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Sample records for enzyme gene expression

  1. Hepatic Xenobiotic Metabolizing Enzyme Gene Expression ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    BACKGROUND: Differences in responses to environmental chemicals and drugs between life stages are likely due in part to differences in the expression of xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes and transporters (XMETs). No comprehensive analysis of the mRNA expression of XMETs has been carried out through life stages in any species. RESULTS: Using full-genome arrays, the mRNA expression of all XMETs and their regulatory proteins was examined during fetal (gestation day (GD) 19), neonatal (postnatal day (PND) 7), prepubescent (PND32), middle age (12 months), and old age (18 and 24 months) in the C57BL/6J (C57) mouse liver and compared to adults. Fetal and neonatal life stages exhibited dramatic differences in XMET mRNA expression compared to the relatively minor effects of old age. The total number of XMET probe sets that differed from adults was 636, 500, 84, 5, 43, and 102 for GD19, PND7, PND32, 12 months, 18 months and 24 months, respectively. At all life stages except PND32, under-expressed genes outnumbered over-expressed genes. The altered XMETs included those in all of the major metabolic and transport phases including introduction of reactive or polar groups (Phase I), conjugation (Phase II) and excretion (Phase III). In the fetus and neonate, parallel increases in expression were noted in the dioxin receptor, Nrf2 components and their regulated genes while nuclear receptors and regulated genes were generally down-regulated. Suppression of male-specific XMETs w

  2. Radiation Exposure Alters Expression of Metabolic Enzyme Genes In Mice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wotring, Virginia E.; Mangala, L. S.; Zhang, Y.; Wu, H.

    2010-01-01

    Most pharmaceuticals are metabolized by the liver. The health of the liver, especially the rate of its metabolic enzymes, determines the concentration of circulating drugs as well as the duration of their efficacy. Because of the importance of the liver in drug metabolism it is important to understand the effects of spaceflight on the enzymes of the liver. Exposure to cosmic radiation is one aspect of spaceflight that can be modeled in ground experiments. This study is an effort to examine the effects of adaptive mechanisms that may be triggered by early exposure to low radiation doses. Using procedures approved by the JSC Animal Care & Use Committee, C57 male mice were exposed to Cs-137 in groups: controls, low dose (50 mGy), high dose (6Gy) and a fourth group that received both radiation doses separated by 24 hours. Animals were anesthetized and sacrificed 4 hours after their last radiation exposure. Livers were removed immediately and flash-frozen in liquid nitrogen. Tissue was homogenized, RNA extracted and purified (Absolutely RNA, Agilent). Quality of RNA samples was evaluated (Agilent Bioanalyzer 2100). Complementary DNA was prepared from high-quality RNA samples, and used to run RT-qPCR screening arrays for DNA Repair and Drug Metabolism (SuperArray, SABiosciences/Qiagen; BioRad Cfx96 qPCR System). Of 91 drug metabolism genes examined, expression of 7 was altered by at least one treatment condition. Genes that had elevated expression include those that metabolize promethazine and steroids (4-8-fold), many that reduce oxidation products, and one that reduces heavy metal exposure (greater than 200-fold). Of the 91 DNA repair and general metabolism genes examined, expression of 14 was altered by at least one treatment condition. These gene expression changes are likely homeostatic and could lead to development of new radioprotective countermeasures.

  3. Gene Cloning, Expression and Enzyme Activity of Vitis vinifera Vacuolar Processing Enzymes (VvVPEs)

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Peijie; Li, Shuxiu; Wang, Yuejin; Zhang, Chaohong

    2016-01-01

    Vacuolar processing enzymes (VPEs) have received considerable attention due to their caspase-1-like activity and ability to regulate programmed cell death (PCD), which plays an essential role in the development of stenospermocarpic seedless grapes ovules. To characterize VPEs and the relationship between stenospermocarpic grapes and the VPE gene family, we identified 3 Vitis vinifera VPE genes (VvβVPE, VvγVPE, and VvδVPE) from the PN40024 grape genome and cloned the full-length complementary DNAs (cDNAs) from the ‘Vitis vinifera cv. Pinot Noir’ and ‘Vitis vinifera cv. Thompson Seedless’ varietals. Each of the VPEs contained a typical catalytic dyad [His (177), Cys (219)] and substrate binding pocket [Arg (112), Arg (389), Ser (395)], except that Ser (395) in the VvγVPE protein sequence was replaced with alanine. Phylogenetic analysis of 4 Arabidopsis thaliana and 6 Vitis vinifera VPEs revealed that the 10 VPEs form 3 major branches. Furthermore, the 6 grapevine VPEs share a similar gene structure, with 9 exons and 8 introns. The 6 grapevine VPEs are located on 3 different chromosomes. We also tested the enzymatic activity of recombinant VPEs expressed in the Pichia Pastoris expression system and found that the VvVPEs exhibit cysteine peptidase activity. Tissue-specific expression analysis showed that VvδVPE is only expressed in flowers, buds and ovules, that VvγVPE is expressed in various tissues, and that VvβVPE was expressed in roots, flowers, buds and ovules. The results of quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) suggested that VvβVPE in seeded grapes increased significantly at 30 days after full-bloom (DAF), close to the timing of endosperm abortion at 32 DAF. These results suggested that VvβVPE is related to ovule abortion in seedless grapes. Our experiments provide a new perspective for understanding the mechanism of stenospermocarpic seedlessness and represent a useful reference for the further study of VPEs. PMID:27551866

  4. Assembly and multiple gene expression of thermophilic enzymes in Escherichia coli for in vitro metabolic engineering.

    PubMed

    Ninh, Pham Huynh; Honda, Kohsuke; Sakai, Takaaki; Okano, Kenji; Ohtake, Hisao

    2015-01-01

    In vitro reconstitution of an artificial metabolic pathway is an emerging approach for the biocatalytic production of industrial chemicals. However, several enzymes have to be separately prepared (and purified) for the construction of an in vitro metabolic pathway, thereby limiting the practical applicability of this approach. In this study, genes encoding the nine thermophilic enzymes involved in a non-ATP-forming chimeric glycolytic pathway were assembled in an artificial operon and co-expressed in a single recombinant Escherichia coli strain. Gene expression levels of the thermophilic enzymes were controlled by their sequential order in the artificial operon. The specific activities of the recombinant enzymes in the cell-free extract of the multiple-gene-expression E. coli were 5.0-1,370 times higher than those in an enzyme cocktail prepared from a mixture of single-gene-expression strains, in each of which a single one of the nine thermophilic enzymes was overproduced. Heat treatment of a crude extract of the multiple-gene-expression cells led to the denaturation of indigenous proteins and one-step preparation of an in vitro synthetic pathway comprising only a limited number of thermotolerant enzymes. Coupling this in vitro pathway with other thermophilic enzymes including the H2 O-forming NADH oxidase or the malate/lactate dehydrogenase facilitated one-pot conversion of glucose to pyruvate or lactate, respectively.

  5. Coordinated Changes in Xenobiotic Metabolizing Enzyme Gene Expression in Aging Male Rats

    EPA Science Inventory

    In order to gain better insight on aging and susceptibility, we characterized the expression of xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes (XMEs) from the livers of rats to evaluate the change in capacity to respond to xenobiotics across the adult lifespan. Gene expression profiles for XMEs...

  6. [Tryptophan 7-halogenase from Pseudomonas aureofaciens ACN strain: gene cloning and sequencing and the enzyme expression].

    PubMed

    Burd', V N; van Pee, K H

    2004-01-01

    The gene of tryptophan 7-halogenase was isolated from the Pseudomonas aureofaciens ACN strain producing pyrrolnitrin, a chlorocontaining antibiotic, and sequenced. A high homology degree (over 95%) was established for the genes and the corresponding halogenases from P. aureofaciens ACN and P. fluorescens BL915. The tryptophan 7-halogenase gene was amplified by PCR, and the corresponding enzyme was expressed in Escherichia coli cells using the pBSII SK+ vector.

  7. Radiation Exposure Alters Expression of Metabolic Enzyme Genes in Mice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wotring, V. E.; Mangala, L. S.; Zhang, Y.; Wu, H.

    2011-01-01

    Most administered pharmaceuticals are metabolized by the liver. The health of the liver, especially the rate of its metabolic enzymes, determines the concentration of circulating drugs as well as the duration of their efficacy. Most pharmaceuticals are metabolized by the liver, and clinically-used medication doses are given with normal liver function in mind. A drug overdose can result in the case of a liver that is damaged and removing pharmaceuticals from the circulation at a rate slower than normal. Alternatively, if liver function is elevated and removing drugs from the system more quickly than usual, it would be as if too little drug had been given for effective treatment. Because of the importance of the liver in drug metabolism, we want to understand the effects of spaceflight on the enzymes of the liver and exposure to cosmic radiation is one aspect of spaceflight that can be modeled in ground experiments. Additionally, it has been previous noted that pre-exposure to small radiation doses seems to confer protection against later and larger radiation doses. This protective power of pre-exposure has been called a priming effect or radioadaptation. This study is an effort to examine the drug metabolizing effects of radioadaptation mechanisms that may be triggered by early exposure to low radiation doses.

  8. Circadian oscillation of starch branching enzyme gene expression in the sorghum endosperm

    SciTech Connect

    Mutisya, J.; Sun, C.; Jansson, C.

    2009-08-31

    Expression of the three SBE genes, encoding starch branching enzymes, in the sorghum endosperm exhibited a diurnal rhythm during a 24-h cycle. Remarkably, the oscillation in SBE expression was maintained in cultured spikes after a 48-h dark treatment, also when fed a continuous solution of sucrose or abscisic acid. Our findings suggest that the rhythmicity in SBE expression in the endosperm is independent of cues from the photosynthetic source and that the oscillator resides within the endosperm itself.

  9. Gestational Age-Dependent Changes in Gene Expression of Metabolic Enzymes and Transporters in Pregnant Mice

    PubMed Central

    Shuster, Diana L.; Bammler, Theo K.; Beyer, Richard P.; MacDonald, James W.; Tsai, Jesse M.; Farin, Frederico M.; Hebert, Mary F.; Thummel, Kenneth E.

    2013-01-01

    Pregnancy-induced changes in drug pharmacokinetics can be explained by changes in expression of drug-metabolizing enzymes and transporters and/or normal physiology. In this study, we determined gestational age-dependent expression profiles for all metabolic enzyme and transporter genes in the maternal liver, kidney, small intestine, and placenta of pregnant mice by microarray analysis. We specifically examined the expression of genes important for xenobiotic, bile acid, and steroid hormone metabolism and disposition, namely, cytochrome P450s (Cyp), UDP-glucuronosyltranserases (Ugt), sulfotransferases (Sult), and ATP-binding cassette (Abc), solute carrier (Slc), and solute carrier organic anion (Slco) transporters. Few Ugt and Sult genes were affected by pregnancy. Cyp17a1 expression in the maternal liver increased 3- to 10-fold during pregnancy, which was the largest observed change in the maternal tissues. Cyp1a2, most Cyp2 isoforms, Cyp3a11, and Cyp3a13 expression in the liver decreased on gestation days (gd) 15 and 19 compared with nonpregnant controls (gd 0). In contrast, Cyp2d40, Cyp3a16, Cyp3a41a, Cyp3a41b, and Cyp3a44 in the liver were induced throughout pregnancy. In the placenta, Cyp expression on gd 10 and 15 was upregulated compared with gd 19. Notable changes were also observed in Abc and Slc transporters. Abcc3 expression in the liver and Abcb1a, Abcc4, and Slco4c1 expression in the kidney were downregulated on gd 15 and 19. In the placenta, Slc22a3 (Oct3) expression on gd 10 was 90% lower than that on gd 15 and 19. This study demonstrates important gestational age-dependent expression of metabolic enzyme and transporter genes, which may have mechanistic relevance to drug disposition in human pregnancy. PMID:23175668

  10. The four aldehyde oxidases of Drosophila melanogaster have different gene expression patterns and enzyme substrate specificities.

    PubMed

    Marelja, Zvonimir; Dambowsky, Miriam; Bolis, Marco; Georgiou, Marina L; Garattini, Enrico; Missirlis, Fanis; Leimkühler, Silke

    2014-06-15

    In the genome of Drosophila melanogaster, four genes coding for aldehyde oxidases (AOX1-4) were identified on chromosome 3. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the AOX gene cluster evolved via independent duplication events in the vertebrate and invertebrate lineages. The functional role and the substrate specificity of the distinct Drosophila AOX enzymes is unknown. Two loss-of-function mutant alleles in this gene region, low pyridoxal oxidase (Po(lpo)) and aldehyde oxidase-1 (Aldox-1(n1)) are associated with a phenotype characterized by undetectable AOX enzymatic activity. However, the genes involved and the corresponding mutations have not yet been identified. In this study we characterized the activities, substrate specificities and expression profiles of the four AOX enzymes in D. melanogaster. We show that the Po(lpo)-associated phenotype is the consequence of a structural alteration of the AOX1 gene. We identified an 11-bp deletion in the Po(lpo) allele, resulting in a frame-shift event, which removes the molybdenum cofactor domain of the encoded enzyme. Furthermore, we show that AOX2 activity is detectable only during metamorphosis and characterize a Minos-AOX2 insertion in this developmental gene that disrupts its activity. We demonstrate that the Aldox-1(n1) phenotype maps to the AOX3 gene and AOX4 activity is not detectable in our assays.

  11. The four aldehyde oxidases of Drosophila melanogaster have different gene expression patterns and enzyme substrate specificities

    PubMed Central

    Marelja, Zvonimir; Dambowsky, Miriam; Bolis, Marco; Georgiou, Marina L.; Garattini, Enrico; Missirlis, Fanis; Leimkühler, Silke

    2014-01-01

    In the genome of Drosophila melanogaster, four genes coding for aldehyde oxidases (AOX1–4) were identified on chromosome 3. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the AOX gene cluster evolved via independent duplication events in the vertebrate and invertebrate lineages. The functional role and the substrate specificity of the distinct Drosophila AOX enzymes is unknown. Two loss-of-function mutant alleles in this gene region, low pyridoxal oxidase (Polpo) and aldehyde oxidase-1 (Aldox-1n1) are associated with a phenotype characterized by undetectable AOX enzymatic activity. However, the genes involved and the corresponding mutations have not yet been identified. In this study we characterized the activities, substrate specificities and expression profiles of the four AOX enzymes in D. melanogaster. We show that the Polpo-associated phenotype is the consequence of a structural alteration of the AOX1 gene. We identified an 11-bp deletion in the Polpo allele, resulting in a frame-shift event, which removes the molybdenum cofactor domain of the encoded enzyme. Furthermore, we show that AOX2 activity is detectable only during metamorphosis and characterize a Minos-AOX2 insertion in this developmental gene that disrupts its activity. We demonstrate that the Aldox-1n1 phenotype maps to the AOX3 gene and AOX4 activity is not detectable in our assays. PMID:24737760

  12. SWI/SNF enzymes promote SOX10- mediated activation of myelin gene expression.

    PubMed

    Marathe, Himangi G; Mehta, Gaurav; Zhang, Xiaolu; Datar, Ila; Mehrotra, Aanchal; Yeung, Kam C; de la Serna, Ivana L

    2013-01-01

    SOX10 is a Sry-related high mobility (HMG)-box transcriptional regulator that promotes differentiation of neural crest precursors into Schwann cells, oligodendrocytes, and melanocytes. Myelin, formed by Schwann cells in the peripheral nervous system, is essential for propagation of nerve impulses. SWI/SNF complexes are ATP dependent chromatin remodeling enzymes that are critical for cellular differentiation. It was recently demonstrated that the BRG1 subunit of SWI/SNF complexes activates SOX10 expression and also interacts with SOX10 to activate expression of OCT6 and KROX20, two transcriptional regulators of Schwann cell differentiation. To determine the requirement for SWI/SNF enzymes in the regulation of genes that encode components of myelin, which are downstream of these transcriptional regulators, we introduced SOX10 into fibroblasts that inducibly express dominant negative versions of the SWI/SNF ATPases, BRM or BRG1. Dominant negative BRM and BRG1 have mutations in the ATP binding site and inhibit gene activation events that require SWI/SNF function. Ectopic expression of SOX10 in cells derived from NIH 3T3 fibroblasts led to the activation of the endogenous Schwann cell specific gene, myelin protein zero (MPZ) and the gene that encodes myelin basic protein (MBP). Thus, SOX10 reprogrammed these cells into myelin gene expressing cells. Ectopic expression of KROX20 was not sufficient for activation of these myelin genes. However, KROX20 together with SOX10 synergistically activated MPZ and MBP expression. Dominant negative BRM and BRG1 abrogated SOX10 mediated activation of MPZ and MBP and synergistic activation of these genes by SOX10 and KROX20. SOX10 was required to recruit BRG1 to the MPZ locus. Similarly, in immortalized Schwann cells, BRG1 recruitment to SOX10 binding sites at the MPZ locus was dependent on SOX10 and expression of dominant negative BRG1 inhibited expression of MPZ and MBP in these cells. Thus, SWI/SNF enzymes cooperate with SOX10 to

  13. Gene expression for peroxisome-associated enzymes in hepatocellular carcinomas induced by ciprofibrate, a hypolipidemic compound

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, M.S.; Nemali, M.R.; Reddy, J.K.

    1986-03-05

    Administration of hypolipidemic compounds leads to marked proliferation of peroxisomes and peroxisome-associated enzymes (PAE) in the livers of rodents and non-rodent species. The increase peroxisome-associated enzymes such as fatty acid ..beta..-oxidation system and catalase is shown to be due to an increase in the levels of mRNA. In this experiment they have examined hepatocellular carcinomas (HCC), induced in male F-344 rats by ciprofibrate (0.025%, w/w for 60 weeks), for gene expression of PAE. Total RNA was purified from HCC as well as from control and ciprofibrate (0.025% for 2 weeks) fed rat livers. Northern blot analysis was performed using (32/sub p/)cDNA probes for albumin, fatty acetyl-CoA oxidase, enoyl-CoA hydratase 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase bifunctional enzyme and catalase. mRNA levels in HCC for albumin, fatty acid ..beta..-oxidation enzymes and catalase were comparable with those levels observed in the livers of rats given ciprofibrate for 2 weeks. In control livers the mRNAs for ..beta..-oxidation enzymes were low. Albumin mRNA levels in all the 3 groups were comparable. Additional studies are necessary to determine whether the increased level of mRNAs for the ..beta..-oxidation enzymes in HCC is due to the effect of ciprofibrate or to the gene amplification.

  14. Characterization and expression analysis of genes encoding ubiquitin conjugating domain-containing enzymes in Carica papaya

    PubMed Central

    Jue, Dengwei; Sang, Xuelian; Shu, Bo; Liu, Liqin; Wang, Yicheng; Jia, Zhiwei; Zou, Yu; Shi, Shengyou

    2017-01-01

    Background Ripening affects the quality and nutritional contents of fleshy fruits and is a crucial process of fruit development. Although several studies have suggested that ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme (E2s or UBC enzymes) are involved in the regulation of fruit ripening, little is known about the function of E2s in papaya (Carica papaya). Methodology/Principal findings In the present study, we searched the papaya genome and identified 34 putative UBC genes, which were clustered into 17 phylogenetic subgroups. We also analyzed the nucleotide sequences of the papaya UBC (CpUBC) genes and found that both exon-intron junctions and sequence motifs were highly conserved among the phylogenetic subgroups. Using real-time PCR analysis, we also found that all the CpUBC genes were expressed in roots, stems, leaves, male and female flowers, and mature fruit, although the expression of some of the genes was increased or decreased in one or several specific organs. We also found that the expression of 13 and two CpUBC genes were incresesd or decreased during one and two ripening stages, respectively. Expression analyses indicates possible E2s playing a more significant role in fruit ripening for further studies. Conclusions To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported genome-wide analysis of the papaya UBC gene family, and the results will facilitate further investigation of the roles of UBC genes in fruit ripening and will aide in the functional validation of UBC genes in papaya. PMID:28231288

  15. The unique glutathione reductase from Xanthomonas campestris: Gene expression and enzyme characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Loprasert, Suvit . E-mail: suvit@cri.or.th; Whangsuk, Wirongrong; Sallabhan, Ratiboot; Mongkolsuk, Skorn

    2005-06-17

    The glutathione reductase gene, gor, was cloned from the plant pathogen Xanthomonas campestris pv. phaseoli. Its gene expression and enzyme characteristics were found to be different from those of previously studied homologues. Northern blot hybridization, promoter-lacZ fusion, and enzyme assay experiments revealed that its expression, unlike in Escherichia coli, is OxyR-independent and constitutive upon oxidative stress conditions. The deduced amino acid sequence shows a unique NADPH binding motif where the most highly conserved arginine residue, which is critical for NADPH binding, is replaced by glutamine. Interestingly, a search of the available Gor amino acid sequences from various sources, including other Xanthomonas species, revealed that this replacement is specific to the genus Xanthomonas. Recombinant Gor enzyme was purified and characterized, and was found to have a novel ability to use both, NADPH and NADH, as electron donor. A gor knockout mutant was constructed and shown to have increased expression of the organic peroxide-inducible regulator gene, ohrR.

  16. Different Gene Expression and Activity Pattern of Antioxidant Enzymes in Bladder Cancer.

    PubMed

    Wieczorek, Edyta; Jablonowski, Zbigniew; Tomasik, Bartlomiej; Gromadzinska, Jolanta; Jablonska, Ewa; Konecki, Tomasz; Fendler, Wojciech; Sosnowski, Marek; Wasowicz, Wojciech; Reszka, Edyta

    2017-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the possible role in and contribution of antioxidant enzymes to bladder cancer (BC) etiology and recurrence after transurethral resection (TUR). We enrolled 40 patients with BC who underwent TUR and 100 sex- and age-matched healthy controls. The analysis was performed at diagnosis and recurrence, taking into account the time of recurrence. Gene expression of catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase 1 (GPX1) and manganese superoxide dismutase (SOD2) was determined in peripheral blood leukocytes. The activity of glutathione peroxidase 3 (GPX3) was examined in plasma, and GPX1 and copper-zinc containing superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) in erythrocytes. SOD2 and GPX1 expression and GPX1 and SOD1 activity were significantly higher in patients at diagnosis of BC in comparison to controls. In patients who had recurrence earlier than 1 year from TUR, CAT and SOD2 expression was lower (at diagnosis p=0.024 and p=0.434, at recurrence p=0.022 and p=0.010), while the GPX1 and GPX3 activity was higher (at diagnosis p=0.242 and p=0.394, at recurrence p=0.019 and p=0.025) compared to patients with recurrence after 1 year from TUR. This study revealed that the gene expression and activity of the antioxidant enzymes are elevated in blood of patients with BC, although a low expression of CAT might contribute to the recurrence of BC, in early prognosis.

  17. Effects of overexpression of PKAc genes on expressions of lignin-modifying enzymes by Pleurotus ostreatus.

    PubMed

    Toyokawa, Chihana; Shobu, Misaki; Tsukamoto, Rie; Okamura, Saki; Honda, Yoichi; Kamitsuji, Hisatoshi; Izumitsu, Kousuke; Suzuki, Kazumi; Irie, Toshikazu

    2016-09-01

    We studied the role of genes encoding the cAMP-dependent protein kinase A catalytic subunit (PKAc) in the ligninolytic system in Pleurotus ostreatus. The wild-type P. ostreatus strain PC9 has two PKAc-encoding genes: PKAc1 and PKAc2 (protein ID 114122 and 85056). In the current study, PKAc1 and PKAc2 were fused with a β-tubulin promoter and introduced into strain PC9 to produce the overexpression strains PKAc1-97 and PKAc2-69. These strains showed significantly higher transcription levels of isozyme genes encoding lignin-modifying enzymes than strain PC9, but the specific gene expression patterns differed between the two recombinant strains. Both recombinants showed 2.05-2.10-fold faster degradation of beechwood lignin than strain PC9. These results indicate that PKAc plays an important role in inducing the wood degradation system in P. ostreatus.

  18. [Antioxidant enzyme gene expression as molecular biomarkers of exposure to polycyclic musks].

    PubMed

    Chen, Chun; Zhou, Qi-xing; Liu, Xiao-wei

    2012-08-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the molecular toxicological effects of low level synthetic musks exposure on the earthworm Eisenia fetida. The method of Sybr Green I real time quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) for detecting gene expression level was established. SOD (superoxide dismutase) and CAT (catalase) mRNA expression levels were measured after 28 days. of AHTN and HHCB exposure. The analysis results of both sequence alignment and melting curve demonstrated that the selected primers were suitable for mRNA quantification. The liner correlation coefficients of SOD and CAT standard curves were 0.997 and 0.994, respectively, and the PCR amplification efficiencies were both close to 100%. Therefore, relative quantification method could be applied to analyze the gene expression levels. The significant elevation of malondialdehyde (MDA) levels indicated that the reactive oxygen species-induced cellular oxidative injury might be one of the main toxic effects of AHTN and HHCB. Besides, a significant positive correlation was observed between the up-regulation of SOD, CAT mRNA and the MDA levels, suggesting that possible changes in the transcript expression of antioxidant enzyme genes were associated with the oxidative stress. Furthermore, the dose-response correlation between SOD, CAT mRNA levels and the exposure concentrations was also found. The overall results indicated that SOD and CAT genes might be potential molecular biomarkers for the evaluation of the pollution stress and toxicological effects of synthetic musks in the environment.

  19. Developmental changes in ketogenic enzyme gene expression during sheep rumen development.

    PubMed

    Lane, M A; Baldwin, R L; Jesse, B W

    2002-06-01

    Ketogenesis is the conversion of acetyl-CoA to the ketone bodies acetoacetate and beta-hydroxybutyrate (BHBA). In hepatic ketogenesis, which occurs during fasting in both nonruminant and ruminant animals, the source of acetyl-CoA is the mitochondrial oxidation of predominantly long-chain fatty acids. In the mature, fed ruminant animal, the ruminal epithelium is also capable of producing ketone bodies. In this case, the source of acetyl-CoA is the mitochondrial oxidation of butyrate produced by the microbial fermentation of feed. The purposes of this study were to determine ontogenic and dietary effects on ketogenic enzyme gene expression in developing lamb ruminal epithelium. Twenty-seven conventionally reared lambs and twenty-seven milk-fed lambs were slaughtered between 1 and 84 d of age. Six additional milk-fed lambs were weaned (the fed group) or maintained on milk replacer with a volatile fatty acid gavage (the VFA group) until 84 d of age. At slaughter, total RNA was extracted from samples of ruminal epithelium. The expression of the genes encoding acetoacetyl-CoA thiolase, the first enzyme in the ketogenic pathway, and 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA synthase, the rate-limiting enzyme in the ketogenic pathway in nonruminant liver, were examined. Acetoacetyl-CoA thiolase and 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA synthase mRNA concentrations increased with age independent of diet. 3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA synthase mRNA levels in ruminal epithelium obtained from milk-fed lambs were low before 42 d of age, but a marked increase occurred by 42 d of age. At 84 d of age, there were no differences in acetoacetyl-CoA thiolase and 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA synthase expression due to diet. The pattern of the expression of these genes, in particular, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA synthase, parallels the rate of production of BHBA by rumen epithelial cells isolated from the same lambs, which increased to conventionally reared adult levels at 42 d of age and did not

  20. The herbicide flumioxazin stimulates pathogenesis-related gene expression and enzyme activities in Vitis vinifera.

    PubMed

    Castro, Antonio Jesús; Saladin, Gäelle; Bézier, Annie; Mazeyrat-Gourbeyre, Florence; Baillieul, Fabienne; Clément, Christophe

    2008-11-01

    In this work, the capacity of the soil-applied herbicide flumioxazin (fmx) to trigger defence mechanisms was assessed using 6-week-old in vitro grown Vitis vinifera L. plantlets. Time-course studies demonstrated that the herbicide induced the expression of basic beta-1,3-glucanase (Vvglu), basic chitinase (Vvchit1b) and PR10 (VvPR10.3) genes encoding three pathogenesis-related (PR) proteins involved in grapevine defence against pathogens. Thus, all transcripts accumulated in grapevine tissues to reach maximum values after 24-72 h of herbicide exposure, except for VvPR10.3 gene expression, which was induced in roots and stems but not in leaves. Induction of PR genes was observed to a greater extent in roots and leaves, and its intensity diminished in the stems although still remained noteworthy. The activities of beta-1,3-glucanase and chitinase enzymes significantly increased in the whole plant after herbicide exposure and were still stimulated 21 days after the beginning of treatments. Similarly, the most remarkable effect occurred in roots. However, all enzyme activities tested were stimulated in the upper aerial tissues as well, indicating that fmx or a derived product acts systemically, likely via root uptake.

  1. [Xenopus laevis peroxiredoxins: Gene expression during development and characterization of the enzymes].

    PubMed

    Sharapov, M G; Novoselov, V I; Ravin, V K

    2016-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are produced via catabolic and anabolic processes during normal embryonic development, and ROS content in the cell is maintained at a certain level. Peroxiredoxins are a family of selenium-independent peroxidases and play a key role in maintaining redox homeostasis of the cell. In addition to regulating the ROS level, peroxiredoxins are involved in intracellular and intercellular signaling, cell differentiation, and tissue development. The time course of peroxiredoxin gene (prx1-6) expression was studied in Xenopus laevis during early ontogeny (Nieuwkoop and Faber stages 10-63). The highest expression level was observed for prx1 at these developmental stages. The prx1, prx3, and prx4 expression level changed most dramatically in response to oxidative stress artificially induced in X. laevis embryos. In X. laevis adults, prx1-6 were all intensely expressed in all organs examined, the prx1 expression level being the highest. The X. laevis prx1-6 genes were cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli, and physico-chemical characteristics were compared for the recombinant enzymes. The highest peroxidase activity and thermal stability were observed for Prx1 and Prx2. It was assumed that Prx1 plays a leading role in X. laevis early development.

  2. In vitro Paracoccidioides brasiliensis biofilm and gene expression of adhesins and hydrolytic enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Sardi, Janaina de Cássia Orlandi; Pitangui, Nayla de Souza; Voltan, Aline Raquel; Braz, Jaqueline Derissi; Machado, Marcelo Pelajo; Fusco Almeida, Ana Marisa; Mendes Giannini, Maria Jose Soares

    2015-01-01

    Paracoccidioides species are dimorphic fungi that initially infect the lungs but can also spread throughout the body. The spreading infection is most likely due to the formation of a biofilm that makes it difficult for the host to eliminate the infection. Biofilm formation is crucial for the development of infections and confines the pathogen to an extracellular matrix. Its presence is associated with antimicrobial resistance and avoidance of host defenses. This current study provides the first description of biofilm formation by Paracoccidioides brasiliensis (Pb18) and an analysis of gene expression, using real-time PCR, associated with 3 adhesins and 2 hydrolytic enzymes that could be associated with the virulence profile. Biofilm formation was analyzed using fluorescence microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). Metabolic activity was determined using the XTT reduction assay. P. brasiliensis was able to form mature biofilm in 144 h with a thickness of 100 μm. The presence of a biofilm was found to be associated with an increase in the expression of adhesins and enzymes. GP43, enolase, GAPDH and aspartyl proteinase genes were over-expressed, whereas phospholipase was down-regulated in biofilm. The characterization of biofilm formed by P. brasiliensis may contribute to a better understanding of the pathogenesis of paracoccidioidomycosis as well as the search for new therapeutic alternatives; while improving the effectiveness of treatment. PMID:26055497

  3. Gene Cloning and Expression and Secretion of Listeria monocytogenes Bacteriophage-Lytic Enzymes in Lactococcus lactis

    PubMed Central

    Gaeng, Susanne; Scherer, Siegfried; Neve, Horst; Loessner, Martin J.

    2000-01-01

    Bacteriophage lysins (Ply), or endolysins, are phage-encoded cell wall lytic enzymes which are synthesized late during virus multiplication and mediate the release of progeny virions. Bacteriophages of the pathogen Listeria monocytogenes encode endolysin enzymes which specifically hydrolyze the cross-linking peptide bridges in Listeria peptidoglycan. Ply118 is a 30.8-kDa l-alanoyl-d-glutamate peptidase and Ply511 (36.5 kDa) acts as N-acetylmuramoyl-l-alanine amidase. In order to establish dairy starter cultures with biopreservation properties against L. monocytogenes contaminations, we have introduced ply118 and ply511 into Lactococcus lactis MG1363 by using a pTRKH2 backbone. The genes were expressed under control of the lactococcal promoter P32, which proved superior to other promoters (P21 and P59) tested in this study. High levels of active enzymes were produced and accumulated in the cytoplasmic cell fractions but were not released from the cells at significant levels. Therefore, ply511 was genetically fused with the SPslpA nucleotide sequence encoding the Lactobacillus brevis S-layer protein signal peptide. Expression of SPslpA–ply511 from pSL-PL511 resulted in secretion of functional Ply511 enzyme from L. lactis cells. One clone expressed an unusually strong lytic activity, which was found to be due to a 115-bp deletion that occurred within the 3′-end coding sequence of SPslpA–ply511, which caused a frameshift mutation and generated a stop codon. Surprisingly, the resulting carboxy-terminal deletion of 80 amino acids in the truncated Ply511Δ(S262–K341) mutant polypeptide strongly increased its lytic activity. Proteolytic processing of the secretion competent SPSlpA-Ply511 propeptide following membrane translocation had no influence on enzyme activity. Immunoblotting experiments using both cytoplasmic and supernatant fractions indicated that the enzyme was quantitatively exported from the cells and secreted into the surrounding medium, where it

  4. Gene cloning and expression and secretion of Listeria monocytogenes bacteriophage-lytic enzymes in Lactococcus lactis.

    PubMed

    Gaeng, S; Scherer, S; Neve, H; Loessner, M J

    2000-07-01

    Bacteriophage lysins (Ply), or endolysins, are phage-encoded cell wall lytic enzymes which are synthesized late during virus multiplication and mediate the release of progeny virions. Bacteriophages of the pathogen Listeria monocytogenes encode endolysin enzymes which specifically hydrolyze the cross-linking peptide bridges in Listeria peptidoglycan. Ply118 is a 30.8-kDa L-alanoyl-D-glutamate peptidase and Ply511 (36.5 kDa) acts as N-acetylmuramoyl-L-alanine amidase. In order to establish dairy starter cultures with biopreservation properties against L. monocytogenes contaminations, we have introduced ply118 and ply511 into Lactococcus lactis MG1363 by using a pTRKH2 backbone. The genes were expressed under control of the lactococcal promoter P32, which proved superior to other promoters (P21 and P59) tested in this study. High levels of active enzymes were produced and accumulated in the cytoplasmic cell fractions but were not released from the cells at significant levels. Therefore, ply511 was genetically fused with the (SP)slpA nucleotide sequence encoding the Lactobacillus brevis S-layer protein signal peptide. Expression of (SP)slpA-ply511 from pSL-PL511 resulted in secretion of functional Ply511 enzyme from L. lactis cells. One clone expressed an unusually strong lytic activity, which was found to be due to a 115-bp deletion that occurred within the 3'-end coding sequence of (SP)slpA-ply511, which caused a frameshift mutation and generated a stop codon. Surprisingly, the resulting carboxy-terminal deletion of 80 amino acids in the truncated Ply511 Delta(S262-K341) mutant polypeptide strongly increased its lytic activity. Proteolytic processing of the secretion competent (SP)SlpA-Ply511 propeptide following membrane translocation had no influence on enzyme activity. Immunoblotting experiments using both cytoplasmic and supernatant fractions indicated that the enzyme was quantitatively exported from the cells and secreted into the surrounding medium, where it

  5. Inhibitors of angiotensin-converting enzyme modulate mitosis and gene expression in pancreatic cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Reddy, M.K.; Baskaran, K.; Molteni, A.

    1995-12-01

    The angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor captopril inhibits mitosis in several cell types that contain ACE and renin activity. In the present study, we evaluated the effect of the ACE inhibitors captopril and CGS 13945 (10{sup {minus}8} to 10{sup {minus}2}M) on proliferation and gene expression in hamster pancreatic duct carcinoma cells in culture. These cells lack renin and ACE activity. Both ACE inhibitors produced a dose-dependent reduction in tumor cell proliferation within 24 hr. Captopril at a concentration of 0.36 mM and CGS 13945 at 150 {mu}M decreased cellular growth rate to approximately half that of the control. Neither drug influenced the viability or the cell cycle distribution of the tumor cells. Slot blot analysis of mRNA for four genes, proliferation associated cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), K-ras, protein kinase C-{Beta} (PKC-{Beta}) and carbonic anhydrase II (CA II) was performed. Both ACE inhibitors increased K-ras expression by a factor of 2, and had no effect on CA II mRNA levels. Captopril also lowered PCNA by 40% and CGS 13945 lowered PKC-{Beta} gene expression to 30% of the control level. The data demonstrate that ACE inhibitors exhibit antimitotic activity and differential gene modulation in hamster pancreatic duct carcinoma cells. The absence of renin and ACE activity in these cells suggests that the antimitotic action of captopril and CGS 13945 is independent of renin-angiotensin regulation. The growth inhibition may occur through downregulation of growth-related gene expression. 27 refs., 5 figs.

  6. Overview of chitin metabolism enzymes in Manduca sexta: Identification, domain organization, phylogenetic analysis and gene expression.

    PubMed

    Tetreau, Guillaume; Cao, Xiaolong; Chen, Yun-Ru; Muthukrishnan, Subbaratnam; Jiang, Haobo; Blissard, Gary W; Kanost, Michael R; Wang, Ping

    2015-07-01

    Chitin is one of the most abundant biomaterials in nature. The biosynthesis and degradation of chitin in insects are complex and dynamically regulated to cope with insect growth and development. Chitin metabolism in insects is known to involve numerous enzymes, including chitin synthases (synthesis of chitin), chitin deacetylases (modification of chitin by deacetylation) and chitinases (degradation of chitin by hydrolysis). In this study, we conducted a genome-wide search and analysis of genes encoding these chitin metabolism enzymes in Manduca sexta. Our analysis confirmed that only two chitin synthases are present in M. sexta as in most other arthropods. Eleven chitin deacetylases (encoded by nine genes) were identified, with at least one representative in each of the five phylogenetic groups that have been described for chitin deacetylases to date. Eleven genes encoding for family 18 chitinases (GH18) were found in the M. sexta genome. Based on the presence of conserved sequence motifs in the catalytic sequences and phylogenetic relationships, two of the M. sexta chitinases did not cluster with any of the current eight phylogenetic groups of chitinases: two new groups were created (groups IX and X) and their characteristics are described. The result of the analysis of the Lepidoptera-specific chitinase-h (group h) is consistent with its proposed bacterial origin. By analyzing chitinases from fourteen species that belong to seven different phylogenetic groups, we reveal that the chitinase genes appear to have evolved sequentially in the arthropod lineage to achieve the current high level of diversity observed in M. sexta. Based on the sequence conservation of the catalytic domains and on their developmental stage- and tissue-specific expression, we propose putative functions for each group in each category of enzymes.

  7. Schisandra fructus extract ameliorates doxorubicin-induce cytotoxicity in cardiomyocytes: altered gene expression for detoxification enzymes.

    PubMed

    Choi, Eun Hye; Lee, Nari; Kim, Hyun Jung; Kim, Mi Kyung; Chi, Sung-Gil; Kwon, Dae Young; Chun, Hyang Sook

    2008-02-01

    The effect of Schisandra fructus extract (SFE) on doxorubicin (Dox)-induced cardiotoxicity was investigated in H9c2 cardiomyocytes. Dox, which is an antineoplastic drug known to induce cardiomyopathy possibly through production of reactive oxygen species, induced significant cytotoxicity, intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), and lipid peroxidation. SFE treatment significantly increased cell survival up to 25%, inhibited intracellular ROS production in a time- and dose-dependent manner, and inhibited lipid peroxidation induced by Dox. In addition, SFE treatment induced expression of cellular glutathione S-transferases (GSTs), which function in the detoxification of xenobiotics, and endogenous toxicants including lipid peoxides. Analyses of 31,100 genes using Affymetrix cDNA microarrays showed that SFE treatment up-regulated expression of genes involved in glutathione metabolism and detoxification [GST theta 1, mu 1, and alpha type 2, heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1), and microsomal epoxide hydrolase (mEH)] and energy metabolism [carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1 (CPT-1), transaldolase, and transketolase]. These data indicated that SFE might increase the resistance to cardiac cell injury by Dox, at least partly, together with altering gene expression, especially induction of phase II detoxification enzymes.

  8. Expression profile of early estradiol-responsive genes in cynomolgus macaque liver: implications for drug-metabolizing enzymes.

    PubMed

    Ise, Ryota; Kito, Go; Uno, Yasuhiro

    2012-01-01

    Estrogen plays important roles in estrogen-responsive tissues, such as mammary glands, ovaries, and the uterus. In the liver, the major drug metabolizing organ, estrogen is known to regulate expression of some drug-metabolizing enzymes. Due to the lack of information on the role of estrogen in hepatic gene expression in primate species, we previously investigated the late response of hepatic gene expression to estradiol in cynomolgus macaques. To understand the early response of hepatic gene expression to estradiol, in this study, microarray analysis was conducted using cynomolgus macaque liver samples collected at 1 h and 5 h after estradiol injection. Comparison of expression profiles in estradiol and solvent (control)-treated ovariectomized cynomolgus macaques revealed 27 differentially expressed genes (>2.0-fold), including 18 at 1 h and 9 at 5 h after estradiol injection. As indicated by Gene Ontology analysis, these genes were related to oxidoreductase activity and transferase activity, partly representing important aspects of drug-metabolizing enzymes. Further analysis by quantitative polymerase chain reaction revealed that estradiol down-regulated CYP2A24, CYP2C76, and CYP2E1 (>2.0-fold) at 1 h and up-regulated GSTM5 (>2.0-fold) at 5 h after estradiol injection. These results suggest that the short-term estradiol treatment influenced expression of hepatic genes, including drug-metabolizing enzyme genes, in cynomolgus macaque liver.

  9. Expression and Enzyme Activity Detection of a Sepiapterin Reductase Gene from Musca domestica Larva.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yan; Pei, Zhihua; Liu, Lei; Wang, Dongfang; Kong, Lingcong; Liu, Shuming; Jiang, Xiuyun; Gao, Yunhang; Ma, Hongxia

    2017-02-01

    Tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) is an essential cofactor for aromatic acid hydroxylases and nitric oxide synthase. Sepiapterin reductase (SPR) catalyzes the final steps of BH4 biosynthesis. Studies on SPR from several insects and other organisms have been reported. However, thus far, enzyme activity of SPR in Musca domestica is kept unknown. In this study, 186 differentially expressed genes including SPR gene from Musca domestica (MDSPR) were screened in subtractive cDNA library. The MDSPR gene was cloned, and the recombinant MDSPI16 protein was expressed as a 51-kDa protein in soluble form. The MDSPR exhibited strong activity to the substrate sepiapterin (SP). The values of Vmax and Km of the MDSPR for SP were 6.83 μM/min and 23.48 μM, and the optimum temperature and pH of MDSPR were 50 °C and 4.0, respectively. This study provides new hypotheses and methods for the production of BH4 using insect-derived SPR.

  10. Constitutive expression of a peanut ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme gene in Arabidopsis confers improved water-stress tolerance through regulation of stress-responsive gene expression.

    PubMed

    Wan, Xiaorong; Mo, Aiqiong; Liu, Shuai; Yang, Lixia; Li, Ling

    2011-04-01

    Ubiquitin (Ub)-conjugating enzymes (UBCs) are key enzymes involved in ubiquitination. Although UBCs have been shown to play important roles in regulating various aspects of plant growth and development, the role of plant UBCs in abiotic stress response needs to be examined further. Here we report the characterization of a ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme gene AhUBC2 from dehydrated peanut plants. The expression of AhUBC2 gene in peanut plants is responsive to physiological water-stress induced by polyethylene glycol (PEG6000), high salinity, abscisic acid (ABA) or low temperature. The constitutive expression of AhUBC2 gene in wild-type Arabidopsis confers improved tolerance to water-stress induced by sorbitol or soil drought in 35S::AhUBC2 transgenic plants. Constitutive expression of AhUBC2 results in significantly increased expressions of three stress-responsive genes P5CS1, RD29A and KIN1 in 35S::AhUBC2 Arabidopsis grown under normal conditions, whereas the expressions of other four stress-responsive genes NCED3, ABF3, RD29B and RD22 are not affected. The proline level in 35S::AhUBC2 Arabidopsis is significantly higher than that in wild-type Arabidopsis under both soil-drought stressed and control conditions. In contrast, there is no significant difference in the levels of NCED3 transcript and endogenous ABA between wild-type and 35S::AhUBC2 Arabidopsis. These results suggest that constitutive expression of AhUBC2 in Arabidopsis confers improved water-stress tolerance likely through activating an ABA-independent signaling pathway, including regulating the expression of ABA-independent stress-responsive genes and promoting the synthesis of osmolyte proline to protect plants from water deficit.

  11. Tandem orientation of duplicated xanthine dehydrogenase genes from Arabidopsis thaliana: differential gene expression and enzyme activities.

    PubMed

    Hesberg, Christine; Hänsch, Robert; Mendel, Ralf R; Bittner, Florian

    2004-04-02

    Xanthine dehydrogenase from the plant Arabidopsis thaliana was analyzed on molecular and biochemical levels. Whereas most other organisms appear to own only one gene for xanthine dehydrogenase A. thaliana possesses two genes in tandem orientation spaced by 704 base pairs. The cDNAs as well as the proteins AtXDH1 and AtXDH2 share an overall identity of 93% and show high homologies to xanthine dehydrogenases from other organisms. Whereas AtXDH2 mRNA is expressed constitutively, alterations of AtXDH1 transcript levels were observed at various stresses like drought, salinity, cold, and natural senescence, but also after abscisic acid treatment. Transcript alteration did not mandatorily result in changes of xanthine dehydrogenase activities. Whereas salt treatment had no effect on xanthine dehydrogenase activities, cold stress caused a decrease, but desiccation and senescence caused a strong increase of activities in leaves. Because AtXDH1 presumably is the more important isoenzyme in A. thaliana it was expressed in Pichia pastoris, purified, and used for biochemical studies. AtXDH1 protein is a homodimer of about 300 kDa consisting of identical subunits of 150 kDa. Like xanthine dehydrogenases from other organisms AtXDH1 uses hypoxanthine and xanthine as main substrates and is strongly inhibited by allopurinol. AtXDH1 could be activated by the purified molybdenum cofactor sulfurase ABA3 that converts inactive desulfo-into active sulfoenzymes. Finally it was found that AtXDH1 is a strict dehydrogenase and not an oxidase, but is able to produce superoxide radicals indicating that besides purine catabolism it might also be involved in response to various stresses that require reactive oxygen species.

  12. Xenobiotic Metabolizing Enzyme and Transporter Gene Expression in Primary Cultures of Human Hepatocytes Modulated by ToxCast Chemicals

    EPA Science Inventory

    ToxCast chemicals were assessed for induction or suppression of xenobiotic metabolizing enzyme and transporter gene expression using primary human hepatocytes. The mRNA levels of 14 target and 2 control genes were measured: ABCB1, ABCB11, ABCG2, SLCO1B1, CYP1A1, CYP1A2, CYP2B6, C...

  13. Modulation of Xenobiotic Metabolizing Enzyme and Transporter Gene Expression in Primary Cultures of Human Hepatocytes by ToxCast Chemicals

    EPA Science Inventory

    ToxCast chemicals were assessed for induction or suppression of xenobiotic metabolizing enzyme and transporter gene expression using primary human hepatocytes. The mRNA levels of 14 target and 2 control genes were measured: ABCB1, ABCB11, ABCG2, SLCO1B1, CYP1A1, CYP1A2, CYP2B6, C...

  14. Sex- and age-dependent gene expression in human liver: An implication for drug-metabolizing enzymes.

    PubMed

    Uno, Yasuhiro; Takata, Ryo; Kito, Go; Yamazaki, Hiroshi; Nakagawa, Kazuko; Nakamura, Yusuke; Kamataki, Tetsuya; Katagiri, Toyomasa

    2017-02-01

    Sex and age differences in hepatic expression of drug-metabolizing enzyme genes could cause variations in drug metabolism, but has not been fully elucidated, especially in Asian population. In this study, the global expression of human hepatic genes was analyzed by microarrays in 40 Japanese subjects (27 males and 13 females). Thirty-five sex-biased genes were identified (P < 0.005). Whereas, 60 age-biased genes in two age groups, <60 years and ≥70 years (P < 0.001), were identified in males. By Gene Ontology analysis, the sex-biased genes were related to protein catabolism and modification, while the age-biased genes were related to transcription regulation and cell death. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction confirmed the female-biased expression of drug-metabolizing enzyme genes BChE, CYP4X1, and SULT1E1 (≥1.5-fold, P < 0.05). Further analysis of drug-metabolizing enzyme genes indicated that expression of CYP2A6 and CYP3A4 in females in the ≥70 age group was less than in the <60 age group (≥1.5-fold, P < 0.05), and this trend was also observed for PXR expression in males (≥1.5-fold, P < 0.05). The results presented provide important insights into hepatic physiology and function, especially drug metabolism, with respect to sex and age.

  15. Hippocampal chromatin-modifying enzymes are pivotal for scopolamine-induced synaptic plasticity gene expression changes and memory impairment.

    PubMed

    Singh, Padmanabh; Konar, Arpita; Kumar, Ashish; Srivas, Sweta; Thakur, Mahendra K

    2015-08-01

    The amnesic potential of scopolamine is well manifested through synaptic plasticity gene expression changes and behavioral paradigms of memory impairment. However, the underlying mechanism remains obscure and consequently ideal therapeutic target is lacking. In this context, chromatin-modifying enzymes, which regulate memory gene expression changes, deserve major attention. Therefore, we analyzed the expression of chromatin-modifying enzymes and recovery potential of enzyme modulators in scopolamine-induced amnesia. Scopolamine administration drastically up-regulated DNA methyltransferases (DNMT1) and HDAC2 expression while CREB-binding protein (CBP), DNMT3a and DNMT3b remained unaffected. HDAC inhibitor sodium butyrate and DNMT inhibitor Aza-2'deoxycytidine recovered scopolamine-impaired hippocampal-dependent memory consolidation with concomitant increase in the expression of synaptic plasticity genes Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and Arc and level of histone H3K9 and H3K14 acetylation and decrease in DNA methylation level. Sodium butyrate showed more pronounced effect than Aza-2'deoxycytidine and their co-administration did not exhibit synergistic effect on gene expression. Taken together, we showed for the first time that scopolamine-induced up-regulation of chromatin-modifying enzymes, HDAC2 and DNMT1, leads to gene expression changes and consequent decline in memory consolidation. Our findings on the action of scopolamine as an epigenetic modulator can pave a path for ideal therapeutic targets. We propose the following putative pathway for scopolamine-mediated memory impairment; scopolamine up-regulates hippocampal DNMT1 and HDAC2 expression, induces methylation and deacetylation of BDNF and Arc promoter, represses gene expression and eventually impairs memory consolidation. On the other hand, Aza-2 and NaB inhibit DNMT1 and HDAC2 respectively, up-regulate BDNF and Arc expression and recover memory consolidation. We elucidate the action of

  16. Expression of a Bacillus phytase C gene in Pichia pastoris and properties of the recombinant enzyme.

    PubMed

    Guerrero-Olazarán, Martha; Rodríguez-Blanco, Lilí; Carreon-Treviño, J Gerardo; Gallegos-López, Juan A; Viader-Salvadó, José M

    2010-08-01

    The cloning and expression of a native gene encoding a Bacillus subtilis phytase using Pichia pastoris as the host is described. In addition, the influence of N-glycosylation on the biochemical properties of the B. subtilis phytase, the influence of pH on the thermostability of the recombinant and native B. subtilis phytases, and the resistance of both phytases to shrimp digestive enzymes and porcine trypsin are also described. After 48 h of methanol induction in shake flasks, a selected recombinant strain produced and secreted 0.82 U/ml (71 mg/liter) recombinant phytase. This phytase was N-glycosylated, had a molecular mass of 39 kDa after N-deglycosylation, exhibited activity within a pH range of 2.5 to 9 and at temperatures of 25 to 70 degrees C, had high residual activity (85% +/- 2%) after 10 min of heat treatment at 80 degrees C and pH 5.5 in the presence of 5 mM CaCl(2), and was resistant to shrimp digestive enzymes and porcine trypsin. Although the recombinant Bacillus phytase had pH and temperature activity profiles that were similar to those of the corresponding nonglycosylated native phytase, the thermal stabilities of the recombinant and native phytases were different, although both were calcium concentration and pH dependent.

  17. Expression pattern of glycoside hydrolase genes in Lutzomyia longipalpis reveals key enzymes involved in larval digestion

    PubMed Central

    Moraes, Caroline da Silva; Diaz-Albiter, Hector M.; Faria, Maiara do Valle; Sant'Anna, Maurício R. V.; Dillon, Rod J.; Genta, Fernando A.

    2014-01-01

    The sand fly Lutzomyia longipalpis is the most important vector of American Visceral Leishmaniasis. Adults are phytophagous (males and females) or blood feeders (females only), and larvae feed on solid detritus. Digestion in sand fly larvae has scarcely been studied, but some glycosidase activities putatively involved in microorganism digestion were already described. Nevertheless, the molecular nature of these enzymes, as the corresponding genes and transcripts, were not explored yet. Catabolism of microbial carbohydrates in insects generally involves β-1,3-glucanases, chitinases, and digestive lysozymes. In this work, the transcripts of digestive β-1,3-glucanase and chitinases were identified in the L. longipalpis larvae throughout analysis of sequences and expression patterns of glycoside hydrolases families 16, 18, and 22. The activity of one i-type lysozyme was also registered. Interestingly, this lysozyme seems to play a role in immunity, rather than digestion. This is the first attempt to identify the molecular nature of sand fly larval digestive enzymes. PMID:25140153

  18. Fumarate and Succinate Regulate Expression of Hypoxia-inducible Genes via TET Enzymes*

    PubMed Central

    Laukka, Tuomas; Mariani, Christopher J.; Ihantola, Tuukka; Cao, John Z.; Hokkanen, Juho; Kaelin, William G.; Godley, Lucy A.; Koivunen, Peppi

    2016-01-01

    The TET enzymes are members of the 2-oxoglutarate-dependent dioxygenase family and comprise three isoenzymes in humans: TETs 1–3. These TETs convert 5-methylcytosine to 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5-hmC) in DNA, and high 5-hmC levels are associated with active transcription. The importance of the balance in these modified cytosines is emphasized by the fact that TET2 is mutated in several human cancers, including myeloid malignancies such as acute myeloid leukemia (AML). We characterize here the kinetic and inhibitory properties of Tets and show that the Km value of Tets 1 and 2 for O2 is 30 μm, indicating that they retain high activity even under hypoxic conditions. The AML-associated mutations in the Fe2+ and 2-oxoglutarate-binding residues increased the Km values for these factors 30–80-fold and reduced the Vmax values. Fumarate and succinate, which can accumulate to millimolar levels in succinate dehydrogenase and fumarate hydratase-mutant tumors, were identified as potent Tet inhibitors in vitro, with IC50 values ∼400–500 μm. Fumarate and succinate also down-regulated global 5-hmC levels in neuroblastoma cells and the expression levels of some hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) target genes via TET inhibition, despite simultaneous HIFα stabilization. The combination of fumarate or succinate treatment with TET1 or TET3 silencing caused differential effects on the expression of specific HIF target genes. Altogether these data show that hypoxia-inducible genes are regulated in a multilayered manner that includes epigenetic regulation via TETs and 5-hmC levels in addition to HIF stabilization. PMID:26703470

  19. Hepatic Xenobiotic Metabolizing Enzyme Gene Expression Through the Life Stages of the Mouse

    EPA Science Inventory

    BACKGROUND: Differences in responses to environmental chemicals and drugs between life stages are likely due in part to differences in the expression of xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes and transporters (XMETs). No comprehensive analysis of the mRNA expression of XMETs has been ca...

  20. Influence of energy supply on expression of genes encoding for lipogenic enzymes and regulatory proteins in growing beef steers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Forty crossbred beef steers were used to determine the effects metabolizable energy (ME) intake and of site and complexity of carbohydrate (CHO) infusion on expression of genes encoding lipogenic enzymes and regulatory proteins in subcutaneous (SC), mesenteric (MES) and omental (OM) adipose. Treatm...

  1. Cloning and expression of a gene encoding a bacterial enzyme for decontamination of organophosphorus nerve agents and nucleotide sequence of the enzyme.

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, T C; Harvey, S P; Chen, G L

    1996-01-01

    Organophosphorus acid (OPA) anhydrolase enzymes have been found in a wide variety of prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms. Interest in these enzymes has been prompted by their ability to catalyze the hydrolysis of toxic organophosphorus cholinesterase-inhibiting compounds, including pesticides and chemical nerve agents. The natural substrates for these enzymes are unknown. The gene (opaA) which encodes an OPA anhydrolase (OPAA-2) was isolated from an Alteromonas sp. strain JD6.5 EcoRI-lambda ZAPII chromosomal library expressed in Escherichia coli and identified by immunodetection with anti-OPAA-2 serum. OPA anhydrolase activity expressed by the immunopositive recombinant clones was demonstrated by using diisopropylfluorophosphate (DFP) as a substrate. A comparison of the recombinant enzyme with native, purified OPAA-2 showed they had the same apparent molecular mass (60 kDa), antigenic properties, and enzyme activity against DFP and the chemical nerve agents sarin, soman, and O-cyclohexyl methylphosphonofluoridate. The gene expressing this activity was found in a 1.74-kb PstI-HindIII fragment of the original 6.1-kb EcoRI DNA insert. The nucleotide sequence of this PstI-HindIII fragment revealed an open reading frame of 1,551 nucleotides, coding for a protein of 517 amino acid residues. Amino acid sequence comparison of OPAA-2 with the protein database showed that OPAA-2 is similar to a 647-amino-acid sequence produced by an open reading frame which appears to be the E. coli pepQ gene. Further comparison of OPAA-2, the E. coli PepQ protein sequence, E. coli aminopeptidase P, and human prolidase showed regions of different degrees of similarity or functionally conserved amino acid substitutions. These findings, along with preliminary data confirming the presence of prolidase activity expressed by OPAA-2, suggest that the OPAA-2 enzyme may, in nature, be used in peptide metabolism. PMID:8633861

  2. In vivo regulation of gene expression of enzymes controlling aldosterone synthesis in rat adrenal.

    PubMed

    LeHoux, J G; Tremblay, A

    1992-12-01

    We studied the effect of alterations in the intake of sodium and potassium as well as changes in circulating adrenocorticotropin (ACTH) on the expression of the two rate-limiting systems of aldosterone formation in the rat. Low sodium and high potassium intake promoted time-dependent increases in the zona glomerulosa cytochrome P450scc (P450scc) and cytochrome P450c11 (P450c11) protein and mRNA levels, but no changes were found in the zona fasciculata-reticularis. In addition, these responses were associated with markedly elevated transcriptional activities. To further define the contribution of P450c11 and P450c18 (aldosterone synthase) in response to these differing intakes, we evaluated their mRNA levels using gene-specific oligonucleotide probes. P450c18 mRNA was restricted to the zona glomerulosa, whereas P450c11 mRNA was detected in both zona glomerulosa and zona fasciculata-reticularis. Furthermore, only P450c18 mRNA was induced by both low sodium or high potassium intake, as P450c11 mRNA levels remained unchanged. Captopril, an inhibitor of angiotensin-I converting enzyme, abolished the enhancing effects of the low sodium regimen on P450scc and P450c18 mRNA levels. Captopril also suppressed the augmentation of P450c18 mRNA observed with potassium supplementation but had no effect on P450scc mRNA levels. When the hypocholesterolemic drug 4-aminopyrazolopyrimidine (4-APP) was administered to rats for 3 consecurive days, both the level of plasma ACTH and the adrenal content of mRNA encoding P450scc increased 24 h post final injection. The coadministration of dexamethasone with 4-APP prevented these increases. In contrast, the mRNA content of P450c11 remained at control levels. In conclusion, this work demonstrates that variations in the intake of sodium and potassium act on the expression of the CYP11B2 gene, but not on that of the CYP11B1 gene. Moreover angiotensin-II (A-II) is an important factor in this mechanism of action. Both ions also enhance the

  3. Cloning and expression of Staphylococcus saprophyticus urease gene sequences in Staphylococcus carnosus and contribution of the enzyme to virulence.

    PubMed Central

    Gatermann, S; Marre, R

    1989-01-01

    The urease gene of Staphylococcus saprophyticus CCM883 was cloned and expressed in Staphylococcus carnosus TM300. In vitro translation of the cloned DNA sequences revealed six polypeptides (of 70, 47, 29, 27, 20, and 17 kilodaltons) that were associated with enzyme activity. Introduction of the cloned genes into a urease-negative mutant of S. saprophyticus restored the virulence of this strain, confirming our previous suggestion (S. Gatermann, J. John, and R. Marre, Infect. Immun. 57:110-116, 1989) that this enzyme is a major virulence factor of the organism and contributes mainly to cystopathogenicity. Images PMID:2777370

  4. Gene and protein expression of O-GlcNAc-cycling enzymes in human laryngeal cancer.

    PubMed

    Starska, Katarzyna; Forma, Ewa; Brzezińska-Błaszczyk, Ewa; Lewy-Trenda, Iwona; Bryś, Magdalena; Jóźwiak, Paweł; Krześlak, Anna

    2015-11-01

    Aberrant protein O-GlcNAcylation may contribute to the development and malignant behavior of many cancers. This modification is controlled by O-linked β-N-acetylglucosamine transferase (OGT) and O-GlcNAcase (OGA). The aim of this study was to determine the expression of O-GlcNAc cycling enzymes mRNA/protein and to investigate their relationship with clinicopathological parameters in laryngeal cancer. The mRNA levels of OGT and MGEA5 genes were determined in 106 squamous cell laryngeal cancer (SCLC) cases and 73 non-cancerous adjacent laryngeal mucosa (NCLM) controls using quantitative real-time PCR. The level of OGT and OGA proteins was analyzed by Western blot. A positive expression of OGT and MGEA5 transcripts and OGT and OGA proteins was confirmed in 75.5 and 68.9 % and in 43.7 and 59.4 % samples of SCLC, respectively. Higher levels of mRNA/protein for both OGT and OGA as well as significant increases of 60 % in total protein O-GlcNAcylation levels were noted in SCLC compared with NCLM (p < 0.05). As a result, an increased level of OGT and MGEA5 mRNA was related to larger tumor size, nodal metastases, higher grade and tumor behavior according to TFG scale, as well as incidence of disease recurrence (p < 0.05). An inverse association between OGT and MGEA5 transcripts was determined with regard to prognosis (p < 0.05). In addition, the highest OGT and OGA protein levels were observed in poorly differentiated tumors (p < 0.05). No correlations with other parameters were noted, but the results showed a trend of more advanced tumors to be more frequently OGT and OGA positive. The results suggest that increased O-GlcNAcylation may have an effect on tumor aggressiveness and prognosis in laryngeal cancer.

  5. YANA – a software tool for analyzing flux modes, gene-expression and enzyme activities

    PubMed Central

    Schwarz, Roland; Musch, Patrick; von Kamp, Axel; Engels, Bernd; Schirmer, Heiner; Schuster, Stefan; Dandekar, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    Background A number of algorithms for steady state analysis of metabolic networks have been developed over the years. Of these, Elementary Mode Analysis (EMA) has proven especially useful. Despite its low user-friendliness, METATOOL as a reliable high-performance implementation of the algorithm has been the instrument of choice up to now. As reported here, the analysis of metabolic networks has been improved by an editor and analyzer of metabolic flux modes. Analysis routines for expression levels and the most central, well connected metabolites and their metabolic connections are of particular interest. Results YANA features a platform-independent, dedicated toolbox for metabolic networks with a graphical user interface to calculate (integrating METATOOL), edit (including support for the SBML format), visualize, centralize, and compare elementary flux modes. Further, YANA calculates expected flux distributions for a given Elementary Mode (EM) activity pattern and vice versa. Moreover, a dissection algorithm, a centralization algorithm, and an average diameter routine can be used to simplify and analyze complex networks. Proteomics or gene expression data give a rough indication of some individual enzyme activities, whereas the complete flux distribution in the network is often not known. As such data are noisy, YANA features a fast evolutionary algorithm (EA) for the prediction of EM activities with minimum error, including alerts for inconsistent experimental data. We offer the possibility to include further known constraints (e.g. growth constraints) in the EA calculation process. The redox metabolism around glutathione reductase serves as an illustration example. All software and documentation are available for download at . Conclusion A graphical toolbox and an editor for METATOOL as well as a series of additional routines for metabolic network analyses constitute a new user-friendly software for such efforts. PMID:15929789

  6. Genome-wide identification of gibberellins metabolic enzyme genes and expression profiling analysis during seed germination in maize.

    PubMed

    Song, Jian; Guo, Baojian; Song, Fangwei; Peng, Huiru; Yao, Yingyin; Zhang, Yirong; Sun, Qixin; Ni, Zhongfu

    2011-08-15

    Gibberellin (GA) is an essential phytohormone that controls many aspects of plant development. To enhance our understanding of GA metabolism in maize, we intensively screened and identified 27 candidate genes encoding the seven GA metabolic enzymes including ent-copalyl diphosphate synthase (CPS), ent-kaurene synthase (KS), ent-kaurene oxidase (KO), ent-kaurenoic acid oxidase (KAO), GA 20-oxidase (GA20ox), GA 3-oxidase (GA3ox), and GA 2-oxidase (GA2ox), using all available public maize databases. The results indicate that maize genome contains three CPS, four KS, two KO and one KAO genes, and most of them are arranged separately on the maize genome, which differs from that in rice. In addition, the enzymes catalyzing the later steps (ZmGA20ox, ZmGA3ox and ZmGA2ox) are also encoded by gene families in maize, but GA3ox enzyme is likely to be encoded by single gene. Expression profiling analysis exhibited that transcripts of 15 GA metabolic genes could be detected during maize seed germination, which provides further evidence for the notion that increased synthesis of active GA in the embryo is required for triggering germination events. Moreover, a variety of temporal genes expression patterns of GA metabolic genes were detected, which revealed the complexity of underlying mechanism for GA regulated seed germination.

  7. Comparison of constitutive gene expression levels of hepatic cholesterol biosynthetic enzymes between Wistar-Kyoto and stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Nemoto, Kiyomitsu; Ikeda, Ayaka; Ito, Sei; Miyata, Misaki; Yoshida, Chiaki; Degawa, Masakuni

    2013-01-01

    Serum total cholesterol amounts in the stroke-prone hypertensive rat (SHRSP) strain are lower than in the normotensive control strain, Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rat. To understand the strain difference, constitutive gene expression levels of hepatic cholesterol biosynthetic enzymes in male 8-week-old SHRSP and WKY rats were comparatively examined by DNA microarray and real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analyses. Of 22 cholesterol biosynthetic enzyme genes, expression levels of 8 genes, Pmvk, Idi1, Fdps, Fdft1, Sqle, Lss, Sc4mol, and Hsd17b7, in SHRSP were less than 50% those of the WKY rats; especially, the expression level of Sqle gene, encoding squalene epoxidase, a rate-limiting enzyme in cholesterol biosynthesis pathway, was about 20%. The gene expression level of sterol regulatory element-binding protein-2 (SREBP-2), which functions as a transcription factor upregulating gene expression of cholesterol biosynthetic enzymes, in SHRSP was about 70% of that in WKY rats. These results demonstrate the possibility that the lower serum total cholesterol level in SHRSP is defined by lower gene expression of most hepatic cholesterol biosynthetic enzymes. In particular, decreased gene expression level of Sqle gene might be the most essential factor. Moreover, the broad range of lowered rates of these genes in SHRSP suggests that the abnormal function and/or expression not only of SREBP-2 but also of one or more other transcription factors for those gene expressions exist in SHRSP.

  8. The gene expression of the main lipogenic enzymes is downregulated in visceral adipose tissue of obese subjects.

    PubMed

    Ortega, Francisco J; Mayas, Dolores; Moreno-Navarrete, José M; Catalán, Victoria; Gómez-Ambrosi, Javier; Esteve, Eduardo; Rodriguez-Hermosa, Jose I; Ruiz, Bartomeu; Ricart, Wifredo; Peral, Belen; Fruhbeck, Gema; Tinahones, Francisco J; Fernández-Real, José M

    2010-01-01

    Contradictory findings regarding the gene expression of the main lipogenic enzymes in human adipose tissue depots have been reported. In this cross-sectional study, we aimed to evaluate the mRNA expression of fatty acid synthase (FAS) and acetyl-CoA carboxilase (ACC) in omental and subcutaneous (SC) fat depots from subjects who varied widely in terms of body fat mass. FAS and ACC gene expression were evaluated by real time-PCR in 188 samples of visceral adipose tissue which were obtained during elective surgical procedures in 119 women and 69 men. Decreased sex-adjusted FAS (-59%) and ACC (-49%) mRNA were found in visceral adipose tissue from obese subjects, with and without diabetes mellitus type 2 (DM-2), compared with lean subjects (both P < 0.0001). FAS mRNA was also decreased (-40%) in fat depots from overweight subjects (P < 0.05). Indeed, FAS mRNA was significantly and positively associated with ACC gene expression (r = 0.316, P < 0.0001) and negatively with BMI (r = -0.274), waist circumference (r = -0.437), systolic blood pressure (r = -0.310), serum glucose (r = -0.277), and fasting triglycerides (r = -0.226), among others (all P < 0.0001). Similar associations were observed for ACC gene expression levels. In a representative subgroup of nonobese (n = 4) and obese women (n = 6), relative FAS gene expression levels significantly correlated (r = 0.657, P = 0.034; n = 10) with FAS protein values. FAS protein levels were also inversely correlated with blood glucose (r = -0.640, P = 0.046) and fasting triglycerides (r = -0.832, P = 0.010). In conclusion, the gene expression of the main lipogenic enzymes is downregulated in visceral adipose tissue from obese subjects.

  9. Microarray Analysis of Differentially-Expressed Genes Encoding CYP450 and Phase II Drug Metabolizing Enzymes in Psoriasis and Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Sumantran, Venil N.; Mishra, Pratik; Bera, Rakesh; Sudhakar, Natarajan

    2016-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 drug metabolizing enzymes are implicated in personalized medicine for two main reasons. First, inter-individual variability in CYP3A4 expression is a confounding factor during cancer treatment. Second, inhibition or induction of CYP3A4 can trigger adverse drug–drug interactions. However, inflammation can downregulate CYP3A4 and other drug metabolizing enzymes and lead to altered metabolism of drugs and essential vitamins and lipids. Little is known about effects of inflammation on expression of CYP450 genes controlling drug metabolism in the skin. Therefore, we analyzed seven published microarray datasets, and identified differentially-expressed genes in two inflammatory skin diseases (melanoma and psoriasis). We observed opposite patterns of expression of genes regulating metabolism of specific vitamins and lipids in psoriasis and melanoma samples. Thus, genes controlling the turnover of vitamin D (CYP27B1, CYP24A1), vitamin A (ALDH1A3, AKR1B10), and cholesterol (CYP7B1), were up-regulated in psoriasis, whereas melanomas showed downregulation of genes regulating turnover of vitamin A (AKR1C3), and cholesterol (CYP39A1). Genes controlling abnormal keratinocyte differentiation and epidermal barrier function (CYP4F22, SULT2B1) were up-regulated in psoriasis. The up-regulated CYP24A1, CYP4F22, SULT2B1, and CYP7B1 genes are potential drug targets in psoriatic skin. Both disease samples showed diminished drug metabolizing capacity due to downregulation of the CYP1B1 and CYP3A5 genes. However, melanomas showed greater loss of drug metabolizing capacity due to downregulation of the CYP3A4 gene. PMID:26901218

  10. Dissociation between gene and protein expression of metabolic enzymes in a rodent model of heart failure

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Studies in advanced heart failure show down-regulation of fatty acid oxidation genes, possibly due to decreased expression of the nuclear transcription factors peroxisome proliferator activated receptor alpha (PPARalpha) and retinoid X receptor alpha (RXRalpha). We assessed mRNA and protein expressi...

  11. Cloning and Expression Analysis of MEP Pathway Enzyme-encoding Genes in Osmanthus fragrans

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Chen; Li, Huogeng; Yang, Xiulian; Gu, Chunsun; Mu, Hongna; Yue, Yuanzheng; Wang, Lianggui

    2016-01-01

    The 2-C-methyl-d-erythritol 4-phosphate (MEP) pathway is responsible for the biosynthesis of many crucial secondary metabolites, such as carotenoids, monoterpenes, plastoquinone, and tocopherols. In this study, we isolated and identified 10 MEP pathway genes in the important aromatic plant sweet osmanthus (Osmanthus fragrans). Multiple sequence alignments revealed that 10 MEP pathway genes shared high identities with other reported proteins. The genes showed distinctive expression profiles in various tissues, or at different flower stages and diel time points. The qRT-PCR results demonstrated that these genes were highly expressed in inflorescences, which suggested a tissue-specific transcript pattern. Our results also showed that OfDXS1, OfDXS2, and OfHDR1 had a clear diurnal oscillation pattern. The isolation and expression analysis provides a strong foundation for further research on the MEP pathway involved in gene function and molecular evolution, and improves our understanding of the molecular mechanism underlying this pathway in plants. PMID:27690108

  12. L-malate enhances the gene expression of carried proteins and antioxidant enzymes in liver of aged rats.

    PubMed

    Zeng, X; Wu, J; Wu, Q; Zhang, J

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies in our laboratory reported L-malate as a free radical scavenger in aged rats. To investigate the antioxidant mechanism of L-malate in the mitochondria, we analyzed the change in gene expression of two malate-aspartate shuttle (MAS)-related carried proteins (AGC, aspartate/glutamate carrier and OMC, oxoglutarate/malate carrier) in the inner mitochondrial membrane, and three antioxidant enzymes (CAT, SOD, and GSH-Px) in the mitochondria. The changes in gene expression of these proteins and enzymes were examined by real-time RT-PCR in the heart and liver of aged rats treated with L-malate. L-malate was orally administered in rats continuously for 30 days using a feeding atraumatic needle. We found that the gene expression of OMC and GSH-Px mRNA in the liver increased by 39 % and 38 %, respectively, in the 0.630 g/kg L-malate treatment group than that in the control group. The expression levels of SOD mRNA in the liver increased by 39 %, 56 %, and 78 % in the 0.105, 0.210, and 0.630 g/kg L-malate treatment groups, respectively. No difference were observed in the expression levels of AGC, OMC, CAT, SOD, and GSH-Px mRNAs in the heart of rats between the L-malate treatment and control groups. These results predicted that L-malate may increase the antioxidant capacity of mitochondria by enhancing the expression of mRNAs involved in the MAS and the antioxidant enzymes.

  13. Molecular cloning, characterization and gene expression of an antioxidant enzyme catalase (MrCat) from Macrobrachium rosenbergii.

    PubMed

    Arockiaraj, Jesu; Easwvaran, Sarasvathi; Vanaraja, Puganeshwaran; Singh, Arun; Othman, Rofina Yasmin; Bhassu, Subha

    2012-05-01

    In this study, we reported a full length of catalase gene (designated as MrCat), identified from the transcriptome database of freshwater prawn Macrobrachium rosenbergii. The complete gene sequence of the MrCat is 2504 base pairs in length, and encodes 516 amino acids. The MrCat protein contains three domains such as catalase 1 (catalase proximal heme-ligand signature) at 350-358, catalase 2 (catalase proximal active site signature) at 60-76 and catalase 3 (catalase family profile) at 20-499. The mRNA expressions of MrCat in healthy and the infectious hypodermal and hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHHNV) challenged M. rosenbergii were examined using quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). The MrCat is highly expressed in digestive tract and all the other tissues (walking leg, gills, muscle, hemocyte, hepatopancreas, pleopods, brain and eye stalk) of M. rosenbergii taken for analysis. The expression is strongly up-regulated in digestive tract after IHHNV challenge. To understand its biological activity, the recombinant MrCat gene was constructed and expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3). The recombinant MrCat existed in high thermal stability and broad spectrum of pH, which showed over 95% enzyme activity between pH 5 and 10.5, and was stable from 40 °C to 70 °C, and exhibited 85-100% enzyme activity from 30 °C to 40 °C.

  14. Coal-burning endemic fluorosis is associated with reduced activity in antioxidative enzymes and Cu/Zn-SOD gene expression.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qi; Cui, Kang-ping; Xu, Yuan-yuan; Gao, Yan-ling; Zhao, Jing; Li, Da-sheng; Li, Xiao-lei; Huang, Hou-jin

    2014-02-01

    To study the effect of fluorine on the oxidative stress in coal-burning fluorosis, we investigated the environmental characteristics of coal-burning endemic fluorosis combined with fluorine content surveillance in air, water, food, briquette, and clay binder samples from Bijie region, Guizhou Province, southwest of China. The activities of antioxidant enzymes including copper/zinc superoxide dismutase (Cu/Zn-SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), and level of lipid peroxidation such as malondialdehyde (MDA) were measured in serum samples obtained from subjects residing in the Bijie region. Expression of the Cu/Zn-SOD gene was assessed by quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR (qRT-PCR). Our results showed that people suffering from endemic fluorosis (the high and low exposure groups) had much higher MDA level. Their antioxidant enzyme activities and Cu/Zn-SOD gene expression levels were lower when compared to healthy people (the control group). Fluorosis can decrease the activities of antioxidant enzymes, which was associated with exposure level of fluorine. Down-regulation of Cu/Zn-SOD expression may play an important role in the aggravation of oxidative stress in endemic fluorosis.

  15. Dihydroflavonol 4-reductase genes encode enzymes with contrasting substrate specificity and show divergent gene expression profiles in Fragaria species.

    PubMed

    Miosic, Silvija; Thill, Jana; Milosevic, Malvina; Gosch, Christian; Pober, Sabrina; Molitor, Christian; Ejaz, Shaghef; Rompel, Annette; Stich, Karl; Halbwirth, Heidi

    2014-01-01

    During fruit ripening, strawberries show distinct changes in the flavonoid classes that accumulate, switching from the formation of flavan 3-ols and flavonols in unripe fruits to the accumulation of anthocyanins in the ripe fruits. In the common garden strawberry (Fragaria×ananassa) this is accompanied by a distinct switch in the pattern of hydroxylation demonstrated by the almost exclusive accumulation of pelargonidin based pigments. In Fragaria vesca the proportion of anthocyanins showing one (pelargonidin) and two (cyanidin) hydroxyl groups within the B-ring is almost equal. We isolated two dihydroflavonol 4-reductase (DFR) cDNA clones from strawberry fruits, which show 82% sequence similarity. The encoded enzymes revealed a high variability in substrate specificity. One enzyme variant did not accept DHK (with one hydroxyl group present in the B-ring), whereas the other strongly preferred DHK as a substrate. This appears to be an uncharacterized DFR variant with novel substrate specificity. Both DFRs were expressed in the receptacle and the achenes of both Fragaria species and the DFR2 expression profile showed a pronounced dependence on fruit development, whereas DFR1 expression remained relatively stable. There were, however, significant differences in their relative rates of expression. The DFR1/DFR2 expression ratio was much higher in the Fragaria×ananassa and enzyme preparations from F.×ananassa receptacles showed higher capability to convert DHK than preparations from F. vesca. Anthocyanin concentrations in the F.×ananassa cultivar were more than twofold higher and the cyanidin:pelargonidin ratio was only 0.05 compared to 0.51 in the F. vesca cultivar. The differences in the fruit colour of the two Fragaria species can be explained by the higher expression of DFR1 in F.×ananassa as compared to F. vesca, a higher enzyme efficiency (Kcat/Km values) of DFR1 combined with the loss of F3'H activity late in fruit development of F.×ananassa.

  16. Phylogeny and expression pattern of starch branching enzyme family genes in cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) under diverse environments.

    PubMed

    Pei, Jinli; Wang, Huijun; Xia, Zhiqiang; Liu, Chen; Chen, Xin; Ma, Pingan; Lu, Cheng; Wang, Wenquan

    2015-08-01

    Starch branching enzyme (SBE) is one of the key enzymes involved in starch biosynthetic metabolism. In this study, six SBE family genes were identified from the cassava genome. Phylogenetic analysis divided the MeSBE family genes into dicot family A, B, C, and the new group. Tissue-specific analysis showed that MeSBE2.2 was strongly expressed in leaves, stems cortex, and root stele, and MeSBE3 had high expression levels in stem cortex and root stele of plants in the rapid growth stage under field condition, whereas the expression levels of MeSBE2.1, MeSBE4, and MeSBE5 were low except for in stems cortex. The transcriptional activity of MeSBE2.2 and MeSBE3 was higher compared with other members and gradually increased in the storage roots during root growth process, while the other MeSBE members normally remained low expression levels. Expression of MeSBE2.2 could be induced by salt, drought, exogenous abscisic acid, jasmonic acid, and salicylic acid signals, while MeSBE3 had positive response to drought, salt, exogenous abscisic acid, and salicylic acid in leaves but not in storage root, indicating that they might be more important in starch biosynthesis pathway under diverse environments.

  17. Clones of FeSOD, MDHAR, DHAR Genes from White Clover and Gene Expression Analysis of ROS-Scavenging Enzymes during Abiotic Stress and Hormone Treatments.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan; Li, Zhou; Peng, Yan; Wang, Xiaojuan; Peng, Dandan; Li, Yaping; He, Xiaoshuang; Zhang, Xinquan; Ma, Xiao; Huang, Linkai; Yan, Yanhong

    2015-11-24

    Increased transcriptional levels of genes encoding antioxidant enzymes play important protective roles in coping with excessive accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in plants exposed to various abiotic stresses. To fully elucidate different evolutions and functions of ROS-scavenging enzymatic genes, we isolated iron superoxide dismutase (FeSOD), dehydroascorbate reductase (DHAR) and monodehydroascorbate reductase (MDHAR) from white clover for the first time and subsequently tested dynamic expression profiles of these genes together with previously identified other antioxidant enzyme genes including copper zinc superoxide dismutase (Cu/ZnSOD), manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD), glutathione reductase (GR), peroxidase (POD), catalase (CAT), and ascorbate peroxidase (APX) in response to cold, drought, salinity, cadmium stress and exogenous abscisic acid (ABA) or spermidine (Spd) treatment. The cloned fragments of FeSOD, DHAR and MDHAR genes were 630, 471 and 669 bp nucleotide sequences encoding 210, 157 and 223 amino acids, respectively. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that both amino acid and nucleotide sequences of these three genes are highly conservative. In addition, the analysis of genes expression showed the transcription of GR, POD, MDHAR, DHAR and Cu/ZnSOD were rapidly activated with relatively high abundance during cold stress. Differently, CAT, APX, FeSOD, Cu/ZnSOD and MnSOD exhibited more abundant transcripts compared to others under drought stress. Under salt stress, CAT was induced preferentially (3-12 h) compared to GR which was induced later (12-72 h). Cadmium stress mainly up-regulated Cu/ZnSOD, DHAR and MDHAR. Interestingly, most of genes expression induced by ABA or Spd happened prior to various abiotic stresses. The particular expression patterns and different response time of these genes indicated that white clover differentially activates genes encoding antioxidant enzymes to mitigate the damage of ROS during various environmental

  18. The interactive effects of mercury and selenium on metabolic profiles, gene expression and antioxidant enzymes in halophyte Suaeda salsa.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoli; Lai, Yongkai; Sun, Hushan; Wang, Yiyan; Zou, Ning

    2016-04-01

    Suaeda salsa is the pioneer halophyte in the Yellow River Delta and was consumed as a popular vegetable. Mercury has become a highly risky contaminant in the sediment of intertidal zones of the Yellow River Delta. In this work, we investigated the interactive effects of mercury and selenium in S. salsa on the basis of metabolic profiling, antioxidant enzyme activities and gene expression quantification. Our results showed that mercury exposure (20 μg L(-1)) inhibited plant growth of S. salsa and induced significant metabolic responses and altered expression levels of INPS, CMO, and MDH in S. salsa samples, together with the increased activities of antioxidant enzymes including SOD and POD. Overall, these results indicated osmotic and oxidative stresses, disturbed protein degradation and energy metabolism change in S. salsa after mercury exposures. Additionally, the addition of selenium could induce both antagonistic and synergistic effects including alleviating protein degradation and aggravating osmotic stress caused by mercury.

  19. Nitric oxide synthase during early embryonic development in silkworm Bombyx mori: Gene expression, enzyme activity, and tissue distribution.

    PubMed

    Kitta, Ryo; Kuwamoto, Marina; Yamahama, Yumi; Mase, Keisuke; Sawada, Hiroshi

    2016-12-01

    To elucidate the mechanism for embryonic diapause or the breakdown of diapause in Bombyx mori, we biochemically analyzed nitric oxide synthase (NOS) during the embryogenesis of B. mori. The gene expression and enzyme activity of B. mori NOS (BmNOS) were examined in diapause, non-diapause, and HCl-treated diapause eggs. In the case of HCl-treated diapause eggs, the gene expression and enzyme activity of BmNOS were induced by HCl treatment. However, in the case of diapause and non-diapause eggs during embryogenesis, changes in the BmNOS activity and gene expressions did not coincide except 48-60 h after oviposition in diapause eggs. The results imply that changes in BmNOS activity during the embryogenesis of diapause and non-diapause eggs are regulated not only at the level of transcription but also post-transcription. The distribution and localization of BmNOS were also investigated with an immunohistochemical technique using antibodies against the universal NOS; the localization of BmNOS was observed mainly in the cytoplasm of yolk cells in diapause eggs and HCl-treated diapause eggs. These data suggest that BmNOS has an important role in the early embryonic development of the B. mori.

  20. Gene expression in the DpnI and DpnII restriction enzyme systems of Streptococcus pneumoniae

    SciTech Connect

    Lacks, S.A.; Sabelnikov, A.G.; Chen, Jau-Der; Greenberg, B.

    1992-12-31

    Although a number of bacterial species are naturally transformable, that is, their cells are able to take up external DNA in substantial amounts and integrate it into the chromosome without artificial manipulation of the cell surface, Streptococcus pneumoniae, the first species in which this phenomenon was detected, remains a prototype of such transformation. Cells of S. pneumonias also contain potent restriction endonucleases able to severely restrict DNA introduced during viral infection. Our current understanding of the genetic basis of the complementary DpnI and DpnII restriction systems and of the biochemistry of their component enzymes are briefly reviewed. The manner in which these enzymes impinge on the transfer of chromosomal genes and of plasmeds will be examined in detail. It will be seen that far from acting against foreign DNA in general, the restriction systems seem to be designed to exclude only infecting viral DNA The presence of complementary restriction systems in different cells of S. pneumonias enhances their effectiveness in blocking viral infection and promoting species survival. This enhanced effectiveness requires the expression of alternative restriction systems. Therefore, the ability of the cells to transfer the restriction enzyme genes and to regulate their expression are important for survival of the species.

  1. Mycoparasitism studies of Trichoderma harzianum against Sclerotinia sclerotiorum: evaluation of antagonism and expression of cell wall-degrading enzymes genes.

    PubMed

    Troian, Rogério Fraga; Steindorff, Andrei Stecca; Ramada, Marcelo Henrique Soller; Arruda, Walquiria; Ulhoa, Cirano José

    2014-10-01

    Trichoderma spp. are known for their biocontrol activity against several plant pathogens. A specific isolate of Trichoderma harzianum, 303/02, has the potential to inhibit the growth of Sclerotinia sclerotiorum, an important agent involved in several crop diseases. In this study, the interaction between T. harzianum 303/02 and mycelia, sclerotia and apothecia of S. sclerotiorum was studied by scanning electron microscopy. RT-qPCR was used to examine the expression of 11 genes potentially involved in biocontrol. T. harzianum 303/02 parasitizes S. sclerotiorum by forming branches that coil around the hyphae. The fungus multiplied abundantly at the sclerotia and apothecia surface, forming a dense mycelium that penetrated the inner surface of these structures. The levels of gene expression varied according to the type of structure with which T. harzianum was interacting. The data also showed the presence of synergistic action between the cell-wall degrading enzymes.

  2. PCR Primers to Study the Diversity of Expressed Fungal Genes Encoding Lignocellulolytic Enzymes in Soils Using High-Throughput Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Barbi, Florian; Bragalini, Claudia; Vallon, Laurent; Prudent, Elsa; Dubost, Audrey; Fraissinet-Tachet, Laurence; Marmeisse, Roland; Luis, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    Plant biomass degradation in soil is one of the key steps of carbon cycling in terrestrial ecosystems. Fungal saprotrophic communities play an essential role in this process by producing hydrolytic enzymes active on the main components of plant organic matter. Open questions in this field regard the diversity of the species involved, the major biochemical pathways implicated and how these are affected by external factors such as litter quality or climate changes. This can be tackled by environmental genomic approaches involving the systematic sequencing of key enzyme-coding gene families using soil-extracted RNA as material. Such an approach necessitates the design and evaluation of gene family-specific PCR primers producing sequence fragments compatible with high-throughput sequencing approaches. In the present study, we developed and evaluated PCR primers for the specific amplification of fungal CAZy Glycoside Hydrolase gene families GH5 (subfamily 5) and GH11 encoding endo-β-1,4-glucanases and endo-β-1,4-xylanases respectively as well as Basidiomycota class II peroxidases, corresponding to the CAZy Auxiliary Activity family 2 (AA2), active on lignin. These primers were experimentally validated using DNA extracted from a wide range of Ascomycota and Basidiomycota species including 27 with sequenced genomes. Along with the published primers for Glycoside Hydrolase GH7 encoding enzymes active on cellulose, the newly design primers were shown to be compatible with the Illumina MiSeq sequencing technology. Sequences obtained from RNA extracted from beech or spruce forest soils showed a high diversity and were uniformly distributed in gene trees featuring the global diversity of these gene families. This high-throughput sequencing approach using several degenerate primers constitutes a robust method, which allows the simultaneous characterization of the diversity of different fungal transcripts involved in plant organic matter degradation and may lead to the

  3. Effect of the combined probiotics with aflatoxin B₁-degrading enzyme on aflatoxin detoxification, broiler production performance and hepatic enzyme gene expression.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Rui-yu; Chang, Juan; Yin, Qing-qiang; Wang, Ping; Yang, Yu-rong; Wang, Xiao; Wang, Guo-qiang; Zheng, Qiu-hong

    2013-09-01

    In order to degrade aflatoxin B₁ (AFB₁), AFB₁-degrading microbes (probiotics) such as Lactobacillus casei, Bacillus subtilis and Pichia anomala, and the AFB₁-degrading enzyme from Aspergillus oryzae were selected and combined to make feed additive. Seventy-five 43-day-old male Arbor Acres broilers were randomly divided into 5 groups, 15 broilers for each group. The broilers were given with 5 kinds of diets such as the basal diet, 400 μg/kg AFB₁ supplement without feed additive, and 200, 400, 800 μg/kg AFB₁ supplement with 0.15% feed additive. The feeding experimental period was 30 d, which was used to determine production performance of broilers. In addition, serum, liver and chest muscle were selected for measuring AFB₁ residues, gene expressions, microscopic and antioxidant analyses. The results showed that adding 0.15% feed additive in broiler diets could significantly relieve the negative effect of AFB₁ on chicken's production performance and nutrient metabolic rates (P<0.05). It could also improve AFB₁ metabolism, hepatic cell structure, antioxidant activity, and many hepatic enzyme gene expressions involved in oxidoreductase, apoptosis, cell growth, immune system and metabolic process (P<0.05). It could be concluded that the feed additive was able to degrade AFB₁ and improve animal production.

  4. Effects of sex and site on amino acid metabolism enzyme gene expression and activity in rat white adipose tissue

    PubMed Central

    Arriarán, Sofía; Agnelli, Silvia; Remesar, Xavier; Fernández-López, José Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives. White adipose tissue (WAT) shows marked sex- and diet-dependent differences. However, our metabolic knowledge of WAT, especially on amino acid metabolism, is considerably limited. In the present study, we compared the influence of sex on the amino acid metabolism profile of the four main WAT sites, focused on the paths related to ammonium handling and the urea cycle, as a way to estimate the extent of WAT implication on body amino-nitrogen metabolism. Experimental Design. Adult female and male rats were maintained, undisturbed, under standard conditions for one month. After killing them under isoflurane anesthesia. WAT sites were dissected and weighed. Subcutaneous, perigonadal, retroperitoneal and mesenteric WAT were analyzed for amino acid metabolism gene expression and enzyme activities. Results. There was a considerable stability of the urea cycle activities and expressions, irrespective of sex, and with only limited influence of site. Urea cycle was more resilient to change than other site-specialized metabolic pathways. The control of WAT urea cycle was probably related to the provision of arginine/citrulline, as deduced from the enzyme activity profiles. These data support a generalized role of WAT in overall amino-N handling. In contrast, sex markedly affected WAT ammonium-centered amino acid metabolism in a site-related way, with relatively higher emphasis in males’ subcutaneous WAT. Conclusions. We found that WAT has an active amino acid metabolism. Its gene expressions were lower than those of glucose-lipid interactions, but the differences were quantitatively less important than usually reported. The effects of sex on urea cycle enzymes expression and activity were limited, in contrast with the wider variations observed in other metabolic pathways. The results agree with a centralized control of urea cycle operation affecting the adipose organ as a whole. PMID:26587356

  5. Differential expression of genes encoding anti-oxidant enzymes in Sydney rock oysters, Saccostrea glomerata (Gould) selected for disease resistance.

    PubMed

    Green, Timothy J; Dixon, Tom J; Devic, Emilie; Adlard, Robert D; Barnes, Andrew C

    2009-05-01

    Sydney rock oysters (Saccostrea glomerata) selectively bred for disease resistance (R) and wild-caught control oysters (W) were exposed to a field infection of disseminating neoplasia. Cumulative mortality of W oysters (31.7%) was significantly greater than R oysters (0.0%) over the 118 days of the experiment. In an attempt to understand the biochemical and molecular pathways involved in disease resistance, differentially expressed sequence tags (ESTs) between R and W S. glomerata hemocytes were identified using the PCR technique, suppression subtractive hybridisation (SSH). Sequencing of 300 clones from two SSH libraries revealed 183 distinct sequences of which 113 shared high similarity to sequences in the public databases. Putative function could be assigned to 64 of the sequences. Expression of nine ESTs homologous to genes previously shown to be involved in bivalve immunity was further studied using quantitative reverse-transcriptase PCR (qRT-PCR). The base-line expression of an extracellular superoxide dismutase (ecSOD) and a small heat shock protein (sHsP) were significantly increased, whilst peroxiredoxin 6 (Prx6) and interferon inhibiting cytokine factor (IK) were significantly decreased in R oysters. From these results it was hypothesised that R oysters would be able to generate the anti-parasitic compound, hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) faster and to higher concentrations during respiratory burst due to the differential expression of genes for the two anti-oxidant enzymes of ecSOD and Prx6. To investigate this hypothesis, protein extracts from hemolymph were analysed for oxidative burst enzyme activity. Analysis of the cell free hemolymph proteins separated by native-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) failed to detect true superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity by assaying dismutation of superoxide anion in zymograms. However, the ecSOD enzyme appears to generate hydrogen peroxide, presumably via another process, which is yet to be elucidated. This

  6. Angiotensin converting enzyme 2 gene expression increased compensatory for left ventricular remodeling in patients with end-stage heart failure.

    PubMed

    Ohtsuki, Masatsugu; Morimoto, Shin-ichiro; Izawa, Hideo; Ismail, Tevfik F; Ishibashi-Ueda, Hatsue; Kato, Yasuchika; Horii, Taiko; Isomura, Tadashi; Suma, Hisayoshi; Nomura, Masanori; Hishida, Hitoshi; Kurahashi, Hiroki; Ozaki, Yukio

    2010-11-19

    It has been reported that angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) 2, a homologue of ACE, has direct effects on cardiac function. However, the role of ACE2 in the development of human heart failure is not fully understood. We evaluated the expression of the ACE2 gene by means of real-time RT-PCR in myocardium from 14 patients with end-stage heart failure. The amount of ACE2 mRNA positively correlated with left ventricular (LV) end-diastolic diameter (r(2)=0.56, p<0.01) but did not significantly correlate with LV ejection fraction or plasma brain natriuretic peptide levels. In conclusion, our data show that the up-regulation of the ACE2 gene in the LV myocardium of patients with severe heart failure was associated with the degree of LV dilatation and may thereby constitute an important adaptive mechanism to retard the progression of adverse LV remodeling.

  7. Increased angiotensin-I converting enzyme gene expression in the failing human heart. Quantification by competitive RNA polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed Central

    Studer, R; Reinecke, H; Müller, B; Holtz, J; Just, H; Drexler, H

    1994-01-01

    Local activation of the components of the renin angiotensin system in the heart is regarded as an important modulator of cardiac phenotype and function; however, little is known about their presence, regulation, and potential activation in the human heart. To investigate the gene expression of major angiotensin-II-forming enzymes in left ventricles of normal (n = 9) and failing human hearts (n = 20), we established a competitive RNA-polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for mRNA quantification of angiotensin-I converting enzyme (ACE) and human heart chymase. For each gene, competitor RNA targets with small internal deletions were used as internal standards to quantify the original number of transcripts and to control reverse transcription and PCR. In PCR, each target and the corresponding competitor were amplified by competing for the same primer oligonucleotides. The variability of ACE RNA-PCR was 11% indicating a high reproducibility of this method. In addition, ACE mRNA levels obtained by competitive RNA-PCR correlated favorably with traditional slot blot hybridization (r = 0.69, n = 10; P < 0.05). Compared with nonfailing hearts, the number of ACE transcripts referred to 100 ng of total RNA was increased threefold in patients with chronic heart failure (4.2 +/- 2.5 vs. 12.8 +/- 6 x 10(5); P < 0.0005). In contrast, no significant difference was found in chymase gene expression between normal and failing hearts. Thus, the expression of the cardiac ACE but not of human heart chymase is upregulated in failing human heart indicating an activation of the cardiac renin-angiotensin system in patients with advanced heart failure. Images PMID:8040271

  8. Cloning and expression of a phloretin hydrolase gene from Eubacterium ramulus and characterization of the recombinant enzyme.

    PubMed

    Schoefer, Lilian; Braune, Annett; Blaut, Michael

    2004-10-01

    Phloretin hydrolase catalyzes the hydrolytic C-C cleavage of phloretin to phloroglucinol and 3-(4-hydroxyphenyl)propionic acid during flavonoid degradation in Eubacterium ramulus. The gene encoding the enzyme was cloned by screening a gene library for hydrolase activity. The insert of a clone conferring phloretin hydrolase activity was sequenced. Sequence analysis revealed an open reading frame of 822 bp (phy), a putative promoter region, and a terminating stem-loop structure. The deduced amino acid sequence of phy showed similarities to a putative protein of the 2,4-diacetylphloroglucinol biosynthetic operon from Pseudomonas fluorescens. The phloretin hydrolase was heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli and purified. The molecular mass of the native enzyme was approximately 55 kDa as determined by gel filtration. The results of sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and the deduced amino acid sequence of phy indicated molecular masses of 30 and 30.8 kDa, respectively, suggesting that the enzyme is a homodimer. The recombinant phloretin hydrolase catalyzed the hydrolysis of phloretin to equimolar amounts of phloroglucinol and 3-(4-hydroxyphenyl)propionic acid. The optimal temperature and pH of the catalyzed reaction mixture were 37 degrees C and 7.0, respectively. The K(m) for phloretin was 13 +/- 3 microM and the k(cat) was 10 +/- 2 s(-1). The enzyme did not transform phloretin-2'-glucoside (phloridzin), neohesperidin dihydrochalcone, 1,3-diphenyl-1,3-propandione, or trans-1,3-diphenyl-2,3-epoxy-propan-1-one. The catalytic activity of the phloretin hydrolase was reduced by N-bromosuccinimide, o-phenanthroline, N-ethylmaleimide, and CuCl(2) to 3, 20, 35, and 85%, respectively. Phloroglucinol and 3-(4-hydroxyphenyl)propionic acid reduced the activity to 54 and 70%, respectively.

  9. Glutathione S-transferase (GST) family in barley: identification of members, enzyme activity, and gene expression pattern.

    PubMed

    Rezaei, Mohammad Kazem; Shobbar, Zahra-Sadat; Shahbazi, Maryam; Abedini, Raha; Zare, Sajjad

    2013-09-15

    Barley (Hordeum vulgare) is one of the most important cereals in many developing countries where drought stress considerably diminishes agricultural production. Glutathione S-transferases (GSTs EC 2.5.1.18) are multifunctional enzymes which play a crucial role in cellular detoxification and oxidative stress tolerance. In this study, 84 GST genes were identified in barley by a comprehensive in silico approach. Sequence alignment and phylogenetic analysis grouped these HvGST proteins in eight classes. The largest numbers of the HvGST genes (50) were included in the Tau class followed by 21 genes in Phi, five in Zeta, two in DHAR, two in EF1G, two in Lambda, and one each in TCHQD and Theta classes. Phylogenetic analysis of the putative GSTs from Arabidopsis, rice, and barley indicated that major functional diversification within the GST family predated the monocot/dicot divergence. However, intra-specious duplication seems to be common. Expression patterns of five GST genes from Phi and Tau classes were investigated in three barley genotypes (Yusof [drought-tolerant], Moroc9-75 [drought-sensitive], and HS1 [wild ecotype]) under control and drought-stressed conditions, during the vegetative stage. All investigated genes were up-regulated significantly under drought stress and/or showed a higher level of transcripts in the tolerant cultivar. Additionally, GST enzyme activity was superior in Yusof and induced in the extreme-drought-treated leaves, while it was not changed in Moroc9-75 under drought conditions. Moreover, the lowest and highest levels of lipid peroxidation were observed in the Yusof and Moroc9-75 cultivars, respectively. Based on the achieved results, detoxification and antioxidant activity of GSTs might be considered an important factor in the drought tolerance of barley genotypes for further investigations.

  10. Single administration of recombinant IL‐6 restores the gene expression of lipogenic enzymes in liver of fasting IL‐6‐deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Gavito, AL; Cabello, R; Suarez, J; Serrano, A; Pavón, F J; Vida, M; Romero, M; Pardo, V; Bautista, D; Arrabal, S; Decara, J; Cuesta, AL; Valverde, A M; Rodríguez de Fonseca, F

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose Lipogenesis is intimately controlled by hormones and cytokines as well as nutritional conditions. IL‐6 participates in the regulation of fatty acid metabolism in the liver. We investigated the role of IL‐6 in mediating fasting/re‐feeding changes in the expression of hepatic lipogenic enzymes. Experimental Approach Gene and protein expression of lipogenic enzymes were examined in livers of wild‐type (WT) and IL‐6‐deficient (IL‐6−/−) mice during fasting and re‐feeding conditions. Effects of exogenous IL‐6 administration on gene expression of these enzymes were evaluated in vivo. The involvement of STAT3 in mediating these IL‐6 responses was investigated by using siRNA in human HepG2 cells. Key Results During feeding, the up‐regulation in the hepatic expression of lipogenic genes presented similar time kinetics in WT and IL‐6−/− mice. During fasting, expression of lipogenic genes decreased gradually over time in both strains, although the initial drop was more marked in IL‐6−/− mice. Protein levels of hepatic lipogenic enzymes were lower in IL‐6−/− than in WT mice at the end of the fasting period. In WT, circulating IL‐6 levels paralleled gene expression of hepatic lipogenic enzymes. IL‐6 administration in vivo and in vitro showed that IL‐6‐mediated signalling was associated with the up‐regulation of hepatic lipogenic enzyme genes. Moreover, silencing STAT3 in HepG2 cells attenuated IL‐6 mediated up‐regulation of lipogenic gene transcription levels. Conclusions and Implications IL‐6 sustains levels of hepatic lipogenic enzymes during fasting through activation of STAT3. Our findings indicate that clinical use of STAT3‐associated signalling cytokines, particularly against steatosis, should be undertaken with caution. PMID:26750868

  11. Effect of salt stress on ion concentration, proline content, antioxidant enzyme activities and gene expression in tomato cultivars

    PubMed Central

    Gharsallah, Charfeddine; Fakhfakh, Hatem; Grubb, Douglas; Gorsane, Faten

    2016-01-01

    Salinity is a constraint limiting plant growth and productivity of crops throughout the world. Understanding the mechanism underlying plant response to salinity provides new insights into the improvement of salt tolerance-crops of importance. In the present study, we report on the responses of twenty cultivars of tomato. We have clustered genotypes into scale classes according to their response to increased NaCl levels. Three local tomato genotypes, representative of different saline scale classes, were selected for further investigation. During early (0 h, 6 h and 12 h) and later (7 days) stages of the response to salt treatment, ion concentrations (Na+, K+  and Ca2+), proline content, enzyme activities (catalase, ascorbate peroxidase and guiacol peroxidase) were recorded. qPCR analysis of candidate genes WRKY (8, 31and 39), ERF (9, 16 and 80), LeNHX (1, 3 and 4) and HKT (class I) were performed. A high K+, Ca2 +and proline accumulation as well as a decrease of Na+  concentration-mediated salt tolerance. Concomitant with a pattern of high-antioxidant enzyme activities, tolerant genotypes also displayed differential patterns of gene expression during the response to salt stress. PMID:27543452

  12. Effects of paraquat on photosynthetic pigments, antioxidant enzymes, and gene expression in Chlorella pyrenoidosa under mixotrophic compared with autotrophic conditions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Weiguo; Liu, Min; Zhang, Peiliang; Yu, Fugen; Lu, Shan; Li, Pengfu; Zhou, Junying

    2014-11-01

    Only limited information is available on herbicide toxicity to algae under mixotrophic conditions. In the present study, we studied the effects of the herbicide paraquat on growth, photosynthetic pigments, antioxidant enzymes, and gene expression in Chlorella pyrenoidosa under mixotrophic compared with autotrophic conditions. The mean measured exposure concentrations of paraquat under mixotrophic and autotrophic conditions were in the range of 0.3-3.4 and 0.6-3.6 μM, respectively. Exposure to paraquat for 72 h under both autotrophic and mixotrophic conditions induced decreased growth and chlorophyll (Chl) content, increased superoxide dismutase and peroxidase activities, and decreased transcript abundances of three photosynthesis-related genes (light-independent protochlorophyllide reductase subunit, photosystem II protein D1, and ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase large subunit [rbcL]). Compared with autotrophic conditions, the inhibition percentage of growth rate under mixotrophic conditions was lower at 0.8 μM paraquat, whereas it was greater at 1.8 and 3.4 μM paraquat. With exposure to 0.8-3.4 μM paraquat, the inhibition rates of Chl a and b content under mixotrophic conditions (43.1-52.4% and 54.6-59.7%, respectively) were greater compared with autotrophic conditions, whereas the inhibition rate of rbcL gene transcription under mixotrophic conditions (35.7-44.0%) was lower. These data showed that similar to autotrophic conditions, paraquat affected the activities of antioxidant enzymes and decreased Chl synthesis and transcription of photosynthesis-related genes in C. pyrenoidosa under mixotrophic conditions, but a differential susceptibility to paraquat toxicity occurred between autotrophically versus mixotrophically grown cells.

  13. Enhanced Gastrointestinal Expression of Cytosolic Malic Enzyme (ME1) Induces Intestinal and Liver Lipogenic Gene Expression and Intestinal Cell Proliferation in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Al-Dwairi, Ahmed; Brown, Adam R.; Pabona, John Mark P.; Van, Trang H.; Hamdan, Hamdan; Mercado, Charles P.; Quick, Charles M.; Wight, Patricia A.; Simmen, Rosalia C. M.; Simmen, Frank A.

    2014-01-01

    The small intestine participates in lipid digestion, metabolism and transport. Cytosolic malic enzyme 1 (ME1) is an enzyme that generates NADPH used in fatty acid and cholesterol biosynthesis. Previous work has correlated liver and adipose ME1 expression with susceptibility to obesity and diabetes; however, the contributions of intestine-expressed ME1 to these conditions are unknown. We generated transgenic (Tg) mice expressing rat ME1 in the gastrointestinal epithelium under the control of the murine villin1 promoter/enhancer. Levels of intestinal ME1 protein (endogenous plus transgene) were greater in Tg than wildtype (WT) littermates. Effects of elevated intestinal ME1 on body weight, circulating insulin, select adipocytokines, blood glucose, and metabolism-related genes were examined. Male Tg mice fed a high-fat (HF) diet gained significantly more body weight than WT male littermates and had heavier livers. ME1-Tg mice had deeper intestinal and colon crypts, a greater intestinal 5-bromodeoxyuridine labeling index, and increased expression of intestinal lipogenic (Fasn, Srebf1) and cholesterol biosynthetic (Hmgcsr, Hmgcs1), genes. The livers from HF diet-fed Tg mice also exhibited an induction of cholesterol and lipogenic pathway genes and altered measures (Irs1, Irs2, Prkce) of insulin sensitivity. Results indicate that gastrointestinal ME1 via its influence on intestinal epithelial proliferation, and lipogenic and cholesterologenic genes may concomitantly impact signaling in liver to modify this tissue’s metabolic state. Our work highlights a new mouse model to address the role of intestine-expressed ME1 in whole body metabolism, hepatomegaly, and crypt cell proliferation. Intestinal ME1 may thus constitute a therapeutic target to reduce obesity-associated pathologies. PMID:25402228

  14. Schisandra Chinensis Baillon regulates the gene expression of phase II antioxidant/detoxifying enzymes in hepatic damage induced rats

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Han I; Do, Gyeong-Min; Lee, Hye Min; Ok, Hyang Mok; Shin, Jae-Ho

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES This study investigated the antioxidant activities and hepatoprotective effects of Schisandra chinensis Baillon extract (SCE) against tert-butyl hydroperoxide (t-BHP)-induced oxidative hepatic damage in rats. MATERIALS/METHODS Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were pretreated with SCE (300, 600, and 1,200 mg/kg BW) or saline once daily for 14 consecutive days. On day 14, each animal, except those belonging to the normal control group, were injected with t-BHP (0.8 mmol/kg BW/i.p.), and all of the rats were sacrificed 16 h after t-BHP injection. RESULTS Although no significant differences in AST and ALT levels were observed among the TC and SCE groups, the high-dose SCE group showed a decreasing tendency compared to the TC group. However, erythrocyte SOD activity showed a significant increase in the low-dose SCE group compared with the TC group. On the other hand, no significant differences in hepatic total glutathione (GSH) level, glutathione reductase (GR), and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) activities were observed among the TC and SCE groups. Hepatic histopathological evaluation revealed that pretreatment with SCE resulted in reduced t-BHP-induced incidence of lesions, such as neutrophil infiltration, swelling of liver cells, and necrosis. In particular, treatment with a high dose of SCE resulted in induction of phase II antioxidant/detoxifying enzyme expression, such as glutathione S-transferase (GST) and glutamate-cysteine ligase catalytic subunit (GCLC). CONCLUSIONS Based on these results, we conclude that SCE exerts protective effects against t-BHP induced oxidative hepatic damage through the reduction of neutrophil infiltration, swelling of liver cells, and necrosis. In addition, SCE regulates the gene expression of phase II antioxidant/detoxifying enzymes independent of hepatic antioxidant enzyme activity. PMID:24944771

  15. Hypersalinity and hydrogen peroxide upregulation of gene expression of antioxidant enzymes in Ulva fasciata against oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Sung, Ming-Shiuan; Hsu, Yi-Ting; Hsu, Yuan-Ting; Wu, Tzure-Meng; Lee, Tse-Min

    2009-01-01

    The modulation of manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD), FeSOD, ascorbate peroxidase (APX), glutathione reductase (GR), and catalase (CAT) gene expression and activities and antioxidants in Ulva fasciata against hypersalinity (90 per thousand)-induced oxidative stress was studied. Increases in H(2)O(2) contents but no changes in lipid peroxidation and protein carbonyl group contents suggest oxidative damage did not occur in 90 per thousand condition. Antioxidants were consumed for reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenging indicated by decreased ascorbate and glutathione contents by 90 per thousand. Antioxidant enzymes were differently expressed by 90 per thousand for ROS removal. MnSOD activity and transcript increased 1 h after 90 per thousand treatment with a peak at hour 3, while FeSOD activity increased fast to the plateau after 1 h and its transcript increased after 3 h. APX activity increased 1 h after 90 per thousand but its transcript rose till 3 h, and GR activity increased after 1 h with a peak at hour 3 but its transcript increased till 3 h. CAT activity and transcript increased after 12 h. Enzyme activity is transcriptionally regulated by 90 per thousand except a fast increase in FeSOD, APX, and GR activities during 1 h. APX is responsible for early H(2)O(2) decomposition while CAT scavenges H(2)O(2) in the later period. The inhibition of 90 per thousand induced increase of H(2)O(2) content and FeSOD activity and transcript by treatment of a H(2)O(2) scavenger, dimethylthiourea, and the increase of FeSOD transcript of 30 per thousand grown thalli by H(2)O(2) treatment suggest that H(2)O(2) mediates the upregulation of FeSOD by hypersalinity while other enzymes is modulated by factors other than H(2)O(2).

  16. Jasmonic Acid Modulates the Physio-Biochemical Attributes, Antioxidant Enzyme Activity, and Gene Expression in Glycine max under Nickel Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Sirhindi, Geetika; Mir, Mudaser Ahmad; Abd-Allah, Elsayed Fathi; Ahmad, Parvaiz; Gucel, Salih

    2016-01-01

    In present study, we evaluated the effects of Jasmonic acid (JA) on physio-biochemical attributes, antioxidant enzyme activity, and gene expression in soybean (Glycine max L.) plants subjected to nickel (Ni) stress. Ni stress decreases the shoot and root length and chlorophyll content by 37.23, 38.31, and 39.21%, respectively, over the control. However, application of JA was found to improve the chlorophyll content and length of shoot and root of Ni-fed seedlings. Plants supplemented with JA restores the chlorophyll fluorescence, which was disturbed by Ni stress. The present study demonstrated increase in proline, glycinebetaine, total protein, and total soluble sugar (TSS) by 33.09, 51.26, 22.58, and 49.15%, respectively, under Ni toxicity over the control. Addition of JA to Ni stressed plants further enhanced the above parameters. Ni stress increases hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) by 68.49%, lipid peroxidation (MDA) by 50.57% and NADPH oxidase by 50.92% over the control. Supplementation of JA minimizes the accumulation of H2O2, MDA, and NADPH oxidase, which helps in stabilization of biomolecules. The activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), peroxidase (POD), catalase (CAT), and ascorbate peroxidase (APX) increases by 40.04, 28.22, 48.53, and 56.79%, respectively, over the control in Ni treated seedlings and further enhancement in the antioxidant activity was observed by the application of JA. Ni treated soybean seedlings showed increase in expression of Fe-SOD by 77.62, CAT by 15.25, POD by 58.33, and APX by 80.58% over the control. Nevertheless, application of JA further enhanced the expression of the above genes in the present study. Our results signified that Ni stress caused negative impacts on soybean seedlings, but, co-application of JA facilitate the seedlings to combat the detrimental effects of Ni through enhanced osmolytes, activity of antioxidant enzymes and gene expression. PMID:27242811

  17. Overexpression of soybean ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme gene GmUBC2 confers enhanced drought and salt tolerance through modulating abiotic stress-responsive gene expression in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Guo-An; Chang, Ru-Zhen; Qiu, Li-Juan

    2010-03-01

    Previous studies have shown that ubiquitination plays important roles in plant abiotic stress responses. In the present study, the ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme gene GmUBC2, a homologue of yeast RAD6, was cloned from soybean and functionally characterized. GmUBC2 was expressed in all tissues in soybean and was up-regulated by drought and salt stress. Arabidopsis plants overexpressing GmUBC2 were more tolerant to salinity and drought stresses compared with the control plants. Through expression analyses of putative downstream genes in the transgenic plants, we found that the expression levels of two ion antiporter genes AtNHX1 and AtCLCa, a key gene involved in the biosynthesis of proline, AtP5CS, and the copper chaperone for superoxide dismutase gene AtCCS, were all increased significantly in the transgenic plants. These results suggest that GmUBC2 is involved in the regulation of ion homeostasis, osmolyte synthesis, and oxidative stress responses. Our results also suggest that modulation of the ubiquitination pathway could be an effective means of improving salt and drought tolerance in plants through genetic engineering.

  18. Gene expression and enzyme activities of the sodium pump during sea urchin development: implications for indices of physiological state.

    PubMed

    Marsh, A G; LeongPKK; Manahan, T

    2000-10-01

    The sodium pump consumes a large portion of the metabolic energy (40%) in sea urchin larvae. Understanding the developmental regulation of ion pumps is important for assessing the physiological state of embryos and larvae. We sequenced a partial cDNA clone (1769 bp) from the sea urchin Strongylocentrotus purpuratus and found it to contain the C-terminal portion of an open reading frame coding for 195 amino acids that exhibited high sequence similarity (89%) to invertebrate alpha-subunits of the Na+,K+-ATPase sodium pump. Northern blots using the 3' untranslated region of this cDNA specifically recognized a 4.6-kbp transcript under high stringency. During embryonic development, a rapid increase in levels of this mRNA transcript during gastrulation (25 h postfertilization) was paralleled by a concomitant increase in the total enzymatic activity of Na+,K+-ATPase. Expression of this subunit during gastrulation increased to a maximum at 36 h, followed by a rapid decline to trace levels by 60 h. The rate of removal of the transcript from the total RNA pool after 36 h closely followed a first-order exponential decay model (r2= 0.988), equivalent to a degradation rate of 7.8% h(-1). By 83 h, transcription of the alpha-subunit gene was low, yet sodium pump activity remained high. Molecular assays for the expression of this gene would underestimate sodium pump activities for assessing physiological state because of the temporal separation between maximal gene expression in a gastrula and maximal enzyme activities in the later larval stage. This finding illustrates the difficulty of using molecular probes for assessing the physiological state of invertebrate larvae.

  19. Effects of temperature - heavy metal interactions, antioxidant enzyme activity and gene expression in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) seedlings.

    PubMed

    Ergün, N; Özçubukçu, S; Kolukirik, M; Temizkan, Ö

    2014-12-01

    In this study, the effect of heat and chromium (Cr) heavy metal interactions on wheat seedlings (Triticum aestivum L. cv. Ç-1252 and Gun91) was investigated by measuring total chlorophyll and carotenoid levels, catalase (CAT) and ascorbate peroxidase (APX) antioxidant enzyme activities, and MYB73, ERF1 and TaSRG gene expression. Examination of pigment levels demonstrated a decrease in total chlorophyll in both species of wheat under combined heat and heavy metal stress, while the carotenoid levels showed a slight increase. APX activity increased in both species in response to heavy metal stress, but the increase in APX activity in the Gun91 seedlings was higher than that in the Ç-1252 seedlings. CAT activity increased in Gun91 seedlings but decreased in Ç-1252 seedlings. These results showed that Gun91 seedling had higher resistance to Cr and Cr + heat stresses than the Ç-1252 seedling. The quantitative molecular analyses implied that the higher resistance was related to the overexpression of TaMYB73, TaERF1 and TaSRG transcription factors. The increase in the expression levels of these transcription factors was profound under combined Cr and heat stress. This study suggests that TaMYB73, TaERF1 and TaSRG transcription factors regulate Cr and heat stress responsive genes in wheat.

  20. Analysis of de novo sequencing and transcriptome assembly and lignocellulolytic enzymes gene expression of Coriolopsis gallica HTC.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yuehong; Cao, Qinghua; Tao, Xiang; Shao, Huanhuan; Zhang, Kun; Zhang, Yizheng; Tan, Xuemei

    2017-03-01

    White-rot basidiomycete Coriolopsis gallica HTC is one of the main biodegraders of poplar. In our previous study, we have shown the strong capacity of C. gallica HTC to degrade lignocellulose. In this study, equal amounts of total RNA fromC. Gallica HTC cultures grown in different conditions were pooled together. Illumina paired-end RNA sequencing was performed, and 13.2 million 90-bp paired-end reads were generated. We chose the Merged Assembly of Oases data-set for the following blast searches and gene ontology analyses. The reads were assembled de novo into 28,034 transcripts (≥ 100 bp) using combined assembly strategy MAO. The transcripts were annotated using Blast2GO. In all, 18,810 transcripts (≥100 bp) achieved BLASTX hits, of which, 7048 transcripts had GO term and 2074 had ECs. The expression level of 11 lignocellulolytic enzyme genes from the assembled C. gallica HTC transcriptome were detected by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction. The results showed that expression levels of these genes were affected by carbon source and nitrogen source at the level of transcription. The current abundant transcriptome data allowed the identification of many new transcripts in C. gallica HTC. Data provided here represent the most comprehensive and integrated genomic resources for cloning and identifying genes of interest from C. gallica HTC. Characterization of C. gallica HTC transcriptome provides an effective tool to understand mechanisms underlying cellular and molecular functions of C. gallica HTC.

  1. Seasonal changes and sexual dimorphism in gene expression of StAR protein, steroidogenic enzymes and sex hormone receptors in the frog brain.

    PubMed

    Santillo, Alessandra; Falvo, Sara; Di Fiore, Maria Maddalena; Chieffi Baccari, Gabriella

    2016-12-24

    The brain of amphibians contains all the key enzymes of steroidogenesis and has a high steroidogenic activity. In seasonally-breeding amphibian species brain steroid levels fluctuate synchronously with the reproductive cycle. Here we report a study of gene expression of StAR protein, key steroidogenic enzymes and sex hormone receptors in the telencephalon (T) and diencephalon-mesencephalon (D-M) of male and female reproductive and post-reproductive Pelophylax esculentus, a seasonally breeding anuran amphibian. Significant differences in gene expression were observed between (a) the reproductive and post-reproductive phase, (b) the two brain regions and (c) male and female frogs. During the reproductive phase, star gene expression increased in the male (both T and D-M) but not in the female brain. Seasonal fluctuations in expression levels of hsd3b1, hsd17b1, srd5a1 and cyp19a1 genes for neurosteroidogenic enzymes occurred in D-M region of both sexes, with the higher levels in reproductive period. Moreover, the D-M region generally showed higher levels of gene expression than the T region in both sexes. Gene expression was higher in females than males for most genes, suggesting higher neurosteroid production in female brain. Seasonal and sex-linked changes were also observed in gene expression for androgen (ar) and estrogen (esr1, esr2) receptors, with the males showing the highest ar levels in reproductive phase and the highest esr1 and esr2 levels in post-reproductive phase; in contrast, females showed the maximum expression for all three genes in reproductive phase. The results are the first evidence for seasonal changes and sexual dimorphism of gene expression of the neurosteroidogenic pathway in amphibians.

  2. Quantification of phase I / II metabolizing enzyme gene expression and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-DNA adduct levels in human prostate

    PubMed Central

    John, Kaarthik; Ragavan, Narasimhan; Pratt, M. Margaret; Singh, Paras B.; Al-Buheissi, Salah; Matanhelia, Shyam S.; Phillips, David H.; Poirier, Miriam C.; Martin, Francis L.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND Studies of migrant populations suggest that dietary and/or environmental factors play a crucial role in the aetiology of prostatic adenocarcinoma (CaP). The human prostate consists of the peripheral zone (PZ), transition zone (TZ) and central zone (CZ); CaP occurs most often in the PZ. METHODS To investigate the notion that an underlying differential expression of phase I/II genes, and/or the presence of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)-DNA adducts might explain the elevated PZ susceptibility, we examined prostate tissues (matched tissue sets consisting of PZ and TZ) from men undergoing radical retropubic prostatectomy for CaP (n=26) or cystoprostatectomy (n=1). Quantitative gene expression analysis was employed for cytochrome P450 (CYP) isoforms CYP1A1, CYP1B1 and CYP1A2, as well as N-acetyltransferase 1 and 2 (NAT1 and NAT2) and catechol-O-methyl transferase (COMT). RESULTS CYP1B1, NAT1 and COMT were expressed in all tissue sets; levels of CYP1B1 and NAT1 were consistently higher in the PZ compared to TZ. Immunohistochemistry confirmed the presence of CYP1B1 (nuclear-associated and primarily in basal epithelial cells) and NAT1. Tissue sections from 23 of these aforementioned 27 matched tissue sets were analyzed for PAH-DNA adduct levels using antiserum elicited against DNA modified with r7, t8-dihydroxy-t-9,10-oxy-7,8,9,10-tetrahydro-benzo[a]pyrene (BPDE). PAH-DNA adduct levels were highest in glandular epithelial cells, but a comparison of PZ and TZ showed no significant differences. CONCLUSION Although expression of activating and/or detoxifying enzymes may be higher in the PZ, PAH-DNA adduct levels appear to be similar in both zones. Therefore, factors other than PAH-DNA adducts may be responsible for promotion of tumour formation in the human prostate. PMID:19143007

  3. Prolonged expression of a lysosomal enzyme in mouse liver after Sleeping Beauty transposon-mediated gene delivery: implications for non-viral gene therapy of mucopolysaccharidoses

    PubMed Central

    Aronovich, Elena L.; Bell, Jason B.; Belur, Lalitha R.; Gunther, Roland; Koniar, Brenda; Erickson, David C. C.; Schachern, Patricia A.; Matise, Ilze; McIvor, R. Scott; Whitley, Chester B.; Hackett, Perry B.

    2007-01-01

    Background The Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposon system is a non-viral vector system that can integrate precise sequences into chromosomes. We evaluated the SB transposon system as a tool for gene therapy of mucopolysaccharidosis (MPS) types I and VII. Methods We constructed SB transposon plasmids for high-level expression of human β-glucuronidase (hGUSB) or α-l-iduronidase (hIDUA). Plasmids were delivered with and without SB transposase to mouse liver by rapid, high-volume tail-vein injection. We studied the duration of expressed therapeutic enzyme activity, transgene presence by PCR, lysosomal pathology by toluidine blue staining and cell-mediated immune response histologically and by immunohistochemical staining. Results Transgene frequency, distribution of transgene and enzyme expression in liver and the level of transgenic enzyme required for amelioration of lysosomal pathology were estimated in MPS I and VII mice. Without immunomodulation, initial GUSB and IDUA activities in plasma reached >100-fold of wild-type (WT) levels but fell to background within 4 weeks post-injection. In immunomodulated transposon-treated MPS I mice plasma IDUA persisted for over 3 months at up to 100-fold WT activity in one-third of MPS I mice, which was sufficient to reverse lysosomal pathology in the liver and, partially, in distant organs. Histological and immunohistochemical examination of liver sections in IDUA transposon-treated WT mice revealed inflammation 10 days post-injection consisting predominantly of mononuclear cells, some of which were CD4- or CD8-positive. Conclusions Our results demonstrate the feasibility of achieving prolonged expression of lysosomal enzymes in the liver and reversing MPS disease in adult mice with a single dose of therapeutic SB transposons. PMID:17407189

  4. T-2 toxin inhibits gene expression and activity of key steroidogenesis enzymes in mouse Leydig cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jian Ying; Zhang, Yong Fa; Meng, Xiang Ping; Li, Yuan Xiao; Ma, Kai Wang; Bai, Xue Fei

    2015-08-01

    T-2 toxin is one of the mycotoxins, a group of type A trichothecenes produced by several fungal genera including Fusarium species, which may lead to the decrease of the testosterone secretion in the primary Leydig cells derived from the mouse testis. The previous study demonstrated the effects of T-2 toxin through direct decrease of the testosterone biosynthesis in the primary Leydig cells derived from the mouse testis. In this study, we further examined the direct biological effects of T-2 toxin on steroidogenesis production, primarily in Leydig cells of mice. Mature mouse Leydig cells were purified by Percoll gradient centrifugation and the cell purity was determined by 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (3β-HSD) staining. To examine T-2 toxin-induced testosterone secretion decrease, we measured the transcription levels of 3 key steroidogenic enzymes and 5 enzyme activities including 3β-HSD-1, P450scc, StAR, CYP17A1, and 17β-HSD in T-2 toxin/human chorionicgonadotropin (hCG) co-treated cells. Our previous study showed that T-2 toxin (10(-7) M, 10(-8) M and 10(-9) M) significantly suppressed hCG (10 ng/ml)-induced testosterone secretion. The studies demonstrated that the suppressive effect is correlated with the decreases in the levels of transcription of 3β-HSD-1, P450scc, and StAR (P<0.05) and also in enzyme activities of 3β-HSD-1, P450scc, StAR, CYP17A1, and 17β-HSD (P<0.05).

  5. Hepatic cannabinoid receptor type 1 mediates alcohol-induced regulation of bile acid enzyme genes expression via CREBH.

    PubMed

    Chanda, Dipanjan; Kim, Yong-Hoon; Li, Tiangang; Misra, Jagannath; Kim, Don-Kyu; Kim, Jung Ran; Kwon, Joseph; Jeong, Won-Il; Ahn, Sung-Hoon; Park, Tae-Sik; Koo, Seung-Hoi; Chiang, John Y L; Lee, Chul-Ho; Choi, Hueng-Sik

    2013-01-01

    Bile acids concentration in liver is tightly regulated to prevent cell damage. Previous studies have demonstrated that deregulation of bile acid homeostasis can lead to cholestatic liver disease. Recently, we have shown that ER-bound transcription factor Crebh is a downstream effector of hepatic Cb1r signaling pathway. In this study, we have investigated the effect of alcohol exposure on hepatic bile acid homeostasis and elucidated the mediatory roles of Cb1r and Crebh in this process. We found that alcohol exposure or Cb1r-agonist 2-AG treatment increases hepatic bile acid synthesis and serum ALT, AST levels in vivo alongwith significant increase in Crebh gene expression and activation. Alcohol exposure activated Cb1r, Crebh, and perturbed bile acid homeostasis. Overexpression of Crebh increased the expression of key bile acid synthesis enzyme genes via direct binding of Crebh to their promoters, whereas Cb1r knockout and Crebh-knockdown mice were protected against alcohol-induced perturbation of bile acid homeostasis. Interestingly, insulin treatment protected against Cb1r-mediated Crebh-induced disruption of bile acid homeostasis. Furthermore, Crebh expression and activation was found to be markedly increased in insulin resistance conditions and Crebh knockdown in diabetic mice model (db/db) significantly reversed alcohol-induced disruption of bile acid homeostasis. Overall, our study demonstrates a novel regulatory mechanism of hepatic bile acid metabolism by alcohol via Cb1r-mediated activation of Crebh, and suggests that targeting Crebh can be of therapeutic potential in ameliorating alcohol-induced perturbation of bile acid homeostasis.

  6. Effects of protease and non-starch polysaccharide enzyme on performance, digestive function, activity and gene expression of endogenous enzyme of broilers.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Lin; Wang, Mingfa; Zhang, Xiaotu; Wang, Zhixiang

    2017-01-01

    Three hundred one-day-old male broiler chickens (Ross-308) were fed corn-soybean basal diets containing non-starch polysaccharide (NSP) enzyme and different levels of acid protease from 1 to 42 days of age to investigate the effects of exogenous enzymes on growth performance, digestive function, activity of endogenous digestive enzymes in the pancreas and mRNA expression of pancreatic digestive enzymes. For days 1-42, compared to the control chickens, average daily feed intake (ADFI) and average daily gain (ADG) were significantly enhanced by the addition of NSP enzyme in combination with protease supplementation at 40 or 80 mg/kg (p<0.05). Feed-to-gain ratio (FGR) was significantly improved by supplementation with NSP enzymes or NSP enzyme combined with 40 or 80 mg/kg protease compared to the control diet (p<0.05). Apparent digestibility of crude protein (ADCP) was significantly enhanced by the addition of NSP enzyme or NSP enzyme combined with 40 or 80 mg/kg protease (p<0.05). Cholecystokinin (CCK) level in serum was reduced by 31.39% with NSP enzyme combined with protease supplementation at 160 mg/kg (p<0.05), but the CCK level in serum was increased by 26.51% with NSP enzyme supplementation alone. After 21 days, supplementation with NSP enzyme and NSP enzyme combined with 40 or 80 mg/kg protease increased the activity of pancreatic trypsin by 74.13%, 70.66% and 42.59% (p<0.05), respectively. After 42 days, supplementation with NSP enzyme and NSP enzyme combined with 40 mg/kg protease increased the activity of pancreatic trypsin by 32.45% and 27.41%, respectively (p<0.05). However, supplementation with NSP enzyme and 80 or 160 mg/kg protease decreased the activity of pancreatic trypsin by 10.75% and 25.88%, respectively (p<0.05). The activities of pancreatic lipase and amylase were significantly higher in treated animals than they were in the control group (p<0.05). Supplementation with NSP enzyme, NSP enzyme combined with 40 or 80 mg/kg protease increased

  7. Effects of protease and non-starch polysaccharide enzyme on performance, digestive function, activity and gene expression of endogenous enzyme of broilers

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Mingfa; Zhang, Xiaotu; Wang, Zhixiang

    2017-01-01

    Three hundred one-day-old male broiler chickens (Ross-308) were fed corn-soybean basal diets containing non-starch polysaccharide (NSP) enzyme and different levels of acid protease from 1 to 42 days of age to investigate the effects of exogenous enzymes on growth performance, digestive function, activity of endogenous digestive enzymes in the pancreas and mRNA expression of pancreatic digestive enzymes. For days 1-42, compared to the control chickens, average daily feed intake (ADFI) and average daily gain (ADG) were significantly enhanced by the addition of NSP enzyme in combination with protease supplementation at 40 or 80 mg/kg (p<0.05). Feed-to-gain ratio (FGR) was significantly improved by supplementation with NSP enzymes or NSP enzyme combined with 40 or 80 mg/kg protease compared to the control diet (p<0.05). Apparent digestibility of crude protein (ADCP) was significantly enhanced by the addition of NSP enzyme or NSP enzyme combined with 40 or 80 mg/kg protease (p<0.05). Cholecystokinin (CCK) level in serum was reduced by 31.39% with NSP enzyme combined with protease supplementation at 160 mg/kg (p<0.05), but the CCK level in serum was increased by 26.51% with NSP enzyme supplementation alone. After 21 days, supplementation with NSP enzyme and NSP enzyme combined with 40 or 80 mg/kg protease increased the activity of pancreatic trypsin by 74.13%, 70.66% and 42.59% (p<0.05), respectively. After 42 days, supplementation with NSP enzyme and NSP enzyme combined with 40 mg/kg protease increased the activity of pancreatic trypsin by 32.45% and 27.41%, respectively (p<0.05). However, supplementation with NSP enzyme and 80 or 160 mg/kg protease decreased the activity of pancreatic trypsin by 10.75% and 25.88%, respectively (p<0.05). The activities of pancreatic lipase and amylase were significantly higher in treated animals than they were in the control group (p<0.05). Supplementation with NSP enzyme, NSP enzyme combined with 40 or 80 mg/kg protease increased

  8. Gene expression analysis and enzyme assay reveal a potential role of the carboxylesterase gene CpCE-1 from Cydia pomonella in detoxification of insecticides.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xue-Qing

    2016-05-01

    Carboxylesterases (CarEs) are responsible for metabolism of xenobiotics including insecticides in insects. Understanding the expression patterns of a such detoxifying gene and effect of insecticides on its enzyme activity are important to clarify the function of this gene relevant to insecticides-detoxifying process, but little information is available in the codling moth Cydia pomonella (L.). In this study, we investigated the expression profiles of CarE gene CpCE-1 at different developmental stages and in different tissues of C. pomonella, as well as the larvae exposed to chlorpyrifos-ethyl and lambda-cyhalothrin by using absolute real-time quantitative PCR (absolute RT-qPCR). Results indicated that CpCE-1 expression was significantly altered during C. pomonella development stages, and this expression differed between sexes, with a higher transcript in females than males. Meanwhile, CpCE-1 is overexpressed in cuticle, midgut and head than silk gland, fat body and Malpighian tubules. Exposure of third instar larvae to a non-lethal dosage of chlorpyrifos-ethyl and lambda-cyhalothrin resulted in induction of CpCE-1 transcript. The total carboxylesterase enzyme activity was inhibited by chlorpyrifos-ethyl in vivo; in contrast, the activity of Escherichia coli produced recombinant CpCE-1 was significantly inhibited by both lambda-cyhalothrin and chlorpyrifos-ethyl in vitro. These results suggested that CpCE-1 in C. pomonella is potentially involved in the development and in detoxification of chlorpyrifos-ethyl and lambda-cyhalothrin.

  9. GENE EXPRESSION PROFILING OF XENOBIOTIC METABOLIZING ENZYMES (XMES) IN THE AGING MALE FISHER RAT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Detoxification and elimination of xenobiotics is a major function of the liver and is important in maintaining the metabolic homeostasis of the organism. The degree to which aging affects hepatic metabolism is not known. The expression of XMEs, in part, determines the fate of the...

  10. [Effects of light intensity on associated enzyme activity and gene expression during callus formation of Vitis vinifera].

    PubMed

    Liu, Rong; Yang, Guowei; Wu, Yueyan; Rao, Huiyun; Li, Xuefu; Li, Meiqin; Qian, Pingxian

    2015-08-01

    We analyzed the best light intensity for callus induction and maintenance in Vitis vinifera and explored the mechanism of grape callus browning. Tender stem segments of grape cultivar "gold finger" were used to study the effects of different light intensities (0, 500, 1 000, 1 500, 2 000, 2 500, 3 000 and 4 000 Lx) on the induction rate, browning rate and associated enzyme activity and gene expression during Vitis vinifera callus formation. The callus induction rate under 0, 500, 1 000 and 1 500 Lx was more than 92%, significantly higher than in other treatments (P < 0.05). A lower browning rate and better callus growth were also observed during subculture under 1 000 and 1 500 Lx treatments. We found that chlorogenic acid, caffeic acid, p-hydroxybenzoic acid and coumaric acid contents were correlated with the browning rate of callus, among which chlorogenic acid content was positively correlated with the browning rate (P < 0.05). Peroxidase (POD) and polyphenol oxidase (PPO) activities were negatively correlated with the browning rate of callus (P < 0.01). The POD, PPO and phenylalanine ammonialyase (PAL) expression levels were positively correlated with the browning rate at P < 0.05 or P < 0.01. An appropriate light intensity for the tissue culture of Vitis vinifera was 1 000-1 500 Lx, higher or lower light intensities significantly impaired normal callus growth.

  11. [Effect of colchicine and Triton X-100 on expression of the enzyme-encoding genes in nongerminating seeds of sugarbeet (Beta vulgaris L.)].

    PubMed

    Kirikovich, S S; Levites, E V

    2011-01-01

    The expression of the enzyme-coding genes, controlling glucose-phosphate isomerase (GPI), malate dehydrogenase (MDH), and alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH), was examined in nongerminating seeds of sugarbeet after Triton X-100 (TX-100) and colchicine treatment. Two types of changes revealed included modification of the enzymatic loci expression (change of the isozyme electrophoretic mobility) and inactivation of standard profiles. In the MDH and GPI systems, these processes were found to be associated. Complete isozyme modification was accompanied with the disappearance of standard profiles. In the ADH system, the treatment with TX-100 and colchicine gave rise to two independent processes, including silencing of the Adh1 locus and the appearance of the ADH isozymes with abnormal electrophoretic mobility, which were probably the products of the Adh2 locus. It was suggested that the effect of TX-100 and colchicine on the expression of the enzyme-encoding genes examined depended on the intracellular localization of the encoded enzymes.

  12. Characterization of the Impact of Life Stage on Xenobiotic Metabolizing Enzyme Expression and Gene -Chemical Interactions in the Liver

    EPA Science Inventory

    Differences in responses to environmental chemicals and drugs between life stages are likely due in part to differences in the expression of xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes and transporters (XMETs). We have carried out a comprehensive analysis of the mRNA expression of XMETs thro...

  13. Remote Ischemic Preconditioning Enhances the Expression of Genes Encoding Antioxidant Enzymes and Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress-Related Proteins in Rat Skeletal Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Park, Ui Jun; Kim, Hyoung Tae; Cho, Won Hyun; Park, Jae Hyoung; Jung, Hye Ra; Kim, Min Young

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Ischemic preconditioning (IPC), including remote IPC (rIPC) and direct IPC (dIPC), is a promising method to decrease ischemia-reperfusion (IR) injury. This study tested the effect of both rIPC and dIPC on the genes for antioxidant enzymes and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-related proteins. Materials and Methods: Twenty rats were randomly divided into the control and study groups. In the control group (n=10), the right hind limb was sham-operated. The left hind limb (IscR) of the control group underwent IR injury without IPC. In the study group (n=10), the right hind limb received IR injury after 3 cycles of rIPC. The IscR received IR injury after 3 cycles of dIPC. Gene expression was analyzed by Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction from the anterior tibialis muscle. Results: The expression of the antioxidant enzyme genes including glutathione peroxidase (GPx), superoxide dismutase (SOD) 1 and catalase (CAT) were significantly reduced in IscR compared with sham treatment. In comparison with IscR, rIPC enhanced the expression of GPx, SOD2, and CAT genes. dIPC enhanced the expression of SOD2 and CAT genes. The expression of SOD2 genes was consistently higher in rIPC than in dIPC, but the difference was only significant for SOD2. The expression of genes for ER stress-related proteins tended to be reduced in IscR in comparison with sham treatment. However, the difference was only significant for C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP). In comparison with IscR, rIPC significantly up-regulated activating transcription factor 4 and CHOP, whereas dIPC up-regulated CHOP. Conclusion: Both rIPC and dIPC enhanced expression of genes for antioxidant enzymes and ER stress-related proteins. PMID:28042553

  14. Expression of the Isoamylase Gene of Flavobacterium odoratum KU in Escherichia coli and Identification of Essential Residues of the Enzyme by Site-Directed Mutagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Abe, Jun-ichi; Ushijima, Chiaki; Hizukuri, Susumu

    1999-01-01

    The isoamylase gene from Flavobacterium odoratum KU was cloned into and expressed in Escherichia coli JM109. The promoter of the gene was successful in E. coli, and the enzyme produced was excreted into the culture medium, depending on the amount of the enzyme expressed. The enzyme found in the culture medium showed almost the same Mr, heat-inactivating constant, and N-terminal sequence as those of the enzyme accumulated in the periplasmic space. This result indicated that the enzyme accumulated in an active form at the periplasm was transported out of the cell. The primary sequence of the enzyme, which was deduced from its nucleotide sequence, showed that the mature enzyme consisted of 741 amino acid residues. By changing five possible residues to Ala independently, it was found that Asp-374, Glu-422, and Asp-497 were essential. The sequences around those residues were highly conserved in isoamylases of different origins and the glycogen operon protein X, GlgX. The comparison of the distance between these essential residues with those of various amylases suggested that the bacterial and plant isoamylase but not GlgX had a longer fourth loop than the other amylases. This longer fourth loop had a possible role in accommodating the long branched chains of native glycogens and starches. PMID:10473430

  15. Dietary açai modulates ROS production by neutrophils and gene expression of liver antioxidant enzymes in rats

    PubMed Central

    Guerra, Joyce Ferreira da Costa; Magalhães, Cíntia Lopes de Brito; Costa, Daniela Caldeira; Silva, Marcelo Eustáquio; Pedrosa, Maria Lúcia

    2011-01-01

    Açai (Euterpe oleracea Mart.) has recently emerged as a promising source of natural antioxidants. Because increased oxidative stress and impaired antioxidant defense mechanisms are important factors in the development of diabetic complications and many health claims have been reported for açai, the present study was undertaken to evaluate the possible protective effects of açai on the production of reactive oxygen species by neutrophils and on the liver antioxidant defense system in control and streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. Diet supplementation with 2% açai was found to increase mRNA levels for gamma-glutamylcysteine synthetase and glutathione peroxidase in liver tissue and to decrease reactive oxygen species production by neutrophils. Compared to control animals, diabetic rats exhibited lower levels of mRNA coding for Zn-superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase and gamma-glutamylcysteine synthetase and higher levels of reactive oxygen species production by neutrophils, thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances and carbonyl proteins in hepatic tissues. Although açai supplementation was not effective in restore gene expression of antioxidant enzymes in diabetic rats, it showed a protective effect, decreasing thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances levels and increasing reduced glutathione content in the liver. These findings suggest that açai can modulate reactive oxygen species production by neutrophils and that it has a significant favorable effect on the liver antioxidant defense system under fisiological conditions of oxidative stress and partially revert deleterious effects of diabetes in the liver. PMID:22128218

  16. Amelioration of cholesterol induced atherosclerosis by normalizing gene expression, cholesterol profile and antioxidant enzymes by Vigna unguiculata.

    PubMed

    Janeesh, P A; Abraham, Annie

    2013-06-01

    Cardiovascular diseases, especially atherosclerosis, have found to be the dreadful diseases worldwide and therapeutic interventions using plant sources have wide therapeutic value. Vigna unguiculata (VU) leaves have been used as food and therapeutics. Hence, our study was designed to evaluate the hypolipidemic as well as anti-atherogenic potential of VU leaves in normalizing atherogenic gene expression, cholesterol profile, generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and antioxidant enzyme system on cholesterol fed rabbit model. For the study New Zealand white rabbits were randomly divided into four groups of six animals each and experimental period was three months; group -i - ND [normal diet (40 g feed)], group-ii- ND (normal diet) +EAVU [ethyl acetate fraction of Vigna unguiculata (150 mg/kg body weight)], group -iii- ND [normal diet ]+ CFD [cholesterol fed diet (cholesterol 1 % of 40 g feed and cholic acid 0.5 % of 40 g feed)] and group-iv - ND [normal diet] +CFD [cholesterol fed diet ]+EAVU [ethyl acetate fraction of Vigna unguiculata (150 mg/kg body weight)]. Atherosclerosis was induced by feeding the rabbit with cholesterol (1 % of 40 g feed) and cholic acid (0.5 % of 40 g feed). Supplementation of EAVU normalized cholesterol profile, generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), lipid peroxidation products like thiobarbituric acid reactive substance (TBARS), antioxidant system and important genes of cardiovascular diseases like interleukin-10 (IL 10), paraoxanase-1 (PON I), interleukin-6 (IL 6), and cyclooxygenase-2 (Cox 2) to near normal level as compared with normal diet. The result obtained showed the antioxidant as well as anti-atherogenic potential of Vigna unguiculata leaves in ameliorating cholesterol induced atherosclerosis, and thus it is good task to include VU leaves in daily diet for the prevention of cardiovascular diseases especially atherosclerosis.

  17. Inhibition of HIV-1 gene expression by novel macrophage-tropic DNA enzymes targeted to cleave HIV-1 TAT/Rev RNA.

    PubMed Central

    Unwalla, H; Banerjea, A C

    2001-01-01

    Many regions of the HIV-1 genome have been targeted in earlier studies by RNA-cleaving DNA enzymes possessing the 10-23 catalytic motif, and efficient inhibition of HIV-1 gene expression was reported. All these studies employed charged synthetic lipids to introduce the catalytic DNA into the mammalian cells, which severely limits its practical application and usefulness in vivo. Taking advantage of the ability of G residues to interact directly with the scavenger receptors on the macrophages, we synthesized a DNA enzyme 5970 that contained 10 G residues at the 3' end. With the aim of improving the intracellular stability of the DNA enzyme 5970, we added two short stretches of stem-loop structures that were 12 bases long on either side of the DNA enzyme 5970. DNA enzyme 5970 without the poly-G tracts cleaved the synthetic RNA of HIV-1 TAT/Rev, two important regulatory proteins of HIV, very efficiently in a sequence-specific manner. Addition of 10 G residues at the 3' end of the DNA enzyme affected the cleavage efficiency only marginally whereas the same DNA enzyme with stem-loop structures on either end was significantly less efficient. The DNA enzyme with the poly-G tract at its 3' end was taken up specifically by a human macrophage-specific cell line directly in the absence of Lipofectin and was also able to inhibit HIV-1 gene expression in a transient-expression system as well as when challenged with the virus. The potential applications of these novel macrophage-tropic DNA enzymes are discussed. PMID:11415445

  18. Cloning heterologous genes into E. Coli for enzyme production and crystal growth: Problems of expression and microheterogeneity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carter, Charles W.

    1988-07-01

    Protein crystal growth is heavily dependant on provision of large amounts of very pure protein. For this reason, molecular cloning will be used increasingly to permit the study of proteins which cannot otherwise be prepared in sufficient amounts, or purity, or both. We have obtained a stable clone of the tryptophanyl-tRNA synthetase from Bacillus stearothermophilus that is active in enzyme production. This result entailed two unusual aspects of interest to those using molecular cloning for enzyme production and crystal growth: (1) The cloning steps required stringent selection procedures that may have selected an unspecified mutational event 5' to the structural gene, because an as yet unknown flanking element of the B. stearothermophilus DNA produces a marked instability in plasmids containing the native DNA. (2) The homologous Escherichia coli trpS enzyme apparently interferes with crystallization of B. stearothermophilus tryptophanyl-tRNA synthetase purified from an E. coli strain. We have therefore deleted the E. coli chromosomal trpS gene by site-specific recombination of a recombinant lambda phage containing a marked deletion of the E. coli trpS gene. Enzyme prepared from this deletion strain crystallizes in a normal fashion, suitable for high-resolution X-ray crystallography studies. Crystallographic data sets from isomorphous crystals grown with native and cloned protein are identical to 3Åresolution to within normal scaling statistics.

  19. Genetic ontogeny of pancreatic enzymes in Labrus bergylta larvae and the effect of feed type on enzyme activities and gene expression.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Truls Wergeland; Folkvord, Arild; Grøtan, Espen; Sæle, Øystein

    2013-03-01

    A newly cultivated wrasse species, Labrus bergylta, have shown great potential for use in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) farms in the battle against sea lice (Lepeoptheirus salmonis) infections. Hatchery reared L. bergylta were studied from 2 to 55 DPH to examine the molecular basis of digestive ontogeny related to the pancreas. An isolated feeding trial was performed on 27-34 DPH larvae to compare the effect of diet on enzyme activity and the possible exogenous contribution by live feed. The following genes coding for key pancreatic enzymes were analyzed by qPCR: trypsin, Cyp7 A1, BAL, sPLA(2) 1B, amylase and pancreatic chitinase. Enzyme activity was measured on trypsin, neutral lipase, sPLA(2), amylase and chitinase in fed and unfed larvae. We did not observe any effects of the formulated diet v.s. rotifers on enzyme activities of neutral lipase, chitinase and sPLA(2). However, a probable feed-dependency was observed at a transcriptional level, where rotifers seem to stimulate upregulation. The regulation of BAL was the only exception, where an upregulation was observed after weaning both in the ontogeny series and the experimental part. Our data on pancreatic chitinase and amylase mRNA levels suggest the importance of carbohydrates in the diet of early larval and juvenile L. bergylta.

  20. Biosynthesis of D-alanyl-lipoteichoic acid: cloning, nucleotide sequence, and expression of the Lactobacillus casei gene for the D-alanine-activating enzyme.

    PubMed Central

    Heaton, M P; Neuhaus, F C

    1992-01-01

    The D-alanine-activating enzyme (Dae; EC 6.3.2.4) encoded by the dae gene from Lactobacillus casei ATCC 7469 is a cytosolic protein essential for the formation of the D-alanyl esters of membrane-bound lipoteichoic acid. The gene has been cloned, sequenced, and expressed in Escherichia coli, an organism which does not possess Dae activity. The open reading frame is 1,518 nucleotides and codes for a protein of 55.867 kDa, a value in agreement with the 56 kDa obtained by electrophoresis. A putative promoter and ribosome-binding site immediately precede the dae gene. A second open reading frame contiguous with the dae gene has also been partially sequenced. The organization of these genetic elements suggests that more than one enzyme necessary for the biosynthesis of D-alanyl-lipoteichoic acid may be present in this operon. Analysis of the amino acid sequence deduced from the dae gene identified three regions with significant homology to proteins in the following groups of ATP-utilizing enzymes: (i) the acid-thiol ligases, (ii) the activating enzymes for the biosynthesis of enterobactin, and (iii) the synthetases for tyrocidine, gramicidin S, and penicillin. From these comparisons, a common motif (GXXGXPK) has been identified that is conserved in the 19 protein domains analyzed. This motif may represent the phosphate-binding loop of an ATP-binding site for this class of enzymes. A DNA fragment (1,568 nucleotides) containing the dae gene and its putative ribosome-binding site has been subcloned and expressed in E. coli. Approximately 0.5% of the total cell protein is active Dae, whereas 21% is in the form of inclusion bodies. The isolation of this minimal fragment without a native promoter sequence provides the basis for designing a genetic system for modulating the D-alanine ester content of lipoteichoic acid. PMID:1385594

  1. Cloning and expression of zebrafish genes encoding the heme synthesis enzymes uroporphyrinogen III synthase (UROS) and protoporphyrinogen oxidase (PPO).

    PubMed

    Hanaoka, Ryuki; Dawid, Igor B; Kawahara, Atsuo

    2007-02-01

    Heme is synthesized from glycine and succinyl CoA by eight heme synthesis enzymes. Although genetic defects in any of these enzymes are known to cause severe human blood diseases, their developmental expression in mammals is unknown. In this paper, we report two zebrafish heme synthesis enzymes, uroporphyrinogen III synthase (UROS) and protoporphyrinogen oxidase (PPO) that are well conserved in comparison to their human counterparts. Both UROS and PPO formed pairs of bilateral stripes in the lateral plate mesoderm at the 15-somite stage. At 24 h post-fertilization (hpf), UROS and PPO were predominantly expressed in the intermediate cell mass (ICM) that is the major site of primitive hematopoiesis. The expression of UROS and PPO was drastically suppressed in the bloodless mutants cloche and vlad tepes/gata 1 from 15-somite to 24hpf stages, indicating that both cloche and vlad tepes/gata 1 are required for the induction and maintenance of UROS and PPO expression in the ICM.

  2. RNA-Seq Analysis of the Expression of Genes Encoding Cell Wall Degrading Enzymes during Infection of Lupin (Lupinus angustifolius) by Phytophthora parasitica

    PubMed Central

    Blackman, Leila M.; Cullerne, Darren P.; Torreña, Pernelyn; Taylor, Jen; Hardham, Adrienne R.

    2015-01-01

    RNA-Seq analysis has shown that over 60% (12,962) of the predicted transcripts in the Phytophthora parasitica genome are expressed during the first 60 h of lupin root infection. The infection transcriptomes included 278 of the 431 genes encoding P. parasitica cell wall degrading enzymes. The transcriptome data provide strong evidence of global transcriptional cascades of genes whose encoded proteins target the main categories of plant cell wall components. A major cohort of pectinases is predominantly expressed early but as infection progresses, the transcriptome becomes increasingly dominated by transcripts encoding cellulases, hemicellulases, β-1,3-glucanases and glycoproteins. The most highly expressed P. parasitica carbohydrate active enzyme gene contains two CBM1 cellulose binding modules and no catalytic domains. The top 200 differentially expressed genes include β-1,4-glucosidases, β-1,4-glucanases, β-1,4-galactanases, a β-1,3-glucanase, an α-1,4-polygalacturonase, a pectin deacetylase and a pectin methylesterase. Detailed analysis of gene expression profiles provides clues as to the order in which linkages within the complex carbohydrates may come under attack. The gene expression profiles suggest that (i) demethylation of pectic homogalacturonan occurs before its deacetylation; (ii) cleavage of the backbone of pectic rhamnogalacturonan I precedes digestion of its side chains; (iii) early attack on cellulose microfibrils by non-catalytic cellulose-binding proteins and enzymes with auxiliary activities may facilitate subsequent attack by glycosyl hydrolases and enzymes containing CBM1 cellulose-binding modules; (iv) terminal hemicellulose backbone residues are targeted after extensive internal backbone cleavage has occurred; and (v) the carbohydrate chains on glycoproteins are degraded late in infection. A notable feature of the P. parasitica infection transcriptome is the high level of transcription of genes encoding enzymes that degrade β-1

  3. The accumulation of endogenous proline induces changes in gene expression of several antioxidant enzymes in leaves of transgenic Swingle citrumelo.

    PubMed

    de Carvalho, Kenia; de Campos, Marília Kaphan Freitas; Domingues, Douglas Silva; Pereira, Luiz Filipe Protasio; Vieira, Luiz Gonzaga Esteves

    2013-04-01

    Plant exposure to abiotic stresses leads to an accumulation of reactive oxygen species with the concomitant increase in antioxidant defense mechanisms. Previous studies showed that exogenous application of proline mitigate the deleterious effects caused by oxidative stress due to its ability to increase the activity of antioxidant enzymes. However, there are no reports of the effects of high endogenous accumulation of proline in the transcriptional pattern of antioxidant enzymes genes under normal conditions of water supply or in response to water deficit. Here, we show that isoforms of four antioxidant enzymes genes (Ascorbate peroxidase-APX, Catalase-CAT, Superoxide dismutase-SOD and Glutathione reductase-GR) were differentially regulated in leaves of Swingle citrumelo transgenic plants with high endogenous proline accumulation submitted to water deficits and also under normal water supply condition. Proline per se caused a two-fold change in the transcription activity of APX1, APXcl, CAT2 and Cu/ZnSOD2, while during water deficit proline influenced mRNAs levels in APXs and Cu/ZnSODs isoforms, MnSODmit and GRcl. This study adds new information on the role of proline during drought conditions and, more important, without the potential confounding effects imposed by water deficiency. We showed that, in addition to its known effects on diverse plant physiological and biochemical processes, high endogenous proline can also acts as a regulatory/signalling molecule capable of altering the transcript levels of stress-related genes.

  4. Analysis of gene expression changes of drug metabolizing enzymes in the livers of F344 rats following oral treatment with kava extract.

    PubMed

    Guo, Lei; Li, Quanzhen; Xia, Qingsu; Dial, Stacey; Chan, Po-Chuen; Fu, Peter

    2009-02-01

    The association of kava product use with liver-related risks has prompted regulatory action in many countries. We studied the changes in gene expression of drug metabolizing enzymes in the livers of Fischer 344 male rats administered kava extract by gavage for 14 weeks. Analysis of 22,226 genes revealed that there were 14, 41, 110, 386, and 916 genes significantly changed in the 0.125, 0.25, 0.5, 1.0, and 2.0 g/kg treatment groups, respectively. There were 16 drug metabolizing genes altered in all three high-dose treatment groups, among which seven genes belong to cytochrome P450 isozymes. While gene expression of Cyp1a1, 1a2, 2c6, 3a1, and 3a3 increased; Cyp 2c23 and 2c40 decreased, all in a dose-dependent manner. Real-time PCR analyses of several genes verified these results. Our results indicate that kava extract can significantly modulate drug metabolizing enzymes, particularly the CYP isozymes, which could cause herb-drug interactions and may potentially lead to hepatotoxicity.

  5. Cadmium-Induced Disruption in 24-h Expression of Clock and Redox Enzyme Genes in Rat Medial Basal Hypothalamus: Prevention by Melatonin

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez-Ortega, Vanesa; Cano-Barquilla, Pilar; Scacchi, Pablo A.; Cardinali, Daniel P.; Esquifino, Ana I.

    2011-01-01

    In a previous study we reported that a low daily p.o. dose of cadmium (Cd) disrupted the circadian expression of clock and redox enzyme genes in rat medial basal hypothalamus (MBH). To assess whether melatonin could counteract Cd activity, male Wistar rats (45 days of age) received CdCl2 (5 ppm) and melatonin (3 μg/mL) or vehicle (0.015% ethanol) in drinking water. Groups of animals receiving melatonin or vehicle alone were also included. After 1 month, MBH mRNA levels were measured by real-time PCR analysis at six time intervals in a 24-h cycle. In control MBH Bmal1 expression peaked at early scotophase, Per1 expression at late afternoon, and Per2 and Cry2 expression at mid-scotophase, whereas neither Clock nor Cry1 expression showed significant 24-h variations. This pattern was significantly disrupted (Clock, Bmal1) or changed in phase (Per1, Per2, Cry2) by CdCl2 while melatonin counteracted the changes brought about by Cd on Per1 expression only. In animals receiving melatonin alone the 24-h pattern of MBH Per2 and Cry2 expression was disrupted. CdCl2 disrupted the 24-h rhythmicity of Cu/Zn- and Mn-superoxide dismutase (SOD), nitric oxide synthase (NOS)-1, NOS-2, heme oxygenase (HO)-1, and HO-2 gene expression, most of the effects being counteracted by melatonin. In particular, the co-administration of melatonin and CdCl2 increased Cu/Zn-SOD gene expression and decreased that of glutathione peroxidase (GPx), glutathione reductase (GSR), and HO-2. In animals receiving melatonin alone, significant increases in mean Cu/Zn and Mn-SOD gene expression, and decreases in that of GPx, GSR, NOS-1, NOS-2, HO-1, and HO-2, were found. The results indicate that the interfering effect of melatonin on the activity of a low dose of CdCl2 on MBH clock and redox enzyme genes is mainly exerted at the level of redox enzyme gene expression. PMID:21442002

  6. Responses of Aspergillus flavus to Oxidative Stress Are Related to Fungal Development Regulator, Antioxidant Enzyme, and Secondary Metabolite Biosynthetic Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Fountain, Jake C.; Bajaj, Prasad; Nayak, Spurthi N.; Yang, Liming; Pandey, Manish K.; Kumar, Vinay; Jayale, Ashwin S.; Chitikineni, Anu; Lee, Robert D.; Kemerait, Robert C.; Varshney, Rajeev K.; Guo, Baozhu

    2016-01-01

    The infection of maize and peanut with Aspergillus flavus and subsequent contamination with aflatoxin pose a threat to global food safety and human health, and is exacerbated by drought stress. Drought stress-responding compounds such as reactive oxygen species (ROS) are associated with fungal stress responsive signaling and secondary metabolite production, and can stimulate the production of aflatoxin by A. flavus in vitro. These secondary metabolites have been shown to possess diverse functions in soil-borne fungi including antibiosis, competitive inhibition of other microbes, and abiotic stress alleviation. Previously, we observed that isolates of A. flavus showed differences in oxidative stress tolerance which correlated with their aflatoxin production capabilities. In order to better understand these isolate-specific oxidative stress responses, we examined the transcriptional responses of field isolates of A. flavus with varying levels of aflatoxin production (NRRL3357, AF13, and Tox4) to H2O2-induced oxidative stress using an RNA sequencing approach. These isolates were cultured in an aflatoxin-production conducive medium amended with various levels of H2O2. Whole transcriptomes were sequenced using an Illumina HiSeq platform with an average of 40.43 million filtered paired-end reads generated for each sample. The obtained transcriptomes were then used for differential expression, gene ontology, pathway, and co-expression analyses. Isolates which produced higher levels of aflatoxin tended to exhibit fewer differentially expressed genes than isolates with lower levels of production. Genes found to be differentially expressed in response to increasing oxidative stress included antioxidant enzymes, primary metabolism components, antibiosis-related genes, and secondary metabolite biosynthetic components specifically for aflatoxin, aflatrem, and kojic acid. The expression of fungal development-related genes including aminobenzoate degradation genes and conidiation

  7. Ectopic expression of ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme gene from wild rice, OgUBC1, confers resistance against UV-B radiation and Botrytis infection in Arabidopsis thaliana

    SciTech Connect

    Jeon, En Hee; Pak, Jung Hun; Kim, Mi Jin; Kim, Hye Jeong; Shin, Sang Hyun; Lee, Jai Heon; Kim, Doh Hoon; Oh, Ju Sung; Oh, Boung-Jun; Jung, Ho Won; Chung, Young Soo

    2012-10-19

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We isolated a novel E2 ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme from leaves of wild rice plants. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The OgUBC1 was highly expressed in leaves treated with SA and UV-B radiation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The recombinant OgUBC1 has an enzymatic activity of E2 in vitro. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The OgUBC1 could protect disruption of plant cells by UV-B radiation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer OgUBC1 confers disease resistance and UV-B tolerance in transgenic Arabidopsis plants. -- Abstract: A previously unidentified gene encoding ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme was isolated from leaves of wild rice plant treated with wounding and microbe-associated molecular patterns. The OgUBC1 gene was composed of 148 amino acids and contained a typical active site and 21 ubiquitin thioester intermediate interaction residues and 4 E3 interaction residues. Both exogenous application of salicylic acid and UV-B irradiation triggered expression of OgUBC1 in leaves of wild rice. Recombinant OgUBC1 proteins bound to ubiquitins in vitro, proposing that the protein might act as E2 enzyme in planta. Heterologous expression of the OgUBC1 in Arabidopsis thaliana protected plants from cellular damage caused by an excess of UV-B radiation. A stable expression of chalcone synthase gene was detected in leaves of OgUBC1-expressing Arabidopsis, resulting in producing higher amounts of anthocyanin than those in wild-type Col-0 plants. Additionally, both pathogenesis-related gene1 and 5 were transcribed in the transgenic Arabidopsis in the absence of pathogen infection. The OgUBC1-expressing plants were resistant to the infection of Botrytis cinerea. Taken together, we suggested that the OgUBC1 is involved in ubiquitination process important for cellular response against biotic and abiotic stresses in plants.

  8. Germacrene A synthase in yarrow (Achillea millefolium) is an enzyme with mixed substrate specificity: gene cloning, functional characterization and expression analysis

    PubMed Central

    Pazouki, Leila; Memari, Hamid R.; Kännaste, Astrid; Bichele, Rudolf; Niinemets, Ülo

    2015-01-01

    Terpenoid synthases constitute a highly diverse gene family producing a wide range of cyclic and acyclic molecules consisting of isoprene (C5) residues. Often a single terpene synthase produces a spectrum of molecules of given chain length, but some terpene synthases can use multiple substrates, producing products of different chain length. Only a few such enzymes has been characterized, but the capacity for multiple-substrate use can be more widespread than previously thought. Here we focused on germacrene A synthase (GAS) that is a key cytosolic enzyme in the sesquiterpene lactone biosynthesis pathway in the important medicinal plant Achillea millefolium (AmGAS). The full length encoding gene was heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3), functionally characterized, and its in vivo expression was analyzed. The recombinant protein catalyzed formation of germacrene A with the C15 substrate farnesyl diphosphate (FDP), while acyclic monoterpenes were formed with the C10 substrate geranyl diphosphate (GDP) and cyclic monoterpenes with the C10 substrate neryl diphosphate (NDP). Although monoterpene synthesis has been assumed to be confined exclusively to plastids, AmGAS can potentially synthesize monoterpenes in cytosol when GDP or NDP become available. AmGAS enzyme had high homology with GAS sequences from other Asteraceae species, suggesting that multi-substrate use can be more widespread among germacrene A synthases than previously thought. Expression studies indicated that AmGAS was expressed in both autotrophic and heterotrophic plant compartments with the highest expression levels in leaves and flowers. To our knowledge, this is the first report on the cloning and characterization of germacrene A synthase coding gene in A. millefolium, and multi-substrate use of GAS enzymes. PMID:25784918

  9. Germacrene A synthase in yarrow (Achillea millefolium) is an enzyme with mixed substrate specificity: gene cloning, functional characterization and expression analysis.

    PubMed

    Pazouki, Leila; Memari, Hamid R; Kännaste, Astrid; Bichele, Rudolf; Niinemets, Ülo

    2015-01-01

    Terpenoid synthases constitute a highly diverse gene family producing a wide range of cyclic and acyclic molecules consisting of isoprene (C5) residues. Often a single terpene synthase produces a spectrum of molecules of given chain length, but some terpene synthases can use multiple substrates, producing products of different chain length. Only a few such enzymes has been characterized, but the capacity for multiple-substrate use can be more widespread than previously thought. Here we focused on germacrene A synthase (GAS) that is a key cytosolic enzyme in the sesquiterpene lactone biosynthesis pathway in the important medicinal plant Achillea millefolium (AmGAS). The full length encoding gene was heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3), functionally characterized, and its in vivo expression was analyzed. The recombinant protein catalyzed formation of germacrene A with the C15 substrate farnesyl diphosphate (FDP), while acyclic monoterpenes were formed with the C10 substrate geranyl diphosphate (GDP) and cyclic monoterpenes with the C10 substrate neryl diphosphate (NDP). Although monoterpene synthesis has been assumed to be confined exclusively to plastids, AmGAS can potentially synthesize monoterpenes in cytosol when GDP or NDP become available. AmGAS enzyme had high homology with GAS sequences from other Asteraceae species, suggesting that multi-substrate use can be more widespread among germacrene A synthases than previously thought. Expression studies indicated that AmGAS was expressed in both autotrophic and heterotrophic plant compartments with the highest expression levels in leaves and flowers. To our knowledge, this is the first report on the cloning and characterization of germacrene A synthase coding gene in A. millefolium, and multi-substrate use of GAS enzymes.

  10. Cloning and expression of lipoxygenase genes and enzyme activity in ripening persimmon fruit in response to GA and ABA treatment

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two genes of the lipoxygenase (LOX) family, DkLox1 and DkLox3 (GenBank accession No. JF436951 and JF436950), were cloned from persimmon fruit (Diospyros kaki L. ‘Fuping Jianshi’). Sequence analysis indicated that they belong to the 9-LOX sub-group. Heterologous expression of DkLox1 in E. coli produc...

  11. Phloem-Specific Expression of Yang Cycle Genes and Identification of Novel Yang Cycle Enzymes in Plantago and Arabidopsis[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Pommerrenig, Benjamin; Feussner, Kirstin; Zierer, Wolfgang; Rabinovych, Valentyna; Klebl, Franz; Feussner, Ivo; Sauer, Norbert

    2011-01-01

    The 5-methylthioadenosine (MTA) or Yang cycle is a set of reactions that recycle MTA to Met. In plants, MTA is a byproduct of polyamine, ethylene, and nicotianamine biosynthesis. Vascular transcriptome analyses revealed phloem-specific expression of the Yang cycle gene 5-METHYLTHIORIBOSE KINASE1 (MTK1) in Plantago major and Arabidopsis thaliana. As Arabidopsis has only a single MTK gene, we hypothesized that the expression of other Yang cycle genes might also be vascular specific. Reporter gene studies and quantitative analyses of mRNA levels for all Yang cycle genes confirmed this hypothesis for Arabidopsis and Plantago. This includes the Yang cycle genes 5-METHYLTHIORIBOSE-1-PHOSPHATE ISOMERASE1 and DEHYDRATASE-ENOLASE-PHOSPHATASE-COMPLEX1. We show that these two enzymes are sufficient for the conversion of methylthioribose-1-phosphate to 1,2-dihydroxy-3-keto-5-methylthiopentene. In bacteria, fungi, and animals, the same conversion is catalyzed in three to four separate enzymatic steps. Furthermore, comparative analyses of vascular and nonvascular metabolites identified Met, S-adenosyl Met, and MTA preferentially or almost exclusively in the vascular tissue. Our data represent a comprehensive characterization of the Yang cycle in higher plants and demonstrate that the Yang cycle works primarily in the vasculature. Finally, expression analyses of polyamine biosynthetic genes suggest that the Yang cycle in leaves recycles MTA derived primarily from polyamine biosynthesis. PMID:21540433

  12. D-ribulose-5-phosphate 3-epimerase: Cloning and heterologous expression of the spinach gene, and purification and characterization of the recombinant enzyme

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Y.R.; Hartman, F.C.; Lu, T.Y.S.; Larimer, F.W.

    1998-09-01

    The authors have achieved, to their knowledge, the first high-level heterologous expression of the gene encoding D-ribulose-5-phosphate 3-epimerase from any source, thereby permitting isolation and characterization of the epimerase as found in photosynthetic organisms. The extremely labile recombinant spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.) enzyme was stabilized by DL-{alpha}-glycerophosphate or ethanol and destabilized by D-ribulose-5-phosphate or 2-mercaptoethanol. Despite this lability, the unprecedentedly high specific activity of the purified material indicates that the structural integrity of the enzyme is maintained throughout isolation. Ethylenediaminetetraacetate and divalent metal cations did not affect epimerase activity, thereby excluding a requirement for the latter in catalysis. As deduced from the sequence of the cloned spinach gene and the electrophoretic mobility under denaturing conditions of the purified recombinant enzyme, its 25-kD subunit size was about the same as that of the corresponding epimerases of yeast and mammals. However, in contrast to these other species, the recombinant spinach enzyme was octameric rather than dimeric, as assessed by gel filtration and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis under nondenaturing conditions. Western-blot analyses with antibodies to the purified recombinant enzyme confirmed that the epimerase extracted from spinach leaves is also octameric.

  13. Identification of genes for melatonin synthetic enzymes in 'Red Fuji' apple (Malus domestica Borkh.cv.Red) and their expression and melatonin production during fruit development.

    PubMed

    Lei, Qiong; Wang, Lin; Tan, Dun-Xian; Zhao, Yu; Zheng, Xiao-Dong; Chen, Hao; Li, Qing-Tian; Zuo, Bi-Xiao; Kong, Jin

    2013-11-01

    Melatonin is present in many edible fruits; however, the presence of melatonin in apple has not previously been reported. In this study, the genes for melatonin synthetic enzymes including tryptophan decarboxylase, tryptamine 5-hydroxylase (T5H), arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase, and N-acetylserotonin methyltransferase were identified in 'Red Fuji' apple. Each gene has several homologous genes. Sequence analysis shows that these genes have little homology with those of animals and they only have limited homology with known genes of rice melatonin synthetic enzymes. Multiple origins of melatonin synthetic genes during the evolution are expected. The expression of these genes is fully coordinated with melatonin production in apple development. Melatonin levels in apple exhibit an inverse relationship with the content of malondialdehyde, a product of lipid peroxidation. Two major melatonin synthetic peaks appeared on July 17 and on October 8 in both unbagged and bagged apple samples. At the periods mentioned above, apples experienced rapid expansion and increased respiration. These episodes significantly elevate reactive oxygen species production in the apple. Current data further confirmed that melatonin produced in apple was used to neutralize the toxic oxidants and protect the developing apple against oxidative stress.

  14. Role of constitutive androstane receptor in Toll-like receptor-mediated regulation of gene expression of hepatic drug-metabolizing enzymes and transporters.

    PubMed

    Shah, Pranav; Guo, Tao; Moore, David D; Ghose, Romi

    2014-01-01

    Impairment of drug disposition in the liver during inflammation has been attributed to downregulation of gene expression of drug-metabolizing enzymes (DMEs) and drug transporters. Inflammatory responses in the liver are primarily mediated by Toll-like receptors (TLRs). We have recently shown that activation of TLR2 or TLR4 by lipoteichoic acid (LTA) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS), respectively, leads to the downregulation of gene expression of DMEs/transporters. However, the molecular mechanism underlying this downregulation is not fully understood. The xenobiotic nuclear receptors, pregnane X receptor (PXR) and constitutive androstane receptor (CAR), regulate the expression of DMEs/transporter genes. Downregulation of DMEs/transporters by LTA or LPS was associated with reduced expression of PXR and CAR genes. To determine the role of CAR, we injected CAR(+/+) and CAR(-/-) mice with LTA or LPS, which significantly downregulated (~40%-60%) RNA levels of the DMEs, cytochrome P450 (Cyp)3a11, Cyp2a4, Cyp2b10, uridine diphosphate glucuronosyltransferase 1a1, amine N-sulfotransferase, and the transporter, multidrug resistance-associated protein 2, in CAR(+/+) mice. Suppression of most of these genes was attenuated in LTA-treated CAR(-/-) mice. In contrast, LPS-mediated downregulation of these genes was not attenuated in CAR(-/-) mice. Induction of these genes by mouse CAR activator 1,4-bis-[2-(3,5-dichloropyridyloxy)]benzene was sustained in LTA- but not in LPS-treated mice. Similar observations were obtained in humanized CAR mice. We have replicated these results in primary hepatocytes as well. Thus, LPS can downregulate DME/transporter genes in the absence of CAR, whereas the effect of LTA on these genes is attenuated in the absence of CAR, indicating the potential involvement of CAR in LTA-mediated downregulation of DME/transporter genes.

  15. Molecular expression of l-asparaginase gene from Nocardiopsis alba NIOT-VKMA08 in Escherichia coli: A prospective recombinant enzyme for leukaemia chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Meena, Balakrishnan; Anburajan, Lawrance; Vinithkumar, Nambali Valsalan; Shridhar, Divya; Raghavan, Rangamaran Vijaya; Dharani, Gopal; Kirubagaran, Ramalingam

    2016-09-30

    l-Asparaginase is an antineoplastic agent that selectively reduces the level of l-asparagine in blood and diminishes the proliferation of cancerous cells. Studies were carried out on the cloning and heterologous expression of l-asparaginase biosynthesis gene (ansA) from Nocardiopsis alba NIOT-VKMA08 to achieve the stable inducible system that overproduces the glutaminase-free recombinant l-asparaginase. Overexpression of recombinant l-asparaginase was achieved with an optimized final concentration of 1.5mM of isopropyl-β-d-thiogalactoside (IPTG) and the enzyme was expressed as a soluble protein. The recombinant enzyme was purified using nickel-nitrilotriacetic acid (Ni-NTA) chromatography and the purified enzyme disclosed an elevated level of asparaginase activity (158.1IU/mL). Optimum pH and temperature of the purified l-asparaginase for the hydrolysis of l-asparagine were 8.0 and 37°C and it was very specific for its natural substrate, l-asparagine. Detailed studies were carried out on the kinetics of enzyme reaction, catalytic activity, temperature and ionic strength and the thermostability of the l-asparaginase enzyme. The functional characterisation of the recombinant l-asparaginase was studied through Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), in silico sequence analysis and protein structural modelling. Glutaminase activity was not detected in the recombinant l-asparaginase, which could reduce the probable side effects during leukaemia therapy.

  16. Ontogeny changes and weaning effects in gene expression patterns of digestive enzymes and regulatory digestive factors in spotted rose snapper (Lutjanus guttatus) larvae.

    PubMed

    Moguel-Hernández, I; Peña, R; Andree, K B; Tovar-Ramirez, D; Bonacic, K; Dumas, S; Gisbert, E

    2016-10-01

    The study of digestive physiology is an important issue in species that have been introduced in aquaculture like the spotted rose snapper (Lutjanus guttatus). The aims of this study were to describe the expression of digestive enzymes (trypsinogen, chymotrypsinogen, α-amylase, lipoprotein lipase, phospholipase A and pepsinogen) and their relation with orexigenic (neuropeptide Y, NPY) and anorexigenic (cholecystokinin, CCK) factors during the larval development and to evaluate the effect of weaning in their expression. The results showed that the transcripts of all the assayed digestive enzymes, with the exception of pepsinogen, and NPY and CCK were already present in L. guttatus from the hatching stage. The expression of all the enzymes was low during the yolk-sac stage (0-2 days after hatching, DAH), whereas after the onset of exogenous feeding at 2 DAH, their expression increased and fluctuated throughout larval development, which followed a similar pattern as in other marine fish species and reflected changes in different types of food items and the progressive maturation of the digestive system. On the other hand, weaning of L. guttatus larvae from live prey onto a microdiet between 25 and 35 DAH significantly affected the relative expression of most pancreatic digestive enzymes during the first weaning days, whereas chymotrypsinogen 2 and lipoprotein lipase remained stable during this period. At the end of co-feeding, larvae showed similar levels of gene expression regardless of the diet (live prey vs. microdiet), which indicated that larvae of L. guttatus were able to adapt their digestive capacities to the microdiet. In contrast, feeding L. guttatus larvae with live feed or microdiet did not affect the expression of CCK and NPY. The relevance of these findings with regard to current larval rearing procedures of L. guttatus is discussed.

  17. Wounding induces changes in tuber polyamine content, polyamine metabolic gene expression, and enzyme activity during closing layer formation and initiation of wound periderm formation.

    PubMed

    Lulai, Edward C; Neubauer, Jonathan D; Olson, Linda L; Suttle, Jeffrey C

    2015-03-15

    Tuber wound-healing processes are complex, and the associated regulation and modulation of these processes are poorly understood. Polyamines (PA) are involved in modulating a variety of responses to biotic and abiotic plant stresses and have been suggested to be involved in tuber wound responses. However, the time course of wound-induced changes in tuber PA content, activity of key biosynthetic enzymes and associated gene expression has not been determined and coordinated with major wound-healing processes. The objective of this study was to determine these wound-induced changes and their coordination with wound-healing processes. Wounding induced increases in putrescine (Put) and spermidine (Spd), but had only minor effects on spermine (Spm) content during the 168 h time course which encompassed the initiation and completion of the closing layer formation, and the initiation of cell division and wound periderm formation. As determinants of the first committed step in PA biosynthesis, arginine and ornithine decarboxylase (ADC and ODC, respectively) activities were below levels of detectability in resting tubers and expression of genes encoding these two enzymes was low. Within 6h of wounding, increases in the in vitro activities of ADC and ODC and expression of their cognate genes were observed. Expression of a gene encoding S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase, required for Spd and Spm biosynthesis, was also increased 6h after wounding and remained elevated throughout the time course. Expression of a polyamine catabolic gene, encoding polyamine oxidase, was down-regulated after wounding. Results indicated a rapid wound-induced increase in PA biosynthesis during closing layer formation and the time of nuclei entry and exit from S-phase. PA content remained elevated as wound-induced cells became meristematic and initiated formation of the wound periderm suggesting sustained involvement in wound-healing.

  18. Cloning and Expression of Phytase appA Gene from Shigella sp. CD2 in Pichia pastoris and Comparison of Properties with Recombinant Enzyme Expressed in E. coli.

    PubMed

    Pal Roy, Moushree; Mazumdar, Deepika; Dutta, Subhabrata; Saha, Shyama Prasad; Ghosh, Shilpi

    2016-01-01

    The phytase gene appAS was isolated from Shigella sp. CD2 genomic library. The 3.8 kb DNA fragment contained 1299 bp open reading frame encoding 432 amino acid protein (AppAS) with 22 amino acid signal peptide at N-terminal and three sites of N-glycosylation. AppAS contained the active site RHGXRXP and HDTN sequence motifs, which are conserved among histidine acid phosphatases. It showed maximum identity with phytase AppA of Escherichia coli and Citrobacter braakii. The appAS was expressed in Pichia pastoris and E. coli to produce recombinant phytase rAppAP and rAppAE, respectively. Purified glycosylated rAppAP and nonglycosylated rAppAE had specific activity of 967 and 2982 U mg(-1), respectively. Both had pH optima of 5.5 and temperature optima of 60°C. Compared with rAppAE, rAppAP was 13 and 17% less active at pH 3.5 and 7.5 and 11 and 18% less active at temperature 37 and 50°C, respectively; however, it was more active at higher incubation temperatures. Thermotolerance of rAppAP was 33% greater at 60°C and 24% greater at 70°C, when compared with rAppAE. Both the recombinant enzymes showed high specificity to phytate and resistance to trypsin. To our knowledge, this is the first report on cloning and expression of phytase from Shigella sp.

  19. Cloning and Expression of Phytase appA Gene from Shigella sp. CD2 in Pichia pastoris and Comparison of Properties with Recombinant Enzyme Expressed in E. coli

    PubMed Central

    Pal Roy, Moushree; Mazumdar, Deepika; Dutta, Subhabrata; Saha, Shyama Prasad; Ghosh, Shilpi

    2016-01-01

    The phytase gene appAS was isolated from Shigella sp. CD2 genomic library. The 3.8 kb DNA fragment contained 1299 bp open reading frame encoding 432 amino acid protein (AppAS) with 22 amino acid signal peptide at N-terminal and three sites of N-glycosylation. AppAS contained the active site RHGXRXP and HDTN sequence motifs, which are conserved among histidine acid phosphatases. It showed maximum identity with phytase AppA of Escherichia coli and Citrobacter braakii. The appAS was expressed in Pichia pastoris and E. coli to produce recombinant phytase rAppAP and rAppAE, respectively. Purified glycosylated rAppAP and nonglycosylated rAppAE had specific activity of 967 and 2982 U mg-1, respectively. Both had pH optima of 5.5 and temperature optima of 60°C. Compared with rAppAE, rAppAP was 13 and 17% less active at pH 3.5 and 7.5 and 11 and 18% less active at temperature 37 and 50°C, respectively; however, it was more active at higher incubation temperatures. Thermotolerance of rAppAP was 33% greater at 60°C and 24% greater at 70°C, when compared with rAppAE. Both the recombinant enzymes showed high specificity to phytate and resistance to trypsin. To our knowledge, this is the first report on cloning and expression of phytase from Shigella sp. PMID:26808559

  20. Activity and gene expression profile of certain antioxidant enzymes in different organs of rats after subacute cyanide exposure: effect of alpha-ketoglutarate.

    PubMed

    Hariharakrishnan, Janardhanan; Anand, Tamatam; Satpute, Ravindra M; Jayaraj, Ravindran; Prasad, G B K S; Bhattacharya, Rahul

    2009-01-01

    Oxidative stress plays a crucial role in mediating cyanide toxicity. The present study addresses the effect of cyanide on activity and gene-expression profile of certain antioxidant enzymes and the expression of heat shock protein (HSP-70) in different organs of rats. Rats were treated with 0.50 LD(50) (7.0 mg/kg) of potassium cyanide (KCN; oral) and/or alpha-ketoglutarate (A-KG; 1.0 g/kg; oral) daily for 14 days, and various biochemical variables were measured in brain, liver, and kidney after 7 and 14 days of treatments and a 7-day recovery period. Cyanide significantly reduced the activity of glutathione peroxidase (GPx), glutathione reductase (GR), superoxide dismutase (SOD), and catalase (CA) in all the organs after 7 days, while the activity of GPx in brain, liver, and kidney, GR in liver, and CA in brain remained diminished up to 14 days. The gene-expression profile of corresponding enzymes did not show any difference between the control and treatment groups. Elevated levels of malondialdehyde were observed in brain and kidney 7 and 14 days after cyanide. Cyanide also increased the expression of HSP-70 activity in brain after 7 days alone. Regression of toxicity was observed after the withdrawal of KCN. Treatment of A-KG was found to prevent all the biochemical alterations caused by cyanide. This study reveals that oxidative stress caused by cyanide was independent of the expression of antioxidant enzyme activity at the gene level, and all changes responded favorably to A-KG, indicating its therapeutic potential.

  1. Analysis of expressed sequence tags and identification of genes encoding cell-wall-degrading enzymes from the fungivorous nematode Aphelenchus avenae

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background The fungivorus nematode, Aphelenchus avenae is widespread in soil and is found in association with decaying plant material. This nematode is also found in association with plants but its ability to cause plant disease remains largely undetermined. The taxonomic position and intermediate lifestyle of A. avenae make it an important model for studying the evolution of plant parasitism within the Nematoda. In addition, the exceptional capacity of this nematode to survive desiccation makes it an important system for study of anhydrobiosis. Expressed sequence tag (EST) analysis may therefore be useful in providing an initial insight into the poorly understood genetic background of A. avenae. Results We present the generation, analysis and annotation of over 5,000 ESTs from a mixed-stage A. avenae cDNA library. Clustering of 5,076 high-quality ESTs resulted in a set of 2,700 non-redundant sequences comprising 695 contigs and 2,005 singletons. Comparative analyses indicated that 1,567 (58.0%) of the cluster sequences had homologues in Caenorhabditis elegans, 1,750 (64.8%) in other nematodes, 1,321(48.9%) in organisms other than nematodes, and 862 (31.9%) had no significant match to any sequence in current protein or nucleotide databases. In addition, 1,100 (40.7%) of the sequences were functionally classified using Gene Ontology (GO) hierarchy. Similarity searches of the cluster sequences identified a set of genes with significant homology to genes encoding enzymes that degrade plant or fungal cell walls. The full length sequences of two genes encoding glycosyl hydrolase family 5 (GHF5) cellulases and two pectate lyase genes encoding polysaccharide lyase family 3 (PL3) proteins were identified and characterized. Conclusion We have described at least 2,214 putative genes from A. avenae and identified a set of genes encoding a range of cell-wall-degrading enzymes. This EST dataset represents a starting point for studies in a number of different fundamental and

  2. Colored light-quality selective plastic films affect anthocyanin content, enzyme activities, and the expression of flavonoid genes in strawberry (Fragaria × ananassa) fruit.

    PubMed

    Miao, Lixiang; Zhang, Yuchao; Yang, Xiaofang; Xiao, Jinping; Zhang, Huiqin; Zhang, Zuofa; Wang, Yuezhi; Jiang, Guihua

    2016-09-15

    The influence of colored light-quality selective plastic films (red, yellow, green, blue, and white) on the content of anthocyanin, the activities of the related enzymes and the transcripts of the flavonoid gene was studied in developing strawberry fruit. The results indicated that colored films had highly significant effects on the total anthocyanin content (TAC) and proportions of individual anthocyanins. Compared with the white control film, the red and yellow films led to the significant increase of TAC, while the green and blue films caused a decrease of TAC. Colored film treatments also significantly affected the related enzyme activity and the expression of structural genes and transcription factor genes, which suggested that the enhancement of TAC by the red and yellow films might have resulted from the activation of related enzymes and transcription factor genes in the flavonoid pathway. Treatment with red and yellow light-quality selective plastic films might be useful as a supplemental cultivation practice for enhancing the anthocyanin content in developing strawberry fruit.

  3. A modest glucokinase overexpression in the liver promotes fed expression levels of glycolytic and lipogenic enzyme genes in the fasted state without altering SREBP-1c expression.

    PubMed

    Scott, D K; Collier, J J; Doan, T T T; Bunnell, A S; Daniels, M C; Eckert, D T; O'Doherty, R M

    2003-12-01

    Hepatic genes crucial for carbohydrate and lipid homeostasis are regulated by insulin and glucose metabolism. However, the relative contributions of insulin and glucose to the regulation of metabolic gene expression are poorly defined in vivo. To address this issue, adenovirus-mediated hepatic overexpression of glucokinase was used to determine the effects of increased hepatic glucose metabolism on gene expression in fasted or ad libitum fed rats. In the fasted state, a 3 fold glucokinase overexpression was sufficient to mimic feeding-induced increases in pyruvate kinase and acetyl CoA carboxylase mRNA levels, demonstrating a primary role for glucose metabolism in the regulation of these genes in vivo. Conversely, glucokinase overexpression was unable to mimic feeding-induced alterations of fatty acid synthase, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, carnitine palmitoyl transferase I or PEPCK mRNAs, indicating insulin as the primary regulator of these genes. Interestingly, glucose-6-phosphatase mRNA was increased by glucokinase overexpression in both the fasted and fed states, providing evidence, under these conditions, for the dominance of glucose over insulin signaling for this gene in vivo. Importantly, glucokinase overexpression did not alter sterol regulatory element binding protein 1-c mRNA levels in vivo and glucose signaling did not alter the expression of this gene in primary hepatocytes. We conclude that a modest hepatic overexpression of glucokinase is sufficient to alter expression of metabolic genes without changing the expression of SREBP-1c.

  4. The synthetic gestagen Levonorgestrel disrupts sexual development in Xenopus laevis by affecting gene expression of pituitary gonadotropins and gonadal steroidogenic enzymes.

    PubMed

    Lorenz, Claudia; Contardo-Jara, Valeska; Trubiroha, Achim; Krüger, Angela; Viehmann, Viola; Wiegand, Claudia; Pflugmacher, Stephan; Nützmann, Gunnar; Lutz, Ilka; Kloas, Werner

    2011-12-01

    In the present study, Xenopus laevis tadpoles were chronically exposed to four concentrations of the synthetic gestagen Levonorgestrel (LNG; 10(-11), 10(-10), 10(-9), and 10(-8)M) starting at Nieuwkoop and Faber (NF) stage 48 until completion of metamorphosis. At NF 58 and 66, brain-pituitary and gonad samples were taken for gene expression analyses of gonadotropins and gonadal steroidogenic enzymes. Exposure to 10(-9) and 10(-8)M LNG until NF 58 repressed messenger RNA (mRNA) expression of luteinizing hormone (LH) β in both genders. This decrease was persistent after further treatment until NF 66 in the 10(-8)M LNG treatment. Expression of follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) β was affected sex-specifically. No effect was present in NF 58 females, whereas LNG at 10(-9) and 10(-8)M significantly increased FSHβ mRNA levels in males. In NF 66 females, 10(-9)M LNG treatment increased FSHβ gene expression, whereas a decrease was observed in NF 66 males exposed to 10(-8)M LNG. In gonads, expression of steroid-5-alpha-reductase was affected sex-specifically with increased mRNA levels in females but repressed levels in males. Gene expression of further gonadal steroidogenic factors was decreased by 10(-8)M LNG in both genders at NF 66. Assessment of gonad gross morphology and histology revealed poorly developed testes in the 10(-8)M LNG treatment. Our results reveal considerable effects of chronic LNG exposure on sexual development of amphibians. The persistent inhibition of LHβ expression concomitant with decreased mRNA levels of gonadal steroidogenic enzymes is suggested to result in the disruption of reproduction in adult amphibians.

  5. Lupinus albus Conglutin Gamma Modifies the Gene Expressions of Enzymes Involved in Glucose Hepatic Production In Vivo.

    PubMed

    González-Santiago, Ana E; Vargas-Guerrero, Belinda; García-López, Pedro M; Martínez-Ayala, Alma L; Domínguez-Rosales, José A; Gurrola-Díaz, Carmen M

    2017-01-18

    Lupinus albus seeds contain conglutin gamma (Cγ) protein, which exerts a hypoglycemic effect and positively modifies proteins involved in glucose homeostasis. Cγ could potentially be used to manage patients with impaired glucose metabolism, but there remains a need to evaluate its effects on hepatic glucose production. The present study aimed to analyze G6pc, Fbp1, and Pck1 gene expressions in two experimental animal models of impaired glucose metabolism. We also evaluated hepatic and renal tissue integrity following Cγ treatment. To generate an insulin resistance model, male Wistar rats were provided 30% sucrose solution ad libitum for 20 weeks. To generate a type 2 diabetes model (STZ), five-day-old rats were intraperitoneally injected with streptozotocin (150 mg/kg). Each animal model was randomized into three subgroups that received the following oral treatments daily for one week: 0.9% w/v NaCl (vehicle; IR-Ctrl and STZ-Ctrl); metformin 300 mg/kg (IR-Met and STZ-Met); and Cγ 150 mg/kg (IR-Cγ and STZ-Cγ). Biochemical parameters were assessed pre- and post-treatment using colorimetric or enzymatic methods. We also performed histological analysis of hepatic and renal tissue. G6pc, Fbp1, and Pck1 gene expressions were quantified using real-time PCR. No histological changes were observed in any group. Post-treatment G6pc gene expression was decreased in the IR-Cγ and STZ-Cγ groups. Post-treatment Fbp1 and Pck1 gene expressions were reduced in the IR-Cγ group but increased in STZ-Cγ animals. Overall, these findings suggest that Cγ is involved in reducing hepatic glucose production, mainly through G6pc inhibition in impaired glucose metabolism disorders.

  6. CO2-responsive expression and gene organization of three ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase enzymes and carboxysomes in Hydrogenovibrio marinus strain MH-110.

    PubMed

    Yoshizawa, Yoichi; Toyoda, Koichi; Arai, Hiroyuki; Ishii, Masaharu; Igarashi, Yasuo

    2004-09-01

    Hydrogenovibrio marinus strain MH-110, an obligately lithoautotrophic hydrogen-oxidizing bacterium, fixes CO2 by the Calvin-Benson-Bassham cycle. Strain MH-110 possesses three different sets of genes for ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RubisCO): CbbLS-1 and CbbLS-2, which belong to form I (L8S8), and CbbM, which belongs to form II (Lx). In this paper, we report that the genes for CbbLS-1 (cbbLS-1) and CbbM (cbbM) are both followed by the cbbQO genes and preceded by the cbbR genes encoding LysR-type regulators. In contrast, the gene for CbbLS-2 (cbbLS-2) is followed by genes encoding carboxysome shell peptides. We also characterized the three RubisCOs in vivo by examining their expression profiles in environments with different CO2 availabilities. Immunoblot analyses revealed that when strain MH-110 was cultivated in 15% CO2, only the form II RubisCO, CbbM, was expressed. When strain MH-110 was cultivated in 2% CO2, CbbLS-1 was expressed in addition to CbbM. In the 0.15% CO2 culture, the expression of CbbM decreased and that of CbbLS-1 disappeared, and CbbLS-2 was expressed. In the atmospheric CO2 concentration of approximately 0.03%, all three RubisCOs were expressed. Transcriptional analyses of mRNA by reverse transcription-PCR showed that the regulation was at the transcriptional level. Electron microscopic observation of MH-110 cells revealed the formation of carboxysomes in the 0.15% CO2 concentration. The results obtained here indicate that strain MH-110 adapts well to various CO2 concentrations by using different types of RubisCO enzymes.

  7. Genomic organisation of the mouse gene encoding endothelin-converting enzyme-1 (ECE-1) and mRNA expression of ECE-1 isoforms in murine tissues.

    PubMed

    Lindenau, Steffi; von Langsdorff, Christian; Saxena, Amit; Paul, Martin; Orzechowski, Hans-Dieter

    2006-05-24

    Mouse knockout-models have previously revealed important biological functions of endothelin-converting enzyme-1 (ECE-1) in normal cardiac and craniofacial development. Since human ECE-1 is expressed in various isoforms, termed a, b, c, and d, expression of which is controlled by alternative promoters, we postulated that corresponding isoforms may also be transcribed from the murine Ece1 gene. By comparative sequence analysis using exon-specific sequences of human and rat ECE-1 we have resolved the complete exon-intron structure of the murine Ece1 locus on chromosome 4. The murine Ece1 gene comprises 23 exons distributed over 100 kb of genomic DNA and was found to be structurally highly conserved when compared to the human ECE1 gene. As with the human gene, the exons containing isoform-specific sequences were localised in the 5' terminal region of the murine Ece1 gene. Using specific sense primers, isoform-specific expression of murine ECE-1 mRNA in various mouse tissues was confirmed by RT-PCR. Using real-time PCR we demonstrated that ECE-1c was the most abundantly expressed isoform in most tissues, except for heart and aorta displaying a more even isoform distribution. We detected an additional isoform-specific exon, designated c2, which was apparently constitutively spliced and expressed only as minor fraction of ECE-1c transcripts. Our results provide evidence of structural conservation of mammalian genes encoding ECE-1 and will facilitate a more refined analysis of ECE-1 mRNA expression in the mouse model organism.

  8. Global Gene Expression Profiling of Endothelium Exposed to Heme Reveals an Organ-Specific Induction of Cytoprotective Enzymes in Sickle Cell Disease

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Tianwei; Li, Yuhua; Adisa, Olufolake; Mosunjac, Mario; Ofori-Acquah, Solomon F.

    2011-01-01

    Background Sickle cell disease (SCD) is characterized by hemolysis, vaso-occlusion and ischemia reperfusion injury. These events cause endothelial dysfunction and vasculopathies in multiple systems. However, the lack of atherosclerotic lesions has led to the idea that there are adaptive mechanisms that protect the endothelium from major vascular insults in SCD patients. The molecular bases for this phenomenon are poorly defined. This study was designed to identify the global profile of genes induced by heme in the endothelium, and assess expression of the heme-inducible cytoprotective enzymes in major organs impacted by SCD. Methods and Findings Total RNA isolated from heme-treated endothelial monolayers was screened with the Affymetrix U133 Plus 2.0 chip, and the microarray data analyzed using multiple bioinformatics software. Hierarchical cluster analysis of significantly differentially expressed genes successfully segregated heme and vehicle-treated endothelium. Validation studies showed that the induction of cytoprotective enzymes by heme was influenced by the origin of endothelial cells, the duration of treatment, as well as the magnitude of induction of individual enzymes. In agreement with these heterogeneities, we found that induction of two major Nrf2-regulated cytoprotective enzymes, heme oxygenase-1 and NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase-1 is organ-specific in two transgenic mouse models of SCD. This data was confirmed in the endothelium of post-mortem lung tissues of SCD patients. Conclusions Individual organ systems induce unique profiles of cytoprotective enzymes to neutralize heme in SCD. Understanding this heterogeneity may help to develop effective therapies to manage vasculopathies of individual systems. PMID:21483798

  9. Molecular cloning, heterologous expression, and primary structure of the structural gene for the copper enzyme nitrous oxide reductase from denitrifying Pseudomonas stutzeri.

    PubMed Central

    Viebrock, A; Zumft, W G

    1988-01-01

    The nos genes of Pseudomonas stutzeri are required for the anaerobic respiration of nitrous oxide, which is part of the overall denitrification process. A nos-coding region of ca. 8 kilobases was cloned by plasmid integration and excision. It comprised nosZ, the structural gene for the copper-containing enzyme nitrous oxide reductase, genes for copper chromophore biosynthesis, and a supposed regulatory region. The location of the nosZ gene and its transcriptional direction were identified by using a series of constructs to transform Escherichia coli and express nitrous oxide reductase in the heterologous background. Plasmid pAV5021 led to a nearly 12-fold overexpression of the NosZ protein compared with that in the P. stutzeri wild type. The complete sequence of the nosZ gene, comprising 1,914 nucleotides, together with 282 nucleotides of 5'-flanking sequences and 238 nucleotides of 3'-flanking sequences was determined. An open reading frame coded for a protein of 638 residues (Mr, 70,822) including a presumed signal sequence of 35 residues for protein export. The presequence is in conformity with the periplasmic location of the enzyme. Another open reading frame of 2,097 nucleotides, in the opposite transcriptional direction to that of nosZ, was excluded by several criteria from representing the coding region for nitrous oxide reductase. Codon usage for nosZ of P. stutzeri showed a high G + C content in the degenerate codon position (83.9% versus an average of 60.2%) and relaxed codon usage for the Glu codon, characteristic features of Pseudomonas genes from other species. E. coli nitrous oxide reductase was purified to homogeneity. It had the Mr of the P. stutzeri enzyme but lacked the copper chromophore. Images PMID:3049543

  10. The Streptomyces venezuelae pikAV gene contains a transcription unit essential for expression of enzymes involved in glycosylation of narbonolide and 10-deoxymethynolide.

    PubMed

    Chen, S; Roberts, J B; Xue, Y; Sherman, D H; Reynolds, K A

    2001-01-24

    In Streptomyces venezuelae, four polyketide synthase (PKS) polypeptides encoded by pikAI-pikAIV are used to generate 10 and 12-membered macrocyclic structures, narbonolide and 10-deoxymethynolide. Sequence analysis suggests these genes are translationally coupled with downstream genes, pikAV (encoding a type II thioesterase), desVIII-desVI (encoding enzymes responsible for production of the final glycosylated products pikromycin, narbomycin, methymycin and neomethymycin) and desR (a resistance gene). Type II thioesterases have been suggested to have an editing function in polyketide biosynthesis and deletion of the corresponding genes often leads to decreased levels of polyketide production. Surprisingly an in-frame deletion of 687 bp of the 843 bp pikAV ORF led to a strain SC1022 that produced normal yields of polyketide products, but only in the aglycone form. Plasmid-based expression of the desVIII-VI and desR in the SC1022 strain completely restored production of glycosylated products, despite the absence of a functional pikAV gene product. Under these conditions the PikAV TEII therefore does not play an important role in polyketide biosynthesis, and its function remains an enigma. These observations also demonstrate that the region of pikAV DNA deleted in strain SC1022 contains a transcription unit essential for expression of the des genes. A sequence alignment of PikAV with members of the highly conserved type II thioesterases revealed a short divergent region at the carboxy terminus, suggesting a region of pikAV that might contain such a transcription unit. DNA containing this region of pikAV was shown to be able to increase plasmid-based expression of both crotonyl CoA reductase gene (ccr) and the erythromycin resistance gene (ermE) in S. venezuelae.

  11. Effects of different dwarfing interstocks on key enzyme activities and the expression of genes related to malic acid metabolism in Red Fuji apples.

    PubMed

    Shi, J; Li, F F; Ma, H; Li, Z Y; Xu, J Z

    2015-12-22

    In this experiment, the test materials were 'Red Fuji' apple trees grafted onto three interstocks (No. 53, No. 111, and No. 236), which were chosen from SH40 seeding interstocks. The content of malic acid, the enzyme activities, and the expression of genes related to malic acid metabolism were determined during fruit development.The results showed that malic acid content in the ripe fruit on interstock No. 53 was higher than that in the interstock No. 111 fruit. The malate dehydrogenase (NAD-MDH) activity in apples on interstock No. 53 was highest on Day 30, Day 100, and Day 160 after bloom, and the malic enzyme (NADP-ME) activity in apples on interstock No. 111 was higher than in the interstock No. 53 fruit from Day 70 to Day 100 after bloom. The relative expression of NAD-MDH genes in interstock No. 53 fruit was higher than in No. 236 fruit on Day 100 after bloom, but the relative expression of NADP-ME in No. 236 interstock fruit was lower than in No. 53 fruit. The relative expression of NAD-MDH genes in No. 53 interstock fruit was highest on Day 160 after bloom. This might have been the main reason for the difference in the accumulation of malic acid in the ripe apples.There was a positive correlation between the relative expression of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) and the malic acid content of the fruit, and the content of malic acid in the apples was affected by the PEPC activity during the early developmental stage.

  12. Identification of cellular genes induced in human cells after activation of the OAS/RNaseL pathway by vaccinia virus recombinants expressing these antiviral enzymes.

    PubMed

    Domingo-Gil, Elena; González, José Manuel; Esteban, Mariano

    2010-03-01

    Interferon (IFN) type I induces the expression of antiviral proteins such as 2',5'-oligoadenylate synthetases (OAS). The enzyme OAS is activated by dsRNA to produce 5'-phosphorylated, 2-5-linked oligoadenylates (2-5A) that activate RNaseL which, in turn, triggers RNA breakdown, leading to multiple biological functions. Although RNaseL is required for IFN antiviral function, there are many aspects of the molecular mechanisms that remain obscure. Here, we have used microarray analyses from human HeLa cells infected with vaccinia virus (VACV) recombinants expressing OAS-RNaseL enzymes (referred as 2-5A system) with the aim to identify host genes that are up- or down-regulated in the course of infection by the activation of this antiviral pathway. We found that activation of the 2-5A system from VACV recombinants produces a remarkable stimulation of transcription for genes that regulate many cellular processes, like those that promote cell growth arrest, GADD45B and KCTD11, apoptosis as CUL2, PDCD6, and TNFAIP8L2, IFN-stimulated genes as IFI6, and related to tumor suppression as PLA2G2A. The 2-5A system activation produces down-regulation of transcription of some genes that promote cell growth as RUNX2 and ESR2 and of genes in charge to maintain mitochondria homeostasis as MIPEP and COX5A. These results reveal new genes induced in response to the activation of the 2-5A system with roles in apoptosis, translational control, cell growth arrest, and tumor suppression.

  13. Impact of the Interaction between 3′-UTR SNPs and microRNA on the Expression of Human Xenobiotic Metabolism Enzyme and Transporter Genes

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Rongrong; Yang, Fan; Urban, Thomas J.; Li, Lang; Chalasani, Naga; Flockhart, David A.; Liu, Wanqing

    2012-01-01

    Genetic variation in the expression of human xenobiotic metabolism enzymes and transporters (XMETs) leads to inter-individual variability in metabolism of therapeutic agents as well as differed susceptibility to various diseases. Recent expression quantitative traits loci (eQTL) mapping in a few human cells/tissues have identified a number of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) significantly associated with mRNA expression of many XMET genes. These eQTLs are therefore important candidate markers for pharmacogenetic studies. However, questions remain about whether these SNPs are causative and in what mechanism these SNPs may function. Given the important role of microRNAs (miRs) in gene transcription regulation, we hypothesize that those eQTLs or their proxies in strong linkage disequilibrium (LD) altering miR targeting are likely causative SNPs affecting gene expression. The aim of this study is to identify eQTLs potentially regulating major XMETs via interference with miR targeting. To this end, we performed a genome-wide screening for eQTLs for 409 genes encoding major drug metabolism enzymes, transporters and transcription factors, in publically available eQTL datasets generated from the HapMap lymphoblastoid cell lines and human liver and brain tissue. As a result, 308 eQTLs significantly (p < 10−5) associated with mRNA expression of 101 genes were identified. We further identified 7,869 SNPs in strong LD (r2 ≥ 0.8) with these eQTLs using the 1,000 Genome SNP data. Among these 8,177 SNPs, 27 are located in the 3′-UTR of 14 genes. Using two algorithms predicting miR-SNP interaction, we found that almost all these SNPs (26 out of 27) were predicted to create, abolish, or change the target site for miRs in both algorithms. Many of these miRs were also expressed in the same tissue that the eQTL were identified. Our study provides a strong rationale for continued investigation for the functions of these eQTLs in pharmacogenetic settings. PMID

  14. Effects of dietary zinc on gene expression of antioxidant enzymes and heat shock proteins in hepatopancreas of abalone Haliotis discus hannai.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chenglong; Zhang, Wenbing; Mai, Kangsen; Xu, Wei; Zhong, Xiaoli

    2011-06-01

    The expression patterns of different genes encoding antioxidant enzymes and heat shock proteins were investigated, in present study, by real-time quantitative PCR in the hepatopancreas of abalone Haliotis discus hannai fed with different levels of dietary zinc (6.69, 33.8, 710.6 and 3462.5 mg/kg) for 20 weeks. The antioxidant enzymes include Cu/Zn-superoxide dismutase (Cu/Zn-SOD), Mn-superoxide dismutase (Mn-SOD), catalase (CAT), mu-glutathione-s-transferase (mu-GST) and thioredoxin peroxidase (TPx). The results showed that the mRNA expression of these antioxidant enzymes increased and reached the maximum at the dietary zinc level of 33.8 mg/kg, and then dropped progressively. Expression levels of the heat shock proteins (HSP26, HSP70 and HSP90) firstly increased at 33.8 mg/kg dietary Zn level, and reached to the maximum at 710.6 mg/kg, then dropped at 3462.5 mg/kg (p<0.05). Excessive dietary Zn (710.6 and 3462.5 mg/kg) significantly increases the Zn content and significantly decreases the total antioxidant capacity (T-AOC) in hepatopancreas (p<0.05). These findings showed that dietary Zn (33.8 mg/kg) could highly trigger the expression levels of antioxidant enzymes and heat shock proteins, but excessive dietary Zn (710.6 and 3462.5 mg/kg) induces a high oxidative stress in abalone.

  15. Citrate Accumulation-Related Gene Expression and/or Enzyme Activity Analysis Combined With Metabolomics Provide a Novel Insight for an Orange Mutant

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Ling-Xia; Shi, Cai-Yun; Liu, Xiao; Ning, Dong-Yuan; Jing, Long-Fei; Yang, Huan; Liu, Yong-Zhong

    2016-01-01

    ‘Hong Anliu’ (HAL, Citrus sinensis cv. Hong Anliu) is a bud mutant of ‘Anliu’ (AL), characterized by a comprehensive metabolite alteration, such as lower accumulation of citrate, high accumulation of lycopene and soluble sugars in fruit juice sacs. Due to carboxylic acid metabolism connects other metabolite biosynthesis and/or catabolism networks, we therefore focused analyzing citrate accumulation-related gene expression profiles and/or enzyme activities, along with metabolic fingerprinting between ‘HAL’ and ‘AL’. Compared with ‘AL’, the transcript levels of citrate biosynthesis- and utilization-related genes and/or the activities of their respective enzymes such as citrate synthase, cytosol aconitase and ATP-citrate lyase were significantly higher in ‘HAL’. Nevertheless, the mitochondrial aconitase activity, the gene transcript levels of proton pumps, including vacuolar H+-ATPase, vacuolar H+-PPase, and the juice sac-predominant p-type proton pump gene (CsPH8) were significantly lower in ‘HAL’. These results implied that ‘HAL’ has higher abilities for citrate biosynthesis and utilization, but lower ability for the citrate uptake into vacuole compared with ‘AL’. Combined with the metabolites-analyzing results, a model was then established and suggested that the reduction in proton pump activity is the key factor for the low citrate accumulation and the comprehensive metabolite alterations as well in ‘HAL’. PMID:27385485

  16. Effects of oolong tea on gene expression of gluconeogenic enzymes in the mouse liver and in rat hepatoma H4IIE cells.

    PubMed

    Yasui, Kensuke; Miyoshi, Noriyuki; Tababe, Hiroki; Ishigami, Yoko; Fukutomi, Ryuuta; Imai, Shinjiro; Isemura, Mamoru

    2011-09-01

    Tea has many beneficial effects. We have previously reported that green tea and a catechin-rich green tea beverage modulated the gene expression of the gluconeogenic enzymes glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase) and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) in the normal murine liver. In the present study, we examined the effects of oral administration of oolong tea on the hepatic expression of gluconeogenesis-related genes in the mouse. The intake of oolong tea for 4 weeks reduced the hepatic expression of G6Pase and PEPCK together with that of the transcription factor hepatocyte nuclear factor (HNF) 4α. When rat hepatoma H4IIE cells were incubated in the presence of oolong tea, the expression of these genes was repressed in accordance with the findings in vivo. The reduced protein expression of PEPCK and HNF4α was also demonstrated. We then fractionated oolong tea by sequential extraction with three organic solvents to give three fractions and the residual fraction (Fraction IV). In addition to organic fractions, Fraction IV, which was devoid of low-molecular-weight catechins such as (-)-epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), had effects similar to those of oolong tea on H4IIE cells. Fraction IV repressed the gene expression of insulin-like growth factor binding protein 1, as insulin did. This activity was different from that of EGCG. The present findings suggest that drinking oolong tea may help to prevent diabetes and that oolong tea contains a component or components with insulin-like activity distinguishable from EGCG. Identification of such component(s) may open the way to developing a new drug for diabetes.

  17. Effects of soybean meal on digestive enzymes activity, expression of inflammation-related genes, and chromatin modifications in marine fish (Sparus aurata L.) larvae.

    PubMed

    Perera, Erick; Yúfera, Manuel

    2016-11-02

    The effects of soybean meal (SBM) in early diet of Sparus aurata larvae at two developmental windows were assessed. Prolonged (beyond 14 days post-hatch, dph) feeding with SBM decreased the activity of pancreatic enzymes of larvae. In the absence of SBM these larvae later resumed enzyme activities, but exhibited a significant delay in development. Larvae response to SBM involved up-regulation of extracellular matrix remodeling enzymes and pro-inflammatory cytokines, coupled with a drop in putative intestinal enzymes. Larvae receiving SBM at first feeding appear later to have lower expression of inflammation-related genes, especially those fed SBM until 14 dph. Multivariate analysis confirmed that the duration of the SBM early feeding period drives the physiology of larvae in different directions. Feeding larvae with SBM increased global histone H3 acetylation, whereas upon removal of SBM the process was reverted. A more in deep analysis revealed a dynamic interplay among several reversible histone modifications such as H3K14ac and H3K27m3. Finally, we showed that SBM feeding of larvae results in global hypomethylation that persist after SBM removal. This study is the first demonstrating an effect of diet on marine fish epigenetics. It is concluded that there are limitations for extending SBM feeding of S. aurata larvae beyond 14 dph even under co-feeding with live feed, affecting key physiological processes and normal growth. However, up to 14 dph, SBM does not affect normal development, and produces apparently lasting effects on some key enzymes, genes, and chromatin modifications.

  18. Increased gene expression of catecholamine-synthesizing enzymes in adrenal glands contributes to high circulating catecholamines in pigs with tachycardia-induced cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Tomaszek, A; Kiczak, L; Bania, J; Paslawska, U; Zacharski, M; Janiszewski, A; Noszczyk-Nowak, A; Dziegiel, P; Kuropka, P; Ponikowski, P; Jankowska, E A

    2015-04-01

    High levels of circulating catecholamines have been established as fundamental pathophysiological elements of heart failure (HF). However, it is unclear whether the increased gene expression of catecholamine-synthesis enzymes in the adrenal glands contributes to these hormone abnormalities in large animal HF models. We analyzed the mRNA levels of catecholamine-synthesizing enzymes: tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), aromatic L-amino acid decarboxylase (AAAD), dopamine-β-hydroxylase (DBH) and phenylethanolamine N-methyltransferase (PNMT) in adrenal glands of 18 pigs with chronic systolic non-ischaemic HF (tachycardia-induced cardiomyopathy due to right ventricle pacing) and 6 sham-operated controls. Pigs with severe HF demonstrated an increased expression of TH and DBH (but neither AAAD nor PNMT) as compared to animals with milder HF and controls (P<0.05 in all cases). The increased adrenal mRNA expression of TH and DBH was accompanied by a reduced left ventricle ejection fraction (LVEF) (P<0.001) and an elevated plasma B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) (P<0.01), the other indices reflecting HF severity. There was a positive relationship between the increased adrenal mRNA expression of TH and DBH, and the high levels of circulating adrenaline and noradrenaline (all P<0.05). The association with noradrenaline remained significant also when adjusted for LVEF and plasma BNP, suggesting a significant contribution of adrenals to the circulating pool of catecholamines in subjects with systolic HF.

  19. Wakame and Nori in restructured meats included in cholesterol-enriched diets affect the antioxidant enzyme gene expressions and activities in Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Moreira, Adriana Schultz; González-Torres, Laura; Olivero-David, Raul; Bastida, Sara; Benedi, Juana; Sánchez-Muniz, Francisco J

    2010-09-01

    The effects of diets including restructured meats (RM) containing Wakame or Nori on total liver glutathione status, and several antioxidant enzyme gene expressions and activities were tested. Six groups of ten male growing Wistar rats each were fed a mix of 85% AIN-93 M diet and 15% freeze-dried RM for 35 days. The control group (C) consumed control RM, the Wakame (W) and the Nori (N) groups, RM with 5% Wakame and 5% Nori, respectively. Animals on added cholesterol diets (CC, CW, and CN) consumed their corresponding basal diets added with cholesterol (2%) and cholic acid (0.4%). Alga and dietary cholesterol significantly interact (P < 0.002) influencing all enzyme expressions but not activities. The cholesterol supplement decreased most enzyme expression and activity. W-RM vs. C-RM increased (P < 0.05) expression of GPx, GR, Mn-SOD, and Cu,Zn-SOD and decreased that of catalase. N-RM vs. C-RM increased (P < 0.05) expression of catalase and Mn-SOD. GR activity increased in W-RM rats while SOD activity increased, but that of Se-GPx decreased in N animals. W-RM increased total and reduced glutathione and decreased the redox index. CN diet induced significantly lower plasma cholesterol levels (P < 0.001) than the CW diet. In conclusion, Nori-RM is a hypocholesterolemic food while Wakame-RM is an antioxidant food. This should be taken into account when including this kind of RM as potential functional foods in human.

  20. Identification of the gene for β-fructofuranosidase from Ceratocystis moniliformis CMW 10134 and characterization of the enzyme expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background β-Fructofuranosidases (or invertases) catalyse the commercially-important biotransformation of sucrose into short-chain fructooligosaccharides with wide-scale application as a prebiotic in the functional foods and pharmaceutical industries. Results We identified a β-fructofuranosidase gene (CmINV) from a Ceratocystis moniliformis genome sequence using protein homology and phylogenetic analysis. The predicted 615 amino acid protein, CmINV, grouped with an existing clade within the glycoside hydrolase (GH) family 32 and showed typical conserved motifs of this enzyme family. Heterologous expression of the CmINV gene in Saccharomyces cerevisiae BY4742∆suc2 provided further evidence that CmINV indeed functions as a β-fructofuranosidase. Firstly, expression of the CmINV gene complemented the inability of the ∆suc2 deletion mutant strain of S. cerevisiae to grow on sucrose as sole carbohydrate source. Secondly, the recombinant protein was capable of producing short-chain fructooligosaccharides (scFOS) when incubated in the presence of 10% sucrose. Purified deglycosylated CmINV protein showed a molecular weight of ca. 66 kDa and a Km and Vmax on sucrose of 7.50 mM and 986 μmol/min/mg protein, respectively. Its optimal pH and temperature conditions were determined to be 6.0 and 62.5°C, respectively. The addition of 50 mM LiCl led to a 186% increase in CmINV activity. Another striking feature was the relatively high volumetric production of this protein in S. cerevisiae as one mL of supernatant was calculated to contain 197 ± 6 International Units of enzyme. Conclusion The properties of the CmINV enzyme make it an attractive alternative to other invertases being used in industry. PMID:24225070

  1. Influence of low protein diets on gene expression of digestive enzymes and hormone secretion in the gastrointestinal tract of young weaned piglets*

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Zhi-mei; Ma, Xian-yong; Yang, Xue-fen; Fan, Qiu-li; Xiong, Yun-xia; Qiu, Yue-qin; Wang, Li; Wen, Xiao-lu; Jiang, Zong-yong

    2016-01-01

    To investigate dietary protein level effects on digestive mechanisms, weaned piglets were fed for 45 d with diets containing 20%, 17%, or 14% crude protein (CP) supplemented to meet requirements for essential amino acids. This article describes the influence of dietary protein on gastrointestinal hormones and expression of an array of digestive enzymes in the gastrointestinal tract and pancreas. Results indicated that there were no significant differences in expression of enzymes involved in carbohydrate digestion, except for maltase in the duodenum. In the jejunum, amylase expression in pigs fed 20% CP was much higher than that in pigs fed other diets (P<0.05) and maltase expression in those fed 17% CP was higher than that in other treatments (P<0.05). Although there were no remarkable differences in expression of aminopeptidase in the small intestine or carboxypeptidase in the pancreas (P>0.05), there was a trend towards higher expression of various proteases in pigs fed 17% CP. The duodenal expression of enteropeptidase in diets with 14% and 17% CP was significantly higher than that with 20% CP (P<0.05), but treatment differences did not existed in jejunum (P>0.05). The expression of GPR93 as a nutrient-responsive G protein-coupled receptor in 14% and 17% CP diets was significantly higher than that in 20% CP diet in the small intestine (P<0.05). The expressions of genes for pancreatic enzymes, lipase and elastase, were significantly higher in pigs fed diets with low CP, while similar trends occurred for carboxypeptidase, chymotrypsin and amylase. Conversely, the gastric expressions of pepsinogen A and progastricsin were lower with the 17% CP diet. Differences between treatments were found in the gastric antral contents of cholecystokinin and somatostatin: both increased in pigs fed 17% CP, accompanied by decreased content of motilin, which was also seen in plasma concentrations. These patterns were not reflected in duodenal contents. In general, 17% dietary CP

  2. Pigs that are divergent in feed efficiency, differ in intestinal enzyme and nutrient transporter gene expression, nutrient digestibility and microbial activity.

    PubMed

    Vigors, S; Sweeney, T; O'Shea, C J; Kelly, A K; O'Doherty, J V

    2016-11-01

    Feed efficiency is an important trait in the future sustainability of pig production, however, the mechanisms involved are not fully elucidated. The objective of this study was to examine nutrient digestibility, organ weights, select bacterial populations, volatile fatty acids (VFA's), enzyme and intestinal nutrient transporter gene expression in a pig population divergent in feed efficiency. Male pigs (n=75; initial BW 22.4 kg SEM 2.03 kg) were fed a standard finishing diet for 43 days before slaughter to evaluate feed intake and growth for the purpose of calculating residual feed intake (RFI). Phenotypic RFI was calculated as the residuals from a regression model regressing average daily feed intake (ADFI) on average daily gain (ADG) and midtest BW0.60 (MBW). On day 115, 16 pigs (85 kg SEM 2.8 kg), designated as high RFI (HRFI) and low RFI (LRFI) were slaughtered and digesta was collected to calculate the coefficient of apparent ileal digestibility (CAID), total tract nutrient digestibility (CATTD), microbial populations and VFA's. Intestinal tissue was collected to examine intestinal nutrient transporter and enzyme gene expression. The LRFI pigs had lower ADFI (P<0.001), improved feed conversion ratio (P<0.001) and an improved RFI value relative to HRFI pigs (0.19 v. -0.14 SEM 0.08; P<0.001). The LRFI pigs had an increased CAID of gross energy (GE), and an improved CATTD of GE, nitrogen and dry matter compared to HRFI pigs (P<0.05). The LRFI pigs had higher relative gene expression levels of fatty acid binding transporter 2 (FABP2) (P<0.01), the sodium/glucose co-transporter 1 (SGLT1) (P<0.05), the glucose transporter GLUT2 (P<0.10), and the enzyme sucrase-isomaltase (SI) (P<0.05) in the jejunum. The LRFI pigs had increased populations of lactobacillus spp. in the caecum compared with HRFI pigs. In colonic digesta HRFI pigs had increased acetic acid concentrations (P<0.05). Differences in nutrient digestibility, intestinal microbial populations and gene

  3. Cloning, sequence analysis, and expression of genes encoding xylan-degrading enzymes from the thermophile "Caldocellum saccharolyticum".

    PubMed Central

    Lüthi, E; Love, D R; McAnulty, J; Wallace, C; Caughey, P A; Saul, D; Bergquist, P L

    1990-01-01

    A lambda recombinant bacteriophage coding for xylanase and beta-xylosidase activity has been isolated from a genomic library of the extremely thermophilic anaerobe "Caldocellum saccharolyticum." Partial Sau3AI fragments of the lambda recombinant DNA were ligated into pBR322. A recombinant plasmid with an insertion of ca. 7 kilobases of thermophilic DNA expressing both enzymatic activities was isolated. The location of the genes has been established by analyzing deletion derivatives, and the DNA sequence of 6.067 kilobases of the insert has been determined. Five open reading frames (ORFs) were found, one of which (ORF1; Mr 40,455) appears to code for a xylanase (XynA) which also acts on o-nitrophenyl-beta-D-xylopyranoside. Another, ORF5 (Mr 56,365), codes for a beta-xylosidase (XynB). The xynA gene product shows significant homology with the xylanases from the alkalophilic Bacillus sp. strain C125 and Clostridium thermocellum. PMID:2111111

  4. [Cloning and expression of the key enzyme hyoscyamine 6 beta-hydroxylase gene (DaH6H) in scopolamine biosynthesis of Datura arborea].

    PubMed

    Qiang, Wei; Hou, Yan-ling; Li, Xiao; Xia, Ke; Liao, Zhi-hua

    2015-10-01

    Hyoscyamine 6 beta-hydroxylase (H6H) is the last rate-limiting enzyme directly catalyzing the formation of scopolamine in tropane alkaloids (TAs) biosynthesis pathway. It is the primary target gene in the genetic modification of TAs metabolic pathway. Full-length cDNA and gDNA sequences of a novel H6H gene were cloned from Datura arborea (DaH6H, GenBank accession numbers for cDNA and gDNA are KR006981 and KR006983, respectively). Nucleotide sequence analysis reveals an open reading frame of 1375 bp encoding 347 amino acids in the cDNA of DaH6H, while the gDNA of DaH6H contains four exons and three introns, with the highest similarity to the gDNA of H6H from D. stramonium. DaH6H also exhibited the most identity of 90.5% with DsH6H in amino acids and harbored conserved 2-oxoglutarate binding motif and two iron binding motifs. The expression level of DaH6H was highest in the mature leaf, followed by the secondary root, and with no expression in the primary root based on qPCR analysis. Its expression was inhibited by MeJA. DaH6H was expressed in E. coli and a 39 kD recombinant protein was detected in SDS-PAGE. Comparison of the contents of scopolamine and hyoscyamine in various TAs-producing plants revealed that D. arborea was one of the rare scopolamine predominant plants. Cloning of DaH6H gene will allow more research in the molecular regulatory mechanism of TAs biosynthesis in distinct plants and provide a new candidate gene for scopolamine metabolic engineering.

  5. Addition of fish oil to diets for dairy cows. II. Effects on milk fat and gene expression of mammary lipogenic enzymes.

    PubMed

    Ahnadi, Charaf E; Beswick, Naomi; Delbecchi, Louis; Kennelly, John J; Lacasse, Pierre

    2002-11-01

    Sixteen Holstein cows in mid-lactation were used to determine whether alterations of mammary fatty acid metabolism are responsible for the milk fat depression associated with consumption of fish oil. Cows were given a total mixed ration with no added fish oil (control), unprotected fish oil (3.7 % of dry matter), or glutaraldehyde-protected microcapsules of fish oil (1.5% or 3.0% of dry matter) for 4 weeks. Milk samples were taken once a week and a mammary biopsy was taken from a rear quarter at the end of the treatment period. Milk fat content was lower in cows given unprotected fish oil (26.0 g/kg), 1.5% protected fish oil (24.6 g/kg) and 3% protected fish oil (20.4 g/kg) than in cows fed the control diet (36.0 g/kg). This was mainly due to a decrease in the synthesis of short-chain fatty acids. Consumption of protected fish oil decreased the abundance of lipogenic enzymes mRNA in the mammary gland. Acetyl-CoA carboxylase, fatty acid synthase, and stearoyl-CoA desaturase mRNAs for cows given 3% protected fish oil averaged only 30%, 25% and 25% of control values, respectively. Dietary addition of unprotected fish oil slightly decreased mRNA abundance of these enzymes but markedly reduced the amount of lipoprotein lipase mRNA. Milk fat content was significantly correlated with gene expression of acetyl-CoA carboxylase, fatty acid synthase, and stearoyl-CoA desaturase but not lipoprotein lipase. These results suggest that fish oil reduces milk fat percentage by inhibiting gene expression of mammary lipogenic enzymes.

  6. Sodium-pump gene-expression, protein abundance and enzyme activity in isolated nephron segments of the aging rat kidney

    PubMed Central

    Scherzer, Pnina; Gal-Moscovici, Anca; Sheikh-Hamad, David; Popovtzer, Mordecai M

    2015-01-01

    Aging is associated with alteration in renal tubular functions, including sodium handling and concentrating ability. Na-K-ATPase plays a key role in driving tubular transport, and we hypothesized that decreased concentrating ability of the aging kidney is due in part to downregulation of Na-K-ATPase. In this study, we evaluated Na and K balance, aldosterone levels, and Na-K-ATPase gene expression, protein abundance, and activity in aging rat kidney. Na-K-ATPase activity (assayed microfluorometrically), mRNA (RT-PCR), and protein abundance (immunoblotting) were quantitated in the following isolated nephron segments: PCT, PST, MTAL, DCT, and CCD from 2, 8, 15, and 24 month-old-rats. In the course of aging, creatinine clearance decreased from 0.48 ± 0.02 mL/min/100 g BW to 0.28 ± 0.06 (P < 0.001) and aldosterone decreased from 23.6 ± 0.8 ng/dL to 13.2 ± 0.6 (P < 0.001). Serum Na+ and K+ increased by 4.0% and 22.5%, respectively. Na-K-ATPase activity, mRNA, and protein abundance of the α1 subunit displayed similar trends in all assayed segments; increasing in PCT and PST; decreasing in MTAL and DCT; increasing in CCD: in PCT they increased by 40%, 75%, and 250%, respectively; while in PST they increased by 80%, 50%, and 100%, respectively (P < 0.001). In MTAL they declined by 36%, 24%, and 34%, respectively, and in DCT by 38%, 59%, and 60%, respectively (P < 0.001). They were higher in CCD by 110%, 115%, and 246%, respectively (P < 0.001). Rats maintained Na/K balance; however with a steady state elevated serum K+. These results reveal quantitative changes in axial distribution of Na-K-ATPase at the level of gene expression, protein abundance, and activity in the nephrons of aging animals and may explain, in part, the pathophysiology of the senescent kidney. PMID:26056060

  7. Cloning and expression of the cDNA encoding human fumarylacetoacetate hydrolase, the enzyme deficient in hereditary tyrosinemia: assignment of the gene to chromosome 15.

    PubMed Central

    Phaneuf, D; Labelle, Y; Bérubé, D; Arden, K; Cavenee, W; Gagné, R; Tanguay, R M

    1991-01-01

    Type 1 hereditary tyrosinemia (HT) is an autosomal recessive disease characterized by a deficiency of the enzyme fumarylacetoacetate hydrolase (FAH; E.C.3.7.1.2). We have isolated human FAH cDNA clones by screening a liver cDNA expression library using specific antibodies and plaque hybridization with a rat FAH cDNA probe. A 1,477-bp cDNA was sequenced and shown to code for FAH by an in vitro transcription-translation assay and sequence homology with tryptic fragments of purified FAH. Transient expression of this FAH cDNA in transfected CV-1 mammalian cells resulted in the synthesis of an immunoreactive protein comigrating with purified human liver FAH on SDS-PAGE and having enzymatic activity as shown by the hydrolysis of the natural substrate fumarylacetoacetate. This indicates that the single polypeptide chain encoded by the FAH gene contains all the genetic information required for functional activity, suggesting that the dimer found in vivo is a homodimer. The human FAH cDNA was used as a probe to determine the gene's chromosomal localization using somatic cell hybrids and in situ hybridization. The human FAH gene maps to the long arm of chromosome 15 in the region q23-q25. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 6 Figure 8 PMID:1998338

  8. Gene cloning, functional expression and characterisation of a novel glycogen branching enzyme from Rhizomucor miehei and its application in wheat breadmaking.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shupeng; Liu, Yu; Yan, Qiaojuan; Jiang, Zhengqiang

    2014-09-15

    A gene (RmGBE) encoding a glycogen branching enzyme from Rhizomucor miehei was cloned into the pET28a (+) vector and expressed in Escherichia coli, and biochemically analysed. RmGBE had an open reading frame of 2097bp encoding 698 amino acid residues. The purified enzyme was a monomer of 78.1kDa. RmGBE was optimally active at 25°C and pH 7.5. It displayed excellent cold adaptation over a low temperature range of 10-30°C, retaining over 85% of its relative activity. RmGBE showed the highest specificity to amylose, about ten times higher than to amylopectin. Addition of RmGBE to wheat bread resulted in a 26% increase in specific volume and a 38% decrease in crumb firmness in comparison with the control. Besides, the retrogradation of bread was significantly retarded along with the enzyme reaction. These properties make RmGBE highly useful in the food and starch industries.

  9. Effects of growth hormone, insulin-like growth factor I, triiodothyronine, thyroxine, and cortisol on gene expression of carbohydrate metabolic enzymes in sea bream hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Leung, L Y; Woo, Norman Y S

    2010-11-01

    The present study investigated the regulatory effects of growth hormone (GH), human insulin-like growth factor I (hIGF-I), thyroxine (T(4)), triiodothyronine (T(3)) and cortisol, on mRNA expression of key enzymes involved in carbohydrate metabolism, including glucokinase (GK), glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase), glycogen synthase (GS), glycogen phosphorylase (GP) and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH) in hepatocytes isolated from silver sea bream. Genes encoding GK, G6Pase, GS and GP were partially cloned and characterized from silver sea bream liver and real-time PCR assays were developed for the quantification of the mRNA expression profiles of these genes in order to evaluate the potential of these carbohydrate metabolic pathways. GK mRNA level was elevated by GH and hIGF-I, implying that GH-induced stimulation of GK expression may be mediated via IGF-I. GH was found to elevate GS and G6Pase expression, but reduce G6PDH mRNA expression. However, hIGF-I did not affect mRNA levels of GS, G6Pase and G6PDH, suggesting that GH-induced modulation of GS, G6Pase and G6PDH expression levels is direct, and occurs independently of the action of IGF-I. T(3) and T(4) directly upregulated transcript abundance of GK, G6Pase, GS and GP. Cortisol significantly increased transcript amounts of G6Pase and GS but markedly decreased transcript abundance of GK and G6PDH. These changes in transcript abundance indicate that (1) the potential of glycolysis is stimulated by GH and thyroid hormones, but attenuated by cortisol, (2) gluconeogenic and glycogenic potential are augmented by GH, thyroid hormones and cortisol, (3) glycogenolytic potential is upregulated by thyroid hormones but not affected by GH or cortisol, and (4) the potential of the pentose phosphate pathway is attenuated by GH and cortisol but unaffected by thyroid hormones.

  10. Effects of heavy metals on the expression of a zinc-inducible metallothionein-III gene and antioxidant enzyme activities in Crassostrea gigas.

    PubMed

    Cong, Ming; Wu, Huifeng; Liu, Xiaoli; Zhao, Jianmin; Wang, Xuan; Lv, Jiasen; Hou, Lin

    2012-10-01

    Sequestration by metallothioneins and antioxidant defense are two kinds of important defense mechanisms employed by mollusks to minimize adverse effects caused by heavy metal contaminants in marine environment. In the present study, a novel metallothionein gene, CgMT-III, was cloned from Crassostrea gigas, consisting of eighteen conserved cysteine residues and encoding a MT III-like protein with two tandem β domains. The expression level of CgMT-III transcript induced by zinc was much higher than that induced by cadmium exposure. It suggested that CgMT-III was perhaps mainly involved in homeostatic control of zinc metabolism, which was distinct from previously identified MTs in C. gigas. Among the tested antioxidant enzymes including superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), SOD and GPx showed varying up-regulations in a tissue-specific manner, while CAT activities were inhibited in both gill and hepatopancreas from C. gigas exposed to heavy metals. It can be inferred that CgMT-III was mainly involved in zinc homeostasis, and CgMT-III gene together with CAT enzyme could be potential biomarkers to indicate heavy metal, especially zinc pollution in marine organisms.

  11. Threonine modulates immune response, antioxidant status and gene expressions of antioxidant enzymes and antioxidant-immune-cytokine-related signaling molecules in juvenile blunt snout bream (Megalobrama amblycephala).

    PubMed

    Habte-Tsion, Habte-Michael; Ren, Mingchun; Liu, Bo; Ge, Xianping; Xie, Jun; Chen, Ruli

    2016-04-01

    A 9-week feeding trial was conducted to investigate the effects of graded dietary threonine (Thr) levels (0.58-2.58%) on the hematological parameters, immune response, antioxidant status and hepatopancreatic gene expression of antioxidant enzymes and antioxidant-immune-cytokine-related signaling molecules in juvenile blunt snout bream. For this purpose, 3 tanks were randomly arranged and assigned to each experimental diet. Fish were fed with their respective diet to apparent satiation 4 times daily. The results indicated that white blood cell, red blood cell and haemoglobin significantly responded to graded dietary Thr levels, while hematocrit didn't. Complement components (C3 and C4), total iron-binding capacity (TIBC), immunoglobulin M (IgM), superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), catalase (CAT) increased with increasing dietary Thr levels up to 1.58-2.08% and thereafter tended to decrease. Dietary Thr regulated the gene expressions of Cu/Zn-SOD, Mn-SOD and CAT, GPx1, glutathione S-transferase mu (GST), nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), heat shock protein-70 (Hsp70), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), apolipoprotein A-I (ApoA1), glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) and fructose-bisphosphate aldolase B (ALDOB); while the gene expression of peroxiredoxin II (PrxII) was not significantly modified by graded Thr levels. These genes are involved in different functions including antioxidant, immune, and defense responses, energy metabolism and protein synthesis. Therefore, this study could provide a new molecular tool for studies in fish immunonutrition and shed light on the regulatory mechanisms that dietary Thr improved the antioxidant and immune capacities of fish.

  12. How to achieve high-level expression of microbial enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Long; Yang, Haiquan; Shin, Hyun-dong; Chen, Rachel R.; Li, Jianghua; Du, Guocheng; Chen, Jian

    2013-01-01

    Microbial enzymes have been used in a large number of fields, such as chemical, agricultural and biopharmaceutical industries. The enzyme production rate and yield are the main factors to consider when choosing the appropriate expression system for the production of recombinant proteins. Recombinant enzymes have been expressed in bacteria (e.g., Escherichia coli, Bacillus and lactic acid bacteria), filamentous fungi (e.g., Aspergillus) and yeasts (e.g., Pichia pastoris). The favorable and very advantageous characteristics of these species have resulted in an increasing number of biotechnological applications. Bacterial hosts (e.g., E. coli) can be used to quickly and easily overexpress recombinant enzymes; however, bacterial systems cannot express very large proteins and proteins that require post-translational modifications. The main bacterial expression hosts, with the exception of lactic acid bacteria and filamentous fungi, can produce several toxins which are not compatible with the expression of recombinant enzymes in food and drugs. However, due to the multiplicity of the physiological impacts arising from high-level expression of genes encoding the enzymes and expression hosts, the goal of overproduction can hardly be achieved, and therefore, the yield of recombinant enzymes is limited. In this review, the recent strategies used for the high-level expression of microbial enzymes in the hosts mentioned above are summarized and the prospects are also discussed. We hope this review will contribute to the development of the enzyme-related research field. PMID:23686280

  13. Antioxidant-rich leaf extract of Barringtonia racemosa significantly alters the in vitro expression of genes encoding enzymes that are involved in methylglyoxal degradation III

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Kin Weng; Abdul Aziz, Azlina; Razali, Nurhanani; Aminuddin, Norhaniza

    2016-01-01

    Background Barringtonia racemosa is a medicinal plant belonging to the Lecythidaceae family. The water extract of B. racemosa leaf (BLE) has been shown to be rich in polyphenols. Despite the diverse medicinal properties of B. racemosa, information on its major biological effects and the underlying molecular mechanisms are still lacking. Methods In this study, the effect of the antioxidant-rich BLE on gene expression in HepG2 cells was investigated using microarray analysis in order to shed more light on the molecular mechanism associated with the medicinal properties of the plant. Results Microarray analysis showed that a total of 138 genes were significantly altered in response to BLE treatment (p < 0.05) with a fold change difference of at least 1.5. SERPINE1 was the most significantly up-regulated gene at 2.8-fold while HAMP was the most significantly down-regulated gene at 6.5-fold. Ingenuity Pathways Analysis (IPA) revealed that “Cancer, cell death and survival, cellular movement” was the top network affected by the BLE with a score of 44. The top five canonical pathways associated with BLE were Methylglyoxal Degradation III followed by VDR/RXR activation, TR/RXR activation, PXR/RXR activation and gluconeogenesis. The expression of genes that encode for enzymes involved in methylglyoxal degradation (ADH4, AKR1B10 and AKR1C2) and glycolytic process (ENO3, ALDOC and SLC2A1) was significantly regulated. Owing to the Warburg effect, aerobic glycolysis in cancer cells may increase the level of methylglyoxal, a cytotoxic compound. Conclusions BLE has the potential to be developed into a novel chemopreventive agent provided that the cytotoxic effects related to methylglyoxal accumulation are minimized in normal cells that rely on aerobic glycolysis for energy supply. PMID:27635343

  14. Further EST analysis of endocrine genes that are preferentially expressed in the neural complex of Ciona intestinalis: receptor and enzyme genes associated with endocrine system in the neural complex.

    PubMed

    Sekiguchi, Toshio; Kawashima, Takeshi; Satou, Yutaka; Satoh, Nori

    2007-01-15

    Identification of orthologs of vertebrate neuropeptides and hypothalamic hormones in the neural complex of ascidians suggests integral roles of the ascidian neural complex in the endocrine system. In the present study, we investigated endocrine-related genes expressed in the neural complex of Ciona intestinalis. Comprehensive analyses of 3'-end sequences of the neural complex cDNAs placed 10,029 clones into 4051 independent clusters or genes, 1524 of them being expressed preferentially in this organ. Comparison of the 1524 genes with the human proteome databank demonstrated that 476 matched previously identified human proteins with distinct functions. Further analyses of sequence similarity of the 476 genes demonstrated that 21 genes are candidates for those involved in the endocrine system. Although we cannot detect hormone or peptide candidates, we found 21 genes such as receptors for peptide ligands, receptor-modulating proteins, and processing enzymes. We then characterized the Ciona prohormone convertase 2 (Ci-PC2) and carboxypeptidase E (Ci-CPE), which are associated with endoproteolytic processing of peptide hormone precursors. Furthermore, genes encoding these transcripts are expressed specifically in the neural complex of young adult ascidians. These data provide the molecular basis for further functional studies of the endocrine role of the neural complex of ascidians.

  15. Silencing gene expression of the ethylene-forming enzyme results in a reversible inhibition of ovule development in transgenic tobacco plants

    PubMed Central

    De Martinis D; Mariani, C

    1999-01-01

    To study the role of ethylene in plant reproduction, we constructed transgenic tobacco plants in which the expression of a pistil-specific gene coding for the ethylene-forming enzyme 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate oxidase was inhibited. Flowers from transgenic plants showed female sterility due to an arrest in ovule development. Megasporogenesis did not occur, and ovules did not reach maturity. When pollinated, pollen tubes were able to reach the ovary but did not penetrate into the immature ovule in transgenic plants. Flower treatment with an ethylene source resulted in a functional recovery of ovule development and restored guidance of the pollen tube tip into the ovule micropyle that resulted in seed set. The recovery was abolished if inhibitors of ethylene action were present. These results demonstrate that the plant hormone ethylene is required during the very early stages of female sporogenesis and ultimately to enable fertilization. PMID:10368177

  16. Effects of Bacillus subtilis on the growth performance, digestive enzymes, immune gene expression and disease resistance of white shrimp, Litopenaeus vannamei.

    PubMed

    Zokaeifar, Hadi; Balcázar, José Luis; Saad, Che Roos; Kamarudin, Mohd Salleh; Sijam, Kamaruzaman; Arshad, Aziz; Nejat, Naghmeh

    2012-10-01

    We studied the effect of two probiotic Bacillus subtilis strains on the growth performance, digestive enzyme activity, immune gene expression and disease resistance of juvenile white shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei). A mixture of two probiotic strains, L10 and G1 in equal proportions, was administered at two different doses 10(5) (BM5) and 10(8) (BM8) CFU g(-1) feed to shrimp for eight weeks. In comparison to untreated control group, final weight, weight gain and digestive enzyme activity were significantly greater in shrimp fed BM5 and BM8 diets. Significant differences for specific growth rate (SGR) and survival were recorded in shrimp fed BM8 diet as compared with the control; however, no significant differences were recorded for food conversion ratio (FCR) among all the experimental groups. Eight weeks after the start of the feeding period, shrimp were challenged with Vibrio harveyi. Statistical analysis revealed significant differences in shrimp survival between probiotic and control groups. Cumulative mortality of the control group was 63.3%, whereas cumulative mortality of the shrimp that had been given probiotics was 20.0% with BM8 and 33.3% with BM5. Subsequently, real-time PCR was employed to determine the mRNA levels of prophenoloxidase (proPO), peroxinectin (PE), lipopolysaccharide- and β-1,3-glucan-binding protein (LGBP) and serine protein (SP). The expression of all immune-related genes studied was significantly up-regulated (P < 0.05) in the shrimp fed BM5 and BM8 diets compared to the control group. These findings demonstrate that administration of B. subtilis strains, L10 and G1, can improve growth performance and disease resistance through an enhanced immune response in shrimp.

  17. The time enzyme in melatonin biosynthesis in fish: Day/night expressions of three aralkylamine N-acetyltransferase genes in three-spined stickleback.

    PubMed

    Kulczykowska, Ewa; Kleszczyńska, Agnieszka; Gozdowska, Magdalena; Sokołowska, Ewa

    2017-03-16

    In vertebrates, aralkylamine N-acetyltransferase (AANAT; EC 2.3.1.87) is a time-keeping enzyme in melatonin (Mel) biosynthesis. Uniquely in fish, there are several AANAT isozymes belonging to two AANAT subfamilies, AANAT1 and AANAT2, which are encoded by distinct genes. The different substrate preferences, kinetics and spatial expression patterns of isozymes indicate that they may have different functions. In the three-spined stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus), there are three genes encoding three AANAT isozymes. In this study, for the first time, the levels of aanat1a, aanat1b and aanat2 mRNAs are measured by absolute RT-qPCR in the brain, eye, skin, stomach, gut, heart and kidney collected at noon and midnight. Melatonin levels are analysed by HPLC with fluorescence detection in homogenates of the brain, eye, skin and kidney. The levels of aanats mRNAs differ significantly within and among organs. In the brain, eye, stomach and gut, there are day/night variations in aanats mRNAs levels. The highest levels of aanat1a and aanat1b mRNAs are in the eye. The extremely high expressions of these genes which are reflected in the highest Mel concentrations at this site at noon and midnight strongly suggest that the eye is an important source of the hormone in the three-spined sticklebacks. A very low level of aanat2 mRNA in all organs may suggest that AANAT1a and/or AANAT1b are principal isozymes in the three-spine sticklebacks. A presence of the isozymes of defined substrate preferences provides opportunity for control of acetylation of amines by modulation of individual aanat expression and permits the fine-tuning of indolethylamines and phenylethylamines metabolism to meet the particular needs of a given organ.

  18. Temperature modulates hepatic carbohydrate metabolic enzyme activity and gene expression in juvenile GIFT tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) fed a carbohydrate-enriched diet.

    PubMed

    Qiang, J; He, J; Yang, H; Wang, H; Kpundeh, M D; Xu, P; Zhu, Z X

    2014-02-01

    The effects of rearing temperature on hepatic glucokinase (GK), glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase) and Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) activity and gene expression were studied in GIFT (genetically improved farmed tilapia) tilapia fed a high carbohydrate diet containing 28% crude protein, 5% crude lipid and 40% wheat starch. Triplicate groups of fish (11.28 g initial body weight) were fed the diet for 45 days at 22 °C, 28 °C or 34 °C. At the end of the trial, final body weight of juvenile at 28 °C (59.12 g) was higher than that of the fish reared at 22 °C (27.13 g) and 34 °C (43.17 g). Feed intake, feed efficiency and protein efficiency ratio were also better at 28 °C. Liver glycogen levels were higher at 28 °C, while plasma glucose levels were higher in the 22 °C group. Significant (P<0.05) effects of water temperature on enzymes activities and gene expression were observed. Hepatic GK activity and mRNA level were higher at 28 °C than at 34 °C. Higher G6Pase and G6PD activity and gene expression were observed at 22 °C. Overall, the data show that juveniles reared at 28 °C exhibited enhanced liver glycolytic capacity. In contrast, hepatic gluconeogenesis and lipogenesis were increased by low temperature (22 °C).

  19. Effect of dietary supplementation of probiotics and palm fruits extracts on the antioxidant enzyme gene expression in the mucosae of gilthead seabream (Sparus aurata L.).

    PubMed

    Esteban, M A; Cordero, H; Martínez-Tomé, M; Jiménez-Monreal, A M; Bakhrouf, A; Mahdhi, A

    2014-08-01

    Antioxidant activity is particularly important, since oxidation is an unavoidable reaction in all living bodies. At present, natural antioxidants to be used on food as an alternative to synthetic ones are being sought. Gilthead seabream (Sparus aurata L.) specimens were fed for 4 weeks with diets enriched with bacterial probiotics (Shewanella putrefaciens Pdp11 and Bacillus sp), single or in combination with Tunisian dates palm fruit extracts. The expression of the main antioxidant enzyme genes (superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione reductase) in the mucosae (gut, skin and gill) was evaluated after 2 and 4 weeks. Previously, free radical scavenging and several antioxidant assays were developed to know the antioxidant properties present on the palm fruits extracts. The results demonstrated that experimental diets alter the expression of the studied antioxidant genes, primarily in the gill and skin. Furthermore, the tested probiotics and mainly, the aqueous date palm fruits extracts had significant antioxidant properties based on their protective effect against the levels of intracellular reactive oxygen species, especially when administering during 4 weeks. For this reason, probiotics and date palm fruit extracts may serve as good natural antioxidants and could potentially be considered as a functional food ingredient for fish in farms.

  20. Prolonged expression of the BX1 signature enzyme is associated with a recombination hotspot in the benzoxazinoid gene cluster in Zea mays.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Linlin; McMullen, Michael D; Bauer, Eva; Schön, Chris-Carolin; Gierl, Alfons; Frey, Monika

    2015-07-01

    Benzoxazinoids represent preformed protective and allelopathic compounds. The main benzoxazinoid in maize (Zea mays L.) is 2,4-dihydroxy-7-methoxy-1,4-benzoxazin-3-one (DIMBOA). DIMBOA confers resistance to herbivores and microbes. Protective concentrations are found predominantly in young plantlets. We made use of the genetic diversity present in the maize nested association mapping (NAM) panel to identify lines with significant benzoxazinoid concentrations at later developmental stages. At 24 d after imbibition (dai), only three lines, including Mo17, showed effective DIMBOA concentrations of 1.5mM or more; B73, by contrast, had low a DIMBOA content. Mapping studies based on Mo17 and B73 were performed to reveal mechanisms that influence the DIMBOA level in 24 dai plants. A major quantitative trait locus mapped to the Bx gene cluster located on the short arm of chromosome 4, which encodes the DIMBOA biosynthetic genes. Mo17 was distinguished from all other NAM lines by high transcriptional expression of the Bx1 gene at later developmental stages. Bx1 encodes the signature enzyme of the pathway. In Mo17×B73 hybrids at 24 dai, only the Mo17 Bx1 allele transcript was detected. A 3.9kb cis-element, termed DICE (distal cis-element), that is located in the Bx gene cluster approximately 140 kb upstream of Bx1, was required for high Bx1 transcript levels during later developmental stages in Mo17. The DICE region was a hotspot of meiotic recombination. Genetic analysis revealed that high 24 dai DIMBOA concentrations were not strictly dependent on high Bx1 transcript levels. However, constitutive expression of Bx1 in transgenics increased DIMBOA levels at 24 dai, corroborating a correlation between DIMBOA content and Bx1 transcription.

  1. Phylogenetic relationships and gene expression pattern of three different cathepsin L (Ctsl) isoforms in zebrafish: Ctsla is the putative yolk processing enzyme.

    PubMed

    Tingaud-Sequeira, Angèle; Cerdà, Joan

    2007-01-15

    Certain cysteine proteases, such as cathepsin L (Ctsl), have been involved in yolk processing mechanisms in oocytes and embryos of lower vertebrates. In zebrafish (Danio rerio), three different ctsl genes, ctsla, ctslb and ctslc, have been found in the genome, but their pattern of expression, as well as information on which the encoded enzymes are potentially involved in yolk absorption during embryogenesis, is unknown. Here, phylogenetic and gene structure analysis revealed that zebrafish ctsla and ctslb genes are similar, showing a highly conserved structure in comparison with human ctsl, while ctslc presents different exon organization together with an earlier evolution. Thus, ctslc appears to be evolved from a common ancestral ctsl-like gene, possibly through an early duplication event, whereas ctsla and ctslb may be originated from a second duplication mechanism. Zebrafish ctsla, ctslb and ctslc also showed different patterns of mRNA expression during embryogenesis and in adult tissues. While Ctsla transcripts were accumulated in embryos throughout development and in the adult ovary, those encoding Ctslb were detected only in embryos around the time of hatching as previously reported, and those for Ctslc appeared only in larvae and in some adult tissues, but not in the ovary. In zebrafish and killifish (Fundulus heteroclitus) embryos, Ctsla mRNA was first detected in blastomers, and later in development it was localized in cells of the yolk syncytial layer, an embryonic structure involved in yolk absorption. These data therefore suggested that Ctsla is most likely the putative protease involved in yolk processing in fish embryos, while Ctslc seems not to be required during early embryogenesis in zebrafish.

  2. Gene expression analysis of enzymes of the carotenoid biosynthesis pathway involved in β-cryptoxanthin accumulation in wild raspberry, Rubus palmatus.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Kouichi; Tokiwano, Tetsuo; Yoshizawa, Yuko

    2017-03-18

    β-cryptoxanthin (β-Cry), a xanthophyll, is unlike other abundant carotenoids, such as α-carotene, β-carotene, lycopene, lutein, and zeaxanthin. It is not found in most fruits or vegetables but is found only in specific fruits, such as hot chili pepper, persimmon, and citrus fruits. Because recent reports suggest that β-Cry intake is beneficial to human health, the xanthophyll requires further investigation. Although β-Cry accumulates in the fruit of wild raspberry, Rubus palmatus, it is not present in cultivated raspberry. In the present study, two wild raspberry species were studied-R. palmatus, which accumulates β-Cry in the fruit, and R. crataegifolius, which does not accumulate β-Cry. Four carotenoid biosynthetic enzymes derived from these two species were analyzed-phytoene synthase (PSY), lycopene β-cyclase (LCYb), β-carotene hydroxylase (HYb), and zeaxanthin epoxidase (ZEP). Expression levels of their genes were also assessed to elucidate mechanism underlying β-Cry accumulation. Partial gene sequences of RubPSY, RubLCYb, RubHYb, and RubZEP, isolated from immature raspberry fruits of R. palmatus, were used as probes for Northern blot analysis. RubZEP expression ceased as the fruits matured, possibly because of reduced production of zeaxanthin. β-Cry is considered to be an intermediate compound that accumulates in the mature fruits of R. palmatus. High expression of RubPSY was detectable in the mature fruits of R. crataegifolius, and the expression of RubLCYb, RubHYb, and RubZEP was detectable during all stages of fruit maturation. In contrast, β-Cry was absent in the mature fruits of R. crataegifolius.

  3. Influence of SkQ1 on Expression of Nrf2 Gene, ARE-Controlled Genes of Antioxidant Enzymes and Their Activity in Rat Blood Leukocytes under Oxidative Stress.

    PubMed

    Vnukov, V V; Gutsenko, O I; Milutina, N P; Kornienko, I V; Ananyan, A A; Danilenko, A O; Panina, S B; Plotnikov, A A; Makarenko, M S

    2015-12-01

    The study demonstrated that oxidative stress induced by hyperoxia (0.5 MPa for 90 min) resulted in reduction of mRNA levels of transcription factor Nrf2 and Nrf2-induced genes encoding antioxidant enzymes (SOD1, CAT, GPx4) in peripheral blood leukocytes of rats. The changes in gene expression profiles under hyperoxia were accompanied by disbalance of activity of antioxidant enzymes in the leukocytes, namely activation of superoxide dismutase and inhibition of catalase, glutathione peroxidase, and glutathione-S-transferase. Pretreatment of rats with SkQ1 (50 nmol/kg for five days) significantly increased mRNA levels of transcription factor Nrf2 and Nrf2-induced genes encoding antioxidant enzymes SOD2 and GPx4 and normalized the transcriptional activity of the SOD1 and CAT genes in the leukocytes in hyperoxia-induced oxidative stress. At the same time, the activity of catalase and glutathione peroxidase was increased, and the activity of superoxide dismutase and glutathione-S-transferase returned to the control level. It is hypothesized that protective effect of SkQ1 in hyperoxia-induced oxidative stress can be realized via a direct antioxidant property and the stimulation of the Keap1/Nrf2 redox-sensitive signaling system.

  4. Elevated gene expression in chalcone synthase enzyme suggests an increased production of flavonoids in skin and synchronized red cell cultures of North American native grape berries.

    PubMed

    Davis, Gina; Ananga, Anthony; Krastanova, Stoyanka; Sutton, Safira; Ochieng, Joel W; Leong, Stephen; Tsolova, Violetka

    2012-06-01

    Anthocyanins are antioxidants and are among the natural products synthesized via the flavonoid biosynthesis pathway. Anthocyanins have been recommended for dietary intake in the prevention of cardiovascular diseases, cancer, and age-related conditions such as Alzheimer's disease or dementia. With an increasingly aging population in many parts of the world, strategies for the commercial production of in vitro synchronized red cell cultures as natural antioxidants will be a significant contribution to human medicine. Red pigmented fruits such as grapes (Vitis sp.) are a major source of bioavailable anthocyanins and other polyphenols. Since the level of antioxidants varies among cultivars, this study is the first one that phytochemically and genetically characterizes native grape cultivars of North America to determine the optimal cultivar and berry cells for the production of anthocyanins as antioxidants. Using real-time PCR and bioinformatics approaches, we tested for the transcript expression of the chalcone synthase (CHS) gene, an enzyme involved in the flavonoid and anthocyanin biosynthesis pathway, in different parts of physiologically mature grape berries and in vitro synchronized red cells. A low level of expression was recorded in berry flesh, compared with an elevated expression in berry skins and in vitro synchronized red cells, suggesting increased production of flavonoids in skin and cell cultures. This preliminary study demonstrates the potential of functional genomics in natural products research as well as in systematic studies of North American native grapes, specifically in muscadine (Vitis rotundifolia).

  5. The multigene family of lysophosphatidate acyltransferase (LPAT)-related enzymes in Ricinus communis: cloning and molecular characterization of two LPAT genes that are expressed in castor seeds.

    PubMed

    Arroyo-Caro, José María; Chileh, Tarik; Kazachkov, Michael; Zou, Jitao; Alonso, Diego López; García-Maroto, Federico

    2013-02-01

    The multigene family encoding proteins related to lysophosphatidyl-acyltransferases (LPATs) has been analyzed in the castor plant Ricinus communis. Among them, two genes designated RcLPAT2 and RcLPATB, encoding proteins with LPAT activity and expressed in the developing seed, have been cloned and characterized in some detail. RcLPAT2 groups with well characterized members of the so-called A-class LPATs and it shows a generalized expression pattern in the plant and along seed development. Enzymatic assays of RcLPAT2 indicate a preference for ricinoleoyl-CoA over other fatty acid thioesters when ricinoleoyl-LPA is used as the acyl acceptor, while oleoyl-CoA is the preferred substrate when oleoyl-LPA is employed. RcLPATB groups with B-class LPAT enzymes described as seed specific and selective for unusual fatty acids. However, RcLPATB exhibit a broad specificity on the acyl-CoAs, with saturated fatty acids (12:0-16:0) being the preferred substrates. RcLPATB is upregulated coinciding with seed triacylglycerol accumulation, but its expression is not restricted to the seed. These results are discussed in the light of a possible role for LPAT isoenzymes in the channelling of ricinoleic acid into castor bean triacylglycerol.

  6. The ketogenic diet upregulates expression of the gene encoding the key ketogenic enzyme mitochondrial 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA synthase in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Cullingford, Tim E; Eagles, Douglas A; Sato, Hitoshi

    2002-04-01

    The ketogenic diet is a clinically and experimentally effective anti-epileptic treatment whose molecular mechanism(s) of action remain to be elucidated. As a first step in defining its effects on regulation of fatty acid oxidation and ketogenesis at the genetic level, we have administered to rats: (1) a calorie-restricted ketogenic diet (KCR); (2) a calorie-restricted normal diet (NCR); or (3) a normal diet ad libitum (NAL). We have used RNase protection to co-assay diet-induced changes in abundance of the mRNA encoding the critical enzyme of ketogenesis from acetyl-CoA namely mitochondrial 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA synthase (mHS) in liver and brain, together with mRNAs encoding three other key enzymes of fatty acid oxidation. We demonstrate that NCR-fed rats exhibit a significant 2-fold increase in liver mHS mRNA compared to NAL-fed rats, and that KCR-fed rats exhibit a significant 2-fold increase in both liver and brain mHS mRNA compared to NAL-fed rats. Our results demonstrate, for the first time, the effect of a ketogenic diet on gene expression in brain, and suggest possible anti-epileptic mechanisms for future investigation.

  7. Effect of Enzyme Inhibitors on Terpene Trilactones Biosynthesis and Gene Expression Profiling in Ginkgo biloba Cultured Cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lijia; Tong, Hui; Wang, Mingxuan; Zhu, Jianhua; Zi, Jiachen; Song, Liyan; Yu, Rongmin

    2015-12-01

    The biosynthetic pathway of terpene trilactones of Ginkgo biloba is unclear. In this present study, suspension cultured cells of G. biloba were used to explore the regulation of the mevalonic acid (MVA) and methylerythritol 4-phosphate (MEP) pathways in response to specific enzyme inhibitors (lovastatin and clomazone). The results showed that the biosynthesis of bilobalide was more highly correlated with the MVA pathway, and the biosynthesis of ginkgolides was more highly correlated with the MEP pathway. Meanwhile, according to the results, it could be speculated that bilobalide might be a product of ginkgolide metabolism.

  8. Coexisting role of fasting or feeding and dietary lipids in the control of gene expression of enzymes involved in the synthesis of saturated, monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Cruz, Maricela; Sánchez González, Raúl; Sánchez García, Apolos M; Lòpez-Alarcòn, Mardia

    2012-03-15

    In the liver, maintaining lipid homeostasis is regulated by physiological and exogenous factors. These lipids are synthesized by Fasn, elongases and desaturases. Interactions in an organism among these factors are quite complex and, to date, relatively little is known about them. The aim of this study was to evaluate the coexisting role of physiological (insulin, fasting and feeding) and exogenous (dietary lipids) factors in the control of gene expression of Fasn, elongases and desaturases via Srebf-1c in liver from rats. Gene expression of encoding enzymes for fatty acid synthesis and fatty acid composition was evaluated in liver from rats in fasting and feeding (at 30, 60, 90 and 120 min after feeding) when food intake (adequate or high-lipid diet) was synchronized to a restricted period of 7h. Fasn, Scd and Fads2 were induced during 120 min after initial feeding in both dietary groups. This induction may be activated in part by insulin via Srebf-1c. Also, we showed for the first time that Elovl7 may be regulated by insulin and dietary lipids. The failure to synthesize saturated and monounsaturated fatty acids is consistent with a downregulation of Fasn and Scd, respectively, by dietary lipids. A higher content of LC-PUFAs was observed due to a high expression of Elovl2 and Elovl5, although Fads2 was suppressed by dietary lipids. Therefore, elongases may have a mechanism that is Srebf-1c-independent. This study suggests that a high-lipid diet triggers, during 120 min after initial feeding, a tight coordination among de novo lipogenesis, elongation, and desaturation and may not always be regulated by Srebf-1c. Finally, upregulation by feeding (insulin) of Fasn, Scd, Fads2 and Srebf-1c is insufficient to compensate for the inhibitory effect of dietary lipids.

  9. Arabidopsis plants acclimate to water deficit at low cost through changes of carbon usage: an integrated perspective using growth, metabolite, enzyme, and gene expression analysis.

    PubMed

    Hummel, Irène; Pantin, Florent; Sulpice, Ronan; Piques, Maria; Rolland, Gaëlle; Dauzat, Myriam; Christophe, Angélique; Pervent, Marjorie; Bouteillé, Marie; Stitt, Mark; Gibon, Yves; Muller, Bertrand

    2010-09-01

    Growth and carbon (C) fluxes are severely altered in plants exposed to soil water deficit. Correspondingly, it has been suggested that plants under water deficit suffer from C shortage. In this study, we test this hypothesis in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) by providing an overview of the responses of growth, C balance, metabolites, enzymes of the central metabolism, and a set of sugar-responsive genes to a sustained soil water deficit. The results show that under drought, rosette relative expansion rate is decreased more than photosynthesis, leading to a more positive C balance, while root growth is promoted. Several soluble metabolites accumulate in response to soil water deficit, with K(+) and organic acids as the main contributors to osmotic adjustment. Osmotic adjustment costs only a small percentage of the daily photosynthetic C fixation. All C metabolites measured (not only starch and sugars but also organic acids and amino acids) show a diurnal turnover that often increased under water deficit, suggesting that these metabolites are readily available for being metabolized in situ or exported to roots. On the basis of 30 enzyme activities, no in-depth reprogramming of C metabolism was observed. Water deficit induces a shift of the expression level of a set of sugar-responsive genes that is indicative of increased, rather than decreased, C availability. These results converge to show that the differential impact of soil water deficit on photosynthesis and rosette expansion results in an increased availability of C for the roots, an increased turnover of C metabolites, and a low-cost C-based osmotic adjustment, and these responses are performed without major reformatting of the primary metabolism machinery.

  10. GENE EXPRESSION PROFILING OF XENOBIOTIC METABOLIZING ENZYMES (XMES) THROUGH THE LIFE STAGES OF THE MALE C57BL/6 MOUSE

    EPA Science Inventory

    In the presence of foreign compounds, metabolic homeostasis of the organism is maintained by the liver's ability to detoxify and eliminate these xenobiotics. This is accomplished, in part, by the expression of XMEs, which metabolize xenobiotics and determine whether exposure will...

  11. Undercover: gene control by metabolites and metabolic enzymes

    PubMed Central

    van der Knaap, Jan A.; Verrijzer, C. Peter

    2016-01-01

    To make the appropriate developmental decisions or maintain homeostasis, cells and organisms must coordinate the expression of their genome and metabolic state. However, the molecular mechanisms that relay environmental cues such as nutrient availability to the appropriate gene expression response remain poorly understood. There is a growing awareness that central components of intermediary metabolism are cofactors or cosubstrates of chromatin-modifying enzymes. As such, their concentrations constitute a potential regulatory interface between the metabolic and chromatin states. In addition, there is increasing evidence for a direct involvement of classic metabolic enzymes in gene expression control. These dual-function proteins may provide a direct link between metabolic programing and the control of gene expression. Here, we discuss our current understanding of the molecular mechanisms connecting metabolism to gene expression and their implications for development and disease. PMID:27881599

  12. Expression of Enzymes that Metabolize Medications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wotring, V. E.; Peters, C. P.

    2011-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Increased exposure to radiation is one physiological stressor associated with spaceflight and it is feasible to conduct ground experiments using known radiation exposures. The health of the liver, especially the activity rate of its metabolic enzymes, determines the concentration of circulating drugs as well as the duration of their efficacy. While radiation is known to alter normal physiological function, how radiation affects liver metabolism of administered medications is unclear. Crew health could be affected if the actions of medications used in spaceflight deviated from expectations formed during terrestrial medication use. This study is an effort to identify liver metabolic enzymes whose expression is altered by spaceflight or by radiation exposures that mimic features of the spaceflight environment. METHODS: Using procedures approved by the Animal Care and Use Committee, mice were exposed to either 137Cs (controls, 50 mGy, 6Gy, or 50 mGy + 6Gy separated by 24 hours) or 13 days of spaceflight on STS 135. Animals were anesthetized and sacrificed at several time points (4 hours, 24 hours or 7 days) after their last radiation exposure, or within 6 hours of return to Earth for the STS 135 animals. Livers were removed immediately and flash-frozen in liquid nitrogen. Tissue was homogenized, RNA extracted, purified and quality-tested. Complementary DNA was prepared from high-quality RNA samples, and used in RT-qPCR experiments to determine relative expression of a wide variety of genes involved in general metabolism and drug metabolism. RESULTS: Results of the ground radiation exposure experiments indicated 65 genes of the 190 tested were significantly affected by at least one of the radiation doses. Many of the affected genes are involved in the metabolism of drugs with hydrophobic or steroid-like structures, maintenance of redox homeostasis and repair of DNA damage. Most affected genes returned to near control expression levels by 7 days post

  13. Effects of dietary tannic acid on the growth, hepatic gene expression, and antioxidant enzyme activity in Brandt's voles (Microtus brandti).

    PubMed

    Ye, Man-Hong; Nan, Yan-Lei; Ding, Meng-Meng; Hu, Jun-Bang; Liu, Qian; Wei, Wan-Hong; Yang, Sheng-Mei

    2016-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the physiological and biochemical responses of Brandt's voles to the persistent presence of dietary tannic acid. The diet for animals in the experimental group was supplemented with 3% dietary tannic acid for 5weeks. The control group received a commercial lab chow. No significant differences were detected in body weight, organ (heart, kidney, and liver) weights, and organ parameters between animals from two groups. However, voles in the experimental group had significantly higher daily food intake, increased contents of proline and histidine in saliva and feces after protein hydrolysis, and elevated hepatic expression of transferrin than the control. Our results suggested the existence of adaptive strategies developed in Brandt's voles to overcome the adverse effects of dietary tannic acid. (1) Food consumption was increased to satisfy their nutritional demands. (2) The secretion of tannic-acid-binding salivary proteins was promoted. (3) The absorption of iron was enhanced. These alterations contributed to neutralize the negative effects of tannic acid and maintain body mass in animals supplemented with tannic acid. As the result of the consumption of tannic acid, hepatic expression of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase was significantly decreased, while the overall potential of the antioxidant system, characterized by increased hepatic enzymatic activities of catalase and glutathione peroxidase, was enhanced. Our results also implied the involvement of tannic acid in the regulation of lipid metabolism and oxidative stress in voles.

  14. Physical and Flavor Characteristics, Fatty Acid Profile, Antioxidant Status and Nrf2-Dependent Antioxidant Enzyme Gene Expression Changes in Young Grass Carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella) Fillets Fed Dietary Valine

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Wei-Dan; Liu, Yang; Wu, Pei; Jiang, Jun; Kuang, Sheng-Yao; Tang, Ling; Tang, Wu-Neng; Zhang, Yong-An; Zhou, Xiao-Qiu

    2017-01-01

    This study was conducted to examine the effects of dietary valine on the physical and flavor characteristics, fatty acid (FA) profile, antioxidant status and Nrf2-dependent antioxidant enzyme gene expression in the muscle of young grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella) fed increasing levels of valine (4.3, 8.0, 10.6, 13.1, 16.9 and 19.1 g/kg) for 8 weeks. Compared with the control group, the group fed valine showed improved physical characteristics of fish fillets (increased relative shear force, hydroxyproline, protein and lipid levels and decreased cathepsin B and L activities, as well as cooking loss, were observed). Moreover, valine improved the flavor of young grass carp fillets by increasing the amino acid (AA) concentration in fish muscle (increased aspartic acid, threonine, glutamine, cystine, methionine, leucine, tyrosine, phenylalanine, lysine, histidine, arginine and valine concentrations were observed). Additionally, optimal valine supplementation increased the potential health benefits to humans by decreasing the saturated FA (C15:0 and C16:0) concentration and increasing the unsaturated FA (monounsaturated FAs (MUFAs), such as C16:1, C18:1c+t and C20:1, and polyunsaturated FAs (PUFAs), such as C18:3n-3, C20:2 and C22:6) concentration. In addition, the reduced glutathione (GSH) content and the activities of Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD1), catalase (CAT) and Selenium-dependent glutathione peroxydase (Se-GPx) increased under valine supplementation (P < 0.05). Furthermore, the SOD1, CAT and Se-GPx mRNA levels increased with dietary valine levels, possibly due to the up-regulation of NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), target of rapamycin (TOR) and ribosomal protein S6 kinase 1 (S6K1) and the down-regulation of Kelch-like-ECH-associated protein 1 (Keap1) in muscle (P < 0.05). In conclusion, valine improved the physical and flavor characteristics, FA profile, and antioxidant status and regulated the expression of the antioxidant enzyme genes Nrf2, Keap1, TOR

  15. Novel polymorphic human UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) 2A3: Cloning, functional characterization of enzyme variants, comparative tissue expression, and gene induction

    PubMed Central

    Court, Michael H.; Hazarika, Suwagmani; Krishnaswamy, Soundararajan; Finel, Moshe; Williams, J. Andrew

    2008-01-01

    UDP-glucuronosyltransferases (UGTs) are critical to the detoxification of numerous drugs, environmental pollutants, and endogenous molecules. However as yet not all of the human UGTs have been cloned and characterized. cDNA clones from the UGT2A3 gene (located on chromosome 4q13) were isolated using pooled human liver RNA. Approximately 10% of clones contained a c.1489A>G nucleotide substitution yielding proteins with a residue 497 alanine (UGT2A3.2) instead of a threonine (UGT2A3.1). The allele frequency of this polymorphism (rs13128286) was 0.13 in a European-American population as determined by direct DNA sequencing. Of 81 structurally diverse glucuronidation substrates tested, UGT2A3 expressed by a baculovirus system selectively glucuronidated bile acids – particularly hyodeoxycholic acid at the 6-hydroxy position. Apparent Km values of UGT2A3.1 and UGT2A3.2 for hyodeoxycholic acid 6-glucuronidation were 69±7 and 44±12 µM, respectively. Of 29 different extrahepatic tissues evaluated by real-time PCR, UGT2A3 mRNA was most highly expressed in small intestine (160% of liver), colon (78% of liver) and adipose tissue (91% of liver). An in silico scan of the proximal UGT2A3 promoter/5’-regulatory region identified transcription factor consensus elements consistent with tissue selective expression in liver (HNF1), and intestine (CDX2), as well as induction by rifampicin (PXR). In LS180 human intestinal cells, rifampicin increased UGT2A3 mRNA by more than 4.5-fold compared with vehicle while levels were not significantly affected by the AhR ligand β-naphthoflavone. This is the first report establishing UGT2A3 as a functional enzyme, and represents significant progress toward the goal of having a complete set of recombinant human UGTs for comparative functional analyses. PMID:18523138

  16. Effects of an Antimutagenic 1,4-Dihydropyridine AV-153 on Expression of Nitric Oxide Synthases and DNA Repair-related Enzymes and Genes in Kidneys of Rats with a Streptozotocin Model of Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Ošiņa, Kristīne; Rostoka, Evita; Isajevs, Sergejs; Sokolovska, Jelizaveta; Sjakste, Tatjana; Sjakste, Nikolajs

    2016-11-01

    Development of complications of diabetes mellitus (DM), including diabetic nephropathy, is a complex multi-stage process, dependent on many factors including the modification of nitric oxide (NO) production and an impaired DNA repair. The goal of this work was to study in vivo effects of 1,4-dihydropyridine AV-153, known as antimutagen and DNA binder, on the expression of several genes and proteins involved in NO metabolism and DNA repair in the kidneys of rats with a streptozotocin (STZ)-induced model of DM. Transcription intensity was monitored by means of real-time RT-PCR and the expression of proteins by immunohistochemistry. Development of DM significantly induced PARP1 protein expression, while AV-153 (0.5 mg/kg) administration decreased it. AV-153 increased the expression of Parp1 gene in the kidneys of both intact and diabetic animals. Expression of H2afx mRNA and γH2AX histone protein, a marker of DNA breakage, was not changed in diabetic animals, but AV-153 up-regulated the expression of the gene without any impact on the protein expression. Development of DM was followed by a significant increase in iNOS enzyme expression, while AV-153 down-regulated the enzyme expression up to normal levels. iNos gene expression was also found to be increased in diabetic animals, but unlike the protein, the expression of mRNA was found to be enhanced by AV-153 administration. Expression of both eNOS protein and eNos gene in the kidneys was down-regulated, and the administration of AV-153 normalized the expression level. The effects of the compound in the kidneys of diabetic animals appear to be beneficial, as a trend for the normalization of expression of NO synthases is observed.

  17. Plasma Catecholamines (CA) and Gene Expression of CA Biosynthetic Enzymes in Adrenal Medulla and Sympathetic Ganglia of Rats Exposed to Single or Repeated Hypergravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrak, J.; Jurani, M.; Baranovska, M.; Hapala, I.; Frollo, I.; Kvetnansky, R.

    2008-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate plasma epinephrine (EPI) and norepinephrine (NE) levels in blood collected directly during a single or 8-times repeated centrifugation at hypergravity 4G, using remote controlled equipment. Plasma EPI levels showed a huge hypergravity-induced increase. After the last blood collection during hypergravity, the centrifuge was turned off and another blood sampling was performed immediately after the centrifuge decelerated and stopped (10 min). In these samples plasma EPI showed significantly lower levels compared to centrifugation intervals. Plasma NE levels showed none or small changes. Repeated exposure to hypergravity 4G (8 days for 60 min) eliminated the increase in plasma EPI levels at the 15 min interval but did not markedly affect plasma NE levels. To explain these findings we measured mRNA levels of CA biosynthetic enzymes tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), dopamine-β-hydroxylase (DBH) and phenylethanolamine N-methyltransferase (PNMT) in the adrenal medulla (AM) and stellate ganglia (SG) of rats exposed to continuous hypergravity (2G) up to 6 days. In AM, TH, DBH and PNMT mRNA levels were significantly increased in intervals up to 3 days, however, after 6 day hypergravity exposure, no significant elevation was found. In SG, no significant changes in gene expression of CA enzymes were seen both after a single or repeated hypergravity. Thus, our data show that hypergravity highly activates the adrenomedullary system, whereas the sympathoneural system is not significantly changed. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that during repeated or continuous exposure of the organism to hypergravity the adrenomedullary system is adapted, whereas sympathoneural system is not affected.

  18. Sub-toxic Ethanol Exposure Modulates Gene Expression and Enzyme Activity of Antioxidant Systems to Provide Neuroprotection in Hippocampal HT22 Cells.

    PubMed

    Casañas-Sánchez, Verónica; Pérez, José A; Quinto-Alemany, David; Díaz, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Ethanol is known to cause severe systemic damage often explained as secondary to oxidative stress. Brain is particularly vulnerable to ethanol-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) because the high amounts of lipids, and because nerve cell membranes contain high amounts of peroxidable fatty acids. Usually these effects of ethanol are associated to high and/or chronic exposure to ethanol. However, as we show in this manuscript, a low and acute dose of ethanol trigger a completely different response in hippocampal cells. Thus, we have observed that 0.1% ethanol exposure to HT22 cells, a murine hippocampal-derived cell line, increases the transcriptional expression of different genes belonging to the classical, glutathione/glutaredoxin and thioredoxin/peroxiredoxin antioxidant systems, these including Sod1, Sod2, Gpx1, Gclc, and Txnrd1. Paralleling these changes, enzyme activities of total superoxide dismutase (tSOD), catalase, total glutathione peroxidase (tGPx), glutathione-S-reductase (GSR), and total thioredoxin reductase (tTXNRD), were all increased, while the generation of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), as indicators of lipid peroxidation, and glutathione levels remained unaltered. Ethanol exposure did not affect cell viability or cell growing as assessed by real-time cell culture monitoring, indicating that low ethanol doses are not deleterious for hippocampal cells, but rather prevented glutamate-induced excitotoxicity. In summary, we conclude that sub-toxic exposure to ethanol may well be neuroprotective against oxidative insults in hippocampal cells.

  19. Sub-toxic Ethanol Exposure Modulates Gene Expression and Enzyme Activity of Antioxidant Systems to Provide Neuroprotection in Hippocampal HT22 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Casañas-Sánchez, Verónica; Pérez, José A.; Quinto-Alemany, David; Díaz, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Ethanol is known to cause severe systemic damage often explained as secondary to oxidative stress. Brain is particularly vulnerable to ethanol-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) because the high amounts of lipids, and because nerve cell membranes contain high amounts of peroxidable fatty acids. Usually these effects of ethanol are associated to high and/or chronic exposure to ethanol. However, as we show in this manuscript, a low and acute dose of ethanol trigger a completely different response in hippocampal cells. Thus, we have observed that 0.1% ethanol exposure to HT22 cells, a murine hippocampal-derived cell line, increases the transcriptional expression of different genes belonging to the classical, glutathione/glutaredoxin and thioredoxin/peroxiredoxin antioxidant systems, these including Sod1, Sod2, Gpx1, Gclc, and Txnrd1. Paralleling these changes, enzyme activities of total superoxide dismutase (tSOD), catalase, total glutathione peroxidase (tGPx), glutathione-S-reductase (GSR), and total thioredoxin reductase (tTXNRD), were all increased, while the generation of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), as indicators of lipid peroxidation, and glutathione levels remained unaltered. Ethanol exposure did not affect cell viability or cell growing as assessed by real-time cell culture monitoring, indicating that low ethanol doses are not deleterious for hippocampal cells, but rather prevented glutamate-induced excitotoxicity. In summary, we conclude that sub-toxic exposure to ethanol may well be neuroprotective against oxidative insults in hippocampal cells. PMID:27512374

  20. Anti-Inflammatory Effects of Hyperbaric Oxygenation during DSS-Induced Colitis in BALB/c Mice Include Changes in Gene Expression of HIF-1α, Proinflammatory Cytokines, and Antioxidative Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nitrogen species have an indispensable role in regulating cell signalling pathways, including transcriptional control via hypoxia inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α). Hyperbaric oxygenation treatment (HBO2) increases tissue oxygen content and leads to enhanced ROS production. In the present study DSS-induced colitis has been employed in BALB/c mice as an experimental model of gut mucosa inflammation to investigate the effects of HBO2 on HIF-1α, antioxidative enzyme, and proinflammatory cytokine genes during the colonic inflammation. Here we report that HBO2 significantly reduces severity of DSS-induced colitis, as evidenced by the clinical features, histological assessment, impaired immune cell expansion and mobilization, and reversal of IL-1β, IL-2, and IL-6 gene expression. Gene expression and antioxidative enzyme activity were changed by the HBO2 and the inflammatory microenvironment in the gut mucosa. Strong correlation of HIF-1α mRNA level to GPx1, SOD1, and IL-6 mRNA expression suggests involvement of HIF-1α in transcriptional regulation of these genes during colonic inflammation and HBO2. This is further confirmed by a strong correlation of HIF-1α with known target genes VEGF and PGK1. Results demonstrate that HBO2 has an anti-inflammatory effect in DSS-induced colitis in mice, and this effect is at least partly dependent on expression of HIF-1α and antioxidative genes. PMID:27656047

  1. In vivo transduction by intravenous injection of a lentiviral vector expressing human ADA into neonatal ADA gene knockout mice: a novel form of enzyme replacement therapy for ADA deficiency.

    PubMed

    Carbonaro, Denise A; Jin, Xiangyang; Petersen, Denise; Wang, Xingchao; Dorey, Fred; Kil, Ki Soo; Aldrich, Melissa; Blackburn, Michael R; Kellems, Rodney E; Kohn, Donald B

    2006-06-01

    Using a mouse model of adenosine deaminase-deficient severe combined immune deficiency syndrome (ADA-deficient SCID), we have developed a noninvasive method of gene transfer for the sustained systemic expression of human ADA as enzyme replacement therapy. The method of delivery is a human immunodeficiency virus 1-based lentiviral vector given systemically by intravenous injection on day 1 to 2 of life. In this article we characterize the biodistribution of the integrated vector, the expression levels of ADA enzyme activity in various tissues, as well as the efficacy of systemic ADA expression to correct the ADA-deficient phenotype in this mouse model. The long-term expression of enzymatically active ADA achieved by this method, primarily from transduction of liver and lung, restored immunologic function and significantly extended survival. These studies illustrate the potential for sustained in vivo production of enzymatically active ADA, as an alternative to therapy by frequent injection of exogenous ADA protein.

  2. Spearmint induced hypothalamic oxidative stress and testicular anti-androgenicity in male rats - altered levels of gene expression, enzymes and hormones.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Vikas; Kural, Mool Raj; Pereira, B M J; Roy, Partha

    2008-12-01

    Mentha spicata Labiatae, commonly known as spearmint, can be used for various kinds of illnesses in herbal medicines and food industries. One of the prominent functions of this plant extract is its anti-androgenic activity. The present study investigated the probable correlation between oxidative stress in hypothalamic region and anti-androgenic action of this plant's aqueous extract on rats. Decreased activities of enzymes like superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase and glutathione reductase in hypothalamus of treated rats indicated spearmint induced oxidative stress. Further RT-PCR and immunoblot analysis demonstrated the decreased expression of some of the steroidogenic enzymes, cytochrome P450scc, cytochrome P450C17, 3beta-Hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (3beta-HSD), 17beta-Hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (17beta-HSD) and other related proteins like, steroidogenic acute regulatory protein, androgen receptor and scavenger receptor class B-1. Further, in vitro enzyme assays demonstrated depressed activities of testicular 3beta-HSD and 17beta-HSD enzymes. Histopathology indicated a decreased sperm density in cauda epididymis and degeneration of ductus deference. Our study suggested that spearmint probably induced oxidative stress in hypothalamus resulting in decreased synthesis of LH and FSH which in turn down-regulated the production of testicular testosterone through the disruption of a number of intermediate cascades.

  3. A R2R3-MYB transcription factor, GmMYB12B2, affects the expression levels of flavonoid biosynthesis genes encoding key enzymes in transgenic Arabidopsis plants.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiao-Wei; Li, Jing-Wen; Zhai, Ying; Zhao, Yan; Zhao, Xu; Zhang, Hai-Jun; Su, Lian-Tai; Wang, Ying; Wang, Qing-Yu

    2013-12-10

    Isoflavones play diverse roles in plant-microbe interactions and are potentially important for human nutrition and health. To study the regulation of isoflavonoid synthesis in soybean, the R2R3-MYB transcription factor GmMYB12B2 was isolated and characterized. Yeast expression experiments demonstrated that GmMYB12B2 showed transcriptional activity. GmMYB12B2 was localized in the nucleus when it was transiently expressed in onion epidermal cells. Real-time quantitative PCR analysis revealed that GmMYB12B2 transcription was increased in roots and mature seeds compared with other organs. The gene expression level in immature embryos was consistent with the accumulation of isoflavones. CHS8 is a key enzyme in plant flavonoid biosynthesis. Transient expression experiments in soybean calli demonstrated that CHS8 was regulated by GmMYB12B2 and produced more fluorescence. The expression levels of some key enzymes in flavonoid biosynthesis were examined in transgenic Arabidopsis lines. The results showed that the expression levels of PAL1, CHS and FLS in transgenic plants were significantly higher than those in wild type plants. However, the expression level of DFR was lower, and the expression levels of CHI, F3H and F3'H were the same in all lines. GmMYB12B2 expression caused a constitutive increase in the accumulation of flavonoids in transgenic Arabidopsis lines compared with wild type plants.

  4. The effect of alcohol and hydrogen peroxide on liver hepcidin gene expression in mice lacking antioxidant enzymes, glutathione peroxidase-1 or catalase.

    PubMed

    Harrison-Findik, Duygu Dee; Lu, Sizhao

    2015-05-06

    This study investigates the regulation of hepcidin, the key iron-regulatory molecule, by alcohol and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in glutathione peroxidase-1 (gpx-1(-/-)) and catalase (catalase(-/-)) knockout mice. For alcohol studies, 10% ethanol was administered in the drinking water for 7 days. Gpx-1(-/-) displayed significantly higher hepatic H2O2 levels than catalase(-/-) compared to wild-type mice, as measured by 2'-7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate (DCFH-DA). The basal level of liver hepcidin expression was attenuated in gpx-1(-/-) mice. Alcohol increased H2O2 production in catalase(-/-) and wild-type, but not gpx-1(-/-), mice. Hepcidin expression was inhibited in alcohol-fed catalase(-/-) and wild-type mice. In contrast, alcohol elevated hepcidin expression in gpx-1(-/-) mice. Gpx-1(-/-) mice also displayed higher level of basal liver CHOP protein expression than catalase(-/-) mice. Alcohol induced CHOP and to a lesser extent GRP78/BiP expression, but not XBP1 splicing or binding of CREBH to hepcidin gene promoter, in gpx-1(-/-) mice. The up-regulation of hepatic ATF4 mRNA levels, which was observed in gpx-1(-/-) mice, was attenuated by alcohol. In conclusion, our findings strongly suggest that H2O2 inhibits hepcidin expression in vivo. Synergistic induction of CHOP by alcohol and H2O2, in the absence of gpx-1, stimulates liver hepcidin gene expression by ER stress independent of CREBH.

  5. Inhibition of Gene Expression of Organic Cation/Carnitine Transporter and Antioxidant Enzymes in Oxazaphosphorines-Induced Acute Cardiomyopathic Rat Models

    PubMed Central

    Sayed-Ahmed, Mohamed M.; Aldelemy, Meshan Lafi; Hafez, Mohamed M.; Al-Shabanah, Othman A.

    2012-01-01

    It is well documented that high therapeutic doses of oxazaphosphorines, cyclophosphamide (CP) and ifosfamide (IFO), are associated with cardiomyopathy. This study investigated whether oxazaphosphorines alter the expression of organic cation/carnitine transporter (OCTN2) and antioxidant genes and if so, whether these alterations contribute to CP and IFO-induced cardiotoxicity. Adult male Wistar albino rats were assigned to one of six treatment groups namely, control, L carnitine, CP, IFO, CP plus L carnitine and IFO plus L carnitine. In cardiac and kidney tissues, CP and IFO significantly decreased mRNA and protein expression of OCTN2. Oxazaphosphorines significantly increased serum acyl-carnitine/free carnitine ratio and urinary carnitine excretion and significantly decreased total carnitine in cardiac tissues. Interestingly, carnitine supplementation completely reversed the biochemical and gene expression changes-induced by oxazaphosphorines to the control values, except OCTN2 expression remained inhibited by IFO. Data from this study suggest that: (1) Oxazaphosphorines decreased myocardial carnitine content following the inhibition of OCTN2 mRNA and protein expression in cardiac tissues. (2) Oxazaphosphorine therapy increased urinary loss of carnitine secondary to the inhibition of OCTN2 mRNA and protein expression in proximal tubules of the kidney. (3) Carnitine supplementation attenuates CP but not IFO-induced inhibition of OCTN2 mRNA and protein expression in heart and kidney tissues. PMID:22701146

  6. Phase variation of a Type IIG restriction-modification enzyme alters site-specific methylation patterns and gene expression in Campylobacter jejuni strain NCTC11168

    PubMed Central

    Anjum, Awais; Brathwaite, Kelly J.; Aidley, Jack; Connerton, Phillippa L.; Cummings, Nicola J.; Parkhill, Julian; Connerton, Ian; Bayliss, Christopher D.

    2016-01-01

    Phase-variable restriction-modification systems are a feature of a diverse range of bacterial species. Stochastic, reversible switches in expression of the methyltransferase produces variation in methylation of specific sequences. Phase-variable methylation by both Type I and Type III methyltransferases is associated with altered gene expression and phenotypic variation. One phase-variable gene of Campylobacter jejuni encodes a homologue of an unusual Type IIG restriction-modification system in which the endonuclease and methyltransferase are encoded by a single gene. Using both inhibition of restriction and PacBio-derived methylome analyses of mutants and phase-variants, the cj0031c allele in C. jejuni strain NCTC11168 was demonstrated to specifically methylate adenine in 5′CCCGA and 5′CCTGA sequences. Alterations in the levels of specific transcripts were detected using RNA-Seq in phase-variants and mutants of cj0031c but these changes did not correlate with observed differences in phenotypic behaviour. Alterations in restriction of phage growth were also associated with phase variation (PV) of cj0031c and correlated with presence of sites in the genomes of these phages. We conclude that PV of a Type IIG restriction-modification system causes changes in site-specific methylation patterns and gene expression patterns that may indirectly change adaptive traits. PMID:26786317

  7. Real time PCR expression analysis of gene encoding p5cs enzyme and proline metabolism under NaCI salinity in rice.

    PubMed

    Bagdi, D L; Shaw, B P; Sahu, B B; Purohit, G K

    2015-07-01

    Regulation of proline accumulation in seedlings of rice (Oryza sativa L. cv. Lunishree) was investigated. The increasing concentration of NaCl from 85 mM to 425 mM NaCl progressively increased proline content in rice. The maximum increase in proline content was recorded at 425 mM NaCl concentration as compared to control and other concentrations of NaCl. The highest significant activity of proline synthesizing enzymes, delta1-Pyrrolline-5-carboxylate synthetase, delta1-Pyrrolline-5-carboxylate reductase and Ornithine-δ- aminotransferase with lowest activity of proline hydrolysis enzymes;Proline dehydrogenase was also recorded at 425 mM NaCl salinity over control and other concentrations of NaCI with insignificant increase in the activity of delta1-Pyrrolline-5-carboxylate synthetase and Ornithine-δ-aminotransferase at 85 mM NaCI over control. It was found that the transcript of gene encoded with p5cs is up regulated about 1.35 folds under salinity stress. This gene synthesis an osmo protectant to help the plant resist the change in osmotic imbalances. Externally addition of MnCl2 at 300 mg/220 ml 1/2 strength Hoagland solution, having 1% NaCI, was also seen to increase 893.9% proline content of this variety as compared to control.

  8. Ghrelin receptor agonist GHRP-2 prevents arthritis-induced increase in E3 ubiquitin-ligating enzymes MuRF1 and MAFbx gene expression in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Granado, Miriam; Priego, Teresa; Martín, Ana I; Villanúa, Maria Angeles; López-Calderón, Asunción

    2005-12-01

    Chronic arthritis is a catabolic state associated with an inhibition of the IGF system and a decrease in body weight. Cachexia and muscular wasting is secondary to protein degradation by the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. The aim of this work was to analyze the effect of adjuvant-induced arthritis on the muscle-specific ubiquitin ligases muscle ring finger 1 (MuRF1) and muscle atrophy F-box (MAFbx) as well as on IGF-I and IGF-binding protein-5 (IGFBP-5) gene expression in the skeletal muscle. We also studied whether the synthetic ghrelin receptor agonist, growth hormone releasing peptide-2 (GHRP-2), was able to prevent arthritis-induced changes in the skeletal muscle. Arthritis induced an increase in MuRF1, MAFbx (P < 0.01), and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha mRNA (P < 0.05) in the skeletal muscle. Arthritis decreased the serum IGF-I and its gene expression in the liver (P < 0.01), whereas it increased IGF-I and IGFBP-5 gene expression in the skeletal muscle (P < 0.01). Administration of GHRP-2 for 8 days prevented the arthritis-induced increase in muscular MuRF1, MAFbx, and TNF-alpha gene expression. GHRP-2 treatment increased the serum concentrations of IGF-I and the IGF-I mRNA in the liver and in the cardiac muscle and decreased muscular IGFBP-5 mRNA both in control and in arthritic rats (P < 0.05). GHRP-2 treatment increased muscular IGF-I mRNA in control rats (P < 0.01), but it did not modify the muscular IGF-I gene expression in arthritic rats. These data indicate that arthritis induces an increase in the activity of the ubiquitin-proteasome proteolytic pathway that is prevented by GHRP-2 administration. The parallel changes in muscular IGFBP-5 and TNF-alpha gene expression with the ubiquitin ligases suggest that they can participate in skeletal muscle alterations during chronic arthritis.

  9. Characterization of the mammalian DNA polymerase gene(s) and enzyme(s). Annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Mishra, N.C.

    1995-01-01

    Two Genes for DNA polymerase delta were identified from the wild type Chinese hamster ovary cells. These genes were cloned via RT-PCR from mRNA prepared the Chinese hamster ovary cells using primers specific to conserved sequences of the DNA polymerase {delta} gene. The first gene encodes a PCNA dependent DNA polymerase {delta} gene whereas the second gene encodes a PCNA independent DNA polymerase {delta} gene. Methods were developed to clone these genes in expression vector and host systems. The role of the two genes in DNA replication and repair was determined.

  10. Stress enhances the gene expression and enzyme activity of phenylalanine ammonia-lyase and the endogenous content of salicylic acid to induce flowering in pharbitis.

    PubMed

    Wada, Kaede C; Mizuuchi, Kaori; Koshio, Aya; Kaneko, Kentaro; Mitsui, Toshiaki; Takeno, Kiyotoshi

    2014-07-01

    The involvement of salicylic acid (SA) in the regulation of stress-induced flowering in the short-day plant pharbitis (also called Japanese morning glory) Ipomoea nil (formerly Pharbitis nil) was studied. Pharbitis cv. Violet was induced to flower when grown in 1/100-strength mineral nutrient solution under non-inductive long-day conditions. All fully expanded true leaves were removed from seedlings, leaving only the cotyledons, and flowering was induced under poor-nutrition stress conditions. This indicates that cotyledons can play a role in the regulation of poor-nutrition stress-induced flowering. The expression of the pharbitis homolog of PHENYLALANINE AMMONIA-LYASE, the enzyme activity of phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL; E.C. 4.3.1.5) and the content of SA in the cotyledons were all up-regulated by the stress treatment. The Violet was also induced to flower by low-temperature stress, DNA demethylation and short-day treatment. Low-temperature stress enhanced PAL activity, whereas non-stress factors such as DNA demethylation and short-day treatment decreased the activity. The PAL enzyme activity was also examined in another cultivar, Tendan, obtaining similar results to Violet. The exogenously applied SA did not induce flowering under non-stress conditions but did promote flowering under weak stress conditions in both cultivars. These results suggest that stress-induced flowering in pharbitis is induced, at least partly, by SA, and the synthesis of SA is promoted by PAL.

  11. Effects of the pharmaceuticals diclofenac and metoprolol on gene expression levels of enzymes of biotransformation, excretion pathways and estrogenicity in primary hepatocytes of Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus).

    PubMed

    Gröner, Frederike; Ziková, Andrea; Kloas, Werner

    2015-01-01

    The expression levels of key enzymes of the xenobiotic metabolism and excretion pathways concerning biotransformation phases I (cytochrome P4501A), II (glutathione S-transferase) and III (multidrug resistance protein) and of the estrogenic biomarker vitellogenin (vtg) were investigated in primary hepatocytes isolated from male Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) after exposure to diclofenac and metoprolol, two pharmaceuticals prevalent in the aquatic environment worldwide. The lowest test concentration (4×10(-9) M) was chosen to reflect an environmentally relevant exposure situation. Furthermore concentration dependent effects were investigated. Therefore a series of concentrations higher than the environmentally relevant range were used (10- and 100-fold). Diclofenac significantly induced all chosen biomarkers already at the environmentally relevant concentration indicating that biotransformation and elimination occur via the pathways under investigation. Estrogenic potential of this substance was demonstrated by VTG up-regulation as well. Metoprolol was either less effective than diclofenac or metabolized using different pathways. Key enzymes of the xenobiotic metabolism were less (CYP1A, GST) or not (MDRP) induced and a mild increase in vtg mRNA was detected only for 4×10(-8) M. No concentration-dependency for metoprolol was found.

  12. FvSNF1, the sucrose non-fermenting protein kinase gene of Fusarium virguliforme, is required for cell-wall-degrading enzymes expression and sudden death syndrome development in soybean.

    PubMed

    Islam, Kazi T; Bond, Jason P; Fakhoury, Ahmad M

    2017-01-28

    Fusarium virguliforme is a soil-borne pathogenic fungus that causes sudden death syndrome (SDS) in soybean. Its pathogenicity is believed to require the activity of cell-wall-degrading enzymes (CWDEs). The sucrose non-fermenting protein kinase 1 gene (SNF1) is a key component of the glucose de-repression pathway in yeast, and a regulator of gene expression for CWDEs in some plant pathogenic fungi. To elucidate the functional role of the SNF1 homolog in F. virguliforme, FvSNF1 was disrupted using a split-marker strategy. Disruption of FvSNF1 in F. virguliforme abolishes galactose utilization and causes poor growth on xylose, arabinose and sucrose. However, the resulting Fvsnf1 mutant grew similar to wild-type and ectopic transformants on glucose, fructose, maltose, or pectin as the main source of carbon. The Fvsnf1 mutant displayed no expression of the gene-encoding galactose oxidase (GAO), a secretory enzyme that catalyzes oxidation of D-galactose. It also exhibited a significant reduction in the expression of several CWDE-coding genes in contrast to the wild-type strain. Greenhouse pathogenicity assays revealed that the Fvsnf1 mutant was severely impaired in its ability to cause SDS on challenged soybean plants. Microscopy and microtome studies on infected roots showed that the Fvsnf1 mutant was defective in colonizing vascular tissue of infected plants. Cross and longitudinal sections of infected roots stained with fluorescein-labeled wheat germ agglutinin and Congo red showed that the Fvsnf1 mutant failed to colonize the xylem vessels and phloem tissue at later stages of infection. Quantification of the fungal biomass in inoculated roots further confirmed a reduced colonization of roots by the Fvsnf1 mutant when compared to the wild type. These findings suggest that FvSNF1 regulates the expression of CWDEs in F. virguliforme, thus affecting the virulence of the fungus on soybean.

  13. Effect of dietary arginine on growth, intestinal enzyme activities and gene expression in muscle, hepatopancreas and intestine of juvenile Jian carp (Cyprinus carpio var. Jian).

    PubMed

    Chen, Gangfu; Feng, Lin; Kuang, Shengyao; Liu, Yang; Jiang, Jun; Hu, Kai; Jiang, Weidan; Li, Shuhong; Tang, Ling; Zhou, Xiaoqiu

    2012-07-01

    The present study was conducted to test the hypothesis that dietary arginine promotes digestion and absorption capacity, and, thus, enhances fish growth. This improvement might be related to the target of rapamycin (TOR) and eIF4E-binding protein (4E-BP). A total of 1200 juvenile Jian carp, Cyprinus carpio var. Jian, with an average initial weight of 6.33 (SE 0.03) g, were fed with diets containing graded concentrations of arginine, namely, 9.8 (control), 12.7, 16.1, 18.5, 21.9 and 24.5 g arginine/kg diet for 9 weeks. An real-time quantitative PCR analysis was performed to determine the relative expression of TOR and 4E-BP in fish muscle, hepatopancreas and intestine. Dietary arginine increased (P < 0.05): (1) glutamate-oxaloacetate transaminase and glutamate-pyruvate transaminase activities in muscle and hepatopancreas; (2) intestine and hepatopancreas protein content, folds height, and trypsin, chymotrypsin, lipase, Na⁺/K⁺-ATPase, alkaline phosphatase, γ-glutamyl transpeptidase and creatine kinase activities in intestine; (3) Lactobacillus counts; (4) relative expression of TOR in the muscle, hepatopancreas and distal intestine (DI); (5) relative expression of 4E-BP in proximal intestine (PI) and mid-intestine (MI), as compared with the control group. In contrast, dietary arginine reduced (P < 0.05): (1) plasma ammonia content; (2) Aeromonas hydrophila and Escherichia coli counts; (3) relative expression of TOR in PI and MI; (4) relative expression of 4E-BP in the muscle, hepatopancreas and DI. The arginine requirement estimated by specific growth rate using quadratic regression analysis was found to be 18.0 g/kg diet. These results indicate that arginine improved fish growth, digestive and absorptive ability and regulated the expression of TOR and 4E-BP genes.

  14. Reconstitution of an active magnesium chelatase enzyme complex from the bchI, -D, and -H gene products of the green sulfur bacterium Chlorobium vibrioforme expressed in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Petersen, B L; Jensen, P E; Gibson, L C; Stummann, B M; Hunter, C N; Henningsen, K W

    1998-02-01

    Magnesium-protoporphyrin chelatase, the first enzyme unique to the (bacterio)chlorophyll-specific branch of the porphyrin biosynthetic pathway, catalyzes the insertion of Mg2+ into protoporphyrin IX. Three genes, designated bchI, -D, and -H, from the strictly anaerobic and obligately phototrophic green sulfur bacterium Chlorobium vibrioforme show a significant level of homology to the magnesium chelatase-encoding genes bchI, -D, and -H and chlI, -D, and -H of Rhodobacter sphaeroides and Synechocystis strain PCC6803, respectively. These three genes were expressed in Escherichia coli; the subsequent purification of overproduced BchI and -H proteins on an Ni2+-agarose affinity column and denaturation of insoluble BchD protein in 6 M urea were required for reconstitution of Mg-chelatase activity in vitro. This work therefore establishes that the magnesium chelatase of C. vibrioforme is similar to the magnesium chelatases of the distantly related bacteria R. sphaeroides and Synechocystis strain PCC6803 with respect to number of subunits and ATP requirement. In addition, reconstitution of an active heterologous magnesium chelatase enzyme complex was obtained by combining the C. vibrioforme BchI and -D proteins and the Synechocystis strain PCC6803 ChlH protein. Furthermore, two versions, with respect to the N-terminal start of the bchI gene product, were expressed in E. coli, yielding ca. 38- and ca. 42-kDa versions of the BchI protein, both of which proved to be active. Western blot analysis of these proteins indicated that two forms of BchI, corresponding to the 38- and the 42-kDa expressed proteins, are also present in C. vibrioforme.

  15. Heterologous expression of the Rhodobacter capsulatus BchI, -D, and -H genes that encode magnesium chelatase subunits and characterization of the reconstituted enzyme.

    PubMed

    Willows, R D; Beale, S I

    1998-12-18

    Magnesium chelatase inserts Mg2+ into protoporphyrin IX in the chlorophyll and bacteriochlorophyll biosynthetic pathways. In photosynthetic bacteria, the products of three genes, bchI, bchD, and bchH, are required for magnesium chelatase activity. These genes from Rhodobacter capsulatus were cloned separately into expression plasmids pET3a and pET15b. The pET15b constructs produced NH2-terminally His6-tagged proteins. All proteins were highly expressed and were purified to near homogeneity. The BchI and BchH proteins were soluble. BchD proteins were insoluble, inactive inclusion bodies that were renatured by rapid dilution from 6 M urea. The presence of BchI in the solution into which the urea solution of BchD was diluted increased the yield of active BchD. A molar ratio of 1 BchI:1 BchD was sufficient for maximum renaturation of BchD. All of the proteins were active in the magnesium chelatase assay except His-tagged BchI, which was inactive and inhibited in incubations containing non-His-tagged BchI. Expressed BchH proteins contained tightly bound protoporphyrin IX, and they were susceptible to inactivation by light. Maximum magnesium chelatase activity per mol of BchD occurred at a stoichiometry of 4 BchI:1 BchD. The optimum reaction pH was 8.0. The reaction exhibited Michaelis-Menten kinetics with respect to protoporphyrin IX and BchH.

  16. Crocin "saffron" protects against beryllium chloride toxicity in rats through diminution of oxidative stress and enhancing gene expression of antioxidant enzymes.

    PubMed

    El-Beshbishy, Hesham A; Hassan, Memy H; Aly, Hamdy A A; Doghish, Ahmed S; Alghaithy, Abdulaziz A A

    2012-09-01

    Beryllium chloride (BeCl(2)) is a highly toxic substance that accumulates in different tissues after absorption. The purpose of this study was to investigate protective role of crocin against BeCl(2)-intoxication in rats. Male Wistar rats were used in this study and categorised into four groups (n=8). Group I served as normal control rats. Group II treated orally with BeCl(2) 86 mg/kg b.w. for five consecutive days. This dose was equivalent to experimental LD(50). Group III treated intraperitoneally with crocin 200 mg/kg b.w. for seven consecutive days. Group IV received crocin for seven consecutive days before BeCl(2) administration. Blood samples and liver and brain homogenates were obtained for haematological, biochemical and RT-PCR examinations. The haematocrit value, RBCs count and haemoglobin concentration were significantly decreased in BeCl(2)-treated rats. A significant increase was observed in rat liver and brain malondialdehyde level and protein carbonyls content in BeCl(2) exposed group compared to the control group, and these values were significantly declined upon administration of crocin. Lactate dehydrogenase levels in rat liver and brain significantly increased compared to the control group and was associated with significant decrease in catalase and superoxide dismutase activities. Reduced glutathione hepatic contents of BeCl(2)-treated rats were significantly decreased. There was significant decline in mRNA expression of catalase and superoxide dismutase genes in BeCl(2)-intoxicated rats compared to the normal rats. Crocin treatment prior to BeCl(2) intake resulted in significant increase in mRNA expressions of catalase and superoxide dismutase genes near to normalcy. The haematological and biochemical parameters were restored near to normal levels. Our results suggested that, BeCl(2) induced oxidation of cellular lipids and proteins and that administration of crocin reduced BeCl(2)-induced oxidative stress combined with initiation of m

  17. Genes Encoding Enzymes Involved in Ethanol Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Hurley, Thomas D.; Edenberg, Howard J.

    2012-01-01

    The effects of beverage alcohol (ethanol) on the body are determined largely by the rate at which it and its main breakdown product, acetaldehyde, are metabolized after consumption. The main metabolic pathway for ethanol involves the enzymes alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH). Seven different ADHs and three different ALDHs that metabolize ethanol have been identified. The genes encoding these enzymes exist in different variants (i.e., alleles), many of which differ by a single DNA building block (i.e., single nucleotide polymorphisms [SNPs]). Some of these SNPs result in enzymes with altered kinetic properties. For example, certain ADH1B and ADH1C variants that are commonly found in East Asian populations lead to more rapid ethanol breakdown and acetaldehyde accumulation in the body. Because acetaldehyde has harmful effects on the body, people carrying these alleles are less likely to drink and have a lower risk of alcohol dependence. Likewise, an ALDH2 variant with reduced activity results in acetaldehyde buildup and also has a protective effect against alcoholism. In addition to affecting drinking behaviors and risk for alcoholism, ADH and ALDH alleles impact the risk for esophageal cancer. PMID:23134050

  18. Investigation into the effects of antioxidant-rich extract of Tamarindus indica leaf on antioxidant enzyme activities, oxidative stress and gene expression profiles in HepG2 cells

    PubMed Central

    Razali, Nurhanani; Abdul Aziz, Azlina; Lim, Chor Yin

    2015-01-01

    The leaf extract of Tamarindus indica L. (T. indica) had been reported to possess high phenolic content and showed high antioxidant activities. In this study, the effects of the antioxidant-rich leaf extract of the T. indica on lipid peroxidation, antioxidant enzyme activities, H2O2-induced ROS production and gene expression patterns were investigated in liver HepG2 cells. Lipid peroxidation and ROS production were inhibited and the activity of antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione peroxidase was enhanced when the cells were treated with the antioxidant-rich leaf extract. cDNA microarray analysis revealed that 207 genes were significantly regulated by at least 1.5-fold (p < 0.05) in cells treated with the antioxidant-rich leaf extract. The expression of KNG1, SERPINC1, SERPIND1, SERPINE1, FGG, FGA, MVK, DHCR24, CYP24A1, ALDH6A1, EPHX1 and LEAP2 were amongst the highly regulated. When the significantly regulated genes were analyzed using Ingenuity Pathway Analysis software, “Lipid Metabolism, Small Molecule Biochemistry, Hematological Disease” was the top biological network affected by the leaf extract, with a score of 36. The top predicted canonical pathway affected by the leaf extract was the coagulation system (P < 2.80 × 10−6) followed by the superpathway of cholesterol biosynthesis (P < 2.17 × 10−4), intrinsic prothrombin pathway (P < 2.92 × 10−4), Immune Protection/Antimicrobial Response (P < 2.28 × 10−3) and xenobiotic metabolism signaling (P < 2.41 × 10−3). The antioxidant-rich leaf extract of T. indica also altered the expression of proteins that are involved in the Coagulation System and the Intrinsic Prothrombin Activation Pathway (KNG1, SERPINE1, FGG), Superpathway of Cholesterol Biosynthesis (MVK), Immune protection/antimicrobial response (IFNGR1, LEAP2, ANXA3 and MX1) and Xenobiotic Metabolism Signaling (ALDH6A1, ADH6). In conclusion, the antioxidant-rich leaf extract of T. indica inhibited lipid

  19. Cloning, characterization, and expression in Escherichia coli of a gene encoding Listeria seeligeri catalase, a bacterial enzyme highly homologous to mammalian catalases.

    PubMed Central

    Haas, A; Brehm, K; Kreft, J; Goebel, W

    1991-01-01

    A gene coding for catalase (hydrogen-peroxide:hydrogen-peroxide oxidoreductase; EC 1.11.1.6) of the gram-positive bacterium Listeria seeligeri was cloned from a plasmid library of EcoRI-digested chromosomal DNA, with Escherichia coli DH5 alpha as a host. The recombinant catalase was expressed in E. coli to an enzymatic activity approximately 50 times that of the combined E. coli catalases. The nucleotide sequence was determined, and the deduced amino acid sequence revealed 43.2% amino acid sequence identity between bovine liver catalase and L. seeligeri catalase. Most of the amino acid residues which are involved in catalytic activity, the formation of the active center accession channel, and heme binding in bovine liver catalase were also present in L. seeligeri catalase at the corresponding positions. The recombinant protein contained 488 amino acid residues and had a calculated molecular weight of 55,869. The predicted isoelectric point was 5.0. Enzymatic and genetic analyses showed that there is most probably a single catalase of this type in L. seeligeri. A perfect 21-bp inverted repeat, which was highly homologous to previously reported binding sequences of the Fur (ferric uptake regulon) protein of E. coli, was detected next to the putative promoter region of the L. seeligeri catalase gene. Images PMID:1860824

  20. Cloning, characterization, and expression in Escherichia coli of a gene encoding Listeria seeligeri catalase, a bacterial enzyme highly homologous to mammalian catalases.

    PubMed

    Haas, A; Brehm, K; Kreft, J; Goebel, W

    1991-08-01

    A gene coding for catalase (hydrogen-peroxide:hydrogen-peroxide oxidoreductase; EC 1.11.1.6) of the gram-positive bacterium Listeria seeligeri was cloned from a plasmid library of EcoRI-digested chromosomal DNA, with Escherichia coli DH5 alpha as a host. The recombinant catalase was expressed in E. coli to an enzymatic activity approximately 50 times that of the combined E. coli catalases. The nucleotide sequence was determined, and the deduced amino acid sequence revealed 43.2% amino acid sequence identity between bovine liver catalase and L. seeligeri catalase. Most of the amino acid residues which are involved in catalytic activity, the formation of the active center accession channel, and heme binding in bovine liver catalase were also present in L. seeligeri catalase at the corresponding positions. The recombinant protein contained 488 amino acid residues and had a calculated molecular weight of 55,869. The predicted isoelectric point was 5.0. Enzymatic and genetic analyses showed that there is most probably a single catalase of this type in L. seeligeri. A perfect 21-bp inverted repeat, which was highly homologous to previously reported binding sequences of the Fur (ferric uptake regulon) protein of E. coli, was detected next to the putative promoter region of the L. seeligeri catalase gene.

  1. Correlation Index-Based Responsible-Enzyme Gene Screening (CIRES), a Novel DNA Microarray-Based Method for Enzyme Gene Involved in Glycan Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Harumi; Takematsu, Hiromu; Fujinawa, Reiko; Naito, Yuko; Okuno, Yasushi; Tsujimoto, Gozoh; Suzuki, Akemi; Kozutsumi, Yasunori

    2007-01-01

    Background Glycan biosynthesis occurs though a multi-step process that requires a variety of enzymes ranging from glycosyltransferases to those involved in cytosolic sugar metabolism. In many cases, glycan biosynthesis follows a glycan-specific, linear pathway. As glycosyltransferases are generally regulated at the level of transcription, assessing the overall transcriptional profile for glycan biosynthesis genes seems warranted. However, a systematic approach for assessing the correlation between glycan expression and glycan-related gene expression has not been reported previously. Methodology To facilitate genetic analysis of glycan biosynthesis, we sought to correlate the expression of genes involved in cell-surface glycan formation with the expression of the glycans, as detected by glycan-recognizing probes. We performed cross-sample comparisons of gene expression profiles using a newly developed, glycan-focused cDNA microarray. Cell-surface glycan expression profiles were obtained using flow cytometry of cells stained with plant lectins. Pearson's correlation coefficients were calculated for these profiles and were used to identify enzyme genes correlated with glycan biosynthesis. Conclusions This method, designated correlation index-based responsible-enzyme gene screening (CIRES), successfully identified genes already known to be involved in the biosynthesis of certain glycans. Our evaluation of CIRES indicates that it is useful for identifying genes involved in the biosynthesis of glycan chains that can be probed with lectins using flow cytometry. PMID:18043739

  2. Effects of triclosan on the detoxification system in the yellow catfish (Pelteobagrus fulvidraco): expressions of CYP and GST genes and corresponding enzyme activity in phase I, II and antioxidant system.

    PubMed

    Ku, Peijia; Wu, Xiaoyan; Nie, Xiangping; Ou, Ruikang; Wang, Lan; Su, Tian; Li, Yigang

    2014-11-01

    Triclosan (TCS), a broad-spectrum antibacterial agent widely used in pharmaceuticals and personal case products (PPCPs), has been universally detected in aquatic ecosystem in recent years. Unfortunately, there is limited information about its potential impacts on responses of genes and enzymes related to fish detoxification. In the present work, we cloned CYP3A and alpha-GST of yellow catfish (Pelteobagrus fulvidraco) and tested the transcriptional expression of CYP1A, CYP3A and GST as well as the alterations of their corresponding enzymes, including ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase (EROD), aminopyrine N-demethylase (APND), erythromycin N-demethylase (ERND), glutathione S-transferase (GST) and catalase (CAT), and also the oxidative product malondialdehyde (MDA) content in the liver of P. fulvidraco exposed to TCS. Amino acids of CYP3A and GST were deduced and phylogenetic tree was constructed respectively. High identity percent was exhibited between P. fulvidraco and other species, such as other fish, birds and mammals. Results indicated that TCS significantly elevated CYP1A and GST but decreased CYP3A expression, EROD activity and MDA content at lower concentrations of TCS at 24h. Moreover, CYP3A and GST were significantly inhibited at 72 h but induced at 168 h at lower concentrations. However, CYP3A was always induced at the highest concentration during the exposure period. Furthermore, CYP3A, GST, GST enzyme and MDA content exhibited a dose-effect relationship to some extent, but no significant responses were observed in ERND, APND and CAT except for individual treatments. Taken together, EROD was the most sensitive to TCS exposure as compared to other enzymes. Meanwhile, mRNA responses were more sensitive in yellow catfish.

  3. Identification of Enzyme Genes Using Chemical Structure Alignments of Substrate-Product Pairs.

    PubMed

    Moriya, Yuki; Yamada, Takuji; Okuda, Shujiro; Nakagawa, Zenichi; Kotera, Masaaki; Tokimatsu, Toshiaki; Kanehisa, Minoru; Goto, Susumu

    2016-03-28

    Although there are several databases that contain data on many metabolites and reactions in biochemical pathways, there is still a big gap in the numbers between experimentally identified enzymes and metabolites. It is supposed that many catalytic enzyme genes are still unknown. Although there are previous studies that estimate the number of candidate enzyme genes, these studies required some additional information aside from the structures of metabolites such as gene expression and order in the genome. In this study, we developed a novel method to identify a candidate enzyme gene of a reaction using the chemical structures of the substrate-product pair (reactant pair). The proposed method is based on a search for similar reactant pairs in a reference database and offers ortholog groups that possibly mediate the given reaction. We applied the proposed method to two experimentally validated reactions. As a result, we confirmed that the histidine transaminase was correctly identified. Although our method could not directly identify the asparagine oxo-acid transaminase, we successfully found the paralog gene most similar to the correct enzyme gene. We also applied our method to infer candidate enzyme genes in the mesaconate pathway. The advantage of our method lies in the prediction of possible genes for orphan enzyme reactions where any associated gene sequences are not determined yet. We believe that this approach will facilitate experimental identification of genes for orphan enzymes.

  4. Nucleosome repositioning underlies dynamic gene expression.

    PubMed

    Nocetti, Nicolas; Whitehouse, Iestyn

    2016-03-15

    Nucleosome repositioning at gene promoters is a fundamental aspect of the regulation of gene expression. However, the extent to which nucleosome repositioning is used within eukaryotic genomes is poorly understood. Here we report a comprehensive analysis of nucleosome positions as budding yeast transit through an ultradian cycle in which expression of >50% of all genes is highly synchronized. We present evidence of extensive nucleosome repositioning at thousands of gene promoters as genes are activated and repressed. During activation, nucleosomes are relocated to allow sites of general transcription factor binding and transcription initiation to become accessible. The extent of nucleosome shifting is closely related to the dynamic range of gene transcription and generally related to DNA sequence properties and use of the coactivators TFIID or SAGA. However, dynamic gene expression is not limited to SAGA-regulated promoters and is an inherent feature of most genes. While nucleosome repositioning occurs pervasively, we found that a class of genes required for growth experience acute nucleosome shifting as cells enter the cell cycle. Significantly, our data identify that the ATP-dependent chromatin-remodeling enzyme Snf2 plays a fundamental role in nucleosome repositioning and the expression of growth genes. We also reveal that nucleosome organization changes extensively in concert with phases of the cell cycle, with large, regularly spaced nucleosome arrays being established in mitosis. Collectively, our data and analysis provide a framework for understanding nucleosome dynamics in relation to fundamental DNA-dependent transactions.

  5. Macrophage mediated PCI enhanced gene-directed enzyme prodrug therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christie, Catherine E.; Zamora, Genesis; Kwon, Young J.; Berg, Kristian; Madsen, Steen J.; Hirschberg, Henry

    2015-03-01

    Photochemical internalization (PCI) is a photodynamic therapy-based approach for improving the delivery of macromolecules and genes into the cell cytosol. Prodrug activating gene therapy (suicide gene therapy) employing the transduction of the E. coli cytosine deaminase (CD) gene into tumor cells, is a promising method. Expression of this gene within the target cell produces an enzyme that converts the nontoxic prodrug, 5-FC, to the toxic metabolite, 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). 5-FC may be particularly suitable for brain tumors, because it can readily cross the bloodbrain barrier (BBB). In addition the bystander effect, where activated drug is exported from the transfected cancer cells into the tumor microenvironment, plays an important role by inhibiting growth of adjacent tumor cells. Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) are frequently found in and around glioblastomas. Monocytes or macrophages (Ma) loaded with drugs, nanoparticles or photosensitizers could therefore be used to target tumors by local synthesis of chemo attractive factors. The basic concept is to combine PCI, to enhance the ex vivo transfection of a suicide gene into Ma, employing specially designed core/shell NP as gene carrier.

  6. Bacteriophage T4 deoxynucleotide kinase: gene cloning and enzyme purification.

    PubMed Central

    Brush, G S; Bhatnagar, S K; Bessman, M J

    1990-01-01

    Gene 1 of bacteriophage T4 has been cloned into a lambda pL expression vector, resulting in the overproduction of deoxynucleotide kinase. A procedure that includes affinity chromatography on Cibacron Blue F3GA-agarose has been used to purify milligram quantities of enzymes from a 2-liter culture. The enzyme has been partially characterized in vitro and in vivo, and it appears to be identical to the deoxynucleotide kinase isolated from T4-infected Escherichia coli. These results prove the earlier contention that the phosphorylation of three dissimilar deoxynucleotides (5-hydroxymethyldeoxycytidylate, dTMP, and dGMP), to the exclusion of most others, is catalyzed by a single protein. Images PMID:2160930

  7. Abnormally high digestive enzyme activity and gene expression explain the contemporary evolution of a Diabrotica biotype able to feed on soybeans

    PubMed Central

    Curzi, Matías J; Zavala, Jorge A; Spencer, Joseph L; Seufferheld, Manfredo J

    2012-01-01

    Western corn rootworm (Diabrotica virgifera) (WCR) depends on the continuous availability of corn. Broad adoption of annual crop rotation between corn (Zea mays) and nonhost soybean (Glycine max) exploited WCR biology to provide excellent WCR control, but this practice dramatically reduced landscape heterogeneity in East-central Illinois and imposed intense selection pressure. This selection resulted in behavioral changes and “rotation-resistant” (RR) WCR adults. Although soybeans are well defended against Coleopteran insects by cysteine protease inhibitors, RR-WCR feed on soybean foliage and remain long enough to deposit eggs that will hatch the following spring and larvae will feed on roots of planted corn. Other than documenting changes in insect mobility and egg laying behavior, 15 years of research have failed to identify any diagnostic differences between wild-type (WT)- and RR-WCR or a mechanism that allows for prolonged RR-WCR feeding and survival in soybean fields. We documented differences in behavior, physiology, digestive protease activity (threefold to fourfold increases), and protease gene expression in the gut of RR-WCR adults. Our data suggest that higher constitutive activity levels of cathepsin L are part of the mechanism that enables populations of WCR to circumvent soybean defenses, and thus, crop rotation. These new insights into the mechanism of WCR tolerance of soybean herbivory transcend the issue of RR-WCR diagnostics and management to link changes in insect gut proteolytic activity and behavior with landscape heterogeneity. The RR-WCR illustrates how agro-ecological factors can affect the evolution of insects in human-altered ecosystems. PMID:22957201

  8. Expression of streptavidin gene in bacteria and plants

    SciTech Connect

    Guan, Xueni; Wurtele, E.S.; Nikolau, B.J. )

    1990-05-01

    Six biotin-containing proteins are present in plants, representing at least four different biotin enzymes. The physiological function of these biotin enzymes is not understood. Streptavidin, a protein from Streptomyces avidinii, binds tightly and specifically to biotin causing inactivation of biotin enzymes. One approach to elucidating the physiological function of biotin enzymes in plant metabolism is to create transgenic plants expressing the streptavidin gene. A plasmid containing a fused streptavidin-beta-galactosidase gene has been expressed in E. coli. We also have constructed various fusion genes that include an altered CaMV 35S promoter, signal peptides to target the streptavidin protein to specific organelles, and the streptavidin coding gene. We are examining the expression of these genes in cells of carrot.

  9. Gene expression profiles of some cytokines, growth factors, receptors, and enzymes (GM-CSF, IFNγ, MMP-2, IGF-II, EGF, TGF-β, IGF-IIR) during pregnancy in the cat uterus.

    PubMed

    Agaoglu, Ozgecan Korkmaz; Agaoglu, Ali Reha; Guzeloglu, Aydin; Aslan, Selim; Kurar, Ercan; Kayis, Seyit Ali; Schäfer-Somi, Sabine

    2016-03-01

    Early pregnancy is one of the most critical periods of pregnancy, and many factors such as cytokines, enzymes, and members of the immune system have to cooperate in a balanced way. In the present study, the gene expression profiles of factors associated with pregnancy such as EGF, transforming growth factor beta, granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor, interferon gamma, insulin-like growth factor 2, insulin-like growth factor 2 receptor, and matrix metalloproteinase 2 were analyzed in uterine tissues of female cats. The cats were assigned to five groups: G1 (embryo positive, n = 7; 7th day after mating), G2 (after implantation, n = 7; 20th day after mating), G3 (midgestation, n = 7; 24-25th day after mating), G4 (late gestation, n = 7; 30-45th day after mating), G5 (oocyte group, n = 7; 7th day after estrus). Tissue samples from the uterus and placenta were collected after ovariohysterectomy. Relative messenger RNA levels were determined by real-time polymerase chain reaction. All the factors examined were detected in all tissue samples. In the course of pregnancy, significantly higher expression of EGF and matrix metalloproteinase 2 in G2 than in G1 was observed (P < 0.05). Insulin-like growth factor 2 expression was higher in all groups than in G1 (P < 0.05). Upregulation of EGF during implantation was detected. The expression of interferon gamma was significantly higher in G3 than in G1 (P < 0.05). Transforming growth factor beta and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor were constantly expressed in all groups. In conclusion, the expressions of these factors in feline uterine tissue at different stages of pregnancy might indicate that these factors play roles in the development of pregnancy such as trophoblast invasion, vascularization, implantation, and placentation.

  10. Method of controlling gene expression

    DOEpatents

    Peters, Norman K.; Frost, John W.; Long, Sharon R.

    1991-12-03

    A method of controlling expression of a DNA segment under the control of a nod gene promoter which comprises administering to a host containing a nod gene promoter an amount sufficient to control expression of the DNA segment of a compound of the formula: ##STR1## in which each R is independently H or OH, is described.

  11. The flow of gene expression.

    PubMed

    Misteli, Tom

    2004-03-01

    Gene expression is a highly interconnected multistep process. A recent meeting in Iguazu Falls, Argentina, highlighted the need to uncover both the molecular details of each single step as well as the mechanisms of coordination among processes in order to fully understand the expression of genes.

  12. Coordinated changes in xenobiotic metabolizing enzyme (XME) gene expression through the life stages of the male C57BL/6 mouse

    EPA Science Inventory

    Metabolic homeostasis of the organism is maintained by the liver's ability to detoxify and eliminate xenobiotics. This is accomplished, in part, by the expression of XMEs, which metabolize xenobiotics and determine whether exposure will result in toxicity. Some evidence indicates...

  13. Effect of lead treatment on medicarpin accumulation and on the gene expression of key enzymes involved in medicarpin biosynthesis in Medicago sativa L.

    PubMed

    Ghelich, Sima; Zarinkamar, Fatemeh; Soltani, Bahram Mohammad; Niknam, Vahid

    2014-12-01

    Lead (Pb) is the most common heavy metal contaminant in the environment. The present study was undertaken to determine the effect of Pb treatment on medicarpin production and accumulation in Medicago sativa L. To this aim, 7- and 30-day-old plants were treated with 0, 120, 240, 500, and 1,000 μM Pb during 10 days. The content of medicarpin was determined by HPLC, and the extent of medicarpin production was deduced from the result of semiquantitative RT-PCR performed on PAL, CHS, and VR genes. HPLC results indicated that medicarpin concentration has been reduced in the roots, while its exudation to the culture medium has been increased. RT-PCR results indicated that the transcript levels of PAL, CHS, and VR genes have not been affected following Pb stress in seedlings. At the vegetative stage, transcript levels of PAL and CHS genes have been reduced in the roots. However, the transcript level of VR gene increased at 120 and 240 μM Pb, while it decreased at higher concentrations. In the shoot, the transcript levels of PAL, CHS, and VR genes were increased following increased concentration of lead in the medium. Overall, q-PCR results suggest that medicarpin biosynthesis has been induced in the shoots and reduced in the roots of the plants treated with a toxic concentration of Pb.

  14. Dietary phenylalanine-improved intestinal barrier health in young grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella) is associated with increased immune status and regulated gene expression of cytokines, tight junction proteins, antioxidant enzymes and related signalling molecules.

    PubMed

    Feng, Lin; Li, Wen; Liu, Yang; Jiang, Wei-Dan; Kuang, Sheng-Yao; Jiang, Jun; Tang, Ling; Wu, Pei; Tang, Wu-Neng; Zhang, Yong-An; Zhou, Xiao-Qiu

    2015-08-01

    The present work evaluated the effects of dietary phenylalanine (Phe) on the intestinal immune response, tight junction proteins transcript abundance, and the gene expression of immune- and antioxidant-related signalling molecules in the intestine. In addition, the dietary Phe (and Phe + Tyr) requirement of young grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella) was also estimated. Fish were fed fish meal-casein-gelatin based diets (302.3 g crude protein kg(-1)) containing 3.4 (basal diet), 6.1, 9.1, 11.5, 14.0 and 16.8 g Phe kg(-1) with a fixed amount of 10.7 g tyrosine kg(-1) for 8 weeks. The results showed that Phe deficiency or excess Phe reduced the lysozyme and acid phosphatase activities and complement C 3 content in the intestine (P < 0.05). Moreover, zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1), occludin and claudin c mRNA levels were highest in the fish fed the diet containing 11.5 g Phe kg(-1) (P < 0.05). However, claudin 12 and claudin b mRNA levels were not significantly affected by dietary Phe (P > 0.05). Gene expression of interleukin-10 (IL-10), transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1), target of rapamycin (TOR) and inhibitor of nuclear factor κBα (IκBα) in proximal intestine (PI), mid intestine (MI) and distal intestine (DI) increased as dietary Phe increased up to 6.1, 9.1, 11.5 and 14.0 g kg(-1), respectively (P < 0.05). However, interleukin-8 (IL-8), tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and nuclear factor-κB p65 (NF-κB p65) mRNA levels showed opposite tendencies. In addition, the mRNA level of superoxide dismutase (SOD) was significantly lower in the intestinal tissue of the group fed a diet with Phe levels of 16.8 g kg(-1) than in those of other groups (P < 0.05). The expression of NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) gene was increased as dietary Phe increased up to 9.1 g kg(-1) (P < 0.05). In conclusion, Phe improved intestinal immune status, and regulated gene expression of cytokines, tight junction proteins, antioxidant enzymes, NF-κB p65, IκBα, TOR, and Nrf2 in the fish

  15. Discovering modulators of gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Babur, Özgün; Demir, Emek; Gönen, Mithat; Sander, Chris; Dogrusoz, Ugur

    2010-01-01

    Proteins that modulate the activity of transcription factors, often called modulators, play a critical role in creating tissue- and context-specific gene expression responses to the signals cells receive. GEM (Gene Expression Modulation) is a probabilistic framework that predicts modulators, their affected targets and mode of action by combining gene expression profiles, protein–protein interactions and transcription factor–target relationships. Using GEM, we correctly predicted a significant number of androgen receptor modulators and observed that most modulators can both act as co-activators and co-repressors for different target genes. PMID:20466809

  16. Acute intermittent porphyria: identification and expression of exonic mutations in the hydroxymethylbilane synthase gene. An initiation codon missense mutation in the housekeeping transcript causes "variant acute intermittent porphyria" with normal expression of the erythroid-specific enzyme.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, C H; Astrin, K H; Lee, G; Anderson, K E; Desnick, R J

    1994-01-01

    Acute intermittent porphyria (AIP), an autosomal dominant inborn error, results from the half-normal activity of the heme biosynthetic enzyme, hydroxymethylbilane synthase (EC 4.3.1.8). Diagnosis of AIP heterozygotes is essential to prevent acute, life-threatening neurologic attacks by avoiding various precipitating factors. Since biochemical diagnosis is problematic, the identification of hydroxymethylbilane synthase mutations has facilitated the detection of AIP heterozygotes. Molecular analyses of unrelated AIP patients revealed six exonic mutations: an initiating methionine to isoleucine substitution (M1I) in a patient with variant AIP, which precluded translation of the housekeeping, but not the erythroid-specific isozyme; four missense mutations in classical AIP patients, V93F, R116W, R201W, C247F; and a nonsense mutation W283X in a classical AIP patient, which truncated the housekeeping and erythroid-specific isozymes. Each mutation was confirmed in genomic DNA from family members. The W283X lesion was found in another unrelated AIP family. Expression of each mutation in Escherichia coli revealed that R201W, C247F, and W283X had residual activity. In vitro transcription/translation studies indicated that the M1I allele produced only the erythroid-specific enzyme, while the other mutant alleles encoded both isozymes. These mutations provide insight into the molecular pathology of classic and variant AIP and facilitate molecular diagnosis in AIP families. Images PMID:7962538

  17. Arabidopsis Plants Acclimate to Water Deficit at Low Cost through Changes of Carbon Usage: An Integrated Perspective Using Growth, Metabolite, Enzyme, and Gene Expression Analysis1[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Hummel, Irène; Pantin, Florent; Sulpice, Ronan; Piques, Maria; Rolland, Gaëlle; Dauzat, Myriam; Christophe, Angélique; Pervent, Marjorie; Bouteillé, Marie; Stitt, Mark; Gibon, Yves; Muller, Bertrand

    2010-01-01

    Growth and carbon (C) fluxes are severely altered in plants exposed to soil water deficit. Correspondingly, it has been suggested that plants under water deficit suffer from C shortage. In this study, we test this hypothesis in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) by providing an overview of the responses of growth, C balance, metabolites, enzymes of the central metabolism, and a set of sugar-responsive genes to a sustained soil water deficit. The results show that under drought, rosette relative expansion rate is decreased more than photosynthesis, leading to a more positive C balance, while root growth is promoted. Several soluble metabolites accumulate in response to soil water deficit, with K+ and organic acids as the main contributors to osmotic adjustment. Osmotic adjustment costs only a small percentage of the daily photosynthetic C fixation. All C metabolites measured (not only starch and sugars but also organic acids and amino acids) show a diurnal turnover that often increased under water deficit, suggesting that these metabolites are readily available for being metabolized in situ or exported to roots. On the basis of 30 enzyme activities, no in-depth reprogramming of C metabolism was observed. Water deficit induces a shift of the expression level of a set of sugar-responsive genes that is indicative of increased, rather than decreased, C availability. These results converge to show that the differential impact of soil water deficit on photosynthesis and rosette expansion results in an increased availability of C for the roots, an increased turnover of C metabolites, and a low-cost C-based osmotic adjustment, and these responses are performed without major reformatting of the primary metabolism machinery. PMID:20631317

  18. Characterization of the mammalian DNA polymerase gene(s) and enzyme(s). Annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Mishra, N.C.

    1994-01-01

    Consistent with the long term goal of our research to understand the nature of the key enzymes in eukaryotic DNA replication we have characterized the properties of the wild type DNA polymerases of the {alpha}-family and their mutants. We have also provided evidence for the role of aphidicolin in the elongation process of the in vivo DNA replication in eukaryotic cells. We also developed a technology for planned prep from a large numbers of clones for direct screening by size or restriction digestion in order to facilitate our goals to clone the DNA polymerase gene.

  19. Gene expression of receptors and enzymes involved in GABAergic and glutamatergic neurotransmission in the CNS of rats behaviourally dependent on ethanol

    PubMed Central

    Eravci, Murat; Schulz, Olaf; Grospietsch, Thorsten; Pinna, Graziano; Brödel, Oliver; Meinhold, Harald; Baumgartner, Andreas

    2000-01-01

    The steady state levels of the messenger RNA (mRNA) of eight GABAA receptor subunits, five glutamate receptor subunits and seven enzymes involved in the synthesis of glutamate and GABA were measured in eight regions of rat brain in a recently developed animal model of ‘behavioural dependence' on ethanol.‘Behavioural dependence' including loss of control was induced by offering the rats the choice between ethanol and water over a 9-month period (Group A). This group was compared with a group given the choice between ethanol and water for only 2 months (not yet ‘behaviourally dependent', Group B), a group forced to consume ethanol as sole fluid over a 9-month period (also not ‘behaviourally dependent', Group C) and ethanol-naive control rats (Group D). All groups were sacrificed 1 month after the ethanol was withdrawn.The mRNA concentrations of all eight GABA receptor subunits, four out of the five subunits of different glutamate receptors and those of seven enzymes involved in GABA and glutamate production were reduced almost exclusively in the parieto-occipital cortex in Groups A and B, but not Group C.These data suggest that the synthesis of glutamate and GABA and the activities of their respective neurons are selectively impaired in the parieto-occipital cortex in the groups having consumed ethanol in a free-choice design, in which its rewarding properties can better take effect than after forced administration.As the parieto-occipital cortex is believed to contain emotional memory structures, it may be hypothesized that the glutamatergic and GABAergic neuronal systems in this area are involved in the development of memory for reward from ethanol. However, they are not specifically associated with ‘behavioural dependence'. PMID:11015291

  20. Gene expression profile analysis of type 2 diabetic mouse liver.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fang; Xu, Xiang; Zhang, Yi; Zhou, Ben; He, Zhishui; Zhai, Qiwei

    2013-01-01

    Liver plays a key role in glucose metabolism and homeostasis, and impaired hepatic glucose metabolism contributes to the development of type 2 diabetes. However, the precise gene expression profile of diabetic liver and its association with diabetes and related diseases are yet to be further elucidated. In this study, we detected the gene expression profile by high-throughput sequencing in 9-week-old normal and type 2 diabetic db/db mouse liver. Totally 12132 genes were detected, and 2627 genes were significantly changed in diabetic mouse liver. Biological process analysis showed that the upregulated genes in diabetic mouse liver were mainly enriched in metabolic processes. Surprisingly, the downregulated genes in diabetic mouse liver were mainly enriched in immune-related processes, although all the altered genes were still mainly enriched in metabolic processes. Similarly, KEGG pathway analysis showed that metabolic pathways were the major pathways altered in diabetic mouse liver, and downregulated genes were enriched in immune and cancer pathways. Analysis of the key enzyme genes in fatty acid and glucose metabolism showed that some key enzyme genes were significantly increased and none of the detected key enzyme genes were decreased. In addition, FunDo analysis showed that liver cancer and hepatitis were most likely to be associated with diabetes. Taken together, this study provides the digital gene expression profile of diabetic mouse liver, and demonstrates the main diabetes-associated hepatic biological processes, pathways, key enzyme genes in fatty acid and glucose metabolism and potential hepatic diseases.

  1. The modular structure of Escherichia coli threonyl-tRNA synthetase as both an enzyme and a regulator of gene expression.

    PubMed

    Caillet, Joël; Nogueira, Teresa; Masquida, Benoît; Winter, Flore; Graffe, Monique; Dock-Brégeon, Anne-Catherine; Torres-Larios, Alfredo; Sankaranarayanan, Rajan; Westhof, Eric; Ehresmann, Bernard; Ehresmann, Chantal; Romby, Pascale; Springer, Mathias

    2003-02-01

    In addition to its role in tRNA aminoacylation, Escherichia coli threonyl-tRNA synthetase is a regulatory protein which binds a site, called the operator, located in the leader of its own mRNA and inhibits translational initiation by competing with ribosome binding. This work shows that the two essential steps of regulation, operator recognition and inhibition of ribosome binding, are performed by different domains of the protein. The catalytic and the C-terminal domain of the protein are involved in binding the two anticodon arm-like structures in the operator whereas the N-terminal domain of the enzyme is responsible for the competition with the ribosome. This is the first demonstration of a modular structure for a translational repressor and is reminiscent of that of transcriptional regulators. The mimicry between the operator and tRNA, suspected on the basis of previous experiments, is further supported by the fact that identical regions of the synthetase recognize both the operator and the tRNA anticodon arm. Based on these results, and recent structural data, we have constructed a computer-derived molecular model for the operator-threonyl-tRNA synthetase complex, which sheds light on several essential aspects of the regulatory mechanism.

  2. The resveratrol analogue, 2,3′,4,5′-tetramethoxystilbene, does not inhibit CYP gene expression, enzyme activity and benzo[a]pyrene–DNA adduct formation in MCF-7 cells exposed to benzo[a]pyrene

    PubMed Central

    Einem Lindeman, Tracey; Poirier, Miriam C.; Divi, Rao L.

    2011-01-01

    Exposure to carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) induces cytochrome P450 (CYP) 1A1 and 1B1 enzymes, which biotransform PAHs resulting in the formation of DNA adducts. We hypothesised that 2,3′,4,5′-tetramethoxystilbene (TMS), an analogue of resveratrol and a potent CYP1B1 inhibitor, may inhibit r7, t8, t9-trihydroxy-c-10-(N2deoxyguanosyl)-7,8,9,10-tetrahydro-benzo[a]pyrene (BPdG) adduct formation in cells exposed to benzo[a]pyrene (BP). To address this, MCF-7 cells were cultured for 96 h in the presence of 1 μM BP, 1 μM BP + 1 μM TMS or 1 μM BP + 4 μM TMS. Cells were assayed at 2–12 h intervals for: BPdG adducts by r7, t8-dihydroxy-t-9,10-epoxy-7,8,9,10-tetrahydrobenzo[a]pyrene (BPDE)-DNA chemiluminescence immunoassay; CYP1A1 and 1B1 gene expression changes by relative real-time polymerase chain reaction; and CYP1A1/1B1 enzyme activity by ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase (EROD) assay. Whereas maximal BPdG levels were similar for all exposure groups, the times at which the maxima were reached increased by 16 and 24 h with the addition of 1 and 4 μM TMS, respectively. The maximal expression of CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 occurred at 16, 24 and 48 h, but the maximal level for EROD-specific activity was reached at 24, 48 and 60 h, in cells exposed to 1 μM BP, 1 μM BP + 1 μM TMS or 1 μM BP + 4 μM TMS, respectively. The area under the curve from 4 to 96 h of exposure (AUC4–96 h) for BPdG adduct formation was not increased in the presence of TMS, but for CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 expression fold increase AUC4–96 h and EROD-specific activity AUC4–96 h, there were significant (P < 0.05) increases in the presence of 4 μM TMS. Therefore, during 96 h of exposure in MCF-7 cells, the combination of BP plus TMS caused a slowing of BP biotransformation, with an increase in CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 expression and EROD activity, and a slowing, but no change in magnitude of BPdG formation. PMID:21669939

  3. Regulation of methane genes and genome expression

    SciTech Connect

    John N. Reeve

    2009-09-09

    At the start of this project, it was known that methanogens were Archaeabacteria (now Archaea) and were therefore predicted to have gene expression and regulatory systems different from Bacteria, but few of the molecular biology details were established. The goals were then to establish the structures and organizations of genes in methanogens, and to develop the genetic technologies needed to investigate and dissect methanogen gene expression and regulation in vivo. By cloning and sequencing, we established the gene and operon structures of all of the “methane” genes that encode the enzymes that catalyze methane biosynthesis from carbon dioxide and hydrogen. This work identified unique sequences in the methane gene that we designated mcrA, that encodes the largest subunit of methyl-coenzyme M reductase, that could be used to identify methanogen DNA and establish methanogen phylogenetic relationships. McrA sequences are now the accepted standard and used extensively as hybridization probes to identify and quantify methanogens in environmental research. With the methane genes in hand, we used northern blot and then later whole-genome microarray hybridization analyses to establish how growth phase and substrate availability regulated methane gene expression in Methanobacterium thermautotrophicus ΔH (now Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus). Isoenzymes or pairs of functionally equivalent enzymes catalyze several steps in the hydrogen-dependent reduction of carbon dioxide to methane. We established that hydrogen availability determine which of these pairs of methane genes is expressed and therefore which of the alternative enzymes is employed to catalyze methane biosynthesis under different environmental conditions. As were unable to establish a reliable genetic system for M. thermautotrophicus, we developed in vitro transcription as an alternative system to investigate methanogen gene expression and regulation. This led to the discovery that an archaeal protein

  4. Genome-Wide Prediction of Metabolic Enzymes, Pathways, and Gene Clusters in Plants1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Peifen; Kim, Taehyong; Banf, Michael; Chavali, Arvind K.; Nilo-Poyanco, Ricardo; Bernard, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Plant metabolism underpins many traits of ecological and agronomic importance. Plants produce numerous compounds to cope with their environments but the biosynthetic pathways for most of these compounds have not yet been elucidated. To engineer and improve metabolic traits, we need comprehensive and accurate knowledge of the organization and regulation of plant metabolism at the genome scale. Here, we present a computational pipeline to identify metabolic enzymes, pathways, and gene clusters from a sequenced genome. Using this pipeline, we generated metabolic pathway databases for 22 species and identified metabolic gene clusters from 18 species. This unified resource can be used to conduct a wide array of comparative studies of plant metabolism. Using the resource, we discovered a widespread occurrence of metabolic gene clusters in plants: 11,969 clusters from 18 species. The prevalence of metabolic gene clusters offers an intriguing possibility of an untapped source for uncovering new metabolite biosynthesis pathways. For example, more than 1,700 clusters contain enzymes that could generate a specialized metabolite scaffold (signature enzymes) and enzymes that modify the scaffold (tailoring enzymes). In four species with sufficient gene expression data, we identified 43 highly coexpressed clusters that contain signature and tailoring enzymes, of which eight were characterized previously to be functional pathways. Finally, we identified patterns of genome organization that implicate local gene duplication and, to a lesser extent, single gene transposition as having played roles in the evolution of plant metabolic gene clusters. PMID:28228535

  5. Human Lacrimal Gland Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Aakalu, Vinay Kumar; Parameswaran, Sowmya; Maienschein-Cline, Mark; Bahroos, Neil; Shah, Dhara; Ali, Marwan; Krishnakumar, Subramanian

    2017-01-01

    Background The study of human lacrimal gland biology and development is limited. Lacrimal gland tissue is damaged or poorly functional in a number of disease states including dry eye disease. Development of cell based therapies for lacrimal gland diseases requires a better understanding of the gene expression and signaling pathways in lacrimal gland. Differential gene expression analysis between lacrimal gland and other embryologically similar tissues may be helpful in furthering our understanding of lacrimal gland development. Methods We performed global gene expression analysis of human lacrimal gland tissue using Affymetrix ® gene expression arrays. Primary data from our laboratory was compared with datasets available in the NLM GEO database for other surface ectodermal tissues including salivary gland, skin, conjunctiva and corneal epithelium. Results The analysis revealed statistically significant difference in the gene expression of lacrimal gland tissue compared to other ectodermal tissues. The lacrimal gland specific, cell surface secretory protein encoding genes and critical signaling pathways which distinguish lacrimal gland from other ectodermal tissues are described. Conclusions Differential gene expression in human lacrimal gland compared with other ectodermal tissue types revealed interesting patterns which may serve as the basis for future studies in directed differentiation among other areas. PMID:28081151

  6. Lipogenesis and stearoyl-CoA desaturase gene expression and enzyme activity in adipose tissue of short- and long-fed Angus and Wagyu steers fed corn- or hay-based diets.

    PubMed

    Chung, K Y; Lunt, D K; Kawachi, H; Yano, H; Smith, S B

    2007-02-01

    Angus and Wagyu steers consuming high-roughage diets exhibit large differences in adipose tissue fatty acid composition, but there are no differences in terminal measures of stearoyl-CoA desaturase (SCD) activity or gene expression. Also, adipose tissue lipids of cattle fed corn-based diets have greater MUFA:SFA ratios than cattle fed hay-based diets. We hypothesized that any changes in SCD gene expression and activity would precede similar changes in adipose tissue lipogenesis between short- and long-fed endpoints. Furthermore, changes in SCD activity and gene expression between production endpoints would differ between corn- and hay-fed steers and between Wagyu and Angus steers. Angus (n = 8) and Wagyu (n = 8) steers were fed a corn-based diet for 8 mo (short-fed; 16 mo of age) or 16 mo (long-fed; 24 mo of age), whereas another group of Angus (n = 8) and Wagyu (n = 8) steers was fed a hay-based diet for 12 mo (short-fed; 20 mo of age) or 20 mo (long-fed; 28 mo of age) to match the end point BW of the corn-fed steers. Acetate incorporation into lipids in vitro was greater (P < 0.01) in corn-fed steers than in hay-fed steers and tended (P = 0.06) to be greater in Wagyu than in Angus s.c. adipose tissue because the rate in Wagyu was twice that of Angus adipose tissue in the corn-fed, short-fed steers. There were diet x end point interactions for lipogenesis in i.m. and s.c. adipose tissues (both P < 0.01) because lipogenesis was 60 to 90% lower in the long-fed cattle than in short-fed cattle fed the corn-based diet. The greatest SCD enzyme activity in Angus s.c. adipose tissue was observed at 24 mo of age (corn-based diet), but activity in Wagyu adipose tissue was greatest at 28 mo of age (hay-based diet; breed x diet x end point interaction, P = 0.08). For short- vs. long-fed endpoints in Angus, s.c. adipose tissue SCD activity was less (hay diet) or the same (corn diet). Conversely, SCD gene expression was greatest in long-fed Wagyu steers fed the hay- or corn

  7. Regulation of Aspergillus genes encoding plant cell wall polysaccharide-degrading enzymes; relevance for industrial production.

    PubMed

    de Vries, R P

    2003-03-01

    The genus Aspergillus is widely used for the production of plant cell wall polysaccharide-degrading enzymes. The range of enzymes purified from these fungi covers nearly every function required for the complete degradation of cellulose, xyloglucan, xylan, galacto(gluco)mannan and pectin. This paper describes the Aspergillus enzymes involved in the degradation of these polysaccharides and discusses the regulatory systems involved in the expression of the genes encoding these proteins. The latter is of major importance in the large-scale production of these enzymes for industrial applications.

  8. Expression pattern of genes encoding nitrate and ammonium assimilating enzymes in Arabidopsis thaliana exposed to short term NaCl stress.

    PubMed

    Debouba, Mohamed; Dguimi, Houda Maaroufi; Ghorbel, Mohamed; Gouia, Houda; Suzuki, Akira

    2013-01-15

    Key steps in nitrate nutrition and assimilation were assessed over two weeks in control and 100mM NaCl-exposed Arabidopsis thaliana (Columbia) plants. The data showed that NaCl stress lowered nitrate contents in both leaves and roots. While NaCl stress decreased ammonium contents in leaves, it increased the contents in roots at the end of treatment. A survey of transcript levels of NIA1 (At1g77760) and NIA2 (At1g37130) and nitrate reductase (NR, EC 1.6.1.6) activity in the leaves and roots suggested a major role of NIA2 rather than NIA1 in the regulation of NR by salt stress. A drop in mRNA levels for GLN2 (At5g35630) and GLN1;2 (At1g66200) by salt was associated with a similar inhibition of glutamine synthetase (GS, EC 6.3.1.2) activity in the leaves. In the roots, NaCl stress was found to enhance mRNA levels of GLN2 and cytosolic-encoding genes (GLN1;1 (At5g37600) and GLN1;2).

  9. Expression of Enzymes that Metabolize Medications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wotring, Virginia E.; Peters, C. P.

    2012-01-01

    Most pharmaceuticals are metabolized by the liver. Clinically-used medication doses are given with normal liver function in mind. A drug overdose can result if the liver is damaged and removing pharmaceuticals from the circulation at a rate slower than normal. Alternatively, if liver function is elevated and removing drugs from the system more quickly than usual, it would be as if too little drug had been given for effective treatment. Because of the importance of the liver in drug metabolism we want to understand the effects of spaceflight on the enzymes of the liver.

  10. The Entamoeba histolytica genome: primary structure and expression of proteolytic enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Tillack, Manuela; Biller, Laura; Irmer, Henriette; Freitas, Michelle; Gomes, Maria A; Tannich, Egbert; Bruchhaus, Iris

    2007-01-01

    Background A number of studies have shown that peptidases and in particular cysteine peptidases constitute major pathogenicity factors in Entamoeba histolytica. Recent studies have suggested that a considerable number of genes coding for proteolytic enzymes are present within the E. histolytica genome and questions remain about the mode of expression of the various molecules. Results By homology search within the recently published amoeba genome, we identified a total of 86 E. histolytica genes coding for putative peptidases, including 46 recently described peptidase genes. In total these comprise (i) 50 cysteine peptidases of different families but most of which belong to the C1 papain superfamily, (ii) 22 different metallo peptidases from at least 11 different families, (iii) 10 serine peptidases belonging to 3 different families, and (iv) 4 aspartic peptidases of only one family. Using an oligonucleotide microarray, peptidase gene expression patterns of 7 different E. histolytica isolates as well as of heat stressed cells were analysed. A total of 21 out of 79 amoeba peptidase genes analysed were found to be significantly expressed under standard axenic culture conditions whereas the remaining are not expressed or at very low levels only. In heat-stressed cells the expression of 2 and 3 peptidase genes, respectively, were either decreased or increased. Only minor differences were observed between the various isolates investigated, despite the fact that these isolates were originated from asymptomatic individuals or from patients with various forms of amoebic diseases. Conclusion Entamoeba histolytica possesses a large number of genes coding for proteolytic enzymes. Under standard culture conditions or upon heat-stress only a relatively small number of these genes is significantly expressed and only very few variations become apparent between various clinical E. histolytica isolates, calling into question the importance of these enzymes in E. histolytica

  11. Nonreplicating vaccinia vector efficiently expresses recombinant genes.

    PubMed

    Sutter, G; Moss, B

    1992-11-15

    Modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA), a highly attenuated vaccinia virus strain that has been safety tested in humans, was evaluated for use as an expression vector. MVA has multiple genomic deletions and is severely host cell restricted: it grows well in avian cells but is unable to multiply in human and most other mammalian cells tested. Nevertheless, we found that replication of viral DNA appeared normal and that both early and late viral proteins were synthesized in human cells. Proteolytic processing of viral structural proteins was inhibited, however, and only immature virus particles were detected by electron microscopy. We constructed an insertion plasmid with the Escherichia coli lacZ gene under the control of the vaccinia virus late promoter P11, flanked by sequences of MVA DNA, to allow homologous recombination at the site of a naturally occurring 3500-base-pair deletion within the MVA genome. MVA recombinants were isolated and propagated in permissive avian cells and shown to express the enzyme beta-galactosidase upon infection of nonpermissive human cells. The amount of enzyme made was similar to that produced by a recombinant of vaccinia virus strain Western Reserve, which also had the lacZ gene under control of the P11 promoter, but multiplied to high titers. Since recombinant gene expression is unimpaired in nonpermissive human cells, MVA may serve as a highly efficient and exceptionally safe vector.

  12. Monoallelic Gene Expression in Mammals.

    PubMed

    Chess, Andrew

    2016-11-23

    Monoallelic expression not due to cis-regulatory sequence polymorphism poses an intriguing problem in epigenetics because it requires the unequal treatment of two segments of DNA that are present in the same nucleus and that can indeed have absolutely identical sequences. Here, I focus on a few recent developments in the field of monoallelic expression that are of particular interest and raise interesting questions for future work. One development is regarding analyses of imprinted genes, in which recent work suggests the possibility that intriguing networks of imprinted genes exist and are important for genetic and physiological studies. Another issue that has been raised in recent years by a number of publications is the question of how skewed allelic expression should be for it to be designated as monoallelic expression and, further, what methods are appropriate or inappropriate for analyzing genomic data to examine allele-specific expression. Perhaps the most exciting recent development in mammalian monoallelic expression is a clever and carefully executed analysis of genetic diversity of autosomal genes subject to random monoallelic expression (RMAE), which provides compelling evidence for distinct evolutionary forces acting on random monoallelically expressed genes.

  13. Tuning noise in gene expression.

    PubMed

    Tyagi, Sanjay

    2015-05-05

    The relative contribution of promoter architecture and the associated chromatin environment in regulating gene expression noise has remained elusive. In their recent work, Arkin, Schaffer and colleagues (Dey et al, 2015) show that mean expression and noise for a given promoter at different genomic loci are uncorrelated and influenced by the local chromatin environment.

  14. Efficient production and evaluation of lignocellulolytic enzymes using a constitutive protein expression system in Penicillium oxalicum.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yibo; Xue, Haizhao; Liu, Guodong; Song, Xin; Qu, Yinbo

    2015-06-01

    Native lignocellulolytic enzyme systems secreted by filamentous fungi can be further optimized by protein engineering or supplementation of exogenous enzyme components. We developed a protein production and evaluation system in cellulase-producing fungus Penicillium oxalicum. First, by deleting the major amylase gene amy15A, a strain Δ15A producing few extracellular proteins on starch was constructed. Then, three lignocellulolytic enzymes (BGL4, Xyn10B, and Cel12A) with originally low expression levels were successfully expressed with selected constitutive promoters in strain Δ15A. BGL4 and Cel12A overexpression resulted in increased specific filter paper activity (FPA), while the overexpression of Xyn10B improved volumetric FPA but not specific FPA. By switching the culture medium, this platform is convenient to produce originally low-expressed lignocellulolytic enzymes in relatively high purities on starch and to evaluate the effect of their supplementation on the performance of a complex cellulase system on cellulose.

  15. Repression of gene expression by oxidative stress.

    PubMed Central

    Morel, Y; Barouki, R

    1999-01-01

    Gene expression is modulated by both physiological signals (hormones, cytokines, etc.) and environmental stimuli (physical parameters, xenobiotics, etc.). Oxidative stress appears to be a key pleiotropic modulator which may be involved in either pathway. Indeed, reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been described as second messengers for several growth factors and cytokines, but have also been shown to rise following cellular insults such as xenobiotic metabolism or enzymic deficiency. Extensive studies on the induction of stress-response genes by oxidative stress have been reported. In contrast, owing to the historical focus on gene induction, less attention has been paid to gene repression by ROS. However, a growing number of studies have shown that moderate (i.e. non-cytotoxic) oxidative stress specifically down-regulates the expression of various genes. In this review, we describe the alteration of several physiological functions resulting from oxidative-stress-mediated inhibition of gene transcription. We will then focus on the repressive oxidative modulation of various transcription factors elicited by ROS. PMID:10477257

  16. IDENTIFICATION OF CHANGES IN XENOBIOTIC METABOLISM ENZYME EXPRESSION DURING AGING USING COMPREHENSIVE TRANSCRIPT PROFILING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Aging leads to changes in the expression of enzymes and transporters important in the metabolism and fate of xenobiotics in liver, kidney and intestine. Most notable are the changes in a number of CYP and xenobiotic transporter genes regulated by the nuclear receptors PXR, CAR an...

  17. A highly tunable system for the simultaneous expression of multiple enzymes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Ito, Yoichiro; Yamanishi, Mamoru; Ikeuchi, Akinori; Matsuyama, Takashi

    2015-01-16

    Control of the expression levels of multiple enzymes in transgenic yeasts is essential for the effective production of complex molecules through fermentation. Here, we propose a tunable strategy for the control of expression levels based on the design of terminator regions and other gene-expression control elements in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Our genome-integrated system, which is capable of producing high expression levels over a wide dynamic range, will broadly enable metabolic engineering and synthetic biology. We demonstrated that the activities of multiple cellulases and the production of ethanol were doubled in a transgenic yeast constructed with our system compared with those achieved with a standard expression system.

  18. Differential Gene Expression in Glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Jakobs, Tatjana C.

    2014-01-01

    In glaucoma, regardless of its etiology, retinal ganglion cells degenerate and eventually die. Although age and elevated intraocular pressure (IOP) are the main risk factors, there are still many mysteries in the pathogenesis of glaucoma. The advent of genome-wide microarray expression screening together with the availability of animal models of the disease has allowed analysis of differential gene expression in all parts of the eye in glaucoma. This review will outline the findings of recent genome-wide expression studies and discuss their commonalities and differences. A common finding was the differential regulation of genes involved in inflammation and immunity, including the complement system and the cytokines transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) and tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα). Other genes of interest have roles in the extracellular matrix, cell–matrix interactions and adhesion, the cell cycle, and the endothelin system. PMID:24985133

  19. Differential gene expression in glaucoma.

    PubMed

    Jakobs, Tatjana C

    2014-07-01

    In glaucoma, regardless of its etiology, retinal ganglion cells degenerate and eventually die. Although age and elevated intraocular pressure (IOP) are the main risk factors, there are still many mysteries in the pathogenesis of glaucoma. The advent of genome-wide microarray expression screening together with the availability of animal models of the disease has allowed analysis of differential gene expression in all parts of the eye in glaucoma. This review will outline the findings of recent genome-wide expression studies and discuss their commonalities and differences. A common finding was the differential regulation of genes involved in inflammation and immunity, including the complement system and the cytokines transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) and tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα). Other genes of interest have roles in the extracellular matrix, cell-matrix interactions and adhesion, the cell cycle, and the endothelin system.

  20. Transgenic Arabidopsis Gene Expression System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferl, Robert; Paul, Anna-Lisa

    2009-01-01

    The Transgenic Arabidopsis Gene Expression System (TAGES) investigation is one in a pair of investigations that use the Advanced Biological Research System (ABRS) facility. TAGES uses Arabidopsis thaliana, thale cress, with sensor promoter-reporter gene constructs that render the plants as biomonitors (an organism used to determine the quality of the surrounding environment) of their environment using real-time nondestructive Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) imagery and traditional postflight analyses.

  1. Zipf's Law in Gene Expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furusawa, Chikara; Kaneko, Kunihiko

    2003-02-01

    Using data from gene expression databases on various organisms and tissues, including yeast, nematodes, human normal and cancer tissues, and embryonic stem cells, we found that the abundances of expressed genes exhibit a power-law distribution with an exponent close to -1; i.e., they obey Zipf’s law. Furthermore, by simulations of a simple model with an intracellular reaction network, we found that Zipf’s law of chemical abundance is a universal feature of cells where such a network optimizes the efficiency and faithfulness of self-reproduction. These findings provide novel insights into the nature of the organization of reaction dynamics in living cells.

  2. Role of hepatitis B virus X repression of C/EBPbeta activity in the down-regulation of glutathione S-transferase A2 gene: implications in other phase II detoxifying enzyme expression.

    PubMed

    Cho, I J; Ki, S H; Brooks, C; Kim, S G

    2009-02-01

    1. A genome-wide in silico screening rendered the genes of phase II enzymes in the rat genome whose promoters contain the putative DNA elements interacting with CCAAT/enhancer binding protein (C/EBP) and NF-E2-related factor (Nrf2). The hepatitis B virus X (HBx) protein strongly modulates the transactivation and/or the repression of genes regulated by some bZIP transcription factors. 2. This study investigated the effects of HBx on the induction of phase II enzymes with the aim of elucidating the role of HBx interaction with C/EBPbeta or Nrf2 bZIP transcription factors in hepatocyte-derived cells. 3. Immunoblot and reporter gene analyses revealed that transfection of HBx interfered with the constitutive and inducible GSTA2 transactivation promoted by oltipraz (C/EBPbeta activator), but not that by tert-butylhydroquinone (t-BHQ, Nrf2 activator). Moreover, HBx transfection completely inhibited GSTA2 reporter gene activity induced by C/EBPbeta, but failed to inhibit that by Nrf2. 4. Gel shift assays identified that HBx inhibited the increase in C/EBPbeta-DNA complex formation by oltipraz, but not the increase in Nrf2-DNA complex by t-BHQ. Immunoprecipitation and immunoblot assays verified the direct interaction between HBx and C/EBPbeta. Moreover, chromatin immunoprecipitation assays confirmed HBx inhibition of C/EBPbeta binding to its binding site in the GSTA2 gene promoter. HBx repressed the induction of other phase II enzymes including GSTP, UDP-glucuronyltransferase 1A, microsomal epoxide hydrolase, GSTM1, GSTM2, and gamma-glutamylcysteine synthase. 5. These results demonstrate that HBx inhibits the induction of phase II detoxifying enzymes, which is mediated by its interaction with C/EBPbeta, but not Nrf2, substantiating the specific role of HBx in phase II detoxifying capacity.

  3. Neighboring Genes Show Correlated Evolution in Gene Expression.

    PubMed

    Ghanbarian, Avazeh T; Hurst, Laurence D

    2015-07-01

    When considering the evolution of a gene's expression profile, we commonly assume that this is unaffected by its genomic neighborhood. This is, however, in contrast to what we know about the lack of autonomy between neighboring genes in gene expression profiles in extant taxa. Indeed, in all eukaryotic genomes genes of similar expression-profile tend to cluster, reflecting chromatin level dynamics. Does it follow that if a gene increases expression in a particular lineage then the genomic neighbors will also increase in their expression or is gene expression evolution autonomous? To address this here we consider evolution of human gene expression since the human-chimp common ancestor, allowing for both variation in estimation of current expression level and error in Bayesian estimation of the ancestral state. We find that in all tissues and both sexes, the change in gene expression of a focal gene on average predicts the change in gene expression of neighbors. The effect is highly pronounced in the immediate vicinity (<100 kb) but extends much further. Sex-specific expression change is also genomically clustered. As genes increasing their expression in humans tend to avoid nuclear lamina domains and be enriched for the gene activator 5-hydroxymethylcytosine, we conclude that, most probably owing to chromatin level control of gene expression, a change in gene expression of one gene likely affects the expression evolution of neighbors, what we term expression piggybacking, an analog of hitchhiking.

  4. Enzymes To Die For: Exploiting Nucleotide Metabolizing Enzymes for Cancer Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Ardiani, Andressa; Johnson, Adam J.; Ruan, Hongmei; Sanchez-Bonilla, Marilyn; Serve, Kinta; Black, Margaret E.

    2012-01-01

    Suicide gene therapy is an attractive strategy to selectively destroy cancer cells while minimizing unnecessary toxicity to normal cells. Since this idea was first introduced more than two decades ago, numerous studies have been conducted and significant developments have been made to further its application for mainstream cancer therapy. Major limitations of the suicide gene therapy strategy that have hindered its clinical application include inefficient directed delivery to cancer cells and the poor prodrug activation capacity of suicide enzymes. This review is focused on efforts that have been and are currently being pursued to improve the activity of individual suicide enzymes towards their respective prodrugs with particular attention to the application of nucleotide metabolizing enzymes in suicide cancer gene therapy. A number of protein engineering strategies have been employed and our discussion here will center on the use of mutagenesis approaches to create and evaluate nucleotide metabolizing enzymes with enhanced prodrug activation capacity and increased thermostability. Several of these studies have yielded clinically important enzyme variants that are relevant for cancer gene therapy applications because their utilization can serve to maximize cancer cell killing while minimizing the prodrug dose, thereby limiting undesirable side effects. PMID:22384805

  5. Contribution of enzymatic properties, cell permeability, and enzyme expression to microbiological activities of beta-lactams in three Bacteroides fragilis isolates that harbor a metallo-beta-lactamase gene.

    PubMed Central

    Rasmussen, B A; Yang, Y; Jacobus, N; Bush, K

    1994-01-01

    The metallo-beta-lactamase gene, ccrA, has been cloned from three clinical isolates of Bacteroides fragilis, TAL3636, QMCN3, and QMCN4. Although all three isolates harbored a gene encoding a potent beta-lactamase, the MICs of benzylpenicillin, piperacillin, cefotaxime, ceftazidime, imipenem, and biapenem for the three isolates varied from 4- to > 128-fold. QMCN4 was the most susceptible of the three isolates, followed by QMCN3. TAL3636 was resistant to all of the beta-lactams. Previous DNA sequence analysis of the three ccrA genes revealed that the enzymes differed at 5 amino acid residues (B. A. Rasmussen, Y. Gluzman, and F. P. Tally, Mol. Microbiol. 5:1211-1219, 1991). Biochemical characterization of the three enzymes revealed only small differences in kcat and Km values for the majority of beta-lactams tested. Thus, the 5 amino acid substitutions affected the hydrolyzing activity of the enzymes only modestly. Crypticity differences between the three isolates showed that QMCN4 was the least permeable of the isolates to cephaloridine, followed by TAL3636, and that QMCN3 was highly permeable to cephaloridine. Therefore, neither catalytic activity nor permeability was a major contributor to the dramatic differences in the MICs. Instead, microbiological susceptibility was closely related to the level of metallo-beta-lactamase present in each isolate. Both biochemical and physical studies indicated that TAL3636 produced 5- to 10-fold and 50- to 100-fold more metallo-beta-lactamase than QMCN3 and QMCN4, respectively. Therefore, the level of CcrA enzyme production is the dominant contributing factor to high-level resistance among strains harboring a ccrA gene. Images PMID:7811029

  6. Contribution of enzymatic properties, cell permeability, and enzyme expression to microbiological activities of beta-lactams in three Bacteroides fragilis isolates that harbor a metallo-beta-lactamase gene.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, B A; Yang, Y; Jacobus, N; Bush, K

    1994-09-01

    The metallo-beta-lactamase gene, ccrA, has been cloned from three clinical isolates of Bacteroides fragilis, TAL3636, QMCN3, and QMCN4. Although all three isolates harbored a gene encoding a potent beta-lactamase, the MICs of benzylpenicillin, piperacillin, cefotaxime, ceftazidime, imipenem, and biapenem for the three isolates varied from 4- to > 128-fold. QMCN4 was the most susceptible of the three isolates, followed by QMCN3. TAL3636 was resistant to all of the beta-lactams. Previous DNA sequence analysis of the three ccrA genes revealed that the enzymes differed at 5 amino acid residues (B. A. Rasmussen, Y. Gluzman, and F. P. Tally, Mol. Microbiol. 5:1211-1219, 1991). Biochemical characterization of the three enzymes revealed only small differences in kcat and Km values for the majority of beta-lactams tested. Thus, the 5 amino acid substitutions affected the hydrolyzing activity of the enzymes only modestly. Crypticity differences between the three isolates showed that QMCN4 was the least permeable of the isolates to cephaloridine, followed by TAL3636, and that QMCN3 was highly permeable to cephaloridine. Therefore, neither catalytic activity nor permeability was a major contributor to the dramatic differences in the MICs. Instead, microbiological susceptibility was closely related to the level of metallo-beta-lactamase present in each isolate. Both biochemical and physical studies indicated that TAL3636 produced 5- to 10-fold and 50- to 100-fold more metallo-beta-lactamase than QMCN3 and QMCN4, respectively. Therefore, the level of CcrA enzyme production is the dominant contributing factor to high-level resistance among strains harboring a ccrA gene.

  7. Hepatocyte Growth Factor Regulates Angiotensin Converting Enzyme Expression*

    PubMed Central

    Day, Regina M.; Thiel, Gerald; Lum, Julie; Chévere, Rubén D.; Yang, Yongzhen; Stevens, Joanne; Sibert, Laura; Fanburg, Barry L.

    2008-01-01

    Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) is a mitogen, morphogen, and motogen that functions in tissue healing and acts as an anti-fibrotic factor. The mechanism for this is not well understood. Recent studies implicate somatic angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) in fibrosis. We examined the effects of HGF on ACE expression in bovine pulmonary artery endothelial cells (BPAEC). Short term treatment of BPAEC with HGF transiently increased both ACE mRNA (3 h) and activity (24 h), as determined by ACE protease assays and reverse transcription-PCR. Incubation of BPAEC with HGF for longer periods suppressed ACE mRNA (6 h) and activity (72 h). In contrast, phorbol ester (PMA) treatment produced sustained increase in ACE mRNA and activity. We examined the short term molecular effects of HGF on ACE using PMA for comparison. HGF and PMA increased transcription from a luciferase reporter with the core ACE promoter, which contains a composite binding site for SP1/3 and Egr-1. Immunocytochemistry and electrophoretic mobility shift assay showed that both HGF and PMA increased Egr-1 binding. HGF also increased SP3 binding, as measured by EMSA. However, HGF and PMA increased the cellular activity of only Egr-1, not SP3, as measured by luciferase reporter assays. Deletion of the Egr-1 site in the reporter construct completely abrogated HGF-induced transcription but only ~50% of PMA-induced activity. Expression of dominant negative Egr-1 and SP3 blocked up-regulation of the ACE promoter by HGF but only reduced up-regulation by PMA. These results show that HGF transiently increases gene transcription of ACE via activation of Egr-1, whereas PMA regulation involves Egr-1 and additional factor(s). PMID:14679188

  8. Construction of a tunable multi-enzyme-coordinate expression system for biosynthesis of chiral drug intermediates

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Wei; Fang, Baishan

    2016-01-01

    Systems that can regulate and coordinate the expression of multiple enzymes for metabolic regulation and synthesis of important drug intermediates are poorly explored. In this work, a strategy for constructing a tunable multi-enzyme-coordinate expression system for biosynthesis of chiral drug intermediates was developed and evaluated by connecting protein-protein expressions, regulating the strength of ribosome binding sites (RBS) and detecting the system capacity for producing chiral amino acid. Results demonstrated that the dual-enzyme system had good enantioselectivity, low cost, high stability, high conversion rate and approximately 100% substrate conversion. This study has paved a new way of exploring metabolic mechanism of functional genes and engineering whole cell-catalysts for synthesis of chiral α-hydroxy acids or chiral amino acids. PMID:27456301

  9. Structure, expression and functions of MTA genes.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Rakesh; Wang, Rui-An

    2016-05-15

    Metastatic associated proteins (MTA) are integrators of upstream regulatory signals with the ability to act as master coregulators for modifying gene transcriptional activity. The MTA family includes three genes and multiple alternatively spliced variants. The MTA proteins neither have their own enzymatic activity nor have been shown to directly interact with DNA. However, MTA proteins interact with a variety of chromatin remodeling factors and complexes with enzymatic activities for modulating the plasticity of nucleosomes, leading to the repression or derepression of target genes or other extra-nuclear and nucleosome remodeling and histone deacetylase (NuRD)-complex independent activities. The functions of MTA family members are driven by the steady state levels and subcellular localization of MTA proteins, the dynamic nature of modifying signals and enzymes, the structural features and post-translational modification of protein domains, interactions with binding proteins, and the nature of the engaged and resulting features of nucleosomes in the proximity of target genes. In general, MTA1 and MTA2 are the most upregulated genes in human cancer and correlate well with aggressive phenotypes, therapeutic resistance, poor prognosis and ultimately, unfavorable survival of cancer patients. Here we will discuss the structure, expression and functions of the MTA family of genes in the context of cancer cells.

  10. Transient gene expression in electroporated Solanum protoplasts.

    PubMed

    Jones, H; Ooms, G; Jones, M G

    1989-11-01

    Electroporation was used to evaluate parameters important in transient gene expression in potato protoplasts. The protoplasts were from leaves of wild potato Solanum brevidens, and from leaves, tubers and suspension cells of cultivated Solanum tuberosum cv. Désirée. Reporter enzyme activity, chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (CAT) under the control of the cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) 35S promoter, depended on the field strength and the pulse duration used for electroporation. Using field pulses of 85 ms duration, the optimum field strengths for maximum CAT activity were: S. brevidens mesophyll protoplasts--250 V/cm; Désirée mesophyll protoplasts--225 V/cm; Désirée suspension culture protoplasts--225 V/cm; and Désirée tuber protoplasts--150 V/cm. The optimum field strengths correlated inversely with the size of the protoplasts electroporated; this is consistent with biophysical theory. In time courses, maximum CAT activity (in Désirée mesophyll protoplasts) occurred 36-48 h after electroporation. Examination at optimised conditions of a chimaeric gene consisting of a class II patatin promoter linked to the beta-glucuronidase (gus) gene, showed expression (at DNA concentrations between 0-10 pmol/ml) comparable to the CaMV 35S promoter in both tuber and mesophyll protoplasts. At higher DNA concentrations (20-30 pmol/ml) the patatin promoter directed 4-5 times higher levels of gus expression. Implications and potential contributions towards studying gene expression, in particular of homologous genes in potato, are discussed.

  11. Regulation of ABO gene expression.

    PubMed

    Kominato, Yoshihiko; Hata, Yukiko; Matsui, Kazuhiro; Takizawa, Hisao

    2005-07-01

    The ABO blood group system is important in blood transfusions and in identifying individuals during criminal investigations. Two carbohydrate antigens, the A and B antigens, and their antibodies constitute this system. Although biochemical and molecular genetic studies have demonstrated the molecular basis of the histo-blood group ABO system, some aspects remain to be elucidated. To explain the molecular basis of how the ABO genes are controlled in cell type-specific expression, during normal cell differentiation, and in cancer cells with invasive and metastatic potential that lack A/B antigens, it is essential to understand the regulatory mechanism of ABO gene transcription. We review the transcriptional regulation of the ABO gene, including positive and negative elements in the upstream region of the gene, and draw some inferences that help to explain the phenomena described above.

  12. Expressing exogenous genes in newts by transgenesis.

    PubMed

    Casco-Robles, Martin Miguel; Yamada, Shouta; Miura, Tomoya; Nakamura, Kenta; Haynes, Tracy; Maki, Nobuyasu; Del Rio-Tsonis, Katia; Tsonis, Panagiotis A; Chiba, Chikafumi

    2011-05-01

    The great regenerative abilities of newts provide the impetus for studies at the molecular level. However, efficient methods for gene regulation have historically been quite limited. Here we describe a protocol for transgenically expressing exogenous genes in the newt Cynops pyrrhogaster. This method is simple: a reaction mixture of I-SceI meganuclease and a plasmid DNA carrying a transgene cassette flanked by the enzyme recognition sites is directly injected into fertilized eggs. The protocol achieves a high efficiency of transgenesis, comparable to protocols used in other animal systems, and it provides a practical number of transgenic newts (∼20% of injected embryos) that survive beyond metamorphosis and that can be applied to regenerative studies. The entire protocol for obtaining transgenic adult newts takes 4-5 months.

  13. Heterologous Expression of a Bioactive β-Hexosyltransferase, an Enzyme Producer of Prebiotics, from Sporobolomyces singularis

    PubMed Central

    Dagher, Suzanne F.; Azcarate-Peril, M. Andrea

    2013-01-01

    Galacto-oligosaccharides (GOS) are indigestible dietary fibers that are able to reach the lower gastrointestinal tract to be selectively fermented by health-promoting bacteria. In this report, we describe the heterologous expression of an optimized synthetically produced version of the β-hexosyltransferase gene (Bht) from Sporobolomyces singularis. The Bht gene encodes a glycosyl hydrolase (EC 3.2.1.21) that acts as galactosyltransferase, able to catalyze a one-step conversion of lactose to GOS. Expression of the enzyme in Escherichia coli yielded an inactive insoluble protein, while the methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris GS115 produced a bioactive β-hexosyltransferase (rBHT). The enzyme exhibited faster kinetics at pHs between 3.5 and 6 and at temperatures between 40 and 50°C. Enzyme stability improved at temperatures lower than 40°C, and glucose was found to be a competitive inhibitor of enzymatic activity. P. pastoris secreted a fraction of the bioactive rBHT into the fermentation broth, while the majority of the enzyme remained associated with the outer membrane. Both the secreted and the membrane-associated forms were able to efficiently convert lactose to GOS. Additionally, resting cells with membrane-bound enzyme converted 90% of the initial lactose into GOS at 68% yield (g/g) (the maximum theoretical is 75%) with no secondary residual (glucose or galactose) products. This is the first report of a bioactive BHT from S. singularis that has been heterologously expressed. PMID:23241974

  14. Gene expression profile of pulpitis

    PubMed Central

    Galicia, Johnah C.; Henson, Brett R.; Parker, Joel S.; Khan, Asma A.

    2016-01-01

    The cost, prevalence and pain associated with endodontic disease necessitate an understanding of the fundamental molecular aspects of its pathogenesis. This study was aimed to identify the genetic contributors to pulpal pain and inflammation. Inflamed pulps were collected from patients diagnosed with irreversible pulpitis (n=20). Normal pulps from teeth extracted for various reasons served as controls (n=20). Pain level was assessed using a visual analog scale (VAS). Genome-wide microarray analysis was performed using Affymetrix GeneTitan Multichannel Instrument. The difference in gene expression levels were determined by the Significance Analysis of Microarray program using a false discovery rate (q-value) of 5%. Genes involved in immune response, cytokine-cytokine receptor interaction and signaling, integrin cell surface interactions, and others were expressed at relatively higher levels in the in the pulpitis group. Moreover, several genes known to modulate pain and inflammation showed differential expression in asymptomatic and mild pain patients (≥30mm on VAS) compared to those with moderate to severe pain. This exploratory study provides a molecular basis for the clinical diagnosis of pulpitis. With an enhanced understanding of pulpal inflammation, future studies on treatment and management of pulpitis and on pain associated with it can have a biological reference to bridge treatment strategies with pulpal biology. PMID:27052691

  15. Gene expression profile of pulpitis.

    PubMed

    Galicia, J C; Henson, B R; Parker, J S; Khan, A A

    2016-06-01

    The cost, prevalence and pain associated with endodontic disease necessitate an understanding of the fundamental molecular aspects of its pathogenesis. This study was aimed to identify the genetic contributors to pulpal pain and inflammation. Inflamed pulps were collected from patients diagnosed with irreversible pulpitis (n=20). Normal pulps from teeth extracted for various reasons served as controls (n=20). Pain level was assessed using a visual analog scale (VAS). Genome-wide microarray analysis was performed using Affymetrix GeneTitan Multichannel Instrument. The difference in gene expression levels were determined by the significance analysis of microarray program using a false discovery rate (q-value) of 5%. Genes involved in immune response, cytokine-cytokine receptor interaction and signaling, integrin cell surface interactions, and others were expressed at relatively higher levels in the pulpitis group. Moreover, several genes known to modulate pain and inflammation showed differential expression in asymptomatic and mild pain patients (⩾30 mm on VAS) compared with those with moderate to severe pain. This exploratory study provides a molecular basis for the clinical diagnosis of pulpitis. With an enhanced understanding of pulpal inflammation, future studies on treatment and management of pulpitis and on pain associated with it can have a biological reference to bridge treatment strategies with pulpal biology.

  16. UBA 1: an essential yeast gene encoding ubiquitin-activating enzyme.

    PubMed Central

    McGrath, J P; Jentsch, S; Varshavsky, A

    1991-01-01

    All known functions of ubiquitin are mediated through its covalent attachment to other proteins. The post-translational formation of ubiquitin--protein conjugates is preceded by an ATP-requiring step in which the carboxyl terminus of ubiquitin is adenylated and subsequently joined, through a thiolester bond, to a cysteine residue in the ubiquitin-activating enzyme, also known as E1. We report the isolation and functional analysis of the gene (UBA1) for the ubiquitin-activating enzyme of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. UBA1 encodes a 114 kd protein whose amino acid sequence contains motifs characteristic of nucleotide-binding sites. Expression of catalytically active UBA1 protein in E. coli, which lacks the ubiquitin system, confirmed that the yeast UBA1 gene encodes a ubiquitin-activating enzyme. Deletion of the UBA1 gene is lethal, demonstrating that the formation of ubiquitin--protein conjugates is essential for cell viability. Images PMID:1989885

  17. DNA adenine methyltransferase (Dam) controls the expression of the cytotoxic enterotoxin (act) gene of Aeromonas hydrophila via tRNA modifying enzyme-glucose-inhibited division protein (GidA).

    PubMed

    Erova, Tatiana E; Kosykh, Valeri G; Sha, Jian; Chopra, Ashok K

    2012-05-01

    Aeromonas hydrophila is both a human and animal pathogen, and the cytotoxic enterotoxin (Act) is a crucial virulence factor of this bacterium because of its associated hemolytic, cytotoxic, and enterotoxic activities. Previously, to define the role of some regulatory genes in modulating Act production, we showed that deletion of a glucose-inhibited division gene (gidA) encoding tRNA methylase reduced Act levels, while overproduction of DNA adenine methyltransferase (Dam) led to a concomitant increase in Act-associated biological activities of a diarrheal isolate SSU of A. hydrophila. Importantly, there are multiple GATC binding sites for Dam within an upstream sequence of the gidA gene and one such target site in the act gene upstream region. We showed the dam gene to be essential for the viability of A. hydrophila SSU, and, therefore, to better understand the interaction of the encoding genes, Dam and GidA, in act gene regulation, we constructed a gidA in-frame deletion mutant of Escherichia coli GM28 (dam(+)) and GM33 (∆dam) strains. We then tested the expressional activity of the act and gidA genes by using a promoterless pGlow-TOPO vector containing a reporter green fluorescent protein (GFP). Our data indicated that in GidA(+) strains of E. coli, constitutive methylation of the GATC site(s) by Dam negatively regulated act and gidA gene expression as measured by GFP production. However, in the ∆gidA strains, irrespective of the presence or absence of constitutively active Dam, we did not observe any alteration in the expression of the act gene signifying the role of GidA in positively regulating Act production. To determine the exact mechanism of how Dam and GidA influence Act, a real-time quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) assay was performed. The analysis indicated an increase in gidA and act gene expression in the A. hydrophila Dam-overproducing strain, and these data matched with Act production in the E. coli GM28 strain. Thus, the extent of DNA methylation

  18. Gene expression throughout a vertebrate's embryogenesis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Describing the patterns of gene expression during embryonic development has broadened our understanding of the processes and patterns that define morphogenesis. Yet gene expression patterns have not been described throughout vertebrate embryogenesis. This study presents statistical analyses of gene expression during all 40 developmental stages in the teleost Fundulus heteroclitus using four biological replicates per stage. Results Patterns of gene expression for 7,000 genes appear to be important as they recapitulate developmental timing. Among the 45% of genes with significant expression differences between pairs of temporally adjacent stages, significant differences in gene expression vary from as few as five to more than 660. Five adjacent stages have disproportionately more significant changes in gene expression (> 200 genes) relative to other stages: four to eight and eight to sixteen cell stages, onset of circulation, pre and post-hatch, and during complete yolk absorption. The fewest differences among adjacent stages occur during gastrulation. Yet, at stage 16, (pre-mid-gastrulation) the largest number of genes has peak expression. This stage has an over representation of genes in oxidative respiration and protein expression (ribosomes, translational genes and proteases). Unexpectedly, among all ribosomal genes, both strong positive and negative correlations occur. Similar correlated patterns of expression occur among all significant genes. Conclusions These data provide statistical support for the temporal dynamics of developmental gene expression during all stages of vertebrate development. PMID:21356103

  19. Cloning-independent expression and screening of enzymes using cell-free protein synthesis systems.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Yong-Chan; Song, Jae-Kwang; Kim, Dong-Myung

    2014-01-01

    We present a strategy for expression and screening of microbial enzymes without involving cloning procedures. Libraries of putative ω-transaminases (ω-TA) and mutated Candida antarctica lipase B (CalB) are PCR-amplified from bacterial colonies and directly expressed in an Escherichia coli-based cell-free protein synthesis system. The open nature of cell-free protein synthesis system also allows streamlined analysis of the enzymatic activity of the expressed enzymes, which greatly shortens the time required for enzyme screening. We expect that the proposed strategy will provide a universal platform for bridging the information gap between nucleotide sequence and protein function, in order to accelerate the discovery of novel enzymes. The proposed strategy can also serve as a viable option for the rapid and precise tuning of enzyme molecules, not only for analytical purposes, but also for industrial applications. This is accomplished via large-scale production using microbial cells transformed with variant genes selected from the cell-free expression screening.

  20. Does FACS perturb gene expression?

    PubMed

    Richardson, Graham M; Lannigan, Joanne; Macara, Ian G

    2015-02-01

    Fluorescence activated cell sorting is the technique most commonly used to separate primary mammary epithelial sub-populations. Many studies incorporate this technique before analyzing gene expression within specific cellular lineages. However, to our knowledge, no one has examined the effects of fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS) separation on short-term transcriptional profiles. In this study, we isolated a heterogeneous mixture of cells from the mouse mammary gland. To determine the effects of the isolation and separation process on gene expression, we harvested RNA from the cells before enzymatic digestion, following enzymatic digestion, and following a mock FACS sort where the entire cohort of cells was retained. A strict protocol was followed to minimize disruption to the cells, and to ensure that no subpopulations were enriched or lost. Microarray analysis demonstrated that FACS causes minimal disruptions to gene expression patterns, but prior steps in the mammary cell isolation process are followed by upregulation of 18 miRNA's and rapid decreases in their predicted target transcripts. © 2015 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry.

  1. The Gene Expression Omnibus Database.

    PubMed

    Clough, Emily; Barrett, Tanya

    2016-01-01

    The Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) database is an international public repository that archives and freely distributes high-throughput gene expression and other functional genomics data sets. Created in 2000 as a worldwide resource for gene expression studies, GEO has evolved with rapidly changing technologies and now accepts high-throughput data for many other data applications, including those that examine genome methylation, chromatin structure, and genome-protein interactions. GEO supports community-derived reporting standards that specify provision of several critical study elements including raw data, processed data, and descriptive metadata. The database not only provides access to data for tens of thousands of studies, but also offers various Web-based tools and strategies that enable users to locate data relevant to their specific interests, as well as to visualize and analyze the data. This chapter includes detailed descriptions of methods to query and download GEO data and use the analysis and visualization tools. The GEO homepage is at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/geo/.

  2. Isolated gene encoding an enzyme with UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylase and phosphoglucomutase activities from Cyclotella cryptica

    DOEpatents

    Jarvis, Eric E.; Roessler, Paul G.

    1999-01-01

    The present invention relates to a cloned gene which encodes an enzyme, the purified enzyme, and the applications and products resulting from the use of the gene and enzyme. The gene, isolated from Cyclotella cryptica, encodes a multifunctional enzyme that has both UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylase and phosphoglucomutase activities.

  3. Isolated gene encoding an enzyme with UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylase and phosphoglucomutase activities from Cyclotella cryptica

    DOEpatents

    Jarvis, E.E.; Roessler, P.G.

    1999-07-27

    The present invention relates to a cloned gene which encodes an enzyme, the purified enzyme, and the applications and products resulting from the use of the gene and enzyme. The gene, isolated from Cyclotella cryptica, encodes a multifunctional enzyme that has both UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylase and phosphoglucomutase activities. 8 figs.

  4. Classification of genes based on gene expression analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Angelova, M. Myers, C. Faith, J.

    2008-05-15

    Systems biology and bioinformatics are now major fields for productive research. DNA microarrays and other array technologies and genome sequencing have advanced to the point that it is now possible to monitor gene expression on a genomic scale. Gene expression analysis is discussed and some important clustering techniques are considered. The patterns identified in the data suggest similarities in the gene behavior, which provides useful information for the gene functionalities. We discuss measures for investigating the homogeneity of gene expression data in order to optimize the clustering process. We contribute to the knowledge of functional roles and regulation of E. coli genes by proposing a classification of these genes based on consistently correlated genes in expression data and similarities of gene expression patterns. A new visualization tool for targeted projection pursuit and dimensionality reduction of gene expression data is demonstrated.

  5. Effect of long-term selenium yeast intervention on activity and gene expression of antioxidant and xenobiotic metabolising enzymes in healthy elderly volunteers from the Danish Prevention of Cancer by Intervention by Selenium (PRECISE) pilot study.

    PubMed

    Ravn-Haren, Gitte; Krath, Britta N; Overvad, Kim; Cold, Søren; Moesgaard, Sven; Larsen, Erik H; Dragsted, Lars O

    2008-06-01

    Numerous mechanisms have been proposed to explain the anti-carcinogenic effects of Se, among them altered carcinogen metabolism. We investigated the effect of Se supplementation on activities of glutathione peroxidase (GPX), glutathione reductase (GR) and glutathione S-transferase (GST) in different blood compartments, and expression of selected phase 1 and phase 2 genes in leucocytes (GPX1, gamma-glutamylcysteine ligase catalytic subunit (GCLC), AP-1 transcription factor Fos-related antigen 1 (Fra1), NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase (NQO1), and aryl hydrocarbon receptor repressor (AhRR)). Healthy elderly Danes (n 105; age 71.3 (SD 4.26) years; 36% reporting use of multivitamin/mineral supplements) participated and were supplemented daily for 5 years with placebo, 100 microg, 200 microg or 300 microg Se as Se-enriched yeast (SelenoPrecise). Blood samples were collected after 5 years of intervention. When all four groups were compared we found no effect of Se supplementation on plasma GPX or GR, on erythrocyte GPX, GR or GST, or on thrombocyte GR or GST. We found increased thrombocyte GPX activity at the two highest dosage levels in women only, but not in men. No effects on GPX1, NQO1 or AhRR gene expression were found. When all Se-supplemented groups were pooled we found significant down regulation of the expression of some phase 2 genes (GCLC, Fra1). A significant increase in AhRR gene expression with smoking was found but was independent of Se supplementation. Down regulation of phase 2 genes could increase the risk of cancer. However, further studies are needed to establish whether the observed effect in leucocytes reflects a similar expression pattern in target tissues.

  6. Expression in human prostate of drug- and carcinogen-metabolizing enzymes: association with prostate cancer risk.

    PubMed Central

    Agúndez, J. A.; Martínez, C.; Olivera, M.; Gallardo, L.; Ladero, J. M.; Rosado, C.; Prados, J.; Rodriguez-Molina, J.; Resel, L.; Benítez, J.

    1998-01-01

    The role of two common polymorphisms of enzymes involved in the metabolism of drugs and carcinogens was studied in relation to prostate cancer. The gene encoding one of these enzymes (NAT2) is located in an area where frequent allelic loss occurs in prostate cancer. Mutations at the genes CYP2D6 and NAT2 were analysed by allele-specific polymerase chain reaction and restriction mapping in DNA from 94 subjects with prostate cancer and 160 male healthy control subjects. Eleven prostate specimens were analysed for genotype and enzymatic activities NAT2, CYP2D6 and CYP3A by using the enzyme-specific substrates sulphamethazine and dextromethorphan. Enzyme activities with substrate specificities corresponding to NAT2, CYP2D6 and CYP3A are present in human prostate tissue, with mean +/-s.d. activities of 4.8+/-4.4 pmol min(-1) mg(-1) protein, 156+/-91 and 112+/-72 nmol min(-1) mg(-1) protein respectively. The Km values for the prostate CYP2D6 and CYP3A enzyme activities corresponded to that of liver CYP2D6 and CYP3A activities, and the CYP2D6 enzyme activity is related to the CYP2D6 genotype. The N-acetyltransferase, in contrast, had a higher Km than NAT2 and was independent of the NAT2 genotype. The CYP2D6 and CYP3A enzymes, and an N-acetyltransferase activity that is independent of the regulation of the NAT2 gene, are expressed in human prostate tissue. The presence of carcinogen-metabolizing enzymes in human prostate with a high interindividual variability may be involved in the regulation of local levels of carcinogens and mutagens and may underlie interindividual differences in cancer susceptibility. Images Figure 1 PMID:9823980

  7. Functional Expression of Enterobacterial O-Polysaccharide Biosynthesis Enzymes in Bacillus subtilis

    PubMed Central

    Schäffer, Christina; Wugeditsch, Thomas; Messner, Paul; Whitfield, Chris

    2002-01-01

    The expression of heterologous bacterial glycosyltransferases is of interest for potential application in the emerging field of carbohydrate engineering in gram-positive organisms. To assess the feasibility of using enzymes from gram-negative bacteria, the functional expression of the genes wbaP (formerly rfbP), wecA (formerly rfe), and wbbO (formerly rfbF) from enterobacterial lipopolysaccharide O-polysaccharide biosynthesis pathways was examined in Bacillus subtilis. WbaP and WecA are initiation enzymes for O-polysaccharide formation, catalyzing the transfer of galactosyl 1-phosphate from UDP-galactose and N-acetylglucosaminyl 1-phosphate from UDP-N-acetylglucosamine, respectively, to undecaprenylphosphate. The WecA product (undecaprenylpyrophosphoryl GlcNAc) is used as an acceptor to which the bifunctional wbbO gene product sequentially adds a galactopyranose and a galactofuranose residue from the corresponding UDP sugars to form a lipid-linked trisaccharide. Genes were cloned into the shuttle vectors pRB374 and pAW10. In B. subtilis hosts, the genes were effectively transcribed under the vegII promoter control of pRB374, but the plasmids were susceptible to rearrangements and deletion. In contrast, pAW10-based constructs, in which genes were cloned downstream of the tet resistance cassette, were stable but yielded lower levels of enzyme activity. In vitro glycosyltransferase assays were performed in Escherichia coli and B. subtilis, using membrane preparations as sources of enzymes and endogenous undecaprenylphosphate as an acceptor. Incorporation of radioactivity from UDP-α-d-14C-sugar into reaction products verified the functionality of WbaP, WecA, and WbbO in either host. Enzyme activities in B. subtilis varied between 20 and 75% of those measured in E. coli. PMID:12324313

  8. A member of the maize isopentenyl transferase gene family, Zea mays isopentenyl transferase 2 (ZmIPT2), encodes a cytokinin biosynthetic enzyme expressed during kernel development. Cytokinin biosynthesis in maize.

    PubMed

    Brugière, Norbert; Humbert, Sabrina; Rizzo, Nancy; Bohn, Jennifer; Habben, Jeffrey E

    2008-06-01

    Cytokinins (CKs) are plant hormones that regulate a large number of processes associated with plant growth and development such as induction of stomata opening, delayed senescence, suppression of auxin-induced apical dominance, signaling of nitrogen availability, differentiation of plastids and control of sink strength. In maize, CKs are thought to play an important role in establishing seed size and increasing seed set under normal and unfavorable environmental conditions therefore influencing yield. In recent years, the discovery of isopentenyl transferase (IPT) genes in plants has shed light on the CK biosynthesis pathway in plants. In an effort to increase our understanding of the role played by CKs in maize development and sink-strength, we identified several putative IPT genes using a bioinformatics approach. We focused our attention on one gene in particular, ZmIPT2, because of its strong expression in developing kernels. The expression of the gene and its product overlays the change in CK levels in developing kernels suggesting a major role in CK biosynthesis for kernel development. We demonstrate that at 8-10 days after pollination (DAP) the endosperm and especially the basal transfer cell layer (BETL) is a major site of ZmIPT2 expression, and that this expression persists in the BETL and the developing embryo into later kernel development stages. We show that ectopic expression of ZmIPT2 in calli and in planta created phenotypes consistent with CK overproduction. We also show that ZmIPT2 preferentially uses ADP and ATP over AMP as the substrates for dimethylallyl diphosphate (DMAPP) IPT activity. The expression pattern of ZmIPT2 in the BETL, endosperm and embryo during kernel development will be discussed with an emphasis on the suggested role of CKs in determining sink-strength and grain production in crop plants.

  9. Transcriptional regulation of genes encoding arabinan-degrading enzymes in Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Raposo, Maria Paiva; Inácio, José Manuel; Mota, Luís Jaime; de Sá-Nogueira, Isabel

    2004-03-01

    Bacillus subtilis produces hemicellulases capable of releasing arabinosyl oligomers and arabinose from plant cell walls. In this work, we characterize the transcriptional regulation of three genes encoding arabinan-degrading enzymes that are clustered with genes encoding enzymes that further catabolize arabinose. The abfA gene comprised in the metabolic operon araABDLMNPQ-abfA and the xsa gene located 23 kb downstream most probably encode alpha-L-arabinofuranosidases (EC 3.2.1.55). Here, we show that the abnA gene, positioned immediately upstream from the metabolic operon, encodes an endo-alpha-1,5-arabinanase (EC 3.2.1.99). Furthermore, by in vivo RNA studies, we inferred that abnA and xsa are monocistronic and are transcribed from sigma(A)-like promoters. Transcriptional fusion analysis revealed that the expression of the three arabinases is induced by arabinose and arabinan and is repressed by glucose. The levels of induction by arabinose and arabinan are higher during early postexponential growth, suggesting a temporal regulation. Moreover, the induction mechanism of these genes is mediated through negative control by the key regulator of arabinose metabolism, AraR. Thus, we analyzed AraR-DNA interactions by in vitro quantitative DNase I footprinting and in vivo analysis of single-base-pair substitutions within the promoter regions of xsa and abnA. The results indicate that transcriptional repression of the abfA and xsa genes is achieved by a tightly controlled mechanism but that the regulation of abnA is more flexible. We suggest that the expression of genes encoding extracellular degrading enzymes of arabinose-containing polysaccharides, transport systems, and intracellular enzymes involved in further catabolism is regulated by a coordinate mechanism triggered by arabinose via AraR.

  10. Gene Expression in Adult Metafemales of Drosophila Melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Birchler, J. A.; Hiebert, J. C.; Krietzman, M.

    1989-01-01

    The expression of selected X-linked and autosomal genes was examined in metafemales (3X:2A) compared to diploid sisters. Three enzyme activities (glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, 6-phospho-gluconate dehydrogenase, β-hydroxyacid dehydrogenase) encoded by X-linked genes are not significantly different in the two classes of flies. In contrast, three autosomally encoded enzyme activities (alcohol dehydrogenase, α-glycerophosphate dehydrogenase, isocitrate dehydrogenase) are reduced in metafemales. Protein and DNA comparisons between metafemales and diploid sisters show a lowered level of total protein whereas the total DNA measurements are similar. Thus, the total cell number in metafemales is basically unchanged but gene expression is reduced. Phenotypic analysis of three autosomal loci, glass (gl), purple (pr) and pink-peach (p(p)), show that all three have lowered expression in metafemales while the X-linked loci, white-apricot (w(a)) and Bar (B), are dosage compensated. Quantitative dot blot analysis of messenger RNA levels of the second chromosomal locus, alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh), and the X chromosomal locus, rudimentary (r), show that Adh has reduced expression and r is partially compensated per total RNA in metafemales. It is proposed that the increased dosage of the X chromosome inversely affects both the X and autosomal gene expression but the simultaneous increased dosage of the structural genes on the X results in dosage compensation. The reduced levels of expression of autosomal genes could contribute to the great inviability of metafemales. PMID:2503426

  11. Harnessing gene expression networks to prioritize candidate epileptic encephalopathy genes.

    PubMed

    Oliver, Karen L; Lukic, Vesna; Thorne, Natalie P; Berkovic, Samuel F; Scheffer, Ingrid E; Bahlo, Melanie

    2014-01-01

    We apply a novel gene expression network analysis to a cohort of 182 recently reported candidate Epileptic Encephalopathy genes to identify those most likely to be true Epileptic Encephalopathy genes. These candidate genes were identified as having single variants of likely pathogenic significance discovered in a large-scale massively parallel sequencing study. Candidate Epileptic Encephalopathy genes were prioritized according to their co-expression with 29 known Epileptic Encephalopathy genes. We utilized developing brain and adult brain gene expression data from the Allen Human Brain Atlas (AHBA) and compared this to data from Celsius: a large, heterogeneous gene expression data warehouse. We show replicable prioritization results using these three independent gene expression resources, two of which are brain-specific, with small sample size, and the third derived from a heterogeneous collection of tissues with large sample size. Of the nineteen genes that we predicted with the highest likelihood to be true Epileptic Encephalopathy genes, two (GNAO1 and GRIN2B) have recently been independently reported and confirmed. We compare our results to those produced by an established in silico prioritization approach called Endeavour, and finally present gene expression networks for the known and candidate Epileptic Encephalopathy genes. This highlights sub-networks of gene expression, particularly in the network derived from the adult AHBA gene expression dataset. These networks give clues to the likely biological interactions between Epileptic Encephalopathy genes, potentially highlighting underlying mechanisms and avenues for therapeutic targets.

  12. Analysis of Mycobacterium leprae gene expression using DNA microarray.

    PubMed

    Akama, Takeshi; Tanigawa, Kazunari; Kawashima, Akira; Wu, Huhehasi; Ishii, Norihisa; Suzuki, Koichi

    2010-10-01

    Mycobacterium leprae, the causative agent of leprosy, does not grow under in vitro condition, making molecular analysis of this bacterium difficult. For this reason, bacteriological information regarding M. leprae gene function is limited compared with other mycobacterium species. In this study, we performed DNA microarray analysis to clarify the RNA expression profile of the Thai53 strain of M. leprae grown in footpads of hypertensive nude rats (SHR/NCrj-rnu). Of 1605 M. leprae genes, 315 showed signal intensity twofold higher than the median. These genes include Acyl-CoA metabolic enzymes and drug metabolic enzymes, which might be related to the virulence of M. leprae. In addition, consecutive RNA expression profile and in silico analyses enabled identification of possible operons within the M. leprae genome. The present results will shed light on M. leprae gene function and further our understanding of the pathogenesis of leprosy.

  13. Pulmonary Gene Expression Profiling of Inhaled Ricin

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    in which 34 genes had statistically significant changes in gene expression. Transcripts identified by the assay included those that facilitate...gene expression. Transcripts identified by the assay included those that facilitate tissue healing (early growth response gene (egr)-1), regulate...impingement to determine aerosol concentration. Ricin concentrations from impinger samples were measured by protein assay (Pierce, MicroBCA, Rockford

  14. Expression of genes encoding enzymes involved in the one carbon cycle in rat placenta is determined by maternal micronutrients (folic acid, vitamin B12) and omega-3 fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Khot, Vinita; Kale, Anvita; Joshi, Asmita; Chavan-Gautam, Preeti; Joshi, Sadhana

    2014-01-01

    We have reported that folic acid, vitamin B12, and omega-3 fatty acids are interlinked in the one carbon cycle and have implications for fetal programming. Our earlier studies demonstrate that an imbalance in maternal micronutrients influence long chain polyunsaturated fatty acid metabolism and global methylation in rat placenta. We hypothesize that these changes are mediated through micronutrient dependent regulation of enzymes in one carbon cycle. Pregnant dams were assigned to six dietary groups with varying folic acid and vitamin B12 levels. Vitamin B12 deficient groups were supplemented with omega-3 fatty acid. Placental mRNA levels of enzymes, levels of phospholipids, and glutathione were determined. Results suggest that maternal micronutrient imbalance (excess folic acid with vitamin B12 deficiency) leads to lower mRNA levels of methylene tetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) and methionine synthase , but higher cystathionine b-synthase (CBS) and Phosphatidylethanolamine-N-methyltransferase (PEMT) as compared to control. Omega-3 supplementation normalized CBS and MTHFR mRNA levels. Increased placental phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), phosphatidylcholine (PC), in the same group was also observed. Our data suggests that adverse effects of a maternal micronutrient imbalanced diet may be due to differential regulation of key genes encoding enzymes in one carbon cycle and omega-3 supplementation may ameliorate most of these changes.

  15. Expression of E. coli araBAD operon encoding enzymes for metabolizing L-arabinose in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Sedlak; Ho

    2001-01-02

    The Escherichia coli araBAD operon consists of three genes encoding three enzymes that convert L-arabinose to D-xylulose-5 phosphate. In this paper we report that the genes of the E. coli araBAD operon have been expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae using strong promoters from genes encoding S. cerevisiae glycolytic enzymes (pyruvate kinase, phosphoglucose isomerase, and phosphoglycerol kinase). The expression of these cloned genes in yeast was demonstrated by the presence of the active enzymes encoded by these cloned genes and by the presence of the corresponding mRNAs in the new host. The level of expression of L-ribulokinase (araB) and L-ribulose-5-phosphate 4-epimerase (araD) in S. cerevisiae was relatively high, with greater than 70% of the activity of the enzymes in wild type E. coli. On the other hand, the expression of L-arabinose isomerase (araA) reached only 10% of the activity of the same enzyme in wild type E. coli. Nevertheless, S. cerevisiae, bearing the cloned L-arabinose isomerase gene, converted L-arabinose to detectable levels of L-ribulose during fermentation. However, S. cerevisiae bearing all three genes (araA, araB, and araD) was not able to produce detectable amount of ethanol from L-arabinose. We speculate that factors such as pH, temperature, and competitive inhibition could reduce the activity of these enzymes to a lower level during fermentation compared to their activity measured in vitro. Thus, the ethanol produced from L-arabinose by recombinant yeast containing the expressed BAD genes is most likely totally consumed by the cell to maintain viability.

  16. Reversible histone methylation regulates brain gene expression and behavior

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jun; Andreassi, Megan

    2011-01-01

    Epigenetic chromatin remodeling, including reversible histone methylation, regulates gene transcription in brain development and synaptic plasticity. Aberrant chromatin modifications due to mutant chromatin enzymes or chemical exposures have been associated with neurological or psychiatric disorders such as mental retardation, schizophrenia, depression, and drug addiction. Some chromatin enzymes, such as histone demethylases JARID1C and UTX, are coded by X-linked genes which are not X-inactivated in females. The higher expression of JARID1C and UTX in females could contribute to sex differences in brain development and behavior. PMID:20816965

  17. Does inbreeding affect gene expression in birds?

    PubMed

    Hansson, Bengt; Naurin, Sara; Hasselquist, Dennis

    2014-09-01

    Inbreeding increases homozygosity, exposes genome-wide recessive deleterious alleles and often reduces fitness. The physiological and reproductive consequences of inbreeding may be manifested already during gene regulation, but the degree to which inbreeding influences gene expression is unknown in most organisms, including in birds. To evaluate the pattern of inbreeding-affected gene expression over the genome and in relation to sex, we performed a transcriptome-wide gene expression (10 695 genes) study of brain tissue of 10-day-old inbred and outbred, male and female zebra finches. We found significantly lower gene expression in females compared with males at Z-linked genes, confirming that dosage compensation is incomplete in female birds. However, inbreeding did not affect gene expression at autosomal or sex-linked genes, neither in males nor in females. Analyses of single genes again found a clear sex-biased expression at Z-linked genes, whereas only a single gene was significantly affected by inbreeding. The weak effect of inbreeding on gene expression in zebra finches contrasts to the situation, for example, in Drosophila where inbreeding has been found to influence gene expression more generally and at stress-related genes in particular.

  18. [Neuronal plasticity and gene expression].

    PubMed

    Sokolova, O O; Shtark, M B; Lisachev, P D

    2010-01-01

    Neuronal plasticity--a fundamental feature of brain--provides adequate interactions with dynamic environment. One of the most deeply investigated forms of the neuronal plasticity is a long-term potentiation (LTP)--a phenomenon underlying learning and memory. Signal paths activated during LTP converge into the nuclear of the neuron, giving rise to launch of the molecular-genetic programs, which mediate structural and functional remodeling of synapses. In the review data concerning involvement of multilevel gene expression into plastic change under neuronal activation are summarized.

  19. Evaluating Fumonisin Gene Expression in Fusarium verticillioides.

    PubMed

    Scala, Valeria; Visentin, Ivan; Cardinale, Francesca

    2017-01-01

    Transcript levels of key genes in a biosynthetic pathway are often taken as a proxy for metabolite production. This is the case of FUM1, encoding the first dedicated enzyme in the metabolic pathway leading to the production of the mycotoxins Fumonisins by fungal species belonging to the genus Fusarium. FUM1 expression can be quantified by different methods; here, we detail a protocol based on quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR), by which relative or absolute transcript abundance can be estimated in Fusaria grown in vitro or in planta. As very seldom commercial kits for RNA extraction and cDNA synthesis are optimized for fungal samples, we developed a protocol tailored for these organisms, which stands alone but can be also easily integrated with specific reagents and kits commercially available.

  20. Altered expression of fatty acid–metabolizing enzymes in aromatase-deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Nemoto, Yoshihisa; Toda, Katsumi; Ono, Masafumi; Fujikawa-Adachi, Kiyomi; Saibara, Toshiji; Onishi, Saburo; Enzan, Hideaki; Okada, Teruhiko; Shizuta, Yutaka

    2000-01-01

    Hepatic steatosis is a frequent complication in nonobese patients with breast cancer treated with tamoxifen, a potent antagonist of estrogen. In addition, hepatic steatosis became evident spontaneously in the aromatase-deficient (ArKO) mouse, which lacks intrinsic estrogen production. These clinical and laboratory observations suggest that estrogen helps to maintain constitutive lipid metabolism. To clarify this hypothesis, we characterized the expression and activity in ArKO mouse liver of enzymes involved in peroxisomal and mitochondrial fatty acid β-oxidation. Northern analysis showed reduced expression of mRNAs for very long fatty acyl-CoA synthetase, peroxisomal fatty acyl-CoA oxidase, and medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase, enzymes required in fatty acid β-oxidation. In vitro assays of fatty acid β-oxidation activity using very long (C24:0), long (C16:0), or medium (C12:0) chain fatty acids as the substrates confirmed that the corresponding activities are also diminished. Impaired gene expression and enzyme activities of fatty acid β-oxidation were restored to the wild-type levels, and hepatic steatosis was substantially diminished in animals treated with 17β-estradiol. Wild-type and ArKO mice showed no difference in the binding activities of the hepatic nuclear extracts to a peroxisome proliferator response element. These findings demonstrate the pivotal role of estrogen in supporting constitutive hepatic expression of genes involved in lipid β-oxidation and in maintaining hepatic lipid homeostasis. PMID:10862797

  1. Gene expression-targeted isoflavone therapy.

    PubMed

    Węgrzyn, Alicja

    2012-04-01

    Lysosomal storage diseases (LSD) form a group of inherited metabolic disorders caused by dysfunction of one of the lysosomal proteins, resulting in the accumulation of certain compounds. Although these disorders are among first genetic diseases for which specific treatments were proposed, there are still serious unsolved problems that require development of novel therapeutic procedures. An example is neuronopathy, which develops in most of LSD and cannot be treated efficiently by currently approved therapies. Recently, a new potential therapy, called gene expression-targeted isoflavone therapy (GET IT), has been proposed for a group of LSD named mucopolysaccharidoses (MPS), in which storage of incompletely degraded glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) results in severe symptoms of virtually all tissues and organs, including central nervous system. The idea of this therapy is to inhibit synthesis of GAGs by modulating expression of genes coding for enzymes involved in synthesis of these compounds. Such a modulation is possible by using isoflavones, particularly genistein, which interfere with a signal transduction process necessary for stimulation of expression of certain genes. Results of in vitro experiments and studies on animal models indicated a high efficiency of GET IT, including correction of behavior of affected mice. However, clinical trials, performed with soy isoflavone extracts, revealed only limited efficacy. This caused a controversy about GET IT as a potential, effective treatment of patients suffering from MPS, especially neuronopathic forms of these diseases. It this critical review, I present possible molecular mechanisms of therapeutic action of isoflavones (particularly genistein) and suggest that efficacy of GET IT might be sufficiently high when using relatively high doses of synthetic genistein (which was employed in experiments on cell cultures and mouse models) rather than low doses of soy isoflavone extracts (which were used in clinical trials). This

  2. Two chitin metabolic enzyme genes from Hyriopsis cumingii: cloning, characterization, and potential functions.

    PubMed

    Wang, G-L; Xu, B; Bai, Z-Y; Li, J-L

    2012-12-19

    Chitin, the second most important natural polymer in the world, and its N-deacetylated derivative chitosan are found in a wide variety of organisms. These versatile biopolymers are associated with a broad range of biological functions. This article is the first to report the potential functions of 2 chitin metabolic enzyme genes from Hyriopsis cumingii. A chitinase-3 gene (Chi-3) and a chitin deacetylase gene (Cda) were cloned from H. cumingii and characterized. Semi-quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction analysis revealed that the Cda gene was expressed in blood, mantle, liver, stomach, kidney, intestine, gill, and foot, whereas Chi-3 was also expressed in those tissues but not in blood. The tissue-specific expression of H. cumingii Chi-3 indicated that other Chi genes may be involved in the H. cumingii immune system. Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis showed that the expression of Chi-3 was significantly (P < 0.05) upregulated 12 h after shell damage, suggesting that Chi-3 might hydrolyze superfluous chitin after shell recovery and play a role in shell formation. Conversely, Cda expression did not change significantly (P > 0.05) to maintain a certain degree of acetylation in chitin/chitosan. This study enriches the basic research on chitin metabolic genes and lays foundations for further research of shell regeneration in mussels.

  3. Expression of functional Plasmodium falciparum enzymes using a wheat germ cell-free system.

    PubMed

    Mudeppa, Devaraja G; Rathod, Pradipsinh K

    2013-12-01

    One decade after the sequencing of the Plasmodium falciparum genome, 95% of malaria proteins in the genome cannot be expressed in traditional cell-based expression systems, and the targets of the best new leads for antimalarial drug discovery are either not known or not available in functional form. For a disease that kills up to 1 million people per year, routine expression of recombinant malaria proteins in functional form is needed both for the discovery of new therapeutics and for identification of targets of new drugs. We tested the general utility of cell-free systems for expressing malaria enzymes. Thirteen test enzyme sequences were reverse amplified from total RNA, cloned into a plant-like expression vector, and subjected to cell-free expression in a wheat germ system. Protein electrophoresis and autoradiography confirmed the synthesis of products of expected molecular masses. In rare problematic cases, truncated products were avoided by using synthetic genes carrying wheat codons. Scaled-up production generated 39 to 354 μg of soluble protein per 10 mg of translation lysate. Compared to rare proteins where cell-based systems do produce functional proteins, the cell-free yields are comparable or better. All 13 test products were enzymatically active, without failure. This general path to produce functional malaria proteins should now allow the community to access new tools, such as biologically active protein arrays, and lead to the discovery of new chemical functions, structures, and inhibitors of previously inaccessible malaria gene products.

  4. Dynamic expression of retinoic acid synthesizing and metabolizing enzymes in the developing mouse inner ear

    PubMed Central

    Romand, Raymond; Kondo, Takako; Fraulob, Valérie; Petkovich, Martin; Dollé, Pascal; Hashino, Eri

    2008-01-01

    Retinoic acid signaling plays essential roles in morphogenesis and neural development through transcriptional regulation of downstream target genes. It is believed that the balance between the activities of synthesizing and metabolizing enzymes determines the amount of active retinoic acid to which a developing tissue is exposed. In this study, we investigated spatio-temporal expression patterns of four synthesizing enzymes, the retinaldehyde dehydrogenases 1, 2, 3 and 4 (Raldh1, Raldh2, Raldh3 and Raldh4) and two metabolizing enzymes (Cyp26A1 and Cyp26B1) in the embryonic and postnatal mouse inner ear using quantitative RT-PCR, in situ hybridization and Western blot analysis. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis and Western blot data revealed that the expression of CYP26s was much higher than that of Raldhs at early embryonic ages, but that Cyp26 expression was down-regulated during embryonic development. Conversely, the expression levels of Raldh2 and -3 increased during development and were significantly higher than the Cyp26 levels at postnatal day 20. At this age, Raldh3 was expressed predominantly in the cochlea, while Raldh2 was present in the vestibular end organ. At early embryonic stages as observed by in situ hybridization, the synthesizing enzymes were expressed only in the dorsoventral epithelium of the otocyst, while the metabolizing enzymes were present mainly in mesenchymal cells surrounding the otic epithelium. At later stages, Raldh2, Raldh3 and Cyp26B1 were confined to the stria vascularis, spiral ganglion and supporting cells in the cochlear and vestibular epithelia, respectively. The downregulation of Cyp26s and the upregulation of Raldhs after birth during inner ear maturation suggests tissue changes in the sensitivity to retinoic acid concentrations. PMID:16615129

  5. Ozone-induced changes in the expression of the genes encoding regulatory enzymes for polyamine, ethylene and phenylpropanoid metabolisms in ozone tolerant and sensitive birch (Betula pendula Roth) clones

    SciTech Connect

    Talvinen, J.; Pellinen, R.; Eloranta, T.; Kangasjaervi, J. ); Julkunen-Tiitto, R. ); Karjalainen, R. )

    1993-05-01

    Increase in the atmospheric ozone concentration has been shown to affect plant growth in several ways; from decreased photosynthetic activity to visible dames and in some extreme situations even to tissue death. Plants protect themselves from the damaging effect of ozone by inducing several physiological reactions. For example, increases in ethylene production, polyamine and phenylpropanoid synthesis have been observed in stress reaction induced by increased atmospheric ozone. similar changes, which are often called general stress reactions, are induced by several other biotic and which are often called general stress reactions, are induced by several other biontic and abiotic factors, e.g., plant pathogens. It has been shown previously that the production of stress ethylene can partly be responsible for the ozone damage formation in plants. Induction of stress-polyamine synthesis can prevent ethylene formation and is higher in some ozone-tolerant plants. We have exposed ozone sensitive and resistant birch clones to ozone (150 ppb. 8 hours) to analyze ozone-induced changes in the phenylpropanoid and polyamine metabolisms and gene expression. The polyamine and phenylpropanoid contents of the experimental material are currently being analyzed and the results will be presented. We have also cloned by PCR gene probes for birch ACC-synthase, arginine decarboxylase (ADC) and phenylalanine ammoniumlyase (PAL) genes. Results will be presented where the probes have been used to analyze ozone-induced expression of the genes in the birch clones.

  6. Detection of sugar accumulation and expression levels of correlative key enzymes in winter wheat (Triticum aestivum) at low temperatures.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Yan; Yu, Jing; Cang, Jing; Liu, Lijie; Mu, Yongchao; Wang, Junhong; Zhang, Da

    2011-01-01

    Carbohydrate accumulation is common in frost-resistant plants, and many enzymes participate in this process. The sugar content and expression levels of metabolic enzymes related to sugar biosynthesis in response to drops in temperature were measured in two cultivars of winter wheat (Triticum aestivum) with different cold tolerances. The results indicate that the two cultivars examined, Dongnongdongmai 1 and Jimai 22, accumulated high levels of carbohydrate before November 4 (above 0°C), and that accumulation decreased as temperatures fell. However, this decrease was more modest in Dongnongdongmai 1, which had a higher sugar content. Sucrose and fructose were the main soluble sugars, indicating an important role in freezing tolerance. Gene expression studies revealed that expression of the genes encoding chloroplastic enzymes was significantly upregulated in the tillering nodes. Expression upregulation of TaSS and TaTPT may be helpful for sugar accumulation before November 4.

  7. Parental vitamin deficiency affects the embryonic gene expression of immune-, lipid transport- and apolipoprotein genes

    PubMed Central

    Skjærven, Kaja H.; Jakt, Lars Martin; Dahl, John Arne; Espe, Marit; Aanes, Håvard; Hamre, Kristin; Fernandes, Jorge M. O.

    2016-01-01

    World Health Organization is concerned for parental vitamin deficiency and its effect on offspring health. This study examines the effect of a marginally dietary-induced parental one carbon (1-C) micronutrient deficiency on embryonic gene expression using zebrafish. Metabolic profiling revealed a reduced 1-C cycle efficiency in F0 generation. Parental deficiency reduced the fecundity and a total of 364 genes were differentially expressed in the F1 embryos. The upregulated genes (53%) in the deficient group were enriched in biological processes such as immune response and blood coagulation. Several genes encoding enzymes essential for the 1-C cycle and for lipid transport (especially apolipoproteins) were aberrantly expressed. We show that a parental diet deficient in micronutrients disturbs the expression in descendant embryos of genes associated with overall health, and result in inherited aberrations in the 1-C cycle and lipid metabolism. This emphasises the importance of parental micronutrient status for the health of the offspring. PMID:27731423

  8. Parental vitamin deficiency affects the embryonic gene expression of immune-, lipid transport- and apolipoprotein genes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skjærven, Kaja H.; Jakt, Lars Martin; Dahl, John Arne; Espe, Marit; Aanes, Håvard; Hamre, Kristin; Fernandes, Jorge M. O.

    2016-10-01

    World Health Organization is concerned for parental vitamin deficiency and its effect on offspring health. This study examines the effect of a marginally dietary-induced parental one carbon (1-C) micronutrient deficiency on embryonic gene expression using zebrafish. Metabolic profiling revealed a reduced 1-C cycle efficiency in F0 generation. Parental deficiency reduced the fecundity and a total of 364 genes were differentially expressed in the F1 embryos. The upregulated genes (53%) in the deficient group were enriched in biological processes such as immune response and blood coagulation. Several genes encoding enzymes essential for the 1-C cycle and for lipid transport (especially apolipoproteins) were aberrantly expressed. We show that a parental diet deficient in micronutrients disturbs the expression in descendant embryos of genes associated with overall health, and result in inherited aberrations in the 1-C cycle and lipid metabolism. This emphasises the importance of parental micronutrient status for the health of the offspring.

  9. Mechanoregulation of gene expression in fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Wang, James H.-C.; Thampatty, Bhavani P.; Lin, Jeen-Shang; Im, Hee-Jeong

    2010-01-01

    Mechanical loads placed on connective tissues alter gene expression in fibroblasts through mechanotransduction mechanisms by which cells convert mechanical signals into cellular biological events, such as gene expression of extracellular matrix components (e.g., collagen). This mechanical regulation of ECM gene expression affords maintenance of connective tissue homeostasis. However, mechanical loads can also interfere with homeostatic cellular gene expression and consequently cause the pathogenesis of connective tissue diseases such as tendinopathy and osteoarthritis. Therefore, the regulation of gene expression by mechanical loads is closely related to connective tissue physiology and pathology. This article reviews the effects of various mechanical loading conditions on gene regulation in fibroblasts and discusses several mechanotransduction mechanisms. Future research directions in mechanoregulation of gene expression are also suggested. PMID:17331678

  10. Differential Gene Expression in Human Cerebrovascular Malformations

    PubMed Central

    Shenkar, Robert; Elliott, J. Paul; Diener, Katrina; Gault, Judith; Hu, Ling-Jia; Cohrs, Randall J.; Phang, Tzulip; Hunter, Lawrence; Breeze, Robert E.; Awad, Issam A.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE We sought to identify genes with differential expression in cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs), arteriovenous malformations (AVMs), and control superficial temporal arteries (STAs) and to confirm differential expression of genes previously implicated in the pathobiology of these lesions. METHODS Total ribonucleic acid was isolated from four CCM, four AVM, and three STA surgical specimens and used to quantify lesion-specific messenger ribonucleic acid expression levels on human gene arrays. Data were analyzed with the use of two separate methodologies: gene discovery and confirmation analysis. RESULTS The gene discovery method identified 42 genes that were significantly up-regulated and 36 genes that were significantly down-regulated in CCMs as compared with AVMs and STAs (P = 0.006). Similarly, 48 genes were significantly up-regulated and 59 genes were significantly down-regulated in AVMs as compared with CCMs and STAs (P = 0.006). The confirmation analysis showed significant differential expression (P < 0.05) in 11 of 15 genes (angiogenesis factors, receptors, and structural proteins) that previously had been reported to be expressed differentially in CCMs and AVMs in immunohistochemical analysis. CONCLUSION We identify numerous genes that are differentially expressed in CCMs and AVMs and correlate expression with the immunohistochemistry of genes implicated in cerebrovascular malformations. In future efforts, we will aim to confirm candidate genes specifically related to the pathobiology of cerebrovascular malformations and determine their biological systems and mechanistic relevance. PMID:12535382

  11. Metadata Analysis of Phanerochaete chrysosporium Gene Expression Data Identified Common CAZymes Encoding Gene Expression Profiles Involved in Cellulose and Hemicellulose Degradation

    PubMed Central

    Kameshwar, Ayyappa Kumar Sista; Qin, Wensheng

    2017-01-01

    In literature, extensive studies have been conducted on popular wood degrading white rot fungus, Phanerochaete chrysosporium about its lignin degrading mechanisms compared to the cellulose and hemicellulose degrading abilities. This study delineates cellulose and hemicellulose degrading mechanisms through large scale metadata analysis of P. chrysosporium gene expression data (retrieved from NCBI GEO) to understand the common expression patterns of differentially expressed genes when cultured on different growth substrates. Genes encoding glycoside hydrolase classes commonly expressed during breakdown of cellulose such as GH-5,6,7,9,44,45,48 and hemicellulose are GH-2,8,10,11,26,30,43,47 were found to be highly expressed among varied growth conditions including simple customized and complex natural plant biomass growth mediums. Genes encoding carbohydrate esterase class enzymes CE (1,4,8,9,15,16) polysaccharide lyase class enzymes PL-8 and PL-14, and glycosyl transferases classes GT (1,2,4,8,15,20,35,39,48) were differentially expressed in natural plant biomass growth mediums. Based on these results, P. chrysosporium, on natural plant biomass substrates was found to express lignin and hemicellulose degrading enzymes more than cellulolytic enzymes except GH-61 (LPMO) class enzymes, in early stages. It was observed that the fate of P. chrysosporium transcriptome is significantly affected by the wood substrate provided. We believe, the gene expression findings in this study plays crucial role in developing genetically efficient microbe with effective cellulose and hemicellulose degradation abilities. PMID:28123349

  12. Evaluating Functional Annotations of Enzymes Using the Gene Ontology.

    PubMed

    Holliday, Gemma L; Davidson, Rebecca; Akiva, Eyal; Babbitt, Patricia C

    2017-01-01

    The Gene Ontology (GO) (Ashburner et al., Nat Genet 25(1):25-29, 2000) is a powerful tool in the informatics arsenal of methods for evaluating annotations in a protein dataset. From identifying the nearest well annotated homologue of a protein of interest to predicting where misannotation has occurred to knowing how confident you can be in the annotations assigned to those proteins is critical. In this chapter we explore what makes an enzyme unique and how we can use GO to infer aspects of protein function based on sequence similarity. These can range from identification of misannotation or other errors in a predicted function to accurate function prediction for an enzyme of entirely unknown function. Although GO annotation applies to any gene products, we focus here a describing our approach for hierarchical classification of enzymes in the Structure-Function Linkage Database (SFLD) (Akiva et al., Nucleic Acids Res 42(Database issue):D521-530, 2014) as a guide for informed utilisation of annotation transfer based on GO terms.

  13. Gene expression patterns in glucose-stimulated podocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Seung Hyeok; Yang, Sanghwa; Jung, Dong Sub; Li, Jin Ji; Kim, Jin Ju; Kwak, Seung Jae; Kim, Dong Ki; Moon, Sung Jin; Lee, Jung Eun; Han, Dae-Suk; Kang, Shin-Wook

    2008-06-06

    To explore the mechanisms of podocyte injury under diabetic conditions, we performed an expression profile in glucose-stimulated podocytes. Differential gene expression profiles between conditionally immortalized mouse podocytes cultured in medium containing 5.6 and 30 mM glucose were measured with oligonucleotide microarrays. Of the genes identified, heme oxygenase-1, vascular endothelial growth factor-A, and thrombospondin-1 showed a consistently increased pattern, whereas angiotensin-converting enzyme-2 and peroxisomal proliferator activator receptor-{gamma} were down-regulated. These results were validated using real-time PCR and western blotting in podocytes, and with immunohistochemistry on renal tissues from streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. Not only is this the first report of gene expression profiling of podocyte injury under diabetic conditions, but the identified genes are promising targets for future diabetes research.

  14. Norovirus gene expression and replication.

    PubMed

    Thorne, Lucy G; Goodfellow, Ian G

    2014-02-01

    Noroviruses are small, positive-sense RNA viruses within the family Caliciviridae, and are now accepted widely as a major cause of acute gastroenteritis in both developed and developing countries. Despite their impact, our understanding of the life cycle of noroviruses has lagged behind that of other RNA viruses due to the inability to culture human noroviruses (HuNVs). Our knowledge of norovirus biology has improved significantly over the past decade as a result of numerous technological advances. The use of a HuNV replicon, improved biochemical and cell-based assays, combined with the discovery of a murine norovirus capable of replication in cell culture, has improved greatly our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of norovirus genome translation and replication, as well as the interaction with host cell processes. In this review, the current state of knowledge of the intracellular life of noroviruses is discussed with particular emphasis on the mechanisms of viral gene expression and viral genome replication.

  15. Evidence of calcium-dependent pathway in the regulation of human beta1,3-glucuronosyltransferase-1 (GlcAT-I) gene expression: a key enzyme in proteoglycan synthesis.

    PubMed

    Barré, Lydia; Venkatesan, Narayanan; Magdalou, Jacques; Netter, Patrick; Fournel-Gigleux, Sylvie; Ouzzine, Mohamed

    2006-08-01

    The importance of heparan- and chondroitin-sulfate proteoglycans in physiological and pathological processes led to the investigation of the regulation of beta1,3-glucuronosyltransferase I (GlcAT-I), responsible for the completion of glycosaminoglycan-protein linkage tetrasaccharide, a key step prior to polymerization of chondroitin- and heparan-sulfate chains. We have cloned and functionally characterized GlcAT-I 5'-flanking regulatory region. Mutation analysis and electrophoretic mobility shift assays demonstrated the importance of Sp1 motif located at -65/-56 position in promoter activity. Furthermore, we found that elevation of intracellular calcium concentration by the calcium ionophore ionomycin stimulated GlcAT-I gene expression as well as glycosaminoglycan chain synthesis in HeLa cells. Bisanthracycline, an anti-Sp1 compound, inhibited GlcAT-I basal promoter activity and suppressed ionomycin induction, suggesting the importance of Sp1 in calcium induction of GlcAT-I gene expression. Nuclear protein extracts from ionomycin-induced cells exhibited an increased DNA binding of Sp1 factor to the consensus sequence at position -65/-56. Signaling pathway analysis and MEK inhibition studies revealed the important role of p42/p44 MAPK in the stimulation of GlcAT-I promoter activity by ionomycin. The present study identifies, for the first time, GlcAT-I as a target of calcium-dependent signaling pathway and evidences the critical role of Sp1 transcription factor in the activation of GlcAT-I expression.

  16. Differentially expressed myo-inositol monophosphatase gene (CaIMP) in chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) encodes a lithium-sensitive phosphatase enzyme with broad substrate specificity and improves seed germination and seedling growth under abiotic stresses.

    PubMed

    Saxena, Saurabh C; Salvi, Prafull; Kaur, Harmeet; Verma, Pooja; Petla, Bhanu Prakash; Rao, Venkateswara; Kamble, Nitin; Majee, Manoj

    2013-12-01

    myo-Inositol monophosphatase (IMP) is an essential enzyme in the myo-inositol metabolic pathway where it primarily dephosphorylates myo-inositol 1-phosphate to maintain the cellular inositol pool which is important for many metabolic and signalling pathways in plants. The stress-induced increased accumulation of inositol has been reported in a few plants including chickpea; however, the role and regulation of IMP is not well defined in response to stress. In this work, it has been shown that IMP activity is distributed in all organs in chickpea and was noticeably enhanced during environmental stresses. Subsequently, using degenerate oligonucleotides and RACE strategy, a full-length IMP cDNA (CaIMP) was cloned and sequenced. Biochemical study revealed that CaIMP encodes a lithium-sensitive phosphatase enzyme with broad substrate specificity, although maximum activity was observed with the myo-inositol 1-phosphate and l-galactose 1-phosphate substrates. Transcript analysis revealed that CaIMP is differentially expressed and regulated in different organs, stresses and phytohormones. Complementation analysis in Arabidopsis further confirmed the role of CaIMP in l-galactose 1-phosphate and myo-inositol 1-phosphate hydrolysis and its participation in myo-inositol and ascorbate biosynthesis. Moreover, Arabidopsis transgenic plants over-expressing CaIMP exhibited improved tolerance to stress during seed germination and seedling growth, while the VTC4/IMP loss-of-function mutants exhibited sensitivity to stress. Collectively, CaIMP links various metabolic pathways and plays an important role in improving seed germination and seedling growth, particularly under stressful environments.

  17. Expression of virus-encoded proteinases: functional and structural similarities with cellular enzymes.

    PubMed Central

    Dougherty, W G; Semler, B L

    1993-01-01

    Many viruses express their genome, or part of their genome, initially as a polyprotein precursor that undergoes proteolytic processing. Molecular genetic analyses of viral gene expression have revealed that many of these processing events are mediated by virus-encoded proteinases. Biochemical activity studies and structural analyses of these viral enzymes reveal that they have remarkable similarities to cellular proteinases. However, the viral proteinases have evolved unique features that permit them to function in a cellular environment. In this article, the current status of plant and animal virus proteinases is described along with their role in the viral replication cycle. The reactions catalyzed by viral proteinases are not simple enzyme-substrate interactions; rather, the processing steps are highly regulated, are coordinated with other viral processes, and frequently involve the participation of other factors. Images PMID:8302216

  18. Familial aggregation analysis of gene expressions

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Shao-Qi; Xu, Liang-De; Zhang, Guang-Mei; Li, Xia; Li, Lin; Shen, Gong-Qing; Jiang, Yang; Yang, Yue-Ying; Gong, Bin-Sheng; Jiang, Wei; Zhang, Fan; Xiao, Yun; Wang, Qing K

    2007-01-01

    Traditional studies of familial aggregation are aimed at defining the genetic (and non-genetic) causes of a disease from physiological or clinical traits. However, there has been little attempt to use genome-wide gene expressions, the direct phenotypic measures of genes, as the traits to investigate several extended issues regarding the distributions of familially aggregated genes on chromosomes or in functions. In this study we conducted a genome-wide familial aggregation analysis by using the in vitro cell gene expressions of 3300 human autosome genes (Problem 1 data provided to Genetic Analysis Workshop 15) in order to answer three basic genetics questions. First, we investigated how gene expressions aggregate among different types (degrees) of relative pairs. Second, we conducted a bioinformatics analysis of highly familially aggregated genes to see how they are distributed on chromosomes. Third, we performed a gene ontology enrichment test of familially aggregated genes to find evidence to support their functional consensus. The results indicated that 1) gene expressions did aggregate in families, especially between sibs. Of 3300 human genes analyzed, there were a total of 1105 genes with one or more significant (empirical p < 0.05) familial correlation; 2) there were several genomic hot spots where highly familially aggregated genes (e.g., the chromosome 6 HLA genes cluster) were clustered; 3) as we expected, gene ontology enrichment tests revealed that the 1105 genes were aggregating not only in families but also in functional categories. PMID:18466548

  19. Aromatase gene expression in the stallion.

    PubMed

    Lemazurier, E; Sourdaine, P; Nativelle, C; Plainfossé, B; Séralini, G

    2001-06-10

    Adult stallion secretes very high estrogen levels in its testicular vein and semen, and the responsible enzyme cytochrome P450 aromatase (P450 arom) is known to be present mainly in Leydig cells. We studied in further details the distribution of equine aromatase in various adult tissues including the brain (hypothalamic area), liver, kidney, small intestine, muscle, bulbourethral gland and testes. The aromatase mRNA was essentially detected by RT-PCR in testis (169+/-14 amol of aromatase mRNA per microg of total RNA) and was barely detectable in brain, or below 0.1 amol/microg RNA in other tissues. This range of expression was confirmed by ELISA (50+/-7 pg/microg total protein) in the testis, and by immunoblot, evidencing a 53 kDA specific protein band in testis and brain only. The corresponding aromatase activity was well detected, by 3H(2)O release from 1beta, 2beta(3)H-androstenedione, in testis and brain (200+/-23 and 25+/-6 pmol/min per mg, respectively) and below 3 pmol product formed/min per mg in other tissues. This study indicates that the testis, among the tissues analyzed, is the major source of aromatase in the adult stallion, and that the aromatase gene expression is specifically enhanced at this level, and is responsible for the high estrogen synthesis observed. Moreover, the study of aromatase in one colt testis has shown lower levels of transcripts, protein and enzyme activity, evidencing that aromatase is regulated during the development and may serve as a useful marker of testicular function. As the second organ where aromatase mRNA and activity are both well detected is brain, this study also underlines the possible role of neurosteroids in stallion on behaviour, brain function or central endocrine control.

  20. Genes and enzymes of ectoine biosynthesis in halotolerant methanotrophs.

    PubMed

    Reshetnikov, Alexander S; Khmelenina, Valentina N; Mustakhimov, Ildar I; Trotsenko, Yuri A

    2011-01-01

    Ectoine (1,4,5,6-tetrahydro-2-methyl-4-pyrimidine carboxylic acid) is a widely distributed compatible solute accumulated by halophilic and halotolerant microorganisms to prevent osmotic stress in highly saline environments. Ectoine as a highly water keeping compound stabilizing biomolecules and whole cells can be used in scientific work, cosmetics, and medicine. Detailed understanding of the organization/regulation of the ectoine biosynthetic pathway in various producers is an active area of research. Here we review current knowledge on some genetic and enzymatic aspects of ectoine biosynthesis in halophilic and halotolerant methanotrophs. By using PCR methodology, the genes coding for the specific enzymes of ectoine biosynthesis, diaminobutyric acid (DABA) aminotransferase (EctB), DABA acetyltransferase (EctA), and ectoine synthase (EctC), were identified in several methanotrophic species. Organization of these genes in either ectABC or ectABC-ask operons, the latter additionally encoding aspartate kinase isozyme (Ask), correlated well with methanotroph halotolerance and intracellular ectoine level. A new gene, ectR1 encoding the MarR-like transcriptional regulatory protein EctR1, negatively controlling transcription of ectoine biosynthetic genes was found upstream of ectABC-ask operon in Methylomicrobium alcaliphilum 20Z. The ectR-like genes were also found in halotolerant methanol utilizers Methylophaga alcalica and Methylophaga thalassica as well as in several genomes of nonmethylotrophic species. The His(6)-tagged DABA acetyltransferases from Mm. alcaliphilum, M. alcalica, and M. thalassica were purified and the enzyme properties were found to correlate with the ecophysiologies of these bacteria. All these discoveries should be very helpful for better understanding the biosynthetic mechanism of this important natural compound, and for the targeted metabolic engineering of its producers.

  1. Methods for monitoring multiple gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Berka, Randy; Bachkirova, Elena; Rey, Michael

    2012-05-01

    The present invention relates to methods for monitoring differential expression of a plurality of genes in a first filamentous fungal cell relative to expression of the same genes in one or more second filamentous fungal cells using microarrays containing Trichoderma reesei ESTs or SSH clones, or a combination thereof. The present invention also relates to computer readable media and substrates containing such array features for monitoring expression of a plurality of genes in filamentous fungal cells.

  2. Methods for monitoring multiple gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Berka, Randy; Bachkirova, Elena; Rey, Michael

    2013-10-01

    The present invention relates to methods for monitoring differential expression of a plurality of genes in a first filamentous fungal cell relative to expression of the same genes in one or more second filamentous fungal cells using microarrays containing Trichoderma reesei ESTs or SSH clones, or a combination thereof. The present invention also relates to computer readable media and substrates containing such array features for monitoring expression of a plurality of genes in filamentous fungal cells.

  3. Methods for monitoring multiple gene expression

    DOEpatents

    Berka, Randy; Bachkirova, Elena; Rey, Michael

    2008-06-01

    The present invention relates to methods for monitoring differential expression of a plurality of genes in a first filamentous fungal cell relative to expression of the same genes in one or more second filamentous fungal cells using microarrays containing Trichoderma reesei ESTs or SSH clones, or a combination thereof. The present invention also relates to computer readable media and substrates containing such array features for monitoring expression of a plurality of genes in filamentous fungal cells.

  4. Expression and evaluation of enzymes required for the hydrolysis of galactomannan.

    PubMed

    Malherbe, A R; Rose, S H; Viljoen-Bloom, M; van Zyl, W H

    2014-08-01

    The cost-effective production of bioethanol from lignocellulose requires the complete conversion of plant biomass, which contains up to 30 % mannan. To ensure utilisation of galactomannan during consolidated bioprocessing, heterologous production of mannan-degrading enzymes in fungal hosts was explored. The Aspergillus aculeatus endo-β-mannanase (Man1) and Talaromyces emersonii α-galactosidase (Agal) genes were expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae Y294, and the Aspergillus niger β-mannosidase (cMndA) and synthetic Cellvibrio mixtus β-mannosidase (Man5A) genes in A. niger. Maximum enzyme activity for Man1 (374 nkat ml(-1), pH 5.47), Agal (135 nkat ml(-1), pH 2.37), cMndA (12 nkat ml(-1), pH 3.40) and Man5A (8 nkat ml(-1), pH 3.40) was observed between 60 and 70 °C. Co-expression of the Man1 and Agal genes in S. cerevisiae Y294[Agal-Man1] reduced the extracellular activity relative to individual expression of the respective genes. However, the combined action of crude Man1, Agal and Man5A enzyme preparations significantly decreased the viscosity of galactomannan in locust bean gum, confirming hydrolysis thereof. Furthermore, when complemented with exogenous Man5A, S. cerevisiae Y294[Agal-Man1] produced 56 % of the theoretical ethanol yield, corresponding to a 66 % carbohydrate conversion, on 5 g l(-1) mannose and 10 g l(-1) locust bean gum.

  5. Organization and control of genes encoding catabolic enzymes in Rhizobiaceae

    SciTech Connect

    Parke, D.; Ornston, L.N.

    1993-03-01

    Rhizobiaceae, a diverse bacterial group comprising rhizobia and agrobacteria, symbiotic partnership with plants form nitrogen-fixing nodules on plant roots or are plant pathogens. Phenolic compounds produced by plants serve as inducers of rhizobial nodulation genes and agrobacterial virulence genes reflect their capacity to utilize numerous aromatics, including phenolics, as a source of carbon and energy. In many microbes the aerobic degradation of numerous aromatic compounds to tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates is achieved by the [beta]-ketoadipate pathway. Our initial studies focused on the organization and regulation of the ketoadipate pathway in Agrobacterium tumefaciens. We have cloned, identified and characterized a novel regulatory gene that modulates expression of an adjacent pca (protocatechuate) structural gene, pcaD. Regulation of pcaD is mediated by the regulatory gene, termed pcaQ, in concert with the intermediate [beta]-carboxy-cis,cis-muconate. [beta]-carboxy-cis,cismuconate is an unstable chemical, not marketed commercially, and it is unlikely to permeate Escherichia coli cells if supplied in media. Because of these factors, characterization of pcaQ in E. coli required an in vivo delivery system for [beta]-carboxycis,cis-muconate. This was accomplished by designing an E. coli strain that expressed an Acinetobacter calcoaceticus pcaA gene for conversion of protocatechuate to [beta]-carboxy-cis,cis-muconate.

  6. Expression of digestive enzymes and nutrient transporters in Eimeria acervulina-challenged layers and broilers.

    PubMed

    Su, S; Miska, K B; Fetterer, R H; Jenkins, M C; Wong, E A

    2014-05-01

    Avian coccidiosis is a disease caused by intestinal protozoa in the genus Eimeria. Clinical signs of coccidiosis include intestinal lesions and reduced feed efficiency and BW gain. This growth reduction may be due to changes in expression of digestive enzymes and nutrient transporters in the intestine. The objective of this study was to examine the differential expression of digestive enzymes, transporters of amino acids, peptides, sugars, and minerals, and an antimicrobial peptide in the small intestine of Eimeria acervulina-infected broilers and layers. Uninfected broilers and layers, in general, expressed these genes at comparable levels. Some differences included 3-fold and 2-fold greater expression of the peptide transporter PepT1 and the antimicrobial peptide LEAP2 (liver expressed antimicrobial peptide 2), respectively, in the jejunum of layers compared with broilers and 17-fold greater expression of LEAP2 in the duodenum of broilers compared with layers. In the duodenum of Eimeria-infected broilers and layers, there was downregulation of aminopeptidase N; sucrase-isomaltase; the neutral, cationic, and anionic amino acid transporters b(o,+)AT/rBAT, B(o)AT, CAT2, and EAAT3; the sugar transporter GLUT2; the zinc transporter ZnT1; and LEAP2. In the jejunum of infected layers there was downregulation of many of the same genes as in the duodenum plus downregulation of PepT1, b(o,+)AT/rBAT, and the y(+) L system amino acid transporters y(+) LAT1 and y(+) LAT2. In the ileum of infected layers there was downregulation of CAT2, y(+)LAT1, the L type amino acid transporter LAT1, and the sugar transporter GLUT1, and upregulation of APN, PepT1, the sodium glucose transporter SGLT4, and LEAP2. In E. acervulina-infected broilers, there were no gene expression changes in the jejunum and ileum. These changes in intestinal digestive enzyme and nutrient transporter gene expression may result in a decrease in the efficiency of protein digestion, uptake of important amino acids

  7. Heterologous expression of xylanase enzymes in lipogenic yeast Yarrowia lipolytica

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, Wei; Wei, Hui; Alahuhta, Markus; ...

    2014-12-02

    In order to develop a direct microbial sugar conversion platform for the production of lipids, drop-in fuels and chemicals from cellulosic biomass substrate, we chose Yarrowia lipolytica as a viable demonstration strain. Y. lipolytica is known to accumulate lipids intracellularly and is capable of metabolizing sugars to produce lipids; however, it lacks the lignocellulose-degrading enzymes needed to break down biomass directly. While research is continuing on the development of a Y. lipolytica strain able to degrade cellulose, in this study, we present successful expression of several xylanases in Y. lipolytica. The XynII and XlnD expressing Yarrowia strains exhibited an abilitymore » to grow on xylan mineral plates. This was shown by Congo Red staining of halo zones on xylan mineral plates. Enzymatic activity tests further demonstrated active expression of XynII and XlnD in Y. lipolytica. Furthermore, synergistic action in converting xylan to xylose was observed when XlnD acted in concert with XynII. Finally, the successful expression of these xylanases in Yarrowia further advances us toward our goal to develop a direct microbial conversion process using this organism.« less

  8. Estimation and Testing of Gene Expression Heterosis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Peng; Nettleton, Dan

    2014-01-01

    Heterosis, also known as the hybrid vigor, occurs when the mean phenotype of hybrid off-spring is superior to that of its two inbred parents. The heterosis phenomenon is extensively utilized in agriculture though the molecular basis is still unknown. In an effort to understand phenotypic heterosis at the molecular level, researchers have begun to compare expression levels of thousands of genes between parental inbred lines and their hybrid offspring to search for evidence of gene expression heterosis. Standard statistical approaches for separately analyzing expression data for each gene can produce biased and highly variable estimates and unreliable tests of heterosis. To address these shortcomings, we develop a hierarchical model to borrow information across genes. Using our modeling framework, we derive empirical Bayes estimators and an inference strategy to identify gene expression heterosis. Simulation results show that our proposed method outperforms the more traditional strategy used to detect gene expression heterosis. This article has supplementary material online. PMID:25435758

  9. Estimation and Testing of Gene Expression Heterosis.

    PubMed

    Ji, Tieming; Liu, Peng; Nettleton, Dan

    2014-09-01

    Heterosis, also known as the hybrid vigor, occurs when the mean phenotype of hybrid off-spring is superior to that of its two inbred parents. The heterosis phenomenon is extensively utilized in agriculture though the molecular basis is still unknown. In an effort to understand phenotypic heterosis at the molecular level, researchers have begun to compare expression levels of thousands of genes between parental inbred lines and their hybrid offspring to search for evidence of gene expression heterosis. Standard statistical approaches for separately analyzing expression data for each gene can produce biased and highly variable estimates and unreliable tests of heterosis. To address these shortcomings, we develop a hierarchical model to borrow information across genes. Using our modeling framework, we derive empirical Bayes estimators and an inference strategy to identify gene expression heterosis. Simulation results show that our proposed method outperforms the more traditional strategy used to detect gene expression heterosis. This article has supplementary material online.

  10. Cinnamaldehyde enhances Nrf2 nuclear translocation to upregulate phase II detoxifying enzyme expression in HepG2 cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, Tzou-Chi; Chung, Yu-Ling; Wu, Mei-Li; Chuang, Show-Mei

    2011-05-11

    Cinnamaldehyde has been demonstrated to stimulate glutathione production and the expression of phase II detoxifying enzymes in HepG2 cells. The mechanism underlying this cinnamaldehyde-mediated gene expression relies on Nrf2 transcriptional activity. Therefore, the molecular signaling events in cinnamaldehyde-mediated detoxifying enzyme expression were further investigated in this study. Cinnamaldehyde activated ERK1/2, Akt, and JNK signaling pathways, but not the p38 MAP kinase pathway, subsequently leading to Nrf2 nuclear translocation and eventually increasing phase II enzyme expression. In contrast, inhibition of ERK1/2, Akt, or JNK pathways attenuated Nrf2 nuclear translocation and phase II enzyme expression. Depletion of Nrf2 by small RNA interference (si-RNA) showed that the protein levels of phase II enzymes were no longer induced by cinnamaldehyde. A luciferase reporter assay and an electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) also demonstrated that cinnamaldehyde-activated signaling resulted in the increased transcriptional activity of Nrf2 through binding to the ARE4 enhancer sequence. Altogether, these data suggest that ERK1/2, Akt, and JNK pathways activated by cinnamaldehyde collectively control Nrf2 nuclear translocation and transcriptional activity, leading to the increase of phase II enzyme expression. Application of an appropriate chemopreventive agent such as cinnamaldehyde could potentially be an alternative strategy for cancer chemoprevention.

  11. Cloning of a fibrinolytic enzyme (subtilisin) gene from Bacillus subtilis in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Ghasemi, Younes; Dabbagh, Fatemeh; Ghasemian, Abdollah

    2012-09-01

    Several investigations are being pursued to enhance the efficacy and specificity of fibrinolytic therapy. In this regard, microbial fibrinolytic enzymes attracted much more medical interests during these decades. Subtilisin, a member of subtilases (the superfamily of subtilisin-like serine proteases) and also a fibrinolytic enzyme is quite common in Gram-positive bacteria, and Bacillus species stand out in particular, as many extracellular and even intracellular variants have been identified. In the present work, the subtilisin gene from Bacillus subtilis PTCC 1023 was cloned into the vector pET-15b and expressed in Escherichia coli strain BL21 (DE3). Total genomic DNA were isolated and used for PCR amplification of the subtilisin gene by means of the specific primers. SDS-PAGE and enzyme assay were done for characterizing the expressed protein. A ~1,100 bp of the structural subtilisin gene was amplified. The DNA and amino acid sequence alignments resulting from the BLAST search of subtilisin showed high sequence identity with the other strains of B. subtilis, whereas significantly lower identity was observed with other bacterial subtilisins. The recombinant enzyme had the same molecular weight as other reported subtilisins and the E. coli transformants showed high subtilisin activity. This study provides evidence that subtilisin can be actively expressed in E. coli. The commercial availability of subtilisin is of great importance for industrial applications and also pharmaceutical purposes as thrombolytic agent. Thus, the characterization of new recombinant subtilisin and the development of rapid, simple, and effective production methods are not only of academic interest, but also of practical importance.

  12. Digestive enzyme expression and epithelial structure of small intestine in neonatal rats after 16 days spaceflight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyake, M.; Yamasaki, M.; Hazama, A.; Ijiri, K.; Shimizu, T.

    It is important to assure whether digestive system can develop normally in neonates during spaceflight. Because the small intestine changes its function and structure drastically around weaning known as redifferentiation. Lactase expression declines and sucrase increases in small intestine for digestion of solid food before weaning. In this paper, we compared this enzyme transition and structural development of small intestine in neonatal rats after spaceflight. To find digestive genes differentially expressed in fight rats, DNA membrane macroarray was also used. Eight-day old rats were loaded to Space Shuttle Columbia, and housed in the animal facility for 16 days in space (STS-90, Neurolab mission). Two control groups (AGC; asynchronous ground control and VIV; vivarium) against flight group (FLT) were prepared. There was no difference in structure (crypt depth) and cell differentiation of epithelium between FLT and AGC by immunohistochemical analysis. We found that the amount of sucrase mRNA compared to lactase was decreased in FLT by RT-PCR. It reflected the enzyme transition was inhibited. Increase of 5 genes (APO A-I, APO A-IV, ACE, aFABP and aminopeptidase M) and decrease of carboxypeptidase-D were detected in FLT using macroarray. We think nutrition differences (less nourishment and late weaning) during spaceflight may cause inhibition of enzyme transition at least partly. The weightlessness might contribute to the inhibition through behavioral change.

  13. Expression of phosphatidylcholine biosynthetic enzymes during early embryogenesis in the amphibian Bufo arenarum.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Bussy, Rodrigo; Mouguelar, Valeria; Banchio, Claudia; Coux, Gabriela

    2015-04-01

    In the principal route of phosphatidylcholine (PC) synthesis the regulatory steps are catalysed by CTP:phosphocholine cytidylyltransferase (CCT) and choline kinase (CK). Knock-out mice in Pcyt1a (CCT gene) and Chka1 (CK gene) resulted in preimplantation embryonic lethality, demonstrating the essential role of this pathway. However, there is still a lack of detailed CCT and CK expression analysis during development. The aim of the current work was to study the expression during early development of both enzymes in the external-fertilization vertebrate Bufo arenarum. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and western blot confirmed their presence in unfertilized eggs. Analysis performed in total extracts from staged embryos showed constant protein levels of both enzymes until the 32-cell stage: then they decreased, reaching a minimum in the gastrula before starting to recover. CTP:phosphocholine cytidylyltransferase is an amphitropic enzyme that inter-converts between cytosolic inactive and membrane-bound active forms. Immunoblot analysis demonstrated that the cytosolic:total CCT protein ratio does not change throughout embryogenesis, suggesting a progressive decline of CCT activity in early development. However, PC (and phosphatidylethanolamine) content per egg/embryo remained constant throughout the stages analysed. In conclusion, the current data for B. arenarum suggest that net synthesis of PC mediated by CCT and CK is not required in early development and that supplies for membrane biosynthesis are fulfilled by lipids already present in the egg/embryo reservoirs.

  14. Identification, cloning, and expression of Pseudomonas aeruginosa phosphorylcholine phosphatase gene.

    PubMed

    Massimelli, María J; Beassoni, Paola R; Forrellad, Marina A; Barra, José L; Garrido, Mónica N; Domenech, Carlos E; Lisa, Angela T

    2005-05-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa phosphorylcholine phosphatase (PChP) is a periplasmic enzyme produced simultaneously with the hemolytic phospholipase C (PLc-H) when the bacteria are grown in the presence of choline, betaine, dimethylglycine or carnitine. Molecular analysis of the P. aeruginosa mutant JUF8-00, after Tn5-751 mutagenesis, revealed that the PA5292 gene in the P. aeruginosa PAO1 genome was responsible for the synthesis of PChP. The enzyme expressed in E. coli, rPChP-Ec, purified by a chitin-binding column (IMPACT-CN system, New England BioLabs) was homogeneous after SDS-PAGE analysis. PChP was also expressed in P. aeruginosa PAO1-LAC, rPChP-Pa. Both recombinant enzymes exhibited a molecular mass of approximately 40 kDa, as expected for the size of the PA5292 gene, and catalyzed the hydrolysis of phosphorylcholine, phosphorylethanolamine, and p-nitrophenylphosphate. The saturation curve of rPChP-Ec and rPChP-Pa by phosphorylcholine revealed that these recombinant enzymes, like the purified native PChP, also contained the high- and low-affinity sites for phosphorylcholine and that the enzyme activity was inhibited by high substrate concentration.

  15. Microbial sucrose isomerases: producing organisms, genes and enzymes.

    PubMed

    Goulter, Ken C; Hashimi, Saeed M; Birch, Robert G

    2012-01-05

    Sucrose isomerase (SI) activity is used industrially for the conversion of sucrose into isomers, particularly isomaltulose or trehalulose, which have properties advantageous over sucrose for some food uses. All of the known microbial SIs are TIM barrel proteins that convert sucrose without need for any cofactors, with varying kinetics and product specificities. The current analysis was undertaken to bridge key gaps between the information in patents and scientific publications about the microbes and enzymes useful for sucrose isomer production. This analysis shows that microbial SIs can be considered in 5 structural classes with corresponding functional distinctions that broadly align with the taxonomic differences between producing organisms. The most widely used bacterial strain for industrial production of isomaltulose, widely referred to as "Protaminobacter rubrum" CBS 574.77, is identified as Serratia plymuthica. The strain producing the most structurally divergent SI, with a high product specificity for trehalulose, widely referred to as "Pseudomonas mesoacidophila" MX-45, is identified as Rhizobium sp. Each tested SI-producer is shown to have a single SI gene and enzyme, so the properties reported previously for the isolated proteins can reasonably be associated with the products of the genes subsequently cloned from the same isolates and SI classes. Some natural isolates with potent SI activity do not catabolize the isomer under usual production conditions. The results indicate that their industrial potential may be further enhanced by selection for variants that do not catabolize the sucrose substrate.

  16. Identification of positive and negative transcriptional regulatory elements of the rabbit angiotensin-converting enzyme gene.

    PubMed Central

    Goraya, T Y; Kessler, S P; Kumar, R S; Douglas, J; Sen, G C

    1994-01-01

    The two tissue-specific mRNAs encoding the isozymes of rabbit angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) are generated from the same gene by alternative choice of two transcription initiation sites 5.7 kb apart. In the current study, we have characterized the regulatory sites controlling the transcription of the larger pulmonary isozyme mRNA. For this purpose, reporter genes driven by varying lengths of upstream region of the ACE gene were transfected into ACE-producing cells. Our results demonstrated that the transcription of this gene is primarily driven by positive elements within the first 274 bp DNA upstream of the transcription initiation site. The reporter gene driven by this region was expressed in two ACE-producing cells but not in two ACE-non-producing cells thereby establishing its tissue specificity. Our experiments also revealed the existence of a strong negative element located between -692 and -610 positions. This element suppressed the expression of the reporter gene in a dose-dependent and position and orientation-independent fashion thus suggesting that it is a true silencer element. It could also repress the expression of a reporter gene driven by the heterologous strong promoter of the beta-actin gene. The repressing effects of the negative element could be partially overcome by cotransfecting the isolated negative element along with the reporter gene containing the negative element. This result was possibly due to the functional removal of a limiting trans-acting factor which binds to this element. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays revealed that the negative element can form several complexes with proteins present in the nuclear extract of an ACE-producing cell line. At least part of the negative element is strongly conserved in the upstream regions of the human and mouse ACE genes. Images PMID:8165133

  17. Enzyme diversity and mosaic gene organization in denitrification.

    PubMed

    Zumft, W G; Körner, H

    1997-02-01

    Denitrification is a main branch of the global nitrogen cycle. In the past ten years unravelling the underlying biochemistry and genetics has proceeded at an increasing pace. Fungal denitrification has become a new field. The biochemical investigation of denitrification has culminated in the description of the crystal structures of the two types of nitrite reductases. The N2O reductase shares with cytochrome c oxidase the CuA center as a structurally novel metal site. The cytochrome b subunit of NO reductase has a striking conservation of heme-binding transmembrane segments versus the subunit I of cytochrome c oxidase. Another putative denitrification gene product shows structural relation to the subunit III of the oxidase. N2O reductase and NO reductase may be ancestors of energy-conserving enzymes of the heme-copper oxidase superfamily. More than 30 genes for denitrification are located in a > 30-kb cluster in Pseudomonas stutzeri, and comparable gene clusters have been identified in Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Paracoccus denitrificans. Genes necessary for nitrite reduction and NO reduction have a mosaic arrangement with very few conserved locations within these clusters and relative to each other.

  18. Gene expression control by Bacillus anthracis purine riboswitches.

    PubMed

    Kirchner, Marion; Schneider, Sabine

    2017-02-16

    In all kingdoms of life, cellular replication relies on the presence of nucleosides and nucleotides, the building blocks of nucleic acids and the main source of energy. In bacteria, the availability of metabolites sometimes directly regulates the expression of enzymes and proteins involved in purine salvage, biosynthesis and uptake through riboswitches. Riboswitches are located in bacterial mRNAs and can control gene expression by conformational changes in response to ligand binding. We have established an inverse reporter gene system in Bacillus subtilis that allows us to monitor riboswitch-controlled gene expression. We used it to investigate the activity of five potential purine riboswitches from B. anthracis in response to different purines and pyrimidines. Furthermore, in vitro studies on the aptamer domains of the riboswitches reveal their variation in guanine binding affinity ranging from nM to µM. These data do not only provide insight into metabolite sensing but can also aid to engineer artificial cell regulatory systems.

  19. Regulation of erythroid cell-specific gene expression during erythropoiesis.

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, P. R.; Plumb, M.; Frampton, J.; Llewellyn, D.; Chester, J.; Chambers, I.; MacLeod, K.; Fleming, J.; O'Prey, J.; Walker, M.

    1988-01-01

    The aim of our group's work over the past few years has been to investigate the molecular mechanisms regulating erythroid cell-specific gene expression during erythroid cell differentiation. In addition to the alpha-globin gene, we have focussed on two non-globin genes of interest encoding the rabbit red cell-specific lipoxygenase (LOX) and the mouse glutathione peroxidase (GSHPX), an important seleno-enzyme responsible for protection against peroxide-damage. Characterisation of the GSHPX gene showed that the seleno-cysteine residue in the active site of the enzyme is encoded by UGA, which usually functions as a translation-termination codon. This novel finding has important implications regarding mRNA sequence context effects affecting codon recognition. The regulation of the GSHPX and red cell LOX genes has been investigated by functional transfection experiments. The 700 bp upstream of the GSHPX promoter seems to function equally well when linked to the bacterial chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (CAT) gene and transfected into mouse erythroid or fibroblast cell lines. However, the presence of tissue-specific DNase I hypersensitive sites (DHSS) in the 3' flanking region of the GSHPX gene suggests that such sites may be important in its regulation in the various cell types in which it is highly expressed, i.e., erythroid cells, liver and kidney. The transcription unit of the RBC LOX gene has also been defined and 5' and 3' flanking regions are being investigated for erythroid-specific regulatory elements: a region upstream of the LOX gene gives increased expression of a linked CAT gene when transfected into mouse erythroid cell lines compared to non-erythroid cell lines.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3151147

  20. Differential Expression of Cytochrome P450 Enzymes in Normal and Tumor Tissues from Childhood Rhabdomyosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Molina-Ortiz, Dora; Camacho-Carranza, Rafael; González-Zamora, José Francisco; Shalkow-Kalincovstein, Jaime; Cárdenas-Cardós, Rocío; Ností-Palacios, Rosario; Vences-Mejía, Araceli

    2014-01-01

    Intratumoral expression of genes encoding Cytochrome P450 enzymes (CYP) might play a critical role not only in cancer development but also in the metabolism of anticancer drugs. The purpose of this study was to compare the mRNA expression patterns of seven representative CYPs in paired tumor and normal tissue of child patients with rabdomyosarcoma (RMS). Using real time quantitative RT-PCR, the gene expression pattern of CYP1A1, CYP1A2, CYP1B1, CYP2E1, CYP2W1, CYP3A4, and CYP3A5 were analyzed in tumor and adjacent non-tumor tissues from 13 child RMS patients. Protein concentration of CYPs was determined using Western blot. The expression levels were tested for correlation with the clinical and pathological data of the patients. Our data showed that the expression levels of CYP1A1 and CYP1A2 were negligible. Elevated expression of CYP1B1 mRNA and protein was detected in most RMS tumors and adjacent normal tissues. Most cancerous samples exhibit higher levels of both CYP3A4 and CYP3A5 compared with normal tissue samples. Expression of CYP2E1 mRNA was found to be significantly higher in tumor tissue, however no relation was found with protein levels. CYP2W1 mRNA and/or protein are mainly expressed in tumors. In conclusion, we defined the CYP gene expression profile in tumor and paired normal tissue of child patients with RMS. The overexpression of CYP2W1, CYP3A4 and CYP3A5 in tumor tissues suggests that they may be involved in RMS chemoresistance; furthermore, they may be exploited for the localized activation of anticancer prodrugs. PMID:24699256

  1. [Expression of tobacco SKP1 gene induced by oligochitosan].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fu-Yun; Feng, Bin; Du, Yu-Guang; Bai, Xue-Fang; Zhang, Yu-Kui

    2005-04-01

    Oligochitosan is an effective inductor for plant resistance. To understand the induced resistance mechanism, mRNA differential display was used to isolate genes from Nicotiana tabacum var. Samsun NN and four enhanced-expression gene fragments were obtained and were reamplified. The reamplified products of appropriate size were isolated and purified before they were subcloned into PMD18-T vector. The results of plasmids digestion by EcoRI and HindIII and analysis of reverse Northern blot indicated that the expression of the four genes was enhanced by oligochitosan induction. Sequence and homology analysis show that they share 82% identity in nucleotide sequence with Nicotiana benthamiana SKP1 gene. Because the SKP1 protein as the core component of SCF (ubiquitin ligase enzyme E3) is relevant to plant resistance to virus, so these results suggested that oligochitosan can induce plant resistance and its mechanism may be relevant to ubiquitination.

  2. Gene Expression Patterns in Ovarian Carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Schaner, Marci E.; Ross, Douglas T.; Ciaravino, Giuseppe; Sørlie, Therese; Troyanskaya, Olga; Diehn, Maximilian; Wang, Yan C.; Duran, George E.; Sikic, Thomas L.; Caldeira, Sandra; Skomedal, Hanne; Tu, I-Ping; Hernandez-Boussard, Tina; Johnson, Steven W.; O'Dwyer, Peter J.; Fero, Michael J.; Kristensen, Gunnar B.; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Hastie, Trevor; Tibshirani, Robert; van de Rijn, Matt; Teng, Nelson N.; Longacre, Teri A.; Botstein, David; Brown, Patrick O.; Sikic, Branimir I.

    2003-01-01

    We used DNA microarrays to characterize the global gene expression patterns in surface epithelial cancers of the ovary. We identified groups of genes that distinguished the clear cell subtype from other ovarian carcinomas, grade I and II from grade III serous papillary carcinomas, and ovarian from breast carcinomas. Six clear cell carcinomas were distinguished from 36 other ovarian carcinomas (predominantly serous papillary) based on their gene expression patterns. The differences may yield insights into the worse prognosis and therapeutic resistance associated with clear cell carcinomas. A comparison of the gene expression patterns in the ovarian cancers to published data of gene expression in breast cancers revealed a large number of differentially expressed genes. We identified a group of 62 genes that correctly classified all 125 breast and ovarian cancer specimens. Among the best discriminators more highly expressed in the ovarian carcinomas were PAX8 (paired box gene 8), mesothelin, and ephrin-B1 (EFNB1). Although estrogen receptor was expressed in both the ovarian and breast cancers, genes that are coregulated with the estrogen receptor in breast cancers, including GATA-3, LIV-1, and X-box binding protein 1, did not show a similar pattern of coexpression in the ovarian cancers. PMID:12960427

  3. The angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) gene family of Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Yan, Hai-Yan; Mita, Kazuei; Zhao, Xia; Tanaka, Yoshikazu; Moriyama, Minoru; Wang, Huabin; Iwanaga, Masashi; Kawasaki, Hideki

    2017-04-15

    We previously reported regarding an ecdysone-inducible angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) gene. We found another four ACE genes in the Bombyx genome. The present study was undertaken to clarify the evolutionally changed function of the ACE of Bombyx mori. Core regions of deduced amino acid sequences of ACE genes were compared with those of other insect ACE genes. Five Bombyx genes have the conserved Zn(2+)-binding-site motif (HEXXH); however, BmAcer4 has only one and BmAcer3 has no catalytic ligand. BmAcer1 and BmAcer2 were expressed in several organs. BmAcer3 was expressed in testes, and BmAcer4 and BmAcer5 were expressed in compound eyes; however, the transcription levels of these three genes were very low. Quantitative RT-PCR and Western analysis were conducted to determine the tissue distribution and developmental expression of BmAcer1and BmAcer2. Transcripts of BmAcer1 and BmAcer2 were found in the reproductive organs during the larval and pupal stages. BmAcer1 was dominant in fat bodies during the feeding stage and showed high expression in the epidermis, wing discs, and pupal wing tissues after the wandering stage. Its expression patterns in epidermis, wing discs, and wing tissues resembled the hemolymph ecdysteroid titer in the larval and pupal stages. Acer1 was observed in the hemolymph at all stages, appearing to be the source of it are fat bodies, wings, and epidermis, and functioning after being secreted into the hemolymph. BmAcer2 was abundant in the midgut during the feeding stage and after the wandering stage and in silk glands after the pupal stage. We conclude that the evolution of BmAcer occurred through duplication, and, thereafter, functional diversification developed.

  4. Gene expression patterns associated with queen honey bee longevity.

    PubMed

    Corona, Miguel; Hughes, Kimberly A; Weaver, Daniel B; Robinson, Gene E

    2005-11-01

    The oxidative stress theory of aging proposes that accumulation of oxidative damage is the main proximate cause of aging and that lifespan is determined by the rate at which this damage occurs. Two predictions from this theory are that long-lived organisms produce fewer ROS or have increased antioxidant production. Based in these predictions, molecular mechanisms to promote longevity could include either changes in the regulation of mitochondrial genes that affect ROS production or elevated expression of antioxidant genes. We explored these possibilities in the honey bee, a good model for the study of aging because it has a caste system in which the same genome produces both a long-lived queen and a short-lived worker. We measured mRNA levels for genes encoding eight of the most prominent antioxidant enzymes and five mitochondrial proteins involved in respiration. The expression of antioxidant genes generally decreased with age in queens, but not in workers. Expression of most mitochondrial genes, in particular CytC, was higher in young queens, but these genes showed a faster age-related decline relative to workers. One exception to this trend was COX-I in thorax. This resulted in higher COX-I/CytC ratios in old queens compared to old workers, which suggests caste-specific differences in mitochondrial function that might be related to the caste-specific differences in longevity. Queen honey bee longevity appears to have evolved via mechanisms other than increased antioxidant gene expression.

  5. Arabidopsis gene expression patterns during spaceflight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, A.-L.; Ferl, R. J.

    The exposure of Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis) plants to spaceflight environments resulted in the differential expression of hundreds of genes. A 5 day mission on orbiter Columbia in 1999 (STS-93) carried transgenic Arabidopsis plants engineered with a transgene composed of the alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh) gene promoter linked to the β -Glucuronidase (GUS) reporter gene. The plants were used to evaluate the effects of spaceflight on two fronts. First, expression patterns visualized with the Adh/GUS transgene were used to address specifically the possibility that spaceflight induces a hypoxic stress response, and to assess whether any spaceflight response was similar to control terrestrial hypoxia-induced gene expression patterns. (Paul et al., Plant Physiol. 2001, 126:613). Second, genome-wide patterns of native gene expression were evaluated utilizing the Affymetrix ATH1 GeneChip? array of 8,000 Arabidopsis genes. As a control for the veracity of the array analyses, a selection of genes identified with the arrays was further characterized with quantitative Real-Time RT PCR (ABI - TaqmanTM). Comparison of the patterns of expression for arrays of hybridized with RNA isolated from plants exposed to spaceflight compared to the control arrays revealed hundreds of genes that were differentially expressed in response to spaceflight, yet most genes that are hallmarks of hypoxic stress were unaffected. These results will be discussed in light of current models for plant responses to the spaceflight environment, and with regard to potential future flight opportunities.

  6. Identification and Characterization of MAE1, the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Structural Gene Encoding Mitochondrial Malic Enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Boles, Eckhard; de Jong-Gubbels, Patricia; Pronk, Jack T.

    1998-01-01

    Pyruvate, a precursor for several amino acids, can be synthesized from phosphoenolpyruvate by pyruvate kinase. Nevertheless, pyk1 pyk2 mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae devoid of pyruvate kinase activity grew normally on ethanol in defined media, indicating the presence of an alternative route for pyruvate synthesis. A candidate for this role is malic enzyme, which catalyzes the oxidative decarboxylation of malate to pyruvate. Disruption of open reading frame YKL029c, which is homologous to malic enzyme genes from other organisms, abolished malic enzyme activity in extracts of glucose-grown cells. Conversely, overexpression of YKL029c/MAE1 from the MET25 promoter resulted in an up to 33-fold increase of malic enzyme activity. Growth studies with mutants demonstrated that presence of either Pyk1p or Mae1p is required for growth on ethanol. Mutants lacking both enzymes could be rescued by addition of alanine or pyruvate to ethanol cultures. Disruption of MAE1 alone did not result in a clear phenotype. Regulation of MAE1 was studied by determining enzyme activities and MAE1 mRNA levels in wild-type cultures and by measuring β-galactosidase activities in a strain carrying a MAE1::lacZ fusion. Both in shake flask cultures and in carbon-limited chemostat cultures, MAE1 was constitutively expressed. A three- to fourfold induction was observed during anaerobic growth on glucose. Subcellular fractionation experiments indicated that malic enzyme in S. cerevisiae is a mitochondrial enzyme. Its regulation and localization suggest a role in the provision of intramitochondrial NADPH or pyruvate under anaerobic growth conditions. However, since null mutants could still grow anaerobically, this function is apparently not essential. PMID:9603875

  7. Identification and characterization of the Arabidopsis gene encoding the tetrapyrrole biosynthesis enzyme uroporphyrinogen III synthase.

    PubMed

    Tan, Fui-Ching; Cheng, Qi; Saha, Kaushik; Heinemann, Ilka U; Jahn, Martina; Jahn, Dieter; Smith, Alison G

    2008-03-01

    UROS (uroporphyrinogen III synthase; EC 4.2.1.75) is the enzyme responsible for the formation of uroporphyrinogen III, the precursor of all cellular tetrapyrroles including haem, chlorophyll and bilins. Although UROS genes have been cloned from many organisms, the level of sequence conservation between them is low, making sequence similarity searches difficult. As an alternative approach to identify the UROS gene from plants, we used functional complementation, since this does not require conservation of primary sequence. A mutant of Saccharomyces cerevisiae was constructed in which the HEM4 gene encoding UROS was deleted. This mutant was transformed with an Arabidopsis thaliana cDNA library in a yeast expression vector and two colonies were obtained that could grow in the absence of haem. The rescuing plasmids encoded an ORF (open reading frame) of 321 amino acids which, when subcloned into an Escherichia coli expression vector, was able to complement an E. coli hemD mutant defective in UROS. Final proof that the ORF encoded UROS came from the fact that the recombinant protein expressed with an N-terminal histidine-tag was found to have UROS activity. Comparison of the sequence of AtUROS (A. thaliana UROS) with the human enzyme found that the seven invariant residues previously identified were conserved, including three shown to be important for enzyme activity. Furthermore, a structure-based homology search of the protein database with AtUROS identified the human crystal structure. AtUROS has an N-terminal extension compared with orthologues from other organisms, suggesting that this might act as a targeting sequence. The precursor protein of 34 kDa translated in vitro was imported into isolated chloroplasts and processed to the mature size of 29 kDa. Confocal microscopy of plant cells transiently expressing a fusion protein of AtUROS with GFP (green fluorescent protein) confirmed that AtUROS was targeted exclusively to chloroplasts in vivo.

  8. Enzyme

    MedlinePlus

    Enzymes are complex proteins that cause a specific chemical change in all parts of the body. For ... use them. Blood clotting is another example of enzymes at work. Enzymes are needed for all body ...

  9. Histone modifications and skeletal muscle metabolic gene expression.

    PubMed

    McGee, Sean L; Hargreaves, Mark

    2010-03-01

    1. Skeletal muscle oxidative function and metabolic gene expression are co-ordinately downregulated in metabolic diseases such as insulin resistance, obesity and Type 2 diabetes. Altering skeletal muscle metabolic gene expression to favour enhanced energy expenditure is considered a potential therapy to combat these diseases. 2. Histone deacetylases (HDACs) are chromatin-remodelling enzymes that repress gene expression. It has been shown that HDAC4 and 5 co-operatively regulate a number of genes involved in various aspects of metabolism. Understanding how HDACs are regulated provides insights into the mechanisms regulating skeletal muscle metabolic gene expression. 3. Multiple kinases control phosphorylation-dependent nuclear export of HDACs, rendering them unable to repress transcription. We have found a major role for the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) in response to energetic stress, yet metabolic gene expression is maintained in the absence of AMPK activity. Preliminary evidence suggests a potential role for protein kinase D, also a Class IIa HDAC kinase, in this response. 4. The HDACs are also regulated by ubiquitin-mediated proteasomal degradation, although the exact mediators of this process have not been identified. 5. Because HDACs appear to be critical regulators of skeletal muscle metabolic gene expression, HDAC inhibition could be an effective therapy to treat metabolic diseases. 6. Together, these data show that HDAC4 and 5 are critical regulators of metabolic gene expression and that understanding their regulation could provide a number of points of intervention for therapies designed to treat metabolic diseases, such as insulin resistance, obesity and Type 2 diabetes.

  10. Stratified gene expression analysis identifies major amyotrophic lateral sclerosis genes.

    PubMed

    Jones, Ashley R; Troakes, Claire; King, Andrew; Sahni, Vibhu; De Jong, Simone; Bossers, Koen; Papouli, Efterpi; Mirza, Muddassar; Al-Sarraj, Safa; Shaw, Christopher E; Shaw, Pamela J; Kirby, Janine; Veldink, Jan H; Macklis, Jeffrey D; Powell, John F; Al-Chalabi, Ammar

    2015-05-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a neurodegenerative disease of motor neurons resulting in progressive paralysis. Gene expression studies of ALS only rarely identify the same gene pathways as gene association studies. We hypothesized that analyzing tissues by matching on degree of disease severity would identify different patterns of gene expression from a traditional case-control comparison. We analyzed gene expression changes in 4 postmortem central nervous system regions, stratified by severity of motor neuron loss. An overall comparison of cases (n = 6) and controls (n = 3) identified known ALS gene, SOX5, as showing differential expression (log2 fold change = 0.09, p = 5.5 × 10(-5)). Analyses stratified by disease severity identified expression changes in C9orf72 (p = 2.77 × 10(-3)), MATR3 (p = 3.46 × 10(-3)), and VEGFA (p = 8.21 × 10(-4)), all implicated in ALS through genetic studies, and changes in other genes in pathways involving RNA processing and immune response. These findings suggest that analysis of gene expression stratified by disease severity can identify major ALS genes and may be more efficient than traditional case-control comparison.

  11. Gene Expression Noise, Fitness Landscapes, and Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charlebois, Daniel

    The stochastic (or noisy) process of gene expression can have fitness consequences for living organisms. For example, gene expression noise facilitates the development of drug resistance by increasing the time scale at which beneficial phenotypic states can be maintained. The present work investigates the relationship between gene expression noise and the fitness landscape. By incorporating the costs and benefits of gene expression, we track how the fluctuation magnitude and timescale of expression noise evolve in simulations of cell populations under stress. We find that properties of expression noise evolve to maximize fitness on the fitness landscape, and that low levels of expression noise emerge when the fitness benefits of gene expression exceed the fitness costs (and that high levels of noise emerge when the costs of expression exceed the benefits). The findings from our theoretical/computational work offer new hypotheses on the development of drug resistance, some of which are now being investigated in evolution experiments in our laboratory using well-characterized synthetic gene regulatory networks in budding yeast. Nserc Postdoctoral Fellowship (Grant No. PDF-453977-2014).

  12. Role and importance of polymorphisms with respect to DNA methylation for the expression of CYP2E1 enzyme.

    PubMed

    Naselli, Flores; Catanzaro, Irene; Bellavia, Daniele; Perez, Alessandro; Sposito, Laura; Caradonna, Fabio

    2014-02-15

    Different individuals possess slightly different genetic information and show genetically-determined differences in several enzyme activities due to genetic variability. Following an integrated approach, we studied the polymorphisms and methylation of sites contained in the 5' flanking region of the metabolizing enzyme CYP2E1 in correlation to its expression in both tumor and non-neoplastic liver cell lines, since to date little is known about the influence of these (epi)genetic elements in basal conditions and under induction by the specific inductor and a demethylating agent. In treated cells, reduced DNA methylation, assessed both at genomic and gene level, was not consistently associated with the increase of enzyme expression. Interestingly, the Rsa/Pst haplotype differentially influenced CYP2E1 enzyme expression. In addition, regarding the Variable Number of Tandem Repeats polymorphism, cells with A4/A4 genotype showed a greater expression inhibition (ranging from 20% to 30%) compared with others carrying the A2/A2 one, while those cells bringing A2/A3 genotype showed an increase of expression (of 25%, about). Finally, we demonstrated for the first time that the A2 and A3 CYP2E1 alleles play a more important role in the expression of the enzyme, compared with other (epi)genetic factors, since they are binding sites for trans-acting proteins.

  13. Transient changes of enzyme activities and expression of stress proteins in the small intestine of piglets after weaning.

    PubMed

    Tao, Xin; Xu, Ziwei; Men, Xiaoming

    2015-01-01

    To determine the transient effects of weaning on the small intestine, 16 piglets were slaughtered at days 0, 1, 4 and 7 after weaning. Jejunal samples were collected to examine different enzyme activities and mRNA expressions of two stress protein families, namely, heat-shock proteins (HSP) and trefoil factors (TFF). Results showed that the activities of ceruloplasmin, alkaline phosphatase and lactate dehydrogenase, were significantly changed at Day 1 and/or Day 4. The mRNA expressions of HSP10, HSP60 and HSP90 showed a pattern of increased expression with time after weaning. Expression significantly differed between Day 0 and Day 7 after weaning. The mRNA expression of HSP70 was significantly increased on Day 1 only. Similarly, the mRNA expressions of TFF1 and TFF2 were significantly increased on Day 7 compared with those on Day 0. Expression of TFF3 was not affected by time after weaning. In conclusion, the present study indicated that weaning induced transient injury to small intestinal morphology and function. Particularly it changed enzyme activities and gene expression of stress proteins in the small intestine of piglets. At first time, a change in the gene expression of HSP10 and a gene overexpression of TFF1 in the small intestine of piglets after weaning was found.

  14. Garlic Influences Gene Expression In Vivo and In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Charron, Craig S; Dawson, Harry D; Novotny, Janet A

    2016-02-01

    There is a large body of preclinical research aimed at understanding the roles of garlic and garlic-derived preparations in the promotion of human health. Most of this research has targeted the possible functions of garlic in maintaining cardiovascular health and in preventing and treating cancer. A wide range of outcome variables has been used to investigate the bioactivity of garlic, ranging from direct measures of health status such as cholesterol concentrations, blood pressure, and changes in tumor size and number, to molecular and biochemical measures such as mRNA gene expression, protein concentration, enzyme activity, and histone acetylation status. Determination of how garlic influences mRNA gene expression has proven to be a valuable approach to elucidating the mechanisms of garlic bioactivity. Preclinical studies investigating the health benefits of garlic far outnumber human studies and have made frequent use of mRNA gene expression measurement. There is an immediate need to understand mRNA gene expression in humans as well. Although safety and ethical constraints limit the types of available human tissue, peripheral whole blood is readily accessible, and measuring mRNA gene expression in whole blood may provide a unique window to understanding how garlic intake affects human health.

  15. Plasmodium infection alters Anopheles gambiae detoxification gene expression

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Anopheles gambiae has been shown to change its global gene expression patterns upon Plasmodium infection. While many alterations are directly related to the mosquito's innate immune response, parasite invasion is also expected to generate toxic by-products such as free radicals. The current study aimed at identifying which loci coding for detoxification enzymes are differentially expressed as a function of Plasmodium berghei infection in midgut and fat body tissues. Results Using a custom-made DNA microarray, transcript levels of 254 loci primarily belonging to three major detoxification enzyme families (glutathione S-transferases, cytochrome P450 monooxygenases and esterases) were compared in infected and uninfected mosquitoes both during ookinete invasion and the release of sporozoites into the hemocoel. The greatest changes in gene expression were observed in the midgut in response to ookinete invasion. Interestingly, many detoxification genes including a large number of P450s were down-regulated at this stage. In the fat body, while less dramatic, gene expression alterations were also observed and occurred during the ookinete invasion and during the release of sporozoites into the hemocoel. While most gene expression changes were tissue-related, CYP6M2, a CYP previously associated with insecticide resistance, was over-expressed both in the midgut and fat body during ookinete invasion. Conclusions Most toxicity-related reactions occur in the midgut shortly after the ingestion of an infected blood meal. Strong up-regulation of CYP6M2 in the midgut and the fat body as well as its previous association with insecticide resistance shows its broad role in metabolic detoxification. PMID:20482856

  16. Gene expression in the etiology of schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Bray, Nicholas J

    2008-05-01

    Gene expression represents a fundamental interface between genes and environment in the development and ongoing plasticity of the human brain. Individual differences in gene expression are likely to underpin much of human diversity, including psychiatric illness. In the past decade, the development of microarray and proteomic technology has enabled global description of gene expression in schizophrenia. However, it is difficult on the basis of gene expression assays alone to distinguish between those changes that constitute primary etiology and those that reflect secondary pathology, compensatory mechanisms, or confounding influences. In this respect, tests of genetic association with schizophrenia will be instructive because changes in gene expression that result from gene variants that are associated with the disorder are likely to be of primary etiological significance. However, regulatory polymorphism is extremely difficult to recognize on the basis of sequence interrogation alone. Functional assays at the messenger RNA and/or protein level will be essential in elucidating the molecular mechanisms underlying genetic association with schizophrenia and are likely to become increasingly important in the identification of regulatory variants with which to test for association with the disorder and related traits. Once established, etiologically relevant changes in gene expression can be recapitulated in model systems in order to elucidate the molecular and physiological pathways that may ultimately give rise to the condition.

  17. Heterologous gene expression in Hansenula polymorpha: Efficient secretion of glucoamylase

    SciTech Connect

    Gellissen, G.; Janowicz, Z.A.; Merckelbach, A.; Keup, P.; Weydemann, U.; Strasser, A.W.M. ); Piontek, M.; Hollenberg, C.P. )

    1991-03-01

    The authors have introduced the glucoamylase gene (GAM1) from Schwanniomyces occidentalis into the genome of the methylotrophic yeast Hansenula polymorpha to study the potential of this organism as a host for high-level expression of a heterologous gene encoding a secretory protein. Transformants of H. polymorpha containing GAM1 under control of the formate dehydrogenase (FMD) promoter are stable and efficiently secrete an active glucoamylase that is faithfully processed and modified. Yields of up to 1.4 g/l of active enzyme were obtained at cell densities of 100-130 grams dry weight per liter.

  18. Cloning of the Arabidopsis and Rice Formaldehyde Dehydrogenase Genes: Implications for the Origin of Plant Adh Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Dolferus, R.; Osterman, J. C.; Peacock, W. J.; Dennis, E. S.

    1997-01-01

    This article reports the cloning of the genes encoding the Arabidopsis and rice class III ADH enzymes, members of the alcohol dehydrogenase or medium chain reductase/dehydrogenase superfamily of proteins with glutathione-dependent formaldehyde dehydrogenase activity (GSH-FDH). Both genes contain eight introns in exactly the same positions, and these positions are conserved in plant ethanol-active Adh genes (class P). These data provide further evidence that plant class P genes have evolved from class III genes by gene duplication and acquisition of new substrate specificities. The position of introns and similarities in the nucleic acid and amino acid sequences of the different classes of ADH enzymes in plants and humans suggest that plant and animal class III enzymes diverged before they duplicated to give rise to plant and animal ethanol-active ADH enzymes. Plant class P ADH enzymes have gained substrate specificities and evolved promoters with different expression properties, in keeping with their metabolic function as part of the alcohol fermentation pathway. PMID:9215914

  19. Betacyanin Biosynthetic Genes and Enzymes Are Differentially Induced by (a)biotic Stress in Amaranthus hypochondriacus

    PubMed Central

    Casique-Arroyo, Gabriela; Martínez-Gallardo, Norma; González de la Vara, Luis; Délano-Frier, John P.

    2014-01-01

    An analysis of key genes and enzymes of the betacyanin biosynthetic pathway in Amaranthus hypochondriacus (Ah) was performed. Complete cDNA sequence of Ah genes coding for cyclo-DOPA 5-O glucosyltransferase (AhcDOPA5-GT), two 4, 5-DOPA-extradiol-dioxygenase isoforms (AhDODA-1 and AhDODA-2, respectively), and a betanidin 5-O-glucosyltransferase (AhB5-GT), plus the partial sequence of an orthologue of the cytochrome P-450 R gene (CYP76AD1) were obtained. With the exception AhDODA-2, which had a closer phylogenetic relationship to DODA-like genes in anthocyanin-synthesizing plants, all genes analyzed closely resembled those reported in related Caryophyllales species. The measurement of basal gene expression levels, in addition to the DOPA oxidase tyrosinase (DOT) activity, in different tissues of three Ah genotypes having contrasting pigmentation levels (green to red-purple) was determined. Additional analyses were performed in Ah plants subjected to salt and drought stress and to two different insect herbivory regimes. Basal pigmentation accumulation in leaves, stems and roots of betacyanic plants correlated with higher expression levels of AhDODA-1 and AhB5-GT, whereas DOT activity levels coincided with pigment accumulation in stems and roots and with the acyanic nature of green plants, respectively, but not with pigmentation in leaves. Although the abiotic stress treatments tested produced changes in pigment levels in different tissues, pigment accumulation was the highest in leaves and stems of drought stressed betacyanic plants, respectively. However, tissue pigment accumulation in stressed Ah plants did not always correlate with betacyanin biosynthetic gene expression levels and/or DOT activity. This effect was tissue- and genotype-dependent, and further suggested that other unexamined factors were influencing pigment content in stressed Ah. The results obtained from the insect herbivory assays, particularly in acyanic plants, also support the proposal that

  20. Noise minimisation in gene expression switches.

    PubMed

    Monteoliva, Diana; McCarthy, Christina B; Diambra, Luis

    2013-01-01

    Gene expression is subject to stochastic variation which leads to fluctuations in the rate of protein production. Recently, a study in yeast at a genomic scale showed that, in some cases, gene expression variability alters phenotypes while, in other cases, these remain unchanged despite fluctuations in the expression of other genes. These studies suggested that noise in gene expression is a physiologically relevant trait and, to prevent harmful stochastic variation in the expression levels of some genes, it can be subject to minimisation. However, the mechanisms for noise minimisation are still unclear. In the present work, we analysed how noise expression depends on the architecture of the cis-regulatory system, in particular on the number of regulatory binding sites. Using analytical calculations and stochastic simulations, we found that the fluctuation level in noise expression decreased with the number of regulatory sites when regulatory transcription factors interacted with only one other bound transcription factor. In contrast, we observed that there was an optimal number of binding sites when transcription factors interacted with many bound transcription factors. This finding suggested a new mechanism for preventing large fluctuations in the expression of genes which are sensitive to the concentration of regulators.

  1. Noise Minimisation in Gene Expression Switches

    PubMed Central

    Monteoliva, Diana; McCarthy, Christina B.; Diambra, Luis

    2013-01-01

    Gene expression is subject to stochastic variation which leads to fluctuations in the rate of protein production. Recently, a study in yeast at a genomic scale showed that, in some cases, gene expression variability alters phenotypes while, in other cases, these remain unchanged despite fluctuations in the expression of other genes. These studies suggested that noise in gene expression is a physiologically relevant trait and, to prevent harmful stochastic variation in the expression levels of some genes, it can be subject to minimisation. However, the mechanisms for noise minimisation are still unclear. In the present work, we analysed how noise expression depends on the architecture of the cis-regulatory system, in particular on the number of regulatory binding sites. Using analytical calculations and stochastic simulations, we found that the fluctuation level in noise expression decreased with the number of regulatory sites when regulatory transcription factors interacted with only one other bound transcription factor. In contrast, we observed that there was an optimal number of binding sites when transcription factors interacted with many bound transcription factors. This finding suggested a new mechanism for preventing large fluctuations in the expression of genes which are sensitive to the concentration of regulators. PMID:24376783

  2. Porcine Hypothalamic Aromatase Cytochrome P450: Isoform Characterization, Sex-Dependent Activity, Regional Expression, and Regulation by Enzyme Inhibition in Neonatal Boars

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Domestic pigs have three CYP19 genes encoding functional paralogues of the enzyme aromatase cytochrome P450 (P450arom) that are expressed in the gonads, placenta and pre-implantation blastocyst. All catalyze estrogen synthesis, but the “gonadal” type enzyme is unique in also synthesizing a nonaromat...

  3. Gene Expression Patterns in Human Liver Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xin; Cheung, Siu Tim; So, Samuel; Fan, Sheung Tat; Barry, Christopher; Higgins, John; Lai, Kin-Man; Ji, Jiafu; Dudoit, Sandrine; Ng, Irene O.L.; van de Rijn, Matt; Botstein, David; Brown, Patrick O.

    2002-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a leading cause of death worldwide. Using cDNA microarrays to characterize patterns of gene expression in HCC, we found consistent differences between the expression patterns in HCC compared with those seen in nontumor liver tissues. The expression patterns in HCC were also readily distinguished from those associated with tumors metastatic to liver. The global gene expression patterns intrinsic to each tumor were sufficiently distinctive that multiple tumor nodules from the same patient could usually be recognized and distinguished from all the others in the large sample set on the basis of their gene expression patterns alone. The distinctive gene expression patterns are characteristic of the tumors and not the patient; the expression programs seen in clonally independent tumor nodules in the same patient were no more similar than those in tumors from different patients. Moreover, clonally related tumor masses that showed distinct expression profiles were also distinguished by genotypic differences. Some features of the gene expression patterns were associated with specific phenotypic and genotypic characteristics of the tumors, including growth rate, vascular invasion, and p53 overexpression. PMID:12058060

  4. Factors involved in the regulation of the Schizosaccharomyces pombe malic enzyme gene.

    PubMed

    Groenewald, M; Viljoen-Bloom, M

    2001-06-01

    Transcription of the Schizosaccharomyces pombe malic enzyme gene, mae2, is induced when cells are grown on high glucose concentrations or under nonaerated conditions. Two cis-acting elements in the mae2 promoter, upstream activator sequences UAS1 and UAS2, are required for basal expression, whilst three negative-acting, upstream repressor sequences are involved in general derepression of mae2. Both the Pka1 and Sty1 signal transduction pathways are involved in the induced expression of mae2 under fermentative conditions. Expression of mae2 seems to be regulated in response to the carbon source, lack of oxygen and osmotic stress conditions, probably to assist in maintaining the intracellular redox balance.

  5. Overexpression of bacterial ethylene-forming enzyme gene in Trichoderma reesei enhanced the production of ethylene

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xi; Liang, Yong; Hua, Jing; Tao, Li; Qin, Wensheng; Chen, Sanfeng

    2010-01-01

    In order to efficiently utilize natural cellulose materials to produce ethylene, three expression vectors containing the ethylene-forming enzyme (efe) gene from Pseudomonas syringae pv. glycinea were constructed. The target gene was respectively controlled by different promoters: cbh I promoter from Trichoderma reesei cellobiohydrolases I gene, gpd promoter from Aspergillus nidulans glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase gene and pgk I promoter from T. reesei 3-phosphoglycerate kinase I gene. After transforming into T. reesei QM9414, 43 stable transformants were obtained by PCR amplification and ethylene determination. Southern blot analysis of 14 transformants demonstrated that the efe gene was integrated into chromosomal DNA with copy numbers from 1 to 4. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis of 6 transformants showed that the heterologous gene was transcribed. By using wheat straw as a carbon source, the ethylene production rates of aforementioned 14 transformants were measured. Transformant C30-3 with pgk I promoter had the highest ethylene production (4,012 nl h-1 l-1). This indicates that agricultural wastes could be used to produce ethylene in recombinant filamentous fungus T. reesei. PMID:20150979

  6. Digital gene expression signatures for maize development.

    PubMed

    Eveland, Andrea L; Satoh-Nagasawa, Namiko; Goldshmidt, Alexander; Meyer, Sandra; Beatty, Mary; Sakai, Hajime; Ware, Doreen; Jackson, David

    2010-11-01

    Genome-wide expression signatures detect specific perturbations in developmental programs and contribute to functional resolution of key regulatory networks. In maize (Zea mays) inflorescences, mutations in the RAMOSA (RA) genes affect the determinacy of axillary meristems and thus alter branching patterns, an important agronomic trait. In this work, we developed and tested a framework for analysis of tag-based, digital gene expression profiles using Illumina's high-throughput sequencing technology and the newly assembled B73 maize reference genome. We also used a mutation in the RA3 gene to identify putative expression signatures specific to stem cell fate in axillary meristem determinacy. The RA3 gene encodes a trehalose-6-phosphate phosphatase and may act at the interface between developmental and metabolic processes. Deep sequencing of digital gene expression libraries, representing three biological replicate ear samples from wild-type and ra3 plants, generated 27 million 20- to 21-nucleotide reads with frequencies spanning 4 orders of magnitude. Unique sequence tags were anchored to 3'-ends of individual transcripts by DpnII and NlaIII digests, which were multiplexed during sequencing. We mapped 86% of nonredundant signature tags to the maize genome, which associated with 37,117 gene models and unannotated regions of expression. In total, 66% of genes were detected by at least nine reads in immature maize ears. We used comparative genomics to leverage existing information from Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) and rice (Oryza sativa) in functional analyses of differentially expressed maize genes. Results from this study provide a basis for the analysis of short-read expression data in maize and resolved specific expression signatures that will help define mechanisms of action for the RA3 gene.

  7. Zinc affects differently growth, photosynthesis, antioxidant enzyme activities and phytochelatin synthase expression of four marine diatoms.

    PubMed

    Nguyen-Deroche, Thi Le Nhung; Caruso, Aurore; Le, Thi Trung; Bui, Trang Viet; Schoefs, Benoît; Tremblin, Gérard; Morant-Manceau, Annick

    2012-01-01

    Zinc-supplementation (20 μM) effects on growth, photosynthesis, antioxidant enzyme activities (superoxide dismutase, ascorbate peroxidase, catalase), and the expression of phytochelatin synthase gene were investigated in four marine diatoms (Amphora acutiuscula, Nitzschia palea, Amphora coffeaeformis and Entomoneis paludosa). Zn-supplementation reduced the maximum cell density. A linear relationship was found between the evolution of gross photosynthesis and total chlorophyll content. The Zn treatment decreased the electron transport rate except in A. coffeaeformis and in E. paludosa at high irradiance. A linear relationship was found between the efficiency of light to evolve oxygen and the size of the light-harvesting antenna. The external carbonic anhydrase activity was stimulated in Zn-supplemented E. paludosa but was not correlated with an increase of photosynthesis. The total activity of the antioxidant enzymes did not display any clear increase except in ascorbate peroxidase activity in N. palea. The phytochelatin synthase gene was identified in the four diatoms, but its expression was only revealed in N. palea, without a clear difference between control and Zn-supplemented cells. Among the four species, A. paludosa was the most sensitive and A. coffeaeformis, the most tolerant. A. acutiuscula seemed to be under metal starvation, whereas, to survive, only N. palea developed several stress responses.

  8. Expression and inactivation of osteopontin-degrading PHEX enzyme in squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Neves, Raquel L; Chiarantin, Gabrielly M D; Nascimento, Fábio D; Pesquero, João B; Nader, Helena B; Tersariol, Ivarne L S; McKee, Marc D; Carmona, Adriana K; Barros, Nilana M T

    2016-08-01

    Proteolytic enzymes mediate the activation or inactivation of many physiologic and pathologic processes. The PHEX gene (Phosphate-regulating gene with homologies to endopeptidase on the X chromosome) encodes a metallopeptidase, which is mutated in patients with a prevalent form (1:20,000) of inherited rickets-X-linked hypophosphatemia (XLH). XLH shows growth retardation, hypophosphatemia, osteomalacia, and defective renal phosphate reabsorption and metabolism of vitamin D. Most PHEX studies have focused on bone, and recently we identified osteopontin (OPN) as the first protein substrate for PHEX, demonstrating in the murine model of XLH (Hyp mice) an increase in OPN that contributes to the osteomalacia. Besides its role in bone mineralization, OPN is expressed in many tissues, and therein has different functions. In tumor biology, OPN is known to be associated with metastasis. Here, we extend our PHEX-OPN studies to investigate PHEX expression in a squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) cell line and its possible involvement in modulating OPN function. Real-time PCR showed PHEX-OPN co-expression in SCC cells, with sequencing of the 22 exons showing no mutation of the PHEX gene. Although recombinant PHEX hydrolyze SCC-OPN fragments, unlike in bone cells, SCC-PHEX protein was not predominantly at the plasma membrane. Enzymatic activity assays, FACs and immunoblotting analyses demonstrated that membrane PHEX is degraded by cysteine proteases and the decreased PHEX activity could contribute to inappropriate OPN regulation. These results highlight for the first time PHEX in tumor biology.

  9. Gene expression homeostasis and chromosome architecture

    PubMed Central

    Seshasayee, Aswin Sai Narain

    2014-01-01

    In rapidly growing populations of bacterial cells, including those of the model organism Escherichia coli, genes essential for growth - such as those involved in protein synthesis - are expressed at high levels; this is in contrast to many horizontally-acquired genes, which are maintained at low transcriptional levels.1 This balance in gene expression states between 2 distinct classes of genes is established by a galaxy of transcriptional regulators, including the so-called nucleoid associated proteins (NAP) that contribute to shaping the chromosome.2 Besides these active players in gene regulation, it is not too far-fetched to anticipate that genome organization in terms of how genes are arranged on the chromosome,3 which is the result of long-drawn transactions among genome rearrangement processes and selection, and the manner in which it is structured inside the cell, plays a role in establishing this balance. A recent study from our group has contributed to the literature investigating the interplay between global transcriptional regulators and genome organization in establishing gene expression homeostasis.4 In particular, we address a triangle of functional interactions among genome organization, gene expression homeostasis and horizontal gene transfer. PMID:25997086

  10. Unmasking ultradian rhythms in gene expression

    PubMed Central

    van der Veen, Daan R.; Gerkema, Menno P.

    2017-01-01

    Biological oscillations with an ultradian time scale of 1 to several hours include cycles in behavioral arousal, episodic glucocorticoid release, and gene expression. Ultradian rhythms are thought to have an extrinsic origin because of a perceived absence of ultradian rhythmicity in vitro and a lack of known molecular ultradian oscillators. We designed a novel, non–spectral-analysis method of separating ultradian from circadian components and applied it to a published gene expression dataset with an ultradian sampling resolution. Ultradian rhythms in mouse hepatocytes in vivo have been published, and we validated our approach using this control by confirming 175 of 323 ultradian genes identified in a prior study and found 862 additional ultradian genes. For the first time, we now report ultradian expression of >900 genes in vitro. Sixty genes exhibited ultradian transcriptional rhythmicity, both in vivo and in vitro, including 5 genes involved in the cell cycle. Within these 60 genes, we identified significant enrichment of specific DNA motifs in the 1000 bp proximal promotor, some of which associate with known transcriptional factors. These findings are in strong support of instrinsically driven ultradian rhythms and expose potential molecular mechanisms and functions underlying ultradian rhythms that remain unknown.—Van der Veen, D. R., Gerkema, M. P. Unmasking ultradian rhythms in gene expression. PMID:27871062

  11. Cardiovascular gene expression profiles of dioxin exposure in zebrafish embryos.

    PubMed

    Handley-Goldstone, Heather M; Grow, Matthew W; Stegeman, John J

    2005-05-01

    2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) is a widespread environmental contaminant that causes altered heart morphology, circulatory impairment, edema, hemorrhage, and early life stage mortality in fish. TCDD toxicity is dependent, in large part, on the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR), but understanding of the molecular mechanism of cardiovascular embryotoxicity remains incomplete. To identify genes potentially involved in cardiovascular effects, we constructed custom cDNA microarrays consisting of 4896 zebrafish adult heart cDNA clones and over 200 genes with known developmental, toxicological and housekeeping roles. Gene expression profiles were obtained for 3-day-old zebrafish after early embryonic exposure to either 0.5 or 5.0 nM TCDD. In all, 516 clones were significantly differentially expressed (p < 0.005) under at least one treatment condition; 123 high-priority clones were selected for further investigation. Cytochromes P450 1A and 1B1, and other members of the AHR gene battery, were strongly and dose-dependently induced by TCDD. Importantly, altered expression of cardiac sarcomere components, including cardiac troponin T2 and multiple myosin isoforms, was consistent with the hypothesis that TCDD causes dilated cardiomyopathy. Observed increases in expression levels of mitochondrial energy transfer genes also may be related to cardiomyopathy. Other TCDD-responsive genes included fatty acid and steroid metabolism enzymes, ribosomal and signal-transduction proteins, and 18 expressed sequence tags (ESTs) with no known protein homologs. As the first broad-scale study of TCDD-modulated gene expression in a non-mammalian system, this work provides an important perspective on mechanisms of TCDD toxicity.

  12. Transcriptional regulation of human thromboxane synthase gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, K.D.; Baek, S.J.; Fleischer, T

    1994-09-01

    The human thromboxane synthase (TS) gene encodes a microsomal enzyme catalyzing the conversion of prostaglandin endoperoxide into thromboxane A{sub 2}(TxA{sub 2}), a potent inducer of vasoconstriction and platelet aggregation. A deficiency in platelet TS activity results in bleeding disorders, but the underlying molecular mechanism remains to be elucidated. Increased TxA{sub 2} has been associated with many pathophysiological conditions such as cardiovascular disease, pulmonary hypertension, pre-eclampsia, and thrombosis in sickle cell patients. Since the formation of TxA{sub 2} is dependent upon TS, the regulation of TS gene expression may presumably play a crucial role in vivo. Abrogation of the regulatory mechanism in TS gene expression might contribute, in part, to the above clinical manifestations. To gain insight into TS gene regulation, a 1.7 kb promoter of the human TS gene was cloned and sequenced. RNase protection assay and 5{prime} RACE protocols were used to map the transcription initiation site to nucleotide A, 30 bp downstream from a canonical TATA box. Several transcription factor binding sites, including AP-1, PU.1, and PEA3, were identified within this sequence. Transient expression studies in HL-60 cells transfected with constructs containing various lengths (0.2 to 5.5 kb) of the TS promoter/luciferase fusion gene indicated the presence of multiple repressor elements within the 5.5 kb TS promoter. However, a lineage-specific up-regulation of TS gene expression was observed in HL-60 cells induced by TPA to differentiate along the macrophage lineage. The increase in TS transcription was not detectable until 36 hr after addition of the inducer. These results suggest that expression of the human TS gene may be regulated by a mechanism involving repression and derepression of the TS promoter.

  13. Fasting-induced changes in ECL cell gene expression.

    PubMed

    Lambrecht, Nils W G; Yakubov, Iskandar; Sachs, George

    2007-10-22

    Gastric enterochromaffin-like (ECL) cells release histamine in response to food because of elevation of gastrin and neural release of pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating peptide (PACAP). Acid secretion is at a basal level in the absence of food but is rapidly stimulated with feeding. Rats fasted for 24 h showed a significant decrease of mucosal histamine despite steady-state expression of the histamine-synthesizing enzyme histidine decarboxylase (HDC). Comparative transcriptomal analysis using gene expression oligonucleotide microarrays of 95% pure ECL cells from fed and 24-h fasted rats, thereby eliminating mRNA contamination from other gastric mucosal cell types, identified significantly increased gene expression of the enzymes histidase and urocanase catabolizing the HDC substrate L-histidine but significantly decreased expression of the cellular L-histidine uptake transporter SN2 and of the vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (VMAT-2) responsible for histamine uptake into secretory vesicles. This was confirmed by reverse transcriptase-quantitative polymerase chain reaction of gastric fundic mucosal samples from fed and 24-h fasted rats. The decrease of VMAT-2 gene expression was also shown by a decrease in VMAT-2 protein content in protein extracts from fed and 24-h fasted rats compared with equal amounts of HDC protein and Na-K-ATPase alpha(1)-subunit protein content. These results indicate that rat gastric ECL cells regulate their histamine content during 24-h fasting not by a change in HDC gene or protein expression but by regulation of substrate concentration for HDC and a decreased histamine secretory pool.

  14. Engineering Enzymes in Energy Crops: Conditionally Activated Enzymes Expressed in Cellulosic Energy Crops

    SciTech Connect

    2010-01-15

    Broad Funding Opportunity Announcement Project: Enzymes are required to break plant biomass down into the fermentable sugars that are used to create biofuel. Currently, costly enzymes must be added to the biofuel production process. Engineering crops to already contain these enzymes will reduce costs and produce biomass that is more easily digested. In fact, enzyme costs alone account for $0.50-$0.75/gallon of the cost of a biomass-derived biofuel like ethanol. Agrivida is genetically engineering plants to contain high concentrations of enzymes that break down cell walls. These enzymes can be “switched on” after harvest so they won’t damage the plant while it’s growing.

  15. Expression of polarity genes in human cancer.

    PubMed

    Lin, Wan-Hsin; Asmann, Yan W; Anastasiadis, Panos Z

    2015-01-01

    Polarity protein complexes are crucial for epithelial apical-basal polarity and directed cell migration. Since alterations of these processes are common in cancer, polarity proteins have been proposed to function as tumor suppressors or oncogenic promoters. Here, we review the current understanding of polarity protein functions in epithelial homeostasis, as well as tumor formation and progression. As most previous studies focused on the function of single polarity proteins in simplified model systems, we used a genomics approach to systematically examine and identify the expression profiles of polarity genes in human cancer. The expression profiles of polarity genes were distinct in different human tissues and classified cancer types. Additionally, polarity expression profiles correlated with disease progression and aggressiveness, as well as with identified cancer types, where specific polarity genes were commonly altered. In the case of Scribble, gene expression analysis indicated its common amplification and upregulation in human cancer, suggesting a tumor promoting function.

  16. Regulation of Gene Expression in Protozoa Parasites

    PubMed Central

    Gomez, Consuelo; Esther Ramirez, M.; Calixto-Galvez, Mercedes; Medel, Olivia; Rodríguez, Mario A.

    2010-01-01

    Infections with protozoa parasites are associated with high burdens of morbidity and mortality across the developing world. Despite extensive efforts to control the transmission of these parasites, the spread of populations resistant to drugs and the lack of effective vaccines against them contribute to their persistence as major public health problems. Parasites should perform a strict control on the expression of genes involved in their pathogenicity, differentiation, immune evasion, or drug resistance, and the comprehension of the mechanisms implicated in that control could help to develop novel therapeutic strategies. However, until now these mechanisms are poorly understood in protozoa. Recent investigations into gene expression in protozoa parasites suggest that they possess many of the canonical machineries employed by higher eukaryotes for the control of gene expression at transcriptional, posttranscriptional, and epigenetic levels, but they also contain exclusive mechanisms. Here, we review the current understanding about the regulation of gene expression in Plasmodium sp., Trypanosomatids, Entamoeba histolytica and Trichomonas vaginalis. PMID:20204171

  17. Dynamic modeling of gene expression data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holter, N. S.; Maritan, A.; Cieplak, M.; Fedoroff, N. V.; Banavar, J. R.

    2001-01-01

    We describe the time evolution of gene expression levels by using a time translational matrix to predict future expression levels of genes based on their expression levels at some initial time. We deduce the time translational matrix for previously published DNA microarray gene expression data sets by modeling them within a linear framework by using the characteristic modes obtained by singular value decomposition. The resulting time translation matrix provides a measure of the relationships among the modes and governs their time evolution. We show that a truncated matrix linking just a few modes is a good approximation of the full time translation matrix. This finding suggests that the number of essential connections among the genes is small.

  18. Mining Gene Expression Data of Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Zhenli; Huang, Zhengliang; Li, Ke

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Microarray produces a large amount of gene expression data, containing various biological implications. The challenge is to detect a panel of discriminative genes associated with disease. This study proposed a robust classification model for gene selection using gene expression data, and performed an analysis to identify disease-related genes using multiple sclerosis as an example. Materials and methods Gene expression profiles based on the transcriptome of peripheral blood mononuclear cells from a total of 44 samples from 26 multiple sclerosis patients and 18 individuals with other neurological diseases (control) were analyzed. Feature selection algorithms including Support Vector Machine based on Recursive Feature Elimination, Receiver Operating Characteristic Curve, and Boruta algorithms were jointly performed to select candidate genes associating with multiple sclerosis. Multiple classification models categorized samples into two different groups based on the identified genes. Models’ performance was evaluated using cross-validation methods, and an optimal classifier for gene selection was determined. Results An overlapping feature set was identified consisting of 8 genes that were differentially expressed between the two phenotype groups. The genes were significantly associated with the pathways of apoptosis and cytokine-cytokine receptor interaction. TNFSF10 was significantly associated with multiple sclerosis. A Support Vector Machine model was established based on the featured genes and gave a practical accuracy of ∼86%. This binary classification model also outperformed the other models in terms of Sensitivity, Specificity and F1 score. Conclusions The combined analytical framework integrating feature ranking algorithms and Support Vector Machine model could be used for selecting genes for other diseases. PMID:24932510

  19. Amino acid regulation of gene expression.

    PubMed Central

    Fafournoux, P; Bruhat, A; Jousse, C

    2000-01-01

    The impact of nutrients on gene expression in mammals has become an important area of research. Nevertheless, the current understanding of the amino acid-dependent control of gene expression is limited. Because amino acids have multiple and important functions, their homoeostasis has to be finely maintained. However, amino-acidaemia can be affected by certain nutritional conditions or various forms of stress. It follows that mammals have to adjust several of their physiological functions involved in the adaptation to amino acid availability by regulating the expression of numerous genes. The aim of the present review is to examine the role of amino acids in regulating mammalian gene expression and protein turnover. It has been reported that some genes involved in the control of growth or amino acid metabolism are regulated by amino acid availability. For instance, limitation of several amino acids greatly increases the expression of the genes encoding insulin-like growth factor binding protein-1, CHOP (C/EBP homologous protein, where C/EBP is CCAAT/enhancer binding protein) and asparagine synthetase. Elevated mRNA levels result from both an increase in the rate of transcription and an increase in mRNA stability. Several observations suggest that the amino acid regulation of gene expression observed in mammalian cells and the general control process described in yeast share common features. Moreover, amino acid response elements have been characterized in the promoters of the CHOP and asparagine synthetase genes. Taken together, the results discussed in the present review demonstrate that amino acids, by themselves, can, in concert with hormones, play an important role in the control of gene expression. PMID:10998343

  20. IMP2, a gene involved in the expression of glucose-repressible genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Lodi, T; Goffrini, P; Ferrero, I; Donnini, C

    1995-09-01

    Two mutants carrying different deletions of the IMP2 coding sequence of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, delta T1, which encodes a protein lacking the last 26 C-terminal amino acids, and delta T2, which completely lacks the coding region, were analysed for derepression of glucose-repressible maltose, galactose, raffinose and ethanol utilization pathways in response to glucose limitation. The role of the IMP2 gene product in the regulation of carbon catabolite repressible enzymes maltase, invertase, alcohol dehydrogenase, NAD-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase (NAD-GDH) and L-lactate:ferricytochrome-c oxidoreductase (L-LCR) was also analysed. The IMP2 gene product is required for the rapid glucose derepression of all above-mentioned carbon source utilization pathways and of all the enzymes except for L-LCR. NAD-GDH is regulated by IMP2 in the opposite way and, in fact, this enzyme was released at higher levels in both imp2 mutants than in the wild-type strain. Therefore, the product of IMP2 appears to be involved in positive and negative regulation. Both deletions result in growth and catalytic defects; in some cases partial modification of the gene product yielded more dramatic effects than its complete absence. Moreover, evidence is provided that the IMP2 gene product regulates galactose- and maltose-inducible genes at the transcriptional level and is a positive regulator of maltase, maltose permease and galactose permease gene expression.

  1. Endothelin-converting enzyme is a plausible target gene for hypoxia-inducible factor.

    PubMed

    Khamaisi, Mogher; Toukan, Hala; Axelrod, Jonathan H; Rosenberger, Christian; Skarzinski, Galia; Shina, Ahuva; Meidan, Rina; Koesters, Robert; Rosen, Seymour; Walkinshaw, Gail; Mimura, Imari; Nangaku, Masaomi; Heyman, Samuel N

    2015-04-01

    Renal endothelin-converting enzyme (ECE)-1 is induced in experimental diabetes and following radiocontrast administration, conditions characterized by renal hypoxia, hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) stabilization, and enhanced endothelin synthesis. Here we tested whether ECE-1 might be a HIF-target gene in vitro and in vivo. ECE-1 transcription and expression increased in cultured vascular endothelial and proximal tubular cell lines, subject to hypoxia, to mimosine or cobalt chloride. These interventions are known to stabilize HIF signaling by inhibition of HIF-prolyl hydroxylases. In rats, HIF-prolyl-hydroxylase inhibition by mimosine or FG-4497 increased HIF-1α immunostaining in renal tubules, principally in distal nephron segments. This was associated with markedly enhanced ECE-1 protein expression, predominantly in the renal medulla. A progressive and dramatic increase in ECE-1 immunostaining over time, in parallel with enhanced HIF expression, was also noted in conditional von Hippel-Lindau knockout mice. Since HIF and STAT3 are cross-stimulated, we triggered HIF expression by STAT3 activation in mice, transfected by or injected with a chimeric IL-6/IL-6-receptor protein, and found a similar pattern of enhanced ECE-1 expression. Chromatin immunoprecipitation sequence (ChIP-seq) and PCR analysis in hypoxic endothelial cells identified HIF binding at the ECE-1 promoter and intron regions. Thus, our findings suggest that ECE-1 may be a novel HIF-target gene.

  2. Identification and characterization of a ubiquitinconjugating enzyme UBE2A gene from lamprey.

    PubMed

    Chen, Liyong; Wu, Fenfang; Feng, Bo

    2016-02-01

    Ubiquitin-conjugating enzymes (E2s) play an important role in the mechanism of ubiquitin transfer. Although in most species many of these enzymes share high sequence and structural conservation, their existence and functions in the lamprey remain unknown. In this study, we identified and characterized a ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme (UBE2A)-like gene in lamprey. The gene, designated as LaUBE2A, contained a 456-bp open reading frame encoding a 152-amino acid protein with a typical UBC domain. Real-time PCR assay showed that LaUBE2A was expressed in various tissues of the adult lamprey, with higher levels in the leukocytes and muscle and lower levels in the skin and liver. The high conservation in amino acid sequence between LaUBE2A and UBE2As from Homo sapiens, Mus musculus, Cavia porcellus, and Alligator sinensi implied that the function of LaUBE2A may be similar to that of UBE2A.

  3. Imputing gene expression to maximize platform compatibility.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Weizhuang; Han, Lichy; Altman, Russ B

    2017-02-15

    Microarray measurements of gene expression constitute a large fraction of publicly shared biological data, and are available in the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO). Many studies use GEO data to shape hypotheses and improve statistical power. Within GEO, the Affymetrix HG-U133A and HG-U133 Plus 2.0 are the two most commonly used microarray platforms for human samples; the HG-U133 Plus 2.0 platform contains 54 220 probes and the HG-U133A array contains a proper subset (21 722 probes). When different platforms are involved, the subset of common genes is most easily compared. This approach results in the exclusion of substantial measured data and can limit downstream analysis. To predict the expression values for the genes unique to the HG-U133 Plus 2.0 platform, we constructed a series of gene expression inference models based on genes common to both platforms. Our model predicts gene expression values that are within the variability observed in controlled replicate studies and are highly correlated with measured data. Using six previously published studies, we also demonstrate the improved performance of the enlarged feature space generated by our model in downstream analysis.

  4. Optimal Reference Genes for Gene Expression Normalization in Trichomonas vaginalis.

    PubMed

    dos Santos, Odelta; de Vargas Rigo, Graziela; Frasson, Amanda Piccoli; Macedo, Alexandre José; Tasca, Tiana

    2015-01-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis is the etiologic agent of trichomonosis, the most common non-viral sexually transmitted disease worldwide. This infection is associated with several health consequences, including cervical and prostate cancers and HIV acquisition. Gene expression analysis has been facilitated because of available genome sequences and large-scale transcriptomes in T. vaginalis, particularly using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR), one of the most used methods for molecular studies. Reference genes for normalization are crucial to ensure the accuracy of this method. However, to the best of our knowledge, a systematic validation of reference genes has not been performed for T. vaginalis. In this study, the transcripts of nine candidate reference genes were quantified using qRT-PCR under different cultivation conditions, and the stability of these genes was compared using the geNorm and NormFinder algorithms. The most stable reference genes were α-tubulin, actin and DNATopII, and, conversely, the widely used T. vaginalis reference genes GAPDH and β-tubulin were less stable. The PFOR gene was used to validate the reliability of the use of these candidate reference genes. As expected, the PFOR gene was upregulated when the trophozoites were cultivated with ferrous ammonium sulfate when the DNATopII, α-tubulin and actin genes were used as normalizing gene. By contrast, the PFOR gene was downregulated when the GAPDH gene was used as an internal control, leading to misinterpretation of the data. These results provide an important starting point for reference gene selection and gene expression analysis with qRT-PCR studies of T. vaginalis.

  5. Transient gene expression in tobacco using Gibson assembly and the Gene Gun.

    PubMed

    Mattozzi, Matthew D; Voges, Mathias J; Silver, Pamela A; Way, Jeffrey C

    2014-04-18

    In order to target a single protein to multiple subcellular organelles, plants typically duplicate the relevant genes, and express each gene separately using complex regulatory strategies including differential promoters and/or signal sequences. Metabolic engineers and synthetic biologists interested in targeting enzymes to a particular organelle are faced with a challenge: For a protein that is to be localized to more than one organelle, the engineer must clone the same gene multiple times. This work presents a solution to this strategy: harnessing alternative splicing of mRNA. This technology takes advantage of established chloroplast and peroxisome targeting sequences and combines them into a single mRNA that is alternatively spliced. Some splice variants are sent to the chloroplast, some to the peroxisome, and some to the cytosol. Here the system is designed for multiple-organelle targeting with alternative splicing. In this work, GFP was expected to be expressed in the chloroplast, cytosol, and peroxisome by a series of rationally designed 5' mRNA tags. These tags have the potential to reduce the amount of cloning required when heterologous genes need to be expressed in multiple subcellular organelles. The constructs were designed in previous work(11), and were cloned using Gibson assembly, a ligation independent cloning method that does not require restriction enzymes. The resultant plasmids were introduced into Nicotiana benthamiana epidermal leaf cells with a modified Gene Gun protocol. Finally, transformed leaves were observed with confocal microscopy.

  6. Perspectives: Gene Expression in Fisheries Management

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nielsen, Jennifer L.; Pavey, Scott A.

    2010-01-01

    Functional genes and gene expression have been connected to physiological traits linked to effective production and broodstock selection in aquaculture, selective implications of commercial fish harvest, and adaptive changes reflected in non-commercial fish populations subject to human disturbance and climate change. Gene mapping using single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) to identify functional genes, gene expression (analogue microarrays and real-time PCR), and digital sequencing technologies looking at RNA transcripts present new concepts and opportunities in support of effective and sustainable fisheries. Genomic tools have been rapidly growing in aquaculture research addressing aspects of fish health, toxicology, and early development. Genomic technologies linking effects in functional genes involved in growth, maturation and life history development have been tied to selection resulting from harvest practices. Incorporating new and ever-increasing knowledge of fish genomes is opening a different perspective on local adaptation that will prove invaluable in wild fish conservation and management. Conservation of fish stocks is rapidly incorporating research on critical adaptive responses directed at the effects of human disturbance and climate change through gene expression studies. Genomic studies of fish populations can be generally grouped into three broad categories: 1) evolutionary genomics and biodiversity; 2) adaptive physiological responses to a changing environment; and 3) adaptive behavioral genomics and life history diversity. We review current genomic research in fisheries focusing on those that use microarrays to explore differences in gene expression among phenotypes and within or across populations, information that is critically important to the conservation of fish and their relationship to humans.

  7. Gene expression analysis of precision-cut human liver slices indicates stable expression of ADME-Tox related genes

    SciTech Connect

    Elferink, M.G.L.; Olinga, P.; van Leeuwen, E.M.; Bauerschmidt, S.; Polman, J.; Schoonen, W.G.; Heisterkamp, S.H.; Groothuis, G.M.M.

    2011-05-15

    In the process of drug development it is of high importance to test the safety of new drugs with predictive value for human toxicity. A promising approach of toxicity testing is based on shifts in gene expression profiling of the liver. Toxicity screening based on animal liver cells cannot be directly extrapolated to humans due to species differences. The aim of this study was to evaluate precision-cut human liver slices as in vitro method for the prediction of human specific toxicity by toxicogenomics. The liver slices contain all cell types of the liver in their natural architecture. This is important since drug-induced toxicity often is a multi-cellular process. Previously we showed that toxicogenomic analysis of rat liver slices is highly predictive for rat in vivo toxicity. In this study we investigated the levels of gene expression during incubation up to 24 h with Affymetrix microarray technology. The analysis was focused on a broad spectrum of genes related to stress and toxicity, and on genes encoding for phase-I, -II and -III metabolizing enzymes and transporters. Observed changes in gene expression were associated with cytoskeleton remodeling, extracellular matrix and cell adhesion, but for the ADME-Tox related genes only minor changes were observed. PCA analysis showed that changes in gene expression were not associated with age, sex or source of the human livers. Slices treated with acetaminophen showed patterns of gene expression related to its toxicity. These results indicate that precision-cut human liver slices are relatively stable during 24 h of incubation and represent a valuable model for human in vitro hepatotoxicity testing despite the human inter-individual variability.

  8. Characterization of Genes Encoding Key Enzymes Involved in Anthocyanin Metabolism of Kiwifruit during Storage Period

    PubMed Central

    Li, Boqiang; Xia, Yongxiu; Wang, Yuying; Qin, Guozheng; Tian, Shiping

    2017-01-01

    ‘Hongyang’ is a red fleshed kiwifruit with high anthocyanin content. In this study, we mainly investigated effects of different temperatures (25 and 0°C) on anthocyanin biosynthesis in harvested kiwifruit, and characterized the genes encoding key enzymes involved in anthocyanin metabolism, as well as evaluated the mode of the action, by which low temperature regulates anthocyanin accumulation in ‘Hongyang’ kiwifruit during storage period. The results showed that low temperature could effectively enhance the anthocyanin accumulation of kiwifruit in the end of storage period (90 days), which related to the increase in mRNA levels of ANS1, ANS2, DRF1, DRF2, and UGFT2. Moreover, the transcript abundance of MYBA1-1 and MYB5-1, the genes encoding an important component of MYB–bHLH–WD40 (MBW) complex, was up-regulated, possibly contributing to the induction of specific anthocyanin biosynthesis genes under the low temperature. To further investigate the roles of AcMYB5-1/5-2/A1-1 in regulation of anthocyanin biosynthesis, genes encoding the three transcription factors were transiently transformed in Nicotiana benthamiana leaves. Overexpression of AcMYB5-1/5-2/A1-1 activated the gene expression of NtANS and NtDFR in tobacco. Our results suggested that low temperature storage could stimulate the anthocyanin accumulation in harvested kiwifruit via regulating several structural and regulatory genes involved in anthocyanin biosynthesis. PMID:28344589

  9. Cloning, expression, and regulation of tissue-specific genes in Drosophila

    SciTech Connect

    Korochkin, L.I.

    1995-08-01

    The family of esterase genes was studied in various Drosophilia species. These genes are classified as tissue-specific and housekeeping ones. The expression of tissue-specific esterases in the male reproductive system of Drosophilia species from the virilis and melanogaster groups was thoroughly examined. Modifier genes controlling activity level, time of synthesis, and distribution in cells of the tissue-specific esterase isozyme from the ejaculatory bulb were revealed. The structural gene coding of this enzyme was isolated, cloned, and sequenced. This gene was shown to be similar in different Drosophilia species; the transcriptional level of tissue specificity of this gene was determined. The possibility of transformating the tissue-specific gene into a housekeeping one was demonstrated. In different Drosophilia species, this gene can be expressed in different parts of the reproductive system. In transgenic males carrying the gene of another species, the foreign gene is expressed as in the donor. 68 refs., 11 figs.

  10. A robust and efficient method for estimating enzyme complex abundance and metabolic flux from expression data

    PubMed Central

    Barker, Brandon E.; Smallbone, Kieran; Myers, Christopher R.; Xi, Hongwei; Locasale, Jason W.; Gu, Zhenglong

    2015-01-01

    A major theme in constraint-based modeling is unifying experimental data, such as biochemical information about the reactions that can occur in a system or the composition and localization of enzyme complexes, with high-throughput data including expression data, metabolomics, or DNA sequencing. The desired result is to increase predictive capability and improve our understanding of metabolism. The approach typically employed when only gene (or protein) intensities are available is the creation of tissue-specific models, which reduces the available reactions in an organism model, and does not provide an objective function for the estimation of fluxes. We develop a method, flux assignment with LAD (least absolute deviation) convex objectives and normalization (FALCON), that employs metabolic network reconstructions along with expression data to estimate fluxes. In order to use such a method, accurate measures of enzyme complex abundance are needed, so we first present an algorithm that addresses quantification of complex abundance. Our extensions to prior techniques include the capability to work with large models and significantly improved run-time performance even for smaller models, an improved analysis of enzyme complex formation, the ability to handle large enzyme complex rules that may incorporate multiple isoforms, and either maintained or significantly improved correlation with experimentally measured fluxes. FALCON has been implemented in MATLAB and ATS, and can be downloaded from: https://github.com/bbarker/FALCON. ATS is not required to compile the software, as intermediate C source code is available. FALCON requires use of the COBRA Toolbox, also implemented in MATLAB. PMID:26381164

  11. Control of gene expression in trypanosomes.

    PubMed Central

    Vanhamme, L; Pays, E

    1995-01-01

    Trypanosomes are protozoan agents of major parasitic diseases such as Chagas' disease in South America and sleeping sickness of humans and nagana disease of cattle in Africa. They are transmitted to mammalian hosts by specific insect vectors. Their life cycle consists of a succession of differentiation and growth phases requiring regulated gene expression to adapt to the changing extracellular environment. Typical of such stage-specific expression is that of the major surface antigens of Trypanosoma brucei, procyclin in the procyclic (insect) form and the variant surface glycoprotein (VSG) in the bloodstream (mammalian) form. In trypanosomes, the regulation of gene expression is effected mainly at posttranscriptional levels, since primary transcription of most of the genes occurs in long polycistronic units and is constitutive. The transcripts are processed by transsplicing and polyadenylation under the influence of intergenic polypyrimidine tracts. These events show some developmental regulation. Untranslated sequences of the mRNAs seem to play a prominent role in the stage-specific control of individual gene expression, through a modulation of mRNA abundance. The VSG and procyclin transcription units exhibit particular features that are probably related to the need for a high level of expression. The promoters and RNA polymerase driving the expression of these units resemble those of the ribosomal genes. Their mutually exclusive expression is ensured by controls operating at several levels, including RNA elongation. Antigenic variation in the bloodstream is achieved through DNA rearrangements or alternative activation of the telomeric VSG gene expression sites. Recent discoveries, such as the existence of a novel nucleotide in telomeric DNA and the generation of point mutations in VSG genes, have shed new light on the mechanisms and consequences of antigenic variation. PMID:7603410

  12. Resource Sharing Controls Gene Expression Bursting.

    PubMed

    Caveney, Patrick M; Norred, S Elizabeth; Chin, Charles W; Boreyko, Jonathan B; Razooky, Brandon S; Retterer, Scott T; Collier, C Patrick; Simpson, Michael L

    2017-02-17

    Episodic gene expression, with periods of high expression separated by periods of no expression, is a pervasive biological phenomenon. This bursty pattern of expression draws from a finite reservoir of expression machinery in a highly time variant way, i.e., requiring no resources most of the time but drawing heavily on them during short intense bursts, that intimately links expression bursting and resource sharing. Yet, most recent investigations have focused on specific molecular mechanisms intrinsic to the bursty behavior of individual genes, while little is known about the interplay between resource sharing and global expression bursting behavior. Here, we confine Escherichia coli cell extract in both cell-sized microfluidic chambers and lipid-based vesicles to explore how resource sharing influences expression bursting. Interestingly, expression burst size, but not burst frequency, is highly sensitive to the size of the shared transcription and translation resource pools. The intriguing implication of these results is that expression bursts are more readily amplified than initiated, suggesting that burst formation occurs through positive feedback or cooperativity. When extrapolated to prokaryotic cells, these results suggest that large translational bursts may be correlated with large transcriptional bursts. This correlation is supported by recently reported transcription and translation bursting studies in E. coli. The results reported here demonstrate a strong intimate link between global expression burst patterns and resource sharing, and they suggest that bursting plays an important role in optimizing the use of limited, shared expression resources.

  13. Application of multidisciplinary analysis to gene expression.

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xuefel; Kang, Huining; Fields, Chris; Cowie, Jim R.; Davidson, George S.; Haaland, David Michael; Sibirtsev, Valeriy; Mosquera-Caro, Monica P.; Xu, Yuexian; Martin, Shawn Bryan; Helman, Paul; Andries, Erik; Ar, Kerem; Potter, Jeffrey; Willman, Cheryl L.; Murphy, Maurice H.

    2004-01-01

    Molecular analysis of cancer, at the genomic level, could lead to individualized patient diagnostics and treatments. The developments to follow will signal a significant paradigm shift in the clinical management of human cancer. Despite our initial hopes, however, it seems that simple analysis of microarray data cannot elucidate clinically significant gene functions and mechanisms. Extracting biological information from microarray data requires a complicated path involving multidisciplinary teams of biomedical researchers, computer scientists, mathematicians, statisticians, and computational linguists. The integration of the diverse outputs of each team is the limiting factor in the progress to discover candidate genes and pathways associated with the molecular biology of cancer. Specifically, one must deal with sets of significant genes identified by each method and extract whatever useful information may be found by comparing these different gene lists. Here we present our experience with such comparisons, and share methods developed in the analysis of an infant leukemia cohort studied on Affymetrix HG-U95A arrays. In particular, spatial gene clustering, hyper-dimensional projections, and computational linguistics were used to compare different gene lists. In spatial gene clustering, different gene lists are grouped together and visualized on a three-dimensional expression map, where genes with similar expressions are co-located. In another approach, projections from gene expression space onto a sphere clarify how groups of genes can jointly have more predictive power than groups of individually selected genes. Finally, online literature is automatically rearranged to present information about genes common to multiple groups, or to contrast the differences between the lists. The combination of these methods has improved our understanding of infant leukemia. While the complicated reality of the biology dashed our initial, optimistic hopes for simple answers from

  14. Epigenetic regulation of inducible gene expression in the immune system.

    PubMed

    Lim, Pek Siew; Li, Jasmine; Holloway, Adele F; Rao, Sudha

    2013-07-01

    T cells are exquisitely poised to respond rapidly to pathogens and have proved an instructive model for exploring the regulation of inducible genes. Individual genes respond to antigenic stimulation in different ways, and it has become clear that the interplay between transcription factors and the chromatin platform of individual genes governs these responses. Our understanding of the complexity of the chromatin platform and the epigenetic mechanisms that contribute to transcriptional control has expanded dramatically in recent years. These mechanisms include the presence/absence of histone modification marks, which form an epigenetic signature to mark active or inactive genes. These signatures are dynamically added or removed by epigenetic enzymes, comprising an array of histone-modifying enzymes, including the more recently recognized chromatin-associated signalling kinases. In addition, chromatin-remodelling complexes physically alter the chromatin structure to regulate chromatin accessibility to transcriptional regulatory factors. The advent of genome-wide technologies has enabled characterization of the chromatin landscape of T cells in terms of histone occupancy, histone modification patterns and transcription factor association with specific genomic regulatory regions, generating a picture of the T-cell epigenome. Here, we discuss the multi-layered regulation of inducible gene expression in the immune system, focusing on the interplay between transcription factors, and the T-cell epigenome, including the role played by chromatin remodellers and epigenetic enzymes. We will also use IL2, a key inducible cytokine gene in T cells, as an example of how the different layers of epigenetic mechanisms regulate immune responsive genes during T-cell activation.

  15. Expression and secretion of cellulosmal enzymes by engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Enzyme systems that digest the cellulose and hemicellulose in plant cell walls have potential value in the biorefining of feedstocks such as crop residues, straws, and grasses to fuel ethanol and other bioproducts. Clostridium cellulovorans is a useful source of biomass-degrading enzymes because thi...

  16. Expression of Ascaris suum malic enzyme in a mutant Escherichia coli allows production of succinic acid from glucose

    SciTech Connect

    Stols, L.; Donnelly, M.I.; Kulkarni, G.; Harris, B.G.

    1997-12-31

    The malic enzyme gene of Ascaris suum was cloned into the vector pTRC99a in two forms encoding alternative amino-termini. The resulting plasmids, pMEA1 and pMEA2, were introduced into Escherichia coli NZN111, a strain that is unable to grow fermentatively because of inactivation of the genes encoding pyruvate dissimilation. Induction of pMEA1, which encodes the native animoterminus, gave better overexpression of malic enzyme, approx 12-fold compared to uninduced cells. Under the appropriate culture conditions, expression of malic enzyme allowed the fermentative dissimilation of glucose by NZN111. The major fermentation product formed in induced cultures was succinic acid.

  17. Modeling gene expression in time and space.

    PubMed

    Rué, Pau; Garcia-Ojalvo, Jordi

    2013-01-01

    Cell populations rarely exhibit gene-expression profiles that are homogeneous in time and space. In the temporal domain, dynamical behaviors such as oscillations and pulses of protein production pervade cell biology, underlying phenomena as diverse as circadian rhythmicity, cell cycle control, stress and damage responses, and stem-cell pluripotency. In multicellular populations, spatial heterogeneities are crucial for decision making and development, among many other functions. Cells need to exquisitely coordinate this temporal and spatial variation to survive. Although the spatiotemporal character of gene expression is challenging to quantify experimentally at the level of individual cells, it is beneficial from the modeling viewpoint, because it provides strong constraints that can be probed by theoretically analyzing mathematical models of candidate gene and protein circuits. Here, we review recent examples of temporal dynamics and spatial patterning in gene expression to show how modeling such phenomenology can help us unravel the molecular mechanisms of cellular function.

  18. Chemically regulated gene expression in plants.

    PubMed

    Padidam, Malla

    2003-04-01

    Chemically inducible systems that activate or inactivate gene expression have many potential applications in the determination of gene function and in plant biotechnology. The precise timing and control of gene expression are important aspects of chemically inducible systems. Several systems have been developed and used to analyze gene function, marker-free plant transformation, site-specific DNA excision, activation tagging, conditional genetic complementation, and restoration of male fertility. Chemicals that are used to regulate transgene expression include the antibiotic tetracycline, the steroids dexamethasone and estradiol, copper, ethanol, the inducer of pathogen-related proteins benzothiadiazol, herbicide safeners, and the insecticide methoxyfenozide. Systems that are suitable for field application are particularly useful for experimental systems and have potential applications in biotechnology.

  19. CIRCADIAN CLOCK AND CELL CYCLE GENE EXPRESSION

    PubMed Central

    Metz, Richard P.; Qu, Xiaoyu; Laffin, Brian; Earnest, David; Porter, Weston W.

    2009-01-01

    Mouse mammary epithelial cells (HC-11) and mammary tissues were analyzed for developmental changes in circadian clock, cellular proliferation and differentiation marker genes. Expression of the clock genes, Per1 and Bmal1, were elevated in differentiated HC-11 cells whereas Per2 mRNA levels were higher in undifferentiated cells. This differentiation-dependent profile of clock gene expression was consistent with that observed in mouse mammary glands as Per1 and Bmal1 mRNA levels were elevated in late pregnant and lactating mammary tissues, while Per2 expression was higher in proliferating virgin and early pregnant glands. In both HC-11 cells and mammary glands, elevated Per2 expression was positively correlated with c-Myc and Cyclin D1 mRNA levels while Per1 and Bmal1 expression changed in conjunction with ß-casein mRNA levels. Interestingly, developmental stage had differential effects on rhythms of clock gene expression in the mammary gland. These data suggest that circadian clock genes may play a role in mouse mammary gland development and differentiation. PMID:16261617

  20. Regulation of malic enzyme expression and the molecular basis for a cytosolic malic enzyme null mutation

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, M.L.

    1987-01-01

    In order to investigate the basis for the MOD-1 null mutation, a {lambda}gt 11 cDNA library was constructed using mRNA from the livers of induced MOD-1 null mice as a template. A recombinant phage with a 2kb insert was isolated by screening with wild type malic enzyme cDNA probes. The subcloned insert exhibited an atypical (non-wild type) restriction pattern and was subjected to sequence analysis. MOD-1 null malic enzyme cDNA contains an internal, tandemly-duplicated sequence that corresponds to nucleotides 1027-1548 in the coding region of wild type murine malic enzyme cDNA. An open reading frame is retained throughout the duplicated sequences. The discovery of a 522 nucleotide, in-frame duplication accounts for the increased size of MOD-1 null malic enzyme mRNAs. Western immunoblot analysis disclosed that MOD-1 null liver cytosol contains an 82 kDa protein that is recognized by anti malic enzyme antibodies. Under stringent conditions, an anti-sense {sup 32}P-oligonucleotide that spans the abnormal junction between the reiterated sequences hybridized with the 2.5 and 3.6 kb MOD-1 null malic enzyme mRNAs, but failed to form stable complexes with wild type malic enzyme mRNAs.

  1. Cloning and analysis of the four genes coding for Bpu10I restriction-modification enzymes.

    PubMed Central

    Stankevicius, K; Lubys, A; Timinskas, A; Vaitkevicius, D; Janulaitis, A

    1998-01-01

    The Bpu 10I R-M system from Bacillus pumilus 10, which recognizes the asymmetric 5'-CCTNAGC sequence, has been cloned, sequenced and expressed in Escherichia coli . The system comprises four adjacent, similarly oriented genes encoding two m5C MTases and two subunits of Bpu 10I ENase (34.5 and 34 kDa). Both bpu10IR genes either in cis or trans are needed for the manifestation of R. Bpu 10I activity. Subunits of R. Bpu 10I, purified to apparent homogeneity, are both required for cleavage activity. This heterosubunit structure distinguishes the Bpu 10I restriction endonuclease from all other type II restriction enzymes described previously. The subunits reveal 25% amino acid identity. Significant similarity was also identified between a 43 amino acid region of R. Dde I and one of the regions of higher identity shared between the Bpu 10I subunits, a region that could possibly include the catalytic/Mg2+binding center. The similarity between Bpu 10I and Dde I MTases is not limited to the conserved motifs (CM) typical for m5C MTases. It extends into the variable region that lies between CMs VIII and IX. Duplication of a progenitor gene, encoding an enzyme recognizing a symmetric nucleotide sequence, followed by concerted divergent evolution, may provide a possible scenario leading to the emergence of the Bpu 10I ENase, which recognizes an overall asymmetric sequence and cleaves within it symmetrically. PMID:9461472

  2. Cell-Free Phospholipid Biosynthesis by Gene-Encoded Enzymes Reconstituted in Liposomes

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Andrew; Noga, Marek J.; de Graaf, Paul; Westerlaken, Ilja; Yildirim, Esengul; Danelon, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    The goal of bottom-up synthetic biology culminates in the assembly of an entire cell from separate biological building blocks. One major challenge resides in the in vitro production and implementation of complex genetic and metabolic pathways that can support essential cellular functions. Here, we show that phospholipid biosynthesis, a multiple-step process involved in cell membrane homeostasis, can be reconstituted starting from the genes encoding for all necessary proteins. A total of eight E. coli enzymes for acyl transfer and headgroup modifications were produced in a cell-free gene expression system and were co-translationally reconstituted in liposomes. Acyl-coenzyme A and glycerol-3-phosphate were used as canonical precursors to generate a variety of important bacterial lipids. Moreover, this study demonstrates that two-step acyl transfer can occur from enzymes synthesized inside vesicles. Besides clear implications for growth and potentially division of a synthetic cell, we postulate that gene-based lipid biosynthesis can become instrumental for ex vivo and protein purification-free production of natural and non-natural lipids. PMID:27711229

  3. Oligogalacturonide-mediated induction of a gene involved in jasmonic acid synthesis in response to the cell-wall-degrading enzymes of the plant pathogen Erwinia carotovora.

    PubMed

    Norman, C; Vidal, S; Palva, E T

    1999-07-01

    Identification of Arabidopsis thaliana genes responsive to plant cell-wall-degrading enzymes of Erwinia carotovora subsp. carotovora led to the isolation of a cDNA clone with high sequence homology to the gene for allene oxide synthase, an enzyme involved in the biosynthesis of jasmonates. Expression of the corresponding gene was induced by the extracellular enzymes from this pathogen as well as by treatment with methyl jasmonate and short oligogalacturonides (OGAs). This suggests that OGAs are involved in the induction of the jasmonate pathway during plant defense response to E. carotovora subsp. carotovora attack.

  4. Functional analysis of the human somatic angiotensin I-converting enzyme gene promoter.

    PubMed

    Testut, P; Soubrier, F; Corvol, P; Hubert, C

    1993-08-01

    Angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) is a key enzyme in the regulation of systemic blood pressure and plays a major role in the renin-angiotensin and bradykinin-kinin systems, at the luminal surface of the vascular endothelia. To identify the promoter region, the transcription regulatory elements and the cell specificity of the ACE gene, five successive DNA deletions of the 5' upstream region (-1214, -754, -472, -343, -132 bp relative to the start site of transcription) were isolated and fused in sense and antisense orientations to the bacterial chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) reporter gene in the promoterless plasmid pBLCAT3. Promoter activities were measured in transient transfection assays using three different cell lines from rabbit endothelium (RE), human embryocarcinoma (Tera-1) and hepatocarcinoma cells (HepG2). All five fragments of the ACE promoter region directed expression of the CAT gene when transfected into the endothelial and the embryocarcinoma cells, which contain endogenous ACE mRNA and express ACE activity. In contrast only minimal levels of promoter activity were obtained on transfection into hepatocarcinoma cells in which endogenous ACE mRNA and ACE activity were not detected. Transfection of RE and Tera-1 cells demonstrated that promoter activity was defined by the length of the ACE promoter sequence inserted into the construct. The 132 bases located upstream from the transcription start site were sufficient to confer ACE promoter activity, whereas the sequences upstream from -472 bp and between -343 bp and -132 bp were responsible for a decrease of promoter activity. Furthermore, the minimal 132 bp of the ACE promoter contains elements which direct cell-specific CAT expression. In addition, the DNA transfection study in the presence of dexamethasone suggested that the potential glucocorticoid regulatory elements, located in the sequence of the ACE promoter, are not functional.

  5. Functional analysis of the human somatic angiotensin I-converting enzyme gene promoter.

    PubMed Central

    Testut, P; Soubrier, F; Corvol, P; Hubert, C

    1993-01-01

    Angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) is a key enzyme in the regulation of systemic blood pressure and plays a major role in the renin-angiotensin and bradykinin-kinin systems, at the luminal surface of the vascular endothelia. To identify the promoter region, the transcription regulatory elements and the cell specificity of the ACE gene, five successive DNA deletions of the 5' upstream region (-1214, -754, -472, -343, -132 bp relative to the start site of transcription) were isolated and fused in sense and antisense orientations to the bacterial chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) reporter gene in the promoterless plasmid pBLCAT3. Promoter activities were measured in transient transfection assays using three different cell lines from rabbit endothelium (RE), human embryocarcinoma (Tera-1) and hepatocarcinoma cells (HepG2). All five fragments of the ACE promoter region directed expression of the CAT gene when transfected into the endothelial and the embryocarcinoma cells, which contain endogenous ACE mRNA and express ACE activity. In contrast only minimal levels of promoter activity were obtained on transfection into hepatocarcinoma cells in which endogenous ACE mRNA and ACE activity were not detected. Transfection of RE and Tera-1 cells demonstrated that promoter activity was defined by the length of the ACE promoter sequence inserted into the construct. The 132 bases located upstream from the transcription start site were sufficient to confer ACE promoter activity, whereas the sequences upstream from -472 bp and between -343 bp and -132 bp were responsible for a decrease of promoter activity. Furthermore, the minimal 132 bp of the ACE promoter contains elements which direct cell-specific CAT expression. In addition, the DNA transfection study in the presence of dexamethasone suggested that the potential glucocorticoid regulatory elements, located in the sequence of the ACE promoter, are not functional. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 PMID:8394696

  6. Paternally expressed genes predominate in the placenta.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xu; Miller, Donald C; Harman, Rebecca; Antczak, Douglas F; Clark, Andrew G

    2013-06-25

    The discovery of genomic imprinting through studies of manipulated mouse embryos indicated that the paternal genome has a major influence on placental development. However, previous research has not demonstrated paternal bias in imprinted genes. We applied RNA sequencing to trophoblast tissue from reciprocal hybrids of horse and donkey, where genotypic differences allowed parent-of-origin identification of most expressed genes. Using this approach, we identified a core group of 15 ancient imprinted genes, of which 10 were paternally expressed. An additional 78 candidate imprinted genes identified by RNA sequencing also showed paternal bias. Pyrosequencing was used to confirm the imprinting status of six of the genes, including the insulin receptor (INSR), which may play a role in growth regulation with its reciprocally imprinted ligand, histone acetyltransferase-1 (HAT1), a gene involved in chromatin modification, and lymphocyte antigen 6 complex, locus G6C, a newly identified imprinted gene in the major histocompatibility complex. The 78 candidate imprinted genes displayed parent-of-origin expression bias in placenta but not fetus, and most showed less than 100% silencing of the imprinted allele. Some displayed variability in imprinting status among individuals. This variability results in a unique epigenetic signature for each placenta that contributes to variation in the intrauterine environment and thus presents the opportunity for natural selection to operate on parent-of-origin differential regulation. Taken together, these features highlight the plasticity of imprinting in mammals and the central importance of the placenta as a target tissue for genomic imprinting.

  7. Heterologous expression and characterization of a novel branching enzyme from the thermoalkaliphilic anaerobic bacterium Anaerobranca gottschalkii.

    PubMed

    Thiemann, Volker; Saake, Bodo; Vollstedt, Angela; Schäfer, Thomas; Puls, Jürgen; Bertoldo, Costanzo; Freudl, Roland; Antranikian, Garabed

    2006-08-01

    The gene encoding the branching enzyme (BE) from the thermoalkaliphilic, anaerobic bacterium Anaerobranca gottschalkii was fused with a twin arginine translocation protein secretory-pathway-dependent signal sequence from Escherichia coli and expressed in Staphylococcus carnosus. The secreted BE was purified using hydrophobic interaction and gel filtration chromatography. The monomeric enzyme (72 kDa) shows maximal activity at 50 degrees C and pH 7.0. With amylose the BE displays high transglycosylation and extremely low hydrolytic activity. The conversion of amylose and linear dextrins was analysed by applying high-performance anion exchange chromatography and quantitative size-exclusion chromatography. Amylose (10(4)-4 x 10(7) g/mol) was converted to a major extent to products displaying molecular masses of 10(4)-4 x 10(5) g/mol, indicating that the enzyme could be applicable for the production of starch or dextrins with narrow molecular mass distributions. The majority of the transferred oligosaccharides, determined after enzymatic hydrolysis of the newly synthesized alpha-1,6 linkages, ranged between 10(3) and 10(4) g/mol, which corresponds to a degree of polymerisation (DP) of 6-60. The minimal donor chain length is DP 16. Furthermore, the obtained results support the hypotheses of a random endocleavage mechanism of BE and the occurrence of interchain branching.

  8. Cloning, characterization and subcellular localization of a gene encoding a human Ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme (E2) homologous to the Arabidopsis thaliana UBC-16 gene product.

    PubMed

    Yin, Gang; Ji, Chaoneng; Wu, Tong; Shen, Zhouliang; Xu, Xin; Xie, Yi; Mao, Yumin

    2006-05-01

    Ubiquitin charging and activation of class III E2 enzymes has been directly linked to their nuclear import. It has not been published whether other classes E2s also abide by this mechanism. During the large-scale sequencing analysis of a human fetal brain cDNA library, we isolated a cDNA clone that is 2252 base pair in length, encoding a putative 162 amino acid protein, which shares high homology to Arabidopsis thaliana ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme 16 (Accession number NP_565110, 51% identity and 71% similarity) at protein level. Bioinformatics analysis revealed that the gene is composed of 7 exons, located on human chromosome 8q13-8q21.1, and that the predicted protein of the gene is a class I E2, for only composed of a conserved approximately 150-amino acid catalytic core, ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme E2 domain (UBC domain). In the C-terminal of the UBC domain sequence, there are two nuclear localization signals (NLSs). RT-PCR showed that this gene is ubiquitously expressed in 16 kinds of normal human tissues, but expression level is very low, unless in human heart, brain, liver, and pancreas. The subcellular localizations of the new human Ubiquitin conjugating enzyme E2 and its mutation were also examined, which showed that the nuclear localization of hUBC16 depended on two conditions: It has NLS, and at the same time, has enzyme active site, too, at least in HEK293 cells.

  9. Transient Expression of cor Gene in Papaver somniferum

    PubMed Central

    Hosseini, Bahman; Shahriari-Ahmadi, Farajollah; Hashemi, Haleh; Marashi, Mohammad-Hasan; Mohseniazar, Mahdi; Farokhzad, Alireza; Sabokbari, Masoume

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Papaver somniferum is the commercial source of morphine and codeine. The isolation of effective genes involved in the morphine biosynthesis of P. somniferum is very important in the production of specific metabolites achieved using metabolic engi-neering techniques. In this pathway, the key enzyme COR is involved in the conversion of codeinone to codeine and morphinone to morphine. Methods the gene encoding of this enzyme was isolated using primers designed on the base of gene sequence available on (NCBI) for P. somniferum. This gene correct size around (960 bp) was first subcloned into pTZ57RIT vector then cloned into expression vectors (pBI121) between BamHI and SacI sites to allow the expression of cor gene driven by the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S pro-moter. The result was confirmed through different molecular methods e.g. PCR and en-zyme digestion by BamHI and SacI. The recombinant plasmid was transformed into the E. coli strain DH5α using a freeze-thaw method. Having selected positive colones on selection medium, plasmid was extracted by miniprep method and recombinant plasmids were selected based on PCR and digestion. The construct was then mobilized in Agrobacterium tumefaciens C58/pGV3850 (KmR RifR). After gene transformation to P. somniferum plants, the agroinfiltration method was also used for transient expression of COR enzyme. Results evaluation results showed that morphine and codeine were detectable in the leaves of transgenic plants containing cor transgene and there was significant difference in the final production. After completing this experiment for three times, results showed that in 11 sets from 15 sets of leaves experiment tested, main alkaloids (codeine, morphine, papaverin, noscapine and thebaine) were detectable. Conclusion Whereas no signal was detected in non-infiltrated control leaves or in leaves infiltrated with non-recombinant bacteria for morphine and codeine, others such as thebaine and papaverine were detectable

  10. Three gene expression vector sets for concurrently expressing multiple genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Jun; Kondo, Takashi; Makino, Harumi; Ogura, Akira; Matsuda, Fumio; Kondo, Akihiko

    2014-05-01

    Yeast has the potential to be used in bulk-scale fermentative production of fuels and chemicals due to its tolerance for low pH and robustness for autolysis. However, expression of multiple external genes in one host yeast strain is considerably labor-intensive due to the lack of polycistronic transcription. To promote the metabolic engineering of yeast, we generated systematic and convenient genetic engineering tools to express multiple genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We constructed a series of multi-copy and integration vector sets for concurrently expressing two or three genes in S. cerevisiae by embedding three classical promoters. The comparative expression capabilities of the constructed vectors were monitored with green fluorescent protein, and the concurrent expression of genes was monitored with three different fluorescent proteins. Our multiple gene expression tool will be helpful to the advanced construction of genetically engineered yeast strains in a variety of research fields other than metabolic engineering.

  11. A Genome-Wide Screen Indicates Correlation between Differentiation and Expression of Metabolism Related Genes

    PubMed Central

    Shende, Akhilesh; Singh, Anupama; Meena, Anil; Ghosal, Ritika; Ranganathan, Madhav; Bandyopadhyay, Amitabha

    2013-01-01

    Differentiated tissues may be considered as materials with distinct properties. The differentiation program of a given tissue ensures that it acquires material properties commensurate with its function. It may be hypothesized that some of these properties are acquired through production of tissue-specific metabolites synthesized by metabolic enzymes. To establish correlation between metabolism and organogenesis we have carried out a genome-wide expression study of metabolism related genes by RNA in-situ hybridization. 23% of the metabolism related genes studied are expressed in a tissue-restricted but not tissue-exclusive manner. We have conducted the screen on whole mount chicken (Gallus gallus) embryos from four distinct developmental stages to correlate dynamic changes in expression patterns of metabolic enzymes with spatio-temporally unique developmental events. Our data strongly suggests that unique combinations of metabolism related genes, and not specific metabolic pathways, are upregulated during differentiation. Further, expression of metabolism related genes in well established signaling centers that regulate different aspects of morphogenesis indicates developmental roles of some of the metabolism related genes. The database of tissue-restricted expression patterns of metabolism related genes, generated in this study, should serve as a resource for systematic identification of these genes with tissue-specific functions during development. Finally, comprehensive understanding of differentiation is not possible unless the downstream genes of a differentiation cascade are identified. We propose, metabolic enzymes constitute a significant portion of these downstream target genes. Thus our study should help elucidate different aspects of tissue differentiation. PMID:23717462

  12. A genome-wide screen indicates correlation between differentiation and expression of metabolism related genes.

    PubMed

    Roy, Priti; Kumar, Brijesh; Shende, Akhilesh; Singh, Anupama; Meena, Anil; Ghosal, Ritika; Ranganathan, Madhav; Bandyopadhyay, Amitabha

    2013-01-01

    Differentiated tissues may be considered as materials with distinct properties. The differentiation program of a given tissue ensures that it acquires material properties commensurate with its function. It may be hypothesized that some of these properties are acquired through production of tissue-specific metabolites synthesized by metabolic enzymes. To establish correlation between metabolism and organogenesis we have carried out a genome-wide expression study of metabolism related genes by RNA in-situ hybridization. 23% of the metabolism related genes studied are expressed in a tissue-restricted but not tissue-exclusive manner. We have conducted the screen on whole mount chicken (Gallus gallus) embryos from four distinct developmental stages to correlate dynamic changes in expression patterns of metabolic enzymes with spatio-temporally unique developmental events. Our data strongly suggests that unique combinations of metabolism related genes, and not specific metabolic pathways, are upregulated during differentiation. Further, expression of metabolism related genes in well established signaling centers that regulate different aspects of morphogenesis indicates developmental roles of some of the metabolism related genes. The database of tissue-restricted expression patterns of metabolism related genes, generated in this study, should serve as a resource for systematic identification of these genes with tissue-specific functions during development. Finally, comprehensive understanding of differentiation is not possible unless the downstream genes of a differentiation cascade are identified. We propose, metabolic enzymes constitute a significant portion of these downstream target genes. Thus our study should help elucidate different aspects of tissue differentiation.

  13. Aldehyde Dehydrogenase Gene Superfamily in Populus: Organization and Expression Divergence between Paralogous Gene Pairs.

    PubMed

    Tian, Feng-Xia; Zang, Jian-Lei; Wang, Tan; Xie, Yu-Li; Zhang, Jin; Hu, Jian-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Aldehyde dehydrogenases (ALDHs) constitute a superfamily of NAD(P)+-dependent enzymes that catalyze the irreversible oxidation of a wide range of reactive aldehydes to their corresponding nontoxic carboxylic acids. ALDHs have been studied in many organisms from bacteria to mammals; however, no systematic analyses incorporating genome organization, gene structure, expression profiles, and cis-acting elements have been conducted in the model tree species Populus trichocarpa thus far. In this study, a comprehensive analysis of the Populus ALDH gene superfamily was performed. A total of 26 Populus ALDH genes were found to be distributed across 12 chromosomes. Genomic organization analysis indicated that purifying selection may have played a pivotal role in the retention and maintenance of PtALDH gene families. The exon-intron organizations of PtALDHs were highly conserved within the same family, suggesting that the members of the same family also may have conserved functionalities. Microarray data and qRT-PCR analysis indicated that most PtALDHs had distinct tissue-specific expression patterns. The specificity of cis-acting elements in the promoter regions of the PtALDHs and the divergence of expression patterns between nine paralogous PtALDH gene pairs suggested that gene duplications may have freed the duplicate genes from the functional constraints. The expression levels of some ALDHs were up- or down-regulated by various abiotic stresses, implying that the products of these genes may be involved in the adaptation of Populus to abiotic stresses. Overall, the data obtained from our investigation contribute to a better understanding of the complexity of the Populus ALDH gene superfamily and provide insights into the function and evolution of ALDH gene families in vascular plants.

  14. Contrasted patterns of selection since maize domestication on duplicated genes encoding a starch pathway enzyme.

    PubMed

    Corbi, J; Debieu, M; Rousselet, A; Montalent, P; Le Guilloux, M; Manicacci, D; Tenaillon, M I

    2011-03-01

    Maize domestication from teosinte (Zea mays ssp. parviglumis) was accompanied by an increase of kernel size in landraces. Subsequent breeding has led to a diversification of kernel size and starch content among major groups of inbred lines. We aim at investigating the effect of domestication on duplicated genes encoding a key enzyme of the starch pathway, the ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (AGPase). Three pairs of paralogs encode the AGPase small (SSU) and large (LSU) subunits mainly expressed in the endosperm, the embryo and the leaf. We first validated the putative sequence of LSU(leaf) through a comparative expression assay of the six genes. Second, we investigated the patterns of molecular evolution on a 2 kb coding region homologous among the six genes in three panels: teosintes, landraces, and inbred lines. We corrected for demographic effects by relying on empirical distributions built from 580 previously sequenced ESTs. We found contrasted patterns of selection among duplicates: three genes exhibit patterns of directional selection during domestication (SSU(end), LSU(emb)) or breeding (LSU(leaf)), two exhibit patterns consistent with diversifying (SSU(leaf)) and balancing selection (SSU(emb)) accompanying maize breeding. While patterns of linkage disequilibrium did not reveal sign of coevolution between genes expressed in the same organ, we detected an excess of non-synonymous substitutions in the small subunit functional domains highlighting their role in AGPase evolution. Our results offer a different picture on AGPase evolution than the one depicted at the Angiosperm level and reveal how genetic redundancy can provide flexibility in the response to selection.

  15. Expression of myriapod pair rule gene orthologs

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Segmentation is a hallmark of the arthropods; most knowledge about the molecular basis of arthropod segmentation comes from work on the fly Drosophila melanogaster. In this species a hierarchic cascade of segmentation genes subdivides the blastoderm stepwise into single segment wide regions. However, segmentation in the fly is a derived feature since all segments form virtually simultaneously. Conversely, in the vast majority of arthropods the posterior segments form one at a time from a posterior pre-segmental zone. The pair rule genes (PRGs) comprise an important level of the Drosophila segmentation gene cascade and are indeed the first genes that are expressed in typical transverse stripes in the early embryo. Information on expression and function of PRGs outside the insects, however, is scarce. Results Here we present the expression of the pair rule gene orthologs in the pill millipede Glomeris marginata (Myriapoda: Diplopoda). We find evidence that these genes are involved in segmentation and that components of the hierarchic interaction of the gene network as found in insects may be conserved. We further provide evidence that segments are formed in a single-segment periodicity rather than in pairs of two like in another myriapod, the centipede Strigamia maritima. Finally we show that decoupling of dorsal and ventral segmentation in Glomeris appears already at the level of the PRGs. Conclusions Although the pair rule gene network is partially conserved among insects and myriapods, some aspects of PRG interaction are, as suggested by expression pattern analysis, convergent, even within the Myriapoda. Conserved expression patterns of PRGs in insects and myriapods, however, may represent ancestral features involved in segmenting the arthropod ancestor. PMID:21352542

  16. Human AZU-1 gene, variants thereof and expressed gene products

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Huei-Mei; Bissell, Mina

    2004-06-22

    A human AZU-1 gene, mutants, variants and fragments thereof. Protein products encoded by the AZU-1 gene and homologs encoded by the variants of AZU-1 gene acting as tumor suppressors or markers of malignancy progression and tumorigenicity reversion. Identification, isolation and characterization of AZU-1 and AZU-2 genes localized to a tumor suppressive locus at chromosome 10q26, highly expressed in nonmalignant and premalignant cells derived from a human breast tumor progression model. A recombinant full length protein sequences encoded by the AZU-1 gene and nucleotide sequences of AZU-1 and AZU-2 genes and variant and fragments thereof. Monoclonal or polyclonal antibodies specific to AZU-1, AZU-2 encoded protein and to AZU-1, or AZU-2 encoded protein homologs.

  17. Rubisco gene expression in C4 plants.

    PubMed

    Patel, Minesh; Berry, James O

    2008-01-01

    In leaves of most C(4) plants, ribulose 1,5 bisphosphate carboxylase (Rubisco) accumulates only in bundle sheath (bs) cells that surround the vascular centres, and not in mesophyll (mp) cells. It has been shown previously that in the C(4) dicots amaranth and Flaveria bidentis, post-transcriptional control of mRNA translation and stability mediate the C(4) expression patterns of genes encoding the large and small Rubisco subunits (chloroplast rbcL and nuclear RbcS, respectively). Translational control appears to regulate bs cell-specific Rubisco gene expression during early dicot leaf development, while control of mRNA stability appears to mediate bs-specific accumulation of RbcS and rbcL transcripts in mature leaves. Post-transcriptional control is also involved in the regulation of Rubisco gene expression by light, and in response to photosynthetic activity. Transgenic and transient expression studies in F. bidentis provide direct evidence for post-transcriptional control of bs cell-specific RbcS expression, which is mediated by the 5' and 3' untranslated regions (UTRs) of the mRNA. Comparisons of Rubisco gene expression in these dicots and in the monocot maize indicates possible commonalities in the regulation of RbcS and rbcL genes in these divergent C(4) species. Now that the role of post-transcriptional regulation in C(4) gene expression has been established, it is likely that future studies of mRNA-protein interactions will address long-standing questions about the establishment and maintenance of cell type-specificity in these plants. Some of these regulatory mechanisms may have ancestral origins in C(3) species, through modification of pre-existing factors, or by the acquisition of novel C(4) processes.

  18. Expression, stability, and replacement of glucan-remodeling enzymes during developmental transitions in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Rolli, Eleonora; Ragni, Enrico; de Medina-Redondo, María; Arroyo, Javier; de Aldana, Carlos R Vázquez; Popolo, Laura

    2011-05-01

    Sporulation is a developmental variation of the yeast life cycle whereby four spores are produced within a diploid cell, with proliferation resuming after germination. The GAS family of glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored glucan-remodeling enzymes exemplifies functional interplay between paralogous genes during the yeast life cycle. GAS1 and GAS5 are expressed in vegetative cells and repressed during sporulation while GAS2 and GAS4 exhibit a reciprocal pattern. GAS3 is weakly expressed in all the conditions and encodes an inactive protein. Although Gas1p functions in cell wall formation, we show that it persists during sporulation but is relocalized from the plasma membrane to the epiplasm in a process requiring End3p-mediated endocytosis and the Sps1 protein kinase of the p21-activated kinase family. Some Gas1p is also newly synthesized and localized to the spore membrane, but this fraction is dispensable for spore formation. By way of contrast, the Gas2-Gas4 proteins, which are essential for spore wall assembly, are rapidly degraded after spore formation. On germination, Gas1p is actively synthesized and concentrated in the growing part of the spore, which is essential for its elongation. Thus Gas1p is the primary glucan-remodeling enzyme required in vegetative growth and during reentry into the proliferative state. The dynamic interplay among Gas proteins is crucial to couple glucan remodeling with morphogenesis in developmental transitions.

  19. Role of farnesoid X receptor in establishment of ontogeny of phase-I drug metabolizing enzyme genes in mouse liver.

    PubMed

    Peng, Lai; Piekos, Stephanie; Guo, Grace L; Zhong, Xiao-Bo

    2016-09-01

    The expression of phase-I drug metabolizing enzymes in liver changes dramatically during postnatal liver maturation. Farnesoid X receptor (FXR) is critical for bile acid and lipid homeostasis in liver. However, the role of FXR in regulating ontogeny of phase-I drug metabolizing genes is not clear. Hence, we applied RNA-sequencing to quantify the developmental expression of phase-I genes in both Fxr-null and control (C57BL/6) mouse livers during development. Liver samples of male C57BL/6 and Fxr-null mice at 6 different ages from prenatal to adult were used. The Fxr-null showed an overall effect to diminish the "day-1 surge" of phase-I gene expression, including cytochrome P450s at neonatal ages. Among the 185 phase-I genes from 12 different families, 136 were expressed, and differential expression during development occurred in genes from all 12 phase-I families, including hydrolysis: carboxylesterase (Ces), paraoxonase (Pon), and epoxide hydrolase (Ephx); reduction: aldoketo reductase (Akr), quinone oxidoreductase (Nqo), and dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase (Dpyd); and oxidation: alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh), aldehyde dehydrogenase (Aldh), flavin monooxygenases (Fmo), molybdenum hydroxylase (Aox and Xdh), cytochrome P450 (P450), and cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase (Por). The data also suggested new phase-I genes potentially targeted by FXR. These results revealed an important role of FXR in regulation of ontogeny of phase-I genes.

  20. Alternative-splicing-mediated gene expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qianliang; Zhou, Tianshou

    2014-01-01

    Alternative splicing (AS) is a fundamental process during gene expression and has been found to be ubiquitous in eukaryotes. However, how AS impacts gene expression levels both quantitatively and qualitatively remains to be fully explored. Here, we analyze two common models of gene expression, each incorporating a simple splice mechanism that a pre-mRNA is spliced into two mature mRNA isoforms in a probabilistic manner. In the constitutive expression case, we show that the steady-state molecular numbers of two mature mRNA isoforms follow mutually independent Poisson distributions. In the bursting expression case, we demonstrate that the tail decay of the steady-state distribution for both mature mRNA isoforms that in general are not mutually independent can be characterized by the product of mean burst size and splicing probability. In both cases, we find that AS can efficiently modulate both the variability (measured by variance) and the noise level of the total mature mRNA, and in particular, the latter is always lower than the noise level of the pre-mRNA, implying that AS always reduces the noise. These results altogether reveal that AS is a mechanism of efficiently controlling the gene expression noise.

  1. Gene expression patterns during somatic embryo development and germination in maize Hi II callus cultures.

    PubMed

    Che, Ping; Love, Tanzy M; Frame, Bronwyn R; Wang, Kan; Carriquiry, Alicia L; Howell, Stephen H

    2006-09-01

    Gene expression patterns were profiled during somatic embryogenesis in a regeneration-proficient maize hybrid line, Hi II, in an effort to identify genes that might be used as developmental markers or targets to optimize regeneration steps for recovering maize plants from tissue culture. Gene expression profiles were generated from embryogenic calli induced to undergo embryo maturation and germination. Over 1,000 genes in the 12,060 element arrays showed significant time variation during somatic embryo development. A substantial number of genes were downregulated during embryo maturation, largely histone and ribosomal protein genes, which may result from a slowdown in cell proliferation and growth during embryo maturation. The expression of these genes dramatically recovered at germination. Other genes up-regulated during embryo maturation included genes encoding hydrolytic enzymes (nucleases, glucosidases and proteases) and a few storage genes (an alpha-zein and caleosin), which are good candidates for developmental marker genes. Germination is accompanied by the up-regulation of a number of stress response and membrane transporter genes, and, as expected, greening is associated with the up-regulation of many genes encoding photosynthetic and chloroplast components. Thus, some, but not all genes typically associated with zygotic embryogenesis are significantly up or down-regulated during somatic embryogenesis in Hi II maize line regeneration. Although many genes varied in expression throughout somatic embryo development in this study, no statistically significant gene expression changes were detected between total embryogenic callus and callus enriched for transition stage somatic embryos.

  2. Nature and regulation of pistil-expressed genes in tomato.

    PubMed

    Milligan, S B; Gasser, C S

    1995-07-01

    The specialized reproductive functions of angiosperm pistils are dependent in part upon the regulated activation of numerous genes expressed predominantly in this organ system. To better understand the nature of these pistil-predominant gene products we have analyzed seven cDNA clones isolated from tomato pistils through differential hybridization screening. Six of the seven cDNAs represent sequences previously undescribed in tomato, each having a unique pistil- and/or floral-predominant expression pattern. The putative protein products encoded by six of the cDNAs have been identified by their similarity to sequences in the database of previously sequenced genes, with a seventh sequence having no significant similarity with any previously reported sequence. Three of the putative proteins appear to be targeted to the endomembrane system and include an endo-beta-1,4-glucanase which is expressed exclusively in pistils at early stages of development, and proteins similar in sequence to gamma-thionin and miraculin which are expressed in immature pistils and stamens, and in either sepals or petals, respectively. Two other clones, similar in sequence to each other, were expressed primarily in immature pistils and stamens and encode distinct proteins with similarity to leucine aminopeptidases. An additional clone, which encodes a protein similar in sequence to the enzyme hyoscyamine 6-beta-hydroxylase and to other members of the family of Fe2+/ascorbate-dependent oxidases, was expressed at high levels in pistils, stamens and sepals, and at detectable levels in some vegetative organs. Together, these observations provide new insight into the nature and possible functional roles of genes expressed during reproductive development.

  3. Expression and characterization of thermostable glycogen branching enzyme from Geobacillus mahadia Geo-05

    PubMed Central

    Mohtar, Nur Syazwani; Raja Abd Rahman, Raja Noor Zaliha; Leow, Thean Chor; Salleh, Abu Bakar; Mat Isa, Mohd Noor

    2016-01-01

    The glycogen branching enzyme (EC 2.4.1.18), which catalyses the formation of α-1,6-glycosidic branch points in glycogen structure, is often used to enhance the nutritional value and quality of food and beverages. In order to be applicable in industries, enzymes that are stable and active at high temperature are much desired. Using genome mining, the nucleotide sequence of the branching enzyme gene (glgB) was extracted from the Geobacillus mahadia Geo-05 genome sequence provided by the Malaysia Genome Institute. The size of the gene is 2013 bp, and the theoretical molecular weight of the protein is 78.43 kDa. The gene sequence was then used to predict the thermostability, function and the three dimensional structure of the enzyme. The gene was cloned and overexpressed in E. coli to verify the predicted result experimentally. The purified enzyme was used to study the effect of temperature and pH on enzyme activity and stability, and the inhibitory effect by metal ion on enzyme activity. This thermostable glycogen branching enzyme was found to be most active at 55 °C, and the half-life at 60 °C and 70 °C was 24 h and 5 h, respectively. From this research, a thermostable glycogen branching enzyme was successfully isolated from Geobacillus mahadia Geo-05 by genome mining together with molecular biology technique. PMID:27957389

  4. A destabilized bacterial luciferase for dynamic gene expression studies

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Michael S.; Wilgus, John R.; Chewning, Christopher S.; Sayler, Gary S.

    2006-01-01

    Fusions of genetic regulatory elements with reporter genes have long been used as tools for monitoring gene expression and have become a major component in synthetic gene circuit implementation. A major limitation of many of these systems is the relatively long half-life of the reporter protein(s), which prevents monitoring both the initiation and the termination of transcription in real-time. Furthermore, when used as components in synthetic gene circuits, the long time constants associated with reporter protein decay may significantly degrade circuit performance. In this study, short half-life variants of LuxA and LuxB from Photorhabdus luminescens were constructed in Escherichia coli by inclusion of an 11-amino acid carboxy-terminal tag that is recognized by endogenous tail-specific proteases. Results indicated that the addition of the C-terminal tag affected the functional half-life of the holoenzyme when the tag was added to luxA or to both luxA and luxB, but modification of luxB alone did not have a significant effect. In addition, it was also found that alteration of the terminal three amino acid residues of the carboxy-terminal tag fused to LuxA generated variants with half-lives of intermediate length in a manner similar to that reported for GFP. This report is the first instance of the C-terminal tagging approach for the regulation of protein half-life to be applied to an enzyme or monomer of a multi-subunit enzyme complex and will extend the utility of the bacterial luciferase reporter genes for the monitoring of dynamic changes in gene expression. PMID:19003433

  5. Gene expression profiling in liver and testis of rats to characterize the toxicity of triazole fungicides

    SciTech Connect

    Tully, Douglas B.; Bao Wenjun; Goetz, Amber K.; Blystone, Chad R.; Ren, Hongzu; Schmid, Judith E.; Strader, Lillian F.; Wood, Carmen R.; Best, Deborah S.; Narotsky, Michael G.; Wolf, Douglas C.; Rockett, John C.; Dix, David J. . E-mail: dix.david@epa.gov

    2006-09-15

    Four triazole fungicides were studied using toxicogenomic techniques to identify potential mechanisms of action. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were dosed for 14 days by gavage with fluconazole, myclobutanil, propiconazole, or triadimefon. Following exposure, serum was collected for hormone measurements, and liver and testes were collected for histology, enzyme biochemistry, or gene expression profiling. Body and testis weights were unaffected, but liver weights were significantly increased by all four triazoles, and hepatocytes exhibited centrilobular hypertrophy. Myclobutanil exposure increased serum testosterone and decreased sperm motility, but no treatment-related testis histopathology was observed. We hypothesized that gene expression profiles would identify potential mechanisms of toxicity and used DNA microarrays and quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) to generate profiles. Triazole fungicides are designed to inhibit fungal cytochrome P450 (CYP) 51 enzyme but can also modulate the expression and function of mammalian CYP genes and enzymes. Triazoles affected the expression of numerous CYP genes in rat liver and testis, including multiple Cyp2c and Cyp3a isoforms as well as other xenobiotic metabolizing enzyme (XME) and transporter genes. For some genes, such as Ces2 and Udpgtr2, all four triazoles had similar effects on expression, suggesting possible common mechanisms of action. Many of these CYP, XME and transporter genes are regulated by xeno-sensing nuclear receptors, and hierarchical clustering of CAR/PXR-regulated genes demonstrated the similarities of toxicogenomic responses in liver between all four triazoles and in testis between myclobutanil and triadimefon. Triazoles also affected expression of multiple genes involved in steroid hormone metabolism in the two tissues. Thus, gene expression profiles helped identify possible toxicological mechanisms of the triazole fungicides.

  6. Gene expression profiles in irradiated cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minafra, L.; Bravatà, V.; Russo, G.; Ripamonti, M.; Gilardi, M. C.

    2013-07-01

    Knowledge of the molecular and genetic mechanisms underlying cellular response to radiation may provide new avenues to develop innovative predictive tests of radiosensitivity of tumours and normal tissues and to improve individual therapy. Nowadays very few studies describe molecular changes induced by hadrontherapy treatments, therefore this field has to be explored and clarified. High-throughput methodologies, such as DNA microarray, allow us to analyse mRNA expression of thousands of genes simultaneously in order to discover new genes and pathways as targets of response to hadrontherapy. Our aim is to elucidate the molecular networks involved in the sensitivity/resistance of cancer cell lines subjected to hadrontherapy treatments with a genomewide approach by using cDNA microarray technology to identify gene expression profiles and candidate genes responsible of differential cellular responses.

  7. Gene expression profiles in irradiated cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Minafra, L.; Bravatà, V.; Russo, G.; Ripamonti, M.; Gilardi, M. C.

    2013-07-26

    Knowledge of the molecular and genetic mechanisms underlying cellular response to radiation may provide new avenues to develop innovative predictive tests of radiosensitivity of tumours and normal tissues and to improve individual therapy. Nowadays very few studies describe molecular changes induced by hadrontherapy treatments, therefore this field has to be explored and clarified. High-throughput methodologies, such as DNA microarray, allow us to analyse mRNA expression of thousands of genes simultaneously in order to discover new genes and pathways as targets of response to hadrontherapy. Our aim is to elucidate the molecular networks involved in the sensitivity/resistance of cancer cell lines subjected to hadrontherapy treatments with a genomewide approach by using cDNA microarray technology to identify gene expression profiles and candidate genes responsible of differential cellular responses.

  8. Enhanced Phospholipase A2 Group 3 Expression by Oxidative Stress Decreases the Insulin-Degrading Enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Yui, Daishi; Nishida, Yoichiro; Nishina, Tomoko; Mogushi, Kaoru; Tajiri, Mio; Ishibashi, Satoru; Ajioka, Itsuki; Ishikawa, Kinya; Mizusawa, Hidehiro; Murayama, Shigeo; Yokota, Takanori

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress has a ubiquitous role in neurodegenerative diseases and oxidative damage in specific regions of the brain is associated with selective neurodegeneration. We previously reported that Alzheimer disease (AD) model mice showed decreased insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE) levels in the cerebrum and accelerated phenotypic features of AD when crossbred with alpha-tocopherol transfer protein knockout (Ttpa-/-) mice. To further investigate the role of chronic oxidative stress in AD pathophysiology, we performed DNA microarray analysis using young and aged wild-type mice and aged Ttpa-/- mice. Among the genes whose expression changed dramatically was Phospholipase A2 group 3 (Pla2g3); Pla2g3 was identified because of its expression profile of cerebral specific up-regulation by chronic oxidative stress in silico and in aged Ttpa-/- mice. Immunohistochemical studies also demonstrated that human astrocytic Pla2g3 expression was significantly increased in human AD brains compared with control brains. Moreover, transfection of HEK293 cells with human Pla2g3 decreased endogenous IDE expression in a dose-dependent manner. Our findings show a key role of Pla2g3 on the reduction of IDE, and suggest that cerebrum specific increase of Pla2g3 is involved in the initiation and/or progression of AD. PMID:26637123

  9. PPAR{gamma} transcriptionally regulates the expression of insulin-degrading enzyme in primary neurons

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Jing; Zhang, Lang; Liu, Shubo; Zhang, Chi; Huang, Xiuqing; Li, Jian; Zhao, Nanming; Wang, Zhao

    2009-06-12

    Insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE) is a protease that has been demonstrated to play a key role in degrading both A{beta} and insulin and deficient in IDE function is associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD) and type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2) pathology. However, little is known about the cellular and molecular regulation of IDE expression. Here we show IDE levels are markedly decreased in DM2 patients and positively correlated with the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {gamma} (PPAR{gamma}) levels. Further studies show that PPAR{gamma} plays an important role in regulating IDE expression in rat primary neurons through binding to a functional peroxisome proliferator-response element (PPRE) in IDE promoter and promoting IDE gene transcription. Finally, we demonstrate that PPAR{gamma} participates in the insulin-induced IDE expression in neurons. These results suggest that PPAR{gamma} transcriptionally induces IDE expression which provides a novel mechanism for the use of PPAR{gamma} agonists in both DM2 and AD therapies.

  10. Malolactic enzyme from Oenococcus oeni: heterologous expression in Escherichia coli and biochemical characterization.

    PubMed

    Schümann, Christina; Michlmayr, Herbert; Del Hierro, Andrés M; Kulbe, Klaus D; Jiranek, Vladimir; Eder, Reinhard; Nguyen, Thu-Ha

    2013-01-01

    Malolactic enzymes (MLE) are known to directly convert L-malic acid into L-lactic acid with a catalytical requirement of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD (+) ) and Mn ( 2+) ; however, the reaction mechanism is still unclear. To study a MLE, the structural gene from Oenococcus oeni strain DSM 20255 was heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli, yielding 22.9 kU l (-1) fermentation broth. After affinity chromatography and removal of apparently inactive protein by precipitation, purified recombinant MLE had a specific activity of 280 U mg (-1) protein with a recovery of approximately 61%. The enzyme appears to be a homodimer with a molecular mass of 128 kDa consisting of two 64 kDa subunits. Characterization of the recombinant enzyme showed optimum activity at pH 6.0 and 45°C, and Km, Vmax and kcat values of 4.9 mM, 427 U mg (-1) and 456 sec (-1) for L-malic acid, 91.4 µM, 295 U mg (-1) and 315 sec (-1) for NAD (+) and 4.6 µM, 229 U mg (-1) and 244 sec (-1) for Mn ( 2+) , respectively. The recombinant MLE retained 95% of its activity after 3 mo at room temperature and 7 mo at 4°C. When using pyruvic acid as substrate, the enzyme showed the conversion of pyruvic acid with detectable L-lactate dehydrogenase (L-LDH) activity and oxidation of NADH. This interesting observation might explain that MLE catalyzes a redox reaction and hence, the requirements for NAD (+) and Mn ( 2+) during the conversion of L-malic to L-lactic acid.

  11. Visualizing Gene Expression In Situ

    SciTech Connect

    Burlage, R.S.

    1998-11-02

    Visualizing bacterial cells and describing their responses to the environment are difficult tasks. Their small size is the chief reason for the difficulty, which means that we must often use many millions of cells in a sample in order to determine what the average response of the bacteria is. However, an average response can sometimes mask important events in bacterial physiology, which means that our understanding of these organisms will suffer. We have used a variety of instruments to visualize bacterial cells, all of which tell us something different about the sample. We use a fluorescence activated cell sorter to sort cells based on the fluorescence provided by bioreporter genes, and these can be used to select for particular genetic mutations. Cells can be visualized by epifluorescent microscopy, and sensitive photodetectors can be added that allow us to find a single bacterial cell that is fluorescent or bioluminescent. We have also used standard photomultipliers to examine cell aggregates as field bioreporter microorganisms. Examples of each of these instruments show how our understanding of bacterial physiology has changed with the technology.

  12. Rod photoreceptor-specific gene expression in human retinoblastoma cells.

    PubMed Central

    Di Polo, A; Farber, D B

    1995-01-01

    Retinoblastoma cells in culture have previously been shown to express cone-specific genes but not their rod counterparts. We have detected the messages for the rod alpha, beta, and gamma subunits of cGMP phosphodiesterase (PDE), the rod alpha subunit of transducin, rod opsin, and the cone alpha' subunit of PDE in RNA of human Y-79 retinoblastoma cells by reverse transcription-PCR. Quantitative analysis of the mRNAs for the rod alpha and cone alpha' PDE subunits revealed that they were expressed at comparable levels; however, the transcript encoding the rod beta PDE subunit was 10 times more abundant in these cells. Northern hybridization analysis of Y-79 cell RNA confirmed the presence of the transcripts for rod and cone PDE catalytic subunits. To test whether the transcriptional machinery required for the expression of rod-specific genes was endogenous in Y-79 retinoblastoma cells, cultures were transfected with a construct containing the promoter region of the rod beta PDE subunit gene attached to the firefly luciferase reporter vector. Significant levels of reporter enzyme activity were observed in the cell lysates. Our results demonstrate that the Y-79 retinoblastoma cell line is a good model system for the study of transcriptional regulation of rod-specific genes. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:7732024

  13. Glycerophosphorylcholine regulates Haemophilus influenzae glpQ gene expression.

    PubMed

    Alrousan, Enas; Fan, Xin

    2015-05-01

    An important virulence strategy adopted by Haemophilus influenzae to establish a niche on the mucosal surface of the host is the phosphorylcholine (ChoP) decoration of its lipopolysaccharides, which promotes adherence to the host cells. Haemophilus influenzae is able to use glycerophosphorylcholine (GPC) from host for ChoP synthesis. Utilization of GPC requires glpQ, which encodes a glycerophosphodiester phosphodiesterase enzyme. In this study, we investigate the transcriptional regulation of glpQ gene using real-time PCR and transcriptional fusion of H. influenzae glpQ promoter to the Escherichia coli lacZ reporter gene. The glpQ promoter activities were examined under environmental conditions including changes in temperature, oxygen, high salt and minimal growth medium. Our data showed that under room temperature and anaerobic conditions, the glpQ gene expression levels were significantly higher than under other growth conditions. In addition, the glpQ gene expression levels were upregulated in the presence of GPC. These results suggest that H. influenzae may upregulate glpQ expression in response to different environments it encounters during infection, from the airway surfaces (room temperature) to deep tissues (anaerobic). Upregulation of glpQ by GPC may allow efficient use of abundant GPC from mammalian cells by H. influenzae as a source of nutrient and for ChoP decoration of lipopolysaccharide that facilitates bacterial adhesion to host cells and growth during infection.

  14. Changes in Liver Metabolic Gene Expression from Radiation Exposure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, C. P.; Wotring, V. E.

    2012-01-01

    Increased exposure to radiation is one physiological stressor associated with spaceflight. While known to alter normal physiological function, how radiation affects metabolism of administered medications is unclear. Crew health could be affected if the actions of medications used in spaceflight deviated from expectations formed during terrestrial medication use. Three different doses of gamma radiation (50 mGy - 6.05 Gy) and a sham were administered to groups of 6 mice each, and after various intervals of recovery time, liver gene expression was measured with RT-qPCR arrays for drug metabolism and DNA repair enzymes. Results indicated approx.65 genes of the 190 tested were significantly affected by at least one of the radiation doses. Many of the affected genes are involved in the metabolism of drugs with hydrophobic or steroid-like structures, maintenance of redox homeostasis and repair of DNA damage. Most affected genes returned to near control expression levels by 7 days post-treatment. With 6 Gy exposure, metallothionein expression was 132-fold more than control at the 4 hr time point, and fell at each later time point (11-fold at 24 hrs, and 8-fold at 7 days). In contrast, Cyp17a1 showed a 4-fold elevation at 4 hrs after exposure and remained constant for 7 days.

  15. Gene cloning of alpha-methylserine aldolase from Variovorax paradoxus and purification and characterization of the recombinant enzyme.

    PubMed

    Nozaki, Hiroyuki; Kuroda, Shinji; Watanabe, Kunihiko; Yokozeki, Kenzo

    2008-10-01

    The alpha-methylserine aldolase gene from Variovorax paradoxus strains AJ110406, NBRC15149, and NBRC15150 was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. Formaldehyde release activity from alpha-methyl-L-serine was detected in the cell-free extract of E.coli expressing the gene from three strains. The recombinant enzyme from V. paradoxus NBRC15150 was purified. The Vmax and Km of the enzyme for the formaldehyde release reaction from alpha-methyl-L-serine were 1.89 micromol min(-1) mg(-1) and 1.2 mM respectively. The enzyme was also capable of catalyzing the synthesis of alpha-methyl-L-serine and alpha-ethyl-L-serine from L-alanine and L-2-aminobutyric acid respectively, accompanied by hydroxymethyl transfer from formaldehyde. The purified enzyme also catalyzed alanine racemization. It contained 1 mole of pyridoxal 5'-phosphate per mol of the enzyme subunit, and exhibited a specific spectral peak at 429 nm. With L-alanine and L-2-aminobutyric acid as substrates, the specific peak, assumed to be a result of the formation of a quinonoid intermediate, increased at 498 nm and 500 nm respectively.

  16. Gene expression profile in pelvic organ prolapse†

    PubMed Central

    Brizzolara, S.S.; Killeen, J.; Urschitz, J.

    2009-01-01

    It was hypothesized that the processes contributing to pelvic organ prolapse (POP) may be identified by transcriptional profiling of pelvic connective tissue in conjunction with light microscopy. In order to test this, we performed a frequency-matched case–control study of women undergoing hysterectomy for POP and controls. Total RNA, extracted from uterosacral and round ligament samples used to generate labeled cRNA, was hybridized to microarrays and analyzed for the expression of 32 878 genes. Significance Analysis of Microarrays (Stanford University, CA, USA) identified differentially expressed genes used for ontoanalysis. Quantitative PCR (qPCR) confirmed results. Light microscopy confirmed the tissue type and assessed inflammatory infiltration. The analysis of 34 arrays revealed 249 differentially expressed genes with fold changes (FC) larger than 1.5 and false discovery rates ≤5.2%. Immunity and defense was the most significant biological process differentially expressed in POP. qPCR confirmed the elevated steady-state mRNA levels for four genes: interleukin-6 (FC 9.8), thrombospondin 1 (FC 3.5) and prostaglandin-endoperoxide synthase 2 (FC 2.4) and activating transcription factor 3 (FC 2.6). Light microscopy showed all the samples were composed of fibromuscular connective tissue with no inflammatory infiltrates. In conclusion, genes enriched for ‘immunity and defense’ contribute to POP independent of inflammatory infiltrates. PMID:19056808

  17. Homogalacturonan-modifying enzymes: structure, expression, and roles in plants

    PubMed Central

    Sénéchal, Fabien; Wattier, Christopher; Rustérucci, Christine; Pelloux, Jérôme

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the changes affecting the plant cell wall is a key element in addressing its functional role in plant growth and in the response to stress. Pectins, which are the main constituents of the primary cell wall in dicot species, play a central role in the control of cellular adhesion and thereby of the rheological properties of the wall. This is likely to be a major determinant of plant growth. How the discrete changes in pectin structure are mediated is thus a key issue in our understanding of plant development and plant responses to changes in the environment. In particular, understanding the remodelling of homogalacturonan (HG), the most abundant pectic polymer, by specific enzymes is a current challenge in addressing its fundamental role. HG, a polymer that can be methylesterified or acetylated, can be modified by HGMEs (HG-modifying enzymes) which all belong to large multigenic families in all species sequenced to date. In particular, both the degrees of substitution (methylesterification and/or acetylation) and polymerization can be controlled by specific enzymes such as pectin methylesterases (PMEs), pectin acetylesterases (PAEs), polygalacturonases (PGs), or pectate lyases-like (PLLs). Major advances in the biochemical and functional characterization of these enzymes have been made over the last 10 years. This review aims to provide a comprehensive, up to date summary of the recent data concerning the structure, regulation, and function of these fascinating enzymes in plant development and in response to biotic stresses. PMID:25056773

  18. Clustering of High Throughput Gene Expression Data

    PubMed Central

    Pirim, Harun; Ekşioğlu, Burak; Perkins, Andy; Yüceer, Çetin

    2012-01-01

    High throughput biological data need to be processed, analyzed, and interpreted to address problems in life sciences. Bioinformatics, computational biology, and systems biology deal with biological problems using computational methods. Clustering is one of the methods used to gain insight into biological processes, particularly at the genomics level. Clearly, clustering can be used in many areas of biological data analysis. However, this paper presents a review of the current clustering algorithms designed especially for analyzing gene expression data. It is also intended to introduce one of the main problems in bioinformatics - clustering gene expression data - to the operations research community. PMID:23144527

  19. Facilitated diffusion buffers noise in gene expression.

    PubMed

    Schoech, Armin P; Zabet, Nicolae Radu

    2014-09-01

    Transcription factors perform facilitated diffusion [three-dimensional (3D) diffusion in the cytosol and 1D diffusion on the DNA] when binding to their target sites to regulate gene expression. Here, we investigated the influence of this binding mechanism on the noise in gene expression. Our results showed that, for biologically relevant parameters, the binding process can be represented by a two-state Markov model and that the accelerated target finding due to facilitated diffusion leads to a reduction in both the mRNA and the protein noise.

  20. Facilitated diffusion buffers noise in gene expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoech, Armin P.; Zabet, Nicolae Radu

    2014-09-01

    Transcription factors perform facilitated diffusion [three-dimensional (3D) diffusion in the cytosol and 1D diffusion on the DNA] when binding to their target sites to regulate gene expression. Here, we investigated the influence of this binding mechanism on the noise in gene expression. Our results showed that, for biologically relevant parameters, the binding process can be represented by a two-state Markov model and that the accelerated target finding due to facilitated diffusion leads to a reduction in both the mRNA and the protein noise.

  1. Objective and subjective probability in gene expression.

    PubMed

    Velasco, Joel D

    2012-09-01

    In this paper I address the question of whether the probabilities that appear in models of stochastic gene expression are objective or subjective. I argue that while our best models of the phenomena in question are stochastic models, this fact should not lead us to automatically assume that the processes are inherently stochastic. After distinguishing between models and reality, I give a brief introduction to the philosophical problem of the interpretation of probability statements. I argue that the objective vs. subjective distinction is a false dichotomy and is an unhelpful distinction in this case. Instead, the probabilities in our models of gene expression exhibit standard features of both objectivity and subjectivity.

  2. The Interrelationship between Promoter Strength, Gene Expression, and Growth Rate

    PubMed Central

    Klesmith, Justin R.; Detwiler, Emily E.; Tomek, Kyle J.; Whitehead, Timothy A.

    2014-01-01

    In exponentially growing bacteria, expression of heterologous protein impedes cellular growth rates. Quantitative understanding of the relationship between expression and growth rate will advance our ability to forward engineer bacteria, important for metabolic engineering and synthetic biology applications. Recently, a work described a scaling model based on optimal allocation of ribosomes for protein translation. This model quantitatively predicts a linear relationship between microbial growth rate and heterologous protein expression with no free parameters. With the aim of validating this model, we have rigorously quantified the fitness cost of gene expression by using a library of synthetic constitutive promoters to drive expression of two separate proteins (eGFP and amiE) in E. coli in different strains and growth media. In all cases, we demonstrate that the fitness cost is consistent with the previous findings. We expand upon the previous theory by introducing a simple promoter activity model to quantitatively predict how basal promoter strength relates to growth rate and protein expression. We then estimate the amount of protein expression needed to support high flux through a heterologous metabolic pathway and predict the sizable fitness cost associated with enzyme production. This work has broad implications across applied biological sciences because it allows for prediction of the interplay between promoter strength, protein expression, and the resulting cost to microbial growth rates. PMID:25286161

  3. Genomic signatures of germline gene expression.

    PubMed

    McVicker, Graham; Green, Phil

    2010-11-01

    Transcribed regions in the human genome differ from adjacent intergenic regions in transposable element density, crossover rates, and asymmetric substitution and sequence composition patterns. We tested whether these differences reflect selection or are instead a byproduct of germline transcription, using publicly available gene expression data from a variety of germline and somatic tissues. Crossover rate shows a strong negative correlation with gene expression in meiotic tissues, suggesting that crossover is inhibited by transcription. Strand-biased composition (G+T content) and A → G versus T → C substitution asymmetry are both positively correlated with germline gene expression. We find no evidence for a strand bias in allele frequency data, implying that the substitution asymmetry reflects a mutation rather than a fixation bias. The density of transposable elements is positively correlated with germline expression, suggesting that such elements preferentially insert into regions that are actively transcribed. For each of the features examined, our analyses favor a nonselective explanation for the observed trends and point to the role of germline gene expression in shaping the mammalian genome.

  4. [Imprinting genes and it's expression in Arabidopsis].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hong-Yu; Xu, Pei-Zhou; Yang, Hua; Wu, Xian-Jun

    2010-07-01

    Genomic imprinting refers to the phenomenon that the expression of a gene copy depends on its parent of origin. The Arabidopsis imprinted FIS (Fertilisation-independent seed) genes, mea, fis2, and fie, play essential roles in the repression of central cell and the regulation of early endosperm development. fis mutants display two phenotypes: autonomous diploid endosperm development when fertilization is absent and un-cellularised endosperm formation when fertilization occurs. The FIS Polycomb protein complex including the above three FIS proteins catalyzes histone H3 K27 tri-methylation on target loci. DME (DEMETER), a DNA glycosylase, and AtMET1 (Methyltransferase1), a DNA methyltransferase, are involved in the regulation of imprinted expression of both mea and fis2. This review summarizes the studies on the Arabidopsis imprinted FIS genes and other related genes. Recent works have shown that the insertion of transposons may affect nearby gene expression, which may be the main driving force behind the evolution of genomic imprinting. This summary covers the achievements on Arabidopsis imprinted genes will provide important information for studies on genomic imprinting in the important crops such as rice and maize.

  5. Correct developmental expression of a cloned alcohol dehydrogenase gene transduced into the Drosophila germ line.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, D A; Posakony, J W; Maniatis, T

    1983-08-01

    We have used P-element-mediated transformation to introduce a cloned Drosophila alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh) gene into the germ line of ADH null flies. Six independent transformants expressing ADH were identified by their acquired resistance to ethanol. Each transformant carries a single copy of the cloned Adh gene in a different chromosomal location. Four of the six transformant lines exhibit normal Adh expression by the following criteria: quantitative levels of ADH enzyme activity in larvae and adults; qualitative tissue specificity; the size of stable Adh mRNA; and the characteristic developmental switch in utilization of two different Adh promoters. The remaining two transformants express ADH enzyme activity with the correct tissue specificity, but at a lower level than wild type. These results demonstrate that an 11.8 kb chromosomal fragment containing the Adh gene includes the cis-acting sequences necessary for its correct developmental expression, and that a variety of chromosomal sites permit proper Adh gene function.

  6. Use of mRNA expression to detect the induction of drug metabolising enzymes in rat and human hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Richert, L. Tuschl, G.; Pekthong, D.; Mantion, G.; Weber, J.-C.; Mueller, S.O.

    2009-02-15

    It is important to investigate the induction of cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes by drugs. The most relevant end point is enzyme activity; however, this requires many cells and is low throughput. We have compared the CYP1A, CYP2B and CYP3A induction response to eight inducers in rat and human hepatocytes using enzyme activities (CYP1A2 (ethoxyresorufin), 2B (benzoxyresorufin for rat and bupropion for human) and CYP3A (testosterone)) and Taqman{sup TM} Low Density Array (TLDA) analysis. There was a good correlation between the induction of CYP1A2, CYP2B6 and CYP3A4 enzyme activities and mRNA expression in human hepatocytes. In contrast, BROD activities and mRNA expression in rat hepatocytes correlated poorly. However, bupropion hydroxylation correlated well with Cyp2b1 expression in rat hepatocytes. TLDA analysis of a panel of mRNAs encoding for CYPs, phase 2 enzymes, nuclear receptors and transporters revealed that the main genes induced by the 8 compounds tested were the CYPs. AhR ligands also induced UDP-glucuronosyltransferases and glutathione S-transferases in rat and human hepatocytes. The transporters, MDR1, MDR3 and OATPA were the only transporter genes significantly up-regulated in human hepatocytes. In rat hepatocytes Bsep, Mdr2, Mrp2, Mrp3 and Oatp2 were up-regulated. We could then show a good in vivo:in vitro correlation in the induction response of isolated rat hepatocytes and ex-vivo hepatic microsomes for the drug development candidate, EMD392949. In conclusion, application of TLDA methodology to investigate the potential of compounds to induce enzymes in rat and human hepatocytes increases the throughput and information gained from one assay, without reducing the predictive capacity.

  7. Heterologous Expression and Maturation of an NADP-Dependent [NiFe]-Hydrogenase: A Key Enzyme in Biofuel Production

    PubMed Central

    Jenney, Francis E.; McTernan, Patrick M.; Adams, Michael W. W.

    2010-01-01

    Hydrogen gas is a major biofuel and is metabolized by a wide range of microorganisms. Microbial hydrogen production is catalyzed by hydrogenase, an extremely complex, air-sensitive enzyme that utilizes a binuclear nickel-iron [NiFe] catalytic site. Production and engineering of recombinant [NiFe]-hydrogenases in a genetically-tractable organism, as with metalloprotein complexes in general, has met with limited success due to the elaborate maturation process that is required, primarily in the absence of oxygen, to assemble the catalytic center and functional enzyme. We report here the successful production in Escherichia coli of the recombinant form of a cytoplasmic, NADP-dependent hydrogenase from Pyrococcus furiosus, an anaerobic hyperthermophile. This was achieved using novel expression vectors for the co-expression of thirteen P. furiosus genes (four structural genes encoding the hydrogenase and nine encoding maturation proteins). Remarkably, the native E. coli maturation machinery will also generate a functional hydrogenase when provided with only the genes encoding the hydrogenase subunits and a single protease from P. furiosus. Another novel feature is that their expression was induced by anaerobic conditions, whereby E. coli was grown aerobically and production of recombinant hydrogenase was achieved by simply changing the gas feed from air to an inert gas (N2). The recombinant enzyme was purified and shown to be functionally similar to the native enzyme purified from P. furiosus. The methodology to generate this key hydrogen-producing enzyme has dramatic implications for the production of hydrogen and NADPH as vehicles for energy storage and transport, for engineering hydrogenase to optimize production and catalysis, as well as for the general production of complex, oxygen-sensitive metalloproteins. PMID:20463892

  8. Sequence and gene expression evolution of paralogous genes in willows

    PubMed Central

    Harikrishnan, Srilakshmy L.; Pucholt, Pascal; Berlin, Sofia

    2015-01-01

    Whole genome duplications (WGD) have had strong impacts on species diversification by triggering evolutionary novelties, however, relatively little is known about the balance between gene loss and forces involved in the retention of duplicated genes originating from a WGD. We analyzed putative Salicoid duplicates in willows, originating from the Salicoid WGD, which took place more than 45 Mya. Contigs were constructed by de novo assembly of RNA-seq data derived from leaves and roots from two genotypes. Among the 48,508 contigs, 3,778 pairs were, based on fourfold synonymous third-codon transversion rates and syntenic positions, predicted to be Salicoid duplicates. Both copies were in most cases expressed in both tissues and 74% were significantly differentially expressed. Mean Ka/Ks was 0.23, suggesting that the Salicoid duplicates are evolving by purifying selection. Gene Ontology enrichment analyses showed that functions related to DNA- and nucleic acid binding were over-represented among the non-differentially expressed Salicoid duplicates, while functions related to biosynthesis and metabolism were over-represented among the differentially expressed Salicoid duplicates. We propose that the differentially expressed Salicoid duplicates are regulatory neo- and/or subfunctionalized, while the non-differentially expressed are dose sensitive, hence, functionally conserved. Multiple evolutionary processes, thus drive the retention of Salicoid duplicates in willows. PMID:26689951

  9. Sequence and gene expression evolution of paralogous genes in willows.

    PubMed

    Harikrishnan, Srilakshmy L; Pucholt, Pascal; Berlin, Sofia

    2015-12-22

    Whole genome duplications (WGD) have had strong impacts on species diversification by triggering evolutionary novelties, however, relatively little is known about the balance between gene loss and forces involved in the retention of duplicated genes originating from a WGD. We analyzed putative Salicoid duplicates in willows, originating from the Salicoid WGD, which took place more than 45 Mya. Contigs were constructed by de novo assembly of RNA-seq data derived from leaves and roots from two genotypes. Among the 48,508 contigs, 3,778 pairs were, based on fourfold synonymous third-codon transversion rates and syntenic positions, predicted to be Salicoid duplicates. Both copies were in most cases expressed in both tissues and 74% were significantly differentially expressed. Mean Ka/Ks was 0.23, suggesting that the Salicoid duplicates are evolving by purifying selection. Gene Ontology enrichment analyses showed that functions related to DNA- and nucleic acid binding were over-represented among the non-differentially expressed Salicoid duplicates, while functions related to biosynthesis and metabolism were over-represented among the differentially expressed Salicoid duplicates. We propose that the differentially expressed Salicoid duplicates are regulatory neo- and/or subfunctionalized, while the non-differentially expressed are dose sensitive, hence, functionally conserved. Multiple evolutionary processes, thus drive the retention of Salicoid duplicates in willows.

  10. Impact of Statins on Gene Expression in Human Lung Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Lane, Jérôme; van Eeden, Stephan F.; Obeidat, Ma’en; Sin, Don D.; Tebbutt, Scott J.; Timens, Wim; Postma, Dirkje S.; Laviolette, Michel; Paré, Peter D.; Bossé, Yohan

    2015-01-01

    Statins are 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase inhibitors that alter the synthesis of cholesterol. Some studies have shown a significant association of statins with improved respiratory health outcomes of patients with asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and lung cancer. Here we hypothesize that statins impact gene expression in human lungs and may reveal the pleiotropic effects of statins that are taking place directly in lung tissues. Human lung tissues were obtained from patients who underwent lung resection or transplantation. Gene expression was measured on a custom Affymetrix array in a discovery cohort (n = 408) and two replication sets (n = 341 and 282). Gene expression was evaluated by linear regression between statin users and non-users, adjusting for age, gender, smoking status, and other covariables. The results of each cohort were combined in a meta-analysis and biological pathways were studied using Gene Set Enrichment Analysis. The discovery set included 141 statin users. The lung mRNA expression levels of eighteen and three genes were up-regulated and down-regulated in statin users (FDR < 0.05), respectively. Twelve of the up-regulated genes were replicated in the first replication set, but none in the second (p-value < 0.05). Combining the discovery and replication sets into a meta-analysis improved the significance of the 12 up-regulated genes, which includes genes encoding enzymes and membrane proteins involved in cholesterol biosynthesis. Canonical biological pathways altered by statins in the lung include cholesterol, steroid, and terpenoid backbone biosynthesis. No genes encoding inflammatory, proteases, pro-fibrotic or growth factors were altered by statins, suggesting that the direct effect of statin in the lung do not go beyond its antilipidemic action. Although more studies are needed with specific lung cell types and different classes and doses of statins, the improved health outcomes and survival observed in statin

  11. The TRANSFAC system on gene expression regulation.

    PubMed

    Wingender, E; Chen, X; Fricke, E; Geffers, R; Hehl, R; Liebich, I; Krull, M; Matys, V; Michael, H; Ohnhäuser, R; Prüss, M; Schacherer, F; Thiele, S; Urbach, S

    2001-01-01

    The TRANSFAC database on transcription factors and their DNA-binding sites and profiles (http://www.gene-regulation.de/) has been quantitatively extended and supplemented by a number of modules. These modules give information about pathologically relevant mutations in regulatory regions and transcription factor genes (PathoDB), scaffold/matrix attached regions (S/MARt DB), signal transduction (TRANSPATH) and gene expression sources (CYTOMER). Altogether, these distinct database modules constitute the TRANSFAC system. They are accompanied by a number of program routines for identifying potential transcription factor binding sites or for localizing individual components in the regulatory network of a cell.

  12. Marker gene tethering by nucleoporins affects gene expression in plants.

    PubMed

    Smith, Sarah; Galinha, Carla; Desset, Sophie; Tolmie, Frances; Evans, David; Tatout, Christophe; Graumann, Katja

    2015-01-01

    In non-plant systems, chromatin association with the nuclear periphery affects gene expression, where interactions with nuclear envelope proteins can repress and interactions with nucleoporins can enhance transcription. In plants, both hetero- and euchromatin can localize at the nuclear periphery, but the effect of proximity to the nuclear periphery on gene expression remains largely unknown. This study explores the putative function of Seh1 and Nup50a nucleoporins on gene expression by using the Lac Operator / Lac Repressor (LacI-LacO) system adapted to Arabidopsis thaliana. We used LacO fused to the luciferase reporter gene (LacO:Luc) to investigate whether binding of the LacO:Luc transgene to nucleoporin:LacI protein fusions alters luciferase expression. Two separate nucleoporin-LacI-YFP fusions were introduced into single insert, homozygous LacO:Luc Arabidopsis plants. Homozygous plants carrying LacO:Luc and a single insert of either Seh1-LacI-YFP or Nup50a-LacI-YFP were tested for luciferase activity and compared to plants containing LacO:Luc only. Seh1-LacI-YFP increased, while Nup50a-LacI-YFP decreased luciferase activity. Seh1-LacI-YFP accumulated at the nuclear periphery as expected, while Nup50a-LacI-YFP was nucleoplasmic and was not selected for further study. Protein and RNA levels of luciferase were quantified by western blotting and RT-qPCR, respectively. Increased luciferase activity in LacO:Luc+Seh1-LacI-YFP plants was correlated with