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Sample records for enzyme-inducing antiepileptic drugs

  1. Teratogenicity of Antiepileptic Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Güveli, Betül Tekin; Rosti, Rasim Özgür; Güzeltaş, Alper; Tuna, Elif Bahar; Ataklı, Dilek; Sencer, Serra; Yekeler, Ensar; Kayserili, Hülya; Dirican, Ahmet; Bebek, Nerses; Baykan, Betül; Gökyiğit, Ayşen; Gürses, Candan

    2017-01-01

    Objective Antiepileptic drugs (AED) have chronic teratogenic effects, the most common of which are congenital heart disease, cleft lip/palate, urogenital and neural tube defects. The aim of our study is to examine teratogenic effects of AED and the correlation between these malformations and AED in single or multiple pregnancies. Methods This is a retrospective study of malformations in children born to mothers currently followed up by our outpatient clinics who used or discontinued AED during their pregnancy. Their children were then investigated using echocardiography, urinary ultrasound, cranial magnetic resonance image, and examined by geneticists and pediatric dentists. Results One hundred and seventeen children were included in the study. Ninety one of these children were exposed to AED during pregnancy. The most commonly used AED were valproic acid and carbamazepine in monotherapy. The percentage of major anomaly was 6.8% in all children. Dysmorphic features and dental anomalies were observed more in children exposed especially to valproic acid. There were 26 mothers with two and four mothers with three pregnancies from the same fathers. No correlation was found between the distribution of malformations in recurring pregnancies and AED usage. Conclusion Our study has the highest number of dysmorphism examined in literature, found in all the children exposed to valproic acid, which may account for the higher rate of facial dysmorphism and dental anomalies. On lower doses of valproic acid, major malformations are not seen, although the risk increases with polytherapy. Our data also indicate possible effects of genetic and environmental factors on malformations. PMID:28138106

  2. Antiepileptic Drugs and Pregnancy Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Wlodarczyk, Bogdan J.; Palacios, Ana M.; George, Timothy M.; Finnell, Richard H.

    2012-01-01

    The treatment of epilepsy in women of reproductive age remains a clinical challenge. While most women with epilepsy require anticonvulsant drugs for adequate control of their seizures, the teratogenicity associated with some antiepileptic drugs is a risk that needs to be carefully addressed. Antiepileptic medications are also used to treat an ever broadening range of medical conditions such as bipolar disorder, migraine prophylaxis, cancer and neuropathic pain. Despite the fact that the majority of pregnancies of women with epilepsy who are receiving pharmacological treatment are normal, studies have demonstrated that the risk of having a pregnancy complicated by a major congenital malformation is doubled when comparing the risk of untreated pregnancies. Furthermore, when antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) are used in polytherapy regimens, the risk is tripled, especially when valproic acid (VPA) is included. However, it should be noted that the risks are specific for each anticonvulsant drug. Some investigations have suggested that the risk of teratogenicity is increased in a dose-dependent manner. More recent studies have reported that in utero exposure to AEDs can have detrimental effects on the cognitive functions and language skills in later stages of life. In fact, the FDA just issued a safety announcement on the impact of VPA on cognition (Safety Announcement 6-30-2011). The purpose of this document is to review the most commonly used compounds in the treatment of women with epilepsy, and to provide information on the latest experimental and human epidemiological studies of the effects of antiepileptic drugs in the exposed embryos. PMID:22711424

  3. Antiepileptic drugs and brain development.

    PubMed

    Ikonomidou, Chrysanthy; Turski, Lechoslaw

    2010-01-01

    Epilepsy, the most common neurological disorder in young humans, has its highest incidence during the first year of life. Antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) which are used to treat seizures in infants, children and pregnant women target ion channels, neurotransmitters and second messenger systems in the brain. The same targets regulate brain processes essential both for propagation of seizures and for brain development, learning, memory and emotional behavior. Here we review adverse effects of AEDs in the developing mammalian brain. In addition, we discuss mechanisms explaining adverse effects of AEDs in the developing mammalian brain including interference with cell proliferation and migration, neurogenesis, axonal arborization, synaptogenesis, synaptic plasticity and physiological apoptotic cell death.

  4. [Mechanism of action of antiepileptic drugs].

    PubMed

    Saidón, Patricia

    2003-01-01

    Antiepileptic drugs (DAEs) act through different mechanisms of action: increase in central inhibition, inhibition of excitatorios mechanisms and modification of the excitability through their action on the ionic channels. Epilepsy is characterized by an abnormal and hypersynchronic unloading of a neuronal population. The activity of numerous drugs is associated to increase in gabaergic activity. Another group of drugs decreases excitatory mechanisms, through the inhibition of ionic channels, or through a decrease in the activity of the excitatory neurotransmitters. There are some of antiepileptic drugs, especially within the group of drugs of recent appearance, for wich the mechanism of action remains unknown.

  5. Adverse effects of new antiepileptic drugs.

    PubMed

    Onat, Filiz; Ozkara, Cigdem

    2004-04-01

    Starting with phenobarbital in the 1900s, it took almost 70-80 years to introduce old-generation agents for the treatment of epilepsy. Then, in eleven years, nine more new antiepileptic drugs were added to the armamentarium. These drugs produce a nearly 40-50% decrease in seizure incidence in refractory patients, but few patients have been able to achieve complete freedom from seizures. So the search for more effective drugs with minimal adverse effect profiles will continue. Although the new antiepileptic drugs do not demonstrate a superior efficacy compared to the older ones, they do offer some advantages in terms of tolerability, fewer drug interactions and simpler pharmacokinetics. However, our knowledge concerning their safety profiles can not yet be considered adequate due to the relatively short time these drugs have been on the market and to the limited number of patients exposed to them. The fact that the serious side effects of felbamate and vigabatrine appeared late after marketing should be taken as an important lesson because it implies the potential for unknown side effects at any time during treatment. Antiepileptic drug treatment should begin with diagnosis of the seizure and epileptic syndrome, followed by selection of the drug most appropriate for treatment of the individual patient, and continued with monitoring of not only the seizures but the adverse effect profile as well.

  6. Methods of assessment of antiepileptic drugs.

    PubMed Central

    Milligan, N; Richens, A

    1981-01-01

    Epilepsy is a symptom with protean manifestations and as such it is a difficult disease in which to carry out a therapeutic trial. The methods available to research workers for the assessment of new antiepileptic drugs are hampered by the fact that epilepsy is a fluctuant condition. Although it is a chronic disorder open to study using cross-over trials and within-patient comparisons, accurate assessment cannot be easily made at any one point in time. Research workers are therefore automatically placed at a time factor disadvantage and this is especially so for those searching for quick methods of evaluating new compounds. The need for a quick and reliable method of assessing a new antiepileptic drug has long been appreciated. This article will discuss the methods currently available and we will begin by considering the most commonly used method of assessment with particular reference to some of the problems involved in conducting a controlled clinical trial in epilepsy. PMID:7272157

  7. Antiepileptic Drug Withdrawal in Dogs with Epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Gesell, Felix Kaspar; Hoppe, Sonja; Löscher, Wolfgang; Tipold, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Epilepsy is one of the most common neurological disorders in dogs and is treated by chronic administration of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs). In human beings with epilepsy, it is common clinical practice to consider drug withdrawal after a patient has been in remission (seizure free) for three or more years, but withdrawal is associated with the risk of relapse. In the present study, the consequences of AED withdrawal were studied in dogs with epilepsy. Therefore, 200 owners of dogs with idiopathic or presumed idiopathic epilepsy were contacted by telephone interview, 138 cases could be enrolled. In 11 cases, the therapy had been stopped after the dogs had become seizure free for a median time of 1 year. Reasons for AED withdrawal were appearance or fear of adverse side effects, financial aspects, and the idea that the medication could be unnecessary. Following AED withdrawal, four of these dogs remained seizure free, seven dogs suffered from seizure recurrence, of which only three dogs could regain seizure freedom after resuming AED therapy. Due to the restricted case number, an exact percentage of dogs with seizure recurrence after AED withdrawal cannot be given. However, the present study gives a hint that similar numbers as in human patients are found, and the data can help owners of epileptic dogs and the responsible clinician to decide when and why to stop antiepileptic medication.

  8. Antiepileptic Drug Withdrawal in Dogs with Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Gesell, Felix Kaspar; Hoppe, Sonja; Löscher, Wolfgang; Tipold, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Epilepsy is one of the most common neurological disorders in dogs and is treated by chronic administration of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs). In human beings with epilepsy, it is common clinical practice to consider drug withdrawal after a patient has been in remission (seizure free) for three or more years, but withdrawal is associated with the risk of relapse. In the present study, the consequences of AED withdrawal were studied in dogs with epilepsy. Therefore, 200 owners of dogs with idiopathic or presumed idiopathic epilepsy were contacted by telephone interview, 138 cases could be enrolled. In 11 cases, the therapy had been stopped after the dogs had become seizure free for a median time of 1 year. Reasons for AED withdrawal were appearance or fear of adverse side effects, financial aspects, and the idea that the medication could be unnecessary. Following AED withdrawal, four of these dogs remained seizure free, seven dogs suffered from seizure recurrence, of which only three dogs could regain seizure freedom after resuming AED therapy. Due to the restricted case number, an exact percentage of dogs with seizure recurrence after AED withdrawal cannot be given. However, the present study gives a hint that similar numbers as in human patients are found, and the data can help owners of epileptic dogs and the responsible clinician to decide when and why to stop antiepileptic medication. PMID:26664952

  9. Pros and cons for the development of new antiepileptic drugs.

    PubMed

    Bialer, Meir; Walker, Matthew C; Sander, Josemir W

    2002-01-01

    There continues to be an escalation in the number of new antiepileptic drugs, with many recently marketed drugs and many more entering clinical trials. This growth begs the question as to whether we need additional antiepileptic drugs. We consider the answer to this question from the medical perspective and also from the viewpoint of the pharmaceutical industry, health providers and from a more global, international perspective. There is undoubtedly a medical need for new antiepileptic drugs, and despite growing competition, the antiepileptic drug market remains profitable. However, in health services with limited resources, it is important that this expense is not offset by failure to research more appropriate use of existing antiepileptic drugs that may have a greater impact on healthcare. This is especially true for developing countries where resources would be much better spent on prevention and closing the treatment gap (the difference between those who can be treated and those who are treated).

  10. Antiepileptic Drugs 2012: Recent Advances and Trends

    PubMed Central

    Sirven, Joseph I.; Noe, Katherine; Hoerth, Matthew; Drazkowski, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    There are now 24 antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) approved for use in epilepsy in the United States by the Food and Drug Administration. A literature search was conducted using PubMed, MEDLINE, and Google for all English-language articles that discuss newly approved AEDs and the use of AEDs in epilepsy in the United States from January 1, 2008, through December 31, 2011. Five new agents were identified that have come onto the market within the past 2 years. Moreover, 3 trends involving AEDs have become clinically important and must be considered by all who treat patients with epilepsy. These trends include issues of generic substitution of AEDs, pharmacogenomics predicting serious adverse events in certain ethnic populations, and the issue of the suicide risk involving the entire class of AEDs. This article discusses the most recent AEDs approved for use in the United States and the 3 important trends shaping the modern medical management of epilepsy. PMID:22958992

  11. Psychotic disorders induced by antiepileptic drugs in people with epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ziyi; Lusicic, Ana; O'Brien, Terence J; Velakoulis, Dennis; Adams, Sophia J; Kwan, Patrick

    2016-10-01

    Antiepileptic drug treatment can induce psychosis in some patients. However, there are no agreed definitions or diagnostic criteria for antiepileptic drug-induced psychotic disorder in the classification systems of either epileptology or psychiatry. In this study we investigated the clinical spectrum of antiepileptic drug-induced psychotic disorder in patients with epilepsy. The medical records of all patients with epilepsy who were diagnosed by a neuropsychiatrist as having a psychotic disorder at the Royal Melbourne Hospital from January 1993 to June 2015 were reviewed. Data were extracted regarding epilepsy and its treatment, psychotic symptoms profile and outcome. The diagnosis of epilepsy was established in accordance to the classification system of the International League Against Epilepsy while that of psychotic disorder was made according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 5th Edition and the proposal on neuropsychiatric disorders in epilepsy. Patients with antiepileptic drug-induced psychotic disorder were compared to those with psychotic disorders unrelated to antiepileptic drugs assessed over the same period (non-antiepileptic drug induced psychotic disorder group). Univariate comparisons were performed and variables with a value of P < 0.1 were selected for the multivariate logistic regression analysis. The records of 2630 in-patients and outpatients with epilepsy were screened, from which 98 (3.7%) with psychotic disorders were identified. Among these, 14 (14.3%) were diagnosed to have antiepileptic drug-induced psychotic disorder. Excluding one patient who developed psychosis after valproate withdrawal, 76.9% in the antiepileptic drug induced psychotic disorder group were female and the percentage of temporal lobe involvement was higher in the antiepileptic drug induced psychotic disorder group (69.2% versus 38.1%, P < 0.05). Current use of levetiracetam was higher in antiepileptic drug-induced psychotic disorder group (84

  12. The Controversy over Generic Antiepileptic Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, Susan J.; Hartman, Adam L.

    2010-01-01

    As patent protection ends for the next generation of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs), a complex debate continues over generic substitution of AEDs. On one hand, generic drug formulations provide cost savings for patients and society. On the other hand, patients with epilepsy and physicians are wary about the adequacy and efficacy of the Food and Drug Administration's (FDA) standards for generics. This article reviews current and proposed bioequivalence test procedures, summarizes new generic AED formulations and their costs, and discusses potential pitfalls in the current standards. These shortcomings include certain pharmacokinetic factors and clinical pharmacologic factors that may affect bioequivalence of generic AEDs, and statistical limitations of the standards. While the drug concentration differences between the brand name drug and each generic formulation are unlikely to be substantial, the differences with generic-to-generic switches will be greater and potentially clinically significant. Conversely, owing to their more favorable pharmacokinetic profile, newer AEDs may be less prone to problems with generic substitution than older ones. Unfortunately, very few data are available to guide decisions regarding what is best for an individual patient. Based on new prediction methods, generic substitution should be safe for many patients but identifying them ultimately requires more rigorous study. PMID:22477799

  13. Bone mass and turnover in women with epilepsy on antiepileptic drug monotherapy.

    PubMed

    Pack, Alison M; Morrell, Martha J; Marcus, Robert; Holloway, Leah; Flaster, Edith; Doñe, Silvia; Randall, Alison; Seale, Cairn; Shane, Elizabeth

    2005-02-01

    Antiepileptic drugs, particularly cytochrome P450 enzyme inducers, are associated with disorders of bone metabolism. We studied premenopausal women with epilepsy receiving antiepileptic drug monotherapy (phenytoin, carbamazepine, valproate, and lamotrigine). Subjects completed exercise and nutrition questionnaires and bone mineral density studies. Serum was analyzed for indices of bone metabolism including calcium, 25-hydroxyvitamin D, parathyroid hormone, insulin growth factor I, insulin binding protein III, and bone formation markers, bone-specific alkaline phosphatase, and osteocalcin. Urine was analyzed for cross-linked N-telopeptide of type I collagen, a bone resorption marker. Calcium concentrations were significantly less in subjects receiving carbamazepine, phenytoin, and valproate than in those receiving lamotrigine (p = 0.008). Insulin growth factor-I was significantly reduced in subjects receiving phenytoin compared with those receiving lamotrigine (p = 0.017). Subjects receiving phenytoin had significantly greater levels of bone-specific alkaline phosphatase (p = 0.007). Our results demonstrate that phenytoin is associated with changes in bone metabolism and increased bone turnover. The lower calcium concentrations in subjects taking carbamazepine or valproate compared with those taking other antiepileptic drugs suggest that these antiepileptic drugs may have long-term effects. Subjects receiving lamotrigine had no significant reductions in calcium or increases in markers of bone turnover, suggesting this agent is less likely to have long-term adverse effects on bone.

  14. Potential new methods for antiepileptic drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Robert S; Ho, Jet

    2002-01-01

    Use of novel drug delivery methods could enhance the efficacy and reduce the toxicity of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs). Slow-release oral forms of medication or depot drugs such as skin patches might improve compliance and therefore seizure control. In emergency situations, administration via rectal, nasal or buccal mucosa can deliver the drug more quickly than can oral administration. Slow-release oral forms and rectal forms of AEDs are already approved for use, nasal and buccal administration is currently off-label and skin patches for AEDs are an attractive but currently hypothetical option. Therapies under development may result in the delivery of AEDs directly to the regions of the brain involved in seizures. Experimental protocols are underway to allow continuous infusion of potent excitatory amino acid antagonists into the CSF. In experiments with animal models of epilepsy, AEDs have been delivered successfully to seizure foci in the brain by programmed infusion pumps, acting in response to computerised EEG seizure detection. Inactive prodrugs can be given systemically and activated at the site of the seizure focus by locally released compounds. One such drug under development is DP-VPA (or DP16), which is cleaved to valproic acid (sodium valproate) by phospholipases at the seizure focus. Liposomes and nanoparticles are engineered micro-reservoirs of a drug, with attached antibodies or receptor-specific binding agents designed to target the particles to a specific region of the body. Liposomes in theory could deliver a high concentration of an AED to a seizure focus. Penetration of the blood-brain barrier can be accomplished by linking large particles to iron transferrin or biological toxins that can cross the barrier. In the near future, it is likely that cell transplants that generate neurotransmitters and neuromodulators will accomplish renewable endogenous drug delivery. However, the survival and viability of transplanted cells have yet to be demonstrated

  15. Neurodevelopmental effects of fetal antiepileptic drug exposure.

    PubMed

    Velez-Ruiz, Naymee J; Meador, Kimford J

    2015-03-01

    Many studies investigating cognitive outcomes in children of women with epilepsy report an increased risk of mental impairment. Verbal scores on neuropsychometric measures may be selectively more involved. While a variety of factors contribute to the cognitive problems of children of women with epilepsy, antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) appear to play a major role. The mechanisms by which AEDs affect neurodevelopmental outcomes remain poorly defined. Animal models suggest that AED-induced apoptosis, altered neurotransmitter environment, and impaired synaptogenesis are some of the mechanisms responsible for cognitive and behavioral teratogenesis. AEDs that are known to induce apoptosis, such as valproate, appear to affect children's neurodevelopment in a more severe fashion. Fetal valproate exposure has dose-dependent associations with reduced cognitive abilities across a range of domains, and these appear to persist at least until the age of 6. Some studies have shown neurodevelopmental deficiencies associated with the use of phenobarbital and possibly phenytoin. So far, most of the investigations available suggest that fetal exposures to lamotrigine or levetiracetam are safer with regard to cognition when compared with other AEDs. Studies on carbamazepine show contradictory results, but most information available suggests that major poor cognitive outcomes should not be attributed to this medication. Overall, children exposed to polytherapy prenatally appear to have worse cognitive and behavioral outcomes compared with children exposed to monotherapy, and with the unexposed. There is an increase risk of neurodevelopmental deficits when polytherapy involves the use of valproate versus other agents.

  16. Molecular Targets for Antiepileptic Drug Development

    PubMed Central

    Meldrum, Brian S.; Rogawski, Michael A.

    2007-01-01

    Summary This review considers how recent advances in the physiology of ion channels and other potential molecular targets, in conjunction with new information on the genetics of idiopathic epilepsies, can be applied to the search for improved antiepileptic drugs (AEDs). Marketed AEDs predominantly target voltage-gated cation channels (the α subunits of voltage-gated Na+ channels and also T-type voltage-gated Ca2+ channels) or influence GABA-mediated inhibition. Recently, α2–δ voltage-gated Ca2+ channel subunits and the SV2A synaptic vesicle protein have been recognized as likely targets. Genetic studies of familial idiopathic epilepsies have identified numerous genes associated with diverse epilepsy syndromes, including genes encoding Na+ channels and GABAA receptors, which are known AED targets. A strategy based on genes associated with epilepsy in animal models and humans suggests other potential AED targets, including various voltage-gated Ca2+ channel subunits and auxiliary proteins, A- or M-type voltage-gated K+ channels, and ionotropic glutamate receptors. Recent progress in ion channel research brought about by molecular cloning of the channel subunit proteins and studies in epilepsy models suggest additional targets, including G-protein-coupled receptors, such as GABAB and metabotropic glutamate receptors; hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated cation (HCN) channel subunits, responsible for hyperpolarization-activated current Ih; connexins, which make up gap junctions; and neurotransmitter transporters, particularly plasma membrane and vesicular transporters for GABA and glutamate. New information from the structural characterization of ion channels, along with better understanding of ion channel function, may allow for more selective targeting. For example, Na+ channels underlying persistent Na+ currents or GABAA receptor isoforms responsible for tonic (extrasynaptic) currents represent attractive targets. The growing understanding of the

  17. Effects of fetal antiepileptic drug exposure

    PubMed Central

    Baker, G.A.; Browning, N.; Cohen, M.J.; Bromley, R.L.; Clayton-Smith, J.; Kalayjian, L.A.; Kanner, A.; Liporace, J.D.; Pennell, P.B.; Privitera, M.; Loring, D.W.; Labiner, David; Moon, Jennifer; Sherman, Scott; Combs Cantrell, Deborah T.; Silver, Cheryl; Goyal, Monisha; Schoenberg, Mike R.; Pack, Alison; Palmese, Christina; Echo, Joyce; Meador, Kimford J.; Loring, David; Pennell, Page; Drane, Daniel; Moore, Eugene; Denham, Megan; Epstein, Charles; Gess, Jennifer; Helmers, Sandra; Henry, Thomas; Motamedi, Gholam; Flax, Erin; Bromfield, Edward; Boyer, Katrina; Dworetzky, Barbara; Cole, Andrew; Halperin, Lucila; Shavel-Jessop, Sara; Barkley, Gregory; Moir, Barbara; Harden, Cynthia; Tamny-Young, Tara; Lee, Gregory; Cohen, Morris; Penovich, Patricia; Minter, Donna; Moore, Layne; Murdock, Kathryn; Liporace, Joyce; Wilcox, Kathryn; Kanner, Andres; Nelson, Michael N.; Rosenfeld, William; Meyer, Michelle; Clayton-Smith, Jill; Mawer, George; Kini, Usha; Martin, Roy; Privitera, Michael; Bellman, Jennifer; Ficker, David; Baade, Lyle; Liow, Kore; Baker, Gus; Booth, Alison; Bromley, Rebecca; Casswell, Miranda; Barrie, Claire; Ramsay, Eugene; Arena, Patricia; Kalayjian, Laura; Heck, Christianne; Padilla, Sonia; Miller, John; Rosenbaum, Gail; Wilensky, Alan; Constantino, Tawnya; Smith, Julien; Adab, Naghme; Veling-Warnke, Gisela; Sam, Maria; O'Donovan, Cormac; Naylor, Cecile; Nobles, Shelli; Santos, Cesar; Holmes, Gregory L.; Druzin, Maurice; Morrell, Martha; Nelson, Lorene; Finnell, Richard; Yerby, Mark; Adeli, Khosrow; Wells, Peter; Browning, Nancy; Blalock, Temperance; Crawford, Todd; Hendrickson, Linda; Jolles, Bernadette; Kunchai, Meghan Kelly; Loblein, Hayley; Ogunsola, Yinka; Russell, Steve; Winestone, Jamie; Wolff, Mark; Zaia, Phyllis; Zajdowicz, Thad

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To examine outcomes at age 4.5 years and compare to earlier ages in children with fetal antiepileptic drug (AED) exposure. Methods: The NEAD Study is an ongoing prospective observational multicenter study, which enrolled pregnant women with epilepsy on AED monotherapy (1999–2004) to determine if differential long-term neurodevelopmental effects exist across 4 commonly used AEDs (carbamazepine, lamotrigine, phenytoin, or valproate). The primary outcome is IQ at 6 years of age. Planned analyses were conducted using Bayley Scales of Infant Development (BSID at age 2) and Differential Ability Scale (IQ at ages 3 and 4.5). Results: Multivariate intent-to-treat (n = 310) and completer (n = 209) analyses of age 4.5 IQ revealed significant effects for AED group. IQ for children exposed to valproate was lower than each other AED. Adjusted means (95% confidence intervals) were carbamazepine 106 (102–109), lamotrigine 106 (102–109), phenytoin 105 (102–109), valproate 96 (91–100). IQ was negatively associated with valproate dose, but not other AEDs. Maternal IQ correlated with child IQ for children exposed to the other AEDs, but not valproate. Age 4.5 IQ correlated with age 2 BSID and age 3 IQ. Frequency of marked intellectual impairment diminished with age except for valproate (10% with IQ <70 at 4.5 years). Verbal abilities were impaired for all 4 AED groups compared to nonverbal skills. Conclusions: Adverse cognitive effects of fetal valproate exposure persist to 4.5 years and are related to performances at earlier ages. Verbal abilities may be impaired by commonly used AEDs. Additional research is needed. PMID:22491865

  18. Hypoactive sexual desire disorder caused by antiepileptic drugs.

    PubMed

    Singh, M; Bathla, Manish; Martin, A; Aneja, J

    2015-01-01

    Female sexual dysfunction is common but poorly understood sexual problem in women. Sexual dysfunction in female is multi-factorial in origin and also observed with intake of drug acting on central nervous system. This case report describes a female epileptic patient who developed sexual dysfunction with intake of antiepileptic drugs.

  19. Functional roles of benzothiazole motif in antiepileptic drug research.

    PubMed

    Amir, Mohammad; Hassan, Mohd Zaheen

    2013-12-01

    Benzothiazoles are promising candidates for the design of novel antiepileptic drugs. The endocyclic sulphur and nitrogen functions present in this heterocyclic nucleus have been shown to be critical for the anticonvulsant activity. The present review outlines the rational design and anticonvulsant potential of promising benzothiazole lead molecules. Particular focus has been placed on the structure activity relationship of different benzothiazole derivatives giving selected examples of molecules with significant activity being that these molecules may serve as prototypes for the development of more active antiepileptic drugs.

  20. [Use of antiepileptic drugs for the preventive treatment of migraine].

    PubMed

    Hamada, Junichi

    2009-10-01

    Migraine and epilepsy share several common characteristic clinical features, and epilepsy is a comorbid disorder of migraine. Clinical studies have shown that some antiepileptic drugs are effective for the preventive treatment of migraine. The rationale for the use of these antiepileptic drugs in migraine prophylaxis is the hypothesis that migraine and epilepsy have several common pathophysiological mechanisms. It has been suggested that in these 2 pathological conditions, an imbalance exists between excitatory glutamate-mediated transmission and inhibitory GABA-mediated transmission in cerebral tissues, mainly in specific brain areas. Moreover, it has been postulated that abnormal activation of some kinds of voltage-gated ionic channels has been postulated to have a key role in both migraine and epilepsy, especially when caused by a genetic abnormality. It has been found that cortical spreading depression is involved in the pathophysiological mechanism of epilepsy, in addition to the generation of migraine aura. Preventive antiepileptic drugs can be chosen for treatment after considering clinical efficacy- scientific evidence, side effects, and patients' specific personal conditions. Recently, scientific evidence was found to demonstrate efficacy of valproic acid and topiramate in the preventive treatment of migraine. These drugs can reduce the incidence of migraine attacks in the large clinical studies. Other new antiepileptic drugs can be tried in future clinical study.

  1. The Effects of Antiepileptic Drugs on Classroom Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Titus, Jeffrey B.; Thio, Liu Lin

    2009-01-01

    Epilepsy is one of the most common neurological disorders in children, and it has been associated with an increased risk of cognitive, psychiatric, and learning problems. Although side effects of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) have been long studied in adults, an understanding of how they manifest in children is only beginning to emerge. Careful…

  2. Neurologic birth defects after prenatal exposure to antiepileptic drugs.

    PubMed

    Uziel, Daniela; Rozental, Renato

    2008-12-01

    Maternal epilepsy has a potential for fetal injury, either antiepileptic drug (AED)--induced or as a consequence of seizures per se. The intent of this article is to explore this relationship, discussing similar patterns of malformations seen with AEDs or different disease exposure during pregnancy, and the potential role of gap junctional intercellular communication in abnormal morphogenesis.

  3. Antiepileptic Drug Nonadherence and Its Predictors among People with Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Getnet, Asmamaw; Woldeyohannes, Solomon Meseret; Bekana, Lulu; Menberu, Melak; Yimer, Solomon; Assaye, Adisu; Belete, Habte

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Antiepileptic drugs are effective in the treatment of epilepsy to the extent that about 70% of people with epilepsy can be seizure-free, but poor adherence to medication is major problem to sustained remission and functional restoration. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence and associated factors of antiepileptic drug nonadherence. Methods. Cross-sectional study was conducted on 450 individuals who were selected by systematic random sampling method. Antiepileptic drug nonadherence was measured by Morisky Medication Adherence Scale (MMAS) and logistic regression was used to look for significant associations. Result. The prevalence of AEDs nonadherence was 37.8%. Being on treatment for 6 years and above [AOR = 3.47, 95% CI: 1.88, 6.40], payment for AEDs [AOR = 2.76, 95% CI: 1.73, 4.42], lack of health information [AOR = 2.20, 95% CI: 1.41,3.43], poor social support [AOR = 1.88, 95%, CI: 1.01, 3.50], perceived stigma [AOR = 2.27, 95% CI: 1.45, 3.56], and experience side effect [AOR = 1.70, 95% CI: 1.06, 2.72] were significantly associated with antiepileptic drug nonadherence. Conclusion. More than one-third of people with epilepsy were not compliant with their AEDs. Giving health information about epilepsy and its management and consequent reduction in stigma will help for medication adherence. PMID:28053370

  4. Antiepileptic drugs in the treatment of neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Eisenberg, Elon; River, Yaron; Shifrin, Ala; Krivoy, Norberto

    2007-01-01

    Antiepileptic drugs are an effective treatment for various forms of neuropathic pain of peripheral origin, although they rarely provide complete pain relief. Multiple multicentre randomised controlled trials have shown clear efficacy of gabapentin and pregabalin for postherpetic neuralgia and painful diabetic neuropathy. Theses drugs can be rapidly titrated and are well tolerated. Topiramate, lamotrigine, carbamazepine and oxcarbazepine are alternatives for the treatment of painful diabetic neuropathy, but should be titrated slowly. Carbamazepine remains the drug of choice for trigeminal neuralgia; however, oxcarbazepine and lamotrigine are potential alternatives. There is an apparent need for large-scale randomised controlled trials on the efficacy of antiepileptic drugs in neuropathic pain in general, and in cancer-related neuropathic pain and neuropathic pain of central origin in particular. Trials with long-term follow-up are required to establish the long-term efficacy of antiepileptic drugs in neuropathic pain. There is only limited scientific evidence to support the idea that drug combinations are likely to be more efficacious and safer than each drug alone; further studies are warranted in this area.

  5. Current discoveries on the cognitive effects of antiepileptic drugs.

    PubMed

    Meador, K J

    2000-08-01

    The cognitive effects of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) are of particular concern to clinicians because these drugs are the primary therapeutic modality for managing epilepsy. In general, the cognitive effects of most AEDs are modest and offset by their benefit in reducing seizures. Nonetheless, the cognitive effects of a particular AED may be clinically significant when treating specific patient populations, such as children and the elderly.

  6. Levetiracetam as an antiepileptic, neuroprotective, and hyperalgesic drug.

    PubMed

    Cortes-Altamirano, J L; Olmos-Hernández, A; Bonilla-Jaime, H; Bandala, C; González-Maciel, A; Alfaro-Rodríguez, A

    2016-01-01

    The main purpose of this review was to expound upon the mechanism of action of Levetiracetam (LEV) as an antiepileptic, neuroprotective, and hyperalgesic drug. LEV is a second-generation anti-epileptic drug (AED) that is approved for clinical use as monotherapy and may also be used for adjunctive treatment of patients with seizures. Several researchers have recommended LEV as a treatment option in different diseases causing neuronal damage, and recently, LEV has been used as an antihyperalgesic drug. LEV exhibits favorable characteristics, including a low potential for interaction, a short elimination half-life, and has neither active metabolites nor major negative effects on cognition. This has generated many new research avenues for the utilization of this drug. However, the precise mechanism of action of LEV has not been fully elucidated. In this review, a search was conducted on PubMed, ProQuest, EBSCO, and the Science Citation index for studies evaluating the effects of LEV as an antiepileptic, neuroprotective, and hyperalgesic drug. A total of 32 studies related to the use of LEV suggested different mechanisms of action, such as binding to the synaptic vesicle glycoprotein 2A (SV2A) protein, inhibition of Ca2+ N-type channels, and its presence as a neuromodulator. These studies concluded that the pharmacodynamics of LEV should be viewed as a single pathway, and should not be based on specific molecular targets that depend on the physiological or pathological conditions prevalent at that time.

  7. Cutaneous Adverse Drug Reactions in Dogs Treated with Antiepileptic Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Koch, Tina; Mueller, Ralf S.; Dobenecker, Britta; Fischer, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Epilepsy is one of the most common neurologic disorders in dogs and life-long treatment with antiepileptic drugs (AED) is frequently required. Adverse events of AED targeting the skin are only rarely reported in veterinary medicine and the true incidence and spectrum of cutaneous reactions in epileptic dogs remains unknown. In this study, we hypothesized that cutaneous reactions commonly occur in epileptic dogs and are related to AED treatment. A retrospective case review of 185 dogs treated for epilepsy identified 20.0% with simultaneous appearance of dermatologic signs. In a subsequent prospective case investigation (n = 137), we identified newly appearing or distinct worsening of skin lesions following initiation of AED therapy in 10.9% of dogs treated for epilepsy (95% CI 6.8–17.7%). Cutaneous lesions were classified as probably drug-induced in 40.0% of these cases. Patch testing and intradermal testing were further investigated as potential diagnostic methods to confirm AED hypersensitivity. They were of high specificity but sensitivity and positive predictive value appeared inappropriate to recommend their routine use in clinical practice. PMID:27148543

  8. Therapeutic strategies in the choice of antiepileptic drugs.

    PubMed

    de Borchgrave, V; Delvaux, V; de Tourchaninoff, M; Dubru, J M; Ghariani, S; Grisar, Th; Legros, B; Ossemann, M; Sadzot, B; Tugendhaft, P; Van Bogaert, P; van Rijckevorsel, K

    2002-03-01

    The choice of treatment of newly diagnosed epilepsy involves many factors such as age, sex, life style, general health and concomitant medication. The seizure type, syndrome, and the pharmacology, efficacy and safety of the antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) should also be considered. Some of the new AEDs appear to provide at least equivalent efficacy with better tolerability. Some of these drugs have the potential to become drugs of first choice in newly diagnosed epilepsy. At the present time, we also must consider the criteria of reimbursement of these drugs. In this paper, we try to describe common and practical strategies to start a treatment of newly diagnosed epilepsy.

  9. Seizures and antiepileptic drugs: does exposure alter normal brain development?

    PubMed

    Marsh, Eric D; Brooks-Kayal, Amy R; Porter, Brenda E

    2006-12-01

    Seizures and antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) affect brain development and have long-term neurological consequences. The specific molecular and cellular changes, the precise timing of their influence during brain development, and the full extent of the long-term consequences of seizures and AEDs exposure have not been established. This review critically assesses both the basic and clinical science literature on the effects of seizures and AEDs on the developing brain and finds that evidence exists to support the hypothesis that both seizures and antiepileptic drugs influence a variety of biological process, at specific times during development, which alter long-term cognition and epilepsy susceptibility. More research, both clinical and experimental, is needed before changes in current clinical practice, based on the scientific data, can be recommended.

  10. Neurological and Psychiatric Sequelae of Developmental Exposure to Antiepileptic Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Gedzelman, Evan R.; Meador, Kimford J.

    2012-01-01

    The neurons in the developing mammalian brain are susceptible to antiepileptic drug (AED) effects. It is known that later in life deficits in cognitive performance as well as psychiatric deficits can manifest after early AED exposure. The extent of these deficits will be addressed. This review will attempt to draw parallels between the existent animal models and human studies. Through analysis of these studies, important future research will be elucidated and possible new and emerging therapies will be discussed. PMID:23293628

  11. Effect of anti-epileptic drugs in pregnancy and teratogenesis.

    PubMed

    Lakshmi, Sowbhagya; Sunanda, Kulkarni

    2008-07-01

    Epilepsy raises special concern in women during pregnancy. Antiepileptic drugs are known to induce major and minor malformations in the foetus. Aim of the study was to find an association between maternal serum alpha fetoprotein levels, foetal abnormalities and antiepileptic drugs mediated teratogenicity. Maternal serum alpha feto protein levels, kidney and liver function tests in age matched normal pregnant women and seizure free epileptic pregnant women during 12-14 weeks of gestation were estimated. Cases were subjected to ultrasonography at 11(th)-14(th) week of pregnancy and again at 20(th) week of pregnancy. maternal serum alfa feto protein was assayed by a specific Electro Chemiluminescence Immuno Assay test. There was no significant difference in kidney and liver function tests in cases as compared to controls. There were elevated levels of alpha feto protein in cases as compared to controls but this was not statistically significant. No anomalies were detected in ultrasound reports. Most women had normal full term delivery with healthy children but of low birth weight. No correlation was seen between maternal serum alfa feto protein levels and antiepileptic drug leading to teratogenesis.

  12. Exposure to antiepileptic drugs in utero and child development

    PubMed Central

    Veiby, Gyri; Daltveit, Anne Kjersti; Schjølberg, Synnve; Stoltenberg, Camilla; Øyen, Anne-Siri; Vollset, Stein Emil; Engelsen, Bernt A.; Gilhus, Nils Erik

    2013-01-01

    Summary Purpose Antiepileptic drugs may cause congenital malformations. Less is known about the effect on development in infancy and childhood. The aim of this study was to examine whether exposure to antiepileptic drugs during pregnancy has an impact on early child development. Methods From mid-year 1999 through December 2008, children of mothers recruited at 13–17 weeks of pregnancy were studied in the ongoing prospective Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study. Information on birth outcomes were obtained from the Medical Birth Registry (108,264 –children), and mothers reported on their child’s motor development, language, social skills, and autistic traits using items from standardized screening tools at 18 months (61,351 children) and 36 months of age (44,147 children). The relative risk of adverse outcomes in children according to maternal or paternal epilepsy with and without prenatal exposure to antiepileptic drugs was estimated as odds ratios (ORs), using logistic regression with adjustment for maternal age, parity, education, smoking, depression/anxiety, folate-supplementation, and child congenital malformation or low birth weight. Key findings A total of 333 children were exposed to antiepileptic drugs in utero. At 18 months, the exposed children had increased risk of abnormal scores for gross motor skills (7.1 % vs. 2.9 %; OR, 2.0; 95 % Confidence Interval [CI], 1.1–3.7) and autistic traits (3.5 % vs. 0.9 %; OR, 2.7; CI, 1.1–6.7) compared to children of parents without epilepsy. At 36 months, the exposed children had increased risk of abnormal score for gross motor skills (7.5 % vs. 3.3 %; OR, 2.2; CI, 1.1–4.2), sentence skills (11.2 % vs. 4.8 %; OR, 2.1; CI, 1.2–3.6), and autistic traits (6.0 % vs. 1.5 %; OR, 3.4; CI, 1.6–7.0). The drug-exposed children also had increased risk of congenital malformations (6.1 % vs. 2.9 %; OR, 2.1; CI, 1.4–3.4), but exclusion of congenital malformations did not affect the risk of adverse development

  13. [The "cost-benefit" analysis of new antiepileptic drugs].

    PubMed

    Vlasov, P N; Orekhova, N V

    2011-01-01

    The objective was to optimize the pharmaceutical treatment of epileptic patients and to evaluate the clinical-economical effectiveness of new antiepileptic drugs (AED)--levetiracetam, lamotrigine, topiramate and oxcarbazepine. The study included 134 patients with different types of seizures who received earlier antiepileptics with the addition of new AED as mono- or polytherapy. The cost of treatment and pharmacoeconomic "cost-benefit" index were calculated before and after the treatment optimization. After one year of the treatment with "news" AED, the decrease in seizure frequency was 75-92%. The "cost-benefit" ratio was significantly (p < 0.05) decreased by 2-3 times in all types of seizures despite the increase of direst costs of the treatment. The significant (p < 0.05) decrease in the cost of treatment of epilepsy was noted in all groups studied. In conclusion, the rational treatment using "new" AED allows to reduce both the total cost of treatment and ccost-benefits ratio.

  14. Adverse cognitive effects of antiepileptic pharmacotherapy: Each additional drug matters.

    PubMed

    Witt, Juri-Alexander; Elger, Christian E; Helmstaedter, Christoph

    2015-11-01

    The study was set up to evaluate the impact of the total drug load of antiepileptic pharmacotherapy on cognition. Retrospective analyses were based on 834 patients with epilepsy who underwent a brief routine assessment of executive function and verbal memory (EpiTrack Plus) at our department. The total drug load was quantified in two ways: (1) number of concurrent antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) and (2) total drug load according to the defined daily dose (DDD) provided by the World Health Organization. The cognitive measures showed higher inverse correlations with the number of AEDs (executive function: r=-0.35, p<0.001; memory: r=-0.22, p<0.001) than with the total DDD (executive function: r=-0.27, p<0.001; memory: r=-0.17, p<0.001). Reanalysis with statistical control for disease severity hardly changed the aforementioned results. With each additional drug in polytherapy, we observed a significantly lower performance in executive function. In this regard an additional explorative approach revealed that regimens combining AEDs with favorable cognitive profiles were associated with higher cognitive performance. Correlations between indicators of disease severity and drug load indices were low: altogether explaining only up to 9% of the observed variance in drug load. The findings demonstrate a considerable adverse effect of a higher drug load on cognition, especially on executive functions. Simply counting the number of drugs may be sufficient as a rough estimate of the risk of side effects. However, the combination of AEDs with favorable cognitive profiles may attenuate the negative effect of the total drug load.

  15. The rise and fall of borax as an antiepileptic drug.

    PubMed

    Jensen, John P A

    2006-04-01

    Five hundred eighty-six patients with epilepsy were treated with borax (hydrated sodium tetraborate) between 1912 and 1948 at the Kolonien Filadelfia Epilepsy Hospital, Dianalund, Denmark. A rough estimation shows that less than 5% experienced a more than 50% reduction in the total number of seizures. Charts were reviewed to find a connection between the concept of Bacillus epilepticus (1916) and the so-called renaissance of borax treatment described in 1923, and to find an explanation for the popularity of this seemingly ineffective antiepileptic drug.

  16. Pharmacy and generic substitution of antiepileptic drugs: missing in action?

    PubMed

    Welty, Timothy E

    2007-06-01

    Generic substitution of antiepileptic drugs is an issue that is gathering a lot of attention in the neurology community but is not receiving much attention within pharmacy. Several proposals have been drafted that restrict a pharmacist's decision-making in generic substitution. These proposals highlight concerns about the pharmacy community related to generic substitution. Careful consideration needs to be given to these issues by pharmacists and pharmacy professional organizations. Unless pharmacy as a profession takes strong positions in support of a pharmacist's ability to make decisions about pharmacotherapy and addresses many of the pharmacy-related problems of generic substitution, policies that negatively impact pharmacy will be established.

  17. Teratogenic potential of antiepileptic drugs in the zebrafish model.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sung Hak; Kang, Jung Won; Lin, Tao; Lee, Jae Eun; Jin, Dong Il

    2013-01-01

    The zebrafish model is an attractive candidate for screening of developmental toxicity during early drug development. Antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) arouse concern for the risk of teratogenicity, but the data are limited. In this study, we evaluated the teratogenic potential of seven AEDs (carbamazepine (CBZ), ethosuximide (ETX), valproic acid (VPN), lamotrigine (LMT), lacosamide (LCM), levetiracetam (LVT), and topiramate (TPM)) in the zebrafish model. Zebrafish embryos were exposed to AEDs from initiation of gastrula (5.25 hours post-fertilization (hpf)) to termination of hatching (72 hpf) which mimic the mammalian teratogenic experimental design. The lethality and teratogenic index (TI) of AEDs were determined and the TI values of each drug were compared with the US FDA human pregnancy categories. Zebrafish model was useful screening model for teratogenic potential of antiepilepsy drugs and was in concordance with in vivo mammalian data and human clinical data.

  18. Disorders of reproduction in patients with epilepsy: antiepileptic drug related mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Isojärvi, Jouko

    2008-03-01

    Epilepsy, antiepileptic drugs (AEDs), and the reproductive system have complex interactions. Fertility is lower in both men and women with epilepsy than in the general population. Moreover, reproductive endocrine disorders are more common among patients with epilepsy than among the population in general. These disorders have been attributed both to epilepsy itself and to AEDs. The use of the liver enzyme inducing AEDs phenobarbital, phenytoin and carbamazepine increases serum sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) concentrations in both men and women with epilepsy. Over time the increase in serum SHBG levels leads to diminished bioactivity of testosterone and estradiol, which may result in diminished potency in men and menstrual disorders in some women, and, thus, to reduced fertility. Valproate (VPA) medication may have effects on serum androgen concentrations and it reduces serum follicle stimulating hormone levels in men with epilepsy. However, the clinical significance of the VPA related reproductive endocrine changes in men is unknown. On the other hand, in women the use of VPA is associated with a frequent occurrence of reproductive endocrine disorders characterized by polycystic changes in the ovaries, high serum testosterone concentrations (hyperandrogenism) and menstrual disorders. Young women with epilepsy seem to be especially vulnerable to the effects of VPA on serum androgen levels. The endocrine effects of the new AEDs have not been widely studied. However, it seems they may offer an alternative if reproductive endocrine problems emerge during treatment with the older antiepileptic drugs. On the other hand, it seems that in many cases the reproductive endocrine effects of the AEDs are reversible, if the medication is discontinued.

  19. Antiepileptic drugs and adverse skin reactions: An update.

    PubMed

    Błaszczyk, Barbara; Lasoń, Władysław; Czuczwar, Stanisław Jerzy

    2015-06-01

    This paper summarizes current views on clinical manifestation, pathogenesis, prognosis and management of antiepileptic drug (AED)-induced adverse skin reactions. Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, MEDLINE (PubMed) and ISI Web of Knowledge were searched. The recent classification, among drug-induced skin injuries, points to Stevens-Johnson syndrome/toxic epidermal necrolysis (SJS/TEN), acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis and hypersensitivity syndrome (HSS), which may be also recognized as a drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS) or drug-induced hypersensitivity syndrome (DIHS). The use of aromatic AEDs, e.g. phenytoin, carbamazepine, oxcarbazepine, phenobarbital, primidone, zonisamide, and lamotrigine is more frequently associated with cutaneous eruption and other signs or symptoms of drug hypersensitivity. There is a high degree of cross-reactivity (40-80%) in patients with hypersensitivity or allergic reactions to AEDs. Pharmacogenetic variations in drug biotransformation may also play a role in inducing these undesired effects. It is suggested that avoidance of specific AEDs in populations at special risk, cautious dose titration and careful monitoring of clinical response and, if applicable, laboratory parameters can minimize the serious consequences of idiosyncratic reactions.

  20. Neurological teratogenic effects of antiepileptic drugs during pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Nie, Qingmei; Su, Baohua; Wei, Jianping

    2016-01-01

    Epilepsy is one of the few neurologic disorders that requires a constant treatment during pregnancy. Epilepsy affects 0.3–0.8% of pregnant women. Prescription of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) to pregnant women with epilepsy requires monitoring and maintaining a balance between limiting seizures and decreasing fetal exposure to the potential teratogenic effects. AEDs are also commonly used for psychiatric disorders, pain disorders, and migraines. The types of malformations that can result in fetuses exposed to AEDs include minor anomalies, major congenital malformations, intrauterine growth retardation, cognitive dysfunction, low IQ, microcephaly, and infant mortality. In the present review, we analyzed and summarized the current understanding of neurological development in fetuses that are exposed to various AEDs administered to pregnant epileptic women. PMID:27698740

  1. Use of Antiepileptic Drugs for Hyperkinetic Movement Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Siniscalchi, A; Gallelli, L; De Sarro, G

    2010-01-01

    Many studies investigated the use of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) in several neurological diseases other than epilepsy. These neurological disorders, usually, involve neuronal excitability through the modulating of ion channels, receptors and intracellular signaling pathways, and are the targets of the AEDs. This article provides a review of the clinical efficacy of both conventional and newer AEDs in hyperkinetic movement disorders. Some of these indications for AEDs have been established, while others are under investigation. The modulation of GABAergic transmission may explain the neuronal hyper-excitability that underlies some forms of hyperkinetic movement disorders. So, AEDs able to increase GABAergic neurotransmission may play a role in hyperkinetic movement disorders treatment. Therefore, AEDs could represent a useful therapeutic option in the management of hyperkinetic movement disorders where the available treatments are ineffective. PMID:21629443

  2. Antiepileptic drug effects on mood and behavior: molecular targets.

    PubMed

    Perucca, Piero; Mula, Marco

    2013-03-01

    With almost 100 years of clinical experience, antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) remain the mainstay of epilepsy treatment. They suppress epileptic seizures by acting on a variety of mechanisms and molecular targets involved in the regulation of neuronal excitability. These include inhibitory-GABAergic and excitatory-glutamatergic neurotransmission, as well as ion (sodium and calcium) conductance through voltage-gated channels. On the other hand, accruing evidence indicates that these mechanisms and targets are also implicated in the regulation of mood and behavior, which may explain why each AED is associated with specific psychotropic effects. These effects, however, cannot be explained solely on the basis of the known mode of action of each AED, and other mechanisms or targets are likely to be implicated. In this article, we review positive and negative effects of AEDs on mood and behavior, discuss putative underlying mechanisms, and highlight knowledge gaps which should be addressed in future studies.

  3. Antiepileptic drug trials: the view from the clinic.

    PubMed

    Faught, Edward

    2012-06-01

    A golden age of antiepileptic drug development has yielded over a dozen useful new compounds, but the nature of clinical trials has made translation to practical use in the clinic difficult. Most clinical trials are designed for regulatory purposes and fail to answer critical clinical questions. These questions include: which drug is best as initial therapy, which drugs work as monotherapy, what are good drug combinations, what is the best starting dose and titration schedule, what is a reasonable target dose, what is the shape of the dose-response curve and does it vary significantly between patients, what is the true incidence of side effects, and what is the long-term efficacy of the drug? Most of these questions could be answered by changing trial designs, but many changes would entail additional time and money. There are encouraging signs that trials with procedures more directly applicable to the clinic are becoming common. These include direct comparative trials, longer trials with emphasis on seizure freedom, and trials with more flexible dosing schedules. In the past, funding of longer and more naturalistic trials has fallen to government agencies, but commercial funding has been obtained for several recent studies. Better quality control, innovative endpoints, structured searching for side effects, and standardisation of data collection are also promising topics for development.

  4. Impact of antiepileptic drugs on bone health: Need for monitoring, treatment, and prevention strategies

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Ekta; Singh, Harmanjit; Gupta, Yogendra Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Epilepsy is the most common neurological disorder affecting approximately 50 million people worldwide. In India, overall prevalence of epilepsy is reported to be 5.59/1000 population. Antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) constitute the main-stay of treatment with a large number of AEDs available in the market. High incidence of adverse effects is a major limitation with AEDs. One of the major concerns is significant metabolic effects on the bone. However, little attention has been paid to this issue because most of the bone effects remain subclinical for a long time and may take years to manifest clinically. The main effects include hypocalcemia, hypophosphatemia, reduced serum levels of Vitamin D, increase in parathormone (PTH) levels, and alterations in bone turnover markers. The CYP450 enzyme-inducing AEDs such as phenytoin, phenobarbital, carbamazepine, and primidone are the most common AEDs associated with bone disorders while the data regarding the effect of valproate and newer AEDs such as lamotrigine, gabapentin, vigabatrin, levetiracetam, and topiramate on bone metabolism and bone density are scanty and controversial. Deficiency of Vitamin D is commonly described as a cause for the bone loss in epileptic patients while others being decreased absorption of calcium, increased PTH levels, and inhibition of calcitonin secretion, etc. However, there are no formal practical guidelines for the management of bone disease among those taking AEDs. Evidence-based strategies regarding monitoring, prevention, and treatment of bone diseases in patients on AED therapy are needed. PMID:27843822

  5. Prediction of antiepileptic drug treatment outcomes using machine learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colic, Sinisa; Wither, Robert G.; Lang, Min; Zhang, Liang; Eubanks, James H.; Bardakjian, Berj L.

    2017-02-01

    Objective. Antiepileptic drug (AED) treatments produce inconsistent outcomes, often necessitating patients to go through several drug trials until a successful treatment can be found. This study proposes the use of machine learning techniques to predict epilepsy treatment outcomes of commonly used AEDs. Approach. Machine learning algorithms were trained and evaluated using features obtained from intracranial electroencephalogram (iEEG) recordings of the epileptiform discharges observed in Mecp2-deficient mouse model of the Rett Syndrome. Previous work have linked the presence of cross-frequency coupling (I CFC) of the delta (2-5 Hz) rhythm with the fast ripple (400-600 Hz) rhythm in epileptiform discharges. Using the I CFC to label post-treatment outcomes we compared support vector machines (SVMs) and random forest (RF) machine learning classifiers for providing likelihood scores of successful treatment outcomes. Main results. (a) There was heterogeneity in AED treatment outcomes, (b) machine learning techniques could be used to rank the efficacy of AEDs by estimating likelihood scores for successful treatment outcome, (c) I CFC features yielded the most effective a priori identification of appropriate AED treatment, and (d) both classifiers performed comparably. Significance. Machine learning approaches yielded predictions of successful drug treatment outcomes which in turn could reduce the burdens of drug trials and lead to substantial improvements in patient quality of life.

  6. Old and new antiepileptic drugs during pregnancy and lactation--report of a case.

    PubMed

    Rauchenzauner, Markus; Kiechl-Kohlendorfer, Ursula; Rostasy, Kevin; Luef, Gerhard

    2011-04-01

    We describe a case of a woman with epilepsy treated with primidone/phenobarbital (so-called "old" antiepileptic drug) and levetiracetam (so-called "new" antiepileptic drug) who was discouraged from breastfeeding, resulting in clinically significant withdrawal seizures in her newborn. As a consequence, even when two or more antiepileptic drugs are needed for the treatment of women with epilepsy, breastfeeding should be recommended, mothers should be informed about the possibility of drug effects on the neonate, and infants of mothers treated with primidone/phenobarbital should be closely monitored for possible signs of sedation.

  7. Why are antiepileptic drugs used for nonepileptic conditions?

    PubMed

    Bialer, Meir

    2012-12-01

    Antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) are used to treat various nonepileptic central nervous system (CNS) disorders, both in neurology and psychiatry. Most AEDs have multiple mechanisms of action (MOAs), which include modulation of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)ergic and glutamatergic neurotransmission, and alteration of voltage-gated ion channels or intracellular signaling pathways. These MOAs may explain the efficacy of AEDs in the treatment of bipolar disorder and neuropathic pain. Bipolar disorder and epilepsy have some common features, such as their episodic nature and associated kindling phenomena, which led to the regulatory approval and use of the AEDs carbamazepine (CBZ), valproic acid (VPA), and lamotrigine (LTG) in the treatment of bipolar disorder. A major limitation for the development of drugs with improved mood-stabilizing activity is the lack of knowledge on the mechanism of treatment for bipolar disorder. In contrast to epilepsy, no animal models in bipolar disorder are universally accepted and no model is able to exhibit the characteristic mood swings. Although most AEDs have now been investigated for their mood-stabilizing effects, only three (e.g., VPA, CBZ, and LTG) demonstrated clinical efficacy in patients. This suggests that the mechanism of drug action in mood disorder and in epilepsy only partially overlaps. Peripheral nerve damage leads to the initiation of cellular and molecular changes in the nervous system resulting in ectopic, repetitive firing perceived as chronic pain. Epileptic seizures are also characterized by hyperexcitability of neurons in the brain. The spontaneous electrogenesis in neuropathic pain has similarities to that of epilepsy. Alteration in sodium channels expression suggests that the mechanism underlying epileptic hyperexcitability may be similar to those underlying neuropathic pain. The AEDs gabapentin (GBP) and pregabalin (PGB) have become the mainstay of treatment for various neuropathic pain syndromes, owing to their ability

  8. Antiepileptic Drugs with Mood Stabilizing Properties and Their Relation with Psychotropic Drug Use in Institutionalized Epilepsy Patients with Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leunissen, C. L. F.; de la Parra, N. M.; Tan, I. Y.; Rentmeester, Th. W.; Vader, C. I.; Veendrick-Meekes, M. J. B. M.; Aldenkamp, A. P.

    2011-01-01

    A large number of patients with epilepsy and intellectual disability take medication, amongst which antiepileptic and psychotropic drugs, often simultaneously. Certain antiepileptic drugs have mood-stabilizing properties, e.g. carbamazepine, valproic acid and lamotrigine. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the use of these…

  9. Selected pharmacokinetic issues of the use of antiepileptic drugs and parenteral nutrition in critically ill patients

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Objectives To conduct a systematic review for the evidence supporting or disproving the reality of parenteral nutrition- antiepileptic drugs interaction, especially with respect to the plasma protein-binding of the drug. Methods The articles related to the topic were identified through Medline and PubMed search (1968-Feburary 2010) for English language on the interaction between parenteral nutrition and antiepileptic drugs; the search terms used were anti-epileptic drugs, parenteral nutrition, and/or interaction, and/or in vitro. The search looked for prospective randomized and nonrandomized controlled studies; prospective nonrandomized uncontrolled studies; retrospective studies; case reports; and in vitro studies. Full text of the articles were then traced from the Universiti Sains Malaysia (USM) library subscribed databases, including Wiley-Blackwell Library, Cochrane Library, EBSCOHost, OVID, ScienceDirect, SAGE Premier, Scopus, SpringerLINK, and Wiley InterScience. The articles from journals not listed by USM library were traced through inter library loan. Results There were interactions between parenteral nutrition and drugs, including antiepileptics. Several guidelines were designed for the management of illnesses such as traumatic brain injuries or cancer patients, involving the use of parenteral nutrition and antiepileptics. Moreover, many studies demonstrated the in vitro and in vivo parenteral nutrition -drugs interactions, especially with antiepileptics. Conclusions There was no evidence supporting the existence of parenteral nutrition-antiepileptic drugs interaction. The issue has not been studied in formal researches, but several case reports and anecdotes demonstrate this drug-nutrition interaction. However, alteration in the drug-free fraction result from parenteral nutrition-drug (i.e. antiepileptics) interactions may necessitate scrupulous reassessment of drug dosages in patients receiving these therapies. This reassessment may be particularly

  10. Polycystic ovary syndrome in patients on antiepileptic drugs

    PubMed Central

    Viswanathan, Lakshminarayanapuram G.; Satishchandra, Parthasarathy; Bhimani, Bipin C.; Reddy, Janardhan YC; Rama Murthy, Batchu S.; Subbakrishna, Doddaballapura K.; Sinha, Sanjib

    2016-01-01

    Objective: This study aims to discuss the prevalence of polycystic ovary (PCO) and Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) in women with epilepsy (WWE) on valproate (VPA), carbamazepine (CBZ), or phenobarbitone (PB), drug naive WWE and women with bipolar affective disorder (BPAD) on VPA. Materials and Methods: This prospective study included 190 women aged 18–45 years, who had epilepsy or BPAD (on VPA), and consented for study. Patients were grouped as Group 1 (n = 40): WWE on VPA, Group 2 (n = 50): WWE on CBZ, Group 3 (n = 50): WWE on PB, Group 4 (n = 30): drug naïve WWE, and Group 5 (n = 20): women with BPAD on VPA. All women were interviewed for medical, menstrual, drug and treatment history, nature of epilepsy, and seizure control. Chi-square test and Fisher's exact test were done to compare results between the groups. Results: Fifty-two women (52/190; 27.4%) had menstrual disturbances, in which oligomenorrhea was the most common (55.8%). There was a significant difference in the occurrence of PCOS in patients on VPA versus normal population (P = 0.05) and patients on other antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) (P = 0.02). There was, however, no significant difference in the occurrence of PCO between patients on VPA and the untreated epileptic women. VPA group (Epilepsy + BPAD) had a significantly higher occurrence of obesity than other treatment groups (P = 0.043, OR = 2.11). Conclusions: The study observed significantly higher occurrence of PCO in patients on VPA compared to other AEDs and the normal population. The importance of proper clinical evaluation before initiating VPA is highlighted. PMID:27570385

  11. Modulating Behavior in C. elegans Using Electroshock and Antiepileptic Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Kailiang; Grill, Brock; Dawson-Scully, Ken

    2016-01-01

    The microscopic nematode Caenorhabditis elegans has emerged as a valuable model for understanding the molecular and cellular basis of neurological disorders. The worm offers important physiological similarities to mammalian models such as conserved neuron morphology, ion channels, and neurotransmitters. While a wide-array of behavioral assays are available in C. elegans, an assay for electroshock/electroconvulsion remains absent. Here, we have developed a quantitative behavioral method to assess the locomotor response following electric shock in C. elegans. Electric shock impairs normal locomotion, and induces paralysis and muscle twitching; after a brief recovery period, shocked animals resume normal locomotion. We tested electric shock responses in loss-of-function mutants for unc-25, which encodes the GABA biosynthetic enzyme GAD, and unc-49, which encodes the GABAA receptor. unc-25 and unc-49 mutants have decreased inhibitory GABAergic transmission to muscles, and take significantly more time to recover normal locomotion following electric shock compared to wild-type. Importantly, increased sensitivity of unc-25 and unc-49 mutants to electric shock is rescued by treatment with antiepileptic drugs, such as retigabine. Additionally, we show that pentylenetetrazol (PTZ), a GABAA receptor antagonist and proconvulsant in mammalian and C. elegans seizure models, increases susceptibility of worms to electric shock. PMID:27668426

  12. Epilepsy, Antiepileptic Drugs, and Aggression: An Evidence-Based Review

    PubMed Central

    Besag, Frank; Ettinger, Alan B.; Mula, Marco; Gobbi, Gabriella; Comai, Stefano; Aldenkamp, Albert P.; Steinhoff, Bernhard J.

    2016-01-01

    Antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) have many benefits but also many side effects, including aggression, agitation, and irritability, in some patients with epilepsy. This article offers a comprehensive summary of current understanding of aggressive behaviors in patients with epilepsy, including an evidence-based review of aggression during AED treatment. Aggression is seen in a minority of people with epilepsy. It is rarely seizure related but is interictal, sometimes occurring as part of complex psychiatric and behavioral comorbidities, and it is sometimes associated with AED treatment. We review the common neurotransmitter systems and brain regions implicated in both epilepsy and aggression, including the GABA, glutamate, serotonin, dopamine, and noradrenaline systems and the hippocampus, amygdala, prefrontal cortex, anterior cingulate cortex, and temporal lobes. Few controlled clinical studies have used behavioral measures to specifically examine aggression with AEDs, and most evidence comes from adverse event reporting from clinical and observational studies. A systematic approach was used to identify relevant publications, and we present a comprehensive, evidence-based summary of available data surrounding aggression-related behaviors with each of the currently available AEDs in both adults and in children/adolescents with epilepsy. A psychiatric history and history of a propensity toward aggression/anger should routinely be sought from patients, family members, and carers; its presence does not preclude the use of any specific AEDs, but those most likely to be implicated in these behaviors should be used with caution in such cases. PMID:27255267

  13. [Antiepileptic drugs for the prevention of pediatric migraine].

    PubMed

    Cuvellier, J-C

    2009-12-01

    Migraine, according to the criteria of the International Headache Society, occurs in about 5 to 10% of children and adolescents. Pediatric migraine can cause a significant impact on quality of life. As stated by the American Academy of Neurology and Child Neurology Society's migraine guidelines, situations for prophylaxis consideration include recurring migraines that significantly interfere with daily activities, despite acute therapy; frequent headaches; contraindication, overuse, or failure of acute therapy; adverse reactions to acute therapy; cost of acute and preventive therapies; patient preferences; and presence of uncommon migraine conditions. Preventive therapy may be warranted in as many as 30% of young patients with migraine seen in tertiary headache centers. Headache related disability can be measured by scoring systems such as the Pediatric Migraine Disability Assessment Scale. Numerous medications have been studied to prevent migraines in children, including antihistamines, antidepressants, and antihypertensive agents. However, few high quality clinical trials actually demonstrate efficacy in this population. Recently, many studies dealt with the use of antiepileptic drugs in this indication but there is a paucity of placebo controlled studies. Both topiramate (TPM) and divalproex sodium have been studied in a randomized-controlled study. Only TPM showed efficacy, though, clearly, further controlled trials are needed to confirm these data. Besides unproven efficacy, adverse effects of valproic acid, such as weight gain, somnolence, and alopecia may limit its use. Additional studies are warranted before recommending levetiracetam (LVT), zonisamide (ZNS) and gabapentin (GBP) agents for migraine prophylaxis in children and adolescents.

  14. Enzyme-induced and tumor-targeted drug delivery system based on multifunctional mesoporous silica nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yin-Jia; Luo, Guo-Feng; Zhu, Jing-Yi; Xu, Xiao-Ding; Zeng, Xuan; Cheng, Dong-Bing; Li, You-Mei; Wu, Yan; Zhang, Xian-Zheng; Zhuo, Ren-Xi; He, Feng

    2015-05-06

    Functional mesoporous silica particles have attracted growing research interest for controlled drug delivery in targeted cancer therapy. For the purpose of efficient targeting tumor cells and reducing the adverse effect of antitumor drug doxorubicin (DOX), biocompatible and enzyme-responsive mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) with tumor specificity were desired. To construct these functional MSNs, the classic rotaxane structure formed between alkoxysilane tether and α-cyclodextrin (α-CD) was employed to anchor onto the orifices of MSNs as gatekeeper in this work. After subsequent modification by multifunctional peptide (azido-GFLGR7RGDS with tumor-targeting, membrane-penetrating, and cathepsin B-responsive functions) to stabilize the gatekeeper, the resulting functional MSNs showed a strong ability to load and seal DOX in their nanopores. When incubating these DOX-loaded MSNs with tumor and normal cells, the nanoparticles could efficiently employ their surface-encoded RGDS and continuous seven arginine (R7) sequences to target tumor cells, penetrate the cell membrane, and enter tumor cells. Because cathepsin B overexpressed in late endosomes and lysosomes of tumor cells could specifically hydrolyze GFLG sequences of the nanovalves, the DOX-loaded MSNs showed an "off-on" drug release behavior that ∼80% loaded DOX could be released within 24 h and thus showed a high rate of apoptosis. Furthermore, in vitro cellular experiments indicated that DOX-loaded MSNs (DOX@MSN-GFLGR7RGDS/α-CD) had high growth inhibition toward αvβ3-positive HeLa cancerous cells. The research might offer a practical way for designing the tumor-targeted and enzyme-induced drug delivery system for cancer therapy.

  15. [Antiepileptic drugs as mood stabilizers: what did we learn from the epileptology?].

    PubMed

    Rajna, Péter

    2008-09-30

    Author summarizes the practical aspects of psychiatric application of mood stabilizing antiepileptic drugs. He observes how to transfer experiences taken from the "epileptologic" practice into the psychiatric care of bipolar patients. He shortly demonstrates the relevant information on the mechanisms of action, controversies and possible clinical effects influenced by the seizure inhibiting effect of the concerning molecules. By the opinion of the author the clinical importance of pharmacokinetic parameters are underestimated in the psychiatric practice. Therefore--as an original approach in the literature--he summarizes the detailed clinical indications of serum level measurements of antiepileptic drugs applied in psychiatry as mood stabilizers. The therapeutic experiences in epilepsy added a lot of practices for the most effective dosing, building, tapering and exchange of the mood stabilizer antiepileptics. Drug interactions (appear among the psychotropic drugs or with the commonly used medicines). As in any chronic therapies the main condition of patient's compliance is the lacking or very mild presence of the applied therapy. The paper discusses the most frequently occurring and drug-specific side effects in table forms. Using the term of "relative therapeutic potential" the need of balance between the efficacy (influenced by the choice and dosing) and the tolerance are pointed. Rules of application can change significantly in special populations like in pregnancy, obesity, chronic diseases or in chronic comorbid states and in case of polytherapy. As for the special therapeutic effects, the experiences are not completed even in group of antiepileptics: we have larger and more favorable knowledge on the traditional drugs (carbamazepine and valproate) and on lamotrigine (from the newer generation) but promising but not enough information exists on the newest antiepileptic molecules. Further targeted studies are needed for the identification and positioning of

  16. Current Status of the New Antiepileptic Drugs in Chronic Pain.

    PubMed

    Sidhu, Harpreet S; Sadhotra, Akshay

    2016-01-01

    Antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) are extensively used worldwide to treat a wide range of disorders other than epilepsy, such as neuropathic pain, migraine, and bipolar disorder. Due to this situation more than 20 new third-generation AEDs have been introduced in the market recently. The future design of new AEDs must also have potential to help in the non-epileptic disorders. The wide acceptance of second generation AEDs for the management of various non-epileptic disorders has caused the emergence of generics in the market. The wide use of approved AEDs outside epilepsy is based on both economic and scientific reasons. Bipolar disorders, migraine prophylaxis, fibromyalgia, and neuropathic pain represent the most attractive indication expansion opportunities for anticonvulsant developers, providing blockbuster revenues. Strong growth in non-epilepsy conditions will see Pfizer's Lyrica become the market leading brand by 2018. In this review, we mainly focus on the current status of new AEDs in the treatment of chronic pain and migraine prophylaxis. AEDs have a strong analgesic potential and this is demonstrated by the wide use of carbamazepine in trigeminal neuralgia and sodium valproate in migraine prophylaxis. At present, data on the new AEDs for non-epileptic conditions are inconclusive. Not all AEDs are effective in the management of neuropathic pain and migraine. Only those AEDs whose mechanisms of action are match with pathophysiology of the disease, have potential to show efficacy in non-epileptic disorder. For this better understanding of the pathophysiology of the disease and mechanisms of action of new AEDs are essential requirement before initiating pre-clinical and clinical trials. Many new AEDs show good results in the animal model and open-label studies but fail to provide strong evidence at randomized, placebo-controlled trials. The final decision regarding the clinical efficacy of the particular AEDs in a specific non-epileptic disorder should be

  17. Current Status of the New Antiepileptic Drugs in Chronic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Sidhu, Harpreet S.; Sadhotra, Akshay

    2016-01-01

    Antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) are extensively used worldwide to treat a wide range of disorders other than epilepsy, such as neuropathic pain, migraine, and bipolar disorder. Due to this situation more than 20 new third-generation AEDs have been introduced in the market recently. The future design of new AEDs must also have potential to help in the non-epileptic disorders. The wide acceptance of second generation AEDs for the management of various non-epileptic disorders has caused the emergence of generics in the market. The wide use of approved AEDs outside epilepsy is based on both economic and scientific reasons. Bipolar disorders, migraine prophylaxis, fibromyalgia, and neuropathic pain represent the most attractive indication expansion opportunities for anticonvulsant developers, providing blockbuster revenues. Strong growth in non-epilepsy conditions will see Pfizer’s Lyrica become the market leading brand by 2018. In this review, we mainly focus on the current status of new AEDs in the treatment of chronic pain and migraine prophylaxis. AEDs have a strong analgesic potential and this is demonstrated by the wide use of carbamazepine in trigeminal neuralgia and sodium valproate in migraine prophylaxis. At present, data on the new AEDs for non-epileptic conditions are inconclusive. Not all AEDs are effective in the management of neuropathic pain and migraine. Only those AEDs whose mechanisms of action are match with pathophysiology of the disease, have potential to show efficacy in non-epileptic disorder. For this better understanding of the pathophysiology of the disease and mechanisms of action of new AEDs are essential requirement before initiating pre-clinical and clinical trials. Many new AEDs show good results in the animal model and open-label studies but fail to provide strong evidence at randomized, placebo-controlled trials. The final decision regarding the clinical efficacy of the particular AEDs in a specific non-epileptic disorder should be

  18. Effects of antiepileptic drugs on antioxidant and oxidant molecular pathways: focus on trace elements.

    PubMed

    Nazıroğlu, Mustafa; Yürekli, Vedat Ali

    2013-07-01

    Current reports on trace elements, oxidative stress, and the effect of antiepileptic drugs are poor and controversial. We aimed to review effects of most common used antiepileptics on antioxidant, trace element, calcium ion (Ca(2+)) influx, and oxidant systems in human and experimental animal models. Observations of lower blood or tissue antioxidant levels in epileptic patients and animals compared to controls in recent publications may commonly support the proposed crucial role of antioxidants in the pathogenesis of epilepsy. Effects of old and new antiepileptics on reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in epilepsy are controversial. The old antiepileptic drugs like valproic acid, phenytoin, and carbamazepine induced ROS overproduction, while new epileptic drugs (e.g., topiramate and zonisamide) induced scavenger effects on over production of ROS in human and animals. Antioxidant trace element levels such as selenium, copper, and zinc were generally low in the blood of epileptic patients, indicating trace element deficiencies in the pathogenesis of epilepsy. Recent papers indicate that selenium with/without topiramate administration in human and animals decreased seizure levels, although antioxidant values were increased. Recent studies also reported that sustained depolarization of mitochondrial membranes, enhanced ROS production and Ca(2+) influx may be modulated by topiramate. In conclusion, there is a large number of recent studies about the role of antioxidants or neuroprotectants in clinical and experimental models of epilepsy. New antiepileptic drugs are more prone to restore antioxidant redox systems in brain and neurons.

  19. The effects of antiepileptic drugs on the growth of glioblastoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ching-Yi; Lai, Hung-Yi; Chiu, Angela; Chan, She-Hung; Hsiao, Ling-Ping; Lee, Shih-Tseng

    2016-05-01

    To determine the effects of antiepileptic drug compounds on glioblastoma cellular growth, we exposed glioblastoma cell lines to select antiepileptic drugs. The effects of selected antiepileptic drugs on glioblastoma cells were measured by MTT assay. For compounds showing significant inhibition, cell cycle analysis was performed. Statistical analysis was performed using SPSS. The antiepileptic compounds selected for screening included carbamazepine, ethosuximide, gabapentin, lamotrigine, levetiracetam, magnesium sulfate, oxcarbazepine, phenytoin, primidone, tiagabine, topiramate, valproic acid, and vigabatrin. Dexamethasone and temozolomide were used as a negative and positive control respectively. Our results showed temozolomide and oxcarbazepine significantly inhibited glioblastoma cell growth and reached IC50 at therapeutic concentrations. The other antiepileptic drugs screened were unable to reach IC50 at therapeutic concentrations. The metabolites of oxcarbazepine were also unable to reach IC50. Dexamethasone, ethosuximide, levetiracetam, and vigabatrin showed some growth enhancement though they did not reach statistical significance. The growth enhancement effects of ethosuximide, levetiracetam, and vigabatrin found in the study may indicate that these compounds should not be used for prophylaxis or short term treatment of epilepsy in glioblastoma. While valproic acid and oxcarbazepine were effective, the required dose of valproic acid was far above that used for the treatment of epilepsy and the metabolites of oxcarbazepine failed to reach significant growth inhibition ruling out the use of oral oxcarbazepine or valproic acid as monotherapy in glioblastoma. The possibility of using these compounds as local treatment is a future area of study.

  20. Human placental perfusion method in the assessment of transplacental passage of antiepileptic drugs

    SciTech Connect

    Myllynen, Paeivi . E-mail: paivi.k.myllynen@oulu.fi; Pienimaeki, Paeivi; Vaehaekangas, Kirsi

    2005-09-01

    Epilepsy is one of the most common neurological diseases, affecting about 0.5 to 1% of pregnant women. It is commonly accepted that older antiepileptic drugs bear teratogenic potential. So far, no agreement has been reached about the safest antiepileptic drug during pregnancy. It is known that nearly all drugs cross the placenta at least to some extent. Nowadays, there is very little information available of the pharmacokinetics of drugs in the feto-placental unit. Detailed information about drug transport across the placenta would be valuable for the development of safe and effective treatments. For reasons of safety, human studies on placental transfer are restricted to a limited number of drugs. Interspecies differences limit the extrapolation of animal data to humans. Several in vitro methods for the study of placental transfer have been developed over the past decades. The placental perfusion method is the only experimental method that has been used to study human placental transfer of substances in organized placental tissue. The aim of this article is to review human placental perfusion data on antiepileptic drugs. According to perfusion data, it seems that most of the antiepileptic drugs are transferred across the placenta meaning significant fetal exposure.

  1. Antiepileptic drugs for the treatment of neuropathic pain: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Vargas-Espinosa, Maríam L.; Sanmartí-García, Gemma; Vázquez-Delgado, Eduardo

    2012-01-01

    Many therapies have been proposed for the management of neuropathic pain, and they include the use of different antiepileptic drugs. However, the lack of high quality studies indicates that results on the different neuropathic disorders under study do not recommend a particular drug treatment. This study makes a systematic review of the published literature on the use of several antiepileptic drugs to treat neuropathic pain, and has the objective of considering both its clinical characteristics and pharmacological use, which will depend on their level of scientific evidence and will follow the principles of evidence-based dentistry. The articles were stratified according to their scientific evidence using the SORT criteria (Strength of Recommendation Taxonomy), and it included those articles that only have level 1 or 2. Randomized clinical trials were stratified according to their level of quality using the JADAD scale, an instrument described by Jadad et al. (7). to assess the quality of clinical trials, while studies with a level below 3 were discarded. Recently, type A or B recommendations are given in favor or against the use of antiepileptic drugs to treat neuropathic pain on the basis of their scientific quality. Key words:Neuropathic pain, antiepileptic drugs (AEDs), trigeminal neuralgia, glossopharyngeal neuralgia, post- herpetic neuralgia, burning mouth syndrome, persistent idiopathic facial pain. PMID:22549682

  2. Foetal Antiepileptic Drug Exposure and Verbal versus Non-Verbal Abilities at Three Years of Age

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meador, Kimford J.; Baker, Gus A.; Browning, Nancy; Cohen, Morris J.; Clayton-Smith, Jill; Kalayjian, Laura A.; Kanner, Andres; Liporace, Joyce D.; Pennell, Page B.; Privitera, Michael; Loring, David W.

    2011-01-01

    We previously reported that foetal valproate exposure impairs intelligence quotient. In this follow-up investigation, we examined dose-related effects of foetal antiepileptic drug exposure on verbal and non-verbal cognitive measures. This investigation is an ongoing prospective observational multi-centre study in the USA and UK, which has enrolled…

  3. A comparative study of antipyrine and lignocaine disposition in normal subjects and in patients treated with enzyme-inducing drugs.

    PubMed Central

    Perucca, E; Hedges, A; Makki, K A; Richens, A

    1980-01-01

    1 The disposition kinetics of lignocaine and antipyrine were compared in eight normal subjects and in eleven patients receiving chronic therapy with antiepileptic drugs. The urinary excretion of D-glucaric acid (D-GA) was measured in 16 subjects. 2 In patients treated with antiepileptic drugs antipyrine clearance and D-GA excretion were significantly increased, whereas lignocaine biovailability was significantly reduced. 3 When all the subjects included in the study were considered, a significant positive correlation could be found between the apparent oral clearance of lignocaine (Dose/area under the blood concentration curve) and both antipyrine clearance (r = 0.73) and D-GA excretion (r = 0.74). 4 When normal subjects and epileptic patients were considered separately, a significant positive correlation could be confirmed between the apparent oral clearance of lignocaine and both antipyrine clearance (r = 0.71) and D-GA excretion (r = 0.76) in normal subjects, and between antipyrine clearance and D-GA excretion (r = 0.75) in epileptic patients. 5 These results suggest that the reduction of the oral availability of lignocaine in epileptic patients is secondary to induction of first-pass metabolism of the latter drug. PMID:7437261

  4. Risk of falls associated with antiepileptic drug use in ambulatory elderly populations

    PubMed Central

    Maximos, Mira; Chang, Feng; Patel, Tejal

    2017-01-01

    Background: Falls are a major cause of morbidity and mortality in older adults. About a third of those aged 65 years or older fall at least once each year, which can result in hospitalizations, hip fractures and nursing home admissions that incur high costs to individuals, families and society. The objective of this clinical review was to assess the risk of falls in ambulatory older adults who take antiepileptic drugs, medications that can increase fall risk and decrease bone density. Methods: PubMed, EMBASE, MEDLINE and the Cochrane Library electronic databases were searched from inception to July 2014. Case-control, quasi-experimental and observational design studies published in English that assessed quantifiable fall risk associated with antiepileptic drug use in ambulatory patient populations with a mean or median age of 65 years or older were eligible for inclusion. One author screened all titles and abstracts from the initial search. Two authors independently reviewed and abstracted data from full-text articles that met eligibility criteria. Results: Searches yielded 399 unique articles, of which 7 met inclusion criteria—4 prospective or longitudinal cohort studies, 1 cohort study with a nested case-control, 1 cross-sectional survey and 1 retrospective cross-sectional database analysis. Studies that calculated the relative risk of falls associated with antiepileptic drug use reported a range of 1.29 to 1.62. Studies that reported odds ratios of falls associated with antiepileptic drug use ranged from 1.75 to 6.2 for 1 fall or at least 1 fall and from 2.56 to 7.1 for more frequent falls. Discussion: Health care professionals should monitor older adults while they take antiepileptic drugs to balance the need for such pharmacotherapy against an increased risk of falling and injuries from falls.

  5. Inhibition of aminophylline-induced convulsions in mice by antiepileptic drugs and other agents.

    PubMed

    Czuczwar, S J; Janusz, W; Wamil, A; Kleinrok, Z

    1987-12-15

    Common antiepileptic drugs and agents affecting different neurotransmitter systems were studied against aminophylline (280 mg/kg i.p.)-induced convulsions in mice. All drugs and agents were administered i.p. Diazepam and phenobarbital antagonized the whole seizure pattern and the respective ED50 values for the clonic phase were 3.5 and 62 mg/kg. Valproate at 500 mg/kg protected fewer than 50% of mice against the clonic phase. The remaining antiepileptics (acetazolamide, up to 1,000 mg/kg; carbamazepine and diphenylhydantoin, up to 50 mg/kg; ethosuximide, 500 mg/kg and trimethadione, 400 mg/kg) were totally ineffective in this respect. Propranolol (up to 20 mg/kg), baclofen (20 mg/kg), gamma-hydroxybutyric acid (300 mg/kg), aminooxyacetic acid (20 mg/kg), clonidine (up to 0.2 mg/kg), ketamine (30 mg/kg), atropine (20 mg/kg), papaverine (50 mg/kg) and L-phenylisopropyladenosine (2 mg/kg) did not affect the clonic phase either. Only antagonists of N-methyl-D-aspartic acid excitation, 2-amino-5-phosphonopentanoic acid and 2-amino-7-phosphonoheptanoic acid afforded protection against aminophylline-induced clonic seizure activity. The results show that aminophylline convulsions are relatively resistant to antiepileptic drugs and suggest that antagonists of excitatory transmission are potential antiaminophylline drugs.

  6. Antiepileptic drugs for the treatment of neuropathic pain: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Vargas-Espinosa, María-Lucila; Sanmartí-García, Gemma; Vázquez-Delgado, Eduardo; Gay-Escoda, Cosme

    2012-09-01

    Many therapies have been proposed for the management of neuropathic pain, and they include the use of different antiepileptic drugs. However, the lack of high quality studies indicates that results on the different neuropathic disorders under study do not recommend a particular drug treatment. This study makes a systematic review of the published literature on the use of several antiepileptic drugs to treat neuropathic pain, and has the objective of considering both its clinical characteristics and pharmacological use, which will depend on their level of scientific evidence and will follow the principles of evidence-based dentistry. The articles were stratified according to their scientific evidence using the SORT criteria (Strength of Recommendation Taxonomy), and it included those articles that only have level 1 or 2. Randomized clinical trials were stratified according to their level of quality using the JADAD scale, an instrument described by Jadad et al. (7). to assess the quality of clinical trials, while studies with a level below 3 were discarded. Recently, type A or B recommendations are given in favor or against the use of antiepileptic drugs to treat neuropathic pain on the basis of their scientific quality.

  7. The Australian Register of antiepileptic drugs in pregnancy: changes over time in the epileptic population.

    PubMed

    Vajda, F J E; O'Brien, T J; Graham, J; Lander, C M; Eadie, M J

    2014-09-01

    The demographic characteristics, details of pregnancies, epilepsies, and treatment of 855 pregnant women with epilepsy enrolled in the Australian Antiepileptic Drugs in Pregnancy Register during 1999-2005 were compared with the corresponding data for the 801 women enrolled from 2006-2012. We estimate that the Register captures approximately 1 in 12 of all pregnancies in Australian women with epilepsy. A number of statistically significant changes were found, with nearly all explained by factors such as re-enrolment of women who had enrolled earlier pregnancies, changes in general population behaviour, altered attitudes to prescribing valproate and using it in lower doses, and the advent of newer antiepileptic drugs which have displaced the use of older agents. It appears that the Register has continued to capture a reasonably representative sample of pregnant Australian women with epilepsy as time has passed.

  8. Progress report on new antiepileptic drugs: a summary of the Fifth Eilat Conference (EILAT V).

    PubMed

    Bialer, M; Johannessen, S I; Kupferberg, H J; Levy, R H; Loiseau, P; Perucca, E

    2001-01-01

    The Fifth Eilat Conference on New Antiepileptic Drugs (AEDs) took place at the Dan Hotel, Eilat, Israel, 25-29 June 2000. Basic scientists, clinical pharmacologists and neurologists from 20 countries attended the conference, whose main themes included recognition of unexpected adverse effects, new indications of AEDs, and patient-tailored AED therapy. According to tradition, the central part of the conference was devoted to a review of AEDs in development, as well to updates on AEDs that have been marketed in recent years. This article summarizes the information presented on drugs in preclinical and clinical development, including AWD 131-138, DP-valproate, harkoseride, LY300164, NPS 1776, NW 1015, pregabalin, remacemide, retigabine, rufinamide and valrocemide. The potential value of an innovative strategy, porcine embryonic GABAergic cell transplants, is also discussed. Finally, updates on felbamate, fosphenytoin, gabapentin, lamotrigine, levetiracetam, oxcarbazepine, tiagabine, topiramate, vigabatrin, zonisamide, and the antiepileptic vagal stimulator device are presented.

  9. Is primary prevention with antiepileptic drugs effective in brain tumors or brain metastases?

    PubMed

    Lobos-Urbina, Diego; Kittsteiner-Manubens, Lucas; Peña, José

    2017-03-21

    Patients with brain tumors –primary or metastatic- have an increased risk of presenting seizures during the course of their disease. So, prophylactic antiepileptic drugs have been proposed. However, the effects of this intervention are not yet clear. To answer this question, we searched in Epistemonikos database, which is maintained by screening multiple databases. We identified 12 systematic reviews including 80 studies overall. Twelve corresponded to randomized trials, but only two answered the question of interest. We extracted data, conducted a meta-analysis and generated a summary of findings table using the GRADE method. We concluded primary prevention with antiepileptic drugs might not reduce the risk of seizures, and it is associated to frequent adverse effects.

  10. Antiepileptic drug use in a nursing home setting: a retrospective study in older adults.

    PubMed

    Callegari, Camilla; Ielmini, M; Bianchi, L; Lucano, M; Bertù, Lorenza; Vender, Simone

    2016-01-01

    The authors set out to examine qualitatively the use of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) in a population of older adults in a nursing home setting, evaluating aspects such as specialist prescriptions and changes in dosage. This retrospective prevalence study was carried out in a state-funded nursing home that provides care and rehabilitation for elderly people. The first objective of the study was to determine the prevalence of AED use in this population. The second objective was to monitor AED dosage modifications during the fifteen-month study period, focusing on the safety and the tolerability of AEDs. In the period of time considered, 129 of 402 monitored patients received at least one anti-epileptic therapy. The prevalence of AED use was therefore 32%. Gabapentin was found to be the most commonly prescribed drug, with a frequency of 29%, and it was used mainly for anxiety disorders, psychosis, neuropathic pain and mood disorders.

  11. Antiepileptic drug use in a nursing home setting: a retrospective study in older adults.

    PubMed

    Callegari, Camilla; Ielmini, M; Bianchi, L; Lucano, M; Bertù, L; Vender, Simone

    2016-05-13

    The authors set out to examine qualitatively the use of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) in a population of older adults in a nursing home setting, evaluating aspects such as specialist prescriptions and changes in dosage. This retrospective prevalence study was carried out in a state-funded nursing home that provides care and rehabilitation for elderly people. The first objective of the study was to determine the prevalence of AED use in this population. The second objective was to monitor AED dosage modifications during the fifteen-month study period, focusing on the safety and the tolerability of AEDs. In the period of time considered, 129 of 402 monitored patients received at least one anti-epileptic therapy. The prevalence of AED use was therefore 32%. Gabapentin was found to be the most commonly prescribed drug, with a frequency of 29%, and it was used mainly for anxiety disorders, psychosis, neuropathic pain and mood disorders.

  12. Antiepileptic drug use in a nursing home setting: a retrospective study in older adults

    PubMed Central

    Callegari, Camilla; Ielmini, Marta; Bianchi, Lucia; Lucano, Melissa; Bertù, Lorenza; Vender, Simone

    2016-01-01

    Summary The authors set out to examine qualitatively the use of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) in a population of older adults in a nursing home setting, evaluating aspects such as specialist prescriptions and changes in dosage. This retrospective prevalence study was carried out in a state-funded nursing home that provides care and rehabilitation for elderly people. The first objective of the study was to determine the prevalence of AED use in this population. The second objective was to monitor AED dosage modifications during the fifteen-month study period, focusing on the safety and the tolerability of AEDs. In the period of time considered, 129 of 402 monitored patients received at least one anti-epileptic therapy. The prevalence of AED use was therefore 32%. Gabapentin was found to be the most commonly prescribed drug, with a frequency of 29%, and it was used mainly for anxiety disorders, psychosis, neuropathic pain and mood disorders. PMID:27358221

  13. Update on the Genetic Polymorphisms of Drug-Metabolizing Enzymes in Antiepileptic Drug Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Saruwatari, Junji; Ishitsu, Takateru; Nakagawa, Kazuko

    2010-01-01

    Genetic polymorphisms in the genes that encode drug-metabolizing enzymes are implicated in the inter-individual variability in the pharmacokinetics and pharmaco-dynamics of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs). However, the clinical impact of these polymorphisms on AED therapy still remains controversial. The defective alleles of cytochrome P450 (CYP) 2C9 and/or CYP2C19 could affect not only the pharmacokinetics, but also the pharmacodynamics of phenytoin therapy. CYP2C19 deficient genotypes were associated with the higher serum concentration of an active metabolite of clobazam, N-desmethylclobazam, and with the higher clinical efficacy of clobazam therapy than the other CYP2C19 genotypes. The defective alleles of CYP2C9 and/or CYP2C19 were also found to have clinically significant effects on the inter-individual variabilities in the population pharmacokinetics of phenobarbital, valproic acid and zonisamide. EPHX1 polymorphisms may be associated with the pharmacokinetics of carbamazepine and the risk of phenytoin-induced congenital malformations. Similarly, the UDP-glucuronosyltransferase 2B7 genotype may affect the pharmacokinetics of lamotrigine. Gluthatione S-transferase null genotypes are implicated in an increased risk of hepatotoxicity caused by carbamazepine and valproic acid. This article summarizes the state of research on the effects of mutations of drug-metabolizing enzymes on the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of AED therapies. Future directions for the dose-adjustment of AED are discussed. PMID:27713373

  14. [Influence of co-administered antiepileptic drugs on nitrazepam tolerance in mice].

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Y; Nagai, T; Okada, S

    1998-11-01

    In the treatment of epilepsy, benzodiazepines are often administered in combination with other antiepileptic drug (s) because of the development of tolerance. In this study, the influence of concurrently administered antiepileptic drugs on tolerance to the anticonvulsant action of the nitrazepam (NZP) was studied using an animal tolerance model. Mice were given vehicle, NZP alone or NZP concurrently with one of six antiepileptic drugs (carbamazepine CBZ, phenytoin PHT, zonisamide ZNS, vigabatrin VGB, lamotrigine LTG, or flunarizine FNR) twice daily for 5 days. Tolerance was assessed by the ability of NZP to prevent pentylenetetrazol-induced clonic convulsions. Tolerance developed in mice treated with NZP alone, NZP plus CBZ, PHT, ZNS, VGB or LTG. On the other hand, mice receiving NZP + FNR showed no tolerance; there was no significant difference in seizure frequency between the vehicle group and NZP + FNR group. These data suggest that co-administration of FNR but not CBZ, PHT, ZNS, VGB or LTG may delay if not prevent development of tolerance to the anticonvulsant action of benzodiazepines.

  15. Progress report on new antiepileptic drugs: a summary of the fourth Eilat conference (EILAT IV).

    PubMed

    Bialer, M; Johannessen, S I; Kupferberg, H J; Levy, R H; Loiseau, P; Perucca, E

    1999-03-01

    The Fourth Eilat Conference on New Antiepileptic Drugs (AEDs) was held at the Royal Beach Hotel, Eilat, Israel, from 6th to 10th September 1998. Epileptologists and scientists from 20 countries attended the conference, which was held to discuss a number of issues in drug development, including outcome assessment in epilepsy (long-term efficacy, quality of life, safety), cost-effectiveness, an update on drugs in development, a progress report on recently marketed AEDs, and controversies in strategies for drug development. This review focuses on drugs in development and recently marketed AEDs. Drugs in development include ADCI, AWD 131-138, DP16, ganaxolone (CCD 1042), levetiracetam (ucb L059), losigamone, pregabalin (isobutyl GABA [CI-1008]), remacemide hydrochloride, retigabine (D-23129), rufinamide (CGP 33101), soretolide (D2916), TV1901, and 534U87. New information on the safety and efficacy of recently marketed drugs (felbamate, fosphenytoin, gabapentin, lamotrigine, oxcarbazepine, tiagabine, topiramate, vigabatrin, zonisamide) and of a new antiepileptic device, the neurocybernetic prosthesis (NCP), has become available. This paper summarizes the presentations made at the conference.

  16. The role side effects play in the choice of antiepileptic therapy in brain tumor-related epilepsy: a comparative study on traditional antiepileptic drugs versus oxcarbazepine

    PubMed Central

    Maschio, Marta; Dinapoli, Loredana; Vidiri, Antonello; Pace, Andrea; Fabi, Alessandra; Pompili, Alfredo; Carapella, Maria Carmine; Jandolo, Bruno

    2009-01-01

    Background Seizure control doesn't represent the only challenging goal in patients with brain tumor-related epilepsy. Side effects have often taken precedence for patients' quality of life. Methods We performed an observational retrospective study on patients with brain tumor-related epilepsy: 35 who had assumed oxcarbazepine monotherapy and 35 patients who had undergone treatment with traditional antiepileptic drugs. Primary variable of efficacy was the mean seizure frequency per month and safety variables were the drop-out for side effects and total incidence of side effects. We applied the Propensity Score technique to minimize selection bias. Results Our results showed a similar efficacy of oxcarbazepine and traditional antiepileptic drugs over time, but the difference in safety and tolerability between the two groups was significant: traditional AEDs caused more side effects, both serious and non serious. Conclusion This study highlights the importance of taking into consideration not only seizure control but also the appearance of side effects when choosing antiepileptic drugs in this patients population. PMID:19419544

  17. Antiepileptic Drug Use, Falls, Fractures, and BMD in Postmenopausal Women: Findings From the Women's Health Initiative (WHI)

    PubMed Central

    Carbone, Laura D; Johnson, Karen C; Robbins, John; Larson, Joseph C; Curb, J David; Watson, Kathleen; Gass, Margery; LaCroix, Andrea Z

    2010-01-01

    Antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) are used increasingly in clinical practice to treat a number of conditions. However, the relationship between the use of these medications, particularly the newer AEDs, and fracture risk has not been well characterized. We used data from the Women's Health Initiative (WHI) to determine the relationship bewteen the use of AEDs and falls, fractures, and bone mineral density (BMD) over an average of 7.7 years of follow-up. We included 138,667 women (1,385 users of AEDs and 137,282 nonusers) aged 50 to 79 years in this longitudinal cohort analyses. After adjustment for covariates, use of AEDs was positively associated with total fractures [hazard ratio (HR) = 1.44, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.30–1.61], all site-specific fractures including the hip (HR = 1.51, 95% CI 1.05–2.17), clinical vertebral fractures (HR = 1.60, 95% CI 1.20–2.12), lower arm or wrist fractures (HR = 1.40, 95% CI 1.11–1.76), and other clinical fractures (HR = 1.46, 95% CI 1.29–1.65) and two or more falls (HR = 1.62, 95% CI 1.50–1.74) but not with baseline BMD or changes in BMD (p ≥ .064 for all sites). Use of more than one and use of enzyme-inducing AEDs were significantly associated with total fractures (HR = 1.55, 95% CI 1.15–2.09 and HR = 1.36, 95% CI 1.09–1.69, respectively). We conclude that in clinical practice, postmenopausal women who use AEDs should be considered at increased risk for fracture, and attention to fall prevention may be particularly important in these women. © 2010 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research. PMID:19839772

  18. Antiepileptic drug selection for people with HIV/AIDS: evidence-based guidelines from the ILAE and AAN.

    PubMed

    Birbeck, Gretchen L; French, Jacqueline A; Perucca, Emilio; Simpson, David M; Fraimow, Henry; George, Jomy M; Okulicz, Jason F; Clifford, David B; Hachad, Houda; Levy, René H

    2012-01-01

    A joint panel of the American Academy of Neurology (AAN) and the International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE) convened to develop guidelines for selection of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) among people with HIV/AIDS. The literature was systematically reviewed to assess the global burden of relevant comorbid entities, to determine the number of patients who potentially utilize AEDs and antiretroviral agents (ARVs), and to address AED-ARV interactions. Key findings from this literature search included the following: AED-ARV administration may be indicated in up to 55% of people taking ARVs. Patients receiving phenytoin may require a lopinavir/ritonavir dosage increase of approximately 50% to maintain unchanged serum concentrations (Level C). Patients receiving valproic acid may require a zidovudine dosage reduction to maintain unchanged serum zidovudine concentrations (Level C). Coadministration of valproic acid and efavirenz may not require efavirenz dosage adjustment (Level C). Patients receiving ritonavir/atazanavir may require a lamotrigine dosage increase of approximately 50% to maintain unchanged lamotrigine serum concentrations (Level C). Coadministration of raltegravir/atazanavir and lamotrigine may not require lamotrigine dosage adjustment (Level C). Coadministration of raltegravir and midazolam may not require midazolam dosage adjustment (Level C). Patients may be counseled that it is unclear whether dosage adjustment is necessary when other AEDs and ARVs are combined (Level U). It may be important to avoid enzyme-inducing AEDs in people on ARV regimens that include protease inhibitors or nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors because pharmacokinetic interactions may result in virologic failure, which has clinical implications for disease progression and development of ARV resistance. If such regimens are required for seizure control, patients may be monitored through pharmacokinetic assessments to ensure efficacy of the ARV regimen (Level C).

  19. A comparative study of the relative enzyme inducing properties of anticonvulsant drugs in epileptic patients.

    PubMed Central

    Perucca, E; Hedges, A; Makki, K A; Ruprah, M; Wilson, J F; Richens, A

    1984-01-01

    The antipyrine clearance and the urinary excretion of D-glucaric acid (D-GA) were determined in 122 patients receiving chronic anticonvulsant drug treatment and in 21 drug-free control subjects. Patients treated with carbamazepine (CBZ), phenytoin (DPH), primidone (PMD) and phenobarbitone (PB), either alone or in combination, showed higher values of antipyrine clearance and excreted larger amounts of D-GA as compared to controls. While antipyrine clearance values did not differ significantly from one drug group to another, D-GA excretion was significantly higher in patients treated with CBZ than in those treated with DPH. In patients treated with sodium valproate antipyrine clearance did not differ from control values. There was a trend for D-GA excretion to be higher in these patients but the difference was not statistically significant. Significant positive correlations were found between the dosage of CBZ, DPH, PMD and PB and both indices of enzyme induction. These data demonstrate a dose-dependent degree of enzyme induction in patients receiving therapeutic doses of these anticonvulsants. The relative potency at average dose levels for antipyrine clearance was PB (1), DPH (0.92), CBZ (0.84), PMD (0.82) and for log D-GA excretion was PB (1), CBZ (0.96), PMD (0.95), DPH (0.90). PMID:6435654

  20. Brain Graph Topology Changes Associated with Anti-Epileptic Drug Use.

    PubMed

    Haneef, Zulfi; Levin, Harvey S; Chiang, Sharon

    2015-06-01

    Neuroimaging studies of functional connectivity using graph theory have furthered our understanding of the network structure in temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). Brain network effects of anti-epileptic drugs could influence such studies, but have not been systematically studied. Resting-state functional MRI was analyzed in 25 patients with TLE using graph theory analysis. Patients were divided into two groups based on anti-epileptic medication use: those taking carbamazepine/oxcarbazepine (CBZ/OXC) (n=9) and those not taking CBZ/OXC (n=16) as a part of their medication regimen. The following graph topology metrics were analyzed: global efficiency, betweenness centrality (BC), clustering coefficient, and small-world index. Multiple linear regression was used to examine the association of CBZ/OXC with graph topology. The two groups did not differ from each other based on epilepsy characteristics. Use of CBZ/OXC was associated with a lower BC. Longer epilepsy duration was also associated with a lower BC. These findings can inform graph theory-based studies in patients with TLE. The changes observed are discussed in relation to the anti-epileptic mechanism of action and adverse effects of CBZ/OXC.

  1. Prenatal Exposure to Antiepileptic Drugs and Dental Agenesis

    PubMed Central

    Jacobsen, Pernille E.; Henriksen, Tine B.; Haubek, Dorte; Østergaard, John R.

    2014-01-01

    Objective The aim of the study was to investigate the association between prenatal exposure to AEDs and the risk of dental agenesis and to differentiate between the possible effects of the different drugs used. Methods Data on 214 exposed and 255 unexposed children, aged 12–18 years, were extracted from the Prescription Database of the Central Denmark Region and North Denmark Region and the Danish Medical Birth Registry. The children's dental charts were examined for the presence of dental agenesis. Results Overall, children exposed to AED in utero had an increased risk of developing dental agenesis, but as a group, the difference was not significant (OR = 1.7; [95% CI: 0.8–3.6]). The risk of developing dental agenesis was three-fold increased (OR = 3.1; [95% CI: 1.3–7.4]) in children exposed to valproate in mono- or in poly-therapy with other AEDs than carbamazepine or oxcarbazepine. The risk was further increased (OR = 11.2; [95% CI: 2.4–51.9]) in children exposed to valproate and carbamazepine or oxcarbazepine in combination. Conclusions The present study shows that dental agenesis is a potential congenital abnormality that is related to prenatal exposure to valproate, and dental agenesis may be considered a sensitive marker for the teratogenicity of valproate. PMID:24416231

  2. Drug interactions involving antiepileptic drugs: assessment of the consistency among three drug compendia and FDA-approved labels.

    PubMed

    Ekstein, Dana; Tirosh, Matanya; Eyal, Yonatan; Eyal, Sara

    2015-03-01

    Interactions of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) with other substances may lead to adverse effects and treatment failure. To avoid such interactions, clinicians often rely on drug interaction compendia. Our objective was to compare the concordance for twenty-two AEDs among three drug interaction compendia (Micromedex, Lexi-Interact, and Clinical Pharmacology) and the US Food and Drug Administration-approved product labels. For each AED, the overall concordance among data sources regarding existence of interactions and their classification was poor, with less than twenty percent of interactions listed in all four sources. Concordance among the three drug compendia decreased with the fraction of the drug excreted unchanged and was greater for established inducers of hepatic drug-metabolizing enzymes than for the drugs that are not inducers (R-square=0.83, P<0.01). For interactions classified as contraindications, major, and severe, concordance among the four data sources was, in most cases, less than 30%. Prescribers should be aware of the differences between drug interaction sources of information for both older AEDs and newer AEDs, in particular for those AEDs which are not involved in hepatic enzyme-mediated interactions.

  3. Feasibility and acceptance of salivary monitoring of antiepileptic drugs via the US Postal Service.

    PubMed

    Tennison, Michael; Ali, Imran; Miles, Michael V; D'Cruz, O'Neill; Vaughn, Bradley; Greenwood, Robert

    2004-06-01

    Salivary and serum levels of phenobarbital, carbamazepine, and phenytoin are closely correlated. Salivary monitoring of antiepileptic drugs has a number of advantages including the potential for home collection if measured levels are unaffected by transit in the mail. Saliva was collected from 60 adult and 42 pediatric patients in the clinic. A control aliquot was immediately frozen, and a second aliquot was packaged and mailed to the laboratory. Patients were also asked to collect another sample at the same time on the following day and mail it to the laboratory. On receipt, all samples were held frozen and analyzed as a single batch by fluorescence polarization immunoassay. The effects of mailing, the duration in transit, and the season were assessed by multivariable, repeated-measures analysis of variance. One hundred two saliva samples were collected in a mean of 2.6 minutes, and the mailed aliquot was received in a mean of 6.4 days. Two children and 3 adults (4.9% of total) preferred blood collection, but the rest preferred saliva collection or had no preference. There was no significant difference between the control sample and the clinic mailed samples for any of the 3 medications. There were no significant effects of the duration in transit or the season on reliability. Transit of saliva samples in the mail does not adversely affect accuracy of antiepileptic drug measurement. Patients prefer and can successful collect saliva samples at home. Home monitoring of salivary antiepileptic drug levels is a cost-effective technique that deserves additional study.

  4. Cancer risk in people with epilepsy: the role of antiepileptic drugs.

    PubMed

    Singh, Gagandeep; Driever, Pablo Hernáiz; Sander, Josemir W

    2005-01-01

    There has been considerable debate about the relationship between epilepsy and cancer, in particular whether the incidence of cancer is increased in people with epilepsy and whether antiepileptic drugs promote or protect against cancer. We review available evidence from animal experiments, genotoxicity studies and clinico-epidemiological observations, and discuss proposed mechanisms underlying the association between epilepsy and cancer. A carcinoma-promoting effect has been seen unequivocally in rodent models for phenobarbital and phenytoin; phenobarbital promoted liver tumours and phenytoin caused lymphoid cell and liver tumours in rats. Early human epidemiological studies found an association between phenobarbital and hepatocellular carcinoma, and several subsequent studies suggested an association with lung cancer. An association with brain tumours has also been demonstrated. Phenytoin has been causally implicated in three human cancers: lymphoma, myeloma and neuroblastoma, the latter specifically in the setting of foetal hydantoin syndrome. However, despite considerable long-term pharmaco-epidemiological data being available for both antiepileptic drugs, evidence for human carcinogenicity is not consistent and both are considered only possibly carcinogenic to humans. Valproate, however, has been found to exert an antiproliferative effect on certain cancer cell lines both in vitro and in vivo. A corresponding cancer-suppressive effect has not been studied in human epidemiological studies, though there are now preliminary reports of the use of valproate in human haematological and solid tumours. The anticancer activity of valproate appears to be driven by histone deacetylase inhibition and to be independent of hormone or multidrug protein resistance dependent mechanisms. The newer antiepileptic drugs appear to be safe, as no carcinogenicity has been demonstrated either during regulatory testing or in post-marketing surveillance. Nevertheless, the subject of

  5. Current understanding of the mechanism of action of the antiepileptic drug lacosamide.

    PubMed

    Rogawski, Michael A; Tofighy, Azita; White, H Steve; Matagne, Alain; Wolff, Christian

    2015-02-01

    The antiepileptic drug lacosamide [(R)-2-acetamido-N-benzyl-3-methoxypropanamide], a chiral functionalized amino acid, was originally identified by virtue of activity in the mouse and rat maximal electroshock (MES) test. Attention was drawn to lacosamide because of its high oral potency and stereoselectivity. Lacosamide is also active in the 6 Hz seizure model but inactive against clonic seizures in rodents induced by subcutaneous pentylenetetrazol, bicuculline and picrotoxin. It is also ineffective in genetic models of absence epilepsy. At doses greater than those required to confer protection in the MES test, lacosamide inhibits behavioral and electrographic seizures in hippocampal kindled rats. It also effectively terminates seizures in the rat perforant path stimulation status epilepticus model when administered early after the onset of seizures. Lacosamide does not exhibit antiepileptogenic effects in kindling or post-status epilepticus models. The profile of lacosamide in animal seizure and epilepsy models is similar to that of sodium channel blocking antiepileptic drugs, such as phenytoin and carbamazepine. However, unlike these agents, lacosamide does not affect sustained repetitive firing (SRF) on a time scale of hundreds of milliseconds or affect fast inactivation of voltage-gated sodium channels; however, it terminates SRF on a time scale of seconds by an apparent effect on sodium channel slow inactivation. Lacosamide shifts the slow inactivation curve to more hyperpolarized potentials and enhances the maximal fraction of channels that are in the slow inactivated state. Currently, lacosamide is the only known antiepileptic drug in clinical practice that exerts its anticonvulsant activity predominantly by selectively enhancing slow sodium channel inactivation.

  6. Increase in bile flow and biliary excretion of glutathione-derived sulfhydryls in rats by drug-metabolizing enzyme inducers is mediated by multidrug resistance protein 2.

    PubMed

    Johnson, David R; Habeebu, Sultan S M; Klaassen, Curtis D

    2002-03-01

    Glutathione (GSH) is an important cellular constituent for normal liver homeostasis. Certain drug-metabolizing enzyme inducers (i.e., phenobarbital [PB] and pregnenolone-16alpha-carbonitrile [PCN]) increase biliary excretion of GSH-derived sulfhydryls (SH) as well as bile flow, whereas other drug-metabolizing enzyme inducers (i.e., 3-methylcholanthrene [3MC] and benzo(a)pyrene [BaP]), do not. The purpose of the study was to determine whether rat multidrug resistance protein 2 (Mrp2) is the inducible transporter responsible for increasing biliary SH excretion and bile flow. Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were injected ip daily for 4 days with PB, PCN, 3MC, BaP, or vehicle; Mrp2-null Eisai hyperbilirubinemic (EHBR) rats were injected ip daily for 4 days with PCN or vehicle. Although no drug-metabolizing enzyme inducer altered hepatic GSH in SD rats, PB and PCN significantly increased the rate of biliary SH excretion and bile flow. Neither 3MC nor BaP affected the biliary SH excretion rate or bile flow. In control EHBR rats, despite elevated hepatic GSH, the rate of biliary SH excretion was almost completely eliminated and bile flow was dramatically reduced compared with SD rats. Furthermore, PCN treatment did not affect bile flow or the biliary SH excretion rate in EHBR rats. PB and PCN also increased Mrp2 protein levels, but 3MC and BaP did not. None of the drug-metabolizing enzyme inducers tested significantly increased Mrp2 mRNA levels. PCN increased Mrp2 protein, but not Mrp2 mRNA, in a time-dependent manner. In conclusion, Mrp2 is the inducible efflux transporter responsible for increased biliary SH excretion and bile flow after administration of some drug-metabolizing enzyme inducers.

  7. Antiepileptic Drugs-induced Stevens–Johnson syndrome: A case Series

    PubMed Central

    Trivedi, Bhavi S.; Darji, Nishita H.; Malhotra, Supriya D.; Patel, Pankaj R.

    2016-01-01

    Stevens–Johnson syndrome (SJS) is an acute life-threatening mucocutaneous reaction, characterized by extensive necrosis and detachment of the epidermis from the skin. The overall incidence of SJS is seen in five cases per million people per year. SJS is typically caused by drugs and is a kind of idiosyncratic reaction. Adverse drug reactions such an SJS have a remarkable effect on patient's safety issues. We encountered nine cases of antiepileptic drug (AED)-induced SJS, specifically with carbamazepine, oxcarbazepine, and phenytoin. To manage the reaction, the clinician withdrew the drug in all 8 cases, and in 1 case, the patient was shifted to valproate and symptomatic treatment was provided. There is still a controversy whether or not all AEDs can cause SJS. Recent studies have investigated the role of genetic factors - HLAB*502 allele in the development of AED-induced SJS in patients of Asian ancestry. PMID:28104975

  8. Relationship of child IQ to parental IQ and education in children with fetal antiepileptic drug exposure.

    PubMed

    Meador, Kimford J; Baker, Gus A; Browning, Nancy; Clayton-Smith, Jill; Cohen, Morris J; Kalayjian, Laura A; Kanner, Andres; Liporace, Joyce D; Pennell, Page B; Privitera, Michael; Loring, David W

    2011-06-01

    Clinical trial designs need to control for genetic and environmental influences when examining cognitive outcomes in children for whom clinical considerations preclude randomization. However, the contributions of maternal and paternal IQ and education to pediatric cognitive outcomes are uncertain in disease populations. The Neurodevelopmental Effects of Antiepileptic Drugs (NEAD) Study is an ongoing prospective observational multicenter study in the United States and United Kingdom, which enrolled pregnant women with epilepsy to determine if differential long-term neurodevelopmental effects exist across four commonly used antiepileptic drugs. Here, we examined the relationship of IQ and education in both parents to child IQ at age 3 years. IQ and education for both parents were statistically correlated to child IQ. However, paternal IQ and education were not significant after accounting for maternal IQ effects. Because maternal IQ and education are independently related to child cognitive outcome, both should be assessed in studies investigating the effects of fetal drug exposures or other environmental factors that could affect the child's cognitive outcome.

  9. The influence of established and new antiepileptic drugs on visual perception. II. A controlled study in patients with epilepsy under long-term antiepileptic medication.

    PubMed

    Steinhoff, B J; Freudenthaler, N; Paulus, W

    1997-12-01

    In this study, we investigated visual performance under chronic antiepileptic drug treatment. Patients were under carbamazepine (CBZ) (n = 18), valproic acid (VPA) (n = 9), CBZ and vigabatrin (VGB) (n = 4), CBZ and gabapentin (GBP) (n = 8), and under CBZ and topiramate (TPR) (n = 6), respectively. Seven untreated patients with epilepsy and 42 healthy volunteers served as controls. The test battery comprised the Lanthony-D15-désaturé colour perception test, increment, postadaptation and transient tritanopia (TT) threshold measurements, visual perception threshold assessments for monochromatic and chromatic gratings and gaussian dots, and critical flicker fusion (CFF) tests. No differences were seen between naive patients and healthy controls. Patients under drug treatment always showed alterations of visual perception. Postadaptation and TT thresholds were altered under each drug regimen after short delays between switching off the adaptation light and switching on the blue test light. Threshold elevations were maximum under the combination of CBZ and TPR and lowest under CBZ and GBP. Consistent impairment of the CFF was seen under combined CBZ and TPR whereas VPA as well as combined CBZ and VGB led to ameliorations the mechanisms of which are discussed. The other tests were less sensitive. In conclusion, alterations of visual function were apparent under chronic antiepileptic drug treatment both with established and new agents. However, it may be difficult to distinguish between effects based on specific modes of action and nonspecific retino- and neurotoxicity.

  10. Effect of Antiepileptic drugs on plasma lipoprotein (a) and other lipid levels in childhood.

    PubMed

    Aynaci, F M; Orhan, F; Orem, A; Yildirmis, S; Gedik, Y

    2001-05-01

    Antiepileptic drugs may alter plasma lipid status in epileptic patients. We conducted a study to assess the effect of phenobarbital, carbamazepine, and valproate on plasma levels of lipoprotein (a), total cholesterol, triglycerides, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, apolipoprotein A, and apolipoprotein B in 22 epileptic children. The children were separated as group 1, seven children, mean age 1.6+/-0.2 years, treated with phenobarbital, 5 mg/kg/day, twice daily; group 2, seven children, mean age 9.8+/-1.2 years, treated with carbamazepine, 20 mg/kg/day, twice daily; and group 3, eight children, mean age 6.8+/-0.6 years, treated with valproate, 20 mg/kg/day, twice daily. Plasma lipoprotein (a) and other lipid levels were studied before (pretreatment) and at 3 and 6 months of treatment. Friedman two-way analysis of variance and Wilcoxon's signed-rank test were used for statistical analysis, and the results were expressed as the mean and standard error of the mean. The mean age of children in group 1 was significantly low, compared with groups 2 and, 3 (P < .001). The mean pretreatment lipid levels between the groups were not significant. The increase in lipoprotein (a) at 3 and 6 months and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol at 6 months was statistically significant in group 1 (P < .025). We suggest a careful monitoring of plasma levels of lipoprotein (a) and other lipids in epileptic children treated with antiepileptic drugs.

  11. Epileptiform activity and cognitive deficits in SNAP-25(+/-) mice are normalized by antiepileptic drugs.

    PubMed

    Corradini, Irene; Donzelli, Andrea; Antonucci, Flavia; Welzl, Hans; Loos, Maarten; Martucci, Roberta; De Astis, Silvia; Pattini, Linda; Inverardi, Francesca; Wolfer, David; Caleo, Matteo; Bozzi, Yuri; Verderio, Claudia; Frassoni, Carolina; Braida, Daniela; Clerici, Mario; Lipp, Hans-Peter; Sala, Mariaelvina; Matteoli, Michela

    2014-02-01

    Synaptosomal-associated protein of 25 kDa (SNAP-25) is a protein that participates in the regulation of synaptic vesicle exocytosis through the formation of the soluble NSF attachment protein receptor complex and modulates voltage-gated calcium channels activity. The Snap25 gene has been associated with schizophrenia, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, and bipolar disorder, and lower levels of SNAP-25 have been described in patients with schizophrenia. We used SNAP-25 heterozygous (SNAP-25(+/-)) mice to investigate at which extent the reduction of the protein levels affects neuronal network function and mouse behavior. As interactions of genotype with the specific laboratory conditions may impact behavioral results, the study was performed through a multilaboratory study in which behavioral tests were replicated in at least 2 of 3 distinct European laboratories. Reductions of SNAP-25 levels were associated with a moderate hyperactivity, which disappeared in the adult animals, and with impaired associative learning and memory. Electroencephalographic recordings revealed the occurrence of frequent spikes, suggesting a diffuse network hyperexcitability. Consistently, SNAP-25(+/-) mice displayed higher susceptibility to kainate-induced seizures, paralleled by degeneration of hilar neurons. Notably, both EEG profile and cognitive defects were improved by antiepileptic drugs. These results indicate that reduction of SNAP-25 expression is associated to generation of epileptiform discharges and cognitive dysfunctions, which can be effectively treated by antiepileptic drugs.

  12. Are antiepileptic drugs used in the treatment of migraine associated with an increased risk of suicidality?

    PubMed

    Kanner, Andres M

    2011-06-01

    Three antiepileptic drugs (AEDs), valproic acid, gabapentin, and topiramate (TPM), are used frequently in the prophylactic treatment of migraines. In December 2008, the US Food and Drug Administration issued a warning suggesting that the use of all AEDs is associated with an increased risk of suicidal ideation and behavior. This warning has been received by the medical community with great skepticism, and the validity of the findings of the meta-analysis that led to its publication has been questioned because of various methodological problems. Yet, migraine by itself is associated with an increased risk of suicidal ideation and behavior as well as with an increased risk of psychiatric disorders that facilitate the development of suicidal behavior. Furthermore, TPM has been associated with psychiatric adverse events that potentially could result in suicidal ideation and behavior. In this article, we review data to determine whether the AEDs used in the prevention of migraine are associated with an increased risk of suicidality.

  13. The Portland Neurotoxicity Scale: Validation of a Brief Self-Report Measure of Antiepileptic-Drug-Related Neurotoxicity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salinsky, Martin C.; Storzbach, Daniel

    2005-01-01

    The Portland Neurotoxicity Scale (PNS) is a brief patient-based survey of neurotoxicity complaints commonly encountered with the use of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs). The authors present data on the validity of this scale, particularly when used in longitudinal studies. Participants included 55 healthy controls, 23 epilepsy patient controls, and 86…

  14. The Impact of Anti-Epileptic Drugs on Growth and Bone Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Hueng-Chuen; Lee, Herng-Shen; Chang, Kai-Ping; Lee, Yi-Yen; Lai, Hsin-Chuan; Hung, Pi-Lien; Lee, Hsiu-Fen; Chi, Ching-Shiang

    2016-01-01

    Epilepsy is a common neurological disorder worldwide and anti-epileptic drugs (AEDs) are always the first choice for treatment. However, more than 50% of patients with epilepsy who take AEDs have reported bone abnormalities. Cytochrome P450 (CYP450) isoenzymes are induced by AEDs, especially the classical AEDs, such as benzodiazepines (BZDs), carbamazepine (CBZ), phenytoin (PT), phenobarbital (PB), and valproic acid (VPA). The induction of CYP450 isoenzymes may cause vitamin D deficiency, hypocalcemia, increased fracture risks, and altered bone turnover, leading to impaired bone mineral density (BMD). Newer AEDs, such as levetiracetam (LEV), oxcarbazepine (OXC), lamotrigine (LTG), topiramate (TPM), gabapentin (GP), and vigabatrin (VB) have broader spectra, and are safer and better tolerated than the classical AEDs. The effects of AEDs on bone health are controversial. This review focuses on the impact of AEDs on growth and bone metabolism and emphasizes the need for caution and timely withdrawal of these medications to avoid serious disabilities. PMID:27490534

  15. Antiepileptic drug intervention decouples electroencephalogram (EEG) signals: a case study in Unverricht-Lundborg Disease.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chang-Chia; Xanthopoulos, Petros; Chaovalitwongse, W; Pardalos, Panos M; Uthman, Basim M

    2008-01-01

    Change in severity of myoclonus as an outcome measure of antiepileptic drug (AED) treatment in patients with Unverricht-Lundborg Disease (ULD) has been estimated by utilizing the Unified Myoclonus Rating Scale (UMRS). In this study, we measure treatment effects through EEG analysis using mutual information approach to quantify interdependence/coupling strength among different electrode sites. Mutual information is known to have the ability to capture linear and non-linear dependencies between EEG time series with superior performance over the traditional linear measures. One subject with ULD participated in this study and 1-hour EEG recordings were acquired before and after treatment of AED. Our results indicate that the mutual information is significantly lower after taking the add-on AED for four weeks at least. This finding could lead to a new insight for developing a new outcome measure for patient with ULD, when UMRS could potentially fail to detect a significant difference.

  16. Association of antiepileptic drugs, vitamin D, and calcium supplementation with bone fracture occurrence in epilepsy patients.

    PubMed

    Espinosa, Patricio S; Perez, David L; Abner, Erin; Ryan, Melody

    2011-09-01

    The aim of this study is to determine whether calcium and vitamin D supplementation reduces the risk of bone fractures in adult epilepsy patients. Records were obtained on 7716 patients with epilepsy prescribed antiepileptic drugs (AED) from the Veteran Affairs Hospital in Lexington, Kentucky. We performed a single center, retrospective cohort study to examine the proportion of fractures in 3303 patients on AED who took supplements compared to patients on AED not taking supplements. Patients prescribed long-term AEDs taking calcium and vitamin D were as likely to have fractures as those who did not take these supplements (11.7% vs. 9.9%, χ(2)=0.59, p=0.44). Phenytoin use was associated with a statistically significant increased risk of fractures OR=1.55 (1.10-2.24). Thus, in this group of patients with epilepsy on AED, bone fractures were not prevented in individuals taking calcium and vitamin D supplementation.

  17. Psychological factors and use of antiepileptic drugs: pilot work using an objective measure of adherence.

    PubMed

    Kemp, Steven; Feely, Morgan; Hay, Alastair; Wild, Heather; Cooper, Cathryn

    2007-01-01

    Given the current emphasis on the "concordance" prescribing model, a study was designed to determine the influence of patients' beliefs about epilepsy, beliefs about medication and a range of neuroepilepsy variables on drug adherence among a sample of epilepsy patients. A special feature of the study was the use of a credible objective measure of drug adherence. Psychological health was also assessed. Thirty-seven patients were recruited from a local epilepsy clinic. Beliefs about epilepsy (illness representations), beliefs about epilepsy medication, anxiety, depression, neuroepilepsy status and adherence were all measured. Data were collected via clinical interview and questionnaire methods. Adherence with drug treatment was determined by an objective measure using low-dose phenobarbital as an indicator of adherence and, or, measurement of antiepileptic drug levels. Neither illness representations nor beliefs about epilepsy drugs were related to adherence. With the exception of time since last seizure, which was positively related to adherence, neuroepilepsy variables were unrelated to adherence. A number of significant associations between cognitive representations of epilepsy and mood were found.

  18. Local anesthetic and antiepileptic drug access and binding to a bacterial voltage-gated sodium channel.

    PubMed

    Boiteux, Céline; Vorobyov, Igor; French, Robert J; French, Christopher; Yarov-Yarovoy, Vladimir; Allen, Toby W

    2014-09-09

    Voltage-gated sodium (Nav) channels are important targets in the treatment of a range of pathologies. Bacterial channels, for which crystal structures have been solved, exhibit modulation by local anesthetic and anti-epileptic agents, allowing molecular-level investigations into sodium channel-drug interactions. These structures reveal no basis for the "hinged lid"-based fast inactivation, seen in eukaryotic Nav channels. Thus, they enable examination of potential mechanisms of use- or state-dependent drug action based on activation gating, or slower pore-based inactivation processes. Multimicrosecond simulations of NavAb reveal high-affinity binding of benzocaine to F203 that is a surrogate for FS6, conserved in helix S6 of Domain IV of mammalian sodium channels, as well as low-affinity sites suggested to stabilize different states of the channel. Phenytoin exhibits a different binding distribution owing to preferential interactions at the membrane and water-protein interfaces. Two drug-access pathways into the pore are observed: via lateral fenestrations connecting to the membrane lipid phase, as well as via an aqueous pathway through the intracellular activation gate, despite being closed. These observations provide insight into drug modulation that will guide further developments of Nav inhibitors.

  19. Solid Dispersion Approach Improving Dissolution Rate of Stiripentol: a Novel Antiepileptic Drug

    PubMed Central

    Afifi, Samar

    2015-01-01

    Some drugs have low bioavailability due to their poor aqueous solubility and/or slow dissolution rate in biological fluids. Stiripentol (STP) is a novel anticonvulsant drug that is structurally unrelated to the currently available antiepileptics. It has poor aqueous solubility and its solubility has to be enhanced accordingly. Polyethyleneglycol 6000 (PEG-6000) is commonly utilized as a hydrophilic carrier for poorly water soluble drugs in order to improve their bioavailability. STP and PEG-6000 binary system was obtained by physical mixture, solvent evaporation, co-evaporation and melting methods using different weight ratios. The properties of the prepared binary systems were evaluated using dissolution rate, phase solubility, Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) studies. The FTIR spectroscopic studies showed the stability of STP and absence of STP-PEG-6000 interaction. The DSC and SEM studies indicated the amorphous state of STP in its binary systems with PEG-6000. Dissolution profile of STP was significantly improved via complexation with PEG-6000 as compared with the pure drug. The binary system which was prepared using melting method showed the highest dissolution rate. The promising results of the prepared binary systems open the avenue for further oral formulation of STP. PMID:26664367

  20. Solid Dispersion Approach Improving Dissolution Rate of Stiripentol: a Novel Antiepileptic Drug.

    PubMed

    Afifi, Samar

    2015-01-01

    Some drugs have low bioavailability due to their poor aqueous solubility and/or slow dissolution rate in biological fluids. Stiripentol (STP) is a novel anticonvulsant drug that is structurally unrelated to the currently available antiepileptics. It has poor aqueous solubility and its solubility has to be enhanced accordingly. Polyethyleneglycol 6000 (PEG-6000) is commonly utilized as a hydrophilic carrier for poorly water soluble drugs in order to improve their bioavailability. STP and PEG-6000 binary system was obtained by physical mixture, solvent evaporation, co-evaporation and melting methods using different weight ratios. The properties of the prepared binary systems were evaluated using dissolution rate, phase solubility, Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) studies. The FTIR spectroscopic studies showed the stability of STP and absence of STP-PEG-6000 interaction. The DSC and SEM studies indicated the amorphous state of STP in its binary systems with PEG-6000. Dissolution profile of STP was significantly improved via complexation with PEG-6000 as compared with the pure drug. The binary system which was prepared using melting method showed the highest dissolution rate. The promising results of the prepared binary systems open the avenue for further oral formulation of STP.

  1. Developmental effects of antiepileptic drugs and the need for improved regulations

    PubMed Central

    Loring, David W.

    2016-01-01

    Antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) are among the most common teratogenic drugs prescribed to women of childbearing age. AEDs can induce both anatomical (malformations) and behavioral (cognitive/behavioral deficits) teratogenicity. Only in the last decade have we begun to truly discriminate differential AED developmental effects. Fetal valproate exposure carries a special risk for both anatomical and behavioral teratogenic abnormalities, but the mechanisms and reasons for individual variability are unknown. Intermediate anatomical risks exist for phenobarbital and topiramate. Several AEDs (e.g., lamotrigine and levetiracetam) appear to possess low risks for both anatomical and behavioral teratogenesis. Despite advances in the past decade, our knowledge of the teratogenic risks for most AEDs and the underlying mechanisms remain inadequate. Further, the long-term effects of AEDs in neonates and older children remain uncertain. The pace of progress is slow given the lifelong consequences of diminished developmental outcomes, exposing children unnecessarily to potential adverse effects. It is imperative that new approaches be employed to determine risks more expediently. Our recommendations include a national reporting system for congenital malformations, federal funding of the North American AED Pregnancy Registry, routine meta-analyses of cohort studies to detect teratogenic signals, monitoring of AED prescription practices for women, routine preclinical testing of all new AEDs for neurodevelopmental effects, more specific Food and Drug Administration requirements to establish differential AED cognitive effects in children, and improved funding of basic and clinical research to fully delineate risks and underlying mechanisms for AED-induced anatomical and behavioral teratogenesis. PMID:26519545

  2. Neuropsychological effects of antiepileptic drugs (carbamazepine versus valproate) in adult males with epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Shehata, Ghaydaa A; Bateh, Abd El-aziz M; Hamed, Sherifa A; Rageh, Tarek A; Elsorogy, Yaser B

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effect of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) on cognition and behavior in adult epileptic males controlled on treatment with conventional antiepileptic medications. Methods: Cognitive, mood, behavior and personality traits were assessed in 45 epileptic patients treated with carbamazepine and/or valproate and free of seizures for ≥1 year. Thirty-four newly diagnosed or untreated patients with epilepsy and 58 matched healthy subjects were also included for comparison. A battery of psychometric tests was utilized including Stanford-Binet (4th edition), Beck Inventory for Depression, Aggressive Scale and Eysenck Personality Questionnaire. Results: Compared to matched control subjects, treated and untreated epileptic patients had poor performance in different cognitive and behavioral functions testing. Treated patients had worse scores in memory for digits forward and backward, total short-term memory, extroversion and psychosis. The duration of AEDs intake was correlated with memory of objects (r = −0.323; P = 0.030), bead memory (r = −0.314; P = 0.036) and total nonverbal short-term memory (r = −0.346; P = 0.020). Treated and untreated epileptic patients had poor performance of similar extent in behavioral functions testing (depression, aggression and neurosis). The dose of AEDs was correlated with testing scores for neurosis (r = 0.307; P = 0.040), verbal aggression (r = 0.483; P = 0.001) and nonverbal aggression (r = 0.526; P = 0.000), and duration of drug intake was correlated with scores for depression (r = 0.384; P = 0.009), psychosis (r = 0.586; P = 0.0001) and nonverbal aggression (r = 0.300; P = 0.045). Conclusions: This study provides support for the notion that AEDs can impair performance in cognition, mood and behavior. Duration of drug intake and the number of the utilized AEDs are the main confounding variables. This study did not provide clues on how to exclude the effect of epilepsy itself and psychosocial variables as

  3. Several major antiepileptic drugs are substrates for human P-glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Luna-Tortós, Carlos; Fedrowitz, Maren; Löscher, Wolfgang

    2008-12-01

    One of the current hypotheses of pharmacoresistant epilepsy proposes that transport of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) by drug efflux transporters such as P-glycoprotein (Pgp) at the blood-brain barrier may play a significant role in pharmacoresistance in epilepsy by extruding AEDs from their intended site of action. However, several recent in vitro studies using cell lines that overexpress efflux transporters indicate that human Pgp may not transport AEDs to any relevant extent. In this respect it has to be considered that most AEDs are highly permeable, so that conventional bi-directional transport assays as used in these previous studies may fail to identify AEDs as Pgp substrates, particularly if these drugs are not high-affinity substrates for Pgp. In the present study, we used a modified transport assay that allows evaluating active transport independently of the passive permeability component. In this concentration equilibrium transport assay (CETA), the drug is initially added at identical concentration to both sides of a polarized, Pgp-overexpressing cell monolayer instead of applying the drug to either the apical or basolateral side for studying bi-directional transport. Direct comparison of the conventional bi-directional (concentration gradient) assay with the CETA, using MDR1-transfected LLC cells, demonstrated that CETA, but not the conventional assay, identified phenytoin and phenobarbital as substrates of human Pgp. Furthermore, directional transport was determined for lamotrigine and levetiracetam, but not carbamazepine. Transport of AEDs could be completely or partially (>50%) inhibited by the selective Pgp inhibitor, tariquidar. However, transport of phenobarbital and levetiracetam was also inhibited by MK571, which preferentially blocks transport by multidrug resistance transporters (MRPs), indicating that, in addition to Pgp, these AEDs are substrates of MRPs. The present study provides the first direct evidence that several AEDS are substrates of

  4. New generation antiepileptic drugs: what do they offer in terms of improved tolerability and safety?

    PubMed Central

    Gazzola, Deana M.

    2011-01-01

    Over the last two decades a total of 11 antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) have been introduced to the US market. Randomized, placebo-controlled trials have yielded information about each drug’s efficacy, tolerability, and safety profile; however, few studies have compared the newer generation AEDs directly with the older generation. Comparative studies are not always straightforward in their interpretation, as many characteristics of drugs, both favorable and unfavorable, may not be highlighted by such studies. In general, findings from the literature suggest that the newer generation AEDs (including vigabatrin, felbamate, gabapentin, lamotrigine, tiagabine, topiramate, levetiracetam, oxcarbazepine, zonisamide, pregabalin, rufinamide, and lacosamide) enjoy both improved tolerability and safety compared with older agents such as phenobarbital, phenytoin, carbamazepine, and valproate. This is partially supported by some of the findings of the QSS and the TTA Committee of the American Academy of Neurology (AAN), whose review of four AEDs (gabapentin, lamotrigine, topiramate, and tiagabine) is discussed. Briefly, when compared with carbamazepine, lamotrigine was better tolerated; topiramate adverse events (AEs) were fairly comparable to carbamazepine and valproate; and tiagabine compared with placebo was associated with a higher discontinuation rate due to AEs. The findings of the SANAD trial are also presented; when administered to patients with partial epilepsy, carbamazepine was most likely to fail due to AEs, and lamotrigine and gabapentin were least likely to fail due to AEs. When administered to patients with idiopathic generalized epilepsy, topiramate was most frequently associated with AE-related discontinuation, followed by valproate; and while valproate was the most efficacious drug in this arm of the study, lamotrigine was more tolerable. What makes the SANAD study valuable and somewhat unique is its head-to-head comparison of one drug with another. Such

  5. Selecting anti-epileptic drugs: a pediatric epileptologist’s view, a computer’s view

    PubMed Central

    Pestian, J; Matykiewicz, P; Holland-Bouley, K; Standridge, S; Spencer, M; Glauser, T

    2012-01-01

    Objective To identify which clinical characteristics are important to include in clinical decision support systems developed for Antiepileptic Drug (AEDs) selection. Methods Twenty-three epileptologists from the Childhood Absence Epilepsy network completed a survey related to AED selection. Using cluster analysis their responses where classified into subject matter groups and weighted for importance. Results Five distinct subject matter groups were identified and their relative weighting for importance were determined: disease characteristics (weight 4.8 ± 0.049), drug toxicities (3.82 ± 0.098), medical history (3.12 ± 0.102), systemic characteristics (2.57 ± 0.048) and genetic characteristics (1.08 ± 0.046). Conclusion Research about prescribing patterns exists but research on how such data can be used to train advanced technology is novel. As machine learning algorithms becomes more and more prevalent in clinical decisions support systems, developing methods for determining which data should be part of those algorithms is equally important. PMID:22998126

  6. Generic products of antiepileptic drugs: a perspective on bioequivalence and interchangeability.

    PubMed

    Bialer, Meir; Midha, Kamal K

    2010-06-01

    Most antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) are currently available as generic products, yet neurologists and patients are reluctant to switch to generics. Generic AEDs are regarded as bioequivalent to brand AEDs after meeting the average bioequivalence criteria; consequently, they are considered to be interchangeable with their respective brands without loss of efficacy and safety. According to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) the present bioequivalence requirements are already so rigorous and constrained that there is little possibility that generics that meet regulatory bioequivalence criteria could lead to therapeutic problems. So is there a scientific rationale for the concerns about switching patients with epilepsy to bioequivalent generics? Herein we discuss the assessment of bioequivalence and propose a scaled-average bioequivalence approach where scaling of bioequivalence is carried out based on brand lot-to-lot variance as an alternative to the conventional bioequivalence test as a means to determine whether switching patients to generic formulations, or vice versa, is a safe and effective therapeutic option. Meeting the proposed scaled-average bioequivalence requirements will ensure that when an individual patient is switched, he or she has fluctuations in plasma levels similar to those from lot-to-lot of the brand reference levels and thus should make these generic products safely switchable without change in efficacy and safety outcomes.

  7. Effect of antiepileptic drugs on plasma lipids, lipoprotein (a), and liver enzymes.

    PubMed

    Sonmez, Fatma Mujgan; Demir, Ercan; Orem, Asim; Yildirmis, Sermet; Orhan, Fazil; Aslan, Adnan; Topbas, Murat

    2006-01-01

    We conducted a study to assess the effect of phenobarbital, carbamazepine, and valproate on serum lipid profiles and lipoprotein (a) in 64 children with epilepsy (aged between 1 and 15 years) admitted to the child neurology outpatient clinic between July 2000 and July 2002. The children were separated as group 1 (18 children), treated with phenobarbital, 5 mg/kg/day; group 2 (22 children), treated with carbamazepine, 10 to 15 mg/kg/day; and group 3 (24 children), treated with sodium valproate, 20 mg/kg/day. Plasma lipoprotein (a), total cholesterol, triglycerides, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, apolipoprotein A and apolipoprotein B levels, and liver enzymes alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, alkaline phosphatase, and gamma-glutamyltransferase were determined before the initiation of the treatment and at 3, 6, and 12 months of the treatment period. The mean age of children in group 1 was significantly low compared with those in groups 2 and 3 (P <.05). The mean pretreatment lipid levels among the groups were not significantly increased. The mean lipoprotein (a) levels were significantly increased in all groups at 3, 6, and 12 months of the treatment period (P <.05). The increase in alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, alkaline phosphatase, total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol at 3, 6, and 12 months was statistically significant in group 1 (P <.05). The higher levels in lipoprotein (a) (mean > 30 mg/dL) were observed only in carbamazepine-treated patients at 6 and 12 months. The percentage of children with lipoprotein (a) levels over 30 mg/dL was 44%, 63%, and 33% in the phenobarbital-, carbamazepine-, and valproate-treated children, respectively. Antiepileptic drugs significantly increase the level of lipoprotein (a), which is a major risk factor for atherosclerosis, and also have variable effects on other lipid parameters

  8. Clinical pharmacokinetics of new-generation antiepileptic drugs at the extremes of age: an update.

    PubMed

    Italiano, Domenico; Perucca, Emilio

    2013-08-01

    Epilepsies occur across the entire age range, and their incidence peaks in the first years of life and in the elderly. Therefore, antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) are commonly used at the extremes of age. Rational prescribing in these age groups requires not only an understanding of the drugs' pharmacodynamic properties, but also careful consideration of potential age-related changes in their pharmacokinetic profile. The present article, which updates a review published in 2006 in this journal, focuses on recent findings on the pharmacokinetics of new-generation AEDs in neonates, infants, children, and the elderly. Significant new information on the pharmacokinetics of new AEDs in the perinatal period has been acquired, particularly for lamotrigine and levetiracetam. As a result of slow maturation of the enzymes involved in glucuronide conjugation, lamotrigine elimination occurs at a particularly slow rate in neonates, and becomes gradually more efficient during the first months of life. In the case of levetiracetam, elimination occurs primarily by renal excretion and is also slow at birth, but drug clearance increases rapidly thereafter and can even double within 1 week. In general, infants older than 2-3 months and children show higher drug clearance (normalized for body weight) than adults. This pattern was confirmed in recent studies that investigated the pediatric pharmacokinetics of several new AEDs, including levetiracetam, rufinamide, stiripentol, and eslicarbazepine acetate. At the other extreme of age, in the elderly, drug clearance is generally reduced compared with younger adults because of less efficient drug-metabolizing activity, decreased renal function, or both. This general pattern, described previously for several AEDs, was confirmed in recent studies on the effect of old age on the clearance of felbamate, levetiracetam, pregabalin, lacosamide, and retigabine. For those drugs which are predominantly eliminated by renal excretion, aging

  9. Atherosclerotic effects of long-term old and new antiepileptic drugs monotherapy: a cross-sectional comparative study.

    PubMed

    El-Farahaty, Reham M; El-Mitwalli, Ashraf; Azzam, Hanan; Wasel, Yasser; Elrakhawy, Mohamed M; Hasaneen, Bothina Mohammed

    2015-03-01

    This work aimed to evaluate the metabolic and atherogenic effects of long-term antiepileptic drugs in a group of Egyptian epileptic patients. Sixty-nine epileptic patients on antiepileptic drug monotherapy for at least 2 years and 34 control subjects were recruited in this study. Patients were divided into 5 subgroups according to antiepileptic drugs used (valproate, carbamazepine, lamotrigine, topiramate, and levetiracetam). Fasting lipid profile (total cholesterol, triglyceride, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol), lipoprotein(a), homocysteine, free thyroxine, thyroid-stimulating hormone, and common carotid artery intima-media thickness were measured for all subjects. Significant higher mean values of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein / high-density lipoprotein ratio, lipoprotein(a), homocysteine, significantly lower mean value of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and significantly larger diameter of common carotid artery intima-media thickness were observed in each drug-treated group versus control group. Our study supports that long-term monotherapy treatment with valproate, carbamazepine, lamotrigine, and topiramate had altered markers of vascular risk that might enhance atherosclerosis, whereas levetiracetam exerted minimal effect.

  10. Comparison of the effectiveness of four antiepileptic drugs in the treatment of status epilepticus according to four different efficacy criteria.

    PubMed

    Redecker, Juliane; Wittstock, Matthias; Benecke, Reiner; Rösche, Johannes

    2015-08-01

    The preliminary data presented here shall give an impression on how different criteria for the identification of an antiepileptic drug (AED) with a possible or certain treatment effect can have an influence on the results of retrospective case series. We present a data subset from a large retrospective study which, when completed, will cover all treatment episodes of status epilepticus (SE) at the neurological department of the Universitätsmedizin Rostock from January 2010 to June 2013. We compare and contrast the results of four different efficacy criteria for the effectiveness of phenytoin (PHT), valproate (VPA), levetiracetam (LEV), and lacosamide (LCM): criterion 1 = the last AED administered before SE termination; criterion 2 = the last drug introduced into the antiepileptic therapy within 72 h before SE termination and without changes in the comedication; criterion 3 = the last drug introduced into the antiepileptic therapy or increased in dose within 24h before SE termination without changes in the comedication; and criterion 4 = the last drug introduced into the antiepileptic therapy within 72 h before SE termination, even allowing changes in the comedication. Thirty-seven treatment episodes in 32 patients (13 male and 19 female, mean age at first episode: 68 years, SD: 17) could be analyzed. In 31 episodes, at least one AED was given intravenously. Efficacy rates in the whole case series according to all four criteria were not significantly different between the four AEDs, but there was a considerable difference in the efficacy rates of each AED when evaluating them with the different efficacy criteria. Our data show that statistically significant results concerning the efficacy of different AEDs in different subtypes of SE may depend on the outcome criteria. Therefore, efficacy criteria for the effectiveness of AEDs in the treatment of SE should be standardized. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Status Epilepticus.

  11. Inhibition of the enzyme, GABA-aminotransferase in human platelets by vigabatrin, a potential antiepileptic drug.

    PubMed Central

    Rimmer, E; Kongola, G; Richens, A

    1988-01-01

    1. The effect of the new antiepileptic drug, vigabatrin (gamma-vinyl GABA), on the platelet enzyme, GABA-aminotransferase (GABA-T) was investigated in volunteers and patients. Platelets GABA-T activity was assayed using a radioenzymic method. 2. Three single oral doses of vigabatrin (1 g, 2 g and 4 g) were given to six healthy male volunteers in an open randomised cross over study and compared with a baseline period preceding the three treatments. 3. Significant inhibition of the platelet GABA-T was produced by treatment with all three doses and a dose-response relationship was demonstrated. The minimum enzyme activities after 1 g, 2 g and 4 g doses were 43%, 30% and 21% respectively compared with the control values. 4. A significant depression of enzyme activity occurred at 30 min after drug administration and the values remained below control values for 72 h post-dose, outlasting the presence of the drug itself in the plasma. 5. Eight patients with chronic refractory epilepsy were treated with vigabatrin for 6 weeks. After taking the 2 g daily dose for 1 week there was a marked reduction in platelet enzyme activity in all subjects but the enzyme inhibition produced by the 3 g dose was not significantly different from that produced by the 2 g dose, even after 4 weeks treatment with the larger dose. The mean enzyme activity was approximately 30% throughout the active treatment period. One week after stopping vigabatrin, the enzyme levels were not significantly different from the baseline values.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3358887

  12. A pilot randomized controlled clinical trial to improve antiepileptic drug adherence in young children with epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Modi, Avani C; Guilfoyle, Shanna M; Mann, Krista A; Rausch, Joseph R

    2016-03-01

    The primary aim was to examine the preliminary efficacy of a family tailored problem-solving intervention to improve antiepileptic drug (AED) adherence in families of children with new-onset epilepsy. Secondary aims were to assess changes in targeted mechanisms and treatment feasibility and acceptability. Fifty families (M(age) = 7.6 ± 3.0; 80% Caucasian; 42% idiopathic localization related) completed baseline questionnaires and were given an electronic monitor to observe daily AED adherence. If adherence was ≤ 95% in the first 7 months of the study, families were randomized (Supporting Treatment Adherence Regimens (STAR): n = 11; Treatment as Usual (TAU): n = 12). Twenty-one families were not randomized due to adherence being ≥95%. The STAR intervention included four face-to-face and two telephone problem-solving sessions over 8 weeks. Significant group differences in adherence were found during active intervention (weeks 4-6; TAU = -12.0 vs. STAR = 18.1, p < 0.01; and weeks session 6-8: TAU = -9.7 vs. STAR = 15.3, p < 0.05). Children who received the STAR intervention exhibited improved adherence compared to children in the TAU group during active treatment. Significant changes in epilepsy knowledge and management were noted for the STAR group. Families expressed benefitting from the STAR intervention. Future studies should include a larger sample size and booster intervention sessions to maintain treatment effects over time.

  13. Hyperammonaemia and hepatotoxicity during chronic valproate therapy: enhancement by combination with other antiepileptic drugs.

    PubMed Central

    Ratnaike, R N; Schapel, G J; Purdie, G; Rischbieth, R H; Hoffmann, S

    1986-01-01

    Erythrocyte (ENH3) and plasma (PNH3) ammonia levels, liver function tests and plasma valproate concentration were measured in 81 epileptic patients, comprising three therapeutic groups: Group 1 (23 patients) received sodium valproate (VPA) monotherapy, group 2 (33 patients) received sodium valproate combined with phenytoin, carbamazepine, phenobarbitone and/or primidone and group 3 (25 patients) received one or more of these anti-epileptic drugs without sodium valproate. The mean ENH3 and PNH3 of patients in group 1 (41.1 +/- 30.7 mumol l-1 and 37.1 +/- 31.8 mumol l-1, respectively) and group 2 (44.5 +/- 21.3 and 37.6 +/- 21.4 mumol l-1, respectively) were significantly (P less than 0.01) higher than those in group 3 (28.7 +/- 10.6 and 21.5 +/- 7.8 mumol l-1, respectively) and the reference range (30.1 +/- 7.9 and 20.8 +/- 5.7 mumol l-1, respectively). Hyperammonaemia was more prevalent amongst patients in group 2, for both ENH3 (45.5%) and PNH3 (54.6%), than amongst patients in group 1 (30.4% and 52.2%, respectively) and group 3 (8% and 8%, respectively). There was a significant (P less than 0.05) positive correlation between plasma VPA and total bilirubin concentrations. Chronic VPA therapy was also associated with an increase in bilirubin concentrations measured on average four months apart. PMID:3091053

  14. Lacosamide neurotoxicity associated with concomitant use of sodium channel-blocking antiepileptic drugs: a pharmacodynamic interaction?

    PubMed

    Novy, Jan; Patsalos, Philip N; Sander, Josemir W; Sisodiya, Sanjay M

    2011-01-01

    Lacosamide is a new antiepileptic drug (AED) apparently devoid of major pharmacokinetic interactions. Data from a small postmarketing assessment suggest people who had lacosamide co-prescribed with a voltage-gated sodium channel (VGSC)-blocking AED seemed more likely to discontinue lacosamide because of tolerability problems. Among 39 people with refractory epilepsy who developed neurotoxicity (diplopia, dizziness, drowsiness) on lacosamide treatment given in combination with VGSC-blocking AEDs, we identified 7 (17.9%) without any changes in serum levels of other AEDs in whom the symptoms were ameliorated by dose reduction of the concomitant VGSC-blocking AED. Symptoms in these people seem to have arisen from a pharmacodynamic interaction between lacosamide and other VGSC-blocking AEDs. Slow-inactivated VGSCs targeted by lacosamide might be more sensitive to the effects of conventional VGSC-blocking AEDs. Advising people to reduce concomitantly the conventional VGSC-blocking AEDs during lacosamide uptitration in cases of neurotoxicity might improve the tolerability of combination treatment.

  15. Homocysteine, folate, vitamin B-12 and vitamin B-6 in patients receiving antiepileptic drug monotherapy.

    PubMed

    Tamura, T; Aiso, K; Johnston, K E; Black, L; Faught, E

    2000-06-01

    We hypothesized that elevated plasma homocysteine concentrations (hyperhomocysteinemia) exist in patients receiving antiepileptic drugs (AED), and a long-term administration of AED may result in an increased risk of occlusive vascular disease in these patients. A total of 62 patients who received AED monotherapy (phenytoin, lamotrigine, carbamazepine or valproate) participated in this study. Blood concentrations of homocysteine, folate, vitamin B-12 and pyridoxal-5'-phosphate (PLP, a coenzyme form of vitamin B-6) were measured, and thermolabile genotypes of 5, 10-methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) were also determined. Of 62 patients, only seven (11.4%) had hyperhomocysteinemia. Of 20 patients who received phenytoin, three (15.0%) had hyperhomocysteinemia, whereas 85% of these had plasma folate concentrations below the normal range. However, erythrocyte folate concentrations were abnormally low in only 25% of the patients who received phenytoin. Valproate administration increased serum vitamin B-12 concentrations. Over 55% of the entire patients had PLP concentrations below the normal range, although the reason is unknown. Only three patients had the homozygous thermolabile genotype of MTHFR; therefore, meaningful statistical analysis was not possible in this study. However, one patient with homozygous genotype who received phenytoin therapy had hyperhomocysteinemia with poor folate nutritional status, and the other two had normal homocysteine concentrations with normal folate status. Our data suggest that hyperhomocysteinemia is not a serious clinical concern in epileptic patients when folate nutriture is adequate.

  16. Is breast-feeding of infants advisable for epileptic mothers taking antiepileptic drugs?

    PubMed

    Chen, Lei; Liu, Fang; Yoshida, Shuichi; Kaneko, Sunao

    2010-10-01

    Epilepsy is a relatively common maternal complication affecting 0.3-0.5% of pregnant women. For most mothers with epilepsy, the use of antiepileptic drugs (AED) is unavoidable, even during pregnancy and lactation. Therefore, the fetus is indirectly exposed to AED via the placenta and breast milk. AED are also prescribed for female patients with other diseases, such as bipolar disorders. In clinical settings, physicians are frequently questioned whether or not women patients taking AED should breast-feed their offspring. Thus, it is necessary to establish an optimum AED regimen for women taking AED, in particular for those with epilepsy during pregnancy and lactation. In this article, we critically review the effects of AED on infants via breast milk and attempt to provide suggestions for clinicians regarding these effects during breast-feeding, based on the data of transplacental passage of AED, breast milk concentration/maternal serum concentration ratios, AED metabolism in infants and the effects of AED in breast milk on infants.

  17. Progress report on new antiepileptic drugs: A summary of the Twelfth Eilat Conference (EILAT XII).

    PubMed

    Bialer, Meir; Johannessen, Svein I; Levy, René H; Perucca, Emilio; Tomson, Torbjörn; White, H Steve

    2015-03-01

    The Twelfth Eilat Conference on New Antiepileptic Drugs (AEDs) - EILAT XII, took place in Madrid, Spain from August 31st to September 3rd 2014. About 130 basic scientists, clinical pharmacologists and neurologists from 22 countries attended the conference, whose main themes included "Conquering pharmacoresistant epilepsy", "Innovative emergency treatments", "Progress report on second-generation treatment" and "New methods and formulations". Consistent with previous formats of this conference, a large part of the program was devoted to a review of AEDs in development, as well as updates on AEDs introduced since 2004. Like the EILAT X and EILAT XI reports, the current article focuses on the preclinical and clinical pharmacology of AEDs that are currently in development. These include adenosine-releasing silk, allopregnanolone (SAGE-547), AMP-X-0079, brivaracetam, bumetanide, cannabidiol, cannabidivarin, 2-deoxy-glucose, everolimus, ganaxolone, huperzine A, imepitoin, minocycline, NAX 801-2, pitolisant, PRX 0023, SAGE-217, valnoctamide and its homologue sec-butyl-propylacetamide (SPD), and VLB-01. Since the previous Eilat conference, perampanel has been introduced into the market and twelve novel potential epilepsy treatments are presented for the first time.

  18. Effect of antiepileptic drugs on the postictal state. A critical overview.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Dieter

    2010-10-01

    Although postictal events contribute to seizure severity and thus affect quality of life, the effect of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) on the postictal state is not well known. This review assesses the available evidence from randomized controlled trials on the effect of AEDs on postictal events. The instruments used in AED trials include postictal items of The Liverpool Seizure Severity Scale (LSSS) and Seizure Severity Scale (SSQ) and postictal recovery of electroencephalography (EEG) background activity. The effect of AEDs on postictal components of LSSS, if documented separately or at all, was either too small to be clinically significant (for lamotrigine) or not different from that of controls (topiramate, valproate). However, lacosamide showed improvement on the SSQ over placebo, and levetiracetam was associated with a speedier postictal recovery of EEG background activity compared with placebo. Although measuring the effect of AEDs on postictal state is of great clinical interest, the limited evidence found in this review suggests that further work is needed to evaluate current instruments used to assess AED-associated changes in postictal events.

  19. Understanding patients' perspective in the use of generic antiepileptic drugs: compelling lessons for physicians to improve physician/patient communication

    PubMed Central

    Liow, Kore

    2009-01-01

    Background Epilepsy is a condition in which consistency of treatment is paramount to successful management and for most patients, effective seizure control can be achieved. Given the severe consequences of even a single breakthrough seizure, patients should be afforded every opportunity to succeed on their given regimens. Discussion Some experts argue that global policy on generic antiepileptic drug substitution in epilepsy should be limited – occurring at the discretion of and with careful monitoring by the physician. While the debate continues, physicians still have daily responsibilities to their patients to help them best manage their epilepsy within the context of the current environment – the reality of which may involve switching to a generic antiepileptic drug or navigating various formulations between generics. Summary To provide context, this paper first reviews the main "hot button" issues fueling the ongoing generic debate, including a broad overview of the current state of the literature. The main goal however is to provide physicians with a patient perspective on generic antiepileptic drug use in epilepsy as a source of clinically useful, everyday advice to improve communication and increase patient self-advocacy, both of which are necessary for optimal patient outcome. PMID:19292903

  20. Lamotrigine, an antiepileptic drug, inhibits 5-HT3 receptor currents in NCB-20 neuroblastoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ki Jung; Jeun, Seung Hyun

    2017-01-01

    Lamotrigine is an antiepileptic drug widely used to treat epileptic seizures. Using whole-cell voltage clamp recordings in combination with a fast drug application approach, we investigated the effects of lamotrigine on 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)3 receptors in NCB-20 neuroblastoma cells. Co-application of lamotrigine (1~300 µM) resulted in a concentration-dependent reduction in peak amplitude of currents induced by 3 µM of 5-HT for an IC50 value of 28.2±3.6 µM with a Hill coefficient of 1.2±0.1. These peak amplitude decreases were accompanied by the rise slope reduction. In addition, 5-HT3-mediated currents evoked by 1 mM dopamine, a partial 5-HT3 receptor agonist, were inhibited by lamotrigine co-application. The EC50 of 5-HT for 5-HT3 receptor currents were shifted to the right by co-application of lamotrigine without a significant change of maximal effect. Currents activated by 5-HT and lamotrigine co-application in the presence of 1 min pretreatment of lamotrigine were similar to those activated by 5-HT and lamotrigine co-application alone. Moreover, subsequent application of lamotrigine in the presence of 5-HT and 5-hydroxyindole, known to attenuate 5-HT3 receptor desensitization, inhibited 5-HT3 receptor currents in a concentration-dependent manner. The deactivation of 5-HT3 receptor was delayed by washing with an external solution containing lamotrigine. Lamotrigine accelerated the desensitization process of 5-HT3 receptors. There was no voltage-dependency in the inhibitory effects of lamotrigine on the 5-HT3 receptor currents. These results indicate that lamotrigine inhibits 5-HT3-activated currents in a competitive manner by binding to the open state of the channels and blocking channel activation or accelerating receptor desensitization. PMID:28280410

  1. Antiepileptic drug treatment of rolandic epilepsy and Panayiotopoulos syndrome: clinical practice survey and clinical trial feasibility

    PubMed Central

    Mellish, Louise C; Dunkley, Colin; Ferrie, Colin D; Pal, Deb K

    2015-01-01

    Background The evidence base for management of childhood epilepsy is poor, especially for the most common specific syndromes such as rolandic epilepsy (RE) and Panayiotopoulos syndrome (PS). Considerable international variation in management and controversy about non-treatment indicate the need for high quality randomised controlled trials (RCT). The aim of this study is, therefore, to describe current UK practice and explore the feasibility of different RCT designs for RE and PS. Methods We conducted an online survey of 590 UK paediatricians who treat epilepsy. Thirty-two questions covered annual caseload, investigation and management practice, factors influencing treatment, antiepileptic drug preferences and hypothetical trial design preferences. Results 132 responded (22%): 81% were paediatricians and 95% at consultant seniority. We estimated, annually, 751 new RE cases and 233 PS cases. Electroencephalography (EEG) is requested at least half the time in approximately 70% of cases; MRI brain at least half the time in 40%–65% cases and neuropsychological evaluation in 7%–8%. Clinicians reported non-treatment in 40%: main reasons were low frequency of seizures and parent/child preferences. Carbamazepine is the preferred older, and levetiracetam the preferred newer, RCT arm. Approximately one-half considered active and placebo designs acceptable, choosing seizures as primary and cognitive/behavioural measures as secondary outcomes. Conclusions Management among respondents is broadly in line with national guidance, although with possible overuse of brain imaging and underuse of EEG and neuropsychological assessments. A large proportion of patients in the UK remains untreated, and clinicians seem amenable to a range of RCT designs, with carbamazepine and levetiracetam the preferred active drugs. PMID:25202134

  2. Effects of antiepileptic drugs on associative LTP-like plasticity in human motor cortex.

    PubMed

    Heidegger, Tonio; Krakow, Karsten; Ziemann, Ulf

    2010-10-01

    Antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) are used extensively in clinical practice but relatively little is known on their specific effects at the systems level of human cortex. Here we tested, using a double-blind randomized placebo-controlled crossover design in healthy subjects, the effects of a single therapeutic oral dose of seven AEDs with different modes of action (tiagabine, diazepam, gabapentin, lamotrigine, topiramate, levetiracetam and piracetam) on long-term potentiation (LTP)-like motor cortical plasticity induced by paired associative transcranial magnetic stimulation (PAS). PAS-induced LTP-like plasticity was assessed from the increase in motor evoked potential amplitude in a hand muscle contralateral to the stimulated motor cortex. Levetiracetam significantly reduced LTP-like plasticity when compared to the placebo condition. Tiagabine, diazepam, lamotrigine and piracetam resulted in nonsignificant trends towards reduction of LTP-like plasticity while gabapentin and topiramate had no effect. The particularly depressant effect of levetiracetam is probably explained by its unique mode of action through binding at the vesicle membrane protein SV2A. Enhancement of gamma-amino butyric acid-dependent cortical inhibition by tiagabine, diazepam and possibly levetiracetam, and blockage of voltage-gated sodium channels by lamotrigine, may also depress PAS-induced LTP-like plasticity but these mechanisms appear to be less relevant. Findings may inform about AED-related adverse effects on important LTP-dependent central nervous systems processes such as learning or memory formation. The particular depressant effect of levetiracetam on LTP-like plasticity may also relate to the unique properties of this drug to inhibit epileptogenesis, a potentially LTP-associated process.

  3. Lamotrigine, an antiepileptic drug, inhibits 5-HT3 receptor currents in NCB-20 neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ki Jung; Jeun, Seung Hyun; Sung, Ki-Wug

    2017-03-01

    Lamotrigine is an antiepileptic drug widely used to treat epileptic seizures. Using whole-cell voltage clamp recordings in combination with a fast drug application approach, we investigated the effects of lamotrigine on 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)3 receptors in NCB-20 neuroblastoma cells. Co-application of lamotrigine (1~300 µM) resulted in a concentration-dependent reduction in peak amplitude of currents induced by 3 µM of 5-HT for an IC50 value of 28.2±3.6 µM with a Hill coefficient of 1.2±0.1. These peak amplitude decreases were accompanied by the rise slope reduction. In addition, 5-HT3-mediated currents evoked by 1 mM dopamine, a partial 5-HT3 receptor agonist, were inhibited by lamotrigine co-application. The EC50 of 5-HT for 5-HT3 receptor currents were shifted to the right by co-application of lamotrigine without a significant change of maximal effect. Currents activated by 5-HT and lamotrigine co-application in the presence of 1 min pretreatment of lamotrigine were similar to those activated by 5-HT and lamotrigine co-application alone. Moreover, subsequent application of lamotrigine in the presence of 5-HT and 5-hydroxyindole, known to attenuate 5-HT3 receptor desensitization, inhibited 5-HT3 receptor currents in a concentration-dependent manner. The deactivation of 5-HT3 receptor was delayed by washing with an external solution containing lamotrigine. Lamotrigine accelerated the desensitization process of 5-HT3 receptors. There was no voltage-dependency in the inhibitory effects of lamotrigine on the 5-HT3 receptor currents. These results indicate that lamotrigine inhibits 5-HT3-activated currents in a competitive manner by binding to the open state of the channels and blocking channel activation or accelerating receptor desensitization.

  4. Discontinuing antiepileptic drugs in patients who are seizure free on monotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Specchio, L; Tramacere, L; La Neve, A; Beghi, E

    2002-01-01

    Objectives: To assess the recurrence rate of epilepsy attributable to discontinuation of treatment in seizure free patients and to identify the risk factors for recurrence. Methods: 330 patients referred to an epilepsy centre who were seizure free for at least 2 years while on stable monotherapy were the study population. Discontinuation of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) was proposed to all eligible patients or to their carers after discussion of the risks and benefits. Depending on whether they accepted or refused treatment withdrawal, the patients were stratified into two cohorts and followed up until seizure relapse or 31 March 1999, whichever came first. For each patient, records were taken of the main demographic and clinical variables. Results: The sample comprised 225 patients who entered the discontinuation programme and 105 who decided to continue treatment. Twenty nine patients (28%) continuing treatment had a relapse, compared with 113 (50%) of those entering the withdrawal programme. For patients continuing treatment, the probability of remission was 95% at 6 months, 91% at 12 months, 82% at 24 months, 80% at 36 months, and 68% at 60 months. The corresponding values for patients discontinuing treatment were 88%, 74%, 57%, 51%, and 48%. After adjusting for the principal prognostic factors, in patients discontinuing AEDs the risk of seizure relapse was 2.9 times that of patients continuing treatment. A relation was also found between relapse and duration of active disease, number of years of remission while on treatment, and abnormal psychiatric findings. Conclusions: Seizure free referral patients on stable monotherapy who elect to withdraw drug treatment are at higher risk of seizure relapse compared with patients continuing treatment. Severity of disease and seizure free period are significant prognostic factors. PMID:11784819

  5. Comparative study of lacosamide and classical sodium channel blocking antiepileptic drugs on sodium channel slow inactivation.

    PubMed

    Niespodziany, Isabelle; Leclère, Nathalie; Vandenplas, Catherine; Foerch, Patrik; Wolff, Christian

    2013-03-01

    Many antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) exert their therapeutic activity by modifying the inactivation properties of voltage-gated sodium (Na(v) ) channels. Lacosamide is unique among AEDs in that it selectively enhances the slow inactivation component. Although numerous studies have investigated the effects of AEDs on Na(v) channel inactivation, a direct comparison of results cannot be made because of varying experimental conditions. In this study, the effects of different AEDs on Na(v) channel steady-state slow inactivation were investigated under identical experimental conditions using whole-cell patch-clamp in N1E-115 mouse neuroblastoma cells. All drugs were tested at 100 μM, and results were compared with those from time-matched control groups. Lacosamide significantly shifted the voltage dependence of Na(v) current (I(Na) ) slow inactivation toward more hyperpolarized potentials (by -33 ± 7 mV), whereas the maximal fraction of slow inactivated channels and the curve slope did not differ significantly. Neither SPM6953 (lacosamide inactive enantiomer), nor carbamazepine, nor zonisamide affected the voltage dependence of I(Na) slow inactivation, the maximal fraction of slow inactivated channels, or the curve slope. Phenytoin significantly increased the maximal fraction of slow inactivated channels (by 28% ± 9%) in a voltage-independent manner but did not affect the curve slope. Lamotrigine slightly increased the fraction of inactivated currents (by 15% ± 4%) and widened the range of the slow inactivation voltage dependence. Lamotrigine and rufinamide induced weak, but significant, shifts of I(Na) slow inactivation toward more depolarized potentials. The effects of lacosamide on Na(v) channel slow inactivation corroborate previous observations that lacosamide has a unique mode of action among AEDs that act on Na(v) channels.

  6. Disseminating findings from a drug class review: using best practices to inform prescription of antiepileptic drugs for bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Melvin, Cathy L; Ranney, Leah M; Carey, Timothy S; Evans, W Douglas; AED Dissemination Panel; Kreps, Gary; Linden, Thomas; Oldham, John

    2008-03-01

    Evidence from drug class reviews is often not accessible to practicing clinicians nor is it presented in a way that allows clinicians to use the information to guide treatment and prescribing decisions. Nevertheless, information from such reviews can be very helpful to clinicians as they evaluate the "evidence" provided to them through marketing strategies implemented, primarily, by the pharmaceutical industry and designed to influence their prescribing behavior. Unfortunately, these marketing strategies can be used to promote the off-label use of drugs that may not be efficacious. One example is the pharmaceutical marketing to promote off-label use of gabapentin (Neurontin) for the treatment of bipolar disorder, the legality of which was later addressed in a major lawsuit by the National Association of Attorneys General. We describe an effort to use counter-marketing strategies to compete with those implemented by the pharmaceutical industry and to help clinicians, principally psychiatrists, make use of available evidence to inform their prescription of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) in the treatment of bipolar disorder. A growing body of literature describes industry marketing practices designed to influence prescriber behavior. This literature suggests that use of competing approaches involving the same underlying strategies to deliver highly credible information from trusted sources can inform prescriber knowledge and prescribing practice. We describe our use of existing evidence to develop accurate and convincing messages and materials to be disseminated nationally to counter industry misinformation and promote evidence-based prescription of AEDs.

  7. Use of antiepileptic drugs during pregnancy and lactation: Type of information provided by searching Google.

    PubMed

    Lavi-Blau, Tal; Ekstein, Dana; Neufeld, Miri Y; Eyal, Sara

    2016-02-01

    Surveys among women with epilepsy (WWE) show that they receive their essential pregnancy-related information from many sources, including the internet. Our aim was to assess the types of websites provided by searching Google for the use of four antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) during pregnancy and lactation. The search was performed on 40 computers used by health-care professionals, on 40 computers used by nonhealth-care professionals, and on 5 computers used by WWE in Israel and on 8 computers used by nonhealth-care professionals in the U.S. On each computer, a Google search was conducted for term combinations that included one AED name ("carbamazepine","valproic acid", "lamotrigine", "levetiracetam", or "Keppra") and "Pregnancy", "Lactation", or "Breastfeeding". The top three and top ten websites retrieved in every search were mapped (a total of 45 and 150 websites, respectively, from each computer). Across all searches in English, on both U.S. and Israeli computers, the majority of websites listed among the first three and first ten results were those of independent health portals. The representation of the Epilepsy Foundation website was 10% or less, and only a few results were obtained from the NIH's general public-oriented MedlinePlus. In Hebrew, results included almost exclusively Israeli or Hebrew-translated websites. As in English, results from public-oriented, professionally-written websites in Hebrew accounted for less than 50% of entries. Overall, the availability of readable and high-quality information on AEDs used by pregnant and breastfeeding women is limited. Guiding patients towards accurate web resources can help them navigate among the huge amount of available online information.

  8. Antiepileptic drug teratogenesis: what are the risks for congenital malformations and adverse cognitive outcomes?

    PubMed

    Harden, Cynthia L

    2008-01-01

    Antiepileptic drug (AED) exposure in utero has been associated with major congenital malformations (MCMs) and adverse cognitive outcomes in the offspring of women with epilepsy (WWE). However, determining the exact risk and the relative risks of AEDs for these outcomes has been challenging, and only in recent years has improved study designs enabled us to get a clearer picture of the risks. Still, there is a startling lack of information for many of the newer and widely used AEDs. At this point of time, studies clearly show that valproate (VPA) as a part of polytherapy or when used as a monotherapy is associated with an increased risk of MCMs, and that it poses about threefold the risk of carbamazepine (CBZ). It is unclear if any other AEDs studied pose an increased risk of MCM occurrence; in the best available large study the absolute rates of MCMs with other several other AEDs were not different from untreated WWE. The absolute risks have been reported as CBZ 2.2%, lamotrigine (LTG) 3.2%, phenytoin (PHT) 3.7%, untreated WWE 3.5%, with VPA as the outlier at 6.2%. In utero VPA exposure is also associated with a risk of lower verbal intelligence quotient (IQ) in children, at approximately 10 points lower than controls. CBZ appears to pose no risk to cognitive outcome, and there is some evidence that PHT and phenobarbital (PB) may be associated with risk of reduced cognitive outcome. Polytherapy is associated with greater risk than monotherapy for both MCMs and cognitive outcome. Although more information is needed and hopefully will be obtained from ongoing prospective studies, it is clear that WWE taking VPA and planning pregnancy should have a discussion with their physician about considering changing to another AED before pregnancy, if possible.

  9. Apgar-score in children prenatally exposed to antiepileptic drugs: a population-based cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Christensen, Jakob; Pedersen, Henrik Søndergaard; Kjaersgaard, Maiken Ina Siegismund; Parner, Erik Thorlund; Vestergaard, Mogens; Sørensen, Merete Juul; Olsen, Jørn; Bech, Bodil Hammer; Pedersen, Lars Henning

    2015-01-01

    Objectives It is unknown if prenatal exposure to antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) increases the risk of low Apgar score in offspring. Setting Population-based study using health registers in Denmark. Participants We identified all 677 021 singletons born in Denmark from 1997 to 2008 and linked the Apgar score from the Medical Birth Register with information on the women's prescriptions for AEDs during pregnancy from the Danish Register of Medicinal Product Statistics. We used the Danish National Hospital Registry to identify mothers diagnosed with epilepsy before birth of the child. Results were adjusted for smoking and maternal age. Results Among 2906 children exposed to AEDs, 55 (1.9%) were born with an Apgar score ≤7 as compared with 8797 (1.3%) children among 674 115 pregnancies unexposed to AEDs (adjusted relative risk (aRR)=1.41 (95% CI 1.07 to 1.85). When analyses were restricted to the 2215 children born of mothers with epilepsy, the aRR of having a low Apgar score associated with AED exposure was 1.34 (95% CI 0.90 to 2.01) When assessing individual AEDs, we found increased, unadjusted RR for exposure to carbamazepine (RR=1.86 (95% CI 1.01 to 3.42)), valproic acid (RR=1.85 (95% CI 1.04 to 3.30)) and topiramate (RR=2.97 (95% CI 1.26 to 7.01)) when compared to unexposed children. Conclusions Prenatal exposure to AEDs was associated with increased risk of being born with a low Apgar score, but the absolute risk of a low Apgar score was <2%. Risk associated with individual AEDs indicate that the increased risk is not a class effect, but that there may be particularly high risks of a low Apgar score associated with certain AEDs. PMID:26359281

  10. Antiepileptic drugs prescribed in pregnancy and prevalence of major congenital malformations: comparative prevalence studies

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, Irene; Collings, Shuk-Li; McCrea, Rachel L; Nazareth, Irwin; Osborn, David P; Cowen, Phil J; Sammon, Cormac J

    2017-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to examine the prevalence of major congenital malformations associated with antiepileptic drug (AED) treatment in pregnancy. Patients and methods Using data from The Health Improvement Network, we identified women who have given live birth and their offspring. Four subgroups were selected based on the AED treatment in early pregnancy, valproate, carbamazepine, lamotrigine and women not receiving AED treatment. We compared the prevalence of major congenital malformations within children of these four groups and estimated prevalence ratios (PRs) using Poisson regression adjusted for maternal age, sex of child, quintiles of Townsend deprivation score and indication for treatment. Results In total, 240,071 women were included in the study. A total of 229 women were prescribed valproate in pregnancy, 357 were prescribed lamotrigine and 334 were prescribed carbamazepine and 239,151 women were not prescribed AEDs. Fifteen out of 229 (6.6%) women prescribed valproate gave birth to a child with a major congenital malformation. The figures for lamotrigine, carbamazepine and women not prescribed AEDs were 2.7%, 3.3% and 2.2%, respectively. The prevalence of major congenital malformation was similar for women prescribed lamotrigine or carbamazepine compared to women with no AED treatment in pregnancy. For women prescribed valproate in polytherapy, the prevalence was fourfold higher. After adjustments, the effect of estimates attenuated, but the prevalence remained two- to threefold higher in women prescribed valproate. Conclusion The results of our study suggest that lamotrigine and carbamazepine are safer treatment options than valproate in pregnancy and should be considered as alternative treatment options for women of childbearing potential and in pregnancy. PMID:28243149

  11. Early pediatric antiepileptic drug nonadherence is related to lower long-term seizure freedom

    PubMed Central

    Rausch, Joseph R.; Glauser, Tracy A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To examine the relationship between previously identified nonadherence trajectories during the first 6 months of antiepileptic drug (AED) therapy and long-term seizure-free rates (defined as ≥1 year of seizure freedom at the 4 years postdiagnosis milestone) in a cohort of children with newly diagnosed epilepsy. Methods: A prospective longitudinal observational study of AED adherence and seizure freedom in a consecutive cohort of 124 children (ages 2–12 years) with newly diagnosed epilepsy was conducted. The association between previously identified AED adherence trajectories (i.e., near-perfect adherence [e.g., average adherence = 96.8%] vs nonadherent) and seizure freedom for ≥1 year at the 4 years postdiagnosis milestone was determined. Results: Children who exhibited nonadherence to AED therapy in the first 6 months of treatment were 3.24 times more likely not to have achieved ≥1 year of seizure freedom at the 4 years postdiagnosis milestone compared to children in the near-perfect adherence group (χ2 = 5.13; p = 0.02). Specifically, at the 4 years postdiagnosis milestone, only 12% of children in the near-perfect adherence group were continuing to experience seizures compared to 31% of children in the nonadherent group. Conclusions: Children with epilepsy who achieved near-perfect adherence during the first 6 months of therapy experienced a higher rate of seizure freedom 4 years postdiagnosis compared with those children who demonstrated early nonadherence. This suggests that adherence intervention early in the course of treatment could play a role in improving long-term seizure freedom rates in children with epilepsy. PMID:24463625

  12. Developmental Enamel Defects in Children Prenatally Exposed to Anti-Epileptic Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Jacobsen, Pernille E.; Henriksen, Tine B.; Haubek, Dorte; Østergaard, John R.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Some anti-epileptic drugs (AED) have well-known teratogenic effects. The aim of the present study was to elucidate the effect of prenatal exposure to AED and the risk of enamel defects in the primary and permanent dentition. Methods A total of 38 exposed and 129 non-exposed children, 6–10 years of age, were recruited from the Aarhus Birth Cohort and the Department of Neurology, Viborg Regional Hospital, Denmark. Medication during pregnancy was confirmed by the Danish Prescription Database. All children had their teeth examined and outcomes in terms of enamel opacities and enamel hypoplasia were recorded. Results Children prenatally exposed to AED have an increased prevalence of enamel hypoplasia (11% vs. 4%, odds ratio (OR) = 3.6 [95% confidence interval (CI): 0.9 to 15.4]), diffuse opacities (18% vs. 7%, OR = 3.0; [95% CI: 1.0 to 8.7, p<0.05]), and numerous (>3) white opacities (18% vs. 10%, OR = 2.2; [95% CI: 0.8 to 6.1]) in the primary dentition. In the permanent dentition, an increased risk of numerous (>3) white opacities (34% vs. 12%, OR = 3.3; [95% CI: 1.3 to 8.4]) was found. Conclusions The present study shows that children prenatally exposed to AED have an increased risk of developing numerous teeth with white opacities in their primary and permanent dentition. In addition, they also have an increased risk of developing diffuse opacities and enamel hypoplasia in their primary teeth. PMID:23520494

  13. Antiepileptic drugs in non-epilepsy disorders: relations between mechanisms of action and clinical efficacy.

    PubMed

    Johannessen Landmark, Cecilie

    2008-01-01

    Antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) are used extensively to treat multiple non-epilepsy disorders, both in neurology and psychiatry. This article provides a review of the clinical efficacy of AEDs in non-epilepsy disorders based on recently published preclinical and clinical studies, and attempts to relate this efficacy to the mechanism of action of AEDs and pathophysiological processes associated with the disorders. Some newer indications for AEDs have been established, while others are under investigation. The disorders where AEDs have been demonstrated to be of clinical importance include neurological disorders, such as essential tremor, neuropathic pain and migraine, and psychiatric disorders, including anxiety, schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. Many of the AEDs have various targets of action in the synapse and have several proposed relevant mechanisms of action in epilepsy and in other disorders. Pathophysiological processes disturb neuronal excitability by modulating ion channels, receptors and intracellular signalling pathways, and these are targets for the pharmacological action of various AEDs. Attention is focused on the glutamatergic and GABAergic synapses. In psychiatric conditions such as schizophrenia and bipolar disorder, AEDs such as valproate, carbamazepine and lamotrigine appear to have clear roles based on their effect on intracellular pathways. On the other hand, some AEDs, e.g. topiramate, have efficacy for nonpsychiatric disorders including migraine, possibly by enhancing GABAergic and reducing glutamatergic neurotransmission. AEDs that seem to enhance GABAergic neurotransmission, e.g. tiagabine, valproate, gabapentin and possibly levetiracetam, may have a role in treating neurological disorders such as essential tremor, or anxiety disorders. AEDs with effects on voltage-gated sodium or calcium channels may be advantageous in treating neuropathic pain, e.g. gabapentin, pregabalin, carbamazepine, oxcarbazepine, lamotrigine and valproate. Co

  14. [Medical and medico-social case management of drug-resistant partial epilepsy. Specific implementation of long-term antiepileptic treatment in the adult].

    PubMed

    Chassagnon, S

    2004-06-01

    Medical treatment of refractory localisation-related epilepsies in adults should always be considered with regard to surgical possibilities. When long-term therapy with antiepileptic drugs is necessary, the treatment tries to achieve maximal efficacy with the lowest unavoidable toxicity. Until an evidence-based choice can be made, the management is currently based on empirical knowledge. In this article, the available literature on effectiveness and monitoring of long term antiepileptic therapy is reviewed.

  15. Influence of Ivabradine on the Anticonvulsant Action of Four Classical Antiepileptic Drugs Against Maximal Electroshock-Induced Seizures in Mice.

    PubMed

    Sawicka, Katarzyna M; Wawryniuk, Agnieszka; Zwolak, Agnieszka; Daniluk, Jadwiga; Szpringer, Monika; Florek-Luszczki, Magdalena; Drop, Bartlomiej; Zolkowska, Dorota; Luszczki, Jarogniew J

    2017-01-12

    Although the role of hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channels in neuronal excitability and synaptic transmission is still unclear, it is postulated that the HCN channels may be involved in seizure activity. The aim of this study was to assess the effects of ivabradine (an HCN channel inhibitor) on the protective action of four classical antiepileptic drugs (carbamazepine, phenobarbital, phenytoin and valproate) against maximal electroshock-induced seizures in mice. Tonic seizures (maximal electroconvulsions) were evoked in adult male albino Swiss mice by an electric current (sine-wave, 25 mA, 0.2 s stimulus duration) delivered via auricular electrodes. Acute adverse-effect profiles of the combinations of ivabradine with classical antiepileptic drugs were measured in mice along with total brain antiepileptic drug concentrations. Results indicate that ivabradine (10 mg/kg, i.p.) significantly enhanced the anticonvulsant activity of valproate and considerably reduced that of phenytoin in the mouse maximal electroshock-induced seizure model. Ivabradine (10 mg/kg) had no impact on the anticonvulsant potency of carbamazepine and phenobarbital in the maximal electroshock-induced seizure test in mice. Ivabradine (10 mg/kg) significantly diminished total brain concentration of phenytoin and had no effect on total brain valproate concentration in mice. In conclusion, the enhanced anticonvulsant action of valproate by ivabradine in the mouse maximal electroshock-induced seizure model was pharmacodynamic in nature. A special attention is required when combining ivabradine with phenytoin due to a pharmacokinetic interaction and reduction of the anticonvulsant action of phenytoin in mice. The combinations of ivabradine with carbamazepine and phenobarbital were neutral from a preclinical viewpoint.

  16. Effects of antiepileptic drugs on the serum folate and vitamin B12 in various epileptic patients.

    PubMed

    Huang, Hong-Li; Zhou, Hao; Wang, Nuan; Yu, Chun-Yu

    2016-10-01

    Epilepsy is a common neurodegenerative disease with an increasing morbidity. Clinical treatment of epilepsy includes symptomatic treatment, etiological treatment, surgery and prevention. The aim of the present study was to determine the effects of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) on serum folate and vitamin B12 in various epileptic patients, and to examine the correlation between these effects and secondary cerebrovascular events. A total of 68 epileptic patients, diagnosed between May 2012 and May 2014, were included in the present study. The study included 8 cases of autonomic seizures, 10 cases of absence seizures, 13 cases of complex partial seizures, 28 cases of generalized tonic-clonic seizures, and 9 cases of simple partial seizures. The patients received appropriate AED treatment according to the characteristics of epileptic seizure and the treatment guidance. The differences in the serum levels of folate and vitamin B12 in these patients, and the differences in the secondary cerebrovascular events in these patients after 1 year follow-up were analyzed. The difference in the AEDs used by various epileptic patients was statistically significant (P<0.05). The proportion of AED monotherapy in the autonomic seizure group and petit mal group was highest, and the proportion of two AED in combination with the psychomotor seizure, grand mal and simple partial seizure groups was highest. The serum levels of folate and vitamin B12 in these patients following treatment were significantly lower than those prior to treatment (P<0.05). The differences in the serum levels of folate and vitamin B12 in these groups following treatment were not statistically significant (P>0.05). The difference in the incidence of cerebrovascular events in these groups at follow up was not statistically significant (P>0.05). The multifactorial logistic regression analysis revealed that the serum levels of folate and vitamin B12 were the independent risk factors for epilepsy with secondary

  17. Comparative persistence of antiepileptic drugs in patients with epilepsy: A STROBE-compliant retrospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Edward Chia-Cheng; Hsieh, Cheng-Yang; Su, Chien-Chou; Yang, Yea-Huei Kao; Huang, Chin-Wei; Lin, Swu-Jane; Setoguchi, Soko

    2016-01-01

    Abstract We compared persistence of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) including carbamazepine, oxcarbazepine, gabapentin, lamotrigine, topiramate, valproic acid, and phenytoin in an Asian population with epilepsy. A retrospective cohort study was conducted by analyzing Taiwan's National Health Insurance Research Database (NHIRD). Adult epilepsy patients newly prescribed with AEDs between 2005 and 2009 were included. The primary outcome was persistence, defined as the treatment duration from the date of AED initiation to the date of AED discontinuation, switching, hospitalization due to seizure or disenrollment from databases, whichever came first. Cox proportional hazard models were used to estimate the risk of non-persistence with AEDs. Among the 13,061 new users of AED monotherapy (mean age: 58 years; 60% men), the persistence ranged from 218.8 (gabapentin) to 275.9 (oxcarbazepine) days in the first treatment year. The risks of non-persistence in patients receiving oxcarbazepine (adjusted hazard ratio [HR], 0.78; 95% CI, 0.74–0.83), valproic acid (0.88; 0.85–0.92), lamotrigine (0.72; 0.65–0.81), and topiramate (0.90; 0.82–0.98) were significantly lower than in the carbamazepine group. Compared with carbamazepine users, the non-persistence risk was higher in phenytoin users (1.10; 1.06–1.13), while gabapentin users (1.03; 0.98–1.09) had similar risk. For risk of hospitalization due to seizure and in comparison with carbamazepine users, oxcarbazepine (0.66; 0.58–0.74) and lamotrigine (0.46; 0.35–0.62) users had lower risk, while phenytoin (1.35; 1.26–1.44) users had higher risk. The results remained consistent throughout series of sensitivity and stratification analyses. The persistence varied among AEDs and was better for oxcarbazepine, valproic acid, lamotrigine, and topiramate, but worse for phenytoin when compared with carbamazepine. PMID:27583857

  18. Large-Scale Phenotype-Based Antiepileptic Drug Screening in a Zebrafish Model of Dravet Syndrome1,2,3

    PubMed Central

    Dinday, Matthew T.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Mutations in a voltage-gated sodium channel (SCN1A) result in Dravet Syndrome (DS), a catastrophic childhood epilepsy. Zebrafish with a mutation in scn1Lab recapitulate salient phenotypes associated with DS, including seizures, early fatality, and resistance to antiepileptic drugs. To discover new drug candidates for the treatment of DS, we screened a chemical library of ∼1000 compounds and identified 4 compounds that rescued the behavioral seizure component, including 1 compound (dimethadione) that suppressed associated electrographic seizure activity. Fenfluramine, but not huperzine A, also showed antiepileptic activity in our zebrafish assays. The effectiveness of compounds that block neuronal calcium current (dimethadione) or enhance serotonin signaling (fenfluramine) in our zebrafish model suggests that these may be important therapeutic targets in patients with DS. Over 150 compounds resulting in fatality were also identified. We conclude that the combination of behavioral and electrophysiological assays provide a convenient, sensitive, and rapid basis for phenotype-based drug screening in zebrafish mimicking a genetic form of epilepsy. PMID:26465006

  19. Intrapatient variation in antiepileptic drug plasma concentration after generic substitution vs stable brand-name drug regimens.

    PubMed

    Contin, Manuela; Alberghini, Lucia; Candela, Carmina; Benini, Giulia; Riva, Roberto

    2016-05-01

    Generic substitution of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) is still a matter of controversy and concern among clinicians and patients. We aimed to assess intrasubject variation in plasma concentrations of lamotrigine (LTG), levetiracetam (LEV) and topiramate (TPM) after generic substitution compared with a stable brand-name drug regimen in a population of patients with epilepsy. A retrospective analysis was performed on prospectively collected and stored data from our therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) database for the years 2009-2014. The main outcome variable was the proportion of patients who, after switching from branded to generic formulations, showed a greater than ±20% change in AED plasma concentrations compared to the proportion of control patients showing a change in AED plasma concentrations of the same extent while receiving stable branded formulations over repeated TDM tests. Fifty patients on LTG, 27 on LEV and 16 on TPM showing at least one TDM test while receiving generic products fulfilled the inclusion/exclusion criteria for the analysis and were compared with 200 control patients for LTG, 120 for LEV and 80 for TPM. The proportion of patients showing an intrasubject change greater than ±20% in AED plasma concentrations was similar in the brand name vs generic group compared with the control one for LTG (22% vs 33%) and LEV (44% vs 38%), while it was higher in the control group for TPM (41% vs 6%, p<0.01). These are the first data in the literature about the within-patient variation in steady-state plasma concentrations of a series of stable treatments with brand-name AEDs in a real clinical setting. In conclusion, a significant interday variability in intrapatient LTG, LEV and TPM plasma concentrations can be observed even in patients stabilized with the same brand name product over time. This suggests that any change in plasma AED concentration and possible related clinical effects after generic substitution may be not necessarily related to the switch

  20. Markers of bone turnover in patients with epilepsy and their relationship to management of bone diseases induced by antiepileptic drugs.

    PubMed

    Hamed, Sherifa A

    2016-01-01

    Data from cross-sectional and prospective studies revealed that patients with epilepsy and on long-term treatment with antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) are at increased risk for metabolic bone diseases. Bone diseases were reported in about 50% of patients on AEDs. Low bone mineral density, osteopenia/osteoporosis, osteomalacia, rickets, altered concentration of bone turnover markers and fractures were reported with phenobarbital, phenytoin, carbamazepine, valproate, oxcarbazepine and lamotrigine. The mechanisms for AEDs-induced bone diseases are heterogeneous and include hypovitaminosis D, hypocalcemia and direct acceleration of bone loss and/or reduction of bone formation. This article reviews the evidence, predictors and mechanisms of AEDs-induced bone abnormalities and its clinical implications. For patients on AEDs, regular monitoring of bone health is recommended. Prophylactic administration of calcium and vitamin D is recommended for all patients. Treatment doses of calcium and vitamin D and even anti-resorptive drug therapy are reserved for patients at high risk of pathological fracture.

  1. The Secondary Effects of Antiepileptic Drugs (AEDs) in Children and Their Implications on Augmentative and Alternative Communication (AAC) Processes: A Best-Evidence Synthesis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Srinivasan, Saranya

    2009-01-01

    This study uses a best-evidence synthesis method to investigate the secondary effects of various antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) and their implications on augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) processes. Epilepsy is a common serious neurological disorder, a concomitant condition in individuals with severe developmental and intellectual…

  2. Pregnancy outcome in women exposed to antiepileptic drugs: teratogenic role of maternal epilepsy and its pharmacologic treatment.

    PubMed

    Cassina, Matteo; Dilaghi, Arianna; Di Gianantonio, Elena; Cesari, Elena; De Santis, Marco; Mannaioni, Guido; Pistelli, Alessandra; Clementi, Maurizio

    2013-08-01

    Infants born to epileptic women treated with antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) have an increased risk of major congenital malformations (MCMs). In order to determine the role of maternal epilepsy we conducted a prospective cohort study on three cohorts of pregnant women: (i) 385 epileptic women treated with AEDs, (ii) 310 non-epileptic women treated with AEDs, (iii) 867 healthy women not exposed to AEDs (control group). The rate of MCMs in the epileptic group (7.7%) was not statistically higher than in the non-epileptic one (3.9%) (p=0.068). The rate in the first group was higher compared to the control group (p=0.001), while the rate in the second one was not (p=0.534). Our data confirm that AEDs therapy is the main cause of the increased risk of malformations in the offspring of epileptic women; however a teratogenic role of the maternal epilepsy itself cannot be excluded.

  3. Predictive value of isolated epileptiform discharges for a favorable therapeutic response to antiepileptic drugs in nonepileptic psychiatric patients.

    PubMed

    Boutros, Nash N; Kirollos, Sandra B; Pogarell, Oliver; Gallinat, Jürgen

    2014-02-01

    The efficacy of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) in treating behavioral symptoms in nonepileptic psychiatric patients with abnormal EEGs is currently unknown. Although isolated epileptiform discharges have been reported in many psychiatric conditions, they are most commonly observed in patients with aggression, panic, or autistic spectrum disorders. The literature search was guided by 3 criteria: (1) studies had patients who did not experience seizures, (2) patients had EEGs, and (3) an AED was administered. Most important finding is that the number of "controlled" studies was extremely small. Overall, most reports suggest that the use of an AED can be associated with clinical and, at times, improved EEG abnormalities. Additionally, six controlled studies were found for other psychiatric disorders, such as learning disabilities with similar results. Overall, the use of anticonvulsants to treat nonepileptic psychiatric patients needs further controlled studies to better define indications, adequate EEG work-up, best AED to be used, and optimal durations of treatment attempts.

  4. Modulation of Antioxidant Enzymatic Activities by Certain Antiepileptic Drugs (Valproic Acid, Oxcarbazepine, and Topiramate): Evidence in Humans and Experimental Models

    PubMed Central

    Cárdenas-Rodríguez, Noemí; Coballase-Urrutia, Elvia; Rivera-Espinosa, Liliana; Romero-Toledo, Arantxa; Sampieri, Aristides III; Ortega-Cuellar, Daniel; Montesinos-Correa, Hortencia; Floriano-Sánchez, Esaú; Carmona-Aparicio, Liliana

    2013-01-01

    It is estimated that at least 100 million people worldwide will suffer from epilepsy at some point in their lives. This neurological disorder induces brain death due to the excessive liberation of glutamate, which activates the postsynaptic N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptors, which in turn cause the reuptake of intracellular calcium (excitotoxicity). This excitotoxicity elicits a series of events leading to nitric oxide synthase (NOS) activation and the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Several studies in experimental models and in humans have demonstrated that certain antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) exhibit antioxidant effects by modulating the activity of various enzymes associated with this type of stress. Considering the above-mentioned data, we aimed to compile evidence elucidating how AEDs such as valproic acid (VPA), oxcarbazepine (OXC), and topiramate (TPM) modulate oxidative stress. PMID:24454986

  5. Modulation of antioxidant enzymatic activities by certain antiepileptic drugs (valproic acid, oxcarbazepine, and topiramate): evidence in humans and experimental models.

    PubMed

    Cárdenas-Rodríguez, Noemí; Coballase-Urrutia, Elvia; Rivera-Espinosa, Liliana; Romero-Toledo, Arantxa; Sampieri, Aristides; Ortega-Cuellar, Daniel; Montesinos-Correa, Hortencia; Floriano-Sánchez, Esaú; Carmona-Aparicio, Liliana

    2013-01-01

    It is estimated that at least 100 million people worldwide will suffer from epilepsy at some point in their lives. This neurological disorder induces brain death due to the excessive liberation of glutamate, which activates the postsynaptic N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptors, which in turn cause the reuptake of intracellular calcium (excitotoxicity). This excitotoxicity elicits a series of events leading to nitric oxide synthase (NOS) activation and the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Several studies in experimental models and in humans have demonstrated that certain antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) exhibit antioxidant effects by modulating the activity of various enzymes associated with this type of stress. Considering the above-mentioned data, we aimed to compile evidence elucidating how AEDs such as valproic acid (VPA), oxcarbazepine (OXC), and topiramate (TPM) modulate oxidative stress.

  6. A Review for the Analysis of Antidepressant, Antiepileptic and Quinolone Type Drugs in Pharmaceuticals and Environmental Samples.

    PubMed

    Rani, Susheela; Malik, Ashok Kumar; Kaur, Ramandeep; Kaur, Ripneel

    2016-09-02

    The analysis of drugs in various biological fluids is an important criterion for the determination of the physiological performance of a drug. After sampling of the biological fluid, the next step in the analytical process is sample preparation. Sample preparation is essential for isolation of desired components from complex biological matrices and greatly influences their reliable and accurate determination. The complexity of biological fluids adds to the challenge of direct determination of the drug by chromatographic analysis, therefore demanding a sample preparation step that is often time consuming, tedious and frequently overlooked. However, direct online injection methods offer the advantage of reducing sample preparation steps and enabling effective pre-concentration and clean-up of biological fluids. These procedures can be automated and therefore reduce the requirements for handling potentially infectious biomaterial, improve reproducibility, and minimize sample manipulations and potential contamination. This review is focused on the discovery and development of high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and gas chromatography (GC) with different detectors. The drugs covered in this review are antiepileptics, antidepressant (AD), and quinolones. The application of these methods for determination of these drugs in biological, environmental and pharmaceutical samples has also been discussed.

  7. Sexual dysfunction in women with epilepsy: role of antiepileptic drugs and psychotropic medications.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez, Mary A; Mushtaq, Romila; Stimmel, Glen

    2008-01-01

    Sexual dysfunction is a frequently encountered comorbid disorder in patients with neurological and psychiatric disorders. Importantly, sexual dysfunction can also occur as a treatment emergent adverse effect of a number of commonly used psychotropic and antiepileptic medications, and can include decreased libido, erectile dysfunction, disordered arousal, delayed orgasm, and anorgasmia. These effects can occur in both men and women, and can be seen across age groups. Understanding the neurobiology of normal sexual response, as well as the pharmacologic mechanisms of these commonly used medications can enable the clinician to predict how medication use may impact different phases of sexual response. Discussion of the current treatment strategies for female sexual dysfunction is also elucidated in this chapter.

  8. An Australian nationwide survey on medicinal cannabis use for epilepsy: History of antiepileptic drug treatment predicts medicinal cannabis use.

    PubMed

    Suraev, Anastasia S; Todd, Lisa; Bowen, Michael T; Allsop, David J; McGregor, Iain S; Ireland, Carol; Lintzeris, Nicholas

    2017-02-24

    Epilepsy Action Australia conducted an Australian nationwide online survey seeking opinions on and experiences with the use of cannabis-based products for the treatment of epilepsy. The survey was promoted via the Epilepsy Action Australia's main website, on their Facebook page, and by word of mouth. The survey consisted of 39 questions assessing demographics, clinical factors, including diagnosis and seizure types, and experiences with and opinions towards cannabis use in epilepsy. A total of 976 responses met the inclusion criteria. Results show that 15% of adults with epilepsy and 13% of parents/guardians of children with epilepsy were currently using, or had previously used, cannabis products to treat epilepsy. Of those with a history of cannabis product use, 90% of adults and 71% of parents reported success in reducing seizure frequency after commencing cannabis products. The main reasons for medicinal cannabis use were to manage treatment-resistant epilepsy and to obtain a more favorable side-effect profile compared to standard antiepileptic drugs. The number of past antiepileptic drugs tried was a significant predictor of medicinal cannabis use in both adults and children with epilepsy. Fifty-six percent of adults with epilepsy and 62% of parents/guardians of children with epilepsy expressed willingness to participate in clinical trials of cannabinoids. This survey provides insight into the use of cannabis products for epilepsy, in particular some of the likely factors influencing use, as well as novel insights into the experiences of and attitudes towards medicinal cannabis in people with epilepsy in the Australian community. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Cannabinoids and Epilepsy".

  9. Common Variants of KCNJ10 Are Associated with Susceptibility and Anti-Epileptic Drug Resistance in Chinese Genetic Generalized Epilepsies

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Yong; Yan, Kui Po; Qu, Qiang; Qu, Jian; Chen, Zi Gui; Song, Tao; Luo, Xiang-Ying; Sun, Zhong-Yi; Bi, Chang-Long; Liu, Jin-Fang

    2015-01-01

    To explore genetic mechanism of genetic generalized epilepsies (GGEs) is challenging because of their complex heritance pattern and genetic heterogeneity. KCNJ10 gene encodes Kir4.1 channels and plays a major role in modulating resting membrane potentials in excitable cells. It may cause GGEs if mutated. The purpose of this study was to investigate the possible association between KCNJ10 common variants and the susceptibility and drug resistance of GGEs in Chinese population. The allele-specific MALDI–TOF mass spectrometry method was used to assess 8 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of KCNJ10 in 284 healthy controls and 483 Chinese GGEs patients including 279 anti-epileptic drug responsive patients and 204 drug resistant patients. We found the rs6690889 TC+TT genotypes were lower frequency in the GGEs group than that in the healthy controls (6.7% vs 9.5%, p = 0.01, OR = 0.50[0.29–0.86]). The frequency of rs1053074 G allele was lower in the childhood absence epilepsy (CAE) group than that in the healthy controls (28.4% vs 36.2%, p = 0.01, OR = 0.70[0.53–0.93]). The frequency of rs12729701 G allele and AG+GG genotypes was lower in the CAE group than that in the healthy controls (21.2% vs 28.4%, p = 0.01, OR = 0.74[0.59–0.94] and 36.3% vs 48.1%, p = 0.01, OR = 0.83[0.72–0.96], respectively). The frequency of rs12402969 C allele and the CC+CT genotypes were higher in the GGEs drug responsive patients than that in the drug resistant patients (9.3% vs 5.6%, OR = 1.73[1.06–2.85], p = 0.026 and 36.3% vs 48.1%, p = 0.01, OR = 0.83[0.72–0.96], respectively). This study identifies potential SNPs of KCNJ10 gene that may contribute to seizure susceptibility and anti-epileptic drug resistance. PMID:25874548

  10. Association of SCN1A gene polymorphism with antiepileptic drug responsiveness in the population of Thrace, Greece

    PubMed Central

    Veletza, Stavroula; Heliopoulos, Ioannis; Vadikolias, Konstantinos; Tripsianis, Grigorios; Stathi, Chrysa; Piperidou, Charitomeni

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The aim was to examine the influence of the SCN1A gene polymorphism IVS5-91 rs3812718 G>A on the response to antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) in monotherapy or polytherapy. Material and methods Two hundred epilepsy patients and 200 healthy subjects were genotyped for SCN1A IVS5-91 rs3812718 G>A polymorphism using TaqMan assay. Patients were divided into drug-responsive and drug-resistant patients. The drug-responsive group was further studied, comparing monotherapy in maximum and minimum doses and monotherapy-responsive and -resistant groups. Results There were no statistically significant differences in the allelic frequencies and genotype distributions between patients and controls (p = 0.178). The distribution of SCN1A IVS5-91 rs3812718 G>A genotypes was similar between drug-responsive and drug-resistant patients (p = 0.463). The differences in genotype distributions (A/A or A/G vs. G/G) between monotherapy-responsive and -resistant groups were statistically significant (p = 0.021). Within the monotherapy-responsive group, patients with the A/A or A/G genotype needed higher dose AEDs than patients with the G/G genotype (p = 0.032). The relative risk for generalized epilepsy due to A-containing genotypes was of marginal statistical significance when compared with the G/G genotype (p = 0.05). Conclusions Overall, our findings demonstrate an association of SCN1A IVS5-91 rs3812718 G>A polymorphism with AED responsiveness in monotherapy without evidence of an effect on drug-resistant epilepsy. PMID:28144265

  11. Current Research on Antiepileptic Compounds.

    PubMed

    Wei, Cheng-Xi; Bian, Ming; Gong, Guo-Hua

    2015-11-20

    Epilepsy affects about 1% of the world's population. Due to the fact all antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) have some undesirable side effects and about 30% of epileptic patients are not seizure-free with the existing AEDs, there is still an urgent need for the development of more effective and safer AEDs. Based on our research work on antiepileptic compounds and other references in recent years, this review covers the reported work on antiepileptic compounds which are classified according to their structures. This review summarized 244 significant anticonvulsant compounds which are classified by functional groups according to the animal model data, although there are some limitations in the data. This review highlights the properties of new compounds endowed with promising antiepileptic properties, which may be proven to be more effective and selective, and possibly free of unwanted side effects. The reviewed compounds represent an interesting possibility to overcome refractory seizures and to reduce the percentage of patients with a poor response to drug therapy.

  12. Influence of ethacrynic acid on the anticonvulsant activity of conventional antiepileptic drugs in the mouse maximal electroshock seizure model.

    PubMed

    Łukawski, Krzysztof; Swiderska, Grażyna; Łuszczki, Jarogniew J; Czuczwar, Stanisław J

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether ethacrynic acid (EA), a loop diuretic with anticonvulsant activity, would affect the protective action of the conventional antiepileptics (AEDs) carbamazepine (CBZ), phenytoin (PHT), valproate (VPA) and phenobarbital (PB) in the mouse maximal electroshock seizure (MES) model. The effects of acute and chronic treatment with EA on these AEDs were examined. At a single dose of 100 mg/kg ip, EA enhanced the antielectroshock activity of VPA, decreasing its ED₅₀ value from 225.6 to 146.6 mg/kg (p < 0.05), but enhancement was not observed following continuous administration of EA (12.5 mg/kg) for seven days. Combined treatment of EA with other AEDs had no effect on their ED₅₀ values. The observed interaction between EA and VPA was pharmacodynamic in nature as EA did not alter free plasma (non-protein-bound) and total brain concentrations of VPA. Taking into consideration the clinical use of both drugs, this interaction between EA and VPA can be important for patients receiving these drugs.

  13. The novel antiepileptic drug levetiracetam (ucb L059) appears to act via a specific binding site in CNS membranes.

    PubMed

    Noyer, M; Gillard, M; Matagne, A; Hénichart, J P; Wülfert, E

    1995-11-14

    Levetiracetam ((S)-alpha-ethyl-2-oxo-pyrrolidine acetamide, ucb L059) is a novel potential antiepileptic agent presently in clinical development with unknown mechanism of action. The finding that its anticonvulsant activity is highly stereoselective (Gower et al., 1992) led us to investigate the presence of specific binding sites for [3H]levetiracetam in rat central nervous system (CNS). Binding assays, performed on crude membranes, revealed the existence of a reversible, saturable and stereoselective specific binding site. Results obtained in hippocampal membranes suggest that [3H]levetiracetam labels a single class of binding sites (nH = 0.92 +/- 0.06) with modest affinity (Kd = 780 +/- 115 nM) and with a high binding capacity (Bmax = 9.1 +/- 1.2 pmol/mg protein). Similar Kd and Bmax values were obtained in other brain regions (cortex, cerebellum and striatum). ucb L060, the (R) enantiomer of levetiracetam, displayed about 1000 times less affinity for these sites. The binding of [3H]levetiracetam is confined to the synaptic plasma membranes in the central nervous system since no specific binding was observed in a range of peripheral tissues including heart, kidneys, spleen, pancreas, adrenals, lungs and liver. The commonly used antiepileptic drugs carbamazepine, phenytoin, valproate, phenobarbital and clonazepam, as well as the convulsant agent t-butylbicyclophosphorothionate (TBPS), picrotoxin and bicuculline did not displace [3H]levetiracetam binding. However, ethosuximide (pKi = 3.5 +/- 0.1), pentobarbital (pKi = 3.8 +/- 0.1), pentylenetetrazole (pKi = 4.1 +/- 0.1) and bemegride (pKi = 5.0 +/- 0.1) competed with [3H]levetiracetam with pKi values comparable to active drug concentrations observed in vivo. Structurally related compounds, including piracetam and aniracetam, also displaced [3H]levetiracetam binding. (S) Stereoisomer homologues of levetiracetam demonstrated a rank order of affinity for [3H]levetiracetam binding in correlation with their

  14. Critical review of current animal models of seizures and epilepsy used in the discovery and development of new antiepileptic drugs.

    PubMed

    Löscher, Wolfgang

    2011-06-01

    Animal models for seizures and epilepsy have played a fundamental role in advancing our understanding of basic mechanisms underlying ictogenesis and epileptogenesis and have been instrumental in the discovery and preclinical development of novel antiepileptic drugs (AEDs). However, there is growing concern that the efficacy of drug treatment of epilepsy has not substantially improved with the introduction of new AEDs, which, at least in part, may be due to the fact that the same simple screening models, i.e., the maximal electroshock seizure (MES) and s.c. pentylenetetrazole (PTZ) seizure tests, have been used as gatekeepers in AED discovery for >6 decades. It has been argued that these old models may identify only drugs that share characteristics with existing drugs, and are unlikely to have an effect on refractory epilepsies. Indeed, accumulating evidence with several novel AEDs, including levetiracetan, has shown that the MES and PTZ models do not identify all potential AEDs but instead may fail to discover compounds that have great potential efficacy but work through mechanisms not tested by these models. Awareness of the limitations of acute seizure models comes at a critical crossroad. Clearly, preclinical strategies of AED discovery and development need a conceptual shift that is moving away from using models that identify therapies for the symptomatic treatment of epilepsy to those that may be useful for identifying therapies that are more effective in the refractory population and that may ultimately lead to an effective cure in susceptible individuals by interfering with the processes underlying epilepsy. To realize this goal, the molecular mechanisms of the next generation of therapies must necessarily evolve to include targets that contribute to epileptogenesis and pharmacoresistance in relevant epilepsy models.

  15. Effect of the Anti-depressant Sertraline, the Novel Anti-seizure Drug Vinpocetine and Several Conventional Antiepileptic Drugs on the Epileptiform EEG Activity Induced by 4-Aminopyridine.

    PubMed

    Sitges, Maria; Aldana, Blanca Irene; Reed, Ronald Charles

    2016-06-01

    Seizures are accompanied by an exacerbated activation of cerebral ion channels. 4-aminopyridine (4-AP) is a pro-convulsive agent which mechanism of action involves activation of Na(+) and Ca(2+) channels, and several antiepileptic drugs control seizures by reducing these channels permeability. The antidepressant, sertraline, and the anti-seizure drug vinpocetine are effective inhibitors of cerebral presynaptic Na(+) channels. Here the effectiveness of these compounds to prevent the epileptiform EEG activity induced by 4-AP was compared with the effectiveness of seven conventional antiepileptic drugs. For this purpose, EEG recordings before and at three intervals within the next 30 min following 4-AP (2.5 mg/kg, i.p.) were taken in anesthetized animals; and the EEG-highest peak amplitude values (HPAV) calculated. In control animals, the marked increase in the EEG-HPAV observed near 20 min following 4-AP reached its maximum at 30 min. Results show that this epileptiform EEG activity induced by 4-AP is prevented by sertraline and vinpocetine at a dose of 2.5 mg/kg, and by carbamazepine, phenytoin, lamotrigine and oxcarbazepine at a higher dose (25 mg/kg). In contrast, topiramate (25 mg/kg), valproate (100 mg/kg) and levetiracetam (100 mg/kg) failed to prevent the epileptiform EEG activity induced by 4-AP. It is concluded that 4-AP is a useful tool to elicit the mechanism of action of anti-seizure drugs at clinical meaningful doses. The particular efficacy of sertraline and vinpocetine to prevent seizures induced by 4-AP is explained by their high effectiveness to reduce brain presynaptic Na(+) and Ca(2+) channels permeability.

  16. Prevalence of Different Combinations of Antiepileptic Drugs and CNS Drugs in Elderly Home Care Service and Nursing Home Patients in Norway

    PubMed Central

    Johannessen Landmark, Cecilie; Granas, Anne Gerd

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) are used to treat different conditions in elderly patients and are among the drug classes most susceptible to be involved in drug-drug interactions (DDI). The aim of the study was to describe and compare use of AEDs between home care service and nursing home patients, as these patients are not included in nationwide databases of drug utilization. In the combined population, we investigate DDI of AEDs with other central nervous system- (CNS-) active drugs and DDIs involving AEDs in general. Materials and Methods. Point-prevalence study of Norwegian patients in home care services and nursing homes in 2009. At the patient level, we screened for different DDIs involving AEDs. Results. In total, 882 patients (7.8%) of 11,254 patients used AEDs and number of users did not differ between home care services and nursing homes (8.2% versus 7.7%). In the combined population, we identified 436 potential DDIs in 45% of the patients. Conclusions. In a large population of elderly, home care service and nursing home patients do not differ with respect to exposure of AEDs but use more AEDs as compared to the general population of similar age. The risk of DDIs with AEDs and other CNS-active drugs should be taken into consideration and individual clinical evaluations are assessed in this population. PMID:27525114

  17. Does brain slices from pentylenetetrazole-kindled mice provide a more predictive screening model for antiepileptic drugs?

    PubMed

    Hansen, Suzanne L; Sterjev, Zoran; Werngreen, Marie; Simonsen, Bodil J; Knudsen, Katrine E; Nielsen, Ane H; Pedersen, Mikael E; Badolo, Lassiana; Kristiansen, Uffe; Vestergaard, Henrik T

    2012-05-05

    The cortical wedge is a commonly applied model for in vitro screening of new antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) and has been extensively used in characterization of well-known AEDs. However, the predictive validity of this model as a screening model has been questioned as, e.g., carbamazepine has been reported to lack effect in this model. The neuroplastic changes induced in acute and chronic animal models of epilepsy are known to affect the pharmacological profile of AEDs in vivo. Hence, we investigated whether brain slices from pentylenetetrazole (PTZ)-kindled animals could provide a more predictive screening model for AEDs. To this end, we compared the in vitro and in vivo pharmacological profile of several selected AEDs (phenobarbital, phenytoin, tiagabine, fosphenytoin, valproate, and carbamazepine) along with citalopram using the PTZ-kindled model and brain slices from naïve, saline-injected and PTZ-kindled mice. Our data suggest that the use of slices from PTZ-kindled mice in the cortical wedge does not increase the predictive validity of the model as an in vitro screening model for AEDs. Traditionally, the incidence of certain seizure types is widely used as a measure to characterize drug action in animal models of epilepsy. In our study, the anticonvulsant effect of the AEDs was investigated in vivo using several observational parameters (i.e., incidence and duration of convulsions, latency to clonic convulsions, and severity of convulsions). We found that including the observational parameter "severity" offered important additional information about the drug profile that would otherwise be lost if only a single parameter as "incidence" was used.

  18. New Molecular Targets for Antiepileptic Drugs: α2δ, SV2A, and Kv7/KCNQ/M Potassium Channels

    PubMed Central

    Rogawski, Michael A.; Bazil, Carl W.

    2008-01-01

    Many currently prescribed antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) act via voltage-gated sodium channels, through effects on γ-aminobutyric acid–mediated inhibition, or via voltage-gated calcium channels. Some newer AEDs do not act via these traditional mechanisms. The molecular targets for several of these nontraditional AEDs have been defined using cellular electrophysiology and molecular approaches. Here, we describe three of these targets: α2δ, auxiliary subunits of voltage-gated calcium channels through which the gabapentinoids gabapentin and pregabalin exert their anticonvulsant and analgesic actions; SV2A, a ubiquitous synaptic vesicle glycoprotein that may prepare vesicles for fusion and serves as the target for levetiracetam and its analog brivaracetam (which is currently in late-stage clinical development); and Kv7/KCNQ/M potassium channels that mediate the M-current, which acts a brake on repetitive firing and burst generation and serves as the target for the investigational AEDs retigabine and ICA-105665. Functionally, all of the new targets modulate neurotransmitter output at synapses, focusing attention on presynaptic terminals as critical sites of action for AEDs. PMID:18590620

  19. Effects of levetiracetam, an antiepileptic drug, on memory impairments associated with aging and Alzheimer's disease in mice.

    PubMed

    Devi, Latha; Ohno, Masuo

    2013-05-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that elevated hippocampal activation may be important for disrupting cognitive functions in aged subjects as well as patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). Therefore, reducing deleterious overactivity of the hippocampus may have therapeutic benefits. This study was designed to compare the effects of levetiracetam, an antiepileptic drug, on memory deficits associated with normal aging and AD in mouse models. Pretraining administration of levetiracetam ameliorated memory impairments of aged C57BL/6 mice (17-20months of age) in the contextual fear conditioning paradigm. Acute levetiracetam immediately after training was also efficacious in rescuing contextual memory decline in aged mice, whereas administration at a later posttraining interval (3h) had no effect. These results suggest that suppressing overexcitation with acute levetiracetam around the time of acquisition or early consolidation may be sufficient to reverse memory decline associated with aging. In contrast, pretraining administration of levetiracetam was not able to rescue memory deficits in 5XFAD transgenic mice harboring amyloid plaque pathologies at moderate (6-8months old) or massive (12-15months old) levels, differentiating between normal aging- and AD-related memory impairments in the responsiveness to acute levetiracetam treatment.

  20. Efficacy of Anti-Epileptic Drugs in the Treatment of Tumor and Its Associated Epilepsy: An in vitro Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Taranjeet; Manchanda, Shaffi; Saini, Vedangana; Lakhman, Sukhwinder S.; Kaur, Gurcharan

    2016-01-01

    The change in the therapeutic targets from neuron to glia has proved beneficial in the treatment of many psychiatric disorders. The anti-epileptic drugs (AEDs) have been widely prescribed for the treatment of partial and complete seizures, bipolar disorder among others. The current study was carried out to explore the efficacy of some conventional and novel AEDs for the treatment of tumor-associated epilepsy which develops in 29-49% of the patients diagnosed with brain tumors. We used C6 glioma cell line as model system to study the effect of selected AEDs, viz., gabapentin (GBP), valproic acid (VPA) and topiramate (TPM). Morphometry, cell cycle analysis, apoptosis, expression of different protein markers, viz., GFAP, HSP70 and nuclear factor-κB (NFκB) were studied in AED-treated cultures. The study was further extended to rat hypothalamic primary explant cultures, and cell migration and expression of plasticity markers - neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) and polysialylation of NCAM (PSA-NCAM) - were studied in the explants. TPM was observed to show more pronounced increase in apoptosis of glioblastoma cells accompanied by significant downregulation in the expression of HSP70 and NFκB. TPM-treated explants also showed highest process ramification and cellular migration accompanied by intense expression of the plasticity markers as compared to those treated with GBP and VPA. Among the 3 AEDs tested, TPM was observed to show more promising effects on cytoprotection and plasticity of C6 glioma cells. PMID:27536020

  1. Stepwise optimization approach for improving LC-MS/MS analysis of zwitterionic antiepileptic drugs with implementation of experimental design.

    PubMed

    Kostić, Nađa; Dotsikas, Yannis; Malenović, Anđelija; Jančić Stojanović, Biljana; Rakić, Tijana; Ivanović, Darko; Medenica, Mirjana

    2013-07-01

    In this article, a step-by-step optimization procedure for improving analyte response with implementation of experimental design is described. Zwitterionic antiepileptics, namely vigabatrin, pregabalin and gabapentin, were chosen as model compounds to undergo chloroformate-mediated derivatization followed by liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) analysis. Application of a planned stepwise optimization procedure allowed responses of analytes, expressed as areas and signal-to-noise ratios, to be improved, enabling achievement of lower limit of detection values. Results from the current study demonstrate that optimization of parameters such as scan time, geometry of ion source, sheath and auxiliary gas pressure, capillary temperature, collision pressure and mobile phase composition can have a positive impact on sensitivity of LC-MS/MS methods. Optimization of LC and MS parameters led to a total increment of 53.9%, 83.3% and 95.7% in areas of derivatized vigabatrin, pregabalin and gabapentin, respectively, while for signal-to-noise values, an improvement of 140.0%, 93.6% and 124.0% was achieved, compared to autotune settings. After defining the final optimal conditions, a time-segmented method was validated for the determination of mentioned drugs in plasma. The method proved to be accurate and precise with excellent linearity for the tested concentration range (40.0 ng ml(-1)-10.0 × 10(3)  ng ml(-1)).

  2. Intrinsic excitability measures track antiepileptic drug action and uncover increasing/decreasing excitability over the wake/sleep cycle

    PubMed Central

    Meisel, Christian; Schulze-Bonhage, Andreas; Freestone, Dean; Cook, Mark James; Achermann, Peter; Plenz, Dietmar

    2015-01-01

    Pathological changes in excitability of cortical tissue commonly underlie the initiation and spread of seizure activity in patients suffering from epilepsy. Accordingly, monitoring excitability and controlling its degree using antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) is of prime importance for clinical care and treatment. To date, adequate measures of excitability and action of AEDs have been difficult to identify. Recent insights into ongoing cortical activity have identified global levels of phase synchronization as measures that characterize normal levels of excitability and quantify any deviation therefrom. Here, we explore the usefulness of these intrinsic measures to quantify cortical excitability in humans. First, we observe a correlation of such markers with stimulation-evoked responses suggesting them to be viable excitability measures based on ongoing activity. Second, we report a significant covariation with the level of AED load and a wake-dependent modulation. Our results indicate that excitability in epileptic networks is effectively reduced by AEDs and suggest the proposed markers as useful candidates to quantify excitability in routine clinical conditions overcoming the limitations of electrical or magnetic stimulation. The wake-dependent time course of these metrics suggests a homeostatic role of sleep, to rebalance cortical excitability. PMID:26554021

  3. Correlation of the "EMIT" antiepileptic drug assay with a gas liquid chromatographic method.

    PubMed

    Legaz, M; Raisys, V A

    1976-02-01

    Many methodologies have been developed for determining anticonvulsant drug levels in human serum. Unfortunately, most procedures are either time consuming or subject to a variety of interferring substances. The "Enzyme Multiplied Immunoassay Technique" (EMIT) system has been evaluated for its speed, sensitivity, accuracy, and precision. When compared with a gas-liquid chromatographic procedure, the EMIT assay appeared to yield results which were statistically comparable for the drugs diphenylhydantoin, phenobarbital, and primidone. The EMIT assay also demonstrated no significant interference when challenged with extraordinarily high levels of potentially cross reacting drugs. Results obtained with the EMIT assay correlated well with GLC data and rank it as an attractive alternative to many of the existing procedures now being used.

  4. Fully validated method for rapid and simultaneous measurement of six antiepileptic drugs in serum and plasma using ultra-performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kuhn, Joachim; Knabbe, Cornelius

    2013-06-15

    Therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) may be very useful in the clinical management of antiepileptic drug therapy for multiple reasons, such as individual variability, metabolism, genetic factors or drug-drug or drug-food interactions. In addition, TDM is helpful to study the variation in pharmacokinetics that occurs between individuals. Here, we describe a rapid assay using ultra-performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry to measure the antiepileptic drugs lacosamide, lamotrigine, levetiracetam, primidone, topiramate, and zonisamide. After the addition of internal standards (ISs) and protein precipitation of serum or plasma, 1 μl of sample was separated on a 2.1×50 mm reverse phase column (Waters, Acquity UPLC BEH Phenyl, 1.7 μm). Analytes were then ionized and detected by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry with multiple reaction monitoring. Runtime was 2.5 min per injection. Matrix effects were investigated by systematical ion suppression and in-source fragmentation experiments. The calibration curves of the 6 antiepileptic drugs were linear over the working range between 0.05 and 50 mg/L (r>0.99). The limit of detection (LOD) was <0.05 mg/L, whereas the limit of quantification (LLOQ) was 0.10 mg/L of all drugs measured in the assay. The intraassay and interassay coefficients of variation for all compounds were <15% for very low concentration (0.1 mg/L) and <8% in the clinically relevant concentration range (>1.0 mg/L). Mean recoveries were between 87.8 and 98.6% for all drugs. There were no significant ion suppressions detected at the elution times of the analytes. The mean differences between serum and heparinized plasma values were less than 6% for the 6 antiepileptic drugs. All drugs were stable in serum at -20°C, 4°C, and even at RT for at least 1 month. In summary, a specific and sensitive stable isotope dilution UPLC-MS/MS method was developed and validated for routine clinical monitoring of lacosamide

  5. The antiepileptic drug lamotrigine is a substrate of mouse and human breast cancer resistance protein (ABCG2).

    PubMed

    Römermann, Kerstin; Helmer, Renate; Löscher, Wolfgang

    2015-06-01

    Resistance to antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) is the major problem in the treatment of epilepsy. One hypothesis to explain AED resistance suggests that seizure-induced overexpression of efflux transporters at the blood-brain barrier (BBB) restricts AEDs to reach their brain targets. Various studies examined whether AEDs are substrates of P-glycoprotein (Pgp; MDR1; ABCB1), whereas information about the potential role of breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP; ABCG2) is scanty. We used a highly sensitive in vitro assay (concentration equilibrium transport assay; CETA) with MDCKII cells transduced with murine Bcrp1 or human BCRP to evaluate whether AEDs are substrates of this major efflux transporter. Six of 7 AEDs examined, namely phenytoin, phenobarbital, carbamazepine, levetiracetam, topiramate, and valproate, were not transported by Bcrp at therapeutic concentrations, whereas lamotrigine exhibited a marked asymmetric, Bcrp-mediated transport in the CETA, which could be almost completely inhibited with the Bcrp inhibitor Ko143. Significant but less marked transport of lamotrigine was determined in MDCK cells transfected with human BCRP. Lamotrigine is also a substrate of human Pgp, so that this drug is the first AED that has been identified as a dual substrate of the two major human efflux transporters at the BBB. Previous in vivo studies have demonstrated a synergistic or cooperative role of Pgp and Bcrp in the efflux of dual substrates at the BBB, so that transport of lamotrigine by Pgp and BCRP may be an important mechanism of pharmacoresistance in epilepsy patients in whom both transporters are overexpressed.

  6. Low plasma antioxidant status in patients with epilepsy and the role of antiepileptic drugs on oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Menon, Bindu; Ramalingam, Krishnan; Kumar, Rajendiran Vinoth

    2014-01-01

    Background: Oxidative stress has been implicated in various disorders including epilepsy. We studied the antioxidant status in patients with epilepsy and aimed at determining whether there was any difference in the antioxidant levels between patients and controls, patients who are not on antiepileptic drugs (AEDs), and on treatment, between individual AEDs and patients on monotherapy and polytherapy. Materials and Methods: Antioxidant levels like catalase, glutathione peroxidase (GPx), vitamin E, glutathione (GSH), thiol group (SH), uric acid, and total antioxidant capacity (TAC) were compared between 100 patients with epilepsy and equal number of controls. Twenty-five patients who were not on AEDs were compared with patients on AEDs and the control group. Patients were divided into monotherapy and polytherapy group and antioxidant status was compared between the two groups and between individual drugs. Results: Catalase, SH, vitamin E, and TAC were significantly low in patients with epilepsy than those in the control group (P < 0.001). GSH and uric acid did not show any difference; GPx in patients was significantly higher than those in the control group There were no differences in the antioxidant levels between the treated and the untreated groups; however, it was lower in untreated patients than controls (P < 0.001), suggesting that AEDs do not modify the oxidative stress. Patients on Valproate (VPA) showed higher catalase and GPx levels. Catalase was higher in the monotherapy than polytherapy group (P < 0.04). Conclusion: Our study found significantly low levels of antioxidant in patients as compared to controls. AED did not influence the antioxidant status suggesting that seizures induce oxidative stress. PMID:25506160

  7. Seizure Outcomes Following Use of Generic vs. Brand-Name Antiepileptic Drugs: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kesselheim, Aaron S.; Stedman, Margaret R.; Bubrick, Ellen J.; Gagne, Joshua J.; Misono, Alexander S.; Lee, Joy L.; Brookhart, M. Alan; Avorn, Jerry; Shrank, William H.

    2011-01-01

    Background The automatic substitution of bioequivalent generic for brand-name antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) has been linked by anecdotal report to loss of seizure control. Objective To evaluate studies comparing brand-name and generic AEDs and determine whether evidence exists of superiority of the brand-name version in maintaining seizure control. Data Sources English-language human studies identified in searches of MEDLINE, EMBASE, and International Pharmaceutical Abstracts (1984 to August 2009). Study Selection Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and observational studies comparing seizure events or seizure-related outcomes between one brand-name AED and at least one alternate version produced by a distinct manufacturer. Data Extraction We identified 16 articles (9 RCTs, 1 prospective nonrandomized trial, 6 observational studies). We assessed characteristics of the studies and, for RCTs, extracted counts for patients whose seizures were characterized as “controlled” and “uncontrolled.” Data Synthesis Seven RCTs were included in the meta-analysis. The aggregate odds ratio (n=204) was 1.0 (95% confidence interval: 0.7–1.4), indicating no difference in the odds of uncontrolled seizure for patients on generic medications compared to patients on brand-name medications. In contrast, the observational studies identified trends in drug or health services utilization that the authors attributed to changes in seizure control. Conclusions Though most RCTs were short-term evaluations, the available evidence does not suggest an association between loss of seizure control and generic substitution of at least three types of AEDs. The observational study data may be explained by factors such as undue concern from patients or physicians about the effectiveness of generic AEDs after a recent switch. In the absence of better data, physicians may want to consider more intensive monitoring of high-risk patients taking AEDs when any switch occurs. PMID:20329806

  8. Brain tumors in eloquent areas: A European multicenter survey of intraoperative mapping techniques, intraoperative seizures occurrence, and antiepileptic drug prophylaxis.

    PubMed

    Spena, Giannantonio; Schucht, Philippe; Seidel, Kathleen; Rutten, Geert-Jan; Freyschlag, Christian Franz; D'Agata, Federico; Costi, Emanule; Zappa, Francesca; Fontanella, Marco; Fontaine, Denys; Almairac, Fabien; Cavallo, Michele; De Bonis, Pasquale; Conesa, Gerardo; Foroglou, Nicholas; Gil-Robles, Santiago; Mandonnet, Emanuel; Martino, Juan; Picht, Thomas; Viegas, Catarina; Wager, Michel; Pallud, Johan

    2017-04-01

    Intraoperative mapping and monitoring techniques for eloquent area tumors are routinely used world wide. Very few data are available regarding mapping and monitoring methods and preferences, intraoperative seizures occurrence and perioperative antiepileptic drug management. A questionnaire was sent to 20 European centers with experience in intraoperative mapping or neurophysiological monitoring for the treatment of eloquent area tumors. Fifteen centers returned the completed questionnaires. Data was available on 2098 patients. 863 patients (41.1%) were operated on through awake surgery and intraoperative mapping, while 1235 patients (58.8%) received asleep surgery and intraoperative electrophysiological monitoring or mapping. There was great heterogeneity between centers with some totally AW oriented (up to 100%) and other almost totally ASL oriented (up to 92%) (31% SD). For awake surgery, 79.9% centers preferred an asleep-awake-asleep anesthesia protocol. Only 53.3% of the centers used ECoG or transcutaneous EEG. The incidence of intraoperative seizures varied significantly between centers, ranging from 2.5% to 54% (p < 0.001). It there appears to be a statistically significant link between the mastery of mapping technique and the risk of intraoperative seizures. Moreover, history of preoperative seizures can significantly increase the risk of intraoperative seizures (p < 0.001). Intraoperative seizures occurrence was similar in patients with or without perioperative drugs (12% vs. 12%, p = 0.2). This is the first European survey to assess intraoperative functional mapping and monitoring protocols and the management of peri- and intraoperative seizures. This data can help identify specific aspects that need to be investigated in prospective and controlled studies.

  9. An evaluation of factors affecting adherence to antiepileptic drugs in patients with epilepsy: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Gurumurthy, Ranjana; Chanda, Kulkarni; Sarma, GRK

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Adherence to antiepileptic drug (AED) therapy is important for controlling seizures in patients with epilepsy (PWE). It is vital to identify the factors influencing adherence to AED therapy using validated tools. This study aimed to evaluate the pattern and extent of AED adherence among PWE and to identify the factors that influence adherence. METHODS This was a cross-sectional study involving PWE who had a confirmed diagnosis. Treatment adherence was assessed using the four-item Morisky Medication Adherence Scale. Univariate analysis with chi-square test was used to observe the association between different variables and AED adherence. Binary logistic regression analysis was used to identify the predictors of adherence. RESULTS 451 PWE (mean age 27.3 ± 8.1 years) were enrolled in the study; 251 (55.7%) were male and 198 (43.9%) were from the lower socioeconomic class. 326 (72.3%) patients had high adherence to AED therapy, while 125 (27.7%) had low adherence. AED adherence was significantly associated with socioeconomic status (p = 0.043) and type of epilepsy (p = 0.033). However, no significant difference was observed between adherence and age, gender, marital status, epilepsy duration, number and type of AEDs, and occurrence of adverse drug reactions. Patients with focal epilepsy and those from the middle/lower-middle socioeconomic classes were less likely to be nonadherent. The primary reason for nonadherence was forgetfulness. CONCLUSION This study found that a majority of PWE have optimal rates of AED adherence and that forgetfulness is the primary reason for nonadherence among PWE. PMID:26805666

  10. A novel HPLC method for quantification of 10 antiepileptic drugs or metabolites in serum/plasma using a monolithic column.

    PubMed

    Heideloff, Courtney; Bunch, Dustin R; Wang, Sihe

    2010-02-01

    Therapeutic drug monitoring of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) is important in maximizing the therapeutic response while minimizing the adverse effects. High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) is the most commonly used technique for this purpose. Recently, commercial monolithic columns were introduced, which consist of a single rod of fused silica or polymer. The objective of this work was to develop a simple and fast method to quantify 10 commonly measured AEDs or metabolites [carbamazepine, carbamazepine-10,11-epoxide, felbamate, lamotrigine, 10,11-dihydro-10-hydroxy-carbamazepine (active metabolite of oxcarbazepine), pentobarbital, phenobarbital, phenytoin, primidone, and zonisamide] in serum/plasma by HPLC using a reverse-phase monolithic column. Serum/heparin plasma (100 microL) was mixed with an internal standard solution (5-ethyl-5-p-tolylbarbituric acid in methanol, 250 microL). After centrifugation at 15,500 g for 10 minutes, 15 microL of supernatant was injected into a monolithic column. The analytes were eluted with an isocratic solution of 0.1 M, pH 6.5, phosphate buffer:methanol:acetonitrile (77:20:3), monitored at 210 nm. The chromatography time was 16 minutes. The method was linear from 0.4-4.9 to 21.2-190.9 microg/mL depending on the analytes with analytical recovery of 80%-114%. The inter- and intra-assay coefficients of variation were <8% in 3 levels of serum-based controls for all the analytes. No significant carryover was observed. Commercial controls containing >100 therapeutic drugs and common endogenous substances were tested and showed no interference. Comparison studies for 6 AEDs or metabolites were performed against commercial HPLC methods. Three AEDs were compared with Food and Drug Administration-approved immunoassays. All comparisons had R > 0.96 with slope ranging from 0.86 to 1.20. This is a simple and fast HPLC method suitable for measuring the 10 AEDs or metabolites. The use of the monolithic column resulted in increased

  11. Inverse Association between Sodium Channel-Blocking Antiepileptic Drug Use and Cancer: Data Mining of Spontaneous Reporting and Claims Databases

    PubMed Central

    Takada, Mitsutaka; Fujimoto, Mai; Motomura, Haruka; Hosomi, Kouichi

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs) are drug targets for the treatment of epilepsy. Recently, a decreased risk of cancer associated with sodium channel-blocking antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) has become a research focus of interest. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that the use of sodium channel-blocking AEDs are inversely associated with cancer, using different methodologies, algorithms, and databases. Methods: A total of 65,146,507 drug-reaction pairs from the first quarter of 2004 through the end of 2013 were downloaded from the US Food and Drug Administration Adverse Event Reporting System. The reporting odds ratio (ROR) and information component (IC) were used to detect an inverse association between AEDs and cancer. Upper limits of the 95% confidence interval (CI) of < 1 and < 0 for the ROR and IC, respectively, signified inverse associations. Furthermore, using a claims database, which contains 3 million insured persons, an event sequence symmetry analysis (ESSA) was performed to identify an inverse association between AEDs and cancer over the period of January 2005 to May 2014. The upper limit of the 95% CI of adjusted sequence ratio (ASR) < 1 signified an inverse association. Results: In the FAERS database analyses, significant inverse associations were found between sodium channel-blocking AEDs and individual cancers. In the claims database analyses, sodium channel-blocking AED use was inversely associated with diagnoses of colorectal cancer, lung cancer, gastric cancer, and hematological malignancies, with ASRs of 0.72 (95% CI: 0.60 - 0.86), 0.65 (0.51 - 0.81), 0.80 (0.65 - 0.98), and 0.50 (0.37 - 0.66), respectively. Positive associations between sodium channel-blocking AEDs and cancer were not found in the study. Conclusion: Multi-methodological approaches using different methodologies, algorithms, and databases suggest that sodium channel-blocking AED use is inversely associated with colorectal cancer, lung cancer, gastric

  12. Anti-Epileptic Drug Combination Efficacy in an In Vitro Seizure Model – Phenytoin and Valproate, Lamotrigine and Valproate

    PubMed Central

    O’Brien, Terence J.; Williams, David A.; French, Chris R.

    2017-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the relative efficacy of different classes of commonly used anti-epileptic drugs (AEDs) with different mechanisms of action, individually and in combination, to suppress epileptiform discharges in an in vitro model. Extracellular field potential were recorded in 450 μm thick transverse hippocampal slices prepared from juvenile Wistar rats, in which “epileptiform discharges” (ED’s) were produced with a high-K+ (8.5 mM) bicarbonate-buffered saline solution. Single and dual recordings in stratum pyramidale of CA1 and CA3 regions were performed with 3–5 MΩ glass microelectrodes. All drugs—lamotrigine (LTG), phenytoin (PHT) and valproate (VPA)—were applied to the slice by superfusion at a rate of 2 ml/min at 32°C. Effects upon frequency of ED’s were assessed for LTG, PHT and VPA applied at different concentrations, in isolation and in combination. We demonstrated that high-K+ induced ED frequency was reversibly reduced by LTG, PHT and VPA, at concentrations corresponding to human therapeutic blood plasma concentrations. With a protocol using several applications of drugs to the same slice, PHT and VPA in combination displayed additivity of effect with 50μM PHT and 350μM VPA reducing SLD frequency by 44% and 24% individually (n = 19), and together reducing SLD frequency by 66% (n = 19). 20μM LTG reduced SLD frequency by 32% and 350μM VPA by 16% (n = 18). However, in combination there was a supra-linear suppression of ED’s of 64% (n = 18). In another independent set of experiments, similar results of drug combination responses were also found. In conclusion, a combination of conventional AEDs with different mechanisms of action, PHT and VPA, displayed linear additivity of effect on epileptiform activity. More intriguingly, a combination of LTG and VPA considered particularly efficacious clinically showed a supra-additive suppression of ED’s. This approach may be useful as an in vitro platform for assessing drug

  13. A microdialysis study of the novel antiepileptic drug levetiracetam: extracellular pharmacokinetics and effect on taurine in rat brain

    PubMed Central

    Tong, X; Patsalos, P N

    2001-01-01

    Using a rat model which allows serial blood sampling and concurrent brain microdialysis sampling, we have investigated the temporal kinetic inter-relationship of levetiracetam in serum and brain extracellular fluid (frontal cortex and hippocampus) following systemic administration of levetiracetam, a new antiepileptic drug. Concurrent extracellular amino acid concentrations were also determined. After administration (40 or 80 mg kg−1), levetiracetam rapidly appeared in both serum (Tmax, 0.4 – 0.7 h) and extracellular fluid (Tmax, 2.0 – 2.5 h) and concentrations rose linearly and dose-dependently, suggesting that transport across the blood-brain barrier is rapid and not rate-limiting. The serum free fraction (free/total serum concentration ratio; mean±s.e.mean range 0.93 – 1.05) was independent of concentration and confirms that levetiracetam is not bound to blood proteins. The kinetic profiles for the hippocampus and frontal cortex were indistinguishable suggesting that levetiracetam distribution in the brain is not brain region specific. However, t1/2 values were significantly larger than those for serum (mean range, 3.0 – 3.3 h vs 2.1 – 2.3 h) and concentrations did not attain equilibrium with respect to serum. Levetiracetam (80 mg kg−1) was associated with a significant reduction in taurine in the hippocampus and frontal cortex. Other amino acids were unaffected by levetiracetam. Levetiracetam readily and rapidly enters the brain without regional specificity. Its prolonged efflux from and slow equilibration within the brain may explain, in part, its long duration of action. The concurrent changes in taurine may contribute to its mechanism of action. PMID:11454660

  14. Effects of antiepileptic drug therapy on vitamin D status and biochemical markers of bone turnover in children with epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Nettekoven, Sina; Ströhle, Alexander; Trunz, Birgit; Wolters, Maike; Hoffmann, Susanne; Horn, Rüdiger; Steinert, Martin; Brabant, Georg; Lichtinghagen, Ralf; Welkoborsky, Hans-Jürgen; Tuxhorn, Ingrid; Hahn, Andreas

    2008-12-01

    Reports of decreased serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25-OHD) and altered bone metabolism associated with antiepileptic drug (AED) treatment are inconsistent and predominantly restricted to adults. In this cross-sectional observational study, the aim was to evaluate the influence of AED treatment on vitamin D status and markers of bone turnover in children with epilepsy. In 38 children taking AEDs and 44 healthy control subjects, blood samples were collected to determine the levels of serum 25-OHD, intact parathyroid hormone (iPTH), calcium (Ca), phosphate (P), bone alkaline phosphatase (BAP), osteocalcin (OC) and C terminal telopeptide of type I collagen (ICTP). More than 75% of the patients were vitamin D deficient (serum 25-OHD<20 ng/mL) and 21% of the patients had an insufficient vitamin D status (serum 25-OHD=20-30 ng/mL). In the patients, the serum levels of OC (p = 0.002) and BAP (p < 0.001) were significantly increased, but ICTP (p = 0.002) concentrations were significantly decreased compared with the control group. When patients where divided into two groups according to their medication (mono- or polytherapy), significantly lower 25-OHD (p = 0.038) and ICTP (p = 0.005) levels and elevated BAP (p = 0.023) concentrations were found in patients under polytherapy. An association between 25-OHD and the measured bone markers could not be determined. Our results indicate that the prevalence of vitamin D deficiency in epilepsy patients under AED treatment is high, especially under polytherapy, and alteration markers of bone formation and resorption suggests an accelerated skeletal turnover. The routine monitoring of serum 25-OHD and vitamin D supplementation on an individual basis should be considered.

  15. Prenatal exposure to antiepileptic drugs and use of primary healthcare during childhood: a population-based cohort study in Denmark

    PubMed Central

    Würtz, Anne Mette; Vestergaard, Claus Høstrup; Vestergaard, Mogens; Bech, Bodil Hammer

    2017-01-01

    Objective Prenatal exposure to antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) has been associated with adverse outcomes in the offspring such as congenital malformations and neuropsychiatric disorders. The objective of this study was to investigate whether prenatal exposure to AEDs is also associated with more frequent use of primary healthcare during childhood. Design Population-based cohort study. Setting Nationwide national registers in Denmark. Participants All live-born singletons in Denmark during 1997–2012 identified in the Danish National Patient Register and followed until 31 December 2013 (n=963 010). Information on prenatal exposure to AEDs for maternal indication of epilepsy and other neurological conditions was obtained from the Danish Register of Medicinal Product Statistics. Main outcome measures The primary outcome measure was the number and type of contacts with the general practitioner (GP), excluding routine well-child visits and vaccinations. The secondary outcome measure was specific services provided at the GP contact. The association between prenatal exposure to AEDs and contacts with the GP was estimated by using negative binomial regression adjusting for sex and date of birth of the child, maternal age, cohabitation status, income, education, substance abuse, depression, severe psychiatric disorders and use of antipsychotics, antidepressants and insulin. Results Children exposed prenatally to AEDs (n=4478) had 3% (95% CI 0 to 5%) more GP contacts during the study period than unexposed children. This was primarily accounted for by the number of phone contacts. Within each year of follow-up, exposed children tended to have more contacts than unexposed children, but the differences were small. We found no difference between exposed and unexposed children with regard to specific services provided at the GP contact. For the individual AEDs, we found that exposure to valproate or oxcarbazepine was associated with more GP contacts. Conclusions We found only minor

  16. Intestinal absorption of the antiepileptic drug substance vigabatrin is altered by infant formula in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Nøhr, Martha Kampp; Thale, Zia I; Brodin, Birger; Hansen, Steen H; Holm, René; Nielsen, Carsten Uhd

    2014-01-01

    Vigabatrin is an antiepileptic drug substance mainly used in pediatric treatment of infantile spasms. The main source of nutrition for infants is breast milk and/or infant formula. Our hypothesis was that infant formula may affect the intestinal absorption of vigabatrin. The aim was therefore to investigate the potential effect of coadministration of infant formula with vigabatrin on the oral absorption in vitro and in vivo. The effect of vigabatrin given with an infant formula on the oral uptake and transepithelial transport was investigated in vitro in Caco-2 cells. In vivo effects of infant formula and selected amino acids on the pharmacokinetic profile of vigabatrin was investigated after oral coadministration to male Sprague–Dawley rats using acetaminophen as a marker for gastric emptying. The presence of infant formula significantly reduced the uptake rate and permeability of vigabatrin in Caco-2 cells. Oral coadministration of vigabatrin and infant formula significantly reduced Cmax and prolonged tmax of vigabatrin absorption. Ligands for the proton-coupled amino acid transporter PAT1, sarcosine, and proline/l-tryptophan had similar effects on the pharmacokinetic profile of vigabatrin. The infant formula decreased the rate of gastric emptying. Here we provide experimental evidence for an in vivo role of PAT1 in the intestinal absorption of vigabatrin. The effect of infant formula on the oral absorption of vigabatrin was found to be due to delayed gastric emptying, however, it seems reasonable that infant formula may also directly affect the intestinal absorption rate of vigabatrin possibly via PAT1. PMID:25505585

  17. Metabolic concerns associated with antiepileptic medications.

    PubMed

    Sheth, Raj D

    2004-11-23

    Because treatment with antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) is often for years or lifelong, physicians should be aware of the metabolic changes that can be associated with AED use and the potential effects of these changes during long-term therapy. Alterations of bone metabolism leading to decreased bone mineral density, associated particularly but not exclusively with the hepatic enzyme-inducing AEDs, can worsen the risk for fractures, which is already increased in patients with epilepsy by factors such as seizure-related falls and trauma. Some AEDs are associated with weight gain, an effect that is not only distressing to many patients but may be sufficient to increase the risk for cardiovascular disease and other disorders associated with excessive body weight. The carbonic anhydrase-inhibiting properties of some AEDs can lead to metabolic acidosis. The AEDs that inhibit carbonic anhydrase are also associated with an increase in risk for renal stones, as is the ketogenic diet. Awareness of the potential metabolic disturbances associated with AED use is particularly important because many of them are subtle and may take years to become clinically apparent.

  18. The Influence of Solid Microneedles on the Transdermal Delivery of Selected Antiepileptic Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Julia; Ita, Kevin B.; Morra, Matthew J.; Popova, Inna E.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this project was to examine the effect of microneedle rollers on the percutaneous penetration of tiagabine hydrochloride and carbamazepine across porcine skin in vitro. Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometric analysis was carried out using an Agilent 1200 Series HPLC system coupled to an Agilent G1969A TOF-MS system. Transdermal flux values of the drugs were determined from the steady-state portion of the cumulative amount versus time curves. Following twelve hours of microneedle roller application, there was a 6.74-fold increase in the percutaneous penetration of tiagabine hydrochloride (86.42 ± 25.66 µg/cm2/h) compared to passive delivery (12.83 ± 6.30 µg/cm2/h). For carbamazepine in 20% ethanol, passive transdermal flux of 7.85 ± 0.60 µg/cm2/h was observed compared to 10.85 ± 0.11 µg/cm2/h after microneedle treatment. Carbamazepine reconstituted in 30% ethanol resulted in only a 1.19-fold increase in drug permeation across porcine skin (36.73 ± 1.83 µg/cm2/h versus 30.74 ± 1.32 µg/cm2/h). Differences in flux values of untreated and microneedle-treated porcine skin using solid microneedles for the transdermal delivery of tiagabine were statistically significant. Although there were 1.38- and 1.19-fold increases in transdermal flux values of carbamazepine when applied as 20% and 30% ethanol solutions across microneedle-treated porcine skin, respectively, the increases were not statistically significant. PMID:27854292

  19. Orally disintegrating tablet of novel salt of antiepileptic drug: formulation strategy and evaluation.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Ziyaur; Siddiqui, Akhtar; Khan, Mansoor A

    2013-11-01

    The aim of present research was to design and evaluate orally disintegrating tablet (ODT) of novel lamotrigine-cyclamate salt. Box-Behnken response surface methodology was selected to design the optimized formulation. The independent factors selected were tablet hardness (X1), disintegrant (X2) and lubricant (X3) levels, and responses chosen were disintegration time (DT, Y1), friability (Y2), T50 (Y3), and T90 (Y4). The tablets were also characterized for drug uniformity by near infrared chemical imaging (NIR-CI) and taste masking evaluation by electronic tongue. All the selected independent variables were statistically (p<0.05) effect the Y1 while Y2, Y3, and Y4 affected only by X2. The optimized ODT was found to meet the regulatory requirement of DT and friability specification. The NIR-CI images indicated uniform distribution of active and inactive ingredients within the tablets. The electronic tongue results were analyzed by principle component analysis (PCA). It indicated that novel salt of lamotrigine and its ODT formulation have a taste similar to cyclamic acid which is indicated by close proximity on PCA score plot, lower Euclidean distance, and high discrimination index values. Furthermore, these parameters were very close to ODT placebo formulation. On the other hand, lamotrigine, its ODT, and placebo formulation were far from each other. In summary, lamotrigine salt provides another avenue for pediatric friendly formulation for children and will enhance patience compliance.

  20. Improvement of physicochemical properties of an antiepileptic drug by salt engineering.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Ziyaur; Zidan, Ahmed S; Samy, Raghu; Sayeed, Vilayat A; Khan, Mansoor A

    2012-09-01

    The focus of the present investigation was to evaluate the feasibility of using cyclamic salt of lamotrigine in order to improve its solubility and intrinsic dissolution rate (IDR). The salt was prepared by solution crystallization method and characterized chemically by fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), proton ((1)H) and carbon ((13)C) nuclear magnetic resonance (liquid and solid, NMR) spectroscopy, physically by powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), thermally by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), physicochemically for solubility, IDR, solution and solid-state stability, and polymorphism by solution recrystallization and slurry conversion studies. The FTIR, NMR, PXRD, DSC, and TGA spectra and thermograms indicated the salt formation. The salt formation increased lamotrigine solubility by 19-fold and IDR by 4.9-fold in water. The solution and solid-state stability were similar to parent molecule and were resistant to polymorphic transformation. In conclusion, cyclamic salt of lamotrigine provides another potential avenue for the pharmaceutical development of lamotrigine with improved physicochemical properties especially for pediatric population. It is also possible that appropriate dosage forms can be formulated with much lower drug amount and better safety profile than existing products.

  1. Do ATP-binding cassette transporters cause pharmacoresistance in epilepsy? Problems and approaches in determining which antiepileptic drugs are affected.

    PubMed

    Löscher, Wolfgang; Luna-Tortós, Carlos; Römermann, Kerstin; Fedrowitz, Maren

    2011-01-01

    Resistance to multiple antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) is a common problem in epilepsy, affecting at least 30% of patients. One prominent hypothesis to explain this resistance suggests an inadequate penetration or excess efflux of AEDs across the blood - brain barrier (BBB) as a result of overexpressed efflux transporters such as P-glycoprotein (Pgp), the encoded product of the multidrug resistance- 1 (MDR1, ABCB1) gene. Pgp and MDR1 are markedly increased in epileptogenic brain tissue of patients with AED-resistant partial epilepsy and following seizures in rodent models of partial epilepsy. In rodent models, AED-resistant rats exhibit higher Pgp levels than responsive animals; increased Pgp expression is associated with lower brain levels of AEDs; and, most importantly, co-administration of Pgp inhibitors reverses AED resistance. Thus, it is reasonable to conclude that Pgp plays a significant role in mediating resistance to AEDs in rodent models of epilepsy - however, whether this phenomenon extends to at least some human refractory epilepsy remains unclear, particularly because it is still a matter of debate which AEDs, if any, are transported by human Pgp. The difficulty in determining which AEDs are substrates of human Pgp is mainly a consequence of the fact that AEDs are highly permeable compounds, which are not easily identified as Pgp substrates in in vitro models of the BBB, such as monolayer (Transwell(®)) efflux assays. By using a modified assay (concentration equilibrium transport assay; CETA), which minimizes the influence of high transcellular permeability, two groups have recently demonstrated that several major AEDs are transported by human Pgp. Importantly, it was demonstrated in these studies that Pgp-mediated transport highly depends on the AED concentration and may not be identified if concentrations below or above the therapeutic range are used. In addition to the efflux transporters, seizure-induced alterations in BBB integrity and activity of

  2. ACEA (a highly selective cannabinoid CB1 receptor agonist) stimulates hippocampal neurogenesis in mice treated with antiepileptic drugs.

    PubMed

    Andres-Mach, Marta; Haratym-Maj, Agnieszka; Zagaja, Miroslaw; Rola, Radoslaw; Maj, Maciej; Chrościńska-Krawczyk, Magdalena; Luszczki, Jarogniew J

    2015-10-22

    Hippocampal neurogenesis plays a very important role in learning and memory functions. In a search for best neurological drugs that protect neuronal cells and stimulate neurogenesis with no side effects, cannabinoids proved to be a strong group of substances having many beneficial properties. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of ACEA (arachidonyl-2'-chloroethylamide--a highly selective cannabinoid CB1 receptor agonist) combined with a classical antiepileptic drug sodium valproate (VPA) on neural precursor cells' proliferation and differentiation in the mouse brain. All experiments were performed on adolescent CB57/BL male mice injected i.p. with VPA (10mg/kg), ACEA (10mg/kg) and PMSF (30 mg/kg) (phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride--a substance protecting ACEA against degradation by the fatty-acid amidohydrolase) for 10 days. Next an acute response of proliferating neural precursor cells to ACEA and VPA administration was evaluated with Ki-67 staining (Time point 1). Next, in order to determine whether acute changes translated into long-term alterations in neurogenesis, proliferating cells were labeled with 5-bromo-2deoxyuridine (BrdU) followed by confocal microscopy used to determine the percentage of BrdU-labeled cells that showed mature cell phenotypes (Time point 2). Results indicate that ACEA with PMSF significantly increase the total number of Ki-67-positive cells when compared to the control group. Moreover, ACEA in combination with VPA increased the number of Ki-67-positive cells, whereas VPA administered alone had no impact on proliferating cells' population. Accordingly, neurogenesis study results indicate that the combination of ACEA+PMSF administered alone and in combination with VPA considerably increases the total number of BrdU-positive cells in comparison to the control group while ACEA+PMSF alone and in combination with VPA increased total numbers of BrdU-positive cells, newly born neurons and astrocytes as compared to VPA group but not to

  3. Efficacy and tolerability of adjunctive brivaracetam in patients with prior antiepileptic drug exposure: A post-hoc study.

    PubMed

    Asadi-Pooya, Ali A; Sperling, Michael R; Chung, Steve; Klein, Pavel; Diaz, Anyzeila; Elmoufti, Sami; Schiemann, Jimmy; Whitesides, John

    2017-02-27

    Brivaracetam (BRV), a selective, high-affinity ligand for synaptic vesicle protein 2A, is a new antiepileptic drug (AED) for adjunctive treatment of focal (partial-onset) seizures in adults with epilepsy. This post-hoc analysis was conducted to explore the efficacy of adjunctive BRV in patients with prior levetiracetam (LEV) exposure and whether changes in efficacy were related to the similar mechanism of action of these two drugs. Data were pooled from three Phase III studies (NCT00490035; NCT00464269; NCT01261325) of adults with focal seizures taking 1-2 AEDs who received placebo or BRV 50-200mg/day without titration over a 12-week treatment period. Patients taking concomitant LEV at enrollment were excluded from this analysis. Patients were categorized by their status of prior exposure to LEV, carbamazepine (CBZ), topiramate (TPM), or lamotrigine (LTG), to investigate any consistent trend towards reduced response in AED-exposed subgroups compared to AED-naïve subgroups, regardless of the mechanism of action. Study completion rates, percent reduction from baseline in focal seizure frequency over placebo, ≥50% responder rates, and tolerability were evaluated for each subgroup. A total of 1160 patients were investigated. Study completion rates were similar in the AED-exposed subgroups and AED-naïve subgroups. In subgroups with (531 patients) or without (629 patients) prior LEV exposure, ≥50% responder rates for each dose of BRV compared with placebo were generally higher among the LEV-naïve subgroups than the previously LEV-exposed subgroups. LEV-exposed subgroups receiving BRV doses ≥50mg/day showed greater ≥50% responder rates than those receiving placebo. Similar results were observed for CBZ, TPM, and LTG. Previous treatment failure with commonly prescribed AEDs (LEV, CBZ, TPM, or LTG) is associated with a reduced response to BRV irrespective of the mechanism of action. Hence, this post-hoc analysis indicates that previous treatment failure with LEV

  4. Updated ILAE evidence review of antiepileptic drug efficacy and effectiveness as initial monotherapy for epileptic seizures and syndromes.

    PubMed

    Glauser, Tracy; Ben-Menachem, Elinor; Bourgeois, Blaise; Cnaan, Avital; Guerreiro, Carlos; Kälviäinen, Reetta; Mattson, Richard; French, Jacqueline A; Perucca, Emilio; Tomson, Torbjorn

    2013-03-01

    The purpose of this report was to update the 2006 International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE) report and identify the level of evidence for long-term efficacy or effectiveness for antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) as initial monotherapy for patients with newly diagnosed or untreated epilepsy. All applicable articles from July 2005 until March 2012 were identified, evaluated, and combined with the previous analysis (Glauser et al., 2006) to provide a comprehensive update. The prior analysis methodology was utilized with three modifications: (1) the detectable noninferiority boundary approach was dropped and both failed superiority studies and prespecified noninferiority studies were analyzed using a noninferiority approach, (2) the definition of an adequate comparator was clarified and now includes an absolute minimum point estimate for efficacy/effectiveness, and (3) the relationship table between clinical trial ratings, level of evidence, and conclusions no longer includes a recommendation column to reinforce that this review of efficacy/evidence for specific seizure types does not imply treatment recommendations. This evidence review contains one clarification: The commission has determined that class I superiority studies can be designed to detect up to a 20% absolute (rather than relative) difference in the point estimate of efficacy/effectiveness between study treatment and comparator using an intent-to-treat analysis. Since July, 2005, three class I randomized controlled trials (RCT) and 11 class III RCTs have been published. The combined analysis (1940-2012) now includes a total of 64 RCTs (7 with class I evidence, 2 with class II evidence) and 11 meta-analyses. New efficacy/effectiveness findings include the following: levetiracetam and zonisamide have level A evidence in adults with partial onset seizures and both ethosuximide and valproic acid have level A evidence in children with childhood absence epilepsy. There are no major changes in the level of evidence

  5. Robust isocratic high performance liquid chromatographic method for simultaneous determination of seven antiepileptic drugs including lamotrigine, oxcarbazepine and zonisamide in serum after solid-phase extraction.

    PubMed

    Vermeij, T A C; Edelbroek, P M

    2007-09-15

    A rapid, simple and robust method is presented for the simultaneous determination of seven antiepileptic drugs (AEDs), including primidone, phenobarbital, phenytoin, carbamazepine with its two major metabolites carbamazepine-10,11-epoxide and carbamazepine-10,11-(trans)-dihydrodiol and the new AEDs lamotrigine, hydroxycarbazepine (active metabolite of oxcarbazepine) and zonisamide in serum by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC)-diode array detector (DAD). After solid-phase extraction, separation is achieved on an Alltima 3C18 analytical column using isocratic elution with a mixture of acetonitrile, methanol and phosphate buffer at 45 degrees C. The method is exhaustively validated, including experimental design in combination with statistical evaluation (ANOVA) to study the robustness of chromatography and sample preparation. Commonly co-administered antiepileptic drugs do not interfere with the method. Intra-day precision (RSD<1.9%), linearity, lower limit of quantitation (LOQ<0.065 mg/l) and robustness make the method suitable for daily therapeutic drug monitoring and pharmacokinetic studies.

  6. The novel antiepileptic drug imepitoin compares favourably to other GABA-mimetic drugs in a seizure threshold model in mice and dogs.

    PubMed

    Löscher, Wolfgang; Hoffmann, Katrin; Twele, Friederike; Potschka, Heidrun; Töllner, Kathrin

    2013-11-01

    Recently, the imidazolinone derivative imepitoin has been approved for treatment of canine epilepsy. Imepitoin acts as a low-affinity partial agonist at the benzodiazepine (BZD) site of the GABAA receptor and is the first compound with such mechanism that has been developed as an antiepileptic drug (AED). This mechanism offers several advantages compared to full agonists, including less severe adverse effects and a lack of tolerance and dependence liability, which has been demonstrated in rodents, dogs, and nonhuman primates. In clinical trials in epileptic dogs, imepitoin was shown to be an effective and safe AED. Recently, seizures in dogs have been proposed as a translational platform for human therapeutic trials on new epilepsy treatments. In the present study, we compared the anticonvulsant efficacy of imepitoin, phenobarbital and the high-affinity partial BZD agonist abecarnil in the timed i.v. pentylenetetrazole (PTZ) seizure threshold test in dogs and, for comparison, in mice. Furthermore, adverse effects of treatments were compared in both species. All drugs dose-dependently increased the PTZ threshold in both species, but anticonvulsant efficacy was higher in dogs than mice. At the doses selected for this study, imepitoin was slightly less potent than phenobarbital in increasing seizure threshold, but markedly more tolerable in both species. Effective doses of imepitoin in the PTZ seizure model were in the same range as those suppressing spontaneous recurrent seizures in epileptic dogs. The study demonstrates that low-affinity partial agonists at the benzodiazepine site of the GABAA receptor, such as imepitoin, offer advantages as a new category of AEDs.

  7. Absence of HLA-B*1502 and HLA-A*3101 alleles in 9 Korean patients with antiepileptic drug-induced skin rash: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Song, Ju Sun; Kang, Eun-Suk; Joo, Eun Yeon; Hong, Seung Bong; Seo, Dae-Won; Lee, Soo-Youn

    2014-09-01

    There have been a number of studies about correlations between HLA genotypes in various ethnic groups and occurrence of various cutaneous adverse drug reactions, ranging in intensity from mild to severe, caused by antiepileptic drugs (AEDs). This is the first report analyzing the HLA genotypes of 9 Korean patients with skin rashes induced by various AEDs. The AEDs that induced skin rash were lamotrigine (n=3), carbamazepine (n=3), oxcarbazepine (n=1), phenobarbital (n=1), and phenytoin (n=1). None of the patients' HLA genotypes was either HLA-B*1502 or HLA-A*3101. Based on these series of cases, AED-induced skin rash can occur independently of HLA-B*1502 or HLA-A*3101 genotypes in the Korean patients.

  8. [Jacksonian fits and threatened premature labour (the effect of valium, prepar and antiepileptic drugs on the fetus and uterine contractility ante and intra partum) (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Tempfer, H

    1975-12-12

    The case is reported of a 30-year-old patient whose fifth pregnancy (para 2, no living children) was complicated by the necessity of surgical removal of a stage II astrocytoma. Threatened premature labour was averted by the continuous administration of Prepar as from the 25th week of pregnancy and spontaneous vaginal delivery of a live-born infant was achieved in the 35th week. The development of repeated Jacksonian fits necessitated the administration of high doses of Valium (215 mg i.v. over a 50-nour period) both pre and intra partum, over and above the long-term antiepileptic maintenance therapy which the patient had received throughout the entire pregnancy. The fetal heart rate was not affected by Valium even at such high dosage. This case serves to illustrate that if the indication arises, high doses of Valium may be given before and during labour in conjunction with long-term antiepileptic drugs and Prepar apparently without adverse effects on the fetus or on uterine activity.

  9. Treatment of cardiac arrhythmias in a mouse model of Rett syndrome with Na+-channel-blocking antiepileptic drugs.

    PubMed

    Herrera, José A; Ward, Christopher S; Pitcher, Meagan R; Percy, Alan K; Skinner, Steven; Kaufmann, Walter E; Glaze, Daniel G; Wehrens, Xander H T; Neul, Jeffrey L

    2015-04-01

    One quarter of deaths associated with Rett syndrome (RTT), an X-linked neurodevelopmental disorder, are sudden and unexpected. RTT is associated with prolonged QTc interval (LQT), and LQT-associated cardiac arrhythmias are a potential cause of unexpected death. The standard of care for LQT in RTT is treatment with β-adrenergic antagonists; however, recent work indicates that acute treatment of mice with RTT with a β-antagonist, propranolol, does not prevent lethal arrhythmias. In contrast, acute treatment with the Na(+) channel blocker phenytoin prevented arrhythmias. Chronic dosing of propranolol may be required for efficacy; therefore, we tested the efficacy of chronic treatment with either propranolol or phenytoin on RTT mice. Phenytoin completely abolished arrhythmias, whereas propranolol showed no benefit. Surprisingly, phenytoin also normalized weight and activity, but worsened breathing patterns. To explore the role of Na(+) channel blockers on QT in people with RTT, we performed a retrospective analysis of QT status before and after Na(+) channel blocker antiepileptic therapies. Individuals with RTT and LQT significantly improved their QT interval status after being started on Na(+) channel blocker antiepileptic therapies. Thus, Na(+) channel blockers should be considered for the clinical management of LQT in individuals with RTT.

  10. The influence of established and new antiepileptic drugs on visual perception. 1. A placebo-controlled, double-blind, single-dose study in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Steinhoff, B J; Freudenthaler, N; Paulus, W

    1997-12-01

    The influence of single oral dosages of carbamazepine (CBZ), valproic acid, vigabatrin (VGB), lamotrigine (LTG), gabapentin (GBP), and losigamone (LSG) on visual perception was investigated in ten healthy volunteers according to a double-blind, placebo-controlled, cross-over study design. The test battery comprised visual acuity, the Lanthony-D-15-désaturé colour perception test, increment, postadaptation and transient tritanopia threshold measurements, perception threshold assessment for monochromatic and chromatic gaussian dots, monochromatic gratings and gratings of differing spatial frequency, and critical flicker fusion tests with various stimuli. The only consistent and partly significant effects were seen after VGB and GBP. After VGB, increment, postadaptation and transient tritanopia thresholds and the critical flicker fusion increased, whereas GBP led to a somewhat converse profile. The other tests were not influenced consistently by any antiepileptic drug (AED). We conclude that: (i) gamma-amino-butyric acid-(GABA)-related properties as under the prototype drug VGB result in specific alterations of the transient tritanopia phenomenon which is consistent with the physiological hypothesis for this retinal paradigm based on extracellular recordings in primates. The possible mechanisms why VGB improved critical flicker fusion as the only AED in this trial are discussed. The profile of GBP indicates a unique mechanism of action. We have not observed specific influences on visual perception under AEDs which act mainly via alterations of ion membrane conductance. The transient tritanopia and flicker fusion paradigms we used appear to be promising to investigate antiepileptic drugs with hitherto unknown modes of actions in human noninvasively.

  11. N-Alkylprotoporphyrin Formation and Hepatic Porphyria in Dogs After Administration of a New Antiepileptic Drug Candidate: Mechanism and Species Specificity

    PubMed Central

    Nicolas, Jean-Marie; Chanteux, Hugues; Mancel, Valérie; Dubin, Guy-Marie; Gerin, Brigitte; Staelens, Ludovicus; Depelchin, Olympe; Kervyn, Sophie

    2014-01-01

    A new antiepileptic synaptic vesicle 2a (SV2a) ligand drug candidate was tested in 4-week oral toxicity studies in rat and dog. Brown pigment inclusions were found in the liver of high-dose dogs. The morphology of the deposits and the accompanying liver changes (increased plasma liver enzymes, increased total hepatic porphyrin level, decreased liver ferrochelatase activity, combined induction, and inactivation of cytochrome P-450 CYP2B11) suggested disruption of the heme biosynthetic cascade. None of these changes was seen in rat although this species was exposed to higher parent drug levels. Toxicokinetic analysis and in vitro metabolism assays in hepatocytes showed that dog is more prone to oxidize the drug candidate than rat. Mass spectrometry analysis of liver samples from treated dogs revealed an N-alkylprotoporphyrin adduct. The elucidation of its chemical structure suggested that the drug transforms into a reactive metabolite which is structurally related to a known reference porphyrogenic agent allylisopropylacetamide. That particular metabolite, primarily produced in dog but neither in rat nor in human, has the potential to alkylate the prosthetic heme of CYP. Overall, the data suggested that the drug candidate should not be porphyrogenic in human. This case study further exemplifies the species variability in the susceptibility to drug-induced porphyria. PMID:24973095

  12. Psychiatric uses of antiepileptic treatments.

    PubMed

    Boylan, Laura S.; Devinsky, Orrin; Barry, John J.; Ketter, Terence A.

    2002-10-01

    Antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) possess potent negative or positive psychotropic effects. Clear evidence of benefit exists for valproate, carbamazepine, and lamotrigine in bipolar disorder. Reports of benefit from various AEDs in mood, anxiety, impulse control, and personality disorder are reviewed. Further research is needed to clarify which patients are likely to benefit. Clinicians must closely attend to the ongoing risk/benefit analysis and consider possible iatrogenic worsening of neuropsychiatric symptoms.

  13. Phenobarbital or potassium bromide as an add-on antiepileptic drug for the management of canine idiopathic epilepsy refractory to imepitoin.

    PubMed

    Royaux, E; Van Ham, L; Broeckx, B J G; Van Soens, I; Gielen, I; Deforce, D; Bhatti, S F M

    2017-02-01

    Imepitoin has recently been approved in Europe for the management of dogs with idiopathic epilepsy. Currently, there is no evidence-based information available on the efficacy of antiepileptic drugs used as additions to the therapeutic regimen in dogs with idiopathic epilepsy that are not well controlled with imepitoin. The goal of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of phenobarbital or potassium bromide (KBr) as add-on antiepileptic drugs for controlling dogs refractory to a maximum dose of imepitoin (30 mg/kg twice daily). The study was performed as a prospective, randomised, controlled clinical trial. The efficacy of phenobarbital and KBr was evaluated by comparing monthly seizure frequency (MSF), monthly seizure day frequency (MSDF), the presence of cluster seizures during a retrospective 2-month period with a prospective follow-up of 6 months, and the overall responder rate. Twenty-seven dogs were included in the study, 14 dogs in the phenobarbital group and 13 dogs in the KBr group. Both median MSF and MSDF decreased in the phenobarbital group (both P = 0.001) and in the KBr group (P = 0.004 and P = 0.003, respectively). Overall, the number of dogs with cluster seizures decreased (P = 0.0005). The responder rate was 79% vs. 69% in the phenobarbital and KBr groups, respectively. We conclude that phenobarbital or KBr add-on treatment decreases median MSF and MSDF in epileptic dogs refractory to a maximum dose of imepitoin. Combination therapy was generally well tolerated and resulted in an improvement in seizure management in the majority of the dogs.

  14. Inhibition of lipopolysaccharide-induced liver injury in rats treated with a hepatic drug-metabolizing enzyme inducer p,p'-DDT.

    PubMed

    Shimada, Yuko; Tomita, Mariko; Yoshida, Toshinori; Fukuyama, Tomoki; Katoh, Yoshitaka; Ohnuma-Koyama, Aya; Takahashi, Naofumi; Soma, Katsumi; Kojima, Sayuri; Ohtsuka, Ryoichi; Takeda, Makio; Kuwahara, Maki; Harada, Takanori

    2015-03-01

    Hepatocellular hypertrophy in association with drug-metabolizing enzyme induction is considered to be an adaptive change associated with drug metabolism. To improve our understanding of liver hypertrophy, we determined the effect of a single ip injection of either lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or vehicle in male F344 rats with hepatocellular hypertrophy induced by oral delivery of p,p'-DDT for 2 weeks. The rats were sacrificed 3h or 24h after LPS or vehicle injection. LPS induced a focal hepatocellular necrosis in rats fed the control diet. When rats pre-treated with p,p'-DDT were injected with LPS, necrotic foci surrounded by ballooned hepatocytes were observed in the liver. The change was consistent with reduced LPS-mediated increases in plasma hepatic biomarkers, neutrophil influx, and apoptosis, and also associated with hepatic mRNA levels of TNF-α, CYPs, and NOS2. By contrast, when combined with p,p'-DDT and LPS, faint hepatocellular fatty change was extended, together with a synergistic increase in total blood cholesterol. These results suggest that hepatocytes exposed to p,p'-DDT are protected from the cell-lethal toxic effects of an exogenous stimulus, resulting in cell ballooning rather than necrosis in association with reduced inflammation and apoptosis, but compromised by an adverse effect on lipid metabolism.

  15. The anti-epileptic drug levetiracetam reverses the inhibition by negative allosteric modulators of neuronal GABA- and glycine-gated currents

    PubMed Central

    Rigo, J-M; Hans, G; Nguyen, L; Rocher, V; Belachew, S; Malgrange, B; Leprince, P; Moonen, G; Selak, I; Matagne, A; Klitgaard, H

    2002-01-01

    In this study in vitro and in vivo approaches were combined in order to investigate if the anti-epileptic mechanism(s) of action of levetiracetam (LEV; Keppra®) may involve modulation of inhibitory neurotransmission.GABA- and glycine-gated currents were studied in vitro using whole-cell patch-clamp techniques applied on cultured cerebellar granule, hippocampal and spinal neurons. Protection against clonic convulsions was assessed in vivo in sound-susceptible mice. The effect of LEV was compared with reference anti-epileptic drugs (AEDs): carbamazepine, phenytoin, valproate, clonazepam, phenobarbital and ethosuximide.LEV contrasted the reference AEDs by an absence of any direct effect on glycine-gated currents. At high concentrations, beyond therapeutic relevance, it induced a small reduction in the peak amplitude and a prolongation of the decay phase of GABA-gated currents. A similar action on GABA-elicited currents was observed with the reference AEDs, except ethosuximide.These minor direct effects contrasted with a potent ability of LEV (EC50=1 – 10 μM) to reverse the inhibitory effects of the negative allosteric modulators zinc and β-carbolines on both GABAA and glycine receptor-mediated responses.Clonazepam, phenobarbital and valproate showed a similar ability to reverse the inhibition of β-carbolines on GABA-gated currents. Blockade of zinc inhibition of GABA responses was observed with clonazepam and ethosuximide. Phenytoin was the only AED together with LEV that inhibited the antagonism of zinc on glycine-gated currents and only clonazepam and phenobarbital inhibited the action of DMCM.LEV (17 mg kg−1) produced a potent suppression of sound-induced clonic convulsions in mice. This protective effect was significantly abolished by co-administration of the β-carboline FG 7142, from a dose of 5 mg kg−1. In contrast, the benzodiazepine receptor antagonist flumazenil (up to 10 mg kg−1) was without any effect on the protection

  16. Effect of tetrahydrocurcumin on the profiles of drug-metabolizing enzymes induced by a high fat and high fructose diet in mice.

    PubMed

    Jearapong, Nattharat; Chatuphonprasert, Waranya; Jarukamjorn, Kanokwan

    2015-09-05

    Cytochrome P450 (CYP), a superfamily of hepatic monooxygenase enzymes, catalyzes biotransformation of endogenous compounds and xenobiotics. Modification of CYPs associated with metabolic diseases and continuous consumption of diet with excessive energy levels. Tetrahydrocurcumin (THC) exhibited beneficial effects in metabolic syndromes such as diabetic mellitus and dyslipidemia. The present study aimed to investigate the effects of THC and vitamin E (vitE) on the expression profiles of CYPs in the livers of mice fed with the high fat and high fructose diet. In addition to ad libitum access to commercial regular diet, the high fat and high fructose diet (HFD) group of adult male ICR mice was administered a HFD, which consisted of intragastric administration of hydrogenated soybean oil (1mL/day) and the addition of 20% fructose to the drinking water for 8weeks. During the induction period, subgroups of mice (n=5) were daily intragastrically administered with THC (100 or 200mg/kg/day) or vitE (100mg/kg/day). The expressions of CYP mRNA and protein were quantified using real-time PCR and the levels of these proteins were quantified using immunoblotting. Continuous consuming of high fat and high fructose for 8weeks significantly increased the expressions of Cyp1a1, Cyp1a2, Cyp1b1, Cyp2c29, and Cyp3a11 while THC ultimately normalized these CYPs profiles. In the control mice, most of the investigated CYPs was unchanged by THC, with the exception that the Cyp1a1, Cyp2b9, and Cyp3a11 proteins were elevated. These findings provided additional important information on the effects of THC on diet induced-metabolic dysfunctions. However, drug interactions due to the use of THC as an alternative supplement are of concern, particularly in the combinations that include a drug that is a substrate of Cyp1a1, Cyp2b9, and Cyp3a11.

  17. Effects of levetiracetam, a novel antiepileptic drug, on convulsant activity in two genetic rat models of epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Gower, A J; Hirsch, E; Boehrer, A; Noyer, M; Marescaux, C

    1995-11-01

    The anticonvulsant effects of levetiracetam were assessed in two genetic rat models. In the audiogenic-seizure prone rat, levetiracetam, 5.4 to 96 mg/kg i.p. dose-dependently inhibited both wild running and tonic-clonic convulsions. In the GAERS model of petit mal epilepsy, levetiracetam markedly suppressed spontaneous spike-and-wave discharge (SWD) but left the underlying EEG trace normal. The effects were already marked at 5.4 mg/kg and did not increase significantly up to 170 mg/kg although more animals were completely protected. Levetiracetam produced no observable effects on behaviour apart from slight reversible sedation at 170 mg/kg. In contrast, piracetam, a structural analogue of levetiracetam, significantly and consistently suppressed SWD in GAERS rats only at the high dose of 1000 mg/kg with some slight effects at lower doses. The effect of piracetam appeared to be due to increased sleeping rather than to a direct antiepileptic effect. The results with levetiracetam argue for a clinical application in both petit mal, absence epilepsy and in treating generalised tonic-clonic and partial seizures.

  18. The Current Availability of Antiepileptic Drugs in Zambia: Implications for the ILAE/WHO “Out of the Shadows” Campaign

    PubMed Central

    Chomba, Elwyn Nachanya; Haworth, Alan; Mbewe, Edward; Atadzhanov, Masharip; Ndubani, Philimon; Kansembe, Henry; Birbeck, Gretchen Lano

    2010-01-01

    Recent concerns regarding antiepileptic drug (AED) availability in Zambia led us to conduct a study in the Lusaka and Southern Provinces to quantify the availability and cost of AEDs and assess determinants. Among 111 pharmacies, almost one-half did not carry AEDs (N = 54; 49.1%). Available AEDs were phenobarbitone (21; 18.9%), carbamazepine (27; 24.3%), valproic acid (4; 3.6%), and phenytoin (3; 2.7%). Adult out-of-pocket monthly costs ranged from US $7 to $30. Pediatric syrups were universally unavailable. Interviews revealed several barriers to AED provision, including that handling phenobarbitone (historically the most affordable AED) has become increasingly difficult because of newly enforced regulatory requirements. Personal communications with epilepsy-care providers in other low income countries suggest that this problem may be widespread. Improved enforcement of existing drug regulations may be contributing to the AED shortage. Social programs aimed at encouraging people with epilepsy to come “out of the shadows” must be preceded by improved AED access. PMID:20810822

  19. Evaluation of transport of common antiepileptic drugs by human multidrug resistance-associated proteins (MRP1, 2 and 5) that are overexpressed in pharmacoresistant epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Luna-Tortós, Carlos; Fedrowitz, Maren; Löscher, Wolfgang

    2010-06-01

    Resistance to antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) is one of the most serious problems in the treatment of epilepsy. Accumulating experimental evidence suggests that increased expression of the drug efflux transporter P-glycoprotein (Pgp) at the blood-brain barrier may be involved in the mechanisms leading to AED resistance. In addition to Pgp, increased expression of several multidrug resistance-associated proteins (MRPs) has been determined in epileptogenic brain regions of patients with pharmacoresistant epilepsy. However, it is not known whether AEDs are substrates for MRPs. In the present experiments, we evaluated whether common AEDs are transported by human MRPs (MRP1, 2 and 5) that are overexpressed in AED resistant epilepsy. For this purpose, we used a highly sensitive assay (concentration equilibrium transport assay; CETA) in polarized kidney cell lines (LLC, MDCKII) transfected with human MRPs. The assay was validated by known MRP substrates, including calcein-AM (MRP1), vinblastine (MRP2) and chloromethylfluorescein diacetate (CMFDA; MRP5). The directional transport determined with these drugs in MRP-transfected cell lines could be blocked with the MRP inhibitor MK571. However, in contrast to transport of known MRP substrates, none of the common AEDs (carbamazepine, valproate, levetiracetam, phenytoin, lamotrigine and phenobarbital) used in this study was transported by MRP1, MRP2 or MRP5. A basolateral-to-apical transport of valproate, which could be inhibited by MK571 and probenecid, was determined in LLC cells (both wildtype and transfected), but the specific transporter involved was not identified. The data indicate that common AEDs are not substrates for human MRP1, MRP2 or MRP5, at least in the in vitro models used in this study.

  20. Zebrafish embryotoxicity test for developmental (neuro)toxicity: Demo case of an integrated screening approach system using anti-epileptic drugs.

    PubMed

    Beker van Woudenberg, Anna; Snel, Cor; Rijkmans, Eke; de Groot, Didima; Bouma, Marga; Hermsen, Sanne; Piersma, Aldert; Menke, Aswin; Wolterbeek, André

    2014-11-01

    To improve the predictability of the zebrafish embryotoxicity test (ZET) for developmental (neuro)toxicity screening, we used a multiple-endpoints strategy, including morphology, motor activity (MA), histopathology and kinetics. The model compounds used were antiepileptic drugs (AEDs): valproic acid (VPA), carbamazepine (CBZ), ethosuximide (ETH) and levetiracetam (LEV). For VPA, histopathology was the most sensitive parameter, showing effects already at 60μM. For CBZ, morphology and MA were the most sensitive parameters, showing effects at 180μM. For ETH, all endpoints showed similar sensitivity (6.6mM), whereas MA was the most sensitive parameter for LEV (40mM). Inclusion of kinetics did not alter the absolute ranking of the compounds, but the relative potency was changed considerably. Taking all together, this demo-case study showed that inclusion of multiple-endpoints in ZET may increase the sensitivity of the assay, contribute to the elucidation of the mode of toxic action and to a better definition of the applicability domain of ZET.

  1. FT-Raman, FT-IR and UV-visible spectral investigations and ab initio computations of anti-epileptic drug: vigabatrin.

    PubMed

    Edwin, Bismi; Joe, I Hubert

    2013-10-01

    Vibrational analysis of anti-epileptic drug vigabatrin, a structural GABA analog was carried out using NIR FT-Raman and FTIR spectroscopic techniques. The equilibrium geometry, various bonding features and harmonic vibrational wavenumbers were studied using density functional theory method. The detailed interpretation of the vibrational spectra has been carried out with the aid of VEDA.4 program. Vibrational spectra, natural bond orbital analysis and optimized molecular structure show clear evidence for the effect of electron charge transfer on the activity of the molecule. Predicted electronic absorption spectrum from TD-DFT calculation has been compared with the UV-vis spectrum. The Mulliken population analysis on atomic charges and the HOMO-LUMO energy were also calculated. Good consistency is found between the calculated results and experimental data for the electronic absorption as well as IR and Raman spectra. The blue-shifting of the C-C stretching wavenumber reveals that the vinyl group is actively involved in the conjugation path. The NBO analysis confirms the occurrence of intramolecular hyperconjugative interactions resulting in ICT causing stabilization of the system.

  2. FT-Raman, FT-IR and UV-visible spectral investigations and ab initio computations of anti-epileptic drug: Vigabatrin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwin, Bismi; Joe, I. Hubert

    2013-10-01

    Vibrational analysis of anti-epileptic drug vigabatrin, a structural GABA analog was carried out using NIR FT-Raman and FTIR spectroscopic techniques. The equilibrium geometry, various bonding features and harmonic vibrational wavenumbers were studied using density functional theory method. The detailed interpretation of the vibrational spectra has been carried out with the aid of VEDA.4 program. Vibrational spectra, natural bond orbital analysis and optimized molecular structure show clear evidence for the effect of electron charge transfer on the activity of the molecule. Predicted electronic absorption spectrum from TD-DFT calculation has been compared with the UV-vis spectrum. The Mulliken population analysis on atomic charges and the HOMO-LUMO energy were also calculated. Good consistency is found between the calculated results and experimental data for the electronic absorption as well as IR and Raman spectra. The blue-shifting of the Csbnd C stretching wavenumber reveals that the vinyl group is actively involved in the conjugation path. The NBO analysis confirms the occurrence of intramolecular hyperconjugative interactions resulting in ICT causing stabilization of the system.

  3. Novel antiepileptic drug lacosamide exerts neuroprotective effects by decreasing glial activation in the hippocampus of a gerbil model of ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Ji Yun; Yan, Bing Chun; Park, Joon Ha; Ahn, Ji Hyeon; Lee, Dae Hwan; Kim, In Hye; Cho, Jeong-Hwi; Chen, Bai Hui; Lee, Jae-Chul; Cho, Young Shin; Shin, Myoung Chul; Cho, Jun Hwi; Hong, Seongkweon; Won, Moo-Ho; Kim, Sung Koo

    2015-12-01

    Lacosamide, which is a novel antiepileptic drug, has been reported to exert various additional therapeutic effects. The present study investigated the neuroprotective effects of lacosamide against transient cerebral ischemia-induced neuronal cell damage in the hippocampal cornu ammonis (CA)-1 region of a gerbil model. Neuronal Nuclei immunohistochemistry demonstrated that pre- and post-surgical treatment (5 min ischemia) with 25 mg/kg lacosamide protected CA1 pyramidal neurons in the lacosamide-treated-ischemia-operated group from ischemic injury 5 days post-ischemia, as compared with gerbils in the vehicle-treated-ischemia-operated group. Furthermore, treatment with 25 mg/kg lacosamide markedly attenuated the activation of astrocytes and microglia in the ischemic CA1 region at 5 days post-ischemia. The results of the present study suggested that pre- and post-surgical treatment of the gerbils with lacosamide was able to protect against transient cerebral ischemic injury-induced CA1 pyramidal neuronal cell death in the hippocampus. In addition, the neuroprotective effects of lacosamide may be associated with decreased activation of glial cells in the ischemic CA1 region.

  4. Effects of antiepileptic drugs on mRNA levels of BDNF and NT-3 and cell neogenesis in the developing rat brain.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xiu-Yu; Wang, Ji-Wen; Cui, Hong; Li, Bao-Min; Lei, Ge-Fei; Sun, Ruo-Peng

    2010-03-01

    Epilepsy is a common neurological disorder that occurs more frequently in childhood than in adulthood. Antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) which are used to treat seizures in pregnant women, infants, and young children may cause cognitive impairment or other uncertain injury. However, the exact mechanisms responsible for adverse effects of AEDs in the developing brain are still not clear. In the present study, we investigate the effects of AEDs on mRNA levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and neurotrophin-3 (NT-3), cell neogenesis and mossy fiber sprouting (MFS) in the developing rat brain. Long-term treatment with Phenobarbital (40mg/kg), valproate (100mg/kg) and topiramate (40mg/kg) reduces BDNF and NT-3 mRNA expression in the developing brain, while lamotrigine reduces mRNA expression only at high dose level (80mg/kg). Cell neogenesis only increases in the rats treated with valproate and lamotrigine. And no differences are observed between the control group and the AEDs-treated groups in the Timm scores of the CA3 region and supragranular region. Our findings present some possible mechanisms to explain why different AEDs cause different cognitive impairment.

  5. The Antiepileptic Drug Levetiracetam Suppresses Non-Convulsive Seizure Activity and Reduces Ischemic Brain Damage in Rats Subjected to Permanent Middle Cerebral Artery Occlusion

    PubMed Central

    Cuomo, Ornella; Rispoli, Vincenzo; Leo, Antonio; Politi, Giovanni Bosco; Vinciguerra, Antonio; di Renzo, Gianfranco; Cataldi, Mauro

    2013-01-01

    The antiepileptic drug Levetiracetam (Lev) has neuroprotective properties in experimental stroke, cerebral hemorrhage and neurotrauma. In these conditions, non-convulsive seizures (NCSs) propagate from the core of the focal lesion into perilesional tissue, enlarging the damaged area and promoting epileptogenesis. Here, we explore whether Lev neuroprotective effect is accompanied by changes in NCS generation or propagation. In particular, we performed continuous EEG recordings before and after the permanent occlusion of the middle cerebral artery (pMCAO) in rats that received Lev (100 mg/kg) or its vehicle immediately before surgery. Both in Lev-treated and in control rats, EEG activity was suppressed after pMCAO. In control but not in Lev-treated rats, EEG activity reappeared approximately 30-45 min after pMCAO. It initially consisted in single spikes and, then, evolved into spike-and-wave and polyspike-and-wave discharges. In Lev-treated rats, only rare spike events were observed and the EEG power was significantly smaller than in controls. Approximately 24 hours after pMCAO, EEG activity increased in Lev-treated rats because of the appearance of polyspike events whose power was, however, significantly smaller than in controls. In rats sacrificed 24 hours after pMCAO, the ischemic lesion was approximately 50% smaller in Lev-treated than in control rats. A similar neuroprotection was observed in rats sacrificed 72 hours after pMCAO. In conclusion, in rats subjected to pMCAO, a single Lev injection suppresses NCS occurrence for at least 24 hours. This electrophysiological effect could explain the long lasting reduction of ischemic brain damage caused by this drug. PMID:24236205

  6. Prescribing pattern of anti-epileptic drugs in an Italian setting of elderly outpatients: a population-based study during 2004–07

    PubMed Central

    Oteri, Alessandro; Trifirò, Gianluca; Gagliostro, Maria Silvia; Tari, Daniele Ugo; Moretti, Salvatore; Bramanti, Placido; Spina, Edoardo; Caputi, Achille Patrizio; Arcoraci, Vincenzo

    2010-01-01

    AIMS The aims of the study were to assess the trend of older and newer anti-epileptic drugs (AEDs) in the elderly population and to analyze the effects of a health-policy intervention with regard to AED use in general practice in a setting in Southern Italy. METHODS Data were extracted from the ‘Caserta-1’ Local-Health-Unit Arianna database in the years 2004–07. Patients aged over 65 years, receiving at least one AED prescription and registered in the lists of 88 general practitioners, were selected. The use of older and newer AEDs was calculated as 1 year prevalence and incidence of use and defined daily dose (DDD) per 1000 inhabitants day−1. Sub-analyses by gender, age and indication of use were performed. RESULTS Most of AED users were treated because of neuropathic pain (64.8%). However, the main indication of use for older AEDs (57.8%) was epilepsy, whereas newer AEDs (79.5%) were used for neuropathic pain. Prevalence and incidence of newer AED use increased until 2006, followed by a reduction in 2007. Newer AEDs, particularly gabapentin and pregabalin, were used in the treatment of more patients than older AEDs. However phenobarbital, accounting for more than 50% of total AED volume, was the most prescribed medication during the entire study period. CONCLUSIONS An increasing use of AEDs has been observed during 2004–07, mostly due to the prescription of newer compounds for neuropathic pain. The fall in the use of newer AEDs during 2007 coincides with revised re-imbursement criteria for gabapentin and pregabalin. The large use of phenobarbital in the elderly should be considered in the light of a risk of adverse drug reactions. PMID:20840443

  7. Be sure to read the fine print: the agency for healthcare research and quality comparative effectiveness report on antiepileptic drugs.

    PubMed

    Welty, Timothy E; Faught, Edward; Schmidt, Dieter; McAuley, James W; Ryan, Melody

    2012-05-01

    For many questions related to the pharmacotherapy of epilepsy, there are few or no published data. This lack of data presents dilemmas to practitioners who must make informed, rational decisions about therapy on a daily basis and to policymakers dealing with drug formulary management and reimbursement. Reliance on randomized, clinical trial data is inefficient because of the extensive time and expense involved in conducting a study and the inability to answer every question encountered in practice. In addition, results from randomized, clinical studies are not fully applicable in the clinical setting because of short trial duration and the frequent use of surrogate controls that are rarely seen in routine practice.

  8. Interaction of an antiepileptic drug, lamotrigine with human serum albumin (HSA): Application of spectroscopic techniques and molecular modeling methods.

    PubMed

    Poureshghi, Fatemeh; Ghandforoushan, Parisa; Safarnejad, Azam; Soltani, Somaieh

    2017-01-01

    Lamotrigine (an epileptic drug) interaction with human serum albumin (HSA) was investigated by fluorescence, UV-Vis, FTIR, CD spectroscopic techniques, and molecular modeling methods. Binding constant (Kb) of 5.74×10(3) and number of binding site of 0.97 showed that there is a slight interaction between lamotrigine and HSA. Thermodynamic studies was constructed using the flourimetric titrations in three different temperatures and the resulted data used to calculate the parameters using Vant Hoff equation. Decreased Stern Volmer quenching constant by enhanced temperature revealed the static quenching mechanism. Negative standard enthalpy (ΔH) and standard entropy (ΔS) changes indicated that van der Waals interactions and hydrogen bonds were dominant forces which facilitate the binding of Lamotrigine to HSA, the results were confirmed by molecular docking studies which showed no hydrogen binding. The FRET studies showed that there is a possibility of energy transfer between Trp214 and lamotrigine. Also the binding of lamotrigine to HSA in the studied concentrations was not as much as many other drugs, but the secondary structure of the HSA was significantly changed following the interaction in a way that α-helix percentage was reduced from 67% to 57% after the addition of lamotrigine in the molar ratio of 4:1 to HSA. According to the docking studies, lamotrigine binds to IB site preferably.

  9. Are adverse effects of antiepileptic drugs different in symptomatic partial and idiopathic generalized epilepsies? The Portuguese-Brazilian validation of the Liverpool Adverse Events Profile.

    PubMed

    Martins, H H; Alonso, N B; Vidal-Dourado, M; Carbonel, T D; de Araújo Filho, G M; Caboclo, L O; Yacubian, E M; Guilhoto, L M

    2011-11-01

    We report the results of administration of the Portuguese-Brazilian translation of the Liverpool Adverse Events Profile (LAEP) to 100 patients (mean age=34.5, SD=12.12; 56 females), 61 with symptomatic partial epilepsy (SPE) and 39 with idiopathic generalized epilepsy (IGE) (ILAE, 1989) who were on a stable antiepileptic drug (AED) regimen and being treated in a Brazilian tertiary epilepsy center. Carbamazepine was the most commonly used AED (43.0%), followed by valproic acid (32.0%). Two or more AEDs were used by 69.0% of patients. The mean LAEP score (19 questions) was 37.6 (SD=13.35). The most common adverse effects were sleepiness (35.0%), memory problems (35.0%), and difficulty in concentrating (25.0%). Higher LAEP scores were associated with polytherapy with three or more AEDs (P=0.005), female gender (P<0.001), older age (P<0.001), and uncontrolled seizures (P=0.045). The intraclass coefficient (test-retest reliability) for LAEP overall score was 0.848 (95% CI=0.782-0.895), with a range from 0.370 (unsteadiness) to 0.750 (memory problems). Cronbach's α coefficient (internal consistency) was 0.903. The LAEP was highly correlated with Quality of Life in Epilepsy-31 inventory (r=-0.804, P>0.001) and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (Depression: r=0.637, P<0.001; Anxiety: r=0.621, P<0.001) dimensions. LAEP overall scores were similar in people with SPE and IGE and were not helpful in differentiating adverse effects in these two groups. Clinical variables that influenced global LAEP were seizure frequency (P=0.050) and generalized tonic-clonic seizures in the last month (P=0.031) in the IGE group, and polytherapy with three or more AEDs (P=0.003 and P=0.003) in both IGE and SPE groups.

  10. Evaluation of cytochrome P450 inductions by anti-epileptic drug oxcarbazepine, 10-hydroxyoxcarbazepine, and carbamazepine using human hepatocytes and HepaRG cells.

    PubMed

    Sugiyama, Ikuo; Murayama, Norie; Kuroki, Ayaka; Kota, Jagannath; Iwano, Shunsuke; Yamazaki, Hiroshi; Hirota, Takashi

    2016-09-01

    Anti-epileptic drug oxcarbazepine is structurally related to carbamazepine, but has reportedly different metabolic pathway. Auto-induction potentials of oxcarbazepine, its pharmacologically active metabolite 10-hydroxyoxcarbazepine and carbamazepine were evaluated by cytochrome P450 (CYP) 1A2, CYP2B6 and CYP3A4 mRNA levels and primary metabolic rates using human hepatocytes and HepaRG cells. For the CYP1A2 the induction potential determined as the fold change in mRNA levels was 7.2 (range: 2.3-11.5) and 10.0 (6.2-13.7) for oxcarbazepine and carbamazepine, respectively, while 10-hydroxyoxcarbazepine did not induce. The fold change in mRNA levels for CYP2B6 was 11.5 (3.2-19.3), 7.0 (2.5-10.8) and 14.8 (3.1-29.1) for oxcarbazepine, 10-hydroxyoxcarbazepine and carbamazepine, respectively. The fold change for CYP3A4 induction level by oxcarbazepine, 10-hydroxyoxcarbazepine and carbamazepine was 3.5 (1.2-7.4), 2.7 (0.8-5.7) and 8.3 (3.5-14.5), respectively. The data suggest lower induction potential of oxcarbazepine and 10-hydroxyoxcarbazepine relative to carbamazepine. The results in HepaRG cells showed similar trend as the human hepatocytes. After incubation for 72 h in hepatocytes and HepaRG cells, auto-induction was evident for only carbamazepine metabolism. The 10-keto group instead of double bond at C10 position is evidently a determinant factor for limited auto-induction of P450 enzymes by oxcarbazepine.

  11. Subchronic treatment with antiepileptic drugs modifies pentylenetetrazol-induced seizures in mice: Its correlation with benzodiazepine receptor binding

    PubMed Central

    Rocha, Luisa

    2008-01-01

    Experiments using male CD1 mice were carried out to investigate the effects of subchronic (daily administration for 8 days) pretreatments with drugs enhancing GABAergic transmission (diazepam, 10 mg/kg, ip; gabapentin, 100 mg/kg, po; or vigabatrin, 500 mg/kg, po) on pentylenetetrazol (PTZ)-induced seizures, 24 h after the last injection. Subchronic administration of diazepam reduced latencies to clonus, tonic extension and death induced by PTZ. Subchronic vigabatrin produced enhanced latency to the first clonus but faster occurrence of tonic extension and death induced by PTZ. Subchronic gabapentin did not modify PTZ-induced seizures. Autoradiography experiments revealed reduced benzodiazepine receptor binding in several brain areas after subchronic treatment with diazepam or gabapentin, whereas subchronic vigabatrin did not induce significant receptor changes. The present results indicate differential effects induced by the subchronic administration of diazepam, vigabatrin, and gabapentin on the susceptibility to PTZ-induced seizures, benzodiazepine receptor binding, or both. PMID:18830436

  12. Quantification of new antiepileptic drugs by liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry and its application to cellular uptake experiment using human placental choriocarcinoma BeWo cells.

    PubMed

    Furugen, Ayako; Kobayashi, Masaki; Nishimura, Ayako; Takamura, Shigeo; Narumi, Katsuya; Yamada, Takehiro; Iseki, Ken

    2015-10-01

    A method for quantification of new antiepileptic drugs, including lamotrigine (LTG), levetiracetam (LEV), gabapentin (GBP), and topiramate (TPM), in cellular samples, using liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry was developed to better understand the membrane transport mechanisms of these drugs. Cell lysate was deproteinized by methanol containing LEV-d3 as an internal standard (IS). Chromatographic separation was performed on a C18 column using gradient elution with methanol-water-formic acid (10:90:0.1, v/v/v) and methanol-formic acid (100:0.1, v/v). Analytes were detected in positive ion electrospray mode with selected reaction monitoring (SRM). This method was applicable for a linear range of 5 to 500pmol for LTG; 5 to 1000pmol for LEV; 10 to 10,000pmol for GBP; and 5 to 5000pmol for TPM. The intra-day precision, inter-day precision, and accuracy data were assessed and found to be acceptable. This developed and validated method was then successfully applied to the investigation of uptake of the new antiepileptic drugs in placental choriocarcinoma BeWo cells. The intracellular concentration of these drugs in BeWo cells, accumulating over 30min at 37°C was in the order of GBP>LTG>LEV≈TPM. Furthermore, the uptake of GBP at 4°C was much lower than that at 37°C. The uptake of GBP was saturated at high concentrations. The kinetic parameters calculated for GBP uptake in BeWo cells were determined as Km of 105.4±6.4μM and Vmax at 8153±348pmol/mg protein/min. The novel method described here should enable investigators to elucidate the transport mechanisms of these antiepileptic drugs in BeWo cells.

  13. Pharmacodynamic potentiation of antiepileptic drugs' effects by some HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors against audiogenic seizures in DBA/2 mice.

    PubMed

    Russo, Emilio; Donato di Paola, Eugenio; Gareri, Pietro; Siniscalchi, Antonio; Labate, Angelo; Gallelli, Luca; Citraro, Rita; De Sarro, Giovambattista

    2013-04-01

    It is known that the 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitors (statins) are effective in both the primary and the secondary prevention of ischemic heart disease. Increasing evidence indicates that statins have protective effects in several neurological diseases including stroke, cerebral ischemia, Parkinson disease, multiple sclerosis, traumatic brain injury and epilepsy. The aim of the present research was to evaluate the effects of some HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (i.e. lovastatin, simvastatin, atorvastatin, fluvastatin and pravastatin) commonly used for the treatment of hypercholesterolemia in the DBA/2 mice, an animal model of generalized tonic-clonic seizures. Furthermore, the co-administration of these compounds with some antiepileptic drugs (AEDs; i.e. carbamazepine, diazepam, felbamate, gabapentin, lamotrigine, levetiracetam, oxcarbazepine, phenobarbital, phenytoin, topiramate and valproate) was studied in order to identify possible positive pharmacological interactions. Simvastatin only was active against both the tonic and clonic phase of audiogenic seizures, whereas the other statins tested were only partially effective against the tonic phase with the following order of potency: lovastatin>fluvastatin>atorvastatin; pravastatin was completely ineffective up to the dose of 150mg/kg. The co-administration of ineffective doses of all statins with AEDs generally increased the potency of the latter reducing their ED50 values. In particular, simvastatin was the most active in potentiating the activity of AEDs and the combinations of statins with carbamazepine, diazepam, felbamate, lamotrigine, topiramate and valproate were the most favorable, whereas, the co-administrations with the other AEDs studied was in most cases neutral. The increase in potency was generally associated with an enhancement of motor impairment (TD50); however, the therapeutic index (TD50/ED50) of combined treatment of AEDs with statins was predominantly more

  14. Long-term Effectiveness of Antiepileptic Drug Monotherapy in Partial Epileptic Patients: A 7-year Study in an Epilepsy Center in China

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Fei; Lang, Sen-Yang; Wang, Xiang-Qing; Shi, Xiao-Bing; Ma, Yun-Feng; Zhang, Xu; Chen, Ya-Nan; Zhang, Jia-Tang

    2015-01-01

    Background: It is important to choose an appropriate antiepileptic drug (AED) to manage partial epilepsy. Traditional AEDs, such as carbamazepine (CBZ) and valproate (VPA), have been proven to have good therapeutic effects. However, in recent years, a variety of new AEDs have increasingly been used as first-line treatments for partial epilepsy. As the studies regarding the effectiveness of new drugs and comparisons between new AEDs and traditional AEDs are few, it is determined that these are areas in need of further research. Accordingly, this study investigated the long-term effectiveness of six AEDs used as monotherapy in patients with partial epilepsy. Methods: This is a retrospective, long-term observational study. Patients with partial epilepsy who received monotherapy with one of six AEDs, namely, CBZ, VPA, topiramate (TPM), oxcarbazepine (OXC), lamotrigine (LTG), or levetiracetam (LEV), were identified and followed up from May 2007 to October 2014, and time to first seizure after treatment, 12-month remission rate, retention rate, reasons for treatment discontinuation, and adverse effects were evaluated. Results: A total of 789 patients were enrolled. The median time of follow-up was 56.95 months. CBZ exhibited the best time to first seizure, with a median time to first seizure of 36.06 months (95% confidential interval: 30.64–44.07). CBZ exhibited the highest 12-month remission rate (85.55%), which was significantly higher than those of TPM (69.38%, P = 0.006), LTG (70.79%, P = 0.001), LEV (72.54%, P = 0.005), and VPA (73.33%, P = 0.002). CBZ, OXC, and LEV had the best retention rate, followed by LTG, TPM, and VPA. Overall, adverse effects occurred in 45.87% of patients, and the most common adverse effects were memory problems (8.09%), rashes (7.76%), abnormal hepatic function (6.24%), and drowsiness (6.24%). Conclusion: This study demonstrated that CBZ, OXC, and LEV are relatively effective in managing focal epilepsy as measured by time to first seizure

  15. A comparison of the efficacy of carbamazepine and the novel anti-epileptic drug levetiracetam in the tetanus toxin model of focal complex partial epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Doheny, H C; Whittington, M A; Jefferys, J G R; Patsalos, P N

    2002-01-01

    The tetanus toxin seizure model, which is associated with spontaneous and intermittent generalized and non-generalized seizures, is considered to reflect human complex partial epilepsy. The purpose of the present study was to investigate and compare the anticonvulsant effects of carbamazepine with that of levetiracetam, a new anti-epileptic drug in this model. One μl of tetanus toxin solution (containing 12 mLD50 μl−1 of tetanus toxin) was placed stereotactically into the rat left hippocampus resulting in generalized and non-generalized seizures. Carbamazepine (4 mg kg−1 h−1) and levetiracetam (8 and 16 mg kg−1 h−1) were administered during a 7 day period via an osmotic minipump which was placed in the peritoneal cavity. Carbamazepine (4 mg kg−1 h−1) exhibited no significant anticonvulsant effect, compared to control, when the entire 7 day study period was evaluated but the reduction in generalized seizures was greater (35.5%) than that for non-generalized seizures (12.6%). However, during the first 2 days of carbamazepine administration a significant reduction in both generalized seizure frequency (90%) and duration (25%) was observed. Non-generalized seizures were unaffected. This time-dependent anticonvulsant effect exactly paralleled the central (CSF) and peripheral (serum) kinetics of carbamazepine in that steady-state concentrations declined over time, with the highest concentrations achieved during the first 2 days. Also there was a significant 27.3% reduction in duration of generalized seizures during the 7 day study period (P=0.0001). Levetiracetam administration (8 and 16 mg kg−1 h−1) was associated with a dose-dependent reduction in the frequency of both generalized (39 v 57%) and non-generalized (36 v 41%) seizures. However, seizure suppression was more substantial for generalized seizures. Also a significant dose-dependent reduction in overall generalized seizure duration was observed. These data provide

  16. Antiepileptics for aggression and associated impulsivity

    PubMed Central

    Huband, Nick; Ferriter, Michael; Nathan, Rajan; Jones, Hannah

    2014-01-01

    Background Aggression is a major public health issue and is integral to several mental health disorders. Antiepileptic drugs may reduce aggression by acting on the central nervous system to reduce neuronal hyper-excitability associated with aggression. Objectives To evaluate the efficacy of antiepileptic drugs in reducing aggression and associated impulsivity. Search methods We searched CENTRAL, MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, PsycINFO, metaRegister of Controlled Trials (mRCT) and ClinicalTrials.gov to April 2009. We also searched Cochrane Schizophrenia Group’s register of trials on aggression, National Research Record and handsearched for studies. Selection criteria Prospective, placebo-controlled trials of antiepileptic drugs taken regularly by individuals with recurrent aggression to reduce the frequency or intensity of aggressive outbursts. Data collection and analysis Three authors independently selected studies and two authors independently extracted data. We calculated standardised mean differences (SMDs), with odds ratios (ORs) for dichotomous data. Main results Fourteen studies with data from 672 participants met the inclusion criteria. Five different antiepileptic drugs were examined. Sodium valproate/divalproex was superior to placebo for outpatient men with recurrent impulsive aggression, for impulsively aggressive adults with cluster B personality disorders, and for youths with conduct disorder, but not for children and adolescents with pervasive developmental disorder. Carbamazepine was superior to placebo in reducing acts of self-directed aggression in women with borderline personality disorder, but not in children with conduct disorder. Oxcarbazepine was superior to placebo for verbal aggression and aggression against objects in adult outpatients. Phenytoin was superior to placebo on the frequency of aggressive acts in male prisoners and in outpatient men including those with personality disorder, but not on the frequency of ‘behavioral incidents’ in

  17. Infantile Spasms and Cytomegalovirus Infection: Antiviral and Antiepileptic Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunin-Wasowicz, Dorota; Kasprzyk-Obara, Jolanta; Jurkiewicz, Elzbieta; Kapusta, Monika; Milewska-Bobula, Bogumila

    2007-01-01

    From 1 January 1995 to 31 December 2004, 22 patients (13 males, nine females; age range 2-12mo) with infantile spasms and cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection were treated with intravenous ganciclovir (GCV) and antiepileptic drugs. GCV was given for 3 to 12 weeks with a 1-month interval (one, two, or three courses). Epileptic spasms occurred before…

  18. Prescription of antiepileptics and the risk of road traffic crash.

    PubMed

    Orriols, Ludivine; Foubert-Samier, Alexandra; Gadegbeku, Blandine; Delorme, Bernard; Tricotel, Aurore; Philip, Pierre; Moore, Nicholas; Lagarde, Emmanuel

    2013-03-01

    Studies assessing the impact of epilepsy and its medication on the risk of road traffic crashes have shown inconsistent results. The aim in this study was to assess this risk using French databases. Data from three French national databases were extracted and matched: the national health care insurance database, police reports, and the national police database of injurious crashes. Only antiepileptics prescribed predominantly in epilepsy were studied (phenobarbital, phenytoin, ethosuximide, valproic acid, vigabatrin, tiagabin, levitiracetam, zonisamide, and lacosamide). A case-control analysis comparing responsible and non-responsible drivers and a case-crossover analysis were performed. Drivers (72 685) involved in an injurious crash in France between July 2005 and May 2008, were included. Drivers exposed to prescribed antiepileptic medicines (n = 251) had an increased risk of being responsible for a crash (OR 1.74 [1.29-2.34]). The association was also significant for the most severe epileptic patients (n = 99; OR = 2.20 [1.31-3.69]). Case-crossover analysis found no association between crash risk and treatment prescription. Patients with prescription of antiepileptic drugs should be cautioned about their potential risk of road traffic crash. This risk is however more likely to be related to seizures than to the effect of antiepileptic medicines.

  19. Indications of newer and older anti-epileptic drug use: findings from a southern Italian general practice setting from 2005–2011

    PubMed Central

    Italiano, Domenico; Capuano, Annalisa; Alibrandi, Angela; Ferrara, Rosarita; Cannata, Angelo; Trifirò, Gianluca; Sultana, Janet; Ferrajolo, Carmen; Tari, Michele; Tari, Daniele Ugo; Perrotta, Margherita; Pagliaro, Claudia; Rafaniello, Concita; Spina, Edoardo; Arcoraci, Vincenzo

    2015-01-01

    Aims The aim of the study was to analyze the prescribing pattern of both newer and older AEDs. Methods A population of almost 150 000 individuals registered with 123 general practitioners was included in this study. Patients who received at least one AED prescription over 2005–2011 were identified. The 1 year prevalence and cumulative incidence of AED use, by drug class and individual drug, were calculated over the study period. Potential predictors of starting therapy with newer AEDs were also investigated. Results The prevalence of use per 1000 inhabitants of older AEDs increased from 10.7 (95% CI10.1, 11.2) in 2005 to 13.0 (95% CI12.4, 13.6) in 2011, while the incidence remained stable. Newer AED incidence decreased from 9.4 (95% CI 8.9, 9.9) in 2005 to 7.0 (95% CI 6.6, 7.5) in 2011, with a peak of 15.5 (95% CI 14.8, 16.1) in 2006. Phenobarbital and valproic acid were the most commonly prescribed AEDs as starting therapy for epilepsy. Gabapentin and pregabalin accounted for most new pain-related prescriptions, while valproic acid and lamotrigine were increasingly used for mood disorders. Female gender (OR 1.36, 95% CI 1.20, 1.53), age ranging between 45–54 years (OR 1.39, 95% CI 1.16, 1.66) and pain as an indication (OR 16.7, 95% CI, 13.1, 21.2) were associated with newer AEDs starting therapy. Conclusions Older AEDs were mainly used for epileptic and mood disorders, while newer drugs were preferred for neuropathic pain. Gender, age, indication of use and year of starting therapy influenced the choice of AED type. The decrease of newer AED use during 2007 is probably related to the restricted reimbursement criteria for gabapentin and pregabalin. PMID:25556909

  20. Mechanistic and conformational studies on the interaction of a platinum(II) complex containing an antiepileptic drug, levetiracetam, with bovine serum albumin by optical spectroscopic techniques in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Shahabadi, Nahid; Hadidi, Saba

    2015-02-01

    Fluorescence spectroscopy in combination with circular dichroism (CD) and ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) absorption spectroscopy were employed to investigate the binding of a new platinum(II) complex containing an antiepileptic drug "Levetiracetam" to bovine serum albumin (BSA) under the physiological conditions. In the mechanism discussion, it was proved that the fluorescence quenching of BSA by Pt(II) complex is a result of the formation of Pt(II) complex-BSA complex. The thermodynamic parameters ΔG, ΔH, and ΔS at different temperatures (283, 298, and 310 K) were calculated, and the negative value for ΔH and ΔS indicate that the hydrogen bonds and van der Waals interactions play major roles in Pt(II) complex-BSA association. Binding studies concerning the number of binding sites (n~1) and apparent binding constant K b were performed by fluorescence quenching method. The site marker competitive experiments indicated that the binding of Pt(II) complex to BSA primarily took place in site II. Based on the Förster's theory, the average binding distance between Pt(II) complex and BSA was obtained (r = 5.29 nm). Furthermore, UV-vis, CD, and synchronous fluorescence spectrum were used to investigate the structural change of BSA molecules with addition of Pt(II) complex. These results indicate that the binding of Pt(II) complex to BSA causes apparent change in the secondary structure of BSA and do affect the microenvironment around the tryptophan residue.

  1. Antiepileptic Activity of Preferential Inhibitors of Persistent Sodium Current

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Lyndsey L.; Thompson, Christopher H.; Hawkins, Nicole A.; Nath, Ravi D.; Petersohn, Adam A.; Rajamani, Sridharan; Bush, William S.; Frankel, Wayne N.; Vanoye, Carlos G.; Kearney, Jennifer A.; George, Alfred L.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Evidence from basic neurophysiology and molecular genetics has implicated persistent sodium current conducted by voltage-gated sodium (NaV) channels as a contributor to the pathogenesis of epilepsy. Many antiepileptic drugs target NaV channels and modulate neuronal excitability mainly by a use-dependent block of transient sodium current, although suppression of persistent current may also contribute to the efficacy of these drugs. We hypothesized that a drug or compound capable of preferential inhibition of persistent sodium current would have antiepileptic activity. Methods We examined the antiepileptic activity of two selective persistent sodium current blockers ranolazine, an FDA-approved drug for treatment of angina pectoris, and GS967, a novel compound with more potent effects on persistent current, in the epileptic Scn2aQ54 mouse model. We also examined the effect of GS967 in the maximal electroshock model and evaluated effects of the compound on neuronal excitability, propensity for hilar neuron loss, development of mossy fiber sprouting and survival of Scn2aQ54 mice. Results We found that ranolazine was capable of reducing seizure frequency by ~50% in Scn2aQ54 mice. The more potent persistent current blocker GS967 reduced seizure frequency by greater than 90% in Scn2aQ54 mice and protected against induced seizures in the maximal electroshock model. GS967 greatly attenuated abnormal spontaneous action potential firing in pyramidal neurons acutely isolated from Scn2aQ54 mice. In addition to seizure suppression in vivo, GS967 treatment greatly improved the survival of Scn2aQ54 mice, prevented hilar neuron loss, and suppressed the development of hippocampal mossy fiber sprouting. Significance Our findings indicate that the selective persistent sodium current blocker GS967 has potent antiepileptic activity and this compound could inform development of new agents. PMID:24862204

  2. New mixed ligand zinc(II) complexes based on the antiepileptic drug sodium valproate and bioactive nitrogen-donor ligands. Synthesis, structure and biological properties.

    PubMed

    Darawsheh, Mohanad; Abu Ali, Hijazi; Abuhijleh, A Latif; Rappocciolo, Emilia; Akkawi, Mutaz; Jaber, Suhair; Maloul, Salam; Hussein, Yasmeen

    2014-07-23

    Starting from the precursor [Zinc Valproate complex] (1), new mixed ligand zinc(II) complexes of valproic acid and nitrogen-based ligands, formulating as, [Zn(valp)22,9-dmphen] (2), [Zn2(valp)4(quin)2] (3), [Zn(valp)2(2-ampy)2] (4), and [Zn(valp)2(2-ampic)2] (5) (valp = valproate, 2,9-dmphen = 2,9-dimethyl-1,10-phenanthroline, quin = quinoline, 2-ampy = 2-aminopyridine, 2-ampic = 2-amino-6-picoline) were synthesized and characterized using IR, (1)H NMR, (13)C{(1)H} NMR and UV-Vis spectrometry. The crystal structures of complexes 2, 3 and 4 were determined using single-crystal X-ray diffraction. The complexes were also evaluated for their anti-bacterial activity using in-vitro agar diffusion method against three Gram-positive (Micrococcus luteus, Staphylococcus aureus, and Bacillus subtilis) and three Gram-negative (Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Proteus mirabilis) species. Complex 2 showed considerable activity against all tested microorganisms and the effect of complexation on the anti-bacterial activity of the parent ligand of 2 was also investigated. The anti-bacterial activity of 2,9-dmphen against Gram-negative bacteria was enhanced upon complexation with zinc valproate. On the other hand, complexes 1 and 3 showed weak inhibition activity against the tested species and complexes 4 and 5 didn't show any activity at all. Two methods were used for testing the inhibition of ferriprotoporphyrinIX bio-mineralization: a semi-quantitative micro-assay and a previously self-developed quantitative in-vitro method. Both were used to study the efficiency of these complexes in inhibiting the formation of the Malaria pigment which considered being the target of many known anti-malarial drugs such as Chloroquine and Amodiaquine. Results showed that the efficiency of complex 2 in preventing the formation of β-Hematin was 80%. The efficiency of Amodiaquine as a standard drug was reported to give 91%.

  3. Significant HLA class I type associations with aromatic antiepileptic drug (AED)-induced SJS/TEN are different from those found for the same AED-induced DRESS in the Spanish population.

    PubMed

    Ramírez, Elena; Bellón, Teresa; Tong, Hoi Y; Borobia, Alberto M; de Abajo, Francisco J; Lerma, Victoria; Moreno Hidalgo, Miguel A; Castañer, José L; Cabañas, Rosario; Fiandor, Ana; González-Ramos, Jessica; Herranz, Pedro; Cachafeiro, Lucía; González-Herrada, Carlos; González, Olga; Aramburu, José A; Laosa, Olga; Hernández, Rafael; Carcas, Antonio J; Frías, Jesús

    2017-01-01

    Aromatic antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) are among the drugs most frequently involved in severe cutaneous adverse reactions (SCARs), such as Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS), toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN), and drug reactions with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS). This study investigated the associations between the genetic polymorphisms of HLA class-I and AED-induced SCARs in the Spanish population. HLA class-I genotypes were determined in AED (phenytoin[PHT],lamotrigine[LTG],carbamazepine[CBZ],phenobarbital[PB])-induced SJS/TEN (n=15) or DRESS (n=12) cases included in the Spanish SCAR registry, PIELenRed. There were 3 control groups: (A)tolerant to a single AED, (B)tolerant to any AED, and (C)Spanish population controls. For SJS/TEN, concomitant HLA-A*02:01/Cw15:02 alleles were significantly associated with PHT-cases compared to control groups B and C [(B)odds ratio(OR):14.75, p=0.009;(C)OR:27.50, p<0.001], and were close to significance with respect to control group A (p=0.060). The genotype frequency of the HLA-B*38:01 was significantly associated with PHT-LTG-cases compared with the 3 groups of controls [(A)OR:12.86, p=0.012;(B)OR:13.81; p=0.002;(C)OR:14.35, p<0.001], and with LTG-cases [(A)OR:147.00, p=0.001;(B)OR:115.00, p<0.001;(C)OR:124.70, p<0.001]. We found the HLA-B*15:02 allele in a Spanish Romani patient with a CBZ-case. The HLA-A*11:01 was significantly associated with CBZ-cases [(A)OR:63.89, p=0.002;(B)OR:36.33, p=0.005;(C)OR:28.29, p=0.007]. For DRESS, the HLA-A*24:02 genotype frequency was statistically significant in the PHT-LTG-cases [(A)OR:22.56, p=0.003;(B)OR:23.50. p=0.001; (C)OR:33.25, p<0.001], and in the LTG-cases [(A),OR:49.00, p=0.015;(B)OR:27.77, p=0.005; (C)OR:34.53, p=0.002]. HLA-A*31:01 was significantly associated with the CBZ-cases [(A)OR:22.00, p=0.047;(B)OR:29.50, p=0.033;(C)OR:35.14, p=0.006]. In conclusion, we identified several significant genetic risk factors for the first time in the Spanish Caucasian population: HLA

  4. Synthesis and antiepileptic activity of schiff's bases of dialkylamino alkoxy isatin derivatives.

    PubMed

    Swathi, Konda; Sarangapani, Manda

    2015-01-01

    In the present work, some new 5-[2(3)-dialkylamino alkoxy] Indole 3-thiosemicarbazone 2-ones and 5-[2(3)-dialkylamino alkoxy] Indole 3-hydrazone 2-one were prepared from 5-hydroxy isatin. The structures of the products were characterized by IR, NMR, and MASS Spectral studies. All the compounds were examined for antiepileptic activity by maximal electroshock seizure (MES) and pentylenetetrazole (PTZ) induced convulsion method. These compounds were also evaluated for their neurotoxicity study by rotarod method. Some of these compounds showed good antiepileptic activity when compared with standard drug Phenytoin and all the compounds showed less neurotoxicity when compared with standard drug Diazepam.

  5. Significance of the EEG in the decision to initiate antiepileptic treatment in patients with epilepsy: a perspective on recent evidence.

    PubMed

    Jaseja, Harinder

    2009-10-01

    The significance of electroencephalography in the prediction of seizure recurrence after a first unprovoked seizure remains a topic of debate. Opinion on the initiation of antiepileptic treatment after a first seizure also remains divided. However, in view of recent evidence, this article is intended to highlight the significance of a properly performed EEG in the decision to initiate antiepileptic drug treatment as early as possible to prevent further morbidity and other consequences.

  6. Antiepileptic Medications in Autism Spectrum Disorder: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hirota, Tomoya; Veenstra-VanderWeele, Jeremy; Hollander, Eric; Kishi, Taro

    2014-01-01

    Electroencephalogram-recorded epileptiform activity is common in children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), even without clinical seizures. A systematic literature search identified 7 randomized, placebo-controlled trials of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) in ASD (total n = 171), including three of valproate, and one each of lamotrigine,…

  7. The Relationship among Side Effects Associated with Anti-Epileptic Medications in Those with Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sipes, Megan; Matson, Johnny L.; Belva, Brian; Turygin, Nicole; Kozlowski, Alison M.; Horovitz, Max

    2011-01-01

    Seizures are fairly common in those with intellectual disabilities. In order to treat these seizures, antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) are often used and in many cases are effective. However, these medications often create a variety of associated side effects. In order to monitor these side effects, measures such as the SEIZES-B have been used. While…

  8. Discontinuance of Antiepileptic Medications in Patients with Developmental Disability and Diagnosis of Epilepsy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alvarez, Norberto

    1989-01-01

    Followup 8 years after reduction of antiepileptic drugs in 50 institutionalized developmentally disabled epileptic patients found recurrence of seizures in 26 patients. Predictors for a seizure-free state off medication included few documented seizures in lifetime, no gross neurological abnormalities, and persistently normal electroencephalograms.…

  9. Requirements for generic antiepileptic medicines: a clinical perspective.

    PubMed

    Trinka, Eugen; Krämer, Günter; Graf, Martin

    2011-12-01

    Many antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) are now available as a generic product. This can potentially save the healthcare providers massive costs. Hence, governmental authorities have introduced rules and incentives for clinicians to switch from the original branded AED to a generic product. Clinicians and patients with epilepsy are reluctant to switch. The licensing of generic AEDs is based on the equation that bioavailability means therapeutic equivalence. However, from a clinical standpoint one has to consider several other relevant issues: (1) Do generic AEDs have the same efficacy, safety and quality? (2) Can generic AEDs be used as substitutions for brand AEDs? (3) Can generic products of AEDs be used interchangeably? (4) Does the generic AED manufacturer guarantee the long-term consistency of availability on the market? (4) Do generic AEDs reduce the costs, and--if so--are these costs worth any additional risk to patient's safety? This article reviews the clinical issues related to current bioequivalence, prescribability, and switchability of AEDs.

  10. Antiepileptic popular ketogenic diet: emerging twists in an ancient story.

    PubMed

    Vamecq, Joseph; Vallée, Louis; Lesage, Florian; Gressens, Pierre; Stables, James P

    2005-01-01

    The antiepileptic activity associated with ketogenic diets (KD) have been known for some time. First reports date back to the Middle Ages and even Biblical times where KD was achieved by fasting (i.e. "water diet") [see Swink, T.D., Vining, E.P.G., Freeman, J.M., 1997. The ketogenic diet: 1997. Adv. Pediatr. 44, 297-329, and references therein]. In the early 20th century, changes in the design of the KD were introduced, shifting the so-called "water diet" to a high-fat diet. Initial clinical evaluations undertaken between the 1920s and 1940s were enthusiastic, but the popularity of the KD was retrograded upon clinical introduction of phenytoin and subsequently other antiepileptic drugs. Today, despite a pharmacological arsenal targeting cerebral receptors and specific events in seizure initiation and development, about 30-40% patients are still refractory to available medications. Thus, the KD has been re-introduced in recent years as an alternative therapy, averring to be efficacious against some instances of resistant or intractable epilepsy. Despite a long historical background and enlarged clinical use, identification of the underlying anticonvulsant mechanisms associated with this nonpharmacological approach is still in stagnation. The present review is an attempt to encourage current research orientation through well-based and directed proposals for putative emerging candidates mediating KD anticonvulsant mechanisms. The reader is provided with a special emphasis on ATP-sensitive and recently cloned two-pore (or tandem) domain potassium channels, as well as several emerging conceptual views and advances such as nuclear receptors, uncoupling proteins and gap junctions that the authors speculate may contribute to understanding the basic mechanisms linked to the KD.

  11. Antiepileptic potential of matrine via regulation the levels of gamma-aminobutyric acid and glutamic acid in the brain.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Jun; Jiang, Yugang

    2013-12-05

    Our present study aimed to determine the antiepileptic activity of matrine, and explore the possible molecular mechanism. To evaluate the antiepileptic activity of matrine, seizures in mice induced by PTZ and MES were established, then the pentobarbital sodium-induced anaesthetizing time and locomotor activity tests in mice were also carried out. For the molecular mechanism investigations, contents of aspartic acid (Asp), gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), glutamic acid (Glu), glycine (Gly) in seizures mice were determined; then, the chronic seizures rats induced by PTZ were prepared, and western blotting was used to determine the expressions of GAD 65, GABAA and GABAB in the brains. In the results, matrine showed significant antiepileptic effects on seizures mice induced by MES and PTZ. Moreover, the pentobarbital sodium-induced anaesthetizing time and locomotor activity tests were also demonstrated that matrine had obvious antiepileptic effects. Additionally, our results revealed that after treatment with matrine, contents of GABA can be elevated, and the contents of Glu were obviously decreased. Furthermore, western blotting revealed that the mechanism regarding the antiepileptic effect of may be related to the up-regulations of GAD 65 and GABAA in the brain. Collectively, we suggested that matrine can be developed as an effective antiseptic drug.

  12. Design and synthesis of chroman derivatives with dual anti-breast cancer and antiepileptic activities

    PubMed Central

    Rawat, Pinki; Verma, Saurabh Manaswita

    2016-01-01

    A series of chroman derivatives was designed, prepared, and examined for their anti-breast cancer and antiepileptic activities. All synthesized compounds yielded results that were in good agreement with spectral data. The bioassay showed that some of the resultant compounds exerted remarkable inhibitory effects on growth of human breast cancer cell line MCF-7. In particular, compound 6i (the concentration required for 50% inhibition of cell growth [GI50] =34.7 µM) exerted promising anticancer activity toward MCF-7 cell line. Additionally, compounds 6b, 6c, 6d, 6e, 6g, 6i, and 6l showed advanced antiepileptic activity than reference drugs. None of the compounds showed neurotoxicity, as determined by the rotarod test. The obtained results proved that these distinctive compounds could be relevant as models for future discovery and research, as well as for the production of more number of active derivatives. PMID:27621598

  13. Long-term antiepileptic treatment with histone deacetylase inhibitors may reduce the risk of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Stettner, Mark; Krämer, Günter; Strauss, Arne; Kvitkina, Tatjana; Ohle, Sandra; Kieseier, Bernd C; Thelen, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Various antiepileptic drugs such as valproic acid, carbamazepine, oxcarbazepine, lamotrigine and levetiracetam are known to exert histone deacetylase inhibitory (HDACi) properties, which can modify aberrantly silenced gene expression by an epigenetic mechanism. This study was initiated to examine a potential beneficial effect of these drugs on prostate cancer (PC) development. The prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels of 106 patients under long-term treatment with antiepileptic drugs and known HDACi properties were examined. PSA represents a hallmark in the early detection of PC, and its levels may predict an invasive disease in subsequent years. For in-vitro experiments, the PC cell line LNCaP was treated with HDACi drugs; subsequently, PSA and further PC markers were assessed. When men over 50 years of age were treated with HDACi drugs they had lower age-corrected PSA levels compared with control groups, according to the following ranking: valproic acid>levetiracetam>carbamazepine/oxcarbazepine>lamotrigine. Furthermore, there was a correlation between PSA reduction and the number of HDACi drugs within the medication, lending credence to the idea that a synergistic effect might be possible. Moreover, in vitro, HDACi drugs decrease PSA on mRNA and protein levels and exhibit further oncoprotective properties.The fact that HDACi drugs exert antiproliferative effects on neoplastic cells in vitro and in vivo, which are paralleled by expression alterations of aberrantly regulated genes, underlines the potential therapeutic value of HDACi drugs. These data suggest that long-term HDACi treatment can positively influence the characteristically slow transformation of tumour precursor cells in the prostate and may thus reduce a patient's risk of developing PC.

  14. Weight-reducing side effects of the antiepileptic agents topiramate and zonisamide.

    PubMed

    Antel, J; Hebebrand, J

    2012-01-01

    Drug-induced weight alteration can be a serious side effect that applies to several therapeutic agents and must be referred to in the respective approved labeling texts. The side effect may become health threatening in case of significant weight change in either direction. Several antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) are associated with weight gain such as gabapentin, pregabalin, valproic acid, and vigabatrin and to some extent carbamazepine. Others are weight neutral such as lamotrigine, levetiracetam, and phenytoin or associated with slight weight loss as, e.g., felbamate. The focus of this chapter is on the two AEDs causing strong weight loss: topiramate and zonisamide. For both drugs, several molecular mechanisms of actions are published. We provide a review of these potential mechanisms, some of which are based on in vivo studies in animal models for obesity, and of clinical studies exploring these two drugs as single entities or in combinations with other agents.

  15. Antiepileptics for post-herpetic neuralgia in the elderly: current and future prospects.

    PubMed

    Pickering, Gisèle

    2014-09-01

    Post-herpetic neuralgia is a painful condition and its prevalence increases with age. It is a burden for older patients and the association of age-related pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic changes, high co-morbidity and polypharmacy leads to the risk of adverse drug reactions and interactions. This type of neuropathic pain is particularly difficult to treat and guidelines recommend the use of gabapentinoids and some antidepressants, the utility of which may be hampered by adverse effects such as sedation, dizziness and impaired age-related renal function. Re-formulations of antiepileptics (anticonvulsants) are being developed and/or marketed and suggest interesting innovative profiles with improved bioavailability, low drug-drug interactions and better tolerability that need to be confirmed in future studies. However, there are no new antiepileptics being developed for post-herpetic neuralgia, and prospective studies specifically focused on the older population are still missing, while this age group is particularly at risk of developing shingles and chronic neuropathic pain with a deleterious impact on quality of life.

  16. Effects of valproate derivatives I. Antiepileptic efficacy of amides, structural analogs and esters.

    PubMed

    Redecker, C; Altrup, U; Hoppe, D; Düsing, R; Speckmann, E J

    2000-01-04

    Derivatives of the antiepileptic drug valproate (VPA, 2-propylpentanoic acid) have been synthesized and tested in order to improve the intracellular availability of VPA. The buccal ganglia of Helix pomatia were used as a test nervous system and antiepileptic efficacies were reconfirmed using rat cortex in vivo. Epileptiform activities consisted of typical paroxysmal depolarization shifts (PDS) which appeared in the identified neuron B3 with application of pentylenetetrazol. Epileptiform activities were found to be accelerated, unaffected or blocked. (i) The Amide-derivatives 2-propylpentanamide and N,N-dipropyl-2-propylpentanamide, and short chain ester derivatives 1-O-(2-propylpentanoyl)-2,3-propandiol, 2,2-di(hydroxymethyl)-1-O-(2-propylpentanoyl)-1,3-propanediol and 2,2-di(hydroxymethyl)-1,3-di-O-(2-propylpentanoyl)-1,3-propanediol accelerated epileptiform activities. Membrane potential often shifted to a permanent depolarization which corresponded to the PDS-inactivation level. (ii) The structural analogs 1-cycloheptene-1-carboxylic acid and cyclooctanecarboxylic acid accelerated epileptiform activities only slightly or were without effects. (iii) The small VPA-ester, 2-propylpentanoic acid ethyl ester, decreased the epileptiform activities in a way that is comparable to the effects of VPA well known from previous studies. It thus could be thought as a VPA-pro-drug. (iv) The mannitol-esters 1-O-(2-propylpentanoyl)-D-mannitol and 3,4;5,6-Di-O-isopropylidene-1-O-(2-propylpentanoyl)-D-mannitol blocked the PDS in a way which is different from the known effects of VPA. These substances are interpreted not to exert their effects after being metabolized to VPA and thus they are thought to be new antiepileptic substances.

  17. [Combined treatment with antiepileptic drugs. Andalusian Epilepsy Guide 2015].

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Álvarez, Juan C; Ramos-Lizana, Julio; Machado-Casas, Irene S; Serrano-Castro, Pedro J; Martínez-Antón, Jacinto L; Ruiz-Giménez, Jesús

    2015-04-16

    Objetivo. Elaborar unas recomendaciones basadas en evidencias cientificas y en consenso de los autores y revisores, que aborden las cuestiones basicas acerca de la combinacion de farmacos antiepilepticos. Desarrollo. Un comite de 11 expertos pertenecientes a la Sociedad Andaluza de Epilepsia (SAdE), constituido por siete neurologos, tres neuropediatras y un neurologo-neurofisiologo, todos con especial competencia en epilepsia, promovieron la realizacion de una revision bibliografica exhaustiva entre 55 expertos en epilepsia pertenecientes a la SAdE, en busca de evidencias disponibles relacionadas con temas diagnosticos o terapeuticos en epilepsia. La guia se estructuro en 35 capitulos. Uno de los capitulos abordo la combinacion de farmacos antiepilepticos en el tratamiento de la epilepsia. Basandose en 77 citas bibliograficas y en la opinion consensuada de autores y revisores, se confecciono una serie de recomendaciones de facil aplicacion. Conclusiones. La combinacion de farmacos antiepilepticos en los pacientes con epilepsia cuyas crisis no estan controladas con un solo farmaco puede conseguir en numerosas ocasiones que entren en remision. Existe una serie de factores relacionados con el tipo de epilepsia y caracteristicas del paciente y con los farmacos antiepilepticos que se van a utilizar en combinacion que pueden favorecer el exito terapeutico. Se debe evitar en lo posible el sobretratamiento con la combinacion de farmacos antiepilepticos. Los resultados de esta revision proveen unas recomendaciones sobre el tratamiento combinado con farmacos antiepilepticos, basadas en evidencias cientificas y en el consenso de los autores, utiles, sencillas y aplicables en los diferentes niveles asistenciales.

  18. [Epilepsy and cognition: the role of antiepileptic drugs].

    PubMed

    García-Peñas, Juan José; Fournier-Del Castillo, M Concepción; Domínguez-Carral, Jana

    2014-02-24

    Introduccion. Multiples y muy diversos factores se relacionan con la alteracion cognitiva en la epilepsia, incluyendo el efecto adverso directo de los farmacos antiepilepticos (FAE). El uso de los FAE requiere de un riguroso equilibrio entre riesgo y beneficio para conseguir asi el mejor control de las crisis con el menor numero de efectos adversos neurocognitivos. Objetivo. Analizar los efectos adversos cognitivos generales y especificos de los FAE de primera, segunda y tercera generacion. Desarrollo. Todos los FAE disponibles pueden producir efectos adversos cognitivos, que son mas frecuentes en politerapia, con dosis totales altas y niveles sericos elevados. Las alteraciones mas comunes son el descenso de la capacidad de reaccion y de la velocidad de procesamiento con afectacion concomitante de la memoria, la atencion y el lenguaje. Sin embargo, hay gran controversia sobre la existencia o no de perfiles cognitivos especificos para cada uno de los distintos FAE y se dispone de una informacion contradictoria al respecto por la inadecuada metodologia de los estudios comparativos. Conclusiones. Los efectos adversos cognitivos de los FAE son frecuentes y pueden afectar negativamente la tolerabilidad, el cumplimiento y el mantenimiento a largo plazo del tratamiento antiepileptico. Se debe considerar el potencial efecto adverso cognitivo de los distintos FAE a la hora de elegir un tratamiento y es importante reconocer e identificar precozmente estos efectos adversos y saber como pueden afectar a los pacientes.

  19. Practitioner Review: Use of Antiepileptic Drugs in Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guerrini, Renzo; Parmeggiani, Lucio

    2006-01-01

    Background: The aim in treating epilepsy is to minimise or control seizures with full respect of quality-of-life issues, especially of cognitive functions. Optimal treatment first demands a correct recognition of the major type of seizures, followed by a correct diagnosis of the type of epilepsy or of the specific syndrome. Methods: Review of data…

  20. Intranasal delivery of antiepileptic medications for treatment of seizures.

    PubMed

    Wermeling, Daniel P

    2009-04-01

    Acute isolated seizure, repetitive or recurrent seizures, and status epilepticus are all deemed medical emergencies. Mortality and worse neurologic outcome are directly associated with the duration of seizure activity. A number of recent reviews have described consensus statements regarding the pharmacologic treatment protocols for seizures when patients are in pre-hospital, institutional, and home-bound settings. Benzodiazepines, such as lorazepam, diazepam, midazolam, and clonazepam are considered to be medications of first choice. The rapidity by which a medication can be delivered to the systemic circulation and then to the brain plays a significant role in reducing the time needed to treat seizures and reduce opportunity for damage to the CNS. Speed of delivery, particularly outside of the hospital, is enhanced when transmucosal routes of delivery are used in place of an intravenous injection. Intranasal transmucosal delivery of benzodiazepines is useful in reducing time to drug administration and cessation of seizures in the pre-hospital setting, when actively seizing patients arrive in the emergency room, and at home where caregivers treat their dependents. This review summarizes factors to consider when choosing a benzodiazepine for intranasal administration, including formulation and device considerations, pharmacology and pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic profiles. A review of the most relevant clinical studies in epilepsy patients will provide context for the relative success of this technique with a number of benzodiazepines and relatively less sophisticated nasal preparations. Neuropeptides delivered intranasally, crossing the blood-brain barrier via the olfactory system, may increase the availability of medications for treatment of epilepsy. Consequently, there remains a significant unmet medical need to serve the pharamcotherapeutic requirements of epilepsy patients through commercial development and marketing of intranasal antiepileptic products.

  1. The Effectiveness of Mood Stabilizers and Antiepileptic Medication for the Management of Behaviour Problems in Adults with Intellectual Disability: A Systematic Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deb, S.; Chaplin, R.; Sohanpal, S.; Unwin, G.; Soni, R.; Lenotre, L.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Psychotropic medications are used to manage behaviour problems in adults with intellectual disability (ID). One group of psychotropic medication are mood stabilizers such as lithium and some antiepileptic drugs. Method: A comprehensive systematic review was performed to determine the evidence base for the effectiveness of mood…

  2. Use of antiepileptic or benzodiazepine medication and suicidal ideation--The Northern Finland Birth Cohort 1966.

    PubMed

    Rissanen, I; Jääskeläinen, E; Isohanni, M; Koponen, H; Ansakorpi, H; Miettunen, J

    2015-05-01

    Both antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) and benzodiazepines (BZDs) have previously been associated with an increased risk of suicidality. Our aim was to study the association between the use of conventional AEDs and BZDs and suicidal ideation in a large population-based cohort. Information on the medications used in the Northern Finland Birth Cohort 1966 was collected from the subjects at the age of 31 years, using a postal questionnaire (N=8211). The presence of suicidal ideation and other symptoms of depression and anxiety was assessed via the Hopkins Symptom Checklist - 25 questionnaire. The associations between medications and suicidal ideation were studied in different diagnostic groups and adjusted for symptoms of depression and anxiety. No difference was observed in suicidal ideation between AED users (n=54) and nonusers (n=8157). Subjects using BZDs (n=147) had greater suicidal ideation compared with nonusers (n=8064). Antiepileptic drug and benzodiazepine users more often exhibited other depression and anxiety symptoms. After adjustment for these symptoms, both AED and BZD users had less suicidal ideation compared with nonusers. In conclusion, in this population-based cohort, neither the use of AEDs nor that of BZDs was found to be associated with increased suicidal ideation when the symptoms of depression and anxiety were taken into account.

  3. Direct evidence of nonadherence to antiepileptic medication in refractory focal epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Carpentier, Nicolas; Jonas, Jacques; Frismand, Solène; Vignal, Jean-Pierre; Rikir, Estelle; Baumann, Cédric; Lapicque, Françoise; Saint-Marcoux, Franck; Vespignani, Hervé; Maillard, Louis

    2013-01-01

    The adherence to medication in drug-resistant focal epilepsy (RFE) remains largely unknown. The present work aimed to assess the frequency of recent adherence to antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) in patients with RFE. This prospective observational study screened all patients with RFE, admitted to the Nancy University Hospital between April 2006 and September 2008, for a 5-day hospitalization without AED tapering. The adherence to AEDs was assessed by measuring serum drug levels on day 1 (reflecting the recent "at home" adherence) and day 5 (reflecting the individual reference concentration when drug ingestion was supervised). A patient was considered nonadherent if at least one of their serum drug levels was different between days 1 and 5. The day-1 value was considered different from day 5 when it was at least 30% lower (underdosed) or 30% higher (overdosed). Nonadherent patients were classified as under-consumers in the case of one or more underdosed day-1 values, over-consumers in the case of one or more overdosed day-1 values, or undefined if they exhibited both underdosed and overdosed day-1 values. Forty-four of the 48 screened patients were included. Eighteen (40.9%) of 44 patients were nonadherent. Among them, 12 (66.7%) were over-consumers, 4 (22.2%) were under-consumers, and 2 (11.1%) were undefined nonadherents. The study indicates that recent adherence to antiepileptic medication in this group of patients with RFE is poor. Overconsumption is the most frequent form of nonadherence in this population and should be specifically assessed to prevent its possible consequences in terms of AEDs dose-dependent adverse events.

  4. In silico inhibition of GABARAP activity using antiepileptic medicinal derived compounds

    PubMed Central

    Mathew, Shilu; Faheem, Muhammad; Al-Malki, Abdulrahman L; Kumosani, Taha A; Qadri, Ishtiaq

    2015-01-01

    Epilepsy is a neurological disorder affecting more than 50 million people worldwide. It can be controlled by antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) but more than 30% patients are still resistant to AEDs. To overcome this problem, researchers are trying to develop novel approaches to treat epilepsy including the use of herbal medicines. The γ-amino butyric acid type-A receptor associated protein (GABARAP) is ubiquitin-like modifier implicated in the intracellular trafficking of GABAAR. An in silico mutation was created at 116 amino acid position G116A, and an in silico study was carried out to identify the potential binding inhibitors (with antiepileptic properties) against the active sites of GABARAP. Five different plant derived compounds namely (a) Aconitine (b) Berberine (c) Montanine (d) Raubasine (e) Safranal were selected, and their quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSAR) have been conducted to search the inhibitory activity of the selected compounds. The results have shown maximum number of hydrogen bond (H-bond) interactions of Raubasine with highest interaction energy among all of the five compounds. So, Raubasine could be the best fit ligand of GABARAP but in vitro, and in vivo studies are necessary for further confirmation. PMID:26124559

  5. Reduction of voltage-operated potassium currents by levetiracetam: a novel antiepileptic mechanism of action?

    PubMed

    Madeja, Michael; Margineanu, Doru Georg; Gorji, Ali; Siep, Elke; Boerrigter, Paul; Klitgaard, Henrik; Speckmann, Erwin-Josef

    2003-10-01

    Levetiracetam (ucb L059; Keppra) is a novel antiepileptic drug. Its effects on action potential generation and voltage-operated potassium currents were studied in acutely isolated hippocampal CA1 neurones from rat and guinea pig, using the patch-clamp technique in the whole-cell configuration. (i) Levetiracetam reduced repetitive action potential generation and affected the single action potential. Levetiracetam, 100 microM, decreased the total number of action potentials and reduced the total depolarisation area of repetitive action potentials by 21%. Furthermore, levetiracetam increased the duration of the first action potential slightly, prolonged that of the second action potential by 13% and decreased the slope of rise by 23%. (ii) Levetiracetam decreased the voltage-operated potassium current. Without effect on sodium and A-type potassium currents, levetiracetam, 100 microM, reduced the delayed rectifier current by 26%. The concentration of half-maximal block was 47 microM for guinea pig and 6 microM for rat neurones. Thus, the reduction of repetitive action potential generation by levetiracetam can be attributed, unexpectedly, to a moderate reduction of the delayed rectifier potassium current, as supported by a simulation of action potential generation. This suggests that a reduction of potassium currents may contribute to the antiepileptic effect(s) of levetiracetam.

  6. Colorimetric Detection of Escherichia coli Based on the Enzyme-Induced Metallization of Gold Nanorods.

    PubMed

    Chen, Juhong; Jackson, Angelyca A; Rotello, Vincent M; Nugen, Sam R

    2016-05-01

    A novel enzyme-induced metallization colorimetric assay is developed to monitor and measure beta-galactosidase (β-gal) activity, and is further employed for colorimetric bacteriophage (phage)-enabled detection of Escherichia coli (E. coli). This assay relies on enzymatic reaction-induced silver deposition on the surface of gold nanorods (AuNRs). In the presence of β-gal, the substrate p-aminophenyl β-d-galactopyranoside is hydrolyzed to produce p-aminophenol (PAP). Reduction of silver ions by PAP generates a silver shell on the surface of AuNRs, resulting in the blue shift of the longitudinal localized surface plasmon resonance peak and multicolor changes of the detection solution from light green to orange-red. Under optimized conditions, the detection limit for β-gal is 128 pM, which is lower than the conventional colorimetric assay. Additionally, the assay has a broader dynamic range for β-gal detection. The specificity of this assay for the detection of β-gal is demonstrated against several protein competitors. Additionally, this technique is successfully applied to detect E. coli bacteria cells in combination with bacteriophage infection. Due to the simplicity and short incubation time of this enzyme-induced metallization colorimetric method, the assay is well suited for the detection of bacteria in low-resource settings.

  7. Spontaneous and restriction enzyme-induced chromosomal recombination in mammalian cells.

    PubMed Central

    Godwin, A R; Bollag, R J; Christie, D M; Liskay, R M

    1994-01-01

    We have derived Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell hybrids containing herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (tk) heteroalleles for the study of spontaneous and restriction enzyme-induced interchromosomal recombination. These lines allowed us to make a direct comparison between spontaneous intrachromosomal and interchromosomal recombination using the same tk heteroalleles at the same genomic insertion site. We find that the frequency of interchromosomal recombination is less by a factor of at least 5000 than that of intrachromosomal recombination. Our results with mammalian cells differ markedly from results with Saccharomyces cerevisiae, with which similar studies typically give only a 10-to 30-fold difference. Next, to inquire into the fate of double-strand breaks at either of the two different Xho I linker insertion mutations, we electroporated PaeR7I enzyme, an isoschizomer of Xho I, into these hybrids. A priori, these breaks can be repaired either by recombination from the homology or by end-joining. Despite a predicted bias against recovering end-joining products in our system, all cells characterized by enzyme-induced resistance to hypoxanthine/aminopterin/thymidine were, in fact, due to nonhomologous recombination or end-joining. These results are in agreement with other studies that used extrachromosomal sequences to examine the relative efficiencies of end-joining and homologous recombination in mammalian cells, but are in sharp contrast to results of analogous studies in S. cerevisiae, wherein only products of homologous events are detected. Images Fig. 2 PMID:7809076

  8. An Update on Maternal Use of Antiepileptic Medications in Pregnancy and Neurodevelopment Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Gerard, Elizabeth E; Meador, Kimford J

    2015-06-01

    Antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) are prescribed commonly to women of childbearing age. In utero exposure to some AEDs can have significant cognitive and behavioral consequences for the unborn child. Recently, prospective studies of women taking AEDs during pregnancy have added significantly to our understanding of cognitive and behavioral teratogenic risks posed by fetal AED exposure. Valproate is clearly associated with impaired cognitive development as well as an increased risk of disorders such as autism and autism spectrum disorder. Exposure to carbamazepine, lamotrigine, levetiracetam, or phenytoin monotherapy is associated with more favorable cognitive and behavioral outcomes than valproate, but more data are required to clarify if these AEDs have more subtle effects on cognition and behavior. There are insufficient data on the developmental effects of other AEDs in humans. Further, the underlying mechanisms of cognitive teratogenesis are poorly understood, including the genetic factors that affect susceptibility to AEDs.

  9. An Update on Maternal Use of Antiepileptic Medications in Pregnancy and Neurodevelopment Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Gerard, Elizabeth E.; Meador, Kimford J.

    2015-01-01

    Antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) are prescribed commonly to women of childbearing age. In utero exposure to some AEDs can have significant cognitive and behavioral consequences for the unborn child. Recently, prospective studies of women taking AEDs during pregnancy have added significantly to our understanding of cognitive and behavioral teratogenic risks posed by fetal AED exposure. Valproate is clearly associated with impaired cognitive development as well as an increased risk of disorders such as autism and autism spectrum disorder. Exposure to carbamazepine, lamotrigine, levetiracetam, or phenytoin monotherapy is associated with more favorable cognitive and behavioral outcomes than valproate, but more data are required to clarify if these AEDs have more subtle effects on cognition and behavior. There are insufficient data on the developmental effects of other AEDs in humans. Further, the underlying mechanisms of cognitive teratogenesis are poorly understood, including the genetic factors that affect susceptibility to AEDs. PMID:27617120

  10. Therapeutic Drug Monitoring of the Newer Anti-Epilepsy Medications

    PubMed Central

    Krasowski, Matthew D.

    2010-01-01

    In the past twenty years, 14 new antiepileptic drugs have been approved for use in the United States and/or Europe. These drugs are eslicarbazepine acetate, felbamate, gabapentin, lacosamide, lamotrigine, levetiracetam, oxcarbazepine, pregabalin, rufinamide, stiripentol, tiagabine, topiramate, vigabatrin and zonisamide. In general, the clinical utility of therapeutic drug monitoring has not been established in clinical trials for these new anticonvulsants, and clear guidelines for drug monitoring have yet to be defined. The antiepileptic drugs with the strongest justifications for drug monitoring are lamotrigine, oxcarbazepine, stiripentol, and zonisamide. Stiripentol and tiagabine are strongly protein bound and are candidates for free drug monitoring. Therapeutic drug monitoring has lower utility for gabapentin, pregabalin, and vigabatrin. Measurement of salivary drug concentrations has potential utility for therapeutic drug monitoring of lamotrigine, levetiracetam, and topiramate. Therapeutic drug monitoring of the new antiepileptic drugs will be discussed in managing patients with epilepsy. PMID:20640233

  11. Felbamate displays in vitro antiepileptic effects as a broad spectrum excitatory amino acid receptor antagonist.

    PubMed

    Domenici, M R; Sagratella, S; Ongini, E; Longo, R; Scotti de Carolis, A

    1994-12-27

    The in vitro antiepileptic activity of the novel anticonvulsant drug felbamate was tested in rat hippocampal slices on the CA1 epileptiform bursting induced by different chemical epileptogenic agents. The effects of felbamate were compared with those of the anticonvulsant drugs diphenylhydantoin and pentobarbitone and with the effects of excitatory amino acid antagonists acting at both N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) and non-NMDA receptors. Like the non-NMDA receptor antagonist 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (CNQX), felbamate at a minimum effective concentration of 1 mM induced a significant (P < 0.01) reduction of the duration of the CA1 epileptiform bursting due to the K+ channel blocker, 4-aminopyridine, and the excitatory amino acids, kainate and quisqualate. Like the NMDA receptor antagonist ketamine, felbamate (1.6 mM) significantly (P < 0.01) decreased the duration of the CA1 epileptiform bursting caused by 'Mg(2+)-free' solutions. Conversely, felbamate (1.6 mM), CNQX (100 microM) and ketamine (100 microM) failed to affect the epileptiform bursting induced by the GABA antagonist penicillin. Pentobarbitone (100 microM) significantly (P < 0.01) decreased the duration of the CA1 epileptiform bursting caused by 'Mg(2+)-free' solutions, 4-aminopyridine or penicillin, while diphenylhydantoin (up to concentrations of 100 microM) failed to have an effect. The results indicate that felbamate displays a unique profile of in vitro antiepileptic effects as a broad spectrum antagonist of excitatory amino acid transmission.

  12. Non-imidazole histamine H3 receptor ligands incorporating antiepileptic moieties.

    PubMed

    Sadek, Bassem; Schwed, Johannes Stephan; Subramanian, Dhanasekaran; Weizel, Lilia; Walter, Miriam; Adem, Abdu; Stark, Holger

    2014-04-22

    A small series of histamine H3 receptor (H3R) ligands (1-5) incorporating different antiepileptic structural motifs has been newly synthesized. All compounds exhibited moderate to high in vitro hH3R affinities up to a sub-nanomolar concentration range with pKi values in the range of 6.25-9.62 with varying preferences for this receptor subtype. The compounds (1-5) were further investigated in vivo on anticonvulsant effects against maximum electroshock (MES)-induced and pentylenetetrazole (PTZ)-kindled convulsions in rats having phenytoin (PHT) as the reference antiepileptic drug (AED). Surprisingly, animals pretreated with 1 mg/kg, i.p. of 5,5-diphenyl-3-(3-(piperidin-1-yl)propyl)imidazolidine-2,4-dione (4) were only moderately protected and no protection was observed for compounds 1-3 and 5 in three different doses (1 mg, 5 mg, and 10 mg/kg i.p.). Compound 4 (1 mg/kg, i.p.) failed to modify PTZ-kindled convulsion. However, a dose of 10 mg/kg significantly reduced convulsions in both models. In contrast, 5,5-diphenyl-3-(4-(3-(piperidin-1-yl)propoxy)benzyl)imidazolidine-2,4-dione (5) (1, 5, and 10 mg/kg, i.p.) showed proconvulsant effects in the MES model with further confirmation of these results in the PTZ model as no protection was observed against convulsion in the doses tested (1 and 10 mg/kg). In addition, compound 4 (10 mg/kg, i.p.) significantly prolonged myoclonic latency time and shortened total convulsion duration when compared to control, PHT or standard H3R inverse agonist/antagonist pitolisant (PIT). Our results showed that H3R pharmacophores could successfully be structurally combined to antiepileptic moieties, especially phenytoin partial structures, maintaining the H3R affinity. However, the new derivatives for multiple-target approaches in epilepsy models are complex and show that pharmacophore elements are not easily pharmacologically combinable.

  13. Differential effects of microsomal enzyme inducers on in vitro thyroxine (T(4)) and triiodothyronine (T(3)) glucuronidation.

    PubMed

    Hood, A; Klaassen, C D

    2000-05-01

    Microsomal enzyme inducers that increase UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UDP-GT) activity are suspected to affect the thyroid gland by increasing the glucuronidation of T(4), which reduces serum thyroxine (T(4)). In response to reduced serum T(4), serum thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) increases. However, not all microsomal enzyme inducers that reduce serum T(4) produce an increase in serum TSH. We have shown that serum TSH is increased the most in rats treated with the microsomal enzyme inducers phenobarbital (PB) or pregnenolone-16alpha-carbonitrile (PCN), whereas TSH is affected less in rats treated with 3-methylcholanthrene (3MC) and Aroclor 1254 (PCB). It is unclear why serum TSH is differentially affected by various microsomal enzyme inducers. We propose that the glucuronidation of T(3) might be the reason serum TSH is increased by some microsomal enzyme inducers but not by others. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were fed either a basal diet or a diet containing PB (at 300, 600, 1200, or 2400 ppm), PCN (at 200, 400, 800, or 1600 ppm), 3MC (at 50, 100, 200, or 400 ppm), or PCB (at 25, 50, 100, or 200 ppm) for 7 days; and T(4) and T(3) UDP-GT activities were then determined. T(4) UDP-GT activity was increased in rats treated with PB (120%), PCN (250 to 400%), 3MC (400 to 600%), or PCB (300 to 430%). In contrast, T(3) UDP-GT activity was increased in rats treated with PB (90%) or PCN (120 to 200%), whereas 3MC and PCB treatments did not have an appreciable effect. In conclusion, differential effects on T(3) glucuronosyltransferase activity were found in rats treated with microsomal enzyme inducers.

  14. New antiepileptic medication linked to blue discoloration of the skin and eyes.

    PubMed

    Clark, Sarah; Antell, Alexandra; Kaufman, Kimberly

    2015-02-01

    Ezogabine is an antiepileptic medication approved in June 2011 by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) as an adjunctive treatment for partial seizures. Minimal drug interactions and a novel mechanism of action made ezogabine an appealing new treatment option. However, adverse effects reported during clinical trials and following drug approval have been alarming. A Risk Evaluation Mitigation Strategy (REMS) program has been established for urinary retention. A safety alert was published in April 2013 warning ezogabine may cause retinal pigment abnormalities and/or blue-gray discoloration, most notably on or near the lips, nail beds, sclera and conjunctiva with long-term use. In October 2013, the FDA announced a formal label change to ezogabine to include a black boxed warning emphasizing the previously reported warnings of eye and skin discoloration and permanent vision changes. Given the unknown nature of the pathophysiology, consequences and potential for reversibility of these effects, GlaxoSmithKline and the FDA have published recommendations for patients currently receiving ezogabine. Further data from published case reports and long-term safety trials in the future may lend additional insight into these concerning effects.

  15. The morphology of silver nanoparticles prepared by enzyme-induced reduction.

    PubMed

    Schneidewind, Henrik; Schüler, Thomas; Strelau, Katharina K; Weber, Karina; Cialla, Dana; Diegel, Marco; Mattheis, Roland; Berger, Andreas; Möller, Robert; Popp, Jürgen

    2012-01-01

    Silver nanoparticles were synthesized by an enzyme-induced growth process on solid substrates. In order to customize the enzymatically grown nanoparticles (EGNP) for analytical applications in biomolecular research, a detailed study was carried out concerning the time evolution of the formation of the silver nanoparticles, their morphology, and their chemical composition. Therefore, silver-nanoparticle films of different densities were investigated by using scanning as well as transmission electron microscopy to examine their structure. Cross sections of silver nanoparticles, prepared for analysis by transmission electron microscopy were additionally studied by energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy in order to probe their chemical composition. The surface coverage of substrates with silver nanoparticles and the maximum particle height were determined by Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy. Variations in the silver-nanoparticle films depending on the conditions during synthesis were observed. After an initial growth state the silver nanoparticles exhibit the so-called desert-rose or nanoflower-like structure. This complex nanoparticle structure is in clear contrast to the auto-catalytically grown spherical particles, which maintain their overall geometrical appearance while increasing their diameter. It is shown, that the desert-rose-like silver nanoparticles consist of single-crystalline plates of pure silver. The surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopic (SERS) activity of the EGNP structures is promising due to the exceptionally rough surface structure of the silver nanoparticles. SERS measurements of the vitamin riboflavin incubated on the silver nanoparticles are shown as an exemplary application for quantitative analysis.

  16. Varied effects of conventional antiepileptics on responding maintained by negative versus positive reinforcement.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Celeste; Harvey, Mark T; May, Michael E; Valdovinos, Maria G; Patterson, Tina G; Couppis, Maria H; Kennedy, Craig H

    2008-02-27

    We analyzed the effects of four conventional antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) - carbamazepine (CBZ), ethosuximide (ETH), phenytoin (PHT), and valproate (VPA) - on operant behavior maintained by negative or positive reinforcement contingencies. Rats were trained to lever press on a free-operant avoidance schedule or variable-interval (VI) schedule of appetitive reinforcement. Dose-effect functions were separately established on each reinforcement contingency for CBZ (12.5-100 mg/kg), ETH (25-200 mg/kg), PHT (12.5-50 mg/kg), and VPA (50-400 mg/kg). CBZ and PHT reduced responding on free-operant avoidance and VI appetitive reinforcement tasks, with positively reinforced behavior reduced at lower drug dosages than negatively reinforced responding. ETH and VPA reduced responding on the VI appetitive reinforcement task, but did not alter behavior maintained on the free-operant avoidance schedule. Our results suggest that conventional AEDs vary in their effect on operant behavior, depending on the type of reinforcement process maintaining responding.

  17. Antiepileptic hypersensitivity syndrome: clinicians beware and be aware.

    PubMed

    Bessmertny, Olga; Pham, Trinh

    2002-01-01

    Antiepileptic hypersensitivity syndrome is a serious idiosyncratic, non-dose-related adverse reaction reported to occur with phenytoin, phenobarbital, carbamazepine, primidone, and lamotrigine. The reaction usually develops 1 to 12 weeks after initiation of therapy with one of the above agents and is recognized by the classic triad of fever, rash, and internal organ involvement. Immediate discontinuation of the suspected anticonvulsant is essential for good outcome. Patients usually are managed supportively with hydration, antihistamines, H(2)-receptor blockers, and topical corticosteroids. In severe cases, the use of systemic corticosteroids may be necessary. The use of intravenous immune globulin should be limited to severe cases where Kawasaki disease or idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura cannot be ruled out. Education of health care professionals and patients is imperative to improving outcomes and prevention of this reaction in the future.

  18. Epilepsy as a pyridoxine-dependent condition: quantified urinary biomarkers for status evaluation and monitoring antiepileptic treatment.

    PubMed

    Dolina, Svetlana; Margalit, Dov; Malitsky, Sergey; Pressman, Eugeny; Rabinkov, Aharon

    2012-08-01

    The study testifies an assumption on epilepsy as an inborn error of pyridoxine metabolism and suggests non-invasive quantitative biomarkers for clarified evaluation of clinical status and monitoring an individual treatment by antiepileptic drugs. Urinary parameters of pyridoxal-phosphate (PLP)-dependent tryptophan degradation and the level of 4-pyridoxic acid, the end product of pyridoxine metabolism, were measured by HPLC method with simultaneous ultraviolet and fluorimetric detection in children with different forms of epilepsy and matched healthy controls. The concentrations of compounds formed or metabolized in the course of tryptophan degradation (kynurenines, indoxyl-sulfate) along with correlations between them turned out to be quantitative biomarkers useful for both clarifying patient's clinical state and monitoring antiepileptic treatment. In particular, the value of the ratio of 4-pyridoxic acid to kynurenine appears to be an index of an experienced seizure attack, while the ratio of 3-hydroxyanthranilic acid to 3-hydroxykynurenine reflects activity of kynureninase, the enzyme of critical sensitivity to PLP supply. Growing progressively worse, epilepsy is accompanied by aggravation of PLP-dependent disturbances of tryptophan metabolism and expanding inhibition of kynureninase. The affected pyridoxine metabolism is discussed as an inborn genetic trait in epilepsy in general, rather than a specific sign of pyridoxine-dependent epilepsy solely.

  19. Effect of ethacrynic acid on the anticonvulsant activity of the second-generation antiepileptics against maximal electroshock-induced seizures in mice.

    PubMed

    Łukawski, Krzysztof; Swiderska, Grazyna; Czuczwar, Stanisław J

    2009-12-01

    Recent experimental studies show that ethacrynic acid (ETA), a loop diuretic, exerts the anticonvulsant activity. Therefore, we tested the effect of ETA on the protective action of some second-generation antiepileptic drugs (oxcarbazepine [OXC], lamotrigine [LTG] and topiramate [TPM]) in the mouse maximal electroshock seizure (MES) model. ETA was administered acutely (50 and 100 mg/kg i.p.) or chronically, for 7 days (12.5 mg/kg i.p.). Both ETA acute (up to 100 mg/kg) and chronic (up to 12.5 mg/kg) treatment did not influence the threshold for electroconvulsions. In the MES test, ETA (100 mg/kg) potentiated the protective activity of TPM, decreasing its ED(50) value from 38.1 to 18.7 mg/kg (P<0.01). In contrast, ETA (100 mg/kg) remained without effect on the anticonvulsant action of the other antiepileptics (OXC and LTG) in mice. Chronic administration of ETA (12.5 mg/kg) did not affect the protective action of tested antiepileptics. The observed interaction between acute ETA and TPM was pharmacodynamic in nature because neither plasma nor total brain TPM concentrations were altered after injection of ETA.These results indicate existing interactions between ETA and TPM, which may have some clinical importance for epileptic patients treated with TPM and additionally ETA due to other medical causes.

  20. Highly sensitive DNA detection using cascade amplification strategy based on hybridization chain reaction and enzyme-induced metallization.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xu; Zhang, Zhi-Ling; Zheng, Si-Yang

    2015-04-15

    A novel highly sensitive colorimetric assay for DNA detection using cascade amplification strategy based on hybridization chain reaction and enzyme-induced metallization was established. The DNA modified superparamagnetic beads were demonstrated to capture and enrich the target DNA in the hybridization buffer or human plasma. The hybridization chain reaction and enzyme-induced silver metallization on the gold nanoparticles were used as cascade signal amplification for the detection of target DNA. The metalization of silver on the gold nanoparticles induced a significant color change from red to yellow until black depending on the concentration of the target DNA, which could be recognized by naked eyes. This method showed a good specificity for the target DNA detection, with the capabilty to discriminate single-base-pair mismatched DNA mutation (single nucleotide polymorphism). Meanwhile, this approach exhibited an excellent anti-interference capability with the convenience of the magentic seperation and washing, which enabled its usage in complex biological systems such as human blood plasma. As an added benefit, the utilization of hybridization chain reaction and enzyme-induced metallization improved detection sensitivity down to 10pM, which is about 100-fold lower than that of traditional unamplified homogeneous assays.

  1. Effect of enzyme inducers and inhibitors on the pharmacokinetics of oltipraz in rats.

    PubMed

    Bae, Soo Kyung; Lee, Shin Jung; Kim, Young Hoon; Kim, Taekrho; Lee, Myung Gull

    2005-04-01

    A series of in-vitro and in-vivo experiments, using various inducers and inhibitors of hepatic microsomal cytochrome P450 (CYP) isozymes, was conducted to study oltipraz pharmacokinetics in rats. In in-vivo studies, oltipraz at a dose of 10 mg kg(-) was administered intravenously to rats. In rats pretreated with SKF 525-A (a nonspecific CYP isozyme inhibitor in rats; n-9), the time-averaged total body clearance (CL) of oltipraz was significantly slower (56.6% decrease) than that in untreated rats (n=9). This indicated that oltipraz is metabolized via CYP isozymes in rats. Hence, various enzyme inducers or inhibitors were used in in-vitro and in-vivo studies in rats. In rats pretreated with 3-methylcholanthrene (n=9 and 8 for untreated and treated groups, respectively), phenobarbital (n=7 and 10 for untreated and treated groups, respectively) or dexamethasone (n=7 and 12 for untreated and treated groups, respectively) (main inducers of CYP1A1/2, 2B1/2 and 3A1/2 in rats, respectively), the CL values were significantly faster (38.4, 94.4 and 33.6% increase, respectively). In rats pretreated with sulfaphenazole (n=8 and 9 for untreated and treated groups, respectively), quinine (n=7 and 9 for untreated and treated groups, respectively) or troleandomycin (n=8 and 9 for untreated and treated groups, respectively) (main inhibitors of CYP2C11, 2D1 and 3A1/2 in rats, respectively), the CL values were significantly slower (31.0, 27.6 and 36.3% decrease, respectively). The in-vivo results with various enzyme inhibitors correlated well with the in-vitro intrinsic clearance for disappearance of oltipraz (CL(int)) (n=5, each). The above data suggested that oltipraz could be metabolized in male rats mainly via CYP1A1/2, 2B1/2, 2C11, 3A1/2 and 2D1.

  2. Continuous Infusion Antiepileptic Medications for Refractory Status Epilepticus: A Review for Nurses.

    PubMed

    Wiss, Adam L; Samarin, Michael; Marler, Jacob; Jones, G Morgan

    Status epilepticus requires treatment with emergent initial therapy with a benzodiazepine and urgent control therapy with an additional antiepileptic drug (AED) to terminate clinical and/or electrographic seizure activity. However, nearly one-third of patients will prove refractory to the aforementioned therapies and are prone to a higher degree of neuronal injury, resistance to pharmacotherapy, and death. Current guidelines for refractory status epilepticus (RSE) recommend initiating a continuous intravenous (CIV) anesthetic over bolus dosing with a different AED. Continuous intravenous agents most commonly used for this indication include midazolam, propofol, and pentobarbital, but ketamine is an alternative option. Comparative studies illustrating the optimal agent are lacking, and selection is often based on adverse effect profiles and patient-specific factors. In addition, dosing and titration are largely based on small studies and expert opinion with continuous electroencephalogram monitoring used to guide intensity and duration of treatment. Nonetheless, the doses required to halt seizure activity are likely to produce profound adverse effects that clinicians should anticipate and combat. The purpose of this review was to summarize the available RSE literature focusing on CIV midazolam, pentobarbital, propofol, and ketamine, and to serve as a primer for nurses providing care to these patients.

  3. Development and validation of sensitive spectrophotometric method for determination of two antiepileptics in pharmaceutical formulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gouda, Ayman A.; Malah, Zakia Al

    2013-03-01

    Rapid, sensitive and validated spectrophotometric methods for the determination of two antiepileptics (gabapentin (GAB) and pregabalin (PRG)) in pure forms and in pharmaceutical formulations was developed. The method is based on the formation of charge transfer complex between drug and the chromogenic reagents quinalizarin (Quinz) and alizarin red S (ARS) producing charge transfer complexes in methanolic medium which showed an absorption maximum at 571 and 528 nm for GAB and 572 and 538 nm for PRG using Quinz and ARS, respectively. The optimization of the reaction conditions such as the type of solvent, reagent concentration and reaction time were investigated. Beer's law is obeyed in the concentration ranges 0.4-8.0 and 0.5-10 μg mL-1 for GAB and PRG using Quinz and ARS, respectively. The molar absorptivity, Sandell sensitivity, detection and quantification limits are also calculated. The correlation coefficients were ⩾0.9992 with a relative standard deviation (RSD%) of ⩽1.76. The methods are successfully applied to the determination of GAB and PRG in pharmaceutical formulations and the validity assesses by applying the standard addition technique, which compared with those obtained using the reported methods.

  4. Difficulties in Treatment and Management of Epilepsy and Challenges in New Drug Development

    PubMed Central

    Wahab, Abdul

    2010-01-01

    Epilepsy is a serious neurological disorder that affects around 50 million people worldwide. Almost 30% of epileptic patients suffer from pharmacoresistance, which is associated with social isolation, dependent behaviour, low marriage rates, unemployment, psychological issues and reduced quality of life. Currently available antiepileptic drugs have a limited efficacy, and their negative properties limit their use and cause difficulties in patient management. Antiepileptic drugs can provide only symptomatic relief as these drugs suppress seizures but do not have ability to cure epileptogenesis. The long term use of antiepileptic drugs is limited due to their adverse effects, withdrawal symptoms, deleterious interactions with other drugs and economic burden, especially in developing countries. Furthermore, some of the available antiepileptic drugs may even potentiate certain type of seizures. Several in vivo and in vitro animal models have been proposed and many new antiepileptic drugs have been marketed recently, but large numbers of patients are still pharmacoresistant. This review will highlight the difficulties in treatment and management of epilepsy and the limitations of available antiepileptic drugs and animal seizure models. PMID:27713344

  5. Difficulties in Treatment and Management of Epilepsy and Challenges in New Drug Development.

    PubMed

    Wahab, Abdul

    2010-07-05

    Epilepsy is a serious neurological disorder that affects around 50 million people worldwide. Almost 30% of epileptic patients suffer from pharmacoresistance, which is associated with social isolation, dependent behaviour, low marriage rates, unemployment, psychological issues and reduced quality of life. Currently available antiepileptic drugs have a limited efficacy, and their negative properties limit their use and cause difficulties in patient management. Antiepileptic drugs can provide only symptomatic relief as these drugs suppress seizures but do not have ability to cure epileptogenesis. The long term use of antiepileptic drugs is limited due to their adverse effects, withdrawal symptoms, deleterious interactions with other drugs and economic burden, especially in developing countries. Furthermore, some of the available antiepileptic drugs may even potentiate certain type of seizures. Several in vivo and in vitro animal models have been proposed and many new antiepileptic drugs have been marketed recently, but large numbers of patients are still pharmacoresistant. This review will highlight the difficulties in treatment and management of epilepsy and the limitations of available antiepileptic drugs and animal seizure models.

  6. Antiepileptic and Antioxidant Effect of Hydroalcoholic Extract of Ferula Assa Foetida Gum on Pentylentetrazole- induced Kindling in Male Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kiasalari, Zahra; Khalili, Mohsen; Roghani, Mehrdad; Heidari, Hamid; Azizi, Yaser

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Considering the prevalence of epilepsy and the failure of available treatments for many epileptic patients, finding more effective drugs in the treatment of epilepsy seems necessary. Oxidative stress has a special role in the pathogenesis of epileptic syndrome. Therefore, in the present study, we have examined the anti-epileptic and anti-oxidant properties of the Ferula Assa Foetida gum extract, using the pentylentetrazole (PTZ) kindling method. In this experimental study, sixty male Albino mice weighing 25-30 g were selected and were randomly divided into 6 groups. 1- the control group, 2- PTZ-kindled mice, 3- positive control group which received valproate (100 mg/kg) as anti-convulsant drug, 4-5 & 6- the groups of kindled mice that pretreated with 25, 50 and 100 mg/kg doses of Ferula Assa Foetida gum extract. Methods Kindling has been induced in all groups, except for the control group via 11 PTZ injections (35 mg /kg; ip) every other day for 22 days. In the 24th day, the PTZ challenge dose was injected (75 mg / kg) to all groups except the control group. The intensity of seizures were observed and noted until 30 minutes after PTZ injection. At list, the mice were decapitated and the brains of all the mice were removed.. and their biochemical factors levels including malondialdehyde (MDA), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and nitric oxide (NO) were determined. Results Results of this study show that Ferula Assa Foetida gum extract is able to reduce seizure duration and its intensity. In addition, this extract has reduced MDA and NO levels and increased the level of SOD in the brain tissue compared to the PTZ- kindled mice. Discussion It can be concluded that Ferula Assa Foetida gum extract, in specific doses, is able to show an anti-epileptic effect because of its antioxidant properties, probably acting through an enzyme activity mechanism. PMID:25337361

  7. Fixed drug eruption to sitagliptin.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Mrinal; Gupta, Anish

    2015-01-01

    Fixed drug eruption is a common adverse effect seen with various drugs notably antibiotics, antiepileptics and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Herein we report a case of Sitagliptin induced fixed drug eruption in a 46 year old female who developed circumscribed, erythematous macules all over the body within one week of initiation of Sitagliptin. The lesions resolved with residual hyperpigmentation on cessation of the drug. The diagnosis was confirmed by an oral provocation test which led to a reactivation of the lesions. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of fixed drug eruption to Sitagliptin reported in the literature.

  8. Acute drug prescribing to children on chronic antiepilepsy therapy and the potential for adverse drug interactions in primary care

    PubMed Central

    Novak, Philipp H; Ekins-Daukes, Suzie; Simpson, Colin R; Milne, Robert M; Helms, Peter; McLay, James S

    2005-01-01

    Aims To investigate the extent of acute coprescribing in primary care to children on chronic antiepileptic therapy, which could give rise to potentially harmful drug–drug interactions. Design Acute coprescribing to children on chronic antiepileptic drug therapy in primary care was assessed in 178 324 children aged 0–17 years for the year 1 November 1999 to 31 October 2000. Computerized prescribing data were retrieved from 161 representative general practices in Scotland. Setting One hundred and sixty-one general practices throughout Scotland. Results During the study year 723 (0.41%) children chronically prescribed antiepileptic therapy were identified. Fourteen antiepileptic agents were prescribed, with carbamazepine, sodium valproate and lamotrigine accounting for 80% of the total. During the year children on chronic antiepileptic therapy were prescribed 4895 acute coprescriptions for 269 different medicines. The average number of acute coprescriptions for non-epileptic drug therapy were eight, 11, six, and six for the 0–1, 2–4, 5–11, and 12–17-year-olds, respectively. Of these acute coprescriptions 72 (1.5%) prescribed to 22 (3.0%) children were identified as a potential source of clinically serious interactions. The age-adjusted prevalence rates for potentially serious coprescribing were 86, 26, 22, and 33/1000 children chronically prescribed antiepileptic therapy in the 0–1, 2–4, 5–11, and 12–17-year-old age groups, respectively. The drugs most commonly coprescribed which could give rise to such interactions were antacids, erythromycin, ciprofloxacin, theophylline and the low-dose oral contraceptive. For 10 (45.5%0 of the 20 children identified at risk of a potentially clinically serious adverse drug interaction, the acute coprescription was prescribed off label because of age or specific contraindication/warning. Conclusions In primary care, 3.0% of children on chronic antiepileptic therapy are coprescribed therapeutic agents, which could

  9. Adsorption of the antiepileptic carbamazepine onto agricultural soils.

    PubMed

    Calisto, Vania; Esteves, Valdemar I

    2012-05-01

    Carbamazepine is an antiepileptic pharmaceutical which is commonly found in environmental matrices. It passes through wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) almost completely unaffected and has been found to be highly persistent in the environment. The application of sludge in agricultural fields and the use of WWTP effluents for irrigation constitute a potential source of soil contamination. Consequently, the assessment of the interaction between carbamazepine and soils is of crucial importance to understand its fate in the environment. To monitor the sorption behavior of carbamazepine onto agricultural soils, batch equilibrium experiments were performed using soils subjected to distinct long-term fertilizations. In order to follow the adsorption experiments, an UV spectral deconvolution methodology was applied and the results compared with those from micellar electrokinetic chromatography. The results obtained by both methods did not present significant statistical differences at 95% confidence level. Therefore, it was proven that, in the context of adsorption studies, UV spectral deconvolution is a valid alternative to common chromatographic methods, with the major advantage of being a simple and fast procedure. The adsorption of carbamazepine onto the selected soils was satisfactorily described by the Freundlich model. The obtained Freundlich parameters (K(F)) (between 1.79 ± 0.07 and 4.8 ± 0.2 mg kg(-1) (mg L(-1))(-N)) indicate that the adsorption behavior of carbamazepine is dependent on the soil fertilization. Also, it is not extensively sorbed, indicating that carbamazepine present in soils can be a potential source of contamination of surface and ground waters through run-off and infiltration.

  10. Drugs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hurst, Hunter, Ed.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    This document contains the third volume of "Today's Delinquent," an annual publication of the National Center for Juvenile Justice. This volume deals with the issue of drugs and includes articles by leading authorities in delinquency and substance abuse who share their views on causes and cures for the drug problem among youth in this country.…

  11. Homeostasis or channelopathy? Acquired cell type-specific ion channel changes in temporal lobe epilepsy and their antiepileptic potential

    PubMed Central

    Wolfart, Jakob; Laker, Debora

    2015-01-01

    Neurons continuously adapt the expression and functionality of their ion channels. For example, exposed to chronic excitotoxicity, neurons homeostatically downscale their intrinsic excitability. In contrast, the “acquired channelopathy” hypothesis suggests that proepileptic channel characteristics develop during epilepsy. We review cell type-specific channel alterations under different epileptic conditions and discuss the potential of channels that undergo homeostatic adaptations, as targets for antiepileptic drugs (AEDs). Most of the relevant studies have been performed on temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE), a widespread AED-refractory, focal epilepsy. The TLE patients, who undergo epilepsy surgery, frequently display hippocampal sclerosis (HS), which is associated with degeneration of cornu ammonis subfield 1 pyramidal cells (CA1 PCs). Although the resected human tissue offers insights, controlled data largely stem from animal models simulating different aspects of TLE and other epilepsies. Most of the cell type-specific information is available for CA1 PCs and dentate gyrus granule cells (DG GCs). Between these two cell types, a dichotomy can be observed: while DG GCs acquire properties decreasing the intrinsic excitability (in TLE models and patients with HS), CA1 PCs develop channel characteristics increasing intrinsic excitability (in TLE models without HS only). However, thorough examination of data on these and other cell types reveals the coexistence of protective and permissive intrinsic plasticity within neurons. These mechanisms appear differentially regulated, depending on the cell type and seizure condition. Interestingly, the same channel molecules that are upregulated in DG GCs during HS-related TLE, appear as promising targets for future AEDs and gene therapies. Hence, GCs provide an example of homeostatic ion channel adaptation which can serve as a primer when designing novel anti-epileptic strategies. PMID:26124723

  12. Comparative enzyme-inducing effects of chlorpromazine and fluphenazine therapies in psychotic patients.

    PubMed

    Harman, A W; Frewin, D B; Priestly, B G

    1980-01-01

    Antipyrine elimination kinetics were measured in psychotic patients receiving either long-term chlorpromazine or fluphenazine decanoate therapy and in non-medicated control subjects. Patients receiving chlorpromazine metabolised antipyrine faster than the controls while, in patients receiving fluphenazine decanoate, there was not change. The results suggest that long-term chlorpromazine therapy induced the activity of drug-metabolising enzymes, whereas fluphenazine decanoate therapy had no effect.

  13. The effects of antiepileptic inducers in neuropsychopharmacology, a neglected issue. Part I: A summary of the current state for clinicians.

    PubMed

    de Leon, Jose

    2015-01-01

    The literature on inducers in epilepsy and bipolar disorder is seriously contaminated by false negative findings. This is part i of a comprehensive review on antiepileptic drug (AED) inducers using both mechanistic pharmacological and evidence-based medicine to provide practical recommendations to neurologists and psychiatrists concerning how to control for them. Carbamazepine, phenobarbital and phenytoin, are clinically relevant AED inducers; correction factors were calculated for studied induced drugs. These correction factors are rough simplifications for orienting clinicians, since there is great variability in the population regarding inductive effects. As new information is published, the correction factors may need to be modified. Some of the correction factors are so high that the drugs (e.g., bupropion, quetiapine or lurasidone) should not co-prescribed with potent inducers. Clobazam, eslicarbazepine, felbamate, lamotrigine, oxcarbazepine, rufinamide, topiramate, vigabatrin and valproic acid are grouped as mild inducers which may (i)be inducers only in high doses; (ii)frequently combine with inhibitory properties; and (iii)take months to reach maximum effects or de-induction, definitively longer than the potent inducers. Potent inducers, definitively, and mild inducers, possibly, have relevant effects in the endogenous metabolism of (i)sexual hormones, (ii) vitamin D, (iii)thyroid hormones, (iv)lipid metabolism, and (v)folic acid.

  14. The effects of antiepileptic inducers in neuropsychopharmacology, a neglected issue. Part II: Pharmacological issues and further understanding.

    PubMed

    de Leon, Jose

    2015-01-01

    The literature on inducers in epilepsy and bipolar disorder is seriously contaminated by false negative findings. Part II of this comprehensive review on antiepileptic drug (AED) inducers provides clinicians with further educational material about the complexity of interpreting AED drug-drug interactions. The basic pharmacology of induction is reviewed including the cytochrome P450 (CYP) isoenzymes, the Uridine Diphosphate Glucuronosyltransferases (UGTs), and P-glycoprotein (P-gp). CYP2B6 and CYP3A4 are very sensitive to induction. CYP1A2 is moderately sensitive while CYP2C9 and CYP2C19 are only mildly sensitive. CYP2D6 cannot be induced by medications. Induction of UGT and P-gp are poorly understood. The induction of metabolic enzymes such as CYPs and UGTs, and transporters such as P-gp, implies that the amount of these proteins increases when they are induced; this is almost always explained by increasing synthesis mediated by the so-called nuclear receptors (constitutive androstane, estrogen, glucocorticoid receptors and pregnaneX receptors). Although parti provides correction factors for AEDs, extrapolation from an average to an individual patient may be influenced by administration route, absence of metabolic enzyme for genetic reasons, and presence of inhibitors or other inducers. AED pharmacodynamic DDIs may also be important. Six patients with extreme sensitivity to AED inductive effects are described.

  15. Neuroactive Peptides as Putative Mediators of Antiepileptic Ketogenic Diets

    PubMed Central

    Giordano, Carmela; Marchiò, Maddalena; Timofeeva, Elena; Biagini, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    mechanisms involved in the beneficial effects of KDs. In this review, we summarize the current evidence for altered regulation of the synthesis of neuropeptides and peripheral hormones in response to KDs, and we try to define a possible role for specific neuroactive peptides in mediating the antiepileptic properties of diet-induced ketogenesis. PMID:24808888

  16. Phase II enzyme-inducing and antioxidant activities of beetroot (Beta vulgaris L.) extracts from phenotypes of different pigmentation.

    PubMed

    Wettasinghe, Mahinda; Bolling, Bradley; Plhak, Leslie; Xiao, Hang; Parkin, Kirk

    2002-11-06

    Free-radical scavenging, reducing, and phase II enzyme-inducing activities of aqueous and 5% aqueous ethanol extracts of freeze-dried root tissue of four beet (Beta vulgaris L.) strains (red, white, orange, and high-pigment (red) phenotypes) were determined. Aqueous and ethanolic tissue extracts of the regular and high-pigment red phenotypes were most capable of inhibiting metmyoglobin/H(2)O(2)-mediated oxidation of 2-2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) (ABTS) and 2,2'-azobis-(2-amidinopropane) dihydrochloride (AAPH)-mediated bleaching of beta-carotene. These same extracts were also most efficient at reducing ABTS radical cation and inducing quinone reductase in murine hepatoma (Hepa 1c1c7) cells in vitro.

  17. [Repression of the enzyme inducible syntheses in Escherichia coli K12 mutant with a deleted ptsH gene].

    PubMed

    Gershanovich, V N; Il'ina, T S; Rusina, O Iu; Iurovitskaia, N V; Bol'shakova, T N

    1977-01-01

    The genome of lambda phage with thermosensitive repressor was integrated into the pts region of the E. coli chromosome. Such a lysogenic culture behaves as a pts mutant at 30 degrees. Heating of cells of this strain leads to the induction of lambda prophage and formation of deletions in the pts region. A mutant with a deletion covering ptsH gene was isolated after prophage induction. The deletion nature of pts mutation was confirmed in genetic and biochemical experiments. It was shown that the deletion is small and does not involve ptsI and lig genes. The isolated deltaptsH mutant possesses all characteristics of pts mutants: pleiotropic impairment of transport and utilization of a number of carbohydrates, repression of the enzyme inducible synthesis and resistance to catabolite repression with glucose. These data (together with earlier ones) allow us to conclude that the phosphorylated form of HPr is involved (in direct of indirect manner/ in activation of DNA transcription.

  18. The Effects of Antiepileptic Medications on the Social Skills of Individuals with Mental Retardation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matson, Johnny L.; Luke, Melissa A.; Mayville, Stephen B.

    2004-01-01

    Prevalence rates of epilepsy are much higher among persons with developmental disabilities compared to the general population. Anticonvulsant medication is the most common method of treating seizure disorders. Many of these antiepileptic medications (AEDs) are associated with various side effects, which may have detrimental effects on the social…

  19. Pharmacophore modeling, 3D-QSAR, and in silico ADME prediction of N-pyridyl and pyrimidine benzamides as potent antiepileptic agents.

    PubMed

    Malik, Ruchi; Mehta, Pakhuri; Srivastava, Shubham; Choudhary, Bhanwar Singh; Sharma, Manish

    2016-09-08

    Biological mechanism attributing mutations in KCNQ2/Q3 results in benign familial neonatal epilepsy (BFNE), a rare form of epilepsy and thus neglected. It offers a potential target for antiepileptic drug discovery. In the present work, a pharmacophore-based 3D-QSAR model was generated for a series of N-pyridyl and pyrimidine benzamides possessing KCNQ2/Q3 opening activity. The pharmacophore model generated contains one hydrogen bond donor (D), one hydrophobic (H), and two aromatic rings (R). They are the crucial molecular write-up detailing predicted binding efficacy of high affinity and low affinity ligands for KCNQ2/Q3 opening activity. Furthermore, it has been validated by using a biological correlation between pharmacophore hypothesis-based 3D-QSAR variables and functional fingerprints of openers responsible for the receptor binding and also by docking of these benzamides into the validated homology model. Excellent statistical computational tools of QSAR model such as good correlation coefficient (R(2 )>( )0.80), higher F value (F > 39), and excellent predictive power (Q(2) > 0.7) with low standard deviation (SD <0.3) strongly suggest that the developed model could be used for prediction of antiepileptic activity of newer analogs. A preliminary pharmacokinetic profile of these derivatives was also performed on the basis of QikProp predictions.

  20. Induction of T(4) UDP-GT activity, serum thyroid stimulating hormone, and thyroid follicular cell proliferation in mice treated with microsomal enzyme inducers.

    PubMed

    Hood, Alan; Allen, Marcia L; Liu, YaPing; Liu, Jie; Klaassen, Curtis D

    2003-04-01

    The microsomal enzyme inducers phenobarbital (PB), pregnenolone-16 alpha-carbonitrile (PCN), 3-methylcholanthrene (3MC), and Aroclor 1254 (PCB) are known to induce thyroxine (T(4)) glucuronidation and reduce serum T(4) concentrations in rats. Also, microsomal enzyme inducers that increase serum TSH (i.e., PB and PCN) also increase thyroid follicular cell proliferation in rats. Little is known about the effects of these microsomal enzyme inducers on T(4) glucuronidation, serum thyroid hormone concentrations, serum TSH, and thyroid gland growth in mice. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that microsomal enzyme inducers induce T(4) UDP-GT activity, resulting in reduced serum T(4) concentrations, as well as increased serum TSH and thyroid follicular cell proliferation in mice. B6C3F male mice were fed a control diet or a diet containing PB (600, 1200, 1800, or 2400 ppm), PCN (250, 500, 1000, or 2000 ppm), 3MC (62.5, 125, 250, or 500 ppm), or PCB (10, 30, 100, or 300 ppm) for 21 days. All four inducers increased liver weight and hepatic microsomal UDP-GT activity toward chloramphenicol, alpha-naphthol, and T(4). PB and PCB decreased serum total T(4), but PCN and 3MC did not. Serum thyroid stimulating hormone was markedly increased by PCN and 3MC treatments, and slightly increased by PB and PCB treatments. All four microsomal enzyme inducers dramatically increased thyroid follicular cell proliferation in mice. The findings suggest that PB, PCN, 3MC, and PCB disrupt thyroid hormone homeostasis in mice.

  1. New hits as phase II enzymes inducers from a focused library with heteroatom-heteroatom and Michael-acceptor motives.

    PubMed

    Cabrera, Mauricio; de Ovalle, Stefani; Bollati-Fogolín, Mariela; Nascimento, Fabiana; Corbelini, Patrícia; Janarelli, Fernanda; Kawano, Daniel; Eifler-Lima, Vera Lucia; González, Mercedes; Cerecetto, Hugo

    2015-11-01

    The increased activity of phase-II-detoxification enzymes, such as quinone reductase (QR) and glutation S-transferase (GST), correlates with protection against chemically induced carcinogenesis. Herein we studied 11 different chemotypes, pyrazole, 1,2,4-oxadiazole, 1,2,5-oxadiazole, 1,2,3-thiadiazole, 1,2,4-thiazole, 1,3,4-oxathiazole, thienyl hydrazone, α,β-unsaturated-oxime, α,β-unsaturated-N-oxide, coumarin and α,β-unsaturated-carbonyl, as phase-II enzymes inducers in order to identify new pharmacophores with chemopreventive activity. Fifty-four compounds were analyzed on wild-type mouse-hepatoma Hepa-1c1c7 and on the aryl-hydrocarbon-nuclear-translocator (Arnt)-defective mutant BpRc1 cells. New monofunctional inducers of QR and GST were identified, the 1,2,5-oxadiazol-2-oxide (3), the 1,2,4-triazine-4-oxides (23) and (32) and the tetrahydropyrimidinones (28) and (49). It was confirmed that Nrf2 nuclear translocation is the operative molecular mechanism that allows compound (3) to exert protective effects via expression of downstream phase-II enzymes.

  2. New hits as phase II enzymes inducers from a focused library with heteroatom–heteroatom and Michael-acceptor motives

    PubMed Central

    Cabrera, Mauricio; de Ovalle, Stefani; Bollati-Fogolín, Mariela; Nascimento, Fabiana; Corbelini, Patrícia; Janarelli, Fernanda; Kawano, Daniel; Eifler-Lima, Vera Lucia; González, Mercedes; Cerecetto, Hugo

    2015-01-01

    The increased activity of phase-II-detoxification enzymes, such as quinone reductase (QR) and glutation S-transferase (GST), correlates with protection against chemically induced carcinogenesis. Herein we studied 11 different chemotypes, pyrazole, 1,2,4-oxadiazole, 1,2,5-oxadiazole, 1,2,3-thiadiazole, 1,2,4-thiazole, 1,3,4-oxathiazole, thienyl hydrazone, α,β-unsaturated-oxime, α,β-unsaturated-N-oxide, coumarin and α,β-unsaturated-carbonyl, as phase-II enzymes inducers in order to identify new pharmacophores with chemopreventive activity. Fifty-four compounds were analyzed on wild-type mouse-hepatoma Hepa-1c1c7 and on the aryl-hydrocarbon-nuclear-translocator (Arnt)-defective mutant BpRc1 cells. New monofunctional inducers of QR and GST were identified, the 1,2,5-oxadiazol-2-oxide (3), the 1,2,4-triazine-4-oxides (23) and (32) and the tetrahydropyrimidinones (28) and (49). It was confirmed that Nrf2 nuclear translocation is the operative molecular mechanism that allows compound (3) to exert protective effects via expression of downstream phase-II enzymes. PMID:28031894

  3. Highly sensitive visual detection of Avian Influenza A (H7N9) virus based on the enzyme-induced metallization.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Huifang; Ma, Xiaoming; Hu, Shuisheng; Lin, Yue; Guo, Longhua; Qiu, Bin; Lin, Zhenyu; Chen, Guonan

    2016-05-15

    Development of convenient but sensitive method for influenza detection is highly important in immediate and effective clinical treatment. In this study, an ultrasensitive colorimetric approach combining the advantages of the convenience of the enzyme-induced metallization and the high specificity of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for the detection of influenza virus A (H7N9 as model) has been developed. Two rounds of amplification are utilized to enhance the detection sensitivity. The amplification of enzymatic reaction combines with the specific optical properties of gold nanoparticles causing the enhancing of the optical signal immensely. In addition, the increased surface area and the magnetic enrichment effect also enable the magnetic bead (MB) to catch a large number of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and detection antibody (Ab2), thus very small amounts of the virus can be easily detected. Compared with conventional method, this approach exhibits outstanding sensitivity for ALP detection, 0.2U/L of ALP can be distinguished with a spectrometer and 2U/L with the naked eye. And as low as 25 pg/mL of H7N9 can be detected by the naked eye. This approach shows an extensive horizon for bioassays and is available in clinical diagnosis with the advances of simplification, effectiveness, low cost and sensitive readout.

  4. Ca2+ cytochemical changes of hepatotoxicity caused by halothane and sevoflurane in enzyme-induced hypoxic rats

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Wei-Feng; Yang, Li-Qun; Zhou, Mai-Tao; Liu, Zhi-Qiang; Li, Quan

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigat the relation between hepatotoxicity of halothane and sevoflurane and altered hepatic calcium homeostasis in enzyme-induced hypoxic rats. METHODS: Forty-eight rats were pretreated with phen-obarbital and randomly divided into six groups (eight in each group) and exposed to O2/ N2/1.2 MAC anesthetics for 1 h: normal control (NC), 21% O2/79% N2; hypoxic control (HC), 14% O2/86%N2; normal sevoflurane (NS), 21% O2/ N2/1.2MAC sevoflurane; hypoxic sevoflurane (HS), 14% O2/ N2/1.2MAC sevoflurane; normal halothane (NH)21%O2/79%N2/1.2MAC halothane; hypoxic halothane (HH), 14% O2/N2/1.2MAC halothane. Liver specimens and blood were taken 24 h after exposure to calcium and determined by EDX microanalysis. RESULTS: The liver of all rats given halothane (14% O2) had extensive centrilobular necrosis and denaturation. Morphologic damage was accompanied with an increase in serum glutamic pyruvic transminase. In groups NH and HH, more calcium was precipitated in cytoplasm and mitochondria. CONCLUSION: These results suggest that halothane increases cytosolic Ca2+ concentration in hepatocytes. Elevation in Ca2+ concentration is implicated in the mechanism of halothane-induced hepatotoxicity. sevoflurane is less effective in affecting hepatic calcium homeostasis than halothane. PMID:16124059

  5. Identification of the antiepileptic racetam binding site in the synaptic vesicle protein 2A by molecular dynamics and docking simulations.

    PubMed

    Correa-Basurto, José; Cuevas-Hernández, Roberto I; Phillips-Farfán, Bryan V; Martínez-Archundia, Marlet; Romo-Mancillas, Antonio; Ramírez-Salinas, Gema L; Pérez-González, Óscar A; Trujillo-Ferrara, José; Mendoza-Torreblanca, Julieta G

    2015-01-01

    Synaptic vesicle protein 2A (SV2A) is an integral membrane protein necessary for the proper function of the central nervous system and is associated to the physiopathology of epilepsy. SV2A is the molecular target of the anti-epileptic drug levetiracetam and its racetam analogs. The racetam binding site in SV2A and the non-covalent interactions between racetams and SV2A are currently unknown; therefore, an in silico study was performed to explore these issues. Since SV2A has not been structurally characterized with X-ray crystallography or nuclear magnetic resonance, a three-dimensional (3D) model was built. The model was refined by performing a molecular dynamics simulation (MDS) and the interactions of SV2A with the racetams were determined by docking studies. A reliable 3D model of SV2A was obtained; it reached structural equilibrium during the last 15 ns of the MDS (50 ns) with remaining structural motions in the N-terminus and long cytoplasmic loop. The docking studies revealed that hydrophobic interactions and hydrogen bonds participate importantly in ligand recognition within the binding site. Residues T456, S665, W666, D670 and L689 were important for racetam binding within the trans-membrane hydrophilic core of SV2A. Identifying the racetam binding site within SV2A should facilitate the synthesis of suitable radio-ligands to study treatment response and possibly epilepsy progression.

  6. Identification of the antiepileptic racetam binding site in the synaptic vesicle protein 2A by molecular dynamics and docking simulations

    PubMed Central

    Correa-Basurto, José; Cuevas-Hernández, Roberto I.; Phillips-Farfán, Bryan V.; Martínez-Archundia, Marlet; Romo-Mancillas, Antonio; Ramírez-Salinas, Gema L.; Pérez-González, Óscar A.; Trujillo-Ferrara, José; Mendoza-Torreblanca, Julieta G.

    2015-01-01

    Synaptic vesicle protein 2A (SV2A) is an integral membrane protein necessary for the proper function of the central nervous system and is associated to the physiopathology of epilepsy. SV2A is the molecular target of the anti-epileptic drug levetiracetam and its racetam analogs. The racetam binding site in SV2A and the non-covalent interactions between racetams and SV2A are currently unknown; therefore, an in silico study was performed to explore these issues. Since SV2A has not been structurally characterized with X-ray crystallography or nuclear magnetic resonance, a three-dimensional (3D) model was built. The model was refined by performing a molecular dynamics simulation (MDS) and the interactions of SV2A with the racetams were determined by docking studies. A reliable 3D model of SV2A was obtained; it reached structural equilibrium during the last 15 ns of the MDS (50 ns) with remaining structural motions in the N-terminus and long cytoplasmic loop. The docking studies revealed that hydrophobic interactions and hydrogen bonds participate importantly in ligand recognition within the binding site. Residues T456, S665, W666, D670 and L689 were important for racetam binding within the trans-membrane hydrophilic core of SV2A. Identifying the racetam binding site within SV2A should facilitate the synthesis of suitable radio-ligands to study treatment response and possibly epilepsy progression. PMID:25914622

  7. Pharmacokinetics of the antiepileptic drug levetiracetam in healthy Japanese and Caucasian volunteers following intravenous administration.

    PubMed

    Toublanc, Nathalie; Okagaki, Takuya; Boyce, Malcolm; Chan, Robert; Mugitani, Ayumi; Watanabe, Shikiko; Yamamoto, Katsumi; Yoshida, Katsumi; Andreas, Jens-Otto

    2015-12-01

    The intravenous (iv) formulation of levetiracetam has been available in clinical practice worldwide for several years, but not in Japan. Two open-label studies were conducted: Study A evaluated the bioequivalence of iv and oral tablet formulations in healthy Japanese volunteers; and Study B subsequently compared the pharmacokinetics of iv levetiracetam in healthy Japanese and Caucasian volunteers. Study A had a randomised, two-way crossover design; a single 1,500 mg levetiracetam dose was administered as a 15-min iv infusion and as 3 × 500 mg oral tablets to Japanese volunteers. In Study B, 1,500 mg levetiracetam was administered as single and repeated 15-min iv infusions to Japanese and Caucasian volunteers. Overall, 26/27 volunteers completed Study A and 32/32 (16 Japanese; 16 Caucasian) completed Study B. In Study A, the point estimate and 90 % confidence interval (CI) for the geometric least squares mean (LSM) ratio (iv vs oral) were fully included within the acceptance range for bioequivalence (0.85-1.25) for the area under plasma concentration-time curve from 0 to last quantifiable observation (AUClast 0.97 [0.95, 0.99]), but not for the maximum plasma concentration (C max 1.64 [1.47, 1.83]). In Study B, after a single iv infusion, the point estimates (90 % CI) for the geometric LSM ratio (Japanese vs Caucasian) for body weight-normalised C max and AUClast were 1.21 (1.07, 1.36) and 0.97 (0.90, 1.04), respectively. Corresponding values after repeated iv infusions were C max,ss 1.01 (0.91, 1.12) and AUCτ,ss 0.89 (0.83, 0.96). Levetiracetam was well tolerated in both studies. Study A did not demonstrate the bioequivalence of single doses of levetiracetam 1,500 mg administered as an iv infusion and as oral tablets in healthy Japanese adults. Study B, however, showed that pharmacokinetic profiles were generally similar between Japanese and Caucasian adults after single and repeated iv infusions of levetiracetam 1,500 mg.

  8. The role of antiepileptic drugs in free radicals generation and antioxidant levels in epileptic patients.

    PubMed

    Eldin, Essam Eldin Mohamed Nour; Elshebiny, Hosam Abdel-Fattah; Mohamed, Tarek Mostafa; Abdel-Aziz, Mohamed Abdel-Azim; El-Readi, Mahmoud Zaki

    2016-01-01

    Many risk factors are encountered during the pathogenesis of epilepsy. In this study, the effect of seizure frequency on free radical generation and antioxidants levels in epileptic patients was evaluated. This study was carried out on 15 healthy controls (GI) and 60 epileptic patients treated with mono- or poly-therapy of carbamazepine, valproic acid, or phenytoin. The treated epileptic patients were divided into 2 main groups according to the seizure frequency: controlled seizure patients GII (n = 30) and uncontrolled seizure patients GIII (n = 30). GII included the GIIA subgroup (n = 15) which had been seizure free for more than 12 months and the GIIB subgroup (n = 15) which had been seizure free for a period from 6 to12 months. GIII included GIIIA (n = 15) and GIIIB (n = 15) for patients which had a seizure frequency of less than and more than four times/month, respectively. In comparison to the control group (GI), the levels of nitric oxide (NO) and malondialdehyde/creatinine ratio were significantly increased in GIIB, GIIIA, and GIIIB, while vitamins A and E levels were significantly decreased in GIIIB. Serum NO levels had significant negative correlations with serum vitamin E in the GIIA and GIIB groups, and with vitamin A in the GIIIA and GIIIB groups. However, serum NO had positive correlation with urinary MDA/Cr ratio. The imbalance between free radical generation and antioxidant system in epileptic patients may be a factor in seizure frequency.

  9. Unilateral hemorrhagic macular infarction associated with marijuana, alcohol and antiepileptic drug intake.

    PubMed

    Aktaş, Serdar; Tetikoğlu, Mehmet; İnan, Sibel; Aktaş, Hatice; Özcura, Fatih

    2017-03-01

    A 55-year-old male presented with a complaint of a painless and sudden loss of vision in the right eye. Fundus photography revealed loss of transparency and edema in the central macular region. Optical coherence tomography showed increased reflectivity and diffused swelling in the inner retinal layers. Fluorescein angiography revealed a large area of capillary non-perfusion with a pronounced hypofluorescent area with distinct borders. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a hemorrhagic macular infarction associated with marijuana and pregabalin misuse.

  10. Transformation of the antiepileptic drug oxcarbazepine upon different water disinfection processes.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhi; Fenet, Hélène; Gomez, Elena; Chiron, Serge

    2011-02-01

    Transformation of the pharmaceutical oxcarbazepine (OXC), a keto analogue of carbamazepine (CBZ) was investigated under different water disinfection processes (ozonation, chlorination and UV irradiation) to compare its persistence, toxicity and degradation pathways with those of CBZ. Analysis by LC-ion trap-MS(n) allowed for the identification of up to thirteen transformation products (TPs). The major abundant and persistent TPs (10,11-dihydro-10,11-trans-dihydroxy-carbamazepine (DiOH-CBZ), acridine (ACIN) and 1-(2-benzaldehyde)-(1H, 3H)-quinazoline-2,4-dione (BQD)) were identical to those previously reported during water treatment of CBZ. Only one new compound arising from an intramolecular cyclisation reaction was identified during UV irradiation. OXC reacted quickly with hydroxyl radical and relatively rapidly with free chlorine while slow reaction rates were recorded in presence of ozone and upon UV irradiation. An increase of the acute toxicity of UV irradiated solutions, monitored by a Daphnia magna bioassay, was recorded, probably due to the accumulation of ACIN. The formation of ACIN is of concern due to the carcinogenic properties of this chemical. ACIN was also generated during the direct UV photo transformation of DiOH-CBZ and 10-hydroxy-10,11-dihydro-carbamazepine (OH-CBZ), two metabolites of OXC and CBZ widely detected in water resources. Analysis of tap water samples revealed the occurrence at ng/L levels of the major TPs detected under laboratory scale experiments, except ACIN.

  11. GLO1 inhibitors for neuropsychiatric and anti-epileptic drug development

    PubMed Central

    McMurray, Katherine M. J.; Distler, Margaret G.; Sidhu, Preetpal S.; Arnold, Leggy A.; Palmer, Abraham A.; Plant, Leigh D.

    2014-01-01

    Many current pharmacological treatments for neuropsychiatric disorders, such as anxiety and depression, are limited by a delayed onset of therapeutic effect, adverse side effects, abuse potential or lack of effect in many patients. These off-target effects highlight the need to identify novel mechanisms and targets for treatment. Recently, modulation of glyoxalase 1 (GLO1) activity was shown to regulate anxiety-like behavior and seizure susceptibility in mice. These effects are likely mediated through the regulation of methylglyoxal (MG) by GLO1, as MG acts as a competitive partial agonist at GABAA receptors (GABAARs). Thus, modulation of MG by GLO1 represents a novel target for treatment. Here, we evaluate the therapeutic potential of indirectly modulating MG concentrations through GLO1 inhibitors for the treatment of neuropsychiatric disorders. PMID:24646261

  12. [Pharmacogenetics and antiepileptic drug metabolism: implication of genetic variants in cytochromes P450].

    PubMed

    Saldaña-Cruz, Ana Miriam; Sánchez-Corona, José; Márquez de Santiago, Daniel Alejandro; García-Zapién, Alejandra Guadalupe; Flores-Martínez, Silvia Esperanza

    2013-05-01

    Introduccion. Los farmacos antiepilepticos (FAE) son la base para el control de las crisis en pacientes con epilepsia; sin embargo, se conoce que el 20-30% de los pacientes son farmacorresistentes. Son diversos los factores que contribuyen a la variabilidad de la respuesta a los FAE, y esta variabilidad puede atribuirse, al menos en parte, a la presencia de polimorfismos (variaciones de la secuencia) en genes que codifican para enzimas involucradas en el metabolismo de los FAE. Objetivo. Describir las variaciones de la secuencia en genes que codifican para proteinas implicadas en el metabolismo de algunos de los principales FAE, con enfasis en las enzimas citocromo P450 (CYP450). Desarrollo. Existen algunos polimorfismos en genes que codifican para proteinas involucradas en el metabolismo de farmacos, particularmente enzimas de la superfamilia CYP450, que se consideran ya de utilidad clinica en el manejo terapeutico. La presencia de estas variantes geneticas contribuye a la variabilidad de la actividad de enzimas metabolizadoras, lo que, a su vez, influye en la pobre o inadecuada respuesta terapeutica, e incluso en la aparicion de efectos adversos. Conclusiones. La identificacion de la variabilidad interindividual en la respuesta a los diversos FAE puede permitir la individualizacion del tratamiento con la intencion de maximizar su eficacia y minimizar el riesgo, independientemente de que la variabilidad clinica y los efectos adversos se presenten en una minoria de pacientes.

  13. [Prevalence, type of epilepsy and use of antiepileptic drugs in primary care].

    PubMed

    Fernández-Suárez, Elena; Villa-Estébanez, Rubén; Garcia-Martinez, Alberto; Fidalgo-González, José A; Zanabili Al-Sibbai, Ahmad A; Salas-Puig, Javier

    2015-06-16

    Introduccion. La epilepsia es una enfermedad con gran repercusion social y economica. La prevalencia deberia ser usada como la base mas importante para planificar la prevencion secundaria y terciaria. Objetivos. Identificar los pacientes con diagnostico de epilepsia en un centro de atencion primaria y determinar la prevalencia, las caracteristicas demograficas, el tipo de sindrome epileptico y el uso de los farmacos antiepilepticos. Pacientes y metodos. Estudio descriptivo transversal retrospectivo. Incluyo 196 pacientes con diagnostico de epilepsia pertenecientes a un centro de salud y revision de la historia clinica hospitalaria, con el estudio de las variables sociodemograficas y clinicofarmacologicas. Resultados. Prevalencia de epilepsia: 8,4/1.000 habitantes. Edad media: 50,3 años. Sexo: 52,6%, hombres. Ambito: 79,6%, urbano. Antecedentes familiares de epilepsia: 14,8%. Tipo de epilepsia: focal sintomatica por ictus (14,3%), generalizada idiopatica (13,8%), focal criptogenica (8,7%), no clasificada (31,1%). Edad media al inicio de la crisis: 31,6 años. Comorbilidad neurologica o psiquiatrica: 62,8%. Ultima revision: el 18,9% sin tratamiento antiepileptico, el 56,6% en monoterapia y el 24,5% en politerapia. Libres de crisis: 76,5%. Farmacos mas prescritos: acido valproico, carbamacepina, fenitoina, lamotrigina y levetiracetam. Un 78,6% sin efectos secundarios. Fallecimiento: 4,1%. Conclusiones. La prevalencia de pacientes con epilepsia fue de 8,4/1.000 habitantes y predomina la focal sintomatica por ictus. Casi un tercio de los pacientes referia algun factor desencadenante de crisis, principalmente consumo de alcohol o fiebre. Predomina la monoterapia, los efectos secundarios son escasos y, en la ultima revision, la mayoria se hallaba libre de crisis.

  14. Role of adenosine in the antiepileptic effects of deep brain stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Miranda, Maisa F.; Hamani, Clement; de Almeida, Antônio-Carlos G.; Amorim, Beatriz O.; Macedo, Carlos E.; Fernandes, Maria José S.; Nobrega, José N.; Aarão, Mayra C.; Madureira, Ana Paula; Rodrigues, Antônio M.; Andersen, Monica L.; Tufik, Sergio; Mello, Luiz E.; Covolan, Luciene

    2014-01-01

    Despite the effectiveness of anterior thalamic nucleus (AN) deep brain stimulation (DBS) for the treatment of epilepsy, mechanisms responsible for the antiepileptic effects of this therapy remain elusive. As adenosine modulates neuronal excitability and seizure activity in animal models, we hypothesized that this nucleoside could be one of the substrates involved in the effects of AN DBS. We applied 5 days of stimulation to rats rendered chronically epileptic by pilocarpine injections and recorded epileptiform activity in hippocampal slices. We found that slices from animals given DBS had reduced hippocampal excitability and were less susceptible to develop ictal activity. In live animals, AN DBS significantly increased adenosine levels in the hippocampus as measured by microdialysis. The reduced excitability of DBS in vitro was completely abolished in animals pre-treated with A1 receptor antagonists and was strongly potentiated by A1 receptor agonists. We conclude that some of the antiepileptic effects of DBS may be mediated by adenosine. PMID:25324724

  15. Effects of microsomal enzyme inducers on outer-ring deiodinase activity toward thyroid hormones in various rat tissues.

    PubMed

    Hood, A; Klaassen, C D

    2000-03-15

    Microsomal enzyme inducers, such as phenobarbital (PB), pregnenolone-16alpha-carbonitrile (PCN), 3-methylcholanthrene (3MC), and Aroclor 1254 (PCB) are more effective at reducing serum thyroxine (T(4)) than serum triiodothyronine (T(3)). It is possible that rats treated with PB and PCN maintain serum T(3) by increasing serum TSH, which stimulates the thyroid gland to synthesize more T(3). However, it is unclear how serum T(3) is maintained in rats treated with 3MC or PCB, because serum TSH is not increased in these rats. We hypothesized that increased conversion of T(4) to T(3), catalyzed by outer-ring deiodinases (ORD) type-I and -II, is the reason serum T(3) is maintained in rats treated with 3MC or PCB. Furthermore, 3MC and PCB do not increase serum TSH, whereas PB and PCN do, because type-II ORD activity in the pituitary of 3MC- and PCB-treated rats is increased greater than in rats treated with PB or PCN. To test these two hypotheses, male Sprague-Dawley rats were fed either a basal diet or a diet containing PB (300, 600, 1200, or 2400 ppm), PCN (200, 400, 800, or 1600 ppm), 3MC (50, 100, 200, or 400 ppm), or PCB (25, 50, 100, or 200 ppm) for 7 days. Type-I ORD activity was measured in thyroid, kidney, and liver, whereas type-II ORD activity was measured in brown adipose tissue, pituitary, and brain. Type-I ORD activity in thyroid was not affected by PB, 3MC, or PCB treatments, and was slightly increased by PCN. Type-I ORD activity in kidney was not affected by PB, PCN, or 3MC treatments, and was reduced by PCB treatment. Type-I ORD activity in liver was reduced by PB, PCN, 3MC, and PCB treatments. Type-II ORD activity in brown adipose tissue was unaffected by any of the four treatments. Type-II ORD activity in pituitary was unaffected by PB or 3MC treatments, and was increased by PCN or PCB treatments. Type-II ORD activity in brain was unaffected by PB treatment, and was increased by PCN, 3MC, and PCB treatments. Overall, total ORD activity, calculated by

  16. AEDS and Psychotropic Drugs in Children with Autism and Epilepsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tuchman, Roberto

    2004-01-01

    The efficacy of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) and psychotropic medications in children with autism is limited to the treatment of seizures or to specific behaviors such as irritability, impulsivity, hyperactivity, repetitive behaviors, or aggression. The reliability and value of the available data--to determine the efficacy of these medications in…

  17. Antiepileptic and antipsychotic activities of standardized Śilājatu (Shilajit) in experimental animals

    PubMed Central

    Durg, Sharanbasappa; Veerapur, Veeresh P.; Thippeswamy, B. S.; Ahamed, Syed Mansoor

    2015-01-01

    Background: Śilājatu (Shilajit; SJ) is claimed in traditional Indian medical practice to be useful in the treatment of nervous disorders, epilepsy and as antistress. Aim: To investigate whether SJ possesses antiepileptic and antipsychotic activities in rodents. Materials and Methods: Isonicotinyl hydrazine (INH), pentylenetetrazole (PTZ), apomorphine, phenytoin, diazepam, haloperidol and other chemicals of analytical grade were procured from standard companies. The antiepileptic activity of SJ was assessed using maximal electro shock (MES)-induced seizures in rats, INH and PTZ-induced seizures in mice. The antipsychotic effect of SJ was evaluated using apomorphine-induced climbing and stereotyped behaviours respectively, in mice and rats. Settings and Designs: SJ (25 and 50 mg/kg, p.o.) was given orally once daily for 15 days in all the rodent models. On the test day, SJ was administered 1 h prior to electric shock or chemical inducers (INH/PTZ/apomorphine) in experimental animals; the animals were then observed for different phases of seizures and psychotic behaviours. In addition, gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) content in the brain of rats and mice was estimated in seizure models. Statistical Analysis: The data were expressed as mean ± standard error of mean. Statistical comparisons were performed by one-way ANOVA followed by Tukey's post-test using Graph Pad Prism version 5.0, USA. A P < 0.05 was considered significant. Results and Conclusions: SJ pretreatment significantly inhibited the seizures induced by MES, INH and PTZ in a dose dependent manner. Further, SJ augmented brain GABA levels to normal, decreased by INH and PTZ in mice brain. SJ pretreatment also significantly inhibited the climbing and stereotyped behaviours induced by apomorphine. The present data seems to confirm the antiepileptic activity of SJ which may be because of enhancing the GABAergic system. The antipsychotic activity observed may be due to anti-dopaminergic and/or GABA

  18. Forebrain-selective AMPA-receptor antagonism guided by TARP γ-8 as an antiepileptic mechanism.

    PubMed

    Kato, Akihiko S; Burris, Kevin D; Gardinier, Kevin M; Gernert, Douglas L; Porter, Warren J; Reel, Jon; Ding, Chunjin; Tu, Yuan; Schober, Douglas A; Lee, Matthew R; Heinz, Beverly A; Fitch, Thomas E; Gleason, Scott D; Catlow, John T; Yu, Hong; Fitzjohn, Stephen M; Pasqui, Francesca; Wang, He; Qian, Yuewei; Sher, Emanuele; Zwart, Ruud; Wafford, Keith A; Rasmussen, Kurt; Ornstein, Paul L; Isaac, John T R; Nisenbaum, Eric S; Bredt, David S; Witkin, Jeffrey M

    2016-12-01

    Pharmacological manipulation of specific neural circuits to optimize therapeutic index is an unrealized goal in neurology and psychiatry. AMPA receptors are important for excitatory synaptic transmission, and their antagonists are antiepileptic. Although efficacious, AMPA-receptor antagonists, including perampanel (Fycompa), the only approved antagonist for epilepsy, induce dizziness and motor impairment. We hypothesized that blockade of forebrain AMPA receptors without blocking cerebellar AMPA receptors would be antiepileptic and devoid of motor impairment. Taking advantage of an AMPA receptor auxiliary protein, TARP γ-8, which is selectively expressed in the forebrain and modulates the pharmacological properties of AMPA receptors, we discovered that LY3130481 selectively antagonized recombinant and native AMPA receptors containing γ-8, but not γ-2 (cerebellum) or other TARP members. Two amino acid residues unique to γ-8 determined this selectivity. We also observed antagonism of AMPA receptors expressed in hippocampal, but not cerebellar, tissue from an patient with epilepsy. Corresponding to this selective activity, LY3130481 prevented multiple seizure types in rats and mice and without motor side effects. These findings demonstrate the first rationally discovered molecule targeting specific neural circuitries for therapeutic advantage.

  19. Sedative and antiepileptic effects of Anthocephalus cadamba Roxb. in mice and rats

    PubMed Central

    Nagakannan, Pandian; Shivasharan, Basavaraj D.; Veerapur, Veeresh P.; Thippeswamy, Boreddy S.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The aim of the present study was to evaluate the sedative and antiepileptic activities of ethanolic extract of Anthocephalus cadamba (ACE) bark in various experimental animal models. Materials and Methods: ACE was tested at three doses viz. 100, 200 and 400 mg/kg p.o. We used ketamine-induced sleeping time model to test the sedative property of the extract where, onset and duration of sleep were observed. A paradigm of anticonvulsant models (pentylenetetrazole, isoniazid and maximal electroshock-induced seizures) were used to evaluate its protective effect against absence and generalized types of seizures. Onset of clonic convulsions, tonic extension and time of death were observed in PTZ and INH-induced seizure models. In MES model, duration of tonic hind leg extension and onset of stupor were observed. Results: ACE showed significant increase in ketamine induced sleeping time. It also exhibited significant increase (P<0.05, 0.01 and 0.001) in latency to clonic convulsion, tonic extension and time of death in PTZ and INH models at all tested doses, whereas in the MES model, the lower dose was found to be effective when compared with the higher doses (200 and 400 mg/kg, p.o.). Conclusion: The results of the present investigation demonstrated that ACE possesses sedative and antiepileptic activities. PMID:22144777

  20. Clinically significant drug interactions with atypical antipsychotics.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, William Klugh; Jann, Michael W; Kutscher, Eric C

    2013-12-01

    Atypical antipsychotics [also known as second-generation antipsychotics (SGAs)] have become a mainstay therapeutic treatment intervention for patients with schizophrenia, bipolar disorders and other psychotic conditions. These agents are commonly used with other medications--most notably, antidepressants and antiepileptic drugs. Drug interactions can take place by various pharmacokinetic, pharmacodynamic and pharmaceutical mechanisms. The pharmacokinetic profile of each SGA, especially with phase I and phase II metabolism, can allow for potentially significant drug interactions. Pharmacodynamic interactions arise when agents have comparable receptor site activity, which can lead to additive or competitive effects without alterations in measured plasma drug concentrations. Additionally, the role of drug transporters in drug interactions continues to evolve and may effect both pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic interactions. Pharmaceutical interactions occur when physical incompatibilities take place between agents prior to drug absorption. Approximate therapeutic plasma concentration ranges have been suggested for a number of SGAs. Drug interactions that markedly increase or decrease the concentrations of these agents beyond their ranges can lead to adverse events or diminished clinical efficacy. Most clinically significant drug interactions with SGAs occur via the cytochrome P450 (CYP) system. Many but not all drug interactions with SGAs are identified during drug discovery and pre-clinical development by employing a series of standardized in vitro and in vivo studies with known CYP inducers and inhibitors. Later therapeutic drug monitoring programmes, clinical studies and case reports offer methods to identify additional clinically significant drug interactions. Some commonly co-administered drugs with a significant potential for drug-drug interactions with selected SGAs include some SSRIs. Antiepileptic mood stabilizers such as carbamazepine and valproate, as

  1. A simple high-throughput method for determination of antiepileptic analogues of γ-aminobutyric acid in pharmaceutical dosage forms using microplate fluorescence reader.

    PubMed

    Martinc, Boštjan; Vovk, Tomaž

    2013-01-01

    Pregabalin (PGB), gabapentin (GBP), and vigabatrin (VGB) are structural analogues of γ-aminobutyric acid used for the treatment of different forms of epilepsy. Their analytical determination is challenging since these molecules have no significant UV or visible absorption. Several derivatization methods have been developed and used for their determination in bulk or pharmaceutical dosage forms. We aimed to develop a high- throughput method using a microplate reader with fluorescence detection and simple derivatization with fluorescamine. Obtained method involves derivatization step of only 5 min at room temperature and simultaneous measurements of 96 samples (λex 395, λem 476 nm) thus rendering excellent high-throughput analysis. The method was found to be linear with r²>0.998 across investigated analytical ranges of 0.75 to 30.0 µg/mL for PGB, 2.00 to 80.0 µg/mL for GBP, and 1.50 to 60.0 µg/mL for VGB. Intraday and interday precision values did not exceed 4.93%. The accuracy was ranging between 96.6 to 103.5%. The method was also found to be specific since used excipients did not interfere with the method. The robustness study showed that derivatization procedure is more robust than spectrofluorimetric conditions. The developed high-throughput method was successfully applied for determination of drug content and dissolution profiles in pharmaceutical dosage forms of studied antiepileptic drugs.

  2. A Survey of the Use of Antiepileptic and Muscle Relaxant Medication in a Sample of Children with Neuromotor Disorders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greer, Bobby G.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    A longitudinal survey of 424 preschoolers and infants with neuromotor disorders served by a children's rehabilitation center was conducted to determine the number who were receiving muscle relaxant or anticonvulsant medication, as well as average daily dosages. An increase in the number of antiepileptic prescriptions was found from 1962 to 1986.…

  3. Effect and Safety of Shihogyejitang for Drug Resistant Childhood Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jinsoo; Son, Kwanghyun; Hwang, Gwiseo

    2016-01-01

    Objective. Herbal medicine has been widely used to treat drug resistant epilepsy. Shihogyejitang (SGT) has been commonly used to treat epilepsy. We investigated the effect and safety of SGT in children with drug resistant epilepsy. Design. We reviewed medical records of 54 patients with epilepsy, who failed to respond to at least two antiepileptic drugs and have been treated with SGT between April 2006 and June 2014 at the Department of Pediatric Neurology, I-Tomato Hospital, Korea. Effect was measured by the response rate, seizure-free rate, and retention rate at six months. We also checked adverse events, change in antiepileptic drugs use, and the variables related to the outcome. Results. Intent-to-treat analysis showed that, after six months, 44.4% showed a >50% seizure reduction, 24.1% including seizure-free, respectively, and 53.7% remained on SGT. Two adverse events were reported, mild skin rash and fever. Focal seizure type presented significantly more positive responses when compared with other seizure types at six months (p = 0.0284, Fisher's exact test). Conclusion. SGT is an effective treatment with excellent tolerability for drug resistant epilepsy patients. Our data provide evidence that SGT may be used as alternative treatment option when antiepileptic drug does not work in epilepsy children. PMID:27047568

  4. [Drug resistant epilepsy. Clinical and neurobiological concepts].

    PubMed

    Espinosa-Jovel, Camilo A; Sobrino-Mejía, Fidel E

    2015-08-16

    Drug-resistant epilepsy, is a condition defined by the International League Against Epilepsy as persistent seizures despite having used at least two appropriate and adequate antiepileptic drug treatments. Approximately 20-30% of patients with epilepsy are going to be resistant to antiepileptic drugs, with different patterns of clinical presentation, which are related to the biological basis of this disease (de novo resistance, relapsing-remitting and progressive). Drug resistant epilepsy, impacts negatively the quality of life and significantly increases the risk of premature death. From the neurobiological point of view, this medical condition is the result of the interaction of multiple variables related to the underlying disease, drug interactions and proper genetic aspects of each patient. Thanks to advances in pharmacogenetics and molecular biology research, currently some hypotheses may explain the cause of this condition and promote the study of new therapeutic options. Currently, overexpression of membrane transporters such as P-glycoprotein, appears to be one of the most important mechanisms in the development of drug resistant epilepsy. The objective of this review is to deepen the general aspects of this clinical condition, addressing the definition, epidemiology, differential diagnosis and the pathophysiological bases.

  5. Drug interactions and the statins

    PubMed Central

    Herman, R J

    1999-01-01

    Drug interactions commonly occur in patients receiving treatment with multiple medications. Most interactions remain unrecognized because drugs, in general, have a wide margin of safety or because the extent of change in drug levels is small when compared with the variation normally seen in clinical therapy. All drug interactions have a pharmacokinetic or pharmacodynamic basis and are predictable given an understanding of the pharmacology of the drugs involved. Drugs most liable to pose problems are those having concentration-dependent toxicity within, or close to, the therapeutic range; those with steep dose-response curves; those having high first-pass metabolism or those with a single, inhibitable route of elimination. Knowing which drugs possess these intrinsic characteristics, together with a knowledge of hepatic P-450 metabolism and common enzyme-inducing and enzyme-inhibiting drugs, can greatly assist physicians in predicting interactions that may be clinically relevant. This article reviews the pharmacology of drug interactions that can occur with hydroxymethylglutaryl-coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitors (statins) to illustrate the scope of the problem and the ways in which physicians may manage this important therapeutic class of drugs. PMID:10584091

  6. Research Progress on the Role of ABC Transporters in the Drug Resistance Mechanism of Intractable Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Jie; Mao, Ding-an; Liu, Li-qun

    2015-01-01

    The pathogenesis of intractable epilepsy is not fully clear. In recent years, both animal and clinical trials have shown that the expression of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters is increased in patients with intractable epilepsy; additionally, epileptic seizures can lead to an increase in the number of sites that express ABC transporters. These findings suggest that ABC transporters play an important role in the drug resistance mechanism of epilepsy. ABC transporters can perform the funcions of a drug efflux pump, which can reduce the effective drug concentration at epilepsy lesions by reducing the permeability of the blood brain barrier to antiepileptic drugs, thus causing resistance to antiepileptic drugs. Given the important role of ABC transporters in refractory epilepsy drug resistance, antiepileptic drugs that are not substrates of ABC transporters were used to obtain ABC transporter inhibitors with strong specificity, high safety, and few side effects, making them suitable for long-term use; therefore, these drugs can be used for future clinical treatment of intractable epilepsy. PMID:26491660

  7. Emerging drugs for partial-onset epilepsy: a review of brivaracetam

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Lan; Li, Shuchuen

    2016-01-01

    There are more than 12 new antiepileptic drugs approved in the last 2 decades. Even with these newer agents, seizure remission is still unachievable in around 30% of patients with partial-onset seizures (POS). Brivaracetam (BRV) is chemically related to levetiracetam (LEV) and possesses a strong binding affinity for the synaptic vesicle protein 2A tenfold above that of LEV, and other possible modes of antiepileptic actions. BRV is now under Phase III development for POS, but data from one Phase III trial also suggested its potential efficacy for primary generalized seizures. The purpose of this review is to provide updated information on the mechanisms of action of the available antiepileptic drugs, with a focus on BRV to assess its pharmacology, pharmacokinetics, clinical efficacy, safety, and tolerability in patients with uncontrolled POS. To date, six Phase IIb and III clinical trials have been performed to investigate the efficacy, safety, and tolerability of BRV as an adjunctive treatment for patients with POS. Generally, BRV was well tolerated and did not show significant difference in safety profile, compared to placebo. The efficacy outcomes of BRV, although not consistent across trials, did indicate that BRV was a promising add-on therapy for patients with POS. In conclusion, the many favorable attributes of BRV, like its high oral efficacy, good tolerability, dosing regimen, and minimal drug interaction, make it a promising antiepileptic therapy for patients with uncontrolled partial-onset epilepsy. PMID:27217762

  8. Neuropeptide Y as an endogenous antiepileptic, neuroprotective and pro-neurogenic peptide.

    PubMed

    Xapelli, Sara; Agasse, Fabienne; Ferreira, Raquel; Silva, Ana P; Malva, João O

    2006-11-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) is a small peptide important in cardiovascular physiology, feeding, anxiety, depression and epilepsy. In the hippocampus, NPY is mainly produced and released by GABAergic interneurons and inhibits glutamatergic neurotransmission in the excitatory tri-synaptic circuit. Under epileptic conditions, there is a robust overexpression of NPY and NPY receptors particularly in the granular and pyramidal cells, contributing to the tonic inhibition of glutamate release and consequently to control the spread of excitability into other brain structures. Recently, an important role was attributed to NPY in neuroprotection against excitotoxicity and in the modulation of neurogenesis. In the present review we discuss the potential relevance of NPY and NPY receptors in neuroprotection and neurogenesis, with implications for brain repair strategies. Recent patents describing new NPY receptor antagonists directed to treat obesity and cardiovascular disorders were published. However, the NPYergic system may also prove to be a good target for the treatment of pharmaco-resistant forms of temporal lobe epilepsy, by acting on hyperexcitability, neuronal death or brain repair. In order to achieve new NPY-based antiepileptic and brain repair strategies, selective NPY receptor agonists able to reach their targets in the epileptic brain must be developed in the near future.

  9. Rapid HPLC analysis of the antiepileptic lamotrigine and its metabolites in human plasma.

    PubMed

    Saracino, Maria Addolorata; Bugamelli, Francesca; Conti, Matteo; Amore, Mario; Raggi, Maria Augusta

    2007-09-01

    A liquid chromatographic method with diode array detection (DAD) has been developed for the analysis of the antiepileptic agent lamotrigine (LTG) and its metabolites, lamotrigine 2-N-glucuronide and 2-N-methylated in plasma samples. The analytes were separated on a C8 RP column, using a mobile phase composed of methanol and a 0.45 mM, pH 3.5 phosphate buffer containing 0.17% triethylamine (24:76 v/v). Melatonin was used as the internal standard (IS). The DAD detector was set at 220 nm for the detection of all the analytes. A simple protein precipitation with methanol guaranteed high extraction yield values (>90%) and good purification from matrix interference. Good linearity was obtained in the 0.1-15.0 microg/mL range for LTG and lamotrigine 2-N-glucuronide and in the 0.1-2.0 microg/mL range for lamotrigine 2-N-methylated. The analytical method was validated in terms of precision, extraction yield, and accuracy. These assays gave RSD% values for precision always lower than 4.3% and mean accuracy higher than 80%. The method seems to be suitable for the analysis of plasma samples from patients treated with Lamictal.

  10. Role of cytochrome P450 in drug interactions

    PubMed Central

    Bibi, Zakia

    2008-01-01

    Drug-drug interactions have become an important issue in health care. It is now realized that many drug-drug interactions can be explained by alterations in the metabolic enzymes that are present in the liver and other extra-hepatic tissues. Many of the major pharmacokinetic interactions between drugs are due to hepatic cytochrome P450 (P450 or CYP) enzymes being affected by previous administration of other drugs. After coadministration, some drugs act as potent enzyme inducers, whereas others are inhibitors. However, reports of enzyme inhibition are very much more common. Understanding these mechanisms of enzyme inhibition or induction is extremely important in order to give appropriate multiple-drug therapies. In future, it may help to identify individuals at greatest risk of drug interactions and adverse events. PMID:18928560

  11. Cost-effective and highly sensitive cholesterol microsensors with fast response based on the enzyme-induced conductivity change of polyaniline

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, Kuan-Chung; Chu, Chia-Ho; Hsu, Chen-Pin; Kang, Yen-Wen; Fang, Jung-Ying; Chen, Chih-Chen; Li, Sheng-Shian; Andrew Yeh, J.; Yao, Da-Jeng; Wang, Yu-Lin; Hsu, Chia-Hsien; Huang, Yu-Fen

    2014-09-15

    In this study, a cost-effective and highly sensitive cholesterol microsensor, which is consisted of cholesterol oxidase (ChOx), horseradish peroxidase (HRP), and polyaniline (PANI), was developed based on the enzyme-induced conductivity change of PANI with fast response. Hydrogen peroxide is produced via the reaction between cholesterol and ChOx, which was immobilized in a dialysis membrane. The produced hydrogen peroxide can oxidize HRP, which can be reduced by oxidizing PANI, thus resulting in decreased conductivity of the polyaniline thin film. The reduced HRP can be oxidized again by hydrogen peroxide and the cycle of the oxidation/reduction continues until all hydrogen peroxide are reacted, leading to the high sensitivity of the sensor due to the signal contributed from all hydrogen peroxide molecules. Cholesterol was detected near the physiological concentrations ranging from 100 mg/dl to 400 mg/dl with the cholesterol microsensors. The results show linear relation between cholesterol concentration and the conductivity change of the PANI. The microsensor showed no response to cholesterol when the PANI was standalone without cholesterol oxidase immobilized, indicating that the enzymatic reaction is required for cholesterol detection. The simple process of the sensor fabrication allows the sensor to be cost-effective and disposable usage. This electronic cholesterol microsensor is promising for point-of-care health monitoring in cholesterol level with low cost and fast response.

  12. Bifunctional magnetic nanobeads for sensitive detection of avian influenza A (H7N9) virus based on immunomagnetic separation and enzyme-induced metallization.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhen; Zhou, Chuan-Hua; Chen, Jian-Jun; Xiong, Chaochao; Chen, Ze; Pang, Dai-Wen; Zhang, Zhi-Ling

    2015-06-15

    Bifunctional magnetic nanobeads (bi-MBs) were fabricated by co-immobilizing target recognition molecules and signal molecules on a magnetic nanobead surface, which were used as both separation and enrichment carriers and signal carriers. The bi-MBs could capture and separate avian influenza A (H7N9) virus (H7N9 AIV) from complex samples efficiently based on the specific reaction between antigen-antibody and their good magnetic response, which simplified sample pretreatment and saved the detection time. Taking advantages of their high surface to volume ratio and rich surface functional groups, multiple alkaline phosphatase (ALP) signal molecules were tethered on the surface of bi-MBs which greatly amplified the detection signal. As an efficient signal amplification strategy, enzyme-induced metallization had been integrated with bi-MBs and anodic stripping voltammetry to construct an ultrasensitive electrochemical immunosensor for H7N9 AIV detection. Under the optimal conditions, the introduction of bi-MBs could amplify the detection signal in about four times compared with the same immunoassay without MBs, and the method showed a wide linear range of 0.01-20 ng/mL with a detection limit of 6.8 pg/mL. The electrochemical immunosensor provides a simple and reliable platform with high sensitivity and selectivity which shows great potential in early diagnosis of diseases.

  13. Cost-effective and highly sensitive cholesterol microsensors with fast response based on the enzyme-induced conductivity change of polyaniline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Kuan-Chung; Chu, Chia-Ho; Hsu, Chen-Pin; Kang, Yen-Wen; Fang, Jung-Ying; Hsu, Chia-Hsien; Huang, Yu-Fen; Chen, Chih-Chen; Li, Sheng-Shian; Andrew Yeh, J.; Yao, Da-Jeng; Wang, Yu-Lin

    2014-09-01

    In this study, a cost-effective and highly sensitive cholesterol microsensor, which is consisted of cholesterol oxidase (ChOx), horseradish peroxidase (HRP), and polyaniline (PANI), was developed based on the enzyme-induced conductivity change of PANI with fast response. Hydrogen peroxide is produced via the reaction between cholesterol and ChOx, which was immobilized in a dialysis membrane. The produced hydrogen peroxide can oxidize HRP, which can be reduced by oxidizing PANI, thus resulting in decreased conductivity of the polyaniline thin film. The reduced HRP can be oxidized again by hydrogen peroxide and the cycle of the oxidation/reduction continues until all hydrogen peroxide are reacted, leading to the high sensitivity of the sensor due to the signal contributed from all hydrogen peroxide molecules. Cholesterol was detected near the physiological concentrations ranging from 100 mg/dl to 400 mg/dl with the cholesterol microsensors. The results show linear relation between cholesterol concentration and the conductivity change of the PANI. The microsensor showed no response to cholesterol when the PANI was standalone without cholesterol oxidase immobilized, indicating that the enzymatic reaction is required for cholesterol detection. The simple process of the sensor fabrication allows the sensor to be cost-effective and disposable usage. This electronic cholesterol microsensor is promising for point-of-care health monitoring in cholesterol level with low cost and fast response.

  14. Anticonvulsant drugs in bipolar disorder

    PubMed Central

    Grunze, Heinz; Schlösser, Sandra; Amann, Benedikt; Walden, Jörg

    1999-01-01

    Although much progress has been made in successfully treating bipolar disorder, there is increasing awareness of the limitations of traditional treatment regimens such as lithium and neuroleptics. The large family of anticonvulsant drugs, however, appears to be capable of providing new treatment options, not only as medication of second choice in patients refractory to treatment, but often as a treatment standard with high efficacy and low incidence of side effects. Besides established mood stabilizers such as carbamazepine and valproate, new antiepileptic drugs are entering the field with promising initial results in the treatment of bipolar patients. Furthermore, bringing to light the mechanisms of action of anticonvulsants and the similarities between anticonvulsants effective in bipolar disorder may also deepen our understanding of the pathophysiological basis of the disorder. PMID:22033602

  15. Association of UGT2B7 and UGT1A4 Polymorphisms with Serum Concentration of Antiepileptic Drugs in Children

    PubMed Central

    Du, Zhongliang; Jiao, Yukun; Shi, Lianting

    2016-01-01

    Background This study aimed to analyze the relationship of UGT2B7 and UGT1A4 polymorphisms with metabolism of valproic acid (VPA) and lamotrigine (LTG) in epileptic children. Material/Methods We administered VPA (102) and LTG (102) to 204 children with epilepsy. Blood samples were collected before the morning dose. Serum concentration of LTG was measured by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Serum VPA concentration was tested by fluorescence polarization immunoassay. UGT2B7 A268G, C802T, and G211T polymorphisms, as well as UGT1A4 L48V polymorphism, were assayed by direct automated DNA sequencing after PCR. Evaluation of efficacy was conducted using the Engel method. Results The adjusted serum concentration of VPA was 4.26 μg/mL per mg/kg and LTG was 1.56 μg/mL per mg/kg. Multiple linear regression analysis revealed that VPA or LTG adjusted concentration showed a good linear relation with sex and age. UGT2B7 A268G and C802T polymorphisms were demonstrated to affect the serum concentration of VPA (F=3.147, P=0.047; F=22.754, P=0.000). UGT1A4 L48V polymorphism was not related with the serum concentration of LTG (F=5.328, P=0.006). In the efficacy analysis, we found that C802T polymorphism exerted strong effects on efficacy of VPA (χ2=9.265, P=0.010). L48V polymorphism also showed effects on efficacy of LTG (χ2=17.397, P=0.001). Conclusions UGT2B7, UGT1A4 polymorphisms play crucial roles in metabolism of VPA and LTG. PMID:27795544

  16. Use of antiepileptic drugs in nontraumatic neurosurgical procedures. Is there any best route and time of administration?

    PubMed

    Rabinowicz, A L; Salvat, J M; Leiguarda, R C; Demonty, F; Salvat, F; Cervio, A; Manes, F; Lazarowski, A

    1997-10-01

    We assessed in 15 consecutive patients the best route and time of administration for phenytoin (PHT) prophylaxis in neurosurgical procedures. We also correlated PHT levels in serum and cerebrospinal fluid after oral and parenteral loading doses. The mean PHT level was 13.9 micrograms/ml in serum and 2.03 micrograms/ml in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), with a significant correlation between levels in both compartments (r = 0.73, p < 0.01). Mean PHT levels among the different groups were not statistically significant. We conclude that therapeutic levels of PHT in CSF can be achieved independently of the route of administration, as long as accepted loading doses are used.

  17. Uptake of three antibiotics and an anti-epileptic drug by wheat plants spray irrigated with wastewater treatment plant effluent

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    With rising demands on water supplies necessitating water reuse, wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) effluent is often used to irrigate agricultural lands. Emerging contaminants, like pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs), are frequently found in effluent due to limited removal during WWT...

  18. Influence of chemical structure on skin reactions induced by antiepileptic drugs--the role of the aromatic ring.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiang-Qing; Shi, Xiao-Bing; Au, Ran; Chen, Fu-Shun; Wang, Fang; Lang, Sen-Yang

    2011-05-01

    Here we assessed whether the presence of an aromatic ring as a commonality in chemical structures of AEDs can explain skin reaction. We found that 164 cases of skin reactions associated with the use of AEDs were reported. Aromatic AEDs were suspected in 88.41% (145/164) of patients with skin reactions versus 59.80% (2316/3873) of patients without skin reactions. The presence of an aromatic ring in the chemical structure was associated with a significant increased risk of skin reactions (adjusted ROR 3.50; 95% CI 2.29, 5.35). Among the aromatic AEDs, skin reactions were significantly associated with carbamazepine, lamotrigine, and oxarbazepine. These results confirm that the presence of an aromatic ring as a common feature in chemical structures of AEDs partly explains AED-skin reactions. Skin reactions were reported triple as frequently with aromatic AEDs than with non-aromatic AEDs.

  19. [Importance of drug interactions with smoking in modern drug research].

    PubMed

    Laki, Szilvia; Kalapos-Kovács, Bernadett; Antal, István; Klebovich, Imre

    2013-01-01

    Drug interaction is a process during which a drug's fate in the body or its pharmacological properties are altered by an influencing factor. The extent of the drug interaction's effect can vary. The interaction could result from the modulation by another drug, food, alcohol, caffeine, narcotics, a drug influencing absorption or smoking. Moreover, transporter interactions with smoking could also have a major impact on many drug's efficacy. Clinically relevant drug interactions with smoking were classified in terms of their effect: pharmacokinetic, pharmacodynamic and transporter interactions. Policyclic aromatic carbohydrates, found in cigarette smoke, have enzyme inducing properties. The interaction affects mainly the hepatic isoenzyme CYP1A2. Interactions caused by smoking have an effect on all drugs being substrates of and therefore metabolised by CYP1A2. Pharmacokinetic alteration can also occur during the absorption, distribution and elimination process. The pharmacodynamic interactions are mainly caused by the effects of nicotine, a cigarette smoke component. Through interactions, smoking could also modify the activity of transporter proteins, altering this way the ADME properties of many drugs. Since smoking is one of the deadliest artefact in the history of human civilisation, identifying drug interactions with smoking is the physician's and pharmacist's major responsibility and task. Moreover, it is necessary to identify the patient's smoking habits during a medical treatment. This review aims to investigate the main types of drug interactions (PK/PD), identify factors influencing the activity of CYP enzymes and transporters, and also summarize the mechanisms of the most important drug interactions with smoking and their clinically relevant consequences (Table II-VI.). Drugs, with effects somehow altered by smoking-interactions, have been studied.

  20. Anti-convulsive and anti-epileptic properties of brivaracetam (ucb 34714), a high-affinity ligand for the synaptic vesicle protein, SV2A

    PubMed Central

    Matagne, A; Margineanu, D-G; Kenda, B; Michel, P; Klitgaard, H

    2008-01-01

    Background and purpose: Screening of 12 000 compounds for binding affinity to the synaptic vesicle protein 2A (SV2A), identified a high-affinity pyrrolidone derivative, brivaracetam (ucb 34714). This study examined its pharmacological profile in various in vitro and in vivo models of seizures and epilepsy, to evaluate its potential as a new antiepileptic drug. Experimental approach: The effects of brivaracetam and levetiracetam on epileptiform activity and seizure expression were examined in rat hippocampal slices, corneally kindled mice, audiogenic seizure–susceptible mice, maximal electroshock and pentylenetetrazol seizures in mice, hippocampal-kindled rats, amygdala-kindled rats and genetic absence epilepsy rats. Key results: Brivaracetam and levetiracetam reduced epileptiform responses in rat hippocampal slices, brivaracetam being most potent. Brivaracetam also differed from levetiracetam by its ability to protect against seizures in normal mice induced by a maximal electroshock or maximal dose of pentylenetetrazol. In corneally kindled mice and hippocampal-kindled rats, brivaracetam induced potent protection against secondarily generalized motor seizures and showed anti-kindling properties superior to levetiracetam. In amygdala-kindled rats, brivaracetam induced a significant suppression in motor-seizure severity and, contrary to levetiracetam, reduced the after-discharge at a higher dose. Audiogenic seizure–susceptible mice were protected more potently against the expression of clonic convulsions by brivaracetam than by levetiracetam. Brivaracetam induced a more complete suppression of spontaneous spike-and-wave discharges in genetic absence epilepsy rats than levetiracetam. Conclusions and implications: Brivaracetam has higher potency and efficacy than levetiracetam as an anti-seizure and anti-epileptogenic agent in various experimental models of epilepsy, and a wide therapeutic index. PMID:18500360

  1. Drug treatments for subjective tinnitus: serendipitous discovery versus rational drug design.

    PubMed

    Smith, Paul F; Darlington, Cynthia L

    2005-07-01

    Progress has been made in understanding the neural basis of subjective tinnitus (ST); however, this has not, as yet, translated into many new drug treatments. One reason for this is that realistic behavioral models of ST in animals have been developed only recently, and are still not widely used. Nonetheless, some significant pharmacological advances have been made. At present, there is evidence to support the efficacy of transtympanic gentamicin administration in the treatment of tinnitus associated with Meniere's disease; there is also some evidence to support the efficacy of intratympanic steroid and lidocaine application in the management of ST. Although benzodiazepines and anti-epileptic drugs appear to be effective in many cases of this condition, there is concern about their adverse side effect profile. Based on well-controlled clinical trials, vasodilators such as misoprostol, and histamine receptor ligands should be further investigated. Finally, given the evidence that ST is a form of sensory epilepsy, new antiepileptic drugs should be tested for potential efficacy as they are developed; such drugs may include novel N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonists, as well as cannabinoids.

  2. Antiepileptic action of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) inhibition in an animal model of temporal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Tai, Tina Y; Warner, Lindsay N; Jones, Terrance D; Jung, Sangwook; Concepcion, Francis A; Skyrud, David W; Fender, Jason; Liu, Yusha; Williams, Aaron D; Neumaier, John F; D'Ambrosio, Raimondo; Poolos, Nicholas P

    2017-02-22

    Several phosphorylation signaling pathways have been implicated in the pathogenesis of epilepsy arising from both genetic causes and acquired insults to the brain. Identification of dysfunctional signaling pathways in epilepsy may provide novel targets for antiepileptic therapies. We previously described a deficit in phosphorylation signaling mediated by p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK) that occurs in an animal model of temporal lobe epilepsy, and that produces neuronal hyperexcitability measured in vitro. We asked whether in vivo pharmacological manipulation of p38 MAPK activity would influence seizure frequency in chronically epileptic animals. Administration of a p38 MAPK inhibitor, SB203580, markedly worsened spontaneous seizure frequency, consistent with prior in vitro results. However, anisomycin, a non-specific p38 MAPK activator, significantly increased seizure frequency. We hypothesized that this unexpected result was due to activation of a related MAPK, c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK). Administration of JNK inhibitor SP600125 significantly decreased seizure frequency in a dose-dependent manner without causing overt behavioral abnormalities. Biochemical analysis showed increased JNK expression and activity in untreated epileptic animals. These results show for the first time that JNK is hyperactivated in an animal model of epilepsy, and that phosphorylation signaling mediated by JNK may represent a novel antiepileptic target.

  3. Disruption of thyroid hormone homeostasis in Ugt1a-deficient Gunn rats by microsomal enzyme inducers is not due to enhanced thyroxine glucuronidation

    SciTech Connect

    Richardson, Terrilyn A.; Klaassen, Curtis D.

    2010-10-01

    Microsomal enzyme inducers (MEI) that increase UDP-glucuronosyltransferases (UGTs) are thought to increase glucuronidation of thyroxine (T{sub 4}), thus reducing serum T{sub 4}, and subsequently increasing thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH). Ugt1a1 and Ugt1a6 mediate T{sub 4} glucuronidation. Therefore, this experiment determined the involvement of Ugt1a enzymes in increased T{sub 4} glucuronidation, decreased serum T{sub 4}, and increased TSH after MEI treatment. Male Wistar and Ugt1a-deficient Wistar (Gunn) rats were fed a control diet or diet containing pregnenolone-16{alpha}-carbonitrile (PCN; 800 ppm), 3-methylcholanthrene (3-MC; 200 ppm), or Aroclor 1254 (PCB; 100 ppm) for 7 days. Serum T{sub 4}, triiodothyronine (T{sub 3}), and TSH concentrations, hepatic T{sub 4}/T{sub 3} glucuronidation, and thyroid histology and follicular cell proliferation were investigated. PCN, 3-MC, and PCB treatments decreased serum T{sub 4}, whereas serum T{sub 3} was maintained in both Gunn and Wistar rats (except for PCB treatment). TSH was increased in Wistar and Gunn rats after PCN (130 and 277%) or PCB treatment (72 and 60%). T{sub 4} glucuronidation in Wistar rats was increased after PCN (298%), 3-MC (85%), and PCB (450%), but was extremely low in Gunn rats, and unchanged after MEI. T{sub 3} glucuronidation was increased after PCN (121%) or PCB (58%) in Wistar rats, but only PCN increased T{sub 3} glucuronidation in Gunn rats (43%). PCN treatment induced thyroid morphological changes and increased follicular cell proliferation in both strains. These data demonstrate that T{sub 4} glucuronidation cannot be increased in Ugt1a-deficient Gunn rats. Thus, the decrease in serum T{sub 4}, increase in TSH, and increase in thyroid cell proliferation after MEI are not dependent on increased T{sub 4} glucuronidation, and cannot be attributed to Ugt1a enzymes.

  4. Drug-Induced Liver Injury.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Leslie A; Collins-Yoder, Angela; Collins, Rachel E

    2016-10-01

    Drug-induced liver injury (DILI) can result from both idiosyncratic and intrinsic mechanisms. This article discusses the clinical impact of DILI from a broad range of medications as well as herbal and dietary supplements. Risk factors for idiosyncratic DILI (IDILI) are the result of multiple host, environmental, and compound factors. Some triggers of IDILI often seen in critical care include antibiotics, antiepileptic medications, statins, novel anticoagulants, proton pump inhibitors, inhaled anesthetics, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents, methotrexate, sulfasalazine, and azathioprine. The mechanism of IDILI due to these medications varies, and the resulting damage can be cholestatic, hepatocellular, or mixed. The primary treatment of IDILI is to discontinue the causative agent. DILI due to acetaminophen is intrinsic because the liver damage is predictably aligned with the dose ingested. Acute acetaminophen ingestion can be treated with activated charcoal or N-acetylcysteine. Future areas of research include identification of mitochondrial stress biomarkers and of the patients at highest risk for DILI.

  5. [Therapeutic drug monitoring of zonisamide].

    PubMed

    Verdier, Marie-Clémence; Bentué-Ferrer, Danièle; Tribut, Olivier

    2010-01-01

    Zonisamide is a second generation antiepileptic drug available in France since 2005. It provides a mechanism of action similar to those of phenytoin or carbamazepine. It is indicated in association in the treatment of partial epilepsy with or without secondary generalization. Zonisamide is well absorbed with maximum concentration achieved in 2 to 5 h. It is partly metabolized by the CYP3A4. Its elimination half-life is very long, around 60 h. Studies in adults and children show low concentration-efficacy and concentration-toxicity correlations, but a therapeutic range has been determined between 10 and 40 mg/L. Zonisamide is sensitive to the inductive molecules of CYP which will increase its clearance and decrease its half-life. A specific monitoring of patient is recommended in renal impairment. For this molecule, the interest of TDM has been evaluated: possibly useful.

  6. Interaction of Approved Drugs with Synaptic Vesicle Protein 2A.

    PubMed

    Danish, Azeem; Namasivayam, Vigneshwaran; Schiedel, Anke C; Müller, Christa E

    2017-04-01

    Levetiracetam (LEV) and its recently approved derivative brivaracetam are anti-epileptic drugs with a unique mechanism of action. The synaptic vesicle protein 2A (SV2A) was previously identified as their main target. In the current study, we tested a collection of 500 approved drugs for interaction with the human SV2A protein expressed in Chinese hamster ovary cells. Competition binding studies were performed using cell lysates with high SV2A expression and [(3) H]brivaracetam as a radioligand. A hit rate of 3% was obtained, defined as compounds that inhibited radioligand binding by more than 90% at a screening concentration of 20 μM. Subsequent concentration-inhibition curves revealed the antihistaminic prodrug loratadine (Ki  = 1.16 μM) and the antimalarial drug quinine (Ki  = 2.03 μM) to be the most potent SV2A protein ligands of the investigated drug library. Both compounds were similarly potent as LEV (Ki  = 1.74 μM), providing structurally novel scaffolds for SV2A ligands. A pharmacophore model was established, which indicated steric and electronic conformities of brivaracetam with the new SV2A ligands, and preliminary structure-activity relationships were determined. The anti-convulsive effects of the natural product quinine may - at least in part - be explained by interaction with SV2A. Loratadine and quinine represent new lead structures for anti-epileptic drug development.

  7. New Treatments for Drug-Resistant Epilepsy that Target Presynaptic Transmitter Release

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-07-01

    genetically-encoded fusion protein of the vesicle protein Vesicular Associated Membrane Protein (VAMP2) and pH-sensitive Enhanced Green Fluorescent...new therapeutic target for treatment of unresponsive epilepsies. While LEV binds to both the synaptic vesicle protein SV2a and N-type Ca2+ channels... Protein (EGFP). Research Goals: Task 1. Assess the effect of chronic treatment with antiepileptic drugs acting on presynaptic glutamate release

  8. HPLC-DAD determination of CNS-acting drugs in human blood, plasma, and serum.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Ana María Jiménez; Navas, María José; Asuero, Agustín G

    2014-01-01

    This is a review of the literature regarding high-performance liquid chromatography-diode array detection (HPLC-DAD) procedures for the detection and determination of several categories of central nervous system-acting drugs in blood, plasma, or serum samples. Psychiatric and neurological drugs, such as antidepressants, benzodiazepines, antipsychotics, antiepileptics, and antiparkinsonians, have been included because of their relevance to therapeutic drug monitoring and systematic toxicological analysis. Articles published between 2000 and January 2012 have been taken into consideration. This review has focused on methodological approaches, sample pretreatment techniques, and other practical aspects.

  9. Drug metabolism for the perplexed medicinal chemist.

    PubMed

    Testa, Bernard

    2009-11-01

    Two related and significant issues may elicit perplexity in medicinal chemists and are discussed here. First, a broad presentation of the pharmacological and toxicological consequences of drug metabolism should justify the significance of drug metabolism and serve as an incentive to further study. When comparing the pharmacological activities of a drug and its metabolite(s), a continuum is found which ranges from soft drugs (no active metabolites) to prodrugs (inactive per se, as illustrated here with clopidogrel and prasugrel). Innumerable intermediate cases document drugs whose activity is shared by one or more metabolites, as exemplified with tamoxifen. The toxicological consequences of metabolism at the molecular, macromolecular, and macroscopic levels are manyfold. A brief overview is offered together with a summary of the reactions of toxification and detoxification of the antiepileptic valproic acid. The second issue discussed in the review is a comparison of the relative significance of cytochromes P450 and other oxidoreductases (EC 1), hydrolases (EC 3), and transferases (EC 2) in drug metabolism, based on a 'guesstimate' of the number of drug metabolites that are known to be produced by them. The conclusion is that oxidoreductases are the main enzymes responsible for the formation of toxic or active metabolites, whereas transferases play the major role in producing inactive and nontoxic metabolites.

  10. Design, synthesis and antiepileptic properties of novel 1-(substituted benzylidene)-3-(1-(morpholino/piperidino methyl)-2,3-dioxoindolin-5-yl)urea derivatives.

    PubMed

    Prakash, Chinnasamy Rajaram; Raja, Sundararajan

    2011-12-01

    Twenty new 1-(substituted benzylidene)-3-(1-(morpholino/piperidino methyl)-2,3-dioxoindolin-5-yl) urea derivatives were designed and synthesized. Antiepileptic screening was performed using MES and scPTZ seizures tests. The neurotoxicity was determined by rotorod test. In the preliminary screening, compounds 5c, 5g, 5j and 5n were found active in MES model, while 5o showed significant antiepileptic activity in scPTZ model. Further all these five compounds were administered orally to rats, 5c, 5g and 5n showed better activity than Phenytoin in oral route. Among these compounds 5c revealed protection in MES at a dose of 30 mg/kg and 100 mg/kg 0.5 h and 4 h after i.p. administration respectively. This molecule provided also protection in the scPTZ at a dose of 300 mg/kg in both time intervals.

  11. Alcohol and drugs in epilepsy: pathophysiology, presentation, possibilities, and prevention.

    PubMed

    Leach, John Paul; Mohanraj, Rajiv; Borland, William

    2012-09-01

    The potentially serious outcomes from ingestion of and dependence on toxins make this an important topic for epileptologists. We must be aware of the potential for harm from compounds that may be freely available, yet patients may try to conceal their use. Problematic compounds may cause seizures either acutely or on withdrawal: Their use may reduce effectiveness of antiepileptic drugs, or may simply promote and enhance chaotic lifestyles. Any or all of these factors may worsen seizure control or even directly cause seizures. This article highlights the pathophysiology behind provoked seizures, provides clues to diagnosis, and then outlines the steps that clinicians should take to reduce the deleterious effects of toxic compounds.

  12. Flurbiprofen-induced generalized bullous fixed drug eruption.

    PubMed

    Balta, I; Simsek, H; Simsek, G G

    2014-01-01

    Fixed drug eruption (FDE) is an unusual drug-related side effect that results in recurrent lesions whenever the causative drugs are used. FDEs usually occur as a single, sharply demarcated, round erythematous patch or plaque, occasionally with localized bullae. The most common offending agents include antimicrobials, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and antiepileptics. There are some reports where contact dermatitis and cutaneous vasculitis have been associated with the use of flurbiprofen. We present the case of a 50-year-old man with flurbiprofen-induced generalized bullous FDE. To the best of our knowledge, the most serious form of FDE, the generalized bullous FDE, to be caused by flurbiprofen has not been reported previously.

  13. Genome-wide association study identifies common variants associated with pharmacokinetics of psychotropic drugs.

    PubMed

    Athanasiu, Lavinia; Smorr, Lisa-Lena H; Tesli, Martin; Røssberg, Jan I; Sønderby, Ida E; Spigset, Olav; Djurovic, Srdjan; Andreassen, Ole A

    2015-08-01

    Individual variation in pharmacokinetics of psychotropic drugs, particularly metabolism, is an important factor to consider in pharmacological treatment in psychiatry. A large proportion of this variance is still not accounted for, but evidence so far suggests the involvement of genetic factors. We performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) with concentration dose ratio (CDR) as sub-phenotype to assess metabolism rate of psychotropic drugs in a homogenous Norwegian sample of 1334 individuals diagnosed with a severe mental disorder. The GWAS revealed one genome-wide significant marker (rs16935279, p-value=3.95×10(-10), pperm=7.5×10(-4)) located in an intronic region of the lncRNA LOC100505718. Carriers of the minor allele have a lower metabolism rate of antiepileptic drugs compared to major allele carriers. In addition, several nominally significant associations between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and CDR for antipsychotic, antidepressant and antiepileptic drugs were disclosed. We consider standardised CDR to be a useful measure of the metabolism rate of a drug. The present findings indicate that common gene variants could affect the metabolism of psychotropic drugs. This warrants further investigations into the functional mechanisms involved as it may lead to identification of predictive markers as well as novel drug targets.

  14. From bench to drug: Human seizure modeling using Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Song, Juan; Tanouye, Mark A.

    2008-01-01

    Studies of human seizure disorders have revealed that susceptibility to seizures is greatly influenced by genetic factors. In addition to causing epilepsy, genetic factors can suppress seizures and epileptogenesis. Examination of seizure-suppressor genes is challenging in humans. However, such genes are readily identified and analyzed in a Drosophila animal model of epilepsy. In this article, the epilepsy phenotype of Drosophila seizure-sensitive mutants is reviewed. A novel class of genes called seizure-suppressors is described. Mutations defining suppressors revert the “epilepsy” phenotype of neurological mutants. We conclude this review with particular discussion of a seizure-suppressor gene encoding DNA topoisomerase I (top1). Mutations of top1 are especially effective at reverting the seizure-sensitive phenotype of Drosophila epilepsy mutants. In addition, an unexpected class of anti-epileptic drugs has been identified. These are DNA topoisomerase I inhibitors such as camptothecin and its derivatives; several candidates are comparable or perhaps better than traditional anti-epileptic drugs such as valproate at reducing seizures in Drosophila drug-feeding experiments. PMID:18063465

  15. 2.3.7.8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-Dioxin Induced Immunosuppression: Its Possible Alteration by In Vivo Administration of Specific Hepatic Enzyme Inducers.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-06-27

    England .2 LIST OF ACOREVIAT:CNS AND SYMBOLS TCDD =2.3.7.8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxtn TCDF = 2.3.7 8-IOetrachlo’dibenzofuran 3MC =3-methyicholanthrene...this research program was to clarify whether drugs that in vitro inhibit TCDD binding to the hepatic cytosolic Ah "rec3ptor" such as 3MC , PNF and TCDF...these enzymes has also been performed. The study of this year has been concentrated on the effects of only two inducers, that is TCDF and 3MC , since

  16. Palladium-benzodiazepine derivatives as promising metallodrugs for the development of antiepileptic therapies.

    PubMed

    Barros, Walleska Bismaida Zacarias Galvão; da Silva, Allysson Haide Queiroz; Barbosa, Ana Soraya Lima; Nunes, Ábner Magalhães; Reys, José Rui Machado; de Araújo-Filho, Heitor Gomes; de Souza Siqueira Quintans, Jullyana; Quintans-Júnior, Lucindo José; Pfeffer, Michel; Dos Santos Malta, Valéria Rodrigues; Meneghetti, Mario Roberto

    2016-02-01

    We synthesized two organometallic diazepam-palladium(II) derivatives by C-H activation of diazepam (DZP) with palladium salts, i.e., PdCl2 and Pd(OAc)2 (OAc=acetate). Both compounds obtained are air stable and were isolated in good yields. The anticonvulsant potential of the complexes, labeled [(DZP)PdCl]2 and [(DZP)PdOAc]2, was evaluated through two animal models: pentylenetetrazole (PTZ)- and picrotoxin (PTX)-induced convulsions. The organometallic DZP-palladium(II) acetate complex, [(DZP)PdOAc]2, significantly increased (p<0.01 or p<0.001) latencies and protected the animals against convulsions induced by PTZ and PTX, while the analogous chloro derivative, [(DZP)PdCl]2, was effective (p<0.01) only in the PTZ model. These effects appear to be mediated through the GABAergic system. The possible mechanism of action of the DZP-palladium(II) complexes was also confirmed with the use of flumazenil (FLU), a GABAA-benzodiazepine receptor complex site antagonist. Herein, we present the first report of the anticonvulsant properties of organometallic DZP-palladium(II) complexes as well as evidence that these compounds may play an important role in the study of new drugs to treat patients with epilepsy.

  17. Derangements in bone mineral parameters and bone mineral density in south Indian subjects on antiepileptic medications

    PubMed Central

    Koshy, George; Varghese, Ron Thomas; Naik, Dukhabandhu; Asha, Hesargatta Shyamsunder; Thomas, Nihal; Seshadri, Mandalam Subramaniam; Alexander, Mathew; Thomas, Maya; Aaron, Sanjith; Paul, Thomas Vizhalil

    2014-01-01

    Background: Although there are reports describing the association of alternations of bone and mineral metabolism in epileptic patients with long-term anticonvulsant therapy, there are only limited Indian studies which have looked at this aspect. Objectives: This study was done to compare the prevalence of changes in bone mineral parameters and bone mineral density (BMD) in ambulant individuals on long-term anticonvulsant therapy with age- and body mass index (BMI)-matched healthy controls. Materials and Methods: There were 55 men (on medications for more than 6 months) and age- and BMI-matched 53 controls. Drug history, dietary calcium intake (DCI), and duration of sunlight exposure were recorded. Bone mineral parameters and BMD were measured. Results: The control group had a significantly higher daily DCI with mean ± SD of 396 ± 91 mg versus 326 ± 101 mg (P = 0.007) and more sunlight exposure of 234 ± 81 vs 167 ± 69 min (P = 0.05). BMD at the femoral neck was significantly lower in cases (0.783 ± 0.105 g/cm2) when compared to controls (0.819 ± 0.114 g/cm2). Majority of the patients (61%) had low femoral neck BMD (P = 0.04). There was no significant difference in the proportion of subjects with vitamin D deficiency (<20 ng/mL) between cases (n = 32) and controls (n = 37) (P = 0.234). Conclusions: Vitamin D deficiency was seen in both the groups in equal proportions, highlighting the existence of a high prevalence of this problem in India. Low femoral neck BMD found in cases may stress the need for supplementing calcium and treating vitamin D deficiency in this specific group. However, the benefit of such intervention has to be studied in a larger proportion of epileptic patients. PMID:25221394

  18. Drug treatment strategies for epilepsy revisited: starting early or late? One drug or several drugs?

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Dieter

    2016-12-01

    There are two popular strategies for current drug treatment of epilepsy; starting early may be better and polytherapy conveys advantages over monotherapy. This review briefly examines if the historical record is much of a guide to determine the clinical value of these two strategies. Great clinical scientists of the 19(th) and early 20(th) century, such as Sir William Gowers, and William Aldren Turner, offered vivid single case studies and showed early results of seizure remission in groups of subjects. The historical record offered, however, no evidence of clear clinical benefits for early treatment and polytherapy. Combination treatment was thought to be useful in only some cases. In agreement, current evidence shows no clear clinical benefit of starting treatment early, except perhaps in severe epilepsy. Polytherapy is clinically useful in a subgroup of subjects, but despite being a standard treatment strategy for over one hundred years, it has been poorly studied. In fact, there is no compelling experimental or clinical evidence for a difference in seizure outcome between monotherapy and polytherapy. This surprising finding should prompt a re-appraisal regarding the need to test both strategies separately for the licensing of new antiepileptic drugs.

  19. Evaluation of anti-epileptic activity of leaf extracts of Punica granatum on experimental models of epilepsy in mice

    PubMed Central

    Viswanatha, Gollapalle L.; Venkataranganna, Marikunte V.; Prasad, Nunna Bheema Lingeswara; Ashok, Godavarthi

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: This study was aimed to examine the anti-epileptic activity of leaf extracts of Punica granatum in experimental models of epilepsy in Swiss albino mice. Materials and Methods: Petroleum ether leaf extract of P. granatum (PLPG), methanolic LPG (MLPG), and aqueous LPG (ALPG) extracts of P. granatum leaves was initially evaluated against 6-Hz-induced seizure model; the potent extract was further evaluated against maximal electroshock (MES) and pentylenetetrazole (PTZ)-induced convulsions. Further, the potent extract was evaluated for its influence on Gamma amino butyric acid (GABA) levels in brain, to explore the possible mechanism of action. In addition, the potent extract was subjected to actophotometer test to assess its possible locomotor activity deficit inducing action. Results: In 6-Hz seizure test, the MLPG has alleviated 6-Hz-induced seizures significantly and dose dependently at doses 50, 100, 200, and 400 mg/kg. In contrast, PLPG and ALPG did not show any protection, only high dose of ALPG (400 and 800 mg/kg, p.o.) showed very slight inhibition. Based on these observations, only MLPG was tested in MES and PTZ models. Interestingly, the MLPG (50, 100, 200 and 400 mg/kg) has offered significant and dose-dependent protection against MES (P < 0.01) and PTZ-induced (P < 0.01) seizures in mice. Further, MLPG showed a significant increase in brain GABA levels (P < 0.01) compared to control and showed insignificant change in locomotor activity in all tested doses (100, 200 and 400 mg/kg). Interestingly, higher dose of MLPG (400 mg/kg, p.o.) and Diazepam (5 mg/mg, p.o.) have completely abolished the convulsions in all the anticonvulsant tests. Conclusion: These findings suggest that MLPG possesses significant anticonvulsant property, and one of the possible mechanisms behind the anticonvulsant activity of MLPG may be through enhanced GABA levels in the brain. PMID:27757273

  20. Investigational new drugs for focal epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Mula, Marco

    2016-01-01

    For more than 30 years, antiepileptic drug development has been based on specific assumptions regarding the neurobiology of epilepsy but all marketed drugs have not changed the proportion of drug refractory patients. It is, therefore, evident that new molecular targets need to be identified. Advances in neurobiology and molecular pharmacology are bringing into the epilepsy field new neurochemical functions such as those modulated by cannabinoid, serotonin, melatonin and galanin receptors. Among all the different compounds, the melatonin type 3 receptor agonist beprodone and cannabidiol are those at the more advanced stage of development. Interestingly, despite the structural analogies with tetrahydrocannabinol, the anticonvulsant activity of cannabidiol is not mediated by an interaction with cannabinoid receptors. Neurosteroids represent another remarkable class of drugs, and among them, ganaxolone is at the most advanced stage of development. Furthermore, for the first time, potential disease-modifying agents and techniques are entering the epilepsy market. Rapalogues such as everolimus and the antibiotic minocycline are currently under development for specific epileptic syndromes like tuberous sclerosis or Angelman syndrome. Finally, optogenetics, though still at an early stage of development, represents a futuristic therapeutic strategy for drug-refractory epilepsy.

  1. [Evidence-based therapeutic drug monitoring of lopinavir].

    PubMed

    Barrail-Tran, Aurélie; Taburet, Anne-Marie; Poirier, Jean-Marie

    2011-01-01

    The HIV protease inhibitor lopinavir presents a wide inter-individual variability related to liver and intestinal metabolism involving CYP3A. Published studies were analyzed to establish whether there is evidence that therapeutic drug monitoring of lopinavir could improve patient care. In naïve or pretreated HIV-infected patients, no relationship could be evidenced between virological efficacy and trough lopinavir concentration, most likely because concentrations are above inhibitory concentrations. Although data are limited, patients with elevated triglycerides and cholesterol had trough lopinavir concentrations >8 000 ng/mL. These data suggest that the level of evidence of interest of lopinavir therapeutic drug monitoring is may be recommended in some situations such as children, pregnant women, pretreated patients if the number of mutations is <5, when coadministration with drug with metabolizing enzyme inducing properties is warranted and toxicity.

  2. Drug allergies

    MedlinePlus

    Allergic reaction - drug (medication); Drug hypersensitivity; Medication hypersensitivity ... A drug allergy involves an immune response in the body that produces an allergic reaction to a medicine. The ...

  3. Prediction of drug-drug interactions with carbamazepine-10,11-epoxide using a new in vitro assay for epoxide hydrolase inhibition.

    PubMed

    Rosa, Maria; Bonnaillie, Pierre; Chanteux, Hugues

    2016-12-01

    1. Carbamazepine is an antiepileptic drug which is metabolized by CYP3A4 into carbamazepine-10,11-epoxide. This metabolite is then detoxified by epoxide hydrolase. As carbamazepine-10,11-epoxide has been associated with neurotoxicity, it is critical to identify whether a new antiepileptic drug has the potential to inhibit epoxide hydrolase and therefore increase carbamazepine-10,11-epoxide plasma levels. 2. In this study, an in vitro assay was developed to evaluate epoxide hydrolase activity by using carbamazepine-10,11-epoxide as probe substrate. The ability of this assay to predict drug-drug interactions (DDI) at the epoxide hydrolase level was also investigated. 3. To this aim, known inhibitors of epoxide hydrolase for which in vivo data are available were used. Firstly, carbamazepine-10,11-epoxide hydrolase activity was determined in liver microsomes, cytosol and hepatocytes. Thereafter, the IC50 of epoxide hydrolase inhibitors (progabide, valproic acid, valpromide and valnoctamide) was determined in liver microsomes and hepatocytes. Finally, prediction of AUC increase was performed using the in vitro data generated. 4. Interestingly, epoxide hydrolase activity was found to be much higher in human hepatocytes compared to liver microsomes/cytosol. Even though assessed on a limited number of compounds, this study demonstrated that the use of hepatocytes seems to be a more relevant model to assess and predict DDI at the epoxide hydrolase level.

  4. Drug Safety

    MedlinePlus

    ... over-the-counter drug. The FDA evaluates the safety of a drug by looking at Side effects ... clinical trials The FDA also monitors a drug's safety after approval. For you, drug safety means buying ...

  5. Comparative Pre-Emptive Analgesic Efficacy Study of Novel Antiepileptic Agents Lamotrigine and Topiramate in Patients Undergoing Major Surgeries at a Tertiary Care Hospital: A Randomized Double Blind Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Ankush; Bhosale, Uma A.; Shah, Priyank; Yegnanarayan, Radha; Sardesai, Shalini

    2016-01-01

    Background Central nervous sensitization, following surgical injury, leads to postoperative pain hypersensitivity due to lowered pain threshold in peripheral nociceptors and increased excitability of spinal neurons. Pre-emptive analgesia is intended to decrease pain perception and overall analgesic need by use of drug regimen, seizing CNS sensitization before exposure to painful stimuli. Few studies support pre-emptive analgesic efficacy of novel antiepileptic agent Gabapentin. Though Topiramate and Lamotrigine have been proven analgesic in animal models of chronic pain and clinical studies of Gabapentin-resistant neuropathic pain, literature search revealed scarce data on its pre-emptive analgesic efficacy. Purpose This study is designed to study and compare the pre-emptive analgesic efficacy of Lamotrigine, Topiramate, and Diclofenac sodium in postoperative pain control. Methods This randomized clinical trial included 90 patients of either sex, between 18 and 70 years undergoing major surgeries. Patients were randomly allocated to control and test groups and received respective treatment 30 min before induction of anesthesia. Aldrete's and pain scores were recorded using the Visual Analog Scale, Facial and Behavioral Rating Scale at awakening and at 1, 2, 4, 6, and 24 h. Postoperative rescue analgesic consumption for 24 h was recorded. Results Significantly higher pain scores were observed in the Topiramate group postoperatively for 2 h on all pain scales (p < 0.05), whereas in the control group it was significantly higher at 1 h (p < 0.05). Lamotrigine-treated patients were more comfortable throughout the study with significantly less (p < 0.05) postoperative analgesic requirement. Conclusions Study results strongly suggest the pre-emptive analgesic efficacy of a single oral dose of Lamotrigine over Diclofenac and Topiramate in postoperative pain control. PMID:27721585

  6. AED Treatment Through Different Ages: As Our Brains Change, Should Our Drug Choices Also?

    PubMed Central

    French, Jacqueline A.; Staley, Brigid A.

    2012-01-01

    Patient age can impact selection of the optimal antiepileptic drug for a number of reasons. Changes in brain physiology from neonate to elderly, as well as changes in underlying etiologies of epilepsy, could potentially affect the ability of different drugs to control seizures. Unfortunately, much of this is speculative, as good studies demonstrating differences in efficacy across age ranges do not exist. Beyond the issue of efficacy, certain drugs may be more or less appropriate at different ages because of differing pharmacokinetics, including changes in hepatic metabolism, absorption, and elimination. Lack of appropriate drug formulations (such as liquid forms) may be a barrier to using drugs in the very young. Finally, some serious adverse events are seen either exclusively or preferentially at different ages. PMID:23476119

  7. AED Treatment Through Different Ages: As Our Brains Change, Should Our Drug Choices Also?

    PubMed

    French, Jacqueline A; Staley, Brigid A

    2012-07-01

    Patient age can impact selection of the optimal antiepileptic drug for a number of reasons. Changes in brain physiology from neonate to elderly, as well as changes in underlying etiologies of epilepsy, could potentially affect the ability of different drugs to control seizures. Unfortunately, much of this is speculative, as good studies demonstrating differences in efficacy across age ranges do not exist. Beyond the issue of efficacy, certain drugs may be more or less appropriate at different ages because of differing pharmacokinetics, including changes in hepatic metabolism, absorption, and elimination. Lack of appropriate drug formulations (such as liquid forms) may be a barrier to using drugs in the very young. Finally, some serious adverse events are seen either exclusively or preferentially at different ages.

  8. Concomitant therapy in people with epilepsy: potential drug-drug interactions and patient awareness.

    PubMed

    Eyal, Sara; Rasaby, Sivan; Ekstein, Dana

    2014-02-01

    People with epilepsy (PWE) may use prescription and over-the-counter (OTC) drugs for the treatment of concomitant diseases. Combinations of these drugs, as well as dietary supplements, with antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) may lead to reduced control of seizures and of coexisting medical conditions and increased risk of adverse drug reactions (ADRs). The aims of this study were to obtain comprehensive lists of medications, dietary supplements, botanicals, and specific food components used by adult PWE and to evaluate the potential for interactions involving AEDs and patients' awareness of such potential interactions. We conducted a prospective, questionnaire-based study of PWE attending the Hadassah-Hebrew University Epilepsy Clinic over a period of 7months. The questionnaire interview included the listing of medications, medicinal herbs, dietary supplements, and specific food components consumed and the knowledge of potential drug-drug interactions (DDIs), and it was conducted by a pharmacist. Drug-drug interactions were analyzed via the Micromedex online database. Out of 179 patients who attended the clinic over the study period, we interviewed 73 PWE, of which 71 were included in our final analysis. The mean number of AEDs consumed per subject was 1.7 (SD: 0.8, range: 1-4). Forty (56%) subjects were also treated with other prescription and/or OTC medications, and thirty-four (48%) took dietary supplements. Drug families most prone to DDIs involving AEDs included antipsychotic agents, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, and statins. Two-thirds of study participants (67%) knew that DDIs may lead to ADRs, but only half (56%) were aware of the potential for reduced seizure control. Only 44% always reported treatment with AEDs to medical professionals. This study provides for the first time a comprehensive picture of prescription and OTC drugs and food supplements used by PWE. Despite a considerable potential for DDIs involving AEDs, patient awareness is limited

  9. Drugs, drugs--who has the drugs?

    PubMed

    Blair, James

    2012-01-01

    Drug diversion, although on the increase, is not the only problem involving drugs that hospital security officials should be concerned with. Growing drug shortages, offshore production, counterfeiting, and weaknesses in the drug supply chain in case of a world-wide pandemic, are even greater causes for concern, the author claims.

  10. ABHD6 blockade exerts antiepileptic activity in PTZ-induced seizures and in spontaneous seizures in R6/2 mice.

    PubMed

    Naydenov, Alipi V; Horne, Eric A; Cheah, Christine S; Swinney, Katie; Hsu, Ku-Lung; Cao, Jessica K; Marrs, William R; Blankman, Jacqueline L; Tu, Sarah; Cherry, Allison E; Fung, Susan; Wen, Andy; Li, Weiwei; Saporito, Michael S; Selley, Dana E; Cravatt, Benjamin F; Oakley, John C; Stella, Nephi

    2014-07-16

    The serine hydrolase α/β-hydrolase domain 6 (ABHD6) hydrolyzes the most abundant endocannabinoid (eCB) in the brain, 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG), and controls its availability at cannabinoid receptors. We show that ABHD6 inhibition decreases pentylenetetrazole (PTZ)-induced generalized tonic-clonic and myoclonic seizure incidence and severity. This effect is retained in Cnr1(-/-) or Cnr2(-/-) mice, but blocked by addition of a subconvulsive dose of picrotoxin, suggesting the involvement of GABAA receptors. ABHD6 inhibition also blocked spontaneous seizures in R6/2 mice, a genetic model of juvenile Huntington's disease known to exhibit dysregulated eCB signaling. ABHD6 blockade retained its antiepileptic activity over chronic dosing and was not associated with psychomotor or cognitive effects. While the etiology of seizures in R6/2 mice remains unsolved, involvement of the hippocampus is suggested by interictal epileptic discharges, increased expression of vGLUT1 but not vGAT, and reduced Neuropeptide Y (NPY) expression. We conclude that ABHD6 inhibition may represent a novel antiepileptic strategy.

  11. ABHD6 blockade exerts antiepileptic activity in PTZ-induced seizures and in spontaneous seizures in R6/2 mice

    PubMed Central

    Cheah, Christine S.; Swinney, Katie; Hsu, Ku-Lung; Cao, Jessica K.; Marrs, William; Blankman, Jacqueline L.; Tu, Sarah; Cherry, Allison E.; Fung, Susan; Wen, Andy; Li, Weiwei; Saporito, Michael S.; Selley, Dana E.; Cravatt, Benjamin F.; Oakley, John C.; Stella, Nephi

    2014-01-01

    The serine hydrolase α/β-hydrolase domain 6 (ABHD6) hydrolyzes the most abundant endocannabinoid (eCB) in the brain, 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG), and controls its availability at cannabinoid receptors. We show that ABHD6 inhibition decreases pentylenetetrazole (PTZ)-induced generalized tonic-clonic and myoclonic seizure incidence, and severity. This effect is retained in cnr1−/− or cnr2−/− mice, but blocked by addition of a subconvulsive dose of picrotoxin, suggesting the involvement of GABAA receptors. ABHD6 inhibition also blocked spontaneous seizures in R6/2 mice, a genetic model of Juvenile Huntington’s disease known to exhibit dysregulated eCB signaling. ABHD6 blockade retained its antiepileptic activity over chronic dosing and was not associated with psychomotor or cognitive effects. While the etiology of seizures in R6/2 mice remains unsolved, involvement of the hippocampus is suggested by interictal epileptic discharges, increased expression of vGLUT1 but not vGAT, and reduced Neuropeptide Y (NPY) expression. We conclude that ABHD6 inhibition may represent a novel antiepileptic strategy. PMID:25033180

  12. [Therapeutic drug monitoring of topiramate].

    PubMed

    Bentué-Ferrer, Danièle; Tribut, Olivier; Verdier, Marie-Clémence

    2010-01-01

    Topiramate, a second generation anticonvulsant drug, is marketed in France since 1997. It is also indicated in the prophylaxis of headache and is used, except legal notices, in the treatment of neuropathic pains and bipolar disorders. The efficiency and the risk of adverse reactions are dose dependent. However, the good correlation between the dosage and the plasmatic concentrations, and the relatively low interindividual variability, when we take into account the age and the association with an enzyme inducer, are not in favour of the interest of a dosage. Furthermore, there is a covering range between the effective and not effective concentrations, and levels susceptible or not to facilitate the appearance of an adverse event. There is no validated therapeutic range, but to the usual dosages the plasma concentrations are included between 5 and 20 mg/L (15-60 micromol/L), mostly in the low part of this interval. For this molecule, the level of proof of the interest of the TDM was estimated in: possibly useful.

  13. The effects of fall-risk-increasing drugs on postural control: a literature review.

    PubMed

    de Groot, Maartje H; van Campen, Jos P C M; Moek, Marije A; Tulner, Linda R; Beijnen, Jos H; Lamoth, Claudine J C

    2013-11-01

    Meta-analyses showed that psychotropic drugs (antidepressants, neuroleptics, benzodiazepines, antiepileptic drugs) and some cardiac drugs (digoxin, type IA anti-arrhythmics, diuretics) are associated with increased fall risk. Because balance and gait disorders are the most consistent predictors of future falls, falls due to use of these so-called fall-risk-increasing drugs (FRIDs) might be partly caused by impairments of postural control that these drugs can induce. Therefore, the effects of FRIDs on postural control were examined by reviewing literature. Electronic databases and reference lists of identified papers were searched until June 2013. Only controlled research papers examining the effects of FRIDs on postural control were included. FRIDs were defined according to meta-analyses as antidepressants, neuroleptics, benzodiazepines, antiepileptic drugs, digoxin, type IA anti-arrhythmics, and diuretics. Ninety-four papers were included, of which study methods for quantifying postural control, and the effects of FRIDs on postural control were abstracted. Postural control was assessed with a variety of instruments, mainly evaluating aspects of body sway during quiet standing. In general, postural control was impaired, indicated by an increase in parameters quantifying body sway, when using psychotropic FRIDs. The effects were more pronounced when people were of a higher age, used psychotropics at higher daily doses, with longer half-lives, and administered for a longer period. From the present literature review, it can be concluded that psychotropic drugs cause impairments in postural control, which is probably one of the mediating factors for the increased fall risk these FRIDs are associated with. The sedative effects of these drugs on postural control are reversible, as was proven in intervention studies where FRIDs were withdrawn. The findings of the present literature review highlight the importance of using psychotropic drugs in the older population only at

  14. Treatment Effects of Onion (Allium cepa) and Ginger (Zingiber officinale) on Sexual Behavior of Rat after Inducing an Antiepileptic Drug (lamotrigine)

    PubMed Central

    Khaki, Arash; Farnam, Alireza; Badie, Arash Davatgar; Nikniaz, Hussein

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The aim of the present study was to evaluate the beneficial degree of sexual behavior in male rats after inducement of onion and ginger in lamotrigine receiving groups. Material and Methods: Wistar rats (n=70) (male=35, female=35) were allocated so that males were divided into seven groups: control (n=5) and test groups (n=35). Control group used normal Saline (3 cc for each rat). Lamotrigine group were given Lamotrigine (10 mg/kg). Onion group used onion fresh juice (3 cc for each rat/daily). Ginger group was fed on ginger powder (100 mg/kg/daily). Onion & Lamotrigine group used both onion juice (3 cc fresh onion juice for each rat/day) and Lamotrigine (10 mg/kg). Ginger & Lamotrigine group used both ginger powder (100 mg/kg/day) and Lamotrigine (10 mg/kg/day). Onion, ginger & Lamortigine group jointly used ginger powder (100 mg/kg/day) and onion juice (3 cc juice for each rat) and Lamotrigine (10 mg/kg/day). All groups were given treatments orally. For sexual behaviors, Estradiolbenzoate (50 microgram) and 6 hours before test (500 microgram) progesterone was injected to the female rats subcutaneously. Then rats were viewed for erection, ejaculation and cup. Results: There was maximum Serum total testosterone level in the onion group, there was maximum malondialdehyde (MDA) in the Lamotrigine group and there was maximum total antioxidant capacity in both the onion group and ginger group (p<0.05). Conclusion: Results revealed that administration of (100 mg/kg/day) of ginger powder, and freshly prepared onion juice (3 cc for each rat), significantly lowered the adverse effects of lamotrigine, and can have beneficial effects on sexual behavior in male rat. PMID:25207007

  15. Non alcoholic fatty liver disease, insulin resistance, dyslipidemia and atherogenic ratios in epileptic children and adolescents on long term antiepileptic drug therapy.

    PubMed

    Saleh, Dina Ahmed Amin; Ismail, Mona Ahmed; Ibrahim, Ayman Mohamed

    2012-01-15

    This study explores the occurrence of Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease (NAFLD), Insulin Resistance (IR), dyslipidemia and atherogenic ratios in epileptic children and adolescents receiving Valproic Acid (VPA), Carbamazepine (CBZ) or both (combination therapy) compared to healthy controls. Abdominal Computerized Tomography (CT), measurements of serum fasting insulin, glucose, serum lipids and liver enzymes were performed in VPA (n = 14), CBZ (n = 14) or both (n = 10) treated non-diabetic non-obese epileptic patients compared to healthy controls (n = 10). Abdominal CT demonstrated characteristics of fatty liver disease in 42.8% of VPA, in 21.4% of CBZ, in 60% of combination therapy treated patients and none of the healthy controls. All of them were overweight and 53.3% had IR. In conclusion VPA therapy was associated with increased risk of IR and NAFLD, while CBZ therapy was associated with dyslipidemia and combination therapy was associated with all these risks.

  16. The antiepileptic drug valproic acid and other medium-chain fatty acids acutely reduce phosphoinositide levels independently of inositol in Dictyostelium.

    PubMed

    Chang, Pishan; Orabi, Benoit; Deranieh, Rania M; Dham, Manik; Hoeller, Oliver; Shimshoni, Jakob A; Yagen, Boris; Bialer, Meir; Greenberg, Miriam L; Walker, Matthew C; Williams, Robin S B

    2012-01-01

    Valproic acid (VPA) is the most widely prescribed epilepsy treatment worldwide, but its mechanism of action remains unclear. Our previous work identified a previously unknown effect of VPA in reducing phosphoinositide production in the simple model Dictyostelium followed by the transfer of data to a mammalian synaptic release model. In our current study, we show that the reduction in phosphoinositide [PtdInsP (also known as PIP) and PtdInsP(2) (also known as PIP(2))] production caused by VPA is acute and dose dependent, and that this effect occurs independently of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) activity, inositol recycling and inositol synthesis. In characterising the structural requirements for this effect, we also identify a family of medium-chain fatty acids that show increased efficacy compared with VPA. Within the group of active compounds is a little-studied group previously associated with seizure control, and analysis of two of these compounds (nonanoic acid and 4-methyloctanoic acid) shows around a threefold enhanced potency compared with VPA for protection in an in vitro acute rat seizure model. Together, our data show that VPA and a newly identified group of medium-chain fatty acids reduce phosphoinositide levels independently of inositol regulation, and suggest the reinvestigation of these compounds as treatments for epilepsy.

  17. Effects of the human antiepileptic drug carbamazepine on the behavior, biomarkers, and heat shock proteins in the Asian clam Corbicula fluminea.

    PubMed

    Chen, Huihui; Zha, Jinmiao; Liang, Xuefang; Li, Jiasu; Wang, Zijian

    2014-10-01

    Carbamazepine (CBZ), an anticonvulsant and mood-stabilizing pharmaceutical, is a widespread contaminant in aquatic environments. In this study, the effects of chronic exposure to environmentally relevant CBZ concentrations were investigated in freshwater clams Corbicula fluminea. Adult C. fluminea were exposed to 0.5, 5, and 50 μg/L of CBZ for 30 days, after which siphoning behavior (filtration rates), biomarker levels, and heat shock protein expression were measured. The filtration rates were significantly decreased (p<0.05) by 50 μg/L CBZ treatment, indicating a negative impact on C. fluminea health. Superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione reductase (GR) activities were decreased, and catalase (CAT) activity and malondialdehyde (MDA) content were increased in the gills and digestive gland, suggesting that CBZ induced an oxidative effect. The levels of Hsp22, Hsp40, and Hsp70 mRNAs were also markedly induced after 5 or 50 μg/L CBZ treatment (p<0.05), whereas Hsp60 and Hsp90 mRNAs in gills and Hsp60 mRNA in digestive gland were significantly repressed (p<0.05). Finally, the expression of Hsp70 protein was significantly increased (p<0.05) by 5 and 50 μg/L exposure. In aggregate, these results confirm that environmentally relevant concentrations of CBZ can exert a negative effect on C. fluminea tissue at the molecular and protein level.

  18. Acute and subacute drug-induced movement disorders.

    PubMed

    Burkhard, Pierre R

    2014-01-01

    Many pharmacological agents may induce a variety of movement disorders, including dystonia, tremor, parkinsonism, myoclonus and dyskinesia, with an acute, subacute or more chronic time course. Motor symptoms may be isolated or part of a more extensive cerebral or systemic condition, such as the neuroleptic malignant syndrome or the serotonin syndrome. Drug-induced movement disorders share a number of features that should make them easy to identify, including a clear temporal relationship between medication initiation and symptom onset, a dose-effect, and, with the exception of tardive syndromes, complete resolution after discontinuation of the offending agent. Diagnosis relies on a thorough medication history. Medications commonly involved include dopamine receptor blockers, antidepressants and anti-epileptics, among many others. Mechanisms underlying drug-induced movement disorders involve blockade, facilitation or imbalance of dopamine, serotonin, noradrenaline and cholinergic neurotransmission in the basal ganglia. The present review focuses on drug-induced movement disorders that typically develop as an acute (hours to days) or subacute (days to weeks) event, including acute dystonic reactions, akathisia, drug-induced parkinsonism, neuroleptic malignant syndrome, serotonin syndrome, parkinsonism-hyperpyrexia syndrome, drug-induced tremor, drug-induced hyperkinesias and movement disorders associated with the use of recreational drugs.

  19. Drug Resistance

    MedlinePlus

    HIV Treatment Drug Resistance (Last updated 3/2/2017; last reviewed 3/2/2017) Key Points As HIV multiplies in the ... the risk of drug resistance. What is HIV drug resistance? Once a person becomes infected with HIV, ...

  20. A Wolbachia deubiquitylating enzyme induces cytoplasmic incompatibility.

    PubMed

    Beckmann, John F; Ronau, Judith A; Hochstrasser, Mark

    2017-03-01

    Wolbachia are obligate intracellular bacteria(1) that infect arthropods, including approximately two-thirds of insect species(2). Wolbachia manipulate insect reproduction by enhancing their inheritance through the female germline. The most common alteration is cytoplasmic incompatibility (CI)(3-5), where eggs from uninfected females fail to develop when fertilized by sperm from Wolbachia-infected males. By contrast, if female and male partners are both infected, embryos are viable. CI is a gene-drive mechanism impacting population structure(6) and causing reproductive isolation(7), but its molecular mechanism has remained unknown. We show that a Wolbachia deubiquitylating enzyme (DUB) induces CI. The CI-inducing DUB, CidB, cleaves ubiquitin from substrates and is encoded in a two-gene operon, and the other protein, CidA, binds CidB. Binding is strongest between cognate partners in cidA-cidB homologues. In transgenic Drosophila, the cidA-cidB operon mimics CI when sperm introduce it into eggs, and a catalytically inactive DUB does not induce sterility. Toxicity is recapitulated in yeast by CidB alone; this requires DUB activity but is rescued by coexpressed CidA. A paralogous operon involves a putative nuclease (CinB) rather than a DUB. Analogous binding, toxicity and rescue in yeast were observed. These results identify a CI mechanism involving interacting proteins that are secreted into germline cells by Wolbachia, and suggest new methods for insect control.

  1. Prevalence and pattern of drug treatment for behavior and seizure disorders of TMR students.

    PubMed

    Gadow, K D; Kalachnik, J

    1981-05-01

    The prevalence and pattern of psychotropic and antiepileptic drug treatment for TMR children and adolescents in public schools were determined from teacher questionnaires and parent interviews. The relationship between drug use and age, race, and sex was also examined. The findings, indicated that during the school year, 10 percent of the students received medication for seizure disorders and 4.9 percent were treated for behavior disorders. An additional 1.8 percent were treated concurrently for both a seizure and a behavior disorder. The data also suggested that dosages of methylphenidate (Ritalin), the most frequently prescribed drug for persons with behavior disorders, were conservative. The results were interpreted with regard to drug use among nonretarded and severely and profoundly mentally retarded populations.

  2. The phase 2 enzyme inducers ethacrynic acid, DL-sulforaphane, and oltipraz inhibit lipopolysaccharide-induced high-mobility group box 1 secretion by RAW 264.7 cells.

    PubMed

    Killeen, Meaghan E; Englert, Joshua A; Stolz, Donna Beer; Song, Mingchen; Han, Yusheng; Delude, Russell L; Kellum, John A; Fink, Mitchell P

    2006-03-01

    The diuretic ethacrynic acid (EA) has been shown to inhibit signaling by the proinflammatory transcription factor nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB). Accordingly, we sought to determine whether this compound is capable of inhibiting the release of cytokines [interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-10] and NO from RAW 264.7 murine macrophage-like cells stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Additionally, we sought to determine whether EA can inhibit secretion of high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1), a nuclear protein that is secreted by immunostimulated macrophages and functions in the extracellular milieu as a proinflammatory mediator. In a concentration-dependent manner, EA inhibited secretion of IL-6, IL-10, nitric oxide, and HMGB1. As expected, EA inhibited NF-kappaB DNA binding in LPS-stimulated RAW 264.7 cells. Treating these cells with pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate, SN50 (amino acid sequence AAVALLPAVLLALLAPVQRKRQKLMP) or 5-(thien-3-yl)-3-aminothiophene-2-carboxamide (SC-514) also inhibited LPS-induced NF-kappaB DNA binding, but these compounds failed to inhibit LPS-induced HMGB1 secretion. These findings suggested that inhibition of HMGB1 secretion by EA might occur via a mechanism unrelated to the NF-kappaB signaling pathway. Because EA is an electrophilic compound that is known to be capable of inducing expression of so-called phase 2 proteins, we sought to determine whether two other phase 2 enzyme inducers, oltipraz and DL-sulforaphane, also are capable of inhibiting HMGB1 release from immunostimulated macrophages. Incubating RAW 264.7 cells with either oltipraz or DL-sulforaphane inhibited LPS-induced HMGB1 secretion. Moreover, both EA and DL-sulforaphane inhibited relocalization of nuclear HMGB1 into the cytoplasm of LPS-stimulated RAW 264.7 cells. These data suggest that phase 2 inducers may exert anti-inflammatory effects by inhibiting secretion of the cytokine-like nuclear protein HMGB1.

  3. Tuberous sclerosis associated with MDR1 gene expression and drug-resistant epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Lazarowski, A; Sevlever, G; Taratuto, A; Massaro, M; Rabinowicz, A

    1999-10-01

    Intractable seizures are the most common manifestation in severe cases of tuberous sclerosis. Multidrug resistance type 1 (MDR1) gene expression is directly linked to the resistance of tumor cells to chemotherapy as the major cause of treatment failure, but it has not been reported in tuberous sclerosis cells nor has the relationship between the MDR1 gene and antiepileptic drugs been described. A 4-month-old female is described with poorly controlled seizures secondary to tuberous sclerosis. The patient was treated with antiepileptic drugs, including phenytoin, phenobarbital, and lorazepam, without improvement of symptoms. Phenytoin blood levels were invariably subtherapeutic and ranged from 0.45 to 3.55 microg/mL, despite several consecutive intravenous loading doses. Surgical treatment with total resection of the brain lesions was performed as a last resort. Immunohistochemical analysis of the resected tissues revealed high levels of P-glycoprotein 170 expression, the product of the MDR1 gene. Both MDR1 gene expression and persistently low phenytoin levels likely share a common pathway liable to induce drug-resistant epilepsy.

  4. Generic Drugs

    MedlinePlus

    Generic Drugs: The Same Medicine for Less Money What is a generic drug? A generic is a copy of a brand-name drug. A brand- name drug has a patent. When ... benefit to your health, and you will save money. 7KH IHGHUDO )RRG DQG 'UXJ $GPLQLVWUDWLRQ )'$ UHJXODWHV ERWK ...

  5. Drug hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Yawalkar, N

    2009-01-01

    Drug hypersensitivity represents an immune-mediated reaction to a drug. Although several drug hypersensitivity reactions are confined to the skin and rather mild, some may be life threatening and also involve further organs such as liver, kidney and bone marrow. The exact pathogenesis of many drug hypersensitivity reactions is still obscure. In this review the concepts on how small molecular drugs can activate the immune system are discussed and the hapten, prohapten and p-i concept are explained. Furthermore, the classification of drug hypersensitivity reactions and some common and severe clinical manifestations of drug-induced T cell mediated reactions are presented.

  6. [The original nootropic and neuroprotective drug noopept potentiates the anticonvulsant activity of valproate in mice].

    PubMed

    Kravchenko, E V; Ponteleeva, I V; Trofimov, S S; Lapa, V I; Ostrovskaia, R U; Voronina, T A

    2009-01-01

    The influence of the original dipeptide drug noopept, known to possess nootrope, neuroprotector, and anxiolytic properties, on the anticonvulsant activity of the antiepileptic drug valproate has been studied on the model of corazole-induced convulsions in mice. Neither a single administration of noopept (0.5 mg/kg, i.p.) nor its repeated introduction in 10 or 35 days enhanced the convulsant effect of corazole, which is evidence that noopept alone does not possess anticonvulsant properties. Prolonged (five weeks) preliminary administration of noopept enhanced the anticonvulsant activity of valproate. This result justifies the joint chronic administration of noopept in combination with valproate in order to potentiate the anticonvulsant effect of the latter drug. In addition, the administration of noopept favorably influences the cognitive functions and suppresses the development of neurodegenerative processes.

  7. An Update on Drug-induced Liver Injury.

    PubMed

    Devarbhavi, Harshad

    2012-09-01

    Idiosyncratic drug-induced liver injury (DILI) is an important cause of morbidity and mortality following drugs taken in therapeutic doses. Hepatotoxicity is a leading cause of attrition in drug development, or withdrawal or restricted use after marketing. No age is exempt although adults and the elderly are at increased risk. DILI spans the entire spectrum ranging from asymptomatic elevation in transaminases to severe disease such as acute hepatitis leading to acute liver failure. The liver specific Roussel Uclaf Causality Assessment Method is the most validated and extensively used for determining the likelihood that an implicated drug caused DILI. Asymptomatic elevation in liver tests must be differentiated from adaptation. Drugs producing DILI have a signature pattern although no single pattern is characteristic. Antimicrobial and central nervous system agents including antiepileptic drugs are the leading causes of DILI worldwide. In the absence of a diagnostic test or a biomarker, the diagnosis rests on the evidence of absence of competing causes such as acute viral hepatitis, autoimmune hepatitis and others. Recent studies show that antituberculosis drugs given for active or latent disease are still a major cause of drug-induced liver injury in India and the West respectively. Presence of jaundice signifies a severe disease and entails a worse outcome. The pathogenesis is unclear and is due to a mix of host, drug metabolite and environmental factors. Research has evolved from incriminating candidate genes to genome wide analysis studies. Immediate cessation of the drug is key to prevent or minimize progressive damage. Treatment is largely supportive. N-acetylcysteine is the antidote for paracetamol toxicity. Carnitine has been tried in valproate injury whereas steroids and ursodeoxycholic acid may be used in DILI associated with hypersensitivity or cholestatic features respectively. This article provides an overview of the epidemiology, the patterns of

  8. Combined neuropsychological and neurophysiological assessment of drug effects on groups and individuals.

    PubMed

    Gevins, Alan; Ilan, Aaron B; Jiang, An; Sam-Vargas, Lita; Baum, Cliff; Chan, Cynthia S

    2011-08-01

    An initial standardized approach for combining neuropsychological and neurophysiological measures in order to assess the neurocognitive effects of drugs in groups and individuals is introduced. Its application is illustrated with sedatives, antiepileptic drugs, psychostimulants, antihistamines, and intoxicants. Task performance, electroencephalography, and evoked potential measures during computerized attention and memory testing that are most sensitive to drug effects are identified in a sample population and then applied to individuals. In six example exploratory studies, drug effects were detected with an average area under curve (AUC) of 0.97 (p < 0.0001; 95% sensitivity, 96% specificity). In 10 example validation studies with other drugs and/or different subjects and populations, detection was strong in the eight studies with drugs and doses known to have significant neurocognitive effects (AUC 0.83, p < 0.0001; 82% sensitivity, 89% specificity), whereas no effect was detected in the two studies with drugs known to have faint neurocognitive effects (AUC 0.56, p > 0.10). Individual differences in response to different drugs with similar clinical uses, to varying doses of the same drug, and in pharmacodynamic response were then demonstrated. The significant (p < 0.01) increase in sensitivity and specificity of combined neuropsychological and neurophysiological measures compared with the former alone suggests that fewer subjects may be needed to assess the neurocognitive effects of drugs in future studies. The findings suggest that the concept of combining neuropsychological testing with simultaneous measures of neurophysiological function is worth further exploration.

  9. Drug Allergy

    MedlinePlus

    ... of other allergies, such as food allergy or hay fever Allergic reaction to another drug A family history ... so, what drug was it? Do you have hay fever, food allergy or other allergies? Is there a ...

  10. Drugged Driving

    MedlinePlus

    ... Alerts Alcohol Club Drugs Cocaine Hallucinogens Heroin Inhalants Marijuana MDMA (Ecstasy/Molly) Methamphetamine Opioids Prescription Drugs & Cold ... in the past year. Middle Figure: Driving after marijuana use is more common than driving after alcohol ...

  11. Drugs (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Drugs for fever, cough, stuffy nose, runny nose, diarrhea, and allergies are common drugs which are especially helpful during times of illness. All medications should be kept out of the reach of children.

  12. Drug Abuse

    MedlinePlus

    ... abuse also plays a role in many major social problems, such as drugged driving, violence, stress, and child abuse. Drug abuse can lead to homelessness, crime, and missed work or problems with keeping a ...

  13. Drug Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leviton, Harvey S.

    1975-01-01

    This article attempts to assemble pertinent information about the drug problem, particularily marihuana. It also focuses on the need for an educational program for drug control with the public schools as the main arena. (Author/HMV)

  14. Drug Debacle.

    PubMed

    Sorrel, Amy Lynn

    2016-07-01

    Medicaid's Vendor Drug Program is under examination by the Texas Legislature. TMA's Physicians Medicaid Congress is seizing the opportunity to call for an administrative overhaul of a drug benefit physicians describe as unnecessarily complicated and confusing.

  15. Thirty Years of Orphan Drug Legislation and the Development of Drugs to Treat Rare Seizure Conditions: A Cross Sectional Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, Georg F.

    2016-01-01

    Background Epilepsy is a serious chronic health condition with a high morbidity impairing the life of patients and afflicted families. Many epileptic conditions, especially those affecting children, are rare disorders generating an urgent medical need for more efficacious therapy options. Therefore, we assessed the output of the US and European orphan drug legislations. Methods Quantitative analysis of the FDA and EMA databases for orphan drug designations according to STrengthening the Reporting of OBservational studies in Epidemiology (STROBE) criteria. Results Within the US Orphan Drug Act 40 designations were granted delivering nine approvals, i.e. clobazam, diazepam viscous solution for rectal administration, felbamate, fosphenytoin, lamotrigine, repository corticotropin, rufinamide, topiramate, and vigabatrin. Since 2000 the EMA granted six orphan drug designations whereof two compounds were approved, i.e. rufinamide and stiripentol. In the US, two orphan drug designations were withdrawn. Orphan drugs were approved for conditions including Lennox-Gastaut syndrome, infantile spasms, Dravet syndrome, and status epilepticus. Comparing time to approval for rufinamide, which was approved in the US and the EU to treat rare seizure conditions, the process seems faster in the EU (2.2 years) than in the US (4.3 years). Conclusion Orphan drug development in the US and in the EU delivered only few molecular entities to treat rare seizure disorders. The development programs focused on already approved antiepileptic drugs or alternative pharmaceutical formulations. Most orphan drugs approved in the US are not approved in the EU to treat rare seizures although some were introduced after 2000 when the EU adopted the Orphan Drug Regulation. PMID:27557111

  16. Investigation into the reasons for preventable drug related admissions to a medical admissions unit: observational study

    PubMed Central

    Howard, R; Avery, A; Howard, P; Partridge, M

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To describe the drugs and types of medicine management problems most frequently associated with preventable drug related admissions to an acute medical admissions unit. Design: Observation study. Setting: Medical admissions unit in a teaching hospital in Nottingham, UK. Participants: 4093 patients seen by pharmacists on the medical admissions unit between 1 January and 30 June 2001. Main outcome measures: Proportion of admissions that were drug related and preventable, classification of the underlying causes of preventable drug related admissions, and identification of drugs most commonly associated with preventable drug related admissions. Results: Of the admissions seen by pharmacists, 265 (6.5%) were judged to be drug related and 178 (67%) of these were judged to be preventable. Preventable admissions were mainly due to problems with prescribing (63 cases (35%)), monitoring (46 cases (26%)), and adherence to medication (53 cases (30%)). The drugs most commonly implicated were NSAIDs, antiplatelets, antiepileptics, hypoglycaemics, diuretics, inhaled corticosteroids, cardiac glycosides, and beta-blockers. Conclusions: Potentially preventable drug related morbidity was associated with 4.3% of admissions to a medical admissions unit. In 91% of cases these admissions were related to problems with either prescribing, monitoring, or adherence. PMID:12897361

  17. Rational use of generic psychotropic drugs.

    PubMed

    Carbon, Maren; Correll, Christoph U

    2013-05-01

    For economic reasons, the generic substitution of branded medications is common and welcome. These replacements are based on the concept of bioequivalence, which is considered equal to therapeutic equivalence. Regulatory standards for bioequivalence require the 90 % confidence intervals of group averages of pharmacokinetic measures of a generic and the original drug to overlap within ±20 %. However, therapeutic equivalence has been challenged for several psychotropic agents by retrospective studies and case reports. To evaluate the degree of bioequivalence and therapeutic equivalence of branded and generic psychotropic drugs, we performed an electronic search (from database inception until 24 May 2012 and without language restrictions) in PubMed/MEDLINE, Cochrane Library, and Web of Science. Search terms were "(generic) AND (psychotropic OR psychoactive OR antipsychotic OR antiepileptic OR antidepressant OR stimulant OR benzodiazepine)" or the respective individual substances. We included clinical studies, regardless of design, comparing branded with generic psychotropic drug formulations, identifying 35 such studies. We also included case reports/series reporting on outcomes after a switch between brand and generic psychotropics, identifying 145 clinical cases. Bioequivalence studies in healthy controls or animals, in-vitro studies, and health economics studies without medical information were excluded. An overview of the few randomized controlled studies supports that US FDA regulations assure clinically adequate drug delivery in the majority of patients switched from brand to generic. However, with a growing number of competing generic products for one substance, and growing economic pressure to substitute with the currently cheapest generic, frequent generic-generic switches, often unbeknownst to prescribing clinicians, raise concerns, particularly for antiepileptics/mood stabilizers. Generic-generic switches may vary by more than ±20 % from each other in

  18. Screening for basic drugs in hair of drug addicts by liquid chromatography/time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Pelander, Anna; Ristimaa, Johanna; Rasanen, Ilpo; Vuori, Erkki; Ojanperä, Ilkka

    2008-12-01

    Hair analysis in forensic and clinical toxicology has been strongly focused on drugs of abuse, and comprehensive, drug class-independent screening methods based on mass spectrometric detection have not been applied to date. In this study, a qualitative drug screening method by liquid chromatography coupled to time-of-flight mass spectrometry, earlier developed and evaluated for forensic toxicological urine analysis, was adapted for screening of basic drugs in hair. The method included alkaline hydrolysis, purification with mixed-mode solid phase extraction, and analysis by liquid chromatography coupled to time-of-flight mass spectrometry with automated data analysis and reporting. Identification was based on accurate mass, isotopic pattern fit, and retention time, if available. Analysis of 32 hair samples from deceased drug addicts revealed 35 different drugs. The drug classes identified included antidepressants, antipsychotics, antiepileptics, amphetamines, opioids, beta-blockers, a benzodiazepine, a hypnotic, a local anesthetic, an antiemetic, and an antipyretic analgesic. The findings were in good agreement with the findings in blood and urine by other methods. Moreover, information about previous drug use not evident in the analysis of other matrices was obtained in the majority (72%) of the cases. Tramadol was an especially predominant finding, suggesting tramadol abuse as an opioid substitute. One apparent false-positive finding was identified. The mean and median mass accuracies of positive findings were 2.3 and 1.8 ppm, corresponding to 0.5 and 0.4 mDa, respectively. Cutoff values for tramadol and methamphetamine in hair were 100 and 200 pg/mg, respectively. The method proved to be a simple and straightforward tool for comprehensive screening of basic drugs in hair.

  19. COPD - control drugs

    MedlinePlus

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease - control drugs; Bronchodilators - COPD - control drugs; Beta agonist inhaler - COPD - control drugs; Anticholinergic inhaler - COPD - control drugs; Long-acting inhaler - COPD - control drugs; ...

  20. Comparative use of three electrokinetic capillary methods for the determination of drugs in body fluids. Prospects for rapid determination of intoxications.

    PubMed

    Caslavska, J; Lienhard, S; Thormann, W

    1993-05-28

    Three electrokinetic capillary methods, micellar electrokinetic capillary chromatography, capillary zone electrophoresis and capillary isotachophoresis, are shown to be well suited for the rapid screening and confirmation of drugs in serum and urine of patients with medical drug overdoses (intoxications), situations where rapid identification without precise quantification is needed. Patients' samples obtained from the emergency care unit were analysed in an instrument featuring on-column, fast forward-scanning multi-wavelength detection and the data were compared with those obtained by conventional methods. The drugs studied included salicylate, acetaminophen (paracetamol) and antiepileptics. In cases with high drug concentrations, body fluids can be injected directly or may have only to be diluted (urine) or ultrafiltered (serum) prior to analysis, providing results within about 30 min. Thus, electrokinetic capillary methods can be employed for rapid drug screening, provided that instrumentation with a database for peak identification is available.

  1. Drug Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    NBOD2, a program developed at Goddard Space Flight Center to solve equations of motion coupled N-body systems is used by E.I. DuPont de Nemours & Co. to model potential drugs as a series of elements. The program analyses the vibrational and static motions of independent components in drugs. Information generated from this process is used to design specific drugs to interact with enzymes in designated ways.

  2. Drug Addiction

    MedlinePlus

    ... mental health disorders, several factors may contribute to development of drug addiction and dependence. The main factors are: Environment. Environmental factors, including your family's beliefs and attitudes ...

  3. Drugged Driving

    MedlinePlus

    ... Naloxone Pain Prevention Treatment Trends & Statistics Women and Drugs Publications Funding Funding Opportunities Clinical Research Post-Award Concerns General Information Grant & Contract Application ...

  4. Club Drugs

    MedlinePlus

    ... Naloxone Pain Prevention Treatment Trends & Statistics Women and Drugs Publications Funding Funding Opportunities Clinical Research Post-Award Concerns General Information Grant & Contract Application ...

  5. Pharmacokinetic changes in drugs during protein-calorie malnutrition: correlation between drug metabolism and hepatic microsomal cytochrome P450 isozymes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Joo Hyun; Suh, Ok Kyung; Lee, Myung Gull

    2004-07-01

    The rats with protein-calorie malnutrition (PCM, 5% casein diet for a period of 4-week) were reported to exhibit 60 and 80% suppression in the hepatic microsomal cytochrome P450 (CYP) 1A2 and CYP2C11 levels, respectively, and 40-50% decreases in CYP2E1 and CYP3A1/2 levels compared to control (23% casein diet for a period of 4-week) based on Western blot analysis. In addition, Northern blot analysis showed that CYP1A2, CYP2E1, CYP2C11, and CYP3A1/2 mRNAs decreased in the state of PCM as well. Hence, pharmacokinetic changes of the drugs in rats with PCM [especially the area under the plasma concentration-time curve from time zero to time infinity (AUC) changes of metabolite(s)] reported from literatures were tried to explain in terms of CYP isozyme changes in the rats. Otherwise, the time-averaged nonrenal clearance (CL NR) of parent drug was compared. Pharmacokinetic changes of the drugs in other types of malnutritional state, such as kwashiorkor and marasmus, in both human and animal models were also compared. The drugs reviewed are as follows: diuretics, antibiotics, anticancer agents, antiepileptics, antiarrythmics, analgesics, xanthines, antimalarials, and miscellaneous.

  6. Drugs@FDA: FDA Approved Drug Products

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cosmetics Tobacco Products Home Drug Databases Drugs@FDA Drugs@FDA: FDA Approved Drug Products Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options Linkedin Pin it Email Print Search by Drug Name, Active Ingredient, or Application Number Enter at ...

  7. Brivaracetam: a rational drug discovery success story

    PubMed Central

    Rogawski, M A

    2008-01-01

    Levetiracetam, the α-ethyl analogue of the nootropic piracetam, is a widely used antiepileptic drug (AED) that provides protection against partial seizures and is also effective in the treatment of primary generalized seizure syndromes including juvenile myoclonic epilepsy. Levetiracetam was discovered in 1992 through screening in audiogenic seizure susceptible mice and, 3 years later, was reported to exhibit saturable, stereospecific binding in brain to a ∼90 kDa protein, later identified as the ubiquitous synaptic vesicle glycoprotein SV2A. A large-scale screening effort to optimize binding affinity identified the 4-n-propyl analogue, brivaracetam, as having greater potency and a broadened spectrum of activity in animal seizure models. Recent phase II clinical trials demonstrating that brivaracetam is efficacious and well tolerated in the treatment of partial onset seizures have validated the strategy of the discovery programme. Brivaracetam is among the first clinically effective AEDs to be discovered by optimization of pharmacodynamic activity at a molecular target. PMID:18552880

  8. Drug Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sardana, Raj K.

    This autoinstructional lesson deals with the study of such drugs as marijuana and LSD, with emphasis on drug abuse. It is suggested that it can be used in science classes at the middle level of school. No prerequisites are suggested. The teacher's guide lists the behavioral objectives, the equipment needed to complete the experience and suggests…

  9. Antineoplastic Drugs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadée, Wolfgang; El Sayed, Yousry Mahmoud

    The limited scope of therapeutic drug-level monitoring in cancer chemotherapy results from the often complex biochemical mechanisms that contribute to antineoplastic activity and obscure the relationships among drug serum levels and therapeutic benefits. Moreover, new agents for cancer chemotherapy are being introduced at a more rapid rate than for the treatment of other diseases, although the successful application of therapeutic drug-level monitoring may require several years of intensive study of the significance of serum drug levels. However, drug level monitoring can be of considerable value during phase I clinical trials of new antineoplastic agents in order to assess drug metabolism, bioavailability, and intersubject variability; these are important parameters in the interpretation of clinical studies, but have no immediate benefit to the patient. High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) probably represents the most versatile and easily adaptable analytical technique for drug metabolite screening (1). HPLC may therefore now be the method of choice during phase I clinical trials of antineoplastic drugs. For example, within a single week we developed an HPLC assay—using a C18 reverse-phase column, UV detection, and direct serum injection after protein precipitation—for the new radiosensitizer, misonidazole (2).

  10. Behavioral and antiepileptic effects of acute administration of the extract of the plant Cestrum nocturnum Lin (lady of the night).

    PubMed

    Pérez-Saad, Héctor; Buznego, María T

    2008-04-01

    Cestrum nocturnum is a garden shrub from the family Solanaceae and is used as a remedy for different health disorders. The aim of the present work was to investigate the potential neuropharmacological action profile of decoctions obtained from dry leaves of the plant. Decoctions were tested in different neuropharmacological models-Irwin test, exploratory behavior, tests for analgesia, isoniazid- and picrotoxin-induced convulsions, and maximal electroshock seizures-in mice, as well as in amphetamine-induced stereotypies and penicillin epileptic foci in rats. Decoctions of 1 and 5% (D1 and D5) induced restlessness, and the 30% decoction (D30) induced passivity. D5 and D30 reduced significantly exploratory behavior and amphetamine-induced stereotypies within a 3-hour observation period. The latter effect was apparent during the second 60 minutes. Decoctions reduced the amount of writhes induced by acetic acid in a dose-dependent manner, but were not effective in the hot plate model. The decoctions were not effective against pharmacologically induced convulsions. However, repeated administration of five doses of D5, at 1-hour intervals, reduced the amplitude of penicillin-induced epileptic spikes in both primary and secondary foci, in curarized rats. Taken together, the results suggest that C. nocturnum possesses active substances with analgesic activity provided through a peripheral action mechanism, in parallel with some psychoactive activity that does not fit well the neuropharmacological action profile of known reference neurotropic drugs.

  11. Levetiracetam might act as an efficacious drug to attenuate cognitive deficits of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Rong

    2016-01-01

    Levetiracetam is a homologue of piracetam with an a-ethyl side-chain substitution and it is a Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved antiepileptic drug. Recently, several studies have found that levetiracetam was able to reduce seizure frequency in epileptic seizures patients without affecting their cognitive functions. In the present review, the effects of levetiracetam on cognitive improvement were summarized in epileptic seizures patients with or without Alzheimer's disease (AD), high-grade glioma (HGG) patients and amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI) patients. In addition, levetiracetam was observed to improve the cognitive deficits in normal aged animals and the transgenic animal models with AD, suggesting that levetiracetam may be a better choice for the prevention or treatment of AD.

  12. [Gliomas – What I Have to Know in ten Questions].

    PubMed

    Gulden-Sala, Wiebke; Roth, Patrick; Brown, Michelle; Andratschke, Nicolaus; Weller, Michael; Stupp, Roger

    2016-03-16

    Gliomas are the most common primary tumors involving the central nervous system. They can manifest with diverse and non-specific general and neurological symptoms. The diagnostic gold standard is cerebral magnetic resonance imaging and subsequent histological confirmation of the diagnosis. Steroids, especially dexamethasone, are used in case of focal symptoms and of symptoms caused by increased intracranial pressure, and antiepileptic drugs are used to manage epileptic seizures. Non-enzyme-inducing antiepileptic drugs are preferable. Glioma patients have an inherently elevated thromboembolic risk, and therapeutic anticoagulation is indicated following a thromboembolic event. Surgery, radiotherapy and systemic therapy are used as tumor-specific therapy modalities in gliomas. Molecular markers play an increasing role in the prognosis and selection of therapy in daily oncological routine.

  13. Second-order advantage with excitation-emission photoinduced fluorimetry for the determination of the antiepileptic carbamazepine in environmental waters.

    PubMed

    Lozano, Valeria A; Escandar, Graciela M

    2013-06-11

    A photochemically induced fluorescence system combined with second-order chemometric analysis for the determination of the anticonvulsant carbamazepine (CBZ) is presented. CBZ is a widely used drug for the treatment of epilepsy and is included in the group of emerging contaminant present in the aquatic environment. CBZ is not fluorescent in solution but can be converted into a fluorescent compound through a photochemical reaction in a strong acid medium. The determination is carried out by measuring excitation-emission photoinduced fluorescence matrices of the products formed upon ultraviolet light irradiation in a laboratory-constructed reactor constituted by two simple 4 W germicidal tubes. Working conditions related to both the reaction medium and the photoreactor geometry are optimized by an experimental design. The developed approach enabled the determination of CBZ at trace levels without the necessity of applying separation steps, and in the presence of uncalibrated interferences which also display photoinduced fluorescence and may be potentially present in the investigated samples. Different second-order algorithms were tested and successful resolution was achieved using multivariate curve resolution-alternating least-squares (MCR-ALS). The study is employed for the discussion of the scopes and yields of each of the applied second-order chemometric tools. The quality of the proposed method is probed through the determination of the studied emerging pollutant in both environmental and drinking water samples. After a pre-concentration step on a C18 membrane using 50.0 mL of real water samples, a prediction relative error of 2% and limits of detection and quantification of 0.2 and 0.6 ng mL(-1) were respectively obtained.

  14. [Psychoactive drugs and costs in the Madrid III (Valdemoro) prison].

    PubMed

    Algora-Donoso, I; Varela-González, O

    2008-01-01

    Annual pharmaceutical expenditures in prisons increases dramatically and the rising costs of psychoactive drugs have especially contributed to this. These drugs are often prescribed in order to find therapeutic uses in the field of personality disorders, addictions, and dysfunctional behaviours that are not included in the authorized indications (compassionate use). This study has enabled a detailed description of the use of psychoactive drugs at the Madrid III prison, a centre with one of the lowest levels of pharmaceutical expenditure in this autonomous community. During a two-week period, all prescriptions of psychoactive drugs were collected and registered along with data of several possible conditioning factors. 20.5% of the population was receiving some kind of psychoactive drug; 76% of those inmates undergoing treatment were receiving one or two substances; 65% were taking anxiolytics, 38% antidepressants and 27% antipsychotics. The total amount of psychoactive drugs consumed was 9,840 defined daily doses, 46% of which were anxiolytics, 17% antidepressants and 14% antipsychotics. The total cost of the fortnight's treatment was euros 5,379 with a saving of euro 611 due to requesting and selecting offers carried out by the pharmacist. 72% of the costs were spent on anti-psychotics and the newer psychoactive drugs, representing 66% of the prescriptions, accounted for 98% of expenditure. The prescriber was one of the key influential factors over the amount, type and cost of the treatments. There are signs that compassionate use of current antipsychotics and antiepileptics, and newer antidepressants are a main cause of the dramatic increase in the costs, with cost-efficiency not always clearly demonstrated. These results are not an isolated fact restricted only to prisons, as demonstrated by consumption data published by the National Health System in the same year.

  15. [Club drugs].

    PubMed

    Guerreiro, Diogo Frasquilho; Carmo, Ana Lisa; da Silva, Joaquim Alves; Navarro, Rita; Góis, Carlos

    2011-01-01

    Club drugs are the following substances: Methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA); Methamphetamine; Lysergic Acid Diethylamide (LSD); Ketamine; Gamma-hydroxybutyrate (GHB) and Flunitrazepam. These substances are mainly used by adolescents and young adults, mostly in recreational settings like dance clubs and rave parties. These drugs have diverse psychotropic effects, are associated with several degrees of toxicity, dependence and long term adverse effects. Some have been used for several decades, while others are relatively recent substances of abuse. They have distinct pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic properties, are not easy to detect and, many times, the use of club drugs is under diagnosed. Although the use of these drugs is increasingly common, few health professionals feel comfortable with the diagnosis and treatment. The authors performed a systematic literature review, with the goal of synthesising the existing knowledge about club drugs, namely epidemiology, mechanism of action, detection, adverse reactions and treatment. The purpose of this article is creating in Portuguese language a knowledge data base on club drugs, that health professionals of various specialties can use as a reference when dealing with individual with this kind of drug abuse.

  16. Drug Eruptions: An 8-year Study Including 106 Inpatients at a Dermatology Clinic in Turkey

    PubMed Central

    Akpinar, Fatma; Dervis, Emine

    2012-01-01

    Background: Few clinical studies are found in the literature about patients hospitalized with a diagnosis of cutaneous drug eruption. Aims: To determine the clinical types of drug eruptions and their causative agents in a hospital-based population. Materials and Methods: This retrospective study was performed in the Dermatology Department of Haseki General Hospital. Through 1751 patients hospitalized in this department between 2002 and 2009, inpatients diagnosed as drug eruption were evaluated according to WHO causality definitions. 106 patients composed of probable and possible cases of cutaneous drug eruptions were included in this study. Results: Seventy one females and 35 males were evolved. Mean age was 44.03±15.14. Duration between drug intake and onset of reaction varied from 5 minutes to 3 months. The most common clinical type was urticaria and/or angioedema in 48.1% of the patients, followed by maculopapular rash in 13.2%, and drug rash with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms in 8.5%. Drugs most frequently associated with cutaneous drug eruptions were antimicrobial agents in 40.5% of the patients, followed by antipyretic/anti-inflammatory analgesics in 31.1%, and antiepileptics in 11.3%. Conclusion: Urticaria and/or angioedema and maculopapular rash comprised majority of the drug eruptions. Rare reactions such as acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis, sweet syndrome, oral ulceration were also found. Antimicrobial agents and antipyretic/anti-inflammatory analgesics were the most commonly implicated drugs. Infrequently reported adverse reactions to myorelaxant agents, newer cephalosporins and fluoroquinolones were also detected. We suppose that studies on drug eruptions should continue, because the pattern of consumption of drugs is changing in every country at different periods and many new drugs are introduced on the market continuously. PMID:22707770

  17. Prescription and consumption of solid oral drugs dispensed as unitary doses in a third level hospital

    PubMed Central

    Calderón-Guzmán, David; Juárez-Olguín, Hugo; Hernández-García, Ernestina; Medina-Andrade, Alejandro; Juarez Tapia, Belen

    2015-01-01

    Background: The knowledge about the pattern of prescription and consumption of solid oral drugs dispensed as unitary doses (UD) in Mexico is sparing. Purpose: The aim of this study was to describe the pattern of prescription and consumption of solid oral drugs dispensed as unitary doses (UD) in a third level private hospital of Mexico. A retrospective study of a 60-month period (from 2007 to 2011) was carried out to know the pattern of drugs dispensed as UD in a third level hospital. Results: Among the principal drugs consumed were analgesic, antihypertensive, antibiotic, anti-inflammatory, antiepileptic, and diuretics. The dispensation of drugs per year was as follows: 181 drugs with 85,167 UD in 2007; 199 with 90,519 UD in 2008; 193 with 101,479 UD in 2009; 195 with 100,798 UD in 2010; and 198 with 103,913 UD in 2011. Conclusion: The findings confirmed that prescription and consumption of unitary doses in the hospitalization service increased, and revealed the extensive use of analgesics as the principal prescribed drug in this kind of hospital. PMID:27013914

  18. [Oral loading dose of phenytoin in the treatment of serial seizures, prevention of seizure recurrence and rapid drug substitution].

    PubMed

    Sokić, D; Janković, S M

    1994-01-01

    Over a period of nine months twenty-five epileptic patients were treated with the oral loading dose of phenytoin. The dose ranged from 12 to 23 mg/kg body weight during 1 to 12 hours. In 20 patients with serial seizures or intolerance to other antiepileptic drugs this treatment was effective. Seizures also stopped in 2 of 4 patients with serial partial motor seizures. These 2 patients required both higher loading dose and faster rate of administration than the other patients. A patient with epilepsia partialis continua failed to respond to the treatment. Patients that received phenytoin through the naso-gastric tube, in respect to oral administration, required higher doses to obtain therapeutic plasma levels of phenytoin. One patient had mild nausea, 3 mild dizziness, and 1 tinitus on the first day of the treatment. There was no correlation between a given dose and the achieved phenytoin plasma levels. In our opinion the therapy with oral loading dose of phenytoin is highly effective in the treatment of serial generalized seizures and rapid antiepileptic drug substitution, and partially effective in the prevention of partial motor seizures. It produces only mild and transient side-effects.

  19. Neurotransmitters, psychotropic drugs and microglia: clinical implications for psychiatry.

    PubMed

    Kato, T A; Yamauchi, Y; Horikawa, H; Monji, A; Mizoguchi, Y; Seki, Y; Hayakawa, K; Utsumi, H; Kanba, S

    2013-01-01

    Psychiatric disorders have long and dominantly been regarded to be induced by disturbances of neuronal networks including synapses and neurotransmitters. Thus, the effects of psychotropic drugs such as antipsychotics and antidepressants have been understood to modulate synaptic regulation via receptors and transporters of neurotransmitters such as dopamine and serotonin. Recently, microglia, immunological/inflammatory cells in the brain, have been indicated to have positive links to psychiatric disorders. Positron emission tomography (PET) imaging and postmortem studies have revealed microglial activation in the brain of neuropsychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia, depression and autism. Animal models of neuropsychiatric disorders have revealed the underlying microglial pathologies. In addition, various psychotropic drugs have been suggested to have direct effects on microglia. Until now, the relationship between microglia, neurotransmitters and psychiatric disorders has not been well understood. Therefore, in this review, at first, we summarize recent findings of interaction between microglia and neurotransmitters such as dopamine, serotonin, norepinephrine, acetylcholine and glutamate. Next, we introduce up-to-date knowledge of the effects of psychotropic drugs such as antipsychotics, antidepressants and antiepileptics on microglial modulation. Finally, we propose the possibility that modulating microglia may be a key target in the treatment of various psychiatric disorders. Further investigations and clinical trials should be conducted to clarify this perspective, using animal in vivo studies and imaging studies with human subjects.

  20. Anti-Epileptic Effect of Ganoderma Lucidum Polysaccharides by Inhibition of Intracellular Calcium Accumulation and Stimulation of Expression of CaMKII α in Epileptic Hippocampal Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shu-Qiu; Li, Xiao-Jie; Qiu, Hong-Bin; Jiang, Zhi-Mei; Simon, Maria; Ma, Xiao-Ru; Liu, Lei; Liu, Jun-Xing; Wang, Fang-Fang; Liang, Yan-Feng; Wu, Jia-Mei; Di, Wei-Hua; Zhou, Shaobo

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the mechanism of the anti-epileptic effect of Ganoderma lucidum polysaccharides (GLP), the changes of intracellular calcium and CaMK II α expression in a model of epileptic neurons were investigated. Method Primary hippocampal neurons were divided into: 1) Control group, neurons were cultured with Neurobasal medium, for 3 hours; 2) Model group I: neurons were incubated with Mg2+ free medium for 3 hours; 3) Model group II: neurons were incubated with Mg2+ free medium for 3 hours then cultured with the normal medium for a further 3 hours; 4) GLP group I: neurons were incubated with Mg2+ free medium containing GLP (0.375 mg/ml) for 3 hours; 5) GLP group II: neurons were incubated with Mg2+ free medium for 3 hours then cultured with a normal culture medium containing GLP for a further 3 hours. The CaMK II α protein expression was assessed by Western-blot. Ca2+ turnover in neurons was assessed using Fluo-3/AM which was added into the replacement medium and Ca2+ turnover was observed under a laser scanning confocal microscope. Results The CaMK II α expression in the model groups was less than in the control groups, however, in the GLP groups, it was higher than that observed in the model group. Ca2+ fluorescence intensity in GLP group I was significantly lower than that in model group I after 30 seconds, while in GLP group II, it was reduced significantly compared to model group II after 5 minutes. Conclusion GLP may inhibit calcium overload and promote CaMK II α expression to protect epileptic neurons. PMID:25010576

  1. Expression pattern of NMDA receptors reveals antiepileptic potential of apigenin 8-C-glucoside and chlorogenic acid in pilocarpine induced epileptic mice.

    PubMed

    Aseervatham, G Smilin Bell; Suryakala, U; Doulethunisha; Sundaram, S; Bose, P Chandra; Sivasudha, T

    2016-08-01

    The present study was aimed to evaluate the effect of apigenin 8-C-glucoside (Vitexin) and chlorogenic acid on epileptic mice induced by pilocarpine and explored its possible mechanisms. Intraperitonial administration of pilocarpine (85mg/kg) induced seizure in mice was assessed by behavior observations, which is significantly (p>0.05) reduced by apigenin 8-C-glucoside (AP8CG) (10mg/kg) and chlorogenic acid (CA) (5mg/kg), similar to diazepam. Seizure was accompanied by an imbalance in the levels of Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and glutamate in the pilocarpine administered group. Moreover, convulsion along with reduced acetylcholinesterase, increased monoamine oxidase and oxidative stress was observed in epileptic mice brain. AP8CG and CA significantly restored back to normal levels even at lower doses. Further, increased lipid peroxidation and nitrite content was also significantly attenuated by AP8CG and CA. However, CA was found to be more effective when compared to AP8CG. In addition, the mRNA expression of N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR), mGluR1 and mGlu5 was significantly (P≤0.05) inhibited by AP8CG and CA in a lower dose. The mRNA expression of GRIK1 did not differ significantly in any of the group and showed a similar pattern of expression. Our result shows that AP8CG and CA selectively inhibit NMDAR, mGluR1 and mGlu5 expression. Modification in the provoked NMDAR calcium response coupled with neuronal death. Hence, these findings underline that the polyphenolics, AP8CG and CA have exerted antiepileptic and neuroprotective activity by suppressing glutamate receptors.

  2. A Randomized Double-Blind Placebo-Controlled Study to Compare Preemptive Analgesic Efficacy of Novel Antiepileptic Agent Lamotrigine in Patients Undergoing Major Surgeries

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Priyank; Bhosale, Uma A; Gupta, Ankush; Yegnanarayan, Radha; Sardesai, Shalini

    2016-01-01

    Background: If postoperative acute pain remains unrelieved, it may result in significant morbidity and mortality. Preemptive analgesic initiated before surgery offers premature analgesia even before exposure to an initial noxious stimulus bestowing effective postoperative analgesia. In developed countries, it is regularly practiced as a part of well-defined protocol. In our country however, only a few centers practice it and that too irregularly and with undefined protocol. Few studies support preemptive analgesic efficacy of novel antiepileptic agent gabapentin. Though lamotrigine is a proven analgesic in animal models of chronic pain and clinical studies of gabapentin-resistant neuropathic pain, a literature search revealed scarce data on its preemptive analgesic efficacy. Aims: The present study is designed to study the preemptive analgesic efficacy of lamotrigine in comparison with diclofenac sodium in postoperative pain control. Materials and Methods: This randomized clinical trial included 90 patients of both sexes, between 18 years and 70 years undergoing major surgeries. Patients were randomly allocated into placebo, control, and test groups and received the respective treatment 30 min before the induction of anesthesia. Aldrete score and pain score were recorded using visual analog scale (VAS), facial rating scale (FRS), and behavioral rating scale (BRS) at awakening and at 1 h, 2 h, 4 h, 6 h, and 24 h. Postoperative rescue analgesic consumption for 24 h was recorded. Results: Significantly higher pain scores were observed in the placebo group postoperatively for 2 h on all pain scales (P < 0.05), whereas in the control group it was significantly higher at 1 h (P < 0.05). The test group patients were more comfortable throughout the study and postoperative analgesic requirement was significantly less (P < 0.05). Conclusions: The study recommends the use of single oral dose lamotrigine as preemptive analgesic for effective postoperative pain control. PMID

  3. Drug dependence

    MedlinePlus

    ... starts using drugs to try to self-treat mental illness. Support Groups Many support groups are available in ... American Psychiatric Association. Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders . 5th ed. Arlington, VA: American Psychiatric Publishing. 2013. ...

  4. Drug Facts

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... Cocaine (Coke, Crack) Facts Heroin (Smack, Junk) Facts Marijuana (Weed, Pot) Facts MDMA (Ecstasy, Molly) Facts Meth ( ... Information About Drugs Alcohol Bath Salts Cocaine Heroin Marijuana MDMA Meth Pain Medicines Spice (K2) Tobacco/Nicotine ...

  5. Drug abuse

    MedlinePlus

    ... 5th ed. Arlington, VA: American Psychiatric Publishing. 2013. Weiss RD. Drugs of abuse. In: Goldman L, ... Hospice and Palliative Medicine, Atlanta, GA. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Isla Ogilvie, PhD, and the ...

  6. Study Drugs

    MedlinePlus

    ... may have withdrawal symptoms like depression, thoughts of suicide, intense drug cravings, sleep problems, and fatigue. The ... some proven ways to boost concentration and beat stress: Meditation . Even a few minutes of meditation each ...

  7. Drug-drug interactions: antiretroviral drugs and recreational drugs.

    PubMed

    Staltari, Orietta; Leporini, Christian; Caroleo, Benedetto; Russo, Emilio; Siniscalchi, Antonio; De Sarro, Giovambattista; Gallelli, Luca

    2014-01-01

    With the advances in antiretroviral (ARV) therapy, patients with Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infection are living longer, however, some patients encounter co- morbidities which sometimes require treatment. Therefore, during the treatment with ARV drugs these patients could take several recreational drugs (e.g. amphetamines, hallucinogenes, opiates, or alcohol) with a possible development of drug-drug interactions (DDIs). In particular, Nucleoside/nucleotide reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs/NtRTIs) are mainly excreted through the kidney and are not substrates of the cytochrome P450 or P-glycoprotein, therefore the DDIs during this treatment are minimal. In contrast, the other ARV drugs (i.e. non-nucleoside reversetranscriptase inhibitors, Protease inhibitors, Integrase inhibitors, chemokine receptor 5 antagonists and HIV-fusion inhibitors) are an important class of antiretroviral medications that are frequent components of HAART regimens but show several DDIs related to interaction with the cytochrome P450 or P-glycoprotein. In this paper we will review data concerning the possibility of DDI in HIV patients treated with ARV and taking recreational drugs.

  8. Cobicistat versus ritonavir boosting and differences in the drug-drug interaction profiles with co-medications.

    PubMed

    Marzolini, Catia; Gibbons, Sara; Khoo, Saye; Back, David

    2016-07-01

    Nearly all HIV PIs and the integrase inhibitor elvitegravir require a pharmacokinetic enhancer in order to achieve therapeutic plasma concentrations at the desired dose and frequency. Whereas ritonavir has been the only available pharmacokinetic enhancer for more than a decade, cobicistat has recently emerged as an alternative boosting agent. Cobicistat and ritonavir are equally strong inhibitors of cytochrome P450 (CYP) 3A4 and consequently were shown to be equivalent pharmacokinetic enhancers for elvitegravir and for the PIs atazanavir and darunavir. Since cobicistat is a more selective CYP inhibitor than ritonavir and is devoid of enzyme-inducing properties, differences are expected in their interaction profiles with some co-medications. Drugs whose exposure might be altered by ritonavir but unaltered by cobicistat are drugs primarily metabolized by CYP1A2, CYP2B6, CYP2C8, CYP2C9 and CYP2C19 or drugs undergoing mainly glucuronidation. Thus, co-medications should be systematically reviewed when switching the pharmacokinetic enhancer to anticipate potential dosage adjustments.

  9. Does mechanism of drug action matter to inform rational polytherapy in epilepsy?

    PubMed

    Giussani, Giorgia; Beghi, Ettore

    2013-05-01

    When monotherapy for epilepsy fails, add-on therapy is an alternative option. There are several possible antiepileptic drug combinations based on their different and multiple mechanisms of action and pharmacokinetic interactions. However, only when benefits of drug combinations outweigh the harms, polytherapy can be defined as "rational". In the past 20 years, second generation AEDs have been marketed, some of which have better defined mechanisms of action and better pharmacokinetic profile. The mechanisms of action of AEDs involve, among others, blockade of voltage-gated sodium channels, blockade of voltage-gated calcium channel, activation of the ionotropic GABAA receptor and increase of GABA levels at the synaptic cleft, blockade of glutamate receptors, binding to synaptic vesicle protein 2A, and opening of KCNQ (Kv7) potassium channels. Aim of this review was to examine published reports on AEDs combinations in animal models and humans focusing on mechanisms of action and pharmacokinetic interactions. Studies in animals have shown that AED combinations are more effective when using drugs with different mechanisms of action. The most effective combination was found using a drug with a single mechanism of action and another with multiple mechanisms of action. In humans some combinations between a blocker of voltage-gated sodium channels and a drug with multiple mechanisms of action may be synergistic. Future studies are necessary to better define rational combinations and complementary mechanisms of action, considering also pharmacokinetic interactions and measures of toxicity and not only drug efficacy.

  10. Drug watch.

    PubMed

    Whitson, S

    1999-01-01

    Recent developments on new anti-HIV agents and drugs for opportunistic infections are highlighted. Information is provided on the infusion inhibitor T-20; DuPont's second generation non-nukes, DPC 961 and DPC 963; Papirine (PEN203) for the human papilloma virus; Sporanox for treating fungal infections; and the antiretroviral protein, lysozyme. In addition, information is given on a plant found in the Bolivian rainforest that may contain compounds to prevent HIV infection by blocking the enzyme, integrase. Other promising new drugs addressed at the 6th Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections are listed in a table. Contact information for US clinical trials is provided.

  11. Antineoplastic Drugs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Sara; Michael, Nancy, Ed.

    This module on antineoplastic drugs is intended for use in inservice or continuing education programs for persons who administer medications in long-term care facilities. Instructor information, including teaching suggestions, and a listing of recommended audiovisual materials and their sources appear first. The module goal and objectives are then…

  12. Club Drugs

    MedlinePlus

    ... Drug Gamma-hydroxybutyrate (GHB), also known as G, Liquid Ecstasy, and Soap Ketamine, also known as Special K, K, Vitamin K, and Jet Rohypnol, also known as Roofies Methamphetamine, also known as Speed, Ice, Chalk, Meth, Crystal, Crank, and Glass Lysergic Acid Diethylamide (LSD), also ...

  13. Transporter-mediated drug-drug interactions.

    PubMed

    Müller, Fabian; Fromm, Martin F

    2011-07-01

    Drug-drug interactions are a serious clinical issue. An important mechanism underlying drug-drug interactions is induction or inhibition of drug transporters that mediate the cellular uptake and efflux of xenobiotics. Especially drug transporters of the small intestine, liver and kidney are major determinants of the pharmacokinetic profile of drugs. Transporter-mediated drug-drug interactions in these three organs can considerably influence the pharmacokinetics and clinical effects of drugs. In this article, we focus on probe drugs lacking significant metabolism to highlight mechanisms of interactions of selected intestinal, hepatic and renal drug transporters (e.g., organic anion transporting polypeptide [OATP] 1A2, OATP2B1, OATP1B1, OATP1B3, P-gp, organic anion transporter [OAT] 1, OAT3, breast cancer resistance protein [BCRP], organic cation transporter [OCT] 2 and multidrug and toxin extrusion protein [MATE] 1). Genotype-dependent drug-drug interactions are also discussed.

  14. Simple and sensitive high performance liquid chromatography method with fluorescence detection for therapeutic drug monitoring of topiramate.

    PubMed

    Milosheska, Daniela; Vovk, Tomaž; Grabnar, Iztok; Roškar, Robert

    2015-01-01

    A simple, sensitive, accurate, precise and inexpensive HPLC method with fluorescence detection, suitable for routine therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) of an antiepileptic drug topiramate, was developed and validated. The determination of plasma topiramate concentration was carried out after precolumn derivatization, using 4-chloro-7-nitrobenzofurazan as a fluorescent labeling agent and bendroflumethiazide as an internal standard. The standard calibration curve was linear over the concentration range of 0.01-24 μg/mL (r² > 0.9998). The intra- and inter-day accuracies expressed as bias were from 1.4 to 9.9% and from 1.9 to 10.2%, respectively. The intra- and inter-day precisions were below 7.9% and 2.7%, respectively. The validated method was applied for the measurement of plasma topiramate concentrations in patients with epilepsy. The reported method is appropriate for TDM of topiramate as well as for pharmacokinetic and bioequivalence studies.

  15. Drug therapy of epileptic seizures among adult epileptic outpatients of University of Gondar Referral and Teaching Hospital, Gondar, North West Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Birru, Eshetie Melese; Shafi, Miftah; Geta, Mestayet

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to assess the practice of pharmacotherapy of epilepsy and its treatment outcomes in adult epileptic outpatients at the University of Gondar Referral and Teaching Hospital, Gondar, North West Ethiopia. Methods An institution based, retrospective cross-sectional study was conducted from the medical charts of 336 adult epileptic patients at the outpatient epileptic clinic of Neurology Department of University of Gondar Teaching Hospital from May 2014 to April 2015. Reviewing follow-up information from the medical charts was used to evaluate antiepileptic drug (AED) prescribing patterns and treatment outcome. Data were collected by using data collection format and analyzed using SPSS software version 16. Results The most common type of seizure diagnosed was generalized tonic–clonic seizure (n=245, 72.91%). Monotherapy with an AED accounted for 80.35% of the cases, whereas dual therapy and polytherapy with three AED combinations accounted for 16.37% and 3.28%, respectively. The most frequently prescribed AED was phenobarbitone (62.47%) followed by carbamazepine (17.91%). From the total epileptic cases, 277 (82.4%) had well-controlled seizure status in the last three consecutive months. Conclusion Most of the patients were maintained by monotherapy, and largely this was by the older antiepileptic drug, phenobarbitone. Considering the development of pharmacotherapy of epilepsy and other patient related factors, the standard treatment guideline for Ethiopia needs to be revised periodically. PMID:28053533

  16. Drugs@FDA: FDA Approved Drug Products

    MedlinePlus

    ... by Month Approvals, tentative approvals, and supplements Original New Drug Approvals (NDAs and BLAs) by Month All applications ... FDA. Does not include tentative approvals. Original Abbreviated New Drug Approvals (ANDAs) by Month Generic Drug Approvals. Does ...

  17. Antiplatelet Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Hirsh, Jack; Spencer, Frederick A.; Baglin, Trevor P.; Weitz, Jeffrey I.

    2012-01-01

    The article describes the mechanisms of action, pharmacokinetics, and pharmacodynamics of aspirin, dipyridamole, cilostazol, the thienopyridines, and the glycoprotein IIb/IIIa antagonists. The relationships among dose, efficacy, and safety are discussed along with a mechanistic overview of results of randomized clinical trials. The article does not provide specific management recommendations but highlights important practical aspects of antiplatelet therapy, including optimal dosing, the variable balance between benefits and risks when antiplatelet therapies are used alone or in combination with other antiplatelet drugs in different clinical settings, and the implications of persistently high platelet reactivity despite such treatment. PMID:22315278

  18. Drugs Approved for Neuroblastoma

    Cancer.gov

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for neuroblastoma. The list includes generic names and brand names. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  19. Drugs Approved for Retinoblastoma

    Cancer.gov

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for retinoblastoma. The list includes generic names and brand names. The drug names link to NCI’s Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  20. Drugs Approved for Leukemia

    Cancer.gov

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the FDA for use in leukemia. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries. The list includes generic names, brand names, and common drug combinations, which are shown in capital letters.

  1. Club Drug Use

    MedlinePlus

    ... different from other illicit drugs?What are the dangers of taking club drugs?What can I do ... Drug Use | Gamma-Hydroxybutyrate (GHB)Learn about the dangers of taking gamma-hydroxybutyrate (GHB), an illegal drug ...

  2. Effects of Drug Use

    MedlinePlus

    ... Used Drugs in the Past Drug Use Prevention Phone Numbers and Websites Search ... and the brain , sometimes forever. Learn more about: how drug use and mental health problems often happen together the link between drug use ...

  3. Urine drug screen

    MedlinePlus

    Drug screen -- urine ... detect the presence of illegal and some prescription drugs in your urine. Their presence indicates that you recently used these drugs. Some drugs may remain in your system for ...

  4. Drugs and the Brain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Institutes of Health (DHHS), Bethesda, MD.

    This booklet explores various aspects of drug addiction, with a special focus on drugs' effects on the brain. A brief introduction presents information on the rampant use of drugs in society and elaborates the distinction between drug abuse and drug addiction. Next, a detailed analysis of the brain and its functions is given. Drugs target the more…

  5. To treat or not to treat drug-refractory epilepsy by the ketogenic diet? That is the question.

    PubMed

    Ułamek-Kozioł, Marzena; Pluta, Ryszard; Bogucka-Kocka, Anna; Czuczwar, Stanisław J

    2016-12-23

    Epilepsy is a serious neurologic disorder worldwide which affects about 1% of the population (ca. 50 million people), the highest prevalence occurring in both children and elderly. Apart from idiopathic forms, etiology of the disease involves multiple brain risk factors - the most frequent being cerebrovascular diseases, tumours and traumatic injuries. Several treatment options exist, including, for instance, pharmacotherapy, vagal nerve stimulation or epilepsy surgery. In spite of treatment, about 30% of patients with epilepsy still have seizures and become drug-refractory. This is why other treatment options may be recommended, and ketogenic diet seems a last-chance method, especially in children and adolescents with epilepsy. The diet contains high amounts of fat and low carbohydrates with vitamin supplementation. The elevated concentrations of ketones induced by the diet may result in inhibition of the synaptic activity of glutamate, the mammalian target of the rapamycin pathway, and activation of adenosine triphosphate-sensitive potassium channels. One of the main ketones is acetone, shown to increase the seizure threshold and potentiate the anticonvulsant activity of some antiepileptic drugs. The clinical effectiveness of the ketogenic diet has been confirmed in a number of clinical trials carried out mainly on children. A wider use of the ketogenic diet may be limited by the number of early adverse effects (gastrointestinal distress, acidosis, hypoglycaemia, dehydration and lethargy), and late adverse effects (hyperuricaemia, hyperlipidaemia, kidney stones, easy bruising, and decreases in height and weight). Recently, data are available on the negative impact of the ketogenic diet on the qualitative characteristics of lipoprotein subfractions which points to the atherogenic fenotype as a new side-effect. In conclusion, future research directed to the proper identification of patients (in terms of age, epilepsy type and duration, recommended antiepileptic

  6. Drug Treated Schizophrenia, Schizoaffective and Bipolar Disorder Patients Evaluated by qEEG Absolute Spectral Power and Mean Frequency Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wix-Ramos, Richard; Moreno, Xiomara; Capote, Eduardo; González, Gilbert; Uribe, Ezequiel

    2014-01-01

    Objective Research of electroencephalograph (EEG) power spectrum and mean frequency has shown inconsistent results in patients with schizophrenic, schizoaffective and bipolar disorders during medication when compared to normal subjects thus; the characterization of these parameters is an important task. Methods We applied quantitative EEG (qEEG) to investigate 38 control, 15 schizophrenic, 7 schizoaffective and 11 bipolar disorder subjects which remaine under the administration of psychotropic drugs (except control group). Absolute spectral power (ASP), mean frequency and hemispheric electrical asymmetry were measured by 19 derivation qEEG. Group mean values were compared with non parametrical Mann-Whitney test and spectral EEG maps with z-score method at p < 0.05. Results Most frequent drug treatments for schizophrenic patients were neuroleptic+antiepileptic (40% of cases) or 2 neuroleptics (33.3%). Schizoaffective patients received neuroleptic+benzodiazepine (71.4%) and for bipolar disorder patients neuroleptic+antiepileptic (81.8%). Schizophrenic (at all derivations except for Fp1, Fp2, F8 and T6) and schizoaffective (only at C3) show higher values of ASP (+57.7% and +86.1% respectively) compared to control group. ASP of bipolar disorder patients did not show differences against control group. The mean frequency was higher at Fp1 (+14.2%) and Fp2 (+17.4%) in bipolar disorder patients than control group, but no differences were found in frequencies between schizophrenic or schizoaffective patients against the control group. Majority of spectral differences were found at the left hemisphere in schizophrenic and schizoaffective but not in bipolar disorder subjects. Conclusion The present report contributes to characterize quantitatively the qEEG in drug treated schizophrenic, schizoaffective or bipolar disorder patients. PMID:24851121

  7. DrugCentral: online drug compendium

    PubMed Central

    Ursu, Oleg; Holmes, Jayme; Knockel, Jeffrey; Bologa, Cristian G.; Yang, Jeremy J.; Mathias, Stephen L.; Nelson, Stuart J.; Oprea, Tudor I.

    2017-01-01

    DrugCentral (http://drugcentral.org) is an open-access online drug compendium. DrugCentral integrates structure, bioactivity, regulatory, pharmacologic actions and indications for active pharmaceutical ingredients approved by FDA and other regulatory agencies. Monitoring of regulatory agencies for new drugs approvals ensures the resource is up-to-date. DrugCentral integrates content for active ingredients with pharmaceutical formulations, indexing drugs and drug label annotations, complementing similar resources available online. Its complementarity with other online resources is facilitated by cross referencing to external resources. At the molecular level, DrugCentral bridges drug-target interactions with pharmacological action and indications. The integration with FDA drug labels enables text mining applications for drug adverse events and clinical trial information. Chemical structure overlap between DrugCentral and five online drug resources, and the overlap between DrugCentral FDA-approved drugs and their presence in four different chemical collections, are discussed. DrugCentral can be accessed via the web application or downloaded in relational database format. PMID:27789690

  8. Drug Preferences of Multiple Drug Abusers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harford, Robert J.

    1978-01-01

    Examined drug preferences of a group of active multiple drug abusers referred for treatment. Nearly half the respondents preferred drugs other than type they most frequently used. Preferences were related to method of administration. Results suggest preference is one among several determinants of drug use. (Author/BEF)

  9. On the Slow Diffusion of Point-of-Care Systems in Therapeutic Drug Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Sanavio, Barbara; Krol, Silke

    2015-01-01

    Recent advancements in point-of-care (PoC) technologies show great transformative promises for personalized preventative and predictive medicine. However, fields like therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM), that first allowed for personalized treatment of patients’ disease, still lag behind in the widespread application of PoC devices for monitoring of patients. Surprisingly, very few applications in commonly monitored drugs, such as anti-epileptics, are paving the way for a PoC approach to patient therapy monitoring compared to other fields like intensive care cardiac markers monitoring, glycemic controls in diabetes, or bench-top hematological parameters analysis at the local drug store. Such delay in the development of portable fast clinically effective drug monitoring devices is in our opinion due more to an inertial drag on the pervasiveness of these new devices into the clinical field than a lack of technical capability. At the same time, some very promising technologies failed in the clinical practice for inadequate understanding of the outcome parameters necessary for a relevant technological breakthrough that has superior clinical performance. We hope, by over-viewing both TDM practice and its yet unmet needs and latest advancement in micro- and nanotechnology applications to PoC clinical devices, to help bridging the two communities, the one exploiting analytical technologies and the one mastering the most advanced techniques, into translating existing and forthcoming technologies in effective devices. PMID:25767794

  10. [Case of drug-induced hypersensitivity syndrome due to lamotrigine: demonstration of sequential reactivation of herpesviruses].

    PubMed

    Sato, Tatsuharu; Kuniba, Hideo; Matsuo, Mitsuhiro; Matsuzaka, Tetsuo; Moriuchi, Hiroyuki

    2012-01-01

    Drug-induced hypersensitivity syndrome (DIHS) is a rare but severe multiorgan disorder. The reactivation of human herpesvirus-6 (HHV-6) and other human herpesviruses has been reported to be associated with its pathogenesis. We herein report a case of 14-year-old female who developed DIHS during the treatment with lamotrigine, a novel antiepileptic drug. She initially presented with fever, skin rash, cervical lymphadenopathy, leukocytosis with eosinophilia and atypical lymphocytosis, liver dysfunction and hypogammaglobulinemia. Discontinuation of the drug and administration of prednisolone led to improvement;however, tapering of prednisolone and administration of midazolam and ketamine thereafter triggered clinical deterioration. She subsequently developed hyperthyroidism followed by hypothyroidism. Herpesviral loads were determined in her peripheral blood by real-time PCR during the course of the treatment, and sequential reactivation of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), HHV-6 and cytomegalovirus was demonstrated. EBV viremia was detected throughout the course, except for a short period when HHV-6 viremia was at the peak. HHV-6 viremia developed after the secondary deterioration. Cytomegalovirus viremia appeared transiently before the hyperthyroidic state reversed and became hypothyroidic. Although this syndrome should be regarded as a systemic reaction induced by a complex interplay among herpesviruses and the immune responses against viral infections and drugs, it remains unknown how such a sequential reactivation is related to the pathogenesis of the condition.

  11. Hydrotropic Solubilization of Lipophilic Drugs for Oral Delivery: The Effects of Urea and Nicotinamide on Carbamazepine Solubility–Permeability Interplay

    PubMed Central

    Beig, Avital; Lindley, David; Miller, Jonathan M.; Agbaria, Riad; Dahan, Arik

    2016-01-01

    Hydrotropy refers to increasing the water solubility of otherwise poorly soluble compound by the presence of small organic molecules. While it can certainly increase the apparent solubility of a lipophilic drug, the effect of hydrotropy on the drugs’ permeation through the intestinal membrane has not been studied. The purpose of this work was to investigate the solubility–permeability interplay when using hydrotropic drug solubilization. The concentration-dependent effects of the commonly used hydrotropes urea and nicotinamide, on the solubility and the permeability of the lipophilic antiepileptic drug carbamazepine were studied. Then, the solubility–permeability interplay was mathematically modeled, and was compared to the experimental data. Both hydrotropes allowed significant concentration-dependent carbamazepine solubility increase (up to ∼30-fold). A concomitant permeability decrease was evident both in vitro and in vivo (∼17-fold for nicotinamide and ∼9-fold for urea), revealing a solubility–permeability tradeoff when using hydrotropic drug solubilization. A relatively simplified simulation approach based on proportional opposite correlation between the solubility increase and the permeability decrease at a given hydrotrope concentration allowed excellent prediction of the overall solubility–permeability tradeoff. In conclusion, when using hydrotropic drug solubilization it is prudent to not focus solely on solubility, but to account for the permeability as well; achieving optimal solubility–permeability balance may promote the overall goal of the formulation to maximize oral drug exposure. PMID:27826241

  12. Finding a better drug for epilepsy: Preclinical screening strategies and experimental trial design

    PubMed Central

    Simonato, Michele; Löscher, Wolfgang; Cole, Andrew J.; Dudek, F. Edward; Engel, Jerome; Kaminski, Rafal M.; Loeb, Jeffrey A.; Scharfman, Helen; Staley, Kevin J.; Velíšek, Libor; Klitgaard, Henrik

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY The antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) introduced during the past two decades have provided several benefits: they offered new treatment options for symptomatic treatment of seizures, improved ease of use and tolerability, and lowered risk for hypersensitivity reactions and detrimental drug– drug interactions. These drugs, however, neither attenuated the problem of drug-refractory epilepsy nor proved capable of preventing or curing the disease. Therefore, new preclinical screening strategies are needed to identify AEDs that target these unmet medical needs. New therapies may derive from novel targets identified on the basis of existing hypotheses for drug-refractory epilepsy and the biology of epileptogenesis; from research on genetics, transcriptomics, and epigenetics; and from mechanisms relevant for other therapy areas. Novel targets should be explored using new preclinical screening strategies, and new technologies should be used to develop medium- to high-throughput screening models. In vivo testing of novel drugs should be performed in models mimicking relevant aspects of drug refractory epilepsy and/or epileptogenesis. To minimize the high attrition rate associated with drug development, which arises mainly from a failure to demonstrate sufficient clinical efficacy of new treatments, it is important to define integrated strategies for preclinical screening and experimental trial design. An important tool will be the discovery and implementation of relevant biomarkers that will facilitate a continuum of proof-of-concept approaches during early clinical testing to rapidly confirm or reject preclinical findings, and thereby lower the risk of the overall development effort. In this review, we overview some of the issues related to these topics and provide examples of new approaches that we hope will be more successful than those used in the past. PMID:22708847

  13. Mozart's music in children with drug-refractory epileptic encephalopathies.

    PubMed

    Coppola, Giangennaro; Toro, Annacarmela; Operto, Francesca Felicia; Ferrarioli, Giuseppe; Pisano, Simone; Viggiano, Andrea; Verrotti, Alberto

    2015-09-01

    Mozart's sonata for two pianos in D major, K448, has been shown to decrease interictal EEG discharges and recurrence of clinical seizures in both adults and young patients. In this prospective, open-label study, we evaluated the effect of listening to a set of Mozart's compositions, according to the Tomatis method, on sleep quality and behavioral disorders, including auto-/hetero-aggression, irritability, and hyperactivity, in a group of children and adolescents with drug-resistant epilepsy. The study group was composed of 11 outpatients (7 males and 4 females), between 1.5years and 21years of age (mean age: 11.9years), all suffering from drug-resistant epileptic encephalopathy (n=11). All of them had a severe/profound intellectual disability associated with cerebral palsy. During the study period, each patient had to listen to a set of Mozart's compositions 2h per day for fifteen days for a total of 30h, which could be distributed over the day depending on the habits and compliance of each patient. The music was filtered by a device preferably delivering higher sound frequencies (>3000Hz) according to the Tomatis principles. The antiepileptic drug therapy remained unchanged throughout the study period. During the 15-day music therapy, 2 out of 11 patients had a reduction of 50-75% in seizure recurrence, and 3 out of 12 patients had a reduction of 75-89%. Overall, 5 (45.4%) out of 11 patients had a ≥50% reduction in the total number of seizures, while the percentage decrease of the total seizure number (11/11) compared with baseline was -51.5% during the 15-day music therapy and -20.7% in the two weeks after the end of treatment. All responders also had an improvement in nighttime sleep and daytime behavior.

  14. Prenatal anticonvulsant drug exposure: teratogenic effect on the dentition.

    PubMed

    Orup, H I; Keith, D A; Holmes, L B

    1998-01-01

    Prenatal exposure to anticonvulsant medication has been shown to cause craniofacial dysmorphology, prenatal growth retardation, hypoplastic nails and phalanges, and visceral abnormalities. In this study we examined maxillary and mandibular stone dental casts (45) and panoramic radiographs (39) from 45 individuals with ages 4.5 to 22.0 years for changes in mesiodistal crown size of deciduous and permanent teeth, and the presence of dental anomalies. These individuals had been exposed prenatally to antiepileptic drugs (AEDs). Mesiodistal crown diameters were measured from the dental casts and converted into standard scores (Z), using published normative data from the University of Michigan Longitudinal Craniofacial Growth Series. A significant increase in mesiodistal crown dimensions of the posterior maxillary teeth was observed, specifically in primary molars and their permanent premolar successors, as well as permanent molars. Changes in tooth size were more common in females than in males. Dental maturity, assessed using the panoramic radiographs, was equal to chronologic age. An increased frequency of hypodontia was the only notable dental anomaly.

  15. Personality, Drug Preference, Drug Use, and Drug Availability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feldman, Marc; Boyer, Bret; Kumar, V. K.; Prout, Maurice

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between drug preference, drug use, drug availability, and personality among individuals (n = 100) in treatment for substance abuse in an effort to replicate the results of an earlier study (Feldman, Kumar, Angelini, Pekala, & Porter, 2007) designed to test prediction derived from Eysenck's (1957, 1967)…

  16. Psychotropic drugs in the treatment of obesity: what promise?

    PubMed

    Appolinario, Jose C; Bueno, João R; Coutinho, Walmir

    2004-01-01

    Obesity is a chronic and highly prevalent medical condition associated with increased risk for the development of numerous and sometimes fatal diseases. Despite its severity, there are few anti-obesity agents available on the market. Although psychotropic agents are not approved for the treatment of obesity, they have been used by clinicians as a therapeutic tool in daily clinical practice. The purpose of this article is to review the rationale, as well as the evidence, for the potential use of these agents in obesity treatment. Evidence for the efficacy of psychotropic agents in obesity treatment comes from different sources. The first type of evidence is weight loss observed with treatment in clinical trials of patients with neuropsychiatric syndromes (e.g. mood disorders, epilepsy). A recent example of such findings is the weight reduction reported in clinical trials involving obese patients with binge eating disorder. While randomised, controlled trials specifically designed to investigate the weight loss properties of psychotropic agents in obese patients are the most appropriate source of evidence of anti-obesity action, such trials remain scarce. The most studied psychotropic agents in obesity trials are drugs used in the treatment of mood disorders, i.e. mainly antidepressants and antiepileptics. SSRIs (e.g. fluoxetine, sertraline and fluvoxamine) were amongst the first psychotropic agents investigated in the treatment of obesity. Additional data have also been published for other antidepressants (e.g. venlafaxine, citalopram and bupropion) and antiepileptics (e.g. topiramate and zonisamide). Based on the available data for the efficacy of psychotropic agents in obesity and other related conditions, SSRIs may be considered for the management of certain subgroups of obese individuals with comorbid conditions such as depression, binge eating disorder and type 2 diabetes mellitus. In addition, some newer agents, such as bupropion, topiramate and zonisamide

  17. Drug combination therapy increases successful drug repositioning.

    PubMed

    Sun, Wei; Sanderson, Philip E; Zheng, Wei

    2016-07-01

    Repositioning of approved drugs has recently gained new momentum for rapid identification and development of new therapeutics for diseases that lack effective drug treatment. Reported repurposing screens have increased dramatically in number in the past five years. However, many newly identified compounds have low potency; this limits their immediate clinical applications because the known, tolerated plasma drug concentrations are lower than the required therapeutic drug concentrations. Drug combinations of two or more compounds with different mechanisms of action are an alternative approach to increase the success rate of drug repositioning.

  18. Adverse drug reactions reported by consumers for nervous system medications in Europe 2007 to 2011

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Reporting of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) has traditionally been the sole province of healthcare professionals. In the European Union, more countries have allowed consumers to report ADRs directly to the regulatory agencies. The aim of this study was to characterize ADRs reported by European consumer for nervous system medications. Methods ADRs reported by consumers for nervous system medications (ATC group N) from 2007 to 2011 and located in the European ADR database, EudraVigilance, were analysed. Data were categorized with respect to age and sex, category and seriousness of reported ADRs and medications. The unit of analysis was one ADR. Results We located 4766 ADRs reported for nervous system medications, and one half of these were serious including 19 deaths. Less than 5% of ADRs were reported in children. Totally, 58% of ADRs were reported for women, 42% for men. The majority of reported ADRs were of the types “nervous system disorders” (18% of total ADRs) followed by “psychiatric disorders” (18% of total ADRs) and “general disorders” (15% of total ADRs) which also were the system organ classes in which the majority of serious ADRs were found. ADR reports encompassed medicines from the therapeutic groups: antiepileptics (ATC group N03) (36% of total ADRs), parasympathomimetics (ATC group N07) (22% of total ADRs) and antidepressants ATC group N06A (9% of total ADRs). Antiepileptics were the therapeutic group with the highest share of serious ADRs (60%) followed by antidepressants (15%). Many serious ADRs were reported for pregabalin and varenicline. Conclusions The majority of ADRs from nervous system mediations reported by consumers that were identified from the EudraVigilance database were serious. The value of consumer reports in pharmacovigilance still remains unclarified. PMID:23763896

  19. Personality, drug preference, drug use, and drug availability.

    PubMed

    Feldman, Marc; Boyer, Bret; Kumar, V K; Prout, Maurice

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between drug preference, drug use, drug availability, and personality among individuals (n = 100) in treatment for substance abuse in an effort to replicate the results of an earlier study (Feldman, Kumar, Angelini, Pekala, & Porter, 2007) designed to test prediction derived from Eysenck's (1957, 1967) theories. Drug preference was measured by the method of paired-comparison and personality was measured with the Zuckerman-Kuhlman Personality Questionnaire-50 CC. Contrary to expectations, high compared with low scorers on Sociability and Impulsive-Sensation Seeking preferred depressants. Surprisingly, low compared with high scorers on neuroticism did not differ in preference for alcohol. As in the previous study, drug preference, use, and availability were highly correlated, although ease of availability was slightly more predictive of drug use than drug preference. Clinical and theoretical implications are discussed.

  20. Prophylactic and therapeutic functions of drug combinations against noise-induced hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Bao, Jianxin; Hungerford, Michelle; Luxmore, Randi; Ding, Dalian; Qiu, Ziyu; Lei, Debin; Yang, Aizhen; Liang, Ruqiang; Ohlemiller, Kevin K

    2013-10-01

    Noise is the most common occupational and environmental hazard. Noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) is the second most common form of sensorineural hearing deficit, after age-related hearing loss (presbycusis). Although promising approaches have been identified for reducing NIHL, currently there are no effective medications to prevent NIHL. Development of an efficacious treatment has been hampered by the complex array of cellular and molecular pathways involved in NIHL. We turned this difficulty into an advantage by asking whether NIHL could be effectively prevented by targeting multiple signaling pathways with a combination of drugs already approved by U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). We previously found that antiepileptic drugs blocking T-type calcium channels had both prophylactic and therapeutic effects for NIHL. NIHL can also be reduced by an up-regulation of glucocorticoid (GC) signaling pathways. Based on these findings, we tested a combination therapy for NIHL that included ethosuximide and zonisamide (anticonvulsants) and dexamethasone and methylprednisolone (synthetic GCs) in mice under exposure conditions typically associated with dramatic permanent threshold shifts (PTS). We first examined possible prophylactic effects for each drug when administered alone 2 h before noise, and calculated the median effective dose (ED50). We then tested for synergistic effects of two-drug combinations (anticonvulsant + GC), and identified combinations with the strongest synergy against NIHL, based on a previously established combination index (CI) metric. We repeated similar tests to determine their therapeutic effects when administered the same drugs 24 h after the noise exposure. Our study shows the feasibility of developing pharmacological intervention in multiple pathways, and discovering drug combinations with optimal synergistic effects in preventing permanent NIHL.

  1. 99 Films on Drugs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weber, David O., Ed.

    This catalog describes and evaluates 16-millimeter films about various aspects of drug use. Among the subjects covered by the 99 films are the composition and effects of different drugs, reasons why people use drugs, life in the drug culture, the problem of law enforcement, and various means of dealing with drug users. Each film is synopsized. Two…

  2. Drug Reaction with Eosinophilia and Systemic Symptom (DRESS) induced by carbamazepine: a case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    EL Omairi, Nissrine; Abourazzak, Sanae; Chaouki, Sanae; Atmani, Samir; Hida, Moustapha

    2014-01-01

    Drug-induced hypersensitivity or Drug Reaction with Eosinophilia and Systemic Symptom (DRESS) is a severe adverse drug-induced reaction. Diagnosing DRESS is challenging due to the diversity of cutaneous eruption and organs involved. Most of the aromatic anticonvulsants, such as phenytoin, phenobarbital, and carbamazepine, can induce DRESS. Culprit drug withdrawal and corticosteroids constituted the mainstay of DRESS treatment. We describe a 6 year-old boy who presented fever and rash 4 weeks after starting carbamazepine. Investigation revealed leukocytosis, atypical lymphocytosis, and elevated serum transaminases. The diagnosis of DREES syndrome was made, Carbamazepine was stopped and replaced initially by Clobazam and by Valproic acid after discharge, no systemic corticotherapy was prescribed. Symptoms began to resolve within two weeks, and by one month later her laboratory values had returned to normal. The aim of this work is to raise awareness general practitioner and pediatricians to suspect Dress syndrome in patients who present with unusual complaints and skin findings after starting any antiepileptic drug. PMID:25360193

  3. Drug Reaction with Eosinophilia and Systemic Symptom (DRESS) induced by carbamazepine: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    E L omairi, Nissrine; Abourazzak, Sanae; Chaouki, Sanae; Atmani, Samir; Hida, Moustapha

    2014-01-01

    Drug-induced hypersensitivity or Drug Reaction with Eosinophilia and Systemic Symptom (DRESS) is a severe adverse drug-induced reaction. Diagnosing DRESS is challenging due to the diversity of cutaneous eruption and organs involved. Most of the aromatic anticonvulsants, such as phenytoin, phenobarbital, and carbamazepine, can induce DRESS. Culprit drug withdrawal and corticosteroids constituted the mainstay of DRESS treatment. We describe a 6 year-old boy who presented fever and rash 4 weeks after starting carbamazepine. Investigation revealed leukocytosis, atypical lymphocytosis, and elevated serum transaminases. The diagnosis of DREES syndrome was made, Carbamazepine was stopped and replaced initially by Clobazam and by Valproic acid after discharge, no systemic corticotherapy was prescribed. Symptoms began to resolve within two weeks, and by one month later her laboratory values had returned to normal. The aim of this work is to raise awareness general practitioner and pediatricians to suspect Dress syndrome in patients who present with unusual complaints and skin findings after starting any antiepileptic drug.

  4. Routine drug and food interactions during antihelminthic treatment of neurocysticercosis: a reason for the variable efficacy of albendazole and praziquantel?

    PubMed

    Romo, Matthew L; Carpio, Arturo; Kelvin, Elizabeth A

    2014-04-01

    Neurocysticercosis (NC) or infection of the central nervous system with Taenia solium larvae is a leading cause of preventable seizures and epilepsy in endemic regions across the globe. Albendazole and praziquantel are commonly used antihelminthic agents to treat NC; however, viable cysts persist in the majority of patients, putting them at risk for future seizures and other neurological complications. Because of their pharmacokinetic profiles, albendazole and praziquantel have the potential to interact with many different drugs. During antihelminthic treatment, antiepileptic drugs and corticosteroids are commonly co-administered to manage seizures and cerebral edema; however, the most commonly used agents from these drug classes are known to significantly alter plasma concentrations of albendazole and praziquantel. The overarching issue with drug interactions during the treatment of NC is whether or not they have clinical relevance, as the plasma concentrations of albendazole and praziquantel have not been directly linked with eradication of viable cysts. Future studies should attempt to evaluate the validity of a causal relationship between antihelminthic plasma concentrations and outcomes so that drug interactions can be better understood and managed and so that treatment can be optimized.

  5. Drug-drug interactions between clopidogrel and novel cardiovascular drugs.

    PubMed

    Pelliccia, Francesco; Rollini, Fabiana; Marazzi, Giuseppe; Greco, Cesare; Gaudio, Carlo; Angiolillo, Dominick J

    2015-10-15

    The combination of aspirin and the thienopyridine clopidogrel is a cornerstone in the prevention of atherothrombotic events. These two agents act in concert to ameliorate the prothrombotic processes stimulated by plaque rupture and vessel injury complicating cardiovascular disease. Guidelines recommend the use of clopidogrel in patients with acute coronary syndromes and in those undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention, and the drug remains the most utilized P2Y12 receptor inhibitor despite the fact that newer antiplatelet agents are now available. In recent years, numerous studies have shown inconsistency in the efficacy of clopidogrel to prevent atherothrombotic events. Studies of platelet function testing have shown variability in the response to clopidogrel. One of the major reason for this phenomenon lies in the interaction between clopidogrel and other drugs that may affect clopidogrel absorption, metabolism, and ultimately its antiplatelet action. Importantly, these drug-drug interactions have prognostic implications, since patients with high on-treatment platelet reactivity associated with reduced clopidogrel metabolism have an increased risk of ischemia. Previous systematic reviews have focused on drug-drug interactions between clopidogrel and specific pharmacologic classes, such as proton pump inhibitors, calcium channel blockers, and statins. However, more recent pieces of scientific evidence show that clopidogrel may also interact with newer drugs that are now available for the treatment of cardiovascular patients. Accordingly, the aim of this review is to highlight and discuss recent data on drug-drug interactions between clopidogrel and third-generation proton pump inhibitors, pantoprazole and lansoprazole, statins, pitavastatin, and antianginal drug, ranolazine.

  6. Attitudes towards drug legalization among drug users.

    PubMed

    Trevino, Roberto A; Richard, Alan J

    2002-01-01

    Research shows that support for legalization of drugs varies significantly among different sociodemographic and political groups. Yet there is little research examining the degree of support for legalization of drugs among drug users. This paper examines how frequency and type of drug use affect the support for legalization of drugs after adjusting for the effects of political affiliation and sociodemographic characteristics. A sample of 188 drug users and non-drug users were asked whether they would support the legalization of marijuana, cocaine, and heroin. Respondents reported their use of marijuana, crack, cocaine, heroin, speedball, and/or methamphetamines during the previous 30 days. Support for legalization of drugs was analyzed by estimating three separate logistic regressions. The results showed that the support for the legalization of drugs depended on the definition of "drug user" and the type of drug. In general, however, the results showed that marijuana users were more likely to support legalizing marijuana, but they were less likely to support the legalization of cocaine and heroin. On the other hand, users of crack, cocaine, heroin, speedball, and/or methamphetamines were more likely to support legalizing all drugs including cocaine and heroin.

  7. Antimicrobial (Drug) Resistance Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... Visitor Information Contact Us Research > NIAID's Role in Research > Antimicrobial (Drug) Resistance > Understanding share with facebook share with twitter ... Prevention, Antimicrobial (Drug) Resistance Antimicrobial (Drug) Resistance Antimicrobial ... To prevent antimicrobial resistance, you and your healthcare ...

  8. Drug Plan Coverage Rules

    MedlinePlus

    ... Medication Therapy Management programs Drug plan coverage rules , current page Using your drug plan for the first time Filling a prescription without your new plan card Costs for Medicare drug coverage Joining a health or ...

  9. Drugs Approved for Melanoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Ask about Your Treatment Research Drugs Approved for Melanoma This page lists cancer drugs approved by the ... that are not listed here. Drugs Approved for Melanoma Aldesleukin Cobimetinib Cotellic (Cobimetinib) Dabrafenib Dacarbazine DTIC-Dome ( ...

  10. Drug Retention Times

    SciTech Connect

    Center for Human Reliability Studies

    2007-05-01

    The purpose of this monograph is to provide information on drug retention times in the human body. The information provided is based on plausible illegal drug use activities that might be engaged in by a recreational drug user.

  11. Drug-induced hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

    Toxic hepatitis ... to get liver damage. Some drugs can cause hepatitis with small doses, even if the liver breakdown ... liver. Many different drugs can cause drug-induced hepatitis. Painkillers and fever reducers that contain acetaminophen are ...

  12. National Drug IQ Challenge

    MedlinePlus

    ... National Drug IQ Challenge 2016 National Drug & Alcohol IQ Challenge Print Get Started! Correct/Total Questions: Score: ... accessible version of the 2016 National Drug & Alcohol IQ Challenge , [PDF, 637KB]. Download an accessible version of ...

  13. Prescription Drug Abuse

    MedlinePlus

    ... Whether they're using street drugs or medications, drug abusers often have trouble at school, at home, with ... a short period of time may make a drug abuser aggressive or paranoid. Although stimulant abuse might not ...

  14. [Contemporary opinions on classification, pathogenesis and treatment of drug-resistant epilepsy].

    PubMed

    Jóźwiak, Sergiusz

    2007-01-01

    Epilepsy is one of the most frequent neurological disorders, both in children and adult persons. About 0.5-1% of general population suffer from epilepsy, which means that about 50 million people in the world are affected. First years of life and very late adulthood are periods in human's life particularly predisposing to epilepsy. Repetitive epileptic seizures may cause many life-threatening situations and significantly lower patient's quality of life. To the most serious complications belong status epilepticus and sudden unexpected deaths due to epilepsy (SUDEP). Absences from work or school caused by seizures, difficulties in social life, frequent injuries and necessity of polytherapy are also important for patients. All these factors result in low self-esteem and poor quality of life. The main aim of the treatment was control of epileptic seizures. However, despite of new antiepileptic drugs developed almost every year, in one third of all patients with epilepsy seizures remain out of control. Those patients are regarded to have "drug-resistant epilepsy". Despite of significant scale of the problem, there is no one definition of the phenomenon. In the presented review the authors outline current definitions, recent opinions on pathogenesis and risk factors, and provide practical rules of pharmacotherapy of epilepsy, which should help to restrict drug-resistancy.

  15. Monoaminergic Mechanisms in Epilepsy May Offer Innovative Therapeutic Opportunity for Monoaminergic Multi-Target Drugs.

    PubMed

    Svob Strac, Dubravka; Pivac, Nela; Smolders, Ilse J; Fogel, Wieslawa A; De Deurwaerdere, Philippe; Di Giovanni, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    A large body of experimental and clinical evidence has strongly suggested that monoamines play an important role in regulating epileptogenesis, seizure susceptibility, convulsions, and comorbid psychiatric disorders commonly seen in people with epilepsy (PWE). However, neither the relative significance of individual monoamines nor their interaction has yet been fully clarified due to the complexity of these neurotransmitter systems. In addition, epilepsy is diverse, with many different seizure types and epilepsy syndromes, and the role played by monoamines may vary from one condition to another. In this review, we will focus on the role of serotonin, dopamine, noradrenaline, histamine, and melatonin in epilepsy. Recent experimental, clinical, and genetic evidence will be reviewed in consideration of the mutual relationship of monoamines with the other putative neurotransmitters. The complexity of epileptic pathogenesis may explain why the currently available drugs, developed according to the classic drug discovery paradigm of "one-molecule-one-target," have turned out to be effective only in a percentage of PWE. Although, no antiepileptic drugs currently target specifically monoaminergic systems, multi-target directed ligands acting on different monoaminergic proteins, present on both neurons and glia cells, may represent a new approach in the management of seizures, and their generation as well as comorbid neuropsychiatric disorders.

  16. Monoaminergic Mechanisms in Epilepsy May Offer Innovative Therapeutic Opportunity for Monoaminergic Multi-Target Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Svob Strac, Dubravka; Pivac, Nela; Smolders, Ilse J.; Fogel, Wieslawa A.; De Deurwaerdere, Philippe; Di Giovanni, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    A large body of experimental and clinical evidence has strongly suggested that monoamines play an important role in regulating epileptogenesis, seizure susceptibility, convulsions, and comorbid psychiatric disorders commonly seen in people with epilepsy (PWE). However, neither the relative significance of individual monoamines nor their interaction has yet been fully clarified due to the complexity of these neurotransmitter systems. In addition, epilepsy is diverse, with many different seizure types and epilepsy syndromes, and the role played by monoamines may vary from one condition to another. In this review, we will focus on the role of serotonin, dopamine, noradrenaline, histamine, and melatonin in epilepsy. Recent experimental, clinical, and genetic evidence will be reviewed in consideration of the mutual relationship of monoamines with the other putative neurotransmitters. The complexity of epileptic pathogenesis may explain why the currently available drugs, developed according to the classic drug discovery paradigm of “one-molecule-one-target,” have turned out to be effective only in a percentage of PWE. Although, no antiepileptic drugs currently target specifically monoaminergic systems, multi-target directed ligands acting on different monoaminergic proteins, present on both neurons and glia cells, may represent a new approach in the management of seizures, and their generation as well as comorbid neuropsychiatric disorders. PMID:27891070

  17. Drug screening in Scn1a zebrafish mutant identifies clemizole as a potential Dravet Syndrome treatment

    PubMed Central

    Baraban, Scott C.; Dinday, Matthew T.; Hortopan, Gabriela A.

    2013-01-01

    Dravet syndrome (DS) is a catastrophic pediatric epilepsy with severe intellectual disability, impaired social development and persistent drug-resistant seizures. One of its primary monogenic causes are mutations in Nav1.1 (SCN1A), a voltage-gated sodium channel. Here we characterise zebrafish Nav1.1 (scn1Lab) mutants originally identified in a chemical mutagenesis screen. Mutants exhibit spontaneous abnormal electrographic activity, hyperactivity and convulsive behaviors. Although scn1Lab expression is reduced, microarray analysis is remarkable for the small fraction of differentially expressed genes (~3%) and lack of compensatory expression changes in other scn subunits. Ketogenic diet, diazepam, valproate, potassium bromide and stiripentol attenuate mutant seizure activity; seven other antiepileptic drugs have no effect. A phenotype-based screen of 320 compounds identifies a US Food and Drug Administration-approved compound (clemizole) that inhibits convulsive behaviors and electrographic seizures. This approach represents a new direction in modeling pediatric epilepsy and could be used to identify novel therapeutics for any monogenic epilepsy disorder. PMID:24002024

  18. Nuclear Receptors in Drug Metabolism, Drug Response and Drug Interactions.

    PubMed

    Prakash, Chandra; Zuniga, Baltazar; Song, Chung Seog; Jiang, Shoulei; Cropper, Jodie; Park, Sulgi; Chatterjee, Bandana

    Orally delivered small-molecule therapeutics are metabolized in the liver and intestine by phase I and phase II drug-metabolizing enzymes (DMEs), and transport proteins coordinate drug influx (phase 0) and drug/drug-metabolite efflux (phase III). Genes involved in drug metabolism and disposition are induced by xenobiotic-activated nuclear receptors (NRs), i.e. PXR (pregnane X receptor) and CAR (constitutive androstane receptor), and by the 1α, 25-dihydroxy vitamin D3-activated vitamin D receptor (VDR), due to transactivation of xenobiotic-response elements (XREs) present in phase 0-III genes. Additional NRs, like HNF4-α, FXR, LXR-α play important roles in drug metabolism in certain settings, such as in relation to cholesterol and bile acid metabolism. The phase I enzymes CYP3A4/A5, CYP2D6, CYP2B6, CYP2C9, CYP2C19, CYP1A2, CYP2C8, CYP2A6, CYP2J2, and CYP2E1 metabolize >90% of all prescription drugs, and phase II conjugation of hydrophilic functional groups (with/without phase I modification) facilitates drug clearance. The conjugation step is mediated by broad-specificity transferases like UGTs, SULTs, GSTs. This review delves into our current understanding of PXR/CAR/VDR-mediated regulation of DME and transporter expression, as well as effects of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) and epigenome (specified by promoter methylation, histone modification, microRNAs, long non coding RNAs) on the expression of PXR/CAR/VDR and phase 0-III mediators, and their impacts on variable drug response. Therapeutic agents that target epigenetic regulation and the molecular basis and consequences (overdosing, underdosing, or beneficial outcome) of drug-drug/drug-food/drug-herb interactions are also discussed. Precision medicine requires understanding of a drug's impact on DME and transporter activity and their NR-regulated expression in order to achieve optimal drug efficacy without adverse drug reactions. In future drug screening, new tools such as humanized mouse models and

  19. New mixed ligand palladium(II) complexes based on the antiepileptic drug sodium valproate and bioactive nitrogen-donor ligands: Synthesis, structural characterization, binding interactions with DNA and BSA, in vitro cytotoxicity studies and DFT calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabrizi, Leila; Chiniforoshan, Hossein; Tavakol, Hossein

    2015-04-01

    The complexes [Pd(valp)2(imidazole)2] (1), [Pd(valp)2(pyrazine)2] (2) (valp is sodium valproate) have been synthesized and characterized using IR, 1H NMR, 13C{1H} NMR and UV-Vis spectrometry. The interaction of complexes with CT-DNA has been investigated using spectroscopic tools and viscosity measurement. In each case, the association constant (Kb) was deduced from the absorption spectral study and the number of binding sites (n) and the binding constant (K) were calculated from relevant fluorescence quenching data. As a result, a non-covalent interaction between the metal complex and DNA was suggested, which could be assigned to an intercalative binding. In addition, the interaction of 1 and 2 was ventured with bovine serum albumin (BSA) with the help of absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy measurements. Through these techniques, the apparent association constant (Kapp) and the binding constant (K) could be calculated for each complex. Evaluation of cytotoxic activity of the complexes against four different cancer cell lines proved that the complexes exhibited cytotoxic specificity and significant cancer cell inhibitory rate. Moreover, density functional theory (DFT) calculations were employed to provide more evidence about the observed data. The majority of trans isomers were supported not only by energies, but also by the similarity of its calculated IR frequencies, UV adsorptions and NMR chemical shifts to the experimental values.

  20. Nanoencapsulation for drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Kumari, Avnesh; Singla, Rubbel; Guliani, Anika; Yadav, Sudesh Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Nanoencapsulation of drug/small molecules in nanocarriers (NCs) is a very promising approach for development of nanomedicine. Modern drug encapsulation methods allow efficient loading of drug molecules inside the NCs thereby reducing systemic toxicity associated with drugs. Targeting of NCs can enhance the accumulation of nanonencapsulated drug at the diseased site. This article focussed on the synthesis methods, drug loading, drug release mechanism and cellular response of nanoencapsulated drugs on liposomes, micelles, carbon nanotubes, dendrimers, and magnetic NCs. Also the uses of these various NCs have been highlighted in the field of nanotechnology. PMID:26417260

  1. [Therapeutic drug monitoring of pregabaline].

    PubMed

    Bentué-Ferrer, Danièle; Tribut, Olivier; Verdier, Marie-Clémence

    2010-01-01

    Pregabaline, a second generation antiepileptic, is marketed in France since 2005. It is also indicated in the treatment of painful neuropathy and in generalized anxious disorder. Its pharmacokinetic profile: low metabolism and no binding to plasma proteins, is not in favour of the necessity of a TDM. But other studies would be necessary to concluded more definitively. Pregabalin however, required a dosage adjustment in case of renal insufficiency. The values of the plasma concentrations found after various doses are in agreement in the different studies, without that we can define a therapeutic range. For this molecule, the level of proof of the interest of TDM was estimated in: remaining to estimate.

  2. Enzyme Induced Formation of Monodisperse Hydrogel Nanoparticles Tunable in Size

    SciTech Connect

    Bocharova, Vera; Sharp, Danna; Jones, Aaron; Cheng, Shiwang; Griffin, Philip J.; Agapov, Alexander L.; Voylov, Dmitry; Wang, Yangyang; Kisliuk, Alexander; Melman, Artem; Sokolov, Alexei P.

    2015-03-09

    Here, we report a novel approach to synthesize monodisperse hydrogel nanoparticles that are tunable in size. The distinctive feature of our approach is the use of a multicopper oxidase enzyme, laccase, as both a biocatalyst and template for nanoparticle growth. We utilize the ferroxidase activity of laccase to initiate localized production of iron(III) cations from the oxidation of iron(II) cations. We demonstrate that nanoparticles are formed in a dilute polymer solution of alginate as a result of cross-linking between alginate and enzymatically produced iron(III) cations. Exerting control over the enzymatic reaction allows for nanometer-scale tuning of the hydrogel nanoparticle radii in the range of 30–100 nm. Moreover, the nanoparticles and their growth kinetics were characterized via dynamic light scattering, atomic force microscopy, and UV–vis spectroscopy. Our finding opens up a new avenue for the synthesis of tunable nanoscale hydrogel particles for biomedical applications.

  3. Enzyme Induced Formation of Monodisperse Hydrogel Nanoparticles Tunable in Size

    DOE PAGES

    Bocharova, Vera; Sharp, Danna; Jones, Aaron; ...

    2015-03-09

    Here, we report a novel approach to synthesize monodisperse hydrogel nanoparticles that are tunable in size. The distinctive feature of our approach is the use of a multicopper oxidase enzyme, laccase, as both a biocatalyst and template for nanoparticle growth. We utilize the ferroxidase activity of laccase to initiate localized production of iron(III) cations from the oxidation of iron(II) cations. We demonstrate that nanoparticles are formed in a dilute polymer solution of alginate as a result of cross-linking between alginate and enzymatically produced iron(III) cations. Exerting control over the enzymatic reaction allows for nanometer-scale tuning of the hydrogel nanoparticle radiimore » in the range of 30–100 nm. Moreover, the nanoparticles and their growth kinetics were characterized via dynamic light scattering, atomic force microscopy, and UV–vis spectroscopy. Our finding opens up a new avenue for the synthesis of tunable nanoscale hydrogel particles for biomedical applications.« less

  4. Drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS) and its relation with autoimmunity in a reference center in Mexico*

    PubMed Central

    Matta, Juan Manuel Ruiz; Flores, Silvia Méndez; Cherit, Judith Domínguez

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND Drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms is a severe adverse drug reaction, with a reported mortality of 10%. Long-term outcomes involve organic failure and autoimmune diseases in some populations. OBJECTIVE To evaluate the clinical prognosis of patients with drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms. METHODS We conducted a retrospective review at a referral hospital in Mexico City in a period of 22 years (1992-2013), looking up for records with diagnosis of DRESS according to RegiSCAR criteria. Clinical characteristics, organ failures, culprit drugs, treatment, and short and long-term sequelae were analyzed. RESULTS We found 11 patients with diagnosis of drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms syndrome, 7 female and 4 male, with a median age of 22 years-old; 9 had maculopapular rash and 2 were erythrodermic. Affected organs were liver (8/11), kidney (6/11) and hematologic disorders (8/11). The most common culprit drugs were antiepileptic (63%). Systemic corticosteroids were given to 8 patients, being pyelonephritis (1/8) and pneumonia (2/8) the adverse events of this therapy. Long-term sequelae were 1 patient with renal failure, 1 patient with chronic anemia; and 2 patients developed autoimmune diseases (one autoimmune thyroid disease and another one with autoimmune thyroid disease and autoimmune hemolytic anemia). Study limitations: The retrospective nature of the study and the limited number of patients with drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms. CONCLUSIONS Drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms syndrome has been linked to the development of chronic organ failure. We found two young patients who developed autoimmune diseases in the short term. Patients with drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms should have a long-term monitoring for signs or symptoms suggestive of an autoimmune disease. PMID:28225953

  5. Text mining for drug-drug interaction.

    PubMed

    Wu, Heng-Yi; Chiang, Chien-Wei; Li, Lang

    2014-01-01

    In order to understand the mechanisms of drug-drug interaction (DDI), the study of pharmacokinetics (PK), pharmacodynamics (PD), and pharmacogenetics (PG) data are significant. In recent years, drug PK parameters, drug interaction parameters, and PG data have been unevenly collected in different databases and published extensively in literature. Also the lack of an appropriate PK ontology and a well-annotated PK corpus, which provide the background knowledge and the criteria of determining DDI, respectively, lead to the difficulty of developing DDI text mining tools for PK data collection from the literature and data integration from multiple databases.To conquer the issues, we constructed a comprehensive pharmacokinetics ontology. It includes all aspects of in vitro pharmacokinetics experiments, in vivo pharmacokinetics studies, as well as drug metabolism and transportation enzymes. Using our pharmacokinetics ontology, a PK corpus was constructed to present four classes of pharmacokinetics abstracts: in vivo pharmacokinetics studies, in vivo pharmacogenetic studies, in vivo drug interaction studies, and in vitro drug interaction studies. A novel hierarchical three-level annotation scheme was proposed and implemented to tag key terms, drug interaction sentences, and drug interaction pairs. The utility of the pharmacokinetics ontology was demonstrated by annotating three pharmacokinetics studies; and the utility of the PK corpus was demonstrated by a drug interaction extraction text mining analysis.The pharmacokinetics ontology annotates both in vitro pharmacokinetics experiments and in vivo pharmacokinetics studies. The PK corpus is a highly valuable resource for the text mining of pharmacokinetics parameters and drug interactions.

  6. Drug Delivery Systems for Platinum Drugs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huynh, Vien T.; Scarano, Wei; Stenzel, Martina H.

    2013-09-01

    Since the discovery of cisplatin, drugs based on platinum, have made a significant impact on the treatment of various cancers. The administration of platinum drugs is however accompanied by significant side effects. This chapter discusses the types of drug delivery systems that have been developed in order to enable the targeted delivery while maintaining controlled temporal supply of the drug. The sizes of carriers range from nanometer to micrometer sized particles. The most common types of drug carriers are micelles, liposomes, nanoparticles, and dendrimers, but also a few microspheres have been developed. Most striking aspect of the delivery of platinum drugs is the possibility of physical encapsulation but also the binding of the drug to the polymer carrier coordinate covalent bond. Since platinum drugs have typically two permanent and two leaving ligands, the polymer can be part of either ligand. As the leaving ligand, the platinum drug is released often as cisplatin. If the polymer provides the functionality for the permanent ligand, a new macromolecular drug has been formed. In addition to the attachment of pt(II) drugs, recent offorts are devoted to the conjugation via the Pt((IV) prodrug.

  7. Nuclear Receptors in Drug Metabolism, Drug Response and Drug Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Prakash, Chandra; Zuniga, Baltazar; Song, Chung Seog; Jiang, Shoulei; Cropper, Jodie; Park, Sulgi; Chatterjee, Bandana

    2016-01-01

    Orally delivered small-molecule therapeutics are metabolized in the liver and intestine by phase I and phase II drug-metabolizing enzymes (DMEs), and transport proteins coordinate drug influx (phase 0) and drug/drug-metabolite efflux (phase III). Genes involved in drug metabolism and disposition are induced by xenobiotic-activated nuclear receptors (NRs), i.e. PXR (pregnane X receptor) and CAR (constitutive androstane receptor), and by the 1α, 25-dihydroxy vitamin D3-activated vitamin D receptor (VDR), due to transactivation of xenobiotic-response elements (XREs) present in phase 0-III genes. Additional NRs, like HNF4-α, FXR, LXR-α play important roles in drug metabolism in certain settings, such as in relation to cholesterol and bile acid metabolism. The phase I enzymes CYP3A4/A5, CYP2D6, CYP2B6, CYP2C9, CYP2C19, CYP1A2, CYP2C8, CYP2A6, CYP2J2, and CYP2E1 metabolize >90% of all prescription drugs, and phase II conjugation of hydrophilic functional groups (with/without phase I modification) facilitates drug clearance. The conjugation step is mediated by broad-specificity transferases like UGTs, SULTs, GSTs. This review delves into our current understanding of PXR/CAR/VDR-mediated regulation of DME and transporter expression, as well as effects of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) and epigenome (specified by promoter methylation, histone modification, microRNAs, long non coding RNAs) on the expression of PXR/CAR/VDR and phase 0-III mediators, and their impacts on variable drug response. Therapeutic agents that target epigenetic regulation and the molecular basis and consequences (overdosing, underdosing, or beneficial outcome) of drug-drug/drug-food/drug-herb interactions are also discussed. Precision medicine requires understanding of a drug’s impact on DME and transporter activity and their NR-regulated expression in order to achieve optimal drug efficacy without adverse drug reactions. In future drug screening, new tools such as humanized mouse models and

  8. Drug-induced Depression: a Case/Non Case Study in the French Pharmacovigilance Database.

    PubMed

    Lafay-Chebassier, Claire; Chavant, François; Favrelière, Sylvie; Pizzoglio, Véronique; Pérault-Pochat, Marie-Christine

    2015-01-01

    Depression is a complex disorder with heterogeneous clinical anomalies whose neurobiological understanding still remains unclear. Medications have been implicated as potential causes of depression but for many of them, data are controversial. The present study aims to investigate association bet ween drugs and reports of depression. We used the case/non case method in the French pharmacovigilance database (FPVD) to identify drugs associated with depression. Cases were reports of depression in the FPVD between January 2007 and December 2011. Non cases were all other reports during the same period. Data were expressed as reporting odds ratio (ROR) with their 95% confidence interval. Of the 114,692 reports recorded in the FPVD during the studied period, we identified 474 cases of depression. For the majority of the patients, they were considered as "non serious" (56%) and evolution was favorable (64%). Significant RORs were found for antiepileptics (topiramate, levetiracetam), anti-infective and especially anti-retroviral drugs (efavirenz, emtricitabine, tenofovir, etravirine, raltegravir), interferons and other agents including isotretinoin, methylphenidate, sodium oxybate, varenicline, montelukast, flunarizine, adalimumab, anastrozole. Taking into account the limits of the methodology, the present study described associations with mainly expected drugs belonging to various therapeutic classes but it also found a signal with some anti-retrovirals. On the contrary, we did not find some assumed associations like cardiovascular medications, antimalarial. For most of the drugs, one or more mechanisms were found to explain these depressogenic effects on the basis of animal and human literature. Even if such associations need to be confirmed by further prospective studies, cautions are necessary for many drugs to early detect depressive symptoms.

  9. Managing drug-resistant epilepsy: challenges and solutions

    PubMed Central

    Dalic, Linda; Cook, Mark J

    2016-01-01

    Despite the development of new antiepileptic drugs (AEDs), ~20%–30% of people with epilepsy remain refractory to treatment and are said to have drug-resistant epilepsy (DRE). This multifaceted condition comprises intractable seizures, neurobiochemical changes, cognitive decline, and psychosocial dysfunction. An ongoing challenge to both researchers and clinicians alike, DRE management is complicated by the heterogeneity among this patient group. The underlying mechanism of DRE is not completely understood. Many hypotheses exist, and relate to both the intrinsic characteristics of the particular epilepsy (associated syndrome/lesion, initial response to AED, and the number and type of seizures prior to diagnosis) and other pharmacological mechanisms of resistance. The four current hypotheses behind pharmacological resistance are the “transporter”, “target”, “network”, and “intrinsic severity” hypotheses, and these are reviewed in this paper. Of equal challenge is managing patients with DRE, and this requires a multidisciplinary approach, involving physicians, surgeons, psychiatrists, neuropsychologists, pharmacists, dietitians, and specialist nurses. Attention to comorbid psychiatric and other diseases is paramount, given the higher prevalence in this cohort and associated poorer health outcomes. Treatment options need to consider the economic burden to the patient and the likelihood of AED compliance and tolerability. Most importantly, higher mortality rates, due to comorbidities, suicide, and sudden death, emphasize the importance of seizure control in reducing this risk. Overall, resective surgery offers the best rates of seizure control. It is not an option for all patients, and there is often a significant delay in referring to epilepsy surgery centers. Optimization of AEDs, identification and treatment of comorbidities, patient education to promote adherence to treatment, and avoidance of triggers should be periodically performed until further

  10. What Are Drugs?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minnesota Police and Peace Officers Association.

    This guide for parents presents, in Laotian and English, information about drugs, drug use and abuse, and treatment for drug use. Most of the information is presented in question and answer form to give parents the information they need to answer their children's questions and help prevent drug use. The following sections are included: (1)…

  11. Utah Drug Use Questionnaire.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Governor's Citizen Advisory Committee on Drugs, Salt Lake City, UT.

    This questionnaire assesses drug use practices in junior and senior high school students. The 21 multiple choice items pertain to drug use practices, use history, available of drugs, main reason for drug use, and demographic data. The questionnaire is untimed, group administered, and may be given by the classroom teacher in about 10 minutes. Item…

  12. Fighting the Drug War.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    The Journal of State Government, 1990

    1990-01-01

    All nine articles in this periodical issue focus on the theme of the war against illegal drug use, approaching the topic from a variety of perspectives. The articles are: "The Drug War: Meeting the Challenge" (Stanley E. Morris); "Ways to Fight Drug Abuse" (Bruce A. Feldman); "Treatment Key to Fighting Drugs" (Stan…

  13. Drugs and Young People

    MedlinePlus

    Drug abuse is a serious public health problem. It affects almost every community and family in some way. Drug abuse in children and teenagers may pose a ... of young people may be more susceptible to drug abuse and addiction than adult brains. Abused drugs ...

  14. New drug update: 2010.

    PubMed

    Hussar, Daniel A

    2010-10-01

    Five new drugs that are used for medical problems often encountered in the elderly have been selected for consideration in this review. The uses and most important properties of these agents are considered, and a rating for each new drug is determined using the New Drug Comparison Rating (NDCR) system developed by the author. In the NDCR system, a rating from 1 to 5 (5 being the highest rating) is assigned for each new drug. The rating is based on a comparison of the new drug with related drugs already marketed. Advantages, disadvantages, and other important information regarding the new drug are identified and used as the basis for determining the rating.

  15. 2016 New Drug Update.

    PubMed

    Hussar, Daniel A

    2016-04-01

    Six new drugs marketed within the last year, which are used for medical problems often experienced by the elderly, have been selected for consideration in this review. The uses and most important properties of these agents are discussed, and a rating for each new drug is determined using the New Drug Comparison Rating (NDCR) system developed by the author. Advantages, disadvantages, and other important information regarding the new drug are identified and used as the basis for determining the rating. The drugs include a hypnotic, an anticoagulant, two drugs for heart failure, and two drugs to reduce low-density lipoprotein cholesterol.

  16. New drug update: 2011.

    PubMed

    Hussar, Daniel A

    2012-04-01

    Five new drugs that are used for medical problems often encountered in the elderly have been selected for consideration in this review. The uses and most important properties of these agents are considered, and a rating for each new drug is determined using the New Drug Comparison Rating (NDCR) system developed by the author. In the NDCR system, a rating from 1 to 5 (5 being the highest rating) is assigned for each new drug. The rating is based on a comparison of the new drug with related drugs already marketed. Advantages, disadvantages, and other important information regarding the new drug are identified and used as the basis for determining the rating.

  17. [Current movements of four serious adverse events induced by medicinal drugs based on spontaneous reports in Japan].

    PubMed

    Sudo, Chie; Azuma, Yu-ichiro; Maekawa, Keiko; Kaniwa, Nahoko; Sai, Kimie; Saito, Yoshiro

    2011-01-01

    Spontaneous reports on suspected serious adverse events caused by medicines from manufacturing/distributing pharmaceutical companies or medical institutions/pharmacies are regulated by the Pharmaceutical Affairs Law of Japan, and this system is important for post-marketing safety features. Although causal relationship between the medicine and the adverse event is not evaluated, and one incidence may be redundantly reported, this information would be useful to roughly grasp the current movements of drug-related serious adverse events, We searched open-source data of the spontaneous reports publicized by Pharmaceutical and Medical Devices Agency for 4 serious adverse events (interstitial lung disease, rhabdomyolysis, anaphylaxis, and Stevens-Johnson syndrome/toxic epidermal necrolysis) from 2004 to 2010 fiscal year (for 2010, from April 1 st to January 31th). Major drug-classes suspected to the adverse events were antineoplastics for interstitial lung disease, hyperlipidemia agents and psychotropics for rhabdomyolysis, antibiotics/chemotherapeutics, antineoplastics and intracorporeal diagnostic agents for anaphylaxis (anaphylactic shock, anaphylactic reactions, anaphylactoid shock and anaphylactoid reactions), and antibiotics/chemotherapeutics, antipyretics and analgesics, anti-inflammatory agents/common cold drugs, and antiepileptics for Stevens-Johnson syndrome/toxic epidermal necrolysis. These results would help understanding of current situations of the 4 drug-related serious adverse events in Japan.

  18. Drug hypersensitivity syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bonnetblanc, J M

    1993-01-01

    Some types of hypersensitivity to drugs are defined either by the generic name of the drug or descriptive terms. They are sometimes assimilated to pseudolymphoma because the causative drugs are often the same, although the eruption lacks clinical and histopathological criteria of pseudolymphoma. It is then suggested to use 'idiosyncratic drug hypersensitivity syndrome' to define this type of drug reaction. As the skin and other organs may be involved, a generic name would help to determine a better definition and a surveillance program.

  19. New drug update: 2012.

    PubMed

    Hussar, Daniel A

    2013-04-01

    Five new drugs that are used for medical problems often experienced by the elderly have been selected for consideration in this review. The uses and most important properties of these agents are considered, and a rating for each new drug is determined. The rating is based on a comparison of the new drug with related drugs already marketed. Advantages, disadvantages, and other important information regarding the new drug are identified and used as the basis for determining the rating.

  20. Drug interactions with oral sulphonylurea hypoglycaemic drugs.

    PubMed

    Hansen, J M; Christensen, L K

    1977-01-01

    The effect of the oral sulphonylurea hypoglycaemic drugs may be influenced by a large number of other drugs. Some of these combinations (e.g. phenylbutazone, sulphaphenazole) may result in cases of severe hypoglycaemic collapse. Tolbutamide and chlorpropamide should never be given to a patient without a prior careful check of which medicaments are already being given. Similarly, no drug should be given to a diabetic treated with tolbutamide and chlorpropamide without consideration of the possibility of interaction phenomena.

  1. Sodium channel-inhibiting drugs and cancer survival: protocol for a cohort study using the CPRD primary care database

    PubMed Central

    Fairhurst, Caroline; Martin, Fabiola; Watt, Ian; Doran, Tim; Bland, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Voltage-gated sodium channel (VGSC)-inhibiting drugs are commonly used to treat epilepsy and cardiac arrhythmia. VGSCs are also widely expressed in various cancers, including those of the breast, bowel and prostate. A number of VGSC-inhibiting drugs have been shown to inhibit cancer cell proliferation, invasion, tumour growth and metastasis in preclinical models, suggesting that VGSCs may be novel molecular targets for cancer treatment. Surprisingly, we previously found that prior exposure to VGSC-inhibiting drugs may be associated with reduced overall survival in patients with cancer, but we were unable to control for the cause of death or indication for prescription. The purpose of the present study is to interrogate a different database to further investigate the relationship between VGSC-inhibiting drugs and cancer-specific survival. Methods and analysis A cohort study using primary care data from the Clinical Practice Research Datalink database will include patients with diagnosis of breast, bowel and prostate cancer (13 000). The primary outcome will be cancer-specific survival from the date of cancer diagnosis. Cox proportional hazards regression will be used to compare survival of patients taking VGSC-inhibiting drugs (including antiepileptic drugs and class I antiarrhythmic agents) with patients with cancer not taking these drugs, adjusting for cancer type, age and sex. Drug exposure will be treated as a time-varying covariate to account for potential immortal time bias. Various sensitivity and secondary analyses will be performed. Ethics and dissemination The project has been reviewed and approved by the University of York Ethical Review Process. Results will be presented at an international conference and published in open access peer-reviewed journals according to the STROBE and RECORD guidelines. PMID:27601493

  2. Drugs and drug resistance in African trypanosomiasis.

    PubMed

    Delespaux, Vincent; de Koning, Harry P

    2007-01-01

    Despite the many decades of use of most of the current trypanocides, we know little of their mode of action. This may in part be because most of these will act on multiple targets once inside the cell, and they derive their selective action on the parasite from selective accumulation by the pathogen. Loss of this capacity for drug uptake by the trypanosome would thus be a major cause for drug resistance. We here discuss the use of current drugs against human and veterinary African trypanosomiasis, the prevalence, causes and mechanisms of drug resistance and new developments in trypanosomiasis therapy such as the introduction of nifurtimox and DB289.

  3. Therapeutic drug monitoring for antidepressant drug treatment.

    PubMed

    Ostad Haji, Elnaz; Hiemke, Christoph; Pfuhlmann, Bruno

    2012-01-01

    The aim of antidepressant drug treatment is to produce remission without causing adverse effects during the acute phase of the illness and to prevent relapses or recurrences during continuation or maintenance therapy. To achieve these goals, drug choice and dosage must be optimized for each patient individually. Therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM), which is based on the assumption that clinical effects correlate better with blood levels than doses, can be helpful. When using tricyclic antidepressant <