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Sample records for enzyme prodrug therapy

  1. Substrate Mediated Enzyme Prodrug Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Fejerskov, Betina; Zelikin, Alexander N.

    2012-01-01

    In this report, we detail Substrate Mediated Enzyme Prodrug Therapy (SMEPT) as a novel approach in drug delivery which relies on enzyme-functionalized cell culture substrates to achieve a localized conversion of benign prodrug(s) into active therapeutics with subsequent delivery to adhering cells or adjacent tissues. For proof-of-concept SMEPT, we use surface adhered micro-structured physical hydrogels based on poly(vinyl alcohol), β-glucuronidase enzyme and glucuronide prodrugs. We demonstrate enzymatic activity mediated by the assembled hydrogel samples and illustrate arms of control over rate of release of model fluorescent cargo. SMEPT was not impaired by adhering cells and afforded facile time - and dose – dependent uptake of the in situ generated fluorescent cargo by hepatic cells, HepG2. With the use of a glucuronide derivative of an anticancer drug, SN-38, SMEPT afforded a decrease in cell viability to a level similar to that achieved using parent drug. Finally, dose response was achieved using SMEPT and administration of judiciously chosen concentration of SN-38 glucuronide prodrug thus revealing external control over drug delivery using drug eluting surface. We believe that this highly adaptable concept will find use in diverse biomedical applications, specifically surface mediated drug delivery and tissue engineering. PMID:23152927

  2. PDEPT: polymer-directed enzyme prodrug therapy

    PubMed Central

    Satchi, R; Connors, T A; Duncan, R

    2001-01-01

    Polymer-directed enzyme prodrug therapy (PDEPT) is a novel two-step antitumour approach using a combination of a polymeric prodrug and polymer-enzyme conjugate to generate cytotoxic drug selectively at the tumour site. In this study the polymeric prodrug N-(2-hydroxypropyl) methacrylamide (HPMA) copolymer-Gly-Phe-Leu-Gly-doxorubicin conjugate PK1 (currently under Phase II clinical evaluation) was selected as the model prodrug, and HPMA copolymer-cathepsin B as a model for the activating enzyme conjugate. Following polymer conjugation (yield of 30–35%) HPMA copolymer-cathepsin B retained ~20–25% enzymatic activity in vitro. To investigate pharmacokinetics in vivo,125I-labelled HPMA copolymer-cathepsin B was administered intravenously (i.v.) to B16F10 tumour-bearing mice. HPMA copolymer-cathespin B exhibited a longer plasma half-life (free cathepsin B t1/2α= 2.8 h; bound cathepsin B t1/2α= 3.2 h) and a 4.2-fold increase in tumour accumulation compared to the free enzyme. When PK1 (10 mg kg−1dox-equiv.) was injected i.v. into C57 mice bearing subcutaneously (s.c.) palpable B16F10 tumours followed after 5 h by HPMA copolymer-cathepsin B there was a rapid increase in the rate of dox release within the tumour (3.6-fold increase in the AUC compared to that seen for PK1 alone). When PK1 and the PDEPT combination were used to treat established B16F10 melanoma tumour (single dose; 10 mg kg−1dox-equiv.), the antitumour activity (T/C%) seen for the combination PDEPT was 168% compared to 152% seen for PK1 alone, and 144% for free dox. Also, the PDEPT combination showed activity against a COR-L23 xenograft whereas PK1 did not. PDEPT has certain advantages compared to ADEPT and GDEPT. The relatively short plasma residence time of the polymeric prodrug allows subsequent administration of polymer-enzyme without fear of prodrug activation in the circulation and polymer-enzyme conjugates have reduced immunogenicity. This study proves the concept of PDEPT and

  3. Macrophage mediated PCI enhanced gene-directed enzyme prodrug therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christie, Catherine E.; Zamora, Genesis; Kwon, Young J.; Berg, Kristian; Madsen, Steen J.; Hirschberg, Henry

    2015-03-01

    Photochemical internalization (PCI) is a photodynamic therapy-based approach for improving the delivery of macromolecules and genes into the cell cytosol. Prodrug activating gene therapy (suicide gene therapy) employing the transduction of the E. coli cytosine deaminase (CD) gene into tumor cells, is a promising method. Expression of this gene within the target cell produces an enzyme that converts the nontoxic prodrug, 5-FC, to the toxic metabolite, 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). 5-FC may be particularly suitable for brain tumors, because it can readily cross the bloodbrain barrier (BBB). In addition the bystander effect, where activated drug is exported from the transfected cancer cells into the tumor microenvironment, plays an important role by inhibiting growth of adjacent tumor cells. Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) are frequently found in and around glioblastomas. Monocytes or macrophages (Ma) loaded with drugs, nanoparticles or photosensitizers could therefore be used to target tumors by local synthesis of chemo attractive factors. The basic concept is to combine PCI, to enhance the ex vivo transfection of a suicide gene into Ma, employing specially designed core/shell NP as gene carrier.

  4. Antibody directed enzyme prodrug therapy (ADEPT): a three phase system.

    PubMed

    Sharma, S K; Bagshawe, K D; Springer, C J; Burke, P J; Rogers, G T; Boden, J A; Antoniw, P; Melton, R G; Sherwood, R F

    1991-01-01

    Monoclonal anti-CEA antibody, A5B7, and its fragments conjugated to CPG2 localize to a peak concentration in the LS174T xenografts within 24 h after injection, but enzyme activity persists in plasma such that prodrug injection has to be delayed for 5-6 days in order to avoid toxicity. Injection of prodrug at this time did not result in growth delay of this tumour. A three-phase system has been developed in which residual plasma enzyme was inactivated and cleared by a galactosylated anti-CPG2 antibody, SB43gal, allowing prodrug administration within 24 h after the conjugate. Using this three-phase system, a marked growth delay of this tumour was achieved after a single course of treatment consisting of conjugate injection followed by SB43gal, 19 h later and three doses of the prodrug.

  5. Horseradish peroxidase-encapsulated chitosan nanoparticles for enzyme-prodrug cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Cao, Xiaodan; Chen, Chao; Yu, Haijun; Wang, Ping

    2015-01-01

    Among various enzyme-based therapies, enzyme-prodrug therapy (EPT) promises minimized side effects in that it activates non-toxic prodrugs locally where the enzymes are placed. The success of such an approach requires high enzyme stability against both structural denaturation and potential immunogenicity. This work examines the efficiency of nanoparticles for enzyme protection in EPT applications. Specifically, horseradish peroxidase (HRP)-encapsulated chitosan nanoparticles (HRP-CSNP) were constructed and examined with respect to stability enhancement. HRP-CSNP retained enzyme activity and had improved stability at 37 °C in the presence of a denaturant, urea. The nanoparticles effectively bound to the surface of human breast cancer cell Bcap37 and led to over 80 % cell death when applied with a prodrug indole-3-acetic acid. PMID:25257586

  6. Nitroreductase gene-directed enzyme prodrug therapy: insights and advances toward clinical utility.

    PubMed

    Williams, Elsie M; Little, Rory F; Mowday, Alexandra M; Rich, Michelle H; Chan-Hyams, Jasmine V E; Copp, Janine N; Smaill, Jeff B; Patterson, Adam V; Ackerley, David F

    2015-10-15

    This review examines the vast catalytic and therapeutic potential offered by type I (i.e. oxygen-insensitive) nitroreductase enzymes in partnership with nitroaromatic prodrugs, with particular focus on gene-directed enzyme prodrug therapy (GDEPT; a form of cancer gene therapy). Important first indications of this potential were demonstrated over 20 years ago, for the enzyme-prodrug pairing of Escherichia coli NfsB and CB1954 [5-(aziridin-1-yl)-2,4-dinitrobenzamide]. However, it has become apparent that both the enzyme and the prodrug in this prototypical pairing have limitations that have impeded their clinical progression. Recently, substantial advances have been made in the biodiscovery and engineering of superior nitroreductase variants, in particular development of elegant high-throughput screening capabilities to enable optimization of desirable activities via directed evolution. These advances in enzymology have been paralleled by advances in medicinal chemistry, leading to the development of second- and third-generation nitroaromatic prodrugs that offer substantial advantages over CB1954 for nitroreductase GDEPT, including greater dose-potency and enhanced ability of the activated metabolite(s) to exhibit a local bystander effect. In addition to forging substantial progress towards future clinical trials, this research is supporting other fields, most notably the development and improvement of targeted cellular ablation capabilities in small animal models, such as zebrafish, to enable cell-specific physiology or regeneration studies.

  7. Optimization of alkylating agent prodrugs derived from phenol and aniline mustards: a new clinical candidate prodrug (ZD2767) for antibody-directed enzyme prodrug therapy (ADEPT).

    PubMed

    Springer, C J; Dowell, R; Burke, P J; Hadley, E; Davis, D H; Blakey, D C; Melton, R G; Niculescu-Duvaz, I

    1995-12-22

    Sixteen novel potential prodrugs derived from phenol or aniline mustards and their 16 corresponding drugs with ring substitution and/or different alkylating functionalities were designed. The [[[4-]bis(2-bromoethyl)-(1a), [[[4-[bis(2-iodoethyl)-(1b), and [[[4-[(2-chloroethyl)-[2-(mesyloxy)ethyl]amino]phenyl]oxy] carbonyl]-L-glutamic acids (1c), their [[[2- and 3-substituted-4-[bis(2-chloroethyl)amino]phenyl]oxy]carbonyl]-L- glutamic acids (1e-1), and the [[3-substituted-4-[bis(2-chloroethyl)amino]phenyl]carbamoyl]-L- glutamic acids (1o-r) were synthesized. They are bifunctional alkylating agents in which the activating effect of the phenolic hydroxyl or amino function is masked through an oxycarbonyl or a carbamoyl bond to a glutamic acid. These prodrugs were designed to be activated to their corresponding phenol and aniline nitrogen mustard drugs at a tumor site by prior administration of a monoclonal antibody conjugated to the bacterial enzyme carboxypeptidase G2 (CPG2) in antibody-directed enzyme prodrug therapy (ADEPT). The synthesis of the analogous novel parent drugs (2a-r) is also described. The viability of a colorectal cell line (LoVo) was monitored with the potential prodrugs and the parent drugs. The differential in the cytotoxicity between the potential prodrugs and their corresponding active drugs ranged between 12 and > 195 fold. Compounds 1b-d,f,o exhibited substantial prodrug activity, since a cytotoxicity differential of > 100 was achieved compared to 2b-d,f,o respectively. The ability of the potential prodrugs to act as substrates for CPG2 was determined (kinetic parameters KM and kcat), and the chemical stability was measured for all the compounds. The unsubstituted phenols with different alkylating functionalities (1a-c) proved to have the highest ratio of the substrates kcat:KM. From these studies [[[4-[bis(2-iodoethyl)amino]phenyl]oxy]carbonyl]-L-glutamic acid (1b) emerges as a new ADEPT clinical trial candidate due to its physicochemical and

  8. Neural Stem Cell-Mediated Enzyme-Prodrug Therapy for Glioma: Preclinical Studies

    PubMed Central

    Aboody, Karen S.; Najbauer, Joseph; Metz, Marianne Z.; D’Apuzzo, Massimo; Gutova, Margarita; Annala, Alexander J.; Synold, Timothy W.; Couture, Larry A.; Blanchard, Suzette; Moats, Rex A.; Garcia, Elizabeth; Aramburo, Soraya; Valenzuela, Valerie V.; Frank, Richard T.; Barish, Michael E.; Brown, Christine E.; Kim, Seung U.; Badie, Behnam; Portnow, Jana

    2013-01-01

    High-grade gliomas are extremely difficult to treat because they are invasive and therefore are not curable by surgical resection; the toxicity of currently chemo- and radiation therapies limits the doses that can be used. Neural stem cells (NSCs) have inherent tumor-tropic properties that enable their use as delivery vehicles that can target enzyme/prodrug therapy selectively to tumors. We have used a cytosine deaminase (CD)-expressing clonal human NSC line, HB1.F3.CD, to home to gliomas in mice and locally convert the tumor-localized prodrug 5-fluorocytosine to the active chemotherapeutic 5-fluorouracil. In vitro studies confirmed that the NSCs have normal karyotype, tumor tropism, and CD expression, indicating that these cells are genetically and functionally stable. In vivo biodistribution studies demonstrated that these NSCs retained tumor tropism, even in mice pre-treated with radiation or dexamethasone to mimic clinically relevant adjuvant therapies. We evaluated safety and toxicity after intracerebral administration of the NSCs in non-tumor bearing, and in orthotopic glioma-bearing, immunocompetent and immunodeficient mice. We detected no difference in toxicity associated with conversion of 5-fluorocytosine to 5-fluorouracil, no NSCs outside the brain, and no histological evidence of pathology or tumorigenesis attributable to the NSCs. The average tumor volume in mice that received HB1.F3.CD NSCs and 5-fluorocytosine was approximately one-third that of the average volume in control mice. On the basis of these results, we conclude that combination therapy with HB1.F3.CD NSCs and 5-fluorocytosine is safe, non-toxic and effective in mice. These data have led to approval of a first-inhuman study of an allogeneic NSC-mediated enzyme/prodrug targeted cancer therapy in patients with recurrent high-grade glioma. PMID:23658244

  9. Modular adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vectors used for cellular virus-directed enzyme prodrug therapy.

    PubMed

    Hagen, Sven; Baumann, Tobias; Wagner, Hanna J; Morath, Volker; Kaufmann, Beate; Fischer, Adrian; Bergmann, Stefan; Schindler, Patrick; Arndt, Katja M; Müller, Kristian M

    2014-01-01

    The pre-clinical and clinical development of viral vehicles for gene transfer increased in recent years, and a recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) drug took center stage upon approval in the European Union. However, lack of standardization, inefficient purification methods and complicated retargeting limit general usability. We address these obstacles by fusing rAAV-2 capsids with two modular targeting molecules (DARPin or Affibody) specific for a cancer cell-surface marker (EGFR) while simultaneously including an affinity tag (His-tag) in a surface-exposed loop. Equipping these particles with genes coding for prodrug converting enzymes (thymidine kinase or cytosine deaminase) we demonstrate tumor marker specific transduction and prodrug-dependent apoptosis of cancer cells. Coding terminal and loop modifications in one gene enabled specific and scalable purification. Our genetic parts for viral production adhere to a standardized cloning strategy facilitating rapid prototyping of virus directed enzyme prodrug therapy (VDEPT). PMID:24457557

  10. Recent progress in gene-directed enzyme prodrug therapy: an emerging cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Both, Gerald W

    2009-08-01

    The principle of gene-directed enzyme prodrug therapy (GDEPT) has existed for many years but, while simple in concept, the effective practical application of this therapy has proven to be challenging. Improvements in the efficacy of GDEPT have been achieved principally through the choice and development of more effective vectors, by optimizing and controlling gene expression and by increasing the activity of the delivered enzyme through mutation. While innovation continues in this field, the pioneering GDEPT systems designed to treat glioma and prostate cancer have completed or are now entering late-stage clinical trials, respectively. As the pace of innovation in GDEPT technology far exceeds its clinical application, these initial products are anticipated to be replaced by next-generation biologicals. This review highlights recent progress in the strategies and development of GDEPT and summarizes the status of current clinical trials. With the first GDEPT product for treatment of resected gliomas poised to gain marketing approval, a new era in cancer gene medicine is emerging. PMID:19649987

  11. A Fusion Protein of RGD4C and β-Lactamase Has a Favorable Targeting Effect in Its Use in Antibody Directed Enzyme Prodrug Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hao; Zhou, Xiao-Liang; Long, Wei; Liu, Jin-Jian; Fan, Fei-Yue

    2015-01-01

    Antibody directed enzyme prodrug therapy (ADEPT) utilizing β-lactamase is a promising treatment strategy to enhance the therapeutic effect and safety of cytotoxic agents. In this method, a conjugate (antibody-β-lactamase fusion protein) is employed to precisely activate nontoxic cephalosporin prodrugs at the tumor site. A major obstacle to the clinical translation of this method, however, is the low catalytic activity and high immunogenicity of the wild-type enzymes. To overcome this challenge, we fused a cyclic decapeptide (RGD4C) targeting to the integrin with a β-lactamase variant with reduced immunogenicity which retains acceptable catalytic activity for prodrug hydrolysis. Here, we made a further investigation on its targeting effect and pharmacokinetic properties, the results demonstrated that the fusion protein retains a targeting effect on integrin positive cells and has acceptable pharmacokinetic characteristics, which benefits its use in ADEPT. PMID:25927583

  12. Silk-Elastinlike Hydrogel Improves the Safety of Adenovirus-Mediated Gene-Directed Enzyme-Prodrug Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Gustafson, Joshua A.; Price, Robert A.; Greish, Khaled; Cappello, Joseph; Ghandehari, Hamidreza

    2010-01-01

    Recombinant Silk-Elastinlike Protein polymers (SELPs) are well-known for their highly tunable properties on both the molecular and macroscopic hydrogel level. One specific structure of these polymers, SELP-815K, has been investigated as an injectable controlled delivery system for the treatment of head and neck cancer via a gene-directed enzyme prodrug therapy (GDEPT) approach. Due to its pore size and gelation properties in vivo, SELP restricts the distribution and controls the release of therapeutic viruses for up to one month. It has been shown that SELP-mediated delivery significantly improves therapeutic outcome of the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSVtk)/ganciclovir (GCV) system in xenograft models of human head and neck cancer. However little is known about potential benefits of this approach with regard to toxicity in the presence of a fully intact immune system. The studies presented here were designed to assess the change in toxicity of the SELP mediated viral delivery compared to free viral injection in a non-tumor bearing immune competent mouse model. Toxicity was assessed at 1, 2, 4, and 12 weeks via body weight monitoring, complete blood count (CBC), and blood chemistry. It was found that in the acute and subacute phases (weeks 1-4) there is significant toxicity in groups combining the virus and the prodrug, and matrix-mediated gene delivery with SELP demonstrates a reduction in toxicity from the 2 week time point through the 4 week time point. At the end of the subchronic phase (12 weeks), signs of toxicity had subsided in both groups. Based on these results, recombinant SELPs offer a significant reduction in toxicity of virus-mediated GDEPT treatment compared to free virus injection in the acute and subacute phases. PMID:20586469

  13. HDAC inhibition amplifies gap junction communication in neural progenitors: Potential for cell-mediated enzyme prodrug therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, Zahidul . E-mail: Zahidul.Khan@ki.se; Akhtar, Monira; Asklund, Thomas; Juliusson, Bengt . E-mail: Tomas.Ekstrom@ki.se

    2007-08-01

    Enzyme prodrug therapy using neural progenitor cells (NPCs) as delivery vehicles has been applied in animal models of gliomas and relies on gap junction communication (GJC) between delivery and target cells. This study investigated the effects of histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors on GJC for the purpose of facilitating transfer of therapeutic molecules from recombinant NPCs. We studied a novel immortalized midbrain cell line, NGC-407 of embryonic human origin having neural precursor characteristics, as a potential delivery vehicle. The expression of gap junction protein connexin 43 (C x 43) was analyzed by western blot and immunocytochemistry. While C x 43 levels were decreased in untreated differentiating NGC-407 cells, the HDAC inhibitor 4-phenylbutyrate (4-PB) increased C x 43 expression along with increased membranous deposition in both proliferating and differentiating cells. Simultaneously, Ser 279/282-phosphorylated form of C x 43 was declined in both culture conditions by 4-PB. The 4-PB effect in NGC-407 cells was verified by using HNSC.100 human neural progenitors and Trichostatin A. Improved functional GJC is of imperative importance for therapeutic strategies involving intercellular transport of low molecular-weight compounds. We show here an enhancement by 4-PB, of the functional GJC among NGC-407 cells, as well as between NGC-407 and human glioma cells, as indicated by increased fluorescent dye transfer.

  14. Rational design of an AKR1C3-resistant analog of PR-104 for enzyme-prodrug therapy.

    PubMed

    Mowday, Alexandra M; Ashoorzadeh, Amir; Williams, Elsie M; Copp, Janine N; Silva, Shevan; Bull, Matthew R; Abbattista, Maria R; Anderson, Robert F; Flanagan, Jack U; Guise, Christopher P; Ackerley, David F; Smaill, Jeff B; Patterson, Adam V

    2016-09-15

    The clinical stage anti-cancer agent PR-104 has potential utility as a cytotoxic prodrug for exogenous bacterial nitroreductases expressed from replicating vector platforms. However substrate selectivity is compromised due to metabolism by the human one- and two-electron oxidoreductases cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase (POR) and aldo-keto reductase 1C3 (AKR1C3). Using rational drug design we developed a novel mono-nitro analog of PR-104A that is essentially free of this off-target activity in vitro and in vivo. Unlike PR-104A, there was no biologically relevant cytotoxicity in cells engineered to express AKR1C3 or POR, under aerobic or anoxic conditions, respectively. We screened this inert prodrug analog, SN34507, against a type I bacterial nitroreductase library and identified E. coli NfsA as an efficient bioactivator using a DNA damage response assay and recombinant enzyme kinetics. Expression of E. coli NfsA in human colorectal cancer cells led to selective cytotoxicity to SN34507 that was associated with cell cycle arrest and generated a robust 'bystander effect' at tissue-like cell densities when only 3% of cells were NfsA positive. Anti-tumor activity of SN35539, the phosphate pre-prodrug of SN34507, was established in 'mixed' tumors harboring a minority of NfsA-positive cells and demonstrated marked tumor control following heterogeneous suicide gene expression. These experiments demonstrate that off-target metabolism of PR-104 can be avoided and identify the suicide gene/prodrug partnership of E. coli NfsA/SN35539 as a promising combination for development in armed vectors.

  15. Rational design of an AKR1C3-resistant analog of PR-104 for enzyme-prodrug therapy.

    PubMed

    Mowday, Alexandra M; Ashoorzadeh, Amir; Williams, Elsie M; Copp, Janine N; Silva, Shevan; Bull, Matthew R; Abbattista, Maria R; Anderson, Robert F; Flanagan, Jack U; Guise, Christopher P; Ackerley, David F; Smaill, Jeff B; Patterson, Adam V

    2016-09-15

    The clinical stage anti-cancer agent PR-104 has potential utility as a cytotoxic prodrug for exogenous bacterial nitroreductases expressed from replicating vector platforms. However substrate selectivity is compromised due to metabolism by the human one- and two-electron oxidoreductases cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase (POR) and aldo-keto reductase 1C3 (AKR1C3). Using rational drug design we developed a novel mono-nitro analog of PR-104A that is essentially free of this off-target activity in vitro and in vivo. Unlike PR-104A, there was no biologically relevant cytotoxicity in cells engineered to express AKR1C3 or POR, under aerobic or anoxic conditions, respectively. We screened this inert prodrug analog, SN34507, against a type I bacterial nitroreductase library and identified E. coli NfsA as an efficient bioactivator using a DNA damage response assay and recombinant enzyme kinetics. Expression of E. coli NfsA in human colorectal cancer cells led to selective cytotoxicity to SN34507 that was associated with cell cycle arrest and generated a robust 'bystander effect' at tissue-like cell densities when only 3% of cells were NfsA positive. Anti-tumor activity of SN35539, the phosphate pre-prodrug of SN34507, was established in 'mixed' tumors harboring a minority of NfsA-positive cells and demonstrated marked tumor control following heterogeneous suicide gene expression. These experiments demonstrate that off-target metabolism of PR-104 can be avoided and identify the suicide gene/prodrug partnership of E. coli NfsA/SN35539 as a promising combination for development in armed vectors. PMID:27453434

  16. The high-affinity maltose switch MBP317-347 has low affinity for glucose: implications for targeting tumors with metabolically directed enzyme prodrug therapy.

    PubMed

    Valdes, Gilmer; Schulte, Reinhard W; Ostermeier, Marc; Iwamoto, Keisuke S

    2014-03-01

    Development of agents with high affinity and specificity for tumor-specific markers is an important goal of molecular-targeted therapy. Here, we propose a shift in paradigm using a strategy that relies on low affinity for fundamental metabolites found in different concentrations in cancerous and non-cancerous tissues: glucose and lactate. A molecular switch, MBP317-347, originally designed to be a high-affinity switch for maltose and maltose-like polysaccharides, was demonstrated to be a low-affinity switch for glucose, that is, able to be activated by high concentrations (tens of millimolar) of glucose. We propose that such a low-affinity glucose switch could be used as a proof of concept for a new prodrug therapy strategy denominated metabolically directed enzyme prodrug therapy (MDEPT) where glucose or, preferably, lactate serves as the activator. Accordingly, considering the typical differential concentrations of lactate found in tumors and in healthy tissues, a low-affinity lactate-binding switch analogous to the low-affinity glucose-binding switch MBP317-347 would be an order of magnitude more active in tumors than in normal tissues and therefore can work as a differential activator of anticancer drugs in tumors.

  17. Novel β-lactamase-random peptide fusion libraries for phage display selection of cancer cell-targeting agents suitable for enzyme prodrug therapy

    PubMed Central

    Shukla, Girja S.; Krag, David N.

    2010-01-01

    Novel phage-displayed random linear dodecapeptide (X12) and cysteine-constrained decapeptide (CX10C) libraries constructed in fusion to the amino-terminus of P99 β-lactamase molecules were used for identifying β-lactamase-linked cancer cell-specific ligands. The size and quality of both libraries were comparable to the standards of other reported phage display systems. Using the single-round panning method based on phage DNA recovery, we identified severalβ-lactamase fusion peptides that specifically bind to live human breast cancer MDA-MB-361 cells. The β-lactamase fusion to the peptides helped in conducting the enzyme activity-based clone normalization and cell-binding screening in a very time- and cost-efficient manner. The methods were suitable for 96-well readout as well as microscopic imaging. The success of the biopanning was indicated by the presence of ~40% cancer cell-specific clones among recovered phages. One of the binding clones appeared multiple times. The cancer cell-binding fusion peptides also shared several significant motifs. This opens a new way of preparing and selecting phage display libraries. The cancer cell-specific β-lactamase-linked affinity reagents selected from these libraries can be used for any application that requires a reporter for tracking the ligand molecules. Furthermore, these affinity reagents have also a potential for their direct use in the targeted enzyme prodrug therapy of cancer. PMID:19751096

  18. Radiolabelling of glycosylated MFE-23::CPG2 fusion protein (MFECP1) with 99mTc for quantitation of tumour antibody-enzyme localisation in antibody-directed enzyme pro-drug therapy (ADEPT).

    PubMed

    Francis, R J; Mather, S J; Chester, K; Sharma, S K; Bhatia, J; Pedley, R B; Waibel, R; Green, A J; Begent, R H J

    2004-08-01

    MFECP1 is a glycosylated recombinant fusion protein composed of MFE-23, a high-affinity anti-carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) single chain Fv (scFv), fused to the enzyme carboxypeptidase G2 (CPG2), and has been constructed for use in antibody-directed enzyme pro-drug therapy (ADEPT). Radiolabelling of glycosylated MFECP1 with technetium-99m was developed for the purpose of determining tumour localisation of MFECP1 in a phase I ADEPT clinical study. The method used was 99mTc-carbonyl [99mTc(H2O)3(CO)3]+ (abbreviated to TcCO) mediated labelling of 99mTc to the hexahistidine (His) tag of MFECP1. MFECP1 fusion protein was labelled with TcCO under a variety of conditions, and this was shown to be a relatively simple and robust method. Tissue biodistribution was assessed in a CEA-expressing LS174T (human colon carcinoma) nude mouse xenograft model. Tissues were taken at 1, 4 and 6 h for assessment of distribution of radioactivity and for measurement of CPG2 enzyme levels. The amount of radioactivity retained by the tumour proved to be an accurate estimation of actual measured enzyme activity, indicating that this radiolabelling method does not appear to damage the antibody-antigen binding or the enzyme activity of MFECP1. However, correlation between CPG2 enzyme activity and measured radioactivity in liver, spleen and kidney was poor, indicating retention of radioactivity in non-tumour sites but loss of enzyme activity. The high retention of technetium radioisotope in normal tissues may limit the clinical applicability of this radiolabelling method for MFECP1; however, these results suggest that this technique does have applicability for measuring the biodistribution of His-tagged recombinant proteins.

  19. Prodrug converting enzyme gene delivery by L. monocytogenes

    PubMed Central

    Stritzker, Jochen; Pilgrim, Sabine; Szalay, Aladar A; Goebel, Werner

    2008-01-01

    Background Listeria monocytogenes is a highly versatile bacterial carrier system for introducing protein, DNA and RNA into mammalian cells. The delivery of tumor antigens with the help of this carrier into tumor-bearing animals has been successfully carried out previously and it was recently reported that L. monocytogenes is able to colonize and replicate within solid tumors after local or even systemic injection. Methods Here we report on the delivery of two prodrug converting enzymes, purine-deoxynucleoside phosphorylase (PNP) and a fusion protein consisting of yeast cytosine deaminase and uracil phosphoribosyl transferase (FCU1) into cancer cells in culture by L. monocytogenes. Transfer of the prodrug converting enzymes was achieved by bacterium mediated transfer of eukaryotic expression plasmids or by secretion of the proteins directly into the host cell cytosol by the infecting bacteria. Results The results indicate that conversion of appropriate prodrugs to toxic drugs in the cancer cells occured after both procedures although L. monocytogenes-mediated bactofection proved to be more efficient than enzyme secretion 4T1, B16 and COS-1 tumor cells. Exchanging the constitutively PCMV-promoter with the melanoma specific P4xTETP-promoter resulted in melanoma cell-specific expression of the prodrug converting enzymes but reduced the efficiencies. Conclusion These experiments open the way for bacterium mediated tumor specific activation of prodrugs in live animals with tumors. PMID:18402662

  20. Ligand-conjugated mesoporous silica nanorattles based on enzyme targeted prodrug delivery system for effective lung cancer therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Sundarraj, Shenbagamoorthy; Thangam, Ramar; Sujitha, Mohanan V.; Vimala, Karuppaiya; Kannan, Soundarapandian

    2014-03-15

    Epidermal growth factor receptor antibody (EGFRAb) conjugated silica nanorattles (SNs) were synthesized and used to develop receptor mediated endocytosis for targeted drug delivery strategies for cancer therapy. The present study determined that the rate of internalization of silica nanorattles was found to be high in lung cancer cells when compared with the normal lung cells. EGFRAb can specifically bind to EGFR, a receptor that is highly expressed in lung cancer cells, but is expressed at low levels in other normal cells. Furthermore, in vitro studies clearly substantiated that the cPLA{sub 2}α activity, arachidonic acid release and cell proliferation were considerably reduced by pyrrolidine-2 loaded EGFRAb-SN in H460 cells. The cytotoxicity, cell cycle arrest and apoptosis were significantly induced by the treatment of pyrrolidine-2 loaded EGFRAb-SN when compared with free pyrrolidine-2 and pyrrolidine-2 loaded SNs in human non-small cell lung cancer cells. An in vivo toxicity assessment showed that silica nanorattles and EGFRAb-SN-pyrrolidine-2 exhibited low systemic toxicity in healthy Balb/c mice. The EGFRAb-SN-pyrrolidine-2 showed a much better antitumor activity (38%) with enhanced tumor inhibition rate than the pyrrolidine-2 on the non-small cell lung carcinoma subcutaneous model. Thus, the present findings validated the low toxicity and high therapeutic potentials of EGFRAb-SN-pyrrolidine-2, which may provide a convincing evidence of the silica nanorattles as new potential carriers for targeted drug delivery systems. - Highlights: • EGFRAb-SN developed for receptor-mediated Drug delivery system (DDS). • EGFRAb-SN-pyrrolidine-2 targeted DDS for cPLA2α inhibition in NSLC. • Study indicates EGFRAb-SN-pyrrolidine-2 as an efficient in target dug delivery carrier. • Study explains entire efficiency of EGFRAb-SN-pyrrolidine-2 in vitro and in vivo models.

  1. Puromycin-Sensitive Aminopeptidase: An Antiviral Prodrug Activating Enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Tehler, Ulrika; Nelson, Cara H.; Peterson, Larryn W.; Provoda, Chester J.; Hilfinger, John M.; Lee, Kyung-Dall; McKenna, Charles E.; Amidon, Gordon L.

    2010-01-01

    Cidofovir (HPMPC) is a broad-spectrum antiviral agent, currently used to treat AIDS-related human cytomegalovirus retinitis. Cidofovir has recognized therapeutic potential for orthopox virus infections, although its use is hampered by its inherent low oral bioavailability. Val-Ser-cyclic HPMPC (Val-Ser-cHPMPC) is a promising peptide prodrug which has previously been shown by us to improve the permeability and bioavailability of the parent compound in rodent models (Eriksson et al. Molecular Pharmaceutics, 2008 vol 5 598-609). Puromycin-sensitive aminopeptidase was partially purified from Caco-2 cell homogenates and identified as a prodrug activating enzyme for Val-Ser-cHPMPC. The prodrug activation process initially involves an enzymatic step where the l-Valine residue is removed by puromycin-sensitive aminopeptidase, a step that is bestatin-sensitive. Subsequent chemical hydrolysis results in the generation of cHPMPC. A recombinant puromycin-sensitive aminopeptidase was generated and its substrate specificity investigated. The kcat for Val-pNA was significantly lower than that for Ala-pNA, suggesting that some amino acids are preferred over others. Furthermore, the three-fold higher kcat for Val-Ser-cHPMPC as compared to Val-pNA suggests that the leaving group may play an important role in determining hydrolytic activity. In addition to its ability to hydrolyze a variety of substrates, these observations strongly suggest that puromycin-sensitive aminopeptidase is an important enzyme for activating Val-Ser-cHPMPC in vivo. Taken together, our data suggest that puromycin-sensitive aminopeptidase makes an attractive target for future prodrug design. PMID:19969024

  2. Substrate-Competitive Activity-Based Profiling of Ester Prodrug Activating Enzymes.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hao; Majmudar, Jaimeen D; Davda, Dahvid; Ghanakota, Phani; Kim, Ki H; Carlson, Heather A; Showalter, Hollis D; Martin, Brent R; Amidon, Gordon L

    2015-09-01

    Understanding the mechanistic basis of prodrug delivery and activation is critical for establishing species-specific prodrug sensitivities necessary for evaluating preclinical animal models and potential drug-drug interactions. Despite significant adoption of prodrug methodologies for enhanced pharmacokinetics, functional annotation of prodrug activating enzymes is laborious and often unaddressed. Activity-based protein profiling (ABPP) describes an emerging chemoproteomic approach to assay active site occupancy within a mechanistically similar enzyme class in native proteomes. The serine hydrolase enzyme family is broadly reactive with reporter-linked fluorophosphonates, which have shown to provide a mechanism-based covalent labeling strategy to assay the activation state and active site occupancy of cellular serine amidases, esterases, and thioesterases. Here we describe a modified ABPP approach using direct substrate competition to identify activating enzymes for an ethyl ester prodrug, the influenza neuraminidase inhibitor oseltamivir. Substrate-competitive ABPP analysis identified carboxylesterase 1 (CES1) as an oseltamivir-activating enzyme in intestinal cell homogenates. Saturating concentrations of oseltamivir lead to a four-fold reduction in the observed rate constant for CES1 inactivation by fluorophosphonates. WWL50, a reported carbamate inhibitor of mouse CES1, blocked oseltamivir hydrolysis activity in human cell homogenates, confirming CES1 is the primary prodrug activating enzyme for oseltamivir in human liver and intestinal cell lines. The related carbamate inhibitor WWL79 inhibited mouse but not human CES1, providing a series of probes for analyzing prodrug activation mechanisms in different preclinical models. Overall, we present a substrate-competitive activity-based profiling approach for broadly surveying candidate prodrug hydrolyzing enzymes and outline the kinetic parameters for activating enzyme discovery, ester prodrug design, and

  3. Substrate-Competitive Activity-Based Profiling of Ester Prodrug Activating Enzymes.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hao; Majmudar, Jaimeen D; Davda, Dahvid; Ghanakota, Phani; Kim, Ki H; Carlson, Heather A; Showalter, Hollis D; Martin, Brent R; Amidon, Gordon L

    2015-09-01

    Understanding the mechanistic basis of prodrug delivery and activation is critical for establishing species-specific prodrug sensitivities necessary for evaluating preclinical animal models and potential drug-drug interactions. Despite significant adoption of prodrug methodologies for enhanced pharmacokinetics, functional annotation of prodrug activating enzymes is laborious and often unaddressed. Activity-based protein profiling (ABPP) describes an emerging chemoproteomic approach to assay active site occupancy within a mechanistically similar enzyme class in native proteomes. The serine hydrolase enzyme family is broadly reactive with reporter-linked fluorophosphonates, which have shown to provide a mechanism-based covalent labeling strategy to assay the activation state and active site occupancy of cellular serine amidases, esterases, and thioesterases. Here we describe a modified ABPP approach using direct substrate competition to identify activating enzymes for an ethyl ester prodrug, the influenza neuraminidase inhibitor oseltamivir. Substrate-competitive ABPP analysis identified carboxylesterase 1 (CES1) as an oseltamivir-activating enzyme in intestinal cell homogenates. Saturating concentrations of oseltamivir lead to a four-fold reduction in the observed rate constant for CES1 inactivation by fluorophosphonates. WWL50, a reported carbamate inhibitor of mouse CES1, blocked oseltamivir hydrolysis activity in human cell homogenates, confirming CES1 is the primary prodrug activating enzyme for oseltamivir in human liver and intestinal cell lines. The related carbamate inhibitor WWL79 inhibited mouse but not human CES1, providing a series of probes for analyzing prodrug activation mechanisms in different preclinical models. Overall, we present a substrate-competitive activity-based profiling approach for broadly surveying candidate prodrug hydrolyzing enzymes and outline the kinetic parameters for activating enzyme discovery, ester prodrug design, and

  4. Prodrug/Enzyme based acceleration of absorption of hydrophobic drugs: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Kapoor, Mamta; Siegel, Ronald A

    2013-09-01

    Poor water solubility of APIs is a key challenge in drug discovery and development as it results in low drug bioavailability upon local or systemic administration. The prodrug approach is commonly utilized to enhance solubility of hydrophobic drugs. However, for accelerated drug absorption, supersaturated solutions need to be employed. In this work, a novel prodrug/enzyme based system was developed wherein prodrug and enzyme are coadministered at the point of absorption (e.g., nasal cavity) to form in situ supersaturated drug solutions for enhanced bioavailability. A combination of fosphenytoin/alkaline phosphatase was used as a model system. Prodrug conversion kinetics were evaluated with various prodrug/enzyme ratios at pH 7.4 and 32 °C. Phenytoin permeation rates were determined at various degrees of supersaturation (S = 0.8-6.1), across confluent Madin Darby canine kidney II-wild type monolayers (a nasal epithelium model), with prodrug and enzyme spiked into the apical chamber. Membrane intactness was confirmed by measuring transepithelial electrical resistance and inulin permeability. Fosphenytoin and phenytoin concentrations were analyzed using HPLC. Results indicated that a supersaturated solution could be formed using such prodrug/enzyme systems. Drug absorption increased proportionately with increasing degrees of supersaturation; this flux was 1.5-6 fold greater than that for the saturated phenytoin solution. The experimental data fitted reasonably well to a two compartment pharmacokinetic (PK) model with first order conversion of prodrug to drug. This prodrug/enzyme system markedly enhances drug transport across the model membrane. Applied in vivo, this strategy could be used to facilitate drug absorption through mucosal membranes when absorption is limited by solubility.

  5. Theranostic reduction-sensitive gemcitabine prodrug micelles for near-infrared imaging and pancreatic cancer therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Haijie; Wang, Haibo; Chen, Yangjun; Li, Zuhong; Wang, Yin; Jin, Qiao; Ji, Jian

    2015-12-01

    A biodegradable and reduction-cleavable gemcitabine (GEM) polymeric prodrug with in vivo near-infrared (NIR) imaging ability was reported. This theranostic GEM prodrug PEG-b-[PLA-co-PMAC-graft-(IR820-co-GEM)] was synthesized by ring-opening polymerization and ``click'' reaction. The as-prepared reduction-sensitive prodrug could self-assemble into prodrug micelles in aqueous solution confirmed by dynamic light scattering (DLS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). In vitro drug release studies showed that these prodrug micelles were able to release GEM in an intracellular-mimicking reductive environment. These prodrug micelles could be effectively internalized by BxPC-3 pancreatic cancer cells, which were observed by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). Meanwhile, a methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium (MTT) assay demonstrated that this prodrug exhibited high cytotoxicity against BxPC-3 cells. The in vivo whole-animal near-infrared (NIR) imaging results showed that these prodrug micelles could be effectively accumulated in tumor tissue and had a longer blood circulation time than IR820-COOH. The endogenous reduction-sensitive gemcitabine prodrug micelles with the in vivo NIR imaging ability might have great potential in image-guided pancreatic cancer therapy.A biodegradable and reduction-cleavable gemcitabine (GEM) polymeric prodrug with in vivo near-infrared (NIR) imaging ability was reported. This theranostic GEM prodrug PEG-b-[PLA-co-PMAC-graft-(IR820-co-GEM)] was synthesized by ring-opening polymerization and ``click'' reaction. The as-prepared reduction-sensitive prodrug could self-assemble into prodrug micelles in aqueous solution confirmed by dynamic light scattering (DLS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). In vitro drug release studies showed that these prodrug micelles were able to release GEM in an intracellular-mimicking reductive environment. These prodrug micelles could be effectively internalized by BxPC-3 pancreatic cancer cells, which

  6. Full-course inhibition of biodegradation-induced inflammation in fibrous scaffold by loading enzyme-sensitive prodrug.

    PubMed

    Pan, Guoqing; Liu, Shen; Zhao, Xin; Zhao, Jingwen; Fan, Cunyi; Cui, Wenguo

    2015-06-01

    Biodegradation-induced inflammation in biodegradable scaffold materials is a critical problem to be addressed due to its potential inducement to tissue necrosis, granulomas, or tumor genesis. Here, a facile strategy for on-demand release of anti-inflammatory drugs and full-course inhibition of degradation-induced inflammation was demonstrated by simply loading an esterase-sensitive prodrug into a fibrous scaffold. In this study, drug release from the prodrug-loaded scaffolds showed an enzyme-triggered release process, which led to an initial moderate release of anti-inflammatory drugs and a later-stage degradation-synchronized drug release. This unique release kinetics ingeniously achieved on-demand drug therapy and efficient inhibition of inflammation throughout the biodegradation in vivo. More importantly, the prodrug-loaded scaffolds prepared with different biodegradable polymers (i.e., different biodegradation rates) all showed drug release kinetics that matched to the biodegradation rates and full-course inhibition of inflammation in vivo. Therefore, this method offered a general approach for on-demand release of anti-inflammatory drugs and efficient inhibition of inflammation throughout the biodegradation of different polymeric scaffolds. In addition, the release kinetics in our system showed potentials for "batch release" of multiple drugs in combination therapies as well as provided a feasible hint for the drug therapies of some other symptoms caused by in vivo biodegradation.

  7. ALA-Butyrate prodrugs for Photo-Dynamic Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berkovitch, G.; Nudelman, A.; Ehenberg, B.; Rephaeli, A.; Malik, Z.

    2010-05-01

    The use of 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) administration has led to many applications of photodynamic therapy (PDT) in cancer. However, the hydrophilic nature of ALA limits its ability to penetrate the cells and tissues, and therefore the need for ALA derivatives became an urgent research target. In this study we investigated the activity of novel multifunctional acyloxyalkyl ester prodrugs of ALA that upon metabolic hydrolysis release active components such as, formaldehyde, and the histone deacetylase inhibitory moiety, butyric acid. Evaluation of these prodrugs under photo-irradiation conditions showed that butyryloxyethyl 5-amino-4-oxopentanoate (ALA-BAC) generated the most efficient photodynamic destruction compared to ALA. ALA-BAC stimulated a rapid biosynthesis of protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) in human glioblastoma U-251 cells which resulted in generation of intracellular ROS, reduction of mitochondrial activity, leading to apoptotic and necrotic death of the cells. The apoptotic cell death induced by ALA / ALA-BAC followed by PDT equally activate intrinsic and extrinsic apoptotic signals and both pathways may occur simultaneously. The main advantage of ALA-BAC over ALA stems from its ability to induce photo-damage at a significantly lower dose than ALA.

  8. Boronic Prodrug of Endoxifen as an Effective Hormone Therapy for Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Changde; Zhong, Qiu; Zhang, Qiang; Zheng, Shilong; Miele, Lucio; Wang, Guangdi

    2015-01-01

    As a prodrug, tamoxifen is activated by the P450 enzyme CYP2D6 that is responsible for converting it to the active metabolites, 4-hydroxytamoxifen and endoxifen. Patients with genetic polymorphisms of CYP2D6 may not receive the full benefit of tamoxifen therapy. There is increasing evidence that poor metabolizer patients have lower plasma concentrations of endoxifen and suffer worse disease outcome, although some clinical studies reported no correlation between CYP2D6 polymorphism and tamoxifen therapy outcome. Endoxifen is currently undergoing clinical trials as a potentially improved and more potent SERM (Selective Estrogen Receptor Modulator) for endocrine therapy that is independent of CYP2D6 status in patients. However, direct administration of endoxifen may present the problem of low bioavailability due to its rapid first-pass metabolism via O-glucuronidation. We have designed and synthesized ZB483, a boronic prodrug of endoxifen suitable for oral administration with greatly enhanced bioavailability by increasing the concentration of endoxifen in mouse blood. Our study demonstrated that ZB483 potently inhibited growth of ER+ breast cancer cells in vitro and was efficiently converted to endoxifen in cell culture media by oxidative deboronation. In vivo this metabolic conversion is equally efficient as indicated in the pharmacokinetic study. Moreover, at the same dose, ZB483 afforded a 30-40 fold higher level endoxifen in mouse blood compared to unconjugated endoxifen administration. The significantly enhanced bioavailability of endoxifen conferred by the boronic prodrug was further validated in an in vivo efficacy study. ZB483 was demonstrated to be more efficacious than endoxifen in inhibiting xenograft tumor growth in mice at equal dosage but more so at lower dosage. Together, these preclinical studies demonstrate that ZB483 is a promising endocrine therapy agent with markedly enhanced bioavailability in systemic circulation and superior efficacy compared to

  9. Selective tumor DNA synthesis inhibition: in vivo prodrug activation by an exogenous enzyme.

    PubMed

    Tschiersch, B; Schwabe, K; Sydow, G; Graffi, A

    1977-11-01

    Using the combination of alpha-L-arabinofuranosidase from Aspergillus niger with beta-peltatin A-alpha-L-arabinofuranoside, the selective effect of a new cancer of chemotherapy method based on a pH-dependent activation of cancerostatic prodrugs by exogenous enzymes was studied. In comparative experiments the selectivity of prodrug activation was measured by 3H-thymidine incorporation in tumor and normal tissues of CBA mice inoculated im with the transplantable mammary carcinoma, MA-21224. The results show that this special type of carrier principle may lead to a higher degree of selectivity than the usual direct application of cancerostatic drugs.

  10. Use of enzyme inhibitors to evaluate the conversion pathways of ester and amide prodrugs: a case study example with the prodrug ceftobiprole medocaril.

    PubMed

    Eichenbaum, Gary; Skibbe, Jennifer; Parkinson, Andrew; Johnson, Mark D; Baumgardner, Dawn; Ogilvie, Brian; Usuki, Etsuko; Tonelli, Fred; Holsapple, Jeff; Schmitt-Hoffmann, Anne

    2012-03-01

    An approach was developed that uses enzyme inhibitors to support the assessment of the pathways that are responsible for the conversion of intravenously administered ester and amide prodrugs in different biological matrices. The methodology was applied to ceftobiprole medocaril (BAL5788), the prodrug of the cephalosporin antibiotic, ceftobiprole. The prodrug was incubated in plasma, postmitochondrial supernatant fractions from human liver (impaired and nonimpaired), kidney, and intestine as well as erythrocytes, in the presence and absence of different enzyme inhibitors (acetylcholinesterase, pseudocholinesterase, retinyl palmitoyl hydrolase, serine esterases, amidases, and cholinesterase). Hydrolysis was rapid, extensive, and not dependent on the presence of β-nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide phosphate (reduced form) in all matrices tested, suggesting the involvement of carboxylesterases but not P450 enzymes. Hydrolysis in healthy human plasma was rapid and complete and only partially inhibited in the presence of paraoxonase inhibitors or in liver from hepatic impaired patients, suggesting involvement of nonparaoxonase pathways. The results demonstrate the utility of this approach in confirming the presence of multiple conversion pathways of intravenously administered prodrugs and in the case of BAL5788 demonstrated that this prodrug is unlikely to be affected by genetic polymorphisms, drug interactions, or other environmental factors that might inhibit or induce the enzymes involved in its conversion.

  11. PSMA-specific theranostic nanoplex for combination of TRAIL gene and 5-FC prodrug therapy of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhihang; Penet, Marie-France; Krishnamachary, Balaji; Banerjee, Sangeeta R; Pomper, Martin G; Bhujwalla, Zaver M

    2016-02-01

    Metastatic prostate cancer causes significant morbidity and mortality and there is a critical unmet need for effective treatments. We have developed a theranostic nanoplex platform for combined imaging and therapy of prostate cancer. Our prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) targeted nanoplex is designed to deliver plasmid DNA encoding tumor necrosis factor related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL), together with bacterial cytosine deaminase (bCD) as a prodrug enzyme. Nanoplex specificity was tested using two variants of human PC3 prostate cancer cells in culture and in tumor xenografts, one with high PSMA expression and the other with negligible expression levels. The expression of EGFP-TRAIL was demonstrated by fluorescence optical imaging and real-time PCR. Noninvasive (19)F MR spectroscopy detected the conversion of the nontoxic prodrug 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC) to cytotoxic 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) by bCD. The combination strategy of TRAIL gene and 5-FC/bCD therapy showed significant inhibition of the growth of prostate cancer cells and tumors. These data demonstrate that the PSMA-specific theranostic nanoplex can deliver gene therapy and prodrug enzyme therapy concurrently for precision medicine in metastatic prostate cancer.

  12. Enzymes to die for: exploiting nucleotide metabolizing enzymes for cancer gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Ardiani, Andressa; Johnson, Adam J; Ruan, Hongmei; Sanchez-Bonilla, Marilyn; Serve, Kinta; Black, Margaret E

    2012-04-01

    Suicide gene therapy is an attractive strategy to selectively destroy cancer cells while minimizing unnecessary toxicity to normal cells. Since this idea was first introduced more than two decades ago, numerous studies have been conducted and significant developments have been made to further its application for mainstream cancer therapy. Major limitations of the suicide gene therapy strategy that have hindered its clinical application include inefficient directed delivery to cancer cells and the poor prodrug activation capacity of suicide enzymes. This review is focused on efforts that have been and are currently being pursued to improve the activity of individual suicide enzymes towards their respective prodrugs with particular attention to the application of nucleotide metabolizing enzymes in suicide cancer gene therapy. A number of protein engineering strategies have been employed and our discussion here will center on the use of mutagenesis approaches to create and evaluate nucleotide metabolizing enzymes with enhanced prodrug activation capacity and increased thermostability. Several of these studies have yielded clinically important enzyme variants that are relevant for cancer gene therapy applications because their utilization can serve to maximize cancer cell killing while minimizing the prodrug dose, thereby limiting undesirable side effects.

  13. Enhanced green fluorescent protein fusion proteins of herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase and cytochrome P450 4B1: applications for prodrug-activating gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Steffens, S; Frank, S; Fischer, U; Heuser, C; Meyer, K L; Dobberstein, K U; Rainov, N G; Kramm, C M

    2000-05-01

    To monitor therapeutic transgene expression, we developed fusion genes of enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) with two different prodrug-activating enzyme genes: herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase (HSV-tk) and rabbit cytochrome P450 4B1 (cyp4b1). Expression of the resulting fusion proteins, TK-EGFP and 4B1-EGFP, rendered transduced human and rodent glioma cells sensitive to cytotoxic treatment with the corresponding prodrugs ganciclovir and 4-ipomeanol. Ganciclovir and 4-ipomeanol sensitivity was comparable with that achieved with the native HSV-TK and CYP4B1 proteins. As shown by fluorescence microscopy, TK-EGFP was expressed predominantly intranuclearly, whereas 4B1-EGFP was detectable in the cytoplasm, thereby displaying the orthotopic subcellular distribution of the corresponding native enzymes. The fluorescence intensity correlated well with the corresponding prodrug sensitivity, as shown by fluorescence-activated cell sorter analysis. EGFP expression was also used for the selection of stably HSV-tk-transduced cells by flow cytometric cell sorting. Resulting cell populations showed a homogeneity of fluorescence intensity similar to single-cell clones after antibiotic selection. In conclusion, tk-egfp and 4b1-egfp fusion genes are valuable tools for monitoring prodrug-activating gene therapy in living cells. EGFP fusion genes/proteins provide a simple and reproducible means for the detection, selection, and characterization of cells expressing enzyme genes for prodrug activation.

  14. Rapid delivery of diazepam from supersaturated solutions prepared using prodrug/enzyme mixtures: toward intranasal treatment of seizure emergencies.

    PubMed

    Kapoor, Mamta; Winter, Tate; Lis, Lev; Georg, Gunda I; Siegel, Ronald A

    2014-05-01

    Current treatments for seizure emergencies, such as status epilepticus, include intravenous or rectal administration of benzodiazepines. While intranasal delivery of these drugs is desirable, the small volume of the nasal cavity and low drug solubility pose significant difficulties. Here, we prepared supersaturated diazepam solutions under physiological conditions and without precipitation, using a prodrug/enzyme system. Avizafone, a peptide prodrug of diazepam, was delivered with--Aspergillus oryzae (A.O.) protease, an enzyme identified from a pool of hydrolytic enzymes in assay buffer, pH 7.4 at 32°C. This enzyme converted avizafone to diazepam at supersaturated concentrations. In vitro permeability studies were performed at various prodrug/enzyme ratios using Madin-Darby canine kidney II-wild type (MDCKII-wt) monolayers, a representative model of the nasal epithelium. Monolayer integrity was examined using TEER measurement and the lucifer yellow permeability assay. Prodrug/drug concentrations were measured using HPLC. Enzyme kinetics with avizafone-protease mixtures revealed K(M) = 1,501 ± 232 μM and V(max) = 1,369 ± 94 μM/s. Prodrug-protease mixtures, when co-delivered apically onto MDCKII-wt monolayers, showed 2-17.6-fold greater diazepam flux (S = 1.3-15.3) compared to near-saturated diazepam (S = 0.7). Data for prodrug conversion upstream (apical side) and drug permeability downstream (basolateral side) fitted reasonably well to a previously developed in vitro two compartment pharmacokinetic model. Avizafone-protease mixtures resulted in supersaturated diazepam in less than 5 min, with the rate and extent of supersaturation determined by the prodrug/enzyme ratio. Together, these results suggest that an intranasal avizafone-protease system may provide a rapid and alternative means of diazepam delivery.

  15. Rapid delivery of diazepam from supersaturated solutions prepared using prodrug/enzyme mixtures: toward intranasal treatment of seizure emergencies.

    PubMed

    Kapoor, Mamta; Winter, Tate; Lis, Lev; Georg, Gunda I; Siegel, Ronald A

    2014-05-01

    Current treatments for seizure emergencies, such as status epilepticus, include intravenous or rectal administration of benzodiazepines. While intranasal delivery of these drugs is desirable, the small volume of the nasal cavity and low drug solubility pose significant difficulties. Here, we prepared supersaturated diazepam solutions under physiological conditions and without precipitation, using a prodrug/enzyme system. Avizafone, a peptide prodrug of diazepam, was delivered with--Aspergillus oryzae (A.O.) protease, an enzyme identified from a pool of hydrolytic enzymes in assay buffer, pH 7.4 at 32°C. This enzyme converted avizafone to diazepam at supersaturated concentrations. In vitro permeability studies were performed at various prodrug/enzyme ratios using Madin-Darby canine kidney II-wild type (MDCKII-wt) monolayers, a representative model of the nasal epithelium. Monolayer integrity was examined using TEER measurement and the lucifer yellow permeability assay. Prodrug/drug concentrations were measured using HPLC. Enzyme kinetics with avizafone-protease mixtures revealed K(M) = 1,501 ± 232 μM and V(max) = 1,369 ± 94 μM/s. Prodrug-protease mixtures, when co-delivered apically onto MDCKII-wt monolayers, showed 2-17.6-fold greater diazepam flux (S = 1.3-15.3) compared to near-saturated diazepam (S = 0.7). Data for prodrug conversion upstream (apical side) and drug permeability downstream (basolateral side) fitted reasonably well to a previously developed in vitro two compartment pharmacokinetic model. Avizafone-protease mixtures resulted in supersaturated diazepam in less than 5 min, with the rate and extent of supersaturation determined by the prodrug/enzyme ratio. Together, these results suggest that an intranasal avizafone-protease system may provide a rapid and alternative means of diazepam delivery. PMID:24700272

  16. Glutathione- and pH-responsive nonporous silica prodrug nanoparticles for controlled release and cancer therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zhigang; Liu, Shiying; Kang, Yuejun; Wang, Mingfeng

    2015-03-01

    A myriad of drug delivery systems such as liposomes, micelles, polymers and inorganic nanoparticles (NPs) have been developed for cancer therapy. Very few of them, however, have the ability to integrate multiple functionalities such as specific delivery, high circulation stability, controllable release and good biocompatibility and biodegradability in a single system to improve the therapeutic efficacy. Herein, we report two types of stimuli-responsive nonporous silica prodrug NPs towards this goal for controlled release of anticancer drugs and efficient combinatorial cancer therapy. As a proof of concept, anticancer drugs camptothecin (CPT) and doxorubicin (DOX) were covalently encapsulated into silica matrices through glutathione (GSH)-responsive disulfide and pH-responsive hydrazone bonds, respectively, resulting in NPs with sizes tunable in the range of 50-200 nm. Both silica prodrug NPs showed stimuli-responsive controlled release upon exposure to a GSH-rich or acidic environment, resulting in improved anticancer efficacy. Notably, two prodrug NPs simultaneously taken up by HeLa cells showed a remarkable combinatorial efficacy compared to free drug pairs. These results suggest that the stimuli-responsive silica prodrug NPs are promising anticancer drug carriers for efficient cancer therapy.A myriad of drug delivery systems such as liposomes, micelles, polymers and inorganic nanoparticles (NPs) have been developed for cancer therapy. Very few of them, however, have the ability to integrate multiple functionalities such as specific delivery, high circulation stability, controllable release and good biocompatibility and biodegradability in a single system to improve the therapeutic efficacy. Herein, we report two types of stimuli-responsive nonporous silica prodrug NPs towards this goal for controlled release of anticancer drugs and efficient combinatorial cancer therapy. As a proof of concept, anticancer drugs camptothecin (CPT) and doxorubicin (DOX) were

  17. Identification of activating enzymes of a novel FBPase inhibitor prodrug, CS-917

    PubMed Central

    Kubota, Kazuishi; Inaba, Shin-ichi; Nakano, Rika; Watanabe, Mihoko; Sakurai, Hidetaka; Fukushima, Yumiko; Ichikawa, Kimihisa; Takahashi, Tohru; Izumi, Takashi; Shinagawa, Akira

    2015-01-01

    CS-917 (MB06322) is a selective small compound inhibitor of fructose 1,6-bisphosphatase (FBPase), which is expected to be a novel drug for the treatment of type 2 diabetes by inhibiting gluconeogenesis. CS-917 is a bisamidate prodrug and activation of CS-917 requires a two-step enzyme catalyzed reaction. The first-step enzyme, esterase, catalyzes the conversion of CS-917 into the intermediate form (R-134450) and the second-step enzyme, phosphoramidase, catalyzes the conversion of R-134450 into the active form (R-125338). In this study, we biochemically purified the CS-917 esterase activity in monkey small intestine and liver. We identified cathepsin A (CTSA) and elastase 3B (ELA3B) as CS-917 esterases in the small intestine by mass spectrometry, whereas we found CTSA and carboxylesterase 1 (CES1) in monkey liver. We also purified R-134450 phosphoramidase activity in monkey liver and identified sphingomyelin phosphodiesterase, acid-like 3A (SMPADL3A), as an R-134450 phosphoramidase, which has not been reported to have any enzyme activity. Recombinant human CTSA, ELA3B, and CES1 showed CS-917 esterase activity and recombinant human SMPDL3A showed R-134450 phosphoramidase activity, which confirmed the identification of those enzymes. Identification of metabolic enzymes responsible for the activation process is the requisite first step to understanding the activation process, pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics of CS-917 at the molecular level. This is the first identification of a phosphoramidase other than histidine triad nucleotide-binding protein (HINT) family enzymes and SMPDL3A might generally contribute to activation of the other bisamidate prodrugs. PMID:26171222

  18. Chirally Pure Prodrugs and Their Converting Enzymes Lead to High Supersaturation and Rapid Transcellular Permeation of Benzodiazepines.

    PubMed

    Kapoor, Mamta; Cheryala, Narsihmulu; Rautiola, Davin; Georg, Gunda I; Cloyd, James C; Siegel, Ronald A

    2016-08-01

    Water-soluble prodrugs can be rapidly converted by enzymes to hydrophobic drugs, whose aqueous thermodynamic solubilities are low, but are maintained in aqueous solution at supersaturated concentrations due to slow precipitation kinetics. Recently, we investigated avizafone (AVF) in combination with Aspergillus oryzae protease as a prodrug/enzyme system intended to produce supersaturated diazepam (DZP). Several fold enhancement of permeation of supersaturated DZP across Madin-Darby canine kidney II-wild type (MDCKII-wt) monolayers was observed, compared to saturated DZP solutions. However, prodrug conversion was incomplete, putatively due to partial racemization of AVF and stereoselectivity of A oryzae protease. Here we report synthesis of chirally pure AVF, and demonstrate complete conversion to supersaturated DZP followed by complete DZP permeation at enhanced rates across MDCKII-wt cell monolayers. We also synthesized, for the first time, a chirally pure prodrug of midazolam (MDZ-pro) and carried out the same sequence of studies. A oryzae protease was identified as a benign and efficient activating enzyme for MDZ-pro. The MDZ-pro/A oryzae protease system showed greater than 25-fold increase in absorption rate of MDZ across MDCKII-wt monolayers, compared to saturated MDZ. Such chirally pure prodrug/enzyme systems are promising candidates for efficient intranasal delivery of benzodiazepine drugs used in the treatment of seizure emergencies.

  19. Potential use of radiolabeled glucuronide prodrugs with auger and/or alpha emitters in combined chemo- and radio-therapy of cancer.

    PubMed

    Unak, T

    2000-07-01

    Nowadays, the scientists from different disciplines have focused their attentions to new anticancer drug design for cancer chemotherapy. An effective anticancer drug should ensure the selective drug incorporation into the targeted tumor cells without principally incorporation into the normal cells. So, the targeted tumor cells can selectively be damaged by the cytotoxic effectiveness of the drug. The basic principles of drug design have involved "prodrug" concept, which means a chemical agent which is not itself active as an anticancer drug, but it can be transformed to an active form after its administration. Prodrugs can finally be activated onto the tumor cells by some kind of enzymes. In this context, the activation of glucuronide prodrugs by b-glucuronidase have a large potential applications in cancer chemotherapy. On the other hand, combined chemo- and radio-therapy of cancer (CCRTC) concept aims to combine the cytotoxicity of an aglycone with the radiotoxicity of an appropriate radionuclide on the same prodrug. So, the cytotoxic and radiotoxic effectiveness' will be able to be concentrated into the same tumor cell to increase obviously its damage. For experimental realization of this concept an effective anticancer prodrug should be radiolabeled with a radionuclide having high level of radiotoxic effectiveness such as Auger and/or alpha-emitter radionuclides. Iodine-125 and astatine-211 are very interesting radionuclides as being effective Auger and/or alpha-emitters. Briefly, the glucuronide prodrugs radiolabeled with iodine-125 or astatine-211 promise to be designed very effective anticancer agents in the future applications of cancer chemotherapy. PMID:10903386

  20. Utilization of peptide carrier system to improve intestinal absorption: targeting prolidase as a prodrug-converting enzyme

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bai, J. P.; Hu, M.; Subramanian, P.; Mosberg, H. I.; Amidon, G. L.

    1992-01-01

    The feasibility of targeting prolidase as a peptide prodrug-converting enzyme has been examined. The enzymatic hydrolysis by prolidase of substrates for the peptide transporter L-alpha-methyldopa-pro and several dipeptide analogues without an N-terminal alpha-amino group (phenylpropionylproline, phenylacetylproline, N-benzoylproline, and N-acetylproline) was investigated. The Michaelis-Menten parameters Km and Vmax for L-alpha-methyldopa-pro are 0.09 +/- 0.02 mM and 3.98 +/- 0.25 mumol/min/mg protein, respectively. However, no hydrolysis of the dipeptide analogues without an N-terminal alpha-amino group is observed, suggesting that an N-terminal alpha-amino group is required for prolidase activity. These results demonstrate that prolidase may serve as a prodrug-converting enzyme for the dipeptide-type prodrugs, utilizing the peptide carrier for transport of prodrugs into the mucosal cells and prolidase, a cytosolic enzyme, to release the drug. However, a free alpha-amino group appears to be necessary for prolidase hydrolysis.

  1. Biocompatible polymeric nanocomplexes as an intracellular stimuli-sensitive prodrug for type-2 diabetes combination therapy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Feng-Zhen; Xie, Zhi-Shen; Xing, Lei; Zhang, Bing-Feng; Zhang, Jia-Liang; Cui, Peng-Fei; Qiao, Jian-Bin; Shi, Kun; Cho, Chong-Su; Cho, Myung-Haing; Xu, Xiaojun; Li, Ping; Jiang, Hu-Lin

    2015-12-01

    Combination therapy is usually considered as a promising strategy owing to its advantages such as reduced doses, minimized side effects and improved therapeutic efficiency in a variety of diseases including diabetes. Here we synthesized a new highly intracellular stimuli-sensitive chitosan-graft-metformin (CS-MET) prodrug by imine reaction between oxidative chitosan and metformin for type 2 diabetes (T2D) therapy. Hypothetically, CS-MET functions dually as an anti-diabetes prodrug as well as a gene delivery vector without superfluous materials. CS-MET formed nanocomplexes with therapeutic gene through electrostatic interactions and entered cells by Organic Cation Transporter (OCT)-independent endocytosis. The incorporation of metformin into chitosan has been found to increase endosomal escape via the proton sponge effect. When vector carrying a short-hairpin RNA (shRNA) silencing sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP), a major transcription factor involved in de novo lipogenisis, it reduced the SREBP mRNA and proteins efficiently. Furthermore, by intraperitoneal injection, CS-MET/shSREBP nanocomplexes effectively knocked down SREBP in livers of western-type diet (WD)-induced obese C57BL/6J mice, markedly reversed insulin resistance and alleviated the fatty liver phenotype without obvious toxic effects. Thus we were able to show that the intracellular stimuli-sensitive CS-MET prodrug renders a potential platform to increase the anti-diabetes activity with synergistic enhancement of gene therapy.

  2. Targeting enzymes for cancer therapy: old enzymes in new roles.

    PubMed Central

    Deonarain, M. P.; Epenetos, A. A.

    1994-01-01

    Enzymes which traditionally have played no role in cell-directed cytotoxicity are finding their way into schemes for prodrug activation and immunotoxins owing to such useful enzymatic activity. Alkaline phosphatase, carboxypeptidases, beta-glucosidases and beta-lactamases among many others are being utilised to regenerate potent anti-cancer drugs or toxic small molecules from precursors in a bid to enhance their activity in tumours. These prodrug activation systems require the pretargeting of the enzyme to the surface of a tumour cell, usually by an antibody or its immunoreactive fragment. A recent novel approach proposes the intracellular delivery of appropriate enzymes, such as phosphodiesterases, to particular cellular compartments. There, enzyme activity can cause substantive damage resulting in cell death. Cell targeting of mammalian phosphodiesterase promises to improve upon conventional immunotoxins because of their increased cytotoxicity when targeted to the appropriate compartment and their expected lack of, or lower, immunogenicity in clinical use. PMID:7947082

  3. Platinum(iv) prodrug conjugated Pd@Au nanoplates for chemotherapy and photothermal therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Saige; Chen, Xiaolan; Wei, Jingping; Huang, Yizhuan; Weng, Jian; Zheng, Nanfeng

    2016-03-01

    Owing to the excellent near infrared (NIR) light absorption and efficient passive targeting toward tumor tissue, two-dimensional (2D) core-shell PEGylated Pd@Au nanoplates have great potential in both photothermal therapy and drug delivery systems. In this work, we successfully conjugate Pd@Au nanoplates with a platinum(iv) prodrug c,c,t-[Pt(NH3)2Cl2(O2CCH2CH2CO2H)2] to obtain a nanocomposite (Pd@Au-PEG-Pt) for combined photothermal-chemotherapy. The prepared Pd@Au-PEG-Pt nanocomposite showed excellent stability in physiological solutions and efficient Pt(iv) prodrug loading. Once injected into biological tissue, the Pt(iv) prodrug was easily reduced by physiological reductants (e.g. ascorbic acid or glutathione) into its cytotoxic and hydrophilic Pt(ii) form and released from the original nanocomposite, and the NIR laser irradiation could accelerate the release of Pt(ii) species. More importantly, Pd@Au-PEG-Pt has high tumor accumulation (29%ID per g), which makes excellent therapeutic efficiency at relatively low power density possible. The in vivo results suggested that, compared with single therapy the combined thermo-chemotherapy treatment with Pd@Au-PEG-Pt resulted in complete destruction of the tumor tissue without recurrence, while chemotherapy using Pd@Au-PEG-Pt without irradiation or photothermal treatment using Pd@Au-PEG alone did not. Our work highlights the prospects of a feasible drug delivery strategy of the Pt prodrug by using 2D Pd@Au nanoplates as drug delivery carriers for multimode cancer treatment.Owing to the excellent near infrared (NIR) light absorption and efficient passive targeting toward tumor tissue, two-dimensional (2D) core-shell PEGylated Pd@Au nanoplates have great potential in both photothermal therapy and drug delivery systems. In this work, we successfully conjugate Pd@Au nanoplates with a platinum(iv) prodrug c,c,t-[Pt(NH3)2Cl2(O2CCH2CH2CO2H)2] to obtain a nanocomposite (Pd@Au-PEG-Pt) for combined photothermal-chemotherapy. The

  4. Esterase-activatable β-lapachone prodrug micelles for NQO1-targeted lung cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Xinpeng; Huang, Xiumei; Moore, Zachary; Huang, Gang; Kilgore, Jessica A.; Wang, Yiguang; Hammer, Suntrea; Williams, Noelle S.; Boothman, David A.; Gao, Jinming

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is one of the most lethal forms of cancer and current chemotherapeutic strategies lack broad specificity and efficacy. Recently, β-lapachone (β-lap) was shown to be highly efficacious in killing non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells regardless of their p53, cell cycle and caspase status. Pre-clinical and clinical use of β-lap (clinical form, ARQ501 or 761) is hampered by poor pharmacokinetics and toxicity due to hemolytic anemia. Here, we report the development and preclinical evaluation of β-lap prodrug nanotherapeutics consisting of diester derivatives of β-lap encapsulated in biocompatible and biodegradable poly(ethylene glycol)-b-poly(d,l-lactic acid) (PEG-b-PLA) micelles. Compared to the parent drug, diester derivatives of β-lap showed higher drug loading densities inside PEG-b-PLA micelles. After esterase treatment, micelle-delivered β-lap-dC3 and -dC6 prodrugs were converted to β-lap. Cytotoxicity assays using A549 and H596 lung cancer cells showed that both micelle formulations maintained NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1)-dependent cytotoxicity. However, antitumor efficacy study of β-lap-dC3 micelles against orthotopic A549 NSCLC xenograft-bearing mice showed significantly greater long-term survival over β-lap-dC6 micelles or β-lap-HPβCD complexes. Improved therapeutic efficacy of β-lap-dC3 micelles correlated with higher area under the concentration-time curves of β-lap in tumors, and enhanced pharmacodynamic endpoints (e.g., PARP1 hyperactivation, γH2AX, and ATP depletion). β-Lap-dC3 prodrug micelles provide a promising strategy for NQO1-targeted therapy of lung cancer with improved safety and antitumor efficacy. PMID:25542645

  5. Prodrug strategies in anticancer chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Kratz, Felix; Müller, Ivonne A; Ryppa, Claudia; Warnecke, André

    2008-01-01

    The majority of clinically approved anticancer drugs are characterized by a narrow therapeutic window that results mainly from a high systemic toxicity of the drugs in combination with an evident lack of tumor selectivity. Besides the development of suitable galenic formulations such as liposomes or micelles, several promising prodrug approaches have been followed in the last decades with the aim of improving chemotherapy. In this review we elucidate the two main concepts that underlie the design of most anticancer prodrugs: drug targeting and controlled release of the drug at the tumor site. Consequently, active and passive targeting using tumor-specific ligands or macromolecular carriers are discussed as well as release strategies that are based on tumor-specific characteristics such as low pH or the expression of tumor-associated enzymes. Furthermore, other strategies such as ADEPT (antibody-directed enzyme prodrug therapy) and the design of self-eliminating structures are introduced. Chemical realization of prodrug approaches is illustrated by drug candidates that have or may have clinical importance.

  6. Noninvasive theranostic imaging of HSV1-sr39TK-NTR/GCV-CB1954 dual-prodrug therapy in metastatic lung lesions of MDA-MB-231 triple negative breast cancer in mice.

    PubMed

    Sekar, Thillai V; Foygel, Kira; Ilovich, Ohad; Paulmurugan, Ramasamy

    2014-01-01

    Metastatic breast cancer is an obdurate cancer type that is not amenable to chemotherapy regimens currently used in clinic. There is a desperate need for alternative therapies to treat this resistant cancer type. Gene-Directed Enzyme Prodrug Therapy (GDEPT) is a superior gene therapy method when compared to chemotherapy and radiotherapy procedures, proven to be effective against many types of cancer in pre-clinical evaluations and clinical trials. Gene therapy that utilizes a single enzyme/prodrug combination targeting a single cellular mechanism needs significant overexpression of delivered therapeutic gene in order to achieve therapy response. Hence, to overcome this obstacle we recently developed a dual therapeutic reporter gene fusion that uses two different prodrugs, targeting two distinct cellular mechanisms in order to achieve effective therapy with a limited expression of delivered transgenes. In addition, imaging therapeutic reporter genes offers additional information that indirectly correlates gene delivery, expression, and functional effectiveness as a theranostic approach. In the present study, we evaluate the therapeutic potential of HSV1-sr39TK-NTR fusion dual suicide gene therapy system that we recently developed, in MDA-MB-231 triple negative breast cancer lung-metastatic lesions in a mouse model. We compared the therapeutic potential of HSV1-sr39TK-NTR fusion with respective dual prodrugs GCV-CB1954 with HSV1-sr39TK/GCV and NTR/CB1954 single enzyme prodrug system in this highly resistant metastatic lesion of the lungs. In vitro optimization of dose and duration of exposure to GCV and CB1954 was performed in MDA-MB-231 cells. Drug combinations of 1 μg/ml GCV and 10 μM CB1954 for 3 days was found to be optimal regimen for induction of significant cell death, as assessed by FACS analysis. In vivo therapeutic evaluation in animal models showed a complete ablation of lung metastatic nodules of MDA-MB-231 triple negative breast cancer cells following

  7. Polymer-Based Prodrugs: Improving Tumor Targeting and the Solubility of Small Molecule Drugs in Cancer Therapy.

    PubMed

    Dragojevic, Sonja; Ryu, Jung Su; Raucher, Drazen

    2015-12-04

    The majority of anticancer drugs have poor aqueous solubility, produce adverse effects in healthy tissue, and thus impose major limitations on both clinical efficacy and therapeutic safety of cancer chemotherapy. To help circumvent problems associated with solubility, most cancer drugs are now formulated with co-solubilizers. However, these agents often also introduce severe side effects, thereby restricting effective treatment and patient quality of life. A promising approach to addressing problems in anticancer drug solubility and selectivity is their conjugation with polymeric carriers to form polymer-based prodrugs. These polymer-based prodrugs are macromolecular carriers, designed to increase the aqueous solubility of antitumor drugs, can enhance bioavailability. Additionally, polymer-based prodrugs approach exploits unique features of tumor physiology to passively facilitate intratumoral accumulation, and so improve chemodrug pharmacokinetics and pharmacological properties. This review introduces basic concepts of polymer-based prodrugs, provides an overview of currently emerging synthetic, natural, and genetically engineered polymers that now deliver anticancer drugs in preclinical or clinical trials, and highlights their major anticipated applications in anticancer therapies.

  8. Co-delivery of doxorubicin and curcumin by pH-sensitive prodrug nanoparticle for combination therapy of cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yumin; Yang, Cuihong; Wang, Weiwei; Liu, Jinjian; Liu, Qiang; Huang, Fan; Chu, Liping; Gao, Honglin; Li, Chen; Kong, Deling; Liu, Qian; Liu, Jianfeng

    2016-01-01

    Ample attention has focused on cancer drug delivery via prodrug nanoparticles due to their high drug loading property and comparatively lower side effects. In this study, we designed a PEG-DOX-Cur prodrug nanoparticle for simultaneous delivery of doxorubicin (DOX) and curcumin (Cur) as a combination therapy to treat cancer. DOX was conjugated to PEG by Schiff's base reaction. The obtained prodrug conjugate could self-assemble in water at pH 7.4 into nanoparticles (PEG-DOX NPs) and encapsulate Cur into the core through hydrophobic interaction (PEG-DOX-Cur NPs). When the PEG-DOX-Cur NPs are internalized by tumor cells, the Schiff's base linker between PEG and DOX would break in the acidic environment that is often observed in tumors, causing disassembling of the PEG-DOX-Cur NPs and releasing both DOX and Cur into the nuclei and cytoplasma of the tumor cells, respectively. Compared with free DOX, free Cur, free DOX-Cur combination, or PEG-DOX NPs, PEG-DOX-Cur NPs exhibited higher anti-tumor activity in vitro. In addition, the PEG-DOX-Cur NPs also showed prolonged blood circulation time, elevated local drug accumulation and increased tumor penetration. Enhanced anti-tumor activity was also observed from the PEG-DOX-Cur-treated animals, demonstrating better tumor inhibitory property of the NPs. Thus, the PEG-DOX-Cur prodrug nanoparticle system provides a simple yet efficient approach of drug delivery for chemotherapy. PMID:26876480

  9. Co-delivery of doxorubicin and curcumin by pH-sensitive prodrug nanoparticle for combination therapy of cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yumin; Yang, Cuihong; Wang, Weiwei; Liu, Jinjian; Liu, Qiang; Huang, Fan; Chu, Liping; Gao, Honglin; Li, Chen; Kong, Deling; Liu, Qian; Liu, Jianfeng

    2016-02-01

    Ample attention has focused on cancer drug delivery via prodrug nanoparticles due to their high drug loading property and comparatively lower side effects. In this study, we designed a PEG-DOX-Cur prodrug nanoparticle for simultaneous delivery of doxorubicin (DOX) and curcumin (Cur) as a combination therapy to treat cancer. DOX was conjugated to PEG by Schiff’s base reaction. The obtained prodrug conjugate could self-assemble in water at pH 7.4 into nanoparticles (PEG-DOX NPs) and encapsulate Cur into the core through hydrophobic interaction (PEG-DOX-Cur NPs). When the PEG-DOX-Cur NPs are internalized by tumor cells, the Schiff’s base linker between PEG and DOX would break in the acidic environment that is often observed in tumors, causing disassembling of the PEG-DOX-Cur NPs and releasing both DOX and Cur into the nuclei and cytoplasma of the tumor cells, respectively. Compared with free DOX, free Cur, free DOX-Cur combination, or PEG-DOX NPs, PEG-DOX-Cur NPs exhibited higher anti-tumor activity in vitro. In addition, the PEG-DOX-Cur NPs also showed prolonged blood circulation time, elevated local drug accumulation and increased tumor penetration. Enhanced anti-tumor activity was also observed from the PEG-DOX-Cur-treated animals, demonstrating better tumor inhibitory property of the NPs. Thus, the PEG-DOX-Cur prodrug nanoparticle system provides a simple yet efficient approach of drug delivery for chemotherapy.

  10. Co-delivery of doxorubicin and curcumin by pH-sensitive prodrug nanoparticle for combination therapy of cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yumin; Yang, Cuihong; Wang, Weiwei; Liu, Jinjian; Liu, Qiang; Huang, Fan; Chu, Liping; Gao, Honglin; Li, Chen; Kong, Deling; Liu, Qian; Liu, Jianfeng

    2016-01-01

    Ample attention has focused on cancer drug delivery via prodrug nanoparticles due to their high drug loading property and comparatively lower side effects. In this study, we designed a PEG-DOX-Cur prodrug nanoparticle for simultaneous delivery of doxorubicin (DOX) and curcumin (Cur) as a combination therapy to treat cancer. DOX was conjugated to PEG by Schiff’s base reaction. The obtained prodrug conjugate could self-assemble in water at pH 7.4 into nanoparticles (PEG-DOX NPs) and encapsulate Cur into the core through hydrophobic interaction (PEG-DOX-Cur NPs). When the PEG-DOX-Cur NPs are internalized by tumor cells, the Schiff’s base linker between PEG and DOX would break in the acidic environment that is often observed in tumors, causing disassembling of the PEG-DOX-Cur NPs and releasing both DOX and Cur into the nuclei and cytoplasma of the tumor cells, respectively. Compared with free DOX, free Cur, free DOX-Cur combination, or PEG-DOX NPs, PEG-DOX-Cur NPs exhibited higher anti-tumor activity in vitro. In addition, the PEG-DOX-Cur NPs also showed prolonged blood circulation time, elevated local drug accumulation and increased tumor penetration. Enhanced anti-tumor activity was also observed from the PEG-DOX-Cur-treated animals, demonstrating better tumor inhibitory property of the NPs. Thus, the PEG-DOX-Cur prodrug nanoparticle system provides a simple yet efficient approach of drug delivery for chemotherapy. PMID:26876480

  11. Dihydropyrimidine Dehydrogenase Is a Prognostic Marker for Mesenchymal Stem Cell-Mediated Cytosine Deaminase Gene and 5-Fluorocytosine Prodrug Therapy for the Treatment of Recurrent Gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Taemoon; Na, Juri; Kim, Young-il; Chang, Da-Young; Kim, Young Il; Kim, Hyeonjin; Moon, Ho Eun; Kang, Keon Wook; Lee, Dong Soo; Chung, June-Key; Kim, Sung-Soo; Suh-Kim, Haeyoung; Paek, Sun Ha; Youn, Hyewon

    2016-01-01

    We investigated a therapeutic strategy for recurrent malignant gliomas using mesenchymal stem cells (MSC), expressing cytosine deaminase (CD), and prodrug 5-Fluorocytosine (5-FC) as a more specific and less toxic option. MSCs are emerging as a novel cell therapeutic agent with a cancer-targeting property, and CD is considered a promising enzyme in cancer gene therapy which can convert non-toxic 5-FC to toxic 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU). Therefore, use of prodrug 5-FC can minimize normal cell toxicity. Analyses of microarrays revealed that targeting DNA damage and its repair is a selectable option for gliomas after the standard chemo/radio-therapy. 5-FU is the most frequently used anti-cancer drug, which induces DNA breaks. Because dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase (DPD) was reported to be involved in 5-FU metabolism to block DNA damage, we compared the survival rate with 5-FU treatment and the level of DPD expression in 15 different glioma cell lines. DPD-deficient cells showed higher sensitivity to 5-FU, and the regulation of DPD level by either siRNA or overexpression was directly related to the 5-FU sensitivity. For MSC/CD with 5-FC therapy, DPD-deficient cells such as U87MG, GBM28, and GBM37 showed higher sensitivity compared to DPD-high U373 cells. Effective inhibition of tumor growth was also observed in an orthotopic mouse model using DPD- deficient U87MG, indicating that DPD gene expression is indeed closely related to the efficacy of MSC/CD-mediated 5-FC therapy. Our results suggested that DPD can be used as a biomarker for selecting glioma patients who may possibly benefit from this therapy. PMID:27446484

  12. Dihydropyrimidine Dehydrogenase Is a Prognostic Marker for Mesenchymal Stem Cell-Mediated Cytosine Deaminase Gene and 5-Fluorocytosine Prodrug Therapy for the Treatment of Recurrent Gliomas.

    PubMed

    Chung, Taemoon; Na, Juri; Kim, Young-Il; Chang, Da-Young; Kim, Young Il; Kim, Hyeonjin; Moon, Ho Eun; Kang, Keon Wook; Lee, Dong Soo; Chung, June-Key; Kim, Sung-Soo; Suh-Kim, Haeyoung; Paek, Sun Ha; Youn, Hyewon

    2016-01-01

    We investigated a therapeutic strategy for recurrent malignant gliomas using mesenchymal stem cells (MSC), expressing cytosine deaminase (CD), and prodrug 5-Fluorocytosine (5-FC) as a more specific and less toxic option. MSCs are emerging as a novel cell therapeutic agent with a cancer-targeting property, and CD is considered a promising enzyme in cancer gene therapy which can convert non-toxic 5-FC to toxic 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU). Therefore, use of prodrug 5-FC can minimize normal cell toxicity. Analyses of microarrays revealed that targeting DNA damage and its repair is a selectable option for gliomas after the standard chemo/radio-therapy. 5-FU is the most frequently used anti-cancer drug, which induces DNA breaks. Because dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase (DPD) was reported to be involved in 5-FU metabolism to block DNA damage, we compared the survival rate with 5-FU treatment and the level of DPD expression in 15 different glioma cell lines. DPD-deficient cells showed higher sensitivity to 5-FU, and the regulation of DPD level by either siRNA or overexpression was directly related to the 5-FU sensitivity. For MSC/CD with 5-FC therapy, DPD-deficient cells such as U87MG, GBM28, and GBM37 showed higher sensitivity compared to DPD-high U373 cells. Effective inhibition of tumor growth was also observed in an orthotopic mouse model using DPD- deficient U87MG, indicating that DPD gene expression is indeed closely related to the efficacy of MSC/CD-mediated 5-FC therapy. Our results suggested that DPD can be used as a biomarker for selecting glioma patients who may possibly benefit from this therapy. PMID:27446484

  13. Cisplatin Prodrug-Conjugated Gold Nanocluster for Fluorescence Imaging and Targeted Therapy of the Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Fangyuan; Feng, Bing; Yu, Haijun; Wang, Dangge; Wang, Tingting; Liu, Jianping; Meng, Qingshuo; Wang, Siling; Zhang, Pengcheng; Zhang, Zhiwen; Li, Yaping

    2016-01-01

    Theranostic nanomedicine has emerged as a promising modality for cancer diagnosis and treatment. In this study, we report the fabrication of fluorescence gold nanoclusters (GNC) conjugated with a cisplatin prodrug and folic acid (FA) (FA-GNC-Pt) for fluorescence imaging and targeted chemotherapy of breast cancer. The physio-chemical properties of FA-GNC-Pt nanoparticles are thoroughly characterized by fluorescence/UV-Vis spectroscopic measurement, particle size and zeta-potential examination. We find that FA-modification significantly accelerated the cellular uptake and increased the cytotoxicity of GNC-Pt nanoparticles in murine 4T1 breast cancer cells. Fluorescence imaging in vivo using 4T1 tumor bearing nude mouse model shows that FA-GNC-Pt nanoparticles selectively accumulate in the orthotopic 4T1 tumor and generate strong fluorescence signal due to the tumor targeting effect of FA. Moreover, we demonstrate that FA-GNC-Pt nanoparticles significantly inhibit the growth and lung metastasis of the orthotopically implanted 4T1 breast tumors. All these data imply a good potential of the GNC-based theranostic nanoplatform for fluorescence tumor imaging and cancer therapy. PMID:27022415

  14. Synthesis, chemical and enzymatic hydrolysis, and aqueous solubility of amino acid ester prodrugs of 3-carboranyl thymidine analogs for boron neutron capture therapy of brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Hasabelnaby, Sherifa; Goudah, Ayman; Agarwal, Hitesh K; abd Alla, Mosaad S M; Tjarks, Werner

    2012-09-01

    Various water-soluble L-valine-, L-glutamate-, and glycine ester prodrugs of two 3-Carboranyl Thymidine Analogs (3-CTAs), designated N5 and N5-2OH, were synthesized for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) of brain tumors since the water solubilities of the parental compounds proved to be insufficient in preclinical studies. The amino acid ester prodrugs were prepared and stored as hydrochloride salts. The water solubilities of these amino acid ester prodrugs, evaluated in phosphate buffered saline (PBS) at pH 5, pH 6 and pH 7.4, improved 48-6600 times compared with parental N5 and N5-2OH. The stability of the amino acid ester prodrugs was evaluated in PBS at pH 7.4, Bovine serum, and Bovine cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). The rate of the hydrolysis in all three incubation media depended primarily on the amino acid promoiety and, to a lesser extend, on the site of esterification at the deoxyribose portion of the 3-CTAs. In general, 3'-amino acid ester prodrugs were less sensitive to chemical and enzymatic hydrolysis than 5'-amino acid ester prodrugs and the stabilities of the latter decreased in the following order: 5'-valine > 5'-glutamate > 5'-glycine. The rate of the hydrolysis of the 5'-amino acid ester prodrugs in Bovine CSF was overall higher than in PBS and somewhat lower than in Bovine serum. Overall, 5'-glutamate ester prodrug of N5 and the 5'-glycine ester prodrugs of N5 and N5-2OH appeared to be the most promising candidates for preclinical BNCT studies. PMID:22889558

  15. Far-Red Light-Activatable Prodrug of Paclitaxel for the Combined Effects of Photodynamic Therapy and Site-Specific Paclitaxel Chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Thapa, Pritam; Li, Mengjie; Bio, Moses; Rajaputra, Pallavi; Nkepang, Gregory; Sun, Yajing; Woo, Sukyung; You, Youngjae

    2016-04-14

    Paclitaxel (PTX) is one of the most useful chemotherapeutic agents approved for several cancers, including ovarian, breast, pancreatic, and nonsmall cell lung cancer. However, it causes systemic side effects when administered parenterally. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a new strategy for treating local cancers using light and photosensitizer. Unfortunately, PDT is often followed by recurrence due to incomplete ablation of tumors. To overcome these problems, we prepared the far-red light-activatable prodrug of PTX by conjugating photosensitizer via singlet oxygen-cleavable aminoacrylate linker. Tubulin polymerization enhancement and cytotoxicity of prodrugs were dramatically reduced. However, once illuminated with far-red light, the prodrug effectively killed SKOV-3 ovarian cancer cells through the combined effects of PDT and locally released PTX. Ours is the first PTX prodrug that can be activated by singlet oxygen using tissue penetrable and clinically useful far-red light, which kills the cancer cells through the combined effects of PDT and site-specific PTX chemotherapy.

  16. Novel water-soluble prodrugs of acyclovir cleavable by the dipeptidyl-peptidase IV (DPP IV/CD26) enzyme.

    PubMed

    Diez-Torrubia, Alberto; Cabrera, Silvia; de Castro, Sonia; García-Aparicio, Carlos; Mulder, Gwenn; De Meester, Ingrid; Camarasa, María-José; Balzarini, Jan; Velázquez, Sonsoles

    2013-01-01

    We herein report for the first time the successful use of the dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPPIV/CD26) prodrug approach to guanine derivatives such as the antiviral acyclovir (ACV). The solution- and solid-phase synthesis of the tetrapeptide amide prodrug 3 and the tripeptide ester conjugate 4 of acyclovir are reported. The synthesis of the demanding tetrapeptide amide prodrug of ACV 3 was first established in solution and successfully transferred onto solid support by using Ellman's dihydropyran (DHP) resin. In contrast with the valyl ester prodrug (valacyclovir, VACV), the tetrapeptide amide prodrug 3 and the tripeptide ester conjugate 4 of ACV proved fully stable in PBS. Both prodrugs converted to VACV (for 4) or ACV (for 3) upon exposure to purified DPPIV/CD26 or human or bovine serum. Vildagliptin, a potent inhibitor of DPPIV/CD26 efficiently inhibited the DPPIV/CD26-catalysed hydrolysis reaction. Both amide and ester prodrugs of ACV showed pronounced anti-herpetic activity in cell culture and significantly improved the water solubility in comparison with the parent drug.

  17. Mesenchymal stromal cells retrovirally transduced with prodrug-converting genes are suitable vehicles for cancer gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Ďuriniková, E; Kučerová, L; Matúšková, M

    2014-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSC) possess a set of several fairly unique properties which make them ideally suitable both for cellular therapies and regenerative medicine. These include: relative ease of isolation, the ability to differentiate along mesenchymal and non-mesenchymal lineages in vitro and the ability to be extensively expanded in culture without a loss of differentiative capacity. MSC are not only hypoimmunogenic, but they mediate immunosuppression upon transplantation, and possess pronounced anti-inflammatory properties. They are able to home to damaged tissues, tumors, and metastases following systemic administration. The ability of homing holds big promise for tumor-targeted delivery of therapeutic agents. Viruses are naturally evolved vehicles efficiently transferring their genes into host cells. This ability made them suitable for engineering vector systems for the delivery of genes of interest. MSC can be retrovirally transduced with genes encoding prodrug-converting genes (suicide genes), which are not toxic per se, but catalyze the formation of highly toxic metabolites following the application of a nontoxic prodrug. The homing ability of MSC holds advantages compared to virus vehicles which display many shortcomings in effective delivery of the therapeutic agents. Gene therapies mediated by viruses are limited by their restricted ability to track cancer cells infiltrating into the surrounding tissue, and by their low migratory capacity towards tumor. Thus combination of cellular therapy and gene delivery is an attractive option - it protects the vector from immune surveillance, and supports targeted delivery of a therapeutic gene/protein to the tumor site.

  18. Amplifying the red-emission of upconverting nanoparticles for biocompatible clinically used prodrug-induced photodynamic therapy.

    PubMed

    Punjabi, Amol; Wu, Xiang; Tokatli-Apollon, Amira; El-Rifai, Mahmoud; Lee, Hyungseok; Zhang, Yuanwei; Wang, Chao; Liu, Zhuang; Chan, Emory M; Duan, Chunying; Han, Gang

    2014-10-28

    A class of biocompatible upconverting nanoparticles (UCNPs) with largely amplified red-emissions was developed. The optimal UCNP shows a high absolute upconversion quantum yield of 3.2% in red-emission, which is 15-fold stronger than the known optimal β-phase core/shell UCNPs. When conjugated to aminolevulinic acid, a clinically used photodynamic therapy (PDT) prodrug, significant PDT effect in tumor was demonstrated in a deep-tissue (>1.2 cm) setting in vivo at a biocompatible laser power density. Furthermore, we show that our UCNP-PDT system with NIR irradiation outperforms clinically used red light irradiation in a deep tumor setting in vivo. This study marks a major step forward in photodynamic therapy utilizing UCNPs to effectively access deep-set tumors. It also provides an opportunity for the wide application of upconverting red radiation in photonics and biophotonics.

  19. Amplifying the Red-Emission of Upconverting Nanoparticles for Biocompatible Clinically Used Prodrug-Induced Photodynamic Therapy

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Punjabi, Amol; Wu, Xiang; Tokatli-Apollon, Amira; El-Rifai, Mahmoud; Lee, Hyungseok; Zhang, Yuanwei; Wang, Chao; Liu, Zhuang; Chan, Emory M.; Duan, Chunying; et al

    2014-09-25

    A class of biocompatible upconverting nanoparticles (UCNPs) with largely amplified red-emissions was developed. The optimal UCNP shows a high absolute upconversion quantum yield of 3.2% in red-emission, which is 15-fold stronger than the known optimal β-phase core/shell UCNPs. When conjugated to aminolevulinic acid, a clinically used photodynamic therapy (PDT) prodrug, significant PDT effect in tumor was demonstrated in a deep-tissue (>1.2 cm) setting in vivo at a biocompatible laser power density. Furthermore, we show that our UCNP–PDT system with NIR irradiation outperforms clinically used red light irradiation in a deep tumor setting in vivo. This study marks a major stepmore » forward in photodynamic therapy utilizing UCNPs to effectively access deep-set tumors.Lastly, it also provides an opportunity for the wide application of upconverting red radiation in photonics and biophotonics.« less

  20. Amplifying the Red-Emission of Upconverting Nanoparticles for Biocompatible Clinically Used Prodrug-Induced Photodynamic Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Punjabi, Amol; Wu, Xiang; Tokatli-Apollon, Amira; El-Rifai, Mahmoud; Lee, Hyungseok; Zhang, Yuanwei; Wang, Chao; Liu, Zhuang; Chan, Emory M.; Duan, Chunying; Han, Gang

    2014-09-25

    A class of biocompatible upconverting nanoparticles (UCNPs) with largely amplified red-emissions was developed. The optimal UCNP shows a high absolute upconversion quantum yield of 3.2% in red-emission, which is 15-fold stronger than the known optimal β-phase core/shell UCNPs. When conjugated to aminolevulinic acid, a clinically used photodynamic therapy (PDT) prodrug, significant PDT effect in tumor was demonstrated in a deep-tissue (>1.2 cm) setting in vivo at a biocompatible laser power density. Furthermore, we show that our UCNP–PDT system with NIR irradiation outperforms clinically used red light irradiation in a deep tumor setting in vivo. This study marks a major step forward in photodynamic therapy utilizing UCNPs to effectively access deep-set tumors.Lastly, it also provides an opportunity for the wide application of upconverting red radiation in photonics and biophotonics.

  1. Nanoparticle-mediated delivery of a rapidly activatable prodrug of SN-38 for neuroblastoma therapy

    PubMed Central

    Alferiev, Ivan S.; Iyer, Radhika; Croucher, Jamie L.; Adamo, Richard F.; Zhang, Kehan; Mangino, Jennifer L.; Kolla, Venkatadri; Fishbein, Ilia; Brodeur, Garrett M.; Levy, Robert J.; Chorny, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Nanomedicine-based strategies have the potential to improve therapeutic performance of a wide range of anticancer agents. However, the successful implementation of nanoparticulate delivery systems requires the development of adequately sized nanocarriers delivering their therapeutic cargo to the target in a protected, pharmacologically active form. The present studies focused on a novel nanocarrier-based formulation strategy for SN-38, a topoisomerase I inhibitor with proven anticancer potential, whose clinical application is compromised by toxicity, poor stability and incompatibility with conventional delivery vehicles. SN-38 encapsulated in biodegradable sub-100 nm sized nanoparticles (NP) in the form of its rapidly activatable prodrug derivative with tocopherol succinate potently inhibited the growth of neuroblastoma cells in a dose- and exposure time-dependent manner, exhibiting a delayed response pattern distinct from that of free SN-38. In a xenograft model of neuroblastoma, prodrug-loaded NP caused rapid regression of established large tumors, significantly delayed tumor regrowth after treatment cessation and markedly extended animal survival. The NP formulation strategy enabled by a reversible chemical modification of the drug molecule offers a viable means for SN-38 delivery achieving sustained intratumoral drug levels and contributing to the potency and extended duration of antitumor activity, both prerequisites for effective treatment of neuroblastoma and other cancers. PMID:25770994

  2. Docetaxel prodrug liposomes for tumor therapy: characterization, in vitro and in vivo evaluation.

    PubMed

    Ren, Guolian; Liu, Dan; Guo, Weiling; Wang, Menglin; Wu, Chunnuan; Guo, Mengran; Ai, Xiaoyu; Wang, Yongjun; He, Zhonggui

    2016-05-01

    There is a strong desire to develop docetaxel (DTX) formulation with good therapeutic effectiveness in view of serious adverse reactions of the commercial formulation of DTX (Taxotere®). In this study, a redox-responsive DTX-vitamin E prodrug was successfully formulated into liposomes with the drug loading of 4.14% ± 0.10%. Compared with DTX liposomes, the DTX prodrug liposomes (DPLs) showed good stability for 30-d shelf life and during dilution with different media. In vitro antitumor activity of DPLs on human prostatic carcinoma PC-3 cells and human lung cancer A549 cells was evaluated using cytotoxicity and apoptosis assays. In spite of a decrease in in vitro antitumor activity, the in vivo pharmacokinetic study reveals that DPLs exhibit significantly longer DTX plasma half-life (t1/2, 1.38-fold) and higher bioavailability (AUC0-t, 14.49-fold) compared with DTX liposomes. The antitumor activity of DPLs to the A549 tumor xenograft model showed selective accumulation in tumor tissue, significant inhibition the growth of the tumors and a much lower toxicity as seen in body weight loss, compared with DTX-Solution. Taken together, the results showed that DPLs is a promising strategy for DTX antitumor delivery. PMID:26965023

  3. Optimized human CYP4B1 in combination with the alkylator prodrug 4-ipomeanol serves as a novel suicide gene system for adoptive T-cell therapies.

    PubMed

    Roellecke, K; Virts, E L; Einholz, R; Edson, K Z; Altvater, B; Rossig, C; von Laer, D; Scheckenbach, K; Wagenmann, M; Reinhardt, D; Kramm, C M; Rettie, A E; Wiek, C; Hanenberg, H

    2016-07-01

    Engineering autologous or allogeneic T cells to express a suicide gene can control potential toxicity in adoptive T-cell therapies. We recently reported the development of a novel human suicide gene system that is based on an orphan human cytochrome P450 enzyme, CYP4B1, and the naturally occurring alkylator prodrug 4-ipomeanol. The goal of this study was to systematically develop a clinically applicable self-inactivating lentiviral vector for efficient co-expression of CYP4B1 as an ER-located protein with two distinct types of cell surface proteins, either MACS selection genes for donor lymphocyte infusions after allogeneic stem cell transplantation or chimeric antigen receptors for retargeting primary T cells. The U3 region of the myeloproliferative sarcoma virus in combination with the T2A site was found to drive high-level expression of our CYP4B1 mutant with truncated CD34 or CD271 as MACS suitable selection markers. This lentiviral vector backbone was also well suited for co-expression of CYP4B1 with a codon-optimized CD19 chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) construct. Finally, 4-ipomeanol efficiently induced apoptosis in primary T cells that co-express mutant CYP4B1 and the divergently located MACS selection and CAR genes. In conclusion, we here developed a clinically suited lentiviral vector that supports high-level co-expression of cell surface proteins with a potent novel human suicide gene. PMID:27092941

  4. Recent Trends in Targeted Anticancer Prodrug and Conjugate Design

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Yashveer; Palombo, Matthew; Sinko, Patrick J.

    2009-01-01

    Anticancer drugs are often nonselective antiproliferative agents (cytotoxins) that preferentially kill dividing cells by attacking their DNA at some level. The lack of selectivity results in significant toxicity to noncancerous proliferating cells. These toxicities along with drug resistance exhibited by the solid tumors are major therapy limiting factors that results into poor prognosis for patients. Prodrug and conjugate design involves the synthesis of inactive drug derivatives that are converted to an active form inside the body and preferably at the site of action. Classical prodrug and conjugate design has focused on the development of prodrugs that can overcome physicochemical (e.g., solubility, chemical instability) or biopharmaceutical problems (e.g., bioavailability, toxicity) associated with common anticancer drugs. The recent targeted prodrug and conjugate design, on the other hand, hinges on the selective delivery of anticancer agents to tumor tissues thereby avoiding their cytotoxic effects on noncancerous cells. Targeting strategies have attempted to take advantage of low extracellular pH, elevated enzymes in tumor tissues, the hypoxic environment inside the tumor core, and tumor-specific antigens expressed on tumor cell surfaces. The present review highlights recent trends in prodrug and conjugate rationale and design for cancer treatment. The various approaches that are currently being explored are critically analyzed and a comparative account of the advantages and disadvantages associated with each approach is presented. PMID:18691040

  5. The cytostatic activity of NUC-3073, a phosphoramidate prodrug of 5-fluoro-2'-deoxyuridine, is independent of activation by thymidine kinase and insensitive to degradation by phosphorolytic enzymes.

    PubMed

    Vande Voorde, Johan; Liekens, Sandra; McGuigan, Christopher; Murziani, Paola G S; Slusarczyk, Magdalena; Balzarini, Jan

    2011-09-01

    A novel phosphoramidate nucleotide prodrug of the anticancer nucleoside analogue 5-fluoro-2'-deoxyuridine (5-FdUrd) was synthesized and evaluated for its cytostatic activity. Whereas 5-FdUrd substantially lost its cytostatic potential in thymidine kinase (TK)-deficient murine leukaemia L1210 and human lymphocyte CEM cell cultures, NUC-3073 markedly kept its antiproliferative activity in TK-deficient tumour cells, and thus is largely independent of intracellular TK activity to exert its cytostatic action. NUC-3073 was found to inhibit thymidylate synthase (TS) in the TK-deficient and wild-type cell lines at drug concentrations that correlated well with its cytostatic activity in these cells. NUC-3073 does not seem to be susceptible to inactivation by catabolic enzymes such as thymidine phosphorylase (TP) and uridine phosphorylase (UP). These findings are in line with our observations that 5-FdUrd, but not NUC-3073, substantially loses its cytostatic potential in the presence of TP-expressing mycoplasmas in the tumour cell cultures. Therefore, we propose NUC-3073 as a novel 5-FdUrd phosphoramidate prodrug that (i) may circumvent potential resistance mechanisms of tumour cells (e.g. decreased TK activity) and (ii) is not degraded by catabolic enzymes such as TP which is often upregulated in tumour cells or expressed in mycoplasma-infected tumour tissue.

  6. Engineering of lipid prodrug-based, hyaluronic acid-decorated nanostructured lipid carriers platform for 5-fluorouracil and cisplatin combination gastric cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Chun-Ying; Zhou, Min; Chen, Ying-wei; Chen, Mei-mei; Shen, Feng; Xu, Lei-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The first-line chemotherapy treatment protocol for gastric cancer is combination chemotherapy of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and cisplatin (CDDP). The aim of this study was to engineer prodrug-based nanostructured lipid carriers (NLC) platform for codelivery of 5-FU and CDDP to enhance therapy and decrease toxicity. Methods First, 5-FU-stearic acid lipid conjugate was synthesized by two steps. Second, 5-FU-stearic acid prodrug and CDDP were loaded in NLC. Finally, hyaluronic acid (HA) was coated onto NLC surface. Average size, zeta potential, and drug loading capacity of NLC were evaluated. Human gastric cancer cell line BGC823 (BGC823 cells) was used for the testing of in vitro cytotoxicity assays. In vivo antitumor activity of NLC was evaluated in mice bearing BGC823 cells model. Results HA-coated 5-FU-stearic acid prodrug and CDDP-loaded NLC (HA-FU/C-NLC) showed a synergistic effect in combination therapy and displayed the greatest antitumor activity than all of the free drugs or uncoated NLC in vitro and in vivo. Conclusion This work reveals that HA-coated NLC could be used as a novel carrier to code-liver 5-FU and CDDP for gastric cancer therapy. HA-FU/C-NLC could be a promising targeted and combinational therapy in nanomedicine. PMID:26089667

  7. Seneca Valley Virus 3Cpro Substrate Optimization Yields Efficient Substrates for Use in Peptide-Prodrug Therapy.

    PubMed

    Miles, Linde A; Brennen, W Nathaniel; Rudin, Charles M; Poirier, John T

    2015-01-01

    The oncolytic picornavirus Seneca Valley Virus (SVV-001) demonstrates anti-tumor activity in models of small cell lung cancer (SCLC), but may ultimately need to be combined with cytotoxic therapies to improve responses observed in patients. Combining SVV-001 virotherapy with a peptide prodrug activated by the viral protease 3Cpro is a novel strategy that may increase the therapeutic potential of SVV-001. Using recombinant SVV-001 3Cpro, we measured cleavage kinetics of predicted SVV-001 3Cpro substrates. An efficient substrate, L/VP4 (kcat/KM = 1932 ± 183 M(-1)s(-1)), was further optimized by a P2' N→P substitution yielding L/VP4.1 (kcat/KM = 17446 ± 2203 M(-1)s(-1)). We also determined essential substrate amino acids by sequential N-terminal deletion and substitution of amino acids found in other picornavirus genera. A peptide corresponding to the L/VP4.1 substrate was selectively cleaved by SVV-001 3Cpro in vitro and was stable in human plasma. These data define an optimized peptide substrate for SVV-001 3Cpro, with direct implications for anti-cancer therapeutic development. PMID:26069962

  8. Seneca Valley Virus 3Cpro Substrate Optimization Yields Efficient Substrates for Use in Peptide-Prodrug Therapy.

    PubMed

    Miles, Linde A; Brennen, W Nathaniel; Rudin, Charles M; Poirier, John T

    2015-01-01

    The oncolytic picornavirus Seneca Valley Virus (SVV-001) demonstrates anti-tumor activity in models of small cell lung cancer (SCLC), but may ultimately need to be combined with cytotoxic therapies to improve responses observed in patients. Combining SVV-001 virotherapy with a peptide prodrug activated by the viral protease 3Cpro is a novel strategy that may increase the therapeutic potential of SVV-001. Using recombinant SVV-001 3Cpro, we measured cleavage kinetics of predicted SVV-001 3Cpro substrates. An efficient substrate, L/VP4 (kcat/KM = 1932 ± 183 M(-1)s(-1)), was further optimized by a P2' N→P substitution yielding L/VP4.1 (kcat/KM = 17446 ± 2203 M(-1)s(-1)). We also determined essential substrate amino acids by sequential N-terminal deletion and substitution of amino acids found in other picornavirus genera. A peptide corresponding to the L/VP4.1 substrate was selectively cleaved by SVV-001 3Cpro in vitro and was stable in human plasma. These data define an optimized peptide substrate for SVV-001 3Cpro, with direct implications for anti-cancer therapeutic development.

  9. Pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy during pancreatic insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Berry, Amy J

    2014-06-01

    Pancreatic stimulation and therefore digestion is a tightly controlled and hormonally mediated process. Any alterations affecting any of the systematic steps for successful digestion and absorption to occur will impair appropriate pancreatic enzymatic secretion, entry into the bowel lumen, functionality once inside the lumen, and thus appropriate mixing with foods and nutrients. Many causes of pancreatic insufficiency may require the initiation of pancreatic enzyme therapy, including but not limited to cystic fibrosis, pancreatic cancer, acute and chronic pancreatitis, and pancreatic surgery. This purpose of this article is to help clarify the conditions that cause pancreatic insufficiency, how to determine if the patient is malabsorbing, and the best use of pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy for treatment in these conditions. The first step in determining if pancreatic enzyme therapy is appropriate is to determine if the patient is malabsorbing specifically due to pancreatic exocrine insufficiency. An overview of the methods used to determine pancreatic insufficiency is provided, as well as appropriate treatment methods. Recent Food and Drug Administration regulations require a more thorough process, including randomized controlled trials to prove the safety and efficacy of pancreatic enzymes, to approve them for use. The studies used to verify efficacy also are examined. Last, dosing guidelines and some unconventional ways to administer pancreatic enzymes, such as during enteral feedings, are reviewed.

  10. Oral enzyme therapy for celiac sprue

    PubMed Central

    Bethune, Michael T; Khosla, Chaitan

    2012-01-01

    Celiac sprue is an inflammatory disease of the small intestine caused by dietary gluten and treated by adherence to a lifelong gluten-free diet. The recent identification of immunodominant gluten peptides, the discovery of their cogent properties, and the elucidation of the mechanisms by which they engender immunopathology in genetically-susceptible individuals have advanced our understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of this complex disease, enabling the rational design of new therapeutic strategies. The most clinically advanced of these is oral enzyme therapy, in which enzymes capable of proteolyzing gluten (i.e. glutenases) are delivered to the alimentary tract of a celiac sprue patient to detoxify ingested gluten in situ. In this chapter, we discuss the key challenges for discovery and preclinical development of oral enzyme therapies for celiac sprue. Methods for lead identification, assay development, gram-scale production and formulation, and lead optimization for next-generation proteases are described and critically assessed. PMID:22208988

  11. GR-891: a novel 5-fluorouracil acyclonucleoside prodrug for differentiation therapy in rhabdomyosarcoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Marchal, J A; Prados, J; Melguizo, C; Gómez, J A; Campos, J; Gallo, M A; Espinosa, A; Arena, N; Aránega, A

    1999-01-01

    Differentiation therapy provides an alternative treatment of cancer that overcomes the undesirable effects of classical chemotherapy, i.e. cytotoxicity and resistance to drugs. This new approach to cancer therapy focuses on the development of specific agents designed to selectively engage the process of terminal differentiation, leading to the elimination of tumorigenic cells and recovery of normal cell homeostasis. A series of new anti-cancer pyrimidine acyclonucleoside-like compounds were designed and synthesized by structural modifications of 5-fluorouracil, a drug which causes considerable cell toxicity and morbidity, and we evaluated their applicability for differentiation therapy in human rhabdomyosarcoma cells. We tested the pyrimidine derivative GR-891, (RS)-1-{[3-(2-hydroxyethoxy)-1-isopropoxy]propyl}-5-fluorouracil, an active drug which shows low toxicity in vivo and releases acrolein which is an aldehyde with anti-tumour activity. Both GR-891 and 5-fluorouracil caused time- and dose-dependent growth inhibition in vitro; however, GR-891 showed no cytotoxicity at low doses (22.5 μmol l−1 and 45 μmol l−1) and induced terminal myogenic differentiation in RD cells (a rhabdomyosarcoma cell line) treated for 6 days. Changes in morphological features and in protein organization indicated re-entry in the pathway of muscular maturation. Moreover, GR-891 increased adhesion capability mediated by the expression of fibronectin, and did not induce overexpression of P-glycoprotein, the mdr1 gene product, implicated in multidrug resistance. New acyclonucleoside-like compounds such as GR-891 have important potential advantages over 5-fluorouracil because of their lower toxicity and their ability to induce myogenic differentiation in rhabdomyosarcoma cells. Our results suggest that this drug may be useful for differentiation therapy in this type of tumour. 1999 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10070873

  12. Controlled Au-Polymer Nanostructures for Multiphoton Imaging, Prodrug Delivery, and Chemo-Photothermal Therapy Platforms.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chih-Chia; Liu, Tzu-Ming

    2015-11-18

    We have successfully introduced a proton-induced controlled reaction of HAuCl4 and poly(styrene-alt-maleic acid) (PSMA) sodium salt to prepare triangular and multicore Au@polymer nanoparticles (NPs). The interparticle interactions in the core gave rise to an absorption band at the near-infrared wavelength. The near-infrared optical properties of the resulting Au-polymer nanostructures are highly stable in a physiological environment, which offered strong photo-to-thermal conversion by a moderate continuous-wave 808 nm laser and exhibited multiphoton fluorescence for imaging using a 1230 nm light excitation (femtosecond laser). Exposure of the carboxylate groups at the polymer shell made the surface structure of the Au multicore @polymer NPs directly conjugate Pt(II)-/Pt(IV)-based drugs, which possessed the elimination of the immediate toxicity over the short time and resulted in an anticancer effect after 3 days. A synergistic effect of the chemo-photothermal therapy showed a moderate hyperthermia assistance (<1 W/cm(2)) and better anticancer performance over time compared with the individual treatments. We demonstrated that such PSMA-based methodology not only enables a broad range of chemical material synthesis in the kinetic control to form Au nano-octahedrons and nanotriangles using Br(-)/I(-) ions additives but also could be extended to form Au/Fe3O4@polymer nanocomposites via proton-assisted PSMA self-assembly. PMID:26501876

  13. Recombinant Enzyme Replacement Therapy in Hypophosphatasia.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, Christine; Jakob, Franz; Seefried, Lothar; Mentrup, Birgit; Graser, Stephanie; Plotkin, Horacio; Girschick, Hermann J; Liese, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    Hypophosphatasia (HPP) is a rare monogenetic and multisystemic disease with involvement of different organs, including bone, muscle, kidney, lung, gastrointestinal tract and the nervous system. The exact metabolic mechanisms of the effects of TNAP deficiency in different tissues are not understood in detail. There is no approved specific treatment for HPP; therefore symptomatic treatment in order to improve the clinical features is of major interest. Enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) is a relatively new type of treatment based on the principle of administering a medical treatment replacing a defective or absent enzyme. Recently ERT with a bone targeted recombinant human TNAP molecule has been reported to be efficient in ten severely affected patients and improved survival of life threatening forms. These results are very promising especially with regard to the skeletal phenotype but it is unclear whether ERT also has beneficial effects for craniosynostosis and in other affected tissues in HPP such as brain and kidney. Long-term data are not yet available and further systematic clinical trials are needed. It is also necessary to establish therapeutic approaches to help patients who are affected by less severe forms of HPP but also suffer from a significant reduction in quality of life. Further basic research on TNAP function and role in different tissues and on its physiological substrates is critical to gain a better insight in the pathogenesis in HPP. This and further experiences in new therapeutic strategies may improve the prognosis and quality of life of patients with all forms of HPP.

  14. Co-Delivery of Cisplatin Prodrug and Chlorin e6 by Mesoporous Silica Nanoparticles for Chemo-Photodynamic Combination Therapy to Combat Drug Resistance.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Shen, Jianliang; Su, Hua; Mu, Ge; Sun, Jing-Hua; Tan, Cai-Ping; Liang, Xing-Jie; Ji, Liang-Nian; Mao, Zong-Wan

    2016-06-01

    Combination therapy shows great promise in circumventing cisplatin resistance. We report herein the development of a novel nanoscale drug delivery system (nDDS) based nanotherapeutic that combines chemotherapy and photodynamic therapy (PDT) into one single platform to achieve synergistic anticancer capacity to conquer cisplatin resistance. Mesoporous silica nanoparticle (MSNs) was used as the drug delivery vector to conjugate cisplatin prodrug and to load photosensitizer chlorin e6 (Ce6) to afford the dual drug loaded delivery system MSNs/Ce6/Pt. The hybrid nanoparticles have an average diameter of about 100 nm and slightly positive surface charge of about 18.2 mV. The MSNs/Ce6/Pt nanoparticles can be efficiently internalized by cells through endocytosis, thereby achieving much higher cellular Pt uptake than cisplatin in cisplatin-resistant A549R lung cancer cells. After 660 nm light irradiation (10 mW/cm(2)), the cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) level in MSNs/Ce6/Pt treated cells was elevated dramatically. As a result of these properties, MSNs/Ce6/Pt exhibited very potent anticancer activity against A549R cells, giving a half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) value for the combination therapy of 0.53 μM, much lower than that of cisplatin (25.1 μM). This study suggests the great potential of nDDS-based nanotherapeutic for combined chemo-photodynamic therapy to circumvent cisplatin resistance.

  15. Design and analysis of immune-evading enzymes for ADEPT therapy

    PubMed Central

    Osipovitch, Daniel C.; Parker, Andrew S.; Makokha, Christabell D.; Desrosiers, Joseph; Kett, Warren C.; Moise, Leonard; Bailey-Kellogg, Chris; Griswold, Karl E.

    2012-01-01

    The unparalleled specificity and activity of therapeutic proteins has reshaped many aspects of modern clinical practice, and aggressive development of new protein drugs promises a continued revolution in disease therapy. As a result of their biological origins, however, therapeutic proteins present unique design challenges for the biomolecular engineer. For example, protein drugs are subject to immune surveillance within the patient's body; this anti-drug immune response can compromise therapeutic efficacy and even threaten patient safety. Thus, there is a growing demand for broadly applicable protein deimmunization strategies. We have recently developed optimization algorithms that integrate computational prediction of T-cell epitopes and bioinformatics-based assessment of the structural and functional consequences of epitope-deleting mutations. Here, we describe the first experimental validation of our deimmunization algorithms using Enterobacter cloacae P99 β-lactamase, a component of antibody-directed enzyme prodrug cancer therapies. Compared with wild-type or a previously deimmunized variant, our computationally optimized sequences exhibited significantly less in vitro binding to human type II major histocompatibility complex immune molecules. At the same time, our globally optimal design exhibited wild-type catalytic proficiency. We conclude that our deimmunization algorithms guide the protein engineer towards promising immunoevasive candidates and thereby have the potential to streamline biotherapeutic development. PMID:22898588

  16. Management of Gaucher disease: enzyme replacement therapy.

    PubMed

    Zimran, Ari; Elstein, Deborah

    2014-09-01

    Starting in 1994, 3 years after the first approval of the placental-derived enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) with alglucerase, the recombinant form imiglucerase was the introduced and became the standard of care for the visceral symptoms of Gaucher disease. For patients with non-neuronopathic (type 1) Gaucher disease, ERT is safe, with few adverse/side events, and effective in reducing hepatosplenomegaly, improving hematological parameters such as anemia and thrombocytopenia, and to a lesser degree, ameliorating lung- and bone-referred disease. Dosage differences are appreciated mainly as differences in the initial slope in achieving improvements before plateauing. Because ERT does not pass the blood-brain barrier, for patients with the acute neuronopathic form (type 2), there is no substantial change in the life-threatening neurological parameters and hence ERT is not seen as efficacious; but for patients with sub-acute neuronopathic forms (type 3), ERT for the often devastating visceral symptoms, improved quality of life, and longevity make ERT part of the standard care. Due to a world-wide reduction in imiglucerase availability mid-2009 that was not resolved quickly, patients were ERT-stopped or dose-reduced, re-invigorated the movement to provide additional therapeutic options. Early access programs of two new ERTs, then at the pre-license stage, were initiated at regulatory authorities' request for patients requiring ERT. At that point, velaglucerase alfa which has the native-enzyme sequence produced in a (proprietary) human cell line, and taliglucerase alfa, which is plant-cell-derived and produced in an inexpensive platform, were completing Phase 3 clinical trials. Velaglucerase alfa was FDA-approved in February 2010 while taliglucerase alfo was approved in May 2012. Marketing of these ERTs has also targeted the extraordinarily high cost of imiglucerase. However, with > 20 years' experience with infusible ERTs, many patients are eager to consider oral

  17. Enzymes approved for human therapy: indications, mechanisms and adverse effects.

    PubMed

    Baldo, Brian A

    2015-02-01

    Research and drug developments fostered under orphan drug product development programs have greatly assisted the introduction of efficient and safe enzyme-based therapies for a range of rare disorders. The introduction and regulatory approval of 20 different recombinant enzymes has enabled, often for the first time, effective enzyme-replacement therapy for some lysosomal storage disorders, including Gaucher (imiglucerase, taliglucerase, and velaglucerase), Fabry (agalsidase alfa and beta), and Pompe (alglucosidase alfa) diseases and mucopolysaccharidoses I (laronidase), II (idursulfase), IVA (elosulfase), and VI (galsulfase). Approved recombinant enzymes are also now used as therapy for myocardial infarction (alteplase, reteplase, and tenecteplase), cystic fibrosis (dornase alfa), chronic gout (pegloticase), tumor lysis syndrome (rasburicase), leukemia (L-asparaginase), some collagen-based disorders such as Dupuytren's contracture (collagenase), severe combined immunodeficiency disease (pegademase bovine), detoxification of methotrexate (glucarpidase), and vitreomacular adhesion (ocriplasmin). The development of these efficacious and safe enzyme-based therapies has occurred hand in hand with some remarkable advances in the preparation of the often specifically designed recombinant enzymes; the manufacturing expertise necessary for commercial production; our understanding of underlying mechanisms operative in the different diseases; and the mechanisms of action of the relevant recombinant enzymes. Together with information on these mechanisms, safety findings recorded so far on the various adverse events and problems of immunogenicity of the recombinant enzymes used for therapy are presented. PMID:25648140

  18. Enzymes approved for human therapy: indications, mechanisms and adverse effects.

    PubMed

    Baldo, Brian A

    2015-02-01

    Research and drug developments fostered under orphan drug product development programs have greatly assisted the introduction of efficient and safe enzyme-based therapies for a range of rare disorders. The introduction and regulatory approval of 20 different recombinant enzymes has enabled, often for the first time, effective enzyme-replacement therapy for some lysosomal storage disorders, including Gaucher (imiglucerase, taliglucerase, and velaglucerase), Fabry (agalsidase alfa and beta), and Pompe (alglucosidase alfa) diseases and mucopolysaccharidoses I (laronidase), II (idursulfase), IVA (elosulfase), and VI (galsulfase). Approved recombinant enzymes are also now used as therapy for myocardial infarction (alteplase, reteplase, and tenecteplase), cystic fibrosis (dornase alfa), chronic gout (pegloticase), tumor lysis syndrome (rasburicase), leukemia (L-asparaginase), some collagen-based disorders such as Dupuytren's contracture (collagenase), severe combined immunodeficiency disease (pegademase bovine), detoxification of methotrexate (glucarpidase), and vitreomacular adhesion (ocriplasmin). The development of these efficacious and safe enzyme-based therapies has occurred hand in hand with some remarkable advances in the preparation of the often specifically designed recombinant enzymes; the manufacturing expertise necessary for commercial production; our understanding of underlying mechanisms operative in the different diseases; and the mechanisms of action of the relevant recombinant enzymes. Together with information on these mechanisms, safety findings recorded so far on the various adverse events and problems of immunogenicity of the recombinant enzymes used for therapy are presented.

  19. Enzyme replacement therapy for pancreatic insufficiency: present and future

    PubMed Central

    Fieker, Aaron; Philpott, Jessica; Armand, Martine

    2011-01-01

    Pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy is currently the mainstay of treatment for nutrient malabsorption secondary to pancreatic insufficiency. This treatment is safe and has few side effects. Data demonstrate efficacy in reducing steatorrhea and fat malabsorption. Effective therapy has been limited by the ability to replicate the physiologic process of enzyme delivery to the appropriate site, in general the duodenum, at the appropriate time. The challenges include enzyme destruction in the stomach, lack of adequate mixing with the chyme in the duodenum, and failing to deliver and activate at the appropriate time. Treatment is begun when clinically significant malabsorption occurs resulting in steatorrhea and weight loss. Treatment failure is addressed in a sequential fashion. Current research is aimed at studying new enzymes and delivery systems to improve the efficiency of action in the duodenum along with developing better means to monitor therapy. PMID:21753892

  20. Systemically Injectable Enzyme-Loaded Polyion Complex Vesicles as In Vivo Nanoreactors Functioning in Tumors.

    PubMed

    Anraku, Yasutaka; Kishimura, Akihiro; Kamiya, Mako; Tanaka, Sayaka; Nomoto, Takahiro; Toh, Kazuko; Matsumoto, Yu; Fukushima, Shigeto; Sueyoshi, Daiki; Kano, Mitsunobu R; Urano, Yasuteru; Nishiyama, Nobuhiro; Kataoka, Kazunori

    2016-01-11

    The design and construction of nanoreactors are important for biomedical applications of enzymes, but lipid- and polymeric-vesicle-based nanoreactors have some practical limitations. We have succeeded in preparing enzyme-loaded polyion complex vesicles (PICsomes) through a facile protein-loading method. The preservation of enzyme activity was confirmed even after cross-linking of the PICsomes. The cross-linked β-galactosidase-loaded PICsomes (β-gal@PICsomes) selectively accumulated in the tumor tissue of mice. Moreover, a model prodrug, HMDER-βGal, was successfully converted into a highly fluorescent product, HMDER, at the tumor site, even 4 days after administration of the β-gal@PICsomes. Intravital confocal microscopy showed continuous production of HMDER and its distribution throughout the tumor tissues. Thus, enzyme-loaded PICsomes are useful for prodrug activation at the tumor site and could be a versatile platform for enzyme delivery in enzyme prodrug therapy.

  1. Systemically Injectable Enzyme-Loaded Polyion Complex Vesicles as In Vivo Nanoreactors Functioning in Tumors.

    PubMed

    Anraku, Yasutaka; Kishimura, Akihiro; Kamiya, Mako; Tanaka, Sayaka; Nomoto, Takahiro; Toh, Kazuko; Matsumoto, Yu; Fukushima, Shigeto; Sueyoshi, Daiki; Kano, Mitsunobu R; Urano, Yasuteru; Nishiyama, Nobuhiro; Kataoka, Kazunori

    2016-01-11

    The design and construction of nanoreactors are important for biomedical applications of enzymes, but lipid- and polymeric-vesicle-based nanoreactors have some practical limitations. We have succeeded in preparing enzyme-loaded polyion complex vesicles (PICsomes) through a facile protein-loading method. The preservation of enzyme activity was confirmed even after cross-linking of the PICsomes. The cross-linked β-galactosidase-loaded PICsomes (β-gal@PICsomes) selectively accumulated in the tumor tissue of mice. Moreover, a model prodrug, HMDER-βGal, was successfully converted into a highly fluorescent product, HMDER, at the tumor site, even 4 days after administration of the β-gal@PICsomes. Intravital confocal microscopy showed continuous production of HMDER and its distribution throughout the tumor tissues. Thus, enzyme-loaded PICsomes are useful for prodrug activation at the tumor site and could be a versatile platform for enzyme delivery in enzyme prodrug therapy. PMID:26629778

  2. Dual-therapeutic reporter genes fusion for enhanced cancer gene therapy and imaging.

    PubMed

    Sekar, T V; Foygel, K; Willmann, J K; Paulmurugan, R

    2013-05-01

    Two of the successful gene-directed enzyme prodrug therapies include herpes simplex virus-thymidine kinase (HSV1-TK) enzyme-ganciclovir prodrug and the Escherichia coli nitroreductase (NTR) enzyme-CB1954 prodrug strategies; these enzyme-prodrug combinations produce activated cytotoxic metabolites of the prodrugs capable of tumor cell death by inhibiting DNA synthesis and killing quiescent cells, respectively. Both these strategies also affect significant bystander cell killing of neighboring tumor cells that do not express these enzymes. We have developed a dual-combination gene strategy, where we identified HSV1-TK and NTR fused in a particular orientation can effectively kill tumor cells when the tumor cells are treated with a fusion HSV1-TK-NTR gene- along with a prodrug combination of GCV and CB1954. In order to determine whether the dual-system demonstrate superior therapeutic efficacy than either HSV1-TK or NTR systems alone, we conducted both in vitro and in vivo tumor xenograft studies using triple negative SUM159 breast cancer cells, by evaluating the efficacy of cell death by apoptosis and necrosis upon treatment with the dual HSV1-TK genes-GCV-CB1954 prodrugs system, and compared the efficiency to HSV1-TK-GCV and NTR-CB1954. Our cell-based studies, tumor regression studies in xenograft mice, histological analyses of treated tumors and bystander studies indicate that the dual HSV1-TK-NTR-prodrug system is two times more efficient even with half the doses of both prodrugs than the respective single gene-prodrug system, as evidenced by enhanced apoptosis and necrosis of tumor cells in vitro in culture and xenograft of tumor tissues in animals.

  3. Rational Design of Antirheumatic Prodrugs Specific for Sites of Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Onuoha, Shimobi C.; Ferrari, Mathieu; Sblattero, Daniele

    2015-01-01

    Objective Biologic drugs, such as the anti–tumor necrosis factor (anti‐TNF) antibody adalimumab, have represented a breakthrough in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. Yet, concerns remain over their lack of efficacy in a sizable proportion of patients and their potential for systemic side effects such as infection. Improved biologic prodrugs specifically targeted to the site of inflammation have the potential to alleviate current concerns surrounding biologic anticytokine therapies. The purpose of this study was to design, construct, and evaluate in vitro and ex vivo the targeting and antiinflammatory capacity of activatable bispecific antibodies. Methods Activatable dual variable domain (aDVD) antibodies were designed and constructed to target intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM‐1), which is up‐regulated at sites of inflammation, and anti‐TNF antibodies (adalimumab and infliximab). These bispecific molecules included an external arm that targets ICAM‐1 and an internal arm that comprises the therapeutic domain of an anti‐TNF antibody. Both arms were linked to matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)–cleavable linkers. The constructs were tested for their ability to bind and neutralize both in vitro and ex vivo targets. Results Intact aDVD constructs demonstrated significantly reduced binding and anti‐TNF activity in the prodrug formulation as compared to the parent antibodies. Human synovial fluid and physiologic concentrations of MMP enzyme were capable of cleaving the external domain of the antibody, revealing a fully active molecule. Activated antibodies retained the same binding and anti‐TNF inhibitory capacities as the parent molecules. Conclusion The design of a biologic prodrug with enhanced specificity for sites of inflammation (synovium) and reduced specificity for off‐target TNF is described. This construct has the potential to form a platform technology that is capable of enhancing the therapeutic index of drugs for the treatment of

  4. Gene therapy for brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Bansal, K; Engelhard, H H

    2000-09-01

    "Gene therapy" can be defined as the transfer of genetic material into a patient's cells for therapeutic purposes. To date, a diverse and creative assortment of treatment strategies utilizing gene therapy have been devised, including gene transfer for modulating the immune system, enzyme prodrug ("suicide gene") therapy, oncolytic therapy, replacement/therapeutic gene transfer, and antisense therapy. For malignant glioma, gene-directed prodrug therapy using the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase gene was the first gene therapy attempted clinically. A variety of different strategies have now been pursued experimentally and in clinical trials. Although, to date, gene therapy for brain tumors has been found to be reasonably safe, concerns still exist regarding issues related to viral delivery, transduction efficiency, potential pathologic response of the brain, and treatment efficacy. Improved viral vectors are being sought, and potential use of gene therapy in combination with other treatments is being investigated.

  5. Homology modeling of human γ-butyric acid transporters and the binding of pro-drugs 5-aminolevulinic acid and methyl aminolevulinic acid used in photodynamic therapy.

    PubMed

    Baglo, Yan; Gabrielsen, Mari; Sylte, Ingebrigt; Gederaas, Odrun A

    2013-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a safe and effective method currently used in the treatment of skin cancer. In ALA-based PDT, 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA), or ALA esters, are used as pro-drugs to induce the formation of the potent photosensitizer protoporphyrin IX (PpIX). Activation of PpIX by light causes the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and toxic responses. Studies have indicated that ALA and its methyl ester (MAL) are taken up into the cells via γ-butyric acid (GABA) transporters (GATs). Uptake via GATs into peripheral sensory nerve endings may also account for one of the few adverse side effects of ALA-based PDT, namely pain. In the present study, homology models of the four human GAT subtypes were constructed using three x-ray crystal structures of the homologous leucine transporter (LeuT) as templates. Binding of the native substrate GABA and the possible substrates ALA and MAL was investigated by molecular docking of the ligands into the central putative substrate binding sites in the outward-occluded GAT models. Electrostatic potentials (ESPs) of the putative substrate translocation pathway of each subtype were calculated using the outward-open and inward-open homology models. Our results suggested that ALA is a substrate of all four GATs and that MAL is a substrate of GAT-2, GAT-3 and BGT-1. The ESP calculations indicated that differences likely exist in the entry pathway of the transporters (i.e. in outward-open conformations). Such differences may be exploited for development of inhibitors that selectively target specific GAT subtypes and the homology models may hence provide tools for design of therapeutic inhibitors that can be used to reduce ALA-induced pain. PMID:23762315

  6. Bioengineering Novel Chimeric microRNA-34a for Prodrug Cancer Therapy: High-Yield Expression and Purification, and Structural and Functional Characterization

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei-Peng; Ho, Pui Yan; Chen, Qiu-Xia; Addepalli, Balasubrahmanyam; Limbach, Patrick A.; Li, Mei-Mei; Wu, Wen-Juan; Jilek, Joseph L.; Qiu, Jing-Xin; Zhang, Hong-Jian; Li, Tianhong; Wun, Theodore; White, Ralph DeVere; Lam, Kit S.

    2015-01-01

    Development of anticancer treatments based on microRNA (miRNA/miR) such as miR-34a replacement therapy is limited to the use of synthetic RNAs with artificial modifications. Herein, we present a new approach to a high-yield and large-scale biosynthesis, in Escherichia coli using transfer RNA (tRNA) scaffold, of chimeric miR-34a agent, which may act as a prodrug for anticancer therapy. The recombinant tRNA fusion pre–miR-34a (tRNA/mir-34a) was quickly purified to a high degree of homogeneity (>98%) using anion-exchange fast protein liquid chromatography, whose primary sequence and post-transcriptional modifications were directly characterized by mass spectrometric analyses. Chimeric tRNA/mir-34a showed a favorable cellular stability while it was degradable by several ribonucleases. Deep sequencing and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction studies revealed that tRNA-carried pre–miR-34a was precisely processed to mature miR-34a within human carcinoma cells, and the same tRNA fragments were produced from tRNA/mir-34a and the control tRNA scaffold (tRNA/MSA). Consequently, tRNA/mir-34a inhibited the proliferation of various types of human carcinoma cells in a dose-dependent manner and to a much greater degree than the control tRNA/MSA, which was mechanistically attributable to the reduction of miR-34a target genes. Furthermore, tRNA/mir-34a significantly suppressed the growth of human non–small-cell lung cancer A549 and hepatocarcinoma HepG2 xenograft tumors in mice, compared with the same dose of tRNA/MSA. In addition, recombinant tRNA/mir-34a had no or minimal effect on blood chemistry and interleukin-6 level in mouse models, suggesting that recombinant RNAs were well tolerated. These findings provoke a conversation on producing biologic miRNAs to perform miRNA actions, and point toward a new direction in developing miRNA-based therapies. PMID:26022002

  7. Activation of multiple chemotherapeutic prodrugs by the natural enzymolome of tumour-localised probiotic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Lehouritis, Panos; Stanton, Michael; McCarthy, Florence O; Jeavons, Matthieu; Tangney, Mark

    2016-01-28

    Some chemotherapeutic drugs (prodrugs) require activation by an enzyme for efficacy. We and others have demonstrated the ability of probiotic bacteria to grow specifically within solid tumours following systemic administration, and we hypothesised that the natural enzymatic activity of these tumour-localised bacteria may be suitable for activation of certain such chemotherapeutic drugs. Several wild-type probiotic bacteria; Escherichia coli Nissle, Bifidobacterium breve, Lactococcus lactis and Lactobacillus species, were screened against a panel of popular prodrugs. All strains were capable of activating at least one prodrug. E. coli Nissle 1917 was selected for further studies because of its ability to activate numerous prodrugs and its resistance to prodrug toxicity. HPLC data confirmed biochemical transformation of prodrugs to their toxic counterparts. Further analysis demonstrated that different enzymes can complement prodrug activation, while simultaneous activation of multiple prodrugs (CB1954, 5-FC, AQ4N and Fludarabine phosphate) by E. coli was confirmed, resulting in significant efficacy improvement. Experiments in mice harbouring murine tumours validated in vitro findings, with significant reduction in tumour growth and increase in survival of mice treated with probiotic bacteria and a combination of prodrugs. These findings demonstrate the ability of probiotic bacteria, without the requirement for genetic modification, to enable high-level activation of multiple prodrugs specifically at the site of action. PMID:26655063

  8. Reversible Michael additions: covalent inhibitors and prodrugs.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Martin H

    2012-11-01

    Covalent inhibition is an efficient molecular mechanism for inhibiting enzymes or modulating the function of proteins and is found in the action of many drugs and biologically active natural products. However, it is has been less appreciated that the formation of covalent bonds can be reversible or irreversible. This review focuses on biologically active compounds that are Michael acceptors and how the reversible nature of the Michael addition reaction influences biological activity and how this can be exploited in designing prodrugs.

  9. 10-Boronic acid substituted camptothecin as prodrug of SN-38.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei; Xie, Shao; Ma, Longjun; Chen, Yi; Lu, Wei

    2016-06-30

    Malignant tumor cells have been found to have high levels of reactive oxygen species such as hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), supporting the hypothesis that a prodrug could be activated by intracellular H2O2 and lead to a potential antitumor therapy. In this study, the 7-ethyl-10-boronic acid camptothecin (B1) was synthesized for the first time as prodrug of SN-38, by linking a cleavable aryl carbon-boron bond to the SN-38. Prodrug B1 selectively activated by H2O2, converted rapidly to the active form SN-38 under favorable oxidative conditions in cancer cells with elevated levels of H2O2. The cell survival assay showed that prodrug B1 was equally or more effective in inhibiting the growth of six different cancer cells, as compared to SN-38. Unexpectedly, prodrug B1 displayed even more potent Topo I inhibitory activity than SN-38, suggesting that it was not only a prodrug of SN-38 but also a typical Topo I inhibitor. Prodrug B1 also demonstrated a significant antitumor activity at 2.0 mg/kg in a xenograft model using human brain star glioblastoma cell lines U87MG. PMID:27060760

  10. JCL Roundtable: enzyme replacement therapy for lipid storage disorders.

    PubMed

    Brown, W Virgil; Desnick, Robert J; Grabowski, Gregory A

    2014-01-01

    There are several inherited disorders that involve abnormal storage of lipids in tissues leading to severe compromise of organs. Sadly, these are often accompanied by lifelong morbidity and early mortality. Disorders such as Gaucher, Fabry, and lysosomal acid lipase deficiencies (Wolman and cholesteryl ester storage diseases) have been known for many years, and provide a difficult and frustrating set of problems for patients, their families, and their physicians. With recombinant methods of protein synthesis, it is now possible to literally replace the defective enzymes that underlie the basic pathophysiology of many such disorders. The delivery of these enzymes into the affected cells is possible because of their location in the lysosomes where the natural degradation of their lipid substrates occurs. I have asked 2 well-known investigators to join us for this Roundtable. These are professors who have been involved with the research that has made this type of therapy possible and who have participated in the clinical trials that demonstrated the value of enzyme replacement therapy. They are Dr. Robert Desnick, dean of Genetic and Genomic Medicine and professor and chairman emeritus of the Department of Genetics and Genomic Sciences at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai in New York City, and Dr. Gregory Grabowski, professor of Microbiology, Biochemistry, and Pediatrics, at the University of Cincinnati College of Medicine. Dr. Grabowski recently retired from that school to become the chief science officer of Synageva, a company involved in producing enzymes for this type of therapy. PMID:25234559

  11. Enzyme Replacement Therapies: Better Lives Versus the Bottom Line

    PubMed Central

    CARROLL, JOHN

    2006-01-01

    On the highest end of the drug-cost spectrum, enzyme replacement therapies are beneficial to only a few thousand patients at most. But to give those with life-long struggles a chance at a ‘normal existence,’ can insurers and employers put a price on hope? The field is booming, making the question more important with each passing day. PMID:23393488

  12. Nanoencapsulated and microencapsulated enzymes in drug antidotal therapy.

    PubMed

    Szilasi, Mária; Budai, Marianna; Budai, Lívia; Petrikovics, Ilona

    2012-07-01

    A catalytic bioscavenger for the therapeutic and prophylactic defense against recognized chemical threat agents has been a long-standing objective of civilian and military research. Among the toxic agents, organophosphate molecules and cyanide have been widely studied. In order to overcome the limitations of traditional antidotal therapies, isolated, purified, recombinant enzymes with bacterial origin possessing fast catalytic activity were used in in vitro and in vivo experiments. However, the fast degradation, excretion and adverse immunologic reaction against enzymes limit their in vivo use. Development of biodegradable, nontoxic carrier systems, microparticles, and nanoparticles-offering advantageous pharmacokinetic parameters was suggested. Present work deals with the perspectives of carrier systems, such as resealed and annealed erythrocytes and sterically stabilized liposomes. Dendritic polymers and polymer-conjugated enzymes, being in the focus of extensive research efforts nowadays, are also discussed.

  13. Theranostic Imaging of Cancer Gene Therapy.

    PubMed

    Sekar, Thillai V; Paulmurugan, Ramasamy

    2016-01-01

    Gene-directed enzyme prodrug therapy (GDEPT) is a promising therapeutic approach for treating cancers of various phenotypes. This strategy is independent of various other chemotherapeutic drugs used for treating cancers where the drugs are mainly designed to target endogenous cellular mechanisms, which are different in various cancer subtypes. In GDEPT an external enzyme, which is different from the cellular proteins, is expressed to convert the injected prodrug in to a toxic metabolite, that normally kill cancer cells express this protein. Theranostic imaging is an approach used to directly monitor the expression of these gene therapy enzymes while evaluating therapeutic effect. We recently developed a dual-GDEPT system where we combined mutant human herpes simplex thymidine kinase (HSV1sr39TK) and E. coli nitroreductase (NTR) enzyme, to improve therapeutic efficiency of cancer gene therapy by simultaneously injecting two prodrugs at a lower dose. In this approach we use two different prodrugs such as ganciclovir (GCV) and CB1954 to target two different cellular mechanisms to kill cancer cells. The developed dual GDEPT system was highly efficacious than that of either of the system used independently. In this chapter, we describe the complete protocol involved for in vitro and in vivo imaging of therapeutic cancer gene therapy evaluation. PMID:27424910

  14. Enzyme replacement therapy in a mouse model of aspartylglycosaminuria.

    PubMed

    Dunder, U; Kaartinen, V; Valtonen, P; Väänänen, E; Kosma, V M; Heisterkamp, N; Groffen, J; Mononen, I

    2000-02-01

    Aspartylglycosaminuria (AGU), the most common lysosomal disorder of glycoprotein degradation, is caused by deficient activity of glycosylasparaginase (AGA). AGA-deficient mice share most of the clinical, biochemical and histopathologic characteristics of human AGU disease. In the current study, recombinant human AGA administered i.v. to adult AGU mice disappeared from the systemic circulation of the animals in two phases predominantly into non-neuronal tissues, which were rapidly cleared from storage compound aspartylglucosamine. Even a single AGA injection reduced the amount of aspartylglucosamine in the liver and spleen of AGU mice by 90% and 80%, respectively. Quantitative biochemical analyses along with histological and immunohistochemical studies demonstrated that the pathophysiologic characteristics of AGU were effectively corrected in non-neuronal tissues of AGU mice during 2 wk of AGA therapy. At the same time, AGA activity increased to 10% of that in normal brain tissue and the accumulation of aspartylglucosamine was reduced by 20% in total brain of the treated animals. Immunohistochemical studies suggested that the corrective enzyme was widely distributed within the brain tissue. These findings suggest that AGU may be correctable by enzyme therapy.-Dunder, U., Kaartinen, V., Valtonen, P., Väänänen, E., Kosma, V.-M., Heisterkamp, N., Groffen, J., Mononen, I. Enzyme replacement therapy in a mouse model of aspartylglycosaminuria.

  15. Integrating a novel SN38 prodrug into the PEGylated liposomal system as a robust platform for efficient cancer therapy in solid tumors.

    PubMed

    Fang, Tao; Dong, Yuehan; Zhang, Xiaomin; Xie, Ke; Lin, Li; Wang, Hangxiang

    2016-10-15

    Liposomal nanoassemblies have been used extensively as carriers for the delivery of both lipophilic and hydrophilic drugs. They represent a mature, versatile technology with considerable potential for improving the pharmacokinetics of drugs. However, the formulation of many chemotherapeutics into liposome systems has posed a significant challenge due to their incompatible physicochemical properties, as was the case with camptothecin-based chemotherapeutics. Here, we present a rational paradigm of potent chemotherapeutics that were reconstructed and subsequently integrated into liposomal nanoassemblies. Using SN38 (7-ethyl-10-hydroxy camptothecin) as a model drug, a lipophilic prodrug 1 (designated as LA-SN38) was constructed by tethering the linoleic acid (LA) moiety via esterification, which was further facilitated to form liposomal nanoparticles (LipoNP) through supramolecular nanoassembly. The resulting 1-loaded LipoNP exhibited sustained drug release kinetics and decreased cellular uptake by macrophage cells. Uptake by tumor cells was enhanced relative to our previous supramolecular nanoparticles (SNP 1), which were derived from the self-assembling prodrug 1. Notably, LipoNP outperformed SNP 1 in terms of pharmacokinetics and in vivo therapeutic efficacy in both human BEL-7402 hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and HCT-116 colorectal cancer-derived xenograft mouse models. These results were likely due to the improved systemic circulation and preferential accumulation of nanodrugs in tumors. Hence, our results suggest that the combination of liposomal delivery platforms with rational prodrug engineering may emerge as a promising approach for the effective and safe delivery of anticancer chemotherapeutics.

  16. Integrating a novel SN38 prodrug into the PEGylated liposomal system as a robust platform for efficient cancer therapy in solid tumors.

    PubMed

    Fang, Tao; Dong, Yuehan; Zhang, Xiaomin; Xie, Ke; Lin, Li; Wang, Hangxiang

    2016-10-15

    Liposomal nanoassemblies have been used extensively as carriers for the delivery of both lipophilic and hydrophilic drugs. They represent a mature, versatile technology with considerable potential for improving the pharmacokinetics of drugs. However, the formulation of many chemotherapeutics into liposome systems has posed a significant challenge due to their incompatible physicochemical properties, as was the case with camptothecin-based chemotherapeutics. Here, we present a rational paradigm of potent chemotherapeutics that were reconstructed and subsequently integrated into liposomal nanoassemblies. Using SN38 (7-ethyl-10-hydroxy camptothecin) as a model drug, a lipophilic prodrug 1 (designated as LA-SN38) was constructed by tethering the linoleic acid (LA) moiety via esterification, which was further facilitated to form liposomal nanoparticles (LipoNP) through supramolecular nanoassembly. The resulting 1-loaded LipoNP exhibited sustained drug release kinetics and decreased cellular uptake by macrophage cells. Uptake by tumor cells was enhanced relative to our previous supramolecular nanoparticles (SNP 1), which were derived from the self-assembling prodrug 1. Notably, LipoNP outperformed SNP 1 in terms of pharmacokinetics and in vivo therapeutic efficacy in both human BEL-7402 hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and HCT-116 colorectal cancer-derived xenograft mouse models. These results were likely due to the improved systemic circulation and preferential accumulation of nanodrugs in tumors. Hence, our results suggest that the combination of liposomal delivery platforms with rational prodrug engineering may emerge as a promising approach for the effective and safe delivery of anticancer chemotherapeutics. PMID:27544846

  17. Enhanced cellular uptake and intracellular drug controlled release of VESylated gemcitabine prodrug nanocapsules.

    PubMed

    Fang, Yanfen; Du, Fang; Xu, Yanyun; Meng, Haijing; Huang, Jin; Zhang, Xiongwen; Lu, Wei; Liu, Shiyuan; Yu, Jiahui

    2015-04-01

    Gemcitabine, 2',2'-difluoro-2'-deoxycytidine (dFdC), is the first-line antitumor agent in the treatment of pancreatic tumors. However, it possesses certain drawbacks, such as poor biological half-life resulted from rapid metabolism and the induction of resistance, leading to its restricted therapeutic potential. With the purpose of overcoming the above drawbacks, we developed a novel VESylated gemcitabine (VES-dFdC) prodrug by coupling the N4-amino group of the pyrimidine ring of dFdC to the carboxylic group of vitamin E succinate (VES). The resulting amphiphilic compound could protect the N4-amino group of the pyrimidine ring of dFdC from being degraded by cytidine deaminase. What is more, the prodrug was able to form nanocapsules in aqueous media (similar to the structure of cytomembrane), confirmed by transmission electron microscope (TEM). Their average particle size is about 107 nm with zeta potential of -33.4 mV measured by dynamic light scattering (DLS). VES-dFdC nanocapsules showed accelerated accumulative drug release profile in simulated lysosome environment (sodium acetate buffer pH 5+cathepsin B, an enzyme in lysosome), due to the easily hydrolyzed property of amide bond by cathepsin B, while rather stable in PBS (pH 7.4) or sodium acetate buffer (pH 5.0) without cathepsin B, indicating their enhanced intracellular drug controlled release manner. Besides, VES-dFdC prodrug nanocapsules showed enhanced cellular uptake ability, and the amount of cellular uptake of the nanocapsules by the pancreatic cancer cell line BxPC-3 is seventy times higher than that of native gemcitabine in the first 1.5 h. Compared with free gemcitabine, VES-dFdC nanocapsules showed essentially increased growth inhibition activity against BxPC-3 cells, indicating its great potential as prodrug for pancreatic tumor therapy with improved antitumor activity.

  18. Prodrug Strategies for Paclitaxel.

    PubMed

    Meng, Ziyuan; Lv, Quanxia; Lu, Jun; Yao, Houzong; Lv, Xiaoqing; Jiang, Feng; Lu, Aiping; Zhang, Ge

    2016-01-01

    Paclitaxel is an anti-tumor agent with remarkable anti-tumor activity and wide clinical uses. However, it is also faced with various challenges especially for its poor water solubility and low selectivity for the target. To overcome these disadvantages of paclitaxel, approaches using small molecule modifications and macromolecule modifications have been developed by many research groups from all over the world. In this review, we discuss the different strategies especially prodrug strategies that are currently used to make paclitaxel more effective. PMID:27223283

  19. Prodrug Strategies for Paclitaxel

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Ziyuan; Lv, Quanxia; Lu, Jun; Yao, Houzong; Lv, Xiaoqing; Jiang, Feng; Lu, Aiping; Zhang, Ge

    2016-01-01

    Paclitaxel is an anti-tumor agent with remarkable anti-tumor activity and wide clinical uses. However, it is also faced with various challenges especially for its poor water solubility and low selectivity for the target. To overcome these disadvantages of paclitaxel, approaches using small molecule modifications and macromolecule modifications have been developed by many research groups from all over the world. In this review, we discuss the different strategies especially prodrug strategies that are currently used to make paclitaxel more effective. PMID:27223283

  20. Pharmacological Evaluation and Preliminary Pharmacokinetics Studies of a New Diclofenac Prodrug without Gastric Ulceration Effect

    PubMed Central

    dos Santos, Jean Leandro; Moreira, Vanessa; Campos, Michel Leandro; Chelucci, Rafael Consolin; Barbieri, Karina Pereira; de Castro Souto, Pollyana Cristina Maggio; Matsubara, Márcio Hideki; Teixeira, Catarina; Bosquesi, Priscila Longhin; Peccinini, Rosângela Gonçalves; Chin, Chung Man

    2012-01-01

    Long-term nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) therapy has been associated with several adverse effects such as gastric ulceration and cardiovascular events. Among the molecular modifications strategies, the prodrug approach is a useful tool to discover new safe NSAIDs. The 1-(2,6-dichlorophenyl)indolin-2-one is a diclofenac prodrug which demonstrated relevant anti-inflammatory properties without gastro ulceration effect. In addition, the prodrug decreases PGE2 levels, COX-2 expression and cellular influx into peritoneal cavity induced by carrageenan treatment. Preliminary pharmacokinetic studies have shown in vivo bioconversion of prodrug to diclofenac. This prodrug is a new nonulcerogenic NSAID useful to treat inflammatory events by long-term therapy. PMID:23203127

  1. Interruption of enzyme replacement therapy in Gaucher disease.

    PubMed

    Goldblatt, J; Fletcher, J M; McGill, J; Szer, J; Wilson, M

    2016-06-01

    In Australia, 58 patients with Gaucher disease were managed by a Gaucher Disease Advisory Committee (GDAC) through a centrally adminis-tered national programme, the Life Savings Drug Program (LSDP). In June 2009, Genzyme Corporation, which manufactures imiglucerase (Cerezyme), the only enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) registered for the treatment of Gaucher disease in Australia at that time, announced that due to a viral contamination problem there would be no further shipments of Cerezyme to Australia prior to the end of 2009. The GDAC allocated available drug supplies in order to maintain treatment to those most in need on a hierarchal clinical severity basis. A cohort of 24 patients with Type 1 Gaucher disease was withdrawn from therapy, 22 of whom had no discernible clinically significant adverse effects when reviewed off therapy for up to 6 months. In this paper, we review the course of 20 of the patients who have been on imiglucerase for periods of at least 24 months after the end of their 'drug holiday'. No patient experienced a bone crisis nor clinical nor magnetic resonance imaging evidence of new avascular necrosis events during this period. Two years after recommencing ERT after a 6-month drug holiday, no patient had developed an overt irreversible complication of their Gaucher disease, with the majority returning to their previous clinical status. PMID:27245534

  2. Synthesis and Preclinical Evaluation of a Highly Improved Anticancer Prodrug Activated by Histone Deacetylases and Cathepsin L

    PubMed Central

    Ueki, Nobuhide; Wang, Wei; Swenson, Cooper; McNaughton, Caroline; Sampson, Nicole S.; Hayman, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Lack of absolute selectivity against cancer cells is a major limitation for current cancer therapies. In the previous study, we developed a prodrug strategy for selective cancer therapy using a masked cytotoxic agent puromycin [Boc-Lys(Ac)-Puromycin], which can be sequentially activated by histone deacetylases (HDACs) and cathepsin L (CTSL) to kill cancer cells expressing high levels of both enzymes. Despite the promise as a selective cancer therapy, its requirement of relatively high dosage could be a potential issue in the clinical setting. To address this issue, we aimed to further improve the overall efficacy of our prodrug strategy. Since the proteolytic cleavage by CTSL is the rate-limiting step for the drug activation, we sought to improve the substrate structure for CTSL activity by modifying the α-amino protecting group of lysine. Here we show that protection with Fmoc [Fmoc-Lys(Ac)-Puromycin] exhibits a marked improvement in overall anticancer efficacy compared to the original Boc-Lys(Ac)-Puromycin and this is mainly due to the highly efficient cellular uptake besides its improved substrate structure. Furthermore, to address a concern that the improved drug efficacy might direct high toxicity to the normal cells, we confirmed that Fmoc-Lys(Ac)-Puromycin still retains excellent cancer selectivity in vitro and no obvious systemic off-target toxicity in vivo. Thus our preclinical evaluation data presented here demonstrate that the Fmoc-Lys(Ac)-Puromycin exhibits substantially improved anticancer efficacy, further supporting our approach for the selective cancer therapy. PMID:27162551

  3. Dual-therapy with αvβ3-targeted Sn2 lipase-labile fumagillin-prodrug nanoparticles and zoledronic acid in the Vx2 rabbit tumor model.

    PubMed

    Esser, Alison K; Schmieder, Anne H; Ross, Michael H; Xiang, Jingyu; Su, Xinming; Cui, Grace; Zhang, Huiying; Yang, Xiaoxia; Allen, John S; Williams, Todd; Wickline, Samuel A; Pan, Dipanjan; Lanza, Gregory M; Weilbaecher, Katherine N

    2016-01-01

    Fumagillin, an unstable anti-angiogenesis mycotoxin, was synthesized into a stable lipase-labile prodrug and incorporated into integrin-targeted lipid-encapsulated nanoparticles (αvβ3-Fum-PD NP). Dual anti-angiogenic therapy combining αvβ3-Fum-PD NP with zoledronic acid (ZA), a long-acting osteoclast inhibitor with proposed anti-angiogenic effects, was evaluated. In vitro, αvβ3-Fum-PD NP reduced (P<0.05) endothelial cell viability without impacting macrophage viability. ZA suppressed (P<0.05) macrophage viability at high dosages but not endothelial cell proliferation. 3D MR neovascular imaging of rabbit Vx2 tumors showed no effect with ZA, whereas αvβ3-Fum-PD NP alone and with ZA decreased angiogenesis (P<0.05). Immunohistochemistry revealed decreased (P<0.05) microvascularity with αvβ3-Fum-PD NP and ZA and further microvascular reduction (P<0.05) with dual-therapy. In vivo, ZA did not decrease tumor macrophage numbers nor cancer cell proliferation, whereas αvβ3-Fum-PD-NPs reduced both measures. Dual-therapy with ZA and αvβ3-Fum-PD-NP may provide enhanced neo-adjuvant utility if macrophage ZA uptake is increased. From the Clinical Editor: Although anti-angiogenesis is one of the treatment modalities in the fight against cancer, many cancers become resistant to VEGF pathway inhibitors. In this article, the authors investigated the use of dual therapy using fumagillin, integrin-targeted lipid-encapsulated nanoparticles (αvβ3- Fum-PD NP) and zoledronic acid (ZA), in both in-vitro and in-vivo experiments. This combination approach may provide an insight to the design of future drugs against cancers.

  4. Dual-therapy with αvβ3-targeted Sn2 lipase-labile fumagillin-prodrug nanoparticles and zoledronic acid in the Vx2 rabbit tumor model.

    PubMed

    Esser, Alison K; Schmieder, Anne H; Ross, Michael H; Xiang, Jingyu; Su, Xinming; Cui, Grace; Zhang, Huiying; Yang, Xiaoxia; Allen, John S; Williams, Todd; Wickline, Samuel A; Pan, Dipanjan; Lanza, Gregory M; Weilbaecher, Katherine N

    2016-01-01

    Fumagillin, an unstable anti-angiogenesis mycotoxin, was synthesized into a stable lipase-labile prodrug and incorporated into integrin-targeted lipid-encapsulated nanoparticles (αvβ3-Fum-PD NP). Dual anti-angiogenic therapy combining αvβ3-Fum-PD NP with zoledronic acid (ZA), a long-acting osteoclast inhibitor with proposed anti-angiogenic effects, was evaluated. In vitro, αvβ3-Fum-PD NP reduced (P<0.05) endothelial cell viability without impacting macrophage viability. ZA suppressed (P<0.05) macrophage viability at high dosages but not endothelial cell proliferation. 3D MR neovascular imaging of rabbit Vx2 tumors showed no effect with ZA, whereas αvβ3-Fum-PD NP alone and with ZA decreased angiogenesis (P<0.05). Immunohistochemistry revealed decreased (P<0.05) microvascularity with αvβ3-Fum-PD NP and ZA and further microvascular reduction (P<0.05) with dual-therapy. In vivo, ZA did not decrease tumor macrophage numbers nor cancer cell proliferation, whereas αvβ3-Fum-PD-NPs reduced both measures. Dual-therapy with ZA and αvβ3-Fum-PD-NP may provide enhanced neo-adjuvant utility if macrophage ZA uptake is increased. From the Clinical Editor: Although anti-angiogenesis is one of the treatment modalities in the fight against cancer, many cancers become resistant to VEGF pathway inhibitors. In this article, the authors investigated the use of dual therapy using fumagillin, integrin-targeted lipid-encapsulated nanoparticles (αvβ3- Fum-PD NP) and zoledronic acid (ZA), in both in-vitro and in-vivo experiments. This combination approach may provide an insight to the design of future drugs against cancers. PMID:26515754

  5. CYP4F Enzymes Are the Major Enzymes in Human Liver Microsomes That Catalyze the O-Demethylation of the Antiparasitic Prodrug DB289 [2,5-Bis(4-amidinophenyl)furan-bis-O-methylamidoxime

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Michael Zhuo; Saulter, Janelle Y.; Usuki, Etsuko; Cheung, Yen-Ling; Hall, Michael; Bridges, Arlene S.; Loewen, Greg; Parkinson, Oliver T.; Stephens, Chad E.; Allen, James L.; Zeldin, Darryl C.; Boykin, David W.; Tidwell, Richard R.; Parkinson, Andrew; Paine, Mary F.; Hall, James Edwin

    2007-01-01

    DB289 [2,5-bis(4-amidinophenyl)furan-bis-O-methylamidoxime] is biotransformed to the potent antiparasitic diamidine DB75 [2,5-bis(4-amidinophenyl) furan] by sequential oxidative O-demethylation and reductive N-dehydroxylation reactions. Previous work demonstrated that the N-dehydroxylation reactions are catalyzed by cytochrome b5/NADH-cytochrome b5 reductase. Enzymes responsible for catalyzing the DB289 O-demethylation pathway have not been identified. We report an in vitro metabolism study to characterize enzymes in human liver microsomes (HLMs) that catalyze the initial O-demethylation of DB289 (M1 formation). Potent inhibition by 1-aminobenzotriazole confirmed that M1 formation is catalyzed by P450 enzymes. M1 formation by HLMs was NADPH-dependent, with a Km and Vmax of 0.5 μM and 3.8 nmol/min/mg protein, respectively. Initial screening showed that recombinant CYP1A1, CYP1A2, and CYP1B1 were efficient catalysts of M1 formation. However, none of these three enzymes was responsible for M1 formation by HLMs. Further screening showed that recombinant CYP2J2, CYP4F2, and CYP4F3B could also catalyze M1 formation. An antibody against CYP4F2, which inhibited both CYP4F2 and CYP4F3B, inhibited 91% of M1 formation by HLMs. Two inhibitors of P450-mediated arachidonic acid metabolism, HET0016 (N-hydroxy-N′-(4-n-butyl-2-methylphenyl)formamidine) and 17-octadecynoic acid, effectively inhibited M1 formation by HLMs. Inhibition studies with ebastine and antibodies against CYP2J2 suggested that CYP2J2 was not involved in M1 formation by HLMs. Additionally, ketoconazole preferentially inhibited CYP4F2, but not CYP4F3B, and partially inhibited M1 formation by HLMs. We conclude that CYP4F enzymes (e.g., CYP4F2, CYP4F3B) are the major enzymes responsible for M1 formation by HLMs. These findings indicate that, in human liver, members of the CYP4F subfamily biotransform not only endogenous compounds but also xenobiotics. PMID:16997912

  6. Computationally-designed phenylephrine prodrugs - a model for enhancing bioavailability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karaman, Rafik; Karaman, Donia; Zeiadeh, Isra'

    2013-11-01

    DFT calculations at B3LYP 6-31G (d,p) for intramolecular proton transfer in a number of Kirby's enzyme models demonstrated that the driving force for the proton transfer efficiency is the distance between the two reactive centres (rGM) and the attack angle (α); and the rate of the reaction is linearly correlated with rGM2 and sin (180°- α). Based on these results three phenylephrine prodrugs were designed to provide phenylephrine with higher bioavailability than their parent drug. Using the experimental t1/2 (the time needed for the conversion of 50% of the reactants to products) and EM (effective molarity) values for these processes the t1/2 values for the conversion of the three prodrugs to the parent drug, phenylephrine were calculated. The calculated t1/2 values for ProD 1 and ProD 2 were very high (145 days and several years, respectively) whereas that of ProD 3 was found to be about 35 hours. Therefore, the intra-conversion rates of the phenylephrine prodrugs to phenylephrine can be programmed according to the nature of the prodrug linker.

  7. Pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy for pancreatic exocrine insufficiency in the 21st century

    PubMed Central

    Trang, Tony; Chan, Johanna; Graham, David Y

    2014-01-01

    Restitution of normal fat absorption in exocrine pancreatic insufficiency remains an elusive goal. Although many patients achieve satisfactory clinical results with enzyme therapy, few experience normalization of fat absorption, and many, if not most, will require individualized therapy. Increasing the quantity of lipase administered rarely eliminates steatorrhea but increases the cost of therapy. Enteric coated enzyme microbead formulations tend to separate from nutrients in the stomach precluding coordinated emptying of enzymes and nutrients. Unprotected enzymes mix well and empty with nutrients but are inactivated at pH 4 or below. We describe approaches for improving the results of enzyme therapy including changing to, or adding, a different product, adding non-enteric coated enzymes, (e.g., giving unprotected enzymes at the start of the meal and acid-protected formulations later), use of antisecretory drugs and/or antacids, and changing the timing of enzyme administration. Because considerable lipid is emptied in the first postprandial hour, it is prudent to start therapy with enteric coated microbead prior to the meal so that some enzymes are available during that first hour. Patients with hyperacidity may benefit from adjuvant antisecretory therapy to reduce the duodenal acid load and possibly also sodium bicarbonate to prevent duodenal acidity. Comparative studies of clinical effectiveness of different formulations as well as the characteristics of dispersion, emptying, and dissolution of enteric-coated microspheres of different diameter and density are needed; many such studies have been completed but not yet made public. We discuss the history of pancreatic enzyme therapy and describe current use of modern preparations, approaches to overcoming unsatisfactory clinical responses, as well as studies needed to be able to provide reliably effective therapy. PMID:25206255

  8. Renal histology before and after effective enzyme replacement therapy in a patient with classical Fabry's disease.

    PubMed

    Hirashio, S; Taguchi, T; Naito, T; Maki, K; Ogata, S; Taniyama, K; Taniguchi, Y; Yorioka, N

    2009-05-01

    A 38-year-old man underwent renal biopsy because of proteinuria. It revealed swelling and vacuolation of glomerular epithelial cells, as well as myelin-like structures characteristic of Fabry's disease. Detection of decreased plasma activity of alpha-galactosidase A confirmed the diagnosis. Enzyme replacement therapy was provided with recombinant agalsidase-beta, resulting in improvement of his symptoms. When renal biopsy was repeated, specific staining for globotriaosylceramide showed that renal deposits were decreased by enzyme therapy.

  9. Dipeptidyl-peptidase IV (DPP IV/CD26)-activated prodrugs: a successful strategy for improving water solubility and oral bioavailability.

    PubMed

    Velázquez, Sonsoles; de Castro, Sonia; Diez-Torrubia, Alberto; Balzarini, Jan; Camarasa, María-José

    2015-01-01

    In the search of novel enzyme-based prodrug approaches to improve pharmacological properties of therapeutic drugs such as solubility and bioavailability, dipeptidyl-peptidase IV (DPP IV, also termed as CD26) enzyme activity provides a previously unexplored successful prodrug strategy. This review covers key aspects of the enzyme useful for the design of CD26-directed prodrugs. The proof-of-concept of this prodrug technology is provided for amine-containing agents by directly linking appropriate di- (or oligo)peptide moieties to a free amino group of a non-peptidic drug through an amide bond which is specifically hydrolized by DPP IV/CD26. Special emphasis is also made in discussing the design and synthesis of more elaborated tripartite prodrug systems, for further extension of the strategy to hydroxy-containing drugs. The application of this technology to improve water solubility and oral bioavailability of prominent examples of antiviral nucleosides is highlighted.

  10. Modulating lipophilicity of rohitukine via prodrug approach: Preparation, characterization, and in vitro enzymatic hydrolysis in biorelevant media.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Vikas; Bharate, Sonali S; Vishwakarma, Ram A

    2016-09-20

    Rohitukine is a medicinally important natural product which has inspired the discovery of two anticancer clinical candidates. Rohitukine is highly hydrophilic in nature which hampers its oral bioavailability. Thus, herein our objective was to improve the drug-like properties of rohitukine via prodrug-strategy. Various ester prodrugs were synthesized and studied for solubility, lipophilicity, chemical stability and enzymatic hydrolysis in plasma/esterase. All prodrugs displayed lower aqueous solubility and improved lipophilicity compared with rohitukine, which was in accordance with the criteria of compounds in drug-discovery. The stability of synthesized prodrugs was evaluated in buffers at different pH, SGF, SIF, rat plasma and in esterase enzyme. The rate of hydrolysis in all incubation media was dependent primarily on the acyl promoieties. Hexanoyl ester prodrug of rohitukine, 3d, was stable under chemical conditions; however it was completely hydrolyzed to rohitukine, in plasma and in esterase in 4h. Hexanoate ester 3d appeared to be the most promising prodrug as it remained intact at gastric/intestinal pH and was completely transformed to the parent compound in plasma as desired for an ideal prodrug. The data presented herein, will help in designing prodrugs with desired physicochemical properties in future in structurally similar chemotypes. PMID:27422078

  11. A biochemical and physicochemical comparison of two recombinant enzymes used for enzyme replacement therapies of hunter syndrome.

    PubMed

    Chung, Yo Kyung; Sohn, Young Bae; Sohn, Jong Mun; Lee, Jieun; Chang, Mi Sun; Kwun, Younghee; Kim, Chi Hwa; Lee, Jin Young; Yook, Yeon Joo; Ko, Ah-Ra; Jin, Dong-Kyu

    2014-05-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis II (MPS II, Hunter syndrome; OMIM 309900) is an X-linked lysosomal storage disease caused by a deficiency in the enzyme iduronate-2-sulfatase (IDS), leading to accumulation of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). For enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) of Hunter syndrome, two recombinant enzymes, idursulfase (Elaprase(®), Shire Human Genetic Therapies, Lexington, MA) and idursulfase beta (Hunterase(®), Green Cross Corporation, Yongin, Korea), are currently available in Korea. To compare the biochemical and physicochemical differences between idursulfase and idursulfase beta, we examined the formylglycine (FGly) content, specific enzyme activity, mannose-6-phosphate (M6P) content, sialic acid content, and in vitro cell uptake activity of normal human fibroblasts of these two enzymes.The FGly content, which determines the enzyme activity, of idursulfase beta was significantly higher than that of idursulfase (79.4 ± 0.9 vs. 68.1 ± 2.2 %, P < 0.001). In accordance with the FGly content, the specific enzyme activity of idursulfase beta was significantly higher than that of idursulfase (42.6 ± 1.1 vs. 27.8 ± 0.9 nmol/min/μg protein, P < 0.001). The levels of M6P and sialic acid were not significantly different (2.4 ± 0.1 vs 2.4 ± 0.3 mol/mol protein for M6P and 12.3 ± 0.7 vs. 12.4 ± 0.4 mol/mol protein for sialic acid). However, the cellular uptake activity of the normal human fibroblasts in vitro showed a significant difference (Kuptake, 5.09 ± 0.96 vs. 6.50 ± 1.28 nM protein, P = 0.017).In conclusion, idursulfase beta exhibited significantly higher specific enzyme activity than idursulfase, resulting from higher FGly content. These biochemical differences may be partly attributed to clinical efficacy. However, long-term clinical evaluations of Hunter syndrome patients treated with these two enzymes will be needed to demonstrate the clinical implications of significant difference of the enzyme activity and the FGly content.

  12. Prodrugs of phosphonates and phosphates: crossing the membrane barrier

    PubMed Central

    Wiemer, Andrew J.; Wiemer, David F.

    2016-01-01

    A substantial portion of metabolism involves transformation of phosphate esters, including pathways leading to nucleotides and oligonucleotides, carbohydrates, isoprenoids and steroids, and phosphorylated proteins. Because the natural substrates bear one or more negative charges, drugs that target these enzymes generally must be charged as well but small charged molecules can have difficulty traversing the cell membrane other than by endocytosis. The resulting dichotomy has stimulated abundant effort to develop effective prodrugs, compounds that carry little or no charge to enable them to transit biological membranes but then able to release the parent drug once inside the target cell. This chapter will present recent studies on advances in prodrug forms, along with representative examples of their application to marketed and developmental drugs. PMID:25391982

  13. [DELAYED RESULTS OF ENZYME REPLACEMENT THERAPY, PRESCRIBED BY RESULTS OF 13C-TRIGLYCERIDE BREATH TEST].

    PubMed

    Chernyavskiy, V V; Gvozdetska, L S

    2015-01-01

    Maldigestion persists in most patients with chronic pancreatitis (CP). The objective lipase and amylase insufficiency diagnosis is needed to achieve an adequate clinical response to oral pancreatic enzyme substitution therapy. The novel data is presented in the article about the role of 13C-mixed triglyceride breath test as a tool for exocrine pancreatic insufficiency diagnosis, for evaluating fat malabsorbtion in CP patients. 135 patients were included in the investigation. Delayed results of enzyme replacement therapy were estimated after 1 and 2 year of surveillance. It has been shown, that partial recovery of exocrine pancreatic function is possible, and replacement therapy leads to patients nutritional status improving. Thus 13C-triglyceride breath test could be useful tool in clinical practice for CP diagnosis. The test make it possible to choose the initial pancreatic enzyme dosage and are beneficial during the treatment for pancreatic enzyme dose correction. PMID:26827447

  14. [DELAYED RESULTS OF ENZYME REPLACEMENT THERAPY, PRESCRIBED BY RESULTS OF 13C-TRIGLYCERIDE BREATH TEST].

    PubMed

    Chernyavskiy, V V; Gvozdetska, L S

    2015-01-01

    Maldigestion persists in most patients with chronic pancreatitis (CP). The objective lipase and amylase insufficiency diagnosis is needed to achieve an adequate clinical response to oral pancreatic enzyme substitution therapy. The novel data is presented in the article about the role of 13C-mixed triglyceride breath test as a tool for exocrine pancreatic insufficiency diagnosis, for evaluating fat malabsorbtion in CP patients. 135 patients were included in the investigation. Delayed results of enzyme replacement therapy were estimated after 1 and 2 year of surveillance. It has been shown, that partial recovery of exocrine pancreatic function is possible, and replacement therapy leads to patients nutritional status improving. Thus 13C-triglyceride breath test could be useful tool in clinical practice for CP diagnosis. The test make it possible to choose the initial pancreatic enzyme dosage and are beneficial during the treatment for pancreatic enzyme dose correction.

  15. Impact of metabolizing enzymes on drug response of endocrine therapy in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Saladores, Pilar H; Precht, Jana C; Schroth, Werner; Brauch, Hiltrud; Schwab, Matthias

    2013-05-01

    Estrogen-receptor positive breast cancer accounts for 75% of diagnosed breast cancers worldwide. There are currently two major options for adjuvant treatment: tamoxifen and aromatase inhibitors. Variability in metabolizing enzymes determines their pharmacokinetic profile, possibly affecting treatment response. Therefore, prediction of therapy outcome based on genotypes would enable a more personalized medicine approach, providing optimal therapy for each patient. In this review, the authors will discuss the current evidence on the most important metabolizing enzymes in endocrine therapy, with a special focus on CYP2D6 and its role in tamoxifen metabolism.

  16. Sulforaphane Preconditioning Sensitizes Human Colon Cancer Cells towards the Bioreductive Anticancer Prodrug PR-104A.

    PubMed

    Erzinger, Melanie M; Bovet, Cédric; Hecht, Katrin M; Senger, Sabine; Winiker, Pascale; Sobotzki, Nadine; Cristea, Simona; Beerenwinkel, Niko; Shay, Jerry W; Marra, Giancarlo; Wollscheid, Bernd; Sturla, Shana J

    2016-01-01

    The chemoprotective properties of sulforaphane (SF), derived from cruciferous vegetables, are widely acknowledged to arise from its potent induction of xenobiotic-metabolizing and antioxidant enzymes. However, much less is known about the impact of SF on the efficacy of cancer therapy through the modulation of drug-metabolizing enzymes. To identify proteins modulated by a low concentration of SF, we treated HT29 colon cancer cells with 2.5 μM SF. Protein abundance changes were detected by stable isotope labeling of amino acids in cell culture. Among 18 proteins found to be significantly up-regulated, aldo-keto reductase 1C3 (AKR1C3), bioactivating the DNA cross-linking prodrug PR-104A, was further characterized. Preconditioning HT29 cells with SF reduced the EC50 of PR-104A 3.6-fold. The increase in PR-104A cytotoxicity was linked to AKR1C3 abundance and activity, both induced by SF in a dose-dependent manner. This effect was reproducible in a second colon cancer cell line, SW620, but not in other colon cancer cell lines where AKR1C3 abundance and activity were absent or barely detectable and could not be induced by SF. Interestingly, SF had no significant influence on PR-104A cytotoxicity in non-cancerous, immortalized human colonic epithelial cell lines expressing either low or high levels of AKR1C3. In conclusion, the enhanced response of PR-104A after preconditioning with SF was apparent only in cancer cells provided that AKR1C3 is expressed, while its expression in non-cancerous cells did not elicit such a response. Therefore, a subset of cancers may be susceptible to combined food-derived component and prodrug treatments with no harm to normal tissues. PMID:26950072

  17. Sulforaphane Preconditioning Sensitizes Human Colon Cancer Cells towards the Bioreductive Anticancer Prodrug PR-104A

    PubMed Central

    Erzinger, Melanie M.; Bovet, Cédric; Hecht, Katrin M.; Senger, Sabine; Winiker, Pascale; Sobotzki, Nadine; Cristea, Simona; Beerenwinkel, Niko; Shay, Jerry W.; Marra, Giancarlo; Wollscheid, Bernd; Sturla, Shana J.

    2016-01-01

    The chemoprotective properties of sulforaphane (SF), derived from cruciferous vegetables, are widely acknowledged to arise from its potent induction of xenobiotic-metabolizing and antioxidant enzymes. However, much less is known about the impact of SF on the efficacy of cancer therapy through the modulation of drug-metabolizing enzymes. To identify proteins modulated by a low concentration of SF, we treated HT29 colon cancer cells with 2.5 μM SF. Protein abundance changes were detected by stable isotope labeling of amino acids in cell culture. Among 18 proteins found to be significantly up-regulated, aldo-keto reductase 1C3 (AKR1C3), bioactivating the DNA cross-linking prodrug PR-104A, was further characterized. Preconditioning HT29 cells with SF reduced the EC50 of PR-104A 3.6-fold. The increase in PR-104A cytotoxicity was linked to AKR1C3 abundance and activity, both induced by SF in a dose-dependent manner. This effect was reproducible in a second colon cancer cell line, SW620, but not in other colon cancer cell lines where AKR1C3 abundance and activity were absent or barely detectable and could not be induced by SF. Interestingly, SF had no significant influence on PR-104A cytotoxicity in non-cancerous, immortalized human colonic epithelial cell lines expressing either low or high levels of AKR1C3. In conclusion, the enhanced response of PR-104A after preconditioning with SF was apparent only in cancer cells provided that AKR1C3 is expressed, while its expression in non-cancerous cells did not elicit such a response. Therefore, a subset of cancers may be susceptible to combined food-derived component and prodrug treatments with no harm to normal tissues. PMID:26950072

  18. Enzyme

    MedlinePlus

    Enzymes are complex proteins that cause a specific chemical change in all parts of the body. For ... use them. Blood clotting is another example of enzymes at work. Enzymes are needed for all body ...

  19. Trial watch – inhibiting PARP enzymes for anticancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Sistigu, Antonella; Manic, Gwenola; Obrist, Florine; Vitale, Ilio

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases (PARPs) are a members of family of enzymes that catalyze poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation (PARylation) and/or mono(ADP-ribosyl)ation (MARylation), two post-translational protein modifications involved in crucial cellular processes including (but not limited to) the DNA damage response (DDR). PARP1, the most abundant family member, is a nuclear protein that is activated upon sensing distinct types of DNA damage and contributes to their resolution by PARylating multiple DDR players. Recent evidence suggests that, along with DDR, activated PARP1 mediates a series of prosurvival and proapoptotic processes aimed at preserving genomic stability. Despite this potential oncosuppressive role, upregulation and/or overactivation of PARP1 or other PARP enzymes has been reported in a variety of human neoplasms. Over the last few decades, several pharmacologic inhibitors of PARP1 and PARP2 have been assessed in preclinical and clinical studies showing potent antineoplastic activity, particularly against homologous recombination (HR)-deficient ovarian and breast cancers. In this Trial Watch, we describe the impact of PARP enzymes and PARylation in cancer, discuss the mechanism of cancer cell killing by PARP1 inactivation, and summarize the results of recent clinical studies aimed at evaluating the safety and therapeutic profile of PARP inhibitors in cancer patients. PMID:27308587

  20. Trial watch - inhibiting PARP enzymes for anticancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Sistigu, Antonella; Manic, Gwenola; Obrist, Florine; Vitale, Ilio

    2016-03-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases (PARPs) are a members of family of enzymes that catalyze poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation (PARylation) and/or mono(ADP-ribosyl)ation (MARylation), two post-translational protein modifications involved in crucial cellular processes including (but not limited to) the DNA damage response (DDR). PARP1, the most abundant family member, is a nuclear protein that is activated upon sensing distinct types of DNA damage and contributes to their resolution by PARylating multiple DDR players. Recent evidence suggests that, along with DDR, activated PARP1 mediates a series of prosurvival and proapoptotic processes aimed at preserving genomic stability. Despite this potential oncosuppressive role, upregulation and/or overactivation of PARP1 or other PARP enzymes has been reported in a variety of human neoplasms. Over the last few decades, several pharmacologic inhibitors of PARP1 and PARP2 have been assessed in preclinical and clinical studies showing potent antineoplastic activity, particularly against homologous recombination (HR)-deficient ovarian and breast cancers. In this Trial Watch, we describe the impact of PARP enzymes and PARylation in cancer, discuss the mechanism of cancer cell killing by PARP1 inactivation, and summarize the results of recent clinical studies aimed at evaluating the safety and therapeutic profile of PARP inhibitors in cancer patients.

  1. Design and synthesis of novel prodrugs of 2'-deoxy-2'-methylidenecytidine activated by membrane dipeptidase overexpressed in tumor tissues.

    PubMed

    Kohchi, Yasunori; Hattori, Kazuo; Oikawa, Nobuhiro; Mizuguchi, Eisaku; Isshiki, Yoshiaki; Aso, Kohsuke; Yoshinari, Kiyoshi; Shirai, Haruyoshi; Miwa, Masanori; Inagaki, Yukiko; Ura, Masako; Ogawa, Kotaroh; Okabe, Hisafumi; Ishitsuka, Hideo; Shimma, Nobuo

    2007-04-15

    DNA microarray analysis comparing human tumor tissues with normal tissues including hematopoietic progenitor cells resulted in identification of membrane dipeptidase as a prodrug activation enzyme. Novel prodrugs of 2'-deoxy-2'-methylidenecytidine (DMDC) including compound 23 that are activated by membrane dipeptidase (MDP) preferentially in tumor tissue were designed and synthesized to generate the active drug, DMDC, after hydrolysis of the dipeptide bond followed by spontaneous cyclization of the promoiety.

  2. Influence of the prodrugs 5-fluorocytosine and CPT-11 on ovarian cancer cells using genetically engineered stem cells: tumor-tropic potential and inhibition of ovarian cancer cell growth.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ki-Yon; Kim, Seung U; Leung, Peter C K; Jeung, Eui-Bae; Choi, Kyung-Chul

    2010-04-01

    Recent studies have shown that genetically engineered stem cells (GESTECs) to produce suicide enzymes that convert non-toxic prodrugs to toxic metabolites selectively migrate toward tumor sites and reduce tumor growth. In the present study, we evaluated whether these GESTECs were capable of migrating to human ovarian cancer cells and examined the potential therapeutic efficacy of the gene-directed enzyme prodrug therapy against ovarian cancer cells in vitro. The expression of cytosine deaminase (CD) or carboxyl esterase (CE) mRNA of GESTECs was confirmed by RT-PCR. A modified transwell migration assay was performed to determine the migratory capacity of GESTECs to ovarian cancer cells. GESTECs (HB1.F3.CD or HB1.F3.CE cells) engineered to express a suicide gene (CD or CE) selectively migrated toward ovarian cancer cells. A [(3)H] thymidine incorporation assay was conducted to measure the proliferative index. Treatment of human epithelial ovarian cancer cell line (SKOV-3, an ovarian adenocarcinoma derived from the ascites of an ovarian cancer patient) with the prodrugs 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC) or camptothecin-11 (CPT-11) in the presence of HB1.F3.CD or HB1.F3.CE cells resulted in the inhibition of ovarian cancer cell growth. Based on the data presented herein, we suggest that GESTECs expressing CD/CE may have a potent advantage to selectively treat ovarian cancers.

  3. Cell-permeable succinate prodrugs bypass mitochondrial complex I deficiency.

    PubMed

    Ehinger, Johannes K; Piel, Sarah; Ford, Rhonan; Karlsson, Michael; Sjövall, Fredrik; Frostner, Eleonor Åsander; Morota, Saori; Taylor, Robert W; Turnbull, Doug M; Cornell, Clive; Moss, Steven J; Metzsch, Carsten; Hansson, Magnus J; Fliri, Hans; Elmér, Eskil

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial complex I (CI) deficiency is the most prevalent defect in the respiratory chain in paediatric mitochondrial disease. This heterogeneous group of diseases includes serious or fatal neurological presentations such as Leigh syndrome and there are very limited evidence-based treatment options available. Here we describe that cell membrane-permeable prodrugs of the complex II substrate succinate increase ATP-linked mitochondrial respiration in CI-deficient human blood cells, fibroblasts and heart fibres. Lactate accumulation in platelets due to rotenone-induced CI inhibition is reversed and rotenone-induced increase in lactate:pyruvate ratio in white blood cells is alleviated. Metabolomic analyses demonstrate delivery and metabolism of [(13)C]succinate. In Leigh syndrome patient fibroblasts, with a recessive NDUFS2 mutation, respiration and spare respiratory capacity are increased by prodrug administration. We conclude that prodrug-delivered succinate bypasses CI and supports electron transport, membrane potential and ATP production. This strategy offers a potential future therapy for metabolic decompensation due to mitochondrial CI dysfunction. PMID:27502960

  4. Cell-permeable succinate prodrugs bypass mitochondrial complex I deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Ehinger, Johannes K.; Piel, Sarah; Ford, Rhonan; Karlsson, Michael; Sjövall, Fredrik; Frostner, Eleonor Åsander; Morota, Saori; Taylor, Robert W.; Turnbull, Doug M.; Cornell, Clive; Moss, Steven J.; Metzsch, Carsten; Hansson, Magnus J.; Fliri, Hans; Elmér, Eskil

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial complex I (CI) deficiency is the most prevalent defect in the respiratory chain in paediatric mitochondrial disease. This heterogeneous group of diseases includes serious or fatal neurological presentations such as Leigh syndrome and there are very limited evidence-based treatment options available. Here we describe that cell membrane-permeable prodrugs of the complex II substrate succinate increase ATP-linked mitochondrial respiration in CI-deficient human blood cells, fibroblasts and heart fibres. Lactate accumulation in platelets due to rotenone-induced CI inhibition is reversed and rotenone-induced increase in lactate:pyruvate ratio in white blood cells is alleviated. Metabolomic analyses demonstrate delivery and metabolism of [13C]succinate. In Leigh syndrome patient fibroblasts, with a recessive NDUFS2 mutation, respiration and spare respiratory capacity are increased by prodrug administration. We conclude that prodrug-delivered succinate bypasses CI and supports electron transport, membrane potential and ATP production. This strategy offers a potential future therapy for metabolic decompensation due to mitochondrial CI dysfunction. PMID:27502960

  5. Hunter syndrome follow-up after 1 year of enzyme-replacement therapy

    PubMed Central

    Puiu, Maria; Chiriţă-Emandi, Adela; Dumitriu, Simona; Arghirescu, Smaranda

    2013-01-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis II (Hunter syndrome) is a rare x-linked disorder caused by a deficiency in the lysosomal enzyme iduronate-2-sulphatase, leading to an accumulation of the glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) dermatansulphate and heparan sulphate. The consequence of GAGs accumulation is progressive, multiorgan disease. Enzyme-replacement therapy is hypothesised to result in disease stabilisation and improved prognosis. We present a severe case of Hunter syndrome diagnosed at age 2 years and 4 months, who started enzyme-replacement therapy at the age of 3 years and 3 months. We report his evolution after 1 year of treatment. The treatment response was good and there was significant improvement in the quality of life. Owing to the rarity of Hunter syndrome, the multisystem nature and the heterogeneity of disease progression, patient care implies interdisciplinary consultations with a wide range of specialists. The best management can be provided in reference centres for metabolic diseases. PMID:23307460

  6. A 24-Year Enzyme Replacement Therapy in an Adenosine-deaminase-Deficient Patient.

    PubMed

    Tartibi, Hana M; Hershfield, Michael S; Bahna, Sami L

    2016-01-01

    Severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) is a fatal childhood disease unless immune reconstitution is performed early in life, with either hematopoietic stem cell transplantation or gene therapy. One of its subtypes is caused by adenosine deaminase (ADA) enzyme deficiency, which leads to the accumulation of toxic metabolites that impair lymphocyte development and function. With the development of polyethylene glycol-conjugated adenosine deaminase (PEG-ADA) enzyme replacement therapy, many ADA-deficient children with SCID who could not receive a hematopoietic stem cell transplantation or gene therapy survived and had longer and healthier lives. We report a 24-year course of treatment in a patient who was diagnosed with ADA deficiency at 4 months of age. The patient was treated with PEG-ADA, which was the only therapy available for him. The patient's plasma ADA level was regularly monitored and the PEG-ADA dose adjusted accordingly. This treatment has resulted in near-normalization of lymphocyte counts, and his clinical course has been associated with only minor to moderate infections. Thus far, he has had no manifestations of autoimmune or lymphoproliferative disorders. This patient is among the longest to be maintained on PEG-ADA enzyme replacement therapy. PMID:26684479

  7. Long Term Treatment with Enzyme Replacement Therapy in Patients with Fabry Disease.

    PubMed

    Oder, Daniel; Nordbeck, Peter; Wanner, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Anderson-Fabry disease is a potentially life-threatening hereditary lysosomal storage disorder taking origin in over 1,000 known pathogenic mutations in the alpha-galactosidase A encoding gene. Over the past 15 years, intravenous replacement therapy of the deficient alpha agalsidase A enzyme has been well-established retarding the progression of a multisystemic disease and organ involvement. Despite this innovative treatment approach, premature deaths still do occur. The response to enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) varies considerably and appears to depend on gender, genotype (classic or later onset/non-classic), stage of disease or age and agalsidase inhibition by anti-agalsidase antibodies. Early ERT treatment at young age, a personalized approach, and adjunctive therapies for specific disease manifestations appear to impact on prognosis and are currently favored with the expectance of more effective intravenous and oral treatments in the short future. PMID:27576727

  8. Long Term Treatment with Enzyme Replacement Therapy in Patients with Fabry Disease.

    PubMed

    Oder, Daniel; Nordbeck, Peter; Wanner, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Anderson-Fabry disease is a potentially life-threatening hereditary lysosomal storage disorder taking origin in over 1,000 known pathogenic mutations in the alpha-galactosidase A encoding gene. Over the past 15 years, intravenous replacement therapy of the deficient alpha agalsidase A enzyme has been well-established retarding the progression of a multisystemic disease and organ involvement. Despite this innovative treatment approach, premature deaths still do occur. The response to enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) varies considerably and appears to depend on gender, genotype (classic or later onset/non-classic), stage of disease or age and agalsidase inhibition by anti-agalsidase antibodies. Early ERT treatment at young age, a personalized approach, and adjunctive therapies for specific disease manifestations appear to impact on prognosis and are currently favored with the expectance of more effective intravenous and oral treatments in the short future.

  9. Dual-Mode HDAC Prodrug for Covalent Modification and Subsequent Inhibitor Release

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) target abnormal epigenetic states associated with a variety of pathologies, including cancer. Here, the development of a prodrug of the canonical broad-spectrum HDACi suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) is described. Although hydroxamic acids are utilized universally in the development of metalloenzyme inhibitors, they are considered to be poor pharmacophores with reduced activity in vivo. We developed a prodrug of SAHA by appending a promoiety, sensitive to thiols, to the hydroxamic acid warhead (termed SAHA-TAP). After incubation of SAHA-TAP with an HDAC, the thiol of a conserved HDAC cysteine residue becomes covalently tagged with the promoiety, initiating a cascade reaction that leads to the release of SAHA. Mass spectrometry and enzyme kinetics experiments validate that the cysteine residue is covalently appended with the TAP promoiety. SAHA-TAP demonstrates cytotoxicity activity against various cancer cell lines. This strategy represents an original prodrug design with a dual mode of action for HDAC inhibition. PMID:25974739

  10. Synthesis of Mevalonate- and Fluorinated Mevalonate Prodrugs and Their in vitro Human Plasma Stability

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Soosung; Watanabe, Mizuki; Jacobs, JC; Yamaguchi, Masaya; Dahesh, Samira; Nizet, Victor; Leyh, Thomas S.; Silverman, Richard B.

    2014-01-01

    The mevalonate pathway is essential for the production of many important molecules in lipid biosynthesis. Inhibition of this pathway is the mechanism of statin cholesterol-lowering drugs, as well as the target of drugs to treat osteoporosis, to combat parasites, and to inhibit tumor cell growth. Unlike the human mevalonate pathway, the bacterial pathway appears to be regulated by diphosphomevalonate (DPM). Enzymes in the mevalonate pathway act to produce isopentenyl diphosphate, the product of the DPM decarboxylase reaction, utilize phosphorylated (charged) intermediates, which are poorly bioavailable. It has been shown that fluorinated DPMs (6-fluoro- and 6,6,6-trifluoro-5-diphosphomevalonate) are excellent inhibitors of the bacterial pathway; however, highly charged DPM and analogues are not bioavailable. To increase cellular permeability of mevalonate analogues, we have synthesized various prodrugs of mevalonate and 6-fluoro- and 6,6,6-trifluoromevalonate that can be enzymatically transformed to the corresponding DPM or fluorinated DPM analogues by esterases or amidases. To probe the required stabilities as potentially bioavailable prodrugs, we measured the half-lives of esters, amides, carbonates, acetals, and ketal promoieties of mevalonate and the fluorinated mevalonate analogues in human blood plasma. Stability studies showed that the prodrugs are converted to the mevalonates in human plasma with a wide range of half-lives. These studies provide stability data for a variety of prodrug options having varying stabilities and should be very useful in the design of appropriate prodrugs of mevalonate and fluorinated mevalonates. PMID:25461893

  11. Synthesis of mevalonate- and fluorinated mevalonate prodrugs and their in vitro human plasma stability.

    PubMed

    Kang, Soosung; Watanabe, Mizuki; Jacobs, J C; Yamaguchi, Masaya; Dahesh, Samira; Nizet, Victor; Leyh, Thomas S; Silverman, Richard B

    2015-01-27

    The mevalonate pathway is essential for the production of many important molecules in lipid biosynthesis. Inhibition of this pathway is the mechanism of statin cholesterol-lowering drugs, as well as the target of drugs to treat osteoporosis, to combat parasites, and to inhibit tumor cell growth. Unlike the human mevalonate pathway, the bacterial pathway appears to be regulated by diphosphomevalonate (DPM). Enzymes in the mevalonate pathway act to produce isopentenyl diphosphate, the product of the DPM decarboxylase reaction, utilize phosphorylated (charged) intermediates, which are poorly bioavailable. It has been shown that fluorinated DPMs (6-fluoro- and 6,6,6-trifluoro-5-diphosphomevalonate) are excellent inhibitors of the bacterial pathway; however, highly charged DPM and analogs are not bioavailable. To increase cellular permeability of mevalonate analogs, we have synthesized various prodrugs of mevalonate and 6-fluoro- and 6,6,6-trifluoromevalonate that can be enzymatically transformed to the corresponding DPM or fluorinated DPM analogs by esterases or amidases. To probe the required stabilities as potentially bioavailable prodrugs, we measured the half-lives of esters, amides, carbonates, acetals, and ketal promoieties of mevalonate and the fluorinated mevalonate analogs in human blood plasma. Stability studies showed that the prodrugs are converted to the mevalonates in human plasma with a wide range of half-lives. These studies provide stability data for a variety of prodrug options having varying stabilities and should be very useful in the design of appropriate prodrugs of mevalonate and fluorinated mevalonates.

  12. Synthesis and Evaluation as Prodrugs of Hydrophilic Carbamate Ester Analogues of Resveratrol.

    PubMed

    Azzolini, Michele; Mattarei, Andrea; La Spina, Martina; Marotta, Ester; Zoratti, Mario; Paradisi, Cristina; Biasutto, Lucia

    2015-09-01

    Resveratrol (3,5,4'-trihydroxy-trans-stilbene) is an unfulfilled promise for health care: its exploitation is hindered by rapid conjugative metabolism in enterocytes and hepatocytes; low water solubility is a serious practical problem. To advantageously modify the physicochemical properties of the compound we have developed prodrugs in which all or part of the hydroxyl groups are linked via an N-monosubstituted carbamate ester bond to promoieties derived from glycerol or galactose, conferring higher water solubility. Kinetic studies of hydrolysis in aqueous solutions and in blood indicated that regeneration of resveratrol takes place in an appropriate time frame for delivery via oral administration. Despite their hydrophilicity some of the synthesized compounds were absorbed in the gastrointestinal tract of rats. In these cases the species found in blood after administration of a bolus consisted mainly of partially deprotected resveratrol derivatives and of the products of their glucuronidation, thus providing proof-of-principle evidence of behavior as prodrugs. The soluble compounds largely reached the lower intestinal tract. Upon administration of resveratrol, the major species found in this region was dihydroresveratrol, produced by enzymes of the intestinal flora. In experiments with a fully protected (trisubstituted) deoxygalactose containing prodrug, the major species were the prodrug itself and partially deprotected derivatives, along with small amounts of dihydroresveratrol. We conclude that the N-monosubstituted carbamate moiety is suitable for use in prodrugs of polyphenols.

  13. Self-Immolative Polycations as Gene Delivery Vectors and Prodrugs Targeting Polyamine Metabolism in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Polycations are explored as carriers to deliver therapeutic nucleic acids. Polycations are conventionally pharmacological inert with the sole function of delivering therapeutic cargo. This study reports synthesis of a self-immolative polycation (DSS-BEN) based on a polyamine analogue drug N1,N11-bisethylnorspermine (BENSpm). The polycation was designed to function dually as a gene delivery carrier and a prodrug targeting dysregulated polyamine metabolism in cancer. Using a combination of NMR and HPLC, we confirm that the self-immolative polycation undergoes intracellular degradation into the parent drug BENSpm. The released BENSpm depletes cellular levels of spermidine and spermine and upregulates polyamine catabolic enzymes spermine/spermidine N1-acetyltransferase (SSAT) and spermine oxidase (SMO). The synthesized polycations form polyplexes with DNA and facilitate efficient transfection. Taking advantage of the ability of BENSpm to sensitize cancer cells to TNFα-induced apoptosis, we show that DSS-BEN enhances the cell killing activity of TNFα gene therapy. The reported findings validate DSS-BEN as a dual-function delivery system that can deliver a therapeutic gene and improve the outcome of gene therapy as a result of the intracellular degradation of DSS-BEN to BENSpm and the subsequent beneficial effect of BENSpm on dysregulated polyamine metabolism in cancer. PMID:25153488

  14. Biocatalytic approaches applied to the synthesis of nucleoside prodrugs.

    PubMed

    Iglesias, Luis E; Lewkowicz, Elizabeth S; Medici, Rosario; Bianchi, Paola; Iribarren, Adolfo M

    2015-01-01

    Nucleosides are valuable bioactive molecules, which display antiviral and antitumour activities. Diverse types of prodrugs are designed to enhance their therapeutic efficacy, however this strategy faces the troublesome selectivity issues of nucleoside chemistry. In this context, the aim of this review is to give an overview of the opportunities provided by biocatalytic procedures in the preparation of nucleoside prodrugs. The potential of biocatalysis in this research area will be presented through examples covering the different types of nucleoside prodrugs: nucleoside analogues as prodrugs, nucleoside lipophilic prodrugs and nucleoside hydrophilic prodrugs.

  15. [Clinical outcomes of 2 pediatric patients with Gaucher's disease in enzyme replacement therapy for 9 years].

    PubMed

    Quijada Fraile, Pilar; Martín Hernández, Elena; Teresa García-Silva, María

    2011-09-01

    We report two cases of type 1 Gaucher's disease in childhood and their outcomes after 9 years of enzyme replacement therapy. The first case concerns a 6-year-old boy who was diagnosed with Gaucher's disease after developing petechial exanthema, thrombocytopenia, anemia and hepatosplenomegaly, coinciding with chickenpox. The second case involves a 9-year-old girl who was referred to our unit. She had hepatosplenomegaly since 4-month-old and subsequently developed thrombocytopenia. Both patients have the N370S/L444P mutation. Enzyme replacement therapy was started with 60 U/kg imiglucerase every 2 weeks at the age of 6 and 9 years, respectively. In both patients, the therapeutic goals were achieved and maintained throughout treatment with a dose of 30 U/kg. PMID:22230125

  16. Enzyme therapy for pompe disease with recombinant human alpha-glucosidase from rabbit milk.

    PubMed

    Van den Hout, J M; Reuser, A J; de Klerk, J B; Arts, W F; Smeitink, J A; Van der Ploeg, A T

    2001-04-01

    Pompe disease is a metabolic myopathy caused by deficiency of lysosomal acid alpha-glucosidase. In this report we review the first 36 weeks of a clinical study on the safety and efficacy of enzyme therapy aimed at correcting the deficiency. Four patients with infantile Pompe disease were enrolled. They received recombinant human alpha-glucosidase from transgenic rabbit milk. The product is generally well tolerated and reaches the primary target tissues. Normalization of alpha-glucosidase activity in skeletal muscle was obtained and degradation of PAS-positive material was seen in tissue sections. The clinical condition of all patients improved. The effect on heart was most significant, with an impressive reduction of the left ventricular mass index (LVMI). Motor function improved. The positive preliminary results stimulate continuation and extension of efforts towards the realization of enzyme therapy for Pompe disease.

  17. Anticancer drug released from near IR-activated prodrug overcomes spatiotemporal limits of singlet oxygen.

    PubMed

    Rajaputra, Pallavi; Bio, Moses; Nkepang, Gregory; Thapa, Pritam; Woo, Sukyung; You, Youngjae

    2016-04-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a cancer treatment modality where photosensitizer (PS) is activated by visible and near IR light to produce singlet oxygen ((1)O2). However, (1)O2 has a short lifetime (<40 ns) and cannot diffuse (<20 nm) beyond the cell diameter (e.g., ∼ 1800 nm). Thus, (1)O2 damage is both spatially and temporally limited and does not produce bystander effect. In a heterogeneous tumor, cells escaping (1)O2 damage can regrow after PDT treatment. To overcome these limitations, we developed a prodrug concept (PS-L-D) composed of a photosensitizer (PS), an anti-cancer drug (D), and an (1)O2-cleavable linker (L). Upon illumination of the prodrug, (1)O2 is generated, which damages the tumor and also releases anticancer drug. The locally released drug could cause spatially broader and temporally sustained damage, killing the surviving cancer cells after the PDT damage. In our previous report, we presented the superior activity of our prodrug of CA4 (combretastatin A-4), Pc-(L-CA4)2, compared to its non-cleavable analog, Pc-(NCL-CA4)2, that produced only PDT effects. Here, we provide clear evidence demonstrating that the released anticancer drug, CA4, indeed damages the surviving cancer cells over and beyond the spatial and temporal limits of (1)O2. In the limited light illumination experiment, cells in the entire well were killed due to the effect of released anti-cancer drug, whereas only a partial damage was observed in the pseudo-prodrug treated wells. A time-dependent cell survival study showed more cell death in the prodrug-treated cells due to the sustained damage by the released CA4. Cell cycle analysis and microscopic imaging data demonstrated the typical damage patterns by CA4 in the prodrug treated cells. A time-dependent histological study showed that prodrug-treated tumors lacked mitotic bodies, and the prodrug caused broader and sustained tumor size reduction compared to those seen in the tumors treated with the pseudo-prodrug. This data

  18. Lipophilic Prodrugs of SN38: Synthesis and in Vitro Characterization toward Oral Chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Bala, Vaskor; Rao, Shasha; Li, Peng; Wang, Shudong; Prestidge, Clive A

    2016-01-01

    SN38 (7-ethyl-10-hydroxy camptothecin) is a potent anticancer agent belonging to the camptothecin family; however, its oral delivery is extensively restricted by poor solubility in pharmaceutically acceptable excipients and low transmucosal permeability. Lipid-based carriers are well-known for their ability to improve oral absorption and bioavailability of lipid soluble and highly permeable compounds. Thus, this study has focused on improving solubility in lipid excipients, controlling stability, and enhancing transmucosal permeability of SN38 by specific chemical modification. To achieve these aims, a series of lipophilic prodrugs were designed and synthesized by esterification at the C10 and/or C20 positon(s) of SN38 with dietary fatty acids of diverse hydrocarbon chain lengths. The solubility of these novel prodrugs in long-chain triglycerides was increased up to 444-fold, and cytotoxicity was significantly reduced in comparison to SN38. The prodrugs were stable in simulated gastric fluids but exhibited different rates of hydrolysis (t1/2 < 5 min to t1/2 > 2 h) in simulated intestinal fluids (in the presence of enzymes) depending on the alkyl chain length and the position modified. A predictable reconversion of prodrugs to SN38 in plasma was also confirmed. On the basis of these studies, SN38-undecanoate (C20) was identified as the optimal prodrug. Finally, in vitro permeability and uptake studies in rat intestinal mucosal membrane using an Ussing chamber showed significant improvement in transepithelial drug transport and cellular uptake. Together, these results indicate that well designed lipophilic prodrugs have potential for the efficacious and safe oral delivery of SN38. PMID:26623947

  19. Design, synthesis, and evaluation of new cyclophosphamide-based anticancer prodrugs

    SciTech Connect

    Moon, Ki-Young.

    1993-01-01

    Cyclophosphamide (CP,1) is a prodrug that is activated by hepatic microsomal mixed-function oxidase (MFO) catalyzed C[sub 4]-hydroxylation. The resulting 4-hydroxycyclophosphamide (4-OH-CP) undergoes ring opening to aldophosphamide (Aldo), followed by generation of cytotoxic phosphoramide mustard (PDA,2) and acrolein by [beta]-elimination. The cytotoxic activity of CP is attributed to the aziridinium ion species derived from PDA that cross-links interstrand DNA. The aim of this research is to design, synthesize, and evaluate new cyclophosphamide-based alkylating agents to achieve improved therapeutic efficacy against neoplastic cells. Benzyl phosphoramide mustard (Benzyl PDA,4), 2.4-difluorobenzyl phosphoramide mustard (2,4-Difluorobenzyl PDA,5) and methyl phosphoramide mustard (Methyl PDA,6) were examined as lipophilic, chemically stable prodrugs of PDA (2). These phosphorodiamidic esters were designed to undergo biotransformation by hepatic microsomal enzymes to produce 2 without generation of acrolein and to be active against CP-resistant tumor cells. Several N-methyl-4-(alkylthio)cyclophosphamide derivatives were synthesized and examined as chemically stable, biooxidative prodrugs of 4-OH-CP, the activated species of CP. All of the prodrugs underwent N-demethylation in a time-dependent manner when incubated with rat hepatic microsomes, which resulted in formation of formaldehyde as well as alkylating species. Among the prodrugs, N-methyl-4-(diethyldithiocarbamoyl)cyclophosphamide (N-CH[sub 3]-4-DDTC-CP,15) showed exceptional in vitro cytotoxicity against 3T3 cells as well as against a panel of human tumor cell lines, with a particular sensitivity to leukemia and small cell lung cancer cell lines. Preliminary in vivo antitumor evaluation against L1210 leukemia in mice showed that all of the prodrugs were active.

  20. RTB Lectin: a novel receptor-independent delivery system for lysosomal enzyme replacement therapies

    PubMed Central

    Acosta, Walter; Ayala, Jorge; Dolan, Maureen C.; Cramer, Carole L.

    2015-01-01

    Enzyme replacement therapies have revolutionized patient treatment for multiple rare lysosomal storage diseases but show limited effectiveness for addressing pathologies in “hard-to-treat” organs and tissues including brain and bone. Here we investigate the plant lectin RTB as a novel carrier for human lysosomal enzymes. RTB enters mammalian cells by multiple mechanisms including both adsorptive-mediated and receptor-mediated endocytosis, and thus provides access to a broader array of organs and cells. Fusion proteins comprised of RTB and human α-L-iduronidase, the corrective enzyme for Mucopolysaccharidosis type I, were produced using a tobacco-based expression system. Fusion products retained both lectin selectivity and enzyme activity, were efficiently endocytosed into human fibroblasts, and corrected the disease phenotype of mucopolysaccharidosis patient fibroblasts in vitro. RTB-mediated delivery was independent of high-mannose and mannose-6-phosphate receptors, which are exploited for delivery of currently approved lysosomal enzyme therapeutics. Thus, the RTB carrier may support distinct in vivo pharmacodynamics with potential to address hard-to-treat tissues. PMID:26382970

  1. A Chaperone Enhances Blood α-Glucosidase Activity in Pompe Disease Patients Treated With Enzyme Replacement Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Parenti, Giancarlo; Fecarotta, Simona; la Marca, Giancarlo; Rossi, Barbara; Ascione, Serena; Donati, Maria Alice; Morandi, Lucia Ovidia; Ravaglia, Sabrina; Pichiecchio, Anna; Ombrone, Daniela; Sacchini, Michele; Pasanisi, Maria Barbara; De Filippi, Paola; Danesino, Cesare; Della Casa, Roberto; Romano, Alfonso; Mollica, Carmine; Rosa, Margherita; Agovino, Teresa; Nusco, Edoardo; Porto, Caterina; Andria, Generoso

    2014-01-01

    Enzyme replacement therapy is currently the only approved treatment for Pompe disease, due to acid α-glucosidase deficiency. Clinical efficacy of this approach is variable, and more effective therapies are needed. We showed in preclinical studies that chaperones stabilize the recombinant enzyme used for enzyme replacement therapy. Here, we evaluated the effects of a combination of enzyme therapy and a chaperone on α-glucosidase activity in Pompe disease patients. α-Glucosidase activity was analyzed by tandem-mass spectrometry in dried blood spots from patients treated with enzyme replacement therapy, either alone or in combination with the chaperone N-butyldeoxynojirimycin given at the time of the enzyme infusion. Thirteen patients with different presentations (3 infantile-onset, 10 late-onset) were enrolled. In 11 patients, the combination treatment resulted in α-glucosidase activities greater than 1.85-fold the activities with enzyme replacement therapy alone. In the whole patient population, α-glucosidase activity was significantly increased at 12 hours (2.19-fold, P = 0.002), 24 hours (6.07-fold, P = 0.001), and 36 hours (3.95-fold, P = 0.003). The areas under the curve were also significantly increased (6.78-fold, P = 0.002). These results suggest improved stability of recombinant α-glucosidase in blood in the presence of the chaperone. PMID:25052852

  2. Production in yeast of alpha-galactosidase A, a lysosomal enzyme applicable to enzyme replacement therapy for Fabry disease.

    PubMed

    Chiba, Yasunori; Sakuraba, Hitoshi; Kotani, Masaharu; Kase, Ryoichi; Kobayashi, Kazuo; Takeuchi, Makoto; Ogasawara, Satoshi; Maruyama, Yutaka; Nakajima, Tasuku; Takaoka, Yuki; Jigami, Yoshifumi

    2002-12-01

    A mammalian-like sugar moiety was created in glycoprotein by Saccharomyces cerevisiae in combination with bacterial alpha-mannosidase to produce a more economic enzyme replacement therapy for patients with Fabry disease. We introduced the human alpha-galactosidase A (alpha-GalA) gene into an S. cerevisiae mutant that was deficient in the outer chains of N-linked mannan. The recombinant alpha-GalA contained both neutral (Man(8)GlcNAc(2)) and acidic ([Man-P](1-2)Man(8)GlcNAc(2)) sugar chains. Because an efficient incorporation of alpha-GalA into lysosomes of human cells requires mannose-6-phosphate (Man-6-P) residues that should be recognized by the specific receptor, we trimmed down the sugar chains of the alpha-GalA by a newly isolated bacterial alpha-mannosidase. Treatment of the alpha-GalA with the alpha-mannosidase resulted in the exposure of a Man-6-P residue on a nonreduced end of oligosaccharide chains after the removal of phosphodiester-linked nonreduced-end mannose. The treated alpha-GalA was efficiently incorporated into fibroblasts derived from patients with Fabry disease. The uptake was three to four times higher than that of the nontreated alpha-GalA and was inhibited by the addition of 5 mM Man-6-P. Incorporated alpha-GalA was targeted to the lysosome, and hydrolyzed ceramide trihexoside accumulated in the Fabry fibroblasts after 5 days. This method provides an effective and economic therapy for many lysosomal disorders, including Fabry disease.

  3. Selective Water-Soluble Gelatinase Inhibitor Prodrugs

    PubMed Central

    Gooyit, Major; Lee, Mijoon; Schroeder, Valerie A.; Ikejiri, Masahiro; Suckow, Mark A.; Mobashery, Shahriar; Chang, Mayland

    2011-01-01

    SB-3CT (1), a selective and potent thiirane-based gelatinase inhibitor, is effective in animal models of cancer metastasis and stroke; however, it is limited by poor aqueous solubility and extensive metabolism. We addressed these issues by blocking the primary site of metabolism and capitalizing on a prodrug strategy to achieve >5000-fold increased solubility. The amide prodrugs were quantitatively hydrolyzed in human blood to a potent gelatinase inhibitor, ND-322 (3). The arginyl amide prodrug (ND-478, 5d) was metabolically stable in mouse, rat, and human liver microsomes. Both 5d and 3 were non-mutagenic in the Ames II mutagenicity assay. The prodrug 5d showed moderate clearance of 0.0582 L/min/kg, remained mostly in the extracellular fluid compartment (Vd = 0.0978 L/kg), and had a terminal half-life of >4 h. The prodrug 5d had superior pharmacokinetic properties than 3, making the thiirane class of selective gelatinase inhibitors suitable for intravenous administration in treatment of acute gelatinase-dependent diseases. PMID:21866961

  4. L-Methionase: A Therapeutic Enzyme to Treat Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Bhupender; Singh, Sukhdev; Kanwar, Shamsher S.

    2014-01-01

    Cancer is an increasing cause of mortality and morbidity throughout the world. L-methionase has potential application against many types of cancers. L-Methionase is an intracellular enzyme in bacterial species, an extracellular enzyme in fungi, and absent in mammals. L-Methionase producing bacterial strain(s) can be isolated by 5,5′-dithio-bis-(2-nitrobenzoic acid) as a screening dye. L-Methionine plays an important role in tumour cells. These cells become methionine dependent and eventually follow apoptosis due to methionine limitation in cancer cells. L-Methionine also plays an indispensable role in gene activation and inactivation due to hypermethylation and/or hypomethylation. Membrane transporters such as GLUT1 and ion channels like Na2+, Ca2+, K+, and Cl− become overexpressed. Further, the α-subunit of ATP synthase plays a role in cancer cells growth and development by providing them enhanced nutritional requirements. Currently, selenomethionine is also used as a prodrug in cancer therapy along with enzyme methionase that converts prodrug into active toxic chemical(s) that causes death of cancerous cells/tissue. More recently, fusion protein (FP) consisting of L-methionase linked to annexin-V has been used in cancer therapy. The fusion proteins have advantage that they have specificity only for cancer cells and do not harm the normal cells. PMID:25250324

  5. Pro-drugs for indirect cannabinoids as therapeutic agents.

    PubMed

    Ashton, John

    2008-10-01

    Medicinal cannabis, cannabis extracts, and other cannabinoids are currently in use or under clinical trial investigation for the control of nausea, emesis and wasting in patients undergoing chemotherapy, the control of neuropathic pain and arthritic pain, and the control of the symptoms of multiple sclerosis. The further development of medicinal cannabinoids has been challenged with problems. These include the psychoactivity of cannabinoid CB1 receptor agonists and the lack of availability of highly selective cannabinoid receptor full agonists (for the CB1 or CB2 receptor), as well as problems of pharmacokinetics. Global activation of cannabinoid receptors is usually undesirable, and so enhancement of local endocannabinoid receptor activity with indirect cannabimimetics is an attractive strategy for therapeutic modulation of the endocannabinoid system. However, existing drugs of this type tend to be metabolized by the same enzymes as their target endocannabinoids and are not yet available in a form that is clinically useful. A potential solution to these problems may now have been suggested by the discovery that paracetamol (acetaminophen) exerts its analgesic (and probably anti-pyretic) effects by its degradation into an anandamide (an endocannabinoid) reuptake inhibitor (AM404) within the body, thus classifying it as pro-drug for an indirect cannabimimetic. Given the proven efficacy and safety of paracetamol, the challenge now is to develop related drugs, or entirely different substrates, into pro-drug indirect cannabimimetics with a similar safety profile to paracetamol but at high effective dose titrations.

  6. Pro-drugs for indirect cannabinoids as therapeutic agents.

    PubMed

    Ashton, John

    2008-10-01

    Medicinal cannabis, cannabis extracts, and other cannabinoids are currently in use or under clinical trial investigation for the control of nausea, emesis and wasting in patients undergoing chemotherapy, the control of neuropathic pain and arthritic pain, and the control of the symptoms of multiple sclerosis. The further development of medicinal cannabinoids has been challenged with problems. These include the psychoactivity of cannabinoid CB1 receptor agonists and the lack of availability of highly selective cannabinoid receptor full agonists (for the CB1 or CB2 receptor), as well as problems of pharmacokinetics. Global activation of cannabinoid receptors is usually undesirable, and so enhancement of local endocannabinoid receptor activity with indirect cannabimimetics is an attractive strategy for therapeutic modulation of the endocannabinoid system. However, existing drugs of this type tend to be metabolized by the same enzymes as their target endocannabinoids and are not yet available in a form that is clinically useful. A potential solution to these problems may now have been suggested by the discovery that paracetamol (acetaminophen) exerts its analgesic (and probably anti-pyretic) effects by its degradation into an anandamide (an endocannabinoid) reuptake inhibitor (AM404) within the body, thus classifying it as pro-drug for an indirect cannabimimetic. Given the proven efficacy and safety of paracetamol, the challenge now is to develop related drugs, or entirely different substrates, into pro-drug indirect cannabimimetics with a similar safety profile to paracetamol but at high effective dose titrations. PMID:18855592

  7. Catalytic nucleic acid enzymes for the study and development of therapies in the central nervous system

    PubMed Central

    Tritz, Richard; Habita, Cellia; Robbins, Joan M.; Gomez, German G.; Kruse, Carol A.

    2005-01-01

    Summary Nucleic acid enzymes have been used with great success for studying natural processes in the central nervous system (CNS). We first provide information on the structural and enzymatic differences of various ribozymes and DNAzymes. We then discuss how they have been used to explore new therapeutic approaches for treating diseases of the CNS. They have been tested in various systems modeling retinitis pigmentosum, proliferative vitreoretinopathy, Alzheimer's disease, and malignant brain tumors. For these models, effective targets for nucleic acid enzymes have been readily identified and the rules for selecting cleavage sites have been well established. The bulk of studies, including those from our laboratory, have emphasized their use for gliomas. With the availability of multiple excellent animal models to test glioma treatments, good progress has been made in the initial testing of nucleic acid enzymes for brain tumor therapy. However, opportunities still exist to significantly improve the delivery and efficacy of ribozymes to achieve effective treatment. The future holds significant potential for the molecular targeting and therapy of eye diseases, neurodegenerative disorders, and brain tumors with these unique treatment agents. PMID:16467915

  8. [Radiation Anticarcinogenesis by Thiazolidine Pro-drug

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warters, Raymond L.; Roberts, Jeanette C.; Fain, Heidi

    1999-01-01

    The original goal of this work was to determine the capacity of selected aminothiols to modulate radiation induced cytotoxicity, mutagenesis and carcinogenesis in a human mammary epithelial cell line. The conclusions from this work are that WR-1065 is the "gold standard" for protection against radiation induced cytotoxicity, mutagenesis and carcinogenesis. While a potent radiation protector, WR-1065 is cytotoxic in vitro and in vivo. Our rationale for a study of the thiazolidine pro-drugs was that these compounds are neither toxic in vitro or in vivo. The results obtained during this funding period indicate that the thiazolidine pro-drugs are as potent as WR-1065 as protectors against radiation induced mutation induction, and thus presumably against radiation induced carcinogenesis. Our results indicate that the thiazolidine prodrugs are excellent candidates to test as non-toxic anticarcinogens for protecting astronauts from cancer induction during space travel.

  9. [In vitro metabolism of fenbendazole prodrug].

    PubMed

    Wen, Ai-Dan; Duan, Li-Ping; Liu, Cong-Shan; Tao, Yi; Xue, Jian; Wu, Ning-Bo; Jiang, Bin; Zhang, Hao-Bing

    2013-02-01

    Synthesized fenbendazole prodrug N-methoxycarbonyl-N'-(2-nitro-4-phenylthiophenyl) thiourea (MPT) was analyzed in vitro in artificial gastric juice, intestinal juice and mouse liver homogenate model by using HPLC method, and metabolic curve was then generated. MPT was tested against Echinococcus granulosus protoscolices in vitro. The result showed that MPT could be metabolized in the three biological media, and to the active compound fenbendazole in liver homogenate, with a metabolic rate of 7.92%. Besides, the prodrug showed a weak activity against E. granulosus protoscolices with a mortality of 45.9%.

  10. Natural and synthetic iminosugars as carbohydrate processing enzyme inhibitors for cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Wrodnigg, Tanja M; Steiner, Andreas J; Ueberbacher, Bernhard J

    2008-01-01

    Iminosugars, featuring a basic nitrogen at the hetero atom position in carbohydrate rings, gain increasing interest in the search for novel approaches towards cancer drug development. This compound class is known as competitive inhibitors of carbohydrate manipulation enzymes, such as glycosidases, which are involved in tumor cell invasion and migration. Such enzymes are also responsible for the attachment of oligosaccharides to the cell surface of tumor cells, displayed as glycoproteins, glycolipids, and proteoglycans, which play an important role in malignant phenotype and tumor growth. Furthermore, cancer cells show an extremely active lysosomal system which is reflected by enhancement of glycoprotein turnover. Iminosugars were found to interact with glycosyl hydrolases responsible for this kind of action in cancer cells and thus open a new compound class in the research field of finding new anti-cancer activities. This review will focus on the role of iminosugars in cancer therapy and will give an overview of their properties.

  11. Recombinant arginine-degrading enzymes in metabolic anticancer therapy and bioanalytics.

    PubMed

    Stasyk, Oleh V; Boretsky, Yuriy R; Gonchar, Mykhailo V; Sibirny, Andriy A

    2015-03-01

    Tumor cells often exhibit specific metabolic defects due to the aberrations in oncogene-dependent regulatory and/or signaling pathways that distinguish them from normal cells. Among others, many malignant cells are deficient in biosynthesis of certain amino acids and concomitantly exhibit elevated sensitivity to deprivation of these amino acids. Although the underlying causes of such metabolic changes are still not fully understood, this feature of malignant cells is exploited in metabolic enzymotherapies based on single amino acid, e.g., arginine, deprivation. To achieve efficient arginine depletion in vivo, two recombinant enzymes, bacterial arginine deiminase and human arginase I have been evaluated and are undergoing further development. This review is aimed to summarize the current knowledge on the application of arginine-degrading enzymes as anticancer agents and as bioanalytical tools for arginine assays. The problems that have to be solved to optimize this therapy for clinical application are discussed. PMID:25231409

  12. Chemical Reactivity Window Determines Prodrug Efficiency toward Glutathione Transferase Overexpressing Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    van Gisbergen, Marike W; Cebula, Marcus; Zhang, Jie; Ottosson-Wadlund, Astrid; Dubois, Ludwig; Lambin, Philippe; Tew, Kenneth D; Townsend, Danyelle M; Haenen, Guido R M M; Drittij-Reijnders, Marie-José; Saneyoshi, Hisao; Araki, Mika; Shishido, Yuko; Ito, Yoshihiro; Arnér, Elias S J; Abe, Hiroshi; Morgenstern, Ralf; Johansson, Katarina

    2016-06-01

    Glutathione transferases (GSTs) are often overexpressed in tumors and frequently correlated to bad prognosis and resistance against a number of different anticancer drugs. To selectively target these cells and to overcome this resistance we previously have developed prodrugs that are derivatives of existing anticancer drugs (e.g., doxorubicin) incorporating a sulfonamide moiety. When cleaved by GSTs, the prodrug releases the cytostatic moiety predominantly in GST overexpressing cells, thus sparing normal cells with moderate enzyme levels. By modifying the sulfonamide it is possible to control the rate of drug release and specifically target different GSTs. Here we show that the newly synthesized compounds, 4-acetyl-2-nitro-benzenesulfonyl etoposide (ANS-etoposide) and 4-acetyl-2-nitro-benzenesulfonyl doxorubicin (ANS-DOX), function as prodrugs for GSTA1 and MGST1 overexpressing cell lines. ANS-DOX, in particular, showed a desirable cytotoxic profile by inducing toxicity and DNA damage in a GST-dependent manner compared to control cells. Its moderate conversion of 500 nmol/min/mg, as catalyzed by GSTA1, seems hereby essential since the more reactive 2,4-dinitrobenzenesulfonyl doxorubicin (DNS-DOX) (14000 nmol/min/mg) did not display a preference for GSTA1 overexpressing cells. DNS-DOX, however, effectively killed GSTP1 (20 nmol/min/mg) and MGST1 (450 nmol/min/mg) overexpressing cells as did the less reactive 4-mononitrobenzenesulfonyl doxorubicin (MNS-DOX) in a MGST1-dependent manner (1.5 nmol/min/mg) as shown previously. Furthermore, we show that the mechanism of these prodrugs involves a reduction in GSH levels as well as inhibition of the redox regulatory enzyme thioredoxin reductase 1 (TrxR1) by virtue of their electrophilic sulfonamide moiety. TrxR1 is upregulated in many tumors and associated with resistance to chemotherapy and poor patient prognosis. Additionally, the prodrugs potentially acted as a general shuttle system for DOX, by overcoming resistance

  13. Enzyme replacement therapy in Hurler syndrome after failure of hematopoietic transplant.

    PubMed

    Arranz, Leonor; Aldamiz-Echevarria, Luis

    2015-06-01

    The most severe form of Mucopolysaccharosidosis type I (MPS-I), Hurler syndrome, presents with progressive respiratory, cardiac and musculoskeletal symptoms and cognitive deterioration. Treatment includes enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) and/or hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). We describe the case of an 8-year old boy with MPS-I, homozygous for W402X, treated at 10 months of age with HSCT and after failure of the transplant, with ERT during 2 years showing good results, including a positive neuropsychological development. PMID:26937401

  14. Enzyme replacement therapy in Hurler syndrome after failure of hematopoietic transplant

    PubMed Central

    Arranz, Leonor; Aldamiz-Echevarria, Luis

    2015-01-01

    The most severe form of Mucopolysaccharosidosis type I (MPS-I), Hurler syndrome, presents with progressive respiratory, cardiac and musculoskeletal symptoms and cognitive deterioration. Treatment includes enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) and/or hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). We describe the case of an 8-year old boy with MPS-I, homozygous for W402X, treated at 10 months of age with HSCT and after failure of the transplant, with ERT during 2 years showing good results, including a positive neuropsychological development. PMID:26937401

  15. Genetic influences of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor response: an opportunity for personalizing therapy?

    PubMed

    Brugts, Jasper J; Simoons, Maarten L

    2012-08-01

    The angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors are a cornerstone drug therapy in the current treatment of patients with hypertension, stable coronary artery disease and heart failure. Individualizing therapy of ACE inhibitors with clinical risk factors in low-risk patients with stable coronary artery disease is not feasible. The concept of pharmacogenetics, by studying patient factors more individually, offers a first glimpse in the quest for the 'holy grail' of personalized medicine. As such, genetic targets in the direct pharmacodynamic pathway of ACE inhibitors, the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, is a plausible candidate for such an approach. In the past few decades, results of pharmacogenetic studies were scarce and inconsistent. However, recently the first reports of larger pharmacogenetic studies are now confirming that the 'pharmacogenetic approach' might be feasible in the future. The current review focuses on the recent developments in pharmacogenetic research in response to ACE inhibitors in patients with stable coronary artery disease. PMID:23030290

  16. Novel prodrugs with a spontaneous cleavable guanidine moiety.

    PubMed

    Hamada, Yoshio

    2016-04-01

    Water-soluble prodrug strategy is a practical alternative for improving the drug bioavailability of sparingly-soluble drugs with reduced drug efficacy. Many water-soluble prodrugs of sparingly-soluble drugs, such as the phosphate ester of a drug, have been reported. Recently, we described a novel water-soluble prodrug based on O-N intramolecular acyl migration. However, these prodrug approaches require a hydroxy group in the structure of their drugs, and other prodrug approaches are often restricted by the structure of the parent drugs. To develop prodrugs with no restriction in the structure, we focused on a decomposition reaction of arginine methyl ester. This reaction proceeds at room temperature under neutral conditions, and we applied this reaction to the prodrug strategy for drugs with an amino group. We designed and synthesized novel prodrugs of representative sparingly soluble drugs phenytoin and sulfathiazole. Phenytoin and sulfathiazole were obtained as stable salt that were converted to parent drugs under physiological conditions. Phenytoin prodrug 3 showed a short half-life (t1/2) of 13min, whereas sulfathiazole prodrug 7 had a moderate t1/2 of 40min. Prodrugs 3 and 7 appear to be suitable for use as an injectable formulation and orally administered drug, respectively.

  17. Biomolecules damage and redox status abnormalities in Fabry patients before and during enzyme replacement therapy.

    PubMed

    Biancini, Giovana Brondani; Jacques, Carlos Eduardo; Hammerschmidt, Tatiane; de Souza, Heryk Motta; Donida, Bruna; Deon, Marion; Vairo, Filippo Pinto; Lourenço, Charles Marques; Giugliani, Roberto; Vargas, Carmen Regla

    2016-10-01

    Fabry disease (FD) is caused by deficient activity of the lysosomal enzyme α-galactosidase A. Its substrates, mainly globotriaosylceramide (Gb3), accumulate and seem to induce other pathophysiological findings of FD. Once enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) is not completely efficient on preventing disease progress in FD patients, elucidating the underlying mechanisms in FD pathophysiology is essential to the development of additional therapeutic strategies. We investigated 58 Fabry patients (23 male and 35 female) subdivided into two groups (at diagnosis and during long-term ERT) and compared them to healthy individuals. Fabry patients at diagnosis presented altered glutathione (GSH) metabolism (higher GSH levels, lower glutathione peroxidase - GPx - and normal glutathione reductase - GR - activities), higher lipid peroxidation levels (thiobarbituric acid reactive species - TBARS - and malondialdehyde - MDA), nitric oxide (NO(.)) equivalents and urinary Gb3. Fabry patients on ERT presented GSH metabolism similar to controls, although lipid peroxidation and urinary levels of NO(.) equivalents remained higher whereas Gb3 levels were lower than at diagnosis but still higher than controls. These data demonstrated that redox impairment occurs in Fabry patients before and after ERT, probably as a consequence of Gb3 accumulation, providing targets to future therapy approaches using antioxidants in combination with ERT in FD. PMID:27458128

  18. Biomolecules damage and redox status abnormalities in Fabry patients before and during enzyme replacement therapy.

    PubMed

    Biancini, Giovana Brondani; Jacques, Carlos Eduardo; Hammerschmidt, Tatiane; de Souza, Heryk Motta; Donida, Bruna; Deon, Marion; Vairo, Filippo Pinto; Lourenço, Charles Marques; Giugliani, Roberto; Vargas, Carmen Regla

    2016-10-01

    Fabry disease (FD) is caused by deficient activity of the lysosomal enzyme α-galactosidase A. Its substrates, mainly globotriaosylceramide (Gb3), accumulate and seem to induce other pathophysiological findings of FD. Once enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) is not completely efficient on preventing disease progress in FD patients, elucidating the underlying mechanisms in FD pathophysiology is essential to the development of additional therapeutic strategies. We investigated 58 Fabry patients (23 male and 35 female) subdivided into two groups (at diagnosis and during long-term ERT) and compared them to healthy individuals. Fabry patients at diagnosis presented altered glutathione (GSH) metabolism (higher GSH levels, lower glutathione peroxidase - GPx - and normal glutathione reductase - GR - activities), higher lipid peroxidation levels (thiobarbituric acid reactive species - TBARS - and malondialdehyde - MDA), nitric oxide (NO(.)) equivalents and urinary Gb3. Fabry patients on ERT presented GSH metabolism similar to controls, although lipid peroxidation and urinary levels of NO(.) equivalents remained higher whereas Gb3 levels were lower than at diagnosis but still higher than controls. These data demonstrated that redox impairment occurs in Fabry patients before and after ERT, probably as a consequence of Gb3 accumulation, providing targets to future therapy approaches using antioxidants in combination with ERT in FD.

  19. Tubulin polymerization by paclitaxel (taxol) phosphate prodrugs after metabolic activation with alkaline phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Mamber, S W; Mikkilineni, A B; Pack, E J; Rosser, M P; Wong, H; Ueda, Y; Forenza, S

    1995-08-01

    Paclitaxel (taxol) phosphate derivatives BMY46366, BMY-46489, BMS180661 and BMS180820 were used to determine the ability of alkaline phosphatase to convert these water-soluble potential prodrugs to tubulin-polymerizing metabolites (i.e., paclitaxel). Compounds were treated up to 180 min with an in vitro metabolic activation system composed of 10% bovine alkaline phosphatase in 0.2 M tris, pH 7.4, or in 0.2 M glycine, pH 8.8, plus 0.05 M MgCl2. Samples were tested (either by direct addition or after methylene chloride extraction/dimethyl-sulfoxide resuspension) in spectrophotometric tubulin polymerization assays utilizing bovine-derived microtubule protein. Pretreatment of 2'- and 7-phosphonoxyphenylpropionate prodrugs BMS180661 and BMS180820 with alkaline phosphatase for 30 to 120 min yielded relative initial slopes of about 20 to 100% at test concentrations equimolar to paclitaxel. High-performance liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry of BMS180661 treated with alkaline phosphatase confirmed the production of paclitaxel from the prodrug. In contrast, 2'- and 7-phosphate analogs BMY46366 and BMY46489 treated with alkaline phosphatase were not active in tubulin assays. None of the paclitaxel phosphate prodrugs polymerized tubulin in the absence of metabolic activation. The differences in tubulin polymerization with metabolic activation may be related both to accessibility of the phosphate group to the enzyme and to anionic charge effects. These results demonstrate that certain paclitaxel phosphate prodrugs can be metabolized by alkaline phosphatase to yield effective tubulin polymerization. PMID:7636751

  20. Structure-Based Rational Design of Prodrugs To Enable Their Combination with Polymeric Nanoparticle Delivery Platforms for Enhanced Antitumor Efficacy**

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hangxiang; Xie, Haiyang; Wu, Jiaping; Wei, Xuyong; Zhou, Lin; Xu, Xiao; Zheng, Shusen

    2014-01-01

    Drug-loaded nanoparticles (NPs) are of particular interest for efficient cancer therapy due to their improved drug delivery and therapeutic index in various types of cancer. However, the encapsulation of many chemotherapeutics into delivery NPs is often hampered by their unfavorable physicochemical properties. Here, we employed a drug reform strategy to construct a small library of SN-38 (7-ethyl-10-hydroxycamptothecin)-derived prodrugs, in which the phenolate group was modified with a variety of hydrophobic moieties. This esterification fine-tuned the polarity of the SN-38 molecule and enhanced the lipophilicity of the formed prodrugs, thereby inducing their self-assembly into biodegradable poly(ethylene glycol)-block-poly(d,l-lactic acid) (PEG-PLA) nanoparticulate structures. Our strategy combining the rational engineering of prodrugs with the pre-eminent features of conventionally used polymeric materials should open new avenues for designing more potent drug delivery systems as a therapeutic modality. PMID:25196427

  1. Targeted delivery of a model immunomodulator to the lymphatic system: comparison of alkyl ester versus triglyceride mimetic lipid prodrug strategies.

    PubMed

    Han, Sifei; Quach, Tim; Hu, Luojuan; Wahab, Anisa; Charman, William N; Stella, Valentino J; Trevaskis, Natalie L; Simpson, Jamie S; Porter, Christopher J H

    2014-03-10

    A lipophilic prodrug approach has been used to promote the delivery of a model immunomodulator, mycophenolic acid (MPA), to the lymphatic system after oral administration. Lymphatic transport was employed to facilitate enhanced drug uptake into lymphocytes, as recent studies demonstrate that targeted drug delivery to lymph resident lymphocytes may enhance immunomodulatory effects. Two classes of lymph-directing prodrugs were synthesised. Alkyl chain derivatives (octyl mycophenolate, MPA-C8E; octadecyl mycophenolate, MPA-C18E; and octadecyl mycophenolamide, MPA-C18AM), to promote passive partitioning into lipids in lymphatic transport pathways, and a triglyceride mimetic prodrug (1,3-dipalmitoyl-2-mycophenoloyl glycerol, 2-MPA-TG) to facilitate metabolic integration into triglyceride deacylation-reacylation pathways. Lymphatic transport, lymphocyte uptake and plasma pharmacokinetics were assessed in mesenteric lymph and carotid artery cannulated rats following intraduodenal infusion of lipid-based formulations containing MPA or MPA prodrugs. Patterns of prodrug hydrolysis in rat digestive fluid, and cellular re-esterification in vivo, were evaluated to examine the mechanisms responsible for lymphatic transport. Poor enzyme stability and low absorption appeared to limit lymphatic transport of the alkyl derivatives, although two of the three alkyl chain prodrugs - MPA-C18AM (6-fold) and MPA-C18E (13-fold) still increased lymphatic drug transport when compared to MPA. In contrast, 2-MPA-TG markedly increased lymphatic drug transport (80-fold) and drug concentrations in lymphocytes (103-fold), and this was achieved via biochemical incorporation into triglyceride deacylation-reacylation pathways. The prodrug was hydrolysed rapidly to 2-mycophenoloyl glycerol (2-MPA-MG) in the presence of rat digestive fluid, and 2-MPA-MG was subsequently re-esterified in the enterocyte with oleic acid (most likely originating from the co-administered formulation) prior to accessing the

  2. Targeted delivery of a model immunomodulator to the lymphatic system: comparison of alkyl ester versus triglyceride mimetic lipid prodrug strategies.

    PubMed

    Han, Sifei; Quach, Tim; Hu, Luojuan; Wahab, Anisa; Charman, William N; Stella, Valentino J; Trevaskis, Natalie L; Simpson, Jamie S; Porter, Christopher J H

    2014-03-10

    A lipophilic prodrug approach has been used to promote the delivery of a model immunomodulator, mycophenolic acid (MPA), to the lymphatic system after oral administration. Lymphatic transport was employed to facilitate enhanced drug uptake into lymphocytes, as recent studies demonstrate that targeted drug delivery to lymph resident lymphocytes may enhance immunomodulatory effects. Two classes of lymph-directing prodrugs were synthesised. Alkyl chain derivatives (octyl mycophenolate, MPA-C8E; octadecyl mycophenolate, MPA-C18E; and octadecyl mycophenolamide, MPA-C18AM), to promote passive partitioning into lipids in lymphatic transport pathways, and a triglyceride mimetic prodrug (1,3-dipalmitoyl-2-mycophenoloyl glycerol, 2-MPA-TG) to facilitate metabolic integration into triglyceride deacylation-reacylation pathways. Lymphatic transport, lymphocyte uptake and plasma pharmacokinetics were assessed in mesenteric lymph and carotid artery cannulated rats following intraduodenal infusion of lipid-based formulations containing MPA or MPA prodrugs. Patterns of prodrug hydrolysis in rat digestive fluid, and cellular re-esterification in vivo, were evaluated to examine the mechanisms responsible for lymphatic transport. Poor enzyme stability and low absorption appeared to limit lymphatic transport of the alkyl derivatives, although two of the three alkyl chain prodrugs - MPA-C18AM (6-fold) and MPA-C18E (13-fold) still increased lymphatic drug transport when compared to MPA. In contrast, 2-MPA-TG markedly increased lymphatic drug transport (80-fold) and drug concentrations in lymphocytes (103-fold), and this was achieved via biochemical incorporation into triglyceride deacylation-reacylation pathways. The prodrug was hydrolysed rapidly to 2-mycophenoloyl glycerol (2-MPA-MG) in the presence of rat digestive fluid, and 2-MPA-MG was subsequently re-esterified in the enterocyte with oleic acid (most likely originating from the co-administered formulation) prior to accessing the

  3. Dual delivery systems based on polyamine analog BENSpm as prodrug and gene delivery vectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yu

    Combination drug and gene therapy shows promise in cancer treatment. However, the success of such strategy requires careful selection of the therapeutic agents, as well as development of efficient delivery vectors. BENSpm (N 1, N11-bisethylnorspermine), a polyamine analogue targeting the intracellular polyamine pathway, draws our special attention because of the following reasons: (1) polyamine pathway is frequently dysregulated in cancer; (2) BENSpm exhibits multiple functions to interfere with the polyamine pathway, such as to up-regulate polyamine metabolism enzymes and down-regulate polyamine biosynthesis enzymes. Therefore BENSpm depletes all natural polyamines and leads to apoptosis and cell growth inhibition in a wide range of cancers; (3) preclinical studies proved that BENSpm can act synergistically with various chemotherapy agents, making it a promising candidate in combination therapy; (4) multiple positive charges in BENSpm enable it as a suitable building block for cationic polymers, which can be further applied to gene delivery. In this dissertation, our goal was to design dual-function delivery vector based on BENSpm that can function as a gene delivery vector and, after intracellular degradation, as an active anticancer agent targeting dysregulated polyamine metabolism. We first demonstrated strong synergism between BENSpm and a potential therapeutic gene product TRAIL. Strong synergism was obtained in both estrogen-dependent MCF-7 breast cancer cells and triple-negative MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. Significant dose reduction of TRAIL in combination with BENSpm in MDA-MB-231 cells, together with the fact that BENSpm rendered MCF-7 cells more sensitive to TRAIL treatment verified our rationale of designing BENSpm-based delivery platform. This was expected to be beneficial for overcoming drug resistance in chemotherapy, as well as boosting the therapeutic effect of therapeutic genes. We first designed a lipid-based BENSpm dual vector (Lipo

  4. Pharmacogenetics, enzyme probes and therapeutic drug monitoring as potential tools for individualizing taxane therapy.

    PubMed

    Krens, Stefanie D; McLeod, Howard L; Hertz, Daniel L

    2013-04-01

    The taxanes are a class of chemotherapeutic agents that are widely used in the treatment of various solid tumors. Although taxanes are highly effective in cancer treatment, their use is associated with serious complications attributable to large interindividual variability in pharmacokinetics and a narrow therapeutic window. Unpredictable toxicity occurrence necessitates close patient monitoring while on therapy and adverse effects frequently require decreasing, delaying or even discontinuing taxane treatment. Currently, taxane dosing is based primarily on body surface area, ignoring other factors that are known to dictate variability in pharmacokinetics or outcome. This article discusses three potential strategies for individualizing taxane treatment based on patient information that can be collected before or during care. The clinical implementation of pharmacogenetics, enzyme probes or therapeutic drug monitoring could enable clinicians to personalize taxane treatment to enhance efficacy and/or limit toxicity.

  5. Effect of enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) added to Home Mechanical Ventilation (HMV) in Adult Pompe disease.

    PubMed

    Sayeed, Nadia; Sharma, Pooja; Abdelhalim, Manahil; Mukherjee, Rahul

    2015-12-01

    Adult Pompe disease/acid maltase deficiency is an autosomal recessive disorder resulting in accumulation of glycogen in skeletal muscles, leading to myopathy frequently involving respiratory muscles. This involvement can cause respiratory insufficiency that may present as acute hypercapnic respiratory failure. Enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) with alpha - glucosidase alfa, the only disease-specific treatment, has been available as treatment option since 2006. ERT has shown efficacy concerning muscle strength and pulmonary function in adult patients as well as positive association with survival. We present two cases where addition of ERT to Home Mechanical Ventilation (HMV) showed improvements in lung function and gas exchange that may not be entirely attributable to nocturnal HMV and therefore may further indicate the beneficial role of ERT in conjunction with HMV in Adult Pompe disease. PMID:26740886

  6. Discontinuation of enzyme replacement therapy in Fabry disease in the Dutch cohort.

    PubMed

    Arends, Maarten; Linthorst, Gabor E; Hollak, Carla E; Biegstraaten, Marieke

    2016-02-01

    Fabry disease (FD) is a progressive, multi-organ, lysosomal storage disease. Enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) is available for the treatment of the disease. While the reasons to initiate ERT have been frequently discussed, discontinuation of ERT is rarely reported. In this paper we describe our experiences with stopping ERT in FD. From 1999 through 2015, twenty-one patients discontinued ERT. These patients were generally older and more severely affected in comparison those who continued ERT. The reason to discontinue ERT switched from death or terminal illness in the first years towards treatment failure in more recent years. Three cases are described in more detail. We conclude that discontinuation of ERT should or may be considered in subgroups of FD patients although further studies on the effectiveness of ERT in subgroups of patients and the course of the disease after discontinuation of ERT are needed. PMID:26654842

  7. Cardiomyopathy and response to enzyme replacement therapy in a male mouse model for Fabry disease.

    PubMed

    Nguyen Dinh Cat, Aurelie; Escoubet, Brigitte; Agrapart, Vincent; Griol-Charhbili, Violaine; Schoeb, Trenton; Feng, Wenguang; Jaimes, Edgar; Warnock, David G; Jaisser, Frederic

    2012-01-01

    Fabry disease is an X-linked disorder of glycosphingolipid metabolism that results in progressive accumulation of neutral glycosphingolipids, (predominately globotriaosylceramide; GL-3) in lysosomes, as well as other cellular compartments and the extracellular space. Our aim was to characterize the cardiac phenotype of male knock-out mice that are deficient in alpha-galactosidase A activity, as a model for Fabry disease and test the efficacy of Enzyme Replacement Therapy with agalsidase-beta. Male mice (3-4 months of age) were characterized with awake blood pressure and heart rate measurements, cardiac echocardiography and electrocardiography measurements under light anesthesia, histological studies and molecular studies with real-time polymerase chain reaction. The Fabry knock-out mouse has bradycardia and lower blood pressure than control wild type (CB7BL/6J) mice. In Fabry knock-out mice, the cardiomyopathy associated mild hypertrophy at echography with normal systolic LV function and mild diastolic dysfunction. Premature atrial contractions were more frequent in without conduction defect. Heart weight normalized to tibial length was increased in Fabry knock-out mice. Ascending aorta dilatation was observed. Molecular studies were consistent with early stages of cardiac remodeling. A single dose of agalsidase-beta (3 mg/kg) did not affect the LV hypertrophy, function or heart rate, but did improve the mRNA signals of early cardiac remodeling. In conclusion, the alpha-galactosidase A deficient mice at 3 to 4 months of age have cardiac and vascular alterations similar to that described in early clinical stage of Fabry disease in children and adolescents. Enzyme replacement therapy affects cardiac molecular remodeling after a single dose.

  8. Enzyme replacement therapy of a novel humanized mouse model of globoid cell leukodystrophy.

    PubMed

    Matthes, Frank; Andersson, Claes; Stein, Axel; Eistrup, Carl; Fogh, Jens; Gieselmann, Volkmar; Wenger, David A; Matzner, Ulrich

    2015-09-01

    An inherited deficiency of β-galactosylceramidase (GALC) causes the lysosomal storage disease globoid cell leukodystrophy (GLD). The disease is characterized by the accumulation of the cytotoxic metabolite psychosine (galactosylsphingosine), causing rapid degeneration of myelinating cells. Most patients suffer from the infantile form of GLD with onset of disease between 3 and 6 months after birth and death by 2 years of age. The most widely used animal model of GLD, the twitcher mouse, presents with an even more rapid course of disease and death around 40 days of age. We have generated a novel "humanized" mouse model of GLD by inserting a human GALC cDNA containing an adult-onset patient mutation into the murine GALC gene. Humanized GALC mice exhibit pathological hallmarks of GLD including psychosine accumulation, neuroinflammation, CNS infiltration of macrophages, astrogliosis and demyelination. Residual GALC activities in mouse tissues are low and the mice display a median lifespan of 46 days. Due to the expression of the human transgene, the mice do not develop an immune response against rhGALC, rendering the animal model suitable for therapies based on human enzyme. Intravenously injected rhGALC was able to surmount the blood-brain barrier and was targeted to lysosomes of brain macrophages, astrocytes and neurons. High-dose enzyme replacement therapy started at postnatal day 21 reduced the elevated psychosine levels in the peripheral and central nervous system by 14-16%, but did not ameliorate neuroinflammation, demyelination and lifespan. These results may indicate that treatment must be started earlier before pathology occurs. PMID:25956830

  9. Impact of enzyme replacement therapy and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in patients with Morquio A syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Tomatsu, Shunji; Sawamoto, Kazuki; Alméciga-Díaz, Carlos J; Shimada, Tsutomu; Bober, Michael B; Chinen, Yasutsugu; Yabe, Hiromasa; Montaño, Adriana M; Giugliani, Roberto; Kubaski, Francyne; Yasuda, Eriko; Rodríguez-López, Alexander; Espejo-Mojica, Angela J; Sánchez, Oscar F; Mason, Robert W; Barrera, Luis A; Mackenzie, William G; Orii, Tadao

    2015-01-01

    Patients with mucopolysaccharidosis IVA (MPS IVA) can present with systemic skeletal dysplasia, leading to a need for multiple orthopedic surgical procedures, and often become wheelchair bound in their teenage years. Studies on patients with MPS IVA treated by enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) showed a sharp reduction on urinary keratan sulfate, but only modest improvement based on a 6-minute walk test and no significant improvement on a 3-minute climb-up test and lung function test compared with the placebo group, at least in the short-term. Surgical remnants from ERT-treated patients did not show reduction of storage materials in chondrocytes. The impact of ERT on bone lesions in patients with MPS IVA remains limited. ERT seems to be enhanced in a mouse model of MPS IVA by a novel form of the enzyme tagged with a bone-targeting moiety. The tagged enzyme remained in the circulation much longer than untagged native enzyme and was delivered to and retained in bone. Three-month-old MPS IVA mice treated with 23 weekly infusions of tagged enzyme showed marked clearance of the storage materials in bone, bone marrow, and heart valves. When treatment was initiated at birth, reduction of storage materials in tissues was even greater. These findings indicate that specific targeting of the enzyme to bone at an early stage may improve efficacy of ERT for MPS IVA. Recombinant N-acetylgalactosamine-6-sulfate sulfatase (GALNS) in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) (erGALNS) and in the methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris (prGALNS) has been produced as an alternative to the conventional production in Chinese hamster ovary cells. Recombinant GALNS produced in microorganisms may help to reduce the high cost of ERT and the introduction of modifications to enhance targeting. Although only a limited number of patients with MPS IVA have been treated with hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), beneficial effects have been reported. A wheelchair-bound patient with a severe form of MPS

  10. Synthesis and characterization of novel dipeptide ester prodrugs of acyclovir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nashed, Yasser E.; Mitra, Ashim K.

    2003-07-01

    Four dipeptide (Gly-Gly, Gly-Val, Val-Val, Val-Gly) ester prodrugs of 9-[(2-hydroxyethoxy)methyl]guanine (acyclovir, ACV) were synthesized. LC/MS was used to characterize the new prodrugs. Both 1H NMR and 13C NMR spectra of the four prodrugs of ACV were measured and assigned based on spectral comparison with compounds of similar structures.

  11. Long circulating enzyme replacement therapy rescues bone pathology in mucopolysaccharidosis VII murine model.

    PubMed

    Rowan, Daniel J; Tomatsu, Shunji; Grubb, Jeffrey H; Haupt, Bisong; Montaño, Adriana M; Oikawa, Hirotaka; Sosa, Angela C; Chen, Anping; Sly, William S

    2012-09-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis (MPS) type VII is a lysosomal storage disease caused by deficiency of the lysosomal enzyme β-glucuronidase (GUS), leading to accumulation of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). Enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) effectively clears GAG storage in the viscera. Recent studies showed that a chemically modified form of GUS (PerT-GUS), which escaped clearance by mannose 6-phosphate and mannose receptors and showed prolonged circulation, reduced CNS storage more effectively than native GUS. Clearance of storage in bone has been limited due to the avascularity of the growth plate. To evaluate the effectiveness of long-circulating PerT-GUS in reducing the skeletal pathology, we treated MPS VII mice for 12 weeks beginning at 5 weeks of age with PerT-GUS or native GUS and used micro-CT, radiographs, and quantitative histopathological analysis for assessment of bones. Micro-CT findings showed PerT-GUS treated mice had a significantly lower BMD. Histopathological analysis also showed reduced storage material and a more organized growth plate in PerT-GUS treated mice compared with native GUS treated mice. Long term treatment with PerT-GUS from birth up to 57 weeks also significantly improved bone lesions demonstrated by micro-CT, radiographs and quantitative histopathological assay. In conclusion, long-circulating PerT-GUS provides a significant impact to rescue of bone lesions and CNS involvement.

  12. [Neuropathic Gaucher disease treated with long enzyme replacement therapy. Two clinical cases].

    PubMed

    Correa, Cecilia

    2013-01-01

    Gaucher disease (GD) is the most common of all inherited lipid storage diseases. It is an autosomal recessive disorder portraying catabolism and cerebroside deposit in the lysosomes, which is due to a lack of glucocerebrosidase enzyme. Though GD shows a panethnic pattern of presentation, it particularly affects the Ashkenazi Jewish population. Several mutations have been defined among GD patients, and some genotypes related to neurologic affection have been described (L444P--most common mutation for neuropathic GD--188S, V394L and G377S). Lipid material storage or deposit exerts multiorganic affection. Enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) has demonstrable efficacy in reversing organic damage related to GD, though its capability to stop neurologic affection is currently under controversy and particular research. This paper portrays two GD cases of Mexican children treated with ERT at general zone hospitals of the Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social in recent years, both of them depicting characteristic type 3 GD mutations, and comparing their clinical evolution with and without neurological features.

  13. Enzyme replacement therapy in newborn mucopolysaccharidosis IVA mice: early treatment rescues bone lesions?

    PubMed

    Tomatsu, Shunji; Montaño, Adriana M; Oikawa, Hirotaka; Dung, Vu Chi; Hashimoto, Amiko; Oguma, Toshihiro; Gutiérrez, Monica L; Takahashi, Tatsuo; Shimada, Tsutomu; Orii, Tadao; Sly, William S

    2015-02-01

    We treated mucopolysaccharidosis IVA (MPS IVA) mice to assess the effects of long-term enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) initiated at birth, since adult mice treated by ERT showed little improvement in bone pathology [1]. To conduct ERT in newborn mice, we used recombinant human N-acetylgalactosamine-6-sulfate sulfatase (GALNS) produced in a CHO cell line. First, to observe the tissue distribution pattern, a dose of 250units/g body weight was administered intravenously in MPS IVA mice at day 2 or 3. The infused enzyme was primarily recovered in the liver and spleen, with detectable activity in the bone and brain. Second, newborn ERT was conducted after a tissue distribution study. The first injection of newborn ERT was performed intravenously, the second to fourth weekly injections were intraperitoneal, and the remaining injections from 5th to 14th weeks were intravenous into the tail vein. MPS IVA mice treated with GALNS showed clearance of lysosomal storage in the liver and spleen, and sinus lining cells in bone marrow. The column structure of the growth plate was organized better than that in adult mice treated with ERT; however, hyaline and fibrous cartilage cells in the femur, spine, ligaments, discs, synovium, and periosteum still had storage materials to some extent. Heart valves were refractory to the treatment. Levels of serum keratan sulfate were kept normal in newborn ERT mice. In conclusion, the enzyme, which enters the cartilage before the cartilage cell layer becomes mature, prevents disorganization of column structure. Early treatment from birth leads to partial remission of bone pathology in MPS IVA mice.

  14. Unravelling the mechanism of action of enzyme replacement therapy in Fabry disease.

    PubMed

    Ko, Younhee; Lee, CheolHo; Moon, Myeong Hee; Hong, Geu-Ru; Cheon, Chong-Kun; Lee, Jin-Sung

    2016-02-01

    Fabry disease (FD) is a rare X-linked recessive glycosphingolipid-storage disorder caused by deficient activity of the lysosomal enzyme alpha-galactosidase A. Intravenous enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) has been used to supplement deficient enzyme activity in patients with FD. Despite its clinical effect and manifestations, clear criteria for the clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of ERT have not been well established. In this study, we investigated the pharmacodynamic actions and short-term effects of ERT in patients with FD through direct molecular profiling from blood samples of patients before and after ERT. Based on this comparison, we observed that immune/inflammation-related pathways and growth factor-related pathways such as innate/adaptive immune pathway, lymphocyte proliferation and leukocyte proliferation were actively regulated under ERT. We also found that TINAGL1, DAAM2, CDK5R1 and MYO5B known to be related with clinical symptoms of FD showed increased levels after ERT, leading to the amelioration of clinical manifestations. Especially the catabolic process-related genes, including USP15 and ERUN1, showed direct increasing after ERT in vivo in male patients. These results suggest that male patients with FD respond more actively to ERT than do female patients with FD. Pathway analysis revealed that oxidative phosphorylation pathway-related genes are downregulated under ERT. ERT has a role to protect the proteins from oxidative damage and such deactivation of oxidative phosphorylation is one of direct pharmacodynamic actions of ERT. These results extended our understanding of the pathophysiology of ERT. To our knowledge, this is the first study to observe the molecular basis for the mechanism of ERT in vivo through the comprehensive comparison of transcriptome study with next-generation sequencing data. PMID:26490183

  15. Successful immune tolerance induction to enzyme replacement therapy in CRIM-negative infantile Pompe disease

    PubMed Central

    Messinger, Yoav H.; Mendelsohn, Nancy J.; Rhead, William; Dimmock, David; Hershkovitz, Eli; Champion, Michael; Jones, Simon A.; Olson, Rebecca; White, Amy; Wells, Cara; Bali, Deeksha; Case, Laura E.; Young, Sarah P.; Rosenberg, Amy S.; Kishnani, Priya S.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Infantile Pompe disease resulting from a deficiency of lysosomal acid α-glucosidase (GAA) requires enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) with recombinant human GAA (rhGAA). Cross-reactive immunologic material negative (CRIM-negative) Pompe patients develop high-titer antibody to the rhGAA and do poorly. We describe successful tolerance induction in CRIM-negative patients. Methods Two CRIM-negative patients with preexisting anti-GAA antibodies were treated therapeutically with rituximab, methotrexate, and gammaglobulins. Two additional CRIM-negative patients were treated prophylactically with a short course of rituximab and methotrexate, in parallel with initiating rhGAA. Results In both patients treated therapeutically, anti-rhGAA was eliminated after 3 and 19 months. All four patients are immune tolerant to rhGAA, off immune therapy, showing B-cell recovery while continuing to receive ERT at ages 36 and 56 months (therapeutic) and 18 and 35 months (prophylactic). All patients show clinical response to ERT, in stark contrast to the rapid deterioration of their nontolerized CRIM-negative counterparts. Conclusion The combination of rituximab with methotrexate ± intravenous gammaglobulins (IVIG) is an option for tolerance induction of CRIM-negative Pompe to ERT when instituted in the naïve setting or following antibody development. It should be considered in other conditions in which antibody response to the therapeutic protein elicits robust antibody response that interferes with product efficacy. PMID:22237443

  16. Enzyme replacement therapy for Mucopolysaccharidosis Type I among patients followed within the MPS Brazil Network

    PubMed Central

    Dornelles, Alícia Dorneles; de Camargo Pinto, Louise Lapagesse; de Paula, Ana Carolina; Steiner, Carlos Eduardo; Lourenço, Charles Marques; Kim, Chong Ae; Horovitz, Dafne Dain Gandelman; Ribeiro, Erlane Marques; Valadares, Eugênia Ribeiro; Goulart, Isabela; Neves de Souza, Isabel C.; da Costa Neri, João Ivanildo; Santana-da-Silva, Luiz Carlos; Silva, Luiz Roberto; Ribeiro, Márcia; de Oliveira Sobrinho, Ruy Pires; Giugliani, Roberto; Schwartz, Ida Vanessa Doederlein

    2014-01-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis type I (MPS I) is a rare lysosomal disorder caused by deficiency of alpha-L-iduronidase. Few clinical trials have assessed the effect of enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) for this condition. We conducted an exploratory, open-label, non-randomized, multicenter cohort study of patients with MPS I. Data were collected from questionnaires completed by attending physicians at the time of diagnosis (T1; n = 34) and at a median time of 2.5 years later (T2; n = 24/34). The 24 patients for whom data were available at T2 were allocated into groups: A, no ERT (9 patients; median age at T1 = 36 months; 6 with severe phenotype); B, on ERT (15 patients; median age at T1 = 33 months; 4 with severe phenotype). For all variables in which there was no between-group difference at baseline, a delta of ≥ ± 20% was considered clinically relevant. The following clinically relevant differences were identified in group B in T2: lower rates of mortality and reported hospitalization for respiratory infection; lower frequency of hepatosplenomegaly; increased reported rates of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome and hearing loss; and stabilization of gibbus deformity. These changes could be due to the effect of ERT or of other therapies which have also been found more frequently in group B. Our findings suggest MPS I patients on ERT also receive a better overall care. ERT may have a positive effect on respiratory morbidity and overall mortality in patients with MPS I. Additional studies focusing on these outcomes and on other therapies should be performed. PMID:24688287

  17. Potential of host defense peptide prodrugs as neutrophil elastase-dependent anti-infective agents for cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Forde, Eanna; Humphreys, Hilary; Greene, Catherine M; Fitzgerald-Hughes, Deirdre; Devocelle, Marc

    2014-01-01

    Host defense peptides (HDPs) are short antimicrobial peptides of the innate immune system. Deficiencies in HDPs contribute to enhanced susceptibility to infections, e.g., in cystic fibrosis (CF). Exogenous HDPs can compensate for these deficiencies, but their development as antimicrobials is limited by cytotoxicity. Three HDP prodrugs were designed so their net positive charge is masked by a promoiety containing a substrate for the enzyme neutrophil elastase (NE). This approach can confine activation to sites with high NE levels. Enzyme-labile peptides were synthesized, and their activation was investigated using purified NE. Susceptibilities of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to parent and prodrug peptides in the presence and absence of NE-rich CF human bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid and different NaCl concentrations were compared. The effect of the HDP promoiety on cytotoxicity was determined with cystic fibrosis bronchial epithelial (CFBE41o-) cells. NE in CF BAL fluids activated the HDP prodrugs, restoring bactericidal activity against reference and clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa. However, activation also required the addition of 300 mM NaCl. Under these conditions, the bactericidal activity levels of the HDP prodrugs differed, with pro-P18 demonstrating the greatest activity (90% to 100% of that of the parent, P18, at 6.25 μg/ml). Cytotoxic effects on CFBE41o- cells were reduced by the addition of the promoiety to HDPs. We demonstrate here for the first time the selective activation of novel HDP prodrugs by a host disease-associated enzyme at in vivo concentrations of the CF lung. This approach may lead to the development of novel therapeutic agents with low toxicity that are active under the challenging conditions of the CF lung.

  18. Far-red light activatable, multifunctional prodrug for fluorescence optical imaging and combinational treatment.

    PubMed

    Bio, Moses; Rajaputra, Pallavi; Nkepang, Gregory; You, Youngjae

    2014-04-24

    We recently developed "photo-unclick chemistry", a novel chemical tool involving the cleavage of aminoacrylate by singlet oxygen, and demonstrated its application to visible light-activatable prodrugs. In this study, we prepared an advanced multifunctional prodrug, Pc-(L-CA4)2, composed of the fluorescent photosensitizer phthalocyanine (Pc), an SO-labile aminoacrylate linker (L), and a cytotoxic drug combretastatin A-4 (CA4). Pc-(L-CA4)2 had reduced dark toxicity compared with CA4. However, once illuminated, it showed improved toxicity similar to CA4 and displayed bystander effects in vitro. We monitored the time-dependent distribution of Pc-(L-CA4)2 using optical imaging with live mice. We also effectively ablated tumors by the illumination with far-red light to the mice, presumably through the combined effects of photodynamic therapy (PDT) and released chemotherapy drug, without any sign of acute systemic toxicity.

  19. In vivo and in situ tracking cancer chemotherapy by highly photostable NIR fluorescent theranostic prodrug.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xumeng; Sun, Xuanrong; Guo, Zhiqian; Tang, Jianbin; Shen, Youqing; James, Tony D; Tian, He; Zhu, Weihong

    2014-03-01

    In vivo monitoring of the biodistribution and activation of prodrugs is urgently required. Near infrared (NIR) fluorescence-active fluorophores with excellent photostability are preferable for tracking drug release in vivo. Herein, we describe a NIR prodrug DCM-S-CPT and its polyethylene glycol-polylactic acid (PEG-PLA) loaded nanoparticles as a potent cancer therapy. We have conjugated a dicyanomethylene-4H-pyran derivative as the NIR fluorophore with camptothecin (CPT) as the anticancer drug using a disulfide linker. In vitro experiments verify that the high intracellular glutathione (GSH) concentrations in tumor cells cause cleavage of the disulfide linker, resulting in concomitantly the active drug CPT release and significant NIR fluorescence turn-on with large Stokes shift (200 nm). The NIR fluorescence of DCM-S-CPT at 665 nm with fast response to GSH can act as a direct off-on signal reporter for the GSH-activatable prodrug. Particularly, DCM-S-CPT possesses much better photostability than ICG, which is highly desirable for in situ fluorescence-tracking of cancer chemotherapy. DCM-S-CPT has been successfully utilized for in vivo and in situ tracking of drug release and cancer therapeutic efficacy in living animals by NIR fluorescence. DCM-S-CPT exhibits excellent tumor-activatable performance when intravenously injected into tumor-bearing nude mice, as well as specific cancer therapy with few side effects. DCM-S-CPT loaded in PEG-PLA nanoparticles shows even higher antitumor activity than free CPT, and is also retained longer in the plasma. The tumor-targeting ability and the specific drug release in tumors make DCM-S-CPT as a promising prodrug, providing significant advances toward deeper understanding and exploration of theranostic drug-delivery systems.

  20. Synthesis, pH-Dependent, and Plasma Stability of Meropenem Prodrugs for Potential Use Against Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Teitelbaum, Aaron M.; Meissner, Anja; Harding, Ryan A.; Wong, Christopher A.; Aldrich, Courtney C.; Remmel, Rory P.

    2013-01-01

    Meropenem, a broad-spectrum parenteral β-lactam antibiotic, in combination with clavulanate has recently shown efficacy in patients with extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis. As a result of meropenem’s short half-life and lack of oral bioavailability, the development of an oral therapy is warranted for TB treatment in underserved countries where chronic parenteral therapy is impractical. To improve the oral absorption of meropenem, several alkyloxycarbonyloxyalkyl ester prodrugs with increased lipophilicity were synthesized and their stability in physiological aqueous solutions and guinea pig as well as human plasma was evaluated. The stability of prodrugs in aqueous solution at pH 6.0 and 7.4 was significantly dependent on the ester promoiety with the major degradation product identified as the parent compound meropenem. However, in simulated gastrointestinal fluid (pH 1.2) the major degradation product identified was ring-opened meropenem with the promoiety still intact, suggesting the gastrointestinal environment may reduce the absorption of meropenem prodrugs in vivo unless administered as an enteric-coated formulation. Additionally, the stability of the most aqueous stable prodrugs in guinea pig or human plasma was short, implying a rapid release of parent meropenem. PMID:23845282

  1. An open-label clinical trial of agalsidase alfa enzyme replacement therapy in children with Fabry disease who are naïve to enzyme replacement therapy

    PubMed Central

    Goker-Alpan, Ozlem; Longo, Nicola; McDonald, Marie; Shankar, Suma P; Schiffmann, Raphael; Chang, Peter; Shen, Yinghua; Pano, Arian

    2016-01-01

    Background Following a drug manufacturing process change, safety/efficacy of agalsidase alfa were evaluated in enzyme replacement therapy (ERT)-naïve children with Fabry disease. Methods In an open-label, multicenter, Phase II study (HGT-REP-084; Shire), 14 children aged ≥7 years received 0.2 mg/kg agalsidase alfa every other week for 55 weeks. Primary endpoints: safety, changes in autonomic function (2-hour Holter monitoring). Secondary endpoints: estimated glomerular filtration rate, left ventricular mass index (LVMI), midwall fractional shortening, pharmacodynamic parameters, and patient-reported quality-of-life. Results Among five boys (median 10.2 [range 6.7, 14.4] years) and nine girls (14.8 [10.1, 15.9] years), eight patients experienced infusion-related adverse events (vomiting, n=4; nausea, n=3; dyspnea, n=3; chest discomfort, n=2; chills, n=2; dizziness, n=2; headache, n=2). One of these had several hypersensitivity episodes. However, no patient discontinued for safety reasons and no serious adverse events occurred. One boy developed immunoglobulin G (IgG) and neutralizing antidrug antibodies. Overall, no deterioration in cardiac function was observed in seven patients with low/abnormal SDNN (standard deviation of all filtered RR intervals; <100 ms) and no left ventricular hypertrophy: mean (SD) baseline SDNN, 81.6 (20.9) ms; mean (95% confidence interval [CI]) change from baseline to week 55, 17.4 (2.9, 31.9) ms. Changes in SDNN correlated with changes in LVMI (r=−0.975). No change occurred in secondary efficacy endpoints: mean (95% CI) change from baseline at week 55 in LVMI, 0.16 (−3.3, 3.7) g/m2.7; midwall fractional shortening, −0.62% (−2.7%, 1.5%); estimated glomerular filtration rate, 0.15 (−11.4, 11.7) mL/min/1.73 m2; urine protein, −1.8 (−6.0, 2.4) mg/dL; urine microalbumin, 0.6 (−0.5, 1.7) mg/dL; plasma globotriaosylceramide (Gb3), −5.71 (−10.8, −0.6) nmol/mL; urinary Gb3, −1,403.3 (−3,714.0, 907.4) nmol/g creatinine

  2. Serum-Mediated Inhibition of Enzyme Replacement Therapy in Fabry Disease.

    PubMed

    Lenders, Malte; Stypmann, Jörg; Duning, Thomas; Schmitz, Boris; Brand, Stefan-Martin; Brand, Eva

    2016-01-01

    Fabry disease (FD) is a progressive multisystemic disorder, treatable with recombinant enzyme replacement therapy (agalsidase). However, recent studies suggest an endogenous inhibition of agalsidase in patients with FD, as reported for other lysosomal storage diseases. To assess the clinical consequences of serum-mediated agalsidase inhibition in affected patients, we determined the agalsidase inhibition status of 168 patients (68 male) with FD and compared outcomes of inhibition-positive patients with those of inhibition-negative patients. The assessment included clinical events during time on agalsidase, determination of renal and cardiac function, and evaluation of FD-related symptoms. The frequency of serum-mediated agalsidase inhibition was 40% in agalsidase-treated males. Inhibition did not depend on the compound initially used (agalsidase-α or -β). Agalsidase inhibition was associated with higher lyso-globotriaosylceramide levels and worse disease severity scores in patients. Compared with agalsidase inhibition-negative men, agalsidase inhibition-positive men showed greater left ventricular mass (P=0.02) and substantially lower renal function (difference in eGFR of about -30 ml/min per 1.73 m(2); P=0.04), which was confirmed by a longitudinal 5-year retrospective analysis. Additionally, affected patients presented more often with FD-typical symptoms, such as diarrhea, fatigue, and neuropathic pain, among others. Therefore, patients with poor clinical outcome on agalsidase should be tested for agalsidase inhibition. Future studies are warranted to determine if affected patients with FD benefit from acute reduction of anti-agalsidase antibodies or long-term immune modulation therapies to suppress agalsidase inhibition and to identify mechanisms that minimize antibody generation against agalsidase.

  3. Enzyme therapy of xeroderma pigmentosum: safety and efficacy testing of T4N5 liposome lotion containing a prokaryotic DNA repair enzyme.

    PubMed

    Yarosh, D; Klein, J; Kibitel, J; Alas, L; O'Connor, A; Cummings, B; Grob, D; Gerstein, D; Gilchrest, B A; Ichihashi, M; Ogoshi, M; Ueda, M; Fernandez, V; Chadwick, C; Potten, C S; Proby, C M; Young, A R; Hawk, J L

    1996-06-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) is a rare genetic disease in which patients are defective in DNA repair and are extremely sensitive to solar UV radiation exposure. A new treatment approach was tested in these patients, in which a prokaryotic DNA repair enzyme specific for UV-induced DNA damage was delivered into the skin by means of topically applied liposomes to supplement the deficient activity. Acute and chronic safety testing in both mice and humans showed neither adverse reactions nor significant changes in serum chemistry or in skin histology. The skin of XP patients treated with the DNA repair liposomes had fewer cyclobutylpyrimidine dimers in DNA and showed less erythema than did control sites. The results encourage further clinical testing of this new enzyme therapy approach.

  4. Dual delivery systems based on polyamine analog BENSpm as prodrug and gene delivery vectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yu

    Combination drug and gene therapy shows promise in cancer treatment. However, the success of such strategy requires careful selection of the therapeutic agents, as well as development of efficient delivery vectors. BENSpm (N 1, N11-bisethylnorspermine), a polyamine analogue targeting the intracellular polyamine pathway, draws our special attention because of the following reasons: (1) polyamine pathway is frequently dysregulated in cancer; (2) BENSpm exhibits multiple functions to interfere with the polyamine pathway, such as to up-regulate polyamine metabolism enzymes and down-regulate polyamine biosynthesis enzymes. Therefore BENSpm depletes all natural polyamines and leads to apoptosis and cell growth inhibition in a wide range of cancers; (3) preclinical studies proved that BENSpm can act synergistically with various chemotherapy agents, making it a promising candidate in combination therapy; (4) multiple positive charges in BENSpm enable it as a suitable building block for cationic polymers, which can be further applied to gene delivery. In this dissertation, our goal was to design dual-function delivery vector based on BENSpm that can function as a gene delivery vector and, after intracellular degradation, as an active anticancer agent targeting dysregulated polyamine metabolism. We first demonstrated strong synergism between BENSpm and a potential therapeutic gene product TRAIL. Strong synergism was obtained in both estrogen-dependent MCF-7 breast cancer cells and triple-negative MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. Significant dose reduction of TRAIL in combination with BENSpm in MDA-MB-231 cells, together with the fact that BENSpm rendered MCF-7 cells more sensitive to TRAIL treatment verified our rationale of designing BENSpm-based delivery platform. This was expected to be beneficial for overcoming drug resistance in chemotherapy, as well as boosting the therapeutic effect of therapeutic genes. We first designed a lipid-based BENSpm dual vector (Lipo

  5. Enzyme replacement therapy for treating mucopolysaccharidosis type IVA (Morquio A syndrome): effect and limitations

    PubMed Central

    Tomatsu, Shunji; Sawamoto, Kazuki; Shimada, Tsutomu; Bober, Michael B.; Kubaski, Francyne; Yasuda, Eriko; Mason, Robert W.; Khan, Shaukat; Alméciga-Díaz, Carlos J.; Barrera, Luis A.; Mackenzie, William G.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Following a Phase III, randomized, double-blind, placebo (PBO)-controlled, multinational study in subjects with mucopolysaccharidosis IVA (MPS IVA), enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) of elosulfase alfa has been approved in several countries. The study was designed to evaluate safety and efficacy of elosulfase alfa in patients with MPS IVA aged 5 years and older. Areas covered Outcomes of clinical trials for MPS IVA have been described. Subjects received either 2.0 mg/kg/week, 2.0 mg/kg/every other week, or PBO, for 24 weeks. The primary endpoint was the change from baseline 6-min walk test (6MWT) distance compared to PBO. The 6MWT results improved in patients receiving 2 mg/kg weekly compared to PBO. The every other week regimen resulted in walk distances comparable to PBO. There was no change from baseline in the 3 Min Stair Climb Test in both treatment groups. Following completion of the initial study, patients, who continued to receive elosulfase alfa 2 mg/kg weekly (QW) for another 48 weeks (for a total of up to 72-week exposure), did not show additional improvement on 6MWT. Expert opinion We suggest that ERT is a therapeutic option for MPS IVA, providing a modest effect and the majority of the effects are seen in the soft tissues. PMID:26973801

  6. Enzyme replacement therapy prevents dental defects in a model of hypophosphatasia.

    PubMed

    McKee, M D; Nakano, Y; Masica, D L; Gray, J J; Lemire, I; Heft, R; Whyte, M P; Crine, P; Millán, J L

    2011-04-01

    Hypophosphatasia (HPP) occurs from loss-of-function mutation in the tissue-non-specific alkaline phosphatase (TNALP) gene, resulting in extracellular pyrophosphate accumulation that inhibits skeletal and dental mineralization. TNALP-null mice (Akp2(-/-)) phenocopy human infantile hypophosphatasia; they develop rickets at 1 week of age, and die before being weaned, having severe skeletal and dental hypomineralization and episodes of apnea and vitamin B(6)-responsive seizures. Delay and defects in dentin mineralization, together with a deficiency in acellular cementum, are characteristic. We report the prevention of these dental abnormalities in Akp2(-/-) mice receiving treatment from birth with daily injections of a mineral-targeting, human TNALP (sALP-FcD(10)). sALP-FcD(10) prevented hypomineralization of alveolar bone, dentin, and cementum as assessed by micro-computed tomography and histology. Osteopontin--a marker of acellular cementum--was immuno-localized along root surfaces, confirming that acellular cementum, typically missing or reduced in Akp2(-/-) mice, formed normally. Our findings provide insight concerning how acellular cementum is formed on tooth surfaces to effect periodontal ligament attachment to retain teeth in their osseous alveolar sockets. Furthermore, they provide evidence that this enzyme-replacement therapy, applied early in post-natal life--where the majority of tooth root development occurs, including acellular cementum formation--could prevent the accelerated tooth loss seen in individuals with HPP. PMID:21212313

  7. Deleterious effects of interruption followed by reintroduction of enzyme replacement therapy on a lysosomal storage disorder.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Ana Paula; Matte, Ursula; Pasqualim, Gabriela; Tavares, Angela Maria Vicente; Mayer, Fabiana Quoos; Martinelli, Barbara; Ribas, Graziela; Vargas, Carmen Regla; Giugliani, Roberto; Baldo, Guilherme

    2016-10-01

    Temporary interruption of enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) in patients with different lysosomal storage disorders may happen for different reasons (adverse reactions, issues with reimbursement, logistic difficulties, and so forth), and the impact of the interruption is still uncertain. In the present work, we studied the effects of the interruption of intravenous ERT (Laronidase, Genzyme) followed by its reintroduction in mice with the prototypical lysosomal storage disorder mucopolysaccharidosis type I, comparing to mice receiving continuous treatment, untreated mucopolysaccharidosis type I mice, and normal mice. In the animals which treatment was temporarily interrupted, we observed clear benefits of treatment in several organs (liver, lung, heart, kidney, and testis) after reintroduction, but a worsening in the thickness of the aortic wall was detected. Furthermore, these mice had just partial improvements in behavioral tests, suggesting some deterioration in the brain function. Despite worsening is some disease aspects, urinary glycosaminoglycans levels did not increase during interruption, which indicates that this biomarker commonly used to monitor treatment in patients should not be used alone to assess treatment efficacy. The deterioration observed was not caused by the development of serum antienzyme antibodies. All together our results suggest that temporary ERT interruption leads to deterioration of function in some organs and should be avoided whenever possible.

  8. Enzyme replacement therapy in late-onset Pompe disease: a systematic literature review.

    PubMed

    Toscano, Antonio; Schoser, Benedikt

    2013-04-01

    Glycogen storage disease type 2/Pompe disease is a progressive muscle disorder with a wide range of phenotypic presentations, caused by an inherited deficiency of acid alpha-glucosidase. Since 2004 only a limited number of patients have been treated with recombinant human alpha-glucosidase from rabbit milk whereas since 2006 enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) with alglucosidase alfa has been licensed for the treatment of Pompe disease. This systematic review evaluates the clinical efficacy and safety of alglucosidase alfa treatment of juvenile and adult patients with late-onset Pompe disease (LOPD). Studies of alglucosidase alfa treatment of LOPD patients-published up to January 2012-were identified by electronic searching of the EMBASE and MEDLINE databases, and manual searching of the reference lists. Data on ERT outcomes were extracted from selected papers and analyzed descriptively. No statistical analysis was performed owing to data heterogeneity. Twenty-one studies containing clinical data from 368 LOPD patients were analyzed. Overall, at least two-thirds of patients were stabilized or had improved creatine kinase levels and muscular and/or respiratory function following treatment with alglucosidase alfa. ERT was well tolerated; most adverse events were mild or moderate infusion-related reactions. In conclusion, alglucosidase alfa treatment is effective and well tolerated and attenuates progression of LOPD in most patients. Further research is required to investigate factors such as age at diagnosis, phenotypic presentation, and genotypic characteristics, identification of which may enable better clinical and therapeutic management of LOPD patients.

  9. Evaluation of Antimalarial Activity and Toxicity of a New Primaquine Prodrug

    PubMed Central

    Davanço, Marcelo Gomes; Aguiar, Anna Caroline Campos; dos Santos, Leandro Alves; Padilha, Elias Carvalho; Campos, Michel Leandro; de Andrade, Cleverton Roberto; da Fonseca, Luiz Marcos; dos Santos, Jean Leandro; Chin, Chung Man; Krettli, Antoniana Ursine; Peccinini, Rosangela Gonçalves

    2014-01-01

    Plasmodium vivax is the most prevalent of the five species causing malaria in humans. The current available treatment for P. vivax malaria is limited and unsatisfactory due to at least two drawbacks: the undesirable side effects of primaquine (PQ) and drug resistance to chloroquine. Phenylalanine-alanine-PQ (Phe-Ala-PQ) is a PQ prodrug with a more favorable pharmacokinetic profile compared to PQ. The toxicity of this prodrug was evaluated in in vitro assays using a human hepatoma cell line (HepG2), a monkey kidney cell line (BGM), and human red blood cells deficient in the enzyme glucose-6-phosphate-dehydrogenase (G6PD). In addition, in vivo toxicity assays were performed with rats that received multiple doses of Phe-Ala-PQ to evaluate biochemical, hematological, and histopathological parameters. The activity was assessed by the inhibition of the sporogonic cycle using a chicken malaria parasite. Phe-Ala-PQ blocked malaria transmission in Aedes mosquitoes. When compared with PQ, it was less cytotoxic to BGM and HepG2 cells and caused less hemolysis of G6PD-deficient red blood cells at similar concentrations. The prodrug caused less alteration in the biochemical parameters than did PQ. Histopathological analysis of the liver and kidney did show differences between the control and Phe-Ala-PQ-treated groups, but they were not statistically significant. Taken together, the results highlight the prodrug as a novel lead compound candidate for the treatment of P. vivax malaria and as a blocker of malaria transmission. PMID:25133630

  10. A prodrug-doped cellular Trojan Horse for the potential treatment of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Levy, Oren; Brennen, W Nathaniel; Han, Edward; Rosen, David Marc; Musabeyezu, Juliet; Safaee, Helia; Ranganath, Sudhir; Ngai, Jessica; Heinelt, Martina; Milton, Yuka; Wang, Hao; Bhagchandani, Sachin H; Joshi, Nitin; Bhowmick, Neil; Denmeade, Samuel R; Isaacs, John T; Karp, Jeffrey M

    2016-06-01

    Despite considerable advances in prostate cancer research, there is a major need for a systemic delivery platform that efficiently targets anti-cancer drugs to sites of disseminated prostate cancer while minimizing host toxicity. In this proof-of-principle study, human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were loaded with poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) microparticles (MPs) that encapsulate the macromolecule G114, a thapsigargin-based prostate specific antigen (PSA)-activated prodrug. G114-particles (∼950 nm in size) were internalized by MSCs, followed by the release of G114 as an intact prodrug from loaded cells. Moreover, G114 released from G114 MP-loaded MSCs selectively induced death of the PSA-secreting PCa cell line, LNCaP. Finally, G114 MP-loaded MSCs inhibited tumor growth when used in proof-of-concept co-inoculation studies with CWR22 PCa xenografts, suggesting that cell-based delivery of G114 did not compromise the potency of this pro-drug in-vitro or in-vivo. This study demonstrates a potentially promising approach to assemble a cell-based drug delivery platform, which inhibits cancer growth in-vivo without the need of genetic engineering. We envision that upon achieving efficient homing of systemically infused MSCs to cancer sites, this MSC-based platform may be developed into an effective, systemic 'Trojan Horse' therapy for targeted delivery of therapeutic agents to sites of metastatic PCa.

  11. Studies on synthesis, stability, release and pharmacodynamic profile of a novel diacerein-thymol prodrug.

    PubMed

    Dhaneshwar, Suneela; Patel, Vriha; Patil, Dipmala; Meena, Gourav

    2013-01-01

    Involvement of oxidative stress, leading to chondrocyte senescence and cartilage ageing has been implicated in the pathogenesis of osteoarthritis (OA). New efforts to prevent the development and progression of OA include strategies and interventions aimed at reducing oxidative damage in articular cartilage using antioxidants as adjuncts to conservative therapy. Diacerein is an anthraquinone derivative with a marked disease modifying effect on OA owing to IL-1 β inhibition. In the present work an attempt was made at design and development of a co-drug of diacerein with antioxidant thymol. Structural elucidation was carried out by spectral analysis. When release kinetics of prodrug was studied in phosphate buffer (pH 7.4) and small intestinal homogenates of rats, 91% and 94% diacerein was available respectively at the end of 4.5 h. Chemical linkage of thymol with diacerein improved its lipophilicity and hence bioavailability. Screening of prodrug in Freud's adjuvant-induced arthritis and ulcerogenic potential by Rainsford's cold stress model exhibited significant reduction in paw volume, joint diameter and ulcer index with superior anti-inflammatory/anti-arthritic activities than the standards. Results of histopathology of tibio-tarsal joint indicated that animals treated with diacerein exhibited moderate synovitis while thymol and physical mixture-treated animals showed mild synovitis. Interestingly in prodrug-treated animals synovitis was not observed. The results of this study underline the promising potential of co-drug of diacerein and thymol in the management of OA. PMID:23218603

  12. Photo-triggered fluorescent theranostic prodrugs as DNA alkylating agents for mechlorethamine release and spatiotemporal monitoring.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yanting; Pan, Rong; Xuan, Weimin; Wei, Yongyi; Liu, Kejian; Zhou, Jiahong; Wang, Wei

    2015-06-28

    We describe a new theranostic strategy for selective delivery and spatiotemporal monitoring of mechlorethamine, a DNA alkylating agent. A photo-responsive prodrug is designed and composed of a photolabile o-nitrophenylethyl group, a DNA alkylating mechlorethamine drug and a coumarin fluorophore. Masking of the "N" in mechlorethamine in a positively charged state in the prodrug renders it inactive, non-toxic, selective and non-fluorescent. Indeed, the stable prodrug shows negligible cytotoxicity towards normal cells with and without UV activation and is completely non-fluorescent. However, upon photo-irradiation, the active mechlorethamine is released and induces efficient DNA cross-links, accompanied by a strong fluorescence enhancement (152 fold). Furthermore, DNA cross-linking activity from the release can be transformed into anticancer activity observed in in vitro studies of tumor cells. Importantly, the drug release progress and the movement can be conveniently monitored by fluorescence spectroscopy. The mechanistic study proves that the DNA cross-linking activity is mainly due to the release of DNA alkylating mechlorethamine. Altogether, the studies show the power of the theranostic strategy for efficient therapy in cancer treatment. PMID:25997534

  13. Velaglucerase alfa enzyme replacement therapy compared with imiglucerase in patients with Gaucher disease.

    PubMed

    Ben Turkia, Hadhami; Gonzalez, Derlis E; Barton, Norman W; Zimran, Ari; Kabra, Madhulika; Lukina, Elena A; Giraldo, Pilar; Kisinovsky, Isaac; Bavdekar, Ashish; Ben Dridi, Marie-Françoise; Gupta, Neerja; Kishnani, Priya S; Sureshkumar, E K; Wang, Nan; Crombez, Eric; Bhirangi, Kiran; Mehta, Atul

    2013-03-01

    Enzyme replacement therapy for Gaucher disease (GD) has been available since 1991. This study compared the efficacy and safety of velaglucerase alfa with imiglucerase, the previous standard of care. A 9-month, global, randomized, double-blind, non-inferiority study compared velaglucerase alfa with imiglucerase (60 U/kg every other week) in treatment-naïve patients aged 3-73 years with anemia and either thrombocytopenia or organomegaly. The primary endpoint was the difference between groups in mean change from baseline to 9 months in hemoglobin concentration. 35 patients were randomized: 34 received study drug (intent-to-treat: 17 per arm), 20 were splenectomized. Baseline characteristics were similar in the two groups. The per-protocol population included 15 patients per arm. The mean treatment difference for hemoglobin concentration from baseline to 9 months (velaglucerase alfa minus imiglucerase) was 0.14 and 0.16 g/dL in the intent-to-treat and per-protocol populations, respectively. The lower bound of the 97.5% one-sided confidence interval in both populations lay within the pre-defined non-inferiority margin of -1.0 g/dL, confirming that velaglucerase alfa is non-inferior to imiglucerase. There were no statistically significant differences in the secondary endpoints. Most adverse events were mild to moderate. No patient receiving velaglucerase alfa developed antibodies to either drug, whereas four patients (23.5%) receiving imiglucerase developed IgG antibodies to imiglucerase, which were cross-reactive with velaglucerase alfa in one patient. This study demonstrates the efficacy and safety of velaglucerase alfa compared with imiglucerase in adult and pediatric patients with GD clinically characterized as Type 1. Differences in immunogenicity were also observed. PMID:23400823

  14. Taliglucerase alfa: an enzyme replacement therapy using plant cell expression technology.

    PubMed

    Grabowski, Gregory A; Golembo, Myriam; Shaaltiel, Yoseph

    2014-05-01

    Gaucher disease (GD) is a rare, genetic lysosomal storage disorder caused by functional defects of acid β-glucosidase that results in multiple organ dysfunction. Glycosylation of recombinant acid human β-glucosidase and exposure of terminal mannose residues are critical to the success of enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) for the treatment of visceral and hematologic manifestations in GD. Three commercially available ERT products for treatment of GD type 1 (GD1) include imiglucerase, velaglucerase alfa, and taliglucerase alfa. Imiglucerase and velaglucerase alfa are produced in different mammalian cell systems and require production glycosylation modifications to expose terminal α-mannose residues, which are needed for mannose receptor-mediated uptake by target macrophages. Such modifications add to production costs. Taliglucerase alfa is a plant cell-expressed acid β-glucosidase approved in the United States and other countries for ERT in adults with GD1. A plant-based expression system, using carrot root cell cultures, was developed for production of taliglucerase alfa and does not require additional processing for postproduction glycosidic modifications. Clinical trials have demonstrated that taliglucerase alfa is efficacious, with a well-established safety profile in adult, ERT-naïve patients with symptomatic GD1, and for such patients previously treated with imiglucerase. These included significant improvements in organomegaly and hematologic parameters as early as 6months, and maintenance of achieved therapeutic values in previously treated patients. Ongoing clinical trials will further characterize the long-term efficacy and safety of taliglucerase alfa in more diverse patient populations, and may help to guide clinical decisions for achieving optimal outcomes for patients with GD1. PMID:24630271

  15. Osseous manifestations of adult Gaucher disease in the era of enzyme replacement therapy.

    PubMed

    Deegan, Patrick B; Pavlova, Elena; Tindall, Jane; Stein, Penelope E; Bearcroft, Philip; Mehta, Atul; Hughes, Derralynn; Wraith, J Edmund; Cox, Timothy M

    2011-01-01

    Enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) for Gaucher disease with mannose-terminated glucocerebrosidase has proved its therapeutic position with salutary effects on hematologic abnormalities, visceral infiltration, and quality of life. The frequency of new bone complications is reduced but not eliminated. Established osteonecrosis is beyond salvage. A systematic description of the burden of bone manifestations, persisting despite ERT, should inform future remedial strategies. Thus, we conducted this study to quantify the burden of residual skeletal disease and to explore putative relationships between clinical, radiologic, and biochemical factors and bone sequelae associated with disability.Consecutive adult patients attending 3 referral centers in the United Kingdom were invited to participate. A representative group of 100 patients agreed to a structured interview, clinical examination, radiologic review, and completion of questionnaires. Osteonecrosis was evident in 43%, Erlenmeyer flask deformity in 59%, fragility fracture in 28%, osteomyelitis in 6%, and lytic lesions in 4%. Mobility was impaired in 32% of patients, while 15% experienced significant pain. The EuroQol 5D (EQ5D) quality of life summary measure was reduced and was associated with osteonecrosis and fragility fracture. Eight patients experienced new osteonecrosis after the start of ERT, though the presentation and evolution were often atypical. Nine patients had been treated from childhood and had an excellent outcome. Osteonecrosis was associated with age of presentation and with splenectomy-indeed, we observed a strong temporal association between splenectomy and incidence of osteonecrosis.The biomarkers PARC/CCL18 and chitotriosidase were associated with prevalent osteonecrosis, and, in particular, with osteonecrosis occurring despite treatment. This study documents significant residual skeletal pathology and disability in patients in the mature phase of their treatment in a developed region. The

  16. Adenosine Deaminase Enzyme Therapy Prevents and Reverses the Heightened Cavernosal Relaxation in Priapism

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Jiaming; Jiang, Xianzhen; Dai, Yingbo; Zhang, Yujin; Tang, Yuxin; Sun, Hong; Mi, Tiejuan; Kellems, Rodney E.; Blackburn, Michael R.; Xia, Yang

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Priapism featured with painful prolonged penile erection is dangerous and commonly seen in sickle cell disease (SCD). The preventive approaches or effective treatment options for the disorder are limited because of poor understanding of its pathogenesis. Recent studies have revealed a novel role of excess adenosine in priapism caused by heightened cavernosal relaxation, and therefore present an intriguing mechanism-based therapeutic possibility. Aim The aim of this study was to determine the therapeutic effects of adenosine deaminase (ADA) enzyme therapy to lower adenosine in priapism. Methods Both ADA-deficient mice and SCD transgenic (Tg) mice display priapism caused by excessive adenosine. Thus, we used these two distinct lines of mouse models of priapism as our investigative tools. Specifically, we treated both of these mice with different dosages of polyethylene glycol–modified ADA (PEG–ADA) to reduce adenosine levels in vivo. At the end points of the experiments, we evaluated the therapeutic effects of PEG–ADA treatment by measuring adenosine levels and monitoring the cavernosal relaxation. Main Outcome Measures Adenosine levels in penile tissues were measured by high-performance liquid chromatography, and cavernosal relaxation was quantified by electrical field stimulation (EFS)-induced corporal cavernosal strip (CCS) assays. Results We found that lowering adenosine levels in penile tissues by PEG–ADA treatment from birth in ADA-deficient mice prevented the increased EFS-induced CCS relaxation associated with priapism. Intriguingly, in both ADA-deficient mice and SCD Tg mice with established priapism, we found that normalization of adenosine levels in penile tissues by PEG–ADA treatment relieved the heightened EFS-induced cavernosal relaxation in priapism. Conclusions Our studies have identified that PEG–ADA is a novel, safe, and mechanism-based drug to prevent and correct excess adenosine-mediated increased cavernosal relaxation

  17. Evaluation of miglustat as maintenance therapy after enzyme therapy in adults with stable type 1 Gaucher disease: a prospective, open-label non-inferiority study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Previous studies have provided equivocal data on the use of miglustat as maintenance therapy in Gaucher disease type 1. We report findings from a clinical trial evaluating the effects of miglustat treatment in patients with stable type 1 Gaucher disease after enzyme therapy. Methods Adult type 1 Gaucher disease patients stabilized during at least 3 years of previous enzyme therapy were included in this 2-year, prospective, open-label non-inferiority study. The primary endpoint was percent change from baseline in liver volume. Secondary endpoints included changes in spleen volume, hemoglobin concentration and platelet count. Results Forty-two patients were enrolled (mean±SD age, 45.1±12.7 years; previous enzyme therapy duration 9.5±4.0 years). Median (range) exposure to miglustat 100 mg t.i.d. was 658 (3–765) days. Twenty-one patients discontinued treatment prematurely; 13 due to adverse events, principally gastrointestinal. The upper 95% confidence limit of mean percent change in liver volume from baseline to end of treatment was below the non-inferiority margin of 10% (–1.1%; 95%CI −6.0, 3.9%). Mean (95%CI) changes in spleen volume, hemoglobin concentration and platelet count were 102 (24,180) mL, –0.95 (−1.38, –0.53) g/dL and −44.1 (–57.6, –30.7) ×109/L, respectively. Conclusions The primary efficacy endpoint was met; overall there was no change in liver volume during 24 months of miglustat therapy. Several patients showed a gradual deterioration in some disease manifestations, suggesting that miglustat could maintain clinical stability, but not in all patients. Miglustat demonstrated a predictable profile of safety and tolerability that was consistent with that reported in previous clinical trials and experience in clinical practice. Trial registration Clinicaltrials.gov identifier NCT00319046 PMID:23270487

  18. [Glucuronyl paclitaxel (Taxol) derivatives as tumor activated prodrugs].

    PubMed

    Bouvier, E; Schmidt, Fr; Monneret, Cl

    2005-01-01

    Three glucuronyl prodrugs of paclitaxel have been synthesized in order to be activated by the B-glucuronidase present within the necrotic areas of tumors. As three compartments containing prodrugs, they include a specifier, a self immolative spacer and the drug. In vitro testing clearly indicates that the two former prodrugs are stable and are more or less detoxified. As expected, in the presence of E. coli B-glucuronidase, the glycosidic linkage is hydrolyzed with a rate depending on the nature of the spacer but, once this hydrolysis has occurred, the self immolative spacer is soon eliminated leading to the liberation of the paclitaxel. PMID:15803101

  19. A macromolecular prodrug strategy for combinatorial drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Li, Nan-Nan; Lin, Jiantao; Gao, Di; Zhang, Li-Ming

    2014-03-01

    A novel macromolecular prodrug strategy was developed for the combinatorial delivery of two poorly water-soluble drugs, dexamethasone and doxorubicin. In this work, dexamethasone was firstly conjugated onto a water-soluble modified polysaccharide by an acid-labile hydrazone linkage. The resultant macromolecular prodrug had an amphiphilic character and could self-assemble into spherical polymeric micelles in aqueous system. With these micelles, doxorubicin was then encapsulated into their hydrophobic cores. For the conjugated dexamethasone and encapsulated doxorubicin, they could exhibit independent and acid-sensitive release characteristics. For the doxorubicin-loaded prodrug micelles, they were easily be internalized by living cells and showed obvious antitumor activity. PMID:24407691

  20. N,N'-Dialkylaminoalkylcarbonyl (DAAC) prodrugs and aminoalkylcarbonyl (AAC) prodrugs of 4-hydroxyacetanilide and naltrexone with improved skin permeation properties.

    PubMed

    Devarajan-Ketha, H; Sloan, K B

    2011-07-01

    N,N'-Dialkylaminoalkylcarbonyl (DAAC) and aminoalkylcarbonyl (AAC) prodrugs of phenolic drugs acetaminophen (APAP) and naltrexone (NTX) are reported. The effects of incorporation of a basic amine group into the promoiety of an acyl prodrug of a phenolic drug on its skin permeation properties are also presented. DAAC-APAP prodrugs were synthesized via a three-step procedure starting with haloalkylcarbonyl esters which were reacted with five different amines: dimethylamine, diethylamine, dipropylamine, morpholine, and piperidine. The spacing between the amino group and the carbonyl group of the acyl group was 1-3 CH(2). After the hydrolysis of the ester, the carboxylic acid product was subsequently coupled with the parent drug via a dicyclohexyl carbodiimide (DCC) mediated coupling to yield the DAAC-APAP-HCl prodrugs in excellent yields. The AAC prodrugs were synthesized using commercially available Boc-protected amino acids using DCC or EDCI as coupling agents. The yields of the prodrugs synthesized using these two different methods have been compared. Half-lives (t(1/2)) of a few members of the DAAC and AAC series were measured in buffer (pH 6.0, 20mM). The members evaluated in hydrolysis experiments exhibit a t(1/2) range of 15-113min. Among AAC-APAP prodrugs, the isopropyl group in valinate-APAP-HCl exerted a steric effect that increased the t(1/2) value for this prodrug compared to alaninate-APAP-HCl or prolinate-APAP-HCl. The 2-morpholinylacetate-APAP prodrug was able to achieve twice the flux of APAP in in vitro diffusion cell experiments through hairless mouse skin. PMID:21616664

  1. Ocular drug metabolism of the bioactivating antioxidant N-acetylcarnosine for vision in ophthalmic prodrug and codrug design and delivery.

    PubMed

    Babizhayev, Mark A

    2008-10-01

    The basic idea in this study relates to the interesting research problem to employ with the knowledgeable pharmacy staff N-acetylcarnosine (NAC) in the developed suitable compounded prodrug ophthalmic preparations, which are currently used for the treatment of cataract and have antioxidant effect, in order to provide the molecular support to one of the most popular beliefs of the growing market for the treatment of senile cataract in patients and animals with efficacious NAC drug formulations worldwide patented by the author. This work presents the progress in ocular NAC prodrug and codrug design and delivery in light of revealed ocular metabolic activities. There is a considerable interest in the ophthalmic codrug design including NAC prodrug based on the strategies to improve ophthalmic drug delivery of the active peptide principal L-carnosine through the sustained intraocular metabolic activation of a dipeptide while making it resistant to enzymatic hydrolysis. Novel approaches to ocular NAC drug delivery, developed by Innovative Vision Products, Inc. (IVP), aim at enhancing the drug bioavailability by ensuring a prolonged retention of the medication in the eye, and/or by facilitating transcorneal penetration. IVP team studied the effects of lubricant eye drops designed as 1% NAC prodrug of L-carnosine containing a mucoadhesive cellulose-based and corneal absorption promoters in a drug delivery system. The predicted responses of the corneal and conjunctival penetrations to the synergistic promoters are useful in controlling the extent and pathway of the ocular and systemic absorptions of instilled NAC prodrug in designed ophthalmic formulations thereof. Utility of peptidase enzyme inhibitors in the codrug formulation to modulate the transport and metabolism of NAC prodrug appears to be a promising strategy for enhancing dipeptide drug transport across the cornea. The developed and officially CE mark registered by IVP NAC prodrug and codrug lubricating eye drop

  2. Anticarcinogenic actions of tributyrin, a butyric acid prodrug.

    PubMed

    Heidor, Renato; Ortega, Juliana Festa; de Conti, Aline; Ong, Thomas Prates; Moreno, Fernando Salvador

    2012-12-01

    Bioactive food compounds (BFCs) exhibit potential anticarcinogenic effects that deserve to be explored. Butyric acid (BA) is considered a promising BFC and has been used in clinical trials; however, its short half-life considerably restricts its therapeutic application. Tributyrin (TB), a BA prodrug present in milk fat and honey, has more favorable pharmacokinetic properties than BA, and its oral administration is also better tolerated. In vitro and in vivo studies have shown that TB acts on multiple anticancer cellular and molecular targets without affecting non-cancerous cells. Among the TB mechanisms of action, the induction of apoptosis and cell differentiation and the modulation of epigenetic mechanisms are notable. Due to its anticarcinogenic potential, strategies as lipid emulsions, nanoparticles, or structured lipids containing TB are currently being developed to improve its organoleptic characteristics and bioavailability. In addition, TB has minimal toxicity, making it an excellent candidate for combination therapy with other agents for the control of cancer. Despite the lack of data available in the literature, TB is a promising molecule for anticancer strategies. Therefore, additional preclinical and clinical studies should be performed using TB to elucidate its molecular targets and anticarcinogenic potential.

  3. Beta-lactamase targeted enzyme activatable photosensitizers for antimicrobial PDT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Xiang; Verma, Sarika; Sallum, Ulysses W.; Hasan, Tayyaba

    2009-06-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) as a treatment modality for infectious disease has shown promise. However, most of the antimicrobial photosensitizers (PS) non-preferentially accumulate in both bacteria and host tissues, causing host tissue phototoxicity during treatment. We have developed a new antimicrobial PDT strategy which exploits beta-lactam resistance mechanism, one of the major drug-resistance bacteria evolved, to achieve enhanced target specificity with limited host damage. Our strategy comprises a prodrug construct with a PS and a quencher linked by beta-lactam ring, resulting in a diminished phototoxicity. This construct, beta-lactamase enzyme-activated-photosensitizer (beta-LEAP), can only be activated in the presence of both light and bacteria, and remains inactive elsewhere such as mammalian tissue. Beta-LEAP construct had shown specific cleavage by purified beta-lactamase and by beta-lactamase over-expressing methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). Specific photodynamic toxicity was observed towards MRSA, while dark and light toxicity were equivalent to reference strains. The prodrug design, synthesis and photophysical properties will be discussed.

  4. New drug, fospropofol disodium: a propofol prodrug.

    PubMed

    Welliver, Mark; Rugari, Susan M

    2009-08-01

    The use of propofol presents chemical and clinical concerns, including pain on injection, allergy risks, possible bacteria growth, and hyperlipidemia. These concerns have encouraged the search for alternative propofol formulations. Elimination of the soybean oil and lecithin carrier agents is difficult because the highly lipophilic diisopropyl phenol molecule does not dissolve in water. Propofol in aqueous solution would be a preferable alternative to lipid-based emulsions. One formulation of propofol is fospropofol disodium (Lusedra, Eisai Corporation of North America, Woodcliff Lake, New Jersey), previously known as Aquavan (MGI Pharma, Bloomington, Minnesota). Fospropofol is an aqueous solution of a propofol prodrug intended for injection. The discovery and development of this drug may address the concerns with the current propofol emulsion formulations while offering altered pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics for sedation. The structure, pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, clinical studies, clinical applications, and implications are discussed. PMID:19731849

  5. Long term enzyme replacement therapy for Fabry disease: effectiveness on kidney, heart and brain

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Fabry disease is an X-linked lysosomal storage disorder caused by α-galactosidase A deficiency leading to renal, cardiac, cerebrovascular disease and premature death. Treatment with α-galactosidase A (enzyme replacement therapy, ERT) stabilises disease in some patients, but long term effectiveness is unclear. Methods Renal, cardiac, and cerebral outcomes were prospectively studied in males and females with Fabry disease treated with ERT. Additionally, the occurrence of major cardiac events, stroke, end-stage renal disease and death was compared to a natural history (NH) cohort meeting treatment criteria. Results Of 75 patients on ERT (median treatment duration 5.2 years, range 0.05-11.0), prospective follow-up was available for 57 adult patients (30 males) and 6 adolescents. Renal function declined in males (-3.4 ml/min/1.73 m2 per year, SE 0.2; p < 0.001) despite ERT, but followed the normal course in females (-0.8 ml/min/1.73 m2 per year, SE 0.3; p = 0.001). Cardiac mass increased during ERT in males (+ 1.2 gram/m2.7, SE 0.3; p < 0.001), but remained stable in females (-0.3 gram/m2.7 per year, SE 0.4; p = 0.52). ERT did not prevent the occurrence of cerebral white matter lesions. Comparison of ERT treated to untreated patients revealed that the odds to develop a first complication increased with age (OR 1.05 (95% CI: 1.0-1.1) per year, p = 0.012). For development of a first or second complication the odds declined with longer treatment duration (OR 0.81 (95% CI: 0.68-0.96) per year of ERT, p = 0.015;OR 0.52 (0.31-0.88), p = 0.014 respectively). Conclusions Long term ERT does not prevent disease progression, but the risk of developing a first or second complication declines with increasing treatment duration. ERT in advanced Fabry disease seems of doubtful benefit. PMID:23531228

  6. Brain uptake of ketoprofen-lysine prodrug in rats.

    PubMed

    Gynther, Mikko; Jalkanen, Aaro; Lehtonen, Marko; Forsberg, Markus; Laine, Krista; Ropponen, Jarmo; Leppänen, Jukka; Knuuti, Johanna; Rautio, Jarkko

    2010-10-31

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) controls the entry of xenobiotics into the brain. Often the development of central nervous system drugs needs to be terminated because of their poor brain uptake. We describe a way to achieve large neutral amino acid transporter (LAT1)-mediated drug transport into the rat brain. We conjugated ketoprofen to an amino acid l-lysine so that the prodrug could access LAT1. The LAT1-mediated brain uptake of the prodrug was demonstrated with in situ rat brain perfusion technique. The ability of the prodrug to deliver ketoprofen into the site of action, the brain intracellular fluid, was determined combining in vivo and in vitro experiments. A rapid brain uptake from blood and cell uptake was seen both in in situ and in vivo experiments. Therefore, our results show that a prodrug approach can achieve uptake of drugs via LAT1 into the brain intracellular fluid. The distribution of the prodrug in the brain parenchyma and the site of parent drug release in the brain were shown with in vivo and in vitro studies. In addition, our results show that although lysine or ketoprofen are not LAT1-substrates themselves, by combining these molecules, the formed prodrug has affinity for LAT1. PMID:20727958

  7. Leveraging Hypoxia-Activated Prodrugs to Prevent Drug Resistance in Solid Tumors.

    PubMed

    Lindsay, Danika; Garvey, Colleen M; Mumenthaler, Shannon M; Foo, Jasmine

    2016-08-01

    Experimental studies have shown that one key factor in driving the emergence of drug resistance in solid tumors is tumor hypoxia, which leads to the formation of localized environmental niches where drug-resistant cell populations can evolve and survive. Hypoxia-activated prodrugs (HAPs) are compounds designed to penetrate to hypoxic regions of a tumor and release cytotoxic or cytostatic agents; several of these HAPs are currently in clinical trial. However, preliminary results have not shown a survival benefit in several of these trials. We hypothesize that the efficacy of treatments involving these prodrugs depends heavily on identifying the correct treatment schedule, and that mathematical modeling can be used to help design potential therapeutic strategies combining HAPs with standard therapies to achieve long-term tumor control or eradication. We develop this framework in the specific context of EGFR-driven non-small cell lung cancer, which is commonly treated with the tyrosine kinase inhibitor erlotinib. We develop a stochastic mathematical model, parametrized using clinical and experimental data, to explore a spectrum of treatment regimens combining a HAP, evofosfamide, with erlotinib. We design combination toxicity constraint models and optimize treatment strategies over the space of tolerated schedules to identify specific combination schedules that lead to optimal tumor control. We find that (i) combining these therapies delays resistance longer than any monotherapy schedule with either evofosfamide or erlotinib alone, (ii) sequentially alternating single doses of each drug leads to minimal tumor burden and maximal reduction in probability of developing resistance, and (iii) strategies minimizing the length of time after an evofosfamide dose and before erlotinib confer further benefits in reduction of tumor burden. These results provide insights into how hypoxia-activated prodrugs may be used to enhance therapeutic effectiveness in the clinic. PMID

  8. Leveraging Hypoxia-Activated Prodrugs to Prevent Drug Resistance in Solid Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Lindsay, Danika; Garvey, Colleen M.; Mumenthaler, Shannon M.; Foo, Jasmine

    2016-01-01

    Experimental studies have shown that one key factor in driving the emergence of drug resistance in solid tumors is tumor hypoxia, which leads to the formation of localized environmental niches where drug-resistant cell populations can evolve and survive. Hypoxia-activated prodrugs (HAPs) are compounds designed to penetrate to hypoxic regions of a tumor and release cytotoxic or cytostatic agents; several of these HAPs are currently in clinical trial. However, preliminary results have not shown a survival benefit in several of these trials. We hypothesize that the efficacy of treatments involving these prodrugs depends heavily on identifying the correct treatment schedule, and that mathematical modeling can be used to help design potential therapeutic strategies combining HAPs with standard therapies to achieve long-term tumor control or eradication. We develop this framework in the specific context of EGFR-driven non-small cell lung cancer, which is commonly treated with the tyrosine kinase inhibitor erlotinib. We develop a stochastic mathematical model, parametrized using clinical and experimental data, to explore a spectrum of treatment regimens combining a HAP, evofosfamide, with erlotinib. We design combination toxicity constraint models and optimize treatment strategies over the space of tolerated schedules to identify specific combination schedules that lead to optimal tumor control. We find that (i) combining these therapies delays resistance longer than any monotherapy schedule with either evofosfamide or erlotinib alone, (ii) sequentially alternating single doses of each drug leads to minimal tumor burden and maximal reduction in probability of developing resistance, and (iii) strategies minimizing the length of time after an evofosfamide dose and before erlotinib confer further benefits in reduction of tumor burden. These results provide insights into how hypoxia-activated prodrugs may be used to enhance therapeutic effectiveness in the clinic. PMID

  9. Tumor-colonizing bacteria: a potential tumor targeting therapy.

    PubMed

    Zu, Chao; Wang, Jiansheng

    2014-08-01

    In 1813, Vautier published his observation of tumor regression in patients who had suffered from gas gangrene. Since then, many publications have described the use of bacteria as antitumor therapy. For example, Bifidobacterium and Clostridium have been shown to selectively colonize tumors and to reduce tumor size. In addition, recent studies have focused on the use of genetic engineering to induce the expression of pro-drug converting enzymes, cytokines, specific antibodies, or suicide genes in tumor-colonizing bacteria. Moreover, some animal experiments have reported the treatment of tumors with engineered bacteria, and few side effects were observed. Therefore, based on these advances in tumor targeting therapy, bacteria may represent the next generation of cancer therapy.

  10. Theranostic nanoparticles for enzyme-activatable fluorescence imaging and photodynamic/chemo dual therapy of triple-negative breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jaehee; Kim, Hyunjin

    2015-01-01

    Background Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) is a highly diverse group of cancers characterized by tumors that does not express estrogen and progesterone receptors, as well as human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) gene expression. TNBC is associated with poor prognosis due to high rate of recurrence and distance metastasis, lack of response to hormonal or HER2-targeted therapies, and partial response to chemotherapy. Hence, development of new therapeutic strategies to overcome such limitations is of great importance. Here we describe the application of photosensitizer-conjugated and camptothecin (CPT)-encapsulated hyaluronic acid (HA) nanoparticles as enzyme-activatable theranostic nanoparticles (EATNP) for near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence imaging and photodynamic/chemo dual therapy of TNBC. Methods For the preparation of EATNPs, chlorin e6 (Ce6), a second generation photosensitizer, was covalently conjugated to a monomethoxy poly(ethylene glycol)-grafted HA backbone. Ce6-conjugated HA (Ce6-HA) formed self-assembled nanoparticles (i.e., Ce6-HA NPs) in an aqueous solution. Subsequently, CPT, a topoisomerase 1 inhibitor with remarkable anticancer efficacy but with low water solubility, was encapsulated inside the hydrophobic core of Ce6-HA NPs thereby forming EATNPs. Results Fluorescence and singlet oxygen generation (SOG) of EATNPs are quenched in its native state. Treatment of EATNPs with hyaluronidase (HAdase) induces enzyme concentration-dependent activation of NIR fluorescence and SOG. Moreover, HAdase-mediated degradation of the nanoparticles also triggers the release of CPT from the EATNPs. In vitro confocal microscopy and cytotoxicity tests confirmed that EATNPs were efficiently introduced into MDA-MB-231 TNBC cell line, thereby inducing better cytotoxicity than that by free CPT. Additional light irradiation onto the EATNP-treated cells significantly increased therapeutic efficacy in TNBC, which indicates that EATNP plays an important role in

  11. Outcome of enzyme replacement therapy in Turkish patients with Gaucher disease: does late intervention affect the response?

    PubMed

    Arikan-Ayyildiz, Zeynep; Yüce, Aysel; Emre, Serap; Baysoy, Gökhan; Saltik-Temizel, Inci Nur; Gürakan, Figen

    2011-01-01

    We aimed to evaluate the outcome of enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) in Turkish Gaucher patients since it first became available in our country. Eleven patients with type I and one patient with type III Gaucher disease (GD) received therapy as 30-60 U/kg and 120 U/kg every two weeks, respectively, for at least six months, starting a mean period of 4.2 years after the diagnosis. Assessment of response included serial measurements of hematological and biochemical parameters and liver and spleen volumes. Symptoms and signs of bone disease, growth and severity scores were also evaluated. ERT in Turkish patients led to marked improvement in hematological parameters and organomegaly in the majority of them. Patients with growth failure demonstrated catch-up growth. Progression of bone disease was not observed except in two patients who experienced a delay of 15 and 8.6 years, respectively, between the diagnosis and the start of ERT. PMID:22272449

  12. Targeted anticancer prodrug with mesoporous silica nanoparticles as vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Jianquan; Fang, Gang; Wang, Xiaodan; Zeng, Fang; Xiang, Yufei; Wu, Shuizhu

    2011-11-01

    A targeted anticancer prodrug system was fabricated with 180 nm mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) as carriers. The anticancer drug doxorubicin (DOX) was conjugated to the particles through an acid-sensitive carboxylic hydrazone linker which is cleavable under acidic conditions. Moreover, folic acid (FA) was covalently conjugated to the particle surface as the targeting ligand for folate receptors (FRs) overexpressed in some cancer cells. The in vitro release profiles of DOX from the MSN-based prodrug systems showed a strong dependence on the environmental pH values. The fluorescent dye FITC was incorporated in the MSNs so as to trace the cellular uptake on a fluorescence microscope. Cellular uptakes by HeLa, A549 and L929 cell lines were tested for FA-conjugated MSNs and plain MSNs respectively, and a much more efficient uptake by FR-positive cancer cells (HeLa) can be achieved by conjugation of folic acid onto the particles because of the folate-receptor-mediated endocytosis. The cytotoxicities for the FA-conjugated MSN prodrug, the plain MSN prodrug and free DOX against three cell lines were determined, and the result indicates that the FA-conjugated MSN prodrug exhibits higher cytotoxicity to FR-positive cells, and reduced cytotoxicity to FR-negative cells. Thus, with 180 nm MSNs as the carriers for the prodrug system, good drug loading, selective targeting and sustained release of drug molecules within targeted cancer cells can be realized. This study may provide useful insights for designing and improving the applicability of MSNs in targeted anticancer prodrug systems.

  13. Ring-Opening Polymerization of Prodrugs: A Versatile Approach to Prepare Well-Defined Drug Loaded Nanoparticles**

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jinyao; Liu, Wenge; Weitzhandler, Isaac; Bhattacharyya, Jayanta; Li, Xinghai; Wang, Jing; Qi, Yizhi; Bhattacharjee, Somnath; Chilkoti, Ashutosh

    2014-01-01

    We report a new methodology for the synthesis of polymer-drug conjugates from “compound”—all in one—prodrug monomers that consist of a cyclic polymerizable group that is appended to a drug through a cleavable linker. We show that organocatalyzed ring-opening polymerization can polymerize these monomers into well-defined polymer prodrugs that are designed to self-assemble into nanoparticles and release drug in response to a physiologically relevant stimulus. This method is compatible with structurally diverse drugs and allows different drugs to be copolymerized with quantitative conversion of the monomers. The drug loading can be controlled by adjusting the monomer(s) to initiator feed ratio and drug release can be encoded into the polymer by the choice of linker. Initiating these monomers from a polyethylene glycol macroinitiator yields amphiphilic diblock copolymers that spontaneously self-assemble into micelles with a long plasma circulation, which is useful for systemic therapy. PMID:25427831

  14. 1-Arylsulfonyl-2-(pyridylmethylsulfinyl) benzimidazoles as new proton pump inhibitor prodrugs.

    PubMed

    Shin, Jai Moo; Sachs, George; Cho, Young-moon; Garst, Michael

    2009-01-01

    New arylsulfonyl proton pump inhibitor (PPI) prodrug forms were synthesized. These prodrugs provided longer residence time of an effective PPI plasma concentration, resulting in better gastric acid inhibition. PMID:20032890

  15. 1-Arylsulfonyl-2-(Pyridylmethylsulfinyl) Benzimidazoles as New Proton Pump Inhibitor Prodrugs

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Jai Moo; Sachs, George; Cho, Young-moon; Garst, Michael

    2010-01-01

    New arylsulfonyl proton pump inhibitor (PPI) prodrug forms were synthesized. These prodrugs provided longer residence time of an effective PPI plasma concentration, resulting in better gastric acid inhibition. PMID:20032890

  16. [Cell therapy for Parkinson disease].

    PubMed

    Muramatsu, Shin-ichi

    2009-11-01

    Advances in the field of stem cell research have raised hopes of creating novel cell replacement therapies for Parkinson disease (PD), although double-blinded clinical trials have met with controversial success in patients implanted with fetal midbrain tissue and autopsy results have shown that some of the grafted fetal neurons displayed pathological changes typical of PD. Dopaminergic neurons have been efficiently derived from stem cells using various methods, and beneficial effects after transplantation have been demonstrated in animal models of PD. Some obstacles remain to be overcome before stem cell therapy can be routinely and safely used to treat PD in humans. A widely used prodrug/suicide gene therapy would be applied to stem cells to reduce risk of tumor formation. Since grafts were transplanted ectopically into the striatum instead of the substantia nigra in most current protocols, surviving dopaminergic neurons would not have to be the same subtype as the nigral cells. If the main mechanism underlying any functional recovery achieved by cell therapies is restoration of dopaminergic neurotransmission, then viral vector-mediated gene delivery of dopamine-synthesizing enzymes represents a more straightforward approach. Future targets for cell therapy should include some types of Parkinsonism with degeneration of striatal neurons.

  17. [Effect of components and some protocols of anti-ulcer therapy on content and activity of monooxigenase system enzymes of the stomach mucosa in experimental stomach ulcer].

    PubMed

    Iakubov, A V; Pattakhova, M Kh

    2009-01-01

    The influence of components and some schemata of antiulcerous therapy on content and activity of monooxigenase system's enzymes in mucous membrane of stomach are studied on the model of experimental stomach ulcer in rats. It is established, that among components of antiulcerous therapy such as omeprazole, clarithromycin and metronidazole inhibit content and activity of MOS enzymes. Tinidazol, amoxicillin and azithromycin do not affect the function of MOS. Rifampicin and pantoprazole induce enzyme system of monooxigenase. In triple therapy with omeprazole, clarithromycin and metronidazole the inhibit effect of preparations to system of MOS is exponentiated and it leads to suppression of mucous cytoprotaction of gastro duodenal zone. Triple therapy of ulcerous disease with pantoprazole, rifampicin and azithromycin is effective planning to stimulate defense mechanisms of the organism.

  18. Insulin-degrading enzyme inhibition, a novel therapy for type 2 diabetes?

    PubMed

    Costes, Safia; Butler, Peter C

    2014-08-01

    The insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE) has been identified as a type 2 diabetes and Alzheimer's disease susceptibility gene, though its physiological function remains unclear. Maianti et al. (2014) now propose that an IDE inhibitor may be a promising therapeutic strategy for type 2 diabetes.

  19. The prodrug DHED selectively delivers 17β-estradiol to the brain for treating estrogen-responsive disorders

    PubMed Central

    Prokai, Laszlo; Nguyen, Vien; Szarka, Szabolcs; Garg, Puja; Sabnis, Gauri; Bimonte-Nelson, Heather A.; McLaughlin, Katie J.; Talboom, Joshua S.; Conrad, Cheryl D.; Shughrue, Paul J.; Gould, Todd D.; Brodie, Angela; Merchenthaler, Istvan; Koulen, Peter; Prokai-Tatrai, Katalin

    2015-01-01

    Many neurological and psychiatric maladies originate from the deprivation of the human brain from estrogens. However, current hormone therapies cannot be used safely to treat these conditions commonly associated with menopause because of detrimental side-effects in the periphery. The latter also prevents the use of the hormone for neuroprotection. Here we show that a small-molecule bioprecursor prodrug, 10β,17β-dihydroxyestra-1,4-dien-3-one (DHED), converts to 17β-estradiol in the brain after systemic administration, but remains inert in the rest of the body. The localized and rapid formation of estrogen from the prodrug was revealed by a series of in vivo bioanalytical assays and through in vivo imaging in rodents. DHED treatment efficiently alleviated symptoms originated from brain estrogen deficiency in animal models of surgical menopause and provided neuroprotection in a rat stroke model. Concomitantly, we determined that 17β-estradiol formed in the brain from DHED elicited changes in gene expression and neuronal morphology identical to those obtained after direct 17β-estradiol treatment. Altogether, complementary functional and mechanistic data show that our approach is highly relevant therapeutically, because administration of the prodrug selectively produces estrogen in the brain independently from the route of administration and treatment regimen. Therefore, peripheral responses associated with the use of systemic estrogens, such as stimulation of the uterus and estrogen-responsive tumor growth, were absent. Collectively, our brain-selective prodrug approach may safely provide estrogen neuroprotection and medicate neurological and psychiatric symptoms developing from estrogen deficiency, particularly those encountered after surgical menopause, without the adverse side-effects of current hormone therapies. PMID:26203081

  20. The prodrug DHED selectively delivers 17β-estradiol to the brain for treating estrogen-responsive disorders.

    PubMed

    Prokai, Laszlo; Nguyen, Vien; Szarka, Szabolcs; Garg, Puja; Sabnis, Gauri; Bimonte-Nelson, Heather A; McLaughlin, Katie J; Talboom, Joshua S; Conrad, Cheryl D; Shughrue, Paul J; Gould, Todd D; Brodie, Angela; Merchenthaler, Istvan; Koulen, Peter; Prokai-Tatrai, Katalin

    2015-07-22

    Many neurological and psychiatric maladies originate from the deprivation of the human brain from estrogens. However, current hormone therapies cannot be used safely to treat these conditions commonly associated with menopause because of detrimental side effects in the periphery. The latter also prevents the use of the hormone for neuroprotection. We show that a small-molecule bioprecursor prodrug, 10β,17β-dihydroxyestra-1,4-dien-3-one (DHED), converts to 17β-estradiol in the brain after systemic administration but remains inert in the rest of the body. The localized and rapid formation of estrogen from the prodrug was revealed by a series of in vivo bioanalytical assays and through in vivo imaging in rodents. DHED treatment efficiently alleviated symptoms that originated from brain estrogen deficiency in animal models of surgical menopause and provided neuroprotection in a rat stroke model. Concomitantly, we determined that 17β-estradiol formed in the brain from DHED elicited changes in gene expression and neuronal morphology identical to those obtained after direct 17β-estradiol treatment. Together, complementary functional and mechanistic data show that our approach is highly relevant therapeutically, because administration of the prodrug selectively produces estrogen in the brain independently from the route of administration and treatment regimen. Therefore, peripheral responses associated with the use of systemic estrogens, such as stimulation of the uterus and estrogen-responsive tumor growth, were absent. Collectively, our brain-selective prodrug approach may safely provide estrogen neuroprotection and medicate neurological and psychiatric symptoms developing from estrogen deficiency, particularly those encountered after surgical menopause, without the adverse side effects of current hormone therapies. PMID:26203081

  1. Comparative impact of AAV and enzyme replacement therapy on respiratory and cardiac function in adult Pompe mice

    PubMed Central

    Falk, Darin J; Soustek, Meghan S; Todd, Adrian Gary; Mah, Cathryn S; Cloutier, Denise A; Kelley, Jeffry S; Clement, Nathalie; Fuller, David D; Byrne, Barry J

    2015-01-01

    Pompe disease is an autosomal recessive genetic disorder characterized by a deficiency of the enzyme responsible for degradation of lysosomal glycogen (acid α-glucosidase (GAA)). Cardiac dysfunction and respiratory muscle weakness are primary features of this disorder. To attenuate the progressive and rapid accumulation of glycogen resulting in cardiorespiratory dysfunction, adult Gaa–/– mice were administered a single systemic injection of rAAV2/9-DES-hGAA (AAV9-DES) or bimonthly injections of recombinant human GAA (enzyme replacement therapy (ERT)). Assessment of cardiac function and morphology was measured 1 and 3 months after initiation of treatment while whole-body plethysmography and diaphragmatic contractile function was evaluated at 3 months post-treatment in all groups. Gaa–/– animals receiving either AAV9-DES or ERT demonstrated a significant improvement in cardiac function and diaphragmatic contractile function as compared to control animals. AAV9-DES treatment resulted in a significant reduction in cardiac dimension (end diastolic left ventricular mass/gram wet weight; EDMc) at 3 months postinjection. Neither AAV nor ERT therapy altered minute ventilation during quiet breathing (eupnea). However, breathing frequency and expiratory time were significantly improved in AAV9-DES animals. These results indicate systemic delivery of either strategy improves cardiac function but AAV9-DES alone improves respiratory parameters at 3 months post-treatment in a murine model of Pompe disease. PMID:26029718

  2. Well-Defined Redox-Sensitive Polyethene Glycol-Paclitaxel Prodrug Conjugate for Tumor-Specific Delivery of Paclitaxel Using Octreotide for Tumor Targeting.

    PubMed

    Yin, Tingjie; Wu, Qu; Wang, Lei; Yin, Lifang; Zhou, Jianping; Huo, Meirong

    2015-08-01

    A redox-sensitive prodrug, octreotide(Phe)-polyethene glycol-disulfide bond-paclitaxel [OCT(Phe)-PEG-ss-PTX], was successfully developed for targeted intracellular delivery of PTX. The formulation emphasizes long-circulation-time polymer-drug conjugates, combined targeting based on EPR and OCT-receptor mediated endocytosis, sharp redox response, and programmed drug release. The nontargeted redox-sensitive prodrug, mPEG-ss-PTX, and the targeted insensitive prodrug, OCT(Phe)-PEG-PTX, were also synthesized as controls. These polymer-PTX conjugates, structurally confirmed by 1H NMR, exhibited approximately 23,000-fold increase in water solubility over parent PTX and possessed drug contents ranging from 11% to 14%. The redox-sensitivity of the objective OCT(Phe)-PEG-ss-PTX prodrug was verified by in vitro PTX release profile in simulated reducing conditions, and the SSTRs-mediated endocytosis was demonstrated by flow cytometry and confocal laser scanning microscopy analyses. Consequently, compared with mPEG-PTX and OCT(Phe)-PEG-PTX, the OCT(Phe)-PEG-ss-PTX exhibited much stronger cyotoxicity and apoptosis-inducing ability against NCI-H446 tumor cells (SSTRs overexpression), whereas a comparable cytotoxicity of these prodrugs was obtained against WI-38 normal cells (no SSTRs expression). Finally, the in vivo studies on NCI-H466 tumor-bearing nude mice demonstrated that the OCT(Phe)-PEG-ss-PTX possessed superior tumor-targeting ability and antitumor activity over mPEG-PTX, OCT(Phe)-PEG-PTX and Taxol, as well as minimal collateral damage. This targeted redox-sensitive polymer-PTX prodrug system is promising in tumor therapy.

  3. Photobiomodulation Therapy Decreases Oxidative Stress in the Lung Tissue after Formaldehyde Exposure: Role of Oxidant/Antioxidant Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Braga, Tarcio Teodoro; Barioni, Éric Diego; de Oliveira Duro, Stephanie; Ratto Tempestini Horliana, Anna Carolina; Câmara, Niels Olsen Saraiva; Marcourakis, Tânia; Farsky, Sandra Helena Poliselli; Lino-dos-Santos-Franco, Adriana

    2016-01-01

    Formaldehyde is ubiquitous pollutant that induces oxidative stress in the lung. Several lung diseases have been associated with oxidative stress and their control is necessary. Photobiomodulation therapy (PBMT) has been highlighted as a promissory treatment, but its mechanisms need to be better investigated. Our objective was to evaluate the effects of PBMT on the oxidative stress generated by FA exposure. Male Wistar rats were submitted to FA exposure of 1% or vehicle (3 days) and treated or not with PBMT (1 and 5 h after each FA exposure). Rats treated only with laser were used as control. Twenty-four hours after the last FA exposure, we analyzed the effects of PBMT on the generation of nitrites and hydrogen peroxide, oxidative burst, glutathione reductase, peroxidase, S-transferase enzyme activities, the gene expression of nitric oxide, cyclooxygenase, superoxide dismutase, the catalase enzyme, and heme oxygenase-1. PBMT reduced the generation of nitrites and hydrogen peroxide and increased oxidative burst in the lung cells. A decreased level of oxidant enzymes was observed which were concomitantly related to an increased level of antioxidants. This study provides new information about the antioxidant mechanisms of PBMT in the lung and might constitute an important tool for lung disease treatment. PMID:27293324

  4. Molecular Basis of Prodrug Activation by Human Valacyclovirase, an [alpha]-Amino Acid Ester Hydrolase

    SciTech Connect

    Lai, Longsheng; Xu, Zhaohui; Zhou, Jiahai; Lee, Kyung-Dall; Amidon, Gordon L.

    2008-07-08

    Chemical modification to improve biopharmaceutical properties, especially oral absorption and bioavailability, is a common strategy employed by pharmaceutical chemists. The approach often employs a simple structural modification and utilizes ubiquitous endogenous esterases as activation enzymes, although such enzymes are often unidentified. This report describes the crystal structure and specificity of a novel activating enzyme for valacyclovir and valganciclovir. Our structural insights show that human valacyclovirase has a unique binding mode and specificity for amino acid esters. Biochemical data demonstrate that the enzyme hydrolyzes esters of {alpha}-amino acids exclusively and displays a broad specificity spectrum for the aminoacyl moiety similar to tricorn-interacting aminopeptidase F1. Crystal structures of the enzyme, two mechanistic mutants, and a complex with a product analogue, when combined with biochemical analysis, reveal the key determinants for substrate recognition; that is, a flexible and mostly hydrophobic acyl pocket, a localized negative electrostatic potential, a large open leaving group-accommodating groove, and a pivotal acidic residue, Asp-123, after the nucleophile Ser-122. This is the first time that a residue immediately after the nucleophile has been found to have its side chain directed into the substrate binding pocket and play an essential role in substrate discrimination in serine hydrolases. These results as well as a phylogenetic analysis establish that the enzyme functions as a specific {alpha}-amino acid ester hydrolase. Valacyclovirase is a valuable target for amino acid ester prodrug-based oral drug delivery enhancement strategies.

  5. Long-Acting Diclofenac Ester Prodrugs for Joint Injection: Kinetics, Mechanism of Degradation, and In Vitro Release From Prodrug Suspension.

    PubMed

    Mertz, Nina; Larsen, Susan Weng; Kristensen, Jesper; Østergaard, Jesper; Larsen, Claus

    2016-10-01

    A prodrug approach for local and sustained diclofenac action after injection into joints based on ester prodrugs having a pH-dependent solubility is presented. Inherent ester prodrug properties influencing the duration of action include their pH-dependent solubility and charge state, as well as susceptibility to undergo esterase facilitated hydrolysis. In this study, physicochemical properties and pH rate profiles of 3 diclofenac ester prodrugs differing with respect to the spacer carbon chain length between the drug and the imidazole-based promoiety were determined and a rate equation for prodrug degradation in aqueous solution in the pH range 1-10 was derived. In the pH range 6-10, the prodrugs were subject to parallel degradation to yield diclofenac and an indolinone derivative. The prodrug degradation was found to be about 6-fold faster in 80% (vol/vol) human plasma as compared to 80% (vol/vol) human synovial fluid with 2-(1-methyl-1H-imidazol-2-yl)ethyl 2-(2-(2,6 dichlorophenyl)amino)phenylacetate being the poorest substrate toward enzymatic cleavage. The conversion and release of parent diclofenac from prodrug suspensions in vitro were studied using the rotating dialysis model. The results suggest that it is possible to alter and control dissolution and reconversion behavior of the diclofenac prodrugs, thus making the prodrug approach feasible for local and sustained diclofenac action after joint injection. PMID:27475785

  6. Effect of Antiviral Therapy on Serum Activity of Angiotensin Converting Enzyme in Patients with Chronic Hepatitis C

    PubMed Central

    Husic-Selimovic, Azra; Sofic, Amela; Huskic, Jasminko; Bulja, Deniz

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Renin-angiotenzin system (RAS) is frequently activated in patients with chronic liver disease. Angiotenzin - II (AT-II), produced by angiotenzin converting enzyme (ACE), has many physiological effects, including an important role in liver fibrogenesis. Combined antiviral therapy with PEG-IFN and ribavirin besides its antiviral effect also leads to a reduction in liver parenchyma fibrosis. Aim of the study: Determining the value of ACE in serum of patients with chronic hepatitis C before and after combined antiviral therapy, as well as the value of ACE activities in sera of the control group. Materials and methods: We studied 50 patients treated at Gastroenterohepatology Department, in the time-period of four years. Value of ACE in serum was determined by Olympus AU 400 device, with application of kit “Infinity TN ACE Liquid Stable Reagent”. HCV RNA levels in sera were measured by real time PCR. HCV RNA test was performed with modular analysis of AMPLICOR and COBAS AMPLICOR HCV MONITOR test v2.0, which has proved infection and was used for quantification of the viruses and monitoring of the patients’ response to therapy. Liver histology was evaluated in accordance with the level of necroinflammation activity and stage of fibrosis. Results: Serum activities of ACE in chronic hepatitis C patients is statistically higher than the values in the control group (p=0.02). Antiviral therapy in chronic hepatitis C patients statistically decreases serum activities of ACE (p= 0.02) and indirectly affects fibrogenesis of the liver parenchyma. Correlation between ACE and ALT activity after the therapy was proved (0.3934). Conclusion: Our findings suggest that the activity of ACE in serum is a good indirect parameter of the liver damage, and could be used as an indirect prognostic factor of the level of liver parenchyma damage. Serum activity of ACE can be used as a parameter for non-invasive assessment of intensity of liver damage. PMID:27147779

  7. Review of aerobic glycolysis and its key enzymes - new targets for lung cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Li, Xue-Bing; Gu, Jun-Dong; Zhou, Qing-Hua

    2015-01-01

    Most tumor cells show different metabolic pathways than normal cells. Even under the conditions of sufficient oxygen, they produce energy by a high rate of glycolysis followed by lactic acid fermentation in the cytosol, which is known as aerobic glycolysis or the Warburg effect. Lung cancer is a malignant tumor with one of the highest incidence and mortality rates in the world at present. However, the exact mechanisms underlying lung cancer development remain unclear. The three key enzymes of glycolysis are hexokinase, phosphofructokinase, and pyruvate kinase. Lactate dehydrogenase catalyzes the transfer of pyruvate to lactate. All four enzymes have been reported to be overexpressed in tumors, including lung cancer, and can be regulated by many oncoproteins to promote tumor proliferation, migration, and metastasis with dependence or independence of glycolysis. The discovery of aerobic glycolysis in the 1920s has provided new means and potential therapeutic targets for lung cancer. PMID:26273330

  8. Immune response to enzyme replacement therapies in lysosomal storage diseases and the role of immune tolerance induction.

    PubMed

    Kishnani, Priya S; Dickson, Patricia I; Muldowney, Laurie; Lee, Jessica J; Rosenberg, Amy; Abichandani, Rekha; Bluestone, Jeffrey A; Burton, Barbara K; Dewey, Maureen; Freitas, Alexandra; Gavin, Derek; Griebel, Donna; Hogan, Melissa; Holland, Stephen; Tanpaiboon, Pranoot; Turka, Laurence A; Utz, Jeanine J; Wang, Yow-Ming; Whitley, Chester B; Kazi, Zoheb B; Pariser, Anne R

    2016-02-01

    The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and National Organization for Rare Disease (NORD) convened a public workshop titled "Immune Responses to Enzyme Replacement Therapies: Role of Immune Tolerance Induction" to discuss the impact of anti-drug antibodies (ADAs) on efficacy and safety of enzyme replacement therapies (ERTs) intended to treat patients with lysosomal storage diseases (LSDs). Participants in the workshop included FDA staff, clinicians, scientists, patients, industry, and advocacy group representatives. The risks and benefits of implementing prophylactic immune tolerance induction (ITI) to reduce the potential clinical impact of antibody development were considered. Complications due to immune responses to ERT are being recognized with increasing experience and lengths of exposure to ERTs to treat several LSDs. Strategies to mitigate immune responses and to optimize therapies are needed. Discussions during the workshop resulted in the identification of knowledge gaps and future areas of research, as well as the following proposals from the participants: (1) systematic collection of longitudinal data on immunogenicity to better understand the impact of ADAs on long-term clinical outcomes; (2) development of disease-specific biomarkers and outcome measures to assess the effect of ADAs and ITI on efficacy and safety; (3) development of consistent approaches to ADA assays to allow comparisons of immunogenicity data across different products and disease groups, and to expedite reporting of results; (4) establishment of a system to widely share data on antibody titers following treatment with ERTs; (5) identification of components of the protein that are immunogenic so that triggers and components of the immune responses can be targeted in ITI; and (6) consideration of early ITI in patients who are at risk of developing clinically relevant ADA that have been demonstrated to worsen treatment outcomes.

  9. Immune response to enzyme replacement therapies in lysosomal storage diseases and the role of immune tolerance induction.

    PubMed

    Kishnani, Priya S; Dickson, Patricia I; Muldowney, Laurie; Lee, Jessica J; Rosenberg, Amy; Abichandani, Rekha; Bluestone, Jeffrey A; Burton, Barbara K; Dewey, Maureen; Freitas, Alexandra; Gavin, Derek; Griebel, Donna; Hogan, Melissa; Holland, Stephen; Tanpaiboon, Pranoot; Turka, Laurence A; Utz, Jeanine J; Wang, Yow-Ming; Whitley, Chester B; Kazi, Zoheb B; Pariser, Anne R

    2016-02-01

    The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and National Organization for Rare Disease (NORD) convened a public workshop titled "Immune Responses to Enzyme Replacement Therapies: Role of Immune Tolerance Induction" to discuss the impact of anti-drug antibodies (ADAs) on efficacy and safety of enzyme replacement therapies (ERTs) intended to treat patients with lysosomal storage diseases (LSDs). Participants in the workshop included FDA staff, clinicians, scientists, patients, industry, and advocacy group representatives. The risks and benefits of implementing prophylactic immune tolerance induction (ITI) to reduce the potential clinical impact of antibody development were considered. Complications due to immune responses to ERT are being recognized with increasing experience and lengths of exposure to ERTs to treat several LSDs. Strategies to mitigate immune responses and to optimize therapies are needed. Discussions during the workshop resulted in the identification of knowledge gaps and future areas of research, as well as the following proposals from the participants: (1) systematic collection of longitudinal data on immunogenicity to better understand the impact of ADAs on long-term clinical outcomes; (2) development of disease-specific biomarkers and outcome measures to assess the effect of ADAs and ITI on efficacy and safety; (3) development of consistent approaches to ADA assays to allow comparisons of immunogenicity data across different products and disease groups, and to expedite reporting of results; (4) establishment of a system to widely share data on antibody titers following treatment with ERTs; (5) identification of components of the protein that are immunogenic so that triggers and components of the immune responses can be targeted in ITI; and (6) consideration of early ITI in patients who are at risk of developing clinically relevant ADA that have been demonstrated to worsen treatment outcomes. PMID:26597321

  10. Towards the development of an enzyme replacement therapy for the metabolic disorder propionic acidemia.

    PubMed

    Darvish-Damavandi, Mahnaz; Ho, Han Kiat; Kang, Tse Siang

    2016-09-01

    Propionic acidemia (PA) is a life-threatening disease caused by the deficiency of a mitochondrial biotin-dependent enzyme known as propionyl coenzyme-A carboxylase (PCC). This enzyme is responsible for degrading the metabolic intermediate, propionyl coenzyme-A (PP-CoA), derived from multiple metabolic pathways. Currently, except for drastic surgical and dietary intervention that can only provide partial symptomatic relief, no other form of therapeutic option is available for this genetic disorder. Here, we examine a novel approach in protein delivery by specifically targeting and localizing our protein candidate of interest into the mitochondrial matrix of the cells. In order to test this concept of delivery, we have utilized cell penetrating peptides (CPPs) and mitochondria targeting sequences (MTS) to form specific fusion PCC protein, capable of translocating and localizing across cell membranes. In vitro delivery of our candidate fusion proteins, evaluated by confocal images and enzymatic activity assay, indicated effectiveness of this strategy. Therefore, it holds immense potential in creating a new paradigm in site-specific protein delivery and enzyme replacement therapeutic for PA. PMID:27504265

  11. Antioxidative enzymes activity and malondialdehyde concentration during mitoxantrone therapy in multiple sclerosis patients.

    PubMed

    Adamczyk-Sowa, M; Sowa, P; Pierzchala, K; Polaniak, R; Labuz-Roszak, B

    2012-12-01

    Mitoxantrone (MX) is approved for the treatment of aggressive relapsing-remitting, secondary-progressive and progressive-relapsing form of multiple sclerosis (MS). The mechanism of its action is multiaxial, however, it is not free from side effects. The causes of the side effects are still unknown and require further investigation. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of MX therapy on enzymatic parameters of endogenous antioxidative status: manganese and copper/zinc superoxide dismutase (MnSOD, Cu/ZnSOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) and lipid peroxidation marker--malondialdehyde (MDA) in blood serum and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in patients suffering from MS. After the MX therapy serum and the CSF MDA concentrations increased significantly. We reported that MnSOD activities decrease in serum and the CSF, while, surprisingly, the serum Cu/ZnSOD activity increases after the MX therapy. We also noted a marked decrease in CSF CAT and GSH-Px activity after the MX treatment. Our results strongly suggest the influence of MX therapy on oxidation/antioxidation status of serum and the CSF. These findings open up new opportunities for a better understanding of underlying physiopathological events in MS and provide a new insight into MX's mechanisms of action, especially its potent side effects.

  12. Melanoma cell therapy: Endothelial progenitor cells as shuttle of the MMP12 uPAR-degrading enzyme.

    PubMed

    Laurenzana, Anna; Biagioni, Alessio; D'Alessio, Silvia; Bianchini, Francesca; Chillà, Anastasia; Margheri, Francesca; Luciani, Cristina; Mazzanti, Benedetta; Pimpinelli, Nicola; Torre, Eugenio; Danese, Silvio; Calorini, Lido; Del Rosso, Mario; Fibbi, Gabriella

    2014-06-15

    The receptor for the urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPAR) accounts for many features of cancer progression, and is therefore considered a target for anti-tumoral therapy. Only full length uPAR mediates tumor progression. Matrix-metallo-proteinase-12 (MMP12)-dependent uPAR cleavage results into the loss of invasion properties and angiogenesis. MMP12 can be employed in the field of "targeted therapies" as a biological drug to be delivered directly in patient's tumor mass. Endothelial Progenitor Cells (EPCs) are selectively recruited within the tumor and could be used as cellular vehicles for delivering anti-cancer molecules. The aim of our study is to inhibit cancer progression by engeneering ECFCs, a subset of EPC, with a lentivirus encoding the anti-tumor uPAR-degrading enzyme MMP12. Ex vivo manipulated ECFCs lost the capacity to perform capillary morphogenesis and acquired the anti-tumor and anti-angiogenetic activity. In vivo MMP12-engineered ECFCs cleaved uPAR within the tumor mass and strongly inhibited tumor growth, tumor angiogenesis and development of lung metastasis. The possibility to exploit tumor homing and activity of autologous MMP12-engineered ECFCs represents a novel way to combat melanoma by a "personalized therapy", without rejection risk. The i.v. injection of radiolabelled MMP12-ECFCs can thus provide a new theranostic approach to control melanoma progression and metastasis. PMID:25003596

  13. Role of Glutamate 64 in the Activation of the Prodrug 5-fluorocytosine by Yeast Cytosine Deaminase†

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jifeng; Sklenak, Stepan; Liu, Aizhuo; Felczak, Krzysztof; Wu, Yan; Li, Yue; Yan, Honggao

    2012-01-01

    Yeast cytosine deaminase catalyzes the hydrolytic deamination of cytosine to uracil as well as the deamination of the prodrug 5-fluorocytosine (5FC) to the anticancer drug 5-fluorouracil. In this study, the role of Glu64 in the activation of the prodrug 5FC was investigated by site-directed mutagenesis, biochemical, NMR, and computational studies. Steady-state kinetics studies showed that the mutation of Glu64 causes a dramatic decrease in kcat and a dramatic increase in Km, indicating Glu64 is important for both binding and catalysis in the activation of 5FC. 19F-NMR experiments showed that binding of the inhibitor 5-fluoro-1H-pyrimidin-2-one (5FPy) to the wild type yCD causes an upfield shift, indicating that the bound inhibitor is in the hydrated form, mimicking the transition state or the tetrahedral intermediate in the activation of 5FC. However, binding of 5FPy to the E64A mutant enzyme causes a downfield shift, indicating that the bound 5FPy remains in an unhydrated form in the complex with the mutant enzyme. 1H and 15N NMR analysis revealed trans-hydrogen-bond D/H isotope effects on the hydrogen of the amide of Glu64, indicating that the carboxylate of Glu64 forms two hydrogen bonds with the hydrated 5FPy. ONIOM calculations showed that the wild type yCD complex with the hydrated form of the inhibitor 1H-pyrimidin-2-one is more stable than the initial binding complex, and in contrast, with the E64A mutant enzyme, the hydrated inhibitor is no longer favored and the conversion has higher activation energy as well. The hydrated inhibitor is stabilized in the wild-type yCD by two hydrogen bonds between it and the carboxylate of Glu64 as revealed by 1H and 15N NMR analysis. To explore the functional role of Glu64 in catalysis, deamination of cytosine catalyzed by the E64A mutant was investigated by ONIOM calculations. The results showed that without the assistance of Glu64, both proton transfers before and after the formation of the tetrahedral reaction

  14. Ester Prodrugs of Ketoprofen: Synthesis, Hydrolysis Kinetics and Pharmacological Evaluation.

    PubMed

    Dhokchawle, B V; Tauro, S J; Bhandari, A B

    2016-01-01

    The ester prodrugs of ketoprofen with various naturally available antioxidants; menthol, thymol, eugenol, guiacol, vanillin and sesamol have been synthesized by the dicyclohexyl carbodiimide (DCC) coupling method, purified and characterized by spectral data. Further, their, partition coefficients have been determined as well as, hydrolytic studies performed. The synthesized compounds are more lipophilic compared to the parent moieties and are stable in acidic environment, which is a prerequisite for their oral absorption. Under gastric as well as intestinal pH conditions these prodrugs showed variable susceptibility towards hydrolysis. The title compounds when evaluated for anti-inflammatory, analgesic activities and ulcerogenicity, showed improvement over the parent drug.

  15. Trifluoromethionine, a prodrug designed against methionine gamma-lyase-containing pathogens, has efficacy in vitro and in vivo against Trichomonas vaginalis.

    PubMed

    Coombs, G H; Mottram, J C

    2001-06-01

    Methionine gamma-lyase, the enzyme which catalyzes the single-step conversion of methionine to alpha-ketobutyrate, ammonia, and methanethiol, is highly active in many anaerobic pathogenic microorganisms but has no counterpart in mammals. This study tested the hypothesis that this pathogen-specific enzyme can be exploited as a drug target by prodrugs that are exclusively activated by it. Trifluoromethionine was confirmed as such a prodrug and shown to be highly toxic in vitro to the anaerobic protozoan parasite Trichomonas vaginalis, to anaerobic bacteria containing methionine gamma-lyase, and to Escherichia coli expressing the trichomonad gene. The compound also has exceptional activity against the parasite growing in vivo, with a single dose preventing lesion formation in five of the six mice challenged. These findings suggest that trifluoromethionine represents a lead compound for a novel class of anti-infective drugs with potential as chemotherapeutic agents against a range of prokaryotic and eukaryotic anaerobic pathogens. PMID:11353620

  16. Development and bioorthogonal activation of palladium-labile prodrugs of gemcitabine.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Jason T; Dawson, John C; Fraser, Craig; Rybski, Witold; Torres-Sánchez, Carmen; Bradley, Mark; Patton, E Elizabeth; Carragher, Neil O; Unciti-Broceta, Asier

    2014-06-26

    Bioorthogonal chemistry has become one of the main driving forces in current chemical biology, inspiring the search for novel biocompatible chemospecific reactions for the past decade. Alongside the well-established labeling strategies that originated the bioorthogonal paradigm, we have recently proposed the use of heterogeneous palladium chemistry and bioorthogonal Pd(0)-labile prodrugs to develop spatially targeted therapies. Herein, we report the generation of biologically inert precursors of cytotoxic gemcitabine by introducing Pd(0)-cleavable groups in positions that are mechanistically relevant for gemcitabine's pharmacological activity. Cell viability studies in pancreatic cancer cells showed that carbamate functionalization of the 4-amino group of gemcitabine significantly reduced (>23-fold) the prodrugs' cytotoxicity. The N-propargyloxycarbonyl (N-Poc) promoiety displayed the highest sensitivity to heterogeneous palladium catalysis under biocompatible conditions, with a reaction half-life of less than 6 h. Zebrafish studies with allyl, propargyl, and benzyl carbamate-protected rhodamines confirmed N-Poc as the most suitable masking group for implementing in vivo bioorthogonal organometallic chemistry. PMID:24867590

  17. Discovery of MK-8970: an acetal carbonate prodrug of raltegravir with enhanced colonic absorption.

    PubMed

    Walji, Abbas M; Sanchez, Rosa I; Clas, Sophie-Dorothee; Nofsinger, Rebecca; de Lera Ruiz, Manuel; Li, Jing; Bennet, Amrithraj; John, Christopher; Bennett, David Jonathan; Sanders, John M; Di Marco, Christina N; Kim, Somang Hope; Balsells, Jaume; Ceglia, Scott S; Dang, Qun; Manser, Kimberly; Nissley, Becky; Wai, John S; Hafey, Michael; Wang, Junying; Chessen, Gene; Templeton, Allen; Higgins, John; Smith, Ronald; Wu, Yunhui; Grobler, Jay; Coleman, Paul J

    2015-02-01

    Developing new antiretroviral therapies for HIV-1 infection with potential for less frequent dosing represents an important goal within drug discovery. Herein, we present the discovery of ethyl (1-((4-((4-fluorobenzyl)carbamoyl)-1-methyl-2-(2-(5-methyl- 1,3,4-oxadiazole-2-carboxamido)propan-2-yl)-6-oxo-1,6-dihydropyrimidin-5-yl)oxy)ethyl) carbonate (MK-8970), a highly optimized prodrug of raltegravir (Isentress). Raltegravir is a small molecule HIV integrase strand-transfer inhibitor approved for the treatment of HIV infection with twice-daily administration. Two classes of prodrugs were designed to have enhanced colonic absorption, and derivatives were evaluated in pharmacokinetic studies, both in vitro and in vivo in different species, ultimately leading to the identification of MK-8970 as a suitable candidate for development as an HIV therapeutic with the potential to require less frequent administration while maintaining the favorable efficacy, tolerability, and minimal drug-drug interaction profile of raltegravir. PMID:25469982

  18. Congenital sucrase-isomaltase deficiency: diagnostic challenges and response to enzyme replacement therapy.

    PubMed

    Puntis, J W L; Zamvar, V

    2015-09-01

    Congenital sucrase-isomaltase (SI) deficiency is a rare genetic condition characterised by a deficiency in the brush-border SI enzyme, resulting in an inability to metabolise sucrose and starches. Six cases of congenital SI deficiency treated with Sucraid (sacrosidase, a yeast-derived enzyme that facilitates sucrose digestion) are described. Typical presenting symptoms were watery diarrhoea, abdominal pain and bloating, sometimes noticeably worse after ingestion of fruit. Diagnosis is challenging since conventional hydrogen breath testing after an oral sucrose load is impractical in young children, and many laboratories no longer look for maldigested sucrose using faecal sugar chromatography. Confirmation is by disaccharidase assay of duodenal or jejunal mucosa obtained endoscopically. All six patients showed little improvement following advice regarding dietary management, but experienced a marked reduction in symptoms with sacrosidase administration; no adverse events were reported. Sacrosidase is an effective and well-tolerated treatment for patients with congenital SI deficiency. Gene testing and clinical trial of sacrosidase may become an alternative to endoscopic biopsies for diagnosis. PMID:26163121

  19. Polymorphic Cytochrome P450 Enzymes (CYPs) and Their Role in Personalized Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Preissner, Robert; Dunkel, Mathias; Gewiess, Andreas; Preissner, Saskia

    2013-01-01

    The cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes are major players in drug metabolism. More than 2,000 mutations have been described, and certain single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) have been shown to have a large impact on CYP activity. Therefore, CYPs play an important role in inter-individual drug response and their genetic variability should be factored into personalized medicine. To identify the most relevant polymorphisms in human CYPs, a text mining approach was used. We investigated their frequencies in different ethnic groups, the number of drugs that are metabolized by each CYP, the impact of CYP SNPs, as well as CYP expression patterns in different tissues. The most important polymorphic CYPs were found to be 1A2, 2D6, 2C9 and 2C19. Thirty-four common allele variants in Caucasians led to altered enzyme activity. To compare the relevant Caucasian SNPs with those of other ethnicities a search in 1,000 individual genomes was undertaken. We found 199 non-synonymous SNPs with frequencies over one percent in the 1,000 genomes, many of them not described so far. With knowledge of frequent mutations and their impact on CYP activities, it may be possible to predict patient response to certain drugs, as well as adverse side effects. With improved availability of genotyping, our data may provide a resource for an understanding of the effects of specific SNPs in CYPs, enabling the selection of a more personalized treatment regimen. PMID:24340040

  20. First human treatment with investigational rhGUS enzyme replacement therapy in an advanced stage MPS VII patient.

    PubMed

    Fox, Joyce E; Volpe, Linda; Bullaro, Josephine; Kakkis, Emil D; Sly, William S

    2015-02-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis type VII (MPS VII, Sly syndrome) is a very rare lysosomal storage disease caused by a deficiency of the enzyme β-glucuronidase (GUS), which is required for the degradation of three glycosaminoglycans (GAGs): dermatan sulfate, heparan sulfate, and chondroitin sulfate. Progressive accumulation of these GAGs in lysosomes leads to increasing dysfunction in numerous tissues and organs. Enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) has been used successfully for other MPS disorders, but there is no approved treatment for MPS VII. Here we describe the first human treatment with recombinant human GUS (rhGUS), an investigational therapy for MPS VII, in a 12-year old boy with advanced stage MPS VII. Despite a tracheostomy, nocturnal continuous positive airway pressure, and oxygen therapy, significant pulmonary restriction and obstruction led to oxygen dependence and end-tidal carbon dioxide (ETCO2) levels in the 60-80mmHg range, eventually approaching respiratory failure (ETCO2 of 100mmHg) and the need for full-time ventilation. Since no additional medical measures could improve his function, we implemented experimental ERT by infusing rhGUS at 2mg/kg over 4h every 2 weeks for 24 weeks. Safety was evaluated by standard assessments and observance for any infusion associated reactions (IARs). Urinary GAG (uGAG) levels, pulmonary function, oxygen dependence, CO2 levels, cardiac valve function, liver and spleen size, and growth velocity were assessed to evaluate response to therapy. rhGUS infusions were well tolerated. No serious adverse events (SAEs) or IARs were observed. After initiation of rhGUS infusions, the patient's uGAG excretion decreased by more than 50%. Liver and spleen size were reduced within 2 weeks of the first infusion and reached normal size by 24 weeks. Pulmonary function appeared to improve during the course of treatment based on reduced changes in ETCO2 after off-ventilator challenges and a reduced oxygen requirement. The patient regained the

  1. First human treatment with investigational rhGUS enzyme replacement therapy in an advanced stage MPS VII patient.

    PubMed

    Fox, Joyce E; Volpe, Linda; Bullaro, Josephine; Kakkis, Emil D; Sly, William S

    2015-02-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis type VII (MPS VII, Sly syndrome) is a very rare lysosomal storage disease caused by a deficiency of the enzyme β-glucuronidase (GUS), which is required for the degradation of three glycosaminoglycans (GAGs): dermatan sulfate, heparan sulfate, and chondroitin sulfate. Progressive accumulation of these GAGs in lysosomes leads to increasing dysfunction in numerous tissues and organs. Enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) has been used successfully for other MPS disorders, but there is no approved treatment for MPS VII. Here we describe the first human treatment with recombinant human GUS (rhGUS), an investigational therapy for MPS VII, in a 12-year old boy with advanced stage MPS VII. Despite a tracheostomy, nocturnal continuous positive airway pressure, and oxygen therapy, significant pulmonary restriction and obstruction led to oxygen dependence and end-tidal carbon dioxide (ETCO2) levels in the 60-80mmHg range, eventually approaching respiratory failure (ETCO2 of 100mmHg) and the need for full-time ventilation. Since no additional medical measures could improve his function, we implemented experimental ERT by infusing rhGUS at 2mg/kg over 4h every 2 weeks for 24 weeks. Safety was evaluated by standard assessments and observance for any infusion associated reactions (IARs). Urinary GAG (uGAG) levels, pulmonary function, oxygen dependence, CO2 levels, cardiac valve function, liver and spleen size, and growth velocity were assessed to evaluate response to therapy. rhGUS infusions were well tolerated. No serious adverse events (SAEs) or IARs were observed. After initiation of rhGUS infusions, the patient's uGAG excretion decreased by more than 50%. Liver and spleen size were reduced within 2 weeks of the first infusion and reached normal size by 24 weeks. Pulmonary function appeared to improve during the course of treatment based on reduced changes in ETCO2 after off-ventilator challenges and a reduced oxygen requirement. The patient regained the

  2. Low-dose, continuous enzyme replacement therapy ameliorates brain pathology in the neurodegenerative lysosomal disorder mucopolysaccharidosis type IIIA.

    PubMed

    King, Barbara; Hassiotis, Sofia; Rozaklis, Tina; Beard, Helen; Trim, Paul J; Snel, Marten F; Hopwood, John J; Hemsley, Kim M

    2016-05-01

    Repeated replacement of sulphamidase via cerebrospinal fluid injection is an effective treatment for pathological changes in the brain in mice and dogs with the lysosomal storage disorder, mucopolysaccharidosis type IIIA (MPS IIIA). Investigational trials of this approach are underway in children with this condition, however, infusions require attendance at a specialist medical facility. We sought to comprehensively evaluate the effectiveness of sustained-release (osmotic pump-delivered) enzyme replacement therapy in murine MPS IIIA as this method, if applied to humans, would require only subcutaneous administration of enzyme once the pump was installed. Six-week-old MPS IIIA and unaffected mice were implanted with subcutaneous mini-osmotic pumps connected to an infusion cannula directed at the right lateral ventricle. Either recombinant human sulphamidase or vehicle were infused over the course of 7 weeks, with pumps replaced part-way through the experimental period. We observed near-normalisation of primarily stored substrate (heparan sulphate) in both hemispheres of the MPS IIIA brain and cervical spinal cord, as determined using tandem mass spectrometry. Immunohistochemistry indicated a reduction in secondarily stored GM 3 ganglioside and neuroinflammatory markers. A bias towards the infusion side was seen in some, but not all outcomes. The recombinant enzyme appears stable under pump-like conditions for at least 1 month. Given that infusion pumps are in clinical use in other nervous system disorders, e.g. for treatment of spasticity or brain tumours, this treatment method warrants consideration for testing in large animal models of MPS IIIA and other lysosomal storage disorders that affect the brain. Clinical trials of repeated injection of replacement enzyme into CSF are underway in patients with the inherited neurodegenerative disorder mucopolysaccharidosis type IIIA. In this pre-clinical study, we examined an alternative approach - slow, continual infusion

  3. Bisphosphonamidate Clodronate Prodrug Exhibits Selective Cytotoxic Activity Against Melanoma Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Webster, Marie R.; Kamat, Chandrashekhar; Connis, Nick; Zhao, Ming; Weeraratna, Ashani T.; Rudek, Michelle A.; Hann, Christine L.; Freel Meyers, Caren L.

    2014-01-01

    Bisphosphonates are used clinically to treat disorders of calcium metabolism and malignant bone disease and are known to inhibit cancer cell growth, adhesion, and invasion. However, clinical use of these agents for the treatment of extraskeletal disease is limited due to low cell permeability. We recently described a bisphosphonamidate prodrug strategy for efficient intracellular release of bisphosphonates, including clodronate (CLO), in NSCLC cells. To evaluate anticancer activity of this prodrug class across many cancer cell types, the bisphosphonamidate clodronate prodrug (CLO prodrug) was screened against the NCI-60 cell line panel, and was found to exhibit selectivity toward melanoma cell lines. Here, we confirm efficient cellular uptake and intracellular activation of this prodrug class in melanoma cells. We further demonstrate inhibition of melanoma cell proliferation, induction of apoptosis, and an anti-tumor effect of CLO prodrug in a xenograft model. These data suggest a novel therapeutic application for the CLO prodrug and potential to selectively target melanoma cells. PMID:24310621

  4. Arylsulfatase A bound to poly(butyl cyanoacrylate) nanoparticles for enzyme replacement therapy--physicochemical evaluation.

    PubMed

    Mühlstein, A; Gelperina, S; Shipulo, E; Maksimenko, O; Kreuter, J

    2014-07-01

    Arylsulfatase A (ASA) deficiency is the cause of metachromatic leucodystrophy (MLD), a lysosomal storage disease associated with severe neurological disorders. Poly(butyl cyanoacrylate) (PBCA) nanoparticles overcoated with polysorbate 80 enabled the delivery of several drugs across the blood-brain barrier to the brain suggesting that these nanoparticles also may transport ASA across this barrier. The objective of this research, therefore, was to evaluate the feasibility of loading ASA onto PBCA nanoparticles. A stable ASA-loaded PBCA nanoparticle formulation was developed that could be easily freeze-dried and stored over a period of more than 8 weeks. The maximum loading capacity for this enzyme was -59 microg per 1 mg of PBCA. In the presence of 3% sucrose as a lyoprotector the activity of freeze-dried ASA was found to be 100% recoverable.

  5. Fabry disease and enzyme replacement therapy in classic patients with same mutation: different formulations--different outcome?

    PubMed

    Politei, J; Schenone, A B; Cabrera, G; Heguilen, R; Szlago, M

    2016-01-01

    We describe the results of the multidisciplinary evaluation in patients with Fabry disease and the same genetic mutation and their outcomes using different approved enzyme replacement therapy (ERT). We measured baseline data and serial results of neuropathic pain assessment and renal, cardiac and cerebrovascular functioning. Pain scale showed improvement in all male cases treated with agalsidasa beta. A mild improvement was detected in agalsidasa alfa-treated patients after 1 year with posterior increase. During the agalsidase beta shortage, two male patients were switched to agalsidasa alfa, after 1 year both cases presented an increase in scale values. Renal evolution showed a tendency toward a decrease in proteinuria in patients using agalsidase beta and worsening with agalsidase alfa. We found improvement in two females using agalsidase beta and no changes in the other cases regarding cardiac functioning. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed increase of white matter lesions in four patients. Improvement and stabilization in neuropathic pain, renal and cardiac functioning and brain MRI were found mainly in patients treated with agalsidase beta. Following the reported recommendations on reintroduction of agalsidase beta after the enzyme shortage, we decided to switch all patients to agalsidase beta.

  6. Enzyme- and pH-Sensitive Branched Polymer-Doxorubicin Conjugate-Based Nanoscale Drug Delivery System for Cancer Therapy.

    PubMed

    Wei, Xiaoli; Luo, Qiang; Sun, Ling; Li, Xue; Zhu, Hongyan; Guan, Pujun; Wu, Min; Luo, Kui; Gong, Qiyong

    2016-05-11

    Owing to their dendritic architectural features, branched copolymers have been investigated as drug delivery systems. In this paper, an enzyme- and pH-sensitive branched poly[N-(2-hydroxypropyl)methacrylamide] (polyHPMA) copolymer-doxorubicin (DOX) conjugate possessing a molecular weight (MW) of 165 kDa was designed and prepared via a one-pot reaction and drug conjugation. This conjugate's potential as a smart, nanoscale drug delivery system (NDDS) is also investigated. The branched conjugate was capable of forming nanoparticles with a negative surface charge. The self-assembled nanoparticles were 102 nm in diameter as measured by dynamic light scattering (DLS) and 95 nm in diameter via scanning electron microscopy, respectively. The nanoparticles were degraded to low-MW products (23∼25 kDa) in the presence of papain or cathepsin B, and the degradation was monitored via DLS and size-exclusion chromatography. The nanoparticles demonstrated pH-sensitive drug release, as the DOX was attached to the branched copolymer via a hydrazone bond. In comparison to free DOX, the conjugate-based nanoparticles exhibited greater accumulation in breast tumors, resulting in enhanced antitumor therapeutic indexes. Furthermore, widespread dissemination of the conjugate among breast tumor cells was confirmed by immunohistochemical assay. Finally, no obvious systemic toxicities were observed in vivo in normal mice. Thus, the branched HPMA copolymer-DOX conjugate may be employed as a safe and efficient pH- and enzyme-responsive NDDS for cancer therapy.

  7. Enzyme- and pH-Sensitive Branched Polymer-Doxorubicin Conjugate-Based Nanoscale Drug Delivery System for Cancer Therapy.

    PubMed

    Wei, Xiaoli; Luo, Qiang; Sun, Ling; Li, Xue; Zhu, Hongyan; Guan, Pujun; Wu, Min; Luo, Kui; Gong, Qiyong

    2016-05-11

    Owing to their dendritic architectural features, branched copolymers have been investigated as drug delivery systems. In this paper, an enzyme- and pH-sensitive branched poly[N-(2-hydroxypropyl)methacrylamide] (polyHPMA) copolymer-doxorubicin (DOX) conjugate possessing a molecular weight (MW) of 165 kDa was designed and prepared via a one-pot reaction and drug conjugation. This conjugate's potential as a smart, nanoscale drug delivery system (NDDS) is also investigated. The branched conjugate was capable of forming nanoparticles with a negative surface charge. The self-assembled nanoparticles were 102 nm in diameter as measured by dynamic light scattering (DLS) and 95 nm in diameter via scanning electron microscopy, respectively. The nanoparticles were degraded to low-MW products (23∼25 kDa) in the presence of papain or cathepsin B, and the degradation was monitored via DLS and size-exclusion chromatography. The nanoparticles demonstrated pH-sensitive drug release, as the DOX was attached to the branched copolymer via a hydrazone bond. In comparison to free DOX, the conjugate-based nanoparticles exhibited greater accumulation in breast tumors, resulting in enhanced antitumor therapeutic indexes. Furthermore, widespread dissemination of the conjugate among breast tumor cells was confirmed by immunohistochemical assay. Finally, no obvious systemic toxicities were observed in vivo in normal mice. Thus, the branched HPMA copolymer-DOX conjugate may be employed as a safe and efficient pH- and enzyme-responsive NDDS for cancer therapy. PMID:27102364

  8. Peptide dendrimer-Doxorubicin conjugate-based nanoparticles as an enzyme-responsive drug delivery system for cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chengyuan; Pan, Dayi; Luo, Kui; She, Wenchuan; Guo, Chunhua; Yang, Yang; Gu, Zhongwei

    2014-08-01

    Peptide dendrimers have shown promise as an attractive platform for drug delivery. In this study, mPEGylated peptide dendrimer-doxorubicin (dendrimer-DOX) conjugate-based nanoparticle is prepared and characterized as an enzyme-responsive drug delivery vehicle. The drug DOX is conjugated to the periphery of dendrimer via an enzyme-responsive tetra-peptide linker Gly-Phe-Leu-Gly (GFLG). The dendrimer-DOX conjugate can self-assemble into nanoparticle, which is confirmed by dynamic light scattering, scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy studies. At equal dose, mPEGylated dendrimer-DOX conjugate-based nanoparticle results in significantly high antitumor activity, and induces apoptosis on the 4T1 breast tumor model due to the evidences from tumor growth curves, an immunohistochemical analysis, and a histological assessment. The in vivo toxicity evaluation demonstrates that nanoparticle substantially avoids DOX-related toxicities and presents good biosafety without obvious side effects to normal organs of both tumor-bearing and healthy mice as measured by body weight shift, blood routine test, and a histological analysis. Thus, the mPEGylated peptide dendrimer-DOX conjugate-based nanoparticle may be a potential nanoscale drug delivery vehicle for the breast cancer therapy.

  9. Enzyme replacement therapy attenuates disease progression in a canine model of late-infantile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (CLN2 disease)

    PubMed Central

    Katz, Martin L; Coates, Joan R; Sibigtroth, Christine M; Taylor, Jacob D; Carpentier, Melissa; Young, Whitney M; Wininger, Fred A; Kennedy, Derek; Vuillemenot, Brian R; O'Neill, Charles A

    2014-01-01

    Using a canine model of classical late-infantile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (CLN2 disease), a study was conducted to evaluate the potential pharmacological activity of recombinant human tripeptidyl peptidase-1 (rhTPP1) enzyme replacement therapy administered directly to the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). CLN2 disease is a hereditary neurodegenerative disorder resulting from mutations in CLN2, which encodes the soluble lysosomal enzyme tripeptidyl peptidase-1 (TPP1). Infants with mutations in both CLN2 alleles develop normally but in the late-infantile/early-childhood period undergo progressive neurological decline accompanied by pronounced brain atrophy. The disorder, a form of Batten disease, is uniformly fatal, with clinical signs starting between 2 and 4 years of age and death usually occurring by the early teenage years. Dachshunds homozygous for a null mutation in the canine ortholog of CLN2 (TPP1) exhibit a similar disorder that progresses to end stage at 10.5–11 months of age. Administration of rhTPP1 via infusion into the CSF every other week, starting at approximately 2.5 months of age, resulted in dose-dependent significant delays in disease progression, as measured by delayed onset of neurologic deficits, improved performance on a cognitive function test, reduced brain atrophy, and increased life span. Based on these findings, a clinical study evaluating the potential therapeutic value of rhTPP1 administration into the CSF of children with CLN2 disease has been initiated. PMID:24938720

  10. Enzyme replacement therapy attenuates disease progression in a canine model of late-infantile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (CLN2 disease).

    PubMed

    Katz, Martin L; Coates, Joan R; Sibigtroth, Christine M; Taylor, Jacob D; Carpentier, Melissa; Young, Whitney M; Wininger, Fred A; Kennedy, Derek; Vuillemenot, Brian R; O'Neill, Charles A

    2014-11-01

    Using a canine model of classical late-infantile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (CLN2 disease), a study was conducted to evaluate the potential pharmacological activity of recombinant human tripeptidyl peptidase-1 (rhTPP1) enzyme replacement therapy administered directly to the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). CLN2 disease is a hereditary neurodegenerative disorder resulting from mutations in CLN2, which encodes the soluble lysosomal enzyme tripeptidyl peptidase-1 (TPP1). Infants with mutations in both CLN2 alleles develop normally but in the late-infantile/early-childhood period undergo progressive neurological decline accompanied by pronounced brain atrophy. The disorder, a form of Batten disease, is uniformly fatal, with clinical signs starting between 2 and 4 years of age and death usually occurring by the early teenage years. Dachshunds homozygous for a null mutation in the canine ortholog of CLN2 (TPP1) exhibit a similar disorder that progresses to end stage at 10.5-11 months of age. Administration of rhTPP1 via infusion into the CSF every other week, starting at approximately 2.5 months of age, resulted in dose-dependent significant delays in disease progression, as measured by delayed onset of neurologic deficits, improved performance on a cognitive function test, reduced brain atrophy, and increased life span. Based on these findings, a clinical study evaluating the potential therapeutic value of rhTPP1 administration into the CSF of children with CLN2 disease has been initiated.

  11. Retroviral-mediated gene therapy for the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma: an innovative approach for cancer therapy.

    PubMed Central

    Huber, B E; Richards, C A; Krenitsky, T A

    1991-01-01

    An approach involving retroviral-mediated gene therapy for the treatment of neoplastic disease is described. This therapeutic approach is called "virus-directed enzyme/prodrug therapy" (VDEPT). The VDEPT approach exploits the transcriptional differences between normal and neoplastic cells to achieve selective killing of neoplastic cells. We now describe development of the VDEPT approach for the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma. Replication-defective, amphotrophic retroviruses were constructed containing a chimeric varicella-zoster virus thymidine kinase (VZV TK) gene that is transcriptionally regulated by either the hepatoma-associated alpha-fetoprotein or liver-associated albumin transcriptional regulatory sequences. Subsequent to retroviral infection, expression of VZV TK was limited to either alpha-fetoprotein- or albumin-positive cells, respectively. VZV TK metabolically activated the nontoxic prodrug 6-methoxypurine arabinonucleoside (araM), ultimately leading to the formation of the cytotoxic anabolite adenine arabinonucleoside triphosphate (araATP). Cells that selectively expressed VZV TK became selectively sensitive to araM due to the VZV TK-dependent anabolism of araM to araATP. Hence, these retroviral-delivered chimeric genes generated tissue-specific expression of VZV TK, tissue-specific anabolism of araM to araATP, and tissue-specific cytotoxicity due to araM exposure. By utilizing such retroviral vectors, araM was anabolized to araATP in hepatoma cells, producing a selective cytotoxic effect. Images PMID:1654555

  12. Bioactivation antioxidant and transglycating properties of N-acetylcarnosine autoinduction prodrug of a dipeptide L-carnosine in mucoadhesive drug delivery eye-drop formulation: powerful eye health application technique and therapeutic platform.

    PubMed

    Babizhayev, Mark A

    2012-06-01

    A considerable interest in N-acetylcarnosine ocular drug design for eye health is based on clinical strategies to improve ocular drug delivery through metabolic enzymatic activation. Human biology aspects of ocular N-acetylcarnosine deacetylation during its pass through the cornea to the aqueous humor and dipeptide hydrolyzing enzymes are characterized. Novel approaches to ocular drug delivery increasing intraocular bioavailability of N-acetylcarnosine biologically activated metabolite carnosine become an integral development ensuring prolonged retention of the medication in the mucoadhesive precorneal area and facilitating transcorneal penetration of the natural dipeptide with the corneal promoters. A comprehensive list of techniques for peptide drug design, synthesis, purification, and biological analyses was considered: liquid chromatography (LC), high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), (1) H and (13) C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), electrospray ionization (ESI) mass spectroscopy, and spectrophotometry. The antioxidant activity of therapeutics-targeted molecules was studied in aqueous solution and in a lipid membrane environment. A deglycation therapeutic system was developed involving removal, by transglycation of sugar or aldehyde moieties from Schiff bases by histidyl-hydrazide compounds or aldehyde scavenger L-carnosine. Clinical studies included ophthalmoscopy, visual acuity (VA), halometer disability glare tests, slit-image, and retro-illumination photography. N-acetylcarnosine 1% lubricant eye drops are considered as an auto-induction prodrug and natural ocular redox state balance therapies with implications in prevention and treatment of serious eye diseases that involve pathways of continuous oxidative damage to ocular tissues(cataracts, primary open-angle glaucoma, age-related macular degeneration) and sight-threatening glycosylation processes (diabetic retinopathy and consequent visual impairment) important for public health. The results of

  13. Simvastatin Prodrug Micelles Target Fracture and Improve Healing

    PubMed Central

    Dusad, Anand; Yuan, Hongjiang; Ren, Ke; Li, Fei; Fehringer, Edward V.; Purdue, P. Edward; Goldring, Steven R.; Daluiski, Aaron; Wang, Dong

    2014-01-01

    Simvastatin (SIM), a widely used anti-lipidaemic drug, has been identified as a bone anabolic agent. Its poor water solubility and the lack of distribution to the skeleton, however, have limited its application in the treatment of bone metabolic diseases. In this study, an amphiphilic macromolecular prodrug of SIM was designed and synthesized to overcome these limitations. The polyethylene glycol (PEG)-based prodrug can spontaneously self-assemble to form micelles. The use of SIM trimer as the prodrug’s hydrophobic segment allows easy encapsulation of additional free SIM. The in vitro studies showed that SIM/SIM-mPEG micelles were internalized by MC3T3 cells via lysosomal trafficking and consistently induced expression of both BMP2 and DKK1 mRNA, suggesting that the prodrug micelle retains the biological functions of SIM. After systemic administration, optical imaging suggests that the micelles would passively target to bone fracture sites associated with hematoma and inflammation. Furthermore, flow cytometry study revealed that SIM/SIM-mPEG micelles had preferred cellular uptake by inflammatory and resident cells within the fracture callus tissue. The treatment study using a mouse osteotomy model validated the micelles’ therapeutic efficacy in promoting bone fracture healing as demonstrated by micro-CT and histological analyses. Collectively, these data suggest that the macromolecular prodrug-based micelle formulation of SIM may have great potential for clinical management of impaired fracture healing. PMID:25542644

  14. Evaluation of Diclofenac Prodrugs for Enhancing Transdermal Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Lobo, Shabbir; Li, Henan; Farhan, Nashid; Yan, Guang

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the approach of using diclofenac acid (DA) prodrugs for enhancing transdermal delivery. Methanol diclofenac ester (MD), ethylene glycol diclofenac ester (ED), glycerol diclofenac ester (GD), and 1,3-propylene glycol diclofenac ester (PD) were synthesized and evaluated for their physicochemical properties such as solubilities, octanol/water partition coefficients, stratum corneum/water partition coefficients, hydrolysis rates, and bioconversion rates. In vitro fluxes across human epidermal membrane (HEM) in Franz diffusion cell were determined on DA, MD, ED, GD, and PD saturated aqueous solutions. The formation of GD and ED led to the prodrugs with higher aqueous solubilities and lower partition coefficients than those of the parent drug. Prodrugs with improved aqueous solubility showed better fluxes across HEM in aqueous solution than that of the parent drug, with GD showing the highest aqueous solubility and also the highest flux. There is a linear relationship between the aqueous solubility and flux for DA, ED and PD, but GD and MD deviated from the linear line. Overall, diclofenac prodrugs with improved hydrophilicity than the parent drug could be utilized for enhancing transdermal diclofenac delivery. PMID:24517636

  15. Lipophilic prodrugs of nucleoside triphosphates as biochemical probes and potential antivirals

    PubMed Central

    Gollnest, Tristan; de Oliveira, Thiago Dinis; Schols, Dominique; Balzarini, Jan; Meier, Chris

    2015-01-01

    The antiviral activity of nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors is often limited by ineffective phosphorylation. We report on a nucleoside triphosphate (NTP) prodrug approach in which the γ-phosphate of NTPs is bioreversibly modified. A series of TriPPPro-compounds bearing two lipophilic masking units at the γ-phosphate and d4T as a nucleoside analogue are synthesized. Successful delivery of d4TTP is demonstrated in human CD4+ T-lymphocyte cell extracts by an enzyme-triggered mechanism with high selectivity. In antiviral assays, the compounds are potent inhibitors of HIV-1 and HIV-2 in CD4+ T-cell (CEM) cultures. Highly lipophilic acyl residues lead to higher membrane permeability that results in intracellular delivery of phosphorylated metabolites in thymidine kinase-deficient CEM/TK− cells with higher antiviral activity than the parent nucleoside. PMID:26503889

  16. Ultrastructural analysis of dermal fibroblasts in mucopolysaccharidosis type I: Effects of enzyme replacement therapy and hematopoietic cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Cox-Brinkman, Josanne; van den Bergh Weerman, Marius A; Wijburg, Frits A; Aerts, Johannes M F G; Florquin, Sandrine; van der Lee, Johanna H; Hollak, Carla E M

    2010-05-01

    In mucopolysaccharidosis type I (MPS I; alpha-L-iduronidase deficiency), glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) accumulate in different cell types, causing characteristic vacuolization. Hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) and enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) both aim to restore tissue morphology by delivering alpha-L-iduronidase to the deficient cells. The authors investigated the efficacy of both therapies on dermal fibroblast morphology in 12 patients by electron microscopy of repeated skin biopsies before and during 2 years of ERT as well as before and 6 months after HCT. Cell vacuolization was rated according to a semi-quantitative scoring system. At baseline all patients showed an increased vacuolization score as compared to controls. In addition the vacuolization score was significantly higher in patients with the severe phenotype of the disease (n = 7) compared to patients with attenuated phenotypes (n = 5) (p = .009). After initiation of ERT a significant decrease in cell vacuolization was observed (p = .012). However, the response rate varied among patients, as the vacuolization score remained high during the first year of ERT in 3 patients with the severe phenotype. In all patients who received a successful HCT (n = 3) only minimal disturbances in cell morphology were observed afterward. In conclusion, both ERT and HCT are capable of restoring, at least partially, dermal fibroblast morphology in MPS I.

  17. The impact of the immune system on the safety and efficiency of enzyme replacement therapy in lysosomal storage disorders.

    PubMed

    Broomfield, A; Jones, S A; Hughes, S M; Bigger, B W

    2016-07-01

    In the light of clinical experience in infantile onset Pompe patients, the immunological impact on the tolerability and long-term efficacy of enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) for lysosomal storage disorders has come under renewed scrutiny. This article details the currently proposed immunological mechanisms involved in the development of anti-drug antibodies and the current therapies used in their treatment. Given the current understanding of the adaptive immune response, it focuses particularly on T cell dependent mechanisms and the paradigm of using lymphocytic negative selection as a predictor of antibody formation. This concept originally postulated in the 1970s, stipulated that the genotypically determined lack of production or production of a variant protein determines an individual's lymphocytic repertoire. This in turn is the key factor in determining the potential severity of an individual's immunological response to ERT. It also highlights the need for immunological assay standardization particularly those looking at describing the degree of functional impact, robust biochemical or clinical endpoints and detailed patient subgroup identification if the true evaluations of impact are to be realised. PMID:26883220

  18. Enzyme replacement therapy "drug holiday": results from an unexpected shortage of an orphan drug supply in Australia.

    PubMed

    Goldblatt, Jack; Fletcher, Janice M; McGill, Jim; Szer, Jeffrey; Wilson, Meredith

    2011-01-15

    The development of recombinantly manufactured enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) has revolutionised the management of some inherited disorders of metabolism. Gaucher disease was the first lysosomal storage disorder for which ERT became commercially available and ERT remains first-line treatment for affected individuals. In Australia, 70 patients with Gaucher disease are treated through a centrally administered Australian Government national program known as the Life Savings Drug Program (LSDP). Imiglucerase (Cerezyme), manufactured by Genzyme Corporation, is the only ERT currently registered in Australia for the treatment of Gaucher disease. In June 2009, Genzyme Corporation announced the detection of a virus in its Allston Landing manufacturing facility which resulted in inventories of imiglucerase being insufficient to meet projected global demand. The Australian Government sought advice from its Gaucher Disease Advisory Committee (GDAC) on recalculating patient doses in order to ration available imiglucerase to those most in need on a clinical severity basis. Management of this rationing process was urgent and required extensive investigation to develop a clinical severity hierarchy, to review available imiglucerase stock spread across multiple pharmacies, to implement a strategy for redistributing available imiglucerase according to specific patients' recalculated doses, to advise treating doctors and patients concerning these changed circumstances and to consider new monitoring schedules during the drug shortage phase. A cohort of 24 patients was withdrawn from therapy, 22 of whom had no discernable clinical adverse effect. This experience suggests that short-term studies of maintenance therapy without a no-treatment arm may lead to erroneous conclusions and that some patients may have treatment holidays or delayed infusions without short-term adverse outcomes.

  19. Intrathecal enzyme replacement therapy improves motor function and survival in a preclinical mouse model of infantile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jui-Yun; Nelvagal, Hemanth R; Wang, Lingling; Birnbaum, Shari G; Cooper, Jonathan D; Hofmann, Sandra L

    2015-01-01

    The neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses (NCLs) are a group of related hereditary lysosomal storage disorders characterized by progressive loss of neurons in the central nervous system resulting in dementia, loss of motor skills, seizures and blindness. A characteristic intralysosomal accumulation of autofluorescent storage material occurs in the brain and other tissues. Three major forms and nearly a dozen minor forms of NCL are recognized. Infantile-onset NCL (CLN1 disease) is caused by severe deficiency in a soluble lysosomal enzyme, palmitoyl-protein thioesterase-1 (PPT1) and no therapy beyond supportive care is available. Homozygous Ppt1 knockout mice reproduce the known features of the disease, developing signs of motor dysfunction at 5 months of age and death around 8 months. Direct delivery of lysosomal enzymes to the cerebrospinal fluid is an approach that has gained traction in small and large animal models of several other neuropathic lysosomal storage diseases, and has advanced to clinical trials. In the current study, Ppt1 knockout mice were treated with purified recombinant human PPT1 enzyme delivered to the lumbar intrathecal space on each of three consecutive days at 6 weeks of age. Untreated PPT1 knockout mice and wild-type mice served as additional controls. Four enzyme concentration levels (0, 2.6, 5.3 and 10.6 mg/ml of specific activity 20 U/mg) were administered in a volume of 80 μl infused over 8 min. Each group consisted of 16-20 mice. The treatment was well tolerated. Disease-specific survival was 233, 267, 272, and 284days for each of the four treatment groups, respectively, and the effect of treatment was highly significant (p<0.0001). The timing of motor deterioration was also delayed. Neuropathology was improved as evidenced by decreased autofluorescent storage material in the spinal cord and a decrease in CD68 staining in the cortex and spinal cord. The improvements in motor function and survival are similar to results reported for

  20. Tumor-activated prodrug (TAP)-conjugated nanoparticles with cleavable domains for safe doxorubicin delivery.

    PubMed

    Guarnieri, Daniela; Biondi, Marco; Yu, Hui; Belli, Valentina; Falanga, Andrea P; Cantisani, Marco; Galdiero, Stefania; Netti, Paolo A

    2015-03-01

    A major issue in chemotherapy is the lack of specificity of many antitumor drugs, which cause severe side effects and an impaired therapeutic response. Here we report on the design and characterization of model tumor activated prodrug-conjugated polystyrene (PS) nanoparticles (TAP-NPs) for the release of doxorubicin (Dox) triggered by matrix metalloprotease-2 (MMP2) enzyme, which is overexpressed in the extracellular matrix of tumors. In particular, TAP-NPs were produced by attaching Dox to poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) through two MMP2-cleavable enzymes. The resulting adduct was then tethered to PS NPs. Results showed that Dox release was actually triggered by MMP2 cleavage and was dependent on enzyme concentration, with a plateau around 20 nM. Furthermore, significant cell cytotoxicity was observed towards three cell lines only in the presence of MMP2, but not in cells without enzyme pre-treatment, even after NP internalization by cells. These findings indicate the potential of TAP-NPs as suitable nanocarriers for an on demand, tumor--specific delivery of antitumor drugs after the response to an endogenous stimulus. Further advancements will focus on the translation of this production technology to biodegradable systems for the safe transport of cytotoxic drug to tumor tissues.

  1. Tumor-activated prodrug (TAP)-conjugated nanoparticles with cleavable domains for safe doxorubicin delivery.

    PubMed

    Guarnieri, Daniela; Biondi, Marco; Yu, Hui; Belli, Valentina; Falanga, Andrea P; Cantisani, Marco; Galdiero, Stefania; Netti, Paolo A

    2015-03-01

    A major issue in chemotherapy is the lack of specificity of many antitumor drugs, which cause severe side effects and an impaired therapeutic response. Here we report on the design and characterization of model tumor activated prodrug-conjugated polystyrene (PS) nanoparticles (TAP-NPs) for the release of doxorubicin (Dox) triggered by matrix metalloprotease-2 (MMP2) enzyme, which is overexpressed in the extracellular matrix of tumors. In particular, TAP-NPs were produced by attaching Dox to poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) through two MMP2-cleavable enzymes. The resulting adduct was then tethered to PS NPs. Results showed that Dox release was actually triggered by MMP2 cleavage and was dependent on enzyme concentration, with a plateau around 20 nM. Furthermore, significant cell cytotoxicity was observed towards three cell lines only in the presence of MMP2, but not in cells without enzyme pre-treatment, even after NP internalization by cells. These findings indicate the potential of TAP-NPs as suitable nanocarriers for an on demand, tumor--specific delivery of antitumor drugs after the response to an endogenous stimulus. Further advancements will focus on the translation of this production technology to biodegradable systems for the safe transport of cytotoxic drug to tumor tissues. PMID:25220931

  2. Enzyme plus light therapy to repair DNA damage in ultraviolet-B-irradiated human skin

    PubMed Central

    Stege, Helger; Roza, Len; Vink, Arie A.; Grewe, Markus; Ruzicka, Thomas; Grether-Beck, Susanne; Krutmann, Jean

    2000-01-01

    Ultraviolet-B (UVB) (290–320 nm) radiation-induced cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers within the DNA of epidermal cells are detrimental to human health by causing mutations and immunosuppressive effects that presumably contribute to photocarcinogenesis. Conventional photoprotection by sunscreens is exclusively prophylactic in nature and of no value once DNA damage has occurred. In this paper, we have therefore assessed whether it is possible to repair UVB radiation-induced DNA damage through topical application of the DNA-repair enzyme photolyase, derived from Anacystis nidulans, that specifically converts cyclobutane dimers into their original DNA structure after exposure to photoreactivating light. When a dose of UVB radiation sufficient to induce erythema was administered to the skin of healthy subjects, significant numbers of dimers were formed within epidermal cells. Topical application of photolyase-containing liposomes to UVB-irradiated skin and subsequent exposure to photoreactivating light decreased the number of UVB radiation-induced dimers by 40–45%. No reduction was observed if the liposomes were not filled with photolyase or if photoreactivating exposure preceded the application of filled liposomes. The UVB dose administered resulted in suppression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), a molecule required for immunity and inflammatory events in the epidermis. In addition, in subjects hypersensitive to nickel sulfate, elicitation of the hypersensitivity reaction in irradiated skin areas was prevented. Photolyase-induced dimer repair completely prevented these UVB radiation-induced immunosuppressive effects as well as erythema and sunburn-cell formation. These studies demonstrate that topical application of photolyase is effective in dimer reversal and thereby leads to immunoprotection. PMID:10660687

  3. Enzyme responsive drug delivery system based on mesoporous silica nanoparticles for tumor therapy in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yun; Ding, Xingwei; Li, Jinghua; Luo, Zhong; Hu, Yan; Liu, Junjie; Dai, Liangliang; Zhou, Jun; Hou, Changjun; Cai, Kaiyong

    2015-04-01

    To reduce the toxic side effects of traditional chemotherapeutics in vivo, we designed and constructed a biocompatible, matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) responsive drug delivery system based on mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs). MMPs substrate peptide containing PLGLAR (sensitive to MMPs) was immobilized onto the surfaces of amino-functionalized MSNs via an amidation reaction, serving as MMPs sensitive intermediate linker. Bovine serum albumin was then covalently coupled to linker as end-cap for sealing the mesopores of MSNs. Lactobionic acid was further conjugated to the system as targeting motif. Doxorubicin hydrochloride was used as the model anticancer drug in this study. A series of characterizations revealed that the system was successfully constructed. The peptide-functionalized MSNs system demonstrated relatively high sensitivity to MMPs for triggering drug delivery, which was potentially important for tumor therapy since the tumor’s microenvironment overexpressed MMPs in nature. The in vivo experiments proved that the system could efficiently inhibit the tumor growth with minimal side effects. This study provides an approach for the development of the next generation of nanotherapeutics toward efficient cancer treatment.

  4. Targeting Cytochrome P450 Enzymes: A New Approach in Anti-cancer Drug Development

    PubMed Central

    Bruno, Robert D.; Njar, Vincent C.O.

    2007-01-01

    Cytochrome P450s (CYPs) represent a large class of heme-containing enzymes that catalyze the metabolism of multitudes of substrates both endogenous and exogenous. Until recently, however, CYPs have been largely overlooked in cancer drug development, acknowledged only for their role in Phase I metabolism of chemotherapeutics. The first successful strategy targeting CYP enzymes in cancer therapy was the development of potent inhibitors of CYP19 (aromatase) for the treatment of breast cancer. Aromatase inhibitors ushered in a new era in hormone ablation therapy for estrogen dependent cancers, and have paved the way for similar strategies (i.e. inhibition of CYP17) that combat androgen dependent prostate cancer. Identification of CYPs involved in the inactivation of anti-cancer metabolites of Vitamin D3 and Vitamin A has triggered development of agents that target these enzymes as well. The discovery of the over-expression of exogenous metabolizing CYPs, such as CYP1B1, in cancer cells has roused interest in the development of inhibitors for chemoprevention and of prodrugs designed to be activated by CYPs only in cancer cells. Finally, the expression of CYPs within tumors has been utilized in the development of bioreductive molecules that are activated by CYPs only under hypoxic conditions. This review offers the first comprehensive analysis of strategies in drug development that either inhibit or exploit CYP enzymes for the treatment of cancer. PMID:17544277

  5. Validation of an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay that detects Histoplasma capsulatum antigenuria in Colombian patients with AIDS for diagnosis and follow-up during therapy.

    PubMed

    Caceres, Diego H; Scheel, Christina M; Tobón, Angela M; Ahlquist Cleveland, Angela; Restrepo, Angela; Brandt, Mary E; Chiller, Tom; Gómez, Beatriz L

    2014-09-01

    We validated an antigen capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) in Colombian persons with AIDS and proven histoplasmosis and evaluated the correlation between antigenuria and clinical improvement during follow-up. The sensitivity of the Histoplasma capsulatum ELISA was 86%, and the overall specificity was 94%. The antigen test successfully monitored the response to therapy.

  6. In Vivo Bioorthogonal Chemistry Enables Local Hydrogel and Systemic Pro-Drug To Treat Soft Tissue Sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Mejia Oneto, Jose M; Khan, Irfan; Seebald, Leah; Royzen, Maksim

    2016-07-27

    The ability to activate drugs only at desired locations avoiding systemic immunosuppression and other dose limiting toxicities is highly desirable. Here we present a new approach, named local drug activation, that uses bioorthogonal chemistry to concentrate and activate systemic small molecules at a location of choice. This method is independent of endogenous cellular or environmental markers and only depends on the presence of a preimplanted biomaterial near a desired site (e.g., tumor). We demonstrate the clear therapeutic benefit with minimal side effects of this approach in mice over systemic therapy using a doxorubicin pro-drug against xenograft tumors of a type of soft tissue sarcoma (HT1080). PMID:27504494

  7. In Vivo Bioorthogonal Chemistry Enables Local Hydrogel and Systemic Pro-Drug To Treat Soft Tissue Sarcoma

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The ability to activate drugs only at desired locations avoiding systemic immunosuppression and other dose limiting toxicities is highly desirable. Here we present a new approach, named local drug activation, that uses bioorthogonal chemistry to concentrate and activate systemic small molecules at a location of choice. This method is independent of endogenous cellular or environmental markers and only depends on the presence of a preimplanted biomaterial near a desired site (e.g., tumor). We demonstrate the clear therapeutic benefit with minimal side effects of this approach in mice over systemic therapy using a doxorubicin pro-drug against xenograft tumors of a type of soft tissue sarcoma (HT1080). PMID:27504494

  8. Excited-State Dynamics of a Two-Photon-Activatable Ruthenium Prodrug.

    PubMed

    Greenough, Simon E; Horbury, Michael D; Smith, Nichola A; Sadler, Peter J; Paterson, Martin J; Stavros, Vasilios G

    2016-01-18

    We present a new approach to investigate how the photodynamics of an octahedral ruthenium(II) complex activated through two-photon absorption (TPA) differ from the equivalent complex activated through one-photon absorption (OPA). We photoactivated a Ru(II) polypyridyl complex containing bioactive monodentate ligands in the photodynamic therapy window (620-1000 nm) by using TPA and used transient UV/Vis absorption spectroscopy to elucidate its reaction pathways. Density functional calculations allowed us to identify the nature of the initially populated states and kinetic analysis recovers a photoactivation lifetime of approximately 100 ps. The dynamics displayed following TPA or OPA are identical, showing that TPA prodrug design may use knowledge gathered from the more numerous and easily conducted OPA studies.

  9. Gene therapy strategies using engineered stem cells for treating gynecologic and breast cancer patients (Review).

    PubMed

    Kim, Ye-Seul; Hwang, Kyung-A; Go, Ryeo-Eun; Kim, Cho-Won; Choi, Kyung-Chul

    2015-05-01

    There are three types of stem cells: embryonic stem (ES) cells, adult stem (AS) cells and induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells. These stem cells have many benefits including the potential ability to differentiate into various organs. In addition, engineered stem cells (GESTECs) designed for delivering therapeutic genes may be capable of treating human diseases including malignant cancers. Stem cells have been found to possess the potential for serving as novel delivery vehicles for therapeutic or suicide genes to primary or metastatic cancer formation sites as a part of gene-directed enzyme/prodrug combination therapy (GEPT). Given the advantageous properties of stem cells, tissue-derived stem cells are emerging as a new tool for anticancer therapy combined with prodrugs. In this review, the effects of GESTECs with different origins, i.e., neural, amniotic membrane and amniotic fluid, introduced to treat patients with diverse types of gynecologic and breast cancers are discussed. Data from the literature indicate the therapeutic potential of these cells as a part of gene therapy strategies to selectively target malignancies in women at clinically terminal stages.

  10. Evaluation of N-nonyl-deoxygalactonojirimycin as a pharmacological chaperone for human GM1 gangliosidosis leads to identification of a feline model suitable for testing enzyme enhancement therapy.

    PubMed

    Rigat, Brigitte A; Tropak, Michael B; Buttner, Justin; Crushell, Ellen; Benedict, Daphne; Callahan, John W; Martin, Douglas R; Mahuran, Don J

    2012-09-01

    Deficiencies of lysosomal β-D-galactosidase can result in GM1 gangliosidosis, a severe neurodegenerative disease characterized by massive neuronal storage of GM1 ganglioside in the brain. Currently there are no available therapies that can even slow the progression of this disease. Enzyme enhancement therapy utilizes small molecules that can often cross the blood brain barrier, but are also often competitive inhibitors of their target enzyme. It is a promising new approach for treating diseases, often caused by missense mutations, associated with dramatically reduced levels of functionally folded enzyme. Despite a number of positive reports based on assays performed with patient cells, skepticism persists that an inhibitor-based treatment can increase mutant enzyme activity in vivo. To date no appropriate animal model, i.e., one that recapitulates a responsive human genotype and clinical phenotype, has been reported that could be used to validate enzyme enhancement therapy. In this report, we identify a novel enzyme enhancement-agent, N-nonyl-deoxygalactonojirimycin, that enhances the mutant β-galactosidase activity in the lysosomes of a number of patient cell lines containing a variety of missense mutations. We then demonstrate that treatment of cells from a previously described, naturally occurring feline model (that biochemically, clinically and molecularly closely mimics GM1 gangliosidosis in humans) with this molecule, results in a robust enhancement of their mutant lysosomal β-galactosidase activity. These data indicate that the feline model could be used to validate this therapeutic approach and determine the relationship between the disease stage at which this therapy is initiated and the maximum clinical benefits obtainable.

  11. Intrathecal enzyme replacement therapy reduces lysosomal storage in the brain and meninges of the canine model of MPS I.

    PubMed

    Kakkis, E; McEntee, M; Vogler, C; Le, S; Levy, B; Belichenko, P; Mobley, W; Dickson, P; Hanson, S; Passage, M

    2004-01-01

    Enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) has been developed for several lysosomal storage disorders, including mucopolysaccharidosis I (MPS I), and is effective at reducing lysosomal storage in many tissues and in ameliorating clinical disease. However, intravenous ERT does not adequately treat storage disease in the central nervous system (CNS), presumably due to effects of the blood-brain barrier on enzyme distribution. To circumvent this barrier, we studied whether intrathecal (IT) recombinant human alpha-L-iduronidase (rhIDU) could penetrate and treat the brain and meninges. An initial dose-response study showed that doses of 0.46-4.14 mg of IT rhIDU successfully penetrated the brain of normal dogs and reached tissue levels 5.6 to 18.9-fold normal overall and 2.7 to 5.9-fold normal in deep brain sections lacking CSF contact. To assess the efficacy and safety in treating lysosomal storage disease, four weekly doses of approximately 1 mg of IT rhIDU were administered to MPS I-affected dogs resulting in a mean 23- and 300-fold normal levels of iduronidase in total brain and meninges, respectively. Quantitative glycosaminoglycan (GAG) analysis showed that the IT treatment reduced mean total brain GAG to normal levels and achieved a 57% reduction in meningeal GAG levels accompanied by histologic improvement in lysosomal storage in all cell types. The dogs did develop a dose-dependent immune response against the recombinant human protein and a meningeal lymphocytic/plasmacytic infiltrate. The IT route of ERT administration may be an effective way to treat the CNS disease in MPS I and could be applicable to other lysosomal storage disorders.

  12. PSMA-Targeted Theranostic Nanoplex for Prostate Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Nimmagadda, Sridhar; Li, Cong; Banerjee, Sangeeta R.; Winnard, Paul T.; Artemov, Dmitri; Glunde, Kristine; Pomper, Martin G.; Bhujwalla, Zaver M.

    2014-01-01

    Theranostic imaging, where diagnosis is combined with therapy, is particularly suitable for a disease that is as complex as cancer, especially now that genomic and proteomic profiling can provide an extensive “fingerprint” of each tumor. With such information, theranostic agents can be designed to personalize treatment and minimize damage to normal tissue. Here we have developed a nanoplex platform for theranostic imaging of prostate cancer (PCa). In these proof-of-principle studies, a therapeutic nanoplex containing multimodal imaging reporters was targeted to prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA), which is expressed on the cell surface of castrate-resistant PCa. The nanoplex was designed to deliver small interfering RNA (siRNA) along with a prodrug enzyme to PSMA-expressing tumors. Each component of the nanoplex was carefully selected to evaluate its diagnostic aspect of PSMA imaging and its therapeutic aspects of siRNA-mediated down-regulation of a target gene and the conversion of a prodrug to cytotoxic drug, using noninvasive multimodality imaging. Studies performed using two variants of human PC3-PCa cells and tumors, one with high PSMA expression level and another with negligible expression levels, demonstrated PSMA-specific uptake. In addition, down-regulation of the selected siRNA target, choline kinase (Chk), and the conversion of the nontoxic prodrug 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC) to cytotoxic 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) were also demonstrated with noninvasive imaging. The nanoplex was well-tolerated and did not induce liver or kidney toxicity or a significant immune response. The nanoplex platform described can be easily modified and applied to different cancers, receptors, and pathways to achieve theranostic imaging, as a single agent or in combination with other treatment modalities. PMID:22866897

  13. Supramolecular Crafting of Self-Assembling Camptothecin Prodrugs with Enhanced Efficacy against Primary Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Su, Hao; Zhang, Pengcheng; Cheetham, Andrew G; Koo, Jin Mo; Lin, Ran; Masood, Asad; Schiapparelli, Paula; Quiñones-Hinojosa, Alfredo; Cui, Honggang

    2016-01-01

    Chemical modification of small molecule hydrophobic drugs is a clinically proven strategy to devise prodrugs with enhanced treatment efficacy. While this prodrug strategy improves the parent drug's water solubility and pharmacokinetic profile, it typically compromises the drug's potency against cancer cells due to the retarded drug release rate and reduced cellular uptake efficiency. Here we report on the supramolecular design of self-assembling prodrugs (SAPD) with much improved water solubility while maintaining high potency against cancer cells. We found that camptothecin (CPT) prodrugs created by conjugating two CPT molecules onto a hydrophilic segment can associate into filamentous nanostructures in water. Our results suggest that these SAPD exhibit much greater efficacy against primary brain cancer cells relative to that of irinotecan, a clinically used CPT prodrug. We believe these findings open a new avenue for rational design of supramolecular prodrugs for cancer treatment. PMID:27217839

  14. Supramolecular Crafting of Self-Assembling Camptothecin Prodrugs with Enhanced Efficacy against Primary Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Su, Hao; Zhang, Pengcheng; Cheetham, Andrew G; Koo, Jin Mo; Lin, Ran; Masood, Asad; Schiapparelli, Paula; Quiñones-Hinojosa, Alfredo; Cui, Honggang

    2016-01-01

    Chemical modification of small molecule hydrophobic drugs is a clinically proven strategy to devise prodrugs with enhanced treatment efficacy. While this prodrug strategy improves the parent drug's water solubility and pharmacokinetic profile, it typically compromises the drug's potency against cancer cells due to the retarded drug release rate and reduced cellular uptake efficiency. Here we report on the supramolecular design of self-assembling prodrugs (SAPD) with much improved water solubility while maintaining high potency against cancer cells. We found that camptothecin (CPT) prodrugs created by conjugating two CPT molecules onto a hydrophilic segment can associate into filamentous nanostructures in water. Our results suggest that these SAPD exhibit much greater efficacy against primary brain cancer cells relative to that of irinotecan, a clinically used CPT prodrug. We believe these findings open a new avenue for rational design of supramolecular prodrugs for cancer treatment. PMID:27217839

  15. Tunable self-assembly of Irinotecan-fatty acid prodrugs with increased cytotoxicity to cancer cells†

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Xiangdong; Zhang, Tingbin; Jiang, Yonggang

    2016-01-01

    The development of a clinical chemotherapeutic is not an easy task. One challenge is how to deliver the agent to cancer cells. Nano-formulation of prodrugs, which combines the strengths of nanotechnology and prodrugs, possesses many advantages for chemotherapeutic drug delivery, including high drug loading efficiency, improved drug availability and enhanced accumulation in cancer cells. Here, we have constructed a small library of Irinotecan-derived prodrugs, in which the 20-hydroxyl group was derived with fatty-acid moieties through esterification. This conjugation fine-tuned the polarity of the Irinotecan molecule, thus enhancing the lipophilicity of the prodrugs and inducing their self-assembly into nanoparticles with different morphologies. These nano-formulated prodrugs accumulated at higher levels in cancer cells and were much more cytotoxic than free drugs. The rational design of prodrug-based nano-formulations opens a new avenue for the engineering of more efficient drug-delivery systems. PMID:27239311

  16. Carbon-Carbon Bond Cleavage in Activation of the Prodrug Nabumetone

    PubMed Central

    Varfaj, Fatbardha; Zulkifli, Siti N. A.; Park, Hyoung-Goo; Challinor, Victoria L.; De Voss, James J.

    2014-01-01

    Carbon-carbon bond cleavage reactions are catalyzed by, among others, lanosterol 14-demethylase (CYP51), cholesterol side-chain cleavage enzyme (CYP11), sterol 17β-lyase (CYP17), and aromatase (CYP19). Because of the high substrate specificities of these enzymes and the complex nature of their substrates, these reactions have been difficult to characterize. A CYP1A2-catalyzed carbon-carbon bond cleavage reaction is required for conversion of the prodrug nabumetone to its active form, 6-methoxy-2-naphthylacetic acid (6-MNA). Despite worldwide use of nabumetone as an anti-inflammatory agent, the mechanism of its carbon-carbon bond cleavage reaction remains obscure. With the help of authentic synthetic standards, we report here that the reaction involves 3-hydroxylation, carbon-carbon cleavage to the aldehyde, and oxidation of the aldehyde to the acid, all catalyzed by CYP1A2 or, less effectively, by other P450 enzymes. The data indicate that the carbon-carbon bond cleavage is mediated by the ferric peroxo anion rather than the ferryl species in the P450 catalytic cycle. CYP1A2 also catalyzes O-demethylation and alcohol to ketone transformations of nabumetone and its analogs. PMID:24584631

  17. A human biotin acceptor domain allows site-specific conjugation of an enzyme to an antibody-avidin fusion protein for targeted drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Asai, Tsuneaki; Trinh, Ryan; Ng, Patrick P; Penichet, Manuel L; Wims, Letitia A; Morrison, Sherie L

    2005-02-01

    We have previously constructed an antibody-avidin (Av) fusion protein, anti-transferrin receptor (TfR) IgG3-Av, which can deliver biotinylated molecules to cells expressing the TfR. We now describe the use of the fusion protein for antibody-directed enzyme prodrug therapy (ADEPT). The 67 amino acid carboxyl-terminal domain (P67) of human propionyl-CoA carboxylase alpha subunit can be metabolically biotinylated at a fixed lysine residue. We genetically fused P67 to the carboxyl terminus of the yeast enzyme FCU1, a derivative of cytosine deaminase that can convert the non-toxic prodrug 5-fluorocytosine to the cytotoxic agent 5-fluorouracil. When produced in Escherichia coli cells overexpressing a biotin protein ligase, the FCU1-P67 fusion protein was efficiently mono-biotinylated. In the presence of 5-fluorocytosine, the biotinylated fusion protein conjugated to anti-rat TfR IgG3-Av efficiently killed rat Y3-Ag1.2.3 myeloma cells in vitro, while the same protein conjugated to an irrelevant (anti-dansyl) antibody fused to Av showed no cytotoxic effect. Efficient tumor cell killing was also observed when E. coli purine nucleoside phosphorylase was similarly targeted to the tumor cells in the presence of the prodrug 2-fluoro-2'-deoxyadenosine. These results suggest that when combined with P67-based biotinylation, anti-TfR IgG3-Av could serve as a universal delivery vector for targeted chemotherapy of cancer.

  18. Melanoma cell therapy: Endothelial progenitor cells as shuttle of the MMP12 uPAR-degrading enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Laurenzana, Anna; Biagioni, Alessio; D'Alessio, Silvia; Bianchini, Francesca; Chillà, Anastasia; Margheri, Francesca; Luciani, Cristina; Mazzanti, Benedetta; Pimpinelli, Nicola; Torre, Eugenio; Danese, Silvio; Calorini, Lido; Rosso, Mario Del; Fibbi, Gabriella

    2014-01-01

    The receptor for the urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPAR) accounts for many features of cancer progression, and is therefore considered a target for anti-tumoral therapy. Only full length uPAR mediates tumor progression. Matrix-metallo-proteinase-12 (MMP12)-dependent uPAR cleavage results into the loss of invasion properties and angiogenesis. MMP12 can be employed in the field of “targeted therapies” as a biological drug to be delivered directly in patient's tumor mass. Endothelial Progenitor Cells (EPCs) are selectively recruited within the tumor and could be used as cellular vehicles for delivering anti-cancer molecules. The aim of our study is to inhibit cancer progression by engeneering ECFCs, a subset of EPC, with a lentivirus encoding the anti-tumor uPAR-degrading enzyme MMP12. Ex vivo manipulated ECFCs lost the capacity to perform capillary morphogenesis and acquired the anti-tumor and anti-angiogenetic activity. In vivo MMP12-engineered ECFCs cleaved uPAR within the tumor mass and strongly inhibited tumor growth, tumor angiogenesis and development of lung metastasis. The possibility to exploit tumor homing and activity of autologous MMP12-engineered ECFCs represents a novel way to combat melanoma by a “personalized therapy”, without rejection risk. The i.v. injection of radiolabelled MMP12-ECFCs can thus provide a new theranostic approach to control melanoma progression and metastasis. PMID:25003596

  19. Oxidative stress and antioxidative enzyme activities in chronic kidney disease and different types of renal replacement therapy.

    PubMed

    Stępniewska, Joanna; Gołembiewska, Edyta; Dołęgowska, Barbara; Domański, Maciej; Ciechanowski, Kazimierz

    2015-01-01

    The incidence and diagnosis of chronic kidney disease (CKD) is on the rise all over the world. CKD is related to ageing of the society and high morbidity due to lifestyle diseases like diabetes, atherosclerosis, and hypertension. CKD is associated with increased oxidative stress generated by uremic toxicity, chronic inflammatory state, lack of vitamins and microelements, parenteral iron administration, and dialysis procedure itself. In terms of cellular physiology, erythrocytes and blood platelets in particular have effective enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidative system. The most efficient enzymatic antioxidants include superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase, glutathione reductase, and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase. Glutathione is the leading non-enzymatic free radical scavenger. In CKD, antioxidative defense is impaired and the abnormal activity of the enzymes and glutathione concentration is described in literature. The imbalance between the formation of reactive oxygen species and antioxidative system efficiency takes part in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular complications. It contributes to increased morbidity and mortality in patients with CKD. The severity of these processes depends on the type of renal replacement therapy; haemodialysis (HD) is more predisposing to such disorders than peritoneal dialysis (PD), or even conservative treatment. This can influence the outcome and the possibility of kidney transplantation. Moreover, the early function of kidney allograft seems to be dependent on perioperative antioxidative ability of platelets, which can play a potential protective role in kidney transplantation.

  20. One Year of Enzyme Replacement Therapy Reduces Globotriaosylceramide Inclusions in Podocytes in Male Adult Patients with Fabry Disease

    PubMed Central

    Najafian, Behzad; Tøndel, Camilla; Svarstad, Einar; Sokolovkiy, Alexey; Smith, Kelly; Mauer, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Fabry nephropathy is associated with progressive accumulation of globotriaosylceramide (GL3) in podocytes. Reducing this GL3 burden may reduce podocyte injury. Sensitive methods to quantify podocyte GL3 content may determine whether a given strategy can benefit podocytes in Fabry disease. We developed an unbiased electron microscopic stereological method to estimate the average volume of podocytes and their GL3 inclusions in 6 paired pre- and post-enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) biopsies from 5 men with Fabry disease. Podocyte GL3 content was regularly reduced (average 73%) after 11–12 months of ERT. This was not detectable using a semi-quantitative approach. Parallel to GL3 reduction, podocytes became remarkably smaller (average 63%). These reductions in podocyte GL3 content or size were not significantly correlated with changes in foot process width (FPW). However, FPW after ERT was significantly correlated with the magnitude of the decrease in podocyte GL3 content from baseline to 11–12 months of ERT. Also podocytes exocytosed GL3 inclusions, a phenomenon correlated with their reduction in their GL3 content. Demonstrable after11–12 months, reduction in podocyte GL3 content allows for early assessment of treatment efficacy and shorter clinical trials in Fabry disease. PMID:27081853

  1. Effective intravenous therapy for neurodegenerative disease with a therapeutic enzyme and a peptide that mediates delivery to the brain.

    PubMed

    Meng, Yu; Sohar, Istvan; Sleat, David E; Richardson, Jason R; Reuhl, Kenneth R; Jenkins, Robert B; Sarkar, Gobinda; Lobel, Peter

    2014-03-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) presents a major challenge to effective treatment of neurological disorders, including lysosomal storage diseases (LSDs), which frequently present with life-shortening and untreatable neurodegeneration. There is considerable interest in methods for intravenous delivery of lysosomal proteins across the BBB but for the most part, levels achievable in the brain of mouse models are modest and increased lifespan remains to be demonstrated. In this study, we have investigated delivery across the BBB using a mouse model of late-infantile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (LINCL), a neurodegenerative LSD caused by loss of tripeptidyl peptidase I (TPP1). We have achieved supraphysiological levels of TPP1 throughout the brain of LINCL mice by intravenous (IV) coadministration of recombinant TPP1 with a 36-residue peptide that contains polylysine and a low-density lipoprotein receptor binding sequence from apolipoprotein E. Importantly, IV administration of TPP1 with the peptide significantly reduces brain lysosomal storage, increases lifespan and improves neurological function. This simple "mix and inject" method is immediately applicable towards evaluation of enzyme replacement therapy to the brain in preclinical models and further exploration of its clinical potential is warranted.

  2. Expression of Eukaryotic Initiation Factor 5A and Hypusine Forming Enzymes in Glioblastoma Patient Samples: Implications for New Targeted Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Preukschas, Michael; Hagel, Christian; Schulte, Alexander; Weber, Kristoffer; Lamszus, Katrin; Sievert, Henning; Pällmann, Nora; Bokemeyer, Carsten; Hauber, Joachim; Braig, Melanie; Balabanov, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    Glioblastomas are highly aggressive brain tumors of adults with poor clinical outcome. Despite a broad range of new and more specific treatment strategies, therapy of glioblastomas remains challenging and tumors relapse in all cases. Recent work demonstrated that the posttranslational hypusine modification of the eukaryotic initiation factor 5A (eIF-5A) is a crucial regulator of cell proliferation, differentiation and an important factor in tumor formation, progression and maintenance. Here we report that eIF-5A as well as the hypusine-forming enzymes deoxyhypusine synthase (DHS) and deoxyhypusine hydroxylase (DOHH) are highly overexpressed in glioblastoma patient samples. Importantly, targeting eIF-5A and its hypusine modification with GC7, a specific DHS-inhibitor, showed a strong antiproliferative effect in glioblastoma cell lines in vitro, while normal human astrocytes were not affected. Furthermore, we identified p53 dependent premature senescence, a permanent cell cycle arrest, as the primary outcome in U87-MG cells after treatment with GC7. Strikingly, combined treatment with clinically relevant alkylating agents and GC7 had an additive antiproliferative effect in glioblastoma cell lines. In addition, stable knockdown of eIF-5A and DHS by short hairpin RNA (shRNA) could mimic the antiproliferative effects of GC7. These findings suggest that pharmacological inhibition of eIF-5A may represent a novel concept to treat glioblastomas and may help to substantially improve the clinical course of this tumor entity. PMID:22927971

  3. Efficacy of Enzyme and Substrate Reduction Therapy with a Novel Antagonist of Glucosylceramide Synthase for Fabry Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ashe, Karen M; Budman, Eva; Bangari, Dinesh S; Siegel, Craig S; Nietupski, Jennifer B; Wang, Bing; Desnick, Robert J; Scheule, Ronald K; Leonard, John P; Cheng, Seng H; Marshall, John

    2015-01-01

    Fabry disease, an X-linked glycosphingolipid storage disorder, is caused by the deficient activity of α-galactosidase A (α-Gal A). This results in the lysosomal accumulation in various cell types of its glycolipid substrates, including globotriaosylceramide (GL-3) and lysoglobotriaosylceramide (globotriaosyl lysosphingolipid, lyso-GL-3), leading to kidney, heart, and cerebrovascular disease. To complement and potentially augment the current standard of care, biweekly infusions of recombinant α-Gal A, the merits of substrate reduction therapy (SRT) by selectively inhibiting glucosylceramide synthase (GCS) were examined. Here, we report the development of a novel, orally available GCS inhibitor (Genz-682452) with pharmacological and safety profiles that have potential for treating Fabry disease. Treating Fabry mice with Genz-682452 resulted in reduced tissue levels of GL-3 and lyso-GL-3 and a delayed loss of the thermal nociceptive response. Greatest improvements were realized when the therapeutic intervention was administered to younger mice before they developed overt pathology. Importantly, as the pharmacologic profiles of α-Gal A and Genz-682452 are different, treating animals with both drugs conferred the greatest efficacy. For example, because Genz-682452, but not α-Gal A, can traverse the blood–brain barrier, levels of accumulated glycosphingolipids were reduced in the brain of Genz-682452–treated but not α-Gal A–treated mice. These results suggest that combining substrate reduction and enzyme replacement may confer both complementary and additive therapeutic benefits in Fabry disease. PMID:25938659

  4. One Year of Enzyme Replacement Therapy Reduces Globotriaosylceramide Inclusions in Podocytes in Male Adult Patients with Fabry Disease.

    PubMed

    Najafian, Behzad; Tøndel, Camilla; Svarstad, Einar; Sokolovkiy, Alexey; Smith, Kelly; Mauer, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Fabry nephropathy is associated with progressive accumulation of globotriaosylceramide (GL3) in podocytes. Reducing this GL3 burden may reduce podocyte injury. Sensitive methods to quantify podocyte GL3 content may determine whether a given strategy can benefit podocytes in Fabry disease. We developed an unbiased electron microscopic stereological method to estimate the average volume of podocytes and their GL3 inclusions in 6 paired pre- and post-enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) biopsies from 5 men with Fabry disease. Podocyte GL3 content was regularly reduced (average 73%) after 11-12 months of ERT. This was not detectable using a semi-quantitative approach. Parallel to GL3 reduction, podocytes became remarkably smaller (average 63%). These reductions in podocyte GL3 content or size were not significantly correlated with changes in foot process width (FPW). However, FPW after ERT was significantly correlated with the magnitude of the decrease in podocyte GL3 content from baseline to 11-12 months of ERT. Also podocytes exocytosed GL3 inclusions, a phenomenon correlated with their reduction in their GL3 content. Demonstrable after11-12 months, reduction in podocyte GL3 content allows for early assessment of treatment efficacy and shorter clinical trials in Fabry disease. PMID:27081853

  5. Plant-based oral delivery of β-glucocerebrosidase as an enzyme replacement therapy for Gaucher's disease.

    PubMed

    Shaaltiel, Yoseph; Gingis-Velitski, Svetlana; Tzaban, Salit; Fiks, Nadia; Tekoah, Yoram; Aviezer, David

    2015-10-01

    Gaucher's disease (GD), a lysosomal storage disorder caused by mutations in the gene encoding glucocerebrosidase (GCD), is currently treated by enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) using recombinant GCD that is administered intravenously every 2 weeks. However, intravenous administration includes discomfort or pain and might cause local and systemic infections that may lead to low patient compliance. An orally administered drug has the potential to alleviate these problems. In this study, we describe the potential use of plant cells as a vehicle for the oral delivery of recombinant human GCD (prGCD) expressed in carrot cells. The in vitro results demonstrate that the plant cells protect the recombinant protein in the gastric fluids and may enable absorption into the blood. Feeding experiments, with rat and pig as model animals, using carrot cells containing prGCD, show that active recombinant prGCD was found in the digestive tract and blood system and reached both, liver and spleen, the target organs in GD. These results demonstrate that the oral administration of proteins encapsulated in plant cells is feasible. Specifically, carrot cells containing recombinant human prGCD can be used as an oral delivery system and are a feasible alternative to intravenous administration of ERT for GD.

  6. Identification of a novel Baeyer‐Villiger monooxygenase from Acinetobacter radioresistens: close relationship to the Mycobacterium tuberculosis prodrug activator EtaA

    PubMed Central

    Minerdi, Daniela; Zgrablic, Ivan; Sadeghi, Sheila J.; Gilardi, Gianfranco

    2012-01-01

    Summary This work demonstrates that Acinetobacter radioresistens strain S13 during the growth on medium supplemented with long‐chain alkanes as the sole energy source expresses almA gene coding for a Baeyer‐Villiger monooxygenase (BVMO) involved in alkanes subterminal oxidation. Phylogenetic analysis placed the sequence of this novel BVMO in the same clade of the prodrug activator ethionamide monooxygenase (EtaA) and it bears only a distant relation to the other known class I BVMO proteins. In silico analysis of the 3D model of the S13 BVMO generated by homology modelling also supports the similarities with EtaA by binding ethionamide to the active site. In vitro experiments carried out with the purified enzyme confirm that this novel BVMO is indeed capable of typical Baeyer‐Villiger reactions as well as oxidation of the prodrug ethionamide. PMID:22862894

  7. Brain uptake of a Zidovudine prodrug after nasal administration of solid lipid microparticles.

    PubMed

    Dalpiaz, Alessandro; Ferraro, Luca; Perrone, Daniela; Leo, Eliana; Iannuccelli, Valentina; Pavan, Barbara; Paganetto, Guglielmo; Beggiato, Sarah; Scalia, Santo

    2014-05-01

    Our previous results demonstrated that a prodrug obtained by the conjugation of the antiretroviral drug zidovudine (AZT) with ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) represents a potential carrier for AZT in the central nervous system, thus possibly increasing AZT efficiency as an anti-HIV drug. Based on these results and in order to enhance AZT brain targeting, the present study focuses on solid lipid microparticles (SLMs) as a carrier system for the nasal administration of UDCA-AZT prodrug. SLMs were produced by the hot emulsion technique, using tristearin and stearic acid as lipidic carriers, whose mean diameters were 16 and 7 μm, respectively. SLMs were of spherical shape, and their prodrug loading was 0.57 ± 0.03% (w/w, tristearin based) and 1.84 ± 0.02% (w/w, stearic acid based). The tristearin SLMs were able to control the prodrug release, whereas the stearic acid SLMs induced a significant increase of the dissolution rate of the free prodrug. The free prodrug was rapidly hydrolyzed in rat liver homogenates with a half-life of 2.7 ± 0.14 min (process completed within 30 min). The tristearin SLMs markedly enhanced the stability of the prodrug (75% of the prodrug still present after 30 min), whereas the stabilization effect of the stearic acid SLMs was lower (14% of the prodrug still present after 30 min). No AZT and UDCA-AZT were detected in the rat cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) after an intravenous prodrug administration (200 μg). Conversely, the nasal administration of stearic acid based SLMs induced the uptake of the prodrug in the CSF, demonstrating the existence of a direct nose-CNS pathway. In the presence of chitosan, the CSF prodrug uptake increased six times, up to 1.5 μg/mL within 150 min after nasal administration. The loaded SLMs appear therefore as a promising nasal formulation for selective zidovudine brain uptake. PMID:24717116

  8. Thapsigargin, Origin, Chemistry, Structure-Activity Relationships and Prodrug Development.

    PubMed

    Quynh Doan, Nhu Thi; Christensen, Soren Brogger

    2015-01-01

    Thapsigargin was originally isolated from the roots of the Mediterranean umbelliferous plant Thapsia garganica in order to characterize the skin irritant principle. Characteristic chemical properties and semi-syntheses are reviewed. The biological activity was related to the subnanomolar affinity for the sarco/endoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase. Prolonged inhibition of the pump afforded collapse of the calcium homeostasis and eventually apoptosis. Structure-activity relationships enabled design of an equipotent analogue containing a linker. Conjugation of the analogue containing the linker with peptides, which only are substrates for either prostate specific antigen (PSA) or prostate specific membrane antigen (PSMA) enabled design of prodrugs targeting a number of cancer diseases including prostate cancer (G115) and hepatocellular carcinoma (G202). Prodrug G202 has under the name of mipsagargin in phase II clinical trials shown promising properties against hepatocellular carcinoma.

  9. Thapsigargin, Origin, Chemistry, Structure-Activity Relationships and Prodrug Development.

    PubMed

    Quynh Doan, Nhu Thi; Christensen, Soren Brogger

    2015-01-01

    Thapsigargin was originally isolated from the roots of the Mediterranean umbelliferous plant Thapsia garganica in order to characterize the skin irritant principle. Characteristic chemical properties and semi-syntheses are reviewed. The biological activity was related to the subnanomolar affinity for the sarco/endoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase. Prolonged inhibition of the pump afforded collapse of the calcium homeostasis and eventually apoptosis. Structure-activity relationships enabled design of an equipotent analogue containing a linker. Conjugation of the analogue containing the linker with peptides, which only are substrates for either prostate specific antigen (PSA) or prostate specific membrane antigen (PSMA) enabled design of prodrugs targeting a number of cancer diseases including prostate cancer (G115) and hepatocellular carcinoma (G202). Prodrug G202 has under the name of mipsagargin in phase II clinical trials shown promising properties against hepatocellular carcinoma. PMID:26429715

  10. Oncolytic Herpes simplex virus expressing yeast cytosine deaminase: relationship between viral replication, transgene expression, prodrug bioactivation

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Suguru; Kuroda, Toshihiko; Fuchs, Bryan C.; He, Xiaoying; Supko, Jeffrey G.; Schmitt, Anthony; McGinn, Christopher M.; Lanuti, Michael; Tanabe, Kenneth K.

    2011-01-01

    Yeast cytosine deaminase (yCD) is a well-characterized prodrug/enzyme system that converts 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC) to 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), and has been combined with oncolytic viruses. However, in vivo studies of the interactions between 5-FC bioactivation and viral replication have not been previously reported, nor have the kinetics of transgene expression and the pharmacokinetics of 5-FC and 5-FU. We constructed a replication-conditional HSV-1 expressing yCD and examined cytotoxicity when 5-FC was initiated at different times after viral infection, and observed that earlier 5-FC administration led to greater cytotoxicity than later 5-FC administration in vitro and in vivo. Twelve days of 5-FC administration was superior to 6 days in animal models, but dosing beyond 12 days did not further enhance efficacy. Consistent with the dosing schedule results, both viral genomic DNA copy number and viral titers were observed to peak on Day 3 after viral injection and gradually decrease thereafter. The virus is replication-conditional and was detected in tumors for as long as 2 weeks after viral injection. The maximum relative extent of yCD conversion of 5-FC to 5-FU in tumors was observed on Day 6 after viral injection and it decreased progressively thereafter. The observation that 5-FU generation within tumors did not lead to appreciable levels of systemic 5-FU (<10 ng/ml) is important and has not been previously reported. The approaches used in these studies of the relationship between the viral replication kinetics, transgene expression, prodrug administration and anti-tumor efficacy are useful in the design of clinical trials of armed, oncolytic viruses. PMID:22076044

  11. A Minireview: Usefulness of Transporter-Targeted Prodrugs in Enhancing Membrane Permeability.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Teruo

    2016-09-01

    Orally administered drugs are categorized into 4 classes depending on the solubility and permeability in a Biopharmaceutics Classification System. Prodrug derivatization is one of feasible approaches in modifying the physicochemical properties such as low solubility and low permeability without changing the in vivo pharmacological action of the parent drug. In this article, prodrug-targeted solute carrier (SLC) transporters were searched randomly by PubMed. Collected SLC transporters are amino acid transporter 1, bile acid transporter, carnitine transporter 2, glucose transporter 1, peptide transporter 1, vitamin C transporter 1, and multivitamin transporter. The usefulness of transporter-targeted prodrugs was evaluated in terms of membrane permeability, stability under acidic condition, and conversion to the parent drug. Among prodrugs collected, peptide transporter-targeted prodrugs exhibited the highest number, and some prodrugs such as valaciclovir and valganciclovir are clinically available. ATP-binding cassette efflux transporter, P-glycoprotein (P-gp), reduces the intestinal absorption of lipophilic P-gp substrate drugs, and SLC transporter-targeted prodrugs of P-gp substrate drugs circumvented the P-gp-mediated efflux transport. Thus, SLC transporter-targeted prodrug derivatization seems to be feasible approach to increase the oral bioavailability by overcoming various unwanted physicochemical properties of orally administered drugs, although the effect of food on prodrug absorption should be taken into consideration.

  12. Nanoparticles Containing High Loads of Paclitaxel-Silicate Prodrugs: Formulation, Drug Release, and Anticancer Efficacy.

    PubMed

    Han, Jing; Michel, Andrew R; Lee, Han Seung; Kalscheuer, Stephen; Wohl, Adam; Hoye, Thomas R; McCormick, Alon V; Panyam, Jayanth; Macosko, Christopher W

    2015-12-01

    We have investigated particle size, interior structure, drug release kinetics, and anticancer efficacy of PEG-b-PLGA-based nanoparticles loaded with a series of paclitaxel (PTX)-silicate prodrugs [PTX-Si(OR)3]. Silicate derivatization enabled us to adjust the hydrophobicity and hydrolytic lability of the prodrugs by the choice of the alkyl group (R) in the silicate derivatives. The greater hydrophobicity of these prodrugs allows for the preparation of nanoparticles that are stable in aqueous dispersion even when loaded with up to ca. 75 wt % of the prodrug. The hydrolytic lability of silicates allows for facile conversion of prodrugs back to the parent drug, PTX. A suite of eight PTX-silicate prodrugs was investigated; nanoparticles were made by flash nanoprecipitation (FNP) using a confined impingement jet mixer with a dilution step (CIJ-D). The resulting nanoparticles were 80-150 nm in size with a loading level of 47-74 wt % (wt %) of a PTX-silicate, which corresponds to 36-59 effective wt % of free PTX. Cryogenic transmission electron microscopy images show that particles are typically spherical with a core-shell structure. Prodrug/drug release profiles were measured. Release tended to be slower for prodrugs having greater hydrophobicity and slower hydrolysis rate. Nanoparticles loaded with PTX-silicate prodrugs that hydrolyze most rapidly showed in vitro cytotoxicity similar to that of the parent PTX. Nanoparticles loaded with more labile silicates also tended to show greater in vivo efficacy. PMID:26505116

  13. Nanoparticles Containing High Loads of Paclitaxel-Silicate Prodrugs: Formulation, Drug Release, and Anticancer Efficacy.

    PubMed

    Han, Jing; Michel, Andrew R; Lee, Han Seung; Kalscheuer, Stephen; Wohl, Adam; Hoye, Thomas R; McCormick, Alon V; Panyam, Jayanth; Macosko, Christopher W

    2015-12-01

    We have investigated particle size, interior structure, drug release kinetics, and anticancer efficacy of PEG-b-PLGA-based nanoparticles loaded with a series of paclitaxel (PTX)-silicate prodrugs [PTX-Si(OR)3]. Silicate derivatization enabled us to adjust the hydrophobicity and hydrolytic lability of the prodrugs by the choice of the alkyl group (R) in the silicate derivatives. The greater hydrophobicity of these prodrugs allows for the preparation of nanoparticles that are stable in aqueous dispersion even when loaded with up to ca. 75 wt % of the prodrug. The hydrolytic lability of silicates allows for facile conversion of prodrugs back to the parent drug, PTX. A suite of eight PTX-silicate prodrugs was investigated; nanoparticles were made by flash nanoprecipitation (FNP) using a confined impingement jet mixer with a dilution step (CIJ-D). The resulting nanoparticles were 80-150 nm in size with a loading level of 47-74 wt % (wt %) of a PTX-silicate, which corresponds to 36-59 effective wt % of free PTX. Cryogenic transmission electron microscopy images show that particles are typically spherical with a core-shell structure. Prodrug/drug release profiles were measured. Release tended to be slower for prodrugs having greater hydrophobicity and slower hydrolysis rate. Nanoparticles loaded with PTX-silicate prodrugs that hydrolyze most rapidly showed in vitro cytotoxicity similar to that of the parent PTX. Nanoparticles loaded with more labile silicates also tended to show greater in vivo efficacy.

  14. An interaction between S*tag and S*protein derived from human ribonuclease 1 allows site-specific conjugation of an enzyme to an antibody for targeted drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Asai, Tsuneaki; Wims, Letitia A; Morrison, Sherie L

    2005-04-01

    We have previously demonstrated that an antibody-avidin fusion protein could be used to deliver biotinylated enzymes to tumor cells for antibody-directed enzyme prodrug therapy. However, the presence of the chicken protein avidin suggests that immunogenicity may be a problem. To address this concern, we developed a new delivery system consisting of human proteins. The amino-terminal 15-amino-acid peptide derived from human ribonuclease 1 (human S*tag) can bind with high affinity to human S*protein (residues 21-124 of the same ribonuclease). We constructed an antibody-S*protein fusion protein in which S*protein was genetically linked to an anti-rat transferrin receptor IgG3 at the carboxyl terminus of the heavy chain. We also constructed an enzyme-S*tag fusion protein in which S*tag was genetically linked to the carboxyl terminus of Escherichia coli purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP). When these two fusion proteins were mixed, S*tag and S*protein interacted specifically and produced homogeneous antibody/PNP complexes that retained the ability to bind antigen. Furthermore, in the presence of the prodrug 2-fluoro-2'-deoxyadenosine in vitro, the complex efficiently killed rat myeloma cells overexpressing the transferrin receptor. These results suggest that human ribonuclease-based site-specific conjugation can be used in vivo for targeted chemotherapy of cancer.

  15. Macromolecular Pt(IV) Prodrugs from Poly(organo)phosphazenes.

    PubMed

    Henke, Helena; Kryeziu, Kushtrim; Banfić, Jelena; Theiner, Sarah; Körner, Wilfried; Brüggemann, Oliver; Berger, Walter; Keppler, Bernhard K; Heffeter, Petra; Teasdale, Ian

    2016-08-01

    The preparation of novel macromolecular prodrugs via the conjugation of two platinum(IV) complexes to suitably functionalized poly(organo)phosphazenes is presented. The inorganic/organic polymers provide carriers with controlled dimensions due to the use of living cationic polymerization and allow the preparation of conjugates with excellent aqueous solubility but long-term hydrolytic degradability. The macromolecular Pt(IV) prodrugs are designed to undergo intracellular reduction and simultaneous release from the macromolecular carrier to present the active Pt(II) drug derivatives. In vitro investigations show a significantly enhanced intracellular uptake of Pt for the macromolecular prodrugs when compared to small molecule Pt complexes, which is also reflected in an increase in cytotoxicity. Interestingly, drug-resistant sublines also show a significantly smaller resistance against the conjugates compared to clinically established platinum drugs, indicating that an alternative uptake route of the Pt(IV) conjugates might also be able to overcome acquired resistance against Pt(II) drugs. In vivo studies of a selected conjugate show improved tumor shrinkage compared to the respective Pt(IV) complex. PMID:27169668

  16. Macromolecular Pt(IV) Prodrugs from Poly(organo)phosphazenes.

    PubMed

    Henke, Helena; Kryeziu, Kushtrim; Banfić, Jelena; Theiner, Sarah; Körner, Wilfried; Brüggemann, Oliver; Berger, Walter; Keppler, Bernhard K; Heffeter, Petra; Teasdale, Ian

    2016-08-01

    The preparation of novel macromolecular prodrugs via the conjugation of two platinum(IV) complexes to suitably functionalized poly(organo)phosphazenes is presented. The inorganic/organic polymers provide carriers with controlled dimensions due to the use of living cationic polymerization and allow the preparation of conjugates with excellent aqueous solubility but long-term hydrolytic degradability. The macromolecular Pt(IV) prodrugs are designed to undergo intracellular reduction and simultaneous release from the macromolecular carrier to present the active Pt(II) drug derivatives. In vitro investigations show a significantly enhanced intracellular uptake of Pt for the macromolecular prodrugs when compared to small molecule Pt complexes, which is also reflected in an increase in cytotoxicity. Interestingly, drug-resistant sublines also show a significantly smaller resistance against the conjugates compared to clinically established platinum drugs, indicating that an alternative uptake route of the Pt(IV) conjugates might also be able to overcome acquired resistance against Pt(II) drugs. In vivo studies of a selected conjugate show improved tumor shrinkage compared to the respective Pt(IV) complex.

  17. Macromolecular Pt(IV) Prodrugs from Poly(organo)phosphazenes

    PubMed Central

    Banfić, Jelena; Theiner, Sarah; Körner, Wilfried; Brüggemann, Oliver; Berger, Walter; Keppler, Bernhard K.; Heffeter, Petra; Teasdale, Ian

    2016-01-01

    The preparation of novel macromolecular prodrugs via the conjugation of two platinum(IV) complexes to suitably functionalized poly(organo)phosphazenes is presented. The inorganic/organic polymers provide carriers with controlled dimensions due to the use of living cationic polymerization and allow the preparation of conjugates with excellent aqueous solubility but long-term hydrolytic degradability. The macromolecular Pt(IV) prodrugs are designed to undergo intracellular reduction and simultaneous release from the macromolecular carrier to present the active Pt(II) drug derivatives. In vitro investigations show a significantly enhanced intracellular uptake of Pt for the macromolecular prodrugs when compared to small molecule Pt complexes, which is also reflected in an increase in cytotoxicity. Interestingly, drug-resistant sublines also show a significantly smaller resistance against the conjugates compared to clinically established platinum drugs, indicating that an alternative uptake route of the Pt(IV) conjugates might also be able to overcome acquired resistance against Pt(II) drugs. In vivo studies of a selected conjugate show improved tumor shrinkage compared to the respective Pt(IV) complex. PMID:27169668

  18. Toxicology and Biodistribution Studies for MGH2.1, an Oncolytic Virus that Expresses Two Prodrug-activating Genes, in Combination with Prodrugs

    PubMed Central

    Kasai, Kazue; Nakashima, Hiroshi; Liu, Fang; Kerr, Samantha; Wang, Jiang; Phelps, Mitch; Potter, Philip M; Goins, William B; Fernandez, Soledad A; Chiocca, E Antonio

    2013-01-01

    MGH2.1 is a herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV1) oncolytic virus that expresses two prodrug-activating transgenes: the cyclophosphamide (CPA)-activating cytochrome P4502B1 (CYP2B1) and the CPT11-activating secreted human intestinal carboxylesterase (shiCE). Toxicology and biodistribution of MGH2.1 in the presence/absence of prodrugs was evaluated in mice. MGH2.1 ± prodrugs was cytotoxic to human glioma cells, but not to normal cells. Pharmacokinetically, intracranial MGH2.1 did not significantly alter the metabolism of intraperitoneally (i.p.) administered prodrugs in mouse plasma, brain, or liver. MGH2.1 did not induce an acute inflammatory reaction. MGH2.1 DNA was detected in brains of mice inoculated with 108 pfus for up to 60 days. However, only one animal showed evidence of viral gene expression at this time. Expression of virally encoded genes was restricted to brain. Intracranial inoculation of MGH2.1 did not induce lethality at 108 pfus in the absence of prodrugs and at 106 pfus in the presence of prodrugs. This study provides safety and toxicology data justifying a possible clinical trial of intratumoral injection of MGH2.1 with peripheral administration of CPA and/or CPT11 prodrugs in humans with malignant gliomas. PMID:23922029

  19. Plant thymidine kinase 1: a novel efficient suicide gene for malignant glioma therapy.

    PubMed

    Khan, Zahidul; Knecht, Wolfgang; Willer, Mette; Rozpedowska, Elzbieta; Kristoffersen, Peter; Clausen, Anders Ranegaard; Munch-Petersen, Birgitte; Almqvist, Per M; Gojkovic, Zoran; Piskur, Jure; Ekström, Tomas J

    2010-06-01

    The prognosis for malignant gliomas remains poor, and new treatments are urgently needed. Targeted suicide gene therapy exploits the enzymatic conversion of a prodrug, such as a nucleoside analog, into a cytotoxic compound. Although this therapeutic strategy has been considered a promising regimen for central nervous system (CNS) tumors, several obstacles have been encountered such as inefficient gene transfer to the tumor cells, limited prodrug penetration into the CNS, and inefficient enzymatic activity of the suicide gene. We report here the cloning and successful application of a novel thymidine kinase 1 (TK1) from the tomato plant, with favorable characteristics in vitro and in vivo. This enzyme (toTK1) is highly specific for the nucleoside analog prodrug zidovudine (azidothymidine, AZT), which is known to penetrate the blood-brain barrier. An important feature of toTK1 is that it efficiently phosphorylates its substrate AZT not only to AZT monophosphate, but also to AZT diphosphate, with excellent kinetics. The efficiency of the toTK1/AZT system was confirmed when toTK1-transduced human glioblastoma (GBM) cells displayed a 500-fold increased sensitivity to AZT compared with wild-type cells. In addition, when neural progenitor cells were used as delivery vectors for toTK1 in intracranial GBM xenografts in nude rats, substantial attenuation of tumor growth was achieved in animals exposed to AZT, and survival of the animals was significantly improved compared with controls. The novel toTK1/AZT suicide gene therapy system in combination with stem cell-mediated gene delivery promises new treatment of malignant gliomas. PMID:20154339

  20. Biotransformation Capacity of Carboxylesterase in Skin and Keratinocytes for the Penta-Ethyl Ester Prodrug of DTPA.

    PubMed

    Fu, Jing; Sadgrove, Matthew; Marson, Lesley; Jay, Michael

    2016-08-01

    The penta-ethyl ester prodrug of the chelating agent diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid (DTPA), referred to as C2E5, effectively accelerated clearance of americium after transdermal delivery. Carboxylesterases (CESs) play important roles in facilitating C2E5 hydrolysis. However, whether CESs in human skin hydrolyze C2E5 remains unknown. We evaluated the gene and protein expression of CESs in distinctive human epidermal cell lines: HEKa, HEKn, HaCaT, and A431. The substrates p-nitrophenyl acetate (pNPA) and 4-nitrophenyl valerate (4-NPV) were used to access esterase and CES activity. C2E5 hydrolysis was measured by radiometric high-performance liquid chromatography after incubation of [(14)C]C2E5 with supernatant fractions after centrifugation at 9000g (S9) prepared from skin cell lines. CES-specific inhibitors were used to access metabolism in human skin S9 fractions with analysis by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. We identified the human carboxylesterase 1 and 2 (CES1 and CES2) bands in a Western blot. The gene expression of these enzymes was supported by a real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). pNPA and 4-NPV assays demonstrated esterase and CES activity in all the cell lines that were comparable to human skin S9 fractions. The prodrug C2E5 was hydrolyzed by skin S9 fractions, resulting in a primary metabolite, C2E4. In human skin S9 fractions, inhibition of C2E5 hydrolysis was greatest with a pan-CES inhibitor (benzil). CES1 inhibition (troglitazone) was greater than CES2 (loperamide), suggesting a primary metabolic role for CES1. These results indicate that human keratinocyte cell lines are useful for the evaluation of human cutaneous metabolism and absorption of ester-based prodrugs. However, keratinocytes from skin provide a small contribution to the overall metabolism of C2E5. PMID:27130352

  1. Weight loss for reduction of proteinuria in diabetic nephropathy: Comparison with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor therapy

    PubMed Central

    Patil, M. R.; Mishra, A.; Jain, N.; Gutch, M.; Tewari, R.

    2013-01-01

    Reduction of weight in obese type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) individuals is emerging as a significant strategy in the reduction of proteinuria in diabetic nephropathy along with control of hyperglycemia, hypertension, and dyslipidemia. The objective was to evaluate the reduction in 24-h proteinuria in T2DM patients with nephropathy by weight loss, with conventional therapy (angiotensin-converting enzyme [ACE] inhibitors) as the control arm. A prospective, randomized controlled trial was conducted between June 2010 and May 2011. T2DM patients with confirmed nephropathy by 24-h urinary protein estimation with a body mass index (BMI) of >25 kg/m2 were studied. Patients who had nondiabetic nephropathy, uncontrolled hypertension (>125/75 mmHg) irrespective of antihypertensive drugs, excess weight due to edema or obesity due to other specific diseases, alcoholics, smokers, and patients who were on hemodialysis were excluded from the study. The patients were divided into three groups, namely, group A, patients on ACE inhibitor therapy; group B, patients on lifestyle modifications for weight loss; and group C, patients on an antiobesity drug (orlistat) and lifestyle modifications. At the end of 6 months, all the three groups were compared. Data were analyzed using software SPSS version 15.0. This study encompassed a total of 88 patients; 12 patients were dropped during the study period and 76 (group A: 22, group B: 23, and group C: 31) patients remained. The mean age of the patients was 58.36 ± 10.87 years (range: 30-70 years). At baseline, age, gender, mean BMI, waist-to-hip ratio (WHR), and 24-h proteinuria did not vary significantly among the three groups. At 6 months, the mean BMI significantly decreased in group C (P < 0.001) compared to that in the other two groups. Among the parameters BMI and WHR, the proportional form of BMI correlated well with the degree of reduction in proteinuria (r = 0.397, P = 0.01). Reduction in weight using lifestyle modifications and

  2. Corticosteroid Therapy for Management of Hemolysis, Elevated Liver Enzymes, and Low Platelet Count (HELLP) Syndrome: A Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Mao, Minhong; Chen, Chen

    2015-12-03

    BACKGROUND Hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes, and low platelet count (HELLP) syndrome is a severe condition of pregnancy that is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Corticoteroid (CORT) therapy is common in the management of HELLP syndrome. This study evaluates the efficacy of CORT therapy to patients with HELLP Syndrome. MATERIAL AND METHODS A literature search was carried out in multiple electronic databases. Meta-analyses of means difference and odds ratio were carried under the random-effects model. RESULTS Fifteen studies (675 CORT treated and 787 control HELLP patients) were included. CORT treatment significantly improved platelet count (mean difference between CORT treated and controls in changes from baseline, MD: 38.08 [15.71, 60.45]×109; p=0.0009), lactic dehydrogenase (LDH) levels (MD: -440 [-760, -120] IU/L; p=0.007), and alanine aminotransferase (ALT) levels (MD: -143.34 [-278.69, -7.99] IU/L; p=0.04) but the decrease in aspartate aminotransferase (AST) levels was not statistically significant (MD: -48.50 [-114.32, 17.32] IU/L; p=0.15). Corticosteroid treatment was also associated with significantly less blood transfusion rate (odds ratio, OR: 0.42 [0.24, 0.76]; p=0.004) and hospital/ICU stay (MD: -1.79 [-3.54, -0.05] days; p=0.04). Maternal mortality (OR: 1.27 [0.45, 3.60]; p=0.65), birth weight (MD: 0.09 [-0.11, 0.28]; p=0.38) and the prevalence of morbid conditions (OR: 0.79 [0.58, 1.08]; p=0.14) did not differ significantly between both groups. CONCLUSIONS Corticosteroid administration to HELLP patients improves platelet count, and the serum levels of LDH and ALT, and reduces hospital/ICU stay and blood transfusion rate, but is not significantly associated with better maternal mortality and overall morbidity.

  3. Long-term bone mineral density response to enzyme replacement therapy in a retrospective pediatric cohort of Gaucher patients.

    PubMed

    Ciana, Giovanni; Deroma, Laura; Franzil, Anna Martina; Dardis, Andrea; Bembi, Bruno

    2012-11-01

    Osteopenia is described as a relevant sign of bone involvement in Gaucher disease (GD) both in pediatric and adult patients. Furthermore, abnormal bone metabolism is considered to play a role in growth and pubertal delay. To analyze the long-term effect of enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) on bone mineral density (BMD), a retrospective observational study was conducted in a cohort of 18 GD pediatric patients (13 males, 5 females; median age 9.2 years). They received biweekly infusions of 20-60 IU/kg of alglucerase/imiglucerase. Clinical, laboratory and imaging parameters were evaluated every 2 years. According to the International Society of Clinical Densitometry guidelines, a Z-score ≤ -2.0 was considered pathological. Nine patients (group P0) began ERT during infancy and nine (group P1) during puberty. At baseline, in three patients (16.6 %; 1P0, 2P1) Z-score was ≤ -2.0 (range -2.47 to -2.25). In patient P0 it normalized after 2 years, while in the 2P1 patients (splenectomized siblings) it persisted abnormal. The remaining 15 patients (83.4 %) always presented a normal value. In group P0, Z-score improved in infancy but showed a significant decrease during puberty, on the contrary it constantly improved in group P1. Furthermore, at baseline group P0 showed a higher median Z-score than group P1: 0.79 (0.38; 1.50) and -1.61 (-2.25; -1.56) respectively. The use of correct BMD standards to interpret bone loss during pediatric age suggests a limited significance of bone loss in these patients. Moreover, the persistence of residual disease activity may affect normal bone growth during puberty in GD populations. PMID:22441841

  4. Prodrugs Bioactivated to Quinones Target NF-κB and Multiple Protein Networks: Identification of the Quinonome.

    PubMed

    Pierce, Emily N; Piyankarage, Sujeewa C; Dunlap, Tareisha; Litosh, Vladislav; Siklos, Marton I; Wang, Yue-Ting; Thatcher, Gregory R J

    2016-07-18

    Electrophilic reactive intermediates resulting from drug metabolism have been associated with toxicity and off-target effects and in some drug discovery programs trigger NO-GO decisions. Many botanicals and dietary supplements are replete with such reactive electrophiles, notably Michael acceptors, which have been demonstrated to elicit chemopreventive mechanisms; and Michael acceptors are gaining regulatory approval as contemporary cancer therapeutics. Identifying protein targets of these electrophiles is central to understanding potential therapeutic benefit and toxicity risk. NO-donating NSAID prodrugs (NO-NSAIDs) have been the focus of extensive clinical and preclinical studies in inflammation and cancer chemoprevention and therapy: a subset exemplified by pNO-ASA, induces chemopreventive mechanisms following bioactivation to an electrophilic quinone methide (QM) Michael acceptor. Having previously shown that these NO-independent, QM-donors activated Nrf2 via covalent modification of Keap-1, we demonstrate that components of canonical NF-κB signaling are also targets, leading to the inhibition of NF-κB signaling. Combining bio-orthogonal probes of QM-donor ASA prodrugs with mass spectrometric proteomics and pathway analysis, we proceeded to characterize the quinonome: the protein cellular targets of QM-modification by pNO-ASA and its ASA pro-drug congeners. Further comparison was made using a biorthogonal probe of the "bare-bones", Michael acceptor, and clinical anti-inflammatory agent, dimethyl fumarate, which we have shown to inhibit NF-κB signaling. Identified quinonome pathways include post-translational protein folding, cell-death regulation, protein transport, and glycolysis; and identified proteins included multiple heat shock elements, the latter functionally confirmed by demonstrating activation of heat shock response. PMID:27258437

  5. Prodrugs Bioactivated to Quinones Target NF-κB and Multiple Protein Networks: Identification of the Quinonome.

    PubMed

    Pierce, Emily N; Piyankarage, Sujeewa C; Dunlap, Tareisha; Litosh, Vladislav; Siklos, Marton I; Wang, Yue-Ting; Thatcher, Gregory R J

    2016-07-18

    Electrophilic reactive intermediates resulting from drug metabolism have been associated with toxicity and off-target effects and in some drug discovery programs trigger NO-GO decisions. Many botanicals and dietary supplements are replete with such reactive electrophiles, notably Michael acceptors, which have been demonstrated to elicit chemopreventive mechanisms; and Michael acceptors are gaining regulatory approval as contemporary cancer therapeutics. Identifying protein targets of these electrophiles is central to understanding potential therapeutic benefit and toxicity risk. NO-donating NSAID prodrugs (NO-NSAIDs) have been the focus of extensive clinical and preclinical studies in inflammation and cancer chemoprevention and therapy: a subset exemplified by pNO-ASA, induces chemopreventive mechanisms following bioactivation to an electrophilic quinone methide (QM) Michael acceptor. Having previously shown that these NO-independent, QM-donors activated Nrf2 via covalent modification of Keap-1, we demonstrate that components of canonical NF-κB signaling are also targets, leading to the inhibition of NF-κB signaling. Combining bio-orthogonal probes of QM-donor ASA prodrugs with mass spectrometric proteomics and pathway analysis, we proceeded to characterize the quinonome: the protein cellular targets of QM-modification by pNO-ASA and its ASA pro-drug congeners. Further comparison was made using a biorthogonal probe of the "bare-bones", Michael acceptor, and clinical anti-inflammatory agent, dimethyl fumarate, which we have shown to inhibit NF-κB signaling. Identified quinonome pathways include post-translational protein folding, cell-death regulation, protein transport, and glycolysis; and identified proteins included multiple heat shock elements, the latter functionally confirmed by demonstrating activation of heat shock response.

  6. Combined suicide gene therapy for pancreatic peritoneal carcinomatosis using BGTC liposomes.

    PubMed

    Hajri, Amor; Wack, Séverine; Lehn, Pierre; Vigneron, Jean-Pierre; Lehn, Jean-Marie; Marescaux, Jacques; Aprahamian, Marc

    2004-01-01

    Peritoneal dissemination is a common end-stage complication of pancreatic cancer for which novel therapeutic modalities are actively investigated, as there is no current effective therapy. Thus, we evaluated, in a mouse model of pancreatic peritoneal carcinomatosis, the therapeutic potential of a novel nonviral gene therapy approach consisting of bis-guanidinium-tren-cholesterol (BGTC)-mediated lipofection of a combined suicide gene system. Human BxPC-3 pancreatic cells secreting the carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) tumor marker were injected into the peritoneal cavity of nude mice. After 8 days, intraperitoneal (i.p.) lipofection was performed using BGTC/DOPE cationic liposomes complexed with plasmids encoding the two prodrug-activating enzymes Herpes Simplex Virus thymidine kinase and Escherichia coli cytosine deaminase, the latter being expressed from a bicistronic cassette also encoding E. coli uracil phosphoribosyltransferase. Administration of the lipoplexes was followed by treatment with the corresponding prodrugs ganciclovir and 5-fluorocytosine. The results presented herein demonstrate that BGTC/DOPE liposomes can efficiently mediate gene transfection into peritoneal tumor nodules. Indeed, HSV-TK mRNA was detected in tumor nodule tissues by semiquantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis. In addition, green fluorescent protein (GFP) fluorescence and X-gal staining were observed in the peritoneal tumor foci following lipofection of the corresponding EGFP and LacZ reporter genes. These expression analyses also showed that transgene expression lasted for about 2 weeks and was preferential for the tumor nodules, this tumor preference being in good agreement with the absence of obvious treatment-related toxicity. Most importantly, mice receiving the full treatment scheme (BGTC liposomes, suicide genes and prodrugs) had significantly lower serum CEA levels than those of the various control groups, a finding indicating that peritoneal

  7. In vivo evidence for a prodrug activation mechanism during colibactin maturation.

    PubMed

    Bian, Xiaoying; Fu, Jun; Plaza, Alberto; Herrmann, Jennifer; Pistorius, Dominik; Stewart, A Francis; Zhang, Youming; Müller, Rolf

    2013-07-01

    Releasing the cytopath: We have identified an N-myristoyl-D-asparagine (1) as the free N-terminal prodrug scaffold in cytopathogenic Escherichia coli strains expressing the colibactin gene cluster. Colibactin is released in vivo upon cleavage of precolibactin. We provide for the first time in vivo evidence of the prodrug-like release mechanism of colibactin. PMID:23744512

  8. Acid-responsive PEGylated doxorubicin prodrug nanoparticles for neuropilin-1 receptor-mediated targeted drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Song, Huijuan; Zhang, Ju; Wang, Weiwei; Huang, Pingsheng; Zhang, Yumin; Liu, Jianfeng; Li, Chen; Kong, Deling

    2015-12-01

    Self-assembled prodrug nanoparticles have demonstrated great promise in cancer chemotherapy. In the present study, we developed a new kind of prodrug nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery. PEGylated doxorubicin conjugate with an acid-cleavable cis-aconityl spacer was prepared. Then it was functionalized with a tumor-penetrating peptide, Cys-Arg-Gly-Asp-Lys (CRGDK), providing the prodrug nanoparticles with the specific binding ability to neurophilin-1 receptor. In acid mediums, doxorubicin could be released from the prodrug nanoparticles with an accumulative release around 60% through the acid-triggered hydrolysis of cis-aconityl bond and nanoparticle disassembly. Whereas, drug release was slow under a neutral pH and the accumulative drug release was less than 16%. In the cell culture tests, our prodrug nanoparticles showed enhanced endocytosis and cytotoxicity in cancer cells including HepG2, MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells, but lower cytotoxicity in human cardiomyocyte H2C9. In the animal experiments, the prodrug nanoparticles were intravenously injected into Balb/c nude mice bearing MDA-MB-231 tumors. Enhanced drug penetration and accumulation in tumors, accompanying with a rapid early tumor-binding behavior, was observed after intravenous injection of the peptide modified prodrug nanoparticles. These data suggests that the acid-sensitive and tumor-targeting PEGylated doxorubicin prodrug nanoparticle may be an efficient drug delivery system for cancer chemotherapy.

  9. Synthesis and evaluation of atorvastatin esters as prodrugs metabolically activated by human carboxylesterases.

    PubMed

    Mizoi, Kenta; Takahashi, Masato; Haba, Masami; Hosokawa, Masakiyo

    2016-02-01

    We synthesized 11 kinds of prodrug with an esterified carboxylic acid moiety of atorvastatin in moderate to high yields. We discovered that they underwent metabolic activation specifically by the human carboxylesterase 1 (CES1) isozyme. The results suggested that these ester compounds of atorvastatin have the potential to act as prodrugs in vivo. PMID:26750256

  10. Factors that restrict the cell permeation of cyclic prodrugs of an opioid peptide, part 3: Synthesis of analogs designed to have improved stability to oxidative metabolism.

    PubMed

    Nofsinger, Rebecca; Fuchs-Knotts, Tarra; Borchardt, Ronald T

    2012-09-01

    Previously, our laboratory reported that cyclic peptide prodrugs of the opioid peptide H-Tyr-D-Ala-Gly-Phe-D-Leu-OH (DADLE) are metabolized by cytochrome P450 (CYP450) enzymes, which limits their systemic exposure after oral dosing to animals. In an attempt to design more metabolically stable cyclic prodrugs of DADLE, we synthesized analogs of DADLE cyclized with a coumarinic acid linker (CA; CA-DADLE), which contained modifications in the amino acid residues known to be susceptible to CYP450 oxidation. Metabolic stability and metabolite identification studies of CA-DADLE and its analogs were then compared using rat liver microsomes (RLM), guinea pig liver microsomes (GPLM), and human liver microsomes (HLM), as well as recombinant human recombinant cytochrome P450 3A4 (hCYP3A4). Similar to the results observed for CA-DADLE, incubation of its analogs with RLM, GPLM, and HLM resulted in monohydroxylation of an amino acid side chain on these cyclic prodrugs. When CA-DADLE was incubated with hCYP3A4, similar oxidative metabolism of the peptide was observed. In contrast, incubation of the CA-DADLE analogs with hCYP3A4 showed that these amino-acid-modified analogs are not substrates for this CYP450 isozyme. These results suggest that the amino-acid-modified analogs of CA-DADLE prepared in this study could be stable to metabolic oxidation by CYP3A4 expressed in human intestinal mucosal cells.

  11. Water-soluble prodrugs of paclitaxel containing self-immolative disulfide linkers.

    PubMed

    Gund, Machhindra; Khanna, Amit; Dubash, Nauzer; Damre, Anagha; Singh, Kishore S; Satyam, Apparao

    2015-01-01

    A new series of disulfide-containing prodrugs of paclitaxel were designed, synthesized and evaluated against 6 cancer cell lines. Some of these prodrugs exhibited nearly equal or slightly better anticancer activity when compared to that of paclitaxel. These prodrugs contain water-soluble groups such as amino, carboxyl, hydroxyl, amino acids, etc., and exhibited 6-140 fold increase in aqueous solubility when compared to paclitaxel. One of these prodrugs exhibited improved water solubility, better in vitro anticancer activity and significantly superior oral bioavailability in mice when compared to those of paclitaxel. Thus, we have identified a very promising lead compound for further optimization and evaluation as a potentially bioavailable water-soluble prodrug of paclitaxel.

  12. Scleroderma renal crisis during intravenous cyclophosphamide pulse therapy for complicated interstitial lung disease was successfully treated with angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor and plasma exchange

    PubMed Central

    Nagamura, Norihiro; Kin, Seikon

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is a multiorgan disorder involving the skin, heart, lungs, kidneys, and intestines. Progressive interstitial lung disease (ILD) is a serious complication in SSc patients, and cyclophosphamide (CYC) is the only recommended therapy for this condition;1) however, its clinical effectiveness is not sufficient. Scleroderma renal crisis (SRC) is a rare complication, characterized by acute renal failure and progressive hypertension. Angiotensin-converting-enzyme inhibitor (ACE-i) is a widely accepted therapy for SRC. We report an SSc patient with SRC and progressive ILD who underwent treatment with CYC and successful treatment with ACE-i and plasma exchange (PE). SRC and ILD are significant contributors to morbidity and mortality among SSc patients, and the therapy for these disorders is of great interest to rheumatologists. This study presents the possibility of favorable effects of PE for SSc-associated ILD and SRC. PMID:27578917

  13. Scleroderma renal crisis during intravenous cyclophosphamide pulse therapy for complicated interstitial lung disease was successfully treated with angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor and plasma exchange.

    PubMed

    Nagamura, Norihiro; Kin, Seikon

    2016-08-01

    Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is a multiorgan disorder involving the skin, heart, lungs, kidneys, and intestines. Progressive interstitial lung disease (ILD) is a serious complication in SSc patients, and cyclophosphamide (CYC) is the only recommended therapy for this condition;(1)) however, its clinical effectiveness is not sufficient. Scleroderma renal crisis (SRC) is a rare complication, characterized by acute renal failure and progressive hypertension. Angiotensin-converting-enzyme inhibitor (ACE-i) is a widely accepted therapy for SRC. We report an SSc patient with SRC and progressive ILD who underwent treatment with CYC and successful treatment with ACE-i and plasma exchange (PE). SRC and ILD are significant contributors to morbidity and mortality among SSc patients, and the therapy for these disorders is of great interest to rheumatologists. This study presents the possibility of favorable effects of PE for SSc-associated ILD and SRC. PMID:27578917

  14. Sulfoxides, Analogues of L-Methionine and L-Cysteine As Pro-Drugs against Gram-Positive and Gram-Negative Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Anufrieva, N V; Morozova, E A; Kulikova, V V; Bazhulina, N P; Manukhov, I V; Degtev, D I; Gnuchikh, E Yu; Rodionov, A N; Zavilgelsky, G B; Demidkina, T V

    2015-01-01

    The problem of resistance to antibiotics requires the development of new classes of broad-spectrum antimicrobial drugs. The concept of pro-drugs allows researchers to look for new approaches to obtain effective drugs with improved pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties. Thiosulfinates, formed enzymatically from amino acid sulfoxides upon crushing cells of genus Allium plants, are known as antimicrobial compounds. The instability and high reactivity of thiosulfinates complicate their use as individual antimicrobial compounds. We propose a pharmacologically complementary pair: an amino acid sulfoxide pro-drug and vitamin B6 - dependent methionine γ-lyase, which metabolizes it in the patient's body. The enzyme catalyzes the γ- and β-elimination reactions of sulfoxides, analogues of L-methionine and L-cysteine, which leads to the formation of thiosulfinates. In the present work, we cloned the enzyme gene from Clostridium sporogenes. Ionic and tautomeric forms of the internal aldimine were determined by lognormal deconvolution of the holoenzyme spectrum and the catalytic parameters of the recombinant enzyme in the γ- and β-elimination reactions of amino acids, and some sulfoxides of amino acids were obtained. For the first time, the possibility of usage of the enzyme for effective conversion of sulfoxides was established and the antimicrobial activity of thiosulfinates against Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria in situ was shown. PMID:26798500

  15. Sulfoxides, Analogues of L-Methionine and L-Cysteine As Pro-Drugs against Gram-Positive and Gram-Negative Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Anufrieva, N. V.; Morozova, E. A.; Kulikova, V. V.; Bazhulina, N. P.; Manukhov, I. V.; Degtev, D. I.; Gnuchikh, E. Yu.; Rodionov, A. N.; Zavilgelsky, G. B.; Demidkina, T. V.

    2015-01-01

    The problem of resistance to antibiotics requires the development of new classes of broad-spectrum antimicrobial drugs. The concept of pro-drugs allows researchers to look for new approaches to obtain effective drugs with improved pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties. Thiosulfinates, formed enzymatically from amino acid sulfoxides upon crushing cells of genus Allium plants, are known as antimicrobial compounds. The instability and high reactivity of thiosulfinates complicate their use as individual antimicrobial compounds. We propose a pharmacologically complementary pair: an amino acid sulfoxide pro-drug and vitamin B6 – dependent methionine γ-lyase, which metabolizes it in the patient’s body. The enzyme catalyzes the γ- and β-elimination reactions of sulfoxides, analogues of L-methionine and L-cysteine, which leads to the formation of thiosulfinates. In the present work, we cloned the enzyme gene from Clostridium sporogenes. Ionic and tautomeric forms of the internal aldimine were determined by lognormal deconvolution of the holoenzyme spectrum and the catalytic parameters of the recombinant enzyme in the γ- and β-elimination reactions of amino acids, and some sulfoxides of amino acids were obtained. For the first time, the possibility of usage of the enzyme for effective conversion of sulfoxides was established and the antimicrobial activity of thiosulfinates against Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria in situ was shown. PMID:26798500

  16. Evaluation of salicylic acid fatty ester prodrugs for UV protection.

    PubMed

    Im, Jong Seob; Balakrishnan, Prabagar; Oh, Dong Hoon; Kim, Jung Sun; Jeon, Eun-Mi; Kim, Dae-Duk; Yong, Chul Soon; Choi, Han-Gon

    2011-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the physicochemical properties and in vitro evaluation of fatty ester prodrugs of salicylic acid for ultraviolet (UV) protection. The physicochemical properties such as lipophilicity, chemical stability and enzymatic hydrolysis were investigated with the following fatty ester prodrugs of salicylic acid: octanoyl (C8SA), nonanoyl (C9SA), decanoyl (C10SA), lauroyl (C12SA), myristoyl (C14SA) and palmitoyl oxysalicylate (C16SA). Furthermore, their skin permeation and accumulation were evaluated using a combination of common permeation enhancing techniques such as the use of a lipophilic receptor solution, removal of stratum corneum and delipidization of skin. Their k' values were proportional to the degree of carbon-carbon saturation in the side chain. All these fatty esters were highly stable in 2-propanol, acetonitrile and glycerin, but unstable in methanol and ethanol. They were relatively unstable in liver and skin homogenates. In particular, C16SA was mostly hydrolyzed to its parent compound in hairless mouse liver and skin homogenates, suggesting that it might be converted to salicylic acid after its topical administration. In the skin permeation and accumulation study, C16SA showed the poorest permeation in all skins, suggesting that it could not be permeated in the skin. Furthermore, C14SA and C16SA were less accumulated in delipidized skin compared with normal skin or stripped skin, suggesting that these esters had relatively strong affinities for lipids compared with the other prodrugs in the skin. C16SA showed significantly higher dermal accumulation in all skins compared with its parent salicylic acid. Thus, the palmitoyl oxysalicylate (C16SA) might be a potential candidate for UV protection due to its absence of skin permeation, smaller uptake in the lipid phase and relatively lower skin accumulation.

  17. A Food Effect Study of an Oral Thrombin Inhibitor and Prodrug Approach To Mitigate It.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jihye; Kim, Bongchan; Kim, Tae Hun; Lee, Sun Hwa; Park, Hee Dong; Chung, Kyungha; Lee, Sung-Hack; Paek, Seungyup; Kim, Eunice EunKyeong; Yoon, SukKyoon; Kim, Aeri

    2016-04-01

    LB30870, a new direct thrombin inhibitor, showed 80% reduction in oral bioavailability in fed state. The present study aims to propose trypsin binding as a mechanism for such negative food effect and demonstrate a prodrug approach to mitigate food effect. Effect of food composition on fed state oral bioavailability of LB30870 was studied in dogs. Various prodrugs were synthesized, and their solubility, permeability, and trypsin binding affinity were measured. LB30870 and prodrugs were subject to cocrystallization with trypsin, and the X-ray structures of cocrystals were determined. Food effect was studied in dogs for selected prodrugs. Protein or lipid meal appeared to affect oral bioavailability of LB30870 in dogs more than carbohydrate meal. Blocking both carboxyl and amidine groups of LB30870 resulted in trypsin Ki values orders of magnitude higher than that of LB30870. Prodrugs belonged to either Biopharmaceutical Classification System I, II, or III. X-ray crystallography revealed that prodrugs did not bind to trypsin, but instead their hydrolysis product at the amidine blocking group formed cocrystal with trypsin. A prodrug with significantly less food effect than LB30870 was identified. Binding of prodrugs to food components such as dietary fiber appeared to counteract the positive effect brought with the prodrug approach. Further formulation research is warranted to enhance the oral bioavailability of prodrugs. In conclusion, this study is the first to demonstrate that the negative food effect of LB30870 can be attributed to trypsin binding. Trypsin binding study is proposed as a screening tool during lead optimization to minimize food effect.

  18. The Medicinal Chemistry of Imidazotetrazine Prodrugs

    PubMed Central

    Moody, Catherine L.; Wheelhouse, Richard T

    2014-01-01

    Temozolomide (TMZ) is the standard first line treatment for malignant glioma, reaching “blockbuster” status in 2010, yet it remains the only drug in its class. The main constraints on the clinical effectiveness of TMZ therapy are its requirement for active DNA mismatch repair (MMR) proteins for activity, and inherent resistance through O6-methyl guanine-DNA methyl transferase (MGMT) activity. Moreover, acquired resistance, due to MMR mutation, results in aggressive TMZ-resistant tumour regrowth following good initial responses. Much of the attraction in TMZ as a drug lies in its PK/PD properties: it is acid stable and has 100% oral bioavailability; it also has excellent distribution properties, crosses the blood-brain barrier, and there is direct evidence of tumour localisation. This review seeks to unravel some of the mysteries of the imidazotetrazine class of compounds to which TMZ belongs. In addition to an overview of different synthetic strategies, we explore the somewhat unusual chemical reactivity of the imidazotetrazines, probing their mechanisms of reaction, examining which attributes are required for an active drug molecule and reviewing the use of this combined knowledge towards the development of new and improved anti-cancer agents. PMID:25014631

  19. Modelling Gaucher disease progression: long-term enzyme replacement therapy reduces the incidence of splenectomy and bone complications

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Long-term complications and associated conditions of type 1 Gaucher Disease (GD) can include splenectomy, bone complications, pulmonary hypertension, Parkinson disease and malignancies. Enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) reverses cytopenia and reduces organomegaly. To study the effects of ERT on long-term complications and associated conditions, the course of Gaucher disease was modelled. The cohort consisted of all diagnosed GD patients in the Netherlands. Mutually exclusive disease states were defined as ‘asymptomatic’, ‘signs/symptoms’, ‘recovery’, ‘splenectomy’, ‘bone complication’, ‘multiple complications’ and ‘malignancy’. A natural history (NH) cohort was delineated based upon historical data on Dutch patients before ERT was available. Cumulative incidence curves were composed for progression from each disease state to the next. Two scenarios were applied for the ERT cohort: time to complications was calculated from A. start of ERT; B. entering the previous disease state. Median time for the development of signs and/or symptoms was 30.1 years (N = 73). In the NH cohort (N = 42), 9% had developed a bone complication after 10 years in the signs/symptoms phase, while 21% had undergone a splenectomy. In the ERT cohort (N = 29 (A), N = 28 (B)), 12% (A) or 4% (B) had developed a bone complication after 10 years in this phase and no patient was splenectomized. No patients in the NH cohort recovered, compared to 50% in the ERT cohort after 3.6 years (N = 28 (A)) or 22.4 years (N = 27 (B)) of treatment. Median time from a first to a second complication was 11 years in the NH cohort (N = 31), whereas 16 respectively 14 percent had developed a second complication after 10 years in the ERT cohort (N = 17, scenario A/B). Fourteen percent (scenario A/B) developed an associated malignancy after 10 years in the phase ‘multiple complications’ (N = 23). Associated malignancies occurred almost exclusively in advanced disease stages, therefore it

  20. Observational clinical study of 22 adult-onset Pompe disease patients undergoing enzyme replacement therapy over 5years.

    PubMed

    Stepien, Karolina M; Hendriksz, Christian J; Roberts, Mark; Sharma, Reena

    2016-04-01

    Pompe disease is an autosomal recessive disease resulting from deficiency of the acid alpha-glucosidase (GAA). The late-onset Pompe Disease (LOPD) patients develop muscular and respiratory complications later in life. We describe a retrospective observational cohort study including 22 patients with LOPD. The cohort was assessed at baseline before Enzyme Replacement Therapy (ERT) with alglucosidase alpha (20mg/kg biweekly) was commenced and subsequently relevant information was collected at 2, 4 and 5years later. The median age of the patients at study entry was 44years (16-64years), with median disease duration of 11.5years (4-31years). At baseline, 10 patients (45%) could walk without support, 12 (55%) could walk with unilateral or bilateral support including 3/12 were wheelchair bound. Mean predicted FVC % was 55.7 (95% CI 45-66) of predicted normal at baseline and showed no significant change after 5years (54.6 (95% CI 43-66)), (all p=0.9815). Mean FVC % supine was 41.8 (95% CI 33.8-49) of predicted normal at baseline and remained significantly unchanged at 5years (48.4 (95% CI 37-59.6)), (all p=0.8680). The overnight non-invasive ventilator dependence increased by 18.2% as compared with baseline and requirement of mobility aids increased during this period by 5.2% as compared with the baseline. Mean walking distance at 6min walk test was 411.5 (95% CI 338-485) at baseline, 266.5 (95% CI 187-346) m at 2years, 238.6 (95% CI 162-315) m at 4years and 286.8 (95% CI 203-370) m at 5years (p=0.1981; ANOVA was completed only for 14 patients). A gradual decline in FVC% predicted was noted only in four cases and a decline in FVC% supine in two other. Only one patient showed a decline in both pulmonary function tests. In all remaining cases (17/22) respiratory function remains stable. In conclusion overall pulmonary function tests and mobility remained stable for 5years in majority of patients on ERT. However, in some patients they continued to decline in spite of ERT

  1. Supramolecular curcumin-barium prodrugs for formulating with ceramic particles.

    PubMed

    Kamalasanan, Kaladhar; Anupriya; Deepa, M K; Sharma, Chandra P

    2014-10-01

    A simple and stable curcumin-ceramic combined formulation was developed with an aim to improve curcumin stability and release profile in the presence of reactive ceramic particles for potential dental and orthopedic applications. For that, curcumin was complexed with barium (Ba(2+)) to prepare curcumin-barium (BaCur) complex. Upon removal of the unbound curcumin and Ba(2+) by dialysis, a water-soluble BaCur complex was obtained. The complex was showing [M+1](+) peak at 10,000-20,000 with multiple fractionation peaks of MALDI-TOF-MS studies, showed that the complex was a supramolecular multimer. The (1)H NMR and FTIR studies revealed that, divalent Ba(2+) interacted predominantly through di-phenolic groups of curcumin to form an end-to-end complex resulted in supramolecular multimer. The overall crystallinity of the BaCur was lower than curcumin as per XRD analysis. The complexation of Ba(2+) to curcumin did not degrade curcumin as per HPLC studies. The fluorescence spectrum was blue shifted upon Ba(2+) complexation with curcumin. Monodisperse nanoparticles with size less than 200dnm was formed, out of the supramolecular complex upon dialysis, as per DLS, and upon loading into pluronic micelles the size was remaining in similar order of magnitude as per DLS and AFM studies. Stability of the curcumin was improved greater than 50% after complexation with Ba(2+) as per UV/Vis spectroscopy. Loading of the supramloecular nanoparticles into pluronic micelles had further improved the stability of curcumin to approx. 70% in water. These BaCur supramolecule nanoparticles can be considered as a new class of prodrugs with improved solubility and stability. Subsequently, ceramic nanoparticles with varying chemical composition were prepared for changing the material surface reactivity in terms of the increase in, degradability, surface pH and protein adsorption. Further, these ceramic particles were combined with curcumin prodrug formulations and optimized the curcumin release

  2. Role of tyrosine 131 in the active site of paAzoR1, an azoreductase with specificity for the inflammatory bowel disease prodrug balsalazide

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chan-Ju; Laurieri, Nicola; Abuhammad, Areej; Lowe, Edward; Westwood, Isaac; Ryan, Ali; Sim, Edith

    2010-01-01

    Azoreductase 1 from Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain PAO1 (paAzoR1) catalyses the activation of the prodrug balsalazide and reduces the azo dye methyl red using reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide cofactor as an electron donor. To investigate the mechanism of the enzyme, a Y131F mutation was introduced and the enzymic properties of the mutant were compared with those of the wild-type enzyme. The crystallographic structure of the mutant with methyl red bound was solved at 2.1 Å resolution and compared with the wild-type structure. Tyr131 is important in the architecture of the active site but is not essential for enzymic activity. PMID:20057057

  3. Both soluble and membrane-bound forms of Flt3 ligand enhance tumor immunity following "suicide" gene therapy in a murine colon carcinoma model.

    PubMed

    Alsheikhly, Abdul-Razzak; Zweiri, Jehad; Walmesley, Alice J; Watson, Alastair J M; Christmas, Stephen E

    2004-11-01

    In prodrug-activated ("suicide") gene therapy, tumor cells are transfected with the gene for an enzyme that converts an inactive prodrug, such as ganciclovir (GCV), to a toxic compound. Transfected cells are killed on administration of GCV, as also are untransfected "bystander" cells. The ability of the dendritic cell stimulatory cytokine Flt3 ligand (Flt3-L) to modulate prodrug-activated gene therapy has been investigated. Transfectants of the murine colon carcinoma MC26 were generated expressing soluble (FLS) and membrane-bound forms of Flt3-L. They were inoculated together with wild-type MC26 cells and cells expressing herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV1) thymidine kinase into BALB/c mice, which were then administered GCV. Expression of Flt3-L or FLS prevented regrowth of tumor in most mice, which was comparable to the effect of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), while tumors recurred in all mice receiving "suicide" gene therapy alone. Recurring tumor cells were resistant to direct killing by GCV but sensitive to "bystander" killing in vitro. Mice without tumor recurrence were rechallenged with unmodified MC26 cells. Of those mice given transfectants expressing GM-CSF, Flt3-L, or FLS, approximately 50% were immune to rechallenge. These mice also showed cytotoxic and proliferative responses to MC26 cells. These experiments show that both soluble and membrane-bound forms of Flt3-L were able to induce a protective immune response to colon carcinoma cells in a fashion similar to GM-CSF.

  4. Discovery and Characterization of a Water-Soluble Prodrug of a Dual Inhibitor of Bacterial DNA Gyrase and Topoisomerase IV

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Benzimidazole 1 is the lead compound resulting from an antibacterial program targeting dual inhibitors of bacterial DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV. With the goal of improving key drug-like properties, namely, the solubility and the formulability of 1, an effort to identify prodrugs was undertaken. This has led to the discovery of a phosphate ester prodrug 2. This prodrug is rapidly cleaved to the parent drug molecule upon both oral and intravenous administration. The prodrug achieved equivalent exposure of 1 compared to dosing the parent in multiple species. The prodrug 2 has improved aqueous solubility, simplifying both intravenous and oral formulation. PMID:26191374

  5. Glycosystems in nanotechnology: Gold glyconanoparticles as carrier for anti-HIV prodrugs.

    PubMed

    Chiodo, Fabrizio; Marradi, Marco; Calvo, Javier; Yuste, Eloisa; Penadés, Soledad

    2014-01-01

    The therapeutic approach for the treatment of HIV infection is based on the highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), a cocktail of antiretroviral drugs. Notwithstanding HAART has shown different drawbacks like toxic side effects and the emergence of viral multidrug resistance. Nanotechnology offers new tools to improve HIV drug treatment and prevention. In this scenario, gold nanoparticles are an interesting chemical tool to design and prepare smart and efficient drug-delivery systems. Here we describe the preparation and antiviral activity of carbohydrate-coated gold nanoparticles loaded with anti-HIV prodrug candidates. The nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors abacavir and lamivudine have been converted to the corresponding thiol-ending ester derivatives and then conjugated to ~3 nm glucose-coated gold nanoparticles by means of "thiol-for-thiol" ligand place exchange reactions. The drugs-containing glyconanoparticles were characterized and the pH-mediated release of the drug from the nanoparticle has been determined. The antiviral activity was tested by evaluating the replication of NL4-3 HIV in TZM-bl infected cells. The proof-of-principle presented in this work aims to introduce gold glyconanoparticles as a new multifunctional drug-delivery system in the therapy against HIV.

  6. Glycosystems in nanotechnology: Gold glyconanoparticles as carrier for anti-HIV prodrugs.

    PubMed

    Chiodo, Fabrizio; Marradi, Marco; Calvo, Javier; Yuste, Eloisa; Penadés, Soledad

    2014-01-01

    The therapeutic approach for the treatment of HIV infection is based on the highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), a cocktail of antiretroviral drugs. Notwithstanding HAART has shown different drawbacks like toxic side effects and the emergence of viral multidrug resistance. Nanotechnology offers new tools to improve HIV drug treatment and prevention. In this scenario, gold nanoparticles are an interesting chemical tool to design and prepare smart and efficient drug-delivery systems. Here we describe the preparation and antiviral activity of carbohydrate-coated gold nanoparticles loaded with anti-HIV prodrug candidates. The nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors abacavir and lamivudine have been converted to the corresponding thiol-ending ester derivatives and then conjugated to ~3 nm glucose-coated gold nanoparticles by means of "thiol-for-thiol" ligand place exchange reactions. The drugs-containing glyconanoparticles were characterized and the pH-mediated release of the drug from the nanoparticle has been determined. The antiviral activity was tested by evaluating the replication of NL4-3 HIV in TZM-bl infected cells. The proof-of-principle presented in this work aims to introduce gold glyconanoparticles as a new multifunctional drug-delivery system in the therapy against HIV. PMID:24991287

  7. Hemocompatible curcumin-dextran micelles as pH sensitive pro-drugs for enhanced therapeutic efficacy in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Raveendran, Radhika; Bhuvaneshwar, G S; Sharma, Chandra P

    2016-02-10

    Curcumin, a component in spice turmeric, is renowned to possess anti-cancer therapeutic potential. However, low aqueous solubility and instability of curcumin which subsequently affects its bioavailability pose as major impediments in its translation to clinical application. In this regard, we focused on conjugating hydrophobic curcumin to the hydrophilic backbone of dextran via succinic acid spacer to design a pro-drug. The structural confirmation of the conjugates was carried out using FTIR and (1)H NMR spectroscopy. Critical micelle measurement affirmed the micelle formation of the pro-drug in aqueous media. The size distribution and zeta potential of the curcumin-dextran (Cur-Dex) micelles were determined using dynamic light scattering technique. The micellar architecture bestowed curcumin negligible susceptibility to degradation under physiological conditions along with enhanced aqueous solubility. Biocompatibility of the micelles was proved by the blood component aggregation and plasma protein interaction studies. In vitro release studies demonstrated the pH sensitivity release of curcumin which is conducive to the tumour micro environment. Profound cytotoxic effects of Cur-Dex micelles in C6 glioma cells were observed from MTT and Live/Dead assay experiments. Moreover, enhanced cellular internalization of the Cur-Dex micelles compared to free curcumin in the cancer cells was revealed by fluorescence microscopy. Our study focuses on the feasibility of Cur-Dex micelles to be extrapolated as promising candidates for safe and efficient cancer therapy.

  8. Hemocompatible curcumin-dextran micelles as pH sensitive pro-drugs for enhanced therapeutic efficacy in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Raveendran, Radhika; Bhuvaneshwar, G S; Sharma, Chandra P

    2016-02-10

    Curcumin, a component in spice turmeric, is renowned to possess anti-cancer therapeutic potential. However, low aqueous solubility and instability of curcumin which subsequently affects its bioavailability pose as major impediments in its translation to clinical application. In this regard, we focused on conjugating hydrophobic curcumin to the hydrophilic backbone of dextran via succinic acid spacer to design a pro-drug. The structural confirmation of the conjugates was carried out using FTIR and (1)H NMR spectroscopy. Critical micelle measurement affirmed the micelle formation of the pro-drug in aqueous media. The size distribution and zeta potential of the curcumin-dextran (Cur-Dex) micelles were determined using dynamic light scattering technique. The micellar architecture bestowed curcumin negligible susceptibility to degradation under physiological conditions along with enhanced aqueous solubility. Biocompatibility of the micelles was proved by the blood component aggregation and plasma protein interaction studies. In vitro release studies demonstrated the pH sensitivity release of curcumin which is conducive to the tumour micro environment. Profound cytotoxic effects of Cur-Dex micelles in C6 glioma cells were observed from MTT and Live/Dead assay experiments. Moreover, enhanced cellular internalization of the Cur-Dex micelles compared to free curcumin in the cancer cells was revealed by fluorescence microscopy. Our study focuses on the feasibility of Cur-Dex micelles to be extrapolated as promising candidates for safe and efficient cancer therapy. PMID:26686156

  9. Novel Biotinylated Lipid Prodrugs of Acyclovir for the Treatment of Herpetic Keratitis (HK): Transporter Recognition, Tissue Stability and Antiviral Activity

    PubMed Central

    Vadlapudi, Aswani Dutt; Vadlapatla, Ramya Krishna; Earla, Ravinder; Sirimulla, Suman; Bailey, Jake Brain; Pal, Dhananjay; Mitra, Ashim K.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Biotinylated lipid prodrugs of acyclovir (ACV) were designed to target the sodium dependent multivitamin transporter (SMVT) on the cornea to facilitate enhanced cellular absorption of ACV. Methods All the prodrugs were screened for in vitro cellular uptake, interaction with SMVT, docking analysis, cytotoxicity, enzymatic stability and antiviral activity. Results Uptake of biotinylated lipid prodrugs of ACV (B-R-ACV and B-12HS-ACV) was significantly higher than biotinylated prodrug (B-ACV), lipid prodrugs (R-ACV and 12HS-ACV) and ACV in corneal cells. Transepithelial transport across rabbit corneas indicated the recognition of the prodrugs by SMVT. Average Vina scores obtained from docking studies further confirmed that biotinylated lipid prodrugs possess enhanced affinity towards SMVT. All the prodrugs studied did not cause any cytotoxicity and were found to be safe and non-toxic. B-R-ACV and B-12HS-ACV were found to be relatively more stable in ocular tissue homogenates and exhibited excellent antiviral activity. Conclusions Biotinylated lipid prodrugs demonstrated synergistic improvement in cellular uptake due to recognition of the prodrugs by SMVT on the cornea and lipid mediated transcellular diffusion. These biotinylated lipid prodrugs appear to be promising drug candidates for the treatment of herpetic keratitis (HK) and may lower ACV resistance in patients with poor clinical response. PMID:23657675

  10. Mechanochemical solid-state polymerization. VIII. Novel composite polymeric prodrugs prepared by mechanochemical polymerization in the presence of pharmaceutical aids.

    PubMed

    Kondo, S; Hosaka, S; Kuzuya, M

    1998-04-01

    We carried out the mechanochemical polymerization of methacryloyl derivatives of acetoaminophen and 5-fluorouracil in the presence of lactose. The reaction proceeded readily and the polymeric prodrugs were quantitatively produced. This method produces powdered polymeric prodrugs in which fine particles of lactose are homogeneously dispersed, since the reaction proceeds quantitatively through a totally dry process. It is difficult to prepare such a powdered polymeric prodrug by conventional solution polymerization. The rate of drug release of polymeric prodrugs increases with increasing content of lactose, as is shown to be true of the specific surface of polymeric prodrugs. These results suggest that lactose is homogeneously dispersed in powdered polymeric prodrugs. The present method seems applicable to a wide variety of pharmaceutical aids. If one takes the physiochemical property of pharmaceutical aids into consideration, novel polymeric prodrugs with a variety of drug release rates can be synthesized simultaneously with mixing. PMID:9579043

  11. Preparation of alginate beads containing a prodrug of diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yu-Tsai; Di Pasqua, Anthony J.; He, Weiling; Tsai, Tsuimin; Sueda, Katsuhiko; Zhang, Yong; Jay, Michael

    2012-01-01

    A penta-ethyl ester prodrug of the radionuclide decorporation agent diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA), which exists as an oily liquid, was encapsulated in alginate beads by the ionotropic gelation method. An optimal formulation was found by varying initial concentrations of DTPA pentaethyl ester, alginate polymer, Tween 80 surfactant and calcium chloride. All prepared alginate beads were ~1.6 mm in diameter, and the optimal formulation had loading and encapsulation efficiencies of 91.0 ± 1.1 and 72.6 ± 2.2%, respectively, and only 3.2 ± 0.8% water absorption after storage at room temperature in ~80% relative humidity. Moreover, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy showed that DTPA penta-ethyl ester did not react with excipients during formation of the DTPA penta-ethyl ester-containing alginate beads. Release of prodrug from alginate beads was via anomalous transport, and its stability enhanced by encapsulation. Collectively, these data suggest that this solid dosage form may be suitable for oral administration after radionuclide contamination. PMID:23399237

  12. Photochemical internalization (PCI) enhanced nonviral transfection of tumor suppressor and pro-drug activating genes; a potential treatment modality for gliomas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Frederick; Zamora, Genesis; Sun, Chung-Ho; Trinidad, Anthony; Berg, Kristian; Madsen, Steen; Kwon, Young Jik; Hirschberg, Henry

    2014-03-01

    The overall objective of the research is to investigate the utility of photochemical internalization for the enhanced nonviral transfection of genes into cells. We have examined, in detail, the evaluation of photochemical internalization (PCI) as a method for the non-viral introduction of the tumor suppressor gene PTEN and the PCI mediated transfection of the cytosine deaminase (CD) pro drug activating gene into glioma cell monolayers and multi-cell tumor spheroids. Expression of the CD gene within the target cell produces an enzyme that converts the nontoxic prodrug, 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC), to the toxic metabolite, 5-fluorouracil (5-FU).

  13. Design, synthesis and in vitro evaluation of novel water-soluble prodrugs of buparvaquone.

    PubMed

    Mäntylä, Antti; Rautio, Jarkko; Nevalainen, Tapio; Keski-Rahkonen, Pekka; Vepsälainen, Jouko; Järvinen, Tomi

    2004-10-01

    Novel water-soluble phosphate prodrugs (2b-5b) of buparvaquone-oxime (1a) and buparvaquone-O-methyloxime (1b) were synthesized and evaluated in vitro as potential oral prodrugs against leishmaniasis. Buparvaquone-oxime (1a), and most probably also buparvaquone-O-methyloxime (1b), released the parent buparvaquone via a cytochrome P450-catalysed reaction. The prodrugs 2b-5b showed significantly higher aqueous solubilities (>4 mg/ml) than buparvaquone (< or = 0.03 microg/ml) over a pH range of 3.0-7.4. The prodrugs 2b, 3b and 5b rapidly released (t1/2 = 7 min) the corresponding oximes of buparvaquone (1a and 1b), and prodrug 4b at a moderate rate (t1/2 = 22.5 min) in alkaline phosphatase solution in vitro. Prodrug 3b was the most chemically stable in the aqueous solutions over a pH range of 3.0-7.4 (t1/2 > 8 days). Although buparvaquone-oxime (1a) has been shown to undergo a cytochrome P450-catalysed oxidation in liver microsomes to the parent buparvaquone and behave as a novel bioreversible prodrug, its usefulness is limited in oral drug delivery due to its poor aqueous solubility, like buparvaquone itself. Further phosphorylation of an oxime form of buparvaquone significantly increased water solubility, and this novel approach is therefore useful to improve physicochemical properties of drugs containing a ketone functional group.

  14. Oxalate-degrading microorganisms or oxalate-degrading enzymes: which is the future therapy for enzymatic dissolution of calcium-oxalate uroliths in recurrent stone disease?

    PubMed

    Peck, Ammon B; Canales, Benjamin K; Nguyen, Cuong Q

    2016-02-01

    Renal urolithiasis is a pathological condition common to a multitude of genetic, physiological and nutritional disorders, ranging from general hyperoxaluria to obesity. The concept of quickly dissolving renal uroliths via chemolysis, especially calcium-oxalate kidney stones, has long been a clinical goal, but yet to be achieved. Over the past 25 years, there has been a serious effort to examine the prospects of using plant and microbial oxalate-degrading enzymes known to catabolize oxalic acid and oxalate salts. While evidence is emerging that bacterial probiotics can reduce recurrent calcium-oxalate kidney stone disease by lowering systemic hyperoxaluria, the possible use of free oxalate-degrading enzyme therapy remains a challenge with several hurdles to overcome before reaching clinical practice. PMID:26645869

  15. Dominant negative selection of vaccinia virus using a thymidine kinase/thymidylate kinase fusion gene and the prodrug azidothymidine

    SciTech Connect

    Holzer, Georg W. . E-mail: falknef@baxter.com

    2005-07-05

    The Escherichia coli thymidine kinase/thymidylate kinase (tk/tmk) fusion gene encodes an enzyme that efficiently converts the prodrug 3'-azido-2',3'-dideoxythymidine (AZT) into its toxic triphosphate derivative, a substance which stops DNA chain elongation. Integration of this marker gene into vaccinia virus that normally is not inhibited by AZT allowed the establishment of a powerful selection procedure for recombinant viruses. In contrast to the conventional vaccinia thymidine kinase (tk) selection that is performed in tk-negative cell lines, AZT selection can be performed in normal (tk-positive) cell lines. The technique is especially useful for the generation of replication-deficient vaccinia viruses and may also be used for gene knock-out studies of essential vaccinia genes.

  16. Long-term endurance and safety of elosulfase alfa enzyme replacement therapy in patients with Morquio A syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hendriksz, Christian J; Parini, Rossella; AlSayed, Moeenaldeen D; Raiman, Julian; Giugliani, Roberto; Solano Villarreal, Martha L; Mitchell, John J; Burton, Barbara K; Guelbert, Norberto; Stewart, Fiona; Hughes, Derralynn A; Berger, Kenneth I; Slasor, Peter; Matousek, Robert; Jurecki, Elaina; Shaywitz, Adam J; Harmatz, Paul R

    2016-09-01

    Long-term efficacy and safety of elosulfase alfa enzyme replacement therapy were evaluated in Morquio A patients over 96weeks (reaching 120weeks in total from pre-treatment baseline) in an open-label, multi-center, phase III extension study. During this extension of a 24-week placebo-controlled phase III study, all patients initially received 2.0mg/kg elosulfase alfa either weekly or every other week, prior to establishment of 2.0mg/kg/week as the recommended dose, at which point all patients received weekly treatment. Efficacy measures were compared to baseline of the initial 24-week study, enabling analyses of changes over 120weeks. In addition to performing analyses for the entire intent-to-treat (ITT) population (N=173), analyses were also performed for a modified per-protocol (MPP) population (N=124), which excluded patients who had orthopedic surgery during the extension study or were non-compliant with the study protocol (as determined by ≥20% missed infusions). Six-minute walk test (6MWT) was the primary efficacy measure; three-minute stair climb test (3MSCT) and normalized urine keratan sulfate (uKS) were secondary efficacy measures. Mean (SE) change from baseline to Week 120 in 6MWT distance was 32.0 (11.3)m and 39.9 (10.1)m for patients receiving elosulfase alfa at 2.0mg/kg/week throughout the study (N=56) and 15.1 (7.1)m and 31.7 (6.8)m in all patients combined, regardless of dosing regimen, for the ITT and MPP populations, respectively. Further analyses revealed that durability of 6MWT improvements was not impacted by baseline 6MWT distance, use of a walking aid, or age. Mean (SE) change at Week 120 in the 3MSCT was 5.5 (1.9) and 6.7 (2.0)stairs/min for patients receiving elosulfase alfa at 2.0mg/kg/week throughout the study and 4.3 (1.2) and 6.8 (1.3)stairs/min in all patients combined, regardless of dosing regimen, for the ITT and MPP populations, respectively Across all patients, mean (SE) change at Week 120 in normalized uKS was -59.4 (1.8)% and

  17. Glutathione S-conjugates as prodrugs to target drug-resistant tumors

    PubMed Central

    Ramsay, Emma E.; Dilda, Pierre J.

    2014-01-01

    Living organisms are continuously exposed to xenobiotics. The major phase of enzymatic detoxification in many species is the conjugation of activated xenobiotics to reduced glutathione (GSH) catalyzed by the glutathione-S-transferase (GST). It has been reported that some compounds, once transformed into glutathione S-conjugates, enter the mercapturic acid pathway whose end products are highly reactive and toxic for the cell responsible for their production. The cytotoxicity of these GSH conjugates depends essentially on GST and gamma-glutamyl transferases (γGT), the enzymes which initiate the mercapturic acid synthesis pathway. Numerous studies support the view that the expression of GST and γGT in cancer cells represents an important factor in the appearance of a more aggressive and resistant phenotype. High levels of tumor GST and γGT expression were employed to selectively target tumor with GST- or γGT-activated drugs. This strategy, explored over the last two decades, has recently been successful using GST-activated nitrogen mustard (TLK286) and γGT-activated arsenic-based (GSAO and Darinaparsin) prodrugs confirming the potential of GSH-conjugates as anticancer drugs. PMID:25157234

  18. Prognostic Factors of the Efficacy of High-dose Corticosteroid Therapy in Hemolysis, Elevated Liver Enzymes, and Low Platelet Count Syndrome During Pregnancy: A Meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Li; Ren, Chenchen; Mao, Minhong; Cui, Shihong

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to identify the factors which can affect the efficacy of corticosteroid (CORT) therapy in the management of hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes, and low platelet count (HELLP) syndrome. Research articles reporting the efficacy of CORT therapy to HELLP syndrome patients were searched in several electronic databases including EMBASE, Google Scholar, Ovid SP, PubMed, and Web of Science. Study selection was based on predefined eligibility criteria. Efficacy was defined by the changes from baseline in HELLP syndrome indicators after CORT therapy. Meta-analyses were carried out with Stata software. Data of 778 CORT-treated HELLP syndrome patients recruited in 22 studies were used in the analyses. Corticosteroid treatment to HELLP syndrome patients was associated with significant changes from baseline in platelet count; serum levels of aspartate aminotransaminase, alanine transaminase, and lactic dehydrogenase (LDH); mean blood pressure; and urinary output. Lower baseline platelet count predicted higher change in platelet count after CORT therapy. Lower baseline platelet count and lower baseline urinary output predicted greater changes in LDH levels after CORT therapy. There was also an inverse relationship between the change from baseline in LDH levels and intensive care duration. Higher CORT doses were associated with greater declines in the aspartate aminotransaminase, alanine transaminase, and LDH levels. Incidence of cesarean delivery was inversely associated with the gestation age. The percentage of nulliparous women had a positive association with the intensive care stay duration. High-dose CORT therapy to HELLP syndrome patients provides benefits in improving disease markers and reducing intensive care duration, especially in cases such as mothers with much lower baseline platelet count and LDH levels. PMID:27043683

  19. Prognostic Factors of the Efficacy of High-dose Corticosteroid Therapy in Hemolysis, Elevated Liver Enzymes, and Low Platelet Count Syndrome During Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Li; Ren, Chenchen; Mao, Minhong; Cui, Shihong

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study was to identify the factors which can affect the efficacy of corticosteroid (CORT) therapy in the management of hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes, and low platelet count (HELLP) syndrome. Research articles reporting the efficacy of CORT therapy to HELLP syndrome patients were searched in several electronic databases including EMBASE, Google Scholar, Ovid SP, PubMed, and Web of Science. Study selection was based on predefined eligibility criteria. Efficacy was defined by the changes from baseline in HELLP syndrome indicators after CORT therapy. Meta-analyses were carried out with Stata software. Data of 778 CORT-treated HELLP syndrome patients recruited in 22 studies were used in the analyses. Corticosteroid treatment to HELLP syndrome patients was associated with significant changes from baseline in platelet count; serum levels of aspartate aminotransaminase, alanine transaminase, and lactic dehydrogenase (LDH); mean blood pressure; and urinary output. Lower baseline platelet count predicted higher change in platelet count after CORT therapy. Lower baseline platelet count and lower baseline urinary output predicted greater changes in LDH levels after CORT therapy. There was also an inverse relationship between the change from baseline in LDH levels and intensive care duration. Higher CORT doses were associated with greater declines in the aspartate aminotransaminase, alanine transaminase, and LDH levels. Incidence of cesarean delivery was inversely associated with the gestation age. The percentage of nulliparous women had a positive association with the intensive care stay duration. High-dose CORT therapy to HELLP syndrome patients provides benefits in improving disease markers and reducing intensive care duration, especially in cases such as mothers with much lower baseline platelet count and LDH levels. PMID:27043683

  20. Modulation of porcine (Sus scrofa domestica) and pheasant (Phasianus colchicus) carbonyl reducing enzymes by anthelmintic therapy with flubendazole.

    PubMed

    Szotáková, Barbora; Nobilis, Milan; Lamka, Jirí; Krízová, Veronika; Savlík, Michal; Skálová, Lenka

    2008-01-01

    Flubendazole (FLU) is a widely administered benzimidazole anthelmintic indicated for the control of parasitic diseases in farm animals including pigs and pheasants. This study was designed to test the biotransformation of FLU in control animals and animals treated with FLU in recommended therapeutic doses. The activities of several pheasant and porcine hepatic and intestinal carbonyl reducing enzymes and their modulation by FLU were also studied. Twelve adult pheasant hens, approximately 1 year old, were divided into two groups and treated for 7 days with placebo or 6 mg of FLU/kg of body weight. Eight male hog weaners, approximately 3 month old, were divided into two groups and treated for 5 days with placebo or 1.57 mg of FLU/kg of body weight. Subcellular fractions, prepared from livers and small intestines of control and FLU treated animals, were incubated with FLU. In vitro formation of two main FLU metabolites, reduced FLU, and hydrolyzed FLU were analyzed using HPLC. While FLU was reduced significantly more intensively in FLU-treated pheasants than in control animals, no differences were observed in pigs. These results were confirmed by measuring the enzyme activities: carbonyl reducing enzyme activities were increased in pheasants treated by FLU, whereas FLU did not affect these enzymes in pigs.

  1. Intracellular implantation of enzymes in hollow silica nanospheres for protein therapy: cascade system of superoxide dismutase and catalase.

    PubMed

    Chang, Feng-Peng; Chen, Yi-Ping; Mou, Chung-Yuan

    2014-11-01

    An approach for enzyme therapeutics is elaborated with cell-implanted nanoreactors that are based on multiple enzymes encapsulated in hollow silica nanospheres (HSNs). The synthesis of HSNs is carried out by silica sol-gel templating of water-in-oil microemulsions so that polyethyleneimine (PEI) modified enzymes in aqueous phase are encapsulated inside the HSNs. PEI-grafted superoxide dismutase (PEI-SOD) and catalase (PEI-CAT) encapsulated in HSNs are prepared with quantitative control of the enzyme loadings. Excellent activities of superoxide dismutation by PEI-SOD@HSN are found and transformation of H2 O2 to water by PEI-CAT@HSN. When PEI-SOD and PEI-CAT are co-encapsulated, cascade transformation of superoxide through hydrogen peroxide to water was facile. Substantial fractions of HSNs exhibit endosome escape to cytosol after their delivery to cells. The production of downstream reactive oxygen species (ROS) and COX-2/p-p38 expression show that co-encapsulated SOD/CAT inside the HSNs renders the highest cell protection against the toxicant N,N'-dimethyl-4,4'-bipyridinium dichloride (paraquat). The rapid cell uptake and strong detoxification effect on superoxide radicals by the SOD/CAT-encapsulated hollow mesoporous silica nanoparticles demonstrate the general concept of implanting catalytic nanoreactors in biological cells with designed functions.

  2. Bacteria in cancer therapy: a novel experimental strategy.

    PubMed

    Patyar, S; Joshi, R; Byrav, D S Prasad; Prakash, A; Medhi, B; Das, B K

    2010-03-23

    Resistance to conventional anticancer therapies in patients with advanced solid tumors has prompted the need of alternative cancer therapies. Moreover, the success of novel cancer therapies depends on their selectivity for cancer cells with limited toxicity to normal tissues. Several decades after Coley's work a variety of natural and genetically modified non-pathogenic bacterial species are being explored as potential antitumor agents, either to provide direct tumoricidal effects or to deliver tumoricidal molecules. Live, attenuated or genetically modified non-pathogenic bacterial species are capable of multiplying selectively in tumors and inhibiting their growth. Due to their selectivity for tumor tissues, these bacteria and their spores also serve as ideal vectors for delivering therapeutic proteins to tumors. Bacterial toxins too have emerged as promising cancer treatment strategy. The most potential and promising strategy is bacteria based gene-directed enzyme prodrug therapy. Although it has shown successful results in vivo yet further investigation about the targeting mechanisms of the bacteria are required to make it a complete therapeutic approach in cancer treatment.

  3. Manageable cytotoxicity of nanocapsules immobilizing D-amino acid oxidase via exogenous administration of nontoxic prodrug

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yang; Zhu, Yingchun; Fu, Jingke

    2014-02-01

    D-Amino acid oxidase (DAO), which could catalyze generation of hydrogen peroxide with strong oxidbility and cytotoxicity, has become of interest as a biocatalyst for therapeutic treatments. Herein we report that amino-functional hollow mesoporous silica with large pore size (10.27 nm) and positively charged surface effectively immobilize DAO with negative charge. The adsorption, activity and stability of DAO are demonstrated to depend mainly on the amino-functionalization of surface. Significant cancer cell killing effect is observed when the cells are treated by the nanocapsules entrapping DAO together with D-alanine, showing distinct dose-dependency on concentration of the nanocapsules entrapping DAO or D-alanine. Nevertheless, the toxicity is completely neutralized by the addition of catalase, and anti-tumor effect is not observed when either the nanocapsules entrapping DAO or D-alanine is applied alone. The results indicate that cytotoxicity of the nanocapsules entrapping DAO could be managed by exogenous administration of nontoxic prodrug to tumor tissue, due to the stereoselectivity of DAO and the scarcity of its substrates in mammalian organisms. Thus, the method might be exploited as a potential treatment for cancer therapy.

  4. A study on the properties and reactivity of naphthoquinone-cobalt(III) prototypes for bioreductive prodrugs.

    PubMed

    Bustamante, Francisco L S; Miranda, Fabio S; Castro, Frederico A V; Resende, Jackson A L C; Pereira, Marcos D; Lanznaster, Mauricio

    2014-03-01

    Our group has recently initiated a study on the development of new prototypes for bioreductive prodrugs, based on Co(III) complexes with the ligand 2,2'-bis(3-hydroxy-1,4-naphthoquinone), H2bhnq. The focus of this work is to investigate the dissociation of bhnq(-2) from the complex upon reduction, and the effects of pH, redox potential, oxygen concentration and nature of the auxiliary ligands on this reaction. The bhnq(2-) ligand is a "non-cytotoxic" agent that was chosen as a probe for the reactivity studies due to its suitable chromophoric properties, at the same time that it resembles more cytotoxic naphthoquinones relevant for cancer therapy. In this way, two Co(III) complexes [Co(bhnq)(L1)]BF4·H2O (1) and [Co(bhnq)(L2)]BF4·H2O (2) (L1=N,N'-bis(pyridin-2-ylmethyl)ethylenediamine and L2=N,N'-dimethyl-N,N'-bis(pyridin-2-ylmethyl)ethylenediamine) were synthesized and fully characterized. The gallium analogs [Ga(bhnq)(L1)]NO3·3H2O (3) and [Ga(bhnq)(L2)]NO3·3H2O (4) were also prepared for helping with the assignments of the redox properties of the cobalt complexes and the structure of 2. Cyclic voltammetry analysis revealed a pH-independent quasi-reversible Co(III)/Co(II) process at -0.22 and -0.08V vs NHE for 1 and 2, respectively. An O2-dependent dissociation of bhnq(2-) was observed for the reaction of 1 with ascorbic acid. For 2, the dissociation of bhnq(2-) was found to be independent on the concentration of O2 and faster than in 1, with little influence of the pH on both complexes. The difference in reactivity between 1 and 2 and their redox properties, among other factors, suggests that 1 undergoes redox cycling, pointed out as a key feature for a prodrug to achieve hypoxic selectivity.

  5. Design, synthesis and biological evaluation of brain-specific glucosyl thiamine disulfide prodrugs of naproxen.

    PubMed

    Fan, Wei; Wu, Yong; Li, Xian-Kun; Yao, Nian; Li, Xun; Yu, Yong-Guo; Hai, Li

    2011-09-01

    Glucosyl derivates exhibited favorable distribution to the brain. However, bidirectional transport of glucose transporter 1 might decrease concentrations of the prodrugs in brain before the release of parent drugs. To overcome this defect, glucosyl thiamine disulfide prodrugs 1a-1c incorporating naproxen were designed and synthesized. Furthermore, prodrug 2 and 3 were also prepared as control. The favorable physicochemical properties of these prodrugs were verified by stability and metabolism studies. Results from the in vivo distribution study indicated that 1a-1c, and 1b in particular, significantly increased the level of naproxen in brain when compared to 2 and 3. The study suggested glucosyl thiamine disulfide was a promising carrier to enhance the brain bioavailability of central nervous system active drugs.

  6. Spacer/Linker Based Synthesis and Biological Evaluation of Mutual Prodrugs as Antiinflammatory Agents

    PubMed Central

    Velingkar, V. S.; Jain, D. R.; Ahire, D. C.

    2010-01-01

    Mutual prodrugs of some antiinflammatory agents were synthesized with the aim of improving the therapeutic index through prevention of gastrointestinal complications and to check the efficiency of release of the parent drug in presence of spacer. These mutual prodrugs were synthesized by direct condensation method using dicyclohexyl carbodiimide as a coupling agent and glycine as a spacer. The title compounds were characterized by spectral techniques and the release of the parent drug from mutual prodrug was studied in two different non-enzymatic buffer solutions at pH 1.2, pH 7.4 and in 80% human plasma. All mutual prodrugs exhibited encouraging hydrolysis profile in 80% human plasma. Biological activity of title compounds was studied by carrageenan-induced paw edema method. From the results obtained, it was concluded that these compounds retain the antiinflammatory action. PMID:21694998

  7. Development and characterization of nanoparticulate formulation of a water soluble prodrug of dexamethasone by HIP complexation

    PubMed Central

    Gaudana, Ripal; Parenky, Ashwin; Vaishya, Ravi; Samanta, Swapan K.; Mitra, Ashim K.

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to develop and characterize a nanoparticulate-based sustained release formulation of a water soluble dipeptide prodrug of dexamethasone, valine–valine-dexamethasone (VVD). Being hydrophilic in nature, it readily leaches out in the external aqueous medium and hence partitions poorly into the polymeric matrix resulting in minimal entrapment in nanoparticles. Hence, hydrophobic ion pairing (HIP) complexation of the prodrug was employed with dextran sulphate as a complexing polymer. A novel, solid in oil in water emulsion method was employed to encapsulate the prodrug in HIP complex form in poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) matrix. Nanoparticles were characterized with respect to size, zeta potential, crystallinity of entrapped drug and surface morphology. A significant enhancement in the entrapment of the prodrug in nanoparticles was achieved. Finally, a simple yet novel method was developed which can also be applicable to encapsulate other charged hydrophilic molecules, such as peptides and proteins. PMID:20939702

  8. Studies on a novel series of acyl ester prodrugs of prostaglandin F2 alpha.

    PubMed Central

    Cheng-Bennett, A; Chan, M F; Chen, G; Gac, T; Garst, M E; Gluchowski, C; Kaplan, L J; Protzman, C E; Roof, M B; Sachs, G

    1994-01-01

    A novel series of prostaglandin F2 alpha (PGF2 alpha) prodrugs, with acyl ester groups at the 9, 11, and 15 positions, was prepared in order to design clinically acceptable prostaglandins for treating glaucoma. Studies involving isolated esterases and ocular tissue homogenates indicated that 9-acyl esters cannot provide a prodrug since PGF2 alpha would not be formed as a product. In contrast, 11-mono, 15-mono, and 11, 15-diesters were converted to PGF2 alpha in ocular tissues and could, therefore, be considered as prodrugs of PGF2 alpha. Carboxylesterase (CE) appeared critically important for the hydrolytic conversion of those PGF2 alpha prodrugs where the 11 or 15-OH group was esterified and such prodrugs were not substrates for acetylcholinesterase (ACHE) or butyrylcholinesterase (BuCHE). The enzymatic hydrolysis of PGF2 alpha-1-isopropyl ester was also investigated for comparative purposes. This PGF2 alpha prodrug was a good substrate for CE, but was also hydrolysed by BuCHE, albeit at a much slower rate. The most striking feature of the enzymatic hydrolysis of PGF2 alpha-1-isopropyl ester in ocular tissue homogenates was that it was much faster than for prodrugs esterified at the 11 and/or 15 positions. In terms of ocular hypotensive activity, all prodrugs which showed detectable conversion to nascent PGF2 alpha were potent ocular hypotensives. Although no separation of ocular hypotensive and ocular surface hyperaemic effects was apparent for PGF2 alpha-1-isopropyl ester, a temporal separation of these effects was apparent for the novel PGF2 alpha ester series. This difference may reflect an unfavourably rapid conversion of PGF2 alpha-1-isopropyl ester in ocular surface tissues compared with anterior segment tissues. PMID:7918269

  9. Hypoxia-activated prodrugs: paths forward in the era of personalised medicine

    PubMed Central

    Hunter, Francis W; Wouters, Bradly G; Wilson, William R

    2016-01-01

    Tumour hypoxia has been pursued as a cancer drug target for over 30 years, most notably using bioreductive (hypoxia-activated) prodrugs that target antineoplastic agents to low-oxygen tumour compartments. Despite compelling evidence linking hypoxia with treatment resistance and adverse prognosis, a number of such prodrugs have recently failed to demonstrate efficacy in pivotal clinical trials; an outcome that demands reflection on the discovery and development of these compounds. In this review, we discuss a clear disconnect between the pathobiology of tumour hypoxia, the pharmacology of hypoxia-activated prodrugs and the manner in which they have been taken into clinical development. Hypoxia-activated prodrugs have been evaluated in the manner of broad-spectrum cytotoxic agents, yet a growing body of evidence suggests that their activity is likely to be dependent on the coincidence of tumour hypoxia, expression of specific prodrug-activating reductases and intrinsic sensitivity of malignant clones to the cytotoxic effector. Hypoxia itself is highly variable between and within individual tumours and is not treatment-limiting in all cancer subtypes. Defining predictive biomarkers for hypoxia-activated prodrugs and overcoming the technical challenges of assaying them in clinical settings will be essential to deploying these agents in the era of personalised cancer medicine. PMID:27070712

  10. Intracellular delivery of potential therapeutic genes: prospects in cancer gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Bakhtiar, Athirah; Sayyad, Mustak; Rosli, Rozita; Maruyama, Atsushi; Chowdhury, Ezharul H

    2014-01-01

    Conventional therapies for malignant cancer such as chemotherapy and radiotherapy are associated with poor survival rates owing to the development of cellular resistance to cancer drugs and the lack of targetability, resulting in unwanted adverse effects on healthy cells and necessitating the lowering of therapeutic dose with consequential lower efficacy of the treatment. Gene therapy employing different types of viral and non-viral carriers to transport gene(s) of interest and facilitating production of the desirable therapeutic protein(s) has tremendous prospects in cancer treatments due to the high-level of specificity in therapeutic action of the expressed protein(s) with diminished off-target effects, although cancer cell-specific delivery of transgene(s) still poses some challenges to be addressed. Depending on the potential therapeutic target genes, cancer gene therapy could be categorized into tumor suppressor gene replacement therapy, immune gene therapy and enzyme- or prodrug-based therapy. This review would shed light on the current progress of delivery of potentially therapeutic genes into various cancer cells in vitro and animal models utilizing a variety of viral and non-viral vectors.

  11. Development of Novel Polymeric Prodrugs Synthesized by Mechanochemical Solid-State Copolymerization of Hydroxyethylcellulose and Vinyl Monomers.

    PubMed

    Doi, Naoki; Sasai, Yasushi; Yamauchi, Yukinori; Adachi, Tetsuo; Kuzuya, Masayuki; Kondo, Shin-ichi

    2015-01-01

    Novel polymeric prodrugs were synthesized by mechanochemical solid-state copolymerization of hydroxyethylcellulose and the methacryloyloxy derivative of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). Copolymerization was about 94% complete after 4 h, and the polymeric prodrug was quantitatively obtained after 14 h of reaction. The number average molecular weight (Mn) and polydispersity (H) of the polymeric prodrug were 39000 g/mol and 6.20, respectively. Mechanical fracturing of the polymer in a stainless steel twin-shell blender improved these properties (Mn=16000 g/mol and H=1.94). 5-FU was sustainably released from the polymeric prodrugs, and the rate was not affected by the molecular weight or molecular weight distribution of the prodrug under the experimental conditions used. These results suggest that novel polymeric prodrugs composed of a polysaccharide and a synthetic polymer can be fabricated by mechanochemical solid-state copolymerization under anaerobic conditions.

  12. Development of Novel Polymeric Prodrugs Synthesized by Mechanochemical Solid-State Copolymerization of Hydroxyethylcellulose and Vinyl Monomers.

    PubMed

    Doi, Naoki; Sasai, Yasushi; Yamauchi, Yukinori; Adachi, Tetsuo; Kuzuya, Masayuki; Kondo, Shin-ichi

    2015-01-01

    Novel polymeric prodrugs were synthesized by mechanochemical solid-state copolymerization of hydroxyethylcellulose and the methacryloyloxy derivative of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). Copolymerization was about 94% complete after 4 h, and the polymeric prodrug was quantitatively obtained after 14 h of reaction. The number average molecular weight (Mn) and polydispersity (H) of the polymeric prodrug were 39000 g/mol and 6.20, respectively. Mechanical fracturing of the polymer in a stainless steel twin-shell blender improved these properties (Mn=16000 g/mol and H=1.94). 5-FU was sustainably released from the polymeric prodrugs, and the rate was not affected by the molecular weight or molecular weight distribution of the prodrug under the experimental conditions used. These results suggest that novel polymeric prodrugs composed of a polysaccharide and a synthetic polymer can be fabricated by mechanochemical solid-state copolymerization under anaerobic conditions. PMID:26423117

  13. Re-engineering Cytochrome P450 2B11dH for Enhanced Metabolism of Several Substrates Including the Anti-cancer Prodrugs Cyclophosphamide and Ifosfamide

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Ling; Chen, Chong S.; Waxman, David J.; Liu, Hong; Halpert, James R.; Kumar, Santosh

    2007-01-01

    Based on recent directed evolution of P450 2B1, six P450 2B11 mutants at three positions were created in an N-terminal modified construct termed P450 2B11dH and characterized for enzyme catalysis using five substrates. Mutant I209A demonstrated a 3.2-fold enhanced kcat/Km for 7-ethoxy-4-trifluoromethylcourmarin O-deethylation, largely due to a dramatic decrease in Km (0.72 vs. 18 μM). I209A also demonstrated enhanced selectivity for testosterone 16β-hydroxylation over 16α-hydroxylation. In contrast, V183L showed a 4-fold increased kcat for 7-benzyloxyresorufin debenzylation and a 4.7-fold increased kcat/Km for testosterone 16α-hydroxylation. V183L also displayed a 1.7-fold higher kcat/Km than P450 2B11dH with the anti-cancer prodrugs cyclophosphamide and ifosfamide, resulting from a ~4-fold decrease in Km. Introduction of the V183L mutation into full-length P450 2B11 did not enhance the kcat/Km. Overall, the re-engineered P450 2B11dH enzymes exhibited enhanced catalytic efficiency with several substrates including the anti-cancer prodrugs. PMID:17254539

  14. Comparison of gallium-67 scanning, bronchoalveolar lavage, and serum angiotensin-converting enzyme levels in pulmonary sarcoidosis. Predicting response to therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Baughman, R.P.; Fernandez, M.; Bosken, C.H.; Mantil, J.; Hurtubise, P.

    1984-05-01

    Patients with active pulmonary sarcoidosis underwent bronchoalveolar lavage, gallium scan, and serum angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) level determination prior to treatment with corticosteroids. Pulmonary function was tested before and after therapy. Increase in vital capacity after treatment ranged from 40 to 1,030 ml; 12 of the 16 patients studied had an increase of more than 200 ml. There was a close correlation between the percentage uptake of gallium scan and the increase of the vital capacity after therapy (r . 0.95, p less than 0.01). There was no relationship between the percentage of lymphocytes obtained on lavage and the changes in vital capacity with therapy (r . 0.05). There was a positive correlation between the changes in vital capacity and the ratio of T4(+):T8(+)lymphocytes (r . 0.62, p less than 0.05) and number of T4 (+) lymphocytes (r . 0.92, p less than 0.01) in the bronchoalveolar fluid. There was a low correlation between the pretreatment ACE level and the change in vital capacity (r . 0.368, p greater than 0.05).

  15. Gene therapy for liver enzyme deficiencies: what have we learned from models for Crigler-Najjar and tyrosinemia?

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Tuan Huy; Ferry, Nicolas

    2007-10-01

    The liver is the site of numerous metabolic inherited diseases. It has unique features that make it compliant to various gene therapy approaches. Many vector types and gene delivery strategies have been evaluated during the past 20 years in a number of animal models of metabolic liver diseases. However, the complete cure of inherited liver deficiencies by gene therapy in relevant animal models were only reported recently. These successes were achieved thanks to major advances in vector technology. In this review, we will focus on Crigler-Najjar disease and hereditary tyrosinemia, two paradigmatic examples of the two categories of enzymatic liver deficiencies: type I, in which the genetic defect does not affect liver histology; and type II, in which liver lesions are present.

  16. Gene therapy for liver enzyme deficiencies: what have we learned from models for Crigler-Najjar and tyrosinemia?

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Tuan Huy; Ferry, Nicolas

    2007-10-01

    The liver is the site of numerous metabolic inherited diseases. It has unique features that make it compliant to various gene therapy approaches. Many vector types and gene delivery strategies have been evaluated during the past 20 years in a number of animal models of metabolic liver diseases. However, the complete cure of inherited liver deficiencies by gene therapy in relevant animal models were only reported recently. These successes were achieved thanks to major advances in vector technology. In this review, we will focus on Crigler-Najjar disease and hereditary tyrosinemia, two paradigmatic examples of the two categories of enzymatic liver deficiencies: type I, in which the genetic defect does not affect liver histology; and type II, in which liver lesions are present. PMID:19072443

  17. Drug Metabolizing Enzymes in Type II Diabetes and their Pharmacogenetics During Therapy of Anti-Diabetes Drugs.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Chiranjib; Hsu, Minna J; Agoramoorthy, Govindasamy

    2015-01-01

    The type 2 diabetes or T2D mellitus has turn into an epidemic throughout the globe in recent years. Various forms of treatment modalities have been available for patients with T2D with some major classes of approved drugs that include Sulfonylureas, Meglitinides, Biguanides, Thiazolidinedione, Alpha-glucosidase inhibitors, GLP-1 analogs, DPP-4 Inhibitors, and SGLT2 inhibitors. This review focuses on the drug metabolizing enzymes (DME), gene polymorphisms, and inter-individual variability in therapeutics including adverse reaction effects involving Phase-I DME and Phase-II in general. This review also covers some key anti-diabetic drugs with respect to their pharcogenomics. PMID:26652255

  18. Lipid nanocarriers containing ester prodrugs of flurbiprofen preparation, physical-chemical characterization and biological studies.

    PubMed

    Bondìl, M L; Craparo, E F; Picone, P; Giammona, G; Di Gesù, R; Di Carlo, M

    2013-02-01

    In this paper, the preparation, chemical-physical, technological and in vitro characterization of nanostructured lipid carriers (NLC) carrying R-flurbiprofen ester prodrugs, were analyzed for a potential pharmaceutical application. R-flurbiprofen was chosen as a model drug because it has been found to play an effective role in counteracting secretases involved in neurodegenerative diseases, although it does not cross the Blood Brain Barrier (BBB). In this study, two R-flurbiprofen ester prodrugs (ethyl and hexyl) were successfully synthesized and entrapped into non-pegylated and pegylated NLC. The obtained systems showed average diameters in the colloidal size range, negative zeta potential values and a good loading capacity. Drug release studies in physiological media on all drug-loaded samples showed a controlled drug release both at at pH 7.4 (containing esterase or not) and in human plasma of each ester prodrug, with a complete hydrolysis to R-flurbiprofen in media containing esterase. Empty and ethyl prodrug-loaded NLC were also demonstrated to have no cytotoxicity on human neuroblastoma (LAN5) cells, while hexyl prodrug-loaded NLC caused a reduction of cell viability probably due to a better capability of prodrug-loaded NLC to cross the cell membrane than the free compounds. These data were confirmed by microscopical observation, in which only the cells treated with hexyl prodrug-loaded NLC showed morphological changes. Outcoming data suggest that NLC could be potential carriers for parenteral administration of ethyl ester of R-flurbiprofen in the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's.

  19. A comparative evaluation of treatments with 17β-estradiol and its brain-selective prodrug in a double-transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Tschiffely, Anna E; Schuh, Rosemary A; Prokai-Tatrai, Katalin; Prokai, Laszlo; Ottinger, Mary Ann

    2016-07-01

    Estrogens are neuroprotective and, thus, potentially useful for the therapy of Alzheimer's disease; however, clinical use of hormone therapy remains controversial due to adverse peripheral effects. The goal of this study was to investigate the benefits of treatment with 10β,17β-dihydroxyestra-1,4-dien-3-one (DHED), a brain-selective prodrug of 17β-estradiol, in comparison with the parent hormone using APPswe/PS1dE9 double transgenic mice to model the pathology of the disease. Ovariectomized and intact females were continuously treated with vehicle, 17β-estradiol, or DHED via subcutaneous osmotic pumps from 6 to 8months of age. We confirmed that this prolonged treatment with DHED did not stimulate uterine tissue, whereas 17β-estradiol treatment increased uterine weight. Amyloid precursor protein decreased in both treatment groups of intact, but not in ovariectomized double transgenic females in which ovariectomy already decreased the expression of this protein significantly. However, reduced brain amyloid-β peptide levels could be observed for both treatments. Consequently, double-transgenic ovariectomized and intact mice had higher cognitive performance compared to untreated control animals in response to both estradiol and DHED administrations. Overall, the tested brain-selective 17β-estradiol prodrug proved to be an effective early-stage intervention in an Alzheimer's disease-relevant mouse model without showing systemic impact and, thus, warrants further evaluation as a potential therapeutic candidate.

  20. Biological and Mechanistic Characterization of Novel Prodrugs of Green Tea Polyphenol Epigallocatechin Gallate Analogs in Human Leiomyoma Cell Lines.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Reda Saber Ibrahim; Liu, Gang; Renzetti, Andrea; Farshi, Pershang; Yang, Huanjie; Soave, Claire; Saed, Ghassan; El-Ghoneimy, Ashraf Ahmed; El-Banna, Hossny Awad; Foldes, Robert; Chan, Tak-Hang; Dou, Q Ping

    2016-10-01

    Uterine fibroids (leiomyomas) are very common benign tumors grown on the smooth muscle layer of the uterus, present in up to 75% of reproductive-age women and causing significant morbidity in a subset of this population. Although the etiology and biology of uterine fibroids are unclear, strong evidence supports that cell proliferation, angiogenesis and fibrosis are involved in their formation and growth. Currently the only cure for uterine fibroids is hysterectomy; the available alternative therapies have limitations. Thus, there is an urgent need for developing a novel strategy for treating this condition. The green tea polyphenol epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) inhibits the growth of uterine leiomyoma cells in vitro and in vivo, and the use of a green tea extract (containing 45% EGCG) has demonstrated clinical activity without side effects in women with symptomatic uterine fibroids. However, EGCG has a number of shortcomings, including low stability, poor bioavailability, and high metabolic transformations under physiological conditions, presenting challenges for its development as a therapeutic agent. We developed a prodrug of EGCG (Pro-EGCG or 1) which shows increased stability, bioavailability and biological activity in vivo as compared to EGCG. We also synthesized prodrugs of EGCG analogs, compounds 2a and 4a, in order to potentially reduce their susceptibility to methylation/inhibition by catechol-O-methyltransferase. Here, we determined the effect of EGCG, Pro-EGCG, and 2a and 4a on cultured human uterine leiomyoma cells, and found that 2a and 4a have potent antiproliferative, antiangiogenic, and antifibrotic activities. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 2357-2369, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26950525

  1. Biological and Mechanistic Characterization of Novel Prodrugs of Green Tea Polyphenol Epigallocatechin Gallate Analogs in Human Leiomyoma Cell Lines.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Reda Saber Ibrahim; Liu, Gang; Renzetti, Andrea; Farshi, Pershang; Yang, Huanjie; Soave, Claire; Saed, Ghassan; El-Ghoneimy, Ashraf Ahmed; El-Banna, Hossny Awad; Foldes, Robert; Chan, Tak-Hang; Dou, Q Ping

    2016-10-01

    Uterine fibroids (leiomyomas) are very common benign tumors grown on the smooth muscle layer of the uterus, present in up to 75% of reproductive-age women and causing significant morbidity in a subset of this population. Although the etiology and biology of uterine fibroids are unclear, strong evidence supports that cell proliferation, angiogenesis and fibrosis are involved in their formation and growth. Currently the only cure for uterine fibroids is hysterectomy; the available alternative therapies have limitations. Thus, there is an urgent need for developing a novel strategy for treating this condition. The green tea polyphenol epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) inhibits the growth of uterine leiomyoma cells in vitro and in vivo, and the use of a green tea extract (containing 45% EGCG) has demonstrated clinical activity without side effects in women with symptomatic uterine fibroids. However, EGCG has a number of shortcomings, including low stability, poor bioavailability, and high metabolic transformations under physiological conditions, presenting challenges for its development as a therapeutic agent. We developed a prodrug of EGCG (Pro-EGCG or 1) which shows increased stability, bioavailability and biological activity in vivo as compared to EGCG. We also synthesized prodrugs of EGCG analogs, compounds 2a and 4a, in order to potentially reduce their susceptibility to methylation/inhibition by catechol-O-methyltransferase. Here, we determined the effect of EGCG, Pro-EGCG, and 2a and 4a on cultured human uterine leiomyoma cells, and found that 2a and 4a have potent antiproliferative, antiangiogenic, and antifibrotic activities. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 2357-2369, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. [Effect of estradiol valerate and chlormadinone acetate in hormone replacement therapy in postmenopause on Kupperman index, body weight, blood pressure, lipids, enzymes and electrolytes].

    PubMed

    Göretzlehner, G; Nikschick, S; Zimmermann, T

    1996-01-01

    Kupperman-index, weight, blood pressure, serum lipids, blood count, thrombocytes, fibrinogen, thrombine time, electrolytes, enzymes, serum proteins, bilirubine and other parameters were studied in 16 healthy post-menopausal women treated for 18 months with 2 mgs estradiol valerate continuously sequentially combined with the antiandrogenic progestogen chlormadinone acetate (CMA) 2 mgs from 1st to 12th every month of treatment. The women were examined after the 1st, 3rd, 6th, 12th, and 18th month during the last 3 days of the progestogen phase, where the CMA had been added to the estradiol valerate for at least 12 days. The combined estradiol-CMA therapy resulted in a significantly reduced Kupperman-index. The total serum cholesterol- and LDLC-levels were also reduced and the HDL-cholesterol and HDLC-cholesterol-quotient increased. Triglycerides, weight, blood pressure, enzymes, and other parameters were unchanged. The positively metabolic effects of estradiol valerate were not altered after the chlormadinone acetate in a sequential regime.

  3. Levodopa deactivates enzymes that regulate thiol-disulfide homeostasis and promotes neuronal cell death: implications for therapy of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Sabens, Elizabeth A; Distler, Anne M; Mieyal, John J

    2010-03-30

    Parkinson's disease (PD), characterized by dopaminergic neuronal loss, is attributed to oxidative stress, diminished glutathione (GSH) levels, mitochondrial dysfunction, and protein aggregation. Treatment of PD involves chronic administration of Levodopa (l-DOPA) which is a pro-oxidant and may disrupt sulfhydryl homeostasis. The goal of these studies is to elucidate the effects of l-DOPA on thiol homeostasis in a model akin to PD, i.e., immortalized dopaminergic neurons (SHSY5Y cells) with diminished GSH content. These neurons exhibit hypersensitivity to l-DOPA-induced cell death, which is attributable to concomitant inhibition of the intracellular thiol disulfide oxidoreductase enzymes. Glutaredoxin (Grx) was deactivated in a dose-dependent fashion, but its content was unaffected. Glutathione disulfide (GSSG) reductase (GR) activity was not altered. Selective knockdown of Grx resulted in an increased level of apoptosis, documenting the role of the Grx system in neuronal survival. l-DOPA treatments also led to decreased activities of thioredoxin (Trx) and thioredoxin reductase (TR), concomitant with diminution of their cellular contents. Selective chemical inhibition of TR activity led to an increased level of apoptosis, documenting the Trx system's contribution to neuronal viability. To investigate the mechanism of inhibition at the molecular level, we treated the each isolated enzyme with oxidized l-DOPA. GR, Trx, and TR activities were little affected. However, Grx was inactivated in a time- and concentration-dependent fashion indicative of irreversible adduction of dopaquinone to its nucleophilic active-site Cys-22, consistent with the intracellular loss of Grx activity but not Grx protein content after l-DOPA treatment. Overall l-DOPA is shown to impair the collaborative contributions of the Grx and Trx systems to neuron survival.

  4. Pervasive supply of therapeutic lysosomal enzymes in the CNS of normal and Krabbe-affected non-human primates by intracerebral lentiviral gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Meneghini, Vasco; Lattanzi, Annalisa; Tiradani, Luigi; Bravo, Gabriele; Morena, Francesco; Sanvito, Francesca; Calabria, Andrea; Bringas, John; Fisher-Perkins, Jeanne M; Dufour, Jason P; Baker, Kate C; Doglioni, Claudio; Montini, Eugenio; Bunnell, Bruce A; Bankiewicz, Krystof; Martino, Sabata; Naldini, Luigi; Gritti, Angela

    2016-05-02

    Metachromatic leukodystrophy (MLD) and globoid cell leukodystrophy (GLD or Krabbe disease) are severe neurodegenerative lysosomal storage diseases (LSD) caused by arylsulfatase A (ARSA) and galactosylceramidase (GALC) deficiency, respectively. Our previous studies established lentiviral gene therapy (GT) as a rapid and effective intervention to provide pervasive supply of therapeutic lysosomal enzymes in CNS tissues of MLD and GLD mice. Here, we investigated whether this strategy is similarly effective in juvenile non-human primates (NHP). To provide proof of principle for tolerability and biological efficacy of the strategy, we established a comprehensive study in normal NHP delivering a clinically relevant lentiviral vector encoding for the human ARSA transgene. Then, we injected a lentiviral vector coding for the human GALC transgene in Krabbe-affected rhesus macaques, evaluating for the first time the therapeutic potential of lentiviral GT in this unique LSD model. We showed favorable safety profile and consistent pattern of LV transduction and enzyme biodistribution in the two models, supporting the robustness of the proposed GT platform. We documented moderate inflammation at the injection sites, mild immune response to vector particles in few treated animals, no indication of immune response against transgenic products, and no molecular evidence of insertional genotoxicity. Efficient gene transfer in neurons, astrocytes, and oligodendrocytes close to the injection sites resulted in robust production and extensive spreading of transgenic enzymes in the whole CNS and in CSF, leading to supraphysiological ARSA activity in normal NHP and close to physiological GALC activity in the Krabbe NHP, in which biological efficacy was associated with preliminary indication of therapeutic benefit. These results support the rationale for the clinical translation of intracerebral lentiviral GT to address CNS pathology in MLD, GLD, and other neurodegenerative LSD.

  5. Pervasive supply of therapeutic lysosomal enzymes in the CNS of normal and Krabbe-affected non-human primates by intracerebral lentiviral gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Meneghini, Vasco; Lattanzi, Annalisa; Tiradani, Luigi; Bravo, Gabriele; Morena, Francesco; Sanvito, Francesca; Calabria, Andrea; Bringas, John; Fisher-Perkins, Jeanne M; Dufour, Jason P; Baker, Kate C; Doglioni, Claudio; Montini, Eugenio; Bunnell, Bruce A; Bankiewicz, Krystof; Martino, Sabata; Naldini, Luigi; Gritti, Angela

    2016-01-01

    Metachromatic leukodystrophy (MLD) and globoid cell leukodystrophy (GLD or Krabbe disease) are severe neurodegenerative lysosomal storage diseases (LSD) caused by arylsulfatase A (ARSA) and galactosylceramidase (GALC) deficiency, respectively. Our previous studies established lentiviral gene therapy (GT) as a rapid and effective intervention to provide pervasive supply of therapeutic lysosomal enzymes in CNS tissues of MLD and GLD mice. Here, we investigated whether this strategy is similarly effective in juvenile non-human primates (NHP). To provide proof of principle for tolerability and biological efficacy of the strategy, we established a comprehensive study in normal NHP delivering a clinically relevant lentiviral vector encoding for the human ARSA transgene. Then, we injected a lentiviral vector coding for the human GALC transgene in Krabbe-affected rhesus macaques, evaluating for the first time the therapeutic potential of lentiviral GT in this unique LSD model. We showed favorable safety profile and consistent pattern of LV transduction and enzyme biodistribution in the two models, supporting the robustness of the proposed GT platform. We documented moderate inflammation at the injection sites, mild immune response to vector particles in few treated animals, no indication of immune response against transgenic products, and no molecular evidence of insertional genotoxicity. Efficient gene transfer in neurons, astrocytes, and oligodendrocytes close to the injection sites resulted in robust production and extensive spreading of transgenic enzymes in the whole CNS and in CSF, leading to supraphysiological ARSA activity in normal NHP and close to physiological GALC activity in the Krabbe NHP, in which biological efficacy was associated with preliminary indication of therapeutic benefit. These results support the rationale for the clinical translation of intracerebral lentiviral GT to address CNS pathology in MLD, GLD, and other neurodegenerative LSD. PMID

  6. Flurbiprofen-antioxidant mutual prodrugs as safer nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs: synthesis, pharmacological investigation, and computational molecular modeling.

    PubMed

    Ashraf, Zaman; Alamgeer; Kanwal, Munazza; Hassan, Mubashir; Abdullah, Sahar; Waheed, Mamuna; Ahsan, Haseeb; Kim, Song Ja

    2016-01-01

    Flurbiprofen-antioxidant mutual prodrugs were synthesized to reduce the gastrointestinal (GI) effects associated with flurbiprofen. For reducing the GI toxicity, the free carboxylic group (-COOH) was temporarily masked by esterification with phenolic -OH of natural antioxidants vanillin, thymol, umbelliferone, and sesamol. The in vitro hydrolysis of synthesized prodrugs showed that they were stable in buffer solution at pH 1.2, indicating their stability in the stomach. The synthesized prodrugs undergo significant hydrolysis in 80% human plasma and thus release free flurbiprofen. The minimum reversion was observed at pH 1.2, suggesting that prodrugs are less irritating to the stomach than flurbiprofen. The anti-inflammatory, analgesic, antipyretic, and ulcerogenic activities of prodrugs were evaluated. All the synthesized prodrugs significantly (P<0.001) reduced the inflammation against carrageenan and egg albumin-induced paw edema at 4 hours of study. The reduction in the size of the inflamed paw showed that most of the compounds inhibited the later phase of inflammation. The prodrug 2-oxo-2H-chromen-7-yl-2-(2-fluorobiphenyl-4-yl)propanoate (4b) showed significant reduction in paw licking with percentage inhibition of 58%. It also exhibited higher analgesic activity, reducing the number of writhes with a percentage of 75%, whereas flurbiprofen showed 69% inhibition. Antipyretic activity was investigated using brewer's yeast-induced pyrexia model, and significant (P<0.001) reduction in rectal temperature was shown by all prodrugs at all times of assessment. The results of ulcerogenic activity showed that all prodrugs produced less GI irritation than flurbiprofen. Molecular docking and simulation studies were carried out with cyclooxygenase (COX-1 and COX-2) proteins, and it was observed that our prodrugs have more potential to selectively bind to COX-2 than to COX-1. It is concluded that the synthesized prodrugs have promising pharmacological activities with

  7. Flurbiprofen–antioxidant mutual prodrugs as safer nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs: synthesis, pharmacological investigation, and computational molecular modeling

    PubMed Central

    Ashraf, Zaman; Alamgeer; Kanwal, Munazza; Hassan, Mubashir; Abdullah, Sahar; Waheed, Mamuna; Ahsan, Haseeb; Kim, Song Ja

    2016-01-01

    Flurbiprofen–antioxidant mutual prodrugs were synthesized to reduce the gastrointestinal (GI) effects associated with flurbiprofen. For reducing the GI toxicity, the free carboxylic group (–COOH) was temporarily masked by esterification with phenolic –OH of natural antioxidants vanillin, thymol, umbelliferone, and sesamol. The in vitro hydrolysis of synthesized prodrugs showed that they were stable in buffer solution at pH 1.2, indicating their stability in the stomach. The synthesized prodrugs undergo significant hydrolysis in 80% human plasma and thus release free flurbiprofen. The minimum reversion was observed at pH 1.2, suggesting that prodrugs are less irritating to the stomach than flurbiprofen. The anti-inflammatory, analgesic, antipyretic, and ulcerogenic activities of prodrugs were evaluated. All the synthesized prodrugs significantly (P<0.001) reduced the inflammation against carrageenan and egg albumin-induced paw edema at 4 hours of study. The reduction in the size of the inflamed paw showed that most of the compounds inhibited the later phase of inflammation. The prodrug 2-oxo-2H-chromen-7-yl-2-(2-fluorobiphenyl-4-yl)propanoate (4b) showed significant reduction in paw licking with percentage inhibition of 58%. It also exhibited higher analgesic activity, reducing the number of writhes with a percentage of 75%, whereas flurbiprofen showed 69% inhibition. Antipyretic activity was investigated using brewer’s yeast-induced pyrexia model, and significant (P<0.001) reduction in rectal temperature was shown by all prodrugs at all times of assessment. The results of ulcerogenic activity showed that all prodrugs produced less GI irritation than flurbiprofen. Molecular docking and simulation studies were carried out with cyclooxygenase (COX-1 and COX-2) proteins, and it was observed that our prodrugs have more potential to selectively bind to COX-2 than to COX-1. It is concluded that the synthesized prodrugs have promising pharmacological activities

  8. Flurbiprofen-antioxidant mutual prodrugs as safer nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs: synthesis, pharmacological investigation, and computational molecular modeling.

    PubMed

    Ashraf, Zaman; Alamgeer; Kanwal, Munazza; Hassan, Mubashir; Abdullah, Sahar; Waheed, Mamuna; Ahsan, Haseeb; Kim, Song Ja

    2016-01-01

    Flurbiprofen-antioxidant mutual prodrugs were synthesized to reduce the gastrointestinal (GI) effects associated with flurbiprofen. For reducing the GI toxicity, the free carboxylic group (-COOH) was temporarily masked by esterification with phenolic -OH of natural antioxidants vanillin, thymol, umbelliferone, and sesamol. The in vitro hydrolysis of synthesized prodrugs showed that they were stable in buffer solution at pH 1.2, indicating their stability in the stomach. The synthesized prodrugs undergo significant hydrolysis in 80% human plasma and thus release free flurbiprofen. The minimum reversion was observed at pH 1.2, suggesting that prodrugs are less irritating to the stomach than flurbiprofen. The anti-inflammatory, analgesic, antipyretic, and ulcerogenic activities of prodrugs were evaluated. All the synthesized prodrugs significantly (P<0.001) reduced the inflammation against carrageenan and egg albumin-induced paw edema at 4 hours of study. The reduction in the size of the inflamed paw showed that most of the compounds inhibited the later phase of inflammation. The prodrug 2-oxo-2H-chromen-7-yl-2-(2-fluorobiphenyl-4-yl)propanoate (4b) showed significant reduction in paw licking with percentage inhibition of 58%. It also exhibited higher analgesic activity, reducing the number of writhes with a percentage of 75%, whereas flurbiprofen showed 69% inhibition. Antipyretic activity was investigated using brewer's yeast-induced pyrexia model, and significant (P<0.001) reduction in rectal temperature was shown by all prodrugs at all times of assessment. The results of ulcerogenic activity showed that all prodrugs produced less GI irritation than flurbiprofen. Molecular docking and simulation studies were carried out with cyclooxygenase (COX-1 and COX-2) proteins, and it was observed that our prodrugs have more potential to selectively bind to COX-2 than to COX-1. It is concluded that the synthesized prodrugs have promising pharmacological activities with

  9. Hunter syndrome in an 11-year old girl on enzyme replacement therapy with idursulfase: brain magnetic resonance imaging features and evolution.

    PubMed

    Manara, Renzo; Rampazzo, Angelica; Cananzi, Mara; Salviati, Leonardo; Mardari, Rodica; Drigo, Paola; Tomanin, Rosella; Gasparotto, Nicoletta; Priante, Elena; Scarpa, Maurizio

    2010-12-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis type II (MPS-II, Hunter disease) is a X-linked recessive disorder. Affected females are extremely rare, mostly due to skewed X chromosome inactivation. A few papers outline MPS-II brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) "gestalt" in males, but neuroradiological reports on females are still lacking. We present an 11-year-old girl affected by the severe form of MPS-II who was followed up over a time span of 8 years, focusing on clinical and brain MRI evolution. In the last 2.5 years, the patient has been treated with enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) with idursulfase (Elaprase™, Shire Human Genetic Therapies AB, Sweden). On brain and cervical MRI examination, abnormalities in our patient did not differ from those detected in male patients: J-shaped pituitary sella, enlargement of perivascular spaces, brain atrophy, mild T2-hyperintensity in the paratrigonal white matter, diffuse platyspondylia, and mild odontoid dysplasia with odontoid cup. Brain atrophy progressed despite ERT introduction, whereas perivascular space enlargement did not change significantly before and after ERT. Cognitive impairment worsened independently from the course of white matter abnormality. Despite a profound knowledge of genetic and biochemical aspects in MPS-II, neuroradiology is still poorly characterized, especially in female patients. Spinal and brain involvement and its natural course and evolution after ERT introduction still need to be clarified. PMID:20052546

  10. Preparation and Characterization of Lipophilic Doxorubicin Pro-drug Micelles.

    PubMed

    Li, Feng; Snow-Davis, Candace; Du, Chengan; Bondarev, Mikhail L; Saulsbury, Marilyn D; Heyliger, Simone O

    2016-01-01

    Micelles have been successfully used for the delivery of anticancer drugs. Amphiphilic polymers form core-shell structured micelles in an aqueous environment through self-assembly. The hydrophobic core of micelles functions as a drug reservoir and encapsulates hydrophobic drugs. The hydrophilic shell prevents the aggregation of micelles and also prolongs their systemic circulation in vivo. In this protocol, we describe a method to synthesize a doxorubicin lipophilic pro-drug, doxorubicin-palmitic acid (DOX-PA), which will enhance drug loading into micelles. A pH-sensitive hydrazone linker was used to conjugate doxorubicin with the lipid, which facilitates the release of free doxorubicin inside cancer cells. Synthesized DOX-PA was purified with a silica gel column using dichloromethane/methanol as the eluent. Purified DOX-PA was analyzed with thin layer chromatography (TLC) and (1)H-Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy ((1)H-NMR). A film dispersion method was used to prepare DOX-PA loaded DSPE-PEG micelles. In addition, several methods for characterizing micelle formulations are described, including determination of DOX-PA concentration and encapsulation efficiency, measurement of particle size and distribution, and assessment of in vitro anticancer activities. This protocol provides useful information regarding the preparation and characterization of drug-loaded micelles and thus will facilitate the research and development of novel micelle-based cancer nanomedicines. PMID:27584689

  11. Human pharmacokinetics and disposition of sarmoxicillin, a lipophilic amoxicillin prodrug.

    PubMed Central

    Smyth, R D; Pfeffer, M; Van Harken, D R; Cohen, A; Hottendorf, G H

    1981-01-01

    Sarmoxicillin, an amoxicillin prodrug, is the methoxymethyl ester of hetamoxicillin. Esterification converted amoxicillin from an amphoteric to a cationic compound and resulted in a 30- to 600-fold increase in lipid partitioning. Oral absorption studies in normal subjects demonstrated that sarmoxicillin was only partially hydrolyzed by nonenzymatic and gut or hepatic first-pass metabolism and that significant quantities of intact ester appeared in the systemic circulation. Sarmoxicillin was converted to amoxicillin in plasma by hydrolysis of the acetone penicinate and the methoxymethyl ester bonds. Significant amoxicillin levels were demonstrated in saliva after administration of sarmoxicillin, but not amoxicillin, over a 250- to 1,000-mg dose range. Differences in the absorption, distribution, or metabolism of amoxicillin were also evident in the lower plasma amoxicillin maximum concentration and area under the curve and longer half-life after sarmoxicillin administration. Differences in the distribution of this lipophilic ester could result in a significant increase in tissue penetration and subsequent therapeutic efficacy of amoxicillin when administered as sarmoxicillin. PMID:7271269

  12. Levodopa replacement therapy alters enzyme activities in striatum and neuropeptide content in striatal output regions of 6-hydroxydopamine lesioned rats.

    PubMed

    Engber, T M; Susel, Z; Kuo, S; Gerfen, C R; Chase, T N

    1991-06-21

    The effects of striatal dopamine denervation and levodopa replacement therapy on neuronal populations in the rat striatum were assessed by measurement of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) and choline acetyltransferase (CAT) activities in the striatum, dynorphin and substance P concentrations in the substantia nigra, and enkephalin concentration in the globus pallidus. Rats with a unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) lesion of the nigrostriatal pathway were treated for 21 days with levodopa (100 mg/kg/day, i.p., with 25 mg/kg benserazide) on either an intermittent (b.i.d.) or continuous (osmotic pump infusion) regimen and sacrificed following a three day drug washout. In saline-treated control rats, striatal GAD activity and globus pallidus enkephalin content were elevated and nigral substance P content was reduced ipsilateral to the 6-OHDA lesion. Intermittent levodopa treatment further increased GAD activity, decreased CAT activity, restored substance P to control levels, markedly increased dynorphin content, and had no effect on enkephalin. In contrast, continuous levodopa elevated globus pallidus enkephalin beyond the levels occurring with denervation, but had no effect on any of the other neurochemical measures. These results indicate that striatal neuronal populations are differentially affected by chronic levodopa therapy and by the continuous or intermittent nature of the treatment regimen. With the exception of substance P, levodopa did not reverse the effects of the 6-OHDA lesion but, rather, either exacerbated the lesion-induced changes (e.g. GAD and enkephalin) or altered neurochemical markers which had been unaffected by the lesion (e.g. CAT and dynorphin).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1717109

  13. Design, Synthesis, and In Vitro Kinetics Study of Atenolol Prodrugs for the Use in Aqueous Formulations

    PubMed Central

    Qtait, Alaa; Dajani, Khulod Khayyat; Abu Lafi, Saleh

    2014-01-01

    Based on DFT, MP2, and the density functional from Truhlar group (hybrid GGA: MPW1k) calculations for an acid-catalyzed hydrolysis of nine Kirby's N-alkylmaleamic acids and two atenolol prodrugs were designed. The calculations demonstrated that the amide bond cleavage is due to intramolecular nucleophilic catalysis by the adjacent carboxylic acid group and the rate-limiting step is determined based on the nature of the amine leaving group. In addition, a linear correlation of the calculated and experimental rate values has drawn credible basis for designing atenolol prodrugs that are bitterless, are stable in neutral aqueous solutions, and have the potential to release the parent drug in a sustained release manner. For example, based on the calculated B3LYP/6-31 G (d,p) rates, the predicted t1/2 (a time needed for 50% of the prodrug to be converted into drug) values for atenolol prodrugs ProD 1-ProD 2 at pH 2 were 65.3 hours (6.3 hours as calculated by GGA: MPW1K) and 11.8 minutes, respectively. In vitro kinetic study of atenolol prodrug ProD 1 demonstrated that the t1/2 was largely affected by the pH of the medium. The determined t1/2 values in 1N HCl, buffer pH 2, and buffer pH 5 were 2.53, 3.82, and 133 hours, respectively. PMID:24526887

  14. Triple-Layered pH-Responsive Micelleplexes Loaded with siRNA and Cisplatin Prodrug for NF-Kappa B Targeted Treatment of Metastatic Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Haijun; Guo, Chengyue; Feng, Bing; Liu, Jianping; Chen, Xianzhi; Wang, Dangge; Teng, Lesheng; Li, Youxin; Yin, Qi; Zhang, Zhiwen; Li, Yaping

    2016-01-01

    The combination of chemotherapy and RNA interference is a promising approach for efficient cancer therapy. However, the success of such a strategy is hampered by the lack of suitable vectors to coordinate small interfering RNA (siRNA) and chemotherapeutic drug into one single platform. We herein report a novel triple-layered pH-responsive micelleplex loading siRNA and alkylated cisplatin prodrug for NF-Kappa B targeted treatment of metastatic breast cancer. The micelles were self-assembled from poly(ethylene glycol)-block-poly(aminolated glycidyl methacrylate)-block-poly(2-(diisopropyl amino) ethyl methacrylate) (PEG-b-PAGA-b-PDPA) triblock copolymers. At pH 7.4, the cisplatin prodrug was encapsulated in the hydrophobic PDPA core and siRNA was loaded on the positively charged PAGA interlayer to form the micelleplexes. The PEG corona can prevent protein absorption during blood circulation, minimize non-specific interaction with the reticuloendothelial system, and prolong the systemic circulation of the micelleplexes. The positively charged PAGA interlayer can facilitate deep tumor penetration of the micelleplexes, which, upon cellular uptake, are dissociated in the early endosomes to release anticancer drug payload due to protonation of the PDPA core. Using a 4T1 breast cancer model, we demonstrate that this novel micelleplex co-loaded with cisplatin prodrug and siRNA-p65 is able to simultaneously inhibit tumor growth and suppress distant metastasis of the cancer cells by downregulating NF-kappa B expression. The results reported in this study suggest that siRNA and anticancer drug co-delivery using pH-responsive micelleplexes is a promising strategy for efficient treatment of metastatic cancer. PMID:26722370

  15. Velaglucerase alfa (VPRIV) enzyme replacement therapy in patients with Gaucher disease: Long-term data from phase III clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Derralynn A; Gonzalez, Derlis E; Lukina, Elena A; Mehta, Atul; Kabra, Madhulika; Elstein, Deborah; Kisinovsky, Isaac; Giraldo, Pilar; Bavdekar, Ashish; Hangartner, Thomas N; Wang, Nan; Crombez, Eric; Zimran, Ari

    2015-01-01

    Type 1 Gaucher disease is an inherited lysosomal enzyme deficiency with variable age of symptom onset. Common presenting signs include thrombocytopenia, anemia, hepatosplenomegaly, bone abnormalities, and, additionally in children, growth failure. Fifty-seven patients aged 3–62 years at the baseline of two phase III trials for velaglucerase alfa treatment were enrolled in the single extension study. In the extension, they received every-other-week velaglucerase alfa intravenous infusions for 1.2–4.8 years at 60 U/kg, although 10 patients experienced dose reduction. No patient experienced a drug-related serious adverse event or withdrew due to an adverse event. One patient died following a convulsion that was reported as unrelated to the study drug. Only one patient tested positive for anti-velaglucerase alfa antibodies. Combining the experience of the initial phase III trials and the extension study, significant improvements were observed in the first 24 months from baseline in hematology variables, organ volumes, plasma biomarkers, and, in adults, the lumbar spine bone mineral density Z-score. Improvements were maintained over longer-term treatment. Velaglucerase alfa had a good long-term safety and tolerability profile, and patients continued to respond clinically, which is consistent with the results of the extension study to the phase I/II trial of velaglucerase alfa. EudraCT number 2008-001965-27; http://www.clinicaltrials.gov identifier NCT00635427. Am. J. Hematol. 90:584–591, 2015. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:25801797

  16. Stem Cell Based Gene Therapy in Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hong Jun; Song, Yun Seob

    2014-01-01

    Current prostate cancer treatment, especially hormone refractory cancer, may create profound iatrogenic outcomes because of the adverse effects of cytotoxic agents. Suicide gene therapy has been investigated for the substitute modality for current chemotherapy because it enables the treatment targeting the cancer cells. However the classic suicide gene therapy has several profound side effects, including immune-compromised due to viral vector. Recently, stem cells have been regarded as a new upgraded cellular vehicle or vector because of its homing effects. Suicide gene therapy using genetically engineered mesenchymal stem cells or neural stem cells has the advantage of being safe, because prodrug administration not only eliminates tumor cells but consequently kills the more resistant therapeutic stem cells as well. The attractiveness of prodrug cancer gene therapy by stem cells targeted to tumors lies in activating the prodrug directly within the tumor mass, thus avoiding systemic toxicity. Therapeutic achievements using stem cells in prostate cancer include the cytosine deaminase/5-fluorocytosine prodrug system, herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase/ganciclovir, carboxyl esterase/CPT11, and interferon-beta. The aim of this study is to review the stem cell therapy in prostate cancer including its proven mechanisms and also limitations. PMID:25121103

  17. Pharmacokinetics of the amidine prodrug of a novel oral anticoagulant factor VIIa inhibitor (AS1924269-00) in rats.

    PubMed

    Nakabayashi, T; Gotoh, Y; Kamada, N; Fujioka, M; Ishihara, T; Hirabayashi, A; Sato, H

    2013-05-01

    AS1924269-00 is a promising orally applicable anticoagulant that inhibits FVIIa but has very low oral absorption. Therefore, in this study, we aimed to develop a prodrug of AS1924269-00, which possesses a carbamate-added amidine functional group, with high membrane permeability. We investigated the pharmacokinetics of the carbamate-type prodrug of AS1924269-00 in rats. The Caco-2 cell monolayer was used as an in vitro model and in parallel an artificial membrane permeability assay (PAMPA) was performed to examine the transport mechanisms of the prodrug. The bioavailability of the active form was determined to be only 0.3% in rats, but the oral absorption of the prodrug was markedly improved, and its bioavailability was 36%. Our in vivo result was consistent with the finding that compared to AS1924269-00, the prodrug showed favorable permeability in Caco-2 cells and PAMPA. We introduced carbamate into the amidine functional group of the FVIIa inhibitor, which possesses the amidine backbone, and converted it to a prodrug using carboxylic acid ethyl ester. This novel prodrug had favorable absorption and membrane permeability in vivo and in vitro. Thus, we suggest a clinical application of the carbamate-added amidine prodrug of the FVIIa inhibitor. PMID:23802432

  18. Synthesis, In Vitro and In Vivo Evaluation of the N-ethoxycarbonylmorpholine Ester of Diclofenac as a Prodrug.

    PubMed

    Jilani, Jamal A; Idkaidek, Nasir M; Alzoubi, Karem H

    2014-01-01

    The N-ethoxycarbonylmorpholine moiety was evaluated as a novel prodrug moiety for carboxylic acid containing drugs represented by diclofenac (1). Compound 2, the N-ethoxycarbonylmorpholine ester of diclofenac was synthesized and evaluated as a potential prodrug. The stability of the synthesized prodrug was evaluated in solutions of pH 1 and 7.4, and in plasma. The ester's half lives were found to be 8 h, 47 h and 21 min in pH 1, pH 7.4 and plasma, respectively. Equimolar doses of diclofenac sodium and its synthesized prodrug were administered orally to a group of rabbits in a crossover study to evaluate their pharmacokinetic parameters. The prodrug 2 shows a similar rate and extent of absorption as the parent drug (1). The ulcerogenicity of the prepared prodrug was evaluated and compared with the parent drug. The prodrug showed less ulcerogenicity as detected by fewer number and smaller size of ulcers. In conclusion, the newly synthesized N-ethoxycarbonylmorpholine ester of diclofenac prodrug showed appropriate stability properties at different pHs, similar pharmacokinetic profile, and much less ulcerogenecity at the GIT compared to the parent drug diclofenac.

  19. Synthesis, In Vitro and In Vivo Evaluation of the N-ethoxycarbonylmorpholine Ester of Diclofenac as a Prodrug

    PubMed Central

    Jilani, Jamal A.; Idkaidek, Nasir M.; Alzoubi, Karem H.

    2014-01-01

    The N-ethoxycarbonylmorpholine moiety was evaluated as a novel prodrug moiety for carboxylic acid containing drugs represented by diclofenac (1). Compound 2, the N-ethoxycarbonylmorpholine ester of diclofenac was synthesized and evaluated as a potential prodrug. The stability of the synthesized prodrug was evaluated in solutions of pH 1 and 7.4, and in plasma. The ester’s half lives were found to be 8 h, 47 h and 21 min in pH 1, pH 7.4 and plasma, respectively. Equimolar doses of diclofenac sodium and its synthesized prodrug were administered orally to a group of rabbits in a crossover study to evaluate their pharmacokinetic parameters. The prodrug 2 shows a similar rate and extent of absorption as the parent drug (1). The ulcerogenicity of the prepared prodrug was evaluated and compared with the parent drug. The prodrug showed less ulcerogenicity as detected by fewer number and smaller size of ulcers. In conclusion, the newly synthesized N-ethoxycarbonylmorpholine ester of diclofenac prodrug showed appropriate stability properties at different pHs, similar pharmacokinetic profile, and much less ulcerogenecity at the GIT compared to the parent drug diclofenac. PMID:24736104

  20. Synthesis of a highly water-soluble acacetin prodrug for treating experimental atrial fibrillation in beagle dogs

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hui; Wang, Ya-Jing; Yang, Lei; Zhou, Mei; Jin, Man-Wen; Xiao, Guo-Sheng; Wang, Yan; Sun, Hai-Ying; Li, Gui-Rong

    2016-01-01

    We previously reported that duodenal administration of the natural flavone acacetin can effectively prevent the induction of experimental atrial fibrillation (AF) in canines; however, it may not be used intravenously to terminate AF due to its poor water-solubility. The present study was to design a water-soluble prodrug of acacetin and investigate its anti-AF effect in beagle dogs. Acacetin prodrug was synthesized by a three-step procedure. Aqueous solubility, bioconversion and anti-AF efficacy of acacetin prodrug were determined with different methodologies. Our results demonstrated that the synthesized phosphate sodium salt of acacetin prodrug had a remarkable increase of aqueous solubility in H2O and clinically acceptable solution (5% glucose or 0.9% NaCl). The acacetin prodrug was effectively converted into acacetin in ex vivo rat plasma and liver microsome, and in vivo beagle dogs. Intravenous infusion of acacetin prodrug (3, 6 and 12 mg/kg) terminated experimental AF without increasing ECG QTc interval in beagle dogs. The intravenous LD50 of acacetin prodrug was 721 mg/kg in mice. Our preclinical study indicates that the synthesized acacetin prodrug is highly water-soluble and safe; it effectively terminates experimental AF in beagle dogs and therefore may be a promising drug candidate for clinical trial to treat patients with acute AF. PMID:27160397

  1. Multifactorial resistance to aminopeptidase inhibitor prodrug CHR2863 in myeloid leukemia cells: down-regulation of carboxylesterase 1, drug sequestration in lipid droplets and pro-survival activation ERK/Akt/mTOR

    PubMed Central

    Verbrugge, Sue Ellen; Al, Marjon; Assaraf, Yehuda G.; Kammerer, Sarah; Chandrupatla, Durga M.S.H.; Honeywell, Richard; Musters, Rene P.J.; Giovannetti, Elisa; O'Toole, Tom; Scheffer, George L.; Krige, David; de Gruijl, Tanja D.; Niessen, Hans W.M.; Lems, Willem F.; Kramer, Pieternella A.; Scheper, Rik J.; Cloos, Jacqueline; Ossenkoppele, Gert J.; Peters, Godefridus J.; Jansen, Gerrit

    2016-01-01

    Aminopeptidase inhibitors are receiving attention as combination chemotherapeutic agents for the treatment of refractory acute myeloid leukemia. However, the factors determining therapeutic efficacy remain elusive. Here we identified the molecular basis of acquired resistance to CHR2863, an orally available hydrophobic aminopeptidase inhibitor prodrug with an esterase-sensitive motif, in myeloid leukemia cells. CHR2863 enters cells by diffusion and is retained therein upon esterase activity-mediated conversion to its hydrophilic active metabolite drug CHR6768, thereby exerting amino acid depletion. Carboxylesterases (CES) serve as candidate prodrug activating enzymes given CES1 expression in acute myeloid leukemia specimens. We established two novel myeloid leukemia sublines U937/CHR2863(200) and U937/CHR2863(5uM), with low (14-fold) and high level (270-fold) CHR2863 resistance. The latter drug resistant cells displayed: (i) complete loss of CES1-mediated drug activation associated with down-regulation of CES1 mRNA and protein, (ii) marked retention/sequestration of the prodrug, (iii) a substantial increase in intracellular lipid droplets, and (iv) a dominant activation of the pro-survival Akt/mTOR pathway. Remarkably, the latter feature coincided with a gain of sensitivity to the mTOR inhibitor rapamycin. These finding delineate the molecular basis of CHR2863 resistance and offer a novel modality to overcome this drug resistance in myeloid leukemia cells. PMID:26496029

  2. Structure of ThiM from Vitamin B1 biosynthetic pathway of Staphylococcus aureus – Insights into a novel pro-drug approach addressing MRSA infections

    PubMed Central

    Drebes, Julia; Künz, Madeleine; Windshügel, Björn; Kikhney, Alexey G.; Müller, Ingrid B.; Eberle, Raphael J.; Oberthür, Dominik; Cang, Huaixing; Svergun, Dmitri I.; Perbandt, Markus; Betzel, Christian; Wrenger, Carsten

    2016-01-01

    Infections caused by the methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) are today known to be a substantial threat for global health. Emerging multi-drug resistant bacteria have created a substantial need to identify and discover new drug targets and to develop novel strategies to treat bacterial infections. A promising and so far untapped antibiotic target is the biosynthesis of vitamin B1 (thiamin). Thiamin in its activated form, thiamin pyrophosphate, is an essential co-factor for all organisms. Therefore, thiamin analogous compounds, when introduced into the vitamin B1 biosynthetic pathway and further converted into non-functional co-factors by the bacterium can function as pro-drugs which thus block various co-factor dependent pathways. We characterized one of the key enzymes within the S. aureus vitamin B1 biosynthetic pathway, 5-(hydroxyethyl)-4-methylthiazole kinase (SaThiM; EC 2.7.1.50), a potential target for pro-drug compounds and analyzed the native structure of SaThiM and complexes with the natural substrate 5-(hydroxyethyl)-4-methylthiazole (THZ) and two selected substrate analogues. PMID:26960569

  3. Structure of ThiM from Vitamin B1 biosynthetic pathway of Staphylococcus aureus – Insights into a novel pro-drug approach addressing MRSA infections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drebes, Julia; Künz, Madeleine; Windshügel, Björn; Kikhney, Alexey G.; Müller, Ingrid B.; Eberle, Raphael J.; Oberthür, Dominik; Cang, Huaixing; Svergun, Dmitri I.; Perbandt, Markus; Betzel, Christian; Wrenger, Carsten

    2016-03-01

    Infections caused by the methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) are today known to be a substantial threat for global health. Emerging multi-drug resistant bacteria have created a substantial need to identify and discover new drug targets and to develop novel strategies to treat bacterial infections. A promising and so far untapped antibiotic target is the biosynthesis of vitamin B1 (thiamin). Thiamin in its activated form, thiamin pyrophosphate, is an essential co-factor for all organisms. Therefore, thiamin analogous compounds, when introduced into the vitamin B1 biosynthetic pathway and further converted into non-functional co-factors by the bacterium can function as pro-drugs which thus block various co-factor dependent pathways. We characterized one of the key enzymes within the S. aureus vitamin B1 biosynthetic pathway, 5-(hydroxyethyl)-4-methylthiazole kinase (SaThiM; EC 2.7.1.50), a potential target for pro-drug compounds and analyzed the native structure of SaThiM and complexes with the natural substrate 5-(hydroxyethyl)-4-methylthiazole (THZ) and two selected substrate analogues.

  4. Synthesis and evaluation of mutual azo prodrug of 5-aminosalicylic acid linked to 2-phenylbenzoxazole-2-yl-5-acetic acid in ulcerative colitis

    PubMed Central

    Jilani, Jamal A; Shomaf, Maha; Alzoubi, Karem H

    2013-01-01

    In this study, the syntheses of 4-aminophenylbenzoxazol-2-yl-5-acetic acid, (an analogue of a known nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug [NSAID]) and 5-[4-(benzoxazol-2-yl-5-acetic acid)phenylazo]-2-hydroxybenzoic acid (a novel mutual azo prodrug of 5-aminosalicylic acid [5-ASA]) are reported. The structures of the synthesized compounds were confirmed using infrared (IR), hydrogen-1 nuclear magnetic resonance (1H NMR), and mass spectrometry (MS) spectroscopy. Incubation of the azo compound with rat cecal contents demonstrated the susceptibility of the prepared azo prodrug to bacterial azoreductase enzyme. The azo compound and the 4-aminophenylbenzoxazol-2-yl-5-acetic acid were evaluated for inflammatory bowel diseases, in trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid (TNB)-induced colitis in rats. The synthesized diazo compound and the 4-aminophenylbenzoxazol-2-yl-5-acetic acid were found to be as effective as 5-aminosalicylic acid for ulcerative colitis. The results of this work suggest that the 4-aminophenylbenzoxazol-2-yl-5-acetic acid may represent a new lead for treatment of ulcerative colitis. PMID:23983456

  5. Design, synthesis and biological evaluation of brain targeting l-ascorbic acid prodrugs of ibuprofen with "lock-in" function.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yi; Qu, Boyi; Wu, Xueying; Li, Xiaocen; Liu, Qingqing; Jin, Xiuxiu; Guo, Li; Hai, Li; Wu, Yong

    2014-07-23

    A novel brain targeting l-ascorbic acid derivatives with "lock-in" function were designed and synthesized as prodrugs to achieve the effective delivery of ibuprofen to brain by glucose transporter 1 (GLUT1) and the Na(+)-dependent vitamin C transporter SVCT2. Ibuprofen-loaded four prodrugs were tested in the animals. Results from the in vivo distribution study after i.v. administration of these four prodrugs and naked ibuprofen indicated that four prodrugs exhibited excellent transport ability across the BBB and significantly increased the level of ibuprofen in brain. Among them, prodrugs 4 showed higher brain concentration. Both biodistribution data and pharmacokinetic parameters suggested that l-ascorbic acid thiamine disulfide delivery system was a promising carrier to enhance CNS drug's delivery ability into brain.

  6. Poly(ethylene glycol)-Prodrug Conjugates: Concept, Design, and Applications

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Shashwat S.; Aher, Naval; Patil, Rajesh; Khandare, Jayant

    2012-01-01

    Poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) is the most widely used polymer in delivering anticancer drugs clinically. PEGylation (i.e., the covalent attachment of PEG) of peptides proteins, drugs, and bioactives is known to enhance the aqueous solubility of hydrophobic drugs, prolong circulation time, minimize nonspecific uptake, and achieve specific tumor targetability through the enhanced permeability and retention effect. Numerous PEG-based therapeutics have been developed, and several have received market approval. A vast amount of clinical experience has been gained which has helped to design PEG prodrug conjugates with improved therapeutic efficacy and reduced systemic toxicity. However, more efforts in designing PEG-based prodrug conjugates are anticipated. In light of this, the current paper highlights the synthetic advances in PEG prodrug conjugation methodologies with varied bioactive components of clinical relevance. In addition, this paper discusses FDA-approved PEGylated delivery systems, their intended clinical applications, and formulations under clinical trials. PMID:22645686

  7. Development of Platinum(iv) Complexes as Anticancer Prodrugs: the Story so Far

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Daniel Yuan Qiang; Ang, Wee Han

    2012-06-01

    The serendipitous discovery of the antitumor properties of cisplatin by Barnett Rosenberg some forty years ago brought about a paradigm shift in the field of medicinal chemistry and challenged conventional thinking regarding the role of potentially toxic heavy metals in drugs. Platinum(II)-based anticancer drugs have since become some of the most effective and widely-used drugs in a clinician's arsenal and have saved countless lives. However, they are limited by high toxicity, severe side-effects and the incidence of drug resistance. In recent years, attention has shifted to stable platinum(IV) complexes as anticancer prodrugs. By exploiting the unique chemical and structural attributes of their scaffolds, these platinum(IV) prodrugs offer new strategies of targeting and killing cancer cells. This review summarizes the development of anticancer platinum(IV) prodrugs to date and some of the exciting strategies that utilise the platinum(IV) construct as targeted chemotherapeutic agents against cancer.

  8. Drug-Initiated Synthesis of Polymer Prodrugs: Combining Simplicity and Efficacy in Drug Delivery†

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    In the field of nanomedicine, the global trend over the past few years has been toward the design of highly sophisticated drug delivery systems with active targeting and/or imaging capabilities, as well as responsiveness to various stimuli to increase their therapeutic efficacy. However, providing sophistication generally increases complexity that could be detrimental in regards to potential pharmaceutical development. An emerging concept to design efficient yet simple drug delivery systems, termed the “drug-initiated” method, consists of growing short polymer chains from drugs in a controlled fashion to yield well-defined drug–polymer prodrugs. These materials are obtained in a reduced amount of synthetic steps and can be self-assembled into polymer prodrug nanoparticles, be incorporated into lipid nanocarriers or be used as water-soluble polymer prodrugs. This Perspective article will capture the recent achievements from the “drug-initiated” method and highlight the great biomedical potential of these materials. PMID:27041820

  9. Synthesis and in vitro Evaluation of Polymeric Prodrug of Ibuprofen with Amino Acid Spacer.

    PubMed

    Redasani, Vivekkumar K; Bari, Sanjay B

    2015-01-01

    The present work is an agreement with simple and efficient method of improving the therapeutic efficacy of ibuprofen by masking its acidic moiety. It aims to reduce gastrointestinal side effects by controlling the rate, duration and site of release. This is achieved by synthesis and evaluation of polymeric prodrug of ibuprofen with natural polymer sodium alginate. The synthesis was supported by N-protected serine as spacer due to chemical incompatibility of drug and polymer. Synthesized prodrug was characterized for confirmation of said structures. The in-vitro dissolution profile of ibuprofen-alginate prodrug showed that the release of the drug is significantly higher in case of pH 7.2 buffer as compared to ibuprofen, which might be due to ester group adjacent to drug get hydrolyzed. The hydrolysis was found to be with faster rate in alkaline media than that of in acidic media.

  10. Modulation of Activity Profiles for Largazole-Based HDAC Inhibitors through Alteration of Prodrug Properties

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Largazole is a potent and class I-selective histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor purified from marine cyanobacteria and was demonstrated to possess antitumor activity. Largazole employs a unique prodrug strategy, via a thioester moiety, to liberate the bioactive species largazole thiol. Here we report alternate prodrug strategies to modulate the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamics profiles of new largazole-based compounds. The in vitro effects of largazole analogues on cancer cell proliferation and enzymatic activities of purified HDACs were comparable to the natural product. However, in vitro and in vivo histone hyperacetylation in HCT116 cells and implanted tumors, respectively, showed differences, particularly in the onset of action and oral bioavailability. These results indicate that, by employing a different approach to disguise the “warhead” moiety, the functional consequence of these prodrugs can be significantly modulated. Our data corroborate the role of the pharmacokinetic properties of this class of compounds to elicit the desired and timely functional response. PMID:25147612

  11. Novel Resveratrol-Based Aspirin Prodrugs: Synthesis, Metabolism, and Anticancer Activity.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yingdong; Fu, Junsheng; Shurlknight, Kelly L; Soroka, Dominique N; Hu, Yuhui; Chen, Xiaoxin; Sang, Shengmin

    2015-08-27

    Regular aspirin use has been convincingly shown to reduce the risk of colorectal cancer. However, long-term use of aspirin leads to gastrotoxicity. Herein, we designed and synthesized a novel class of resveratrol-based aspirin prodrugs to simultaneously release aspirin and resveratrol to attenuate the side effects caused by aspirin. Prodrug RAH exerted enhanced anticancer activities which are better than a physical mixture of aspirin and resveratrol as well as each individually. Metabolism of RAH in mice showed that the majority of RAH is decomposed to release resveratrol and aspirin or salicylic acid either in the intestine or after absorption. Mechanistic studies demonstrate RAH inhibits cell cycle arrest through downregulation of cyclins and induces apoptosis by activation of caspase-3 in cancer cells. These findings highlighted the improved anticancer properties of resveratrol-based aspirin prodrugs. RAH may represent novel and safe alternatives of aspirin for the purpose of daily use in the future.

  12. Microbial-based therapy of cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bernardes, Nuno; Seruca, Raquel; Chakrabarty, Ananda M

    2010-01-01

    The use of bacteria in the regression of certain forms of cancer has been recognized for more than a century. Much effort, therefore, has been spent over the years in developing wild-type or modified bacterial strains to treat cancer. However, their use at the dose required for therapeutic efficacy has always been associated with toxicity problems and other deleterious effects. Recently, the old idea of using bacteria in the treatment of cancer has attracted considerable interest and new genetically engineered attenuated strains as well as microbial compounds that might have specific anticancer activity without side effects are being evaluated for their ability to act as new anticancer agents. This involves the use of attenuated bacterial strains and expressing foreign genes that encode the ability to convert non-toxic prodrugs to cytotoxic drugs. Novel strategies also include the use of bacterial products such as proteins, enzymes, immunotoxins and secondary metabolites, which specifically target cancer cells and cause tumor regression through growth inhibition, cell cycle arrest or apoptosis induction. In this review we describe the current knowledge and discuss the future directions regarding the use of bacteria or their products, in cancer therapy. PMID:21326924

  13. Decreased Risk of Radiation Pneumonitis With Incidental Concurrent Use of Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors and Thoracic Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kharofa, Jordan; Cohen, Eric P.; Tomic, Rade; Xiang Qun; Gore, Elizabeth

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors have been shown to mitigate radiation-induced lung injury in preclinical models. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether ACE inhibitors decrease the risk of radiation pneumonitis in lung cancer patients receiving thoracic irradiation. Methods and Materials: Patients with Stage I through III small-cell and non-small-cell lung cancer treated definitively with radiation from 2004-2009 at the Clement J. Zablocki Veterans Affairs Medical Center were retrospectively reviewed. Acute pulmonary toxicity was quantified within 6 months of completion of treatment according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 4. The use of ACE inhibitors, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, inhaled glucocorticosteroids, statins, and angiotensin receptor blockers; dose-volume histogram parameters; and patient factors were assessed for association with Grade 2 or higher pneumonitis. Results: A total of 162 patients met the criteria for inclusion. The majority of patients had Stage III disease (64%) and received concurrent chemotherapy (61%). Sixty-two patients were identified as ACE inhibitor users (38%). All patients had acceptable radiation plans based on dose-volume histogram constraints (V20 [volume of lung receiving at least 20 Gy] {<=}37% and mean lung dose {<=}20 Gy) with the exception of 2 patients who did not meet both criteria. Grade 2 or higher pulmonary toxicity occurred in 12 patients (7.4%). The rate of Grade 2 or higher pneumonitis was lower in ACE inhibitor users vs. nonusers (2% vs. 11%, p = 0.032). Rates of Grade 2 or higher pneumonitis were significantly increased in patients aged greater than 70 years (16% vs. 2%, p = 0.005) or in whom V5 (volume of lung receiving at least 5 Gy) was 50% or greater (13% vs. 4%, p = 0.04). V10 (volume of lung receiving at least 10 Gy), V20, V30 (volume of lung receiving at least 30 Gy), and mean lung dose were not independently associated with Grade 2 or

  14. An overview of prodrug technology and its application for developing abuse-deterrent opioids.

    PubMed

    Gudin, Jeffrey A; Nalamachu, Srinivas R

    2016-01-01

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has classified prescription drug abuse and overdose deaths as an epidemic. Prescription drug overdose is now the leading cause of injury death, with rates that have more than doubled since 1999. This crisis has developed concurrently with the increased prescribing and availability analgesic drugs, especially opioids, resulting from an effort on the part of clinicians to address a critical need for improved pain assessment and treatment. Clinicians have recognized that oftentimes, opioid analgesics are one of the few remaining options for patients who suffer with severe pain. A 2015 fact sheet issued by the Office of National Drug Policy stated: "While we must ensure better access to prescription medications to alleviate suffering, it is also vital that we do all we can to reduce the diversion and abuse of pharmaceuticals." The US Food and Drug Administration has issued guidance that encourages the research and development of abuse-deterrent formulation of opioids which have the potential to curtail abuse. Included among the recommended formulations for development of abuse-deterrent opioids are prodrugs. Prodrugs are chemically modified versions of pharmacological agents that must undergo a biochemical conversion following administration, often by enzymatic cleavage, to free the active drug. Prodrugs may be inherently abuse-deterrent because they are inactive or significantly less active until conversion to the active drug. This requirement for conversion in the GI tract can modify the pharmacokinetic profile and eliminate or reduce the euphoria when abusers change the route of administration. Abusers often attempt to extract the active drug for injection or insufflation. Prodrugs can be designed to be resistant to crushing or dissolving. In this article, we review the concept of prodrugs and introduce and examine the potential of abuse-deterrent opioid prodrugs.

  15. Acetal-linked polymeric prodrug micelles for enhanced curcumin delivery.

    PubMed

    Li, Man; Gao, Min; Fu, Yunlan; Chen, Chao; Meng, Xuan; Fan, Aiping; Kong, Deling; Wang, Zheng; Zhao, Yanjun

    2016-04-01

    On-demand curcumin delivery via stimuli-responsive micellar nanocarriers holds promise for addressing its solubility and stability problem. Polymer-curcumin prodrug conjugate micelle is one of such nanosystems. The diversity of linker and conjugation chemistry enabled the generation and optimization of different curcumin micelles with tunable stimuli-responsiveness and delivery efficiency. The aim of the current work was to generate and assess acetal-linked polymeric micelles to enrich the pH-responsive curcumin delivery platforms. Curcumin was slightly modified prior to conjugating to amphiphilic methoxy poly(ethylene glycol)-poly(lactic acid) (mPEG-PLA) copolymer via an acetal bond, whereas an ester bond-linked conjugate was used as the control. The acetal-containing micelles showed a hydrodynamic diameter of 91.1 ± 2.9(nm) and the accompanying core size of 63.5 ± 7.1 (nm) with a zeta potential of -10.9 ± 0.7(mV). Both control and pH-labile micelles displayed similar critical micelle concentration at 1.6 μM. The acetal-containing nanocarriers exhibited a pH-dependent drug release behavior, which was faster at lower pH values. The cytotoxicity study in HepG2 cells revealed a significantly lower IC50 at 51.7 ± 9.0(μM) for acetal-linked micelles in contrast to the control at 103.0 ± 17.8(μM), but the polymer residue showed no cytotoxicity upon drug release. The acetal-linked micellar nanocarrier could be a useful addition to the spectrum of currently available stimuli-responsive curcumin nano-formulations. PMID:26731193

  16. An interfacial and comparative in vitro study of gastrointestinal lipases and Yarrowia lipolytica LIP2 lipase, a candidate for enzyme replacement therapy.

    PubMed

    Bénarouche, Anaïs; Point, Vanessa; Carrière, Frédéric; Cavalier, Jean-François

    2014-07-01

    Lipolytic activities of Yarrowia lipolytica LIP2 lipase (YLLIP2), human pancreatic (HPL) and dog gastric (DGL) lipases were first compared using lecithin-stabilized triacylglycerol (TAG) emulsions (Intralipid) at various pH and bile salt concentrations. Like DGL, YLLIP2 was able to hydrolyze TAG droplets covered by a lecithin monolayer, while HPL was not directly active on that substrate. These results were in good agreement with the respective kinetics of adsorption on phosphatidylcholine (PC) monomolecular films of the same three lipases, YLLIP2 being the most tensioactive lipase. YLLIP2 adsorption onto a PC monolayer spread at the air/water interface was influenced by pH-dependent changes in the enzyme/lipid interfacial association constant (KAds) which was optimum at pH 6.0 on long-chain egg PC monolayer, and at pH 5.0 on medium chain dilauroylphosphatidylcholine film. Using substrate monolayers (1,2-dicaprin, trioctanoin), YLLIP2 displayed the highest lipolytic activities on both substrates in the 25-35 mN m(-1) surface pressure range. YLLIP2 was active in a large pH range and displayed a pH-dependent activity profile combining DGL and HPL features at pH values found in the stomach (pH 3-5) and in the intestine (pH 6-7), respectively. The apparent maximum activity of YLLIP2 was observed at acidic pH 4-6 and was therefore well correlated with an efficient interfacial binding at these pH levels, whatever the type of interfaces (Intralipid emulsions, substrate or PC monolayers). All these findings support the use of YLLIP2 in enzyme replacement therapy for the treatment of pancreatic exocrine insufficiency, a pathological situation in which an acidification of intestinal contents occurs.

  17. Effects of enzyme replacement therapy on pain and health related quality of life in patients with Fabry disease: data from FOS (Fabry Outcome Survey)

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, B; d Garcia; Mehta, A; Beck, M; Widmer, U; Ricci, R; on, b

    2005-01-01

    Background: Fabry disease is an X linked lysosomal storage disease caused by deficiency of the lysosomal enzyme α-galactosidase A. This leads to accumulation of globotriaosylceramide in nearly all tissues, including the blood vessels, kidney, myocardium, and nervous system. Symptoms often begin in childhood and include acroparaesthesia, with burning or tingling pain that spreads from the extremities to more proximal sites. Aims: This study set out to evaluate pain and its influence on quality of life in patients with Fabry disease receiving enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) with agalsidase alfa. Methods: Data were obtained from the Fabry Outcome Survey. Pain was measured using the Brief Pain Inventory (BPI), and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) was documented with the European Quality of Life Questionnaire (EQ-5D). Results: The mean (SD) score for "pain at its worst" on the BPI prior to ERT was 5.1 (2.7). One year after commencement of ERT, this had improved by 0.5, and improved by a further 0.6 after 2 years (p<0.05). Similar statistically significant improvements were seen for "pain on average" and "pain now" after 2 years of ERT. The mean HRQoL utility score prior to ERT was 0.66 (0.32). After 12 months of treatment with agalsidase alfa, this had improved to 0.74 (0.26; p<0.05); this improvement was maintained after 2 years. Conclusions: ERT with agalsidase alfa significantly reduces pain and improves quality of life in patients with Fabry disease. PMID:15744039

  18. Chemotherapy pro-drug activation by biocatalytic virus-like nanoparticles containing cytochrome P450.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Sánchez, Lorena; Cadena-Nava, Rubén D; Palomares, Laura A; Ruiz-Garcia, Jaime; Koay, Melissa S T; Cornelissen, Jeroen J M T; Vazquez-Duhalt, Rafael

    2014-06-10

    This work shows, for the first time, the encapsulation of a highly relevant protein in the biomedical field into virus-like particles (VLPs). A bacterial CYP variant was effectively encapsulated in VLPs constituted of coat protein from cowpea chlorotic mottle virus (CCMV). The catalytic VLPs are able to transform the chemotherapeutic pro-drug, tamoxifen, and the emerging pro-drug resveratrol. The chemical nature of the products was identified, confirming similar active products than those obtained with human CYP. The enzymatic VLPs remain stable after the catalytic reaction. The potential use of these biocatalytic nanoparticles as targeted CYP carriers for the activation of chemotherapy drugs is discussed. PMID:24835096

  19. Treatment with an orally bioavailable prodrug of 17β-estradiol alleviates hot flushes without hormonal effects in the periphery

    PubMed Central

    Merchenthaler, Istvan; Lane, Malcolm; Sabnis, Gauri; Brodie, Angela; Nguyen, Vien; Prokai, Laszlo; Prokai-Tatrai, Katalin

    2016-01-01

    Estrogen deprivation has a profound effect on the female brain. One of the most obvious examples of this condition is hot flushes. Although estrogens relieve these typical climacteric symptoms, many women do not want to take them owing to unwanted side-effects impacting, for example, the uterus, breast and blood. Therefore, there is a need for developing safer estrogen therapies. We show here that treatment with 10β,17β-dihydroxyestra-1,4-dien-3-one (DHED), a novel brain-targeting bioprecursor prodrug of the main human estrogen, 17β-estradiol, alleviates hot flushes in rat models of thermoregulatory dysfunction of the brain. Oral administration of DHED elicits a significant reduction of tail skin temperature (TST) rise representing hot flushes in the morphine-dependent ovariectomized rat model and results in the restoration of estrogen deprivation-induced loss of diurnal rhythm in TST. These beneficial effects occur without detrimental peripheral hormonal exposure; thus, the treatment avoids potentially harmful stimulation of estrogen-sensitive peripheral organs, including the uterus and the anterior pituitary, or the proliferation of MCF-7a breast cancer cell xenografts. Our promising preclinical assessments warrant further considerations of DHED for the development of a brain-selective 17β-estradiol therapy to relieve hot flushes without undesirable peripheral side-effects. PMID:27477453

  20. Treatment with an orally bioavailable prodrug of 17β-estradiol alleviates hot flushes without hormonal effects in the periphery.

    PubMed

    Merchenthaler, Istvan; Lane, Malcolm; Sabnis, Gauri; Brodie, Angela; Nguyen, Vien; Prokai, Laszlo; Prokai-Tatrai, Katalin

    2016-01-01

    Estrogen deprivation has a profound effect on the female brain. One of the most obvious examples of this condition is hot flushes. Although estrogens relieve these typical climacteric symptoms, many women do not want to take them owing to unwanted side-effects impacting, for example, the uterus, breast and blood. Therefore, there is a need for developing safer estrogen therapies. We show here that treatment with 10β,17β-dihydroxyestra-1,4-dien-3-one (DHED), a novel brain-targeting bioprecursor prodrug of the main human estrogen, 17β-estradiol, alleviates hot flushes in rat models of thermoregulatory dysfunction of the brain. Oral administration of DHED elicits a significant reduction of tail skin temperature (TST) rise representing hot flushes in the morphine-dependent ovariectomized rat model and results in the restoration of estrogen deprivation-induced loss of diurnal rhythm in TST. These beneficial effects occur without detrimental peripheral hormonal exposure; thus, the treatment avoids potentially harmful stimulation of estrogen-sensitive peripheral organs, including the uterus and the anterior pituitary, or the proliferation of MCF-7a breast cancer cell xenografts. Our promising preclinical assessments warrant further considerations of DHED for the development of a brain-selective 17β-estradiol therapy to relieve hot flushes without undesirable peripheral side-effects. PMID:27477453

  1. Focal splenic lesions in type I Gaucher disease are associated with poor platelet and splenic response to macrophage-targeted enzyme replacement therapy

    PubMed Central

    Stein, Philip; Malhotra, Advitya; Haims, Andrew; Pastores, Gregory M.

    2010-01-01

    Focal splenic lesions (FSL) occur in Gaucher disease type I (GD1), but their clinical significance is not known. Previous studies estimated the prevalence of FSL at 4% (pediatric) to 33% (adult) of GD1 patients and reported an association with splenomegaly. We tested the hypothesis that the presence of FSL is associated with suboptimal response to macrophage-directed enzyme replacement therapy (ERT). Additionally we investigated whether FSL were associated with other phenotypic features of GD1. The splenic parenchyma was assessed by MRI performed for routine evaluation of GD1 in 239 consecutive GD1 patients with intact spleens. The prevalence of FSL was 18.4% (44/239). Following a mean of 3.5 years of ERT, platelet response was inferior among patients with FSL (80,700± 9,600 to 90,100±7,200/mm3, P=0.2) compared to patients without FSL in whom there was a robust platelet response: 108,600±5,670 to 150,200±6,710/mm3, P<0.001. Compared to patients without FSL, patients harboring FSL had worse thrombocytopenia (platelet count: 83,700±8,800 vs. 112,100±4,200/mm3, P=0.004), greater frequency of pre-ERT splenomegaly, and greater post-ERT splenomegaly (8.5±0.77 vs. 4.8±0.25× normal, P<0.001). Additionally, the prevalence of osteonecrosis was higher among patients with FSL compared to patients without FSL (38 vs. 20.7%, P=0.026). FSL appear to be a determinant of response to ERT, suggesting studies comparing relative efficacy of newly emerging therapies for GD1 should adjust for this factor. Moreover, occurrences of FSL coincide with more severe manifestations of GD1 such as avascular osteonecrosis. PMID:20683668

  2. Synthesis and Characterization of Silicate Ester Prodrugs and Poly(ethylene glycol)-b-poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) Block Copolymers for Formulation into Prodrug-Loaded Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wohl, Adam Richard

    Fine control of the physical and chemical properties of customized materials is a field that is rapidly advancing. This is especially critical in pursuits to develop and optimize novel nanoparticle drug delivery. Specifically, I aim to apply chemistry concepts to test the hypothesis "Silicate ester prodrugs of paclitaxel, customized to have the proper hydrophobicity and hydrolytic lability, can be formulated with well-defined, biocompatible, amphiphilic block copolymers into nanoparticles that are effective drugs." Chapter 1 briefly describes the context and motivation of the scientific pursuits described in this thesis. In Chapter 2, a family of model silicate esters is synthesized, the hydrolysis rate of each compound is benchmarked, and trends are established based upon the steric bulk and leaving group ability of the silicate substituents. These trends are then applied to the synthesis of labile silicate ester prodrugs in Chapter 3. The bulk of this chapter focuses on the synthesis, hydrolysis, and cytotoxicity of prodrugs based on paclitaxel, a widely used chemotherapeutic agent. In Chapter 4, a new methodology for the synthesis of narrowly dispersed, "random" poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) polymers by a constant infusion of the glycolide monomer is detailed. Using poly(ethylene glycol) as a macroinitiator, amphiphilic block copolymers were synthesized. Co-formulating a paclitaxel silicate and an amphiphilic block copolymer via flash nanoprecipitation led to highly prodrug-loaded, kinetically trapped nanoparticles. Studies to determine the structure, morphology, behavior, and efficacy of these nanoparticles are described in Chapter 5. Efforts to develop a general strategy for the selective end-functionalization of the polyether block of these amphiphilic block copolymers are discussed in Chapter 6. Examples of this strategy include functionalization of the polyether with an azide or a maleimide. Finally, Chapter 7 provides an outlook for future development of

  3. [Shift of focus in the financing of Hungarian drugs. Reimbursement for orphan drugs for treating rare diseases: financing of enzyme replacement therapy in Hungary].

    PubMed

    Szegedi, Márta; Molnár, Mária Judit; Boncz, Imre; Kosztolányi, György

    2014-11-01

    Focusing on the benefits of patients with rare disease the authors analysed the aspects of orphan medicines financed in the frame of the Hungarian social insurance system in 2012 in order to make the consumption more rational, transparent and predictable. Most of the orphan drugs were financed in the frame of compassionate use by the reimbursement system. Consequently, a great deal of crucial problems occurred in relation to the unconventional subsidized method, especially in the case of the highest cost enzyme replacement therapies. On the base of the findings, proposals of the authors are presented for access to orphan drugs, fitting to the specific professional, economical and ethical aspects of this unique field of the health care system. The primary goal is to provide a suitable subsidized method for the treatment of rare disease patients with unmet medical needs. The financial modification of orphans became indispensible in Hungary. Professionals from numerous fields dealing with rare disease patients' care expressed agreement on the issue. Transforming the orphan medicines' financial structure has been initiated according to internationally shared principles. PMID:25344850

  4. Amidate prodrugs of 9-[2-(phosphonomethoxy)ethyl]adenine as inhibitors of adenylate cyclase toxin from Bordetella pertussis.

    PubMed

    Šmídková, Markéta; Dvoráková, Alexandra; Tloust'ová, Eva; Česnek, Michal; Janeba, Zlatko; Mertlíková-Kaiserová, Helena

    2014-01-01

    Adenylate cyclase toxin (ACT) is the key virulence factor of Bordetella pertussis that facilitates its invasion into the mammalian body. 9-[2-(Phosphonomethoxy)ethyl]adenine diphosphate (PMEApp), the active metabolite of the antiviral drug bis(POM)PMEA (adefovir dipivoxil), has been shown to inhibit ACT. The objective of this study was to evaluate six novel amidate prodrugs of PMEA, both phenyloxy phosphonamidates and phosphonodiamidates, for their ability to inhibit ACT activity in the J774A.1 macrophage cell line. The two phenyloxy phosphonamidate prodrugs exhibited greater inhibitory activity (50% inhibitory concentration [IC50] = 22 and 46 nM) than the phosphonodiamidates (IC50 = 84 to 3,960 nM). The inhibitory activity of the prodrugs correlated with their lipophilicity and the degree of their hydrolysis into free PMEA in J774A.1 cells. Although the prodrugs did not inhibit ACT as effectively as bis(POM)PMEA (IC50 = 6 nM), they were significantly less cytotoxic. Moreover, they all reduced apoptotic effects of ACT and prevented an ACT-induced elevation of intracellular [Ca(2+)]i. The amidate prodrugs were less susceptible to degradation in Caco-2 cells compared to bis(POM)PMEA, while they exerted good transepithelial permeability in this assay. As a consequence, a large amount of intact amidate prodrug is expected to be available to target macrophages in vivo. This feature makes nontoxic amidate prodrugs attractive candidates for further investigation as novel antimicrobial agents.

  5. Fosamprenavir : clinical pharmacokinetics and drug interactions of the amprenavir prodrug.

    PubMed

    Wire, Mary Beth; Shelton, Mark J; Studenberg, Scott

    2006-01-01

    Fosamprenavir is one of the most recently approved HIV-1 protease inhibitors (PIs) and offers reductions in pill number and pill size, and omits the need for food and fluid requirements associated with the earlier-approved HIV-1 PIs. Three fosamprenavir dosage regimens are approved by the US FDA for the treatment of HIV-1 PI-naive patients, including fosamprenavir 1,400 mg twice daily, fosamprenavir 1,400 mg once daily plus ritonavir 200mg once daily, and fosamprenavir 700 mg twice daily plus ritonavir 100mg twice daily. Coadministration of fosamprenavir with ritonavir significantly increases plasma amprenavir exposure. The fosamprenavir 700 mg twice daily plus ritonavir 100mg twice daily regimen maintains the highest plasma amprenavir concentrations throughout the dosing interval; this is the only approved regimen for the treatment of HIV-1 PI-experienced patients and is the only regimen approved in the European Union. Fosamprenavir is the phosphate ester prodrug of the HIV-1 PI amprenavir, and is rapidly and extensively converted to amprenavir after oral administration. Plasma amprenavir concentrations are quantifiable within 15 minutes of dosing and peak at 1.5-2 hours after fosamprenavir dosing. Food does not affect the absorption of amprenavir following administration of the fosamprenavir tablet formulation; therefore, fosamprenavir tablets may be administered without regard to food intake. Amprenavir has a large volume of distribution, is 90% bound to plasma proteins and is a substrate of P-glycoprotein. With <1% of a dose excreted in urine, the renal route is not an important elimination pathway, while the principal route of amprenavir elimination is hepatic metabolism by cytochrome P450 (CYP) 3A4. Amprenavir is also an inhibitor and inducer of CYP3A4. Furthermore, fosamprenavir is commonly administered in combination with low-dose ritonavir, which is also extensively metabolised by CYP3A4, and is a more potent CYP3A4 inhibitor than amprenavir. This potent

  6. Combined strategies of apomorphine diester prodrugs and nanostructured lipid carriers for efficient brain targeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Kuo-Sheng; Wen, Chih-Jen; Yen, Tzu-Chen; Sung, K. C.; Ku, Ming-Chuan; Wang, Jhi-Joung; Fang, Jia-You

    2012-03-01

    Our aim is to develop nanostructured lipid carriers (NLCs) for loading the apomorphine diester prodrugs, diacetyl apomorphine (DAA) and diisobutyryl apomorphine (DIA), into the brain. NLCs were prepared using sesame oil/cetyl palmitate as the lipid matrices. Experiments were performed with the objective of evaluating the physicochemical characteristics, drug release, safety and brain-targeting efficacy of the NLCs. The size of regular NLCs (N-NLCs) was 214 nm. The addition of Forestall (FE) and polyethylene glycol (PEG) to the NLCs (P-NLCs) increased the particle diameter to 250 nm. The zeta potentials of N-NLCs and P-NLCs were respectively shown to be - 21 and 48 mV. Diester prodrugs were more lipophilic and more chemically stable than the parent apomorphine. The hydrolysis study indicated that the prodrugs underwent bioconversion in plasma and brain extract, with DAA exhibiting faster degradation than DIA. Sustained release was achieved through the synergistic effect of integrating strategies of prodrugs and NLCs, with the longer carbon chain showing the slower release (DIA < DAA). None of the NLCs tested here exhibited a toxicity problem according to the examination of neutrophil lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release and hemolysis. Results of a bioimaging study in mice showed that P-NLCs largely accumulated in the brain. The distribution duration of the fluorescent dye in the brain region was also prolonged by the nanocarriers.

  7. An injectable drug-loaded hydrogel based on a supramolecular polymeric prodrug.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Lu; Luo, Qiaojie; Wang, Ying; Li, Xiaodong; Shen, Zhiquan; Zhu, Weipu

    2015-10-01

    We reported a novel injectable doxorubicin-loaded hydrogel based on host-guest interaction and Schiff's base reaction. A supramolecular polymeric prodrug was prepared through the inclusion of adamantane-modified doxorubicin into the β-cyclodextrin cavity on the polyaldehyde dextran chain, which was in situ crosslinked by carboxymethyl chitosan. PMID:26290273

  8. Particle Replication in Nonwetting Templates Nanoparticles with Tumor Selective Alkyl Silyl Ether Docetaxel Prodrug Reduces Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Kevin S.; Finniss, Mathew C.; Schorzman, Allison N.; Kuijer, Jennifer L.; Luft, J. Christopher; Bowerman, Charles J.; Napier, Mary E.; Haroon, Zishan A.; Zamboni, William C.; DeSimone, Joseph M.

    2014-01-01

    Delivery systems designed to have triggered release after passively targeting the tumor may improve small molecule chemotherapeutic delivery. Particle replication in nonwetting templates was used to prepare nanoparticles to passively target solid tumors in an A549 subcutaneous xenograft model. An acid labile prodrug was delivered to minimize systemic free docetaxel concentrations and improve tolerability without compromising efficacy. PMID:24552251

  9. "Project ALERT's" Effects on Adolescents' Prodrug Beliefs: A Replication and Extension Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Heddy Kovach; Ringwalt, Chris L.; Hanley, Sean; Shamblen, Stephen R.

    2010-01-01

    This article represents a replication and extension of previous studies of the effects of "Project ALERT", a school-based substance use prevention program, on the prodrug beliefs of adolescents. Specifically, the authors' research examined "Project ALERT's" effects on adolescents' intentions to use substances in the future, beliefs about substance…

  10. Antimycobacterial activity of pyrazinoate prodrugs in replicating and non-replicating Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Segretti, Natanael Dante; Simões, Cristina Kortstee; Corrêa, Michelle Fidelis; Felli, Veni Maria Andres; Miyata, Marcelo; Cho, Sang Hyun; Franzblau, Scott Gary; Fernandes, João Paulo Dos Santos

    2016-07-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is an important infectious disease caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) and responsible for thousands of deaths every year. Although there are antimycobacterial drugs available in therapeutics, just few new chemical entities have reached clinical trials, and in fact, since introduction of rifampin only two important drugs had reached the market. Pyrazinoic acid (POA), the active agent of pyrazinamide, has been explored through prodrug approach to achieve novel molecules with anti-Mtb activity, however, there is no activity evaluation of these molecules against non-replicating Mtb until the present. Additionally, pharmacokinetic must be preliminary evaluated to avoid future problems during clinical trials. In this paper, we have presented six POA esters as prodrugs in order to evaluate their anti-Mtb activity in replicating and non-replicating Mtb, and these showed activity highly influenced by medium composition (especially by albumin). Lipophilicity seems to play the main role in the activity, possibly due to controlling membrane passage. Novel duplicated prodrugs of POA were also described, presenting interesting activity. Cytotoxicity of these prodrugs set was also evaluated, and these showed no important cytotoxic profile. PMID:27449999

  11. Synthesis, Screening and Pharmacokinetic Evaluation of Potential Prodrugs of Bupropion. Part One: In Vitro Development

    PubMed Central

    O’Byrne, Paul Matthew; Williams, Robert; Walsh, John J.; Gilmer, John F.

    2014-01-01

    In general, prodrugs are developed to circumvent deficiencies associated with the absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion or toxicological (ADMET) profile associated with the active drug. In our study, we select bupropion, a drug with broad pharmacology incorporating dopaminergic, noradrenergic, nicotinic and cytokine modulation properties, but which is rapidly metabolized in vivo. We exploited its carbonyl and secondary amine functionality to facilitate the synthesis of bioprecursor prodrug forms with the sole objective of identifying analogues with enhanced properties over bupropion. A range of analogues were synthesized, ranging from N-methyl, N-benzyl, oximes, enol acetate and ether forms to examples where both functional groups were utilized to form oxadiazine, oxadiazinone, oxazolone and acetylated derivatives. We then developed an in vitro metabolic screen to simulate the human oral delivery route for these analogues. The selection of media in the screens contained a variety of pH, enzymatic and co-factor systems which mimic metabolic in vivo environments that drugs encounter when delivered orally. By coupling our in vitro screening tool to a selective hyphenated technique such as LC-MS, we were able to quickly select potential prodrugs for further in vitro and in vivo development. From the data generated, the N-alkylated bupropion analogues were shown to have the highest potential to act as bioprecursor prodrugs of bupropion. PMID:24830986

  12. Prodrugs of Nonsteroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs (NSAIDs), More Than Meets the Eye: A Critical Review

    PubMed Central

    Qandil, Amjad M.

    2012-01-01

    The design and the synthesis of prodrugs for nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) have been given much attention by medicinal chemists, especially in the last decade. As a therapeutic group, NSAIDs are among the most widely used prescribed and over the counter (OTC) medications. The rich literature about potential NSAID prodrugs clearly shows a shift from alkyl, aryalkyl or aryl esters with the sole role of masking the carboxylic acid group, to more elaborate conjugates that contain carefully chosen groups to serve specific purposes, such as enhancement of water solubility and dissolution, nitric oxide release, hydrogen sulfide release, antioxidant activity, anticholinergic and acetylcholinesterase inhibitory (AChEI) activity and site-specific targeting and delivery. This review will focus on NSAID prodrugs that have been designed or were, later, found to possess intrinsic pharmacological activity as an intact chemical entity. Such intrinsic activity might augment the anti-inflammatory activity of the NSAID, reduce its side effects or transform the potential therapeutic use from classical anti-inflammatory action to something else. Reports discussed in this review will be those of NO-NSAIDs, anticholinergic and AChEI-NSAIDs, Phospho-NSAIDs and some miscellaneous agents. In most cases, this review will cover literature dealing with these NSAID prodrugs from the year 2006 and later. Older literature will be used when necessary, e.g., to explain the chemical and biological mechanisms of action. PMID:23247285

  13. Nasal chitosan microparticles target a zidovudine prodrug to brain HIV sanctuaries.

    PubMed

    Dalpiaz, Alessandro; Fogagnolo, Marco; Ferraro, Luca; Capuzzo, Antonio; Pavan, Barbara; Rassu, Giovanna; Salis, Andrea; Giunchedi, Paolo; Gavini, Elisabetta

    2015-11-01

    Zidovudine (AZT) is an antiretroviral drug that is a substrate of active efflux transporters (AETs) that extrude the drug from the central nervous system (CNS) and macrophages, which are considered to be sanctuaries of HIV. The conjugation of AZT to ursodeoxycholic acid is known to produce a prodrug (UDCA-AZT) that is able to elude the AET systems, indicating the potential ability of this prodrug to act as a carrier of AZT in the CNS and in macrophages. Here, we demonstrate that UDCA-AZT is able to permeate and remain in murine macrophages with an efficiency twenty times higher than that of AZT. Moreover, we propose the nasal administration of this prodrug in order to induce its uptake into the CNS. Chitosan chloride-based microparticles (CP) were prepared by spray-drying and were characterized with respect to size, morphology, density, water uptake and the dissolution profile of UDCA-AZT. The CP sample was then nasally administered to rats. All in vitro and in vivo measurements were also performed for a CP parent physical mixture. The CP sample was able to increase the dissolution rate of UDCA-AZT and to reduce water uptake with respect to its parent physical mixture, inducing better uptake of UDCA-AZT into the cerebrospinal fluid of rats, where the prodrug can act as an AZT carrier in macrophages. PMID:26427553

  14. Cytotoxic, Antiangiogenic and Antitelomerase Activity of Glucosyl- and Acyl- Resveratrol Prodrugs and Resveratrol Sulfate Metabolites.

    PubMed

    Falomir, Eva; Lucas, Ricardo; Peñalver, Pablo; Martí-Centelles, Rosa; Dupont, Alexia; Zafra-Gómez, Alberto; Carda, Miguel; Morales, Juan C

    2016-07-15

    Resveratrol (RES) is a natural polyphenol with relevant and varied biological activity. However, its low bioavailability and rapid metabolism to its glucuronate and sulfate conjugates has opened a debate on the mechanisms underlying its bioactivity. RES prodrugs are being developed to overcome these problems. We have synthesized a series of RES prodrugs and RES sulfate metabolites (RES-S) and evaluated their biological activities. RES glucosylated prodrugs (RES-Glc) were more cytotoxic in HT-29 and MCF-7 cells than RES itself whereas RES-S showed similar or higher cytotoxicity than RES. VEGF production was decreased by RES-Glc, and RES-disulfate (RES-diS) diminished it even more than RES. Finally, RES-Glc and RES-diS inhibited hTERT gene expression to a higher extent than RES. In conclusion, resveratrol prodrugs are promising candidates as anticancer drugs. In addition, RES-S showed distinct biological activity, thus indicating they are not simply RES reservoirs. PMID:27147200

  15. Transdermal permeation of novel n-acetyl-glucosamine/NSAIDs mutual prodrugs.

    PubMed

    Israel, Bridg'ette; Garner, Solomon T; Thakare, Mohan; Elder, Deborah; Abney, Trinia; Azadi, Parastoo; Beach, J Warren; Price, James C; Ahmed, Hisham; Capomacchia, Anthony C

    2012-01-01

    The current investigation reports skin permeation of three novel mutual prodrugs (MP) which couple n-acetyl-glucosamine with an NSAID, either ketoprofen or ibuprofen. They were evaluated for transdermal permeation using shed snakeskin, and to our knowledge represent the first MPs synthesized for this purpose, although they also could be used for subcutaneous delivery. MPs are defined as two active drug compounds usually connected by an ester linkage. Glucosamine administration has been linked to damaged cartilage repair, and pain relief in joints afflicted with osteoarthritis. NSAIDs are commonly used orally in transdermal creams or gels for joint pain relief. Two novel compounds we report (MP1 and MP2) covalently link ibuprofen and ketoprofen directly to the amide nitrogen of n-acetyl-glucosamine (NAG); the other compound (MP3) covalently links ibuprofen to the amide nitrogen, using a short chain acetyl linker. Permeability studies show that the ketoprofen mutual prodrug (MP2) permeates shed snakeskin more than three times greater than either ibuprofen derivative, while ethanol markedly increases the permeation for all three. The ketoprofen mutual prodrug appears the most likely candidate for transdermal administration; all three mutual prodrugs may be candidates for subcutaneous injection.

  16. Enhanced Cellular Uptake and Pharmacokinetic Characteristics of Doxorubicin-Valine Amide Prodrug.

    PubMed

    Park, Yohan; Park, Ju-Hwan; Park, Suryeon; Lee, Song Yi; Cho, Kwan Hyung; Kim, Dae-Duk; Shim, Won-Sik; Yoon, In-Soo; Cho, Hyun-Jong; Maeng, Han-Joo

    2016-09-22

    In this study, we synthesized the valine (Val)-conjugated amide prodrug of doxorubicin (DOX) by the formation of amide bonds between DOX and Val. The synthesis of the DOX-Val prodrug was identified by a proton nuclear magnetic resonance (¹H-NMR) assay. In the MCF-7 cells (human breast adenocarcinoma cell; amino acid transporter-positive cell), the cellular accumulation efficiency of DOX-Val was higher than that of DOX according to the flow cytometry analysis data. Using confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) imaging, it was confirmed that DOX-Val as well as DOX was mainly distributed in the nucleus of cancer cells. DOX-Val was intravenously administered to rats at a dose of 4 mg/kg, and the plasma concentrations of DOX-Val (prodrug) and DOX (formed metabolite) were quantitatively determined. Based on the systemic exposure (represented as area under the curve (AUC) values) of DOX-Val (prodrug) and DOX (formed metabolite), approximately half of DOX-Val seemed to be metabolized into DOX. However, it is expected that the remaining DOX-Val may exert improved cellular uptake efficiency in cancer cells after its delivery to the cancer region.

  17. Enhanced Cellular Uptake and Pharmacokinetic Characteristics of Doxorubicin-Valine Amide Prodrug.

    PubMed

    Park, Yohan; Park, Ju-Hwan; Park, Suryeon; Lee, Song Yi; Cho, Kwan Hyung; Kim, Dae-Duk; Shim, Won-Sik; Yoon, In-Soo; Cho, Hyun-Jong; Maeng, Han-Joo

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we synthesized the valine (Val)-conjugated amide prodrug of doxorubicin (DOX) by the formation of amide bonds between DOX and Val. The synthesis of the DOX-Val prodrug was identified by a proton nuclear magnetic resonance (¹H-NMR) assay. In the MCF-7 cells (human breast adenocarcinoma cell; amino acid transporter-positive cell), the cellular accumulation efficiency of DOX-Val was higher than that of DOX according to the flow cytometry analysis data. Using confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) imaging, it was confirmed that DOX-Val as well as DOX was mainly distributed in the nucleus of cancer cells. DOX-Val was intravenously administered to rats at a dose of 4 mg/kg, and the plasma concentrations of DOX-Val (prodrug) and DOX (formed metabolite) were quantitatively determined. Based on the systemic exposure (represented as area under the curve (AUC) values) of DOX-Val (prodrug) and DOX (formed metabolite), approximately half of DOX-Val seemed to be metabolized into DOX. However, it is expected that the remaining DOX-Val may exert improved cellular uptake efficiency in cancer cells after its delivery to the cancer region. PMID:27669201

  18. Ester prodrugs of acyclic nucleoside thiophosphonates compared to phosphonates: synthesis, antiviral activity and decomposition study.

    PubMed

    Roux, Loïc; Priet, Stéphane; Payrot, Nadine; Weck, Clément; Fournier, Maëlenn; Zoulim, Fabien; Balzarini, Jan; Canard, Bruno; Alvarez, Karine

    2013-05-01

    9-[2-(Thiophosphonomethoxy)ethyl]adenine [S-PMEA, 8] and (R)-9-[2-(Thiophosphonomethoxy)propyl]adenine [S-PMPA, 9] are acyclic nucleoside thiophosphonates we described recently that display the same antiviral spectrum (DNA viruses) as approved and potent phosphonates PMEA and (R)-PMPA. Here, we describe the synthesis, antiviral activities in infected cell cultures and decomposition study of bis(pivaloyloxymethoxy)-S-PMEA [Bis-POM-S-PMEA, 13] and bis(isopropyloxymethylcarbonyl)-S-PMPA [Bis-POC-S-PMPA, 14] as orally bioavailable prodrugs of the S-PMEA 8 and S-PMPA 9, in comparison to the equivalent "non-thio" derivatives [Bis-POM-PMEA, 11] and [Bis-POC-PMPA, 12]. Compounds 11, 12, 13 and 14 were evaluated for their in vitro antiviral activity against HIV-1-, HIV-2-, HBV- and a broad panel of DNA viruses, and found to exhibit moderate to potent antiviral activity. In order to determine the decomposition pathway of the prodrugs 11, 12, 13 and 14 into parent compounds PMEA, PMPA, 8 and 9, kinetic data and decomposition pathways in several media are presented. As expected, bis-POM-S-PMEA 13 and bis-POC-S-PMPA 14 behaved as prodrugs of S-PMEA 8 and S-PMPA 9. However, thiophosphonates 8 and 9 were released very smoothly in cell extracts, in contrast to the release of PMEA and PMPA from "non-thio" prodrugs 11 and 12. PMID:23603046

  19. Chemotherapeutic potential of diazeniumdiolate-based aspirin prodrugs in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Basudhar, Debashree; Cheng, Robert C; Bharadwaj, Gaurav; Ridnour, Lisa A; Wink, David A; Miranda, Katrina M

    2015-06-01

    Diazeniumdiolate-based aspirin prodrugs have previously been shown to retain the anti-inflammatory properties of aspirin while protecting against the common side effect of stomach ulceration. Initial analysis of two new prodrugs of aspirin that also release either nitroxyl (HNO) or nitric oxide (NO) demonstrated increased cytotoxicity toward human lung carcinoma cells compared to either aspirin or the parent nitrogen oxide donor. In addition, cytotoxicity was significantly lower in endothelial cells, suggesting cancer-specific sensitivity. To assess the chemotherapeutic potential of these new prodrugs in treatment of breast cancer, we studied their effect both in cultured cells and in a nude mouse model. Both prodrugs reduced growth of breast adenocarcinoma cells more effectively than the parent compounds while not being appreciably cytotoxic in a related nontumorigenic cell line (MCF-10A). The HNO donor also was more cytotoxic than the related NO donor. The basis for the observed specificity was investigated in terms of impact on metabolism, DNA damage and repair, apoptosis, angiogenesis and metastasis. The results suggest a significant pharmacological potential for treatment of breast cancer.

  20. Chemotherapeutic Potential of Diazeniumdiolate-based Aspirin Prodrugs in Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Basudhar, Debashree; Cheng, Robert C.; Bharadwaj, Gaurav; Ridnour, Lisa A.; Wink, David A.; Miranda, Katrina M.

    2015-01-01

    Diazeniumdiolate-based aspirin prodrugs have previously been shown to retain the anti-inflammatory properties of aspirin while protecting against the common side effect of stomach ulceration. Initial analysis of two new prodrugs of aspirin that also release either nitroxyl (HNO) or nitric oxide (NO) demonstrated increased cytotoxicity toward human lung carcinoma cells compared to either aspirin or the parent nitrogen oxide donor. In addition, cytotoxicity was significantly lower in endothelial cells, suggesting cancer-specific sensitivity. To assess the chemotherapeutic potential of these new prodrugs in breast cancer, we studied their effect both in cultured cells and in a nude mouse model. Both prodrugs reduced growth of breast adenocarcinoma cells more effectively than the parent compounds while not being appreciably cytotoxic in a related non-tumorigenic cell line (MCF-10A). The HNO donor also was more cytotoxic than the related NO donor. The basis for the observed specificity was investigated in terms of impact on metabolism, DNA damage and repair, apoptosis, angiogenesis and metastasis. The results suggest a significant pharmacological potential for treatment of breast cancer. PMID:25659932

  1. Enzymatic Synthesis of Sorboyl-Polydatin Prodrug in Biomass-Derived 2-Methyltetrahydrofuran and Antiradical Activity of the Unsaturated Acylated Derivatives

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Rongling; Zhao, Xiangjie; Jiang, Ling; Zhu, Chun; Zhao, Yuping; Jia, Jianbo

    2016-01-01

    Efficient and highly regioselective synthesis of the potential 6′′-O-sorboyl-polydatin prodrug in biomass-derived 2-methyltetrahydrofuran (2-MeTHF) was achieved using Candida antarctica lipase B for the first time. Under the optimal conditions, the initial reaction rate, maximum substrate conversion, and 6′′-regioselectivity were as high as 8.65 mM/h, 100%, and 100%, respectively. Kinetic and operational stability investigations evidently demonstrated excellent enzyme compatibility of the 2-MeTHF compared to the traditional organic solvents. With respect to the antioxidant properties, three unsaturated ester derivatives showed slightly lower DPPH radical scavenging activities than the parent agent. Interestingly, further studies also revealed that the antiradical capacities of the acylates decreased with the elongation of the unsaturated aliphatic chain length from C4 to C11. The reason might be attributed to the increased steric hindrance derived from the acyl residues in derivatives. PMID:27668253

  2. Enzymatic Synthesis of Sorboyl-Polydatin Prodrug in Biomass-Derived 2-Methyltetrahydrofuran and Antiradical Activity of the Unsaturated Acylated Derivatives

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Rongling; Zhao, Xiangjie; Jiang, Ling; Zhu, Chun; Zhao, Yuping; Jia, Jianbo

    2016-01-01

    Efficient and highly regioselective synthesis of the potential 6′′-O-sorboyl-polydatin prodrug in biomass-derived 2-methyltetrahydrofuran (2-MeTHF) was achieved using Candida antarctica lipase B for the first time. Under the optimal conditions, the initial reaction rate, maximum substrate conversion, and 6′′-regioselectivity were as high as 8.65 mM/h, 100%, and 100%, respectively. Kinetic and operational stability investigations evidently demonstrated excellent enzyme compatibility of the 2-MeTHF compared to the traditional organic solvents. With respect to the antioxidant properties, three unsaturated ester derivatives showed slightly lower DPPH radical scavenging activities than the parent agent. Interestingly, further studies also revealed that the antiradical capacities of the acylates decreased with the elongation of the unsaturated aliphatic chain length from C4 to C11. The reason might be attributed to the increased steric hindrance derived from the acyl residues in derivatives.

  3. Diacerein-thymol prodrug: in vivo release and pharmacological screening in experimental models of osteoarthritis in Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Patil, Dipmala; Dhaneshwar, Suneela; Kadam, Parag

    2015-01-01

    We have reported the synthesis, characterization, in vitro release profile and preliminary pharmacological investigations of an antioxidant mutual prodrug of diacerein with thymol in our earlier communication. The present work reports the results of in vivo release studies and extensive pharmacological evaluation of this prodrug in collagenase- induced osteoarthritis and monosodium iodoacetate- induced hyperalgesia in Wistar rats. In vivo release was thoroughly studied in Wistar rats upon oral administration of the prodrug. In rat blood, release of 92.7% of diacerein and 20.5% of thymol was observed. From these studies we hypothesized that activation of prodrug could be mediated by physiological pH of blood (7.4) and serum esterases. Pharmacological screening of prodrug in collagenase and monoiodoacetate-induced osteoarthritis at a dose of 6.8 mg/kg, (BID) exhibited significant reduction in knee diameter (p<0.001), increase in paw withdrawal latency (p<0.001), and locomotor activity (p<0.001) with significantly higher anti-inflammatory and anti-osteoarthritic activities as compared to parent drug. The biochemical studies indicated a significant step-up in glucosaminoglycan level (p<0.001) and reduction in the C-reactive protein (p<0.001) and sulfated alkaline phosphatase levels (p<0.001). The histopathological and radiological studies confirmed the additive anti-osteoarthritic effect of prodrug as compared to plain diacerein. Antioxidant potential of prodrug was significantly more (p<0.001) while ulcer index was significantly lower (p<0.01) than diacerein. Interestingly, the diarrhea observed in diacerein- treated animals was not evident in animalstreated with prodrug, thymol and their physical mixture. Our findings indicate promising potential of this antioxidant prodrug to be used for long-term and safer management of OA. PMID:25675406

  4. Oxygen Availability for Porphyrin Biosynthesis Enzymes Determines the Production of Protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) during Hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Otsuka, Shimpei; Matsumoto, Kentaro; Nakajima, Motowo; Tanaka, Tohru; Ogura, Shun-Ichiro

    2015-01-01

    5-Aminolevulinic acid (ALA), a precursor of porphyrin, is specifically converted to the fluorescent substance protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) in tumors to be used as a prodrug for photodynamic therapy and diagnosis. Hypoxia, a common feature of solid tumors, decreases the efficacy of ALA-based photodynamic therapy and diagnosis. This decrease results from the excretion of porphyrin precursor coproporphyrinogen III (CPgenIII), an intermediate in the biosynthesis of PpIX. However, the mechanism of CPgenIII excretion during hypoxia remains unclear. In this study, we revealed the importance of mitochondrial respiration for the production of PpIX during hypoxia. Porphyrin concentrations were estimated in human gastric cancer cell lines by HPLC. Expression levels of porphyrin biosynthesis genes were measured by qRT-PCR and immunoblotting. Blockage of porphyrin biosynthesis was an oxygen-dependent phenomenon resulting from decreased PpIX production in mitochondria under hypoxic conditions. PpIX production was increased by the inhibition of mitochondrial respiration complexes, which indicates that the enzymes of porphyrin biosynthesis compete with respiration complexes for molecular oxygen. Our results indicate that targeting the respiration complexes is a rationale for enhancing the effect of ALA-mediated treatment and diagnosis. PMID:26717566

  5. Oxygen Availability for Porphyrin Biosynthesis Enzymes Determines the Production of Protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) during Hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Otsuka, Shimpei; Matsumoto, Kentaro; Nakajima, Motowo; Tanaka, Tohru; Ogura, Shun-ichiro

    2015-01-01

    5-Aminolevulinic acid (ALA), a precursor of porphyrin, is specifically converted to the fluorescent substance protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) in tumors to be used as a prodrug for photodynamic therapy and diagnosis. Hypoxia, a common feature of solid tumors, decreases the efficacy of ALA-based photodynamic therapy and diagnosis. This decrease results from the excretion of porphyrin precursor coproporphyrinogen III (CPgenIII), an intermediate in the biosynthesis of PpIX. However, the mechanism of CPgenIII excretion during hypoxia remains unclear. In this study, we revealed the importance of mitochondrial respiration for the production of PpIX during hypoxia. Porphyrin concentrations were estimated in human gastric cancer cell lines by HPLC. Expression levels of porphyrin biosynthesis genes were measured by qRT-PCR and immunoblotting. Blockage of porphyrin biosynthesis was an oxygen-dependent phenomenon resulting from decreased PpIX production in mitochondria under hypoxic conditions. PpIX production was increased by the inhibition of mitochondrial respiration complexes, which indicates that the enzymes of porphyrin biosynthesis compete with respiration complexes for molecular oxygen. Our results indicate that targeting the respiration complexes is a rationale for enhancing the effect of ALA-mediated treatment and diagnosis. PMID:26717566

  6. The self-assembling camptothecin-tocopherol prodrug: An effective approach for formulating camptothecin.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jianqin; Liu, Chuang; Wang, Pengcheng; Ghazwani, Mohammed; Xu, Jieni; Huang, Yixian; Ma, Xiaochao; Zhang, Peijun; Li, Song

    2015-09-01

    Camptothecin (CPT) is a potent antitumor agent and functions via inhibiting the activity of topoisomerase I during DNA replication. However, the clinical application of CPT has been greatly hindered by its extremely poor solubility, the instability of its active lactone ring in blood stream, as well as the non-specific toxicity to normal tissues. In addition, most of the formulations developed so far are not applicable for formulating CPT. In this study, two novel CPT prodrugs were developed by conjugating CPT to α-tocopherol via a carbonate ester bond (CPT-VE) or disulfide linkage (CPT-S-S-VE). Both CPT prodrugs were able to self-assemble into nanofibers with the facilitation of a PEG5K-Fmoc-VE2-based nanomicellar carrier. Both prodrug nanoassemblies exhibited excellent stability. Fluorescence quenching, UV absorbance, and FT-IR studies demonstrated strong interactions between carrier and prodrugs, including hydrophobic interaction, π-π stacking, as well as hydrogen bonding. NMR studies suggested that prodrugs were successfully incorporated into PEG5K-Fmoc-VE2 during self-assembly process. In vitro, PEG5K-Fmoc-VE2/CPT-S-S-VE presented significantly higher level of cytotoxicity on tumor cells compared to PEG5K-Fmoc-VE2/CPT-VE. Biodistribution study showed that CPT-S-S-VE formulated in PEG5K-Fmoc-VE2 micelles was effectively converted to parent CPT following delivery to tumor tissues. Finally, PEG5K-Fmoc-VE2/CPT-S-S-VE nanofibers showed superior tumor growth inhibition in an aggressive murine breast cancer model (4T1.2).

  7. In vivo and in vitro evaluation of combretastatin A-4 and its sodium phosphate prodrug

    PubMed Central

    Grosios, K; Holwell, S E; McGown, A T; Pettit, G R; Bibby, M C

    1999-01-01

    The anti-tumour effects and mechanism of action of combretastatin A-4 and its prodrug, combretastatin A-4 disodium phosphate, were examined in subcutaneous and orthotopically transplanted experimental colon tumour models. Additionally, the ability of these compounds to directly interfere with endothelial cell behaviour was also examined in HUVEC cultures. Combretastatin A-4 (150 mg kg–1, intraperitoneally (i.p.)) and its water-soluble prodrug (100 mg kg–1, i.p.) caused almost complete vascular shutdown (at 4 h), extensive haemorrhagic necrosis which started at 1 h after treatment and significant tumour growth delay in MAC 15A subcutaneous (s.c.) colon tumours. Similar vascular effects were obtained in MAC 15 orthotopic tumours and SW620 human colon tumour xenografts treated with the prodrug. More importantly, in the orthotopic models, necrosis was seen in vascularized metastatic deposits but not in avascular secondary deposits. The possible mechanism giving rise to these effects was examined in HUVEC cells. Here cellular networks formed in type I calf-skin collagen layers and these networks were completely disrupted when incubated with a non-cytotoxic concentration of combretastatin A-4 or its prodrug. This effect started at 4 h and was complete by 24 h. The same non-cytotoxic concentrations resulted in disorganization of F-actin and β-tubulin at 1 h after treatment. In conclusion, combretastatin A-4 and its prodrug caused extensive necrosis in MAC 15A s.c. and orthotopic colon cancer and metastases, resulting in anti-tumour effects. Necrosis was not seen in avascular tumour nodules, suggesting a vascular mechanism of action. © 1999 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10604728

  8. The Self-Assembling Camptothecin-Tocopherol Prodrug: An Effective Approach for Formulating Camptothecin

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Jianqin; Liu, Chuang; Wang, Pengcheng; Ghazwani, Mohammed; Xu, Jieni; Huang, Yixian; Ma, Xiaochao; Zhang, Peijun; Li, Song

    2015-01-01

    Camptothecin (CPT) is a potent antitumor agent and functions via inhibiting the activity of topoisomerase I during DNA replication. However, the clinical application of CPT has been greatly hindered by its extremely poor solubility, the instability of its active lactone ring in blood stream, as well as the non-specific toxicity to normal tissues. In addition, most of the formulations developed so far are not applicable for formulating CPT. In this study, two novel CPT prodrugs were developed by conjugating CPT to α-tocopherol via a carbonate ester bond (CPT-VE) or disulfide linkage (CPT-S-S-VE). Both CPT prodrugs were able to self-assemble into nanofibers with the facilitation of a PEG5K-Fmoc-VE2-based nanomicellar carrier. Both prodrug nanoassemblies exhibited excellent stability. Fluorescence quenching, UV absorbance, and FT-IR studies demonstrated strong interactions between carrier and prodrugs, including hydrophobic interaction, π-π stacking, as well as hydrogen bonding. NMR studies suggested that prodrugs were successfully incorporated into PEG5K-Fmoc-VE2 during self-assembly process. In vitro, PEG5K-Fmoc-VE2/CPT-S-S-VE presented significantly higher level of cytotoxicity on tumor cells compared to PEG5K-Fmoc-VE2/CPT-VE. Biodistribution study showed that CPT-S-S-VE formulated in PEG5K-Fmoc-VE2 micelles was effectively converted to parent CPT following delivery to tumor tissues. Finally, PEG5K-Fmoc-VE2/CPT-S-S-VE nanofibers showed superior tumor growth inhibition in an aggressive murine breast cancer model (4T1.2). PMID:26057133

  9. Pharmacokinetic evaluation of the anticancer prodrug simmitecan in different experimental animals

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Zhe-yi; Li, Xiu-xue; Du, Fei-fei; Yang, Jun-ling; Niu, Wei; Xu, Fang; Wang, Feng-qing; Li, Chuan; Sun, Yan

    2013-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the pharmacokinetics and disposition of simmitecan (L-P) that was a water-soluble ester prodrug of chimmitecan (L-2-Z) with potent anti-tumor activities in different experimental animals, and to assess its drug-drug interaction potential. Methods: SD rats were injected with a single iv bolus doses of L-P (3.75, 7.5 and 15 mg/kg). The pharmacokinetics, tissue distribution, excretion and metabolism of L-P and its active metabolite L-2-Z were studied through quantitative measurements and metabolite profiling with LC/MS. The binding of L-P and L-2-Z to rat plasma proteins was examined using an ultrafiltration method. Systemic exposures of beagle dogs to L-P as well as drug distribution in tumors of the nude mice xenograft model of human hepatic cancer SMMC-7721 cells were also examined. The metabolism of L-P by liver mcirosomal carboxylesterase in vitro was investigated in different species. The effects of L-P and L-2-Z on cytochrome P450 enzymes were examined using commercial screening kits. Results: The in vivo biotransformation of L-P to L-2-Z showed a significant species difference, with a mean elimination half-life t1/2 of approximately 1.4 h in rats and 1.9 h in dogs. The systemic exposure levels of L-P and L-2-Z were increased in a dose-dependent manner. In rats, approximately 66% of L-P and 79% of L-2-Z were bound to plasma proteins. In rats and the nude mice bearing human hepatic cancers, most organ tissues had significantly higher concentrations of L-P than the corresponding plasma levels. In the tumor tissues, the L-P levels were comparable to those of plasma, whereas the L-2-Z levels were lower than the L-P levels. In rats, L-P was eliminated mainly via biliary excretion, but metabolism played an important role in elimination of the intact L-P. Finally, L-P and L-2-Z exerted moderate inhibition on the activity of CYP3A4 in vitro. Conclusion: L-P and L-2-Z have relatively short elimination half-lives and L-P is mainly eliminated via

  10. Folate receptor-mediated enhanced and specific delivery of far-red light-activatable prodrugs of combretastatin A-4 to FR-positive tumor.

    PubMed

    Nkepang, Gregory; Bio, Moses; Rajaputra, Pallavi; Awuah, Samuel G; You, Youngjae

    2014-12-17

    We examined the concept of a novel prodrug strategy in which anticancer drug can be locally released by visible/near IR light, taking advantage of the photodynamic process and photo-unclick chemistry. Our most recently formulated prodrug of combretastatin A-4, Pc-(L-CA4)2, showed multifunctionality for fluorescence imaging, light-activated drug release, and the combined effects of PDT and local chemotherapy. In this formulation, L is a singlet oxygen cleavable linker. Here, we advanced this multifunctional prodrug by adding a tumor-targeting group, folic acid (FA). We designed and prepared four FA-conjugated prodrugs 1-4 (CA4-L-Pc-PEGn-FA: n = 0, 2, 18, ∼45) and one non-FA-conjugated prodrug 5 (CA4-L-Pc-PEG18-boc). Prodrugs 3 and 4 had a longer PEG spacer and showed higher hydrophilicity, enhanced uptake to colon 26 cells via FR-mediated mechanisms, and more specific localization to SC colon 26 tumors in Balb/c mice than prodrugs 1 and 2. Prodrug 4 also showed higher and more specific uptake to tumors, resulting in selective tumor damage and more effective antitumor efficacy than non-FA-conjugated prodrug 5. FR-mediated targeting seemed to be an effective strategy to spare normal tissues surrounding tumors in the illuminated area during treatment with this prodrug.

  11. Enzyme replacement therapy for mucopolysaccharidosis VI: Growth and pubertal development in patients treated with recombinant human N-acetylgalactosamine 4-sulfatase

    PubMed Central

    Decker, Celeste; Yu, Zi-Fan; Giugliani, Roberto; Schwartz, Ida Vanessa D.; Guffon, Nathalie; Teles, Elisa Leão; Miranda, M. Clara Sá; Wraith, J. Edmond; Beck, Michael; Arash, Laila; Scarpa, Maurizio; Ketteridge, David; Hopwood, John J.; Plecko, Barbara; Steiner, Robert; Whitley, Chester B.; Kaplan, Paige; Swiedler, Stuart J.; Conrad, Susan; Harmatz, Paul

    2010-01-01

    Background and Methods Growth failure is characteristic of untreated mucopolysaccharidosis type VI (MPS VI: Maroteaux-Lamy syndrome). Growth was studied in fifty-six MPS VI patients (5 to 29 years old) prior to and for up to 240 weeks of weekly infusions of recombinant human arylsulfatase B (rhASB) at 1 mg/kg during Phase 1/2, Phase 2, Phase 3 or Phase 3 Extension clinical trials. Height, weight, and Tanner stage data were collected. Pooled data were analyzed to determine mean height increase by treatment week, growth impacts of pubertal status, baseline urinary GAG, and age at treatment initiation. Growth rate for approximately 2 years prior to and following treatment initiation was analyzed using longitudinal modeling. Results Mean height increased by 2.9 cm after 48 weeks and 4.3 cm after 96 weeks on enzyme replacement therapy (ERT). Growth on ERT was not correlated with baseline urinary GAG. Patients under 16 years of age showed greatest increases in height on treatment. Model results based on pooled data showed significant improvement in growth rate during 96 weeks of ERT when compared to the equivalent pretreatment time period. Delayed pubertal onset or progression was noted in 10 patients entering the clinical trials; all of whom showed progression of at least one Tanner stage during 2 years on ERT, and 6 of whom (60%) completed puberty. Conclusion Analysis of mean height by treatment week and longitudinal modeling demonstrate significant increase in height and growth rate in MPS VI patients receiving long-term ERT. This impact was greatest in patients aged below 16 years. Height increase may result from bone growth and/or reduction in joint contractures. Bone growth and resolution of delayed puberty may be related to improvements in general health, bone cell health, nutrition, endocrine gland function and reduced inflammation. PMID:20634905

  12. B-cell Depletion and Immunomodulation Prior to Initiation of Enzyme Replacement Therapy Blocks the Immune Response to Acid Alpha Glucosidase in Infantile Onset Pompe Disease

    PubMed Central

    Elder, Melissa E.; Nayak, Sushrusha; Collins, Shelley W.; Lawson, Lee Ann; Kelley, Jeffry S.; Herzog, Roland W.; Modica, Renee F.; Lew, Judy; Lawrence, Robert M.; Byrne, Barry J.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Pompe disease is a progressive neuromuscular disorder due to acid alpha glucosidase (GAA) deficiency. Cross-reacting immunologic material (CRIM)-negative infants with null GAA mutations have the most severe phenotype and develop anti-GAA antibodies following exposure to enzyme replacement therapy (ERT). Antibodies influence bio-distribution, attenuate the beneficial effects of ERT, and are believed to influence infusion-associated reactions (IARs), which occur in nearly all early-onset patients. We evaluated the potential that B-cell depletion prior to ERT initiation would block GAA antibody responses and improve clinical outcome. Study Design Six Pompe subjects (four CRIM-negative) between 2–8 months of age received rituximab and sirolimus or myophenolate prior to ERT. Four subjects continued to receive sirolimus, every 12-week rituximab and monthly intravenous immunoglobulin for the duration of ERT. Sirolimus trough levels, IgG levels, CD3, CD4, CD8, CD19, CD20, NTproBNP, CK, CK-MB, CRP, platelet, alkaline phosphatase, AST, ALT were measured regularly. Results Immunomodulation achieved B-cell depletion without adverse effects. After 17–36 months of rituximab, sirolimus and ERT, all subjects lacked antibodies against GAA, four continued to gain motor milestones, yet two progressed to require invasive ventilation. Absence of infusion associated reactions allowed accelerated infusion rates. No IARs were observed at standard or accelerated infusion rates. Conclusions B-cell depletion and T-cell immunomodulation in infants naïve to ERT was accomplished safely, eliminated immune responses against GAA, thereby optimizing clinical outcome, however this approach did not necessarily influence sustained independent ventilation. Importantly, study outcomes support the concept of initiating immunomodulation prior to beginning ERT since the study regimen allowed for prompt initiation of treatment. PMID:23601496

  13. Oxidative and nitrative stress and pro-inflammatory cytokines in Mucopolysaccharidosis type II patients: effect of long-term enzyme replacement therapy and relation with glycosaminoglycan accumulation.

    PubMed

    Jacques, Carlos Eduardo Diaz; Donida, Bruna; Mescka, Caroline P; Rodrigues, Daiane G B; Marchetti, Desirèe P; Bitencourt, Fernanda H; Burin, Maira G; de Souza, Carolina F M; Giugliani, Roberto; Vargas, Carmen Regla

    2016-09-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis type II (MPS II) is a lysosomal storage disease caused by a deficient activity of iduronate-2-sulfatase, leading to abnormal accumulation of glycosaminoglycans (GAG). The main treatment for MPS II is enzyme replacement therapy (ERT). Previous studies described potential benefits of six months of ERT against oxidative stress in patients. Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate oxidative, nitrative and inflammatory biomarkers in MPS II patients submitted to long term ERT. It were analyzed urine and blood samples from patients on ERT (mean time: 5.2years) and healthy controls. Patients presented increased levels of lipid peroxidation, assessed by urinary 15-F2t-isoprostane and plasmatic thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances. Concerning to protein damage, urinary di-tyrosine (di-Tyr) was increased in patients; however, sulfhydryl and carbonyl groups in plasma were not altered. It were also verified increased levels of urinary nitrate+nitrite and plasmatic nitric oxide (NO) in MPS II patients. Pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1β and TNF-α were increased in treated patients. GAG levels were correlated to di-Tyr and nitrate+nitrite. Furthermore, IL-1β was positively correlated with TNF-α and NO. Contrastingly, we did not observed alterations in erythrocyte superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase and glutathione reductase activities, in reduced glutathione content and in the plasmatic antioxidant capacity. Although some parameters were still altered in MPS II patients, these results may suggest a protective role of long-term ERT against oxidative stress, especially upon oxidative damage to protein and enzymatic and non-enzymatic defenses. Moreover, the redox imbalance observed in treated patients seems to be GAG- and pro-inflammatory cytokine-related.

  14. Variations in plasma and urinary lipids in response to enzyme replacement therapy for Fabry disease patients by nanoflow UPLC-ESI-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Byeon, Seul Kee; Kim, Jin Yong; Lee, Jin-Sung; Moon, Myeong Hee

    2016-03-01

    A deficiency of α-galactosidase A causes Fabry disease (FD) by disrupting lipid metabolism, especially trihexosylceramide (THC). Enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) is clinically offered to FD patients in an attempt to lower the accumulated lipids. Studies on specific types of lipids that are directly or indirectly altered by FD are very scarce, even though they are crucial in understanding the biological process linked to the pathogenesis of FD. We performed a comprehensive lipid profiling of plasma and urinary lipids from FD patients with nanoflow liquid chromatography electrospray-ionization tandem mass spectrometry (nLC-ESI-MS/MS) and identified 129 plasma and 111 urinary lipids. Among these, lipids that exhibited alternations (>twofold) in patients were selected as targets for selected reaction monitoring (SRM)-based high-speed quantitation using nanoflow ultra-performance LC-ESI-MS/MS (nUPLC-ESI-MS/MS) and 31 plasma and 26 urinary lipids showed significant elevation among FD patients. Higher percentages of sphingolipids (SLs; 48% for plasma and 42% for urine) were highly elevated in patients; whereas, a smaller percentage of phospholipids (PLs; 15% for plasma and 13% for urine) were significantly affected. Even though α-galactosidase A is reported to affect THC only, the results show that other classes of lipids (especially SLs) are changed as well, indicating that FD not only alters metabolism of THC but various classes of lipids too. Most lipids showing significant increases in relative amounts before ERT decreased after ERT, but overall, ERT influenced plasma lipids more than urinary lipids. PMID:26873218

  15. Facial-muscle weakness, speech disorders and dysphagia are common in patients with classic infantile Pompe disease treated with enzyme therapy.

    PubMed

    van Gelder, C M; van Capelle, C I; Ebbink, B J; Moor-van Nugteren, I; van den Hout, J M P; Hakkesteegt, M M; van Doorn, P A; de Coo, I F M; Reuser, A J J; de Gier, H H W; van der Ploeg, A T

    2012-05-01

    Classic infantile Pompe disease is an inherited generalized glycogen storage disorder caused by deficiency of lysosomal acid α-glucosidase. If left untreated, patients die before one year of age. Although enzyme-replacement therapy (ERT) has significantly prolonged lifespan, it has also revealed new aspects of the disease. For up to 11 years, we investigated the frequency and consequences of facial-muscle weakness, speech disorders and dysphagia in long-term survivors. Sequential photographs were used to determine the timing and severity of facial-muscle weakness. Using standardized articulation tests and fibreoptic endoscopic evaluation of swallowing, we investigated speech and swallowing function in a subset of patients. This study included 11 patients with classic infantile Pompe disease. Median age at the start of ERT was 2.4 months (range 0.1-8.3 months), and median age at the end of the study was 4.3 years (range 7.7 months -12.2 years). All patients developed facial-muscle weakness before the age of 15 months. Speech was studied in four patients. Articulation was disordered, with hypernasal resonance and reduced speech intelligibility in all four. Swallowing function was studied in six patients, the most important findings being ineffective swallowing with residues of food (5/6), penetration or aspiration (3/6), and reduced pharyngeal and/or laryngeal sensibility (2/6). We conclude that facial-muscle weakness, speech disorders and dysphagia are common in long-term survivors receiving ERT for classic infantile Pompe disease. To improve speech and reduce the risk for aspiration, early treatment by a speech therapist and regular swallowing assessments are recommended.

  16. Variations in plasma and urinary lipids in response to enzyme replacement therapy for Fabry disease patients by nanoflow UPLC-ESI-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Byeon, Seul Kee; Kim, Jin Yong; Lee, Jin-Sung; Moon, Myeong Hee

    2016-03-01

    A deficiency of α-galactosidase A causes Fabry disease (FD) by disrupting lipid metabolism, especially trihexosylceramide (THC). Enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) is clinically offered to FD patients in an attempt to lower the accumulated lipids. Studies on specific types of lipids that are directly or indirectly altered by FD are very scarce, even though they are crucial in understanding the biological process linked to the pathogenesis of FD. We performed a comprehensive lipid profiling of plasma and urinary lipids from FD patients with nanoflow liquid chromatography electrospray-ionization tandem mass spectrometry (nLC-ESI-MS/MS) and identified 129 plasma and 111 urinary lipids. Among these, lipids that exhibited alternations (>twofold) in patients were selected as targets for selected reaction monitoring (SRM)-based high-speed quantitation using nanoflow ultra-performance LC-ESI-MS/MS (nUPLC-ESI-MS/MS) and 31 plasma and 26 urinary lipids showed significant elevation among FD patients. Higher percentages of sphingolipids (SLs; 48% for plasma and 42% for urine) were highly elevated in patients; whereas, a smaller percentage of phospholipids (PLs; 15% for plasma and 13% for urine) were significantly affected. Even though α-galactosidase A is reported to affect THC only, the results show that other classes of lipids (especially SLs) are changed as well, indicating that FD not only alters metabolism of THC but various classes of lipids too. Most lipids showing significant increases in relative amounts before ERT decreased after ERT, but overall, ERT influenced plasma lipids more than urinary lipids.

  17. Oxidative and nitrative stress and pro-inflammatory cytokines in Mucopolysaccharidosis type II patients: effect of long-term enzyme replacement therapy and relation with glycosaminoglycan accumulation.

    PubMed

    Jacques, Carlos Eduardo Diaz; Donida, Bruna; Mescka, Caroline P; Rodrigues, Daiane G B; Marchetti, Desirèe P; Bitencourt, Fernanda H; Burin, Maira G; de Souza, Carolina F M; Giugliani, Roberto; Vargas, Carmen Regla

    2016-09-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis type II (MPS II) is a lysosomal storage disease caused by a deficient activity of iduronate-2-sulfatase, leading to abnormal accumulation of glycosaminoglycans (GAG). The main treatment for MPS II is enzyme replacement therapy (ERT). Previous studies described potential benefits of six months of ERT against oxidative stress in patients. Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate oxidative, nitrative and inflammatory biomarkers in MPS II patients submitted to long term ERT. It were analyzed urine and blood samples from patients on ERT (mean time: 5.2years) and healthy controls. Patients presented increased levels of lipid peroxidation, assessed by urinary 15-F2t-isoprostane and plasmatic thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances. Concerning to protein damage, urinary di-tyrosine (di-Tyr) was increased in patients; however, sulfhydryl and carbonyl groups in plasma were not altered. It were also verified increased levels of urinary nitrate+nitrite and plasmatic nitric oxide (NO) in MPS II patients. Pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1β and TNF-α were increased in treated patients. GAG levels were correlated to di-Tyr and nitrate+nitrite. Furthermore, IL-1β was positively correlated with TNF-α and NO. Contrastingly, we did not observed alterations in erythrocyte superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase and glutathione reductase activities, in reduced glutathione content and in the plasmatic antioxidant capacity. Although some parameters were still altered in MPS II patients, these results may suggest a protective role of long-term ERT against oxidative stress, especially upon oxidative damage to protein and enzymatic and non-enzymatic defenses. Moreover, the redox imbalance observed in treated patients seems to be GAG- and pro-inflammatory cytokine-related. PMID:27251652

  18. pH and hydrogen peroxide dual responsive supramolecular prodrug system for controlled release of bioactive molecules.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yin; Wang, Haibo; Chen, Yangjun; Liu, Xiangsheng; Jin, Qiao; Ji, Jian

    2014-09-01

    Nowadays, cancer is one of the most fatal threatens to human health. By utilizing the differences of cell environment between cancer cells and their normal counterparts as assembly-disassembly triggers, various smart drug nanocarriers have been designed to fight the cancer. Nevertheless, most of them are still not robust enough. One important reason is that they merely focus on a single stimulus. Thus, in order to achieve a better therapeutic effect, constructing multi responsive polymers is of great significance. However, most of multi responsive polymers used, up until now, are mainly based on block polymers synthesized via traditional polymerization methods, which are relatively time-consuming and laborious. Here in this article, a facile strategy preparing smart polymers with dual responsiveness (endosomal pH and over produced H2O2) was proposed and realized by orthogonal assembly of β-CD-hydrazone-DOX and PEG-Fc. The obtained polymers were found to be able to spontaneously assemble into micelles in water, indicating their potential applications as drug nanocarriers. In vitro study revealed that the release of the encapsulated DOX was significantly enhanced by both H2O2 and low pH at 5.0. Furthermore, fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry analysis showed that the assembled supramolecular prodrug micelles could be internalized into cancer cells. These properties suggested their promising application in cancer therapy. PMID:24984266

  19. New tools for the quantitative assessment of prodrug delivery and neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Samuelson, Lynn E; Scherer, Randy L; VanSaun, Michael N; Fan, Kang-Hsien; Dozier, E Ashley; Carter, Kathy J; Koyama, Tatsuki; Shyr, Yu; Aschner, Michael; Stanwood, Gregg D; Bornhop, Darryl J; Matrisian, Lynn M; McIntyre, J Oliver

    2015-03-01

    Systemic off-target toxicities, including neurotoxicity, are prevalent side effects in cancer patients treated with a number of otherwise highly efficacious anticancer drugs. In the current study, we have: (1) developed a new analytical metric for the in vivo preclinical assessment of systemic toxicities/neurotoxicity of new drugs and delivery systems; and (2) evaluated, in mice, the in vivo efficacy and toxicity of a versatile and modular NanoDendron (ND) drug delivery and imaging platform that we recently developed. Our paclitaxel-carrying ND prodrug, ND(PXL), is activated following proteolytic cleavage by MMP9, resulting in localized cytotoxic chemotherapy. Using click chemistry, we combined ND(PXL) with a traceable beacon, ND(PB), yielding ND(PXL)-ND(PB) that functions as a theranostic compound. In vivo fluorescence FRET imaging of this theranostic platform was used to confirm localized delivery to tumors and to assess the efficiency of drug delivery to tumors, achieving 25-30% activation in the tumors of an immunocompetent mouse model of breast cancer. In this model, ND-drug exhibited anti-tumor efficacy comparable to nab-paclitaxel, a clinical formulation. In addition, we combined neurobehavioral metrics of nociception and sensorimotor performance of individual mice to develop a novel composite toxicity score that reveals and quantifies peripheral neurotoxicity, a debilitating long-term systemic toxicity of paclitaxel therapy. Importantly, mice treated with nab-paclitaxel developed changes in behavioral metrics with significantly higher toxicity scores indicative of peripheral neuropathy, while mice treated with ND(PXL) showed no significant changes in behavioral responses or toxicity score. Our ND formulation was designed to be readily adaptable to incorporate different drugs, imaging modalities and/or targeting motifs. This formulation has significant potential for preclinical and clinical tools across multiple disease states. The studies presented here

  20. Topical iontophoretic delivery of ionizable, biolabile aciclovir prodrugs: A rational approach to improve cutaneous bioavailability.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yong; Alberti, Ingo; Kalia, Yogeshvar N

    2016-02-01

    The objective was to investigate the topical iontophoretic delivery of a series of amino acid ester prodrugs of aciclovir (ACV-X, where ACV=aciclovir and X=Arg, Gly, Ile, Phe, Trp and Val) as a means to enhance cutaneous delivery of ACV. The newly synthesized prodrugs were characterized by (1)H NMR and high resolution mass spectrometry. Analytical methods using HPLC-UV were developed for their quantification and each method was validated. Investigation of solution stability as a function of pH showed that all ACV-X prodrugs were relatively stable in acid conditions at pH 2.0 and pH 5.5 for up to 8h but susceptible to extensive hydrolysis at pH 7.4 and under alkaline conditions (pH 10). No ACV-X hydrolysis was observed after contact for 2h with the external surface of porcine stratum corneum. However, there was significant hydrolysis following contact with the dermal surface of dermatomed porcine skin, in particular, for ACV-Arg. Passive transport of ACV and ACV-X prodrugs from aqueous solution after 2h was below the limit of detection. Iontophoresis of ACV at 0.5 mA/cm(2) for 2h led to modest ACV skin deposition (QDEP,ACV) of 4.6 ± 0.3 nmol/cm(2). In contrast, iontophoresis of ACV-X prodrugs under the same conditions produced order of magnitude increases in cutaneous deposition of ACV species, that is, QDEP,TOTAL=QDEP,ACV+QDEP,ACV-X. QDEP,TOTAL for ACV-Gly, ACV-Val, ACV-Ile, ACV-Phe, ACV-Trp and ACV-Arg was 412.8 ± 44.0, 358.8 ± 66.8, 434.1 ± 68.2, 249.8 ± 81.4, 156.1 ± 76.3, 785.9 ± 78.1 nmol/cm(2), respectively. The extent of bioconversion of ACV-X to ACV in the skin was high and the proportion of ACV present ranged from 81% to 100%. The skin retention ratio, a measure of the selectivity of ACV species for deposition over permeation after iontophoretic delivery of ACV-X prodrugs, was dependent on both the rate of transport and the susceptibility to hydrolysis of the prodrugs. Skin deposition of ACV and its six prodrugs were investigated further as a

  1. Topical iontophoretic delivery of ionizable, biolabile aciclovir prodrugs: A rational approach to improve cutaneous bioavailability.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yong; Alberti, Ingo; Kalia, Yogeshvar N

    2016-02-01

    The objective was to investigate the topical iontophoretic delivery of a series of amino acid ester prodrugs of aciclovir (ACV-X, where ACV=aciclovir and X=Arg, Gly, Ile, Phe, Trp and Val) as a means to enhance cutaneous delivery of ACV. The newly synthesized prodrugs were characterized by (1)H NMR and high resolution mass spectrometry. Analytical methods using HPLC-UV were developed for their quantification and each method was validated. Investigation of solution stability as a function of pH showed that all ACV-X prodrugs were relatively stable in acid conditions at pH 2.0 and pH 5.5 for up to 8h but susceptible to extensive hydrolysis at pH 7.4 and under alkaline conditions (pH 10). No ACV-X hydrolysis was observed after contact for 2h with the external surface of porcine stratum corneum. However, there was significant hydrolysis following contact with the dermal surface of dermatomed porcine skin, in particular, for ACV-Arg. Passive transport of ACV and ACV-X prodrugs from aqueous solution after 2h was below the limit of detection. Iontophoresis of ACV at 0.5 mA/cm(2) for 2h led to modest ACV skin deposition (QDEP,ACV) of 4.6 ± 0.3 nmol/cm(2). In contrast, iontophoresis of ACV-X prodrugs under the same conditions produced order of magnitude increases in cutaneous deposition of ACV species, that is, QDEP,TOTAL=QDEP,ACV+QDEP,ACV-X. QDEP,TOTAL for ACV-Gly, ACV-Val, ACV-Ile, ACV-Phe, ACV-Trp and ACV-Arg was 412.8 ± 44.0, 358.8 ± 66.8, 434.1 ± 68.2, 249.8 ± 81.4, 156.1 ± 76.3, 785.9 ± 78.1 nmol/cm(2), respectively. The extent of bioconversion of ACV-X to ACV in the skin was high and the proportion of ACV present ranged from 81% to 100%. The skin retention ratio, a measure of the selectivity of ACV species for deposition over permeation after iontophoretic delivery of ACV-X prodrugs, was dependent on both the rate of transport and the susceptibility to hydrolysis of the prodrugs. Skin deposition of ACV and its six prodrugs were investigated further as a

  2. Nanostructured nanoparticles of self-assembled lipid pro-drugs as a route to improved chemotherapeutic agents

    SciTech Connect

    Sagnella, Sharon M.; Gong, Xiaojuan; Moghaddam, Minoo J.; Conn, Charlotte E.; Kimpton, Kathleen; Waddington, Lynne J.; Krodkiewska, Irena; Drummond, Calum J.

    2014-09-24

    We demonstrate that oral delivery of self-assembled nanostructured nanoparticles consisting of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) lipid prodrugs results in a highly effective, target-activated, chemotherapeutic agent, and offers significantly enhanced efficacy over a commercially available alternative that does not self-assemble. The lipid prodrug nanoparticles have been found to significantly slow the growth of a highly aggressive mouse 4T1 breast tumour, and essentially halt the growth of a human MDA-MB-231 breast tumour in mouse xenografts. Systemic toxicity is avoided as prodrug activation requires a three-step, enzymatic conversion to 5-FU, with the third step occurring preferentially at the tumour site. Additionally, differences in the lipid prodrug chemical structure and internal nanostructure of the nanoparticle dictate the enzymatic conversion rate and can be used to control sustained release profiles. Thus, we have developed novel oral nanomedicines that combine sustained release properties with target-selective activation.

  3. Imidazopyridazine hepatitis C virus polymerase inhibitors. Structure-activity relationship studies and the discovery of a novel, traceless prodrug mechanism.

    PubMed

    Leivers, Martin; Miller, John F; Chan, Stephanie A; Lauchli, Ryan; Liehr, Sebastian; Mo, Wenyan; Ton, Tony; Turner, Elizabeth M; Youngman, Michael; Falls, J Greg; Long, Susan; Mathis, Amanda; Walker, Jill

    2014-03-13

    By reducing the basicity of the core heterocycle in a series of HCV NS5B inhibitors, the hERG liability was reduced. The SAR was then systematically explored in order to increase solubility and enable dose escalation while retaining potency. During this exploration, a facile decarboxylation was noted and was exploited as a novel prodrug mechanism. The synthesis and characterization of these prodrugs and their utilization in chronic toxicity studies are presented.

  4. Pharmacokinetics of amino acid ester prodrugs of acyclovir after oral administration: interaction with the transporters on Caco-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Katragadda, Suresh; Jain, Ritesh; Kwatra, Deep; Hariharan, Sudharshan; Mitra, Ashim K

    2008-10-01

    In vivo systemic absorption of the amino acid prodrugs of acyclovir (ACV) after oral administration was evaluated in rats. Stability of the prodrugs, L-alanine-ACV (AACV), L-serine-ACV (SACV), L-isoleucine-ACV (IACV), gamma-glutamate-ACV (EACV) and L-valine-ACV (VACV) was evaluated in various tissues. Interaction of these prodrugs with the transporters on Caco-2 cells was studied. In vivo systemic bioavailability of these prodrugs upon oral administration was evaluated in jugular vein cannulated rats. The amino acid ester prodrugs showed affinity towards various amino acid transporters as well as the peptide transporter on the Caco-2 cells. In terms of stability, EACV was most enzymatically stable compared to other prodrugs especially in liver homogenate. In oral absorption studies, ACV and AACV showed high terminal elimination rate constants (lambda(z)). SACV and VACV exhibited approximately five-fold increase in area under the curve (AUC) values relative to ACV (p<0.05). C(max(T)) (maximum concentration) of SACV was observed to be 39+/-22 microM in plasma which is 2 times better than VACV and 15 times better than ACV. C(last(T)) (concentration at the last time point) of SACV was observed to be 0.18+/-0.06 microM in plasma which is two times better than VACV and three times better than ACV. Amino acid ester prodrugs of ACV were absorbed at varying amounts (C(max)) and eliminated at varying rates (lambda(z)) thereby leading to varying extents (AUC). The amino acid ester prodrug SACV owing to its enhanced stability, higher AUC and better concentration at last time point seems to be a promising candidate for the oral treatment of herpes infections.

  5. Water-soluble nitric-oxide-releasing acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) prodrugs.

    PubMed

    Rolando, Barbara; Lazzarato, Loretta; Donnola, Monica; Marini, Elisabetta; Joseph, Sony; Morini, Giuseppina; Pozzoli, Cristina; Fruttero, Roberta; Gasco, Alberto

    2013-07-01

    A series of water-soluble (benzoyloxy)methyl esters of acetylsalicylic acid (ASA), commonly known as aspirin, are described. The new derivatives each have alkyl chains containing a nitric oxide (NO)-releasing nitrooxy group and a solubilizing moiety bonded to the benzoyl ring. The compounds were synthesized and evaluated as ASA prodrugs. After conversion to the appropriate salt, most of the derivatives are solid at room temperature and all possess good water solubility. They are quite stable in acid solution (pH 1) and less stable at physiological pH. In human serum, these compounds are immediately metabolized by esterases, producing a mixture of ASA, salicylic acid (SA), and of the related NO-donor benzoic acids, along with other minor products. Due to ASA release, the prodrugs are capable of inhibiting collagen-induced platelet aggregation of human platelet-rich plasma. Simple NO-donor benzoic acids 3-hydroxy-4-(3-nitrooxypropoxy)benzoic acid (28) and 3-(morpholin-4-ylmethyl)-4-[3-(nitrooxy)propoxy]benzoic acid (48) were also studied as representative models of the whole class of benzoic acids formed following metabolism of the prodrugs in serum. These simplified derivatives did not trigger antiaggregatory activity when tested at 300 μM. Only 28 displays quite potent NO-dependent vasodilatatory action. Further in vivo evaluation of two selected prodrugs, {[2-(acetyloxy)benzoyl]oxy}methyl-3-[(3-[aminopropanoyl)oxy]-4-[3-(nitrooxy)propoxy]benzoate⋅HCl (38) and {[2-(acetyloxy)benzoyl]oxy}methyl 3-(morpholin-4-ylmethyl)-4-[3-(nitrooxy)propoxy]benzoate oxalate (49), revealed that their anti-inflammatory activities are similar to that of ASA when tested in the carrageenan-induced paw edema assay in rats. The gastrotoxicity of the two prodrugs was also determined to be lower than that of ASA in a lesion model in rats. Taken together, these results indicated that these NO-donor ASA prodrugs warrant further investigation for clinical application.

  6. Determination of metformin and its prodrugs in human and rat blood by hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Huttunen, Kristiina M; Rautio, Jarkko; Leppänen, Jukka; Vepsäläinen, Jouko; Keski-Rahkonen, Pekka

    2009-10-15

    Simple and specific hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC) method with ultraviolet (UV) detection was developed for the simultaneous determination of highly water-soluble metformin and its more lipophilic prodrugs in human and rat blood samples. The sample preparation was accomplished by precipitating proteins with acetonitrile, which enabled the direct injection of supernatants to the HPLC. Chromatographic separation was performed on an analytical normal phase silica column using a mixture of 0.01 M ammonium acetate pH 5.0 and acetonitrile (40:60, v/v) as a mobile phase at flow rate of 1 ml/min and at the wavelength of 235 nm. The method was validated in terms of specificity, linearity, accuracy, precision, recovery, and analyte stability. The UV-HILIC method was suitable for detecting both metformin and one of its more lipophilic prodrugs simultaneously in human and rat blood samples.

  7. Copper-free click-chemistry platform to functionalize cisplatin prodrugs.

    PubMed

    Pathak, Rakesh K; McNitt, Christopher D; Popik, Vladimir V; Dhar, Shanta

    2014-06-01

    The ability to rationally design and construct a platform technology to develop new platinum(IV) [Pt(IV)] prodrugs with functionalities for installation of targeting moieties, delivery systems, fluorescent reporters from a single precursor with the ability to release biologically active cisplatin by using well-defined chemistry is critical for discovering new platinum-based therapeutics. With limited numbers of possibilities considering the sensitivity of Pt(IV) centers, we used a strain-promoted azide-alkyne cycloaddition approach to provide a platform, in which new functionalities can easily be installed on cisplatin prodrugs from a single Pt(IV) precursor. The ability of this platform to be incorporated in nanodelivery vehicle and conjugation to fluorescent reporters were also investigated.

  8. Enzyme Kinetics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moe, Owen; Cornelius, Richard

    1988-01-01

    Conveys an appreciation of enzyme kinetic analysis by using a practical and intuitive approach. Discusses enzyme assays, kinetic models and rate laws, the kinetic constants (V, velocity, and Km, Michaels constant), evaluation of V and Km from experimental data, and enzyme inhibition. (CW)

  9. Metabolism and Pharmacokinetics of the Anti-Hepatitis C Virus Nucleotide Prodrug GS-6620

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ting; Babusis, Darius; Lepist, Eve-Irene; Sauer, Dorothea; Park, Yeojin; Vela, Jennifer E.; Shih, Robert; Birkus, Gabriel; Stefanidis, Dimitrios; Kim, Choung U.; Cho, Aesop

    2014-01-01

    The anti-hepatitis C virus nucleotide prodrug GS-6620 employs a double-prodrug approach, with l-alanine-isopropyl ester and phenol moieties attached to the 5′-phosphate that release the nucleoside monophosphate in hepatocytes and a 3′-isobutyryl ester added to improve permeability and oral bioavailability. Consistent with the stability found in intestinal homogenates, following oral administration, intact prodrug levels in blood plasma were the highest in dogs, followed by monkeys, and then were the lowest in hamsters. In contrast, liver levels of the triphosphate metabolite at the equivalent surface area-adjusted doses were highest in hamsters, followed by in dogs and monkeys. Studies in isolated primary hepatocytes suggest that relatively poor oral absorption in hamsters and monkeys was compensated for by relatively efficient hepatocyte activation. As intestinal absorption was found to be critical to the effectiveness of GS-6620 in nonclinical species, stomach pH, formulation, and food effect studies were completed in dogs. Consistent with in vitro absorption studies in Caco-2 cells, the absorption of GS-6620 was found to be complex and highly dependent on concentration. Higher rates of metabolism were observed at lower concentrations that were unable to saturate intestinal efflux transporters. In first-in-human clinical trials, the oral administration of GS-6620 resulted in poor plasma exposure relative to that observed in dogs and in large pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic variabilities. While a double-prodrug approach, including a 3′-isobutyryl ester, provided higher intrinsic intestinal permeability, this substitution appeared to be a metabolic liability, resulting in extensive intestinal metabolism and relatively poor oral absorption in humans. PMID:24419340

  10. Mitigation of nitrogen mustard mediated skin injury by a novel indomethacin bifunctional prodrug.

    PubMed

    Composto, Gabriella M; Laskin, Jeffrey D; Laskin, Debra L; Gerecke, Donald R; Casillas, Robert P; Heindel, Ned D; Joseph, Laurie B; Heck, Diane E

    2016-06-01

    Nitrogen mustard (NM) is a bifunctional alkylating agent that is highly reactive in the skin causing extensive tissue damage and blistering. In the present studies, a modified cutaneous murine patch model was developed to characterize NM-induced injury and to evaluate the efficacy of an indomethacin pro-drug in mitigating toxicity. NM (20μmol) or vehicle control was applied onto 6mm glass microfiber filters affixed to the shaved dorsal skin of CD-1 mice for 6min. This resulted in absorption of approximately 4μmol of NM. NM caused localized skin damage within 1 d, progressing to an eschar within 2-3 d, followed by wound healing after 4-5 d. NM-induced injury was associated with increases in skin thickness, inflammatory cell infiltration, reduced numbers of sebocytes, basal keratinocyte double stranded DNA breaks, as measured by phospho-histone 2A.X expression, mast cell degranulation and increases in inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). Wound healing was characterized by epidermal hyperplasia and marked increases in basal cells expressing proliferating cell nuclear antigen. A novel indomethacin-anticholinergic prodrug (4338) designed to target cyclooxygenases and acetylcholinesterase (AChE), was found to markedly suppress NM toxicity, decreasing wound thickness and eschar formation. The prodrug also inhibited mast cell degranulation, suppressed keratinocyte expression of iNOS and COX-2, as well as markers of epidermal proliferation. These findings indicate that a novel bifunctional pro-drug is effective in limiting NM mediated dermal injury. Moreover, our newly developed cutaneous patch model is a sensitive and reproducible method to assess the mechanism of action of countermeasures. PMID:27189522

  11. Metabolic fate and pharmacokinetics of the acyclovir prodrug valaciclovir in cynomolgus monkeys.

    PubMed

    de Miranda, P; Burnette, T C

    1994-01-01

    Valaciclovir, the L-valyl ester of acyclovir (ZOVIRAX), demonstrated good oral absorption and nearly complete conversion to acyclovir in cynomolgus monkeys, indicating its suitability as an orally administered prodrug. The major urinary metabolites of [8-14C]valaciclovir, administered orally (10 and 25 mg/kg) or intravenously (10 mg/kg) to male monkeys, were acyclovir (46%-59% of urinary radioactivity), 8-hydroxyacyclovir (25%-30%), and 9-(carboxymethoxymethyl)guanine (CMMG) (11%-12%). Following oral and intravenous dosing, intact prodrug accounted for only 0.5% and 6% of urinary radioactivity, respectively. Dose-independent kinetics were observed for acyclovir derived from orally administered [8-14C]valaciclovir at the 10 and 25 mg/kg dose levels, with both AUC (24 and 60 microM.hr, respectively) and Cmax (8 and 23 microM, respectively) increasing nearly in proportion to the dose. Acyclovir was present in plasma at all sampling times (5 min to 7 hr postdose) after both oral doses, whereas the prodrug was not detected following either oral dose. The elimination of acyclovir after oral administration was monophasic, with an apparent half-life of 1.3-1.5 hr. Similar to acyclovir, both 8-hydroxyacyclovir and CMMG demonstrated dose-independent kinetics with apparent elimination half-lives of 1-1.6 hr. Intravenously administered [8-14C]valaciclovir (10 mg/kg) was rapidly converted to acyclovir, with the elimination half-life of acyclovir (0.9 hr) being 1.5-fold that of the prodrug (0.6 hr). The oral bioavailability of acyclovir derived from valaciclovir in cynomolgus monkey was 67 +/- 13%, representing a significant improvement over the limited bioavailability after acyclovir administration to primates.

  12. A radioimmunoassay for SQ 27,519, the active phosphinic acid-carboxylic diacid of the prodrug fosinopril in human serum

    SciTech Connect

    Tu, J.I.; Brennan, J.; Stouffer, B.; Eckelman, W.C. )

    1990-07-01

    Fosinopril (SQ 28,555) is a member of a new chemical class of angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors being developed by The Squibb Institute for Medical Research. During or following absorption, fosinopril, a prodrug, is hydrolyzed pharmacologically to the active diacid, SQ 27,519. A specific radioimmunoassay (RIA) for the measurement of SQ 27,519 in human serum has been developed. The assay utilizes a specific SQ 27,519 antibody, 125I-iodohistamine-SQ 27,519 radiolabel, and human serum standards. Satisfactory zero binding and assay sensitivity are achieved after a 2-h incubation at room temperature. Separation of the antibody-bound and free radiolabeled antigens is achieved by using polyethylene glycol-goat anti-rabbit gamma globulin separant. Recovery efficiencies ranged from 97.2 to 109.4%. The assay exhibited little or no cross-reactivity with captopril. Cross-reactivities for prodrug (SQ 28,555) and phenolic SQ 27,519 were 5 and 9%, respectively. Intra-assay variability (3.3-5.6%) and interassay variability (7.1-6.6%) were observed. Linear regression analysis indicates that RIA and (14C) thin-layer radiochromatography (TLRC) methods gave a highly significant correlation (RIA = 1.0 (14C)TLRC + 0.17, r = 0.991). Pharmacokinetic profiles of patient sera containing SQ 27,519 obtained by RIA and (14C)TLRC are identical. The RIA has been used routinely in support of the bioavailability and pharmacokinetic studies of fosinopril in humans.

  13. Development and validation of LC-MSMS assay for the determination of the prodrug dabigatran etexilate and its active metabolites in human plasma.

    PubMed

    Nouman, Eman G; Al-Ghobashy, Medhat A; Lotfy, Hayam M

    2015-05-01

    Dabigatran etexilate (DABE) is a low-molecular-weight prodrug that is converted after oral administration to dabigatran (DAB)-a directly acting oral anticoagulant. In this study, an LC-MSMS assay was developed and validated for the determination of DABE, free DAB and its equipotent O-glucuronide conjugates in plasma. Owing to the susceptibility of DABE and DAB to chemical hydrolysis, cleavage of the O-glucuronide moiety was carried out using β-glucuronidase enzyme. Free and total plasma concentrations of DAB were determined in incurred plasma samples before and after enzymatic cleavage (50°C and 3 h), respectively. RP-HPLC separation was carried out using acetonitrile: water (30:70, v/v), adjusted to pH 3.0 using formic acid. Tandem mass spectrometric detection at positive electrospray ionization in the MRM mode was then employed for the determination of DABE and DAB. The analysis was carried out within 5.0 min over a linear concentration range of 1.00-600.00 ng/mL for the prodrug and its active metabolite. Validation was carried out according to FDA guidelines for bioanalytical method. The recoveries were higher than 89.48%, the accuracy was within 98.33-110.12% and the RSD was below 10% for the studied compounds in both incurred plasma and quality control samples. Results of incurred sample re-analysis and incurred sample stability revealed less than 10% variability. This indicated good assay precision and sufficient stability of target analytes in their real matrix at the employed experimental conditions. The applicability of the assay for therapeutic drug monitoring and the determination of the pharmacokinetic parameters were demonstrated.

  14. Development and validation of LC-MSMS assay for the determination of the prodrug dabigatran etexilate and its active metabolites in human plasma.

    PubMed

    Nouman, Eman G; Al-Ghobashy, Medhat A; Lotfy, Hayam M

    2015-05-01

    Dabigatran etexilate (DABE) is a low-molecular-weight prodrug that is converted after oral administration to dabigatran (DAB)-a directly acting oral anticoagulant. In this study, an LC-MSMS assay was developed and validated for the determination of DABE, free DAB and its equipotent O-glucuronide conjugates in plasma. Owing to the susceptibility of DABE and DAB to chemical hydrolysis, cleavage of the O-glucuronide moiety was carried out using β-glucuronidase enzyme. Free and total plasma concentrations of DAB were determined in incurred plasma samples before and after enzymatic cleavage (50°C and 3 h), respectively. RP-HPLC separation was carried out using acetonitrile: water (30:70, v/v), adjusted to pH 3.0 using formic acid. Tandem mass spectrometric detection at positive electrospray ionization in the MRM mode was then employed for the determination of DABE and DAB. The analysis was carried out within 5.0 min over a linear concentration range of 1.00-600.00 ng/mL for the prodrug and its active metabolite. Validation was carried out according to FDA guidelines for bioanalytical method. The recoveries were higher than 89.48%, the accuracy was within 98.33-110.12% and the RSD was below 10% for the studied compounds in both incurred plasma and quality control samples. Results of incurred sample re-analysis and incurred sample stability revealed less than 10% variability. This indicated good assay precision and sufficient stability of target analytes in their real matrix at the employed experimental conditions. The applicability of the assay for therapeutic drug monitoring and the determination of the pharmacokinetic parameters were demonstrated. PMID:25797721

  15. Fabrication of Reductive-Responsive Prodrug Nanoparticles with Superior Structural Stability by Polymerization-Induced Self-Assembly and Functional Nanoscopic Platform for Drug Delivery.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wen-Jian; Hong, Chun-Yan; Pan, Cai-Yuan

    2016-09-12

    A highly efficient strategy, polymerization-induced self-assembly (PISA) for fabrication of the polymeric drug delivery systems in cancer chemotherapy is reported. Diblock prodrug copolymer, PEG-b-P(MEO2MA-co-CPTM) was used as the macro-RAFT agent to fabricate prodrug nanoparticles through PISA. The advantages of fabricating intelligent drug delivery system via this approach are as following: (1) Simultaneous fulfillment of polymerization, self-assembly, and drug encapsulation in one-pot at relatively high concentration (100 mg/mL); (2) Almost complete monomer conversion allows direct application of the resultant prodrug nanoparticles without further purification; (3) Robust structures of the resultant prodrug nanoparticles, because the cross-linker was used as the comonomer, resulted in core-cross-linking simultaneously with the formation of the prodrug nanoparticles; (4) The drug content in the resultant prodrug nanoparticles can be accurately modulated just via adjusting the feed molar ratio of MEO2MA/CPTM in the synthesis of PEG-b-P(MEO2MA-co-CPTM). The prodrug nanoparticles with similar diameters but various drug contents were obtained using different prodrug macro-CTA. In consideration of the long-term biological toxicity, the prodrug nanoparticles with higher drug content exhibit more excellent anticancer efficiency due to that lower dosage of them are enough for effectively killing HeLa cells. PMID:27548375

  16. Stem and progenitor cell-mediated tumor selective gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Aboody, K S; Najbauer, J; Danks, M K

    2008-05-01

    The poor prognosis for patients with aggressive or metastatic tumors and the toxic side effects of currently available treatments necessitate the development of more effective tumor-selective therapies. Stem/progenitor cells display inherent tumor-tropic properties that can be exploited for targeted delivery of anti