, which converts ecdysone into the more active 20E, is expressed in tissues peripheral to the prothoracic glands during the fifth instar. Transcript levels of shd in the fat body and midgut closely parallel the enzyme activity measured in vitro. The results indicate that these Halloween genes are transcriptionally regulated to support the high biosynthetic activity that produces the cyclic ecdysteroid pulses triggering moulting.

  8. Role of the ACE2/Angiotensin 1-7 Axis of the Renin-Angiotensin System in Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Patel, Vaibhav B; Zhong, Jiu-Chang; Grant, Maria B; Oudit, Gavin Y

    2016-04-15

    Heart failure (HF) remains the most common cause of death and disability, and a major economic burden, in industrialized nations. Physiological, pharmacological, and clinical studies have demonstrated that activation of the renin-angiotensin system is a key mediator of HF progression. Angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2), a homolog of ACE, is a monocarboxypeptidase that converts angiotensin II into angiotensin 1-7 (Ang 1-7) which, by virtue of its actions on the Mas receptor, opposes the molecular and cellular effects of angiotensin II. ACE2 is widely expressed in cardiomyocytes, cardiofibroblasts, and coronary endothelial cells. Recent preclinical translational studies confirmed a critical counter-regulatory role of ACE2/Ang 1-7 axis on the activated renin-angiotensin system that results in HF with preserved ejection fraction. Although loss of ACE2 enhances susceptibility to HF, increasing ACE2 level prevents and reverses the HF phenotype. ACE2 and Ang 1-7 have emerged as a key protective pathway against HF with reduced and preserved ejection fraction. Recombinant human ACE2 has been tested in phase I and II clinical trials without adverse effects while lowering and increasing plasma angiotensin II and Ang 1-7 levels, respectively. This review discusses the transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of ACE2 and the role of the ACE2/Ang 1-7 axis in cardiac physiology and in the pathophysiology of HF. The pharmacological and therapeutic potential of enhancing ACE2/Ang 1-7 action as a novel therapy for HF is highlighted.

  9. Regulation of genes encoding cellulolytic enzymes by Pal-PacC signaling in Aspergillus nidulans.

    PubMed

    Kunitake, Emi; Hagiwara, Daisuke; Miyamoto, Kentaro; Kanamaru, Kyoko; Kimura, Makoto; Kobayashi, Tetsuo

    2016-04-01

    Cellulosic biomass represents a valuable potential substitute for fossil-based fuels. As such, there is a strong need to develop efficient biotechnological processes for the enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulosic biomass via the optimization of cellulase production by fungi. Ambient pH is an important factor affecting the industrial production of cellulase. In the present study, we demonstrate that several Aspergillus nidulans genes encoding cellulolytic enzymes are regulated by Pal-PacC-mediated pH signaling, as evidenced by the decreased cellulase productivity of the palC mutant and pacC deletants of A. nidulans. The deletion of pacC was observed to result in delayed induction and decreased expression of the cellulase genes based on time course expression analysis. The genome-wide identification of PacC-regulated genes under cellobiose-induced conditions demonstrated that genes expressed in a PacC-dependent manner included 82 % of ClrB (a transcriptional activator of the cellulase genes)-regulated genes, including orthologs of various transporter and β-glucosidase genes considered to be involved in cellobiose uptake or production of stronger inducer molecules. Together with the significant overlap between ClrB- and PacC-regulated genes, the results suggest that PacC-mediated regulation of the cellulase genes involves not only direct regulation by binding to their promoter regions but also indirect regulation via modulation of the expression of genes involved in ClrB-dependent transcriptional activation. Our findings are expected to contribute to the development of more efficient industrial cellulase production methods.

  10. SWI/SNF enzymes promote SOX10- mediated activation of myelin gene expression.

    PubMed

    Marathe, Himangi G; Mehta, Gaurav; Zhang, Xiaolu; Datar, Ila; Mehrotra, Aanchal; Yeung, Kam C; de la Serna, Ivana L

    2013-01-01

    SOX10 is a Sry-related high mobility (HMG)-box transcriptional regulator that promotes differentiation of neural crest precursors into Schwann cells, oligodendrocytes, and melanocytes. Myelin, formed by Schwann cells in the peripheral nervous system, is essential for propagation of nerve impulses. SWI/SNF complexes are ATP dependent chromatin remodeling enzymes that are critical for cellular differentiation. It was recently demonstrated that the BRG1 subunit of SWI/SNF complexes activates SOX10 expression and also interacts with SOX10 to activate expression of OCT6 and KROX20, two transcriptional regulators of Schwann cell differentiation. To determine the requirement for SWI/SNF enzymes in the regulation of genes that encode components of myelin, which are downstream of these transcriptional regulators, we introduced SOX10 into fibroblasts that inducibly express dominant negative versions of the SWI/SNF ATPases, BRM or BRG1. Dominant negative BRM and BRG1 have mutations in the ATP binding site and inhibit gene activation events that require SWI/SNF function. Ectopic expression of SOX10 in cells derived from NIH 3T3 fibroblasts led to the activation of the endogenous Schwann cell specific gene, myelin protein zero (MPZ) and the gene that encodes myelin basic protein (MBP). Thus, SOX10 reprogrammed these cells into myelin gene expressing cells. Ectopic expression of KROX20 was not sufficient for activation of these myelin genes. However, KROX20 together with SOX10 synergistically activated MPZ and MBP expression. Dominant negative BRM and BRG1 abrogated SOX10 mediated activation of MPZ and MBP and synergistic activation of these genes by SOX10 and KROX20. SOX10 was required to recruit BRG1 to the MPZ locus. Similarly, in immortalized Schwann cells, BRG1 recruitment to SOX10 binding sites at the MPZ locus was dependent on SOX10 and expression of dominant negative BRG1 inhibited expression of MPZ and MBP in these cells. Thus, SWI/SNF enzymes cooperate with SOX10 to

  11. Haploid Origin of Cork Oak Anther Embryos Detected by Enzyme and RAPD Gene Markers.

    PubMed

    Bueno; Agundez; Gomez; Carrascosa; Manzanera

    2000-05-01

    In vitro-induced cork oak (Quercus suber L.) embryos from anther cultures proved to be of haploid origin both by enzyme and RAPD gene marker analysis. The problem considered was to ascertain if embryo cultures originated either from a single haploid cell, from a microspore, or from multiple haploid cells. Therefore, a heterozygotic gene was searched for in the parent tree. The gene coding for shikimate dehydrogenase (SKDH1) proved to be heterozygous in the parental tree, and subsequently, these allozymes were screened for the embryos induced in anther cultures from the same tree. Only haploid embryos were found, confirming the microspore origin. Different genotypes were not identified inside each anther by isozyme analysis, probably because of selective pressure for one embryo early in development, but both parental SKDH1 alleles were found in the embryos of different anthers. The banding patterns detected by RAPD markers permitted the identification of multiple microspore origins inside each anther.

  12. Overview of chitin metabolism enzymes in Manduca sexta: Identification, domain organization, phylogenetic analysis and gene expression.

    PubMed

    Tetreau, Guillaume; Cao, Xiaolong; Chen, Yun-Ru; Muthukrishnan, Subbaratnam; Jiang, Haobo; Blissard, Gary W; Kanost, Michael R; Wang, Ping

    2015-07-01

    Chitin is one of the most abundant biomaterials in nature. The biosynthesis and degradation of chitin in insects are complex and dynamically regulated to cope with insect growth and development. Chitin metabolism in insects is known to involve numerous enzymes, including chitin synthases (synthesis of chitin), chitin deacetylases (modification of chitin by deacetylation) and chitinases (degradation of chitin by hydrolysis). In this study, we conducted a genome-wide search and analysis of genes encoding these chitin metabolism enzymes in Manduca sexta. Our analysis confirmed that only two chitin synthases are present in M. sexta as in most other arthropods. Eleven chitin deacetylases (encoded by nine genes) were identified, with at least one representative in each of the five phylogenetic groups that have been described for chitin deacetylases to date. Eleven genes encoding for family 18 chitinases (GH18) were found in the M. sexta genome. Based on the presence of conserved sequence motifs in the catalytic sequences and phylogenetic relationships, two of the M. sexta chitinases did not cluster with any of the current eight phylogenetic groups of chitinases: two new groups were created (groups IX and X) and their characteristics are described. The result of the analysis of the Lepidoptera-specific chitinase-h (group h) is consistent with its proposed bacterial origin. By analyzing chitinases from fourteen species that belong to seven different phylogenetic groups, we reveal that the chitinase genes appear to have evolved sequentially in the arthropod lineage to achieve the current high level of diversity observed in M. sexta. Based on the sequence conservation of the catalytic domains and on their developmental stage- and tissue-specific expression, we propose putative functions for each group in each category of enzymes. PMID:25616108

  13. Silent cholinesterase gene: variations in the properties of serum enzyme in apparent homozygotes

    PubMed Central

    Rubinstein, H. M.; Dietz, A. A.; Hodges, L. K.; Lubrano, T.; Czebotar, V.

    1970-01-01

    The cholinesterase activity of the sera of 25 subjects diagnosed as homozygotes for the silent cholinesterase gene was studied by a sensitive enzymatic method employing several thiocholine esters and various inhibitors, and by disc electrophoretic, immunochemical, and chromatographic methods. (a) With one exception, the sera fell into two classes by all criteria. One class (type I, 16 cases) had no normal serum cholinesterase. The other class (type II, eight cases) had about 2% of apparently normal serum cholinesterase. The remaining serum was intermediate between the two classes in several respects. One explanation for these results is that there are several “silent” genes concerned; possibly these are allelic. (b) Normal sera and all silent sera contain small amounts of a cholinesterase activity labeled the residual cholinesterase. The enzyme(s) responsible has properties similar to those of acetylcholinesterase rather than serum cholinesterase. It is estimated that about 1% of the activity of normal serum against acetylthiocholine is due to this enzyme. The source of the residual cholinesterase is not yet known. Images PMID:4984470

  14. Identification and characterization of a ubiquitinconjugating enzyme UBE2A gene from lamprey.

    PubMed

    Chen, Liyong; Wu, Fenfang; Feng, Bo

    2016-02-01

    Ubiquitin-conjugating enzymes (E2s) play an important role in the mechanism of ubiquitin transfer. Although in most species many of these enzymes share high sequence and structural conservation, their existence and functions in the lamprey remain unknown. In this study, we identified and characterized a ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme (UBE2A)-like gene in lamprey. The gene, designated as LaUBE2A, contained a 456-bp open reading frame encoding a 152-amino acid protein with a typical UBC domain. Real-time PCR assay showed that LaUBE2A was expressed in various tissues of the adult lamprey, with higher levels in the leukocytes and muscle and lower levels in the skin and liver. The high conservation in amino acid sequence between LaUBE2A and UBE2As from Homo sapiens, Mus musculus, Cavia porcellus, and Alligator sinensi implied that the function of LaUBE2A may be similar to that of UBE2A. PMID:26463350

  15. Molecular cloning and characterization of a malic enzyme gene from the oleaginous yeast Lipomyces starkeyi.

    PubMed

    Tang, Wei; Zhang, Sufang; Tan, Haidong; Zhao, Zongbao K

    2010-06-01

    The malic enzyme-encoding cDNA (GQ372891) from the oleaginous yeast Lipomyces starkeyi AS 2.1560 was isolated, which has an 1719-bp open reading frame flanked by a 290-bp 5' untranslated sequence and a 92-bp 3' untranslated sequence. The proposed gene, LsME1, encoded a protein with 572 amino acid residues. The protein presented 58% sequence identity with the malic enzymes from Yarrowia lipolytica CLIB122 and Aspergillus fumigatus Af293. The LsME1 gene was cloned into the vector pMAL-p4x to express a fusion protein (MBP-LsME1) in Escherichia coli TB1. The fusion protein was purified and then cleaved by Factor Xa to give the recombinant LsME1. This purified enzyme took either NAD(+) or NADP(+) as the coenzyme but preferred NAD(+). The K (m) values for malic acid, NAD(+) and NADP(+) were 0.85 +/- 0.05 mM, 0.34 +/- 0.08 mM, and 7.4 +/- 0.32 mM, respectively, at pH 7.3.

  16. Dipeptidase-inactivated tACE action in vivo: selective inhibition of sperm-zona pellucida binding in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Deguchi, Eishi; Tani, Taeko; Watanabe, Hitomi; Yamada, Shuichi; Kondoh, Gen

    2007-11-01

    The angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) plays a crucial role in male fertilization and is a key regulator of blood pressure. Testicular ACE (tACE), the germinal specific isozyme expressed on different promoters, exclusively carries out the role of ACE in fertility, although the site and mode of action are not well known. To investigate the contribution of tACE in fertilization, we produced transgenic mouse lines carrying a dipeptidase-inactivated mutant. Although the transgenic mice showed normal blood pressure, kidney morphology, and fertility, reduced fertilization was observed after in vitro fertilization (IVF). The sperm-zona pellucida (ZP) binding was exclusively impaired in these lines in a manner similar to that observed in an Ace knockout mouse. The dipeptidase activity was reduced in epididymal ingredients but not in the testis. Furthermore, direct application of mutant protein did not suppress sperm-ZP binding of intact sperm during IVF, implying that the dipeptidase-inactivated mutant affects sperm modification in the epididymis for ZP binding. Our results indicate that the dipeptidase-inactivated tACE acts in vivo, suggesting that tACE contributes to fertilization as a dipeptidase at least in the epididymis.

  17. [Possible correlation of polymorphism of angiotensin-converting enzyme gene with psychological aspects of birth stress].

    PubMed

    Spivak, I M; Smirnova, T Iu; Gruzdev, N V; Shneĭder, O V; Abramchenko, V V; Spivak, D L

    2006-01-01

    The paper presents results of a pilot study of genetic correlates of adaptive strategies characteristic for religious and (or) spiritual people in stress, induced by unusual and (or) extreme conditions. Birth stress, experienced by 79 young normal female urban dwellers Ss in the course of late pregnancy, giving birth, and the immediately following period post partum, was chosen as model of stress in general. Their state, as well as the state of the child, was monitored in each case by professional physicians, and assessed according to standard obstetric procedures. 3 kinds of standard psychological tests, providing assessment of neurotization, creativity, and the scope of religious/spiritual sensations, were conducted. The latter formed focal point of our research. As in has recently been supposed, religious/spiritual people tend to be more adaptive in illness and stress, which is quite important for clinical practice. The first aim of our study was to test whether religious/spiritual sensations in stress tend to occur as part of general neurotization; or, as part of creative response in the service of the ego; or, finally, they form a specific dimension of adaptive strategies. In home to simultaneously assess possible genetic determination of each of these options, we have introduced intro our study a module of assessment of genetic I/D polymorphisms of ACE gene, primarily linked to the status of the renin-angiotensin system. As a result of factor analysis, existence of 3 strong trends was demonstrated. 1. Neurotization, creativity, religious/spiritual processes tend to form 3 independent aspects of response of normal humans to birth stress. 2. Frequency of occurrence of D-allele tends to reveal strong correlation with only one of these 3 options, which is the generall level of neurotization. The latter conclusion corresponds well to what is currently known about the role of renin-angiotensin system primarily in regulation of cardiovascular system, and probably

  18. Association of the ACE rs4646994 and rs4341 polymorphisms with the progression of carotid atherosclerosis in slovenian patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Merlo, S; Novák, J; Tkáčová, N; Nikolajević Starčević, J; Šantl Letonja, M; Makuc, J; Cokan Vujkovac, A; Letonja, J; Bregar, D; Zorc, M; Rojko, M; Mankoč, S; Kruzliak, P

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The current study was designed to reveal possible associations between the angiotensin-converting-enzyme (ACE) gene polymorphisms (rs4646994 and rs4341) with markers of carotid atherosclerosis in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in a 4-year-long follow-up study. Five hundred and ninety-five T2DM subjects and 200 control subjects were enrolled. Genotyping of ACE polymorphisms was performed using KASPar assays, and ultrasound examinations were performed twice (at the enrollment and at follow-up). With regard to the progression of atherosclerosis in subjects with T2DM, statistically significant differences were demonstrated in the change of the sum of carotid plaques thickness for the rs4646994 polymorphism. We did not demonstrate an association between the tested polymorphisms (rs4646994 and rs4341) and either carotid intima media thickness (CIMT) or CIMT progression in a 3.8-year period. In our study, we demonstrated that subjects with T2DM with the DD genotype of the rs4646994 [ACE insertion/deletion (I/D)] polymorphism had faster progression of atherosclerosis in comparison to subjects with other genotypes.

  19. Plant eR Genes That Encode Photorespiratory Enzymes Confer Resistance against Disease

    PubMed Central

    Taler, Dvir; Galperin, Marjana; Benjamin, Ido; Cohen, Yigal; Kenigsbuch, David

    2004-01-01

    Downy mildew caused by the oomycete pathogen Pseudoperonospora cubensis is a devastating foliar disease of cucurbits worldwide. We previously demonstrated that the wild melon line PI 124111F (PI) is highly resistant to all pathotypes of P. cubensis. That resistance was controlled genetically by two partially dominant, complementary loci. Here, we show that unlike other plant disease resistance genes, which confer an ability to resist infection by pathogens expressing corresponding avirulence genes, the resistance of PI to P. cubensis is controlled by enhanced expression of the enzymatic resistance (eR) genes At1 and At2. These constitutively expressed genes encode the photorespiratory peroxisomal enzyme proteins glyoxylate aminotransferases. The low expression of At1 and At2 in susceptible melon lines is regulated mainly at the transcriptional level. This regulation is independent of infection with the pathogen. Transgenic melon plants overexpressing either of these eR genes displayed enhanced activity of glyoxylate aminotransferases and remarkable resistance against P. cubensis. The cloned eR genes provide a new resource for developing downy mildew–resistant melon varieties. PMID:14688292

  20. Targeting the ACE2 and Apelin Pathways Are Novel Therapies for Heart Failure: Opportunities and Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Kazemi-Bajestani, Seyyed M. R.; Patel, Vaibhav B.; Wang, Wang; Oudit, Gavin Y.

    2012-01-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2)/Ang II/Ang 1–7 and the apelin/APJ are two important peptide systems which exert diverse effects on the cardiovascular system. ACE2 is a key negative regulator of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) where it metabolizes angiotensin (Ang) II into Ang 1–7, an endogenous antagonist of Ang II. Both the prolonged activation of RAS and the loss of ACE2 can be detrimental as they lead to functional deterioration of the heart and progression of cardiac, renal, and vascular diseases. Recombinant human ACE2 in an animal model of ACE2 knockout mice lowers Ang II. These interactions neutralize the pressor and subpressor pathologic effects of Ang II by producing Ang 1–7 levels in vivo, that might be cardiovascular protective. ACE2 hydrolyzes apelin to Ang II and, therefore, is responsible for the degradation of both peptides. Apelin has emerged as a promising peptide biomarker of heart failure. The serum level of apelin in cardiovascular diseases tends to be decreased. Apelin is recognized as an imperative controller of systemic blood pressure and myocardium contractility. Dysregulation of the apelin/APJ system may be involved in the predisposition to cardiovascular diseases, and enhancing apelin action may have important therapeutic effects. PMID:22655211

  1. Angiotensin converting enzyme 2 and atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yutang; Tikellis, Chris; Thomas, Merlin C; Golledge, Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    Angiotensin converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) is a homolog of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) which generates angiotensin II from angiotensin I. ACE, its product angiotensin II and the downstream angiotensin type I receptor are important components of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS). Angiotensin II, the most important component of the RAS, promotes the development of atherosclerosis. The identification of ACE2 in 2000 opened a new chapter of research on the regulation of the RAS. ACE2 degrades pro-atherosclerotic angiotensin II and generates anti-atherosclerotic angiotensin 1-7. In this review, we explored the importance of ACE2 in protecting experimental animals from developing atherosclerosis and its involvement in human atherosclerosis. We also examined the published evidence assessing the importance of ACE2 in different cell types relevant to atherosclerosis and putative underlying cellular and molecular mechanisms linking ACE2 with protection from atherosclerosis. ACE2 shifts the balance from angiotensin II to angiotensin 1-7 inhibiting the progression of atherosclerosis in animal models.

  2. Genetic Deletion of ACE2 Induces Vascular Dysfunction in C57BL/6 Mice: Role of Nitric Oxide Imbalance and Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Rabelo, Luiza A.; Todiras, Mihail; Nunes-Souza, Valéria; Qadri, Fatimunnisa; Szijártó, István András; Gollasch, Maik; Penninger, Josef M.; Bader, Michael; Santos, Robson A.; Alenina, Natalia

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating evidence indicates that angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) plays a critical role in cardiovascular homeostasis, and its altered expression is associated with major cardiac and vascular disorders. The aim of this study was to evaluate the regulation of vascular function and assess the vascular redox balance in ACE2-deficient (ACE2-/y) animals. Experiments were performed in 20–22 week-old C57BL/6 and ACE2-/y male mice. Evaluation of endothelium-dependent and -independent relaxation revealed an impairment of in vitro and in vivo vascular function in ACE2-/y mice. Drastic reduction in eNOS expression at both protein and mRNA levels, and a decrease in •NO concentrations were observed in aortas of ACE2-/y mice in comparison to controls. Consistently, these mice presented a lower plasma and urine nitrite concentration, confirming reduced •NO availability in ACE2-deficient animals. Lipid peroxidation was significantly increased and superoxide dismutase activity was decreased in aorta homogenates of ACE2-/y mice, indicating impaired antioxidant capacity. Taken together, our data indicate, that ACE2 regulates vascular function by modulating nitric oxide release and oxidative stress. In conclusion, we elucidate mechanisms by which ACE2 is involved in the maintenance of vascular homeostasis. Furthermore, these findings provide insights into the role of the renin-angiotensin system in both vascular and systemic redox balance. PMID:27070147

  3. ACE2 and vasoactive peptides: novel players in cardiovascular/renal remodeling and hypertension.

    PubMed

    Mendoza-Torres, Evelyn; Oyarzún, Alejandra; Mondaca-Ruff, David; Azocar, Andrés; Castro, Pablo F; Jalil, Jorge E; Chiong, Mario; Lavandero, Sergio; Ocaranza, María Paz

    2015-08-01

    The renin-angiotensin system (RAS) is a key component of cardiovascular physiology and homeostasis due to its influence on the regulation of electrolyte balance, blood pressure, vascular tone and cardiovascular remodeling. Deregulation of this system contributes significantly to the pathophysiology of cardiovascular and renal diseases. Numerous studies have generated new perspectives about a noncanonical and protective RAS pathway that counteracts the proliferative and hypertensive effects of the classical angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE)/angiotensin (Ang) II/angiotensin type 1 receptor (AT1R) axis. The key components of this pathway are ACE2 and its products, Ang-(1-7) and Ang-(1-9). These two vasoactive peptides act through the Mas receptor (MasR) and AT2R, respectively. The ACE2/Ang-(1-7)/MasR and ACE2/Ang-(1-9)/AT2R axes have opposite effects to those of the ACE/Ang II/AT1R axis, such as decreased proliferation and cardiovascular remodeling, increased production of nitric oxide and vasodilation. A novel peptide from the noncanonical pathway, alamandine, was recently identified in rats, mice and humans. This heptapeptide is generated by catalytic action of ACE2 on Ang A or through a decarboxylation reaction on Ang-(1-7). Alamandine produces the same effects as Ang-(1-7), such as vasodilation and prevention of fibrosis, by interacting with Mas-related GPCR, member D (MrgD). In this article, we review the key roles of ACE2 and the vasoactive peptides Ang-(1-7), Ang-(1-9) and alamandine as counter-regulators of the ACE-Ang II axis as well as the biological properties that allow them to regulate blood pressure and cardiovascular and renal remodeling.

  4. Crosstalk between ACE2 and PLGF regulates vascular permeability during acute lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lantao; Li, Yong; Qin, Hao; Xing, Dong; Su, Jie; Hu, Zhenjie

    2016-01-01

    Angiotensin converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) treatment suppresses the severity of acute lung injury (ALI), through antagonizing hydrolyzing angiotensin II (AngII) and the ALI-induced apoptosis of pulmonary endothelial cells. Nevertheless, the effects of ACE2 on vessel permeability and its relationship with placental growth factor (PLGF) remain ill-defined. In the current study, we examined the relationship between ACE2 and PLGF in ALI model in mice. We used a previously published bleomycin method to induce ALI in mice, and treated the mice with ACE2. We analyzed the levels of PLGF in these mice. The mouse lung vessel permeability was determined by a fluorescence pharmacokinetic assay following i.v. injection of 62.5 µg/kg Visudyne. PLGF pump or soluble Flt-1 (sFlt-1) pump was given to augment or suppress PLGF effects, respectively. The long-term effects on lung function were determined by measurement of lung resistance using methacholine. We found that ACE2 treatment did not alter PLGF levels in lung, but antagonized the effects of PLGF on increases of lung vessel permeability. Ectogenic PLGF abolished the antagonizing effects of ACE2 on the vessel permeability against PLGF. On the other hand, suppression of PLGF signaling mimicked the effects of ACE2 on the vessel permeability against PLGF. The suppression of vessel permeability resulted in improvement of lung function after ALI. Thus, ACE2 may antagonize the PLGF-mediated increases in lung vessel permeability during ALI, resulting in improvement of lung function after ALI. PMID:27158411

  5. A prospective study of frequency and characteristics of cough during ACE inhibitor treatment.

    PubMed

    Sato, Atsuhisa; Fukuda, Seiichi

    2015-01-01

    Angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors are reportedly effective, and positively indicated in patients with chronic heart failure with decreased contractility, after myocardial infarction, after cerebrovascular disorders, and in those with chronic kidney disease. However, the biggest challenge to continuous use of ACE inhibitors is the adverse reaction of cough. Accordingly, in the present study, we investigated the present state and characteristics of ACE inhibitor-induced cough in patients with essential hypertension currently being treated with an ACE inhibitor for an average of 18 months, who could be regularly checked for cough. Subjects in this study were 176 patients overall (mean age 67 ± 11 years old), 90 men and 86 women. The adverse reaction of cough was observed in 20% of patients, and more frequently in women than in men. However, in 26 of the patients with cough, the cough either resolved naturally or completely disappeared while the treatment continued, after which patients could continue taking the medication. Specifically, ACE inhibitor treatment was eventually discontinued due to cough in 5.1% of patients. Cough occurred less frequently with concomitant calcium antagonists or diuretics than with ACE inhibitor monotherapy. Cough as an adverse reaction occurred at a low frequency when medication was taken at bedtime. We considered a number of measures to counteract cough, then in addition to starting the ACE inhibitor treatment as early as possible, it is important to devise ways for the ACE inhibitor treatment to be continued for as long as possible, through the adept use of these measures.

  6. ACE2 and vasoactive peptides: novel players in cardiovascular/renal remodeling and hypertension.

    PubMed

    Mendoza-Torres, Evelyn; Oyarzún, Alejandra; Mondaca-Ruff, David; Azocar, Andrés; Castro, Pablo F; Jalil, Jorge E; Chiong, Mario; Lavandero, Sergio; Ocaranza, María Paz

    2015-08-01

    The renin-angiotensin system (RAS) is a key component of cardiovascular physiology and homeostasis due to its influence on the regulation of electrolyte balance, blood pressure, vascular tone and cardiovascular remodeling. Deregulation of this system contributes significantly to the pathophysiology of cardiovascular and renal diseases. Numerous studies have generated new perspectives about a noncanonical and protective RAS pathway that counteracts the proliferative and hypertensive effects of the classical angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE)/angiotensin (Ang) II/angiotensin type 1 receptor (AT1R) axis. The key components of this pathway are ACE2 and its products, Ang-(1-7) and Ang-(1-9). These two vasoactive peptides act through the Mas receptor (MasR) and AT2R, respectively. The ACE2/Ang-(1-7)/MasR and ACE2/Ang-(1-9)/AT2R axes have opposite effects to those of the ACE/Ang II/AT1R axis, such as decreased proliferation and cardiovascular remodeling, increased production of nitric oxide and vasodilation. A novel peptide from the noncanonical pathway, alamandine, was recently identified in rats, mice and humans. This heptapeptide is generated by catalytic action of ACE2 on Ang A or through a decarboxylation reaction on Ang-(1-7). Alamandine produces the same effects as Ang-(1-7), such as vasodilation and prevention of fibrosis, by interacting with Mas-related GPCR, member D (MrgD). In this article, we review the key roles of ACE2 and the vasoactive peptides Ang-(1-7), Ang-(1-9) and alamandine as counter-regulators of the ACE-Ang II axis as well as the biological properties that allow them to regulate blood pressure and cardiovascular and renal remodeling. PMID:26275770

  7. Gene expression of regulatory enzymes involved in the intermediate metabolism of sheep subjected to feed restriction.

    PubMed

    van Harten, S; Brito, R; Almeida, A M; Scanlon, T; Kilminster, T; Milton, J; Greeff, J; Oldham, C; Cardoso, L A

    2013-03-01

    The effect of feed restriction on gene expression of regulatory enzymes of intermediary metabolism was studied in two sheep breeds (Australian Merino and Dorper) subjected to two nutritional treatments: feed restriction (85% of daily maintenance requirements) and control (ad libitum feeding), during 42 days. The experimental animals (ram lambs) were divided into four groups, n = 5 (Australian Merino control (MC), Australian Merino Restriction (MR), Dorper control (DC) and Dorper Restriction (DR)). After the trial, animals were sacrificed and samples were taken from liver tissue to quantify glucose levels and gene expression of relevant intermediary metabolism enzymes (phosphofructokinase (PFK), pyruvate kinase (PK), phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase, fructose 1,6-bisphosphatase, glucose-6-phosphatase, glycogen synthase (GS), fatty acid synthase (FAS), glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) and carbamoyl phosphate synthase (CPS)) through real-time PCR. During the experimental period, the MR animals lost 12.6% in BW compared with 5.3% lost by the Dorper lambs. MC and DC rams gained, respectively, 8.8% and 14% during the same period. Within the Dorper breed, restricted feed animals revealed a significant decrease over controls in the transcription of PFK (1.95-fold) and PK (2.26-fold), both glycolytic enzymes. The gluconeogenesis showed no change in the feed restricted animals of both breeds. DR feed group presented a significant decrease over the homologous Merino sheep group on GS. In both experimental breeds, FAS mRNA expression was decreased in restricted feed groups. GDH expression was decreased only in the DR animals (1.84-fold) indicating a reduced catabolism of amino acids in these animals. Finally, CPS was significantly (P < 0.05) higher in the Dorper sheep, indicating a facilitated urea synthesis in this breed. These results indicate a better adaptation of metabolic intermediate regulatory enzymes and hepatic glucose production of Dorper sheep to feed restriction

  8. Cell-Free Phospholipid Biosynthesis by Gene-Encoded Enzymes Reconstituted in Liposomes

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Andrew; Noga, Marek J.; de Graaf, Paul; Westerlaken, Ilja; Yildirim, Esengul; Danelon, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    The goal of bottom-up synthetic biology culminates in the assembly of an entire cell from separate biological building blocks. One major challenge resides in the in vitro production and implementation of complex genetic and metabolic pathways that can support essential cellular functions. Here, we show that phospholipid biosynthesis, a multiple-step process involved in cell membrane homeostasis, can be reconstituted starting from the genes encoding for all necessary proteins. A total of eight E. coli enzymes for acyl transfer and headgroup modifications were produced in a cell-free gene expression system and were co-translationally reconstituted in liposomes. Acyl-coenzyme A and glycerol-3-phosphate were used as canonical precursors to generate a variety of important bacterial lipids. Moreover, this study demonstrates that two-step acyl transfer can occur from enzymes synthesized inside vesicles. Besides clear implications for growth and potentially division of a synthetic cell, we postulate that gene-based lipid biosynthesis can become instrumental for ex vivo and protein purification-free production of natural and non-natural lipids. PMID:27711229

  9. Recent progress in gene-directed enzyme prodrug therapy: an emerging cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Both, Gerald W

    2009-08-01

    The principle of gene-directed enzyme prodrug therapy (GDEPT) has existed for many years but, while simple in concept, the effective practical application of this therapy has proven to be challenging. Improvements in the efficacy of GDEPT have been achieved principally through the choice and development of more effective vectors, by optimizing and controlling gene expression and by increasing the activity of the delivered enzyme through mutation. While innovation continues in this field, the pioneering GDEPT systems designed to treat glioma and prostate cancer have completed or are now entering late-stage clinical trials, respectively. As the pace of innovation in GDEPT technology far exceeds its clinical application, these initial products are anticipated to be replaced by next-generation biologicals. This review highlights recent progress in the strategies and development of GDEPT and summarizes the status of current clinical trials. With the first GDEPT product for treatment of resected gliomas poised to gain marketing approval, a new era in cancer gene medicine is emerging. PMID:19649987

  10. The herbicide flumioxazin stimulates pathogenesis-related gene expression and enzyme activities in Vitis vinifera.

    PubMed

    Castro, Antonio Jesús; Saladin, Gäelle; Bézier, Annie; Mazeyrat-Gourbeyre, Florence; Baillieul, Fabienne; Clément, Christophe

    2008-11-01

    In this work, the capacity of the soil-applied herbicide flumioxazin (fmx) to trigger defence mechanisms was assessed using 6-week-old in vitro grown Vitis vinifera L. plantlets. Time-course studies demonstrated that the herbicide induced the expression of basic beta-1,3-glucanase (Vvglu), basic chitinase (Vvchit1b) and PR10 (VvPR10.3) genes encoding three pathogenesis-related (PR) proteins involved in grapevine defence against pathogens. Thus, all transcripts accumulated in grapevine tissues to reach maximum values after 24-72 h of herbicide exposure, except for VvPR10.3 gene expression, which was induced in roots and stems but not in leaves. Induction of PR genes was observed to a greater extent in roots and leaves, and its intensity diminished in the stems although still remained noteworthy. The activities of beta-1,3-glucanase and chitinase enzymes significantly increased in the whole plant after herbicide exposure and were still stimulated 21 days after the beginning of treatments. Similarly, the most remarkable effect occurred in roots. However, all enzyme activities tested were stimulated in the upper aerial tissues as well, indicating that fmx or a derived product acts systemically, likely via root uptake.

  11. Functional genomics and SNP analysis of human genes encoding proline metabolic enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Williams, D. Bart; Zhaorigetu, Siqin; Khalil, Shadi; Wan, Guanghua; Valle, David

    2009-01-01

    Proline metabolism in mammals involves two other amino acids, glutamate and ornithine, and five enzymatic activities, Δ1-pyrroline-5-carboxylate (P5C) reductase (P5CR), proline oxidase, P5C dehydrogenase, P5C synthase and ornithine-δ-aminotransferase (OAT). With the exception of OAT, which catalyzes a reversible reaction, the other 4 enzymes are unidirectional, suggesting that proline metabolism is purpose-driven, tightly regulated, and compartmentalized. In addition, this tri-amino-acid system also links with three other pivotal metabolic systems, namely the TCA cycle, urea cycle, and pentose phosphate pathway. Abnormalities in proline metabolism are relevant in several diseases: six monogenic inborn errors involving metabolism and/or transport of proline and its immediate metabolites have been described. Recent advances in the Human Genome Project, in silico database mining techniques, and research in dissecting the molecular basis of proline metabolism prompted us to utilize functional genomic approaches to analyze human genes which encode proline metabolic enzymes in the context of gene structure, regulation of gene expression, mRNA variants, protein isoforms, and single nucleotide polymorphisms. PMID:18506409

  12. Identification of Genes Coding Aminoglycoside Modifying Enzymes in E. coli of UTI Patients in India

    PubMed Central

    Bashir, Yasir; Dar, Firdous Ahmad; Sekhar, M.

    2016-01-01

    This study is to probe the pattern of antibiotic resistance against aminoglycosides and its mechanism in E. coli obtained from patients from Chennai, India. Isolation and identification of pathogens were done on MacConkey agar. Antimicrobial sensitivity testing was done by disc diffusion test. The identification of genes encoding aminoglycoside modifying enzymes was done by Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR). Out of 98 isolates, 71 (72.45%) isolates were identified as E. coli and the remaining 27 (27.55%) as other bacteria. Disc diffusion method results showed a resistance level of 72.15% for streptomycin, 73.4% for gentamicin, 63.26% for neomycin, 57.14% for tobramycin, 47.9% for netilmicin, and 8.16% for amikacin in E. coli. PCR screening showed the presence of four genes, namely, rrs, aacC2, aacA-aphD, and aphA3, in their plasmid DNA. The results point towards the novel mechanism of drug resistance in E. coli from UTI patients in India as they confirm the presence of genes encoding enzymes that cause resistance to aminoglycoside drugs. This could be an alarm for drug prescription to UTI patients. PMID:27403451

  13. Association of Genetic Variants in the Apelin-APJ System and ACE2 with Blood Pressure Responses to Potassium Supplementation: the GenSalt Study

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Qi; Gu, Dongfeng; Kelly, Tanika N.; Hixson, James E.; Rao, Dabeeru C.; Jaquish, Cashell E.; Chen, Jing; Huang, Jianfeng; Chen, Chung-Shiuan; Gu, C. Charles; Whelton, Paul K.; He, Jiang

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND Genetic factors may influence blood pressure (BP) responses to dietary potassium intake. We examined the association of genetic variants in the apelin-APJ system and angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) with BP responses to potassium supplementation. METHODS We conducted a 7-day potassium supplementation (60 mmol/day) intervention among 1,906 Chinese adults who participated in the Genetic Epidemiology Network of Salt-Sensitivity (GenSalt) study. Tag single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) based on HapMap data and potential functional SNPs were selected in the APLN, APLNR, and ACE2 genes. Because the ACE2 and APLN genes are located on the X chromosome, men and women were analyzed separately. RESULTS In women, SNP rs2235306 in the APLN gene was significantly associated with diastolic BP (DBP) response to potassium supplementation (P=0.0009). The DBP responses [95% confidence interval (CI)] among those with genotypes T/T, T/C, and C/C were −2.22 (−2.74, −1.70), −1.69 (−2.20, −1.19), and −0.81 (−1.54, −0.09) mmHg, respectively. In men, SNP rs4646174 of the ACE2 gene was significantly associated with systolic BP (SBP), DBP, and mean arterial pressure (MAP) responses to potassium supplementation (P=0.0001, P=0.001, and P=3.0×10−6, respectively). The SBP, DBP and MAP responses (95% CI) were −0.79 (−2.27, 0.69) versus −3.53 (−3.94, −3.12), 1.07 (−0.34, 2.49) versus −1.06 (−1.43, −0.69), and 0.44 (−0.60, 1.48) versus −1.89 (−2.22, −1.55) mmHg among men with minor G allele compared to those with major C allele of rs4646174, respectively. CONCLUSIONS Our study indicates that genetic variation of APLN and ACE2 may influence BP response to potassium intake. PMID:20224560

  14. Molecular characterization and transcriptional regulation of the renin-angiotensin system genes in Senegalese sole (Solea senegalensis Kaup, 1858): differential gene regulation by salinity.

    PubMed

    Armesto, Paula; Cousin, Xavier; Salas-Leiton, Emilio; Asensio, Esther; Manchado, Manuel; Infante, Carlos

    2015-06-01

    In this work, the complete cDNA sequence encoding angiotensinogen (agt) in the euryhaline flatfish Senegalese sole was obtained. Additionally, putative coding sequences belonging to other renin-angiotensin system (RAS) genes including renin (ren), angiotensin-converting enzyme (ace), angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ace2), as well as angiotensin II receptor type I (agtr1) and type II (agtr2), were also identified. In juvenile tissues, agt transcripts were mainly detected in liver, ren in kidney, ace and ace2 in intestine, agtr1 in kidney and brain, and agtr2 in liver and kidney. Expression analysis of the six RAS genes after a salinity shift revealed a clear increase of agt mRNA abundance in liver just after transferring soles to high salinity water (60 ppt) with a peak at 48 h. Moreover, gene expression analysis in gills showed transcriptional regulation of ace and agtr1 at 48 h and agtr2 at 96 h after transferring soles to 60 ppt. Incubation of larvae before mouth opening (until 3 days post hatch; dph) at low salinity (10 ppt) resulted in a coordinated transcriptional up-regulation of RAS genes. Nevertheless, no differences in mRNA abundance between salinities were observed when larvae were cultivated to low salinity after mouth opening. Whole-mount in situ hybridization (WISH) signal for agt and ace in 3 dph larvae incubated at 10 ppt and 35 ppt confirmed that the former gene was mainly expressed in liver whereas the later gene was mainly located in pharynx and posterior gut, without pronounced differences in intensity between salinities. Possible physiological significance of all these results is discussed.

  15. Betacyanin Biosynthetic Genes and Enzymes Are Differentially Induced by (a)biotic Stress in Amaranthus hypochondriacus

    PubMed Central

    Casique-Arroyo, Gabriela; Martínez-Gallardo, Norma; González de la Vara, Luis; Délano-Frier, John P.

    2014-01-01

    An analysis of key genes and enzymes of the betacyanin biosynthetic pathway in Amaranthus hypochondriacus (Ah) was performed. Complete cDNA sequence of Ah genes coding for cyclo-DOPA 5-O glucosyltransferase (AhcDOPA5-GT), two 4, 5-DOPA-extradiol-dioxygenase isoforms (AhDODA-1 and AhDODA-2, respectively), and a betanidin 5-O-glucosyltransferase (AhB5-GT), plus the partial sequence of an orthologue of the cytochrome P-450 R gene (CYP76AD1) were obtained. With the exception AhDODA-2, which had a closer phylogenetic relationship to DODA-like genes in anthocyanin-synthesizing plants, all genes analyzed closely resembled those reported in related Caryophyllales species. The measurement of basal gene expression levels, in addition to the DOPA oxidase tyrosinase (DOT) activity, in different tissues of three Ah genotypes having contrasting pigmentation levels (green to red-purple) was determined. Additional analyses were performed in Ah plants subjected to salt and drought stress and to two different insect herbivory regimes. Basal pigmentation accumulation in leaves, stems and roots of betacyanic plants correlated with higher expression levels of AhDODA-1 and AhB5-GT, whereas DOT activity levels coincided with pigment accumulation in stems and roots and with the acyanic nature of green plants, respectively, but not with pigmentation in leaves. Although the abiotic stress treatments tested produced changes in pigment levels in different tissues, pigment accumulation was the highest in leaves and stems of drought stressed betacyanic plants, respectively. However, tissue pigment accumulation in stressed Ah plants did not always correlate with betacyanin biosynthetic gene expression levels and/or DOT activity. This effect was tissue- and genotype-dependent, and further suggested that other unexamined factors were influencing pigment content in stressed Ah. The results obtained from the insect herbivory assays, particularly in acyanic plants, also support the proposal that

  16. Betacyanin biosynthetic genes and enzymes are differentially induced by (a)biotic stress in Amaranthus hypochondriacus.

    PubMed

    Casique-Arroyo, Gabriela; Martínez-Gallardo, Norma; González de la Vara, Luis; Délano-Frier, John P

    2014-01-01

    An analysis of key genes and enzymes of the betacyanin biosynthetic pathway in Amaranthus hypochondriacus (Ah) was performed. Complete cDNA sequence of Ah genes coding for cyclo-DOPA 5-O glucosyltransferase (AhcDOPA5-GT), two 4, 5-DOPA-extradiol-dioxygenase isoforms (AhDODA-1 and AhDODA-2, respectively), and a betanidin 5-O-glucosyltransferase (AhB5-GT), plus the partial sequence of an orthologue of the cytochrome P-450 R gene (CYP76AD1) were obtained. With the exception AhDODA-2, which had a closer phylogenetic relationship to DODA-like genes in anthocyanin-synthesizing plants, all genes analyzed closely resembled those reported in related Caryophyllales species. The measurement of basal gene expression levels, in addition to the DOPA oxidase tyrosinase (DOT) activity, in different tissues of three Ah genotypes having contrasting pigmentation levels (green to red-purple) was determined. Additional analyses were performed in Ah plants subjected to salt and drought stress and to two different insect herbivory regimes. Basal pigmentation accumulation in leaves, stems and roots of betacyanic plants correlated with higher expression levels of AhDODA-1 and AhB5-GT, whereas DOT activity levels coincided with pigment accumulation in stems and roots and with the acyanic nature of green plants, respectively, but not with pigmentation in leaves. Although the abiotic stress treatments tested produced changes in pigment levels in different tissues, pigment accumulation was the highest in leaves and stems of drought stressed betacyanic plants, respectively. However, tissue pigment accumulation in stressed Ah plants did not always correlate with betacyanin biosynthetic gene expression levels and/or DOT activity. This effect was tissue- and genotype-dependent, and further suggested that other unexamined factors were influencing pigment content in stressed Ah. The results obtained from the insect herbivory assays, particularly in acyanic plants, also support the proposal that

  17. [GENES ALLELE STATUS OF ANGIOTENSINCONVERTING ENZYME (I/D) AND ENDOTHELIAL NITRIC OXIDE SYNTHASE (894 G > T) IN PATIENTS WITH ACUTE CORONARY SYNDROME].

    PubMed

    Sydorchuk, L P; Ursuliak, Y V

    2015-01-01

    The association of genes polymorphism of angiotensin-converting enzyme ACE (I/D) and endothelial nitric oxide synthase eNOS (894 G > T) with acute myocardial infarction (MI) among residents of North Bukovina region was evaluated. II/GG and ID/GG haplotypesre associated with more frequent presence of Q-MI, with localization on anterior wall and primary appearance. ID/TT, or II/TG haplotypes are associated with the presence of a severe re-Q-MI, with localization on the posterior wall. ID/TG variant is associated in 93.7% of cases with Q-MI, regardless of its location and times of occurrence. ID/TG increased relative risk of Q-MI by 2,93 times (OR = 4,79; P = 0,002), which confirmed the severity of the disease and increases the risk of MI inanterior and higher in posterior walls of the left ventricle (OR = 4.31; P = 0.007 and OR = 4.6; P = 0.005, respectively) increases the likelihood of the first Ml by 2.88 times (OR = 4.62; P = 0.003) and its re-occurrence or recurrence--by 2.67 times (OR = 4; P = 0.022). Mutations absence: in haplotypes (II/GG) is a protective factor of Q-MI appearance (OR = 0.19; P = 0.004) and makes the chances for the first MI the lowest in observed population (OR = 0.36; P = 0.045). PMID:27089712

  18. Serine proteases as candidates for proteolytic processing of angiotensin-I converting enzyme.

    PubMed

    Aragão, Danielle S; de Andrade, Maria Claudina C; Ebihara, Fabiana; Watanabe, Ingrid K M; Magalhães, Dayane C B P; Juliano, Maria Aparecida; Hirata, Izaura Yoshico; Casarini, Dulce Elena

    2015-01-01

    Somatic angiotensin-I converting enzyme (sACE) is a broadly distributed peptidase which plays a role in blood pressure and electrolyte homeostasis by the conversion of angiotensin I into angiotensin II. N-domain isoforms (nACE) with 65 and 90 kDa have been described in body fluids, tissues and mesangial cells (MC), and a 90 kDa nACE has been described only in spontaneously hypertensive rats. The aim of this study was to investigate the existence of proteolytic enzymes that may act in the hydrolysis of sACE generating nACEs in MC. After the confirmation of the presence of ACE sheddases in Immortalized MC (IMC), we purified and characterized these enzymes using fluorogenic substrates specifically designed for ACE sheddases. Purified enzyme identified as a serine protease by N-terminal sequence was able to generate nACE. In the present study, we described for the first time the presence of ACE sheddases in IMC, identified as serine proteases able to hydrolyze sACE in vitro. Further investigations are necessary to elucidate the mechanisms responsible for the expression and regulation of ACE sheddases in MC and their roles in the generation of nACEs, especially the 90 kDa form possibly related to hypertension.

  19. Brain-targeted angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 overexpression attenuates neurogenic hypertension by inhibiting cyclooxygenase-mediated inflammation.

    PubMed

    Sriramula, Srinivas; Xia, Huijing; Xu, Ping; Lazartigues, Eric

    2015-03-01

    Overactivity of the renin-angiotensin system, oxidative stress, and cyclooxygenases (COX) in the brain are implicated in the pathogenesis of hypertension. We previously reported that angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) overexpression in the brain attenuates the development of deoxycorticosterone acetate-salt hypertension, a neurogenic hypertension model with enhanced brain renin-angiotensin system and sympathetic activity. To elucidate the mechanisms involved, we investigated whether oxidative stress, mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling and cyclooxygenase (COX) activation in the brain are modulated by ACE2 in neurogenic hypertension. Deoxycorticosterone acetate-salt hypertension significantly increased expression of Nox-2 (+61±5%), Nox-4 (+50±13%), and nitrotyrosine (+89±32%) and reduced activity of the antioxidant enzymes, catalase (-29±4%) and superoxide dismutase (-31±7%), indicating increased oxidative stress in the brain of nontransgenic mice. This increased oxidative stress was attenuated in transgenic mice overexpressing ACE2 in the brain. Deoxycorticosterone acetate-salt-induced reduction of neuronal nitric oxide synthase expression (-26±7%) and phosphorylated endothelial nitric oxide synthase/total endothelial nitric oxide synthase (-30±3%), and enhanced phosphorylation of protein kinase B and extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 in the paraventricular nucleus, were reversed by ACE2 overexpression. In addition, ACE2 overexpression blunted the hypertension-mediated increase in gene and protein expression of COX-1 and COX-2 in the paraventricular nucleus. Furthermore, gene silencing of either COX-1 or COX-2 in the brain, reduced microglial activation and accompanied neuroinflammation, ultimately attenuating Deoxycorticosterone acetate-salt hypertension. Together, these data provide evidence that brain ACE2 overexpression reduces oxidative stress and COX-mediated neuroinflammation, improves antioxidant and nitric oxide signaling, and

  20. Nucleotide sequencing and characterization of the genes encoding benzene oxidation enzymes of Pseudomonas putida

    SciTech Connect

    Irie, S.; Doi, S.; Yorifuji, T.; Takagi, M.; Yano, K.

    1987-11-01

    The nucleotide sequence of the genes from Pseudomonas putida encoding oxidation of benzene to catechol was determined. Five open reading frames were found in the sequence. Four corresponding protein molecules were detected by a DNA-directed in vitro translation system. Escherichia coli cells containing the fragment with the four open reading frames transformed benzene to cis-benzene glycol, which is an intermediate of the oxidation of benzene to catechol. The relation between the product of each cistron and the components of the benzene oxidation enzyme system is discussed.

  1. Association between polymorphisms of the insulin-degrading enzyme gene and late-onset Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shitao; He, Feiyan; Wang, Ying

    2015-06-01

    The insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE) gene is a strong positional and biological candidate for late-onset Alzheimer disease (LOAD) susceptibility, with recent studies independently demonstrating an association between IDE gene variants and LOAD. However, previous data have been controversial. To investigate the relationship between IDE gene polymorphisms and LOAD risk, a case-control association study of 406 Han Chinese participants in Xinjiang, China, was undertaken. The LOAD and control groups consisted of 202 and 204 participants, respectively. The single-nucleotide polymorphisms rs1887922 and rs1999764 of the IDE gene were linked to LOAD incidence. The presence of the CT+CC genotype of rs1999764 had a protective effect compared to the TT genotype (adjusted P=.0001; odds ratio [OR]=0.226; 95% confidence interval [CI]=0.116-0.441), while the CT+CC genotype of rs1887922 was associated with increased LOAD risk (adjusted P=.0001; OR=3.640; 95% CI=1.889-7.016). Moreover, the effects of rs1887922 and rs1999764 were associated with LOAD risk independent of the apolipoprotein E ∊4 polymorphism and were more significant in men and women, respectively. These results demonstrate that the polymorphisms rs1887922 and rs1999764 of the IDE gene are associated with LOAD susceptibility in the Xinjiang Han population.

  2. Evolution of the Division of Labor between Genes and Enzymes in the RNA World

    PubMed Central

    Boza, Gergely; Szilágyi, András; Kun, Ádám; Santos, Mauro; Szathmáry, Eörs

    2014-01-01

    The RNA world is a very likely interim stage of the evolution after the first replicators and before the advent of the genetic code and translated proteins. Ribozymes are known to be able to catalyze many reaction types, including cofactor-aided metabolic transformations. In a metabolically complex RNA world, early division of labor between genes and enzymes could have evolved, where the ribozymes would have been transcribed from the genes more often than the other way round, benefiting the encapsulating cells through this dosage effect. Here we show, by computer simulations of protocells harboring unlinked RNA replicators, that the origin of replicational asymmetry producing more ribozymes from a gene template than gene strands from a ribozyme template is feasible and robust. Enzymatic activities of the two modeled ribozymes are in trade-off with their replication rates, and the relative replication rates compared to those of complementary strands are evolvable traits of the ribozymes. The degree of trade-off is shown to have the strongest effect in favor of the division of labor. Although some asymmetry between gene and enzymatic strands could have evolved even in earlier, surface-bound systems, the shown mechanism in protocells seems inevitable and under strong positive selection. This could have preadapted the genetic system for transcription after the subsequent origin of chromosomes and DNA. PMID:25474573

  3. Evolution of the division of labor between genes and enzymes in the RNA world.

    PubMed

    Boza, Gergely; Szilágyi, András; Kun, Ádám; Santos, Mauro; Szathmáry, Eörs

    2014-12-01

    The RNA world is a very likely interim stage of the evolution after the first replicators and before the advent of the genetic code and translated proteins. Ribozymes are known to be able to catalyze many reaction types, including cofactor-aided metabolic transformations. In a metabolically complex RNA world, early division of labor between genes and enzymes could have evolved, where the ribozymes would have been transcribed from the genes more often than the other way round, benefiting the encapsulating cells through this dosage effect. Here we show, by computer simulations of protocells harboring unlinked RNA replicators, that the origin of replicational asymmetry producing more ribozymes from a gene template than gene strands from a ribozyme template is feasible and robust. Enzymatic activities of the two modeled ribozymes are in trade-off with their replication rates, and the relative replication rates compared to those of complementary strands are evolvable traits of the ribozymes. The degree of trade-off is shown to have the strongest effect in favor of the division of labor. Although some asymmetry between gene and enzymatic strands could have evolved even in earlier, surface-bound systems, the shown mechanism in protocells seems inevitable and under strong positive selection. This could have preadapted the genetic system for transcription after the subsequent origin of chromosomes and DNA.

  4. Leucine-684: A conserved residue of an AMP-acetyl CoA synthetase (AceCS) from Leishmania donovani is involved in substrate recognition, catalysis and acetylation.

    PubMed

    Soumya, Neelagiri; Tandan, Hitendra; Damre, Mangesh V; Gangwal, Rahul P; Sangamwar, Abhay T; Singh, Sushma

    2016-04-15

    AMP-acetyl CoA synthetase (AMP-AceCS) is a key enzyme which catalyzes the activation of acetate to acetyl CoA, an important intermediate at the cross roads of various anabolic and catabolic pathways. Multiple sequence alignment of Leishmania donovani AceCS with other organisms revealed the presence of a highly conserved leucine residue at 684 position which is known to be crucial for acetylation by protein acetyl transferases in other organisms. In an attempt to understand the role of leucine residue at 684 position in L. donovani acetyl CoA synthetase (LdAceCS), it was mutated to proline (P) by site directed mutagenesis. Kinetic analysis of the L684P-LdAceCS mutant revealed approximately two fold increased binding affinity with acetate, whereas fivefold decreased affinity was observed with ATP. There was insignificant change in secondary structure as revealed by CD however, two fold decreased fluorescence intensity was observed at an emission maxima of 340 nm. Interestingly, L684P mutation abolished the acetylation of the mutant enzyme indicating the importance of L684 in acetylation of the enzyme. Changes in biochemical parameters of the mutant protein were validated by homology modeling of the wild type and mutant LdAceCS enzyme using Salmonella enterica AceCS crystal structure as template. Our data provides evidence for the role of leucine 684 residue in substrate recognition, catalysis and acetylation of the AceCS enzyme.

  5. Fat-to-glucose interconversion by hydrodynamic transfer of two glyoxylate cycle enzyme genes

    PubMed Central

    Cordero, P; Campion, J; Milagro, FI; Marzo, F; Martinez, JA

    2008-01-01

    The glyoxylate cycle, which is well characterized in higher plants and some microorganisms but not in vertebrates, is able to bypass the citric acid cycle to achieve fat-to-carbohydrate interconversion. In this context, the hydrodynamic transfer of two glyoxylate cycle enzymes, such as isocytrate lyase (ICL) and malate synthase (MS), could accomplish the shift of using fat for the synthesis of glucose. Therefore, 20 mice weighing 23.37 ± 0.96 g were hydrodinamically gene transferred by administering into the tail vein a bolus with ICL and MS. After 36 hours, body weight, plasma glucose, respiratory quotient and energy expenditure were measured. The respiratory quotient was increased by gene transfer, which suggests that a higher carbohydrate/lipid ratio is oxidized in such animals. This application could help, if adequate protocols are designed, to induce fat utilization for glucose synthesis, which might be eventually useful to reduce body fat depots in situations of obesity and diabetes. PMID:19077206

  6. Advanced control evaluation for structures (ACES) programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearson, Jerome; Waites, Henry

    1988-01-01

    The ACES programs are a series of past, present, and future activities at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Ground facility for Large Space Structure Control Verification (GF/LSSCV). The main objectives of the ACES programs are to implement control techniques on a series of complex dynamical systems, to determine the control/structure interaction for the control techniques, and to provide a national facility in which dynamics and control verification can be effected. The focus is on these objectives and how they are implemented under various engineering and economic constraints. Future plans that will be effected in upcoming ACES programs are considered.

  7. Meta-analytical association between angiotensin-converting enzyme gene polymorphisms and sarcoidosis risk.

    PubMed

    Zhu, R; Bi, L Q; Kong, H; Tilley, S L; Wang, H; Xie, W P

    2015-01-01

    Previous reports identified an association between sarcoidosis and an insertion/deletion (I/D) polymorphism in angiotensin-converting enzyme. Our meta-analysis of articles published between March 1996 and June 2013 identified studies in the PubMed, EMBASE, and the China National Knowledge Infrastructure databases. We examined whether angiotensin-converting enzyme polymorphisms influence sarcoidosis susceptibility. The strength of the association between I/D polymorphisms and sarcoidosis risk was measured based on the odds ratio and 95% confidence interval. Analysis was based on recessive and dominant models. Ethnic subgroup analysis from 18 articles (1882 cases and 3066 controls) showed that DD homozygote carriers were at a slightly increased risk of sarcoidosis compared with II homozygotes and DI heterozygotes (P = 0.03). Comparison of DD plus DI vs II revealed no significant association with sarcoidosis in group and ethnic subgroup analysis. We found that the I/D polymorphism in the angiotensin-converting enzyme gene was not associated with a major risk of sarcoidosis. PMID:25966127

  8. Gene homogeneity for aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes in gram-positive cocci.

    PubMed Central

    Ounissi, H; Derlot, E; Carlier, C; Courvalin, P

    1990-01-01

    Aminoglycoside-resistant strains of Staphylococcus and Enterococcus, approximately 500 of each, were screened by dot blot hybridization for the presence of genes encoding aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes. The MICs of various aminoglycosides for the strains were determined, and the enzyme contents of the cells were inferred from the resistance phenotypes. The agreements (in percent) of the hybridization results with the deduced enzyme contents for Staphylococcus and Enterococcus species were, respectively, 80 and 87.6 for ANT(6) (aminoglycoside nucleotidyltransferase), 99.8 and 100 for both APH(3') (aminoglycoside phosphotransferase) and APH(2")-AAC(6') (aminoglycoside acetyltransferase), and 100 and 100 for ANT(4'). The weak correlation obtained with the probe for ANT(6) was due to the fact that gram-positive cocci can also be streptomycin resistant by synthesis of APH(3") or ANT(3")(9) and by ribosomal mutation. The remaining probes appeared to be specific: they hybridized with all the resistant clinical isolates but not with the susceptible strains. These results indicate that, except for streptomycin, nucleic acid hybridization is a valid approach for the detection and characterization of aminoglycoside resistance in gram-positive cocci. PMID:1963528

  9. Angiotensin converting enzymes from human urine of mild hypertensive untreated patients resemble the N-terminal fragment of human angiotensin I-converting enzyme.

    PubMed

    Casarini, D E; Plavinik, F L; Zanella, M T; Marson, O; Krieger, J E; Hirata, I Y; Stella, R C

    2001-01-01

    Angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) activity was analyzed in human urine collected from mild hypertensive untreated patients. DEAE-cellulose chromatography using linear gradient elution revealed two forms of angiotensin I-converting enzyme, eluted in the conductivity of 0.75 and 1.25 mS. The fractions of each conductivity were pooled and submitted to direct gel filtration in an AcA-34 column, and the apparent molecular weights of urinary ACEs were estimated as 90 kDa (for ACE eluted in 0.75 mS) and 65 kDa (for ACE eluted in 1.25 mS). Both enzymes have a K(i) of the order of 10(-7) M for the specific inhibitors studied, and are able to hydrolyze luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone and N-acetyl-Ser-Asp-Lys-Pro as described for N-domain ACE. By Western blot analysis, both peaks were recognized by ACE-specific antibody Y4, confirming the molecular weight already described. A plate precipitation assay using monoclonal antibodies to the N-domain of ACE showed that both forms of ACE binds with all monoclonal antibodies to the active N-domain ACE, suggesting that these forms of human urine ACEs resemble the N-fragment of ACE. The HP2 ACE (65 kDa) is similar to low molecular weight (LMW) ACE from normal subjects, and the HP2 ACE (90 kDa) is different from high molecular weight (190 kDa) and LMW (65 kDa) normal ACEs. The 90 kDa ACE could have an important role in development of hypertension. It will be fundamental to elucidate the molecular mechanism responsible for the genesis of this isoform.

  10. Xenobiotic Metabolizing Enzyme and Transporter Gene Expression in Primary Cultures of Human Hepatocytes Modulated by ToxCast Chemicals

    EPA Science Inventory

    ToxCast chemicals were assessed for induction or suppression of xenobiotic metabolizing enzyme and transporter gene expression using primary human hepatocytes. The mRNA levels of 14 target and 2 control genes were measured: ABCB1, ABCB11, ABCG2, SLCO1B1, CYP1A1, CYP1A2, CYP2B6, C...

  11. Modulation of Xenobiotic Metabolizing Enzyme and Transporter Gene Expression in Primary Cultures of Human Hepatocytes by ToxCast Chemicals

    EPA Science Inventory

    ToxCast chemicals were assessed for induction or suppression of xenobiotic metabolizing enzyme and transporter gene expression using primary human hepatocytes. The mRNA levels of 14 target and 2 control genes were measured: ABCB1, ABCB11, ABCG2, SLCO1B1, CYP1A1, CYP1A2, CYP2B6, C...

  12. Role of genetic mutations in folate-related enzyme genes on Male Infertility.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kang; Zhao, Ruizhe; Shen, Min; Ye, Jiaxin; Li, Xiao; Huang, Yuan; Hua, Lixin; Wang, Zengjun; Li, Jie

    2015-11-09

    Several studies showed that the genetic mutations in the folate-related enzyme genes might be associated with male infertility; however, the results were still inconsistent. We performed a meta-analysis with trial sequential analysis to investigate the associations between the MTHFR C677T, MTHFR A1298C, MTR A2756G, MTRR A66G mutations and the MTHFR haplotype with the risk of male infertility. Overall, a total of 37 studies were selected. Our meta-analysis showed that the MTHFR C677T mutation was a risk factor for male infertility in both azoospermia and oligoasthenoteratozoospermia patients, especially in Asian population. Men carrying the MTHFR TC haplotype were most liable to suffer infertility while those with CC haplotype had lowest risk. On the other hand, the MTHFR A1298C mutation was not related to male infertility. MTR A2756G and MTRR A66G were potential candidates in the pathogenesis of male infertility, but more case-control studies were required to avoid false-positive outcomes. All of these results were confirmed by the trial sequential analysis. Finally, our meta-analysis with trial sequential analysis proved that the genetic mutations in the folate-related enzyme genes played a significant role in male infertility.

  13. In vitro Paracoccidioides brasiliensis biofilm and gene expression of adhesins and hydrolytic enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Sardi, Janaina de Cássia Orlandi; Pitangui, Nayla de Souza; Voltan, Aline Raquel; Braz, Jaqueline Derissi; Machado, Marcelo Pelajo; Fusco Almeida, Ana Marisa; Mendes Giannini, Maria Jose Soares

    2015-01-01

    Paracoccidioides species are dimorphic fungi that initially infect the lungs but can also spread throughout the body. The spreading infection is most likely due to the formation of a biofilm that makes it difficult for the host to eliminate the infection. Biofilm formation is crucial for the development of infections and confines the pathogen to an extracellular matrix. Its presence is associated with antimicrobial resistance and avoidance of host defenses. This current study provides the first description of biofilm formation by Paracoccidioides brasiliensis (Pb18) and an analysis of gene expression, using real-time PCR, associated with 3 adhesins and 2 hydrolytic enzymes that could be associated with the virulence profile. Biofilm formation was analyzed using fluorescence microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). Metabolic activity was determined using the XTT reduction assay. P. brasiliensis was able to form mature biofilm in 144 h with a thickness of 100 μm. The presence of a biofilm was found to be associated with an increase in the expression of adhesins and enzymes. GP43, enolase, GAPDH and aspartyl proteinase genes were over-expressed, whereas phospholipase was down-regulated in biofilm. The characterization of biofilm formed by P. brasiliensis may contribute to a better understanding of the pathogenesis of paracoccidioidomycosis as well as the search for new therapeutic alternatives; while improving the effectiveness of treatment. PMID:26055497

  14. ROS inhibit the expression of testicular steroidogenic enzyme genes via the suppression of Nur77 transactivation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung-Yon; Gong, Eun-Yeung; Hong, Cheol Yi; Kim, Keon-Hee; Han, Jung-Soo; Ryu, Jae Chun; Chae, Ho Zoon; Yun, Chul-Ho; Lee, Keesook

    2009-12-01

    Steroidogenesis decreases with aging in the testis, whereas the levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) increase. In addition, ROS have been reported to inhibit testicular steroidogenesis. Here, we investigated the effects of ROS on the transcriptional activity of Nur77, one of the major transcription factors that regulate the expression of steroidogenic enzyme genes. ROS signaling inhibited Nur77 transactivation, which was diminished by either treatment with c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) inhibitor or the expression of a dominant negative form of JNK. This suggests the involvement of JNK signaling, which elevates the expression of c-Jun as well as its phosphorylation in Leydig cells. In transient transfection assays, c-Jun suppressed Nur77 transactivation in a dose-dependent manner. Further studies using c-Jun mutants revealed that the protein level of c-Jun, but not phosphorylation itself, was important for the suppression of Nur77 transactivation. Nur77 directly interacted with c-Jun in vivo, which blocked the DNA binding activity of Nur77. Together, these results suggest that ROS signaling-mediated c-Jun upregulation suppresses the expression of steroidogenic enzyme genes by inhibiting Nur77 transactivation, resulting in the reduction of testicular steroidogenesis. These findings may provide a mechanistic explanation for the age-related decline in testicular steroid hormone production. PMID:19751824

  15. Phylogenetic analysis of cellulolytic enzyme genes from representative lineages of termites and a related cockroach.

    PubMed

    Todaka, Nemuri; Inoue, Tetsushi; Saita, Kanako; Ohkuma, Moriya; Nalepa, Christine A; Lenz, Michael; Kudo, Toshiaki; Moriya, Shigeharu

    2010-01-01

    The relationship between xylophagous termites and the protists resident in their hindguts is a textbook example of symbiosis. The essential steps of lignocellulose degradation handled by these protists allow the host termites to thrive on a wood diet. There has never been a comprehensive analysis of lignocellulose degradation by protists, however, as it has proven difficult to establish these symbionts in pure culture. The trends in lignocellulose degradation during the evolution of the host lineage are also largely unknown. To clarify these points without any cultivation technique, we performed meta-expressed sequence tag (EST) analysis of cDNA libraries originating from symbiotic protistan communities in four termite species and a wood-feeding cockroach. Our results reveal the establishment of a degradation system with multiple enzymes at the ancestral stage of termite-protistan symbiosis, especially GHF5 and 7. According to our phylogenetic analyses, the enzymes comprising the protistan lignocellulose degradation system are coded not only by genes innate to the protists, but also genes acquired by the protists via lateral transfer from bacteria. This gives us a fresh perspective from which to understand the evolutionary dynamics of symbiosis.

  16. Cloning of the Arabidopsis and Rice Formaldehyde Dehydrogenase Genes: Implications for the Origin of Plant Adh Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Dolferus, R.; Osterman, J. C.; Peacock, W. J.; Dennis, E. S.

    1997-01-01

    This article reports the cloning of the genes encoding the Arabidopsis and rice class III ADH enzymes, members of the alcohol dehydrogenase or medium chain reductase/dehydrogenase superfamily of proteins with glutathione-dependent formaldehyde dehydrogenase activity (GSH-FDH). Both genes contain eight introns in exactly the same positions, and these positions are conserved in plant ethanol-active Adh genes (class P). These data provide further evidence that plant class P genes have evolved from class III genes by gene duplication and acquisition of new substrate specificities. The position of introns and similarities in the nucleic acid and amino acid sequences of the different classes of ADH enzymes in plants and humans suggest that plant and animal class III enzymes diverged before they duplicated to give rise to plant and animal ethanol-active ADH enzymes. Plant class P ADH enzymes have gained substrate specificities and evolved promoters with different expression properties, in keeping with their metabolic function as part of the alcohol fermentation pathway. PMID:9215914

  17. The genes and enzymes of the carotenoid metabolic pathway in Vitis vinifera L.

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    carotenoid metabolic pathway is well characterised, and the genes and enzymes have been studied in a number of plants. The study of the 42 carotenoid pathway genes of grapevine showed that they share a high degree of similarity with other eudicots. Expression and pigment profiling of developing berries provided insights into the most complete grapevine carotenoid pathway representation. This study represents an important reference study for further characterisation of carotenoid biosynthesis and catabolism in grapevine. PMID:22702718

  18. Concerted suppression of all starch branching enzyme genes in barley produces amylose-only starch granules

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Starch is stored in higher plants as granules composed of semi-crystalline amylopectin and amorphous amylose. Starch granules provide energy for the plant during dark periods and for germination of seeds and tubers. Dietary starch is also a highly glycemic carbohydrate being degraded to glucose and rapidly absorbed in the small intestine. But a portion of dietary starch, termed “resistant starch” (RS) escapes digestion and reaches the large intestine, where it is fermented by colonic bacteria producing short chain fatty acids (SCFA) which are linked to several health benefits. The RS is preferentially derived from amylose, which can be increased by suppressing amylopectin synthesis by silencing of starch branching enzymes (SBEs). However all the previous works attempting the production of high RS crops resulted in only partly increased amylose-content and/or significant yield loss. Results In this study we invented a new method for silencing of multiple genes. Using a chimeric RNAi hairpin we simultaneously suppressed all genes coding for starch branching enzymes (SBE I, SBE IIa, SBE IIb) in barley (Hordeum vulgare L.), resulting in production of amylose-only starch granules in the endosperm. This trait was segregating 3:1. Amylose-only starch granules were irregularly shaped and showed peculiar thermal properties and crystallinity. Transgenic lines retained high-yield possibly due to a pleiotropic upregualtion of other starch biosynthetic genes compensating the SBEs loss. For gelatinized starch, a very high content of RS (65 %) was observed, which is 2.2-fold higher than control (29%). The amylose-only grains germinated with same frequency as control grains. However, initial growth was delayed in young plants. Conclusions This is the first time that pure amylose has been generated with high yield in a living organism. This was achieved by a new method of simultaneous suppression of the entire complement of genes encoding starch branching enzymes. We

  19. FIRE_ACE_ER2_MAS

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2015-10-28

    ... First ISCCP Regional Experiment (FIRE) Arctic Cloud Experiment (ACE) NASA ER-2 Moderate Resolution Imaging ... SSFR Location:  Northern Alaska Arctic Ocean Spatial Coverage:  Fairbanks, Alaska and the surrounding ...

  20. Kidney scintigraphy after ACE inhibition in the diagnosis of renovascular hypertension

    SciTech Connect

    Ghione, S.; Fommei, E.; Palombo, C.; Giaconi, S.; Mantovanelli, A.; Ragazzini, A.; Palla, L.

    1986-01-01

    Suppression of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) by angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibition may induce renal failure in patients with bilateral renal artery stenosis. Recent scintigraphic studies with the glomerular tracer technetium-99m-diethylenetriaminepenta-acetate (99m-Tc DTPA) indicate that in patients with unilateral renal artery stenosis, glomerular filtration rate (GFR) may be markedly reduced in the affected kidney after inhibition of ACE. This finding reflects the important role of the RAS in maintaining GFR (by increasing postglomerular resistance) in states of low renal perfusion pressure. Preliminary observations suggest that this scintigraphic test might be useful in the detection of renovascular hypertension.

  1. ACE-FTS measurements of HCFC-22

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolonjari, F.; Walker, K. A.; Boone, C. D.; Strahan, S.; McLinden, C. A.; Manney, G. L.; Daffer, W. H.; Bernath, P. F.

    2012-04-01

    In the 1980s scientists discovered an annual springtime minimum in stratospheric ozone over the Antarctic. It was determined that the decline in ozone concentration was primarily caused by catalytic reactions of ozone and chlorine. The emissions of anthropogenic chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) were determined to be major sources of the chlorine. The Montreal Protocol on Substances that Deplete the Ozone Layer (with its subsequent amendments) restricts the emissions of ozone depleting substances. To fulfill the need for safe, stable replacements of CFCs, hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs) and hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) were developed. The use of HCFC-22 as a replacement has led to an increase in its atmospheric abundance. This is of concern due to its ozone depletion potential and its global warming potential. The Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (ACE) is a mission on-board the Canadian satellite SCISAT. The primary instrument on SCISAT is a high-resolution infrared Fourier Transform Spectrometer (ACE-FTS). With its wide spectral range, the ACE-FTS is capable of measuring an extensive range of gases including key CFC and HCFC species. The altitude distribution from the ACE-FTS profiles provides information that is complementary to the ground-based measurements that have been used to monitor these species. The global distribution of HCFC-22 has been computed from measurements by ACE-FTS. Both seasonal variations and an inter-hemispheric difference are observed. Additionally, a rapid increase in the global concentration of HCFC-22 has been observed since the start of the ACE mission in 2004. Comparisons to ground-based and air-borne measurements show good agreement with the ACE-FTS measurements. The global distributions of HCFC-22 have also been compared to a chemistry and transport model (CTM), the Global Modelling Initiative Combined Stratospheric-Tropospheric Model. There are distinct differences between the model results and ACE-FTS measurements. The causes and

  2. Antioxidant defense enzyme genes and asthma susceptibility: gender-specific effects and heterogeneity in gene-gene interactions between pathogenetic variants of the disease.

    PubMed

    Polonikov, Alexey V; Ivanov, Vladimir P; Bogomazov, Alexey D; Freidin, Maxim B; Illig, Thomas; Solodilova, Maria A

    2014-01-01

    Oxidative stress resulting from an increased amount of reactive oxygen species and an imbalance between oxidants and antioxidants plays an important role in the pathogenesis of asthma. The present study tested the hypothesis that genetic susceptibility to allergic and nonallergic variants of asthma is determined by complex interactions between genes encoding antioxidant defense enzymes (ADE). We carried out a comprehensive analysis of the associations between adult asthma and 46 single nucleotide polymorphisms of 34 ADE genes and 12 other candidate genes of asthma in Russian population using set association analysis and multifactor dimensionality reduction approaches. We found for the first time epistatic interactions between ADE genes underlying asthma susceptibility and the genetic heterogeneity between allergic and nonallergic variants of the disease. We identified GSR (glutathione reductase) and PON2 (paraoxonase 2) as novel candidate genes for asthma susceptibility. We observed gender-specific effects of ADE genes on the risk of asthma. The results of the study demonstrate complexity and diversity of interactions between genes involved in oxidative stress underlying susceptibility to allergic and nonallergic asthma. PMID:24895604

  3. Antioxidant Defense Enzyme Genes and Asthma Susceptibility: Gender-Specific Effects and Heterogeneity in Gene-Gene Interactions between Pathogenetic Variants of the Disease

    PubMed Central

    Polonikov, Alexey V.; Ivanov, Vladimir P.; Bogomazov, Alexey D.; Freidin, Maxim B.; Illig, Thomas; Solodilova, Maria A.

    2014-01-01

    Oxidative stress resulting from an increased amount of reactive oxygen species and an imbalance between oxidants and antioxidants plays an important role in the pathogenesis of asthma. The present study tested the hypothesis that genetic susceptibility to allergic and nonallergic variants of asthma is determined by complex interactions between genes encoding antioxidant defense enzymes (ADE). We carried out a comprehensive analysis of the associations between adult asthma and 46 single nucleotide polymorphisms of 34 ADE genes and 12 other candidate genes of asthma in Russian population using set association analysis and multifactor dimensionality reduction approaches. We found for the first time epistatic interactions between ADE genes underlying asthma susceptibility and the genetic heterogeneity between allergic and nonallergic variants of the disease. We identified GSR (glutathione reductase) and PON2 (paraoxonase 2) as novel candidate genes for asthma susceptibility. We observed gender-specific effects of ADE genes on the risk of asthma. The results of the study demonstrate complexity and diversity of interactions between genes involved in oxidative stress underlying susceptibility to allergic and nonallergic asthma. PMID:24895604

  4. [Preplacentation pregnancy loss in cases of angiotensin-converting enzyme insertion/deletion polymorphism].

    PubMed

    Ivanov, P; Konova, E; Komsa-Penkova, R; Kovacheva, K; Nikolov, N; Simeonova, M; Tanchev, St

    2014-01-01

    The balance between coagulation and fibrinolysis processes is critical for establishment and development of early pregnancy. Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) is related with plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 activity which is a key regulator in embryo implantation. Therefor polymorphisms in ACE gene and variation in ACE activity could be associated with an early pregnancy wastage risk. This study investigated carrier status for insertion/deletion (I/D) polymorphism in introne 16 of ACE gene in 71 women with two or more pregnancy loss in preplacentation period (between 10 and 14 weeks of gestation) and 75 women without pregnancy complications. DD genotype for I/D polymorphism was found respectively in 31% and 24% in patients and controls. Heterozygosity of D allele was found correspondingly in 47.9% and 54.7%. The dominant genetic model was used for allele prevalence comparison. D allele in DD genotype was not significantly prevalent in women with early pregnancy wastage compared with the control subjects, OR = 1.42, 95% CI (0.64-3.15). The study found a weak association between I/D polymorphism and preplacentation pregnancy loss. The additive effect over the pregnancy loss risk of I/D polymorphism could be supposed in a presence of other inherited or acquired factors connected with endometrial receptivity and implantation process. PMID:25510065

  5. The Aerosol/Cloud/Ecosystems Mission (ACE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schoeberl, Mark

    2008-01-01

    The goals and measurement strategy of the Aerosol/Cloud/Ecosystems Mission (ACE) are described. ACE will help to answer fundamental science questions associated with aerosols, clouds, air quality and global ocean ecosystems. Specifically, the goals of ACE are: 1) to quantify aerosol-cloud interactions and to assess the impact of aerosols on the hydrological cycle and 2) determine Ocean Carbon Cycling and other ocean biological processes. It is expected that ACE will: narrow the uncertainty in aerosol-cloud-precipitation interaction and quantify the role of aerosols in climate change; measure the ocean ecosystem changes and precisely quantify ocean carbon uptake; and, improve air quality forecasting by determining the height and type of aerosols being transported long distances. Overviews are provided of the aerosol-cloud community measurement strategy, aerosol and cloud observations over South Asia, and ocean biology research goals. Instruments used in the measurement strategy of the ACE mission are also highlighted, including: multi-beam lidar, multiwavelength high spectra resolution lidar, the ocean color instrument (ORCA)--a spectroradiometer for ocean remote sensing, dual frequency cloud radar and high- and low-frequency micron-wave radiometer. Future steps for the ACE mission include refining measurement requirements and carrying out additional instrument and payload studies.

  6. Enterococcus faecalis strains from food, environmental, and clinical origin produce ACE-inhibitory peptides and other bioactive peptides during growth in bovine skim milk.

    PubMed

    Gútiez, Loreto; Gómez-Sala, Beatriz; Recio, Isidra; del Campo, Rosa; Cintas, Luis M; Herranz, Carmen; Hernández, Pablo E

    2013-08-16

    Enterococcus faecalis isolates from food and environmental origin were evaluated for their angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE)-inhibitory activity (ACE-IA) after growth in bovine skim milk (BSM). Most (90% active) but not all (10% inactive) E. faecalis strains produced BSM-derived hydrolysates with high ACE-IA. Known ACE-inhibitory peptides (ACE-IP) and an antioxidant peptide were identified in the E. faecalis hydrolysates by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (RP-HPLC-MS/MS). Antimicrobial activity against Pediococcus damnosus CECT4797 and Listeria ivanovii CECT913 was also observed in the E. faecalis hydrolysates. The incidence of virulence factors in the E. faecalis strains with ACE-IA and producers of ACE-IP was variable but less virulence factors were observed in the food and environmental strains than in the clinical reference strains. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and multilocus sequence typing (MLST) based analysis demonstrated that food and environmental E. faecalis strains were genetically different from those of clinical origin. When evaluated, most E. faecalis strains of clinical origin also originated BSM-derived hydrolysates with high ACE-IA due to the production of ACE-IP. Accordingly, the results of this work suggest that most E. faecalis strains of food, environmental and clinical origin produce BSM-derived bioactive peptides with human health connotations and potential biotechnological applications.

  7. Intrarenal distributions and changes of Angiotensin-converting enzyme and Angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 in feline and canine chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Mitani, Sawane; Yabuki, Akira; Sawa, Mariko; Chang, Hye-Sook; Yamato, Osamu

    2014-01-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) is a key enzyme in the renin-angiotensin system (RAS). ACE2 is a newly identified member of the RAS. The present immunohistochemical study focused on changes in intrarenal ACE and ACE2 immunoreactivity in feline and canine chronic kidney disease (CKD). ACE immunoreactivity was predominantly observed in the brush border of the proximal tubules in dogs and cats. ACE immunoreactivity was lower in CKD kidneys than in normal kidneys, and quantitative analysis demonstrated negative correlations between ACE and renal tissue damage in dogs. ACE2 immunoreactivity was also detected in the proximal tubules; it increased or decreased with CKD in dogs, depending on the renal region assessed. The changes in ACE and ACE2 in CKD were associated with the plasma creatinine concentration in dogs. Findings from dogs with glomerulonephritis were similar to those from dogs with non-glomerulonephritis. The present study suggests that changes in the intrarenal expression of ACE and ACE2 contribute to the pathological mechanisms of canine CKD, but not to the mechanisms of feline CKD. PMID:24004970

  8. Gene amplification-associated overexpression of the RNA editing enzyme ADAR1 enhances human lung tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Anadón, C; Guil, S; Simó-Riudalbas, L; Moutinho, C; Setien, F; Martínez-Cardús, A; Moran, S; Villanueva, A; Calaf, M; Vidal, A; Lazo, P A; Zondervan, I; Savola, S; Kohno, T; Yokota, J; de Pouplana, L R; Esteller, M

    2016-08-18

    The introduction of new therapies against particular genetic mutations in non-small-cell lung cancer is a promising avenue for improving patient survival, but the target population is small. There is a need to discover new potential actionable genetic lesions, to which end, non-conventional cancer pathways, such as RNA editing, are worth exploring. Herein we show that the adenosine-to-inosine editing enzyme ADAR1 undergoes gene amplification in non-small cancer cell lines and primary tumors in association with higher levels of the corresponding mRNA and protein. From a growth and invasion standpoint, the depletion of ADAR1 expression in amplified cells reduces their tumorigenic potential in cell culture and mouse models, whereas its overexpression has the opposite effects. From a functional perspective, ADAR1 overexpression enhances the editing frequencies of target transcripts such as NEIL1 and miR-381. In the clinical setting, patients with early-stage lung cancer, but harboring ADAR1 gene amplification, have poor outcomes. Overall, our results indicate a role for ADAR1 as a lung cancer oncogene undergoing gene amplification-associated activation that affects downstream RNA editing patterns and patient prognosis. PMID:26640150

  9. Association of insulin degrading enzyme gene polymorphisms with Alzheimer's disease: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Huawei; Wang, Lin; Shi, Tianlu; Shang, Yuping; Jiang, Ling

    2015-05-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a chronic degenerative disorder. It is caused by both genetic and environmental factors. The association of Insulin Degrading Enzyme (IDE) genotypes rs4646953, rs2251101 and rs1544210 with AD has been detected, but the findings were conflicted, however, Apolipoprotein-E (APOE)-ε4 allele has been observed as a genetic risk factor for AD. To investigate the issue, a meta-analysis was performed. We searched PubMed, Springer Link, AlzGene and CNKI for relevant literatures published by June 2013. Pooled odds ratio (OR) with 95% confidence interval (CI) was calculated to explore the significant association. A total of 11 studies comprising 5771 cases and 5474 controls were considered in final meta-analysis. We found that weak connections existed between rs4646953 (TT vs. CC: z = 2.24, p = 0.025, OR = 1.536) and AD, but no significant associations have been found between other IDE gene single nucleotide polymorphisms of rs4646953, rs2251101 and rs1544210 with AD. We certified that APOE-ε4 allele was still be a suspected factor to AD. There was no evidence for obvious publication bias in overall meta-analysis. Furthermore, larger-scale randomized controlled trials are necessary to validate the association between IDE gene polymorphisms with AD.

  10. Gene amplification-associated overexpression of the RNA editing enzyme ADAR1 enhances human lung tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Anadón, C; Guil, S; Simó-Riudalbas, L; Moutinho, C; Setien, F; Martínez-Cardús, A; Moran, S; Villanueva, A; Calaf, M; Vidal, A; Lazo, P A; Zondervan, I; Savola, S; Kohno, T; Yokota, J; de Pouplana, L R; Esteller, M

    2016-01-01

    The introduction of new therapies against particular genetic mutations in non-small-cell lung cancer is a promising avenue for improving patient survival, but the target population is small. There is a need to discover new potential actionable genetic lesions, to which end, non-conventional cancer pathways, such as RNA editing, are worth exploring. Herein we show that the adenosine-to-inosine editing enzyme ADAR1 undergoes gene amplification in non-small cancer cell lines and primary tumors in association with higher levels of the corresponding mRNA and protein. From a growth and invasion standpoint, the depletion of ADAR1 expression in amplified cells reduces their tumorigenic potential in cell culture and mouse models, whereas its overexpression has the opposite effects. From a functional perspective, ADAR1 overexpression enhances the editing frequencies of target transcripts such as NEIL1 and miR-381. In the clinical setting, patients with early-stage lung cancer, but harboring ADAR1 gene amplification, have poor outcomes. Overall, our results indicate a role for ADAR1 as a lung cancer oncogene undergoing gene amplification-associated activation that affects downstream RNA editing patterns and patient prognosis. PMID:26640150

  11. The Use of Angiotensin-I Converting Enzyme I/D Genetic Polymorphism as a Biomarker of Athletic Performance in Humans

    PubMed Central

    De Mello Costa, Maria Fernanda; Slocombe, Ron

    2012-01-01

    Angiotensin II is a key regulator of blood pressure and cardiovascular function in mammals. The conversion of angiotensin into its active form is carried out by Angiotensin I-Converting Enzyme (ACE). The measurement of ACE concentration in plasma or serum, its enzymatic activity, and the correlation between an insertion/deletion (I/D) genetic polymorphism of the ACE gene have been investigated as possible indicators of superior athletic performance in humans. In this context, other indicators of superior adaptation to exercise resulting in better athletic performance (such as ventricular hypertrophy, VO2 max, and competition results) were mostly used to study the association between ACE I/D polymorphism and improved performance. Despite the fact that the existing literature presents little consensus, there is sufficient scientific evidence to warrant further investigation on the usage of ACE activity and the I/D ACE gene polymorphism as biomarkers of superior athletic performance in humans of specific ethnicities or in athletes involved in certain sports. In this sense, a biomarker would be a substance or genetic component that could be measured to provide a degree of certainty, or an indication, of the presence of a certain trait or characteristic that would be beneficial to the athlete’s performance. Difficulties in interpreting and comparing the results of scientific research on the topic arise from dissimilar protocols and variation in study design. This review aims to investigate the current literature on the use of ACE I/D polymorphism as a biomarker of performance in humans through the comparison of scientific publications. PMID:25586030

  12. Cloning and polymorphisms of the 3' untranslated region of malic enzyme gene in Chinese red cattle.

    PubMed

    Zhou, G L; Zhang, G L; Cao, Y; Jin, H G

    2011-09-01

    The objective of this study was to identify alternative transcripts and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the 3'-untranslated region (3' UTR) of bovine malic enzyme (ME1) gene and to evaluate the extent to which polymorphisms were associated with meat quality and carcass traits in Chinese red cattle. Two transcripts, long transcript and short transcript that differ in the length of the 3' UTR were cloned. A single nucleotide polymorphism was detected in 3' UTR and a restriction site for endonuclease ME1-Dra I was also found. The result revealed that the ME1-Dra I genotypes had a significant effect on cooking loss, pH measured 24h post-mortem (pH(24h)) and eye muscle area (P < 0.05). In conclusion, the SNPs may be used as DNA markers to select for meat quality and carcass traits in Chinese red cattle.

  13. Tailored therapy of ACE inhibitors in stable coronary artery disease: pharmacogenetic profiling of treatment benefit.

    PubMed

    Brugts, Jasper J; Boersma, Eric; Simoons, Maarten L

    2010-08-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors are among the most commonly used drugs in stable coronary artery disease as these agents have been proven to be effective for reducing the risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. As with other drugs, individual variation in treatment benefit is likely. Such heterogeneity could be used to target ACE-inhibitor therapy to those patients most likely to benefit from treatment. However, prior attempts to target ACE-inhibitor therapy to those patients who are most likely to benefit of such prophylactic treatment in secondary prevention using clinical characteristics or the level of baseline risk appeared not to be useful. A new approach of 'tailored therapy' could be to integrate more patient-specific characteristics, such as the genetic information of patients. Pharmacogenetic research of ACE inhibitors in coronary artery disease patients is at a formative stage, and studies are limited. The Perindopril Genetic association (PERGENE) study is a large pharmacogenetic substudy of the randomized placebo-controlled European trial On Reduction of Cardiac Events with Perindopril in Patients with Stable Coronary Artery disease (EUROPA) trial, aimed to assess the feasibility of pharmacogenetic profiling of ACE-inhibitor therapy by perindopril. This article summarizes the recent findings of the PERGENE study and pharmacogenetic research of the treatment benefit of perindopril in stable coronary artery disease. PMID:20712529

  14. The genes and enzymes involved in the biosynthesis of thiamin and thiamin diphosphate in yeasts.

    PubMed

    Kowalska, Ewa; Kozik, Andrzej

    2008-01-01

    Thiamin (vitamin B1) is an essential molecule for all living organisms. Its major biologically active derivative is thiamin diphosphate, which serves as a cofactor for several enzymes involved in carbohydrate and amino acid metabolism. Important new functions for thiamin and its phosphate esters have recently been suggested, e.g. in gene expression regulation by influencing mRNA structure, in DNA repair after UV illumination, and in the protection of some organelles against reactive oxygen species. Unlike higher animals, which rely on nutritional thiamin intake, yeasts can synthesize thiamin de novo. The biosynthesis pathways include the separate synthesis of two precursors, 4-amino-5-hydroxymethyl-2-methylpyrimidine diphosphate and 5-(2-hydroxyethyl)-4-methylthiazole phosphate, which are then condensed into thiamin monophosphate. Additionally, yeasts evolved salvage mechanisms to utilize thiamin and its dephosphorylated late precursors, 4-amino-5-hydroxymethyl-2-methylpyrimidine and 5-(2-hydroxyethyl)-4-methylthiazole, from the environment. The current state of knowledge on the discrete steps of thiamin biosynthesis in yeasts is far from satisfactory; many intermediates are postulated only by analogy to the much better understood biosynthesis process in bacteria. On the other hand, the genetic mechanisms regulating thiamin biosynthesis in yeasts are currently under extensive exploration. Only recently, the structures of some of the yeast enzymes involved in thiamin biosynthesis, such as thiamin diphosphokinase and thiazole synthase, were determined at the atomic resolution, and mechanistic proposals for the catalysis of particular biosynthetic steps started to emerge.

  15. Restriction enzyme-free construction of random gene mutagenesis libraries in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Pai, Jen C; Entzminger, Kevin C; Maynard, Jennifer A

    2012-02-15

    Directed evolution relies on both random and site-directed mutagenesis of individual genes and regulatory elements to create variants with altered activity profiles for engineering applications. Central to these experiments is the construction of large libraries of related variants. However, a number of technical hurdles continue to limit routine construction of random mutagenesis libraries in Escherichia coli, in particular, inefficiencies during digestion and ligation steps. Here, we report a restriction enzyme-free approach to library generation using megaprimers termed MegAnneal. Target DNA is first exponentially amplified using error-prone polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and then linearly amplified with a single 3' primer to generate long, randomly mutated, single-stranded megaprimers. These are annealed to single-stranded dUTP-containing template plasmid and extended with T7 polymerase to create a complementary strand, and the resulting termini are ligated with T4 DNA ligase. Using this approach, we are able to reliably generate libraries of approximately 10⁷ colony-forming units (cfu)/μg DNA/transformation in a single day. We have created MegAnneal libraries based on three different single-chain antibodies and identified variants with enhanced expression and ligand-binding affinity. The key advantages of this approach include facile amplification, restriction enzyme-free library generation, and a significantly reduced risk of mutations outside the targeted region and wild-type contamination as compared with current methods.

  16. Expression pattern of glycoside hydrolase genes in Lutzomyia longipalpis reveals key enzymes involved in larval digestion

    PubMed Central

    Moraes, Caroline da Silva; Diaz-Albiter, Hector M.; Faria, Maiara do Valle; Sant'Anna, Maurício R. V.; Dillon, Rod J.; Genta, Fernando A.

    2014-01-01

    The sand fly Lutzomyia longipalpis is the most important vector of American Visceral Leishmaniasis. Adults are phytophagous (males and females) or blood feeders (females only), and larvae feed on solid detritus. Digestion in sand fly larvae has scarcely been studied, but some glycosidase activities putatively involved in microorganism digestion were already described. Nevertheless, the molecular nature of these enzymes, as the corresponding genes and transcripts, were not explored yet. Catabolism of microbial carbohydrates in insects generally involves β-1,3-glucanases, chitinases, and digestive lysozymes. In this work, the transcripts of digestive β-1,3-glucanase and chitinases were identified in the L. longipalpis larvae throughout analysis of sequences and expression patterns of glycoside hydrolases families 16, 18, and 22. The activity of one i-type lysozyme was also registered. Interestingly, this lysozyme seems to play a role in immunity, rather than digestion. This is the first attempt to identify the molecular nature of sand fly larval digestive enzymes. PMID:25140153

  17. Antihypertensive treatment in renal transplant patients--is there a role for ACE inhibitors?

    PubMed

    Hausberg, M; Kosch, M; Hohage, H; Suwelack, B; Barenbrock, M; Kisters, K; Rahn, K H

    2001-01-01

    During the past two decades great progress was achieved with regards to short-term kidney graft survival. However, long-term graft survival did not improve similarly. Many factors contribute to chronic graft nephropathy eventually resulting in late graft loss, among these arterial hypertension is of major importance. In patients with chronic renal disease of diabetic and non-diabetic origin, angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors have been convincingly shown to slow the progression of renal failure. The achieved nephroprotection correlates with the reduction of proteinuria by ACE inhibitor treatment. Also in renal transplant patients, ACE inhibitors have been shown unequivocally to reduce urinary protein excretion. The prevention of hyperfiltration, particular in the context of a reduced number of functional nephrons in patients with chronic graft nephropathy, could be important to prolong graft survival after renal transplantation. Moreover, ACE inhibitors may exert beneficial effects on immunologic processes contributing to chronic graft nephropathy. Many studies published in the last decade show convincingly that ACE inhibitors are safe and effective for the treatment of hypertension in renal allograft recipients. However, no data exist so far showing that ACE inhibitors are superior to other antihypertensive drugs in renal transplant patients and that they prolong graft survival. Studies investigating this issue are warranted. Apart from effects on the graft, ACE inhibitors may improve alterations of the cardiovascular system generally observed in renal transplant patients, such as structural alterations of large arteries, left ventricular hypertrophy, disturbed mechanical vessel wall properties and endothelial dysfunction. Therefore, angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors could reduce cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in kidney transplant patients.

  18. Steroidogenic enzyme gene expression in the brain of the parthenogenetic whiptail lizard, Cnemidophorus uniparens

    PubMed Central

    Dias, Brian George; Chin, Sonia Grace; Crews, David

    2008-01-01

    The steroidogenic enzyme CYP17 is responsible for catalyzing the production of androgenic precursors, while CYP19 converts testosterone to estradiol. De novo neurosteroidogenesis in specific brain regions influences steroid hormone dependent behaviors. In the all-female lizard species Cnemidophorus uniparens, individuals alternately display both male-like mounting and female-like receptivity. Mounting is associated with high circulating concentrations of progesterone following ovulation (PostOv), while receptivity is correlated with estrogen preceding it (PreOv). At a neuroanatomical level, the preoptic area (POA) and ventromedial nucleus of the hypothalamus (VMN) are the foci of the male-typical mounting and female-typical receptivity, respectively. In this study, we indirectly test the hypothesis that the whiptail lizard brain is capable of de novo neurosteroidogenesis by cloning fragments of the genes encoding two steroidogenic enzymes, CYP17 and CYP19, and examining their expression patterns in the C. uniparens brain. Our data indicate that these genes are expressed in the C. uniparens brain, and more importantly in the POA and VMN. Using radioactive in situ hybridization, we measured higher CYP17 mRNA levels in the POA of PostOv lizards compared to receptive PreOv animals; CYP19 mRNA levels in the VMN did not change across the ovarian cycle. To our knowledge, these are the first data suggesting that the reptilian brain is capable of de novo steroidogenesis. This study also supports the idea that non-gonadal sources of steroid hormones locally produced in behaviorally relevant brain loci are central to the mediation of behavioral output. PMID:19084508

  19. FISH comets show that the salvage enzyme TK1 contributes to gene-specific DNA repair

    PubMed Central

    McAllister, Katherine A.; Yasseen, Akeel A.; McKerr, George; Downes, C. S.; McKelvey-Martin, Valerie J.

    2014-01-01

    Thymidine kinase 1 (TK1) is a salvage enzyme that phosphorylates thymidine, imported from surrounding fluids, to create dTMP, which is further phosphorylated to the DNA precursor dTTP. TK1 deficiency has for a long time been known to cause increased cellular sensitivity to DNA damage. We have examined preferential strand break repair of DNA domains in TK1+ and TK1- clones of the Raji cell line, by the Comet-FISH technique, in bulk DNA and in the actively transcribed tumor suppressor (TP53) and human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) gene regions, over 1 h after 5Gy γ-irradiation. Results showed that repair of the TP53 and hTERT gene regions was more efficient in TK1+ compared to TK1- cells, a trend also reflected to a lesser degree in genomic DNA repair between the cell-lines. The targeted gene-specific repair in TK+ cells occurred rapidly, mainly over the first 15 min repair-period. Therefore, TK1 is needed for preferential repair of actively transcribed regions, through a previously unsuspected mechanism. In principle, TK1 could exert its protective effects through supply of a supplementary dTTP pool for accurate repair of damaged genes; but Raji TK1+ cells in thymidine free media still show preferential repair of transcribed regions. TK1 therefore does not exert its protective effects through dTTP pools, but through another unidentified mechanism, which affects sensitivity to and mutagenicity by DNA damaging agents. PMID:25152750

  20. FISH comets show that the salvage enzyme TK1 contributes to gene-specific DNA repair.

    PubMed

    McAllister, Katherine A; Yasseen, Akeel A; McKerr, George; Downes, C S; McKelvey-Martin, Valerie J

    2014-01-01

    Thymidine kinase 1 (TK1) is a salvage enzyme that phosphorylates thymidine, imported from surrounding fluids, to create dTMP, which is further phosphorylated to the DNA precursor dTTP. TK1 deficiency has for a long time been known to cause increased cellular sensitivity to DNA damage. We have examined preferential strand break repair of DNA domains in TK1(+) and TK1(-) clones of the Raji cell line, by the Comet-FISH technique, in bulk DNA and in the actively transcribed tumor suppressor (TP53) and human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) gene regions, over 1 h after 5Gy γ-irradiation. Results showed that repair of the TP53 and hTERT gene regions was more efficient in TK1(+) compared to TK1(-) cells, a trend also reflected to a lesser degree in genomic DNA repair between the cell-lines. The targeted gene-specific repair in TK(+) cells occurred rapidly, mainly over the first 15 min repair-period. Therefore, TK1 is needed for preferential repair of actively transcribed regions, through a previously unsuspected mechanism. In principle, TK1 could exert its protective effects through supply of a supplementary dTTP pool for accurate repair of damaged genes; but Raji TK1(+) cells in thymidine free media still show preferential repair of transcribed regions. TK1 therefore does not exert its protective effects through dTTP pools, but through another unidentified mechanism, which affects sensitivity to and mutagenicity by DNA damaging agents. PMID:25152750

  1. CAT5, a new gene necessary for derepression of gluconeogenic enzymes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Proft, M; Kötter, P; Hedges, D; Bojunga, N; Entian, K D

    1995-01-01

    PCK1 encoding phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase is transcriptionally regulated by two upstream activating elements. By screening for mutants that failed to derepress a UAS2PCK1-CYC1-lacZ reporter gene we isolated the new recessive derepression mutation cat5. The CAT5 gene encodes a protein of 272 amino acids showing a 42% identity to the ZC395.2 gene product of Caenorhabditis elegans whose function is unknown. Deletion of CAT5 caused a complete loss of glucose derepression affecting gluconeogenic key enzymes. Respiration, but not mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase activity, was also affected. CAT5 expression is 5- to 6-fold repressed by glucose, and CAT5 transcriptional activation was dependent on CAT1 (SNF1), CAT8 and CAT5 itself. The CAT5 gene is necessary for UAS1PCK1 and UAS2PCK1 protein binding since a carbon source-specific interaction was no longer detectable in cat5 mutants. Glucose derepression of gluconeogenesis depends on the active Cat1 (Snf1) protein kinase and the Cat8 zinc cluster activator. Mig1p-independent overexpression of CAT8 did not stimulate activation of gluconeogenic promoters in cat1 and in cat5 mutants. Since Cat8p multicopy expression suppresses the ethanol growth deficiency in cat1 (snf1) mutants, these results indicate that activation of Cat8p by the Cat1p (Snf1p) kinase and the Cat5p protein might be necessary for release from glucose repression. Images PMID:8557031

  2. Recruitment of genes and enzymes conferring resistance to the nonnatural toxin bromoacetate

    PubMed Central

    Desai, Kevin K.; Miller, Brian G.

    2010-01-01

    Microbial niches contain toxic chemicals capable of forcing organisms into periods of intense natural selection to afford survival. Elucidating the mechanisms by which microbes evade environmental threats has direct relevance for understanding and combating the rise of antibiotic resistance. In this study we used a toxic small-molecule, bromoacetate, to model the selective pressures imposed by antibiotics and anthropogenic toxins. We report the results of genetic selection experiments that identify nine genes from Escherichia coli whose overexpression affords survival in the presence of a normally lethal concentration of bromoacetate. Eight of these genes encode putative transporters or transmembrane proteins, while one encodes the essential peptidoglycan biosynthetic enzyme, UDP-N-acetylglucosamine enolpyruvoyl transferase (MurA). Biochemical studies demonstrate that the primary physiological target of bromoacetate is MurA, which becomes irreversibly inactivated via alkylation of a critical active-site cysteine. We also screened a comprehensive library of E. coli single-gene deletion mutants and identified 63 strains displaying increased susceptibility to bromoacetate. One hypersensitive bacterium lacks yliJ, a gene encoding a predicted glutathione transferase. Herein, YliJ is shown to catalyze the glutathione-dependent dehalogenation of bromoacetate with a kcat/Km value of 5.4 × 103 M-1 s-1. YliJ displays exceptional substrate specificity and produces a rate enhancement exceeding 5 orders of magnitude, remarkable characteristics for reactivity with a nonnatural molecule. This study illustrates the wealth of intrinsic survival mechanisms that can be exploited by bacteria when they are challenged with toxins. PMID:20921376

  3. PathExpress update: the enzyme neighbourhood method of associating gene-expression data with metabolic pathways.

    PubMed

    Goffard, Nicolas; Frickey, Tancred; Weiller, Georg

    2009-07-01

    The post-genomic era presents us with the challenge of linking the vast amount of raw data obtained with transcriptomic and proteomic techniques to relevant biological pathways. We present an update of PathExpress, a web-based tool to interpret gene-expression data and explore the metabolic network without being restricted to predefined pathways. We define the Enzyme Neighbourhood (EN) as a sub-network of linked enzymes with a limited path length to identify the most relevant sub-networks affected in gene-expression experiments. PathExpress is freely available at: http://bioinfoserver.rsbs.anu.edu.au/utils/PathExpress/.

  4. Multiple horizontally acquired genes from fungal and prokaryotic donors encode cellulolytic enzymes in the bdelloid rotifer Adineta ricciae.

    PubMed

    Szydlowski, L; Boschetti, C; Crisp, A; Barbosa, E G G; Tunnacliffe, A

    2015-07-25

    The bdelloid rotifer, Adineta ricciae, an anhydrobiotic microinvertebrate, exhibits a high rate of horizontal gene transfer (HGT), with as much as 10% of its transcriptome being of foreign origin. Approximately 80% of these foreign transcripts are involved in metabolic processes, and therefore bdelloids represent a useful model for assessing the contribution of HGT to biochemical diversity. To validate this concept, we focused on cellulose digestion, an unusual activity in animals, which is represented by at least 16 genes encoding cellulolytic enzymes in A. ricciae. These genes have been acquired from a variety of different donor organisms among the bacteria and fungi, demonstrating that bdelloids use diverse genetic resources to construct a novel biochemical pathway. A variable complement of the cellulolytic gene set was found in five other bdelloid species, indicating a dynamic process of gene acquisition, duplication and loss during bdelloid evolution. For example, in A. ricciae, gene duplications have led to the formation of three copies of a gene encoding a GH45 family glycoside hydrolase, at least one of which encodes a functional enzyme; all three of these gene copies are present in a close relative, Adineta vaga, but only one copy was found in each of four Rotaria species. Furthermore, analysis of expression levels of the cellulolytic genes suggests that a bacterial-origin cellobiase is upregulated upon desiccation. In summary, bdelloid rotifers have apparently developed cellulolytic functions by the acquisition and domestication of multiple foreign genes.

  5. Identification and expression analysis of castor bean (Ricinus communis) genes encoding enzymes from the triacylglycerol biosynthesis pathway.

    PubMed

    Cagliari, Alexandro; Margis-Pinheiro, Márcia; Loss, Guilherme; Mastroberti, Alexandra Antunes; de Araujo Mariath, Jorge Ernesto; Margis, Rogério

    2010-11-01

    Castor bean (Ricinus communis) oil contains ricinoleic acid-rich triacylglycerols (TAGs). As a result of its physical and chemical properties, castor oil and its derivatives are used for numerous bio-based products. In this study, we survey the Castor Bean Genome Database to report the identification of TAG biosynthesis genes. A set of 26 genes encoding six distinct classes of enzymes involved in TAGs biosynthesis were identified. In silico characterization and sequence analysis allowed the identification of plastidic isoforms of glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase and lysophosphatidate acyltransferase enzyme families, involved in the prokaryotic lipid biosynthesis pathway, that form a cluster apart from the cytoplasmic isoforms, involved in the eukaryotic pathway. In addition, two distinct membrane bound diacylglycerol acyltransferase enzymes were identified. Quantitative expression pattern analyses demonstrated variations in gene expressions during castor seed development. A tendency of maximum expression level at the middle of seed development was observed. Our results represent snapshots of global transcriptional activities of genes encompassing six enzyme families involved in castor bean TAG biosynthesis that are present during seed development. These genes represent potential targets for biotechnological approaches to produce nutritionally and industrially desirable oils.

  6. Polymorphisms in Genes of Tricarboxylic Acid Cycle Key Enzymes Are Associated with Early Recurrence of Hepatocellular Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Wan, Shaogui; Wu, Yousheng; Zhou, Xingchun; Chen, Yibing; An, Jiaze; Yu, Xiaohe; Zhang, Huiqing; Yang, Hushan; Xing, Jinliang

    2015-01-01

    Alterations of activity and expression in tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle key enzymes have been indicated in several malignancies, including hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). They play an important role in the progression of cancer. However, the impact of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes encoding these key enzymes on the recurrence of HCC has not been investigated. In this study, we genotyped 17 SNPs in genes encoding TCA cycle key enzymes and analyzed their association with recurrence-free survival (RFS) in a cohort of 492 Chinese HCC patients by Cox proportional hazard model and survival tree analysis. We identified 7 SNPs in SDHC, SDHD, FH, and IDH2 genes to be significantly associated with the RFS of HCC patients. Moreover, all these SNPs were associated with the early recurrence (within 2 years after surgery) risk of diseases. Cumulative effect analysis showed that these SNPs exhibited a dose-dependent effect on the overall and early recurrence. Further stratified analysis suggested that number of risk genotypes modified the protective effect on HCC recurrence conferred by transcatheter arterial chemoembolization treatment. Finally, the survival tree analysis revealed that SNP rs10789859 in SDHD gene was the primary factor contributing to HCC recurrence in our population. To the best of our knowledge, we for the first time observed the association between SNPs in genes encoding TCA cycle key enzymes and HCC recurrence risk. Further observational and functional studies are needed to validate our findings and generalize its clinical usage. PMID:25894340

  7. Genetic ontogeny of pancreatic enzymes in Labrus bergylta larvae and the effect of feed type on enzyme activities and gene expression.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Truls Wergeland; Folkvord, Arild; Grøtan, Espen; Sæle, Øystein

    2013-03-01

    A newly cultivated wrasse species, Labrus bergylta, have shown great potential for use in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) farms in the battle against sea lice (Lepeoptheirus salmonis) infections. Hatchery reared L. bergylta were studied from 2 to 55 DPH to examine the molecular basis of digestive ontogeny related to the pancreas. An isolated feeding trial was performed on 27-34 DPH larvae to compare the effect of diet on enzyme activity and the possible exogenous contribution by live feed. The following genes coding for key pancreatic enzymes were analyzed by qPCR: trypsin, Cyp7 A1, BAL, sPLA(2) 1B, amylase and pancreatic chitinase. Enzyme activity was measured on trypsin, neutral lipase, sPLA(2), amylase and chitinase in fed and unfed larvae. We did not observe any effects of the formulated diet v.s. rotifers on enzyme activities of neutral lipase, chitinase and sPLA(2). However, a probable feed-dependency was observed at a transcriptional level, where rotifers seem to stimulate upregulation. The regulation of BAL was the only exception, where an upregulation was observed after weaning both in the ontogeny series and the experimental part. Our data on pancreatic chitinase and amylase mRNA levels suggest the importance of carbohydrates in the diet of early larval and juvenile L. bergylta.

  8. Genes encoding hub and bottleneck enzymes of the Arabidopsis metabolic network preferentially retain homeologs through whole genome duplication

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Whole genome duplication (WGD) occurs widely in angiosperm evolution. It raises the intriguing question of how interacting networks of genes cope with this dramatic evolutionary event. Results In study of the Arabidopsis metabolic network, we assigned each enzyme (node) with topological centralities (in-degree, out-degree and between-ness) to measure quantitatively their centralities in the network. The Arabidopsis metabolic network is highly modular and separated into 11 interconnected modules, which correspond well to the functional metabolic pathways. The enzymes with higher in-out degree and between-ness (defined as hub and bottleneck enzymes, respectively) tend to be more conserved and preferentially retain homeologs after WGD. Moreover, the simultaneous retention of homeologs encoding enzymes which catalyze consecutive steps in a pathway is highly favored and easily achieved, and enzyme-enzyme interactions contribute to the retention of one-third of WGD enzymes. Conclusions Our analyses indicate that the hub and bottleneck enzymes of metabolic network obtain great benefits from WGD, and this event grants clear evolutionary advantages in adaptation to different environments. PMID:20478072

  9. Endothelin-converting enzyme is a plausible target gene for hypoxia-inducible factor.

    PubMed

    Khamaisi, Mogher; Toukan, Hala; Axelrod, Jonathan H; Rosenberger, Christian; Skarzinski, Galia; Shina, Ahuva; Meidan, Rina; Koesters, Robert; Rosen, Seymour; Walkinshaw, Gail; Mimura, Imari; Nangaku, Masaomi; Heyman, Samuel N

    2015-04-01

    Renal endothelin-converting enzyme (ECE)-1 is induced in experimental diabetes and following radiocontrast administration, conditions characterized by renal hypoxia, hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) stabilization, and enhanced endothelin synthesis. Here we tested whether ECE-1 might be a HIF-target gene in vitro and in vivo. ECE-1 transcription and expression increased in cultured vascular endothelial and proximal tubular cell lines, subject to hypoxia, to mimosine or cobalt chloride. These interventions are known to stabilize HIF signaling by inhibition of HIF-prolyl hydroxylases. In rats, HIF-prolyl-hydroxylase inhibition by mimosine or FG-4497 increased HIF-1α immunostaining in renal tubules, principally in distal nephron segments. This was associated with markedly enhanced ECE-1 protein expression, predominantly in the renal medulla. A progressive and dramatic increase in ECE-1 immunostaining over time, in parallel with enhanced HIF expression, was also noted in conditional von Hippel-Lindau knockout mice. Since HIF and STAT3 are cross-stimulated, we triggered HIF expression by STAT3 activation in mice, transfected by or injected with a chimeric IL-6/IL-6-receptor protein, and found a similar pattern of enhanced ECE-1 expression. Chromatin immunoprecipitation sequence (ChIP-seq) and PCR analysis in hypoxic endothelial cells identified HIF binding at the ECE-1 promoter and intron regions. Thus, our findings suggest that ECE-1 may be a novel HIF-target gene.

  10. [Xenopus laevis peroxiredoxins: Gene expression during development and characterization of the enzymes].

    PubMed

    Sharapov, M G; Novoselov, V I; Ravin, V K

    2016-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are produced via catabolic and anabolic processes during normal embryonic development, and ROS content in the cell is maintained at a certain level. Peroxiredoxins are a family of selenium-independent peroxidases and play a key role in maintaining redox homeostasis of the cell. In addition to regulating the ROS level, peroxiredoxins are involved in intracellular and intercellular signaling, cell differentiation, and tissue development. The time course of peroxiredoxin gene (prx1-6) expression was studied in Xenopus laevis during early ontogeny (Nieuwkoop and Faber stages 10-63). The highest expression level was observed for prx1 at these developmental stages. The prx1, prx3, and prx4 expression level changed most dramatically in response to oxidative stress artificially induced in X. laevis embryos. In X. laevis adults, prx1-6 were all intensely expressed in all organs examined, the prx1 expression level being the highest. The X. laevis prx1-6 genes were cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli, and physico-chemical characteristics were compared for the recombinant enzymes. The highest peroxidase activity and thermal stability were observed for Prx1 and Prx2. It was assumed that Prx1 plays a leading role in X. laevis early development. PMID:27239855

  11. Drug Metabolizing Enzyme and Transporter Gene Variation, Nicotine Metabolism, Prospective Abstinence, and Cigarette Consumption.

    PubMed

    Bergen, Andrew W; Michel, Martha; Nishita, Denise; Krasnow, Ruth; Javitz, Harold S; Conneely, Karen N; Lessov-Schlaggar, Christina N; Hops, Hyman; Zhu, Andy Z X; Baurley, James W; McClure, Jennifer B; Hall, Sharon M; Baker, Timothy B; Conti, David V; Benowitz, Neal L; Lerman, Caryn; Tyndale, Rachel F; Swan, Gary E

    2015-01-01

    The Nicotine Metabolite Ratio (NMR, ratio of trans-3'-hydroxycotinine and cotinine), has previously been associated with CYP2A6 activity, response to smoking cessation treatments, and cigarette consumption. We searched for drug metabolizing enzyme and transporter (DMET) gene variation associated with the NMR and prospective abstinence in 2,946 participants of laboratory studies of nicotine metabolism and of clinical trials of smoking cessation therapies. Stage I was a meta-analysis of the association of 507 common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) at 173 DMET genes with the NMR in 449 participants of two laboratory studies. Nominally significant associations were identified in ten genes after adjustment for intragenic SNPs; CYP2A6 and two CYP2A6 SNPs attained experiment-wide significance adjusted for correlated SNPs (CYP2A6 PACT=4.1E-7, rs4803381 PACT=4.5E-5, rs1137115, PACT=1.2E-3). Stage II was mega-regression analyses of 10 DMET SNPs with pretreatment NMR and prospective abstinence in up to 2,497 participants from eight trials. rs4803381 and rs1137115 SNPs were associated with pretreatment NMR at genome-wide significance. In post-hoc analyses of CYP2A6 SNPs, we observed nominally significant association with: abstinence in one pharmacotherapy arm; cigarette consumption among all trial participants; and lung cancer in four case:control studies. CYP2A6 minor alleles were associated with reduced NMR, CPD, and lung cancer risk. We confirmed the major role that CYP2A6 plays in nicotine metabolism, and made novel findings with respect to genome-wide significance and associations with CPD, abstinence and lung cancer risk. Additional multivariate analyses with patient variables and genetic modeling will improve prediction of nicotine metabolism, disease risk and smoking cessation treatment prognosis. PMID:26132489

  12. Drug Metabolizing Enzyme and Transporter Gene Variation, Nicotine Metabolism, Prospective Abstinence, and Cigarette Consumption.

    PubMed

    Bergen, Andrew W; Michel, Martha; Nishita, Denise; Krasnow, Ruth; Javitz, Harold S; Conneely, Karen N; Lessov-Schlaggar, Christina N; Hops, Hyman; Zhu, Andy Z X; Baurley, James W; McClure, Jennifer B; Hall, Sharon M; Baker, Timothy B; Conti, David V; Benowitz, Neal L; Lerman, Caryn; Tyndale, Rachel F; Swan, Gary E

    2015-01-01

    The Nicotine Metabolite Ratio (NMR, ratio of trans-3'-hydroxycotinine and cotinine), has previously been associated with CYP2A6 activity, response to smoking cessation treatments, and cigarette consumption. We searched for drug metabolizing enzyme and transporter (DMET) gene variation associated with the NMR and prospective abstinence in 2,946 participants of laboratory studies of nicotine metabolism and of clinical trials of smoking cessation therapies. Stage I was a meta-analysis of the association of 507 common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) at 173 DMET genes with the NMR in 449 participants of two laboratory studies. Nominally significant associations were identified in ten genes after adjustment for intragenic SNPs; CYP2A6 and two CYP2A6 SNPs attained experiment-wide significance adjusted for correlated SNPs (CYP2A6 PACT=4.1E-7, rs4803381 PACT=4.5E-5, rs1137115, PACT=1.2E-3). Stage II was mega-regression analyses of 10 DMET SNPs with pretreatment NMR and prospective abstinence in up to 2,497 participants from eight trials. rs4803381 and rs1137115 SNPs were associated with pretreatment NMR at genome-wide significance. In post-hoc analyses of CYP2A6 SNPs, we observed nominally significant association with: abstinence in one pharmacotherapy arm; cigarette consumption among all trial participants; and lung cancer in four case:control studies. CYP2A6 minor alleles were associated with reduced NMR, CPD, and lung cancer risk. We confirmed the major role that CYP2A6 plays in nicotine metabolism, and made novel findings with respect to genome-wide significance and associations with CPD, abstinence and lung cancer risk. Additional multivariate analyses with patient variables and genetic modeling will improve prediction of nicotine metabolism, disease risk and smoking cessation treatment prognosis.

  13. Drug Metabolizing Enzyme and Transporter Gene Variation, Nicotine Metabolism, Prospective Abstinence, and Cigarette Consumption

    PubMed Central

    Bergen, Andrew W.; Michel, Martha; Nishita, Denise; Krasnow, Ruth; Javitz, Harold S.; Conneely, Karen N.; Lessov-Schlaggar, Christina N.; Hops, Hyman; Zhu, Andy Z. X.; Baurley, James W.; McClure, Jennifer B.; Hall, Sharon M.; Baker, Timothy B.; Conti, David V.; Benowitz, Neal L.; Lerman, Caryn; Tyndale, Rachel F.; Swan, Gary E.

    2015-01-01

    The Nicotine Metabolite Ratio (NMR, ratio of trans-3’-hydroxycotinine and cotinine), has previously been associated with CYP2A6 activity, response to smoking cessation treatments, and cigarette consumption. We searched for drug metabolizing enzyme and transporter (DMET) gene variation associated with the NMR and prospective abstinence in 2,946 participants of laboratory studies of nicotine metabolism and of clinical trials of smoking cessation therapies. Stage I was a meta-analysis of the association of 507 common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) at 173 DMET genes with the NMR in 449 participants of two laboratory studies. Nominally significant associations were identified in ten genes after adjustment for intragenic SNPs; CYP2A6 and two CYP2A6 SNPs attained experiment-wide significance adjusted for correlated SNPs (CYP2A6 PACT=4.1E-7, rs4803381 PACT=4.5E-5, rs1137115, PACT=1.2E-3). Stage II was mega-regression analyses of 10 DMET SNPs with pretreatment NMR and prospective abstinence in up to 2,497 participants from eight trials. rs4803381 and rs1137115 SNPs were associated with pretreatment NMR at genome-wide significance. In post-hoc analyses of CYP2A6 SNPs, we observed nominally significant association with: abstinence in one pharmacotherapy arm; cigarette consumption among all trial participants; and lung cancer in four case:control studies. CYP2A6 minor alleles were associated with reduced NMR, CPD, and lung cancer risk. We confirmed the major role that CYP2A6 plays in nicotine metabolism, and made novel findings with respect to genome-wide significance and associations with CPD, abstinence and lung cancer risk. Additional multivariate analyses with patient variables and genetic modeling will improve prediction of nicotine metabolism, disease risk and smoking cessation treatment prognosis. PMID:26132489

  14. Fumarate and Succinate Regulate Expression of Hypoxia-inducible Genes via TET Enzymes.

    PubMed

    Laukka, Tuomas; Mariani, Christopher J; Ihantola, Tuukka; Cao, John Z; Hokkanen, Juho; Kaelin, William G; Godley, Lucy A; Koivunen, Peppi

    2016-02-19

    The TET enzymes are members of the 2-oxoglutarate-dependent dioxygenase family and comprise three isoenzymes in humans: TETs 1-3. These TETs convert 5-methylcytosine to 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5-hmC) in DNA, and high 5-hmC levels are associated with active transcription. The importance of the balance in these modified cytosines is emphasized by the fact that TET2 is mutated in several human cancers, including myeloid malignancies such as acute myeloid leukemia (AML). We characterize here the kinetic and inhibitory properties of Tets and show that the Km value of Tets 1 and 2 for O2 is 30 μm, indicating that they retain high activity even under hypoxic conditions. The AML-associated mutations in the Fe(2+) and 2-oxoglutarate-binding residues increased the Km values for these factors 30-80-fold and reduced the Vmax values. Fumarate and succinate, which can accumulate to millimolar levels in succinate dehydrogenase and fumarate hydratase-mutant tumors, were identified as potent Tet inhibitors in vitro, with IC50 values ∼400-500 μm. Fumarate and succinate also down-regulated global 5-hmC levels in neuroblastoma cells and the expression levels of some hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) target genes via TET inhibition, despite simultaneous HIFα stabilization. The combination of fumarate or succinate treatment with TET1 or TET3 silencing caused differential effects on the expression of specific HIF target genes. Altogether these data show that hypoxia-inducible genes are regulated in a multilayered manner that includes epigenetic regulation via TETs and 5-hmC levels in addition to HIF stabilization. PMID:26703470

  15. SY 12-2 ACE INHIBITORS AND ARBS: SIMILARITIES AND DIFFERENCES IN CV RISK REDUCTION.

    PubMed

    Danser, Alexander

    2016-09-01

    Blockade of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) can be accomplished at the level of the angiotensin-generating enzymes renin and angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE; using renin inhibitors or ACE inhibitors), the type 1 angiotensin II (AT1) receptor or mineralocorticoid receptor (MR; using angiotensin receptor blockers [ARBs] or MR blockers) and/or renin release (using beta-blockers). Several of these drugs are often combined-for example in heart failure-but such approaches may ultimately lead to RAAS annihilation with adverse consequences such as hypotension, renal dysfunction and hyperkalaemia. The biochemical consequences of each type of blockade are different. For instance, ACE inhibitors will lower angiotensin II, thus no longer allowing stimulation of both AT1 and type 2 angiotensin II (AT2) receptors, while ARBs raise angiotensin II, allowing selective stimulation of the unoccupied AT2 receptor. This might be of particular importance in women, in whom the protective AT2 receptor pathway is believed to be upregulated. Multiple clinical trials have compared the various types of RAAS blockers and/or their combination. This talk will summarize the current evidence with regard to similarities and differences between ACE inhibitors and ARBs, also considering their side-effect profile, dose and combination with other RAAS blockers. PMID:27643121

  16. Effect of deletion polymorphism of angiotensin converting enzyme gene on progression of diabetic nephropathy during inhibition of angiotensin converting enzyme: observational follow up study.

    PubMed Central

    Parving, H. H.; Jacobsen, P.; Tarnow, L.; Rossing, P.; Lecerf, L.; Poirier, O.; Cambien, F.

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the concept that an insertion/deletion polymorphism of the angiotensin converting enzyme gene predicts the therapeutic efficacy of inhibition of angiotensin converting enzyme on progression of diabetic nephropathy. DESIGN: Observational follow up study of patients with insulin dependent diabetes and nephropathy who had been treated with captopril for a median of 7 years (range 3-9 years). SETTING: Outpatient diabetic clinic in a tertiary referral centre. PATIENTS: 35 patients with insulin dependent diabetes and nephropathy were investigated during captopril treatment (median 75 mg/day (range 12.5 to 150 mg/day)) that was in many cases combined with a loop diuretic, 11 patients were homozygous for the deletion allele and 24 were heterozygous or homozygous for the insertion allele of the angiotensin converting enzyme gene. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Albuminuria, arterial blood pressure, and glomerular filtration rate according to insertion/deletion polymorphism. RESULTS: The two groups had comparable glomerular filtration rate, albuminuria, blood pressure, and haemoglobin A1c concentration at baseline. Captopril induced nearly the same reduction in mean blood pressure in the two groups-to 103 (SD 5) mm Hg in the group with the deletion and 102 (8) mm Hg in the group with the insertion-and in geometric mean albumin excretion-573 (antilog SE 1.3) micrograms/min and 470 (1.2) micrograms/min, respectively. The rate of decline in glomerular filtration rate (linear regression of all glomerular filtration rate measurements during antihypertensive treatment) was significantly steeper in the group homozygous for the double deletion allele than in the other group (mean 5.7 (3.7) ml/min/year and 2.6 (2.8) ml/min/year, respectively; P = 0.01). Multiple linear regression analysis showed that haemoglobin A1c concentration, albuminuria, and the double deletion genotype independently influenced the sustained rate of decline in glomerular filtration rate (R1

  17. Genome-Wide Identification, Phylogenetic and Expression Analyses of the Ubiquitin-Conjugating Enzyme Gene Family in Maize

    PubMed Central

    Jue, Dengwei; Sang, Xuelian; Lu, Shengqiao; Dong, Chen; Zhao, Qiufang; Chen, Hongliang; Jia, Liqiang

    2015-01-01

    Background Ubiquitination is a post-translation modification where ubiquitin is attached to a substrate. Ubiquitin-conjugating enzymes (E2s) play a major role in the ubiquitin transfer pathway, as well as a variety of functions in plant biological processes. To date, no genome-wide characterization of this gene family has been conducted in maize (Zea mays). Methodology/Principal Findings In the present study, a total of 75 putative ZmUBC genes have been identified and located in the maize genome. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that ZmUBC proteins could be divided into 15 subfamilies, which include 13 ubiquitin-conjugating enzymes (ZmE2s) and two independent ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme variant (UEV) groups. The predicted ZmUBC genes were distributed across 10 chromosomes at different densities. In addition, analysis of exon-intron junctions and sequence motifs in each candidate gene has revealed high levels of conservation within and between phylogenetic groups. Tissue expression analysis indicated that most ZmUBC genes were expressed in at least one of the tissues, indicating that these are involved in various physiological and developmental processes in maize. Moreover, expression profile analyses of ZmUBC genes under different stress treatments (4°C, 20% PEG6000, and 200 mM NaCl) and various expression patterns indicated that these may play crucial roles in the response of plants to stress. Conclusions Genome-wide identification, chromosome organization, gene structure, evolutionary and expression analyses of ZmUBC genes have facilitated in the characterization of this gene family, as well as determined its potential involvement in growth, development, and stress responses. This study provides valuable information for better understanding the classification and putative functions of the UBC-encoding genes of maize. PMID:26606743

  18. Cloning of ubiquitin-activating enzyme and ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme genes from Gracilaria lemaneiformis and their activity under heat shock.

    PubMed

    Li, Guang-Qi; Zang, Xiao-Nan; Zhang, Xue-Cheng; Lu, Ning; Ding, Yan; Gong, Le; Chen, Wen-Chao

    2014-03-15

    To study the response of Gracilaria lemaneiformis to heat stress, two key enzymes - ubiquitin-activating enzyme (E1) and ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme (E2) - of the Ubiquitin/26S proteasome pathway (UPP) were studied in three strains of G. lemaneiformis-wild type, heat-tolerant cultivar 981 and heat-tolerant cultivar 07-2. The full length DNA sequence of E1 contained only one exon. The open reading frame (ORF) sequence was 981 nucleotides encoding 326 amino acids, which contained conserved ATP binding sites (LYDRQIRLWGLE, ELAKNVLLAGV, LKEMN, VVCAI) and the ubiquitin-activating domains (VVCAI…LMTEAC, VFLDLGDEYSYQ, AIVGGMWGRE). The gene sequence of E2 contained four exons and three introns. The sum of the four exons gave an open reading frame sequence of 444 nucleotides encoding 147 amino acids, which contained a conserved ubiquitin-activating domain (GSICLDIL), ubiquitin-conjugating domains (RIYHPNIN, KVLLSICSLL, DDPLV) and ubiquitin-ligase (E3) recognition sites (KRI, YPF, WSP). Real-time-PCR analysis of transcription levels of E1 and E2 under heat shock conditions (28°C and 32°C) showed that in wild type, transcriptions of E1 and E2 were up-regulated at 28°C, while at 32°C, transcriptions of the two enzymes were below the normal level. In cultivar 981 and cultivar 07-2 of G. lemaneiformis, the transcription levels of the two enzymes were up-regulated at 32°C, and transcription level of cultivar 07-2 was even higher than that of cultivar 981. These results suggest that the UPP plays an important role in high temperature resistance of G. lemaneiformis and the bioactivity of UPP is directly related to the heat-resistant ability of G. lemaneiformis.

  19. The angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor, captopril, prevents the hyperactivity and impulsivity of neurokinin-1 receptor gene 'knockout' mice: sex differences and implications for the treatment of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder.

    PubMed

    Porter, Ashley J; Pillidge, Katharine; Grabowska, Ewelina M; Stanford, S Clare

    2015-04-01

    Mice lacking functional neurokinin-1 receptors (NK1R-/-) display behavioural abnormalities resembling attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD): locomotor hyperactivity, impulsivity and inattentiveness. The preferred ligand for NK1R, substance P, is metabolised by angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE), which forms part of the brain renin angiotensin system (BRAS). In view of evidence that the BRAS modulates locomotor activity and cognitive performance, we tested the effects of drugs that target the BRAS on these behaviours in NK1R-/- and wildtype mice. We first tested the effects of the ACE inhibitor, captopril, on locomotor activity. Because there are well-established sex differences in both ADHD and ACE activity, we compared the effects of captopril in both male and female mice. Locomotor hyperactivity was evident in male NK1R-/- mice, only, and this was abolished by treatment with captopril. By contrast, male wildtypes and females of both genotypes were unaffected by ACE inhibition. We then investigated the effects of angiotensin AT1 (losartan) and AT2 (PD 123319) receptor antagonists on the locomotor activity of male NK1R-/- and wildtype mice. Both antagonists increased the locomotor activity of NK1R-/- mice, but neither affected the wildtypes. Finally, we tested the effects of captopril on the performance of male NK1R-/- and wildtype mice in the 5-choice serial reaction-time task (5-CSRTT) and found that ACE inhibition prevented the impulsivity of NK1R-/- mice. These results indicate that certain behaviours, disrupted in ADHD, are influenced by an interaction between the BRAS and NK1R, and suggest that ACE inhibitors could provide a novel treatment for this disorder.

  20. Effect of curcumin on hepatic antioxidant enzymes activities and gene expressions in rats intoxicated with aflatoxin B1.

    PubMed

    El-Bahr, S M

    2015-01-01

    Twenty-eight rats were examined in a 5-week experiment to investigate the effect of curcumin on gene expression and activities of hepatic antioxidant enzymes in rats intoxicated with aflatoxin B1 (AFB1 ). The rats were divided into four groups. Rats in 1-4 groups served as control, oral curcumin treated (15 mg/kg body weight), single i.p. dose of AFB1 (3 mg/kg body weight) and combination of single i.p. dose of AFB1 with oral curcumin treated, respectively. AFB1 Liver damage and oxidative stress were evident in untreated AFB1 -intoxicated rats as indicated by a significant elevation in hepatic transaminases, elevation in lipid peroxide biomarkers (thiobarbituric acid reactive substances; TBARS), reduction of reduced glutathione (GSH) concentration, reduction in the activities of antioxidant enzymes namely catalase (CAT), total superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPX) and glutathione-S-transferase (GST) and down-regulation of gene expression of these antioxidant enzymes compared to control. Liver sections of rats intoxicated with AFB1 showed a disrupted lobular architecture, scattered necrotic cells and biliary proliferation. Administration of curcumin with AFB1 resulted in amelioration of AFB1 -induced effects compared to untreated AFB1 -intoxicated rats via an up-regulation of antioxidant enzyme gene expression, activation of the expressed genes and increase in the availability of GSH.

  1. Several genes encoding enzymes with the same activity are necessary for aerobic fungal degradation of cellulose in nature.

    PubMed

    Busk, Peter K; Lange, Mette; Pilgaard, Bo; Lange, Lene

    2014-01-01

    The cellulose-degrading fungal enzymes are glycoside hydrolases of the GH families and lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases. The entanglement of glycoside hydrolase families and functions makes it difficult to predict the enzymatic activity of glycoside hydrolases based on their sequence. In the present study we further developed the method Peptide Pattern Recognition to an automatic approach not only to find all genes encoding glycoside hydrolases and lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases in fungal genomes but also to predict the function of the genes. The functional annotation is an important feature as it provides a direct route to predict function from primary sequence. Furthermore, we used Peptide Pattern Recognition to compare the cellulose-degrading enzyme activities encoded by 39 fungal genomes. The results indicated that cellobiohydrolases and AA9 lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases are hallmarks of cellulose-degrading fungi except brown rot fungi. Furthermore, a high number of AA9, endocellulase and β-glucosidase genes were identified, not in what are known to be the strongest, specialized lignocellulose degraders but in saprophytic fungi that can use a wide variety of substrates whereas only few of these genes were found in fungi that have a limited number of natural, lignocellulotic substrates. This correlation suggests that enzymes with different properties are necessary for degradation of cellulose in different complex substrates. Interestingly, clustering of the fungi based on their predicted enzymes indicated that Ascomycota and Basidiomycota use the same enzymatic activities to degrade plant cell walls. PMID:25461894

  2. Several Genes Encoding Enzymes with the Same Activity Are Necessary for Aerobic Fungal Degradation of Cellulose in Nature

    PubMed Central

    Busk, Peter K.; Lange, Mette; Pilgaard, Bo; Lange, Lene

    2014-01-01

    The cellulose-degrading fungal enzymes are glycoside hydrolases of the GH families and lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases. The entanglement of glycoside hydrolase families and functions makes it difficult to predict the enzymatic activity of glycoside hydrolases based on their sequence. In the present study we further developed the method Peptide Pattern Recognition to an automatic approach not only to find all genes encoding glycoside hydrolases and lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases in fungal genomes but also to predict the function of the genes. The functional annotation is an important feature as it provides a direct route to predict function from primary sequence. Furthermore, we used Peptide Pattern Recognition to compare the cellulose-degrading enzyme activities encoded by 39 fungal genomes. The results indicated that cellobiohydrolases and AA9 lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases are hallmarks of cellulose-degrading fungi except brown rot fungi. Furthermore, a high number of AA9, endocellulase and β-glucosidase genes were identified, not in what are known to be the strongest, specialized lignocellulose degraders but in saprophytic fungi that can use a wide variety of substrates whereas only few of these genes were found in fungi that have a limited number of natural, lignocellulotic substrates. This correlation suggests that enzymes with different properties are necessary for degradation of cellulose in different complex substrates. Interestingly, clustering of the fungi based on their predicted enzymes indicated that Ascomycota and Basidiomycota use the same enzymatic activities to degrade plant cell walls. PMID:25461894

  3. Isolation of DNA encoding sucrase genes from Streptococcus salivarius and partial characterization of the enzymes expressed in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Houck, C M; Pear, J R; Elliott, R; Perchorowicz, J T

    1987-01-01

    Restriction enzyme fragments containing two sucrase genes have been isolated from a cosmid library of Streptococcus salivarius DNA. The genes were expressed in Escherichia coli cells, and the properties of both enzymes were studied in partially purified protein extracts from E. coli. One gene encoding an invertase-type sucrase was subcloned on a 2.4-kilobase-pair fragment. The sucrase enzyme had a Km for sucrose of 48 mM and a pH optimum of 6.5. The S. salivarius sucrase clone showed no detectable hybridization to a yeast invertase clone. Two overlapping subclones which had 1 kilobase pair of DNA in common were used to localize a fructosyltransferase gene. The fructosyltransferase had a Km of 93 mM and a pH optimum of 7.0. The product of the fructosyltransferase was a levan. A fructosyltransferase clone from Bacillus subtilis did not hybridize to S. salivarius DNA. The properties of the enzymes were compared with those of previously characterized sucrases. Images PMID:3112128

  4. Enzyme activity and gene expression profiles of Xanthobacter autotrophicus GJ10 during aerobic biodegradation of 1,2-dichloroethane.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ajit; Pillay, Balakrishna; Olaniran, Ademola O

    2015-08-01

    Xanthobacter autotrophicus GJ10 has been widely studied because of its ability to degrade halogenated compounds, especially 1,2-dichloroethane (1,2-DCA), which is achieved through chromosomal as well as plasmid pAUX1 encoded 1,2-DCA degrading genes. This work described the gene expression and enzyme activity profiles as well as the intermediates formed during the 1,2-DCA degradation by this organism. A correlation between gene expression, enzyme activity and metabolic intermediates, after the induction of GJ10 grown culture with 1,2-DCA, was established at different time intervals. Haloalkane dehalogenase (dhlA) and haloacid dehalogenase (dhlB) were constitutively expressed while the expression of alcohol dehydrogenase (max) and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ald) was found to be inducible. The DhlA and DhlB activities were relatively higher compared to that of the inducible enzymes, Max and Ald. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to correlate gene expression profiles with enzyme activity and metabolite formation during 1,2-DCA degradation process in GJ10. Findings from this study may assist in fully understanding the mechanism of 1,2-DCA degradation by GJ10. It could also assist in the design and implementation of appropriate bioaugmentation strategies for complete removal of 1,2-DCA from contaminated environment.

  5. End-to-end gene fusions and their impact on the production of multifunctional biomass degrading enzymes.

    PubMed

    Rizk, Mazen; Antranikian, Garabed; Elleuche, Skander

    2012-11-01

    The reduction of fossil fuels, coupled with its increase in price, has made the search for alternative energy resources more plausible. One of the topics gaining fast interest is the utilization of lignocellulose, the main component of plants. Its primary constituents, cellulose and hemicellulose, can be degraded by a series of enzymes present in microorganisms, into simple sugars, later used for bioethanol production. Thermophilic bacteria have proven to be an interesting source of enzymes required for hydrolysis since they can withstand high and denaturing temperatures, which are usually required for processes involving biomass degradation. However, the cost associated with the whole enzymatic process is staggering. A solution for cost effective and highly active production is through the construction of multifunctional enzyme complexes harboring the function of more than one enzyme needed for the hydrolysis process. There are various strategies for the degradation of complex biomass ranging from the regulation of the enzymes involved, to cellulosomes, and proteins harboring more than one enzymatic activity. In this review, the construction of multifunctional biomass degrading enzymes through end-to-end gene fusions, and its impact on production and activity by choosing the enzymes and linkers is assessed.

  6. End-to-end gene fusions and their impact on the production of multifunctional biomass degrading enzymes

    SciTech Connect

    Rizk, Mazen; Antranikian, Garabed; Elleuche, Skander

    2012-11-09

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Multifunctional enzymes offer an interesting approach for biomass degradation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Size and conformation of separate constructs play a role in the effectiveness of chimeras. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A connecting linker allows for maximal flexibility and increased thermostability. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Genes with functional similarities are the best choice for fusion candidates. -- Abstract: The reduction of fossil fuels, coupled with its increase in price, has made the search for alternative energy resources more plausible. One of the topics gaining fast interest is the utilization of lignocellulose, the main component of plants. Its primary constituents, cellulose and hemicellulose, can be degraded by a series of enzymes present in microorganisms, into simple sugars, later used for bioethanol production. Thermophilic bacteria have proven to be an interesting source of enzymes required for hydrolysis since they can withstand high and denaturing temperatures, which are usually required for processes involving biomass degradation. However, the cost associated with the whole enzymatic process is staggering. A solution for cost effective and highly active production is through the construction of multifunctional enzyme complexes harboring the function of more than one enzyme needed for the hydrolysis process. There are various strategies for the degradation of complex biomass ranging from the regulation of the enzymes involved, to cellulosomes, and proteins harboring more than one enzymatic activity. In this review, the construction of multifunctional biomass degrading enzymes through end-to-end gene fusions, and its impact on production and activity by choosing the enzymes and linkers is assessed.

  7. ACE Reduces Metabolic Abnormalities in a High-Fat Diet Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seong-Jong; Han, Jong-Min; Lee, Jin-Seok; Son, Chang-Gue; Im, Hwi-Jin; Jo, Hyun-Kyung; Yoo, Ho-Ryong; Kim, Yoon-Sik; Seol, In-Chan

    2015-01-01

    The medicinal plants Artemisia iwayomogi (A. iwayomogi) and Curcuma longa (C. longa) radix have been used to treat metabolic abnormalities in traditional Korean medicine and traditional Chinese medicine (TKM and TCM). In this study we evaluated the effect of the water extract of a mixture of A. iwayomogi and C. longa (ACE) on high-fat diet-induced metabolic syndrome in a mouse model. Four groups of C57BL/6N male mice (except for the naive group) were fed a high-fat diet freely for 10 weeks. Among these, three groups (except the control group) were administered a high-fat diet supplemented with ACE (100 or 200 mg/kg) or curcumin (50 mg/kg). Body weight, accumulation of adipose tissues in abdomen and size of adipocytes, serum lipid profiles, hepatic steatosis, and oxidative stress markers were analyzed. ACE significantly reduced the body and peritoneal adipose tissue weights, serum lipid profiles (total cholesterol and triglycerides), glucose levels, hepatic lipid accumulation, and oxidative stress markers. ACE normalized lipid synthesis-associated gene expressions (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma, PPARγ; fatty acid synthase, FAS; sterol regulatory element-binding transcription factor-1c, SREBP-1c; and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha, PPARα). The results from this study suggest that ACE has the pharmaceutical potential reducing the metabolic abnormalities in an animal model. PMID:26508977

  8. Clones of FeSOD, MDHAR, DHAR Genes from White Clover and Gene Expression Analysis of ROS-Scavenging Enzymes during Abiotic Stress and Hormone Treatments.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan; Li, Zhou; Peng, Yan; Wang, Xiaojuan; Peng, Dandan; Li, Yaping; He, Xiaoshuang; Zhang, Xinquan; Ma, Xiao; Huang, Linkai; Yan, Yanhong

    2015-01-01

    Increased transcriptional levels of genes encoding antioxidant enzymes play important protective roles in coping with excessive accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in plants exposed to various abiotic stresses. To fully elucidate different evolutions and functions of ROS-scavenging enzymatic genes, we isolated iron superoxide dismutase (FeSOD), dehydroascorbate reductase (DHAR) and monodehydroascorbate reductase (MDHAR) from white clover for the first time and subsequently tested dynamic expression profiles of these genes together with previously identified other antioxidant enzyme genes including copper zinc superoxide dismutase (Cu/ZnSOD), manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD), glutathione reductase (GR), peroxidase (POD), catalase (CAT), and ascorbate peroxidase (APX) in response to cold, drought, salinity, cadmium stress and exogenous abscisic acid (ABA) or spermidine (Spd) treatment. The cloned fragments of FeSOD, DHAR and MDHAR genes were 630, 471 and 669 bp nucleotide sequences encoding 210, 157 and 223 amino acids, respectively. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that both amino acid and nucleotide sequences of these three genes are highly conservative. In addition, the analysis of genes expression showed the transcription of GR, POD, MDHAR, DHAR and Cu/ZnSOD were rapidly activated with relatively high abundance during cold stress. Differently, CAT, APX, FeSOD, Cu/ZnSOD and MnSOD exhibited more abundant transcripts compared to others under drought stress. Under salt stress, CAT was induced preferentially (3-12 h) compared to GR which was induced later (12-72 h). Cadmium stress mainly up-regulated Cu/ZnSOD, DHAR and MDHAR. Interestingly, most of genes expression induced by ABA or Spd happened prior to various abiotic stresses. The particular expression patterns and different response time of these genes indicated that white clover differentially activates genes encoding antioxidant enzymes to mitigate the damage of ROS during various environmental

  9. The Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (ACE): Mission Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernath, P.

    2003-04-01

    The ACE mission goals are: (1) to measure and to understand the chemical and dynamical processes that control the distribution of ozone in the upper troposphere and stratosphere, with a particular emphasis on the Arctic region; (2) to explore the relationship between atmospheric chemistry and climate change; (3) to study the effects of biomass burning in the free troposphere; (4) to measure aerosol number density, size distribution and composition in order to reduce the uncertainties in their effects on the global energy balance. ACE will make a comprehensive set of simultaneous measurements of trace gases, thin clouds, aerosols, and temperature by solar occultation from a satellite in low earth orbit. A high inclination (74 degrees) low earth orbit (650 km) will give ACE coverage of tropical, mid-latitudes and polar regions. The solar occultation advantages are high sensitivity and self-calibration. A high-resolution (0.02 cm-1) infrared Fourier Transform Spectrometer (FTS) operating from 2 to 13 microns (750-4100 cm-1) will measure the vertical distribution of trace gases, and the meteorological variables of temperature and pressure. The ACE concept is derived from the now-retired ATMOS FTS instrument, which flew on the Space Shuttle in 1985, 1992, 1993, 1994. Climate-chemistry coupling may lead to the formation of an Arctic ozone hole. ACE will provide high quality data to confront these model predictions and will monitor polar chemistry as chlorine levels decline. The ACE-FTS can measure water vapor and HDO in the tropical tropopause region to study dehydration and strat-trop exchange. The molecular signatures of massive forest fires will evident in the ACE infrared spectra. The CO_2 in our spectra can be used to either retrieve atmospheric pressure or (if the instrument pointing knowledge proves to be satisfactory) for an independent retrieval of a CO_2 profile for carbon cycle science. Aerosols and clouds will be monitored using the extinction of solar

  10. Does the use of ACE inhibitors or angiotensin receptor blockers affect bone loss in older men?

    PubMed Central

    Leung, J.; Zhang, Y. F.; Bauer, D.; Ensrud, K. E.; Barrett-Connor, E.; Leung, P. C.

    2013-01-01

    Summary In a prospective cohort study of 5,995 older American men (MrOS), users of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors had a small but significant increase in bone loss at the hip over 4 years after adjustment for confounders. Use of angiotensin II AT1 receptor blockers (ARB) was not significantly associated with bone loss. Introduction Experimental evidence suggests that angiotensin II promotes bone loss by its effects on osteoblasts. It is therefore plausible that ACE inhibitor and ARB may reduce rates of bone loss. The objective of this study is to examine the independent effects of ACE inhibitor and ARB on bone loss in older men. Methods Out of 5,995 American men (87.2%) aged ≥65 years, 5,229 were followed up for an average of 4.6 years in a prospective six-center cohort study—The Osteoporotic Fractures in Men Study (MrOS). Bone mineral densities (BMD) at total hip, femoral neck, and trochanter were measured by Hologic densitometer (QDR 4500) at baseline and year 4. Results Out of 3,494 eligible subjects with complete data, 1,166 and 433 subjects reported use of ACE inhibitors and ARBs, respectively. When compared with nonusers, continuous use of ACE inhibitors was associated with a small (0.004 g/cm2) but significant increase in the average rate of BMD loss at total hip and trochanter over 4 years after adjustment for confounders. Use of ARB was not significantly associated with bone loss. Conclusion Use of ACE inhibitors but not ARB may marginally increase bone loss in older men. PMID:22080379

  11. A cladistic model of ACE sequence variation with implications for myocardial infarction, Alzheimer disease and obesity.

    PubMed

    Katzov, Hagit; Bennet, Anna M; Kehoe, Patrick; Wiman, Björn; Gatz, Margaret; Blennow, Kaj; Lenhard, Boris; Pedersen, Nancy L; de Faire, Ulf; Prince, Jonathan A

    2004-11-01

    Sequence variation in ACE, which encodes angiotensin I converting enzyme, contributes to a large proportion of variability in plasma ACE levels, but the extent to which this impacts upon human disease is unresolved. Most efforts to associate ACE with other heritable traits have involved a single Alu insertion/deletion polymorphism, despite the probable existence of other functional sequence variants with effects that may not be consistently detectable by solely typing the Alu indel. Here, utilizing single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that differentiate major ACE clades in European populations, we demonstrate a number of significant phenotype associations across more than 4000 Swedish individuals. In a systematic analysis of metabolic phenotypes, effects were detected upon several traits, including fasting plasma glucose levels, insulin levels and measures of obesity (P-values ranging from 0.046 to 8.4 x 10(-6)). Extending cladistic models to the study of myocardial infarction and Alzheimer disease, significant associations were observed with greater effect sizes than those typically obtained in large-scale meta-analyses based on the Alu indel. Population frequencies of ACE genotypes were also found to change with age, congruent with previous data suggesting effects upon longevity. Clade models consistently outperformed those based upon single markers, reinforcing the importance of taking into consideration the possible confounding effects of allelic heterogeneity in this genomic region. Utilizing computational tools, potential functional variants are highlighted that may underlie phenotypic variability, which is discussed along with the broader implications these results may have for studies attempting to link variation in ACE to human disease.

  12. Phylogenetic Relationships and Functional Genes: Distribution of a Gene (mnxG) Encoding a Putative Manganese-Oxidizing Enzyme in Bacillus Species▿

    PubMed Central

    Mayhew, Lisa E.; Swanner, Elizabeth D.; Martin, Andy P.; Templeton, Alexis S.

    2008-01-01

    Several Bacillus and Paenibacillus species were isolated from Fe and Mn oxide minerals precipitating at a deep subsurface oxic-anoxic interface at Henderson Molybdenum Mine, Empire, CO. The isolates were investigated for their Mn(II)-oxidizing potential and interrogated for possession of the mnxG gene, a gene that codes for a putative Mn(II)-oxidizing enzyme in Bacillus species. Seven of eight Bacillus species were capable of Mn(II) oxidation; however, the mnxG gene was detected in only one isolate. Using sequences of known Bacillus species both with and without amplifiable mnxG genes and Henderson Mine isolates, the 16S rRNA and mnxG gene phylogenies were compared to determine if 16S rRNA sequences could be used to predict the presence or absence of an amplifiable mnxG gene within the genomes of the isolates. We discovered a strong correspondence between 16S rRNA sequence similarity and the presence/absence of an amplifiable mnxG gene in the isolates. The data revealed a complex phylogenetic distribution of the mnxG gene in which vertical inheritance and gene loss influence the distribution of the gene among the Bacillus species included in this study. Comparisons of 16S rRNA and functional gene phylogenies can be used as a tool to aid in unraveling the history and dispersal of the mnxG gene within the Bacillus clade. PMID:18849460

  13. Metabolic gene clusters encoding the enzymes of two branches of the 3-oxoadipate pathway in the pathogenic yeast Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Gérecová, Gabriela; Neboháčová, Martina; Zeman, Igor; Pryszcz, Leszek P; Tomáška, Ľubomír; Gabaldón, Toni; Nosek, Jozef

    2015-05-01

    The pathogenic yeast Candida albicans utilizes hydroxyderivatives of benzene via the catechol and hydroxyhydroquinone branches of the 3-oxoadipate pathway. The genetic basis and evolutionary origin of this catabolic pathway in yeasts are unknown. In this study, we identified C. albicans genes encoding the enzymes involved in the degradation of hydroxybenzenes. We found that the genes coding for core components of the 3-oxoadipate pathway are arranged into two metabolic gene clusters. Our results demonstrate that C. albicans cells cultivated in media containing hydroxybenzene substrates highly induce the transcription of these genes as well as the corresponding enzymatic activities. We also found that C. albicans cells assimilating hydroxybenzenes cope with the oxidative stress by upregulation of cellular antioxidant systems such as alternative oxidase and catalase. Moreover, we investigated the evolution of the enzymes encoded by these clusters and found that most of them share a particularly sparse phylogenetic distribution among Saccharomycotina, which is likely to have been caused by extensive gene loss. We exploited this fact to find co-evolving proteins that are suitable candidates for the missing enzymes of the pathway. PMID:25743787

  14. Enzymes Catalyzing the Early Steps of Clavulanic Acid Biosynthesis Are Encoded by Two Sets of Paralogous Genes in Streptomyces clavuligerus

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Susan E.; Elder, Kenneth J.; Aidoo, Kwamena A.; Paradkar, Ashish S.

    2000-01-01

    Genes encoding the proteins required for clavulanic acid biosynthesis and for cephamycin biosynthesis are grouped into a “supercluster” in Streptomyces clavuligerus. Nine open reading frames (ORFs) associated with clavulanic acid biosynthesis were located in a 15-kb segment of the supercluster, including six ORFs encoding known biosynthetic enzymes or regulatory proteins, two ORFs that have been reported previously but whose involvement in clavulanic acid biosynthesis is unclear, and one ORF not previously reported. Evidence for the involvement of these ORFs in clavulanic acid production was obtained by generating mutants and showing that all were defective for clavulanic acid production when grown on starch asparagine medium. However, when five of the nine mutants, including mutants defective in known clavulanic acid biosynthetic enzymes, were grown in a soy-based medium, clavulanic acid-producing ability was restored. This ability to produce clavulanic acid when seemingly essential biosynthetic enzymes have been mutated suggests that paralogous genes encoding functionally equivalent proteins exist for each of the five genes but that these paralogues are expressed only in the soy-based medium. The five genes that have paralogues encode proteins involved in the early steps of the pathway common to the biosynthesis of both clavulanic acid and the other clavam metabolites produced by this organism. No evidence was seen for paralogues of the four remaining genes involved in late, clavulanic acid-specific steps in the pathway. PMID:10681345

  15. Tropine Forming Tropinone Reductase Gene from Withania somnifera (Ashwagandha): Biochemical Characteristics of the Recombinant Enzyme and Novel Physiological Overtones of Tissue-Wide Gene Expression Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Kushwaha, Amit Kumar; Sangwan, Neelam Singh; Trivedi, Prabodh Kumar; Negi, Arvind Singh; Misra, Laxminarain; Sangwan, Rajender Singh

    2013-01-01

    Withania somnifera is one of the most reputed medicinal plants of Indian systems of medicine synthesizing diverse types of secondary metabolites such as withanolides, alkaloids, withanamides etc. Present study comprises cloning and E. coli over-expression of a tropinone reductase gene (WsTR-I) from W. somnifera, and elucidation of biochemical characteristics and physiological role of tropinone reductase enzyme in tropane alkaloid biosynthesis in aerial tissues of the plant. The recombinant enzyme was demonstrated to catalyze NADPH-dependent tropinone to tropine conversion step in tropane metabolism, through TLC, GC and GC-MS-MS analyses of the reaction product. The functionally active homodimeric ∼60 kDa enzyme catalyzed the reaction in reversible manner at optimum pH 6.7. Catalytic kinetics of the enzyme favoured its forward reaction (tropine formation). Comparative 3-D models of landscape of the enzyme active site contours and tropinone binding site were also developed. Tissue-wide and ontogenic stage-wise assessment of WsTR-I transcript levels revealed constitutive expression of the gene with relatively lower abundance in berries and young leaves. The tissue profiles of WsTR-I expression matched those of tropine levels. The data suggest that, in W. somnifera, aerial tissues as well possess tropane alkaloid biosynthetic competence. In vivo feeding of U-[14C]-sucrose to orphan shoot (twigs) and [14C]-chasing revealed substantial radiolabel incorporation in tropinone and tropine, confirming the de novo synthesizing ability of the aerial tissues. This inherent independent ability heralds a conceptual novelty in the backdrop of classical view that these tissues acquire the alkaloids through transportation from roots rather than synthesis. The TR-I gene expression was found to be up-regulated on exposure to signal molecules (methyl jasmonate and salicylic acid) and on mechanical injury. The enzyme's catalytic and structural properties as well as gene expression

  16. Occurrence and fate of ACE-inhibitor peptides in cheeses and in their digestates following in vitro static gastrointestinal digestion.

    PubMed

    Stuknytė, Milda; Cattaneo, Stefano; Masotti, Fabio; De Noni, Ivano

    2015-02-01

    The occurrence of the casein-derived angiotensin converting enzyme-inhibitor (ACE-I) peptides VPP, IPP, RYLGY, RYLG, AYFYPEL, AYFYPE, LHLPLP and HLPLP were investigated in 12 different cheese samples by Ultra Performance Liquid Chromatography/High-Resolution Mass Spectrometry. The total amount of ACE-I peptides was in the range 0.87-331mgkg(-1). VPP and IPP largely prevailed in almost all cheeses. Following in vitro static gastrointestinal digestion of Cheddar, Gorgonzola, Maasdam and Grana Padano cheeses, type and amount of ACE-I peptides changed, and only VPP, IPP, HLPLP and LHLPLP were detected in the intestinal digestates. The results evidenced that the degree of proteolysis itself cannot be regarded as a promoting or hindering factor for ACE-I peptide release during cheese digestion. Moreover, the data indicated that the ACE-I potential of cheeses cannot be inferred based on the type and amount of ACE-I peptides present in undigested samples. PMID:25172679

  17. Gene transfer corrects acute GM2 gangliosidosis--potential therapeutic contribution of perivascular enzyme flow.

    PubMed

    Cachón-González, M Begoña; Wang, Susan Z; McNair, Rosamund; Bradley, Josephine; Lunn, David; Ziegler, Robin; Cheng, Seng H; Cox, Timothy M

    2012-08-01

    The GM2 gangliosidoses are fatal lysosomal storage diseases principally affecting the brain. Absence of β-hexosaminidase A and B activities in the Sandhoff mouse causes neurological dysfunction and recapitulates the acute Tay-Sachs (TSD) and Sandhoff diseases (SD) in infants. Intracranial coinjection of recombinant adeno-associated viral vectors (rAAV), serotype 2/1, expressing human β-hexosaminidase α (HEXA) and β (HEXB) subunits into 1-month-old Sandhoff mice gave unprecedented survival to 2 years and prevented disease throughout the brain and spinal cord. Classical manifestations of disease, including spasticity-as opposed to tremor-ataxia-were resolved by localized gene transfer to the striatum or cerebellum, respectively. Abundant biosynthesis of β-hexosaminidase isozymes and their global distribution via axonal, perivascular, and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) spaces, as well as diffusion, account for the sustained phenotypic rescue-long-term protein expression by transduced brain parenchyma, choroid plexus epithelium, and dorsal root ganglia neurons supplies the corrective enzyme. Prolonged survival permitted expression of cryptic disease in organs not accessed by intracranial vector delivery. We contend that infusion of rAAV into CSF space and intraparenchymal administration by convection-enhanced delivery at a few strategic sites will optimally treat neurodegeneration in many diseases affecting the nervous system. PMID:22453766

  18. Gene Transfer Corrects Acute GM2 Gangliosidosis—Potential Therapeutic Contribution of Perivascular Enzyme Flow

    PubMed Central

    Cachón-González, M Begoña; Wang, Susan Z; McNair, Rosamund; Bradley, Josephine; Lunn, David; Ziegler, Robin; Cheng, Seng H; Cox, Timothy M

    2012-01-01

    The GM2 gangliosidoses are fatal lysosomal storage diseases principally affecting the brain. Absence of β-hexosaminidase A and B activities in the Sandhoff mouse causes neurological dysfunction and recapitulates the acute Tay–Sachs (TSD) and Sandhoff diseases (SD) in infants. Intracranial coinjection of recombinant adeno-associated viral vectors (rAAV), serotype 2/1, expressing human β-hexosaminidase α (HEXA) and β (HEXB) subunits into 1-month-old Sandhoff mice gave unprecedented survival to 2 years and prevented disease throughout the brain and spinal cord. Classical manifestations of disease, including spasticity—as opposed to tremor-ataxia—were resolved by localized gene transfer to the striatum or cerebellum, respectively. Abundant biosynthesis of β-hexosaminidase isozymes and their global distribution via axonal, perivascular, and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) spaces, as well as diffusion, account for the sustained phenotypic rescue—long-term protein expression by transduced brain parenchyma, choroid plexus epithelium, and dorsal root ganglia neurons supplies the corrective enzyme. Prolonged survival permitted expression of cryptic disease in organs not accessed by intracranial vector delivery. We contend that infusion of rAAV into CSF space and intraparenchymal administration by convection-enhanced delivery at a few strategic sites will optimally treat neurodegeneration in many diseases affecting the nervous system. PMID:22453766

  19. Gene-Enzyme Relationships of Aromatic Amino Acid Biosynthesis in Higher Plants

    SciTech Connect

    2002-08-12

    Inhibition studies of amino acids in Nicotiana silvestris suspension cells gave clues to the difficulties for obtaining mutants deficient in post prephenate pathway proteins of aromatic amino acid biosynthesis (prephenate aminotransferase, arogenate dehydrogenase and arogenate dehydratase). Such mutants, if successfully obtained, would allow gene-enzyme relationships of aromatic amino acid proteins to be studied. We found that amino acids were inhibitory toward plant cell growth, and thus were unable to rescue analog resistant mutants. Toxicity of all amino acids toward exponentially dividing Nicotiana silvestris suspension cultured cells was monitored by following growth rates. Except for L-glutamine, all 19 protein amino acids inhibited cell growth. Inhibition of growth progressed to cell deterioration. Electron microscopy showed that amino acids triggered a state of cell shrinkage that eventually degenerated to total cellular disorganization. L-glutamine was not only an effective agent for prevention of amino acid toxicity, but enhanced the final growth yield. L-glutamine also was able to completely reverse inhibition effects in cells that had been in the slowed exponential phase. Two types of inhibition occurred and we have proposed that any amino acid inhibition that can be completely antagonized by L-glutamine be called ''general amino acid inhibition''. ''Specific amino acid inhibition'' resulting from particular pathway imbalances caused by certain exogenous amino acids, can be recognized and studied in the presence of L-glutamine which can abolishes the complication effects of general amino acid inhibition.

  20. Combined effects of urinary phytoestrogens metabolites and polymorphisms in metabolic enzyme gene on idiopathic male infertility.

    PubMed

    Qin, Yufeng; Du, Guizhen; Chen, Minjian; Hu, Weiyue; Lu, Chuncheng; Wu, Wei; Hang, Bo; Zhou, Zuomin; Wang, Xinru; Xia, Yankai

    2014-08-01

    Phytoestrogens are plant-derived compounds that may interact with estrogen receptors and mimic estrogenic effects. It remains unclear whether the individual variability in metabolizing phytoestrogens contributes to phytoestrogens-induced beneficial or detrimental effects. Our aim was to determine whether there is any interaction between metabolic rates (MR) of phytoestrogens and genetic polymorphisms in related xenobiotic metabolizing enzyme genes. MR was used to assess phytoestrogen exposure and individual metabolic ability. The amount of phytoestrogens in urine was measured by ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry in 600 idiopathic infertile male patients and 401 controls. Polymorphisms were genotyped using the SNPstream platform combined with the Taqman method. Prototypes and metabolites of secoisolariciresinol (SEC) have inverse effects on male reproduction. It was found that low MR of SEC increased the risk of male infertility (OR 2.49, 95 % CI 1.78, 3.48, P trend = 8.00 × 10(-8)). Novel interactions were also observed between the MR of SEC and rs1042389 in CYP2B6, rs1048943 in CYP1A1, and rs1799931 in NAT2 on male infertility (P inter = 1.06 × 10(-4), 1.14 × 10(-3), 3.55 × 10(-3), respectively). By analyzing the relationships between urinary phytoestrogen concentrations, their metabolites and male infertility, we found that individual variability in metabolizing SEC contributed to the interpersonal differences in SEC's effects on male reproduction.

  1. Statins, ACE inhibitors and ARBs in cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Montecucco, Fabrizio; Mach, François

    2009-06-01

    Atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the main cause of death in developed and developing countries. It is well accepted that several diseases - including hypertension, dyslipidemia and diabetes mellitus - increase CVD. More recently also chronic inflammatory diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis, have been shown to accelerate CVD. This association further supports a responsible role for inflammatory processes in all stages of CVD pathophysiology. Clinically, CVD ranges through different acute and chronic syndromes with ischemic symptoms in distal tissues, including heart, cerebral region or peripheral arteries. Several treatments for reducing CVD are under investigation. In this review we focus on statins, angiotensin-converting-enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, and angiotensin-II receptor blockers (ARBs), updating therapeutic evidence from the last clinical trials with particular relevance to diabetic patients. PMID:19520311

  2. Effect of the combined probiotics with aflatoxin B₁-degrading enzyme on aflatoxin detoxification, broiler production performance and hepatic enzyme gene expression.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Rui-yu; Chang, Juan; Yin, Qing-qiang; Wang, Ping; Yang, Yu-rong; Wang, Xiao; Wang, Guo-qiang; Zheng, Qiu-hong

    2013-09-01

    In order to degrade aflatoxin B₁ (AFB₁), AFB₁-degrading microbes (probiotics) such as Lactobacillus casei, Bacillus subtilis and Pichia anomala, and the AFB₁-degrading enzyme from Aspergillus oryzae were selected and combined to make feed additive. Seventy-five 43-day-old male Arbor Acres broilers were randomly divided into 5 groups, 15 broilers for each group. The broilers were given with 5 kinds of diets such as the basal diet, 400 μg/kg AFB₁ supplement without feed additive, and 200, 400, 800 μg/kg AFB₁ supplement with 0.15% feed additive. The feeding experimental period was 30 d, which was used to determine production performance of broilers. In addition, serum, liver and chest muscle were selected for measuring AFB₁ residues, gene expressions, microscopic and antioxidant analyses. The results showed that adding 0.15% feed additive in broiler diets could significantly relieve the negative effect of AFB₁ on chicken's production performance and nutrient metabolic rates (P<0.05). It could also improve AFB₁ metabolism, hepatic cell structure, antioxidant activity, and many hepatic enzyme gene expressions involved in oxidoreductase, apoptosis, cell growth, immune system and metabolic process (P<0.05). It could be concluded that the feed additive was able to degrade AFB₁ and improve animal production.

  3. Effect of the combined probiotics with aflatoxin B₁-degrading enzyme on aflatoxin detoxification, broiler production performance and hepatic enzyme gene expression.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Rui-yu; Chang, Juan; Yin, Qing-qiang; Wang, Ping; Yang, Yu-rong; Wang, Xiao; Wang, Guo-qiang; Zheng, Qiu-hong

    2013-09-01

    In order to degrade aflatoxin B₁ (AFB₁), AFB₁-degrading microbes (probiotics) such as Lactobacillus casei, Bacillus subtilis and Pichia anomala, and the AFB₁-degrading enzyme from Aspergillus oryzae were selected and combined to make feed additive. Seventy-five 43-day-old male Arbor Acres broilers were randomly divided into 5 groups, 15 broilers for each group. The broilers were given with 5 kinds of diets such as the basal diet, 400 μg/kg AFB₁ supplement without feed additive, and 200, 400, 800 μg/kg AFB₁ supplement with 0.15% feed additive. The feeding experimental period was 30 d, which was used to determine production performance of broilers. In addition, serum, liver and chest muscle were selected for measuring AFB₁ residues, gene expressions, microscopic and antioxidant analyses. The results showed that adding 0.15% feed additive in broiler diets could significantly relieve the negative effect of AFB₁ on chicken's production performance and nutrient metabolic rates (P<0.05). It could also improve AFB₁ metabolism, hepatic cell structure, antioxidant activity, and many hepatic enzyme gene expressions involved in oxidoreductase, apoptosis, cell growth, immune system and metabolic process (P<0.05). It could be concluded that the feed additive was able to degrade AFB₁ and improve animal production. PMID:23831311

  4. Hippocampal chromatin-modifying enzymes are pivotal for scopolamine-induced synaptic plasticity gene expression changes and memory impairment.

    PubMed

    Singh, Padmanabh; Konar, Arpita; Kumar, Ashish; Srivas, Sweta; Thakur, Mahendra K

    2015-08-01

    The amnesic potential of scopolamine is well manifested through synaptic plasticity gene expression changes and behavioral paradigms of memory impairment. However, the underlying mechanism remains obscure and consequently ideal therapeutic target is lacking. In this context, chromatin-modifying enzymes, which regulate memory gene expression changes, deserve major attention. Therefore, we analyzed the expression of chromatin-modifying enzymes and recovery potential of enzyme modulators in scopolamine-induced amnesia. Scopolamine administration drastically up-regulated DNA methyltransferases (DNMT1) and HDAC2 expression while CREB-binding protein (CBP), DNMT3a and DNMT3b remained unaffected. HDAC inhibitor sodium butyrate and DNMT inhibitor Aza-2'deoxycytidine recovered scopolamine-impaired hippocampal-dependent memory consolidation with concomitant increase in the expression of synaptic plasticity genes Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and Arc and level of histone H3K9 and H3K14 acetylation and decrease in DNA methylation level. Sodium butyrate showed more pronounced effect than Aza-2'deoxycytidine and their co-administration did not exhibit synergistic effect on gene expression. Taken together, we showed for the first time that scopolamine-induced up-regulation of chromatin-modifying enzymes, HDAC2 and DNMT1, leads to gene expression changes and consequent decline in memory consolidation. Our findings on the action of scopolamine as an epigenetic modulator can pave a path for ideal therapeutic targets. We propose the following putative pathway for scopolamine-mediated memory impairment; scopolamine up-regulates hippocampal DNMT1 and HDAC2 expression, induces methylation and deacetylation of BDNF and Arc promoter, represses gene expression and eventually impairs memory consolidation. On the other hand, Aza-2 and NaB inhibit DNMT1 and HDAC2 respectively, up-regulate BDNF and Arc expression and recover memory consolidation. We elucidate the action of

  5. Developing Communities: Serving ACE through Tertiary Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sofo, Francesco

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to review the focus and practice of Adult and Community Education (ACE) as well as its conceptualization and delivery and to suggest parameters for an approach based on excellence, a balanced scorecard and performance to meet community needs. Design/methodology/approach: The review examines key aspects of the…

  6. Advanced Colloids Experiment (ACE-H-2)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, William V.; Sicker, Ron; Chmiel, Alan J.; Eustace, John; LaBarbera, Melissa

    2015-01-01

    Increment 43 - 44 Science Symposium presentation of Advanced Colloids Experiment (ACE-H-2) to RPO. The purpose of this event is for Principal Investigators to present their science objectives, testing approach, and measurement methods to agency scientists, managers, and other investigators.

  7. Advanced Colloids Experiment (ACE-T1)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, William V.; Sicker, Ron; Brown, Dan; Eustace, John

    2015-01-01

    Increment 45 - 46 Science Symposium presentation of Advanced Colloids Experiment (ACE-T1) to RPO. The purpose of this event is for Principal Investigators to present their science objectives, testing approach, and measurement methods to agency scientists, managers, and other investigators.

  8. Ace the Verbal on the SAT

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meierding, Loren

    2005-01-01

    Many students are not accepted in to certain colleges and universities because of low SAT scores. Loren Meierding has written Ace the Verbal on the SAT to help students with minimal preparation do well by improving their vocabulary and use better techniques for finding the answers to the questions. This book provides strategies needed to score…

  9. Wide variety of point mutations in the H gene of Bombay and para-Bombay individuals that inactivate H enzyme.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, M; Nishihara, S; Shinya, N; Kudo, T; Iwasaki, H; Seno, T; Okubo, Y; Narimatsu, H

    1997-07-15

    The H genes, encoding an alpha1,2fucosyltransferase, which defines blood groups with the H structure, of four Bombay and 13 para-Bombay Japanese individuals were analyzed for mutations. Four Bombay individuals were homologous for the same null H allele, which is inactivated by a single nonsense mutation at position 695 from G to A (G695A), resulting in termination of H gene translation. The allele inactivated by the G695A was designated h1. The other 13 para-Bombay individuals possessed a trace amount of H antigens on erythrocytes regardless of their secretor status. Sequence analysis of their H genes showed four additional inactivated H gene alleles, h2, h3, h4, and h5. The h2 allele possesed a single base deletion at position 990 G (990-del). The h3 and h4 alleles possessed a single missense mutation, T721C, which changes Tyr 241 to His, and G442T, which changes Asp148 to Tyr, respectively. The h5 allele possessed two missense mutations, T460C (Tyr154to His) and G1042A (Glu348to Lys). The h2, h3, h4, and h5 enzymes directed by these alleles were not fully inactivated by the deletion and the missense mutations expressing some residual enzyme activity resulting in synthesis of H antigen on erythrocytes. Thirteen para-Bombay individuals whose erythrocytes retained a trace amount of H antigen were determined to be heterozygous or homozygous for at least one of h2, h3, h4, or h5 alleles. This clarified that the levels (null to trace amount) of H antigen expression on erythrocytes of Bombay and para-Bombay individuals are determined solely by H enzyme activity. These mutations found in the Japanese H alleles differ from a nonsense mutation found in the Indonesian population. To determine the roles of the H, Se, and Le genes in the expression of H antigen in secretions and Lewis blood group antigen on erythrocytes, the Lewis and secretor genes were also examined in these Bombay and para-Bombay individuals. The Lewis blood group phenotype, Le(alpha- b+), was determined

  10. Study on ecdysteroid levels and gene expression of enzymes related to ecdysteroid biosynthesis in the larval testis of Spodoptera littoralis.

    PubMed

    Iga, Masatoshi; Blais, Catherine; Smagghe, Guy

    2013-01-01

    We investigated here the ecdysteroid titers and the expression of six genes coding for known enzymes of the ecdysteroid biosynthesis in the testes of last instar larvae of the pest cotton leafworm, Spodoptera littoralis. We showed that the timing of the ecdysteroid profile was the same in testes and in hemolymph, with a small peak at day 2 and a large one at day 4 after ecdysis. Ecdysone and 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E) were detected in both tissues. 20E was the major ecdysteroid in testes and in hemolymph from day 4. Interestingly, the gene expression of the steroidogenetic enzymes, Neverland, and the five cytochrome P450 enzymes encoded by the Halloween genes was confirmed in the testes, and varied during the instar. However, from the data obtained so far, we cannot conclude that the measured ecdysteroids in the testes result from the activity of the genes under study. Indeed, it is suggested that the ecdysone produced centrally in the prothoracic glands, could have been transformed into 20E in the testes, where Sl-shade is well expressed. PMID:23007959

  11. Developmental, genetic and environmental factors affect the expression of flavonoid genes, enzymes and metabolites in strawberry fruits.

    PubMed

    Carbone, Fabrizio; Preuss, Anja; De Vos, Ric C H; D'Amico, Eleonora; Perrotta, Gaetano; Bovy, Arnaud G; Martens, Stefan; Rosati, Carlo

    2009-08-01

    The influence of internal (genetic and developmental) and external (environmental) factors on levels of flavonoid gene transcripts, enzyme activity and metabolites was studied in fruit of six cultivated strawberry (Fragaria x ananassa Duch.) genotypes grown at two Italian locations. Gene expression and enzyme activity showed development- and genotype-associated patterns, revealing gene coordination. Analysis clarified the regulation mechanism of the hydroxylation status of the B-ring of the major flavonoid pools and pointed out examples of genotype-specific post-transcriptional regulation mechanisms and key steps of pathway regulation in strawberry fruits. Metabolite profiles were strongly affected by development and genotype. Flavan-3-ols, their proanthocyanidin (PA) derivatives and anthocyanins were the most abundant metabolites. Flavonol levels and PA-associated traits (epicatechin/catechin ratio and mean degree of polymerization) showed significant environmental effects. Multivariate and correlation analyses determined the relationships among genes, enzymes and metabolites. The combined molecular and biochemical information elucidated more in depth the role of genetic and environmental factors on flavonoid metabolism during strawberry fruit development, highlighting the major impact of developmental processes, and revealing genotype-dependent differences and environmental effects on PA-related traits.

  12. Study on ecdysteroid levels and gene expression of enzymes related to ecdysteroid biosynthesis in the larval testis of Spodoptera littoralis.

    PubMed

    Iga, Masatoshi; Blais, Catherine; Smagghe, Guy

    2013-01-01

    We investigated here the ecdysteroid titers and the expression of six genes coding for known enzymes of the ecdysteroid biosynthesis in the testes of last instar larvae of the pest cotton leafworm, Spodoptera littoralis. We showed that the timing of the ecdysteroid profile was the same in testes and in hemolymph, with a small peak at day 2 and a large one at day 4 after ecdysis. Ecdysone and 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E) were detected in both tissues. 20E was the major ecdysteroid in testes and in hemolymph from day 4. Interestingly, the gene expression of the steroidogenetic enzymes, Neverland, and the five cytochrome P450 enzymes encoded by the Halloween genes was confirmed in the testes, and varied during the instar. However, from the data obtained so far, we cannot conclude that the measured ecdysteroids in the testes result from the activity of the genes under study. Indeed, it is suggested that the ecdysone produced centrally in the prothoracic glands, could have been transformed into 20E in the testes, where Sl-shade is well expressed.

  13. The snf1 gene of Ustilago maydis acts as a dual regulator of cell wall degrading enzymes.

    PubMed

    Nadal, Marina; Garcia-Pedrajas, Maria D; Gold, Scott E

    2010-12-01

    Many fungal plant pathogens are known to produce extracellular enzymes that degrade cell wall elements required for host penetration and infection. Due to gene redundancy, single gene deletions generally do not address the importance of these enzymes in pathogenicity. Cell wall degrading enzymes (CWDEs) in fungi are often subject to carbon catabolite repression at the transcriptional level such that, when glucose is available, CWDE-encoding genes, along with many other genes, are repressed. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, one of the main players controlling this process is SNF1, which encodes a protein kinase. In this yeast, Snf1p is required to release glucose repression when this sugar is depleted from the growth medium. We have employed a reverse genetic approach to explore the role of the SNF1 ortholog as a potential regulator of CWDE gene expression in Ustilago maydis. We identified U. maydis snf1 and deleted it from the fungal genome. Consistent with our hypothesis, the relative expression of an endoglucanase and a pectinase was higher in the wild type than in the Δsnf1 mutant strain when glucose was depleted from the growth medium. However, when cells were grown in derepressive conditions, the relative expression of two xylanase genes was unexpectedly higher in the Δsnf1 strain than in the wild type, indicating that, in this case, snf1 negatively regulated the expression of these genes. Additionally, we found that, contrary to several other fungal species, U. maydis Snf1 was not required for utilization of alternative carbon sources. Also, unlike in ascomycete plant pathogens, deletion of snf1 did not profoundly affect virulence in U. maydis.

  14. Ligase-independent cloning of amylase gene from a local Bacillus subtilis isolate and biochemical characterization of the purified enzyme.

    PubMed

    Tuzlakoglu Ozturk, Merve; Akbulut, Nagihan; Issever Ozturk, Saliha; Gumusel, Fusun

    2013-09-01

    Five hundred ninety-seven bacterial isolates from Turkish hot spring water sources were screened for their ability to produce extracellular α-amylase. Among them, a high enzyme-producing Bacillus subtilis isolate, A28, was selected, and its α-amylase gene was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli by a ligase-independent method. α-Amylase from the recombinant strain was purified to homogeneity by Q-Sepharose anion exchange and Sephacryl S-100 gel filtration chromatographies. The final yield of the enzyme was about 22.5 % of the initial activity, with a 16.4-fold increase in specific activity compared with the culture lysate. The optimum temperature and pH of the enzyme were 70 °C and 6.0, respectively. The enzyme was highly active at acidic-neutral pH range of 4.5-7.0. The amy28 α-amylase retained 100 % of its activity after incubation at 50 °C for 90 min. Co(+2), Cu(2+), Fe(2+), Fe(3+), Ni(+2), and Zn(+2) caused significant inhibition in enzyme activity, which was not affected by Na(+), Mg(2+), Li(+), and Ba(2+). The activity was inhibited about 70 % upon treatment of the enzyme with 10 mM ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid. However, Ca(2+) ions known as high temperature stabilizer for other amylases did not stimulate the activity of the enzyme. Due to pH stability and thermostability of the recombinant amylase, this enzyme may be suitable in starch processing, brewing, and food industries.

  15. Association of angiotensin converting enzyme and angiotensin II type 1 receptor genotypes with left ventricular function and mass in patients with angiographically normal coronary arteries.

    PubMed Central

    Hamon, M.; Amant, C.; Bauters, C.; Richard, F.; Helbecque, N.; McFadden, E.; Lablanche, J. M.; Bertrand, M.; Amouyel, P.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To analyse the potential association of the angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) and angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R) gene polymorphisms on left ventricular function and mass in patients with normal coronary arteries. DESIGN: Consecutive sample. SETTING: University hospital. SUBJECTS: 141 consecutive white patients referred for coronary angiography and with angiographically normal coronary arteries. Patients with valvar diseases, cardiomyopathies, or a history of myocardial infarction were excluded. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Left ventricular variables were measured for all patients. The ACE and AT1R genotypes were determined with a polymerase chain reaction based protocol using DNA prepared from white blood cells. A general linear model was used to compare data according to the ACE and to the AT1R genotypes. RESULTS: A strong association was observed between left ventricular mass and systemic hypertension (mean (SD) hypertension: 114 (31) g/m2; no hypertension 98 (23) g/m2; P < 0.003). However, no influence of ACE and AT1R polymorphisms on left ventricular mass was found, regardless of systemic hypertension. The subjects homozygous for the AT1R CC mutation had a significantly lower ejection fraction than those with allele A (AC+AA) (mean (SD) 62(12)% and 68(10)%, respectively, P < 0.05). No synergistic interaction of ACE and AT1R gene polymorphisms on left ventricular function and mass was found. CONCLUSIONS: These data do not support an association of the ACE and AT1R genotypes on left ventricular hypertrophy in white patients with normal coronary arteries. PMID:9227291

  16. CHD5, a brain-specific paralog of Mi2 chromatin remodeling enzymes, regulates expression of neuronal genes.

    PubMed

    Potts, Rebecca Casaday; Zhang, Peisu; Wurster, Andrea L; Precht, Patricia; Mughal, Mohamed R; Wood, William H; Zhang, Yonqing; Becker, Kevin G; Mattson, Mark P; Pazin, Michael J

    2011-01-01

    CHD5 is frequently deleted in neuroblastoma and is a tumor suppressor gene. However, little is known about the role of CHD5 other than it is homologous to chromatin remodeling ATPases. We found CHD5 mRNA was restricted to the brain; by contrast, most remodeling ATPases were broadly expressed. CHD5 protein isolated from mouse brain was associated with HDAC2, p66ß, MTA3 and RbAp46 in a megadalton complex. CHD5 protein was detected in several rat brain regions and appeared to be enriched in neurons. CHD5 protein was predominantly nuclear in primary rat neurons and brain sections. Microarray analysis revealed genes that were upregulated and downregulated when CHD5 was depleted from primary neurons. CHD5 depletion altered expression of neuronal genes, transcription factors, and brain-specific subunits of the SWI/SNF remodeling enzyme. Expression of gene sets linked to aging and Alzheimer's disease were strongly altered by CHD5 depletion from primary neurons. Chromatin immunoprecipitation revealed CHD5 bound to these genes, suggesting the regulation was direct. Together, these results indicate that CHD5 protein is found in a NuRD-like multi-protein complex. CHD5 expression is restricted to the brain, unlike the closely related family members CHD3 and CHD4. CHD5 regulates expression of neuronal genes, cell cycle genes and remodeling genes. CHD5 is linked to regulation of genes implicated in aging and Alzheimer's disease.

  17. CHD5, a Brain-Specific Paralog of Mi2 Chromatin Remodeling Enzymes, Regulates Expression of Neuronal Genes

    PubMed Central

    Potts, Rebecca Casaday; Zhang, Peisu; Wurster, Andrea L.; Precht, Patricia; Mughal, Mohamed R.; Wood, William H.; Zhang, Yonqing; Becker, Kevin G.; Mattson, Mark P.; Pazin, Michael J.

    2011-01-01

    CHD5 is frequently deleted in neuroblastoma and is a tumor suppressor gene. However, little is known about the role of CHD5 other than it is homologous to chromatin remodeling ATPases. We found CHD5 mRNA was restricted to the brain; by contrast, most remodeling ATPases were broadly expressed. CHD5 protein isolated from mouse brain was associated with HDAC2, p66ß, MTA3 and RbAp46 in a megadalton complex. CHD5 protein was detected in several rat brain regions and appeared to be enriched in neurons. CHD5 protein was predominantly nuclear in primary rat neurons and brain sections. Microarray analysis revealed genes that were upregulated and downregulated when CHD5 was depleted from primary neurons. CHD5 depletion altered expression of neuronal genes, transcription factors, and brain-specific subunits of the SWI/SNF remodeling enzyme. Expression of gene sets linked to aging and Alzheimer's disease were strongly altered by CHD5 depletion from primary neurons. Chromatin immunoprecipitation revealed CHD5 bound to these genes, suggesting the regulation was direct. Together, these results indicate that CHD5 protein is found in a NuRD-like multi-protein complex. CHD5 expression is restricted to the brain, unlike the closely related family members CHD3 and CHD4. CHD5 regulates expression of neuronal genes, cell cycle genes and remodeling genes. CHD5 is linked to regulation of genes implicated in aging and Alzheimer's disease. PMID:21931736

  18. YANA – a software tool for analyzing flux modes, gene-expression and enzyme activities

    PubMed Central

    Schwarz, Roland; Musch, Patrick; von Kamp, Axel; Engels, Bernd; Schirmer, Heiner; Schuster, Stefan; Dandekar, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    Background A number of algorithms for steady state analysis of metabolic networks have been developed over the years. Of these, Elementary Mode Analysis (EMA) has proven especially useful. Despite its low user-friendliness, METATOOL as a reliable high-performance implementation of the algorithm has been the instrument of choice up to now. As reported here, the analysis of metabolic networks has been improved by an editor and analyzer of metabolic flux modes. Analysis routines for expression levels and the most central, well connected metabolites and their metabolic connections are of particular interest. Results YANA features a platform-independent, dedicated toolbox for metabolic networks with a graphical user interface to calculate (integrating METATOOL), edit (including support for the SBML format), visualize, centralize, and compare elementary flux modes. Further, YANA calculates expected flux distributions for a given Elementary Mode (EM) activity pattern and vice versa. Moreover, a dissection algorithm, a centralization algorithm, and an average diameter routine can be used to simplify and analyze complex networks. Proteomics or gene expression data give a rough indication of some individual enzyme activities, whereas the complete flux distribution in the network is often not known. As such data are noisy, YANA features a fast evolutionary algorithm (EA) for the prediction of EM activities with minimum error, including alerts for inconsistent experimental data. We offer the possibility to include further known constraints (e.g. growth constraints) in the EA calculation process. The redox metabolism around glutathione reductase serves as an illustration example. All software and documentation are available for download at . Conclusion A graphical toolbox and an editor for METATOOL as well as a series of additional routines for metabolic network analyses constitute a new user-friendly software for such efforts. PMID:15929789

  19. PCR Primers to Study the Diversity of Expressed Fungal Genes Encoding Lignocellulolytic Enzymes in Soils Using High-Throughput Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Barbi, Florian; Bragalini, Claudia; Vallon, Laurent; Prudent, Elsa; Dubost, Audrey; Fraissinet-Tachet, Laurence; Marmeisse, Roland; Luis, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    Plant biomass degradation in soil is one of the key steps of carbon cycling in terrestrial ecosystems. Fungal saprotrophic communities play an essential role in this process by producing hydrolytic enzymes active on the main components of plant organic matter. Open questions in this field regard the diversity of the species involved, the major biochemical pathways implicated and how these are affected by external factors such as litter quality or climate changes. This can be tackled by environmental genomic approaches involving the systematic sequencing of key enzyme-coding gene families using soil-extracted RNA as material. Such an approach necessitates the design and evaluation of gene family-specific PCR primers producing sequence fragments compatible with high-throughput sequencing approaches. In the present study, we developed and evaluated PCR primers for the specific amplification of fungal CAZy Glycoside Hydrolase gene families GH5 (subfamily 5) and GH11 encoding endo-β-1,4-glucanases and endo-β-1,4-xylanases respectively as well as Basidiomycota class II peroxidases, corresponding to the CAZy Auxiliary Activity family 2 (AA2), active on lignin. These primers were experimentally validated using DNA extracted from a wide range of Ascomycota and Basidiomycota species including 27 with sequenced genomes. Along with the published primers for Glycoside Hydrolase GH7 encoding enzymes active on cellulose, the newly design primers were shown to be compatible with the Illumina MiSeq sequencing technology. Sequences obtained from RNA extracted from beech or spruce forest soils showed a high diversity and were uniformly distributed in gene trees featuring the global diversity of these gene families. This high-throughput sequencing approach using several degenerate primers constitutes a robust method, which allows the simultaneous characterization of the diversity of different fungal transcripts involved in plant organic matter degradation and may lead to the

  20. PCR primers to study the diversity of expressed fungal genes encoding lignocellulolytic enzymes in soils using high-throughput sequencing.

    PubMed

    Barbi, Florian; Bragalini, Claudia; Vallon, Laurent; Prudent, Elsa; Dubost, Audrey; Fraissinet-Tachet, Laurence; Marmeisse, Roland; Luis, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    Plant biomass degradation in soil is one of the key steps of carbon cycling in terrestrial ecosystems. Fungal saprotrophic communities play an essential role in this process by producing hydrolytic enzymes active on the main components of plant organic matter. Open questions in this field regard the diversity of the species involved, the major biochemical pathways implicated and how these are affected by external factors such as litter quality or climate changes. This can be tackled by environmental genomic approaches involving the systematic sequencing of key enzyme-coding gene families using soil-extracted RNA as material. Such an approach necessitates the design and evaluation of gene family-specific PCR primers producing sequence fragments compatible with high-throughput sequencing approaches. In the present study, we developed and evaluated PCR primers for the specific amplification of fungal CAZy Glycoside Hydrolase gene families GH5 (subfamily 5) and GH11 encoding endo-β-1,4-glucanases and endo-β-1,4-xylanases respectively as well as Basidiomycota class II peroxidases, corresponding to the CAZy Auxiliary Activity family 2 (AA2), active on lignin. These primers were experimentally validated using DNA extracted from a wide range of Ascomycota and Basidiomycota species including 27 with sequenced genomes. Along with the published primers for Glycoside Hydrolase GH7 encoding enzymes active on cellulose, the newly design primers were shown to be compatible with the Illumina MiSeq sequencing technology. Sequences obtained from RNA extracted from beech or spruce forest soils showed a high diversity and were uniformly distributed in gene trees featuring the global diversity of these gene families. This high-throughput sequencing approach using several degenerate primers constitutes a robust method, which allows the simultaneous characterization of the diversity of different fungal transcripts involved in plant organic matter degradation and may lead to the

  1. Detecting the frequency of aminoglycoside modifying enzyme encoding genes among clinical isolates of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Shokravi, Zahra; Mehrad, Laleh; Ramazani, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) plays an important role in causing many serious nosocomial infections. In this study, the antimicrobial susceptibility and the frequency of aminoglycoside modifying enzyme encoding genes among clinical isolates of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus was investigated from two university hospitals of Zanjan province of Iran. Methods: In this study, the antimicrobial susceptibility of MRSA isolates to various antibiotics was investigated by the disk diffusion method. Multiplex PCR assays were used for the determination of aminoglycoside modifying enzyme (AME) genes and staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) types in MRSA strains. Results: All 58 MRSA isolates were sensitive to vancomycin. Resistance to penicillin G, oxacilin, gentamicin, erythromycin, clindamycin, kanamycin, and tobramycin was found in 96.4%, 98.3%, 51.7%, 53.4%, 55.2%, 62% and 58.6% of the isolates, respectively. The most prevalent AME genes were aac(6′)/aph(2′′) (48.3 %) followed by ant(4)-Ia (24%). The aph(3′)-Ia gene was the least frequent AME gene among MRSA isolates (19%). Of the 58 tested MRSA isolates, 5 (8.6%) were harboured SCCmec type I, 11 (19%) SCCmec type II, 20 (34.5%) SCCmec type III, 17 (29.3%) SCCmec type IVa, 1 (1.7%) SCCmec type IVb, 2 (3.4%) SCCmec type IVc, 11 (19%) SCCmec type IVd, and, 18 (31%) SCCmec type V. Nineteen isolates were not typeable. Conclusion: In conclusion, the aac (6′)/aph (2′′) was the most common aminoglycoside modifying enzyme gene and SCCmec type II and V were the most frequent types detected in hospital isolates, respectively. PMID:26191502

  2. Validation of ozone measurements from the Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (ACE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dupuy, E.; Walker, K. A.; Kar, J.; Boone, C. D.; McElroy, C. T.; Bernath, P. F.; Drummond, J. R.; Skelton, R.; McLeod, S. D.; Hughes, R. C.; Nowlan, C. R.; Dufour, D. G.; Zou, J.; Nichitiu, F.; Strong, K.; Baron, P.; Bevilacqua, R. M.; Blumenstock, T.; Bodeker, G. E.; Borsdorff, T.; Bourassa, A. E.; Bovensmann, H.; Boyd, I. S.; Bracher, A.; Brogniez, C.; Burrows, J. P.; Catoire, V.; Ceccherini, S.; Chabrillat, S.; Christensen, T.; Coffey, M. T.; Cortesi, U.; Davies, J.; de Clercq, C.; Degenstein, D. A.; de Mazière, M.; Demoulin, P.; Dodion, J.; Firanski, B.; Fischer, H.; Forbes, G.; Froidevaux, L.; Fussen, D.; Gerard, P.; Godin-Beekmann, S.; Goutail, F.; Granville, J.; Griffith, D.; Haley, C. S.; Hannigan, J. W.; Höpfner, M.; Jin, J. J.; Jones, A.; Jones, N. B.; Jucks, K.; Kagawa, A.; Kasai, Y.; Kerzenmacher, T. E.; Kleinböhl, A.; Klekociuk, A. R.; Kramer, I.; Küllmann, H.; Kuttippurath, J.; Kyrölä, E.; Lambert, J.-C.; Livesey, N. J.; Llewellyn, E. J.; Lloyd, N. D.; Mahieu, E.; Manney, G. L.; Marshall, B. T.; McConnell, J. C.; McCormick, M. P.; McDermid, I. S.; McHugh, M.; McLinden, C. A.; Mellqvist, J.; Mizutani, K.; Murayama, Y.; Murtagh, D. P.; Oelhaf, H.; Parrish, A.; Petelina, S. V.; Piccolo, C.; Pommereau, J.-P.; Randall, C. E.; Robert, C.; Roth, C.; Schneider, M.; Senten, C.; Steck, T.; Strandberg, A.; Strawbridge, K. B.; Sussmann, R.; Swart, D. P. J.; Tarasick, D. W.; Taylor, J. R.; Tétard, C.; Thomason, L. W.; Thompson, A. M.; Tully, M. B.; Urban, J.; Vanhellemont, F.; Vigouroux, C.; von Clarmann, T.; von der Gathen, P.; von Savigny, C.; Waters, J. W.; Witte, J. C.; Wolff, M.; Zawodny, J. M.

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents extensive {bias determination} analyses of ozone observations from the Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (ACE) satellite instruments: the ACE Fourier Transform Spectrometer (ACE-FTS) and the Measurement of Aerosol Extinction in the Stratosphere and Troposphere Retrieved by Occultation (ACE-MAESTRO) instrument. Here we compare the latest ozone data products from ACE-FTS and ACE-MAESTRO with coincident observations from nearly 20 satellite-borne, airborne, balloon-borne and ground-based instruments, by analysing volume mixing ratio profiles and partial column densities. The ACE-FTS version 2.2 Ozone Update product reports more ozone than most correlative measurements from the upper troposphere to the lower mesosphere. At altitude levels from 16 to 44 km, the average values of the mean relative differences are nearly all within +1 to +8%. At higher altitudes (45-60 km), the ACE-FTS ozone amounts are significantly larger than those of the comparison instruments, with mean relative differences of up to +40% (about +20% on average). For the ACE-MAESTRO version 1.2 ozone data product, mean relative differences are within ±10% (average values within ±6%) between 18 and 40 km for both the sunrise and sunset measurements. At higher altitudes ( 35-55 km), systematic biases of opposite sign are found between the ACE-MAESTRO sunrise and sunset observations. While ozone amounts derived from the ACE-MAESTRO sunrise occultation data are often smaller than the coincident observations (with mean relative differences down to -10%), the sunset occultation profiles for ACE-MAESTRO show results that are qualitatively similar to ACE-FTS, indicating a large positive bias (mean relative differences within +10 to +30%) in the 45-55 km altitude range. In contrast, there is no significant systematic difference in bias found for the ACE-FTS sunrise and sunset measurements.

  3. Cloning, sequencing, and expression of the gene encoding amylopullulanase from Pyrococcus furiosus and biochemical characterization of the recombinant enzyme.

    PubMed

    Dong, G; Vieille, C; Zeikus, J G

    1997-09-01

    The gene encoding the Pyrococcus furiosus hyperthermophilic amylopullulanase (APU) was cloned, sequenced, and expressed in Escherichia coli. The gene encoded a single 827-residue polypeptide with a 26-residue signal peptide. The protein sequence had very low homology (17 to 21% identity) with other APUs and enzymes of the alpha-amylase family. In particular, none of the consensus regions present in the alpha-amylase family could be identified. P. furiosus APU showed similarity to three proteins, including the P. furiosus intracellular alpha-amylase and Dictyoglomus thermophilum alpha-amylase A. The mature protein had a molecular weight of 89,000. The recombinant P. furiosus APU remained folded after denaturation at temperatures of < or = 70 degrees C and showed an apparent molecular weight of 50,000 in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Denaturating temperatures of above 100 degrees C were required for complete unfolding. The enzyme was extremely thermostable, with an optimal activity at 105 degrees C and pH 5.5. Ca2+ increased the enzyme activity, thermostability, and substrate affinity. The enzyme was highly resistant to chemical denaturing reagents, and its activity increased up to twofold in the presence of surfactants.

  4. Profiling of volatile compounds and associated gene expression and enzyme activity during fruit development in two cucumber cultivars.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shuxia; Zhang, Ranran; Hao, Lining; Chen, Weifeng; Cheng, Siqiong

    2015-01-01

    Changes in volatile content, as well as associated gene expression and enzyme activity in developing cucumber fruits were investigated in two Cucumis sativus L. lines (No. 26 and No. 14) that differ significantly in fruit flavor. Total volatile, six-carbon (C6) aldehyde, linolenic and linoleic acid content were higher during the early stages, whereas the nine-carbon (C9) aldehyde content was higher during the latter stages in both lines. Expression of C. sativus hydroperoxide lyase (CsHPL) mirrored 13-hydroperoxide lyase (13-HPL) enzyme activity in variety No. 26, whereas CsHPL expression was correlated with 9-hydroperoxide lyase (9-HPL) enzyme activity in cultivar No. 14. 13-HPL activity decreased significantly, while LOX (lipoxygenase) and 9-HPL activity increased along with fruit ripening in both lines, which accounted for the higher C6 and C9 aldehyde content at 0-6 day post anthesis (dpa) and 9-12 dpa, respectively. Volatile compounds from fruits at five developmental stages were analyzed by principal component analysis (PCA), and heatmaps of volatile content, gene expression and enzyme activity were constructed.

  5. Cloning and manipulation of the Escherichia coli cyclopropane fatty acid synthase gene: physiological aspects of enzyme overproduction.

    PubMed Central

    Grogan, D W; Cronan, J E

    1984-01-01

    Like many other eubacteria, cultures of Escherichia coli accumulate cyclopropane fatty acids (CFAs) at a well-defined stage of growth, due to the action of the cytoplasmic enzyme CFA synthase. We report the isolation of the putative structural gene, cfa, for this enzyme on an E. coli-ColE1 chimeric plasmid by the use of an autoradiographic colony screening technique. When introduced into a variety of E. coli strains, this plasmid, pLC18-11, induced corresponding increases in CFA content and CFA synthase activity. Subsequent manipulation of the cfa locus, facilitated by the insertion of pLC18-11 into a bacteriophage lambda vector, allowed genetic and physiological studies of CFA synthase in E. coli. Overproduction of this enzyme via multicopy cfa plasmids caused abnormally high levels of CFA in membrane phospholipid but no discernable growth perturbation. Infection with phage lambda derivatives bearing cfa caused transient overproduction of the enzyme, although pL-mediated expression of cfa could not be demonstrated in plasmids derived from such phages. CFA synthase specific activities could be raised to very high levels by using cfa runaway-replication plasmids. A variety of physiological factors were found to modulate the levels of CFA synthase in normal and gene-amplified cultures. These studies argue against several possible mechanisms for the temporal regulation of CFA formation. PMID:6325391

  6. Validation of ozone measurements from the Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (ACE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dupuy, E.; Walker, K. A.; Kar, J.; Boone, C. D.; McElroy, C. T.; Bernath, P. F.; Drummond, J. R.; Skelton, R.; McLeod, S. D.; Hughes, R. C.; Nowlan, C. R.; Dufour, D. G.; Zou, J.; Nichitiu, F.; Strong, K.; Baron, P.; Bevilacqua, R. M.; Blumenstock, T.; Bodeker, G. E.; Borsdorff, T.; Bourassa, A. E.; Bovensmann, H.; Boyd, I. S.; Bracher, A.; Brogniez, C.; Burrows, J. P.; Catoire, V.; Ceccherini, S.; Chabrillat, S.; Christensen, T.; Coffey, M. T.; Cortesi, U.; Davies, J.; de Clercq, C.; Degenstein, D. A.; de Mazière, M.; Demoulin, P.; Dodion, J.; Firanski, B.; Fischer, H.; Forbes, G.; Froidevaux, L.; Fussen, D.; Gerard, P.; Godin-Beekman, S.; Goutail, F.; Granville, J.; Griffith, D.; Haley, C. S.; Hannigan, J. W.; Höpfner, M.; Jin, J. J.; Jones, A.; Jones, N. B.; Jucks, K.; Kagawa, A.; Kasai, Y.; Kerzenmacher, T. E.; Kleinböhl, A.; Klekociuk, A. R.; Kramer, I.; Küllmann, H.; Kuttippurath, J.; Kyrölä, E.; Lambert, J.-C.; Livesey, N. J.; Llewellyn, E. J.; Lloyd, N. D.; Mahieu, E.; Manney, G. L.; Marshall, B. T.; McConnell, J. C.; McCormick, M. P.; McDermid, I. S.; McHugh, M.; McLinden, C. A.; Mellqvist, J.; Mizutani, K.; Murayama, Y.; Murtagh, D. P.; Oelhaf, H.; Parrish, A.; Petelina, S. V.; Piccolo, C.; Pommereau, J.-P.; Randall, C. E.; Robert, C.; Roth, C.; Schneider, M.; Senten, C.; Steck, T.; Strandberg, A.; Strawbridge, K. B.; Sussmann, R.; Swart, D. P. J.; Tarasick, D. W.; Taylor, J. R.; Tétard, C.; Thomason, L. W.; Thompson, A. M.; Tully, M. B.; Urban, J.; Vanhellemont, F.; von Clarmann, T.; von der Gathen, P.; von Savigny, C.; Waters, J. W.; Witte, J. C.; Wolff, M.; Zawodny, J. M.

    2008-02-01

    This paper presents extensive validation analyses of ozone observations from the Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (ACE) satellite instruments: the ACE Fourier Transform Spectrometer (ACE-FTS) and the Measurement of Aerosol Extinction in the Stratosphere and Troposphere Retrieved by Occultation (ACE-MAESTRO) instrument. The ACE satellite instruments operate in the mid-infrared and ultraviolet-visible-near-infrared spectral regions using the solar occultation technique. In order to continue the long-standing record of solar occultation measurements from space, a detailed quality assessment is required to evaluate the ACE data and validate their use for scientific purposes. Here we compare the latest ozone data products from ACE-FTS and ACE-MAESTRO with coincident observations from satellite-borne, airborne, balloon-borne and ground-based instruments, by analysing volume mixing ratio profiles and partial column densities. The ACE-FTS version 2.2 Ozone Update product reports more ozone than most correlative measurements from the upper troposphere to the lower mesosphere. At altitude levels from 16 to 44 km, the mean differences range generally between 0 and +10% with a slight but systematic positive bias (typically +5%). At higher altitudes (45-60 km), the ACE-FTS ozone amounts are significantly larger than those of the comparison instruments by up to ~40% (typically +20%). For the ACE-MAESTRO version 1.2 ozone data product, agreement within ±10% (generally better than ±5%) is found between 18 and 40 km for the sunrise and sunset measurements. At higher altitudes (45-55 km), systematic biases of opposite sign are found between the ACE-MAESTRO sunrise and sunset observations. While ozone amounts derived from the ACE-MAESTRO sunrise occultation data are often smaller than the coincident observations (by as much as -10%), the sunset occultation profiles for ACE-MAESTRO show results that are qualitatively similar to ACE-FTS and indicate a large positive bias (+10 to +30

  7. Identification and partial characterization of the enzyme of omega: one of five putative DPP IV genes in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Chihara, Carol J.; Song, Chunyan; LaMonte, Greg; Fetalvero, Kristina; Hinchman, Kristy; Phan, Helen; Pineda, Mario; Robinson, Kelly; Schneider, Gregory P.

    2005-01-01

    The omega (ome) gene product is a modifier of larval cuticle protein 5 and its alleles (and duplicates) in the third instar of Drosophila melanogaster. Using deletion mapping the locus mapped to 70F-71A on the left arm of chromosome 3. A homozygote null mutant (ome 1) shows a pleiotropic phenotype that affected the size, developmental time of the flies, and the fertility (or perhaps the behavior) of homozygous mutant males. The omega gene was verified as producing a dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPPIV) by genetic analysis, substrate specificity and pH optimum. The identity of the gene was confirmed as CG32145 (cytology 70F4) in the Celera Database (Berkeley Drosophila Genome Project), which is consistent with its deletion map position. The genomic structure of the gene is described and the decrease in DPPIV activity in the mutant ome1 is shown to be due to the gene CG32145 (omega). The D. melanogaster omega DPPIV enzyme was partially purified and characterized. The exons of the ome1 mutant were sequenced and a base substitution mutation in exon 4 was identified that would yield a truncated protein caused by a stop codon. A preliminary study of the compartmentalization of the omega DPPIV enzyme in several organs is also reported. Abbreviations: DPPIV dipeptidyl peptidase IV LCP5 & LCP6 third instar larval cuticle proteins 5 & 6 ome & ome1 omega locus name (CG32145) and mutant allele in D. melanogaster pNA paranotroanilide PMID:17119608

  8. PhAP protease from Pseudoalteromonas haloplanktis TAC125: Gene cloning, recombinant production in E. coli and enzyme characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Pascale, D.; Giuliani, M.; De Santi, C.; Bergamasco, N.; Amoresano, A.; Carpentieri, A.; Parrilli, E.; Tutino, M. L.

    2010-08-01

    Cold-adapted proteases have been found to be the dominant activity throughout the cold marine environment, indicating their importance in bacterial acquisition of nitrogen-rich complex organic compounds. However, few extracellular proteases from marine organisms have been characterized so far, and the mechanisms that enable their activity in situ are still largely unknown. Aside from their ecological importance and use as model enzyme for structure/function investigations, cold-active proteolytic enzymes offer great potential for biotechnological applications. Our studies on cold adapted proteases were performed on exo-enzyme produced by the Antarctic marine bacterium Pseudoalteromonas haloplanktis TAC125. By applying a proteomic approach, we identified several proteolytic activities from its culture supernatant. PhAP protease was selected for further investigations. The encoding gene was cloned and the protein was recombinantly produced in E. coli cells. The homogeneous product was biochemically characterised and it turned out that the enzyme is a Zn-dependent aminopeptidase, with an activity dependence from assay temperature typical of psychrophilic enzymes.

  9. Antihypertensive effect of an angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitory peptide from enzyme modified cheese.

    PubMed

    Tonouchi, Hidekazu; Suzuki, Masayuki; Uchida, Masayuki; Oda, Munehiro

    2008-08-01

    Two angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE)-inhibitory peptides were isolated from enzyme modified cheese (EMC) and their amino acid sequences were identified as Leu-Gln-Pro and Met-Ala-Pro. The EMC was prepared by a combination of Protease N, Umamizyme, and Flavourzyme 500L. Both peptides were derived from beta-casein, f 88-90 and f 102-104, respectively. Met-Ala-Pro showed strong ACE inhibitory activity (IC50=0.8 mum) and antihypertensive activity in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) after single oral administration. The IC50 value of Met-Ala-Pro was not affected by pre-incubation with ACE, suggesting that this peptide was a true ACE-inhibitory peptide. We report here, for the first time antihypertensive peptides from EMC.

  10. Is there an association between ACE and CKMM polymorphisms and cycling performance status during 3-week races?

    PubMed

    Lucía, A; Gómez-Gallego, F; Chicharro, J L; Hoyos, J; Celaya, K; Córdova, A; Villa, G; Alonso, J M; Barriopedro, M; Pérez, M; Earnest, C P

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, we examine the association between polymorphisms of the angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) and muscle-specific creatine kinase (CKMM) genes, and the actual performance status observed in professional cyclists capable of completing a classic tour stage race such as the Giro d'Italia, Tour de France, or Vuelta a España. To accomplish this, we compared the frequencies of the ACE and CKMM genotypes/alleles in 50 top-level Spanish professional cyclists that have completed at least one of these events to 119 sedentary controls, and 27 elite (Olympic-class) Spanish runners. The genetic polymorphism at the CK-MM locus was detected with the NcoI restriction endonuclease. The results of our study showed that the proportion of the DD genotype was higher in cyclists (50.0 %) than in the other two groups (p<0.05), the proportion of the ID genotype was higher in controls (46.2 %) than in the other two groups (p<0.05), and the proportion of the II genotype was higher in runners (40.7 %) than in the other two groups (p<0.05). The proportion of the D allele was higher in both cyclists (65.0 %) and controls (57.6 %) than in runners (46.3 %) (p<0.001), whereas the proportion of the I allele was higher in runners than in the other two groups (p<0.001). No statistical differences were found for CKK-MM- NcoI. We conclude that in top-level professional cyclists capable of completing a classic 3-wk tour race, the frequency distribution of the D allele and the DD genotype seems to be higher than in other endurance athletes such as elite runners (in whom the I allele is especially frequent).

  11. Characterization of ACE Inhibitory Peptides from Mactra veneriformis Hydrolysate by Nano-Liquid Chromatography Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry (Nano-LC-ESI-MS) and Molecular Docking

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Rui; Zhu, Yunhan; Chen, Jiao; Wu, Hao; Shi, Lei; Wang, Xinzhi; Wang, Lingchong

    2014-01-01

    Food-derived bioactive compounds are gaining increasing significance in life sciences. In the present study, we identified angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE)-inhibitory peptides from Mactra veneriformis hydrolysate using a nano-LC-MS/MS method. Mactra veneriformis hydrolysate was first separated into four fractions (F1–F4) based on molecular weight by ultrafiltration. The fraction with molecular weight lower than 1 kDa (F1) showed the highest ACE inhibitory activity. F1 was then analyzed by a high throughput nano-LC-MS/MS method and sequences of peptides in F1 were calculated accordingly. The 27 peptides identified as above were chemically synthesized and tested for ACE-inhibitory activity. The hexapeptide VVCVPW showed the highest potency with an IC50 value of 4.07 μM. We then investigated the interaction mechanism between the six most potent peptides and ACE by molecular docking. Our docking results suggested that the ACE inhibitory peptides bind to ACE via interactions with His383, His387, and Glu411 residues. Particularly, similar to the thiol group of captopril, the cysteine thiol group of the most potent peptide VVCVPW may play a key role in the binding of this peptide to the ACE active site. PMID:24983637

  12. Functional Analysis of the Phycomyces carRA Gene Encoding the Enzymes Phytoene Synthase and Lycopene Cyclase

    PubMed Central

    Sanz, Catalina; Velayos, Antonio; Álvarez, María Isabel; Benito, Ernesto P.; Eslava, Arturo P.

    2011-01-01

    Phycomyces carRA gene encodes a protein with two domains. Domain R is characterized by red carR mutants that accumulate lycopene. Domain A is characterized by white carA mutants that do not accumulate significant amounts of carotenoids. The carRA-encoded protein was identified as the lycopene cyclase and phytoene synthase enzyme by sequence homology with other proteins. However, no direct data showing the function of this protein have been reported so far. Different Mucor circinelloides mutants altered at the phytoene synthase, the lycopene cyclase or both activities were transformed with the Phycomyces carRA gene. Fully transcribed carRA mRNA molecules were detected by Northern assays in the transformants and the correct processing of the carRA messenger was verified by RT-PCR. These results showed that Phycomyces carRA gene was correctly expressed in Mucor. Carotenoids analysis in these transformants showed the presence of ß-carotene, absent in the untransformed strains, providing functional evidence that the Phycomyces carRA gene complements the M. circinelloides mutations. Co-transformation of the carRA cDNA in E. coli with different combinations of the carotenoid structural genes from Erwinia uredovora was also performed. Newly formed carotenoids were accumulated showing that the Phycomyces CarRA protein does contain lycopene cyclase and phytoene synthase activities. The heterologous expression of the carRA gene and the functional complementation of the mentioned activities are not very efficient in E. coli. However, the simultaneous presence of both carRA and carB gene products from Phycomyces increases the efficiency of these enzymes, presumably due to an interaction mechanism. PMID:21858003

  13. Rv2131c gene product: An unconventional enzyme that is both inositol monophosphatase and fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase

    SciTech Connect

    Gu Xiaoling; Chen Mao; Shen Hongbo; Jiang Xin; Huang Yishu; Wang Honghai . E-mail: hhwang@fudan.edu.cn

    2006-01-20

    Inositol monophosphatase is an enzyme in the biosynthesis of myo-inostiol, a crucial substrate for the synthesis of phosphatidylinositol, which has been demonstrated to be an essential component of mycobacteria. In this study, the Rv2131c gene from Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv was cloned into the pET28a vector and the recombinant plasmid was transformed into Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) strain, allowing the expression of the enzyme in fusion with a histidine-rich peptide on the N-terminal. The fusion protein was purified from the soluble fraction of the lysed cells under native conditions by immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC). The purified Rv2131c gene product showed inositol monophosphatase activity but with substrate specificity that was broader than those of several bacterial and eukaryotic inositol monophosphatases, and it also acted as fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase. The dimeric enzyme exhibited dual activities of IMPase and FBPase, with K {sub m} of 0.22 {+-} 0.03 mM for inositol-1-phosphate and K {sub m} of 0.45 {+-} 0.05 mM for fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase. To better understand the relationship between the function and structure of the Rv2131c enzyme, we constructed D40N, L71A, and D94N mutants and purified these corresponding proteins. Mutations of D40N and D94N caused the proteins to almost completely lose both the inositol monophosphatase and fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase activities. However, L71A mutant did not cause loss either of the activities, but the activity toward the inositol was 12-fold more resistant to inhibition by lithium (IC{sub 5} {approx} 60 mM). Based on the substrate specificity and presence of conserved sequence motifs of the M. tuberculosis Rv2131c, we proposed that the enzyme belonged to class IV fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase (FBPase IV)

  14. Enhanced Gene Detection Assays for Fumarate-Adding Enzymes Allow Uncovering of Anaerobic Hydrocarbon Degraders in Terrestrial and Marine Systems

    PubMed Central

    von Netzer, Frederick; Pilloni, Giovanni; Kleindienst, Sara; Krüger, Martin; Knittel, Katrin; Gründger, Friederike

    2013-01-01

    The detection of anaerobic hydrocarbon degrader populations via catabolic gene markers is important for the understanding of processes at contaminated sites. Fumarate-adding enzymes (FAEs; i.e., benzylsuccinate and alkylsuccinate synthases) have already been established as specific functional marker genes for anaerobic hydrocarbon degraders. Several recent studies based on pure cultures and laboratory enrichments have shown the existence of new and deeply branching FAE gene lineages, such as clostridial benzylsuccinate synthases and homologues, as well as naphthylmethylsuccinate synthases. However, established FAE gene detection assays were not designed to target these novel lineages, and consequently, their detectability in different environments remains obscure. Here, we present a new suite of parallel primer sets for detecting the comprehensive range of FAE markers known to date, including clostridial benzylsuccinate, naphthylmethylsuccinate, and alkylsuccinate synthases. It was not possible to develop one single assay spanning the complete diversity of FAE genes alone. The enhanced assays were tested with a range of hydrocarbon-degrading pure cultures, enrichments, and environmental samples of marine and terrestrial origin. They revealed the presence of several, partially unexpected FAE gene lineages not detected in these environments before: distinct deltaproteobacterial and also clostridial bssA homologues as well as environmental nmsA homologues. These findings were backed up by dual-digest terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism diagnostics to identify FAE gene populations independently of sequencing. This allows rapid insights into intrinsic degrader populations and degradation potentials established in aromatic and aliphatic hydrocarbon-impacted environmental systems. PMID:23124238

  15. Phloem-specific expression of Yang cycle genes and identification of novel Yang cycle enzymes in Plantago and Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Pommerrenig, Benjamin; Feussner, Kirstin; Zierer, Wolfgang; Rabinovych, Valentyna; Klebl, Franz; Feussner, Ivo; Sauer, Norbert

    2011-05-01

    The 5-methylthioadenosine (MTA) or Yang cycle is a set of reactions that recycle MTA to Met. In plants, MTA is a byproduct of polyamine, ethylene, and nicotianamine biosynthesis. Vascular transcriptome analyses revealed phloem-specific expression of the Yang cycle gene 5-METHYLTHIORIBOSE KINASE1 (MTK1) in Plantago major and Arabidopsis thaliana. As Arabidopsis has only a single MTK gene, we hypothesized that the expression of other Yang cycle genes might also be vascular specific. Reporter gene studies and quantitative analyses of mRNA levels for all Yang cycle genes confirmed this hypothesis for Arabidopsis and Plantago. This includes the Yang cycle genes 5-METHYLTHIORIBOSE-1-PHOSPHATE ISOMERASE1 and DEHYDRATASE-ENOLASE-PHOSPHATASE-COMPLEX1. We show that these two enzymes are sufficient for the conversion of methylthioribose-1-phosphate to 1,2-dihydroxy-3-keto-5-methylthiopentene. In bacteria, fungi, and animals, the same conversion is catalyzed in three to four separate enzymatic steps. Furthermore, comparative analyses of vascular and nonvascular metabolites identified Met, S-adenosyl Met, and MTA preferentially or almost exclusively in the vascular tissue. Our data represent a comprehensive characterization of the Yang cycle in higher plants and demonstrate that the Yang cycle works primarily in the vasculature. Finally, expression analyses of polyamine biosynthetic genes suggest that the Yang cycle in leaves recycles MTA derived primarily from polyamine biosynthesis.

  16. Phloem-specific expression of Yang cycle genes and identification of novel Yang cycle enzymes in Plantago and Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Pommerrenig, Benjamin; Feussner, Kirstin; Zierer, Wolfgang; Rabinovych, Valentyna; Klebl, Franz; Feussner, Ivo; Sauer, Norbert

    2011-05-01

    The 5-methylthioadenosine (MTA) or Yang cycle is a set of reactions that recycle MTA to Met. In plants, MTA is a byproduct of polyamine, ethylene, and nicotianamine biosynthesis. Vascular transcriptome analyses revealed phloem-specific expression of the Yang cycle gene 5-METHYLTHIORIBOSE KINASE1 (MTK1) in Plantago major and Arabidopsis thaliana. As Arabidopsis has only a single MTK gene, we hypothesized that the expression of other Yang cycle genes might also be vascular specific. Reporter gene studies and quantitative analyses of mRNA levels for all Yang cycle genes confirmed this hypothesis for Arabidopsis and Plantago. This includes the Yang cycle genes 5-METHYLTHIORIBOSE-1-PHOSPHATE ISOMERASE1 and DEHYDRATASE-ENOLASE-PHOSPHATASE-COMPLEX1. We show that these two enzymes are sufficient for the conversion of methylthioribose-1-phosphate to 1,2-dihydroxy-3-keto-5-methylthiopentene. In bacteria, fungi, and animals, the same conversion is catalyzed in three to four separate enzymatic steps. Furthermore, comparative analyses of vascular and nonvascular metabolites identified Met, S-adenosyl Met, and MTA preferentially or almost exclusively in the vascular tissue. Our data represent a comprehensive characterization of the Yang cycle in higher plants and demonstrate that the Yang cycle works primarily in the vasculature. Finally, expression analyses of polyamine biosynthetic genes suggest that the Yang cycle in leaves recycles MTA derived primarily from polyamine biosynthesis. PMID:21540433

  17. Modulation of Vascular ACE by Oxidative Stress in Young Syrian Cardiomyopathic Hamsters: Therapeutic Implications.

    PubMed

    Cruz, Nildris; Miranda, Jorge D; Crespo, Maria J

    2016-01-01

    Increased vascular angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) activity and oxidative stress are present in young Syrian cardiomyopathic hamsters (SCH) before the clinical manifestation of heart failure (HF). The developmental time-course of these alterations and their potential interactions, however, are still unknown. We evaluated mRNA and protein levels of ACE, endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in the vasculature of SCH from one to four months of age. Total RNA and proteins were quantified with real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Western blot, respectively. The role of nitric oxide (NO) on vascular ACE activity was also assessed. ACE mRNA and protein levels were up-regulated in SCH at two months of age compared with controls (CT) (p < 0.05). At this two-month stage, eNOS protein levels were lower in SCH (87%) than in CT (100%) (p < 0.05), although iNOS protein levels increased significantly (482%) compared to CT (100%; p < 0.05). In addition, ACE mRNA expression and activity were modulated by NO at two months of age. Thus, the combination of low eNOS and high iNOS protein levels may underlie vascular renin-angiotensin system (RAS) over-activation. Altogether, these factors may contribute to the development of endothelial dysfunction and vascular hyper-reactivity in the early stages of heart failure, and eventually trigger cardiac deterioration in this animal model of HF. PMID:27420103

  18. Antioxidant and ACE Inhibitory Bioactive Peptides Purified from Egg Yolk Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Yousr, Marwa; Howell, Nazlin

    2015-01-01

    Protein by-products from the extraction of lecithin from egg yolk can be converted into value-added products, such as bioactive hydrolysates and peptides that have potential health enhancing antioxidant, and antihypertensive properties. In this study, the antioxidant and angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory activities of peptides isolated and purified from egg yolk protein were investigated. Defatted egg yolk was hydrolyzed using pepsin and pancreatin and sequentially fractionated by ultrafiltration, followed by gel filtration to produce egg yolk gel filtration fractions (EYGF). Of these, two fractions, EYGF-23 and EYGF-33, effectively inhibited the peroxides and thiobarbituric acid reactive substance (TBARS) in an oxidizing linoleic acid model system. The antioxidant mechanism involved superoxide anion and hydroxyl radicals scavenging and ferrous chelation. The presence of hydrophobic amino acids such as tyrosine (Y) and tryptophan (W), in sequences identified by LC-MS as WYGPD (EYGF-23) and KLSDW (EYGF-33), contributed to the antioxidant activity and were not significantly different from the synthetic BHA antioxidant. A third fraction (EYGF-56) was also purified from egg yolk protein by gel filtration and exhibited high ACE inhibitory activity (69%) and IC50 value (3.35 mg/mL). The SDNRNQGY peptide (10 mg/mL) had ACE inhibitory activity, which was not significantly different from that of the positive control captopril (0.5 mg/mL). In addition, YPSPV in (EYGF-33) (10 mg/mL) had higher ACE inhibitory activity compared with captopril. These findings indicated a substantial potential for producing valuable peptides with antioxidant and ACE inhibitory activity from egg yolk. PMID:26690134

  19. Modulation of Vascular ACE by Oxidative Stress in Young Syrian Cardiomyopathic Hamsters: Therapeutic Implications

    PubMed Central

    Cruz, Nildris; Miranda, Jorge D.; Crespo, Maria J.

    2016-01-01

    Increased vascular angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) activity and oxidative stress are present in young Syrian cardiomyopathic hamsters (SCH) before the clinical manifestation of heart failure (HF). The developmental time-course of these alterations and their potential interactions, however, are still unknown. We evaluated mRNA and protein levels of ACE, endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in the vasculature of SCH from one to four months of age. Total RNA and proteins were quantified with real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Western blot, respectively. The role of nitric oxide (NO) on vascular ACE activity was also assessed. ACE mRNA and protein levels were up-regulated in SCH at two months of age compared with controls (CT) (p < 0.05). At this two-month stage, eNOS protein levels were lower in SCH (87%) than in CT (100%) (p < 0.05), although iNOS protein levels increased significantly (482%) compared to CT (100%; p < 0.05). In addition, ACE mRNA expression and activity were modulated by NO at two months of age. Thus, the combination of low eNOS and high iNOS protein levels may underlie vascular renin-angiotensin system (RAS) over-activation. Altogether, these factors may contribute to the development of endothelial dysfunction and vascular hyper-reactivity in the early stages of heart failure, and eventually trigger cardiac deterioration in this animal model of HF. PMID:27420103

  20. The two endo-β-N-acetylglucosaminidase genes from Arabidopsis thaliana encode cytoplasmic enzymes controlling free N-glycan levels.

    PubMed

    Fischl, Richard M; Stadlmann, Johannes; Grass, Josephine; Altmann, Friedrich; Léonard, Renaud

    2011-10-01

    Endo-β-N-acetylglucosaminidases (ENGases) cleave N-glycans from proteins and/or peptides by hydrolyzing the O-glycosidic linkage between the two core-N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) residues. Although, two homologous genes potentially encoding ENGases have been identified in Arabidopsis thaliana, their respective substrate specificity, their subcellular and their organ specific localization was hitherto unknown. In order to investigate the role of ENGases in this model plant species, we transiently expressed the two A. thaliana genes in Nicotiana benthamiana and determined the substrate specificities, as well as the Km values, of the purified recombinant enzymes. The assumed predominantly cytosolic localisation of both enzymes, here referred to as AtENGase85A and AtENGase85B, was determined by confocal microscopy of plant leaves expressing the respective GFP-fusion constructs. For the individual characterization of the two enzymes expression patterns in planta, single knock-out plants were selected for both genes. Although both enzymes are present in most organs, only AtENGase85A (At5g05460) was expressed in stems and no ENGase activity was detected in siliques. A double knock-out was generated by crossing but-like single knock-out plants-no apparent phenotype was observed. In contrast, in this double knock-out, free N-glycans carrying a single GlcNAc at the reducing end are completely absent and their counterparts with two GlcNAc-visible only at a trace level in wild type-accumulated dramatically.

  1. Substrate-driven gene expression in Roseburia inulinivorans: Importance of inducible enzymes in the utilization of inulin and starch

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Karen P.; Martin, Jenny C.; Chassard, Christophe; Clerget, Marlene; Potrykus, Joanna; Campbell, Gill; Mayer, Claus-Dieter; Young, Pauline; Rucklidge, Garry; Ramsay, Alan G.; Flint, Harry J.

    2011-01-01

    Roseburia inulinivorans is a recently identified motile representative of the Firmicutes that contributes to butyrate formation from a variety of dietary polysaccharide substrates in the human large intestine. Microarray analysis was used here to investigate substrate-driven gene-expression changes in R. inulinivorans A2-194. A cluster of fructo-oligosaccharide/inulin utilization genes induced during growth on inulin included one encoding a β-fructofuranosidase protein that was prominent in the proteome of inulin-grown cells. This cluster also included a 6-phosphofructokinase and an ABC transport system, whereas a distinct inulin-induced 1-phosphofructokinase was linked to a fructose-specific phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent sugar phosphotransferase system (PTS II transport enzyme). Real-time PCR analysis showed that the β-fructofuranosidase and adjacent ABC transport protein showed greatest induction during growth on inulin, whereas the 1-phosphofructokinase enzyme and linked sugar phosphotransferase transport system were most strongly up-regulated during growth on fructose, indicating that these two clusters play distinct roles in the use of inulin. The R. inulinivorans β-fructofuranosidase was overexpressed in Escherichia coli and shown to hydrolyze fructans ranging from inulin down to sucrose, with greatest activity on fructo-oligosaccharides. Genes induced on starch included the major extracellular α-amylase and two distinct α-glucanotransferases together with a gene encoding a flagellin protein. The latter response may be concerned with improving bacterial access to insoluble starch particles. PMID:20679207

  2. Substrate-driven gene expression in Roseburia inulinivorans: importance of inducible enzymes in the utilization of inulin and starch.

    PubMed

    Scott, Karen P; Martin, Jenny C; Chassard, Christophe; Clerget, Marlene; Potrykus, Joanna; Campbell, Gill; Mayer, Claus-Dieter; Young, Pauline; Rucklidge, Garry; Ramsay, Alan G; Flint, Harry J

    2011-03-15

    Roseburia inulinivorans is a recently identified motile representative of the Firmicutes that contributes to butyrate formation from a variety of dietary polysaccharide substrates in the human large intestine. Microarray analysis was used here to investigate substrate-driven gene-expression changes in R. inulinivorans A2-194. A cluster of fructo-oligosaccharide/inulin utilization genes induced during growth on inulin included one encoding a β-fructofuranosidase protein that was prominent in the proteome of inulin-grown cells. This cluster also included a 6-phosphofructokinase and an ABC transport system, whereas a distinct inulin-induced 1-phosphofructokinase was linked to a fructose-specific phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent sugar phosphotransferase system (PTS II transport enzyme). Real-time PCR analysis showed that the β-fructofuranosidase and adjacent ABC transport protein showed greatest induction during growth on inulin, whereas the 1-phosphofructokinase enzyme and linked sugar phosphotransferase transport system were most strongly up-regulated during growth on fructose, indicating that these two clusters play distinct roles in the use of inulin. The R. inulinivorans β-fructofuranosidase was overexpressed in Escherichia coli and shown to hydrolyze fructans ranging from inulin down to sucrose, with greatest activity on fructo-oligosaccharides. Genes induced on starch included the major extracellular α-amylase and two distinct α-glucanotransferases together with a gene encoding a flagellin protein. The latter response may be concerned with improving bacterial access to insoluble starch particles.

  3. Combined suppression of the intrarenal and circulating vasoconstrictor renin-ACE-ANG II axis and augmentation of the vasodilator ACE2-ANG 1-7-Mas axis attenuates the systemic hypertension in Ren-2 transgenic rats exposed to chronic hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Červenka, L; Bíbová, J; Husková, Z; Vaňourková, Z; Kramer, H J; Herget, J; Jíchová, Š; Sadowski, J; Hampl, V

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to test the hypothesis that chronic hypoxia would aggravate hypertension in Ren-2 transgenic rats (TGR), a well-defined monogenetic model of hypertension with increased activity of endogenous renin-angiotensin system (RAS). Systolic blood pressure (SBP) in conscious rats and mean arterial pressure (MAP) in anesthetized TGR and normotensive Hannover Sprague-Dawley (HanSD) rats were determined under normoxia that was either continuous or interrupted by two weeks´ hypoxia. Expression, activities and concentrations of individual components of RAS were studied in plasma and kidney of TGR and HanSD rats under normoxic conditions and after exposure to chronic hypoxia. In HanSD rats two weeks´ exposure to chronic hypoxia did not alter SBP and MAP. Surprisingly, in TGR it decreased markedly SBP and MAP; this was associated with substantial reduction in plasma and kidney renin activities and also of angiotensin II (ANG II) levels, without altering angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) activities. Simultaneously, in TGR the exposure to hypoxia increased kidney ACE type 2 (ACE2) activity and angiotensin 1-7 (ANG 1-7) concentrations as compared with TGR under continuous normoxia. Based on these results, we propose that suppression of the hypertensiogenic ACE-ANG II axis in the circulation and kidney tissue, combined with augmentation of the intrarenal vasodilator ACE2-ANG 1-7 axis, is the main mechanism responsible for the blood pressure-lowering effects of chronic hypoxia in TGR. PMID:25194129

  4. Antioxidant, antibacterial and ACE-inhibitory activity of four monofloral honeys in relation to their chemical composition.

    PubMed

    León-Ruiz, Virginia; González-Porto, Amelia V; Al-Habsi, Nasser; Vera, Soledad; San Andrés, María Paz; Jauregi, Paula

    2013-11-01

    Different monofloral honeys from Castilla-La Mancha (Spain) have been studied in order to determine their main functional and biological properties. Thyme honey and chestnut honey possess the highest antioxidant capacity, which is due to their high vitamin C (in thyme honey) and total polyphenolic content (in chestnut honey). On the other hand, chestnut honey showed high antimicrobial activity against Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli, whilst others had no activity against S. aureus and showed very small activity against E. coli. Moreover it was found that the antimicrobial activity measured in chestnut honey was partly due to its lysozyme content. In addition the angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory activity was measured, and the ACE inhibition is one mechanism by which antihypertensive activity is exerted in vivo. All the types of honey showed some activity but chestnut honey had the highest ACE inhibitory activity. PMID:24056722

  5. In vitro autoradiographic localization of angiotensin-converting enzyme in sarcoid lymph nodes

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, R.K.; Chai, S.Y.; Dunbar, M.S.; Mendelsohn, F.A.

    1986-09-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) was localized in sarcoid lymph nodes by an in vitro autoradiographic technique using a synthetic ACE inhibitor of high affinity, /sup 125/I-labelled 351A. The lymph nodes were from seven patients with active sarcoidosis who underwent mediastinoscopy and from six control subjects who had nodes resected at either mediastinoscopy or laparotomy. Angiotensin-converting enzyme was localized in the epithelioid cells of sarcoid granulomata in markedly increased amounts compared with control nodes, where it was restricted to vessels and some histiocytes. In sarcoid lymph nodes, there was little ACE present in lymphocytes or fibrous tissue. Sarcoid nodes with considerable fibrosis had much less intense ACE activity than the nonfibrotic nodes. The specific activity of ACE measured by an enzymatic assay in both the control and sarcoid lymph nodes closely reflected the ACE activity demonstrated by autoradiography. Sarcoid lymph nodes with fibrosis had an ACE specific activity of half that of nonfibrotic nodes (p less than 0.05). There was a 15-fold increase in specific ACE activity in sarcoid nodes (p less than 0.05) compared to normal. Serum ACE was significantly higher in those sarcoid patients whose lymph nodes were not fibrosed compared with those with fibrosis (p less than 0.01). This technique offers many advantages over the use of polyclonal antibodies. The 351A is a highly specific ACE inhibitor, chemically defined and in limitless supply. This method enables the quantitation of results, and autoradiographs may be stored indefinitely for later comparison.

  6. Expression of genes coding for antioxidant enzymes and heat shock proteins is altered in primary cultures of rat hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Van Remmen, H; Williams, M D; Heydari, A R; Takahashi, R; Chung, H Y; Yu, B P; Richardson, A

    1996-02-01

    The expression of genes for heat shock proteins in the HSP70 family and genes for antioxidant enzymes was studied in rat hepatocytes cultured in either L-15 or Williams E media on a collagen matrix for up to 48 hours. The mRNA transcripts for the heat shock proteins hsp70, hsc70, and grp78 were induced dramatically when hepatocytes were cultured in L-15, and to a lesser extent when cultured in Williams E. The increase in hsp70 and hsc70 mRNA levels in the cultured hepatocytes was correlated with an increase in the nuclear transcription of these two genes and the binding activity of the heat shock transcription factor to the heat shock element. Culturing rat hepatocytes in either L-15 or Williams E resulted in a decrease in the levels of the mRNA transcripts for catalase and glutathione peroxidase and the activities of these two enzymes. However, the expression of Cu/Zn-superoxide dismutase, i.e., the level of the mRNA transcript or the enzymatic activity, did not change appreciably when hepatocytes were cultured for up to 48 hours. The decline in catalase and glutathione peroxidase expression in the cultured hepatocytes was correlated with a decrease in the GSH/GSSG ratio and an increase in lipid peroxidation. These data show that the expression of several genes involved in cellular protection change when hepatocytes are placed in primary cultures. Therefore, one must be careful in extrapolating from primary cultures to the liver in vivo, especially when studying processes that might be affected by heat shock proteins or antioxidant enzymes.

  7. Angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors produced by Streptomyces chromofuscus. Discovery, taxonomy and fermentation.

    PubMed

    Nakatsukasa, W M; Wilgus, R M; Thomas, D N; Mertz, F P; Boeck, L D

    1985-08-01

    Culture A58365.1, NRRL 15098, identified as a new strain of Streptomyces chromofuscus, was found to produce two novel angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, A58365A and A58365B. Fermentation medium studies afforded an increase in ACE inhibitor titers from less than 1 microgram/ml to greater than 20 micrograms/ml. Proline was the obligatory supplement for ACE inhibitor biosynthesis.

  8. Expression of the lipid transfer protein Ace-AMP1 in transgenic wheat enhances antifungal activity and defense responses.

    PubMed

    Roy-Barman, Subhankar; Sautter, Christof; Chattoo, Bharat B

    2006-08-01

    To enhance fungal disease resistance, wheat plants (cv. Bobwhite) were engineered to constitutively express the potent antimicrobial protein Ace-AMP1 from Allium cepa, driven by a maize ubiquitin promoter along with its first intron. The bar gene was used for selection of putative transformants on medium containing phosphinothricin (PPT). Transgene inheritance, integration and stability of expression were confirmed over two generations by PCR, Southern, northern and western blot analyses, respectively. The levels of Ace-AMP1 in different transgenic lines correlated with the transcript levels of the transgene. Up to 50% increase in resistance to Blumeria graminis f. sp. tritici was detected in detached leaf assays. In ears of transgenic wheat inoculated with Neovossia indica, Ace-AMP1 intensified expression of defense-related genes. Elevated levels of salicylic acid and of transcripts of phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL), glucanase (PR2) and chitinase (PR3) in the transgenic plants indicated manifestation of systemic acquired resistance (SAR). PMID:16906444

  9. Gene expression in the DpnI and DpnII restriction enzyme systems of Streptococcus pneumoniae

    SciTech Connect

    Lacks, S.A.; Sabelnikov, A.G.; Chen, Jau-Der; Greenberg, B.

    1992-12-31

    Although a number of bacterial species are naturally transformable, that is, their cells are able to take up external DNA in substantial amounts and integrate it into the chromosome without artificial manipulation of the cell surface, Streptococcus pneumoniae, the first species in which this phenomenon was detected, remains a prototype of such transformation. Cells of S. pneumonias also contain potent restriction endonucleases able to severely restrict DNA introduced during viral infection. Our current understanding of the genetic basis of the complementary DpnI and DpnII restriction systems and of the biochemistry of their component enzymes are briefly reviewed. The manner in which these enzymes impinge on the transfer of chromosomal genes and of plasmeds will be examined in detail. It will be seen that far from acting against foreign DNA in general, the restriction systems seem to be designed to exclude only infecting viral DNA The presence of complementary restriction systems in different cells of S. pneumonias enhances their effectiveness in blocking viral infection and promoting species survival. This enhanced effectiveness requires the expression of alternative restriction systems. Therefore, the ability of the cells to transfer the restriction enzyme genes and to regulate their expression are important for survival of the species.

  10. Coal-burning endemic fluorosis is associated with reduced activity in antioxidative enzymes and Cu/Zn-SOD gene expression.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qi; Cui, Kang-ping; Xu, Yuan-yuan; Gao, Yan-ling; Zhao, Jing; Li, Da-sheng; Li, Xiao-lei; Huang, Hou-jin

    2014-02-01

    To study the effect of fluorine on the oxidative stress in coal-burning fluorosis, we investigated the environmental characteristics of coal-burning endemic fluorosis combined with fluorine content surveillance in air, water, food, briquette, and clay binder samples from Bijie region, Guizhou Province, southwest of China. The activities of antioxidant enzymes including copper/zinc superoxide dismutase (Cu/Zn-SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), and level of lipid peroxidation such as malondialdehyde (MDA) were measured in serum samples obtained from subjects residing in the Bijie region. Expression of the Cu/Zn-SOD gene was assessed by quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR (qRT-PCR). Our results showed that people suffering from endemic fluorosis (the high and low exposure groups) had much higher MDA level. Their antioxidant enzyme activities and Cu/Zn-SOD gene expression levels were lower when compared to healthy people (the control group). Fluorosis can decrease the activities of antioxidant enzymes, which was associated with exposure level of fluorine. Down-regulation of Cu/Zn-SOD expression may play an important role in the aggravation of oxidative stress in endemic fluorosis.

  11. The gene expression of the main lipogenic enzymes is downregulated in visceral adipose tissue of obese subjects.

    PubMed

    Ortega, Francisco J; Mayas, Dolores; Moreno-Navarrete, José M; Catalán, Victoria; Gómez-Ambrosi, Javier; Esteve, Eduardo; Rodriguez-Hermosa, Jose I; Ruiz, Bartomeu; Ricart, Wifredo; Peral, Belen; Fruhbeck, Gema; Tinahones, Francisco J; Fernández-Real, José M

    2010-01-01

    Contradictory findings regarding the gene expression of the main lipogenic enzymes in human adipose tissue depots have been reported. In this cross-sectional study, we aimed to evaluate the mRNA expression of fatty acid synthase (FAS) and acetyl-CoA carboxilase (ACC) in omental and subcutaneous (SC) fat depots from subjects who varied widely in terms of body fat mass. FAS and ACC gene expression were evaluated by real time-PCR in 188 samples of visceral adipose tissue which were obtained during elective surgical procedures in 119 women and 69 men. Decreased sex-adjusted FAS (-59%) and ACC (-49%) mRNA were found in visceral adipose tissue from obese subjects, with and without diabetes mellitus type 2 (DM-2), compared with lean subjects (both P < 0.0001). FAS mRNA was also decreased (-40%) in fat depots from overweight subjects (P < 0.05). Indeed, FAS mRNA was significantly and positively associated with ACC gene expression (r = 0.316, P < 0.0001) and negatively with BMI (r = -0.274), waist circumference (r = -0.437), systolic blood pressure (r = -0.310), serum glucose (r = -0.277), and fasting triglycerides (r = -0.226), among others (all P < 0.0001). Similar associations were observed for ACC gene expression levels. In a representative subgroup of nonobese (n = 4) and obese women (n = 6), relative FAS gene expression levels significantly correlated (r = 0.657, P = 0.034; n = 10) with FAS protein values. FAS protein levels were also inversely correlated with blood glucose (r = -0.640, P = 0.046) and fasting triglycerides (r = -0.832, P = 0.010). In conclusion, the gene expression of the main lipogenic enzymes is downregulated in visceral adipose tissue from obese subjects.

  12. Binding of ACE-inhibitors to in vitro and patient-derived amyloid-β fibril models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhavaraju, Manikanthan; Phillips, Malachi; Bowman, Deborah; Aceves-Hernandez, Juan M.; Hansmann, Ulrich H. E.

    2016-01-01

    Currently, no drugs exist that can prevent or reverse Alzheimer's disease, a neurodegenerative disease associated with the presence, in the brain, of plaques that are composed of β-amyloid (Aβ) peptides. Recent studies suggest that angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, a set of drugs used to treat hypertension, may inhibit amyloid formation in vitro. In the present study, we investigate through computer simulations the binding of ACE inhibitors to patient-derived Aβ fibrils and contrast it with that of ACE inhibitors binding to in vitro generated fibrils. The binding affinities of the ACE inhibitors are compared with that of Congo red, a dye that is used to identify amyloid structures and that is known to be a weak inhibitor of Aβ aggregation. We find that ACE inhibitors have a lower binding affinity to the patient-derived fibrils than to in vitro generated ones. For patient-derived fibrils, their binding affinities are even lower than that of Congo red. Our observations raise doubts on the hypothesis that these drugs inhibit fibril formation in Alzheimer patients by interacting directly with the amyloids.

  13. Methods for the isolation of genes encoding novel PHB cycle enzymes from complex microbial communities.

    PubMed

    Nordeste, Ricardo F; Trainer, Maria A; Charles, Trevor C

    2010-01-01

    Development of different PHAs as alternatives to petrochemically derived plastics can be facilitated by mining metagenomic libraries for diverse PHA cycle genes that might be useful for synthesis of bioplastics. The specific phenotypes associated with mutations of the PHA synthesis pathway genes in Sinorhizobium meliloti allows for the use of powerful selection and screening tools to identify complementing novel PHA synthesis genes. Identification of novel genes through their function rather than sequence facilitates finding functional proteins that may otherwise have been excluded through sequence-only screening methodology. We present here methods that we have developed for the isolation of clones expressing novel PHA metabolism genes from metagenomic libraries.

  14. Methods for the isolation of genes encoding novel PHB cycle enzymes from complex microbial communities.

    PubMed

    Nordeste, Ricardo F; Trainer, Maria A; Charles, Trevor C

    2010-01-01

    Development of different PHAs as alternatives to petrochemically derived plastics can be facilitated by mining metagenomic libraries for diverse PHA cycle genes that might be useful for synthesis of bioplastics. The specific phenotypes associated with mutations of the PHA synthesis pathway genes in Sinorhizobium meliloti allows for the use of powerful selection and screening tools to identify complementing novel PHA synthesis genes. Identification of novel genes through their function rather than sequence facilitates finding functional proteins that may otherwise have been excluded through sequence-only screening methodology. We present here methods that we have developed for the isolation of clones expressing novel PHA metabolism genes from metagenomic libraries. PMID:20830568

  15. Coordinate regulation of two genes encoding gluconeogenic enzymes by the trans-dominant locus Tse-1.

    PubMed Central

    Lem, J; Chin, A C; Thayer, M J; Leach, R J; Fournier, R E

    1988-01-01

    Tissue-specific extinguisher-1 (Tse-1) is a mouse genetic locus that can repress liver-specific tyrosine aminotransferase gene expression in trans. To search for other Tse-1-responsive genes, hepatoma microcell hybrids retaining mouse chromosome 11 or human chromosome 17, containing murine Tse-1 and human TSE1, respectively, were screened for expression of liver-specific mRNAs. While most liver gene activity was unaffected in such hybrids, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase and tyrosine aminotransferase gene expression was coordinately repressed in these clones. Extinction of both genes was apparently mediated by a single genetic locus that resides on human chromosome 17. Images PMID:2902627

  16. ACE inhibition by astilbin isolated from Erythroxylum gonocladum (Mart.) O.E. Schulz.

    PubMed

    Lucas-Filho, M D; Silva, G C; Cortes, S F; Mares-Guia, T R; Perpétua Ferraz, V; Serra, C P; Braga, F C

    2010-04-01

    Erythroxylum species have several traditional uses in different countries, including the treatment of hypertension. The ethanol extract from E. gonocladum aerial parts, a species endemic to the Brazilian cerrado, elicited a concentration-dependent inhibition of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) (pIC(50)=4.53+/-0.05). Extract fractionation led to the isolation of two compounds, whose structures were assigned by spectrometric data as astilbin and beta-sitosterol, along with a mixture of palmitic, stearic and linolenic acids. This is the first report on the occurrence of these compounds on E. gonocladum. Astilbin promoted significant ACE inhibition in vitro (pIC(50)=5.86+/-0.33) and its activity did not differ from captopril, when both compounds were assayed at 10 microM concentration.

  17. Biochemical identification and ganglionic localization of leech angiotensin-converting enzymes.

    PubMed

    Vandenbulcke, F; Laurent, V; Verger-Bocquet, M; Stefano, G B; Salzet, M

    1997-10-01

    We demonstrate the presence of a membrane and soluble form of leech Theromyzon tessulatum angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE). Four steps in the purification of this enzyme include gel-permeation, captopril-sepharose affinity and anion-exchange chromatography followed by a reverse-phase HPLC. The peptidyl dipeptidases (of approximately 120 and approximately 100 kDa) are glycosylated enzymes hydrolysing the Phe8-His9 bond of angiotensin I, exhibiting the same specific activity and Km whereas the soluble ACE exhibits a higher catalytic efficiency. This hydrolysis is inhibited by the ACE-specific antagonist captopril. Western blot analysis of a polyclonal antiserum raised against the first 11 amino-acid residues of the membrane ACE and the N-terminal sequence of the soluble molecule also demonstrates the presence of two ACE enzymes. Anti-ACE immunocytochemistry also supports the presence of two forms of ACE. This material is found in neurons and glia. We demonstrate for the first time the cellular localization and biochemical characterization of ACEs in the central nervous system of an invertebrate. Thus, the leech brain may represent a simple model for the study of these enzymes.

  18. ACE inhibitors could be therapeutic for antisocial personality disorder.

    PubMed

    Hobgood, Donna K

    2013-11-01

    Antisocial personality traits are an important topic for research. The societal cost of these behaviors encourages efforts at a better understanding of central nervous system causes. Catecholamine genes are being studied to facilitate this understanding, and some tentative findings are being reached about several of these genes. It seems that many genes play a role to produce antisocial behaviors so complexity of elucidating each gene is obvious. One conclusion that could be drawn from the current research findings is that DA2 like receptors (DRD2, DRD3, DRD4) with alleles that decrease neurotransmission are facilitatory of antisocial behaviors. DA2 like receptors cause neuronal firing to inhibit many peripheral functions through adenylyl cyclase inhibition. When these receptors are less active by genetically decreased density, lower affinity, or by low dopamine levels as final common pathways then inhibition is released and a state of disinhibition can be said to describe this state. Peripheral metabolism is increased and behavioral activation is noted. Renin is disinhibited in this setting thus allowing sympathetic nervous system activation. The fight or flight behaviors thus produced, in the extreme, would be the setting of antisocial behavior. Research validates this hypothesis. Understanding this final common pathway toward antisocial behavior should lead to better treatment for individuals with this pattern of behavior before they have caused harm to themselves and others. ACE inhibitors are well tolerated drugs used in the treatment of hypertension and heart failure and would also treat antisocial behavior disorders.

  19. Investigation of genetic variants in ubiquitin enzyme genes involved in the modulation of neurodevelopmental processes: a role in schizophrenia susceptibility?

    PubMed

    Andrews, Jessica L; Fernandez-Enright, Francesca

    2014-11-24

    Despite extensive research during the last few decades, the etiology of schizophrenia remains unclear. Evidence of both genetic and environmental influences in the developmental profile of schizophrenia has grown, and due to the complexity of this disorder, a polygenic aspect has been associated with this neuropsychiatric pathology. Unfortunately, no diagnostic strategies based on biological measurement or genetic testing is currently available for schizophrenia. Gene-expression profiling and recent protein studies have shown a decrease in the expression of ubiquitin pathway proteins in the prefrontal cortex of schizophrenia patients. We have examined single nucleotide polymorphisms (or SNPs) within three genes from the ubiquitin protein system: the ubiquitin conjugating enzyme E2D1 (UBE2D1) gene, the E3 SUMO-protein ligase protein inhibitor of activated STAT 2 (PIAS2) gene, and the E3 ubiquitin ligase F-box and leucine-rich repeat protein 21 (FBXL21) gene, in a Caucasian case-control population for schizophrenia. After Bonferroni correction for multiple testing was applied, no significant associations were reported for any of the tested SNPs. Additional genetic analyses will be necessary to fully explore the role of these three genes in schizophrenia. Regarding the rising interest in ubiquitin-related proteins as a therapeutic target in other pathologies such as cancer, further research into the role of ubiquitin pathways in schizophrenia seems topical and timely.

  20. A chromatin modifying enzyme, SDG8, is involved in morphological, gene expression, and epigenetic responses to mechanical stimulation.

    PubMed

    Cazzonelli, Christopher I; Nisar, Nazia; Roberts, Andrea C; Murray, Kevin D; Borevitz, Justin O; Pogson, Barry J

    2014-01-01

    Thigmomorphogenesis is viewed as being a response process of acclimation to short repetitive bursts of mechanical stimulation or touch. The underlying molecular mechanisms that coordinate changes in how touch signals lead to long-term morphological changes are enigmatic. Touch responsive gene expression is rapid and transient, and no transcription factor or DNA regulatory motif has been reported that could confer a genome wide mechanical stimulus. We report here on a chromatin modifying enzyme, SDG8/ASHH2, which can regulate the expression of many touch responsive genes identified in Arabidopsis. SDG8 is required for the permissive expression of touch induced genes; and the loss of function of sdg8 perturbs the maximum levels of induction on selected touch gene targets. SDG8 is required to maintain permissive H3K4 trimethylation marks surrounding the Arabidopsis touch-inducible gene TOUCH 3 (TCH3), which encodes a calmodulin-like protein (CML12). The gene neighboring was also slightly down regulated, revealing a new target for SDG8 mediated chromatin modification. Finally, sdg8 mutants show perturbed morphological response to wind-agitated mechanical stimuli, implicating an epigenetic memory-forming process in the acclimation response of thigmomorphogenesis. PMID:25374573

  1. A chromatin modifying enzyme, SDG8, is involved in morphological, gene expression, and epigenetic responses to mechanical stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Cazzonelli, Christopher I.; Nisar, Nazia; Roberts, Andrea C.; Murray, Kevin D.; Borevitz, Justin O.; Pogson, Barry J.

    2014-01-01

    Thigmomorphogenesis is viewed as being a response process of acclimation to short repetitive bursts of mechanical stimulation or touch. The underlying molecular mechanisms that coordinate changes in how touch signals lead to long-term morphological changes are enigmatic. Touch responsive gene expression is rapid and transient, and no transcription factor or DNA regulatory motif has been reported that could confer a genome wide mechanical stimulus. We report here on a chromatin modifying enzyme, SDG8/ASHH2, which can regulate the expression of many touch responsive genes identified in Arabidopsis. SDG8 is required for the permissive expression of touch induced genes; and the loss of function of sdg8 perturbs the maximum levels of induction on selected touch gene targets. SDG8 is required to maintain permissive H3K4 trimethylation marks surrounding the Arabidopsis touch-inducible gene TOUCH 3 (TCH3), which encodes a calmodulin-like protein (CML12). The gene neighboring was also slightly down regulated, revealing a new target for SDG8 mediated chromatin modification. Finally, sdg8 mutants show perturbed morphological response to wind-agitated mechanical stimuli, implicating an epigenetic memory-forming process in the acclimation response of thigmomorphogenesis. PMID:25374573

  2. Cooperative Activation of a Eukaryotic Transcription Factor: Interaction between Cu(I) and Yeast ACE1 Protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furst, Peter; Hamer, Dean

    1989-07-01

    Cu ions activate yeast metallothionein gene transcription by altering the conformation and DNA-binding activity of the ACE1 transcription factor. We show that this conformational switch occurs in an all-or-none highly cooperative fashion (Hill coefficient = 4). Analysis of the subunit composition of ACE1 bound to DNA indicates that cooperativity results from the binding of multiple Cu(I) ions to the cysteine-rich DNA-binding domain. Surprisingly, DNA has little effect on the interaction between Cu(I) and ACE1 as assayed by partial proteolysis; this suggests that the effect of the metal on DNA binding is primarily kinetic rather than thermodynamic. Although Ag(I) also activates ACE1, it acts less cooperatively than the smaller Cu(I) ion and the resulting metalloprotein has a reduced affinity for DNA. The cooperative interaction between Cu and ACE1 allows the cell to respond to a small change in metal concentration by a large change in gene expression.

  3. A comparison of the N-terminal sequence of the leech Theromyzon tessulatum angiotensin converting-like enzyme with forms of vertebrate angiotensin converting enzymes.

    PubMed

    Laurent, V; Salzet, M

    1995-09-22

    This paper reports the purification of an angiotensing-converting like enzyme (ACE) of ca. 120 kDa from extracts of head membranes of the leech Theromyzon tessulatum. After solubilization with Triton X-114, the ACE-like enzyme contained in the detergent-poor fraction was separated using five steps of purification including gel permeation and anion exchange chromatographies followed by reverse-phase HPLC. The first 23 amino acid residues of the N-terminal part (GLDPELSPGCFSADEAGAQLFAE) of the purified S-pyridylethylated leech ACE established by automated Edman degradation revealed ca. 87% sequence identity with the N-terminal sequence of the guinea pig ACE. This enzyme cleaves the hyppuryl-His-Leu substrate with a specific activity of 5600 nmol hyppurate min-1 mg protein-1. Hydrolysis of this substrate by ACE-like enzyme is inhibited at 80% by 10 microM captopril or 10 microM lisinopril (IC50 of 200 nM and 50 nM, respectively). This enzyme is close in sequence and in activity to single domain vertebrate ACE. This is the first N-terminal sequence of an ACE-like enzyme determined in invertebrates.

  4. The interactive effects of mercury and selenium on metabolic profiles, gene expression and antioxidant enzymes in halophyte Suaeda salsa.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoli; Lai, Yongkai; Sun, Hushan; Wang, Yiyan; Zou, Ning

    2016-04-01

    Suaeda salsa is the pioneer halophyte in the Yellow River Delta and was consumed as a popular vegetable. Mercury has become a highly risky contaminant in the sediment of intertidal zones of the Yellow River Delta. In this work, we investigated the interactive effects of mercury and selenium in S. salsa on the basis of metabolic profiling, antioxidant enzyme activities and gene expression quantification. Our results showed that mercury exposure (20 μg L(-1)) inhibited plant growth of S. salsa and induced significant metabolic responses and altered expression levels of INPS, CMO, and MDH in S. salsa samples, together with the increased activities of antioxidant enzymes including SOD and POD. Overall, these results indicated osmotic and oxidative stresses, disturbed protein degradation and energy metabolism change in S. salsa after mercury exposures. Additionally, the addition of selenium could induce both antagonistic and synergistic effects including alleviating protein degradation and aggravating osmotic stress caused by mercury.

  5. Genome organization, phylogenies, expression patterns, and three-dimensional protein models of two acetylcholinesterase genes from the red flour beetle.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yanhui; Pang, Yuan-Ping; Park, Yoonseong; Gao, Xiwu; Yao, Jianxiu; Zhang, Xin; Zhu, Kun Yan

    2012-01-01

    Since the report of a paralogous acetylcholinesterase (AChE, EC3.1.1.7) gene in the greenbug (Schizaphis graminum) in 2002, two different AChE genes (Ace1 and Ace2) have been identified in each of at least 27 insect species. However, the gene models of Ace1 and Ace2, and their molecular properties have not yet been comprehensively analyzed in any insect species. In this study, we sequenced the full-length cDNAs, computationally predicted the corresponding three-dimensional protein models, and profiled developmental stage and tissue-specific expression patterns of two Ace genes from the red flour beetle (Tribolium castaneum; TcAce1 and TcAce2), a globally distributed major pest of stored grain products and an emerging model organism. TcAce1 and TcAce2 encode 648 and 604 amino acid residues, respectively, and have conserved motifs including a choline-binding site, a catalytic triad, and an acyl pocket. Phylogenetic analysis show that both TcAce genes are grouped into two insect Ace clusters and TcAce1 is completely diverged from TcAce2, suggesting that these two genes evolve from their corresponding Ace gene lineages in insect species. In addition, TcAce1 is located on chromosome 5, whereas TcAce2 is located on chromosome 2. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and quantitative real-time PCR analyses indicate that both genes are virtually transcribed in all the developmental stages and predominately expressed in the insect brain. Our computational analyses suggest that the TcAce1 protein is a robust acetylcholine (ACh) hydrolase and has susceptibility to sulfhydryl agents whereas the TcAce2 protein is not a catalytically efficient ACh hydrolase.

  6. Angiotensin converting enzyme in the brain, testis, epididymis, pituitary gland and adrenal gland

    SciTech Connect

    Strittmatter, S.M.

    1986-01-01

    (/sup 3/H)Captopril binds to angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) in rat tissue homogenates. The pharmacology, regional distribution and copurification of (/sup 3/H)captopril binding with enzymatic activity demonstrate the selectivity of (/sup 3/H)captopril labeling of ACE. (/sup 3/H)Captopril binding to purified ACE reveals differences in cationic dependence and anionic regulation between substrate catalysis and inhibitor recognition. (/sup 3/H)Captopril association with ACE is entropically driven. The selectivity of (/sup 3/H)captopril binding permits autoradiographic localization of the ACE in the brain, male reproductive system, pituitary gland and adrenal gland. In the brain, ACE is visualized in a striatonigral neuronal pathway which develops between 1 and 7 d after birth. In the male reproductive system, (/sup 3/H)captopril associated silver grains are found over spermatid heads and in the lumen of seminiferous tubules in stages I-VIII and XII-XIV. In the pituitary gland, ACE is localized to the posterior lobe and patches of the anterior lobe. The adrenal medulla contains moderate ACE levels while low levels are found in the adrenal cortex. Adrenal medullary ACE is increased after hypophysectomy and after reserpine treatment. The general of ligand binding techniques for the study of enzymes is demonstrated by the specific labeling of another enzyme, enkephaline convertase, in crude tissue homogenates by the inhibitor (/sup 3/H)GEMSA.

  7. Dihydroflavonol 4-reductase genes encode enzymes with contrasting substrate specificity and show divergent gene expression profiles in Fragaria species.

    PubMed

    Miosic, Silvija; Thill, Jana; Milosevic, Malvina; Gosch, Christian; Pober, Sabrina; Molitor, Christian; Ejaz, Shaghef; Rompel, Annette; Stich, Karl; Halbwirth, Heidi

    2014-01-01

    During fruit ripening, strawberries show distinct changes in the flavonoid classes that accumulate, switching from the formation of flavan 3-ols and flavonols in unripe fruits to the accumulation of anthocyanins in the ripe fruits. In the common garden strawberry (Fragaria×ananassa) this is accompanied by a distinct switch in the pattern of hydroxylation demonstrated by the almost exclusive accumulation of pelargonidin based pigments. In Fragaria vesca the proportion of anthocyanins showing one (pelargonidin) and two (cyanidin) hydroxyl groups within the B-ring is almost equal. We isolated two dihydroflavonol 4-reductase (DFR) cDNA clones from strawberry fruits, which show 82% sequence similarity. The encoded enzymes revealed a high variability in substrate specificity. One enzyme variant did not accept DHK (with one hydroxyl group present in the B-ring), whereas the other strongly preferred DHK as a substrate. This appears to be an uncharacterized DFR variant with novel substrate specificity. Both DFRs were expressed in the receptacle and the achenes of both Fragaria species and the DFR2 expression profile showed a pronounced dependence on fruit development, whereas DFR1 expression remained relatively stable. There were, however, significant differences in their relative rates of expression. The DFR1/DFR2 expression ratio was much higher in the Fragaria×ananassa and enzyme preparations from F.×ananassa receptacles showed higher capability to convert DHK than preparations from F. vesca. Anthocyanin concentrations in the F.×ananassa cultivar were more than twofold higher and the cyanidin:pelargonidin ratio was only 0.05 compared to 0.51 in the F. vesca cultivar. The differences in the fruit colour of the two Fragaria species can be explained by the higher expression of DFR1 in F.×ananassa as compared to F. vesca, a higher enzyme efficiency (Kcat/Km values) of DFR1 combined with the loss of F3'H activity late in fruit development of F.×ananassa.

  8. Dihydroflavonol 4-reductase genes encode enzymes with contrasting substrate specificity and show divergent gene expression profiles in Fragaria species.

    PubMed

    Miosic, Silvija; Thill, Jana; Milosevic, Malvina; Gosch, Christian; Pober, Sabrina; Molitor, Christian; Ejaz, Shaghef; Rompel, Annette; Stich, Karl; Halbwirth, Heidi

    2014-01-01

    During fruit ripening, strawberries show distinct changes in the flavonoid classes that accumulate, switching from the formation of flavan 3-ols and flavonols in unripe fruits to the accumulation of anthocyanins in the ripe fruits. In the common garden strawberry (Fragaria×ananassa) this is accompanied by a distinct switch in the pattern of hydroxylation demonstrated by the almost exclusive accumulation of pelargonidin based pigments. In Fragaria vesca the proportion of anthocyanins showing one (pelargonidin) and two (cyanidin) hydroxyl groups within the B-ring is almost equal. We isolated two dihydroflavonol 4-reductase (DFR) cDNA clones from strawberry fruits, which show 82% sequence similarity. The encoded enzymes revealed a high variability in substrate specificity. One enzyme variant did not accept DHK (with one hydroxyl group present in the B-ring), whereas the other strongly preferred DHK as a substrate. This appears to be an uncharacterized DFR variant with novel substrate specificity. Both DFRs were expressed in the receptacle and the achenes of both Fragaria species and the DFR2 expression profile showed a pronounced dependence on fruit development, whereas DFR1 expression remained relatively stable. There were, however, significant differences in their relative rates of expression. The DFR1/DFR2 expression ratio was much higher in the Fragaria×ananassa and enzyme preparations from F.×ananassa receptacles showed higher capability to convert DHK than preparations from F. vesca. Anthocyanin concentrations in the F.×ananassa cultivar were more than twofold higher and the cyanidin:pelargonidin ratio was only 0.05 compared to 0.51 in the F. vesca cultivar. The differences in the fruit colour of the two Fragaria species can be explained by the higher expression of DFR1 in F.×ananassa as compared to F. vesca, a higher enzyme efficiency (Kcat/Km values) of DFR1 combined with the loss of F3'H activity late in fruit development of F.×ananassa. PMID:25393679

  9. Changes in trehalose content, enzyme activity and gene expression related to trehalose metabolism in Flammulina velutipes under heat shock.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jian-Hui; Shang, Xiao-Dong; Liu, Jian-Yu; Tan, Qi

    2016-08-01

    Trehalose plays important roles in the protection of organisms against adverse environmental conditions. The growth and development of Flammulina velutipes is regulated and controlled under complex external conditions. This study investigated the effect of heat stress on trehalose metabolism in mycelia and fruiting bodies. The activities of enzymes involved in trehalose metabolism, the transcriptional levels of the corresponding genes and the trehalose content in the mycelia of Flammulina velutipes strain Dan3 under relatively high temperatures were investigated. The mycelia and fruiting bodies of a strain cultivated in a factory were collected at different stages to examine the trehalose content and expression levels of various genes. The results showed that intracellular trehalose significantly accumulated in the mycelia in response to 37 °C heat shock. Heat shock significantly stimulated the activities of trehalose-6-phosphate synthase and trehalose-6-phosphate phosphatase, thereby promoting the accumulation of trehalose for the first 2-6 h. The activity of neutral trehalase also decreased during this period. In addition, changes in the activities of trehalose-6-phosphate synthase, trehalose-6-phosphate phosphatase and neutral trehalase paralleled changes in the expression levels of the regulatory genes. As for the trehalose phosphorylase, the degradation of trehalose was stronger than its synthesis under heat stress. Heat shock can induce a stress response in the mycelia through the regulation of genes related to trehalose metabolism and the subsequent promotion and control of the transcription and translation of enzymes. The analysis of the trehalose and gene expression levels in the cultivated strain suggests that a substantial amount of trehalose had accumulated in the mycelia prior to induction of the primordia, and the fruiting bodies could possibly utilize degraded trehalose that translocated from the mycelia to maintain their growth. PMID:27312340

  10. L-methionine gamma-lyase from Citrobacter freundii: cloning of the gene and kinetic parameters of the enzyme.

    PubMed

    Manukhov, I V; Mamaeva, D V; Morozova, E A; Rastorguev, S M; Faleev, N G; Demidkina, T V; Zavilgelsky, G B

    2006-04-01

    It is shown for the first time for the Enterobacteriaceae family that a gene encoding L-methionine gamma-lyase (MGL) is present in the genome of Citrobacter freundii. Homogeneous enzyme has been purified from C. freundii cells and its N-terminal sequence has been determined. The hybrid plasmid pUCmgl obtained from the C. freundii genomic library contains an EcoRI insert of about 3000 bp, which ensures the appearance of MGL activity when expressed in Escherichia coli TG1 cells. The nucleotide sequence of the EcoRI fragment contains two open reading frames. The first frame (the megL gene) encodes a protein of 398 amino acid residues that has sequence homology with MGLs from different sources. The second frame encodes a protein with sequence homology with proteins belonging to the family of permeases. To overexpress the megL gene it was cloned into pET-15b vector. Recombinant enzyme has been purified and its kinetic parameters have been determined. It is demonstrated that a presence of a hybrid plasmid pUCmgl, containing the megL gene in the E. coli K12 cells, leads to a decrease in efficiency of EcoKI-restriction. It seems likely that decomposition of L-methionine under the action of MGL leads to a decrease in the intracellular content of S-adenosylmethionine. Expression of the megL gene in the C. freundii genome occurs only upon induction by a significant amount of L-methionine.

  11. Glutathione S-transferase (GST) family in barley: identification of members, enzyme activity, and gene expression pattern.

    PubMed

    Rezaei, Mohammad Kazem; Shobbar, Zahra-Sadat; Shahbazi, Maryam; Abedini, Raha; Zare, Sajjad

    2013-09-15

    Barley (Hordeum vulgare) is one of the most important cereals in many developing countries where drought stress considerably diminishes agricultural production. Glutathione S-transferases (GSTs EC 2.5.1.18) are multifunctional enzymes which play a crucial role in cellular detoxification and oxidative stress tolerance. In this study, 84 GST genes were identified in barley by a comprehensive in silico approach. Sequence alignment and phylogenetic analysis grouped these HvGST proteins in eight classes. The largest numbers of the HvGST genes (50) were included in the Tau class followed by 21 genes in Phi, five in Zeta, two in DHAR, two in EF1G, two in Lambda, and one each in TCHQD and Theta classes. Phylogenetic analysis of the putative GSTs from Arabidopsis, rice, and barley indicated that major functional diversification within the GST family predated the monocot/dicot divergence. However, intra-specious duplication seems to be common. Expression patterns of five GST genes from Phi and Tau classes were investigated in three barley genotypes (Yusof [drought-tolerant], Moroc9-75 [drought-sensitive], and HS1 [wild ecotype]) under control and drought-stressed conditions, during the vegetative stage. All investigated genes were up-regulated significantly under drought stress and/or showed a higher level of transcripts in the tolerant cultivar. Additionally, GST enzyme activity was superior in Yusof and induced in the extreme-drought-treated leaves, while it was not changed in Moroc9-75 under drought conditions. Moreover, the lowest and highest levels of lipid peroxidation were observed in the Yusof and Moroc9-75 cultivars, respectively. Based on the achieved results, detoxification and antioxidant activity of GSTs might be considered an important factor in the drought tolerance of barley genotypes for further investigations.

  12. Multiphysics Applications of ACE3P

    SciTech Connect

    K.H. Lee, C. Ko, Z. Li, C.-K. Ng, L. Xiao, G. Cheng, H. Wang

    2012-07-01

    The TEM3P module of ACE3P, a parallel finite-element electromagnetic code suite from SLAC, focuses on the multiphysics simulation capabilities, including thermal and mechanical analysis for accelerator applications. In this pa- per, thermal analysis of coupler feedthroughs to supercon- ducting rf (SRF) cavities will be presented. For the realistic simulation, internal boundary condition is implemented to capture RF heating effects on the surface shared by a di- electric and a conductor. The multiphysics simulation with TEM3P matched the measurement within 0.4%.

  13. 4-Dihydromethyltrisporate dehydrogenase from Mucor mucedo, an enzyme of the sexual hormone pathway: purification, and cloning of the corresponding gene.

    PubMed

    Czempinski, K; Kruft, V; Wöstemeyer, J; Burmester, A

    1996-09-01

    We have purified the NADP-dependent 4-dihydromethyltrisporate dehydrogenase from the zygomycete Mucor mucedo. The enzyme is involved in the biosynthesis of trisporic acid, the sexual hormone of zygomycetes, which induces the first steps of zygophore development. Protein was obtained from the (-) mating type of M. mucedo after induction with trisporic acid, and purified by gel filtration and affinity chromatography steps. On SDS-PAGE a band with an apparent molecular mass of 33 kDa was ascribed to the enzyme. After transferring onto PVDF membranes the protein was digested with endoprotease Lys-C, and several peptides were sequenced. Oligonucleotides derived from protein sequence data were used for PCR amplification of genomic M. mucedo DNA. The PCR fragment was used as probe for isolation of the corresponding cDNA and complete genomic DNA clones. Comparison of protein and DNA sequence data showed that the cloned fragment corresponded to the purified protein. Search for similarity with protein sequences of the Swiss-Prot database revealed a relationship to enzymes belonging to the aldo/keto reductase superfamily. Southern-blot analysis of genomic DNA with the labelled cloned fragment detected a single-copy gene in both mating types of M. mucedo. PCR with genomic DNA from other zygomycetes gave rise to several fragments. Hybridization analysis with the cloned M. mucedo fragment showed that a fragment of similar length cross-hybridized in Blakeslea trispora (Choanephoraceae) as well as in Parasitella parasitica and Absidia glauca (Mucoraceae). The promoter region of the gene contains DNA elements with similarity to a cAMP-regulated gene of Dictyostelium discoideum.

  14. L-malate enhances the gene expression of carried proteins and antioxidant enzymes in liver of aged rats.

    PubMed

    Zeng, X; Wu, J; Wu, Q; Zhang, J

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies in our laboratory reported L-malate as a free radical scavenger in aged rats. To investigate the antioxidant mechanism of L-malate in the mitochondria, we analyzed the change in gene expression of two malate-aspartate shuttle (MAS)-related carried proteins (AGC, aspartate/glutamate carrier and OMC, oxoglutarate/malate carrier) in the inner mitochondrial membrane, and three antioxidant enzymes (CAT, SOD, and GSH-Px) in the mitochondria. The changes in gene expression of these proteins and enzymes were examined by real-time RT-PCR in the heart and liver of aged rats treated with L-malate. L-malate was orally administered in rats continuously for 30 days using a feeding atraumatic needle. We found that the gene expression of OMC and GSH-Px mRNA in the liver increased by 39 % and 38 %, respectively, in the 0.630 g/kg L-malate treatment group than that in the control group. The expression levels of SOD mRNA in the liver increased by 39 %, 56 %, and 78 % in the 0.105, 0.210, and 0.630 g/kg L-malate treatment groups, respectively. No difference were observed in the expression levels of AGC, OMC, CAT, SOD, and GSH-Px mRNAs in the heart of rats between the L-malate treatment and control groups. These results predicted that L-malate may increase the antioxidant capacity of mitochondria by enhancing the expression of mRNAs involved in the MAS and the antioxidant enzymes.

  15. Hepatic Xenobiotic Metabolizing Enzyme Gene Expression Through the Life Stages of the Mouse

    EPA Science Inventory

    BACKGROUND: Differences in responses to environmental chemicals and drugs between life stages are likely due in part to differences in the expression of xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes and transporters (XMETs). No comprehensive analysis of the mRNA expression of XMETs has been ca...

  16. Site-saturation mutagenesis of Glomerella cingulata cutinase gene for enhanced enzyme thermostability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanapi, Wan Nurhidayah Wan; Iuan-Sheau, Chin; Mahadi, Nor Muhammad; Murad, Abdul Munir Abdul; Bakar, Farah Diba Abu

    2015-09-01

    Cutinase is an important biocatalyst for various industrial applications. This enzyme which has dual functionality comparable to esterases and lipases, is efficient in the hydrolysis of soluble esters and emulsified triacylglycerols. Naturally-occurring enzymes usually have disadvantages when applied in non-natural catalysis due to Glomerella cingulata cutinase enzyme thermostability. It is postulated that by increasing the rigidity at certain amino acid positions showing high mobility based on the three-dimensional structure of G. cingulata cutinase, the improvement in thermostability will be achieved. The amino acid N82 of G. cingulata cutinase was selected based on its high B-factor value determined via the B-FITTER program. Megaprimer PCR was employed to introduce mutations at the chosen site by randomization using NNK degenerate primers. About 300 transformants were selected for screening of positive cutinase variants. The N82_V14 cutinase variant was observed to be more thermostable at an almost 2-fold increase when exposed at 50°C for 1 hr as compared to the wild-type enzyme. This study may provide valuable information regarding thermal stability of cutinases denaturation at high temperatures.

  17. Angiotensin converting enzyme of Thalassophryne nattereri venom.

    PubMed

    da Costa Marques, Maria Elizabeth; de Araújo Tenório, Humberto; Dos Santos, Claudio Wilian Victor; Dos Santos, Daniel Moreira; de Lima, Maria Elena; Pereira, Hugo Juarez Vieira

    2016-10-01

    Animal venoms are complex mixtures, including peptides, proteins (i.e., enzymes), and other compounds produced by animals in predation, digestion, and defense. These molecules have been investigated regarding their molecular mechanisms associated with physiological action and possible pharmacological applications. Recently, we have described the presence of a type of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) activity in the venom of Thalassophryne nattereri. It is a zinc-dependent peptidase with a wide range of effects. By removing dipeptide His-Leu from terminal C, the ACE converts angiotensinI (AngI) into angiotensin II (AngII) and inactivates bradykinin, there by regulating blood pressure and electrolyte homeostasis. The fractionation of T. nattereri venom in CM-Sepharose indicated a peak (CM2) with angiotensin-converting activity, converting AngI into Ang II. Electrophoresis on polyacrylamide gel (12%) revealed one band with 30kDa for CM2 similar in size to natterins, which are toxins with proteolytic activity found in T. nattereri venom. Mass spectrometry indicated that the protein sequence of the ACE purified from T. nattereri venom corresponds to natterin 1. The isolated protein has also demonstrated inhibition through captopril and EDTA and is characterized as a classic ACE. Thus, the isolated enzyme purified from T. nattereri venom is the first ACE isolated from fish venom.

  18. Angiotensin converting enzyme of Thalassophryne nattereri venom.

    PubMed

    da Costa Marques, Maria Elizabeth; de Araújo Tenório, Humberto; Dos Santos, Claudio Wilian Victor; Dos Santos, Daniel Moreira; de Lima, Maria Elena; Pereira, Hugo Juarez Vieira

    2016-10-01

    Animal venoms are complex mixtures, including peptides, proteins (i.e., enzymes), and other compounds produced by animals in predation, digestion, and defense. These molecules have been investigated regarding their molecular mechanisms associated with physiological action and possible pharmacological applications. Recently, we have described the presence of a type of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) activity in the venom of Thalassophryne nattereri. It is a zinc-dependent peptidase with a wide range of effects. By removing dipeptide His-Leu from terminal C, the ACE converts angiotensinI (AngI) into angiotensin II (AngII) and inactivates bradykinin, there by regulating blood pressure and electrolyte homeostasis. The fractionation of T. nattereri venom in CM-Sepharose indicated a peak (CM2) with angiotensin-converting activity, converting AngI into Ang II. Electrophoresis on polyacrylamide gel (12%) revealed one band with 30kDa for CM2 similar in size to natterins, which are toxins with proteolytic activity found in T. nattereri venom. Mass spectrometry indicated that the protein sequence of the ACE purified from T. nattereri venom corresponds to natterin 1. The isolated protein has also demonstrated inhibition through captopril and EDTA and is characterized as a classic ACE. Thus, the isolated enzyme purified from T. nattereri venom is the first ACE isolated from fish venom. PMID:27327905

  19. Clusters of genes encoding fructan biosynthesizing enzymes in wheat and barley.

    PubMed

    Huynh, Bao-Lam; Mather, Diane E; Schreiber, Andreas W; Toubia, John; Baumann, Ute; Shoaei, Zahra; Stein, Nils; Ariyadasa, Ruvini; Stangoulis, James C R; Edwards, James; Shirley, Neil; Langridge, Peter; Fleury, Delphine

    2012-10-01

    Fructans are soluble carbohydrates with health benefits and possible roles in plant adaptation. Fructan biosynthetic genes were isolated using comparative genomics and physical mapping followed by BAC sequencing in barley. Genes encoding sucrose:sucrose 1-fructosyltransferase (1-SST), fructan:fructan 1-fructosyltransferase (1-FFT) and sucrose:fructan 6-fructosyltransferase (6-SFT) were clustered together with multiple copies of vacuolar invertase genes and a transposable element on two barley BAC. Intron-exon structures of the genes were similar. Phylogenetic analysis of the fructosyltransferases and invertases in the Poaceae showed that the fructan biosynthetic genes may have evolved from vacuolar invertases. Quantitative real-time PCR was performed using leaf RNA extracted from three wheat cultivars grown under different conditions. The 1-SST, 1-FFT and 6-SFT genes had correlated expression patterns in our wheat experiment and in existing barley transcriptome database. Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers were developed and successfully mapped to a major QTL region affecting wheat grain fructan accumulation in two independent wheat populations. The alleles controlling high- and low- fructan in parental lines were also found to be associated in fructan production in a diverse set of 128 wheat lines. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first report on the mapping and sequencing of a fructan biosynthetic gene cluster and in particular, the isolation of a novel 1-FFT gene from barley.

  20. Clusters of genes encoding fructan biosynthesizing enzymes in wheat and barley.

    PubMed

    Huynh, Bao-Lam; Mather, Diane E; Schreiber, Andreas W; Toubia, John; Baumann, Ute; Shoaei, Zahra; Stein, Nils; Ariyadasa, Ruvini; Stangoulis, James C R; Edwards, James; Shirley, Neil; Langridge, Peter; Fleury, Delphine

    2012-10-01

    Fructans are soluble carbohydrates with health benefits and possible roles in plant adaptation. Fructan biosynthetic genes were isolated using comparative genomics and physical mapping followed by BAC sequencing in barley. Genes encoding sucrose:sucrose 1-fructosyltransferase (1-SST), fructan:fructan 1-fructosyltransferase (1-FFT) and sucrose:fructan 6-fructosyltransferase (6-SFT) were clustered together with multiple copies of vacuolar invertase genes and a transposable element on two barley BAC. Intron-exon structures of the genes were similar. Phylogenetic analysis of the fructosyltransferases and invertases in the Poaceae showed that the fructan biosynthetic genes may have evolved from vacuolar invertases. Quantitative real-time PCR was performed using leaf RNA extracted from three wheat cultivars grown under different conditions. The 1-SST, 1-FFT and 6-SFT genes had correlated expression patterns in our wheat experiment and in existing barley transcriptome database. Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers were developed and successfully mapped to a major QTL region affecting wheat grain fructan accumulation in two independent wheat populations. The alleles controlling high- and low- fructan in parental lines were also found to be associated in fructan production in a diverse set of 128 wheat lines. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first report on the mapping and sequencing of a fructan biosynthetic gene cluster and in particular, the isolation of a novel 1-FFT gene from barley. PMID:22864927

  1. Immobilization of angiotensin-converting enzyme on glyoxyl-agarose.

    PubMed

    Megías, Cristina; Pedroche, Justo; del Mar Yust, María; Alaiz, Manuel; Girón-Calle, Julio; Millán, Francisco; Vioque, Javier

    2006-06-28

    The assay of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibition by food-derived peptides is usually carried out by using soluble ACE in a batch process. The purification of this enzyme from tissues is not an easy task, and the resulting preparation loses activity very fast. In addition, ACE commercial preparations are very expensive. In this work the immobilization of ACE, through lysine amino groups, to 4% beads cross-linked (4 BCL) glyoxyl-agarose is described. The amount of immobilized enzyme increased with increasing concentrations of enzyme and with incubation time until a saturation point was reached at 50 mg protein/mL gel and 3.5 hours, respectively. The IC50 values for a noncompetitive sunflower peptide inhibitor were similar for the soluble (30.56 microM) and immobilized (32.7 microM) enzymes. An immobilized derivative was obtained that was 60 times more stable than the soluble enzyme at 60 degrees C. This procedure yields a derivative that can be reused and has increased thermal stability compared to that of the soluble enzyme. Thus, ACE immobilization is a good alternative to using soluble freshly prepared or commercial preparations because of economical and practical reasons.

  2. Uterine artery dysfunction in pregnant ACE2 knockout mice is associated with placental hypoxia and reduced umbilical blood flow velocity

    PubMed Central

    Pulgar, Victor M.; Lindsey, Sarah H.; Yamane, Larissa; Varagic, Jasmina; McGee, Carolynne; daSilva, Mauro; Lopes Bonfa, Paula; Gurley, Susan B.; Brosnihan, K. Bridget

    2015-01-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) knockout is associated with reduced fetal weight at late gestation; however, whether uteroplacental vascular and/or hemodynamic disturbances underlie this growth-restricted phenotype is unknown. Uterine artery reactivity and flow velocities, umbilical flow velocities, trophoblast invasion, and placental hypoxia were determined in ACE2 knockout (KO) and C57Bl/6 wild-type (WT) mice at day 14 of gestation. Although systolic blood pressure was higher in pregnant ACE2 KO vs. WT mice (102.3 ± 5.1 vs. 85.1 ± 1.9 mmHg, n = 5–6), the magnitude of difference was similar to that observed in nonpregnant ACE2 KO vs. WT mice. Maternal urinary protein excretion, serum creatinine, and kidney or heart weights were not different in ACE2 KO vs. WT. Fetal weight and pup-to-placental weight ratio were lower in ACE2 KO vs. WT mice. A higher sensitivity to Ang II [pD2 8.64 ± 0.04 vs. 8.5 ± 0.03 (−log EC50)] and greater maximal contraction to phenylephrine (169.0 ± 9.0 vs. 139.0 ± 7.0% KMAX), were associated with lower immunostaining for Ang II receptor 2 and fibrinoid content of the uterine artery in ACE2 KO mice. Uterine artery flow velocities and trophoblast invasion were similar between study groups. In contrast, umbilical artery peak systolic velocities (60.2 ± 4.5 vs. 75.1 ± 4.5 mm/s) and the resistance index measured using VEVO 2100 ultrasound were lower in the ACE2 KO vs. WT mice. Immunostaining for pimonidazole, a marker of hypoxia, and hypoxia-inducible factor-2α were higher in the trophospongium and placental labyrinth of the ACE2 KO vs. WT. In summary, placental hypoxia and uterine artery dysfunction develop before major growth of the fetus occurs and may explain the fetal growth restricted phenotype. PMID:25968580

  3. Angiotensin-converting enzyme overexpression in myelomonocytes prevents Alzheimer’s-like cognitive decline

    PubMed Central

    Bernstein, Kenneth E.; Koronyo, Yosef; Salumbides, Brenda C.; Sheyn, Julia; Pelissier, Lindsey; Lopes, Dahabada H.J.; Shah, Kandarp H.; Bernstein, Ellen A.; Fuchs, Dieu-Trang; Yu, Jeff J.-Y.; Pham, Michael; Black, Keith L.; Shen, Xiao Z.; Fuchs, Sebastien; Koronyo-Hamaoui, Maya

    2014-01-01

    Cognitive decline in patients with Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is associated with elevated brain levels of amyloid β protein (Aβ), particularly neurotoxic Aβ1–42. Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) can degrade Aβ1–42, and ACE overexpression in myelomonocytic cells enhances their immune function. To examine the effect of targeted ACE overexpression on AD, we crossed ACE10/10 mice, which overexpress ACE in myelomonocytes using the c-fms promoter, with the transgenic APPSWE/PS1ΔE9 mouse model of AD (AD+). Evaluation of brain tissue from these AD+ACE10/10 mice at 7 and 13 months revealed that levels of both soluble and insoluble brain Aβ1–42 were reduced compared with those in AD+ mice. Furthermore, both plaque burden and astrogliosis were drastically reduced. Administration of the ACE inhibitor ramipril increased Aβ levels in AD+ACE10/10 mice compared with the levels induced by the ACE-independent vasodilator hydralazine. Overall, AD+ACE10/10 mice had less brain-infiltrating cells, consistent with reduced AD-associated pathology, though ACE-overexpressing macrophages were abundant around and engulfing Aβ plaques. At 11 and 12 months of age, the AD+ACE10/WT and AD+ACE10/10 mice were virtually equivalent to non-AD mice in cognitive ability, as assessed by maze-based behavioral tests. Our data demonstrate that an enhanced immune response, coupled with increased myelomonocytic expression of catalytically active ACE, prevents cognitive decline in a murine model of AD. PMID:24487585

  4. Mycoparasitism studies of Trichoderma harzianum against Sclerotinia sclerotiorum: evaluation of antagonism and expression of cell wall-degrading enzymes genes.

    PubMed

    Troian, Rogério Fraga; Steindorff, Andrei Stecca; Ramada, Marcelo Henrique Soller; Arruda, Walquiria; Ulhoa, Cirano José

    2014-10-01

    Trichoderma spp. are known for their biocontrol activity against several plant pathogens. A specific isolate of Trichoderma harzianum, 303/02, has the potential to inhibit the growth of Sclerotinia sclerotiorum, an important agent involved in several crop diseases. In this study, the interaction between T. harzianum 303/02 and mycelia, sclerotia and apothecia of S. sclerotiorum was studied by scanning electron microscopy. RT-qPCR was used to examine the expression of 11 genes potentially involved in biocontrol. T. harzianum 303/02 parasitizes S. sclerotiorum by forming branches that coil around the hyphae. The fungus multiplied abundantly at the sclerotia and apothecia surface, forming a dense mycelium that penetrated the inner surface of these structures. The levels of gene expression varied according to the type of structure with which T. harzianum was interacting. The data also showed the presence of synergistic action between the cell-wall degrading enzymes. PMID:24966041

  5. Significance of Polymorphisms and Expression of Enzyme-Encoding Genes Related to Glutathione in Hematopoietic Cancers and Solid Tumors

    PubMed Central