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Sample records for enzyme induction

  1. Arabinan degrading enzymes from Aspergillus nidulans: induction and purification.

    PubMed

    Ramón, D; vd Veen, P; Visser, J

    1993-10-01

    The presence in Aspergillus nidulans of two enzymes related to the Aspergillus niger endo-arabinase and alpha-L-arabinofuranosidase B has been established using antibodies against the purified A. niger enzymes. Moreover, the absence of an equivalent in A. nidulans to the alpha-L-arabinofuranosidase A of A. niger has been confirmed both at the protein and at the DNA level. Both A. nidulans arabinases have been purified and physico-chemically and kinetically characterized. They have a much higher temperature optimum than the corresponding A. niger enzymes. The pattern of induction has been studied on media containing different carbon sources showing an important role of L-arabitol in the induction of these enzymes.

  2. The induction of microsomal electron transport enzymes.

    PubMed

    Waterman, M R; Estabrook, R W

    1983-01-01

    Liver endoplasmic reticulum contains as NADPH-dependent electron transport complex where the family of hemeproteins, termed cytochrome P-450, serve as catalysts for the oxidation of a variety of different organic chemicals. The content and inventory of the types of cytochrome P-450 is readily modified following in vivo treatment of animals with 'inducing agents' such as barbiturates, steroids and polycyclic hydrocarbons. Recent studies have applied the methods of molecular biology to evaluate changes in the transcription and translation of genomic information occurring concomitant with the initiation of synthesis of various types of cytochrome P-450. The ability to isolate unique cytochrome P-450 proteins and to prepare specific antibodies now permits the study of in vitro translation of mRNA and the preparation of specific cDNAs. The present review summarizes the historic background leading to current concepts of cytochrome P-450 induction and describes recent advances in our knowledge of the regulation of cytochrome P-450 synthesis in the liver.

  3. Induction of cellulolytic enzymes in Trichoderma reesei by sophorose.

    PubMed Central

    Sternberg, D; Mandels, G R

    1979-01-01

    Sophorose (2-O-beta-glucopyranosyl-D-glucose) induces carboxymethyl cellulase in Trichoderma reesei QM6a mycelium with 1.5 to 2 h. The induction response to sophorose concentration, although complicated by the metabolism of sophorose, shows saturation kinetics. Most of the cellulase appears after most of the sophorose has been taken up, but the presence of an inducer is required to maintain cellulase synthesis because enzyme production ceases after separation of the mycelium from the induction medium. Cellulase appears simultaneously in the medium and in the mycelium, and no appreciable levels accumulate in the mycelium. Response to pH suggest either that synthesis and secretion of the enzyme are closely associated or concurrent events affected by surface interactions with the medium. Effects of temperature and pH on cellulase induction by sophorose are similar to those reported for induction by cellulose. The kinetics of absorption by mycelium differs from that of other beta-linked saccharides and glucose, the uptake of sophorose being much slower. Under our cultural conditions, sophorose appears to induce an incomplete array of cellulase enzymes, as indicated by enzymatic and electrophoretic studies. Images PMID:39061

  4. IN VITRO INDUCTION OF LYSOSOMAL ENZYMES BY PHAGOCYTOSIS

    PubMed Central

    Axline, Stanton G.; Cohn, Zanvil A.

    1970-01-01

    The in vitro induction of lysosomal enzymes by phagocytosis was demonstrated in cultivated mouse peritoneal macrophages. The contribution of each of several steps in the endocytic process to enzyme induction was examined. The enzymatic response after the uptake of equal numbers of erythrocytes (RBC) and nondigestible particles were compared. Phagocytosis of RBC produced a marked increase in the levels of acid phosphatase, β-glucuronidase, and cathepsin D. Puromycin (1 µg/ml) inhibited the enzyme response. In contrast, phagocytosis of polyvinyl toluene, polystyrene, and insoluble starch particles produced no increase in macrophage lysosomal enzymes, although fusion of phagosomes with preexisting lysosomes occurred normally. The endocytic stimulus to synthesis of inducible lysosomal enzymes, therefore, occurred at or beyond the stage of digestion. Purified protein (bovine gamma globulin) aggregates and homopolymer coacervates of poly-l-glutamic acid: poly-l-lysine were effective inducers of lysosomal acid phosphatase, β-glucuronidase, and cathepsin D, whereas homopolymers of the same D-amino acids were ineffective as inducers. Both the quantity of phagocytized substrate and its rate of enzymatic hydrolysis appear to control the level and persistance of lysosomal hydrolases. PMID:4911552

  5. Molecular mechanism of induction of key enzymes related to lipogenesis.

    PubMed

    Noguchi, T; Iritani, N; Tanaka, T

    1992-06-01

    Key enzymes related to lipogenesis in the liver are induced by a high glucose diet or insulin and suppressed by starvation, diabetes, or glucagon. Most of these enzymes are also induced by dietary fructose, even in diabetic liver. This regulation occurs at the posttranscriptional level as well as at the transcriptional level. We studied extensively the molecular mechanism of induction of L-type pyruvate kinase (LPK). The transcription of the LPK gene in the liver was stimulated by insulin and inhibited by glucagon. This insulin action required ongoing protein synthesis and metabolism of glucose and was enhanced by glucocorticoid. On the other hand, the mechanism of induction of the LPK by dietary fructose depended on plasma insulin levels. Dietary fructose stimulated transcription of the LPK gene in normal rats, whereas it acted mainly at the posttranscriptional level in diabetic rats. These fructose effects were attributable to a common metabolite of fructose and glycerol. The induction of LPK mRNA by dietary glucose was impaired in the liver of Wistar fatty rats, a model of obese non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, but fructose-induced accumulation of the mRNA was not. Studies on transgenic mice indicated that the 5'-flanking region up to -3 kb of the LPK gene contained all cis-acting elements necessary for tissue-specific expression of LPK and its stimulation by diets and insulin. Further analysis using a transient expression assay revealed the presence of three cis-acting elements necessary for expression of LPK in hepatocytes in the region up to -170 kb. However, these elements alone were not sufficient for dietary and hormonal regulation of this enzyme when analyzed in transgenic mice.

  6. Enzyme induction in neonates after fetal exposure to antiepileptic drugs

    SciTech Connect

    Rating, D.; Jaeger-Roman, E.; Nau, H.; Kuhnz, W.; Helge, H.

    1983-01-01

    The /sup 13/C-AP breath test is shown to be a convenient, noninvasive method to monitor velocity and capacity of P450-dependent AP N-demethylation in infancy and childhood. According to /sup 13/C-AP breath tests, neonates have a very low capacity to eliminate /sup 13/CO/sub 2/, which is only 15 to 21% of the activity in adults. During the first year of life AP N-demethylation increases to reach its maximum at about 2 years; afterwards a slight decrease occurs. In 25 neonates exposed prenatally to different antiepileptic drugs /sup 13/C-AP breath test was efficiently used to prove that cytochrome AP N-demethylation was considerably stimulated. After primidone/phenobarbitone, especially in combination with phenytoin, /sup 13/C elimination reaches and even surpasses the range for older children. Valproate exposure during fetal life is not consistently followed by a significant increase in AP N-demethylation. The enzyme induction demonstrated by /sup 13/C-AP breath test was often accompanied by accelerated metabolic clearance and shortened half-life times of transplacentally acquired antiepileptic drugs. There was good agreement between /sup 13/C-AP breath tests and pharmacokinetic data for primidone/phenobarbitone but not for phenytoin. In contrast, in the case of phenytoin exposure during pregnancy the pharmacokinetic parameters and the /sup 13/C breath test data will transport very different informations about enzyme induction in these neonates.

  7. Expanding role of microsomal enzyme induction, and its implications for clinical chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Goldberg, D.M.

    1980-05-01

    Microsomal enzyme induction, a term denoting the ability of the substrate for a microsomal enzyme to enhance the activity of that enzyme and frequently of related enzymes, has been demonstrated in a wide range of tissues, notably the liver, placenta, small intestinal muccosa, and peripheral lymphocytes. The major agents that cause microsomal enzyme induction are drugs and xenobiotics. Factors modulating the extent of enzyme induction by a given agent include age and nutrition, and wide species variations are encountered with different inducing agents. Markers for microsomal enzyme induction include determination of the plasma half-life for conveniently measured drugs, and the measurement of endogenous metabolites such as 6;-hydroxycortisol and D-glucaric acid in 24-h urine collections. While these are valuable for monitoring enzyme induction in healthy patients, they are altered in certain forms of liver disease, and results must then be interpreted with caution. Microsomal enzyme induction may interfere with reference values, particularly for membrane-bound enzymes, in otherwise healthy populations, and may play a role in metabolic bone disease, drug interactions, carcinogenesis, and hypertriglyceridemia. Drug therapy of the neonatal and congenital hyperbilirubinemias has been inspired by the mechanism of hepatic microsomal enzyme induction, and ''markers'' for enzyme induction can be used to monitor drug compliance. The activity of serum <-glutamyltransferase seems to be especially valuable for this purpose.

  8. Effects of microsomal enzyme induction on paracetamol metabolism in man.

    PubMed Central

    Prescott, L F; Critchley, J A; Balali-Mood, M; Pentland, B

    1981-01-01

    1 The metabolism of paracetamol after a single oral dose of 20 mg/kg was compared in fifteen patients with microsomal enzyme induction taking anticonvulsants or rifampicin and twelve healthy volunteers. 2 Induction was confirmed by measurement of the plasma antipyrine half-life (mean 6.4 h in the patients compared with 12.8 h in the volunteers). 3 The glucuronide conjugation of paracetamol was enhanced in the induced patients as shown by lower plasma paracetamol concentrations, a shorter paracetamol half-life, higher paracetamol glucuronide concentrations and an increased ratio of the area under the plasma concentration time curves of the glucuronide to the unchanged drug. There were no significant differences in sulphate conjugation. 4 There was a corresponding change in the pattern of urinary metabolite excretion. The induced patients excreted significantly less unchanged drug and sulphate conjugate and more glucuronide conjugate than the healthy volunteers. 5 The urinary excretion of the mercapturic acid and cysteine conjugated of paracetamol was the same in both groups. 6 Conversion of paracetamol to its potentially hepatotoxic metabolite does not seem to be increased in patients induced with anticonvulsants or rifampicin. There would seem to be no contraindication to the use of these drugs in combination. PMID:7306429

  9. Induction of Nitrate Assimilatory Enzymes in the Tree Betula pendula.

    PubMed

    Friemann, A; Lange, M; Hachtel, W; Brinkmann, K

    1992-07-01

    The coordinate appearance of the bispecific NAD(P)H-nitrate reductase (NR; EC 1.6.6.2) and nitrite reductase (NiR; EC 1.7.7.1) was investigated in leaves and roots from European white birch seedlings (Betula pendula Roth). Induction by nitrate and light of both enzymes was analyzed by in vitro assays and by measuring NR- and NiR-encoding mRNA pools with homologous cDNAs as probes. When birch seedlings were grown on a medium containing ammonium as the sole nitrogen source, low constitutive expression of NR and NiR was observed in leaves, whereas only NiR was significantly expressed in roots. Upon transfer of the seedlings to a nitrate-containing medium, mRNA pools and activities of NR and NiR dramatically increased in leaves and roots, with a more rapid induction in leaves. Peak accumulations of mRNA pools preceded the maximum activities of NR and NiR, suggesting that the appearance of both activities can be mainly attributed to an increased expression of NR and NiR genes. Expression of NR was strictly light-dependent in leaves and roots and was repressed by ammonium in roots but not in leaves. In contrast with NR, constitutive expression of NiR was not affected by light, and even a slight induction following the addition of nitrate was found in the dark in roots but not in leaves. No effect of ammonium on NiR expression was detectable in both organs. In leaves as well as in roots, NiR was induced more rapidly than NR, which appears to be a safety measure to prevent nitrite accumulation.

  10. Induction Specificity and Catabolite Repression of the Early Enzymes in Camphor Degradation by Pseudomonas putida

    PubMed Central

    Hartline, Richard A.; Gunsalus, I. C.

    1971-01-01

    The ability of bornane and substituted bornanes to induce the early enzymes for d(+)-camphor degradation and control of these enzymes by catabolite repression were studied in a strain of a Pseudomonas putida. Bornane and 20 substituted bornane compounds showed induction. Of these 21 compounds, bornane and 8 of the substituted bornanes provided induction without supporting growth. Oxygen, but not nitrogen, enhanced the inductive potency of the unsubstituted bornane ring. All bornanedione isomers caused induction, and those with substituents on each of the three consecutive carbon atoms, including the methyl group at the bridgehead carbon, showed induction without supporting growth. Although it was not possible to obtain experimental data for a case of absolute gratuitous induction by compounds not supporting growth, indirect evidence in support of gratuitous induction is presented. It is proposed that the ability of P. putida to tolerate the unusually high degree of possible gratuitous induction observed for camphor catabolism may be related to the infrequent occurrence of bicyclic ring structures in nature. Survival of an organism with a broad specificity for gratuitous induction is discussed. Glucose and succinate, but not glutamate, produced catabolite repression of the early camphor-degrading enzymes. Pathway enzymes differ in their degree of sensitivity to succinate-provoked catabolite repression. The ability of a compound to produce catabolite repression is not, however, directly related to the duration of the lag period (diauxic lag) between growth on camphor and growth on the repressing compound. PMID:5573731

  11. Microsomal enzyme induction following repeated oral administration of LAAM.

    PubMed

    Masten, L W; Price, S R; Burnett, C J

    1978-04-01

    The oral administration of 1-alpha-acetylmethadol (LAAM) in the mouse was shown to cause a significant elevation in the hepatic LAAM N-demethylase activity. Compared to the self-induction phenomena found with methadone and propoxyphene, LAAM was three and two times more potent, respectively, on a molar basis than these two structurally similar narcotic analogs. Moreover, microsomal induction by LAAM resulted in significant elevations of aminopyrine N-demethylase and aniline hydroxylase activities. These effects were also correlated with a dose related decrement of pentobarbital sleeping time. Thus LAAM appears to be a relatively potent inducer of microsomal metabolism.

  12. Induction and Repression of Amidase Enzymes in Aspergillus nidulans

    PubMed Central

    Hynes, M. J.

    1970-01-01

    Aspergillus nidulans can grow on acetamide as both a carbon and nitrogen source and can also grow on formamide as a nitrogen source. Two distinct enzymes, an acetamidase and a formamidase, are produced. The control of the synthesis of these two enzymes in a wild-type strain was investigated. The formamidase is induced by acetamide and formamide and repressed by ammonia. The acetamidase is induced by formamide and acetamide, repressed by carbon metabolites derived from glucose and acetate, and repressed by ammonia. Repression of the acetamidase by ammonia depends on the carbon source; growth on glucose but not on acetate or acetamide allows repression to occur. The pattern of acetamidase repression is compared with that of histidine catabolic enzymes in various bacteria. PMID:5432013

  13. Proof of de novo synthesis of the qa enzymes of Neurospora crassa during induction

    PubMed Central

    Reinert, William R.; Giles, Norman H.

    1977-01-01

    In Neurospora crassa three inducible enzymes are necessary to catabolize quinic acid to protocatechuic acid. The three genes encoding these enzymes are tightly linked on chromosome VII near methionine-7 (me-7). This qa cluster includes a fourth gene, qa-1, which encodes a regulatory protein apparently exerting positive control over transcription of the other three qa genes. However, an alternative hypothesis is that the qa-1 protein simply activates preformed polypeptides derived from the three structural genes. The use of density labeling with D2O demonstrated conclusively that the qa enzymes are synthesized de novo only during induction on quinic acid. Native catabolic dehydroquinase (5-dehydroquinate dehydratase; 5-dehydroquinate hydro-lyase, EC 4.2.1.10) (a homopolymer of ca 22 identical subunits) has a density of 1.2790 g/cm3 as determined by centrifugation in a modified cesium chloride density gradient. Growth in H2O followed by induction in 95% D2O shifts the density of the enzyme to 1.3130 g/cm3, indicating de novo synthesis during induction. In the reciprocal experiment, i.e., growth in 80% D2O followed by induction in either 95% D2O or H2O, the densities of catabolic dehydroquinase were 1.3135 and 1.2800 g/cm3, respectively. Because growth on D2O does not affect the density of the H2O-induced enzyme, there can be no significant synthesis of catabolic dehydroquinase prior to induction. Similar results were obtained for a second qa enzyme, quinate dehydrogenase (quinate:NAD+ oxidoreductase, EC 1.1.1.24). Thus, induction of two qa enzymes involves de novo protein synthesis, not enzyme activation or assembly. PMID:144915

  14. Introduction to hepatic drug metabolizing enzyme induction in drug safety evaluation studies.

    PubMed

    Botts, Suzanne; Ennulat, Daniela; Francke-Carroll, Sabine; Graham, Mark; Maronpot, Robert R; Mohutsky, Michael

    2010-08-01

    The following three articles represent the output of a combined effort initiated by the Scientific Regulatory Policy Committee of the Society of Toxicologic Pathology to provide a unified review of current scientific practices and relevant literature and provide suggestions regarding the recognition, interpretation, and risk assessment of hepatic drug metabolizing enzyme (DME) induction studies. The core objective was to provide a review that the scientific community including pathologists, regulatory scientists, toxicologists, investigative scientists, and others would find valuable for managing, designing, and interpreting toxicity studies supporting regulatory filings. Three working groups composed of scientists from industry, academia, and regulatory agencies were convened to review the available literature on important aspects of the interpretation and risk assessment of hepatic microsomal DME enzyme induction in three publications. The three reviews are as follows: "Effects of Hepatic Drug Metabolizing Enzyme Induction on Clinical Pathology Parameters in Animals and Man," Toxicol Pathol "Hepatic Drug Metabolizing Enzyme Induction: Microscopic and Ultrastructural Appearance," Toxicol Pathol "Hepatic Drug Metabolizing Enzyme Induction and Implications for Preclinical and Clinical Risk Assessment," Toxicol Pathol The purpose of this introduction is not to summarize the articles but rather to frame the series and to provide a common mechanistic introduction.

  15. Prostate Cancer Prevention Through Induction of Phase 2 Enzymes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-04-01

    enzymes. During our Phase I Award, we identified sulforaphane as the most potent inducer of carcinogen defenses in the prostate cell. We have...characterized global effects of sulforaphane in prostate cancer cell lines using cDNA microarray technology that allows large-scale determination of changes...of sulforaphane ) and decreased risk of prostate cancer. These findings argue strongly for a preventive intervention trial involving supplementation

  16. Prostate Cancer Prevention Through Induction of Phase 2 Enzymes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-10-01

    hypothesis. We have identified sulforaphane , a dietary isothiocyanate found in cucifers, as the most potent phase 2 enzyme inducing agent in human prostate...cancer cell lines compared to over 50 other compounds screened in our laboratory. Sulforaphane readily induced increased expression of quinone...characterizing global changes in mRNA expression for nearly 10,000 genes simultaneously using cDNA microarrays after treatment of prostate cells with sulforaphane

  17. Patterns Cancer Prevention Through Induction of Phase 2 Enzymes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-04-01

    2) enzymes. During our Phase I Award, we identified sulforaphane as the most potent inducer of carcinogen defenses in the prostate cell. We have...characterized global effects of sulforaphane in prostate cancer cell lines using cDNA microarray technology that allows large-scale determination of...changes in gene expression. These findings argue strongly for a preventive intervention trial involving with sulforaphane . During our Phase 2 Award, we used

  18. Relevance of induction of human drug-metabolizing enzymes: pharmacological and toxicological implications

    PubMed Central

    PARK, B. K.; KITTERINGHAM, N. R.; PIRMOHAMED, M.; TUCKER, G. T.

    1996-01-01

    1Human drug-metabolizing systems can be induced, or activated, by a large number of exogenous agents including drugs, alcohol, components in the diet and cigarette smoke, as well as by endogenous factors. 2Such perturbation of enzyme activity undoubtedly contributes to both intra- and inter-individual variation both with respect to the rate and route of metabolism for a particular drug. Induction may, in theory, either attenuate the pharmacological response or exacerbate the toxicity of a particular drug, or both. 3The clinical impact of enzyme induction will depend upon the number of different enzyme isoforms affected and the magnitude of the inductive response within an individual, and also on the therapeutic indices of the affected substrates. 4The toxicological implications will be determined either by any change in the route of metabolism, or by a disturbance of the balance between activation and detoxication processes, which may be isozyme selective. PMID:8799511

  19. On the mechanisms of induction of cancer-protective enzymes: a unifying proposal.

    PubMed Central

    Prochaska, H J; De Long, M J; Talalay, P

    1985-01-01

    Induction of detoxification enzymes is a major mechanism whereby a wide variety of chemical agents protect rodents against neoplastic, mutagenic, and other toxicities of carcinogens. The enzyme NAD(P)H:(quinone acceptor) oxidoreductase (EC 1.6.99.2) can protect against the toxicities of quinones and is a useful marker for protective enzyme induction. Quinone reductase can be induced in murine Hepa 1c1c7 hepatoma cells and 3T3 embryo fibroblasts by compounds that are chemoprotectors in vivo, including some phenolic antioxidants, azo dyes, aromatic diamines, and aminophenols. Structurally dissimilar catechols (1,2-diphenols) and hydroquinones (1,4-diphenols) induce quinone reductase in these systems, but resorcinol (1,3-diphenol) and its substituted analogues are inactive. Furthermore, only aromatic 1,2- and 1,4-diamines and aminophenols are inducers, whereas the 1,3-diamines are completely inactive. These findings suggest that the functional capacity to form quinones or quinone-diimines, rather than the precise structure, is essential for inductive activity and that the generation of the signal for enzyme induction depends upon oxidation-reduction lability. The observations that some chemoprotective compounds (e.g., azo dyes, beta-naphthoflavone) induce both cytochromes P-450 and quinone reductase, whereas others (e.g., tert-butylhydroquinone) induce only quinone reductase, can be reconciled by the fact that inducers of the first type are metabolized by P-450 enzymes to form products that are functionally similar to compounds of the second type. PMID:3934671

  20. Effect of enzyme induction on bioavailability of hetacillin in patients treated with anticonvulsants and chlorpromazine.

    PubMed

    Galanopoulou, P; Karageorgiou, C; Dimakopoulou, K

    1990-01-01

    The effect of liver enzyme induction on bioavailability of hetacillin was studied in patients chronically treated with anticonvulsants or chlorpromazine. 24 chronic psychiatric patients classified according to their medication in two groups (anticonvulsants, chlorpromazine) and one group of 11 healthy volunteers, received an i.m. administration of 500 mg hetacillin. Serum levels of ampicillin derived from hetacillin in blood samples taken 2, 4 and 6 hours after the injection were measured and the half-life of the antibiotic was determined for each group. Urinary D-glucaric acid was considered the induction index. Correlation coefficients between the induction index and pharmacokinetic parameters of hetacillin were also determined. Anticonvulsants and chlorpromazine induced the liver microsomal enzymes as demonstrated by the increased D-glucaric acid excretion (P less than 0.001 - P less than 0.05). No statistically significant differences were found in serum levels and half-life of the antibiotic. Correlation coefficients suggest that enzyme induction and hetacillin bioavailability are not significantly related.

  1. Quantitative Site-Specific Phosphoproteomics of Trichoderma reesei Signaling Pathways upon Induction of Hydrolytic Enzyme Production.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Elizabeth V; Imanishi, Susumu Y; Haapaniemi, Pekka; Yadav, Avinash; Saloheimo, Markku; Corthals, Garry L; Pakula, Tiina M

    2016-02-05

    The filamentous fungus Trichoderma reesei is used for industrial production of secreted enzymes including carbohydrate active enzymes, such as cellulases and hemicellulases. The production of many of these enzymes by T. reesei is influenced by the carbon source it grows on, where the regulation system controlling hydrolase genes involves various signaling pathways. T. reesei was cultivated in the presence of sorbitol, a carbon source that does not induce the production of cellulases and hemicellulases, and then exposed to either sophorose or spent-grain extract, which are efficient inducers of the enzyme production. Specific changes at phosphorylation sites were investigated in relation to the production of cellulases and hemicellulases using an MS-based framework. Proteome-wide phosphorylation following carbon source exchange was investigated in the early stages of induction: 0, 2, 5, and 10 min. The workflow involved sequential trypsin digestion, TiO2 enrichment, and MS analysis using a Q Exactive mass spectrometer. We report on the identification and quantitation of 1721 phosphorylation sites. Investigation of the data revealed a complex signaling network activated upon induction involving components related to light-mediated cellulase induction, osmoregulation, and carbon sensing. Changes in protein phosphorylation were detected in the glycolytic pathway, suggesting an inhibition of glucose catabolism at 10 min after the addition of sophorose and as early as 2 min after the addition of spent-grain extract. Differential phosphorylation of factors related to carbon storage, intracellular trafficking, cytoskeleton, and cellulase gene regulation were also observed.

  2. Effects of doxylamine succinate on thyroid hormone balance and enzyme induction in mice.

    PubMed

    Bookstaff, R C; Murphy, V A; Skare, J A; Minnema, D; Sanzgiri, U; Parkinson, A

    1996-12-01

    The effects of doxylamine (as the succinate salt) on microsomal enzyme activity and serum thyroid hormone levels were examined in B6C3F1 mice following dietary exposure for 7 or 15 days (0, 40, 375, 750, or 1500 ppm in diet, expressed as free base doxylamine). In addition, the hepatic P450 enzyme inducer sodium phenobarbital (375 ppm, expressed as free acid phenobarbital) was used as a positive control for CYP2B induction. Exposure of mice to doxylamine produced dose-related increases in liver weight at both time points. Liver weights were also increased in the phenobarbital-treated mice. Doxylamine treatment caused a dose-dependent increase (up to 2.6-fold) in liver microsomal cytochrome P450 in both male and female mice, at both time points. Analyses of the activities of various hepatic microsomal cytochromes P450 indicated that doxylamine caused a marked induction of CYP2B enzymes. This was demonstrated by a large increase in the O-dealkylation of 7-pentoxyresorufin (up to 38-fold) and the 16beta-hydroxylation of testosterone (up to 6.9-fold), both of which are indicative of CYP2B induction. In addition, like phenobarbital, doxylamine treatment resulted in a modest induction of CYP3A and CYP2A enzymes and approximately a 50% increase in thyroxine-glucuronosyltransferase activity. Doxylamine did not appear to induce P450 enzymes in the CYP1A, CYP2E, or CYP4A enzyme subfamilies. None of the enzyme-inducing effects of doxylamine could be distinguished from those of phenobarbital. These results suggest that doxylamine is a phenobarbital-type inducer of liver microsomal cytochrome P450 in B6C3F1 mice. Exposure to either doxylamine or phenobarbital also resulted in decreases in serum thyroxine (T4) levels (approximately 80% of control) with compensatory increases in serum thyroid-stimulating hormone levels (approximately 4-fold). No clear changes in serum triiodothyronine levels were apparent. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that doxylamine increases

  3. Induction of Hydrolytic Enzymes in Brassica campestris in Response to Pathovars of Xanthomonas campestris.

    PubMed

    Conrads-Strauch, J; Dow, J M; Milligan, D E; Parra, R; Daniels, M J

    1990-05-01

    Inoculation of mature leaves of turnip (Brassica campestris) with the incompatible Xanthomonas campestris pv vitians resulted in the induction of beta-1,3-glucanase and chitinase/lysozyme (CHL) activity. No increase in the basal activity of beta-1,3-glucanase was observed after inoculation of leaves with heat- or rifampicin-killed X. c. vitians, Escherichia coli, or sterile water. Inoculation with the compatible X. campestris pv campestris resulted in a slower induction of glucanase than that seen with X. c. vitians. In contrast, all bacteria caused an induction of CHL activity. One major beta-1,3-glucanase (molecular mass 36.5 kilodaltons, isoelectric point [pl] ~8.5) was purified from both inoculated and untreated leaves by ion-exchange chromatography. The enzyme degraded laminarin by an endo-glycolytic mechanism. Two major CHL isozymes (CHL 1 and CHL 2, molecular mass 30 kilodaltons and pl 9.4 and 10.2, respectively) were purified from X. c. vitians inoculated leaves by affinity chromatography on a chitin column followed by ion-exchange chromatography. Both enzymes degraded chitin by an endo-glycolytic mechanism although the ratio of lysozyme to chitinase specific activities for CHL 1 and CHL2 were different. The induction of CHL 1 was associated with the hypersensitive reaction caused by X. c. vitians whereas all other treatments induced largely CHL 2.

  4. Dose responses for Colletotrichum lindemuthianum elicitor-mediated enzyme induction in French bean cell suspension cultures.

    PubMed

    Dixon, R A; Dey, P M; Murphy, D L; Whitehead, I M

    1981-03-01

    The induction of L-phenylalanine ammonialyase (PAL, EC 4.3.1.5) and flavanone synthase in French bean cell suspension cultures in response to heat-released elicitor from cell walls of the phytopathogenic fungus Colletotrichum lindemuthianum is highly dependent upon elicitor concentration. The elicitor dose-response curve for PAL induction shows two maxima at around 17.5 and 50 μg elicitor carbohydrate per ml culture, whereas the flavanone synthase response shows one maximum at around 100 μg ml(-1). The PAL response is independent of the elicitor concentration present during the lag phase of enzyme induction; if the initial elicitor concentration is increased after 2 h by addition of extra elicitor, or decreased by dilution of the cultures, the dose response curves obtained reflect the concentration of elicitor present at the time of harvest. PAL induction is not prevented by addition of methyl sugar derivatives to the cultures; α-methyl-D-glucoside, itself a weak elicitor of PAL activity, elicits a multiphasic PAL response when increasing concentrations are added in the presence of Colletotrichum elicitor. Eight fractions with different monosaccharide compositions, obtained from the crude elicitor by gel-filtration, each elicit different dose-responses for PAL induction; the response to unfractionated elicitor is not the sum of the response to the isolated fractions. There is no correlation between the ability of the fractions to induce PAL in the cultures and their ability to act as elicitors of isoflavonoid phytoalexin accumulation in bean hypocotyls.

  5. Thai Fruits Exhibit Antioxidant Activity and Induction of Antioxidant Enzymes in HEK-293 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Anantachoke, Natthinee; Lomarat, Pattamapan; Praserttirachai, Wasin; Khammanit, Ruksinee

    2016-01-01

    The cellular antioxidant enzymes play the important role of protecting the cells and organisms from the oxidative damage. Natural antioxidants contained in fruits have attracted considerable interest because of their presumed safety and potential nutritional value. Even though antioxidant activities of many fruits have been reported, the effects of phytochemicals contained in fruits on the induction of antioxidant enzymes in the cells have not been fully defined. In this study, we showed that extracts from Antidesma ghaesembilla, Averrhoa bilimbi, Malpighia glabra, Mangifera indica, Sandoricum koetjape, Syzygium malaccense, and Ziziphus jujuba inhibited H2O2-induced intracellular reactive oxygen species production in HEK-293 cells. Additionally, these Thai fruit extracts increased the mRNA and protein expressions of antioxidant enzymes, catalase, glutathione peroxidase-1, and manganese superoxide dismutase. The consumption of Thai fruits rich in phenolic compounds may reduce the risk of oxidative stress. PMID:28074103

  6. Thai Fruits Exhibit Antioxidant Activity and Induction of Antioxidant Enzymes in HEK-293 Cells.

    PubMed

    Anantachoke, Natthinee; Lomarat, Pattamapan; Praserttirachai, Wasin; Khammanit, Ruksinee; Mangmool, Supachoke

    2016-01-01

    The cellular antioxidant enzymes play the important role of protecting the cells and organisms from the oxidative damage. Natural antioxidants contained in fruits have attracted considerable interest because of their presumed safety and potential nutritional value. Even though antioxidant activities of many fruits have been reported, the effects of phytochemicals contained in fruits on the induction of antioxidant enzymes in the cells have not been fully defined. In this study, we showed that extracts from Antidesma ghaesembilla, Averrhoa bilimbi, Malpighia glabra, Mangifera indica, Sandoricum koetjape, Syzygium malaccense, and Ziziphus jujuba inhibited H2O2-induced intracellular reactive oxygen species production in HEK-293 cells. Additionally, these Thai fruit extracts increased the mRNA and protein expressions of antioxidant enzymes, catalase, glutathione peroxidase-1, and manganese superoxide dismutase. The consumption of Thai fruits rich in phenolic compounds may reduce the risk of oxidative stress.

  7. The quantitative prediction of in vivo enzyme-induction caused by drug exposure from in vitro information on human hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Kato, Motohiro; Chiba, Koji; Horikawa, Masato; Sugiyama, Yuichi

    2005-08-01

    There have been no reports of the quantitative prediction of induction for drug-metabolizing enzymes in humans. We have tried to predict such enzyme induction in humans from in vitro data obtained using human hepatocytes. The in vitro and in vivo data on enzyme induction by inducers, such as rifampicin, phenobarbital and omeprazole, were collected from the published literature. The degree of enzyme induction in humans was compared with that predicted from in vitro data on human hepatocytes. Using the in vivo data, we calculated the hepatic intrinsic clearance of typical CYP substrates, such as midazolam and caffeine, before and after inducer treatment and estimated the induction ratios of hepatic intrinsic clearance following treatment. In the in vitro studies, the amount of mRNA or enzyme and enzyme activity in human hepatocytes, with or without an inducer, were compared and the induction ratios were estimated. The unbound mean concentration was taken as an index of drug exposure and the induction ratios in the in vivo and in vitro studies were compared. The unbound mean concentrations of inducers used in the in vitro studies were higher than those in the in vivo studies. The maximum induction ratios by inducers in the in vitro studies were higher than those in the in vivo studies. The induction ratio for rifampicin, omeprazole, troglitazone, dexamethasone and phenobarbital increased as the unbound mean concentration increased to reach a constant value. The induction of CYP3A and 1A was analyzed by the Emax model. The maximum induction ratio (Emax) and the concentration at half maximum induction (EC50) for rifampicin, omeprazole, troglitazone, dexamethasone and phenobarbital were 12.3, 0.847 micromol/L, 2.36, 0.225 micromol/L, 6.86, 0.002 micromol/L, 8.30, 9.32 micromol/L, and 7.62, 58.4 micromol/L, respectively. The Emax and EC50 of omeprazole for CYP1A were 12.02 and 0.075 micromol/L, respectively. The predicted induction ratio of all those inducers, except for

  8. Hepatocytes cultured in alginate microspheres: an optimized technique to study enzyme induction.

    PubMed

    Ringel, M; von Mach, M A; Santos, R; Feilen, P J; Brulport, M; Hermes, M; Bauer, A W; Schormann, W; Tanner, B; Schön, M R; Oesch, F; Hengstler, J G

    2005-01-05

    An important application of hepatocyte cultures is identification of drugs acting as inducers of biotransformation enzymes that alter metabolic clearance of other therapeutic agents. In the present study we optimized an in vitro system with hepatocytes cultured in alginate microspheres that allow studies of enzyme induction with excellent sensitivity. Induction factors obtained with standard inducers, such as 3-methylcholanthrene or phenobarbital, were higher compared to those with conventional hepatocyte co-cultures on collagen coated dishes. This is illustrated by activities of 7-ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase (EROD) after incubation with 5 microM 3-methylcholanthrene (3-MC), a standard inducer for cytochrome P4501A1 and 1A2. Mean activities for solvent controls and 3-MC exposed cells were 2.99 and 449 pmol/min/mg protein (induction factor: 150) for hepatocytes cultured in microspheres compared to 2.72 and 80.6 pmol/min/mg (induction factor: 29.6) for hepatocytes on collagen coated dishes. To compare these in vitro data to the in vivo situation male Sprague Dawley rats, the same strain that was used also for the in vitro studies, were exposed to 3-MC in vivo using a protocol that guarantees maximal induction. Activities were 29.2 and 1656 pmol/min/mg in liver homogenate of solvent and 3-MC treated animals (induction factor: 56.7). Thus, the absolute activities of 3-MC exposed hepatocytes in microspheres are lower compared to the in vivo situation. However, the induction factor in vitro was even higher compared to the in vivo situation (150-fold versus 56.7-fold). A similar scenario was observed using phenobarbital (0.75 mM) for induction of CYP2B and 3A isoenzymes: induction factors for testosterone hydroxylation in position 16beta were 127.5- and 50.4-fold for hepatocytes in microspheres and conventionally cultured hepatocytes, respectively. The new in vitro system with hepatocytes embedded in solid alginate microspheres offers several technical advantages: (i

  9. Toxicity and microsomal enzyme induction effects of several polybrominated biphenyls of Firemaster.

    PubMed

    Dannan, G A; Sleight, S D; Aust, S D

    1982-01-01

    Some toxicological and pharmacological effects of 2,4,5,2',5'-penta- (congener 1), 2,3,4,2',4',5'-hexa- (congener 5), 2,4,5,3',4',5'-hexa- (congener 6), 2,3,4,5,3',4',-hexa- (congener 7), and 2,3,4,5,2',3',4'-heptabromobiphenyl (congener 9) were evaluated in male rats given a single 90 mg/kg ip injection and killed seven days later. Only congener 7 depressed body weight gain, spleen and thymus weights, and caused severe histopathological changes in the thymus. Congener 7 caused the largest increase in liver weight and the most changes in liver pathology while congener 1 failed to enlarge this organ and caused the mildest ultrastructural changes. Liver microsomes were isolated and evaluated for enzyme induction from all treated rats except those administered congener 6, which was previously identified as a mixed-type enzyme inducer (Dannan et al., 1978b). All congeners increased the liver microsomal cytochrome P-450 content, but only congener 7 shifted the carbon monoxide difference spectrum absorption maximum to 448.0 nm. The microsomal ethyl isocyanide difference spectrum 455/430 nm ratio was increased the most by congener 7 (3 fold). All congeners increased cytochrome P-450 reductase and microsomal epoxide hydrase activities by nearly 1.5-3 fold. Congener 7 failed to induce aminopyrine-N-demethylase activity but the remaining congeners increased it by 2 fold. Congener 7 was the most effective inducer of benzo[a]pyrene hydroxylase and p-nitrophenol UDP-glucuronyl transferase. These results add to the suggestion that the presence of an ortho halogen on a polyhalogenated biphenyl does not completely abolish toxicity or 3-methylcholanthrene-type microsomal enzyme induction.

  10. Induction of drug metabolizing enzymes in polybrominated biphenyl-fed lactating rats and their pups.

    PubMed

    Moore, R W; Dannan, G A; Aust, S D

    1978-04-01

    Polybrominated biphenyls (PBBs) cause a mixed-type (phenobarbital- plus 3-methylcholanthrene-like) induction of liver microsomal drug metabolizing enzymes in rats. However, 2,2',4,4',5,5'-hexabromobiphenyl and 2,2',3,4,4',5,5'-heptabromobiphenyl, which together comprise less than 80% of PBBs (FireMaster), were shown to be strictly phenobarbital-type inducers. Other components (unidentified) must therefore cause the 3-methylcholanthrene-like effects. The potential for PBBs to exert effects on neonates through milk was examined. Lactating rats were fed 0, 0.1, 1.0, or 10 ppm FireMaster for the 18 days following delivery, at which time mothers and most pups were sacrificed. Pups nursing from mothers fed 10 ppm PBBs showed significant increases in liver weights and microsomal protein, and both mothers and pups had increased cytochrome P-450, aminopyrine demethylation, benzo[a]pyrene hydroxylation, and UDP-glucuronyltransferase. Pups nursing from rats fed 1.0 ppm had increases in microsomal protein, cytochrome P-450, aminopyrine demethylation, and benzo[a]pyrene hydroxylation, while their mothers were unaffected. Several pups from the 0, 0.1, and 1.0 ppm groups were maintained on their mother's diets, raised, and allowed to mate. Their pups showed much the same responses to PBBs as did the original group of pups. The effects on both generations of adult female rats were also comparable. PBBs cause a mixed-type induction in both lactating rats and their nursing pups; PBB components responsible for both aspects of this induction must be transmitted through milk. Nursing rats are approximately tenfold more sensitive to the effects of PBBs in their mother's diets than are the dams. The approximate no-effect level for microsomal induction in nursing rats is 0.1 ppm PBBs in the diet of the adult.

  11. Cistanche tubulosa ethanol extract mediates rat sex hormone levels by induction of testicular steroidgenic enzymes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tian; Chen, Chen; Yang, Man; Deng, Baiwan; Kirby, Gordon Michael; Zhang, Xiaoying

    2016-01-01

    Plants of the genus Cistanche Hoffmg. et Link (Orobanchaceae) are usually used as ethno-medicine in Eastern Asia. Pharmacology studies have shown that Cistanche possesses an androgen-like effect; however, the exact mechanism is unclear. The present study determines the effect of ethanol extract of Cistanche tubulosa (Schenk) R. Wight stem (CTE) on hormone levels and testicular steroidogenic enzymes in rats. Phenylethanoid glycoside content of CTE was detected by UV spectrophotometry. Rats were fed with different doses of CTE (0.2, 0.4, and 0.8 g/kg) by intragastric administration for 20 d. Sperm parameters were measured by staining and counting method. The level of progesterone and testosterone in serum was quantified by radioimmunoassay. The expression levels of cholesterol side-chain cleavage enzyme (CYP11A1), 17α-hydroxylase/17, 20-lyase (CYP17A1), and a liver metabolic enzyme (CYP3A4) in the microsome were assessed by immunohistochemical staining or/and western blot analysis. The study illustrates that the administration of CTE (0.4 and 0.8 g/kg) increased sperm count (2.3- and 2.7-folds) and sperm motility (1.3- and 1.4-folds) and decreased the abnormal sperm (0.76- and 0.6-folds). The serum level of progesterone and testosterone in rats was also increased by CTE administration (p < 0.05). Results of immunohistochemistry and western blot analysis confirmed that the expression of CYP11A1, CYP17A1, and CYP3A4 was enhanced by CTE (p < 0.05). It was also found that high-dose of CTE can cause mild hepatic edema. Our results suggest that the increase in sex hormone levels could be mediated by the induction of testicular steroidogenic enzymes.

  12. Metabolic changes in elicitor-treated bean cells. Selectivity of enzyme induction in relation to phytoalexin accumulation.

    PubMed

    Robbins, M P; Bolwell, G P; Dixon, R A

    1985-05-02

    Treatment of cell suspension cultures of Phaseolus vulgaris c.v. Immuna with an elicitor preparation heat-released from the cell walls of the phytopathogenic fungus Colletotrichum lindemuthianum resulted in rapid accumulation of the prenylated 5-hydroxyisoflavanone phytoalexin kievitone followed by later accumulation of the pterocarpan-derived phytoalexin phaseollin. Kievitone formation was preceded by rapid transient increases in the extractable activities of the enzymes L-phenylalanine ammonia-lyase and chalcone synthase. The extractable activities of 15 enzymes were measured in the cell cultures during the period of kievitone accumulation. The results suggest a highly selective induction of enzymes associated directly with the phytoalexin pathway. No induction of enzymes of pathways diverging from or providing substrates for the phenylpropanoid----isoflavonoid pathway was observed. The increase in glutamate dehydrogenase activity in control cultures was prevented by elicitor application. A comparison of enzyme activities in control and Colletotrichum-infected bean hypocotyls provided further evidence of the selective induction of enzymes of phytoalexin synthesis, although peroxidase, glutamate dehydrogenase and glutamate synthase activities were higher in infected than in healthy hypocotyls. It is concluded that the major enzymic changes occurring in elicitor-treated bean cells are probably those directly associated with defence mechanisms such as the formation of isoflavonoid phytoalexins (this paper) or accumulation of phenolic compounds and hydroxyproline-protein in the cell walls [Bolwell, G. P. et al. (1985) Eur. J. Biochem. 148, 571-578].

  13. Successful immune tolerance induction to enzyme replacement therapy in CRIM-negative infantile Pompe disease

    PubMed Central

    Messinger, Yoav H.; Mendelsohn, Nancy J.; Rhead, William; Dimmock, David; Hershkovitz, Eli; Champion, Michael; Jones, Simon A.; Olson, Rebecca; White, Amy; Wells, Cara; Bali, Deeksha; Case, Laura E.; Young, Sarah P.; Rosenberg, Amy S.; Kishnani, Priya S.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Infantile Pompe disease resulting from a deficiency of lysosomal acid α-glucosidase (GAA) requires enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) with recombinant human GAA (rhGAA). Cross-reactive immunologic material negative (CRIM-negative) Pompe patients develop high-titer antibody to the rhGAA and do poorly. We describe successful tolerance induction in CRIM-negative patients. Methods Two CRIM-negative patients with preexisting anti-GAA antibodies were treated therapeutically with rituximab, methotrexate, and gammaglobulins. Two additional CRIM-negative patients were treated prophylactically with a short course of rituximab and methotrexate, in parallel with initiating rhGAA. Results In both patients treated therapeutically, anti-rhGAA was eliminated after 3 and 19 months. All four patients are immune tolerant to rhGAA, off immune therapy, showing B-cell recovery while continuing to receive ERT at ages 36 and 56 months (therapeutic) and 18 and 35 months (prophylactic). All patients show clinical response to ERT, in stark contrast to the rapid deterioration of their nontolerized CRIM-negative counterparts. Conclusion The combination of rituximab with methotrexate ± intravenous gammaglobulins (IVIG) is an option for tolerance induction of CRIM-negative Pompe to ERT when instituted in the naïve setting or following antibody development. It should be considered in other conditions in which antibody response to the therapeutic protein elicits robust antibody response that interferes with product efficacy. PMID:22237443

  14. Glucose is essential for proliferation and the glycolytic enzyme induction that provokes a transition to glycolytic energy production.

    PubMed

    Greiner, E F; Guppy, M; Brand, K

    1994-12-16

    A transition from aerobic to anaerobic metabolism occurs as mitogen-activated thymocytes undergo proliferation. Glucose utilization and lactate formation increases 18- and 38-fold, respectively, during proliferation. The absolute amount of 14CO2 production by pyruvate dehydrogenase remains constant, while 14CO2 production by the tricarboxylic acid cycle is reduced during transition from a resting to a proliferating state. Addition of 2,4-dinitrophenol, an agent uncoupling oxidative phosphorylation, and phenacinemethosulfate, an electron acceptor, provide evidence that the reduction of glucose oxidation in proliferating thymocytes is caused neither by limitation of the tricarboxylic acid cycle itself nor by an insufficient supply of ADP. Our data suggest that enhanced cytosolic regeneration of NAD+ by induction of the glycolytic enzymes during proliferation effectively competes with NADH transport and its subsequent oxidation in the mitochondria. Mitogen-stimulated rat thymocytes cultured in a conventional medium containing glucose induce their glycolytic enzymes 8-10-fold in the S phase of the cell cycle and divide within a culture period of 72 h. Replacement of glucose by glutamine, glutamine and ribose, or glutamine and uridine prevents glycolytic enzyme induction and thymocyte proliferation. The effect of glucose on glycolytic enzyme induction cannot be mimicked by 3-O-methylglucose or 2-deoxyglucose. In conclusion, glucose is required for proliferation and the glycolytic enzyme induction that mediates the transition from oxidative to glycolytic energy production during the G1/S transition of rat thymocytes.

  15. Induction and inhibition of cytochrome P450 and drug-metabolizing enzymes by climbazole.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Yasuna; Suzuki, Michiya; Ohshiro, Naomi; Sunagawa, Takashi; Sasaki, Tadanori; Oguro, Takiko; Tokuyama, Shogo; Yamamoto, Toshinori; Yoshida, Takemi

    2002-01-01

    To determine the effect of climbazole on hepatic microsomal cytochrome P450 (P450) and drug-metabolizing enzymes, four different P450 isoforms (CYP2B1, 3A2, 2E1, and 2C12) were examined in female Long-Evans rats. Treatment of rats with climbazole resulted in the induction of P450 content. Climbazole both induced and inhibited aminopyrine N-demethylase activity, but not erythromycin N-demethylase activity. Uridine 5'-phosphate (UDP)-glucuronosyl transferase and glutathione S-transferase activities were also increased with climbazole treatment. Immunoblot analyses revealed that climbazole induces CYP2B1 and CYP3A2 at the lower dose examined, but it failed to increase CYP2B1 at the higher dose. Northern blot analysis revealed that climbazole markedly increases P450 2B1 mRNA. These results indicate that climbazole induces and inhibits P450-dependent drug-metabolizing enzymes in vivo and may have the dose-differential effect on CYP2B1 in rat liver.

  16. Induction of hepatic cytochrome P450 enzymes: methods, mechanisms, recommendations, and in vitro-in vivo correlations.

    PubMed

    Hewitt, N J; Lecluyse, E L; Ferguson, S S

    2007-01-01

    Induction of drug-clearance pathways (Phase 1 and 2 enzymes and transporters) can have important clinical consequences. Inducers can (1) increase the clearance of other drugs, resulting in a decreased therapeutic effect, (2) increase the activation of pro-drugs, causing an alteration in their efficacy and pharmacokinetics, and (3) increase the bioactivation of drugs that contribute to hepatotoxicity via reactive intermediates. Nuclear receptors are key mediators of drug-induced changes in the expression of drug-clearance pathways. However, species differences in nuclear receptor activation make the prediction of cytochrome P450 (CYP) induction in humans from data derived from animal models problematic. Thus, in vitro human-relevant model systems are increasingly used to evaluate enzyme induction. In this review, the authors' current understanding of the mechanisms of enzyme induction and the in vitro methods for assessing the induction potential of new drugs will be discussed. Relevant issues and considerations surrounding proper study design and the interpretation of in vitro results will be discussed in light of the current US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recommendations.

  17. In vitro inhibition and induction of human liver cytochrome p450 enzymes by milnacipran.

    PubMed

    Paris, Brandy L; Ogilvie, Brian W; Scheinkoenig, Julie A; Ndikum-Moffor, Florence; Gibson, Remi; Parkinson, Andrew

    2009-10-01

    Milnacipran (Savella) inhibits both norepinephrine and serotonin reuptake and is distinguished by a nearly 3-fold greater potency in inhibiting norepinephrine reuptake in vitro compared with serotonin. We evaluated the ability of milnacipran to inhibit and induce human cytochrome P450 enzymes in vitro. In human liver microsomes, milnacipran did not inhibit CYP1A2, 2B6, 2C8, 2C9, 2C19, or 2D6 (IC(50) >or= 100 microM); whereas, a comparator with dual reuptake properties [duloxetine (Cymbalta)] inhibited CYP2D6 (IC(50) = 7 microM) and CYP2B6 (IC(50) = 15 microM) with a relatively high potency. Milnacipran inhibited CYP3A4/5 in a substrate-dependent manner (i.e., midazolam 1'-hydroxylation IC(50) approximately 30 microM; testosterone 6beta-hydroxylation IC(50) approximately 100 microM); whereas, duloxetine inhibited both CYP3A4/5 activities with equal potency (IC(50) = 37 and 38 microM, respectively). Milnacipran produced no time-dependent inhibition (<10%) of P450 activity, whereas duloxetine produced time-dependent inhibition of CYP1A2, 2B6, 2C19, and 3A4/5. To evaluate P450 induction, freshly isolated human hepatocytes (n = 3) were cultured and treated once daily for 3 days with milnacipran (3, 10, and 30 microM), after which microsomal P450 activities were measured. Whereas positive controls (omeprazole, phenobarbital, and rifampin) caused anticipated P450 induction, milnacipran had minimal effect on CYP1A2, 2C8, 2C9, or 2C19 activity. The highest concentration of milnacipran (30 microM; >10 times plasma C(max)) produced 2.6- and 2.2-fold increases in CYP2B6 and CYP3A4/5 activity (making it 26 and 34% as effective as phenobarbital and rifampin, respectively). Given these results, milnacipran is not expected to cause clinically significant P450 inhibition or induction.

  18. Polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) induction of CYP3A4 enzyme activity in healthy Faroese adults

    SciTech Connect

    Petersen, Maria Skaalum Halling, Jonrit; Damkier, Per; Nielsen, Flemming; Grandjean, Philippe; Weihe, Pal; Brosen, Kim

    2007-10-15

    The CYP3A4 enzyme is, along with other cytochrome P450 enzymes, involved in the metabolism of environmental pollutants and is highly inducible by these substances. A commercial polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) mixture, 1,1,1,-trichloro-2-(o-chlorophenyl), 2-(p'-chlorophenyl)ethane (o,p'-DDT) and 1,1,-dichloro-2,2-bis (p-chlorophenyl)ethene (p,p'-DDE) are known to induce CYP3A4 activity through activation of nuclear receptors, such as the pregnane X receptor. However, this induction of CYP3A4 has not yet been investigated in humans. Thus, the aim of the study was to determine the variability of the CYP3A4 phenotype in regard to increased concentrations of PCBs and other persistent organohalogen pollutants (POPs) in healthy Faroese adults. In 310 randomly selected Faroese residents aged 18-60 years, the CYP3A4 activity was determined based on the urinary 6{beta}-hydroxycortisol/cortisol (6{beta}-OHC/FC) ratio. POP exposures were assessed by measuring their concentrations in serum lipid. The results showed a unimodal distribution of the 6{beta}-OHC/FC ratio with values ranging from 0.58 to 27.38. Women had a slightly higher 6{beta}-OHC/FC ratio than men (p = 0.07). Confounder-adjusted multiple regression analysis showed significant associations between 6{beta}-OHC/FC ratios and {sigma}PCB, PCB-TEQ and p,p'-DDE, o,p'-DDT and HCB, respectively, but the associations were statistically significant for men only.

  19. Use of mRNA expression to detect the induction of drug metabolising enzymes in rat and human hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Richert, L. Tuschl, G.; Pekthong, D.; Mantion, G.; Weber, J.-C.; Mueller, S.O.

    2009-02-15

    It is important to investigate the induction of cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes by drugs. The most relevant end point is enzyme activity; however, this requires many cells and is low throughput. We have compared the CYP1A, CYP2B and CYP3A induction response to eight inducers in rat and human hepatocytes using enzyme activities (CYP1A2 (ethoxyresorufin), 2B (benzoxyresorufin for rat and bupropion for human) and CYP3A (testosterone)) and Taqman{sup TM} Low Density Array (TLDA) analysis. There was a good correlation between the induction of CYP1A2, CYP2B6 and CYP3A4 enzyme activities and mRNA expression in human hepatocytes. In contrast, BROD activities and mRNA expression in rat hepatocytes correlated poorly. However, bupropion hydroxylation correlated well with Cyp2b1 expression in rat hepatocytes. TLDA analysis of a panel of mRNAs encoding for CYPs, phase 2 enzymes, nuclear receptors and transporters revealed that the main genes induced by the 8 compounds tested were the CYPs. AhR ligands also induced UDP-glucuronosyltransferases and glutathione S-transferases in rat and human hepatocytes. The transporters, MDR1, MDR3 and OATPA were the only transporter genes significantly up-regulated in human hepatocytes. In rat hepatocytes Bsep, Mdr2, Mrp2, Mrp3 and Oatp2 were up-regulated. We could then show a good in vivo:in vitro correlation in the induction response of isolated rat hepatocytes and ex-vivo hepatic microsomes for the drug development candidate, EMD392949. In conclusion, application of TLDA methodology to investigate the potential of compounds to induce enzymes in rat and human hepatocytes increases the throughput and information gained from one assay, without reducing the predictive capacity.

  20. Enhancing bioplastic-substrate interaction via pore induction and directed migration of enzyme location.

    PubMed

    Lele, Bhalchandra S; Papworth, Glenn; Katsemi, Vicky; Rüterjans, Heinz; Martyano, Igor; Klabunde, Kenneth J; Russell, Alan J

    2004-06-20

    We demonstrate two novel approaches to enhance interactions of polymer-immobilized biomolecules with their substrates. In the first approach, diisopropylfluorophosphatase (DFPase) containing poly(urethane) (PU) coatings were made microporous by incorporating, then extracting, poly(ethylene glycol)-based diesters as porogens. Incorporation of 2% w/w porogen increased the effective diffusion coefficient of diisopropylfluorophosphate (DFP) through the coatings by 30% and increased the apparent turnover number of immobilized DFPase 3-fold. In the second approach, prior to immobilization, hydrophobic modification of DFPase was achieved through its conjugation with a dimer/trimer mixture of a uretdione based on 1,6-diisocyanatohexane. When the hydrophobically modified DFPase was immobilized in coatings, catalytic activity was 4-fold higher than that of the equivalent, immobilized, native DFPase. This activity enhancement was independent of the presence or absence of pores. Confocal microscopy images of coatings containing fluorescently labeled lysozyme show that the native enzyme is distributed uniformly over the entire thickness of the coatings. Hydrophobically modified and fluorescently labeled lysozyme is accumulated only in the upper 10 microm cross-sectional layer of a 100 microm-thick coating. Interactions of bioplastics with their substrates are tunable either by pore induction in a polymer or by directed migration of the hydrophobically modified biomolecule to the desired location. The latter approach has broad implications, including overcoming mass transfer limitations experienced by immobilized biocatalysts.

  1. Molecular responses as indicators of marine pollution: DNA damage and enzyme induction in Limanda limanda and Asterias rubens

    SciTech Connect

    Everaarts, J.M.; Sleiderink, H.M.; Besten, P.J. den

    1994-12-01

    During a survey from 26 August through 13 September 1991, specimens of the flatfish, Limanda limanda (dab), and the asteroid echinoderm, Asterias rubens (seastar), were collected at sampling locations along transacts radiating into the North Sea from the coastal zone of The Netherlands. In homogenates of liver tissue from male dab and the digestive gland (pyloric caeca) of female seastar, DNA damage (strand breaks) and induction of the cytochrome P450-dependent monooxygenase system (MO) were determined. Areas could be described with significantly increased percentages of strand breaks (lower integrity) both in dab and seastar. However, enhanced DNA strand breaks did not correspond with contamination gradients, expressed as concentrations of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) or polyaromatic hydrocarbons. MO enzyme induction in the hepatic 13,000g fraction of male dab, measured as 7-ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase activity, was significantly enhanced in response to low ambient temperatures. Some evidence was found for the facilitation of benzo[a]pyrene hydroxylase activity expressing the enzyme induction in the microsomal fraction of pyloric caeca of seastars, at increasing PCB concentrations. DNA integrity and enzyme induction elucidate the physiologic status and might be indicative for ambient impairment within restricted areas, and not necessarily related to the presence of anthropogenic or xeno-biotic substances. 27 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Influence of dietary macronutrients on induction of hepatic drug metabolizing enzymes by Coleus forskohlii extract in mice.

    PubMed

    Yokotani, Kaori; Chiba, Tsuyoshi; Sato, Yoko; Nakanishi, Tomoko; Murata, Masatsune; Umegaki, Keizo

    2013-01-01

    From studies in mice, we have reported that Coleus forskohlii extract (CFE), a popular herbal weight-loss ingredient, markedly induced hepatic drug metabolizing enzymes, especially cytochrome P450 (CYP), and interacted with co-administered drugs. This study was designed to examine how the induction of drug metabolizing enzymes by CFE was influenced by different levels of macronutrients in the diet. Mice were fed a non-purified diet or semi-purified diet with and without CFE (0.3-0.5%) for 14-18 d, and changes in the ratio of liver weight to body weight, an indicator of hepatic CYP induction, and hepatic drug metabolizing enzymes were analyzed. The ratio of liver weight to body weight, content and activities of CYPs, and activity of glutathione S-transferase were higher in a semi-purified standard diet (AIN93G formula) group than in high sucrose (62.9%) and high fat (29.9%) diet groups. Different levels of protein (7%, 20%, and 33%) in the diets did not influence CFE-induced CYP induction or increase the ratio of liver weight to body weight. The effect of CFE on the ratio of liver weight to body weight was higher with a semi-purified diet than with a non-purified diet, and was similar between dietary administration and intragastric gavage when the CFE dose and the diet were the same. There was a positive correlation between CFE-induced CYP induction and the content of starch in the diets, suggesting that dietary starch potentiates CFE-induced CYP induction in mice. The mechanism of enhanced CYP induction remains unclear.

  3. Synergism of thyroid hormone and high carbohydrate diet in the induction of lipogenic enzymes in the rat. Mechanisms and implications.

    PubMed Central

    Mariash, C N; Kaiser, F E; Schwartz, H L; Towle, H C; Oppenheimer, J H

    1980-01-01

    We have investigated the relationship between the administration of triiodothyronine (T3) and a high carbohydrate (CHO) fat-free diet in the induction of lipogenic enzymes in two rat tissues, liver, and fat. Male thyroidectomized rats were treated with graded daily doses of T3 and either supplemented with a high CHO diet or left on a regular diet. Enzymes studied included malic enzyme (ME), fatty acid synthetase, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, and 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase. In the liver, all four lipogenic enzymes showed a synergistic response between T3 administration and high CHO feeding. In fat, ME also responded synergistically. The interaction was reflected in an increased sensitivity to T3. The dose of T3 required to achieve 50% maximal response was reduced three- to seven-fold by the high CHO diet. This phenomenon could not be attributed to a dietary-induced alteration either in T3 metabolism or in number or affinity of the T3-nuclear receptors. Moreover, studies of the relative rate of synthesis of ME suggested a simultaneous time of onset in the induction of ME, within 2 h after the application of either T3 or CHO. Thus, it is unlikely that either stimulus is secondary to the other. Since parallel experiments from this laboratory (Towle, Mariash, and Oppenheimer,1980.Changes in hepatic levels of messenger ribonucleic acid for malic enzyme during induction by thyroid hormone or diet. Biochemistry. 19: 579-585.) show that ME induction both by CHO and T3 is mediated by an increase in specific messenger RNA for ME, the interaction of T3 and the dietary factor occurs at a pretanslational level. PMID:7364940

  4. Characterization of xenobiotic-induced hepatocellular enzyme induction in rats: anticipated thyroid effects and unique pituitary gland findings.

    PubMed

    Zabka, Tanja S; Fielden, Mark R; Garrido, Rosario; Tao, Jianhua; Fretland, Adrian J; Fretland, Jennifer L; Albassam, Mudher A; Singer, Thomas; Kolaja, Kyle L

    2011-06-01

    During routine safety evaluation of RO2910, a non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor for HIV infection, histopathology findings concurrent with robust hepatocellular induction occurred in multiple organs, including a unique, albeit related, finding in the pituitary gland. For fourteen days, male and female rats were administered, by oral gavage vehicle, 100, 300, or 1000 mg/kg/day of RO2910. Treated groups had elevated serum thyroid-stimulating hormone and decreased total thyroxine, and hypertrophy in the liver, thyroid gland, and pituitary pars distalis. These were considered consequences of hepatocellular induction and often were dose dependent and more pronounced in males than in females. Hepatocellular centrilobular hypertrophy corresponded with increased expression of cytochrome P450s 2B1/2, 3A1, and 3A2 and UGT 2B1. Bilateral thyroid follicular cell hypertrophy occurred concurrent to increased mitotic activity and sometimes colloid depletion, which were attributed to changes in thyroid hormone levels. Males had hypertrophy of thyroid-stimulating hormone-producing cells (thyrotrophs) in the pituitary pars distalis. All findings were consistent with the well-established adaptive physiologic response of rodents to xenobiotic-induced hepatocellular microsomal enzyme induction. Although the effects on the pituitary gland following hepatic enzyme induction-mediated hypothyroidism have not been reported previously, other models of stress and thyroid depletion leading to pituitary stimulation support such a shared pathogenesis.

  5. Biochemical Characterization of Porphobilinogen Deaminase–Deficient Mice During Phenobarbital Induction of Heme Synthesis and the Effect of Enzyme Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Johansson, Annika; Möller, Christer; Fogh, Jens; Harper, Pauline

    2003-01-01

    Acute intermittent porphyria (AIP) is a genetic disorder caused by a deficiency of porphobilinogen deaminase (PBGD), the 3rd enzyme in heme synthesis. It is clinically characterized by acute attacks of neuropsychiatric symptoms and biochemically by increased urinary excretion of the porphyrin precursors porphobilinogen (PBG) and 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA). A mouse model that is partially deficient in PBGD and biochemically mimics AIP after induction of the hepatic ALA synthase by phenobarbital was used in this study to identify the site of formation of the presumably toxic porphyrin precursors and study the effect of enzyme-replacement therapy by using recombinant human PBGD (rhPBGD). After 4 d of phenobarbital administration, high levels of PBG and ALA were found in liver, kidney, plasma, and urine of the PBGD-deficient mice. The administration of rhPBGD intravenously or subcutaneously after a 4-d phenobarbital induction was shown to lower the PBG level in plasma in a dose-dependent manner with maximal effect seen after 30 min and 2 h, respectively. Injection of rhPBGD subcutaneously twice daily during a 4-d phenobarbital induction reduced urinary PBG excretion to 25% of the levels found in PBGD-deficient mice administered with only phenobarbital. This study points to the liver as the main producer of PBG and ALA in the phenobarbital-induced PBGD-deficient mice and demonstrates efficient removal of accumulated PBG in plasma and urine by enzyme-replacement therapy. PMID:15208740

  6. Enzyme

    MedlinePlus

    Enzymes are complex proteins that cause a specific chemical change in all parts of the body. For ... use them. Blood clotting is another example of enzymes at work. Enzymes are needed for all body ...

  7. [Induction of sesquiterpene cyclase gene expression and antioxidant enzymes regulated by exongenous salicylic acid in leaves of Capsicum annuum].

    PubMed

    He, Shuilin; Lin, Wenxiong; Chen, Rukai

    2002-05-01

    An analysis of the induction of sesquitèrpene cyclase gene expression and antioxidant enzymes in Capsicum annuum by exongenous salicyclic acid (SA) pointed out that the sesquiterpene cyclase gene expression in detached pepper leaves was induced by 0.5-4 mmol.L-1 of exongenous SA, whereas the enzyme activity and accumulation of cyclase mRNA were much lower, and it took a longer time (36 h) for the gene to be induced to express after SA treatment, comparing to other elicitors such as UV and fungi treatment. The activities of SOD and POD were enhanced, while the CAT activity was inhibited to some degree. Consequently, H2O2 content was increased in SA treated pepper leaves. H2O2 accumulation was related to the integrated influences from antioxidant enzymes.

  8. The role of carbon starvation in the induction of enzymes that degrade plant-derived carbohydrates in Aspergillus niger

    PubMed Central

    van Munster, Jolanda M.; Daly, Paul; Delmas, Stéphane; Pullan, Steven T.; Blythe, Martin J.; Malla, Sunir; Kokolski, Matthew; Noltorp, Emelie C.M.; Wennberg, Kristin; Fetherston, Richard; Beniston, Richard; Yu, Xiaolan; Dupree, Paul; Archer, David B.

    2014-01-01

    Fungi are an important source of enzymes for saccharification of plant polysaccharides and production of biofuels. Understanding of the regulation and induction of expression of genes encoding these enzymes is still incomplete. To explore the induction mechanism, we analysed the response of the industrially important fungus Aspergillus niger to wheat straw, with a focus on events occurring shortly after exposure to the substrate. RNA sequencing showed that the transcriptional response after 6 h of exposure to wheat straw was very different from the response at 24 h of exposure to the same substrate. For example, less than half of the genes encoding carbohydrate active enzymes that were induced after 24 h of exposure to wheat straw, were also induced after 6 h exposure. Importantly, over a third of the genes induced after 6 h of exposure to wheat straw were also induced during 6 h of carbon starvation, indicating that carbon starvation is probably an important factor in the early response to wheat straw. The up-regulation of the expression of a high number of genes encoding CAZymes that are active on plant-derived carbohydrates during early carbon starvation suggests that these enzymes could be involved in a scouting role during starvation, releasing inducing sugars from complex plant polysaccharides. We show, using proteomics, that carbon-starved cultures indeed release CAZymes with predicted activity on plant polysaccharides. Analysis of the enzymatic activity and the reaction products, indicates that these proteins are enzymes that can degrade various plant polysaccharides to generate both known, as well as potentially new, inducers of CAZymes. PMID:24792495

  9. Dietary chemoprevention strategies for induction of phase II xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes in lung carcinogenesis: A review

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Xiang-Lin; Spivack, Simon D.

    2013-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer mortality for men and women in the United States and is a growing worldwide problem. Protection against lung cancer is associated with higher dietary intake of fruits and vegetables, according to recent large epidemiologic studies. One strategy for lung cancer chemoprevention focuses on the use of agents to modulate the metabolism and disposition of tobacco, environmental and endogenous carcinogens through upregulation of detoxifying phase II enzymes. We summarize the substantial evidence that suggests that induction of phase II enzymes, particularly the glutathione S-transferases, plays a direct role in chemoprotection against lung carcinogenesis. The engagement of the Keap1–Nrf2 complex regulating the antioxidant response element (ARE) signaling pathway has been identified as a key molecular target of chemopreventive phase II inducers in several systems. Monitoring of phase II enzyme induction has led to identification of novel chemopreventive agents such as the isothiocyanate sulforaphane, and the 1,2-dithiole-3-thiones. However, no agents have yet demonstrated clear benefit in human cell systems, or in clinical trials. Alternative strategies include: (a) using intermediate cancer biomarkers for the endpoint in human trials; (b) high-throughput small molecule discovery approaches for induced expression of human phase II genes; and (c) integrative approaches that consider pharmacogenetics, along with pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics in target lung tissue. These approaches may lead to a more effective strategy of tailored chemoprevention efforts using compounds with proven human activity. PMID:19185948

  10. Dietary chemoprevention strategies for induction of phase II xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes in lung carcinogenesis: A review.

    PubMed

    Tan, Xiang-Lin; Spivack, Simon D

    2009-08-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer mortality for men and women in the United States and is a growing worldwide problem. Protection against lung cancer is associated with higher dietary intake of fruits and vegetables, according to recent large epidemiologic studies. One strategy for lung cancer chemoprevention focuses on the use of agents to modulate the metabolism and disposition of tobacco, environmental and endogenous carcinogens through upregulation of detoxifying phase II enzymes. We summarize the substantial evidence that suggests that induction of phase II enzymes, particularly the glutathione S-transferases, plays a direct role in chemoprotection against lung carcinogenesis. The engagement of the Keap1-Nrf2 complex regulating the antioxidant response element (ARE) signaling pathway has been identified as a key molecular target of chemopreventive phase II inducers in several systems. Monitoring of phase II enzyme induction has led to identification of novel chemopreventive agents such as the isothiocyanate sulforaphane, and the 1,2-dithiole-3-thiones. However, no agents have yet demonstrated clear benefit in human cell systems, or in clinical trials. Alternative strategies include: (a) using intermediate cancer biomarkers for the endpoint in human trials; (b) high-throughput small molecule discovery approaches for induced expression of human phase II genes; and (c) integrative approaches that consider pharmacogenetics, along with pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics in target lung tissue. These approaches may lead to a more effective strategy of tailored chemoprevention efforts using compounds with proven human activity.

  11. Glutamine Synthetase Induction in Embryonic Neural Retina: Immunochemical Identification of Polysomes Involved in Enzyme Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, P. K.; Moscona, A. A.

    1973-01-01

    Glutamine synthetase (EC 6.3.1.2) in embryonic neural retina in culture is rapidly induced by hydrocortisone. Retina polysomes involved in translation of this enzyme were precipitated with a high degree of specificity by the gammaglobulin isolated from antiserum against the enzyme (anti-enzyme gammaglobulin). Using immunoprecipitation procedures, we determined that the amount of polysome-bound nascent enzyme was maximal in polysomes comprising 9-14 ribosomes and was about 3-fold higher in the induced than in the noninduced retina. Within this size group of polysomes, those comprising 11-13 ribosomes showed consistently greater binding of anti-enzyme [125I]gammaglobulin than of normal [125I]-gammaglobulin. This size of polysomes corresponds to that calculated for a monocistronic messenger RNA for the subunit of this enzyme, which has a molecular weight of 42,000. The application of immunochemical techniques to identification of templates for synthesis of an enzyme in embryonic cells that constitutes less than 1% of the total cellular proteins indicates the usefulness of this method for detailed studies on regulation of other quantitatively minor products significant in cell differentiation. PMID:4146379

  12. Applying theories of microbial metabolism for induction of targeted enzyme activity in a methanogenic microbial community at a metabolic steady state.

    PubMed

    Speda, Jutta; Johansson, Mikaela A; Jonsson, Bengt-Harald; Karlsson, Martin

    2016-09-01

    Novel enzymes that are stable in diverse conditions are intensively sought because they offer major potential advantages in industrial biotechnology, and microorganisms in extreme environments are key sources of such enzymes. However, most potentially valuable enzymes are currently inaccessible due to the pure culturing problem of microorganisms. Novel metagenomic and metaproteomic techniques that circumvent the need for pure cultures have theoretically provided possibilities to identify all genes and all proteins in microbial communities, but these techniques have not been widely used to directly identify specific enzymes because they generate vast amounts of extraneous data.In a first step towards developing a metaproteomic approach to pinpoint targeted extracellular hydrolytic enzymes of choice in microbial communities, we have generated and analyzed the necessary conditions for such an approach by the use of a methanogenic microbial community maintained on a chemically defined medium. The results show that a metabolic steady state of the microbial community could be reached, at which the expression of the targeted hydrolytic enzymes were suppressed, and that upon enzyme induction a distinct increase in the targeted enzyme expression was obtained. Furthermore, no cross talk in expression was detected between the two focal types of enzyme activities under their respective inductive conditions. Thus, the described approach should be useful to generate ideal samples, collected before and after selective induction, in controlled microbial communities to clearly discriminate between constituently expressed proteins and extracellular hydrolytic enzymes that are specifically induced, thereby reducing the analysis to only those proteins that are distinctively up-regulated.

  13. Induction of antioxidant enzyme activity and lipid peroxidation level in ion-beam-bombarded rice seeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semsang, Nuananong; Yu, LiangDeng

    2013-07-01

    Low-energy ion beam bombardment has been used to mutate a wide variety of plant species. To explore the indirect effects of low-energy ion beam on biological damage due to the free radical production in plant cells, the increase in antioxidant enzyme activities and lipid peroxidation level was investigated in ion-bombarded rice seeds. Local rice seeds were bombarded with nitrogen or argon ion beams at energies of 29-60 keV and ion fluences of 1 × 1016 ions cm-2. The activities of the antioxidant enzymes; superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), ascorbate peroxidase (APX), dehydroascorbate reductase (DHAR), glutathione reductase (GR), glutathione S-transferase (GST) and lipid peroxidation level were assayed in the germinated rice seeds after ion bombardment. The results showed most of the enzyme activities and lipid peroxidation levels in both the argon and nitrogen bombarded samples were higher than those in the natural control. N-ion bombardment could induce higher levels of antioxidant enzyme activities in the rice samples than the Ar-ion bombardment. Additional effects due to the vacuum condition were found to affect activities of some antioxidant enzymes and lipid peroxidation level. This study demonstrates that ion beam bombardment and vacuum condition could induce the antioxidant enzyme activity and lipid peroxidation level which might be due to free radical production in the bombarded rice seeds.

  14. Phenobarbital in the genetically obese Zucker rat. II. In vivo and in vitro assessments of microsomal enzyme induction.

    PubMed

    Brouwer, K L; Kostenbauder, H B; McNamara, P J; Blouin, R A

    1984-12-01

    In vivo and in vitro alterations in drug metabolism and the extent of enzyme induction of the hepatic microsomal cytochrome P-450 system were evaluated in obese and lean Zucker and lean Sprague-Dawley rats. Phenobarbital enzyme-inducing regimens were administered p.o. to achieve similar steady-state phenobarbital plasma concentrations. Control rats received p.o. placebo solution. No significant intra- or inter-strain differences in antipyrine clearance (milliliters per hour) or apparent volume of distribution (liters) were observed between the placebo-treated lean Sprague-Dawley, lean Zucker and obese Zucker rats. Intra- and inter-strain differences in hepatic microsomal protein and cytochrome P-450 content were observed. Compared to placebo, antipyrine clearance (milliliters per hour) after chronic phenobarbital pretreatment was increased in the Sprague-Dawley (198%) and lean Zucker rats (131%), but not significantly altered in the obese Zucker rats. Similarly, increases in hepatic weight, whole liver microsomal protein and cytochrome P-450 content were also observed in the Sprague-Dawley (34, 124 and 352%, respectively) and the lean Zucker rats (24, 96 and 249%, respectively). However, no significant alterations in these parameters were observed in the obese Zucker rats after phenobarbital treatment. Results from these in vivo and in vitro studies implicate alterations in drug metabolism and genetic differences in cytochrome P-450 content in Zucker rats relative to the Sprague-Dawley strain. Obese Zucker rats failed to exhibit a significant induction response after phenobarbital pretreatment.

  15. Effect of caffeine-coconut products interactions on induction of microsomal drug-metabolizing enzymes in Wistar albino rats.

    PubMed

    Abara, A E; Obochi, G O; Malu, S P; Obi-Abang, M; Ekam, V S; Uboh, F E

    2007-01-01

    Effect of caffeine-coconut products interactions on induction of drug-metabolizing enzyme in Wistar albino rats was studied. Twenty rats were randomly divided into four groups: The control group (1) received via oral route a placebo (4.0 ml of distilled water). Groups 2 to 4 were treated for a 14-day period with 50 mg/kg body weight of caffeine, 50 mg/kg body weight of caffeine and 50 mg/kg body weight of coconut water, and 50 mg/kg body weight of caffeine and 50 mg/kg body weight of coconut milk in 4.0 ml of the vehicle via gastric intubation respectively. One day after the final exposure, the animals were anaesthetized by inhalation of an overdose of chloroform. The blood of each rat was collected by cardiac puncture while the liver of each rat was harvested and processed to examine several biochemical parameters, i.e., total protein and RNA levels, protein/RNA ratios, and activities of alanine and aspartate amino transferase (ALT and AST, respectively). The results showed that while ingestion of coconut milk and coconut water increased the values of protein and protein/RNA ratios, it decreased alanine and aspartate amino transferase (ALT and AST) activities. These effects, in turn, enhanced the induction of the metabolizing enzymes and a resultant faster clearance and elimination of the caffeine from the body, there by reducing the toxic effect on the liver.

  16. Phase I to II cross-induction of xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes: A feedforward control mechanism for potential hormetic responses

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Qiang Pi Jingbo; Woods, Courtney G.; Andersen, Melvin E.

    2009-06-15

    Hormetic responses to xenobiotic exposure likely occur as a result of overcompensation by the homeostatic control systems operating in biological organisms. However, the mechanisms underlying overcompensation that leads to hormesis are still unclear. A well-known homeostatic circuit in the cell is the gene induction network comprising phase I, II and III metabolizing enzymes, which are responsible for xenobiotic detoxification, and in many cases, bioactivation. By formulating a differential equation-based computational model, we investigated in this study whether hormesis can arise from the operation of this gene/enzyme network. The model consists of two feedback and one feedforward controls. With the phase I negative feedback control, xenobiotic X activates nuclear receptors to induce cytochrome P450 enzyme, which bioactivates X into a reactive metabolite X'. With the phase II negative feedback control, X' activates transcription factor Nrf2 to induce phase II enzymes such as glutathione S-transferase and glutamate cysteine ligase, etc., which participate in a set of reactions that lead to the metabolism of X' into a less toxic conjugate X''. The feedforward control involves phase I to II cross-induction, in which the parent chemical X can also induce phase II enzymes directly through the nuclear receptor and indirectly through transcriptionally upregulating Nrf2. As a result of the active feedforward control, a steady-state hormetic relationship readily arises between the concentrations of the reactive metabolite X' and the extracellular parent chemical X to which the cell is exposed. The shape of dose-response evolves over time from initially monotonically increasing to J-shaped at the final steady state-a temporal sequence consistent with adaptation-mediated hormesis. The magnitude of the hormetic response is enhanced by increases in the feedforward gain, but attenuated by increases in the bioactivation or phase II feedback loop gains. Our study suggests a

  17. Phase I to II cross-induction of xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes: a feedforward control mechanism for potential hormetic responses.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiang; Pi, Jingbo; Woods, Courtney G; Andersen, Melvin E

    2009-06-15

    Hormetic responses to xenobiotic exposure likely occur as a result of overcompensation by the homeostatic control systems operating in biological organisms. However, the mechanisms underlying overcompensation that leads to hormesis are still unclear. A well-known homeostatic circuit in the cell is the gene induction network comprising phase I, II and III metabolizing enzymes, which are responsible for xenobiotic detoxification, and in many cases, bioactivation. By formulating a differential equation-based computational model, we investigated in this study whether hormesis can arise from the operation of this gene/enzyme network. The model consists of two feedback and one feedforward controls. With the phase I negative feedback control, xenobiotic X activates nuclear receptors to induce cytochrome P450 enzyme, which bioactivates X into a reactive metabolite X'. With the phase II negative feedback control, X' activates transcription factor Nrf2 to induce phase II enzymes such as glutathione S-transferase and glutamate cysteine ligase, etc., which participate in a set of reactions that lead to the metabolism of X' into a less toxic conjugate X''. The feedforward control involves phase I to II cross-induction, in which the parent chemical X can also induce phase II enzymes directly through the nuclear receptor and indirectly through transcriptionally upregulating Nrf2. As a result of the active feedforward control, a steady-state hormetic relationship readily arises between the concentrations of the reactive metabolite X' and the extracellular parent chemical X to which the cell is exposed. The shape of dose-response evolves over time from initially monotonically increasing to J-shaped at the final steady state-a temporal sequence consistent with adaptation-mediated hormesis. The magnitude of the hormetic response is enhanced by increases in the feedforward gain, but attenuated by increases in the bioactivation or phase II feedback loop gains. Our study suggests a

  18. The Role of Constitutive Androstane Receptor in Oxazaphosphorine-mediated Induction of Drug-metabolizing Enzymes in Human Hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Duan; Li, Linhao; Fuhrman, Jennifer; Ferguson, Stephen; Wang, Hongbing

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The objective of this study was to investigate the roles of the constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) in cyclophosphamide (CPA)- and ifosfamide (IFO)-mediated induction of hepatic drug-metabolizing enzymes (DME). Methods Induction of DMEs was evaluated using real-time RT-PCR and Western blotting analysis in human primary hepatocyte (HPH) cultures. Activation of CAR, pregnane X receptor (PXR), and aryl hydrocarbon receptor by CPA and IFO was assessed in cell-based reporter assays in HepG2 cells and/or nuclear translocation assays in HPHs. Results CYP2B6 reporter activity was significantly enhanced by CPA and IFO in HepG2 cells co-transfected with CYP2B6 reporter plasmid and a chemical-responsive human CAR variant (CAR1+A) construct. Real-time RT-PCR and Western blotting analysis in HPHs showed that both CPA and IFO induced the expressions of CYP2B6 and CYP3A4. Notably, treatment of HPHs with CPA but not IFO resulted in significant nuclear accumulation of CAR, which represents the initial step of CAR activation. Further studies in HPHs demonstrated that selective inhibition of PXR by sulforaphane preferentially repressed IFO- over CPA-mediated induction of CYP2B6. Conclusion These results provide novel insights into the differential roles of CAR in the regulation of CPA- and IFO-induced DME expression and potential drug-drug interactions. PMID:21487929

  19. Induction of Phase 2 Antioxidant Enzymes by Broccoli Sulforaphane: Perspectives in Maintaining the Antioxidant Activity of Vitamins A, C, and E

    PubMed Central

    Boddupalli, Sekhar; Mein, Jonathan R.; Lakkanna, Shantala; James, Don R.

    2012-01-01

    Consumption of fruits and vegetables is recognized as an important part of a healthy diet. Increased consumption of cruciferous vegetables in particular has been associated with a decreased risk of several degenerative and chronic diseases, including cardiovascular disease and certain cancers. Members of the cruciferous vegetable family, which includes broccoli, Brussels sprouts, cauliflower, and cabbage, accumulate significant concentrations of glucosinolates, which are metabolized in vivo to biologically active isothiocyanates (ITCs). The ITC sulforaphane, which is derived from glucoraphanin, has garnered particular interest as an indirect antioxidant due to its extraordinary ability to induce expression of several enzymes via the KEAP1/Nrf2/ARE pathway. Nrf2/ARE gene products are typically characterized as Phase II detoxification enzymes and/or antioxidant (AO) enzymes. Over the last decade, human clinical studies have begun to provide in vivo evidence of both Phase II and AO enzyme induction by SF. Many AO enzymes are redox cycling enzymes that maintain redox homeostasis and activity of free radical scavengers such as vitamins A, C, and E. In this review, we present the existing evidence for induction of PII and AO enzymes by SF, the interactions of SF-induced AO enzymes and proposed maintenance of the essential vitamins A, C, and E, and, finally, the current view of genotypic effects on ITC metabolism and AO enzyme induction and function. PMID:22303412

  20. Ergosteroids: induction of thermogenic enzymes in liver of rats treated with steroids derived from dehydroepiandrosterone.

    PubMed

    Lardy, H; Partridge, B; Kneer, N; Wei, Y

    1995-07-03

    Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), an intermediate in the biosynthesis of testosterone and estrogens, exerts several physiological effects not involving the sex hormones. When fed to rats it induces the thermogenic enzymes mitochondrial sn-glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase and cytosolic malic enzyme in their livers. Animals and humans, and their excised tissues, are known to hydroxylate DHEA at several positions and to interconvert 7 alpha-hydroxy-DHEA, 7 beta-hydroxy-DHEA, 7-oxo-DHEA, and the corresponding derivatives of androst-5-enediol. We report here that these 7-oxygenated derivatives are active inducers of these thermogenic enzymes in rats and that the 7-oxo derivatives are more active than the parent steroids. We postulate that the 7 alpha-hydroxy and 7-oxo derivatives are on a metabolic pathway from DHEA to more active steroid hormones. These 7-oxo steroids have potential as therapeutic agents because of their increased activity and because they are not convertible to either testosterone or estrogens.

  1. Induction of phase 2 enzymes by serum oxidized polyamines through activation of Nrf2: effect of the polyamine metabolite acrolein.

    PubMed

    Kwak, Mi-Kyoung; Kensler, Thomas W; Casero, Robert A

    2003-06-06

    The naturally occurring polycationic polyamines including putrescine, spermidine, and spermine play an important role in cell growth, differentiation, and gene expression. However, circulating polyamines are potential substrates for several oxidizing enzymes including copper-containing serum amine oxidase. These enzymes are capable of oxidizing serum polyamines to several toxic metabolites including aldehydes and H(2)O(2). In this study, we investigated the effects of polyamines as inducers of phase 2 enzymes and other genes that promote cell survival in a cell culture system in the presence of bovine serum. Spermidine and spermine (50 microM) increased NAD(P)H quinone oxidoreductase (NQO1) activity up to 3-fold in murine keratinocyte PE cells. Transcript levels for glutathione S-transferase (GST) A1, GST M1, NQO1, gamma-glutamylcysteine ligase regulatory subunit, and UDP-glucuronyltransferase 1A6 were significantly increased by spermidine and this effect was mediated through the antioxidant response element (ARE). The ARE from the mouse GST A1 promoter was activated about 9-fold by spermine and 5-fold by spermidine treatment, but could be inhibited by the amine oxidase inhibitor, aminoguanidine, suggesting that acrolein or hydrogen peroxide generated from polyamines by serum amine oxidase may be mediators for phase 2 enzyme induction. Elevations of ARE-luciferase expression and NQO1 enzyme activity by spermidine were not affected by catalase, while both were completely repressed by aldehyde dehydrogenase treatment. Direct addition of acrolein to PE cells induced multiple phase 2 genes and elevated nuclear levels of Nrf2, a transcription factor that binds to the ARE. Expression of mutant Nrf2 repressed the activation of the ARE-luciferase reporter by polyamines and acrolein. These results indicate that spermidine and spermine increase the expression of phase 2 genes in cells grown in culture through activation of the Nrf2-ARE pathway by generating the sulfhydryl

  2. Effects of atorvastatin metabolites on induction of drug-metabolizing enzymes and membrane transporters through human pregnane X receptor

    PubMed Central

    Hoffart, E; Ghebreghiorghis, L; Nussler, AK; Thasler, WE; Weiss, TS; Schwab, M; Burk, O

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Atorvastatin metabolites differ in their potential for drug interaction because of differential inhibition of drug-metabolizing enzymes and transporters. We here investigate whether they exert differential effects on the induction of these genes via activation of pregnane X receptor (PXR) and constitutive androstane receptor (CAR). EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Ligand binding to PXR or CAR was analysed by mammalian two-hybrid assembly and promoter/reporter gene assays. Additionally, surface plasmon resonance was used to analyse ligand binding to CAR. Primary human hepatocytes were treated with atorvastatin metabolites, and mRNA and protein expression of PXR-regulated genes was measured. Two-hybrid co-activator interaction and co-repressor release assays were utilized to elucidate the molecular mechanism of PXR activation. KEY RESULTS All atorvastatin metabolites induced the assembly of PXR and activated CYP3A4 promoter activity. Ligand binding to CAR could not be proven. In primary human hepatocytes, the para-hydroxy metabolite markedly reduced or abolished induction of cytochrome P450 and transporter genes. While significant differences in co-activator recruitment were not observed, para-hydroxy atorvastatin demonstrated only 50% release of co-repressors. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS Atorvastatin metabolites are ligands of PXR but not of CAR. Atorvastatin metabolites demonstrate differential induction of PXR target genes, which results from impaired release of co-repressors. Consequently, the properties of drug metabolites have to be taken into account when analysing PXR-dependent induction of drug metabolism and transport. The drug interaction potential of the active metabolite, para-hydroxy atorvastatin, might be lower than that of the parent compound. PMID:21913896

  3. A QUANTITATIVE MODEL FOR XENOBIOTIC METABOLIZING ENZYME (XME) INDUCTION REGULATED BY THE PREGNANE X RECEPTOR (PXR)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The nuclear receptor, PXR, is an integral part of the regulation of hepatic metabolism. It has been shown to regulate specific CYPs (phase I drug-metabolizing enzymes) as well as certain phase II drug metabolism activities, including UDP-glucuronosyl transferase (UGT), sulfotran...

  4. A QUANTITATIVE MODEL FOR XENOBIOTIC METABOLIZING ENZYME (XME) INDUCTION REGULATED BY THE PREGNANE X RECEPTOR (PXR)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The nuclear receptor, PXR, is an integral part of the regulation of hepatic metabolism. It has been shown to regulate specific CYPs (phase I drug-metabolizing enzymes) as well as certain phase II drug metabolism activities, including UDP-glucuronosyl transferase (UGT), sulfotran...

  5. Induction by leptin of uncoupling protein-2 and enzymes of fatty acid oxidation

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yan-Ting; Shimabukuro, Michio; Koyama, Kazunori; Lee, Young; Wang, May-Yun; Trieu, Falguni; Newgard, Christopher B.; Unger, Roger H.

    1997-01-01

    We have studied mechanisms by which leptin overexpression, which reduces body weight via anorexic and thermogenic actions, induces triglyceride depletion in adipocytes and nonadipocytes. Here we show that leptin alters in pancreatic islets the mRNA of the genes encoding enzymes of free fatty acid metabolism and uncoupling protein-2 (UCP-2). In animals infused with a recombinant adenovirus containing the leptin cDNA, the levels of mRNAs encoding enzymes of mitochondrial and peroxisomal oxidation rose 2- to 3-fold, whereas mRNA encoding an enzyme of esterification declined in islets from hyperleptinemic rats. Islet UCP-2 mRNA rose 6-fold. All in vivo changes occurred in vitro in normal islets cultured with recombinant leptin, indicating direct extraneural effects. Leptin overexpression increased UCP-2 mRNA by more than 10-fold in epididymal, retroperitoneal, and subcutaneous fat tissue of normal, but not of leptin–receptor-defective obese rats. By directly regulating the expression of enzymes of free fatty acid metabolism and of UCP-2, leptin controls intracellular triglyceride content of certain nonadipocytes, as well as adipocytes. PMID:9177227

  6. Potent induction of cellular antioxidants and phase 2 enzymes by resveratrol in cardiomyocytes: protection against oxidative and electrophilic injury.

    PubMed

    Cao, Zhuoxiao; Li, Yunbo

    2004-04-05

    Resveratrol is known to be protective against oxidative cardiovascular disorders. However, the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. This study was undertaken to determine if resveratrol could increase endogenous antioxidants and phase 2 enzymes in cardiomyocytes, and if such increased cellular defenses could provide protection against oxidative and electrophilic cell injury. Incubation of cardiac H9C2 cells with low micromolar resveratrol resulted in a significant induction of a scope of cellular antioxidants and phase 2 enzymes in a concentration- and/or time-dependent fashion. To investigate the protective effects of the resveratrol-induced cellular defenses on oxidative and electrophilic cell injury, H9C2 cells were first incubated with resveratrol, and then exposed to xanthine oxidase (XO)/xanthine, 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal or doxorubicin. We observed that resveratrol pretreatment afforded a marked protection against the above agent-mediated cytotoxicity in H9C2 cells. Moreover, the resveratrol pretreatment led to a great reduction in XO/xanthine-induced intracellular accumulation of ROS. Taken together, this study demonstrates that resveratrol induces antioxidants and phase 2 enzymes in cardiomyocytes, which is accompanied by increased resistance to oxidative and electrophilic cell injury.

  7. Fibroblast response to metallic debris in vitro. Enzyme induction cell proliferation, and toxicity.

    PubMed

    Maloney, W J; Smith, R L; Castro, F; Schurman, D J

    1993-06-01

    Bovine synovial fibroblasts in primary monolayer culture were exposed to particulate metallic debris. The effects of the metallic particles on the synthesis and secretion of proteolytic enzymes and on cell proliferation and viability were examined. Uniform suspensions of titanium, titanium-aluminum, cobalt, and chromium particles, ranging in size from approximately 0.1 to ten micrometers (average, one to three micrometers), were prepared; the particle concentrations (the volume of particles divided by the total volume of the suspension) ranged from 0.0005 to 5 per cent. Aliquots of the particle suspensions were added to the synovial fibroblast cultures. The final particle concentrations in the media ranged from 0.0000083 to 0.83 per cent. After seventy-two hours of exposure, each medium was harvested and was assayed for proteolytic and collagenolytic activity and for hexosaminidase levels. Neutral metalloproteases, quantified by collagenolytic and caseinolytic (proteolytic) activity, represent enzymes, secreted by cells, that are capable of degrading extracellular matrix. Hexosaminidase is a marker for lysosomal enzyme activity that can include more than thirty enzymes, such as proteases, lipases, nucleases, and phosphatases. Cell proliferation was quantified by uptake of 3H-thymidine. Cell morphology was examined by scanning electron microscopy. Titanium, titanium-aluminum, and chromium significantly stimulated 3H-thymidine uptake at low particle concentrations (p < 0.01, p < 0.002, and p < 0.002, respectively). Exposure to cobalt, even at the lowest particle concentration, resulted in a significant decrease in thymidine uptake (p = 0.027). At the highest particle concentrations, all particles were toxic, as evidenced by the absence of thymidine uptake. At high particle concentrations, all of the metals caused a decrease in caseinolytic (proteolytic) and collagenolytic activity in the culture media. Titanium elevated the lysosomal enzyme marker, hexosaminidase

  8. Evidence for two waves of induction of DNA enzymes in stimulated human lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Noy, Guido C. F. Pedrali; Dalpra, Leda; Pedrini, Antonia M.; Ciarrocchi, Giovanni; Giulotto, Elena; Nuzzo, Fiorella; Falaschi, Arturo

    1974-01-01

    The stimulation of human lymphocytes with phytohaemoagglutinin induces the appearance or increase of several enzymes of DNA metabolism [Pedrini etal., Biochem. Biophys. Res. Comm., 47:1221(1972)]. With long times of stimulation, two phenomena are observed; an increase in the levels of DNA polymerase, of a DNase acting on single-stranded DNA, and of an endonuclease, occurring between the third and fourth day, in parallel with a wave of DNA synthesis;a second wave of increase of the same enzymes and of DNA ligase,occurring between the fifth and eight day when the DNA replication rate, as measured by thymidine-pulses, has decreased to values close to the background. PMID:4453522

  9. Enzymes of anaerobic ethylbenzene and p-ethylphenol catabolism in 'Aromatoleum aromaticum': differentiation and differential induction.

    PubMed

    Muhr, Enrico; Schühle, Karola; Clermont, Lina; Sünwoldt, Katharina; Kleinsorge, Daniel; Seyhan, Deniz; Kahnt, Jörg; Schall, Iris; Cordero, Paul R; Schmitt, Georg; Heider, Johann

    2015-11-01

    The denitrifying bacterium 'Aromatoleum aromaticum' strain EbN1 is one of the best characterized bacteria regarding anaerobic ethylbenzene degradation. EbN1 also degrades various other aromatic and phenolic compounds in the absence of oxygen, one of them being p-ethylphenol. Despite having similar chemical structures, ethylbenzene and p-ethylphenol have been proposed to be metabolized by completely separate pathways. In this study, we established and applied biochemical and molecular biological methods to show the (almost) exclusive presence and specificity of enzymes involved in the respective degradation pathways by recording enzyme activities, complemented by heme staining, immuno- and biotin-blotting analyses. These combined results substantiated the predicted p-ethylphenol degradation pathway. The identified enzymes include a heme c-containing p-ethylphenol-hydroxylase, both an (R)- and an (S)-specific alcohol dehydrogenase as well as a novel biotin-dependent carboxylase. We also establish an activity assay for benzoylacetate-CoA ligases likely being involved in both metabolic pathways.

  10. Alpha Adrenergic Induction of Transport of Lysosomal Enzyme across the Blood-Brain Barrier

    PubMed Central

    Urayama, Akihiko; Dohgu, Shinya; Robinson, Sandra M.; Sly, William S.; Grubb, Jeffery H.; Banks, William A

    2015-01-01

    The impermeability of the adult blood-brain barrier (BBB) to lysosomal enzymes impedes the ability to treat the central nervous system manifestations of lysosomal storage diseases. Here, we found that simultaneous stimulation of the alpha1 and alpha2 adrenoreceptor restores in adult mice the high rate of transport for the lysosomal enzyme P-GUS that is seen in neonates but lost with development. Beta adrenergics, other monoamines, and acetylcholine did not restore this transport. A high dose (500 microg/mouse) of clonidine, a strong alpha2 and weak alpha1 agonist, was able to act as monotherapy in the stimulation of P-GUS transport. Neither use of alpha1 plus alpha2 agonists nor the high dose clonidine disrupted the BBB to albumin. In situ brain perfusion and immunohistochemistry studies indicated that adrengerics act on transporters already at the luminal surface of brain endothelial cells. These results show that adrenergic stimulation, including monotherapy with clonidine, could be key for CNS enzyme replacement therapy. PMID:26545208

  11. Alpha Adrenergic Induction of Transport of Lysosomal Enzyme across the Blood-Brain Barrier.

    PubMed

    Urayama, Akihiko; Dohgu, Shinya; Robinson, Sandra M; Sly, William S; Grubb, Jeffery H; Banks, William A

    2015-01-01

    The impermeability of the adult blood-brain barrier (BBB) to lysosomal enzymes impedes the ability to treat the central nervous system manifestations of lysosomal storage diseases. Here, we found that simultaneous stimulation of the alpha1 and alpha2 adrenoreceptor restores in adult mice the high rate of transport for the lysosomal enzyme P-GUS that is seen in neonates but lost with development. Beta adrenergics, other monoamines, and acetylcholine did not restore this transport. A high dose (500 microg/mouse) of clonidine, a strong alpha2 and weak alpha1 agonist, was able to act as monotherapy in the stimulation of P-GUS transport. Neither use of alpha1 plus alpha2 agonists nor the high dose clonidine disrupted the BBB to albumin. In situ brain perfusion and immunohistochemistry studies indicated that adrengerics act on transporters already at the luminal surface of brain endothelial cells. These results show that adrenergic stimulation, including monotherapy with clonidine, could be key for CNS enzyme replacement therapy.

  12. Ergosteroids: induction of thermogenic enzymes in liver of rats treated with steroids derived from dehydroepiandrosterone.

    PubMed Central

    Lardy, H; Partridge, B; Kneer, N; Wei, Y

    1995-01-01

    Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), an intermediate in the biosynthesis of testosterone and estrogens, exerts several physiological effects not involving the sex hormones. When fed to rats it induces the thermogenic enzymes mitochondrial sn-glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase and cytosolic malic enzyme in their livers. Animals and humans, and their excised tissues, are known to hydroxylate DHEA at several positions and to interconvert 7 alpha-hydroxy-DHEA, 7 beta-hydroxy-DHEA, 7-oxo-DHEA, and the corresponding derivatives of androst-5-enediol. We report here that these 7-oxygenated derivatives are active inducers of these thermogenic enzymes in rats and that the 7-oxo derivatives are more active than the parent steroids. We postulate that the 7 alpha-hydroxy and 7-oxo derivatives are on a metabolic pathway from DHEA to more active steroid hormones. These 7-oxo steroids have potential as therapeutic agents because of their increased activity and because they are not convertible to either testosterone or estrogens. PMID:7604042

  13. Induction of Erythroid Differentiation in Human Erythroleukemia Cells by Depletion of Malic Enzyme 2

    PubMed Central

    Everett, Peter; Clish, Clary B.; Sukhatme, Vikas P.

    2010-01-01

    Malic enzyme 2 (ME2) is a mitochondrial enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of malate to pyruvate and CO2 and uses NAD as a cofactor. Higher expression of this enzyme correlates with the degree of cell de-differentiation. We found that ME2 is expressed in K562 erythroleukemia cells, in which a number of agents have been found to induce differentiation either along the erythroid or the myeloid lineage. We found that knockdown of ME2 led to diminished proliferation of tumor cells and increased apoptosis in vitro. These findings were accompanied by differentiation of K562 cells along the erythroid lineage, as confirmed by staining for glycophorin A and hemoglobin production. ME2 knockdown also totally abolished growth of K562 cells in nude mice. Increased ROS levels, likely reflecting increased mitochondrial production, and a decreased NADPH/NADP+ ratio were noted but use of a free radical scavenger to decrease inhibition of ROS levels did not reverse the differentiation or apoptotic phenotype, suggesting that ROS production is not causally involved in the resultant phenotype. As might be expected, depletion of ME2 induced an increase in the NAD+/NADH ratio and ATP levels fell significantly. Inhibition of the malate-aspartate shuttle was insufficient to induce K562 differentiation. We also examined several intracellular signaling pathways and expression of transcription factors and intermediate filament proteins whose expression is known to be modulated during erythroid differentiation in K562 cells. We found that silencing of ME2 leads to phospho-ERK1/2 inhibition, phospho-AKT activation, increased GATA-1 expression and diminished vimentin expression. Metabolomic analysis, conducted to gain insight into intermediary metabolic pathways that ME2 knockdown might affect, showed that ME2 depletion resulted in high orotate levels, suggesting potential impairment of pyrimidine metabolism. Collectively our data point to ME2 as a potentially novel metabolic target for

  14. Effect of honokiol on the induction of drug-metabolizing enzymes in human hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Yong-Yeon; Jeong, Hyeon-Uk; Kim, Jeong-Han; Lee, Hye Suk

    2014-01-01

    Honokiol, 2-(4-hydroxy-3-prop-2-enyl-phenyl)-4-prop-2-enyl-phenol, an active component of Magnolia officinalis and Magnolia grandiflora, exerts various pharmacological activities such as antitumorigenic, antioxidative, anti-inflammatory, neurotrophic, and antithrombotic effects. To investigate whether honokiol acts as a perpetrator in drug interactions, messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) levels of phase I and II drug-metabolizing enzymes, including cytochrome P450 (CYP), UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT), and sulfotransferase 2A1 (SULT2A1), were analyzed by real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction following 48-hour honokiol exposure in three independent cryopreserved human hepatocyte cultures. Honokiol treatment at the highest concentration tested (50 μM) increased the CYP2B6 mRNA level and CYP2B6-catalyzed bupropion hydroxylase activity more than two-fold in three different hepatocyte cultures, indicating that honokiol induces CYP2B6 at higher concentrations. However, honokiol treatment (0.5–50 μM) did not significantly alter the mRNA levels of phase I enzymes (CYP1A2, CYP3A4, CYP2C8, CYP2C9, and CYP2C19) or phase II enzymes (UGT1A1, UGT1A4, UGT1A9, UGT2B7, and SULT2A1) in cryopreserved human hepatocyte cultures. CYP1A2-catalyzed phenacetin O-deethylase and CYP3A4-catalyzed midazolam 1′-hydroxylase activities were not affected by 48-hour honokiol treatment in cryopreserved human hepatocytes. These results indicate that honokiol is a weak CYP2B6 inducer and is unlikely to increase the metabolism of concomitant CYP2B6 substrates and cause pharmacokinetic-based drug interactions in humans. PMID:25395831

  15. Effect of honokiol on the induction of drug-metabolizing enzymes in human hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Cho, Yong-Yeon; Jeong, Hyeon-Uk; Kim, Jeong-Han; Lee, Hye Suk

    2014-01-01

    Honokiol, 2-(4-hydroxy-3-prop-2-enyl-phenyl)-4-prop-2-enyl-phenol, an active component of Magnolia officinalis and Magnolia grandiflora, exerts various pharmacological activities such as antitumorigenic, antioxidative, anti-inflammatory, neurotrophic, and antithrombotic effects. To investigate whether honokiol acts as a perpetrator in drug interactions, messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) levels of phase I and II drug-metabolizing enzymes, including cytochrome P450 (CYP), UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT), and sulfotransferase 2A1 (SULT2A1), were analyzed by real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction following 48-hour honokiol exposure in three independent cryopreserved human hepatocyte cultures. Honokiol treatment at the highest concentration tested (50 μM) increased the CYP2B6 mRNA level and CYP2B6-catalyzed bupropion hydroxylase activity more than two-fold in three different hepatocyte cultures, indicating that honokiol induces CYP2B6 at higher concentrations. However, honokiol treatment (0.5-50 μM) did not significantly alter the mRNA levels of phase I enzymes (CYP1A2, CYP3A4, CYP2C8, CYP2C9, and CYP2C19) or phase II enzymes (UGT1A1, UGT1A4, UGT1A9, UGT2B7, and SULT2A1) in cryopreserved human hepatocyte cultures. CYP1A2-catalyzed phenacetin O-deethylase and CYP3A4-catalyzed midazolam 1'-hydroxylase activities were not affected by 48-hour honokiol treatment in cryopreserved human hepatocytes. These results indicate that honokiol is a weak CYP2B6 inducer and is unlikely to increase the metabolism of concomitant CYP2B6 substrates and cause pharmacokinetic-based drug interactions in humans.

  16. Gut wall metabolism of verapamil in older people: effects of rifampicin-mediated enzyme induction

    PubMed Central

    Fromm, Martin F; Dilger, Karin; Busse, Dagmar; Kroemer, Heyo K; Eichelbaum, Michel; Klotz, Ulrich

    1998-01-01

    Aims To investigate prehepatic metabolism of verapamil and its inducibility by rifampicin in older subjects. Methods Eight older subjects (67.1±1.2 years mean±s.d.) received racemic, unlabelled verapamil orally for 16 days (120 mg twice daily). Rifampicin (600 mg daily) was coadministered from day 5 to 16. Using stable isotope technology (i.e. intravenous coadministration of 10 mg deuterated verapamil) during verapamil steady-state without (day 4) and with rifampicin (day 16) bioavailability, prehepatic and hepatic extraction of verapamil were determined. The effects of verapamil on AV-conduction were measured by the maximum PR interval prolongation (%). Results Bioavailability of the cardiovascularly more active S-verapamil decreased from 14.2±4.3% on day 4 to 0.6±0.5% on day 16 (P<0.001). As a consequence, effects of orally administered verapamil on the AV-conduction were nearly abolished (14.4±9.4%vs 2.7±2.6%, P<0.01). This could be attributed to a considerable increase of prehepatic extraction during treatment with rifampicin (41.7±22.1%vs 91.6±6.6%, P<0.01) and to a minor extent to induction of hepatic metabolism (73.7±9.4%vs 91.6±5.3%, P<0.01). Conclusions Prehepatic metabolism of verapamil occurred in the group of older people investigated. Induction of gut wall metabolism most likely was the major reason for the loss of verapamil effect during treatment with rifampicin in this group of older subjects. PMID:9517368

  17. Parallel induction of heme oxygenase-1 and chemoprotective phase 2 enzymes by electrophiles and antioxidants: regulation by upstream antioxidant-responsive elements (ARE).

    PubMed Central

    Prestera, T.; Talalay, P.; Alam, J.; Ahn, Y. I.; Lee, P. J.; Choi, A. M.

    1995-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Heme oxygenase (HO; EC 1.14.99.3) catalyzes the conversion of heme to biliverdin, which is reduced enzymatically to bilirubin. Since bilirubin is a potent antioxidant and heme a pro-oxidant, HO may protect cells against oxidative damage. HO-1 is highly inducible by diverse chemical agents, resembling those evoking induction of phase 2 enzymes (i.e., Michael reaction acceptors, heavy metals, trivalent arsenicals, and sulfhydryl reagents). Phase 2 enzymes (glutathione transferases; NAD (P)H:quinone reductase; glucuronosyltransferases) are regulated by antioxidant-responsive elements (ARE), and their induction protects against chemical carcinogenesis. Is HO-1 regulated by chemical agents and enhancer elements similar to those controlling phase 2 enzymes? MATERIALS AND METHODS: Induction of HO-1 by phorbol ester and heavy metals is transcriptionally controlled through a 268-bp SX2 fragment, containing two phorbol ester-responsive (TRE) sites (TGAC/GT C/AA) which overlap ARE consensus sequences (TGACNNNGC). Therefore, mutations of the SX2 element designed to distinguish ARE from TRE were inserted into chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) reporter plasmids, and the response of the CAT activity of murine hepatoma cells stably transfected with these constructs was examined with a wide range of inducers of phase 2 enzymes. RESULTS: All compounds raised HO-1 mRNA and CAT expression constructs containing wild-type SX2. When the SX2 region was mutated to alter TRE consensus sequences without destroying the ARE consensus, full inducibility was preserved. Conversely, when the ARE consensus was disturbed, inducibility was abolished. CONCLUSION: Induction of heme oxygenase-1 is regulated by several chemically distinct classes of inducers (mostly electrophiles), which also induce phase 2 enzymes, and these inductions are mediated by similar AREs. These findings support the importance of HO-1 as a protector against oxidative damage and suggest that HO-1 induction is

  18. Immune response to enzyme replacement therapies in lysosomal storage diseases and the role of immune tolerance induction.

    PubMed

    Kishnani, Priya S; Dickson, Patricia I; Muldowney, Laurie; Lee, Jessica J; Rosenberg, Amy; Abichandani, Rekha; Bluestone, Jeffrey A; Burton, Barbara K; Dewey, Maureen; Freitas, Alexandra; Gavin, Derek; Griebel, Donna; Hogan, Melissa; Holland, Stephen; Tanpaiboon, Pranoot; Turka, Laurence A; Utz, Jeanine J; Wang, Yow-Ming; Whitley, Chester B; Kazi, Zoheb B; Pariser, Anne R

    2016-02-01

    The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and National Organization for Rare Disease (NORD) convened a public workshop titled "Immune Responses to Enzyme Replacement Therapies: Role of Immune Tolerance Induction" to discuss the impact of anti-drug antibodies (ADAs) on efficacy and safety of enzyme replacement therapies (ERTs) intended to treat patients with lysosomal storage diseases (LSDs). Participants in the workshop included FDA staff, clinicians, scientists, patients, industry, and advocacy group representatives. The risks and benefits of implementing prophylactic immune tolerance induction (ITI) to reduce the potential clinical impact of antibody development were considered. Complications due to immune responses to ERT are being recognized with increasing experience and lengths of exposure to ERTs to treat several LSDs. Strategies to mitigate immune responses and to optimize therapies are needed. Discussions during the workshop resulted in the identification of knowledge gaps and future areas of research, as well as the following proposals from the participants: (1) systematic collection of longitudinal data on immunogenicity to better understand the impact of ADAs on long-term clinical outcomes; (2) development of disease-specific biomarkers and outcome measures to assess the effect of ADAs and ITI on efficacy and safety; (3) development of consistent approaches to ADA assays to allow comparisons of immunogenicity data across different products and disease groups, and to expedite reporting of results; (4) establishment of a system to widely share data on antibody titers following treatment with ERTs; (5) identification of components of the protein that are immunogenic so that triggers and components of the immune responses can be targeted in ITI; and (6) consideration of early ITI in patients who are at risk of developing clinically relevant ADA that have been demonstrated to worsen treatment outcomes. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. Regulation and Localization of Key Enzymes during the Induction of Kranz-Less, C4-Type Photosynthesis in Hydrilla verticillata.

    PubMed Central

    Magnin, N. C.; Cooley, B. A.; Reiskind, J. B.; Bowes, G.

    1997-01-01

    Kranz-less, C4-type photosynthesis was induced in the submersed monocot Hydrilla verticillata (L.f.) Royle. During a 12-d induction period the CO2 compensation point and O2 inhibition of photosynthesis declined linearly. Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) activity increased 16-fold, with the major increase occurring within 3 d. Asparagine and alanine aminotransferases were also induced rapidly. Pyruvate orthophosphate dikinase (PPDK) and NADP-malic enzyme (ME) activities increased 10-fold but slowly over 15 d. Total ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase activity did not increase, and its activation declined from 82 to 50%. Western blots for PEPC, PPDK, and NADP-ME indicated that increased protein levels were involved in their induction. The H. verticillata NADP-ME polypeptide was larger (90 kD) than the maize C4 enzyme (62 kD). PEPC and PPDK exhibited up-regulation in the light. Subcellular fractionation of C4-type leaves showed that PEPC was cytosolic, whereas PPDK and NADP-ME were located in the chloroplasts. The O2 inhibition of photosynthesis was doubled when C4-type but not C3-type leaves were exposed to diethyl oxalacetate, a PEPC inhibitor. The data are consistent with a C4-cycle concentrating CO2 in H. verticillata chloroplasts and indicate that Kranz anatomy is not obligatory for C4-type photosynthesis. H. verticillata predates modern terrestrial C4 monocots; therefore, this inducible CO2-concentrating mechanism may represent an ancient form of C4 photosynthesis. PMID:12223888

  20. A bleached-kraft mill effluent fraction causing induction of a fish mixed-function oxygenase enzyme

    SciTech Connect

    Burnison, B.K.; Hodson, P.V.; Nuttley, D.J.; Efler, S.

    1996-09-01

    Pulp mill effluents contain a myriad of chemicals that have the potential to cause deleterious effects on aquatic biota in receiving waters. Some of these chemicals evoke an acute lethal response of exposed biota while others evoke sublethal responses. One such sublethal response is the induction of mixed-function oxygenases (MFO) in fish, specifically the CYP1A1 enzyme ethoxy-resorufin-o-deethylase (EROD). Compounds causing MFO induction include congeners of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), dioxins, furans, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). The authors followed the partitioning of the inducing chemicals in pulp mill effluent fractions by Toxicity Identification Evaluation (TIE), or bioassay-driven chemical analysis. This procedure was eventually modified to a more direct technique involving centrifugation, filtration, cleanup procedures, and C{sub 18} solid-phase adsorption. The extracts from the fractionation of two pulp mill effluents after secondary treatment were tested for EROD-inducing activity in a 4-d rainbow trout bioassay. The methanol extracts of particulates/colloids showed significant inducing capacity in Mill A effluent but not in Mill B effluent. The C{sub 18} methanol extracts induced activity from both effluents, with extracts from Mill A causing the greatest response. The particulate/colloidal extract (Mill A) was used as the source material for chemicals which caused EROD induction. The fraction was purified by solid-phase extraction techniques and reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography. The majority of the EROD activity was found in the moderately nonpolar region of the chromatogram (K{sub ow} = 4.6 to 5.1).

  1. Phase II enzyme induction by a carotenoid, lutein, in a PC12D neuronal cell line

    SciTech Connect

    Miyake, Seiji; Kobayashi, Saori; Tsubota, Kazuo; Ozawa, Yoko

    2014-04-04

    Highlights: • Lutein reduced ROS levels in a PC12D neuronal cell line. • Lutein induced mRNAs of phase II antioxidative enzymes in PC12D neuronal cells. • Lutein increased protein levels of HO-1, SOD2, and NQO-1 in PC12D neuronal cells. • Lutein had no effect on intranuclear Nrf2 levels in PC12D neuronal cells. • Lutein did not activate potential upstream Nrf2 nuclear translocation pathways. - Abstract: The mechanism by which lutein, a carotenoid, acts as an antioxidant in retinal cells is still not fully understood. Here, lutein treatment of a neuronal cell line (PC12D) immediately resulted in reduced intracellular ROS levels, implying that it has a direct role in ROS scavenging. Significantly, lutein treatment also induced phase II antioxidative enzyme expression, probably via a nuclear factor-like 2 (Nrf2) independent pathway. This latter mechanism could explain why lutein acts diversely to protect against oxidative/cytotoxic stress, and why it is physiologically involved in the human neural tissue, such as the retina.

  2. Enzyme-induction dependent bioactivation of troglitazone and troglitazone quinone in vivo.

    PubMed

    Tettey, J N; Maggs, J L; Rapeport, W G; Pirmohamed, M; Park, B K

    2001-08-01

    Troglitazone (TGZ), a 2,4-thiazolidinedione antidiabetic, causes hepatotoxicity in 1.9% of patients. TGZ is an inducer of, and substrate for, hepatic P450 3A. Microsomal metabolism yields a benzoquinone (TGZQ) and reactive intermediates. Kassahun et al. [Kassahun et al. (2001) Chem. Res. Toxicol. 14, 62-70] have trapped the intermediates as thioester, thioether, and disulfide conjugates of glutathione and found five conjugates in rat bile. The thioether was substituted in the chromane moiety. We have investigated the effect of the P450 3A inducer, dexamethasone (DEX), on metabolism of TGZ and TGZQ in rats and assessed the compounds' cytotoxicity. TGZ-glucuronide and sulfonate were confirmed as principal biliary metabolites of TGZ (50 mg/kg, iv). Bile from noninduced animals also contained a TGZ-glutathione thioether adduct (ML3) but it was substituted in the thiazolidinedione moiety. Pretreatment with DEX (50 mg/kg/day for 3 days) resulted in a 2-5-fold increase in the biliary concentration of ML3 and a 2-fold increase in the concentration of TGZQ, which was commensurate with the induction of hepatic P450 3A. Three of the known glutathione-conjugated metabolites were also found. TGZQ (50 mg/kg, iv) was metabolized to an analogue of one of the TGZ-glutathione thioesters and a glutathione adduct of TGZQ hydroquinone after DEX pretreatment. TGZ quinol glucuronide was a biliary metabolite of TGZ and TGZQ. Its formation would represent deactivation of TGZQ. TGZ was toxic to rat hepatocytes and Hep-G2 cells at concentrations exceeding 50 and 25 microM, respectively, after 24 h. In contrast, TGZQ was nontoxic to rat hepatocytes and toxic to Hep G2 cells only at concentrations exceeding 100 microM. Our results show that TGZQ as well as TGZ yields reactive metabolites in vivo, and that bioactivation is enhanced by induction of P450 3A. However, hepatotoxicity is unlikely to be due to either TGZQ or its metabolites.

  3. The induction of two biosynthetic enzymes helps Escherichia coli sustain heme synthesis and activate catalase during hydrogen peroxide stress.

    PubMed

    Mancini, Stefano; Imlay, James A

    2015-05-01

    Hydrogen peroxide pervades many natural environments, including the phagosomes that mediate cell-based immunity. Transcriptomic analysis showed that during protracted low-grade H(2)O(2) stress, Escherichia coli responds by activating both the OxyR defensive regulon and the Fur iron-starvation response. OxyR induced synthesis of two members of the nine-step heme biosynthetic pathway: ferrochelatase (HemH) and an isozyme of coproporphyrinogen III oxidase (HemF). Mutations that blocked either adaptation caused the accumulation of porphyrin intermediates, inadequate activation of heme enzymes, low catalase activity, defective clearance of H(2)O(2) and a failure to grow. Genetic analysis indicated that HemH induction is needed to compensate for iron sequestration by the mini-ferritin Dps. Dps activity protects DNA and proteins by limiting Fenton chemistry, but it interferes with the ability of HemH to acquire the iron that it needs to complete heme synthesis. HemF is a manganoprotein that displaces HemN, an iron-sulfur enzyme whose synthesis and/or stability is apparently problematic during H(2)O(2) stress. Thus, the primary responses to H(2)O(2), including the sequestration of iron, require compensatory adjustments in the mechanisms of iron-cofactor synthesis. The results support the growing evidence that oxidative stress is primarily an iron pathology.

  4. Apoptosis and autophagy induction in mammalian cells by small interfering RNA knockdown of mRNA capping enzymes.

    PubMed

    Chu, Chun; Shatkin, Aaron J

    2008-10-01

    Addition of a 5' cap to RNA polymerase II transcripts, the first step of pre-mRNA processing in eukaryotes from yeasts to mammals, is catalyzed by the sequential action of RNA triphosphatase, guanylyltransferase, and (guanine-N-7)methyltransferase. The effects of knockdown of these capping enzymes in mammalian cells were investigated using T7 RNA polymerase-synthesized small interfering RNA and also a lentivirus-based inducible, short hairpin RNA system. Decreasing either guanylyltransferase or methyltransferase resulted in caspase-3 activation and elevated terminal deoxynucleotidyltransferase-mediated dUTP-biotin nick end labeling (TUNEL) staining characteristic of apoptosis. Induction of apoptosis was independent of p53 tumor suppressor but dependent on BAK or BAX. In addition, levels of the BH3 family member Bim increased, while Mcl-1 and Bik levels remained unchanged during apoptosis. In contrast to capping enzyme knockdown, apoptosis induced by cycloheximide inhibition of protein synthesis required BAK but not BAX. Both Bim and Mcl-1 levels decreased in cycloheximide-induced apoptosis while Bik levels were unchanged, suggesting that apoptosis in siRNA-treated cells is not a direct consequence of loss of mRNA translation. siRNA-treated BAK(-/-) BAX(-/-) double-knockout mouse embryonic fibroblasts failed to activate capase-3 or increase TUNEL staining but instead exhibited autophagy, as demonstrated by proteolytic processing of microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 (LC3) and translocation of transfected green fluorescent protein-LC3 from the nucleus to punctate cytoplasmic structures.

  5. Enhanced response to enzyme replacement therapy in Pompe disease after the induction of immune tolerance.

    PubMed

    Sun, Baodong; Bird, Andrew; Young, Sarah P; Kishnani, Priya S; Chen, Y-T; Koeberl, Dwight D

    2007-11-01

    Pompe disease, which results from mutations in the gene encoding the glycogen-degrading lysosomal enzyme acid alpha -glucosidase (GAA) (also called "acid maltase"), causes death in early childhood related to glycogen accumulation in striated muscle and an accompanying infantile-onset cardiomyopathy. The efficacy of enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) with recombinant human GAA was demonstrated during clinical trials that prolonged subjects' overall survival, prolonged ventilator-free survival, and also improved cardiomyopathy, which led to broad-label approval by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Patients who lack any residual GAA expression and are deemed negative for cross-reacting immunologic material (CRIM) have a poor response to ERT. We previously showed that gene therapy with an adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector containing a liver-specific promoter elevated the GAA activity in plasma and prevented anti-GAA antibody formation in immunocompetent GAA-knockout mice for 18 wk, predicting that liver-specific expression of human GAA with the AAV vector would induce immune tolerance and enhance the efficacy of ERT. In this study, a very low number of AAV vector particles was administered before initiation of ERT, to prevent the antibody response in GAA-knockout mice. A robust antibody response was provoked in naive GAA-knockout mice by 6 wk after a challenge with human GAA and Freund's adjuvant; in contrast, administration of the AAV vector before the GAA challenge prevented the antibody response. Most compellingly, the antibody response was prevented by AAV vector administration during the 12 wk of ERT, and the efficacy of ERT was thereby enhanced. Thus, AAV vector-mediated gene therapy induced a tolerance to introduced GAA, and this strategy could enhance the efficacy of ERT in CRIM-negative patients with Pompe disease and in patients with other lysosomal storage diseases.

  6. Enhanced Response to Enzyme Replacement Therapy in Pompe Disease after the Induction of Immune Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Baodong ; Bird, Andrew ; Young, Sarah P. ; Kishnani, Priya S. ; Chen, Y.-T. ; Koeberl, Dwight D. 

    2007-01-01

    Pompe disease, which results from mutations in the gene encoding the glycogen-degrading lysosomal enzyme acid α-glucosidase (GAA) (also called “acid maltase”), causes death in early childhood related to glycogen accumulation in striated muscle and an accompanying infantile-onset cardiomyopathy. The efficacy of enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) with recombinant human GAA was demonstrated during clinical trials that prolonged subjects’ overall survival, prolonged ventilator-free survival, and also improved cardiomyopathy, which led to broad-label approval by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Patients who lack any residual GAA expression and are deemed negative for cross-reacting immunologic material (CRIM) have a poor response to ERT. We previously showed that gene therapy with an adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector containing a liver-specific promoter elevated the GAA activity in plasma and prevented anti-GAA antibody formation in immunocompetent GAA-knockout mice for 18 wk, predicting that liver-specific expression of human GAA with the AAV vector would induce immune tolerance and enhance the efficacy of ERT. In this study, a very low number of AAV vector particles was administered before initiation of ERT, to prevent the antibody response in GAA-knockout mice. A robust antibody response was provoked in naive GAA-knockout mice by 6 wk after a challenge with human GAA and Freund’s adjuvant; in contrast, administration of the AAV vector before the GAA challenge prevented the antibody response. Most compellingly, the antibody response was prevented by AAV vector administration during the 12 wk of ERT, and the efficacy of ERT was thereby enhanced. Thus, AAV vector–mediated gene therapy induced a tolerance to introduced GAA, and this strategy could enhance the efficacy of ERT in CRIM-negative patients with Pompe disease and in patients with other lysosomal storage diseases. PMID:17924344

  7. FireMaster BP-6: fractionation, metabolic and enzyme induction studies.

    PubMed

    Safe, S; Kohli, J; Crawford, A

    1978-04-01

    FireMaster BP-6 is a commercial polybrominated biphenyl (PBB) preparation containing a complex mixture of isomers with the major component being identified as 2,2',4,4',5,5'-hexabromobiphenyl. Column chromatographic techniques have been developed in which the crude FireMaster is separated into three fractions, F1, F2, and F3, in increasing order of polarity. F1 consists of highly purified 2,2',4,4',5,5'-hexabromobiphenyl (94%) whereas F2-F3 contain less of this isomer and correspondingly more of the other bromobiphenyl components. Previously we have shown that crude FireMaster BP-6 is metabolized in mammals to give hydroxylated degradation products and the metabolism of F1, not unexpectedly, gives comparable results. It is well known that PBBs are effective inducers of diverse microsomal enzymes including including the aryl hydrocarbon hydroxylase (AHH) system. The effects of FireMaster BP-6 and F1-F3 as AHH inducers have been investigated by using the following approach: the substrates used to monitor AHH activity are model halogenated aromatic compounds; the levels of metabolites and metabolite conjugates formed have been quantitated for control and induced enzymes; the levels of macromolecular adducts have also been quantitated for the inducers. This approach thus not only measures the rate of increase of detoxification products (metabolites and metabolite conjugates) but also monitors the macromolecule adduct formation which represents a toxification route. The effects of the PBBs as AHH inducers will be discussed in terms of the above approach.

  8. Phase 2 enzyme induction by conjugated linoleic acid improves lupus-associated oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Bergamo, Paolo; Maurano, Francesco; Rossi, Mauro

    2007-07-01

    Conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) exhibits anticancer and anti-inflammatory properties. Its ability to increase total GSH (GSH+GSSG) amount and gamma-glutamylcysteine ligase (gammaGCL) protein expression was recently associated with the inhibition of typical pathological signs in MRL/MpJ-Fas(lpr) mice (MRL/lpr). In the present study the ability of CLA to modulate oxidative stress and phase 2 enzyme activity in the same animal model was investigated. Disease severity was associated with age-dependent production of anti-double-stranded DNA antibodies (anti-dsDNA IgGs) and with enhanced extent of oxidative stress markers: reduced total GSH, increased protein 3-nitrotyrosines (3-NT), and protein-bound carbonyl (PC) amounts. To examine the effect of CLA on antioxidant status, CLA or olive oil (as control) was administered to pregnant MRL/lpr mice. Significantly higher total GSH and Trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity (TEAC) levels were measured in serum of CLA-treated dams (and their pups), as compared with controls. Finally, the antioxidant and chemopreventive properties of CLA were investigated in old MRL/lpr mice. Sera of CLA-treated mice contained higher concentrations of total GSH which were negatively correlated with the levels of oxidative stress markers. Moreover, increased GSH, gammaGCL, glutathione S-transferase (GSTs), and NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase (NQO1) activities were measured in liver and spleen of CLA-treated animals. In conclusion our data indicate that the activation of detoxifying enzymes may be one of the mechanisms whereby dietary CLA down-regulates oxidative stress in MRL/lpr mice.

  9. [Involvement of microRNA in the induction of drug-metabolizing enzymes].

    PubMed

    Shizu, Ryota; Numazawa, Satoshi; Yoshida, Takemi

    2012-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small noncoding RNAs of about 20 nucleotides in length and participate in the post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression. Accumulating evidence indicates that miRNA binds to 3'-UTR of its target mRNAs and thereby destabilizes the transcripts or suppresses the translation. It is expected that miRNAs could have diverse functions and therefore play a role in the gene expression caused by the drug treatment, which have yet to be determined. Demonstration of the participation of specific miRNA in the drug-mediated gene expression would make it a biomarker for the toxicological assessment and help an understanding of molecular machinery of the drug-drug interaction. Under these backgrounds, we investigated the change of miRNAs in the liver of mice treated with phenobarbital, a typical inducer for drug-metabolizing enzymes, and demonstrate the participation of miRNAs in the phenobarbital-regulated gene expression. We investigated the relationship between phenobarbital-mediated changes in miRNA and mRNA by using Agilent miRNA microarray and DNA microarray, followed by real time RT-PCR. From these experiments, it was suggested that the phenobarbital-induced changes in cyp2c29 and mrp3 are regulated by miR-30a and miR-29b, respectively. In addition, we obtained evidence that indicates a phenobarbital-mediated decrease in miR-122, a highly abundant liver-specific miRNA, leads to the activation of the transcription factor CAR and thereby induces drug-metabolizing enzymes.

  10. Active paraplegics are protected against exercise-induced oxidative damage through the induction of antioxidant enzymes.

    PubMed

    Inglés, M; Serra-Añó, P; Gambini, J; Abu-Sharif, F; Dromant, M; Garcia-Valles, R; Pareja-Galeano, H; Garcia-Lucerga, C; Gomez-Cabrera, M C

    2016-10-01

    Experimental study. Exercise improves functional capacity in spinal cord injury (SCI). However, exhaustive exercise, especially when sporadic, is linked to the production of reactive oxygen species that may have a detrimental effect on SCI. We aimed to study the effect of a single bout of exhaustive exercise on systemic oxidative stress parameters and on the expression of antioxidant enzymes in individuals with paraplegia. The study was conducted in the Physical Therapy department and the Physical Education and Sports department of the University of Valencia. Sixteen paraplegic subjects were submitted to a graded exercise test (GET) until volitional exhaustion. They were divided into active or non-active groups. Blood samples were drawn immediately, 1 and 2 h after the GET. We determined plasma malondialdehyde (MDA) and protein carbonylation as markers of oxidative damage. Antioxidant gene expression (catalase and glutathione peroxidase-GPx) was determined in peripheral blood mononuclear cells. We found a significant increase in plasma MDA and protein carbonyls immediately after the GET (P<0.05). This increment correlated significantly with the lactate levels. Active paraplegics showed lower levels of exercise-induced oxidative damage (P<0.05) and higher exercise-induced catalase (P<0.01) and GPx (P<0.05) gene expression after the GET. These results suggest that exercise training may be useful in SCI patients to develop systemic antioxidant defenses that may protect them against exercise-induced oxidative damage.

  11. Induction of xenobiotic receptors, transporters, and drug metabolizing enzymes by oxycodone.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Hazem E; Myers, Alan L; Lee, Insong J; Mason, Clifford W; Wang, Duan; Sinz, Michael W; Wang, Hongbing; Eddington, Natalie D

    2013-05-01

    Perturbations of the expression of transporters and drug-metabolizing enzymes (DMEs) by opioids can be the locus of deleterious drug-drug interactions (DDIs). Many transporters and DMEs are regulated by xenobiotic receptors [XRs; e.g., pregnane X receptor (PXR), constitutive androstane receptor (CAR), and Aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR)]; however, there is a paucity of information regarding the influence of opioids on XRs. The objective of this study was to determine the influence of oxycodone administration (15 mg/kg intraperitoneally twice daily for 8 days) on liver expression of XRs, transporters, and DMEs in rats. Microarray, quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and immunoblotting analyses were used to identify significantly regulated genes. Three XRs (e.g., PXR, CAR, and AhR), 27 transporters (e.g., ABCB1 and SLC22A8), and 19 DMEs (e.g., CYP2B2 and CYP3A1) were regulated (P < 0.05) with fold changes ranging from -46.3 to 17.1. Using MetaCore (computational platform), we identified a unique gene-network of transporters and DMEs assembled around PXR, CAR, and AhR. Therefore, a series of transactivation/translocation assays were conducted to determine whether the observed changes of transporters/DMEs are mediated by direct activation of PXR, CAR, or AhR by oxycodone or its major metabolites (noroxycodone and oxymorphone). Neither oxycodone nor its metabolites activated PXR, CAR, or AhR. Taken together, these findings identify a signature hepatic gene-network associated with repeated oxycodone administration in rats and demonstrate that oxycodone alters the expression of many transporters and DMEs (without direct activation of PXR, CAR, and AhR), which could lead to undesirable DDIs after coadministration of substrates of these transporters/DMEs with oxycodone.

  12. Loss of glycogen debranching enzyme AGL drives bladder tumor growth via induction of hyaluronic acid synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Guin, Sunny; Ru, Yuanbin; Agarwal, Neeraj; Lew, Carolyn R.; Owens, Charles; Comi, Giacomo P.; Theodorescu, Dan

    2015-01-01

    Purpose We demonstrated that Amylo-alpha-1-6-glucosidase-4-alpha-glucanotransferase (AGL) is a tumor growth suppressor and prognostic marker in human bladder cancer. Here we determine how AGL loss enhances tumor growth, hoping to find therapeutically tractable targets/pathways that could be used in patients with low AGL expressing tumors. Experimental Design We transcriptionally profiled bladder cell lines with different AGL expression. By focusing on transcripts overexpressed as a function of low AGL and associated with adverse clinicopathologic variables in human bladder tumors, we sought to increase the chances of discovering novel therapeutic opportunities. Results One such transcript was hyaluronic acid synthase 2 (HAS2), an enzyme responsible for hyaluronic acid (HA) synthesis. HAS2 expression was inversely proportional to that of AGL in bladder cancer cells and immortalized and normal urothelium. HAS2 driven HA synthesis was enhanced in bladder cancer cells with low AGL and this drove anchorage dependent and independent growth. siRNA mediated depletion of HAS2 or inhibition of HA synthesis by 4-Methylumbelliferone (4MU) abrogated in vitro and xenograft growth of bladder cancer cells with low AGL. AGL and HAS2 mRNA expression in human tumors was inversely correlated in patient datasets. Patients with high HAS2 and low AGL tumor mRNA expression had poor survival lending clinical support to xenograft findings that HAS2 drives growth of tumors with low AGL. Conclusion Our study establishes HAS2 mediated HA synthesis as a driver of growth of bladder cancer with low AGL and provides preclinical rationale for personalized targeting of HAS2/HA signaling in patients with low AGL expressing tumors. PMID:26490312

  13. Induction of TNF-alpha-converting enzyme-ectodomain shedding by pathogenic autoantibodies.

    PubMed

    Sisto, Margherita; Lisi, Sabrina; Lofrumento, Dario Domenico; Frassanito, Maria Antonia; Cucci, Liana; D'Amore, Simona; Mitolo, Vincenzo; D'Amore, Massimo

    2009-12-01

    The release of the soluble form of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha from the plasma membrane occurs through the activation of the secretase tumor necrosis factor-alpha-converting enzyme (TACE). The current study was designed to examine whether the anti-Ro/SSA autoantibodies (Abs) are capable to regulate TACE expression in non-neoplastic human salivary gland epithelial cells (SGEC) cultures. We investigated the effect of anti-Ro/SSA Abs on the localization and abundance of cell-surface TACE and on TACE pro-domain-shedding and activation. In addition, the potential physiological consequences of TNF-alpha blockage by the biological agent Adalimumab on post-translational regulation of TACE are discussed. Anti-Ro/SSA Abs were purified from IgG fractions of patients with primary Sjögren's syndrome, using Sepharose 4B-Ro/SSA affinity columns. Flow cytometry, reverse transcription-PCR, western blot and immunohistochemistry were used to study TACE expression on SGEC and TACE regulation by Abs. Our study demonstrated a dose-dependent increase of TACE messenger RNA (mRNA) expression in anti-Ro/SSA Abs-treated SGEC, followed by internalization, pro-domain shedding and activation of TACE protein, suggesting that increased TACE activity is necessary for the release of TNF-alpha observed in anti-Ro/SSA Abs-stimulated SGEC. Adalimumab treatment brought TACE mRNA and surface TACE expression to levels than those observed in untreated SGEC. These data suggest that the effect of anti-Ro/SSA Abs on TACE expression and intracellular distribution is exerted by TNF-alpha production.

  14. Oligogalacturonide-mediated induction of a gene involved in jasmonic acid synthesis in response to the cell-wall-degrading enzymes of the plant pathogen Erwinia carotovora.

    PubMed

    Norman, C; Vidal, S; Palva, E T

    1999-07-01

    Identification of Arabidopsis thaliana genes responsive to plant cell-wall-degrading enzymes of Erwinia carotovora subsp. carotovora led to the isolation of a cDNA clone with high sequence homology to the gene for allene oxide synthase, an enzyme involved in the biosynthesis of jasmonates. Expression of the corresponding gene was induced by the extracellular enzymes from this pathogen as well as by treatment with methyl jasmonate and short oligogalacturonides (OGAs). This suggests that OGAs are involved in the induction of the jasmonate pathway during plant defense response to E. carotovora subsp. carotovora attack.

  15. Significant interspecies differences in induction profiles of hepatic CYP enzymes by TCDD in bank and field voles.

    PubMed

    Murtomaa-Hautala, Mari; Korkalainen, Merja; Pelkonen, Olavi; Hegde, Nagabhooshan; Pohjanvirta, Raimo; Huitu, Otso; Henttonen, Heikki; Rautio, Arja; Viitala, Pirkko; Viluksela, Matti

    2012-03-01

    The gene expression and induction of cytochrome P450 (CYP)-enzymes following 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) peroral administration was studied in the livers of two wild vole species--the bank vole (Myodes glareolus) and the field vole (Microtus agrestis). The dioxin-sensitive C57BL/6 mouse was used as a reference. Doses of 0.05, 0.5, 5.0, and 50 µg/kg were applied to ascertain a dose-response relationship, and the dose of 50 µg/kg was applied to the study time course for up to 96 h. The cytochrome P450 1A1 (CYP1A1) mRNA expression showed an expected dose-dependent increase equally in both vole species. Bank voles expressed notably higher CYP2A mRNA levels as compared with field voles. Both species exhibited dose-dependent increases in putative CYP1A-, CYP2B-, and CYP2A-associated activities as measured by fluorometric assays for ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase (EROD), penthoxyresorufin-O-depenthylase (PROD), and 7-ethoxycoumarin-O-deethylase (ECOD), respectively. Putative CYP2A-associated coumarin-7-hydroxylase (COH) activity showed a slight increase at the two highest doses of TCDD in field voles but not in bank voles, and their basal COH activity was only one-fourth or less of that in field voles. Overall, however, bank voles tended to exhibit higher CYP-associated enzyme activities measured at the two largest doses of TCDD than field voles. A western blot analysis of aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) revealed that the two vole species had differential band patterns, suggesting dissimilar structures for their AhRs.

  16. A microscale in vitro physiological model of the liver: predictive screens for drug metabolism and enzyme induction.

    PubMed

    Sivaraman, A; Leach, J K; Townsend, S; Iida, T; Hogan, B J; Stolz, D B; Fry, R; Samson, L D; Tannenbaum, S R; Griffith, L G

    2005-12-01

    In vitro models of the liver using isolated primary hepatocytes have been used as screens for measuring the metabolism, toxicity and efficacy of xenobiotics, for studying hepatocyte proliferation, and as bioartificial liver support systems. Yet, primary isolated hepatocytes rapidly lose liver specific functions when maintained under standard in vitro cell culture conditions. Many modifications to conventional culture methods have been developed to foster retention of hepatocyte function. Still, not all of the important functions -- especially the biotransformation functions of the liver -- can as yet be replicated at desired levels, prompting continued development of new culture systems. In the first part of this article, we review primary hepatocyte in vitro systems used in metabolism and enzyme induction studies. We then describe a scalable microreactor system that fosters development of 3D-perfused micro-tissue units and show that primary rat cells cultured in this system are substantially closer to native liver compared to cells cultured by other in vitro methods, as assessed by a broad spectrum of gene expression, protein expression and biochemical activity metrics. These results provide a foundation for extension of this culture model to other applications in drug discovery -- as a model to study drug-drug interactions, as a model for the assessment of acute and chronic liver toxicity arising from exposure to drugs or environmental agents; and as a disease model for the study of viral hepatitis infection and cancer metastasis.

  17. Induction of Shikimic Acid Pathway Enzymes by Light in Suspension Cultured Cells of Parsley (Petroselinum crispum) 1

    PubMed Central

    McCue, Kent F.; Conn, Eric E.

    1990-01-01

    Light treatment of suspension cultured cells of parsley (Petroselinum crispum) was shown to increase the activity of the shikimic acid pathway enzyme, 3-deoxy-d-arabino-heptulosonic acid-7-phosphate (DAHP) synthase (EC 4.1.2.15). DAHP synthase activity was assayed for two isoforms, DS-Mn and DS-Co (RJ Ganson, TA d'Amato, RA Jensen [1986] Plant Physiol 82: 203-210). Light increased the enzymatic activity of the plastidic isoform DS-Mn as much as 2-fold, averaging 1.6-fold with >95% confidence. The cytosolic isoform DS-Co was unaffected. Cycloheximide and actinomycin D, translational and transcriptional inhibitors, respectively, both reversed induction of DS-Mn by light suggesting transcriptional regulation of the gene. Chorismate mutase activity was assayed for the two isoforms CM I and CM II (BK Singh, JA Connelly, EE Conn [1985] Arch Biochem Biophys 243: 374-384). Treatment by light did not significantly affect either chorismate mutase isoform. The ratio of the two chorismate mutase isoforms changed during the growth cycle, with an increase in the ratio of plastidic to cytosolic isoforms occurring towards the end of logarithmic growth. PMID:16667741

  18. Induction by Glucocorticoids of Angiotensin Converting Enzyme Production from Bovine Endothelial Cells in Culture and Rat Lung In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Mendelsohn, F. A. O.; Lloyd, C. J.; Kachel, C.; Funder, J. W.

    1982-01-01

    The effect of corticosteroids on angiotensin converting enzyme was investigated in endothelial cell cultures and intact rat lung. Cultured endothelial cells from bovine aorta showed net production of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) over 2 d culture in serum-free medium. Dexamethasone (DM) increased cell ACE activity six- to sevenfold at 100 nM with a threshold effect at 0.3 nM. The effect of DM on ACE production was completely inhibited by actinomycin D or cycloheximide. Deoxycorticosterone (DOC) and aldosterone were markedly less active, with a threshold near 100 nM and significant (two to threefold) stimulation of ACE activity at 1 μM. In cells incubated in the presence of 10 nM DM, DOC (10 μM) significantly inhibited ACE production compared with 10 nM DM alone, suggesting that DOC is a partial agonist/partial antagonist in this enzyme system. Protein content of cells or medium was unchanged by steroids at all doses used. In vivo, adrenalectomized rats showed lower pulmonary ACE compared with intact controls, and when injected with DM (40 μg/d for 4 d) showed a significant (twofold, P < 0.002) increase in lung ACE over oil-injected, adrenalectomized controls; serum ACE did not change. Injection with DOC (40 μg/d) or aldosterone (10 μg/d) had no effect on lung or serum ACE. Over a range (0.6 to 2,000 μg) of concentrations of DM administered daily for 7 d, the dose-response curve of DM for induction of pulmonary ACE mirrored that for thymolysis; for both, half-maximal effects were seen at ∼6 μg DM/d, and plateau levels at 60 μg/d. We conclude that glucocorticoids are potent inducers of ACE activity in endothelial cells in culture and in rat lung in vivo, and that the action of aldosterone and DOC reflects occupancy of glucocorticoid receptors. This effect may be of (patho)physiological relevance in regulating levels of ACE in local vascular beds, and thereby modulating local levels of the vasoactive peptides angiotensin II and bradykinin. PMID:6286730

  19. Relative potency based on hepatic enzyme induction predicts immunosuppressive effects of a mixture of PCDDS/PCDFS and PCBS

    SciTech Connect

    Smialowicz, R.J.; DeVito, M.J. Williams, W.C.; Birnbaum, L.S.

    2008-03-15

    The toxic equivalency factor (TEF) approach was employed to compare immunotoxic potency of mixtures containing polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins, polychlorinated dibenzofurans and polychlorinated biphenyls relative to 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), using the antibody response to sheep erythrocytes (SRBC). Mixture-1 (MIX-1) contained TCDD, 1,2,3,7,8-pentachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (PeCDD), 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzofuran (TCDF), 1,2,3,7,8-pentachlorodibenzofuran (1-PeCDF), 2,3,4,7,8-pentachlorodibenzofuran (4-PeCDF), and 1,2,3,4,6,7,8,9-octachlorodibenzofuran (OCDF). Mixture-2 (MIX-2) contained MIX-1 and the following PCBs, 3,3',4,4'-tetrachlorobiphenyl (IUPAC No. 77), 3,3',4,4',5-pentachlorobiphenyl (126), 3,3',4,4',5,5N-hexachlorobiphenyl (169), 2,3,3',4,4'-pentachlorobiphenyl (105), 2,3',4,4',5-pentachlorobiphenyl (118), and 2,3,3',4,4',5-hexachlorobiphenyl (156). The mixture compositions were based on relative chemical concentrations in food and human tissues. TCDD equivalents (TEQ) of the mixture were estimated using relative potency factors from hepatic enzyme induction in mice [DeVito, M.J., Diliberto, J.J., Ross, D.G., Menache, M.G., Birnbaum, L.S., 1997. Dose-response relationships for polyhalogenated dioxins and dibenzofurans following subchronic treatment in mice. I .CYP1A1 and CYP1A2 enzyme activity in liver, lung and skin. Toxicol. Appl. Pharmacol. 130, 197-208; DeVito, M.J., Menache, G., Diliberto, J.J., Ross, D.G., Birnbaum L.S., 2000. Dose-response relationships for induction of CYP1A1 and CYP1A2 enzyme activity in liver, lung, and skin in female mice following subchronic exposure to polychlorinated biphenyls. Toxicol. Appl. Pharmacol. 167, 157-172] Female mice received 0, 1.5, 15, 150 or 450 ng TCDD/kg/day or approximately 0, 1.5, 15, 150 or 450 ng TEQ/kg/day of MIX-1 or MIX-2 by gavage 5 days per week for 13 weeks. Mice were immunized 3 days after the last exposure and 4 days later, body, spleen, thymus, and liver weights were measured

  20. Dose of Phenobarbital and Age of Treatment at Early Life are Two Key Factors for the Persistent Induction of Cytochrome P450 Enzymes in Adult Mouse Liver

    PubMed Central

    Tien, Yun-Chen; Liu, Ke; Pope, Chad; Wang, Pengcheng; Ma, Xiaochao

    2015-01-01

    Drug treatment of neonates and infants and its long-term consequences on drug responses have emerged in recent years as a major challenge for health care professionals. In the current study, we use phenobarbital as a model drug and mouse as an in vivo model to demonstrate that the dose of phenobarbital and age of treatment are two key factors for the persistent induction of gene expression and consequential increases of enzyme activities of Cyp2b, Cyp2c, and Cyp3a in adult livers. We show that phenobarbital treatment at early life of day 5 after birth with a low dose (<100 mg/kg) does not change expression and enzyme activities of Cyp2b, Cyp2c, and Cyp3a in adult mouse liver, whereas phenobarbital treatment with a high dose (>200 mg/kg) significantly increases expression and enzyme activities of these P450s in adult liver. We also demonstrate that phenobarbital treatment before day 10 after birth, but not at later ages, significantly increases mRNAs, proteins, and enzyme activities of the tested P450s. Such persistent induction of P450 gene expression and enzyme activities in adult livers by phenobarbital treatment only occurs within a sensitive age window early in life. The persistent induction in gene expression and enzyme activities is higher in female mice than in male mice for Cyp2b10 but not for Cyp2c29 and Cyp3a11. These results will stimulate studies to evaluate the long-term impacts of drug treatment with different doses at neonatal and infant ages on drug metabolism, therapeutic efficacy, and drug-induced toxicity throughout the rest of life. PMID:26400395

  1. Dose of Phenobarbital and Age of Treatment at Early Life are Two Key Factors for the Persistent Induction of Cytochrome P450 Enzymes in Adult Mouse Liver.

    PubMed

    Tien, Yun-Chen; Liu, Ke; Pope, Chad; Wang, Pengcheng; Ma, Xiaochao; Zhong, Xiao-bo

    2015-12-01

    Drug treatment of neonates and infants and its long-term consequences on drug responses have emerged in recent years as a major challenge for health care professionals. In the current study, we use phenobarbital as a model drug and mouse as an in vivo model to demonstrate that the dose of phenobarbital and age of treatment are two key factors for the persistent induction of gene expression and consequential increases of enzyme activities of Cyp2b, Cyp2c, and Cyp3a in adult livers. We show that phenobarbital treatment at early life of day 5 after birth with a low dose (<100 mg/kg) does not change expression and enzyme activities of Cyp2b, Cyp2c, and Cyp3a in adult mouse liver, whereas phenobarbital treatment with a high dose (>200 mg/kg) significantly increases expression and enzyme activities of these P450s in adult liver. We also demonstrate that phenobarbital treatment before day 10 after birth, but not at later ages, significantly increases mRNAs, proteins, and enzyme activities of the tested P450s. Such persistent induction of P450 gene expression and enzyme activities in adult livers by phenobarbital treatment only occurs within a sensitive age window early in life. The persistent induction in gene expression and enzyme activities is higher in female mice than in male mice for Cyp2b10 but not for Cyp2c29 and Cyp3a11. These results will stimulate studies to evaluate the long-term impacts of drug treatment with different doses at neonatal and infant ages on drug metabolism, therapeutic efficacy, and drug-induced toxicity throughout the rest of life. Copyright © 2015 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  2. Correlation between mixed-function oxidase enzyme induction and aflatoxin B/sub 1/-induced unscheduled DNA synthesis in the chick embryo, in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, J.W.; Bloom, S.E.

    1984-01-01

    The unscheduled DNA synthesis (UDS) technique has been adapted for use in the chick embryo, in vivo, to determine the relationship between induction of the mixed-function oxidase (MFO) enzyme system and genetic damage from an indirect-acting mutagen-carcinogen. Embryos were injected at 6 days of incubation (DI) with either phenobarbital (PB), a specific inducer of P-450-associated enzyme activities, or 3,4,3',4'-tetrachlorobiphenyl (TCB), a specific inducer of P/sub 1/-450-associated enzyme activities. Aflatoxin B/sub 1/ (AFB1) was injected 24 hr later (7 DI), followed by a 5-hr continuous /sup 3/H-thymidine exposure. The livers were removed, prepared for autoradiography, and hepatocytes were scored for an increase in grains/nucleus, indicative of UDS. Aflatoxin B/sub 1/ caused a dose-related increase in UDS in all control and induction groups. Phenobarbital-induced embryos had an increased UDS response while TCB-induced embryos had a decreased UDS response, relative to noninduced embryos, for each dosage of AFB1. This suggests that the genotoxicity of an indirect-acting mutagen-carcinogen can be either increased or decreased, in vivo, depending on the inducer used. The chick embryo provides an excellent system for studying the effect of MFO induction on the genotoxicity of promutagen-carcinogens in a developing system.

  3. Sex difference in induction of hepatic CYP2B and CYP3A subfamily enzymes by nicardipine and nifedipine in rats.

    PubMed

    Konno, Yoshihiro; Sekimoto, Masashi; Nemoto, Kiyomitsu; Degawa, Masakuni

    2004-04-01

    Male and female of F344 rats were treated per os with nicardipine (Nic) and nifedipine (Nif), and changes in the levels of mRNA and protein of hepatic cytochrome P450 (P450) enzymes, CYP2B1, CYP2B2, CYP3A1, CYP3A2, CYP3A9, and CYP3A18 were examined. Furthermore, hepatic microsomal activities for pentoxyresorufin O-dealkylation (PROD) and nifedipine oxidation, which are mainly mediated by CYP2B and CYP3A subfamily enzymes, respectively, were measured. Analyses of RT-PCR and Western blotting revealed that Nic and Nif induced predominantly CYP3A and CYP2B enzymes, respectively. As for the gene activation of CYP2B enzymes, especially CYP2B1, Nif showed high capacity in both sexes of rats, whereas Nic did a definite capacity in the males but little in the females. Gene activations of CYP3A1, CYP3A2, and CYP3A18 by Nic occurred in both sexes of rats, although that of CYP3A9 did only in the male rats. Although gene activations of CYP3A1 and CYP3A2 by Nif were observed in both sexes of rats, a slight activation of the CYP3A9 gene occurred only in female rats, and the CYP3A18 gene activation, in neither male nor female rats. Thus, changes in levels of the mRNA or protein of CYP2B and CYP3A enzymes, especially CYP2B1 and CYP3A2, were closely correlated with those in hepatic PROD and nifedipine oxidation activities, respectively. The present findings demonstrate for the first time the sex difference in the Nic- and Nif-mediated induction of hepatic P450 enzymes in rats and further indicate that Nic and Nif show different specificities and sex dependencies in the induction of hepatic P450 enzymes.

  4. Global Gene Expression Profiling of Endothelium Exposed to Heme Reveals an Organ-Specific Induction of Cytoprotective Enzymes in Sickle Cell Disease

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Tianwei; Li, Yuhua; Adisa, Olufolake; Mosunjac, Mario; Ofori-Acquah, Solomon F.

    2011-01-01

    Background Sickle cell disease (SCD) is characterized by hemolysis, vaso-occlusion and ischemia reperfusion injury. These events cause endothelial dysfunction and vasculopathies in multiple systems. However, the lack of atherosclerotic lesions has led to the idea that there are adaptive mechanisms that protect the endothelium from major vascular insults in SCD patients. The molecular bases for this phenomenon are poorly defined. This study was designed to identify the global profile of genes induced by heme in the endothelium, and assess expression of the heme-inducible cytoprotective enzymes in major organs impacted by SCD. Methods and Findings Total RNA isolated from heme-treated endothelial monolayers was screened with the Affymetrix U133 Plus 2.0 chip, and the microarray data analyzed using multiple bioinformatics software. Hierarchical cluster analysis of significantly differentially expressed genes successfully segregated heme and vehicle-treated endothelium. Validation studies showed that the induction of cytoprotective enzymes by heme was influenced by the origin of endothelial cells, the duration of treatment, as well as the magnitude of induction of individual enzymes. In agreement with these heterogeneities, we found that induction of two major Nrf2-regulated cytoprotective enzymes, heme oxygenase-1 and NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase-1 is organ-specific in two transgenic mouse models of SCD. This data was confirmed in the endothelium of post-mortem lung tissues of SCD patients. Conclusions Individual organ systems induce unique profiles of cytoprotective enzymes to neutralize heme in SCD. Understanding this heterogeneity may help to develop effective therapies to manage vasculopathies of individual systems. PMID:21483798

  5. Nano red elemental selenium has no size effect in the induction of seleno-enzymes in both cultured cells and mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jinsong; Wang, Huali; Bao, Yongping; Zhang, Lide

    2004-05-28

    We previous reported that a nano red elemental selenium (Nano-Se) in the range from 20 approximately 60 nm had similar bioavailability to sodium selenite (BioFactors 15 (2001) 27). We recently found that Nano-Se with different size had marked difference in scavenging an array of free radicals in vitro, the smaller the particle, the better scavenging activity (Free Radic. Biol. Med. 35 (2003) 805). In order to examine whether there is a size effect of Nano-Se in the induction of Se-dependent enzymes, a range of Nano-Se (5 approximately 200 nm) have been prepared based on the control of elemental Se atom aggregation. The sizes of Nano-Se particles were inversely correlated with protein levels in the redox system of selenite and glutathione. Different sizes of red elemental Se were prepared by adding varying amount of bovine serum albumin (BSA). Three different sizes of Nano-Se (5 approximately 15 nm, 20 approximately 60 nm, and 80 approximately 200 nm) have been chosen for the comparison of biological activity in terms of the induction of seleno-enzyme activities. Results showed that there was no significant size effect of Nano-Se from 5 to 200 nm in the induction of glutathione peroxidase (GPx), phospholipid hydroperoxide glutathione peroxidase (PHGPx) and thioredoxin reductase-1 (TrxR-1) in human hepatoma HepG2 cells and the livers of mice.

  6. Kinetic determination of vitellogenin induction in the epidermis of cyprinid and perciform fishes: Evaluation of sensitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays.

    PubMed

    Allner, Bernhard; Hennies, Mark; Lerche, Cristiano F; Schmidt, Thomas; Schneider, Klaus; Willner, Marco; Stahlschmidt-Allner, Petra

    2016-12-01

    Induction of vitellogenin (VTG) in male and immature fish is a standardized endpoint in endocrine-disruption testing. To establish a nondestructive swab sampling method, VTG induction in the epidermis of Cypriniformes and Perciformes species was investigated. Both VTG and estrogen receptor genes are expressed in epidermal cells. Immunoaffinity and mass fingerprint analyses show induction of identical VTG peptides in liver and epidermis. Induction of VTG by estradiol (E2) and bisphenol A (BPA) in the epidermis was quantified with homolog enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Initial values in juveniles and males were below 1 ng VTG/mL extraction buffer. Exposure to E2 led to values between 200 ng/mL and 4600 ng/mL in cyprinids and between 10 ng/mL and 81 ng/mL in perciforms. Exposure to BPA increased VTG amounts to 250 ng/mL in fathead minnows, 1360 ng/mL in goldfish, 100 ng/mL in zebrafish, and 12 ng/mL in bluegills. Serum VTG contents demonstrated a similar dose-response pattern in the epidermis and the blood. These results show that VTG induction may be reliably assessed in the skin mucus of fishes, demonstrating the suitability of this biological sample for investigating estrogenic activity in compliance with Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development standard protocols. This broadens the perspectives in toxicological screening and environmental monitoring, reducing the number of tested animals and minimizing harmful effects for animals, allowing for follow-up of individual induction profiles. Environ Toxicol Chem 2016;35:2916-2930. © 2016 The Authors. Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of SETAC.

  7. Hazardous effect of organophosphate compound, dichlorvos in transgenic Drosophila melanogaster (hsp70-lacZ): induction of hsp70, anti-oxidant enzymes and inhibition of acetylcholinesterase.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Subash Chandra; Siddique, Hifzur Rahman; Saxena, Daya Krishna; Chowdhuri, Debapratim Kar

    2005-08-30

    We tested a working hypothesis that stress genes and anti-oxidant enzyme machinery are induced by the organophosphate compound dichlorvos in a non-target organism. Third instar larvae of Drosophila melanogaster transgenic for hsp70 were exposed to 0.1 to 100.0 ppb dichlorvos and 5.0 mM CuSO(4) (an inducer of oxidative stress and stress genes) and hsp70, and activities of acetylcholinesterase (AchE), superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and lipid peroxidation (LPO) product were measured. The study was further extended to examine tissue damage, if any, under such conditions. A concentration- and time-dependent increase in hsp70 and anti-oxidant enzymes was observed in the exposed organism as compared to control. A comparison of stress gene expression with SOD, CAT activities and LPO product under similar experimental conditions revealed that induction of hsp70 precedes the anti-oxidant enzyme activities in the exposed organism. Further, concomitant with a significant inhibition of AChE activity, significant induction of hsp70 was observed following chemical exposure. Mild tissue damage was observed in the larvae exposed to 10.0 ppb dichlorvos for 48 h when hsp70 expression reaches plateau. Dichlorvos at 0.1 ppb dietary concentration did not evoke significant hsp70 expression, anti-oxidant enzymes and LPO and AchE inhibition in the exposed organism, and thereby, was found to be non-hazardous to D. melanogaster. Conversely, 1.0 ppb of the test chemical stimulated a significant induction of hsp70 and anti-oxidant enzymes and significant inhibition of AchE; hence this concentration of test chemical was hazardous to the organism. The present study suggests that (a) both stress genes and anti-oxidant enzymes are stimulated as indices of cellular defense against xenobiotic hazard in D. melanogaster with hsp70 being proposed as first-tier bio-indicator of cellular hazard, (b) 0.1 ppb of the test chemical may be regarded as No Observed Adverse Effect Level (NOAEL), and

  8. Rapid induction by fungal elicitor of the synthesis of cinnamyl-alcohol dehydrogenase, a specific enzyme of lignin synthesis.

    PubMed

    Grand, C; Sarni, F; Lamb, C J

    1987-11-16

    A fivefold increase in the extractable activity of cinnamyl-alcohol dehydrogenase, an enzyme of phenylpropanoid metabolism specific for lignin synthesis, was observed within 10 h of treatment of cell-suspension cultures of bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) with a high-molecular-mass elicitor preparation heat-released from mycelial cell walls of the bean pathogen Colletotrichum lindemuthianum. Elicitor caused a rapid, marked but transient increase in the synthesis of cinnamyl-alcohol dehydrogenase with maximum rates 2-3 h after elicitation, concomitant with the phase of rapid increase in enzyme activity. There is a close correspondence between increased polysomal mRNA activity encoding cinnamyl-alcohol dehydrogenase, as measured by incorporation of [35S]methionine into immunoprecipitable enzyme subunits in vitro, and the stimulation of enzyme synthesis in vivo in response to elicitor. This marked increase in polysomal mRNA activity represents an increase as a proportion of total cellular mRNA activity, indicating that elicitor does not stimulate synthesis of this enzyme by selective recruitment from the total pool of cellular mRNA. Elicitor stimulation of cinnamyl-alcohol dehydrogenase activity and enzyme synthesis is more rapid than previously observed for other proteins involved inducible defense mechanisms, such as enzymes of phytoalexin biosynthesis or the apoproteins of cell-wall hydroxyproline-rich glycoproteins.

  9. Influence of temperature and ontogeny on the levels of glucosinolates in broccoli (Brassica oleracea Var. italica) sprouts and their effect on the induction of mammalian phase 2 enzymes.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Fernanda Maria Valente; Rosa, Eduardo; Fahey, Jed W; Stephenson, Katherine K; Carvalho, Rosa; Aires, Alfredo

    2002-10-09

    Broccoli inflorescences have been recognized as components of healthy diets on the basis of their high content of fiber, vitamin C, carotenoids, and glucosinolates/isothiocyanates. Broccoli sprouts have been recently shown to have high levels of glucoraphanin (4-methylsulfinylbutyl glucosinolate), the precursor of the chemoprotective isothiocyanate, sulforaphane. This study evaluated the effects of temperature and developmental stage on the glucosinolate content of broccoli sprouts. Seedlings cultivated using a 30/15 degrees C (day/night) temperature regime had significantly higher glucosinolate levels (measured at six consecutive days postemergence) than did sprouts cultivated at lower temperatures (22/15 and 18/12 degrees C; p < 0.001). Both higher (33.1 degrees C) and lower (11.3 degrees C) constant temperatures induced higher glucosinolate levels in sprouts grown to a uniform size. Glucosinolate levels were highest in cotyledons and lowest in roots of sprouts dissected both early and late in the 11 day developmental span investigated. Nongerminated seeds have the highest glucosinolate levels and concordantly greater induction of mammalian phase 2 detoxication enzymes. Levels decline as sprouts germinate and develop, with consistently higher glucosinolate content in younger developmental stages, independent of the temperature regime. Temperature stress or its associated developmental anomalies induce higher glucosinolate levels, specific elevations in glucoraphanin content, and parallel induction of phase 2 chemoprotective enzymes.

  10. Enzyme induction and histopathology elucidate aryl hydrocarbon receptor-mediated versus non-aryl hydrocarbon receptor-mediated effects of Aroclor 1268 in American mink (Neovison vison).

    PubMed

    Folland, William R; Newsted, John L; Fitzgerald, Scott D; Fuchsman, Phyllis C; Bradley, Patrick W; Kern, John; Kannan, Kurunthachalam; Zwiernik, Matthew J

    2016-03-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) concentrations reported in preferred prey and blubber of bottlenose dolphins from the Turtle-Brunswick River estuary (Georgia, USA) suggest the potential for adverse effects. However, PCBs in Turtle-Brunswick River estuary dolphins are primarily derived from Aroclor 1268, and predicting toxic effects of Aroclor 1268 is uncertain because of the mixture's unique composition and associated physiochemical characteristics. These differences suggest that toxicity benchmarks for other PCB mixtures may not be relevant to dolphins exposed to Aroclor 1268. American mink (Neovison vison) were used as a surrogate model for cetaceans to characterize mechanisms of action associated with Aroclor 1268 exposure. Mink share similarities in phylogeny and life history with cetaceans and are characteristically sensitive to PCBs, making them an attractive surrogate species for marine mammals in ecotoxicity studies. Adult female mink and a subsequent F1 generation were exposed to Aroclor 1268 through diet, and effects on enzyme induction, histopathology, thyroid hormone regulation, hematology, organ weights, and body condition index were compared to a negative control and a 3,3',4,4',5-pentachlorobiphenyl (PCB 126)-positive control. Aroclor 1268 dietary exposure concentrations ranged from 1.8 µg/g wet weight to 29 µg/g wet weight. Anemia, hypothyroidism, and hepatomegaly were observed in mink exposed to Aroclor 1268 beyond various dietary thresholds. Cytochrome P450 induction and squamous epithelial proliferation jaw lesions were low in Aroclor 1268 treatments relative to the positive control. Differences in enzyme induction and the development of squamous epithelial proliferation jaw lesions between Aroclor 1268 treatments and the positive control, coupled with effects observed in Aroclor 1268 treatments not observed in the positive control, indicate that mechanisms additional to the aryl hydrocarbon receptor-mediated pathway are associated with

  11. Induction of chalcone isomerase in elicitor-treated bean cells. Comparison of rates of synthesis and appearance of immunodetectable enzyme.

    PubMed

    Robbins, M P; Dixon, R A

    1984-11-15

    Chalcone isomerase, an enzyme involved in the formation of flavonoid-derived compounds in plants, has been purified nearly 600-fold from cell suspension cultures of dwarf French bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.). Chromatofocussing yielded a single form of the enzyme of apparent pI 5.0. This preparation was used to raise rabbit anti-(chalcone isomerase) serum. Changes in the rate of synthesis of chalcone isomerase have been investigated by indirect immunoprecipitation of enzyme labelled in vivo with [35S]methionine in elicitor-treated cultures of P. vulgaris. Elicitor, heat-released from cell walls of the phytopathogenic fungus Colletotrichum lindemuthianum, the causal agent of anthracnose disease of bean, causes increased synthesis of the isomerase, with maximum synthetic rate occurring 11-12 h after exposure to elicitor. Immune blotting studies indicate that the elicitor-mediated increase in extractable activity of the isomerase is associated with increased appearance of immunodetactable isomerase protein of Mr 27 000. However, the maximum level of immunodetectable isomerase was attained approximately 6 h earlier than maximum extractable activity. Furthermore, a 2.8-fold increase in enzyme activity above basal levels at 12 h after elicitor-treatment was associated with a corresponding 5.8-fold increase in immunodetectable enzyme. It is concluded that elicitor induces the synthesis of both active and inactive chalcone isomerase of Mr 27 000, and that some activation of inactive enzyme occurs during the elicitor-mediated increase in isomerase activity. The presence of a pool of inactive chalcone isomerase in bean cell cultures has recently been suggested on the basis of density labelling experiments utilising 2H from 2H2O [Dixon et al. (1983) Planta (Berl.) 159, 561-569].

  12. Effects of vitamin A and/or thyroidectomy on liver microsomal enzymes and their induction in 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin-treated rats.

    PubMed

    Rozman, K; Gorski, J R; Dutton, D; Parkinson, A

    1987-10-12

    Vitamin A and thyroid hormone status have been shown previously to alter the toxicity of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) in rats. In the present study, we have examined the effects of a vitamin A-excess and a vitamin A-deficient diet on thyroid hormone levels, on selected drug-metabolizing enzymes in liver microsomes, and on their inducibility by TCDD in male Sprague-Dawley rats. Except for a slight increase in serum T3 levels, none of these end points was affected by feeding rats the vitamin A-deficient diet. In contrast, excess dietary vitamin A caused a decrease in serum thyroxine (T4) and triiodothyronine (T3) levels, although the levels of T3 remained in the euthyroid range (60-80 ng/dl). The concentration of liver microsomal cytochromes P-450 and b5 and the basal activity of benzo[a]pyrene hydroxylase and 7-ethoxyresorufin O-de-ethylase were unaffected by excess dietary vitamin A. This result is consistent with our previous observation that the basal activity of these enzymes is dependent more on T3 than on T4 levels. Vitamin A excess markedly suppressed the activity of liver microsomal UDP-glucuronosyl transferase toward 1-naphthol. However, no such enzyme suppression was observed in thyroidectomized rats. This suggests that the suppressive effect of vitamin A on UDP-glucuronosyl transferase activity may be dependent on T3. Neither vitamin A nor thyroid status had any major effect on the inducibility of UDP-glucuronosyl transferase and cytochrome P-450-dependent enzyme activities by TCDD. However, vitamin A and TCDD had a nearly additive effect on suppression of serum T4. It is concluded that liver microsomal enzyme induction is not associated with the modulatory effect of vitamin A and thyroid hormones on the toxicity of TCDD.

  13. Induction of leucine aminopeptidase (LAP) like activity with wounding and methyl jasmonate in pigeonpea (Cajanas cajan) suggests the role of these enzymes in plant defense in leguminosae.

    PubMed

    Lomate, Purushottam R; Hivrale, Vandana K

    2011-06-01

    Aminopeptidases are ubiquitous in nature and their activities have been identified in several plant species. Leucine aminopeptidases (LAPs) are predominantly studied in solanaceous plants and are induced in response to wounding, herbivory and methyl jasmonate (MeJA). The functions of plant aminopeptidases are still under discussion and it is likely that the different classes play various roles. In the present study we report the local and systemic induction of LAP-like activity upon mechanical wounding and MeJA treatment. Two proteins with LAP-like activity were detected in pigeonpea leaves. They were designated as AP1 and AP2. AP1 activity was significantly induced upon wounding and application of MeJA. The estimated molecular masses of AP1 and AP2 were ∼ 60 and 41 kDa respectively in SDS-PAGE. The pH optimum for LAP-like activity in control leaf extracts was found to be neutral (pH 7.0) however the enzymes showed highest activity at alkaline pH (pH 9.0) in the leaf extracts of treated plants. The temperature optimum for LAP-like activity was around 40-50 °C. The enzymes were strongly inhibited by 1, 10 phenanthroline and bestatin. Heavy metal ions and EDTA inhibited LAP-like activities, whereas Mn(+2) and Mg(+2) activated the enzyme activities. Beside LpNA (33.5 U/mg/min) pigeonpea LAP-like enzymes also cleaved ApNA (15 U/mg/min) but were unable to cleave VpNA. Total proteolytic activity was also observed to be induced in treated plants. LAP-like activity was increased upto 19.5 fold after gel filtration chromatography. Results suggest that these enzymes may have functional defensive role in pigeonpea.

  14. Induction of mixed-function oxygenase system and antioxidant enzymes in the coral Montastraea faveolata on acute exposure to benzo(a)pyrene.

    PubMed

    Ramos, R; García, E

    2007-01-01

    Components of the cytochrome P(450) monooxygenase system (MFO) and antioxidant enzymes were investigated in the coral Montastraea faveolata exposed to the organic contaminant benzo(a)pyrene (B(a)P). For bioassays the corals were exposed to increasing concentrations of B(a)P (0.01 and 0.1 ppm) for 24 and 72 h, with water renewal every 24 h. Enzymatic activity of catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione S-transferase (GST) were measured in host (polyp) and hosted (zooxanthellae) cells. NADPH cytochrome c reductase activity and contents of cytochrome P(450) and P(420) were only measured in the polyp. Antioxidant enzymes CAT and SOD in polyps and zooxanthellae and GST in polyps increased significantly at the highest concentration and maximum time of exposure. Cytochrome P(420) was found in all colonies, and the cytochrome P(450) content was greatest in the colonies from the highest concentrations of contaminant. NADPH cytochrome c reductase activity and the concentration of pigments did not vary between treatments. This is the first report of the induction of both detoxifying mechanisms, the MFO system and antioxidant enzymes on acute exposure to an organic contaminant in the reef-constructing coral species M. faveolata.

  15. Induction of hepatic CYP3A enzymes by pregnancy-related hormones: studies in human hepatocytes and hepatic cell lines.

    PubMed

    Papageorgiou, Ioannis; Grepper, Susan; Unadkat, Jashvant D

    2013-02-01

    CYP3A activity is induced by approximately 2-fold during the third trimester of human pregnancy. Placental growth hormone (PGH), estrogens (primarily 17β-estradiol), cortisol, and progesterone have the potential to modulate CYP3A activity. Therefore, we determined whether the elevated plasma concentrations of these hormones during pregnancy induce hepatic CYP3A expression. We incubated sandwich-cultured human hepatocytes (SCHH) from premenopausal female donors (n = 2) with the physiologic (unbound, 1× total) and the 10× total third trimester hormone plasma concentrations (individually and in combination) and determined their effect on CYP3A activity and the transcripts of CYP3A4, CYP3A5, and the respective hormone receptors (growth hormone receptor, glucocorticoid receptor, and estrogen receptor alpha). Of all the hormones, cortisol was the most potent inducer of CYP3A activity and CYP3A4, CYP3A5 mRNA expression. The combination of PGH/growth hormone and cortisol induced CYP3A activity and expression significantly more than did cortisol alone. When incubated with the unbound or total plasma concentration of all the hormones, CYP3A activity in SCHH was induced to an extent comparable to that observed in vivo during the third trimester. These hormones had only a modest effect on the mRNA expression of the hormone receptors. The pattern of induction observed in SCHH was reproduced in HepaRG cells but not in HuH7/HepG2 cells. SCHH or HepaRG cells could be used to determine the mechanistic basis of CYP3A induction during pregnancy and to predict the magnitude of induction likely to be observed during the first and second trimesters, when phenotyping studies to measure in vivo CYP3A activity are logistically difficult to perform.

  16. Combined effect of copper and cadmium on heavy metal ion bioaccumulation and antioxidant enzymes induction in Chlorella vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Qian, Haifeng; Li, Jingjing; Pan, Xiangjie; Sun, Liwei; Lu, Tao; Ran, Hongyu; Fu, Zhengwei

    2011-11-01

    The relationships between metal uptake and antioxidant enzyme activities or a response to membrane lipid peroxidation (i.e., malondialdehyde production) in Chlorella vulgaris exposed to Cu and Cd compounds singly and in combination were investigated. The results showed that bioaccumulation of a single metal was influenced by the presence of the other metal. The activities of superoxide dismutase and peroxidase increased to more than fivefold of the control after exposure to Cu(1.5 μM) alone or to Cu(1.5 μM) with Cd mixtures. Malondialdehyde levels in C. vulgaris also increased to approximately twofold of the control after exposure to high concentration of Cu(1.5 μM) alone or to Cu and Cd mixtures. However, Cd alone did not significantly increase the levels of antioxidant enzymes or malondialdehyde.

  17. Copper and zinc induction of lipid peroxidation and effects on antioxidant enzyme activities in the microalga Pavlova viridis (Prymnesiophyceae).

    PubMed

    Li, Mei; Hu, Changwei; Zhu, Qin; Chen, Li; Kong, Zhiming; Liu, Zhili

    2006-01-01

    The metal-induced lipid peroxidation and response of antioxidative enzymes have been investigated in the marine microalga Pavlova viridis to understand the mechanisms of metal resistance in algal cells. We have analyzed superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPX) activities and glutathione (GSH) contents in microalgal cells grown at different concentrations of copper and zinc. In response to each metal, lipid peroxidation was enhanced with the increase of concentrations, as an indication of the oxidative damage caused by metal concentration assayed in the microalgae cells. Exposure of P. viridis to the two metals caused changes in enzyme activities in a different manner, depending on the metal assayed: after copper treatments, total SOD activity was enhanced, while it was reduced after zinc exposure. Copper and zinc stimulated the activities of CAT and GSH whereas GPX showed a remarkable increase in activity in response to copper treatments and decrease after zinc treatments. These results suggest that an activation of some antioxidant enzymes was enhanced to counteract the oxidative stress induced by the two metals.

  18. Effects of Enzyme Induction and/or Glutathione Depletion on Methimazole-Induced Hepatotoxicity in Mice and the Protective Role of N-Acetylcysteine

    PubMed Central

    Heidari, Reza; Babaei, Hossein; Roshangar, Leila; Eghbal, Mohammad Ali

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Methimazole is the most convenient drug used in the management of hyperthyroid patients. However, associated with its clinical use is hepatotoxicity as a life threatening adverse effect. The exact mechanism of methimazole-induced hepatotoxicity is still far from clear and no protective agent has been developed for this toxicity. Methods: This study attempts to evaluate the hepatotoxicity induced by methimazole at different experimental conditions in a mice model. Methimazole-induced hepatotoxicity was investigated in different situations such as enzyme induced and/or glutathione depleted animals. Results: Methimazole (100 mg/kg, i.p) administration caused hepatotoxicity as revealed by increase in serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT) activity as well as pathological changes of the liver. Furthermore, a significant reduction in hepatic glutathione content and an elevation in lipid peroxidation were observed in methimazole-treated mice. Combined administration of L-buthionine sulfoximine (BSO), as a glutathione depletory agent, caused a dramatic change in methimazole-induced hepatotoxicity characterized by hepatic necrosis and a severe elevation of serum ALT activity. Enzyme induction using phenobarbital and/or β-naphtoflavone beforehand, deteriorated methimazole-induced hepatotoxicity in mice. N-acetyl cysteine (300 mg/kg, i.p) administration effectively alleviated hepatotoxic effects of methimazole in both glutathione-depleted and/or enzyme induced animals. Conclusion: The severe hepatotoxic effects of methimazole in glutathione-depleted animals, reveals the crucial role of glutathione as a cellular defense mechanism against methimazole-induced hepatotoxicity. Furthermore, the more hepatotoxic properties of methimazole in enzyme-induced mice, indicates the role of reactive intermediates in the hepatotoxicity induced by this drug. The protective effects of N-acetylcysteine could be attributed to its radical/reactive metabolite scavenging, and/or antioxidant

  19. Effect of naturally occurring plant phenolics on the induction of drug metabolizing enzymes by o-toluidine.

    PubMed

    Szaefer, Hanna; Jodynis-Liebert, Jadwiga; Cichocki, Michał; Matuszewska, Arleta; Baer-Dubowska, Wanda

    2003-04-15

    Plant phenolics modify the metabolic activation of several carcinogens, including aromatic amines. In this study, we have evaluated the effects of three structurally diversified plant phenolics, protocatechuic acid (PCA), tannic acid (TA) and ellagic acid (EA) on cytochrome p450-dependent enzymes and glutathione S-transferase (GST) activities after oral administration alone or in combination with o-toluidine in rat liver and kidney. Protocatechuic and ellagic acids significantly decreased the activities of ethoxy- (EROD), methoxy- (MROD) and penthoxyresorufin (PROD) dealkylases in liver. In kidney, all phenolics inhibited only the activity of PROD. Enzyme modulation in liver correlated with CA metabolism measured in plasma. Treatment of rats with ellagic acid 1 h before o-toluidine administration diminished the activities of all hepatic alkoxyresorufine dealkylases induced by o-toluidine but increased renal EROD. In contrast to EA, protocatechuic and tannic acids increased the activities of p450-dependent enzymes in liver. All phenolics administered in combination with o-toluidine increased the activity of GST, which was reduced after the treatment with o-toluidine alone. In addition, CA metabolism in plasma resulting from oral treatment with CA was measured. The formation of CA metabolites was reduced by PCA and EA, and the metabolism of CA induced by o-toluidine was depressed by administration of all three phenolics. Our results indicate that plant phenolics, especially EA, may modulate the genotoxic effects of o-toluidine by modifying pathways leading to the formation of its reactive metabolite. Moreover, as the result of CYP1A modification these compounds may affect the metabolism of CA.

  20. Effects of copper on induction of thiol-compounds and antioxidant enzymes by the fruiting body of Oudemansiella radicata.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Juan; Qin, Chuixin; Shu, Xueqin; Chen, Rong; Song, Haihai; Li, Qiao; Xu, Heng

    2015-01-01

    Oudemansiella radicata has been found to have ability to tolerate and accumulate heavy metals. In this study, to know about the metal tolerance and detoxification strategy of O. radicata, the tolerance responses in both cap and stipe of the fruiting body, including the copper content, the changes of thiol compounds production and antioxidant enzymes activities, caused by various copper stress (150-600 mg kg(-1)) during 2-6 days were investigated. Results showed that Cu content in the fruiting bodies increased with the increasing Cu concentrations and growing time, which was higher in cap than that in stipe. For thiols contents, the maximum level was in the sample at 300 mg kg(-1) Cu after 2 d both in cap and stipe, in accordance with superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione reductase (GR) activities. Guaicol peroxidase (POD) activities reached maximum at 150 mg kg(-1) Cu after 4 d and 6 d, respectively in cap and stipe, while the maximum of catalase (CAT) activities was recorded at 300 and 600 mg kg(-1) Cu after 4 d in the cap and stipe, respectively. As a whole, low concentration of Cu stimulated the production of thiols and activated the antioxidant enzymes activities in the fruiting body of O. radicata after 2/4 d, while high-level Cu decreased the thiols production and enzymes activities after 4/6 d. Furthermore, the cap was more sensitive than the stipe to Cu exposure. Different indicators showed different responses to copper accumulation and the different fruiting part (cap and stipe) of O. radicata had ability to response the oxidative stress caused by Cu. Considering the metal accumulation and its own detoxification with short growing time, mushroom might have the potential to be used as bio-accumulator to deal with Cu exposure in the Cu-contaminated farmland soil.

  1. Characteristic single glucosinolates from Moringa oleifera: Induction of detoxifying enzymes and lack of genotoxic activity in various model systems.

    PubMed

    Förster, Nadja; Mewis, Inga; Glatt, Hansruedi; Haack, Michael; Brigelius-Flohé, Regina; Schreiner, Monika; Ulrichs, Christian

    2016-11-09

    Leaves of Moringa oleifera are used by tribes as biological cancer medicine. Scientific investigations with M. oleifera conducted so far have almost exclusively used total plant extracts. Studies on the activity of single compounds are missing. Therefore, the biological effects of the two main aromatic multi-glycosylated glucosinolates of M. oleifera were investigated in the present study. The cytotoxic effects of M. oleifera glucosinolates were identified for HepG2 cells (NRU assay), for V79-MZ cells (HPRT assay, SCE assay), and for two Salmonella typhimurium strains (Ames test). Genotoxic effects of these glucosinolates were not observed (Ames test, HPRT assay, and SCE assay). Reporter gene assays revealed a significant increase in the ARE-dependent promoter activity of NQO1 and GPx2 indicating an activation of the Nrf2 pathway by M. oleifera glucosinolates. Since both enzymes can also be induced via activation of the AhR, plasmids containing promoters of both enzymes mutated in the respective binding sites (pGL3enh-hNQO1-ARE, pGL3enh-hNQO1-XRE, pGL3bas-hGPX2-mutARE, pGL3bas-hGPX2-mutXRE) were transfected. Analyses revealed that the majority of the stimulating effects was mediated by the ARE motif, whereas the XRE motif played only a minor role. The stimulating effects of M. oleifera glucosinolates could be demonstrated both at the transcriptional (reporter gene assay, real time-PCR) and translational levels (enzyme activity) making them interesting compounds for further investigation.

  2. Developmental Regulation and Induction of Cytochrome P450 2W1, an Enzyme Expressed in Colon Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Choong, Eva; Guo, Jia; Persson, Anna; Virding, Susanne; Johansson, Inger; Mkrtchian, Souren; Ingelman-Sundberg, Magnus

    2015-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 2W1 (CYP2W1) is expressed predominantly in colorectal and also in hepatic tumors, whereas the levels are insignificant in the corresponding normal human adult tissues. CYP2W1 has been proposed as an attractive target for colorectal cancer (CRC) therapy by exploiting its ability to activate duocarmycin prodrugs to cytotoxic metabolites. However, its endogenous function, regulation and developmental pattern of expression remain unexplored. Here we report the CYP2W1 developmental expression in the murine and human gastrointestinal tissues. The gene expression in the colon and small intestine commence at early stages of embryonic life and is completely silenced shortly after the birth. Immunohistochemical analysis of human fetal colon revealed that CYP2W1 expression is restricted to the crypt cells. The silencing of CYP2W1 after birth correlates with the increased methylation of CpG-rich regions in both murine and human CYP2W1 genes. Analysis of CYP2W1 expression in the colon adenocarcinoma cell line HCC2998 revealed that the gene expression can be induced by e.g. the antitumor agent imatinib, linoleic acid and its derivatives. The imatinib mediated induction of CYP2W1 suggests an adjuvant therapy to treatment with duocarmycins that thus would involve induction of tumor CYP2W1 levels followed by the CYP2W1 activated duocarmycin prodrugs. Taken together these data strongly support further exploration of CYP2W1 as a specific drug target in CRC. PMID:25844926

  3. Contributions of apoplasmic cadmium accumulation, antioxidative enzymes and induction of phytochelatins in cadmium tolerance of the cadmium-accumulating cultivar of black oat (Avena strigosa Schreb.).

    PubMed

    Uraguchi, Shimpei; Kiyono, Masako; Sakamoto, Takuya; Watanabe, Izumi; Kuno, Katsuji

    2009-07-01

    The contributions of cadmium (Cd) accumulation in cell walls, antioxidative enzymes and induction of phytochelatins (PCs) to Cd tolerance were investigated in two distinctive genotypes of black oat (Avena strigosa Schreb.). One cultivar of black oat 'New oat' accumulated Cd in the leaves at the highest concentration compared to another black oat cultivar 'Soil saver' and other major graminaceous crops. The shoot:root Cd ratio also demonstrated that 'New oat' was the high Cd-accumulating cultivar, whereas 'Soil saver' was the low Cd-accumulating cultivar. Varied levels of Cd exposure demonstrated the strong Cd tolerance of 'New oat'. By contrast, low Cd-accumulating cultivar 'Soil saver' suffered Cd toxicity such as growth defects and increased lipid peroxidation, even though it accumulated less Cd in shoots than 'New oat'. Higher activities of ascorbate peroxidase (EC 1.11.1.11) and superoxide dismutase (EC 1. 15. 1. 1) were observed in the leaves of 'New oat' than in 'Soil saver'. No advantage of 'New oat' in PCs induction was observed in comparison to Cd-sensitive cultivar 'Soil saver', although Cd exposure increased the concentration of total PCs in both cultivars. Higher and increased Cd accumulation in cell wall fraction was observed in shoots of 'New oat'. On the other hand, in 'Soil saver', apoplasmic Cd accumulation showed saturation under higher Cd exposure. Overall, the present results suggest that cell wall Cd accumulation and antioxidative activities function in the tolerance against Cd stress possibly in combination with vacuolar Cd compartmentation.

  4. Induction of Defense-Related Enzymes in Banana Plants: Effect of Live and Dead Pathogenic Strain of Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cubense.

    PubMed

    Thakker, Janki N; Patel, Samiksha; Dhandhukia, Pinakin C

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to scrutinize the response of banana (Grand Naine variety) plants when interacting with dead or live pathogen, Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. cubense, a causative agent of Panama disease. Response of plants was evaluated in terms of induction of defense-related marker enzyme activity, namely, peroxidase (POX), polyphenol oxidase (PPO), β-1,3 glucanase, chitinase, and phenolics. Plant's interaction with live pathogen resulted in early induction of defense to restrain penetration as well as antimicrobial productions. However, pathogen overcame the defense of plant and caused disease. Interaction with dead pathogen resulted in escalating defense response in plants. Later on plants inoculated with dead pathogen showed resistance to even forced inoculation of live pathogen. Results obtained in the present study suggest that dead pathogen was able to mount defense response in plants and provide resistance to Panama disease upon subsequent exposure. Therefore, preparation from dead pathogen could be a potential candidate as a biocontrol agent or plant vaccine to combat Panama disease.

  5. Dipeptidyl peptidase IV is involved in the cellulose-responsive induction of cellulose biomass-degrading enzyme genes in Aspergillus aculeatus.

    PubMed

    Tani, Shuji; Yuki, Shota; Kunitake, Emi; Sumitani, Jun-Ichi; Kawaguchi, Takashi

    2017-06-01

    We screened for factors involved in the cellulose-responsive induction of cellulose biomass-degrading enzyme genes from approximately 12,000 Aspergillus aculeatus T-DNA insertion mutants harboring a transcriptional fusion between the FIII-avicelase gene (cbhI) promoter and the orotidine 5'-monophosphate decarboxylase gene. Analysis of 5-fluoroorodic acid (5-FOA) sensitivity, cellulose utilization, and cbhI expression of the mutants revealed that a mutant harboring T-DNA at the dipeptidyl peptidase IV (dppIV) locus had acquired 5-FOA resistance and was deficient in cellulose utilization and cbhI expression. The deletion of dppIV resulted in a significant reduction in the cellulose-responsive expression of both cbhI as well as genes controlled by XlnR-independent and XlnR-dependent signaling pathways at an early phase in A. aculeatus. In contrast, the dppIV deletion did not affect the xylose-responsive expression of genes under the control of XlnR. These results demonstrate that DppIV participates in cellulose-responsive induction in A. aculeatus.

  6. In vitro drug-drug interactions of budesonide: inhibition and induction of transporters and cytochrome P450 enzymes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Nancy; Cui, Donghui; Wang, Qing; Wen, Zhiming; Finkelman, Richard D; Welty, Devin

    2017-07-21

    1. Budesonide is a glucocorticoid used in the treatment of several respiratory and gastrointestinal inflammatory diseases. Glucocorticoids have been demonstrated to induce cytochrome P450 (CYP) 3A and the efflux transporter P-glycoprotein (P-gp). This study aimed to evaluate the potential of budesonide to act as a perpetrator or a victim of transporter- or CYP-mediated drug-drug interactions (DDIs). 2. In vitro studies were conducted for P-gp, breast cancer resistance protein and organic anion and cation transporters (OATP1B1, OATP1B3, OAT1, OAT3, OCT2) in transporter-transfected cells. Changes in mRNA expression in human hepatocytes and enzyme activity in human liver microsomes by budesonide were determined for CYP1A2, CYP2B6, CYP2C8, CYP2C9, CYP2C19, CYP2D6 and CYP3A. 3. The data indicated that budesonide is a substrate of P-gp but is not a substrate or an inhibitor of the other transporters investigated. Budesonide is neither an inducer nor an inhibitor of major CYP enzymes. The effect of P-gp on budesonide disposition is anticipated to be low owing to CYP3A-mediated clearance. 4. Collectively, our data indicate there is a low risk of budesonide perpetrating clinical DDIs mediated by the transporters or CYPs studied.

  7. Regulation of Enzyme Activities in Drosophila: Genetic Variation Affecting Induction of Glucose 6-Phosphate and 6-Phosphogluconate Dehydrogenases in Larvae

    PubMed Central

    Cochrane, Bruce J.; Lucchesi, John C.; Laurie-Ahlberg, C. C.

    1983-01-01

    The genetic basis of modulation by dietary sucrose of the enzyme activities glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) and 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (6PGD) activities in third instar larvae of Drosophila melanogaster was investigated, using isogenic lines derived from wild populations. Considerable genetically determined variation in response was detected among lines that differed only in their third chromosome constitution. Comparison of crossreacting material between a responding and a nonresponding line showed that the G6PD activity variation is due to changes in G6PD protein level. These differences in responses are localized in the fat body, with 300 m m sucrose in the diet resulting in a sixfold stimulation of G6PD activity and a fourfold one of 6PGD in the line showing the strongest response. In this tissue, the responses of the two enzymes are closely correlated with one another. Using recombinant lines, we obtained data that suggested the existence of more than one gene on chromosome III involved in the regulation of G6PD in the fat body, and at least one of these genes affects the level of 6PGD as well. PMID:6416921

  8. Induction of energy metabolism related enzymes in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae exposed to ibogaine is adaptation to acute decrease in ATP energy pool.

    PubMed

    Paskulin, Roman; Jamnik, Polona; Obermajer, Natasa; Slavić, Marija; Strukelj, Borut

    2010-02-10

    Ibogaine has been extensively studied in the last decades in relation to its anti-addictive properties that have been repeatedly reported as being addiction interruptive and craving eliminative. In our previous study we have already demonstrated induction of energy related enzymes in rat brains treated with ibogaine at a dose of 20mg/kg i.p. 24 and 72 h prior to proteomic analysis. In this study a model organism yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae was cultivated with ibogaine in a concentration of 1mg/l. Energy metabolism cluster enzymes glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, phosphoglycerate kinase, enolase and alcohol dehydrogenase were induced after 5h of exposure. This is a compensation of demonstrated ATP pool decrease after ibogaine. Yeast in a stationary growth phase is an accepted model for studies of housekeeping metabolism of eukaryotes, including humans. Study showed that ibogaine's influence on metabolism is neither species nor tissue specific. Effect is not mediated by binding of ibogaine to receptors, as previously described in literature since they are lacking in this model.

  9. Do Antioxidant Enzymes and Glutathione Play Roles in the Induction of Hepatic Oxidative Stress in Mice upon Subchronic Exposure to Mixtures of Dichloroacetate and Trichloroacetate?

    PubMed Central

    Hassoun, Ezdihar; Cearfoss, Jacquelyn

    2014-01-01

    Dichloroacetate (DCA) and trichloroacetate (TCA) are water chlorination byproducts, and their mixtures were previously found to induce additive to greater than additive effects on hepatic oxidative stress (OS) induction in mice after subchronic exposure. To investigate the roles of antioxidant enzymes and glutathione (GSH) in those effects, livers of B6C3F1 mice treated by gavage with 7.5, 15, or 30 mg DCA/kg/day, 12.5, 25, or 50 mg TCA/kg/day, and mixtures (Mix I, Mix II and Mix III) at DCA:TCA ratios corresponding to 7.5:12.5, 15:25 and 25:50 mg/kg/day, respectively, for 13 weeks. Livers were assayed for superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), as well as for GSH levels. In general, DCA suppressed SOD and GSH-Px activities and GSH levels but caused no changes in CAT activity; TCA increased SOD and CAT activities, suppressed GSH-Px activity, but did not change GSH levels; mixtures of DCA and TCA increased SOD and CAT activities and suppressed GSH-Px activity and GSH levels. In conclusion, antioxidant enzymes contribute to DCA-, TCA- and mixtures-induced OS, but not to changes from additive to greater than additive effects produced by different mixture compositions of the compounds. GSH on the hand may contribute to these changes. PMID:25530655

  10. Arsenic speciation in rice by capillary electrophoresis/inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry: enzyme-assisted water-phase microwave digestion.

    PubMed

    Qu, Haiou; Mudalige, Thilak K; Linder, Sean W

    2015-04-01

    We report an analytical methodology for the quantification of common arsenic species in rice and rice cereal using capillary electrophoresis coupled with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (CE-ICPMS). An enzyme (i.e., α-amylase)-assisted water-phase microwave extraction procedure was used to extract four common arsenic species, including dimethylarsinic acid (DMA), monomethylarsonic acid (MMA), arsenite [As(III)], and arsenate [As(V)] from the rice matrices. The addition of the enzyme α-amylase during the extraction process was necessary to reduce the sample viscosity, which subsequently increased the injection volume and enhanced the signal response. o-Arsanilic acid (o-ASA) was added to the sample solution as a mobility marker and internal standard. The obtained repeatability [i.e., relative standard deviation (RSD %)] of the four arsenic analytes of interest was less than 1.23% for elution time and 2.91% for peak area. The detection limits were determined to be 0.15-0.27 ng g(-1). Rice standard reference materials SRM 1568b and CRM 7503-a were used to validate this method. The quantitative concentrations of each organic arsenic and summed inorganic arsenic were found within 5% difference of the certified values of the two reference materials.

  11. Cigarette smoke-induced induction of antioxidant enzyme activities in airway leukocytes is absent in active smokers with COPD.

    PubMed

    Dove, Rosamund E; Leong-Smith, Pheneatia; Roos-Engstrand, Ester; Pourazar, Jamshid; Shah, Mittal; Behndig, Annelie F; Mudway, Ian S; Blomberg, Anders

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative injury to the airway has been proposed as an important underlying mechanism in the pathogenesis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). As the extent of oxidant-mediated damage is dependent on the endogenous antioxidant defences within the airways, we examined whether COPD was associated with deficiencies in the antioxidant network within the respiratory tract lining fluids (RTLFs) and resident airway leukocytes. We hypothesised that COPD would be associated with both basal depression of antioxidant defences and impaired adaptive antioxidant responses to cigarette smoke. Low molecular weight and enzymatic antioxidants together with metal-handling proteins were quantified in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and airway leukocytes, derived from current (n=9) and ex-smoking COPD patients (n=15), as well as from smokers with normal lung function (n=16) and healthy never smokers (n=13). Current cigarette smoking was associated with an increase in ascorbate and glutathione within peripheral RTLFs in both smokers with normal lung function compared with healthy never smokers and in COPD smokers compared with COPD ex-smokers. In contrast, intra-cellular antioxidant enzyme activities (glutathione peroxidase, glutathione reductase, and catalase) were only up-regulated in smokers with normal lung function compared with healthy never smokers and not in actively smoking COPD patients relative to COPD ex-smokers. We found no evidence of impaired basal antioxidant defences, within either the RTLFs or airway leukocytes in stable ex-smoking COPD patients compared with healthy never smoking controls. Current cigarette smoking induced an up-regulation of low molecular weight antioxidants in the RTLFs of both control subjects with normal lung function and patients with COPD. Importantly, the present data demonstrated a cigarette smoke-induced increase in intra-cellular antioxidant enzyme activities only within the smokers with normal lung function, implying that patients

  12. T-lymphocyte induction of human monocyte angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) is not dependent upon T-lymphocyte proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Vuk-Pavlovic, Z.; Rohrbach, M.S.

    1986-03-05

    Human peripheral blood monocytes cultured in serum free media for seven days show a basal activity of the ectoenzyme ACE which is augmented 2-3 times by the presence of autologous peripheral blood T-lymphocytes. Since these two cell types are also involved in autologous mixed lymphocyte reaction if serum is present, the authors compared the ability of T-cells to stimulate ACE activity in the presence or absence of proliferation (measured by /sup 3/H-thymidine incorporation). By the seventh day, cultures with 5% AB/sup +/ serum showed significant increase in proliferation but no increase in ACE activity compared to the serum free cultures. Even higher proliferation rate achieved by co-culturing T-lymphocytes with allogeneic monocytes did not increase ACE production; on the contrary, ACE activity remained at the basal level. Monocyte-T-cell co-cultures stimulated with increasing concentrations of ConA or PHA showed dose dependent increases in proliferation but parallel decreases in ACE activity. Addition of soluble antigen (Candida albicans) also enhanced proliferation but not ACE synthesis. They conclude that T-lymphocyte induction of monocyte ACE is a result of cooperation between autologous cells which is not dependent upon T-cell proliferation.

  13. Hepatic enzyme induction and mutagenicity of airborne particulate matter from Santiago, Chile in the nourished and malnourished rat.

    PubMed

    Adonis, M; Quinones, L; Gil, L; Gibson, G

    1997-05-01

    1. Respirable, airborne particles in the ambient air in downtown Santiago, Chile, have been characterized for the seasonal variation in total polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon content, 13 of which have been identified including the mutagens (benzo(a)pyrene, dibenzo(a,h)anthracene, benzo(a)anthracene, benzo(b)fluoranthene and indeno(1,2,3, c,d)pyrene amongst others. 2. Organic extracts derived from these particles were administered to both the nourished and malnourished rat and resulted in modulation of the hepatic mixed function oxidase system including induction of NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase, cytochrome P4501A as determined by Western blot analysis and the associated ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase and aryl hydrocarbon hydroxylase activities. 3. The cytochrome P4504A1-dependent 12-hydroxylation of lauric acid was induced in the malnourished state, but this activity was significantly inhibited by treatment of the animals with particle extracts in both nutritional states. 4. The particle extracts contained both direct and indirect-acting mutagens in the Ames test, and depending on the relative complement of both, resulted in either increased or decreased mutagenicity in the presence of S9 activation systems derived from both nourished and malnourished animals. 5. These results are discussed in the context of the interindividual risk assessment of airborne, particulate matter to man.

  14. Silver nanoparticles reduce brain inflammation and related neurotoxicity through induction of H2S-synthesizing enzymes.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Carter, Daniel A; Leo, Bey Fen; Ruenraroengsak, Pakatip; Chen, Shu; Goode, Angela E; Theodorou, Ioannis G; Chung, Kian Fan; Carzaniga, Raffaella; Shaffer, Milo S P; Dexter, David T; Ryan, Mary P; Porter, Alexandra E

    2017-03-02

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNP) are known to penetrate into the brain and cause neuronal death. However, there is a paucity in studies examining the effect of AgNP on the resident immune cells of the brain, microglia. Given microglia are implicated in neurodegenerative disorders such as Parkinson's disease (PD), it is important to examine how AgNPs affect microglial inflammation to fully assess AgNP neurotoxicity. In addition, understanding AgNP processing by microglia will allow better prediction of their long term bioreactivity. In the present study, the in vitro uptake and intracellular transformation of citrate-capped AgNPs by microglia, as well as their effects on microglial inflammation and related neurotoxicity were examined. Analytical microscopy demonstrated internalization and dissolution of AgNPs within microglia and formation of non-reactive silver sulphide (Ag2S) on the surface of AgNPs. Furthermore, AgNP-treatment up-regulated microglial expression of the hydrogen sulphide (H2S)-synthesizing enzyme cystathionine-γ-lyase (CSE). In addition, AgNPs showed significant anti-inflammatory effects, reducing lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated ROS, nitric oxide and TNFα production, which translated into reduced microglial toxicity towards dopaminergic neurons. Hence, the present results indicate that intracellular Ag2S formation, resulting from CSE-mediated H2S production in microglia, sequesters Ag(+) ions released from AgNPs, significantly limiting their toxicity, concomitantly reducing microglial inflammation and related neurotoxicity.

  15. Silver coordination polymers for prevention of implant infection: thiol interaction, impact on respiratory chain enzymes, and hydroxyl radical induction.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Oliver; Vig Slenters, Tünde; Brunetto, Priscilla S; Villaruz, Amer E; Sturdevant, Daniel E; Otto, Michael; Landmann, Regine; Fromm, Katharina M

    2010-10-01

    Prosthetic joint replacements are used increasingly to alleviate pain and improve mobility of the progressively older and more obese population. Implant infection occurs in about 5% of patients and entails significant morbidity and high social costs. It is most often caused by staphylococci, which are introduced perioperatively. They are a source of prolonged seeding and difficult to treat due to antibiotic resistance; therefore, infection prevention by prosthesis coating with nonantibiotic-type anti-infective substances is indicated. A renewed interest in topically used silver has fostered development of silver nanoparticles, which, however, present a potential health hazard. Here we present new silver coordination polymer networks with tailored physical and chemical properties as nanostructured coatings on metallic implant substrates. These compounds exhibited strong biofilm sugar-independent bactericidal activity on in vitro-grown biofilms and prevented murine Staphylococcus epidermidis implant infection in vivo with slow release of silver ions and limited transient leukocyte cytotoxicity. Furthermore, we describe the biochemical and molecular mechanisms of silver ion action by gene screening and by targeting cell metabolism of S. epidermidis at different levels. We demonstrate that silver ions inactivate enzymes by binding sulfhydryl (thiol) groups in amino acids and promote the release of iron with subsequent hydroxyl radical formation by an indirect mechanism likely mediated by reactive oxygen species. This is the first report investigating the global metabolic effects of silver in the context of a therapeutic application. We anticipate that the compounds presented here open a new treatment field with a high medical impact.

  16. cis-terpin hydrate metabolism by a Brevibacterium: patterns of enzyme induction, and accumulation of -terpineol in growth.

    PubMed

    Baum, R H; Marr, E K

    1972-04-01

    A brevibacterium, strain TH-4, previously isolated by aerobic enrichment on the monocyclic monoterpenoid cis-terpin hydrate as a sole carbon and energy source, was found to grow on alpha-terpineol and on a number of common sugars and organic acids. Oxidation of these terpenoids was shown to occur via an induced enzyme system, as measured manometrically by oxygen uptake and prevention of protein synthesis with chloramphenicol or puromycin. Oxidation of terpin hydrate by cell suspensions appeared to be coincidentally induced by growth on alpha-terpineol, and oxidation of alpha-terpineol similarly appeared to be induced by growth on terpin hydrate. Culture fluids in which the TH-4 organism was grown at the expense of cis-terpin hydrate were found to contain (-)-alpha-terpineol in combined butanol-ether extracts. The isolated compound was shown to be chromatographically and spectrophotometrically identical to an authentic sample of alpha-terpineol. The stereospecificity of an enzymatic dehydration of terpin hydrate to alpha-terpineol is considered.

  17. Silver nanoparticles reduce brain inflammation and related neurotoxicity through induction of H2S-synthesizing enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Carter, Daniel A.; Leo, Bey Fen; Ruenraroengsak, Pakatip; Chen, Shu; Goode, Angela E.; Theodorou, Ioannis G.; Chung, Kian Fan; Carzaniga, Raffaella; Shaffer, Milo S. P.; Dexter, David T.; Ryan, Mary P.; Porter, Alexandra E.

    2017-01-01

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNP) are known to penetrate into the brain and cause neuronal death. However, there is a paucity in studies examining the effect of AgNP on the resident immune cells of the brain, microglia. Given microglia are implicated in neurodegenerative disorders such as Parkinson’s disease (PD), it is important to examine how AgNPs affect microglial inflammation to fully assess AgNP neurotoxicity. In addition, understanding AgNP processing by microglia will allow better prediction of their long term bioreactivity. In the present study, the in vitro uptake and intracellular transformation of citrate-capped AgNPs by microglia, as well as their effects on microglial inflammation and related neurotoxicity were examined. Analytical microscopy demonstrated internalization and dissolution of AgNPs within microglia and formation of non-reactive silver sulphide (Ag2S) on the surface of AgNPs. Furthermore, AgNP-treatment up-regulated microglial expression of the hydrogen sulphide (H2S)-synthesizing enzyme cystathionine-γ-lyase (CSE). In addition, AgNPs showed significant anti-inflammatory effects, reducing lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated ROS, nitric oxide and TNFα production, which translated into reduced microglial toxicity towards dopaminergic neurons. Hence, the present results indicate that intracellular Ag2S formation, resulting from CSE-mediated H2S production in microglia, sequesters Ag+ ions released from AgNPs, significantly limiting their toxicity, concomitantly reducing microglial inflammation and related neurotoxicity. PMID:28251989

  18. Degradation of cellulose by the bean-pathogenic fungus Colletotrichum lindemuthianum. Production of extracellular cellulolytic enzymes by cellulose induction.

    PubMed

    Acosta-Rodríguez, Ismael; Piñón-Escobedo, Carlos; Zavala-Páramo, Ma Guadalupe; López-Romero, Everardo; Cano-Camacho, Horacio

    2005-05-01

    Colletotrichum lindemuthianum was able to grow and produce extracellular cellulolytic activity in a defined medium containing cellulose as the main carbon substrate. As measured either by the hydrolysis of 4-methylumbelliferyl-beta-D -cellotrioside or the release of glucose from carboxymethylcellulose, activity reached a peak after 13 days of incubation and then declined whereas growth markedly increased afterwards. Detection of glucose in carboxymethylcellulose hydrolysates suggested the concerted operation of endo-1,4-beta-glucanase, cellobiohydrolase (exo-1,4-beta-glucanase) and beta-glucosidase activities. The highest levels of cellulolytic activity were obtained in media supplemented with cellulose and glutamate. Other carbon and nitrogen sources markedly influenced growth and enzyme production. Oligonucleotides homologous to specific regions of the cellobiohydrolase-encoding cbhII gene from Trichoderma reesei were used to isolate a C. lindemuthianum cbhII-DNA fragment whose sequence revealed homologies of 98% and 92% with the nucleotide and the deduced amino acid sequences of the corresponding cbhII-DNA of T. reesei, respectively. RT-PCR and Southern blot analyses of total RNA samples obtained from cellulose-grown but not from glucose-grown mycelium revealed the expression of the corresponding cbhII transcript. The cbhII-cDNA fragment was cloned and sequenced.

  19. Silver nanoparticles reduce brain inflammation and related neurotoxicity through induction of H2S-synthesizing enzymes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez-Carter, Daniel A.; Leo, Bey Fen; Ruenraroengsak, Pakatip; Chen, Shu; Goode, Angela E.; Theodorou, Ioannis G.; Chung, Kian Fan; Carzaniga, Raffaella; Shaffer, Milo S. P.; Dexter, David T.; Ryan, Mary P.; Porter, Alexandra E.

    2017-03-01

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNP) are known to penetrate into the brain and cause neuronal death. However, there is a paucity in studies examining the effect of AgNP on the resident immune cells of the brain, microglia. Given microglia are implicated in neurodegenerative disorders such as Parkinson’s disease (PD), it is important to examine how AgNPs affect microglial inflammation to fully assess AgNP neurotoxicity. In addition, understanding AgNP processing by microglia will allow better prediction of their long term bioreactivity. In the present study, the in vitro uptake and intracellular transformation of citrate-capped AgNPs by microglia, as well as their effects on microglial inflammation and related neurotoxicity were examined. Analytical microscopy demonstrated internalization and dissolution of AgNPs within microglia and formation of non-reactive silver sulphide (Ag2S) on the surface of AgNPs. Furthermore, AgNP-treatment up-regulated microglial expression of the hydrogen sulphide (H2S)-synthesizing enzyme cystathionine-γ-lyase (CSE). In addition, AgNPs showed significant anti-inflammatory effects, reducing lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated ROS, nitric oxide and TNFα production, which translated into reduced microglial toxicity towards dopaminergic neurons. Hence, the present results indicate that intracellular Ag2S formation, resulting from CSE-mediated H2S production in microglia, sequesters Ag+ ions released from AgNPs, significantly limiting their toxicity, concomitantly reducing microglial inflammation and related neurotoxicity.

  20. Induction of base excision repair enzymes NTH1 and APE1 in rat spleen following aniline exposure.

    PubMed

    Ma, Huaxian; Wang, Jianling; Abdel-Rahman, Sherif Z; Boor, Paul J; Khan, M Firoze

    2013-03-15

    Mechanisms by which aniline exposure elicits splenotoxicity, especially a tumorigenic response, are not well-understood. Earlier, we have shown that aniline exposure leads to oxidative DNA damage and up-regulation of OGG1 and NEIL1/2 DNA glycosylases in rat spleen. However, the contribution of endonuclease III homolog 1 (NTH1) and apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1 (APE1) in the repair of aniline-induced oxidative DNA damage in the spleen is not known. This study was, therefore, focused on examining whether NTH1 and APE1 contribute to the repair of oxidative DNA lesions in the spleen, in an experimental condition preceding tumorigenesis. To achieve this, male SD rats were subchronically exposed to aniline (0.5 mmol/kg/day via drinking water for 30 days), while controls received drinking water only. By quantitating the cleavage products, the activities of NTH1 and APE1 were assayed using substrates containing thymine glycol (Tg) and tetrahydrofuran, respectively. Aniline treatment led to significant increases in NTH1- and APE1-mediated BER activity in the nuclear extracts of spleen of aniline-treated rats compared to the controls. NTH1 and APE1 mRNA expression in the spleen showed 2.9- and 3.2-fold increases, respectively, in aniline-treated rats compared to the controls. Likewise, Western blot analysis showed that protein expression of NTH1 and APE1 in the nuclear extracts of spleen from aniline-treated rats was 1.9- and 2.7-fold higher than the controls, respectively. Immunohistochemistry indicated that aniline treatment also led to stronger immunoreactivity for both NTH1 and APE1 in the spleens, confined to the red pulp areas. These results, thus, show that aniline exposure is associated with induction of NTH1 and APE1 in the spleen. The increased repair activity of NTH1 and APE1 could be an important mechanism for the removal of oxidative DNA lesions. These findings thus identify a novel mechanism through which NTH1 and APE1 may regulate the repair of

  1. Induction of base excision repair enzymes NTH1 and APE1 in rat spleen following aniline exposure

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Huaxian; Wang, Jianling; Abdel-Rahman, Sherif Z.; Boor, Paul J.; Khan, M. Firoze

    2013-01-01

    Mechanisms by which aniline exposure elicits splenotoxicity, especially a tumorigenic response, are not well-understood. Earlier, we have shown that aniline exposure leads to oxidative DNA damage and up-regulation of OGG1 and NEIL1/2 DNA glycosylases in rat spleen. However, the contribution of endonuclease III homolog 1 (NTH1) and apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1 (APE1) in the repair of aniline-induced oxidative DNA damage in the spleen is not known. This study was, therefore, focused on examining whether NTH1 and APE1 contribute to the repair of oxidative DNA lesions in the spleen, in an experimental condition preceding tumorigenesis. To achieve this, male SD rats were subchronically exposed to aniline (0.5 mmol/kg/day via drinking water for 30 days), while controls received drinking water only. By quantitating the cleavage products, the activities of NTH1 and APE1 were assayed using substrates containing thymine glycol (Tg) and tetrahydrofuran, respectively. Aniline treatment led to significant increases in NTH1- and APE1-mediated BER activity in the nuclear extracts of spleen of aniline-treated rats compared to the controls. NTH1 and APE1 mRNA expression in the spleen showed 2.9- and 3.2-fold increases, respectively, in aniline-treated rats compared to controls. Likewise, Western blot analysis showed that protein expression of NTH1 and APE1 in the nuclear extracts of spleen from aniline-treated rats was 1.9- and 2.7-fold higher than controls, respectively. Immunohistochemistry indicated that aniline treatment also led to stronger immunoreactivity for both NTH1 and APE1 in the spleens, confined to the red pulp areas. These results, thus, show that aniline exposure is associated with induction of NTH1 and APE1 in the spleen. The increased repair activity of NTH1 and APE1 could be an important mechanism for the removal of oxidative DNA lesions. These findings thus identify a novel mechanism through which NTH1 and APE1 may regulate the repair of oxidative DNA

  2. The effect of fenbuconazole on cell proliferation and enzyme induction in the liver of female CD1 mice

    SciTech Connect

    Juberg, Daland R.; Mudra, Daniel R.; Hazelton, George A.; Parkinson, Andrew

    2006-07-15

    Fenbuconazole, a triazole fungicide, has been associated with an increase in the incidence of liver adenomas in female mice following long-term dietary exposure. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether the mode of action for liver tumor formation by fenbuconazole is similar to that of phenobarbital. Treatment of CD1 mice with 0, 20, 60, 180 or 1300 ppm fenbuconazole for up to 4 weeks caused a dose-dependent increase in liver weight that was associated with centrilobular hepatocellular hypertrophy, cytoplasmic eosinophilia and panlobular hepatocellular vacuolation, as well as an initial increase in the cell proliferation labeling index. Fenbuconazole also caused a dose-dependent increase in liver microsomal cytochromes b{sub 5} and P450 and the levels of immunoreactive CYP2B10 and its associated activity 7-pentoxyresorufin O-dealkylation (PROD). Treatment of mice with 1000 ppm phenobarbital elicited the same effects as treatment of mice with 1300 ppm fenbuconazole, except that phenobarbital was more effective than fenbuconazole at inducing PROD activity, even though fenbuconazole induced CYP2B10 to the same extent as did phenobarbital. This difference was attributed to the ability of fenbuconazole to bind tightly to CYP2B10 and partially mask its catalytic activity in liver microsomes, which is characteristic of several azole-containing drugs. All hepatocellular changes and induced enzyme activity returned to control levels within 4 weeks of discontinuing treatment with fenbuconazole or phenobarbital, indicating that the observed changes were fully reversible. We conclude that fenbuconazole is a phenobarbital-type inducer of mouse liver cytochrome P450, and the mode of action by which fenbuconazole induces liver adenomas in mice is similar to that of phenobarbital.

  3. Cloning of chlorophyllase, the key enzyme in chlorophyll degradation: Finding of a lipase motif and the induction by methyl jasmonate

    PubMed Central

    Tsuchiya, Tohru; Ohta, Hiroyuki; Okawa, Katsuya; Iwamatsu, Akihiro; Shimada, Hiroshi; Masuda, Tatsuru; Takamiya, Ken-ichiro

    1999-01-01

    Chlorophyllase (Chlase) is the first enzyme involved in chlorophyll (Chl) degradation and catalyzes the hydrolysis of ester bond to yield chlorophyllide and phytol. In the present study, we isolated the Chlase cDNA. We synthesized degenerate oligo DNA probes based on the internal amino acid sequences of purified Chlase from Chenopodium album, screened the C. album cDNA library, and cloned a cDNA (CaCLH, C. album chlorophyll-chlorophyllido hydrolase). The deduced amino acid sequence (347 aa residues) had a lipase motif overlapping with an ATP/GTP-binding motif (P-loop). CaCLH possibly was localized in the extraplastidic part of the cell, because a putative signal sequence for endoplasmic reticulum is at the N terminus. The amino acid sequence shared 37% identity with a function-unknown gene whose mRNA is inducible by coronatine and methyl jasmonate (MeJA) in Arabidopsis thaliana (AtCLH1). We expressed the gene products of AtCLH1 and of CaCLH in Escherichia coli, and they similarly exhibited Chlase activity. Moreover, we isolated another full-length cDNA based on an Arabidopsis genomic fragment and expressed it in E. coli, demonstrating the presence of the second Arabidopsis CLH gene (AtCLH2). No typical feature of signal sequence was identified in AtCLH1, whereas AtCLH2 had a typical signal sequence for chloroplast. AtCLH1 mRNA was induced rapidly by a treatment of MeJA, which is known to promote senescence and Chl degradation in plants, and a high mRNA level was maintained up to 9 h. AtCLH2, however, did not respond to MeJA. PMID:10611389

  4. Induction and suppression of the key enzymes of glycolysis and gluconeogenesis in isolated perfused rat liver in response to glucose, fructose and lactate

    PubMed Central

    Wimhurst, Janet M.; Manchester, K. L.

    1973-01-01

    1. Measurements were made of the activities of the four key enzymes involved in gluconeogenesis, pyruvate carboxylase (EC 6.4.1.1), phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (EC 4.1.1.32), fructose 1,6-diphosphatase (EC 3.1.3.11) and glucose 6-phosphatase (EC 3.1.3.9), of serine dehydratase (EC 4.2.1.13) and of the four enzymes unique to glycolysis, glucokinase (EC 2.7.1.2), hexokinase (EC 2.7.1.1), phosphofructokinase (EC 2.7.1.11) and pyruvate kinase (EC 2.7.1.40), in livers from starved rats perfused with glucose, fructose or lactate. Changes in perfusate concentrations of glucose, fructose, lactate, pyruvate, urea and amino acid were monitored for each perfusion. 2. Addition of 15mm-glucose at the start of perfusion decreased the activity of pyruvate carboxylase. Constant infusion of glucose to maintain the concentration also decreased the activities of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase, fructose 1,6-diphosphatase and serine dehydratase. Addition of 2.2mm-glucose initially to give a perfusate sugar concentration similar to the blood sugar concentration of starved animals had no effect on the activities of the enzymes compared with zero-time controls. 3. Addition of 15mm-fructose initially decreased glucokinase activity. Constant infusion of fructose decreased activities of glucokinase, phosphofructokinase, pyruvate carboxylase, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase, glucose 6-phosphatase and serine dehydratase. 4. Addition of 7mm-lactate initially elevated the activity of pyruvate carboxylase, as also did constant infusion; maintenance of a perfusate lactate concentration of 18mm induced both pyruvate carboxylase and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase activities. 5. Addition of cycloheximide had no effect on the activities of the enzymes after 4h of perfusion at either low or high concentrations of glucose or at high lactate concentration. Cycloheximide also prevented the loss or induction of pyruvate carboxylase and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase activities with high substrate

  5. The induction of salt stress tolerance by propyl gallate treatment in green microalga Dunaliella bardawil, through enhancing ascorbate pool and antioxidant enzymes activity.

    PubMed

    Einali, Alireza

    2017-10-08

    The effect of propyl gallate (PG), a synthetic antioxidant, on antioxidant responses and salinity tolerance was investigated in the cells of the green microalga, Dunaliella bardawil. Algal suspensions grown at three salinity levels of 1, 2, and 3 M NaCl were incubated with 1 mM of PG. The number of cells was significantly lower in all PG-treated cells compared to untreated controls. Despite PG-induced cell death, the fresh weight of all PG-treated cells was considerably higher than controls. PG-treated cells had enhanced antioxidant capacity because of increased levels of Chlorophyll a, β-carotene, reduced ascorbate, protein, and enzymatic activities, but accumulated lower levels of malonyldialdehyde and hydrogen peroxide compared to untreated cells. The results suggest that PG acts as a signal molecule both directly by reducing of free radical oxidants and indirectly by augmenting ascorbate pool levels, β-carotene production, and antioxidant enzymes activity to boost the capacity of antioxidant systems and radical oxygen species scavenging. Therefore, induction of salt stress tolerance by PG in D. bardawil is associated with metabolic adjustments through activation or synthesis of both enzymatic and non-enzymatic molecules involved in antioxidant systems.

  6. Induction of biotransformation enzymes by the carcinogenic air-pollutant 3-nitrobenzanthrone in liver, kidney and lung, after intra-tracheal instillation in rats.

    PubMed

    Mizerovská, Jana; Dračínská, Helena; Frei, Eva; Schmeiser, Heinz H; Arlt, Volker M; Stiborová, Marie

    2011-02-28

    3-Nitrobenzanthrone (3-NBA), a carcinogenic air pollutant, was investigated for its ability to induce cytochrome P450 (CYP) 1A1/2 and NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase (NQO1) in liver, kidney and lung of rats treated by intra-tracheal instillation. The organs used were from a previous study performed to determine the persistence of 3-NBA-derived DNA adducts in target and non-target tissues (Bieler et al., Carcinogenesis 28 (2007) 1117-1121, [22]). NQO1 is the enzyme reducing 3-NBA to N-hydroxy-3-aminobenzanthrone (N-OH-3-ABA) and CYP1A enzymes oxidize a human metabolite of 3-NBA, 3-aminobenzanthrone (3-ABA), to yield the same reactive intermediate. 3-NBA and 3-ABA are both activated to species forming DNA adducts by cytosols and/or microsomes isolated from rat lung, the target organ for 3-NBA carcinogenicity, and from liver and kidney. Each compound generated the same five DNA adducts detectable by (32)P-postlabelling. When hepatic cytosols from rats treated with 0.2 or 2mg/kg body weight of 3-NBA were incubated with 3-NBA, DNA adduct formation was 3.2- and 8.6-fold higher, respectively, than in incubations with cytosols from control animals. Likewise, cytosols isolated from lungs and kidneys of rats exposed to 3-NBA more efficiently activated 3-NBA than those of control rats. This increase corresponded to an increase in protein levels and enzymatic activities of NQO1. Incubations of hepatic, pulmonary or renal microsomes of 3-NBA-treated rats with 3-ABA led to an 9.6-fold increase in DNA-adduct formation relative to controls. The highest induction in DNA-adduct levels was found in lung. The stimulation of DNA-adduct formation correlated with expression of CYP1A1/2 induced by the intra-tracheal instillation of 3-NBA. The results demonstrate that 3-NBA induces NQO1 and CYP1A1/2 in livers, lungs and kidneys of rats after intra-tracheal instillation, thereby enhancing its own genotoxic and carcinogenic potential. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Enhanced enzyme activities of inclusion bodies of recombinant beta-galactosidase via the addition of inducer analog after L-arabinose induction in the araBAD promoter system of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Jung, Kyung-Hwan

    2008-03-01

    We observed that an inclusion body (IB) of recombinant beta-galactosidase that was produced by the araBAD promoter system in Escherichia coli (E. coli) showed enzyme activity. In order to improve its activity, the lowering of the transcription rate of the beta-galactosidase structural gene was attempted through competition between an inducer (L-arabinose) and an inducer analog (D-fucose). In the deep-well microtiter plate culture and lab-scale fermentor culture, it was demonstrated that the addition of D-fucose caused an improvement in specific beta-galactosidase production, although beta-galactosidase was produced as an IB. In particular, the addition of D-fucose after induction led to an increase in the specific activity of beta-galactosidase IB. Finally, we confirmed that the addition of D-fucose after induction caused changes in the structure of beta-galactosidase IB, with higher enzyme activity. Based on these results, we expect that an improved enzyme IB will be used as a biocatalyst of the enzyme bioprocess, because an enzyme IB can be purified easily and has physical durability.

  8. Novel polymorphic human UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) 2A3: Cloning, functional characterization of enzyme variants, comparative tissue expression, and gene induction

    PubMed Central

    Court, Michael H.; Hazarika, Suwagmani; Krishnaswamy, Soundararajan; Finel, Moshe; Williams, J. Andrew

    2008-01-01

    UDP-glucuronosyltransferases (UGTs) are critical to the detoxification of numerous drugs, environmental pollutants, and endogenous molecules. However as yet not all of the human UGTs have been cloned and characterized. cDNA clones from the UGT2A3 gene (located on chromosome 4q13) were isolated using pooled human liver RNA. Approximately 10% of clones contained a c.1489A>G nucleotide substitution yielding proteins with a residue 497 alanine (UGT2A3.2) instead of a threonine (UGT2A3.1). The allele frequency of this polymorphism (rs13128286) was 0.13 in a European-American population as determined by direct DNA sequencing. Of 81 structurally diverse glucuronidation substrates tested, UGT2A3 expressed by a baculovirus system selectively glucuronidated bile acids – particularly hyodeoxycholic acid at the 6-hydroxy position. Apparent Km values of UGT2A3.1 and UGT2A3.2 for hyodeoxycholic acid 6-glucuronidation were 69±7 and 44±12 µM, respectively. Of 29 different extrahepatic tissues evaluated by real-time PCR, UGT2A3 mRNA was most highly expressed in small intestine (160% of liver), colon (78% of liver) and adipose tissue (91% of liver). An in silico scan of the proximal UGT2A3 promoter/5’-regulatory region identified transcription factor consensus elements consistent with tissue selective expression in liver (HNF1), and intestine (CDX2), as well as induction by rifampicin (PXR). In LS180 human intestinal cells, rifampicin increased UGT2A3 mRNA by more than 4.5-fold compared with vehicle while levels were not significantly affected by the AhR ligand β-naphthoflavone. This is the first report establishing UGT2A3 as a functional enzyme, and represents significant progress toward the goal of having a complete set of recombinant human UGTs for comparative functional analyses. PMID:18523138

  9. Induction of defense-related enzymes in soybean leaves by class IId bacteriocins (thuricin 17 and bacthuricin F4) purified from Bacillus strains.

    PubMed

    Jung, Woo-Jin; Mabood, Fazli; Souleimanov, Alfred; Smith, Donald L

    2011-12-20

    We have recently discovered a new class of bacteriocin (class IId) which stimulates plant growth in a way similar to Nod factors. Nod factors have been shown to provoke aspects of plant disease resistance. We investigated the effects of bacteriocins [thuricin 17 (T17) and bacthuricin F4 (BF4)] on the activities of phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL), guaiacol peroxidase (POD), ascorbate peroxidase (APX), superoxide dismutase (SOD), and polyphenol oxidase (PPO). Bacteriocin solutions were fed into the cut stems of soybean (Glycine max L. Merr. cv. OAC Bayfield) seedlings at the first trifoliate stage. PAL activity in T17 treated leaves was the highest at 72h after treatment and was 75.5% greater than the control at that time. At 72h after treatment POD activities in T17 and BF4 treated leaves increased by 72.7 and 91.3%, respectively, as compared with the control treatment. APX activity was 52.3 and 49.6% respectively, greater than the control in T17 and BF4 treated leaves at 72h after treatment. SOD activity in T17 treated leaves was the highest at 72h after treatment and was 26.0% greater than the control at that time. SOD activity was 70.5 and 60.2% greater, respectively, than the control in T17 and BF4 treated leaves, at 72h. Using PAGE we found that one APX isozyme (28kDa isoform) showed the strongest induction in all bacteriocin treated leaves at 72h. Activity of the seven SOD isozymes was increased by both bacteriocins, relative to the control treatment. The 33kDa PPO isozyme was induced strongly by both bacteriocins, relative to the control treatment. These results indicate that class IId bacteriocins can act as an inducer of plant disease defense-related enzymes and may be acting through mechanisms similar to Nod factors.

  10. A unique downstream estrogen responsive unit mediates estrogen induction of proteinase inhibitor-9, a cellular inhibitor of IL-1beta- converting enzyme (caspase 1).

    PubMed

    Krieg, S A; Krieg, A J; Shapiro, D J

    2001-11-01

    Recently, proteinase inhibitor 9 (PI-9) was identified as the first endogenous inhibitor of caspase 1 (IL-1beta-converting enzyme). The regulation of PI-9 expression, therefore, has great importance in the control of inflammatory processes. We reported that PI-9 mRNA and protein are rapidly and directly induced by estrogen in human liver cells. Using transient transfections to assay PI-9 promoter truncations and mutations, we demonstrate that this strong estrogen induction is mediated by a unique downstream estrogen responsive unit (ERU) approximately 200 nucleotides downstream of the transcription start site. Using primers flanking the ERU in chromatin immunoprecipitation assays, we demonstrate estrogen-dependent binding of ER to the cellular PI-9 promoter. The ERU consists of an imperfect estrogen response element (ERE) palindrome immediately adjacent to a direct repeat containing two consensus ERE half-sites separated by 13 nucleotides (DR13). In transient transfections, all four of the ERE half-sites in the imperfect ERE and in the DR13 were important for estrogen inducibility. Transfected chicken ovalbumin upstream transcription factor I and II down-regulated estrogen-mediated expression from the ERU. EMSAs using purified recombinant human ERalpha demonstrate high-affinity binding of two ER complexes to the ERU. Further EMSAs showed that one ER dimer binds to an isolated DR13, supporting the view that one ER dimer binds to the imperfect ERE and one ER dimer binds to DR13. Deoxyribonuclease I footprinting showed that purified ER protected all four of the half-sites in the ERU. Our finding that a direct repeat can function with an imperfect ERE palindrome to confer estrogen inducibility on a native gene extends the repertoire of DNA sequences able to function as EREs.

  11. Effects of mammalian CYP3A inducers on CYP3A-related enzyme activities in grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idellus): Possible implications for the establishment of a fish CYP3A induction model.

    PubMed

    Li, Dan; Yang, Xian-Le; Zhang, Shu-Jun; Lin, Mao; Yu, Wen-Juan; Hu, Kun

    2008-01-01

    Unexpected drug-drug interactions in fish are generally associated with the induction of CYP3A activity and may lead to the formation of drug residues and thus threaten the safety of fishery products. However, little information is available about CYP3A induction in fish. In the present study, we determined the in vivo and in vitro effects of typical mammalian CYP3A inducers (rifampicin, phenobarbital and dexamethasone) on CYP3A-related enzyme activities in a freshwater teleost, the grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idellus). Our results showed that the response to rifampicin was similar for grass carp liver cell line (GCL), liver microsomes and the primary hepatocytes of grass carp, as indicated by the activity of aminopyrine N-demethylase (APND). When erythromycin N-demethylase (ERND) and 6beta-testosterone hydroxylase (6beta-TOH) were taken into consideration, the GCL displayed a greater capacity for conducting CYP3A metabolism and induction than the C. idellus kidney cell line (CIK). Using erythromycin and testosterone as substrates, we demonstrated that CYP3A catalysis exhibited non-Michaelis-Menten kinetics in GCL cells, and that V(max)/K(m) values were significantly increased due to rifampicin-treatment. Overall, this study may have implications for the use of GCL as a CYP3A induction model to identify physiological changes in fish as well as the similarities or differences between fish and mammals.

  12. Mutual augmentation of the induction of the histamine-forming enzyme, histidine decarboxylase, between alendronate and immuno-stimulants (IL-1, TNF, and LPS), and its prevention by clodronate

    SciTech Connect

    Deng Xue; Yu Zhiqian; Funayama, Hiromi; Shoji, Noriaki; Sasano, Takashi; Iwakura, Yoichiro; Sugawara, Shunji; Endo, Yasuo . E-mail: endo@pharmac.dent.tohoku.ac.jp

    2006-05-15

    Nitrogen-containing bisphosphonates (N-BPs), powerful anti-bone-resorptive drugs, have inflammatory side effects, while histamine is not only an inflammatory mediator, but also an immuno-modifier. In murine models, a single intraperitoneal injection of an N-BP induces various inflammatory reactions, including the induction of the histamine-forming enzyme histidine decarboxylase (HDC) in tissues important in immune responses (such as liver, lungs, spleen, and bone marrow). Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and the proinflammatory cytokines IL-1 and TNF are also capable of inducing HDC. We reported previously that in mice (i) the inflammatory actions of N-BPs depend on IL-1 (ii) N-BP pretreatment augments both LPS-stimulated IL-1 production and HDC induction, and (iii) the co-administration of clodronate (a non-N-BP) with an N-BP inhibits the latter's inflammatory actions (including HDC induction). Here, we add the new findings that (a) pretreatment with alendronate (a typical N-BP) augments both IL-1- and TNF-induced HDC elevations, (b) LPS pretreatment augments the alendronate-induced HDC elevation, (c) co-administration of clodronate with alendronate abolishes these augmentations, (d) alendronate does not induce HDC in IL-1-deficient mice even if they are pretreated with LPS, and (e) alendronate increases IL-1{beta} in all tissues tested, but not in the serum. These results suggest that (1) there are mutual augmentations between alendronate and immuno-stimulants (IL-1, TNF, and LPS) in HDC induction, (2) tissue IL-1{beta} is important in alendronate-stimulated HDC induction, and (3) combination use of clodronate may have the potential to reduce the inflammatory effects of alendronate (we previously found that clodronate, conveniently, does not inhibit the anti-bone-resorptive activity of alendronate)

  13. [Effect of hepatocarcinogenicity of estragole on the glucocorticoid-mediated induction of liver-specific enzymes and the activity of the transcription factors FOXA and HNF4 in the liver of mouse and rat].

    PubMed

    Kaledin, V I; Pakharukova, M Iu; Pivovarova, E N; Kropachev, K Iu; Baginskaia, N V; Vasil'eva, E D; Il'nitskaia, S I; Nikitenko, E V; Kobzev, V F; Merkulova, T I

    2010-01-01

    The carcinogenic effects of estragole in mice of the earlier unexplored strain ICR has been studied. It has been shown that there is a distinct correlation between the extent of inhibition of glucocorticoid-mediated induction of tyrosine aminotransferase and trypthophan oxygenase after acute administration of estragole and the frequency of liver tumors after estragole exposure. Estragole inhibits the induction of these enzymes only in female mice, but not in male mice and rats. DNA-binding activities of liver-enriched transcription factors were investigated on carcinogen-susceptible and -resistant animals. Estragole decreases the HNF4 (hepatic nuclear factor 4) and FOXA DNA-binding activities only in susceptible female mice, but not in nonsusceptible male mice and rats and does not influence the C/EBP and HNF1 activities. Pentachlorophenol, which prevents the hepatocarcinogenic effect of estragole, abolishes its inhibitory effect on tyrosine aminotransferase and trypthophan oxygenase glucocorticoid induction and restores the FOXA and HNF4 DNA-binding activities. The parallelism between the hepatocarcinogenic effects of estragole and the inhibition of FOXA and HNF4 DNA-binding activities serves as an additional argument for the involvement of these factors in the mechanisms of tumor suppression in the liver.

  14. D-arabinose metabolism in Escherichia coli B: induction and cotransductional mapping of the L-fucose-D-arabinose pathway enzymes.

    PubMed

    Elsinghorst, E A; Mortlock, R P

    1988-12-01

    D-Arabinose is degraded by Escherichia coli B via some of the L-fucose pathway enzymes and a D-ribulokinase which is distinct from the L-fuculokinase of the L-fucose pathway. We found that L-fucose and D-arabinose acted as the apparent inducers of the enzymes needed for their degradation. These enzymes, including D-ribulokinase, appeared to be coordinately regulated, and mutants which constitutively synthesized the L-fucose enzymes also constitutively synthesized D-ribulokinase. In contrast to D-arabinose-positive mutants of E. coli K-12, in which L-fuculose-1-phosphate and D-ribulose-1-phosphate act as inducers of the L-fucose pathway, we found that these intermediates did not act as inducers in E. coli B. To further characterize the E. coli B system, some of the L-fucose-D-arabinose genes were mapped by using bacteriophage P1 transduction. A transposon Tn10 insertion near the E. coli B L-fucose regulon was used in two- and three-factor reciprocal crosses. The gene encoding D-ribulokinase, designated darK, was found to map within the L-fucose regulon, and the partial gene order was found to be Tn10-fucA-darK-fucI-fucK-thyA.

  15. D-arabinose metabolism in Escherichia coli B: induction and cotransductional mapping of the L-fucose-D-arabinose pathway enzymes.

    PubMed Central

    Elsinghorst, E A; Mortlock, R P

    1988-01-01

    D-Arabinose is degraded by Escherichia coli B via some of the L-fucose pathway enzymes and a D-ribulokinase which is distinct from the L-fuculokinase of the L-fucose pathway. We found that L-fucose and D-arabinose acted as the apparent inducers of the enzymes needed for their degradation. These enzymes, including D-ribulokinase, appeared to be coordinately regulated, and mutants which constitutively synthesized the L-fucose enzymes also constitutively synthesized D-ribulokinase. In contrast to D-arabinose-positive mutants of E. coli K-12, in which L-fuculose-1-phosphate and D-ribulose-1-phosphate act as inducers of the L-fucose pathway, we found that these intermediates did not act as inducers in E. coli B. To further characterize the E. coli B system, some of the L-fucose-D-arabinose genes were mapped by using bacteriophage P1 transduction. A transposon Tn10 insertion near the E. coli B L-fucose regulon was used in two- and three-factor reciprocal crosses. The gene encoding D-ribulokinase, designated darK, was found to map within the L-fucose regulon, and the partial gene order was found to be Tn10-fucA-darK-fucI-fucK-thyA. PMID:3056899

  16. Induction of T(4) UDP-GT activity, serum thyroid stimulating hormone, and thyroid follicular cell proliferation in mice treated with microsomal enzyme inducers.

    PubMed

    Hood, Alan; Allen, Marcia L; Liu, YaPing; Liu, Jie; Klaassen, Curtis D

    2003-04-01

    The microsomal enzyme inducers phenobarbital (PB), pregnenolone-16 alpha-carbonitrile (PCN), 3-methylcholanthrene (3MC), and Aroclor 1254 (PCB) are known to induce thyroxine (T(4)) glucuronidation and reduce serum T(4) concentrations in rats. Also, microsomal enzyme inducers that increase serum TSH (i.e., PB and PCN) also increase thyroid follicular cell proliferation in rats. Little is known about the effects of these microsomal enzyme inducers on T(4) glucuronidation, serum thyroid hormone concentrations, serum TSH, and thyroid gland growth in mice. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that microsomal enzyme inducers induce T(4) UDP-GT activity, resulting in reduced serum T(4) concentrations, as well as increased serum TSH and thyroid follicular cell proliferation in mice. B6C3F male mice were fed a control diet or a diet containing PB (600, 1200, 1800, or 2400 ppm), PCN (250, 500, 1000, or 2000 ppm), 3MC (62.5, 125, 250, or 500 ppm), or PCB (10, 30, 100, or 300 ppm) for 21 days. All four inducers increased liver weight and hepatic microsomal UDP-GT activity toward chloramphenicol, alpha-naphthol, and T(4). PB and PCB decreased serum total T(4), but PCN and 3MC did not. Serum thyroid stimulating hormone was markedly increased by PCN and 3MC treatments, and slightly increased by PB and PCB treatments. All four microsomal enzyme inducers dramatically increased thyroid follicular cell proliferation in mice. The findings suggest that PB, PCN, 3MC, and PCB disrupt thyroid hormone homeostasis in mice.

  17. Induction of cancer chemopreventive enzymes by coffee is mediated by transcription factor Nrf2. Evidence that the coffee-specific diterpenes cafestol and kahweol confer protection against acrolein

    SciTech Connect

    Higgins, Larry G. Cavin, Christophe; Itoh, Ken; Yamamoto, Masayuki; Hayes, John D.

    2008-02-01

    Mice fed diets containing 3% or 6% coffee for 5 days had increased levels of mRNA for NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1) and glutathione S-transferase class Alpha 1 (GSTA1) of between 4- and 20-fold in the liver and small intestine. Mice fed 6% coffee also had increased amounts of mRNA for UDP-glucuronosyl transferase 1A6 (UGT1A6) and the glutamate cysteine ligase catalytic (GCLC) subunit of between 3- and 10-fold in the small intestine. Up-regulation of these mRNAs was significantly greater in mice possessing Nrf2 (NF-E2 p45 subunit-related factor 2) than those lacking the transcription factor. Basal levels of mRNAs for NQO1, GSTA1, UGT1A6 and GCLC were lower in tissues from nrf2{sup -/-} mice than from nrf2{sup +/+} mice, but modest induction occurred in the mutant animals. Treatment of mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) from nrf2{sup +/+} mice with either coffee or the coffee-specific diterpenes cafestol and kahweol (C + K) increased NQO1 mRNA up to 9-fold. MEFs from nrf2{sup -/-} mice expressed less NQO1 mRNA than did wild-type MEFs, but NQO1 was induced modestly by coffee or C + K in the mutant fibroblasts. Transfection of MEFs with nqo1-luciferase reporter constructs showed that induction by C + K was mediated primarily by Nrf2 and required the presence of an antioxidant response element in the 5'-upstream region of the gene. Luciferase reporter activity did not increase following treatment of MEFs with 100 {mu}mol/l furan, suggesting that this ring structure within C + K is insufficient for gene induction. Priming of nrf2{sup +/+} MEFs, but not nrf2{sup -/-} MEFs, with C + K conferred 2-fold resistance towards acrolein.

  18. Testing the ecotoxicology of vegetable versus mineral based lubricating oils: 2. Induction of mixed function oxidase enzymes in barramundi, Lates calcarifer, a tropical fish species.

    PubMed

    Mercurio, Philip; Burns, Kathryn A; Cavanagh, Joanne

    2004-05-01

    An increasing number of vegetable-based oils are being developed as environmentally friendly alternatives to petroleum products. However, toxicity towards key tropical marine species has not been investigated. In this study we used laboratory-based biomarker induction experiments to compare the relative stress of a vegetable-based lubricating oil for marine 2-stroke engines with its mineral oil-based counterpart on tropical fish. The sub-lethal stress of 2-stoke outboard lubricating oils towards the fish Lates calcarifer (barramundi) was examined using liver microsomal mixed function oxidase (MFO) induction assays. This study is the first investigation into the use of this key commercial species in tropical North Queensland, Australia in stress assessment of potential hydrocarbon pollution using ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase (EROD) induction. Our results indicated that barramundi provide a wide range of inducible rates of EROD activity in response to relevant organic stressors. The vegetable- and mineral-based lubricants induced significant EROD activity at 1.0 mg kg(-1) and there was no significant difference between the two oil treatments at that concentration. At increasing concentrations of 2 and 3 mg kg(-1), the mineral-based lubricant resulted in slightly higher EROD activity than the vegetable-based lubricant. The EROD activity of control and treated barramundi are found to be within ranges for other species from temperate and tropical environments. These results indicate that vegetable-based lubricants may be less stressful to barramundi than their mineral counterparts at concentrations of lubricant > or =2 mg kg(-1). There is great potential for this species to be used in the biomonitoring of waterways around tropical North Queensland and SE Asia.

  19. Antioxidant effects of the ethanol extract from flower of Camellia japonica via scavenging of reactive oxygen species and induction of antioxidant enzymes.

    PubMed

    Piao, Mei Jing; Yoo, Eun Sook; Koh, Young Sang; Kang, Hee Kyoung; Kim, Junoh; Kim, Yong Jin; Kang, Hak Hee; Hyun, Jin Won

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the antioxidant properties of the ethanol extract of the flower of Camellia japonica (Camellia extract). Camellia extract exhibited 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl radical and intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenging activity in human HaCaT keratinocytes. In addition, Camellia extract scavenged superoxide anion generated by xanthine/xanthine oxidase and hydroxyl radical generated by the Fenton reaction (FeSO(4) + H(2)O(2)) in a cell-free system, which was detected by electron spin resonance spectrometry. Furthermore, Camellia extract increased the protein expressions and activity of cellular antioxidant enzymes, such as superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione peroxidase. These results suggest that Camellia extract exhibits antioxidant properties by scavenging ROS and enhancing antioxidant enzymes. Camellia extract contained quercetin, quercetin-3-O-glucoside, quercitrin and kaempferol, which are antioxidant compounds.

  20. Antioxidant Activity and Induction of mRNA Expressions of Antioxidant Enzymes in HEK-293 Cells of Moringa oleifera Leaf Extract.

    PubMed

    Vongsak, Boonyadist; Mangmool, Supachoke; Gritsanapan, Wandee

    2015-08-01

    The leaves of Moringa oleifera, collected in different provinces in Thailand, were determined for the contents of total phenolics, total flavonoids, major components, and antioxidant activity. The extract and its major active components were investigated for the inhibition of H2O2-induced reactive oxygen species production and the effects on antioxidant enzymes mRNA expression. The extract, crypto-chlorogenic acid, isoquercetin and astragalin, significantly reduced the reactive oxygen species production inducing by H2O2 in HEK-293 cells. Treatment with isoquercetin significantly increased the mRNA expression levels of antioxidant enzymes such as superoxide dismutase, catalase and heme oxygenase 1. These results confirm that M. oleifera leaves are good sources of natural antioxidant with isoquercetin as an active compound. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  1. Control of isocitrate lyase synthesis in Chlorella fusca var. vacuolata. The basal activity of the enzyme and the kinetics of induction.

    PubMed Central

    Thurston, C F

    1977-01-01

    1. Isocitrate lyase activity was measured in non-induced Chlorella fusca var. vacuolata cells. 2. During exponential autotrophic growth about 1-2 molecules of the enzyme per cell were present. 3. In light-limited cultures the amount of the enzyme increased to 10-20 molecules/cell. 4. When autotrophic cultures were placed in the dark, the basal activity of isocitrate lyase increased after a 2h lag so that after 8h in the dark there was a 500-fold increase in activity. 5. When isocitrate lyase was induced (by addition of acetate and removal of illumination) in autotrophic cultures which had been growing exponentially, the full induced rate of enzyme synthesis was obtained after 70-80min. 6. When light-limited autotrophic cultures were induced, the rate of isocitrate lyase synthesis was maximal after only 40-50min. 7. These data are consistent with a catabolite-repression control co-ordinated with photosynthetic activity,which may be independent of the specific inducing effect of acetate. PMID:880227

  2. Induction of wheat and maize glutathione S-transferase by some herbicide safeners and their effect on enzyme activity against butachlor and terbuthylazine.

    PubMed

    Scarponi, Luciano; Quagliarini, Elisa; Del Buono, Daniele

    2006-10-01

    The expression of glutathione S-transferase (GST) activity in wheat and maize shoots was investigated in response to treatments with the herbicide safeners benoxacor, cloquintocet-mexyl, fenchlorazole-ethyl, fenclorim, fluxofenim and oxabetrinil. These safeners significantly enhanced the GST activity towards 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (CDNB) as a 'standard' substrate, with the exception of oxabetrinil in maize. The enhancements of GST (CDNB) activity were found to be concomitant with increases in V(max) (the reaction rate when the enzyme is fully saturated by the substrate) in wheat following cloquintocet-mexyl and fenchlorazole-ethyl treatments, and in maize following fenchlorazole-ethyl treatment. Otherwise, decreases in V(max) were observed in wheat and maize following fenclorim and fluxofenim treatments. With the exception of oxabetrinil, all the safeners significantly reduced the apparent K(M) (the substrate concentration required for 50% of maximum GST activity) of both wheat and maize GST. The V(max) and K(M) variations following safener treatments are discussed in terms of an increased expression of GST enzymes and an increased affinity for the CDNB substrate. The activity of wheat and maize GST was also assayed towards butachlor and terbuthylazine respectively; the results indicate the ability of cloquintocet-mexyl, fenchlorazole-ethyl and fluxofenim to enhance the enzyme activity in wheat and of benoxacor and fenchlorazole-ethyl to do so in maize.

  3. Studies on the alterations in haematological indices, micronuclei induction and pathological marker enzyme activities in Channa punctatus (spotted snakehead) perciformes, channidae exposed to thermal power plant effluent.

    PubMed

    Javed, Mehjbeen; Ahmad, Irshad; Ahmad, Ajaz; Usmani, Nazura; Ahmad, Masood

    2016-01-01

    The present study was conducted to assess the toxicity of thermal power plant effluent containing heavy metals (Fe > Cu > Zn > Mn > Ni > Co > Cr) on haematological indices, micronuclei, lobed nuclei and activity of pathological marker enzymes [alkaline phosphatase (ALP), aspartate transferase (AST), alanine transferase (ALT) and creatine kinase (CK)] in Channa punctatus. Total erythrocyte count (-54.52 %), hemoglobin (-36.98 %), packed cell volume (-36.25 %), mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration (-1.41 %) and oxygen (O2) carrying capacity (-37.04 %) declined significantly over reference fish, however total leukocyte count (+25.43 %), mean corpuscular hemoglobin (+33.52 %) and mean corpuscular volume (+35.49 %) showed elevation. High frequency of micronuclei (1133.3 %) and lobed nuclei (150 %) were observed in exposed fish which may indicate mutagenesis. Activities of pathological marker enzymes ALP, AST, ALT and CK increased significantly in serum of exposed fish. The ratio of ALT: AST in exposed fish was beyond 1 which indicates manifestation of pathological processes. These biomarkers show that fish have macrocytic hypochromic anemia. Leukocytosis showed general defence response against heavy metal toxicity and marker enzymes showed tissue degeneration. In conclusion, thermal power plant effluent has strong potential to induce micronuclei, tissue pathology, making the fish anemic, weak, stressed and vulnerable to diseases.

  4. Enzyme induction in rat lung and liver by condensates and fractions from main-stream and side-stream cigarette smoke

    SciTech Connect

    Pasquini, R.; Sforzolini, G.S.; Savino, A.; Angeli, G.; Monarca, S.

    1987-12-01

    Aryl hydrocarbon hydroxylase (AHH) and dimethylnitrosamine demethylase (DMND) activities in pulmonary and hepatic tissues of male Sprague-Dawley rats were assayed following pretreatment with known inducers (benzo(a)pyrene, 3-methylcholanthrene, Aroclor 1254, phenobarbital) and with main-stream (MS) and side-stream (SS) cigarette smoke condensates and their related fractions. Biochemical assays by spectrophotofluorimetry (AHH activity) and spetrophotometry (DMND activity) and by a biological assay (Ames test) were performed to detect AHH and DMND induction. Ames test proved to be much less sensitive than the spectrophotofluorimetric analysis for AHH determination. Both main-stream and side-stream cigarette smoke condensates and some fractions, containing water-soluble bases, water-insoluble bases, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, were found to induce AHH activity in lung and liver, the lung being induced to the greatest extent. The highest levels of AHH inducibility were found for the SS-smoke condensate and related fractions. In particular, the insoluble bases fractions gave the highest induction. On the contrary, pulmonary DMND activity was not affected by pretreatment with the same materials, while hepatic DMND response was only minimally induced by Aroclor and phenobarbital treatment.

  5. Carnosic acid protects against 6-hydroxydopamine-induced neurotoxicity in in vivo and in vitro model of Parkinson's disease: involvement of antioxidative enzymes induction.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chi-Rei; Tsai, Chia-Wen; Chang, Shu-Wei; Lin, Chia-Yuan; Huang, Li-Chun; Tsai, Chia-Wen

    2015-01-05

    The neuroprotective effects of carnosic acid (CA), a phenolic diterpene isolated from rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis), have been widely investigated in recent years, however, its protection in in vivo still unclear. In this study, we investigated the behavioral activity and neuroprotective effects of CA in a rat model of Parkinson's disease (PD) induced by 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA). Rats were treated with 20mg/kg body weight of CA for 3 weeks before 6-OHDA exposure. Results indicated that CA improved the locomotor activity and reduced the apomorphine-caused rotation in 6-OHDA-stimulated rats. Significant protection against lipid peroxidation and GSH reduction was observed in the 6-OHDA rats pretreated with CA. Pretreatment with CA increased the protein expression of γ-glutamate-cysteine ligase catalytic subunit, γ-glutamate-cysteine ligase modifier subunit, superoxide dismutase, and glutathione reductase compared with 6-OHDA-stimulated rats and SH-SY5Y cells. Immunoblots showed that the reduction of the Bcl-2/Bax ratio, the induction of caspase 3 cleavage, and the induction of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) cleavage by 6-OHDA was reversed in the presence of SB203580 (a p38 inhibitor) or SP600125 (a JNK inhibitor) in SH-SY5Y cells. Rats treated with CA reversed the 6-OHDA-mediated the activation of c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase and p38, the down-regulation of the Bcl-2/Bax ratio, the up-regulation of cleaved caspase 3/caspase 3 and cleaved PARP/PARP ratio, and the down-regulation of tyrosine hydroxylase protein. However, BAM7, an activator of Bax, attenuated the effect of CA on apoptosis in SH-SY5Y cells. These results suggest that CA protected against 6-OHDA-induced neurotoxicity is attributable to its anti-apoptotic and anti-oxidative action. The present findings may help to clarify the possible mechanisms of rosemary in the neuroprotection of PD.

  6. Elucidating rifampin's inducing and inhibiting effects on glyburide pharmacokinetics and blood glucose in healthy volunteers: unmasking the differential effects of enzyme induction and transporter inhibition for a drug and its primary metabolite.

    PubMed

    Zheng, H X; Huang, Y; Frassetto, L A; Benet, L Z

    2009-01-01

    The effects of single doses of intravenous (IV) ciprofloxacin and rifampin and of multiple doses of rifampin on glyburide exposure and blood glucose levels were investigated in nine healthy volunteers. A single IV dose of rifampin significantly increased the area under the concentration-time curve (AUC) of glyburide and its metabolite. Blood glucose levels were significantly lower than those observed after dosing with glyburide alone. Multiple doses of rifampin induced an increase in liver enzyme levels, leading to a marked decrease in glyburide exposure and blood glucose levels. When IV rifampin was administered after multiple doses of rifampin, the inhibition of hepatic uptake transporters masked the induction effect; however, the relative changes in AUC for glyburide and its hydroxyl metabolite were similar to those seen under noninduced conditions. The studies reported here demonstrate how measurements of the levels of both the parent drug and its primary metabolite are useful in unmasking simultaneous drug-drug induction and inhibition effects and in characterizing enzymatic vs. transporter mechanisms.

  7. Correlation between hepatocarcinogenic effect of estragole and its influence on glucocorticoid induction of liver-specific enzymes and activities of FOXA and HNF4 transcription factors in mouse and rat liver.

    PubMed

    Kaledin, V I; Pakharukova, M Yu; Pivovarova, E N; Kropachev, K Yu; Baginskaya, N V; Vasilieva, E D; Ilnitskaya, S I; Nikitenko, E V; Kobzev, V F; Merkulova, T I

    2009-04-01

    It is known that the carcinogenic effect of estragole, a component of essential oils of many spicy plants, is characterized by species, tissue, and sex specificity. It causes mainly liver tumors in female mice but is not carcinogenic for male mice and for rats. In this work, the estragole hepatocarcinogenicity was shown for female mice of previously not studied ICR line. The strict correlation between estragole hepatocarcinogenicity and its ability to decrease the level of glucocorticoid induction of liver-specific enzymes tyrosine aminotransferase (TAT) and tryptophan oxygenase (TO) was found. Inhibition of TAT and TO inducibility by estragole takes place only in female mice but not in male mice and in rats. Studying the estragole effect on DNA-binding activity of transcription factors, present mainly in liver and regulating expression of genes encoding liver-specific proteins, has shown that estragole decreases FOXA and HNF4 activities but not activities of C/EBP and HNF1, and this happens only in female mice, for which this substance is hepatocarcinogen, but not in male mice and in rats. Pentachlorophenol, preventing hepatocarcinogenic effect of estragole, abolishes inhibitory influence of the latter on the TAT and TO glucocorticoid induction and restores DNA-binding activity of FOXA and HNF4. Thus, a correlation was revealed between the estragole hepatocarcinogenic effect and decrease in DNA-binding activity of transcription factors FOXA and HNF4, which might be indicative of the role of these factors in tumor suppression mechanisms in liver.

  8. A recessive mutation in the RUB1-conjugating enzyme, RCE1, reveals a requirement for RUB modification for control of ethylene biosynthesis and proper induction of basic chitinase and PDF1.2 in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Paul B; Cancel, Jesse D

    2004-05-01

    By screening etiolated Arabidopsis seedlings for mutants with aberrant ethylene-related phenotypes, we identified a mutant that displays features of the ethylene-mediated triple response even in the absence of ethylene. Further characterization showed that the phenotype observed for the dark-grown seedlings of this mutant is reversible by prevention of ethylene perception and is dependent on a modest increase in ethylene production correlated with an increase in 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) oxidase (ACO) activity in the hypocotyl. Molecular characterization of leaves of the mutant revealed severely impaired induction of basic chitinase (chiB) and plant defensin (PDF)1.2 following treatment with jasmonic acid and/or ethylene. Positional cloning of the mutation resulted in identification of a 49-bp deletion in RCE1 (related to ubiquitin 1 (RUB1)-conjugating enzyme), which has been demonstrated to be responsible for covalent attachment of RUB1 to the SCF (Skpl Cdc 53 F-box) ubiquitin ligase complex to modify its activity. Our analyses with rce1-2 demonstrate a previously unknown requirement for RUB1 modification for regulation of ethylene biosynthesis and proper induction of defense-related genes in Arabidopsis.

  9. Effect of age on the induction of 8-oxo-2'-deoxyguanosine-releasing enzyme in rat liver by gamma-ray irradiation.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Takao; Tahara, Shoichi; Tanno, Munehiko; Taguchi, Takahiko

    2003-01-01

    Aged (27 months of age) and young (6 months of age) Fischer 344/DuCrj rats were exposed to gamma-ray irradiation, and their livers were compared for levels of oxidative DNA modifications and repair enzyme activities. The amounts of 8-oxo-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG) in the nuclear DNA of the livers of both young and aged rats increased immediately after irradiation, by 1.7-fold in the livers of young rats and 2.7-fold in the livers of the aged rats. Also, the rate of 8-oxodG decay was slower in the livers of the aged rats than in young rat liver, and remained above the baseline level even 1 week after irradiation. The activities of 8-oxodG-releasing enzymes peaked 2 and 6 h after irradiation in the livers of young and aged rats, respectively. The repair activity in the livers of the young rats was increased by sevenfold 2 h after irradiation, while the livers of the aged rats showed a twofold increase 6 h after irradiation. These results suggest that the ability to repair damaged DNA is lower in aged rats, and that the accumulation of oxidative DNA damage that takes place during aging may be related to this decline in repair activity.

  10. Solid bioprocess of tarbush (Flourensia cernua) leaves for β-glucosidase production by Aspergillus niger: initial approach to fiber-glycoside interaction for enzyme induction.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Trujillo, Juan; Medina-Morales, Miguel A; Sanchez-Flores, Ariel; Arevalo, Carlos; Ascacio-Valdes, Juan A; Mellado, Miguel; Aguilar, Cristobal N; Aguilera-Carbo, Antonio F

    2017-08-01

    Commercial cellulase production has increased in recent years and consistent research has been carried out to improve levels of β-glucosidase. Bioprocesses have been successfully adapted to produce this enzyme, with solid-state fermentations as the best-suited technique involving fungi. The aim of this study was to use leaves of tarbush (Flourensia cernua), an abundant shrub of the Chihuahuan Desert, as a carbon source for β-glucosidase production by Aspergillus niger. During the solid bioprocess, this enzyme reached its peak production at 36 h of culture with 3876.6 U/L. There is a particular interest in the substrate composition because of the possibility of phenolic glycosides having an important role in β-glucosidase production. HPLC-MS analyses showed that glycosides were present with the highest accumulation at 36 h of fungal culture. Luteolin and apigenin glycosides [1.8 and 2.4 absorbance units, respectively] were also detected and showed their highest point of detection alongside the highest β-glucosidase activity. No apparent changes in cellulose were observed, while hemicellulose content decreased, which could be related to production and activity of β-glucosidase. This study shows that leaves of F. cernua are an important raw material for β-glucosidase production and give a source of compounds of added value which also may have an important role for β-glucosidase production.

  11. Quantitative Histological Assessment of Xenobiotic-Induced Liver Enzyme Induction and Pituitary-Thyroid Axis Stimulation in Rats Using Whole-Slide Automated Image Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zabka, Tanja S.; Tao, Jianhua; Fielden, Mark; Fretland, Adrian; Albassam, Mudher

    2013-01-01

    Preclinical evaluation of a new compound, RO2910, identified a hypertrophic response in liver, thyroid gland, and pituitary gland (pars distalis). We aimed to develop and validate automated image analysis methods to quantify and refine the interpretation of semi-quantitative histology. Wistar-Han rats were administered RO2910 for 14 days. Liver, thyroid, and pituitary gland tissues were processed for routine histology and immunolabeled with anti–thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) antibody (pituitary) and anti–topoisomerase II antibody (thyroid). Glass slides were scanned, image analysis methods were developed and applied to whole-slide images, and numerical results were compared with histopathology, circulating hormone levels, and liver enzyme mRNA expression for validation. Quantitative analysis of slides had strong individual correlation with semi-quantitative histological evaluation of all tissues studied. Hepatocellular hypertrophy quantification also correlated strongly with liver enzyme mRNA expression. In the pars distalis, measurement of TSH weak-staining areas correlated with both hypertrophy scores and circulating TSH levels. Whole-slide image analysis enabled automated quantification of semi-quantitative histopathology findings and a more refined interpretation of these data. The analysis also enabled a direct correlation with non-histological parameters using straightforward statistical analysis to provide a more refined dose- and sex-response relationship and integration among affected parameters. These findings demonstrate the utility of our image analysis to support preclinical safety evaluations. PMID:23456825

  12. Influence of a Modified Atmosphere on the Induction and Activity of Respiratory Enzymes in Broccoli Florets during the Early Stage of Postharvest Storage.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hsiao-Wen; Makino, Yoshio; Inoue, Jun; Maejima, Kensaku; Funayama-Noguchi, Sachiko; Yamada, Takeshi; Noguchi, Ko

    2017-09-22

    Modified atmosphere packaging and controlled atmosphere storage (hypoxia conditions) extend shelf lives of horticultural products by depressing the O2 uptake rate. We investigated the relationship between atmospheres and alternative oxidase (AOX) to cytochrome c oxidase (COX) activities (on the basis of oxygen isotope discrimination) and the relative amounts of two respiratory enzymes, AOX and COX, during the early stage of storage. Broccoli florets, with high O2 uptake rates, were stored under hypoxia and normoxia at 25 °C. O2 uptake rates, weight loss, and yellowing of broccoli florets were significantly lower when stored under hypoxia than when stored under normoxia. Significantly more AOX proteins were produced during storage under normoxia, but COX proteins were more consistent than those of AOX proteins. Hypoxia may depress the expression of AOX and prolong the shelf life. Oxygen isotope discrimination was elevated under hypoxia after 50.5 h. AOX production in broccoli was controlled more by changing atmospheres than by COX.

  13. Induction of resistance to alkylating agents in E. coli: the ada+ gene product serves both as a regulatory protein and as an enzyme for repair of mutagenic damage.

    PubMed Central

    Teo, I; Sedgwick, B; Demple, B; Li, B; Lindahl, T

    1984-01-01

    The expression of several inducible enzymes for repair of alkylated DNA in Escherichia coli is controlled by the ada+ gene. This regulatory gene has been cloned into a multicopy plasmid and shown to code for a 37-kd protein. Antibodies raised against homogeneous O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (the main repair activity for mutagenic damage in alkylated DNA) were found to cross-react with this 37-kd protein. Cell extracts from several independently derived ada mutants contain variable amounts of an altered 37-kd protein after an inducing alkylation treatment. In addition, an 18-kd protein identical with the previously isolated O6-methyl-guanine-DNA methyltransferase has been identified as a product of the ada+ gene. The smaller polypeptide is derived from the 37-kd protein by proteolytic processing. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. Fig. 7. Fig. 8. PMID:6092060

  14. Potent induction of rat liver microsomal, drug-metabolizing enzymes by 2,3,3',4,4',5-hexabromobiphenyl, a component of fireMaster.

    PubMed

    Robertson, L W; Parkinson, A; Bandiera, S; Safe, S

    1981-04-01

    The multistep synthesis and purification of 2,3,3',4,4',5-hexabromobiphenyl (HBBp) is described. Capillary gas chromatography revealed that HBBp comprises 0.05% of the industrial polybrominated biphenyl (PBB) mixture, fireMaster BP-6 (lot 7062). When administered to immature male Wistar rats, HBBp caused a dose-dependent increase in (a) the activity of benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P) hydroxylase (AHH) and 4-chlorobiphenyl (4-CBP) hydroxylase and (b) the concentration of cytochrome P-450. Sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS)-gel electrophoresis indicated that these increases in cytochrome P-450 and cytochrome P-450-dependent monooxygenase activities were accompanied by a dose-dependent intensification of a protein of relative molecular weight (Mr) 55 000 which comigrated with the major 3-methylcholanthrene(MC)-inducible form of cytochrome P-450 (i.e., cytochrome P-448). Like MC, but in contrast to phenobarbitone (PB), HBBp competitively displaced 2,3,7,8-[3H]tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin ([3H]-TCDD) from the cytosolic protein thought to be the receptor for cytochrome P-448 induction. The results indicate that HBBp is a potent inducer of cytochrome P-448 and as such is the third MC-type inducer identified in fireMaster BP-6.

  15. Induction of alcohol-metabolizing enzymes and heat shock protein expression by ethanol and modulation by fenugreek seed polyphenols in Chang liver cells.

    PubMed

    Kaviarasan, S; Ramamurthy, Nalini; Gunasekaran, P; Varalakshmi, E; Anuradha, C V

    2009-02-01

    The present study investigated the effect of fenugreek seed polyphenolic extract (FPEt) on ethanol-induced protein expression in Chang liver cells. Cells were incubated with either 30 mM EtOH alone or together in the presence of FPEt for 24 h. Cells were harvested and assessed for expression of alcohol metabolizing enzymes-alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH(2) isoform), aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH(2) isoform), cytochrome P450 (CYP2E1), the electron transport component (cytochrome-c), and the heat shock proteins. The expression of ADH(2), ALDH(2), and CYP2E1 were upregulated, whereas the expression of cytochrome-c was downregulated in the ethanol-treated cells. The expression of cellular heat shock proteins-HSP70, HSC70, HSC92, and mitochondrial protein mtHSP70 were induced in ethanol-treated Chang liver cells. FPEt modulated the protein expression changes induced by ethanol and had no effect when incubated with normal Chang liver cells. FPEt might exert cytoprotective action on ethanol-induced liver cell damage, possibly by enhancing cellular redox status.

  16. Induction of rhodanese, a detoxification enzyme, in livers from mice after long-term irradiation with low-dose-rate gamma-rays.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Tetsuo; Taki, Keiko; Wang, Bing; Ono, Tetsuya; Matsumoto, Tsuneya; Oghiso, Yoichi; Tanaka, Kimio; Ichinohe, Kazuaki; Nakamura, Shingo; Tanaka, Satoshi; Nenoi, Mitsuru

    2008-11-01

    The health effects of low-dose radiation exposure are of public concern. Although molecular events in the cellular response to high-dose-rate radiation exposure have been fully investigated, effects of long-term exposure to extremely low-dose-rate radiation remain unclear. Protein expression was analyzed by two-dimensional electrophoresis in livers from mice irradiated for 485 days (22 hr/day) at low-dose-rates of 0.032 microGy/min, 0.65 microGy/min and 13 microGy/min (total doses of 21 mGy, 420 mGy and 8000 mGy, respectively). One of the proteins that showed marked changes in expression was identified as rhodanese (thiosulfate sulfurtransferase). Rhodanese expression was increased after irradiation at 0.65 microGy/min and 13 microGy/min, while its expression was not changed at 0.032 microGy/min. Rhodanese is a detoxification enzyme, probably related to the regulation of antioxidative function. However, antioxidative proteins, such as superoxide dismutase (SOD)1 (also known as Cu,Zn-SOD) and SOD2 (also known as Mn-SOD), which can be induced by high-dose-rate radiation, were not induced at any low-dose-rates tested. These findings indicate that rhodanese is a novel protein induced by low-dose-rate radiation, and further analysis could provide insight into the effects of extremely low-dose-rate radiation exposure.

  17. High altitude exposure alters gene expression levels of DNA repair enzymes, and modulates fatty acid metabolism by SIRT4 induction in human skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Acs, Zoltan; Bori, Zoltan; Takeda, Masaki; Osvath, Peter; Berkes, Istvan; Taylor, Albert W; Yang, Hu; Radak, Zsolt

    2014-06-01

    We hypothesized that high altitude exposure and physical activity associated with the attack to Mt Everest could alter mRNA levels of DNA repair and metabolic enzymes and cause oxidative stress-related challenges in human skeletal muscle. Therefore, we have tested eight male mountaineers (25-40 years old) before and after five weeks of exposure to high altitude, which included attacks to peaks above 8000m. Data gained from biopsy samples from vastus lateralis revealed increased mRNA levels of both cytosolic and mitochondrial superoxide dismutase. On the other hand 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase (OGG1) mRNA levels tended to decrease while Ku70 mRNA levels and SIRT6 decreased with altitude exposure. The levels of SIRT1 and SIRT3 mRNA did not change significantly. However, SIRT4 mRNA level increased significantly, which could indicate decreases in fatty acid metabolism, since SIRT4 is one of the important regulators of this process. Within the limitations of this human study, data suggest that combined effects of high altitude exposure and physical activity climbing to Mt. Everest, could jeopardize the integrity of the particular chromosome. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Phenyl derivative of pyranocoumarin precludes Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. Lycopersici infection in Lycopersicon esculentum via induction of enzymes of the phenylpropanoid pathway.

    PubMed

    Sangeetha, S; Sarada, D V L

    2015-01-01

    Binding of phenyl derivative of pyranocoumarin (PDP) modulated activity of fungal endopolygalacturonase in silico. Induced fit docking study of PDP with endopolygalacturonase (1HG8) showed a bifurcated hydrogen bond interaction with the protein at Lys 244 with a docking score of -3.6 and glide energy of -37.30 kcal/mol. Docking with endopolygalacturonase II (1CZF) resulted hydrogen bond formation with Lys 258 with a docking score of -2.3 and glide energy of -30.42 kcal/mol. It was hypothesized that this modulation favors accumulation of cell wall fragments (oligogalacturonides) which act as elicitors of plant defense responses. In order to prove the same, in vivo studies were carried out using a formulation developed from PDP (PDP 5EC) on greenhouse grown Lycopersicon esculentum L. The formulation was effective at different concentrations in reduction of seed infection, improvement of vigor and control of Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. lycopersici infection in L. esculentum. At a concentration of 2 %, PDP 5EC significant reduction in seed infection (95.83 %), improvement in seed vigor (64.31 %) and control of F. oxysporum f.sp. lycopersici infection (96.15 %) were observed. Further application of PDP 5EC to L. esculentum challenged with F. oxysporum f.sp. lycopersici significantly increased the activity of enzymes of the phenylpropanoid pathway, namely, peroxidase (PO), polyphenol oxidase (PPO), phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL), and enhanced the total phenolic content when compared to the control.

  19. Evaluation of toxic equivalency factors for induction of cytochromes P450 CYP1A1 and CYP1A2 enzyme activity by dioxin-like compounds.

    PubMed

    Toyoshiba, Hiroyoshi; Walker, Nigel J; Bailer, A John; Portier, Christopher J

    2004-01-15

    The toxic equivalency factor (TEF) method has been used to characterize the toxicity of human mixtures of dioxin-like compounds and is being considered for use with other classes of potentially toxic agents. TEFs are estimated by examining the relative potencies of the various congeners for a series of biological and toxicological effects. In this paper, we consider changes in activity for two enzymes, cytochrome P450 1A1 (CYP1A1)-associated 7-ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase (EROD) and CYP1A2-associated acetanilide-4-hydroxylase (A4H) activity, resulting from exposure to 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), 3,3',4,4',5-pentachlorobiphenyl (PCB), 2,3,4,7,8-pentachlorodibenzofuran (PeCDF) or a mixture of these agents. The ratio of median effective dose (ED50) is one way to estimate the relative potencies, especially for gene expression and protein endpoints. ED50's were estimated with a nonlinear regression model in which dose-related changes in mean responses are described by a Hill function. ED50's along with other model parameters were estimated by fitting this model to a given data set. Significant differences in estimated model parameters were tested by likelihood ratio methods. The estimated parameters indicated that congener-specific dose-response shapes were significantly different, that additivity failed for these congeners, and that the ratios of ED50's did not predict the response seen for the mixture. These results indicate that for some biological responses, the use of a single relative potency factor (RPF) is not appropriate for the comparison of the dose response behavior of different dioxin-like congeners.

  20. Inhibition of ROS-induced apoptosis in endothelial cells by nitrone spin traps via induction of phase II enzymes and suppression of mitochondria-dependent pro-apoptotic signaling

    PubMed Central

    Das, Amlan; Gopalakrishnan, Bhavani; Voss, Oliver H.; Doseff, Andrea I.; Villamena, Frederick A.

    2012-01-01

    Oxidative stress is the main etiological factor behind the pathogenesis of various diseases including inflammation, cancer, cardiovascular and neurodegenerative disorders. Due to the spin trapping abilities and various pharmacological properties of nitrones, their application as therapeutic agent has been gaining attention. Though the antioxidant properties of the nitrones are well known, the mechanisms by which they modulate the cellular defense machinery against oxidative stress is not well investigated and requires further elucidation. Here, we have investigated the mechanisms of cytoprotection of the nitrone spin traps against oxidative stress in bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAEC). Cytoprotective properties of both the cyclic nitrone 5,5-dimethyl-pyrroline N-oxide (DMPO) and linear nitrone alpha-phenyl N-tert-butyl nitrone (PBN) against H2O2-induced cytoxicity were investigated. Preincubation of BAEC with PBN or DMPO resulted in the inhibition of H2O2–mediated cytotoxicity and apoptosis. Nitrone-treatment resulted in the induction and restoration of phase II antioxidant enzymes via nuclear translocation of NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf-2) in oxidatively-challenged cells. Furthermore, the nitrones were found to inhibit the mitochondrial depolarization and subsequent activation of caspase-3 induced by H2O2. Significant down-regulation of the pro-apoptotic proteins p53 and Bax, and up-regulation of the anti-apoptotic proteins Bcl-2 and p-Bad were observed when the cells were preincubated with the nitrones prior to H2O2–treatment. It was also observed that Nrf-2 silencing completely abolished the protective effects of nitrones. Hence, these findings suggest that nitrones confer protection to the endothelial cells against oxidative stress by modulating phase II antioxidant enzymes and subsequently inhibiting mitochondria-dependent apoptotic cascade. PMID:22580046

  1. Gravitational induction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bini, Donato; Cherubini, Christian; Chicone, Carmen; Mashhoon, Bahram

    2008-11-01

    We study the linear post-Newtonian approximation to general relativity known as gravitoelectromagnetism (GEM); in particular, we examine the similarities and differences between GEM and electrodynamics. Notwithstanding some significant differences between them, we find that a special nonstationary metric in GEM can be employed to show explicitly that it is possible to introduce gravitational induction within GEM in close analogy with Faraday's law of induction and Lenz's law in electrodynamics. Some of the physical implications of gravitational induction are briefly discussed.

  2. Inductive reasoning.

    PubMed

    Hayes, Brett K; Heit, Evan; Swendsen, Haruka

    2010-03-01

    Inductive reasoning entails using existing knowledge or observations to make predictions about novel cases. We review recent findings in research on category-based induction as well as theoretical models of these results, including similarity-based models, connectionist networks, an account based on relevance theory, Bayesian models, and other mathematical models. A number of touchstone empirical phenomena that involve taxonomic similarity are described. We also examine phenomena involving more complex background knowledge about premises and conclusions of inductive arguments and the properties referenced. Earlier models are shown to give a good account of similarity-based phenomena but not knowledge-based phenomena. Recent models that aim to account for both similarity-based and knowledge-based phenomena are reviewed and evaluated. Among the most important new directions in induction research are a focus on induction with uncertain premise categories, the modeling of the relationship between inductive and deductive reasoning, and examination of the neural substrates of induction. A common theme in both the well-established and emerging lines of induction research is the need to develop well-articulated and empirically testable formal models of induction. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website.

  3. Enzyme assays.

    PubMed

    Reymond, Jean-Louis; Fluxà, Viviana S; Maillard, Noélie

    2009-01-07

    Enzyme assays are analytical tools to visualize enzyme activities. In recent years a large variety of enzyme assays have been developed to assist the discovery and optimization of industrial enzymes, in particular for "white biotechnology" where selective enzymes are used with great success for economically viable, mild and environmentally benign production processes. The present article highlights the aspects of fluorogenic and chromogenic substrates, sensors, and enzyme fingerprinting, which are our particular areas of interest.

  4. Induction voidmeter

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, T.T.; Roop, C.J.; Schmidt, K.J.; Brewer, J.

    1983-12-21

    An induction voidmeter for detecting voids in a conductive fluid may comprise: a four arm bridge circuit having two adjustable circuit elements connected as opposite arms of said bridge, an input branch, and an output branch; two induction coils, bifilarly wound together, connected as the remaining two opposing arms of said bridge circuit and positioned such that the conductive fluid passes through said coils; means for applying an AC excitation signal to said input branch; and means for detecting the output signal generated in response to said excitation signal across said output branch. The induction coils may be located outside or inside a non-magnetic pipe containing the conductive fluid.

  5. Induction voidmeter

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Thomas T.; Roop, Conard J.; Schmidt, Kenneth J.; Brewer, John

    1986-01-01

    An induction voidmeter for detecting voids in a conductive fluid may comprise: a four arm bridge circuit having two adjustable circuit elements connected as opposite arms of said bridge circuit, an input branch, and an output branch; two induction coils, bifilarly wound together, connected as the remaining two opposing arms of said bridge circuit and positioned such that the conductive fluid passes through said coils; applying an AC excitation signal to said input branch; and detecting the output signal generated in response to said excitation signal across said output branch. The induction coils may be located outside or inside a non-magnetic pipe containing the conductive fluid.

  6. Enzyme Kinetics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moe, Owen; Cornelius, Richard

    1988-01-01

    Conveys an appreciation of enzyme kinetic analysis by using a practical and intuitive approach. Discusses enzyme assays, kinetic models and rate laws, the kinetic constants (V, velocity, and Km, Michaels constant), evaluation of V and Km from experimental data, and enzyme inhibition. (CW)

  7. Enzyme Kinetics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moe, Owen; Cornelius, Richard

    1988-01-01

    Conveys an appreciation of enzyme kinetic analysis by using a practical and intuitive approach. Discusses enzyme assays, kinetic models and rate laws, the kinetic constants (V, velocity, and Km, Michaels constant), evaluation of V and Km from experimental data, and enzyme inhibition. (CW)

  8. Induction synchrotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takayama, Ken; Kishiro, Junichi

    2000-08-01

    A novel proton synchrotron employing induction cells instead of radio frequency cavities is proposed. The major feature of the barrier bucket acceleration, where acceleration and longitudinal focusing are independently achieved is theoretically discussed with the help of multi-particle simulations. It is proved that barrier bucket acceleration allows ultimate use of longitudinal phase-space and is quite effective to substantially increase the beam intensity in synchrotrons. Engineering aspects of key devices to realize the novel synchrotron, a ferri/ferro-magnetic material loaded induction cell and a modulator being rapidly switched in synchronization with beam acceleration are described in detail. The idea is applied to an existing machine (the KEK 12 GeV-PS) and high-intensity proton rings such as JHF, ESS, and SNS and their predicted improvement in machine performance is given with numerical values for each case.

  9. Enzyme Informatics

    PubMed Central

    Alderson, Rosanna G.; Ferrari, Luna De; Mavridis, Lazaros; McDonagh, James L.; Mitchell, John B. O.; Nath, Neetika

    2012-01-01

    Over the last 50 years, sequencing, structural biology and bioinformatics have completely revolutionised biomolecular science, with millions of sequences and tens of thousands of three dimensional structures becoming available. The bioinformatics of enzymes is well served by, mostly free, online databases. BRENDA describes the chemistry, substrate specificity, kinetics, preparation and biological sources of enzymes, while KEGG is valuable for understanding enzymes and metabolic pathways. EzCatDB, SFLD and MACiE are key repositories for data on the chemical mechanisms by which enzymes operate. At the current rate of genome sequencing and manual annotation, human curation will never finish the functional annotation of the ever-expanding list of known enzymes. Hence there is an increasing need for automated annotation, though it is not yet widespread for enzyme data. In contrast, functional ontologies such as the Gene Ontology already profit from automation. Despite our growing understanding of enzyme structure and dynamics, we are only beginning to be able to design novel enzymes. One can now begin to trace the functional evolution of enzymes using phylogenetics. The ability of enzymes to perform secondary functions, albeit relatively inefficiently, gives clues as to how enzyme function evolves. Substrate promiscuity in enzymes is one example of imperfect specificity in protein-ligand interactions. Similarly, most drugs bind to more than one protein target. This may sometimes result in helpful polypharmacology as a drug modulates plural targets, but also often leads to adverse side-effects. Many cheminformatics approaches can be used to model the interactions between druglike molecules and proteins in silico. We can even use quantum chemical techniques like DFT and QM/MM to compute the structural and energetic course of enzyme catalysed chemical reaction mechanisms, including a full description of bond making and breaking. PMID:23116471

  10. Induction machine

    SciTech Connect

    Owen, W.H.

    1980-10-14

    A polyphase rotary induction machine for use as a motor or generator utilizes, a single rotor assembly having two series connected sets of rotor windings, a first stator winding disposed around the first rotor winding and means for controlling the current induced in one set of the rotor windings compared to the current induced in the other set of the rotor windings. The rotor windings may be wound rotor windings or squirrel cage windings.

  11. Induction machine

    DOEpatents

    Owen, Whitney H.

    1980-01-01

    A polyphase rotary induction machine for use as a motor or generator utilizing a single rotor assembly having two series connected sets of rotor windings, a first stator winding disposed around the first rotor winding and means for controlling the current induced in one set of the rotor windings compared to the current induced in the other set of the rotor windings. The rotor windings may be wound rotor windings or squirrel cage windings.

  12. Multivalent Induction of Biodegradative Threonine Deaminase

    PubMed Central

    Yui, Yoshiki; Watanabe, Yasuyoshi; Ito, Seiji; Shizuta, Yutaka; Hayaishi, Osamu

    1977-01-01

    To determine the inducer(s) of the biodegradative threonine deaminase in Escherichia coli, the effects of various amino acids on the synthesis of this enzyme were investigated. The complex medium used hitherto for the enzyme induction can be completely replaced by a synthetic medium composed of 18 natural amino acids. In this synthetic medium, the omission of each of the seven amino acids threonine, serine, aspartic acid, methionine, valine, leucine, and arginine resulted in the greatest loss of enzyme formation. These seven amino acids did not significantly influence the uptake of other amino acids into the cells. Furthermore, they did not stimulate the conversion of inactive enzyme into an active form, since they did not affect the enzyme level in cells in which protein synthesis was inhibited by chloramphenicol. Threonine, serine, aspartic acid, and methionine failed to stimulate enzyme production in cells in which messenger ribonucleic acid synthesis was arrested by rifampin, whereas valine, leucine, and arginine stimulated enzyme synthesis under the same conditions. Therefore, the first four amino acids appear to act as inducers of the biodegradative threonine deaminase in E. coli and the last three amino acids appear to be amplifiers of enzyme production. The term “multivalent induction” has been proposed for this type of induction, i.e., enzyme induction only by the simultaneous presence of several amino acids. PMID:334736

  13. Marine enzymes.

    PubMed

    Debashish, Ghosh; Malay, Saha; Barindra, Sana; Joydeep, Mukherjee

    2005-01-01

    Marine enzyme biotechnology can offer novel biocatalysts with properties like high salt tolerance, hyperthermostability, barophilicity, cold adaptivity, and ease in large-scale cultivation. This review deals with the research and development work done on the occurrence, molecular biology, and bioprocessing of marine enzymes during the last decade. Exotic locations have been accessed for the search of novel enzymes. Scientists have isolated proteases and carbohydrases from deep sea hydrothermal vents. Cold active metabolic enzymes from psychrophilic marine microorganisms have received considerable research attention. Marine symbiont microorganisms growing in association with animals and plants were shown to produce enzymes of commercial interest. Microorganisms isolated from sediment and seawater have been the most widely studied, proteases, carbohydrases, and peroxidases being noteworthy. Enzymes from marine animals and plants were primarily studied for their metabolic roles, though proteases and peroxidases have found industrial applications. Novel techniques in molecular biology applied to assess the diversity of chitinases, nitrate, nitrite, ammonia-metabolizing, and pollutant-degrading enzymes are discussed. Genes encoding chitinases, proteases, and carbohydrases from microbial and animal sources have been cloned and characterized. Research on the bioprocessing of marine-derived enzymes, however, has been scanty, focusing mainly on the application of solid-state fermentation to the production of enzymes from microbial sources.

  14. Understanding Enzymes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sinnott, M. L.

    1979-01-01

    Describes the way enzymes operate through reaction energetics, and explains that most of the catalytic power of enzymes lies in the strong noncovalent forces responsible for initial binding of substrate, which are only manifested at the transition state of the reaction. (Author/GA)

  15. Enzymes, Industrial

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Enzymes serve key roles in numerous biotechnology processes and products that are commonly encountered in the forms of food and beverages, cleaning supplies, clothing, paper products, transportation fuels, pharmaceuticals, and monitoring devices. Enzymes can display regio- and stereo-specificity, p...

  16. Zinc Enzymes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bertini, I.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Discusses the role of zinc in various enzymes concerned with hydration, hydrolysis, and redox reactions. The binding of zinc to protein residues, properties of noncatalytic zinc(II) and catalytic zinc, and the reactions catalyzed by zinc are among the topics considered. (JN)

  17. Food Enzymes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McBroom, Rachel; Oliver-Hoyo, Maria T.

    2007-01-01

    Many students view biology and chemistry as two unrelated, separate sciences; how these courses are generally taught in high schools may do little to change that impression. The study of enzymes provide a great opportunity for both biology and chemistry teachers to share with students the interdisciplinary nature of science. This article describes…

  18. Zinc Enzymes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bertini, I.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Discusses the role of zinc in various enzymes concerned with hydration, hydrolysis, and redox reactions. The binding of zinc to protein residues, properties of noncatalytic zinc(II) and catalytic zinc, and the reactions catalyzed by zinc are among the topics considered. (JN)

  19. Engineering enzymes.

    PubMed

    Dutton, P Leslie; Moser, Christopher C

    2011-01-01

    Fundamental research into bioinorganic catalysis of the kind presented at this Faraday Discussion has the potential to turn inspiration drawn from impressive natural energy and chemical transformations into artificial catalyst constructions useful to mankind. Creating bio-inspired artificial constructions requires a level of understanding well beyond simple description of structures and mechanisms of natural enzymes. To be useful, such description must be augmented by a practical sense of structural and energetic engineering tolerances of the mechanism. Significant barriers to achieving an engineering understanding of enzyme mechanisms arise from natural protein complexity. In certain cases we can surmount these barriers to understanding, such as natural electron tunneling, coupling of electron tunneling to light capture and proton exchange as well as simpler bond breaking redox catalysis. Hope for similar solutions of more complex bioinorganic enzymes is indicated in several papers presented in this Discussion. Armed with an engineering understanding of mechanism, the current serious frustrations to successful creation of functional artificial proteins that are rooted in protein complexity can fall away. Here we discuss the genetic and biological roots of protein complexity and show how to dodge and minimize the effects of complexity. In the best-understood cases, artificial enzymes can be designed from scratch using the simplest of protein scaffolds.

  20. Food Enzymes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McBroom, Rachel; Oliver-Hoyo, Maria T.

    2007-01-01

    Many students view biology and chemistry as two unrelated, separate sciences; how these courses are generally taught in high schools may do little to change that impression. The study of enzymes provide a great opportunity for both biology and chemistry teachers to share with students the interdisciplinary nature of science. This article describes…

  1. Therapeutic response to a novel enzyme-targeting radiosensitization treatment (KORTUC II) for residual lesions in patients with stage IV primary breast cancer, following induction chemotherapy with epirubicin and cyclophosphamide or taxane

    PubMed Central

    Aoyama, Nobutaka; Ogawa, Yasuhiro; Yasuoka, Miki; Iwasa, Hitomi; Miyatake, Kana; Yoshimatsu, Rika; Yamanishi, Tomoaki; Hamada, Norihiko; Tamura, Taiji; Kobayashi, Kana; Murata, Yoriko; Yamagami, Takuji; Miyamura, Mitsuhiko

    2017-01-01

    Linac-based radiotherapy has a negligible effect on the majority of advanced neoplasms. Therefore, a novel radiosensitization treatment Kochi Oxydol Radiation Therapy for Unresectable Carcinomas II (KORTUC II), which utilizes hydrogen peroxide and sodium hyaluronate was developed. The effectiveness of KORTUC II for the treatment of chemotherapy-resistant supraclavicular lymph node metastases and recurrent breast cancers has previously been demonstrated. The present study evaluated the safety and efficacy of KORTUC II in patients with stage IV primary breast cancer. Seven patients (age range, 36–65 years) were enrolled. All patients received induction chemotherapy prior to KORTUC II treatment and underwent positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) examinations prior to and 2–7 months following KORTUC II treatment, and every six months thereafter where possible. The radiotherapy regimen (x-ray irradiation) was 2.75 gray (Gy)/fraction, 5 fractions/week for 16–18 fractions with a total radiation dose of 44–49.5 Gy. Administration of the KORTUC II agent (3–6 ml: 3 ml for a lesion <3 cm in diameter and 6 ml for a lesion ≥3 cm) was initiated from the sixth radiotherapy fraction, and was conducted twice a week under ultrasonographic guidance. The therapeutic effects were evaluated by PET-CT examinations prior to and following KORTUC II treatment. Of the seven lesions from the seven patients, five exhibited complete responses, two exhibited partial responses and none exhibited stable disease or progressive disease. The overall survival rate was determined to be 100% at 1 and 86% at 2 years post-treatment. The mean duration of follow-up by December 2014 was 51 months. The results of the PET-CT studies indicated that KORTUC II treatment demonstrated marked therapeutic effects with satisfactory treatment outcomes and acceptable adverse effects. PMID:28123524

  2. Sterols regulate 3β-hydroxysterol Δ24-reductase (DHCR24) via dual sterol regulatory elements: cooperative induction of key enzymes in lipid synthesis by Sterol Regulatory Element Binding Proteins.

    PubMed

    Zerenturk, Eser J; Sharpe, Laura J; Brown, Andrew J

    2012-10-01

    3β-Hydroxysterol Δ24-reductase (DHCR24) catalyzes a final step in cholesterol synthesis, and has been ascribed diverse functions, such as being anti-apoptotic and anti-inflammatory. How this enzyme is regulated transcriptionally by sterols is currently unclear. Some studies have suggested that its expression is regulated by Sterol Regulatory Element Binding Proteins (SREBPs) while another suggests it is through the Liver X Receptor (LXR). However, these transcription factors have opposing effects on cellular sterol levels, so it is likely that one predominates. Here we establish that sterol regulation of DHCR24 occurs predominantly through SREBP-2, and identify the particular region of the DHCR24 promoter to which SREBP-2 binds. We demonstrate that sterol regulation is mediated by two sterol regulatory elements (SREs) in the promoter of the gene, assisted by two nearby NF-Y binding sites. Moreover, we present evidence that the dual SREs work cooperatively to regulate DHCR24 expression by comparison to two known SREBP target genes, the LDL receptor with one SRE, and farnesyl-diphosphate farnesyltransferase 1, with two SREs. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Primary enzyme quantitation

    DOEpatents

    Saunders, G.C.

    1982-03-04

    The disclosure relates to the quantitation of a primary enzyme concentration by utilizing a substrate for the primary enzyme labeled with a second enzyme which is an indicator enzyme. Enzyme catalysis of the substrate occurs and results in release of the indicator enzyme in an amount directly proportional to the amount of primary enzyme present. By quantifying the free indicator enzyme one determines the amount of primary enzyme present.

  4. Electromagnetic induction methods

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Electromagnetic induction geophysical methods are finding greater and greater use for agricultural purposes. Electromagnetic induction methods measure the electrical conductivity (or resistivity) for a bulk volume of soil directly beneath the surface. An instrument called a ground conductivity meter...

  5. Teaching Arrangement Inductively.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mendelson, Michael

    1988-01-01

    Argues that teaching arrangement inductively offers an alternative to the standard imitation of business communication text models. Asserts that the inductive method stimulates individual rather than formulaic responses to the problems of organization, and that inductively-trained writers see arrangements as a powerful element in persuasive…

  6. Inductive Reasoning and Writing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rooks, Clay; Boyd, Robert

    2003-01-01

    Induction, properly understood, is not merely a game, nor is it a gimmick, nor is it an artificial way of explaining an element of reasoning. Proper understanding of inductive reasoning--and the various types of reasoning that the authors term inductive--enables the student to evaluate critically other people's writing and enhances the composition…

  7. Induction into Learning Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fulton, Kathleen; Yoon, Irene; Lee, Christine

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents the National Commission on Teaching and America's Future (NCTAF) vision for new teacher induction into strong schools that support a career of continuous professional growth. The paper examines data on induction's impact on teacher retention and emerging information on induction's effects on improving student learning, and goes…

  8. Pulsed IR inductive lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razhev, A. M.; Churkin, D. S.; Kargapol'tsev, E. S.

    2014-07-01

    Pulsed inductive discharge is a new alternative method of pumping active gas laser media. The work presents results of experimental investigations of near, mid, and far IR inductive gas lasers (H2, HF, and CO2) operating at different transitions of atoms and molecules with different mechanisms of formation of inversion population. The excitation systems of a pulsed inductive cylindrical discharge (pulsed inductively coupled plasma) and pulsed RF inductive discharge in the gases are developed. Various gas mixtures including H2, N2, He, Ne, F2, NF3, and SF6 are used. Characteristics of near IR H2 laser radiation are investigated. Maximal pulse peak power of 7 kW is achieved. The possibility of using a pulsed inductive discharge as a new method of pumping HF laser active medium is demonstrated. The pulsed RF inductive CO2 laser is created and a total efficiency of 17% is achieved.

  9. Dissociation and serenity induction.

    PubMed

    Zoellner, Lori A; Sacks, Matthew B; Foa, Edna B

    2007-09-01

    Dissociation is a common experience during or immediately after a traumatic event; yet, most of the current knowledge regarding dissociation is retrospective in nature. The aim of the present study investigated a non-pharmacological method of dissociative induction with a clinical sample. Participants with PTSD and non-trauma exposed participants were randomly assigned to receive either a dissociative induction, or a serenity induction, based on modified Velten mood induction procedures. Participants receiving the dissociative induction reported higher state-dissociation than those receiving the serenity induction. The PTSD group reported greater state dissociation than the non-trauma exposed group, regardless of induction. State dissociation was related to trait dissociation, PTSD severity, and depression. The present results provide an initial demonstration of the viability for inducing state dissociation in the laboratory with a PTSD sample.

  10. Sequential inductive learning

    SciTech Connect

    Gratch, J.

    1996-12-31

    This article advocates a new model for inductive learning. Called sequential induction, it helps bridge classical fixed-sample learning techniques (which are efficient but difficult to formally characterize), and worst-case approaches (which provide strong statistical guarantees but are too inefficient for practical use). Learning proceeds as a sequence of decisions which are informed by training data. By analyzing induction at the level of these decisions, and by utilizing the only enough data to make each decision, sequential induction provides statistical guarantees but with substantially less data than worst-case methods require. The sequential inductive model is also useful as a method for determining a sufficient sample size for inductive learning and as such, is relevant to learning problems where the preponderance of data or the cost of gathering data precludes the use of traditional methods.

  11. Elevated Liver Enzymes

    MedlinePlus

    Symptoms Elevated liver enzymes By Mayo Clinic Staff Elevated liver enzymes may indicate inflammation or damage to cells in the liver. Inflamed or ... than normal amounts of certain chemicals, including liver enzymes, into the bloodstream, which can result in elevated ...

  12. Induction: Making the Leap

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ling, Lorraine M.

    2009-01-01

    This article provides a critical examination of a variety of approaches to induction focusing especially upon Australia and other Pacific Rim countries. The question of the purposes induction serves for graduate teachers, experienced teachers and education systems is addressed in terms of whether it is a technical exercise which preserves the…

  13. Foundation doctors' induction experiences.

    PubMed

    Miles, Susan; Kellett, Joanne; Leinster, Sam J

    2015-07-24

    It is well established that trainee doctors struggle with the transition from medical school to starting work and feel unprepared for many aspects of their new role. There is evidence that suitable induction experiences improve competence and confidence, but available data indicate that trainee doctors on the UK Foundation Programme are commonly not experiencing useful inductions. The aim of the reported research was to explore trainee doctors' experiences with induction during their first year of the Foundation Programme to identify the most useful characteristics. A questionnaire was designed to explore trainee doctors' experiences with induction at two points during their first Foundation year, during the first and third of three rotations, to enable all induction experiences on offer during the year to be surveyed. Data were collected using an anonymous questionnaire distributed during a teaching session, with an online version available for those trainees not present. Questions gathered information about characteristics of the inductions, usefulness of components of the inductions and what gaps exist. 192 Foundation trainee doctors completed the questionnaire during Rotation 1 and 165 during Rotation 3. The findings indicated that induction experiences at the beginning of the year, including the local Preparation for Professional Practice week, were more useful than those received for later rotations. Longer inductions were more useful than shorter. Departmental inductions were generally only moderately helpful and they missed many important characteristics. Gaps in their inductions identified by many trainees matched those aspects judged to be most useful by those trainees who had experienced these characteristics. Many Foundation trainee doctors are experiencing inadequate inductions, notably at the department level. Trainees are starting rotations in new departments without rudimentary knowledge about their role and responsibilities in that department

  14. Progress in Induction Linacs

    SciTech Connect

    Caporaso, G J

    2000-09-27

    This presentation will be a broad survey of progress in induction technology over the past four years. Much work has been done on accelerators for hydrodynamic test radiography and other applications. Solid-state pulsers have been developed which can provide unprecedented flexibility and precision in pulse format and accelerating voltage for both ion and electron induction machines. Induction linacs can now be built which can operate with MHz repetition rates. Solid-state technology has also made possible the development of fast kickers for precision control of high current beams. New insulator technology has been developed which will improve conventional induction linacs in addition to enabling a new class of high gradient induction linacs.

  15. Principles of Induction Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briggs*, Richard J.

    The basic concepts involved in induction accelerators are introduced in this chapter. The objective is to provide a foundation for the more detailed coverage of key technology elements and specific applications in the following chapters. A wide variety of induction accelerators are discussed in the following chapters, from the high current linear electron accelerator configurations that have been the main focus of the original developments, to circular configurations like the ion synchrotrons that are the subject of more recent research. The main focus in the present chapter is on the induction module containing the magnetic core that plays the role of a transformer in coupling the pulsed power from the modulator to the charged particle beam. This is the essential common element in all these induction accelerators, and an understanding of the basic processes involved in its operation is the main objective of this chapter. (See [1] for a useful and complementary presentation of the basic principles in induction linacs.)

  16. P450 enzymes of estrogen metabolism.

    PubMed

    Martucci, C P; Fishman, J

    1993-01-01

    Endogenous and exogenous estrogens undergo extensive oxidative metabolism by specific cytochrome P450 enzymes. Certain drugs and xenobiotics have been found to be potent inducers of estrogen hydroxylating enzymes with C-2 hydroxylase induction being greater than that of C-16 hydroxylase. Oxygenated estrogen metabolites have different biological activities, with C-2 metabolites having limited or no activity and C-4 and C-16 metabolites having similar potency to estradiol. Pathophysiological roles for some of the oxygenated estrogen metabolites have been proposed, e.g. 16 alpha-hydroxyestrone and 4-hydroxyestrone. These reactive estrogens are capable of damaging cellular proteins and DNA and may be carcinogenic in specific cells.

  17. How induction generators work

    SciTech Connect

    Nailen, R.L.

    1980-06-01

    The operating principles of the induction generator, which is a standard squirrel cage motor in which the shaft is coupled to and driven by an engine or turbine at a rate above its synchronous speed and which, under these conditions, produces electrical power, are described. The advantages of induction generators, e.g., low cost, simplicity, frequency and voltage controlled by the utility system, no synchronizing controls needed, and the advantages of using small induction generators run by wind turbines, small gas turbines and in low head hydro plants are discussed. (LCL)

  18. Direct reading inductance meter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolby, R. B. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A direct reading inductance meter comprised of a crystal oscillator and an LC tuned oscillator is presented. The oscillators function respectively to generate a reference frequency, f(r), and to generate an initial frequency, f(0), which when mixed produce a difference equal to zero. Upon connecting an inductor of small unknown value in the LC circuit to change its resonant frequency to f(x), a difference frequency (f(r)-f(x)) is produced that is very nearly a linear function of the inductance of the inductor. The difference frequency is measured and displayed on a linear scale in units of inductance.

  19. Properties of inductive reasoning.

    PubMed

    Heit, E

    2000-12-01

    This paper reviews the main psychological phenomena of inductive reasoning, covering 25 years of experimental and model-based research, in particular addressing four questions. First, what makes a case or event generalizable to other cases? Second, what makes a set of cases generalizable? Third, what makes a property or predicate projectable? Fourth, how do psychological models of induction address these results? The key results in inductive reasoning are outlined, and several recent models, including a new Bayesian account, are evaluated with respect to these results. In addition, future directions for experimental and model-based work are proposed.

  20. Fundamentals of enzyme kinetics.

    PubMed

    Seibert, Eleanore; Tracy, Timothy S

    2014-01-01

    This chapter provides a general introduction to the kinetics of enzyme-catalyzed reactions, with a focus on drug-metabolizing enzymes. A prerequisite to understanding enzyme kinetics is having a clear grasp of the meanings of "enzyme" and "catalysis." Catalysts are reagents that can increase the rate of a chemical reaction without being consumed in the reaction. Enzymes are proteins that form a subset of catalysts. These concepts are further explored below.

  1. Induction melter apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Roach, Jay A [Idaho Falls, ID; Richardson, John G [Idaho Falls, ID; Raivo, Brian D [Idaho Falls, ID; Soelberg, Nicholas R [Idaho Falls, ID

    2008-06-17

    Apparatus and methods of operation are provided for a cold-crucible-induction melter for vitrifying waste wherein a single induction power supply may be used to effect a selected thermal distribution by independently energizing at least two inductors. Also, a bottom drain assembly may be heated by an inductor and may include an electrically resistive heater. The bottom drain assembly may be cooled to solidify molten material passing therethrough to prevent discharge of molten material therefrom. Configurations are provided wherein the induction flux skin depth substantially corresponds with the central longitudinal axis of the crucible. Further, the drain tube may be positioned within the induction flux skin depth in relation to material within the crucible or may be substantially aligned with a direction of flow of molten material within the crucible. An improved head design including four shells forming thermal radiation shields and at least two gas-cooled plenums is also disclosed.

  2. Induction heating coupler

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, Robert L. (Inventor); Copeland, Carl E. (Inventor); Swaim, Robert J. (Inventor); Coultrip, Robert H. (Inventor); Johnston, David F. (Inventor); Phillips, W. Morris (Inventor); Johnson, Samuel D. (Inventor); Dinkins, James R. (Inventor); Buckley, John D. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    An induction heating device includes a handle having a hollow interior and two opposite ends, a wrist connected to one end of the handle, a U-shaped pole piece having two spaced apart ends, a tank circuit including an induction coil wrapped around the pole piece and a capacitor connected to the induction coil, a head connected to the wrist and including a housing for receiving the U-shaped pole piece, the two spaced apart ends of the pole piece extending outwardely beyond the housing, and a power source connected to the tank circuit. When the tank circuit is energized and a susceptor is placed in juxtaposition to the ends of the U-shaped pole piece, the susceptor is heated by induction heating due to magnetic flux passing between the two ends of the pole piece.

  3. Enhancing Induction Coil Reliability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreter, K.; Goldstein, R.; Yakey, C.; Nemkov, V.

    2014-12-01

    In induction hardening, thermal fatigue is one of the main copper failure modes of induction heat treating coils. There have been papers published that describe this failure mode and others that describe some good design practices. The variables previously identified as the sources of thermal fatigue include radiation from the part surface, frequency, current, concentrator losses, water pressure and coil wall thickness. However, there is very little quantitative data on the factors that influence thermal fatigue in induction coils is available in the public domain. By using finite element analysis software this study analyzes the effect of common design variables of inductor cooling, and quantifies the relative importance of these variables. A comprehensive case study for a single shot induction coil with Fluxtrol A concentrator applied is used for the analysis.

  4. Thermal kinetic inductance detector

    DOEpatents

    Cecil, Thomas; Gades, Lisa; Miceli, Antonio; Quaranta, Orlando

    2016-12-20

    A microcalorimeter for radiation detection that uses superconducting kinetic inductance resonators as the thermometers. The detector is frequency-multiplexed which enables detector systems with a large number of pixels.

  5. Linear induction accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Buttram, M.T.; Ginn, J.W.

    1988-06-21

    A linear induction accelerator includes a plurality of adder cavities arranged in a series and provided in a structure which is evacuated so that a vacuum inductance is provided between each adder cavity and the structure. An energy storage system for the adder cavities includes a pulsed current source and a respective plurality of bipolar converting networks connected thereto. The bipolar high-voltage, high-repetition-rate square pulse train sets and resets the cavities. 4 figs.

  6. Induction of the Proepicardium.

    PubMed

    Maya-Ramos, Lisandro; Cleland, James; Bressan, Michael; Mikawa, Takashi

    2013-09-01

    The proepicardium is a transient extracardiac embryonic tissue that gives rise to the epicardium and a number of coronary vascular cell lineages. This important extracardiac tissue develops through multiple steps of inductive events, from specification of multiple cell lineages to morphogenesis. This article will review our current understanding of inductive events involved in patterning of the proepicardium precursor field, specification of cell types within the proepicardium, and their extension and attachment to the heart.

  7. Induction Heating Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Induction heating technology, a magnetic non-deforming process, was developed by Langley researchers to join plastic and composite components in space. Under NASA license, Inductron Corporation uses the process to produce induction heating systems and equipment for numerous applications. The Torobonder, a portable system, comes with a number of interchangeable heads for aircraft repair. Other developments are the E Heating Head, the Toroid Joining Gun, and the Torobrazer. These products perform bonding applications more quickly, safely and efficiently than previous methods.

  8. Induction launcher design considerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Driga, M. D.; Weldon, W. F.

    1989-01-01

    New concepts in the design of induction accelerators and their power supplies for space and military applications are discussed. Particular attention is given to a piecewise-rising-frequency power supply in which each elementary generator (normal compulsator or rising frequency generator) has a different base frequency. A preliminary design of a coaxial induction accelerator for a hypersonic real gas facility is discussed to illustrate the concepts described.

  9. Doubly fed induction machine

    DOEpatents

    Skeist, S. Merrill; Baker, Richard H.

    2005-10-11

    An electro-mechanical energy conversion system coupled between an energy source and an energy load including an energy converter device having a doubly fed induction machine coupled between the energy source and the energy load to convert the energy from the energy source and to transfer the converted energy to the energy load and an energy transfer multiplexer coupled to the energy converter device to control the flow of power or energy through the doubly fed induction machine.

  10. Induction as Knowledge Integration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Benjamin D.; Rosenbloom, Paul S.

    1996-01-01

    Two key issues for induction algorithms are the accuracy of the learned hypothesis and the computational resources consumed in inducing that hypothesis. One of the most promising ways to improve performance along both dimensions is to make use of additional knowledge. Multi-strategy learning algorithms tackle this problem by employing several strategies for handling different kinds of knowledge in different ways. However, integrating knowledge into an induction algorithm can be difficult when the new knowledge differs significantly from the knowledge the algorithm already uses. In many cases the algorithm must be rewritten. This paper presents Knowledge Integration framework for Induction (KII), a KII, that provides a uniform mechanism for integrating knowledge into induction. In theory, arbitrary knowledge can be integrated with this mechanism, but in practice the knowledge representation language determines both the knowledge that can be integrated, and the costs of integration and induction. By instantiating KII with various set representations, algorithms can be generated at different trade-off points along these dimensions. One instantiation of KII, called RS-KII, is presented that can implement hybrid induction algorithms, depending on which knowledge it utilizes. RS-KII is demonstrated to implement AQ-11, as well as a hybrid algorithm that utilizes a domain theory and noisy examples. Other algorithms are also possible.

  11. Phytoalexin Induction in French Bean 1

    PubMed Central

    Dixon, Richard A.; Dey, Prakash M.; Lawton, Michael A.; Lamb, Christopher J.

    1983-01-01

    Treatment of hypocotyl sections or cell suspension cultures of dwarf French bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) with an abiotic elicitor (denatured ribonuclease A) resulted in increased extractable activity of the enzyme l-phenylalanine ammonia-lyase. This induction could be transmitted from treated cells through a dialysis membrane to cells which were not in direct contact with the elicitor. In hypocotyl sections, induction of isoflavonoid phytoalexin accumulation was also transmitted across a dialysis membrane, although levels of insoluble, lignin-like phenolic material remained unchanged in elicitor-treated and control sections. In bean cell suspension cultures, the induction of phenylalanine ammonia-lyase in cells separated from ribonuclease-treated cells by a dialysis membrane was also accompanied by increases in the activities of chalcone synthase and chalcone isomerase, two enzymes previously implicated in the phytoalexin defense response. Such intercellular transmission of elicitation did not occur in experiments with cells treated with a biotic elicitor preparation heat-released from the cell walls of the bean pathogen Colletotrichum lindemuthianum. The results confirm and extend previous suggestions that a low molecular weight, diffusible factor of host plant origin is involved (in French bean) in the intercellular transmission of the elicitation response to abiotic elicitors. PMID:16662813

  12. Inducible trehalase enzyme activity of Morchella conica Persoon mycelium.

    PubMed

    Czövek, Pálma; Király, I

    2011-03-01

    Morchella conica Pers. strains of the study were isolated from fruit bodies collected in ash-mixed forests. At first, the strains were cultured on potato dextrose agar (PDA), then on modified Murashige and Skoog (MS) solid agar media. A normal-growing strain was chosen for the trehalase induction experiments. During the trehalase induction treatment, mycelia were grown in liquid culture containing different concentrations of trehalose. After the induction period of trehalase enzymes, physiological state of the mycelium and the oxidative stress were monitored in the vegetative mycelia by measuring the change of the malondialdehyde content, superoxide dismutase enzyme activity, the fresh and dry weight. The examined Morchella conica strain utilized the trehalose properly. The rising amount of the trehalose triggered the increase of the mycelial trehalase enzyme activity. Our results clearly proved that both neutral and acidic trehalase isoenzyme activity of the Morchella conica mycelium are inducible and are playing important role in the utilization of external trehalose.

  13. Lactose metabolism by Streptococcus mutans: evidence for induction of the tagatose 6-phosphate pathway.

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, I R; Lebtag, H

    1979-01-01

    Growth on lactose by strains of Streptococcus mutans resulted in the induction of the lactose-phosphoenolpyruvate-phosphotransferase system, phospho-beta-galactosidase, and the enzymes of the tagatose 6-phosphate pathway. PMID:230175

  14. Insolubilization process increases enzyme stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Billingham, J.; Lyn, J.

    1971-01-01

    Enzymes complexed with polymeric matrices contain properties suggesting application to enzyme-controlled reactions. Stability of insolubilized enzyme derivatives is markedly greater than that of soluble enzymes and physical form of insolubilized enzymes is useful in column and batch processes.

  15. Malate Utilization by a Group D Streptococcus: Regulation of Malic Enzyme Synthesis by an Inducible Malate Permease

    PubMed Central

    London, Jack; Meyer, Eleanor Y.

    1970-01-01

    Induction of an nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide-specific malic enzyme and a malate entry system permits Streptococcus faecalis to grow at the expense of malate. Evidence is presented which shows that biosynthesis of the permease, but not of the malic enzyme, is subject to catabolite repression by glucose. In contrast to the malic enzyme, the catalytic function of the entry system does not appear to be inhibited by intermediate products of glycolysis. Although the induction of the entry system does not appear to be coordinated with the induction of the malic enzyme, the latter process is dependent upon the permease for the transport and accumulation of inducer. PMID:5437724

  16. ARSENIC INDUCTION OF HEME OXYGENASE AS A BIOMARKER

    EPA Science Inventory


    Useful biomarkers of arsenic effects in both experimental animals and humans are needed. Arsenate and arsenite are good inducers of rat hepatic and renal heme oxygenase (HO); monomethylarsonic acid (MMA) and dimethylarsinic acid (DMA) are not. Therefore, HO enzyme induction ...

  17. ARSENIC INDUCTION OF HEME OXYGENASE AS A BIOMARKER

    EPA Science Inventory


    Useful biomarkers of arsenic effects in both experimental animals and humans are needed. Arsenate and arsenite are good inducers of rat hepatic and renal heme oxygenase (HO); monomethylarsonic acid (MMA) and dimethylarsinic acid (DMA) are not. Therefore, HO enzyme induction ...

  18. Contributions of Human Enzymes in Carcinogen Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Rendic, Slobodan; Guengerich, F. Peter

    2012-01-01

    Considerable support exists for roles of metabolism in modulating the carcinogenic properties of chemicals. In particular, many of these compounds are procarcinogens that require activation to electrophilic forms to exert genotoxic effects. We systematically analyzed the existing literature on metabolism of carcinogens by human enzymes, which has been developed largely in the past 25 years. The metabolism and especially bioactivation of carcinogens are dominated by cytochrome P450 enzymes (66% of bioactivations). Within this group, six P450s—1A1, 1A2, 1B1, 2A6, 2E1, and 3A4—accounted for 77% of the P450 activation reactions. The roles of these P450s can be compared with those estimated for drug metabolism and should be considered in issues involving enzyme induction, chemoprevention, molecular epidemiology, inter-individual variations, and risk assessment. PMID:22531028

  19. Contributions of human enzymes in carcinogen metabolism.

    PubMed

    Rendic, Slobodan; Guengerich, F Peter

    2012-07-16

    Considerable support exists for the roles of metabolism in modulating the carcinogenic properties of chemicals. In particular, many of these compounds are pro-carcinogens that require activation to electrophilic forms to exert genotoxic effects. We systematically analyzed the existing literature on the metabolism of carcinogens by human enzymes, which has been developed largely in the past 25 years. The metabolism and especially bioactivation of carcinogens are dominated by cytochrome P450 enzymes (66% of bioactivations). Within this group, six P450s--1A1, 1A2, 1B1, 2A6, 2E1, and 3A4--accounted for 77% of the P450 activation reactions. The roles of these P450s can be compared with those estimated for drug metabolism and should be considered in issues involving enzyme induction, chemoprevention, molecular epidemiology, interindividual variations, and risk assessment.

  20. Developments in Enzyme Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chaplin, M. F.

    1984-01-01

    Enzyme technology has a well-established industrial base, with applications that have survived competition. The most prominent applications of enzymes in biotechnology are examined with an explanation of some theoretical background. Topics include extending an enzyme's useful life, partition and diffusion, industrial uses, and therapeutic uses.…

  1. Developments in Enzyme Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chaplin, M. F.

    1984-01-01

    Enzyme technology has a well-established industrial base, with applications that have survived competition. The most prominent applications of enzymes in biotechnology are examined with an explanation of some theoretical background. Topics include extending an enzyme's useful life, partition and diffusion, industrial uses, and therapeutic uses.…

  2. Wrapper Induction Software

    SciTech Connect

    2011-08-18

    Wrapper Induction is a software package that allows for unsupervised, semi-supervised, and manual extraction of social media data independent of language or site architecture. A large range of blog formats is available to individuals as means of publishing data to the internet. Blogs are a source of rich information for analysts. With a growing volume of information and blog engines, there is an increased need for automatic or semi-automatic extraction of that data for processing to help deliver results to analysts. Wrapper Induction is designed to automatically or semi-automatically create a template that can be used to harvest blog data from websites. Blogs are in a variety of formats and languages. Wrapper Induction creates a template and extracts blog data in a way that is independent of a specified blog format or language.

  3. Inductive dielectric analyzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agranovich, Daniel; Polygalov, Eugene; Popov, Ivan; Ben Ishai, Paul; Feldman, Yuri

    2017-03-01

    One of the approaches to bypass the problem of electrode polarization in dielectric measurements is the free electrode method. The advantage of this technique is that, the probing electric field in the material is not supplied by contact electrodes, but rather by electromagnetic induction. We have designed an inductive dielectric analyzer based on a sensor comprising two concentric toroidal coils. In this work, we present an analytic derivation of the relationship between the impedance measured by the sensor and the complex dielectric permittivity of the sample. The obtained relationship was successfully employed to measure the dielectric permittivity and conductivity of various alcohols and aqueous salt solutions.

  4. Induction powered biological radiosonde

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fryer, T. B. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    An induction powered implanted monitor for epidurally measuring intracranial pressure and telemetering the pressure information to a remote readout is disclosed. The monitor utilizes an inductance-capacitance (L-C) oscillator in which the C comprises a variable capacitance transducer, one electrode of which is a small stiff pressure responsive diaphragm. The oscillator is isolated from a transmitting tank circuit by a buffer circuit and all electric components in the implanted unit except an input and an output coil are shielded by a metal housing.

  5. HIGH GRADIENT INDUCTION ACCELERATOR

    SciTech Connect

    Caporaso, G J; Sampayan, S; Chen, Y; Blackfield, D; Harris, J; Hawkins, S; Holmes, C; Krogh, M; Nelson, S; Nunnally, W; Paul, A; Poole, B; Rhodes, M; Sanders, D; Selenes, K; Sullivan, J; Wang, L; Watson, J

    2007-06-21

    A new type of compact induction accelerator is under development at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory that promises to increase the average accelerating gradient by at least an order of magnitude over that of existing induction machines. The machine is based on the use of high gradient vacuum insulators, advanced dielectric materials and switches and is stimulated by the desire for compact flash x-ray radiography sources. Research describing an extreme variant of this technology aimed at proton therapy for cancer will be described. Progress in applying this technology to several applications will be reviewed.

  6. The average enzyme principle

    PubMed Central

    Reznik, Ed; Chaudhary, Osman; Segrè, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    The Michaelis-Menten equation for an irreversible enzymatic reaction depends linearly on the enzyme concentration. Even if the enzyme concentration changes in time, this linearity implies that the amount of substrate depleted during a given time interval depends only on the average enzyme concentration. Here, we use a time re-scaling approach to generalize this result to a broad category of multi-reaction systems, whose constituent enzymes have the same dependence on time, e.g. they belong to the same regulon. This “average enzyme principle” provides a natural methodology for jointly studying metabolism and its regulation. PMID:23892076

  7. Unobserved "home" induction onto buprenorphine.

    PubMed

    Lee, Joshua D; Vocci, Frank; Fiellin, David A

    2014-01-01

    Unobserved, or "home" buprenorphine induction is common in some clinical practices. Patients take the initial and subsequent doses of buprenorphine after, rather than during, an office visit. This review summarizes the literature on the feasibility and acceptability, safety, effectiveness, and prevalence of unobserved induction. We searched the English language literature for studies describing unobserved buprenorphine induction and associated outcomes. Clinical studies were assessed by strength of design, bias, and internal and external validity. Surveys of provider practices and unobserved induction adoption were reviewed for prevalence data and key findings. We also examined previous review papers and international buprenorphine treatment guidelines. N = 10 clinical studies describing unobserved induction were identified: 1 randomized controlled trial, 3 prospective cohort studies, and 6 retrospective cohort studies. The evidence supports the feasibility of unobserved induction, particularly in office-based primary care practices. Evidence is weak to moderate in support of no differences in adverse event rates between unobserved and observed inductions. There is insufficient or weak evidence in terms of any or no differences in overall effectiveness (treatment retention, medication adherence, illicit opioid abstinence, other drug use). N = 9 provider surveys assessed unobserved induction: observed induction logistics are seen as barriers to buprenorphine prescribing; unobserved induction appears widespread in specific locations. International guidelines reviewed emphasize clinician or pharmacist observed induction (the United States, the United Kingdom, France, Australia); only one (Denmark) explicitly endorses unobserved induction. There is insufficient evidence supporting unobserved induction as more, less, or as effective as observed induction. However, the predominantly observational and naturalistic studies of unobserved induction reviewed, all of which

  8. Profiling the orphan enzymes.

    PubMed

    Sorokina, Maria; Stam, Mark; Médigue, Claudine; Lespinet, Olivier; Vallenet, David

    2014-06-06

    The emergence of Next Generation Sequencing generates an incredible amount of sequence and great potential for new enzyme discovery. Despite this huge amount of data and the profusion of bioinformatic methods for function prediction, a large part of known enzyme activities is still lacking an associated protein sequence. These particular activities are called "orphan enzymes". The present review proposes an update of previous surveys on orphan enzymes by mining the current content of public databases. While the percentage of orphan enzyme activities has decreased from 38% to 22% in ten years, there are still more than 1,000 orphans among the 5,000 entries of the Enzyme Commission (EC) classification. Taking into account all the reactions present in metabolic databases, this proportion dramatically increases to reach nearly 50% of orphans and many of them are not associated to a known pathway. We extended our survey to "local orphan enzymes" that are activities which have no representative sequence in a given clade, but have at least one in organisms belonging to other clades. We observe an important bias in Archaea and find that in general more than 30% of the EC activities have incomplete sequence information in at least one superkingdom. To estimate if candidate proteins for local orphans could be retrieved by homology search, we applied a simple strategy based on the PRIAM software and noticed that candidates may be proposed for an important fraction of local orphan enzymes. Finally, by studying relation between protein domains and catalyzed activities, it appears that newly discovered enzymes are mostly associated with already known enzyme domains. Thus, the exploration of the promiscuity and the multifunctional aspect of known enzyme families may solve part of the orphan enzyme issue. We conclude this review with a presentation of recent initiatives in finding proteins for orphan enzymes and in extending the enzyme world by the discovery of new activities.

  9. Training in Inductive Reasoning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tomic, Welko

    This study investigated the effects of K. J. Klauer's (1989) inductive reasoning training program of teaching children. Effects of training and the range of transfer of the training were assessed. The subjects were 34 third-grade Dutch children of average ability, matched on age, sex, and IQ. Children from the training condition (N=17) received…

  10. Using Continuity Induction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hathaway, Dan

    2011-01-01

    Here is a technique for proving the fundamental theorems of analysis that provides a unified way to pass from local properties to global properties on the real line, just as ordinary induction passes from local implication (if true for "k", the theorem is true for "k" + 1) to a global conclusion in the natural numbers.

  11. Iteration, Not Induction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dobbs, David E.

    2009-01-01

    The main purpose of this note is to present and justify proof via iteration as an intuitive, creative and empowering method that is often available and preferable as an alternative to proofs via either mathematical induction or the well-ordering principle. The method of iteration depends only on the fact that any strictly decreasing sequence of…

  12. Induction technology optimization code

    SciTech Connect

    Caporaso, G.J.; Brooks, A.L.; Kirbie, H.C.

    1992-08-21

    A code has been developed to evaluate relative costs of induction accelerator driver systems for relativistic klystrons. The code incorporates beam generation, transport and pulsed power system constraints to provide an integrated design tool. The code generates an injector/accelerator combination which satisfies the top level requirements and all system constraints once a small number of design choices have been specified (rise time of the injector voltage and aspect ratio of the ferrite induction cores, for example). The code calculates dimensions of accelerator mechanical assemblies and values of all electrical components. Cost factors for machined parts, raw materials and components are applied to yield a total system cost. These costs are then plotted as a function of the two design choices to enable selection of an optimum design based on various criteria. The Induction Technology Optimization Study (ITOS) was undertaken to examine viable combinations of a linear induction accelerator and a relativistic klystron (RK) for high power microwave production. It is proposed, that microwaves from the RK will power a high-gradient accelerator structure for linear collider development. Previous work indicates that the RK will require a nominal 3-MeV, 3-kA electron beam with a 100-ns flat top. The proposed accelerator-RK combination will be a high average power system capable of sustained microwave output at a 300-Hz pulse repetition frequency. The ITOS code models many combinations of injector, accelerator, and pulse power designs that will supply an RK with the beam parameters described above.

  13. Iteration, Not Induction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dobbs, David E.

    2009-01-01

    The main purpose of this note is to present and justify proof via iteration as an intuitive, creative and empowering method that is often available and preferable as an alternative to proofs via either mathematical induction or the well-ordering principle. The method of iteration depends only on the fact that any strictly decreasing sequence of…

  14. Learning and Inductive Inference

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-07-01

    is also a paradigm example of induction as discussed by philosophers ( Carnap , 1950). Data compression is of practical value for storage and...IBelser, A. 0. Hlolzman, and A. Kent (Eds.., Eneyclopedia of computer science and technology (Vol. II). New York: Marcel Dekker, 24 51. " Carnap , R. 1950

  15. Educational Inductive Gravimeter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nunn, John

    2014-01-01

    A simple inductive gravimeter constructed from a rigid plastic pipe and insulated copper wire is described. When a magnet is dropped through the vertically mounted pipe it induces small alternating voltages. These small signals are fed to the microphone input of a typical computer and sampled at a typical rate of 44.1 kHz using a custom computer…

  16. Educational Inductive Gravimeter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nunn, John

    2014-01-01

    A simple inductive gravimeter constructed from a rigid plastic pipe and insulated copper wire is described. When a magnet is dropped through the vertically mounted pipe it induces small alternating voltages. These small signals are fed to the microphone input of a typical computer and sampled at a typical rate of 44.1 kHz using a custom computer…

  17. Using Continuity Induction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hathaway, Dan

    2011-01-01

    Here is a technique for proving the fundamental theorems of analysis that provides a unified way to pass from local properties to global properties on the real line, just as ordinary induction passes from local implication (if true for "k", the theorem is true for "k" + 1) to a global conclusion in the natural numbers.

  18. Metallic induction reaction engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hart, Douglas; Mongeau, Peter P.; Kolm, Henry H.

    1985-11-01

    Metal rings placed close to a pulsed field coil have been accelerated at 200 million gee to 5 km/s in a 2 cm length by Bandoletov in the USSR Bandoletov, 1977. We have studied the basic phenomena and ultimate limitations of the pulsed induction process both theoretically and experimentally to determine its usefulness as a reaction engine. It is possible in principle to accelerate metal rings at high efficiency, and impart sufficient energy to ensure melting and evaporation, so that the reaction mass is ultimately ejected in the form of plasma. In practice the process is limited by electrical, mechanical and thermal failure of the induction coil. Over a hundred shots were fired including several in which 12 gram rings were accelerated to over 700 m/s at efficiencies above 30 percent. This is equivalent to the performance of a high power rifle with a one inch long barrel. An unexpected result of these studies is the discovery that to achieve maximum velocity, the mutual inductance gradient between induction coil and projectile ring in the firing position must be reduced to minimize the initial acceleration. This reduces the back voltage and increases the interaction time, resulting in maximum energy transfer.

  19. Enzyme kinetics of conjugating enzymes: PAPS sulfotransferase.

    PubMed

    James, Margaret O

    2014-01-01

    The sulfotransferase (SULT) enzymes catalyze the formation of sulfate esters or sulfamates from substrates that contain hydroxy or amine groups, utilizing 3'-phosphoadenosyl-5'-phosphosulfate (PAPS) as the donor of the sulfonic group. The rate of product formation depends on the concentrations of PAPS and substrate as well as the sulfotransferase enzyme; thus, if PAPS is held constant while varying substrate concentration (or vice versa), the kinetic constants derived are apparent constants. When studied over a narrow range of substrate concentrations, classic Michaelis-Menten kinetics can be observed with many SULT enzymes and most substrates. Some SULT enzymes exhibit positive or negative cooperativity during conversion of substrate to product, and the kinetics fit the Hill plot. A characteristic feature of most sulfotransferase-catalyzed reactions is that, when studied over a wide range of substrate concentrations, the rate of product formation initially increases as substrate concentration increases, then decreases at high substrate concentrations, i.e., they exhibit substrate inhibition or partial substrate inhibition. This chapter gives an introduction to sulfotransferases, including a historical note, the nomenclature, a description of the function of SULTs with different types of substrates, presentation of examples of enzyme kinetics with SULTs, and a discussion of what is known about mechanisms of substrate inhibition in the sulfotransferases.

  20. Staff Induction: Issues Surrounding Induction into International Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stirzaker, Rosalind

    2004-01-01

    This article analyses the literature on staff induction into international schools. It defines what is meant by the term "induction" and identifies the benefits to both individuals and organization if it is done well. It stresses that induction is a process, not an event, and discusses the various stages involved: the initial recruitment, the…

  1. Evolutionary dynamics of enzymes.

    PubMed

    Demetrius, L

    1995-08-01

    This paper codifies and rationalizes the large diversity in reaction rates and substrate specificity of enzymes in terms of a model which postulates that the kinetic properties of present-day enzymes are the consequence of the evolutionary force of mutation and selection acting on a class of primordial enzymes with poor catalytic activity and broad substrate specificity. Enzymes are classified in terms of their thermodynamic parameters, activation enthalpy delta H* and activation entropy delta S*, in their kinetically significant transition states as follows: type 1, delta H* > 0, delta S* < 0; type 2, delta H* < or = 0, delta S* < or = 0; type 3, delta H* > 0, delta S* > 0. We study the evolutionary dynamics of these three classes of enzymes subject to mutation, which acts at the level of the gene which codes for the enzyme and selection, which acts on the organism that contains the enzyme. Our model predicts the following evolutionary trends in the reaction rate and binding specificity for the three classes of molecules. In type 1 enzymes, evolution results in random, non-directional changes in the reaction rate and binding specificity. In type 2 and 3 enzymes, evolution results in a unidirectional increase in both the reaction rate and binding specificity. We exploit these results in order to codify the diversity in functional properties of present-day enzymes. Type 1 molecules will be described by intermediate reaction rates and broad substrate specificity. Type 2 enzymes will be characterized by diffusion-controlled rates and absolute substrate specificity. The type 3 catalysts can be further subdivided in terms of their activation enthalpy into two classes: type 3a (delta H* small) and type 3b (delta H* large). We show that type 3a will be represented by the same functional properties that identify type 2, namely, diffusion-controlled rates and absolute substrate specificity, whereas type 3b will be characterized by non-diffusion-controlled rates and absolute

  2. Catalyzed enzyme electrodes

    DOEpatents

    Zawodzinski, Thomas A.; Wilson, Mahlon S.; Rishpon, Judith; Gottesfeld, Shimshon

    1993-01-01

    An enzyme electrode is prepared with a composite coating on an electrical conductor. The composite coating is formed from a casting solution of a perfluorosulfonic acid polymer, an enzyme, and a carbon supported catalyst. The solution may be cast directly on the conductor surface or may be formed as a membrane and applied to the surface. The perfluorosulfonic acid ionomer formed from the casting solution provides an insoluble biocompatible protective matrix for the enzyme and acts to retain the enzyme for long term availability in the electrode structure. The carbon supported catalyst provides catalytic sites throughout the layer for the oxidation of hydrogen peroxide from the enzyme reactions. The carbon support then provides a conductive path for establishing an electrical signal to the electrical conductor. In one embodiment, the electrical conductor is a carbon cloth that permits oxygen or other gas to be introduced to the perfluorosulfonic polymer to promote the enzyme reaction independent of oxygen in the solution being tested.

  3. Rational enzyme redesign

    SciTech Connect

    Ornstein, R.L.

    1994-05-01

    Protein engineering is first a means of elucidating structure-function relations in an enzyme, and second, a means of changing a protein to make it serve a different, but generally related, purpose. In principle, one may change the functional characteristics of an enzyme by altering its substrate specificity, kinetics, optimum range of activity, and chemical mechanism. Obviously one cannot make all possible combinations of amino acid changes for even the smallest enzyme, so the essential question is which changes to make. The intent of rational protein/enzyme redesign is to alter a protein/enzyme in a timely and premeditated fashion. This article provides an outline of the process of rational enzyme redesign.

  4. Magnetically responsive enzyme powders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pospiskova, Kristyna; Safarik, Ivo

    2015-04-01

    Powdered enzymes were transformed into their insoluble magnetic derivatives retaining their catalytic activity. Enzyme powders (e.g., trypsin and lipase) were suspended in various liquid media not allowing their solubilization (e.g., saturated ammonium sulfate and highly concentrated polyethylene glycol solutions, ethanol, methanol, 2-propanol) and subsequently cross-linked with glutaraldehyde. Magnetic modification was successfully performed at low temperature in a freezer (-20 °C) using magnetic iron oxides nano- and microparticles prepared by microwave-assisted synthesis from ferrous sulfate. Magnetized cross-linked enzyme powders were stable at least for two months in water suspension without leakage of fixed magnetic particles. Operational stability of magnetically responsive enzymes during eight repeated reaction cycles was generally without loss of enzyme activity. Separation of magnetically modified cross-linked powdered enzymes from reaction mixtures was significantly simplified due to their magnetic properties.

  5. Enzymes for improved biomass conversion

    DOEpatents

    Brunecky, Roman; Himmel, Michael E.

    2016-02-02

    Disclosed herein are enzymes and combinations of the enzymes useful for the hydrolysis of cellulose and the conversion of biomass. Methods of degrading cellulose and biomass using enzymes and cocktails of enzymes are also disclosed.

  6. Induction of plasminogen activator by UV light in normal and xeroderma pigmentosum fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Miskin, R.; Ben-Ishai, R.

    1981-10-01

    Normal and DNA repair-deficient human fibroblasts have been used to study induction of plasminogen activator (PA) by DNA damage. UV light induced the synthesis of PA in skin fibroblasts of all types of xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) in XP heterozygotes and in human amniotic cells. Enzyme induction was, however, not observed in fibroblasts of normal adults. In classical XP, which are deficient in excision repair, PA synthesis occurred in a narrow range of low-UV fluences. In such strains, the level of enzyme produced was correlated with the extent of repair deficiency. UV fluences required for PA induction in XP variants and XP heteozygotes were at least 10 times those inducing enzyme synthesis in excision-deficient XP. Maximum enzyme induction occurred 48 hr after irradiation, and the highest levels of enzyme produced were 15-20 times those of PA baseline levels. Electrophoretic analysis showed that UV irradiation enhances the synthesis of the M/sub r/ 60,000 human urokinase-type PA, which is present in low amounts in untreated cells. Our results suggest that PA induction in human cells is caused by unrepaired DNA damage and represents a eukaryotic SOS-like function. In addition, PA induction may provide a sensitive assay for detection of cellular DNA repair deficiencies and identification of XP heterozygotes.

  7. Profiling the orphan enzymes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The emergence of Next Generation Sequencing generates an incredible amount of sequence and great potential for new enzyme discovery. Despite this huge amount of data and the profusion of bioinformatic methods for function prediction, a large part of known enzyme activities is still lacking an associated protein sequence. These particular activities are called “orphan enzymes”. The present review proposes an update of previous surveys on orphan enzymes by mining the current content of public databases. While the percentage of orphan enzyme activities has decreased from 38% to 22% in ten years, there are still more than 1,000 orphans among the 5,000 entries of the Enzyme Commission (EC) classification. Taking into account all the reactions present in metabolic databases, this proportion dramatically increases to reach nearly 50% of orphans and many of them are not associated to a known pathway. We extended our survey to “local orphan enzymes” that are activities which have no representative sequence in a given clade, but have at least one in organisms belonging to other clades. We observe an important bias in Archaea and find that in general more than 30% of the EC activities have incomplete sequence information in at least one superkingdom. To estimate if candidate proteins for local orphans could be retrieved by homology search, we applied a simple strategy based on the PRIAM software and noticed that candidates may be proposed for an important fraction of local orphan enzymes. Finally, by studying relation between protein domains and catalyzed activities, it appears that newly discovered enzymes are mostly associated with already known enzyme domains. Thus, the exploration of the promiscuity and the multifunctional aspect of known enzyme families may solve part of the orphan enzyme issue. We conclude this review with a presentation of recent initiatives in finding proteins for orphan enzymes and in extending the enzyme world by the discovery of new

  8. Enzymes on material surfaces.

    PubMed

    Talbert, Joey N; Goddard, Julie M

    2012-05-01

    Enzyme interactions with material surfaces are of interest for industrial food and pharmaceutical transformations, biosensors, artificial cells, cell free reactions, drug and nutrition delivery technologies, and imaging. When in contact with a material surface, an enzyme may lose or appear to lose activity due to the nature of the enzyme, the nature of the material, and/or the nature of the interface between the enzyme, material, and substrate environment. The purpose of this review is to survey recent advances that have been made towards the preservation, optimization, and enhancement of enzyme activity on material surfaces within the context of well-known concepts that describe the loss of activity after immobilization. This review breaks down the immobilized enzyme system to look at the individual components of the system-namely the enzyme, the material, and the interface. For each piece, possible causes for the loss of enzyme activity are described as well as strategies that have been applied to limit the affect. At the conclusion we identify areas of future research needed to overcome limitations in the current state-of-the art for immobilized enzyme systems.

  9. Food and feed enzymes.

    PubMed

    Fraatz, Marco Alexander; Rühl, Martin; Zorn, Holger

    2014-01-01

    Humans have benefited from the unique catalytic properties of enzymes, in particular for food production, for thousands of years. Prominent examples include the production of fermented alcoholic beverages, such as beer and wine, as well as bakery and dairy products. The chapter reviews the historic background of the development of modern enzyme technology and provides an overview of the industrial food and feed enzymes currently available on the world market. The chapter highlights enzyme applications for the improvement of resource efficiency, the biopreservation of food, and the treatment of food intolerances. Further topics address the improvement of food safety and food quality.

  10. Inductive Reasoning: A Training Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klauer, Karl Josef; Phye, Gary D.

    2008-01-01

    Researchers have examined inductive reasoning to identify different cognitive processes when participants deal with inductive problems. This article presents a prescriptive theory of inductive reasoning that identifies cognitive processing using a procedural strategy for making comparisons. It is hypothesized that training in the use of the…

  11. Inductive Reasoning: A Training Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klauer, Karl Josef; Phye, Gary D.

    2008-01-01

    Researchers have examined inductive reasoning to identify different cognitive processes when participants deal with inductive problems. This article presents a prescriptive theory of inductive reasoning that identifies cognitive processing using a procedural strategy for making comparisons. It is hypothesized that training in the use of the…

  12. Induction plasma tube

    DOEpatents

    Hull, Donald E.

    1984-01-01

    An induction plasma tube having a segmented, fluid-cooled internal radiation shield is disclosed. The individual segments are thick in cross-section such that the shield occupies a substantial fraction of the internal volume of the plasma enclosure, resulting in improved performance and higher sustainable plasma temperatures. The individual segments of the shield are preferably cooled by means of a counterflow fluid cooling system wherein each segment includes a central bore and a fluid supply tube extending into the bore. The counterflow cooling system results in improved cooling of the individual segments and also permits use of relatively larger shield segments which permit improved electromagnetic coupling between the induction coil and a plasma located inside the shield. Four embodiments of the invention, each having particular advantages, are disclosed.

  13. Pulsed inductive HF laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razhev, A. M.; Churkin, D. S.; Kargapol'tsev, E. S.; Demchuk, S. V.

    2016-03-01

    We report the results of experimentally investigated dependences of temporal, spectral and spatial characteristics of an inductive HF-laser generation on the pump conditions. Gas mixtures H2 - F2(NF3 or SF66) and He(Ne) - H2 - F2(NF3 or SF6) were used as active media. The FWHM pulse duration reached 0.42 μs. This value corresponded to a pulsed power of 45 kW. For the first time, the emission spectrum of an inductive HF laser was investigated, which consisted of seven groups of bands with centres around the wavelengths of 2732, 2736, 2739, 2835, 2837, 2893 and 2913 nm. The cross section profile of the laser beam was a ring with a diameter of about 20 mm and width of about 5 mm. Parameters of laser operation in the repetitively pulsed regime were sufficiently stable. The amplitude instability of light pulses was no greater than 5% - 6%.

  14. Inductive Supervised Quantum Learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monràs, Alex; Sentís, Gael; Wittek, Peter

    2017-05-01

    In supervised learning, an inductive learning algorithm extracts general rules from observed training instances, then the rules are applied to test instances. We show that this splitting of training and application arises naturally, in the classical setting, from a simple independence requirement with a physical interpretation of being nonsignaling. Thus, two seemingly different definitions of inductive learning happen to coincide. This follows from the properties of classical information that break down in the quantum setup. We prove a quantum de Finetti theorem for quantum channels, which shows that in the quantum case, the equivalence holds in the asymptotic setting, that is, for large numbers of test instances. This reveals a natural analogy between classical learning protocols and their quantum counterparts, justifying a similar treatment, and allowing us to inquire about standard elements in computational learning theory, such as structural risk minimization and sample complexity.

  15. Inductive Supervised Quantum Learning.

    PubMed

    Monràs, Alex; Sentís, Gael; Wittek, Peter

    2017-05-12

    In supervised learning, an inductive learning algorithm extracts general rules from observed training instances, then the rules are applied to test instances. We show that this splitting of training and application arises naturally, in the classical setting, from a simple independence requirement with a physical interpretation of being nonsignaling. Thus, two seemingly different definitions of inductive learning happen to coincide. This follows from the properties of classical information that break down in the quantum setup. We prove a quantum de Finetti theorem for quantum channels, which shows that in the quantum case, the equivalence holds in the asymptotic setting, that is, for large numbers of test instances. This reveals a natural analogy between classical learning protocols and their quantum counterparts, justifying a similar treatment, and allowing us to inquire about standard elements in computational learning theory, such as structural risk minimization and sample complexity.

  16. Induction plasma tube

    DOEpatents

    Hull, D.E.

    1982-07-02

    An induction plasma tube having a segmented, fluid-cooled internal radiation shield is disclosed. The individual segments are thick in cross-section such that the shield occupies a substantial fraction of the internal volume of the plasma enclosure, resulting in improved performance and higher sustainable plasma temperatures. The individual segments of the shield are preferably cooled by means of a counterflow fluid cooling system wherein each segment includes a central bore and a fluid supply tube extending into the bore. The counterflow cooling system results in improved cooling of the individual segments and also permits use of relatively larger shield segments which permit improved electromagnetic coupling between the induction coil and a plasma located inside the shield. Four embodiments of the invention, each having particular advantages, are disclosed.

  17. Induction motor control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, Irving G.

    Electromechanical actuators developed to date have commonly ultilized permanent magnet (PM) synchronous motors. More recently switched reluctance (SR) motors have been advocated due to their robust characteristics. Implications of work which utilized induction motors and advanced control techniques are discussed. When induction motors are operated from an energy source capable of controlling voltages and frequencies independently, drive characteristics are obtained which are superior to either PM or SR motors. By synthesizing the machine frequency from a high-frequency carrier (nominally 20 kHz), high efficiencies, low distortion, and rapid torque response are available. At this time multiple horsepower machine drives were demonstrated, and work is on-going to develop a 20 hp average, 40 hp peak class of aerospace actuators. This effort is based upon high-frequency power distribution and management techniques developed by NASA for Space Station Freedom.

  18. Induction motor control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, Irving G.

    1990-01-01

    Electromechanical actuators developed to date have commonly ultilized permanent magnet (PM) synchronous motors. More recently switched reluctance (SR) motors have been advocated due to their robust characteristics. Implications of work which utilized induction motors and advanced control techniques are discussed. When induction motors are operated from an energy source capable of controlling voltages and frequencies independently, drive characteristics are obtained which are superior to either PM or SR motors. By synthesizing the machine frequency from a high-frequency carrier (nominally 20 kHz), high efficiencies, low distortion, and rapid torque response are available. At this time multiple horsepower machine drives were demonstrated, and work is on-going to develop a 20 hp average, 40 hp peak class of aerospace actuators. This effort is based upon high-frequency power distribution and management techniques developed by NASA for Space Station Freedom.

  19. Induction motor control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, Irving G.

    1990-01-01

    Electromechanical actuators developed to date have commonly utilized permanent magnet (PM) synchronous motors. More recently switched reluctance (SR) motors have been advocated due to their robust characteristics. Implications of work which utilizes induction motors and advanced control techniques are discussed. When induction motors are operated from an energy source capable of controlling voltages and frequencies independently, drive characteristics are obtained which are superior to either PM or SR motors. By synthesizing the machine frequency from a high frequency carrier (nominally 20 kHz), high efficiencies, low distortion, and rapid torque response are available. At this time multiple horsepower machine drives were demonstrated, and work is on-going to develop a 20 hp average, 40 hp peak class of aerospace actuators. This effort is based upon high frequency power distribution and management techniques developed by NASA for Space Station Freedom.

  20. Induction motor control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, Irving G.

    1990-01-01

    Electromechanical actuators developed to date have commonly ultilized permanent magnet (PM) synchronous motors. More recently switched reluctance (SR) motors have been advocated due to their robust characteristics. Implications of work which utilized induction motors and advanced control techniques are discussed. When induction motors are operated from an energy source capable of controlling voltages and frequencies independently, drive characteristics are obtained which are superior to either PM or SR motors. By synthesizing the machine frequency from a high-frequency carrier (nominally 20 kHz), high efficiencies, low distortion, and rapid torque response are available. At this time multiple horsepower machine drives were demonstrated, and work is on-going to develop a 20 hp average, 40 hp peak class of aerospace actuators. This effort is based upon high-frequency power distribution and management techniques developed by NASA for Space Station Freedom.

  1. Inductive Position Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Youngquist, Robert C. (Inventor); Simmons, Stephen M. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    An inductive position sensor uses three independent inductors inductively coupled by a common medium such as air. First and second inductors are separated by a fixed distance with the first inductor's axial core and second inductor's axial core maintained parallel to one another. A third inductor is disposed between the first and second inductors with the third inductor's axial core being maintained parallel to those of the first and second inductors. The combination of the first and second inductors are configured for relative movement with the third inductor's axial core remaining parallel to those of the first and second inductors as distance changes from the third inductor to each of the first inductor and second inductor. An oscillating current can be supplied to at least one of the three inductors, while voltage induced in at least one of the three inductors not supplied with the oscillating current is measured.

  2. High Gradient Induction Cell

    SciTech Connect

    Caporaso, G J

    2004-11-29

    A concept being developed for high current electron beams may have application to HEDP and is described here. It involves the use of planar Blumlein stacks placed inside an induction cell. The output end of the Blumlein stack is applied across a high gradient insulator (HGI). These insulators have been used successfully in the presence of kilo Ampere-level electron beam currents for tens of nanoseconds at gradients of 20 MV/meter.

  3. Inductively commutated coilguns

    SciTech Connect

    Mongeau, P.P. )

    1991-01-01

    In this paper the concept and relevance of power factor is presented in regards to high performance launchers. As the scale of launchers grows and as efforts to improve efficiency continue power factor considerations will become crucial in engineering design and ultimate launcher performance limits. The use of motion induced commutation to improve the power factor are discussed. Various approaches to inductive commutation are presented, including: the brush-commutated 9 MJ Coilgun, the solid state-switched coilgun and the quenchgun.

  4. Mitochondrial Ceramide and the Induction of Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Siskind, Leah J.

    2007-01-01

    In most cell types, a key event in apoptosis is the release of proapoptotic intermembrane space proteins from mitochondria to the cytoplasm. In general, it is the release of these intermembrane space proteins that is responsible for the activation of caspases and DNases that are responsible for the execution of apoptosis. The mechanism for the increased permeability of the mitochondrial outer membrane during the induction phase of apoptosis is currently unknown and highly debated. This review will focus on one such proposed mechanism, namely, the formation of ceramide channels in the mitochondrial outer membrane. Ceramides are known to play a major regulatory role in apoptosis by inducing the release of proapoptotic proteins from the mitochondria. As mitochondria are known to contain the enzymes responsible for the synthesis and hydrolysis of ceramide, there exists a mechanism for regulating the level of ceramide in mitochondria. In addition, mitochondrial ceramide levels have been shown to be elevated prior to the induction phase of apoptosis. Ceramide has been shown to form large protein permeable channels in planar phospholipid and mitochondrial outer membranes. Thus, ceramide channels are good candidates for the pathway with which proapoptotic proteins are released from mitochondria during the induction phase of apoptosis. PMID:16167171

  5. Diagnostics for induction accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Fessenden, T.J.

    1996-04-01

    The induction accelerator was conceived by N. C. Christofilos and first realized as the Astron accelerator that operated at LLNL from the early 1960`s to the end of 1975. This accelerator generated electron beams at energies near 6 MeV with typical currents of 600 Amperes in 400 ns pulses. The Advanced Test Accelerator (ATA) built at Livermore`s Site 300 produced 10,000 Ampere beams with pulse widths of 70 ns at energies approaching 50 MeV. Several other electron and ion induction accelerators have been fabricated at LLNL and LBNL. This paper reviews the principal diagnostics developed through efforts by scientists at both laboratories for measuring the current, position, energy, and emittance of beams generated by these high current, short pulse accelerators. Many of these diagnostics are closely related to those developed for other accelerators. However, the very fast and intense current pulses often require special diagnostic techniques and considerations. The physics and design of the more unique diagnostics developed for electron induction accelerators are presented and discussed in detail.

  6. Enzymes in Fermented Fish.

    PubMed

    Giyatmi; Irianto, H E

    Fermented fish products are very popular particularly in Southeast Asian countries. These products have unique characteristics, especially in terms of aroma, flavor, and texture developing during fermentation process. Proteolytic enzymes have a main role in hydrolyzing protein into simpler compounds. Fermentation process of fish relies both on naturally occurring enzymes (in the muscle or the intestinal tract) as well as bacteria. Fermented fish products processed using the whole fish show a different characteristic compared to those prepared from headed and gutted fish. Endogenous enzymes like trypsin, chymotrypsin, elastase, and aminopeptidase are the most involved in the fermentation process. Muscle tissue enzymes like cathepsins, peptidases, transaminases, amidases, amino acid decarboxylases, glutamic dehydrogenases, and related enzymes may also play a role in fish fermentation. Due to the decreased bacterial number during fermentation, contribution of microbial enzymes to proteolysis may be expected prior to salting of fish. Commercial enzymes are supplemented during processing for specific purposes, such as quality improvement and process acceleration. In the case of fish sauce, efforts to accelerate fermentation process and to improve product quality have been studied by addition of enzymes such as papain, bromelain, trypsin, pepsin, and chymotrypsin. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Industrial Enzymes and Biocatalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McAuliffe, Joseph C.; Aehle, Wolfgang; Whited, Gregory M.; Ward, Donald E.

    All life processes are the result of enzyme activity. In fact, life itself, whether plant or animal, involves a complex network of enzymatic reactions. An enzyme is a protein that is synthesized in a living cell. It catalyzes a thermodynamically possible reaction so that the rate of the reaction is compatible with the numerous biochemical processes essential for the growth and maintenance of a cell. The synthesis of an enzyme thus is under tight metabolic regulations and controls that can be genetically or environmentally manipulated sometimes to cause the overproduction of an enzyme by the cell. An enzyme, like chemical catalysts, in no way modifies the equilibrium constant or the free energy change of a reaction.

  8. A taxonomy of inductive problems.

    PubMed

    Kemp, Charles; Jern, Alan

    2014-02-01

    Inductive inferences about objects, features, categories, and relations have been studied for many years, but there are few attempts to chart the range of inductive problems that humans are able to solve. We present a taxonomy of inductive problems that helps to clarify the relationships between familiar inductive problems such as generalization, categorization, and identification, and that introduces new inductive problems for psychological investigation. Our taxonomy is founded on the idea that semantic knowledge is organized into systems of objects, features, categories, and relations, and we attempt to characterize all of the inductive problems that can arise when these systems are partially observed. Recent studies have begun to address some of the new problems in our taxonomy, and future work should aim to develop unified theories of inductive reasoning that explain how people solve all of the problems in the taxonomy.

  9. Cotton cellulose: enzyme adsorption and enzymic hydrolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Beltrame, P.L.; Carniti, P.; Focher, B.; Marzetti, A.; Cattaneo, M.

    1982-01-01

    The adsorption of a crude cellulase complex from Trichoderma viride on variously pretreated cotton cellulose samples was studied in the framework of the Langmuir approach at 2-8 degrees. The saturation amount of adsorbed enzyme was related to the susceptibility of the substrates to hydrolysis. In every case the adsorption process was faster by 2-3 orders of magnitude than the hydrolysis step to give end products. For ZnCl/sub 2/-treated cotton cellulose the Langmuir parameters correlated fairly well with the value of the Michaelis constant, measured for its enzymic hydrolysis, and the adsorptive complex was indistinguishable from the complex of the Michaelis-Menten model for the hydrolysis.

  10. Drug-metabolizing enzymes: mechanisms and functions.

    PubMed

    Sheweita, S A

    2000-09-01

    Drug-metabolizing enzymes are called mixed-function oxidase or monooxygenase and containing many enzymes including cytochrome P450, cytochrome b5, and NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase and other components. The hepatic cytochrome P450s (Cyp) are a multigene family of enzymes that play a critical role in the metabolism of many drugs and xenobiotics with each cytochrome isozyme responding differently to exogenous chemicals in terms of its induction and inhibition. For example, Cyp 1A1 is particularly active towards polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), activating them into reactive intermediates those covalently bind to DNA, a key event in the initiation of carcinogenesis. Likewise, Cyp 1A2 activates a variety of bladder carcinogens, such as aromatic amines and amides. Also, some forms of cytochrome P450 isozymes such as Cyp 3A and 2E1 activate the naturally occurring carcinogens (e.g. aflatoxin B1) and N-nitrosamines respectively into highly mutagenic and carcinogenic agents. The carcinogenic potency of PAHs, and other carcinogens and the extent of binding of their ultimate metabolites to DNA and proteins are correlated with the induction of cytochrome P450 isozymes. Phase II drug-metabolizing enzymes such as glutathione S-transferase, aryl sulfatase and UDP-glucuronyl transferase inactivate chemical carcinogens into less toxic or inactive metabolites. Many drugs change the rate of activation or detoxification of carcinogens by changing the activities of phases I and II drug-metabolizing enzymes. The balance of detoxification and activation reactions depends on the chemical structure of the agents, and is subjected to many variables that are a function of this structure, or genetic background, sex, endocrine status, age, diet, and the presence of other chemicals. It is important to realize that the enzymes involved in carcinogen metabolism are also involved in the metabolism of a variety of substrates, and thus the introduction of specific xenobiotics may change

  11. Chemotactic separation of enzymes.

    PubMed

    Dey, Krishna Kanti; Das, Sambeeta; Poyton, Matthew F; Sengupta, Samudra; Butler, Peter J; Cremer, Paul S; Sen, Ayusman

    2014-12-23

    We demonstrate a procedure for the separation of enzymes based on their chemotactic response toward an imposed substrate concentration gradient. The separation is observed within a two-inlet, five-outlet microfluidic network, designed to allow mixtures of active (ones that catalyze substrate turnover) and inactive (ones that do not catalyze substrate turnover) enzymes, labeled with different fluorophores, to flow through one of the inlets. Substrate solution prepared in phosphate buffer was introduced through the other inlet of the device at the same flow rate. The steady-state concentration profiles of the enzymes were obtained at specific positions within the outlets of the microchannel using fluorescence microscopy. In the presence of a substrate concentration gradient, active enzyme molecules migrated preferentially toward the substrate channel. The excess migration of the active enzyme molecules was quantified in terms of an enrichment coefficient. Experiments were carried out with different pairs of enzymes. Coupling the physics of laminar flow of liquid and molecular diffusion, multiphysics simulations were carried out to estimate the extent of the chemotactic separation. Our results show that, with appropriate microfluidic arrangement, molecular chemotaxis leads to spontaneous separation of active enzyme molecules from their inactive counterparts of similar charge and size.

  12. Low inductance gas switching.

    SciTech Connect

    Chavez, Ray; Harjes, Henry Charles III; Wallace, Zachariah; Elizondo, Juan E.

    2007-10-01

    The laser trigger switch (LTS) is a key component in ZR-type pulsed power systems. In ZR, the pulse rise time through the LTS is > 200 ns and additional stages of pulse compression are required to achieve the desired <100 ns rise time. The inductance of the LTS ({approx}500nH) in large part determines the energy transfer time through the switch and there is much to be gained in improving system performance and reducing system costs by reducing this inductance. The current path through the cascade section of the ZR LTS is at a diameter of {approx} 6-inches which is certainly not optimal from an inductance point of view. The LTS connects components of much greater diameter (typically 4-5 feet). In this LDRD the viability of switch concepts in which the diameter of cascade section is greatly increased have been investigated. The key technical question to be answered was, will the desired multi-channel behavior be maintained in a cascade section of larger diameter. This LDRD proceeded in 2 distinct phases. The original plan for the LDRD was to develop a promising switch concept and then design, build, and test a moderate scale switch which would demonstrate the key features of the concept. In phase I, a switch concept which meet all electrical design criteria and had a calculated inductance of 150 nH was developed. A 1.5 MV test switch was designed and fabrication was initiated. The LDRD was then redirected due to budgetary concerns. The fabrication of the switch was halted and the focus of the LDRD was shifted to small scale experiments designed to answer the key technical question concerning multi-channel behavior. In phase II, the Multi-channel switch test bed (MCST) was designed and constructed. The purpose of MCST was to provide a versatile, fast turn around facility for the study the multi-channel electrical breakdown behavior of a ZR type cascade switch gap in a parameter space near that of a ZR LTS. Parameter scans on source impedance, gap tilt, gap spacing and

  13. The EBI enzyme portal.

    PubMed

    Alcántara, Rafael; Onwubiko, Joseph; Cao, Hong; Matos, Paula de; Cham, Jennifer A; Jacobsen, Jules; Holliday, Gemma L; Fischer, Julia D; Rahman, Syed Asad; Jassal, Bijay; Goujon, Mikael; Rowland, Francis; Velankar, Sameer; López, Rodrigo; Overington, John P; Kleywegt, Gerard J; Hermjakob, Henning; O'Donovan, Claire; Martín, María Jesús; Thornton, Janet M; Steinbeck, Christoph

    2013-01-01

    The availability of comprehensive information about enzymes plays an important role in answering questions relevant to interdisciplinary fields such as biochemistry, enzymology, biofuels, bioengineering and drug discovery. At the EMBL European Bioinformatics Institute, we have developed an enzyme portal (http://www.ebi.ac.uk/enzymeportal) to provide this wealth of information on enzymes from multiple in-house resources addressing particular data classes: protein sequence and structure, reactions, pathways and small molecules. The fact that these data reside in separate databases makes information discovery cumbersome. The main goal of the portal is to simplify this process for end users.

  14. Enzyme nanoband electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J.; Naser, N. ); Renschler, C.L. )

    1993-07-01

    Enzyme nanoelectrodes have been constructed by immobilizing glucose oxidase, alcohol oxidase or tyrosinase onto ultrathin carbon films (of 35-50 nm thickness). The enzyme immobilization is accomplished via entrapment within electropolymerized poly(o-phenylenediamine) coatings. Cyclic voltammetry and controlled-potential amperometry are used to characterize the performance of the new nanoscopic biosensors under different preparation and operation conditions. The resulting electrodes offer convenient and rapid measurements of millimolar substrate concentrations, and (to the best of the authors' knowledge) are the smallest enzyme probes reported to date. 10 refs., 7 figs.

  15. The EBI enzyme portal

    PubMed Central

    Alcántara, Rafael; Onwubiko, Joseph; Cao, Hong; de Matos, Paula; Cham, Jennifer A.; Jacobsen, Jules; Fischer, Julia D.; Rahman, Syed Asad; Jassal, Bijay; Goujon, Mikael; Rowland, Francis; Velankar, Sameer; López, Rodrigo; Overington, John P.; Kleywegt, Gerard J.; Hermjakob, Henning; O’Donovan, Claire; Martín, María Jesús; Thornton, Janet M.; Steinbeck, Christoph

    2013-01-01

    The availability of comprehensive information about enzymes plays an important role in answering questions relevant to interdisciplinary fields such as biochemistry, enzymology, biofuels, bioengineering and drug discovery. At the EMBL European Bioinformatics Institute, we have developed an enzyme portal (http://www.ebi.ac.uk/enzymeportal) to provide this wealth of information on enzymes from multiple in-house resources addressing particular data classes: protein sequence and structure, reactions, pathways and small molecules. The fact that these data reside in separate databases makes information discovery cumbersome. The main goal of the portal is to simplify this process for end users. PMID:23175605

  16. Enzyme molecules as nanomotors.

    PubMed

    Sengupta, Samudra; Dey, Krishna K; Muddana, Hari S; Tabouillot, Tristan; Ibele, Michael E; Butler, Peter J; Sen, Ayusman

    2013-01-30

    Using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, we show that the diffusive movements of catalase enzyme molecules increase in the presence of the substrate, hydrogen peroxide, in a concentration-dependent manner. Employing a microfluidic device to generate a substrate concentration gradient, we show that both catalase and urease enzyme molecules spread toward areas of higher substrate concentration, a form of chemotaxis at the molecular scale. Using glucose oxidase and glucose to generate a hydrogen peroxide gradient, we induce the migration of catalase toward glucose oxidase, thereby showing that chemically interconnected enzymes can be drawn together.

  17. Induction linear accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birx, Daniel

    1992-03-01

    Among the family of particle accelerators, the Induction Linear Accelerator is the best suited for the acceleration of high current electron beams. Because the electromagnetic radiation used to accelerate the electron beam is not stored in the cavities but is supplied by transmission lines during the beam pulse it is possible to utilize very low Q (typically<10) structures and very large beam pipes. This combination increases the beam breakup limited maximum currents to of order kiloamperes. The micropulse lengths of these machines are measured in 10's of nanoseconds and duty factors as high as 10-4 have been achieved. Until recently the major problem with these machines has been associated with the pulse power drive. Beam currents of kiloamperes and accelerating potentials of megavolts require peak power drives of gigawatts since no energy is stored in the structure. The marriage of liner accelerator technology and nonlinear magnetic compressors has produced some unique capabilities. It now appears possible to produce electron beams with average currents measured in amperes, peak currents in kiloamperes and gradients exceeding 1 MeV/meter, with power efficiencies approaching 50%. The nonlinear magnetic compression technology has replaced the spark gap drivers used on earlier accelerators with state-of-the-art all-solid-state SCR commutated compression chains. The reliability of these machines is now approaching 1010 shot MTBF. In the following paper we will briefly review the historical development of induction linear accelerators and then discuss the design considerations.

  18. "Menstrual induction" with Sulproston.

    PubMed

    Csapo, A I; Peskin, E G; Pulkkinen, M; Laajoki, V; Kivikoski, A; Lampe, L; Godeny, S; Szeverenyi, M; Herczeg, J; Resch, B; Bacos, L

    1982-11-01

    The PGE2-analogue Sulproston (16-phenoxy-omega-17,18,19,20-tetranor-PGE2-mythylsulfonylamide) was administered to 200 medically and gynecologically normal women who were 17 +/- 0.4 days beyond their expected menstrual period and who had a positive pregnancy test. The intramuscular impact dose (500 micrograms repeated after 4 hours) caused an immediate tonic uterine contraction which compromised the estradiol 17 beta, progesterone and chorionic gonadotropin production within the fetoplacental unit, and thereby allowed the evolution of cyclic uterine activity, cervical dilatation and tissue expulsion. Pregnancy termination was complete in 92% of women, 5.5% required surgical curettage and 2.5% were given a second Sulproston treatment 2-3 weeks after the first to remove retained tissue from the uterus. The medical induction of menstruation was preferred by 83% of the women who had previously experienced surgical termination of pregnancy. Normal menstruation resumed in all women after 36 +/- 0.9 days. The majority of 42 women questioned found Sulproston a satisfactory, safe, simple and effective drug regimen for "menstrual induction".

  19. Pulsed inductive HF laser

    SciTech Connect

    Razhev, A M; Kargapol'tsev, E S; Churkin, D S; Demchuk, S V

    2016-03-31

    We report the results of experimentally investigated dependences of temporal, spectral and spatial characteristics of an inductive HF-laser generation on the pump conditions. Gas mixtures H{sub 2} – F{sub 2}(NF{sub 3} or SF6{sub 6}) and He(Ne) – H{sub 2} – F{sub 2}(NF{sub 3} or SF{sub 6}) were used as active media. The FWHM pulse duration reached 0.42 μs. This value corresponded to a pulsed power of 45 kW. For the first time, the emission spectrum of an inductive HF laser was investigated, which consisted of seven groups of bands with centres around the wavelengths of 2732, 2736, 2739, 2835, 2837, 2893 and 2913 nm. The cross section profile of the laser beam was a ring with a diameter of about 20 mm and width of about 5 mm. Parameters of laser operation in the repetitively pulsed regime were sufficiently stable. The amplitude instability of light pulses was no greater than 5% – 6%. (lasers)

  20. Commercial production of microbial enzymes

    SciTech Connect

    Munro, I.G.

    1985-01-01

    The advantages and uses of industrially produced microbial enzymes are described. The processes involved in the production of these enzymes, cultivation techniques, enzyme extraction, enzyme purification and immobilization are outlined. Both the history of enzyme technology and its future development are discussed.

  1. RNA as an Enzyme.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cech, Thomas R.

    1986-01-01

    Reviews current findings that explain RNA's function as an enzyme in addition to being an informational molecule. Highlights recent research efforts and notes changes in the information base on RNA activity. Includes models and diagrams of RNA activity. (ML)

  2. Enzymes in Analytical Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fishman, Myer M.

    1980-01-01

    Presents tabular information concerning recent research in the field of enzymes in analytic chemistry, with methods, substrate or reaction catalyzed, assay, comments and references listed. The table refers to 128 references. Also listed are 13 general citations. (CS)

  3. Indicators: Sediment Enzymes

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Sediment enzymes are proteins that are produced by microorganisms living in the sediment or soil. They are indicators of key ecosystem processes and can help determine which nutrients are affecting the biological community of a waterbody.

  4. Starch Biorefinery Enzymes.

    PubMed

    Läufer, Albrecht

    2017-03-07

    Nature uses enzymes to build and convert biomass; mankind uses the same enzymes and produces them on a large scale to make optimum use of biomass in biorefineries. Bacterial α-amylases and fungal glucoamylases have been the workhorses of starch biorefineries for many decades. Pullulanases were introduced in the 1980s. Proteases, cellulases, hemicellulases, and phytases have been on the market for a few years as process aids, improving yields, performance, and costs. Detailed studies of the complex chemical structures of biomass and of the physicochemical limitations of industrial biorefineries have led enzyme developers to produce novel tailor-made solutions for improving yield and profitability in the industry. This chapter reviews the development of enzyme applications in the major starch biorefining processes.

  5. RNA as an Enzyme.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cech, Thomas R.

    1986-01-01

    Reviews current findings that explain RNA's function as an enzyme in addition to being an informational molecule. Highlights recent research efforts and notes changes in the information base on RNA activity. Includes models and diagrams of RNA activity. (ML)

  6. Current methods of labor induction.

    PubMed

    Swamy, Geeta K

    2012-10-01

    In 2009, approximately 23% of all pregnant women in the United States underwent induction of labor, which is more than double the incidence of 9.5% in 1990. The ultimate goal of labor induction is to achieve vaginal delivery by stimulating uterine contractions before the spontaneous onset of labor. Labor induction is clearly indicated when the benefits outweigh the maternal and fetal risks of continued gestation, as well as potential risks associated with the procedure. Many women undergoing labor induction require cervical ripening--a method to facilitate softening, thinning, and dilation of an unfavorable cervix--because it reduces the time to delivery and incidence of failed induction. This article summarizes currently available methods for labor induction and cervical ripening, advantages and disadvantages of various methods, and the safety and effectiveness of each method based on well-conducted clinical trials. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Overproduction of ligninolytic enzymes

    DOEpatents

    Elisashvili, Vladimir; Kachlishvili, Eva; Torok, Tamas

    2014-06-17

    Methods, compositions, and systems for overproducing ligninolytic enzymes from the basidiomycetous fungus are described herein. As described, the method can include incubating a fungal strain of Cerrena unicolor IBB 303 in a fermentation system having growth medium which includes lignocellulosic material and then cultivating the fungal strain in the fermentation system under conditions wherein the fungus expresses the ligninolytic enzymes. In some cases, the lignocellulosic material is mandarin peel, ethanol production residue, walnut pericarp, wheat bran, wheat straw, or banana peel.

  8. Induction of anaesthesia in children.

    PubMed

    Boezaart, A P; van Hasselt, C H

    1987-05-16

    Induction of anaesthesia in children in the age group 2-6 years is a special challenge. In order to minimise emotional and physical stress during induction of anaesthesia by gas inhalation, a toy telephone has been modified to deliver induction gases to the mouthpiece while taped nursery stories can be heard from a small speaker placed in the earpiece. The child holds the hand set and listens to a suitable story, while appropriate concentrations of inhalation agents are adjusted inconspicuously.

  9. The mononuclear molybdenum enzymes

    SciTech Connect

    Hille, R.

    1996-11-01

    Molybdenum is widely available to biological systems due to the solubility of its high-valent oxides in water and is found in two basic forms: as an integral component of the multinuclear M center of nitrogenases and as the mononuclear active sites of a much more diverse group of enzymes that in general function catalytically to transfer an oxygen atom either to or from a physiological acceptor/donor molecule. It is on the basis of this commonly encountered aspect of catalysis that these enzymes are frequently referred to as oxotransferases, although no mechanistic connotation is intended in using the term. Similarly, the vast majority of these enzymes possess a Mo{double_bond}O unit in their active sites and are often referred to as oxomolybdenum enzymes. Neither of these terms is strictly applicable to the entire class of enzymes, however, as some (polysulfide reductase, for example, and possibly formate dehydrogenase) do not possess a Mo{double_bond}O unit. Here the term mononuclear molybdenum enzymes will be used in order to be as generic as possible. 431 refs.

  10. Induction Linac Pulsers

    SciTech Connect

    Faltens, Andris

    2011-01-07

    The pulsers used in most of the induction linacs evolved from the very large body of work that was done in the U.S. and Great Britain during the development of the pulsed magnetron for radar. The radar modulators started at {approx}100 kW and reached >10 MW by 1945. A typical pulse length was 1 {mu}s at a repetition rate of 1,000 pps. A very comprehensive account of the modulator development is Pulse Generators by Lebacqz and Glasoe, one of the Radiation Laboratory Series. There are many permutations of possible modulators, two of the choices being tube type and line type. In earlier notes I wrote that technically the vacuum tube pulser met all of our induction linac needs, in the sense that a number of tubes, in series and parallel if required, could produce our pulses, regulate their voltage, be useable in feed-forward correctors, and provide a low source impedance. At a lower speed, an FET array is similar, and we have obtained and tested a large array capable of >10 MW switching. A modulator with an electronically controlled output only needs a capacitor for energy storage and in a switched mode can transfer the energy from the capacitor to the load at high efficiency. Driving a full size Astron induction core and a simulated resistive 'beam load' we achieved >50% efficiency. These electronically controlled output pulses can produce the pulses we desire but are not used because of their high cost. The second choice, the line type pulser, visually comprises a closing switch and a distributed or a lumped element transmission line. The typical switch cannot open or stop conducting after the desired pulse has been produced, and consequently all of the initially stored energy is dissipated. This approximately halves the efficiency, and the original cost estimating program LIACEP used this factor of two, even though our circuits are usually worse, and even though our inveterate optimists often omit it. The 'missing' energy is that which is reflected back into the

  11. Comprehensive Teacher Induction: Linking Teacher Induction to Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keilwitz, Heather A.

    2014-01-01

    Teacher retention is a wide concern in education and in response school districts throughout the United States are developing more comprehensive teacher induction programs. Components of teacher induction programs that have assisted with successful teacher development include release time for teacher observation, assignment of a knowledgeable…

  12. Kinetic inductance magnetometer.

    PubMed

    Luomahaara, Juho; Vesterinen, Visa; Grönberg, Leif; Hassel, Juha

    2014-09-10

    Sensing ultra-low magnetic fields has various applications in the fields of science, medicine and industry. There is a growing need for a sensor that can be operated in ambient environments where magnetic shielding is limited or magnetic field manipulation is involved. To this end, here we demonstrate a new magnetometer with high sensitivity and wide dynamic range. The device is based on the current nonlinearity of superconducting material stemming from kinetic inductance. A further benefit of our approach is of extreme simplicity: the device is fabricated from a single layer of niobium nitride. Moreover, radio frequency multiplexing techniques can be applied, enabling the simultaneous readout of multiple sensors, for example, in biomagnetic measurements requiring data from large sensor arrays.

  13. The induction of amenorrhoea.

    PubMed

    Hipkin, L J

    1992-02-01

    A survey has shown that many women favour eliminating menstruation and it has been suggested that therapeutic induction of amenorrhoea might be an advantage in female personnel mobilised for war. The traditional method has been to take the oral contraceptive pill continuously. This produces weight gain and other side-effects; spotting and breakthrough bleeding can be a problem initially. The method is however cheap. The Gonadotrophin Releasing Hormone (GnRH) analogue, goserelin, is extremely effective, produces less side-effects, but it is very expensive. Two synthetic steroids, danazol and gestrinone, are moderately effective, have a variety of prominent side-effects and are also quite expensive. With all these drugs normal menstruation resumes in the cycle after they are discontinued. Although goserelin has many advantages over the continuously taken contraceptive pill, its cost precludes it from consideration as a means of eliminating menstruation.

  14. Cooling by Thermodynamic Induction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patitsas, S. N.

    2017-03-01

    A method is described for cooling conductive channels to below ambient temperature. The thermodynamic induction principle dictates that the electrically biased channel will cool if the electrical conductance decreases with temperature. The extent of this cooling is calculated in detail for both cases of ballistic and conventional transport with specific calculations for carbon nanotubes and conventional metals, followed by discussions for semiconductors, graphene, and metal-insulator transition systems. A theorem is established for ballistic transport stating that net cooling is not possible. For conventional transport, net cooling is possible over a broad temperature range, with the range being size-dependent. A temperature clamping scheme for establishing a metastable nonequilibrium stationary state is detailed and followed with discussion of possible applications to on-chip thermoelectric cooling in integrated circuitry and quantum computer systems.

  15. Inductive Position Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Youngquist, Robert C. (Inventor); Simmons, Stephen M. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    An inductive position sensor uses three parallel inductors, each of which has an axial core that is an independent magnetic structure. A first support couples first and second inductors and separate them by a fixed distance. A second support coupled to a third inductor disposed between the first and second inductors. The first support and second support are configured for relative movement as distance changes from the third inductor to each of the first and second inductors. An oscillating current is supplied to the first and second inductors. A device measures a phase component of a source voltage generating the oscillating current and a phase component of voltage induced in the third inductor when the oscillating current is supplied to the first and second inductors such that the phase component of the voltage induced overlaps the phase component of the source voltage.

  16. Borehole induction coil transmitter

    DOEpatents

    Holladay, Gale; Wilt, Michael J.

    2002-01-01

    A borehole induction coil transmitter which is a part of a cross-borehole electromagnetic field system that is used for underground imaging applications. The transmitter consists of four major parts: 1) a wound ferrite or mu-metal core, 2) an array of tuning capacitors, 3) a current driver circuit board, and 4) a flux monitor. The core is wound with several hundred turns of wire and connected in series with the capacitor array, to produce a tuned coil. This tuned coil uses internal circuitry to generate sinusoidal signals that are transmitted through the earth to a receiver coil in another borehole. The transmitter can operate at frequencies from 1-200 kHz and supplies sufficient power to permit the field system to operate in boreholes separated by up to 400 meters.

  17. Inductive System Health Monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iverson, David L.

    2004-01-01

    The Inductive Monitoring System (IMS) software was developed to provide a technique to automatically produce health monitoring knowledge bases for systems that are either difficult to model (simulate) with a computer or which require computer models that are too complex to use for real time monitoring. IMS uses nominal data sets collected either directly from the system or from simulations to build a knowledge base that can be used to detect anomalous behavior in the system. Machine learning and data mining techniques are used to characterize typical system behavior by extracting general classes of nominal data from archived data sets. IMS is able to monitor the system by comparing real time operational data with these classes. We present a description of learning and monitoring method used by IMS and summarize some recent IMS results.

  18. Cooling by Thermodynamic Induction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patitsas, S. N.

    2016-11-01

    A method is described for cooling conductive channels to below ambient temperature. The thermodynamic induction principle dictates that the electrically biased channel will cool if the electrical conductance decreases with temperature. The extent of this cooling is calculated in detail for both cases of ballistic and conventional transport with specific calculations for carbon nanotubes and conventional metals, followed by discussions for semiconductors, graphene, and metal-insulator transition systems. A theorem is established for ballistic transport stating that net cooling is not possible. For conventional transport, net cooling is possible over a broad temperature range, with the range being size-dependent. A temperature clamping scheme for establishing a metastable nonequilibrium stationary state is detailed and followed with discussion of possible applications to on-chip thermoelectric cooling in integrated circuitry and quantum computer systems.

  19. Inductive Electron Heating Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuszewski, M.

    1996-11-01

    Inductively Coupled Plasmas (ICPs) have been studied for over a century. Recently, ICPs have been rediscovered by the multi-billion dollar semiconductor industry as an important class of high-density, low-pressure plasma sources suitable for the manufacture of next-generation integrated circuits. Present low-pressure ICP development is among the most active areas of plasma research. However, this development remains largely empirical, a prohibitively expensive approach for upcoming 300-mm diameter wafers. Hence, there is an urgent need for basic ICP plasma physics research, including experimental characterization and predictive numerical modeling. Inductive radio frequency (rf) power absorption is fundamental to the ICP electron heating and the resulting plasma transport but remains poorly understood. For example, recent experimental measurements and supporting fluid calculationsfootnote M. Tuszewski, Phys. Rev. Lett. 77 in press (1996) on a commercial deposition tool prototype show that the induced rf magnetic fields in the source can cause an order of magnitude reduction in plasma conductivity and in electron heating power density. In some cases, the rf fields penetrate through the entire volume of the ICP discharges while existing models that neglect the induced rf magnetic fields predict rf absorption in a thin skin layer near the plasma surface. The rf magnetic fields also cause more subtle changes in the plasma density and in the electron temperature spatial distributions. These data will be presented and the role of basic research in the applied world of semiconductor manufacturing will be discussed. ^*This research was conducted under the auspices of the U.S. DOE, supported by funds provided by the University of California for discretionary research by Los Alamos National Laboratory.

  20. Induction of alkaline phosphatase in Escherichia coli: effect of procaine hydrochloride.

    PubMed Central

    Tribhuwan, R C; Pradhan, D S

    1977-01-01

    The effect of procaine hydrochloride, an anesthetic known to alter membrane structure, on the induced formation of alkaline phosphatase, a periplasmic enzyme, in Escherichia coli was investigated. Procaine hydrochloride specifically arrested the appearance of active alkaline phosphatase while permitting the induction of another enzyme, beta-galactosidase, which is internally localized. Evidence has been obtained to show that procaine hydrochloride does not arrest synthesis of inactive monomer subunits of the enzyme, indicating that the drug interferes in the conversion of monomer subunits to an active dimer enzyme. Images PMID:328482

  1. Aminoglycoside Modifying Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Ramirez, Maria S.; Tolmasky, Marcelo E.

    2010-01-01

    Aminoglycosides have been an essential component of the armamentarium in the treatment of life-threatening infections. Unfortunately, their efficacy has been reduced by the surge and dissemination of resistance. In some cases the levels of resistance reached the point that rendered them virtually useless. Among many known mechanisms of resistance to aminoglycosides, enzymatic modification is the most prevalent in the clinical setting. Aminoglycoside modifying enzymes catalyze the modification at different −OH or −NH2 groups of the 2-deoxystreptamine nucleus or the sugar moieties and can be nucleotidyltranferases, phosphotransferases, or acetyltransferases. The number of aminoglycoside modifying enzymes identified to date as well as the genetic environments where the coding genes are located is impressive and there is virtually no bacteria that is unable to support enzymatic resistance to aminoglycosides. Aside from the development of new aminoglycosides refractory to as many as possible modifying enzymes there are currently two main strategies being pursued to overcome the action of aminoglycoside modifying enzymes. Their successful development would extend the useful life of existing antibiotics that have proven effective in the treatment of infections. These strategies consist of the development of inhibitors of the enzymatic action or of the expression of the modifying enzymes. PMID:20833577

  2. Random-walk enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Mak, Chi H.; Pham, Phuong; Afif, Samir A.; Goodman, Myron F.

    2015-01-01

    Enzymes that rely on random walk to search for substrate targets in a heterogeneously dispersed medium can leave behind complex spatial profiles of their catalyzed conversions. The catalytic signatures of these random-walk enzymes are the result of two coupled stochastic processes: scanning and catalysis. Here we develop analytical models to understand the conversion profiles produced by these enzymes, comparing an intrusive model, in which scanning and catalysis are tightly coupled, against a loosely coupled passive model. Diagrammatic theory and path-integral solutions of these models revealed clearly distinct predictions. Comparison to experimental data from catalyzed deaminations deposited on single-stranded DNA by the enzyme activation-induced deoxycytidine deaminase (AID) demonstrates that catalysis and diffusion are strongly intertwined, where the chemical conversions give rise to new stochastic trajectories that were absent if the substrate DNA was homogeneous. The C → U deamination profiles in both analytical predictions and experiments exhibit a strong contextual dependence, where the conversion rate of each target site is strongly contingent on the identities of other surrounding targets, with the intrusive model showing an excellent fit to the data. These methods can be applied to deduce sequence-dependent catalytic signatures of other DNA modification enzymes, with potential applications to cancer, gene regulation, and epigenetics. PMID:26465508

  3. Random-walk enzymes.

    PubMed

    Mak, Chi H; Pham, Phuong; Afif, Samir A; Goodman, Myron F

    2015-09-01

    Enzymes that rely on random walk to search for substrate targets in a heterogeneously dispersed medium can leave behind complex spatial profiles of their catalyzed conversions. The catalytic signatures of these random-walk enzymes are the result of two coupled stochastic processes: scanning and catalysis. Here we develop analytical models to understand the conversion profiles produced by these enzymes, comparing an intrusive model, in which scanning and catalysis are tightly coupled, against a loosely coupled passive model. Diagrammatic theory and path-integral solutions of these models revealed clearly distinct predictions. Comparison to experimental data from catalyzed deaminations deposited on single-stranded DNA by the enzyme activation-induced deoxycytidine deaminase (AID) demonstrates that catalysis and diffusion are strongly intertwined, where the chemical conversions give rise to new stochastic trajectories that were absent if the substrate DNA was homogeneous. The C→U deamination profiles in both analytical predictions and experiments exhibit a strong contextual dependence, where the conversion rate of each target site is strongly contingent on the identities of other surrounding targets, with the intrusive model showing an excellent fit to the data. These methods can be applied to deduce sequence-dependent catalytic signatures of other DNA modification enzymes, with potential applications to cancer, gene regulation, and epigenetics.

  4. Lignin-degrading enzymes.

    PubMed

    Pollegioni, Loredano; Tonin, Fabio; Rosini, Elena

    2015-04-01

    A main goal of green biotechnology is to reduce our dependence on fossil reserves and to increase the use of renewable materials. For this, lignocellulose, which is composed of cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin, represents the most promising feedstock. The latter is a complex aromatic heteropolymer formed by radical polymerization of guaiacyl, syringyl, and p-hydroxyphenyl units linked by β-aryl ether linkages, biphenyl bonds and heterocyclic linkages. Accordingly, lignin appears to be a potentially valuable renewable aromatic chemical, thus representing a main pillar in future biorefinery. The resistance of lignin to breakdown is the main bottleneck in this process, although a variety of white-rot fungi, as well as bacteria, have been reported to degrade lignin by employing different enzymes and catabolic pathways. Here, recent investigations have expanded the range of natural biocatalysts involved in lignin degradation/modification and significant progress related to enzyme engineering and recombinant expression has been made. The present review is focused primarily on recent trends in ligninolytic green biotechnology to suggest the potential (industrial) application of ligninolytic enzymes. Future perspectives could include synergy between natural enzymes from different sources (as well as those obtained by protein engineering) and other pretreatment methods that may be required for optimal results in enzyme-based, environmentally friendly, technologies.

  5. Random-walk enzymes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mak, Chi H.; Pham, Phuong; Afif, Samir A.; Goodman, Myron F.

    2015-09-01

    Enzymes that rely on random walk to search for substrate targets in a heterogeneously dispersed medium can leave behind complex spatial profiles of their catalyzed conversions. The catalytic signatures of these random-walk enzymes are the result of two coupled stochastic processes: scanning and catalysis. Here we develop analytical models to understand the conversion profiles produced by these enzymes, comparing an intrusive model, in which scanning and catalysis are tightly coupled, against a loosely coupled passive model. Diagrammatic theory and path-integral solutions of these models revealed clearly distinct predictions. Comparison to experimental data from catalyzed deaminations deposited on single-stranded DNA by the enzyme activation-induced deoxycytidine deaminase (AID) demonstrates that catalysis and diffusion are strongly intertwined, where the chemical conversions give rise to new stochastic trajectories that were absent if the substrate DNA was homogeneous. The C →U deamination profiles in both analytical predictions and experiments exhibit a strong contextual dependence, where the conversion rate of each target site is strongly contingent on the identities of other surrounding targets, with the intrusive model showing an excellent fit to the data. These methods can be applied to deduce sequence-dependent catalytic signatures of other DNA modification enzymes, with potential applications to cancer, gene regulation, and epigenetics.

  6. Methods of induction of labour.

    PubMed

    el Refaey, H; Jauniaux, E

    1997-12-01

    Several research groups around the world reported on the use of the drug misoprostol in the medical management of miscarriage, abortion and induction of labour. This review examines the evolution of interest in this drug, with special emphasis on its role in induction of labour.

  7. A Student Teamwork Induction Protocol

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kamau, Caroline; Spong, Abigail

    2015-01-01

    Faulty group processes have harmful effects on performance but there is little research about intervention protocols to pre-empt them in higher education. This naturalistic experiment compared a control cohort with an inducted cohort. The inducted cohort attended a workshop, consultations, elected a leader and used tools (a group log and group…

  8. Sampling Assumptions in Inductive Generalization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Navarro, Daniel J.; Dry, Matthew J.; Lee, Michael D.

    2012-01-01

    Inductive generalization, where people go beyond the data provided, is a basic cognitive capability, and it underpins theoretical accounts of learning, categorization, and decision making. To complete the inductive leap needed for generalization, people must make a key "sampling" assumption about how the available data were generated.…

  9. From Inductive Reasoning to Proof

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yopp, David A.

    2009-01-01

    Mathematical proof is an expression of deductive reasoning (drawing conclusions from previous assertions). However, it is often inductive reasoning (conclusions drawn on the basis of examples) that helps learners form their deductive arguments, or proof. In addition, not all inductive arguments generate more formal arguments. This article draws a…

  10. A Student Teamwork Induction Protocol

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kamau, Caroline; Spong, Abigail

    2015-01-01

    Faulty group processes have harmful effects on performance but there is little research about intervention protocols to pre-empt them in higher education. This naturalistic experiment compared a control cohort with an inducted cohort. The inducted cohort attended a workshop, consultations, elected a leader and used tools (a group log and group…

  11. The Rapid Induction Susceptibility Scale.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Page, Roger A.; Handley, George W.

    1989-01-01

    Developed Rapid Induction Susceptibility Scale using Chiasson induction to produce hypnotic susceptibility scale which is quickly administered and yields scores comparable to the Stanford Hypnotic Susceptibility Scale, Form C (SHSS:C). Found that validation study with college students (N=100) produced a correlation of .88 with the SHSS:C and…

  12. Sampling Assumptions in Inductive Generalization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Navarro, Daniel J.; Dry, Matthew J.; Lee, Michael D.

    2012-01-01

    Inductive generalization, where people go beyond the data provided, is a basic cognitive capability, and it underpins theoretical accounts of learning, categorization, and decision making. To complete the inductive leap needed for generalization, people must make a key "sampling" assumption about how the available data were generated.…

  13. The Rapid Induction Susceptibility Scale.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Page, Roger A.; Handley, George W.

    1989-01-01

    Developed Rapid Induction Susceptibility Scale using Chiasson induction to produce hypnotic susceptibility scale which is quickly administered and yields scores comparable to the Stanford Hypnotic Susceptibility Scale, Form C (SHSS:C). Found that validation study with college students (N=100) produced a correlation of .88 with the SHSS:C and…

  14. Induction of Superoxide Dismutase by Molecular Oxygen

    PubMed Central

    Gregory, Eugene M.; Fridovich, Irwin

    1973-01-01

    Oxygen induces superoxide dismutase in Streptococcus faecalis and in Escherichia coli B. S. faecalis grown under 20 atm of O2 had 16 times more of this enzyme than did anaerobically grown cells. In the case of E. coli, changing the conditions of growth from anaerobic to 5 atm of O2 caused a 25-fold increase in the level of superoxide dismutase. Induction of this enzyme was a response to O2 rather than to pressure, since 20 atm of N2 was without effect. Induction of superoxide dismutase was a rapid process, and half of the maximal level was reached within 90 min after N2-grown cells of S. faecalis were exposed to 20 atm of O2 at 37 C. S. faecalis did not contain perceptible levels of catalase under any of the growth conditions investigated by Stanier, Doudoroff, and Adelberg (23), and the concentration of catalase in E. coli was not affected by the presence of O2 during growth. S. faecalis, which had been grown under 100% O2 and which therefore contained an elevated level of superoxide dismutase, was more resistant of 46 atm of O2 than were cells which had been grown under N2. E. coli grown under N2 contained as much superoxide dismutase as did S. faecalis grown under 1 atm of O2. The E. coli which had been grown under N2 was as resistant to the deleterious effects of 50 atm of O2 as was S. faecalis which had been grown under 1 atm of O2. These results are consistent with the proposal that the peroxide radical is an important agent of the toxicity of oxygen and that superoxide dismutase may be a component of the systems which have been evolved to deal with this potential toxicity. Images PMID:4196244

  15. Misoprostol for induction of labor.

    PubMed

    Stephenson, Megan L; Wing, Deborah A

    2015-10-01

    Labor-induction rates have increased considerably in the United States as well as around the world. With up to half of all induced labors requiring cervical ripening, prostaglandins have been utilized to increase induction success and achieve vaginal delivery. Misoprostol, a synthetic prostaglandin E1 analog has the ability to mimic the changes of spontaneous labor and has been used off label for over 30 years as a labor-induction agent. In the following article, cervical ripening and induction of labor with misoprostol will be discussed. The risks and benefits of misoprostol for ripening and induction and routes of administration will be reviewed, as well as future directions and new developments for its use.

  16. Induction of models under uncertainty

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheeseman, Peter

    1986-01-01

    This paper outlines a procedure for performing induction under uncertainty. This procedure uses a probabilistic representation and uses Bayes' theorem to decide between alternative hypotheses (theories). This procedure is illustrated by a robot with no prior world experience performing induction on data it has gathered about the world. The particular inductive problem is the formation of class descriptions both for the tutored and untutored cases. The resulting class definitions are inherently probabilistic and so do not have any sharply defined membership criterion. This robot example raises some fundamental problems about induction; particularly, it is shown that inductively formed theories are not the best way to make predictions. Another difficulty is the need to provide prior probabilities for the set of possible theories. The main criterion for such priors is a pragmatic one aimed at keeping the theory structure as simple as possible, while still reflecting any structure discovered in the data.

  17. Inductance due to spin current

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Wei

    2014-03-21

    The inductance of spintronic devices that transport charge neutral spin currents is discussed. It is known that in a media that contains charge neutral spins, a time-varying electric field induces a spin current. We show that since the spin current itself produces an electric field, this implies existence of inductance and electromotive force when the spin current changes with time. The relations between the electromotive force and the corresponding flux, which is a vector calculated by the cross product of electric field and the trajectory of the device, are clarified. The relativistic origin generally renders an extremely small inductance, which indicates the advantage of spin current in building low inductance devices. The same argument also explains the inductance due to electric dipole current and applies to physical dipoles consist of polarized bound charges.

  18. Induction of E. coli oh8Gua endonuclease by oxidative stress: its significance in aerobic life.

    PubMed

    Kim, H S; Park, Y W; Kasai, H; Nishimura, S; Park, C W; Choi, K H; Chung, M H

    1996-06-12

    The induction of 8-hydroxyguanine (oh8Gua) endonuclease, a DNA repair enzyme for an oxidatively modified guanine, oh8Gua was studied in various growth conditions in Escherichia coli (AB1157). Anaerobically grown E. coli were found to have a very low activity of this enzyme while aerobically grown cells showed activity about 20 times that of the anaerobic level. Under the same condition, superoxide dismutase (SOD) showed about 6-fold increase in activity. A shift in growth conditions from anaerobic to aerobic resulted in rapid induction of this enzyme, and this induction was blocked (but not completely) by chloramphenicol. It is indicated that molecular oxygen is an effective stimulator to the induction of this enzyme and its induction depends partly on protein synthesis. Superoxide-producing compounds such as paraquat and menadione also increased the activity of endonuclease as well as SOD, but H2O2 showed no effect. Thus, superoxides are also implied as a stimulator. In contrast, hyperoxia induced only SOD not the endonuclease. This induction of the endonuclease by hyperoxia was only observed in a SOD-deficient strain (QC774). The aerobic activity of the endonuclease in QC774 was the same as that of wild types (AB1157, GC4468). It is implied that the responsiveness of oh8Gua endonuclease to superoxides is less sensitive than that of SOD. The endonuclease was also induced by a temperature shift from 30 to 43 degrees C and treatment with nalidixic acid. Among the stimuli used, molecular oxygen seems to be most effective for its induction. The inducible nature of this enzyme will serve as an important mechanism for the protection of oxidative DNA damage in the aerobic environment.

  19. Induction: The Early Years of Teaching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guyton, Edi; Davis, Douglas; Colarusso, Ron; Grainger, Barbara

    2002-01-01

    Addresses the need for induction programs for beginning teachers and discusses the theoretical and research support for them. Develops the notion of induction as a community responsibility and describes a university-school induction consortium, a university induction program, an induction program at a middle school, and the role of the principal…

  20. Induction: The Early Years of Teaching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guyton, Edi; Davis, Douglas; Colarusso, Ron; Grainger, Barbara

    2002-01-01

    Addresses the need for induction programs for beginning teachers and discusses the theoretical and research support for them. Develops the notion of induction as a community responsibility and describes a university-school induction consortium, a university induction program, an induction program at a middle school, and the role of the principal…

  1. Bridge Inductance of Induction Motor with Closed Rotor Slots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsushita, Makoto; Ishibashi, Fuminori; Suzuki, Takao; Noda, Shinichi

    Closed rotor slots are widely employed in low-power squirrel-cage induction motors with die-cast aluminum cage rotors. Die-cast aluminum cages with closed rotor slots can be manufactured commercially. They help reduce flux pulsation in air gaps, attenuate acoustic noises, and achieve high efficiency. However, it is difficult to calculate bridge inductance of a closed rotor slot accurately because the main flux passes through the bridge and iron saturation can be achieved depending upon the bar current. In this study, bridge inductance was investigated by using a search coil and by FEM analysis and conventional equations. The bridge flux density and the bridge linkage flux were measured by using 4P-0.75kW motor with closed rotor slots, and the bridge inductance was calculated as a function of rotor bar current. The bridge inductance was also analyzed by FEM, and the results were analytically checked by using the calculated conventional equations. From these analyses, it is seen that the measured values of the bridge inductance are in good agreement with the values calculated by FEM and conventional methods. It is verified that the bridge inductance shows a trend similar to that of the μ-H curve of the rotor steel sheet.

  2. Enzyme immunoassay for methamphetamine.

    PubMed

    Aoki, K; Kuroiwa, Y

    1983-01-01

    A competitive enzyme immunoassay for methamphetamine with alkaline phosphatase labeled methamphetamine, Sepharose-antibody and p-nitrophenylphosphate as substrate was developed. The anti-methamphetamine antisera produced in rabbits by immunization with N-(4-aminobutyl) methamphetamine-BSA conjugate were specific for methamphetamine and showed low cross-reactivities with p-OH methamphetamine and amphetamine (metabolites of methamphetamine). The range of methamphetamine measurable by the enzyme immunoassay was 1 to 300 ng/tube. According to the assay, methamphetamine could be detected from urine and extract of hair.

  3. Evolution of enzyme superfamilies.

    PubMed

    Glasner, Margaret E; Gerlt, John A; Babbitt, Patricia C

    2006-10-01

    Enzyme evolution is often constrained by aspects of catalysis. Sets of homologous proteins that catalyze different overall reactions but share an aspect of catalysis, such as a common partial reaction, are called mechanistically diverse superfamilies. The common mechanistic steps and structural characteristics of several of these superfamilies, including the enolase, Nudix, amidohydrolase, and haloacid dehalogenase superfamilies have been characterized. In addition, studies of mechanistically diverse superfamilies are helping to elucidate mechanisms of functional diversification, such as catalytic promiscuity. Understanding how enzyme superfamilies evolve is vital for accurate genome annotation, predicting protein functions, and protein engineering.

  4. Entropy and Enzyme Catalysis.

    PubMed

    Åqvist, Johan; Kazemi, Masoud; Isaksen, Geir Villy; Brandsdal, Bjørn Olav

    2017-02-21

    The role played by entropy for the enormous rate enhancement achieved by enzymes has been debated for many decades. There are, for example, several confirmed cases where the activation free energy is reduced by around 10 kcal/mol due to entropic effects, corresponding to a rate enhancement of ∼10(7) compared to the uncatalyzed reaction. However, despite substantial efforts from both the experimental and theoretical side, no real consensus has been reached regarding the origin of such large entropic contributions to enzyme catalysis. Another remarkable instance of entropic effects is found in enzymes that are adapted by evolution to work at low temperatures, near the freezing point of water. These cold-adapted enzymes invariably show a more negative entropy and a lower enthalpy of activation than their mesophilic orthologs, which counteracts the exponential damping of reaction rates at lower temperature. The structural origin of this universal phenomenon has, however, remained elusive. The basic problem with connecting macroscopic thermodynamic quantities, such as activation entropy and enthalpy derived from Arrhenius plots, to the 3D protein structure is that the underlying detailed (microscopic) energetics is essentially inaccessible to experiment. Moreover, attempts to calculate entropy contributions by computer simulations have mostly focused only on substrate entropies, which do not provide the full picture. We have recently devised a new approach for accessing thermodynamic activation parameters of both enzyme and solution reactions from computer simulations, which turns out to be very successful. This method is analogous to the experimental Arrhenius plots and directly evaluates the temperature dependence of calculated reaction free energy profiles. Hence, by extensive molecular dynamics simulations and calculations of up to thousands of independent free energy profiles, we are able to extract activation parameters with sufficient precision for making

  5. [Micro fabricated enzyme battery].

    PubMed

    Sasaki, S; Karube, I

    1996-10-01

    Although various work has been done in the field of implantable micro actuators such as artificial organs and micro surgery robots, a suitable electric power supply for these is yet to be developed. For this purpose a micro fabricated enzyme fuel cell was developed which uses glucose contained in the human body as a fuel. In order to obtain enough voltage each cell was formed as part of a serial array on a silicon wafer. Glucose solution enters the cells by a capillary effect. In this article fuel cells already developed using biocatalysts are described, and the future possibility of a micro fabricated enzyme battery is discussed.

  6. Inductive source induced polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchant, David; Haber, Eldad; Oldenburg, Douglas W.

    2013-02-01

    Induced polarization (IP) surveys are commonly performed to map the distribution of electrical chargeability that is a diagnostic physical property in mineral exploration and in many environmental problems. Although these surveys have been successful in the past, the galvanic sources required for traditional IP and magnetic IP (MIP) surveys prevent them from being applied in some geological settings. We develop a new methodology for processing frequency domain EM data to identify the presence of IP effects in observations of the magnetic fields arising from an inductive source. The method makes use of the asymptotic behaviour of the secondary magnetic fields at low frequency. A new quantity, referred to as the ISIP datum, is defined so that it equals zero at low frequencies for any frequency-independent (non-chargeable) conductivity distribution. Thus, any non-zero response in the ISIP data indicates the presence of chargeable material. Numerical simulations demonstrate that the method can be applied even in complicated geological situations. A 3-D inversion algorithm is developed to recover the chargeability from the ISIP data and the inversion is demonstrated on synthetic examples.

  7. Linear induction pump

    DOEpatents

    Meisner, John W.; Moore, Robert M.; Bienvenue, Louis L.

    1985-03-19

    Electromagnetic linear induction pump for liquid metal which includes a unitary pump duct. The duct comprises two substantially flat parallel spaced-apart wall members, one being located above the other and two parallel opposing side members interconnecting the wall members. Located within the duct are a plurality of web members interconnecting the wall members and extending parallel to the side members whereby the wall members, side members and web members define a plurality of fluid passageways, each of the fluid passageways having substantially the same cross-sectional flow area. Attached to an outer surface of each side member is an electrically conductive end bar for the passage of an induced current therethrough. A multi-phase, electrical stator is located adjacent each of the wall members. The duct, stators, and end bars are enclosed in a housing which is provided with an inlet and outlet in fluid communication with opposite ends of the fluid passageways in the pump duct. In accordance with a preferred embodiment, the inlet and outlet includes a transition means which provides for a transition from a round cross-sectional flow path to a substantially rectangular cross-sectional flow path defined by the pump duct.

  8. Volumetric magnetic induction tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, H.-Y.; Ma, L.; Soleimani, M.

    2012-05-01

    Magnetic induction tomography (MIT) is a new and emerging type of tomography technique that is able to map the passive electromagnetic properties (in particular conductivity) of an object. Because of its non-invasive feature, it becomes a suitable technique for many industries, such as metal processing and mining. This paper presents a volumetric MIT (VMIT) system based on an existing measurement setup in our 2D system (MIT Mk-I). By increasing the number of sensors in the axial direction, volumetric imaging can be realized and hence can improve the spatial resolution of the reconstructed images. All of the system control, data acquisition and signal demodulation are accomplished by a commercial data acquisition card and the National Instruments graphical programming language. In this paper, both the system architecture and the forward 3D sensitivity model will be presented. The image reconstruction scheme is modified by introducing a 3D sensitivity map to replace the previous 2D sensitivity map used for the MIT Mk-I system. The iterative Landweber technique was implemented as the inverse solver to reconstruct the images. Several laboratory-based experimental results are demonstrated in this paper, with different shapes of imaging objects. The reconstructed images are satisfactory showing for the first time volumetric conductivity reconstruction using a multi-layer MIT system. The results indicate the high-quality image reconstruction using our novel VMIT system for potential use in industrial applications, such as metal flow imaging.

  9. Inductively generating Euler diagrams.

    PubMed

    Stapleton, Gem; Rodgers, Peter; Howse, John; Zhang, Leishi

    2011-01-01

    Euler diagrams have a wide variety of uses, from information visualization to logical reasoning. In all of their application areas, the ability to automatically layout Euler diagrams brings considerable benefits. In this paper, we present a novel approach to Euler diagram generation. We develop certain graphs associated with Euler diagrams in order to allow curves to be added by finding cycles in these graphs. This permits us to build Euler diagrams inductively, adding one curve at a time. Our technique is adaptable, allowing the easy specification, and enforcement, of sets of well-formedness conditions; we present a series of results that identify properties of cycles that correspond to the well-formedness conditions. This improves upon other contributions toward the automated generation of Euler diagrams which implicitly assume some fixed set of well-formedness conditions must hold. In addition, unlike most of these other generation methods, our technique allows any abstract description to be drawn as an Euler diagram. To establish the utility of the approach, a prototype implementation has been developed.

  10. Synthetic Helizyme Enzymes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-08-18

    Enzymes START DATE: 1 August 1986; END DATE: 31 July 1989 RESEARCH OBSCTE: The goal of this project as to design, synthesize and test totally new...the peptide from the resin by HF. Coupling reactions were monitored at nearly all steps using qualitative and quantitative ninhydrin reactions

  11. Amperometric Enzyme Electrodes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-12-01

    and C. Lyons. "Electrode systems for continuous monitoring in cardiomuscula murgery," Ann. NY Acad. Sci.. 102 (1962). 20-45. [6]. 1. J. Updike mid G...Chemistry, John Wiley & Sons: New York (1980). 197-236. [2]. L D. Mell and J. T. Maloy, "A Model for the Amperometric Enzyme Electrode Obtained through

  12. Quorum quenching enzymes.

    PubMed

    Fetzner, Susanne

    2015-05-10

    Bacteria use cell-to-cell communication systems based on chemical signal molecules to coordinate their behavior within the population. These quorum sensing systems are potential targets for antivirulence therapies, because many bacterial pathogens control the expression of virulence factors via quorum sensing networks. Since biofilm maturation is also usually influenced by quorum sensing, quenching these systems may contribute to combat biofouling. One possibility to interfere with quorum sensing is signal inactivation by enzymatic degradation or modification. Such quorum quenching enzymes are wide-spread in the bacterial world and have also been found in eukaryotes. Lactonases and acylases that hydrolyze N-acyl homoserine lactone (AHL) signaling molecules have been investigated most intensively, however, different oxidoreductases active toward AHLs or 2-alkyl-4(1H)-quinolone signals as well as other signal-converting enzymes have been described. Several approaches have been assessed which aim at alleviating virulence, or biofilm formation, by reducing the signal concentration in the bacterial environment. These involve the application or stimulation of signal-degrading bacteria as biocontrol agents in the protection of crop plants against soft-rot disease, the use of signal-degrading bacteria as probiotics in aquaculture, and the immobilization or entrapment of quorum quenching enzymes or bacteria to control biofouling in membrane bioreactors. While most approaches to use quorum quenching as antivirulence strategy are still in the research phase, the growing number of organisms and enzymes known to interfere with quorum sensing opens up new perspectives for the development of innovative antibacterial strategies.

  13. Photoperiodism and Enzyme Activity

    PubMed Central

    Queiroz, Orlando; Morel, Claudine

    1974-01-01

    Metabolic readjustments after a change from long days to short days appear, in Kalanchoe blossfeldiana, to be achieved through the operation of two main mechanisms: variation in enzyme capacity, and circadian rhythmicity. After a lag time, capacity in phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase and capacity in aspartate aminotransferase increase exponentially and appear to be allometrically linked during 50 to 60 short days; then a sudden fall takes place in the activity of the former. Malic enzyme and alanine aminotransferase behave differently. Thus, the operation of the two sections of the pathway (before and after the malate step) give rise to a continuously changing functional compartmentation in the pathway. Circadian rhythmicity, on the other hand, produces time compartmentation through phase shifts and variation in amplitude, independently for each enzyme. These characteristics suggest that the operation of a so-called biological clock would be involved. We propose the hypothesis that feedback regulation would be more accurate and efficient when applied to an already oscillating, clock-controlled enzyme system. PMID:16658749

  14. Cold-Adapted Enzymes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georlette, D.; Bentahir, M.; Claverie, P.; Collins, T.; D'amico, S.; Delille, D.; Feller, G.; Gratia, E.; Hoyoux, A.; Lonhienne, T.; Meuwis, M.-a.; Zecchinon, L.; Gerday, Ch.

    In the last few years, increased attention has been focused on enzymes produced by cold-adapted micro-organisms. It has emerged that psychrophilic enzymes represent an extremely powerful tool in both protein folding investigations and for biotechnological purposes. Such enzymes are characterised by an increased thermosensitivity and, most of them, by a higher catalytic efficiency at low and moderate temperatures, when compared to their mesophilic counterparts. The high thermosensitivity probably originates from an increased flexibility of either a selected area of the molecular edifice or the overall protein structure, providing enhanced abilities to undergo conformational changes during catalysis at low temperatures. Structure modelling and recent crystallographic data have allowed to elucidate the structural parameters that could be involved in this higher resilience. It was demonstrated that each psychrophilic enzyme adopts its own adaptive strategy. It appears, moreover, that there is a continuum in the strategy of protein adaptation to temperature, as the previously mentioned structural parameters are implicated in the stability of thermophilic proteins. Additional 3D crystal structures, site-directed and random mutagenesis experiments should now be undertaken to further investigate the stability-flexibility-activity relationship.

  15. Toying with Enzyme Catalysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richards, Debbie

    1998-01-01

    Describes a set of manipulatives that are used to establish a secure understanding of the concepts related to the environmental factors that affect the activities of enzymes. Includes a description of the model components and procedures for construction of the model. (DDR)

  16. Induction and characterization of -galactosidase in an extreme thermophile.

    PubMed

    Ulrich, J T; McFeters, G A; Temple, K L

    1972-05-01

    A thermostable beta-galactosidase (EC 3.2.1.23; beta-dgalactoside galactohydrolase) was found to be inducible in an extreme thermophile resembling Thermus aquaticus. Enzyme induction was achieved by the addition of lactose, galactose, or the alpha-galactoside, melibiose, to growing cultures. The addition of glucose to induced cultures had a repressive effect on further enzyme synthesis. The enzyme was purified 78-fold, and the optimum temperature and pH for activity were determined to be 80 C and pH 5.0, respectively. The enzyme was activated by both manganese and ferrous iron. Sulfhydryl activation and thermal stabilization indicate that the thermophilic beta-galactosidase is a sulfhydryl enzyme. Kinetic determinations at 80 C established a K(m) of 2.0 x 10(-3)m for the chromogenic substrate o-nitrophenyl beta-d-galactopyranoside (ONPG) and a K(1) of 7.5 x 10(-3)m for lactose. The Arrhenius energy of activation (for the hydrolysis of ONPG) was calculated to be 13.7 kcal/mole. A molecular weight of 5.7 x 10(5) daltons was estimated by elution of the enzyme from Sephadex 4B.

  17. Computational enzyme design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolon, Daniel N.

    2002-08-01

    The long-term objective of computational enzyme design is the ability to generate efficient protein catalysts for any chemical reaction. This thesis develops and experimentally validates a general computational approach for the design of enzymes with novel function. In order to include catalytic mechanism in protein design, a high-energy state (HES) rotamer (side chain representation) was constructed. In this rotamer, substrate atoms are in a HES. In addition, at least one amino acid side chain is positioned to interact favorably with substrate atoms in their HES and facilitate the reaction. Including an amino acid side chain in the HES rotamer automatically positions substrate relative to a protein scaffold and allows protein design algorithms to search for sequences capable of interacting favorably with the substrate. Because chemical similarity exists between the transition state and the high-energy state, optimizing the protein sequence to interact favorably with the HES rotamer should lead to transition state stabilization. In addition, the HES rotamer model focuses the subsequent computational active site design on a relevant phase space where an amino acid is capable of interacting in a catalytically active geometry with substrate. Using a HES rotamer model of the histidine mediated nucleophilic hydrolysis of p-nitrophenyl acetate, the catalytically inert 108 residue E. coli thioredoxin as a scaffold, and the ORBIT protein design software to compute sequences, an active site scan identified two promising active site designs. Experimentally, both candidate ?protozymes? demonstrated catalytic activity significantly above background. In addition, the rate enhancement of one of these ?protozymes? was the same order of magnitude as the first catalytic antibodies. Because polar groups are frequently buried at enzyme-substrate interfaces, improved modeling of buried polar interactions may benefit enzyme design. By studying native protein structures, rules have been

  18. Peroxisomal bifunctional enzyme deficiency.

    PubMed Central

    Watkins, P A; Chen, W W; Harris, C J; Hoefler, G; Hoefler, S; Blake, D C; Balfe, A; Kelley, R I; Moser, A B; Beard, M E

    1989-01-01

    Peroxisomal function was evaluated in a male infant with clinical features of neonatal adrenoleukodystrophy. Very long chain fatty acid levels were elevated in both plasma and fibroblasts, and beta-oxidation of very long chain fatty acids in cultured fibroblasts was significantly impaired. Although the level of the bile acid intermediate trihydroxycoprostanoic acid was slightly elevated in plasma, phytanic acid and L-pipecolic acid levels were normal, as was plasmalogen synthesis in cultured fibroblasts. The latter three parameters distinguish this case from classical neonatal adrenoleukodystrophy. In addition, electron microscopy and catalase subcellular distribution studies revealed that, in contrast to neonatal adrenoleukodystrophy, peroxisomes were present in the patient's tissues. Immunoblot studies of peroxisomal beta-oxidation enzymes revealed that the bifunctional enzyme (enoyl-CoA hydratase/3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase) was deficient in postmortem liver samples, whereas acyl-CoA oxidase and the mature form of beta-ketothiolase were present. Density gradient centrifugation of fibroblast homogenates confirmed that intact peroxisomes were present. Immunoblots of fibroblasts peroxisomal fractions showed that they contained acyl-CoA oxidase and beta-ketothiolase, but bifunctional enzyme was not detected. Northern analysis, however, revealed that mRNA coding for the bifunctional enzyme was present in the patient's fibroblasts. These results indicate that the primary biochemical defect in this patient is a deficiency of peroxisomal bifunctional enzyme. It is of interest that the phenotype of this patient resembled neonatal adrenoleukodystrophy and would not have been distinguished from this disorder by clinical study alone. Images PMID:2921319

  19. The Enzyme Function Initiative†

    PubMed Central

    Gerlt, John A.; Allen, Karen N.; Almo, Steven C.; Armstrong, Richard N.; Babbitt, Patricia C.; Cronan, John E.; Dunaway-Mariano, Debra; Imker, Heidi J.; Jacobson, Matthew P.; Minor, Wladek; Poulter, C. Dale; Raushel, Frank M.; Sali, Andrej; Shoichet, Brian K.; Sweedler, Jonathan V.

    2011-01-01

    The Enzyme Function Initiative (EFI) was recently established to address the challenge of assigning reliable functions to enzymes discovered in bacterial genome projects; in this Current Topic we review the structure and operations of the EFI. The EFI includes the Superfamily/Genome, Protein, Structure, Computation, and Data/Dissemination Cores that provide the infrastructure for reliably predicting the in vitro functions of unknown enzymes. The initial targets for functional assignment are selected from five functionally diverse superfamilies (amidohydrolase, enolase, glutathione transferase, haloalkanoic acid dehalogenase, and isoprenoid synthase), with five superfamily-specific Bridging Projects experimentally testing the predicted in vitro enzymatic activities. The EFI also includes the Microbiology Core that evaluates the in vivo context of in vitro enzymatic functions and confirms the functional predictions of the EFI. The deliverables of the EFI to the scientific community include: 1) development of a large-scale, multidisciplinary sequence/structure-based strategy for functional assignment of unknown enzymes discovered in genome projects (target selection, protein production, structure determination, computation, experimental enzymology, microbiology, and structure-based annotation); 2) dissemination of the strategy to the community via publications, collaborations, workshops, and symposia; 3) computational and bioinformatic tools for using the strategy; 4) provision of experimental protocols and/or reagents for enzyme production and characterization; and 5) dissemination of data via the EFI’s website, enzymefunction.org. The realization of multidisciplinary strategies for functional assignment will begin to define the full metabolic diversity that exists in nature and will impact basic biochemical and evolutionary understanding, as well as a wide range of applications of central importance to industrial, medicinal and pharmaceutical efforts. PMID

  20. Monitoring enzyme kinetic behavior of enzyme-quantum dot bioconjugates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claussen, Jonathan C.; Walper, Scott A.; Susumu, Kimihiro; Ancona, Mario G.; Medintz, Igor L.

    2014-05-01

    Luminescent semiconductor nanocrystals or quantum dots (QDs) hold tremendous promise for in vivo biosensing, cellular imaging, theranostics, and smart molecular sensing probes due to their small size and favorable photonic properties such as resistance to photobleaching, size-tunable PL, and large effective Stokes shifts. Herein, we demonstrate how QD-based bioconjugates can be used to enhance enzyme kinetics. Enzyme-substrate kinetics are analyzed for solutions containing both alkaline phosphatase enzymes and QDs with enzyme-to- QD molar ratios of 2, 12, and 24 as well as for a solution containing the same concentration of enzymes but without QDs. The enzyme kinetic paramters Vmax, KM, and Kcat/KM are extracted from the enzyme progress curves via the Lineweaver-Burk plot. Results demonstrate an approximate increase in enzyme efficiency of 5 - 8% for enzymes immobilized on the QD versus free in solution without QD immobilization.

  1. The Moderately Efficient Enzyme: Futile Encounters and Enzyme Floppiness.

    PubMed

    Bar-Even, Arren; Milo, Ron; Noor, Elad; Tawfik, Dan S

    2015-08-18

    The pioneering model of Henri, Michaelis, and Menten was based on the fast equilibrium assumption: the substrate binds its enzyme reversibly, and substrate dissociation is much faster than product formation. Here, we examine this assumption from a somewhat different point of view, asking what fraction of enzyme-substrate complexes are futile, i.e., result in dissociation rather than product formation. In Knowles' notion of a "perfect" enzyme, all encounters of the enzyme with its substrate result in conversion to product. Thus, the perfect enzyme's catalytic efficiency, kcat/KM, is constrained by only the diffusion on-rate, and the fraction of futile encounters (defined as φ) approaches zero. The available data on >1000 different enzymes suggest that for ≥90% of enzymes φ > 0.99 and for the "average enzyme" φ ≥ 0.9999; namely, <1 of 10(4) encounters is productive. Thus, the "fast equilibrium" assumption holds for the vast majority of enzymes. We discuss possible molecular origins for the dominance of futile encounters, including the coexistence of multiple sub-states of an enzyme's active site (enzyme floppiness) and/or its substrate. Floppiness relates to the inherent flexibility of proteins, but also to conflicting demands, or trade-offs, between rate acceleration (the rate-determining chemical step) and catalytic turnover, or between turnover rate and accuracy. The study of futile encounters and active-site floppiness may contribute to a better understanding of enzyme catalysis, enzyme evolution, and improved enzyme design.

  2. Induction heat treatment of steel

    SciTech Connect

    Semiatin, S.L.; Stutz, D.E.

    1985-01-01

    This book discusses the induction heating. After reviewing heat treating operations for steel and the principles of the heat treatment of steel, an overview of induction heat treating is provided. Next, consideration is given to equipment and equipment selection, coil design, power requirements and temperature control. A discussion of surface and through hardening of steel is provided, including information on frequency and power selection and quenching apparatus. Tempering is considered, followed by information on control of residual stresses, cracking, temper brittleness and the important metallurgical and hardness differences between induction and furnace treated steel.

  3. Inductional Effects in a Halbach Magnet Motion Above Distributed Inductance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tchatchoua, Yves; Conrow, Ary; Kim, Dong; Morgan, Daniel; Majewski, Walerian; Zafar, Zaeema

    2013-03-01

    We experimented with attempts to levitate a linear (bar) Halbach array of five 1'' Nd magnets above a linear inductive track. Next, in order to achieve a control over the relative velocity, we designed a different experiment. In it a large wheel with circumferentially positioned along its rim inducting coils rotates, while the magnet is suspended directly above the rim of the wheel on a force sensor. Faraday's Law with the Lenz's Rule is responsible for the lifting and drag forces on the magnet; the horizontal drag force is measured by another force sensor. Approximating the magnet's linear relative motion over inductors with a motion along a large circle, we may use formulas derived earlier in the literature for linear inductive levitation. We measured lift and drag forces as functions of relative velocity of the Halbach magnet and the inductive ``track,'' in an approximate agreement with the existing theory. We then vary the inductance and shape of the inductive elements to find the most beneficial choice for the lift/drag ratio at the lowest relative speed.

  4. Operating an induction melter apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Roach, Jay A.; Richardson, John G.; Raivo, Brian D.; Soelberg, Nicholas R.

    2006-01-31

    Apparatus and methods of operation are provided for a cold-crucible-induction melter for vitrifying waste wherein a single induction power supply may be used to effect a selected thermal distribution by independently energizing at least two inductors. Also, a bottom drain assembly may be heated by an inductor and may include an electrically resistive heater. The bottom drain assembly may be cooled to solidify molten material passing therethrough to prevent discharge of molten material therefrom. Configurations are provided wherein the induction flux skin depth substantially corresponds with the central longitudinal axis of the crucible. Further, the drain tube may be positioned within the induction flux skin depth in relation to material within the crucible or may be substantially aligned with a direction of flow of molten material within the crucible. An improved head design including four shells forming thermal radiation shields and at least two gas-cooled plenums is also disclosed.

  5. Induction heating coupler and annealer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, Robert L. (Inventor); Johnson, Samuel D. (Inventor); Copeland, Carl E. (Inventor); Coultrip, Robert H. (Inventor); Phillips, W. Morris (Inventor); Johnston, David F. (Inventor); Swaim, Robert J. (Inventor); Dinkins, James R. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    An induction heating device includes a handle having a hollow interior and two opposite ends, a wrist connected to one end of the handle, a U-shaped pole piece having- two spaced apart ends, a tank circuit including an induction coil wrapped around the pole piece and a capacitor connected to the induction coil, a head connected to the wrist and including a housing for receiving the U-shaped pole piece, the two spaced apart ends of the pole piece extending outwardly beyond the housing, and a power source connected to the tank circuit. When the tank circuit is energized and a susceptor is placed in juxtaposition to the ends of the U-shaped pole piece, the susceptor is heated by induction heating due to a magnetic flux passing between the two ends of the pole piece.

  6. Adjustable Induction-Heating Coil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellis, Rod; Bartolotta, Paul

    1990-01-01

    Improved design for induction-heating work coil facilitates optimization of heating in different metal specimens. Three segments adjusted independently to obtain desired distribution of temperature. Reduces time needed to achieve required temperature profiles.

  7. Adjustable Induction-Heating Coil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellis, Rod; Bartolotta, Paul

    1990-01-01

    Improved design for induction-heating work coil facilitates optimization of heating in different metal specimens. Three segments adjusted independently to obtain desired distribution of temperature. Reduces time needed to achieve required temperature profiles.

  8. Modulation of porcine biotransformation enzymes by anthelmintic therapy with fenbendazole and flubendazole.

    PubMed

    Savlík, M; Fimanová, K; Szotáková, B; Lamka, J; Skálová, L

    2006-06-01

    Fenbendazole (FEN) and flubendazole (FLU) are benzimidazole anthelmintics often used in pig management for the control of nematodoses. The in vivo study presented here was designed to test the influence of FLU and FEN on cytochrome P4501A and other cytochrome P450 (CYP) isoforms, UDP-glucuronosyl transferase and several carbonyl reducing enzymes. The results indicated that FEN (in a single therapeutic dose as well as in repeated therapeutic doses) caused significant induction of pig CYP1A, while FLU did not show an inductive effect towards this isoform. Some of the other hepatic and intestinal biotransformation enzymes that were assayed were moderately influenced by FEN or FLU. Strong CYP1A induction following FEN therapy in pigs may negatively affect the efficacy and pharmacokinetics of FEN itself or other simultaneously or consecutively administered drugs. From the perspective of biotransformation enzyme modulation, FLU would appear to be a more convenient anthelmintic therapy of pigs than FEN.

  9. Economic implications of labor induction.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Simon, Raquel; Montañes, Antonio; Clemente, Jesús; Del Pino, María D; Romero, Manuel A; Fabre, Ernesto; Oros, Daniel

    2016-04-01

    To assess health service costs associated with labor induction according to different clinical situations in a tertiary-level hospital. In a prospective study, individual patient cost data were assessed for women admitted for induction of labor at a tertiary hospital in Spain between November 1, 2012, and August 31, 2013. The costs of labor induction were estimated according to maternal and neonatal outcomes, method of delivery, cervical condition at admission, and obstetric indication. Direct costs including professional fees, epidural, maternal stay, consumables, and drugs were calculated. Overall, 412 women were included in the final cost analysis. The mean total cost of labor induction was €3589.87 (95% confidence interval [CI] 3475.13-3704.61). Cesarean delivery after labor induction (€4830.45, 95% CI 4623.13-5037.58) was significantly more expensive than spontaneous delivery (€3037.45, 95% CI 2966.91-3179.99) and instrumental vaginal delivery (€3344.31, 95%CI 3151.69-3536.93). The total cost for patients with a very unfavorable cervix (Bishop score <2; €4283.47, 95% CI 4063.06-4503.88) was almost double that for women with a favorable cervix (€2605.09, 95% CI 2327.38-2837.58). Labor induction for hypertensive disorders of pregnancy was the most expensive obstetric indication for induction of labor (€4347.32, 95% CI 3890.45-4804.18). Following the induction of labor, a number of patient- and treatment-related factors influence costs associated with delivery. Copyright © 2015 International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Halophilic adaptation of enzymes.

    PubMed

    Madern, D; Ebel, C; Zaccai, G

    2000-04-01

    It is now clear that the understanding of halophilic adaptation at a molecular level requires a strategy of complementary experiments, combining molecular biology, biochemistry, and cellular approaches with physical chemistry and thermodynamics. In this review, after a discussion of the definition and composition of halophilic enzymes, the effects of salt on their activity, solubility, and stability are reviewed. We then describe how thermodynamic observations, such as parameters pertaining to solvent-protein interactions or enzyme-unfolding kinetics, depend strongly on solvent composition and reveal the important role played by water and ion binding to halophilic proteins. The three high-resolution crystal structures now available for halophilic proteins are analyzed in terms of haloadaptation, and finally cellular response to salt stress is discussed briefly.

  11. Enzyme catalysis "reilluminated".

    PubMed

    Gärtner, Wolfgang

    2009-01-01

    In a new light: The NADPH:protochlorophyllide (Pchlide) oxidoreductase (POR; see structure, green Pchlide, yellow NADPH) is a good model to investigate catalytical processes in enzymes, as its light activation allows an immediate start of the catalyzed reaction. By irradiation with weak, short laser pulses it is possible to detect conformation changes during the reaction and thus to uncover the elementary steps of the catalytic process.

  12. Multipurpose Vacuum Induction Processing System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Govindaraju, M.; Kulkarni, Deepak; Balasubramanian, K.

    2012-11-01

    Multipurpose vacuum processing systems are cost effective; occupy less space, multiple functional under one roof and user friendly. A multipurpose vacuum induction system was designed, fabricated and installed in a record time of 6 months time at NFTDC Hyderabad. It was designed to function as a) vacuum induction melting/refining of oxygen free electronic copper/pure metals, b) vacuum induction melting furnace for ferrous materials c) vacuum induction melting for non ferrous materials d) large vacuum heat treatment chamber by resistance heating (by detachable coil and hot zone) e) bottom discharge vacuum induction melting system for non ferrous materials f) Induction heat treatment system and g) directional solidification /investment casting. It contains provision for future capacity addition. The attachments require to manufacture multiple shaped castings and continuous rod casting can be added whenever need arises. Present capacity is decided on the requirement for 10years of development path; presently it has 1.2 ton liquid copper handling capacity. It is equipped with provision for capacity addition up to 2 ton liquid copper handling capacity in future. Provision is made to carry out the capacity addition in easy steps quickly. For easy operational maintenance and troubleshooting, design was made in easily detachable sections. High vacuum system is also is detachable, independent and easily movable which is first of its kind in the country. Detailed design parameters, advantages and development history are presented in this paper.

  13. Uronic polysaccharide degrading enzymes.

    PubMed

    Garron, Marie-Line; Cygler, Miroslaw

    2014-10-01

    In the past several years progress has been made in the field of structure and function of polysaccharide lyases (PLs). The number of classified polysaccharide lyase families has increased to 23 and more detailed analysis has allowed the identification of more closely related subfamilies, leading to stronger correlation between each subfamily and a unique substrate. The number of as yet unclassified polysaccharide lyases has also increased and we expect that sequencing projects will allow many of these unclassified sequences to emerge as new families. The progress in structural analysis of PLs has led to having at least one representative structure for each of the families and for two unclassified enzymes. The newly determined structures have folds observed previously in other PL families and their catalytic mechanisms follow either metal-assisted or Tyr/His mechanisms characteristic for other PL enzymes. Comparison of PLs with glycoside hydrolases (GHs) shows several folds common to both classes but only for the β-helix fold is there strong indication of divergent evolution from a common ancestor. Analysis of bacterial genomes identified gene clusters containing multiple polysaccharide cleaving enzymes, the Polysaccharides Utilization Loci (PULs), and their gene complement suggests that they are organized to process completely a specific polysaccharide.

  14. Inductive System Monitors Tasks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    The Inductive Monitoring System (IMS) software developed at Ames Research Center uses artificial intelligence and data mining techniques to build system-monitoring knowledge bases from archived or simulated sensor data. This information is then used to detect unusual or anomalous behavior that may indicate an impending system failure. Currently helping analyze data from systems that help fly and maintain the space shuttle and the International Space Station (ISS), the IMS has also been employed by data classes are then used to build a monitoring knowledge base. In real time, IMS performs monitoring functions: determining and displaying the degree of deviation from nominal performance. IMS trend analyses can detect conditions that may indicate a failure or required system maintenance. The development of IMS was motivated by the difficulty of producing detailed diagnostic models of some system components due to complexity or unavailability of design information. Successful applications have ranged from real-time monitoring of aircraft engine and control systems to anomaly detection in space shuttle and ISS data. IMS was used on shuttle missions STS-121, STS-115, and STS-116 to search the Wing Leading Edge Impact Detection System (WLEIDS) data for signs of possible damaging impacts during launch. It independently verified findings of the WLEIDS Mission Evaluation Room (MER) analysts and indicated additional points of interest that were subsequently investigated by the MER team. In support of the Exploration Systems Mission Directorate, IMS is being deployed as an anomaly detection tool on ISS mission control consoles in the Johnson Space Center Mission Operations Directorate. IMS has been trained to detect faults in the ISS Control Moment Gyroscope (CMG) systems. In laboratory tests, it has already detected several minor anomalies in real-time CMG data. When tested on archived data, IMS was able to detect precursors of the CMG1 failure nearly 15 hours in advance of

  15. Immobilized enzymes in organic synthesis.

    PubMed

    Mosbach, K

    1985-01-01

    The immobilization of enzymes and cells by different methods and the possible stabilization of immobilized preparations are discussed. An outlook on 'second generation enzyme technology', which involves immobilized multi-enzyme systems and coenzymes, is given with examples: the immobilization of dehydrogenases with their active sites facing one another, and systems containing NAD(H) coenzymes immobilized by coupling to dextran (in an enzyme electrode), to polyethylene glycol (in a membrane reactor), or to enzymes themselves. The use of immobilized enzymes to synthesize peptides and disaccharides is described.

  16. Elicitor-mediated induction of chalcone isomerase in Phaseolus vulgaris cell suspension cultures.

    PubMed

    Dixon, R A; Gerrish, C; Lamb, C J; Robbins, M P

    1983-12-01

    Approximately fourfold increases in the extractable activity of the enzyme chalcone isomerase (CHI, EC 5.5.1.6) were observed within 24 h of treatment of cell suspension cultures of Phaseolus vulgaris with a crude elicitor preparation heatreleased from the cell walls of the bean pathogen Colletotrichum lindemuthianum. The induction of CHI activity was highly dependent upon elicitor concentration, with maximum induction occurring in two discrete concentration ranges. A basal half-life for CHI>32 h in control cultures was determined by labelling with (2)H from (2)H2O followed by analysis of the equilibrium distribution of enzyme activity in CsCl density gradients. Comparative density labelling indicated that at both the lower and higher effective elicitor concentrations, the induced appearance of CHI activity was the result of an apparent initial activation of pre-existing enzyme followed by an increase in the rate of de-novo synthesis of the enzyme as compared with non-elicited controls. The increased appearance of the enzyme over the first 8 h in elicitor-treated cultures was inhibited by cycloheximide, cordycepin and actinomycin D. The results are discussed in relation to the mechanisms of co-ordinate enzyme induction operating in French-bean cell cultures exposed to fungal elicitors.

  17. Paraffin Oxidation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa I. Induction of Paraffin Oxidation

    PubMed Central

    van Eyk, J.; Bartels, Trude J.

    1968-01-01

    The induction of paraffin oxidation in intact cells of Pseudomonas aeruginosa was investigated. Oxidation of 14C-heptane by cell-free extracts of adapted cells showed that the activity of whole cells is a reliable reflection of the synthesis of the first enzyme in the degradation of n-alkanes. Induction was significantly affected by glucose and could be completely repressed by malate. The amino acids l-proline, l-alanine, l-arginine, and l-tyrosine exhibited a rather low repressor action. Malonate, a nonrepressive carbon source, allowed gratuitous enzyme synthesis. A number of compounds which did not sustain growth were found to be suitable substitutes for paraffins as an inducer. Among these were cyclopropane and diethoxymethane. The induction studied under conditions of gratuity with the latter compound as an inducer showed immediate linear kinetics only at saturating inducer concentrations. With n-hexane as the inducer, a lag time was always observed, even when high concentrations were used. PMID:4979100

  18. Micellar Polymer Encapsulation of Enzymes.

    PubMed

    Besic, Sabina; Minteer, Shelley D

    2017-01-01

    Although enzymes are highly efficient and selective catalysts, there have been problems incorporating them into fuel cells. Early enzyme-based fuel cells contained enzymes in solution rather than immobilized on the electrode surface. One problem utilizing an enzyme in solution is an issue of transport associated with long diffusion lengths between the site of bioelectrocatalysis and the electrode. This issue drastically decreases the theoretical overall power output due to the poor electron conductivity. On the other hand, enzymes immobilized at the electrode surface have eliminated the issue of poor electron conduction due to close proximity of electron transfer between electrode and the biocatalyst. Another problem is inefficient and short term stability of catalytic activity within the enzyme that is suspended in free flowing solution. Enzymes in solutions are only stable for hours to days, whereas immobilized enzymes can be stable for weeks to months and now even years. Over the last decade, there has been substantial research on immobilizing enzymes at electrode surfaces for biofuel cell and sensor applications. The most commonly used techniques are sandwich or wired. Sandwich techniques are powerful and successful for enzyme immobilization; however, the enzymes optimal activity is not retained due to the physical distress applied by the polymer limiting its applications as well as the non-uniform distribution of the enzyme and the diffusion of analyte through the polymer is slowed significantly. Wired techniques have shown to extend the lifetime of an enzyme at the electrode surface; however, this technique is very hard to master due to specific covalent bonding of enzyme and polymer which changes the three-dimensional configuration of enzyme and with that decreases the optimal catalytic activity. This chapter details encapsulation techniques where an enzyme will be immobilized within the pores/pockets of the hydrophobically modified micellar polymers such as

  19. Enzyme Molar Fractions: A Powerful Tool for Understanding Enzyme Kinetics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Serra, Juan L.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Deduces the relationship between reduced velocity and molar fractions for productive enzyme complexes; obtains the mathematical expression of molar fractions for an enzyme with two specific binding sites per molecule; and proposes a useful plot to follow the dependence of enzyme molar fractions with the concentration of one of its ligands. (JN)

  20. Enzyme linked immunoassay with stabilized polymer saccharide enzyme conjugates

    DOEpatents

    Callstrom, M.R.; Bednarski, M.D.; Gruber, P.R.

    1997-11-25

    An improvement in enzyme linked immunoassays is disclosed wherein the enzyme is in the form of a water soluble polymer saccharide conjugate which is stable in hostile environments. The conjugate comprises the enzyme which is linked to the polymer at multiple points through saccharide linker groups. 19 figs.

  1. Enzyme linked immunoassay with stabilized polymer saccharide enzyme conjugates

    DOEpatents

    Callstrom, Matthew R.; Bednarski, Mark D.; Gruber, Patrick R.

    1997-01-01

    An improvement in enzyme linked immunoassays is disclosed wherein the enzyme is in the form of a water soluble polymer saccharide conjugate which is stable in hostile environments. The conjugate comprises the enzyme which is linked to the polymer at multiple points through saccharide linker groups.

  2. Induction of pulmonary indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase by interferon.

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, R; Imanishi, J; Oku, T; Kishida, T; Hayaishi, O

    1981-01-01

    Pulmonary indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase [indoleamine: oxygen 2,3-oxidoreductase(decyclizing)] has been found to be induced (30- to 100-fold) in the mouse after a single intraperitoneal administration of bacterial endotoxin [Yoshida, R. & Hayaishi, O. (1978) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 75, 3998-4000] or during in vivo virus infection [Yoshida, R., Urade, Y., Tokuda M. & Hayaishi, O. (1979) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 76, 4084-4086]. In the present study, an in vitro system with mouse lung slices was developed in which bacterial endotoxin (5 micrograms/ml)produced an induction (approximately 10-fold) of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase. The endotoxin was substituted by interferon from mouse L cells or mouse brain. The pulmonary enzyme activity increased almost linearly for 48 hr after addition of mouse interferon (10(4) units/ml) to lung slices. Interferon from mouse L cells or mouse brain produced a 10- to 15-fold increase in the enzyme activity, whereas that from human leukocytes was all but ineffective. The effect also was observed using highly purified L-cell interferon, prepared by poly(U) affinity column chromatography. When interferon was treated either by heat, alpha-chymotrypsin, or anti-interferon serum, such increase in the enzyme activity was diminished essentially to the same extent as seen in the antiviral activity. The increase in the enzyme activity was blocked when actinomycin D or cycloheximide was added to the slices before interferon treatment. These results suggest that the enzyme induction was produced by interferon and not by possible contaminants in the interferon preparations. Images PMID:6165986

  3. Treating Wastewater With Immobilized Enzymes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jolly, Clifford D.

    1991-01-01

    Experiments show enzymes are immobilized on supporting materials to make biocatalyst beds for treatment of wastewater. With suitable combination of enzymes, concentrations of various inorganic and organic contaminants, including ammonia and urea, reduced significantly.

  4. Treating Wastewater With Immobilized Enzymes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jolly, Clifford D.

    1991-01-01

    Experiments show enzymes are immobilized on supporting materials to make biocatalyst beds for treatment of wastewater. With suitable combination of enzymes, concentrations of various inorganic and organic contaminants, including ammonia and urea, reduced significantly.

  5. Hypnosis for induction of labour.

    PubMed

    Nishi, Daisuke; Shirakawa, Miyako N; Ota, Erika; Hanada, Nobutsugu; Mori, Rintaro

    2014-08-14

    Induction of labour using pharmacological and mechanical methods can increase complications. Complementary and alternative medicine methods including hypnosis may have the potential to provide a safe alternative option for the induction of labour. However, the effectiveness of hypnosis for inducing labour has not yet been fully evaluated. To assess the effect of hypnosis for induction of labour compared with no intervention or any other interventions. We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group's Trials Register (31 January 2014), handsearched relevant conference proceedings, contacted key personnel and organisations in the field for published and unpublished references. All published and unpublished randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and cluster-RCTs of acceptable quality comparing hypnosis with no intervention or any other interventions, in which the primary outcome is to assess whether labour was induced. Two review authors assessed the one trial report that was identified (but was subsequently excluded). No RCTs or cluster-RCTs were identified from the search strategy. There was no evidence available from RCTs to assess the effect of hypnosis for induction of labour. Evidence from RCTs is required to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of this intervention for labour induction. As hypnosis may delay standard care (in case standard care is withheld during hypnosis), its use in induction of labour should be considered on a case-by-case basis.Future RCTs are required to examine the effectiveness and safety of hypnotic relaxation for induction of labour among pregnant women who have anxiety above a certain level. The length and timing of the intervention, as well as the staff training required, should be taken into consideration. Moreover, the views and experiences of women and staff should also be included in future RCTs.

  6. What is a failed labor induction?

    PubMed

    Lin, Monique G; Rouse, Dwight J

    2006-09-01

    Criteria for failed labor induction have not been standardized. The increasing prevalence of labor induction and the lack of a definition for failed induction contribute to unnecessary abdominal deliveries. Labor duration, cervical dilation, and uterine activity necessary to attain the active phase are reviewed. A practical definition of failed induction of labor is suggested.

  7. 14 CFR 25.1091 - Air induction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Air induction. 25.1091 Section 25.1091... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant Induction System § 25.1091 Air induction. (a) The air induction system for each engine and auxiliary power unit must supply— (1) The air required by that...

  8. 14 CFR 29.1091 - Air induction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Air induction. 29.1091 Section 29.1091... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Induction System § 29.1091 Air induction. (a) The air induction system for each engine and auxiliary power unit must supply the air required by that engine...

  9. 14 CFR 27.1091 - Air induction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Air induction. 27.1091 Section 27.1091... STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Induction System § 27.1091 Air induction. (a) The air induction system for each engine must supply the air required by that engine under the operating...

  10. 14 CFR 27.1091 - Air induction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Air induction. 27.1091 Section 27.1091... STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Induction System § 27.1091 Air induction. (a) The air induction system for each engine must supply the air required by that engine under the operating...

  11. 14 CFR 27.1091 - Air induction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Air induction. 27.1091 Section 27.1091... STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Induction System § 27.1091 Air induction. (a) The air induction system for each engine must supply the air required by that engine under the operating...

  12. 14 CFR 25.1091 - Air induction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Air induction. 25.1091 Section 25.1091... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant Induction System § 25.1091 Air induction. (a) The air induction system for each engine and auxiliary power unit must supply— (1) The air required by that...

  13. 14 CFR 25.1091 - Air induction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Air induction. 25.1091 Section 25.1091... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant Induction System § 25.1091 Air induction. (a) The air induction system for each engine and auxiliary power unit must supply— (1) The air required by that...

  14. 14 CFR 25.1091 - Air induction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Air induction. 25.1091 Section 25.1091... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant Induction System § 25.1091 Air induction. (a) The air induction system for each engine and auxiliary power unit must supply— (1) The air required by that...

  15. 14 CFR 29.1091 - Air induction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Air induction. 29.1091 Section 29.1091... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Induction System § 29.1091 Air induction. (a) The air induction system for each engine and auxiliary power unit must supply the air required by that engine...

  16. 14 CFR 27.1091 - Air induction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Air induction. 27.1091 Section 27.1091... STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Induction System § 27.1091 Air induction. (a) The air induction system for each engine must supply the air required by that engine under the operating...

  17. 14 CFR 25.1091 - Air induction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Air induction. 25.1091 Section 25.1091... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant Induction System § 25.1091 Air induction. (a) The air induction system for each engine and auxiliary power unit must supply— (1) The air required by that...

  18. 14 CFR 29.1091 - Air induction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Air induction. 29.1091 Section 29.1091... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Induction System § 29.1091 Air induction. (a) The air induction system for each engine and auxiliary power unit must supply the air required by that engine...

  19. 14 CFR 29.1091 - Air induction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Air induction. 29.1091 Section 29.1091... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Induction System § 29.1091 Air induction. (a) The air induction system for each engine and auxiliary power unit must supply the air required by that engine...

  20. 14 CFR 29.1091 - Air induction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Air induction. 29.1091 Section 29.1091... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Induction System § 29.1091 Air induction. (a) The air induction system for each engine and auxiliary power unit must supply the air required by that engine...

  1. 14 CFR 27.1091 - Air induction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Air induction. 27.1091 Section 27.1091... STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Induction System § 27.1091 Air induction. (a) The air induction system for each engine must supply the air required by that engine under the operating...

  2. Altered levels of primary antioxidant enzymes in progeria skin fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Yan, T; Li, S; Jiang, X; Oberley, L W

    1999-04-02

    Free radicals are involved in the aging process. In this study, the profile of primary antioxidant enzymes that scavenge reactive oxygen species (ROS) was examined for the first time in human skin fibroblasts from progeria, a premature aging disease. Altered levels of antioxidant enzymes were found in progeria cells. Basal levels of MnSOD were decreased in progeria cells as well as a blunted induction in response to chronic stress. This change may contribute to the accelerated aging process in progeria cells. In contrast, the levels of CuZnSOD showed no progeria-related change. Two H2O2 removing enzymes demonstrated a significant reduction in progeria cells: only 50% of normal CAT activity and 30% of normal GPX activity can be detected in progeria cells. This diminished H2O2 removing capacity in progeria cells may lead to an imbalance of intracellular ROS and therefore may play an important role in the development of progeria.

  3. The Catalytic Function of Enzymes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Splittgerber, Allan G.

    1985-01-01

    Discusses: structure of the enzyme molecule; active site; reaction mechanism; transition state; factors affecting enzyme reaction rates, concentration of enzyme; concentration of substrate; product concentration; temperature effects and pH effects; factors causing a lowering of activation energy; proximity and orientation effects; substrate strain…

  4. The Catalytic Function of Enzymes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Splittgerber, Allan G.

    1985-01-01

    Discusses: structure of the enzyme molecule; active site; reaction mechanism; transition state; factors affecting enzyme reaction rates, concentration of enzyme; concentration of substrate; product concentration; temperature effects and pH effects; factors causing a lowering of activation energy; proximity and orientation effects; substrate strain…

  5. Promotion of extracellular lignocellulolytic enzymes production by restraining the intracellular β-glucosidase in Penicillium decumbens.

    PubMed

    Chen, Mei; Qin, Yuqi; Cao, Qing; Liu, Guodong; Li, Jie; Li, Zhonghai; Zhao, Jian; Qu, Yinbo

    2013-06-01

    In this study, the functions of β-glucosidases in regulation of the lignocellulolytic enzymes production in Penicillium decumbens 114-2 were investigated. The major extracellular β-glucosidase gene bgl1 and the major intracellular β-glucosidase gene bgl2 were deleted in P. decumbens 114-2 respectively. In Δbgl2, the production of extracellular lignocellulolytic enzymes (including endoglucanases, cellobiohydrolases and xylanases) on insoluble cellulose was significantly promoted, while in Δbgl1 there was no any difference compared with that of 114-2. The enhancement of the production of lignocellulolytic enzymes in Δbgl2 was likely attributed to the accumulation of intracellular cellobiose. Induction experiment in Δbgl1Δbgl2 showed that cellobiose was an inducer of lignocellulolytic enzymes expression in P. decumbens 114-2, and the induction was unrelated to the formation, if any, of gentiobiose or sophorose from cellobiose.

  6. Bacteriolytic Enzymes from Streptomycetes

    PubMed Central

    Welsch, Maurice

    1962-01-01

    A study of the bacteriolytic properties of streptomycetes has progressively uncovered the production by these microorganisms of a large number of different enzymes acting upon various bacterial constituents, especially on some of them located in the cell wall. Although the mechanism of the bacteriolysis is far from being completely elucidated at present, it can, however, be stated that, in two instances at least, it can be regarded as an osmotic explosion following upon the destruction of the structure responsible for the rigidity of the cell wall. PMID:14006056

  7. STUDIES ON ENZYME ACTION

    PubMed Central

    Falk, K. George; McGuire, Grace

    1921-01-01

    A number of different methods of treatment of unripe and ripe bananas for the purpose of obtaining and studying sucrolytic and amylolytic enzymes are described. No conclusive evidence of the presence of an amlyase could be obtained in any of the preparations. The sucrase of unripe and ripe bananas was studied more extensively. With ripe bananas, both soluble and insoluble sucrase preparations were obtained. Conditions for converting the soluble into an insoluble form were found. The actions of the sucrase preparations as far as the hydrogen ion concentration for maximum action and the time-action relation are concerned are similar to the behavior of the yeast and the potato sucrase. PMID:19871890

  8. Protein Crystal Malic Enzyme

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Malic Enzyme is a target protein for drug design because it is a key protein in the life cycle of intestinal parasites. After 2 years of effort on Earth, investigators were unable to produce any crystals that were of high enough quality and for this reason the structure of this important protein could not be determined. Crystals obtained from one STS-50 were of superior quality allowing the structure to be determined. This is just one example why access to space is so vital for these studies. Principal Investigator is Larry DeLucas.

  9. Protein Crystal Malic Enzyme

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Malic Enzyme is a target protein for drug design because it is a key protein in the life cycle of intestinal parasites. After 2 years of effort on Earth, investigators were unable to produce any crystals that were of high enough quality and for this reason the structure of this important protein could not be determined. Crystals obtained from one STS-50 were of superior quality allowing the structure to be determined. This is just one example why access to space is so vital for these studies. Principal Investigator is Larry DeLucas.

  10. Interfacial activation-based molecular bioimprinting of lipolytic enzymes.

    PubMed Central

    Mingarro, I; Abad, C; Braco, L

    1995-01-01

    Interfacial activation-based molecular (bio)-imprinting (IAMI) has been developed to rationally improve the performance of lipolytic enzymes in nonaqueous environments. The strategy combinedly exploits (i) the known dramatic enhancement of the protein conformational rigidity in a water-restricted milieu and (ii) the reported conformational changes associated with the activation of these enzymes at lipid-water interfaces, which basically involves an increased substrate accessibility to the active site and/or an induction of a more competent catalytic machinery. Six model enzymes have been assayed in several model reactions in nonaqueous media. The results, rationalized in light of the present biochemical and structural knowledge, show that the IAMI approach represents a straightforward, versatile method to generate manageable, activated (kinetically trapped) forms of lipolytic enzymes, providing under optimal conditions nonaqueous rate enhancements of up to two orders of magnitude. It is also shown that imprintability of lipolytic enzymes depends not only on the nature of the enzyme but also on the "quality" of the interface used as the template. PMID:7724558

  11. Interfacial activation-based molecular bioimprinting of lipolytic enzymes.

    PubMed

    Mingarro, I; Abad, C; Braco, L

    1995-04-11

    Interfacial activation-based molecular (bio)-imprinting (IAMI) has been developed to rationally improve the performance of lipolytic enzymes in nonaqueous environments. The strategy combinedly exploits (i) the known dramatic enhancement of the protein conformational rigidity in a water-restricted milieu and (ii) the reported conformational changes associated with the activation of these enzymes at lipid-water interfaces, which basically involves an increased substrate accessibility to the active site and/or an induction of a more competent catalytic machinery. Six model enzymes have been assayed in several model reactions in nonaqueous media. The results, rationalized in light of the present biochemical and structural knowledge, show that the IAMI approach represents a straightforward, versatile method to generate manageable, activated (kinetically trapped) forms of lipolytic enzymes, providing under optimal conditions nonaqueous rate enhancements of up to two orders of magnitude. It is also shown that imprintability of lipolytic enzymes depends not only on the nature of the enzyme but also on the "quality" of the interface used as the template.

  12. Simple Laboratory Exercise for Induction of Beta-Mannanase from "Aspergillus niger"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulimani, V. H.; Naganagouda, K.

    2010-01-01

    This laboratory experiment was designed for Biochemistry, Biotechnology, Microbiology, and Food Technology students of undergraduate and postgraduate courses. The experiment shows the advantages of using agricultural waste, copra mannan as potent inducer of [beta]-mannanase. The students were able to compare the enzyme induction by commercial…

  13. AN INTEGRATED PHARMACOKINETIC AND PHARMACODYNAMIC STUDY OF ARSENITE ACTION 2. HEME OXYGENASE INDUCTION IN MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Heme oxygenase (HO) is the rate-limiting enzyme in heme degradation and its activity has a significant impact on intracellular heme pools. Rat studies indicate that HO induction is a sensitive, dose-dependent response to arsenite (AsIII) exposure in both liver and kidney. The o...

  14. INDUCTION OF CYTOCHROME P450 ISOFORMS IN RAT LIVER BY TWO CONAZOLES, TRIADIMEFON AND MYCLOBUTANIL

    EPA Science Inventory

    1. This study was undertaken to examine the inductive effects of two triazole antifungal agents, myclobutanil and triadimefon on the expression of hepatic cytochrome P450 (CYP) genes and on the activities of CYP enzymes in male Sprague-Dawley rats. Rats were dosed by gavage for 1...

  15. Enhanced production of recombinant thermo-stable lipase in Escherichia coli at high induction temperature.

    PubMed

    Vélez, Ana Maria; Horta, Antonio Carlos Luperni; da Silva, Adilson José; Iemma, Mônica Rosas da Costa; Giordano, Raquel de Lima Camargo; Zangirolami, Teresa Cristina

    2013-08-01

    Thermostable microbial lipases are potential candidates for industrial applications such as specialty organic syntheses as well as hydrolysis of fats and oils. In this work, basic biochemical engineering tools were applied to enhance the production of BTL2 lipase cloned in Escherichia coli BL321 under control of the strong temperature-inducible λP(L) promoter. Initially, surface response analysis was used to assess the influence of growth and induction temperatures on enzyme production, in flask experiments. The results showed that temperatures of 30 and 45°C were the most suitable for growth and induction, respectively, and led to an enzyme specific activity of 706,000 U/gDCW. The most promising induction conditions previously identified were validated in fed-batch cultivation, carried out in a 2L bioreactor. Specific enzyme activity reached 770,000 U/gDCW, corresponding to 13,000 U/L of culture medium and a lipase protein concentration of 10.8 g/L. This superior performance on enzyme production was a consequence of the improved response of λP(L) promoter triggered by the high induction temperature applied (45°C). These results point out to the importance of taking into account protein structure and stability to adequately design the recombinant protein production strategy for thermally induced promoters. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Simple Laboratory Exercise for Induction of Beta-Mannanase from "Aspergillus niger"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulimani, V. H.; Naganagouda, K.

    2010-01-01

    This laboratory experiment was designed for Biochemistry, Biotechnology, Microbiology, and Food Technology students of undergraduate and postgraduate courses. The experiment shows the advantages of using agricultural waste, copra mannan as potent inducer of [beta]-mannanase. The students were able to compare the enzyme induction by commercial…

  17. Flexible heating head for induction heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, Robert L. (Inventor); Johnson, Samuel D. (Inventor); Coultrip, Robert H. (Inventor); Phillips, W. Morris (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    An induction heating head includes a length of wire having first and second opposite ends and being wound in a flat spiral shape to form an induction coil, a capacitor connected to the first and second ends of the wire, the induction coil and capacitor defining a tank circuit, and a flexible, elastomeric body molded to encase the induction coil. When a susceptor is placed in juxtaposition to the body, and the tank circuit is powered, the susceptor is inductively heated.

  18. Managing the Risk of CYP3A Induction in Drug Development: A Strategic Approach.

    PubMed

    Jones, Barry C; Rollison, Helen; Johansson, Susanne; Kanebratt, Kajsa P; Lambert, Craig; Vishwanathan, Karthick; Andersson, Tommy B

    2017-01-01

    Induction of cytochrome P450 (P450) can impact the efficacy and safety of drug molecules upon multiple dosing with coadministered drugs. This strategy is focused on CYP3A since the majority of clinically relevant cases of P450 induction are related to these enzymes. However, the in vitro evaluation of induction is applicable to other P450 enzymes; however, the in vivo relevance cannot be assessed because the scarcity of relevant clinical data. In the preclinical phase, compounds are screened using pregnane X receptor reporter gene assay, and if necessary structure-activity relationships (SAR) are developed. When projects progress toward the clinical phase, induction studies in a hepatocyte-derived model using HepaRG cells will generate enough robust data to assess the compound's induction liability in vivo. The sensitive CYP3A biomarker 4β-hydroxycholesterol is built into the early clinical phase I studies for all candidates since rare cases of in vivo induction have been found without any induction alerts from the currently used in vitro methods. Using this model, the AstraZeneca induction strategy integrates in vitro assays and in vivo studies to make a comprehensive assessment of the induction potential of new chemical entities. Convincing data that support the validity of both the in vitro models and the use of the biomarker can be found in the scientific literature. However, regulatory authorities recommend the use of primary human hepatocytes and do not advise the use of sensitive biomarkers. Therefore, primary human hepatocytes and midazolam studies will be conducted during the clinical program as required for regulatory submission.

  19. Induction of labour.

    PubMed

    Leduc, Dean; Biringer, Anne; Lee, Lily; Dy, Jessica

    2013-09-01

    Objectif : Analyser la littérature la plus récente afin de formuler des recommandations factuelles à l’intention des fournisseurs de soins obstétricaux au sujet du déclenchement du travail. Options : Mise en œuvre d’un déclenchement du travail dans le cadre d’une grossesse. Issues : Chronologie et méthode appropriées pour ce qui est du déclenchement, mode d’accouchement approprié et issues maternelles et périnatales optimales. Résultats : La littérature publiée a été récupérée par l’intermédiaire de recherches menées dans PubMed, CINAHL et The Cochrane Library en 2010, au moyen d’un vocabulaire contrôlé (p. ex. « labour », « induced », « labour induction », « cervical ripening ») et de mots clés (p. ex. « induce », « induction », « augmentation ») appropriés. Les résultats ont été restreints aux analyses systématiques, aux essais comparatifs randomisés / essais cliniques comparatifs et aux études observationnelles. Aucune restriction n’a été appliquée en matière de date ou de langue. Les recherches ont été mises à jour de façon régulière et intégrées à la directive clinique jusqu’à la fin de 2010. La littérature grise (non publiée) a été identifiée par l’intermédiaire de recherches menées dans les sites Web d’organismes s’intéressant à l’évaluation des technologies dans le domaine de la santé et d’organismes connexes, dans des collections de directives cliniques, dans des registres d’essais cliniques et auprès de sociétés de spécialité médicale nationales et internationales. Valeurs : La qualité des résultats est évaluée au moyen des critères décrits dans le rapport du Groupe d’étude canadien sur les soins de santé préventifs (Tableau 1). Validation : Les données, les déclarations sommaires et les recommandations que contient la présente directive clinique ont été vérifiées en les comparant à celles de directives

  20. 38 CFR 21.282 - Effective date of induction into a rehabilitation program; retroactive induction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... induction into a rehabilitation program; retroactive induction. 21.282 Section 21.282 Pensions, Bonuses, and... Vocational Rehabilitation and Employment Under 38 U.S.C. Chapter 31 Induction into A Rehabilitation Program § 21.282 Effective date of induction into a rehabilitation program; retroactive induction. (a)...

  1. Kinetic Measurements for Enzyme Immobilization.

    PubMed

    Cooney, Michael J

    2017-01-01

    Enzyme kinetics is the study of the chemical reactions that are catalyzed by enzymes, with a focus on their reaction rates. The study of an enzyme's kinetics considers the various stages of activity, reveals the catalytic mechanism of this enzyme, correlates its value to assay conditions, and describes how a drug or a poison might inhibit the enzyme. Victor Henri initially reported that enzyme reactions were initiated by a bond between the enzyme and the substrate. By 1910, Michaelis and Menten were advancing their work by studying the kinetics of an enzyme saccharase which catalyzes the hydrolysis of sucrose into glucose and fructose. They published their analysis and ever since the Michaelis-Menten equation has been used as the standard to describe the kinetics of many enzymes. Unfortunately, soluble enzymes must generally be immobilized to be reused for long times in industrial reactors. In addition, other critical enzyme properties have to be improved like stability, activity, inhibition by reaction products, and selectivity towards nonnatural substrates. Immobilization is by far the chosen process to achieve these goals.Although the Michaelis-Menten approach has been regularly adapted to the analysis of immobilized enzyme activity, its applicability to the immobilized state is limited by the barriers the immobilization matrix places upon the measurement of compounds that are used to model enzyme kinetics. That being said, the estimated value of the Michaelis-Menten coefficients (e.g., V max, K M) can be used to evaluate effects of immobilization on enzyme activity in the immobilized state when applied in a controlled manner. In this review enzyme activity and kinetics are discussed in the context of the immobilized state, and a few novel protocols are presented that address some of the unique constraints imposed by the immobilization barrier.

  2. Kinetic measurements for enzyme immobilization.

    PubMed

    Cooney, Michael J

    2011-01-01

    Enzyme kinetics is the study of the chemical reactions that are catalyzed by enzymes, with a focus on their reaction rates. The study of an enzyme's kinetics considers the various stages of activity, reveals the catalytic mechanism of the enzyme, correlates its value to assay conditions, and describes how a drug or a poison might inhibit the enzyme. Victor Henri initially reported that enzyme reactions were initiated by a bond between the enzyme and the substrate. By 1910, Michaelis and Menten had advanced this work by studying the kinetics of the enzyme saccharase, which catalyzes the hydrolysis of sucrose into glucose and fructose. They published their analysis, and ever since, the Michaelis-Menten equation has been used as the standard to describe the kinetics of many enzymes. Unfortunately, soluble enzymes must generally be immobilized to be reused for long times in industrial reactors. In addition, other critical enzyme properties have to be improved like stability, activity, inhibition by reaction products, selectivity toward nonnatural substrates. Immobilization is by far the chosen process to achieve these goals.Although the Michaelis-Menten approach has been regularly adopted for the analysis of immobilized enzyme activity, its applicability to the immobilized state is limited by the barriers the immobilization matrix places upon the measurement of compounds that are used to model enzyme kinetics. That being said, the estimated value of the Michaelis-Menten coefficients (e.g., V(max), K(M)) can be used to evaluate effects of immobilization on enzyme activity in the immobilized state when applied in a controlled manner. In this review, enzyme activity and kinetics are discussed in the context of the immobilized state, and a few novel protocols are presented that address some of the unique constraints imposed by the immobilization barrier.

  3. Calcium is essential for fructan synthesis induction mediated by sucrose in wheat.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Noël, Giselle; Tognetti, Jorge; Nagaraj, Vinay; Wiemken, Andres; Pontis, Horacio

    2006-12-01

    The role of Ca(2+) in the induction of enzymes involved in fructan synthesis (FSS) mediated by sucrose was studied in wheat (Triticum aestivum). Increase of FSS enzyme activity and induction of the expression of their coding genes by sucrose were inhibited in leaf blades treated with chelating agents (EDTA, EGTA and BAPTA). Ca(2+) channel blockers (lanthanum chloride and ruthenium red) also inhibited the FSS response to sucrose, suggesting the participation of Ca(2+) from both extra- and intra- cellular stores. Sucrose induced a rapid Ca(2+) influx into the cytosol in wheat leaf and root tissues, shown with the Ca(2+ )sensitive fluorescent probe Fluo-3/AM ester. Our results support the hypothesis that calcium is a component of the sucrose signaling pathway that leads to the induction of fructan synthesis.

  4. Enzymes, embryos, and ancestors.

    PubMed

    Gerhart, John

    2010-01-01

    In the 1950s, cellular regulatory mechanisms were newly recognized; with Arthur Pardee I investigated the initial enzyme of pyrimidine biosynthesis, which he discovered is controlled by feedback inhibition. The protein proved unusual in having separate but interacting sites for substrates and regulators. Howard Schachman and I dissociated the protein into different subunits, one binding regulators and one substrates. The enzyme became an early prime example of allostery. In developmental biology I studied the egg of the frog, Xenopus laevis, characterizing early processes of axis formation. My excellent students and I described cortical rotation, a 30° movement of the egg's cortex over tracks of parallel microtubules anchored to the underlying cytoplasmic core, and we perturbed it to alter Spemann's organizer and effect spectacular phenotypes. The entire sequence of events has been elucidated by others at the molecular level, making Xenopus a prime example of vertebrate axis formation. Marc Kirschner, Christopher Lowe, and I then compared hemichordate (half-chordate) and chordate early development. Despite anatomical-physiological differences, these groups share numerous steps of axis formation, ones that were probably already in use in their pre-Cambrian ancestor. I've thoroughly enjoyed exploring these areas during a 50-year period of great advances in biological sciences by the worldwide research community.

  5. The enzymic hydrolysis of amygdalin

    PubMed Central

    Haisman, D. R.; Knight, D. J.

    1967-01-01

    Chromatographic examination has shown that the enzymic hydrolysis of amygdalin by an almond β-glucosidase preparation proceeds consecutively: amygdalin was hydrolysed to prunasin and glucose; prunasin to mandelonitrile and glucose; mandelonitrile to benzaldehyde and hydrocyanic acid. Gentiobiose was not formed during the enzymic hydrolysis. The kinetics of the production of mandelonitrile and hydrocyanic acid from amygdalin by the action of the β-glucosidase preparation favour the probability that three different enzymes are involved, each specific for one hydrolytic stage, namely, amygdalin lyase, prunasin lyase and hydroxynitrile lyase. Cellulose acetate electrophoresis of the enzyme preparation showed that it contained a number of enzymically active components. PMID:4291788

  6. The enzymic hydrolysis of amygdalin.

    PubMed

    Haisman, D R; Knight, D J

    1967-05-01

    Chromatographic examination has shown that the enzymic hydrolysis of amygdalin by an almond beta-glucosidase preparation proceeds consecutively: amygdalin was hydrolysed to prunasin and glucose; prunasin to mandelonitrile and glucose; mandelonitrile to benzaldehyde and hydrocyanic acid. Gentiobiose was not formed during the enzymic hydrolysis. The kinetics of the production of mandelonitrile and hydrocyanic acid from amygdalin by the action of the beta-glucosidase preparation favour the probability that three different enzymes are involved, each specific for one hydrolytic stage, namely, amygdalin lyase, prunasin lyase and hydroxynitrile lyase. Cellulose acetate electrophoresis of the enzyme preparation showed that it contained a number of enzymically active components.

  7. Bacterial sulfite-oxidizing enzymes.

    PubMed

    Kappler, Ulrike

    2011-01-01

    Enzymes belonging to the Sulfite Oxidase (SO) enzyme family are found in virtually all forms of life, and are especially abundant in prokaryotes as shown by analysis of available genome data. Despite this fact, only a limited number of bacterial SO family enzymes has been characterized in detail to date, and these appear to be involved in very different metabolic processes such as energy generation from sulfur compounds, host colonization, sulfite detoxification and organosulfonate degradation. The few characterized bacterial SO family enzymes also show an intriguing range of structural conformations, including monomeric, dimeric and heterodimeric enzymes with varying numbers and types of redox centres. Some of the bacterial enzymes even catalyze novel reactions such as dimethylsulfoxide reduction that previously had been thought not to be catalyzed by SO family enzymes. Classification of the SO family enzymes based on the structure of their Mo domain clearly shows that three distinct groups of enzymes belong to this family, and that almost all SOEs characterized to date are representatives of the same group. The widespread occurrence and obvious structural and functional plasticity of the bacterial SO family enzymes make this an exciting field for further study, in particular the unraveling of the metabolic roles of the three enzyme groups, some of which appear to be associated almost exclusively with pathogenic microorganisms. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Industrial use of immobilized enzymes.

    PubMed

    DiCosimo, Robert; McAuliffe, Joseph; Poulose, Ayrookaran J; Bohlmann, Gregory

    2013-08-07

    Although many methods for enzyme immobilization have been described in patents and publications, relatively few processes employing immobilized enzymes have been successfully commercialized. The cost of most industrial enzymes is often only a minor component in overall process economics, and in these instances, the additional costs associated with enzyme immobilization are often not justified. More commonly the benefit realized from enzyme immobilization relates to the process advantages that an immobilized catalyst offers, for example, enabling continuous production, improved stability and the absence of the biocatalyst in the product stream. The development and attributes of several established and emerging industrial applications for immobilized enzymes, including high-fructose corn syrup production, pectin hydrolysis, debittering of fruit juices, interesterification of food fats and oils, biodiesel production, and carbon dioxide capture are reviewed herein, highlighting factors that define the advantages of enzyme immobilization.

  9. Characterising Complex Enzyme Reaction Data

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Syed Asad; Thornton, Janet M.

    2016-01-01

    The relationship between enzyme-catalysed reactions and the Enzyme Commission (EC) number, the widely accepted classification scheme used to characterise enzyme activity, is complex and with the rapid increase in our knowledge of the reactions catalysed by enzymes needs revisiting. We present a manual and computational analysis to investigate this complexity and found that almost one-third of all known EC numbers are linked to more than one reaction in the secondary reaction databases (e.g., KEGG). Although this complexity is often resolved by defining generic, alternative and partial reactions, we have also found individual EC numbers with more than one reaction catalysing different types of bond changes. This analysis adds a new dimension to our understanding of enzyme function and might be useful for the accurate annotation of the function of enzymes and to study the changes in enzyme function during evolution. PMID:26840640

  10. Technological inductive power transfer systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madzharov, Nikolay D.; Nemkov, Valentin S.

    2017-05-01

    Inductive power transfer is a very fast expanding technology with multiple design principles and practical implementations ranging from charging phones and computers to bionic systems, car chargers and continuous power transfer in technological lines. Only a group of devices working in near magnetic field is considered. This article is devoted to overview of different inductive power transfer (IPT) devices. The review of literature in this area showed that industrial IPT are not much discussed and examined. The authors have experience in design and implementation of several types of IPTs belonging to wireless automotive chargers and to industrial application group. Main attention in the article is paid to principles and design of technological IPTs

  11. Closed inductively coupled plasma cell

    DOEpatents

    Manning, T.J.; Palmer, B.A.; Hof, D.E.

    1990-11-06

    A closed inductively coupled plasma cell generates a relatively high power, low noise plasma for use in spectroscopic studies is disclosed. A variety of gases can be selected to form the plasma to minimize spectroscopic interference and to provide a electron density and temperature range for the sample to be analyzed. Grounded conductors are placed at the tube ends and axially displaced from the inductive coil, whereby the resulting electromagnetic field acts to elongate the plasma in the tube. Sample materials can be injected in the plasma to be excited for spectroscopy. 1 fig.

  12. Closed inductively coupled plasma cell

    DOEpatents

    Manning, Thomas J.; Palmer, Byron A.; Hof, Douglas E.

    1990-01-01

    A closed inductively coupled plasma cell generates a relatively high power, low noise plasma for use in spectroscopic studies. A variety of gases can be selected to form the plasma to minimize spectroscopic interference and to provide a electron density and temperature range for the sample to be analyzed. Grounded conductors are placed at the tube ends and axially displaced from the inductive coil, whereby the resulting electromagnetic field acts to elongate the plasma in the tube. Sample materials can be injected in the plasma to be excited for spectroscopy.

  13. Induction linacs and pulsed power

    SciTech Connect

    Caporaso, G.J.

    1995-07-11

    Progress in electronic power conversion technology is making possible a new class of induction linacs that can operate at extremely high repetition rates. Advances in insulator technology, pulse forming line design and switching may also lead to a new type of high current accelerator with accelerating gradients at least an order of magnitude greater than those attainable today. The evolution of the induction accelerator pulsed power system will be discussed along with some details of these emerging technologies which are at the frontiers of accelerator technology.

  14. Stacked insulator induction accelerator gaps

    SciTech Connect

    Houck, T.I.; Westenskow, G.A.; Kim, J.S.; Eylon, S.; Henestroza, E.; Yu, S.S.; Vanecek, D.

    1997-05-01

    Stacked insulators, with alternating layers of insulating material and conducting film, have been shown to support high surface electrical field stresses. We have investigated the application of the stacked insulator technology to the design of induction accelerator modules for the Relativistic-Klystron Two-Beam Accelerator program. The rf properties of the accelerating gaps using stacked insulators, particularly the impedance at frequencies above the beam pipe cutoff frequency, are investigated. Low impedance is critical for Relativistic-Klystron Two-Beam Accelerator applications where a high current, bunched beam is trsnsported through many accelerating gaps. An induction accelerator module designs using a stacked insulator is presented.

  15. Herbal product–drug interactions mediated by induction

    PubMed Central

    Tirona, Rommel G; Bailey, David G

    2006-01-01

    Despite their common use, it is not widely recognized that herbal medicines can alter the efficacy of coadministered prescription drugs. Constituents in herbs interact with nuclear receptors to enhance metabolizing enzyme and/or transporter activity leading to reduced drug concentrations. Although St John’s wort was the first and most frequently reported source of induction-style herb–drug interactions, this knowledge has not yet changed its current availability. This type of interaction is likely to be relevant to other herbal products. Caregivers need to be aware of the issues and options for therapeutic management. PMID:16722828

  16. Targeted proteomics using selected reaction monitoring reveals the induction of specific terpene synthases in a multi-level study of methyl jasmonate-treated Norway spruce (Picea abies).

    PubMed

    Zulak, Katherine G; Lippert, Dustin N; Kuzyk, Michael A; Domanski, Dominik; Chou, Tina; Borchers, Christoph H; Bohlmann, Jörg

    2009-12-01

    Induction of terpene synthase (TPS) gene expression and enzyme activity is known to occur in response to various chemical and biological stimuli in several species of spruce (genus Picea). However, high sequence identity between TPS family members has made it difficult to determine the induction patterns of individual TPS at the protein and transcript levels and whether specific TPS enzymes respond differentially to treatment. In the present study we used a multi-level approach to measure the induction and activity of TPS enzymes in protein extracts of Norway spruce (Picea abies) bark tissue following treatment with methyl jasmonate (MeJA). Measurements were made on the transcript, protein, enzyme activity and metabolite levels. Using a relatively new proteomics application, selective reaction monitoring (SRM), it was possible to differentiate and quantitatively measure the abundance of several known TPS proteins and three 1-deoxy-D-xylulose 5-phosphate synthase (DXS) isoforms in Norway spruce. Protein levels of individual TPS and DXS enzymes were differentially induced upon MeJA treatment and good correlation was generally observed between induction of transcripts, proteins, and enzyme activities. Most of the mono- and diterpenoid metabolites accumulated with similar temporal patterns of induction as part of the coordinated multi-compound chemical defense response. Protein and enzyme activity levels of the monoTPS (+)-3-carene synthase and the corresponding accumulation of (+)-3-carene was induced to a higher fold change than any other TPS or metabolite measured, indicating an important role in the induced terpenoid defense response in Norway spruce.

  17. Evolution of Enzyme Kinetic Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Ulusu, Nuriye Nuray

    2015-06-01

    This review paper discusses the reciprocal kinetic behaviours of enzymes and the evolution of structure-function dichotomy. Kinetic mechanisms have evolved in response to alterations in ecological and metabolic conditions. The kinetic mechanisms of single-substrate mono-substrate enzyme reactions are easier to understand and much simpler than those of bi-bi substrate enzyme reactions. The increasing complexities of kinetic mechanisms, as well as the increasing number of enzyme subunits, can be used to shed light on the evolution of kinetic mechanisms. Enzymes with heterogeneous kinetic mechanisms attempt to achieve specific products to subsist. In many organisms, kinetic mechanisms have evolved to aid survival in response to changing environmental factors. Enzyme promiscuity is defined as adaptation to changing environmental conditions, such as the introduction of a toxin or a new carbon source. Enzyme promiscuity is defined as adaptation to changing environmental conditions, such as the introduction of a toxin or a new carbon source. Enzymes with broad substrate specificity and promiscuous properties are believed to be more evolved than single-substrate enzymes. This group of enzymes can adapt to changing environmental substrate conditions and adjust catalysing mechanisms according to the substrate's properties, and their kinetic mechanisms have evolved in response to substrate variability.

  18. Thermostable enzymes in lignocellulose hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Viikari, Liisa; Alapuranen, Marika; Puranen, Terhi; Vehmaanperä, Jari; Siika-Aho, Matti

    2007-01-01

    Thermostable enzymes offer potential benefits in the hydrolysis of lignocellulosic substrates; higher specific activity decreasing the amount of enzymes, enhanced stability allowing improved hydrolysis performance and increased flexibility with respect to process configurations, all leading to improvement of the overall economy of the process. New thermostable cellulase mixtures were composed of cloned fungal enzymes for hydrolysis experiments. Three thermostable cellulases, identified as the most promising enzymes in their categories (cellobiohydrolase, endoglucanase and beta-glucosidase), were cloned and produced in Trichoderma reesei and mixed to compose a novel mixture of thermostable cellulases. Thermostable xylanase was added to enzyme preparations used on substrates containing residual hemicellulose. The new optimised thermostable enzyme mixtures were evaluated in high temperature hydrolysis experiments on technical steam pretreated raw materials: spruce and corn stover. The hydrolysis temperature could be increased by about 10-15 degrees C, as compared with present commercial Trichoderma enzymes. The same degree of hydrolysis, about 90% of theoretical, measured as individual sugars, could be obtained with the thermostable enzymes at 60 degrees C as with the commercial enzymes at 45 degrees C. Clearly more efficient hydrolysis per assayed FPU unit or per amount of cellobiohydrolase I protein used was obtained. The maximum FPU activity of the novel enzyme mixture was about 25% higher at the optimum temperature at 65 degrees C, as compared with the highest activity of the commercial reference enzyme at 60 degrees C. The results provide a promising basis to produce and formulate improved enzyme products. These products can have high temperature stability in process conditions in the range of 55-60 degrees C (with present industrial products at 45-50 degrees C) and clearly improved specific activity, essentially decreasing the protein dosage required for an

  19. Inductively coupled helium plasma torch

    DOEpatents

    Montaser, Akbar; Chan, Shi-Kit; Van Hoven, Raymond L.

    1989-01-01

    An inductively coupled plasma torch including a base member, a plasma tube and a threaded insert member within the plasma tube for directing the plasma gas in a tangential flow pattern. The design of the torch eliminates the need for a separate coolant gas tube. The torch can be readily assembled and disassembled with a high degree of alignment accuracy.

  20. Teaching the Photoelectric Effect Inductively

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sokolowski, Andrzej

    2013-01-01

    Research has shown that students have difficulty understanding the underlying process of the photoelectric effect. Thus, this study sought to utilize an inductively situated lesson for teaching the photoelectric effect, hypothesizing that this type of enquiry would help learners delve deeper into the principles of the phenomenon and provide a…

  1. Employment Conditions and Induction Opportunities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, J. A.; D'Arcy, J. M.

    1987-01-01

    Teachers who were newly trained in Northern Ireland in 1985 and who found employment completed a questionnaire regarding their participation in either external or school-based induction programs. Secondary teachers were compared with primary teachers. Results are discussed. (Author/MT)

  2. Induction Year or Staff Development?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bailey, Patrick

    1975-01-01

    The changes taking place in education require of teachers an unprecedented professional re-orientation and growth. Much of this can be done effectively only by a collective effort within the school. Staff development, including the induction of probationary teachers, is the organizing of a systematic response to these many changes. (Author/IRT)

  3. Teaching Inductive Reasoning with Puzzles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wanko, Jeffrey J.

    2017-01-01

    Working with language-independent logic structures can help students develop both inductive and deductive reasoning skills. The Japanese publisher Nikoli (with resources available both in print and online) produces a treasure trove of language-independent logic puzzles. The Nikoli print resources are mostly in Japanese, creating the extra…

  4. An Adaptive Superintendent Induction Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brandon, Jim; Donlevy, Kent; Hanna, Paulette; Gereluk, Dianne; Patterson, Peggy; Rhyason, Kath

    2014-01-01

    This study examined a recently established induction program for new superintendents in the Canadian province of Alberta over a three-year period. In keeping with principles of design-based research data were collected from a variety of sources from the 26 new superintendents and their 25 mentors to assess and adjust programming through three…

  5. Experiments with an induction cooker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zilavy, Peter

    2009-11-01

    The induction cooker is a common appliance nowadays. How does it work? Why is it not possible to use aluminium utensils with it? What experiments can be carried out with it (at different levels) and not only in physics lessons? Searching for the answers to these and other questions is the purpose of this article.

  6. Direct-reading inductance meter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolbly, R. B.

    1977-01-01

    Meter indicates from 30 nH to 3 micro H. Reference inductor of 15 micro H is made by winding 50 turns of Number 26 Formvar wire on Micrometal type 50-2 (or equivalent) core. Circuit eliminates requirement for complex instrument compensation prior to taking coil inductance measurement and thus is as easy to operate as common ohmmeter.

  7. Experiments with an Induction Cooker

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zilavy, Peter

    2009-01-01

    The induction cooker is a common appliance nowadays. How does it work? Why is it not possible to use aluminium utensils with it? What experiments can be carried out with it (at different levels) and not only in physics lessons? Searching for the answers to these and other questions is the purpose of this article. (Contains 5 figures.)

  8. The Inductive Teaching of English.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steinberg, Erwin R.; And Others

    The inductive-method teacher sees himself as part of a process of learning rather than as dispenser of knowledge. He structures classroom situations in which students discover answers and concepts for themselves. He selects material and guides class work, but concentrates on how a student learns, developing a carefully-guided sequence of questions…

  9. Experiments with an Induction Cooker

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zilavy, Peter

    2009-01-01

    The induction cooker is a common appliance nowadays. How does it work? Why is it not possible to use aluminium utensils with it? What experiments can be carried out with it (at different levels) and not only in physics lessons? Searching for the answers to these and other questions is the purpose of this article. (Contains 5 figures.)

  10. Mathematical Induction: Deductive Logic Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dogan, Hamide

    2016-01-01

    Many studies mentioned the deductive nature of Mathematical Induction (MI) proofs but almost all fell short in explaining its potential role in the formation of the misconceptions reported in the literature. This paper is the first of its kind looking at the misconceptions from the perspective of the abstract of the deductive logic from one's…

  11. Plasma-heating by induction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrington, K.; Thorpe, M. L.

    1969-01-01

    Induction-heated plasma torch operates with an input of 1 Mw of direct current of which 71 percent is transferred to the plasma and the remainder is consumed by electrical losses in the system. Continuous operation of the torch should be possible for as long as 5,000 hours.

  12. Teaching the Photoelectric Effect Inductively

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sokolowski, Andrzej

    2013-01-01

    Research has shown that students have difficulty understanding the underlying process of the photoelectric effect. Thus, this study sought to utilize an inductively situated lesson for teaching the photoelectric effect, hypothesizing that this type of enquiry would help learners delve deeper into the principles of the phenomenon and provide a…

  13. Induction generator powered coaxial launchers

    SciTech Connect

    Nalty, K.E.; Driga, M.D. . Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering)

    1991-01-01

    Most coaxial accelerator concepts to date have used switched power supplies to energize coils in the vicinity of the projectile, or have tolerated a grossly oversized power supply which energizes all coils during the course of the launch. Coordination of the switching, while engineeringly possible, provides opportunities for failure which reduces the reliability of the system as compared to a passively activated system requiring no switching. Excitation of un-used sections of a launcher dramatically reduces launch efficiency, and increases both power supply and cooling requirements. A launcher design which avoids the need for switching and automatically excites only the windings in the vicinity of the projectile is presented in this paper. The energy store for the launcher consists of rotating induction machines. The excitation for the launcher is provided by an excitation winding on the projectile, which makes the projectile act like the rotor of a synchronous condenser. This combination of super-synchronous induction machines (the energy stores) and synchronous alternators (the projectile) is called an induction generator. This paper provides a description of the induction generator powered launcher concept, and investigates scaling laws to assess the applicability of this technology for tactical and space launch applications.

  14. The Inductive Teaching of English.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steinberg, Erwin R.; And Others

    The inductive-method teacher sees himself as part of a process of learning rather than as dispenser of knowledge. He structures classroom situations in which students discover answers and concepts for themselves. He selects material and guides class work, but concentrates on how a student learns, developing a carefully-guided sequence of questions…

  15. High average power induction accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Swingle, J.C.

    1985-10-01

    The induction accelerator is discussed with respect to general background and concept, beam transport, scaling, pulse power technology, and the electron beam injector. A discussion of the factors which affect the scaling of the intensity of the beam is given. Limiting factors include collective forces in the beam, virtual cathode formation, surroundings, and beam breakup instability. 24 refs., 11 figs. (WRF)

  16. Detection of novel enzyme intermediates in PEP-utilizing enzymes.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Karen S

    2005-01-01

    This review will focus on established and newly emerging strategies for identifying and characterizing enzyme intermediates using a rapid transient kinetic approach. The merits of this methodology as well as the basics of experimental design are described. Several illustrative examples of PEP-utilizing enzymes have been chosen as they all perform unique, novel chemistries involving enzyme intermediates and have proven to be exciting pharmaceutical targets for antibiotics and herbicides. A novel application of this approach using time-resolved electrospray mass spectrometry to detect chemically labile enzyme intermediates is also discussed.

  17. VITAMIN AND THYROID STATUS IN ARCTIC GRAYLING (THYMALLUS ARCTICUS) EXPOSED TO DOSES OF 3, 3', 4, 4'-TETRACHLOROBIPHENYL THAT INDUCE THE PHASE I ENZYME SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Induction of phase I biotransformation enzymes is recognized as a hallmark response in fish exposed to coplanar PCBs. Depletions of vitamins A and E and disrupted thyroid hormone and glandular structure secondary to this induction have not yet been examined in an arctic fish spec...

  18. Enzyme molecules in solitary confinement.

    PubMed

    Liebherr, Raphaela B; Gorris, Hans H

    2014-09-12

    Large arrays of homogeneous microwells each defining a femtoliter volume are a versatile platform for monitoring the substrate turnover of many individual enzyme molecules in parallel. The high degree of parallelization enables the analysis of a statistically representative enzyme population. Enclosing individual enzyme molecules in microwells does not require any surface immobilization step and enables the kinetic investigation of enzymes free in solution. This review describes various microwell array formats and explores their applications for the detection and investigation of single enzyme molecules. The development of new fabrication techniques and sensitive detection methods drives the field of single molecule enzymology. Here, we introduce recent progress in single enzyme molecule analysis in microwell arrays and discuss the challenges and opportunities.

  19. DGAT enzymes and triacylglycerol biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Yen, Chi-Liang Eric; Stone, Scot J.; Koliwad, Suneil; Harris, Charles; Farese, Robert V.

    2008-01-01

    Triacylglycerols (triglycerides) (TGs) are the major storage molecules of metabolic energy and FAs in most living organisms. Excessive accumulation of TGs, however, is associated with human diseases, such as obesity, diabetes mellitus, and steatohepatitis. The final and the only committed step in the biosynthesis of TGs is catalyzed by acyl-CoA:diacylglycerol acyltransferase (DGAT) enzymes. The genes encoding two DGAT enzymes, DGAT1 and DGAT2, were identified in the past decade, and the use of molecular tools, including mice deficient in either enzyme, has shed light on their functions. Although DGAT enzymes are involved in TG synthesis, they have distinct protein sequences and differ in their biochemical, cellular, and physiological functions. Both enzymes may be useful as therapeutic targets for diseases. Here we review the current knowledge of DGAT enzymes, focusing on new advances since the cloning of their genes, including possible roles in human health and diseases. PMID:18757836

  20. Differential regulation of hepatic enzymes by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and glucocorticoids

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, J.A.; Linder, M.W.; Fernandez, D.; Prough, R.A. )

    1991-03-15

    A putative glucocorticoid (GC) response element has been identified within the first intron of the P450IA1 gene and is apparently necessary for GC-dependent potentiation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) induction of P450IA1. In cultured rat hepatocytes, the synthetic GC, dexamethasone (DEX), potentiated PAH induction of both P450IA1 and glutathione S-transferase protein and mRNA. However, DEX caused a small decrease in PAH-dependent induction of NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase (QOR) subunit protein and mRNA in culture. The potentiation of 3-methylcholanthrene (MC) dependent induction of hepatic P450IA1, GST and QOR by low doses of DEX was evaluated in neonatal and adult rats. In neonates, MC induction was potentiated 2-, 1.5-, and 1.4-fold for P450IA1, GST, and QOR activities, respectively, by DEX. However, in adult rats, DEX potentiated MC induction of P450IA1 activity, but repressed MC induction of GST and QOR. Western immunoanalysis and Northern analysis indicated that the changes in these activities were associated with parallel changes in the levels of immunoreactive proteins and mRNA. Glucocorticoids may have an age-dependent influence on the induction of hepatic enzymes by PAH possibly involving other regulatory factors, in addition to Ah and GC receptors.

  1. Enzyme actuated bioresponsive hydrogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Andrew Nolan

    Bioresponsive hydrogels are emerging with technological significance in targeted drug delivery, biosensors and regenerative medicine. Conferred with the ability to respond to specific biologically derived stimuli, the design challenge is in effectively linking the conferred biospecificity with an engineered response tailored to the needs of a particular application. Moreover, the fundamental phenomena governing the response must support an appropriate dynamic range and limit of detection. The design of these systems is inherently complicated due to the high interdependency of the governing phenomena that guide the sensing, transduction, and the actuation response of hydrogels. To investigate the dynamics of these materials, model systems may be used which seek to interrogate the system dynamics by uni-variable experimentation and limit confounding phenomena such as: polymer-solute interactions, polymer swelling dynamics and biomolecular reaction-diffusion concerns. To this end, a model system, alpha-chymotrypsin (Cht) (a protease) and a cleavable peptide-chromogen (pro-drug) covalently incorporated into a hydrogel, was investigated to understand the mechanisms of covalent loading and release by enzymatic cleavage in bio-responsive delivery systems. Using EDC and Sulfo-NHS, terminal carboxyl groups of N-succinyl-Ala-Ala-Pro-Phe p-nitroanilide, a cleavable chromogen, were conjugated to primary amines of a hydrated poly(HEMA)-based hydrogel. Hydrogel discs were incubated in buffered Cht causing enzyme-mediated cleavage of the peptide and concomitant release of the chromophore for monitoring. To investigate substrate loading and the effects of hydrogel morphology on the system, the concentration of the amino groups (5, 10, 20, and 30 mol%) and the cross-linked density (1, 5, 7, 9 and 12 mol%) were independently varied. Loading-Release Efficiency of the chromogen was shown to exhibit a positive relation to increasing amino groups (AEMA). The release rates demonstrated a

  2. Rapid induction of the synthesis of phenylalanine ammonia-lyase and of chalcone synthase in elicitor-treated plant cells.

    PubMed

    Lawton, M A; Dixon, R A; Hahlbrock, K; Lamb, C

    1983-01-01

    Changes in the rate of synthesis of phenylalanine ammonia-lyase and chalcone synthase, two characteristic enzymes of phenylpropanoid biosynthesis, have been investigated by direct immunoprecipitation of in vivo [35S]methionine-labelled enzyme subunits in elicitor-treated cells of dwarf French bean (Phaseolus vulgaris). Elicitor, heat-released from cell walls of Colletotrichum lindemuthianum, the causal agent of anthracnose disease of bean, causes marked but transient increases in the rates of synthesis of both enzymes concomitant with the phase of rapid increase in enzyme activity at the onset of phaseollin accumulation during the phytoalexin defence response. Increased rates of synthesis of both enzymes can be observed 20 min after elicitor treatment and the pattern of induction of synthesis of phenylalanine ammonia-lyase and chalcone synthase are broadly similar with respect to elicitor concentration and time, maximum rates of synthesis being attained between 2.5 h and 3.0 h after elicitor treatment. Within this overall co-ordination small but distinct differences between the enzymes were observed in: (a) the elicitor concentrations giving maximum enzyme synthesis, and (b) the precise timing of maximum enzyme synthesis, with that for chalcone synthase occurring 20-30 min earlier than that for phenylalanine ammonia-lyase. However, for a given rate of enzyme synthesis, induction of the activities of phenylalanine ammonia-lyase and chalcone synthase is more efficient at high elicitor concentrations. This may reflect the operation under certain circumstances of post-translational control of the activity levels of these enzymes as implicated for phenylalanine ammonia-lyase by previous density-labelling experiments [Lawton et al. (1980) Biochim. Biophys. Acta, 633, 162-175]. The same pattern of induction of enzyme synthesis is observed with elicitor preparations from a variety of sources.

  3. Carbonic anhydrase enzymes regulate mast cell-mediated inflammation.

    PubMed

    Henry, Everett K; Sy, Chandler B; Inclan-Rico, Juan M; Espinosa, Vanessa; Ghanny, Saleena S; Dwyer, Daniel F; Soteropoulos, Patricia; Rivera, Amariliz; Siracusa, Mark C

    2016-08-22

    Type 2 cytokine responses are necessary for the development of protective immunity to helminth parasites but also cause the inflammation associated with allergies and asthma. Recent studies have found that peripheral hematopoietic progenitor cells contribute to type 2 cytokine-mediated inflammation through their enhanced ability to develop into mast cells. In this study, we show that carbonic anhydrase (Car) enzymes are up-regulated in type 2-associated progenitor cells and demonstrate that Car enzyme inhibition is sufficient to prevent mouse mast cell responses and inflammation after Trichinella spiralis infection or the induction of food allergy-like disease. Further, we used CRISPR/Cas9 technology and illustrate that genetically editing Car1 is sufficient to selectively reduce mast cell development. Finally, we demonstrate that Car enzymes can be targeted to prevent human mast cell development. Collectively, these experiments identify a previously unrecognized role for Car enzymes in regulating mast cell lineage commitment and suggest that Car enzyme inhibitors may possess therapeutic potential that can be used to treat mast cell-mediated inflammation. © 2016 Henry et al.

  4. Carbonic anhydrase enzymes regulate mast cell–mediated inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Soteropoulos, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    Type 2 cytokine responses are necessary for the development of protective immunity to helminth parasites but also cause the inflammation associated with allergies and asthma. Recent studies have found that peripheral hematopoietic progenitor cells contribute to type 2 cytokine–mediated inflammation through their enhanced ability to develop into mast cells. In this study, we show that carbonic anhydrase (Car) enzymes are up-regulated in type 2–associated progenitor cells and demonstrate that Car enzyme inhibition is sufficient to prevent mouse mast cell responses and inflammation after Trichinella spiralis infection or the induction of food allergy–like disease. Further, we used CRISPR/Cas9 technology and illustrate that genetically editing Car1 is sufficient to selectively reduce mast cell development. Finally, we demonstrate that Car enzymes can be targeted to prevent human mast cell development. Collectively, these experiments identify a previously unrecognized role for Car enzymes in regulating mast cell lineage commitment and suggest that Car enzyme inhibitors may possess therapeutic potential that can be used to treat mast cell–mediated inflammation. PMID:27526715

  5. Phage lytic enzymes: a history.

    PubMed

    Trudil, David

    2015-02-01

    There are many recent studies regarding the efficacy of bacteriophage-related lytic enzymes: the enzymes of 'bacteria-eaters' or viruses that infect bacteria. By degrading the cell wall of the targeted bacteria, these lytic enzymes have been shown to efficiently lyse Gram-positive bacteria without affecting normal flora and non-related bacteria. Recent studies have suggested approaches for lysing Gram-negative bacteria as well (Briersa Y, et al., 2014). These enzymes include: phage-lysozyme, endolysin, lysozyme, lysin, phage lysin, phage lytic enzymes, phageassociated enzymes, enzybiotics, muralysin, muramidase, virolysin and designations such as Ply, PAE and others. Bacteriophages are viruses that kill bacteria, do not contribute to antimicrobial resistance, are easy to develop, inexpensive to manufacture and safe for humans, animals and the environment. The current focus on lytic enzymes has been on their use as anti-infectives in humans and more recently in agricultural research models. The initial translational application of lytic enzymes, however, was not associated with treating or preventing a specific disease but rather as an extraction method to be incorporated in a rapid bacterial detection assay (Bernstein D, 1997).The current review traces the translational history of phage lytic enzymes-from their initial discovery in 1986 for the rapid detection of group A streptococcus in clinical specimens to evolving applications in the detection and prevention of disease in humans and in agriculture.

  6. Induction generator-induction motor wind-powered pumping system

    SciTech Connect

    Miranda, M.S.; Lyra, R.O.C.; Silva, S.R.

    1997-12-31

    The energy storage matter plays an important role in wind-electric conversion systems for isolated applications. Having that in mind, two different approaches can be basically considered: either the immediate conversion of the generated electric energy, as in a water pumping system or electric energy storage for later use, as in a battery charging system. Due to some features such as no need of an external reactive power source and, sometimes, a gearbox, permanent-magnet synchronous generators have been broadly used in low rated power isolated systems. Despite that, system performance can be affected when the generator is feeding an inductive load (e.g., an induction motor) under variable-speed-variable-frequency operational conditions. Since there is no effective flux control, motor overload may occur at high wind speeds. Thus, good system performance can be obtained through additional control devices which may increase system cost. Although being rugged and cheap, induction machines always work as a reactive power drain; therefore, they demand an external reactive power source. Considering that, reactive static compensators appear as an attractive alternative to the cost x performance problem. In addition to that, different control strategies can be used so that system performance can be improved.

  7. Digestive Enzyme Replacement Therapy: Pancreatic Enzymes and Lactase.

    PubMed

    Felicilda-Reynaldo, Rhea Faye D; Kenneally, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Maldigestion occurs when digestive enzymes are lacking to help break complex food components into absorbable nutrients within the gastrointestinal tract. Education is needed to help patients manage the intricacies of digestive enzyme replacement therapies and ensure their effectiveness in reducing symptoms of maldigestion.

  8. Removable preheater elements improve oxide induction furnace

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leipold, M. H.

    1964-01-01

    Heat and corrosion resistant preheater elements are used in oxide induction furnaces to raise the temperature to the level for conducting electricity. These preheater elements are then removed and the induction coil energized.

  9. Enzymic synthesis of isoflavones.

    PubMed

    Kochs, G; Grisebach, H

    1986-03-03

    The NADPH and oxygen-dependent conversion of (2S)-naringenin to genistein catalyzed by a microsomal preparation from elicitor-treated soybean cell suspension cultures has been resolved into two steps. In the first step (2S)-naringenin is converted to a product (P-2) which yields genistein in a second step. The chemical behaviour of P-2 and its ultraviolet and mass spectral data are consistent with a 2-hydroxyisoflavanone structure. The conversion of (2S)-naringenin to P-2 requires NADPH, oxygen and cytochrome P-450. The participation of cytochrome P-450 was demonstrated by CO inhibition of the reaction and its partial reversal by light, and by inhibition with typical cytochrome P-450 inhibitors. On a Percoll gradient the membrane fraction which catalyzes P-2 formation coincides with marker enzymes for the endoplasmic reticulum and with the position of cytochrome P-450. Enzymatic activity for conversion of P-2 to genistein is mainly present in the supernatant of the 160 000 X g fraction. This reaction, formally a dehydration, does not require NADPH or oxygen.

  10. [The rise of enzyme engineering in China].

    PubMed

    Li, Gaoxiang

    2015-06-01

    Enzyme engineering is an important part of the modern biotechnology. Industrial biocatalysis is considered the third wave of biotechnology following pharmaceutical and agricultural waves. In 25 years, China has made a mighty advances in enzyme engineering research. This review focuses on enzyme genomics, enzyme proteomics, biosynthesis, microbial conversion and biosensors in the Chinese enzyme engineering symposiums and advances in enzyme preparation industry in China.

  11. Computational enzyme design: transitioning from catalytic proteins to enzymes.

    PubMed

    Mak, Wai Shun; Siegel, Justin B

    2014-08-01

    The widespread interest in enzymes stem from their ability to catalyze chemical reactions under mild and ecologically friendly conditions with unparalleled catalytic proficiencies. While thousands of naturally occurring enzymes have been identified and characterized, there are still numerous important applications for which there are no biological catalysts capable of performing the desired chemical transformation. In order to engineer enzymes for which there is no natural starting point, efforts using a combination of quantum chemistry and force-field based protein molecular modeling have led to the design of novel proteins capable of catalyzing chemical reactions not catalyzed by naturally occurring enzymes. Here we discuss the current status and potential avenues to pursue as the field of computational enzyme design moves forward.

  12. Induction brazing at the Kennedy Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clautice, W. E.

    1974-01-01

    A description of the joint design, materials, equipment, qualification testing, inspection methods, and applications involved in performing induction brazing on hyperbolic propellants tubing at Kennedy Space Center. Induction brazing is a form of brazing in which the energy is transmitted to the workpiece by electrical induction; the eddy currents generated in the metal produce heat by resistance losses. Since induction heating is fast and highly localized, undesirable heat effects are minimized and the resulting braze is of high quality.

  13. Induction brazing at the Kennedy Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clautice, W. E.

    1974-01-01

    A description of the joint design, materials, equipment, qualification testing, inspection methods, and applications involved in performing induction brazing on hyperbolic propellants tubing at Kennedy Space Center. Induction brazing is a form of brazing in which the energy is transmitted to the workpiece by electrical induction; the eddy currents generated in the metal produce heat by resistance losses. Since induction heating is fast and highly localized, undesirable heat effects are minimized and the resulting braze is of high quality.

  14. Differential transcriptional responses underlie dietary induction of intestinal carbohydrase activities in house sparrow nestlings.

    PubMed

    Gatica-Sosa, C; Brzęk, P; Chediack, J G; Cid, F D; Karasov, W H; Caviedes-Vidal, E

    2016-04-01

    Many species show diet-induced flexibility of activity of intestinal enzymes; however, molecular and genetic mechanisms responsible for such modulation are less known, particularly in altricial birds. The goal of our study was to test whether a diet-induced increase in activity of intestinal maltase and sucrase in house sparrow nestlings is matched with an increase in maltase-glucoamylase (MG) and sucrase-isomaltase (SI) complex mRNAs respectively. Both enzyme activities were significantly higher in mid-intestine of nestlings fed a medium-starch (MS) diet compared to those fed a starch-free (SF) diet. In contrast to the similar pattern of dietary induction for both enzyme activities, diet MS elevated significantly only the level of MG mRNA, but not SI mRNA. The coordinated increase in activity of maltase and in MG mRNA is consistent with the hypothesis that dietary induction of this enzyme is under transcriptional control. In contrast, the lack of such coordination for changes in activity of sucrase and SI mRNA suggests that upregulation of this enzyme may be achieved by post-translational factor(s). We conclude that genetic mechanisms responsible for diet-induced flexibility of digestive enzymes in birds may differ from that observed in mammals. Journal of Animal Physiology and Animal Nutrition © 2015 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  15. Teacher Induction. NEA Aspects of Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reinhartz, Judy, Ed.

    The following articles are included in this publication on beginning teacher induction: (1) "The Teacher Induction Process: Preserving the Old and Welcoming the New. An Introduction" (Judy Reinhartz); (2) "A Synthesis of Research on Teacher Induction Programs and Practices" (Leslie Huling-Austin); (3)…

  16. Propofol Induction's Effect on Cardiac Function

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-03-31

    This Study Was Focused to Evaluate Feasibility of Doppler Tissue Monitoring During the Induction Anesthesia,; and Evaluate Routine Propofol Induction's Effect on Myocardial Tissue Motion, Using Non-invasive Doppler Tissue and 2D Speckle Tracking Imaging.; This is the First Study, to Our Knowledge, Which Has Evaluated the Possible Impact of Propofol Induction on LV Function.

  17. Energy saving concepts relating to induction generators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nola, F. J.

    1980-01-01

    Energy saving concepts relating to induction generators are presented. The first describes a regenerative scheme using an induction generator as a variable load for prime movers under test is described. A method for reducing losses in induction machines used specifically as wind driven generators is also described.

  18. Structured Statistical Models of Inductive Reasoning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kemp, Charles; Tenenbaum, Joshua B.

    2009-01-01

    Everyday inductive inferences are often guided by rich background knowledge. Formal models of induction should aim to incorporate this knowledge and should explain how different kinds of knowledge lead to the distinctive patterns of reasoning found in different inductive contexts. This article presents a Bayesian framework that attempts to meet…

  19. Advantages and guidelines for mask induction.

    PubMed

    Paddleford, R R

    1992-03-01

    Inhalational agents with low blood/gas solubilities (halothane, isoflurane, and nitrous oxide) are preferred for mask induction. A gradual step up in the vaporizer concentration is the recommended induction method because it is generally smoother and safer than the crash induction technique.

  20. A Retrospective Appraisal of Teacher Induction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nasser-Abu Alhija, Fadia M.; Fresko, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Examination of an induction program for new teachers was undertaken from the viewpoint of induction graduates three years after participation. Their retrospective perspectives were investigated as to their satisfaction with assimilation in school in the induction year, their attitudes towards organizational aspects of the program, and the…

  1. NCTAF/GSU Induction Project. Final Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Black, Linda; Neel, John H.; Benson, Gwen

    2008-01-01

    The National Commission on Teaching and America's Future (NCTAF) and Georgia State University (GSU) developed a model for induction of new teachers in urban high need schools. A model induction program, developed over the three-year implementation period, includes: (1) The BRIDGE (Building Resources: Induction and Development for Georgia…

  2. Carbon-free induction furnace

    DOEpatents

    Holcombe, Cressie E.; Masters, David R.; Pfeiler, William A.

    1985-01-01

    An induction furnace for melting and casting highly pure metals and alloys such as uranium and uranium alloys in such a manner as to minimize contamination of the melt by carbon derived from the materials and the environment within the furnace. The subject furnace is constructed of carbon free materials and is housed within a conventional vacuum chamber. The furnace comprises a ceramic oxide crucible for holding the charge of metal or alloy. The heating of the crucible is achieved by a plasma-sprayed tungsten susceptor surrounding the crucible which, in turn, is heated by an RF induction coil separated from the susceptor by a cylinder of inorganic insulation. The furnace of the present invention is capable of being rapidly cycled from ambient temperatures to about 1650.degree. C. for effectively melting uranium and uranium alloys without the attendant carbon contamination problems previously encountered when using carbon-bearing furnace materials.

  3. Non-carbon induction furnace

    DOEpatents

    Holcombe, C.E.; Masters, D.R.; Pfeiler, W.A.

    1984-01-06

    The present invention is directed to an induction furnace for melting and casting highly pure metals and alloys such as uranium and uranium alloys in such a manner as to minimize contamination of the melt by carbon derived from the materials and the environment within the furnace. The subject furnace is constructed of non-carbon materials and is housed within a conventional vacuum chamber. The furnace comprises a ceramic oxide crucible for holding the charge of metal or alloys. The heating of the crucible is achieved by a plasma-sprayed tungsten susceptor surrounding the crucible which, in turn, is heated by an rf induction coil separated from the susceptor by a cylinder of inorganic insulation. The furnace of the present invention is capable of being rapidly cycled from ambient temperatures to about 1650/sup 0/C for effectively melting uranium and uranium alloys without the attendant carbon contamination problems previously encountered when using carbon-bearing furnace materials.

  4. Teaching the photoelectric effect inductively

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolowski, Andrzej

    2013-01-01

    Research has shown that students have difficulty understanding the underlying process of the photoelectric effect. Thus, this study sought to utilize an inductively situated lesson for teaching the photoelectric effect, hypothesizing that this type of enquiry would help learners delve deeper into the principles of the phenomenon and provide a better background for its quantification. The lesson was conducted with a group of fifteen high-school physics students and a computerized simulated experiment was utilized as the medium for instruction. Students’ responses to a qualitative question about the role of a battery in the photoelectric circuit supported the hypothesis that the lesson was a valuable learning experience. This paper presents an outline for the inductively reasoned learning process.

  5. Online Monitoring of Induction Motors

    SciTech Connect

    McJunkin, Timothy R.; Agarwal, Vivek; Lybeck, Nancy Jean

    2016-01-01

    The online monitoring of active components project, under the Advanced Instrumentation, Information, and Control Technologies Pathway of the Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program, researched diagnostic and prognostic models for alternating current induction motors (IM). Idaho National Laboratory (INL) worked with the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) to augment and revise the fault signatures previously implemented in the Asset Fault Signature Database of EPRI’s Fleet Wide Prognostic and Health Management (FW PHM) Suite software. Induction Motor diagnostic models were researched using the experimental data collected by Idaho State University. Prognostic models were explored in the set of literature and through a limited experiment with 40HP to seek the Remaining Useful Life Database of the FW PHM Suite.

  6. Electromagnetic induction in the moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonett, C. P.

    1982-01-01

    The moon constitutes a nonhydromagnetic, but electrically conducting, target for the solar wind whose response reaches a peak as frequency increases and diminishes with further increase in frequency, suggesting the presence of the magnetic quadrupole moment. Magnetometer measurements of induction using Explorer and Apollo instruments are studied from both the harmonic and transient standpoint, and the resulting determination of internal bulk electrical conductivity is discussed. The closeness of the estimated internal temperature to the Ringwood-Essene solidus at 150-250 km depths suggests a layer of enhanced conductivity in lieu of high temperature. A reduced core radius estimate with a one-sigma upper limit of 360 km is reported. The discussion of lunar electrodynamics presented is restricted to the problem of induction, with only passing reference to flow fields and regional electric fields.

  7. Blackout cloth for dormancy induction

    Treesearch

    Tom Jopson

    2007-01-01

    The use of blackout cloth to create long night photoperiods for the induction of dormancy in certain conifer species has been an established practice for a long time. Its use was suggested by Tinus and McDonald (1979) as an effective technique, and the practice has been commonly used in Canadian forest nurseries for a number of years. Cal-Forest Nursery installed its...

  8. A Theory of Collective Induction

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-01-23

    case binomial theorem for two alternatives (correct and incorrect) to the general case multinomial theorem for three or more alternatives. They also...conviction or acquital. An important exception is the four verdict categories, first-degree murder, second-degree murder, manslaughter, and not guilty, of...hypotheses will occur only if all members propose different hypotheses. In this case the probability of a I I I I I INIW Collective Induction 12 new

  9. Segmented rail linear induction motor

    DOEpatents

    Cowan, Jr., Maynard; Marder, Barry M.

    1996-01-01

    A segmented rail linear induction motor has a segmented rail consisting of a plurality of nonferrous electrically conductive segments aligned along a guideway. The motor further includes a carriage including at least one pair of opposed coils fastened to the carriage for moving the carriage. A power source applies an electric current to the coils to induce currents in the conductive surfaces to repel the coils from adjacent edges of the conductive surfaces.

  10. Segmented rail linear induction motor

    DOEpatents

    Cowan, M. Jr.; Marder, B.M.

    1996-09-03

    A segmented rail linear induction motor has a segmented rail consisting of a plurality of nonferrous electrically conductive segments aligned along a guideway. The motor further includes a carriage including at least one pair of opposed coils fastened to the carriage for moving the carriage. A power source applies an electric current to the coils to induce currents in the conductive surfaces to repel the coils from adjacent edges of the conductive surfaces. 6 figs.

  11. Inductive shearing of drilling pipe

    DOEpatents

    Ludtka, Gerard M.; Wilgen, John; Kisner, Roger; Mcintyre, Timothy

    2016-04-19

    Induction shearing may be used to cut a drillpipe at an undersea well. Electromagnetic rings may be built into a blow-out preventer (BOP) at the seafloor. The electromagnetic rings create a magnetic field through the drillpipe and may transfer sufficient energy to change the state of the metal drillpipe to shear the drillpipe. After shearing the drillpipe, the drillpipe may be sealed to prevent further leakage of well contents.

  12. Metal ions as enzyme effectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medyantseva, El'vina P.; Vertlib, Margarita G.; Budnikov, German K.

    1998-03-01

    The role of metal ions as enzyme effectors is considered. Data on inhibitory and activating effects of metal ions are summarised. The dual character of action of the effectors depending on their concentration and the nature of the enzyme is highlighted. The analytical applications of these effects are discussed. The bibliography includes 66 references.

  13. Making the Rate: Enzyme Dynamics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ragsdale, Frances R.

    2004-01-01

    An enzyme exercise to address the problem of students inability to visualize chemical reaction at the molecular level is described. This exercise is designed as a dry lab exercise but can be modified into a classroom activity then can be augmented by a wet lab procedure, thereby providing students with a practical exposure to enzyme function.

  14. Making the Rate: Enzyme Dynamics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ragsdale, Frances R.

    2004-01-01

    An enzyme exercise to address the problem of students inability to visualize chemical reaction at the molecular level is described. This exercise is designed as a dry lab exercise but can be modified into a classroom activity then can be augmented by a wet lab procedure, thereby providing students with a practical exposure to enzyme function.

  15. Teacher Induction: A New Beginning. Papers from the National Commission on the Induction Process.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brooks, Douglas M., Ed.

    The following papers are included in this monograph that provides a synthesis on beginning teacher induction: (1) "Teacher Induction" (Leslie Huling-Austin); (2) "Local Induction Programs" (Ralph Kester and Mary Marockie); (3) "Statewide Teacher Induction Programs" (Parmalee Hawk and Shirley Robards); (4) "The…

  16. First-Year Undergraduate Induction: Who Attends and How Important Is Induction for First Year Attainment?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murtagh, S.; Ridley, A.; Frings, D.; Kerr-Pertic, S.

    2017-01-01

    The first year of study in higher education is a time of major transition for students. While the importance of induction has been widely demonstrated, there is evidence to suggest that not all students benefit equally from participation in induction. This study examined attendance rates at induction, the relationship between induction attendance…

  17. Quality Teacher Induction: "Fourth-Wave" (1997-2006) Induction Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, Ann L.; Stanulis, Randi Nevins

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this essay is to describe quality teacher induction that has evolved from "fourth-wave" (1997-2006) teacher induction program development and research. A definition of quality induction is proposed, and a set of induction goals and components are outlined. Understandings gained from fourth-wave programs are described, including ways…

  18. Traveling-wave induction launchers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elliott, David G.

    1989-01-01

    An analysis of traveling-wave induction launchers shows that induction is a feasible method of producing armature current and that efficient accelerators can be built without sliding contacts or arcs. In a traveling-wave induction launcher the armature current is induced by a slip speed between the armature and a traveling magnetic field. At 9 m/s slip speed a 9 kg projectile with an aluminum armature weighing 25 percent of the total mass can be accelerated to 3000 m/s in a 5 m-long barrel with a total ohmic loss in the barrel coils and armature of 4 percent of the launch kinetic energy and with an average armature temperature rise of 220 deg C, but a peak excitation frequency of 8600 Hz is required. With a 2 kg launch mass the ohmic loss is 7 percent. A launcher system optimized for rotating generators would have a peak frequency of 4850 Hz; with an aluminum armature weighing 33 percent of the launch mass and a slip speed of 30 m/s the total ohmic loss in the generators, cables, and accelerator would be 43 percent of the launch kinetic energy, and the average armature temperature rise would be 510 deg C.

  19. Two fluxes multistage induction coilgun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gherman, L.; Pearsica, M.; Circiu, I.; Rotaru, C.

    2017-05-01

    This paper presents a brand new induction electromagnetic launcher, which uses two magnetic fluxes in order to accelerate a projectile. One magnetic flux induce a current in the armature and the second magnetic flux is creating a radial magnetic field. This aproach offer multiple advantages over single flux designs. First we are able to control the induced current in armature because we use the coil just to induce current inside the ring with a great efficiency. Second advantage is the angle of 900 between magnetic field density B and the ring. We used the induction to avoid contact between armature and accelerator. In order to create the magnetic field radial we used four coils perpendicular on armature. This approach alove us to control the phase difference between induced current in armature and current in magnetic field coils for a maximum force. The phase difference is obtained by changing the frequency of magnetic field coils power source. We used simulation software to analyze, and simulate a multistage induction coilgun design with two fluxes. The simulation results demonstrated the theoretical results.

  20. Energy harvesting via ferrofluidic induction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monroe, J. G.; Vasquez, Erick S.; Aspin, Zachary S.; Fairley, John D.; Walters, Keisha B.; Berg, Matthew J.; Thompson, Scott M.

    2015-05-01

    A series of experiments were conducted to investigate and characterize the concept of ferrofluidic induction - a process for generating electrical power via cyclic oscillation of ferrofluid (iron-based nanofluid) through a solenoid. Experimental parameters include: number of bias magnets, magnet spacing, solenoid core, fluid pulse frequency and ferrofluid-particle diameter. A peristaltic pump was used to cyclically drive two aqueous ferrofluids, consisting of 7-10 nm iron-oxide particles and commercially-available hydroxyl-coated magnetic beads (~800 nm), respectively. The solutions were pulsated at 3, 6, and 10 Hz through 3.2 mm internal diameter Tygon tubing. A 1000 turn copper-wire solenoid was placed around the tube 45 cm away from the pump. The experimental results indicate that the ferrofluid is capable of inducing a maximum electric potential of approximately +/- 20 μV across the solenoid during its cyclic passage. As the frequency of the pulsating flow increased, the ferro-nanoparticle diameter increased, or the bias magnet separation decreased, the induced voltage increased. The type of solenoid core material (copper or plastic) did not have a discernible effect on induction. These results demonstrate the feasibility of ferrofluidic induction and provide insight into its dependence on fluid/flow parameters. Such fluidic/magneto-coupling can be exploited for energy harvesting and/or conversion system design for a variety of applications.