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Sample records for enzyme ace inhibitors

  1. Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) dimerization is the initial step in the ACE inhibitor-induced ACE signaling cascade in endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Kohlstedt, Karin; Gershome, Cynthia; Friedrich, Matthias; Müller-Esterl, Werner; Alhenc-Gelas, François; Busse, Rudi; Fleming, Ingrid

    2006-05-01

    The binding of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors to ACE initiates a signaling cascade that involves the phosphorylation of the enzyme on Ser1270 as well as activation of the c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK) and leads to alterations in gene expression. To clarify how ACE inhibitors activate this pathway, we determined their effect on the ability of the enzyme to dimerize and the role of ACE dimerization in the initiation of the ACE signaling cascade. In endothelial cells, ACE was detected as a monomer as well as a dimer in native gel electrophoresis and dimerization/oligomerization was confirmed using the split-ubiquitin assay in yeast. ACE inhibitors elicited a rapid, concentration-dependent increase in the dimer/monomer ratio that correlated with that of the ACE inhibitorinduced phosphorylation of ACE. Cell treatment with galactose and glucose to prevent the putative lectin-mediated self-association of ACE or with specific antibodies shielding the N terminus of ACE failed to affect either the basal or the ACE inhibitor-induced dimerization of the enzyme. In ACE-expressing Chinese hamster ovary cells, ACE inhibitors elicited ACE dimerization and phosphorylation as well as the activation of JNK with similar kinetics to those observed in endothelial cells. However, these effects were prevented by the mutation of the essential Zn2+-complexing histidines in the C-terminal active site of the enzyme. Mutation of the N-terminal active site of ACE was without effect. Together, our data suggest that ACE inhibitors can initiate the ACE signaling pathway by inducing ACE dimerization, most probably via the C-terminal active site of the enzyme.

  2. Angiotensin Converting Enzyme (ACE) Inhibitor Extends Caenorhabditis elegans Life Span.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sandeep; Dietrich, Nicholas; Kornfeld, Kerry

    2016-02-01

    Animal aging is characterized by progressive, degenerative changes in many organ systems. Because age-related degeneration is a major contributor to disability and death in humans, treatments that delay age-related degeneration are desirable. However, no drugs that delay normal human aging are currently available. To identify drugs that delay age-related degeneration, we used the powerful Caenorhabditis elegans model system to screen for FDA-approved drugs that can extend the adult lifespan of worms. Here we show that captopril extended mean lifespan. Captopril is an angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor used to treat high blood pressure in humans. To explore the mechanism of captopril, we analyzed the acn-1 gene that encodes the C. elegans homolog of ACE. Reducing the activity of acn-1 extended the mean life span. Furthermore, reducing the activity of acn-1 delayed age-related degenerative changes and increased stress resistance, indicating that acn-1 influences aging. Captopril could not further extend the lifespan of animals with reduced acn-1, suggesting they function in the same pathway; we propose that captopril inhibits acn-1 to extend lifespan. To define the relationship with previously characterized longevity pathways, we analyzed mutant animals. The lifespan extension caused by reducing the activity of acn-1 was additive with caloric restriction and mitochondrial insufficiency, and did not require sir-2.1, hsf-1 or rict-1, suggesting that acn-1 functions by a distinct mechanism. The interactions with the insulin/IGF-1 pathway were complex, since the lifespan extensions caused by captopril and reducing acn-1 activity were additive with daf-2 and age-1 but required daf-16. Captopril treatment and reducing acn-1 activity caused similar effects in a wide range of genetic backgrounds, consistent with the model that they act by the same mechanism. These results identify a new drug and a new gene that can extend the lifespan of worms and suggest new

  3. Angiotensin-I-Converting Enzyme (ACE) Inhibitors from Marine Resources: Prospects in the Pharmaceutical Industry

    PubMed Central

    Wijesekara, Isuru; Kim, Se-Kwon

    2010-01-01

    Hypertension or high blood pressure is one of the major independent risk factors for cardiovascular diseases. Angiotensin-I-converting enzyme (EC 3.4.15.1; ACE) plays an important physiological role in regulation of blood pressure by converting angiotensin I to angiotensin II, a potent vasoconstrictor. Therefore, the inhibition of ACE activity is a major target in the prevention of hypertension. Recently, the search for natural ACE inhibitors as alternatives to synthetic drugs is of great interest to prevent several side effects and a number of novel compounds such as bioactive peptides, chitooligosaccharide derivatives (COS) and phlorotannins have been derived from marine organisms as potential ACE inhibitors. These inhibitory derivatives can be developed as nutraceuticals and pharmaceuticals with potential to prevent hypertension. Hence, the aim of this review is to discuss the marine-derived ACE inhibitors and their future prospects as novel therapeutic drug candidates for treat hypertension. PMID:20479968

  4. A novel aggregation-induced emission based fluorescent probe for an angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) assay and inhibitor screening.

    PubMed

    Wang, Haibo; Huang, Yi; Zhao, Xiaoping; Gong, Wan; Wang, Yi; Cheng, Yiyu

    2014-12-11

    A 'turn-on' fluorescent probe based on aggregation-induced emission (AIE) has been developed. It exhibits excellent selectivity and sensitivity for monitoring angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) activity both in solutions and in living cells as well as for screening ACE inhibitors in vitro.

  5. Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors modulate cellular retinol-binding protein 1 and adiponectin expression in adipocytes via the ACE-dependent signaling cascade.

    PubMed

    Kohlstedt, Karin; Gershome, Cynthia; Trouvain, Caroline; Hofmann, Wolf-Karsten; Fichtlscherer, Stephan; Fleming, Ingrid

    2009-03-01

    Inhibitors of the angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) decrease angiotensin II production and activate an intracellular signaling cascade that affects gene expression in endothelial cells. Because ACE inhibitors have been reported to delay the onset of type 2 diabetes, we determined ACE signaling-modulated gene expression in endothelial cells and adipocytes. Using differential gene expression analysis, several genes were identified that were 3-fold up- or down-regulated by ramiprilat in cells expressing wild-type ACE versus cells expressing a signaling-dead ACE mutant. One up-regulated gene was the cellular retinol-binding protein 1 (CRBP1). In adipocytes, the overexpression of CRBP1 enhanced (4- to 5-fold) the activity of promoters containing response elements for retinol-dependent nuclear receptors [retinoic acid receptor (RAR) and retinoid X receptor (RXR)] or peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPAR). CRBP1 overexpression also enhanced the promoter activity (by 470 +/- 40%) and expression/release of the anti-inflammatory and antiatherogenic adipokine adiponectin (cellular adiponectin by 196 +/- 24%, soluble adiponectin by 228 +/- 74%). Significantly increased adiponectin secretion was also observed after ACE inhibitor treatment of human preadipocytes, an effect prevented by small interfering RNA against CRBP1. Furthermore, in ob/ob mice, ramipril markedly potentiated both the basal (approximately 2-fold) and rosiglitazonestimulated circulating levels of adiponectin. In patients with coronary artery disease or type 2 diabetes, ACE inhibition also significantly increased plasma adiponectin levels (1.6- or 2.1-fold, respectively). In summary, ACE inhibitors affect adipocyte homeostasis via CRBP1 through the activation of RAR/RXR-PPAR signaling and up-regulation of adiponectin. The latter may contribute to the beneficial effects of ACE inhibitors on the development of type 2 diabetes in patients with an activated renin-angiotensin system.

  6. Radiation damage to the lung: mitigation by angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Medhora, Meetha; Gao, Feng; Jacobs, Elizabeth R.; Moulder, John E.

    2011-01-01

    Concern regarding accidental overexposure to radiation has been raised after the devastating Tohuku earthquake and tsunami which initiated the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster in Japan, in March 2011. Radiation exposure is toxic and can be fatal depending on the dose received. Injury to the lung is often reported as part of multi-organ failure in victims of accidental exposures. Doses of radiation >8 Gray to the chest can induce pneumonitis with right ventricular hypertrophy starting after ~2 months. Higher doses may be followed by pulmonary fibrosis that presents months to years after exposure. Though the exact mechanisms of radiation lung damage are not known, experimental animal models have been widely used to study this injury. Rodent models for pneumonitis and fibrosis exhibit vascular, parenchymal and pleural injuries to the lung. Inflammation is a part of the injuries suggesting involvement of the immune system. Researchers world-wide have tested a number of interventions to prevent or mitigate radiation lung injury. One of the first and most successful class of mitigators are inhibitors of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE), an enzyme that is abundant in the lung. These results offer hope that lung injury from radiation accidents may be mitigated, since the ACE inhibitor captopril was effective when started up to one week after irradiation. PMID:22023053

  7. Synthesis and evaluation of novel triazoles and mannich bases functionalized 1,4-dihydropyridine as angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Kumbhare, Ravindra M; Kosurkar, Umesh B; Bagul, Pankaj K; Kanwal, Abhinav; Appalanaidu, K; Dadmal, Tulshiram L; Banerjee, Sanjay Kumar

    2014-11-01

    A series of novel diethyl 2,6-dimethyl-1,4-dihydropyridine-3,5-dicarboxylate embedded triazole and mannich bases were synthesized, and evaluated for their angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory activity. Screening of above synthesized compounds for ACE inhibition showed that triazoles functionalized compounds have better ACE inhibitory activity compared to that of mannich bases analogues. Among all triazoles we found 6 h, 6 i and 6 j to have good ACE inhibition activity with IC50 values 0.713 μM, 0.409 μM and 0.653 μM, respectively. Among mannich bases series compounds, only 7c resulted as most active ACE inhibitor with IC50 value of 0.928 μM.

  8. Angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors from Jasminum azoricum and Jasminum grandiflorum.

    PubMed

    Somanadhan, B; Smitt, U W; George, V; Pushpangadan, P; Rajasekharan, S; Duus, J O; Nyman, U; Olsen, C E; Jaroszewski, J W

    1998-04-01

    Bioactivity-guided fractionation of extracts of the aerial parts of Jasminum azoricum var. travancorense, using an in vitro ACE inhibition assay, led to isolation of three oligomeric, iridoid-type compounds, which were named sambacein I-III. Their structures are based on spectroscopic and chemical evidence. Similarly, fractionation of extracts of aerial parts of J. grandiflorum resulted in the isolation of the previously reported ACE inhibitor, oleacein. The IC50 values of purified ACE inhibitors were 26-36 microM. Moreover, 2-(3,4-dihydroxyphenyl)-ethanol, isoquercitrin and ursolic acid were isolated from J. grandiflorum. Sambaceins and oleacein are formed from genuine iridoid glucosides during processing of the plant material. NMR spectroscopy was used to measure the level of the ACE inhibitors in the traditional medicines prepared in Kerala from these Jasminum species.

  9. Discovery of new angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors from medicinal plants to treat hypertension using an in vitro assay

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background and purpose of the study Angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors plays a critical role in treating hypertension. The purpose of the present investigation was to evaluate ACE inhibition activity of 50 Iranian medicinal plants using an in vitro assay. Methods The ACE activity was evaluated by determining the hydrolysis rate of substrate, hippuryl-L-histidyl-L-leucine (HHL), using reverse phase high performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC). Total phenolic content and antioxidant activity were determined by Folin-Ciocalteu colorimetric method and DPPH radical scavenging assay respectively. Results Six extracts revealed > 50% ACE inhibition activity at 330 μg/ml concentration. They were Berberis integerrima Bunge. (Berberidaceae) (88.2 ± 1.7%), Crataegus microphylla C. Koch (Rosaceae) (80.9 ± 1.3%), Nymphaea alba L. (Nymphaeaceae) (66.3 ± 1.2%), Onopordon acanthium L. (Asteraceae) (80.2 ± 2.0%), Quercus infectoria G. Olivier. (Fagaceae) (93.9 ± 2.5%) and Rubus sp. (Rosaceae) (51.3 ± 1.0%). Q. infectoria possessed the highest total phenolic content with 7410 ± 101 mg gallic acid/100 g dry plant. Antioxidant activity of Q. infectoria (IC50 value 1.7 ± 0.03 μg/ml) was more than that of BHT (IC50 value of 10.3 ± 0.15 μg/ml) and Trolox (IC50 value of 3.2 ± 0.06 μg/ml) as the positive controls. Conclusions In this study, we introduced six medicinal plants with ACE inhibition activity. Despite the high ACE inhibition and antioxidant activity of Q. infectoria, due to its tannin content (tannins interfere in ACE activity), another plant, O. acanthium, which also had high ACE inhibition and antioxidant activity, but contained no tannin, could be utilized in further studies for isolation of active compounds. PMID:24359711

  10. [ACE inhibitors and the kidney].

    PubMed

    Hörl, W H

    1996-01-01

    Treatment with ACE inhibitors results in kidney protection due to reduction of systemic blood pressure, intraglomerular pressure, an antiproliferative effect, reduction of proteinuria and a lipid-lowering effect in proteinuric patients (secondary due to reduction of protein excretion). Elderly patients with diabetes melitus, coronary heart disease or peripheral vascular occlusion are at risk for deterioration of kidney function due to a high frequency of renal artery stenosis in these patients. In patients with renal insufficiency dose reduction of ACE inhibitors is necessary (exception: fosinopril) but more important is the risk for development of hyperkalemia. Patients at risk for renal artery stenosis and patients pretreated with diuretics should receive a low ACE inhibitor dosage initially ("start low - go slow"). For compliance reasons once daily ACE inhibitor dosage is recommended.

  11. A novel design of combining the angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor captopril with the angiotensin receptor blocker (ARB) losartan using homo coupling via PEG diacid linker.

    PubMed

    Hashemzadeh, Mehrnoosh; Park, Shery; Ju, Hee; Movahed, Mohammad R

    2013-12-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death in American adults. Furthermore, the incidence of congestive heart failure is on the rise as a major cause of hospitalization and mortality in this population. Angiotensin Converting Enzyme (ACE) inhibitors prevent the production of angiotensin II, which has been shown to reduce mortality in patients with congestive heart failure. Angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARB) were developed as a direct inhibitor of angiotensin II. ARBs have been shown to be effective in the treatment of patients with systolic heart failure but do not cause chronic coughing which is a common side effect of ACE inhibitors. In theory, a compound that has the combined effect of an ACE inhibitor and an ARB should be more effective in treating heart failure patients than either agents alone. Therefore, the purpose of this manuscript is to design and discuss the benefits of a new molecule, which combines captopril, an ACE inhibitor, with losartan, an ARB. In this experiment Captopril and Losartan were modified and synthesized separately and combined by homo or mono coupling. This was achieved by taking advantage of PEG (Polyethylene glycol) as a linker. It is expected that this molecule will have the combined modes of action of both ACEs and ARBs. Benefits from combination therapy include; increased efficacy, reduced adverse effects, convenience, compliance, and prolonged duration. Consequently, this combined molecule is expected to block the production of angiotensin II more efficiently and effectively. Although captopril and losartan work in the same system by blocking the effect of angiotensin II they have different action sites and mechanisms some patents are also discussed. Losartan blocks the AT1 receptor which is expressed on the cell surface, while captopril inhibits ACE, preventing production of angiotensin II, which is present in both the plasma and on the cell surface, especially on endothelial and smooth muscle cells.

  12. Screening of inhibitors of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) employing high performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization triple quadrupole mass spectrometry (HPLC-ESI-QqQ-MS).

    PubMed

    Musharraf, Syed Ghulam; Bhatti, Muhammad Salman; Choudhary, Muhammad Iqbal; Rahman, Atta-Ur

    2017-04-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) plays a key role in regulating blood pressure in the body by converting the angiotensin I (AI) into angiotensin II (AII). Angiotensin II is a potent vaso-active peptide that causes arterioles to constrict, resulting in increased blood pressure. A rapid and sensitive method for the identification of inhibitors of ACE was developed, and optimized employing HPLC-ESI-QqQ-MS. In this assay, angiotensin I substrate was converted into the product angiotensin II with the catalytic action of ACE. A calibration curve for depleting concentration of angiotensin I was developed and linearity of R(2)=0.999 with a remarkably low concentration of substrate range 20-200nM. The limit of detection and quantification of angiotensin I was found to be 1.93 and 5.84nM, respectively. The enzymatic reaction was optimized for incubation time, concentration, and volume of enzyme and substrate. All reactions were performed at 37°C at pH7.5 with standard incubation time of 20min. Two standard inhibitors, Captopril and Lisinopril, were checked through the newly developed method for their inhibitory potential, and their IC50 values were found to be 3.969 and 0.852μM, respectively. Reproducibility and precision analysis of different experiments showed <9.9% RSD. The developed method can be used for the identification of new ACE inhibitors.

  13. Screening of Zulu medicinal plants for angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Duncan, A C; Jäger, A K; van Staden, J

    1999-12-15

    Twenty plants used by traditional healers in South Africa for the treatment of high blood pressure were investigated for their anti-hypertensive properties, utilizing the angiotensin converting enzyme assay. A hit rate of 65% was achieved, with the highest inhibition (97%) obtained by Adenopodia spicata leaves. A further seven plants exhibited an inhibition greater than 70% and five more over 50%. The leaves of the plants showed the greatest levels of inhibition. There was little difference in the overall hit rate between ethanolic and aqueous extracts, although in most cases there was a marked difference in activity between aqueous and ethanolic extracts from the same species. Plants exhibiting inhibition levels greater than 50% were further tested for the presence of tannins in order to eliminate possible false positives. Active plants that did not contain tannins were Agapanthus africanus, Agave americana, Clausena anisata, Dietes iridioides, Mesembruanthemum spp., Stangeria eriopus and Tulbaghia violacea.

  14. Calmodulin interacts with angiotensin-converting enzyme-2 (ACE2) and inhibits shedding of its ectodomain.

    PubMed

    Lambert, Daniel W; Clarke, Nicola E; Hooper, Nigel M; Turner, Anthony J

    2008-01-23

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme-2 (ACE2) is a regulatory protein of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) and a receptor for the causative agent of severe-acute respiratory syndrome (SARS), the SARS-coronavirus. We have previously shown that ACE2 can be shed from the cell surface in response to phorbol esters by a process involving TNF-alpha converting enzyme (TACE; ADAM17). In this study, we demonstrate that inhibitors of calmodulin also stimulate shedding of the ACE2 ectodomain, a process at least partially mediated by a metalloproteinase. We also show that calmodulin associates with ACE2 and that this interaction is decreased by calmodulin inhibitors.

  15. Structure of human ACE gives new insights into inhibitor binding and design.

    PubMed

    Brew, Keith

    2003-08-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) is a primary target of drugs used for controlling hypertension. A new X-ray crystallographic structure of the key catalytic domain of ACE provides detailed information about the structure of its active site, located in a deep channel, and its interactions with an inhibitor. Such information might facilitate the rational design of ACE inhibitors that are more potent and more selective and therefore of clinical use.

  16. Human intestine luminal ACE2 and amino acid transporter expression increased by ACE-inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Vuille-dit-Bille, Raphael N; Camargo, Simone M; Emmenegger, Luca; Sasse, Tom; Kummer, Eva; Jando, Julia; Hamie, Qeumars M; Meier, Chantal F; Hunziker, Schirin; Forras-Kaufmann, Zsofia; Kuyumcu, Sena; Fox, Mark; Schwizer, Werner; Fried, Michael; Lindenmeyer, Maja; Götze, Oliver; Verrey, François

    2015-04-01

    Sodium-dependent neutral amino acid transporter B(0)AT1 (SLC6A19) and imino acid (proline) transporter SIT1 (SLC6A20) are expressed at the luminal membrane of small intestine enterocytes and proximal tubule kidney cells where they exert key functions for amino acid (re)absorption as documented by their role in Hartnup disorder and iminoglycinuria, respectively. Expression of B(0)AT1 was shown in rodent intestine to depend on the presence of the carboxypeptidase angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2). This enzyme belongs to the renin-angiotensin system and its expression is induced by treatment with ACE-inhibitors (ACEIs) or angiotensin II AT1 receptor blockers (ARBs) in many rodent tissues. We show here in the Xenopus laevis oocyte expression system that human ACE2 also functionally interacts with SIT1. To investigate in human intestine the potential effect of ACEIs or ARBs on ACE2, we analysed intestinal biopsies taken during routine gastroduodenoscopy and ileocolonoscopy from 46 patients of which 9 were under ACEI and 13 ARB treatment. Analysis of transcript expression by real-time PCR and of proteins by immunofluorescence showed a co-localization of SIT1 and B(0)AT1 with ACE2 in the brush-border membrane of human small intestine enterocytes and a distinct axial expression pattern of the tested gene products along the intestine. Patients treated with ACEIs displayed in comparison with untreated controls increased intestinal mRNA levels of ACE2, peptide transporter PEPT1 (SLC15A1) and AA transporters B(0)AT1 and PAT1 (SLC36A1). This study unravels in human intestine the localization and distribution of intestinal transporters involved in amino acid absorption and suggests that ACEIs impact on their expression.

  17. Angiotensin-converting enzyme-2 (ACE2): comparative modeling of the active site, specificity requirements, and chloride dependence.

    PubMed

    Guy, Jodie L; Jackson, Richard M; Acharya, K Ravi; Sturrock, Edward D; Hooper, Nigel M; Turner, Anthony J

    2003-11-18

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2), a homologue of ACE, represents a new and potentially important target in cardio-renal disease. A model of the active site of ACE2, based on the crystal structure of testicular ACE, has been developed and indicates that the catalytic mechanism of ACE2 resembles that of ACE. Structural differences exist between the active site of ACE (dipeptidyl carboxypeptidase) and ACE2 (carboxypeptidase) that are responsible for the differences in specificity. The main differences occur in the ligand-binding pockets, particularly at the S2' subsite and in the binding of the peptide carboxy-terminus. The model explains why the classical ACE inhibitor lisinopril is unable to bind to ACE2. On the basis of the ability of ACE2 to cleave a variety of biologically active peptides, a consensus sequence of Pro-X-Pro-hydrophobic/basic for the protease specificity of ACE2 has been defined that is supported by the ACE2 model. The dipeptide, Pro-Phe, completely inhibits ACE2 activity at 180 microM with angiotensin II as the substrate. As with ACE, the chloride dependence of ACE2 is substrate-specific such that the hydrolysis of angiotensin I and the synthetic peptide substrate, Mca-APK(Dnp), are activated in the presence of chloride ions, whereas the cleavage of angiotensin II is inhibited. The ACE2 model is also suggestive of a possible mechanism for chloride activation. The structural insights provided by these analyses for the differences in inhibition pattern and substrate specificity among ACE and its homologue ACE2 and for the chloride dependence of ACE/ACE2 activity are valuable in understanding the function and regulation of ACE2.

  18. ACE Inhibitor-Induced Angioedema following Cervical Spine Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Sabbagh, Hussam

    2017-01-01

    Angioedema is a well-known side effect of angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEi). However, ACE inhibitors induced angioedema after cervical surgery is a rare condition. They result in increased levels of circulating bradykinins. Rare cases of angioedema following local trauma in patients using ACE inhibitors have been published. We present such a case. A 54-year-old Caucasian female with a history significant for hypertension, controlled with lisinopril, was admitted for routine cervical spine surgery. She has severe degenerative cervical disc disease and was admitted to the hospital for an elective cervical diskectomy. The patient failed weaning off the ventilator on multiple attempts postoperatively. There were no observed symptoms of an allergic reaction. A CT scan of the neck showed extensive soft tissue edema at the level of the arytenoids. Dexamethasone was given to reduce the edema without successful resolution. On review of her medications, it was found that the patient was resumed on lisinopril following the procedure. It was subsequently discontinued. By the following day the patient had a positive leak around the ET tube cuff and patient was successfully extubated. PMID:28348897

  19. A prospective study of frequency and characteristics of cough during ACE inhibitor treatment.

    PubMed

    Sato, Atsuhisa; Fukuda, Seiichi

    2015-01-01

    Angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors are reportedly effective, and positively indicated in patients with chronic heart failure with decreased contractility, after myocardial infarction, after cerebrovascular disorders, and in those with chronic kidney disease. However, the biggest challenge to continuous use of ACE inhibitors is the adverse reaction of cough. Accordingly, in the present study, we investigated the present state and characteristics of ACE inhibitor-induced cough in patients with essential hypertension currently being treated with an ACE inhibitor for an average of 18 months, who could be regularly checked for cough. Subjects in this study were 176 patients overall (mean age 67 ± 11 years old), 90 men and 86 women. The adverse reaction of cough was observed in 20% of patients, and more frequently in women than in men. However, in 26 of the patients with cough, the cough either resolved naturally or completely disappeared while the treatment continued, after which patients could continue taking the medication. Specifically, ACE inhibitor treatment was eventually discontinued due to cough in 5.1% of patients. Cough occurred less frequently with concomitant calcium antagonists or diuretics than with ACE inhibitor monotherapy. Cough as an adverse reaction occurred at a low frequency when medication was taken at bedtime. We considered a number of measures to counteract cough, then in addition to starting the ACE inhibitor treatment as early as possible, it is important to devise ways for the ACE inhibitor treatment to be continued for as long as possible, through the adept use of these measures.

  20. Effect of phlorotannins isolated from Ecklonia cava on angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory activity

    PubMed Central

    Wijesinghe, W.A.J.P.; Ko, Seok-Chun

    2011-01-01

    Inhibition of angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) activity is the most common mechanism underlying the lowering of blood pressure. In the present study, five organic extracts of a marine brown seaweed Ecklonia cava were prepared by using ethanol, ethyl acetate, chloroform, hexane, and diethyl ether as solvents, which were then tested for their potential ACE inhibitory activities. Ethanol extract showed the strongest ACE inhibitory activity with an IC50 value of 0.96 mg/ml. Five kinds of phlorotannins, phloroglucinol, triphlorethol-A, eckol, dieckol, and eckstolonol, were isolated from ethanol extract of E. cava, which exhibited potential ACE inhibition. Dieckol was the most potent ACE inhibitor and was found to be a non-competitive inhibitor against ACE according to Lineweaver-Burk plots. Dieckol had an inducible effect on the production of NO in EAhy926 cells without having cytotoxic effect. The results of this study indicate that E. cava could be a potential source of phlorotannins with ACE inhibitory activity for utilization in production of functional foods. PMID:21556221

  1. Effect of phlorotannins isolated from Ecklonia cava on angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory activity.

    PubMed

    Wijesinghe, W A J P; Ko, Seok-Chun; Jeon, You-Jin

    2011-04-01

    Inhibition of angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) activity is the most common mechanism underlying the lowering of blood pressure. In the present study, five organic extracts of a marine brown seaweed Ecklonia cava were prepared by using ethanol, ethyl acetate, chloroform, hexane, and diethyl ether as solvents, which were then tested for their potential ACE inhibitory activities. Ethanol extract showed the strongest ACE inhibitory activity with an IC(50) value of 0.96 mg/ml. Five kinds of phlorotannins, phloroglucinol, triphlorethol-A, eckol, dieckol, and eckstolonol, were isolated from ethanol extract of E. cava, which exhibited potential ACE inhibition. Dieckol was the most potent ACE inhibitor and was found to be a non-competitive inhibitor against ACE according to Lineweaver-Burk plots. Dieckol had an inducible effect on the production of NO in EAhy926 cells without having cytotoxic effect. The results of this study indicate that E. cava could be a potential source of phlorotannins with ACE inhibitory activity for utilization in production of functional foods.

  2. Cromolyn sodium for ACE inhibitor-induced cough.

    PubMed

    Allen, T L; Gora-Harper, M L

    1997-06-01

    There are several theories on the cause of ACE inhibitor-induced cough, but the exact mechanism is not known. In many patients, if cough develops, the ACE inhibitor can be discontinued and a drug in another therapeutic class used in its place. However, in patients with CHF, diabetic nephropathy, and patients who have experienced a myocardial infarction, discontinuing the ACE inhibitor may not be in the best interest of the patient. In this patient population it would be reasonable to try cromolyn sodium to treat cough, while continuing the ACE inhibitor. Data are not available to support the efficacy of cromolyn sodium to treat cough in patients with diabetic nephropathy, but these patients clearly benefit from the use of an ACE inhibitor. Other factors not addressed in the case reports and the clinical trial such as patient adherence, cost, and quality of life should also play a role in the decision to use cromolyn sodium. Cromolyn sodium has been effective for the treatment of ACE inhibitor-induced cough in many case reports and has had mild success in one small clinical trial. Although none of the reports adequately assessed adverse effects, studies examining cromolyn for other indications have demonstrated a relatively benign adverse effect profile. It is difficult to recommend an exact dose to use because of the dosing variability in the case reports. The majority of the case reports and the one clinical trial used dosages similar to recommendations for bronchial asthma (i.e., 2 puffs [1.6 mg] 4 times daily via MDI or 20-mg capsules 4 times daily via breath-activated inhalation). At this time, the use of cromolyn sodium is a viable option, but more controlled studies are needed to fully elucidate its role in the treatment of ACE inhibitor-induced cough.

  3. New Perspectives in the Renin-Angiotensin-Aldosterone System (RAAS) II: Albumin Suppresses Angiotensin Converting Enzyme (ACE) Activity in Human

    PubMed Central

    Fagyas, Miklós; Úri, Katalin; Siket, Ivetta M.; Fülöp, Gábor Á.; Csató, Viktória; Daragó, Andrea; Boczán, Judit; Bányai, Emese; Szentkirályi, István Elek; Maros, Tamás Miklós; Szerafin, Tamás; Édes, István; Papp, Zoltán; Tóth, Attila

    2014-01-01

    About 8% of the adult population is taking angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors to treat cardiovascular disease including hypertension, myocardial infarction and heart failure. These drugs decrease mortality by up to one-fifth in these patients. We and others have reported previously that endogenous inhibitory substances suppress serum ACE activity, in vivo, similarly to the ACE inhibitor drugs. Here we have made an effort to identify this endogenous ACE inhibitor substance. ACE was crosslinked with interacting proteins in human sera. The crosslinked products were immunoprecipitated and subjected to Western blot. One of the crosslinked products was recognized by both anti-ACE and anti-HSA (human serum albumin) antibodies. Direct ACE-HSA interaction was confirmed by binding assays using purified ACE and HSA. HSA inhibited human purified (circulating) and human recombinant ACE with potencies (IC50) of 5.7±0.7 and 9.5±1.1 mg/mL, respectively. Effects of HSA on the tissue bound native ACE were tested on human saphenous vein samples. Angiotensin I evoked vasoconstriction was inhibited by HSA in this vascular tissue (maximal force with HSA: 6.14±1.34 mN, without HSA: 13.54±2.63 mN), while HSA was without effects on angiotensin II mediated constrictions (maximal force with HSA: 18.73±2.17 mN, without HSA: 19.22±3.50 mN). The main finding of this study is that HSA was identified as a potent physiological inhibitor of the ACE. The enzymatic activity of ACE appears to be almost completely suppressed by HSA when it is present in its physiological concentration. These data suggest that angiotensin I conversion is limited by low physiological ACE activities, in vivo. PMID:24691203

  4. Occurrence and fate of ACE-inhibitor peptides in cheeses and in their digestates following in vitro static gastrointestinal digestion.

    PubMed

    Stuknytė, Milda; Cattaneo, Stefano; Masotti, Fabio; De Noni, Ivano

    2015-02-01

    The occurrence of the casein-derived angiotensin converting enzyme-inhibitor (ACE-I) peptides VPP, IPP, RYLGY, RYLG, AYFYPEL, AYFYPE, LHLPLP and HLPLP were investigated in 12 different cheese samples by Ultra Performance Liquid Chromatography/High-Resolution Mass Spectrometry. The total amount of ACE-I peptides was in the range 0.87-331mgkg(-1). VPP and IPP largely prevailed in almost all cheeses. Following in vitro static gastrointestinal digestion of Cheddar, Gorgonzola, Maasdam and Grana Padano cheeses, type and amount of ACE-I peptides changed, and only VPP, IPP, HLPLP and LHLPLP were detected in the intestinal digestates. The results evidenced that the degree of proteolysis itself cannot be regarded as a promoting or hindering factor for ACE-I peptide release during cheese digestion. Moreover, the data indicated that the ACE-I potential of cheeses cannot be inferred based on the type and amount of ACE-I peptides present in undigested samples.

  5. Interaction of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) with membrane-bound carboxypeptidase M (CPM) - a new function of ACE.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiaoou; Wiesner, Burkhard; Lorenz, Dorothea; Papsdorf, Gisela; Pankow, Kristin; Wang, Po; Dietrich, Nils; Siems, Wolf-Eberhard; Maul, Björn

    2008-12-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) demonstrates, besides its typical dipeptidyl-carboxypeptidase activity, several unusual functions. Here, we demonstrate with molecular, biochemical, and cellular techniques that the somatic wild-type murine ACE (mACE), stably transfected in Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) or Madin-Darby Canine Kidney (MDCK) cells, interacts with endogenous membranal co-localized carboxypeptidase M (CPM). CPM belongs to the group of glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored proteins. Here we report that ACE, completely independent of its known dipeptidase activities, has GPI-targeted properties. Our results indicate that the spatial proximity between mACE and the endogenous CPM enables an ACE-evoked release of CPM. These results are discussed with respect to the recently proposed GPI-ase activity and function of sperm-bound ACE.

  6. Small Bowel Angioedema Secondary to Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Hurairah, Abu

    2016-01-01

    Small bowel angioedema induced by angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors is a rare clinicopathologic entity. It frequently poses a diagnostic challenge and is often not recognized before surgical exploration. The present study illustrates that clinical awareness for this condition and adequate use of radiologic investigations can help make the correct diagnosis of ACE inhibitor-associated angioedema, thus avoiding the cost and morbidity associated with unnecessary interventions. PMID:28133581

  7. ACE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lumia, R.

    1999-01-01

    This document describes the progress made during the fourth year of the Center for Autonomous Control Engineering (ACE). We currently support 30 graduate students, 52 undergraduate students, 9 faculty members, and 4 staff members. Progress will be divided into two categories. The first category explores progress for ACE in general. The second describes the results of each specific project supported within ACE.

  8. [ACE inhibitors from the viewpoint of the clinical pharmacologist].

    PubMed

    Hitzenberger, G

    1996-01-01

    For treatment of hypertension drugs are desirable which exert a 24 hours lasting blood pressure control. Among the ACE-inhibitors some drugs exist which have this action. The elimination pathway plays a minor role in this respect. Not only the inhibition of Angiotensin II generation but also the decreased inhibition of bradykinin-degeneration plays a crucial role with regard to several endothelial functions controlling the so called remodeling of the cardiovascular system.

  9. Role of angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) in diabetic cardiovascular complications.

    PubMed

    Patel, Vaibhav B; Parajuli, Nirmal; Oudit, Gavin Y

    2014-04-01

    Diabetes mellitus results in severe cardiovascular complications, and heart disease and failure remain the major causes of death in patients with diabetes. Given the increasing global tide of obesity and diabetes, the clinical burden of diabetes-induced cardiovascular disease is reaching epidemic proportions. Therefore urgent actions are needed to stem the tide of diabetes which entails new prevention and treatment tools. Clinical and pharmacological studies have demonstrated that AngII (angiotensin II), the major effector peptide of the RAS (renin-angiotensin system), is a critical promoter of insulin resistance and diabetes mellitus. The role of RAS and AngII has been implicated in the progression of diabetic cardiovascular complications and AT1R (AngII type 1 receptor) blockers and ACE (angiotensin-converting enzyme) inhibitors have shown clinical benefits. ACE2, the recently discovered homologue of ACE, is a monocarboxypeptidase which converts AngII into Ang-(1-7) [angiotensin-(1-7)] which, by virtue of its actions on the MasR (Mas receptor), opposes the effects of AngII. In animal models of diabetes, an early increase in ACE2 expression and activity occurs, whereas ACE2 mRNA and protein levels have been found to decrease in older STZ (streptozotocin)-induced diabetic rats. Using the Akita mouse model of Type 1 diabetes, we have recently shown that loss of ACE2 disrupts the balance of the RAS in a diabetic state and leads to AngII/AT1R-dependent systolic dysfunction and impaired vascular function. In the present review, we will discuss the role of the RAS in the pathophysiology and treatment of diabetes and its complications with particular emphasis on potential benefits of the ACE2/Ang-(1-7)/MasR axis activation.

  10. Binding of ACE-inhibitors to in vitro and patient-derived amyloid-β fibril models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhavaraju, Manikanthan; Phillips, Malachi; Bowman, Deborah; Aceves-Hernandez, Juan M.; Hansmann, Ulrich H. E.

    2016-01-01

    Currently, no drugs exist that can prevent or reverse Alzheimer's disease, a neurodegenerative disease associated with the presence, in the brain, of plaques that are composed of β-amyloid (Aβ) peptides. Recent studies suggest that angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, a set of drugs used to treat hypertension, may inhibit amyloid formation in vitro. In the present study, we investigate through computer simulations the binding of ACE inhibitors to patient-derived Aβ fibrils and contrast it with that of ACE inhibitors binding to in vitro generated fibrils. The binding affinities of the ACE inhibitors are compared with that of Congo red, a dye that is used to identify amyloid structures and that is known to be a weak inhibitor of Aβ aggregation. We find that ACE inhibitors have a lower binding affinity to the patient-derived fibrils than to in vitro generated ones. For patient-derived fibrils, their binding affinities are even lower than that of Congo red. Our observations raise doubts on the hypothesis that these drugs inhibit fibril formation in Alzheimer patients by interacting directly with the amyloids.

  11. Evolution of diuretics and ACE inhibitors, their renal and antihypertensive actions—parallels and contrasts

    PubMed Central

    Lant, Ariel F.

    1987-01-01

    1 The emergence of diuretic drugs and angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors ranks amongst the major therapeutic advances of modern medicine. The discovery of these drug groups arose largely by chance, yet each has dramatically influenced the treatment of congestive cardiac failure and arterial hypertension. 2 The central role which diuretics have had in the management of both oedema and hypertension hinges on their ability to induce a net renal excretion of solute and water by selective interference with either active or passive ion transport processes in different segments of the nephron. Irrespective of sites of action, the continued antihypertensive action of diuretics is characterized by a reduction in plasma volume and extracellular fluid (ECF) volume that lasts for as long as the diuretic is given. The mechanism of this effect remains unclear but may involve autoregulatory reactions that leave cardiac output unaltered but maintain a sustained reduction in total peripheral resistance. 3 ACE inhibitors also lower blood pressure by decreasing total peripheral resistance, leaving cardiac output, plasma volume and ECF volume unchanged. The detailed way these haemodynamic changes are achieved remains unknown but inhibition of converting enzyme present not only in the kidney but also in many extrarenal tissue sites, appears important. In both hypertension and cardiac failure, however, the kidney acts as a key target organ for ACE inhibitors. The increased renal vascular resistance and inappropriate renal salt excretion are reversed with enhanced renal blood flow and saluresis. Both angiotensin II (AII) and vasopressin-mediated contraction of glomerular mesangial cells is inhibited, making glomerular filtration more efficient. Reduced aldosterone secondary to blockade of AII formation contributes to saluresis whilst encouraging positive potassium balance. ACE inhibition also impairs breakdown of kinins which may contribute to intrarenal and peripheral

  12. The history of inhibitors of angiotensin converting enzyme.

    PubMed

    Vane, J R

    1999-12-01

    This review paper by Sir John Vane, The Nobel Prize Laureate for the first time reveals the insides of discovery of inhibitors of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE-1), presently known as important drugs for the treatment of hypertension, congestive heart failure and coronary artery disease.

  13. Rediscovering ACE: Novel insights into the many roles of the angiotensin-converting enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Villalobos, Romer A.; Shen, Xiao Z.; Bernstein, Ellen A.; Janjulia, Tea; Taylor, Brian; Giani, Jorge F.; Blackwell, Wendell-Lamar B.; Shah, Kandarp H.; Shi, Peng D.; Fuchs, Sebastien; Bernstein, Kenneth E.

    2013-01-01

    Angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) is best known for the catalytic conversion of angiotensin I to angiotensin II. However, the use of gene-targeting techniques has led to mouse models highlighting many other biochemical properties and actions of this enzyme. This review discusses recent studies examining the functional significance of ACE tissue-specific expression and the presence in ACE of two independent catalytic sites with distinct substrates and biological effects. It is these features which explain why ACE makes important contributions to many different physiological processes including renal development, blood pressure control, inflammation and immunity. PMID:23686164

  14. Targeting ACE and ECE with dual acting inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Hanessian, Stephen; Guesné, Sébastien; Riber, Ludivine; Marin, Julien; Benoist, Alain; Mennecier, Philippe; Rupin, Alain; Verbeuren, Tony J; De Nanteuil, Guillaume

    2008-02-01

    A series of urea analogues related to SA6817 and a GSK phosphonic acid with reported ACE inhibitory activity were prepared and tested for dual ACE and ECE activities. Although excellent ACE and NEP inhibition was achieved, only modest ECE inhibition was observed with one analogue.

  15. Angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory activity and ACE inhibitory peptides of salmon (Salmo salar) protein hydrolysates obtained by human and porcine gastrointestinal enzymes.

    PubMed

    Darewicz, Małgorzata; Borawska, Justyna; Vegarud, Gerd E; Minkiewicz, Piotr; Iwaniak, Anna

    2014-08-13

    The objectives of the present study were two-fold: first, to detect whether salmon protein fractions possess angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory properties and whether salmon proteins can release ACE inhibitory peptides during a sequential in vitro hydrolysis (with commercial porcine enzymes) and ex vivo digestion (with human gastrointestinal enzymes). Secondly, to evaluate the ACE inhibitory activity of generated hydrolysates. A two-step ex vivo and in vitro model digestion was performed to simulate the human digestion process. Salmon proteins were degraded more efficiently by porcine enzymes than by human gastrointestinal juices and sarcoplasmic proteins were digested/hydrolyzed more easily than myofibrillar proteins. The ex vivo digested myofibrillar and sarcoplasmic duodenal samples showed IC50 values (concentration required to decrease the ACE activity by 50%) of 1.06 and 2.16 mg/mL, respectively. The in vitro hydrolyzed myofibrillar and sarcoplasmic samples showed IC50 values of 0.91 and 1.04 mg/mL, respectively. Based on the results of in silico studies, it was possible to identify 9 peptides of the ex vivo hydrolysates and 7 peptides of the in vitro hydrolysates of salmon proteins of 11 selected peptides. In both types of salmon hydrolysates, ACE-inhibitory peptides IW, IY, TVY and VW were identified. In the in vitro salmon protein hydrolysates an ACE-inhibitory peptides VPW and VY were also detected, while ACE-inhibitory peptides ALPHA, IVY and IWHHT were identified in the hydrolysates generated with ex vivo digestion. In our studies, we documented ACE inhibitory in vitro effects of salmon protein hydrolysates obtained by human and as well as porcine gastrointestinal enzymes.

  16. Synthesis and biological studies of highly concentrated lisinopril-capped gold nanoparticles for CT tracking of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghann, William E.; Aras, Omer; Fleiter, Thorsten; Daniel, Marie-Christine

    2011-05-01

    For patients with a history of heart attack or stroke, the prevention of another cardiovascular or cerebrovascular event is crucial. The development of cardiac and pulmonary fibrosis has been associated with overexpression of tissue angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE). Recently, gold nanoparticles (GNPs) have shown great potential as X-ray computed tomography (CT) contrast agents. Since lisinopril is an ACE inhibitor, it has been used as coating on GNPs for targeted imaging of tissue ACE in prevention of fibrosis. Herein, lisinopril-capped gold nanoparticles (LIS-GNPs) were synthesized up to a concentration of 55 mgAu/mL. Their contrast was measured using CT and the results were compared to Omnipaque, a commonly used iodine-based contrast agent. The targeting ability of these LIS-GNPs was also assessed.

  17. Racial differences in blood pressure response to angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors in children: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Li, J S; Baker-Smith, C M; Smith, P B; Hasselblad, V; Murphy, M D; Califf, R M; Benjamin, D K

    2008-09-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors are frequently used to treat hypertension in children.(1) ACE inhibitors alter the balance between the vasoconstrictive, salt-retentive, and cardiac hypertrophic properties of angiotensin II and the vasodilatory and natriuretic properties of bradykinin; they also alter the metabolism of other vasoactive substances.(2) Through these mechanisms, ACE inhibitors decrease systemic vascular resistance and promote natriuresis without increasing heart rate. This study evaluated the results of six trials of ACE inhibitors in children, using meta-analytic techniques to estimate the effect of race on blood pressure response.

  18. ACE inhibitors could be therapeutic for antisocial personality disorder.

    PubMed

    Hobgood, Donna K

    2013-11-01

    Antisocial personality traits are an important topic for research. The societal cost of these behaviors encourages efforts at a better understanding of central nervous system causes. Catecholamine genes are being studied to facilitate this understanding, and some tentative findings are being reached about several of these genes. It seems that many genes play a role to produce antisocial behaviors so complexity of elucidating each gene is obvious. One conclusion that could be drawn from the current research findings is that DA2 like receptors (DRD2, DRD3, DRD4) with alleles that decrease neurotransmission are facilitatory of antisocial behaviors. DA2 like receptors cause neuronal firing to inhibit many peripheral functions through adenylyl cyclase inhibition. When these receptors are less active by genetically decreased density, lower affinity, or by low dopamine levels as final common pathways then inhibition is released and a state of disinhibition can be said to describe this state. Peripheral metabolism is increased and behavioral activation is noted. Renin is disinhibited in this setting thus allowing sympathetic nervous system activation. The fight or flight behaviors thus produced, in the extreme, would be the setting of antisocial behavior. Research validates this hypothesis. Understanding this final common pathway toward antisocial behavior should lead to better treatment for individuals with this pattern of behavior before they have caused harm to themselves and others. ACE inhibitors are well tolerated drugs used in the treatment of hypertension and heart failure and would also treat antisocial behavior disorders.

  19. Angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) activity and expression in rat central nervous system after sleep deprivation.

    PubMed

    Visniauskas, Bruna; Oliveira, Vitor; Carmona, Adriana K; D'Almeida, Vânia; de Melo, Robson L; Tufik, Sérgio; Chagas, Jair R

    2011-04-01

    Proteases are essential either for the release of neuropeptides from active or inactive proteins or for their inactivation. Neuropeptides have a fundamental role in sleep-wake cycle regulation and their actions are also likely to be regulated by proteolytic processing. Using fluorescence resonance energy transfer substrates, specific protease inhibitors and real-time PCR we demonstrate changes in angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) expression and proteolytic activity in the central nervous system in an animal model of paradoxical sleep deprivation during 96 h (PSD). Male rats were distributed into five groups (PSD, 24 h, 48 h and 96 h of sleep recovery after PSD and control). ACE activity and mRNA levels were measured in hypothalamus, hippocampus, brainstem, cerebral cortex and striatum tissue extracts. In the hypothalamus, the significant decrease in activity and mRNA levels, after PSD, was only totally reversed after 96 h of sleep recovery. In the brainstem and hippocampus, although significant, changes in mRNA do not parallel changes in ACE specific activity. Changes in ACE activity could affect angiotensin II generation, angiotensin 1-7, bradykinin and opioid peptides metabolism. ACE expression and activity modifications are likely related to some of the physiological changes (cardiovascular, stress, cognition, metabolism function, water and energy balance) observed during and after sleep deprivation.

  20. Nicotianamine is a novel angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 inhibitor in soybean.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Saori; Yoshiya, Taku; Yoshizawa-Kumagaye, Kumiko; Sugiyama, Toshihiro

    2015-01-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) is a carboxypeptidase which is highly homologous to angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE). ACE2 produces vasodilator peptides angiotensin 1-7 from angiotensin II. In the present study, we synthesized various internally quenched fluorogenic (IQF) substrates (fluorophore-Xaa-Pro-quencher) based on the cleavage site of angiotensin II introducing N-terminal fluorophore N-methylanthranilic acid (Nma) and C-terminal quencher N(ε)-2,4- dinitrophenyl-lysine [Lys(Dnp)]. The synthesized mixed substrates "Nma-Xaa-Pro-Lys(Dnp)" were hydrolyzed by recombinant human (rh) ACE2. The amount of each product was determined by liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC-MS) with fluorescence detection and it was found that Nma-His-Pro-Lys(Dnp) is the most suitable substrate for rhACE2. The K(m), k(cat), and k(cat)/K(m) values of Nma-His-Pro-Lys(Dnp) on rhACE2 were determined to be 23.3 μM, 167 s(-1), and 7.17 μM(-1) s(-1), respectively. Using the rhACE2 and the newly developed IQF substrate, we found rhACE2 inhibitory activity in soybean and isolated the active compound soybean ACE2 inhibitor (ACE2iSB). The physicochemical data on the isolated ACE2iSB were identical to those of nicotianamine. ACE2iSB strongly inhibited rhACE2 activity with an IC50 value of 84 nM. This is the first demonstration of an ACE2 inhibitor from foodstuffs.

  1. Positron emitter labeled enzyme inhibitors

    DOEpatents

    Fowler, Joanna S.; MacGregor, Robert R.; Wolf, Alfred P.; Langstrom, Bengt

    1990-01-01

    This invention involves a new strategy for imaging and mapping enzyme activity in the living human and animal body using positron emitter-labeled suicide enzyme inactivators or inhibitors which become covalently bound to the enzyme as a result of enzymatic catalysis. Two such suicide inactivators for monoamine oxidase have been labeled with carbon-11 and used to map the enzyme subtypes in the living human and animal body using PET. By using positron emission tomography to image the distribution of radioactivity produced by the body penetrating radiation emitted by carbon-11, a map of functionally active monoamine oxidase activity is obtained. Clorgyline and L-deprenyl are suicide enzyme inhibitors and irreversibly inhibit monoamine oxidase. When these inhibitors are labeled with carbon-11 they provide selective probes for monoamine oxidase localization and reactivity in vivo using positron emission tomography.

  2. Positron emitter labeled enzyme inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Fowler, J.S.; MacGregor, R.R.; Wolf, A.P.; Langstrom, B.

    1990-04-03

    This invention involves a new strategy for imaging and mapping enzyme activity in the living human and animal body using positron emitter-labeled suicide enzyme inactivators or inhibitors which become covalently bound to the enzyme as a result of enzymatic catalysis. Two such suicide inactivators for monoamine oxidase have been labeled with carbon-11 and used to map the enzyme subtypes in the living human and animal body using PET. By using positron emission tomography to image the distribution of radioactivity produced by the body penetrating radiation emitted by carbon-11, a map of functionally active monoamine oxidase activity is obtained. Clorgyline and L-deprenyl are suicide enzyme inhibitors and irreversibly inhibit monoamine oxidase. When these inhibitors are labeled with carbon-11 they provide selective probes for monoamine oxidase localization and reactivity in vivo using positron emission tomography.

  3. Positron emitter labeled enzyme inhibitors

    DOEpatents

    Fowler, J.S.; MacGregor, R.R.; Wolf, A.P.

    1987-05-22

    This invention involved a new strategy for imaging and mapping enzyme activity in the living human and animal body using positron emitter-labeled suicide enzyme inactivators or inhibitors which become covalently bound to the enzyme as a result of enzymatic catalysis. Two such suicide in activators for monoamine oxidase have been labeled with carbon-11 and used to map the enzyme subtypes in the living human and animal body using PET. By using positron emission tomography to image the distribution of radioactivity produced by the body penetrating radiation emitted by carbon-11, a map of functionally active monoamine oxidase activity is obtained. Clorgyline and L-deprenyl are suicide enzyme inhibitors and irreversibly inhibit monoamine oxidase. When these inhibitors are labeled with carbon-11 they provide selective probes for monoamine oxidase localization and reactivity in vivo using positron emission tomography. 2 figs.

  4. Structure based drug design of angiotensin-I converting enzyme inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Anthony, C S; Masuyer, G; Sturrock, E D; Acharya, K R

    2012-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is responsible for ∼27% of deaths worldwide, with 80% of these occuring in developing countries. Hypertension is one of the most important treatable factors in the prevention of CVD. Angiotensin-I converting enzyme (ACE) is a two-domain dipeptidylcarboxypeptidase that is a key regulator of blood pressure as a result of its critical role in the reninangiotensin- aldosterone and kallikrien-kinin systems. Consequently, ACE is an important drug target in the treatment of CVD. ACE is primarily known for its ability to cleave angiotensin-I to the vasoactive octapeptide angiotensin-II, but is also able to cleave a number of other substrates including the vasodilator bradykinin and N-acetyl-seryl-aspartyl-lysyl-proline (acetyl-SDKP), a physiological modulator of hematopoiesis. Numerous ACE inhibiors are available clinically, and these are generally effective in treating hypertension. However some adverse effects are associated with ACE inhibition, such as the persistent dry cough and the potentially fatal angioedema. The solution of ACE crystal structures over the last decade has facilitated rational drug design which has contributed to the development of domain-selective ACE inhibitors, the most notable of which include RXP407 (N-domain) and RXPA380 (C-domain), which in principle may herald new therapeutic approaches for ACE inhibition. Additionally, dual inhibitors to ACE and other targets such as neprilysin, endothelin converting enzyme and chymase have been developed. The success of ACE inhibitors has also led to the search for novel inhibitors in food and natural products and the structure guided screening of such libraries may well reveal a number of new ACE inhibitors.

  5. Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE and ACE2) imbalance correlates with the severity of cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis in mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ruixia; Qi, Haiyu; Wang, Jing; Wang, Yan; Cui, Lijian; Wen, Yan; Yin, Chenghong

    2014-04-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) and its effector peptide angiotensin II (Ang II) have been implicated in the pathogenesis of pancreatitis. Angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) degrades Ang II to angiotensin-(1-7) [Ang-(1-7)] and has recently been described to have an antagonistic effect on ACE signalling. However, the specific underlying role of ACE2 in the pathogenesis of severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) is unclear. In the present study, the local imbalance of ACE and ACE2, as well as Ang II and Ang-(1-7) expression, was compared in wild-type (WT) and ACE2 knock-out (KO) or ACE2 transgenic (TG) mice subjected to cerulein-induced SAP. Serum amylase, tumour necrosis factor-α, interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6 and IL-10 levels and histological morphometry were used to determine the severity of pancreatitis. In WT mice, pancreatic ACE and Ang II and serum Ang II expression increased (P < 0.05), while pancreatic ACE2 and Ang-(1-7) and serum Ang-(1-7) levels were also significantly elevated (P < 0.05) from 2 to 72 h after the onset of SAP. However, the ratio of pancreatic ACE2 to ACE expression was significantly reduced (from 1.46 ± 0.09 to 0.27 ± 0.05, P < 0.001) and paralleled the severity of pancreatitis. The Ace2 KO mice exhibited increased levels of tumour necrosis factor-α, IL-1β, IL-6, multifocal coagulative necrosis and inflammatory infiltrate, and lower levels of serum IL-10 and pancreatic Ang-(1-7) (4.70 ± 2.13 versus 10.87 ± 2.51, P < 0.001) compared with cerulein-treated WT mice at the same time point. Conversely, Ace2 TG mice with normal ACE expression were more resistant to SAP challenge as evidenced by a decreased inflammatory response, attenuated pathological changes and increased survival rates. These data suggest that the ACE2-ACE imbalance plays an important role in the pathogenesis of SAP and that pancreatic ACE2 is an important factor in determining the severity of SAP.

  6. Renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system inhibition: overview of the therapeutic use of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin receptor blockers, mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists, and direct renin inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Mercier, Kelly; Smith, Holly; Biederman, Jason

    2014-12-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor or angiotensin receptor blocker (ARB) therapy in hypertensive diabetic patients with macroalbuminuria, microalbuminuria, or normoalbuminuria has been repeatedly shown to improve cardiovascular mortality and reduce the decline in glomerular filtration rate. Renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) blockade in normotensive diabetic patients with normoalbuminuria or microalbuminuria cannot be advocated at present. Dual RAAS inhibition with ACE inhibitors plus ARBs or ACE inhibitors plus direct renin inhibitors has failed to improve cardiovascular or renal outcomes but has predisposed patients to serious adverse events.

  7. Combination ACE inhibitor and angiotensin receptor blocker therapy - future considerations.

    PubMed

    Sica, Domenic A

    2007-01-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin receptor blockers are regularly prescribed for the management of hypertension. Each of these drug classes has also been shown to provide survival benefits for patients with heart failure, proteinuric chronic kidney disease, and/or a high cardiac risk profile. The individual gains seen with each of these drug classes have led to speculation that their combination might offer additive if not synergistic outcome benefits. The foundation of this hypothesis, although biologically possible, has thus far not been sufficiently well proven to support the everyday use of these 2 drug classes in combination. Additional outcomes trials, which are currently proceeding to their conclusion, may provide the necessary proof to support an expanded use of these 2 drug classes in combination.

  8. Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor (enalapril maleate) accelerates recovery of mouse skin from UVB-induced wrinkles

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuura-Hachiya, Yuko; Arai, Koji Y.; Ozeki, Rieko; Kikuta, Ayako; Nishiyama, Toshio

    2013-12-06

    Highlights: •Angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) increases in UVB-irradiated skin. •Administration of an ACE inhibitor improved UVB-induced skin wrinkle. •ACE inhibitor improved UVB-induced epidermal hypertrophy. •ACE inhibitor improved transepidermal water loss in the UVB-irradiated skin. -- Abstract: Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) activity and angiotensin II signaling regulate cell proliferation, differentiation, and tissue remodeling, as well as blood pressure, while in skin, angiotensin II signaling is involved in wound healing, inflammation, and pathological scar formation. Therefore, we hypothesized that angiotensin II is also involved in photoaging of skin. In this study, we examined the effect of enalapril maleate, an ACE inhibitor, on recovery of wrinkled skin of hairless mice exposed to long-term UVB irradiation. Immunohistochemical observation revealed that expression of ACE, angiotensin II, and angiotensin II type 1 (AT1) and type 2 (AT2) receptors in the skin was increased after UVB irradiation (3 times/week at increasing intensities for 8 weeks). Administration of enalapril maleate (5 times/week for 6 weeks, starting 1 week after 10-week irradiation) accelerated recovery from UVB-induced wrinkles, epidermal hyperplasia and epidermal barrier dysfunction, as compared with the vehicle control. Our results indicate that ACE and angiotensin II activity are involved in skin photoaging, and suggest that ACE inhibitor such as enalapril maleate may have potential for improvement of photoaged skin.

  9. Role of angiotensin converting enzyme and angiotensinogen gene polymorphisms in angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor-mediated antiproteinuric action in type 2 diabetic nephropathy patients

    PubMed Central

    Aggarwal, Neerja; Kare, Pawan Kumar; Varshney, Parul; Kalra, Om Prakash; Madhu, Sri Venkata; Banerjee, Basu Dev; Yadav, Anil; Raizada, Alpana; Tripathi, Ashok Kumar

    2017-01-01

    AIM To investigate the role of genetic variants of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) and angiotensinogen (AGT) genes in the antiproteinuric efficacy of ACE inhibitor therapy in diabetic nephropathy (DN) patients. METHODS In the present study, 270 type 2 diabetes mellitus patients with nephropathy were enrolled and treated with ACE inhibitor (ramipril) and followed at 6 mo for renal function and albumin excretion by estimating serum creatinine, end stage renal disease, and albumin/creatinine ratio (ACR) in urine. Genotyping of ACE I/D and AGT M235T polymorphisms were performed by using primer specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and PCR-RFLP techniques, respectively. RESULTS Forty-eight percent of DN patients (responders) benefited with respect to proteinuria from ACE inhibitor therapy at 6 mo follow-up. A significant reduction in ACR was observed after 6 mo treatment with ACE inhibitor irrespective of whether DN patients were micro-albuminuric (≥ 30 and < 300 mg/g creatinine) or macro-albuminuric (≥ 300 mg/g creatinine) at the time of enrollment. However, macro-albuminuric patients (55%) showed better response to therapy. A reduction in urinary ACR was found independent of genotypes of ACE I/D and AGT M235T polymorphisms although macro-albuminuric patients having TT genotype showed statistically insignificant increased response (72%). CONCLUSION ACE inhibitor therapy reduced urinary ACR by ≥ 30% in 50% of DN patients and the response is independent of ACE I/D and AGT M235T polymorphisms. PMID:28344754

  10. A role for the extracellular matrix component hyaluronan in kidney dysfunction during ACE-inhibitor fetopathy.

    PubMed

    Hansell, P; Palm, F

    2015-04-01

    Despite data showing that inhibitors of the renin-angiotensin system increase the risks of fetal morbidity and dysfunctionality later in life, their use during pregnancy has increased. The fetopathy induced by angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors is characterized by anuria, hypotension and growth restriction, but can also be associated with pulmonary hypoplasia. In the kidney, this fetopathy includes atrophy of the medulla, reduced number of glomeruli, developmental lesions of tubules and vessels, tubulointerstitial inflammation and extracellular matrix accumulation. Although angiotensin II (Ang II) inhibition during nephrogenesis interferes with normal growth and development, this review will focus on effects of the heavily accumulated matrix component hyaluronan (HA). An important mechanism of HA accumulation during nephrogenesis is disruption of its normal reduction as a consequence of lack of Ang II activation of hyaluronidase. Hyaluronan has very large water-attracting properties and is pro-inflammatory when fragmented. The ensuing inflammation and interstitial oedema affect kidney function. Hyaluronan is colocalized with CD44 overexpression and infiltrating immune cells. These properties make HA a plausible contributor to the observed structural and functional kidney defects associated with the fetopathy. Available data support an involvement of HA in kidney dysfunction of the foetus and during adulthood due to the physico-chemical characteristics of HA. No clinical treatment for HA accumulation exists. Treatment with the HA-degrading enzyme hyaluronidase and an HA synthesis inhibitor has been tested successfully in experimental models in the kidney, heart and pancreas. Reduced HA accumulation to reduce interstitial oedema and inflammation may improve organ function, but this concept needs to be tested in a controlled study before causal relationships can be established.

  11. Advanced Catalytic Enzyme System (ACES) - Dual Use Capabilities

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-07-01

    CORNsolv (SOYsolv: Tiffin, OH) Biodegradable solvent 1 121 Similar to commercial laundry detergents containing enzymes , an enzyme -based...Rastogi, personal communication). The second approach was to use mild chemical oxidants (such as those used in laundry detergents with enzymes ) to...fighting foams and sprays, aqueous degreasers, and commercial laundry detergents 8. Examples of this are shown in Table 2. Table 2. OPAA

  12. Ace inhibitor therapy for heart failure in patients with impaired renal function: a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Valika, Ali A; Gheorghiade, Mihai

    2013-03-01

    Heart failure syndromes are often associated with multi-organ dysfunction, and concomitant liver, renal, and neurologic involvement is very common. Neuro-hormonal antagonism plays a key role in the management of this syndrome, and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin receptor blockers are one of the cornerstones of therapy. Cardiorenal physiology is becoming more recognized in these patients with advanced heart failure, and the role of neuro-hormonal blockade in this setting is vaguely defined in the literature. Often, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors are decreased or even withheld in these circumstances. The purpose of this article is to review the role and pathophysiology of ace inhibition and angiotensin receptor blockade in patients with acute and chronic heart failure syndromes and concomitant cardiorenal physiology.

  13. Preconception and pregnancy management of women with diabetic nephropathy on angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Podymow, Tiina; Joseph, Geena

    2015-02-01

    Angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors are the mainstay of treatment for diabetic nephropathy to slow progression of disease. Diabetic women of childbearing age with nephropathy should be treated with ACE inhibitors as per guidelines in the pre-pregnancy period. ACE inhibitor use and exposure in the first trimester is controversial and requires counselling pre-pregnancy regarding the risks and benefits of use up to the first trimester, as well as the need to stop ACE inhibitors prior to the second trimester. Current evidence does not suggest that ACE inhibitors in the first trimester are associated with a greater risk of fetal malformations when compared to other antihypertensives. This topic is reviewed in depth, along with blood pressure targets in pregnant women with diabetic proteinuric disease, evidence for prevention of pre-eclampsia, self-monitoring of blood pressures at home in the latter half of pregnancy and the signs and symptoms of pre-eclampsia, proteinuria evolution in pregnancy, renal function prognosis, and restarting ACE inhibitors when breast feeding in the post-partum period.

  14. Potential advantages of cell administration on the inflammatory response compared to standard ACE inhibitor treatment in experimental myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Ciulla, Michele M; Montelatici, Elisa; Ferrero, Stefano; Braidotti, Paola; Paliotti, Roberta; Annoni, Giuseppe; De Camilli, Elisa; Busca, Giuseppe; Chiappa, Luisa; Rebulla, Paolo; Magrini, Fabio; Lazzari, Lorenza

    2008-01-01

    Background Bone Marrow (BM) progenitor cells can target the site of myocardial injury, contributing to tissue repair by neovascolarization and/or by a possible direct paracrine effect on the inflammatory cascade. Angiotensin Converting Enzyme inhibitors (ACE-I) are effective in reducing mortality and preventing left ventricular (LV) function deterioration after myocardial infarction. Methods We investigated the short term effects of BM mononuclear cells (BMMNCs) therapy on the pro-inflammatory cytokines (pro-CKs) and on LV remodelling and compared these effects over a standard ACE-I therapy in a rat model of myocardial cryodamage. Forty two adult inbread Fisher-F344 rats were randomized into three groups: untreated (UT; n = 12), pharmacological therapy (ACE-I; n = 14, receiving quinapril), and cellular therapy (BMMNCs; n = 16, receiving BMMNCs infusion). Rats underwent to a standard echocardiogram in the acute setting and 14 days after the damage, before the sacrifice. Pro-CKs analysis (interleukin (IL)1β, IL-6, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)α was performed (multiplex proteome arrays) on blood samples obtained by direct aorta puncture before the sacrifice; a control group of 6 rats was considered as reference. Results Concerning the extension of the infarcted area as well as the LV dimensions, no differences were observed among the animal groups; treated rats had lower left atrial diameters and higher indexes of LV function. Pro-Cks were increased in infarcted-UT rats if compared with controls, and significantly reduced by BMMNCs and ACE-I ; TNFα inversely correlated with LV fractional shortening. Conclusion After myocardial infarction, both BMMNCs and ACE-I reduce the pattern of pro-Ck response, probably contributing to prevent the deterioration of LV function observed in UT rats. PMID:18549470

  15. The toxicity of angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors to larvae of the disease vectors Aedes aegypti and Anopheles gambiae

    PubMed Central

    Abu Hasan, Zatul-’Iffah; Williams, Helen; Ismail, Nur M.; Othman, Hidayatulfathi; Cozier, Gyles E.; Acharya, K. Ravi; Isaac, R. Elwyn

    2017-01-01

    The control of mosquitoes is threatened by the appearance of insecticide resistance and therefore new control chemicals are urgently required. Here we show that inhibitors of mosquito peptidyl dipeptidase, a peptidase related to mammalian angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE), are insecticidal to larvae of the mosquitoes, Aedes aegypti and Anopheles gambiae. ACE inhibitors (captopril, fosinopril and fosinoprilat) and two peptides (trypsin-modulating oostatic factor/TMOF and a bradykinin-potentiating peptide, BPP-12b) were all inhibitors of the larval ACE activity of both mosquitoes. Two inhibitors, captopril and fosinopril (a pro-drug ester of fosinoprilat), were tested for larvicidal activity. Within 24 h captopril had killed >90% of the early instars of both species with 3rd instars showing greater resistance. Mortality was also high within 24 h of exposure of 1st, 2nd and 3rd instars of An. gambiae to fosinopril. Fosinopril was also toxic to Ae. aegypti larvae, although the 1st instars appeared to be less susceptible to this pro-drug even after 72 h exposure. Homology models of the larval An. gambiae ACE proteins (AnoACE2 and AnoACE3) reveal structural differences compared to human ACE, suggesting that structure-based drug design offers a fruitful approach to the development of selective inhibitors of mosquito ACE enzymes as novel larvicides. PMID:28345667

  16. The toxicity of angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors to larvae of the disease vectors Aedes aegypti and Anopheles gambiae.

    PubMed

    Abu Hasan, Zatul-'Iffah; Williams, Helen; Ismail, Nur M; Othman, Hidayatulfathi; Cozier, Gyles E; Acharya, K Ravi; Isaac, R Elwyn

    2017-03-27

    The control of mosquitoes is threatened by the appearance of insecticide resistance and therefore new control chemicals are urgently required. Here we show that inhibitors of mosquito peptidyl dipeptidase, a peptidase related to mammalian angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE), are insecticidal to larvae of the mosquitoes, Aedes aegypti and Anopheles gambiae. ACE inhibitors (captopril, fosinopril and fosinoprilat) and two peptides (trypsin-modulating oostatic factor/TMOF and a bradykinin-potentiating peptide, BPP-12b) were all inhibitors of the larval ACE activity of both mosquitoes. Two inhibitors, captopril and fosinopril (a pro-drug ester of fosinoprilat), were tested for larvicidal activity. Within 24 h captopril had killed >90% of the early instars of both species with 3(rd) instars showing greater resistance. Mortality was also high within 24 h of exposure of 1(st), 2(nd) and 3(rd) instars of An. gambiae to fosinopril. Fosinopril was also toxic to Ae. aegypti larvae, although the 1(st) instars appeared to be less susceptible to this pro-drug even after 72 h exposure. Homology models of the larval An. gambiae ACE proteins (AnoACE2 and AnoACE3) reveal structural differences compared to human ACE, suggesting that structure-based drug design offers a fruitful approach to the development of selective inhibitors of mosquito ACE enzymes as novel larvicides.

  17. 21 CFR 862.1090 - Angiotensin converting enzyme (A.C.E.) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Angiotensin converting enzyme (A.C.E.) test system. 862.1090 Section 862.1090 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical...

  18. 21 CFR 862.1090 - Angiotensin converting enzyme (A.C.E.) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Angiotensin converting enzyme (A.C.E.) test system. 862.1090 Section 862.1090 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical...

  19. 21 CFR 862.1090 - Angiotensin converting enzyme (A.C.E.) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Angiotensin converting enzyme (A.C.E.) test system. 862.1090 Section 862.1090 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical...

  20. 21 CFR 862.1090 - Angiotensin converting enzyme (A.C.E.) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Angiotensin converting enzyme (A.C.E.) test system. 862.1090 Section 862.1090 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical...

  1. 21 CFR 862.1090 - Angiotensin converting enzyme (A.C.E.) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Angiotensin converting enzyme (A.C.E.) test system. 862.1090 Section 862.1090 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical...

  2. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha convertase (ADAM17) mediates regulated ectodomain shedding of the severe-acute respiratory syndrome-coronavirus (SARS-CoV) receptor, angiotensin-converting enzyme-2 (ACE2).

    PubMed

    Lambert, Daniel W; Yarski, Mike; Warner, Fiona J; Thornhill, Paul; Parkin, Edward T; Smith, A Ian; Hooper, Nigel M; Turner, Anthony J

    2005-08-26

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme-2 (ACE2) is a critical regulator of heart function and a cellular receptor for the causative agent of severe-acute respiratory syndrome (SARS), SARS-CoV (coronavirus). ACE2 is a type I transmembrane protein, with an extracellular N-terminal domain containing the active site and a short intracellular C-terminal tail. A soluble form of ACE2, lacking its cytosolic and transmembrane domains, has been shown to block binding of the SARS-CoV spike protein to its receptor. In this study, we examined the ability of ACE2 to undergo proteolytic shedding and investigated the mechanisms responsible for this shedding event. We demonstrated that ACE2, heterologously expressed in HEK293 cells and endogenously expressed in Huh7 cells, undergoes metalloproteinase-mediated, phorbol ester-inducible ectodomain shedding. By using inhibitors with differing potency toward different members of the ADAM (a disintegrin and metalloproteinase) family of proteases, we identified ADAM17 as a candidate mediator of stimulated ACE2 shedding. Furthermore, ablation of ADAM17 expression using specific small interfering RNA duplexes reduced regulated ACE2 shedding, whereas overexpression of ADAM17 significantly increased shedding. Taken together, these data provided direct evidence for the involvement of ADAM17 in the regulated ectodomain shedding of ACE2. The identification of ADAM17 as the protease responsible for ACE2 shedding may provide new insight into the physiological roles of ACE2.

  3. Molecular and Thermodynamic Mechanisms of the Chloride-dependent Human Angiotensin-I-converting Enzyme (ACE)*

    PubMed Central

    Yates, Christopher J.; Masuyer, Geoffrey; Schwager, Sylva L. U.; Akif, Mohd; Sturrock, Edward D.; Acharya, K. Ravi

    2014-01-01

    Somatic angiotensin-converting enzyme (sACE), a key regulator of blood pressure and electrolyte fluid homeostasis, cleaves the vasoactive angiotensin-I, bradykinin, and a number of other physiologically relevant peptides. sACE consists of two homologous and catalytically active N- and C-domains, which display marked differences in substrate specificities and chloride activation. A series of single substitution mutants were generated and evaluated under varying chloride concentrations using isothermal titration calorimetry. The x-ray crystal structures of the mutants provided details on the chloride-dependent interactions with ACE. Chloride binding in the chloride 1 pocket of C-domain ACE was found to affect positioning of residues from the active site. Analysis of the chloride 2 pocket R522Q and R522K mutations revealed the key interactions with the catalytic site that are stabilized via chloride coordination of Arg522. Substrate interactions in the S2 subsite were shown to affect chloride affinity in the chloride 2 pocket. The Glu403-Lys118 salt bridge in C-domain ACE was shown to stabilize the hinge-bending region and reduce chloride affinity by constraining the chloride 2 pocket. This work demonstrated that substrate composition to the C-terminal side of the scissile bond as well as interactions of larger substrates in the S2 subsite moderate chloride affinity in the chloride 2 pocket of the ACE C-domain, providing a rationale for the substrate-selective nature of chloride dependence in ACE and how this varies between the N- and C-domains. PMID:24297181

  4. Refill Adherence in Relation to Substitution and the Use of Multiple Medications: A Nationwide Population Based Study on New ACE-Inhibitor Users

    PubMed Central

    Jönsson, Anna K.; Lesén, Eva; Mårdby, Ann-Charlotte; Sundell, Karolina Andersson

    2016-01-01

    Objective Generic substitution has contributed to economic savings but switching products may affect patient adherence, particularly among those using multiple medications. The aim was to analyse if use of multiple medications influenced the association between switching products and refill adherence to angiotensin-converting-enzyme (ACE) inhibitors in Sweden. Study Design and Setting New users of ACE-inhibitors, starting between 1 July 2006 and 30 June 2007, were identified in the Swedish Prescribed Drug Register. Refill adherence was assessed using the continuous measure of medication acquisition (CMA) and analysed with linear regression and analysis of covariance. Results The study population included 42735 individuals whereof 51.2% were exposed to switching ACE-inhibitor and 39.6% used multiple medications. Refill adherence was higher among those exposed to switching products than those not, but did not vary depending on the use of multiple medications or among those not. Refill adherence varied with age, educational level, household income, country of birth, previous hospitalisation and previous cardiovascular diagnosis. Conclusion The results indicate a positive association between refill adherence and switching products, mainly due to generic substitution, among new users of ACE-inhibitors in Sweden. This association was independent of use of multiple medications. PMID:27192203

  5. ACE and platelet aggregation inhibitors from Tamarix hohenackeri Bunge (host plant of Herba Cistanches) growing in Xinjiang

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Yachao; Liao, Jing; Tang, Yingzhan; Zhang, Peng; Tan, Chengyu; Ni, Hui; Wu, Xueqin; Li, Ning; Jia, Xiaoguang

    2014-01-01

    Background: Tamarix hohenackeri Bunge is a salt cedar that grows widespread in the desert mountains in Xinjiang. T. hohenackeri has not been investigated earlier, although there are many reports of phytochemical work on other Tamarix species. Materials and Methods: To find out natural angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor and platelet aggregation inhibitors, the bioactive extract (ethyl acetate [EtOAc] fraction) from the dried aerial parts of T. hohenackeri were investigated. The active fraction was purified by repeated column chromatography, including silica gel, Sephadex LH-20 column, medium-pressure liquid chromatography (MPLC) (polyamide column) and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The isolated major constituents were tested for their anti-platelet aggregation activity. Results: Bioassay-directed separation of the EtOAc fraction of the 70% ethanol extract from the air-dried aerial parts of T. hohenackeri led to the isolation of a new triterpenoid lactone (1), together with 13 known compounds (2-14). It was the first time to focus on screening bioactive constituents for this plant. The chemical structures were established on the basis of spectral data (ESI-MS and NMR). The results showed that the flavonoid compounds (7 and 8) and phenolic compounds (9, 10, 11, and 14) were potential ACE inhibitors. And the flavonoid compounds (5 and 7) showed significant anti-platelet aggregation activities. Conclusion: On the basis of the chemical and biological data, the material basis of ACE inhibitory activity for the active part was the phenolic constituents. However, the flavonoid compounds were responsible for the anti-platelet aggregation. The primary structure and activity relationship were also discussed respectively. PMID:24914275

  6. Prostacyclin: its pathogenic role in essential hypertension and the class effect of ACE inhibitors on prostaglandin metabolism.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-García, J L; Villa, E; Serrano, M; Gallardo, J; García-Robles, R

    1999-01-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEI) block degradation of bradykinin, and bradykinin stimulates prostacyclin synthesis. Therefore, we set out to determine whether the effects of ACE inhibitors on prostaglandin production in essential hypertensive patients are class effects or are dependent on ACE inhibitor structure. In addition, we studied whether hypertensives show an impaired capacity to synthesize vasodilator prostaglandins. To address these questions, we compared the effects of captopril (sulfhydryl-containing inhibitor), enalapril and ramipril (carboxyl-containing inhibitors) and fosinopril (phosphoryl-containing inhibitor) on blood pressure and urinary excretion of 6-keto-prostaglandin (PG) F1-alpha (the breakdown product of prostacyclin) in 44 mild-to-moderate essential hypertensive subjects before and 8 weeks after administration of an ACEI. We also studied prostacyclin excretion in 15 normotensive healthy controls. Levels of urinary 6-keto-PGF1-alpha (pg/ml) were measured by specific radioimmunoassay. Hypertensive subjects showed a lower excretion of 6-keto-PGF1-alpha than normotensive controls (212+/-147 vs 353+/-98 pg/ml, p < 0.001). All ACEI induced a significant decrease in MAP and increased the rate of excretion of the prostacyclin metabolite: C, 211+/-200 to 338+/-250 pg/ml, p < 0.05; E, 202+/-133 to 296+/-207 pg/ml, p < 0.05; R, 205+/-127 to 342+/-211 pg/ml, p < 0.05; F, 235+/-128 to 347+/-241 pg/ml, p < 0.05. In hypertensives (n = 44) the decrease in blood pressure correlated negatively with the rise in 6-keto-PGF1-alpha excretion (r = -0.51, p < 0.001). These data suggest that impaired prostacyclin biosynthesis in hypertensive patients could account for haemodynamic changes leading to the hypertensive state. Moreover, the hypotensive mechanisms of ACEI may be mediated by an increase in prostacyclin production; this effect seems to be class-dependent.

  7. Inhibitors of angiotensin-converting enzyme modulate mitosis and gene expression in pancreatic cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Reddy, M.K.; Baskaran, K.; Molteni, A.

    1995-12-01

    The angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor captopril inhibits mitosis in several cell types that contain ACE and renin activity. In the present study, we evaluated the effect of the ACE inhibitors captopril and CGS 13945 (10{sup {minus}8} to 10{sup {minus}2}M) on proliferation and gene expression in hamster pancreatic duct carcinoma cells in culture. These cells lack renin and ACE activity. Both ACE inhibitors produced a dose-dependent reduction in tumor cell proliferation within 24 hr. Captopril at a concentration of 0.36 mM and CGS 13945 at 150 {mu}M decreased cellular growth rate to approximately half that of the control. Neither drug influenced the viability or the cell cycle distribution of the tumor cells. Slot blot analysis of mRNA for four genes, proliferation associated cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), K-ras, protein kinase C-{Beta} (PKC-{Beta}) and carbonic anhydrase II (CA II) was performed. Both ACE inhibitors increased K-ras expression by a factor of 2, and had no effect on CA II mRNA levels. Captopril also lowered PCNA by 40% and CGS 13945 lowered PKC-{Beta} gene expression to 30% of the control level. The data demonstrate that ACE inhibitors exhibit antimitotic activity and differential gene modulation in hamster pancreatic duct carcinoma cells. The absence of renin and ACE activity in these cells suggests that the antimitotic action of captopril and CGS 13945 is independent of renin-angiotensin regulation. The growth inhibition may occur through downregulation of growth-related gene expression. 27 refs., 5 figs.

  8. The ACE inhibitors enalapril and captopril modulate cytokine responses in Balb/c and C57Bl/6 normal mice and increase CD4(+)CD103(+)CD25(negative) splenic T cell numbers.

    PubMed

    Albuquerque, Deijanira; Nihei, Jorge; Cardillo, Fabíola; Singh, Ram

    2010-01-01

    Increasing evidence implies beneficial effects of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors beyond those of their original indications to control hypertension. One of the most attractive non-hemodynamic properties of ACE inhibitors is their ability to regulate cytokine production. The mechanism(s) underlying the role of ACE inhibitors on cytokine synthesis are not well understood but they have traditionally been attributed to the inhibition of angiotensin (Ang) II formation. In fact, it has been extensively demonstrated that ACE inhibitors decrease Ang II-induced production of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines. However, it is not well described if inhibition of endogenous Ang II generation by ACE inhibitors modulates systemic cytokine production in mice. To verify that, in this work, we investigated the effects of treatment with the ACE inhibitors enalapril and captopril on cytokine synthesis in C57Bl/6 and Balb/c mice. Our results show that enalapril up regulates IL-10 produced by splenocytes from Balb/c and C57Bl/6 mice and captopril increased it only in Balb/c mice. Furthermore, CD4(+)CD103(+) presented increased IL-10 production after enalapril treatment. Enalapril as well as captopril short-term treatment enhanced IL-2 synthesis in Balb/c mice. Besides, enhanced IL-2 and IL-10 levels correlates with increased CD4(+)CD103(+)CD25(negative) T cells numbers in spleens from enalapril-treated mice.

  9. The ACE inhibitor ( sup 3 H)SQ29,852 identifies a high affinity recognition site located in the human temporal cortex

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, N.M.; Costall, B.; Egli, P.; Horovitz, Z.P.; Ironside, J.W.; Naylor, R.J.; Williams, T.J. )

    1990-07-01

    The angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor ({sup 3}H)SQ29,852 identified a single high affinity recognition site (defined by 10.0 microM captopril) in the human temporal cortex (pKD 8.62 +/- 0.03; Bmax 248 +/- 24 fmol mg-1 protein, mean +/- S.E.M., n = 4). ACE inhibitors and thiorphan competed to a similar level for the ({sup 3}H)SQ29,852 binding site in the human temporal cortex with a rank order of affinity (pKi values mean +/- S.E.M., n = 3), lisinopril (9.49 +/- 0.02), captopril (9.16 +/- 0.08), SQ29,852 (8.58 +/- 0.04), epicaptopril (7.09 +/- 0.08), fosinopril (7.08 +/- 0.05) and thiorphan (6.40 +/- 0.04). Since this rank order of affinity is similar to the affinity of these compounds to inhibit brain ACE activity it is concluded that ({sup 3}H)SQ29,852 selectively labels the inhibitor recognition site of ACE in the human temporal cortex.

  10. A retrospective study of the effects of angiotensin receptor blockers and angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors in diabetic nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Pathak, Jahnavi V.; Dass, Ervilla E.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Till date, several studies have compared angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors and angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) in terms of delaying the progression of diabetic nephropathy. But the superiority of one drug class over the other remains unsettled. This study has retrospectively compared the effects of ACE inhibitors and ARBs in diabetic nephropathy. The study aims to compare ACE inhibitors and ARBs in terms of delaying or preventing the progression of diabetic nephropathy, association between blood pressure (B.P) and urinary albumin and also B.P and serum creatinine with ACE inhibitor and ARB, know the percentage of hyperkalemia in patients of diabetic nephropathy receiving ACE inhibitor or ARB. Settings and Design: A total of 134 patients diagnosed with diabetic nephropathy during the years 2001–2010 and having a complete follow-up were studied, out of which 99 were on ARB (63 patients of Losartan and 36 of Telmisartan) and 35 on ACE inhibitor (Ramipril). Subjects and Methods: There was at least 1-month of interval between each observation made and also between the date of treatment started and the first reading that is, the observation of the 1st month. In total, three readings were taken that is, of the 1st, 2nd and 3rd month after the treatment started. Comparison of the 1st and 3rd month after the treatment started was done. Mean ± standard deviation, Paired t-test, and Chi-square were used for the analysis of the data. Results: The results reflect that ARBs (Losartan and Telmisartan) when compared to ACE inhibitor (Ramipril) are more effective in terms of delaying the progression of diabetic nephropathy and also in providing renoprotection. Also, ARBs have the property of simultaneously decreasing the systolic B.P and albuminuria when compared to ACE inhibitor (Ramipril). Conclusions: Angiotensin receptor blockers are more renoprotective than ACE inhibitors and also provide better cardioprotection. PMID:25878372

  11. Effects of ACE Inhibitors on Insulin Resistance and Lipid Profile in Children with Metabolic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Çelebi Bitkin, Eda; Boyraz, Mehmet; Taşkın, Necati; Akçay, Arzu; Ulucan, Korkut; Akyol, Mehmet Bedir; Akçay, Teoman

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of using ACE inhibitors on insulin resistance, glucose metabolism, body fat composition, and lipid profile in children over 10 years of age with obesity-associated metabolic syndrome (MS). Methods: A total of 53 children with MS, who had been followed for at least one year were included in the study. The sample was divided into two groups: Group 1-30 obese children (13 female, 17 male) who were not using an ACE inhibitor and Group 2-23 obese children (13 female, 10 male) who were using an ACE inhibitor. Anthropometric and laboratory dataobtained at baseline and at the 3rd, 6th, and 12th months of follow-up were compared in the two groups. Results: Comparison of the data in the two groups at 3rd, 6th, and 12th months revealed no statistically significant differences in terms of weight standard deviation score (SDS), body mass index SDS, weight for height percentile, body fat percentage, and very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL)values. However, there were statistically significant differences in mean glucose and insulin levels, homeostasis model assessment for insulin resistance, LDL and high-density lipoprotein values, and highly significant differences in mean triglyceride values. Conclusions: The positive effects of ACE inhibitor drugs, particularly on hypertriglyceridemia and insulin resistance, might bring them forth as first-line drugs in the treatment of obese and hypertensive children. Randomized, controlled, double-blind, and long-term studies are needed for a definitive conclusion. Conflict of interest:None declared. PMID:24072084

  12. Investigation of interaction studies of cefpirome with ACE-inhibitors in various buffers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nawaz, Muhammad; Arayne, Muhammad Saeed; Sultana, Najma; Abbas, Hira Fatima

    2015-02-01

    This work describes a RP-HPLC method for the determination and interaction studies of cefpirome with ACE-inhibitors (captopril, enalapril and lisinopril) in various buffers. The separation and interaction of cefpirome with ACE-inhibitors was achieved on a Purospher Star, C18 (5 μm, 250 × 4.6 mm) column. Mobile phase consisted of methanol: water (80:20, v/v, pH 3.3); however, for the separation of lisinopril, it was modified to methanol-water (40:60, v/v, pH 3.3) and pumped at a flow rate of 1 mL min-1. In all cases, UV detection was performed at 225 nm. Interactions were carried out in physiological pH i.e., pH 1 (simulated gastric juice), 4 (simulated full stomach), 7.4 (blood pH) and 9 (simulated GI), drug contents were analyzed by reverse phase high performance liquid chromatography. Method was found linear in the concentration range of 1.0-50.0 μg mL-1 with correlation coefficient (r2) of 0.999. Precision (RSD%) was less than 2.0%, indicating good precision of the method and accuracy was 98.0-100.0%. Furthermore, cefpirome-ACE-inhibitors' complexes were also synthesized and results were elucidated on the basis of FT-IR, and 1H NMR. The interaction results show that these interactions are pH dependent and for the co-administration of cefpirome and ACE-inhibitors, a proper interval should be given.

  13. The angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) gene family of Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Yan, Hai-Yan; Mita, Kazuei; Zhao, Xia; Tanaka, Yoshikazu; Moriyama, Minoru; Wang, Huabin; Iwanaga, Masashi; Kawasaki, Hideki

    2017-04-15

    We previously reported regarding an ecdysone-inducible angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) gene. We found another four ACE genes in the Bombyx genome. The present study was undertaken to clarify the evolutionally changed function of the ACE of Bombyx mori. Core regions of deduced amino acid sequences of ACE genes were compared with those of other insect ACE genes. Five Bombyx genes have the conserved Zn(2+)-binding-site motif (HEXXH); however, BmAcer4 has only one and BmAcer3 has no catalytic ligand. BmAcer1 and BmAcer2 were expressed in several organs. BmAcer3 was expressed in testes, and BmAcer4 and BmAcer5 were expressed in compound eyes; however, the transcription levels of these three genes were very low. Quantitative RT-PCR and Western analysis were conducted to determine the tissue distribution and developmental expression of BmAcer1and BmAcer2. Transcripts of BmAcer1 and BmAcer2 were found in the reproductive organs during the larval and pupal stages. BmAcer1 was dominant in fat bodies during the feeding stage and showed high expression in the epidermis, wing discs, and pupal wing tissues after the wandering stage. Its expression patterns in epidermis, wing discs, and wing tissues resembled the hemolymph ecdysteroid titer in the larval and pupal stages. Acer1 was observed in the hemolymph at all stages, appearing to be the source of it are fat bodies, wings, and epidermis, and functioning after being secreted into the hemolymph. BmAcer2 was abundant in the midgut during the feeding stage and after the wandering stage and in silk glands after the pupal stage. We conclude that the evolution of BmAcer occurred through duplication, and, thereafter, functional diversification developed.

  14. Effects of prolonged angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor treatment on amyloid beta-protein metabolism in mouse models of Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Hemming, Matthew L; Selkoe, Dennis J; Farris, Wesley

    2007-04-01

    Genetic and pathologic studies have associated angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) with Alzheimer disease. Previously, we and others have reported that ACE degrades in vitro the amyloid beta-protein (Abeta), a putative upstream initiator of Alzheimer disease. These studies support the hypothesis that deficiency in ACE-mediated Abeta proteolysis could increase Alzheimer disease risk and raise the question of whether ACE inhibitors, a commonly prescribed class of anti-hypertensive medications, can elevate Abeta levels in vivo. To test this hypothesis, we administered the ACE inhibitor captopril to two lines of APP transgenic mice harboring either low levels of Abeta or high levels of Abeta with associated plaque deposition. In both models, we show that captopril does not affect cerebral Abeta levels in either soluble or insoluble pools. Furthermore, we find no change in plaque deposition or in peripheral Abeta levels. Data from these Alzheimer models suggest that captopril and similar ACE inhibitors do not cause Abeta accumulation in vivo.

  15. Isolation and antihypertensive effect of angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory peptides from spinach Rubisco.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yanjun; Marczak, Ewa D; Yokoo, Megumi; Usui, Hachiro; Yoshikawa, Masaaki

    2003-08-13

    Four new inhibitory peptides for angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE), that is, MRWRD, MRW, LRIPVA, and IAYKPAG, were isolated from the pepsin-pancreatin digest of spinach Rubisco with the use of HPLC. IC(50) values of individual peptides were 2.1, 0.6, 0.38, and 4.2 microM, respectively. MRW and MRWRD had an antihypertensive effect after oral administration to spontaneously hypertensive rats. Maximal reduction occurred 2 h after oral administration of MRW, whereas MRWRD showed maximal decrease 4 h after oral administration at doses of 20 and 30 mg/kg, respectively. IAYKPAG also exerted antihypertensive activity after oral administration at the dose of 100 mg/kg, giving a maximum decrease 4 h after oral administration. IAYKP, IAY, and KP, the fragment peptides of IAYKPAG, also exerted antihypertensive activity. LRIPVA [corrected] did not show any antihypertensive effect at a dose of 100 mg/kg despite its potent ACE-inhibitory activity.

  16. Production of Angiotensin I Converting Enzyme Inhibitory (ACE-I) Peptides during Milk Fermentation and Their Role in Reducing Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Rai, Amit Kumar; Sanjukta, Samurailatpam; Jeyaram, Kumaraswamy

    2015-10-13

    Fermented milk is a potential source of various biologically active peptides with specific health benefits. Angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitory (ACE-I) peptides are one of the most studied bioactive peptides produced during milk fermentation. The presence of these peptides is reported in various fermented milk products such as yoghurt, cheese, sour milk, etc, which are also available as commercial products. Many of the ACE-I peptides formed during milk fermentation are resistant to gastrointestinal digestion and inhibit angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) in the rennin angiotension system (RAS). There are various factors, which affect the formation ACE-I peptides and their ability to reach the target tissue in active form, which includes type of starters (lactic acid bacteria, yeast, etc), substrate composition (casein type, whey protein, etc), composition of ACE-I peptide, pre and post fermentation treatments, and its stability during gastrointestinal digestion. The antihypertensive effect of fermented milk products has also been proved by various in-vitro and in-vivo (animal and human trials) experiments. This article reviews the literature on fermented milk products as a source of ACE-I peptides and various factors affecting the production and activity of ACE-I peptides.

  17. Outcomes of preoperative angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor therapy in patients undergoing isolated coronary artery bypass grafting.

    PubMed

    Bandeali, Salman J; Kayani, Waleed T; Lee, Vei-Vei; Pan, Wei; Elayda, Mac Arthur A; Nambi, Vijay; Jneid, Hani M; Alam, Mahboob; Wilson, James M; Birnbaum, Yochai; Ballantyne, Christie M; Virani, Salim S

    2012-10-01

    The association between preoperative use of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors and outcomes after coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) remain controversial. Our aim was to study in-hospital outcomes after isolated CABG in patients on preoperative ACE inhibitors. A retrospective analysis of 8,889 patients who underwent isolated CABG from 2000 through 2011 was conducted. The primary outcome of interest was the incidence of major adverse events (MAEs) defined as a composite of mortality, postoperative renal dysfunction, myocardial infarction, stroke, and atrial fibrillation during index hospitalization. The secondary outcome was the incidence of individual outcomes included in MAEs. Logistic regression analyses were performed. Of 8,889 patients, 3,983 (45%) were on preoperative ACE inhibitors and 4,906 (55%) were not. Overall incidence of MAEs was 38.1% (n = 1,518) in the ACE inhibitor group compared to 33.6% (n = 1,649) in the no-ACE inhibitor group. Preoperative use of ACE inhibitors was independently associated with MAEs (odds ratio 1.13, 95% confidence interval 1.03 to 1.24), most of which was driven by a statistically significant increase in postoperative renal dysfunction (odds ratio 1.18, 95% confidence interval 1.03 to 1.36) and atrial fibrillation (odds ratio 1.15, 95% confidence interval 1.05 to 1.27). In-hospital mortality, postoperative myocardial infarction, and stroke were not significantly associated with preoperative ACE inhibitor use. Analyses performed after excluding patients with low ejection fractions yielded similar results. In conclusion, preoperative ACE inhibitor use was associated with an increased risk of MAEs after CABG, in particular postoperative renal dysfunction and atrial fibrillation.

  18. A review of the preclinical cardiovascular pharmacology of cilazapril, a new angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Waterfall, J. F.

    1989-01-01

    1 Cilazapril is the monoethyl ester prodrug form of the di-acid cilazaprilat, a new angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor. Cilazaprilat has an IC50 of 1.9 nM as an inhibitor of rabbit lung ACE in vitro making it one of the most potent ACE inhibitors currently available. Studies on a wide range of other enzymes show that the inhibition is highly specific. 2 An oral dose of 0.1 mg kg-1 cilazapril evoked the same maximum degree of plasma ACE inhibition (∼76%) in the rat as 0.25 mg kg-1 enalapril. Cilazapril (0.25 mg kg-1 p.o.) inhibited plasma ACE by > 95%. The rate of recovery of ACE activity was slower with cilazapril (5-6% h-1) than with enalapril (10% h-1). 3 In anaesthetised rats cilazaprilat was equipotent with ramiprilat and slightly more potent (1.5×) than enalaprilat as an inhibitor of the angiotensin I pressor response. 4 Following oral administration to conscious rats and intravenous administration to anaesthetised dogs, cilazapril was 2-4.5× more potent than enalapril as an ACE inhibitor. 5 In cats cilazapril (0.1 and 0.3 mg kg-1 p.o.) dose dependently decreased plasma ACE activity and the angiotensin pressor response. Peak effects occurred at 2 h after dosing and plasma ACE inhibition was maintained at ≥ 50% for up to 18 h. Mean arterial pressure was also decreased dose dependently with a peak effect at 3-4 h. 6 Daily oral dosing of cilazapril (30 mg kg-1 p.o.) to spontaneously hypertensive rats evoked a progressive and prolonged (24 h) antihypertensive response with a maximum decrease in systolic blood pressure of 110 mm Hg. 7 Cilazapril (10 mg kg-1 p.o. twice daily for 3.5 days) progressively decreased blood pressure in volume depleted renal hypertensive dogs. The maximum fall in systolic pressure was 39 ± 6 mm Hg. 8 Haemodynamic studies in open chest anaesthetised dogs showed that the hypotensive response to intravenous cilazapril was accompanied by a reduction in total peripheral resistance. Small decreases in cardiac output and

  19. ACE inhibitors

    MedlinePlus

    ... In: Mann DL, Zipes DP, Libby P, Bonow RO, Braunwald E, eds. Braunwald's Heart Disease: A Textbook ... In: Mann DL, Zipes DP, Libby P, Bonow RO, Braunwald E, eds. Braunwald's Heart Disease: A Textbook ...

  20. Dual ACE and neutral endopeptidase inhibitors: novel therapy for patients with cardiovascular disorders.

    PubMed

    Tabrizchi, Reza

    2003-01-01

    Elevated blood pressure is a risk factor for a variety of cardiovascular disorders, including coronary heart disease, peripheral vascular disease, cardiac failure and cerebrovascular disease. The prevailing view is that an elevated systolic rather than diastolic blood pressure is the major contributor in mortality and morbidity attributed to cardiovascular disorders. Isolated high systolic blood pressure, especially in the elderly, is a major risk factor and should undoubtedly be a target for drug treatment. In the general population, systolic and diastolic blood pressure are highly correlated, and thus it is difficult to dissociate the effects of these two components of the blood pressure and specifically ascribe cardiovascular risk factors to just elevated systolic blood pressure. Therefore, the goal in therapy of an individual with hypertension must be to reduce elevated systolic and diastolic blood pressure in order to reduce mortality and morbidity. ACE and neutral peptidase inhibitors are a new class of drugs that may be beneficial in the treatment of patients with hypertension and heart failure. They may also be useful in the treatment of diabetic patients with hypertension and/or heart failure. Drugs of this class are dual inhibitors of ACE and neutral endopeptidase, and are capable of affecting vascular tone and fluid balance. They are capable of producing vasodilatation by virtue of inhibiting the production of angiotensin II, degradation of natriuretic peptides and bradykinin. They also appear to promote natriuresis and diuresis by amplifying the actions of natriuretic peptidase and reducing aldosterone effects. In addition, they should also attenuate trophogenic actions of the renin angiotensin system and the sympathetic nervous system. Omapatrilat is one drug that appears to be at the advanced stages of clinical development. This drug has been shown to be quite effective in the treatment of hypertension. Evidence also seems to indicate that treatment

  1. Are ACE-inhibitors or ARB's still needed for cardiovascular prevention in high risk patients? Insights from profess and transcend.

    PubMed

    Van Mieghem, W; Billiouw, J M; Brohet, C; Dupont, A G; Gazagnes, M D; Heller, F; Krzesinski, J M; Missault, L; Persu, A; Piérard, L; Rottiers, R; Vanhooren, G; Vervaet, P; Herman, A G

    2010-01-01

    The HOPE and EUROPA clinical studies have shown that treatment with the angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, ramipril and perindopril, may reduce the occurrence of major cardiovascular events in patients with proven atherosclerotic disease. The recently published results of the PRoFESS and TRANSCEND trials completed the much needed information concerning the use of an angiotensin receptor blocker for patients at high risk of cardiovascular events. PROFESS compared a therapy of telmisartan 80 mg daily with placebo in patients with a recent ischemic stroke. The difference in the primary outcome of first recurrent stroke was not statistically significant between telmisartan and placebo. The secondary outcome of major cardiovascular events showed a relative risk reduction (RRR) of 7% in favour of telmisartan. This tended to be significant (p = 0.06) despite a rather short follow-up period of only 28 months. In TRANSCEND 5926 patients at high risk for cardiovascular events were randomized to a treatment with telmisartan 80 mg daily or placebo for a mean duration of follow-up of 56 months. The primary composite outcome of cardiovascular death, myocardial infarction, stroke or hospitalization for heart failure showed a non-significant 8% RRR in favour of the telmisartan treated patients. The main secondary outcome of cardiovascular death and myocardial infarction or stroke as used in the HOPE trial showed a non-significant RRR of 13% in favour of telmisartan treated patients (p = 0.068 adjusted for multiplicity of comparisons). In comparing the Kaplan-Meier curves for the endpoint of major cardiovascular events used in HOPE, EUROPA, TRANSCEND and PRoFESS, the trends are similar. Results of most of the recently published trials have been neutral.This could partly be explained by major improvements in the optimal background therapy of the patients included. Nevertheless, the results of PRoFESS and TRANSCEND do not contradict the results from previous studies with

  2. Does the cis/trans configuration of peptide bonds in bioactive tripeptides play a role in ACE-1 enzyme inhibition?

    PubMed Central

    Siltari, Aino; Viitanen, Riikka; Kukkurainen, Sampo; Vapaatalo, Heikki; Valjakka, Jarkko

    2014-01-01

    Background The milk casein-derived bioactive tripeptides isoleucine-proline-proline (IPP) and valine-proline-proline (VPP) have been shown to prevent development of hypertension in animal models and to lower blood pressure in moderately hypertensive subjects in most but not all clinical trials. Inhibition of angiotensin-converting enzyme 1 (ACE-1) has been suggested as the explanation for these antihypertensive and beneficial vascular effects. Previously, human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) have not been used to test ACE-1 inhibiting properties of casein derived tripeptides in vasculature. Purpose We focused on the cis/trans configurations of the peptide bonds in proline-containing tripeptides in order to discover whether the different structural properties of these peptides influence their activity in ACE-1 inhibition. We hypothesized that the configuration of proline-containing peptides plays a significant role in enzyme inhibition. Methods AutoDock 4.2 docking software was used to predict suitable peptide bond configurations of the tripeptides. Besides modeling studies, we completed ACE-1 activity measurements in vitro using HUVEC cultures. Results In HUVEC cells, both IPP and VPP inhibited ACE-1. Based on molecular docking studies, we propose that in ACE-1 inhibition IPP and VPP share a similar cis configuration between the first aliphatic (isoleucine or valine) and the second (proline) amino acid residues and more different configurations between two proline residues. In vivo experiments are needed to validate the significance of the present findings. PMID:24596454

  3. Effects of Angiotensin Converting Enzyme Inhibitors on Liver Fibrosis in HIV and Hepatitis C Coinfection.

    PubMed

    Reese, Lindsey J; Tider, Diane S; Stivala, Alicia C; Fishbein, Dawn A

    2012-01-01

    Background. Liver fibrosis is accelerated in HIV and hepatitis C coinfection, mediated by profibrotic effects of angiotensin. The objective of this study was to determine if angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (ACE-Is) attenuate liver fibrosis in coinfection. Methods. A retrospective review of 156 coinfected subjects was conducted to analyze the association between exposure to ACE-Is and liver fibrosis. Noninvasive indices of liver fibrosis (APRI, FIB-4, Forns indices) were compared between subjects who had taken ACE-Is and controls who had not taken them. Linear regression was used to evaluate ACE-I use as an independent predictor of fibrosis. Results. Subjects taking ACE-Is for three years were no different than controls on the APRI and the FIB-4 but had significantly higher scores than controls on the Forns index, indicating more advanced fibrosis. The use of ACE-Is for three years remained independently associated with an elevated Forns score when adjusted for age, race, and HIV viral load (P < 0.001). There were significant associations between all of the indices and significant fibrosis, as determined clinically and radiologically. Conclusions. There was not a protective association between angiotensin inhibition and liver fibrosis in coinfection. These noninvasive indices may be useful for ruling out significant fibrosis in coinfection.

  4. [The new drug is much more effective than ACE inhibitors in chronic heart failure].

    PubMed

    Sr, Jiří Widimský

    2015-02-01

    PARADIGM-HF study observed clinical outcomes after treatment by new drug LCZ696 or enalapril in patients with systolic chronic heart failure. It was randomized double-blind trial with LCZ696 (200 mg twice a day) and enalapril (10 mg twice a day). 8442 patients were enrolled with NYHA class II or III and left ventricular ejection fiction of 40% or less. Study drugs were added to other recommended medication. The trial was prematurely terminated after median follow-up of 27 months. The primary endpoint of the study was a combination of cardiovascular mortality and the first hospitalization for heart failure. LCZ696 drug, an inhibitor of angiotensin receptor and neprilysin (Arnie), has led to a reduction in the primary composite target by 20% (p <0.001). The treatment has decreased cardiovascular mortality by 20%, p <0.001 and hospitalization for worsening heart failure by 21%, p <0.001. LCZ696 has also decreased total mortality by 16%, p <0.001. The use of LCZ696 has been accompanied by frequent symptomatic hypotension and hypotension with a decrease in systolic blood pressure below 90 mm Hg, however, LCZ696 was less often associated with an increase in serum creatinine and serum potassium than enalapril. In addition, cough has occurred less frequently after LCZ696 than after enalapril. Discontinuation of therapy occurred in 746 patients (17.8%) treated with LCZ696 and in 833 patients (19.8%) treated with enalapril (19.8%) (p = 0.02). PARADIGM-HF study has also shown superiority of LCZ696 compared to ACE inhibitors in stable outpatients with chronic systolic heart failure NYHA stages II and III. Therefore, LCZ696 is more effective than ACE inhibitors (and angiotensin receptor blockers). Moreover, it is well tolerated. LCZ696 seems to replace the ACE inhibitors in mentioned patients. The authors also discuss the results of the first randomized study PARAMOUNT investigating LCZ696 efficacy in patients with chronic heart failure and good left ventricular ejection

  5. Cleavage of arginyl-arginine and lysyl-arginine from the C-terminus of pro-hormone peptides by human germinal angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) and the C-domain of human somatic ACE.

    PubMed Central

    Isaac, R E; Williams, T A; Sajid, M; Corvol, P; Coates, D

    1997-01-01

    Mammalian germinal angiotensin I-converting enzyme (gACE) is a single-domain dipeptidyl carboxypeptidase found exclusively in male germ cells, which has almost identical sequence and enzymic properties with the C-domain of the two-domain somatic ACE. Mutant mice that do not express gACE are infertile, suggesting a role for the enzyme in the processing of undefined peptides involved in fertilization. A number of spermatid peptides [e.g. cholecystokinin (CCK) and gastrin] are processed from pro-hormones by endo- and exo-proteolytic cleavages which might generate substrates for gACE. We have shown that peptide hormone intermediates with Lys/Arg-Arg at the C-terminus are high-affinity substrates for human gACE. gACE from human sperm cleaved Arg-Arg from the C-terminus of the CCK5-GRR (GWMDFGRR), a peptide corresponding to the C-terminus of a CCK-gastrin prohormone intermediate. Hydrolysis of CCK5-GRR by recombinant human C-domain ACE was Cl- dependent, with maximal activity achieved in 5-10 mM NaCl at pH 6.4. C-Domain ACE cleaved Lys/Arg-Arg from the C-terminus of dynorphin-(1-7), a pro-TRH peptide KRQHPGKR, and two insect peptides FSPRLGKR and FSPRLGRR. C-Domain ACE displayed high affinity towards all these substrates with Vmax/Km values between 14 and 113 times greater than the Vmax/Km for the conversion of the best known ACE substrate, angiotensin I, into angiotensin II. In conclusion, we have identified a new class of substrates for human gACE, and we suggest that gACE might be an alternative to carboxypeptidase E for the trimming of basic dipeptides from the C-terminus of intermediates generated from pro-hormones by subtilisin-like convertases in human male germ cells. PMID:9371719

  6. Inhibitors of alanine racemase enzyme: a review.

    PubMed

    Azam, Mohammed Afzal; Jayaram, Unni

    2016-08-01

    Alanine racemase is a fold type III PLP-dependent amino acid racemase enzyme catalysing the conversion of l-alanine to d-alanine utilised by bacterial cell wall for peptidoglycan synthesis. As there are no known homologs in humans, it is considered as an excellent antibacterial drug target. The standard inhibitors of this enzyme include O-carbamyl-d-serine, d-cycloserine, chlorovinyl glycine, alaphosphin, etc. d-Cycloserine is indicated for pulmonary and extra pulmonary tuberculosis but therapeutic use of drug is limited due to its severe toxic effects. Toxic effects due to off-target affinities of cycloserine and other substrate analogs have prompted new research efforts to identify alanine racemase inhibitors that are not substrate analogs. In this review, an updated status of known inhibitors of alanine racemase enzyme has been provided which will serve as a rich source of structural information and will be helpful in generating selective and potent inhibitor of alanine racemase.

  7. Determining the Enzymatic Activity of Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2 (ACE2) in Brain Tissue and Cerebrospinal Fluid Using a Quenched Fluorescent Substrate.

    PubMed

    Sriramula, Srinivas; Pedersen, Kim Brint; Xia, Huijing; Lazartigues, Eric

    2017-01-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) is a component of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) which plays an important role in the regulation of blood pressure and volume homeostasis. Accumulating evidence shows alterations in ACE2 expression and activity in several hypertensive animal models, as well as in patients with hypertension. In order to assess the role of brain ACE2 in hypertension, a specific ACE2 assay is required. Based on a quenched fluorescent substrate, we describe an easy-to-use method for determining ACE2 activity in brain tissue and cerebrospinal fluid. The method can further be adapted for other tissues, plasma, cell extracts, and cell culture supernatants.

  8. Mixed inhibitors of angiotensin-converting enzyme and enkephalinase: Rational design, properties, and potential cardiovascular applications of glycopril and alatriopril

    SciTech Connect

    Gros, C.; Noel, N.; Souque, A.; Schwartz, J.C. ); Danvy, D.; Plaquevent, J.C.; Duhamel, L.; Duhamel, P. ); Lecomte, J.M. ); Bralet, J. )

    1991-05-15

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) and enkephalinase, two cell surface metallopeptidases, are responsible for angiotensin II formation and atrial natriuretic factor (ANF) degradation, respectively, and thereby play a critical role in the metabolism of hormonal peptides exerting essentially opposite actions in cardiovascular regulations. To affect simultaneously both hormonal systems by a single molecular structure, the authors designed glycoprilat and alatrioprilat {l brace}(S)-N-(3-(3,4-methylenedioxyphenyl)-2-(mercaptomethyl)-1-oxopropyl)glycine and -alanine, respectively{r brace}. In vitro the two compounds inhibit both ACE and enkephalinase activities with similar, nanomolar potencies, and in vivo, glycopril and alatriopril, the corresponding diester prodrugs, occupy the two enzyme molecules in lung at similar low dosages. The high potency of these compounds is attributable to interaction of the methylenedioxy group with the S{sub 1} subsite of ACE and of the aromatic ring with the S{prime}{sub 1} subsite of enkephalinase. In rodents, low doses of these mixed inhibitors exert typical actions of ACE inhibitors--i.e., prevention of angiotensin I-induced hypertension-as well as of enkephalinase inhibitors--i.e., protection from {sup 125}I-ANF degradation or enhancement of diuresis and natriuresis following acute extracellular volume expansion. In view of the known counterbalanced physiological actions of the two hormonal peptides, whose metabolism is controlled by ACE and enkephalinase, mixed inhibitors of the two peptidases show promise for the treatment of various cardiovascular and salt-retention disorders.

  9. Renal Expression of FGF23 in Progressive Renal Disease of Diabetes and the Effect of Ace Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Benigni, Ariela; Corna, Daniela; Tomasoni, Susanna; Rottoli, Daniela; Gaspari, Flavio; Remuzzi, Giuseppe; Zoja, Carlamaria

    2013-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23) is a phosphaturic hormone mainly produced by bone that acts in the kidney through FGF receptors and Klotho. Here we investigated whether the kidney was an additional source of FGF23 during renal disease using a model of type 2 diabetic nephropathy. Renal expression of FGF23 and Klotho was assessed in Zucker diabetic fatty (ZDF) and control lean rats at 2, 4, 6, 8 months of age. To evaluate whether the renoprotective effect of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor in this model was associated with changes in FGF23 and Klotho, ZDF rats received ramipril from 4, when proteinuric, to 8 months of age. FGF23 mRNA was not detectable in the kidney of lean rats, nor of ZDF rats at 2 months of age. FGF23 became measurable in the kidney of diabetic rats at 4 months and significantly increased thereafter. FGF23 protein localized in proximal and distal tubules. Renal Klotho mRNA and protein decreased during time in ZDF rats. As renal disease progressed, serum phosphate levels increased in parallel with decline of fractional phosphorus excretion. Ramipril limited proteinuria and renal injury, attenuated renal FGF23 upregulation and ameliorated Klotho expression. Ramipril normalized serum phosphate levels and tended to increase fractional phosphorus excretion. These data indicate that during progressive renal disease the kidney is a site of FGF23 production which is limited by ACE inhibition. Interfering pharmacologically with the delicate balance of FGF23 and phosphorus in diabetes may have implications in clinics. PMID:23967103

  10. Lysozyme and bilirubin bind to ACE and regulate its conformation and shedding

    PubMed Central

    Danilov, Sergei M.; Lünsdorf, Heinrich; Akinbi, Henry T.; Nesterovitch, Andrew B.; Epshtein, Yuliya; Letsiou, Eleftheria; Kryukova, Olga V.; Piegeler, Tobias; Golukhova, Elena Z.; Schwartz, David E.; Dull, Randal O.; Minshall, Richard D.; Kost, Olga A.; Garcia, Joe G. N.

    2016-01-01

    Angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) hydrolyzes numerous peptides and is a critical participant in blood pressure regulation and vascular remodeling. Elevated tissue ACE levels are associated with increased risk for cardiovascular and respiratory disorders. Blood ACE concentrations are determined by proteolytic cleavage of ACE from the endothelial cell surface, a process that remains incompletely understood. In this study, we identified a novel ACE gene mutation (Arg532Trp substitution in the N domain of somatic ACE) that increases blood ACE activity 7-fold and interrogated the mechanism by which this mutation significantly increases blood ACE levels. We hypothesized that this ACE mutation disrupts the binding site for blood components which may stabilize ACE conformation and diminish ACE shedding. We identified the ACE-binding protein in the blood as lysozyme and also a Low Molecular Weight (LMW) ACE effector, bilirubin, which act in concert to regulate ACE conformation and thereby influence ACE shedding. These results provide mechanistic insight into the elevated blood level of ACE observed in patients on ACE inhibitor therapy and elevated blood lysozyme and ACE levels in sarcoidosis patients. PMID:27734897

  11. Biological abatement of enzyme inhibitors

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lignocellulose pretreatments release phenolic compounds that cause enzyme inhibition and deactivation. Bio-abatement, the biological removal of furfurals, acetic acid and phenolics, may utilize fungal fermentation to metabolize these compounds to CO2, water, cell mass, and heat. Our work with Coni...

  12. Bradykinin-mediated cardiovascular protective actions of ACE inhibitors. A new dimension in anti-ischaemic therapy?

    PubMed

    Remme, W J

    1997-01-01

    In addition to being accepted therapy in hypertension and heart failure, ACE inhibitors may well offer a new dimension in anti-ischaemic therapy. Currently, anti-ischaemic properties have been demonstrated by ACE inhibitors in selected patient groups, including patients with left ventricular dysfunction with or without a direct temporal relationship with myocardial infarction. Anti-ischaemic effects of ACE inhibitors become apparent late after initiation of treatment and suggest a structural rather than a functional effect. Underlying mechanisms may include a reduction in ventricular dilatation and (abnormal) cardiac hypertrophy, leading to less myocardial oxygen demand and, possibly, improved subendocardial blood supply, and vasculoprotective effects, i.e. anti-atherosclerotic and antiremodelling properties, a beneficial effect on the fibrinolytic system and an improvement in abnormal endothelial vasodilator function. The latter aspect is most probably the pivotal mode of action where the anti-ischaemic profile of ACE inhibition is concerned. An improvement in endothelial dysfunction has been shown in patients with mild to moderate coronary artery disease [Trial on Reversing ENdothelial Dysfunction (TREND)]. It is of importance that, in both clinical experiments and human studies, the role of bradykinin appears central in the structural and functional cardiovascular effects of ACE inhibition. This is particularly true for the improvement of impaired endothelial function. Myocardial ischaemia evokes vasoconstrictor neurohormonal activation, which may lead to coronary vasoconstriction in diseased coronary segments. The subsequent abnormal endothelial function leads to diminished coronary flow and also increases systemic vasotone and afterload, thus unfavourably altering the myocardial oxygen supply/demand ratio. Under laboratory conditions, acute ACE inhibition counteracts this activation in humans. However, it is speculated that this anti-ischaemic mechanism may

  13. Absence of Cardiac Benefit with Early Combination ACE Inhibitor and Beta Blocker Treatment in mdx Mice.

    PubMed

    Blain, Alison; Greally, Elizabeth; Laval, Steven H; Blamire, Andrew M; MacGowan, Guy A; Straub, Volker W

    2015-04-01

    Most patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) will develop cardiomyopathy; however, the evidence for prophylactic treatment of children with cardiac medications is limited. We have used the mdx mouse model of DMD to assess if early combination treatment with beta blocker (BB) and ACE inhibitor (AI) is superior to single treatment with either one of these drugs. Mice were assessed with cardiac MRI (ventricular structure and function, in vivo calcium influx (manganese-enhanced MRI)), pressure-volume loops, and histopathology. Combination treatment did not show benefits over treatment with AI or BB alone. Indeed, some beneficial aspects of BB and AI were lost when used in combination. None of the treatments impacted RV function. Combination treatment had no significant effect on sarcolemmal damage or histopathology. The study suggests that combined BB and AI may not confer an advantage at an early stage in DMD cardiomyopathy. However, limitations of the mdx model should be considered.

  14. Identification of new polymorphisms of the angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) gene, and study of their relationship to plasma ACE levels by two-QTL segregation-linkage analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Villard, E.; Tiret, L.; Visvikis, S.; Rakotovao, R.; Cambien, F.; Soubrier, F.

    1996-01-01

    Plasma angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) levels are highly genetically determined. A previous segregation-linkage analysis suggested the existence of a functional mutation located within or close to the ACE locus, in almost complete linkage desequilibrium (LD) with the ACE insertion/deletion (I/D) polymorphism and accounting for half the ACE variance. In order to identify the functional variant at the molecular level, we compared ACE gene sequences between four subjects selected for having contrasted ACE levels and I/D genotypes. We identified 10 new polymorphisms, among which 8 were genotyped in 95 healthy nuclear families, in addition to the I/D polymorphism. These polymorphisms could be divided into two groups: five polymorphisms in the 5' region and three in the coding sequence and the 3' UTR. Within each group, polymorphisms were in nearly complete association, whereas polymorphisms from the two groups were in strong negative LD. After adjustment for the I/D polymorphism, all polymorphisms of the 5' group remained significantly associated with ACE levels, which suggests the existence of two quantitative trait loci (QTL) acting additively on ACE levels. Segregation-linkage analyses including one or two ACE-linked QTLs in LD with two ACE markers were performed to test this hypothesis. The two QTLs and the two markers were assumed to be in complete LD. Results supported the existence of two ACE-linked QTLs, which would explain 38% and 49% of the ACE variance in parents and offspring, respectively. One of these QTLs might be the I/D polymorphism itself or the newly characterized 4656(CT)2/3 polymorphism. The second QTL would have a frequency of approximately .20, which is incompatible with any of the yet-identified polymorphisms. More extensive sequencing and extended analyses in larger samples and in other populations will be necessary to characterize definitely the functional variants. PMID:8651305

  15. Investigation of the biochemical effects of renin inhibition in normal volunteers treated by an ACE inhibitor.

    PubMed Central

    Chauveau, D; Guyenne, T T; Cumin, F; Chatellier, G; Corvol, P; Ménard, J

    1992-01-01

    1. In order to investigate accurately the biochemical effects of renin inhibition in man, we have developed a sensitive assay to measure angiotensin I (1-10) decapeptide. 2. Angiotensins were extracted from plasma by adsorption to phenylsilylsilica, and angiotensin I (Ang I) was quantified by radioimmunoassay. The detection limit was 0.77 fmol ml-1, and the extraction recovery of [125I]-Ang I added to albumin buffer was 83% at the inflection point (10 fmol ml-1) of the standard curve. The overall recovery was 98.5 +/- 3.5%. The intra- and inter-assay reproducibility was 10.4% and 9.7% respectively. Cross-reactivity of the antiserum used was low (less than 0.3%) with all angiotensin peptides tested except Ang (2-10) nonapeptide. 3. A human pharmacological model was subsequently used to assess in vivo the biochemical effects of the renin inhibitor CGP 38560A. Six healthy volunteers received 20 mg lisinopril, a long-acting ACE-inhibitor. During the following 24 h, the renin-angiotensin system was reset with typically elevated active plasma renin and Ang I, at respectively 275 and 429% of basal values. 4. In a randomized three-way cross-over protocol, the six volunteers received a 30 min infusion of the renin inhibitor CGP 38560A (125 or 250 micrograms kg-1) or 5% glucose. The fall in plasma Ang I was 92% and 97.5% after the lowest and highest dose of the renin inhibitor, respectively. A concomitant increase in active plasma renin was observed.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1315560

  16. Triple ACE-ECE-NEP inhibition in heart failure: a comparison with ACE and dual ECE-NEP inhibition.

    PubMed

    Mellin, Virginie; Jeng, Arco Y; Monteil, Christelle; Renet, Sylvanie; Henry, Jean Paul; Thuillez, Christian; Mulder, Paul

    2005-09-01

    Mortality remains high in chronic heart failure (CHF) because under ACE inhibitor treatment other neurohumoral systems remain/become (de)activated, such as the endothelin and atrial natriuretic peptide pathways. Dual endothelin-converting enzyme-neutral endopeptidase (ECE-NEP) inhibition exerts beneficial effects in experimental CHF, but whether "triple" ACE-ECE-NEP inhibition is superior to ACE or ECE-NEP inhibition is unknown. We compared, in rats with CHF, ACE-ECE-NEP to ACE or ECE-NEP inhibition in terms of left ventricular (LV) hemodynamics and remodeling. Benazepril (2 mg/kg/d) or the ECE-NEP inhibitor CGS26303 (10 mg/kg/d) were administered alone or in combination (subcutaneously for 28 days starting 7 days after coronary ligation). ACE-ECE-NEP inhibition reduced blood pressure more markedly than ACE or ECE-NEP inhibition. All treatments increased cardiac output to the same extent, but ACE-ECE-NEP inhibition reduced LV diameter and LV end-diastolic pressure more markedly than ACE or ECE-NEP inhibition. The reduction of LV weight and collagen accumulation in the "viable" myocardium was most pronounced after ACE-ECE-NEP inhibition. These results, obtained in experimental CHF, illustrate a further improvement of LV hemodynamics and structure after ACE-ECE-NEP inhibition compared with either ACE or ECE-NEP inhibition, but whether this is associated with a further improvement of exercise tolerance and/or survival remains to be determined.

  17. Efficacy and Safety of Complete RAAS Blockade with ALISKIREN in Patients with Refractory Proteinuria Who were already on Combined ACE Inhibitor, ARB, and Aldosterone Antagonist

    PubMed Central

    Sreelatha, M

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Proteinuria is always associated with intrinsic kidney disese and is a strong predictor of later development of End Stage Renal Disease (ESRD). As Renin Angiotensin Aldosterone System (RAAS) has a role in mediating proteinuria, inhibitors of this system are renoprotective and patients with refractory proteinuria are put on a combination of these agents. The routinely employed triple blockade of RAAS with Angiotensin Converting Enzyme (ACE) inhibitor, ARB and Aldosterone antagonist has many limitations. Addition of Aliskiren to this combination suppresses the RAAS at the earliest stage and can offset many of these limitations. Aim This study was conducted to assess the safety and efficacy of complete RAAS blockade by the addition of Aliskiren in those patients with refractory proteinuria who were already on triple blockade with ACE inhibitor, ARB and Aldosterone antagonist. Settings This study was conducted in Nephrology Department, Calicut Medical College. Materials and Methods A total of 36 patients with refractory proteinuria who were already on ACE inhibitor, ARB and Aldosterone antagonist were divided in to two groups A and B. Group A received Aliskiren in addition to the above combination whereas group B continued the same treatment for 12 weeks. Efficacy of the treatment was assessed by recording 24hr urine protein and safety by S.Creatinine, S.Potassium every 2 weeks of the treatment period. Statistical Analysis Statistical analysis of the lab values was done using SPSS software. Unpaired t-test, Paired t-test and Chi-square test were done for data analysis. Results Statistical analysis revealed that addition of Aliskiren to the combination therapy with ACE inhibitor+ ARB+ Aldosterone antagonist offers no advantage. But mean reduction in proteinuria was more with Group A than Group B. There is no statistically significant change in S.Creatinine and S.Potassium at the end of treatment. Conclusion As proteinuria is a strong risk factor for

  18. Angiotensin-I Converting Enzyme (ACE) Inhibitory and Anti-Oxidant Activities of Sea Cucumber (Actinopyga lecanora) Hydrolysates

    PubMed Central

    Ghanbari, Raheleh; Zarei, Mohammad; Ebrahimpour, Afshin; Abdul-Hamid, Azizah; Ismail, Amin; Saari, Nazamid

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, food protein-derived hydrolysates have received considerable attention because of their numerous health benefits. Amongst the hydrolysates, those with anti-hypertensive and anti-oxidative activities are receiving special attention as both activities can play significant roles in preventing cardiovascular diseases. The present study investigated the angiotensin-I converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory and anti-oxidative activities of Actinopyga lecanora (A. lecanora) hydrolysates, which had been prepared by alcalase, papain, bromelain, flavourzyme, pepsin, and trypsin under their optimum conditions. The alcalase hydrolysate showed the highest ACE inhibitory activity (69.8%) after 8 h of hydrolysis while the highest anti-oxidative activities measured by 2,2-diphenyl 1-1-picrylhydrazyl radical scavenging (DPPH) (56.00%) and ferrous ion-chelating (FIC) (59.00%) methods were exhibited after 24 h and 8 h of hydrolysis, respectively. The ACE-inhibitory and anti-oxidative activities displayed dose-dependent trends, and increased with increasing protein hydrolysate concentrations. Moreover, strong positive correlations between angiotensin-I converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory and anti-oxidative activities were also observed. This study indicates that A. lecanora hydrolysate can be exploited as a source of functional food owing to its anti-oxidant as well as anti-hypertension functions. PMID:26690117

  19. Isolation of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibiting triterpenes from Schinus molle.

    PubMed

    Olafsson, K; Jaroszewski, J W; Smitt, U W; Nyman, U

    1997-08-01

    Bioactivity-guided fractionation of extracts of Schinus molle leaves, using an in vitro assay, led to the isolation of ACE-inhibitory steroidal triterpenes of the euphane type, identified by means of NMR spectroscopic methods. One of the triterpenes was isolated as an equilibrium mixture of epimeric aldehydes. The triterpenes showed moderate ACE-inhibitory activity (IC(50) about 250 microM).

  20. Do ACE Inhibitors Improve the Response to Exercise Training in Functionally Impaired Older Adults? A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Band, Margaret; Miller, Suzanne; Cvoro, Vera; Witham, Miles; Struthers, Allan; McConnachie, Alex; Lloyd, Suzanne M.; McMurdo, Marion

    2014-01-01

    Background. Loss of muscle mass and strength with ageing is a major cause for falls, disability, and morbidity in older people. Previous studies have found that angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEi) may improve physical function in older people. It is unclear whether ACEi provide additional benefit when added to a standard exercise training program. We examined the effects of ACEi therapy on physical function in older people undergoing exercise training. Methods. Community-dwelling people aged ≥65 years with functional impairment were recruited through general (family) practices. All participants received progressive exercise training. Participants were randomized to receive either 4 mg perindopril or matching placebo daily for 20 weeks. The primary outcome was between-group change in 6-minute walk distance from baseline to 20 weeks. Secondary outcomes included changes in Short Physical Performance Battery, handgrip and quadriceps strength, self-reported quality of life using the EQ-5D, and functional impairment measured using the Functional Limitations Profile. Results. A total of 170 participants (n = 86 perindopril, n = 84 placebo) were randomized. Mean age was 75.7 (standard deviation [SD] 6.8) years. Baseline 6-minute walk distance was 306 m (SD 99). Both groups increased their walk distance (by 29.6 m perindopril, 36.4 m placebo group) at 20 weeks, but there was no statistically significant treatment effect between groups (−8.6m [95% confidence interval: −30.1, 12.9], p = .43). No statistically significant treatment effects were observed between groups for the secondary outcomes. Adverse events leading to withdrawal were few (n = 0 perindopril, n = 4 placebo). Interpretation. ACE inhibitors did not enhance the effect of exercise training on physical function in functionally impaired older people. PMID:24201696

  1. Validated ligand mapping of ACE active site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuster, Daniel J.; Marshall, Garland R.

    2005-08-01

    Crystal structures of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) complexed with three inhibitors (lisinopril, captopril, enalapril) provided experimental data for testing the validity of a prior active site model predicting the bound conformation of the inhibitors. The ACE active site model - predicted over 18 years ago using a series of potent ACE inhibitors of diverse chemical structure - was recreated using published data and commercial software. Comparison between the predicted structures of the three inhibitors bound to the active site of ACE and those determined experimentally yielded root mean square deviation (RMSD) values of 0.43-0.81 Å, among the distances defining the active site map. The bound conformations of the chemically relevant atoms were accurately deduced from the geometry of ligands, applying the assumption that the geometry of the active site groups responsible for binding and catalysis of amide hydrolysis was constrained. The mapping of bound inhibitors at the ACE active site was validated for known experimental compounds, so that the constrained conformational search methodology may be applied with confidence when no experimentally determined structure of the enzyme yet exists, but potent, diverse inhibitors are available.

  2. Antifibrotic medication using a combination of N-acetyl-L-cystein (NAC) and ACE inhibitors can prevent the recurrence of Dupuytren's disease.

    PubMed

    Knobloch, Karsten; Redeker, Joern; Vogt, Peter M

    2009-11-01

    Dupuytren's disease is a progress fibromatosis of unknown origin first described in 1831. Nonoperative treatment options have been suggested involving radiation therapy, vitamin E, local injection therapy suing calcium channel blockers, interferon, corticosteroids or collagenase. Transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-beta1) and its downstream Smad signalling system is well established as a key player during fibrogenesis. A number of in vitro experiments have been assessed the blockade of TGF-beta1 and TGF-beta 2. Clinically, a number of antifibrotic agents are available such as N-acetyl-L-cysteins (NAC) as well as angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors or AT II antagonists. However, to date none of the well known substances has been tested clinically in fibromatosis such as Dupuytren's disease especially to prevent recurrences after surgical release. Antifibrotic medication using a combination of N-acetyl-L-cystein (NAC) and ACE inhibitor can prevent the recurrence of Dupyutren's disease. Given the fact that recurrence rate in Dupuytren's disease is high and unpredictable after surgical release, an antifibrotic intervention might be worthwhile to consider in the clinical setting. Antifibrotic agents inhibit TGF-beta1, which play a key role in fibromatosis. Thus, antifibrotic medication might reduce the recurrence rate in fibromatosis such as Dupuytren's disease in a clinical significant way.

  3. Effects of ACE-inhibitors and beta-blockers on left ventricular remodeling in chronic heart failure.

    PubMed

    Khattar, R S

    2003-04-01

    In recent years, it has become increasingly recognised that a central feature of the disease progression associated with heart failure is the process of left ventricular remodeling. The remodeling process manifests as an increase in left ventricular volumes, leading to a rise in wall stress and a compensatory increase in myocardial mass. The left ventricle also gradually assumes a more spherical shape, resulting in functional mitral regurgitation leading to further haemodynamic overload, worsening myocardial function and an unfavourable clinical course. Accumulating clinical data support the hypothesis that the benefits in clinical outcome with ACE-inhibitors and beta-blockers may relate to modification of the remodeling process resulting in slowing of disease progression and preservation of contractile function. The general trend from a number of clinical studies indicates that whereas ACE-inhibitors seem to prevent progressive left ventricular dilatation, the third generation beta-blocker, carvedilol, may actually reverse the remodelling process by reducing left ventricular volumes and improving systolic function. Direct comparisons indicate that carvedilol has a similar safety and tolerability profile to ACE-inhibitors and thereby support the feasibility of administering this drug as first-line therapy in selected patients with mild to moderate chronic heart failure. Therefore, the decision to initiate treatment with carvedilol or an ACE-inhibitor might in future be tailored on an individual basis and followed thereafter by combination therapy at the earliest and safest opportunity. Finally, the possible development of treatment strategies addressing the cellular and molecular mechanisms responsible for the remodeling process and the recently published benefits of device therapies herald a combined, synergistic approach to the future management of heart failure.

  4. The transcription factor HNF1α induces expression of angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) in pancreatic islets from evolutionarily conserved promoter motifs.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Kim Brint; Chhabra, Kavaljit H; Nguyen, Van K; Xia, Huijing; Lazartigues, Eric

    2013-11-01

    Pancreatic angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) has previously been shown to be critical for maintaining glycemia and β-cell function. Efforts to maintain or increase ACE2 expression in pancreatic β-cells might therefore have therapeutic potential for treating diabetes. In our study, we investigated the transcriptional role of hepatocyte nuclear factor 1α (HNF1α) and hepatocyte nuclear factor 1β (HNF1β) in induction of ACE2 expression in insulin-secreting cells. A deficient allele of HNF1α or HNF1β causes maturity-onset diabetes of the young (MODY) types 3 and 5, respectively, in humans. We found that ACE2 is primarily transcribed from the proximal part of the ACE2 promoter in the pancreas. In the proximal part of the human ACE2 promoter, we further identified three functional HNF1 binding sites, as they have binding affinity for HNF1α and HNF1β and are required for induction of promoter activity by HNF1β in insulinoma cells. These three sites are well-conserved among mammalian species. Both HNF1α and HNF1β induce expression of ACE2 mRNA and lead to elevated levels of ACE2 protein and ACE2 enzymatic activity in insulinoma cells. Furthermore, HNF1α dose-dependently increases ACE2 expression in primary pancreatic islet cells. We conclude that HNF1α can induce the expression of ACE2 in pancreatic islet cells via evolutionarily conserved HNF1 binding sites in the ACE2 promoter. Potential therapeutics aimed at counteracting functional HNF1α depletion in diabetes and MODY3 will thus have ACE2 induction in pancreatic islets as a likely beneficial effect.

  5. Structural determinants for binding to angiotensin converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) and angiotensin receptors 1 and 2

    PubMed Central

    Clayton, Daniel; Hanchapola, Iresha; Thomas, Walter G.; Widdop, Robert E.; Smith, Alexander I.; Perlmutter, Patrick; Aguilar, Marie-Isabel

    2015-01-01

    Angiotensin converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) is a zinc carboxypeptidase involved in the renin–angiotensin system (RAS) and inactivates the potent vasopressive peptide angiotensin II (Ang II) by removing the C-terminal phenylalanine residue to yield Ang1–7. This conversion inactivates the vasoconstrictive action of Ang II and yields a peptide that acts as a vasodilatory molecule at the Mas receptor and potentially other receptors. Given the growing complexity of RAS and level of cross-talk between ligands and their corresponding enzymes and receptors, the design of molecules with selectivity for the major RAS binding partners to control cardiovascular tone is an on-going challenge. In previous studies we used single β-amino acid substitutions to modulate the structure of Ang II and its selectivity for ACE2, AT1R, and angiotensin type 2 (AT2R) receptor. We showed that modification at the C-terminus of Ang II generally resulted in more pronounced changes to secondary structure and ligand binding, and here, we further explore this region for the potential to modulate ligand specificity. In this study, (1) a library of 47 peptides derived from the C-terminal tetrapeptide sequence (-IHPF) of Ang II was synthesized and assessed for ACE2 binding, (2) the terminal group requirements for high affinity ACE2 binding were explored by and N- and C-terminal modification, (3) high affinity ACE2 binding chimeric AngII analogs were then synthesized and assessed, (4) the structure of the full-length Ang II analogs were assessed by circular dichroism, and (5) the Ang II analogs were assessed for AT1R/AT2R selectivity by cell-based assays. Studies on the C-terminus of Ang II demonstrated varied specificity at different residue positions for ACE2 binding and four Ang II chimeric peptides were identified as selective ligands for the AT2 receptor. Overall, these results provide insight into the residue and structural requirements for ACE2 binding and angiotensin receptor selectivity. PMID

  6. High association of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) gene insertion/deletion (I/D) polymorphism with recurrent aphthous stomatitis.

    PubMed

    Karakus, Nevin; Yigit, Serbulent; Kalkan, Goknur; Sezer, Saime

    2013-08-01

    Recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS) is a common ulcerative disease of the oral mucosa. Oral ulcers are also the most common feature of Behçet's disease (BD). Association of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) gene insertion/deletion (I/D) polymorphism with BD has been reported in Turkish population. The aim of the present study was to investigate the possible association between ACE gene I/D polymorphism and RAS, and evaluate if there was an association with clinical features in a relatively large cohort of Turkish patients. The study included 198 patients affected by RAS and 214 healthy controls. ACE gene I/D polymorphism genotypes were determined using polymerase chain reaction with I and D allele-specific primers. The genotype and allele frequencies of I/D polymorphism showed statistically significant differences between RAS patients and controls (p < 0.0001 and p < 0.0001, respectively). After stratifying RAS patients according to clinical and demographical characteristics, no significant association was observed. In conclusion, the results of this study suggest that I/D polymorphism of the ACE gene was positively associated with predisposition to develop RAS in Turkish population. Further studies with larger populations are recommended.

  7. [ACE inhibitors and its usefulness in the prevention of aspiration pneumonia in chronic cerebrovascular disease patients with asymptomatic swallowing dysfunction].

    PubMed

    Shibuya, Seiji; Murahashi, Makoto; Inoue, Masahiko; Jimi, Takahiro; Wakayama, Yoshihiro

    2002-03-01

    The double contrast pharyngogram by use of computed radiography (DCP-CR) has been found to be useful in detection of asymptomatic swallowing dysfunction. Following the DCP-CR examination, we investigated the incidence of aspiration pneumonia in 143 patients with chronic cerebrovascular disease (CVD) for 3 years and the effects of ACE inhibitors on the prevention of pneumonia. Aspiration pneumonia occurred in 29 out of 143 patients, and more frequently in the elderly chronic CVD patients with multiple brain lesions. Aspiration pneumonia was confirmed in 26 out of 85 patients (30.6%) with abnormal barium adhesion to the pharyngeal wall on the double contrast pharyngogram image by DCP-CR; whereas pneumonia occurred in 3 out of 58 patients (5.2%) with normal findings of DCP-CR pharyngogram. Among chronic CVD patients with abnormal findings of DCP-CR pharyngogram, the incidence of aspiration pneumonia was significantly lower in the patients treated with ACE inhibitors than in those treated with other antihypertensive agents or without antihypertensive agents (chi 2 value = 7.163, p < 0.05). Accordingly, ACE inhibitors may prevent the aspiration pneumonia and reduce the incidence of aspiration pneumonia in the chronic CVD patients with abnormal DCP-CR pharyngogram images.

  8. Angiotensin Converting Enzyme Inhibitors and Cognitive Decline in Older Adults with Hypertension: Results from the Cardiovascular Health Study

    PubMed Central

    Sink, Kaycee M.; Leng, Xiaoyan; Williamson, Jeff; Kritchevsky, Stephen B.; Yaffe, Kristine; Kuller, Lewis; Yasar, Sevil; Atkinson, Hal; Robbins, Mike; Psaty, Bruce; Goff, David C.

    2010-01-01

    Background Hypertension (HTN) is a risk factor for dementia and animal studies suggest that centrally active (cross the blood brain barrier) angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors may protect against dementia beyond HTN control. Methods Participants in the Cardiovascular Health Study cognition substudy (mean age 75 yrs) with treated HTN and no diagnosis of heart failure (n= 1054) were followed for a median of 6 years to determine whether cumulative exposure to ACE inhibitors (as a class and by central activity), compared to other antihypertensive agents, was associated with lower risk of incident dementia, cognitive decline (by the modified mini mental state exam, 3MSE), or incident disability in instrumental activities of daily living (IADL). Results Among 414 participants exposed to ACE inhibitors and 640 not, there were 158 cases of incident dementia. Compared to other anti-HTN drugs, there was no association between exposure to all ACE inhibitors and risk of dementia (HR 1.01, 95% CI 0.88–1.15), difference in 3MSE scores (−0.32 points/yr, p=0.15), or odds of IADL disability (OR (95% CI) 1.06 (0.99–1.14). Adjusted results were similar. However, centrally active ACE inhibitors were associated with 65% less decline in 3MSE scores per year of exposure (p= 0.01) and non-centrally active ACE inhibitors were associated with greater risk of incident dementia (adjusted HR 1.20 (1.00–1.43) per year of exposure) and greater odds of IADL disability (adjusted OR 1.16 (1.03–1.30) per year of exposure) compared to other anti-HTN drugs. Conclusions While ACE inhibitors as a class do not appear to be independently associated with dementia risk or cognitive decline in older hypertensive adults, there may be within class differences in regards to these outcomes. These results should be confirmed with an RCT of a centrally active ACE inhibitor in the prevention of cognitive decline and dementia. PMID:19597068

  9. ACE inhibitors in heart failure--switching from enalapril to perindopril.

    PubMed

    Masuell, Marcelo; Brusca, Gustavo; Pardo, Augusto; Piñeiro, Daniel; Checkerdhemian, Sergio; Forcada, Pedro

    2002-01-01

    Although ACE inhibitors have demonstrated their beneficial effects in heart failure, whether different agents may induce different benefits remains unclear. We designed an open, sequential, prospective study switching heart failure patients receiving enalapril to perindopril which has been reported to be longer acting and better tolerated. The objective of the study was to find out if clinical and functional status could be further improved by changing from enalapril 30 mg daily to a perindopril 4 mg daily. Assessments of clinical status, echocardiography and nuclear ventriculography were performed at baseline under enalapril (30 mg mean dose (b.i.d.)), then 6 and 12 months after the switch to perindopril (4 mg/day mean dose). Thirty-one patients were included (90% men, aged 56.5 +/- 11.8 years, mean radionuclide left ventricular (LV) ejection fraction 22.4 +/- 8.5 %). After 6 months of treatment, NYHA functional class was significantly improved; the percentage of patients in class I increased to 57% after perindopril versus 20% at baseline (p < 0.001), and 50% of the total study population gained at least one NYHA class. After 12 months of treatment, 80% of the patients were in NYHA class I. Blood pressure decreased significantly with a good tolerance at 6 months and then remained stable. After 12 months of treatment, significant reductions of LV end-diastolic diameter (61.4 +/- 5.3 vs. 64.5 +/- 6.5 mm; p = 0.001) and LV mass index (143.3 +/- 21.5 vs. 164.2 +/- 40.2 g/m2; p < 0.001) were observed, reflecting a positive effect on the LV remodelling process. Despite some limitations, because it is of an open-label design with a small number of patients, our study found significant differences in clinical and objective parameters in heart failure patients switched from enalapril to perindopril. The prognostic significance of these findings remains to be investigated.

  10. Inequity of access to ACE inhibitors in Swedish heart failure patients: a register-based study

    PubMed Central

    Lindahl, Bertil; Hanning, Marianne; Westerling, Ragnar

    2016-01-01

    Background Several international studies suggest inequity in access to evidence-based heart failure (HF) care. Specifically, studies of ACE inhibitors (ACEIs) point to reduced ACEI access related to female sex, old age and socioeconomic position. Thus far, most studies have either been rather small, lacking diagnostic data, or lacking the possibility to account for several individual-based sociodemographic factors. Our aim was to investigate differences, which could reflect inequity in access to ACEIs based on sex, age, socioeconomic status or immigration status in Swedish patients with HF. Methods Individually linked register data for all Swedish adults hospitalised for HF in 2005–2010 (n=93 258) were analysed by multivariate regression models to assess the independent risk of female sex, high age, low employment status, low income level, low educational level or foreign country of birth, associated with lack of an ACEI dispensation within 1 year of hospitalisation. Adjustment for possible confounding was made for age, comorbidity, Angiotensin receptor blocker therapy, period and follow-up time. Results Analysis revealed an adjusted OR for no ACEI dispensation for women of 1.31 (95% CI 1.27 to 1.35); for the oldest patients of 2.71 (95% CI 2.53 to 2.91); and for unemployed patients of 1.59 (95% CI 1.46 to 1.73). Conclusions Access to ACEI treatment was reduced in women, older patients and unemployed patients. We conclude that access to ACEIs is inequitable among Swedish patients with HF. Future studies should include clinical data, as well as mortality outcomes in different groups. PMID:26261264

  11. Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) gene insertion/deletion polymorphism is not a risk factor for hypertension in SLE nephritis.

    PubMed

    Negi, Vir S; Devaraju, Panneer; Gulati, Reena

    2015-09-01

    SLE is a systemic autoimmune disease with high prevalence of hypertension. Around 40-75 % of SLE patients develop nephritis, a major cause of hypertension and mortality. Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) maintains the blood pressure and blood volume homeostasis. An insertion/deletion (I/D) polymorphism in intron 16 of ACE gene was reported to influence the development of hypertension, nephritis, and cardiovascular diseases in different ethnic populations. Despite compelling evidence for the high prevalence of hypertension in individuals with SLE, underlying factors for its development are not well studied. With this background, we analyzed the influence of ACE insertion/deletion polymorphism on susceptibility to SLE, development of nephritis and hypertension, other clinical features and autoantibody phenotype in South Indian SLE patients. Three hundred patients with SLE and 460 age and sex similar ethnicity matched individuals were included as patients and healthy controls, respectively. The ACE gene insertion/deletion polymorphism was analyzed by PCR. Insertion (I) and deletion (D) alleles were observed to be equally distributed among patients (57 and 43 %) and controls (59 and 41 %), respectively. The mutant (D) allele did not confer significant risk for SLE (II vs. ID: p = 0.4, OR 1.15, 95 % CI 0.8-1.6; II vs. DD: p = 0.34, OR 1.22, 95 % CI 0.8-1.85). There was no association of the ACE genotype or the allele with development of lupus nephritis (II vs. ID: p = 0.19, OR 1.41, 95 % CI 0.84-2.36; II vs. DD: p = 0.41, OR 0.74, 95 % CI 0.38-1.41) or hypertension (II vs. ID: p = 0.85, OR 0.9, 95 % CI 0.43-1.8; II vs. DD: p = 0.66, OR 1.217, 95 % CI 0.5-2.8). The presence of mutant allele (D) was not found to influence any clinical features or autoantibody phenotype. The insertion/deletion polymorphism of the ACE gene is not a genetic risk factor for SLE and does not influence development of hypertension or lupus nephritis in South Indian

  12. Effects of Small Molecule Calcium-Activated Chloride Channel Inhibitors on Structure and Function of Accessory Cholera Enterotoxin (Ace) of Vibrio cholerae

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Tanaya; Sheikh, Irshad Ali; Chakravarty, Devlina; Chakrabarti, Pinak; Sarkar, Paramita; Saha, Tultul; Chakrabarti, Manoj K.; Hoque, Kazi Mirajul

    2015-01-01

    Cholera pathogenesis occurs due to synergistic pro-secretory effects of several toxins, such as cholera toxin (CTX) and Accessory cholera enterotoxin (Ace) secreted by Vibrio cholerae strains. Ace activates chloride channels stimulating chloride/bicarbonate transport that augments fluid secretion resulting in diarrhea. These channels have been targeted for drug development. However, lesser attention has been paid to the interaction of chloride channel modulators with bacterial toxins. Here we report the modulation of the structure/function of recombinant Ace by small molecule calcium-activated chloride channel (CaCC) inhibitors, namely CaCCinh-A01, digallic acid (DGA) and tannic acid. Biophysical studies indicate that the unfolding (induced by urea) free energy increases upon binding CaCCinh-A01 and DGA, compared to native Ace, whereas binding of tannic acid destabilizes the protein. Far-UV CD experiments revealed that the α-helical content of Ace-CaCCinh-A01 and Ace-DGA complexes increased relative to Ace. In contrast, binding to tannic acid had the opposite effect, indicating the loss of protein secondary structure. The modulation of Ace structure induced by CaCC inhibitors was also analyzed using docking and molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. Functional studies, performed using mouse ileal loops and Ussing chamber experiments, corroborate biophysical data, all pointing to the fact that tannic acid destabilizes Ace, inhibiting its function, whereas DGA stabilizes the toxin with enhanced fluid accumulation in mouse ileal loop. The efficacy of tannic acid in mouse model suggests that the targeted modulation of Ace structure may be of therapeutic benefit for gastrointestinal disorders. PMID:26540279

  13. Effects of Small Molecule Calcium-Activated Chloride Channel Inhibitors on Structure and Function of Accessory Cholera Enterotoxin (Ace) of Vibrio cholerae.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Tanaya; Sheikh, Irshad Ali; Chakravarty, Devlina; Chakrabarti, Pinak; Sarkar, Paramita; Saha, Tultul; Chakrabarti, Manoj K; Hoque, Kazi Mirajul

    2015-01-01

    Cholera pathogenesis occurs due to synergistic pro-secretory effects of several toxins, such as cholera toxin (CTX) and Accessory cholera enterotoxin (Ace) secreted by Vibrio cholerae strains. Ace activates chloride channels stimulating chloride/bicarbonate transport that augments fluid secretion resulting in diarrhea. These channels have been targeted for drug development. However, lesser attention has been paid to the interaction of chloride channel modulators with bacterial toxins. Here we report the modulation of the structure/function of recombinant Ace by small molecule calcium-activated chloride channel (CaCC) inhibitors, namely CaCCinh-A01, digallic acid (DGA) and tannic acid. Biophysical studies indicate that the unfolding (induced by urea) free energy increases upon binding CaCCinh-A01 and DGA, compared to native Ace, whereas binding of tannic acid destabilizes the protein. Far-UV CD experiments revealed that the α-helical content of Ace-CaCCinh-A01 and Ace-DGA complexes increased relative to Ace. In contrast, binding to tannic acid had the opposite effect, indicating the loss of protein secondary structure. The modulation of Ace structure induced by CaCC inhibitors was also analyzed using docking and molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. Functional studies, performed using mouse ileal loops and Ussing chamber experiments, corroborate biophysical data, all pointing to the fact that tannic acid destabilizes Ace, inhibiting its function, whereas DGA stabilizes the toxin with enhanced fluid accumulation in mouse ileal loop. The efficacy of tannic acid in mouse model suggests that the targeted modulation of Ace structure may be of therapeutic benefit for gastrointestinal disorders.

  14. Effects of centrally acting ACE inhibitors on the rate of cognitive decline in dementia

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Yang; O'Caoimh, Rónán; Healy, Liam; Kerins, David M; Eustace, Joseph; Guyatt, Gordon; Sammon, David; Molloy, D William

    2013-01-01

    Objectives There is growing evidence that antihypertensive agents, particularly centrally acting ACE inhibitors (CACE-Is), which cross the blood–brain barrier, are associated with a reduced rate of cognitive decline. Given this, we compared the rates of cognitive decline in clinic patients with dementia receiving CACE-Is (CACE-I) with those not currently treated with CACE-Is (NoCACE-I), and with those who started CACE-Is, during their first 6 months of treatment (NewCACE-I). Design Observational case–control study. Setting 2 university hospital memory clinics. Participants 817 patients diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease, vascular or mixed dementia. Of these, 361 with valid cognitive scores were included for analysis, 85 CACE-I and 276 NoCACE-I. Measurements Patients were included if the baseline and end-point (standardised at 6 months apart) Standardised Mini-Mental State Examination (SMMSE) or Quick Mild Cognitive Impairment (Qmci) scores were available. Patients with comorbid depression or other dementia subtypes were excluded. The average 6-month rates of change in scores were compared between CACE-I, NoCACE-I and NewCACE-I patients. Results When the rate of decline was compared between groups, there was a significant difference in the median, 6-month rate of decline in Qmci scores between CACE-I (1.8 points) and NoCACE-I (2.1 points) patients (p=0.049), with similar, non-significant changes in SMMSE. Median SMMSE scores improved by 1.2 points in the first 6 months of CACE treatment (NewCACE-I), compared to a 0.8 point decline for the CACE-I (p=0.003) group and a 1 point decline for the NoCACE-I (p=0.001) group over the same period. Multivariate analysis, controlling for baseline characteristics, showed significant differences in the rates of decline, in SMMSE, between the three groups, p=0.002. Conclusions Cognitive scores may improve in the first 6 months after CACE-I treatment and use of CACE-Is is associated with a reduced rate of cognitive

  15. ACE Inhibitor and ARB Medication Use among Medicaid Enrollees with Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Lora, Claudia M.; Sokolovsky, Alexander W.; Touchette, Daniel R.; Jin, Jing; Xiaojing, Hu; Gao, Weihua; Gerber, Ben S.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To examine Ace-Inhibitor (ACEI)and Angiotensin Receptor Blockers (ARB) prescription and adherence patterns by race in diabetic Public Aid recipients. Design, Subjects, and Measures We analyzed prescription records of 27,529 adults age 18–64 with diabetes enrolled in the State of Illinois Public Aid program during 2007 who had at least one clinical indication for receiving an ACEI/ARB prescription. We calculated Proportion of Days Covered (PDC) to assess adherence. Multivariate models adjusted for age, gender, ACEI/ARB indication, and any significant interaction terms. Results Only 47.4% of individuals with at least one indication for ACEI/ARB had filled an ACEI/ARB prescription. African American men were more likely than Caucasian men to ever fill an ACEI/ARB prescription [Adjusted Odds Ratio, AOR (95% CI) 1.69 (1.55–1.83)]. Hispanic English and Spanish speaking men were also more likely than Caucasian men to ever fill an ACEI/ARB prescription [AOR (95% CI) 1.37 (1.16–1.62) and 1.27 (1.05–1.53), respectively]. Similarly, African American and Hispanic English and Spanish speaking women were more likely than Caucasian women to ever fill an ACEI/ARB prescription [AOR (95% CI) 1.70 (1.59–1.81)], 1.55 (1.36–1.76), and 1.98 (1.73–2.28), respectively]. However, African-Americans and Hispanics were less likely than Caucasians to achieve a PDC ≥ 80%. Compared to Caucasians, Hispanic Spanish speakers were the least likely to be adherent [AOR (95% CI) 0.49 (0.41–0.58)]. Furthermore, older individuals were more likely to achieve a PDC ≥ 80% than younger individuals. Conclusion African Americans and Hispanics with diabetes receiving public aid in Illinois were more likely than Caucasians to have filled at least one ACEI/ARB prescription. However, they were less adherent with these medications. Future studies should assess barriers to medication adherence in this population. PMID:23530300

  16. ACE and ACE2 in kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Mizuiri, Sonoo; Ohashi, Yasushi

    2015-01-01

    Renin angiotensin system (RAS) activation has a significant influence on renal disease progression. The classical angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE)-angiotensin II (Ang II)-Ang II type 1 (AT1) axis is considered to control the effects of RAS activation on renal disease. However, since its discovery in 2000 ACE2 has also been demonstrated to have a significant impact on the RAS. The synthesis and catabolism of Ang II are regulated via a complex series of interactions, which involve ACE and ACE2. In the kidneys, ACE2 is expressed in the proximal tubules and less strongly in the glomeruli. The synthesis of inactive Ang 1-9 from Ang I and the catabolism of Ang II to produce Ang 1-7 are the main functions of ACE2. Ang 1-7 reduces vasoconstriction, water retention, salt intake, cell proliferation, and reactive oxygen stress, and also has a renoprotective effect. Thus, in the non-classical RAS the ACE2-Ang 1-7-Mas axis counteracts the ACE-Ang II-AT1 axis. This review examines recent human and animal studies about renal ACE and ACE2. PMID:25664248

  17. Patients With Newly Diagnosed Hypertension Treated With the Renin Angiotensin Receptor Blocker Azilsartan Medoxomil vs Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors: The Prospective EARLY Registry.

    PubMed

    Schmieder, Roland E; Potthoff, Sebastian A; Bramlage, Peter; Baumgart, Peter; Mahfoud, Felix; Buhck, Hartmut; Ouarrak, Taoufik; Ehmen, Martina; Senges, Jochen; Gitt, Anselm K

    2015-12-01

    For patients with newly diagnosed hypertension, angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors or angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) are usually the first-line therapies. There is, however, no real-life data regarding the relative clinical effectiveness and tolerability of either drug class. The prospective registry, Treatment With Azilsartan Compared to ACE Inhibitors in Antihypertensive Therapy (EARLY), was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of the ARB azilsartan medoxomil (AZL-M) vs ACE inhibitors in real-world patients. Of the 1153 patients with newly diagnosed hypertension who were included in the registry, 789 were prescribed AZL-M and 364 were prescribed an ACE inhibitor. After multivariate adjustment, AZL-M was found to provide superior blood pressure reduction and better target blood pressure (<140/90 mm Hg) achievement. The proportion of patients with adverse events was not statistically different between groups. The authors conclude that in newly diagnosed hypertensive patients, AZL-M provides superior blood pressure control with a similar safety profile compared with ACE inhibitors.

  18. EARLY Treatment with azilsartan compared to ACE-inhibitors in anti-hypertensive therapy – rationale and design of the EARLY hypertension registry

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Arterial hypertension is highly prevalent but poorly controlled. Blood pressure (BP) reduction substantially reduces cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Recent randomized, double-blind clinical trials demonstrated that azilsartan medoxomil (AZM) is more effective in reducing BP than the ubiquitary ACE inhibitor ramipril. Therefore, we aimed to test whether these can be verified under clinical practice conditions. Methods/Design The “Treatment with Azilsartan Compared to ACE-Inhibitors in Anti-Hypertensive Therapy” (EARLY) registry is a prospective, observational, national, multicenter registry with a follow-up of up to 12 months. It will include up to 5000 patients on AZM or ACE-inhibitor monotherapy in a ratio of 7 to 3. A subgroup of patients will undergo 24-hour BP monitoring. EARLY has two co-primary objectives: 1) Description of the safety profile of azilsartan and 2) achievement of BP targets based on recent national and international guidelines for patients treated with azilsartan in comparison to those treated with ACE-inhibitors. The most important secondary endpoints are the determination of persistence with treatment and the documentation of cardiovascular and renal events. Recruitment commenced in January 2012 and will be completed by February 2013. Conclusions The data obtained will supplement previous results from randomized controlled trials to document the potential value of utilizing azilsartan medoxomil in comparison to ACE-inhibitor treatment for target BP achievement in clinical practice. PMID:23819631

  19. Apricot and other seed stones: amygdalin content and the potential to obtain antioxidant, angiotensin I converting enzyme inhibitor and hypocholesterolemic peptides.

    PubMed

    García, M C; González-García, E; Vásquez-Villanueva, R; Marina, M L

    2016-11-09

    Stones from olives and Prunus genus fruits are cheap and sustainable sources of proteins and could be potential sources of bioactive peptides. The main limitation to the use of these seeds is the presence of amygdalin. This work proposes to determine amygdalin in olive and Prunus seeds and in protein isolates obtained from them. Moreover, antioxidant, angiotensin I converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor, and hypocholesterolemic properties will be evaluated in hydrolysates obtained from these seeds. Despite some seeds contained amygdalin, all protein isolates were free of this substance. Two different procedures to obtain bioactive peptides from protein isolates were examined: gastrointestinal digestion and processing with Alcalase, Flavourzyme or Thermolysin. Higher antioxidant, ACE inhibitor and hypocholesterolemic activities were observed when proteins were processed with Alcalase, Flavourzyme or Thermolysin. The highest antioxidant and ACE inhibitor capacities were observed for the Prunus genus seed hydrolysates while the highest capacity to reduce micellar cholesterol solubility was observed for the apricot and olive seed hydrolysates.

  20. How should we manage heart failure developing in patients already treated with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and beta-blockers for hypertension, diabetes or coronary disease?

    PubMed

    Gustafsson, Finn; Segura, Julian; Ruilope, Luis M

    2010-08-01

    An increasing number of patients in the community are being treated with angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) and beta-blockers for hypertension, coronary disease or diabetic renal and vascular complications. Some of these patients will develop heart failure despite such treatment. Based on data from hypertension trials it can be estimated that approximately 5% of treated patients will develop heart failure over 5 years. It is unclear whether patients developing heart failure on and off ACE-inhibitors or beta-blockers, respectively, at the time of heart failure diagnosis have similar prognosis.Treatment options for patients developing heart failure while already treated with ACE inhibitors/ARBs and beta-blockers are very limited if current heart failure guidelines are followed. In this review possible strategies are outlined and important areas for research are identified. It is suggested that trials are designed specifically to address prognosis and treatment in this growing population.

  1. Differences in the clinical effects of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and Angiotensin receptor blockers: a critical review of the evidence.

    PubMed

    Dézsi, Csaba András

    2014-06-01

    The renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system plays a major role in the pathophysiology of hypertension and closely related cardio- and cerebrovascular events. Although both angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors and angiotensin receptor antagonists (angiotensin receptor blockers; ARBs) are equally important in the treatment of hypertension, according to the results of recent years, there might be substantial differences in their cardiovascular protective effects, and these differences might be explained by our increasing knowledge of their non-overlapping mechanisms of action. The number of studies investigating how ACE inhibitors and ARB agents differ will certainly be increasing in the future. ACE inhibitors are the safe therapeutic opportunity for hypertensive patients at high risk, with a cardiological comorbidity.

  2. Insulin treatment attenuates renal ADAM17 and ACE2 shedding in diabetic Akita mice.

    PubMed

    Salem, Esam S B; Grobe, Nadja; Elased, Khalid M

    2014-03-15

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) is located in several tissues and is highly expressed in renal proximal tubules, where it degrades the vasoconstrictor angiotensin II (ANG II) to ANG-(1-7). Accumulating evidence supports protective roles of ACE2 in several disease states, including diabetic nephropathy. A disintegrin and metalloprotease (ADAM) 17 is involved in the shedding of several transmembrane proteins, including ACE2. Our previous studies showed increased renal ACE2, ADAM17 expression, and urinary ACE2 in type 2 diabetic mice (Chodavarapu H, Grobe N, Somineni HK, Salem ES, Madhu M, Elased KM. PLoS One 8: e62833, 2013). The aim of the present study was to determine the effect of insulin on ACE2 shedding and ADAM17 in type 1 diabetic Akita mice. Results demonstrate increased renal ACE2 and ADAM17 expression and increased urinary ACE2 fragments (≈70 kDa) and albumin excretion in diabetic Akita mice. Immunostaining revealed colocalization of ACE2 with ADAM17 in renal tubules. Renal proximal tubular cells treated with ADAM17 inhibitor showed reduced ACE2 shedding into the media, confirming ADAM17-mediated shedding of ACE2. Treatment of Akita mice with insulin implants for 20 wk normalized hyperglycemia and decreased urinary ACE2 and albumin excretion. Insulin also normalized renal ACE2 and ADAM17 but had no effect on tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 3 (TIMP3) protein expression. There was a positive linear correlation between urinary ACE2 and albuminuria, blood glucose, plasma creatinine, glucagon, and triglycerides. This is the first report showing an association between hyperglycemia, cardiovascular risk factors, and increased shedding of urinary ACE2 in diabetic Akita mice. Urinary ACE2 could be used as a biomarker for diabetic nephropathy and as an index of intrarenal ACE2 status.

  3. Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor-induced angioedema and hereditary angioedema: a comparison study of attack severity.

    PubMed

    Javaud, Nicolas; Charpentier, Stéphane; Lapostolle, Frédéric; Lekouara, Hakim; Boubaya, Marouane; Lenoir, Gilles; Mekinian, Arsène; Adnet, Frédéric; Fain, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    Objective There appears to be differences in the clinical presentation of hereditary angioedema (HAE) and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor-induced (ACE-I) angioedema (AE). The aim of this study was to compare the clinical characteristics of these two AE forms. Methods We conducted a retrospective study of consecutive patients with HAE or ACE-I AE. The attack characteristics experienced by the patients were compared by a logistic regression analysis using generalized estimating equations. Results A total of 56 patients were included in this study (ACE-I AE, n=25; HAE, n=31). A total of 534 attacks were documented. Severe attacks were more common in the patients who had an acute episode of ACE-I AE than HAE. Swelling of the tongue, lips and larynx were significantly associated with ACE-I AE [OR: 8.70 (95% CI, 1.04-73.70), OR: 20.4 (95% CI, 4.9-84.2) and OR: 7.50 (95% CI, 1.20-48.30), respectively]. Conclusion Swelling of the tongue, lips and larynx are significantly more frequent in drug-induced AE than HAE.

  4. Age and the pharmacokinetics of angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors enalapril and enalaprilat.

    PubMed Central

    Hockings, N; Ajayi, A A; Reid, J L

    1986-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics of angiotension converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors enalapril (10 mg orally) and its active metabolite, enalaprilat (10 mg intravenously) were studied in nine young healthy volunteers aged 22-30 years and nine sex matched elderly subjects aged 65-73 years. After both drugs, a biexponential curve was fitted to the decline in plasma enalaprilat concentration. Area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC) was greater in the elderly for both drugs. Clearance (CL) and clearance/bioavailability (CL/F) were less in the elderly for enalaprilat and enalapril, respectively. There was no difference in F between young (0.62 +/- 0.16) and elderly subjects (0.61 +/- 0.15). Enalaprilat CL and enalapril CL/F were significantly and positively correlated to endogenous creatinine clearance. There was a significant difference in the weight corrected volume of distribution at steady state after enalaprilat between the young and elderly (P less than 0.02). The relationship between plasma enalaprilat concentrations and percentage ACE inhibition, using the Hill equation, showed no difference in the sensitivity to ACE inhibition between the young and the elderly group. The pharmacokinetic differences observed are likely to be related to an age dependent decline in renal function as well as changes in body composition. Kinetic differences partly explain the greater pharmacodynamic response in the elderly. PMID:3011046

  5. Role of angiotensin converting enzyme in the vascular effects of an endopeptidase 24.15 inhibitor.

    PubMed Central

    Telford, S E; Smith, A I; Lew, R A; Perich, R B; Madden, A C; Evans, R G

    1995-01-01

    1. We investigated the role of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) in the cardiovascular effects of N-[1-(R,S)-carboxy-3-phenylpropyl]-Ala-Ala-Tyr-p-aminobenzoate (cFP), a peptidase inhibitor selective for metalloendopeptidase (EP) E.C. 3.4.24.15. 2. In conscious rabbits, cFP (5 mg kg-1, i.v.) markedly slowed the degradation of [3H]-bradykinin, potentiated the depressor response to right atrial administration of bradykinin (10-1000 ng kg-1), and inhibited the pressor response to right atrial angiotensin I (10-100 ng kg-1). In each of these respects, the effects of cFP were indistinguishable from those of the ACE inhibitor, captopril (0.5 mg plus 10 mg kg-1h-1 i.v.). Furthermore, the effects of combined administration of cFP and captopril were indistinguishable from those of captopril alone. 3. In experimentally naive anaesthetized rats, cFP administration (9.3 mg kg-1, i.v.) was followed by a moderate but sustained fall in arterial pressure of 13 mmHg. However, in rats pretreated with bradykinin (50 micrograms kg-1) a more pronounced fall of 30 mmHg was observed. Captopril (5 mg kg-1) had similar hypotensive effects to those of cFP, and cFP had no effect when it was administered after captopril. 4. CFP displaced the binding of [125I]-351A (the p-hydroxybenzamidine derivative of lisinopril) from preparations of rat plasma ACE and solubilized lung membrane ACE (KD = 1.2 and 0.14 microM respectively), and inhibited rat plasma ACE activity (KI = 2.4 microM). Addition of phosphoramidon (10 microM), an inhibitor of a range of metalloendopeptidases, including neutral endopeptidase (E.C.3.4.24.11), markedly reduced the potency of cFP in these systems.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7620708

  6. In silico analysis and molecular docking studies of potential angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor using quercetin glycosides

    PubMed Central

    Muhammad, Syed Aun; Fatima, Nighat

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the inhibitory action of quercetin glycosides by computational docking studies. For this, natural metabolite quercetin glycosides isolated from buckwheat and onions were used as ligand for molecular interaction. The crystallographic structure of molecular target angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) (peptidyl-dipeptidase A) was obtained from PDB database (PDB ID: 1O86). Enalapril, a well-known brand of ACE inhibitor was taken as the standard for comparative analysis. Computational docking analysis was performed using PyRx, AutoDock Vina option based on scoring functions. The quercetin showed optimum binding affinity with a molecular target (angiotensin-converting-enzyme) with the binding energy of −8.5 kcal/mol as compared to the standard (−7.0 kcal/mol). These results indicated that quercetin glycosides could be one of the potential ligands to treat hypertension, myocardial infarction, and congestive heart failure. PMID:26109757

  7. [Advances on enzymes and enzyme inhibitors research based on microfluidic devices].

    PubMed

    Hou, Feng-Hua; Ye, Jian-Qing; Chen, Zuan-Guang; Cheng, Zhi-Yi

    2010-06-01

    With the continuous development in microfluidic fabrication technology, microfluidic analysis has evolved from a concept to one of research frontiers in last twenty years. The research of enzymes and enzyme inhibitors based on microfluidic devices has also made great progress. Microfluidic technology improved greatly the analytical performance of the research of enzymes and enzyme inhibitors by reducing the consumption of reagents, decreasing the analysis time, and developing automation. This review focuses on the development and classification of enzymes and enzyme inhibitors research based on microfluidic devices.

  8. Angiotensin II receptor antagonists and heart failure: angiotensin-converting-enzyme inhibitors remain the first-line option.

    PubMed

    2005-10-01

    (1) Some angiotensin-converting-enzyme inhibitors (ACE inhibitors) reduce mortality in patients with heart failure (captopril, enalapril, ramipril and trandolapril), and in patients with recent myocardial infarction and heart failure or marked left ventricular dysfunction (captopril, ramipril and trandolapril). (2) Angiotensin II receptor antagonists, otherwise known as angiotensin receptor blockers, have haemodynamic effects similar to ACE inhibitors, but differ in their mechanism of action and certain adverse effects. (3) Five clinical trials have evaluated angiotensin II receptor antagonists (candesartan, losartan and valsartan) in terms of their effect on mortality and on the risk of clinical deterioration in patients with symptomatic heart failure, but without severe renal failure, hyperkalemia or hypotension. In these trials, candesartan and valsartan were used at much higher doses than those recommended for the treatment of arterial hypertension. (4) In patients with heart failure who were not taking an angiotensin II receptor antagonist or an ACE inhibitor at enrollment, no significant difference was found between losartan and captopril in terms of mortality or the risk of clinical deterioration. (5) In patients with heart failure who had stopped taking an ACE inhibitor because of adverse effects, candesartan had no effect on mortality as compared with placebo, but it did reduce the risk of clinical deterioration (3 fewer hospitalisations per year per 100 patients). However, candesartan was associated with adverse effects such as renal failure and hyperkalemia, especially in patients who had experienced these same adverse effects while taking an ACE inhibitor. (6) In patients with heart failure who were already taking an ACE inhibitor, adjunctive candesartan or valsartan treatment did not influence mortality in comparison to the addition of a placebo. Adding candesartan or valsartan reduced the risk of hospitalisation (between 1 and 3 fewer hospitalisations

  9. The sulphydryl containing ACE inhibitor Zofenoprilat protects coronary endothelium from Doxorubicin-induced apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Monti, Martina; Terzuoli, Erika; Ziche, Marina; Morbidelli, Lucia

    2013-10-01

    Pediatric and adult cancer patients, following the use of the antitumor drug Doxorubicin develop cardiotoxicity. Pharmacological protection of microvascular endothelium might produce a double benefit: (i) reduction of myocardial toxicity (the primary target of Doxorubicin action) and (ii) maintenance of the vascular functionality for the adequate delivery of chemotherapeutics to tumor cells. This study was aimed to evaluate the mechanisms responsible of the protective effects of the angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor (ACEI) Zofenoprilat against the toxic effects exerted by Doxorubicin on coronary microvascular endothelium. We found that exposure of endothelial cells to Doxorubicin (0.1-1μM range) impaired cell survival by promoting their apoptosis. ERK1/2 related p53 activation, but not reactive oxygen species, was responsible for Doxorubicin induced caspase-3 cleavage. P53 mediated-apoptosis and impairment of survival were reverted by treatment with Zofenoprilat. The previously described PI-3K/eNOS/endogenous fibroblast growth factor signaling was not involved in the protective effect, which, instead, could be ascribed to cystathionine gamma lyase dependent availability of H2S from Zofenoprilat. Furthermore, considering the tumor environment, the treatment of endothelial/tumor co-cultures with Zofenoprilat did not affect the antitumor efficacy of Doxorubicin. In conclusion the ACEI Zofenoprilat exerts a protective effect on Doxorubicin induced endothelial damage, without affecting its antitumor efficacy. Thus, sulfhydryl containing ACEI may be a useful therapy for Doxorubicin-induced cardiotoxicity.

  10. ACE inhibitors hypothesis generation for selective design, synthesis and biological evaluation of 3-mercapto-2-methyl-propanoyl-pyrrolidine-3-imine derivatives as antihypertensive agents.

    PubMed

    Ismail, Mohamed A H; Nabil Aboul-Enein, M; Abouzid, Khaled A M; Abou El Ella, Dalal A; Ismail, Nasser S M

    2009-05-15

    A series of new 3-mercapto-2-methyl-propanoyl-pyrrolidine derivatives (V, VIa-e) were designed. A new validated ACE inhibitors pharmacophore model (hypothesis) was generated for the first time in this research from the biologically active (frozen) conformation of Lisinopril-Human ACE complex that was downloaded from PDB, using stepwise technique of CATALYST modules. The molecular modeling compare-fit study of the designed molecules (V, VIa-e), with such ACE inhibitors hypothesis was fulfilled, and several compounds showed significant high simulation fit values. The compounds with high fit values were synthesized and biologically evaluated in vivo as hypotensive agents. It appears that the in vivo hypotensive activity of compounds V, VIa, VIb, and VIe was consistent with their molecular modeling results, and compound VIe showed the highest activity in comparison to Captopril.

  11. Decreased Risk of Radiation Pneumonitis With Incidental Concurrent Use of Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors and Thoracic Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kharofa, Jordan; Cohen, Eric P.; Tomic, Rade; Xiang Qun; Gore, Elizabeth

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors have been shown to mitigate radiation-induced lung injury in preclinical models. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether ACE inhibitors decrease the risk of radiation pneumonitis in lung cancer patients receiving thoracic irradiation. Methods and Materials: Patients with Stage I through III small-cell and non-small-cell lung cancer treated definitively with radiation from 2004-2009 at the Clement J. Zablocki Veterans Affairs Medical Center were retrospectively reviewed. Acute pulmonary toxicity was quantified within 6 months of completion of treatment according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 4. The use of ACE inhibitors, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, inhaled glucocorticosteroids, statins, and angiotensin receptor blockers; dose-volume histogram parameters; and patient factors were assessed for association with Grade 2 or higher pneumonitis. Results: A total of 162 patients met the criteria for inclusion. The majority of patients had Stage III disease (64%) and received concurrent chemotherapy (61%). Sixty-two patients were identified as ACE inhibitor users (38%). All patients had acceptable radiation plans based on dose-volume histogram constraints (V20 [volume of lung receiving at least 20 Gy] {<=}37% and mean lung dose {<=}20 Gy) with the exception of 2 patients who did not meet both criteria. Grade 2 or higher pulmonary toxicity occurred in 12 patients (7.4%). The rate of Grade 2 or higher pneumonitis was lower in ACE inhibitor users vs. nonusers (2% vs. 11%, p = 0.032). Rates of Grade 2 or higher pneumonitis were significantly increased in patients aged greater than 70 years (16% vs. 2%, p = 0.005) or in whom V5 (volume of lung receiving at least 5 Gy) was 50% or greater (13% vs. 4%, p = 0.04). V10 (volume of lung receiving at least 10 Gy), V20, V30 (volume of lung receiving at least 30 Gy), and mean lung dose were not independently associated with Grade 2 or

  12. Separation and Characterization of Angiotensin I Converting Enzyme (ACE) Inhibitory Peptides from Saurida elongata Proteins Hydrolysate by IMAC-Ni2+

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Lixia; Wu, Shanguang; Zhou, Liqin; Wang, Feng; Lan, Xiongdiao; Sun, Jianhua; Tong, Zhangfa; Liao, Dankui

    2017-01-01

    Lizard fish protein hydrolysates (LFPH) were prepared from Lizard fish (Saurida elongata) proteins possessing powerful angiotensin I converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory activity and the fraction (LFPH-I) with high ACE inhibitory activity was obtained through ultrafiltration. The active Fraction (F2) was isolated from LFPH-I using immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC-Ni2+). Analysis of amino acid levels revealed that F2 eluted from IMAC was enriched in Met, His, Tyr, Pro, Ile, and Leu compared to the crude peptide LFPH-I. F2 with the high ACE inhibitory activity (IC50 of 0.116 mg·mL−1) was further separated by a reverse-phase column to yield a novel ACE inhibitory peptide with IC50 value of 52 μM. The ACE inhibitory peptide was identified as Arg-Tyr-Arg-Pro, RYRP. The present study demonstrated that IMAC may be a useful tool for the separation of ACE inhibitory peptides from protein hydrolysate. PMID:28212269

  13. ACE Inhibitor and Angiotensin Receptor Blocker Use and Mortality in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Molnar, Miklos Z; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar; Lott, Evan H; Lu, Jun Ling; Malakauskas, Sandra M; Ma, Jennie Z; Quarles, Darryl L; Kovesdy, Csaba P

    2014-01-01

    Objective To assess the association between ACEI/ARB use and mortality in CKD patients. Background There is insufficient evidence about the association of angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEI) or angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) with mortality in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients. Methods A logistic regression analysis was used to calculate the propensity of ACEI/ARB initiation in 141,413 US veterans with non-dialysis CKD previously unexposed to ACEI/ARB treatment. We examined the association of ACEI/ARB administration with all-cause mortality in patients matched by propensity scores, using the Kaplan-Meier method and Cox models in “intention-to-treat” analyses, and in generalized linear models with binary outcomes and inverse probability treatment weighing (IPTW) in “as-treated” analyses. Results The mean±SD age of the patients at baseline was 75±10 years, 8% of patients were black, and 22% were diabetic. ACEI/ARB administration was associated with significantly lower risk of mortality both in the intention-to-treat analysis (HR=0.81; 95%CI: 0.78-0.84, p<0.001) and in the as-treated analysis with IPTW (OR=0.37; 95%CI: 0.34-0.41, p<0.001). The association of ACEI/ARB treatment with lower risk of mortality was present in all examined subgroups. Conclusions In this large contemporary cohort of non-dialysis dependent CKD patients, ACEI/ARB administration was associated with greater survival. PMID:24269363

  14. The effects of drug market regulation on pharmaceutical prices in Europe: overview and evidence from the market of ACE inhibitors.

    PubMed

    von der Schulenburg, Fritz; Vandoros, Sotiris; Kanavos, Panos

    2011-11-21

    This study provides an overview of policy measures targeting pharmaceutical expenditure in Europe and analyses their impact on originator pharmaceutical prices. Panel data methods are used to examine the market of ACE Inhibitors in six European countries (Denmark, France, Germany, Netherlands, Sweden, United Kingdom) over period 1991-2006. We find that although some measures are effective in reducing originator prices, others appear to have an insignificant effect. Results suggest that supply side measures such as mandatory generic substitution, regressive pharmacy mark-ups and claw-backs are effective in reducing pharmaceuticals prices. Results are not as strong for demand side measures. Profit controls and the use of cost-effectiveness analysis appear to have a negative effect on prices, while results on reference pricing are inconclusive. Findings also indicate that, although originator prices are not immediately affected by generic entry, they may be influenced by changes in generic prices post patent expiry.

  15. Effect of Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitor, Lisinopril on Morphological and Biochemical Aspects of Fibrotic Liver Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Ambreen, Aysha; Jahan, Sarwat; Malik, Satwat

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims: Hepatic fibrosis results in defective liver regeneration following partial hepatectomy. Angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors can enhance liver regeneration and are also involved in the reduction of hepatic fibrosis. The present study has been conducted to evaluate the potential effect of an ACE inhibitor, lisinopril, on the morphological and biochemical aspects of fibrotic liver regeneration. Materials and Methods: Eight-week old female Sprague Dawley rats were made fibrotic by intragastric carbon tetrachloride treatment. Rats were given saline or lisinopril (1 mg/kg) orally for 1 week and were subjected to sham surgery or two-third partial hepatectomy. Liver regenerative and functional capacities were determined 48 hours post surgery. Results: Lisinopril administration did not affect the regeneration rate, proliferation cell nuclear antigen count, and hepatocellular area of fibrotic livers following partial hepatectomy. No statistically significant difference between treated and control rats regarding mitotic count, hepatocyte nuclear area, and binuclear hepatocyte frequency was observed. Serum biochemical analysis showed that lisinopril non-significantly decreased the partial hepatectomy induced elevated levels of alanine aminotransferase, aspartate transaminase, and alkaline phosphatase whereas lactate dehydrogenase and total bilirubin levels were significantly reduced. No marked reduction in hepatic collagen content and alpha smooth actin positive cells was observed by lisinopril treatment. Conclusion: ACE inhibitor lisinopril did not produce major histomorphological alterations in regenerating fibrotic liver following partial hepatectomy, however, it may improve its functional capability. PMID:27976638

  16. Pioglitazone, a PPARγ agonist, provides comparable protection to angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor ramipril against adriamycin nephropathy in rat.

    PubMed

    Ochodnicky, Peter; Mesarosova, Lucia; Cernecka, Hana; Klimas, Jan; Krenek, Peter; Goris, Maaike; van Dokkum, Richard P E; Henning, Robert H; Kyselovic, Jan

    2014-05-05

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) agonists have been shown to ameliorate diabetic nephropathy, but much less are known about their effects in non-diabetic nephropathies. In the present study, metabolic parameters, blood pressure, aortic endothelial function along with molecular and structural markers of glomerular and tubulointerstitial renal damage, were studied in a rat model of normotensive nephropathy induced by adriamycin and treated with PPARγ agonist pioglitazone (12mg/kg, po), angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor ramipril (1mg/kg, po) or their combination. Pioglitazone had no effect on systolic blood pressure, marginally reduced glycemia and improved aortic endothelium-dependent relaxation. In the kidney, pioglitazone prevented the development of proteinuria and focal glomerulosclerosis to the similar extent as blood-pressure lowering ramipril. Renoprotection provided by either treatment was associated with a reduction in the cortical expression of profibrotic plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 and microvascular damage-inducing endothelin-1, and a limitation of interstitial macrophage influx. Treatment with PPARγ agonist, as well as ACE inhibitor comparably affected renal expression of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) components, normalizing increased renal expression of ACE and enhancing the expression of Mas receptor. Interestingly, combined pioglitazone and ramipril treatment did not provide any additional renoprotection. These results demonstrate that in a nondiabetic renal disease, such as adriamycin-induced nephropathy, PPARγ agonist pioglitazone provides renoprotection to a similar extent as an ACE inhibitor by interfering with the expression of local RAS components and attenuating related profibrotic and inflammatory mechanisms. The combination of the both agents, however, does not lead to any additional renal benefit.

  17. A novel angiotensin-І converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory peptide from gastrointestinal protease hydrolysate of silkworm pupa (Bombyx mori) protein: Biochemical characterization and molecular docking study.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qiongying; Jia, Junqiang; Yan, Hui; Du, Jinjuan; Gui, Zhongzheng

    2015-06-01

    Silkworm pupa (Bombyx mori) protein was hydrolyzed using gastrointestinal endopeptidases (pepsin, trypsin and α-chymotrypsin). Then, the hydrolysate was purified sequentially by ultrafiltration, gel filtration chromatography and RP-HPLC. A novel ACE inhibitory peptide, Ala-Ser-Leu, with the IC50 value of 102.15μM, was identified by IT-MS/MS. This is the first report of Ala-Ser-Leu from natural protein. Lineweaver-Burk plots suggest that the peptide is a competitive inhibitor against ACE. The molecular docking studies revealed that the ACE inhibition of Ala-Ser-Leu is mainly attributed to forming very strong hydrogen bonds with the S1 pocket (Ala354) and the S2 pocket (Gln281 and His353). The results indicate that silkworm pupa (B. mori) protein or its gastrointestinal protease hydrolysate could be used as a functional ingredient in auxiliary therapeutic foods against hypertension.

  18. Regulation of urinary ACE2 in diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Wysocki, Jan; Garcia-Halpin, Laura; Ye, Minghao; Maier, Christoph; Sowers, Kurt; Burns, Kevin D; Batlle, Daniel

    2013-08-15

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme-2 (ACE2) enhances the degradation of ANG II and its expression is altered in diabetic kidneys, but the regulation of this enzyme in the urine is unknown. Urinary ACE2 was studied in the db/db model of type 2 diabetes and stretozotocin (STZ)-induced type 1 diabetes during several physiological and pharmacological interventions. ACE2 activity in db/db mice was increased in the serum and to a much greater extent in the urine compared with db/m controls. Neither a specific ANG II blocker, telmisartan, nor an ACE inhibitor, captopril, altered the levels of urinary ACE2 in db/db or db/m control mice. High-salt diet (8%) increased whereas low-salt diet (0.1%) decreased urinary ACE2 activity in the urine of db/db mice. In STZ mice, urinary ACE2 was also increased, and insulin decreased it partly but significantly after several weeks of administration. The increase in urinary ACE2 activity in db/db mice reflected an increase in enzymatically active protein with two bands identified of molecular size at 110 and 75 kDa and was associated with an increase in kidney cortex ACE2 protein at 110 kDa but not at 75 kDa. ACE2 activity was increased in isolated tubular preparations but not in glomeruli from db/db mice. Administration of soluble recombinant ACE2 to db/m and db/db mice resulted in a marked increase in serum ACE2 activity, but no gain in ACE2 activity was detectable in the urine, further demonstrating that urinary ACE2 is of kidney origin. Increased urinary ACE2 was associated with more efficient degradation of exogenous ANG II (10(-9) M) in urine from db/db compared with that from db/m mice. Urinary ACE2 could be a potential biomarker of increased metabolism of ANG II in diabetic kidney disease.

  19. Influence of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) gene rs4362 polymorphism on the progression of kidney failure in patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD)

    PubMed Central

    Ramanathan, Gnanasambandan; Ghosh, Santu; Elumalai, Ramprasad; Periyasamy, Soundararajan; Lakkakula, Bhaskar V.K.S.

    2016-01-01

    Background & objectives: Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is an inherited systemic disorder, characterized by the fluid filled cysts in the kidneys leading to end stage renal failure in later years of life. Hypertension is one of the major factors independently contributing to the chronic kidney disease (CKD) progression. The renin-angiotensin aldosterone system (RAAS) genes have been extensively studied as hypertension candidate genes. The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of angiotensin converting enzyme tagging - single nucleotide polymorphisms (ACE tag-SNPs) in progression of CKD in patients with ADPKD. Methods: In the present study six ACE tagSNPs (angiotensin converting enzyme tag single nucleotide polymorphisms) and insertion/deletion (I/D) in 102 ADPKD patients and 106 control subjects were investigated. The tagSNPs were genotyped using FRET-based KASPar method and ACE ID by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and electrophoresis. Genotypes and haplotypes were compared between ADPKD patients and controls. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were performed to assess the effect of genotypes and hypertension on CKD advancement. Mantel-Haenszel (M-H) stratified analysis was performed to study the relationship between different CKD stages and hypertension and their interaction. Results: All loci were polymorphic and except rs4293 SNP the remaining loci followed Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. Distribution of ACE genotypes and haplotypes in controls and ADPKD patients was not significant. A significant linkage disequilibrium (LD) was observed between SNPs forming two LD blocks. The univariate analysis revealed that the age, hypertension, family history of diabetes and ACE rs4362 contributed to the advancement of CKD. Interpretation & conclusions: The results suggest that the ACE genotypes are effect modifiers of the relationship between hypertension and CKD advancement among the ADPKD patients. PMID:27748299

  20. Cost-Effectiveness of Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors for the Prevention of Diabetic Nephropathy in The Netherlands – A Markov Model

    PubMed Central

    Adarkwah, Charles Christian; Gandjour, Afschin; Akkerman, Maren; Evers, Silvia M.

    2011-01-01

    Objective Type 2 diabetes is the main cause of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in Europe and the USA. Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors have a potential to slow down the progression of renal disease and therefore provide a renal-protective effect. The aim of our study was to assess the most cost-effective time to start an ACE inhibitor (or an angiotensin II receptor blocker [ARB] if coughing as a side effect occurs) in patients with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes in The Netherlands. Methods A lifetime Markov decision model with simulated 50-year-old patients with newly diagnosed diabetes mellitus was developed using published data on costs and health outcomes and simulating the progression of renal disease. A health insurance perspective was adopted. Three strategies were compared: treating all patients at the time of diagnosing type 2 diabetes, screening for microalbuminuria, and screening for macroalbuminuria. Results In the base-case analysis, the treat-all strategy is associated with the lowest costs and highest benefit and therefore dominates screening both for macroalbuminuria and microalbuminuria. A multivariate sensitivity analysis shows that the probability of savings is 70%. Conclusions In The Netherlands for patients with type 2 diabetes prescription of an ACE inhibitor immediately after diagnosis should be considered if they do not have contraindications. An ARB should be considered for those patients developing a dry cough under ACE inhibitor therapy. The potential for cost savings would be even larger if the prevention of cardiovascular events were considered. PMID:22022539

  1. Investigation of potential inhibitors of chorismate-utilizing enzymes.

    PubMed

    Švarcová, Markéta; Krátký, Martin; Vinšova, Jarmila

    2015-01-01

    Chorismate-utilizing enzymes (CUE) such as chorismate mutase, anthranilate synthase, chorismate pyruvate-lyase, 4-amino-4-deoxychorismate synthase, isochorismate synthase and salicylate synthase are responsible for converting chorismate into various products necessary for the survival of bacteria. The absence of these enzymes in humans and their importance in the virulence and survival of bacteria make them suitable targets for potential antimicrobial compounds. Furthermore, the CUE have significant structural homology and similar catalytic mechanisms, enabling the strategy of affecting multiple enzymes with one single inhibitor. This review follows up the investigation of mechanisms of CUE-catalysed reactions and the concurrent development of CUE inhibitors. Many active compounds were found amongst the structures mimicking the transition state of chorismate during the reaction. Most recently, high nanomolar and low micromolar inhibitors against isochorismate-pyruvate lyase were identified, which were also effective against chorismate mutase and salicylate synthase and belong to the most active inhibitors reported up to date.

  2. T-lymphocyte induction of human monocyte angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) is not dependent upon T-lymphocyte proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Vuk-Pavlovic, Z.; Rohrbach, M.S.

    1986-03-05

    Human peripheral blood monocytes cultured in serum free media for seven days show a basal activity of the ectoenzyme ACE which is augmented 2-3 times by the presence of autologous peripheral blood T-lymphocytes. Since these two cell types are also involved in autologous mixed lymphocyte reaction if serum is present, the authors compared the ability of T-cells to stimulate ACE activity in the presence or absence of proliferation (measured by /sup 3/H-thymidine incorporation). By the seventh day, cultures with 5% AB/sup +/ serum showed significant increase in proliferation but no increase in ACE activity compared to the serum free cultures. Even higher proliferation rate achieved by co-culturing T-lymphocytes with allogeneic monocytes did not increase ACE production; on the contrary, ACE activity remained at the basal level. Monocyte-T-cell co-cultures stimulated with increasing concentrations of ConA or PHA showed dose dependent increases in proliferation but parallel decreases in ACE activity. Addition of soluble antigen (Candida albicans) also enhanced proliferation but not ACE synthesis. They conclude that T-lymphocyte induction of monocyte ACE is a result of cooperation between autologous cells which is not dependent upon T-cell proliferation.

  3. Debate: angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors versus angiotensin II receptor blockers--a gap in evidence-based medicine.

    PubMed

    Ball, Stephen G; White, William B

    2003-05-22

    In this article, 2 leading physicians debate the strength of outcome data on the efficacy of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors versus angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs) for reducing the incidence of cardiovascular, cerebrovascular, and renovascular events. Dr. Stephen G. Ball notes that the efficacy of ACE inhibitors for reducing the risk for myocardial infarction independent of their effects on blood pressure is controversial. In the Heart Outcomes Prevention Evaluation (HOPE) study, ramipril treatment in high-risk patients was associated with a 20% reduction in the risk for myocardial infarction; mean reduction in blood pressure was 3 mm Hg for systolic blood pressure and 1 mm Hg for diastolic blood pressure. The HOPE investigators propose that the 20% reduction was much greater than would be expected based on the observed blood pressure reduction. However, a meta-regression analysis of blood pressure reduction in >20 antihypertensive therapy outcome trials found that the reduction in myocardial infarction risk with ramipril observed in HOPE was consistent with the modest blood pressure reduction seen with that agent. Nevertheless, there are convincing data for prevention of myocardial infarction with ACE inhibitors in patients with heart failure, including those with heart failure after myocardial infarction, as well as supportive evidence from studies in patients with diabetes mellitus and concomitant hypertension. On the other hand, Dr. William B. White takes the position that ARBs are well-tolerated antihypertensive agents that specifically antagonize the angiotensin II type 1 (AT(1)) receptor and provide a more complete block of the pathologic effects of angiotensin II-which are mediated via the AT(1) receptor-than ACE inhibitors. The Evaluation of Losartan in the Elderly (ELITE) II study and the Valsartan Heart Failure Trial (ValHeFT) suggest that ARBs reduce the risk for mortality in patients with congestive heart failure. The Losartan

  4. DNA-linked Inhibitor Antibody Assay (DIANA) for sensitive and selective enzyme detection and inhibitor screening

    PubMed Central

    Navrátil, Václav; Schimer, Jiří; Tykvart, Jan; Knedlík, Tomáš; Vik, Viktor; Majer, Pavel; Konvalinka, Jan; Šácha, Pavel

    2017-01-01

    Human diseases are often diagnosed by determining levels of relevant enzymes and treated by enzyme inhibitors. We describe an assay suitable for both ultrasensitive enzyme quantification and quantitative inhibitor screening with unpurified enzymes. In the DNA-linked Inhibitor ANtibody Assay (DIANA), the target enzyme is captured by an immobilized antibody, probed with a small-molecule inhibitor attached to a reporter DNA and detected by quantitative PCR. We validate the approach using the putative cancer markers prostate-specific membrane antigen and carbonic anhydrase IX. We show that DIANA has a linear range of up to six logs and it selectively detects zeptomoles of targets in complex biological samples. DIANA's wide dynamic range permits determination of target enzyme inhibition constants using a single inhibitor concentration. DIANA also enables quantitative screening of small-molecule enzyme inhibitors using microliters of human blood serum containing picograms of target enzyme. DIANA's performance characteristics make it a superior tool for disease detection and drug discovery. PMID:27679479

  5. The Evaluation of Dipeptidyl Peptidase (DPP)-IV, α-Glucosidase and Angiotensin Converting Enzyme (ACE) Inhibitory Activities of Whey Proteins Hydrolyzed with Serine Protease Isolated from Asian Pumpkin (Cucurbita ficifolia).

    PubMed

    Konrad, Babij; Anna, Dąbrowska; Marek, Szołtysik; Marta, Pokora; Aleksandra, Zambrowicz; Józefa, Chrzanowska

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, whey protein concentrate (WPC-80) and β-lactoglobulin were hydrolyzed with a noncommercial serine protease isolated from Asian pumpkin (Cucurbita ficifolia). Hydrolysates were further fractionated by ultrafiltration using membranes with cut-offs equal 3 and 10 kDa. Peptide fractions of molecular weight lower than 3 and 3-10 kDa were further subjected to the RP-HPLC. Separated preparations were investigated for their potential as the natural inhibitors of dipeptidyl peptidase (DPP-IV), α-glucosidase and angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE). WPC-80 hydrolysate showed higher inhibitory activities against the three tested enzymes than β-lactoglobulin hydrolysate. Especially high biological activities were exhibited by peptide fractions of molecular weight lower than 3 kDa, with ACE IC50 <0.64 mg/mL and DPP-IV IC50 <0.55 mg/mL. This study suggests that peptides generated from whey proteins may support postprandial glycemia regulation and blood pressure maintenance, and could be used as functional food ingredients in the diet of patients with type 2 diabetes.

  6. Comparative effects of a novel angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor versus captopril on plasma angiotensins after myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Flores-Monroy, Jazmín; Ferrario, Carlos M; Valencia-Hernández, Ignacio; Hernández-Campos, Maria Elena; Martínez-Aguilar, Luisa

    2014-01-01

    The compound 4-tert-butyl-2,6-bis(thiomorpholin-4-ylmethyl)phenol (TBTIF) has molecular characteristics similar to angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors of the sulfhydryl subclass. To assess its value as a new therapeutic agent, we performed a comparative analysis of the effect of TBTIF versus captopril on the circulating levels of angiotensin (Ang) peptides and bradykinin as well as ACE and ACE2 expression after myocardial infarction. Male Wistar rats were divided into four groups: (1) sham-operated rats; (2) rats subjected to 48 h of coronary artery ligation; (3) rats administered captopril (1 mg/kg, i.m.), and (4) a similar group of rats given TBTIF (1 mg/kg, i.m.). Both drugs were administered 30 min before coronary artery ligation and again 24 h later. Acute myocardial infarction lowered both systolic and left ventricular systolic blood pressures compared to the sham group and increased plasma levels of Ang I, Ang II, Ang(1-7) and Ang(1-12). Administration of either captopril or TBTIF reversed the increases in plasma angiotensins. Interestingly, the levels of plasma Ang(1-7) achieved by administration of TBTIF reached values higher than those recorded with captopril. Both agents reversed the decreases in plasma concentrations of bradykinin; in addition, TBTIF upregulated ACE expression, while both agents suppressed the ACE2 upregulation induced by myocardial infarction. These results demonstrate a beneficial effect of the novel compound TBTIF in suppressing the acute surge in the circulating renin-angiotensin system activity induced by myocardial infarction. The greater effects of this compound in augmenting plasma Ang(1-7) concentrations may be highly significant as drugs which augment the concentration of this heptapeptide will exert cardioprotective actions in part by suppressing the hypertrophic and profibrotic actions of Ang II.

  7. Inhibitors of the peptidoglycan biosynthesis enzymes MurA-F.

    PubMed

    Hrast, Martina; Sosič, Izidor; Sink, Roman; Gobec, Stanislav

    2014-08-01

    The widespread emergence of resistant bacterial strains is becoming a serious threat to public health. This thus signifies the need for the development of new antibacterial agents with novel mechanisms of action. Continuous efforts in the design of novel antibacterials remain one of the biggest challenges in drug development. In this respect, the Mur enzymes, MurA-F, that are involved in the formation of UDP-N-acetylmuramyl-pentapeptide can be genuinely considered as promising antibacterial targets. This review provides an in-depth insight into the recent developments in the field of inhibitors of the MurA-F enzymes. Special attention is also given to compounds that act as multiple inhibitors of two, three or more of the Mur enzymes. Moreover, the reasons for the lack of preclinically successful inhibitors and the challenges to overcome these hurdles in the next years are also debated.

  8. Angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory activity and structural properties of oven- and freeze-dried protein hydrolysate from fresh water fish (Cirrhinus mrigala).

    PubMed

    Elavarasan, K; Shamasundar, B A; Badii, Faraha; Howell, Nazlin

    2016-09-01

    The angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory activity and structural properties of oven-dried (OD-FPH) and freeze-dried (FD-FPH) protein hydrolysates derived from fresh water fish (Cirrhinus mrigala) muscle, using papain, were investigated. Amino acid profiles indicated a higher proportion of hydrophobic residues in OD-FPH and hydrophilic residues in FD-FPH samples. Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectra revealed random coil structure in OD-FPH and β-sheet in FD-FPH samples. The approximate molecular weight of peptides in OD-FPH and FD-FPH was in the range of 7030-339Da. The IC50 values for ACE inhibition by OD-FPH and FD-FPH samples were found to be 1.15 and 1.53mg of proteinml(-1), respectively. The ACE-inhibitory activity of OD-FPH was more stable (during sequential digestion, using pepsin and pancreatin) than that of FD-FPH sample. The study suggested that the ACE inhibitory activity of protein hydrolysate was not affected by oven-drying.

  9. Effect of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) gene polymorphism on progression of renal disease and the influence of ACE inhibition in IDDM patients: findings from the EUCLID Randomized Controlled Trial. EURODIAB Controlled Trial of Lisinopril in IDDM.

    PubMed

    Penno, G; Chaturvedi, N; Talmud, P J; Cotroneo, P; Manto, A; Nannipieri, M; Luong, L A; Fuller, J H

    1998-09-01

    We examined whether the ACE gene insertion/deletion (I/D) polymorphism modulates renal disease progression in IDDM and how ACE inhibitors influence this relationship. The EURODIAB Controlled Trial of Lisinopril in IDDM is a multicenter randomized placebo-controlled trial in 530 nonhypertensive, mainly normoalbuminuric IDDM patients aged 20-59 years. Albumin excretion rate (AER) was measured every 6 months for 2 years. Genotype distribution was 15% II, 58% ID, and 27% DD. Between genotypes, there were no differences in baseline characteristics or in changes in blood pressure and glycemic control throughout the trial. There was a significant interaction between the II and DD genotype groups and treatment on change in AER (P = 0.05). Patients with the II genotype showed the fastest rate of AER progression on placebo but had an enhanced response to lisinopril. AER at 2 years (adjusted for baseline AER) was 51.3% lower on lisinopril than placebo in the II genotype patients (95% CI, 15.7 to 71.8; P = 0.01), 14.8% in the ID group (-7.8 to 32.7; P = 0.2), and 7.7% in the DD group (-36.6 to 37.6; P = 0.7). Absolute differences in AER between placebo and lisinopril at 2 years were 8.1, 1.7, and 0.8 microg/min in the II, ID, and DD groups, respectively. The significant beneficial effect of lisinopril on AER in the II group persisted when adjusted for center, blood pressure, and glycemic control, and also for diastolic blood pressure at 1 month into the study. Progression from normoalbuminuria to microalbuminuria (lisinopril versus placebo) was 0.27 (0.03-2.26; P = 0.2) in the II group, and 1.30 (0.33-5.17; P = 0.7) in the DD group (P = 0.6 for interaction). Knowledge of ACE genotype may be of value in determining the likely impact of ACE inhibitor treatment.

  10. The Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor captopril inhibits poly(adp-ribose) polymerase activation and exerts beneficial effects in an ovine model of burn and smoke injury.

    PubMed

    Asmussen, Sven; Bartha, Eva; Olah, Gabor; Sbrana, Elena; Rehberg, Sebastian W; Yamamoto, Yusuke; Enkhbaatar, Perenlei; Hawkins, Hal K; Ito, Hiroshi; Cox, Robert A; Traber, Lillian D; Traber, Daniel L; Szabo, Csaba

    2011-10-01

    We investigated the effect of the angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor captopril in a clinically relevant ovine model of smoke and burn injury, with special reference to oxidative stress and activation of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase, in the lung and in circulating leukocytes. Female, adult sheep (28-40 kg) were divided into three groups. After tracheostomy and under deep anesthesia, both vehicle-control-treated (n = 5) and captopril-treated (20 mg/kg per day, i.v., starting 0.5 h before the injury) (n = 5) groups were subjected to 2 × 20%, third-degree burn injury and were insufflated with 48 breaths of cotton smoke. A sham group not receiving burn/smoke was also studied (n = 5). Animals were mechanically ventilated and fluid resuscitated for 24 h in the awake state. Burn and smoke injury resulted in an upregulation of ACE in the lung, evidenced by immunohistochemical determination and Western blotting. Burn and smoke injury resulted in pulmonary dysfunction, as well as systemic hemodynamic alterations. Captopril treatment of burn and smoke animals improved PaO2/FiO2 ratio and pulmonary shunt fraction and reduced the degree of lung edema. There was a marked increase in PAR levels in circulating leukocytes after burn/smoke injury, which was significantly decreased by captopril. The pulmonary level of ACE and the elevated pulmonary levels of transforming growth factor β in response to burn and smoke injury were significantly decreased by captopril treatment. Our results suggest that the ACE inhibitor captopril exerts beneficial effects on the pulmonary function in burn/smoke injury. The effects of the ACE inhibitor may be related to the prevention of reactive oxygen species-induced poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase overactivation. Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibition may also exert additional beneficial effects by inhibiting the expression of the profibrotic mediator transforming growth factor β.

  11. Inhibitors of nucleotidyltransferase superfamily enzymes suppress herpes simplex virus replication.

    PubMed

    Tavis, John E; Wang, Hong; Tollefson, Ann E; Ying, Baoling; Korom, Maria; Cheng, Xiaohong; Cao, Feng; Davis, Katie L; Wold, William S M; Morrison, Lynda A

    2014-12-01

    Herpesviruses are large double-stranded DNA viruses that cause serious human diseases. Herpesvirus DNA replication depends on multiple processes typically catalyzed by nucleotidyltransferase superfamily (NTS) enzymes. Therefore, we investigated whether inhibitors of NTS enzymes would suppress replication of herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) and HSV-2. Eight of 42 NTS inhibitors suppressed HSV-1 and/or HSV-2 replication by >10-fold at 5 μM, with suppression at 50 μM reaching ∼1 million-fold. Five compounds in two chemical families inhibited HSV replication in Vero and human foreskin fibroblast cells as well as the approved drug acyclovir did. The compounds had 50% effective concentration values as low as 0.22 μM with negligible cytotoxicity in the assays employed. The inhibitors suppressed accumulation of viral genomes and infectious particles and blocked events in the viral replication cycle before and during viral DNA replication. Acyclovir-resistant mutants of HSV-1 and HSV-2 remained highly sensitive to the NTS inhibitors. Five of six NTS inhibitors of the HSVs also blocked replication of another herpesvirus pathogen, human cytomegalovirus. Therefore, NTS enzyme inhibitors are promising candidates for new herpesvirus treatments that may have broad efficacy against members of the herpesvirus family.

  12. Effects of the angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor enalapril compared with diuretic therapy in elderly hypertensive patients.

    PubMed

    Verza, M; Cacciapuoti, F; Spiezia, R; D'Avino, M; Arpino, G; D'Errico, S; Sepe, J; Varricchio, M

    1988-11-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of the angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor enalapril in a group of 30 patients (mean age 73.3 years) with moderate hypertension and normal haematological and chemical parameters (170 +/- 8.1 mmHg systolic and 104 +/- 5.8 mmHg diastolic blood pressure), who were receiving diuretic therapy with chlorthalidone (12.5 mg/day). This therapy caused a significant decrease in systolic and diastolic blood pressure (to 165 +/- 6.7 and 98 +/- 4.7 mmHg, respectively; P less than 0.001) but it also induced hypokalaemia (3.04 +/- 0.7 mmol/l; P less than 0.001) and multiple (greater than 10/h) and complex premature ventricular depolarizations (2nd, 3rd and 4th Lown grade). Enalapril treatment (5 mg/day for 5 days and 10 mg thereafter) was added to the diuretic therapy and after 2 months a further decrease in blood pressure was observed (to 158 +/- 5.6 mmHg systolic, P less than 0.001; 87.2 +/- 5.0 mmHg diastolic, P less than 0.001). Moreover, there was a significant reduction in the mean heart rate (from 79 to 72 beats/min, P less than 0.005) and an increase in serum potassium (to 4.19 +/- 0.2 mmol/l; P less than 0.001). In 80% of patients a 24-h dynamic electrocardiogram showed a significant reduction in both the number and complexity of premature ventricular depolarizations. Our findings suggest that ACE inhibitors can be useful in patients developing hypokalaemia during therapy. However, we are not yet able to explain the beneficial effects of enalapril in decreasing the frequency of premature ventricular depolarizations.

  13. Renoprotective effects of combined SGLT2 and ACE inhibitor therapy in diabetic Dahl S rats

    PubMed Central

    Kojima, Naoki; Williams, Jan M; Slaughter, Tiffani N; Kato, Sota; Takahashi, Teisuke; Miyata, Noriyuki; Roman, Richard J

    2015-01-01

    This study examined whether control of hyperglycemia with a new SGLT2 inhibitor, luseogliflozin, given alone or in combination with lisinopril could prevent the development of renal injury in diabetic Dahl salt-sensitive (Dahl S) rats treated with streptozotocin (Dahl-STZ). Blood glucose levels increased from normoglycemic to hyperglycemic levels after treatment of STZ in Dahl S rats. Chronic treatment of Dahl-STZ rats with luseogliflozin (10 mg/kg/day) increased the fractional excretion of glucose and normalized blood glucose and HbA1c levels. Lisinopril (20 mg/kg/day) reduced blood pressure from 145 ± 9 to 120 ± 5 mmHg in Dahl-STZ rats, while luseogliflozin had no effect on blood pressure. Combination therapy reduced blood pressure more than that seen in the rats treated with luseogliflozin or lisinopril alone. Dahl-STZ rats exhibited hyperfiltration, mesangial matrix expansion, severe progressive proteinuria, focal glomerulosclerosis and interstitial fibrosis. Control of hyperglycemia with luseogliflozin reduced the degree of hyperfiltration and renal injury but had no effect on blood pressure or the development of proteinuria. Treatment with lisinopril reduced hyperfiltration, proteinuria and renal injury in Dahl-STZ rats. Combination therapy afforded greater renoprotection than administration of either drug alone. These results suggest that long-term control of hyperglycemia with luseogliflozin, especially in combination with lisinopril to lower blood pressure, attenuates the development of renal injury in this rat model of advanced diabetic nephropathy. PMID:26169541

  14. Characterization of angiotensin I-converting enzyme from anterior gills of the mangrove crab Ucides cordatus.

    PubMed

    Bersanetti, Patrícia A; Nogueira, Regina F; Marcondes, Marcelo F; Paiva, Paulo B; Juliano, Maria A; Juliano, Luiz; Carmona, Adriana K; Zanotto, Flavia P

    2015-03-01

    Angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) is a well-known metallopeptidase that is found in vertebrates, invertebrates and bacteria. We isolated from the anterior gill of the crab Ucides cordatus an isoform of ACE, here named crab-ACE, which presented catalytic properties closely resembling to those of mammalian ACE. The enzyme was purified on Sepharose-lisinopril affinity chromatography to apparent homogeneity and a band of about 72 kDa could be visualized after silver staining and Western blotting. Assays performed with fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) selective ACE substrates Abz-FRK(Dnp)P-OH, Abz-SDK(Dnp)P-OH and Abz-LFK(Dnp)-OH, allowed us to verify that crab-ACE has hydrolytic profile very similar to that of the ACE C-domain. In addition, we observed that crab-ACE can hydrolyze the ACE substrates, angiotensin I and bradykinin. The enzyme was strongly inhibited by the specific ACE inhibitor lisinopril (Ki of 1.26 nM). However, in contrast to other ACE isoforms, crab-ACE presented a very particular optimum pH, being the substrate Abz-FRK(Dnp)-P-OH hydrolyzed efficiently at pH 9.5. Other interesting characteristic of crab-ACE was that the maximum hydrolytic activity was reached at around 45°C. The description of an ACE isoform in Ucides cordatus is challenging and may contribute to a better understanding of the biochemical function of this enzyme in invertebrates.

  15. Human ACE gene polymorphism and distilled water induced cough

    PubMed Central

    Morice, A. H.; Turley, A. J.; Linton, T. K.

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Inhibitors of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) cause a non-productive cough. The insertion/deletion polymorphism of ACE was used as a genetic marker to investigate the relationship between ACE genotype and cough sensitivity. METHODS: A double blind cough challenge was performed in 66 normotensive subjects (34 men) of mean age 34.8 years (range 18-80) using aerosols of distilled water. The number of coughs during the one minute exposure to water was recorded. DNA samples from venous blood were amplified by the polymerase chain reaction and resolved on a 1% agarose gel. They were analysed for the presence of a polymorphism in intron 16 of the ACE gene consisting of an insertion (I) or deletion (D) of an Alu repetitive sequence 287 base pairs long. RESULTS: The distribution of genotypes was 20 II, 26 ID, and 20 DD. The cough response was significantly (p < 0.01) related to the ACE genotype, the mean number of coughs being 15.8, 11.3, and 9.6, respectively, in subjects with the II, ID, and DD genotypes. CONCLUSIONS: The observation that cough challenge is dependent on ACE genotype in normal subjects is evidence of a link between ACE activity and the cough reflex. 


 PMID:9059468

  16. Angiotensin-I Converting Enzyme (ACE) Inhibitory and Anti-Hypertensive Effect of Protein Hydrolysate from Actinopyga lecanora (Sea Cucumber) in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Sadegh Vishkaei, Mahdokht; Ebrahimpour, Afshin; Abdul-Hamid, Azizah; Ismail, Amin; Saari, Nazamid

    2016-01-01

    Food protein hydrolysates are known to exhibit angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory properties and can be used as a novel functional food for prevention of hypertension. This study evaluated the ACE inhibitory potentials of Actinopyga lecanora proteolysate (ALP) in vivo. The pre-fed rats with ALP at various doses (200, 400, 800 mg/kg body weight) exhibited a significant (p ≤ 0.05) suppression effect after inducing hypertension. To determine the optimum effective dose that will produce maximal reduction in blood pressure, ALP at three doses was fed to the rats after inducing hypertension. The results showed that the 800 mg/kg body weight dose significantly reduced blood pressure without noticeable negative physiological effect. In addition, there were no observable changes in the rats’ heart rate after oral administration of the ALP. It was concluded that Actinopyga lecanora proteolysate could potentially be used for the development of functional foods and nutraceuticals for prevention and treatment of hypertension. PMID:27706040

  17. Angiotensin-I Converting Enzyme (ACE) Inhibitory and Anti-Hypertensive Effect of Protein Hydrolysate from Actinopyga lecanora (Sea Cucumber) in Rats.

    PubMed

    Sadegh Vishkaei, Mahdokht; Ebrahimpour, Afshin; Abdul-Hamid, Azizah; Ismail, Amin; Saari, Nazamid

    2016-09-30

    Food protein hydrolysates are known to exhibit angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory properties and can be used as a novel functional food for prevention of hypertension. This study evaluated the ACE inhibitory potentials of Actinopyga lecanora proteolysate (ALP) in vivo. The pre-fed rats with ALP at various doses (200, 400, 800 mg/kg body weight) exhibited a significant (p ≤ 0.05) suppression effect after inducing hypertension. To determine the optimum effective dose that will produce maximal reduction in blood pressure, ALP at three doses was fed to the rats after inducing hypertension. The results showed that the 800 mg/kg body weight dose significantly reduced blood pressure without noticeable negative physiological effect. In addition, there were no observable changes in the rats' heart rate after oral administration of the ALP. It was concluded that Actinopyga lecanora proteolysate could potentially be used for the development of functional foods and nutraceuticals for prevention and treatment of hypertension.

  18. Purification and characterisation of a novel angiotensin-I converting enzyme (ACE)-inhibitory peptide derived from the enzymatic hydrolysate of Enteromorpha clathrata protein.

    PubMed

    Pan, Saikun; Wang, Shujun; Jing, Lingling; Yao, Dongrui

    2016-11-15

    Hydrolysates containing angiotensin-I converting enzyme (ACE)-inhibitory peptide were prepared from Enteromorpha clathrata protein using alcalase. The hydrolysates were fractionated into two molecular-weight ranges (below and above 10kDa) by ultrafiltration. The below-10kDa fraction showed higher ACE-inhibitory activity and was subsequently purified by Sephadex G-15 gel filtration chromatography. The structure of active peptide was identified as Pro-Ala-Phe-Gly by HPLC-Q-TOF-MS and its IC50 value was 35.9μM. The yield of this peptide from E. clathrata protein was 0.82%. Lineweaver-Burk plots demonstrated that the inhibitory kinetic mechanism of this peptide was non-competitive. Stability study revealed that the purified peptide showed resistance against gastrointestinal proteases. Thus, E. clathrata protein hydrolysate treated with alcalase is a beneficial ingredient of nutraceuticals and pharmaceuticals against hypertension and related diseases.

  19. Sources of heterogeneity in case-control studies on associations between statins, ACE-inhibitors, and proton pump inhibitors and risk of pneumonia.

    PubMed

    de Groot, Mark C H; Klungel, Olaf H; Leufkens, Hubert G M; van Dijk, Liset; Grobbee, Diederick E; van de Garde, Ewoudt M W

    2014-10-01

    The heterogeneity in case-control studies on the associations between community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) and ACE-inhibitors (ACEi), statins, and proton pump inhibitors (PPI) hampers translation to clinical practice. Our objective is to explore sources of this heterogeneity by applying a common protocol in different data settings. We conducted ten case-control studies using data from five different health care databases. Databases varied on type of patients (hospitalised vs. GP), level of case validity, and mode of exposure ascertainment (prescription or dispensing based). Identified CAP patients and controls were matched on age, gender, and calendar year. Conditional logistic regression was used to calculate odds ratios (OR) for the associations between the drugs of interest and CAP. Associations were adjusted by a common set of potential confounders. Data of 38,742 cases and 118,019 controls were studied. Comparable patterns of variation between case-control studies were observed for ACEi, statins and PPI use and pneumonia risk with adjusted ORs varying from 1.04 to 1.49, 0.82 to 1.50 and 1.16 to 2.71, respectively. Overall, higher ORs were found for hospitalised CAP patients matched to population controls versus GP CAP patients matched to population controls. Prevalence of drug exposure was higher in dispensing data versus prescription data. We show that case-control selection and methods of exposure ascertainment induce bias that cannot be adjusted for and to a considerable extent explain the heterogeneity in results obtained in case-control studies on statins, ACEi and PPIs and CAP. The common protocol approach helps to better understand sources of variation in observational studies.

  20. Role of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin II receptor blockers, and aldosterone antagonists in the prevention of atrial and ventricular arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Makkar, Kathy M; Sanoski, Cynthia A; Spinler, Sarah A

    2009-01-01

    Atrial arrhythmias, ventricular arrhythmias, and sudden cardiac death (SCD) are significant health problems and an economic burden to society. The renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) may play a key role in the occurrence of structural and electrical remodeling, potentially explaining the development of atrial and ventricular arrhythmias. Angiotensin II has been shown to regulate cardiac cell proliferation and to modulate cardiac myocyte ion channels. Results of post hoc analyses from prospective clinical trials appear to show that angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors and angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs) are most effective in the prevention of new-onset atrial fibrillation in patients with heart failure. It is difficult to determine if these agents are useful in the prevention of new-onset atrial fibrillation after myocardial infarction, and available evidence suggests that the benefit of ACE inhibitors and ARBs for prevention of new-onset atrial fibrillation in patients with hypertension appears limited to those with left ventricular hypertrophy. Patients with structural changes in cardiac muscle, such as those with heart failure and left ventricular hypertrophy, appear to benefit the most from RAAS blockade, possibly due to the theory of reversal of cardiac remodeling. There is no evidence, to our knowledge, that either ACE inhibitors or ARBs facilitate direct electrical current cardioversion in patients with atrial fibrillation; however, it appears that RAAS blockade may be useful in the prevention of recurrent atrial fibrillation after direct electrical current cardioversion. Whether ACE inhibitors may prevent life-threatening ventricular arrhythmias or SCD is unclear. Aldosterone antagonists appear to be useful for the prevention of SCD in patients with left ventricular systolic dysfunction. Results from ongoing clinical trials are anticipated to provide further insight on the potential roles of RAAS inhibitors for the prevention of

  1. Simulated digestion of proanthocyanidins in grape skin and seed extracts and the effects of digestion on the angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory activity.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Katherina; Labra, Javiera

    2013-08-15

    This study investigated the effect of in vitro gastrointestinal digestion on the stability and composition of flavan-3-ols from red grape skin and seed extracts (raw and purified, which are high in proanthocyanidins (PAs)). In addition, the effects of digestion on the angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory activities of these extracts were evaluated. The extracts were digested with a mixture of pepsin-HCl for 2 h, followed by a 2 h incubation with pancreatin and bile salts including a cellulose dialysis tubing (molecular weight cut-off 12 kDa) at 37°C with shaking in the dark and under N2. Under gastric conditions, the mean degree of polymerisation (mDP) of seed extracts, raw (mDP≈6, p<0.05), and purified (mDP≈10, p<0.05) was stable. The mDP of the raw skin extracts increased from 19 to 25 towards the end of the digestion. The PAs were significantly degraded (up to 80%) during the pancreatic digestion, yielding low-molecular-weight compounds that diffused into the serum-available fraction (mDP≈2). The overall mass transfer coefficient (K) of the seed extracts was 10(-7) m(2)/s. After simulated gastrointestinal digestion, over 80% of ACE inhibition by raw seed and skin extracts was preserved. However, the purified seed and skin extracts lost their ability to inhibit ACE after intestinal digestion.

  2. Reduction of microalbuminuria in type-2 diabetes mellitus with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor alone and with cilnidipine.

    PubMed

    Singh, V K; Mishra, A; Gupta, K K; Misra, R; Patel, M L; Shilpa

    2015-01-01

    The aim of our study was to find out the antiproteinuric effect of enalapril angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE inhibitor) alone or in combination with cilnidipine in patients with type-2 diabetes mellitus. The study was conducted on 71 patients with type-2 diabetes mellitus patients with hypertension and microalbuminuria. They were divided into two groups randomly as follows: Group I (enalaprilalone, n = 36) and Group II (enalapril with cilnidipine, n = 35). In both the groups, baseline 24 h urinary albumin was estimated and was repeated every 3 months upto 1-year. After 1-year follow-up, reduction in microalbuminuria was found to be greater in Group II. In Group I microalbuminuria came down by 25.68 ± 21.40 while in Group II it reduced by 54.88 ± 13.84 (P < 0.001). We conclude that in diabetic population, cilnidipine has an additive effect in microalbuminuria reduction over and above the well-proven effect of ACE inhibitors.

  3. Diagnostic use of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE)-inhibited renal scintigraphy in the identification of selective renal artery stenosis in the presence of multiple renal arteries: A case report

    SciTech Connect

    Morton, K.A.; Rose, S.C.; Haakenstad, A.O.; Handy, J.E.; Scuderi, A.J.; Datz, F.L. )

    1990-11-01

    In patients with renovascular hypertension, it is unknown whether the angiotensin converting enzyme-(ACE) inhibited renal scan will identify stenosis of a segmental branch of a single renal artery or of an accessory artery where multiple renal arteries are present. Since multiple renal arteries may be present in approximately 25% of all individuals, it will be important to establish whether the ACE-inhibited renal scan is useful in this population. We report a case of stenosis involving a renal artery in a patient with multiple renal arteries, successfully identified by ACE-inhibited renal scintigraphy.

  4. In situ assembly of enzyme inhibitors using extended tethering.

    PubMed

    Erlanson, Daniel A; Lam, Joni W; Wiesmann, Christian; Luong, Tinh N; Simmons, Robert L; DeLano, Warren L; Choong, Ingrid C; Burdett, Matthew T; Flanagan, W Michael; Lee, Dennis; Gordon, Eric M; O'Brien, Tom

    2003-03-01

    Cysteine aspartyl protease-3 (caspase-3) is a mediator of apoptosis and a therapeutic target for a wide range of diseases. Using a dynamic combinatorial technology, 'extended tethering', we identified unique nonpeptidic inhibitors for this enzyme. Extended tethering allowed the identification of ligands that bind to discrete regions of caspase-3 and also helped direct the assembly of these ligands into small-molecule inhibitors. We first designed a small-molecule 'extender' that irreversibly alkylates the cysteine residue of caspase-3 and also contains a thiol group. The modified protein was then screened against a library of disulfide-containing small-molecule fragments. Mass-spectrometry was used to identify ligands that bind noncovalently to the protein and that also form a disulfide linkage with the extender. Linking the selected fragments with binding elements from the extenders generates reversible, tight-binding molecules that are druglike and distinct from known inhibitors. One molecule derived from this approach inhibited apoptosis in cells.

  5. Single-molecule enzyme kinetics in the presence of inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Saha, Soma; Sinha, Antara; Dua, Arti

    2012-07-28

    Recent studies in single-molecule enzyme kinetics reveal that the turnover statistics of a single enzyme is governed by the waiting time distribution that decays as mono-exponential at low substrate concentration and multi-exponential at high substrate concentration. The multi-exponentiality arises due to protein conformational fluctuations, which act on the time scale longer than or comparable to the catalytic reaction step, thereby inducing temporal fluctuations in the catalytic rate resulting in dynamic disorder. In this work, we study the turnover statistics of a single enzyme in the presence of inhibitors to show that the multi-exponentiality in the waiting time distribution can arise even when protein conformational fluctuations do not influence the catalytic rate. From the Michaelis-Menten mechanism of inhibited enzymes, we derive exact expressions for the waiting time distribution for competitive, uncompetitive, and mixed inhibitions to quantitatively show that the presence of inhibitors can induce dynamic disorder in all three modes of inhibitions resulting in temporal fluctuations in the reaction rate. In the presence of inhibitors, dynamic disorder arises due to transitions between active and inhibited states of enzymes, which occur on time scale longer than or comparable to the catalytic step. In this limit, the randomness parameter (dimensionless variance) is greater than unity indicating the presence of dynamic disorder in all three modes of inhibitions. In the opposite limit, when the time scale of the catalytic step is longer than the time scale of transitions between active and inhibited enzymatic states, the randomness parameter is unity, implying no dynamic disorder in the reaction pathway.

  6. Association between the Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme (ACE) Genetic Polymorphism and Diabetic Retinopathy—A Meta-Analysis Comprising 10,168 Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Shasha; Shi, Chao; Wang, Furu; Wu, Zhifeng

    2016-01-01

    Aims—to address the inconclusive findings of the association of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) insertion/deletion (I/D) polymorphism on risk of diabetic retinopathy (DR), a meta-analysis was conducted. Methods—we conducted a meta-analysis on 4252 DR cases and 5916 controls from 40 published studies by searching electronic databases and reference lists of relevant articles. A random-effects or fixed-effects model was used to estimate the overall and stratification effect sizes on ACE I/D polymorphism on the risk of DR. Results—we found a significant association between the ACE I/D polymorphism and the risk of DR for all genetic model (ID vs. II: OR = 1.14, 95% CI: 1.00–1.30; DD vs. II: OR = 1.38, 95% CI: 1.11–1.71; Allele contrast: OR = 1.17, 95% CI: 1.05–1.30; recessive model: OR = 1.24, 95% CI: 1.02–1.51 and dominant model: OR = 1.21, 95% CI: 1.06–1.38, respectively). In stratified analysis by ethnicity and DM type, we further found that the Asian group with T2DM showed a significant association for all genetic models (ID vs. II: OR = 1.14, 95% CI: 1.01–1.30; DD vs. II: OR = 1.54, 95% CI: 1.14–2.08; Allele contrast: OR = 1.26, 95% CI: 1.09–1.47; recessive model: OR = 1.42, 95% CI: 1.07–1.88 and dominant model: OR = 1.26, 95% CI: 1.07–1.49, respectively). Conclusion—our study suggested that the ACE I/D polymorphism may contribute to DR development, especially in the Asian group with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Prospective and more genome-wide association studies (GWAS) are needed to clarify the real role of the ACE gene in determining susceptibility to DR. PMID:27854313

  7. Human gut endogenous proteins as a potential source of angiotensin-I-converting enzyme (ACE-I)-, renin inhibitory and antioxidant peptides.

    PubMed

    Dave, Lakshmi A; Hayes, Maria; Montoya, Carlos A; Rutherfurd, Shane M; Moughan, Paul J

    2016-02-01

    It is well known that endogenous bioactive proteins and peptides play a substantial role in the body's first line of immunological defence, immune-regulation and normal body functioning. Further, the peptides derived from the luminal digestion of proteins are also important for body function. For example, within the peptide database BIOPEP (http://www.uwm.edu.pl/biochemia/index.php/en/biopep) 12 endogenous antimicrobial and 64 angiotensin-I-converting enzyme (ACE-I) inhibitory peptides derived from human milk and plasma proteins are listed. The antimicrobial peptide database (http://aps.unmc.edu/AP/main.php) lists over 111 human host-defence peptides. Several endogenous proteins are secreted in the gut and are subject to the same gastrointestinal digestion processes as food proteins derived from the diet. The human gut endogenous proteins (GEP) include mucins, serum albumin, digestive enzymes, hormones, and proteins from sloughed off epithelial cells and gut microbiota, and numerous other secreted proteins. To date, much work has been carried out regarding the health altering effects of food-derived bioactive peptides but little attention has been paid to the possibility that GEP may also be a source of bioactive peptides. In this review, we discuss the potential of GEP to constitute a gut cryptome from which bioactive peptides such as ACE-I inhibitory, renin inhibitory and antioxidant peptides may be derived.

  8. Polymorphisms of ACE2 gene are associated with essential hypertension and antihypertensive effects of Captopril in women.

    PubMed

    Fan, X; Wang, Y; Sun, K; Zhang, W; Yang, X; Wang, S; Zhen, Y; Wang, J; Li, W; Han, Y; Liu, T; Wang, X; Chen, J; Wu, H; Hui, R

    2007-08-01

    ACE2 appears to counterbalance the vasopressor effect of angiotensin I converting enzyme (ACE) in the reninangiotensin system. We hypothesized that ACE2 polymorphisms could confer a high risk of hypertension and have an impact on the antihypertensive response to ACE inhibitors. The hypothesis was tested in two casecontrol studies and a clinical trial of 3,408 untreated hypertensive patients randomized to Atenolol, Hydrochlorothiazide, Captopril, or Nifedipine treatments for 4 weeks. ACE2 rs2106809 T allele was found to confer a 1.6-fold risk for hypertension in women (95% confidence interval (CI), 1.132.06), whereas when combined with the effect of the ACE DD genotype, the risk was 2.34-fold (95% CI, 1.754.85) in two independent samples. The adjusted diastolic blood pressure response to Captopril was 3.3 mm Hg lower in ACE2 T allele carriers than in CC genotype carriers (P=0.019) in women. We conclude that the ACE2 T allele confers a high risk for hypertension and reduced antihypertensive response to ACE inhibitors.

  9. Scleroderma renal crisis during intravenous cyclophosphamide pulse therapy for complicated interstitial lung disease was successfully treated with angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor and plasma exchange

    PubMed Central

    Nagamura, Norihiro; Kin, Seikon

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is a multiorgan disorder involving the skin, heart, lungs, kidneys, and intestines. Progressive interstitial lung disease (ILD) is a serious complication in SSc patients, and cyclophosphamide (CYC) is the only recommended therapy for this condition;1) however, its clinical effectiveness is not sufficient. Scleroderma renal crisis (SRC) is a rare complication, characterized by acute renal failure and progressive hypertension. Angiotensin-converting-enzyme inhibitor (ACE-i) is a widely accepted therapy for SRC. We report an SSc patient with SRC and progressive ILD who underwent treatment with CYC and successful treatment with ACE-i and plasma exchange (PE). SRC and ILD are significant contributors to morbidity and mortality among SSc patients, and the therapy for these disorders is of great interest to rheumatologists. This study presents the possibility of favorable effects of PE for SSc-associated ILD and SRC. PMID:27578917

  10. A New Sucrase Enzyme Inhibitor from Azadirachta indica

    PubMed Central

    Abdelhady, Mohamed I. S.; Shaheen, Usama; Bader, Ammar; Youns, Mahmoud A.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Sucrase enzyme inhibitor considered as an oral anti-diabetic therapy that delays the absorption of eaten carbohydrates, reducing the postprandial glucose and insulin peaks to reach normoglycemia. Materials and Methods: Chromatographic fractionation of the hydroalcoholic extract of leaves of Azadirachta indica growing in KSA, followed by in-vitro assay of sucrase enzyme inhibition activity. Results: This investigation led to the isolation of a new remarkable sucrase enzyme inhibitor; 4’-methyl Quercetin-7-O-β-D-glucuronopyranoside (1) alongside with four known compounds; 2,3-hexahydroxydiphenoyl-(α/β)-D-4C1-glucopyranose (2), Avicularin (3), Castalagin (4) and Quercetin-3-O-glucoside (5). The structure of the new compound (1) was elucidated on the basis of its spectral data, including ESI-MS, UV, 1H NMR, 13C NMR, 1H-1H COSY, HSQC, NOESY and HMBC. Conclusion: Under the assay conditions, hydroalcoholic extract of A. indica and compounds 1-5 exhibited significant sucrase enzyme inhibitory activity. SUMMARY Chromatographic fractionation of the hydroalcoholic extract of leaves of Azadirachta indica, led to the Isolation of a new flavonoid glycoside named 4’-methyl Quercetin-7-O-β-D-glucuronopyranoside, alongside to other 4 known polyphenols. The hydroalcoholic extract as well as the isolated compounds exhibited significant sucrase enzyme inhibitory activity. Abbreviations used: ESI-MS; electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry, UV; ultraviolet, NMR; nuclear magnetic resonance, 1H-1H COSY; 1H-1H correlation spectroscopy, NOESY; nuclear overhauser effect spectroscopy, and HSQC; heteronuclear multiple bond correlation. A. indica; Azadirachta indica. PMID:27563214

  11. Attenuation of angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor induced cough by iron supplementation: role of nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Bhalla, Payal; Singh, Narinder Pal; Ravi, Krishnan

    2011-12-01

    The present study examined whether (1) the cough associated with angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor therapy is attenuated by oral intake of iron and anti-oxidants, and (2) nitric oxide (NO) has any role in this attenuation. Of the 100 patients under investigation, cough occurred in 28 of them with preponderance in females. All the 28 patients were followed up for six weeks: the first two weeks were the observation period and the remaining four weeks the experimentation period. After the observation period, 11 patients received a single oral dose of ferrous sulphate (200 mg), eight received vitamin E (200 mg, o.d.) and vitamin C (150 mg, o.d.) and nine were given placebo during the experimentation period. Cough scoring, serum NO and malondialdehyde (MDA) levels were determined during both the periods. While there were significant decreases in cough scores, NO and MDA levels between these two periods in the iron group, cough scores and MDA level decreased significantly in the anti-oxidant group. None of these parameters changed in the control group. NO level was found to be increased significantly in patients who developed cough (n = 28) compared with those who did not cough (n = 72). These results suggest that iron supplementation suppresses cough in patients on ACE-I therapy through its effect on NO generation.

  12. Left ventricular hypertrophy among black hypertensive patients: focusing on the efficacy of angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) is an independent cardiovascular risk factor in patients with essential hypertension. The main objective of this study was to assess the echocardiographic prevalence of left ventricular hypertrophy in patients with hypertension, its risk factors and effect of antihypertensive drugs on its prevalence. Methods A hospital based cross sectional study was conducted on 200 hypertensive patients on treatment in southwest Ethiopia. A pretested structured questionnaire was used to collect data from participants and their clinical records. Blood pressure and anthropometric measurements were taken according to recommended standards. Left ventricular mass was measured by transthoracic echocardiography. Associations between categorical variables were assessed using chi-square test and odds ratio with 95% confidence interval. Logistic regression model was done to identify risks factors of LVH. P values of < 0.05 were considered as statistically significant. Results The mean age, systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure and body mass index were 55.7 ± 11.3 years, 139.2 ± 7.7 mmHg, 89.2 ± 5.7 mmHg and 24.2 ± 3.4 Kg/m2 respectively. The overall prevalence of LVH among these study subjects was 52%. Age ≥50 years (OR: 3.49, 95% CI 1.33-9.14, P = 0.011), female gender (OR: 7.69, 95% CI 3.23-20.0, P < 0.001), systolic blood pressure ≥140 mmHg (OR: 2.85, 95% CI 1.27-6.41, P = 0.011), and duration of hypertension (OR: 3.59, 95% CI 1.47-8.76, P = 0.005) were independent predictors of left ventricular hypertrophy. Angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors were the only antihypertensive drugs associated with lower risk of left ventricular hypertrophy (OR: 0.08, 95% CI 0.03-0.19, p < 0.001). Conclusions Left ventricular hypertrophy was found to be highly prevalent in hypertensive patients in Ethiopia. ACE inhibitors were the only antihypertensive drugs associated with reduced risk

  13. ACE inhibitors and angiotensin II receptor blockers in IgA nephropathy with mild proteinuria: the ACEARB study.

    PubMed

    Pozzi, Claudio; Del Vecchio, Lucia; Casartelli, Donatella; Pozzoni, Pietro; Andrulli, Simeone; Amore, Alessandro; Peruzzi, Licia; Coppo, Rosanna; Locatelli, Francesco

    2006-01-01

    Few studies have investigated IgA nephropathy patients presenting with 'favorable' clinical features at onset, such as normal renal function, proteinuria<1 g/24 hours and the absence of hypertension, and no controlled clinical trials have tested the effects of treatment in such patients who may nevertheless develop end-stage renal disease. It is therefore important to find a well-tolerated and economic therapy capable of decreasing their risk of high proteinuria and blood pressure levels. The aim of this multicenter open-label randomized clinical trial is to test whether blocking the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) decreases the risk of progression in patients aged 3-60 years with biopsy-proven benign IgA glomerulonephritis, proteinuria levels of 0.3-0.9 g/24 hours, and normal renal function and blood pressure. The RAS is blocked by first using a single drug class (angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor or angiotensin II receptor blocker), and then combining the 2 classes as soon as the 1-drug blockade has become ineffective. We plan to enroll 378 patients over the next 3 years and randomize them to receive ramipril 5 mg/day (3 mg/m2 in children) (group A), irbesartan 300 mg/day (175 mg/m 2 in children) (group B) or supportive therapy (group C); if an increase in proteinuria of at least 50% from baseline is detected after 6 months of treatment, the other RAS inhibitor will be added. The observation period will be at least 5 years (except in the case of the development of the primary end point).

  14. Fragment-Based Screening for Enzyme Inhibitors Using Calorimetry.

    PubMed

    Recht, Michael I; Nienaber, Vicki; Torres, Francisco E

    2016-01-01

    Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) provides a sensitive and accurate means by which to study the thermodynamics of binding reactions. In addition, it enables label-free measurement of enzymatic reactions. The advent of extremely sensitive microcalorimeters have made it increasingly valuable as a tool for hit validation and characterization, but its use in primary screening is hampered by requiring large quantities of reagents and long measurement times. Nanocalorimeters can overcome these limitations of conventional ITC, particularly for screening libraries of 500-1000 compounds such as those encountered in fragment-based lead discovery. This chapter describes how nanocalorimetry and conventional microcalorimetry can be used to screen compound libraries for enzyme inhibitors.

  15. Regulation of steady-state beta-amyloid levels in the brain by neprilysin and endothelin-converting enzyme but not angiotensin-converting enzyme.

    PubMed

    Eckman, Elizabeth A; Adams, Stephanie K; Troendle, Frederick J; Stodola, Becky A; Kahn, Murad A; Fauq, Abdul H; Xiao, Hong D; Bernstein, Kenneth E; Eckman, Christopher B

    2006-10-13

    The deposition of beta-amyloid in the brain is a pathological hallmark of Alzheimer disease (AD). Normally, the accumulation of beta-amyloid is prevented in part by the activities of several degradative enzymes, including the endothelin-converting enzymes, neprilysin, insulin-degrading enzyme, and plasmin. Recent reports indicate that another metalloprotease, angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE), can degrade beta-amyloid in vitro and in cellular overexpression experiments. In addition, ACE gene variants are linked to AD risk in several populations. Angiotensin-converting enzyme, neprilysin and endothelin-converting enzyme function as vasopeptidases and are the targets of drugs designed to treat cardiovascular disorders, and ACE inhibitors are commonly prescribed. We investigated the potential physiological role of ACE in regulating endogenous brain beta-amyloid levels for two reasons: first, to determine whether beta-amyloid degradation might be the mechanism by which ACE is associated with AD, and second, to determine whether ACE inhibitor drugs might block beta-amyloid degradation in the brain and potentially increase the risk for AD. We analyzed beta-amyloid accumulation in brains from ACE-deficient mice and in mice treated with ACE inhibitors and found that ACE deficiency did not alter steady-state beta-amyloid concentration. In contrast, beta-amyloid levels are significantly elevated in endothelin-converting enzyme and neprilysin knock-out mice, and inhibitors of these enzymes cause a rapid increase in beta-amyloid concentration in the brain. The results of these studies do not support a physiological role for ACE in the degradation of beta-amyloid in the brain but confirm roles for endothelin-converting enzyme and neprilysin and indicate that reductions in these enzymes result in additive increases in brain amyloid beta-peptide levels.

  16. A genome-wide association study identifies variants in KCNIP4 associated with ACE inhibitor-induced cough.

    PubMed

    Mosley, J D; Shaffer, C M; Van Driest, S L; Weeke, P E; Wells, Q S; Karnes, J H; Velez Edwards, D R; Wei, W-Q; Teixeira, P L; Bastarache, L; Crawford, D C; Li, R; Manolio, T A; Bottinger, E P; McCarty, C A; Linneman, J G; Brilliant, M H; Pacheco, J A; Thompson, W; Chisholm, R L; Jarvik, G P; Crosslin, D R; Carrell, D S; Baldwin, E; Ralston, J; Larson, E B; Grafton, J; Scrol, A; Jouni, H; Kullo, I J; Tromp, G; Borthwick, K M; Kuivaniemi, H; Carey, D J; Ritchie, M D; Bradford, Y; Verma, S S; Chute, C G; Veluchamy, A; Siddiqui, M K; Palmer, C N A; Doney, A; MahmoudPour, S H; Maitland-van der Zee, A H; Morris, A D; Denny, J C; Roden, D M

    2016-06-01

    The most common side effect of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor (ACEi) drugs is cough. We conducted a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of ACEi-induced cough among 7080 subjects of diverse ancestries in the Electronic Medical Records and Genomics (eMERGE) network. Cases were subjects diagnosed with ACEi-induced cough. Controls were subjects with at least 6 months of ACEi use and no cough. A GWAS (1595 cases and 5485 controls) identified associations on chromosome 4 in an intron of KCNIP4. The strongest association was at rs145489027 (minor allele frequency=0.33, odds ratio (OR)=1.3 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.2-1.4), P=1.0 × 10(-8)). Replication for six single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in KCNIP4 was tested in a second eMERGE population (n=926) and in the Genetics of Diabetes Audit and Research in Tayside, Scotland (GoDARTS) cohort (n=4309). Replication was observed at rs7675300 (OR=1.32 (1.01-1.70), P=0.04) in eMERGE and at rs16870989 and rs1495509 (OR=1.15 (1.01-1.30), P=0.03 for both) in GoDARTS. The combined association at rs1495509 was significant (OR=1.23 (1.15-1.32), P=1.9 × 10(-9)). These results indicate that SNPs in KCNIP4 may modulate ACEi-induced cough risk.

  17. A Modern Understanding of the Traditional and Nontraditional Biological Functions of Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Ong, Frank S.; Blackwell, Wendell-Lamar B.; Shah, Kandarp H.; Giani, Jorge F.; Gonzalez-Villalobos, Romer A.; Shen, Xiao Z.; Fuchs, Sebastien

    2013-01-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) is a zinc-dependent peptidase responsible for converting angiotensin I into the vasoconstrictor angiotensin II. However, ACE is a relatively nonspecific peptidase that is capable of cleaving a wide range of substrates. Because of this, ACE and its peptide substrates and products affect many physiologic processes, including blood pressure control, hematopoiesis, reproduction, renal development, renal function, and the immune response. The defining feature of ACE is that it is composed of two homologous and independently catalytic domains, the result of an ancient gene duplication, and ACE-like genes are widely distributed in nature. The two ACE catalytic domains contribute to the wide substrate diversity of ACE and, by extension, the physiologic impact of the enzyme. Several studies suggest that the two catalytic domains have different biologic functions. Recently, the X-ray crystal structure of ACE has elucidated some of the structural differences between the two ACE domains. This is important now that ACE domain-specific inhibitors have been synthesized and characterized. Once widely available, these reagents will undoubtedly be powerful tools for probing the physiologic actions of each ACE domain. In turn, this knowledge should allow clinicians to envision new therapies for diseases not currently treated with ACE inhibitors. PMID:23257181

  18. Angiotensin-II mediates ACE2 Internalization and Degradation through an Angiotensin-II type I receptor-dependent mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Lazartigues, Eric; Filipeanu, Catalin M.

    2014-01-01

    Angiotensin Converting Enzyme type 2 (ACE2) is a pivotal component of the renin-angiotensin system, promoting the conversion of Angiotensin (Ang)-II to Ang-(1-7). We previously reported that decreased ACE2 expression and activity contribute to the development of Ang-II-mediated hypertension in mice. The present study aimed to investigate the mechanisms involved in ACE2 down-regulation during neurogenic hypertension. In ACE2-transfected Neuro-2A cells, Ang-II treatment resulted in a significant attenuation of ACE2 enzymatic activity. Examination of the subcellular localization of ACE2 revealed that Ang-II treatment leads to ACE2 internalization and degradation into lysosomes. These effects were prevented by both the Ang-II type 1 receptor (AT1R) blocker losartan and the lysosomal inhibitor leupeptin. In contrast, in HEK293T cells, which lack endogenous AT1R, Ang-II failed to promote ACE2 internalization. Moreover, this effect could be induced after AT1R transfection. Further, co-immunoprecipitation experiments demonstrated that AT1R and ACE2 form complexes and these interactions were decreased by Ang-II treatment, which also enhanced ACE2 ubiquitination. In contrast, ACE2 activity was not changed by transfection of AT2 or Mas receptors. In vivo, Ang-II-mediated hypertension was blunted by chronic infusion of leupeptin in wildtype C57Bl/6, but not in ACE2 knockout mice. Overall, this is the first demonstration that elevated Ang-II levels reduce ACE2 expression and activity by stimulation of lysosomal degradation through an AT1R-dependent mechanism. PMID:25225202

  19. On the Error of the Dixon Plot for Estimating the Inhibition Constant between Enzyme and Inhibitor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fukushima, Yoshihiro; Ushimaru, Makoto; Takahara, Satoshi

    2002-01-01

    In textbook treatments of enzyme inhibition kinetics, adjustment of the initial inhibitor concentration for inhibitor bound to enzyme is often neglected. For example, in graphical plots such as the Dixon plot for estimation of an inhibition constant, the initial concentration of inhibitor is usually plotted instead of the true inhibitor…

  20. Angiotensin Converting-Enzyme Inhibitors, Angiotensin Receptor Blockers, and Calcium Channel Blockers Are Associated with Prolonged Vascular Access Patency in Uremic Patients Undergoing Hemodialysis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yu-Wei; Wu, Yu-Te; Lin, Chih-Ching

    2016-01-01

    Background Vascular access failure is a huge burden for patients undergoing hemodialysis. Many efforts have been made to maintain vascular access patency, including pharmacotherapy. Angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor (ACE-I), angiotensin receptor blocker (ARB), and calcium channel blocker (CCB) are known for their antihypertensive and cardio-protective effects, however, their effects on long-term vascular access patency are still inconclusive. Design, setting, participants and measurements We retrospectively enrolled patients commencing maintenance hemodialysis between January 1, 2000, and December 31, 2006 by using National Health Insurance Research Database in Taiwan. Primary patency was defined as the date of first arteriovenous fistula (AVF) or arteriovenous graft (AVG) creation to the time of access thrombosis or any intervention aimed to maintain or re-establish vascular access patency. Cox proportional hazards models were used to adjust the influences of patient characteristics, co-morbidities and medications. Results Total 42244 patients were enrolled in this study, 37771 (89.4%) used AVF, 4473 (10.6%) used AVG as their first long term dialysis access. ACE-I, ARB, and CCB use were all associated with prolonged primary patency of AVF [hazard ratio (HR) 0.586, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.557–0.616 for ACE-I use; HR 0.532, CI 0.508–0.556 for ARB use; HR 0.485, CI 0.470–0.501 for CCB use] and AVG (HR 0.557, CI 0.482–0.643 for ACE-I use, HR 0.536, CI 0.467–0.614 for ARB use, HR 0.482, CI 0.442–0.526 for CCB use). Conclusions In our analysis, ACE-I, ARB, and CCB were strongly associated with prolonged primary patency of both AVF and AVG. Further prospective randomized studies are still warranted to prove the causality. PMID:27832203

  1. Using Trypsin & Soybean Trypsin Inhibitor to Teach Principles of Enzyme Kinetics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howard, David R.; Herr, Julie; Hollister, Rhiannon

    2006-01-01

    Trypsin and soybean trypsin inhibitor (Kunitz inhibitor) can be used in a relatively simple and inexpensive student exercise to demonstrate the usefulness of enzyme kinetics. The study of enzyme kinetics is essential to biology because enzymes play such a crucial role in the biochemical pathways of all living organisms. The data from enzyme…

  2. Experiences with ACE inhibitors early after acute myocardial infarction. Rationale and design of the German Multicenter Study on the Effects of Captopril on Cardiopulmonary Exercise parameters post myocardial infarction (ECCE).

    PubMed

    Kleber, F X; Reindl, I; Wenzel, M; Rodewyk, P; Beil, S; Kosloswki, B; Doering, W; Sabin, G V; Hinzmann, S; Winter, U J

    1993-12-01

    Left ventricular damage by necrosis of myocardial tissue can lead to compromise of left ventricular function, to left ventricular volume increase and ultimately to development of heart failure. This sequence in the pathophysiology has been shown to be blunted by ACE inhibitors. Volume increase, however, can also be helpful in restoring stroke volume and ameliorate elevation of filling pressures. Furthermore, very early institution of ACE inhibition has failed to improve short-term mortality after myocardial infarction in one large trial. The aim of the ECCE trial therefore is, to investigate the early effects of the ACE inhibitor captopril on compromise of exercise capacity, thought to be a first measurable sign of developing heart failure. The ECCE trial is a randomized, seven-center investigation, studying the effects of ACE inhibition on oxygen uptake in a double blind, placebo controlled design in a group of 204 patients. Sample size was calculated on the basis of a pilot trial. The study design and first not unblinded data of 104 patients are presented. The population consists of predominantly male patients with mostly first myocardial infarction. They were admitted to hospital within five hours of onset of chest pain. End-diastolic volumes were normal, but ejection fraction was moderately compromised. ACE inhibition was started after the first day, but within 72 hours of onset of chest pain. After four and after twelve weeks, oxygen uptake was considerably below expected values and one third of the patients had severe compromise of exercise capacity.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  3. Characterization of ACE and ACE2 Expression within Different Organs of the NOD Mouse.

    PubMed

    Roca-Ho, Heleia; Riera, Marta; Palau, Vanesa; Pascual, Julio; Soler, Maria Jose

    2017-03-05

    Renin angiotensin system (RAS) is known to play a key role in several diseases such as diabetes, and renal and cardiovascular pathologies. Its blockade has been demonstrated to delay chronic kidney disease progression and cardiovascular damage in diabetic patients. In this sense, since local RAS has been described, the aim of this study is to characterize angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) and ACE2 activities, as well as protein expression, in several tissues of the non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice model. After 21 or 40 days of diabetes onset, mouse serums and tissues were analyzed for ACE and ACE2 enzyme activities and protein expression. ACE and ACE2 enzyme activities were detected in different tissues. Their expressions vary depending on the studied tissue. Thus, whereas ACE activity was highly expressed in lungs, ACE2 activity was highly expressed in pancreas among the studied tissues. Interestingly, we also observed that diabetes up-regulates ACE mainly in serum, lung, heart, and liver, and ACE2 mainly in serum, liver, and pancreas. In conclusion, we found a marked serum and pulmonary alteration in ACE activity of diabetic mice, suggesting a common regulation. The increase of ACE2 activity within the circulation in diabetic mice may be ascribed to a compensatory mechanism of RAS.

  4. Characterization of ACE and ACE2 Expression within Different Organs of the NOD Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Roca-Ho, Heleia; Riera, Marta; Palau, Vanesa; Pascual, Julio; Soler, Maria Jose

    2017-01-01

    Renin angiotensin system (RAS) is known to play a key role in several diseases such as diabetes, and renal and cardiovascular pathologies. Its blockade has been demonstrated to delay chronic kidney disease progression and cardiovascular damage in diabetic patients. In this sense, since local RAS has been described, the aim of this study is to characterize angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) and ACE2 activities, as well as protein expression, in several tissues of the non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice model. After 21 or 40 days of diabetes onset, mouse serums and tissues were analyzed for ACE and ACE2 enzyme activities and protein expression. ACE and ACE2 enzyme activities were detected in different tissues. Their expressions vary depending on the studied tissue. Thus, whereas ACE activity was highly expressed in lungs, ACE2 activity was highly expressed in pancreas among the studied tissues. Interestingly, we also observed that diabetes up-regulates ACE mainly in serum, lung, heart, and liver, and ACE2 mainly in serum, liver, and pancreas. In conclusion, we found a marked serum and pulmonary alteration in ACE activity of diabetic mice, suggesting a common regulation. The increase of ACE2 activity within the circulation in diabetic mice may be ascribed to a compensatory mechanism of RAS. PMID:28273875

  5. Plant Protein Inhibitors of Enzymes: Their Role in Animal Nutrition and Plant Defence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richardson, Michael

    1981-01-01

    Current information and research related to plant protein inhibitors of enzymes are reviewed, including potential uses of the inhibitors for medical treatment and for breeding plant varieties with greater resistance to insects. (DC)

  6. Fixed-Dose Combinations of Renin-Angiotensin System Inhibitors and Calcium Channel Blockers in the Treatment of Hypertension: A Comparison of Angiotensin Receptor Blockers and Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Fu-Chih; Tung, Ying-Chang; Chou, Shing-Hsien; Wu, Lung-Sheng; Lin, Chia-Pin; Wang, Chun-Li; Lin, Yu-Sheng; Chang, Chee-Jen; Chu, Pao-Hsien

    2015-12-01

    Fixed-dose combinations (FDCs) of different regimens are recommended in guidelines for the treatment of hypertension. However, clinical studies comparing FDCs of angiotensin receptor blocker (ARB)/calcium channel blocker (CCB) and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor (ACE inhibitor)/CCB in hypertensive patients are lacking.Using a propensity score matching of 4:1 ratio, this retrospective claims database study compared 2 FDC regimens, ARB/CCB and ACE inhibitor/CCB, in treating hypertensive patients with no known atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. All patients were followed for at least 3 years or until the development of major adverse cardiovascular events (MACEs) during the study period. In addition, the effect of medication adherence on clinical outcomes was evaluated in subgroup analysis based on different portions of days covered.There was no significant difference in MACE-free survival (hazard ratio [HR]: 1.21; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.98-1.50; P = 0.08) and survival free from hospitalization for heart failure (HR: 1.15; 95% CI: 082-1.61; P = 0.431), new diagnosis of chronic kidney disease (HR: 0.98; 95% CI: 071-1.36; P = 0.906), and initiation of dialysis (HR: 0.99; 95% CI: 050-1.92; P = 0.965) between the 2 study groups. The results remained the same within each subgroup of patients with different adherence statuses.ARBs in FDC regimens with CCBs in the present study were shown to be as effective as ACE inhibitors at reducing the risks of MACEs, hospitalization for heart failure, new diagnosis of chronic kidney disease, and new initiation of dialysis in hypertensive patients, regardless of the medication adherence status.

  7. New hydroxamate inhibitors of neurotensin-degrading enzymes. Synthesis and enzyme active-site recognition.

    PubMed

    Bourdel, E; Doulut, S; Jarretou, G; Labbe-Jullie, C; Fehrentz, J A; Doumbia, O; Kitabgi, P; Martinez, J

    1996-08-01

    Selective and mixed inhibitors of the three zinc metallopeptidases that degrade neurotensin (NT), e.g. endopeptidase 24-16 (EC 3.4.24.16), endopeptidase 24-11 (EC 3.4.24.11 or neutral endopeptidase, NEP) and endopeptidase 24-15 (EC 3.4.24.15), and leucine-aminopeptidase (type IV-S), that degrades the NT-related peptides, Neuromedin N (NN), are of great interest. On the structural basis of compound JMV 390-1 (N-[3-[(hydroxyamino)carbonyl]-1-oxo-2(R)-benzylpropyl]-L- isoleucyl-L-leucine), which was a full inhibitor of the major NT degrading enzymes, several hydroxamate inhibitors corresponding to the general formula HONHCO-CH2-CH(CH2-C6H5)CO-X-Y-OH (with X-Y = dipeptide) have been synthesized. Compound 7a (X-Y = Ile-Ala) was nearly 40-times more potent in inhibiting EC 24-16 than NEP and more than 800-times more potent than EC 24-15, with an IC50 (12 nM) almost equivalent to that of compound JMV 390-1. Therefore, this compound is an interesting selective inhibitor of EC 24-16, and should be an interesting probe to explore the physiological involvement of EC 24-16 in the metabolism of neurotensin.

  8. The effect of enalapril (MK421), an angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor, on the conscious pregnant ewe and her foetus.

    PubMed

    Broughton Pipkin, F; Wallace, C P

    1986-03-01

    The effects of enalapril, an angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor, on maternal and foetal blood pressure, heart rate and components of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system were studied in 9 chronically-cannulated pregnant ewes and their foetuses. Six ewes received 1 mg kg-1 enalapril i.v. while 3 were given 2 mg kg-1. Although the initial fall in blood pressure was slightly greater in the higher dose group, there was substantial overlap of data. The pressor response to angiotensin I, assessing ACE activity, was abolished within 10 min of administration, and did not recover during 3 h of observation. Maternal systolic and diastolic pressures reached a nadir 90 min after administration (P less than 0.001, P less than 0.002 respectively). The maximum tachycardia was seen at 60 min (P less than 0.05). The foetuses of the ewes given 1 mg kg-1 enalapril showed no change in systolic or diastolic blood pressure or heart rate. Those of the ewes given the higher dose showed late-onset hypotension, coincident with the lowest maternal blood pressures. Maternal plasma renin concentration (PRC) had risen significantly by 30 min (P less than 0.02), reaching a maximum at approximately 90 min. Maternal plasma angiotensin II and aldosterone concentrations both fell initially (P less than 0.05) but were almost at basal levels by the end of the experiment. Foetal plasma renin, angiotensin II and aldosterone concentrations were unchanged throughout the experiment. Peak values of enaprilic acid, the active principle, were recorded in maternal plasma 65-90 min after administration of 1 mg kg-1, and 25-30 min after the administration of 2 mg kg-1. A trace amount of the active principle was recorded in the foetal plasma of one lamb, whose mother had been given the higher dose. None was recorded in the plasma from three other lambs. Maternal plasma ACE concentrations fell by an average of 84%; in 4 of the 6 ewes in which concentrations were measured they were undetectable after

  9. A biochemical logic gate using an enzyme and its inhibitor. 1. The inhibitor as switching element.

    PubMed

    Sivan, S; Lotan, N

    1999-01-01

    Molecular-scale logic systems will allow for further miniaturization of information processing assemblies and contribute to a better understanding of brain function. Of much interest are the pertinent biological systems, some of the basic components of which are biomolecular switching elements and enzyme-based logic gates. In this series of accounts, results of investigations are presented on the implementation of an enzyme/inhibitor logic gate operating under the rules of Boolean algebra. In this report (part 1 of the series), consideration is given to the experimental conditions-particularly the irradiation mode-that affect the performance of proflavine as inhibitor of alpha-chymotrypsin. Also, assessments are made on the reversibility of the process involved and the long-term stability of the system. Moreover, using a theoretical conformational analysis of proflavine and its reduction products, detailed features were established regarding their three-dimensional structure, partial charge distribution, and hydrophobicity. Accordingly, an understanding was reached as to the factors affecting the interaction between these compounds and the enzyme. In part 2 of this series, the actual implementation of an AND logic gate will be presented. This gate involves proflavine and a chemically derivatized alpha-chymotrypsin, and its operation relies on the conclusions reached in this report regarding the optimal mode for controlling the inhibitory activity of proflavine.

  10. Angioedema Related to Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Javaud, Nicolas; Achamlal, Jallal; Reuter, Paul-George; Lapostolle, Frédéric; Lekouara, Akim; Youssef, Mustapha; Hamza, Lilia; Karami, Ahmed; Adnet, Frédéric; Fain, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The number of cases of acquired angioedema related to angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors induced (ACEI-AAE) is on the increase, with a potential concomitant increase in life-threatening attacks of laryngeal edema. Our objective was to determine the main characteristics of ACEI-AAE attacks and, in doing so, the factors associated with likelihood of hospital admission from the emergency department (ED) after a visit for an attack. A prospective, multicenter, observational study (April 2012–December 2014) was conducted in EDs of 4 French hospitals in collaboration with emergency services (SAMU 93) and a reference center for bradykinin-mediated angioedema. For each patient presenting with an attack, emergency physicians collected demographic and clinical presentation data, treatments, and clinical course. They recorded time intervals from symptom onset to ED arrival and to treatment decision, from ED arrival to specific treatment with plasma-derived C1-inhibitor (C1-INH) or icatibant, and from specific treatment to onset of symptom relief. Attacks requiring hospital admission were compared with those not requiring admission. Sixty-two eligible patients with ACEI-AAE (56% men, median age 63 years) were included. Symptom relief occurred significantly earlier in patients receiving specific treatment than in untreated patients (0.5 [0.5–1.0] versus 3.9 [2.5–7.0] hours; P < 0.0001). Even though icatibant was injected more promptly than plasma-derived C1-INH, there, however, was no significant difference in median time to onset of symptom relief between the 2 drugs (0.5 [0.5–1.3] versus 0.5 [0.4–1.0] hours for C1-INH and icatibant, respectively, P = 0.49). Of the 62 patients, 27 (44%) were admitted to hospital from the ED. In multivariate analysis, laryngeal involvement and progressive swelling at ED arrival were independently associated with admission (Odds ratio [95% confidence interval] = 6.2 [1.3–28.2] and 5.9 [1.3–26

  11. Diagnostic use of angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors in radioisotope evaluation of unilateral renal artery stenosis

    SciTech Connect

    Kremer Hovinga, T.K.; de Jong, P.E.; Piers, D.A.; Beekhuis, H.; van der Hem, G.K.; de Zeeuw, D.

    1989-05-01

    Iodine-123 hippurate renography, (/sup 99m/Tc)diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA) renography, and (/sup 99m/Tc)dimercapto succinic acid (DMSA) renal scintigraphy were performed before and during angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibition in a group of 15 hypertensive patients with angiographically ''significant'' unilateral renal artery stenosis. Visual and quantitative evaluation of the three radioisotope methods before ACE inhibition already disclosed abnormalities suggestive of renal artery stenosis in a high percentage (87%, 60%, and 60%, respectively) in this group of patients, but ACE inhibition further improved the diagnostic yield in all three methods (93%, 86%, and 80%). Iodine-123 hippurate renography was at least as useful as (/sup 99m/Tc)DTPA renography in this respect, while (/sup 99m/Tc)DMSA scintigraphy can be used particularly in segmental stenosis. Despite a large drop in blood pressure after ACE inhibition little adverse reactions were seen and overall renal function was fairly well maintained, the exceptions noted in patients with initially a more impaired renal function.

  12. The use of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and diuretics is associated with a reduced incidence of impairment on cognition in elderly women.

    PubMed

    Yasar, S; Zhou, J; Varadhan, R; Carlson, M C

    2008-07-01

    The effects of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACE-Is) and diuretics (used as antihypertensive agents) on global and domain-specific cognitive decline were evaluated in 326 non-demented community-dwelling participants over the age of 70 years in the Women's Health and Aging Study II. Time-dependent Cox proportional hazards regression analysis was used for evaluating the association between parameters. The use of ACE-I for more than 3 years was associated with reduced incidence of impairment on Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE), Trail Making Test-Part A and Part B (TMT, Parts A and B), Hopkins Verbal Learning Test-Immediate Recall (HVLT-I), and Hopkins Verbal Learning Test-Delayed Recall (HVLT-D). The use of diuretics for more than 3 years was associated with reduced incidence of impairment on MMSE, TMT, Parts A and B, HVLT-I, and (HVLT-D). The presence of vascular disease did not make any difference to these effects. Therefore, the use of ACE-Is or diuretics was associated with reduced incidence of impairment of both global and domain-specific cognition in elderly women, and may help delay progression to dementia.

  13. An angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor, benazepril can be transformed to an active metabolite, benazeprilat, by the liver of dogs with ascitic pulmonary heartworm disease.

    PubMed

    Kitagawa, Hitoshi; Ohba, Yasunori; Kuwahara, Yasuhito; Ohne, Rieko; Kondo, Masahiro; Nakano, Masakazu; Sasaki, Yoshihide; Kitoh, Katsuya

    2003-06-01

    To examine whether an angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor, benazepril, can be transformed to the active metabolite, benazeprilat, by severely injured liver of dogs with ascitic heartworm disease, benazepril hydrochloride was administered orally to dogs once daily for 7 consecutive days at a dose rate of 0.29 mg/kg to 0.63 mg/kg of body weight, and plasma benazepril and benazeprilat concentrations were determined on the 1st and 7th administration days. In 7 dogs with ascitic pulmonary heartworm disease, plasma benazeprilat concentrations tended to be higher than in 7 control dogs both on the 1st and 7th administration days. The peak concentration and area under the concentration-time curve tended to be greater in dogs of the ascites group than in control dogs, but the statistics could not detect significant differences in the time to peak concentration and t(1/2) between the control and ascites groups. Plasma ACE activities decreased after administration of benazepril. In dogs with ascitic heartworm disease, benazepril was readily transformed to benazeprilat by the liver, and was effective for suppression of plasma ACE activity.

  14. Isolation, Purification and Molecular Mechanism of a Peanut Protein-Derived ACE-Inhibitory Peptide

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Aimin; Liu, Hongzhi; Liu, Li; Hu, Hui; Wang, Qiang; Adhikari, Benu

    2014-01-01

    Although a number of bioactive peptides are capable of angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory effects, little is known regarding the mechanism of peanut peptides using molecular simulation. The aim of this study was to obtain ACE inhibiting peptide from peanut protein and provide insight on the molecular mechanism of its ACE inhibiting action. Peanut peptides having ACE inhibitory activity were isolated through enzymatic hydrolysis and ultrafiltration. Further chromatographic fractionation was conducted to isolate a more potent peanut peptide and its antihypertensive activity was analyzed through in vitro ACE inhibitory tests and in vivo animal experiments. MALDI-TOF/TOF-MS was used to identify its amino acid sequence. Mechanism of ACE inhibition of P8 was analyzed using molecular docking and molecular dynamics simulation. A peanut peptide (P8) having Lys-Leu-Tyr-Met-Arg-Pro amino acid sequence was obtained which had the highest ACE inhibiting activity of 85.77% (half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50): 0.0052 mg/ml). This peanut peptide is a competitive inhibitor and show significant short term (12 h) and long term (28 days) antihypertensive activity. Dynamic tests illustrated that P8 can be successfully docked into the active pocket of ACE and can be combined with several amino acid residues. Hydrogen bond, electrostatic bond and Pi-bond were found to be the three main interaction contributing to the structural stability of ACE-peptide complex. In addition, zinc atom could form metal-carboxylic coordination bond with Tyr, Met residues of P8, resulting into its high ACE inhibiting activity. Our finding indicated that the peanut peptide (P8) having a Lys-Leu-Tyr-Met-Arg-Pro amino acid sequence can be a promising candidate for functional foods and prescription drug aimed at control of hypertension. PMID:25347076

  15. The angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor, captopril, prevents the hyperactivity and impulsivity of neurokinin-1 receptor gene 'knockout' mice: sex differences and implications for the treatment of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder.

    PubMed

    Porter, Ashley J; Pillidge, Katharine; Grabowska, Ewelina M; Stanford, S Clare

    2015-04-01

    Mice lacking functional neurokinin-1 receptors (NK1R-/-) display behavioural abnormalities resembling attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD): locomotor hyperactivity, impulsivity and inattentiveness. The preferred ligand for NK1R, substance P, is metabolised by angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE), which forms part of the brain renin angiotensin system (BRAS). In view of evidence that the BRAS modulates locomotor activity and cognitive performance, we tested the effects of drugs that target the BRAS on these behaviours in NK1R-/- and wildtype mice. We first tested the effects of the ACE inhibitor, captopril, on locomotor activity. Because there are well-established sex differences in both ADHD and ACE activity, we compared the effects of captopril in both male and female mice. Locomotor hyperactivity was evident in male NK1R-/- mice, only, and this was abolished by treatment with captopril. By contrast, male wildtypes and females of both genotypes were unaffected by ACE inhibition. We then investigated the effects of angiotensin AT1 (losartan) and AT2 (PD 123319) receptor antagonists on the locomotor activity of male NK1R-/- and wildtype mice. Both antagonists increased the locomotor activity of NK1R-/- mice, but neither affected the wildtypes. Finally, we tested the effects of captopril on the performance of male NK1R-/- and wildtype mice in the 5-choice serial reaction-time task (5-CSRTT) and found that ACE inhibition prevented the impulsivity of NK1R-/- mice. These results indicate that certain behaviours, disrupted in ADHD, are influenced by an interaction between the BRAS and NK1R, and suggest that ACE inhibitors could provide a novel treatment for this disorder.

  16. Naturally occurring active N-domain of human angiotensin I-converting enzyme.

    PubMed Central

    Deddish, P A; Wang, J; Michel, B; Morris, P W; Davidson, N O; Skidgel, R A; Erdös, E G

    1994-01-01

    Angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE, kininase II) is a single-chain protein containing two active site domains (named N- and C-domains according to position in the chain). ACE is bound to plasma membranes by its C-terminal hydrophobic transmembrane anchor. Ileal fluid, rich in ACE activity, obtained from patients after surgical colectomy was used as the source. Column chromatography, including modified affinity chromatography on lisinopril-Sepharose, yielded homogeneous ACE after only a 45-fold purification. N-terminal sequencing of ileal ACE and partial sequencing of CNBr fragments revealed the presence of an intact N terminus but only a single N-domain active site, ending between residues 443 and 559. Thus, ileal-fluid ACE is a unique enzyme differing from the widely distributed two-domain somatic enzyme or the single C-domain testicular (germinal) ACE. The molecular mass of ileal ACE is 108 kDa and when deglycosylated, the molecular mass is 68 kDa, indicating extensive glycosylation (37% by weight). In agreement with the results reported with recombinant variants of ACE, the ileal enzyme is less Cl(-)-dependent than somatic ACE; release of the C-terminal dipeptide from a peptide substrate was optimal in only 10 mM Cl-. In addition to hydrolyzing at the C-terminal end of peptides, ileal ACE efficiently cleaved the protected N-terminal tripeptide from the luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone and its congener 6-31 times faster, depending on the Cl- concentration, than the C-domain in recombinant testicular ACE. Thus we have isolated an active human ACE consisting of a single N-domain. We suggest that there is a bridge section of about 100 amino acids between the active N- and C-domains of somatic ACE where it may be proteolytically cleaved to liberate the active N-domain. These findings have potential relevance and importance in the therapeutic application of ACE inhibitors. PMID:8052664

  17. Effects of taxifolin on the activity of angiotensin-converting enzyme and reactive oxygen and nitrogen species in the aorta of aging rats and rats treated with the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor and dexamethasone.

    PubMed

    Arutyunyan, Tamara V; Korystova, Antonina F; Kublik, Ludmila N; Levitman, Maria Kh; Shaposhnikova, Vera V; Korystov, Yuri N

    2013-12-01

    The action of taxifolin on the angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) and the formation of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS/RNS) in the aorta of aging rats and rats treated with nitric oxide synthase inhibitor (N ω-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME)) or dexamethasone have been studied. The ACE activity in aorta sections was determined by measuring the hydrolysis of hippuryl-L-histidyl-L-leucine, and the ROS/RNS production was measured by oxidation of dichlorodihydrofluorescein. It was shown that taxifolin at a dose of 30-100 μg/kg/day decreases the ACE activity in the aorta of aging rats and of rats treated with L-NAME or dexamethasone to the level of the ACE activity in young control rats. Taxifolin (100 μg/kg/day) was found to also reduce the amount of ROS/RNS in the aorta that increased as a result of L-NAME intake. L-NAME treatment increases the contribution of 5-lipoxygenase and NADPH oxidase to ROS/RNS production in the aorta, while taxifolin (100 μg/kg/day) decreases the contribution of these enzymes to the normal level.

  18. Adverse cardiac effects of exogenous angiotensin 1-7 in rats with subtotal nephrectomy are prevented by ACE inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Griggs, Karen; Patel, Sheila K.

    2017-01-01

    We previously reported that exogenous angiotensin (Ang) 1–7 has adverse cardiac effects in experimental kidney failure due to its action to increase cardiac angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) activity. This study investigated if the addition of an ACE inhibitor (ACEi) to Ang 1–7 infusion would unmask any beneficial effects of Ang 1–7 on the heart in experimental kidney failure. Male Sprague–Dawley rats underwent subtotal nephrectomy (STNx) and were treated with vehicle, the ACEi ramipril (oral 1mg/kg/day), Ang 1–7 (subcutaneous 24 μg/kg/h) or dual therapy (all groups, n = 12). A control group (n = 10) of sham-operated rats were also studied. STNx led to hypertension, renal impairment, cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis, and increased both left ventricular ACE2 activity and ACE binding. STNx was not associated with changes in plasma levels of ACE, ACE2 or angiotensin peptides. Ramipril reduced blood pressure, improved cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis and inhibited cardiac ACE. Ang 1–7 infusion increased blood pressure, cardiac interstitial fibrosis and cardiac ACE binding compared to untreated STNx rats. Although in STNx rats, the addition of ACEi to Ang 1–7 prevented any deleterious cardiac effects of Ang 1–7, a limitation of the study is that the large increase in plasma Ang 1–7 with ramipril may have masked any effect of infused Ang 1–7. PMID:28192475

  19. Simplified assays of lipolysis enzymes for drug discovery and specificity assessment of known inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Iglesias, Jose; Lamontagne, Julien; Erb, Heidi; Gezzar, Sari; Zhao, Shangang; Joly, Erik; Truong, Vouy Linh; Skorey, Kathryn; Crane, Sheldon; Madiraju, S R Murthy; Prentki, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Lipids are used as cellular building blocks and condensed energy stores and also act as signaling molecules. The glycerolipid/ fatty acid cycle, encompassing lipolysis and lipogenesis, generates many lipid signals. Reliable procedures are not available for measuring activities of several lipolytic enzymes for the purposes of drug screening, and this resulted in questionable selectivity of various known lipase inhibitors. We now describe simple assays for lipolytic enzymes, including adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL), hormone sensitive lipase (HSL), sn-1-diacylglycerol lipase (DAGL), monoacylglycerol lipase, α/β-hydrolase domain 6, and carboxylesterase 1 (CES1) using recombinant human and mouse enzymes either in cell extracts or using purified enzymes. We observed that many of the reported inhibitors lack specificity. Thus, Cay10499 (HSL inhibitor) and RHC20867 (DAGL inhibitor) also inhibit other lipases. Marked differences in the inhibitor sensitivities of human ATGL and HSL compared with the corresponding mouse enzymes was noticed. Thus, ATGListatin inhibited mouse ATGL but not human ATGL, and the HSL inhibitors WWL11 and Compound 13f were effective against mouse enzyme but much less potent against human enzyme. Many of these lipase inhibitors also inhibited human CES1. Results describe reliable assays for measuring lipase activities that are amenable for drug screening and also caution about the specificity of the many earlier described lipase inhibitors.

  20. Computational optimization of AG18051 inhibitor for amyloid-beta binding alcohol dehydrogenase enzyme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marques, Alexandra T.; Antunes, Agostinho; Fernandes, Pedro A.; Ramos, Maria J.

    Amyloid-beta (Abeta) binding alcohol dehydrogenase (ABAD) is a multifunctional enzyme involved in maintaining the homeostasis. The enzyme can also mediate some diseases, including genetic diseases, Alzheimer's disease, and possibly some prostate cancers. Potent inhibitors of ABAD might facilitate a better clarification of the functions of the enzyme under normal and pathogenic conditions and might also be used for therapeutic intervention in disease conditions mediated by the enzyme. The AG18051 is the only presently available inhibitor of ABAD. It binds in the active-site cavity of the enzyme and reacts with the NAD+ cofactor to form a covalent adduct. In this work, we use computational methods to perform a rational optimization of the AG18051 inhibitor, through the introduction of chemical substitutions directed to improve the affinity of the inhibitor to the enzyme. The molecular mechanics-Poisson-Boltzmann surface area methodology was used to predict the relative free binding energy of the different modified inhibitor-NAD-enzyme complexes. We show that it is possible to increase significantly the affinity of the inhibitor to the enzyme with small modifications, without changing the overall structure and ADME (absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion) properties of the original inhibitor.

  1. Angiotensin-converting enzyme gene polymorphism predicts the time-course of blood pressure response to angiotensin converting enzyme inhibition in the AASK trial

    PubMed Central

    Bhatnagar, Vibha; O’Connor, Daniel T.; Schork, Nicholas J.; Salem, Rany M.; Nievergelt, Caroline M.; Rana, Brinda K.; Smith, Douglas W.; Bakris, George L.; Middleton, John P.; Norris, Keith C.; Wright, Jackson T.; Cheek, Deanna; Hiremath, Leena; Contreras, Gabriel; Appel, Lawrence J.; Lipkowitz, Michael S.

    2009-01-01

    Objective It has yet to be determined whether genotyping at the angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) locus is predictive of blood pressure response to an ACE inhibitor. Methods Participants from the African American Study of Kidney Disease and Hypertension trial randomized to the ACE inhibitor ramipril (n = 347) were genotyped at three polymorphisms on ACE, just downstream from the ACE insertion/deletion polymorphism (Ins/Del): G12269A, C17888T, and G20037A. Time to reach target mean arterial pressure (≤ 107 mmHg) was analyzed by genotype and ACE haplotype using Kaplan–Meier survival curves and Cox proportional hazard models. Results Individuals with a homozygous genotype at G12269A responded significantly faster than those with a heterozygous genotype; the adjusted (average number of medications and baseline mean arterial pressure) hazard ratio (homozygous compared to heterozygous genotype) was 1.86 (95% confidence limits 1.32–3.23; P < 0.001 for G12269A genotype). The adjusted hazard ratio for participants with homozygous ACE haplotypes compared to those heterozygous ACE haplotypes was 1.40 (1.13–1.75; P = 0.003 for haplotype). The ACE genotype effects were specific for ACE inhibition (i.e., not seen among those randomized to a calcium channel blocker), and were independent of population stratification. Conclusions African-Americans with a homozygous genotype at G12269A or homozygous ACE haplotypes responded to ramipril significantly faster than those with a heterozygous genotype or heterozygous haplotypes, suggesting that heterosis may be an important determinant of responsiveness to an ACE inhibitor. These associations may be a result of biological activity of this polymorphism, or of linkage disequilibrium with nearby variants such as the ACE Ins/Del, perhaps in the regulation of ACE splicing. PMID:17885551

  2. Angiotensin converting enzyme versus angiotensin converting enzyme-2 selectivity of MLN-4760 and DX600 in human and murine bone marrow-derived cells

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Shrinidh; Balasubramanian, Narayanaganesh; Vasam, Goutham; Jarajapu, Yagna PR

    2016-01-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzymes, ACE and ACE2, are key members of renin angiotensin system. Activation of ACE2/Ang-(1-7) pathway enhances cardiovascular protective functions of bone marrow-derived stem/progenitor cells. The current study evaluated the selectivity of ACE2 inhibitors, MLN-4760 and DX-600, and ACE and ACE2 activities in human (hu) and murine (mu) bone marrow cells. Assays were carried out in hu and mu mononuclear cells (MNCs) and huCD34+ cells or mu-lineage-depleted (muLin-) cells, human-recombinant (rh) enzymes, and mu-heart with enzyme-specific substrates. ACE or ACE2 inhibition by racemic MLN-4760, its isomers MLN-4760-A and MLN-4760-B, DX600 and captopril were characterized. MLN-4760-B is relatively less efficacious and less-selective than the racemate or MLN-4760-A at hu-rhACE2, and all three of them inhibited 43% rhACE. In huMNCs, MLN-4760-B detected 63% ACE2 with 28-fold selectivity over ACE. In huCD34+ cells, MLN-4760-B detected 38% of ACE2 activity with 63-fold selectivity. In mu-heart and muMNCs, isomer B was 100- and 228-fold selective for ACE2, respectively. In muLin- cells, MLN-4760-B detected 25% ACE2 activity with a pIC50 of 6.3. The racemic mixture and MLN-4760-A showed lower efficacy and poor selectivity for ACE2 in MNCs and mu-heart. ACE activity detected by captopril was 32 and 19%, respectively, in huCD34+ and muLin- cells. DX600 was less efficacious, and more selective for ACE2 compared to MLN-4760-B in all samples tested. These results suggest that MLN-4760-B is a better antagonist of ACE2 than DX600 at 10μM concentration in human and murine bone marrow cells, and that these cells express more functional ACE2 than ACE. PMID:26851370

  3. Novel Trifluoromethyl-Containing Peptides as Inhibitors for Angiotensin- Converting Enzyme and Enkephalin-Aminopeptidase

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-01-01

    Although many analogs of the potent ACE inhibitors, captopril and enalaprilat, have been synthesized, there is a paucity of information in the...analogs and homologs of captopril and enalaprilat (Table 1). As Table I shows, the direct substitution of TFM for methyl provides a very potent captopril ...active cite conformations by SYBIL 5.0 program indicates that 1-(R,S) should be at least 5 times better than (S,S)- captopril (IC50-- 4 x 10-9M), and

  4. Nine novel angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory peptides from cuttlefish (Sepia officinalis) muscle protein hydrolysates and antihypertensive effect of the potent active peptide in spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Balti, Rafik; Bougatef, Ali; Sila, Assaâd; Guillochon, Didier; Dhulster, Pascal; Nedjar-Arroume, Naima

    2015-03-01

    This study aimed to identify novel ACE inhibitory peptides from the muscle of cuttlefish. Proteins were hydrolyzed and the hydrolysates were then subjected to various types of chromatography to isolate the active peptides. Nine ACE inhibitory peptides were isolated and their molecular masses and amino acid sequences were determined using ESI-MS and ESI-MS/MS, respectively. The structures of the most potent peptides were identified as Val-Glu-Leu-Tyr-Pro, Ala-Phe-Val-Gly-Tyr-Val-Leu-Pro and Glu-Lys-Ser-Tyr-Glu-Leu-Pro. The first peptide displayed the highest ACE inhibitory activity with an IC50 of 5.22μM. Lineweaver-Burk plots suggest that Val-Glu-Leu-Tyr-Pro acts as a non-competitive inhibitor against ACE. Furthermore, antihypertensive effects in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) also revealed that oral administration of Val-Glu-Leu-Tyr-Pro can decrease systolic blood pressure significantly (p<0.01). These results suggest that the Val-Glu-Leu-Tyr-Pro would be a beneficial ingredient for nutraceuticals and pharmaceuticals acting against hypertension and its related diseases.

  5. ACE2 alterations in kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Soler, María José; Wysocki, Jan; Batlle, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) is a monocarboxypeptidase that degrades angiotensin (Ang) II to Ang-(1–7). ACE2 is highly expressed within the kidneys, it is largely localized in tubular epithelial cells and less prominently in glomerular epithelial cells and in the renal vasculature. ACE2 activity has been shown to be altered in diabetic kidney disease, hypertensive renal disease and in different models of kidney injury. There is often a dissociation between tubular and glomerular ACE2 expression, particularly in diabetic kidney disease where ACE2 expression is increased at the tubular level but decreased at the glomerular level. In this review, we will discuss alterations in circulating and renal ACE2 recently described in different renal pathologies and disease models as well as their possible significance. PMID:23956234

  6. Angiotensin converting enzyme immobilized on magnetic beads as a tool for ligand fishing.

    PubMed

    de Almeida, Fernando G; Vanzolini, Kenia L; Cass, Quezia B

    2017-01-05

    Angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) presents an important role in blood pressure regulation, since that converts angiotensin I to the vasoconstrictor angiotensin II. Some commercially available ACE inhibitors are captopril, lisinopril and enalapril; due to their side effects, naturally occurring inhibitors have been prospected. In order to endorse this research field we have developed a new tool for ACE ligand screening. To this end, ACE was extracted from bovine lung, purified and chemically immobilized in modified ferrite magnetic beads (ACE-MBs). The ACE-MBs have shown a Michaelian kinetic behavior towards hippuryl-histidyl-leucine. Moreover, as proof of concept, the ACE-MBs was inhibited by lisinopril with a half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) of 10nM. At the fishing assay, ACE-MBs were able not only to fish out the reference inhibitor, but also one peptide from a pool of tryptic digested BSA. In conclusion, ACE-MBs emerge as new straightforward tool for ACE kinetics determination, inhibition and binder screening.

  7. The Dynamic Nonprime Binding of Sampatrilat to the C-Domain of Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Rajni K; Espinoza-Moraga, Marlene; Poblete, Horacio; Douglas, Ross G; Sturrock, Edward D; Caballero, Julio; Chibale, Kelly

    2016-12-27

    Sampatrilat is a vasopeptidase inhibitor that inhibits both angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) and neutral endopeptidase. ACE is a zinc dipeptidyl carboxypeptidase that contains two extracellular domains (nACE and cACE). In this study the molecular basis for the selectivity of sampatrilat for nACE and cACE was investigated. Enzyme inhibition assays were performed to evaluate the in vitro ACE domain selectivity of sampatrilat. The inhibition of the C-domain (Ki = 13.8 nM) by sampatrilat was 12.4-fold more potent than that for the N-domain (171.9 nM), indicating differences in affinities for the respective ACE domain binding sites. Interestingly, replacement of the P2 group of sampatrilat with an aspartate abrogated its C-selectivity and lowered the potency of the inhibitor to activities in the micromolar range. The molecular basis for this selective profile was evaluated using molecular modeling methods. We found that the C-domain selectivity of sampatrilat is due to occupation of the lysine side chain in the S1 and S2 subsites and interactions with Glu748 and Glu1008, respectively. This study provides new insights into ligand interactions with the nonprime binding site that can be exploited for the design of domain-selective ACE inhibitors.

  8. Low doses of ethanol decrease the activity of the angiotensin-converting enzyme in the aorta of aging rats and rats treated with a nitric oxide synthase inhibitor and dexamethasone.

    PubMed

    Emel'yanov, Maksim O; Korystova, Antonina F; Kublik, Ludmila N; Levitman, Maria Kh; Shaposhnikova, Vera V; Korystov, Yuri N

    2012-01-01

    In the present study, the activity of ACE (angiotensin-converting enzyme) in the aorta of senescent rats and rats treated with the NOS (NO synthase) inhibitor L-NAME (NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester) or dexamethasone and the effect of low doses of ethanol (0.2-1.2 g/kg of body weight, daily for 8-12 days) on this activity were studied. We found that ACE activity increased with age and in response to L-NAME and dexamethasone treatment. Ethanol at a dose of 0.4 g/kg of body weight per day decreased ACE activity in the aorta of aged rats and of rats treated with L-NAME or dexamethasone to the level of activity in young control rats. The optimal ethanol dose (the dose inducing a maximum decrease in ACE activity) increased with increasing doses of dexamethasone: 0.4 g/kg of body weight per day at 30 μg of dexamethasone/kg of body weight and 0.8 g/kg of body weight per day at 100 μg of dexamethasone/kg of body weight. It was also found that optimal doses of ethanol increased the number of cells in the thymus of rats treated with dexamethasone. The optimal dose of ethanol of 0.4 g/kg of body weight per day, which induced a maximum decrease in ACE activity in rat aorta, corresponded to a dose of 30 g of ethanol/day, which, according to epidemiological data, produces a maximum decrease in the incidence of cardiovascular disease in humans. In conclusion, the decrease in ACE activity in vessels may be one of the main mechanisms of the beneficial effects of low doses of ethanol on human health.

  9. Angiotensin I-converting enzyme inhibitor derived from cross-linked oyster protein.

    PubMed

    Xie, Cheng-Liang; Kim, Jin-Soo; Ha, Jong-Myung; Choung, Se-Young; Choi, Yeung-Joon

    2014-01-01

    Following cross-linking by microbial transglutaminase, modified oyster proteins were hydrolyzed to improve inhibitory activity against angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory activity with the use of a single protease, or a combination of six proteases. The oyster hydrolysate with the lowest 50% ACE inhibitory concentration (IC50) of 0.40 mg/mL was obtained by two-step hydrolysis of the cross-linked oyster protein using Protamex and Neutrase. Five ACE inhibitory peptides were purified from the oyster hydrolysate using a multistep chromatographic procedure comprised of ion-exchange, size exclusion, and reversed-phase liquid chromatography. Their sequences were identified as TAY, VK, KY, FYN, and YA, using automated Edman degradation and mass spectrometry. These peptides were synthesized, and their IC50 values were measured to be 16.7, 29.0, 51.5, 68.2, and 93.9 μM, respectively. Toxicity of the peptides on the HepG2 cell line was not detected. The oyster hydrolysate also significantly decreased the systolic blood pressure of spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). The antihypertensive effect of the oyster hydrolysate on SHR was rapid and long-lasting, compared to commercially obtained sardine hydrolysate. These results suggest that the oyster hydrolysate could be a source of effective nutraceuticals against hypertension.

  10. Angiotensin I-Converting Enzyme Inhibitor Derived from Cross-Linked Oyster Protein

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Cheng-Liang; Kim, Jin-Soo; Ha, Jong-Myung; Choung, Se-Young

    2014-01-01

    Following cross-linking by microbial transglutaminase, modified oyster proteins were hydrolyzed to improve inhibitory activity against angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory activity with the use of a single protease, or a combination of six proteases. The oyster hydrolysate with the lowest 50% ACE inhibitory concentration (IC50) of 0.40 mg/mL was obtained by two-step hydrolysis of the cross-linked oyster protein using Protamex and Neutrase. Five ACE inhibitory peptides were purified from the oyster hydrolysate using a multistep chromatographic procedure comprised of ion-exchange, size exclusion, and reversed-phase liquid chromatography. Their sequences were identified as TAY, VK, KY, FYN, and YA, using automated Edman degradation and mass spectrometry. These peptides were synthesized, and their IC50 values were measured to be 16.7, 29.0, 51.5, 68.2, and 93.9 μM, respectively. Toxicity of the peptides on the HepG2 cell line was not detected. The oyster hydrolysate also significantly decreased the systolic blood pressure of spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). The antihypertensive effect of the oyster hydrolysate on SHR was rapid and long-lasting, compared to commercially obtained sardine hydrolysate. These results suggest that the oyster hydrolysate could be a source of effective nutraceuticals against hypertension. PMID:25140307

  11. Angiotensin converting enzyme in the brain, testis, epididymis, pituitary gland and adrenal gland

    SciTech Connect

    Strittmatter, S.M.

    1986-01-01

    (/sup 3/H)Captopril binds to angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) in rat tissue homogenates. The pharmacology, regional distribution and copurification of (/sup 3/H)captopril binding with enzymatic activity demonstrate the selectivity of (/sup 3/H)captopril labeling of ACE. (/sup 3/H)Captopril binding to purified ACE reveals differences in cationic dependence and anionic regulation between substrate catalysis and inhibitor recognition. (/sup 3/H)Captopril association with ACE is entropically driven. The selectivity of (/sup 3/H)captopril binding permits autoradiographic localization of the ACE in the brain, male reproductive system, pituitary gland and adrenal gland. In the brain, ACE is visualized in a striatonigral neuronal pathway which develops between 1 and 7 d after birth. In the male reproductive system, (/sup 3/H)captopril associated silver grains are found over spermatid heads and in the lumen of seminiferous tubules in stages I-VIII and XII-XIV. In the pituitary gland, ACE is localized to the posterior lobe and patches of the anterior lobe. The adrenal medulla contains moderate ACE levels while low levels are found in the adrenal cortex. Adrenal medullary ACE is increased after hypophysectomy and after reserpine treatment. The general of ligand binding techniques for the study of enzymes is demonstrated by the specific labeling of another enzyme, enkephaline convertase, in crude tissue homogenates by the inhibitor (/sup 3/H)GEMSA.

  12. Influence of ACE I/D Polymorphism on Circulating Levels of Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor 1, D-Dimer, Ultrasensitive C-Reactive Protein and Transforming Growth Factor β1 in Patients Undergoing Hemodialysis

    PubMed Central

    de Carvalho, Sara Santos; Simões e Silva, Ana Cristina; Sabino, Adriano de Paula; Evangelista, Fernanda Cristina Gontijo; Gomes, Karina Braga; Dusse, Luci Maria SantAna; Rios, Danyelle Romana Alves

    2016-01-01

    Background There is substantial evidence that chronic renal and cardiovascular diseases are associated with coagulation disorders, endothelial dysfunction, inflammation and fibrosis. Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Insertion/Deletion polymorphism (ACE I/D polymorphism) has also be linked to cardiovascular diseases. Therefore, this study aimed to compare plasma levels of ultrassensible C-reactive protein (usCRP), PAI-1, D-dimer and TGF-β1 in patients undergoing HD with different ACE I/D polymorphisms. Methods The study was performed in 138 patients at ESRD under hemodialysis therapy for more than six months. The patients were divided into three groups according to the genotype. Genomic DNA was extracted from blood cells (leukocytes). ACE I/D polymorphism was investigated by single polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Plasma levels of D-dimer, PAI-1 and TGF-β1 were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and the determination of plasma levels of usCRP was performed by immunonephelometry. Data were analyzed by the software SigmaStat 2.03. Results Clinical characteristics were similar in patients with these three ACE I/D polymorphisms, except for interdialytic weight gain. I allele could be associated with higher interdialytic weight gain (P = 0.017). Patients genotyped as DD and as ID had significantly higher levels of PAI-1 than those with II genotype. Other laboratory parameters did not significantly differ among the three subgroups (P = 0.033). Despite not reaching statistical significance, plasma levels of usCRP were higher in patients carrying the D allele. Conclusion ACE I/D polymorphisms could be associated with changes in the regulation of sodium, fibrinolytic system, and possibly, inflammation. Our data showed that high levels of PAI-1 are detected when D allele is present, whereas greater interdialytic gain is associated with the presence of I allele. However, further studies with different experimental designs are necessary to elucidate the

  13. ACE--Some Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Annie, Ed.; Curtin, Penelope, Ed.

    This publication contains four papers that identify issues within the adult and community education (ACE) sector. "Overview" (Annie Campbell, Peter Thomson) considers what defines ACE; who offers ACE programs; who participates in ACE programs and who does not participate; what are the barriers to participation; who is responsible for…

  14. Structural characterization of angiotensin I-converting enzyme in complex with a selenium analogue of captopril.

    PubMed

    Akif, Mohd; Masuyer, Geoffrey; Schwager, Sylva L U; Bhuyan, Bhaskar J; Mugesh, Govindasamy; Isaac, R Elwyn; Sturrock, Edward D; Acharya, K Ravi

    2011-10-01

    Human somatic angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE), a zinc-dependent dipeptidyl carboxypeptidase, is central to the regulation of the renin-angiotensin aldosterone system. It is a well-known target for combating hypertension and related cardiovascular diseases. In a recent study by Bhuyan and Mugesh [Org. Biomol. Chem. (2011) 9, 1356-1365], it was shown that the selenium analogues of captopril (a well-known clinical inhibitor of ACE) not only inhibit ACE, but also protect against peroxynitrite-mediated nitration of peptides and proteins. Here, we report the crystal structures of human testis ACE (tACE) and a homologue of ACE, known as AnCE, from Drosophila melanogaster in complex with the most promising selenium analogue of captopril (SeCap) determined at 2.4 and 2.35 Å resolution, respectively. The inhibitor binds at the active site of tACE and AnCE in an analogous fashion to that observed for captopril and provide the first examples of a protein-selenolate interaction. These new structures of tACE-SeCap and AnCE-SeCap inhibitor complexes presented here provide important information for further exploration of zinc coordinating selenium-based ACE inhibitor pharmacophores with significant antioxidant activity.

  15. Application of capillary enzyme micro-reactor in enzyme activity and inhibitors studies of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Camara, Mohamed Amara; Tian, Miaomiao; Guo, Liping; Yang, Li

    2015-05-15

    In this study, we present an on-line measurement of enzyme activity and inhibition of Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH) enzyme using capillary electrophoresis based immobilized enzyme micro-reactor (CE-based IMER). The IMER was prepared using a two-step protocol based on electrostatic assembly. The micro-reactor exhibited good stability and reproducibility for on-line assay of G6PDH enzyme. Both the activity as well as the inhibition of the G6PDH enzyme by six inhibitors, including three metals (Cu(2+), Pb(2+), Cd(2+)), vancomycin, urea and KMnO4, were investigated using on-line assay of the CE-based IMERs. The enzyme activity and inhibition kinetic constants were measured using the IMERs which were found to be consistent with those using traditional off-line enzyme assays. The kinetic mechanism of each inhibitor was also determined. The present study demonstrates the feasibility of using CE-based IMERs for rapid and efficient on-line assay of G6PDH, an important enzyme in the pentosephosphate pathway of human metabolism.

  16. The evolution of renin-angiotensin blockade: angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors as the starting point.

    PubMed

    Sica, Domenic A

    2010-04-01

    The renin-angiotensin system has been a target in the treatment of hypertension for close to three decades. Several medication classes that block specific aspects of this system have emerged as useful therapies, including angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin receptor blockers, and, most recently, direct renin inhibitors. There has been a natural history to the development of each of these three drug classes, starting with their use as antihypertensive agents; thereafter, in each case they have been employed as end-organ protective agents. To date, there has been scant evidence to favor angiotensin receptor blockers or direct renin inhibitors over angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors in treating hypertension or in affording end-organ protection; thus, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors remain the standard of care when renin-angiotensin system blockade is warranted.

  17. An additive effect of anti-PAI-1 antibody to ACE inhibitor on slowing the progression of diabetic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Gu, Chunyan; Zhang, Jiandong; Noble, Nancy A; Peng, Xiao-Rong; Huang, Yufeng

    2016-11-01

    While angiotensin II blockade slows the progression of diabetic nephropathy, current data suggest that it alone cannot stop the disease process. New therapies or drug combinations will be required to further slow or halt disease progression. Inhibition of plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 (PAI-1) aimed at enhancing ECM degradation has shown therapeutic potential in diabetic nephropathy. Here, using a mouse model of type diabetes, the maximally therapeutic dose of the PAI-1-neutralizing mouse monoclonal antibody (MEDI-579) was determined and compared with the maximally effective dose of enalapril. We then examined whether addition of MEDI-579 to enalapril would enhance the efficacy in slowing the progression of diabetic nephropathy. Untreated uninephrectomized diabetic db/db mice developed progressive albuminuria and glomerulosclerosis associated with increased expression of transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1, PAI-1, type IV collagen, and fibronectin from weeks 18 to 22, which were reduced by MEDI-579 at 3 mg/kg body wt, similar to enalapril given alone from weeks 12 to 22 Adding MEDI-579 to enalapril from weeks 18 to 22 resulted in further reduction in albuminuria and markers of renal fibrosis. Renal plasmin generation was dramatically reduced by 57% in diabetic mice, a decrease that was partially reversed by MEDI-579 or enalapril given alone but was further restored by these two treatments given in combination. Our results suggest that MEDI-579 is effective in slowing the progression of diabetic nephropathy in db/db mice and that the effect is additive to ACEI. While enalapril is renal protective, the add-on PAI-1 antibody may offer additional renoprotection in progressive diabetic nephropathy via enhancing ECM turnover.

  18. Development of inhibitors as research tools for carbohydrate-processing enzymes.

    PubMed

    Gloster, Tracey M

    2012-10-01

    Carbohydrates, which are present in all domains of life, play important roles in a host of cellular processes. These ubiquitous biomolecules form highly diverse and often complex glycan structures without the aid of a template. The carbohydrate structures are regulated solely by the location and specificity of the enzymes responsible for their synthesis and degradation. These enzymes, glycosyltransferases and glycoside hydrolases, need to be functionally well characterized in order to investigate the structure and function of glycans. The use of enzyme inhibitors, which target a particular enzyme, can significantly aid this understanding, and may also provide insights into therapeutic applications. The present article describes some of the approaches used to design and develop enzyme inhibitors as tools for investigating carbohydrate-processing enzymes.

  19. Patterns of antihypertensive use among patients in the US Department of Defense database initially prescribed an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor or calcium channel blocker.

    PubMed

    Okano, G J; Rascati, K L; Wilson, J P; Remund, D D; Grabenstein, J D; Brixner, D I

    1997-01-01

    The US Department of Defense recently assembled electronic records of outpatient prescriptions dispensed through the Uniformed Services Prescription Database Project (USPDP) going back to 1990. The objectives of this portion of a larger study were: (1) to examine longitudinally the patterns of antihypertensive drug use during the first year of therapy in patients whose initial therapy was with an angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor or a calcium channel blocker (CCB); (2) to determine continuous and noncontinuous users of antihypertensive drugs; and (3) to estimate the direct medication costs for each pattern of medication use. Filtering criteria for patient and prescription identification were developed, because the USPDP contains no records of confirmatory diagnoses of hypertension. Once data filters were implemented, information for 771 patients was analyzed. An ACE inhibitor was the initial therapy for 328 patients, accounting for 1935 antihypertensive medication prescription fills, and a CCB was the initial therapy for 443 patients, accounting for 2459 fills (including refills). Slightly more than half of the patients (n = 401, 52.0%) were classified as continuous users (> or = 80% medication-possession ratio [supply of medication in days divided by the number of days in the 12-month study period]). In the first year, 177 of these continuous users (44.1%) had no change in therapy in the first year, 49 (12.2%) had an increase in dose, 8 (2.0%) had a decrease in dose, 15 (3.7%) had a change to a different therapeutic class of antihypertensive medication, 14 (3.5%) were changed to a different medication in the same therapeutic class, 20 (5.0%) had a new medication added to the regimen, and 118 (29.4%) had complex regimens involving more than one change. For continuous users, the mean medication supply in days was 354.6, and the average time before a medication change was 152.1 days for those continuous users who had one change in therapy. The overall

  20. Action of plant proteinase inhibitors on enzymes of physiopathological importance.

    PubMed

    Oliva, Maria Luiza V; Sampaio, Misako U

    2009-09-01

    Obtained from leguminous seeds, various plant proteins inhibit animal proteinases, including human, and can be considered for the development of compounds with biological activity. Inhibitors from the Bowman-Birk and plant Kunitz-type family have been characterized by proteinase specificity, primary structure and reactive site. Our group mostly studies the genus Bauhinia, mainly the species bauhinioides, rufa, ungulata and variegata. In some species, more than one inhibitor was characterized, exhibiting different properties. Although proteins from this group share high structural similarity, they present differences in proteinase inhibition, explored in studies using diverse biological models.

  1. Systemic reduction of rice blast by inhibitors of antioxidant enzymes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Systemic acquired disease resistance (SAR) of plants may result from an oxidative burst in their tissues caused by both increased production of ROS and decreased antioxidant activity, in particular, enzymatic. Here we tested whether the exogenous inhibitors of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase...

  2. Novel concept of enzyme selective nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD)-modified inhibitors based on enzyme taxonomy from the diphosphate conformation of NAD.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Mikio; Kitagawa, Yasuyuki; Iida, Shui; Kato, Keisuke; Ono, Machiko

    2015-11-15

    The dihedral angle θ of the diphosphate part of NAD(P) were investigated to distinguish the differences in the binding-conformation of NAD(P) to enzymes and to create an enzyme taxonomy. Furthermore, new inhibitors with fixed dihedral angles showed that enzymes could recognize the differences in the dihedral angle θ. We suggest the taxonomy and the dihedral angle θ are important values for chemists to consider when designing inhibitors and drugs that target enzymes.

  3. Angiotensin Converting Enzyme Regulates Cell Proliferation and Migration

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, Clarissa Coelho; Florentino, Rodrigo Machado; França, Andressa; Matias, Eveline; Guimarães, Paola Bianchi; Batista, Carolina; Freire, Valder; Carmona, Adriana Karaoglanovic; Pesquero, João Bosco; de Paula, Ana Maria; Foureaux, Giselle; Leite, Maria de Fatima

    2016-01-01

    Background The angiotensin-I converting enzyme (ACE) plays a central role in the renin-angiotensin system, acting by converting the hormone angiotensin-I to the active peptide angiotensin-II (Ang-II). More recently, ACE was shown to act as a receptor for Ang-II, and its expression level was demonstrated to be higher in melanoma cells compared to their normal counterparts. However, the function that ACE plays as an Ang-II receptor in melanoma cells has not been defined yet. Aim Therefore, our aim was to examine the role of ACE in tumor cell proliferation and migration. Results We found that upon binding to ACE, Ang-II internalizes with a faster onset compared to the binding of Ang-II to its classical AT1 receptor. We also found that the complex Ang-II/ACE translocates to the nucleus, through a clathrin-mediated process, triggering a transient nuclear Ca2+ signal. In silico studies revealed a possible interaction site between ACE and phospholipase C (PLC), and experimental results in CHO cells, demonstrated that the β3 isoform of PLC is the one involved in the Ca2+ signals induced by Ang-II/ACE interaction. Further studies in melanoma cells (TM-5) showed that Ang-II induced cell proliferation through ACE activation, an event that could be inhibited either by ACE inhibitor (Lisinopril) or by the silencing of ACE. In addition, we found that stimulation of ACE by Ang-II caused the melanoma cells to migrate, at least in part due to decreased vinculin expression, a focal adhesion structural protein. Conclusion ACE activation regulates melanoma cell proliferation and migration. PMID:27992423

  4. Tissue-Specific Expression of Transgenic Secreted ACE in Vasculature Can Restore Normal Kidney Functions, but Not Blood Pressure, of Ace-/- Mice

    PubMed Central

    Chattopadhyay, Saurabh; Kessler, Sean P.; Colucci, Juliana Almada; Yamashita, Michifumi; Senanayake, Preenie deS; Sen, Ganes C.

    2014-01-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) regulates normal blood pressure and fluid homeostasis through its action in the renin-angiotensin-system (RAS). Ace-/- mice are smaller in size, have low blood pressure and defective kidney structure and functions. All of these defects are cured by transgenic expression of somatic ACE (sACE) in vascular endothelial cells of Ace-/- mice. sACE is expressed on the surface of vascular endothelial cells and undergoes a natural cleavage secretion process to generate a soluble form in the body fluids. Both the tissue-bound and the soluble forms of ACE are enzymatically active, and generate the vasoactive octapeptide Angiotensin II (Ang II) with equal efficiency. To assess the relative physiological roles of the secreted and the cell-bound forms of ACE, we expressed, in the vascular endothelial cells of Ace-/- mice, the ectodomain of sACE, which corresponded to only the secreted form of ACE. Our results demonstrated that the secreted form of ACE could normalize kidney functions and RAS integrity, growth and development of Ace-/- mice, but not their blood pressure. This study clearly demonstrates that the secreted form of ACE cannot replace the tissue-bound ACE for maintaining normal blood pressure; a suitable balance between the tissue-bound and the soluble forms of ACE is essential for maintaining all physiological functions of ACE. PMID:24475296

  5. Improving L-dopa therapy: the development of enzyme inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Gershanik, Oscar S

    2015-01-01

    The introduction of levodopa produced a monumental change in the treatment of Parkinson's disease (PD). Limitations in its bioavailability and tolerability led to the search for drugs that could improve its pharmacokinetics and safety profile. Dopa-decarboxylase inhibitors were the first such drugs that were developed, and their use in combination with L-dopa has become standard practice. Increasing knowledge on the metabolism of L-dopa allowed the identification of additional targets for intervention in an attempt to improve the symptomatic efficacy of L-dopa. Monoamineoxidase inhibitors, enhancing the central bioavailability of dopamine by blocking its metabolism, were the next step, and despite controversies regarding their efficacy, they have remained as valuable adjuncts to l-dopa in the treatment of PD. More recently, the introduction of potent, selective catechol-O-methyl transferase inhibitors have found their place in the therapeutic armamentarium of PD and are prescribed in combination with l-dopa to prolong the duration of its action.

  6. Fabrication of enzyme-immobilized halloysite nanotubes for affinity enrichment of lipase inhibitors from complex mixtures.

    PubMed

    Wang, Haibo; Zhao, Xiaoping; Wang, Shufang; Tao, Shan; Ai, Ni; Wang, Yi

    2015-05-01

    Lipase is the key enzyme for catalyzing triglyceride hydrolysis in vivo, and lipase inhibitors have been used in the management of obesity. We present the first report on the use of lipase-adsorbed halloysite nanotubes as an efficient medium for the selective enrichment of lipase inhibitors from natural products. A simple and rapid approach was proposed to fabricate lipase-adsorbed nanotubes through electrostatic interaction. Results showed that more than 85% lipase was adsorbed into nanotubes in 90 min, and approximately 80% of the catalytic activity was maintained compared with free lipase. The specificity and reproducibility of the proposed approach were validated by screening a known lipase inhibitor (i.e., orlistat) from a mixture that contains active and inactive compounds. Moreover, we applied this approach with high performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry technique to screen lipase inhibitors from the Magnoliae cortex extract, a medicinal plant used for treating obesity. Two novel biphenyl-type natural lipase inhibitors magnotriol A and magnaldehyde B were identified, and their IC50 values were determined as 213.03 and 96.96 μM, respectively. The ligand-enzyme interactions of magnaldehyde B were further investigated by molecular docking. Our findings proved that enzyme-adsorbed nanotube could be used as a feasible and selective affinity medium for the rapid screening of enzyme inhibitors from complex mixtures.

  7. Effect of combined ultrasonic and alkali pretreatment on enzymatic preparation of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory peptides from native collagenous materials.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuhao; Ma, Liang; Cai, Luyun; Liu, Yi; Li, Jianrong

    2017-05-01

    The combined effect of ultrasonic and alkali pretreatment for the hydrolysis of native collagenous materials and release of ACE inhibitory peptides was investigated. The ultrasonic and alkali pretreatment of pig skin could accelerate the release of the ACE inhibitory peptides from the triple helix of collagen in early stages of hydrolysis. Furthermore, the pretreatment could also accelerate collapse of the triple helix and release more ACE inhibitory peptides during hydrolysis than collagen samples left untreated. Compared to untreated and alkali pretreated samples, the ultrasonic and alkali pretreatment could decrease the thermostability of pig skin significantly (P<0.05) because the ultrasonic and alkali pretreatment could weaken hydrogen bonds and break parts of covalent bonds in collagen, leading to damage of the triple helical structure in collagen. Therefore, the ultrasonic and alkali pretreatment could damage the triple helical structure of collagen in native collagenous materials and expose more inner sites for subsequent hydrolysis, and it could be a potential way to prepare ACE inhibitory peptides effectively from collagen-rich raw material.

  8. Structure-Based Inhibitor Design for an Enzyme That Binds Different Steriods

    SciTech Connect

    Qiu,W.; Zhou, M.; Mazumdar, M.; Azzi, A.; Ghanmi, D.; Luu-The, V.; Labrie, F.; Lin, S.

    2007-01-01

    Human type 5 17{beta}-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase plays a crucial role in local androgen formation in prostate tissue. Several chemicals were synthesized and tested for their ability to inhibit this enzyme, and a series of estradiol derivatives bearing a lactone on the D-ring were found to inhibit its activity efficiently. The crystal structure of the type 5 enzyme in complex with NADP and such a novel inhibitor, EM1404, was determined to a resolution of 1.30 {angstrom}. Significantly more hydrogen bonding and hydrophobic interactions were defined between EM1404 and the enzyme than in the substrate ternary complex. The lactone ring of EM1404 accounts for important interactions with the enzyme, whereas the amide group at the opposite end of the inhibitor contributes to the stability of three protein loops involved in the construction of the substrate binding site. EM1404 has a strong competitive inhibition, with a K{sub i} of 6.9 {+-} 1.4 nM, demonstrating 40 times higher affinity than that of the best inhibitor previously reported. This is observed despite the fact that the inhibitor occupies only part of the binding cavity. Attempts to soak the inhibitor into crystals of the binary complex with NADP were unsuccessful, yielding a structure with a polyethylene glycol fragment occupying the substrate binding site. The relative crystal packing is discussed. Combined studies of small molecule inhibitor synthesis, x-ray crystallography, enzyme inhibition, and molecular modeling make it possible to analyze the plasticity of the substrate binding site of the enzyme, which is essential for developing more potent and specific inhibitors for hormone-dependent cancer therapy.

  9. Comprehensive Database Service : ACE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiroki, Morio; Abe, Tetsuya

    The Data base, ACE commercialized by Chunichi Shimbun in Feb. 1986, aims at covering not only newspaper articles but also the other information which composes different data bases. This paper introduces newspaper articles, new material information and character information which are included in ACE. The content of ACE, how to use the online service, and future subjects are described.

  10. Computational design of a protein-based enzyme inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Procko, Erik; Hedman, Rickard; Hamilton, Keith; Seetharaman, Jayaraman; Fleishman, Sarel J.; Su, Min; Aramini, James; Kornhaber, Gregory; Hunt, John F.; Tong, Liang; Montelione, Gaetano T.; Baker, David

    2013-01-01

    While there has been considerable progress in designing protein-protein interactions, the design of proteins that bind polar surfaces is an unmet challenge. We describe the computational design of a protein that binds the acidic active site of hen egg lysozyme and inhibits the enzyme. The design process starts with two polar amino acids that fit deep into the enzyme active site, identifies a protein scaffold that supports these residues and is complementary in shape to the lysozyme active site region, and finally optimizes the surrounding contact surface for high affinity binding. Following affinity maturation, a protein designed using this method bound lysozyme with low nanomolar affinity, and a combination of NMR studies, crystallography and knockout mutagenesis confirmed the designed binding surface and orientation. Saturation mutagenesis with selection and deep sequencing demonstrated that specific designed interactions extending well beyond the centrally grafted polar residues are critical for high affinity binding. PMID:23827138

  11. Computational design of a protein-based enzyme inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Procko, Erik; Hedman, Rickard; Hamilton, Keith; Seetharaman, Jayaraman; Fleishman, Sarel J; Su, Min; Aramini, James; Kornhaber, Gregory; Hunt, John F; Tong, Liang; Montelione, Gaetano T; Baker, David

    2013-09-23

    While there has been considerable progress in designing protein-protein interactions, the design of proteins that bind polar surfaces is an unmet challenge. We describe the computational design of a protein that binds the acidic active site of hen egg lysozyme and inhibits the enzyme. The design process starts with two polar amino acids that fit deep into the enzyme active site, identifies a protein scaffold that supports these residues and is complementary in shape to the lysozyme active-site region, and finally optimizes the surrounding contact surface for high-affinity binding. Following affinity maturation, a protein designed using this method bound lysozyme with low nanomolar affinity, and a combination of NMR studies, crystallography, and knockout mutagenesis confirmed the designed binding surface and orientation. Saturation mutagenesis with selection and deep sequencing demonstrated that specific designed interactions extending well beyond the centrally grafted polar residues are critical for high-affinity binding.

  12. Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibition in myocardial infarction--Part 1: Clinical data.

    PubMed

    Huckell, V F; Bernstein, V; Cairns, J A; Crowell, R; Dagenais, G R; Higginson, L A; Isserow, S; Laramée, P; Liu, P; McCans, J L; Orchard, R C; Prewitt, R; Quinn, B P; Samson, M; Turazza, F; Warnica, J W; Wielgosz, A

    1997-02-01

    There is an increasing body of clinical trial evidence to support the use of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors in the management of patients following myocardial infarction (MI). Enthusiasm for the use of ACE inhibitors in the acute phase of MI had previously been tempered by the adverse results of an early trial. However, exciting new information is available from several large, randomized studies that has not only quelled those initial concerns but also attests to the efficacy of using this class of medication in the first 24 h after an acute MI. A Canadian National Opinion Leader Symposium was held in November 1995 to review the results of the major ACE inhibitor clinical trials and to discuss key issues and controversies surrounding their use in acute MI. The focus of this paper, the first of two parts, is on the results of the major ACE inhibitor clinical trials.

  13. Design, synthesis and biological activity of novel non-peptidyl endothelin converting enzyme inhibitors, 1-phenyl-tetrazole-formazan analogues.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Kazuto; Hasegawa, Hirohiko; Umekawa, Kayo; Ueki, Yasuyuki; Ohashi, Naohito; Kanaoka, Masaharu

    2002-05-06

    A novel non-peptidyl endothelin converting enzyme inhibitor was obtained through a pharmacophore analysis of known inhibitors and three-dimensional structure database search. Analogues of the new inhibitor were designed using the structure-activity relationship of known inhibitors and synthesized. In anesthetized rats, intraperitoneal administration of the analogues suppressed the pressor responses induced by big endothelin-1.

  14. Is there any difference between angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin receptor blockers for heart failure?

    PubMed

    Rain, Carmen; Rada, Gabriel

    2015-07-06

    Angiotensin receptor blockers are usually considered as equivalent to angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors for patients with heart failure and low-ejection fraction. Some guidelines even recommend the former as first line treatment given their better adverse effects profile. Searching in Epistemonikos database, which is maintained by screening 30 databases, we identified four systematic reviews including eight pertinent randomized controlled trials. We combined the evidence using meta-analysis and generated a summary of findings following the GRADE approach. We concluded angiotensin receptor blockers and angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors probably have a similar effect on mortality, and they might be equivalent in reducing hospitalization risk too. Treatment withdrawal due to adverse effects is probably lower with angiotensin receptor blockers than with angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors.

  15. MEROPS: the database of proteolytic enzymes, their substrates and inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Rawlings, Neil D.; Waller, Matthew; Barrett, Alan J.; Bateman, Alex

    2014-01-01

    Peptidases, their substrates and inhibitors are of great relevance to biology, medicine and biotechnology. The MEROPS database (http://merops.sanger.ac.uk) aims to fulfill the need for an integrated source of information about these. The database has hierarchical classifications in which homologous sets of peptidases and protein inhibitors are grouped into protein species, which are grouped into families, which are in turn grouped into clans. Recent developments include the following. A community annotation project has been instigated in which acknowledged experts are invited to contribute summaries for peptidases. Software has been written to provide an Internet-based data entry form. Contributors are acknowledged on the relevant web page. A new display showing the intron/exon structures of eukaryote peptidase genes and the phasing of the junctions has been implemented. It is now possible to filter the list of peptidases from a completely sequenced bacterial genome for a particular strain of the organism. The MEROPS filing pipeline has been altered to circumvent the restrictions imposed on non-interactive blastp searches, and a HMMER search using specially generated alignments to maximize the distribution of organisms returned in the search results has been added. PMID:24157837

  16. Identification of quinazolinyloxy biaryl urea as a new class of SUMO activating enzyme 1 inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ashutosh; Ito, Akihiro; Hirohama, Mikako; Yoshida, Minoru; Zhang, Kam Y J

    2013-09-15

    SUMO activating enzyme 1 (SUMO E1) is the first enzyme in sumoylation pathway and an important cancer drug target. However, only a few inhibitors were reported up to now that includes three natural products, semi-synthetic protein inhibitors and one AMP mimic. Here, we report the identification of quinazolinyloxy biaryl urea as a new class of SUMO E1 inhibitors. The most active compound of this class inhibited the in vitro sumoylation with an IC50 of 13.4 μM. This compound inhibits sumoylation by blocking the formation of SUMOE1-SUMO thioester intermediate. The biological activity of the most active compound is comparable to previously reported inhibitors with properties suitable for medicinal chemistry optimization for potency and druggability.

  17. Selective inhibitors of digestive enzymes from Aedes aegypti larvae identified by phage display.

    PubMed

    Soares, Tatiane Sanches; Soares Torquato, Ricardo Jose; Alves Lemos, Francisco Jose; Tanaka, Aparecida Sadae

    2013-01-01

    Dengue is a serious disease transmitted by the mosquito Aedes aegypti during blood meal feeding. It is estimated that the dengue virus is transmitted to millions of individuals each year in tropical and subtropical areas. Dengue control strategies have been based on controlling the vector, Ae. aegypti, using insecticide, but the emergence of resistance poses new challenges. The aim of this study was the identification of specific protease inhibitors of the digestive enzymes from Ae. aegypti larvae, which may serve as a prospective alternative biocontrol method. High affinity protein inhibitors were selected by all of the digestive serine proteases of the 4th instar larval midgut, and the specificity of these inhibitors was characterized. These inhibitors were obtained from a phage library displaying variants of HiTI, a trypsin inhibitor from Haematobia irritans, that are mutated in the reactive loop (P1-P4'). Based on the selected amino acid sequence pattern, seven HiTI inhibitor variants were cloned, expressed and purified. The results indicate that the HiTI variants named T6 (RGGAV) and T128 (WNEGL) were selected by larval trypsin-like (IC(50) of 1.1 nM) and chymotrypsin-like enzymes (IC(50) of 11.6 nM), respectively. The variants T23 (LLGGL) and T149 (GGVWR) inhibited both larval chymotrypsin-like (IC(50) of 4.2 nM and 29.0 nM, respectively) and elastase-like enzymes (IC(50) of 1.2 nM for both). Specific inhibitors were successfully obtained for the digestive enzymes of Ae. aegypti larvae by phage display. Our data also strongly suggest the presence of elastase-like enzymes in Ae. aegypti larvae. The HiTI variants T6 and T23 are good candidates for the development as a larvicide to control the vector.

  18. Structure-based repurposing of FDA-approved drugs as inhibitors of NEDD8-activating enzyme.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Hai-Jing; Liu, Li-Juan; Chan, Daniel Shiu-Hin; Wang, Hui-Min; Chan, Philip Wai Hong; Ma, Dik-Lung; Leung, Chung-Hang

    2014-07-01

    We report the discovery of an inhibitor of NEDD8-activating enzyme (NAE) by an integrated virtual screening approach. Piperacillin 1 inhibited NAE activity in cell-free and cell-based systems with high selectivity. Furthermore, piperacillin 1 was able to inhibit the degradation of the NAE downstream protein substrate p27(kip1). Our molecular modeling and kinetic studies suggested that this compound may act as a non-covalent ATP-competitive inhibitor of NAE.

  19. Assessment of 105 Patients with Angiotensin Converting Enzyme-Inhibitor Induced Angioedema

    PubMed Central

    von Buchwald, Christian; Prasad, Sumangali Chandra; Kamaleswaran, Shailajah; Ajgeiy, Kawa Khaled; Authried, Georg; Pallesen, Kristine Appel U.

    2017-01-01

    Objective. To asses a cohort of 105 consecutive patients with angiotensin converting enzyme-inhibitor induced angioedema with regard to demographics, risk factors, family history of angioedema, hospitalization, airway management, outcome, and use of diagnostic codes used for the condition. Study Design. Cohort study. Methods. This was a retrospective cohort study of 105 patients with angiotensin converting enzyme-inhibitor induced angioedema in the period 1995–2014. Results. The cohort consisted of 67 females and 38 males (F : M ratio 1.8), with a mean age of 63 [range 26–86] years. Female gender was associated with a significantly higher risk of angiotensin converting enzyme-inhibitor induced angioedema. 6.7% had a positive family history of angioedema. Diabetes seemed to be a protective factor with regard to angioedema. 95% experienced angioedema of the head and neck. 4.7% needed intubation or tracheostomy. 74 admissions took place during the study period with a total of 143 days spent in the hospital. The diagnosis codes most often used for this condition were “DT783 Quincke's oedema” and “DT78.4 Allergy unspecified”. Complement C1 inhibitor was normal in all tested patients. Conclusion. Female gender predisposes to angiotensin converting enzyme-inhibitor induced angioedema, whereas diabetes seems to be a protective factor. PMID:28286522

  20. Selective Targeting of Extracellular Insulin-Degrading Enzyme by Quasi-Irreversible Thiol-Modifying Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Abdul-Hay, Samer O; Bannister, Thomas D; Wang, Hui; Cameron, Michael D; Caulfield, Thomas R; Masson, Amandine; Bertrand, Juliette; Howard, Erin A; McGuire, Michael P; Crisafulli, Umberto; Rosenberry, Terrone R; Topper, Caitlyn L; Thompson, Caroline R; Schürer, Stephan C; Madoux, Franck; Hodder, Peter; Leissring, Malcolm A

    2015-12-18

    Many therapeutically important enzymes are present in multiple cellular compartments, where they can carry out markedly different functions; thus, there is a need for pharmacological strategies to selectively manipulate distinct pools of target enzymes. Insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE) is a thiol-sensitive zinc-metallopeptidase that hydrolyzes diverse peptide substrates in both the cytosol and the extracellular space, but current genetic and pharmacological approaches are incapable of selectively inhibiting the protease in specific subcellular compartments. Here, we describe the discovery, characterization, and kinetics-based optimization of potent benzoisothiazolone-based inhibitors that, by virtue of a unique quasi-irreversible mode of inhibition, exclusively inhibit extracellular IDE. The mechanism of inhibition involves nucleophilic attack by a specific active-site thiol of the enzyme on the inhibitors, which bear an isothiazolone ring that undergoes irreversible ring opening with the formation of a disulfide bond. Notably, binding of the inhibitors is reversible under reducing conditions, thus restricting inhibition to IDE present in the extracellular space. The identified inhibitors are highly potent (IC50(app) = 63 nM), nontoxic at concentrations up to 100 μM, and appear to preferentially target a specific cysteine residue within IDE. These novel inhibitors represent powerful new tools for clarifying the physiological and pathophysiological roles of this poorly understood protease, and their unusual mechanism of action should be applicable to other therapeutic targets.

  1. Discovery of novel bacterial elongation condensing enzyme inhibitors by virtual screening.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Zhong; Parsons, Joshua B; Tangallapally, Rajendra; Zhang, Weixing; Rock, Charles O; Lee, Richard E

    2014-06-01

    The elongation condensing enzymes in the bacterial fatty acid biosynthesis pathway represent desirable targets for the design of novel, broad-spectrum antimicrobial agents. A series of substituted benzoxazolinones was identified in this study as a novel class of elongation condensing enzyme (FabB and FabF) inhibitors using a two-step virtual screening approach. Structure activity relationships were developed around the benzoxazolinone scaffold showing that N-substituted benzoxazolinones were most active. The benzoxazolinone scaffold has high chemical tractability making this chemotype suitable for further development of bacterial fatty acid synthesis inhibitors.

  2. Role of Genetic Polymorphism of Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme, Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1 and Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase in the Prognosis of Coronary Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ai Yuan; Ji, Xiang Wu; Zhang, Ai Juan; Guan, Li Xue; Huang, Jing; Wang, Jing Xian

    2010-01-01

    Background This study was to investigate the effects of multiple genetic polymorphisms and conventional risk factors in the prognosis of coronary artery disease (CAD). Methods One hundred and fifty five patients with CAD were prospectively recruited, they were subgrouped as single vessel disease (SVD) and multiple vessel disease (MVD). All patients were detected I/D polymorphism of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) gene, 4G/5G polymorphism of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) gene, and G894→T mutation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) gene. The patients were followed up for 10-65 months, mean 35 months. End points were major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE), including angina, myocardial infarction, and cardiac sudden death. Results During the follow-up period, MACE developed in 81 patients, 73 patients with angina, seven with myocardial infarction, and one with cardiac sudden death. CAD patients with MVD were more probable of developing MACE during follow-up. Distribution of PAI-1 gene polymorphism was significantly different between SVD and MVD patients, p < 0.001. The frequency of DD genotype of ACE and 4G/4G genotype of PAI-1 in patients with MACE were significantly higher than those in patients without MACE, p < 0.001 and p = 0.002, respectively. Incidence of diabetes mellitus was significantly higher in patients with MACE than in patients without MACE, P = 0.03. Cox regression analysis showed that diabetes mellitus (HR 2.36, 95% CI 1.33-4.46, p = 0.003), 4G/4G polymorphism of PAI-1 gene (HR 3.45, 95% CI 1.71-6.56, p = 0.009), and D/D polymorphism of ACE gene (HR 2.99, 95% CI 1.84-5.76, p = 0.005), were independent predictors of the MACE. Conclusions Our results showed that the conventional risk factors and genetic polymorphisms have significant influence on prognosis of CAD patients. CAD patients with diabetes mellitus, DD genotype of ACE, and 4G/4G genotype of PAI-1 suggested poor prognosis.

  3. Discovery of Potent Inhibitors of Schistosoma mansoni NAD⁺ Catabolizing Enzyme.

    PubMed

    Jacques, Sylvain A; Kuhn, Isabelle; Koniev, Oleksandr; Schuber, Francis; Lund, Frances E; Wagner, Alain; Muller-Steffner, Hélène; Kellenberger, Esther

    2015-04-23

    The blood fluke Schistosoma mansoni is the causative agent of the intestinal form of schistosomiasis (or bilharzia). Emergence of Schistosoma mansoni with reduced sensitivity to praziquantel, the drug currently used to treat this neglected disease, has underlined the need for development of new strategies to control schistosomiasis. Our ability to screen drug libraries for antischistosomal compounds has been hampered by the lack of validated S. mansoni targets. In the present work, we describe a virtual screening approach to identify inhibitors of S. mansoni NAD(+) catabolizing enzyme (SmNACE), a receptor enzyme suspected to be involved in immune evasion by the parasite at the adult stage. Docking of commercial libraries into a homology model of the enzyme has led to the discovery of two in vitro micromolar inhibitors. Further structure-activity relationship studies have allowed a 3-log gain in potency, accompanied by a largely enhanced selectivity for the parasitic enzyme over the human homologue CD38.

  4. "Mixed inhibitor-prodrug" as a new approach toward systemically active inhibitors of enkephalin-degrading enzymes.

    PubMed

    Fournié-Zaluski, M C; Coric, P; Turcaud, S; Lucas, E; Noble, F; Maldonado, R; Roques, B P

    1992-06-26

    In order to evaluate the possible advantages of potentiating the effects of the endogenous enkephalins, to obtain analgesia without the serious drawbacks of morphine, it was essential to design systemically active compounds which inhibit the two metabolizing enzymes, aminopeptidase N (APN) and neutral endopeptidase 24.11 (NEP). A new concept combining the idea of "prodrug" and "mixed inhibitor" was therefore developed. Given the high efficiency of beta-mercaptoalkylamines as APN inhibitors and of N-(mercaptoacyl) amino acids as NEP inhibitors, compounds associating these molecules through disulfide or thioester bonds, which are known to increase lipophilicity and to favor passage across the blood-brain barrier, have been synthesized. An HPLC study indicated that the disulfide bridge was resistant to serum enzymes but was cleaved by brain membrane homogenates, suggesting that the active inhibitors were released in the central nervous system. The validity of the approach was verified by the efficient antinociceptive responses obtained in the hot plate test in mice after iv administration of disulfide-containing inhibitors (ED50s of from 4 to 26 mg/kg on the jump latency time). The analgesic potencies of the "mixed inhibitor-prodrug" RB 101 [H2NCH(CH2CH2SCH3)CH2SSCH2CH(CH2Ph)CONHCH( CH2Ph)COOCH2Ph] after iv administration were three times greater than those of a similar combined dose of its two constitutive moieties. The separation of the two diastereoisomers constituting RB 101 showed that the analgesia has a stereochemical dependence, the (S,S,S)-isomer being more active than the (S,R,S)-isomer. Furthermore, in the tail flick test in the rat, RB 101 gave 38% analgesia at a dose of 80 mg/kg. Due to its high efficiency and its longer pharmacological effect, RB 101 was selected for a complete study of its analgesic properties.

  5. Effects of a novel ACE inhibitor, 3-(3-thienyl)-l-alanyl-ornithyl-proline, on endothelial vasodilation and hepatotoxicity in l-NAME-induced hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Seth, Mahesh Kumar; Hussain, M Ejaz; Pasha, Santosh; Fahim, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a widespread biological mediator involved in many physiological and pathological processes, eg, in the regulation of vascular tone and hypertension. Chronic inhibition of NO synthase by N(G)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (l-NAME) hydrochloride results in the development of hypertension accompanied by an increase in vascular responsiveness to adrenergic stimuli. Recently, we developed a novel sulfur-containing angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor: 3-(3-thienyl)-l-alanyl-ornithyl-proline (TOP). Our previous studies indicated a superior nature of the molecule as an antihypertensive agent in spontaneously hypertensive rats (showing the involvement of renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system) in comparison to captopril. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of TOP on NO pathway in l-NAME-induced hypertensive rats, and captopril was included as the standard treatment group. Treatment with both TOP (20 mg/kg) and captopril (40 mg/kg) prevented the development of hypertension in l-NAME model, but TOP showed better restoration of NO and normal levels of angiotensin-converting enzyme. In addition, in vitro vasorelaxation assay showed an improvement in endothelium-dependent vasodilation in both the cases. Further, the biochemical (malondialdehyde, alanine aminotransferase, and aspartate aminotransferase) and the histopathological effects of TOP on rat liver tissues revealed a protective nature of TOP in comparison to captopril in the l-NAME model. In conclusion, TOP at 50% lesser dose than captopril was found to be better in the l-NAME model.

  6. Angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin receptor blockers in the treatment of hypertension: should they be used together?

    PubMed

    Verdecchia, Paolo; Angeli, Fabio; Mazzotta, Giovanni; Ambrosio, Giuseppe; Reboldi, Gianpaolo

    2010-11-01

    The combined use of angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs) and angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) poses a dilemma to clinicians. On the one hand, indirect evidence from compelling, but still surrogate outcome measures such as blood pressure and proteinuria suggest some merits of this combination. On the other hand, the outcome benefits of the ACEIs+ARBs combination in morbidity/mortality trials remain confined to patients with severe congestive heart failure (CHF) and reduced ejection fraction. Incidentally, most of the benefit offered by the ACEIs+ARBs combination in these patients was not driven by mortality, but by fewer rehospitalizations for CHF. Even in patients with renal disease and proteinuria, the combined use of ACEIs and ARBs, although highly effective in reducing urinary protein excretion, has not yet been proven to significantly delay end-stage renal disease and the need for dialysis. In the Ongoing Telmisartan Alone and In Combination With Ramipril Global Endpoint Trial (ONTARGET), the dual blockade of the renin angiotensin system did not produce additional outcome benefit over that afforded by ACE inhibition alone. Notably, however, patients with BP >160/100 mmHg at entry were excluded from ONTARGET, thus limiting the applicability of these results to the treatment of hypertension. The European Society of Hypertension guidelines do not suggest large-scale use of the ACEIs+ARBs combination in patients with hypertension. However, patients with resistant hypertension, particularly if proteinuria coexists, could benefit from this combination, which however requires close monitoring for adverse events, including hyperkalemia and worsening renal function.

  7. Effects of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor, captopril, on bone of mice with streptozotocin-induced type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Diao, Teng-Yue; Pan, Hai; Gu, Sa-Sa; Chen, Xi; Zhang, Fang-Yi; Wong, Man-Sau; Zhang, Yan

    2014-05-01

    There are contradictory results about the effect of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs) on bone. This study was performed to address the skeletal renin-angiotensin system (RAS) activity and the effects of the ACEI, captopril, on the bone of streptozotocin-induced type 1 diabetic mice. Histochemical assessment on bone paraffin sections was conducted by Safranin O staining and tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase staining. Micro-computed tomography was performed to analyze bone biological parameters. Gene and protein expression were determined by real-time polymerase chain reaction and immunoblotting, respectively. Type 1 diabetic mice displayed osteopenia phenotype and captopril treatment showed no osteoprotective effects in diabetic mice as shown by the reduction of bone mineral density, trabecular thickness and bone volume/total volume. The mRNA expression of ACE and renin receptor, and the protein expression of renin and angiotensin II were markedly up-regulated in the bone of vehicle-treated diabetic mice compared to those of non-diabetic mice, and these molecular changes of skeletal RAS components were effectively inhibited by treatment with captopril. However, treatment with captopril significantly elevated serum tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase 5b levels, reduced the ratio of osteoprotegerin/receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand expression, increased carbonic anhydrase II mRNA expression and the number of matured osteoclasts and decreased transforming growth factor-β and osteocalcin mRNA expression in the tibia compared to those of diabetic mice. The present study demonstrated that the use of the ACEI, captopril, has no beneficial effect on the skeletal biological properties of diabetic mice. However, this could be attributed, at least partially, to its suppression of osteogenesis and stimulation of osteoclastogenesis, even though it could effectively inhibit high activity of local RAS in the bone of diabetic mice.

  8. Role of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor, lisinopril, on spermatozoal functions in rats.

    PubMed

    Saha, L; Garg, S K; Bhargava, V K; Mazumdar, S

    2000-04-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme is present in the male reproductive system but its role in the physiology of reproduction is not known. To see the effect of angiotensin-converting enzyme on spermatozoal functions, lisinopril, an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor, was administered orally using two different doses (10 and 20 mg/kg/day) to rats. Both short-term (2 weeks) and long-term (6 weeks) effects of the drug were observed. Lisinopril treatment resulted in a marked decrease in sperm density, sperm motility and zona pellucida penetration. Acrosome reaction by spermatozoa obtained from drug-treated animals was significantly lower when compared with spermatozoa from normal animals.

  9. Structural Characterization of Inhibitors with Selectivity against Members of a Homologous Enzyme Family

    SciTech Connect

    Pavlovsky, Alexander G.; Liu, Xuying; Faehnle, Christopher R.; Potente, Nina; Viola, Ronald E.

    2013-01-31

    The aspartate biosynthetic pathway provides essential metabolites for many important biological functions, including the production of four essential amino acids. As this critical pathway is only present in plants and microbes, any disruptions will be fatal to these organisms. An early pathway enzyme, L-aspartate-{beta}-semialdehyde dehydrogenase, produces a key intermediate at the first branch point of this pathway. Developing potent and selective inhibitors against several orthologs in the L-aspartate-{beta}-semialdehyde dehydrogenase family can serve as lead compounds for antibiotic development. Kinetic studies of two small molecule fragment libraries have identified inhibitors that show good selectivity against L-aspartate-{beta}-semialdehyde dehydrogenases from two different bacterial species, Streptococcus pneumoniae and Vibrio cholerae, despite the presence of an identical constellation of active site amino acids in this homologous enzyme family. Structural characterization of enzyme-inhibitor complexes have elucidated different modes of binding between these structurally related enzymes. This information provides the basis for a structure-guided approach to the development of more potent and more selective inhibitors.

  10. Multivalent inhibitors for carbohydrate-processing enzymes: beyond the "lock-and-key" concept.

    PubMed

    Gouin, Sébastien G

    2014-09-08

    During the last decades, tremendous chemical efforts have been dedicated to design monovalent inhibitors of carbohydrate-processing enzymes, with comparatively few rewards in terms of marketed drugs. Recently, an alternative to the traditional "lock and key" approach has emerged. Multivalency, a widely used strategy for lectin inhibition, has been successfully applied to specific glycosidases and glycosyltransferases.

  11. Structural characterization of inhibitors with selectivity against members of a homologous enzyme family.

    PubMed

    Pavlovsky, Alexander G; Liu, Xuying; Faehnle, Christopher R; Potente, Nina; Viola, Ronald E

    2012-01-01

    The aspartate biosynthetic pathway provides essential metabolites for many important biological functions, including the production of four essential amino acids. As this critical pathway is only present in plants and microbes, any disruptions will be fatal to these organisms. An early pathway enzyme, l-aspartate-β-semialdehyde dehydrogenase, produces a key intermediate at the first branch point of this pathway. Developing potent and selective inhibitors against several orthologs in the l-aspartate-β-semialdehyde dehydrogenase family can serve as lead compounds for antibiotic development. Kinetic studies of two small molecule fragment libraries have identified inhibitors that show good selectivity against l-aspartate-β-semialdehyde dehydrogenases from two different bacterial species, Streptococcus pneumoniae and Vibrio cholerae, despite the presence of an identical constellation of active site amino acids in this homologous enzyme family. Structural characterization of enzyme-inhibitor complexes have elucidated different modes of binding between these structurally related enzymes. This information provides the basis for a structure-guided approach to the development of more potent and more selective inhibitors.

  12. Inhibition of MAPK-mediated ACE expression by compound C66 prevents STZ-induced diabetic nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Pan, Yong; Huang, Yi; Wang, Zhe; Fang, Qilu; Sun, Yusheng; Tong, Chao; Peng, Kesong; Wang, Yangwei; Miao, Lining; Cai, Lu; Zhao, Yunjie; Liang, Guang

    2014-02-01

    A range of in vitro, experimental and clinical intervention studies have implicated an important role for hyperglycaemia-induced activation of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) in the development and progression of diabetic nephropathy (DN). Blockade of RAS by angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors is an effective strategy in treating diabetic kidney diseases. However, few studies demonstrate the mechanism by which hyperglycaemia up-regulates the expression of ACE gene. Our previous studies have identified a novel curcumin analogue, (2E,6E)-2,6-bis(2-(trifluoromethyl)benzylidene)cyclohexanone (C66), which could inhibit the high glucose (HG)-induced phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinases in mouse macrophages. In this study, we found that the renal protection of C66 in diabetic mice was associated with mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) inactivation and ACE/angiotensin II (Ang II) down-regulation. Generally, MAPKs have been considered as a downstream signalling of Ang II and a mediator for Ang II-induced pathophysiological actions. However, using C66 and specific inhibitors as small molecule probes, in vitro experiments demonstrate that the MAPK signalling pathway regulates ACE expression under HG stimulation, which contributes to renal Ang II activation and the development of DN. This study indicates that C66 is a potential candidate of DN therapeutic agents, and more importantly, that reduction in ACE expression by MAPKs inhibition seems to be an alternative strategy for the treatment of DN.

  13. A High-Throughput Screening Method for Identification of Inhibitors of the Deubiquitinating Enzyme USP14

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Byung-Hoon; Finley, Daniel; King, Randall W.

    2013-01-01

    Deubiquitinating enzymes (DUBs) reverse the process of ubiquitination, and number nearly 100 in humans. In principle, DUBs represent promising drug targets, as several of the enzymes have been implicated in human diseases. The isopeptidase activity of DUBs can be selectively inhibited by targeting the catalytic site with drug-like compounds. Notably, the mammalian 26S proteasome is associated with three major DUBs: RPN11, UCH37 and USP14. Because the ubiquitin ‘chain-trimming’ activity of USP14 can inhibit proteasome function, inhibitors of USP14 can stimulate proteasomal degradation. We recently established a high-throughput screening (HTS) method to discover small-molecule inhibitors specific for USP14. The protocols in this article cover the necessary procedures for preparing assay reagents, performing HTS for USP14 inhibitors, and carrying out post-HTS analysis. PMID:23788557

  14. Insights on Cytochrome P450 Enzymes and Inhibitors Obtained Through QSAR Studies

    PubMed Central

    Sridhar, Jayalakshmi; Liu, Jiawang; Foroozesh, Maryam; Stevens, Cheryl L. Klein

    2013-01-01

    The cytochrome P450 (CYP) superfamily of heme enzymes play an important role in the metabolism of a large number of endogenous and exogenous compounds, including most of the drugs currently on the market. Inhibitors of CYP enzymes have important roles in the treatment of several disease conditions such as numerous cancers and fungal infections in addition to their critical role in drug-drug interactions. Structure activity relationships (SAR), and three-dimensional quantitative structure activity relationships (3D-QSAR) represent important tools in understanding the interactions of the inhibitors with the active sites of the CYP enzymes. A comprehensive account of the QSAR studies on the major human CYPs 1A1, 1A2, 1B1, 2A6, 2B6, 2C9, 2C19, 2D6, 2E1, 3A4 and a few other CYPs are detailed in this review which will provide us with an insight into the individual/common characteristics of the active sites of these enzymes and the enzyme-inhibitor interactions. PMID:22864238

  15. Reporter enzyme inhibitor study to aid assembly of orthogonal reporter gene assays.

    PubMed

    Ho, Pei-i; Yue, Kimberley; Pandey, Pramod; Breault, Lyne; Harbinski, Fred; McBride, Aaron J; Webb, Brian; Narahari, Janaki; Karassina, Natasha; Wood, Keith V; Hill, Adam; Auld, Douglas S

    2013-05-17

    Reporter gene assays (RGAs) are commonly used to measure biological pathway modulation by small molecules. Understanding how such compounds interact with the reporter enzyme is critical to accurately interpret RGA results. To improve our understanding of reporter enzymes and to develop optimal RGA systems, we investigated eight reporter enzymes differing in brightness, emission spectrum, stability, and substrate requirements. These included common reporter enzymes such as firefly luciferase (Photinus pyralis), Renilla reniformis luciferase, and β-lactamase, as well as mutated forms of R. reniformis luciferase emitting either blue- or green-shifted luminescence, a red-light emitting form of Luciola cruciata firefly luciferase, a mutated form of Gaussia princeps luciferase, and a proprietary luciferase termed "NanoLuc" derived from the luminescent sea shrimp Oplophorus gracilirostris. To determine hit rates and structure-activity relationships, we screened a collection of 42,460 PubChem compounds at 10 μM using purified enzyme preparations. We then compared hit rates and chemotypes of actives for each enzyme. The hit rates ranged from <0.1% for β-lactamase to as high as 10% for mutated forms of Renilla luciferase. Related luciferases such as Renilla luciferase mutants showed high degrees of inhibitor overlap (40-70%), while unrelated luciferases such as firefly luciferases, Gaussia luciferase, and NanoLuc showed <10% overlap. Examination of representative inhibitors in cell-based assays revealed that inhibitor-based enzyme stabilization can lead to increases in bioluminescent signal for firefly luciferase, Renilla luciferase, and NanoLuc, with shorter half-life reporters showing increased activation responses. From this study we suggest strategies to improve the construction and interpretation of assays employing these reporter enzymes.

  16. Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibition reduces food intake and weight gain and improves glucose tolerance in melanocortin-4 receptor deficient female rats.

    PubMed

    Mul, Joram D; Seeley, Randy J; Woods, Stephen C; Begg, Denovan P

    2013-09-10

    Functional loss of melanocortin-4 receptor (MC4R) activity leads to hyperphagia and an obese, glucose intolerant phenotype. We have previously established that inhibition of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) reduces food intake, body weight and glucose homeostasis in diet-induced obesity. The current study assessed the effect of ACE inhibitor treatment in MC4R-deficient female rats on body weight, adiposity and glucose tolerance. Rats homozygous (HOM) for a loss of function Mc4r mutation had an obese phenotype relative to their wildtype (WT) littermates. Inhibition of ACE for 8weeks produced reductions in body weight gain in both HOM and WT rats; however, food intake was only reduced in HOM rats. Weight loss following ACE inhibitor treatment was specific to fat mass while lean mass was unaffected. HOM rats were severely glucose intolerant and insensitive to exogenous insulin injection, and treatment with an ACE inhibitor improved both glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity in HOM rats although not fully to that of the level of WT rats. The current study indicates that HOM rats are sensitive to the anorectic effects of ACE inhibition, unlike their WT littermates. This resulted in a more rapid reduction in body weight gain and a more substantial loss of adipose mass in HOM animals, relative to WT animals, treated with an ACE inhibitor. Overall, these data demonstrate that MC4R signaling is not required for weight loss following treatment with an ACE inhibitor.

  17. Structural insights into chitinolytic enzymes and inhibition mechanisms of selective inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tian; Chen, Lei; Ma, Qiang; Shen, Xu; Yang, Qing

    2014-01-01

    Chitin biodegradation is linked to fungi cell differentiation, nematode egg hatching, arthropods morphogenesis and human defense against malaria and other pathogens infection as well. Two classes of enzymes for chitin degradation include glycosyl hydrolase (GH) family 18 chitinases and family 20 β-N-acetyl-D-hexosaminidases. However, more and more research papers have revealed that either GH 18 family chitinases or GH 20 family β-N-acetyl-D-hexosaminidases are a family composed of a number of isoforms, each of which plays an exclusive role in different life processes. The development of novel and specific inhibitors towards chitinolytic enzymes is of great importance in the investigation of or interference with chitin biodegradation. This review focuses on identified enzymes that are specifically involved in chitin degradation. And the latest progresses on crystal structures and specific inhibitors are summarized within the realm of this field.

  18. Discovery of the first inhibitors of bacterial enzyme D-aspartate ligase from Enterococcus faecium (Aslfm).

    PubMed

    Škedelj, Veronika; Perdih, Andrej; Brvar, Matjaž; Kroflič, Ana; Dubbée, Vincent; Savage, Victoria; O'Neill, Alex J; Solmajer, Tom; Bešter-Rogač, Marija; Blanot, Didier; Hugonnet, Jean-Emmanuel; Magnet, Sophie; Arthur, Michel; Mainardi, Jean-Luc; Stojan, Jure; Zega, Anamarija

    2013-09-01

    The D-aspartate ligase of Enterococcus faecium (Aslfm) is an attractive target for the development of narrow-spectrum antibacterial agents that are active against multidrug-resistant E. faecium. Although there is currently little available information regarding the structural characteristics of Aslfm, we exploited the knowledge that this enzyme belongs to the ATP-grasp superfamily to target its ATP binding site. In the first design stage, we synthesized and screened a small library of known ATP-competitive inhibitors of ATP-grasp enzymes. A series of amino-oxazoles derived from bacterial biotin carboxylase inhibitors showed low micromolar activity. The most potent inhibitor compound 12, inhibits Aslfm with a Ki value of 2.9 μM. In the second design stage, a validated ligand-based pharmacophore modeling approach was used, taking the newly available inhibition data of an initial series of compounds into account. Experimental evaluation of the virtual screening hits identified two novel structural types of Aslfm inhibitors with 7-amino-9H-purine (18) and 7-amino-1H-pyrazolo[3,4-d]pyrimidine (30 and 34) scaffolds, and also with Ki values in the low micromolar range. Investigation the inhibitors modes of action confirmed that these compounds are competitive with respect to the ATP molecule. The binding of inhibitors to the target enzyme was also studied using isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). Compounds 6, 12, 18, 30 and 34 represent the first inhibitors of Aslfm reported to date, and are an important step forward in combating infections due to E. faecium.

  19. Synthesis and evaluation of 2,5-dihydrochorismate analogues as inhibitors of the chorismate-utilising enzymes.

    PubMed

    Payne, Richard J; Bulloch, Esther M M; Toscano, Miguel M; Jones, Michelle A; Kerbarh, Olivier; Abell, Chris

    2009-06-07

    A library of 2,5-dihydrochorismate analogues were designed as inhibitors of the chorismate-utilising enzymes including anthranilate synthase, isochorismate synthase, salicylate synthase and 4-amino-4-deoxychorismate synthase. The inhibitors were synthesised in seven or eight steps from shikimic acid, sourced from star anise. The compounds exhibited moderate but differential inhibition against the four chorismate-utilising enzymes.

  20. Captopril improves postresuscitation hemodynamics protective against pulmonary embolism by activating the ACE2/Ang-(1-7)/Mas axis.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Hong-Li; Li, Chun-Sheng; Zhao, Lian-Xing; Yang, Jun; Tong, Nan; An, Le; Liu, Qi-Tong

    2016-11-01

    Acute pulmonary embolism (APE) has a very high mortality rate, especially at cardiac arrest and even after the return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC). This study investigated the protective effect of the angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor captopril on postresuscitation hemodynamics, in a porcine model of cardiac arrest established by APE. Twenty-nine Beijing Landrace pigs were infused with an autologous thrombus leading to cardiac arrest and subjected to standard cardiopulmonary resuscitation and thrombolysis. Ten resuscitated pigs were randomly and equally apportioned to receive either captopril (22.22 mg/kg) infusion or the same volume saline, 30 min after ROSC. Hemodynamic changes and ACE-Ang II-angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R) and ACE2/Ang-(1-7)/Mas receptor axis levels were determined. APE was associated with a decline in mean arterial pressure and a dramatic increase in pulmonary artery pressure and mean right ventricular pressure. After ROSC, captopril infusion was associated with significantly lower mean right ventricular pressure and systemic and pulmonary vascular resistance, faster heart rate, and higher Ang-(1-7) levels, ACE2/ACE, and Ang-(1-7)/Ang II, compared with the saline infusion. The ACE2/Ang-(1-7)/Mas pathway correlated negatively with external vascular lung water and pulmonary vascular permeability and positively with the right cardiac index. In conclusion, in a pig model of APE leading to cardiac arrest, captopril infusion was associated with less mean right ventricular pressure overload after resuscitation, compared with saline infusion. The reduction in systemic and pulmonary vascular resistance associated with captopril may be by inhibiting the ACE-Ang II-AT1R axis and activating the ACE2/Ang-(1-7)/Mas axis.

  1. Cholinesterase inhibitors: SAR and enzyme inhibitory activity of 3-[omega-(benzylmethylamino)alkoxy]xanthen-9-ones.

    PubMed

    Piazzi, Lorna; Belluti, Federica; Bisi, Alessandra; Gobbi, Silvia; Rizzo, Stefano; Bartolini, Manuela; Andrisano, Vincenza; Recanatini, Maurizio; Rampa, Angela

    2007-01-01

    In this work, we further investigated a previously introduced class of cholinesterase inhibitors. The removal of the carbamic function from the lead compound xanthostigmine led to a reversible cholinesterase inhibitors 3. Some new 3-[omega-(benzylmethylamino)alkoxy]xanthen-9-one analogs were designed, synthesized, and evaluated for their inhibitory activity against both acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and butyrylcholinesterase (BuChE). The length of the alkoxy chain of compound 3 was increased and different substituents were introduced. From the IC(50) values, it clearly appears that the carbamic residue is crucial to obtain highly potent AChE inhibitors. On the other hand, peculiarity of these compounds is the high selectivity toward BuChE with respect to AChE, being compound 12 the most selective one (6000-fold). The development of selective BuChE inhibitors may be of great interest to clarify the physiological role of this enzyme and to provide novel therapeutics for various diseases.

  2. ACE2/Ang-(1-7)/Mas axis stimulates vascular repair-relevant functions of CD34+ cells.

    PubMed

    Singh, Neha; Joshi, Shrinidh; Guo, Lirong; Baker, Matthew B; Li, Yan; Castellano, Ronald K; Raizada, Mohan K; Jarajapu, Yagna P R

    2015-11-15

    CD34(+) stem/progenitor cells have been identified as a promising cell population for the autologous cell-based therapies in patients with cardiovascular disease. The counter-regulatory axes of renin angiotensin system, angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE)/Ang II/angiotensin type 1 (AT1) receptor and ACE2/Ang-(1-7)/Mas receptor, play an important role in the cardiovascular repair. This study evaluated the expression and vascular repair-relevant functions of these two pathways in human CD34(+) cells. CD34(+) cells were isolated from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (MNCs), obtained from healthy volunteers. Expression of ACE, ACE2, AT1, and angiotensin type 2 and Mas receptors were determined. Effects of Ang II, Ang-(1-7), Norleu(3)-Ang-(1-7), and ACE2 activators, xanthenone (XNT) and diminazene aceturate (DIZE) on proliferation, migration, and adhesion of CD34(+) cells were evaluated. ACE2 and Mas were relatively highly expressed in CD34(+) cells compared with MNCs. Ang-(1-7) or its analog, Norleu(3)-Ang-(1-7), stimulated proliferation of CD34(+) cells that was associated with decrease in phosphatase and tensin homologue deleted on chromosome 10 levels and was inhibited by triciribin, an AKT inhibitor. Migration of CD34(+) cells was enhanced by Ang-(1-7) or Norleu(3)-Ang-(1-7) that was decreased by a Rho-kinase inhibitor, Y-27632. In the presence of Ang II, XNT or DIZE enhanced proliferation and migration that were blocked by DX-600, an ACE2 inhibitor. Treatment of MNCs with Ang II, before the isolation of CD34(+) cells, attenuated the proliferation and migration to stromal derived factor-1α. This attenuation was reversed by apocynin, an NADPH oxidase inhibitor. Adhesion of MNCs or CD34(+) cells to fibronectin was enhanced by Ang II and was unaffected by Ang-(1-7). This study suggests that ACE2/Ang-(1-7)/Mas pathway stimulates functions of CD34(+) cells that are cardiovascular protective, whereas Ang II attenuates these functions by acting on MNCs. These findings

  3. Crystal structure of the human angiotensin-converting enzyme-lisinopril complex.

    PubMed

    Natesh, Ramanathan; Schwager, Sylva L U; Sturrock, Edward D; Acharya, K Ravi

    2003-01-30

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) has a critical role in cardiovascular function by cleaving the carboxy terminal His-Leu dipeptide from angiotensin I to produce a potent vasopressor octapeptide, angiotensin II. Inhibitors of ACE are a first line of therapy for hypertension, heart failure, myocardial infarction and diabetic nephropathy. Notably, these inhibitors were developed without knowledge of the structure of human ACE, but were instead designed on the basis of an assumed mechanistic homology with carboxypeptidase A. Here we present the X-ray structure of human testicular ACE and its complex with one of the most widely used inhibitors, lisinopril (N2-[(S)-1-carboxy-3-phenylpropyl]-L-lysyl-L-proline; also known as Prinivil or Zestril), at 2.0 A resolution. Analysis of the three-dimensional structure of ACE shows that it bears little similarity to that of carboxypeptidase A, but instead resembles neurolysin and Pyrococcus furiosus carboxypeptidase--zinc metallopeptidases with no detectable sequence similarity to ACE. The structure provides an opportunity to design domain-selective ACE inhibitors that may exhibit new pharmacological profiles.

  4. Protein Kinase C-δ Mediates Shedding of Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2 from Proximal Tubular Cells

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Fengxia; Zimpelmann, Joseph; Burger, Dylan; Kennedy, Christopher; Hébert, Richard L.; Burns, Kevin D.

    2016-01-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) degrades angiotensin (Ang) II to Ang-(1–7), and protects against diabetic renal injury. Soluble ACE2 fragments are shed from the proximal tubule, and appear at high levels in the urine with diabetes. High glucose-induced shedding of ACE2 from proximal tubular cells is mediated by the enzyme “a disintegrin and metalloproteinase-17″ (ADAM17). Here, we investigated the mechanism for constitutive shedding of ACE2. Mouse proximal tubular cells were cultured and ACE2 shedding into the media was assessed by enzyme activity assay and immunoblot analysis. Cells were incubated with pharmacologic inhibitors, or transfected with silencing (si) RNA. Incubation of proximal tubular cells with increasing concentrations of D-glucose stimulated ACE2 shedding, which peaked at 16 mM, while L-glucose (osmotic control) had no effect on shedding. In cells maintained in 7.8 mM D-glucose, ACE2 shedding was significantly inhibited by the pan-protein kinase C (PKC) competitive inhibitor sotrastaurin, but not by an inhibitor of ADAM17. Incubation of cells with the PKC-α and -β1-specific inhibitor Go6976, the PKC β1 and β2-specific inhibitor ruboxistaurin, inhibitors of matrix metalloproteinases-2,-8, and -9, or an inhibitor of ADAM10 (GI250423X) had no effect on basal ACE2 shedding. By contrast, the PKC-δ inhibitor rottlerin significantly inhibited both constitutive and high glucose-induced ACE2 shedding. Transfection of cells with siRNA directed against PKC-δ reduced ACE2 shedding by 20%, while knockdown of PKC-ε was without effect. These results indicate that constitutive shedding of ACE2 from proximal tubular cells is mediated by PKC-δ, which is also linked to high glucose-induced shedding. Targeting PKC-δ may preserve membrane-bound ACE2 in proximal tubule in disease states and diminish Ang II-stimulated adverse signaling. PMID:27313531

  5. Discovery of Inhibitors for the Ether Lipid-Generating Enzyme AGPS as Anti-Cancer Agents.

    PubMed

    Piano, Valentina; Benjamin, Daniel I; Valente, Sergio; Nenci, Simone; Marrocco, Biagina; Mai, Antonello; Aliverti, Alessandro; Nomura, Daniel K; Mattevi, Andrea

    2015-11-20

    Dysregulated ether lipid metabolism is an important hallmark of cancer cells. Previous studies have reported that lowering ether lipid levels by genetic ablation of the ether lipid-generating enzyme alkyl-glycerone phosphate synthase (AGPS) lowers key structural and oncogenic ether lipid levels and alters fatty acid, glycerophospholipid, and eicosanoid metabolism to impair cancer pathogenicity, indicating that AGPS may be a potential therapeutic target for cancer. In this study, we have performed a small-molecule screen to identify candidate AGPS inhibitors. We have identified several lead AGPS inhibitors and have structurally characterized their interactions with the enzyme and show that these inhibitors bind to distinct portions of the active site. We further show that the lead AGPS inhibitor 1a selectively lowers ether lipid levels in several types of human cancer cells and impairs their cellular survival and migration. We provide here the first report of in situ-active pharmacological tools for inhibiting AGPS, which may provide chemical scaffolds for future AGPS inhibitor development for cancer therapy.

  6. LUDI: rule-based automatic design of new substituents for enzyme inhibitor leads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böhm, Hans-Joachim

    1992-12-01

    Recent advances in a new method for the de novo design of enzyme inhibitors are reported. A new set of rules to define the possible nonbonded contacts between protein and ligand is presented. This method was derived from published statistical analyses of nonbonded contacts in crystal packings of organic molecules and has been implemented in the recently described computer program LUDI. Moreover, LUDI can now append a new substituent onto an already existing ligand. Applications are reported for the design of inhibitors of HIV protease and dihydrofolate reductase. The results demonstrate that LUDI is indeed capable of designing new ligands with improved binding when compared to the reference compound.

  7. Marketing ACE in Victoria.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2001

    This publication presents options raised through various forums for marketing adult and community education (ACE) in Victoria, Australia, and suggested strategies. After an introduction (chapter 1), chapters 2 and 3 provide a broad view of the current situation for marketing ACE. Chapter 2 discusses general issues in the current position--ACE…

  8. Retrostatin, a new specific enzyme inhibitor against avian myeloblastosis virus reverse transcriptase.

    PubMed

    Nishio, M; Kuroda, A; Suzuki, M; Ishimaru, K; Nakamura, S; Nomi, R

    1983-07-01

    A novel enzyme inhibitor against RNA-directed DNA polymerase of avian myeloblastosis virus was produced by an isolate of a new streptomycete for which the name Streptomyces retrostaticus is proposed. This enzyme inhibitor, which was named retrostatin, did not inhibit DNA-directed DNA polymerase of Escherichia coli and DNA-directed RNA polymerase of Ehrlich ascites tumor cells. Retrostatin was produced by the microorganism together with streptonigrin. These two substances were extracted from the culture broth with ethyl acetate at acidic pH. Retrostatin is an acidic pH indicator and the free acid was recovered as a red powder. Retrostatin had weak antibiotic activities against Gram-positive bacteria and yeasts.

  9. [Controlling arachidonic acid metabolic network: from single- to multi-target inhibitors of key enzymes].

    PubMed

    Liu, Ying; Chen, Zheng; Shang, Er-chang; Yang, Kun; Wei, Deng-guo; Zhou, Lu; Jiang, Xiao-lu; He, Chong; Lai, Lu-hua

    2009-03-01

    Inflammatory diseases are common medical conditions seen in disorders of human immune system. There is a great demand for anti-inflammatory drugs. There are major inflammatory mediators in arachidonic acid metabolic network. Several enzymes in this network have been used as key targets for the development of anti-inflammatory drugs. However, specific single-target inhibitors can not sufficiently control the network balance and may cause side effects at the same time. Most inflammation induced diseases come from the complicated coupling of inflammatory cascades involving multiple targets. In order to treat these complicated diseases, drugs that can intervene multi-targets at the same time attracted much attention. The goal of this review is mainly focused on the key enzymes in arachidonic acid metabolic network, such as phospholipase A2, cyclooxygenase, 5-lipoxygenase and eukotriene A4 hydrolase. Advance in single target and multi-targe inhibitors is summarized.

  10. Reaching the Melting Point: Degradative Enzymes and Protease Inhibitors Involved in Baculovirus Infection and Dissemination

    PubMed Central

    Ishimwe, Egide; Hodgson, Jeffrey J.; Clem, Rollie J.; Passarelli, A. Lorena

    2015-01-01

    Baculovirus infection of a host insect involves several steps, beginning with initiation of virus infection in the midgut, followed by dissemination of infection from the midgut to other tissues in the insect, and finally culminating in “melting” or liquefaction of the host, which allows for horizontal spread of infection to other insects. While all of the viral gene products are involved in ultimately reaching this dramatic infection endpoint, this review focuses on two particular types of baculovirus-encoded proteins: degradative enzymes and protease inhibitors. Neither of these types of proteins is commonly found in other virus families, but they both play important roles in baculovirus infection. The types of degradative enzymes and protease inhibitors encoded by baculoviruses are discussed, as are the roles of these proteins in the infection process. PMID:25724418

  11. Diminazene aceturate enhances ACE2 activity and attenuates ischemia-induced cardiac pathophysiology

    PubMed Central

    Qi, YanFei; Zhang, Juan; Cole-Jeffrey, Colleen T; Shenoy, Vinayak; Espejo, Andrew; Hanna, Mina; Song, Chunjuan; Pepine, Carl J; Katovich, Michael J; Raizada, Mohan K

    2013-01-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) plays a critical role against myocardial infarction (MI). We hypothesized that activation of intrinsic ACE2 would be protective against ischemia-induced cardiac pathophysiology. Diminazine aceturate (DIZE), a small molecule ACE2 activator has been used to evaluate this hypothesis. DIZE (15 mg/kg/day, s.c.) was injected two days prior to MI surgery and continued throughout the study-period. MI rats showed a 62% decrease in fractional shortening (FS,%) [control (Con): 51.1 ± 3.2; DIZE alone (D) : 52.1 ± 3.2; MI (M): 19.1± 3.0], a 55% decrease in contractility (dP/dtmax mmHg/s) (Con: 9480 ± 425.3; D: 9585 ± 597.4; M: 4251 ± 657.7), and a 27% increase in ventricular hypertrophy [VH, mg/mm (Con: 26.5 ± 1.5; D: 26.9 ± 1.4; M: 33.4± 1.1)]. DIZE attenuated the MI-induced decrease in FS by 89%, improved dP/dtmax by 92%, and reversed VH by 18%. MI also significantly increased ACE and angiotensin type 1 receptor levels while decreased ACE2 activity by 40% (Con: 246.2 ± 25.1; D: 254.2 ± 20.6; M: 148.9 ± 29.2, RFU/min), which was reversed by DIZE treatment. Thus, DIZE treatment decreased the infarct area, attenuated LV remodeling post-MI and restored normal balance of the cardiac renin angiotensin system. Additionally, DIZE treatment increased circulating endothelial progenitor cells, increased engraftment of cardiac progenitor cells and decreased inflammatory cells in peri-infarct cardiac regions. All of the beneficial effects associated with DIZE treatment were abolished by C-16, an ACE2 inhibitor. Collectively, DIZE and DIZE-like small molecules may represent promising new therapeutic agents for MI. PMID:23959549

  12. Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors-induced angioedema treated by C1 esterase inhibitor concentrate (Berinert®): about one case and review of the therapeutic arsenal.

    PubMed

    Lipski, Samuel Michael; Casimir, Georges; Vanlommel, Martine; Jeanmaire, Mathieu; Dolhen, Pierre

    2015-02-01

    C1 esterase inhibitor (Berinert®) is generally used to treat severe attack of hereditary angioedema. We describe here the case of a patient who presented with a severe angioedema induced by angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs) endangering her life. It could be successfully treated with that medicine.

  13. Ruthenium-containing P450 inhibitors for dual enzyme inhibition and DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Zamora, Ana; Denning, Catherine A; Heidary, David K; Wachter, Erin; Nease, Leona A; Ruiz, José; Glazer, Edith C

    2017-02-14

    Cytochrome P450s are key players in drug metabolism, and overexpression in tumors is associated with significant resistance to many medicinal agents. Consequently, inhibition of P450s could serve as a strategy to restore drug efficacy. However, the widespread expression of P450s throughout the human body and the critical roles they play in various biosynthetic pathways motivates the development of P450 inhibitors capable of controlled local administration. Ruthenium complexes containing P450 inhibitors as ligands were synthesized in order to develop pro-drugs that can be triggered to release the inhibitors in a spatially and temporally controlled fashion. Upon light activation the compounds release ligands that directly bind and inhibit P450 enzymes, while the ruthenium center is able to directly damage DNA.

  14. Yeast as a tool to select inhibitors of the cullin deneddylating enzyme Csn5.

    PubMed

    Cirigliano, Angela; Stirpe, Alessandro; Menta, Sergio; Mori, Mattia; Dell'Edera, Domenico; Pick, Elah; Negri, Rodolfo; Botta, Bruno; Rinaldi, Teresa

    2016-12-01

    The CSN complex plays a key role in various cellular pathways: through a metalloprotease activity of its Csn5 deneddylating enzyme, it regulates the activity of Cullin-RING ligases (CRLs). Indeed, Csn5 has been found amplified in many tumors, but, due to its pleiotropic effects, it is difficult to dissect its function and the involvement in cancer progression. Moreover, while growing evidences point to the neddylation function as a good target for drug development; specific inhibitors have not yet been developed for the CSN. Here, we propose the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model system to screen libraries of small molecules as inhibitors of cullins deneddylation, taking advantage of the unique feature of this organism to survive without a functional CSN5 gene and to accumulate a fully neddylated cullin substrate. By combining molecular modeling and simple genetic tools, we were able to identify two small molecular fragments as selective inhibitors of Csn5 deneddylation function.

  15. Sequence diversity of NanA manifests in distinct enzyme kinetics and inhibitor susceptibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zhongli; von Grafenstein, Susanne; Walther, Elisabeth; Fuchs, Julian E.; Liedl, Klaus R.; Sauerbrei, Andreas; Schmidtke, Michaela

    2016-04-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is the leading pathogen causing bacterial pneumonia and meningitis. Its surface-associated virulence factor neuraminidase A (NanA) promotes the bacterial colonization by removing the terminal sialyl residues from glycoconjugates on eukaryotic cell surface. The predominant role of NanA in the pathogenesis of pneumococci renders it an attractive target for therapeutic intervention. Despite the highly conserved activity of NanA, our alignment of the 11 NanAs revealed the evolutionary diversity of this enzyme. The amino acid substitutions we identified, particularly those in the lectin domain and in the insertion domain next to the catalytic centre triggered our special interest. We synthesised the representative NanAs and the mutagenized derivatives from E. coli for enzyme kinetics study and neuraminidase inhibitor susceptibility test. Via molecular docking we got a deeper insight into the differences between the two major variants of NanA and their influence on the ligand-target interactions. In addition, our molecular dynamics simulations revealed a prominent intrinsic flexibility of the linker between the active site and the insertion domain, which influences the inhibitor binding. Our findings for the first time associated the primary sequence diversity of NanA with the biochemical properties of the enzyme and with the inhibitory efficiency of neuraminidase inhibitors.

  16. Enzyme- and transporter-mediated drug interactions with small molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Shao, Jie; Markowitz, John S; Bei, Di; An, Guohua

    2014-12-01

    Among the novel and target-specific classes of anticancer drugs, small molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) represent an extremely promising and rapidly expanding group. TKIs attack cancer-specific targets and therefore have a favorable safety profile. However, as TKIs are taken orally along with other medications on a daily basis, there is an elevated risk of potentially significant drug-drug interactions. Most TKIs are metabolized primarily through CYP3A4. In addition, many TKIs are also CYP3A4 inhibitors at the same time. In addition to drug metabolizing enzymes (DMEs), another determinant of TKI disposition are drug transporters. There is accumulating evidence showing that the majority of currently marketed TKIs interact with ATP-binding cassette transporters, particularly P-glycoprotein as well as Breast Cancer Resistance Protein and serve as both substrates and inhibitors. Considering the dual roles of TKIs on both DMEs and drug transporters, and the importance of these enzyme and transporters in drug disposition, the potential for enzyme- and transporter-mediated TKI-drug interactions in patients with cancer is an important consideration. This review provides a comprehensive overview of drug interactions with small molecule TKIs mediated by DMEs and drug transporters. The TKI-drug interactions with TKIs being victims and/or perpetrators are summarized.

  17. Sequence diversity of NanA manifests in distinct enzyme kinetics and inhibitor susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Zhongli; von Grafenstein, Susanne; Walther, Elisabeth; Fuchs, Julian E.; Liedl, Klaus R.; Sauerbrei, Andreas; Schmidtke, Michaela

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is the leading pathogen causing bacterial pneumonia and meningitis. Its surface-associated virulence factor neuraminidase A (NanA) promotes the bacterial colonization by removing the terminal sialyl residues from glycoconjugates on eukaryotic cell surface. The predominant role of NanA in the pathogenesis of pneumococci renders it an attractive target for therapeutic intervention. Despite the highly conserved activity of NanA, our alignment of the 11 NanAs revealed the evolutionary diversity of this enzyme. The amino acid substitutions we identified, particularly those in the lectin domain and in the insertion domain next to the catalytic centre triggered our special interest. We synthesised the representative NanAs and the mutagenized derivatives from E. coli for enzyme kinetics study and neuraminidase inhibitor susceptibility test. Via molecular docking we got a deeper insight into the differences between the two major variants of NanA and their influence on the ligand-target interactions. In addition, our molecular dynamics simulations revealed a prominent intrinsic flexibility of the linker between the active site and the insertion domain, which influences the inhibitor binding. Our findings for the first time associated the primary sequence diversity of NanA with the biochemical properties of the enzyme and with the inhibitory efficiency of neuraminidase inhibitors. PMID:27125351

  18. Designed Inhibitors of Insulin-Degrading Enzyme Regulate the Catabolism and Activity of Insulin

    SciTech Connect

    Leissring, Malcolm A.; Malito, Enrico; Hedouin, Sabrine; Reinstatler, Lael; Sahara, Tomoko; Abdul-Hay, Samer O.; Choudhry, Shakeel; Maharvi, Ghulam M.; Fauq, Abdul H.; Huzarska, Malwina; May, Philip S.; Choi, Sungwoon; Logan, Todd P.; Turk, Benjamin E.; Cantley, Lewis C.; Manolopoulou, Marika; Tang, Wei-Jen; Stein, Ross L.; Cuny, Gregory D.; Selkoe, Dennis J.

    2010-09-20

    Insulin is a vital peptide hormone that is a central regulator of glucose homeostasis, and impairments in insulin signaling cause diabetes mellitus. In principle, it should be possible to enhance the activity of insulin by inhibiting its catabolism, which is mediated primarily by insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE), a structurally and evolutionarily distinctive zinc-metalloprotease. Despite interest in pharmacological inhibition of IDE as an attractive anti-diabetic approach dating to the 1950s, potent and selective inhibitors of IDE have not yet emerged. We used a rational design approach based on analysis of combinatorial peptide mixtures and focused compound libraries to develop novel peptide hydroxamic acid inhibitors of IDE. The resulting compounds are {approx} 10{sup 6} times more potent than existing inhibitors, non-toxic, and surprisingly selective for IDE vis-a-vis conventional zinc-metalloproteases. Crystallographic analysis of an IDE-inhibitor complex reveals a novel mode of inhibition based on stabilization of IDE's 'closed,' inactive conformation. We show further that pharmacological inhibition of IDE potentiates insulin signaling by a mechanism involving reduced catabolism of internalized insulin. Conclusions/Significance: The inhibitors we describe are the first to potently and selectively inhibit IDE or indeed any member of this atypical zinc-metalloprotease superfamily. The distinctive structure of IDE's active site, and the mode of action of our inhibitors, suggests that it may be possible to develop inhibitors that cross-react minimally with conventional zinc-metalloproteases. Significantly, our results reveal that insulin signaling is normally regulated by IDE activity not only extracellularly but also within cells, supporting the longstanding view that IDE inhibitors could hold therapeutic value for the treatment of diabetes.

  19. Chalcone-based Selective Inhibitors of a C4 Plant Key Enzyme as Novel Potential Herbicides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, G. T. T.; Erlenkamp, G.; Jäck, O.; Küberl, A.; Bott, M.; Fiorani, F.; Gohlke, H.; Groth, G.

    2016-06-01

    Weeds are a challenge for global food production due to their rapidly evolving resistance against herbicides. We have identified chalcones as selective inhibitors of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC), a key enzyme for carbon fixation and biomass increase in the C4 photosynthetic pathway of many of the world’s most damaging weeds. In contrast, many of the most important crop plants use C3 photosynthesis. Here, we show that 2‧,3‧,4‧,3,4-Pentahydroxychalcone (IC50 = 600 nM) and 2‧,3‧,4‧-Trihydroxychalcone (IC50 = 4.2 μM) are potent inhibitors of C4 PEPC but do not affect C3 PEPC at a same concentration range (selectivity factor: 15–45). Binding and modeling studies indicate that the active compounds bind at the same site as malate/aspartate, the natural feedback inhibitors of the C4 pathway. At the whole plant level, both substances showed pronounced growth-inhibitory effects on the C4 weed Amaranthus retroflexus, while there were no measurable effects on oilseed rape, a C3 plant. Growth of selected soil bacteria was not affected by these substances. Our chalcone compounds are the most potent and selective C4 PEPC inhibitors known to date. They offer a novel approach to combat C4 weeds based on a hitherto unexplored mode of allosteric inhibition of a C4 plant key enzyme.

  20. Chalcone-based Selective Inhibitors of a C4 Plant Key Enzyme as Novel Potential Herbicides

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, G. T. T.; Erlenkamp, G.; Jäck, O.; Küberl, A.; Bott, M.; Fiorani, F.; Gohlke, H.; Groth, G.

    2016-01-01

    Weeds are a challenge for global food production due to their rapidly evolving resistance against herbicides. We have identified chalcones as selective inhibitors of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC), a key enzyme for carbon fixation and biomass increase in the C4 photosynthetic pathway of many of the world’s most damaging weeds. In contrast, many of the most important crop plants use C3 photosynthesis. Here, we show that 2′,3′,4′,3,4-Pentahydroxychalcone (IC50 = 600 nM) and 2′,3′,4′-Trihydroxychalcone (IC50 = 4.2 μM) are potent inhibitors of C4 PEPC but do not affect C3 PEPC at a same concentration range (selectivity factor: 15–45). Binding and modeling studies indicate that the active compounds bind at the same site as malate/aspartate, the natural feedback inhibitors of the C4 pathway. At the whole plant level, both substances showed pronounced growth-inhibitory effects on the C4 weed Amaranthus retroflexus, while there were no measurable effects on oilseed rape, a C3 plant. Growth of selected soil bacteria was not affected by these substances. Our chalcone compounds are the most potent and selective C4 PEPC inhibitors known to date. They offer a novel approach to combat C4 weeds based on a hitherto unexplored mode of allosteric inhibition of a C4 plant key enzyme. PMID:27263468

  1. Identification of inhibitors of Plasmodium falciparum phosphoethanolamine methyltransferase using an enzyme-coupled transmethylation assay

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The phosphoethanolamine methyltransferase, PfPMT, of the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum, a member of a newly identified family of phosphoethanolamine methyltransferases (PMT) found solely in some protozoa, nematodes, frogs, and plants, is involved in the synthesis of the major membrane phospholipid, phosphatidylcholine. PMT enzymes catalyze a three-step S-adenosylmethionine-dependent methylation of the nitrogen atom of phosphoethanolamine to form phosphocholine. In P. falciparum, this activity is a limiting step in the pathway of synthesis of phosphatidylcholine from serine and plays an important role in the development, replication and survival of the parasite within human red blood cells. Results We have employed an enzyme-coupled methylation assay to screen for potential inhibitors of PfPMT. In addition to hexadecyltrimethylammonium, previously known to inhibit PfPMT, two compounds dodecyltrimethylammonium and amodiaquine were also found to inhibit PfPMT activity in vitro. Interestingly, PfPMT activity was not inhibited by the amodiaquine analog, chloroquine, or other aminoquinolines, amino alcohols, or histamine methyltransferase inhibitors. Using yeast as a surrogate system we found that unlike wild-type cells, yeast mutants that rely on PfPMT for survival were sensitive to amodiaquine, and their phosphatidylcholine biosynthesis was inhibited by this compound. Furthermore NMR titration studies to characterize the interaction between amoidaquine and PfPMT demonstrated a specific and concentration dependent binding of the compound to the enzyme. Conclusion The identification of amodiaquine as an inhibitor of PfPMT in vitro and in yeast, and the biophysical evidence for the specific interaction of the compound with the enzyme will set the stage for the development of analogs of this drug that specifically inhibit this enzyme and possibly other PMTs. PMID:20085640

  2. Investigating the selectivity of metalloenzyme inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Day, Joshua A; Cohen, Seth M

    2013-10-24

    The inhibitory activity of a broad group of known metalloenzyme inhibitors against a panel of metalloenzymes was evaluated. Clinically approved inhibitors were selected as well as several other reported metalloprotein inhibitors in order to represent a broad range of metal binding groups (MBGs), including hydroxamic acid, carboxylate, hydroxypyridinonate, thiol, and N-hydroxyurea functional groups. A panel of metalloenzymes, including carbonic anhydrase (hCAII), several matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE), histone deacetylase (HDAC-2), and tyrosinase (TY), was selected based on their clinical importance for a range of pathologies. In addition, each inhibitor was evaluated for its ability to remove Fe(3+) from holo-transferrin to gauge the ability of the inhibitors to access Fe(3+) from a primary transport protein. The results show that the metalloenzyme inhibitors are quite selective for their intended targets, suggesting that despite their ability to bind metal ions, metalloprotein inhibitors are not prone to widespread off-target enzyme inhibition activity.

  3. Biosensors based on enzyme field-effect transistors for determination of some substrates and inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Dzyadevych, Sergei V; Soldatkin, Alexey P; Korpan, Yaroslav I; Arkhypova, Valentyna N; El'skaya, Anna V; Chovelon, Jean-Marc; Martelet, Claude; Jaffrezic-Renault, Nicole

    2003-10-01

    This paper is a review of the authors' publications concerning the development of biosensors based on enzyme field-effect transistors (ENFETs) for direct substrates or inhibitors analysis. Such biosensors were designed by using immobilised enzymes and ion-selective field-effect transistors (ISFETs). Highly specific, sensitive, simple, fast and cheap determination of different substances renders them as promising tools in medicine, biotechnology, environmental control, agriculture and the food industry. The biosensors based on ENFETs and direct enzyme analysis for determination of concentrations of different substrates (glucose, urea, penicillin, formaldehyde, creatinine, etc.) have been developed and their laboratory prototypes were fabricated. Improvement of the analytical characteristics of such biosensors may be achieved by using a differential mode of measurement, working solutions with different buffer concentrations and specific agents, negatively or positively charged additional membranes, or genetically modified enzymes. These approaches allow one to decrease the effect of the buffer capacity influence on the sensor response in an aim to increase the sensitivity of the biosensors and to extend their dynamic ranges. Biosensors for the determination of concentrations of different toxic substances (organophosphorous pesticides, heavy metal ions, hypochlorite, glycoalkaloids, etc.) were designed on the basis of reversible and/or irreversible enzyme inhibition effect(s). The conception of an enzymatic multibiosensor for the determination of different toxic substances based on the enzyme inhibition effect is also described. We will discuss the respective advantages and disadvantages of biosensors based on the ENFETs developed and also demonstrate their practical application.

  4. Identifying the Minimal Enzymes Required for Biosynthesis of Epoxyketone Proteasome Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Joyce; Zhu, Xuejun

    2015-01-01

    Epoxyketone proteasome inhibitors have attracted much interest due to their potential as anti-cancer drugs. While the biosynthetic gene clusters for several peptidyl epoxyketone natural products have recently been identified, the enzymatic logic involved in the formation of the terminal epoxyketone pharmacophore has been relatively unexplored. Here, we report the identification of the minimal set of enzymes from the eponemycin gene cluster necessary for the biosynthesis of novel metabolites containing a terminal epoxyketone pharmacophore in Escherichia coli, a versatile and fast-growing heterologous host. This set of enzymes includes a non-ribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS), a polyketide synthase (PKS), and an acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (ACAD) homolog. In addition to the in vivo functional reconstitution of these enzymes in E. coli, in vitro studies of the eponemycin NRPS and 13C-labeled precursor feeding experiments were performed to advance the mechanistic understanding of terminal epoxyketone formation. PMID:26477320

  5. Chebulin: Terminalia chebula Retz. fruit-derived peptide with angiotensin-I-converting enzyme inhibitory activity.

    PubMed

    Sornwatana, Thakorn; Bangphoomi, Kunan; Roytrakul, Sittiruk; Wetprasit, Nuanchawee; Choowongkomon, Kiattawee; Ratanapo, Sunanta

    2015-01-01

    Angiotensin-I-converting enzyme (ACE) plays an important role in blood pressure regulation. In this study, an ACE-hexapeptide inhibitor (Asp-Glu-Asn-Ser-Lys-Phe) designated as chebulin was produced from the fruit protein of Terminalia chebula Retz. by pepsin digestion, ultrafiltrated through a 3 KDa cut-off membrane, a reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography, and nano-liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry analysis. Chebulin was found to inhibit ACE in a noncompetitive manner, as supported by the structural model. It bounds to ACE by the hydrogen bond, hydrophobic and ionic interactions via the interactions of C-terminal Phe (Phe-6), and N-terminal residues (Asp-1 and Glu-2) with the amino acid residues on noncatalytic sites of the ACE. The results showed that chebulin derived from fruits of T. chebula Retz. is a potential ACE-peptide inhibitor that could be used as a functional food additive for the prevention of hypertension and as an alternative to ACE inhibitor drug.

  6. ACE inhibition with captopril retards the development of signs of neurodegeneration in an animal model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    AbdAlla, Said; Langer, Andreas; Fu, Xuebin; Quitterer, Ursula

    2013-08-16

    Increased generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is a significant pathological feature in the brains of patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). Experimental evidence indicates that inhibition of brain ROS could be beneficial in slowing the neurodegenerative process triggered by amyloid-beta (Abeta) aggregates. The angiotensin II AT1 receptor is a significant source of brain ROS, and AD patients have an increased brain angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) level, which could account for an excessive angiotensin-dependent AT1-induced ROS generation. Therefore, we analyzed the impact of ACE inhibition on signs of neurodegeneration of aged Tg2576 mice as a transgenic animal model of AD. Whole genome microarray gene expression profiling and biochemical analyses demonstrated that the centrally active ACE inhibitor captopril normalized the excessive hippocampal ACE activity of AD mice. Concomitantly, the development of signs of neurodegeneration was retarded by six months of captopril treatment. The neuroprotective profile triggered by captopril was accompanied by reduced amyloidogenic processing of the amyloid precursor protein (APP), and decreased hippocampal ROS, which is known to enhance Abeta generation by increased activation of beta- and gamma-secretases. Taken together, our data present strong evidence that ACE inhibition with a widely used cardiovascular drug could interfere with Abeta-dependent neurodegeneration.

  7. Angiotensin-converting enzyme 2/angiotensin-(1–7)/Mas axis activates Akt signaling to ameliorate hepatic steatosis

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Xi; Yang, Fangyuan; Shi, Tingting; Yuan, Mingxia; Xin, Zhong; Xie, Rongrong; Li, Sen; Li, Hongbing; Yang, Jin-Kui

    2016-01-01

    The classical axis of renin-angiotensin system (RAS), angiotensin (Ang)-converting enzyme (ACE)/Ang II/AT1, contributes to the development of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). However, the role of bypass axis of RAS (Angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2)/Ang-(1–7)/Mas) in hepatic steatosis is still unclear. Here we showed that deletion of ACE2 aggravates liver steatosis, which is correlated with the increased expression of hepatic lipogenic genes and the decreased expression of fatty acid oxidation-related genes in the liver of ACE2 knockout (ACE2−/y) mice. Meanwhile, oxidative stress and inflammation were also aggravated in ACE2−/y mice. On the contrary, overexpression of ACE2 improved fatty liver in db/db mice, and the mRNA levels of fatty acid oxidation-related genes were up-regulated. In vitro, Ang-(1–7)/ACE2 ameliorated hepatic steatosis, oxidative stress and inflammation in free fatty acid (FFA)-induced HepG2 cells, and what’s more, Akt inhibitors reduced ACE2-mediated lipid metabolism. Furthermore, ACE2-mediated Akt activation could be attenuated by blockade of ATP/P2 receptor/Calmodulin (CaM) pathway. These results indicated that Ang-(1–7)/ACE2/Mas axis may reduce liver lipid accumulation partly by regulating lipid-metabolizing genes through ATP/P2 receptor/CaM signaling pathway. Our findings support the potential role of ACE2/Ang-(1–7)/Mas axis in prevention and treatment of hepatic lipid metabolism. PMID:26883384

  8. Inhibition of phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C: studies on synthetic substrates, inhibitors and a synthetic enzyme.

    PubMed

    Vizitiu, D; Kriste, A G; Campbell, A S; Thatcher, G R

    1996-01-01

    Enzyme inhibition studies on phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C (PI-PLC) from B. Cereus were performed in order to gain an understanding of the mechanism of the PI-PLC family of enzymes and to aid inhibitor design. Inhibition studies on two synthetic cyclic phosphonate analogues (1,2) of inositol cyclic-1:2-monophosphate (cIP), glycerol-2-phosphate and vanadate were performed using natural phosphatidylinositol (PI) substrate in Triton X100 co-micelles and an NMR assay. Further inhibition studies on PI-PLC from B. Cereus were performed using a chromogenic, synthetic PI analogue (DPG-PI), an HPLC assay and Aerosol-OT (AOT), phytic acid and vanadate as inhibitors. For purposes of comparison, a model PI-PLC enzyme system was developed employing a synthetic Cu(II)-metallomicelle and a further synthetic PI analogue (IPP-PI). The studies employing natural PI substrate in Triton X100 co-micelles and synthetic DPG-PI in the absence of surfactant indicate three classes of PI-PLC inhibitors: (1) active-site directed inhibitors (e.g. 1,2); (2) water-soluble polyanions (e.g. tetravanadate, phytic acid); (3) surfactant anions (e.g. AOT). Three modes of molecular recognition are indicated to be important: (1) active site molecular recognition; (2) recognition at an anion-recognition site which may be the active site, and; (3) interfacial (or hydrophobic) recognition which may be exploited to increase affinity for the anion-recognition site in anionic surfactants such as AOT. The most potent inhibition of PI-PLC was observed by tetravanadate and AOT. The metallomicelle model system was observed to mimic PI-PLC in reproducing transesterification of the PI analogue substrate to yield cIP as product and in showing inhibition by phytic acid and AOT.

  9. Effect of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors on vascular endothelial function in hypertensive patients after intensive periodontal treatment.

    PubMed

    Rubio, María C; Lewin, Pablo G; De la Cruz, Griselda; Sarudiansky, Andrea N; Nieto, Mauricio; Costa, Osvaldo R; Nicolosi, Liliana N

    2016-04-01

    There is a relation between vascular endothelial function, atherosclerotic disease, and inflammation. Deterioration of endothelial function has been observed twenty-four hours after intensive periodontal treatment. This effect may be counteracted by the action of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, which improve endothelial function. The aim of the present study was to evaluate vascular endothelial function after intensive periodontal treatment, in hypertensive patients treated with angiotensinconverting enzyme inhibitors. A prospective, longitudinal, comparative study involving repeated measurements was conducted. Fifty-two consecutive patients with severe periodontal disease were divided into two groups, one comprising hypertensive patients treated with converting enzyme inhibitors and the other comprising patients with no clinical signs of pathology and not receiving angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors. Endothelial function was assessed by measuring postischemic dilation of the humeral artery (baseline echocardiography Doppler), and intensive periodontal treatment was performed 24h later. Endothelial function was re-assessed 24h and 15 days after periodontal treatment.

  10. Arctic Collaborative Environment (ACE)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-08-01

    distribution is unlimited. Key Data Requirements • Sea Ice – Location: Area, Onset, Growth, Drift, and Decay – Characterization: % Coverage, Thickness...Cloud ACE Developmental Server hosted at UAHuntsville ACE User Community Public Internet Tailored Ice Product Generation (NIC) Arctic Research...distribution is unlimited. Arctic Map 26 July 2012 13 Multi-sensor Analyzed Sea Ice Extent; National Data Buoy Center DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A

  11. Stereochemical course, isotope effects, and enzyme inhibitor studies of glaucine metabolism in fungi

    SciTech Connect

    Kerr, K.M.

    1986-01-01

    The microbial transformation of the aporphine alkaloid glaucine by the fungi Fusarium solani (ATCC 12823) and Aspergillus flavipes (ATCC 1030) proceeds with complete substrate stereoselectivity. The fungus F. solani metabolizes only S-(+)-glaucine (1) to dehydroglaucine (3), and A. flavipes metabolizes only R-(-)-glaucine (2) to dehydroglaucine. This facile microbiological reaction is useful in the destructive resolution of racemic mixtures of glaucine, and may provide a model for producing pure enantiomers (either R or S) of other aporphines from racemic mixtures. In order to extend the reaction to other aporphines and related alkaloids, the overall stereochemical course and enzyme(s) involved in the reaction, and the substrate requirements of the enzyme were investigated. The overall stereochemical course of the transformation was examined using C-7 methyl-blocked analogs of glaucine, cis- and trans-7-methylglaucine, as substrates for the fungi. Isolation and examination of residual substrates from semi-preparative scale incubations by MS, PMR, PMR with a chiral shift reagent, OR and ORD indicated that the transformation was enantioselective in the case of A. flavipes. However, only a 10% enrichment of 6aR,7R-cis-7-methylglaucine was observed in F. solani cultures. The oxidation of glaucine can be envisioned as proceeding through one of several mechanisms, each involving a different enzyme system. Deuterium isotope, induction and enzyme inhibitor experiments helped to distinguish between the three mechanisms.

  12. Exploration of natural enzyme inhibitors with hypoglycemic potentials amongst Eucalyptus Spp. by in vitro assays

    PubMed Central

    Dey, Baishakhi; Mitra, Analava; Katakam, Prakash; Singla, Rajeev K

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the presence and potency of natural enzyme inhibitors with hypoglycemic potentials amongst Eucalyptus Spp. by in vitro assays. METHODS: The leaf extracts of the three different Eucalyptus species [E. globulus (EG), E. citriodora (EC), E. camaldulensis (ECA)] were subjected to in vitro assay procedures to explore the prevalence of natural enzyme inhibitors (NEIs) after preliminary qualitative and quantitative phytochemical evaluations, to study their inhibitory actions against the enzymes like α-amylase, α-glucosidase, aldose reductase, angiotensin converting enzyme and dipeptidyl peptidase 4 playing pathogenic roles in type 2 diabetes. The antioxidant potential and total antioxidant capacity of the species were also evaluated. RESULTS: Major bioactive compounds like polyphenols (341.75 ± 3.63 to 496.85 ± 3.98) and flavonoids (4.89 ± 0.01 to 7.15 ± 0.02) were found in appreciable quantity in three species. Based on the IC50 values of the extracts under investigation, in all assays the effectivity was in the order of EG > ECA > EC. The results of the ferric reducing antioxidant power assay showed that the reducing ability of the species was also in the order of EG > ECA > EC. A strong correlation (R2 = 0.81-0.99) was found between the phenolic contents and the inhibitory potentials of the extracts against the targeted enzymes. CONCLUSION: These results show immense hypoglycemic potentiality of the Eucalyptus Spp. and a remarkable source of NEIs for a future phytotherapeutic approach in Type 2 diabetes. PMID:24748933

  13. Release of angiotensin converting enzyme-inhibitor peptides during in vitro gastrointestinal digestion of Parmigiano Reggiano PDO cheese and their absorption through an in vitro model of intestinal epithelium.

    PubMed

    Basiricò, L; Catalani, E; Morera, P; Cattaneo, S; Stuknytė, M; Bernabucci, U; De Noni, I; Nardone, A

    2015-11-01

    The occurrence of 8 bovine casein-derived peptides (VPP, IPP, RYLGY, RYLG, AYFYPEL, AYFYPE, LHLPLP, and HLPLP) reported as angiotensin converting enzyme-inhibitors (ACE-I) was investigated in the 3-kDa ultrafiltered water-soluble extract (WSE) of Parmigiano Reggiano (PR) cheese samples by ultra-performance liquid chromatography coupled to high-resolution mass spectrometry via an electrospray ionization source. Only VPP, IPP, LHLPLP, and HLPLP were revealed in the WSE, and their total amount was in the range of 8.46 to 21.55 mg/kg of cheese. Following in vitro static gastrointestinal digestion, the same ACE-I peptides along with the newly formed AYFYPEL and AYFYPE were found in the 3 kDa WSE of PR digestates. Digestates presented high amounts (1,880-3,053 mg/kg) of LHLPLP, whereas the remaining peptides accounted for 69.24 to 82.82 mg/kg. The half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) values decreased from 7.92 ± 2.08 in undigested cheese to 3.20 ± 1.69 after in vitro gastrointestinal digestion. The 3-kDa WSE of digested cheeses were used to study the transport of the 8 ACE-I peptides across the monolayers of the Caco-2 cell culture grown on a semipermeable membrane of the transwells. After 1h of incubation, 649.20 ± 148.85 mg/kg of LHLPLP remained in the apical compartment, whereas VPP, IPP, AYFYPEL, AYFYPE, and HLPLP accounted in total for less than 36.78 mg/kg. On average, 0.6% of LHLPLP initially present in the digestates added to the apical compartment were transported intact to the basolateral chamber after the same incubation time. Higher transport rate (2.9%) was ascertained for the peptide HLPLP. No other intact ACE-I peptides were revealed in the basolateral compartment. For the first time, these results demonstrated that the ACE-I peptides HLPLP and LHLPLP present in the in vitro digestates of PR cheese are partially absorbed through an in vitro model of human intestinal epithelium.

  14. Identifying New Drug Targets for Potent Phospholipase D Inhibitors: Combining Sequence Alignment, Molecular Docking, and Enzyme Activity/Binding Assays.

    PubMed

    Djakpa, Helene; Kulkarni, Aditya; Barrows-Murphy, Scheneque; Miller, Greg; Zhou, Weihong; Cho, Hyejin; Török, Béla; Stieglitz, Kimberly

    2016-05-01

    Phospholipase D enzymes cleave phospholipid substrates generating choline and phosphatidic acid. Phospholipase D from Streptomyces chromofuscus is a non-HKD (histidine, lysine, and aspartic acid) phospholipase D as the enzyme is more similar to members of the diverse family of metallo-phosphodiesterase/phosphatase enzymes than phospholipase D enzymes with active site HKD repeats. A highly efficient library of phospholipase D inhibitors based on 1,3-disubstituted-4-amino-pyrazolopyrimidine core structure was utilized to evaluate the inhibition of purified S. chromofuscus phospholipase D. The molecules exhibited inhibition of phospholipase D activity (IC50 ) in the nanomolar range with monomeric substrate diC4 PC and micromolar range with phospholipid micelles and vesicles. Binding studies with vesicle substrate and phospholipase D strongly indicate that these inhibitors directly block enzyme vesicle binding. Following these compelling results as a starting point, sequence searches and alignments with S. chromofuscus phospholipase D have identified potential new drug targets. Using AutoDock, inhibitors were docked into the enzymes selected from sequence searches and alignments (when 3D co-ordinates were available) and results analyzed to develop next-generation inhibitors for new targets. In vitro enzyme activity assays with several human phosphatases demonstrated that the predictive protocol was accurate. The strategy of combining sequence comparison, docking, and high-throughput screening assays has helped to identify new drug targets and provided some insight into how to make potential inhibitors more specific to desired targets.

  15. Affinity Crystallography: A New Approach to Extracting High-Affinity Enzyme Inhibitors from Natural Extracts.

    PubMed

    Aguda, Adeleke H; Lavallee, Vincent; Cheng, Ping; Bott, Tina M; Meimetis, Labros G; Law, Simon; Nguyen, Nham T; Williams, David E; Kaleta, Jadwiga; Villanueva, Ivan; Davies, Julian; Andersen, Raymond J; Brayer, Gary D; Brömme, Dieter

    2016-08-26

    Natural products are an important source of novel drug scaffolds. The highly variable and unpredictable timelines associated with isolating novel compounds and elucidating their structures have led to the demise of exploring natural product extract libraries in drug discovery programs. Here we introduce affinity crystallography as a new methodology that significantly shortens the time of the hit to active structure cycle in bioactive natural product discovery research. This affinity crystallography approach is illustrated by using semipure fractions of an actinomycetes culture extract to isolate and identify a cathepsin K inhibitor and to compare the outcome with the traditional assay-guided purification/structural analysis approach. The traditional approach resulted in the identification of the known inhibitor antipain (1) and its new but lower potency dehydration product 2, while the affinity crystallography approach led to the identification of a new high-affinity inhibitor named lichostatinal (3). The structure and potency of lichostatinal (3) was verified by total synthesis and kinetic characterization. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first example of isolating and characterizing a potent enzyme inhibitor from a partially purified crude natural product extract using a protein crystallographic approach.

  16. Effective virtual screening strategy toward covalent ligands: identification of novel NEDD8-activating enzyme inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shengping; Tan, Jiani; Lai, Zhonghui; Li, Ying; Pang, Junxia; Xiao, Jianhu; Huang, Zhangjian; Zhang, Yihua; Ji, Hui; Lai, Yisheng

    2014-06-23

    The NEDD8-activating enzyme (NAE) is an emerging target for cancer therapy, which regulates the degradation and turnover of a variety of cancer-related proteins by activating the cullin-RING E3 ubiquitin ligases. Among a limited number of known NAE inhibitors, the covalent inhibitors have demonstrated the most potent efficacy through their covalently linked adducts with NEDD8. Inspired by this unique mechanism, in this study, a novel combined strategy of virtual screening (VS) was adopted with the aim to identify diverse covalent inhibitors of NAE. To be specific, a docking-enabled pharmacophore model was first built from the possible active conformations of chosen covalent inhibitors. Meanwhile, a dynamic structure-based phamacophore was also established based on the snapshots derived from molecular dynamic simulation. Subsequent screening of a focused ZINC database using these pharmacophore models combined with covalent docking discovered three novel active compounds. Among them, compound LZ3 exhibited the most potent NAE inhibitory activity with an IC50 value of 1.06 ± 0.18 μM. Furthermore, a cell-based washout experiment proved the proposed covalent binding mechanism for compound LZ3, which confirmed the successful application of our combined VS strategy, indicating it may provide a viable solution to systematically discover novel covalent ligands.

  17. Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol and endocannabinoid degradative enzyme inhibitors attenuate intracranial self-stimulation in mice.

    PubMed

    Wiebelhaus, Jason M; Grim, Travis W; Owens, Robert A; Lazenka, Matthew F; Sim-Selley, Laura J; Abdullah, Rehab A; Niphakis, Micah J; Vann, Robert E; Cravatt, Benjamin F; Wiley, Jenny L; Negus, S Stevens; Lichtman, Aron H

    2015-02-01

    A growing body of evidence implicates endogenous cannabinoids as modulators of the mesolimbic dopamine system and motivated behavior. Paradoxically, the reinforcing effects of Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the primary psychoactive constituent of cannabis, have been difficult to detect in preclinical rodent models. In this study, we investigated the impact of THC and inhibitors of the endocannabinoid hydrolytic enzymes fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) and monoacylglycerol lipase (MAGL) on operant responding for electrical stimulation of the medial forebrain bundle [intracranial self-stimulation (ICSS)], which is known to activate the mesolimbic dopamine system. These drugs were also tested in assays of operant responding for food reinforcement and spontaneous locomotor activity. THC and the MAGL inhibitor JZL184 (4-[bis(1,3-benzodioxol-5-yl)hydroxymethyl]-1-piperidinecarboxylic acid 4-nitrophenyl ester) attenuated operant responding for ICSS and food, and also reduced spontaneous locomotor activity. In contrast, the FAAH inhibitor PF-3845 (N-3-pyridinyl-4-[[3-[[5-(trifluoromethyl)-2-pyridinyl]oxy]phenyl]methyl]-1-piperidinecarboxamide) was largely without effect in these assays. Consistent with previous studies showing that combined inhibition of FAAH and MAGL produces a substantially greater cannabimimetic profile than single enzyme inhibition, the dual FAAH-MAGL inhibitor SA-57 (4-[2-(4-chlorophenyl)ethyl]-1-piperidinecarboxylic acid 2-(methylamino)-2-oxoethyl ester) produced a similar magnitude of ICSS depression as that produced by THC. ICSS attenuation by JZL184 was associated with increased brain levels of 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG), whereas peak effects of SA-57 were associated with increased levels of both N-arachidonoylethanolamine (anandamide) and 2-AG. The cannabinoid receptor type 1 receptor antagonist rimonabant, but not the cannabinoid receptor type 2 receptor antagonist SR144528, blocked the attenuating effects of THC, JZL184, and SA-57 on

  18. Nantenine as an acetylcholinesterase inhibitor: SAR, enzyme kinetics and molecular modeling investigations

    PubMed Central

    Pecic, Stevan; McAnuff, Marie A.; Harding, Wayne W.

    2015-01-01

    Nantenine, as well as a number of flexible analogs, were evaluated for acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitory activity in microplate spectrophotometric assays based on Ellman’s method. It was found that the rigid aporphine core of nantenine is an important structural requirement for its anticholinesterase activity. Nantenine showed mixed inhibition kinetics in enzyme assays. Molecular docking experiments suggest that nantenine binds preferentially to the catalytic site of AChE but is also capable of interacting with the peripheral anionic site (PAS) of the enzyme, thus accounting for its mixed inhibition profile. The aporphine core of nantenine may thus be a useful template for the design of novel PAS or dual-site AChE inhibitors. Inhibiting the PAS is desirable for prevention of aggregation of the amyloid peptide Aβ, a major causative factor in the progression of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). PMID:20583856

  19. Novel angiotensin I-converting enzyme inhibitory peptides derived from an edible mushroom, Pleurotus cystidiosus O.K. Miller identified by LC-MS/MS

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors have been reported to reduce mortality in patients with hypertension. Compared to chemosynthetic drugs, ACE inhibitors derived from natural sources such as food proteins are believed to be safer for consumption and to have fewer adverse effects. Some edible mushrooms have been reported to significantly reduce blood pressure after oral administration. In addition, mushrooms are known to be rich in protein content. This makes them a potential source of ACE inhibitory peptides. Hence, the objective of the current study was to isolate and characterise ACE inhibitory peptides from an edible mushroom, Pleurotus cystidiosus. Methods ACE inhibitory proteins were isolated from P. cystidiosus based on the bioassay guided purification steps, i.e. ammonium sulphate precipitation, reverse phase high performance liquid chromatography and size exclusion chromatography. Active fraction was then analysed by LC-MS/MS and potential ACE inhibitory peptides identified were chemically synthesized. Effect of in vitro gastrointestinal digestions on the ACE inhibitory activity of the peptides and their inhibition patterns were evaluated. Results Two potential ACE inhibitory peptides, AHEPVK and GPSMR were identified from P. cystidiosus with molecular masses of 679.53 and 546.36 Da, respectively. Both peptides exhibited potentially high ACE inhibitory activity with IC50 values of 62.8 and 277.5 μM, respectively. SEC chromatograms and BIOPEP analysis of these peptides revealed that the peptide sequence of the hexapeptide, AHEPVK, was stable throughout gastrointestinal digestion. The pentapeptide, GPSMR, was hydrolysed after digestion and it was predicted to release a dipeptide ACE inhibitor, GP, from its precursor. The Lineweaver-Burk plot of AHEPVK showed that this potent and stable ACE inhibitor has a competitive inhibitory effect against ACE. Conclusion The present study indicated that the peptides from P. cystidiosus could be

  20. Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors in preventing remodeling and development of heart failure after acute myocardial infarction: results of the German multicenter study of the effects of captopril on cardiopulmonary exercise parameters (ECCE).

    PubMed

    Kleber, F X; Sabin, G V; Winter, U J; Reindl, I; Beil, S; Wenzel, M; Fischer, M; Doering, W

    1997-08-04

    Early action of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors after myocardial infarction (MI) has been shown in large scale clinical trials to reduce mortality over the first weeks. However, the mechanisms involved are yet unclear and several trials showed a tendency toward a small, albeit unexpected, rise in cardiogenic shock or mortality. Since cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPX) has become a "gold standard" in assessing the severity of heart failure, we studied--after finishing a pilot trial--the effect of captopril versus placebo in 208 patients who were individually titrated (titrated dose, mean 46/69 mg/day after 7 days/4 weeks, respectively) in order to preserve their blood pressure in the acute phase of myocardial infarction; we followed the development of congestive heart failure (CHF) over 4 weeks by measuring oxygen consumption. After 4 weeks, overall oxygen consumption at the anaerobic threshold (VO2-AT; 13.7 vs 13.1), maximal oxygen consumption (VO2max 19.3 vs 18.9 mL/kg per min) and exercise duration (896 vs 839 sec) showed a nonsignificant difference in favor of the captopril group. The predefined, categorized, combined endpoint of severe heart failure or death (heart failure necessitating ACE inhibition, VO2max < 10 mL/kg per min, or death) was significantly reduced in the captopril group (n = 7/104) versus placebo (n = 18/104; p = 0.03). Differences were mainly caused by fewer CHF events (delta n = 10). We conclude that ACE inhibition with individualized dose titration markedly reduces the 4-week incidence of severe heart failure or death; > 10 patients per 100 treated gained major benefits from this therapy.

  1. Top-down Targeted Metabolomics Reveals a Sulfur-Containing Metabolite with Inhibitory Activity against Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme in Asparagus officinalis.

    PubMed

    Nakabayashi, Ryo; Yang, Zhigang; Nishizawa, Tomoko; Mori, Tetsuya; Saito, Kazuki

    2015-05-22

    The discovery of bioactive natural compounds containing sulfur, which is crucial for inhibitory activity against angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE), is a challenging task in metabolomics. Herein, a new S-containing metabolite, asparaptine (1), was discovered in the spears of Asparagus officinalis by targeted metabolomics using mass spectrometry for S-containing metabolites. The contribution ratio (2.2%) to the IC50 value in the crude extract showed that asparaptine (1) is a new ACE inhibitor.

  2. Treatment-emergent mutations in NAEβ confer resistance to the NEDD8-activating enzyme inhibitor MLN4924.

    PubMed

    Milhollen, Michael A; Thomas, Michael P; Narayanan, Usha; Traore, Tary; Riceberg, Jessica; Amidon, Benjamin S; Bence, Neil F; Bolen, Joseph B; Brownell, James; Dick, Lawrence R; Loke, Huay-Keng; McDonald, Alice A; Ma, Jingya; Manfredi, Mark G; Sells, Todd B; Sintchak, Mike D; Yang, Xiaofeng; Xu, Qing; Koenig, Erik M; Gavin, James M; Smith, Peter G

    2012-03-20

    MLN4924 is an investigational small-molecule inhibitor of NEDD8-activating enzyme (NAE) in clinical trials for the treatment of cancer. MLN4924 is a mechanism-based inhibitor, with enzyme inhibition occurring through the formation of a tight-binding NEDD8-MLN4924 adduct. In cell and xenograft models of cancer, we identified treatment-emergent heterozygous mutations in the adenosine triphosphate binding pocket and NEDD8-binding cleft of NAEβ as the primary mechanism of resistance to MLN4924. Biochemical analyses of NAEβ mutants revealed slower rates of adduct formation and reduced adduct affinity for the mutant enzymes. A compound with tighter binding properties was able to potently inhibit mutant enzymes in cells. These data provide rationales for patient selection and the development of next-generation NAE inhibitors designed to overcome treatment-emergent NAEβ mutations.

  3. Discovery and evaluation of inhibitors to the immunosuppressive enzyme indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase 1 (IDO1): Probing the active site-inhibitor interactions.

    PubMed

    Tomek, Petr; Palmer, Brian D; Flanagan, Jack U; Sun, Chuanwen; Raven, Emma L; Ching, Lai-Ming

    2017-01-27

    High expression of the immunosuppressive enzyme, indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase 1 (IDO1) for a broad range of malignancies is associated with poor patient prognosis, and the enzyme is a validated target for cancer intervention. To identify novel IDO1 inhibitors suitable for drug development, 1597 compounds in the National Cancer Institute Diversity Set III library were tested for inhibitory activity against recombinant human IDO1. We retrieved 35 hits that inhibited IDO1 activity >50% at 20 μM. Five structural filters and the PubChem Bioassay database were used to guide the selection of five inhibitors with IC50 between 3 and 12 μM for subsequent experimental evaluation. A pyrimidinone scaffold emerged as being the most promising. It showed excellent cell penetration, negligible cytotoxicity and passed four out of the five structural filters applied. To evaluate the importance of Ser167 and Cys129 residues in the IDO1 active site for inhibitor binding, the entire NCI library was subsequently screened against alanine-replacement mutant enzymes of these two residues. The results established that Ser167 but not Cys129 is important for inhibitory activity of a broad range of IDO1 inhibitors. Structure-activity-relationship studies proposed substituents interacting with Ser167 on four investigated IDO1 inhibitors. Three of these four Ser167 interactions associated with an increased IDO1 inhibition and were correctly predicted by molecular docking supporting Ser167 as an important mediator of potency for IDO1 inhibitors.

  4. Preparation of a dual-enzyme co-immobilized capillary microreactor and simultaneous screening of multiple enzyme inhibitors by capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Lin, Pingtan; Zhao, Shulin; Lu, Xin; Ye, Fanggui; Wang, Hengshan

    2013-08-01

    A CE method based on a dual-enzyme co-immobilized capillary microreactor was developed for the simultaneous screening of multiple enzyme inhibitors. The capillary microreactor was prepared by co-immobilizing adenosine deaminase and xanthine oxidase on the inner wall at the inlet end of the separation capillary. The enzymes were first immobilized on gold nanoparticles, and the functionalized gold nanoparticles were then assembled on the inner wall at the inlet end of the separation capillary treated with polyethyleneimine. With the developed CE method, the substrates and products were baseline separated within 3 min. The activity of the immobilized enzyme can be directly detected by measuring the peak height of the products. A statistical parameter Z' factor was recommended for evaluation of the accuracy of a drug screening system. In the present study, it was calculated to be larger than 0.5, implying a good accuracy. Finally, screening a small compound library containing two known enzyme inhibitors and 20 natural extracts by the proposed method was demonstrated. The known inhibitors were identified, and some natural extracts were found to be positive for two-enzyme inhibition by the present method.

  5. Marketing research on the angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors antihypertensive medicines

    PubMed Central

    BOBOIA, ANAMARIA; GRIGORESCU, MARIUS RAREŞ; TURCU - ŞTIOLICĂ, ADINA

    2017-01-01

    Background and aims The research aimed at investigating sales trends of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors antihypertensive medicines, both in terms of quantity and value, in ten community pharmacies, for a period of three years. The research on the antihypertensive medicines consumption is important for highlighting the ever increasing impact of hypertension among the population. Methods The methods used in this research were the following: marketing research, method of sampling, descriptive methods, retrospective analysis, method of comparison. Results The results showed that the drugs containing the active substances of the angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors class had had significant increases in quantitative and value sales, bringing substantial revenues to pharmacies. From the quantitative perspective, the best-selling products were those containing Enalaprilum, while in terms of value, the best-selling medicines were those containing Perindoprilum. We evidenced that spectacular sales were also achieved for products that have Lisinoprilum, respectively Captoprilum, as active substances. The largest quantities were marketed for the Captopril Terapia® product and the highest earnings were recorded for the Prestarium® medicine. Conclusion This paper approaches an interesting and topical issue, which can be helpful to professionals (pharmacists, doctors) and other categories, such as economists, statisticians, representatives of companies manufacturing medicines, as well as to hypertensive patients, as it could be used to warn population regarding the incidence of cardiovascular diseases, and, at the same time, trace sales trends in order to accomplish profitable business plans. PMID:28246502

  6. The pharmacological mechanism of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibition by green tea, Rooibos and enalaprilat - a study on enzyme kinetics.

    PubMed

    Persson, Ingrid A-L

    2012-04-01

    Green tea (Camellia sinensis L.) and Rooibos (Aspalathus linearis Dahlg.) inhibit angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) in vitro and in vivo. The ACE inhibitor enalaprilat has been described previously as a competitive inhibitor and sometimes as a non-competitive inhibitor. The aim of this study was to investigate the pharmacological mechanism of ACE inhibition of green tea and Rooibos by enzyme kinetics, and to compare this with enalaprilat. A Michaelis-Menten kinetics and Lineweaver-Burk graph showed mean values of V(max)  = 3.73 µM and K(m)  = 0.71 µM for green tea, of V(max)  = 6.76 µM and K(m)  = 0.78 µM for Rooibos, of V(max)  = 12.54 µM and K(m)  = 2.77 µM for enalaprilat, and of V(max)  = 51.33 µM and K(m)  = 9.22 µM for the PBS control. Incubating serum with green tea or Rooibos saturated with zinc chloride did not change the inhibitory effect. Enalaprilat preincubated with zinc chloride showed a decrease in the inhibitory effect. In conclusion, green tea, Rooibos and enalaprilat seem to inhibit ACE activity using a mixed inhibitor mechanism.

  7. A novel 2-oxoindolinylidene inhibitor of bacterial MurD ligase: Enzyme kinetics, protein-inhibitor binding by NMR and a molecular dynamics study.

    PubMed

    Simčič, Mihael; Pureber, Kaja; Kristan, Katja; Urleb, Uroš; Kocjan, Darko; Grdadolnik, Simona Golič

    2014-08-18

    N-(5-(5-nitro-2-oxo-1,2-dihydro-3H-indol-3-ylidene)4-oxo-2-thioxo-1,3-thiazolidin-3-yl)nicotinamide, a 2-oxoindolinylidene derivative with novel structure scaffold, was evaluated for inhibition potency against the MurD enzyme from Escherichia coli using an enzyme steady-state kinetics study. The compound exerted competitive inhibition with respect to UMA, a MurD substrate, and affected bacterial growth. Furthermore, we isolated and purified (13)C selectively labeled MurD enzyme from E. coli and evaluated the binding interactions of the new compound using the (1)H/(13)C-HSQC 2D NMR method. Molecular dynamics calculations showed stable structure for the MurD-inhibitor complex. The binding mode of novel inhibitor was determined and compared to naphthalene-N-sulfonamide-d-Glu derivatives, transition state mimicking inhibitors, UMA and AMP-PCP, an ATP analog. It binds to the UDP/MurNAc binding region. In contrast to transition state mimicking inhibitors, it does not interact with the enzyme's C-terminal domain, which can be beneficial for ligand binding. A pharmacophore pattern was established for the design of novel drugs having a propensity to inhibit a broad spectrum of Mur enzymes.

  8. Anti-diabetic activity of insulin-degrading enzyme inhibitors mediated by multiple hormones

    PubMed Central

    Maianti, Juan Pablo; McFedries, Amanda; Foda, Zachariah H.; Kleiner, Ralph E.; Du, Xiu Quan; Leissring, Malcolm A.; Tang, Wei-Jen; Charron, Maureen J.; Seeliger, Markus A.; Saghatelian, Alan; Liu, David R.

    2014-01-01

    Despite decades of speculation that inhibiting endogenous insulin degradation might treat type-2 diabetes1, 2, and the identification of IDE (insulin-degrading enzyme) as a diabetes susceptibility gene3, 4, the relationship between the activity of the zinc metalloprotein IDE and glucose homeostasis remains unclear. Although Ide−/− mice have elevated insulin levels, they exhibit impaired, rather than improved, glucose tolerance that may arise from compensatory insulin signalling dysfunction5, 6. IDE inhibitors that are active in vivo are therefore needed to elucidate IDE’s physiological roles and to determine its potential to serve as a target for the treatment of diabetes. Here we report the discovery of a physiologically active IDE inhibitor identified from a DNA-templated macrocycle library. An X-ray structure of the macrocycle bound to IDE reveals that it engages a binding pocket away from the catalytic site, which explains its remarkable selectivity. Treatment of lean and obese mice with this inhibitor shows that IDE regulates the abundance and signalling of glucagon and amylin, in addition to that of insulin. Under physiological conditions that augment insulin and amylin levels, such as oral glucose administration, acute IDE inhibition leads to substantially improved glucose tolerance and slower gastric emptying. These findings demonstrate the feasibility of modulating IDE activity as a new therapeutic strategy to treat type-2 diabetes and expand our understanding of the roles of IDE in glucose and hormone regulation. PMID:24847884

  9. Anti-diabetic activity of insulin-degrading enzyme inhibitors mediated by multiple hormones.

    PubMed

    Maianti, Juan Pablo; McFedries, Amanda; Foda, Zachariah H; Kleiner, Ralph E; Du, Xiu Quan; Leissring, Malcolm A; Tang, Wei-Jen; Charron, Maureen J; Seeliger, Markus A; Saghatelian, Alan; Liu, David R

    2014-07-03

    Despite decades of speculation that inhibiting endogenous insulin degradation might treat type-2 diabetes, and the identification of IDE (insulin-degrading enzyme) as a diabetes susceptibility gene, the relationship between the activity of the zinc metalloprotein IDE and glucose homeostasis remains unclear. Although Ide(-/-) mice have elevated insulin levels, they exhibit impaired, rather than improved, glucose tolerance that may arise from compensatory insulin signalling dysfunction. IDE inhibitors that are active in vivo are therefore needed to elucidate IDE's physiological roles and to determine its potential to serve as a target for the treatment of diabetes. Here we report the discovery of a physiologically active IDE inhibitor identified from a DNA-templated macrocycle library. An X-ray structure of the macrocycle bound to IDE reveals that it engages a binding pocket away from the catalytic site, which explains its remarkable selectivity. Treatment of lean and obese mice with this inhibitor shows that IDE regulates the abundance and signalling of glucagon and amylin, in addition to that of insulin. Under physiological conditions that augment insulin and amylin levels, such as oral glucose administration, acute IDE inhibition leads to substantially improved glucose tolerance and slower gastric emptying. These findings demonstrate the feasibility of modulating IDE activity as a new therapeutic strategy to treat type-2 diabetes and expand our understanding of the roles of IDE in glucose and hormone regulation.

  10. Effect of enzyme inducers and inhibitors on the pharmacokinetics of oltipraz in rats.

    PubMed

    Bae, Soo Kyung; Lee, Shin Jung; Kim, Young Hoon; Kim, Taekrho; Lee, Myung Gull

    2005-04-01

    A series of in-vitro and in-vivo experiments, using various inducers and inhibitors of hepatic microsomal cytochrome P450 (CYP) isozymes, was conducted to study oltipraz pharmacokinetics in rats. In in-vivo studies, oltipraz at a dose of 10 mg kg(-) was administered intravenously to rats. In rats pretreated with SKF 525-A (a nonspecific CYP isozyme inhibitor in rats; n-9), the time-averaged total body clearance (CL) of oltipraz was significantly slower (56.6% decrease) than that in untreated rats (n=9). This indicated that oltipraz is metabolized via CYP isozymes in rats. Hence, various enzyme inducers or inhibitors were used in in-vitro and in-vivo studies in rats. In rats pretreated with 3-methylcholanthrene (n=9 and 8 for untreated and treated groups, respectively), phenobarbital (n=7 and 10 for untreated and treated groups, respectively) or dexamethasone (n=7 and 12 for untreated and treated groups, respectively) (main inducers of CYP1A1/2, 2B1/2 and 3A1/2 in rats, respectively), the CL values were significantly faster (38.4, 94.4 and 33.6% increase, respectively). In rats pretreated with sulfaphenazole (n=8 and 9 for untreated and treated groups, respectively), quinine (n=7 and 9 for untreated and treated groups, respectively) or troleandomycin (n=8 and 9 for untreated and treated groups, respectively) (main inhibitors of CYP2C11, 2D1 and 3A1/2 in rats, respectively), the CL values were significantly slower (31.0, 27.6 and 36.3% decrease, respectively). The in-vivo results with various enzyme inhibitors correlated well with the in-vitro intrinsic clearance for disappearance of oltipraz (CL(int)) (n=5, each). The above data suggested that oltipraz could be metabolized in male rats mainly via CYP1A1/2, 2B1/2, 2C11, 3A1/2 and 2D1.

  11. Yucasin is a potent inhibitor of YUCCA, a key enzyme in auxin biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Takeshi; Hayashi, Ken-Ichiro; Suzuki, Hiromi; Gyohda, Atsuko; Takaoka, Chihiro; Sakaguchi, Yusuke; Matsumoto, Sachiko; Kasahara, Hiroyuki; Sakai, Tatsuya; Kato, Jun-Ichi; Kamiya, Yuji; Koshiba, Tomokazu

    2014-02-01

    Indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), an auxin plant hormone, is biosynthesized from tryptophan. The indole-3-pyruvic acid (IPyA) pathway, involving the tryptophan aminotransferase TAA1 and YUCCA (YUC) enzymes, was recently found to be a major IAA biosynthetic pathway in Arabidopsis. TAA1 catalyzes the conversion of tryptophan to IPyA, and YUC produces IAA from IPyA. Using a chemical biology approach with maize coleoptiles, we identified 5-(4-chlorophenyl)-4H-1,2,4-triazole-3-thiol (yucasin) as a potent inhibitor of IAA biosynthesis in YUC-expressing coleoptile tips. Enzymatic analysis of recombinant AtYUC1-His suggested that yucasin strongly inhibited YUC1-His activity against the substrate IPyA in a competitive manner. Phenotypic analysis of Arabidopsis YUC1 over-expression lines (35S::YUC1) demonstrated that yucasin acts in IAA biosynthesis catalyzed by YUC. In addition, 35S::YUC1 seedlings showed resistance to yucasin in terms of root growth. A loss-of-function mutant of TAA1, sav3-2, was hypersensitive to yucasin in terms of root growth and hypocotyl elongation of etiolated seedlings. Yucasin combined with the TAA1 inhibitor l-kynurenine acted additively in Arabidopsis seedlings, producing a phenotype similar to yucasin-treated sav3-2 seedlings, indicating the importance of IAA biosynthesis via the IPyA pathway in root growth and leaf vascular development. The present study showed that yucasin is a potent inhibitor of YUC enzymes that offers an effective tool for analyzing the contribution of IAA biosynthesis via the IPyA pathway to plant development and physiological processes.

  12. Novel Inhibitors of Rad6 Ubiquitin Conjugating Enzyme: Design, Synthesis, Identification, and Functional Characterization

    PubMed Central

    Nangia-Makker, Pratima; Balan, Vitaly; Morelli, Matteo; Kothayer, Hend; Westwell, Andrew D.; Shekhar, Malathy P.V.

    2013-01-01

    Protein ubiquitination is important for cell signaling, DNA repair, and proteasomal degradation, and it is not surprising that alterations in ubiquitination occur frequently in cancer. Ubiquitin-conjugating enzymes (E2) mediate ubiquitination by selective interactions with ubiquitin-activating (E1) and ubiquitin ligase (E3) enzymes, and thus selective E2 small molecule inhibitor (SMI) will provide specificity unattainable with proteasome inhibitors. Here we describe synthesis and functional characterization of the first SMIs of human E2 Rad6B, a fundamental component of translesion synthesis DNA repair. A pharmacophore model for consensus E2 ubiquitin-binding sites was generated for virtual screening to identify E2 inhibitor candidates. Twelve triazine (TZ) analogs screened in silico by molecular docking to the Rad6B X-ray structure were verified by their effect on Rad6B ubiquitination of histone H2A. TZs #8 and 9 docked to the Rad6B catalytic site with highest complementarity. TZs #1, 2, 8, and 9 inhibited Rad6B-ubiquitin thioester formation and subsequent ubiquitin transfer to histone H2A. SMI #9 inhibition of Rad6 was selective as BCA2 ubiquitination by E2 UbcH5 was unaffected by SMI #9. SMI #9 more potently inhibited proliferation, colony formation, and migration than SMI #8, and induced MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell G2–M arrest and apoptosis. Ubiquitination assays using Rad6 immunoprecipitated from SMI #8- or 9-treated cells confirmed inhibition of endogenous Rad6 activity. Consistent with our previous data showing Rad6B-mediated polyubiquitination stabilizes β-catenin, MDAMB-231 treatment with SMIs #8 or 9 decreased β-catenin protein levels. Together these results describe identification of the first Rad6 SMIs. PMID:23339190

  13. Novel inhibitors of Rad6 ubiquitin conjugating enzyme: design, synthesis, identification, and functional characterization.

    PubMed

    Sanders, Matthew A; Brahemi, Ghali; Nangia-Makker, Pratima; Balan, Vitaly; Morelli, Matteo; Kothayer, Hend; Westwell, Andrew D; Shekhar, Malathy P V

    2013-04-01

    Protein ubiquitination is important for cell signaling, DNA repair, and proteasomal degradation, and it is not surprising that alterations in ubiquitination occur frequently in cancer. Ubiquitin-conjugating enzymes (E2) mediate ubiquitination by selective interactions with ubiquitin-activating (E1) and ubiquitin ligase (E3) enzymes, and thus selective E2 small molecule inhibitor (SMI) will provide specificity unattainable with proteasome inhibitors. Here we describe synthesis and functional characterization of the first SMIs of human E2 Rad6B, a fundamental component of translesion synthesis DNA repair. A pharmacophore model for consensus E2 ubiquitin-binding sites was generated for virtual screening to identify E2 inhibitor candidates. Twelve triazine (TZ) analogs screened in silico by molecular docking to the Rad6B X-ray structure were verified by their effect on Rad6B ubiquitination of histone H2A. TZs #8 and 9 docked to the Rad6B catalytic site with highest complementarity. TZs #1, 2, 8, and 9 inhibited Rad6B-ubiquitin thioester formation and subsequent ubiquitin transfer to histone H2A. SMI #9 inhibition of Rad6 was selective as BCA2 ubiquitination by E2 UbcH5 was unaffected by SMI #9. SMI #9 more potently inhibited proliferation, colony formation, and migration than SMI #8, and induced MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell G2-M arrest and apoptosis. Ubiquitination assays using Rad6 immunoprecipitated from SMI #8- or 9-treated cells confirmed inhibition of endogenous Rad6 activity. Consistent with our previous data showing Rad6B-mediated polyubiquitination stabilizes β-catenin, MDA-MB-231 treatment with SMIs #8 or 9 decreased β-catenin protein levels. Together these results describe identification of the first Rad6 SMIs.

  14. Characterization of Cellulase Enzyme Inhibitors Formed During the Chemical Pretreatments of Rice Straw

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajan, Kalavathy

    Production of fuels and chemicals from a renewable and inexpensive resource such as lignocellulosic biomass is a lucrative and sustainable option for the advanced biofuel and bio-based chemical platform. Agricultural residues constitute the bulk of potential feedstock available for cellulosic fuel production. On a global scale, rice straw is the largest source of agricultural residues and is therefore an ideal crop model for biomass deconstruction studies. Lignocellulosic biofuel production involves the processes of biomass conditioning, enzymatic saccharification, microbial fermentation and ethanol distillation, and one of the major factors affecting its techno-economic feasibility is the biomass recalcitrance to enzymatic saccharification. Preconditioning of lignocellulosic biomass, using chemical, physico-chemical, mechanical and biological pretreatments, is often practiced such that biomass becomes available to downstream processing. Pretreatments, such as dilute acid and hot water, are effective means of biomass conversion. However, despite their processing importance, preconditioning biomass also results in the production of carbohydrate and lignin degradation products that are inhibitory to downstream saccharification enzymes. The saccharification enzyme cocktail is made up of endo-cellulase, exo-cellulase and beta-glucosidase enzymes, whose role is to cleave cellulose polymers into glucose monomers. Specifically, endo-cellulase and exo-cellulase enzymes cleave cellulose chains in the middle and at the end, resulting in cellobiose molecules, which are hydrolyzed into glucose by beta-glucosidase. Unfortunately, degradation compounds generated during pretreatment inhibit the saccharification enzyme cocktail. Various research groups have identified specific classes of inhibitors formed during biomass pretreatment and have studied their inhibitory effect on the saccharification cocktail. These various research groups prepared surrogate solutions in an attempt to

  15. ACE2 and Microbiota: Emerging Targets for Cardiopulmonary Disease Therapy.

    PubMed

    Cole-Jeffrey, Colleen T; Liu, Meng; Katovich, Michael J; Raizada, Mohan K; Shenoy, Vinayak

    2015-12-01

    The health of the cardiovascular and pulmonary systems is inextricably linked to the renin-angiotensin system (RAS). Physiologically speaking, a balance between the vasodeleterious (Angiotensin-converting enzyme [ACE]/Angiotensin II [Ang II]/Ang II type 1 receptor [AT1R]) and vasoprotective (Angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 [ACE2]/Angiotensin-(1-7) [Ang-(1-7)]/Mas receptor [MasR]) components of the RAS is critical for cardiopulmonary homeostasis. Upregulation of the ACE/Ang II/AT1R axis shifts the system toward vasoconstriction, proliferation, hypertrophy, inflammation, and fibrosis, all factors that contribute to the development and progression of cardiopulmonary diseases. Conversely, stimulation of the vasoprotective ACE2/Ang-(1-7)/MasR axis produces a counter-regulatory response that promotes cardiovascular health. Current research is investigating novel strategies to augment actions of the vasoprotective RAS components, particularly ACE2, in order to treat various pathologies. Although multiple approaches to increase the activity of ACE2 have displayed beneficial effects against experimental disease models, the mechanisms behind its protective actions remain incompletely understood. Recent work demonstrating a non-catalytic role for ACE2 in amino acid transport in the gut has led us to speculate that the therapeutic effects of ACE2 can be mediated, in part, by its actions on the gastrointestinal tract and/or gut microbiome. This is consistent with emerging data which suggest that dysbiosis of the gut and lung microbiomes is associated with cardiopulmonary disease. This review highlights new developments in the protective actions of ACE2 against cardiopulmonary disorders, discusses innovative approaches to targeting ACE2 for therapy, and explores an evolving role for gut and lung microbiota in cardiopulmonary health.

  16. Cowpea bruchid Callosobruchus maculatus counteracts dietary protease inhibitors by modulating propeptides of major digestive enzymes.

    PubMed

    Ahn, J-E; Lovingshimer, M R; Salzman, R A; Presnail, J K; Lu, A L; Koiwa, H; Zhu-Salzman, K

    2007-06-01

    Cowpea bruchids, when challenged by consumption of the soybean cysteine protease inhibitor scN, reconfigure expression of their major CmCP digestive proteases and resume normal feeding and development. Previous evidence indicated that insects selectively induced CmCPs from subfamily B, that were more efficient in autoprocessing and possessed not only higher proteolytic, but also scN-degrading activities. In contrast, dietary scN only marginally up-regulated genes from the more predominant CmCP subfamily A that were inferior to subfamily B. To gain further molecular insight into this adaptive adjustment, we performed domain swapping between the two respective subfamily members B1 and A16, the latter unable to autoprocess or degrade scN even after intermolecular processing. Swapping the propeptides did not qualitatively alter autoprocessing in either protease isoform. Incorporation of either the N- (pAmBA) or C-terminal (pAmAB) mature B1 segment into A16, however, was sufficient to prime autoprocessing of A16 to its mature form. Further, the swap at the N-terminal mature A16 protein region (pAmBA) resulted in four amino acid changes. Replacement of these amino acid residues by the corresponding B1 residues, singly and pair-wise, revealed that autoprocessing activation in pAmBA resulted from cumulative and/or coordinated individual effects. Bacterially expressed isolated propeptides (pA16 and pB1) differed in their ability to inhibit mature B1 enzyme. Lower inhibitory activity in pB1 is likely attributable to its lack of protein stability. This instability in the cleaved propeptide is necessary, although insufficient by itself, for scN-degradation by the mature B1 enzyme. Taken together, cowpea bruchids modulate proteolysis of their digestive enzymes by controlling proCmCP cleavage and propeptide stability, which explains at least in part the plasticity cowpea bruchids demonstrate in response to protease inhibitors.

  17. Enzyme-coupled nanoparticles-assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry for searching for low-mass inhibitors of enzymes in complex mixtures.

    PubMed

    Salwiński, Aleksander; Da Silva, David; Delépée, Raphaël; Maunit, Benoît

    2014-04-01

    In this report, enzyme-coupled magnetic nanoparticles (EMPs) were shown to be an effective affinity-based tool for finding specific interactions between enzymatic targets and the low-mass molecules in complex mixtures using classic MALDI-TOF apparatus. EMPs used in this work act as nonorganic matrix enabling ionization of small molecules without any interference in the low-mass range (enzyme-coupled nanoparticles-assisted laser desorption ionization MS, ENALDI MS) and simultaneously carry the superficial specific binding sites to capture inhibitors present in a studied mixture. We evaluated ENALDI approach in two complementary variations: 'ion fading' (IF-ENALDI), based on superficial adsorption of inhibitors and 'ion hunting' (IH-ENALDI), based on selective pre-concentration of inhibitors. IF-ENALDI was applied for two sets of enzyme-inhibitor pairs: tyrosinase-glabridin and trypsin-leupeptin and for the real plant sample: Sparrmannia discolor leaf and stem methanol extract. The efficacy of IH-ENALDI was shown for the pair of trypsin-leupeptin. Both ENALDI approaches pose an alternative for bioassay-guided fractionation, the common method for finding inhibitors in the complex mixtures.

  18. Enzyme-Coupled Nanoparticles-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization Mass Spectrometry for Searching for Low-Mass Inhibitors of Enzymes in Complex Mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salwiński, Aleksander; Da Silva, David; Delépée, Raphaël; Maunit, Benoît

    2014-04-01

    In this report, enzyme-coupled magnetic nanoparticles (EMPs) were shown to be an effective affinity-based tool for finding specific interactions between enzymatic targets and the low-mass molecules in complex mixtures using classic MALDI-TOF apparatus. EMPs used in this work act as nonorganic matrix enabling ionization of small molecules without any interference in the low-mass range (enzyme-coupled nanoparticles-assisted laser desorption ionization MS, ENALDI MS) and simultaneously carry the superficial specific binding sites to capture inhibitors present in a studied mixture. We evaluated ENALDI approach in two complementary variations: `ion fading' (IF-ENALDI), based on superficial adsorption of inhibitors and `ion hunting' (IH-ENALDI), based on selective pre-concentration of inhibitors. IF-ENALDI was applied for two sets of enzyme-inhibitor pairs: tyrosinase-glabridin and trypsin-leupeptin and for the real plant sample: Sparrmannia discolor leaf and stem methanol extract. The efficacy of IH-ENALDI was shown for the pair of trypsin-leupeptin. Both ENALDI approaches pose an alternative for bioassay-guided fractionation, the common method for finding inhibitors in the complex mixtures.

  19. Detection of enzyme inhibitors in crude natural extracts using droplet-based microfluidics coupled to HPLC.

    PubMed

    Ochoa, Abraham; Álvarez-Bohórquez, Enrique; Castillero, Eduardo; Olguin, Luis F

    2017-04-04

    Natural product screening for new bioactive compounds can greatly benefit from low reagents consumption and high throughput capacity of droplet-based microfluidic systems. However, the creation of large droplet libraries in which each droplet carries a different compound is a challenging task. A possible solution is to use an HPLC coupled to a droplet generating microfluidic device to sequentially encapsulate the eluting compounds. In this work we demonstrate the feasibility of carrying out enzyme inhibiting assays inside nano-liter droplets with the different components of a natural crude extract after being separated by a coupled HPLC column. In the droplet formation zone, the eluted components are mixed with an enzyme and a fluorogenic substrate that permits to follow the enzymatic reaction in the presence of each chromatographic peak and identify those inhibiting the enzyme activity. Using a fractal shape channel design and automated image analysis we were able to identify inhibitors of Clostridium perfringens neuraminidase present in a root extract of the Pelargonium sidoides plant. This work demonstrates the feasibility of bioprofiling a natural crude extract after being separated in HPLC using microfluidic droplets on-line and represents an advance in the miniaturization of natural products screening.

  20. A biochemical logic gate using an enzyme and its inhibitor. Part II: The logic gate.

    PubMed

    Sivan, Sarit; Tuchman, Samuel; Lotan, Noah

    2003-06-01

    Enzyme-Based Logic Gates (ENLOGs) are key components in bio-molecular systems for information processing. This report and the previous one in this series address the characterization of two bio-molecular switching elements, namely the alpha-chymotrypsin (alphaCT) derivative p-phenylazobenzoyl-alpha-chymotrypsin (PABalphaCT) and its inhibitor (proflavine), as well as their assembly into a logic gate. The experimental output of the proposed system is expressed in terms of enzymic activity and this was translated into logic output (i.e. "1" or "0") relative to a predetermined threshold value. We have found that an univalent link exists between the dominant isomers of PABalphaCT (cis or trans), the dominant form of either acridine (proflavine) or acridan and the logic output of the system. Thus, of all possible combinations, only the trans-PABalphaCT and the acridan lead to an enzymic activity that can be defined as logic output "1". The system operates under the rules of Boolean algebra and performs as an "AND" logic gate.

  1. Angiotensin I-converting enzyme inhibitory peptide derived from glycinin, the 11S globulin of soybean (Glycine max).

    PubMed

    Mallikarjun Gouda, K G; Gowda, Lalitha R; Rao, A G Appu; Prakash, V

    2006-06-28

    Angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE), a dipeptidyl carboxypeptidase, catalyzes the conversion of Angiotensin I to the potent vasoconstrictor Angiotensin II and plays an important physiological role in regulating blood pressure. Inhibitors of angiotensin 1-converting enzyme derived from food proteins are utilized for pharmaceuticals and physiologically functional foods. ACE inhibitory properties of different enzymatic hydrolysates of glycinin, the major storage protein of soybean, have been demonstrated. The IC50 value for the different enzyme digests ranges from 4.5 to 35 microg of N2. The Protease P hydrolysate contained the most potent suite of ACE inhibitory peptides. The ACE inhibitory activity of the Protease P hydrolysate after fractionation by RP-HPLC and ion-pair chromatography was ascribed to a single peptide. The peptide was homogeneous as evidenced by MALDI-TOF and identified to be a pentapeptide. The sequence was Val-Leu-Ile-Val-Pro. This peptide was synthesized using solid-phase FMOC chemistry. The IC50 for ACE inhibition was 1.69 +/- 0.17 microM. The synthetic peptide was a potent competitive inhibitor of ACE with a Ki of 4.5 +/- 0.25 x 10(-6) M. This peptide was resistant to digestion by proteases of the gastrointestinal tract. The antihypertensive property of this peptide derived from glycinin might find importance in the development of therapeutic functional foods.

  2. Vascular Wall ACE is not required for Atherogenesis in ApoE-/- mice

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Daiana; Bernstein, Kenneth E.; Fuchs, Sebastian; Adams, Jonathan; Synetos, Andreas; Taylor, W. Robert

    2009-01-01

    Background It has been proposed that elements of the renin angiotensin system expressed in the arterial wall are critical for the development of atherosclerosis. Angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) is highly expressed by the endothelium and is responsible for a critical enzymatic step in the generation of angiotensin II. However, the functional contribution of ACE expression in the vascular wall in atherogenesis is unknown. Therefore, we made use of unique genetic models in which mice without expression of ACE in the vascular wall were crossed with apoE-/- mice in order to determine the contribution of tissue ACE expression to atherosclerotic lesion formation. Methods and Results Mice expressing either a soluble form of ACE (ACE 2/2) or mice with somatic ACE expression restricted to the liver and kidney (ACE 3/3) on an ApoE-/- background were placed on a standard chow or Western diet for 6 months. Atherosclerotic lesion area in the ACE 2/2 mice was significantly lower than that seen in the ACE 3/3 mice. However, these animals also had significantly lower blood pressure and reduced plasma ACE activity which precluded establishing a specific causal relationship between absent tissue ACE activity and decreased atherosclerotic lesion extent. Therefore, we studied the ACE 3/3 mice which are normotensive and lack vascular ACE expression. In the ACE 3/3 animals, atherosclerotic lesion area was no different from wild type controls despite reduced plasma ACE activity. Conclusions We concluded that under these experimental conditions, expression of ACE in the arterial wall is not required for atherosclerotic lesion formation. PMID:19880118

  3. ACE and AGTR1 polymorphisms in elite rhythmic gymnastics.

    PubMed

    Di Cagno, Alessandra; Sapere, Nadia; Piazza, Marina; Aquino, Giovanna; Iuliano, Enzo; Intrieri, Mariano; Calcagno, Giuseppe

    2013-02-01

    In the angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) gene, Alu deletion, in intron 16, is associated with higher concentrations of ACE serum activity and this may be associated with elite sprint and power performance. The Alu insertion is associated with lower ACE levels and this could lead to endurance performance. Moreover, recent studies have identified a single-nucleotide polymorphism of the angiotensin type 1 receptor gene AGTR1, which seems to be related to ACE activity. The aim of this study was to examine the involvement of the ACE and the AGTR1 gene polymorphisms in 28 Italian elite rhythmic gymnasts (age range 21 ± 7.6 years), and compare them to 23 middle level rhythmic gymnasts (age range 17 ± 10.9 years). The ACE D allele was significantly more frequent in elite athletes than in the control population (χ(2)=4.07, p=0.04). Comparisons between the middle level and elite athletes revealed significant differences (p<0.0001) for the ACE DD genotype (OR=6.48, 95% confidence interval=1.48-28.34), which was more frequent in elite athletes. There were no significant differences in the AGTR1 A/C genotype or allele distributions between the middle level and elite athletes. In conclusion, the ACE D allele genotype could be a contributing factor to high-performance rhythmic gymnastics that should be considered in athlete development and could help to identify which skills should be trained for talent promotion.

  4. ACES--Today and Tomorrow.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hackney, Harold

    1991-01-01

    Presents text of Presidential Address delivered March 24, 1991, at the Association for Counselor Education and Supervision (ACES) luncheon, part of the American Association for Counseling and Development Convention held in Reno, Nevada. Comments on past, present, and future of ACES, particularly on future challenges and role of ACES. (ABL)

  5. Evaluation of Bacillus subtilis SPB1 biosurfactant effects on hyperglycemia, angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) activity and kidney function in rats fed on high-fat-high-fructose diet.

    PubMed

    Zouari, Raida; Hamden, Khaled; El Feki, Abdelfattah; Chaabouni, Khansa; Makni-Ayadi, Fatma; Sallemi, Fahima; Ellouze-Chaabouni, Semia; Ghribi-Aydi, Dhouha

    2017-05-01

    This study investigated the protective and the curative effects of Bacillus subtilis SPB1 crude lipopeptide biosurfactant in alleviating induced obesity complications in rats fed on high-fat-high-fructose diet (HFFD). Male Wistar rats were divided into five groups with the following treatment schedule: normal diet-fed rats (CD), HFFD-fed rats, HFFD-fed rats supplemented with SPB1 biosurfactant from the first day of the experiment (HFFD + Bios1), rats fed on HFFD receiving standard drug (HFFD + Torva), or SPB1 biosurfactant (HFFD + Bios2) during the last 4 weeks of the study. HFFD induced hyperglycemia, manifested by a significant (p < 0.001) increase (20%) in the levels of glucose and α-amylase activity in the plasma, when compared with CD. The administration of SPB1 biosurfactant to rats fed on HFFD reverted back normal blood glucose and α-amylase activity levels. Also, the findings clearly showed that acute oral administration of SPB1 biosurfactant reduced significantly (34%) the peak of blood glucose concentration 60 min after glucose administration, as compared with untreated rats fed on HFFD. Furthermore, renal dysfunction indices such as creatinine and urea as well as the level of angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) exhibited remarkable increases in serum of rats fed on HFFD by 28.35%, 46%, and 92%,. Interestingly, SPB1 lipopeptides treatments decreased the creatinine and urea levels significantly (p < 0.001) near normal values, as compared with that of the HFFD group, and also showed an improvement of the kidney cortex architecture. Moreover, SPB1 biosurfactant displayed a potent inhibition of ACE activity in vitro (CI50  value= 1.37 mg/mL) as well as in vivo in obese rats by 42% and 27.25% with HFFD + Bios1 and HFFD + Bios2 treatments, respectively, and comparatively with the HFFD group. Besides, SPB1 lipopeptides treatments improved some of serum electrolytes such as Na(+), K(+), Ca(2+ ), and Mg(2+). The results

  6. Free-energy analysis of enzyme-inhibitor binding: aspartic proteinase-pepstatin complexes.

    PubMed

    Kalra, P; Das, A; Jayaram, B

    2001-01-01

    Expeditious in silico determinations of the free energies of binding of a series of inhibitors to an enzyme are of immense practical value in structure-based drug design efforts. Some recent advances in the field of computational chemistry have rendered a rigorous thermodynamic treatment of biologic molecules feasible, starting from a molecular description of the biomolecule, solvent, and salt. Pursuing the goal of developing and making available a software for assessing binding affinities, we present here a computationally rapid, albeit elaborate, methodology to estimate and analyze the molecular thermodynamics of enzyme-inhibitor binding with crystal structures as the point of departure. The complexes of aspartic proteinases with seven inhibitors have been adopted for this study. The standard free energy of complexation is considered in terms of a thermodynamic cycle of six distinct steps decomposed into a total of 18 well-defined components. The model we employed involves explicit all-atom accounts of the energetics of electrostatic interactions, solvent screening effects, van der Waals components, and cavitation effects of solvation combined with a Debye-Huckel treatment of salt effects. The magnitudes and signs of the various components are estimated using the AMBER parm94 force field, generalized Born theory, and solvent accessibility measures. Estimates of translational and rotational entropy losses on complexation as well as corresponding changes in the vibrational and configurational entropy are also included. The calculated standard free energies of binding at this stage are within an order of magnitude of the observed inhibition constants and necessitate further improvements in the computational protocols to enable quantitative predictions. Some areas such as inclusion of structural adaptation effects, incorporation of site-dependent amino acid pKa shifts, consideration of the dynamics of the active site for fine-tuning the methodology are easily

  7. Chemometrics Optimized Extraction Procedures, Phytosynergistic Blending and in vitro Screening of Natural Enzyme Inhibitors Amongst Leaves of Tulsi, Banyan and Jamun

    PubMed Central

    De, Baishakhi; Bhandari, Koushik; Singla, Rajeev K.; Katakam, Prakash; Samanta, Tanmoy; Kushwaha, Dilip Kumar; Gundamaraju, Rohit; Mitra, Analava

    2015-01-01

    -oxidant actions. Inhibitory activities against the targeted enzymes expressed in terms of IC50 values have shown that hydro-ethanolic extracts in all cases whether individual species or composites in varying ratios gave higher IC50 values thus showing greater effectivity. Conclusion: Current research provides the state-of-the-art of search of NEIs amongst three species by in-vitro assays which can be further utilized for bioactivity-guided isolations of such enzyme inhibitors. Further, it reports the optimized phyto-blend ratios so as to achieve synergistic anti-oxidative actions. SUMMARY The current research work focuses on the optimization of the extraction process parameters and the ratios of phyto-synergistic blends of the leaves of three common medicinal plants viz. banyan, jamun and tulsi by chemometrics. Qualitative and quantitative chemo profiling of the extracts were done by different phytochemical tests and UV spectrophotometric methods. Enzymes like alpha amylase, alpha glucosidase, aldose reductase, dipeptidyl peptidase 4, angiotensin converting enzymes are found to be pathogenic in type 2 diabetes. In vitro screening of natural enzyme inhibitors amongst individual extracts and composite blends were carried out by different assay procedures and the potency expressed in terms of IC50 values. Antioxidant potentials were estimated by DPPH radical scavenging, ABTS, FRAP and Dot Blot assay. Hydroalcoholic solvent (50:50) gave maximal yield of bio-actives with minimal chlorophyll leaching. Hydroethanolic extract of tulsi showed maximal antioxidant effect. Though all composites showed synergism, maximal effects were shown by the composite (1:1:2) in terms of polyphenol yield, antioxidant effect and inhibitory actions against the targeted enzymes. Abbreviations used: DPP4- dipeptidyl peptidase 4; AR- aldose reductase; ACE- angiotensin converting enzyme; PPAR-γ- peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-γ; NEIs- natural enzyme inhibitors; BE- binding energy; GLP-1- Glucagon

  8. Syndrome of inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone associated with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor administration.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Tomoaki; Horibata, Yoko; Morimoto, Yasuko; Tateno, Shigeru; Kawasoe, Yasutaka; Niwa, Koichiro

    2013-06-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEI's) are an important medication in the treatment of congestive heart failure. However, ACEIs may cause harmful side effects, such as the syndrome of inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone (SIADH), which is a rare but important side effect. We describe here a case of SIADH associated with ACEI administration in a 6-year-old boy with restrictive cardiomyopathy. After recovery from acute exacerbation of congestive heart failure by tolvaptan administration, an ACEI (cilazapril) was started to decrease the production of angiotensin II, which upregulates serum antidiuretic hormone secretion. The patient's heart failure symptoms worsened, including accumulation of right pleural effusion and ascites, after the initiation of ACEI administration. Cessation of ACEI administration dramatically improved his symptoms. Because it is difficult to distinguish SIADH associated with ACEI from worsening congestive heart failure, the possibility of fluid retention due to ACEI administration should always be considered when this agent is administered to patients with heart failure.

  9. Medicinal Chemistry and Therapeutic Relevance of Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    2007-01-01

    Chemical Basis of Drug Action (PHA337 and PHA447) is a required 2-semester course sequence taught to second-professional year pharmacy students at Creighton University in both the campus and distance-education pathways. The course emphasizes integration of previous content, critical thinking, and therapeutic relevance. The content and learning experiences are organized to transition the students' thinking through a constructive process that provides ample opportunities to recall and integrate previous knowledge, learn and apply new knowledge, establish a logical connection between the science and its therapeutic relevance, and finally to apply the science knowledge to predict clinical activity and clinical outcomes as can be expected in a patient. This manuscript is based on the angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors as an illustration of how our course objectives are accomplished. PMID:19503707

  10. Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors reduce oxidative stress intensity in hyperglicemic conditions in rats independently from bradykinin receptor inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Mikrut, Kinga; Kupsz, Justyna; Koźlik, Jacek; Krauss, Hanna; Pruszyńska-Oszmałek, Ewa; Gibas-Dorna, Magdalena

    2016-01-01

    Aim To investigate whether bradykinin-independent antioxidative effects of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs) exist in acute hyperglycemia. Methods Male Wistar rats were divided into the normoglycemic group (n = 40) and the hyperglycemic group (n = 40). Hyperglycemia was induced by a single intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin (STZ, 65 mg/kg body weight) dissolved in 0.1 mol/L citrate buffer (pH 4.5) 72 hours before sacrifice. The normoglycemic group received the same volume of citrate buffer. Each group was divided into five subgroups (n = 8): control group, captopril group, captopril + bradykinin B1 and B2 receptor antagonists group, enalapril group, and enalapril + bradykinin B1 and B2 receptor antagonists group. Captopril, enalapril, B1 and B2 receptor antagonists, or 0.15 mol/L NaCl were given at 2 and 1 hour before sacrifice. Oxidative status was determined by measuring the concentration of malondialdehyde and H2O2, and the activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and glutathione peroxidase (GPx). Results In STZ-induced hyperglycemic rats ACEIs significantly reduced H2O2 and MDA concentration, while they significantly enhanced SOD and GPx activity. The hyperglycemic group treated simultaneously with ACEIs and bradykinin B1 and B2 receptor antagonists showed a significant decrease in H2O2 concentration compared to the control hyperglycemic group. Conclusion These results suggest the existence of additional antioxidative effect of ACEIs in hyperglycemic conditions, which is not related to the bradykinin mediation and the structure of the drug molecule. PMID:27586552

  11. Label free screening of enzyme inhibitors at femtomole scale using segmented flow electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Sun, Shuwen; Slaney, Thomas R; Kennedy, Robert T

    2012-07-03

    Droplet-based microfluidics is an attractive platform for screening and optimizing chemical reactions. Using this approach, it is possible to reliably manipulate nanoliter volume samples and perform operations such as reagent addition with high precision, automation, and throughput. Most studies using droplet microfluidics have relied on optical techniques to detect the reaction; however, this requires engineering color or fluorescence change into the reaction being studied. In this work, we couple electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) to nanoliter scale segmented flow reactions to enable direct (label-free) analysis of reaction products. The system is applied to a screen of inhibitors for cathepsin B. In this approach, solutions of test compounds (including three known inhibitors) are arranged as an array of nanoliter droplets in a tube segmented by perfluorodecalin. The samples are pumped through a series of tees to add enzyme, substrate (peptides), and quenchant. The resulting reaction mixtures are then infused into a metal-coated, fused silica ESI emitter for MS analysis. The system has potential for high-throughput as reagent addition steps are performed at 0.7 s per sample and ESI-MS at up to 1.2 s per sample. Carryover is inconsequential in the ESI emitter and between 2 and 9% per reagent addition depending on the tee utilized. The assay was reliable with a Z-factor of ~0.8. The method required 0.8 pmol of test compound, 1.6 pmol of substrate, and 5 fmol of enzyme per reaction. Segmented flow ESI-MS allows direct, label free screening of reactions at good throughput and ultralow sample consumption.

  12. Screening, identification, and characterization of mechanistically diverse inhibitors of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis enzyme, pantothenate kinase (CoaA).

    PubMed

    Venkatraman, Janani; Bhat, Jyothi; Solapure, Suresh M; Sandesh, Jatheendranath; Sarkar, Debasmita; Aishwarya, Sundaram; Mukherjee, Kakoli; Datta, Santanu; Malolanarasimhan, Krishnan; Bandodkar, Balachandra; Das, Kaveri S

    2012-03-01

    The authors describe the discovery of anti-mycobacterial compounds through identifying mechanistically diverse inhibitors of the essential Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) enzyme, pantothenate kinase (CoaA). Target-driven drug discovery technologies often work with purified enzymes, and inhibitors thus discovered may not optimally inhibit the form of the target enzyme predominant in the bacterial cell or may not be available at the desired concentration. Therefore, in addition to addressing entry or efflux issues, inhibitors with diverse mechanisms of inhibition (MoI) could be prioritized before hit-to-lead optimization. The authors describe a high-throughput assay based on protein thermal melting to screen large numbers of compounds for hits with diverse MoI. Following high-throughput screening for Mtb CoaA enzyme inhibitors, a concentration-dependent increase in protein thermal stability was used to identify true binders, and the degree of enhancement or reduction in thermal stability in the presence of substrate was used to classify inhibitors as competitive or non/uncompetitive. The thermal shift-based MoI assay could be adapted to screen hundreds of compounds in a single experiment as compared to traditional biochemical approaches for MoI determination. This MoI was confirmed through mechanistic studies that estimated K(ie) and K(ies) for representative compounds and through nuclear magnetic resonance-based ligand displacement assays.

  13. Simultaneous modulation of transport and metabolism of acyclovir prodrugs across rabbit cornea: An approach involving enzyme inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Katragadda, Suresh; Talluri, Ravi S; Mitra, Ashim K

    2006-08-31

    The aim of this study is to identify the class of enzymes responsible for the hydrolysis of amino acid and dipeptide prodrugs of acyclovir (ACV) and to modulate transport and metabolism of amino acid and dipeptide prodrugs of acyclovir by enzyme inhibitors across rabbit cornea. l-Valine ester of acyclovir, valacyclovir (VACV) and l-glycine-valine ester of acyclovir, gly-val-acyclovir (GVACV) were used as model compounds. Hydrolysis studies of VACV and GVACV in corneal homogenate were conducted in presence of various enzyme inhibitors. IC(50) values were determined for the enzyme inhibitors. Transport studies were conducted with isolated rabbit corneas at 34 degrees C. Complete inhibition of VACV hydrolysis was observed in the presence of Pefabloc SC (4-(2-aminoethyl)-benzenesulfonyl-fluoride) and PCMB (p-chloromercuribenzoic acid). Similar trend was also observed with GVACV in the presence of bestatin. IC(50) values of PCMB and bestatin for VACV and GVACV were found to be 3.81+/-0.94 and 0.34+/-0.08muM respectively. Eserine, tetraethyl pyrophosphate (TEPP) and diisopropyl fluorophosphate (DFP) also produced significant inhibition of VACV hydrolysis. Transport of VACV and GVACV across cornea showed decreased metabolic rate and modulation of transport in presence of PCMB and bestain respectively. The principle enzyme classes responsible for the hydrolysis of VACV and GVACV were carboxylesterases and aminopeptidases respectively. Enzyme inhibitors modulated the transport and metabolism of prodrugs simultaneously even though their affinity towards prodrugs was distinct. In conclusion, utility of enzyme inhibitors to modulate transport and metabolism of prodrugs appears to be promising strategy for enhancing drug transport across cornea.

  14. Development of inhibitor-directed enzyme prodrug therapy (IDEPT) for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Martin, Stacy E; Ganguly, Tanushree; Munske, Gerhard R; Fulton, Melody D; Hopkins, Mark R; Berkman, Clifford E; Black, Margaret E

    2014-10-15

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is the second most common cause of cancer death among American men after lung cancer. Unfortunately, current therapies do not provide effective treatments for patients with advanced, metastatic, or hormone refractory disease. Therefore, we seek to generate therapeutic agents for a novel PCa treatment strategy by delivering a suicide enzyme (yCDtriple) to a cell membrane bound biomarker found on PCa cells (prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA)). This approach has resulted in a new PCa treatment strategy reported here as inhibitor-directed enzyme prodrug therapy (IDEPT). The therapeutic agents described were generated using a click chemistry reaction between the unnatural amino acid (p-azidophenylalanine (pAzF)) incorporated into yCDtriple and the dibenzylcyclooctyne moiety of our PSMA targeting agent (DBCO-PEG4-AH2-TG97). After characterization of the therapeutic agents, we demonstrate significant PCa cell killing of PSMA-positive cells. Importantly, we demonstrate that this click chemistry approach can be used to efficiently couple a therapeutic protein to a targeting agent and may be applicable to the ablation of other types of cancers and/or malignancies.

  15. Extracts, anthocyanins and procyanidins from Aronia melanocarpa as radical scavengers and enzyme inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Bräunlich, Marie; Slimestad, Rune; Wangensteen, Helle; Brede, Cato; Malterud, Karl E; Barsett, Hilde

    2013-03-04

    Extracts, subfractions, isolated anthocyanins and isolated procyanidins B2, B5 and C1 from the berries and bark of Aronia melanocarpa were investigated for their antioxidant and enzyme inhibitory activities. Four different bioassays were used, namely scavenging of the diphenylpicrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical, inhibition of 15-lipoxygenase (15-LO), inhibition of xanthine oxidase (XO) and inhibition of α-glucosidase. Among the anthocyanins, cyanidin 3-arabinoside possessed the strongest and cyanidin 3-xyloside the weakest radical scavenging and enzyme inhibitory activity. These effects seem to be influenced by the sugar units linked to the anthocyanidin. Subfractions enriched in procyanidins were found to be potent α-glucosidase inhibitors; they possessed high radical scavenging properties, strong inhibitory activity towards 15-LO and moderate inhibitory activity towards XO. Trimeric procyanidin C1 showed higher activity in the biological assays compared to the dimeric procyanidins B2 and B5. This study suggests that different polyphenolic compounds of A. melanocarpa can have beneficial effects in reducing blood glucose levels due to inhibition of α-glucosidase and may have a potential to alleviate oxidative stress.

  16. The angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor captopril protects nigrostriatal dopamine neurons in animal models of parkinsonism.

    PubMed

    Sonsalla, Patricia K; Coleman, Christal; Wong, Lai-Yoong; Harris, Suzan L; Richardson, Jason R; Gadad, Bharathi S; Li, Wenhao; German, Dwight C

    2013-12-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder characterized by a prominent loss of nigrostriatal dopamine (DA) neurons with an accompanying neuroinflammation. The peptide angiotensin II (AngII) plays a role in oxidative-stress induced disorders and is thought to mediate its detrimental actions via activation of AngII AT1 receptors. The brain renin-angiotensin system is implicated in neurodegenerative disorders including PD. Blockade of the angiotensin converting enzyme or AT1 receptors provides protection in acute animal models of parkinsonism. We demonstrate here that treatment of mice with the angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor captopril protects the striatum from acutely administered 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyrine (MPTP), and that chronic captopril protects the nigral DA cell bodies from degeneration in a progressive rat model of parkinsonism created by the chronic intracerebral infusion of 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP+). The accompanying activation of microglia in the substantia nigra of MPP+-treated rats was reduced by the chronic captopril treatment. These findings indicate that captopril is neuroprotective for nigrostriatal DA neurons in both acute and chronic rodent PD models. Targeting the brain AngII pathway may be a feasible approach to slowing neurodegeneration in PD.

  17. Molecular design and synthesis of novel peptides from amphibians skin acting as inhibitors of cholinesterase enzymes.

    PubMed

    Siano, Alvaro; Garibotto, Francisco F; Andujar, Sebastian A; Baldoni, Hector A; Tonarelli, Georgina G; Enriz, Ricardo D

    2017-03-01

    Cholinesterases are a family of enzymes that catalyze the hydrolysis of neurotransmitter acetylcholine. There are two types of cholinesterases, acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and butyrylcholinesterase (BChE), which differ in their distribution in the body. Currently, cholinesterase inhibitors (ChEI) represent the treatment of choice for Alzheimer's disease (AD). In this paper, we report the synthesis and inhibitory effect on both enzymes of four new peptides structurally related to P1-Hp-1971 (amphibian skin peptide found in our previous work. Sequence: TKPTLLGLPLGAGPAAGPGKR-NH2 ). The bioassay data and cytotoxicity test show that some of the compounds possess a significant AChE and BChE inhibition and no toxic effect. The present work demonstrates that diminution of the size of the original peptide could potentially result in new compounds with significant cholinesterase inhibition activity, although it appears that there is an optimal size for the sequence. We also conducted an exhaustive molecular modeling study to better understand the mechanism of action of these compounds by combining docking techniques with molecular dynamics simulations on BChE. This is the first report about amphibian peptides and the second one of natural peptides with ChE inhibitory activity. Copyright © 2017 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Identification of prolyl carboxypeptidase as an alternative enzyme for processing of renal angiotensin II using mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Grobe, Nadja; Weir, Nathan M.; Leiva, Orly; Ong, Frank S.; Bernstein, Kenneth E.; Schmaier, Alvin H.; Morris, Mariana

    2013-01-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) catalyzes conversion of ANG II to ANG-(1–7). The present study uses newly established proteomic approaches and genetic mouse models to examine the contribution of alternative renal peptidases to ACE2-independent formation of ANG-(1–7). In situ and in vitro mass spectrometric characterization showed that substrate concentration and pH control renal ANG II processing. At pH ≥6, ANG-(1–7) formation was significantly reduced in ACE2 knockout (KO) mice. However, at pH <6, formation of ANG-(1–7) in ACE2 KO mice was similar to that in wild-type (WT) mice, suggesting alternative peptidases for renal ANG II processing. Furthermore, the dual prolyl carboxypeptidase (PCP)-prolyl endopeptidase (PEP) inhibitor Z-prolyl-prolinal reduced ANG-(1–7) formation in ACE2 KO mice, while the ACE2 inhibitor MLN-4760 had no effect. Unlike the ACE2 KO mice, ANG-(1–7) formation from ANG II in PEP KO mice was not different from that in WT mice at any tested pH. However, at pH 5, this reaction was significantly reduced in kidneys and urine of PCP-depleted mice. In conclusion, results suggest that ACE2 metabolizes ANG II in the kidney at neutral and basic pH, while PCP catalyzes the same reaction at acidic pH. This is the first report demonstrating that renal ANG-(1–7) formation from ANG II is independent of ACE2. Elucidation of ACE2-independent ANG-(1–7) production pathways may have clinically important implications in patients with metabolic and renal disease. PMID:23392115

  19. Fabrication of enzyme reactor utilizing magnetic porous polymer membrane for screening D-Amino acid oxidase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jun Fang; Qiao, Juan; Mu, Xiao Yu; Moon, Myeong Hee; Qi, Li

    2017-04-01

    In this work, a unique D-amino acid oxidase reactor for enhanced enzymolysis efficiency is presented. A kind of magnetic polymer matrices, composed of iron oxide nanoparticles and porous polymer membrane (poly styrene-co-maleic anhydride), was prepared. With covalent bonding D-Amino acid oxidase on the surface of the matrices and characterization of scanning electron microscope and vibrating sample magnetometer, it demonstrated that the membrane enzyme reactor was successfully constructed. The enzymolysis efficiency of the enzyme reactor was evaluated and the apparent Michaelis-Menten constants of D-Amino acid oxidase were determined (Km was 1.10mM, Vmax was 23.8mMmin(-1)) by a chiral ligand exchange capillary electrophoresis protocol with methionine as the substrate. The results indicated that the enzyme reactor could exhibit good stability and excellent reusability. Importantly, because the enzyme and the substrate could be confined into the pores of the matrices, the enzyme reactor displayed the improved enzymolysis efficiency due to the confinement effect. Further, the prepared enzyme reactor was applied for D-Amino acid oxidase inhibitors screening. It has displayed that the proposed protocol could pave a new way for fabrication of novel porous polymer membrane based enzyme reactors to screen enzyme inhibitors.

  20. ACE-I Inhibitory Activity from Phaseolus lunatus and Phaseolus vulgaris Peptide Fractions Obtained by Ultrafiltration.

    PubMed

    Betancur-Ancona, David; Dávila-Ortiz, Gloria; Chel-Guerrero, Luis Antonio; Torruco-Uco, Juan Gabriel

    2015-11-01

    The involvement of angiotensin-I-converting enzyme (ACE-I) as one of the mechanisms controlling blood pressure is being studied to find alternative means of control of hypertension on human beings. On the market there are synthetic drugs that can control it, but these can cause undesirable health side effects. In this work was assessed the fractionation by ultrafiltration of the Lima bean (Phaseolus lunatus) and Jamapa bean (Phaseolus vulgaris), protein hydrolysates obtained with Alcalase(®) and Flavourzyme(®) on ACE-I inhibitory activity. Four membranes of different molecular cutoffs (10, 5, 3, and 1 kDa) were used. Fractions that had a higher inhibitory activity in both legumes were denominated as E (<1 kDa) with IC50 of 30.3 and 51.8 μg/mL values for the P. lunatus with Alcalase and Flavourzyme, respectively, and for the Phaseolus vulgaris with Alcalase and Flavourzyme with about 63.8 and 65.8 μg/mL values, respectively. The amino acid composition of these fractions showed residues in essential amino acids, which make a good source of energy and amino acids. On the other hand, the presence of hydrophobic amino acids such as V and P is a determining factor in the ACE-I inhibitor effect. The results suggest the possibility of obtaining and utilizing these peptide fractions in the development and innovation of a functional product that helps with treatment and/or prevention of hypertension.

  1. Three-dimensional Structure of a Kunitz-type Inhibitor in Complex with an Elastase-like Enzyme*

    PubMed Central

    García-Fernández, Rossana; Perbandt, Markus; Rehders, Dirk; Ziegelmüller, Patrick; Piganeau, Nicolas; Hahn, Ulrich; Betzel, Christian; Chávez, María de los Ángeles; Redecke, Lars

    2015-01-01

    Elastase-like enzymes are involved in important diseases such as acute pancreatitis, chronic inflammatory lung diseases, and cancer. Structural insights into their interaction with specific inhibitors will contribute to the development of novel anti-elastase compounds that resist rapid oxidation and proteolysis. Proteinaceous Kunitz-type inhibitors homologous to the bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI) provide a suitable scaffold, but the structural aspects of their interaction with elastase-like enzymes have not been elucidated. Here, we increased the selectivity of ShPI-1, a versatile serine protease inhibitor from the sea anemone Stichodactyla helianthus with high biomedical and biotechnological potential, toward elastase-like enzymes by substitution of the P1 residue (Lys13) with leucine. The variant (rShPI-1/K13L) exhibits a novel anti-porcine pancreatic elastase (PPE) activity together with a significantly improved inhibition of human neuthrophil elastase and chymotrypsin. The crystal structure of the PPE·rShPI-1/K13L complex determined at 2.0 Å resolution provided the first details of the canonical interaction between a BPTI-Kunitz-type domain and elastase-like enzymes. In addition to the essential impact of the variant P1 residue for complex stability, the interface is improved by increased contributions of the primary and secondary binding loop as compared with similar trypsin and chymotrypsin complexes. A comparison of the interaction network with elastase complexes of canonical inhibitors from the chelonian in family supports a key role of the P3 site in ShPI-1 in directing its selectivity against pancreatic and neutrophil elastases. Our results provide the structural basis for site-specific mutagenesis to further improve the binding affinity and/or direct the selectivity of BPTI-Kunitz-type inhibitors toward elastase-like enzymes. PMID:25878249

  2. Enzyme

    MedlinePlus

    Enzymes are complex proteins that cause a specific chemical change in all parts of the body. For ... use them. Blood clotting is another example of enzymes at work. Enzymes are needed for all body ...

  3. Structure-Based Design of Inhibitors of the Crucial Cysteine Biosynthetic Pathway Enzyme O-Acetyl Serine Sulfhydrylase.

    PubMed

    Mazumder, Mohit; Gourinath, Samudrala

    2016-01-01

    The cysteine biosynthetic pathway is of fundamental importance for the growth, survival, and pathogenicity of the many pathogens. This pathway is present in many species but is absent in mammals. The ability of pathogens to counteract the oxidative defences of a host is critical for the survival of these pathogens during their long latent phases, especially in anaerobic pathogens such as Entamoeba histolytica, Leishmania donovani, Trichomonas vaginalis, and Salmonella typhimurium. All of these organisms rely on the de novo cysteine biosynthetic pathway to assimilate sulphur and maintain a ready supply of cysteine. The de novo cysteine biosynthetic pathway, on account of its being important for the survival of pathogens and at the same time being absent in mammals, is an important drug target for diseases such as amoebiasis, trichomoniasis & tuberculosis. Cysteine biosynthesis is catalysed by two enzymes: serine acetyl transferase (SAT) followed by O-acetylserine sulfhydrylase (OASS). OASS is well studied, and with the availability of crystal structures of this enzyme in different conformations, it is a suitable template for structure-based inhibitor development. Moreover, OASS is highly conserved, both structurally and sequence-wise, among the above-mentioned organisms. There have been several reports of inhibitor screening and development against this enzyme from different organisms such as Salmonella typhimurium, Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Entamoeba histolytica. All of these inhibitors have been reported to display micromolar to nanomolar binding affinities for the open conformation of the enzyme. In this review, we highlight the structural similarities of this enzyme in different organisms and the attempts for inhibitor development so far. We also propose that the intermediate state of the enzyme may be the ideal target for the design of effective highaffinity inhibitors.

  4. Pharmacogenetic effects of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors over age-related urea and creatinine variations in patients with dementia due to Alzheimer disease

    PubMed Central

    Berretta, Juliana Marília; Suchi Chen, Elizabeth; Cardoso Smith, Marilia; Ferreira Bertolucci, Paulo Henrique

    2016-01-01

    Background: Renal function declines according to age and vascular risk factors, whereas few data are available regarding genetically-mediated effects of anti-hypertensives over renal function. Objective: To estimate urea and creatinine variations in dementia due to Alzheimer disease (AD) by way of a pharmacogenetic analysis of the anti-hypertensive effects of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEis). Methods: Consecutive outpatients older than 60 years-old with AD and no history of kidney transplant or dialytic therapy were recruited for prospective correlations regarding variations in fasting blood levels of urea and creatinine in one year, considering ACE genotypes of rs1800764 and rs4291 and their respective haplotypes, and treatment with ACEis along with blood pressure variations. Results: For 190 patients, 152 had arterial hypertension, and 122 used ACEis. Minor allele frequencies were 0.492 for rs1800764-C and 0.337 for rs4291-T, both in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. There were no overall significant yearly variations in levels of urea and creatinine, but their concurrent variations were positively correlated (ρ <0.0001). Each A allele of rs4291 led to an yearly urea increase of 3,074 mg/dL, and an yearly creatinine increase of 0.044 mg/dL, while the use of ACEis was protective regarding creatinine variations. The use of ACEis was also protective for carriers of rs1800764-CT/rs4291-AA, while carriers of rs1800764-CT/rs4291-AT had steeper reductions in creatinine levels, particularly when they were treated with ACEis. Conclusions: Effects of ACEis over creatinine variations are genetically mediated and independent of blood pressure variations in older people with AD. PMID:27546928

  5. A focused parameter update: hereditary angioedema, acquired C1 inhibitor deficiency, and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor-associated angioedema.

    PubMed

    Zuraw, Bruce L; Bernstein, Jonathan A; Lang, David M; Craig, Timothy; Dreyfus, David; Hsieh, Fred; Khan, David; Sheikh, Javed; Weldon, David; Bernstein, David I; Blessing-Moore, Joann; Cox, Linda; Nicklas, Richard A; Oppenheimer, John; Portnoy, Jay M; Randolph, Christopher R; Schuller, Diane E; Spector, Sheldon L; Tilles, Stephen A; Wallace, Dana

    2013-06-01

    These parameters were developed by the Joint Task Force on Practice Parameters (JTFPP), representing the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology (AAAAI); the American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology (ACAAI); and the Joint Council of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology. The AAAAI and the ACAAI have jointly accepted responsibility for establishing "A focused parameter update: Hereditary angioedema, acquired C1 inhibitor deficiency, and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor-associated angioedema." This is a complete and comprehensive document at the current time. The medical environment is a changing environment, and not all recommendations will be appropriate for all patients. Because this document incorporated the efforts of many participants, no single individual, including those who served on the JTFPP, is authorized to provide an official AAAAI or ACAAI interpretation of these practice parameters. Any request for information about or an interpretation of these practice parameters by the AAAAI or ACAAI should be directed to the Executive Offices of the AAAAI, the ACAAI, and the Joint Council of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology. The Joint Task Force on Practice Parameters understands that the cost of diagnostic tests and therapeutic agents is an important concern that might appropriately influence the work-up and treatment chosen for a given patient. The JTFPP recognizes that the emphasis of our primary recommendations regarding a medication might vary, for example, depending on third-party payer issues and product patent expiration dates. However, because the cost of a given test or agent is so widely variable and there is a paucity of pharmacoeconomic data, the JTFPP generally does not consider cost when formulating practice parameter recommendations. In some instances the cost benefit of an intervention is considered relevant, and commentary might be provided. These parameters are not designed for use by pharmaceutical companies in drug promotion

  6. Targeting multiple chorismate-utilizing enzymes with a single inhibitor: validation of a three-stage design.

    PubMed

    Ziebart, Kristin T; Dixon, Seth M; Avila, Belem; El-Badri, Mohamed H; Guggenheim, Kathryn G; Kurth, Mark J; Toney, Michael D

    2010-05-13

    Chorismate-utilizing enzymes are attractive antimicrobial drug targets due to their absence in humans and their central role in bacterial survival and virulence. The structural and mechanistic homology of a group of these inspired the goal of discovering inhibitors that target multiple enzymes. Previously, we discovered seven inhibitors of 4-amino-4-deoxychorismate synthase (ADCS) in an on-bead, fluorescent-based screen of a 2304-member one-bead-one-compound combinatorial library. The inhibitors comprise PAYLOAD and COMBI stages, which interact with active site and surface residues, respectively, and are linked by a SPACER stage. These seven compounds, and six derivatives thereof, also inhibit two other enzymes in this family, isochorismate synthase (IS) and anthranilate synthase (AS). The best binding compound inhibits ADCS, IS, and AS with K(i) values of 720, 56, and 80 microM, respectively. Inhibitors with varying SPACER lengths show the original choice of lysine to be optimal. Lastly, inhibition data confirm the PAYLOAD stage directs the inhibitors to the ADCS active site.

  7. Synthesis and discovery of highly functionalized mono- and bis-spiro-pyrrolidines as potent cholinesterase enzyme inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Kia, Yalda; Osman, Hasnah; Suresh Kumar, Raju; Basiri, Alireza; Murugaiyah, Vikneswaran

    2014-04-01

    Novel mono and bis spiropyrrolidine derivatives were synthesized via an efficient ionic liquid mediated, 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition methodology and evaluated in vitro for their AChE and BChE inhibitory activities in search for potent cholinesterase enzyme inhibitors. Most of the synthesized compounds displayed remarkable AChE inhibitory activities with IC50 values ranging from 1.68 to 21.85 μM, wherein compounds 8d and 8j were found to be most active inhibitors against AChE and BChE with IC50 values of 1.68 and 2.75 μM, respectively. Molecular modeling simulation on Torpedo californica AChE and human BChE receptors, showed good correlation between IC50 values and binding interaction template of the most active inhibitors docked into the active site of their relevant enzymes.

  8. Plants with increased expression of ent-kaurene oxidase are resistant to chemical inhibitors of this gibberellin biosynthesis enzyme.

    PubMed

    Swain, Stephen M; Singh, Davinder P; Helliwell, Chris A; Poole, Andrew T

    2005-02-01

    The gibberellin (GA) biosynthetic pathway includes the three-step oxidation of ent-kaurene to ent-kaurenoic acid, catalyzed by the enzyme ent-kaurene oxidase (KO). Arabidopsis plants overexpressing the KO cDNA under the control of the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter, with or without a translational fusion to a modified green fluorescent protein (GFP), are very similar to wild-type (WT) plants under normal growth conditions. In contrast, when WT and 35S:KO (or 35S:KO-GFP) seeds, seedlings or pollen tubes are grown in the presence of chemical inhibitors of KO, such as paclobutrazol and uniconazole, plants with increased KO expression are partially resistant to the effects of these inhibitors. In combination with the observation that decreased KO levels increase the sensitivity to KO inhibitors, the 35S:KO phenotypes demonstrate that the modification of KO enzyme levels could be used to create transgenic crop plants with altered KO inhibitor response. These results also suggest that the KO gene could be used as a selectable marker for plant regeneration based on resistance to KO inhibitors. Finally, the observation that pollen tubes expressing 35S:KO or 35S:KO-GFP have decreased sensitivity to KO inhibitors provides further evidence for a physiological role for GAs in pollen tube elongation.

  9. Chalcone-based small-molecule inhibitors attenuate malignant phenotype via targeting deubiquitinating enzymes.

    PubMed

    Issaenko, Olga A; Amerik, Alexander Yu

    2012-05-01

    The ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) is usurped by many if not all cancers to regulate their survival, proliferation, invasion, angiogenesis and metastasis. Bioflavonoids curcumin and chalcones exhibit anti-neoplastic selectivity through inhibition of the 26S proteasome-activity within the UPS. Here, we provide evidence for a novel mechanism of action of chalcone-based derivatives AM146, RA-9 and RA-14, which exert anticancer activity by targeting deubiquitinating enzymes (DUB) without affecting 20S proteasome catalytic-core activity. The presence of the α,β-unsaturated carbonyl group susceptible to nucleophilic attack from the sulfhydryl of cysteines in the active sites of DUB determines the capacity of novel small-molecules to act as cell-permeable, partly selective DUB inhibitors and induce rapid accumulation of polyubiquitinated proteins and deplete the pool of free ubiquitin. These chalcone-derivatives directly suppress activity of DUB UCH-L1, UCH-L3, USP2, USP5 and USP8, which are known to regulate the turnover and stability of key regulators of cell survival and proliferation. Inhibition of DUB-activity mediated by these compounds downregulates cell-cycle promoters, e.g., cyclin D1 and upregulates tumor suppressors p53, p27(Kip1) and p16(Ink4A). These changes are associated with arrest in S-G 2/M, abrogated anchorage-dependent growth and onset of apoptosis in breast, ovarian and cervical cancer cells without noticeable alterations in primary human cells. Altogether, this work provides evidence of antitumor activity of novel chalcone-based derivatives mediated by their DUB-targeting capacity; supports the development of pharmaceuticals to directly target DUB as a most efficient strategy compared with proteasome inhibition and also provides a clear rationale for the clinical evaluation of these novel small-molecule DUB inhibitors.

  10. Epitope mapping of mAbs to denatured human testicular ACE (CD143).

    PubMed

    Balyasnikova, I V; Metzger, R; Franke, F E; Conrad, N; Towbin, H; Schwartz, D E; Sturrock, E D; Danilov, S M

    2008-10-01

    Angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE; CD143) has two homologous enzymatically active domains (N and C) and plays a crucial role in blood pressure regulation and vascular remodeling. A wide spectrum of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) to different epitopes on the N and C domains of human ACE have been used to study different aspects of ACE biology. In this study, we characterized a set of nine mAbs, developed against the C domain of human ACE, which recognize the denatured forms of ACE and thus are suitable for the detection and quantification of somatic ACE (sACE) and testicular ACE (tACE) using Western blotting and immunohistochemistry on paraffin-embedded human tissues. The epitopes for these mAbs were defined using species cross-reactivity, phage display library screening, Western blotting and ACE mutagenesis. Most of the mAbs recognized common/overlapping region(s) on both somatic and testicular forms of human ACE, whereas mAb 4E10 was relatively specific for the testicular isoform and mAb 5B9 mainly recognized the glycan attached to Asn 731. This set of mAbs is useful for identifying even subtle changes in human ACE conformation because of denaturation. These mAbs are also sensitive tools for the detection of human sACE and tACE in biological fluids and tissues using proteomic approaches. Their high reactivity in paraffin-embedded tissues provides opportunities to study changes in the pattern of ACE expression and glycosylation (particularly with mAb 5B9) in different tissues and cells.

  11. Versatile O-GlcNAc transferase assay for high-throughput identification of enzyme variants, substrates, and inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun J; Abramowitz, Lara K; Bond, Michelle R; Love, Dona C; Kang, Dong W; Leucke, Hans F; Kang, Dae W; Ahn, Jong-Seog; Hanover, John A

    2014-06-18

    The dynamic glycosylation of serine/threonine residues on nucleocytoplasmic proteins with a single N-acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNAcylation) is critical for many important cellular processes. Cellular O-GlcNAc levels are highly regulated by two enzymes: O-GlcNAc transferase (OGT) is responsible for GlcNAc addition and O-GlcNAcase (OGA) is responsible for removal of the sugar. The lack of a rapid and simple method for monitoring OGT activity has impeded the efficient discovery of potent OGT inhibitors. In this study we describe a novel, single-well OGT enzyme assay that utilizes 6 × His-tagged substrates, a chemoselective chemical reaction, and unpurified OGT. The high-throughput Ni-NTA Plate OGT Assay will facilitate discovery of potent OGT-specific inhibitors on versatile substrates and the characterization of new enzyme variants.

  12. NGS Transcriptomes and Enzyme Inhibitors Unravel Complexity of Picrosides Biosynthesis in Picrorhiza kurroa Royle ex. Benth.

    PubMed

    Shitiz, Kirti; Sharma, Neha; Pal, Tarun; Sood, Hemant; Chauhan, Rajinder S

    2015-01-01

    Picrorhiza kurroa is an important medicinal herb valued for iridoid glycosides, Picroside-I (P-I) and Picroside-II (P-II), which have several pharmacological activities. Genetic interventions for developing a picroside production platform would require knowledge on biosynthetic pathway and key control points, which does not exist as of today. The current study reports that geranyl pyrophosphate (GPP) moiety is mainly contributed by the non-mevalonate (MEP) route, which is further modified to P-I and P-II through phenylpropanoid and iridoid pathways, in total consisting of 41 and 35 enzymatic steps, respectively. The role of the MEP pathway was ascertained through enzyme inhibitors fosmidomycin and mevinolin along with importance of other integrating pathways using glyphosate, aminooxy acetic acid (AOA) and actinomycin D, which overall resulted in 17%-92% inhibition of P-I accumulation. Retrieval of gene sequences for enzymatic steps from NGS transcriptomes and their expression analysis vis-à-vis picrosides content in different tissues/organs showed elevated transcripts for twenty genes, which were further shortlisted to seven key genes, ISPD, DXPS, ISPE, PMK, 2HFD, EPSPS and SK, on the basis of expression analysis between high versus low picrosides content strains of P. kurroa so as to eliminate tissue type/ developmental variations in picrosides contents. The higher expression of the majority of the MEP pathway genes (ISPD, DXPS and ISPE), coupled with higher inhibition of DXPR enzyme by fosmidomycin, suggested that the MEP route contributed to the biosynthesis of P-I in P. kurroa. The outcome of the study is expected to be useful in designing a suitable genetic intervention strategy towards enhanced production of picrosides. Possible key genes contributing to picroside biosynthesis have been identified with potential implications in molecular breeding and metabolic engineering of P. kurroa.

  13. NGS Transcriptomes and Enzyme Inhibitors Unravel Complexity of Picrosides Biosynthesis in Picrorhiza kurroa Royle ex. Benth

    PubMed Central

    Shitiz, Kirti; Sharma, Neha; Pal, Tarun; Sood, Hemant; Chauhan, Rajinder S.

    2015-01-01

    Picrorhiza kurroa is an important medicinal herb valued for iridoid glycosides, Picroside-I (P-I) and Picroside-II (P-II), which have several pharmacological activities. Genetic interventions for developing a picroside production platform would require knowledge on biosynthetic pathway and key control points, which does not exist as of today. The current study reports that geranyl pyrophosphate (GPP) moiety is mainly contributed by the non-mevalonate (MEP) route, which is further modified to P-I and P-II through phenylpropanoid and iridoid pathways, in total consisting of 41 and 35 enzymatic steps, respectively. The role of the MEP pathway was ascertained through enzyme inhibitors fosmidomycin and mevinolin along with importance of other integrating pathways using glyphosate, aminooxy acetic acid (AOA) and actinomycin D, which overall resulted in 17%-92% inhibition of P-I accumulation. Retrieval of gene sequences for enzymatic steps from NGS transcriptomes and their expression analysis vis-à-vis picrosides content in different tissues/organs showed elevated transcripts for twenty genes, which were further shortlisted to seven key genes, ISPD, DXPS, ISPE, PMK, 2HFD, EPSPS and SK, on the basis of expression analysis between high versus low picrosides content strains of P. kurroa so as to eliminate tissue type/ developmental variations in picrosides contents. The higher expression of the majority of the MEP pathway genes (ISPD, DXPS and ISPE), coupled with higher inhibition of DXPR enzyme by fosmidomycin, suggested that the MEP route contributed to the biosynthesis of P-I in P. kurroa. The outcome of the study is expected to be useful in designing a suitable genetic intervention strategy towards enhanced production of picrosides. Possible key genes contributing to picroside biosynthesis have been identified with potential implications in molecular breeding and metabolic engineering of P. kurroa. PMID:26658062

  14. Steroid synthesis by Taenia crassiceps WFU cysticerci is regulated by enzyme inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Aceves-Ramos, A; Valdez, R A; Gaona, B; Willms, K; Romano, M C

    2013-07-01

    Cysticerci and tapeworms from Taenia crassiceps WFU, ORF and Taenia solium synthesize sex-steroid hormones in vitro. Corticosteroids increase the 17β-estradiol synthesis by T. crassiceps cysticerci. T. crassiceps WFU cysticerci synthesize corticosteroids, mainly 11-deoxycorticosterone (DOC). The aim of this work was to investigate whether classical steroidogenic inhibitors modify the capacity of T. crassiceps WFU cysticerci to synthesize corticosteroids and sex steroid hormones. For this purpose, T. crassiceps WFU cysticerci were obtained from the abdominal cavity of mice, pre-cultured for 24h in DMEM+antibiotics/antimycotics and cultured in the presence of tritiated progesterone ((3)H-P4), androstendione ((3)H-A4), or dehydroepiandrosterone ((3)H-DHEA) plus different doses of the corresponding inhibitors, for different periods. Blanks with the culture media adding the tritiated precursors were simultaneously incubated. At the end of the incubation period, parasites were separated and media extracted with ether. The resulting steroids were separated by thin layer chromatography (TLC). Data were expressed as percent transformation of the tritiated precursors. Results showed that after 2h of exposure of the cysticerci to 100 μM formestane, the (3)H-17β-estradiol synthesis from tritiated androstenedione was significantly inhibited. The incubation of cysticerci in the presence of (3)H-DHEA and danazol (100 nM) resulted in (3)H-androstenediol accumulation and a significant reduction of the 17β-estradiol synthesis. The cysticerci (3)H-DOC synthesis was significantly inhibited when the parasites were cultured in the presence of different ketoconazole dosis. The drug treatments did not affect parasite's viability. The results of this study showed that corticosteroid and sex steroid synthesis in T. crassiceps WFU cysticerci can be modified by steroidogenic enzyme inhibitors. As was shown previously by our laboratory and others, parasite survival and development depends

  15. Recent advances in inhibitors of bacterial fatty acid synthesis type II (FASII) system enzymes as potential antibacterial agents.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi; Ma, Shutao

    2013-10-01

    Bacterial infections are a constant and serious threat to human health. With the increase of multidrug resistance of clinically pathogenic bacteria, common antibiotic therapies have been less effective. Fatty acid synthesis type II (FASII) system enzymes are essential for bacterial membrane lipid biosynthesis and represent increasingly promising targets for the discovery of antibacterial agents with new mechanisms of action. This review highlights recent advances in inhibitors of bacterial FASII as potential antibacterial agents, paying special attention to the activities, mechanisms, and structure-activity relationships of those inhibitors that mainly target β-ketoacyl-ACP synthase, β-ketoacyl-ACP reductase, β-hydroxyacyl-ACP dehydratase, and enoyl-ACP reductase. Although inhibitors with low nanomolar and selective activity against various bacterial FASII have entered clinical trials, further research is needed to expand upon both available and yet unknown scaffolds to identify new FASII inhibitors that may have antibacterial potential, particularly against resistant bacterial strains.

  16. Angiotensin Converting Enzyme Inhibitor and HMG-CoA Reductase Inhibitor as Adjunct Treatment for Persons with HIV Infection: A Feasibility Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Jason V.; Huppler Hullsiek, Kathleen; Prosser, Rachel; Duprez, Daniel; Grimm, Richard; Tracy, Russell P.; Rhame, Frank; Henry, Keith; Neaton, James D.

    2012-01-01

    Background Treatments that reduce inflammation and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk among individuals with HIV infection receiving effective antiretroviral therapy (ART) are needed. Design and Methods We conducted a 2×2 factorial feasibility study of lisinopril (L) (10 mg daily) vs L-placebo in combination with pravastatin (P) (20 mg daily) vs P-placebo among participants receiving ART with undetectable HIV RNA levels, a Framingham 10 year risk score (FRS) ≥3%, and no indication for ACE-I or statin therapy. Tolerability and adherence were evaluated. Longitudinal mixed models assessed changes in blood pressure (BP), blood lipids, and inflammatory biomarkers from baseline through months 1 and 4. Results Thirty-seven participants were randomized and 34 [lisinopril/pravastatin (n = 9), lisinopril/P-placebo (n = 8), L-placebo/pravastatin (n = 9), L-placebo/P-placebo (n = 8)] attended at least one follow-up visit. Participants were 97% male, 41% white, 67% were current smokers, and 65% were taking a protease inhibitor. Median age was 48 years, CD4 count 483 cells/mm3, FRS 7.79%, total cholesterol 184 mg/dL, and LDL-C 95 mg/dL. There was no treatment difference for pravastatin vs P-placebo in total cholesterol, LDL-C, or any of the inflammatory biomarkers. Participants randomized to lisinopril vs. L-placebo had significant declines in diastolic BP (−3.3 mmHg, p = 0.05), hsCRP (−0.61 µg/mL, p = 0.02) and TNF-α (−0.17 pg/mL, p = 0.04). Participants taking lisinopril vs L-placebo were more likely to report missed doses (88 vs 35%; p = 0.001) and have adherence <90% by pill count (42 vs. 0%; p = 0.02). Few participants from either group reported side effects (n = 3 vs. n = 1). Conclusions The modest BP changes and decreased adherence with lisinopril and absence of lipid differences with pravastatin suggest future studies of these drug classes should consider a run-in period to assess adherence and use a different statin

  17. In vitro studies of eggplant (Solanum melongena) phenolics as inhibitors of key enzymes relevant for type 2 diabetes and hypertension.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Y-I; Apostolidis, E; Shetty, K

    2008-05-01

    National Diabetes Education Program of NIH, Mayo Clinic and American Diabetes Association recommend eggplant-based diet as a choice for management of type 2 diabetes. The rationale for this suggestion is the high fiber and low soluble carbohydrate content of eggplant. We propose that a more physiologically relevant explanation lies in the phenolic-linked antioxidant activity and alpha-glucosidase inhibitory potential of eggplant which could reduce hyperglycemia-induced pathogenesis. Results from this study indicate that phenolic-enriched extracts of eggplant with moderate free radical scavenging-linked antioxidant activity had high alpha-glucosidase inhibitory activity and in specific cases moderate to high angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory activity. Inhibition of these enzymes provide a strong biochemical basis for management of type 2 diabetes by controlling glucose absorption and reducing associated hypertension, respectively. This phenolic antioxidant-enriched dietary strategy also has the potential to reduce hyperglycemia-induced pathogenesis linked to cellular oxidation stress. These results provide strong rationale for further animal and clinical studies.

  18. ACEE composite structures technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klotzsche, M. (Compiler)

    1984-01-01

    The NASA Aircraft Energy Efficiency (ACEE) Composite Primary Aircraft Structures Program has made significant progress in the development of technology for advanced composites in commercial aircraft. Commercial airframe manufacturers have demonstrated technology readiness and cost effectiveness of advanced composites for secondary and medium primary components and have initiated a concerted program to develop the data base required for efficient application to safety-of-flight wing and fuselage structures. Oral presentations were compiled into five papers. Topics addressed include: damage tolerance and failsafe testing of composite vertical stabilizer; optimization of composite multi-row bolted joints; large wing joint demonstation components; and joints and cutouts in fuselage structure.

  19. [Psychotropic effects of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors: what are the arguments?].

    PubMed

    Mesure, G; Fallet, A; Chevalier, J F

    1995-01-01

    The authors report a case of acute mania induced by perindopril (Coversyl) in a 57 year old man with no prior history of mental illness. This Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitor (ACEI) had been introduced eight days prior to the first signs of excitation, in order to treat recently diagnosed arterial hypertension. Without proof of reintroduction, and on the basis of clinical observations, the attribution appears plausible. Similar observations have been made for other molecules in this class of medication, such as captopril (Lopril). A review of literature regroups recent data concerning psychotropic effects of ACEIs. Several reports claim that captopril clearly acts as an antidepressant. Studies on the mood or the quality of life of treated hypertensive patients show ACEIs to have an euphoric-type positive effect compared to other anti-hypertensive treatments. Captopril and perindopril also act like potential antidepressants in experimental models of antidepression. Furthermore, pharmacologic data confirm that the most lipophilic ACEIs penetrate the central nervous system and argue in favor of the role of these molecules in activating central opioides. As these data provide evidence of mood swing in some patients, but also of an overall benefit in hypertensive populations, the clinical importance of the antidepressant effect of ACEIs needs further investigations.

  20. Calcium antagonists and converting enzyme inhibitors reduce renal injury by different mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Dworkin, L D; Benstein, J A; Parker, M; Tolbert, E; Feiner, H D

    1993-04-01

    Both glomerular hypertension and hypertrophy have been associated with the development of glomerular injury in models of hypertension and reduced renal mass. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of antihypertensive therapy on these parameters in the remnant kidney model of progressive glomerular sclerosis. Rats underwent 5/6 nephrectomy and were randomly assigned to receive either no therapy, the calcium entry blocker (CEB), nifedipine, or the angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor (CEI), enalapril. Administration of either drug was associated with a reduction in systemic blood pressure and in the severity of glomerular injury assessed eight weeks after renal ablation. Micropuncture studies four weeks after ablation revealed that systemic and glomerular capillary pressure were high in untreated remnant kidney rats and reduced by enalapril. Administration of nifedipine was associated with a decline in systemic pressure, however, plasma renin levels increased, causing efferent arteriolar vasoconstriction and persistence of glomerular hypertension. Morphometric analysis showed that kidney weight, glomerular volume and glomerular capillary radius were lower in nifedipine treated rats than in the other two groups, indicating that the CEB, but not enalapril, inhibited the hypertrophic response to ablation of renal mass. Therefore, both CEIs and CEBs reduce glomerular injury in rats with remnant kidneys but they may act by different mechanisms. CEI reduce glomerular capillary pressure while CEBs inhibit compensatory kidney growth.

  1. γ-Aminobutyric Acid (GABA) Production and Angiotensin-I Converting Enzyme (ACE) Inhibitory Activity of Fermented Soybean Containing Sea Tangle by the Co-Culture of Lactobacillus brevis with Aspergillus oryzae.

    PubMed

    Jang, Eun Kyeong; Kim, Nam Yeun; Ahn, Hyung Jin; Ji, Geun Eog

    2015-08-01

    To enhance the γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) content, the optimized fermentation of soybean with added sea tangle extract was evaluated at 30°C and pH 5.0. The medium was first inoculated with Aspergillus oryzae strain FMB S46471 and fermented for 3 days, followed by the subsequent inoculation with Lactobacillus brevis GABA 100. After fermentation for 7 days, the fermented soybean showed approximately 1.9 g/kg GABA and exhibited higher ACE inhibitory activity than the traditional soybean product. Furthermore, several peptides in the fraction containing the highest ACE inhibitory activity were identified. The novel fermented soybean enriched with GABA and ACE inhibitory components has great pharmaceutical and functional food values.

  2. Crystallographic identification of a noncompetitive inhibitor binding site on the hepatitis C virus NS5B RNA polymerase enzyme.

    PubMed

    Love, Robert A; Parge, Hans E; Yu, Xiu; Hickey, Michael J; Diehl, Wade; Gao, Jingjin; Wriggers, Hilary; Ekker, Anne; Wang, Liann; Thomson, James A; Dragovich, Peter S; Fuhrman, Shella A

    2003-07-01

    The virus-encoded nonstructural protein 5B (NS5B) of hepatitis C virus (HCV) is an RNA-dependent RNA polymerase and is absolutely required for replication of the virus. NS5B exhibits significant differences from cellular polymerases and therefore has become an attractive target for anti-HCV therapy. Using a high-throughput screen, we discovered a novel NS5B inhibitor that binds to the enzyme noncompetitively with respect to nucleotide substrates. Here we report the crystal structure of NS5B complexed with this small molecule inhibitor. Unexpectedly, the inhibitor is bound within a narrow cleft on the protein's surface in the "thumb" domain, about 30 A from the enzyme's catalytic center. The interaction between this inhibitor and NS5B occurs without dramatic changes to the structure of the protein, and sequence analysis suggests that the binding site is conserved across known HCV genotypes. Possible mechanisms of inhibition include perturbation of protein dynamics, interference with RNA binding, and disruption of enzyme oligomerization.

  3. Mutations in UBA3 confer resistance to the NEDD8-activating enzyme inhibitor MLN4924 in human leukemic cells.

    PubMed

    Xu, G Wei; Toth, Julia I; da Silva, Sara R; Paiva, Stacey-Lynn; Lukkarila, Julie L; Hurren, Rose; Maclean, Neil; Sukhai, Mahadeo A; Bhattacharjee, Rabindra N; Goard, Carolyn A; Medeiros, Bruno; Gunning, Patrick T; Dhe-Paganon, Sirano; Petroski, Matthew D; Schimmer, Aaron D

    2014-01-01

    The NEDD8-activating enzyme (NAE) initiates neddylation, the cascade of post-translational NEDD8 conjugation onto target proteins. MLN4924, a selective NAE inhibitor, has displayed preclinical anti-tumor activity in vitro and in vivo, and promising clinical activity has been reported in patients with refractory hematologic malignancies. Here, we sought to understand the mechanisms of resistance to MLN4924. K562 and U937 leukemia cells were exposed over a 6 month period to MLN4924 and populations of resistant cells (R-K562(MLN), R-U937(MLN)) were selected. R-K562(MLN) and R-U937(MLN) cells contain I310N and Y352H mutations in the NAE catalytic subunit UBA3, respectively. Biochemical analyses indicate that these mutations increase the enzyme's affinity for ATP while decreasing its affinity for NEDD8. These mutations effectively contribute to decreased MLN4924 potency in vitro while providing for sufficient NAE function for leukemia cell survival. Finally, R-K562(MLN) cells showed cross-resistance to other NAE-selective inhibitors, but remained sensitive to a pan-E1 (activating enzyme) inhibitor. Thus, our work provides insight into mechanisms of MLN4924 resistance to facilitate the development of more effective second-generation NAE inhibitors.

  4. Steroidomimetic aminomethyl spiroacetals as novel inhibitors of the enzyme Δ8,7-sterol isomerase in cholesterol biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Krojer, Melanie; Müller, Christoph; Bracher, Franz

    2014-02-01

    Grundmann's ketone is converted to a spiroacetal containing a 5-hydroxymethyl-5-nitro-1,3-dioxane moiety whose hydroxymethyl group can be esterified or directly substituted with primary and secondary amines. Among the resulting aminomethyl spiroacetals, several ones bearing diamino residues were found to be inhibitors of the enzyme Δ8,7-isomerase in cholesterol biosynthesis. The complex bicyclic building block derived from Grundmann's ketone could be replaced by a properly substituted tetraline scaffold, without noteworthy loss in activity. This opens the opportunity to perform further structural modifications for the design of new steroidomimetic inhibitors of human Δ8,7-isomerase.

  5. ACES's Challenges: Past Presidents Comment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheeley, Vernon Lee

    1990-01-01

    Recognizes the golden anniversary of the Association for Counselor Education and Supervision (ACES) and presents the statements of 15 past presidents of the association. Presidential leaders briefly review the association's past and suggest opportunities to help create a promising future for ACES. Outlines nine challenges which confront members of…

  6. FIRE_ACE_SHIP_SSFR

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2015-10-28

    FIRE_ACE_SHIP_SSFR Project Title:  FIRE III ACE Discipline:  ... Level:  L3 Platform:  SHEBA Ship Instrument:  Solar Spectral Flux Radiometer ... Info:  Surface Heat Budget of the Arctic Ocean (SHEBA) Ship SCAR-B Block:  SCAR-B Products ...

  7. FIRE_ACE_UTRECHT_TOWER

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2015-10-28

    FIRE_ACE_UTRECHT_TOWER Project Title:  FIRE II ACE Discipline:  ... L3 Platform:  SHEBA Ship Site; Meteorological tower Instrument:  Eppley precision pyrgeometers Meteorological tower Spatial Coverage:  Fairbanks, Alaska and the surrounding ...

  8. Liquid chromatographic determination of hippuric acid for the evaluation of ethacrynic acid as angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Mehanna, A S; Dowling, M

    1999-05-01

    A rapid, simple and interference-free method is described to evaluate the inhibitory effects of organic compounds on the activity of angiotensin converting enzyme irrespective of their acid-base properties. The assay is based on the high performance liquid chromatographic separation of the synthetic substrate hippuryl-L-histidyl-L-leucine, the hydrolysis product hippuric acid and the test compound. Using the new method, the diuretic drug ethacrynic acid was found to act as an inhibitor for the enzyme in a non competitive mode.

  9. Dynamics of ADAM17-Mediated Shedding of ACE2 Applied to Pancreatic Islets of Male db/db Mice

    PubMed Central

    Pedersen, Kim Brint; Chodavarapu, Harshita; Porretta, Constance; Robinson, Leonie K.

    2015-01-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) gene therapy aimed at counteracting pancreatic ACE2 depletion improves glucose regulation in two diabetic mouse models: db/db mice and angiotensin II-infused mice. A disintegrin and metalloproteinase 17 (ADAM17) can cause shedding of ACE2 from the cell membrane. The aim of our studies was to determine whether ADAM17 depletes ACE2 levels in pancreatic islets and β-cells. Dynamics of ADAM17-mediated ACE2 shedding were investigated in 832/13 insulinoma cells. Within a wide range of ACE2 expression levels, including the level observed in mouse pancreatic islets, overexpression of ADAM17 increases shed ACE2 and decreases cellular ACE2 levels. We provide a mathematical description of shed and cellular ACE2 activities as a function of the ADAM17 activity. The effect of ADAM17 on the cellular ACE2 content was relatively modest with an absolute control strength value less than 0.25 and approaching 0 at low ADAM17 activities. Although we found that ADAM17 and ACE2 are both expressed in pancreatic islets, the β-cell is not the major cell type expressing ACE2 in islets. During diabetes progression in 8-, 12-, and 15-week-old db/db mice, ACE2 mRNA and ACE2 activity levels in pancreatic islets were not decreased over time nor significantly decreased compared with nondiabetic db/m mice. Levels of ADAM17 mRNA and ADAM17 activity were also not significantly changed. Inhibiting basal ADAM17 activity in mouse islets failed to affect ACE2 levels. We conclude that whereas ADAM17 has the ability to shed ACE2, ADAM17 does not deplete ACE2 from pancreatic islets in diabetic db/db mice. PMID:26441236

  10. The endopeptidase activity and the activation by Cl- of angiotensin-converting enzyme is evolutionarily conserved: purification and properties of an an angiotensin-converting enzyme from the housefly, Musca domestica.

    PubMed Central

    Lamango, N S; Sajid, M; Isaac, R E

    1996-01-01

    A soluble 67 kDa angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) has been purified by lisinopril-Sepharose affinity column chromatography from adult houseflies, Musca domestica. The dipeptidyl carboxypeptidase activity towards benzoyl-Gly-His-Leu was inhibited by captopril (IC50 50 nM) and fosinoprilat (IC50 251 nM), two inhibitors of mammalian ACE, and was activated by Cl- (optimal Cl- concentration 600 mM). Musca ACE removed C-terminal dipeptides from angiotensin I, bradykinin [Leu5]enkephalin and [Met5]enkephalin and also functioned as an endopeptidase by hydrolysing dipeptideamides from [Leu5]enkephalinamide and [Met5]enkephalinamide, and a dipeptideamide and a tripeptideamide from substance P. Musca ACE was also able to cleave a tripeptide from both the N-terminus and C-terminus of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone, with C-terminal hydrolysis predominating. Maximal N-terminal tripeptidase activity occurred at 150 mM NaCl, whereas the C-terminal tripeptidase activity continued to rise with increasing concentration of Cl- (0-0.5 M). Musca ACE displays properties of both the N- and C-domains of human ACE, indicating a high degree of conservation during evolution of the substrate specificity of ACE and its response to Cl-. PMID:8670080

  11. Angiotensin-Receptor Blocker, Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitor, and Risks of Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Yu-Cheng; Hung, Chen-Ying; Li, Cheng-Hung; Liao, Ying-Chieh; Huang, Jin-Long; Lin, Ching-Heng; Wu, Tsu-Juey

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Both angiotensin-receptor blockers (ARB) and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEI) have protective effects against atrial fibrillation (AF). The differences between ARB and ACEI in their effects on the primary prevention of AF remain unclear. This study compared ARB and ACEI in combined antihypertensive medications for reducing the risk of AF in patients with hypertension, and determined which was better for AF prevention in a nationwide cohort study. Patients aged ≥55 years and with a history of hypertension were identified from Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database. Medical records of 25,075 patients were obtained, and included 6205 who used ARB, 8034 who used ACEI, and 10,836 nonusers (no ARB or ACEI) in their antihypertensive regimen. Cox regression models were applied to estimate the hazard ratio (HR) for new-onset AF. During an average of 7.7 years’ follow-up, 1619 patients developed new-onset AF. Both ARB (adjusted HR: 0.51, 95% CI 0.44–0.58, P < 0.001) and ACEI (adjusted HR: 0.53, 95% CI 0.47–0.59, P < 0.001) reduced the risk of AF compared to nonusers. Subgroup analysis showed that ARB and ACEI were equally effective in preventing new-onset AF regardless of age, gender, the presence of heart failure, diabetes, and vascular disease, except for those with prior stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA). ARB prevents new-onset AF better than ACEI in patients with a history of stroke or TIA (log-rank P = 0.012). Both ARB and ACEI reduce new-onset AF in patients with hypertension. ARB prevents AF better than ACEI in patients with a history of prior stroke or TIA. PMID:27196491

  12. Effect of the Angiotensin I Converting Enzyme Inhibitor, MK-421, on Experimentally Induced Drinking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fregley, Melvin J.; Fater, Dennis C.; Greenleaf, John E.

    1982-01-01

    MK-421, the ethyl ester maleate salt of N-(S)-1-(ethoxycarbonyl)-3-phenyl-propyl- Ala-L-Pro, is an angiotensin I converting enzyme inhibitor. An initial objective was to determine whether MK-421, administered at 0, 2.5, 5.0, 10.0, 20.0 and 40.0 mg/kg, ip to 96 female rats 15 min prior to administration of the beta-adrenergic agonist, isoproterenol (25 microgram/kg, ip), would inhibit the drinking induced by isoproterenol during 2 h after its administration. The water intake induced by isoproterenol was inhibited significantly by 2.5 mg MK-421/kg. When a similar experiment was performed using Angiotensin I (AI) (200 microgram/kg, ip) as the dipsogenic agent, MK-421 (5 mg/kg, ip), administered 15 min prior to AI, inhibited significantly both the dipsogenic and the diuretic effect of AI. However, administration of angiotensin II (AII, 200 microgram/kg, ip) 15 min after MK-421 (5mg/kg) was accompanied by a water intake that did not differ from AII alone. The drink induced by ip administration of 1.0 m NaCl solution (1% of body wt, ip) was not inhibited by administration of MK-421 (5 mg/kg) 15 min prior to allowing access to water while the drink induced by a 24 h dehydration was partially inhibited. Thus, the drinks induced by administraition of either isoproterenol or AI are dependent on formation of AII. That induced by dehydration is partially dependent, while that induced by hypertonic siilinc is independent of the formation of AII.

  13. Impairing effects of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor Captopril on bone of normal mice.

    PubMed

    Yang, Min; Xia, Chao; Song, Yan; Zhao, Xi; Wong, Man-Sau; Zhang, Yan

    2016-01-15

    There are contradicting results about the effects of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs) on bones. This study was aimed to investigate the effect of ACEI, Captopril, on bone metabolism and histology as well as the action of Captopril on skeletal renin-angiotensin system (RAS) and bradykinin receptor pathway in normal male mice. The urine, serum, tibias and femurs from normal control mice and Captopril-treated (10mg/kg) mice were collected for biochemical, histological and molecular analyses after drug administration for eight weeks. The mice after the treatment with Captopril had a significant decrease of serum testosterone level. The histological measurements showed the loss of trabecular bone mass and trabecular bone number, and the breakage of trabecular bone network as well as the changes of chondrocyte zone at epiphyseal plate in Captopril-treated mice. The defect of Captopril on trabecular bone was reflected by the quantitative bio-parameters from micro-CT. The expression of renin receptor and bradykinin B2 receptor (B2R) was significantly up-regulated in tibia of mice upon to the Captopril treatment, which decreased the ratio of OPG/RANKL and the expression of osteoblastic factor RUNX2. Furthermore, Captopril treatment resulted in the increase of pAkt/Akt and pNFκB expression in tibia. The present study revealed the impairing effects of Captopril on bone via interfering with the circulating sex hormone level and B2R pathway, which suggests that the bone metabolism of patients need to be carefully monitored when being prescribed for ACEIs.

  14. How erosive drinks and enzyme inhibitors impact bond strength to dentin.

    PubMed

    Machado, Camila Moreira; Zamuner, Aline Cristina; Modena, Karin Cristina da Silva; Ishikiriama, Sérgio Kiyoshi; Wang, Linda

    2015-01-01

    Concern has been raised about the bonding of restorative procedures to an erosive lesion, given the change in organic and inorganic composition and structure of this substrate. This in vitro study evaluated the effect of erosive drinks and an enzyme inhibitor (2% chlorhexidine digluconate - 2% CHX) on bond strength to dentin. Sixty sound human third molars were selected, and the occlusal enamel was flattened, exposing the dentin surface. The specimens were randomly divided into three groups: AS-Artificial saliva (control group), RC- Regular Cola and ZC- Zero Cola. Twenty specimens were immersed in their respective solution for 1 minute, 3 times a day, over the course of 5 days. After acid etching and before bonding with Adper Single Bond 2, half of the samples of each group (n = 10) were treated with 2% CHX, whereas the other half (n = 10) were not, forming the control group (CONV). All the specimens were restored with Filtek Z250 composite resin filled in Tygon tubes (0.48 mm2), yielding six microcylinders for microshear bond strength testing. Three composite resin microcylinders of each specimen were tested after 1 month, and the remaining microcylinders were tested after 6 months. Failure modes were determined using a stereomicroscope (40x). The data were statistically analyzed by three-way ANOVA and Tukey tests (α = 0.05). Overall bonding was reduced after 6 months, regardless of treatment. The 2% CHX enhanced bond strength after 1 month only in the ZC group, and did not enhance bonding performance to demineralized dentin by erosive protocol after 6 months in any group.

  15. Ectromelia virus inhibitor of complement enzymes protects intracellular mature virus and infected cells from mouse complement.

    PubMed

    Moulton, Elizabeth A; Bertram, Paula; Chen, Nanhai; Buller, R Mark L; Atkinson, John P

    2010-09-01

    Poxviruses produce complement regulatory proteins to subvert the host's immune response. Similar to the human pathogen variola virus, ectromelia virus has a limited host range and provides a mouse model where the virus and the host's immune response have coevolved. We previously demonstrated that multiple components (C3, C4, and factor B) of the classical and alternative pathways are required to survive ectromelia virus infection. Complement's role in the innate and adaptive immune responses likely drove the evolution of a virus-encoded virulence factor that regulates complement activation. In this study, we characterized the ectromelia virus inhibitor of complement enzymes (EMICE). Recombinant EMICE regulated complement activation on the surface of CHO cells, and it protected complement-sensitive intracellular mature virions (IMV) from neutralization in vitro. It accomplished this by serving as a cofactor for the inactivation of C3b and C4b and by dissociating the catalytic domain of the classical pathway C3 convertase. Infected murine cells initiated synthesis of EMICE within 4 to 6 h postinoculation. The levels were sufficient in the supernatant to protect the IMV, upon release, from complement-mediated neutralization. EMICE on the surface of infected murine cells also reduced complement activation by the alternative pathway. In contrast, classical pathway activation by high-titer antibody overwhelmed EMICE's regulatory capacity. These results suggest that EMICE's role is early during infection when it counteracts the innate immune response. In summary, ectromelia virus produced EMICE within a few hours of an infection, and EMICE in turn decreased complement activation on IMV and infected cells.

  16. The effectiveness of inhibitors of soluble prolyl hydroxylase against the enzyme in the cisternae of isolated bone microsomes.

    PubMed

    Tschank, G; Hanauske-Abel, H M; Peterkofsky, B

    1988-03-01

    Inhibitors of purified, soluble prolyl hydroxylase (K. Majamaa et al. (1984) Eur. J. Biochem. 138, 239-245; K. Majamaa et al. (1986) J. Biol. Chem. 261, 7819-7823) were tested against isolated chick embryo bone microsomes containing intracisternal prolyl hydroxylase and its radiolabeled, unhydroxylated procollagen substrate. Two groups of inhibitors were used which consisted of pyridine-2-carboxylate and 1,2-dihydroxybenzene (catechol) derivatives. The 2,4- and 2,5-pyridine dicarboxylic acids, which are potent inhibitors of the soluble enzyme (Ki values 2 and 0.8 microM, respectively), were effective in the same concentration range against intracisternal prolyl hydroxylase, although their relative affinities were reversed. Inhibition by pyridine-2,4-dicarboxylate in the microsomal system was reversed by increasing the concentration of 2-oxoglutarate. Pyridine-2,4-dicarboxylic acid did not inhibit the uptake of 2-[14C]oxoglutarate into microsomes, so it appears likely that the inhibitor must traverse the microsomal membrane and act directly at the enzyme level. Pyridine-2-carboxylic acid was ineffective in the microsomal system at 1 mM whereas it is a relatively potent inhibitor of the soluble enzyme with a Ki of 25 microM. This finding suggests that the second carboxyl group of the pyridine carboxylate derivatives may be required for their transport into the microsomal lumen. In the soluble system, 3,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid and 1,2-dihydroxybenzene had been found to be competitive inhibitors with relatively low Ki values of 5 and 25 microM, respectively. In the microsomal system, half-maximal inhibition was obtained at approximately 50-100 microM and inhibition was not reversed by increasing the concentrations of either 2-oxoglutarate or ascorbate, alone or together. These results imply that in situ these compounds do not inhibit prolyl hydroxylase directly. Thus, the microsomal system can assess the accessibility of the intracisternal enzyme to potential

  17. Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and beta-blockers in cardiac asymptomatic patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Fayssoil, A

    2010-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is an X-linkedrecessive disorder caused by the absence of dystrophin. Cardiac dysfunction is a classical complication in this disease. Most DMD patients remain asymptomatic for years in spite of the progression of cardiac dysfunction because of their limited daily activities. Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and beta-blockers may delay the onset and the progression of cardiac dysfunction and have to be recommended earlier in this disease.

  18. Small-molecule inhibitors of bacterial AddAB and RecBCD helicase-nuclease DNA repair enzymes.

    PubMed

    Amundsen, Susan K; Spicer, Timothy; Karabulut, Ahmet C; Londoño, Luz Marina; Eberhart, Christina; Fernandez Vega, Virneliz; Bannister, Thomas D; Hodder, Peter; Smith, Gerald R

    2012-05-18

    The AddAB and RecBCD helicase-nucleases are related enzymes prevalent among bacteria but not eukaryotes and are instrumental in the repair of DNA double-strand breaks and in genetic recombination. Although these enzymes have been extensively studied both genetically and biochemically, inhibitors specific for this class of enzymes have not been reported. We developed a high-throughput screen based on the ability of phage T4 gene 2 mutants to grow in Escherichia coli only if the host RecBCD enzyme, or a related helicase-nuclease, is inhibited or genetically inactivated. We optimized this screen for use in 1536-well plates and screened 326,100 small molecules in the NIH molecular libraries sample collection for inhibitors of the Helicobacter pylori AddAB enzyme expressed in an E. coli recBCD deletion strain. Secondary screening used assays with cells expressing AddAB or RecBCD and a viability assay that measured the effect of compounds on cell growth without phage infection. From this screening campaign, 12 compounds exhibiting efficacy and selectivity were tested for inhibition of purified AddAB and RecBCD helicase and nuclease activities and in cell-based assays for recombination; seven were active in the 0.1-50 μM range in one or another assay. Compounds structurally related to two of these were similarly tested, and three were active in the 0.1-50 μM range. These compounds should be useful in further enzymatic, genetic, and physiological studies of these enzymes, both purified and in cells. They may also lead to useful antibacterial agents, since this class of enzymes is needed for successful bacterial infection of mammals.

  19. Discovery of 4-Amino-8-quinoline Carboxamides as Novel, Submicromolar Inhibitors of NAD-Hydrolyzing Enzyme CD38.

    PubMed

    Becherer, J David; Boros, Eric E; Carpenter, Tiffany Y; Cowan, David J; Deaton, David N; Haffner, Curt D; Jeune, Michael R; Kaldor, Istvan W; Poole, J Chuck; Preugschat, Frank; Rheault, Tara R; Schulte, Christie A; Shearer, Barry G; Shearer, Todd W; Shewchuk, Lisa M; Smalley, Terrence L; Stewart, Eugene L; Stuart, J Darren; Ulrich, John C

    2015-09-10

    Starting from the micromolar 8-quinoline carboxamide high-throughput screening hit 1a, a systematic exploration of the structure-activity relationships (SAR) of the 4-, 6-, and 8-substituents of the quinoline ring resulted in the identification of approximately 10-100-fold more potent human CD38 inhibitors. Several of these molecules also exhibited pharmacokinetic parameters suitable for in vivo animal studies, including low clearances and decent oral bioavailability. Two of these CD38 inhibitors, 1ah and 1ai, were shown to elevate NAD tissue levels in liver and muscle in a diet-induced obese (DIO) C57BL/6 mouse model. These inhibitor tool compounds will enable further biological studies of the CD38 enzyme as well as the investigation of the therapeutic implications of NAD enhancement in disease models of abnormally low NAD.

  20. Static and dynamic interactions between GALK enzyme and known inhibitors: guidelines to design new drugs for galactosemic patients.

    PubMed

    Chiappori, Federica; Merelli, Ivan; Milanesi, Luciano; Marabotti, Anna

    2013-05-01

    The search for inhibitors of galactokinase (GALK) enzyme is interesting for their possible therapeutic application capable to alleviate symptoms in people with classic galactosemia. Several high-throughput screenings in the past have found candidate ligands showing a moderate affinity for GALK. Computational analysis of the binding mode of these compounds in comparison to their target protein has been performed only on crystallographic static structures, therefore missing the evolution of the complex during time. In this work, we applied static and dynamics simulations to analyze the interactions between GALK and its potential inhibitors, while taking into account the temporal evolution of the complexes. The collected data allowed us to identify the most important and persistent anchoring points of the known active site and of the newly identified secondary cavity. These data will be of use to increase the specificity and the affinity of a new generation of GALK inhibitors.

  1. Combined Rational Design and a High Throughput Screening Platform for Identifying Chemical Inhibitors of a Ras-activating Enzyme*

    PubMed Central

    Evelyn, Chris R.; Biesiada, Jacek; Duan, Xin; Tang, Hong; Shang, Xun; Papoian, Ruben; Seibel, William L.; Nelson, Sandra; Meller, Jaroslaw; Zheng, Yi

    2015-01-01

    The Ras family small GTPases regulate multiple cellular processes, including cell growth, survival, movement, and gene expression, and are intimately involved in cancer pathogenesis. Activation of these small GTPases is catalyzed by a special class of enzymes, termed guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs). Herein, we developed a small molecule screening platform for identifying lead hits targeting a Ras GEF enzyme, SOS1. We employed an ensemble structure-based virtual screening approach in combination with a multiple tier high throughput experimental screen utilizing two complementary fluorescent guanine nucleotide exchange assays to identify small molecule inhibitors of GEF catalytic activity toward Ras. From a library of 350,000 compounds, we selected a set of 418 candidate compounds predicted to disrupt the GEF-Ras interaction, of which dual wavelength GDP dissociation and GTP-loading experimental screening identified two chemically distinct small molecule inhibitors. Subsequent biochemical validations indicate that they are capable of dose-dependently inhibiting GEF catalytic activity, binding to SOS1 with micromolar affinity, and disrupting GEF-Ras interaction. Mutagenesis studies in conjunction with structure-activity relationship studies mapped both compounds to different sites in the catalytic pocket, and both inhibited Ras signaling in cells. The unique screening platform established here for targeting Ras GEF enzymes could be broadly useful for identifying lead inhibitors for a variety of small GTPase-activating GEF reactions. PMID:25825487

  2. Combined rational design and a high throughput screening platform for identifying chemical inhibitors of a Ras-activating enzyme.

    PubMed

    Evelyn, Chris R; Biesiada, Jacek; Duan, Xin; Tang, Hong; Shang, Xun; Papoian, Ruben; Seibel, William L; Nelson, Sandra; Meller, Jaroslaw; Zheng, Yi

    2015-05-15

    The Ras family small GTPases regulate multiple cellular processes, including cell growth, survival, movement, and gene expression, and are intimately involved in cancer pathogenesis. Activation of these small GTPases is catalyzed by a special class of enzymes, termed guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs). Herein, we developed a small molecule screening platform for identifying lead hits targeting a Ras GEF enzyme, SOS1. We employed an ensemble structure-based virtual screening approach in combination with a multiple tier high throughput experimental screen utilizing two complementary fluorescent guanine nucleotide exchange assays to identify small molecule inhibitors of GEF catalytic activity toward Ras. From a library of 350,000 compounds, we selected a set of 418 candidate compounds predicted to disrupt the GEF-Ras interaction, of which dual wavelength GDP dissociation and GTP-loading experimental screening identified two chemically distinct small molecule inhibitors. Subsequent biochemical validations indicate that they are capable of dose-dependently inhibiting GEF catalytic activity, binding to SOS1 with micromolar affinity, and disrupting GEF-Ras interaction. Mutagenesis studies in conjunction with structure-activity relationship studies mapped both compounds to different sites in the catalytic pocket, and both inhibited Ras signaling in cells. The unique screening platform established here for targeting Ras GEF enzymes could be broadly useful for identifying lead inhibitors for a variety of small GTPase-activating GEF reactions.

  3. Structure-activity relationships of new cyanothiophene inhibitors of the essential peptidoglycan biosynthesis enzyme MurF.

    PubMed

    Hrast, Martina; Turk, Samo; Sosič, Izidor; Knez, Damijan; Randall, Christopher P; Barreteau, Hélène; Contreras-Martel, Carlos; Dessen, Andréa; O'Neill, Alex J; Mengin-Lecreulx, Dominique; Blanot, Didier; Gobec, Stanislav

    2013-08-01

    Peptidoglycan is an essential component of the bacterial cell wall, and enzymes involved in its biosynthesis represent validated targets for antibacterial drug discovery. MurF catalyzes the final intracellular peptidoglycan biosynthesis step: the addition of D-Ala-D-Ala to the nucleotide precursor UDP-MurNAc-L-Ala-γ-D-Glu-meso-DAP (or L-Lys). As MurF has no human counterpart, it represents an attractive target for the development of new antibacterial drugs. Using recently published cyanothiophene inhibitors of MurF from Streptococcus pneumoniae as a starting point, we designed and synthesized a series of structurally related derivatives and investigated their inhibition of MurF enzymes from different bacterial species. Systematic structural modifications of the parent compounds resulted in a series of nanomolar inhibitors of MurF from S. pneumoniae and micromolar inhibitors of MurF from Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus. Some of the inhibitors also show antibacterial activity against S. pneumoniae R6. These findings, together with two new co-crystal structures, represent an excellent starting point for further optimization toward effective novel antibacterials.

  4. Rotational resonance determination of the structure of an enzyme-inhibitor complex: Phosphorylation of an (aminoalkyl)phosphinate inhibitor of D-alanyl-D-alanine ligase by ATP

    SciTech Connect

    McDermott, A.E.; Creuzet, F.; Griffin, R.G. ); Zawadzke, L.E.; Ye, Qizhuang; Walsh, C.T. )

    1990-06-19

    The authors have used a newly developed solid-state NMR method, rotational resonance, to establish the structure of an inhibited complex formed upon reaction of D-alanyl-D-alanine ligase, ATP, and the aminoalkyl dipeptide analogue (1(S)-aminoethyl)(2-carboxy-2(R)-methyl-1-ethyl)phosphinic acid (Ib). Analogue Ib was determined to be an ATP-dependent, slow-binding inhibitor of the D-Ala-D-Ala ligase from Salmonella typhimurium, with an enzyme-inhibitor half-life of 17 days at 37{degree}C. The inhibited complex shows a {sup 31}P NMR spectrum which is very different from that which would arise from a mixture of the free inhibitor and ATP. Four well-resolved lines were observed. A rotational resonance the spectrum shows evidence for strong dipolar couplings between the phosphinate phosphorus and a phosphate ester species. The dipolar coupling between the phosphorus signals at 53 and {minus}3 ppm was measured at rotational resonance by use of numerical simulations of both the line shape of the signal and the profile of magnetization transfer between the two sites. The measured coupling, 1.0 {plus minus} 0.2 kHz, indicates that the two species are bridged in a P-O-P linkage, with a P-P through-space distance of 2.7 {plus minus} 0.2 {angstrom}. This proves that the mechanism of inactivation involves phosphorylation of the enzyme-bound inhibitor by ATP to form a phosphoryl-phosphinate adduct.

  5. Antihypertensive Effects of Artemisia scoparia Waldst in Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats and Identification of Angiotensin I Converting Enzyme Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Cho, Jeong-Yong; Park, Kyung-Hee; Hwang, Do Young; Chanmuang, Saoraya; Jaiswal, Lily; Park, Yang-Kyun; Park, Sun-Young; Kim, So-Young; Kim, Haeng-Ran; Moon, Jae-Hak; Ham, Kyung-Sik

    2015-11-03

    We investigated the antihypertensive effects of Artemisia scoparia (AS) in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). The rats were fed diets containing 2% (w/w) hot water extracts of AS aerial parts for 6 weeks. The AS group had significantly lower systolic and diastolic blood pressure levels than the control group. The AS group also had lower angiotensin I converting enzyme (ACE) activity and angiotensin II content in serum compared to the control group. The AS group showed higher vascular endothelial growth factor and lower ras homolog gene family member A expression levels in kidney compared to the control group. The AS group had significantly lower levels of plasma lipid oxidation and protein carbonyls than the control group. One new and six known compounds were isolated from AS by guided purification. The new compound was determined to be 4'-O-β-D-glucopyranoyl (E)-4-hydroxy-3-methylbut-2-enyl benzoate, based on its nuclear magnetic resonance and electrospray ionization-mass spectroscopy data.

  6. Correlation between ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry and reversed-phase thin-layer chromatography hydrophobicity data for evaluation of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors absorption.

    PubMed

    Odovic, Jadranka V; Markovic, Bojan D; Injac, Rade D; Vladimirov, Sote M; Karljikovic-Rajic, Katarina D

    2012-10-05

    In this research seven ACE inhibitors (enalapril, quinapril, fosinopril, lisinopril, cilazapril, ramipril, benazepril) were studied to evaluate the correlation between their absorption and ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS) and reversed-phase thin-layer chromatography (RP-TLC) hydrophobicity data (φ(0) or C(0) parameters, respectively). Their absorption values were in the range of 25-60%, while calculated KOWWIN logP values were from -0.94 to 6.61. Additionally, perindopril (absorption 70%, KOWWIN logP 2.59) and moexipril (absorption 22%, KOWWIN logP 3.36) were introduced for the theoretical considerations due to their high/low absorption values which were on the opposite sites in comparison with the majority of ACE inhibitors (25-60%). In the theoretical considerations it was shown that the solubility data (logS) must be considered, as independent variable, simultaneously with KOWWIN logP to obtain reliable correlation (r(2)=0.7208) between absorption and ACE inhibitors lipophilicity. As the main topic of this study, the relationships between literature available and absorption data predicted by multiple linear regression (MLR) using logS values besides chromatographically obtained hydrophobicity parameters C(0) (r(2)=0.6424) or φ(0) (r(2)=0.6762) were studied proving that these parameters could be used in ACE inhibitors absorption evaluation. The UHPLC-MS method provides the direct application of experimentally obtained φ(0) values that is the advantage of this method. For better MLR correlation of ACE inhibitors absorption with C(0) parameters (RP-TLC) and logS, mathematical conversion of C(0) parameters to logC(0) values was necessary based on requisite for probability value of regression analysis (P<0.05). The accordance and differences between hydrophobicity parameters obtained by UHPLC-MS and RP-TLC were defined.

  7. VO2 max is associated with ACE genotype in postmenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Hagberg, J M; Ferrell, R E; McCole, S D; Wilund, K R; Moore, G E

    1998-11-01

    Relationships have frequently been found between angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) genotype and various pathological and physiological cardiovascular outcomes and functions. Thus we sought to determine whether ACE genotype affected maximal O2 consumption (VO2 max) and maximal exercise hemodynamics in postmenopausal women with different habitual physical activity levels. Age, body composition, and habitual physical activity levels did not differ among ACE genotype groups. However, ACE insertion/insertion (II) genotype carriers had a 6.3 ml . kg-1 . min-1 higher VO2 max (P < 0.05) than the ACE deletion/deletion (DD) genotype group after accounting for the effect of physical activity levels. The ACE II genotype group also had a 3.3 ml . kg-1 . min-1 higher VO2 max (P < 0.05) than the ACE insertion/deletion (ID) genotype group. The ACE ID group tended to have a higher VO2 max than the DD genotype group, but the difference was not significant. ACE genotype accounted for 12% of the variation in VO2 max among women after accounting for the effect of habitual physical activity levels. The entire difference in VO2 max among ACE genotype groups was the result of differences in maximal arteriovenous O2 difference (a-vDO2). ACE genotype accounted for 17% of the variation in maximal a-vDO2 in these women. Maximal cardiac output index did not differ whatsoever among ACE genotype groups. Thus it appears that ACE genotype accounts for a significant portion of the interindividual differences in VO2 max among these women. However, this difference is the result of genotype-dependent differences in maximal a-vDO2 and not of maximal stroke volume and maximal cardiac output.

  8. Design, synthesis, and antihypertensive activity of curcumin-inspired compounds via ACE inhibition and vasodilation, along with a bioavailability study for possible benefit in cardiovascular diseases

    PubMed Central

    Zhuang, Xiao-dong; Liao, Li-zhen; Dong, Xiao-bian; Hu, Xun; Guo, Yue; Du, Zhi-min; Liao, Xin-xue; Wang, Li-chun

    2016-01-01

    This study describes the synthesis of a novel series of curcumin-inspired compounds via a facile synthetic route. The structures of these derivatives were ascertained using various spectroscopic and analytic techniques. The pharmacological effects of the target analogs were assessed by assaying their inhibition of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE). All of the synthesized derivatives exhibited considerable inhibition of ACE, with half-maximal inhibitory concentrations ranging from 1.23 to 120.32 μM. In a docking analysis with testicular ACE (tACE), the most promising inhibitor (4j) was efficiently accommodated in the deep cleft of the protein cavity, making close interatomic contacts with Glu162, His353, and Ala356, comparable with lisinopril. Compounds 4i, 4j, 4k, and 4l were further selected for determination of their vasodilator activity (cardiac output and stroke volume) on isolated rat hearts using the Langendorff technique. The bioavailability of compound 4j was determined in experimental mice. PMID:26792980

  9. Divergent actions by inhibitors of DP IV and APN family enzymes on CD4+ Teff cell motility and functions.

    PubMed

    Biton, Aliza; Ansorge, Siegfried; Bank, Ute; Täger, Michael; Reinhold, Dirk; Brocke, Stefan

    2011-12-01

    Dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DP IV)/CD26 and aminopeptidase N (APN)/CD13 family enzymes control T cell functions. We have previously defined these peptidases as targets to treat autoimmune disease, but the underlying mechanism is unclear. Here, we determined the effect of enzymatic inhibitors on chemotaxis by CD4+ effector T (Teff) cells. Exposure of Teff cells to the inhibitor of DP IV activity, Lys[Z(NO2)]-pyrrolidide (LZNP) and the inhibitor of APN activity, actinonin has no effect on chemotaxis or unstimulated cell migration, even at high inhibitor concentrations. LZNP and actinonin also fail to suppress migration of unfractionated lymph node cells, excluding paracrine action through other leukocyte subsets. In contrast, inhibition of DP IV and APN activities selectively suppresses lymphocyte functions including proliferation and production of the T helper type (Th)1 cytokine IFN-γ, the Th17 cytokine IL-17, as well as TNF-α, and ameliorates autoimmunity in vivo. The present results combined with previous studies suggest that LZNP and actinonin do not prevent migration of pathogenic Teff cells into target tissues, but rather suppress disease through inhibitor induced release of TGF-β by T cells at the site of inflammation.

  10. Large negatively charged organic host molecules as inhibitors of endonuclease enzymes.

    PubMed

    Tauran, Yannick; Anjard, Christophe; Kim, Beomjoon; Rhimi, Moez; Coleman, Anthony W

    2014-10-07

    Three large negatively charged organic host molecules; β-cyclodextrin sulphate, para-sulphonato-calix[6]arene and para-sulphonato-calix[8]arene have been shown to be effective inhibitors of endonuclease in the low micromolar range, additionally para-sulphonato-calix[8]arene is a partial inhibitor of rhDNase I.

  11. A preference-based free-energy parameterization of enzyme-inhibitor binding. Applications to HIV-1-protease inhibitor design.

    PubMed Central

    Wallqvist, A.; Jernigan, R. L.; Covell, D. G.

    1995-01-01

    The interface between protein receptor-ligand complexes has been studied with respect to their binary interatomic interactions. Crystal structure data have been used to catalogue surfaces buried by atoms from each member of a bound complex and determine a statistical preference for pairs of amino-acid atoms. A simple free energy model of the receptor-ligand system is constructed from these atom-atom preferences and used to assess the energetic importance of interfacial interactions. The free energy approximation of binding strength in this model has a reliability of about +/- 1.5 kcal/mol, despite limited knowledge of the unbound states. The main utility of such a scheme lies in the identification of important stabilizing atomic interactions across the receptor-ligand interface. Thus, apart from an overall hydrophobic attraction (Young L, Jernigan RL, Covell DG, 1994, Protein Sci 3:717-729), a rich variety of specific interactions is observed. An analysis of 10 HIV-1 protease inhibitor complexes is presented that reveals a common binding motif comprised of energetically important contacts with a rather limited set of atoms. Design improvements to existing HIV-1 protease inhibitors are explored based on a detailed analysis of this binding motif. PMID:8528086

  12. Pharmacokinetics of M100240 and MDL 100,173, a dual angiotensin-converting enzyme/neutral endopeptidase inhibitor, in healthy young and elderly volunteers.

    PubMed

    Emmons, Gary T; Argenti, Rick; Martin, Louis L; Martin, Nancy E; Jensen, Bradford K

    2004-08-01

    M100240 is an acetate thioester of MDL 100,173-a dual angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE)/neutral endopeptidase (NEP) inhibitor-in phase II development. The pharmacokinetics of M100240 and MDL 100,173 were compared in young and elderly subjects. Pharmacokinetic data were obtained from 12 young (ages 18-45 years, 10 male, 2 female) and 12 elderly (ages 65-85 years, 7 male, 5 female) healthy subjects in a parallel-group, open-label study. Following an overnight fast, subjects received a single 25-mg oral dose of M100240. Serial plasma concentrations of M100240 and MDL 100,173 were determined using a validated liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) method, and pharmacokinetic parameters were calculated with noncompartmental methods. Single-dose treatment with M100240 was well tolerated in both groups of subjects, with no clinically significant changes in vital signs, ECG recordings, or laboratory safety parameters. M100240 was rapidly absorbed and converted to MDL 100,173, with M100240 concentrations no longer detectable at 3 to 4 hours postdose in both groups. The pharmacokinetics of the pharmacologically active MDL 100,173 were similar for both groups. Although maximum concentrations of M100240 were generally higher in elderly versus young subjects (C(max) 0.48 ng/mL vs. 0.17 ng/mL), systemic availability of M100240 was quite low and variable with plasma, and this apparent difference in parent drug exposure is unlikely to have important clinical implications. No age-related differences in the pharmacokinetic parameters of MDL 100,173 (C(max) 8.16 vs. 9.62 ng/mL, t(max) 1.25 vs. 1.5 h, AUC((0-last)) 81.6 vs. 72.2 ng x h/mL) were observed between young and elderly subjects, respectively. In conclusion, there are no age-related differences in the pharmacokinetics of MDL 100,173 between young and elderly subjects.

  13. Atmospheric Constituent Explorer System (ACES)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darrach, M. R.; Madzunkov, S.; Neidholdt, E.; Simcic, J.

    2016-10-01

    We report on the Atmospheric Constituent Explorer System (ACES), a mass spectrometer based instrument for atmospheric probe missions (e.g. Venus and ice giant) that can determine abundances and isotopic ratios of the noble-gases and trace species.

  14. ACE3 Draft Indicators: Health

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The page information was provided by EPA in conjunction with the opportunity for public comment on the draft indicators for ACE3, which ran from March 8 – April 21, 2011. The public comment period is now closed.

  15. ACE3 Draft Indicators: Biomonitoring

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The page information was provided by EPA in conjunction with the opportunity for public comment on the draft indicators for ACE3, which ran from March 8 – April 21, 2011. The public comment period is now closed.

  16. Synthesis and biological evaluation of 9-oxo-9H-indeno[1,2-b]pyrazine-2,3-dicarbonitrile analogues as potential inhibitors of deubiquitinating enzymes.

    PubMed

    Colombo, Matteo; Vallese, Stefania; Peretto, Ilaria; Jacq, Xavier; Rain, Jean-Christophe; Colland, Frédéric; Guedat, Philippe

    2010-04-06

    High-throughput screening highlighted 9-oxo-9H-indeno[1,2-b]pyrazine-2,3-dicarbonitrile (1) as an active inhibitor of ubiquitin-specific proteases (USPs), a family of hydrolytic enzymes involved in the removal of ubiquitin from protein substrates. The chemical behavior of compound 1 was examined. Moreover, the synthesis and in vitro evaluation of new compounds, analogues of 1, led to the identification of potent and selective inhibitors of the deubiquitinating enzyme USP8.

  17. Delayed toxicity of two chitinolytic enzyme inhibitors (psammaplin a and pentoxifylline) against eastern subterranean termites (Isoptera: Rhinotermitidae).

    PubMed

    Hiusen, Timothy J; Kamble-Shripat, T

    2013-08-01

    By using a no-choice feeding bioassay, delayed toxicity and concentration-dependent mortality of two chitinolytic enzyme inhibitors, pentoxifylline and psammaplin A, were evaluated by determining LT50, LT90, and LT99 (lethal time) against the economically important eastern subterranean termite, Reticulitermes flavipes (Kollar). Pentoxifylline- and psammaplin A-incorporated diets (filter paper) were assayed at 0.01, 0.02, 0.04, 0.08, and 0.21% and 0.0375, 0.075, 0.15, and 0.3% active ingredient (wt:wt), respectively. Acetone-only treated filter paper served as diet for the control treatments. Termite workers were allowed to feed on diet until 100% test population mortality occurred (80-95 d). Both chitinase inhibitors were shown to be toxic to R. flavipes. Concentration-dependent toxicity occurred within the pentoxifylline treatments over the range of 0.01-0.08%, with 0.08% treatments producing an LT50 of 32.2 d. However, mortality in response to psammaplin A treatments lacked concentration-dependent toxicity. Treatment with 0.3% psammaplin A produced an LT50 of 21.3 d. Mortality in response to lower psammaplin A treatments displayed no concentration-dependent trends. This study provides the first report on delayed toxicity of chitinolytic enzyme inhibitors against eastern subterranean termites (order Isoptera) and toxicological data on pentoxifylline and psammaplin A over a range of concentrations.

  18. An inhibitor of apoptosis protein antagonist T-3256336 potentiates the antitumor efficacy of the Nedd8-activating enzyme inhibitor pevonedistat (TAK-924/MLN4924).

    PubMed

    Sumi, Hiroyuki; Inazuka, Masakazu; Morimoto, Megumi; Hibino, Ryosuke; Hashimoto, Kentaro; Ishikawa, Tomoyasu; Kuida, Keisuke; Smith, Peter G; Yoshida, Sei; Yabuki, Masato

    2016-11-18

    Inhibitors of apoptosis proteins (IAPs) are antiapoptotic regulators that block cell death, and are frequently overexpressed in several human cancers, where they facilitate evasion of apoptosis and promote cell survival. IAP antagonists are also known as second mitochondria-derived activator of caspase (SMAC)-mimetics, and have recently been considered as novel therapeutic agents for inducing apoptosis, alone and in combination with other anticancer drugs. In this study, we showed that T-3256336, the orally available IAP antagonist has synergistically enhances the antiproliferative effects of the NEDD8-activating enzyme (NAE) inhibitor pevonedistat (TAK-924/MLN4924), and these effects were attenuated by a TNFα-neutralizing antibody. In the present mechanistic analyses, pevonedistat induced TNFα mRNA and triggered IAP antagonist-dependent extrinsic apoptotic cell death in cancer cell lines. Furthermore, synergistic effects of the combination of T-3256336 and pevonedistat were demonstrated in a HL-60 mouse xenograft model. Our findings provide mechanistic evidence of the effects of IAP antagonists in combination with NAE inhibitors, and demonstrate the potential of a new combination therapy for cancer.

  19. Effect of extrusion process on antioxidant and ACE inhibition properties from bovine haemoglobin concentrate hydrolysates incorporated into expanded maize products.

    PubMed

    Cian, Raúl E; Luggren, Pablo; Drago, Silvina R

    2011-11-01

    Extrusion process has been widely used for the development of many functional foods. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of extrusion process on antioxidant and angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibition properties from bovine haemoglobin concentrate (BHC) hydrolysates (P, FC, PF and FCF). Extrusion was carried out with a Brabender single screw extruder. The ACE inhibition and the antioxidant capacity (AC) were estimated by the inhibition of the ACE and ABTS+√ radical cation expressed as Trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity (TEAC), respectively. The ACE inhibition and TEAC values from hydrolysates were significantly higher than that from BHC. The highest ACE inhibition corresponded to P hydrolysate and the highest TEAC corresponded to PF and FCF hydrolysates. The ACE inhibition and AC from extruded products with added hydrolysates were higher than that from maize control; however, the extrusion process modified both ACE inhibition and AC formerly present in hydrolysates.

  20. Differential downregulation of ACE2 by the spike proteins of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus and human coronavirus NL63.

    PubMed

    Glowacka, Ilona; Bertram, Stephanie; Herzog, Petra; Pfefferle, Susanne; Steffen, Imke; Muench, Marcus O; Simmons, Graham; Hofmann, Heike; Kuri, Thomas; Weber, Friedemann; Eichler, Jutta; Drosten, Christian; Pöhlmann, Stefan

    2010-01-01

    The human coronaviruses (CoVs) severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS)-CoV and NL63 employ angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) for cell entry. It was shown that recombinant SARS-CoV spike protein (SARS-S) downregulates ACE2 expression and thereby promotes lung injury. Whether NL63-S exerts a similar activity is yet unknown. We found that recombinant SARS-S bound to ACE2 and induced ACE2 shedding with higher efficiency than NL63-S. Shedding most likely accounted for the previously observed ACE2 downregulation but was dispensable for viral replication. Finally, SARS-CoV but not NL63 replicated efficiently in ACE2-positive Vero cells and reduced ACE2 expression, indicating robust receptor interference in the context of SARS-CoV but not NL63 infection.

  1. Monoterpenes as inhibitors of digestive enzymes and counter-adaptations in a specialist avian herbivore.

    PubMed

    Kohl, Kevin D; Pitman, Elizabeth; Robb, Brecken C; Connelly, John W; Dearing, M Denise; Forbey, Jennifer Sorensen

    2015-05-01

    Many plants produce plant secondary metabolites (PSM) that inhibit digestive enzymes of herbivores, thus limiting nutrient availability. In response, some specialist herbivores have evolved digestive enzymes that are resistant to inhibition. Monoterpenes, a class of PSMs, have not been investigated with respect to the interference of specific digestive enzymes, nor have such interactions been studied in avian herbivores. We investigated this interaction in the Greater Sage-Grouse (Phasianidae: Centrocercus urophasianus), which specializes on monoterpene-rich sagebrush species (Artemisia spp.). We first measured the monoterpene concentrations in gut contents of free-ranging sage-grouse. Next, we compared the ability of seven individual monoterpenes present in sagebrush to inhibit a protein-digesting enzyme, aminopeptidase-N. We also measured the inhibitory effects of PSM extracts from two sagebrush species. Inhibition of aminopeptidase-N in sage-grouse was compared to inhibition in chickens (Gallus gallus). We predicted that sage-grouse enzymes would retain higher activity when incubated with isolated monoterpenes or sagebrush extracts than chicken enzymes. We detected unchanged monoterpenes in the gut contents of free-ranging sage-grouse. We found that three isolated oxygenated monoterpenes (borneol, camphor, and 1,8-cineole) inhibited digestive enzymes of both bird species. Camphor and 1,8-cineole inhibited enzymes from chickens more than from sage-grouse. Extracts from both species of sagebrush had similar inhibition of chicken enzymes, but did not inhibit sage-grouse enzymes. These results suggest that specific monoterpenes may limit the protein digestibility of plant material by avian herbivores. Further, this work presents additional evidence that adaptations of digestive enzymes to plant defensive compounds may be a trait of specialist herbivores.

  2. Angiotensin converting enzyme from sheep mammary, lingual and other tissues.

    PubMed

    Rao, N Mallikarjuna; Udupa, E G Padmanabha

    2007-11-01

    Occurrence of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) in mammary gland and tongue taste epithelium was demonstrated for the first time. Six times higher ACE activity in lactating mammary gland, than non-lactating mammary gland, suggested pregnancy and lactation hormonal dependent expression of ACE in female mammals. ACE activity was highest in choroid plexus, less in spinal cord and moderate in cerebrum, medulla, cerebellum and pons. Distribution of ACE in different regions of skin, kidney and among other tissues was different. Presence of ACE in adrenal glands, pancreas, bone marrow and thyroid gland indicated functions other than blood pressure homeostasis for this enzyme.

  3. ACE2 orthologues in non-mammalian vertebrates (Danio, Gallus, Fugu, Tetraodon and Xenopus).

    PubMed

    Chou, Chih-Fong; Loh, Chay Boon; Foo, Yik Khoon; Shen, Shuo; Fielding, Burtram C; Tan, Timothy H P; Khan, Sehaam; Wang, Yue; Lim, Seng Gee; Hong, Wanjin; Tan, Yee-Joo; Fu, Jianlin

    2006-08-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2), a newly identified member in the renin-angiotensin system (RAS), acts as a negative regulator of ACE. It is mainly expressed in cardiac blood vessels and the tubular epithelia of kidneys and abnormal expression has been implicated in diabetes, hypertension and heart failure. The mechanism and physiological function of this zinc metallopeptidase in mammals are not yet fully understood. Non-mammalian vertebrate models offer attractive and simple alternatives that could facilitate the exploration of ACE2 function. In this paper we report the in silico analysis of Ace2 genes from the Gallus (chicken), Xenopus (frog), Fugu and Tetraodon (pufferfish) genome assembly databases, and from the Danio (zebrafish) cDNA library. Exon ambiguities of Danio and Xenopus Ace2s were resolved by RT-PCR and 3'RACE. Analyses of the exon-intron structures, alignment, phylogeny and hydrophilicity plots, together with the conserved synteny among these vertebrates, support the orthologous relationship between mammalian and non-mammalian ACE2s. The putative promoters of Ace2 from human, Tetraodon and Xenopus tropicalis drove the expression of enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) specifically in the heart tissue of transgenic Xenopus thus making it a suitable model for future functional genomic studies. Additionally, the search for conserved cis-elements resulted in the discovery of WGATAR motifs in all the putative Ace2 promoters from 7 different animals, suggesting a possible role of GATA family transcriptional factors in regulating the expression of Ace2.

  4. CD36/Sirtuin 1 Axis Impairment Contributes to Hepatic Steatosis in ACE2-Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Qadri, Fatimunnisa; Penninger, Josef M.; Santos, Robson Augusto S.; Bader, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims. Angiotensin converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) is an important component of the renin-angiotensin system. Since angiotensin peptides have been shown to be involved in hepatic steatosis, we aimed to evaluate the hepatic lipid profile in ACE2-deficient (ACE2−/y) mice. Methods. Male C57BL/6 and ACE2−/y mice were analyzed at the age of 3 and 6 months for alterations in the lipid profiles of plasma, faeces, and liver and for hepatic steatosis. Results. ACE2−/y mice showed lower body weight and white adipose tissue at all ages investigated. Moreover, these mice had lower levels of cholesterol, triglycerides, and nonesterified fatty acids in plasma. Strikingly, ACE2−/y mice showed high deposition of lipids in the liver. Expression of CD36, a protein involved in the uptake of triglycerides in liver, was increased in ACE2−/y mice. Concurrently, these mice exhibited an increase in hepatic oxidative stress, evidenced by increased lipid peroxidation and expression of uncoupling protein 2, and downregulation of sirtuin 1. ACE2−/y mice also showed impairments in glucose metabolism and insulin signaling in the liver. Conclusions. Deletion of ACE2 causes CD36/sirtuin 1 axis impairment and thereby interferes with lipid homeostasis, leading to lipodystrophy and steatosis. PMID:28101297

  5. CD36/Sirtuin 1 Axis Impairment Contributes to Hepatic Steatosis in ACE2-Deficient Mice.

    PubMed

    Nunes-Souza, Valéria; Alenina, Natalia; Qadri, Fatimunnisa; Penninger, Josef M; Santos, Robson Augusto S; Bader, Michael; Rabelo, Luiza A

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims. Angiotensin converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) is an important component of the renin-angiotensin system. Since angiotensin peptides have been shown to be involved in hepatic steatosis, we aimed to evaluate the hepatic lipid profile in ACE2-deficient (ACE2(-/y)) mice. Methods. Male C57BL/6 and ACE2(-/y) mice were analyzed at the age of 3 and 6 months for alterations in the lipid profiles of plasma, faeces, and liver and for hepatic steatosis. Results. ACE2(-/y) mice showed lower body weight and white adipose tissue at all ages investigated. Moreover, these mice had lower levels of cholesterol, triglycerides, and nonesterified fatty acids in plasma. Strikingly, ACE2(-/y) mice showed high deposition of lipids in the liver. Expression of CD36, a protein involved in the uptake of triglycerides in liver, was increased in ACE2(-/y) mice. Concurrently, these mice exhibited an increase in hepatic oxidative stress, evidenced by increased lipid peroxidation and expression of uncoupling protein 2, and downregulation of sirtuin 1. ACE2(-/y) mice also showed impairments in glucose metabolism and insulin signaling in the liver. Conclusions. Deletion of ACE2 causes CD36/sirtuin 1 axis impairment and thereby interferes with lipid homeostasis, leading to lipodystrophy and steatosis.

  6. Development of a cellular tau enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay method for screening GSK-3β inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Cho, Goang-Won; Noh, Min-Young; Kang, Byung Yong; Ku, Il-Whea; Park, Jiseon; Hong, Yoon-Ho; Kim, Myung-Hwa; Kim, Seung Hyun

    2011-10-01

    Glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β), a serine/threonine kinase also known as tau protein kinase I, has been implicated in the pathogenic conditions of Alzheimer's disease. Many investigators have focused on GSK-3 inhibitor as a therapeutic drug. In this study, we established a cell-based assay for the screening of novel GSK-3β inhibitors. For this purpose, four-repeat tau cDNAs were stably expressed in human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK293) cells (HEK293-Tau). The proliferation of HEK293-Tau cells was no different from that of HEK293 cells, as measured by the bromodeoxyuridine enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (BrdU ELISA). The concentration-dependent reduction of tau phosphorylation by GSK-3 inhibitors, LiCl, Chir98023, and SB415286, was examined by immunoblot analysis and Tau ELISA (in situ ELISA). Highly consistent data were obtained, suggesting that this novel ELISA method is highly reproducible. Using this ELISA strategy, we isolated a few candidate compounds, including compounds 114 and 149, from several hundreds of synthetic agents and demonstrated that such candidates protect nerve growth factor-differentiated PC12 cells against amyloid-β-induced cell death. These data indicate that this Tau ELISA method in HEK293-Tau cells may be a suitable cell-based assay system to screen for GSK-3β inhibitors.

  7. Recent Update on Human Lactate Dehydrogenase Enzyme 5 (hLDH5) Inhibitors: A Promising Approach for Cancer Chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Rani, Reshma; Kumar, Vinit

    2016-01-28

    Human lactate dehydrogenase (hLDH5), a glycolytic enzyme responsible for the conversion of pyruvate to lactate coupled with oxidation of NADH to NAD(+), plays a crucial role in the promotion of glycolysis in invasive tumor cells. Recently, hLDH5 has been considered a vital therapeutic target for invasive cancers. Selective inhibition of hLDH5 using small molecules holds potential prospects for the treatment of cancer and associated diseases. Consequently, significant progress has been made in the discovery of selective small-molecule hLDH5 inhibitors displaying remarkable inhibitory potencies. The purpose of this review is to discuss briefly the roles of hLDH isoforms and to compile small hLDH5 inhibitors into groups based on their chemical classes and pharmacological applications.

  8. Bioactive peptides: are there more antihypertensive mechanisms beyond ACE inhibition?

    PubMed

    Marques, Claudia; Amorim, Maria Manuela; Pereira, Joana Odila; Pintado, Manuela Estevez; Moura, Daniel; Calhau, Conceicao; Pinheiro, Helder

    2012-01-01

    Diet has a high relevance in health. Hypertension is a major risk factor for cardiovascular diseases and has an important impact on public health, and consequently on countries economy. Scientific research gathered strong evidence about the role of several dietary factors either in etiology or in treatment/prevention of these diseases. Peptides from different food matrices have been studied, and indicated as compounds with particular interest in the context of hypertension. The classical approach involves the identification of peptides with an in vitro ACE inhibitory activity and the assumption that the observed in vivo effects are due to this enzyme blockade. However, in some cases the potency of ACE blockade does not correlate with the antihypertensive activity in vivo. This paper reviews the current literature that identifies mechanisms of action, other than ACE inhibition, that might explain antihypertensive effects of biologically active peptides from different food sources.

  9. In vitro modeling of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor's absorption with chromatographic retention data and selected molecular descriptors.

    PubMed

    Odović, Jadranka; Marković, Bojan; Vladimirov, Sote; Karljiković-Rajić, Katarina

    2014-03-15

    Set of nine angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (enalapril, quinapril, fosinopril, lisinopril, cilazapril, ramipril, benazepril, perindopril and moexipril) were studied to evaluate the correlation between their intestinal absorption and salting-out thin-layer chromatography hydrophobicity parameters (RM(0) or C0) obtained by ascending technique applying four different salts, (NH4)2SO4, NH4NO3, NH4Cl and NaCl as mobile phases. The best correlations between KOWWIN logP and both hydrophobicity parameters, RM(0) and C0, (R(2)>0.850) were observed for NaCl (1.0-3.0M) while the lowest R(2) was obtained for (NH4)2SO4 (0.649 and 0.427, respectively) due to highest salting-out effect of (NH4)2SO4. The effect of selected inorganic salts in the salting-out mobile phases, on the solutes solubility and retention was evaluated. The topological polar surface area should be selected as independent variable (only this molecular descriptor showed low correlation with chromatographic hydrophobicity parameters) for multiple linear regression analysis, to obtain reliable correlation between angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor's intestinal absorption data and salting-out thin-layer chromatograpic hydrophobicity parameters. These correlations provide R(2)=0.823 for RM(0) or R(2)=0.799 for C0 indicating good relationship between predicted and literature available intestinal absorption (ranged from 22% to 70%) of investigated angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors. The proposed in vitro model was checked with three in addition experimentally analyzed drugs, zofenopril, trandolapril and captoril. The satisfactory absorption prediction was obtained for zofenopril and trandolapril, while divergence established for captopril resulted from considerably different structure.

  10. Brain ACE2 shedding contributes to the development of neurogenic hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Chhabra, Kavaljit H.; Lazartigues, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Rationale Over-activity of the brain Renin Angiotensin System (RAS) is a major contributor to neurogenic hypertension. While over-expression of Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme type 2 (ACE2) has been shown to be beneficial in reducing hypertension by transforming Angiotensin (Ang)-II into Ang-(1-7), several groups have reported decreased brain ACE2 expression and activity during the development of hypertension. Objective We hypothesized that ADAM17-mediated ACE2 shedding results in decreased membrane-bound ACE2 in the brain, thus promoting the development of neurogenic hypertension. Methods and Results To test this hypothesis, we used the DOCA-salt model of neurogenic hypertension in non-transgenic (NT) and syn-hACE2 mice over-expressing ACE2 in neurons. DOCA-salt treatment in NT mice led to significant increases in blood pressure, hypothalamic Ang-II levels, inflammation, impaired baroreflex sensitivity, autonomic dysfunction, as well as decreased hypothalamic ACE2 activity and expression, while these changes were blunted or prevented in syn-hACE2 mice. In addition, reduction of ACE2 expression and activity in the brain paralleled a rise in ACE2 activity in the cerebrospinal fluid of NT mice following DOCA-salt treatment and was accompanied by enhanced ADAM17 expression and activity in the hypothalamus. Chronic knockdown of ADAM17 in the brain blunted the development of hypertension and restored ACE2 activity and baroreflex function. Conclusions Our data provide the first evidence that ADAM17-mediated shedding impairs brain ACE2 compensatory activity, thus contributing to the development of neurogenic hypertension. PMID:24014829

  11. Investigations into inhibitor type and mode, simulated gastrointestinal digestion, and cell transport of the angiotensin I-converting enzyme-inhibitory peptides in Pacific hake (Merluccius productus) fillet hydrolysate.

    PubMed

    Cinq-Mars, Crystal D; Hu, Chun; Kitts, David D; Li-Chan, Eunice C Y

    2008-01-23

    Fish protein hydrolysate (FPH) produced by incubation of Pacific hake fillet with 3.00% Protamex at pH 6.5 and 40 degrees C for 125 min demonstrated in vitro ACE-inhibitory activity (IC50 = 165 microg/mL), which was enhanced by ultrafiltration through a 10 kDa molecular weight cutoff membrane (IC50 = 44 microg/mL). However, after simulated gastrointestinal digestion, FPH and ultrafiltrate had similar ACE-inhibitory activity (IC 50 = 90 microg/mL), indicating that FPH peptides act as "pro-drug type" inhibitors and that enrichment by ultrafiltration may be unnecessary. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry confirmed that the molecular weights of major peaks were <1 kDa regardless of ultrafiltration. ACE-inhibitory activities of digested hydrolysates were not significantly affected by preincubation with ACE ( P > 0.05) and exhibited a competitive inhibitory mode. A permeability assay using fully differentiated colorectal adenocarcinoma (Caco-2) cells showed an apical to basolateral transport of peptides that ranged from approximately 2 to 20% after 2 h at 37 degrees C. Pacific hake fillet hydrolysates are a potentially bioavailable source of ACE-inhibitory peptides awaiting further in vivo study.

  12. Effect of Enzyme Inhibitors on Terpene Trilactones Biosynthesis and Gene Expression Profiling in Ginkgo biloba Cultured Cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lijia; Tong, Hui; Wang, Mingxuan; Zhu, Jianhua; Zi, Jiachen; Song, Liyan; Yu, Rongmin

    2015-12-01

    The biosynthetic pathway of terpene trilactones of Ginkgo biloba is unclear. In this present study, suspension cultured cells of G. biloba were used to explore the regulation of the mevalonic acid (MVA) and methylerythritol 4-phosphate (MEP) pathways in response to specific enzyme inhibitors (lovastatin and clomazone). The results showed that the biosynthesis of bilobalide was more highly correlated with the MVA pathway, and the biosynthesis of ginkgolides was more highly correlated with the MEP pathway. Meanwhile, according to the results, it could be speculated that bilobalide might be a product of ginkgolide metabolism.

  13. The absence of intrarenal ACE protects against hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Villalobos, Romer A.; Janjoulia, Tea; Fletcher, Nicholas K.; Giani, Jorge F.; Nguyen, Mien T.X.; Riquier-Brison, Anne D.; Seth, Dale M.; Fuchs, Sebastien; Eladari, Dominique; Picard, Nicolas; Bachmann, Sebastian; Delpire, Eric; Peti-Peterdi, Janos; Navar, L. Gabriel; Bernstein, Kenneth E.; McDonough, Alicia A.

    2013-01-01

    Activation of the intrarenal renin-angiotensin system (RAS) can elicit hypertension independently from the systemic RAS. However, the precise mechanisms by which intrarenal Ang II increases blood pressure have never been identified. To this end, we studied the responses of mice specifically lacking kidney angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) to experimental hypertension. Here, we show that the absence of kidney ACE substantially blunts the hypertension induced by Ang II infusion (a model of high serum Ang II) or by nitric oxide synthesis inhibition (a model of low serum Ang II). Moreover, the renal responses to high serum Ang II observed in wild-type mice, including intrarenal Ang II accumulation, sodium and water retention, and activation of ion transporters in the loop of Henle (NKCC2) and distal nephron (NCC, ENaC, and pendrin) as well as the transporter activating kinases SPAK and OSR1, were effectively prevented in mice that lack kidney ACE. These findings demonstrate that ACE metabolism plays a fundamental role in the responses of the kidney to hypertensive stimuli. In particular, renal ACE activity is required to increase local Ang II, to stimulate sodium transport in loop of Henle and the distal nephron, and to induce hypertension. PMID:23619363

  14. The absence of intrarenal ACE protects against hypertension.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Villalobos, Romer A; Janjoulia, Tea; Fletcher, Nicholas K; Giani, Jorge F; Nguyen, Mien T X; Riquier-Brison, Anne D; Seth, Dale M; Fuchs, Sebastien; Eladari, Dominique; Picard, Nicolas; Bachmann, Sebastian; Delpire, Eric; Peti-Peterdi, Janos; Navar, L Gabriel; Bernstein, Kenneth E; McDonough, Alicia A

    2013-05-01

    Activation of the intrarenal renin-angiotensin system (RAS) can elicit hypertension independently from the systemic RAS. However, the precise mechanisms by which intrarenal Ang II increases blood pressure have never been identified. To this end, we studied the responses of mice specifically lacking kidney angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) to experimental hypertension. Here, we show that the absence of kidney ACE substantially blunts the hypertension induced by Ang II infusion (a model of high serum Ang II) or by nitric oxide synthesis inhibition (a model of low serum Ang II). Moreover, the renal responses to high serum Ang II observed in wild-type mice, including intrarenal Ang II accumulation, sodium and water retention, and activation of ion transporters in the loop of Henle (NKCC2) and distal nephron (NCC, ENaC, and pendrin) as well as the transporter activating kinases SPAK and OSR1, were effectively prevented in mice that lack kidney ACE. These findings demonstrate that ACE metabolism plays a fundamental role in the responses of the kidney to hypertensive stimuli. In particular, renal ACE activity is required to increase local Ang II, to stimulate sodium transport in loop of Henle and the distal nephron, and to induce hypertension.

  15. Inhibitors of the Glyoxylate Cycle Enzyme ICL1 in Candida albicans for Potential Use as Antifungal Agents

    PubMed Central

    Cheah, Hong-Leong; Lim, Vuanghao; Sandai, Doblin

    2014-01-01

    Candida albicans is an opportunistic pathogen that causes candidiasis in humans. In recent years, metabolic pathways in C. albicans have been explored as potential antifungal targets to treat candidiasis. The glyoxylate cycle, which enables C. albicans to survive in nutrient-limited host niches and its. Key enzymes (e.g., isocitrate lyase (ICL1), are particularly attractive antifungal targets for C. albicans. In this study, we used a new screening approach that better reflects the physiological environment that C. albicans cells experience during infection to identify potential inhibitors of ICL. Three compounds (caffeic acid (CAFF), rosmarinic acid (ROS), and apigenin (API)) were found to have antifungal activity against C. albicans when tested under glucose-depleted conditions. We further confirmed the inhibitory potential of these compounds against ICL using the ICL enzyme assay. Lastly, we assessed the bioavailability and toxicity of these compounds using Lipinski's rule-of-five and ADMET analysis. PMID:24781056

  16. UDP-galactose 4'-epimerase from the liver fluke, Fasciola hepatica: biochemical characterization of the enzyme and identification of inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Zinsser, Veronika L; Lindert, Steffen; Banford, Samantha; Hoey, Elizabeth M; Trudgett, Alan; Timson, David J

    2015-03-01

    Leloir pathway enzyme uridine diphosphate (UDP)-galactose 4'-epimerase from the common liver fluke Fasciola hepatica (FhGALE) was identified and characterized. The enzyme can be expressed in, and purified from, Escherichia coli. The recombinant enzyme is active: the K(m) (470 μM) is higher than the corresponding human enzyme (HsGALE), whereas the k(cat) (2.3 s(-1)) is substantially lower. FhGALE binds NAD(+) and has shown to be dimeric by analytical gel filtration. Like the human and yeast GALEs, FhGALE is stabilized by the substrate UDP-galactose. Molecular modelling predicted that FhGALE adopts a similar overall fold to HsGALE and that tyrosine 155 is likely to be the catalytically critical residue in the active site. In silico screening of the National Cancer Institute Developmental Therapeutics Program library identified 40 potential inhibitors of FhGALE which were tested in vitro. Of these, 6 showed concentration-dependent inhibition of FhGALE, some with nanomolar IC50 values. Two inhibitors (5-fluoroorotate and N-[(benzyloxy)carbonyl]leucyltryptophan) demonstrated selectivity for FhGALE over HsGALE. These compounds also thermally destabilized FhGALE in a concentration-dependent manner. Interestingly, the selectivity of 5-fluoroorotate was not shown by orotic acid, which differs in structure by 1 fluorine atom. These results demonstrate that, despite the structural and biochemical similarities of FhGALE and HsGALE, it is possible to discover compounds which preferentially inhibit FhGALE.

  17. Human and rodent carboxylesterases: immunorelatedness, overlapping substrate specificity, differential sensitivity to serine enzyme inhibitors, and tumor-related expression.

    PubMed

    Xie, Mingxing; Yang, Dongfang; Liu, Lan; Xue, Bob; Yan, Bingfang

    2002-05-01

    Carboxylesterases hydrolyze numerous endogenous and foreign compounds with diverse structures. Humans and rodents express multiple forms of carboxylesterases, which share a high degree of sequence identity (approximately 70%). Alignment analyses locate in carboxylesterases several functional subsites such the catalytic triad as seen in acetylcholinesterase. The aim of this study was to determine among human and rodent carboxylesterases the immunorelatedness, overlapping substrate specificity, differential sensitivity to serine enzyme inhibitors, tissue distribution, and tumor-related expression. Six antibodies against whole carboxylesterases or synthetic peptides were tested for their reactivity toward 11 human or rodent recombinant carboxylesterases. The antibodies against whole proteins generally exhibited a broader cross-reactivity than the anti-peptide antibodies. All carboxylesterases hydrolyzed para-nitrophenylacetate and para-nitrophenylbutyrate. However, the relative activity varied markedly from enzyme to enzyme (>20-fold), and some carboxylesterases showed a clear substrate preference. Carboxylesterases with the same functional subsites had a similar profile on substrate specificity and sensitivity toward phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride (PMSF) and paraoxon, suggesting that these subsites play determinant roles in the recognition of substrates and inhibitors. Among three human carboxylesterases, HCE-1 hydrolyzed both substrates to a similar extent, whereas HCE-2 and HCE-3 showed an opposite substrate preference. All three enzymes were inhibited by PMSF and paraoxon, but they showed a marked difference in relative sensitivities. Based on immunoblotting analyses, HCE-1 was present in all tissues examined, whereas HCE-2 and HCE-3 were expressed in a tissue-restricted pattern. Colon carcinomas expressed slightly higher levels of HCE-1 and HCE-2 than the adjacent normal tissues, whereas the opposite was true with HCE-3.

  18. Modulation of angiotensin-converting enzyme by nitric oxide

    PubMed Central

    Ackermann, A; Fernández-Alfonso, M S; Sánchez de Rojas, R; Ortega, T; Paul, M; González, C

    1998-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the effect of nitric oxide (NO) on angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) activity.A biochemical study was performed in order to analyse the effect of the NO-donors, SIN-1 and diethylamine/NO (DEA/NO), and of an aqueous solution of nitric oxide on the ACE activity in plasma from 3-month old male Sprague-Dawley rats and on ACE purified from rabbit lung. SIN-1 significantly inhibited the activity of both enzymes in a concentration-dependent way between 1 and 100 μM. DEA/NO inhibited the activity of purified ACE from 0.1 μM to 10 μM and plasma ACE, with a lower potency, between 1 and 100 μM. An aqueous solution of NO (100 and 150 μM) also inhibited significantly the activity of both enzymes. Lineweaver-Burk plots indicated an apparent competitive inhibition of Hip-His-Leu hydrolysis by NO-donors.Modulation of ACE activity by NO was also assessed in the rat carotid artery by comparing contractions elicited by angiotensin I (AI) and AII. Concentration-response curves to both peptides were performed in arteries with endothelium in the presence of the guanylyl cyclase inhibitor, ODQ (10 μM), and the inhibitor of NO formation, L-NAME (0.1 mM). NO, which is still released from endothelium in the presence of 10 μM ODQ, elicited a significant inhibition of AI contractions at low concentrations (1 and 5 nM). In the absence of endothelium, 1 μM SIN-1 plus 10 μM ODQ, as well as 10 μM DEA/NO plus 10 μM ODQ induced a significant inhibition on AI-induced contractions at 1 and 5 nM and at 1–100 nM, respectively.In conclusion, we demonstrated that (i) NO and NO-releasing compounds inhibit ACE activity in a concentration-dependent and competitive way and that (ii) NO release from endothelium physiologically reduces conversion of AI to AII. PMID:9641545

  19. [Proteolytic enzymes and trypsin inhibitors of higher plants under stress conditions].

    PubMed

    Domash, V I; Sharpio, T P; Zabreĭko, S A; Sosnovskaia, T F

    2008-01-01

    The response of the components of a protease-inhibitor system of legume and cereal crops to stress factors was studied. It was found that salinization, heavy metal ions, and phytopathogenic flora inhibit the activity of neutral, acidic, and alkaline proteases at early stages of seed germination, the degree of the inhibition of the endoprotease activity being dependent on the index of tolerance of legume and cereal crops. It was shown that, in response to unfavorable conditions, accumulation of trypsin inhibitors occurs, which is accompanied by the appearance of new protein components, as indicated by electrophoresis. The results confirm the presumption that serine protease inhibitors are involved in the response of plants to stress factors.

  20. Binding to large enzyme pockets: small-molecule inhibitors of trypanothione reductase.

    PubMed

    Persch, Elke; Bryson, Steve; Todoroff, Nickolay K; Eberle, Christian; Thelemann, Jonas; Dirdjaja, Natalie; Kaiser, Marcel; Weber, Maria; Derbani, Hassan; Brun, Reto; Schneider, Gisbert; Pai, Emil F; Krauth-Siegel, R Luise; Diederich, François

    2014-08-01

    The causative agents of the parasitic disease human African trypanosomiasis belong to the family of trypanosomatids. These parasitic protozoa exhibit a unique thiol redox metabolism that is based on the flavoenzyme trypanothione reductase (TR). TR was identified as a potential drug target and features a large active site that allows a multitude of possible ligand orientations, which renders rational structure-based inhibitor design highly challenging. Herein we describe the synthesis, binding properties, and kinetic analysis of a new series of small-molecule inhibitors of TR. The conjunction of biological activities, mutation studies, and virtual ligand docking simulations led to the prediction of a binding mode that was confirmed by crystal structure analysis. The crystal structures revealed that the ligands bind to the hydrophobic wall of the so-called "mepacrine binding site". The binding conformation and potency of the inhibitors varied for TR from Trypanosoma brucei and T. cruzi.

  1. Tomato pectin methylesterase: modeling, fluorescence, and inhibitor interaction studies-comparison with the bacterial (Erwinia chrysanthemi) enzyme.

    PubMed

    D'Avino, Rossana; Camardella, Laura; Christensen, Tove M I E; Giovane, Alfonso; Servillo, Luigi

    2003-12-01

    The molecular model of Lycopersicon esculentum (tomato) pectin methylesterase (PME) was built by using the X-ray crystal structure of PME from the phytopathogenic bacterium Erwinia chrysanthemi as a template. The overall structure and the position of catalytically important residues (Asp132, Asp 153, and Arg 221, located at the bottom of the active site cleft) are conserved. Instead, loop regions forming the walls of the catalytic site are much shorter and form a less deep cleft, as already revealed by the carrot PME crystal structure. The protein inhibitor of pectin methylesterase (PMEI) isolated from kiwi fruit binds tomato PME with high affinity. Conversely, no complex formation between the inhibitor and PME from E. chrysanthemi is observed, and the activity of this enzyme is unaffected by the presence of the inhibitor. Fluorescence quenching experiments on tomato PME and on PME-PMEI complex suggest that tryptophanyl residues present in the active site region are involved in the interaction and that the inhibitor interacts with plant PME at the level of the active site. We also suggest that the more open active site cleft of tomato PME allows the interaction with the inhibitor. Conversely, the narrow and deep cleft of the active site of E. chrysanthemi PME hinders this interaction. The pH-dependent changes in fluorescence emission intensity observed in tomato PME could arise as the result of protonation of an Asp residue with unusually high pKa, thus supporting the hypothesis that Asp132 acts as acid/base in the catalytic cycle.

  2. Three low molecular weight cysteine proteinase inhibitors of human seminal fluid: purification and enzyme kinetic properties.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Vikash Kumar; Chhikara, Nirmal; Gill, Kamaldeep; Dey, Sharmistha; Singh, Sarman; Yadav, Savita

    2013-08-01

    The cystatins form a superfamily of structurally related proteins with highly conserved structural folds. They are all potent, reversible, competitive inhibitors of cysteine proteinases (CPs). Proteins from this group present differences in proteinase inhibition despite their high level of structural similarities. In this study, three cysteine proteinase inhibitors (CPIs) of low molecular weight were isolated from human seminal fluid (HSF) by affinity chromatography on carboxymethyl (CM)-papain-Sepharose column, purified using various chromatographic procedures and checked for purity on sodium-dodecyl PAGE (SDS-PAGE). Matrix-assisted laser desorption-ionization-time-of flight-mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) identified these proteins as cystatin 9, cystatin SN, and SAP-1 (an N-terminal truncated form of cystatin S). All three CPIs suppressed the activity of papain potentially and showed remarkable heat stability. Interestingly SAP-1 also inhibits the activity of trypsin, chymotrypsin, pepsin, and PSA (prostate specific antigen) and acts as a cross-class protease inhibitor in in vitro studies. Using Surface Plasmon Resonance, we have also observed that SAP-1 shows a significant binding with all these proteases. These studies suggest that SAP-1 is a cross-class inhibitor that may regulate activity of various classes of proteases within the reproductive systems. To our knowledge, this is the first report about purification of CPIs from HSF; the identification of such proteins could provide better insights into the physiological processes and offer intimation for further research.

  3. Is angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors/angiotensin receptor blockers therapy protective against prostate cancer?

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Yeqing; Xu, Xin; Wang, Xiao; Zheng, Xiangyi; Xie, Liping

    2016-01-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that renin-angiotensin system (RAS) may act as a molecular and therapeutic target for treating site-specific cancers, including prostate cancer. However, previous observational studies regarding the association between RAS inhibitors and prostate cancer risk have reported inconsistent results. We examined this association by performing a systematic review and meta-analysis. A total of 20,267 patients from nine cohort studies were enrolled. Compared with non-users of RAS inhibitors, individuals using RAS inhibitors had a reduced risk of prostate cancer (RR 0.92, 95 % CI 0.87-0.98), without statistically significant heterogeneity among studies (P = 0.118 for heterogeneity, I2 = 37.6 %). In addition, when subgroup analyses by study quality and number of cases, more statistically significant associations were observed in studies of high quality (RR 0.93, 95 % CI 0.88-0.97) and large sample size (RR 0.94, 95 % CI 0.91-0.98). There was no evidence of significant publication bias with Begg's test (P = 0.602) or with Egger's test (P = 0.350). Overall, this study indicates that use of RAS inhibitors may be associated with a decreased risk of prostate cancer. Large-scale well designed studies are needed to further explore this association. PMID:26760503

  4. Toward very potent, non-covalent organophosphonate inhibitors of cathepsin C and related enzymes by 2-amino-1-hydroxy-alkanephosphonates dipeptides.

    PubMed

    Drąg, Marcin; Wieczerzak, Ewa; Pawełczak, Małgorzata; Berlicki, Łukasz; Grzonka, Zbigniew; Kafarski, Paweł

    2013-08-01

    Cathepsins play an important role in several human disorders and therefore the design and synthesis of their inhibitors attracts considerable interest in current medicinal chemistry approaches. Due to the presence of a strong sulphydryl nucleophile in the active center of the cysteine type cathepsins, most strategies to date have yielded covalent inhibitors. Here we present a series of non-covalent β-amino-α-hydroxyalkanephosphonate dipeptidic inhibitors of cathepsin C, ranking amongst the best low-molecular weight inhibitors of this enzyme. Their binding modes determined by molecular modelling indicate that the hydroxymethyl fragment of the molecule, not the phosphonate moiety, acts as a transition state analogue of peptide bond hydrolysis. These dipeptide mimetics appear also to be potent inhibitors of other cysteine proteases such as papain, cathepsin B and cathepsin K, thus providing new leading structures for these medicinally important enzymes.

  5. Synthesis of Unprecedented Sulfonylated Phosphono-exo-Glycals Designed as Inhibitors of the Three Mycobacterial Galactofuranose Processing Enzymes.

    PubMed

    Frédéric, Christophe J-M; Tikad, Abdellatif; Fu, Jian; Pan, Weidong; Zheng, Ruixiang B; Koizumi, Akihiko; Xue, Xiaochao; Lowary, Todd L; Vincent, Stéphane P

    2016-10-24

    This study reports a new methodology to synthesize exo-glycals bearing both a sulfone and a phosphonate. This synthetic strategy provides a way to generate exo-glycals displaying two electron-withdrawing groups and was applied to eight different carbohydrates from the furanose and pyranose series. The Z/E configurations of these tetrasubstituted enol ethers could be ascertained using NMR spectroscopic techniques. Deprotection of an exo-glycal followed by an UMP (uridine monophosphate) coupling generated two new UDP (uridine diphosphate)-galactofuranose analogues. These two Z/E isomers were evaluated as inhibitors of UGM, GlfT1, and GlfT2, the three mycobacterial galactofuranose processing enzymes. Molecule 46-(E) is the first characterized inhibitor of GlfT1 reported to date and was also found to efficiently inhibit UGM in a reversible manner. Interestingly, GlfT2 showed a better affinity for the (Z) isomer. The three enzymes studied in the present work are not only interesting because, mechanistically, they are still the topic of intense investigations, but also because they constitute very important targets for the development of novel antimycobacterial agents.

  6. Electrochemically reduced graphene and iridium oxide nanoparticles for inhibition-based angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor detection.

    PubMed

    Kurbanoglu, Sevinc; Rivas, Lourdes; Ozkan, Sibel A; Merkoçi, Arben

    2017-02-15

    In this work, a novel biosensor based on electrochemically reduced graphene oxide and iridium oxide nanoparticles for the detection of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor drug, captopril, is presented. For the preparation of the biosensor, tyrosinase is immobilized onto screen printed electrode by using 1-Ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)-carbodiimide and N-Hydroxysuccinimide coupling reagents, in electrochemically reduced graphene oxide and iridium oxide nanoparticles matrix. Biosensor response is characterized towards catechol, in terms of graphene oxide concentration, number of cycles to reduce graphene oxide, volume of iridium oxide nanoparticles and tyrosinase solution. The designed biosensor is used to inhibit tyrosinase activity by Captopril, which is generally used to treat congestive heart failure. It is an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor that operates via chelating copper at the active site of tyrosinase and thioquinone formation. The captopril detections using both inhibition ways are very sensitive with low limits of detection: 0.019µM and 0.008µM for chelating copper at the active site of tyrosinase and thioquinone formation, respectively. The proposed methods have been successfully applied in captopril determination in spiked human serum and pharmaceutical dosage forms with acceptable recovery values.

  7. Arterial hypertension treated with angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors and glucocorticoids are independent risk factors associated with decreased glomerular filtration rate in systemic sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Ostojic, Predrag; Stojanovski, Natasa

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this study was to estimate prevalence and severity of renal insufficiency in systemic sclerosis (SSc) and to assess risk factors associated with reduced glomerular filtration rate (GFR) in SSc patients. Seventy-three consecutive patients with SSc (67 women and 6 men), mean age 56.2 years, mean disease duration 6.7 years, were included in this cross-sectional study. GFR was measured by creatinine clearance (CCr) in all patients, as well as 24-h proteinuria. We assessed frequency and severity of renal insufficiency in our patients with SSc and estimated the association of renal insufficiency with age, disease duration, subtype of the disease, earlier diagnosed arterial hypertension, and medications for which we assumed to affect renal function-cytostatics, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, glucocorticoids, ACE inhibitors, diuretics, and calcium channel blockers (CCB). Fifty-six out of 73 patients with SSc (76.7%) had reduced GFR (CCr lower than 90 ml/min), compared to 17/73 (23.3%) of patients with normal renal function. Mild renal insufficiency was noticed in 28/73 (38.4%), moderate in 21/73 (28.8%) and severe renal insufficiency in 5/73 (6.8%). End-stage renal disease (CCr < 15 ml/min) was found in 2/73 (2.7%) of patients. Using the univariate general linear statistical model, we have found that previously diagnosed arterial hypertension and treatment with glucocorticoids are independent risk factors for reduced GFR. On the other hand, age, disease duration, disease form, as well as antibodies (anticentromere antibodies-ACA and anti-topoisomerase I antibodies-ATA) were excluded as independent risk factors. Patients with SSc and arterial hypertension treated with CCB had significantly higher mean CCr than patients treated with diuretics (90.4 vs 53.5 ml/min, p = 0.03), or patients treated with ACE inhibitors (90.4 vs 41.7 ml/min, p = 0.001). Decreased GFR is common in SSc. Most of patients have mild or moderate renal insufficiency

  8. Stability to gastrointestinal enzymes and structure-activity relationship of beta-casein-peptides with antihypertensive properties.

    PubMed

    Quirós, Ana; del Mar Contreras, María; Ramos, Mercedes; Amigo, Lourdes; Recio, Isidra

    2009-10-01

    Physiological digestion plays a key role in the formation and degradation of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE)-inhibitory peptides. In this study, we evaluated the impact of a simulated gastrointestinal digestion on the stability of eight peptides previously identified in fermented milk with antihypertensive activity. Two of these identified peptides with sequences LHLPLP and LVYPFPGPIPNSLPQNIPP, possess ACE-inhibitory activity in vitro and antihypertensive activity in vivo. The results showed that LHLPLP was resistant to digestive enzymes. In contrast, LVYPFPGPIPNSLPQNIPP was totally hydrolyzed and its activity decreased after incubation with pepsin and a pancreatic extract. The peptide LHLPLP was incubated with ACE and was found to be a true inhibitor of the enzyme and to exhibit a competitive inhibitor pattern. A structure-activity relationship study of this peptide was carried out by synthesizing several modified peptides related to the sequence LHLPLP. The substitution of amino acid Leu in the penultimate position by Gly improved the ACE-inhibitory activity twofold and the substitution of Pro at C-terminal position by Arg increased the activity twofold, with an IC50 of LHLPLR as low as 1.8 microM.

  9. Discovery of desketoraloxifene analogues as inhibitors of mammalian, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and NAPE phospholipase D enzymes.

    PubMed

    Scott, Sarah A; Spencer, Cierra T; O'Reilly, Matthew C; Brown, Kyle A; Lavieri, Robert R; Cho, Chul-Hee; Jung, Dai-Il; Larock, Richard C; Brown, H Alex; Lindsley, Craig W

    2015-02-20

    Phospholipase D (PLD) hydrolyses cellular lipids to produce the important lipid second messenger phosphatidic acid. A PLD enzyme expressed by Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PldA) has been shown to be important in bacterial infection, and NAPE-PLD has emerged as being key in the synthesis of endocannabinoids. In order to better understand the biology and therapeutic potential of these less explored PLD enzymes, small molecule tools are required. Selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) have been previously shown to inhibit mammalian PLD (PLD1 and PLD2). By targeted screening of a library of SERM analogues, additional parallel synthesis, and evaluation in multiple PLD assays, we discovered a novel desketoraloxifene-based scaffold that inhibited not only the two mammalian PLDs but also structurally divergent PldA and NAPE-PLD. This finding represents an important first step toward the development of small molecules possessing universal inhibition of divergent PLD enzymes to advance the field.

  10. Screening of enzyme inhibitors from traditional Chinese medicine by magnetic immobilized α-glucosidase coupled with capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dong-Mei; Chen, Juan; Shi, Yan-Ping

    2017-03-01

    As the close correlation between α-glucosidase inhibitors and the treatment of diabetes, in combination with capillary electrophoresis (CE), a method was developed to screen α-glucosidase inhibitors from traditional Chinese medicines (TCMs) by immobilizing α-glucosidase on magnetic nanoparticles. Such a magnetic immobilization would be beneficial for enzyme reusability, stability and separation. In this work, Fe3O4 nanoparticles were synthesized by solvothermal method. And the prepared nanoparticles were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), size and zeta potential analysis. With the modification of chitosan (CS) and glutaraldehyde (GA), α-glucosidase was successfully immobilized on the magnetic nanoparticles. The pH and temperature endurance, storage stability and reusability of the immobilized α-glucosidase were studied and compared with those of the free one. With the magnetic immobilized α-glucosidase, the Michaelis-Menten constant (Km) was calculated to be 0.85mM, and the inhibition constant (Ki) and half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) for acarbose were determined to be 7.37 and 13.69μM, respectively. Finally, the developed method was applied to screen α-glucosidase inhibitors from 18 TCMs.

  11. Identification of Angiotensin I-Converting Enzyme Inhibitory Peptides Derived from Enzymatic Hydrolysates of Razor Clam Sinonovacula constricta

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yun; Sadiq, Faizan A.; Fu, Li; Zhu, Hui; Zhong, Minghua; Sohail, Muhammad

    2016-01-01

    Angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory activity of razor clam hydrolysates produced using five proteases, namely, pepsin, trypsin, alcalase, flavourzyme and proteases from Actinomucor elegans T3 was investigated. Flavourzyme hydrolysate showed the highest level of degree of hydrolysis (DH) (45.87%) followed by A. elegans T3 proteases hydrolysate (37.84%) and alcalase (30.55%). The A. elegans T3 proteases was observed to be more effective in generating small peptides with ACE-inhibitory activity. The 3 kDa membrane permeate of A. elegans T3 proteases hydrolysate showed the highest ACE-inhibitory activity with an IC50 of 0.79 mg/mL. After chromatographic separation by Sephadex G-15 gel filtration and reverse phase-high performance liquid chromatography, the potent fraction was subjected to MALDI/TOF-TOF MS/MS for identification. A novel ACE-inhibitory peptide (VQY) was identified exhibiting an IC50 of 9.8 μM. The inhibitory kinetics investigation by Lineweaver-Burk plots demonstrated that the peptide acts as a competitive ACE inhibitor. The razor clam hydrolysate obtained by A. elegans T3 proteases could serve as a source of functional peptides with ACE-inhibitory activity for physiological benefits. PMID:27271639

  12. Identification of Angiotensin I-Converting Enzyme Inhibitory Peptides Derived from Enzymatic Hydrolysates of Razor Clam Sinonovacula constricta.

    PubMed

    Li, Yun; Sadiq, Faizan A; Fu, Li; Zhu, Hui; Zhong, Minghua; Sohail, Muhammad

    2016-06-03

    Angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory activity of razor clam hydrolysates produced using five proteases, namely, pepsin, trypsin, alcalase, flavourzyme and proteases from Actinomucor elegans T3 was investigated. Flavourzyme hydrolysate showed the highest level of degree of hydrolysis (DH) (45.87%) followed by A. elegans T3 proteases hydrolysate (37.84%) and alcalase (30.55%). The A. elegans T3 proteases was observed to be more effective in generating small peptides with ACE-inhibitory activity. The 3 kDa membrane permeate of A. elegans T3 proteases hydrolysate showed the highest ACE-inhibitory activity with an IC50 of 0.79 mg/mL. After chromatographic separation by Sephadex G-15 gel filtration and reverse phase-high performance liquid chromatography, the potent fraction was subjected to MALDI/TOF-TOF MS/MS for identification. A novel ACE-inhibitory peptide (VQY) was identified exhibiting an IC50 of 9.8 μM. The inhibitory kinetics investigation by Lineweaver-Burk plots demonstrated that the peptide acts as a competitive ACE inhibitor. The razor clam hydrolysate obtained by A. elegans T3 proteases could serve as a source of functional peptides with ACE-inhibitory activity for physiological benefits.

  13. Quantifiable analysis of cellular pathway inhibition of a Nedd8-activating enzyme inhibitor, MLN4924, using AlphaScreen.

    PubMed

    Yan, Zhong-Hua; Burkhardt, Anne; Loke, Huay-Keng; Chen, Jesse; Xu, Qing; Brauer, Pam; Ma, Jingya; Lin, Yafang; Garcia, Khris; Dick, Lawrence R; Bembenek, Michael E

    2013-08-15

    Cellular effects of a Nedd8-activating enzyme (NAE) inhibitor, MLN4924, using the AlphaScreen format were explored. MLN4924 acts as a substrate-assisted inhibitor of NAE by forming a tight binding Nedd8-MLN4924 adduct. The inhibited enzyme can no longer transfer Nedd8 downstream to modify and activate the E3 cullin-RING ligases. This results in the stabilization of proteins regulated by the proteasome, leading to cell death. These studies monitored the endogenous cellular changes to NAE∼Nedd8 thioester, the formation of the Nedd8-MLN4924 adduct, and the reduction in the Cul1-Nedd8. Lysates derived from MLN4924-treated HCT116 cells showed that whereas the β-subunit of NAE remained constant, reductions of both NAE∼Nedd8 thioester and Cul1-Nedd8 levels occurred with a concomitant rise of the adduct. Moreover, the formation of the Nedd8-MLN4924 adduct was approximately stoichiometric with the concentration of NAEβ. Higher density 384-well cell-based assays illustrated the kinetics of enzyme inactivation across a wider range of MLN4924 concentrations, showing a rapid loss of NAE∼Nedd8 thioester and Cul1-Nedd8. The reduction of NAE∼Nedd8 thioester precedes the loss of Cul1-Nedd8 at twice the rate. Finally, these results clearly demonstrate the utility of the homogeneous assay for quantitative assessment of these endogenous cellular components in a 384-well plate in response to inhibition of NAE by MLN4924.

  14. SARS coronavirus, but not human coronavirus NL63, utilizes cathepsin L to infect ACE2-expressing cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, I-Chueh; Bosch, Berend Jan; Li, Fang; Li, Wenhui; Lee, Kyoung Hoa; Ghiran, Sorina; Vasilieva, Natalya; Dermody, Terence S; Harrison, Stephen C; Dormitzer, Philip R; Farzan, Michael; Rottier, Peter J M; Choe, Hyeryun

    2006-02-10

    Viruses require specific cellular receptors to infect their target cells. Angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) is a cellular receptor for two divergent coronaviruses, SARS coronavirus (SARS-CoV) and human coronavirus NL63 (HCoV-NL63). In addition to hostcell receptors, lysosomal cysteine proteases are required for productive infection by some viruses. Here we show that SARS-CoV, but not HCoV-NL63, utilizes the enzymatic activity of the cysteine protease cathepsin L to infect ACE2-expressing cells. Inhibitors of cathepsin L blocked infection by SARS-CoV and by a retrovirus pseudotyped with the SARS-CoV spike (S) protein but not infection by HCoV-NL63 or a retrovirus pseudotyped with the HCoV-NL63 S protein. Expression of exogenous cathepsin L substantially enhanced infection mediated by the SARS-CoV S protein and by filovirus GP proteins but not by the HCoV-NL63 S protein or the vesicular stomatitis virus G protein. Finally, an inhibitor of endosomal acidification had substantially less effect on infection mediated by the HCoV-NL63 S protein than on that mediated by the SARS-CoV S protein. Our data indicate that two coronaviruses that utilize a common receptor nonetheless enter cells through distinct mechanisms.

  15. Alternative Roles of STAT3 and MAPK Signaling Pathways in the MMPs Activation and Progression of Lung Injury Induced by Cigarette Smoke Exposure in ACE2 Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Yi-Han; Hsieh, Wen-Yeh; Hsieh, Jih-Sheng; Liu, Fon-Chang; Tsai, Chin-Hung; Lu, Li-Che; Huang, Chen-Yi; Wu, Chien-Liang; Lin, Chih-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation-mediated abnormalities in the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) and expression of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are implicated in the pathogenesis of lung injury. Angiotensin converting enzyme II (ACE2), an angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) homologue that displays antagonist effects on ACE/angiotensin II (Ang II) axis, could also play a protective role against lung diseases. However, the relationship between ACE2 and MMPs activation in lung injury is still largely unclear. The purpose of this study is to investigate whether MMPs activity could be affected by ACE2 and which ACE2 derived signaling pathways could be also involved via using a mouse model with lung injury induced by cigarette smoke (CS) exposure for 1 to 3 weeks. Wild-type (WT; C57BL/6) and ACE2 KO mice (ACE2-/-) were utilized to study CS-induced lung injury. Increases in the resting respiratory rate (RRR), pulmonary immunokines, leukocyte infiltration and bronchial hyperplasia were observed in the CS-exposed mice. Compared to WT mice, more serious physiopathological changes were found in ACE2-/- mice in the first week of CS exposure. CS exposure increased pulmonary ACE and ACE2 activities in WT mice, and significantly increased ACE in ACE2-/- mice. Furthermore, the activity of pulmonary MMPs was decreased in CS-exposed WT mice, whereas this activity was increased in ACE2-/- mice. CS exposure increased the pulmonary p-p38, p-JNK and p-ERK1/2 level in all mice. In ACE2-/- mice, a significant increase p-STAT3 signaling was detected; however, no effect was observed on the p-STAT3 level in WT mice. Our results support the hypothesis that ACE2 deficiency influences MMPs activation and STAT3 phosphorylation signaling to promote more pulmonary inflammation in the development of lung injury. PMID:27019629

  16. Novel Benzimidazole Inhibitors of Botulinum Neurotoxin/A Display Enzyme and Cell-Based Potency

    PubMed Central

    Cardinale, Steven C.; Butler, Michelle M.; Ruthel, Gordon; Nuss, Jonathan E.; Wanner, Laura M.; Li, Bing; Pai, Ramdas; Peet, Norton P.; Bavari, Sina; Bowlin, Terry L.

    2011-01-01

    Botulinum Neurotoxins (BoNTs) are used therapeutically and in cosmetics, providing potential for bioterrorist activity, thus driving the search for small-molecule BoNT inhibitors. This report describes a 70,000-compound screen for inhibition of BoNT/A using a FRET assay to detect proteolysis of a peptide substrate. Hits were confirmed, followed by evaluation to determine compound specificity. Inhibitors fell into three main chemical classes, and on the basis of potency and specificity of inhibition, the activities of two chemotypes were examined further. Compounds exhibited specificity for BoNT/A LC inhibition with respect to other metalloproteases and displayed activity in a neuronal assay for botulinum intoxication. PMID:23205055

  17. Design, synthesis, and biological evaluation of α-hydroxyacyl-AMS inhibitors of amino acid adenylation enzymes.

    PubMed

    Davis, Tony D; Mohandas, Poornima; Chiriac, Maria I; Bythrow, Glennon V; Quadri, Luis E N; Tan, Derek S

    2016-11-01

    Biosynthesis of bacterial natural-product virulence factors is emerging as a promising antibiotic target. Many such natural products are produced by nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPS) from amino acid precursors. To develop selective inhibitors of these pathways, we have previously described aminoacyl-AMS (sulfamoyladenosine) macrocycles that inhibit NRPS amino acid adenylation domains but not mechanistically-related aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases. To improve the cell permeability of these inhibitors, we explore herein replacement of the α-amino group with an α-hydroxy group. In both macrocycles and corresponding linear congeners, this leads to decreased biochemical inhibition of the cysteine adenylation domain of the Yersina pestis siderophore synthetase HMWP2, which we attribute to loss of an electrostatic interaction with a conserved active-site aspartate. However, inhibitory activity can be regained by installing a cognate β-thiol moiety in the linear series. This provides a path forward to develop selective, cell-penetrant inhibitors of the biosynthesis of virulence factors to probe their biological functions and potential as therapeutic targets.

  18. Screening of neuraminidase inhibitors from traditional Chinese medicines by integrating capillary electrophoresis with immobilized enzyme microreactor.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Haiyan; Chen, Zilin

    2014-05-02

    A simple and effective neuraminidase-immobilized capillary microreactor was fabricated by glutaraldehyde cross-linking technology for screening the neuraminidase inhibitors from traditional Chinese medicines. The substrate and product were separated by CE in short-end injection mode within 2 min. Dual-wavelength ultraviolet detection was employed to eliminate the interference from the screened compounds. The parameters relating to the separation efficiency and the activity of immobilized neuraminidase were systematically evaluated. The activity of the immobilized neuraminidase remained 90% after 30 days storage at 4°C. The immobilized NA microreactor could be continuously used for more than 200 runs. The Michaelis-Menten constant of neuraminidase was determined by the microreactor as 136.6 ± 10.8 μM. In addition, six in eighteen natural products were found as potent inhibitors and the inhibition potentials were ranked in the following order: bavachinin>bavachin>baicalein>baicalin>chrysin and vitexin. The half-maximal inhibitory concentrations were 59.52 ± 4.12, 65.28 ± 1.07, 44.79 ± 1.21 and 31.62 ± 2.04 for baicalein, baicalin, bavachin and bavachinin, respectively. The results demonstrated that the neuraminidase-immobilized capillary microreactor was a very effective tool for screening neuraminidase inhibitors from traditional Chinese medicines.

  19. Inhibition of the ribonuclease H activity of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase by GSK5750 correlates with slow enzyme-inhibitor dissociation.

    PubMed

    Beilhartz, Greg L; Ngure, Marianne; Johns, Brian A; DeAnda, Felix; Gerondelis, Peter; Götte, Matthias

    2014-06-06

    Compounds that efficiently inhibit the ribonuclease (RNase) H activity of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) reverse transcriptase (RT) have yet to be developed. Here, we demonstrate that GSK5750, a 1-hydroxy-pyridopyrimidinone analog, binds to the enzyme with an equilibrium dissociation constant (K(d)) of ~400 nM. Inhibition of HIV-1 RNase H is specific, as DNA synthesis is not affected. Moreover, GSK5750 does not inhibit the activity of Escherichia coli RNase H. Order-of-addition experiments show that GSK5750 binds to the free enzyme in an Mg(2+)-dependent fashion. However, as reported for other active site inhibitors, binding of GSK5750 to a preformed enzyme-substrate complex is severely compromised. The bound nucleic acid prevents access to the RNase H active site, which represents a possible biochemical hurdle in the development of potent RNase H inhibitors. Previous studies suggested that formation of a complex with the prototypic RNase H inhibitor β-thujaplicinol is slow, and, once formed, it dissociates rapidly. This unfavorable kinetic behavior can limit the potency of RNase H active site inhibitors. Although the association kinetics of GSK5750 remains slow, our data show that this compound forms a long lasting complex with HIV-1 RT. We conclude that slow dissociation of the inhibitor and HIV-1 RT improves RNase H active site inhibitors and may circumvent the obstacle posed by the inability of these compounds to bind to a preformed enzyme-substrate complex.

  20. Beta-lactamase production in members of the family Enterobacteriaceae and resistance to beta-lactam-enzyme inhibitor combinations.

    PubMed Central

    Thomson, K S; Weber, D A; Sanders, C C; Sanders, W E

    1990-01-01

    Recent reports that members of the family Enterobacteriaceae that produce high levels of certain beta-lactamases are often resistant to ticarcillin-clavulanate prompted this study to assess the relationship between type and amount of enzyme produced and susceptibility to ticarcillin-clavulanate, piperacillin-tazobactam, and cefoperazone-sulbactam. Agar dilution MICs were determined by using 73 strains of Enterobacteriaceae that produced a single beta-lactamase that had been characterized and quantified and a beta-lactamase-negative control strain of Escherichia coli. For E. coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae, MICs of each combination increased as levels of TEM, SHV-1, or class IV enzymes increased. However, the percentage of strains that were resistant was highest for ticarcillin-clavulanate (32%), with only 18 and 6% resistant to piperacillin-tazobactam and cefoperazone-sulbactam, respectively. Strains producing PSE-1, regardless of level, were resistant or moderately susceptible to ticarcillin-clavulanate but were susceptible to piperacillin-tazobactam and cefoperazone-sulbactam. HMS-1 and OHIO-1 beta-lactamases were associated with resistance to ticarcillin-clavulanate and piperacillin-tazobactam, respectively. High levels of class IV enzymes in Klebsiella oxytoca were associated with resistance to all three combinations. These results indicate that the level and type of beta-lactamase produced by members of the family Enterobacteriaceae are important determinants of susceptibility to beta-lactam-inhibitor combinations, especially ticarcillin-clavulanate. PMID:2344169

  1. Chemical inhibitors of CYP450 enzymes in liver microsomes: combining selectivity and unbound fractions to guide selection of appropriate concentration in phenotyping assays.

    PubMed

    Nirogi, Ramakrishna; Palacharla, Raghava Choudary; Uthukam, Venkatesham; Manoharan, Arunkumar; Srikakolapu, Surya Rao; Kalaikadhiban, Ilayaraja; Boggavarapu, Rajesh Kumar; Ponnamaneni, Ranjith Kumar; Ajjala, Devender Reddy; Bhyrapuneni, Gopinadh

    2015-02-01

    1. Chemical inhibition is the widely used method in reaction phenotyping assays for estimation of specific enzyme contribution to a given metabolic pathway. The results from phenotyping assays depend on the selectivity of chemical inhibitor and the concentration of inhibitor used in the incubation. 2. The higher protein concentrations used in the in vitro phenotyping assays will impact the inhibitory potency of chemical inhibitors. The objective of the study is to evaluate comprehensively the selectivity of chemical inhibitors and to guide in selecting appropriate concentration of the chemical inhibitors to be used in the phenotyping assays based on unbound fractions. 3. Selectivity of chemical inhibitors against nine major CYP450 isoforms was determined in liver microsomes using standard probe substrates. The unbound fractions of the selective inhibitors were determined in human liver microsomes using high-throughput equilibrium dialysis. Combining unbound inhibitor concentrations that are required to inhibit the CYP450 activities by 90% and unbound fractions of the chemical inhibitors in liver microsomes appropriate total concentrations of the inhibitors to be used in the phenotyping assays were reported. 4. The findings suggest that non-specific binding of the chemical inhibitors need to be taken into account while selecting concentrations for phenotyping assays.

  2. ACE expression in monocytes is induced by cytokines, phorbol ester and steroid

    SciTech Connect

    Lazarus, D.; Lanzillo, J.; Fanburg, B. )

    1991-03-15

    Angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) levels are elevated in the serum and peripheral blood monocytes (PBM) of patients with granulomatous diseases. However, the role of ACE in (Mo) physiology and the regulation of the inflammatory response is not well understood. Since Mo can be stimulated to form giant cells using phorbol esters, glucocorticoids or certain inflammatory cytokines, the authors examined production of ACE protein by normal PBM, a Mo-like cell line, THP-1, and a macrophage-like cell line, U937 following stimulation with these agents. Using a sensitive ELISA assay, they found that in U937 cells, expression of ACE protein increased by 3.4 fold with dexamethasone, 3.7. fold with phorbol 12-myristate acetate (PMA), and 5.8 fold with the two agents combined. The cytokines IL-4 and GM-CSF substantially increased ACE expression, by 7.6 and 7.7 fold respectively, with maximal effect at 0.01 U/ml, while IFN-{gamma} and TNF-{alpha} had little effect. Similar results were found with PBM and THP-1 cells. The combination of dexamethasone and PMA also induced homotypic cluster formation in PBM, suggesting a correlation between cell adhesion and ACE production. The authors conclude that ACE expression in monocytes and macrophages is stimulated by low concentration of glucocorticoids and certain inflammatory cytokines. ACE may participate in the initiation and propagation of granulomatous inflammatory processes.

  3. ACE2 is augmented in dystrophic skeletal muscle and plays a role in decreasing associated fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Riquelme, Cecilia; Acuña, María José; Torrejón, Javiera; Rebolledo, Daniela; Cabrera, Daniel; Santos, Robson A; Brandan, Enrique

    2014-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is the most common inherited neuromuscular disease and is characterized by absence of the cytoskeletal protein dystrophin, muscle wasting, and fibrosis. We previously demonstrated that systemic infusion or oral administration of angiotensin-(1-7) (Ang-(1-7)), a peptide with opposing effects to angiotensin II, normalized skeletal muscle architecture, decreased local fibrosis, and improved muscle function in mdx mice, a dystrophic model for DMD. In this study, we investigated the presence, activity, and localization of ACE2, the enzyme responsible for Ang-(1-7) production, in wild type (wt) and mdx skeletal muscle and in a model of induced chronic damage in wt mice. All dystrophic muscles studied showed higher ACE2 activity than wt muscle. Immunolocalization studies indicated that ACE2 was localized mainly at the sarcolemma and, to a lesser extent, associated with interstitial cells. Similar results were observed in the model of chronic damage in the tibialis anterior (TA) muscle. Furthermore, we evaluated the effect of ACE2 overexpression in mdx TA muscle using an adenovirus containing human ACE2 sequence and showed that expression of ACE2 reduced the fibrosis associated with TA dystrophic muscles. Moreover, we observed fewer inflammatory cells infiltrating the mdx muscle. Finally, mdx gastrocnemius muscles from mice infused with Ang-(1-7), which decreases fibrosis, contain less ACE2 associated with the muscle. This is the first evidence supporting ACE2 as an important therapeutic target to improve the dystrophic skeletal muscle phenotype.

  4. The Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (ACE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernath, P. F.

    2017-01-01

    The Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (ACE), also called SCISAT, is a Canadian-led small satellite mission for remote sensing of the Earth's atmosphere. ACE was launched into a low Earth circular orbit by NASA on August 12, 2003 and it continues to function nominally. The ACE instruments are a high spectral resolution (0.02 cm-1) Fourier Transform Spectrometer (FTS) operating from 2.2 to 13.3 μm (750-4400 cm-1), a spectrophotometer known as Measurement of Aerosol Extinction in the Stratosphere and Troposphere Retrieved by Occultation (MAESTRO) with wavelength coverage of 285-1020 nm and two filtered detector arrays to image the Sun at 0.525 and 1.02 μm. ACE operates in solar occultation mode to provide altitude profiles of temperature, pressure, atmospheric extinction and the volume mixing ratios (VMRs) for several dozen molecules and related isotopologues. This paper presents a mission overview and a summary of selected scientific results.

  5. Transition-state inhibitors of purine salvage and other prospective enzyme targets in malaria.

    PubMed

    Ducati, Rodrigo G; Namanja-Magliano, Hilda A; Schramm, Vern L

    2013-07-01

    Malaria is a leading cause of human death within the tropics. The gradual generation of drug resistance imposes an urgent need for the development of new and selective antimalarial agents. Kinetic isotope effects coupled to computational chemistry have provided the relevant details on geometry and charge of enzymatic transition states to facilitate the design of transition-state analogs. These features have been reproduced into chemically stable mimics through synthetic chemistry, generating inhibitors with dissociation constants in the pico- to femto-molar range. Transition-state analogs are expected to contribute to the control of malaria.

  6. Polyphenols as