Science.gov

Sample records for eocene climatic optimum

  1. Global warming and ocean acidification through halted weathering feedback during the Middle Eocene Climatic Optimum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Ploeg, R.; Selby, D. S.; Cramwinckel, M.; Bohaty, S. M.; Sluijs, A.; Middelburg, J. J.

    2016-12-01

    The Middle Eocene Climatic Optimum (MECO) represents a 500 kyr period of global warming 40 million years ago associated with a rise in atmospheric CO2 concentrations, but its cause remains enigmatic. Moreover, on the timescale of the MECO, an increase in silicate weathering rates on the continents is expected to balance carbon input and restore the alkalinity of the oceans, but this is in sharp disagreement with observations of extensive carbonate dissolution. Here we show, based on osmium isotope ratios of marine sediments from three different sites, that CO2 rise and warming did not lead to enhanced continental weathering during the MECO, in contrast to expectations from carbon cycle theory. Remarkably, a minor shift to lower, more unradiogenic osmium isotope ratios rather indicates an episode of increased volcanism or reduced continental weathering. This disproves silicate weathering as a geologically constant feedback to CO2 variations. Rather, we suggest that global Early and Middle Eocene warmth diminished the weatherability of continental rocks, ultimately leading to CO2 accumulation during the MECO, and show the plausibility of this scenario using carbon cycle modeling simulations. We surmise a dynamic weathering feedback might explain multiple enigmatic phases of coupled climate and carbon cycle change in the Cretaceous and Cenozoic.

  2. It's getting hot here - The Middle Eocene Climatic Optimum (MECO) in a terrestrial sedimentary record

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Methner, K.; Wacker, U.; Fiebig, J.; Chamberlain, C.; Mulch, A.

    2013-12-01

    The Middle Eocene Climatic Optimum (MECO) represents an enigmatic global warming event during Cenozoic cooling that has been discovered in ocean drill cores from varying latitudes and oceanic basins. It is marked by a rapid negative shift in oxygen isotope ratios of foraminiferal calcite and thought to reflect the combined effects of freshwater input as well as an increase in sea surface and bottom water temperatures by up to 5 to 6 °C. MECO is therefore a temperature extreme during already warm Eocene climate. This makes the MECO to one of the hottest phases during Earth's climate history, yet it is largely unknown how MECO affected temperatures in the continental interiors as well as their rainfall and vegetation dynamics. Here, we present stable isotope (δ18O, δ13C) and clumped isotope temperature (Δ47) records from a middle Eocene (ca. 42.0 to 40.0 Ma) mammal fossil locality in southwestern Montana, USA. The sampled section (Upper Dell Beds, Sage Creek Basin) comprises about 60 m of stacked paleosols that were correlated to Chron C18r by paleomagnetics and biostratigraphy. δ18O values of pedogenic carbonate range from -12 to -18 per mil (SMOW) and to first-order follows the marine δ18O pattern. Low δ18O values coincide with peak-MECO conditions and show a relatively rapid ca. 5°C increase in soil temperatures reaching peak temperatures of ~27°C at the climax of MECO. Immediately after the MECO event temperatures drop rapidly by about 8°C. To our knowledge this is the first terrestrial MECO paleotemperature record that further provides insight into the precipitation dynamics deep within the North American continent during this early Cenozoic hyperthermal. Paleosol Δ47 temperatures are highly reproducible within and across individual soil sequences and provide a realistic temperature estimate prior, during and after the MECO event. The combined δ18O and Δ47 data therefore provide important insight into the isotopic evolution of precipitation and mean

  3. Fossil palm beetles refine upland winter temperatures in the Early Eocene Climatic Optimum.

    PubMed

    Archibald, S Bruce; Morse, Geoffrey E; Greenwood, David R; Mathewes, Rolf W

    2014-06-03

    Eocene climate and associated biotic patterns provide an analog system to understand their modern interactions. The relationship between mean annual temperatures and winter temperatures-temperature seasonality-may be an important factor in this dynamic. Fossils of frost-intolerant palms imply low Eocene temperature seasonality into high latitudes, constraining average winter temperatures there to >8 °C. However, their presence in a paleocommunity may be obscured by taphonomic and identification factors for macrofossils and pollen. We circumvented these problems by establishing the presence of obligate palm-feeding beetles (Chrysomelidae: Pachymerina) at three localities (a fourth, tentatively) in microthermal to lower mesothermal Early Eocene upland communities in Washington and British Columbia. This provides support for warmer winter Eocene climates extending northward into cooler Canadian uplands.

  4. Fossil palm beetles refine upland winter temperatures in the Early Eocene Climatic Optimum

    PubMed Central

    Archibald, S. Bruce; Morse, Geoffrey E.; Greenwood, David R.; Mathewes, Rolf W.

    2014-01-01

    Eocene climate and associated biotic patterns provide an analog system to understand their modern interactions. The relationship between mean annual temperatures and winter temperatures—temperature seasonality—may be an important factor in this dynamic. Fossils of frost-intolerant palms imply low Eocene temperature seasonality into high latitudes, constraining average winter temperatures there to >8 °C. However, their presence in a paleocommunity may be obscured by taphonomic and identification factors for macrofossils and pollen. We circumvented these problems by establishing the presence of obligate palm-feeding beetles (Chrysomelidae: Pachymerina) at three localities (a fourth, tentatively) in microthermal to lower mesothermal Early Eocene upland communities in Washington and British Columbia. This provides support for warmer winter Eocene climates extending northward into cooler Canadian uplands. PMID:24821798

  5. Dynamic, Large-Magnitude CCD Changes in the Atlantic During the Middle Eocene Climatic Optimum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kordesch, W.; Bohaty, S. M.; Palike, H.; Wilson, P. A.; Edgar, K. M.; Agnini, C.; Westerhold, T.; Roehl, U.

    2015-12-01

    The Middle Eocene Climatic Optimum (MECO; ~40.1 Ma) is a transient global warming event that abruptly reversed the long-term Eocene cooling trend. The primary driving mechanism(s) must be linked to a CO2 increase; however, geochemical modeling experiments show that prevailing hypotheses are incompatible with the paleoclimate record. To further examine changes in deep-sea carbonate burial, we identify the MECO for the first time at ODP Site 929 (Equatorial Atlantic; ~3935 m paleodepth) and present new lithological and geochemical data for this site, including benthic foraminiferal stable isotopes (δ18O and δ13C), XRF scanning data, and an orbitally tuned age model. We combine these records with data from a suite of Atlantic sites to form a depth transect between ~2-4 km (DSDP Site 523, ODP Site 1260 and 1263, IODP Site U1404) representing the first detailed record of carbonate dissolution in the Atlantic spanning the MECO. This compilation reveals dissolution at water depths as shallow as ~2 km (>1 km shallower than previous estimates) with multiple and discrete short-lived (<100 kyr) phases of carbonate compensation depth (CCD) shoaling during and after the event. Careful reevaluation of the Pacific CCD records combined with new results suggests similar short-term variability and magnitude of shoaling globally. These data provide new constraints on carbon release history during the MECO and, potentially, the forcing mechanisms for warming. The transient CCD shoaling events indicate multiple pulses of carbon input and acidification decoupled from deep-sea δ18O and δ13C records, indicating that these events must not have been driven directly by changes in temperature or carbon burial/storage - potentially reconciling some of the data-model discrepancies.

  6. Planktic foraminiferal photosymbiont bleaching during the Early Eocene Climatic Optimum (Site 1051, northwestern Atlantic)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luciani, Valeria; D'Onofrio, Roberta; Dickens, Gerald Roy; Wade, Bridget

    2017-04-01

    The symbiotic relationship with algae is a key strategy adopted by many modern species and by early Paleogene shallow-dwelling planktic foraminifera. The endosymbionts play an important role in foraminiferal calcification, longevity and growth, allowing the host to succeed in oligotrophic environment. We have indirect evidence on the presence and loss of algae photosymbionts because symbionts modify the chemistry of the microenvironment where a foraminifer calcifies, resulting in a characteristic geochemical signature between test size and δ13C. We present here the result of a test on loss of algal photosymbiont (bleaching) in planktic foraminifera from the northwest Atlantic Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Site 1051 across the Early Eocene Climatic Optimum (EECO), the interval ( 49-53 Ma) when Earth surface temperatures and probably atmospheric pCO2 reached their Cenozoic maximum. We select this interval because two symbiont-bearing planktic foraminiferal genera Morozovella and Acarinina, that were important calcifiers of the early Paleogene tropical-subtropical oceans, experienced a marked and permanent switch in abundance at the beginning of the EECO, close to the carbon isotope excursion known as J event. Specifically, the relative abundance of Morozovella permanently decreased by at least half, along with a progressive decrease in the number of species. Concomitantly, the genus Acarinina almost doubled its abundance and diversified within the EECO. Many stressors inducing loss of photosymbiosis may have occurred during the long-lasting environmental conditions relating to the EECO extreme warmth, such as high pCO2 and possible decrease of the surface-water pH. The bleaching may therefore represent a potential mechanism to explain the rapid morozovellid decline at the start of the EECO. Our geochemical data from Site 1051 demonstrate that there was indeed a reduction of algal-symbiosis in morozovellids at the EECO beginning. This bleaching event occurred at the

  7. Deep-sea ecosystem response to the Middle Eocene Climate Optimum (MECO) in the North Atlantic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunzel, Dorothea; Schmiedl, Gerhard; Friedrich, Oliver

    2016-04-01

    We investigated the benthic foraminiferal diversity and species composition from North Atlantic IODP Site U1408 in order to document changes in deep-water circulation and organic matter fluxes across the Middle Eocene Climate Optimum (MECO). Site U1408 was drilled at a present water depth of 3022 m southeast of the coast of Newfoundland. The benthic foraminiferal faunas are characterized by generally high species diversity suggesting favorable environmental conditions throughout the studied interval. Among a total of 193 benthic foraminiferal taxa the most dominant genera include Nuttallides, Oridorsalis, Cibicidoides, Pullenia, Anomalinoides, Globocassidulina and Gyroidinoides. Increased abundances of elongate-cylindrical infaunal species suggest approximately 460 ka duration of the MECO (from around 40.19 to 39.73 Ma) and the presence of slightly less ventilated bottom waters and elevated food availability during this time interval. The duration of the MECO also coincides with the presence of the planktonic foraminifer Orbulinoides beckmanni, which therefore is used as an Eocene biostratigraphy marker defining the end of the warm interval with its Last Appearance Datum. Changes in the benthic foraminiferal fauna probably reflect the onset of deep-water formation in the northern North Atlantic Ocean as response to the long-term climatic cooling trend of the middle Eocene. The intensification of deep-water currents and increased influence of cold and well-ventilated deep-water masses is reflected by increased importance of the Nuttallides truempyi-fauna. Superimposed on this long-term faunal trend are changes in the distribution of Globocassidulina subglobosa at a period of approximately 200 ka suggesting an eccentricity forcing of deep-water formation and associated food quality at the sea floor.

  8. The Middle Eocene Climatic Optimum: a multi-proxy record of paleoceanographic changes in the South Atlantic (ODP Site 1263)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boscolo Galazzo, F.; Thomas, E.; Giusberti, L.; Pagani, M.; Luciani, V.

    2012-12-01

    The Middle Eocene Climatic Optimum (MECO) is one of the major and less understood short-term Cenozoic climatic perturbations. The MECO (~40 Ma) interrupted the overall cooling trend of the middle Eocene with a global and transient (~500 Kyr) temperature increase in surface and deep ocean waters (Bohaty et al., 2009). It is recorded globally in pronounced negative δ13C and δ18O values in marine carbonates and coeval shallowing of the CCD (Bohaty et al., 2009). In order to better understand the character of warming, CCD changes, and ecological disruption of this event, we are in the process of producing a high resolution, multi-proxy study on ODP Site 1263 sediments. Site 1263 (South Atlantic, ~2000 m paleodepth) presents a continuous and expanded record of the MECO event. In order to investigate ocean floor paleoenvironmental modifications across the MECO we are developing a record of benthic foraminiferal assemblages in the ≥63 μm size fraction. We will also measure oxygen and carbon stable isotopes on species-specific benthic and planktic foraminifera in order to evaluate difference between surface and deep-water temperature changes, the character of water-column stratification, and potential impacts on export productivity. Organic biomarkers will also be investigated in conjunction with carbonate analyses. TEX86 indices will be applied to evaluate SST patterns and relationships to bulk and foraminiferal δ18O records, higher-plant n-alkanes will be measured to investigate possible links between warming and perturbations of the hydrological cycle. We thus will provide the first integrated, high resolution record of surface and deep-ocean environmental changes and effects on biota across the enigmatic MECO. Bibliography Bohaty et al. (2009). Coupled greenhouse warming and deep-sea acidification in the Middle Eocene. Paleoceanography 24.

  9. Paleobotanical Evidence for Coupling of Temperature and pCO2 during the Early Eocene Climatic Optimum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, R. Y.; Greenwood, D. R.; Basinger, J. F.

    2009-12-01

    The Early Eocene Climatic Optimum (EECO) was the warmest period of the Cenozoic, indicated by multiple proxy mean annual temperature estimates for sea and land surface. However, estimates of pCO2 from geochemical, modeling, and paleontological proxies show a wide range of values, from near modern day levels to an order of magnitude greater. Resolving the pCO2 record for this time period, and correlating it with trends in temperature, is a key task in understanding the interaction of climate and pCO2 in globally warm periods. Here we present a fine scale study of trends in temperature and pCO2 based on paleobotanical data from an early Eocene site from the Okanagan Highlands of British Columbia, Canada. Plant macrofossils were collected using an unbiased census approach from three informal units, allowing for quantitative comparison of trends within the site. Temperature estimates derived from multiple paleobotanical techniques (physiognomic and floristic approaches) suggest microthermal (MAT <13°C) but equable (CMMT >0°C) conditions for this upland site, and show a trend in declining MAT over time reflected in the three units. At the same time, stomatal frequency of Ginkgo suggests that pCO2 was high (>2x modern values), but also declining over time. These results suggest that temperature and pCO2 were coupled during this globally warm period, and that fine scale trends on the order of 103 - 104 years can be tracked within fossil sites to provide a window on climate/pCO2 interactions.

  10. Episodes of intensified biological productivity in the subtropical Atlantic Ocean during the termination of the Middle Eocene Climatic Optimum (MECO)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moebius, Iris; Friedrich, Oliver; Edgar, Kirsty M.; Sexton, Philip F.

    2015-08-01

    The Middle Eocene Climatic Optimum (MECO) is an ~500 kyr interval of pronounced global warming from which the climate system recovered in <50 kyr. The deep-sea sedimentary record can provide valuable insight on the marine ecosystem response to this protracted global warming event and consequently on the ecological changes during this time. Here we present new benthic foraminiferal assemblage data from Ocean Drilling Program Site 1051 in the subtropical North Atlantic, spanning the MECO and post-MECO interval (41.1 to 39.5 Ma). We find little change in the species composition of benthic foraminiferal assemblages during the studied interval, suggesting that the rate of environmental change was gradual enough that these organisms were able to adapt. However, we identify two transient intervals associated with peak warming (higher-productivity interval (HPI)-1; 40.07-39.96 Ma) and shortly after the MECO (HPI-2; 39.68-39.55 Ma), where benthic foraminiferal accumulation rates increase by an order of magnitude. These HPIs at Site 1051 appear to coincide with intervals of strengthened productivity in the Tethys, Southern Ocean, and South Atlantic, and we suggest that an intensified hydrological cycle during the climatic warmth of the MECO was responsible for eutrophication of marine shelf and slope environments.

  11. Did India-Asia plate velocity increase and Neo-Tethys closure contribute to the Early Eocene Climatic Optimum?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoareau, G.; Carry, N.; Marquer, D.; Vrielynck, B.; van Hinsbergen, D. J. J.; Behar, F.; Walter-Simonnet, A.-V.

    2012-04-01

    The 60-50 Ma interval was characterized by a long-term increase of global temperatures (+4 to +6° C), which culminated during the Early Eocene Climatic Optimum (EECO, 53-50 Ma), the warmest interval of the Cenozoic [1]. Geochemical proxies and modelling claim high CO2 atmospheric concentrations prevailing at this time [e.g., 2]. Processes explaining sustained high greenhouse gas concentrations may relate either to volcanic degassing (NAIP, [3]) or to CO2/CH4 release during metamorphism in extensional (NW American Cordillera [4]) or compressional tectonic regimes (India-Asia collision, [5]; Gulf of Alaska, [6]). More recently, it has been suggested that Tethyan closure may have strongly controlled Cretaceous and Eocene climates, through the subduction of large amounts of pelagic carbonates and their recycling as CO2 at arc volcanoes ("subduction factory") [7,8,9]. In order to detail the impact of the Tethys closure on the EECO, we have built a model to calculate the volume of subducted sediments and the amount of CO2 and CH4 emitted at active arc volcanoes along the northern Tethys margin. The model takes into account the sediment thickness, carbonate and organic matter content, the mean subduction velocities of the Indian, Arabian and African plates and the decarbonation efficiency at arc volcanoes. The effect of the India-Asia collision was also modelled using a simple Indian passive margin geometry. Our first results indicate that the mean subduction rate (controlling the volume of subducted sediments) increased from 4.5 cm/yr on late Maastrichtian to a maximum value of 7 cm/yr during the EECO, mainly owing to a dramatic India-Asia plate convergence increase. If a minimal decarbonation efficiency at arc volcanoes of 20% is considered, pelagic carbonate-rich sediments (CaCO3 = 90 wt%) must reach a minimal thickness of 450 m to allow the release of 1018mol/Ma between 60 and 50 Ma, a minimal value to account for Late Paleocene/Early Eocene warming [10]. A

  12. Insights into Ocean Acidification During the Middle Eocene Climatic Optimum from Boron Isotopes at Southern Ocean Site 738

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moebius, I.; Hoenisch, B.; Friedrich, O.

    2015-12-01

    The Middle Eocene Climatic Optimum (MECO) is a ~650-kyr interval of global warming, with a brief ~50 ky long peak warming interval, and an abrupt termination. Deep sea and surface ocean temperature evolution across this interval are fairly well constrained, but thus far we have little understanding of the mechanisms responsible for the gradual warming and rapid recovery. Carbonate mass accumulation rates suggest a shoaling of the carbonate compensation depth, and studies on alkenones indicate increasing atmospheric CO2 levels during the MECO. This suggests an increase in surface ocean CO2, and consequently ocean acidification. However, the severity and timing of the proposed ocean acidification with respect to the onset, peak warming and the termination are currently not well resolved. The boron isotopic composition (δ11B) recorded in planktic foraminifer shells offers an opportunity to infer oceanic pH across this interval. We are working on a boron isotope reconstruction from Southern Ocean IODP site 738 and South Atlantic IODP site 1263, covering 42.0 to 38.5 Ma. These sites are characterized by good carbonate preservation and well-defined age models have been established. Additionally, ecology, nutrient content and bottom-water oxygenation have been shown to change significantly across the event towards a more eutrophic, periodically oxygen-depleted environment supporting different biological communities. We selected the planktic foraminifera species Acarinina spinuloinflata for this study because it is symbiont-bearing, suggesting a near-surface habitat and little vertical migration in the water column, and because of its abundance in the samples. δ11B data will be translated to surface ocean pH and atmospheric pCO2 will be approximated to refine knowledge about the carbon cycle during this time. Parallel analysis of two core sites will help to evaluate the tenacity of the data.

  13. Dextral to sinistral switch in dominant coiling of planktic foraminiferal Morozovella during the Early Eocene Climatic Optimum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luciani, Valeria; D'Onofrio, Roberta; Dickens, Gerald Roy; Wade, Bridget

    2017-04-01

    The coiling direction of trochospiral planktic foraminifera is a widely investigated morphological feature in living species and in upper Quaternary sediment. However, this morphological trait remains scarcely documented in older marine sediment. Here we investigate the coiling direction within Morozovella populations from sections at two ocean drilling sites in the Atlantic that span the Early Eocene Climatic Optimum (EECO; 49-53 Ma). The symbiont-bearing surface-dweller planktic foraminiferal genus Morozovella is of particular interest because of its dominance in tropical-subtropical early Paleogene assemblages, and the time interval is of interest of an abrupt and permanent decline in abundance and taxonomic diversity of Morozovella at the J event, near the beginning of the EECO. Our results demonstrate that morozovellids display a dominant dextral preference during the interval preceding the EECO at both the sites studied. However, all species show a first, prominent flip to sinistral coiling mode starting slightly above the J event. This switch from dextral to sinistral coiling became permanent for most of the Morozovella species slightly after the K/X event. Temporary but significant switches towards sinistral coiled morphotypes also occurred at both sites during several pre-EECO hyperthermal events. We record therefore a remarkable variation in the coiling mode of Morozovella during extreme warming intervals of the early Paleogene. Our record sheds new light on the coiling direction preferences of Paleogene planktic foraminifera. Previous interpretations favour genetic explanations for coiling flips rather than ecological responses. Our present data cannot validate or disprove the former idea, but should stimulate renewed thought on the latter idea.

  14. Clumped Isotopes, trace elements, and δ18O of stromatolites from the Laney Member of the Green River Formation (Eocene): Implications for paleoenvironments during the Eocene Climatic Optimum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corsetti, F. A.; Miller, H. M.; Asangba, A. E.; Johannessen, K. C.; Wang, D. T.; Petryshyn, V. A.; Tripati, A.; Shapiro, R. S.

    2013-12-01

    The Green River Formation, a large lacustrine deposit located across parts of Utah, Colorado, and Wyoming, was deposited during the Eocene Climatic Optimum (~50 Ma), a period of sustained high temperatures and high atmospheric CO2 levels that may provide a geologic analog for future climate scenarios. Large variations in basin hydrology, water chemistry, and paleotemperatures occurring on time scales of tens of thousands of years or longer have been documented in the sedimentary record. Here, we use stromatolites to investigate much finer-scale resolution of paleoenvironmental changes in the Green River Formation and paleo-Lake Gosiute. We studied the lower LaClede Bed, the base of the Laney Member of the Green River Formation, comprised of cyclic layers of oil shale and carbonate. The lower LaClede Bed represents the filling of the lake following an extended period of closure during deposition of the underlying Wilkins Peak Member. To characterize fluctuations in water chemistry and lake level at greater temporal resolution, we conducted micro-stratigraphic and chemostratigraphic analyses on 24 distinct mm-scale laminae in a single 10 cm carbonate stromatolite bed, including δ13C, δ18O, and trace elemental analyses (Mg, Mn, Fe, Si, K, Na, Al, Sr). Sub-cm-scale correlations between petrographic analyses, elemental composition, and carbonate δ13C and δ18O suggest that this stromatolite records both hydrologically-closed and -open periods in the history of Lake Gosiute. During periods of apparent basin closure, we used two models to investigate lake volume change: 1) a Rayleigh distillation model of water evaporation to estimate lake depth variations and 2) a conservative ion model based on Na incorporation into the stromatolites. In both models, lake depth fluctuated by up to 8 m; this represents up to 40km of shoreline change in Lake Gosiute during the deposition of this stromatolite layer. Interestingly, the modern Great Salt Lake experienced similar

  15. New mineralogical and geochemical evidence for the Middle Eocene Climatic Optimum (MECO) in the Neo-Tethys (Central Turkey)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rego, E. S.; Jovane, L.; Giorgioni, M.; Hein, J. R.; Sant'Anna, L. G.; Rodelli, D.; Özcan, E.; Frontalini, F.; Coccioni, R.

    2016-12-01

    The Middle Eocene Climatic Optimum (MECO) is one of several climate warming events that occurred during the Paleogene. It started at 40.5 Ma and produced a global temperature increase over a period of 500 kyr. However, the duration and the d13C signature of this event are not consistent with the models commonly proposed to explain warming events in the Cenozoic, and thus challenge our understanding of carbon cycling and climatic processes. Here we present data of a new section from central Turkey, recording the MECO in the eastern part of the Neo-Tethys. The stratigraphic extent and continuity, as well as the exceptional preservation of various types of microfossils, allow us to obtain a multi-proxy record of unprecedented high resolution for this interval. We integrate data from stable isotopes, X-ray diffraction mineralogy, XRF chemistry, and magnetic properties to obtain a complete paleoclimatic and paleoceanographic reconstruction. Stable isotopes (d13C and d18O) allow us to clearly define the geochemical signature of the MECO. A divergence between the d18O curves of the shallow- and deep-water dwelling planktonic foraminifera after the event suggests a more stratified water column in the Neo-Tethys. Bulk and clay mineralogy reveal changing weathering conditions on land. Higher amounts of chlorite and illite (physical weathering) occur prior and after the event, while the MECO interval displays greater amounts of illite and smectite (chemical weathering). Additionally, the inverse relationship between detrital minerals and calcite suggests that carbonate productivity might have suffered at that time, or an increase in detrital input could have diluted the carbonate fraction. An increase in ARM and magnetic particle grain size also suggests an increase in productivity or preservation of biogenic magnetite. Our results confirm the global nature of the MECO, affecting both oceans and continents. However, different from other events, warming conditions were not

  16. Bottom water changes in the subtropical North Atlantic and the Southern Ocean associated to the Middle Eocene Climatic Optimum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moebius, I.; Friedrich, O.; Edgar, K. M.; Scher, H. D.; Sexton, P.

    2013-12-01

    The Middle Eocene Climatic Optimum (MECO) is a ~650 kyr interval of pronounced global warmth from which the climate system recovered in less than 50 kyr. Despite the valuable insights that the deep-sea sedimentary record could provide on the benthic ecosystem response to this protracted global warming event, and the mechanisms responsible for its relatively rapid recovery, we have little understanding of either. Here we present new data on bottom-water characteristics from ODP Sites 1051 (subtropical North Atlantic) and 738 (Southern Ocean), spanning the MECO and post-MECO interval (41.1 to 39.5 Ma). At Site 1051 we used benthic foraminiferal assemblages and benthic foraminifera accumulation rates (BFAR). We find little change in the species composition, but we identify two transient intervals of BFARs increasing by one order of magnitude associated with peak warming: High Productivity Intervals HPI-1 (40.07 - 39.98 Ma) and HPI-2 (39.70 - 39.62 Ma). We correlate these HPIs to intervals of increased organic carbon burial found in the Tethys and suggest that they represent periods of strengthened productivity in the subtropical North Atlantic and the Tethys. At Southern Ocean Site 738 we used benthic foraminiferal assemblages in combination with Cerium-anomaly data. In contrast to Site 1051, we notice a turnover of the benthic foraminiferal communities during the MECO (40.60 and 39.95 Ma) towards an assemblage dominated by infaunal taxa indicative of eutrophication. Additionally, we observe a drop in benthic foraminiferal abundances during the peak warming (40.10 - 39.97 Ma), synchronous to a low Cerium-anomaly and small excursion in ɛNd values. This indicates a decrease in bottom-water oxygenation during MECO peak warming, potentially caused by the transient influence of an older, oxygen-depleted water mass. Overall, our data suggest that the extent and rate of environmental change associated with the MECO vary greatly in different ocean basins and that the

  17. Characterizing the Response of Fluvial Systems to Extreme Global Warming During the Early Eocene Climatic Optimum: An Analysis of the Wasatch and Green River Formations, Uinta Basin, UT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, E. R.; Plink-Bjorklund, P.

    2013-12-01

    The Wasatch and Green River Formations in the Uinta Basin, UT contain fluvial sandstones that record changes in terrestrial sedimentation coincident with Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM) and at least six post-PETM hyperthermal climate change events. While proxies for chemical weathering rates during the PETM have been developed using the marine osmium isotope record, to date there has been little research on chemical weathering rates in proximal terrestrial depocenters. This work is one part of a multi-proxy research effort combining quantitative petrographic analysis, the stable carbon isotope record, and a high-resolution stratigraphic and sedimentologic framework across the southern margin of the Uinta Basin. Relative tectonic quiescence in the Uinta Basin during the Early Eocene suggests that climate is the forcing mechanism controlling fluvial architecture and composition, and gradual basin subsidence has preserved at least six pulses of greenhouse climate change during the Early Eocene Climatic Optimum (EECO). Terrestrial records of PETM climate do not support a humid climate with increased precipitation as previously suggested from marine proxies of climate change. Instead, terrestrial records of the PETM climate show evidence of prolonged drought punctuated by intense terrestrial flooding events in mid-latitude continental interiors. Increases in chemical weathering rates during the PETM due to increased temperature and average precipitation is cited as a key carbon sink to initiate a recovery phase where atmospheric CO2 returned to normal concentrations. If terrestrial records of chemical weathering rates differ substantially from marine proxies the carbon-cycle dynamics active during the EECO must be reconsidered. Initial results of this study show that these peak hyperthermal climate change conditions in the Uinta Basin preserve more compositionally and texturally immature sediments due to extremely high erosion and deposition rates, and subdued

  18. The onset of the Early Eocene Climatic Optimum, including the K/X event, at Branch Stream, Clarence Valley, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slotnick, B. S.; Dickens, G. R.; Hollis, C. J.; Crampton, J. S.; Strong, P.; Dallanave, E.; Philips, A.

    2014-12-01

    The Early Eocene Climatic Optimum (EECO), lasting from ~53-50 Ma, has been characterized as the warmest sustained interval through the Cenozoic. It was comprised of a broad temperature maximum with elevated atmospheric pCO2, noticeable shifts in carbon cycling, and a variety of faunal and floral changes. This included one, and likely additional, brief (<200 kyr) intervals of extreme warming, the K/X event. At least for the most prominent events, the long-term drop in δ13C and short-term Carbon Isotope Excursions (CIEs) have been coupled to massive fluxes of 13C-depleted carbon into the exogenic system and global climate change. However, much about EECO remains unknown because of a lack of detailed and coupled proxy records; we are currently generating useful records to better characterize lithological and geochemical signatures of EECO. Here, we help rectify this problem by presenting a new lithologic and carbon isotopic record for a ~84-m-thick section of early Eocene upper slope calcareous-rich sediments, now lithified and exposed along Branch Stream, New Zealand. Comparison of new carbon isotopic and lithologic records of this greatly expanded section to nearby Mead Stream identifies multiple negative CIEs in short succession and generally more marl during lowermost EECO (~53.3-51.7 Ma), with the most prominent of these equating to the K/X event. The early Eocene lithologic and δ13C records at Branch and Mead Streams are remarkably similar to each other, with the following distinctions: sequences at Branch Stream are thicker and generally have a wider range of δ13C across CIEs. Both expanded sections are marked by terrigenous dilution, best explained by enhanced seasonal precipitation, elevated greenhouse-gas concentrations, and likely global warming. These data indicate lowermost EECO can be described as a time with a general δ13C low superimposed by a series of short-term climate perturbations.

  19. The palaeoclimatic significance of Eurasian Giant Salamanders (Cryptobranchidae: Zaissanurus, Andrias) - indications for elevated humidity in Central Asia during global warm periods (Eocene, late Oligocene warming, Miocene Climate Optimum)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasilyan, Davit; Böhme, Madelaine; Winklhofer, Michael

    2010-05-01

    Cryptobranchids represent a group of large sized (up to 1.8 m) tailed amphibians known since the Middle Jurassic (Gao & Shubin 2003). Two species are living today in eastern Eurasia: Andrias davidianus (China) and A. japonicus (Japan). Cenozoic Eurasian fossil giant salamanders are known with two genera and two or three species from over 30 localities, ranging from the Late Eocene to the Early Pliocene (Böhme & Ilg 2003). The Late Eocene species Zaissanurus beliajevae is restricted to the Central Asian Zaissan Basin (SE-Kazakhstan, 50°N, 85°E), whereas the Late Oligocene to Early Pliocene species Andrias scheuchzeri is distributed from Central Europe to the Zaissan Basin. In the latter basin the species occur during two periods; the latest Oligocene and the late Early to early Middle Miocene (Chkhikvadse 1982). Andrias scheuchzeri is osteological indistinguishable from both recent species, indicating a similar ecology (Westfahl 1958). To investigate the palaeoclimatic significance of giant salamanders we analyzed the climate within the present-day distribution area and at selected fossil localities with independent palaeoclimate record. Our results indicate that fossil and recent Andrias species occur in humid areas where the mean annual precipitation reach over 900 mm (900 - 1.300 mm). As a working hypothesis (assuming a similar ecology of Andrias and Zaissanurus) we interpret occurrences of both fossil Eurasian giant salamanders as indicative for humid palaeoclimatic conditions. Based on this assumption the Late Eocene, the latest Oligocene (late Oligocene warming) and the late Early to early Middle Miocene (Miocene Climatic Optimum) of Central Asia (Zaissan Basin) are periods of elevated humidity, suggesting a direct (positive) relationship between global climate and Central Asian humidity evolution. Böhme M., Ilg A. 2003: fosFARbase, www.wahre-staerke.com/ Chkhikvadze V.M. 1982. On the finding of fossil Cryptobranchidae in the USSR and Mongolia. Vertebrata

  20. Temperature-Metabolism Linkage and the Effects on Marine Biota: Evidence Across the Middle Eocene Climatic Optimum in the South-East Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boscolo Galazzo, F.; Thomas, E.; Pagani, M.; Warren, C.; Luciani, V.; Giusberti, L.

    2014-12-01

    The Middle Eocene Climatic Optimum (MECO; ~40 Ma) stands out as a middle-term (~500 kyr) interval of warming, interrupting the long-term cooling starting in the latest early Eocene.To characterize oceanographic and biotic changes related to the MECO, we performed a multiproxy investigation at Site 1263 (Walvis Ridge; 28°31.98'S, 02°46.77'E, 2 Km paleodepth), which has a continuous record, not affected by carbonate dissolution. We coupled surface to bottom oxygen and carbon stable isotopes, TEX86, and biotic records from biomarker and micropaleontological analysis to first document both MECO climate change and its effects in an open ocean, SE Atlantic setting. Benthic foraminiferal, coarse fraction and fine fraction accumulation rates were used as proxies for benthic, planktic foraminiferal and nannoplankton productivity, and the abundance of crenarchaeol, biomarker of widespread archaeal nitrifiers, to infer ammonia utilization rates. Our records show an uniform, surface-to-deep warming during MECO at mid southern latitudes. In parallel, benthic and planktic foraminiferal productivity decreased markedly, whereas rates of ammonia consumption increased, while primary productivity and water column stratification appear unchanged. We ascribe these biotic changes to MECO warming, due to the temperature-dependency of metabolic rates, particularly of heterotrophic respirators (e.g., O'Connor et al., 2009). Increased oceanic temperature would have altered pelagic food webs, increasing heterotrophs metabolic rates, thus food needs. Therefore planktic foraminiferal populations declined, and organic matter remineralization in the water-column, i.e., ammonia production, increased. The carbon flux to the sea-floor decreased, starving benthic foraminifera. A decrease in organic carbon export and burial, if widespread in oligotrophic open-ocean areas, would have been important to sustain pCO2rise during the early phase of MECO. References: O'Connor et al., 2009. PLoSBiol, doi

  1. The record of Tethyan planktonic foraminifera at the early Paleogene hyperthermal events and Middle Eocene Climatic Optimum in northeastern Italy: are they comparable?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luciani, Valeria; Giusberti, Luca; Agnini, Claudia; Fornaciari, Eliana; Rio, Domenico

    2010-05-01

    The early Paleogene is one of the more climatically and evolutionary dynamic periods in the Earth history that records a pronounced warming trend peaking in the Early Eocene, and a successive composite transition towards the modern icehouse world. Ever increasingly scientific attention is dedicated to definitely comprehend timing, nature and characters of the complex, non-linear evolution of the Paleogene climate. Several complete and expanded Paleogene successions (Forada, Possagno, Alano, Farra), with a sound magneto-biochronostratigraphic and stable isotope record crop out in the Venetian Southern Alps (Northeast Italy). Recent studies (Giusberti et. al., 2007; Luciani et al., 2007; Agnini et al., 2008) and unpublished data document the presence in these section of the main short-lived warming events (hyperthermals) of the Eocene (Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum, PETM, ca 55 Ma, Eocene Layer of Mysterious Origin (ELMO, ca 53,6 Ma), X-event (ca 52.5 Ma), of the Early Eocene Climatic Optimum (EECO, ca 50-52 Ma) and of the Middle Eocene Climatic Optimum (MECO, ca 40 Ma; Zachos et al., 2001. 2008). All these events are typified by marked negative shifts in δ13C curves that correspond to carbonate decrease related to rise of the carbonate compensation depth in turn induced by large introduction in the ocean-atmosphere system of CO2. Common features to the warming events are pronounced and complex changes in planktonic foraminiferal assemblages, indicating strong environmental perturbations that perfectly parallel the variations of the stable isotope curves in all the examined events. These strict correspondences indicate close cause-effect relationships between changes in environmental conditions and modifications of the assemblages. Our analysis shows that the most striking variations are recorded by the PETM and MECO assemblages that reflect highly perturbed environments. The ELMO, X-event and EECO exhibit planktic foraminiferal responses that are similar to

  2. The middle Eocene climatic optimum (MECO): A multiproxy record of paleoceanographic changes in the southeast Atlantic (ODP Site 1263, Walvis Ridge)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boscolo Galazzo, F.; Thomas, E.; Pagani, M.; Warren, C.; Luciani, V.; Giusberti, L.

    2014-12-01

    The middle Eocene climatic optimum (MECO, ~40 Ma) was a transient period of global warming that interrupted the secular Cenozoic cooling trend. We investigated the paleoceanographic, paleoenvironmental, and paleoecological repercussions of the MECO in the southeast Atlantic subtropical gyre (Ocean Drilling Program Site 1263). TEX86 and δ18O records support an ~4°C increase in surface and deepwater temperatures during the MECO. There is no long-term negative carbon isotope excursion (CIE) associated with the early warming, consistent with other sites, and there is no short-term negative CIE (~50 kyr) during the peak of the MECO, in contrast to what has been observed at some sites. This lack of a CIE during the peak of the MECO at Site 1263 could be due to poor sediment recovery or geographic heterogeneity of the δ13C signal. Benthic and planktic foraminiferal mass accumulation rates markedly declined during MECO, indicating a reduction of planktic foraminiferal production and export productivity. Vertical δ13C gradients do not indicate major changes in water column stratification, and there is no biomarker or micropaleontological evidence that hypoxia developed. We suggest that temperature dependency of metabolic rates could explain the observed decrease in foraminiferal productivity during warming. The kinetics of biochemical reactions increase with temperature, more so for heterotrophs than for autotrophs. Steady warming during MECO may have enhanced heterotroph (i.e., foraminiferal) metabolic rates, so that they required more nutrients. These additional nutrients were not available because of the oligotrophic conditions in the region and the lesser response of primary producers to warming. The combination of warming and heterotroph starvation altered pelagic food webs, increased water column recycling of organic carbon, and decreased the amount of organic carbon available to the benthos.

  3. Changes in calcareous nannofossil assemblages during the Middle Eocene Climatic Optimum in the central-western Tethys (Alano section, NE Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toffanin, Federica; Agnini, Claudia; Fornaciari, Eliana; Rio, Domenico; Giusberti, Luca; Luciani, Valeria; Spofforth, David J. A.; Palike, Heiko

    2010-05-01

    This study is focused on an oxygen and carbon isotope perturbation referred to as Middle Eocene Climatic Optimum. This event occurred at Chron C18r-C18n transition (ca. 40 Ma) lasting some 400-600 kyr and is interpreted as a significant temporary reversal in the middle-late Eocene long-term cooling trend (Bohaty and Zachos, 2003, Bohaty et al., 2009, Jovane et al., 2007, Sexton et al. 2006, Wade and Kroon, 2002). Our main goal is the shaping of the calcareous nannofossil assemblage before, during and after this transient episode of global warming. In fact, there is a general consensus that some nannofossil taxa are characterized by specific paleoecological affinities and thus would be utilized for palenviromental reconstructions. A high resolution sampling for micropaleontological analysis has been performed in Alano on-land section, located in NE Italy (Agnini et al., in press). Semi-quantitative and quantitative analyses on calcareous nannofossil assemblages have been carried out. Preliminary data show that the MECO interval seems to coincide with a significant shift in the relative abundance of calcareous nannofossil taxa, suggesting an intriguing relationship between biotic and abiotic signal (Spofforth et al., in press, Luciani et al, submitted). In particular, eutrophic/cold taxa, as for instance the reticulofenestrids, Cyclicargolithus and Coccolithus, increase in abundance during this warming phase, whereas oligotrophic/warm taxa, Sphenolithus and Zyghrablithus, decrease significantly showing peculiar anticovariant trends with respect to meso-eutrophic taxa. A marked increase in reworked, mainly Cretaceous, specimens is also observed during the MECO. The increase in eutrophic/cold taxa coupled with the decrease of oligotrophic/warm taxa is consistent with a transient enrichment in dissolved nutrients in warmer sea surface waters and suggests that enhanced nutrient availability could drive the make-up of the calcareous nannofossil assemblage. The increase in

  4. Mammalian faunal response to the Early Eocene Climatic Optimum (~53.5-48.5 mya) and a new terrestrial record of the associated carbon isotope excursion from Raven Ridge in the Uinta Basin, Colorado-Utah

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutchak, A. R.

    2010-12-01

    Raven Ridge straddles the Colorado-Utah border on the northeastern edge of the Uinta Basin and consists of intertonguing units of the fluvial Colton and lacustrine Green River Formations. Fossil vertebrate localities along the ridge have produced a diverse mammalian fauna comprising 64 genera in 34 families. Included are the index taxa Smilodectes, Omomys, Heptodon, and Lambdotherium which suggest an age range of mid-Wasatchian (Wa5, ~53.5mya) through mid Bridgerian (Br2, ~48.5mya) for the Raven Ridge fauna. Others have shown that this time interval coincides with the onset, peak, and decline of the Early Eocene Climatic Optimum (EECO), an extended interval of globally warm temperatures following the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM) that is coincident with a large negative carbon excursion. The Raven Ridge fauna provides an excellent opportunity to investigate the effects of a lengthy interval of global warmth on mammalian diversity and ecosystem structure. To study changes in the mammalian fauna that occurred during the EECO, it was necessary to constrain the onset, peak, and decline of the EECO at Raven Ridge through chemostratigraphic correlation with established marine isotope curves. This was accomplished by analysis of approximately 300 sediment samples for Total Organic Carbon (TOC) content. TOC has been used successfully in the Bighorn Basin to identify the stratigraphic occurrence of the Carbon Isotope Excursion (CIE) associated with the PETM, which has roughly the same amplitude as the negative excursion associated with the EECO. The Raven Ridge TOC data show a large negative carbon excursion that starts during the Wa6 biochron, peaks during the Wa7 biochron, and is followed by a positive excursion near the Wa-Br boundary. This terrestrial δ13C pattern is consistent with results seen in established marine isotope curves across the EECO interval. The minimum δ13C value of the negative excursion is -29.67‰, which is comparable to the Bighorn CIE

  5. Possible role of oceanic heat transport in early Eocene climate.

    PubMed

    Sloan, L C; Walker, J C; Moore, T C

    1995-04-01

    Increased oceanic heat transport has often been cited as a means of maintaining warm high-latitude surface temperatures in many intervals of the geologic past, including the early Eocene. Although the excess amount of oceanic heat transport required by warm high latitude sea surface temperatures can be calculated empirically, determining how additional oceanic heat transport would take place has yet to be accomplished. That the mechanisms of enhanced poleward oceanic heat transport remain undefined in paleoclimate reconstructions is an important point that is often overlooked. Using early Eocene climate as an example, we consider various ways to produce enhanced poleward heat transport and latitudinal energy redistribution of the sign and magnitude required by interpreted early Eocene conditions. Our interpolation of early Eocene paleotemperature data indicate that an approximately 30% increase in poleward heat transport would be required to maintain Eocene high-latitude temperatures. This increased heat transport appears difficult to accomplish by any means of ocean circulation if we use present ocean circulation characteristics to evaluate early Eocene rates. Either oceanic processes were very different from those of the present to produce the early Eocene climate conditions or oceanic heat transport was not the primary cause of that climate. We believe that atmospheric processes, with contributions from other factors, such as clouds, were the most likely primary cause of early Eocene climate.

  6. Possible role of oceanic heat transport in early Eocene climate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sloan, L. C.; Walker, J. C.; Moore, T. C. Jr

    1995-01-01

    Increased oceanic heat transport has often been cited as a means of maintaining warm high-latitude surface temperatures in many intervals of the geologic past, including the early Eocene. Although the excess amount of oceanic heat transport required by warm high latitude sea surface temperatures can be calculated empirically, determining how additional oceanic heat transport would take place has yet to be accomplished. That the mechanisms of enhanced poleward oceanic heat transport remain undefined in paleoclimate reconstructions is an important point that is often overlooked. Using early Eocene climate as an example, we consider various ways to produce enhanced poleward heat transport and latitudinal energy redistribution of the sign and magnitude required by interpreted early Eocene conditions. Our interpolation of early Eocene paleotemperature data indicate that an approximately 30% increase in poleward heat transport would be required to maintain Eocene high-latitude temperatures. This increased heat transport appears difficult to accomplish by any means of ocean circulation if we use present ocean circulation characteristics to evaluate early Eocene rates. Either oceanic processes were very different from those of the present to produce the early Eocene climate conditions or oceanic heat transport was not the primary cause of that climate. We believe that atmospheric processes, with contributions from other factors, such as clouds, were the most likely primary cause of early Eocene climate.

  7. Possible role of oceanic heat transport in Early Eocene climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sloan, L. Cirbus; Walker, James C. G.; Moore, T. C.

    1995-04-01

    Increased oceanic heat transport has often been cited as a means of maintaining warm high-latitude surface temperatures in many intervals of the geologic past, including the early Eocene. Although the excess amount of oceanic heat transport required by warm high latitude sea surface temperatures can be calculated empirically, determining how additional oceanic heat transport would take place has yet to be accomplished. That the mechanisms of enhanced poleward oceanic heat transport remain undefined in paleoclimate reconstructions is an important point that is often overlooked. Using early Eocene climate as an example, we consider various ways to produce enhanced poleward heat transport and latitudinal energy redistribution of the sign and magnitude required by interpreted early Eocene conditions. Our interpolation of early Eocene paleotemperature data indicate that an ˜30% increase in poleward heat transport would be required to maintain Eocene high-latitude temperatures. This increased heat transport appears difficult to accomplish by any means of ocean circulation if we use present ocean circulation characteristics to evaluate early Eocene rates. Either oceanic processes were very different from those of the present to produce the early Eocene climate conditions or oceanic heat transport was not the primary cause of that climate. We believe that atmospheric processes, with contributions from other factors, such as clouds, were the most likely primary cause of early Eocene climate.

  8. Warm Eocene climate enhanced petroleum generation from Cretaceous source rocks: A potential climate feedback mechanism?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroeger, K. F.; Funnell, R. H.

    2012-02-01

    Earth surface temperatures, including in the deep sea increased by 5-10°C from the late Paleocene ca. 58 Myr ago to the Early Eocene Climatic Optimum (EECO) centered at about 51 Myr ago. A large (˜2.5‰) drop in δ13C of carbonate spans much of this interval. This suggests a long-term increase in the net flux of 13C-depleted carbon to the ocean and atmosphere that is difficult to explain by changes in surficial carbon cycling alone. We reveal a relationship between surface temperature increase and increased petroleum generation in sedimentary basins operating on 100 kyr to Myr time scales. We propose that early Eocene warming has led to a synchronization of periods of maximum petroleum generation and enhanced generation in otherwise unproductive basins through extension of the volume of source rock within the oil and gas window across hundreds of sedimentary basins globally. Modelling the thermal evolution of four sedimentary basins in the southwest Pacific predicted an up to 50% increase in petroleum generation that would have significantly increased leakage of light hydrocarbons and oil degeneration products into the atmosphere. Extrapolating our modelling results to hundreds of sedimentary basins worldwide suggests that globally increased leakage could have caused a climate feedback effect, driving or enhancing early Eocene climate warming.

  9. Early Eocene climate warming increased petroleum production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balcerak, Ernie

    2012-04-01

    From the late Paleocene, about 58 million years ago, to the early Eocene, about 51 million years ago, Earth's surface temperatures warmed by about 5°-10°C. Also in the early Eocene, there was an increase of carbon-13-depleted carbon in the oceans that cannot be accounted for by changes in carbon cycling at the surface. To better understand the source of that carbon, Kroeger and Funnell modeled the thermal evolution of four sedimentary basins in the southwestern Pacific Ocean. The authors show that the rising surface temperatures of the early Eocene eventually led to warming of the sedimentary beds deep beneath the surface. Petroleum can be produced at only a certain range of temperatures; rising temperatures at greater depths would bring more potential source rocks into temperature conditions under which oil and gas can be produced and released.

  10. Climate Sensitivity to Vegetation Distribution in the Early Eocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clifthorne, S. J.; Shellito, C. J.; Sloan, L. C.

    2004-12-01

    There are large uncertainties associated with the reconstructions of global vegetation distributions for past time periods in Earth history. In order to investigate the influence of the global distribution of vegetation on modeled early Eocene climate, we carried out two experiments with the National Center for Atmospheric Research Community Atmosphere Model (v.2.0.2.). Both experiments used an atmospheric CO2 level of 560 ppm and sea surface temperatures generated in a previous Eocene modeling study (Huber and Sloan, 2001). The experiments differed only in their prescribed vegetation distributions. The first experiment used output from an Eocene study with a dynamic global vegetation model (DGVM) (Shellito and Sloan, in preparation), while the second case used a vegetation scheme based on fossil flora (Sewall et al., 2000). In creating the Sewall et al. (2000) vegetation scheme, no specific atmospheric CO2 level was specified, whereas the DGVM in the study by Shellito and Sloan (in preparation) allowed the initial vegetation to reach equilibrium with a pCO2 level of 560 ppm. Two additional experiments were run with higher atmospheric CO2 concentrations of 1120 ppm; one used output from an Eocene DGVM study with a pCO2 of 1120 ppm (Shellito and Sloan, in preparation), while the second case used the Sewall et al. (2000) vegetation. Comparison of early Eocene climates resulting from each pair of pCO2 experiments allows us to assess the influence of prescribed vegetation upon climate. By evaluating these results at two different levels of atmospheric CO2, we can investigate the combined effects of pCO2 and vegetation upon the resulting early Eocene climate.

  11. Eocene precipitation: How wet do greenhouse climates get? (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenwood, D. R.; Smith, R. Y.

    2010-12-01

    The Eocene was the warmest part of the Cenozoic due to CO2 being at 2x - 4x Holocene levels, with warm climates extending across North America into the Arctic. Substantive paleobotanical evidence for this greenhouse time shows the existence of extensive broadleaf and coniferous polar forests - a circumpolar rain forest. Similarly, Australia in the Eocene - while 25° south of its present position - was a well-forested and humid continent, in contrast to today where 2/3 of the continent is arid or semi-arid and lacks forest. Both of these regions reflect past climate states - mesothermal moist climates with low thermal seasonality at high latitudes - that have no analog in the modern world; undiscovered earth climates. Paleontological temperature proxies provide a basis for understanding early Paleogene climates; however, there is a lack of corresponding proxy data on precipitation. Paleobotanical proxies offer 2 methods for estimated paleo-precipitation; leaf physiognomy (including leaf area analysis), and quantitative analysis of nearest living relatives (‘NLRs’) of macrofloras. Presented here is an exploration of this former greenhouse world, through analyses of macrofloras from mid-latitude North America and the Canadian Arctic, as well as from Australia. Analysis of the Canadian Arctic floras indicate upper microthermal to lower mesothermal moist climates (MAT ~13-15 °C, CMMT ~4 °C, MAP >100cm/a) in the early and middle Eocene. Leaf-area analysis of Paleocene and Eocene Arctic floras demonstrates precipitation for the Paleogene western and eastern Arctic estimated as >100 cm/yr. Sites from the Okanagan Highlands early Eocene lake macrofloras of British Columbia and northern Washington indicate comparable conditions in the early Eocene to those reconstructed for the Arctic in the middle Eocene, with MAP ~100cm/a for most sites along a 1000km North-South transect from Republic in Washington State to Driftwood Canyon near Smithers in northern British

  12. Early Eocene's climate and ocean circulation from coupled model simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, Tobias; Thomas, Maik

    2014-05-01

    While proxy data provide a snapshot of climate conditions at a specific location, coupled atmosphere-ocean models are able to expand this knowledge over the globe. Therefore, they are indispensable tools for understanding past climate conditions. We model the dynamical state of atmosphere and ocean during the Early Eocene and pre-industrial times, using the coupled atmosphere-ocean model ECHAM5/MPIOM with realistic reconstructions of vegetation and CO2. The resulting simulated climate variables are compared to terrestrial and oceanic proxies. The Early Eocene climate is in the global mean warmer (~13°C) and wetter (~1 mm/d) than in pre-industrial times. Especially temperatures in the Southern Ocean, the Greenland Sea and Arctic Ocean raise by up to 25K, being in accordance with surface temperature estimates from terrestrial and marine proxy data. The oceans are hereby rendered ice-free, leading to a decrease of polar albedo and thereby facilitating polar warming. This leads to a by 5K diminished equator-to-pole temperature gradient. Warmer temperatures as well as changed bathymetry have an effect on ocean dynamics in the Early Eocene. Although deep-water formation can be found in the Greenland Sea, Weddell Sea, and Tethys Sea, it is weaker than in the pre-industrial run and the resulting circulation is shallower. This is not only visible in water transport through sea gates but also in the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC), adopting its maximum at 700m depths in the Early Eocene, while maximum transport is reached in the pre-industrial control run at 1200m. Albeit a shallow and weak thermohaline circulation, a global ocean conveyor belt is being triggered, causing a transport from the areas of subduction through the Atlantic and Southern Oceans into the Indian and Pacific Oceans.

  13. Wet tropical climate in SE Tibet during the Late Eocene.

    PubMed

    Sorrel, Philippe; Eymard, Ines; Leloup, Philippe-Herve; Maheo, Gweltaz; Olivier, Nicolas; Sterb, Mary; Gourbet, Loraine; Wang, Guocan; Jing, Wu; Lu, Haijian; Li, Haibing; Yadong, Xu; Zhang, Kexin; Cao, Kai; Chevalier, Marie-Luce; Replumaz, Anne

    2017-08-10

    Cenozoic climate cooling at the advent of the Eocene-Oligocene transition (EOT), ~33.7 Ma ago, was stamped in the ocean by a series of climatic events albeit the impact of this global climatic transition on terrestrial environments is still fragmentary. Yet archival constraints on Late Eocene atmospheric circulation are scarce in (tropical) monsoonal Asia, and the paucity of terrestrial records hampers a meaningful comparison of the long-term climatic trends between oceanic and continental realms. Here we report new sedimentological data from the Jianchuan basin (SE Tibet) arguing for wetter climatic conditions in monsoonal Asia at ~35.5 Ma almost coevally to the aridification recognized northwards in the Xining basin. We show that the occurrence of flash-flood events in semi-arid to sub-humid palustrine-sublacustrine settings preceded the development of coal-bearing deposits in swampy-like environments, thus paving the way to a more humid climate in SE Tibet ahead from the EOT. We suggest that this moisture redistribution possibly reflects more northern and intensified ITCZ-induced tropical rainfall in monsoonal Asia around 35.5 Ma, in accordance with recent sea-surface temperature reconstructions from equatorial oceanic records. Our findings thus highlight an important period of climatic upheaval in terrestrial Asian environments ~2-4 millions years prior to the EOT.

  14. Antarctic climate, Southern Ocean circulation patterns, and deep water formation during the Eocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huck, Claire E.; van de Flierdt, Tina; Bohaty, Steven M.; Hammond, Samantha J.

    2017-07-01

    We assess early-to-middle Eocene seawater neodymium (Nd) isotope records from seven Southern Ocean deep-sea drill sites to evaluate the role of Southern Ocean circulation in long-term Cenozoic climate change. Our study sites are strategically located on either side of the Tasman Gateway and are positioned at a range of shallow (<500 m) to intermediate/deep ( 1000-2500 m) paleowater depths. Unradiogenic seawater Nd isotopic compositions, reconstructed from fish teeth at intermediate/deep Indian Ocean pelagic sites (Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Sites 738 and 757 and Deep Sea Drilling Project (DSDP) Site 264), indicate a dominant Southern Ocean-sourced contribution to regional deep waters (ɛNd(t) = -9.3 ± 1.5). IODP Site U1356 off the coast of Adélie Land, a locus of modern-day Antarctic Bottom Water production, is identified as a site of persistent deep water formation from the early Eocene to the Oligocene. East of the Tasman Gateway an additional local source of intermediate/deep water formation is inferred at ODP Site 277 in the SW Pacific Ocean (ɛNd(t) = -8.7 ± 1.5). Antarctic-proximal shelf sites (ODP Site 1171 and Site U1356) reveal a pronounced erosional event between 49 and 48 Ma, manifested by 2 ɛNd unit negative excursions in seawater chemistry toward the composition of bulk sediments at these sites. This erosional event coincides with the termination of peak global warmth following the Early Eocene Climatic Optimum and is associated with documented cooling across the study region and increased export of Antarctic deep waters, highlighting the complexity and importance of Southern Ocean circulation in the greenhouse climate of the Eocene.

  15. Radiative forcing by forest and subsequent feedbacks in the early Eocene climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Port, U.; Claussen, M.; Brovkin, V.

    2015-03-01

    Using the Max Planck Institute for Meteorology Earth System Model, we investigate the forcing of forests and the feedback triggered by forests in the pre-industrial climate and in the early Eocene climate (about 54 to 52 million years ago). Other than the interglacial, pre-industrial climate, the early Eocene climate was characterised by high temperatures which led to almost ice-free poles. We compare simulations in which all continents are covered either by dense forest or by bare soil. To isolate the effect of soil albedo, we choose either bright soils or dark soils, respectively. Considering bright soil, forests warm in both, the early Eocene climate and the current climate, but the warming differs due to differences in climate feedbacks. The lapse-rate and water-vapour feedback is stronger in early Eocene climate than in current climate, but strong and negative cloud feedbacks and cloud masking in the early Eocene climate outweigh the stronger positive lapse-rate and water-vapour feedback. In the sum, global mean warming is weaker in the early Eocene climate. Sea-ice related feedbacks are weak in the almost ice-free climate of the early Eocene leading to a weak polar amplification. Considering dark soil, our results change. Forests cools stronger in the early Eocene climate than in the current climate because the lapse-rate and water-vapour feedback is stronger in the early Eocene climate while cloud feedbacks and cloud masking are equally strong in both climates. The different temperature change by forest in both climates highlights the state-dependency of vegetation's impact on climate.

  16. Eocene Arctic Ocean and earth's Early Cenozoic climate

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, D.L.

    1985-01-01

    Seasonal changes of the Arctic Ocean are an approximate microcosm of the present advanced interglacial climate of the Earth. A similar relationship has existed for several million years but was the Early Cenozoic Arctic Ocean an analog of Earth's climate, as well. Absence of polar ice during the Cretaceous is relatively well established. During the Cenozoic a worldwide decrease in mean annual ocean temperature resulted from such factors as altered oceanic circulation and lower atmospheric CO/sub 2/ levels. Limited Arctic Ocean data for the middle or late Eocene indicate the presence of upwelling conditions and accompanying high productivity of diatoms, ebridians, silicoflagellates and archaeomonads. During this interval, some seasonality is suggested from the varve-like nature of a single sediment core. However, the absence of drop stones or any ice-rafted sediment supports the idea of an open water, ice-free central Arctic Ocean during this time. Latest Cretaceous Arctic Ocean sediment is interpreted to represent approximately the same conditions as those suggested for the Eocene and together with that data suggest that the central Arctic Ocean was ice-free during part if not all of the first 20 my of the Cenozoic. Sediment representing the succeeding 30 my has not been recovered but by latest Miocene or earl Pliocene, ice-rafted sediment was accumulating, both pack ice and icebergs covered the Arctic Ocean reflecting cyclic glacial climate.

  17. The Early Eocene equable climate problem: can perturbations of climate model parameters identify possible solutions?

    PubMed

    Sagoo, Navjit; Valdes, Paul; Flecker, Rachel; Gregoire, Lauren J

    2013-10-28

    Geological data for the Early Eocene (56-47.8 Ma) indicate extensive global warming, with very warm temperatures at both poles. However, despite numerous attempts to simulate this warmth, there are remarkable data-model differences in the prediction of these polar surface temperatures, resulting in the so-called 'equable climate problem'. In this paper, for the first time an ensemble with a perturbed climate-sensitive model parameters approach has been applied to modelling the Early Eocene climate. We performed more than 100 simulations with perturbed physics parameters, and identified two simulations that have an optimal fit with the proxy data. We have simulated the warmth of the Early Eocene at 560 ppmv CO2, which is a much lower CO2 level than many other models. We investigate the changes in atmospheric circulation, cloud properties and ocean circulation that are common to these simulations and how they differ from the remaining simulations in order to understand what mechanisms contribute to the polar warming. The parameter set from one of the optimal Early Eocene simulations also produces a favourable fit for the last glacial maximum boundary climate and outperforms the control parameter set for the present day. Although this does not 'prove' that this model is correct, it is very encouraging that there is a parameter set that creates a climate model able to simulate well very different palaeoclimates and the present-day climate. Interestingly, to achieve the great warmth of the Early Eocene this version of the model does not have a strong future climate change Charney climate sensitivity. It produces a Charney climate sensitivity of 2.7(°)C, whereas the mean value of the 18 models in the IPCC Fourth Assessment Report (AR4) is 3.26(°)C±0.69(°)C. Thus, this value is within the range and below the mean of the models included in the AR4.

  18. Orbitally paced climatic variations of the North Atlantic during the Mid Eocene: Implications from a 2 Myr benthic isotope record in the North Atlantic (IODP Exp. 342)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vahlenkamp, M.; De Vleeschouwer, D.; Feldtmann, M.; Wu, F.; Zachos, J. C.; Palike, H.

    2016-12-01

    The middle Eocene marks the successive climatic transition from a greenhouse world during the early Eocene Climatic Optimum (EECO) into much cooler conditions culminating in the onset of Antarctic glaciation at the Eocene/Oligocene boundary. No high-resolution stable isotope records from benthic foraminifera yet exist for crucial parts of the so-called "Eocene Gap" as a result of a shallow calcium compensation depth (CCD), preventing the deposition of cyclic carbonate rich sediments during the mid-Eocene [Pälike et al., 2012]. IODP Expedition 342 drilled carbonate-rich sequences from sediment drifts offshore Newfoundland that cover the Eocene Gap with high sedimentation rates (> 2 cm/ kyr). We present a 2 Myr long stable carbon and oxygen isotope record of benthic foraminifera nuttalides truempyi spanning magnetochron C20r in unprecedented resolution (< 2 kyr), sufficient to resolve dominant Milankovic frequencies. Oxygen isotopes from U1410 range between -0.5‰ and 0.4‰ and show climatic variations on orbital time scale superimposed on a long term increase of 0.1‰/Myr. Initial spectral analysis of carbon isotope records ( -0.3‰ to 0.5‰) reveals sensitive response of Atlantic Meridonal Overturning Circulation (AMOC) on Milankovic time scales in our time series.

  19. Climatic changes in the Antarctic Eocene: - palaeontological, mineralogical and geochemical fossil proxies from bryozoans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hara, Urszula

    2017-04-01

    (Bartonian in age). Contrary to that, the bryozoan fauna recognized in the upper part of the LMF (Telm7) is composed of the impoverished biota of the scarse lepraliomorphs, poorly preserved cyclostome of Iridmonoidea and Reticrescis, which are abundantly accompanied by the gadiform fish remains, penguin bones and whales. A sharp decrease in the bryozoan diversity near the contact between the Telm5 and Telm6 was connected with the climatic cooling event, which culminated at the time of deposition of the upper part of the LMF. The skeletal mineralogy along with the geochemical stable isotope studies of the bryozoans (Seymour Island, Antarctic Peninsula) help to elucidate the environmental and climatic changes connected with the Early Eocene Climatic Optimum (EECO), Middle Eocene Climatic Optimum (MECO) as well as the EOT in the stratigraphical profile of the La Meseta Formation. References Hara U. 2015. Bryozoan internal moulds from the La Meseta Formation (Eocene) of Seymour Island, Antarctic Peninsula. Polish Polar Research, vol. 36, 25-49. Hara U., Mors T., Hagstrom J. and Reguero M.A. 2017. Eocene bryozoans assemblages from the La Meseta Formation of Seymour Island, Antarctica (in review).

  20. Early to middle Eocene magneto-biochronology of the southwest Pacific Ocean and climate influence on sedimentation: new data from the Mead Stream section (Marlborough, New Zealand)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dallanave, E.; Agnini, C.; Bachtadse, V.; Muttoni, G.; Crampton, J. S.; Strong, P.; Hines, B. R.; Hollis, C. J.; Slotnick, B. S.

    2014-12-01

    The Mead Stream section (South Island, New Zealand) consists of a 650-m-thick series of continuous and well-exposed strata deposited on a South Pacific continental slope from the Late Cretaceous to the middle Eocene. We examined the uppermost Paleocene-middle Eocene part of the Mead Stream section, which consists of ~360 m of limestone and marl, for detailed magnetic polarity stratigraphy, calcareous nannofossil, and foraminifera biostratigraphy. Magneto-biostratigraphic data indicate that the section straddles magnetic polarity Chrons from C24r to C18n, calcareous nannofossil Zone from NP9a to NP17 (CNP11-CNE15 following a recently revised Paleogene zonation), and from the Waipawan to the Bortonian New Zealand stages (i.e., from the base of the Ypresian to the Bartonian international stages), encompassing 17 Myr (56-39 Ma) of Southwest Pacific Ocean history. The ages of calcareous nannofossil biohorizons are consistent with low to mid-latitude data from the literature, indicating that during the early-middle Eocene the low-mid latitude calcareous nannofossil domain extended at least to ~50-55°S in the South Pacific. Correlation of the magnetic polarity stratigraphy from the Mead Stream section with the geomagnetic polarity time scale allows us to derive the sediment accumulation rates (SAR), which range between 8 and 44 m/Myr. Comparing the SAR with paleotemperature proxy records, we found that two intervals of increased SAR occurred during the early Eocene climatic optimum (EECO; 52-50 Ma) and during the transient climate warming culminating with the middle Eocene climatic optimum (MECO; 40.5 Ma). This correlation indicates that the climate evolution of the early-middle Eocene is recorded in the sedimentation patterns whereby times of warmer climate promote continental weathering, transportation, and accumulation of terrigenous sediments.

  1. Atmospheric carbon dioxide through the Eocene-Oligocene climate transition.

    PubMed

    Pearson, Paul N; Foster, Gavin L; Wade, Bridget S

    2009-10-22

    Geological and geochemical evidence indicates that the Antarctic ice sheet formed during the Eocene-Oligocene transition, 33.5-34.0 million years ago. Modelling studies suggest that such ice-sheet formation might have been triggered when atmospheric carbon dioxide levels (pCO2atm) fell below a critical threshold of approximately 750 p.p.m.v., but the timing and magnitude of pCO2atm relative to the evolution of the ice sheet has remained unclear. Here we use the boron isotope pH proxy on exceptionally well-preserved carbonate microfossils from a recently discovered geological section in Tanzania to estimate pCO2atm before, during and after the climate transition. Our data suggest that are reduction in pCO2atm occurred before the main phase of ice growth,followed by a sharp recovery to pre-transition values and then a more gradual decline. During maximum ice-sheet growth, pCO2atm was between approximately 450 and approximately 1,500 p.p.m.v., with a central estimate of approximately 760 p.p.m.v. The ice cap survived the period of pCO2atm recovery,although possibly with some reduction in its volume, implying (as models predict) a nonlinear response to climate forcing during melting. Overall, our results confirm the central role of declining pCO2atm in the development of the Antarctic ice sheet (in broad agreement with carbon cycle modelling) and help to constrain mechanisms and feedbacks associated with the Earth's biggest climate switch of the past 65 Myr.

  2. Is the Eocene's climate affected by ocean tides?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, Tobias; Thomas, Maik

    2014-05-01

    Global ocean models can generally be divided into Ocean General Circulation and tidal models. Paleoclimate simulations consider dynamics due to the ocean's general, i.e., thermohaline, wind and pressure driven circulation, while tidal dynamics most commonly are neglected due to their strict periodicity and high frequencies. Nevertheless, it could be demonstrated that transport ellipses and energy fluxes are being deformed over shelf areas due to tidal induced friction thus altering ocean circulation and energy fluxes on longer timescales. This makes tides not only an interesting subject of investigation of present-day dynamics, but also of paleo time slices, when both different celestial constellations and geometric shapes of ocean basins affected tidal waves. Using the coupled atmosphere-ocean general circulation model ECHAM5/MPIOM with an integrated tidal module based on luni-solar ephemerides, we simultaneously simulate circulation and tidal dynamics for the Early Eocene (50Ma) and a pre-industrial control run. Major changes in ocean circulation cannot only be observed in shelf areas, but also in the open ocean, for example the Indian and North Atlantic Oceans. Especially the opening of the Tethys Sea alters ocean basin geometry and hereby the dissipation of tidal waves. The southern position of Australia allows resonance between the Indian and Pacific Ocean and leads to high amplitudes in the M2 tide that dominate the Western Pacific and Eastern Indian Oceans. Including tidal dynamics in the ocean model also affects climate by decreasing global mean temperature.

  3. Eocene prevalence of monsoon-like climate over eastern China reflected by hydrological dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dehai; Lu, Shicong; Han, Shuang; Sun, Xiaoyan; Quan, Cheng

    2013-01-01

    Hydrological dynamics of sedimentary basins are essential for understanding regional climatic pattern in the geological past. In previous qualitative studies lithologically depending on the occurrence of featured sedimentary rocks, the Eocene climate of China had been subdivided into three latitudinal zones, with one subtropical high-controlled arid zone throughout middle China, and two humid zones respectively in the north and south. However, recent advances on mammalian fauna distribution, plant fossil-based quantitative paleoclimatic reconstruction, and modeling experiment jointly suggest that the relatively humid monsoonal climate might have prevailed over the territory. Here we examine and compare sedimentary sequences of 10 Eocene sections across eastern China, and hence the lake level fluctuations, to discuss the nature of climate type. Our results show that, instead of the categorically zonal pattern, the hydroclimate dynamics is intensified landward. This is demonstrated by the fact that, in contrast to the wide developed coal layers around the periphery, evaporites are growingly occurred endocentrically to the central part of middle China. However, although we have had assumed that all evaporites are indicator of extreme aridity, the highly oscillated climate in the central part of middle China was humid in the majority of the Eocene, distinct from permanent arid as seen in deserts or steppe along modern horse latitude. From the upcountry distribution pattern of the Eocene hydrological dynamics, it appears that the relatively dry climate in central China was caused by the impact of continentality or rain shadow effect under monsoonal, or monsoon-like climate.

  4. Pulses of middle Eocene to earliest Oligocene climatic deterioration in southern California and the Gulf Coast

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Frederiksen, N.O.

    1991-01-01

    A general deterioration of terrestrial climate took place during middle Eocene to earliest Oligocene time in southern California and in the Gulf Coast. Pollen data, calibrated by calcareous nannofossil ages, indicate four events of rapid floral and/or vegetational change among angiosperms during this time interval. The events can be correlated between the two regions even though these regions lay within different floristic provinces, and each event of angiosperm change is interpreted to indicate a pulse of rapid climatic shift. The most distinct of these events is the Middle Eocene Diversity Decline, which resulted from a peak in last appearances (extinctions, emigrations) centered in the early Bartonian. -from Author

  5. Synchronous turnover of flora, fauna, and climate at the Eocene-Oligocene Boundary in Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jimin; Ni, Xijun; Bi, Shundong; Wu, Wenyu; Ye, Jie; Meng, Jin; Windley, Brian F.

    2014-12-01

    The Eocene-Oligocene Boundary (~34 million years ago) marks one of the largest extinctions of marine invertebrates in the world oceans and of mammalian fauna in Europe and Asia in the Cenozoic era. A shift to a cooler climate across this boundary has been suggested as the cause of this extinction in the marine environment, but there is no manifold evidence for a synchronous turnover of flora, fauna and climate at the Eocene-Oligocene Boundary in a single terrestrial site in Asia to support this hypothesis. Here we report new data of magnetostratigraphy, pollen and climatic proxies in the Asian interior across the Eocene-Oligocene Boundary; our results show that climate change forced a turnover of flora and fauna, suggesting there was a change from large-size perissodactyl-dominant fauna in forests under a warm-temperate climate to small rodent/lagomorph-dominant fauna in forest-steppe in a dry-temperate climate across the Eocene-Oligocene Boundary. These data provide a new terrestrial record for this significant Cenozoic environmental event.

  6. Synchronous turnover of flora, fauna, and climate at the Eocene-Oligocene Boundary in Asia.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jimin; Ni, Xijun; Bi, Shundong; Wu, Wenyu; Ye, Jie; Meng, Jin; Windley, Brian F

    2014-12-12

    The Eocene-Oligocene Boundary (~34 million years ago) marks one of the largest extinctions of marine invertebrates in the world oceans and of mammalian fauna in Europe and Asia in the Cenozoic era. A shift to a cooler climate across this boundary has been suggested as the cause of this extinction in the marine environment, but there is no manifold evidence for a synchronous turnover of flora, fauna and climate at the Eocene-Oligocene Boundary in a single terrestrial site in Asia to support this hypothesis. Here we report new data of magnetostratigraphy, pollen and climatic proxies in the Asian interior across the Eocene-Oligocene Boundary; our results show that climate change forced a turnover of flora and fauna, suggesting there was a change from large-size perissodactyl-dominant fauna in forests under a warm-temperate climate to small rodent/lagomorph-dominant fauna in forest-steppe in a dry-temperate climate across the Eocene-Oligocene Boundary. These data provide a new terrestrial record for this significant Cenozoic environmental event.

  7. Modeling the response of precipitation oxygen stable isotopes to the Eocene climate changes over Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Botsyun, Svetlana; Sepulchre, Pierre; Donnadieu, Yannick; Risi, Camille; Caves, Jeremy K.; Licht, Alexis

    2017-04-01

    The Himalayas and the Tibetan Plateau have become a focus of the Earth sciences because they provide a classical example of tectonics-climate interactions. Present-day high elevations of the Himalayas and the Tibetan Plateau is the ultimate result of the collision between Indian and Asia plates during the Cenozoic, however, the precise uplift history of the Himalayas and the Tibetan Plateau is still uncertain, especially for the early Cenozoic. For the purpose of paleoelevations reconstructions, multiple methods are available, but stable oxygen paleoaltimetry is considered to be one of the most efficient techniques and has been widely applied in Asia. However, paleoelevations studies using stable oxygen presume that climatic processes control δ18O in a uniform way through time. We use climate modeling tools in order to investigate Eocene climate and δ18O over Asia and its controlling factors. The state-of-the-art general circulation model embedded with isotopes LMDz-iso has been applied together with Eocene boundary conditions and varied Eocene topography of the Himalayas and Tibet. The results of our simulations suggest that topography change has a minor direct impact on δ18O over the Himalayas and the Tibetan Plateau. On the contrary, Eocene δ18O in precipitation is primarily controlled by the atmosphere circulation and global temperature changes. Based on our numerical experiments, we show that despite persistence of large-scale atmospheric flows such as the monsoons and westerlies, Eocene δ18O over the region is different from those of the present-day due to global higher temperatures, southward shift to a zone of strong convection and increased role of westerlies moisture source. We show that the Rayleigh distillation is not applicable for the Eocene Himalayas and conclude that the assumption about the stationarity of δ18O-elevation relationship through geological time is inaccurate and misleading for paleoelevation estimates. We also show that Eocene

  8. Modelling the interactions between vegetation and climate from the Cretaceous to the Eocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loptson, Claire; Lunt, Dan; Francis, Jane

    2013-04-01

    The climates during the Cretaceous (~144 to 66 Ma) and the early Eocene (~56 to 48 Ma) were much warmer than the present day. Atmospheric CO2 levels for these past climates have a large uncertainty associated with them, but were possibly as high as 2000 to 3000 ppm for the early Eocene (Beerling and Royer, 2011; Lowenstein and Demicco, 2006) and maximum values are thought to range from 800 to 1800 ppm during the Cretaceous (Royer et al., 2012). Current modelling efforts have had great difficulty in replicating the shallow latitudinal temperature gradient indicated by proxy data for these time periods (e.g. Heinemann et al., 2009; Winguth et al., 2010; Shellito et al., 2009). Mechanisms that can result in such a low temperature gradient have not been found (Winguth et al., 2010; Beerling et al., 2011; Sloan and Morrill, 1998), but a contributing factor could be that not all climate feedbacks are included in these models. Vegetation feedbacks have been shown to be especially important (e.g. Otto-Bliesner and Upchurch, 1997; Bonan, 2008) so by including a more accurate representation of vegetation in the climate model, the model-data discrepancies may be reduced. A fully coupled atmosphere-ocean GCM, HadCM3L, coupled to a dynamic global vegetation model (TRIFFID), was used to simulate the climate and the predicted vegetation distributions for and the early Eocene and 12 different time slices representing different ages throughout the Cretaceous at 4x pre-industrial CO2. The only difference in the way these simulations were set up are different boundary conditions that are specific to that time period, e.g. different solar constants and paleogeographies. This allows a direct comparison between the time slices. We present the changes in climate, and therefore vegetation, during the Cretaceous due to changes in these boundary conditions alone, with a focus on Antarctica. Additional Eocene simulations were also carried out with a) fixed globally-uniform vegetation and b

  9. Multi-proxy records of Eocene vegetation and climatic dynamics from North America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheldon, N. D.; Smith, S. Y.; Stromberg, C. A.; Hyland, E.; Miller, L. A.

    2010-12-01

    The Eocene is characterized by a “thermal maximum” in the early part, and a shift to “icehouse” conditions by the end of the epoch. Consequently, this is an interesting time to look at vegetation dynamics and understanding plant responses to environmental change, especially as refinement of global climate models is needed if we are to understand future climate change impacts. Paleobotanical evidence, such as phytoliths (plant silica bodies), and paleoenvironmental indicators, such as paleosols, offer an opportunity to study vegetation composition and dynamics in the absence of macrofossils on a variety of spatial and temporal scales. To examine the interaction between paleoclimatic/paleoenvironmental changes and paleovegetation changes, we will compare and contrast two well-dated, high-resolution, multi-proxy records from North America. The margins of the Green River Basin system during the Early Eocene Climatic Optimum (53-50 Ma) are an extremely important location for understanding ecological composition and potential climatic drivers of North American floral diversification, because this area is widely considered the point of origin for many modern grass clades. We examined paleosols preserved in the fluvial, basin-margin Wasatch Formation preserved near South Pass, Wyoming. Field identification of the paleosols indicated a suite that includes Entisols, Inceptisols, and Alfisols. To reconstruct paleovegetation, pedogenic carbonates were analyzed isotopically, and samples were collected and extracted for phytoliths . By combining these paleobotanical proxies with quantitative climatic proxies on whole rock geochemistry, we will present an integrated vegetation-climate history of the EECO at the margins of the Green River Basin. Second, we will present high-resolution record of vegetation patterns based on phytoliths from a section of the Renova Formation, Timberhills region, Montana dated to 39.2 ± 3 Ma. The section is composed of Alfisols, Entisols

  10. Sensitivity of the Palaeocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum climate to cloud properties.

    PubMed

    Kiehl, Jeffrey T; Shields, Christine A

    2013-10-28

    The Palaeocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM) was a significant global warming event in the Earth's history (approx. 55 Ma). The cause for this warming event has been linked to increases in greenhouse gases, specifically carbon dioxide and methane. This rapid warming took place in the presence of the existing Early Eocene warm climate. Given that projected business-as-usual levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide reach concentrations of 800-1100 ppmv by 2100, it is of interest to study past climates where atmospheric carbon dioxide was higher than present. This is especially the case given the difficulty of climate models in simulating past warm climates. This study explores the sensitivity of the simulated pre-PETM and PETM periods to change in cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and microphysical properties of liquid water clouds. Assuming lower levels of CCN for both of these periods leads to significant warming, especially at high latitudes. The study indicates that past differences in cloud properties may be an important factor in accurately simulating past warm climates. Importantly, additional shortwave warming from such a mechanism would imply lower required atmospheric CO2 concentrations for simulated surface temperatures to be in reasonable agreement with proxy data for the Eocene.

  11. The Effects of Paleoelevation on the Early Eocene Climate of Western North America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thrasher, B.; Sloan, L.

    2006-12-01

    Paleoelevation, while difficult to ascertain, played an important role in determining the climate of the Laramide Orogeny of Western North America during the early Eocene by way of both providing orographic lift to incoming air masses and establishing minimum annual temperatures for the region. Though fossil evidence suggests regional rainfall and temperature were substantial enough to support subtropical vegetation, isotopic evidence suggests the possibility of snow in some areas. Some studies have argued that extreme topographical relief was able to support permanent snow packs in the highest elevations, while others have argued that these extremes were not necessary and that winter precipitation was merely episodic in nature. This study employs a regional climate model to examine the effects of various topographic scenarios on temperature and precipitation under early Eocene conditions. This includes investigating the effects of an overall increase in elevation versus an increase in the elevation of only the regional highlands.

  12. Determining optimum climate drivers for weather risk projections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chavez, Erik; Kilian, Markus; Lucarini, Valerio

    2016-04-01

    In spite of the exponential increase of available data, the uncertainties of projections of weather variability, especially at local scale, have not decreased. This poses important challenges for the design of weather risk management strategies in various vulnerable sectors such as energy or agricultural production. This paper focuses on a two step methodology to enable projection of local weather risk in future climate scenarios. First, we focus on the optimum selection of drivers of regional weather patterns in order to project local weather variability risk estimates in future climate scenarios. This is carried out through the use of stochastic downscaling enabling conditional modelling of pixel-level distributions of weather variables as a function of inter-annual and inter-decadal climate variability drivers. Secondly, a statistical and physically-based climate model selection methodology is developed in order to produce a sub-ensemble of inter-annual and decadal variability drivers dataset that allows accurate and robust projection of weather variability. The case study of South Eastern Africa will be used. Datasets retrieved from CMIP5 repository in three RCP scenarios (historical, 8.5 and 2.5) are used as well as observed historical weather data.

  13. Characterization of surface moisture changes between the PETM and Early Eocene in a Global Climate Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buzan, J. R.; Huber, M.; Bowen, G. J.; Goldner, A. P.; Noone, D. C.

    2011-12-01

    One of the robust predictions from climate models is the expansion and poleward displacement of Hadley circulation zones-shifting and expanding arid zones across the globe-due to global warming. However, previous proxy studies and recent modeling work for the Eocene, Miocene, and Pliocene present scenarios for increased wetness, in areas like North America, due to a 'permanent' El Niño. One way to test the prediction that arid zones expand in a warmer world is to simulate the deep time paleoclimates, like the Eocene, and compare with proxy records. Using Eocene boundary conditions, we simulated the climatic period using the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Community Atmospheric Model version 3 (CAM3) including an atmospheric water isotopic tracer model (ISO-CAM). We present results from the simulations of two different pCO2 levels, 4480 and 2240 ppm, representing two different Eocene climates. Results show in the high pCO2 case that North America has an increase in precipitation during the summer monsoon season, and specifically a wetting in the pre-boreal summer monsoon season in most central regions. The increase in precipitation during the summer monsoon, however, is not stored in the soil system and is consequently converted to runoff. When the monsoon comes to an end, central North America experiences enhanced drying. Additionally, in North America, there is a shift towards heavier oxygen and hydrogen isotopes. This work can be compared to site proxy data and analysis of dynamics of the atmosphere explaining hydrological cycles in future and past climates.

  14. Late Eocene stable isotope stratigraphy of North Atlantic IODP Site U1411: Orbitally paced climatic heartbeat at the close of the Eocene greenhouse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coxall, Helen; Bohaty, Steve; Wilson, Paul; Liebrand, Diederik; Nyberg, Anna; Holmström, Max

    2016-04-01

    Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Expedition 342 drilled sediment drifts on the Newfoundland margin to recover high-resolution records of North Atlantic ocean-climate history and track the evolution of the modern climate system through the Late Cretaceous and Early Cenozoic. An early Paleogene deep-sea benthic stable isotope composite record from multiple Exp. 342 sites is currently in development and will provide a key reference section for investigations of Atlantic and global climate dynamics. This study presents initial results for the late Eocene slice of the composite from Site U1411, located at mid depth (˜2850m Eocene paleodepth) on the Southeast Newfoundland Ridge. Stable oxygen (δ18O) and carbon (δ13C) isotope ratios were measured on 640 samples hosting exceptionally well-preserved epifaunal benthic foraminifera obtained from the microfossil-rich uppermost Eocene clays at 4cm spacing. Sedimentation rates average 2-3 cm/kyr through the late Eocene, such that our sampling resolution is sufficient to capture the dominant Milankovitch frequencies. Late Eocene Site U1411 benthic δ18O values (1.4 to 0.5‰ VPDB) are comparable to the Pacific and elsewhere in the Atlantic at similar depths; however, δ13C is lower by ˜0.5 ‰ with values intermediate between those of the Southern Labrador Sea to the north (-1 to 0) and mid latitude/South Atlantic (0.5 to 1.5) to the south, suggesting poorly ventilated bottom waters in the late Eocene North Atlantic and limited production of North Atlantic deep water. Applying the initial shipboard magneto-biostratigraphic age framework, the Site U1411 benthic δ13C and δ18O records display clear cyclicity on orbital timescales. Spectral analysis of the raw unfiltered datasets identifies eccentricity (400 and 100 kyr), obliquity (40 kyr) and precession (˜20 kyr) signals imprinted on our time series, revealing distinct climatic heart beats in the late Eocene prior to the transition into the 'ice house'.

  15. Global vegetation distribution and terrestrial climate evolution at the Eocene-Oligocene transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pound, Matthew; Salzmann, Ulrich

    2016-04-01

    The Eocene - Oligocene transition (EOT; ca. 34-33.5 Ma) is widely considered to be the biggest step in Cenozoic climate evolution. Geochemical marine records show both surface and bottom water cooling, associated with the expansion of Antarctic glaciers and a reduction in the atmospheric CO2 concentration. However, the global response of the terrestrial biosphere to the EOT is less well understood and not uniform when comparing different regions. We present new global vegetation and terrestrial climate reconstructions of the Priabonian (late Eocene; 38-33.9 Ma) and Rupelian (early Oligocene; 33.9-28.45 Ma) by synthesising 215 pollen and spore localities. Using presence/absence data of pollen and spores with multivariate statistics has allowed the reconstruction of palaeo-biomes without relying on modern analogues. The reconstructed palaeo-biomes do not show the equator-ward shift at the EOT, which would be expected from a global cooling. Reconstructions of mean annual temperature, cold month mean temperature and warm month mean temperature do not show a global cooling of terrestrial climate across the EOT. Our new reconstructions differ from previous global syntheses by being based on an internally consistent statistically defined classification of palaeo-biomes and our terrestrial based climate reconstructions are in stark contrast to some marine based climate estimates. Our results raise new questions on the nature and extent of terrestrial global climate change at the EOT.

  16. Global cooling during the eocene-oligocene climate transition.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhonghui; Pagani, Mark; Zinniker, David; Deconto, Robert; Huber, Matthew; Brinkhuis, Henk; Shah, Sunita R; Leckie, R Mark; Pearson, Ann

    2009-02-27

    About 34 million years ago, Earth's climate shifted from a relatively ice-free world to one with glacial conditions on Antarctica characterized by substantial ice sheets. How Earth's temperature changed during this climate transition remains poorly understood, and evidence for Northern Hemisphere polar ice is controversial. Here, we report proxy records of sea surface temperatures from multiple ocean localities and show that the high-latitude temperature decrease was substantial and heterogeneous. High-latitude (45 degrees to 70 degrees in both hemispheres) temperatures before the climate transition were approximately 20 degrees C and cooled an average of approximately 5 degrees C. Our results, combined with ocean and ice-sheet model simulations and benthic oxygen isotope records, indicate that Northern Hemisphere glaciation was not required to accommodate the magnitude of continental ice growth during this time.

  17. Simulating the climate of the early Eocene, a perturbed physics approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sagoo, N.; Valdes, P. J.; Gregoire, L. J.; Flecker, R.

    2012-12-01

    Modelling past climates that are very different to the modern provide an important test for the climate models used to predict future climates. The early Eocene was a period of global extreme warmth and simulating the extent of high latitude warmth in this period without overheating the tropics has been problematic, leading to a significant climate model geological data mismatch. There are several areas of uncertainty in climate models but parameter uncertainty is the largest component: sub-grid scale and temporally fast processes such as those that operate in the atmosphere are particularly difficult to measure in the environment and subsequently hard to parameterise in the climate models, resulting in a large range of possible values. Perturbed physics simulations are run by perturbing ten uncertain parameters within their plausible range in the model FAMOUS, an intermediate complexity general circulation model in order to see if the model is capable of generating the global warmth of the early Eocene. The uncertain parameters are perturbed both individually and in combination (single and multiple parameter perturbations). Latin hypercube sampling is used to create the parameter values for the multiple parameter perturbations in order to maximise the parameter space sampled. 2 x pre-industrial atmospheric CO2 is used for the early Eocene simulations. From over one hundred initial parameter sets three simulations have a temperature distribution that overlaps with the available early Eocene proxy data. These are referred to as the good Eocene simulations. In two simulations only a single parameter is varied and in the third parameter all the parameters are co-varied together. In the single parameter perturbations the critical relative humidity for cloud formation and the horizontal atmospheric diffusion parameters are reduced to 89% and 72% of the control value respectively. In the third good simulation all ten uncertain parameters are perturbed; two parameters

  18. Carbon Dioxide and the Early Eocene Climate of Western North America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thrasher, B.; Sloan, L.

    2007-12-01

    Concentrations of atmospheric greenhouse gases play an important role in determining the climate by way of emitting longwave radiation towards the Earth, thereby increasing the temperature of the surface and lower atmosphere above that which would be measured in the absence of these constituents. Carbon dioxide (CO2), a well-mixed greenhouse gas, is naturally added to the atmosphere through aerobic biological respiration and decay, volcanic eruptions, and dissociation from ocean water. Meanwhile, it is removed from the atmosphere through photosynthesis, chemical weathering, and diffusion into the oceans. All of these factors make it difficult to pinpoint the concentration of atmospheric CO2 in the distant past. Indeed, estimates of CO2 concentration during the early Eocene (~ 55 million years ago) vary widely, from 300 ppm to upwards of 2000 ppm. This study employs a regional climate model to examine the effects of different CO2 levels on temperature and precipitation under early Eocene conditions. The region of interest, western North America, contains fossil evidence from the early Eocene that suggests regional rainfall was substantial enough and temperatures were warm enough to support subtropical vegetation, whereas today the region is primarily characterized by desert and steppe.

  19. Stable isotope study of fluid inclusions in fluorite from Idaho: implications for continental climates during the Eocene

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Seal, R.R.; Rye, R.O.

    1993-01-01

    Isotopic studies of fluid inclusions from meteoric water-dominated epithermal ore deposits offer a unique opportunity to study paleoclimates because the fluids can provide direct samples of ancient waters. Fluorite-hosted fluid inclusions from the Eocene (51-50 Ma) epithermal deposits of the Bayhorse mining district, have low salinities and low to moderate homogenization temperatures indicating meteoric origins for the fluids. Oxygen and hydrogen isotope data on inclusion fluids are almost identical to those of modern meteoric waters in the area. The equivalence of the isotope composition of the Eocene inclusion fluids and modern meteoric waters indicates that the Eocene climatic conditions were similar to those today. -from Authors

  20. Fossils and Fossil Climate: The Case for Equable Continental Interiors in the Eocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wing, Scott L.; Greenwood, David R.

    1993-08-01

    There are many methods for inferring terrestrial palaeoclimates from palaeontological data, including the size and species diversity of ectothermic vertebrates, the locomotor and dental adaptations of mammals, characteristics of leaf shape, size, and epidermis, wood anatomy, and the climatic preferences of nearest living relatives of fossil taxa. Estimates of palaeotemperature have also been based on stable oxygen isotope ratios in shells and bones. Interpretation of any of these data relies in some way on uniformitarian assumptions, although at different levels depending on the method. Most of these methods can be applied to a palaeoclimatic reconstruction for the interior of North America during the early Eocene, which is thought to be the warmest interval of global climate in the Cenozoic. Most of the data indicate warm equable climates with little frost. Rainfall was variable, but strong aridity was local or absent. The inferred palaeoclimate is very different from the present climate of the region and from model simulations for the Eocene. This suggests that models fail to incorporate forcing factors that were present at that time, that they treat the heat regime of continents unrealistically, and/or that model inputs such as sea surface temperature gradients or palaeotopography are incorrect.

  1. The Relationship Between Eocene and Modern Climate Sensitivity - is the PETM a Good Analogue for Future Warming?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lunt, D. J.; Farnsworth, A.

    2016-12-01

    One reason often given as motivation for studying the PETM is its relevance to future warming. Here we explore to what extent physical climate feedbacks during the Eocene were similar to those of the modern. We compare and contrast climate model simulations of the Eocene/PETM at 2x and 4x preindustrial values of CO2 with simulations of the modern at 1x and 2x CO2. The differences in climate sensitivity are related to differences in paleogeography, ice sheet, and base-state of the two time periods, but which of these are dominant? Using energy-balance diagnostics we explore how the physical feedbacks related to clouds and surface albedo differ between the two time periods. Finally, we suggest regions where the response to CO2 forcing is similar in the modern and the Eocene.

  2. A High-Resolution Land Cover Study of Regional Early Eocene Climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thrasher, B. L.; Sloan, L. C.; Stauffer, H. L.

    2008-12-01

    Although the distribution of various types of land cover is directly affected by climate factors such as temperature and precipitation, the reverse is also true. Land cover itself can affect regional climate in a number of ways such as through changes in surface albedo, changes in moisture availability, and exchanges of gases with the atmosphere. Much of the research on the effect land cover type has on climate has dealt with modeling deforestation. The removal of boreal forests leads to an increase in albedo, decreases in both temperature and precipitation, and changes in the pattern of snowmelt. Tropical deforestation, on the other hand, leads to an increase in temperature but a decrease in precipitation and evapotranspiration. In addition to vegetation, climate effects due to surface water land cover types (lakes, wetlands, glaciers, etc.) have also been modeled. Studies of North Africa during the mid-Holocene have shown that the addition of lakes and wetlands decreases albedo and increases precipitation and evaporation in the region. Studies of Lake Victoria have shown that increases in the lake surface temperature lead to increases in regional precipitation amount and distribution. Global-scale modeling studies of the basins of Western North America have shown that the presence of a sizeable body of water in this area could have had a mitigating effect on the regional climate during the early Eocene (approximately 50-56 million years ago), keeping winter temperatures above freezing and decreasing the annual temperature range. Meanwhile, regional modeling studies of the same area and time have not examined varying land cover types and have instead used only extensive zones of singular land types. This study uses high-resolution land cover maps with a regional model to examine the climate sensitivity of Western North America during the early Eocene to the addition of land cover features such as lakes, marshland, and shrubs.

  3. Did Paleogene North Atlantic rift-related eruptions drive early Eocene climate cooling?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jolley, David W.; Widdowson, Mike

    2005-02-01

    The delivery of volcanogenic sulphur into the upper atmosphere by explosive eruptions is known to cause significant temporary climate cooling. Therefore, phreatomagmatic and phreatoplinian eruptions occurring during the final rifting stages of active flood basalt provinces provide a potent mechanism for triggering climate change. During the early Eocene, the northeast Atlantic margin was subjected to repeated ashfall for 0.5 m.y. This was the result of extensive phreatomagmatic activity along 3000 km of the opening northeast Atlantic rift. These widespread, predominantly basaltic ashes are now preserved in marine sediments of the Balder Formation and its equivalents, and occur over an area extending from the Faroe Islands to Denmark and southern England. These ash-bearing sediments also contain pollen and spore floras derived from low diversity forests that grew in cooler, drier climates than were experienced either before or after these highly explosive eruptions. In addition, coeval plant macrofossil evidence from the Bighorn Basin, Wyoming, USA, also shows a comparable pattern of vegetation change. The coincidence of the ashes and cooler climate pollen and spore floras in northwest Europe identifies volcanism as the primary cause of climate cooling. Estimates show that whilst relatively few phreatomagmatic eruptive centres along the 3000 km opening rift system could readily generate 0.5-1 °C cooling, on an annual basis, only persistent or repeated volcanic phases would have been able to achieve the long-term cooling effect observed in the floral record. We propose that the cumulative effect of repeated Balder Formation eruptions initiated a biodiversity crisis in the northeast Atlantic margin forests. Only the decline of this persistent volcanic activity, and the subsequent climatic warming at the start of the Eocene Thermal Maximum allowed the growth of subtropical forests to develop across the region.

  4. How Novel are 21st Century Climates? A Global Assessment of Future Climates and their Analogs Back Through the Eocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burke, K. D.; Williams, J. W.; Jackson, S. T.

    2016-12-01

    Climate change is a multivariate process, where changes in the environmental space of a location will likely drive biotic responses of the flora and fauna that inhabit the region. In the face of a rapidly changing climate it is important to understand what the future may hold for ecosystems. One method commonly applied to understand how dissimilar future climates will be relative to the modern period is no-analog analysis. This has been done for 21st century climates relative to the modern period, but has not been extended through the paleorecord. Using HadCM3, CCSM3 TraCE-21ka, PMIP3, PlioMIP2 and EoMIP climate simulations, we assess global and regional climatic novelty by identifying the closest analogs in these periods for both future (21st century) and modern climates. This baseline offers a full range climate space with significant overlap of modern and future projected climates, and allows us to assess both emergences and disappearances of analog climate conditions throughout the past. This extended baseline includes past glacial and interglacial climates, as well as past earth warm periods. Past earth warm periods such as the middle to late Pliocene and the early Eocene may be most similar to projections of future climate, so it is important to evaluate our understanding of these global climates. Here we calculate dissimilarity to quantify novelty and no-analog conditions using the Standardized Euclidian Distance, as well as the Mahalanobis distance. Our work shows that nearest climate analogs for the modern period, as well as future climates, existed and disappeared during past warm periods. These results suggest that though climate change may be regionally novel relative to the modern period for some locations, analogs do exist through the paleorecord which in some cases reduce novelty. Nevertheless, novelty remains high in some locations suggesting that some future climates may be unprecedented.

  5. The Influence of the Green River Lake System on the Local Climate During the Early Eocene Period

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elguindi, N.; Thrasher, B.; Sloan, L. C.

    2006-12-01

    Several modeling efforts have attempted to reproduce the climate of the early Eocene North America. However when compared to proxy data, General Circulation Models (GCMs) tend to produce a large-scale cold-bias. Although higher resolution Regional Climate Models (RCMs) that are able to resolve many of the sub-GCM scale forcings improve this cold bias, RCMs are still unable to reproduce the warm climate of the Eocene. From geologic data, we know that the greater Green River and the Uinta basins were intermontane basins with a large lake system during portions of the Eocene. We speculate that the lack of presence of these lakes in previous modeling studies may explain part of the persistent cold-bias of GCMs and RCMs. In this study, we utilize a regional climate model coupled with a 1D-lake model in an attempt to reduce the uncertainties and biases associated with climate simulations over Eocene western North American. Specifically, we include the Green River Lake system in our RCM simulation and compare climates with and without lakes to proxy data.

  6. Paleogeographic Control on Climate Sensitivity of the Cretaceous-Palaeogene-Eocene.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farnsworth, A.; Lunt, D. J.; Robinson, S.; O'Brien, C. L.; Pancost, R.

    2016-12-01

    Just how sensitive are warm climates of the past (Cretaceous-Eocene-Palaeogene (CPE)) to atmospheric carbon dioxide (pCO2) concentrations. We present an ensemble [1] of 21 climate model simulations spanning the CPE at both 560ppm and 1120ppm using state of the art paleogeographies (GETECH Plc. [1]), to ascertain how sensitive warm climates of the past are to pCO2. We find depending on the time period in the CPE, a doubling of pCO2results in a 2-3°C increase in SST and a 3-5°C increase in surface air temperature. We analyse the reasons behind the varying climate sensitivity, and the geographical distribution of warming, including some of the periods with regions of cooling (figure 1) and how this may help inform future climate change. Further to this we construct a model derived CO2 curve through the CPE based on avaliable proxy-data. Figure 1 - Mean surface annual surface temperature (°C) anomaly (4 x Pre-Industrial pCO2 (1120ppm) minus 2 x Pre-Industrial pCO2(560ppm)) in the Ypresian ( 52 Myr). [1] Lunt, D. J., Farnsworth, A., Loptson, C., Foster, G. L., Markwick, P., O'Brien, C. L., Pancost, R. D., Robinson, S. A., and Wrobel, N.: Palaeogeographic controls on climate and proxy interpretation, Clim. Past Discuss., 11, 5683-5725, doi:10.5194/cpd-11-5683-2015, 2015.

  7. Biotic Response in Aquatic Reptiles (Testudines) during Earliest Eocene Climatic Warming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holroyd, P. A.; Hutchison, J. H.

    2010-12-01

    The earliest Eocene is marked by significant events of global warming: the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM) at ~55.8 Ma and two short-lived events (ETM2 or Elmo and H2) approximately 2 Ma later. These environmental changes induced strong responses in the continental biota. Noteworthy changes in North American mid-latitude faunas and floras that are temporally correlated with earliest Eocene warming events include: increased diversity; turnover; and significant range changes, comprising both northward shifts in ranges of North American taxa as well as intercontinental dispersal across Holarctica. Evidence for these biotic changes comes directly from the fossil record and indirectly from phylogeographic analyses of molecular phylogenies of extant biota. To date, the stratigraphic record of biotic change has only been examined for the flora and terrestrial mammals. Data on reptiles and for continental aquatic systems are particularly lacking. In order to assess the impact of climate-mediated faunal change in aquatic systems during early Paleogene warming, we have focused on developing a detailed record of fossil turtles (Testudines) from the Bighorn Basin of Wyoming, where these records can be directly compared to similarly studied mammalian and floral data and to isotopic studies that provide independent proxies of climate change. Using genus-level occurrence data from more than 450 stratigraphically-constrained localities spanning ~2.5 Ma, we calculated first and last appearances, taxonomic richness, and relative abundance as measured by presence-absence (site occupancy). Among turtles, taxonomic richness increased episodically through the earliest Eocene with two new taxa appearing at the PETM, two immediately following it, and two at Biohorizon B, an interval associated with the younger hyperthermals. These new, immigrant taxa eventually comprised 40% of known generic richness. Phylogenetically, the inferred biogeographic source regions are southern North

  8. Constraining early to middle Eocene climate evolution of the southwest Pacific and Southern Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dallanave, Edoardo; Bachtadse, Valerian; Crouch, Erica M.; Tauxe, Lisa; Shepherd, Claire L.; Morgans, Hugh E. G.; Hollis, Christopher J.; Hines, Benjamin R.; Sugisaki, Saiko

    2016-01-01

    Studies of early Paleogene climate suffer from the scarcity of well-dated sedimentary records from the southern Pacific Ocean, the largest ocean basin during this time. We present a new magnetostratigraphic record from marine sediments that outcrop along the mid-Waipara River, South Island, New Zealand. Fully oriented samples for paleomagnetic analyses were collected along 45 m of stratigraphic section, which encompasses magnetic polarity Chrons from C23n to C21n (∼ 51.5- 47 Ma). These results are integrated with foraminiferal, calcareous nannofossil, and dinoflagellate cyst (dinocyst) biostratigraphy from samples collected in three different expeditions along a total of ∼80 m of section. Biostratigraphic data indicates relatively continuous sedimentation from the lower Waipawan to the upper Heretaungan New Zealand stages (i.e., lower Ypresian to lower Lutetian, 55.5 to 46 Ma). We provide the first magnetostratigraphically-calibrated age of 48.88 Ma for the base of the Heretaungan New Zealand stage (latest early Eocene). To improve the correlation of the climate record in this section with other Southern Ocean records, we reviewed the magnetostratigraphy of Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Site 1172 (East Tasman Plateau) and Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Site U1356 (Wilkes Land Margin, Antarctica). A paleomagnetic study of discrete samples could not confirm any reliable magnetic polarity reversals in the early Eocene at Site 1172. We use the robust magneto-biochronology of a succession of dinocyst bioevents that are common to mid-Waipara, Site 1172, and Site U1356 to assist correlation between the three records. A new integrated chronology offers new insights into the nature and completeness of the southern high-latitude climate histories derived from these sites.

  9. Heterogeneity in global vegetation and terrestrial climate change during the late Eocene to early Oligocene transition.

    PubMed

    Pound, Matthew J; Salzmann, Ulrich

    2017-02-24

    Rapid global cooling at the Eocene - Oligocene Transition (EOT), ~33.9-33.5 Ma, is widely considered to mark the onset of the modern icehouse world. A large and rapid drop in atmospheric pCO2 has been proposed as the driving force behind extinctions in the marine realm and glaciation on Antarctica. However, the global terrestrial response to this cooling is uncertain. Here we present the first global vegetation and terrestrial temperature reconstructions for the EOT. Using an extensive palynological dataset, that has been statistically grouped into palaeo-biomes, we show a more transitional nature of terrestrial climate change by indicating a spatial and temporal heterogeneity of vegetation change at the EOT in both hemispheres. The reconstructed terrestrial temperatures show for many regions a cooling that started well before the EOT and continued into the Early Oligocene. We conclude that the heterogeneous pattern of global vegetation change has been controlled by a combination of multiple forcings, such as tectonics, sea-level fall and long-term decline in greenhouse gas concentrations during the late Eocene to early Oligocene, and does not represent a single response to a rapid decline in atmospheric pCO2 at the EOT.

  10. Heterogeneity in global vegetation and terrestrial climate change during the late Eocene to early Oligocene transition

    PubMed Central

    Pound, Matthew J.; Salzmann, Ulrich

    2017-01-01

    Rapid global cooling at the Eocene – Oligocene Transition (EOT), ~33.9–33.5 Ma, is widely considered to mark the onset of the modern icehouse world. A large and rapid drop in atmospheric pCO2 has been proposed as the driving force behind extinctions in the marine realm and glaciation on Antarctica. However, the global terrestrial response to this cooling is uncertain. Here we present the first global vegetation and terrestrial temperature reconstructions for the EOT. Using an extensive palynological dataset, that has been statistically grouped into palaeo-biomes, we show a more transitional nature of terrestrial climate change by indicating a spatial and temporal heterogeneity of vegetation change at the EOT in both hemispheres. The reconstructed terrestrial temperatures show for many regions a cooling that started well before the EOT and continued into the Early Oligocene. We conclude that the heterogeneous pattern of global vegetation change has been controlled by a combination of multiple forcings, such as tectonics, sea-level fall and long-term decline in greenhouse gas concentrations during the late Eocene to early Oligocene, and does not represent a single response to a rapid decline in atmospheric pCO2 at the EOT. PMID:28233862

  11. Heterogeneity in global vegetation and terrestrial climate change during the late Eocene to early Oligocene transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pound, Matthew J.; Salzmann, Ulrich

    2017-02-01

    Rapid global cooling at the Eocene – Oligocene Transition (EOT), ~33.9–33.5 Ma, is widely considered to mark the onset of the modern icehouse world. A large and rapid drop in atmospheric pCO2 has been proposed as the driving force behind extinctions in the marine realm and glaciation on Antarctica. However, the global terrestrial response to this cooling is uncertain. Here we present the first global vegetation and terrestrial temperature reconstructions for the EOT. Using an extensive palynological dataset, that has been statistically grouped into palaeo-biomes, we show a more transitional nature of terrestrial climate change by indicating a spatial and temporal heterogeneity of vegetation change at the EOT in both hemispheres. The reconstructed terrestrial temperatures show for many regions a cooling that started well before the EOT and continued into the Early Oligocene. We conclude that the heterogeneous pattern of global vegetation change has been controlled by a combination of multiple forcings, such as tectonics, sea-level fall and long-term decline in greenhouse gas concentrations during the late Eocene to early Oligocene, and does not represent a single response to a rapid decline in atmospheric pCO2 at the EOT.

  12. The Eocene climate of China, the early elevation of the Tibetan Plateau and the onset of the Asian Monsoon.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qing; Spicer, Robert A; Yang, Jian; Wang, Yu-Fei; Li, Cheng-Sen

    2013-12-01

    Eocene palynological samples from 37 widely distributed sites across China were analysed using co-existence approach to determine trends in space and time for seven palaeoclimate variables: Mean annual temperature, mean annual precipitation, mean temperature of the warmest month, mean temperature of the coldest month, mean annual range of temperature, mean maximum monthly precipitation and mean minimum monthly precipitation. Present day distributions and observed climates within China of the nearest living relatives of the fossil forms were used to find the range of a given variable in which a maximum number of taxa can coexist. Isotherm and isohyet maps for the early, middle and late Eocene were constructed. These illustrate regional changing patterns in thermal and precipitational gradients that may be interpreted as the beginnings of the modern Asian Monsoon system, and suggest that the uplift of parts of the Tibetan Plateau appear to have taken place by the middle to late Eocene.

  13. Climatic and floral change during the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum in the Bighorn Basin (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wing, S. L.

    2009-12-01

    The Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM) is an interval of global warming lasting ~150 ka that occurred at the start of the Eocene, ~55.8 Ma. Globally, temperature rose 4-8 °C in association with carbon cycle changes attributed to the release of >5,000 Pg of C into the ocean-atmosphere system. Fossil plants from the PETM in the Bighorn Basin, northwestern Wyoming, show that latest Paleocene forests contained palms, deciduous taxodiaceous conifers, and a variety of deciduous and evergreen angiosperms, many belonging to lineages with north temperate distributions. Mean annual temperature (MAT) for the latest Paleocene inferred from leaf margin analysis is ~18 °C. Early and mid-PETM floras have a completely different composition. They lack conifers and broad-leaved deciduous taxa with north temperate distributions, and are dominated by palms, legumes, and other angiosperm taxa with living relatives in the dry tropical forests of Central and South America. Leaf margin analysis gives an MAT of ~23 °C. Floras of this type are known from a stratigraphic interval ~30 m thick that also produces geochemical and mammalian faunal indicators of the PETM. Floras from late PETM or earliest post-PETM time are composed largely of species that had been present in the latest Paleocene, with a few new species that are common in the early Eocene. The inferred MAT is ~18 °C. Leaf size data suggest that the PETM was drier than the immediately preceding and following times. Floral data from the Bighorn Basin indicate that the magnitude of temperature change in this mid-latitude continental interior was similar to that inferred for the surface ocean. Evidence for dryness or seasonal dryness during the PETM has been observed in sections in northern Spain as well as in Wyoming, raising the possibility of widespread water stress in the middle northern latitudes. Change in floral composition during the PETM is consistent with regional extinction in mid-latitude populations of plants

  14. Tectono-climatic implications of Eocene Paratethys regression in the Tajik basin of central Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrapa, Barbara; DeCelles, Peter G.; Wang, Xin; Clementz, Mark T.; Mancin, Nicoletta; Stoica, Marius; Kraatz, Brian; Meng, Jin; Abdulov, Sherzod; Chen, Fahu

    2015-08-01

    Plate tectonics and eustatic sea-level changes have fundamental effects on paleoenvironmental conditions and bio-ecological changes. The Paratethys Sea was a large marine seaway that connected the Mediterranean Neotethys Ocean with Central Asia during early Cenozoic time. Withdrawal of the Paratethys from central Asia impacted the distribution and composition of terrestrial faunas in the region and has been largely associated with changes in global sea level and climate such as cooling associated with the Eocene/Oligocene transition (EOT). Whereas the regression has been dated in the Tarim basin (China), the pattern and timing of regression in the Tajik basin, 400 km to the west, remain unresolved, precluding a test of current paleogeographic models. Here we date the Paratethys regression in Tajikistan at ca. 39 million years ago (Ma), which is several million years older than the EOT (at ca. 34 Ma) marking the greenhouse to icehouse climate transition of the Cenozoic. Our data also show a restricted, evaporitic marine environment since the middle-late Eocene and establishment of desert like environments after ca. 39 Ma. The overall stratigraphic record from the Tajik basin and southern Tien Shan points to deposition in a foreland basin setting by ca. 40 Ma in response to active tectonic growth of the Pamir-Tibet Mountains at the same time. Combined with the northwestward younging trend of the regression in the region, the Tajik basin record is consistent with northward growth of the Pamir and suggests significant tectonic control on Paratethys regression and paleoenvironmental changes in Central Asia.

  15. Tectonic and climatic significance of a late Eocene low-relief, high-level geomorphic surface, Colorado

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, Kathryn M.; Chase, Clement G

    1994-01-01

    New paleobotanical data suggest that in the late Eocene the erosion surface which capped the Front Range, Colorado was 2.2-2.3 km in elevation, which is similar to the 2.5-km present elevation of surface remnants. This estimated elevation casts doubt on the conventional belief that the low-relief geomorphic surface was formed by lateral planation of streams to a base level not much higher than sea level and that the present deeply incised canyons must represent Neogene uplift of Colorado. Description of the surface, calculations of sediment volume, and isostatic balance and fluvial landsculpting models demonstrate that while the high elevation of the erosion surface was due to tectonic forces, its smoothness was mostly a result of climatic factors. A sediment balance calculated for the Front Range suggests that from 2 to 4 km of material were eroded by the late Eocene, consistent with fission track ages. This amount of erosion would remove a significant portionof the 7 km of Laramide upper crustal thickening. Isostatic modeling implies that the 2.2-3.3 km elevation was most likely created by lower crustal thickening during the Laramide. A numerical model of fluvial erosion and deposition suggests a way that a late Eocene surface could have formed at this high elevation without incision. A humid climate with a preponderance of small storm events will diffusively smooth topography and is a possible mechanism for formation oflow-relief, high-level surfaces. Paleoclimate models suggest a lack of large strom events in the late Eocene because of cool sea surface temperatures in the equatorial region. Return to a drier but stormier climate post-Eocene could have caused the incision of the surface by young canyons. By this interpretation, regional erosion surfaces may represent regional climatic rather than tectonic conditions.

  16. Tectonic and climatic significance of a late Eocene low-relief, high-level geomorphic surface, Colorado

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, Kathryn M.; Chase, Clement G

    1994-01-01

    New paleobotanical data suggest that in the late Eocene the erosion surface which capped the Front Range, Colorado was 2.2-2.3 km in elevation, which is similar to the 2.5-km present elevation of surface remnants. This estimated elevation casts doubt on the conventional belief that the low-relief geomorphic surface was formed by lateral planation of streams to a base level not much higher than sea level and that the present deeply incised canyons must represent Neogene uplift of Colorado. Description of the surface, calculations of sediment volume, and isostatic balance and fluvial landsculpting models demonstrate that while the high elevation of the erosion surface was due to tectonic forces, its smoothness was mostly a result of climatic factors. A sediment balance calculated for the Front Range suggests that from 2 to 4 km of material were eroded by the late Eocene, consistent with fission track ages. This amount of erosion would remove a significant portionof the 7 km of Laramide upper crustal thickening. Isostatic modeling implies that the 2.2-3.3 km elevation was most likely created by lower crustal thickening during the Laramide. A numerical model of fluvial erosion and deposition suggests a way that a late Eocene surface could have formed at this high elevation without incision. A humid climate with a preponderance of small storm events will diffusively smooth topography and is a possible mechanism for formation oflow-relief, high-level surfaces. Paleoclimate models suggest a lack of large strom events in the late Eocene because of cool sea surface temperatures in the equatorial region. Return to a drier but stormier climate post-Eocene could have caused the incision of the surface by young canyons. By this interpretation, regional erosion surfaces may represent regional climatic rather than tectonic conditions.

  17. Evolution of the Climate Continuum from the Mid-Miocene Climatic Optimum to the Present

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aswasereelert, W.; Meyers, S. R.; Hinnov, L. A.; Kelly, D.

    2011-12-01

    The recognition of orbital rhythms in paleoclimate data has led to a rich understanding of climate evolution during the Neogene and Quaternary. In contrast, changes in stochastic variability associated with the transition from unipolar to bipolar glaciation have received less attention, although the stochastic component likely preserves key insights about climate. In this study, we seek to evaluate the dominance and character of stochastic climate energy since the Middle Miocene Climatic Optimum (~17 Ma). These analyses extend a previous study that suggested diagnostic stochastic responses associated with Northern Hemisphere ice sheet development during the Plio-Pleistocene (Meyers and Hinnov, 2010). A critical and challenging step necessary to conduct the work is the conversion of depth data to time data. We investigate climate proxy datasets using multiple time scale hypotheses, including depth-derived time scales, sedimentologic/geochemical "tuning", minimal orbital tuning, and comprehensive orbital tuning. To extract the stochastic component of climate, and also explore potential relationships between the orbital parameters and paleoclimate response, a number of approaches rooted in Thomson's (1982) multi-taper spectral method (MTM) are applied. Importantly, the MTM technique is capable of separating the spectral "continuum" - a measure of stochastic variability - from the deterministic periodic orbital signals (spectral "lines") preserved in proxy data. Time series analysis of the proxy records using different chronologic approaches allows us to evaluate the sensitivity of our conclusion about stochastic and deterministic orbital processes during the Middle Miocene to present. Moreover, comparison of individual records permits examination of the spatial dependence of the identified climate responses. Meyers, S.R., and Hinnov, L.A. (2010), Northern Hemisphere glaciation and the evolution of Plio-Pleistocene climate noise: Paleoceanography, 25, PA3207, doi:10

  18. Transition to a climate state qualitatively different from modern in NCAR CCSM simulations of the Eocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caballero, R.; Huber, M.; Hanley, J.

    2012-04-01

    Recent paleoclimate proxy reconstructions indicate that global-mean surface temperatures in past warm climates may have been some 10-15°C higher than today. Little is known about atmospheric dynamics at temperatures this warm. In particular, is it possible that the general circulation may transition to a qualitatively different state at warm enough temperatures? We study this question in a set of simulations using NCAR's Community Climate System Model in both full- and slab-ocean configurations with a range of atmospheric CO2 concentrations extending from preindustrial values (280 ppm) up to 8960 ppm (5 doublings). We find that the simulation at 4480 ppm CO2 gives a remarkably good fit to recent surface temperature reconstructions of the early Eocene, and does not suffer from the classical 'low gradient' problem. We also find that the atmospheric general circulation in this and warmer simulations differs qualitatively from the modern regime in at least two major ways: 1) When equatorial surface temperatures exceed ~33°C, the model undergoes a transition to equatorial superrotation, a state with strong annual- and zonal-mean westerlies on the equator. The transition is driven by zonal momentum convergence due to large-amplitude transient eddies on the equator. These eddies have a structure similar to the observed Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO). The model's MJO variability is weaker than observed when simulating the modern climate but increases sharply with temperature, coming to dominate the tropical variability and mean state of the warmest climates. 2) Poleward atmospheric moisture transport across midlatitudes decreases with increasing temperature, the opposite behaviour to that at temperatures close to modern. We account for this non-monotonic behaviour in terms of a simple diffusive model of the oceanic storm tracks which suggests that it is due mostly to the drop in mean eddy amplitudes as temperature increases.

  19. Quantifying the methane atmospheric concentration during the warm and wet climate of the Middle Miocene Climatic Optimum (17-15 Ma)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramstein, G.; Hopcroft, P.; Ringeval, B.; Hamon, N.

    2012-04-01

    The warm periods, as the Cenomanian, the Eocene or the Middle Miocene correspond almost always to a very weak Equator to Pole thermal gradient. Recent studies demonstrate that it was possible to simulate the Middle Miocene climate (17-15 Ma) using atmospheric CO2 around 2 PAL (1PAL = 280 ppm) (Krapp and Jungclaus, 2011; Hamon et al., accepted). However, these estimates are in disagreement with the reconstructions from marine sediments (13C, Bore) that suggest a much lower atmospheric CO2 (Pagani et al., 1999; Hendericks and Pagani, 2007; Pearson and Palmer, 2000). Here we investigate an alternative view which is to explore and quantify the methane concentration in the atmosphere. In fact, during the warm and wet climate of the Middle Miocene Climatic Optimum (MMCO), the sources of methane could have been much larger than during the preindustrial period and could have lead to larger concentrations that the one commonly used to perform the MMCO modelling experiments. To get a first order value of the change in methane sources in such a climate, we perform a realistic MMCO experiment using coupled atmosphere-ocean general circulation model (FOAM). Sensitivity tests on the CO2 concentration have been performed. Then we use the simulated climate fields to drive a global vegetation model (SDVGM) and simulate the wetland methane emissions. The key question is therefore: Is it possible that methane plays a role and explains the apparent disagreement between the low value of CO2 as described by the data and the high radiative forcing necessary in the model to explain the vegetation distribution reconstructed by pollen data and megafloras?

  20. High plant diversity in Eocene South America: evidence from Patagonia.

    PubMed

    Wilf, Peter; Cúneo, N Rubén; Johnson, Kirk R; Hicks, Jason F; Wing, Scott L; Obradovich, John D

    2003-04-04

    Tropical South America has the highest plant diversity of any region today, but this richness is usually characterized as a geologically recent development (Neogene or Pleistocene). From caldera-lake beds exposed at Laguna del Hunco in Patagonia, Argentina, paleolatitude approximately 47 degrees S, we report 102 leaf species. Radioisotopic and paleomagnetic analyses indicate that the flora was deposited 52 million years ago, the time of the early Eocene climatic optimum, when tropical plant taxa and warm, equable climates reached middle latitudes of both hemispheres. Adjusted for sample size, observed richness exceeds that of any other Eocene leaf flora, supporting an ancient history of high plant diversity in warm areas of South America.

  1. High plant diversity in Eocene South America: Evidence from Patagonia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilf, P.; Cuneo, N.R.; Johnson, K.R.; Hicks, J.F.; Wing, S.L.; Obradovich, J.D.

    2003-01-01

    Tropical South America has the highest plant diversity of any region today, but this richness is usually characterized as a geologically recent development (Neogene or Pleistocene). From caldera-lake beds exposed at Laguna del Hunco in Patagonia, Argentina, paleolatitude ~47oS, we report 102 leaf species. Radioisotopic and paleomagnetic analyses indicate that the flora was deposited 52 million years ago, the time of the early Eocene climatic optimum, when tropical plant taxa and warm, equable climates reached middle latitudes of both hemispheres. Adjusted for sample size, observed richness exceeds that of any other Eocene leaf flora, supporting an ancient history of high plant diversity in warm areas of South America.

  2. Climatic impacts of an expanded Antarctic ice sheet at the Eocene-Oligocene boundary.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennedy, Alan; Lunt, Dan; Lear, Carrie; Farnsworth, Alex

    2015-04-01

    Multiple lines of evidence point to an expansion of the Antarctic ice sheet at the Eocene-Oligocene boundary, ~34 million years ago. A decrease in atmospheric carbon dioxide is currently considered to be the most likely cause of this expansion; however, changes in palaeogeography and continental configuration may have played a role. Recently, two high-profile modelling studies have focussed on the oceanic and climatic effects of an increased Antarctic ice sheet (Knorr and Lohmann, Nature Geoscience, 2014; Goldner et al, Nature, 2014). These two studies were apparently inconsistent, in that they produced very different SST responses to an expanded ice sheet. These were, however, under different continental configurations and with different models, and so more detailed study is warranted. Here, we carry out a suite of model simulations with the UK Met Office model, HadCM3L, consisting of two different palaeogeographies (Chattian and Rupelian), both with and without an Antarctic ice sheet. The results show a very strong dependence on the underlying palaeogeography, with an SST response of opposite sign for the two palaeogeographies. We show the results and discuss the mechanisms behind the changes seen.

  3. Early Eocene biotic and climatic change in interior western North America

    SciTech Connect

    Wing, S.L. ); Bown, T.M.; Obradovich, J.D. )

    1991-12-01

    Imprecise correlation of the marine and terrestrial fossil records has been a major obstacle to understanding migration and extinction of continental biotas and early Cenozoic climate change. New {sup 40}Ar/{sup 39}Ar data from the Willwood Formation in the Bighorn Basin of Wyoming establish an age of 52.8 {plus minus} 0.3 Ma for earliest Lostcabinian (late Wasatchian) faunas and coeval early Eocene floras. Strata just beneath earliest Wasatchian faunas can be correlated with the NP9/NP10 boundary in marine sedimentary units, which has an interpolated age of {approximately}55.7 Ma. This new information allows the authors to estimate the durations of the Wasatchian ({approximately}5 m.y.) and the Lostcabinian ({approximately}2 m.y.) and shows that the continental biotas are coeval with the acme of Cenozoic warmth inferred from {delta}{sup 18}O measurements of foraminifera. From 58 to 50 Ma, paleoclimate in the continental interior at about 45{degree}N was warm and equable, but patterns of temperature change inferred from continental floras do not track precisely the marine {delta}{sup 18}O record.

  4. Missing organic carbon in Eocene marine sediments: Is metabolism the biological feedback that maintains end-member climates?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olivarez Lyle, Annette; Lyle, Mitchell W.

    2006-06-01

    Ocean chemistry is affected by pCO2 in the atmosphere by increasing the dissolution of solid calcium carbonate and elevating the dissolved inorganic carbon concentrations in seawater. Positive feedbacks between the ocean and atmosphere can maintain high atmospheric pCO2 and affect global climate. We report evidence for changes in the oceanic carbon cycle from the first high-quality organic carbon (Corg) data set of Eocene sediments beneath the equatorial Pacific upwelling region (Leg 199 of the Ocean Drilling Program). Eocene Corg mass accumulation rates (MARs) are 10 times lower than Holocene rates, even though expected Corg MARs estimated from biogenic-barium MARs (an indicator of biological production) equal or exceed modern fluxes. What happened to the missing Corg? Recent advances in ecology and biochemical kinetics show that the metabolism of nearly all animals, marine and terrestrial, is positively correlated by first principles to environmental temperatures. The approximately 10°C abyssal temperature difference from Eocene to Holocene should have radically reduced pelagic Corg burial, as we observe. We propose that higher basal metabolism and nutrient utilization/recycling rates in the Eocene water column and surface sediments precluded Corg sediment burial in the pelagic ocean. Increased rates of metabolism, nutrient utilization, and lowered Corg sedimentation caused by increased temperature may have acted as a biological feedback to maintain high atmospheric pCO2 and hothouse climates. Conversely, these same parameters would reverse sign to maintain low pCO2 when temperatures decrease, thereby maintaining "icehouse" conditions during cold climate regimes.

  5. A Turning Point in the Cenozoic Greenhouse to Icehouse Transition during the Late Middle Eocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zachos, J.; Bohaty, S. M.

    2008-12-01

    A fundamental shift from greenhouse to icehouse climates occurred during Eocene-Oligocene time interval, characterized by extensive global cooling and the development of large polar ice sheets. Although the long- term climate trends through this interval have been well established, very few paleoceanographic records provide the necessary resolution to document short-term climatic variability. Compilation of benthic foraminiferal and bulk δ18O records from Southern Ocean sites provides high-resolution data coverage spanning most of the Eocene. Based on these highly-coherent records, there is now sufficient resolution to make general inferences concerning both the long-term and short-term climate variability through the middle and late Eocene. The Middle Eocene Climatic Optimum (MECO) at ~40 Ma stands out as the most prominent reversal in the long-term cooling trend through the middle and late Eocene, representing the lowest δ18O values (warmest temperatures) in all intervals younger than ~48 Ma. Thus, the compiled δ18O records indicate that the warm temperatures sustained during the MECO represent a brief return to temperatures experienced during the early Eocene, and warming of a similar degree did not occur during the remainder of the Eocene, indicating that the MECO was the final Eocene 'hyperthermal' event. Post-MECO cooling was rapid and initiated a long-term cooling trend that culminated near the middle-late Eocene boundary at ~37 Ma. The highest benthic foraminiferal δ18O values of the entire Eocene characterize this interval, representing the most likely period of ice-sheet development prior to the Eocene-Oligocene boundary. This interval of cooling and/or glaciation at 37 Ma was subsequently followed by several late Eocene warming and cooling cycles preceding the major increase in δ18O across the Eocene-Oligocene transition. In the broad perspective, the MECO event appears to represent a major turning point in the Eocene climate evolution, separating

  6. Noachian-Hesperian Transition and a Possible Climatic Optimum: Evidence from Landforms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, J. M.; Howard, A. D.

    2004-01-01

    A climatic optimum? The often strong contrast between the pristine and degraded Noachian channels and craters might be due to a gradual climatic change superimposed upon an episode of mantling associated with early Hesperian volcanism. On the other hand, one or more episodes of volcanism or large impacts could have induced global warming and produced a relatively short-lived optimum for precipitation and runoff. The rapid cutoff of fluvial activity following the development of the later pristine fluvial features is consistent with this scenario. We discuss the changing style of erosion in the highlands during the Noachian and early Hesperian in a companion abstract to this workshop. Here we review the some of the morphologic evidence for a possible Noachian-Hesperian (N-H) climate optimum.

  7. Eocene monsoons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huber, Matthew; Goldner, Aaron

    2012-01-01

    A prominent example of climate-tectonic coupling is the Asian monsoon and the uplift of the Tibetan Plateau. Here we review some of what is known about the history of the monsoon, within a global context and present results from fully coupled Eocene simulations in which Tibetan Plateau height is varied. Peak elevations were doubled from 2000 m to 4000 m whereas mean elevations increased from 750 to 1500 m. The fully coupled Eocene simulations show that introducing a higher Tibetan Plateau into Asian topography intensifies rainfall over southwest Asia, but induces drying over and behind the Plateau. This atmospheric response is controlled by increases in heating over the Plateau region which drives increases in moisture convergence inducing shifts in lower level atmospheric moisture flux. With Eocene boundary conditions aspects of the canonical response from prior work remain the same: cooling over the uplifted region, a large stationary wave response emanating from the plateau and extending into North America, and a large increase in precipitation in summer in the regions with strongest relief, with a rain shadow behind it. But some important local responses are different from similar studies with modern boundary conditions, such as a warming behind the uplifted mountains, and southward advection of warm, moist air from Paratethys onto the Plateau. These results demonstrate that simulations with fully interactive ocean-atmosphere coupled models with a realistic history of paleogeographic boundary conditions will increase the realism of the resulting climatic simulations and increase the body of available proxy evidence for comparison. More generally we find that a global monsoon distribution of precipitation exists in the Eocene regardless of Tibetan Plateau height. Changing Plateau height has minor global impacts, which include a slight drying of midlatitude and cooling of the North Pacific. The results are robust to changes in climate model resolution and

  8. Global carbon cycle perturbation across the Eocene-Oligocene climate transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armstrong McKay, David I.; Tyrrell, Toby; Wilson, Paul A.

    2016-02-01

    The Eocene-Oligocene transition (EOT), ~34 Ma, marks a tipping point in the long-term Cenozoic greenhouse to icehouse climate transition. Paleorecords reveal stepwise rapid cooling and ice growth across the EOT tightly coupled to a transient benthic δ13C excursion and a major and permanent deepening of the carbonate compensation depth (CCD). Based on biogeochemical box modeling, Merico et al. (2008) suggested that a combination of (1) glacioeustatic sea level fall-induced shelf-basin carbonate burial fractionation and (2) shelf carbonate weathering can account for the carbon cycle perturbation, but this finding has been questioned. Alternative proposed mechanisms include increased ocean ventilation, decreased carbonate burial, increased organic carbon burial, increased silicate weathering, and increased ocean calcium concentration. Here we use an improved version of the biogeochemical box model of Merico et al. (2008) to reevaluate these competing hypotheses and an additional mechanism, the expansion of "carbon capacitors" such as permafrost and peatlands. We find that changes in calcium concentration, silicate weathering, and carbonate or organic carbon burial each yield a response that is fundamentally at odds with the form and/or sign of the paleorecords. Shelf-basin carbonate burial fractionation (CCD change), plus shelf carbonate weathering, sequestration of 12C-enriched carbon into carbon capacitors, and possibly increased ocean ventilation (δ13C excursion), offers the best fit to the paleorecords. Further work is needed to understand why the EOT carbon cycle perturbation is so unique when the forcing mechanisms hypothesized to be responsible (cooling and ice growth) are not peculiar to this event.

  9. Impact of Paratethys sea on Eocene Central Asian seasonality: from climatic model to bivalves high-resolution geochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bougeois, L.; Tindall, J. C.; de Rafelis, M.; Reichart, G. J.; de Nooijer, L. J.; Dupont Nivet, G.

    2014-12-01

    The modern Asian climate is mainly characterized by a monsoonal duality between humid summers in southern and eastern Asia and arid climate in Central Asia resulting in a strong seasonality in terms of precipitation and temperature in these respective regions. Asian Monsoons are also characterised by the aridification in Central Asia due to the foehn effect north of the Tibetan Plateau and the inherent perturbation of the atmospheric circulation generated by the monsoons. According to climate models, Asian Monsoons have been mainly governed by Tibetan plateau uplift, the retreat of a vast epicontinental sea (the Proto-Paratethys sea) and global climate changes. Evidence for monsoons a old as Eocene are starting to be established by proxy and model data. This corresponds to the timing of the Proto-Paratethys retreat, however, the role of this sea on climate and the monsoonal expression in that period remain to be established. Here we show, using infra-annual geochemical proxies from oyster shells of the Proto-Paratethys sea and climate simulations, that the Central Asian region was generally arid with high seasonality from hot and arid summers to wetter winters. This high seasonality in Central Asia therefore supports an intense monsoonal circulation was already established although the climate pattern was significantly different than today. During winter months, a strong influence of the Proto-Paratethys moisture is indicated by enhanced precipitations as well as modelled stable isotopic composition of precipitation significantly higher than today. This supports a strong influence on local climate of the Proto-Paratethys sea, which subsequently retreated and was replaced by the Pamir mountains. During Eocene summers, the local climate was more arid despite the presence of the Proto-Paratethys. This may be explained by a strong anticyclonic Hadley cell descending at these latitudes (25 to 45 N) over Central Asia during Eocene times. Furthermore, the Tibetan plateau

  10. Invading Europe: did climate or geography trigger early Eocene primate dispersals?

    PubMed

    Soligo, Christophe

    2007-01-01

    The Palaeocene-Eocene transition is characterized by a significant turnover of mammalian taxa in the fossil record of the northern continents, and primates are among the groups that make their first appearance at this time. One of the many questions that remain to be answered with regard to the earliest evolution of primates is the reason for their sudden and virtually simultaneous appearance in the fossil records of Asia, Europe and North America. The most obvious environmental correlate of the Palaeocene-Eocene transition is a sharp but relatively short-lived warming event leading up to the Palaeocene-Eocene thermal maximum (PETM) and evidenced in the stratigraphic record by a negative delta(13)C excursion. It remains unclear, however, whether or how this warming event may have influenced Palaeocene-Eocene faunal turnovers. This paper explores the hypothesis that environmental changes associated with the PETM facilitated an invasion of Western Europe by primates by comparing the ecological structure of local mammalian fauna immediately before and following the Palaeocene-Eocene transition. The results suggest that changes to the ecological profile of local mammalian fauna were relatively small and did not favour an invasion by primates, although a major uncertainty remains with respect to the availability of arboreal niches. At present it seems more likely that the invasion of western Europe by primates was due to the breakdown of one or more dispersal barriers close to the end of the Palaeocene.

  11. Refining our estimate of atmospheric CO2 across the Eocene-Oligocene climatic transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heureux, Ana M. C.; Rickaby, Rosalind E. M.

    2015-01-01

    The Eocene-Oligocene transition (EOT) followed by Oligocene isotope event 1 (Oi-1) is a dramatic global switch in climate characterized by deep-sea cooling and the first formation of permanent Antarctic ice. Models and proxy evidence suggest that declining partial pressure of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2atm) below a threshold may explain the onset of global cooling and associated ice formation at Oi-1. However, significant uncertainty remains in the estimated values and salient features of reconstructed CO2atm across this interval. In this study, we present novel carbon isotope records from size separated diatom associated organic matter (δ13Cdiatom) preserved in silica frustules. Physical preservation of this material allows concurrent investigation of isotopic and cell size information, providing two input parameters for biogeochemical models and the reconstruction of CO2atm. We estimate CO2atm in two ways; first we use size and reaction-diffusion kinetics of a cell to calculate a CO2atm threshold. Second we use the calibrated relationship between ɛp(diatom) and carbon dioxide from culture and field studies to create a record of CO2atm prior to and across the transition. Our study, from site 1090 in the Atlantic sector of the Southern Ocean, shows CO2atm values fluctuating between 900 and 1700 ± 100 p.p.m.v. across the EOT followed by a drop to values in the order of 700 to 800 ± 100 p.p.m.v. just prior to the onset of Oi-1. Our values and magnitude of CO2atm change differ from previous estimates, but confirm the overall trends inferred from boron isotopes and alkenones, including a marked rebound following Oi-1. Due to the intricate nature of the climate system and complexities in constraining paleo-proxies, this work emphasizes the importance of a multi-proxy approach to estimating of CO2atm in order to elucidate its role in the emplacement of Antarctic ice-sheets at the EOT.

  12. South Greenland Ice-Sheet Response to the Mid-Pliocene Climatic Optimum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlson, A. E.; Mathias, A.; Hatfield, R. G.; Winsor, K.; Stoner, J. S.

    2014-12-01

    The last time atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration approached present day levels was likely during the mid-Pliocene climate optimum 3.3-3.0 Ma. Estimates of sea level from the mid-Pliocene optimum vary widely and contain a significant component of glacial isostasy and dynamic topography, precluding a firm estimate of global ice volume. Here we present new data constraining the southern Greenland ice sheet (GIS) across the mid-Pliocene optimum from IODP Site U1307 located on the Eirik Ridge south of Greenland. Magnetic susceptibility dramatically decreases at ~3.3 Ma, recovering at ~3.05 Ma. Magnetic parameters on silt-size grains (Mrs/Ms) show this decrease likely reflects the loss of silt sourced from the Precambrian terranes of south Greenland, which would suggest the loss of the south GIS. The sand fraction reflects the degree of iceberg rafting with increases at an ~40 ka period. Planktic oxygen isotopes decrease during iceberg rafting events to values lower than the Holocene. An extended interval of low sand occurs from ~3.3 Ma to ~3.2 Ma, which suggests cessation of iceberg rafting. Planktic oxygen isotopes increase during this interval. Assuming a relatively warm climate, this increase could reflect the incursion of high 18-O subtropical waters into the Labrador Sea. The return of iceberg rafted sediments after ~3.2 Ma suggests the regrowth of the GIS with marine-terminating margins. Our new preliminary record points to a GIS collapse during the mid-Pliocene climatic optimum, but that ice-free conditions only lasted for ~100 ka before the return of a volatile ice sheet for the remainder of the mid-Pliocene climatic optimum.

  13. Late Eocene clay boron-derived paleosalinity in the Qaidam Basin and its implications for regional tectonics and climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Chengcheng; Yang, Yibo; Fang, Xiaomin; Zhang, Weilin

    2016-12-01

    The Qaidam Basin, located on the northeastern Tibetan Plateau and containing Cenozoic sediments with a maximum thickness of 12,000 m, is an ideal place to study the phased uplift of the NE Tibetan Plateau and regional climate change. The estimation of the paleosalinity of sedimentary environments not only helps to evaluate the evolution of lakes in this region but offers insights into contemporaneous climate change. We present detailed geochemical and mineralogical investigations from the lacustrine interval of the Hongliugou section in the northern Qaidam Basin to reconstruct salinity fluctuations in the paleolake during the late Eocene era ( 42.0-35.5 Ma). The clay mineral assemblages mainly contain smectite, illite, chlorite, kaolinite and irregular illite/smectite mixed layers. Clay boron-derived paleosalinity estimates (equivalent boron content, Couch's paleosalimeter and B/Ga ratios) along with other proxies sensitive to salinity changes (e.g., Rb/K ratios and ostracod assemblages) collectively indicate an overall brackish sedimentary environment with a higher-salinity period at approximately 40.0-39.2 Ma. This higher-salinity period indicates a more arid environment and is probably related to global cooling. However, the global cooling in late Eocene cannot explain the overall stable long-term salinity pattern, implying that other factors exist. We propose that the migration of the Yiliping depression depocenter in the northern Qaidam and increased orographic rainfall induced by late Eocene tectonic activity at the northern margin of the basin might have partly offset the increase in salinity driven by global cooling.

  14. Ecological Impact of Climate Change on Leaf Economic Strategies Across the Paleocene- Eocene Thermal Maximum, Bighorn Basin, Wyoming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Royer, D. L.; Currano, E. D.; Wilf, P.; Wing, S. L.; Labandeira, C. C.; Lovelock, E. C.

    2007-12-01

    Deciphering the ecological impacts of climate change is a key priority for paleontologists and ecologists alike. An important ecological metric in vegetated settings is the leaf economics spectrum, which represents an adaptive continuum running from rapid resource acquisition to maximized resource retention. This spectrum is comprised of a large number of coordinated traits, including leaf mass per area (LMA), leaf lifespan, photosynthetic rate, nutrient concentration, and palatability to herbivores. Here we apply a recently developed technique for reconstructing LMA to a suite of four isotaphonomic fossil plant sites spanning the Paleocene-Eocene thermal maximum (PETM) in the Bighorn Basin, Wyoming, USA. This technique is based on the biomechanical scaling between petiole width and leaf mass, and it has been calibrated with 65 present-day sites from five continents and tested on two well-known Eocene fossil localities (Bonanza, Utah and Republic, Washington). There are no significant differences in LMA among plants across the PETM. This stasis is present despite a backdrop of extreme climate change during the PETM in this region, including a three-to-four-fold increase in atmospheric CO2, an ~5 °C rise in temperature, and possible drying. Moreover, quantitative measurements of insect herbivory show, on average, a two-fold increase during the PETM relative to before and after the event. We interpret our results to suggest that leaf-economic relationships can, in some situations, partially decouple. More specifically, our documented increase in insect herbivory during the PETM with no concomitant decrease in LMA implies that during this interval less carbon was being captured by plants per unit of investment. Because the rate and magnitude of climate change during the PETM is similar to present-day anthropogenic changes, our results may provide clues for predictions of ecological impacts in the near future.

  15. Terrestrial responses of low-latitude Asia to the Eocene-Oligocene climate transition revealed by integrated chronostratigraphy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Y. X.; Jiao, W. J.; Liu, Z. H.; Jin, J. H.; Wang, D. H.; He, Y. X.; Quan, C.

    2016-02-01

    The Paleogene sedimentary records from southern China hold important clues to the impacts of the Cenozoic climate changes on low latitudes. However, although there are extensive Paleogene terrestrial archives and some contain abundant fossils in this region, few are accurately dated or have a temporal resolution adequate to decipher climate changes. Here, we present a detailed stratigraphic and paleomagnetic study of a fossiliferous late Paleogene succession in the Maoming Basin, Guangdong Province. The succession consists of oil shale of the Youganwo Formation (Fm) in the lower part and the overlying sandstone-dominated Huangniuling Fm in the upper part. Fossil records indicate that the age of the succession possibly spans the late Eocene to the Oligocene. Both the Youganwo Fm and the overlying Huangniuling Fm exhibit striking sedimentary rhythms, and spectral analysis of the depth series of magnetic susceptibility of the Youganwo Fm reveals dominant sedimentary cycles at orbital frequency bands. The transition from the Youganwo oil shale to the overlying Huangniuling sandstones is conformable and represents a major depositional environmental change from a lacustrine to a deltaic environment. Integrating the magnetostratigraphic, lithologic, and fossil data allows establishing a substantially refined chronostratigraphic framework that places the major depositional environmental change at 33.88 Ma, coinciding with the Eocene-Oligocene climate transition (EOT) at ˜ 33.7 to ˜ 33.9 Ma. We suggest that the transition from a lacustrine to deltaic environment in the Maoming Basin represents terrestrial responses to the EOT and indicates prevailing drying conditions in low-latitude regions during the global cooling at EOT.

  16. Shallow marine response to global climate change during the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum, Salisbury Embayment, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Self-Trail, Jean; Robinson, Marci M.; Bralower, Timothy J.; Sessa, Jocelyn A.; Hajek, Elizabeth A.; Kump, Lee R.; Trampush, Sheila M.; Willard, Debra A.; Edwards, Lucy E.; Powars, David S.; Wandless, Gregory A.

    2017-01-01

    The Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM) was an interval of extreme warmth that caused disruption of marine and terrestrial ecosystems on a global scale. Here we examine the sediments, flora, and fauna from an expanded section at Mattawoman Creek-Billingsley Road (MCBR) in Maryland and explore the impact of warming at a nearshore shallow marine (30–100 m water depth) site in the Salisbury Embayment. Observations indicate that at the onset of the PETM, the site abruptly shifted from an open marine to prodelta setting with increased terrestrial and fresh water input. Changes in microfossil biota suggest stratification of the water column and low-oxygen bottom water conditions in the earliest Eocene. Formation of authigenic carbonate through microbial diagenesis produced an unusually large bulk carbon isotope shift, while the magnitude of the corresponding signal from benthic foraminifera is similar to that at other marine sites. This proves that the landward increase in the magnitude of the carbon isotope excursion measured in bulk sediment is not due to a near instantaneous release of 12C-enriched CO2. We conclude that the MCBR site records nearshore marine response to global climate change that can be used as an analog for modern coastal response to global warming.

  17. Shallow marine response to global climate change during the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum, Salisbury Embayment, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Self-Trail, Jean M.; Robinson, Marci M.; Bralower, Timothy J.; Sessa, Jocelyn A.; Hajek, Elizabeth A.; Kump, Lee R.; Trampush, Sheila M.; Willard, Debra A.; Edwards, Lucy E.; Powars, David S.; Wandless, Gregory A.

    2017-07-01

    The Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM) was an interval of extreme warmth that caused disruption of marine and terrestrial ecosystems on a global scale. Here we examine the sediments, flora, and fauna from an expanded section at Mattawoman Creek-Billingsley Road (MCBR) in Maryland and explore the impact of warming at a nearshore shallow marine (30-100 m water depth) site in the Salisbury Embayment. Observations indicate that at the onset of the PETM, the site abruptly shifted from an open marine to prodelta setting with increased terrestrial and fresh water input. Changes in microfossil biota suggest stratification of the water column and low-oxygen bottom water conditions in the earliest Eocene. Formation of authigenic carbonate through microbial diagenesis produced an unusually large bulk carbon isotope shift, while the magnitude of the corresponding signal from benthic foraminifera is similar to that at other marine sites. This proves that the landward increase in the magnitude of the carbon isotope excursion measured in bulk sediment is not due to a near instantaneous release of 12C-enriched CO2. We conclude that the MCBR site records nearshore marine response to global climate change that can be used as an analog for modern coastal response to global warming.

  18. Arctic Climate and Terrestrial Vegetation Responses During the Middle to Late Eocene and Early Oligocene: Colder Winters Preceded Cool-Down.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenwood, D. R.; Eldrett, J.

    2006-12-01

    The late Eocene to early Oligocene is recognized as an interval of substantial change in the global climate, with isotopic proxies of climate indicating a significant drop in sea surface temperatures. Other studies have shown, however that at middle latitudes that terrestrial mean annual temperature did not change significantly over this interval, and that the major change was likely a shift towards a greater range of seasonal temperatures; colder winters and warmer summers. Previous analyses of high latitude (Arctic) middle Eocene climate using both leaf physiognomic analysis and qualitative analysis of identified nearest living relatives of terrestrial floras indicated upper microthermal environments (mean annual temp. or MAT ca 10°C but perhaps as high as 15°C, coldest month mean temp. or CMMT ca 0°C) for Axel Heiberg Island in the Arctic Archipelago, but did not address precipitation nor provide data on the Eocene-Oligocene transition in the Arctic. Presented here are new estimates of temperature and precipitation (annual and season amounts) for the Arctic based on NLR analysis of terrestrial plant palynomorphs (spores and pollen) from the ODP 913B and 985 cores from near Greenland. The record of climate for the Greenland cores show a similar climate in the middle Eocene to that previously estimated for Axel Heiberg Island further to the west, with MAT 10- 15°C but with CMMT >5°C. Precipitation was high (mean annual precip. or MAP >180 cm/yr), although with large uncertainties attached to the estimate. The climate proxy record for the late Eocene to early Oligocene shows a lack of change in MAT and MAP over the time interval. Consistent with other published records at middle latitudes, however, winter temperatures (as CMMT) show greater variability leading up to the E-O boundary, and consistently cooler values in the early Oligocene (CMMT <5°C) than recorded for most of the middle to late Eocene record (CMMT >5°C). Plant groups sensitive to freezing such

  19. Eocene Temperature Evolution of the Tropical Atlantic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cramwinckel, M.; Kocken, I.; Agnini, C.; Huber, M.; van der Ploeg, R.; Frieling, J.; Bijl, P.; Peterse, F.; Roehl, U.; Bohaty, S. M.; Schouten, S.; Sluijs, A.

    2016-12-01

    The transition from the early Eocene ( 50 Ma) hothouse towards the Oligocene ( 33 Ma) icehouse was interrupted by the Middle Eocene Climatic Optimum (MECO) ( 40 Ma), a 500,000-year long episode of deep sea and Southern Ocean warming. It remains unclear whether this transient warming event was global, and whether it was caused by changes in atmospheric greenhouse gas concentrations or confined to high latitudes resulting from ocean circulation change. Here we show, based on biomarker paleothermometry applied at Ocean Drilling Program Site 959, offshore Ghana, that sea surface temperatures in the eastern equatorial Atlantic Ocean declined by 7°C over the middle-late Eocene, in agreement with temperature trends documented in the southern high latitudes. In the equatorial Atlantic, this long-term trend was punctuated by 2.5°C warming during the MECO. At the zenith of MECO warmth, changes in dinoflagellate cyst assemblages and laminated sediments at Site 959 point to open ocean hyperstratification and seafloor deoxygenation, respectively. Remarkably, the data reveal that the magnitude of temperature change in the tropics was approximately half that in the Southern Ocean. This suggests that the generally ice free Eocene yielded limited but significant polar amplification of climate change. Crucially, general circulation model (GCM) simulations reveal that the recorded tropical and deep ocean temperature trends are best explained by greenhouse gas forcing, controlling both middle-late Eocene cooling and the superimposed MECO warming.

  20. Penguin response to the Eocene climate and ecosystem change in the northern Antarctic Peninsula region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jadwiszczak, Piotr

    2010-08-01

    Eocene Antarctic penguins are known solely from the La Meseta Formation (Seymour Island, James Ross Basin). They are most numerous and taxonomically diverse (at least ten species present) within strata formed at the end of this epoch, which is concomitant with a significant cooling trend and biotic turnover prior to the onset of glaciation. Moreover, all newly appeared taxa were small-bodied, and most probably evolved in situ. Interestingly, some chemical proxies suggest enhanced nutrient upwelling events that coincided with obvious changes in the record of La Meseta penguins.

  1. Paleoweathering and paleoenvironmental change recorded in lacustrine sediments of the early to middle Eocene in Fushun Basin, Northeast China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zuoling; Ding, Zhongli; Tang, Zihua; Yang, Shiling; Wang, Xu; Cui, Linlin

    2017-01-01

    Deciphering the long-term interaction among continental silicate weathering, global climate, and atmospheric CO2 concentrations is helpful in understanding the mechanisms of the Cenozoic climate change and accessing the future climatic and environmental response to anthropogenic carbon emissions. The Eocene, which is characterized by the Early Eocene Climatic Optimum (EECO) and the following global cooling, represents an ideal test case. Here we generate geochemical data of the Eocene lacustrine sediments from the Fushun Basin, northeast China, to explore the regional climatic response to the global climate change. The chemical index of alteration (CIA) and plagioclase index of alteration (PIA) consistently show a gradual, long-term decrease, indicating a climatic transition from warm and humid to relatively cold and arid during the Eocene in the Fushun Basin. This climatic trend is broadly coincident with the global cooling and decreasing CO2 concentration, implying that the regional climate is closely correlated with the global climate change over geological time scales. Additionally, the extreme silicate weathering and high lake productivity as reflected by relatively positive δ13C values of lacustrine organic matter are associated with the EECO. This consistency may demonstrate that enhanced continental weathering and lake productivity had served as effective sinks to lower atmospheric CO2 across the EECO. Collectively, our new geochemical data add supporting evidence for a long-term, close coupling among continental silicate weathering, climate, and global carbon cycle during the Eocene.

  2. Variability in climate and productivity during the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum in the western Tethys (Forada section)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giusberti, L.; Boscolo Galazzo, F.; Thomas, E.

    2016-02-01

    The Forada section (northeastern Italy) provides a continuous, expanded deep-sea record of the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM) in the central-western Tethys. We combine a new, high-resolution, benthic foraminiferal assemblage record with published calcareous plankton, mineralogical and biomarker data to document climatic and environmental changes across the PETM, highlighting the benthic foraminiferal extinction event (BEE). The onset of the PETM, occurring ˜ 30 kyr after a precursor event, is marked by a thin, black, barren clay layer, possibly representing a brief pulse of anoxia and carbonate dissolution. The BEE occurred within the 10 cm interval including this layer. During the first 3.5 kyr of the PETM, several agglutinated recolonizing taxa show rapid species turnover, indicating a highly unstable, CaCO3-corrosive environment. Calcareous taxa reappeared after this interval, and the next ˜9 kyr were characterized by rapid alternation of peaks in abundance of various calcareous and agglutinated recolonizers. These observations suggest that synergistic stressors, including deepwater CaCO3 corrosiveness, low oxygenation, and high environmental instability caused the extinction. Combined faunal and biomarker data (BIT index, higher plant n-alkane average chain length) and the high abundance of the mineral chlorite suggest that erosion and weathering increased strongly at the onset of the PETM, due to an overall wet climate with invigorated hydrological cycle, which led to storm flood events carrying massive sediment discharge into the Belluno Basin. This interval was followed by the core of the PETM, characterized by four precessionally paced cycles in CaCO3 %, hematite %, δ13C, abundant occurrence of opportunistic benthic foraminiferal taxa, and calcareous nannofossil and planktonic foraminiferal taxa typical of high-productivity environments, radiolarians, and lower δDn-alkanes. We interpret these cycles as reflecting alternation between an overall

  3. Benthic foraminifera at the Paleocene/Eocene thermal maximum in the western Tethys (Forada section): variability in climate and productivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giusberti, L.; Boscolo Galazzo, F.; Thomas, E.

    2015-09-01

    The Forada section (northeastern Italy) provides a continuous, expanded deep-sea record of the Paleocene/Eocene thermal maximum (PETM) in the central-western Tethys. We combine a new, high resolution, benthic foraminiferal assemblage record with published calcareous plankton, mineralogical and biomarker data to document climatic and environmental changes across the PETM, highlighting the benthic foraminiferal extinction event (BEE). The onset of the PETM, occurring ~ 30 kyr after a precursor event, is marked by a thin, black, barren clay layer, possibly representing a brief pulse of anoxia and carbonate dissolution. The BEE occurred within the 10 cm interval including this layer. During the first 3.5 kyr of the PETM several agglutinated recolonizing taxa show rapid species turnover, indicating a highly unstable, CaCO3-corrosive environment. Calcareous taxa reappeared after this interval, and the next ~ 9 kyr were characterized by rapid alternation of peaks in abundance of various calcareous and agglutinant recolonizers. These observations suggest that synergistic stressors including deep water CaCO3-corrosiveness, low oxygenation, and high environmental instability caused the extinction. Combined faunal and biomarker data (BIT index, higher plant n-alkane average chain length) and the high abundance of the mineral chlorite suggest that erosion and weathering increased strongly at the onset of the PETM, due to an overall wet climate with invigorated hydrological cycle, which led to storm flood-events carrying massive sediment discharge into the Belluno Basin. This interval was followed by the core of the PETM, characterized by four precessionally paced cycles in CaCO3%, hematite%, δ13C, abundant occurrence of opportunistic benthic foraminiferal taxa, as well as calcareous nannofossil and planktonic foraminiferal taxa typical of high productivity environments, radiolarians, and lower δDn-alkanes. We interpret these cycles as reflecting alternation between an

  4. Did gene family expansions during the Eocene-Oligocene boundary climate cooling play a role in Pooideae adaptation to cool climates?

    PubMed

    Sandve, Simen Rød; Fjellheim, Siri

    2010-05-01

    Adaptation to cool environments is a common feature in the core group of the grass subfamily Pooideae (Triticeae and Poeae). This suggest an ancient evolutionary origin of low temperature stress tolerance dating back prior to the initiation of taxonomic divergence of core Pooideae species. Viewing the Pooideae evolution in a palaeo-climatic perspective reveals that taxonomic divergence of the core Pooideae group initiated shortly after a global super-cooling period at the Eocene-Oligocene boundary (approximately 33.5-26 Ma). This global climate cooling altered distributions of plants and animals and must have imposed selection pressure for improved low temperature stress responses. Lineage-specific gene family expansions are known to be involved in adaptation to new environmental stresses. In Pooideae, two gene families involved in low temperature stress response, the C-repeat binding factor (CBF) and fructosyl transferase (FT) gene families, has undergone lineage-specific expansions. We investigated the timing of these gene family expansions by molecular dating and found that Pooideae-specific expansion events in CBF and FT gene families took place during Eocene-Oligocene super-cooling period. We hypothesize that the E-O super-cooling exerted selection pressure for improved low temperature stress response and frost tolerance in a core Pooideae ancestor, and that those individuals with multiple copies of CBF and FT genes were favoured.

  5. Physical stratigraphic model for the Eocene Escanilla sediment routing system, Spanish Pyrenees: Inverting for climate and tectonic change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armitage, John; Allen, Philip; Burgess, Peter; Hampsen, Gary

    2015-04-01

    Sedimentary architectures are fundamentally controlled by the interplay at different temporal and spatial scales of the volume and grain-size distribution of the sediment supply to a depositional setting. Yet, the sediment source is a function of both climate and tectonics, and unravelling the forcing mechanism from the observed stratigraphic architecture remains a key research challenge, particularly if we wish to understand the interactions between tectonics and surface processes. The Escanilla palaeo-sediment routing system has its source region in the south-central Pyrenean orogen in the Mid to Late Eocene, and transported sediment from wedge-top basins along tectonic strike to marine depocentres in the west. From constructing a volumetric budget of the sedimentary system, it is observed that during this period there is a marked change in the source distribution of grains and a movement of the gravel front, across three ~2.6 Myr time intervals from 41.6 to 33.9 Ma. Classic sequence stratigraphy would relate the movement of depositional fronts to changes of base level. However, given the variability of source grain size distributions, we explore the possibility that the position of the gravel front is primarily driven by catchment uplift rate and/or surface run-off. Using a simple model of sediment transport that captures first order processes, we can re-create the lateral movement in gravel deposition within the Escanilla sedimentary system. Movement of the gravel front is both a function of accommodation space and the transport capacity of the sediment routing system. We assume that the transport capacity is a linear function of the local slope and the water flux. By assuming that the observed thickness of deposits is the equivalent to the accommodation space generated, we can then use the stratigraphic architecture to constrain the change in upland catchment size and water flux. We find that during the Mid Eocene there was an increase in catchment length and

  6. Asynchroneity of the Mid-Holocene Climatic Optimum across the Mongolian Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Z.; Ma, Y.

    2009-12-01

    The Holocene Climatic Optimum in Baikal Lake area was interpreted to be marked by maximal distribution of Scots Pine forest between ca. 6.5 and 5.7 cal. ka. However, a recent comparative and synthetic study (including re-calibration of age models) by Prokopenko et al. (2007) resulted in a significantly different interpretation. They demonstrated that Holocene summer temperature maximum that occurred between 6.5 and 2.5 ka led to conifer expansion in Baikal Lake area. Our recent study produced a well-dated sequence from Gun Nuur along the Russian-Mongolian border that seems to lend support to the “6.5-2.5 ka temperature-maximum” interpretation. Our data show that the core portion formed between 1500 and 5500 14C yr BP has high organic matter content, high organic δ13C values, and dominance of planktonic diatom, indicating high lake level and high primary productivity. The following period (0-~1500 14C yr BP) and the preceding period (~5500-~7000 14C yr BP) were characterized by lower lake levels and lower primary productivities. The pollen-based indices unequivocally support the notion that the “climatic optimum” occurred between ~5500 and ~1500 14C yr BP. Our speculation is that lower winter insolation and the remaining ice cover in early Holocene might have retarded temperature rise and the relatively low temperature might have suppressed local-regional evaporation that has been the water vapor sources for precipitation in Siberia, thus early Holocene being cool and dry. The East Asian definition equates “Holocene Climatic Optimum” with a “warm and wet“ period between ~ 8 and ~6 ka marked by the highest primary productivity. However, only cool and wet periods are “optimal” in having the highest primary productivity in “European” climate regions. Our work shows that the warmest and wettest optimum might have occurred asynchronously across the Mongolian Plateau.

  7. Optimum soil frost depth to alleviate climate change effects in cold region agriculture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanai, Yosuke; Iwata, Yukiyoshi; Hirota, Tomoyoshi

    2017-03-01

    On-farm soil frost control has been used for the management of volunteer potatoes (Solanum tuberosum L.), a serious weed problem caused by climate change, in northern Japan. Deep soil frost penetration is necessary for the effective eradication of unharvested small potato tubers; however, this process can delay soil thaw and increase soil wetting in spring, thereby delaying agricultural activity initiation and increasing nitrous oxide emissions from soil. Conversely, shallow soil frost development helps over-wintering of unharvested potato tubers and nitrate leaching from surface soil owing to the periodic infiltration of snowmelt water. In this study, we synthesised on-farm snow cover manipulation experiments to determine the optimum soil frost depth that can eradicate unharvested potato tubers without affecting agricultural activity initiation while minimising N pollution from agricultural soil. The optimum soil frost depth was estimated to be 0.28–0.33 m on the basis of the annual maximum soil frost depth. Soil frost control is a promising practice to alleviate climate change effects on agriculture in cold regions, which was initiated by local farmers and further promoted by national and local research institutes.

  8. Optimum soil frost depth to alleviate climate change effects in cold region agriculture

    PubMed Central

    Yanai, Yosuke; Iwata, Yukiyoshi; Hirota, Tomoyoshi

    2017-01-01

    On-farm soil frost control has been used for the management of volunteer potatoes (Solanum tuberosum L.), a serious weed problem caused by climate change, in northern Japan. Deep soil frost penetration is necessary for the effective eradication of unharvested small potato tubers; however, this process can delay soil thaw and increase soil wetting in spring, thereby delaying agricultural activity initiation and increasing nitrous oxide emissions from soil. Conversely, shallow soil frost development helps over-wintering of unharvested potato tubers and nitrate leaching from surface soil owing to the periodic infiltration of snowmelt water. In this study, we synthesised on-farm snow cover manipulation experiments to determine the optimum soil frost depth that can eradicate unharvested potato tubers without affecting agricultural activity initiation while minimising N pollution from agricultural soil. The optimum soil frost depth was estimated to be 0.28–0.33 m on the basis of the annual maximum soil frost depth. Soil frost control is a promising practice to alleviate climate change effects on agriculture in cold regions, which was initiated by local farmers and further promoted by national and local research institutes. PMID:28322258

  9. Optimum soil frost depth to alleviate climate change effects in cold region agriculture.

    PubMed

    Yanai, Yosuke; Iwata, Yukiyoshi; Hirota, Tomoyoshi

    2017-03-21

    On-farm soil frost control has been used for the management of volunteer potatoes (Solanum tuberosum L.), a serious weed problem caused by climate change, in northern Japan. Deep soil frost penetration is necessary for the effective eradication of unharvested small potato tubers; however, this process can delay soil thaw and increase soil wetting in spring, thereby delaying agricultural activity initiation and increasing nitrous oxide emissions from soil. Conversely, shallow soil frost development helps over-wintering of unharvested potato tubers and nitrate leaching from surface soil owing to the periodic infiltration of snowmelt water. In this study, we synthesised on-farm snow cover manipulation experiments to determine the optimum soil frost depth that can eradicate unharvested potato tubers without affecting agricultural activity initiation while minimising N pollution from agricultural soil. The optimum soil frost depth was estimated to be 0.28-0.33 m on the basis of the annual maximum soil frost depth. Soil frost control is a promising practice to alleviate climate change effects on agriculture in cold regions, which was initiated by local farmers and further promoted by national and local research institutes.

  10. Wetter and cooler: pronounced temperate climate conditions in western Anatolia during the Middle Miocene Climatic Optimum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Güner, Tuncay H.; Bouchal, Johannes M.; Köse, Nesibe; Denk, Thomas

    2017-04-01

    During the course of an ongoing palaeobotanical investigation of the lignite mines of the Yataǧan Basin, Muǧla province, Turkey, the fossil leaves of the Eskihisar lignite mine were analysed using the Climate Leaf Analysis Multivariate Program (CLAMP). The investigated fossil leaves derive from the marls and clayey limestones (Sekköy Member) overlying the exploited lignite seam (uppermost Turgut Member). The age of the studied sedimentary rocks is well constrained by vertebrate fossils occuring in the main lignite seam (MN6 → Gomphoterium angustidens Cuvier, 1817; Percrocuta miocenica Pavlov & Thenius, 1965) and at the Yenieskihisar Mammal locality (MN7/8, uppermost Sekköy Member). 719 specimens were measured and assigned to 65 leaf morphotypes. Using this data, CLAMP reconstructed the following climate parameters: mean annual temperature (MAT) 12.58 (+/-1.5)°C, warm month mean temperature (WMMT) 23.72 (+/-2.5)°C, cold month mean temperature (WMMT) 2.29 (+/-2)°C, length of growing season (LGS) 7.52 (+/-0.75) month, mean growing season precipitation (GSP) 130.1 (+/-40) cm, precipitation during the three wettest months (3-WET) 67 (+/-25) cm, precipitation during the three driest months (3-DRY) 20.4 (+/-7.5) cm. The reconstructed parameters are too cool for tropical climates (the 18˚ C winter isotherm being a threshold for tropical climates) and indicate temperate conditions; climates fitting these parameters (Cfb according to the Köppen-Geiger climate classification) can be found today in regions known as "Tertiary relict areas" (e.g. Black sea coast of Northeast Turkey, eastern China, Japan). Based on a substantial amount of rainfall during the three driest months, it is further possible to exclude markedly seasonal climates such as a summer-dry and winter-wet Mediterranean climate and a summer-wet and winter-dry monsoon climate as commonly found along the southern foothills of the Himalayas and in southwestern China. Instead, a fully humid Cf climate is

  11. Tracing climatic conditions during the deposition of late Cretaceous-early Eocene phosphate beds in Morocco by geochemical compositions of biogenic apatite fossils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kocsis, L.; Gheerbrant, E.; Mouflih, M.; Cappetta, H.; Yans, J.; Ulianov, A.; Amaghzaz, M.

    2012-04-01

    latter negative shift can be linked to the globally recognized Early Eocene Climatic Optimum (Zachos et al., 2001). In terms of carbon isotopic composition, shark teeth enameloid yielded often positive δ13C values, while dentine are always negative and sometimes following clear trend along the series. Coprolites have similar values to dentine, however they display greater variation reflecting the burial milieu and the special environment of phosphatization with the intensive organic matter recycling. Bone-beds show even more variations that could be caused by reworked specimens and also possible enhanced oxidation of organic matter at these levels. Nevertheless, the Sidi Chennane section shows a negative δ13C trend in the early Ypresian, which is compatible with global observations at the time. Moreover, the lowest δ13C values are from the transitional layer between the Ypresian and Thanetian beds which might relate to the Paleocene-Eocene boundary event, though it must be further confirmed. All the fossils display very similar rare earth element (REE) distribution that resembles typical seawater pattern with negative Ce-anomaly and heavy REE enrichment. However the large amount of analyses revealed a general drift in the magnitude of the Ce-anomaly from the older to younger beds that can be used in paleoenvironmental reconstruction.

  12. Eocene cooling linked to early flow across the Tasmanian Gateway

    PubMed Central

    Bijl, Peter K.; Bendle, James A. P.; Bohaty, Steven M.; Pross, Jörg; Schouten, Stefan; Tauxe, Lisa; Stickley, Catherine E.; McKay, Robert M.; Röhl, Ursula; Olney, Matthew; Sluijs, Appy; Escutia, Carlota; Brinkhuis, Henk; Klaus, Adam; Fehr, Annick; Williams, Trevor; Carr, Stephanie A.; Dunbar, Robert B.; Gonzàlez, Jhon J.; Hayden, Travis G.; Iwai, Masao; Jimenez-Espejo, Francisco J.; Katsuki, Kota; Kong, Gee Soo; Nakai, Mutsumi; Passchier, Sandra; Pekar, Stephen F.; Riesselman, Christina; Sakai, Toyosaburo; Shrivastava, Prakash K.; Sugisaki, Saiko; Tuo, Shouting; van de Flierdt, Tina; Welsh, Kevin; Yamane, Masako

    2013-01-01

    The warmest global temperatures of the past 85 million years occurred during a prolonged greenhouse episode known as the Early Eocene Climatic Optimum (52–50 Ma). The Early Eocene Climatic Optimum terminated with a long-term cooling trend that culminated in continental-scale glaciation of Antarctica from 34 Ma onward. Whereas early studies attributed the Eocene transition from greenhouse to icehouse climates to the tectonic opening of Southern Ocean gateways, more recent investigations invoked a dominant role of declining atmospheric greenhouse gas concentrations (e.g., CO2). However, the scarcity of field data has prevented empirical evaluation of these hypotheses. We present marine microfossil and organic geochemical records spanning the early-to-middle Eocene transition from the Wilkes Land Margin, East Antarctica. Dinoflagellate biogeography and sea surface temperature paleothermometry reveal that the earliest throughflow of a westbound Antarctic Counter Current began ∼49–50 Ma through a southern opening of the Tasmanian Gateway. This early opening occurs in conjunction with the simultaneous onset of regional surface water and continental cooling (2–4 °C), evidenced by biomarker- and pollen-based paleothermometry. We interpret that the westbound flowing current flow across the Tasmanian Gateway resulted in cooling of Antarctic surface waters and coasts, which was conveyed to global intermediate waters through invigorated deep convection in southern high latitudes. Although atmospheric CO2 forcing alone would provide a more uniform middle Eocene cooling, the opening of the Tasmanian Gateway better explains Southern Ocean surface water and global deep ocean cooling in the apparent absence of (sub-) equatorial cooling. PMID:23720311

  13. Eocene cooling linked to early flow across the Tasmanian Gateway.

    PubMed

    Bijl, Peter K; Bendle, James A P; Bohaty, Steven M; Pross, Jörg; Schouten, Stefan; Tauxe, Lisa; Stickley, Catherine E; McKay, Robert M; Röhl, Ursula; Olney, Matthew; Sluijs, Appy; Escutia, Carlota; Brinkhuis, Henk

    2013-06-11

    The warmest global temperatures of the past 85 million years occurred during a prolonged greenhouse episode known as the Early Eocene Climatic Optimum (52-50 Ma). The Early Eocene Climatic Optimum terminated with a long-term cooling trend that culminated in continental-scale glaciation of Antarctica from 34 Ma onward. Whereas early studies attributed the Eocene transition from greenhouse to icehouse climates to the tectonic opening of Southern Ocean gateways, more recent investigations invoked a dominant role of declining atmospheric greenhouse gas concentrations (e.g., CO2). However, the scarcity of field data has prevented empirical evaluation of these hypotheses. We present marine microfossil and organic geochemical records spanning the early-to-middle Eocene transition from the Wilkes Land Margin, East Antarctica. Dinoflagellate biogeography and sea surface temperature paleothermometry reveal that the earliest throughflow of a westbound Antarctic Counter Current began ~49-50 Ma through a southern opening of the Tasmanian Gateway. This early opening occurs in conjunction with the simultaneous onset of regional surface water and continental cooling (2-4 °C), evidenced by biomarker- and pollen-based paleothermometry. We interpret that the westbound flowing current flow across the Tasmanian Gateway resulted in cooling of Antarctic surface waters and coasts, which was conveyed to global intermediate waters through invigorated deep convection in southern high latitudes. Although atmospheric CO2 forcing alone would provide a more uniform middle Eocene cooling, the opening of the Tasmanian Gateway better explains Southern Ocean surface water and global deep ocean cooling in the apparent absence of (sub-) equatorial cooling.

  14. Eccentricity pacing of eastern equatorial Pacific carbonate dissolution cycles during the Miocene Climatic Optimum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochhann, Karlos G. D.; Holbourn, Ann; Kuhnt, Wolfgang; Channell, James E. T.; Lyle, Mitch; Shackford, Julia K.; Wilkens, Roy H.; Andersen, Nils

    2016-09-01

    The Miocene Climatic Optimum (MCO; ~16.9 to 14.7 Ma) provides an outstanding opportunity to investigate climate-carbon cycle dynamics during a geologically recent interval of global warmth. We present benthic stable oxygen (δ18O) and carbon (δ13C) isotope records (5-12 kyr time resolution) spanning the late early to middle Miocene interval (18 to 13 Ma) at Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Site U1335 (eastern equatorial Pacific Ocean). The U1335 stable isotope series track the onset and development of the MCO as well as the transitional climatic phase culminating with global cooling and expansion of the East Antarctic Ice Sheet at ~13.8 Ma. We integrate these new data with published stable isotope, geomagnetic polarity, and X-ray fluorescence (XRF) scanner-derived carbonate records from IODP Sites U1335, U1336, U1337, and U1338 on a consistent, astronomically tuned timescale. Benthic isotope and XRF scanner-derived CaCO3 records depict prominent 100 kyr variability with 400 kyr cyclicity additionally imprinted on δ13C and CaCO3 records, pointing to a tight coupling between the marine carbon cycle and climate variations. Our intersite comparison further indicates that the lysocline behaved in highly dynamic manner throughout the MCO, with >75% carbonate loss occurring at paleodepths ranging from ~3.4 to ~4 km in the eastern equatorial Pacific Ocean. Carbonate dissolution maxima coincide with warm phases (δ18O minima) and δ13C decreases, implying that climate-carbon cycle feedbacks fundamentally differed from the late Pleistocene glacial-interglacial pattern, where dissolution maxima correspond to δ13C maxima and δ18O minima. Carbonate dissolution cycles during the MCO were, thus, more similar to Paleogene hyperthermal patterns.

  15. A view from the terrace; ice-sheet dynamics during the Eocene Oligocene Transition climate tipping point

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scher, Howie; Bohaty, Steven; Huck, Claire

    2017-04-01

    Glaciation of Antarctica was the pièce de résistance of the shift in global climate that took place during the Eocene Oligocene Transition (EOT; ca. 34 Ma). The timing and progression of ice-sheet development is constrained by benthic foraminiferal d18O records and geochemical proxies for continental weathering from deep-sea sediment cores. The terrace interval is the roughly 500 kyr interval after the precursor glaciation at 34.2 Ma, when ice-sheet expansion reached a short-lived plateau prior to the coalescence of a continent-scale ice sheet at 33.7 Ma. The terrace interval appears to be the tipping point between greenhouse and icehouse climate states, however ice-sheet dynamics are poorly understood during this crucial time. We present evidence for rapid changes in the Nd isotopic composition of bottom waters bathing a sediment core on Maud Rise (ODP Site 689) during the terrace interval of the EOT. Three distinct excursions toward less radiogenic eNd values suggest either 1) changes in the flux of Antarctic weathering products into the Weddell Sea and/or 2) pulses of deep water production that brought shelf waters with the Antarctic Nd isotope fingerprint into contact with Maud Rise. Both interpretations support a scenario of expansion and contraction of the Antarctic ice sheet during the terrace interval.

  16. Millennial-scale vegetation dynamics in an estuary at the onset of the Miocene Climate Optimum

    PubMed Central

    Kern, Andrea; Harzhauser, Mathias; Mandic, Oleg; Roetzel, Reinhard; Ćorić, Stjepan; Bruch, Angela A.; Zuschin, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Pollen analyses have been proven to possess the possibility to decipher rapid vegetational and climate shifts in Neogene sedimentary records. Herein, a c. 21-kyr-long transgression–regression cycle from the Lower Austrian locality Stetten is analysed in detail to evaluate climatic benchmarks for the early phase of the Middle Miocene Climate Optimum and to estimate the pace of environmental change. Based on the Coexistence Approach, a very clear signal of seasonality can be reconstructed. A warm and wet summer season with c. 204–236 mm precipitation during the wettest month was opposed by a rather dry winter season with precipitation of c. 9–24 mm during the driest month. The mean annual temperature ranged between 15.7 and 20.8 °C, with about 9.6–13.3 °C during the cold season and 24.7–27.9 °C during the warmest month. In contrast, today’s climate of this area, with an annual temperature of 9.8 °C and 660 mm rainfall, is characterized by the winter season (mean temperature: −1.4 °C, mean precipitation: 39 mm) and a summer mean temperature of 19.9 °C (mean precipitation: 84 mm). Different modes of environmental shifts shaped the composition of the vegetation. Within few millennia, marshes and salt marshes with abundant Cyperaceae rapidly graded into Taxodiaceae swamps. This quick but gradual process was interrupted by swift marine ingressions which took place on a decadal to centennial scale. The transgression is accompanied by blooms of dinoflagellates and of the green alga Prasinophyta and an increase in Abies and Picea. Afterwards, the retreat of the sea and the progradation of estuarine and wetland settings were a gradual progress again. Despite a clear sedimentological cyclicity, which is related to the 21-kyr precessional forcing, the climate data show little variation. This missing pattern might be due to the buffering of the precessional-related climate signal by the subtropical vegetation. Another explanation could be the method

  17. The Early Eocene Hyperthermal Events: Magnitude, Characteristics and Orbital Chronology.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauretano, V.; Zachos, J. C.; Lourens, L. J.

    2016-12-01

    The early Eocene was characterized by major perturbations in the global carbon cycle and fluctuations in global temperature on both short- (<104 years) and long- (> 106 years) time scales. The Paleocene- Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM), at 56 Ma, represents the most extreme episode of abrupt short-lived global warming event superimposed on the late Paleocene- early Eocene long-term warming trend. The PETM was followed by a series of smaller "hyperthermal" events showing similar characteristics, including the ETM2 (or Elmo event) at 54 Ma and the ETM3 (or X-event) at 52.8 Ma, leading up to the Early Eocene Climatic Optimum (EECO). These events are recorded in marine and continental sedimentary archives and are marked by prominent carbon isotope excursions (CIEs). As for the PETM, the "hyperthermal" events were associated with dramatic increase in temperature and perturbation of the carbon cycle, driven by the release of large amounts of isotopically light carbon into the ocean-atmosphere system, possibly triggered by a common orbital forcing mechanism. Here, we present astronomically tuned high-resolution benthic stable isotope records from ODP Site 1263, (Walvis Ridge, SE Atlantic) encompassing the early Eocene hyperthermal events. We discuss the changes in deep-sea temperature and global carbon cycle associated with these events in relation to the PETM, and define their timing, duration and the influence of orbital forcing.

  18. Fluvial-system response to climate change: The Paleocene-Eocene Tremp Group, Pyrenees, Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colombera, Luca; Arévalo, Oscar J.; Mountney, Nigel P.

    2017-10-01

    The Tremp Group of the Tremp-Graus Basin (Southern Pyrenees, Spain) is a succession of predominantly continental origin that records the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM), a transient episode of extreme global warming that occurred across the Paleocene-Eocene boundary. For this succession, the stratigraphic position of the PETM is accurately determined, and histories of tectonic and sea-level controls are well constrained. Building upon previous studies, this work assesses changes in sedimentary architecture through the PETM in the Tremp Group, based on quantitative sedimentological analyses documented over a km-scale strike-oriented transect in the Arén area, with the scope to better understand the response of this alluvial system to the hyperthermal event. The analysed features represent a partial record of the geomorphic organization and processes of the system at the time of deposition, and are therefore interpretable in terms of geomorphic change in alluvial landscapes caused by the PETM. The record of the PETM, as previously recognized, begins at a time when erosional palaeotopographic relief was developed and deposition was confined in valleys. A shift between valley back-filling and widespread aggradation is observed at the onset of the PETM interval, which demonstrates uniquely the impact of the hyperthermal on both depositional loci and interfluves. Compared to underlying strata, the interval that embodies the onset and main phase of the PETM is characterized by: (i) higher proportion of channel deposits; (ii) channel complexes of greater average thickness and width; (iii) barforms and channel fills that are slightly thicker; (iv) increased thickness of sets of cross-stratified sandstones; (v) similar values of maximum extraclast size, by architectural element. An evident change in the facies organization of channel deposits is also seen through the stratigraphy, though this appears to predate the PETM. Increased channel-body density in the PETM

  19. Short-term fluctuations in vegetation and phytoplankton during the Middle Eocene greenhouse climate: a 640-kyr record from the Messel oil shale (Germany)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenz, Olaf K.; Wilde, Volker; Riegel, Walter

    2011-11-01

    The Palaeogene was the most recent greenhouse period on Earth. Especially for the Late Palaeocene and Early Eocene, several superimposed short-term hyperthermal events have been described, including extremes such as the Palaeocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum. Major faunal and floral turnovers in the marine and terrestrial realms were recorded in association with these events. High-resolution palynological analysis of the early Middle Eocene maar lake sediments at Messel, near Darmstadt, Germany, provides an insight into the dynamics of a climax vegetation during the Middle Eocene greenhouse climate in a time span without significant climatic excursions. Numerical techniques like detrended correspondence analysis and wavelet analysis have been applied to recognize cyclic fluctuations and long-term trends in the vegetation through a time interval of approximately 640 kyr. Based on the numerical zoning of the pollen diagram, three phases in the development of the vegetation may be distinguished. Throughout these phases, the climax vegetation did not change substantially in qualitative composition, but a trend towards noticeably less humid conditions probably in combination with a drop of the water level in the lake may be recognized. A shift in algal population from the freshwater dinoflagellate cyst Messelodinium thielepfeifferae to a dominance of Botryococcus in the uppermost part of the core is interpreted as a response to changes in acidity and nutrient availability within the lake. Time series analyses of pollen assemblages show that variations in the Milankovitch range of eccentricity, obliquity and precession can be distinguished. In addition, fluctuations in the sub-Milankovitch range are indicated. This demonstrates that floral changes during steady depositional conditions in the Middle Eocene of Messel were controlled by orbital forcing.

  20. Paratethys-Southern Ocean teleconnection in the mid-Burdigalian: European climate on the verge to the Miocene Climate Optimum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grunert, P.; Tzanova, A.; Harzhauser, M.; Piller, W. E.

    2013-12-01

    The Early Ottnangian Cooling (EOC), a distinct cold-spell in European climate at ~18 Ma preceding the Miocene Climate Optimum, is frequently reported in Paratethys records; however, the duration, magnitude, and underlying causes are poorly understood. A new paleoclimatic data-set provides unexpected insights into this event. UK'37-based sea surface temperatures > 25°C between 18.6 and 17.7 Myrs substantially exceed existing estimates, and indicate a significantly warmer European climate than previously assumed for this usually poorly recovered time interval. The EOC is expressed as an average drop of 2-3°C in Paratethyan water temperatures between ~18.1 and 17.8 Myrs punctuated by two distinct cold snaps at ~17.86 Ma and ~17.81 Ma. The short duration of the EOC excludes Tethyan Seaway closure as its underlying cause. Instead, the revealed paleoclimatic pattern shows a strong correlation with isotope event Mi1b in deep-sea δ18O records (ODP Site 1090), and we propose a tight paleoclimatic coupling between the Southern Ocean and the Paratethys/Mediterranean realm as an alternative hypothesis. Eccentricity forcing most likely acted as pacemaker of this teleconnection, a mechanism recently emphasized in Early Miocene studies.

  1. Climate applications for NOAA 1/4° Daily Optimum Interpolation Sea Surface Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyer, T.; Banzon, P. V. F.; Liu, G.; Saha, K.; Wilson, C.; Stachniewicz, J. S.

    2015-12-01

    Few sea surface temperature (SST) datasets from satellites have the long temporal span needed for climate studies. The NOAA Daily Optimum Interpolation Sea Surface Temperature (DOISST) on a 1/4° grid, produced at National Centers for Environmental Information, is based primarily on SSTs from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR), available from 1981 to the present. AVHRR data can contain biases, particularly when aerosols are present. Over the three decade span, the largest departure of AVHRR SSTs from buoy temperatures occurred during the Mt Pinatubo and El Chichon eruptions. Therefore, in DOISST, AVHRR SSTs are bias-adjusted to match in situ SSTs prior to interpolation. This produces a consistent time series of complete SST fields that is suitable for modelling and investigating local climate phenomena like El Nino or the Pacific warm blob in a long term context. Because many biological processes and animal distributions are temperature dependent, there are also many ecological uses of DOISST (e.g., coral bleaching thermal stress, fish and marine mammal distributions), thereby providing insights into resource management in a changing ocean. The advantages and limitations of using DOISST for different applications will be discussed.

  2. Changing seasonality patterns in Central Europe from Miocene Climate Optimum to Miocene Climate Transition deduced from the Crassostrea isotope archive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harzhauser, Mathias; Piller, Werner E.; Müllegger, Stefan; Grunert, Patrick; Micheels, Arne

    2011-03-01

    The Western Tethyan estuarine oyster Crassostrea gryphoides is an excellent climate archive due to its large size and rapid growth. It is geologically long lived and allows a stable isotope-based insight into climatic trends during the Miocene. Herein we utilised the climate archive of 5 oyster shells from the Miocene Climate Optimum (MCO) and the subsequent Miocene Climate Transition (MCT) to evaluate changes of seasonality patterns. MCO shells exhibit highly regular seasonal rhythms of warm-wet and dry-cool seasons. Optimal conditions resulted in extraordinary growth rates of the oysters. δ 13C profiles are in phase with δ 18O although phytoplankton blooms may cause a slight offset. Estuarine waters during the MCO in Central Europe display a seasonal temperature range of c. 9-10 °C. Absolute water temperatures have ranged from 17 to 19 °C during cool seasons and up to 28 °C in warm seasons. Already during the early phase of the MCO, the growth rates are distinctly declining, although gigantic and extremely old shells have been formed at that time. Still, a very regular and well expressed seasonality is dominating the isotope profiles, but episodically occurring extreme climate events influence the environments. The seasonal temperature range is still c. 9 °C but the cool season temperature seems to be slightly lower (16 °C) and the warm season water temperature does not exceed c. 25 °C. In the later MCT at c. 12.5-12.0 Ma the seasonality pattern is breaking down and is replaced by successions of dry years with irregular precipitation events. No correlation between δ 18O and δ 13C is documented maybe due to a suboptimal nutrition level which would explain the low growth rates and small sizes. The amplitude of seasonal temperature range is decreasing to 5-8 °C. No clear cooling trend can be postulated for that time as the winter season water temperatures range from 15 to 20 °C. This may point to unstable precipitation rhythms on a multi-annual to

  3. The Eocene-Oligocene sedimentary record in the Chesapeake Bay impact structure: Implications for climate and sea-level changes on the western Atlantic margin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schulte, P.; Wade, B.S.; Kontny, A.; ,

    2009-01-01

    A multidisciplinary investigation of the Eocene-Oligocene transition in the International Continental Scientific Drilling Program (ICDP)-U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Eyreville core from the Chesapeake Bay impact basin was conducted in order to document environmental changes and sequence stratigraphic setting. Planktonic foraminifera and calcareous nannofossil biostratigraphy indicate that the Eyreville core includes an expanded upper Eocene (Biozones E15 to E16 and NP19/20 to NP21, respectively) and a condensed Oligocene-Miocene (NP24-NN1) sedimentary sequence. The Eocene-Oligocene contact corresponds to a =3-Ma-long hiatus. Eocene- Oligocene sedimentation is dominated by great diversity and varying amounts of detrital and authigenic minerals. Four sedimentary intervals are identified by lithology and mineral content: (1) A 30-m-thick, smectite- and illite-rich interval directly overlies the Exmore Formation, suggesting long-term reworking of impact debris within the Chesapeake Bay impact structure. (2) Subsequently, an increase in kaolinite content suggests erosion from soils developed during late Eocene warm and humid climate in agreement with data derived from other Atlantic sites. However, the kaolinite increase may also be explained by change to a predominant sediment input from outside the Chesapeake Bay impact structure caused by progradation of more proximal facies belts during the highstand systems tract of the late Eocene sequence E10.Spectral analysis based on gamma-ray and magnetic susceptibility logs suggests infl uence of 1.2 Ma low-amplitude oscillation of the obliquity period during the late Eocene. (3) During the latest Eocene (Biozones NP21 and E16), several lithological contacts (clay to clayey silt) occur concomitant with a prominent change in the mineralogical composition with illite as a major component: This lithological change starts close to the Biozone NP19/20-NP21 boundary and may correspond to sequence boundary E10-E11 as observed in

  4. Global Sea Surface Temperature and Ecosystem Change Across the Mid-Miocene Climatic Optimum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veenstra, T. J. T.; Bakker, V. B.; Sangiorgi, F.; Peterse, F.; Schouten, S.; Sluijs, A.

    2016-12-01

    Even though the term Mid-Miocene Climatic Optimum (MMCO; ca. 17 to 14 Ma) has been widely used in the literature since the early 1990's, almost no early-middle Miocene sea surface temperature (SST) proxy records have been published that support climate warming across its onset. Benthic (and diagenetically altered planktic) foram δ18O records show a decrease, suggesting (deep) ocean warming and/or Antarctic ice sheet melting. However, reliable absolute SST proxy records are absent from the tropics and very scarce in temperate and polar regions. This leaves the question if the warmth of the MMCO was truly global and how its onset relates to the widely recorded positive (Monterey) carbon isotope excursion and volcanism. Finally, it remains uncertain how marine ecosystems responded to this hypothesized warming. We present organic biomarker SST proxy records (Uk'37 and TEX86) spanning the MMCO for several locations in the Atlantic and Pacific Ocean along a pole-to-pole transect, including Ocean Drilling Program Site 959 in the eastern Tropical Atlantic, ODP Site 643 in the Norwegian Sea, ODP Site 1007 on the Great Bahama Bank and Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Site U1352 off New Zealand. Additionally, we use marine palynology (mostly dinoflagellate cysts) to assess ecosystem change at these locations. The resulting spatial reconstruction of SST change shows that Middle Miocene warming was global. Nevertheless, the records also show distinct regional variability, including relatively large warming in the Norwegian Sea and a damped signal in the southern hemisphere, suggesting pronounced changes in ocean circulation. The onset of the MMCO was marked by prominent changes in ecological and depositional setting at the studied sites, likely also related to ocean circulation changes.

  5. First record of eocene bony fishes and crocodyliforms from Canada's Western Arctic.

    PubMed

    Eberle, Jaelyn J; Gottfried, Michael D; Hutchison, J Howard; Brochu, Christopher A

    2014-01-01

    Discovery of Eocene non-marine vertebrates, including crocodylians, turtles, bony fishes, and mammals in Canada's High Arctic was a critical paleontological contribution of the last century because it indicated that this region of the Arctic had been mild, temperate, and ice-free during the early - middle Eocene (∼53-50 Ma), despite being well above the Arctic Circle. To date, these discoveries have been restricted to Canada's easternmost Arctic - Ellesmere and Axel Heiberg Islands (Nunavut). Although temporally correlative strata crop out over 1,000 km west, on Canada's westernmost Arctic Island - Banks Island, Northwest Territories - they have been interpreted as predominantly marine. We document the first Eocene bony fish and crocodyliform fossils from Banks Island. We describe fossils of bony fishes, including lepisosteid (Atractosteus), esocid (pike), and amiid, and a crocodyliform, from lower - middle Eocene strata of the Cyclic Member, Eureka Sound Formation within Aulavik National Park (∼76°N. paleolat.). Palynology suggests the sediments are late early to middle Eocene in age, and likely spanned the Early Eocene Climatic Optimum (EECO). These fossils extend the geographic range of Eocene Arctic lepisosteids, esocids, amiids, and crocodyliforms west by approximately 40° of longitude or ∼1100 km. The low diversity bony fish fauna, at least at the family level, is essentially identical on Ellesmere and Banks Islands, suggesting a pan-High Arctic bony fish fauna of relatively basal groups around the margin of the Eocene Arctic Ocean. From a paleoclimatic perspective, presence of a crocodyliform, gar and amiid fishes on northern Banks provides further evidence that mild, year-round temperatures extended across the Canadian Arctic during early - middle Eocene time. Additionally, the Banks Island crocodyliform is consistent with the phylogenetic hypothesis of a Paleogene divergence time between the two extant alligatorid lineages Alligator

  6. First Record of Eocene Bony Fishes and Crocodyliforms from Canada’s Western Arctic

    PubMed Central

    Eberle, Jaelyn J.; Gottfried, Michael D.; Hutchison, J. Howard; Brochu, Christopher A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Discovery of Eocene non-marine vertebrates, including crocodylians, turtles, bony fishes, and mammals in Canada’s High Arctic was a critical paleontological contribution of the last century because it indicated that this region of the Arctic had been mild, temperate, and ice-free during the early – middle Eocene (∼53–50 Ma), despite being well above the Arctic Circle. To date, these discoveries have been restricted to Canada’s easternmost Arctic – Ellesmere and Axel Heiberg Islands (Nunavut). Although temporally correlative strata crop out over 1,000 km west, on Canada’s westernmost Arctic Island – Banks Island, Northwest Territories – they have been interpreted as predominantly marine. We document the first Eocene bony fish and crocodyliform fossils from Banks Island. Principal Findings We describe fossils of bony fishes, including lepisosteid (Atractosteus), esocid (pike), and amiid, and a crocodyliform, from lower – middle Eocene strata of the Cyclic Member, Eureka Sound Formation within Aulavik National Park (∼76°N. paleolat.). Palynology suggests the sediments are late early to middle Eocene in age, and likely spanned the Early Eocene Climatic Optimum (EECO). Conclusions/Significance These fossils extend the geographic range of Eocene Arctic lepisosteids, esocids, amiids, and crocodyliforms west by approximately 40° of longitude or ∼1100 km. The low diversity bony fish fauna, at least at the family level, is essentially identical on Ellesmere and Banks Islands, suggesting a pan-High Arctic bony fish fauna of relatively basal groups around the margin of the Eocene Arctic Ocean. From a paleoclimatic perspective, presence of a crocodyliform, gar and amiid fishes on northern Banks provides further evidence that mild, year-round temperatures extended across the Canadian Arctic during early – middle Eocene time. Additionally, the Banks Island crocodyliform is consistent with the phylogenetic hypothesis of a Paleogene divergence

  7. Global Sea Surface Temperature and Ecosystem Change Across the Mid-Miocene Climatic Optimum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veenstra, T. J. T.; Bakker, V. B.; Sangiorgi, F.; Peterse, F.; Schouten, S.; Sluijs, A.

    2015-12-01

    The Mid-Miocene Climatic Optimum (MMCO) (ca. 17 to 14 Ma) is generally considered as the warmest episode of the Neogene based on deep marine oxygen isotope records and terrestrial plant fossils. To date, however, reasonable resolution high-quality sea surface temperature (SST) proxy records spanning its onset are scarce at best. For the remainder of the MMCO, reliable SST records are absent from the tropics and very scarce in temperate and polar regions. This leaves the question if the MMCO was truly associated with global warming and if this warming was associated with biotic change. We use organic biomarker paleothermometry (Uk'37 and TEX86) to reconstruct SST across the MMCO at four locations along a pole-to-pole transect in the Atlantic and Pacific Ocean. Additionally, we use marine palynology (mostly dinoflagellate cysts) to assess ecosystem change at these locations. This study includes the first tropical biomarker-based SST records of the MMCO. Together with new and existing SST records from higher latitudes and the corresponding palynological records, they provide new insights in the temporal and spatial development of the MMCO. Our results indicate that Mid-Miocene warming was most prominent in the Norwegian Sea, showed a more complex, perhaps upwelling-related pattern in a tropical location, and was small in the Southern Hemisphere.

  8. Rapid Middle Eocene temperature change in western North America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Methner, Katharina; Mulch, Andreas; Fiebig, Jens; Wacker, Ulrike; Gerdes, Axel; Graham, Stephan A.; Chamberlain, C. Page

    2016-09-01

    Eocene hyperthermals are among the most enigmatic phenomena of Cenozoic climate dynamics. These hyperthermals represent temperature extremes superimposed on an already warm Eocene climate and dramatically affected the marine and terrestrial biosphere, yet our knowledge of temperature and rainfall in continental interiors is still rather limited. We present stable isotope (δ18O) and clumped isotope temperature (Δ47) records from a middle Eocene (41 to 40 Ma) high-elevation mammal fossil locality in the North American continental interior (Montana, USA). Δ47 paleotemperatures of soil carbonates delineate a rapid +9/-11 °C temperature excursion in the paleosol record. Δ47 temperatures progressively increase from 23 °C ± 3 °C to peak temperatures of 32 °C ± 3 °C and subsequently drop by 11 °C. This hyperthermal event in the middle Eocene is accompanied by low δ18O values and reduced pedogenic carbonate concentrations in paleosols. Based on laser ablation U/Pb geochronology of paleosol carbonates in combination with magnetostratigraphy, biostratigraphy, stable isotope, and Δ47 evidence, we suggest that this pronounced warming event reflects the Middle Eocene Climatic Optimum (MECO) in western North America. The terrestrial expression of northern hemisphere MECO in western North America appears to be characterized by warmer and wetter (sub-humid) conditions, compared to the post-MECO phase. Large and rapid shifts in δ18O values of precipitation and pedogenic CaCO3 contents parallel temperature changes, indicating the profound impact of the MECO on atmospheric circulation and rainfall patterns in the western North American continental interior during this transient warming event.

  9. Miocene climate seasonality in southern India - first direct evidence for a weak Indian monsoon during the Middle Miocene Climate Optimum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piller, W. E.; Reuter, M.; Kern, A. K.; Harzhauser, M.

    2012-04-01

    The Asian monsoon is an integral component of the global climate system. This large-scale atmospheric circulation comprises the East Asian summer and winter monsoon and the Indian monsoon subsystems, all characterized by seasonal reversing winds and precipitation changes associated with asymmetric heating of land and sea. The Neogene monsoon history is mainly reconstructed from chemical and physical weathering rates recorded in widely continuous marine sequences of the Indus Fan, Bengal Fan and South China Sea, which, depending on the source, physiography and sediment, indicate drier or wetter climates. These indirect climate proxies display an unusually dry period during the Middle Miocene Climate Optimum (MMCO, 16.5-15 Ma). As part of the FWF-projects P18189, P21414 and P23492, we present an Early/Middle Miocene coastal palynoflora record from the siliciclastic Ambalapuzha Formation at the coastal cliff of Varkala (Kerala Basin, SW India). Pollen assemblages and facies document a coastal wetland with mangrove vegetation. The Coexistence Approach was applied for palaeoclimatic reconstructions. This method uses climatic tolerances of all nearest living relatives known for a fossil flora by assuming that the tolerances of a fossil taxon are not significantly different from its modern counterpart. The maximum overlap of the environmental tolerances of all nearest living relatives (coexistence interval) is then regarded as being indicative of the most likely palaeoenvironment. By enquiring the Palaeoflora Database (http://www.palaeoflora.de/), the palaeoclimatic parameters of the pollen flora were calculated. The reconstructed climatic parameters for the MMCO show a seasonal precipitation pattern with a dry and a wet period and moderate rainfalls during the warmest period, which is comparable to the present day annual precipitation cycle in coastal Kerala, and affirms the presence of a monsoon-like atmospheric circulation over South India during the MMCO. However, the

  10. A New Look at the Early Eocene Arctic Climate in CCSM3: Sensitivity to pCO2 and Basin Geography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shellito, C.; Kiehl, J.; Lamarque, J.; Sloan, L.

    2007-12-01

    We present results from new Eocene climate modeling experiments that support the role of high pCO2 in maintaining Arctic warmth during the early Cenozoic. The fully-coupled NCAR Community Climate System Model (CCSM) (v.3) was employed with early Eocene geography in two experiments to test the sensitivity of climate to a large increase in pCO2 (from 2x to 8x pre-industrial pCO2). In a third experiment, we open an ocean passageway from the Eocene Arctic to the Pacific to establish the maximum sensitivity of Arctic climate to neighboring oceans, as periodic connections with adjacent ocean basins may have influenced Arctic climate at this time. To compare with the 8xCO2 scenario, we also run this open Arctic experiment at 8xCO2. In the CO2 sensitivity experiments, annual average global mean temperature rose ~3.4C with a quadrupling of pCO2, consistent with previous modeling studies. The greatest warming occurred in the Arctic Polar region, and is due in part to reduced sea ice formation in the high pCO2 experiment. Arctic surface temperatures from the high pCO2 scenario (8xCO2) agree most closely with new proxy data from the early and middle Eocene Arctic. Mean annual temperature estimates from various proxies range from ~10- 15C. Modeled Arctic temperatures range from 2-8C, and begin to approach 10C along the North American coast. While still somewhat lower than that estimated from proxies, it is important to note that in this 8xCO2 experiment, wintertime Arctic air temperatures remain mostly above freezing. Opening the Arctic to the influence of the Pacific in the third experiment has the effect of warming the average sea surface temperature in the Arctic basin by ~4C. Central Arctic ocean temperatures warm by as much as 5C to 7C. Temperatures are as high as 10C along northern Europe in the open Arctic scenario.

  11. Antarctic Ice Sheet variability across the Eocene-Oligocene boundary climate transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galeotti, Simone; DeConto, Robert; Naish, Timothy; Stocchi, Paolo; Florindo, Fabio; Pagani, Mark; Barrett, Peter; Bohaty, Steven M.; Lanci, Luca; Pollard, David; Sandroni, Sonia; Talarico, Franco M.; Zachos, James C.

    2016-04-01

    About 34 million years ago, Earth’s climate cooled and an ice sheet formed on Antarctica as atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) fell below ~750 parts per million (ppm). Sedimentary cycles from a drillcore in the western Ross Sea provide direct evidence of orbitally controlled glacial cycles between 34 million and 31 million years ago. Initially, under atmospheric CO2 levels of ≥600 ppm, a smaller Antarctic Ice Sheet (AIS), restricted to the terrestrial continent, was highly responsive to local insolation forcing. A more stable, continental-scale ice sheet calving at the coastline did not form until ~32.8 million years ago, coincident with the earliest time that atmospheric CO2 levels fell below ~600 ppm. Our results provide insight into the potential of the AIS for threshold behavior and have implications for its sensitivity to atmospheric CO2 concentrations above present-day levels.

  12. Antarctic Ice Sheet variability across the Eocene-Oligocene boundary climate transition.

    PubMed

    Galeotti, Simone; DeConto, Robert; Naish, Timothy; Stocchi, Paolo; Florindo, Fabio; Pagani, Mark; Barrett, Peter; Bohaty, Steven M; Lanci, Luca; Pollard, David; Sandroni, Sonia; Talarico, Franco M; Zachos, James C

    2016-04-01

    About 34 million years ago, Earth's climate cooled and an ice sheet formed on Antarctica as atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) fell below ~750 parts per million (ppm). Sedimentary cycles from a drill core in the western Ross Sea provide direct evidence of orbitally controlled glacial cycles between 34 million and 31 million years ago. Initially, under atmospheric CO2 levels of ≥600 ppm, a smaller Antarctic Ice Sheet (AIS), restricted to the terrestrial continent, was highly responsive to local insolation forcing. A more stable, continental-scale ice sheet calving at the coastline did not form until ~32.8 million years ago, coincident with the earliest time that atmospheric CO2 levels fell below ~600 ppm. Our results provide insight into the potential of the AIS for threshold behavior and have implications for its sensitivity to atmospheric CO2 concentrations above present-day levels.

  13. Vegetation and climate development on the Atlantic Coastal Plain during the late Mid-Miocene Climatic Optimum (IODP Expedition 313)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prader, Sabine; Kotthoff, Ulrich; McCarthy, Francine; Greenwood, David

    2015-04-01

    The major aims of IODP Expedition 313 are estimating amplitudes, rates and mechanisms of sea-level change and the evaluation of sequence stratigraphic facies models that predict depositional environments, sediment compositions, and stratal geometries in response to sea-level change. Cores from three Sites (313-M0027, M0028, and M0029) from the New Jersey shallow shelf (water depth approximately 35 m) were retrieved during May to July 2009, using an ECORD "mission-specific" jack-up platform. We have investigated the palynology of sediment cores from Site M0027, 45 km off the present-day coast of New Jersey. For this study, we have focused on pollen studies for the second half of the Mid-Miocene Climatic Optimum (MMCO) and the subsequent transition to cooler conditions (ca. 15 to 13 million years before present). Transport-caused bias of the pollen assemblages was identified via the analysis of the terrestrial/marine palynomorph ratio and these results were considered when interpreting palaeo-vegetation from the pollen data. Pollen preservation in the interval analyzed herein was generally very good. Pollen grains were analyzed via both light and scanning electron microscopy. For most samples, the pollen assemblages were not highly diverse. The most abundant taxa through all samples were Quercus (oak) and Carya (hickory). Typical wetland elements like Cyperaceae, Taxodium (cypress), Nyssa (tupelo tree) and taxa today growing in the tropics and subtropics like Sapotaceae, Symplocaceae, Arecaceae (palm trees) and Alangium, which indicate particularly warm climate conditions, were only sporadically found, but indicate warmer phases during the second half of the MMCO. Herbal pollen was generally rare, but members of the Asteraceae, Apiaceae, and Ericaceae families, together with infrequent occurences of Poaceae pollen indicate the presence of areas with open vegetation. The Mid-Miocene pollen assemblages reflect a vegetation in the hinterland of the New Jersey shelf

  14. Climate and Biota across the Eocene-Oligocene transition at Site 1090: recent advances on calcareous nannofossils as paleoclimatic and dissolution proxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pea, Laura; Fioroni, Chiara; Villa, Giuliana; Persico, Davide; Bohaty, Steve

    2010-05-01

    The Eocene-Oligocene transition represents the biggest biotic turnover in the Cenozoic, involving both terrestrial and marine realms. In this study we present the results obtained by a quantitative analysis of late Eocene-early Oligocene (35.5- 33.1 Ma) calcareous nannofossil assemblages from ODP Site 1090 Hole B (Leg 177). This Hole is located on the southern flank of the Agulhas Ridge on the Subantarctic sector of the Atlantic Ocean (42°54'S), and lies along the boundary between the North Atlantic Deep Water and the Circumpolar Deep Water. Thanks to its position above the Carbonate Compensation Depth (3702 m), the nannofossil assemblage preservation is from poor to good in most of the section, even thought some intervals are barren. A well-preserved magnetostratigraphic signal along all of the section and nannofossil biostratigraphy provided the time framework essential for interpreting the assemblage variations. Within a high resolution biostratigraphic framework and through the comparison with bulk oxygen and carbon isotope datasets we attempt to reconstruct sea surface water temperature and trophic conditions, aimed to a late Eocene - early Oligocene paleoceanographic reconstruction for the South Atlantic. A marked change in the nannofossil assemblages is associated with the Oi-1 event: a nonlinear increase of cool-water taxa gives evidence as the evolution of this climatic event is more complex than previously estimated by calcareous nannofossils in the Southern Ocean (Villa et al., 2008). In fact cool-water taxa variation trend likely reflects the two distinct shifts (Step 1 and Step) recognised by Coxall et al. (2005) within the oxygen isotope shift .Step 1 falls in the uppermost part of magnetochron C13r, while the end of step 2 correlates with the base of Chron C13n (Channell et al., 2005). Furthermore, changes in nannofossil abundance and preservation suggest CCD depth fluctuations, showing a deepening near the Eocene/Oligocene boundary, as previously

  15. From Greenhouse to Icehouse: Evidence of Climatic Changes Across the Marine Eocene-Oligocene Transition From the Massignano GSSP Section (Central Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coccioni, R.; Marsili, A.; Montanari, A.

    2004-12-01

    The transition from global "greenhouse" conditions of the early and middle Eocene to global "icehouse" conditions of the early Oligocene marks a turning point in Cenozoic Earth history which was marked by reorganization of global ocean circulation patterns and significant turnovers in the marine and terrestrial biota (Prothero et al., 2003) and led to the development of the first East Antarctic ice-sheet, close to the Eocene/Oligocene boundary (33.7 Ma). The Massignano GSSP for the Eocene/Oligocene boundary (Premoli Silva & Jenkins, 1993), exposed in an abandoned quarry in the Monte Conero area, on the Adriatic coast of central Italy, was investigated at high-resolution in order to provide evidence for climatic changes across the marine Eocene-Oligocene transition. The Massignano section is 23-m thick and consists of alternating reddish/greenish-grey marls and calcareous marls with several biotite-rich levels of volcanic origin which were deposited in a lower bathyal depositional setting, at a paleodepth of 1000-2000 m (Coccioni & Galeotti, 2003). A complete geological record of 3 myr (from 36.2 to 33.2 Ma according to the time scale of Berggren et al., 1995) is preserved which spans the interval from the latest Eocene to the early Oligocene, from Chron C16n to C13n (Bice & Montanari, 1988; Lowrie & Lanci, 1994), and is provided by an accurate calibration of bio- and geochemical events. Cosmic signatures are also recorded in the Massignano section (Montanari et al., 1993) where three impactoclastic, iridium-rich layers occurs in the middle-lower part of the succession (Montanari et al., 1988, 1993; Bodeselitsch et al., 2004). They are possibly linked to the Popigai and Chesapeake Bay impacts and related to a comet shower over a duration of 2.2 myr (Farley et al., 1998). Calcareous nannofossil and foraminiferal assemblages (Coccioni et al., 2000; Spezzaferri et al., 2002), dinoflagellate cyst palynology (Brinkhuis & Biffi, 1993), ostracod faunas (Dall'Antonia et al

  16. Holocene Climatic Optimum centennial-scale paleoceanography in the NE Aegean (Mediterranean Sea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Triantaphyllou, Maria V.; Gogou, Alexandra; Dimiza, Margarita D.; Kostopoulou, Sofia; Parinos, Constantine; Roussakis, Grigoris; Geraga, Maria; Bouloubassi, Ioanna; Fleitmann, Dominik; Zervakis, Vassilis; Velaoras, Dimitris; Diamantopoulou, Antonia; Sampatakaki, Angeliki; Lykousis, Vassilis

    2016-02-01

    Combined micropaleontological and geochemical analyses of the high-sedimentation gravity core M-4G provided new centennial-scale paleoceanographic data for sapropel S1 deposition in the NE Aegean Sea during the Holocene Climatic Optimum. Sapropel layer S1a (10.2-8.0 ka) was deposited in dysoxic to oxic bottom waters characterized by a high abundance of benthic foraminiferal species tolerating surface sediment and/or pore water oxygen depletion (e.g., Chilostomella mediterranensis, Globobulimina affinis), and the presence of Uvigerina mediterranea, which thrives in oxic mesotrophic-eutrophic environments. Preservation of organic matter (OM) is inferred based on high organic carbon as well as loliolide and isololiolide contents, while the biomarker record and the abundances of eutrophic planktonic foraminifera document enhanced productivity. High inputs of terrigenous OM are attributed to north Aegean borderland riverine inputs. Both alkenone-based sea surface temperatures (SSTs) and δO18 G. bulloides records indicate cooling at 8.2 ka (S1a) and ~7.8 ka (S1 interruption). Sapropelic layer S1b (7.7-6.4 ka) is characterized by rather oxic conditions; abundances of foraminiferal species tolerant to oxygen depletion are very low compared with the U. mediterranea rise. Strongly fluctuating SSTs demonstrate repeated cooling and associated dense water formation, with a major event at 7.4 ka followed by cold spells at 7.0, 6.8, and 6.5 ka. The prominent rise of the carbon preference index within the S1b layer indicates the delivery of less degraded terrestrial OM. The increase of algal biomarkers, labile OM-feeding foraminifera and eutrophic planktonic species pinpoints an enhanced in situ marine productivity, promoted by more efficient vertical convection due to repeated cold events. The associated contributions of labile marine OM along with fresher terrestrial OM inputs after ~7.7 ka imply sources alternative/additional to the north Aegean riverine borderland sources for

  17. Late Cretaceous-Early Eocene Climate Change Linked to Tectonic Eevolution of Neo-Tethyan Subduction Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jagoutz, O. E.; Royden, L.; Macdonald, F. A.

    2015-12-01

    budget. Our results show that the global ocean bottom water temperature are highly correlated with CO2 variation modeled due to the arc-continent collisions along the TTSS. Our results show that global climate in the Late Cretaceous to Early Eocene have likely been strongly changed due to the tectonic evolution of the Neo-Tethys.

  18. Modelling the oxygen isotope distribution of ancient seawater using a coupled ocean-atmosphere GCM: Implications for reconstructing early Eocene climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tindall, Julia; Flecker, Rachel; Valdes, Paul; Schmidt, Daniela N.; Markwick, Paul; Harris, Jim

    2010-04-01

    One of the motivations for studying warm climates of the past such as the early Eocene, is the enhanced understanding this brings of possible future greenhouse conditions. Traditionally, climate information deduced from biological or chemical proxies have been used to "test" computer model simulations of past climatic conditions and hence establish some of the uncertainties associated with model-based predictions. However, extracting climate information from proxies is itself an interpretative process and discrepancies between climate information inferred from different types of proxy undermines the assumption that model-data conflicts automatically mean that the model is inherently flawed. A new approach which both acknowledges and reduces the uncertainties associated with both model and data is required. Although the oxygen isotopic ratio ( δ18O) preserved in calcareous marine fossils has been used to reconstruct past seawater temperature for several decades, significant uncertainties associated with this method persist. These include assumptions about past seawater δ18O for which no proxy exists and which is a key control on the temperature inferred from fossil carbonate. Here we present the results of an early Eocene simulation made using a state-of-the-art General Circulation Model (GCM; HadCM3) with CO 2 set at six times pre-industrial values and which has oxygen isotopes incorporated into the full hydrological cycle and hence simulates the δ18O of past seawater. This allows us to explore the implications of the different seawater δ18O correction factors commonly used for δ18O-based temperature reconstruction. It also allows us to focus model-data comparison on δ18O rather than interpret ocean temperature, an approach that reduces uncertainties in model-data comparison since the effects of both the temperature and the isotopic composition of ocean water on δ18O of carbonate are accounted for. The good agreement between model and data for both modern

  19. Southern high-latitude terrestrial climate change during the Palaeocene-Eocene derived from a marine pollen record (ODP Site 1172, East Tasman Plateau)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contreras, L.; Pross, J.; Bijl, P. K.; O'Hara, R. B.; Raine, J. I.; Sluijs, A.; Brinkhuis, H.

    2014-07-01

    Reconstructing the early Palaeogene climate dynamics of terrestrial settings in the high southern latitudes is important to assess the role of high-latitude physical and biogeochemical processes in the global climate system. However, whereas a number of high-quality Palaeogene climate records has become available for the marine realm of the high southern latitudes over the recent past, the long-term evolution of coeval terrestrial climates and ecosystems is yet poorly known. We here explore the climate and vegetation dynamics on Tasmania from the middle Palaeocene to the early Eocene (60.7-54.2 Ma) based on a sporomorph record from Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Site 1172 on the East Tasman Plateau. Our results show that three distinctly different vegetation types thrived on Tasmania under a high-precipitation regime during the middle Palaeocene to early Eocene, with each type representing different temperature conditions: (i) warm-temperate forests dominated by gymnosperms that were dominant during the middle and late Palaeocene (excluding the middle/late Palaeocene transition); (ii) cool-temperate forests dominated by southern beech (Nothofagus) and araucarians that transiently prevailed across the middle/late Palaeocene transition interval (~ 59.5 to ~ 59.0 Ma); and (iii) paratropical forests rich in ferns that were established during and in the wake of the Palaeocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM). The transient establishment of cool-temperate forests lacking any frost-sensitive elements (i.e. palms and cycads) across the middle/late Palaeocene transition interval indicates markedly cooler conditions, with the occurrence of frosts in winter, on Tasmania during that time. The integration of our sporomorph data with previously published TEX86-based sea-surface temperatures from ODP Site 1172 documents that the vegetation dynamics on Tasmania were closely linked with the temperature evolution in the Tasman sector of the Southwest Pacific region. Moreover, the

  20. Southern high-latitude terrestrial climate change during the Paleocene-Eocene derived from a marine pollen record (ODP Site 1172, East Tasman Plateau)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contreras, L.; Pross, J.; Bijl, P. K.; O'Hara, R. B.; Raine, J. I.; Sluijs, A.; Brinkhuis, H.

    2014-01-01

    Reconstructing the early Paleogene climate dynamics of terrestrial settings in the high southern latitudes is important to assess the role of high-latitude physical and biogeochemical processes in the global climate system. However, whereas a number of high-quality Paleogene climate records has become available for the marine realm of the high southern latitudes over the recent past, the long-term evolution of coeval terrestrial climates and ecosystems is yet poorly known. We here explore the climate and vegetation dynamics on Tasmania from the middle Paleocene to the early Eocene (60.7-54.2 Ma) based on a sporomorph record from Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Site 1172 on the East Tasman Plateau. Our results show that three distinctly different vegetation types thrived on Tasmania under a high-precipitation regime during the middle Paleocene to early Eocene, with each type representing different temperature conditions: (i) warm-temperate forests dominated by gymnosperms that were dominant during the middle and late Paleocene; (ii) cool-temperate forests dominated by southern beech (Nothofagus) and araucarians across the middle/late Paleocene transition interval (~59.5 to ~59.0 Ma); and (iii) paratropical forests rich in ferns that were established during and in the wake of the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM). The transient establishment of cool-temperate forests lacking any frost-sensitive elements (i.e., palms and cycads) across the middle/late Paleocene transition interval indicates markedly cooler conditions, with the occurrence of frosts in winter, on Tasmania during that time. The integration of our sporomorph data with previously published TEX86-based sea-surface temperatures from ODP Site 1172 documents that the vegetation dynamics on Tasmania were closely linked with the temperature evolution in the Tasman sector of the Southwest Pacific region. Moreover, the comparison of our season-specific climate estimates for the sporomorph assemblages from ODP

  1. Orbitally tuned timescale and astronomical forcing in the middle Eocene to early Oligocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westerhold, T.; Röhl, U.; Pälike, H.; Wilkens, R.; Wilson, P. A.; Acton, G.

    2014-05-01

    Deciphering the driving mechanisms of Earth system processes, including the climate dynamics expressed as paleoceanographic events, requires a complete, continuous, and high-resolution stratigraphy that is very accurately dated. In this study, a robust astronomically calibrated age model was constructed for the middle Eocene to early Oligocene interval (31-43 Ma) in order to permit more detailed study of the exceptional climatic events that occurred during this time, including the middle Eocene climate optimum and the Eocene-Oligocene transition. A goal of this effort is to accurately date the middle Eocene to early Oligocene composite section cored during the Pacific Equatorial Age Transect (PEAT, IODP Exp. 320/321). The stratigraphic framework for the new timescale is based on the identification of the stable long eccentricity cycle in published and new high-resolution records encompassing bulk and benthic stable isotope, calibrated XRF core scanning, and magnetostratigraphic data from ODP Sites 171B-1052, 189-1172, 199-1218, and 207-1260 as well as IODP Sites 320-U1333, and 320-U1334 spanning magnetic polarity Chrons C12n to C20n. Subsequently orbital tuning of the records to the La2011 orbital solution was conducted. The resulting new timescale revises and refines the existing orbitally tuned age model and the geomagnetic polarity timescale from 31 to 43 Ma. The newly defined absolute age for the Eocene-Oligocene boundary validates the astronomical tuned age of 33.89 Ma identified at the Massignano, Italy, global stratotype section and point. The compilation of geochemical records of climate-controlled variability in sedimentation through the middle-to-late Eocene and early Oligocene demonstrates strong power in the eccentricity band that is readily tuned to the latest astronomical solution. Obliquity driven cyclicity is only apparent during 2.4 myr eccentricity cycle minima around 35.5, 38.3, and 40.1 Ma.

  2. Orbitally tuned time scale and astronomical forcing in the middle Eocene to early Oligocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westerhold, T.; Röhl, U.; Pälike, H.; Wilkens, R.; Wilson, P. A.; Acton, G.

    2013-12-01

    Deciphering the driving mechanisms of Earth system processes, including the climate dynamics expressed as paleoceanographic events, requires a complete, continuous, and high-resolution stratigraphy that is very accurately dated. In this study, we construct a robust astronomically calibrated age model for the middle Eocene to early Oligocene interval (31-43 Ma) in order to permit more detailed study of the exceptional climatic events that occurred during this time, including the Middle Eocene Climate Optimum and the Eocene/Oligocene transition. A goal of this effort is to accurately date the middle Eocene to early Oligocene composite section cored during the Pacific Equatorial Age Transect (PEAT, IODP Exp. 320/321). The stratigraphic framework for the new time scale is based on the identification of the stable long eccentricity cycle in published and new high-resolution records encompassing bulk and benthic stable isotope, calibrated XRF core scanning, and magnetostratigraphic data from ODP Sites 171B-1052, 189-1172, 199-1218, and 207-1260 as well as IODP Sites 320-U1333, and -U1334 spanning magnetic polarity Chrons C12n to C20n. Subsequently we applied orbital tuning of the records to the La2011 orbital solution. The resulting new time scale revises and refines the existing orbitally tuned age model and the Geomagnetic Polarity Time Scale from 31 to 43 Ma. Our newly defined absolute age for the Eocene/Oligocene boundary validates the astronomical tuned age of 33.89 Ma identified at the Massignano (Italy) global stratotype section and point. Our compilation of geochemical records of climate-controlled variability in sedimentation through the middle-to-late Eocene and early Oligocene demonstrates strong power in the eccentricity band that is readily tuned to the latest astronomical solution. Obliquity driven cyclicity is only apparent during very long eccentricity cycle minima around 35.5, 38.3 and 40.1 Ma.

  3. Marine and terrestrial biotic response to climate variability across the Paleocene-Eocene boundary in the Mid-Atlantic region, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willard, D. A.; Aleman, W.; Edwards, L. E.; Farmer, J. R.; Self-Trail, J.

    2009-12-01

    Late Paleocene to early Eocene continental margin sediments provide an opportunity to examine rates and patterns of change in terrestrial and marine ecoystems during an interval of rapid global warming and increasing atmospheric carbon concentrations. We present Paleocene-Eocene thermal maximum (PETM) multiproxy data from a core obtained in 2007 from South Dover Bridge, Talbot County, Maryland. In it, we identified an apparently conformable Paleocene-Eocene contact at the Aquia Formation/Marlboro Clay boundary based on nannofossil, dinocyst, and pollen assemblages. A CaCO3 dissolution zone persists through the lower 91 cm of the Marlboro Clay. Terrestrial palynomorph concentration increases sharply at the base (<10 cm) of the dissolution zone, which is characterized by dominance (40-50%) of fern spores and distinctive palynofacies. Specimens of the dinocyst marker species Apectodinium augustum are present but not abundant. Planktic and benthic foraminifers and nannofossils are absent in the dissolution zone, except for distinct and reduced assemblages at 54 cm above the basal Marlboro contact. Marlboro Clay sediment above the dissolution zone contains a unique nannofossil assemblage that is restricted to this unit and is indicative of the PETM both regionally and globally. The re-occurrence of calcareous nannofossil species in the upper Marlboro that disappeared at the base of the dissolution zone suggests a return to normal oceanic conditions. Comparison of multi-proxy data from this high-sedimentation site with other PETM records is important to improve our understanding of the pattern and timing of vegetation, phytoplankton, and marine responses to climate variability associated with the PETM, both regionally and globally.

  4. The age and composition of the deep crust exposed in the Mariana forearc south of Guam, implications for the scale of Middle Eocene volcanism and climate change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reagan, M. K.; McClelland, W.; Ohara, Y.; Girard, G.; Goff, K.; Peate, D. W.; Stern, R. J.

    2012-12-01

    The sequence of lithologies exposed in the Mariana forearc southeast of Guam is similar to that of many ophiolites and includes widespread basaltic pillow lavas (termed forearc basalts or FAB; Reagan et al., 2010, G-cubed) that are thought to result from decompression melting associated with subduction initiation (SI). Ishizuka et al. (2011, EPSL) showed that the forearc lithologies east of the Bonin Islands were essentially identical to those of the Mariana forearc, and that the basaltic to gabbroic sections had ages of 51-52 Ma. Here, we report geochemistry and geochronology for deep crust lithologies collected during one Shinkai 6500 dive (6K-1229) in the Mariana forearc south of Guam. Gabbros at this location have compositions relating them to FAB and Zircon U-Pb ages of 51.5+/-0.7 Ma, exactly synchronous with similar rocks from the Bonin forearc 1,600 km to the north. Further south in the western Pacific, the Tonga-Kermadec forearc has an ophiolite-like assemblage with compositions and ages similar to those of the equivalent rocks in the IBM system (Bloomer and Fisher, 1987, J. Geol.; Acland, 1996, PhD Thesis, Durham; Todd et al., 2012, EPSL; Michibayashi et al. this meeting). To the north, the record of arc magmatism stretches back to at least 46 Ma in the western Aleutians (Jicha et al., 2006, Geology). Thus, SI could have occurred nearly simultaneously along much of the western margin of the Pacific plate. If so, then the resulting volume of basalt erupted near western Pacific trenches between 52 and 49 Ma would have been globally significant, perhaps exceeding the volumes of the largest igneous provinces. Another global event at about 51 Ma was the Early Eocene Climatic Optimum (EECO). This age marked the time when atmospheric CO2 values and thus global atmospheric temperatures were likely at or near their Cenozoic maxima (Zachos et al., 2008, Nature). The rise in δ18O for seawater toward the EECO began at about 58 Ma and the decline after ~51 Ma

  5. Late Paleocene-middle Eocene benthic foraminifera on a Pacific seamount (Allison Guyot, ODP Site 865): Greenhouse climate and superimposed hyperthermal events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arreguín-Rodríguez, Gabriela J.; Alegret, Laia; Thomas, Ellen

    2016-03-01

    We investigated the response of late Paleocene-middle Eocene (~60-37.5 Ma) benthic foraminiferal assemblages to long-term climate change and hyperthermal events including the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM) at Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Site 865 on Allison Guyot, a seamount in the Mid-Pacific Mountains. Seamounts are isolated deep-sea environments where enhanced current systems interrupt bentho-pelagic coupling, and fossil assemblages from such settings have been little evaluated. Assemblages at Site 865 are diverse and dominated by cylindrical calcareous taxa with complex apertures, an extinct group which probably lived infaunally. Dominance of an infaunal morphogroup is unexpected in a highly oligotrophic setting, but these forms may have been shallow infaunal suspension feeders, which were ecologically successful on the current-swept seamount. The magnitude of the PETM extinction at Site 865 was similar to other sites globally, but lower diversity postextinction faunas at this location were affected by ocean acidification as well as changes in current regime, which might have led to increased nutrient supply through trophic focusing. A minor hyperthermal saw less severe effects of changes in current regime, with no evidence for carbonate dissolution. Although the relative abundance of infaunal benthic foraminifera has been used as a proxy for surface productivity through bentho-pelagic coupling, we argue that this proxy can be used only in the absence of changes in carbonate saturation and current-driven biophysical linking.

  6. Integrated magnetobiostratigraphy, paleoclimatic and paleoceanographic inferences of the middle Eocene-Oligocene interval from the Monte Cagnero Section, central Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jovane, L.; Savian, J. F.; Bohaty, S. M.; Wilson, P. A.; Coccioni, R.; Frontalini, F.; Bancala, G.; Luciani, V.; Roberts, A.

    2010-12-01

    The early Eocene to early Oligocene (~55 to 28 Ma) was an important time period for Cenozoic paleoclimatic and paleogeographic evolution. Deep-sea foraminiferal stable isotope records (δ18O and δ13C) indicate a long-term cooling trend that culminated in the Oi-1 glaciation near the Eocene/Oligocene transition at ~34 Ma. In the middle to late Eocene (~49 to 34 Ma), these records also indicate a strong, transient warming event (Middle Eocene Climate Optimum - MECO) at ~40 Ma. The Monte Cagnero sedimentary section, located in the northeastern Apennines near Urbania, Italy, in the Umbria-Marche Basin, is an important middle Eocene-Oligocene section. We use magneto-biostratigraphy and environmental magnetism to study the impact of closure of the Neo-Tethyan gateway on subtropical Eocene circulation to better understand global climate changes during the switch from greenhouse to icehouse conditions. The studied sediments consist of alternating reddish and greenish limestones and marlstones. We undertook high-resolution (~5 cm sample intervals) paleomagnetic and foraminiferal biostratigraphic analyses to construct an integrated age model. The magnetic mineralogy is dominated by a mixture of high- and low-coercivity minerals (probably hematite and magnetite). Environmental magnetic data indicate long-term trends in the concentration, grain-size and composition of magnetic minerals. Moreover, we recognize a magnetic signature that may be related to the MECO event. These new bio-, chemo-, and magnetic results from Monte Cagnero suggest that the section provides a continuous and well-preserved interval for analyzing middle Eocene to lower Oligocene climate. Ongoing analyses are aimed at unraveling paleoclimatic and paleoceanographic changes during a time interval that is not well recorded at other localities.

  7. Clay mineral assemblages of terrestrial records (Xining Basin, China) during the Eocene-Oligocene climate Transition (EOT) and its environmental implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, C.; Guo, Z.

    2013-12-01

    The Eocene-Oligocene Transition (EOT) between ~34.0 and 33.5 million years ago, where global climate cooled from 'greenhouse' to 'icehouse' at ~33.5 Ma ago, is one of the great events during Cenozoic climate deterioration. In contrast to the marine records of the EOT, significantly less research has focused on the continental climate change during this time, particularly in inner Asia. We present a comprehensive study of the upper Eocene to lower Oligocene succession with regular alternations of laterally continuous gypsum/gypsiferous layers and red mudstone beds in Tashan section of Xining Basin, which is located at the northeastern margin of the Tibetan Plateau. Clay minerals, which were extracted from this succession, were analyzed qualitatively and semi-quantitatively by using X-ray differaction (XRD). Base on detailed magnetostratigraphic time control, clay mineral compositions of this succession (33.1-35.5 Ma) are compared with open ocean marine records and Northern Hemisphere continental records to understand the process and characteristics of Asian climate change before, during and after EOT. Our results indicate that illite is the dominant clay mineral with less chlorite and variable smectite. Multi-parameter evidence suggests that the source areas of detrital inputs in Tashan have not changed and climate is the main control for the composition of the clay fraction. The characteristics of clay mineral concentrations suggest warm and humid fluctuations with cold and dry conditions and intense of seasonality during ~35.5-34.0 Ma in inner Asian. This changed to cold and dry condition at ~34 Ma and remained so from ~34-33.1 Ma. The comparisons between continental and marine records indicate that the climate changes experienced in the Xining basin region are more consistent with Northern Hemisphere rather than open oceans records. This indicates that paleoclimate changes for inner Asian before, during and after EOT was not controlled by Antarctic ice growth

  8. Reconstructing a lost Eocene Paradise, Part II: On the utility of dynamic global vegetation models in pre-Quaternary climate studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shellito, Cindy J.; Sloan, Lisa C.

    2006-02-01

    Models that allow vegetation to respond to and interact with climate provide a unique method for addressing questions regarding feedbacks between the ecosystem and climate in pre-Quaternary time periods. In this paper, we consider how Dynamic Global Vegetation Models (DGVMs), which have been developed for simulations with present day climate, can be used for paleoclimate studies. We begin with a series of tests in the NCAR Land Surface Model (LSM)-DGVM with Eocene geography to examine (1) the effect of removing C 4 grasses from the available plant functional types in the model; (2) model sensitivity to a change in soil texture; and (3), model sensitivity to a change in the value of pCO 2 used in the photosynthetic rate equations. The tests were designed to highlight some of the challenges of using these models and prompt discussion of possible improvements. We discuss how lack of detail in model boundary conditions, uncertainties in the application of modern plant functional types to paleo-flora simulations, and inaccuracies in the model climatology used to drive the DGVM can affect interpretation of model results. However, we also review a number of DGVM features that can facilitate understanding of past climates and offer suggestions for improving paleo-DGVM studies.

  9. The Late Pleistocene climatic optimum in the eastern Arctic region: Evidence from El'gygytgyn Lake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lozhkin, A. V.; Anderson, P. M.; Minyuk, P. S.; Nedorubova, E. Yu.; Goryachev, N. A.

    2015-08-01

    The palynological investigations of sediments of the crater of El'gygytgyn Lake (67°30' N, 172°05' E), which provided a continuous record of interglacial and glacial events in Polar Chukotka, revealed significant climate warming corresponding to Marine Isotope Stage 31 (MIS 31) lasting from 1.062 to 1.081Ma ago. Its upper limit is placed within the Jaramillo paleomagnetic episode (0.99-1.07 Ma) registered in the sedimentary section of the lake. During MIS 31, the vegetation community was dominated by Betula- Alnus forests with subordinate Larix trees. These forests included also coniferous ( Picea, Pinus) and broad-leaved trees and shrubs ( Quercus, Carpinus, Corylus). The interglacial of MIS 31 was characterized by the warmest climate for the entire Quaternary Period. The warming episode established in the continuous record of the section of El'gygytgyn Lake implies relations between climatic events in the Arctic and Antarctic regions.

  10. Richness of plant-insect associations in Eocene Patagonia: a legacy for South American biodiversity.

    PubMed

    Wilf, Peter; Labandeira, Conrad C; Johnson, Kirk R; Cúneo, N Rubén

    2005-06-21

    South America has some of the most diverse floras and insect faunas that are known, but its Cenozoic fossil record of insects and insect herbivory is sparse. We quantified insect feeding on 3,599 leaves from the speciose Laguna del Hunco flora (Chubut, Argentina), which dates to the early Eocene climatic optimum (52 million years ago) and compared the results with three well preserved, rich, and identically analyzed early- and middle-Eocene floras from the following sites in North America: Republic, WA; Green River, UT; and Sourdough, WY. We found significantly more damage diversity at Laguna del Hunco than in the North American floras, whether measured on bulk collections or on individual plant species, for both damage morphotypes and feeding groups. An ancient history of rich, specialized plant-insect associations on diverse plant lineages in warm climates may be a major factor contributing to the current biodiversity of South America.

  11. Astronomical forcing of Eocene monsoons in terrestrial sediments of the northeastern Tibetan Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meijer, Niels; Tjallingii, Rik; Kaya, Mustafa; Licht, Alexis; Abels, Hemmo; Zhang, Yang; Guo, Zhaojie; Lai, Zhongping; Dupont-Nivet, Guillaume

    2017-04-01

    Monsoons are the major source of moisture for NE Tibet but their dynamics remain poorly understood. To provide insight into their driving forces we focus on early monsoonal records during the transition from a greenhouse to an icehouse world, as a part of the ERC "MAGIC" project. The continental mudrocks of the Xining Basin in NE Tibet provide a unique opportunity to study early monsoons because of their relatively continuous deposits from 40 to 15 Ma yielding reliable records of Earth's magnetic reversals and observed astronomically-forced alternations of monsoonal moisture. This study specifically aims to extend the stratigraphy further back in time to examine cyclicity from the Early Eocene Climate Optimum (EECO) to the MECO. Magnetostratigraphic analysis of three parallel sections near Xining shows three chrons that are correlated to C20, C21 and C22. The correlation is supported by U/Pb radiometric dating of zircons in a tuff (50.0 ± 1.1 Ma). The lithostratigraphy shows dry mudrocks alternating with wetter fluvio-lacustrine intervals in regular 10-12 meter cycles. These cycles could be paced by the 405 kyr eccentricity cyclicity according to the age model. XRF scanning of the record reveals three main geochemical components reflecting relative variations of carbonate (Ca), gypsum (S) and lithogenics (Ti). Spectral analysis on these components confirm the observed lithostratigraphic cycles and reveals higher frequency cycles in the carbonate/gypsum content of the muds. Towards the Late Eocene the lacustrine intervals become increasingly gypsiferous followed by the onset of obliquity cyclicity at the Middle Eocene Climatic Optimum (MECO) and up to the Eocene-Oligocene Transition (EOT). This suggests a shift in forcing mechanisms on the monsoons during the transition from greenhouse to icehouse conditions in the latest Eocene.

  12. Climate Monitoring and Recommendations on the Optimum Sowing Period for the Main Crops in the Transylvanian Plain, Romania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rusu, T.; Moraru, P. I.; Sopterean, M. L.; Pop, A. I.; Cacovean, H.

    2012-04-01

    The Transylvanian Plain (TP) is a geographical region located in north-central Romania and is bordered by large rivers to the north and south, the Somes and the Mures, respectively. TP with an area of approx. 395,616 ha, includes areas of three counties (Cluj - CJ, Mures -MS, Bistrita-Nasaud - BN), has a predominantly agricultural character, and is characterized by hilly climate floor with oceanic influences, 6-10 0C average annual temperatures and 500-700 mm/year average annual precipitations. The presence of the Carpathian mountains ring and the arrangement, almost concentric, of the relief from Transylvanian Depression, determines the development of a zonal sequence of soil types, a horizontal zonality as a direct influence of lithology and indirect of the relief, by changing climate and vegetation. Diversity of the pedogenetical factors - highly fragmented relief, forest and herbaceous vegetation grafted on a lithological background predominantly acid in the north - west and predominantly basic in south - est, parent rock composition and especially their combination in the contact zones, have conditioned in this hilly area of TP a tessellated soil cover. During soil pedogenesis, soil properties and features developed in response to differential lithology and macro/microrelief. Evaluated soils were found to largely be a complex mix of Cernisols, Luvisols and Antrisols. Zoning cultures and establishing the optimum sowing periods was made after the observations arising from practice and after the results obtained in the agricultural experimental research stations. Climate changes in recent years and climate monitoring from TP offers the possibility to check the calendar for the optimum sowing period. Monitorization of the thermal and water regime from TP was performed with twenty HOBO microstations which determine the temperature (to a height of 1 m) and rainfalls, same as temperature (at 10, 30, 50 cm depth in soil) and soil moisture (at 10 cm depth). Recorded

  13. Pacing of deep marine sedimentation in the middle Eocene synorogenic Ainsa Basin, Spanish Pyrenees: deconvolving a 6myr record of tectonic and climate controls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mac Niocaill, C.; Cantalejo, B.; Pickering, K. T.; Grant, M.; Johansen, K.

    2016-12-01

    The Middle Eocene thrust-top Ainsa Basin of Northern Spain preserves world-class exposures of deep-marine submarine fan and related deposits. Detailed paleomagnetic, micropaleontologic, and time-series analysis enable us to deconvolve, for the first time in any ancient deep-marine basin worldwide, both the pacing on deposition of the fine-grained interfan sediments and the main sandbodies (submarine fans) through the history of the deep-marine basin. Our magnetostratigraphy and faunal constraints provide a chronological framework for sedimentation in the basin. We use time-series analysis of a range of geochemical and sedimentologic data to identify likely climatic signals in the sedimentary archive. This has enabled us to test the likely importance of climate versus tectonics in controlling deposition. We show that the fine-grained interfan sedimentation preserves a dominant Milankovitch-like cyclicity, whereas the sandbodies (fans) reflect a complex interplay of controls such as tectonics and climate in the sediment source area, including shallow-marine staging areas for sediment redeposition into deeper water. These results not only provide critical information about the timing of substantial coarse clastic delivery into the Ainsa Basin but also give constraints on sediment flux over a 6 Myr window.

  14. Climate of the Eocene Greenhouse Intervals from TEX86 and Other Proxies: Evidence for a More Energetic Hydrologic Cycle? (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zachos, J. C.; Tierney, J. E.; Tingley, M.; Penman, D. E.; Kiehl, J. T.; Sluijs, A.; Bohaty, S. M.; Babila, T.; Rosenthal, Y.

    2013-12-01

    Over the last decade, global scale reconstructions of early Eocene sea surface temperatures (SST) have undergone a dramatic transformation due, in large part, to the discovery and application of the archeal lipid GDGT-based proxy, TEX86. Applied primarily in coastal sections, where GDGT abundance is sufficiently high, the TEX86 based estimates of tropical SST for the intervals of peak Eocene warmth (ie. PETM and EECO) are in excess of 35°C, while for the Arctic estimates exceed 24°C, and in regions proximal to Antarctica, >30°C, yielding low meridional T gradients, and high-latitude warmth that in theory can only be reached with the most extreme radiative forcing (pCO2 ~4500 ppmv). The largest uncertainties in the TEX86 estimates likely reside in the application of core-top calibrations of TEX86 to SST, which have been revised several times, initially by applying regional calibrations, but more recently, by using a Bayesian regression (Tierney & Tingley, in press) which provides robust estimates of error, as much ×7°C in the high latitudes. At several low latitude localities, the Eocene TEX86 based estimates can be validated with other temperature proxies, specifically δ18O and Mg/Ca of well-preserved (i.e., glassy) planktonic foraminifera. While SST estimates from these proxies also have uncertainties, primarily related to seawater chemistry, collectively the use of multi-proxies can reduce uncertainty in local SST estimates. An analysis of sections with multiproxies shows good agreement with offsets in SST of a magnitude attributable to other influences such as sea surface salinity (SSS). In theory, if taken at face value, the TEX86 SST can be combined with δ18O to estimate those other parameters. Here we evaluate coupled TEX86 and δ18O and Mg/Ca records spanning the PETM in coastal sections, Wilson Lake and Bass River, New Jersey Margin, to constrain ΔSST and ΔSSS. We then compare these results with GCM output. The coupled records support a regional

  15. Late Eocene to middle Miocene (33 to 13 million years ago) vegetation and climate development on the North American Atlantic Coastal Plain (IODP Expedition 313, Site M0027)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotthoff, U.; Greenwood, D. R.; McCarthy, F. M. G.; Müller-Navarra, K.; Prader, S.; Hesselbo, S. P.

    2014-08-01

    We investigated the palynology of sediment cores from Site M0027 of IODP (Integrated Ocean Drilling Program) Expedition 313 on the New Jersey shallow shelf to examine vegetation and climate dynamics on the east coast of North America between 33 and 13 million years ago and to assess the impact of over-regional climate events on the region. Palynological results are complemented with pollen-based quantitative climate reconstructions. Our results indicate that the hinterland vegetation of the New Jersey shelf was characterized by oak-hickory forests in the lowlands and conifer-dominated vegetation in the highlands from the early Oligocene to the middle Miocene. The Oligocene witnessed several expansions of conifer forest, probably related to cooling events. The pollen-based climate data imply an increase in annual temperatures from ∼11.5 °C to more than 16 °C during the Oligocene. The Mi-1 cooling event at the onset of the Miocene is reflected by an expansion of conifers and mean annual temperature decrease of ∼4 °C, from ∼16 °C to ∼12 °C around 23 million years before present. Relatively low annual temperatures are also recorded for several samples during an interval around ∼20 million years before present, which may reflect the Mi-1a and the Mi-1aa cooling events. Generally, the Miocene ecosystem and climate conditions were very similar to those of the Oligocene. Miocene grasslands, as known from other areas in the USA during that time period, are not evident for the hinterland of the New Jersey shelf, possibly reflecting moisture from the proto-Gulf Stream. The palaeovegetation data reveal stable conditions during the mid-Miocene climatic optimum at ∼15 million years before present, with only a minor increase in deciduous-evergreen mixed forest taxa and a decrease in swamp forest taxa. Pollen-based annual temperature reconstructions show average annual temperatures of ∼14 °C during the mid-Miocene climatic optimum, ∼2

  16. Observational Evidence for a Decade-long climate optimum near the Hesperian/Amazonian Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsons, R.; Moore, J. M.; Howard, A. D.

    2012-12-01

    Hesperian to Amazonian-aged valleys (HAVs) are predominantly found in the southern equatorial and mid-latitudes of Mars and form parallel to dendritic networks. These features record a significant warming of the regional/global climate which may have been associated with outflow channel formation and/or a period of alluvial fan deposition in Margaritifer Terra [1]. HAVs are distinct from older valley networks in both their age and morphology and they provide a window into the past climate conditions and potential water sources which formed them. Using quantitative geomorphic analysis we calculate the expected range of timescales, water volumes, precipitation rates and atmospheric conditions which contributed to HAV formation. In Newton crater (40oS, -159oE) we measured valley widths, depths, slopes and alluvial fan volumes. These observations, when combined with a set of terrestrial sediment transport prediction functions [2,3,4,5], allow us to calculate an expected duration of fluvial activity ranging from 0.1 to 10 years for water-filled channel depths ranging between 20 and 130 cm, and median sediment grain size ranging from 1 mm to 10 cm. The water volume required to form a single HAV in Newton crater ranges between 1.8 and 5.7~km3 based on the Darcy-Weisbach equation [6] in combination with the aforementioned range in channel depths, grain sizes and formation timescales. These results imply water runoff rates of between 1 to 10~cm/day over a typical, 300~km2, drainage area. Such a high runoff rate and short formation time suggest a brief, dramatic regional to global climate excursion. The source of water which formed these features remains unclear, but it must have been released at the aforementioned rates, and was widely distributed within each drainage catchment, and regionally over Newton crater and the southern highlands. HAV formation was likely a two-step process involving, first, the deposition of a 10s of meters thick regional snowpack along

  17. Delayed European Climate Optimum During the Last Interglacial in Northern Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Richard; Turney, Chris; Lang, Barbara; Brooks, Steve; Rundgren, Mats; Björck, Svante; Hammarlund, Dan

    2015-04-01

    Recent estimates of the Last Interglacial (127-110 kyr) suggest a global average temperature approximately 2˚C above preindustrial levels, providing a potential analogue for future climate change. However, many of the temperature estimates originate from terrestrial sequences with limited temporal resolution, raising questions over the magnitude and relative timing of the warming. Here we report a new quantitative summer temperature reconstruction using non-biting midges (chironomids) from the Danish Last Interglacial site, Hollerup. We find peak average summer temperatures of 17.5˚C, approximately one degree warmer than the AD1961-90 period. In contrast to the timing of the thermal maximum inferred from the pollen record, the chironomid temperature reconstruction suggests that peak warmth took place 3,200 years after the onset of Last Interglacial warming in Europe. Our results indicate a delay in the establishment of full interglacial Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation, most probably linked to enhanced melt of the Greenland Ice Sheet.

  18. The Holocene climatic optimum and pollen records of sapropel 1 in the eastern Mediterranean, 9000-6000 BP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossignol-Strick, Martine

    1999-04-01

    The most recent sapropel in the deep eastern Mediterranean Sea has been deposited between 9 and 6 ka BP. Climate conditions, as revealed by the pollen records of this sapropel in marine cores, were most favorable for temperate deciduous trees, which is in agreement with the inferences from records of peripheral land pollen sites. The abundance of deciduous oak pollen is much higher than that of Artemisia (sage-brush), indicating that annual precipitation in the mid-elevation borderlands was at least 550 mm without summer drought, but more probably in the range 800-1300 mm. The pollen of Pistacia, which formed a savanna at low elevations, is also at its highest abundance and signals the absence of frost in winter, while being capable of withstanding summer drought. The early Holocene therefore appears as the post-glacial climatic optimum with the highest moisture and mildest winters. In southwest Asia, this is also the time of the Neolithic population explosion with incipient domestication of cereals, possibly following natural selection of the 'tough rachis' mutation in wheat and barley by the extreme aridity of the preceding Younger Dryas.

  19. Expansion and diversification of high-latitude radiolarian assemblages in the late Eocene linked to a cooling event in the Southwest Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pascher, K. M.; Hollis, C. J.; Bohaty, S. M.; Cortese, G.; McKay, R. M.

    2015-07-01

    The Eocene was characterised by "greenhouse" climate conditions that were gradually terminated by a long-term cooling trend through the middle and late Eocene. This long-term trend was determined by several large-scale climate perturbations that culminated in a shift to "ice-house" climates at the Eocene-Oligocene Transition. Geochemical and micropaleontological proxies suggest that tropical-to-subtropical sea-surface temperatures persisted into the late Eocene in the high-latitude Southwest Pacific Ocean. Here, we present radiolarian microfossil assemblage and foraminiferal oxygen and carbon stable isotope data from Deep Sea Drilling Project (DSDP) Sites 277, 280, 281 and 283 from the middle Eocene to early Oligocene (~ 40-33 Ma) to identify oceanographic changes in the Southwest Pacific across this major transition in Earth's climate history. The Middle Eocene Climatic Optimum at ~ 40 Ma is characterised by a negative shift in foraminiferal oxygen isotope values and a radiolarian assemblage consisting of about 5 % of low latitude taxa Amphicraspedum prolixum group and Amphymenium murrayanum. In the early late Eocene at ~ 37 Ma, a positive oxygen isotope shift can be correlated to the Priabonian Oxygen Isotope Maximum (PrOM) event - a short-lived cooling event recognized throughout the Southern Ocean. Radiolarian abundance, diversity, and preservation increase during the middle of this event at Site 277 at the same time as diatoms. The PrOM and latest Eocene radiolarian assemblages are characterised by abundant high-latitude taxa. These high-latitude taxa also increase in abundance during the late Eocene and early Oligocene at DSDP Sites 280, 281 and 283 and are associated with very high diatom abundance. We therefore infer a~northward expansion of high-latitude radiolarian taxa onto the Campbell Plateau towards the end of the late Eocene. In the early Oligocene (~ 33 Ma) there is an overall decrease in radiolarian abundance and diversity at Site 277, and diatoms

  20. Geochemical Climate Transfer Functions from North American Soils and Application to Paleosols Across the Eocene-Oligocene Boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheldon, N. D.; Retallack, G. J.

    2001-12-01

    The degree of chemical weathering in soils increases with mean annual precipitation and mean annual temperature. We have quantified these relationships using a database of major element chemical analyses of 126 North American soils. The most robust relationship found was between mean annual precipitation (P in mm) and the chemical index of alteration without potash (CIA-K): P = 221.12e0.0197(CIA-K) with R2 = 0.72. Another strong relationship was found between mean annual precipitation (P in mm) and the molecular ratio of bases/alumina (B): P = -259.34Ln (B) +759.05 with R2 = 0.66. A Mollisol-specific relationship was found relating mean annual precipitation (P in mm) to the molar ratio of lime to alumina (C) as follows: P = -130.93Ln (C) + 467.4 with R2 = 0.59. Our data also showed that most Alfisols can be distinguished from Ultisols by a molecular weathering ratio of bases/alumina of less than 0.5 or by a chemical index of alteration without potash less than 80. Application of these data to a sequence of Eocene and Oligocene paleosols from central Oregon yielded refined paleoprecipitation estimates consistent with those from other pedogenic and paleobotanical transfer functions for paleoclimate.

  1. Reconstructing Middle Eocene Climate and Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide Concentration: Application of a mechanistic theoretical approach to fossil plants from the Messel Pit (Germany)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grein, M.; Roth-Nebelsick, A.; Wilde, V.; Konrad, W.; Utescher, T.

    2009-12-01

    It is assumed that changes in atmospheric CO2 concentrations (from now on expressed as Ca) strongly influenced the development of global temperatures during parts of the Cenozoic. Thus, detailed knowledge of ancient Ca and its variations is of utmost importance for exploring the coupling of atmospheric CO2 and global climate change. Numerous techniques (such as carbon and boron isotopes) were applied in order to obtain Ca, with varying and sometimes even conflicting results. Stomatal density (number of stomata per leaf area) represents another promising proxy for the calculation of ancient Ca since many plants reduce the number of stomata (pores on the leaf surface used for gas exchange) under increasing Ca. As a reason it is assumed that plants try to adjust stomatal conductance in order to optimize their gas exchange (which means maximal assimilation at minimal transpiration). The common technique for calculating Ca from fossil stomatal frequency is to create empirical transfer functions of living plants derived from herbar material or greenhouse experiments. In the presented project, Ca of the Middle Eocene is calculated by applying a different approach which utilizes a mechanistic-theoretical calibration. It couples the processes of a) C3-photosynthesis, b) diffusion and c) transpiration with palaeoclimatic and leaf-anatomical data. The model also includes an optimisation principle supported by ecophysiological data. According to this optimisation principle, plants adjust their stomatal conductance in such a way that photosynthesis rates are constrained by optimal water use (transpiration). This model was applied in the present study to fossil plants from the Messel Pit near Darmstadt (Germany). In order to reconstruct Ca by using fossil plant taxa from Messel, numerous parameters which represent model input have to be estimated from measurements of living representatives. Furthermore, since climate parameters are also required by the model, quantitative

  2. Changes in the strength of Atlantic Ocean overturning circulation across repeated Eocene warming events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirtland Turner, S.; Sexton, P. F.; Norris, R. D.; Wilson, P. A.; Charles, C. D.; Ridgwell, A.

    2015-12-01

    The Paleogene Period (~65 to 34 Ma) was a time of acute climatic warmth, with deep ocean temperatures exceeding 12°C at the height of the Early Eocene Climatic Optimum (~53 to 50 Ma). Multiple rapid warming events, associated with transient deep sea temperature increases of 2 to 4°C (termed 'hyperthermals'), potentially related to orbital forcing of the carbon cycle and climate, occurred from the late Paleocene through at least the early middle Eocene and onset of long-term Cenozoic cooling (~47 Ma). While deep ocean circulation patterns associated with the great glaciations of the Plio-Pleistocene have been studied extensively, the behavior of the ocean's overturning circulation on orbital-timescales in the extreme warmth of the early Cenozoic is largely unknown. Here we present new evidence for changing patterns of ocean overturning in the southern hemisphere associated with four orbitally paced hyperthermal events in the early-middle Eocene (~50 to 48 Ma) based on a combination of multi-site bulk carbonate and benthic foraminiferal stable isotope measurements and Earth system modeling. Our results suggest that southern-sourced overturning weakens and shoals in response to modest atmospheric carbon injections and consequent warming, and is replaced by invasion of nutrient-rich North Atlantic-sourced deep water, leading to predictable spatial patterns in deep-sea carbon isotope records. The changes in abyssal carbon isotope 'aging' gradients associated with these hyperthermals are, in fact, two to three times larger than the change in aging gradient associated with the switch in Atlantic overturning between the Last Glacial Maximum and today. Our results suggest that the Atlantic overturning circulation was sensitive to orbital-scale climate variability during Eocene extreme warmth, not just to interglacial-glacial climatic variability of the Plio-Pleistocene.

  3. Middle Eocene rodents from Peruvian Amazonia reveal the pattern and timing of caviomorph origins and biogeography.

    PubMed

    Antoine, Pierre-Olivier; Marivaux, Laurent; Croft, Darin A; Billet, Guillaume; Ganerød, Morgan; Jaramillo, Carlos; Martin, Thomas; Orliac, Maëva J; Tejada, Julia; Altamirano, Ali J; Duranthon, Francis; Fanjat, Grégory; Rousse, Sonia; Gismondi, Rodolfo Salas

    2012-04-07

    The long-term isolation of South America during most of the Cenozoic produced a highly peculiar terrestrial vertebrate biota, with a wide array of mammal groups, among which caviomorph rodents and platyrrhine primates are Mid-Cenozoic immigrants. In the absence of indisputable pre-Oligocene South American rodents or primates, the mode, timing and biogeography of these extraordinary dispersals remained debated. Here, we describe South America's oldest known rodents, based on a new diverse caviomorph assemblage from the late Middle Eocene (approx. 41 Ma) of Peru, including five small rodents with three stem caviomorphs. Instead of being tied to the Eocene/Oligocene global cooling and drying episode (approx. 34 Ma), as previously considered, the arrival of caviomorphs and their initial radiation in South America probably occurred under much warmer and wetter conditions, around the Mid-Eocene Climatic Optimum. Our phylogenetic results reaffirm the African origin of South American rodents and support a trans-Atlantic dispersal of these mammals during Middle Eocene times. This discovery further extends the gap (approx. 15 Myr) between first appearances of rodents and primates in South America.

  4. Middle Eocene rodents from Peruvian Amazonia reveal the pattern and timing of caviomorph origins and biogeography

    PubMed Central

    Antoine, Pierre-Olivier; Marivaux, Laurent; Croft, Darin A.; Billet, Guillaume; Ganerød, Morgan; Jaramillo, Carlos; Martin, Thomas; Orliac, Maëva J.; Tejada, Julia; Altamirano, Ali J.; Duranthon, Francis; Fanjat, Grégory; Rousse, Sonia; Gismondi, Rodolfo Salas

    2012-01-01

    The long-term isolation of South America during most of the Cenozoic produced a highly peculiar terrestrial vertebrate biota, with a wide array of mammal groups, among which caviomorph rodents and platyrrhine primates are Mid-Cenozoic immigrants. In the absence of indisputable pre-Oligocene South American rodents or primates, the mode, timing and biogeography of these extraordinary dispersals remained debated. Here, we describe South America's oldest known rodents, based on a new diverse caviomorph assemblage from the late Middle Eocene (approx. 41 Ma) of Peru, including five small rodents with three stem caviomorphs. Instead of being tied to the Eocene/Oligocene global cooling and drying episode (approx. 34 Ma), as previously considered, the arrival of caviomorphs and their initial radiation in South America probably occurred under much warmer and wetter conditions, around the Mid-Eocene Climatic Optimum. Our phylogenetic results reaffirm the African origin of South American rodents and support a trans-Atlantic dispersal of these mammals during Middle Eocene times. This discovery further extends the gap (approx. 15 Myr) between first appearances of rodents and primates in South America. PMID:21993503

  5. Shifting ocean carbonate chemistry during the Eocene-Oligocene climate transition: Implications for deep-ocean Mg/Ca paleothermometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peck, V. L.; Yu, J.; Kender, S.; Riesselman, C. R.

    2010-12-01

    To date, no conclusive evidence has been identified for intermediate or deep water cooling associated with the >1‰ benthic δ18O increase at the Eocene-Oligocene transition (EOT) when large permanent ice sheets first appeared on Antarctica. Interpretation of this isotopic shift as purely ice volume change necessitates bipolar glaciation in the early Oligocene approaching that of the Last Glacial Maximum. To test this hypothesis, it is necessary to have knowledge about deep water temperature, which previous studies have attempted to reconstruct using benthic foraminiferal Mg/Ca ratios. However, it appears likely that contemporaneous changes in ocean carbonate chemistry compromised the Mg/Ca temperature sensitivity of benthic foraminifera at deep sites. New geochemical proxy records from a relatively shallow core, ODP Site 1263 (estimated paleodepth of 2100 m on the Walvis Ridge), reveal that carbonate chemistry change across the EOT was not limited to deep sites but extended well above the lysocline, critically limiting our ability to obtain reliable estimates of deep-ocean cooling during that time. Benthic Li/Ca measurements, used as a proxy for [CO32-], suggest that [CO32-] increased by ˜29 μmol/kg at Site 1263 across the EOT and likely impacted benthic foraminiferal Mg/Ca. A [CO32-]-benthic Mg/Ca relationship is most apparent during the early EOT when the overall increase in [CO32-] is interrupted by an apparent dissolution event. Planktonic δ18O and Mg/Ca records suggest no change in thermocline temperature and a δ18Oseawater increase of up to 0.6‰ at this site across the EOT, consistent with previous estimates and supporting the absence of extensive bipolar glaciation in the early Oligocene.

  6. Mid-Burdigalian Paratethyan alkenone record reveals link between orbital forcing, Antarctic ice-sheet dynamics and European climate at the verge to Miocene Climate Optimum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grunert, Patrick; Tzanova, Alexandrina; Harzhauser, Mathias; Piller, Werner E.

    2014-12-01

    The Early Ottnangian Cooling (EOC), a distinct cold-spell in European climate at ~ 18 Ma preceding the Miocene Climate Optimum, is frequently reported in Paratethys records; however, the duration, magnitude, and underlying causes are poorly understood. A new palaeoclimatic data-set provides unexpected insights into this event. UK'37-based sea-surface temperatures > 24 °C between ~ 18.1 and 17.7 Myrs substantially exceed existing estimates, and indicate a significantly warmer European climate than previously assumed for this usually poorly recovered time interval. The EOC is expressed as an average drop of 2-3 °C in Paratethyan water temperatures between ~ 18.1 and 17.8 Myrs with two distinct cold snaps at ~ 17.86 Ma and ~ 17.81 Ma. The short duration of the EOC excludes Tethyan Seaway closure as its underlying cause, although the enhanced palaeoclimatic sensitivity of the Paratethys due to this palaeogeographic configuration potentially contributed to the magnitude of SST deterioration during the EOC. The revealed palaeoclimatic pattern shows a strong correlation with isotope event Mi-1b in deep-sea δ18O records, and we propose a tight palaeoclimatic link between the Southern Ocean and the Paratethys/Mediterranean realm as an alternative hypothesis. The interplay of modulations in the long-term (~ 400 kyrs) and short-term (~ 100 kyrs) eccentricity cycles most likely acted as pacemaker of this palaeoclimatic interaction.

  7. The demise of the early Eocene greenhouse - Decoupled deep and surface water cooling in the eastern North Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bornemann, André; D'haenens, Simon; Norris, Richard D.; Speijer, Robert P.

    2016-10-01

    Early Paleogene greenhouse climate culminated during the early Eocene Climatic Optimum (EECO, 50 to 53 Ma). This episode of global warmth is subsequently followed by an almost 20 million year-long cooling trend leading to the Eocene-Oligocene glaciation of Antarctica. Here we present the first detailed planktic and benthic foraminiferal isotope single site record (δ13C, δ18O) of late Paleocene to middle Eocene age from the North Atlantic (Deep Sea Drilling Project Site 401, Bay of Biscay). Good core recovery in combination with well preserved foraminifera makes this site suitable for correlations and comparison with previously published long-term records from the Pacific Ocean (e.g. Allison Guyot, Shatsky Rise), the Southern Ocean (Maud Rise) and the equatorial Atlantic (Demerara Rise). Whereas our North Atlantic benthic foraminiferal δ18O and δ13C data agree with the global trend showing the long-term shift toward heavier δ18O values, we only observe minor surface water δ18O changes during the middle Eocene (if at all) in planktic foraminiferal data. Apparently, the surface North Atlantic did not cool substantially during the middle Eocene. Thus, the North Atlantic appears to have had a different surface ocean cooling history during the middle Eocene than the southern hemisphere, whereas cooler deep-water masses were comparatively well mixed. Our results are in agreement with previously published findings from Tanzania, which also support the idea of a muted post-EECO surface-water cooling outside the southern high-latitudes.

  8. Mid-Burdigalian Paratethyan alkenone record reveals link between orbital forcing, Antarctic ice-sheet dynamics and European climate at the verge to Miocene Climate Optimum.

    PubMed

    Grunert, Patrick; Tzanova, Alexandrina; Harzhauser, Mathias; Piller, Werner E

    2014-12-01

    The Early Ottnangian Cooling (EOC), a distinct cold-spell in European climate at ~ 18 Ma preceding the Miocene Climate Optimum, is frequently reported in Paratethys records; however, the duration, magnitude, and underlying causes are poorly understood. A new palaeoclimatic data-set provides unexpected insights into this event. U(K')37-based sea-surface temperatures > 24 °C between ~ 18.1 and 17.7 Myrs substantially exceed existing estimates, and indicate a significantly warmer European climate than previously assumed for this usually poorly recovered time interval. The EOC is expressed as an average drop of 2-3 °C in Paratethyan water temperatures between ~ 18.1 and 17.8 Myrs with two distinct cold snaps at ~ 17.86 Ma and ~ 17.81 Ma. The short duration of the EOC excludes Tethyan Seaway closure as its underlying cause, although the enhanced palaeoclimatic sensitivity of the Paratethys due to this palaeogeographic configuration potentially contributed to the magnitude of SST deterioration during the EOC. The revealed palaeoclimatic pattern shows a strong correlation with isotope event Mi-1b in deep-sea δ(18)O records, and we propose a tight palaeoclimatic link between the Southern Ocean and the Paratethys/Mediterranean realm as an alternative hypothesis. The interplay of modulations in the long-term (~ 400 kyrs) and short-term (~ 100 kyrs) eccentricity cycles most likely acted as pacemaker of this palaeoclimatic interaction.

  9. Tectonic Reorganization and the Cause of Paleocene and Eocene pCO2 Anomalies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Austermann, Jacqueline; Carter, Laura B.; Middleton, Jennifer; Stellmann, Jessica; Pyle, Lacey

    2017-04-01

    Oxygen isotope records reveal that deep-sea temperatures were relatively stable in the early and mid Paleocene before they rose by approx. 4°C to peak in the early Eocene. This Early Eocene Climate Optimum was followed by a 17 Myr cooling trend that led to the onset of Antarctic glaciation at the end of the Eocene. Several studies have examined the potential influence of perturbations to the sinks and sources of atmospheric carbon as mechanisms for the temperature drawdown over the Eocene. Examination of the changing magnitude of carbon sinks has focused on the importance of increased weathering associated with the uplift of the Tibetan plateau (Raymo and Ruddiman, 1992), the continental drift of basaltic provinces through the equatorial humid belt (Kent and Muttoni, 2013), or the emplacement of ophiolites during arc-continent collision in the face of a closing Tethys ocean (Jagoutz et al., 2016). With respect to carbon sources, the shutdown of Tethys subduction and related arc volcanism has been argued to significantly decrease carbon emissions and consequently global temperatures (Hoareau et al., 2015). In this study, we re-assess and quantify proposed atmospheric carbon sinks and sources to obtain an integrated picture of carbon flux changes over the Paleocene and Eocene and to estimate the relative importance of different mechanisms. To constrain carbon sources, we attempt to calculate the outgassing associated with large igneous provinces, mid-ocean ridges and volcanic arcs. We use plate reconstructions to track changes in length and divergence / convergence rates at plate boundaries as well as account for the onset and extinction of volcanic arcs. To constrain carbon sinks, we account for the sequestering of carbon due to silicate weathering and organic carbon burial. We again make use of plate reconstructions to trace highly weatherable arc systems and basaltic extrusions through the tropical humid belt and to assess the interplay between warmer Eocene

  10. MECO Warming Changes Continental Rainfall Patterns in Eocene Western North America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Methner, K.; Mulch, A.; Fiebig, J.; Wacker, U.; Gerdes, A.; Graham, S. A.; Chamberlain, C. P.

    2016-12-01

    Eocene hyperthermals represent temperature extremes superimposed on an existing warm climate. They dramatically affected the marine and terrestrial biosphere, but still remain among the most enigmatic phenomena of Cenozoic climate dynamics. To evaluate the impacts of global warm periods on terrestrial temperature and rainfall records in continental interiors, we sampled a suite of middle Eocene ( 40 Ma) paleosols from a high-elevation mammal fossil locality in the hinterland of the North American Cordillera (Sage Creek Basin, Montana, USA) and integrated laser ablation U-Pb dating of pedogenic carbonate, stable isotope (δ18O) and clumped isotope temperature (Δ47) records. Δ47 temperature data of soil carbonates progressively increase from 23 °C ±3 °C to peak temperatures of 32 °C ±3 °C and subsequently drop to 21 °C ±2 °C and delineate a rapid +9/-11 °C temperature excursion in the paleosol record. This hyperthermal event is accompanied by large and rapid shifts towards low δ18O values and reduced pedogenic CaCO3 contents. U-Pb geochronology of the paleosol carbonate confirms a middle Eocene age for soil carbonate formation (39.5 ±1.4 Ma and 40.1 ±0.8 Ma). Based on U-Pb geochronology, magneto- and biostratigraphy we suggest that the recorded Δ47 temperature excursion reflects peak warming during the Middle Eocene Climatic Optimum (MECO). The MECO in continental western North America appears to be characterized by warmer and wetter (sub-humid) conditions in this high-elevation site. Shifts in δ18O values of precipitation and pedogenic CaCO3 contents parallel temperature changes and require modification of mid-latitude rainfall patterns, indicating a profound impact of the MECO on the hydrological cycle and consequently on atmospheric circulation patterns in the hinterland of the North American Cordillera.

  11. Investigating the Sedimentary Response and its Role in Climate Feedbacks Associated with the Paleocene Eocene Thermal Maximum in a Continental Shelf Setting: Lodo Gulch, Lodo Formation, CA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delmanowski, R. D.; Mushegan, A.; Brady, M. E.; Pluhar, C. J.

    2014-12-01

    The Lodo Formation (central CA), records the carbon isotope excursion (CIE) associated with the Paleocene Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM) in a continental margin setting, where increased sedimentation rates - attributed to an enhanced hydrological cycle - provide a means for significant carbon drawdown after the peak of this hyperthermal event (John et al. 2008). This study investigates variations in grain size associated with the recovery from peak CIE values to better constrain the potential mechanism of the apparent increase in sedimentation rates, which can shed light on climate dynamics and feedbacks associated with other warming events.We collected bulk samples at ~10 cm increments over a stratigraphic interval that encompasses the previously documented CIE onset, peak, and recovery phases. We used a laser diffraction particle size analyzer on disaggregated samples to permit detection of variation within clay and silt sediment size fractions (2-63 microns) in addition to sand-size grains. Results show that, while the onset and peak CIE is associated with abundant clays, the recovery interval preserves a marked shift in median grain size to coarse silt and very fine sand. Ongoing work indicates that the grain size increase is not associated with an increase in foraminiferal abundance. Enhanced terrigenous sediment delivery during the CIE recovery could explain both the increase in grain size (this study) and sedimentation rates (previous work). This increased sediment supply could be attributed to (1) increased seasonality and storm intensity during the hyperthermal, (2) marine regression (i.e. basinward shift in shoreline) associated with decreasing rates of sea level rise during sea level highstand, or some combination of these factors. Future work to document compositional and preservational changes in sediments and foraminifera over this time interval will aid in teasing apart the relative influence of potential drivers of change associated with this event.

  12. Mid-latitude continental temperatures through the early Eocene in western Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inglis, Gordon N.; Collinson, Margaret E.; Riegel, Walter; Wilde, Volker; Farnsworth, Alexander; Lunt, Daniel J.; Valdes, Paul; Robson, Brittany E.; Scott, Andrew C.; Lenz, Olaf K.; Naafs, B. David A.; Pancost, Richard D.

    2017-02-01

    Branched glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraethers (brGDGTs) are increasingly used to reconstruct mean annual air temperature (MAAT) during the early Paleogene. However, the application of this proxy in coal deposits is limited and brGDGTs have only been detected in immature coals (i.e. lignites). Using samples recovered from Schöningen, Germany (∼48°N palaeolatitude), we provide the first detailed study into the occurrence and distribution of brGDGTs through a sequence of early Eocene lignites and associated interbeds. BrGDGTs are abundant and present in every sample. In comparison to modern studies, changes in vegetation type do not appear to significantly impact brGDGT distributions; however, there are subtle differences between lignites - representing peat-forming environments - and siliciclastic nearshore marine interbed depositional environments. Using the most recent brGDGT temperature calibration (MATmr) developed for soils, we generate the first continental temperature record from central-western continental Europe through the early Eocene. Lignite-derived MAAT estimates range from 23 to 26 °C while those derived from the nearshore marine interbeds exceed 20 °C. These estimates are consistent with other mid-latitude environments and model simulations, indicating enhanced mid-latitude, early Eocene warmth. In the basal part of the section studied, warming is recorded in both the lignites (∼2 °C) and nearshore marine interbeds (∼2-3 °C). This culminates in a long-term temperature maximum, likely including the Early Eocene Climatic Optimum (EECO). Although this long-term warming trend is relatively well established in the marine realm, it has rarely been shown in terrestrial settings. Using a suite of model simulations we show that the magnitude of warming at Schöningen is broadly consistent with a doubling of CO2, in agreement with late Paleocene and early Eocene pCO2 estimates.

  13. High resolution cyclostratigraphy of the early Eocene - new insights into the origin of the Cenozoic cooling trend

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westerhold, T.; Röhl, U.

    2009-07-01

    Here we present a high-resolution cyclostratigraphy based on X-ray fluorescence (XRF) core scanning data from a new record retrieved from the tropical western Atlantic (Demerara Rise, ODP Leg 207, Site 1258). The Eocene sediments from ODP Site 1258 cover magnetochrons C20 to C24 and show well developed cycles. This record includes the missing interval for reevaluating the early Eocene part of the Geomagnetic Polarity Time Scale (GPTS), also providing key aspects for reconstructing high-resolution climate variability during the Early Eocene Climatic Optimum (EECO). Detailed spectral analysis demonstrates that early Eocene sedimentary cycles are characterized by precession frequencies modulated by short (100 kyr) and long (405 kyr) eccentricity with a generally minor obliquity component. Counting of both the precession and eccentricity cycles results in revised estimates for the duration of magnetochrons C21r through C24n. Our cyclostratigraphic framework also corroborates that the geochronology of the Eocene Green River Formation (Wyoming, USA) is still questionable mainly due to the uncertain correlation of the "Sixth tuff" to the GPTS. Right at the onset of the long-term Cenozoic cooling trend the dominant eccentricity-modulated precession cycles of ODP Site 1258 are interrupted by strong obliquity cycles for a period of ~800 kyr in the middle of magnetochron C22r. These distinct obliquity cycles at this low latitude site point to (1) a high-latitude driving mechanism on global climate variability from 50.1 to 49.4 Ma, and (2) seem to coincide with a significant drop in atmospheric CO2 concentration below a critical threshold between 2- and 3-times the pre-industrial level (PAL). The here newly identified orbital configuration of low eccentricity in combination with high obliquity amplitudes during this ~800-kyr period and the crossing of a critical pCO2 threshold may have led to the formation of the first ephemeral ice sheet on Antarctica as early as ~50 Ma ago.

  14. High resolution cyclostratigraphy of the early Eocene - new insights into the origin of the Cenozoic cooling trend

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westerhold, T.; Röhl, U.

    2009-02-01

    Here we present a high-resolution cyclostratigraphy based on X-ray fluorescence (XRF) core scanning data from a new record retrieved from the tropical western Atlantic (Demerara Rise, ODP Leg 207, Site 1258). The Eocene sediments from ODP Site 1258 cover magnetochrons C20 to C24 and show well developed cycles. This record includes the missing interval for reevaluating the early Eocene part of the Geomagnetic Polarity Time Scale (GPTS), also providing key aspects for reconstructing high-resolution climate variability during the Early Eocene Climatic Optimum (EECO). Detailed spectral analysis demonstrates that early Eocene sedimentary cycles are characterized by precession frequencies modulated by short (100 kyr) and long (405 kyr) eccentricity with a generally minor obliquity component. Counting of both the precession and eccentricity cycles results in revised estimates for the duration of magnetochrons C21r through C24n. Our cyclostratigraphic framework also corroborates that the geochronology of the Eocene Green River Formation (Wyoming, USA) is still questionable mainly due to the uncertain correlation of the "Sixth Tuff" to the GPTS. Right at the onset of the long-term Cenozoic cooling trend the dominant eccentricity-modulated precession cycles of ODP Site 1258 are interrupted by strong obliquity cycles for a period of ~800 kyr in the middle of magnetochron C22r. These distinct obliquity cycles at this low latitude site point to (1) a high-latitude driving mechanism on global climate variability from 50.1 to 49.4 Ma, and (2) seem to coincide with a significant drop in atmospheric CO2 concentration below a critical threshold between 2- and 3-times the pre-industrial level (PAL). The here newly identified orbital configuration of low eccentricity in combination with high obliquity amplitudes during this ~800-kyr period and the crossing of a critical pCO2 threshold may have led to the formation of the first ephemeral ice sheet on Antarctica as early as ~50 Ma ago.

  15. An exceptionally preserved Eocene shark and the rise of modern predator-prey interactions in the coral reef food web.

    PubMed

    Fanti, Federico; Minelli, Daniela; Conte, Gabriele Larocca; Miyashita, Tetsuto

    2016-01-01

    Following extreme climatic warming events, Eocene Lagerstätten document aquatic and terrestrial vertebrate faunas surprisingly similar to modern counterparts. This transition in marine systems is best documented in the earliest teleost-dominated coral reef assemblage of Pesciara di Bolca, northern Italy, from near the end of the Eocene Climatic Optimum. Its rich fauna shows similarities with that of the modern Great Barrier Reef in niche exploitation by and morphological disparity among teleost primary consumers. However, such paleoecological understanding has not transcended trophic levels above primary consumers, particularly in carcharhiniform sharks. We report an exceptionally preserved fossil school shark (Galeorhinus cuvieri) from Pesciara di Bolca. In addition to the spectacular preservation of soft tissues, including brain, muscles, and claspers, this male juvenile shark has stomach contents clearly identifiable as a sphyraenid acanthomorph (barracuda). This association provides evidence that a predator-prey relationship between Galeorhinus and Sphyraena in the modern coral reefs has roots in the Eocene. A growth curve of the living species of Galeorhinus fitted to G. cuvieri suggests that all specimens of G. cuvieri from the lagoonal deposits of Bolca represent sexually and somatically immature juveniles. The modern trophic association between higher-degree consumers (Galeorhinus and Sphyraena) has a counterpart in the Eocene Bolca, just as Bolca and the Great Barrier Reef show parallels among teleost primary consumers. Given the age of Bolca, trophic networks among consumers observed in modern coral reefs arose by the exit from the Climatic Optimum. The biased representation of juveniles suggests that the Bolca Lagerstätte served as a nursery habitat for G. cuvieri. Ultraviolet photography may be useful in probing for exceptional soft tissue preservation before common acid preparation methods.

  16. Early-middle Eocene chronology of the Southern Ocean: magnetostratigraphic data from the South Island of New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dallanave, E.; Bachtadse, V.; Agnini, C.; Muttoni, G.; Hollis, C. J.; Morgans, H. E.; Crampton, J. S.

    2012-12-01

    During the Paleogene the Earth experienced a pronounced warming trend culminating with the early Eocene climatic optimum (EECO, ~52-50 Ma), which was followed by a long-term cooling trend over the middle-late Eocene. This long-term climate evolution was punctuated by several transient (~10^3-5 yr) hyperthermal events (e.g. Paleocene Eocene thermal maximum). Even though great advances have been made in the last few years in understanding the paleoclimate history of the southwestern Pacific Ocean and the implications on the sedimentation patterns, a precise correlation between sites and global events is still missing. This is mainly because of the poor preservation of calcareous nannofossils, diachronous ranges of index species, and a lack of a good magnetic polarity reversals record. We present preliminary early-middle Eocene magnetostratigraphy from the Mid Waipara and the Mead Stream marine sections, cropping out in the South Island of New Zealand. These sections provide the best-known record of oceanic changes in the southern Pacific high-latitude (50-60°S) for this time period. Magnetostratigraphic data, integrated with new and published biostratigraphy, indicates that the sampled ~45 m of the Mid Waipara section straddles polarity Chrons from C23n to C21n (~51.5-47 Ma), with an average sediment accumulation rate of ~9 m/Myr, calculated by means of correlation with the GPTS2004 time scale. This robust chronological framework allow to constrain in time the paleotemperature dataset of Hollis et al. (EPSL 349-350, pp. 53-56, 2012), confirming that the Ashley Mudstone formation of Mid Waipara includes at least the upper part of the EECO and the early-middle Eocene transition. The sampled ~320 m of the Mead Stream section, which comprises the three upper member of the Amuri Limestone (Lower Marl, Upper Limestone and Upper Marl), encompass polarity Chrons from C24r to C18r (~55-40 Ma), with an average sedimentation rate of ~17 m/Myr. We confirm evidence from carbon

  17. Post-Eocene climate change across continental Australia and the diversification of Australasian spiny trapdoor spiders (Idiopidae: Arbanitinae).

    PubMed

    Rix, Michael G; Cooper, Steven J B; Meusemann, Karen; Klopfstein, Seraina; Harrison, Sophie E; Harvey, Mark S; Austin, Andrew D

    2017-04-01

    -plugging in transitional arid zone taxa have evolved twice independently in Western Australia, while in Misgolas and Cataxia, burrow door-building behaviours have likely been independently lost at least three times in the eastern Australian mesic zone. We also show that the presence of idiopids in New Zealand (Cantuaria) is likely to be the result of recent dispersal from Australia, rather than ancient continental vicariance. By providing the first comprehensive, continental synopsis of arid zone biogeography in an Australian arachnid lineage, we show that the diversification of arbanitine Idiopidae was intimately associated with climate shifts during the Neogene, resulting in multiple Mio-Pliocene radiations.

  18. Integrated stratigraphy and astronomical tuning of Smirra cores, lower Eocene, Umbria-Marche basin, Italy.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauretano, Vittoria; Turtù, Antonio; Hilgen, Frits; Galeotti, Simone; Catanzariti, Rita; Reichart, Gert Jan; Lourens, Lucas J.

    2016-04-01

    The early Eocene represents an ideal case study to analyse the impact of increase global warming on the ocean-atmosphere system. During this time interval, the Earth's surface experienced a long-term warming trend that culminated in a period of sustained high temperatures called the Early Eocene Climatic Optimum (EECO). These perturbations of the ocean-atmosphere system involved the global carbon cycle and global temperatures and have been linked to orbital forcing. Unravelling this complex climatic system strictly depends on the availability of high-quality suitable geological records and accurate age models. However, discrepancies between the astrochronological and radioisotopic dating techniques complicate the development of a robust time scale for the early Eocene (49-54 Ma). Here we present the first magneto-, bio-, chemo- and cyclostratigraphic results of the drilling of the land-based Smirra section, in the Umbria Marche Basin. The sediments recovered at Smirra provide a remarkably well-preserved and undisturbed succession of the early Palaeogene pelagic stratigraphy. Bulk stable carbon isotope and X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) scanning records are employed in the construction of an astronomically tuned age model for the time interval between ~49 and ~54 Ma based on the tuning to long-eccentricity. These results are then compared to the astronomical tuning of the benthic carbon isotope record of ODP Site 1263 to evaluate the different age model options and improve the time scale of the early Eocene by assessing the precise number of eccentricity-related cycles comprised in this critical interval.

  19. A warm and wet Little Climatic Optimum and a cold and dry Little Ice Age in the southern Rocky Mountains, USA

    SciTech Connect

    Petersen, K.L.

    1992-05-01

    In the next century, increases in atmospheric trace gas concentration could warm the global average temperature beyond what it has ranged during the past century. Examination of larger-than-historic climatic changes that have occurred in the past in specific regions provides realistic context for evaluating such potential future changes. This paper has contrasted the climatic manifestation of the Little Climatic Optimum or Medieval Warm Period (AD 900--1300) with that of the Little Ice Age (AD 1300--1850) in the northern Colorado Plateau region of the southwestern USA. The zenith of the Anasazi occupation coincides with the former and their demise coincides with the latter, when conditions became too cold and especially dry (in the summer) to support upland dry farming. During the height of the Little Climatic Optimum the region was characterized by a relatively long growing season and greater winter and summer precipitation than that of today. This resulted in a relatively rapid development of a potential dry-farming belt that was twice as wide as the present and areas that cannot be dry farmed today were routinely farmed by the Anasazi. Such conditions would be beneficial to dry farmers in the Four Corners region if those conditions were repeated in the near future.

  20. Biogeographic and evolutionary implications of a diverse paleobiota in amber from the early Eocene of India

    PubMed Central

    Rust, Jes; Singh, Hukam; Rana, Rajendra S.; McCann, Tom; Singh, Lacham; Anderson, Ken; Sarkar, Nivedita; Nascimbene, Paul C.; Stebner, Frauke; Thomas, Jennifer C.; Solórzano Kraemer, Monica; Williams, Christopher J.; Engel, Michael S.; Sahni, Ashok; Grimaldi, David

    2010-01-01

    For nearly 100 million years, the India subcontinent drifted from Gondwana until its collision with Asia some 50 Ma, during which time the landmass presumably evolved a highly endemic biota. Recent excavations of rich outcrops of 50–52-million-year-old amber with diverse inclusions from the Cambay Shale of Gujarat, western India address this issue. Cambay amber occurs in lignitic and muddy sediments concentrated by near-shore chenier systems; its chemistry and the anatomy of associated fossil wood indicates a definitive source of Dipterocarpaceae. The amber is very partially polymerized and readily dissolves in organic solvents, thus allowing extraction of whole insects whose cuticle retains microscopic fidelity. Fourteen orders and more than 55 families and 100 species of arthropod inclusions have been discovered thus far, which have affinities to taxa from the Eocene of northern Europe, to the Recent of Australasia, and the Miocene to Recent of tropical America. Thus, India just prior to or immediately following contact shows little biological insularity. A significant diversity of eusocial insects are fossilized, including corbiculate bees, rhinotermitid termites, and modern subfamilies of ants (Formicidae), groups that apparently radiated during the contemporaneous Early Eocene Climatic Optimum or just prior to it during the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum. Cambay amber preserves a uniquely diverse and early biota of a modern-type of broad-leaf tropical forest, revealing 50 Ma of stasis and change in biological communities of the dipterocarp primary forests that dominate southeastern Asia today. PMID:20974929

  1. The Terrestrial Eocene-Oligocene Transition in North America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prothero, Donald R.; Emry, Robert J.

    1996-06-01

    The transition from the Eocene to the Oligocene epoch, occurring approximately 47 to 30 million years ago, was the most dramatic episode of climatic and biotic change since the demise of the dinosaurs. The mild tropical climates of the Paleocene and early Eocene were replaced by modern climatic conditions and extremes, including glacial ice in Antarctica. The first part of this book summarizes the latest information in the dating and correlation of the strata of late middle Eocene through early Oligocene age in North America. The second part reviews almost all the important terrestrial reptiles and mammals found near the Eocene-Oligocene boundary, in the White River Chronofauna--from the turtles, snakes and lizards to the common rodents, carnivores, oreodonts and deer of the Badlands. This is the first comprehensive treatment of these topics in over sixty years, and will be invaluable to vertebrate paleontologists, geologists, mammalogists and evolutionary biologists.

  2. Expansion and diversification of high-latitude radiolarian assemblages in the late Eocene linked to a cooling event in the southwest Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pascher, K. M.; Hollis, C. J.; Bohaty, S. M.; Cortese, G.; McKay, R. M.; Seebeck, H.; Suzuki, N.; Chiba, K.

    2015-12-01

    The long-term cooling trend from middle to late Eocene was punctuated by several large-scale climate perturbations that culminated in a shift to "icehouse" climates at the Eocene-Oligocene transition. We present radiolarian micro-fossil assemblage and foraminiferal oxygen and carbon stable isotope data from Deep Sea Drilling Project (DSDP) sites 277, 280, 281, and 283 and Ocean Drilling Project (ODP) Site 1172 to identify significant oceanographic changes in the southwest Pacific through this climate transition (~ 40-30 Ma). We find that the Middle Eocene Climatic Optimum at ~ 40 Ma, which is truncated but identified by a negative shift in foraminiferal δ18O values at Site 277, is associated with a small increase in radiolarian taxa with low-latitude affinities (5 % of total fauna). In the early late Eocene at ~ 37 Ma, a positive oxygen isotope shift at Site 277 is correlated with the Priabonian Oxygen Isotope Maximum (PrOM). Radiolarian abundance, diversity, and preservation increase within this cooling event at Site 277 at the same time as diatom abundance. A negative δ18O excursion above the PrOM is correlated with a late Eocene warming event (~ 36.4 Ma). Radiolarian abundance and diversity decline within this event and taxa with low-latitude affinities reappear. Apart from this short-lived warming event, the PrOM and latest Eocene radiolarian assemblages are characterised by abundant high-latitude taxa. High-latitude taxa are also abundant during the late Eocene and early Oligocene (~ 38-30 Ma) at DSDP sites 280, 281, 283 and 1172 and are associated with very high diatom abundance. We therefore infer a northward expansion of high-latitude radiolarian taxa onto the Campbell Plateau in the latest Eocene. In the early Oligocene there is an overall decrease in radiolarian abundance and diversity at Site 277, and diatoms are scarce. These data indicate that, once the Antarctic Circumpolar Current was established in the early Oligocene (~ 30 Ma), a frontal system

  3. Orbital control on carbon cycle alterations and hyperthermal events in a cooling world: the late Early to Mid Eocene record at Possagno (southern Alps, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galeotti, Simone; Sprovieri, Mario; Moretti, Matteo; Rio, Domenico; Fornaciari, Eliana; Giusberti, Luca; Agnini, Claudia; Backman, Jan; Lanci, Luca; Luciani, Valeria

    2013-04-01

    The late Early Eocene to Middle Eocene ~50-45 Million years ago (Ma) time interval in the middle bathyal, pelagic/hemipelagic succession of the Western Tethys Possagno section (southern Alps, Veneto), contains several episodes of negative carbon isotope excursions (CIEs) and concomitant dissolution of carbonates. These episodes are superimposed on a long term global climate cooling that started at about 51 Ma following the Early Eocene Climatic Optimum (EECO). Spectral analysis indicates that CIEs and dissolution events are paced by orbital forcing, confirming the global significance of previous finding on the same interval from Western and Southern Atlantic and Equatorial Pacific sites. The frequency and magnitude of CIEs through time is controlled by long-term modulations of orbital parameters, including long eccentricity (400 kyr) and a 1.2 million year modulation. Highest frequency of events - at the orbital scale - is observed across the EECO, which provides an observational basis to validate theoretical models predicting a threshold effect resulting from orbital forcing superimposed on gradually changing mean global boundary conditions. The observation of the 1.2 million year beat (long-term modulation of obliquity) together with previously published observation of enhanced obliquity (41 kyr) forcing across major CIEs and dissolution intervals indicates that high latitude feedbacks to orbital forcing played a fundamental role in the emplacement of the hyperthermals. The observed orbital forcing signature closely match that of early Eocene hyperthermals, suggesting similar driving processes.

  4. Paleocene-Eocene Data Model Integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shellito, Cindy; Lamarque, Jean-Francois; Kiehl, J.

    2007-08-01

    National Center for Atmospheric Research Workshop on Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum Data-Model Integration, 31 May to 1 June 2007, Santa Fe, New Mexico The warming at the Paleocene-Eocene boundary about 55 million years ago is the subject of intense research, as it has the potential to inform us about the effects of warming on the global ecosystem. Despite many years of research, many questions remain regarding the specifics and dynamics of this transitionally warm period known as the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM). The proposed source of this warming is a large increase in methane, carbon dioxide, or both, possibly from volcanic activity, methane hydrates buried along the continental slopes, and methane emissions from wetlands. Global climate models adapted with Eocene geography and high greenhouse gas levels have so far been unable to reproduce the warm climate of the high latitudes depicted by proxy data from this time. The integration of proxy data derived from the geologic and fossil record with model output is also a challenge, and requires cooperation of scientists from a broad array of disciplines.

  5. The nummulithoclast event within the Lower Eocene in the Southern Tethyan margin: Mechanisms involved, analogy with the filament event and climate implication (Kairouan, Central Tunisia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mardassi, Besma

    2017-10-01

    Early Eocene deposits in Tunisia are marked by clear variations in terms of facies and thickness. Each facies corresponds to an appropriate depositional environment. Shallow water deposits pass gradually offshore into deeper carbonates along a homoclinal ramp. In Central Tunisia, detailed investigation of carbonate facies under transmitted light shows a particular richness of the middle part of Early Eocene deposits in nummulithoclasts. These facies are often frequent within corrugated banks. They are overlaying Globigerina rich well-bedded limestones and overlain by nummulites and Discocyclina rich massively-bedded carbonates. Nummulithoclasts occurrence is recorded on field by an abrupt vertical change from autochthonous thinly-bedded limestones to massively-bedded fossiliferous carbonates. Change concerns structures, textures and limestones' composition. Nummulithoclasts are associated either to planktonic micro-organisms or to benthic fauna and phosphates grains. The middle and the upper parts of the Early Eocene deposits, particularly, fossilize hummocky cross-stratifications and megaripples. Their presence advocates the role of energetic currents in sweeping nummulites from lower circatidal to upper bathyal environments. The absence of a slope break helped the settling of reworked nummulites within deeper environments. The abrupt change, nummulithoclast associations and current structures arouse reflection and make them not reliable to characterize depositional environments. However, their preferential occurrence within the middle part of Early Eocene deposits and the tight linkage with storm activity lead them to be considered as event. The large scale hummocks recorded on field suggests that nummulite fragmentation was triggered by tropical cyclones rather than humble storms. The frequent occurrence of cyclones which correspond to low pressure atmospheric systems seems in relation with a global warming enhancing the sea surface temperature.

  6. No extreme bipolar glaciation during the main Eocene calcite compensation shift.

    PubMed

    Edgar, Kirsty M; Wilson, Paul A; Sexton, Philip F; Suganuma, Yusuke

    2007-08-23

    Major ice sheets were permanently established on Antarctica approximately 34 million years ago, close to the Eocene/Oligocene boundary, at the same time as a permanent deepening of the calcite compensation depth in the world's oceans. Until recently, it was thought that Northern Hemisphere glaciation began much later, between 11 and 5 million years ago. This view has been challenged, however, by records of ice rafting at high northern latitudes during the Eocene epoch and by estimates of global ice volume that exceed the storage capacity of Antarctica at the same time as a temporary deepening of the calcite compensation depth approximately 41.6 million years ago. Here we test the hypothesis that large ice sheets were present in both hemispheres approximately 41.6 million years ago using marine sediment records of oxygen and carbon isotope values and of calcium carbonate content from the equatorial Atlantic Ocean. These records allow, at most, an ice budget that can easily be accommodated on Antarctica, indicating that large ice sheets were not present in the Northern Hemisphere. The records also reveal a brief interval shortly before the temporary deepening of the calcite compensation depth during which the calcite compensation depth shoaled, ocean temperatures increased and carbon isotope values decreased in the equatorial Atlantic. The nature of these changes around 41.6 million years ago implies common links, in terms of carbon cycling, with events at the Eocene/Oligocene boundary and with the 'hyperthermals' of the Early Eocene climate optimum. Our findings help to resolve the apparent discrepancy between the geological records of Northern Hemisphere glaciation and model results that indicate that the threshold for continental glaciation was crossed earlier in the Southern Hemisphere than in the Northern Hemisphere.

  7. A high-resolution benthic stable-isotope record for the South Atlantic: Implications for orbital-scale changes in Late Paleocene-Early Eocene climate and carbon cycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Littler, Kate; Röhl, Ursula; Westerhold, Thomas; Zachos, James C.

    2014-09-01

    The Late Paleocene and Early Eocene were characterized by warm greenhouse climates, punctuated by a series of rapid warming and ocean acidification events known as “hyperthermals”, thought to have been paced or triggered by orbital cycles. While these hyperthermals, such as the Paleocene Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM), have been studied in great detail, the background low-amplitude cycles seen in carbon and oxygen-isotope records throughout the Paleocene-Eocene have hitherto not been resolved. Here we present a 7.7 million year (myr) long, high-resolution, orbitally-tuned, benthic foraminiferal stable-isotope record spanning the late Paleocene and early Eocene interval (∼52.5-60.5 Ma) from Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Site 1262, South Atlantic. This high resolution (∼2-4 kyr) record allows the changing character and phasing of orbitally-modulated cycles to be studied in unprecedented detail as it reflects the long-term trend in carbon cycle and climate over this interval. The main pacemaker in the benthic oxygen-isotope (δ18O) and carbon-isotope (δ13C) records from ODP Site 1262, are the long (405 kyr) and short (100 kyr) eccentricity cycles, and precession (21 kyr). Obliquity (41 kyr) is almost absent throughout the section except for a few brief intervals where it has a relatively weak influence. During the course of the Early Paleogene record, and particularly in the latest Paleocene, eccentricity-paced negative carbon-isotope excursions (δ13C, CIEs) and coeval negative oxygen-isotope (δ18O) excursions correspond to low carbonate (CaCO3) and coarse fraction (%CF) values due to increased carbonate dissolution, suggesting shoaling of the lysocline and accompanied changes in the global exogenic carbon cycle. These negative CIEs and δ18O events coincide with maxima in eccentricity, with changes in δ18O leading changes in δ13C by ∼6 (±5) kyr in the 405-kyr band and by ∼3 (±1) kyr in the higher frequency 100-kyr band on average. However, these

  8. Integrating South Pacific carbon cycling and climate history from Late Paleocene to Middle Eocene: an upper slope transect from eastern New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slotnick, B. S.; Dickens, G. R.; Hollis, C. J.; Crampton, J. S.; Strong, C.; Zachos, J. C.; Hines, B. R.; Philips, A.

    2013-12-01

    The Late Paleocene to Middle Eocene was characterized by prominent variations in global carbon cycling, which operated on both long (>10e6) and short (<10e5) time scales. The interval from about 58 to 52 Ma is now fairly well documented, and can be described in a general sense as a time when δ13C dropped significantly, and the CCD deepened by several hundred meters. Superimposed on these trends were a series of hyperthermal events, each associated with a rapid drop in δ13C and a shoaling of the CCD. A current issue is whether such hyperthermals, which were likely paced/triggered by orbital variations, occurred during the Late Paleocene (before the PETM) and during the middle Eocene (after the start of EECO). The problem arises in part because the CCD is relatively shallow prior to 58 Ma and after 52 Ma, such that well-resolved, single-site deep-sea records spanning the entire interval are rare. To better understand and constrain Late Paleocene to Middle Eocene carbon cycle changes, we extend well-resolved carbon isotope and carbonate content records from the Mead Stream section, which accumulated on the middle-upper slope of proto-New Zealand. In addition, we generated a new carbon isotope and carbonate content record from Branch Stream, a section up-slope from Mead Stream, for comparison between different settings along the same margin. The new data compliments previous work at these localities, such that detailed records now extend from 58 to 38 Ma. The long-term drop in δ13C from 58-52 Ma was followed by a long-term rise in δ13C. Numerous geologically-brief (<0.2 Myr) but relatively small carbon isotope excursions (CIEs) occur through this interval, although it is not clear if they are hyperthermals. In addition, strata from the late Early Eocene has lower carbonate contents than were measured in beds that span the numerous yet distinct clay-rich Early Eocene hyperthermals, an indication that the flux of carbonate to the seafloor decreased, either because of

  9. Modifications in calcareous nannofossil assemblages during the Early Eocene: a tethyan perspective.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agnini, Claudia; Rio, Domenico; Dallanave, Edoardo; Spofforth, David J. A.; Muttoni, Giovanni; Pälike, Heiko

    2010-05-01

    The available oxygen isotope records indicate a long-term warming trend from the late Paleocene through the early Eocene (ca. 59-52 Ma) that peaked at the Early Eocene Climatic Optimum (EECO) (Zachos et al., 2001). This trend was interrupted by at least two or more prominent carbon cycle perturbations, the PETM at ca. 55.5 Ma and the Eocene thermal maximum 2 (ETM2; also referred to as Elmo, H-1) at ca. 53,6 Ma (Kennett and Stott, 1991; Lourens et al., 2005). Here we present calcareous nannofossil data from the hemipelagic Cicogna section located in the Piave River Valley in north eastern Italy (Dallanave et al., 2009). This continuous sedimentary record was studied to reconstruct the main features in the calcareous nannoplankton communities during this critical interval. As is clearly shown by the results, some of the observed prominent modifications are related to short-lived phases of climate perturbation, as for instance the transient and abrupt appearance of odd species during the PETM or the prominent variations in the relative abundance within the assemblages during these events. These short-term changes are usually transitory and calcareous nannoplankton seem to be able to return back to pre-event state. Nonetheless, the overall shape of calcareous nannofossil assemblages showed long lasting or gradual changes, for example the extinction of genera Fasciculithus and Prinsius, the explosion of Zyghrablithus bijugatus and the gradual decrease of heterococcoliths/nannoliths ratio. Either transient or permanent modifications in calcareous nannofossils are associated to dramatic perturbation of paleoenviromental conditions or long trend climate evolution, respectively. References: Dallanave et al., 2009. Earth and Planetary Science Letters, 285, 39-51. Kennett and Stott, 1991. Nature, 353, 225-229. Lourens et al., 2005. Nature, 235, 1083-1087. Zachos et al., 2001. Science, 292, 686-693.

  10. A 600 k.y. record of El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO): Evidence for persisting teleconnections during the Middle Eocene greenhouse climate of Central Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenz, Olaf K.; Wilde, Volker; Riegel, Walter; Harms, Franz-Juergen

    2010-07-01

    The El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) is a globally important factor in today's climate dynamics. Annually laminated oil shales from the maar lake of Messel (Germany) provide high-resolution sedimentological and paleoenvironmental data of a time interval of ˜600 k.y. during the Eocene greenhouse phase. Individual laminae consist of a light spring and summer algal layer (Tetraedron minimum layer) and a dark winter layer composed of terrigenous background sediment. Four sections were selected from the core of the Messel 2001 well in order to count varves and to measure total varve thickness and the thickess of light and dark laminae. Spectral analyses were done in order to detect possible cyclic fluctuations in varve thickness. Fluctuations are significant in the quasi-biennial (2.1-2.5 yr) and low-frequency band (2.8-3.5 yr, 4.9-5.6 yr), thus showing that algal growth as well as the background sedimentation were controlled by ENSO effects at least over a time interval of 600 k.y. This confirms the existence of a previously postulated robust Eocene ENSO. Significant peaks within a quasi-decadal (10-11 yr), interdecadal (17-26 yr), and multidecadal band (˜52 yr, ˜82 yr) show either the enduring influence of more or less cyclic instabilities or the influence of solar cycles.

  11. High-resolution magneto-biostratigraphy of the early Eocene to early Oligocene from Indian Ocean Hole 711A and Italian Monte Cagnero section

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savian, J. F.; Jovane, L.; Coccioni, R.; Frontalini, F.; Bohaty, S.; Wilson, P.; Roberts, A. P.; Florindo, F.; Trindade, R.

    2013-05-01

    One of the main challenges in the integration and analysis of palaeorecords is development of high-resolution age models. An accurate age control is fundamental for the reliable determination of sequences of events in the geological record. The early Eocene to the early Oligocene interval witnessed major changes in Earth's paleoclimate and paleogeography. Stable isotope records (δ18O and δ13C) from pelagic foraminifera for this time period show a long-term cooling trend which ends with an abrupt step, the Oi-1, near the Eocene/Oligocene transition at ~34 Ma, interpreted as the onset of glaciation in Antarctica. Several mechanisms have been proposed as the cause for this event, including the opening of the Southern Ocean, the decrease in atmospheric greenhouse gases, and the closure of the Neo-Tethys (STENT). Superimposed on this long-term cooling trend, some anomalous warming events occur, from which the middle Eocene climatic optimum (MECO) at 40 Ma is the most important. Here we report a high-resolution integrated age model of early Eocene-early Oligocene successions from two sites (Monte Cagnero, Central Italy and ODP Hole 711A, Indian Ocean), using magnetostratigraphy and biostratigraphy, and we also show lithostratigraphy, environmental magnetism, CaCO3, and isotope records on bulk carbonate. In parallel, we provide a high-resolution rock magnetic study of these sections including environmental magnetism data (magnetic susceptibility, ARM, IRM, and BIRM), IRM acquisition, thermomagnetic curves, hysteresis and FORC diagrams. Through these data, the main climatic events are recognized in these sections by the ubiquitous occurrence of non-interacting SD magnetite (in a mixture with fine hematite in the inland sections) associated with spikes in geochemical and isotopic data. These paleorecords will contribute to better understanding of the Eocene and Oligocene global climatic changes.

  12. The magnitude and phasing of variations in climate and ocean carbonate chemistry during Eocene Thermal Maximum 2: Insights into C cycle feedbacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harper, D. T.; Zeebe, R. E.; Hoenisch, B.; Zachos, J. C.

    2016-12-01

    The early Eocene features several large abrupt global warming events ("hyperthermals") that were characterized by negative δ13C excursions suggesting isotopically `light' carbon release to the atmosphere. The most prominent events, the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM) and Eocene Thermal Maximum 2 (ETM2), present an opportunity to study the operation of carbon cycle processes, and in particular negative feedbacks in the carbon cycle, such as silicate and carbonate weathering. Here we study sea surface temperature (SST) and ocean carbonate chemistry changes across ETM2, by measuring Mg/Ca, B/Ca, and δ13C in planktic foraminifera at two IODP sites (1209 in the Pacific and 1265 in the S. Atlantic). We observe a 2-3°C increase in SST in the Pacific and a 2°C increase in the Atlantic. The observed decrease in planktic B/Ca at both sites is consistent with increased atmospheric pCO2, and when scaled to the 0.3 pH unit decrease estimated for the PETM by Penman et al., 2014, the estimated pH decrease during the ETM2 is 0.15. However, reconstructions of the δ13C recovery during the ETM2 show that it is more rapid than models have been able to successfully simulate. We compare these new proxy data to LOSCAR model output, to assess whether the rapid δ13C recovery was a result of: 1) changes in the type and δ13C of weathered carbonates or δ13C of buried organic carbon during the recovery, 2) a one-time event of isotopically `light' carbon burial during the recovery phase, or 3) enhanced burial of `light' carbon due to background orbital eccentricity forcing during the recovery. Our preliminary results suggest that the phasing of the drop in the B/Ca relative to δ13C during recovery is due to the burial of organic carbon.

  13. Was the Arctic Eocene 'rainforest' monsoonal? Estimates of seasonal precipitation from early Eocene megafloras from Ellesmere Island, Nunavut

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    West, Christopher K.; Greenwood, David R.; Basinger, James F.

    2015-10-01

    The early Eocene was the warmest interval of the Cenozoic, and included within it were several hyperthermal events, with the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM) the most pronounced of these. These globally warm climates extended into the Arctic and substantive paleobotanical evidence for high Arctic precipitation (MAP > 150 cm/yr) is indicative of an Arctic rainforest, which contradicts some climate models that show low Arctic precipitation. Prior studies of Arctic early Eocene wood stable-isotope chemistry, however, have shown a summer peak in precipitation, which suggests modern analogs are best sought on the summer-wet east coast of the Asia (e.g., China, Japan, South Korea), not the winter-wet west coasts of the Pacific Northwest of North America). Furthermore, some prior modeling data suggest that highly seasonal 'monsoon-type' summer-wet precipitation regimes (i.e., summer:MAP > 55%) characterized certain mid and lower latitude regions in the early to mid-Eocene. Presented here is a new analysis using leaf physiognomy of 3 leaf megafloras (Split Lake, Stenkul Fiord and Strathcona Fiord) and palynofloral Bioclimatic Analysis from the Margaret Formation from Ellesmere Island, placed stratigraphically as early Eocene, possibly occurring during or following one of the early Eocene hyperthermals. These new data indicate high summer precipitation in the Arctic during the early Eocene, which in part corroborates the results from Eocene wood chemistry. Nevertheless, in contradiction to the wood analysis, monsoonal conditions are not indicated by our analysis, consistent with current modeling studies. High summer (light season) and winter (dark season) precipitation in the Eocene Arctic during hyperthermals would have contributed to regional warmth.

  14. Lacustrine 87Sr/86Sr as a tracer to reconstruct Milankovitch forcing of the Eocene hydrologic cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baddouh, M'bark; Meyers, Stephen R.; Carroll, Alan R.; Beard, Brian L.; Johnson, Clark M.

    2016-08-01

    The Green River Formation (GRF) provides one of the premier paleoclimate archives of the Early Eocene Climatic Optimum (∼50 Ma), representing the apex of the early Cenozoic greenhouse climate. Rhythmic lake-level variability expressed in the GRF has inspired numerous hypotheses for the behavior of the Eocene hydrologic cycle, including its linkage to astronomical forcing, solar variability, and the El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO). However, the lack of sufficient proxy data to document atmospheric water-mass transport and the geographic pattern of evaporation/precipitation/runoff has made it difficult to discriminate between different models for astronomical forcing. Variable 87Sr/86Sr ratios of bedrock that encompass the GRF provide an opportunity to reconstruct the spatial expression of the Eocene hydrologic cycle and its linkage to lake level. Here Sr isotope data from the Wilkins Peak Member, a rhythmic succession that has been demonstrated to record Milankovitch forcing of lake levels, indicate that high lake levels reflect an increased proportion of runoff from less radiogenic rocks west of the basin, eliminating a number of the existing astronomical-forcing hypotheses. The 87Sr/86Sr variability is consistent with a change in mean ENSO state, which is predicted by climate models to be linked to orbital-insolation. Thus, the 87Sr/86Sr data reveal a coupling of high frequency (ENSO) and low frequency (astronomical) climate variability, and also predict the existence of sizable astronomically-forced alpine snowpack during the last greenhouse climate. More broadly, this study demonstrates the utility of 87Sr/86Sr as a powerful tool for reconstructing the deep-time hydrologic cycle.

  15. Ecosystem reconstructions for the hinterland of the Atlantic Coastal Plain during the late Mid-Miocene Climatic Optimum (IODP Expedition 313)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prader, Sabine; Kotthoff, Ulrich; McCarthy, Francine; Greenwood, David

    2016-04-01

    During IODP Expedition 313, cores from three Sites (313-M0027, M0028, and M0029) from the New Jersey shallow shelf (water depth approximately 35 m) were retrieved in 2009. We have investigated the palynology of sediment cores from Site M0027, 45 km off the present-day coast of New Jersey in order to reconstruct environmental and climate change in the region during the second half of the Mid-Miocene Climatic Optimum (MMCO) and the subsequent transition to cooler conditions (ca. 15 to 13 million years before present). Transport-caused bias of the pollen assemblages was identified via the analysis of the terrestrial/marine palynomorph ratio and these results were considered when interpreting palaeo-vegetation from the pollen data. Pollen preservation in the interval analyzed herein was generally very good. Pollen grains were analyzed via both light and scanning electron microscopy. In the analyzed samples, angiosperm tree pollen grains were most abundant and probably formed the main vegetation zone in the lowland during the MMCO. The pollen-based results point to the presence of a deciduous-evergreen mixed forest that was characterised by e.g. Quercus, Carya, Liquidambar, Juglans, Pterocarya, Tilia, Engelhardia. Frequent conifer pollen grains indicate that highland forests with e.g. Pinus, Cathaya, and Picea were present the hinterland of the New Jersey shelf. Typical wetland elements like Nyssa and Taxodium as well as herbal taxa like Polygonum and Polygala were generally rare. The pollen-based climate reconstructions for the hinterland oft the New Jersey shallow shelf document a warm temperate climate without winterfrost and relatively high precipitation through the year during this time. Our results imply that the vegetation and regional climate in the hinterland of the New Jersey shelf did not react as sensitively to the cooling phase following the MMCO as other regions in North America or Europe.

  16. Reconstruction of Middle Eocene - Late Oligocene Southern Ocean paleoclimate through calcareous nannofossils and stable isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villa, Giuliana; Fioroni, Chiara; Persico, Davide; Pea, Laura; Bohaty, Steve

    2010-05-01

    The transition from the ice free early Paleogene world to the glaciated conditions of the early Oligocene has been matter of discussion in the last years. This transition has not been monotonic but punctuated by numerous transient cooling and warming events. Here we present a summary of recent studies based on Nannofossil response to climatic changes during the Eocene and Oligocene. Collected data issue from high latitudes ODP Sites 748, 738, 744, 689 and 690. Based on a detailed revision of the biostratigraphy carried out through quantitative analysis, we conducted paleoecological studies on calcareous nannofossils through the late middle Eocene to the - late Oligocene interval to identify abundance variations of selected taxa in response to changes in sea surface temperature (SST) and trophic conditions. The nannofossil-based interpretation has been compared with detailed oxygen and carbon stable isotope stratigraphy confirming the climate variability in the Southern Ocean for this time interval. We identify the Middle Eocene Climatic optimum (MECO) event, related with the regional exclusion of Paleogenic warm-water taxa from the Southern Ocean, followed by the progressive cooling trend particularly emphasized during the cooling events at about 39 Ma, 37 Ma and 35.5 Ma. In the earliest Oligocene, marked changes in calcareous nannofossil assemblages are strikingly associated with the Oi-1 event recorded in perfect accordance with the oxygen isotope records. For most of the Oligocene we recorded a cold phase, while a warming trend is detected in the late Oligocene. In addiction, a marked increase of taxa thriving in eutrophic conditions coupled with a decrease in oligotrophic taxa, suggests the presence of a time interval (from about 36 Ma to about 26 Ma) with prevailing eutrophic conditions that correspond to an increase of the carbon stable isotope curve. This interval well corresponds with the clay mineral concentration that shows at Site 738 a higher

  17. Tropical/subtropical Upper Paleocene Lower Eocene fluvial deposits in eastern central Patagonia, Chile (46°45'S)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suárez, M.; de la Cruz, R.; Troncoso, A.

    2000-11-01

    A succession of quartz-rich fluvial sandstones and siltstones derived from a mainly rhyolitic source and minor metamorphic rocks, located to the west, represent the first Upper Paleocene-Early Eocene deposits described in Chilean eastern central Patagonian Cordillera (46°45'S). This unit, exposed 25 km south of Chile Chico, south of lago General Carrera, is here defined as the Ligorio Márquez Formation. It overlies with an angular unconformity Lower Cretaceous shallow marine sedimentary rocks (Cerro Colorado Formation) and subaerial tuffs that have yielded K-Ar dates of 128, 125 and 123 Ma (Flamencos Tuffs, of the Divisadero Group). The Ligorio Márquez Formation includes flora indicative of a tropical/subtropical climate, and its deposition took place during the initial part of the Late Paleocene-Early Eocene Cenozoic optimum. The underlying Lower Cretaceous units exhibit folding and faulting, implying a pre-Paleocene-Lower Eocene contractional tectonism. Overlying Oligocene-Miocene marine and continental facies in the same area exhibit thrusts and normal faults indicative of post-Lower Miocene contractional tectonism.

  18. Age of the Mt. Ortles ice cores, the Tyrolean Iceman and glaciation of the highest summit of South Tyrol since the Northern Hemisphere Climatic Optimum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabrielli, Paolo; Barbante, Carlo; Bertagna, Giuliano; Bertó, Michele; Binder, Daniel; Carton, Alberto; Carturan, Luca; Cazorzi, Federico; Cozzi, Giulio; Dalla Fontana, Giancarlo; Davis, Mary; De Blasi, Fabrizio; Dinale, Roberto; Dragà, Gianfranco; Dreossi, Giuliano; Festi, Daniela; Frezzotti, Massimo; Gabrieli, Jacopo; Galos, Stephan P.; Ginot, Patrick; Heidenwolf, Petra; Jenk, Theo M.; Kehrwald, Natalie; Kenny, Donald; Magand, Olivier; Mair, Volkmar; Mikhalenko, Vladimir; Lin, Ping Nan; Oeggl, Klaus; Piffer, Gianni; Rinaldi, Mirko; Schotterer, Ulrich; Schwikowski, Margit; Seppi, Roberto; Spolaor, Andrea; Stenni, Barbara; Tonidandel, David; Uglietti, Chiara; Zagorodnov, Victor; Zanoner, Thomas; Zennaro, Piero

    2016-11-01

    In 2011 four ice cores were extracted from the summit of Alto dell'Ortles (3859 m), the highest glacier of South Tyrol in the Italian Alps. This drilling site is located only 37 km southwest from where the Tyrolean Iceman, ˜ 5.3 kyrs old, was discovered emerging from the ablating ice field of Tisenjoch (3210 m, near the Italian-Austrian border) in 1991. The excellent preservation of this mummy suggested that the Tyrolean Iceman was continuously embedded in prehistoric ice and that additional ancient ice was likely preserved elsewhere in South Tyrol. Dating of the ice cores from Alto dell'Ortles based on 210Pb, tritium, beta activity and 14C determinations, combined with an empirical model (COPRA), provides evidence for a chronologically ordered ice stratigraphy from the modern glacier surface down to the bottom ice layers with an age of ˜ 7 kyrs, which confirms the hypothesis. Our results indicate that the drilling site has continuously been glaciated on frozen bedrock since ˜ 7 kyrs BP. Absence of older ice on the highest glacier of South Tyrol is consistent with the removal of basal ice from bedrock during the Northern Hemisphere Climatic Optimum (6-9 kyrs BP), the warmest interval in the European Alps during the Holocene. Borehole inclinometric measurements of the current glacier flow combined with surface ground penetration radar (GPR) measurements indicate that, due to the sustained atmospheric warming since the 1980s, an acceleration of the glacier Alto dell'Ortles flow has just recently begun. Given the stratigraphic-chronological continuity of the Mt. Ortles cores over millennia, it can be argued that this behaviour has been unprecedented at this location since the Northern Hemisphere Climatic Optimum.

  19. Palaeotectonic implications of increased late Eocene-early Oligocene volcanism from South Pacific DSDP sites

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kennett, J.P.; Von Der Borch, C.; Baker, P.A.; Barton, C.E.; Boersma, A.; Cauler, J.P.; Dudley, W.C.; Gardner, J.V.; Jenkins, D.G.; Lohman, W.H.; Martini, E.; Merrill, R.B.; Morin, R.; Nelson, Campbell S.; Robert, C.; Srinivasan, M.S.; Stein, R.; Takeuchi, A.; Murphy, M.G.

    1985-01-01

    Late Eocene-early Oligocene (42-35 Myr) sediments cored at two DSDP sites in the south-west Pacific contain evidence of a pronounced increase in local volcanic activity, particularly in close association with the Eocene-Oligocene boundary. This pulse of volcanism is coeval with that in New Zealand and resulted from the development of an Indo- Australian / Pacific Plate boundary through the region during the late Eocene. The late Eocene / earliest Oligocene was marked by widespread volcanism and tectonism throughout the Pacific and elsewhere, and by one of the most important episodes of Cenozoic climatic cooling. ?? 1985 Nature Publishing Group.

  20. Large Scale Eocene Ocean Circulation Transition Could Help Antarctic Glaciation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baatsen, M.

    2016-12-01

    The global climate underwent major changes going from the Eocene into the Oligocene, including the formation of a continental-scale Antarctic ice sheet. In addition to a gradual drawdown of CO2 since the Early Eocene, the changing background geography of the earth may also have played a crucial role in setting the background oceanic circulation pattern favorable to ice growth. On the other hand, the ocean circulation may have changed only after the ice sheet started growing, with a similar climatic imprint. It is, therefore, still under debate what the primary forcing or trigger of this transition was. Using an ocean general circulation model (POP) and two different geography reconstruc-tions for the middle-late Eocene, we find two distinctly different patterns of the oceanic circulation to be possible under the same forcing. The first one features deep-water formation and warmer SSTs in the Southern Pacific while in the second, deep water forms in the North Pacific Ocean and Southern Ocean SSTs are colder. The presence of a double equilibrium shows that the ocean circulation was highly susceptible to large scale transitions during the middle-late Eocene. Additionally, changes in benthic oxygen and Neodymium isotopes depict significant changes during the same period. We suggest that a transition in the global meridional overturing circulation can explain the observed changes and preconditions the global climate for the two-step transition into an Icehouse state at the Eocene-Oligocene boundary.

  1. Strong Equatorial Seasonality during Early Eocene greenhouse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samanta, Arpita; Sarkar, Anindya

    2017-04-01

    A warm greenhouse climate, punctuated by a series of rapid warming events (known as hyperthermals), is characteristic of the Late Paleocene to Early Eocene period. Rapid addition of 13C depleted carbon to the exogenic carbon cycle, in an otherwise overall higher atmospheric CO2 level, is thought to set off the hyperthermal events. For understanding the fate of ongoing global warming and response of the climate system and biota, researchers for past few decades are paying more attention to comprehend this climatic enigma. Existing proxies from the most distinct hyperthermal event i.e., PETM indicate that the mean annual sea surface temperature (MASST) was comparatively higher (by ˜8 ˚ C) at high latitude and to a lesser extent towards the equator. Apart from the prominent hyperthermal events the rest of the Early Eocene was significantly warmer and thought to be more equable compare to present. Terrestrial proxy records from the mid-latitude regions indicated that the Mean Annual Temperature (MAT) and Minimum Winter Temperature (MWT) was high, thus reducing the seasonality or difference between MWT and Maximum Summer Temperature (MST). In absence of proxy data from the low latitude region, a ≥40 ˚ C summer temperature was predicted assuming a mild Eocene temperature gradient of ˜0.4 ˚ C/ ˚ latitude and mid-latitude temperature data. Even question was raised about the existence of the tropical rain forest in such climatic extreme. Recent pollen census data, on contrary, suggest proliferation of the tropical rain forest during this climatic extreme. Important in this context is that there is a very few direct evidence of Late Paleocene-Early Eocene MAT and seasonality data from the low latitude/equatorial regions. To resolve this issue, oxygen and carbon isotope ratios of larger benthic foraminifera (Nummulites burdigalensis) were measured in laser based carbonate device attached with the Delta V advantage continuous flow stable isotope ratio mass spectrometer

  2. Late Eocene-Middle Miocene paleoclimates of the south-west Pacific: oxygen isotopic evidence

    SciTech Connect

    Kennett, J.P.; Murphy, M.G.

    1985-01-01

    High resolution oxygen isotopic stratigraphy is presented for Late Eocene-Middle Miocene sequences in a traverse of 6 DSDP sites from the southwest Pacific at water depths ranging from 1300 to 2000 m and from the warm subtropics to the cool temperature water masses. The data record the progressive increase of latitudinal temperature gradients from the late Eocene. A pattern of increasing isotopic offset between the latitudinally distributed sites is linked to the establishment and strengthening of the circum-Antarctic Current. The intensification of this current system progressively decoupled the warm subtropical gyres from cool polar circulation, in turn leading to Antarctic glaciation. Enriched oxygen isotopic values clustering in the middle Oligocene, are interpreted to represent accumulations of Antarctic ice, although this must have been temporary and of relatively low volume. This Antarctic ice must have disappeared by the Early Miocene when delta/sup 18/O values were relatively depleted, reaching minimum values during the late Early Miocene (19.5 to 16.5), the climax of Neogene warmth. This climatic optimum was immediately followed by a major enrichment in benthic delta/sup 18/O values between approx. 16.5 and 13.5 Ma, which is interpreted to represent major, permanent accumulation of the East Antarctic ice sheet and cooling of bottom waters.

  3. Asian monsoons in a late Eocene greenhouse world

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Licht, A.; van Cappelle, M.; Abels, H. A.; Ladant, J.-B.; Trabucho-Alexandre, J.; France-Lanord, C.; Donnadieu, Y.; Vandenberghe, J.; Rigaudier, T.; Lécuyer, C.; Terry, D., Jr.; Adriaens, R.; Boura, A.; Guo, Z.; Soe, Aung Naing; Quade, J.; Dupont-Nivet, G.; Jaeger, J.-J.

    2014-09-01

    The strong present-day Asian monsoons are thought to have originated between 25 and 22 million years (Myr) ago, driven by Tibetan-Himalayan uplift. However, the existence of older Asian monsoons and their response to enhanced greenhouse conditions such as those in the Eocene period (55-34 Myr ago) are unknown because of the paucity of well-dated records. Here we show late Eocene climate records revealing marked monsoon-like patterns in rainfall and wind south and north of the Tibetan-Himalayan orogen. This is indicated by low oxygen isotope values with strong seasonality in gastropod shells and mammal teeth from Myanmar, and by aeolian dust deposition in northwest China. Our climate simulations support modern-like Eocene monsoonal rainfall and show that a reinforced hydrological cycle responding to enhanced greenhouse conditions counterbalanced the negative effect of lower Tibetan relief on precipitation. These strong monsoons later weakened with the global shift to icehouse conditions 34 Myr ago.

  4. Palaeoenvironmental evolution of Lake Gacko (Southern Bosnia and Herzegovina): Impact of the Middle Miocene Climatic Optimum on the Dinaride Lake System

    PubMed Central

    Mandic, Oleg; de Leeuw, Arjan; Vuković, Boško; Krijgsman, Wout; Harzhauser, Mathias; Kuiper, Klaudia F.

    2011-01-01

    eccentricity minimum. Eccentricity maxima are interpreted to trigger lake-level high-stands. These are accompanied by eutrophication events caused by enhanced denudation of the surrounding basement and increased detrital input into the basin. The presented age model proves that Lake Gacko arose during the Middle Miocene Climatic Optimum and that the optimum climatic conditions triggered the formation of this long-lived lake. PMID:21317979

  5. Eocene sea temperatures for the mid-latitude southwest Pacific from Mg/Ca ratios in planktonic and benthic foraminifera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creech, John B.; Baker, Joel A.; Hollis, Christopher J.; Morgans, Hugh E. G.; Smith, Euan G. C.

    2010-11-01

    We have used laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) to measure elemental (Mg/Ca, Al/Ca, Mn/Ca, Zn/Ca, Sr/Ca, and Ba/Ca) ratios of 13 species of variably preserved early to middle Eocene planktonic and benthic foraminifera from New Zealand. The foraminifera were obtained from Ashley Mudstone, mid-Waipara River, South Island, which was deposited at bathyal depth ( ca. 1000 m) on the northern margin of the east-facing Canterbury Basin at a paleo-latitude of ca. 55°S. LA-ICP-MS data yield trace element depth profiles through foraminifera test walls that can be used to identify and exclude zones of surficial contamination and infilling material resulting from diagenetic coatings, mineralisation and detrital sediment. Screened Mg/Ca ratios from 5 species of foraminifera are used to calculate sea temperatures from late Early to early Middle Eocene ( ca. 51 to 46.5 Ma), a time interval that spans the termination of the Early Eocene Climatic Optimum (EECO). During this time, sea surface temperatures (SST) varied from 30 to 24 °C, and bottom water temperatures (BWT) from 21 to 14 °C. Comparison of Mg/Ca sea temperatures with published δ 18O and TEX 86 temperature data from the same samples (Hollis et al., 2009) shows close correspondence, indicating that LA-ICP-MS can provide reliable Mg/Ca sea temperatures even where foraminiferal test preservation is variable. Agreement between the three proxies also implies that Mg/Ca-temperature calibrations for modern planktonic and benthic foraminifera can generally be applied to Eocene species, although some species (e.g., V. marshalli) show significant calibration differences. The Mg/Ca ratio of the Eocene ocean is constrained by our data to be 35-50% lower than the modern ocean depending on which TEX 86 - temperature calibration (Kim et al., 2008; Liu et al., 2009) - is used to compare with the Mg/Ca sea temperatures. Sea temperatures derived from δ 18O analysis of foraminifera from Waipara show

  6. Paleoclimatic analyses of middle Eocene through Oligocene planktic foraminiferal faunas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Keller, G.

    1983-01-01

    Quantitative faunal analyses and oxygen isotope ranking of individual planktic foraminiferal species from deep sea sequences of three oceans are used to make paleoceanographic and paleoclimatic inferences. Species grouped into surface, intermediate and deep water categories based on ??18O values provide evidence of major changes in water-mass stratification, and individual species abundances indicate low frequency cool-warm oscillations. These data suggest that relatively stable climatic phases with minor cool-warm oscillations of ???0.5 m.y. frequency are separated by rapid cooling events during middle Eocene to early Oligocene time. Five major climatic phases are evident in the water-mass stratification between middle Eocene through Oligocene time. Phase changes occur at P14/P15, P15/P16, P20/P21 and P21/P22 Zone boundaries and are marked by major faunal turnovers, rapid cooling in the isotope record, hiatuses and changes in the eustatic sea level. A general cooling trend between middle Eocene to early late Oligocene is indicated by the successive replacement of warm middle Eocene surface water species by cooler late Eocene intermediate water species and still cooler Oligocene intermediate and deep water species. Increased water-mass stratification in the latest Eocene (P17), indicated by the coexistence of surface, intermediate and deep dwelling species groups, suggest that increased thermal gradients developed between the equator and poles nearly coincident with the development of the psychrosphere. This pattern may be related to significant ice accumulation between late Eocene and early late Oligocene time. ?? 1983.

  7. Eocene Paleoclimate: Incredible or Uncredible? Model data syntheses raise questions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huber, M.

    2012-04-01

    Reconstructions of Eocene paleoclimate have pushed on the boundaries of climate dynamics theory for generations. While significant improvements in theory and models have brought them closer to the proxy data, the data themselves have shifted considerably. Tropical temperatures and greenhouse gas concentrations are now reconstructed to be higher than once thought--in agreement with models--but, many polar temperature reconstructions are even warmer than the eye popping numbers from only a decade ago. These interpretations of subtropical-to-tropical polar conditions once again challenge models and theory. But, the devil, is as always in the details and it is worthwhile to consider the range of potential uncertainties and biases in the paleoclimate record interpretations to evaluate the proposition that models and data may not materially disagree. It is necessary to ask whether current Eocene paleoclimate reconstructions are accurate enough to compellingly argue for a complete failure of climate models and theory. Careful consideration of Eocene model output and proxy data reveals that over most of the Earth the model agrees with the upper range of plausible tropical proxy data and the lower range of plausible high latitude proxy reconstructions. Implications for the sensitivity of global climate to greenhouse gas forcing are drawn for a range of potential Eocene climate scenarios ranging from a literal interpretation of one particular model to a literal interpretation of proxy data. Hope for a middle ground is found.

  8. High-Resolution Integrated Magnetobiostratigraphy of a New Middle Eocene Section from the Southern Branch of the Neo-Tethys ELAZIĞ Basin (ELAZIĞ Province, Turkey)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodelli, D.; Jovane, L.; Özcan, E.; Giorgioni, M.; Coccioni, R.; Frontalini, F.; Siciliano, E.; Brogi, A.; Catanzariti, R.; Less, G.; Rostami, M. A.

    2016-12-01

    We present a new marine middle Eocene section, from the Elazığ Province, Central Turkey. The high sedimentation rate of the section, its continuity and lack of apparent tectonic disturbances could be a new reference for the study of the "Middle Eocene Climatic Optimum" (MECO) in a shelf margin. Paleomagnetism and biostratigraphy were used to build a solid, high-resolution magnetostratigraphy of the section. The magnetostratigraphy here presented forms the base to paleoenvironmental analysis, namely environmental magnetism, in order to give new insights on the paleoclimatic events that characterized de middle Eocene. The magnetozones recognized were correlated to the Geomagnetic Polarity Time Scale (GPTS, 2012), and calibrated with the biostratigraphic zonations, showing that the section spans from C19n to C17n, thus encompassing the whole Barthonian stage, with a sedimentation rate variating between 43 m/My to 98 m/My with a mean of 69 m/My. The magnetic minerals present in the selected samples are magnetite and hematite, with magnetite possibly coming in at least two different forms, terrigenous and biogenic, implying the possible presence of magnetotactic bacteria in the environment at the time of deposition. Environmental magnetism measurements and ratios show relatively constant values along the section, with prominent peaks in ARM and IRM during the MECO period, tentatively interpreted as an increase of fine magnetite. On the basis of the distribution and abundance of specific taxa, a likely upper-bathyal (300-600 m) depositional depth was inferred. The abundance of calcareous taxa and the preservation of foraminiferal test suggest that the deposition occurred well above the Calcite Compensation Depth (CCD).The quality of the data at our disposition and the very characteristics of the section (namely, the high sedimentation rate, continuity and lack of apparent tectonic disturbances) can represent a starting point to study the middle Eocene climatic history

  9. Changing atmospheric CO2 concentration was the primary driver of early Cenozoic climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anagnostou, Eleni; John, Eleanor H.; Edgar, Kirsty M.; Foster, Gavin L.; Ridgwell, Andy; Inglis, Gordon N.; Pancost, Richard D.; Lunt, Daniel J.; Pearson, Paul N.

    2016-05-01

    The Early Eocene Climate Optimum (EECO, which occurred about 51 to 53 million years ago), was the warmest interval of the past 65 million years, with mean annual surface air temperature over ten degrees Celsius warmer than during the pre-industrial period. Subsequent global cooling in the middle and late Eocene epoch, especially at high latitudes, eventually led to continental ice sheet development in Antarctica in the early Oligocene epoch (about 33.6 million years ago). However, existing estimates place atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) levels during the Eocene at 500-3,000 parts per million, and in the absence of tighter constraints carbon-climate interactions over this interval remain uncertain. Here we use recent analytical and methodological developments to generate a new high-fidelity record of CO2 concentrations using the boron isotope (δ11B) composition of well preserved planktonic foraminifera from the Tanzania Drilling Project, revising previous estimates. Although species-level uncertainties make absolute values difficult to constrain, CO2 concentrations during the EECO were around 1,400 parts per million. The relative decline in CO2 concentration through the Eocene is more robustly constrained at about fifty per cent, with a further decline into the Oligocene. Provided the latitudinal dependency of sea surface temperature change for a given climate forcing in the Eocene was similar to that of the late Quaternary period, this CO2 decline was sufficient to drive the well documented high- and low-latitude cooling that occurred through the Eocene. Once the change in global temperature between the pre-industrial period and the Eocene caused by the action of all known slow feedbacks (apart from those associated with the carbon cycle) is removed, both the EECO and the late Eocene exhibit an equilibrium climate sensitivity relative to the pre-industrial period of 2.1 to 4.6 degrees Celsius per CO2 doubling (66 per cent confidence), which is similar to the

  10. Changing atmospheric CO2 concentration was the primary driver of early Cenozoic climate.

    PubMed

    Anagnostou, Eleni; John, Eleanor H; Edgar, Kirsty M; Foster, Gavin L; Ridgwell, Andy; Inglis, Gordon N; Pancost, Richard D; Lunt, Daniel J; Pearson, Paul N

    2016-05-19

    The Early Eocene Climate Optimum (EECO, which occurred about 51 to 53 million years ago), was the warmest interval of the past 65 million years, with mean annual surface air temperature over ten degrees Celsius warmer than during the pre-industrial period. Subsequent global cooling in the middle and late Eocene epoch, especially at high latitudes, eventually led to continental ice sheet development in Antarctica in the early Oligocene epoch (about 33.6 million years ago). However, existing estimates place atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) levels during the Eocene at 500-3,000 parts per million, and in the absence of tighter constraints carbon-climate interactions over this interval remain uncertain. Here we use recent analytical and methodological developments to generate a new high-fidelity record of CO2 concentrations using the boron isotope (δ(11)B) composition of well preserved planktonic foraminifera from the Tanzania Drilling Project, revising previous estimates. Although species-level uncertainties make absolute values difficult to constrain, CO2 concentrations during the EECO were around 1,400 parts per million. The relative decline in CO2 concentration through the Eocene is more robustly constrained at about fifty per cent, with a further decline into the Oligocene. Provided the latitudinal dependency of sea surface temperature change for a given climate forcing in the Eocene was similar to that of the late Quaternary period, this CO2 decline was sufficient to drive the well documented high- and low-latitude cooling that occurred through the Eocene. Once the change in global temperature between the pre-industrial period and the Eocene caused by the action of all known slow feedbacks (apart from those associated with the carbon cycle) is removed, both the EECO and the late Eocene exhibit an equilibrium climate sensitivity relative to the pre-industrial period of 2.1 to 4.6 degrees Celsius per CO2 doubling (66 per cent confidence), which is similar to the

  11. Mammal Dispersion linked to The Paleocene Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM): New Insights from India.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khozyem, H.; Adatte, T.; Keller, G.; Spangenberg, J. E.; Bajpai, S.; Samant, B.; Mathur, S.

    2012-04-01

    The Paleocene Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM, 55.5Ma) is globally related with the extinction of deep benthic foraminifera, the diversification of both plancktic foraminifera and mammals. In India, the tempo and timing of mammals dispersion, their association with the PETM or EECO (Early Eocene Climatic Optimum) and the India- Asia collision remain uncertain (Smith et al., 2006 Clementz, 2010). Three sections located in north and northwest India have been studied using sedimentology, micropaleontology, mineralogy (bulk and clay mineralogy) and geochemistry (stable isotopes, major and trace elements, organic matter). Both PETM and ETM2 (second Eocene Thermal Maximum, 53.7Ma), a short-lived warming episode that followed the PETM, are globally marked by a pronounced δ13Ccarb and org negative peak. Both isotopic excursions have been recognized in the Vastan and Tarkeswhar lignite mines (Cambay basin, Gujarat), above the main mammals bearing level. The lower shift is located above the first lignite seam (=lignite 2 of Sahni et al, 2004, 2009) and corresponds to the transition from continental to shallow marine conditions marked by benthic foraminifera and bivalves. The upper excursion appears to be linked to the ETM2 and corresponds to a second marine incursion containing bivalves, benthic (Nummulites burdigalensis) and planktic foraminifera located below the second lignite seam (lignite 1 of Sahni et al, 2004, 2009). A single but very pronounced δ13Corg peak has been detected in the Giral Lignite mine (Barmer, Rajhastan), around 6m above the vertebrates bearing level and may correspond to the PETM. This correlation is confirmed by palynological data (Tripathi et al., 2009, Sahni et al., 2004, 2009) and more particularly by an acme in the dinoflagellate Apectodinium that globally characterizes the PETM interval (Sluijs et al. 2007). Our micropaleontological data combined with stable carbone isotopes indicate the presence of both PETM and ETM2 events and constrain the

  12. OPTIMUM SYSTEMS CONTROL,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Variational calculus and continuous optimal control, (4) The maximum principle and Hamilton Jacobi theory, (5) Optimum systems control examples, (6...Discrete variational calculus and the discrete maximum principle, (7) Optimum control of distributed parameter systems, (8) Optimum state estimation in

  13. Paleoenvironmental reconstruction of the Early Eocene Wind River Formation in the Wind River Basin, Wyoming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyland, E.; Fan, M.; Sheldon, N. D.

    2011-12-01

    Terrestrial basin systems provide important information on paleoclimatic, paleoecological, and paleoenvironmental factors and how they control and respond to global changes and spatio-temporal heterogeneity. Examining these dynamics is crucial for times of major global change like the broad-scale climatic trends (warm/wet/high-CO2 conditions) of the Early Eocene Climatic Optimum (EECO). As most climatic records of such events are derived from global marine datasets, regional terrestrial studies such as these provide a better model for understanding ecological responses and the localized effects of events like the EECO. The formation of the Wind River Basin (northwestern Wyoming) has been studied for decades, but its regional climatic, environmental, and ecological dynamics have been largely overlooked. Recent work in other contemporaneous sites in the Green River Basin has suggested that the dynamics and rapidity of climate change in terrestrial interiors during the EECO may have been significantly different than what is indicated by the marine record, so to address these issues on a more regional scale we examined paleosols preserved in the fluvial, basin-margin Wind River Formation preserved near Dubois, Wyoming. Field identification of the paleosols indicated a suite that includes primarily Inceptisols and Alfisols; most exhibited significant redoximorphic features and Bg horizons that indicate a ponded floodplain paleoenvironment, while others contained deep Bk horizons (>100 cm) consistent with more well-drained, but still sub-humid to humid conditions. Based on the identification of these well-developed soil features, along with distinct horizonation and root development, paleosols were robustly correlated and sampled throughout the Formation, and environmental descriptors were assigned. To further examine the question of regional terrestrial climate/environmental change, whole rock geochemistry (XRF) samples from paleosol depth profiles were analyzed for use

  14. Seasonal variability in Arctic temperatures during the early Eocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eberle, J. J.; Fricke, H. C.; Humphrey, J.; Hackett, L.; Newbrey, M.; Hutchison, H.

    2009-12-01

    As a deep time analog for today’s rapidly warming Arctic region, early Eocene (~53 Ma) rocks on Ellesmere Island, Arctic Canada (~79° N.) preserve evidence of lush swamp forests inhabited by turtles, alligators, primates, tapirs, and hippo-like Coryphodon. Although the rich flora and fauna of the early Eocene Arctic imply warmer, wetter conditions that at present, quantitative estimates of Eocene Arctic climate are rare. By analyzing oxygen isotope ratios of biogenic phosphate from mammal, fish, and turtle fossils from a single locality on central Ellesmere Island, we provide estimates of early Eocene Arctic temperature, including mean annual temperature (MAT) of ~ 8° C, mean annual range in temperature (MART) of ~ 16.5° C, warm month mean temperature (WMMT) of 16 - 19° C, and cold month mean temperature (CMMT) of 0 - 1° C. Our seasonal range in temperature is similar to the range in estimated MAT obtained using different proxies. In particular, unusually high estimates of early Eocene Arctic MAT and sea surface temperature (SST) by others that are based upon the distribution of branched glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraether (GDGT) membrane lipids in terrestrial soil bacteria and marine Crenarchaeota fall within our range of WMMT, suggesting a bias towards summer values. Consequently, caution should be taken when using these methods to infer MAT and SST that, in turn, are used to constrain climate models. From a paleontologic perspective, our temperature estimates verify that alligators and tortoises, by way of nearest living relative-based climatic inference, are viable paleoclimate proxies for mild, above-freezing year-round temperatures. Although in both of these reptiles, past temperature tolerances were greater than in their living descendants.

  15. The middle Eocene Oyambre section (northern Spain): an example of the need for pairing cyclic deep-sea records and outcrop successions in astrochronology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinarès-Turell, Jaume; Martínez-Braceras, Naroa; Payros, Aitor

    2017-04-01

    susceptibility record is employed as the basis for erecting a cyclostratigraphy amenable to spectral analysis. The expanded nature of the succession and the use of the 405 ky "tuning-fork" or metronome of stratigraphic time allows a solid astrochronology to be resolved at precession resolution ( 21 ky). We ultimately scrutinize and correlate the Oyambre outcrop cyclic pattern to published deep-sea astronomically tuned stratigraphies, emphasizing the need for integration. Contribution to research project CGL2015-65404-R (MINECO/FEDER). NM-B received a pre-doctoral grant from the Basque Government. Dinarès-Turell, J., et al. (2014). Astronomical calibration of the Danian stage (early Paleocene) revisited: settling chronologies of sedimentary records across the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans. Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 405, 119-131. Payros, A., et al. (2015). The Lutetian/Bartonian transition (middle Eocene) at the Oyambre section (northern Spain): implications for standard chronostratigraphy. Palaeogeogr. Palaeoclimatol. Palaeoecol. 440, 234-248. Westerhold, T. and Röhl, U. (2013). Orbital pacing of Eocene climate during the Middle Eocene Climate Optimum and the Chron C19r event: Missing link found in the tropical western Atlantic, Geochem. Geophys. Geosys., 14, 4811-4825. Westerhold, T., et al. (2015). Astronomical Calibration of the Geological Timescale: Closing the Middle Eocene Gap. Climate of the Past 11, 1181-1195.

  16. Differing Eocene floral histories in southeastern North America and Western Europe: influence of paleogeography

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Frederiksen, N.O.

    1995-01-01

    Pollen data show that in southeastern North America, the Eocene angiosperm flora attained its maximum relative diversity some 8 m.y. after the late early Eocene to earliest middle Eocene to earliest middle Eocene climatic maximum. Increasing diversity resulted in part from the flora's position on a large continent which allowed easy migration. In western Europe, the floral diversity began decreasing even before the climatic maximum. Paleogeography played large roles in this diversity decrease. In western Europe, terrestrial floras were on islands and peninsulas in the sea, so that the floras underwent increasing isolation and partial local extermination. Temperate plants generally did not migrate to western Europe, because of a lack of nearby uplands, lack of northern terrestrial source areas for these plants, and presence of the Turgai Straights barrier. -from Authors

  17. The Eocene Arctic Azolla phenomenon: species composition, temporal range and geographic extent.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collinson, Margaret; Barke, Judith; van der Burgh, Johan; van Konijnenburg-van Cittert, Johanna; Pearce, Martin; Bujak, Jonathan; Brinkhuis, Henk

    2010-05-01

    and high latitude environmental conditions were suitable for simultaneous widespread proliferation of several Azolla species. This episode coincides with the termination of a period known as the 'Early Eocene Climatic Optimum' (EECO). Both field data and general circulation/climate model experiments invoke high precipitation conditions for the EECO and these might have aided in the onset of massive Azolla proliferation in the Northern Hemisphere.

  18. Asian Eocene monsoons as revealed by leaf architectural signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spicer, Robert A.; Yang, Jian; Herman, Alexei B.; Kodrul, Tatiana; Maslova, Natalia; Spicer, Teresa E. V.; Aleksandrova, Galina; Jin, Jianhua

    2016-09-01

    The onset and development of the Asian monsoon systems is a topic that has attracted considerable research effort but proxy data limitations, coupled with a diversity of definitions and metrics characterizing monsoon phenomena, have generated much debate. Failure of geological proxies to yield metrics capable of distinguishing between rainfall seasonality induced by migrations of the Inter-tropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) from that attributable to topographically modified seasonal pressure reversals has frustrated attempts to understand mechanisms underpinning monsoon development and dynamics. Here we circumvent the use of such single climate parameter metrics in favor of detecting directly the distinctive attributes of different monsoon regimes encoded in leaf fossils. Leaf form adapts to the prevailing climate, particularly under the extreme seasonal stresses imposed by monsoons, so it is likely that fossil leaves carry a unique signature of past monsoon regimes. Leaf form trait spectra obtained from fossils from Eocene basins in southern China were compared with those seen in modern leaves growing under known climate regimes. The fossil leaf trait spectra, including those derived from previously published fossil floras from northwestern India, were most similar to those found in vegetation exposed to the modern Indonesia-Australia Monsoon (I-AM), which is largely a product of seasonal migrations of the ITCZ. The presence of this distinctive leaf physiognomic signature suggests that although a monsoon climate existed in Eocene time across southern Asia the characteristics of the modern topographically-enhanced South Asia Monsoon had yet to develop. By the Eocene leaves in South Asia had become well adapted to an I-AM type regime across many taxa and points to the existence of a pervasive monsoon climate prior to the Eocene. No fossil trait spectra typical of exposure to the modern East Asia monsoon were seen, suggesting the effects of this system in southern

  19. Seasonal variability in Arctic temperatures during early Eocene time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eberle, Jaelyn J.; Fricke, Henry C.; Humphrey, John D.; Hackett, Logan; Newbrey, Michael G.; Hutchison, J. Howard

    2010-08-01

    As a deep time analog for today's rapidly warming Arctic region, early Eocene (52-53 Ma) rock on Ellesmere Island in Canada's High Arctic (˜ 79°N.) preserves evidence of lush swamp forests inhabited by turtles, alligators, primates, tapirs, and hippo-like Coryphodon. Although the rich flora and fauna of the early Eocene Arctic imply warmer, wetter conditions than at present, the quantification of Eocene Arctic climate has been more elusive. By analyzing oxygen isotope ratios of biogenic phosphate from mammal, fish, and turtle fossils from a single locality on central Ellesmere Island, we infer early Eocene Arctic temperatures, including mean annual temperature (MAT) of ˜ 8 °C, mean annual range in temperature of ˜ 16.5-19 °C, warm month mean temperature of 19-20 °C, and cold month mean temperature of 0-3.5 °C. Our seasonal range in temperature is similar to the range in estimated MAT obtained using different proxies. In particular, relatively high estimates of early Eocene Arctic MAT and SST by others that are based upon the distribution of branched glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraether (GDGT) membrane lipids in terrestrial soil bacteria and isoprenoid tetraether lipids in marine Crenarchaeota fall close to our warm month temperature, suggesting a bias towards summer values. From a paleontologic perspective, our temperature estimates verify that alligators and tortoises, by way of nearest living relative-based climatic inference, are viable paleoclimate proxies for mild, above-freezing year-round temperatures. Although for both of these reptilian groups, past temperature tolerances probably were greater than in living descendants.

  20. Extreme Seasonality During Early Eocene Hyperthermals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plink-Bjorklund, P.; Birgenheier, L.

    2012-12-01

    An outcrop multi-proxy dataset from the Uinta Basin, Utah, US indicates that extreme seasonality occurred repeatedly during the Early Eocene transient global warming events (hyperthermals), during the Palaeocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM) as well as during the six consequent younger hyperthermals. In this multi-proxy analysis we have investigated the precipitation distribution and peakedness changes during Early Eocene hyperthermals. This dataset is different from previously published terrestrial climate proxy analyses, in that we fully utilize the sedimentary record itself, and especially the hydrodynamic indicators within the river strata. We combine these high-resolution sedimentologic-stratigraphic analyses, with analyses of terrestrial burrowing traces, and the conventional palaeosol and stable carbon isotope analyses. With this approach, we are able to better document hydroclimatologic changes, and identify climate seasonality changes, rather than just long-term mean humidity/aridity and temperature trends. For this study we analyzed over 1000 m of Palaeocene and Early Eocene river and lake strata in the Uinta Basin, Utah, US (Figs. 1 and 2). The sedimentologic-stratigraphic analyses of outcrops included measuring detailed stratigraphic sections, analyzing photopanels, a spatial GPS survey, and lateral walk-out of stratigraphic packages across an area of 300 km2, with additional data across an area of ca 6000 km2 (Fig. 2). Continental burrowing traces and palaeosols were analyzed along the measured sections. For geochemical analysis 196 samples of mudrock facies were collected along the measured sections and analyzed for total organic carbon (Corg), total nitrogen (Ntot), and δ13C values of bulk organic matter. Biostratigraphy (25), radiometric dates, and carbon isotope stratigraphy, using bulk δ13C of organic matter in floodplain siltstones confirm the position of the PETM and the 6-8 post-PETM hyperthermals in the studied strata The seasonality

  1. Possible methane-induced polar warming in the early Eocene.

    PubMed

    Sloan, L C; Walker, J C; Moore, T C; Rea, D K; Zachos, J C

    1992-05-28

    Reconstructions of early Eocene climate depict a world in which the polar environments support mammals and reptiles, deciduous forests, warm oceans and rare frost conditions. At the same time, tropical sea surface temperatures are interpreted to have been the same as or slightly cooler than present values. The question of how to warm polar regions of Earth without noticeably warming the tropics remains unresolved; increased amounts of greenhouse gases would be expected to warm all latitudes equally. Oceanic heat transport has been postulated as a mechanism for heating high latitudes, but it is difficult to explain the dynamics that would achieve this. Here we consider estimates of Eocene wetland areas and suggest that the flux of methane, an important greenhouse gas, may have been substantially greater during the Eocene than at present. Elevated methane concentrations would have enhanced early Eocene global warming, and also might specifically have prevented severe winter cooling of polar regions because of the potential of atmospheric methane to promote the formation of optically thick, polar stratospheric ice clouds.

  2. Equatorial convergence of India and early Cenozoic climate trends.

    PubMed

    Kent, Dennis V; Muttoni, Giovanni

    2008-10-21

    India's northward flight and collision with Asia was a major driver of global tectonics in the Cenozoic and, we argue, of atmospheric CO(2) concentration (pCO(2)) and thus global climate. Subduction of Tethyan oceanic crust with a carpet of carbonate-rich pelagic sediments deposited during transit beneath the high-productivity equatorial belt resulted in a component flux of CO(2) delivery to the atmosphere capable to maintain high pCO(2) levels and warm climate conditions until the decarbonation factory shut down with the collision of Greater India with Asia at the Early Eocene climatic optimum at approximately 50 Ma. At about this time, the India continent and the highly weatherable Deccan Traps drifted into the equatorial humid belt where uptake of CO(2) by efficient silicate weathering further perturbed the delicate equilibrium between CO(2) input to and removal from the atmosphere toward progressively lower pCO(2) levels, thus marking the onset of a cooling trend over the Middle and Late Eocene that some suggest triggered the rapid expansion of Antarctic ice sheets at around the Eocene-Oligocene boundary.

  3. Equatorial convergence of India and early Cenozoic climate trends

    PubMed Central

    Kent, Dennis V.; Muttoni, Giovanni

    2008-01-01

    India's northward flight and collision with Asia was a major driver of global tectonics in the Cenozoic and, we argue, of atmospheric CO2 concentration (pCO2) and thus global climate. Subduction of Tethyan oceanic crust with a carpet of carbonate-rich pelagic sediments deposited during transit beneath the high-productivity equatorial belt resulted in a component flux of CO2 delivery to the atmosphere capable to maintain high pCO2 levels and warm climate conditions until the decarbonation factory shut down with the collision of Greater India with Asia at the Early Eocene climatic optimum at ≈50 Ma. At about this time, the India continent and the highly weatherable Deccan Traps drifted into the equatorial humid belt where uptake of CO2 by efficient silicate weathering further perturbed the delicate equilibrium between CO2 input to and removal from the atmosphere toward progressively lower pCO2 levels, thus marking the onset of a cooling trend over the Middle and Late Eocene that some suggest triggered the rapid expansion of Antarctic ice sheets at around the Eocene-Oligocene boundary. PMID:18809910

  4. Early-middle Eocene transition in calcareous nannofossil assemblages at IODP Site U1410 (Southeast Newfoundland Ridge, NW Atlantic)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cappelli, Carlotta; Agnini, Claudia; Yamamoto, Yuhji

    2017-04-01

    The early-middle Eocene interval documents the shift from the warmest greenhouse conditions occurred during the Early Eocene Climatic Optimum (EECO, 52-50 Ma) to the beginning of the cooling phase which led to the Oligocene icehouse regime. This important transition is well expressed as a reversal in the global oxygen and carbonate isotope trends (Zachos et al., 2001). Moreover, this interval was a time of remarkable transformation in the marine biosphere. Communities of calcareous nannoplankton, marine calcifying algae at the base of the oceans food chain, experienced transient and permanent profound changes. Calcareous nannofossil are regarded as remarkable tools both in biostratigraphy and paleoecology, with several taxa that show different responses to changes in physical parameters of surface waters. Here, we aim to document calcareous nannoplankton assemblage changes across the early-middle Eocene transition, in order to upset the biostratigraphic framework and to increase comprehension of how phytoplankton communities responded to paleoenvironmental changes at that time. The sedimentary successions recovered at IODP Site U1410 (Exp. 342; 41˚ 19.6987'N; 49˚ 10.1995'W, Norris et al., 2012) on the Southeast Newfoundland Ridge (NW Atlantic) offer an expanded record of the early-middle Eocene interval that is marked by an increase in accumulation rate related to sedimentation of clay-rich nannofossil oozes. Quantitative analysis of calcareous nannofossil assemblages was conducted, encompassing calcareous nannofossil Zones NP12 -NP15 or CNE4-CNE10 (Martini, 1971; Agnini et al., 2014). The study interval records the appearance and proliferation of Noelaerhabdaceae family (i.e, Reticulofenestra/Dictyococcites group), which can be considered one of the most significant shifts in the assemblage structure of the Paleogene. This change was probably favored by modifications in surface water chemistry. The middle Eocene clay-rich sediments contain well preserved

  5. The palaeobiology of high latitude birds from the early Eocene greenhouse of Ellesmere Island, Arctic Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stidham, Thomas A.; Eberle, Jaelyn J.

    2016-02-01

    Fossils attributable to the extinct waterfowl clade Presbyornithidae and the large flightless Gastornithidae from the early Eocene (~52-53 Ma) of Ellesmere Island, in northernmost Canada are the oldest Cenozoic avian fossils from the Arctic. Except for its slightly larger size, the Arctic presbyornithid humerus is not distinguishable from fossils of Presbyornis pervetus from the western United States, and the Gastornis phalanx is within the known size range of mid-latitude individuals. The occurrence of Presbyornis above the Arctic Circle in the Eocene could be the result of annual migration like that of its living duck and geese relatives, or it may have been a year-round resident similar to some Eocene mammals on Ellesmere and some extant species of sea ducks. Gastornis, along with some of the mammalian and reptilian members of the Eocene Arctic fauna, likely over-wintered in the Arctic. Despite the milder (above freezing) Eocene climate on Ellesmere Island, prolonged periods of darkness occurred during the winter. Presence of these extinct birds at both mid and high latitudes on the northern continents provides evidence that future increases in climatic warming (closer to Eocene levels) could lead to the establishment of new migratory or resident populations within the Arctic Circle.

  6. The palaeobiology of high latitude birds from the early Eocene greenhouse of Ellesmere Island, Arctic Canada

    PubMed Central

    Stidham, Thomas A.; Eberle, Jaelyn J.

    2016-01-01

    Fossils attributable to the extinct waterfowl clade Presbyornithidae and the large flightless Gastornithidae from the early Eocene (~52–53 Ma) of Ellesmere Island, in northernmost Canada are the oldest Cenozoic avian fossils from the Arctic. Except for its slightly larger size, the Arctic presbyornithid humerus is not distinguishable from fossils of Presbyornis pervetus from the western United States, and the Gastornis phalanx is within the known size range of mid-latitude individuals. The occurrence of Presbyornis above the Arctic Circle in the Eocene could be the result of annual migration like that of its living duck and geese relatives, or it may have been a year-round resident similar to some Eocene mammals on Ellesmere and some extant species of sea ducks. Gastornis, along with some of the mammalian and reptilian members of the Eocene Arctic fauna, likely over-wintered in the Arctic. Despite the milder (above freezing) Eocene climate on Ellesmere Island, prolonged periods of darkness occurred during the winter. Presence of these extinct birds at both mid and high latitudes on the northern continents provides evidence that future increases in climatic warming (closer to Eocene levels) could lead to the establishment of new migratory or resident populations within the Arctic Circle. PMID:26867798

  7. The palaeobiology of high latitude birds from the early Eocene greenhouse of Ellesmere Island, Arctic Canada.

    PubMed

    Stidham, Thomas A; Eberle, Jaelyn J

    2016-02-12

    Fossils attributable to the extinct waterfowl clade Presbyornithidae and the large flightless Gastornithidae from the early Eocene (~52-53 Ma) of Ellesmere Island, in northernmost Canada are the oldest Cenozoic avian fossils from the Arctic. Except for its slightly larger size, the Arctic presbyornithid humerus is not distinguishable from fossils of Presbyornis pervetus from the western United States, and the Gastornis phalanx is within the known size range of mid-latitude individuals. The occurrence of Presbyornis above the Arctic Circle in the Eocene could be the result of annual migration like that of its living duck and geese relatives, or it may have been a year-round resident similar to some Eocene mammals on Ellesmere and some extant species of sea ducks. Gastornis, along with some of the mammalian and reptilian members of the Eocene Arctic fauna, likely over-wintered in the Arctic. Despite the milder (above freezing) Eocene climate on Ellesmere Island, prolonged periods of darkness occurred during the winter. Presence of these extinct birds at both mid and high latitudes on the northern continents provides evidence that future increases in climatic warming (closer to Eocene levels) could lead to the establishment of new migratory or resident populations within the Arctic Circle.

  8. Deep-sea Benthic Foraminifera in the SE Atlantic across Eocene Hyperthermal Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, E.

    2016-12-01

    Short-term episodes of global warming (hyperthermal events) were superimposed on the warming trend into the Early Eocene Climate Optimum (EECO). The Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM; 56 Ma) was the most extreme, followed by Eocene Thermal Maximum-2 and -3 (ETM2: 1.8 myr, ETM3: 3.1 myr post-PETM). Hyperthermals are characterized by negative carbon isotope excursions (CIEs, emission of isotopically light carbon in the ocean-atmosphere), negative oxygen isotope excursions (global warming) and carbonate dissolution (ocean acidification). Sensitivity of biota to environmental changes due to carbon emissions can be evaluated by studying their response to hyperthermals of different magnitude. Deep-sea benthic foraminiferal records across PETM, ETM2 and -3 are available for Site 1262 (3600 m) and 1263 (1500m) on SE Atlantic Walvis Ridge. Benthic foraminifera (carbonate and agglutinated) are absent in the carbonate-free PETM clay-layer (Site 1262: 65 kyr; Site1263: 10 kyr). Deep-sea benthic foraminifera suffered extinction and diversity loss at the start of the PETM, as they did globally, with diversity recovering only partially. Stable isotope records show a larger PETM-CIE and amount of warming at Site 1263 than global average (McCarren et al., 2008), and warming was more pronounced at Site 1263 than at 1262 during ETM2 (Jennions et al., 2015) and ETM3 (Roehl et al., 2005). During ETM2 and -3, carbonate dissolution affected the sites, both remaining between CCD and lysocline. Assemblages were more severely affected (larger drop in benthic foraminiferal accumulation rates, BFAR) at the shallower site, opposite to expected if caused mainly by carbonate corrosivity. The large decrease in BFAR indicates a decline in food arrival at the sea floor, more pronounced at the shallower site, as supported by changes in relative and absolute abundance of species, and more pronounced at ETM2 than at ETM3. Greater warming at intermediate depths could have been caused by ocean

  9. Asian monsoons in a late Eocene greenhouse world.

    PubMed

    Licht, A; van Cappelle, M; Abels, H A; Ladant, J-B; Trabucho-Alexandre, J; France-Lanord, C; Donnadieu, Y; Vandenberghe, J; Rigaudier, T; Lécuyer, C; Terry, D; Adriaens, R; Boura, A; Guo, Z; Soe, Aung Naing; Quade, J; Dupont-Nivet, G; Jaeger, J-J

    2014-09-25

    The strong present-day Asian monsoons are thought to have originated between 25 and 22 million years (Myr) ago, driven by Tibetan-Himalayan uplift. However, the existence of older Asian monsoons and their response to enhanced greenhouse conditions such as those in the Eocene period (55-34 Myr ago) are unknown because of the paucity of well-dated records. Here we show late Eocene climate records revealing marked monsoon-like patterns in rainfall and wind south and north of the Tibetan-Himalayan orogen. This is indicated by low oxygen isotope values with strong seasonality in gastropod shells and mammal teeth from Myanmar, and by aeolian dust deposition in northwest China. Our climate simulations support modern-like Eocene monsoonal rainfall and show that a reinforced hydrological cycle responding to enhanced greenhouse conditions counterbalanced the negative effect of lower Tibetan relief on precipitation. These strong monsoons later weakened with the global shift to icehouse conditions 34 Myr ago.

  10. Impact ejecta at the Paleocene-Eocene boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaller, Morgan F.; Fung, Megan K.; Wright, James D.; Katz, Miriam E.; Kent, Dennis V.

    2016-10-01

    Extraterrestrial impacts have left a substantial imprint on the climate and evolutionary history of Earth. A rapid carbon cycle perturbation and global warming event about 56 million years ago at the Paleocene-Eocene (P-E) boundary (the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum) was accompanied by rapid expansions of mammals and terrestrial plants and extinctions of deep-sea benthic organisms. Here, we report the discovery of silicate glass spherules in a discrete stratigraphic layer from three marine P-E boundary sections on the Atlantic margin. Distinct characteristics identify the spherules as microtektites and microkrystites, indicating that an extraterrestrial impact occurred during the carbon isotope excursion at the P-E boundary.

  11. Impact ejecta at the Paleocene-Eocene boundary.

    PubMed

    Schaller, Morgan F; Fung, Megan K; Wright, James D; Katz, Miriam E; Kent, Dennis V

    2016-10-14

    Extraterrestrial impacts have left a substantial imprint on the climate and evolutionary history of Earth. A rapid carbon cycle perturbation and global warming event about 56 million years ago at the Paleocene-Eocene (P-E) boundary (the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum) was accompanied by rapid expansions of mammals and terrestrial plants and extinctions of deep-sea benthic organisms. Here, we report the discovery of silicate glass spherules in a discrete stratigraphic layer from three marine P-E boundary sections on the Atlantic margin. Distinct characteristics identify the spherules as microtektites and microkrystites, indicating that an extraterrestrial impact occurred during the carbon isotope excursion at the P-E boundary.

  12. Late Eocene impact microspherules - Stratigraphy, age and geochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, G.; D'Hondt, S. L.; Orth, C. J.; Gilmore, J. S.; Oliver, P. Q.; Shoemaker, E. M.; Molina, E.

    1987-03-01

    The stratigraphy, faunal changes, and geochemistry of deep-sea sediments associated with late Eocene microtektite and microspherule layers are reported. Microprobe analyses of major element compositions of microspherules show that, although there is some compositional overlap in all three late Eocene layers as well as with the Pleistocene Australasian and Ivory Coast microtektites, each microspherule population has characteristic compositional features. All three microspherule layers are associated with decreased carbonate, possibly due to a sudden productivity change, increased dissolution as a result of sea-level and climate fluctuations, or impact events. A discovery of microtektites in the Gl. cerroazulensis Zone off the New Jersey coast extends the North American strewn field from the Caribbean to the northwest Atlantic.

  13. Nondissipative optimum charge regulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosen, R.; Vitebsky, J. N.

    1970-01-01

    Optimum charge regulator provides constant level charge/discharge control of storage batteries. Basic power transfer and control is performed by solar panel coupled to battery through power switching circuit. Optimum controller senses battery current and modifies duty cycle of switching circuit to maximize current available to battery.

  14. Fossil plants indicate that the most significant decrease in atmospheric CO2 happened prior to the Eocene-Oligocene boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinthorsdottir, Margret; Porter, Amanda; Holohan, Aidan; Kunzmann, Lutz; Collinson, Margaret; McElwain, Jennifer

    2016-04-01

    A unique stratigraphic sequence of fossil leaves of Eotrigonobalanus furcinervis (extinct trees of the beech family, Fagaceae) from central Germany was utilized to derive an atmospheric pCO2 record with multiple data points spanning the late middle to late Eocene, two sampling levels which may be earliest Oligocene, and two samples from later in the Oligocene. Using the stomatal proxy, which relies on the inverse relationship between pCO2 and leaf stomatal density, we show that a ~40% decrease in pCO2 preceded the large shift in marine oxygen isotope records that characterizes the Eocene-Oliogocene climate transition. The results endorse the theory that pCO2 drawdown was the main forcer of the Eocene-Oligocene climate change, and a 'tipping point' was reached in the latest Eocene, triggering the plunge of the Earth System into icehouse conditions.

  15. Multiple States in the Vegetation-Atmosphere System during the Early Eocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Port, U.; Claussen, M.

    2014-12-01

    Model simulations suggest that different initial conditions can lead to multiple stable vegetation-atmosphere states in the present-day Sahara. Here, we explore the stability of the vegetation-atmosphere system in the warm, nearly ice-free early Eocene climate. Using the MPI-ESM, we simulate the early Eocene vegetation starting from two different states: Continents are either completely covered by forest or completely barren, devoid of any vegetation. The soil albedo is similar to vegetation albedo. Hence, the albedo effect of vegetation is negligible. Without the albedo effect, the Charney effect which is suggested to cause multiple stable vegetation states in the present-day Sahara is absent. In our simulations, the hydrological effect of vegetation plays the major role. We perform the same simulations with preindustrial conditions to compare the stability of the vegetation-atmosphere system in both climate states. A desert evolves in Central Asia in both early Eocene simulations. This Asian desert is larger when the simulation starts from bare soil instead forest. Bare soil causes a dry climate in Central Asia in the beginning of the simulation. In the dry climate, vegetation does not establish. Forest enhances evaporation relative to bare soil leading to a stronger Asian monsoon and higher precipitation rates. The increased precipitation sustains plant growth and a smaller Asian desert evolves than in the simulation started from bare soil. Moreover, the stronger Asian monsoon affects global climate. Therefore, the two vegetation states in Central Asia accompany two globally different vegetation-atmosphere states. In the preindustrial climate, the Sahara is larger when the initial vegetation is bare soil instead of forest. The same hydrological effect causes the multiple vegetation states the Sahara as in the early Eocene Asian desert. However, the multiple stable vegetation states in the Sahara do not affect the global climate. This result emphasises that the

  16. Ultimate Eocene (Priabonian) Chondrichthyans (Holocephali, Elasmobranchii) of Antarctica

    PubMed Central

    Kriwet, Jürgen; Engelbrecht, Andrea; Mörs, Thomas; Reguero, Marcelo; Pfaff, Cathrin

    2017-01-01

    The Eocene La Meseta Formation on Seymour Island, Antarctic Peninsula, is known for its remarkable wealth of fossil remains of chondrichthyans and teleosts. Chondrichthyans seemingly were dominant elements in the Antarctic Paleogene fish fauna, but decreased in abundance from middle to late Eocene, during which time remains of bony fishes increase. This decline of chondrichthyans at the end of the Eocene generally is related to sudden cooling of seawater, reduction in shelf area, and increasing shelf depth due to the onset of the Antarctic thermal isolation. The last chondrichthyan records known so far include a chimeroid tooth plate from TELM 6 (Lutetian) and a single pristiophorid rostral spine from TELM 7 (Priabonian). Here, we present new chondrichthyan records of Squalus, Squatina, Pristiophorus, Striatolamia, Palaeohypotodus, Carcharocles, and Ischyodus from the upper parts of TELM 7 (Priabonian), including the first record of Carcharocles sokolovi from Antarctica. This assemblage suggests that chondrichthyans persisted much longer in Antarctic waters despite rather cool sea surface temperatures of approximately 5°C. The final disappearance of chondrichthyans at the Eocene–Oligocene boundary concurs with abrupt ice sheet formation in Antarctica. Diversity patterns of chondrichthyans throughout the La Meseta Formation appear to be related to climatic conditions rather than plate tectonics. PMID:28298806

  17. The terminal eocene event and the polish connection

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Van Couvering, J. A.; Aubry, M.-P.; Berggren, W.A.; Bujak, J.P.; Naeser, C.W.; Wieser, T.

    1981-01-01

    The Eocene/Oligocene boundary in Europe is marked by major discontinuities in all environments: the "Grande Coupure" in continental mammals; the elimination of semitropical elements from high-latitude floras; the virtually complete replacement of the shallow-marine malacofauna; and an extraordinary downslope excursion of carbonate deposition in deep-ocean basins (drop in the CCD). These phenomena collectively represent the "Terminal Eocene Event" (TEE). In the Carpathian Mountains, the TEE is manifested in the thin but regionally persistent Globigerina Marl, a calcareous unit containing abundant cool-water microplankton that occurs within very thick, siliceous, bathyal flysch sequences. In southern Poland, the marl is of very latest Eocene age, within planktonic foraminifera zone P17, calcareous nannoplankton zone NP19/20, and the zone of the dinoflagellate Rhomdodinium perforatum. Zircons from bentonites bracketing the marl are dated by fission-track analysis; at Polany, two underlying bentonites are 41.7 and 39.8 Ma, and at Znamirowice two overlying bentonites are 34.6 and 28.9 Ma, in sequence. This accords with glauconite K/Ar ages in Western Europe by which the Eo/Oligocene boundary age is estimated at 37-38 Ma. Global correlations indicate that the TEE corresponds to a major glacio-eustatic regression with a duration of about 0.5 Ma, in which a large Antarctic ice cap was formed, the ocean circulation was permanently changed to the psychrospheric condition, and world climate shifted irreversibly towards the modern state. ?? 1981.

  18. Continental temperature change during Early Eocene hyperthermal events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziegler, Martin; Abels, Hemmo; de Winter, Nils; Gingerich, Philip; Bernasconi, Stefano

    2015-04-01

    Carbonate clumped isotope thermometry has great potential for solving long-standing questions in paleoclimatology as it provides temperature estimates that are independent from assumptions regarding the isotopic or elemental composition of water from which the carbonate precipitated. The clumped isotope group at ETH has worked towards decreasing the sample size requirements and derived new calibrations for the Kiel method based on synthetic and natural calcites. Here we present results of clumped isotope based continental temperatures across the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM). The Bighorn Basin of northwestern Wyoming provides hundreds of meters of excellently exposed river floodplain strata of Paleocene and early Eocene age. Records of the the largest greenhouse-warming episode in this interval of time, were recovered soon after their discovery in deep marine sediments. This has allowed intensive study of the major impact this greenhouse warming event had on continental interior climate. Recently, records of four successive, smaller, transient greenhouse warming events in the early Eocene - ETM2/H1/Elmo, H2, I1, and I2 - were located in the fluvial rock record of the basin. We show that the (summer) temperature excursions during hyperthermal events in continental mid-latitudes were amplified compared to marine temperatures and proportional to the size of associated carbon isotope excursions.

  19. Constructing an Eocene Marine Ecosystem Sensitivity Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'haenens, S.; Bornemann, A.; Speijer, R. P.; Hull, P. M.

    2014-12-01

    A key question in the face of current global environmental change is how marine ecosystems will respond and evolve in the future. To answer this, we first need to understand the relationship between environmental and ecosystem change - i.e., the ecosystem sensitivity. Addressing this question requires understanding of how biota respond to (a succession of) sudden environmental perturbations of varying sizes and durations in varying background conditions (i.e., climatic, oceanographic, biotic). Here, we compare new and published data from the Early to Middle Eocene greenhouse world to understand the sensitivity of marine ecosystems to background environmental change and hyperthermal events. This work focuses on the early Paleogene, because it is considered to be a good analog for a future high CO2 world. Newly generated high-resolution multiproxy datasets based on northern Atlantic DSDP Leg 48 and IODP Leg 342 material will allow us to compare the marine ecosystem responses (including bentho-pelagic systems) to abiotic drivers across climatic disruptions of differing magnitude. Initial results of a benthic foraminiferal community comparison including the PETM and ETM2 hyperthermals in the northeastern Atlantic DSDP sites 401 and 5501 suggest that benthic ecosystem sensitivity may actually be non-linearly linked to background climate states as reflected by a range of geochemical proxies (XRF, TOC, CaCO3, grain sizes, XRD clay mineralogy and foraminiferal δ18O, δ13C, Mg/Ca)2,3, in contrast to planktic communities4. Testing the type of scaling across different taxa, communities, initial background conditions and time scales may be the first big step to disentangle the often synergistic effects of environmental change on ecosystems5. References: 1D'haenens et al., 2012, in prep. 2Bornemann et al., 2014, EPSL 3D'haenens et al., 2014, PA 4Gibbs et al., 2012, Biogeosc. 5 Norris et al., 2013, Science

  20. Polar amplification of the early Eocene indicated by δ2H values of lignin methoxyl groups of mummified wood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anhäuser, Tobias; Hook, Benjamin; Halfar, Jochen; Greule, Markus; Keppler, Frank

    2017-04-01

    A number of well-preserved mummified wood samples have been excavated during diamond mining operations in early Eocene (55-50 Ma) kimberlite deposits located near the Arctic Circle (64° N, 110° W) in the Canadian Northwest Territories. The preserved wood, containing multi-decadal length tree-ring information, therefore allows the reconstruction of an unprecedented snapshot of terrestrial high-latitude climate during the early Eocene. Here we used wood-derived stable hydrogen isotopes (δ2H) as proxy for paleoclimatic interpretations. While cellulose extractions are commonly used for the analysis of modern wood-derived δ2H values, the mummified wood samples had been affected by selective degradation leading to a strong or even complete loss of cellulose while leaving a lignin-rich material behind. We have therefore analyzed δ2H values of the lignin methoxyl groups that have previously been shown to reflect the δ2H values of the local precipitation and can thus be used to infer paleoclimate information such as temperature changes. We applied this proxy to specimens found in three adjacent kimberlite pipes (30 km apart) which represent a range of early Eocene ages (Rb/Sr dating: 55.5 ± 0.7, 55.2 ± 0.3 and 53.3 ± 0.6 Ma [2σ standard deviation]). The δ2H values were measured at annual resolution for the three mummified wood series (length of individual time series: 82, 62 and 40 years) and the mean δ2H value of precipitation for the three decadal-scale time slices was reconstructed. Finally, we used existing relationships between early Eocene temperatures and stable isotopes in precipitation to quantify temperature changes. Warming phases such as the one covered here (culminating in the Early Eocene Climatic Optimum [52 to 50 Ma]) are commonly accompanied by a stronger increase in arctic/subarctic surface air temperatures in comparison to the global average (the ratio of these temperature differences is referred to as the polar amplification). Our estimation

  1. Eocene paleosols of King George Island, Maritime Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spinola, Diogo; Portes, Raquel; Schaefer, Carlos; Kühn, Peter

    2016-04-01

    Red layers between lava flows on King George Island, Maritime Antarctica, were formed during the Eocene, which was one of the warmest periods on Earth in the Cenozoic. Our hypothesis is that these red layers are paleosols formed in periods of little or no volcanic activity. Therefore, our main objective was to identify the main pedogenic properties and features to distinguish these from diagenetic features formed after the lava emplacement. Additionally, we compared our results with volcanic soils formed under different climates to find the best present analogue. The macromorphological features indicate a pedogenic origin, because of the occurrence of well-defined horizons based on colour and structure. Micromorphological analyses showed that most important pedogenic features are the presence of biological channels, plant residues, anisotropic b-fabric, neoformed and illuvial clay and distinct soil microstructure. Although the paleosols are not strongly weathered, the geochemical data also support the pedogenic origin despite of diagenetic features as the partial induration of the profiles and zeolites filling nearly all voids in the horizons in contact with the overlying lava flow, indicating circulation of hydrothermal fluids. The macromorphological and micromorphological features of these paleosols are similar to the soils formed under seasonal climates. Thus, these paleosol features do not correspond to the other proxies (e.g. sediment, plant fossils), which indicate a wet, non-seasonal climate, as in Valdivian Forest, Chile, during the Eocene in King George Island

  2. Widespread Antarctic glaciation during the Late Eocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carter, Andrew; Riley, Teal R.; Hillenbrand, Claus-Dieter; Rittner, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Marine sedimentary rocks drilled on the southeastern margin of the South Orkney microcontinent in Antarctica (Ocean Drilling Program Leg 113 Site 696) were deposited between ∼36.5 Ma to 33.6 Ma, across the Eocene-Oligocene climate transition. The recovered rocks contain abundant grains exhibiting mechanical features diagnostic of iceberg-rafted debris. Sand provenance based on a multi-proxy approach that included petrographic analysis of over 275,000 grains, detrital zircon geochronology and apatite thermochronometry rule out local sources (Antarctic Peninsula or the South Orkney Islands) for the material. Instead the ice-transported grains show a clear provenance from the southern Weddell Sea region, extending from the Ellsworth-Whitmore Mountains of West Antarctica to the coastal region of Dronning Maud Land in East Antarctica. This study provides the first evidence for a continuity of widespread glacier calving along the coastline of the southern Weddell Sea embayment at least 2.5 million yrs before the prominent oxygen isotope event at 34-33.5 Ma that is considered to mark the onset of widespread glaciation of the Antarctic continent.

  3. Pronounced zonal heterogeneity in Eocene southern high-latitude sea surface temperatures.

    PubMed

    Douglas, Peter M J; Affek, Hagit P; Ivany, Linda C; Houben, Alexander J P; Sijp, Willem P; Sluijs, Appy; Schouten, Stefan; Pagani, Mark

    2014-05-06

    Paleoclimate studies suggest that increased global warmth during the Eocene epoch was greatly amplified at high latitudes, a state that climate models cannot fully reproduce. However, proxy estimates of Eocene near-Antarctic sea surface temperatures (SSTs) have produced widely divergent results at similar latitudes, with SSTs above 20 °C in the southwest Pacific contrasting with SSTs between 5 and 15 °C in the South Atlantic. Validation of this zonal temperature difference has been impeded by uncertainties inherent to the individual paleotemperature proxies applied at these sites. Here, we present multiproxy data from Seymour Island, near the Antarctic Peninsula, that provides well-constrained evidence for annual SSTs of 10-17 °C (1σ SD) during the middle and late Eocene. Comparison of the same paleotemperature proxy at Seymour Island and at the East Tasman Plateau indicate the presence of a large and consistent middle-to-late Eocene SST gradient of ∼7 °C between these two sites located at similar paleolatitudes. Intermediate-complexity climate model simulations suggest that enhanced oceanic heat transport in the South Pacific, driven by deep-water formation in the Ross Sea, was largely responsible for the observed SST gradient. These results indicate that very warm SSTs, in excess of 18 °C, did not extend uniformly across the Eocene southern high latitudes, and suggest that thermohaline circulation may partially control the distribution of high-latitude ocean temperatures in greenhouse climates. The pronounced zonal SST heterogeneity evident in the Eocene cautions against inferring past meridional temperature gradients using spatially limited data within given latitudinal bands.

  4. Pronounced zonal heterogeneity in Eocene southern high-latitude sea surface temperatures

    PubMed Central

    Douglas, Peter M. J.; Affek, Hagit P.; Ivany, Linda C.; Houben, Alexander J. P.; Sijp, Willem P.; Sluijs, Appy; Schouten, Stefan; Pagani, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Paleoclimate studies suggest that increased global warmth during the Eocene epoch was greatly amplified at high latitudes, a state that climate models cannot fully reproduce. However, proxy estimates of Eocene near-Antarctic sea surface temperatures (SSTs) have produced widely divergent results at similar latitudes, with SSTs above 20 °C in the southwest Pacific contrasting with SSTs between 5 and 15 °C in the South Atlantic. Validation of this zonal temperature difference has been impeded by uncertainties inherent to the individual paleotemperature proxies applied at these sites. Here, we present multiproxy data from Seymour Island, near the Antarctic Peninsula, that provides well-constrained evidence for annual SSTs of 10–17 °C (1σ SD) during the middle and late Eocene. Comparison of the same paleotemperature proxy at Seymour Island and at the East Tasman Plateau indicate the presence of a large and consistent middle-to-late Eocene SST gradient of ∼7 °C between these two sites located at similar paleolatitudes. Intermediate-complexity climate model simulations suggest that enhanced oceanic heat transport in the South Pacific, driven by deep-water formation in the Ross Sea, was largely responsible for the observed SST gradient. These results indicate that very warm SSTs, in excess of 18 °C, did not extend uniformly across the Eocene southern high latitudes, and suggest that thermohaline circulation may partially control the distribution of high-latitude ocean temperatures in greenhouse climates. The pronounced zonal SST heterogeneity evident in the Eocene cautions against inferring past meridional temperature gradients using spatially limited data within given latitudinal bands. PMID:24753570

  5. Are molecular and isotopic patterns in modern plants representative of ancient floras? Examples from Paleocene and Eocene floras and sediments in the Bighorn Basin (WY, USA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diefendorf, A. F.; Freeman, K. H.; Wing, S. L.; Currano, E. D.

    2011-12-01

    In modern ecosystems, climate, biome and plant community are important predictors of carbon isotope patterns recorded in leaves, leaf waxes, and leaf terpenoids. However, it is unclear if modern carbon isotope patterns are useful analogs in the past when climate and atmospheric CO2 conditions were drastically different than today. It is also uncertain if molecular carbon isotope approaches are more robust with respect to reconstructing patterns of atmospheric δ13C compared to bulk isotope approaches. To evaluate these questions, we present a study of carbon isotope values of bulk organic matter and biomarkers for terrestrial plants (di- and triterpenoids and n-alkanes) from the late Paleocene (62 MA) to the Early Eocene Climatic Optimum (EECO; 52.6 MA) in the Bighorn Basin (WY, USA). We sampled along eight laterally extensive outcrops from the Fort Union and Willwood Formations. Each unit varies in exposure from tens of meters to eighteen kilometers. Sediment lithology includes carbonaceous mudstones, shales, and lignites with total organic carbon ranging from 0.2% to 55%. Climate during this interval, as determined from fossil leaf metrics, warmed from the cooler Paleocene (~10.5°C) to the hot Eocene (~22.2°C) with mean annual precipitation varying from 110 to 170 cm. We collected multiple samples across a laterally extensive outcrop to capture previously reported spatial variability in flora and depositional environment. Carbon isotopes of bulk organic matter, n-alkanes, and di- and triterpenoids (specific for conifers and angiosperms, respectively) were characterized. To determine if plant biomarker relationships from modern plants are applicable to ancient plants, we reconstructed carbon isotope fractionation during photosynthesis (Δleaf) from biomarker carbon isotope values (n-alkanes and terpenoids) and from δ13C values of atmospheric CO2 estimated from planktonic foraminifera. Reconstructed Δleaf values are consistent with predicted Δleaf values when

  6. Optimum Building Shapes for Energy Conservation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berkoz, Esher Balkan

    1977-01-01

    An approach to optimum building shape design is summarized that is based on local climate and is especially important for heat control in lower cost construction with temperature-responsive thermal characteristics. The study was supported by Istanbul Technical University. For journal availability see HE 508 931. (Author/LBH)

  7. Hydrogen isotopes in Eocene river gravels and paleoelevation of the Sierra Nevada.

    PubMed

    Mulch, Andreas; Graham, Stephan A; Chamberlain, C Page

    2006-07-07

    We determine paleoelevation of the Sierra Nevada, California, by tracking the effect of topography on precipitation, as recorded in hydrogen isotopes of kaolinite exposed in gold-bearing river deposits from the Eocene Yuba River. The data, compared with the modern isotopic composition of precipitation, show that about 40 to 50 million years ago the Sierra Nevada stood tall (>/=2200 meters), a result in conflict with proposed young surface uplift by tectonic and climatic forcing but consistent with the Sierra Nevada representing the edge of a pre-Eocene continental plateau.

  8. The sponge genus Ephydatia from the high-latitude middle Eocene: environmental and evolutionary significance.

    PubMed

    Pisera, Andrzej; Manconi, Renata; Siver, Peter A; Wolfe, Alexander P

    2016-01-01

    The freshwater sponge species Ephydatia cf. facunda Weltner, 1895 (Spongillida, Spongillidae) is reported for the first time as a fossil from middle Eocene lake sediments of the Giraffe kimberlite maar in northern Canada. The sponge is represented by birotule gemmuloscleres as well as oxea megascleres. Today, E. facunda inhabits warm-water bodies, so its presence in the Giraffe locality provides evidence of a warm climate at high latitudes during the middle Eocene. The morphological similarity of the birotules to modern conspecific forms suggests protracted morphological stasis, comparable to that reported for other siliceous microfossils from the same locality.

  9. Orbital forcing of the Paleocene and Eocene carbon cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeebe, Richard E.; Westerhold, Thomas; Littler, Kate; Zachos, James C.

    2017-05-01

    Multimillion-year proxy records across the Paleocene and Eocene show prominent variations on orbital time scales. The cycles, which have been identified at various sites across the globe, preferentially concentrate spectral power at eccentricity and precessional frequencies. It is evident that these cycles are an expression of changes in global climate and carbon cycling paced by astronomical forcing. However, little is currently known about the link between orbital forcing and the carbon cycle-climate system and the amplitude of associated atmospheric CO2 variations. Here we use simple and complex carbon cycle models to explore the basic effect of different orbital forcing schemes and noise on the carbon cycle. Our primary modeling target is the high-resolution, ˜7.7 Myr long, benthic isotope record at Ocean Drilling Program Site 1262 in the South Atlantic. For direct insolation forcing (as opposed to artificial eccentricity-tilt-precession), one major challenge is understanding how the system transfers spectral power from high to low frequencies. We discuss feasible solutions, including insolation transformations analogous to electronic AC-DC conversion (DC'ing). Regarding mechanisms, we focus on tropical insolation and a long-term carbon imbalance in terrestrial organic burial/oxidation but do not rule out other scenarios. Our analysis shows that high-latitude mechanisms are unlikely drivers of orbitally paced changes in the late Paleocene-early Eocene (LPEE) Earth system. Furthermore, we provide constraints on the origin and isotopic composition of a possible LPEE cyclic carbon imbalance/source responding to astronomical forcing. Our simulations also reveal a mechanism for the large δ13C-eccentricity lag at the 400 kyr period observed in Paleocene, Oligocene, and Miocene sections. We present the first estimates of orbital-scale variations in atmospheric CO2 during the late Paleocene and early Eocene.

  10. Major early Eocene carbon cycle perturbations and changes in planktic foraminiferal assemblages from the southeast Atlantic Ocean (ODP Site 1263)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luciani, Valeria; D'Onofrio, Roberta; Dickens, Gerald Roy; Wade, Bridget

    2017-04-01

    On a paleoclimatic perspective the early Paleogene represents one of the most interesting and dynamic intervals of the Earth's history. Present record indicates that the Earth climate system reached its Cenozoic maximum peak of global warming and probably of pCO2 during the early Eocene climatic optimum (EECO, 49-53 Ma). Superimposed to the general trend, our planet experienced short-term ( 40-200 kyr) repeated peaks in global temperatures and major changes in the carbon cycle, known as hyperthermals. Great scientific interest has been focused on the early Paleogene hyperthermal events, given the assumed similarity with the current climatic scenario. Less attention has been dedicated to the EECO long lasting perturbation of extraordinary warming thus many characters of this interval still remain largely unconstrained, especially as for the biotic response. We present here results on early Eocene planktic foraminiferal analysis from the southeast Atlantic Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Site 1263 (Walvis Ridge, Leg 208) to explore possible relationship between changes in assemblages and carbon cycle perturbation. The time interval is of particular interest for an abrupt switch occurred at low-latitude of the northern hemisphere between two important calcifiers of the tropical-subtropical early Paleogene oceans, the genera Morozovella and Acarinina at the carbon isotopic excursion known as J event, at the EECO onset. Precisely, the relative abundance of Morozovella permanently decreased by at least half, along with a progressive decrease in the number of species. Concomitantly, Acarinina almost doubled its abundance and diversified. Site 1263 was located during the early Eocene at a latitude of 40° south therefore representing a temperate setting of southern hemisphere not yet explored for planktic foraminiferal changes. We document a permanent decrease in Morozovella abundance at the beginning of the EECO, although this decline is delayed by 165 kyr with respect to

  11. Latitudinal gradients in greenhouse seawater δ(18) O: evidence from Eocene sirenian tooth enamel.

    PubMed

    Clementz, Mark T; Sewall, Jacob O

    2011-04-22

    The Eocene greenhouse climate state has been linked to a more vigorous hydrologic cycle at mid- and high latitudes; similar information on precipitation levels at low latitudes is, however, limited. Oxygen isotopic fluxes track moisture fluxes and, thus, the δ(18)O values of ocean surface waters can provide insight into hydrologic cycle changes. The offset between tropical δ(18)O values from sampled Eocene sirenian tooth enamel and modern surface waters is greater than the expected 1.0 per mil increase due to increased continental ice volume. This increased offset could result from suppression of surface-water δ(18)O values by a tropical, annual moisture balance substantially wetter than that of today. Results from an atmospheric general circulation model support this interpretation and suggest that Eocene low latitudes were extremely wet.

  12. Fossil plant stomata indicate decreasing atmospheric CO2 prior to the Eocene-Oligocene boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinthorsdottir, Margret; Porter, Amanda S.; Holohan, Aidan; Kunzmann, Lutz; Collinson, Margaret; McElwain, Jennifer C.

    2016-02-01

    A unique stratigraphic sequence of fossil leaves of Eotrigonobalanus furcinervis (extinct trees of the beech family, Fagaceae) from central Germany has been used to derive an atmospheric pCO2 record with multiple data points spanning the late middle to late Eocene, two sampling levels which may be earliest Oligocene, and two samples from later in the Oligocene. Using the inverse relationship between the density of stomata and pCO2, we show that pCO2 decreased continuously from the late middle to late Eocene, reaching a relatively stable low value before the end of the Eocene. Based on the subsequent records, pCO2 in parts of the Oligocene was similar to latest Eocene values. These results suggest that a decrease in pCO2 preceded the large shift in marine oxygen isotope records that characterizes the Eocene-Oligocene transition and that when a certain threshold of pCO2 change was crossed, the cumulative effects of this and other factors resulted in rapid temperature decline, ice build up on Antarctica and hence a change of climate mode.

  13. Fossil plant stomata indicate decreasing atmospheric CO2 prior to the Eocene-Oligocene boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinthorsdottir, M.; Porter, A. S.; Holohan, A.; Kunzmann, L.; Collinson, M.; McElwain, J. C.

    2015-10-01

    A unique stratigraphic sequence of fossil leaves of Eotrigonobalanus furcinervis (extinct trees of the beech family, Fagaceae) from central Germany has been used to derive an atmospheric pCO2 record with multiple data points spanning the late middle to late Eocene, two sampling levels which may be earliest Oligocene, and two samples from later in the Oligocene. Using the inverse relationship between the density of stomata and pCO2, we show that pCO2 decreased continuously from the late middle to late Eocene, reaching a relatively stable low value before the end of the Eocene. Based on the subsequent records, pCO2 in parts of the Oligocene was similar to latest Eocene values. These results show that a decrease in pCO2 preceded the large shift in marine oxygen isotope records that characterizes the Eocene-Oliogocene transition. This may be related to the "hysteresis effect" previously proposed - where a certain threshold of pCO2 change was crossed before the cumulative effects of this and other factors resulted in rapid temperature decline, ice build up on Antarctica and hence a change of climate mode.

  14. Larger benthic foraminiferal turnover across the Eocene-Oligocene transition at Siwa Oasis, Western Desert, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orabi, H.; El Beshtawy, M.; Osman, R.; Gadallah, M.

    2015-05-01

    In the Eocene part of the Siwa Oasis, the larger foraminifera are represented by the genera Nummulites, Arxina, Operculina, Sphaerogypsina, Asterocyclina, Grzybowskia, Silvestriella, Gaziryina and Discocyclina in order of abundance. Operculina continues up to the early Oligocene as modern representatives in tropical regions, while the other genera became extinct. Nevertheless, the most common larger foraminiferal genus Lepidocyclina (Nephrolepidina) appears only in the lowermost Oligocene. In spite of the Eocene-Oligocene (E/O) transition is thought to have been attended by major continental cooling at northern middle and high latitudes, we discover that at the Siwa Oasis, there is a clear warming trend from the late Eocene (extinction level of Nummulites, Sphaerogypsina, Asterocyclina, Grzybowskia, Silvestriella and Discocyclina) to the early Oligocene is observed due to the high abundance of Operculina and occurrence of kaolinite and gypsiferous shale deposits in both Qatrani and El Qara formations (Oligocene) at this transition. The El Qara Formation is a new rock unit proposed herein for the Oligocene (Rupelian age) in the first time. Several episodes of volcanic activity occurred in Egypt during the Cenozoic. Mid Tertiary volcanicity was widespread and a number of successive volcanic pulses are starting in the late Eocene. The release of mantle CO2 from this very active volcanic episode may have in fact directly caused the warm Eocene-Oligocene greenhouse climate effect.

  15. Highly Seasonal and Perennial Fluvial Facies: Implications for Climatic Control on the Douglas Creek and Parachute Creek Members, Green River Formation, Southeastern Uinta Basin, Utah

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gall, Ryan D.

    The early to middle Eocene Green River Formation consists of continental strata deposited in Laramide ponded basins in Utah, Colorado, and Wyoming. This study (1) documents fluvial and lacustrine strata from the Douglas Creek and Parachute Creek Members of the middle Green River Formation, southeastern Uinta Basin, Utah, and (2) uses new interpretations of the link between climate and fluvial sedimentary expression to interpret the terrestrial evolution of early Eocene climate. The stratigraphy was analyzed via outcrops along a 10 km transect in Main Canyon on the Tavaputs Plateau, and is divided into three distinct, stratigraphically separated depositional settings: (1) the lowermost Interval 1 is dominated by amalgamated sandstone channels that contain 70-100% upper flow regime sedimentary structures. The channels are interpreted to represent fluvial deposits controlled by a highly seasonal climate, where most deposition was limited to seasonal flooding events. (2) Interval 2 is dominated by alternating siliciclastic and carbonate lacustrine deposits, interpreted as local pulsed fluvial siliciclastic input into shallow Lake Uinta, and periods of fluvial quiescence represented by littoral carbonate deposition. (3) The uppermost Interval 3 is dominated by erosively-based, trough cross bedded sandstone channels interbedded with littoral lacustrine and deltaic deposits. The Interval 3 sandstone channels are interpreted as perennial fluvial deposits with relatively little variation in annual discharge, akin to modern humid-temperate fluvial systems. The stratigraphic transition from seasonally-controlled (Interval 1) to perennial (Interval 3) fluvial deposits is interpreted to represent a fundamental shift in Eocene climate, from the peak hyperthermal regime of the Early Eocene Climatic Optimum (EECO) to a more stable post-EECO climate.

  16. Eocene squalomorph sharks (Chondrichthyes, Elasmobranchii) from Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engelbrecht, Andrea; Mörs, Thomas; Reguero, Marcelo A.; Kriwet, Jürgen

    2017-10-01

    Rare remains of predominantly deep-water sharks of the families Hexanchidae, Squalidae, Dalatiidae, Centrophoridae, and Squatinidae are described from the Eocene La Meseta Formation, Seymour Island, Antarctic Peninsula, which has yielded the most abundant chondrichthyan assemblage from the Southern Hemisphere to date. Previously described representatives of Hexanchus sp., Squalus weltoni, Squalus woodburnei, Centrophorus sp., and Squatina sp. are confirmed and dental variations are documented. Although the teeth of Squatina sp. differ from other Palaeogene squatinid species, we refrain from introducing a new species. A new dalatiid taxon, Eodalatias austrinalis gen. et sp. nov. is described. This new material not only increases the diversity of Eocene Antarctic elasmobranchs but also allows assuming that favourable deep-water habitats were available in the Eocene Antarctic Ocean off Antarctica in the Eocene. The occurrences of deep-water inhabitants in shallow, near-coastal waters of the Antarctic Peninsula agrees well with extant distribution patterns.

  17. Using fossil leaves as paleoprecipitation indicators: An Eocene example

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilf, Peter; Wing, Scott L.; Greenwood, David R.; Greenwood, Cathy L.

    1998-03-01

    Estimates of past precipitation are of broad interest for many areas of inquiry, including reconstructions of past environments and topography, climate modeling, and ocean circulation studies. The shapes and sizes of living leaves are highly sensitive to moisture conditions, and assemblages of fossil leaves of flowering plants have great potential as paleoprecipitation indicators. Most quantitative estimates of paleoprecipitation have been based on a multivariate data set of morphological leaf characters measured from samples of living vegetation tied to climate stations. However, when tested on extant forests, this method has consistently overestimated precipitation. We present a simpler approach that uses only the mean leaf area of a vegetation sample as a predictor variable but incorporates a broad range of annual precipitation and geographic coverage into the predictor set. The significant relationship that results, in addition to having value for paleoclimatic reconstruction, refines understanding of the long-observed positive relationship between leaf area and precipitation. Seven precipitation estimates for the Eocene of the Western United States are revised as lower than previously published but remain far wetter than the same areas today. Abundant moisture may have been an important factor in maintaining warm, frost-free conditions in the Eocene because of the major role of water vapor in retaining and transporting atmospheric heat.

  18. Continental ice in Greenland during the Eocene and Oligocene.

    PubMed

    Eldrett, James S; Harding, Ian C; Wilson, Paul A; Butler, Emily; Roberts, Andrew P

    2007-03-08

    The Eocene and Oligocene epochs (approximately 55 to 23 million years ago) comprise a critical phase in Earth history. An array of geological records supported by climate modelling indicates a profound shift in global climate during this interval, from a state that was largely free of polar ice caps to one in which ice sheets on Antarctica approached their modern size. However, the early glaciation history of the Northern Hemisphere is a subject of controversy. Here we report stratigraphically extensive ice-rafted debris, including macroscopic dropstones, in late Eocene to early Oligocene sediments from the Norwegian-Greenland Sea that were deposited between about 38 and 30 million years ago. Our data indicate sediment rafting by glacial ice, rather than sea ice, and point to East Greenland as the likely source. Records of this type from one site alone cannot be used to determine the extent of ice involved. However, our data suggest the existence of (at least) isolated glaciers on Greenland about 20 million years earlier than previously documented, at a time when temperatures and atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations were substantially higher.

  19. Optimum connection management scheduling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadar, Ivan

    2000-08-01

    Connection Management plays a key role in both distributed 'local' network-centric and 'globally' connected info- centric systems. The role of Connection Management is to provide seamless demand-based sharing of the information products. For optimum distributed information fusion performance, these systems must minimize communications delays and maximize message throughput, and at the same time take into account relative-sensors-targets geometrical constraints and data pedigree. In order to achieve overall distributed 'network' effectiveness, these systems must be adaptive, and be able to distribute data s needed in real- time. A system concept will be described which provides optimum capacity-based information scheduling. A specific example, based on a satellite channel, is used to illustrate simulated performance results and their effects on fusion systems performance.

  20. Reconstructing a lost Eocene paradise: Part I. Simulating the change in global floral distribution at the initial Eocene thermal maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shellito, Cindy J.; Sloan, Lisa C.

    2006-02-01

    This study utilizes the NCAR Land Surface Model (LSM1.2) integrated with dynamic global vegetation to recreate the early Paleogene global distribution of vegetation and to examine the response of the vegetation distribution to changes in climate at the Paleocene-Eocene boundary (˜ 55 Ma). We run two simulations with Eocene geography driven by climatologies generated in two atmosphere global modeling experiments: one with atmospheric pCO 2 at 560 ppm, and another at 1120 ppm. In both scenarios, the model produces the best match with fossil flora in the low latitudes. A comparison of model output from the two scenarios suggests that the greatest impact of climate on vegetation will occur in the high latitudes, in the Arctic Circle and in Antarctica. In these regions, greater accumulated summertime warmth in the 1120 ppm simulation allows temperate plant functional types to expand further poleward. Additionally, the high pCO 2 scenario produces a greater abundance of trees over grass at these high latitudes. In the middle and low latitudes, the general distribution of plant functional types is similar in both pCO 2 scenarios. Likely, a greater increment of greenhouse gases is necessary to produce the type of change evident in the mid-latitude paleobotanical record. Overall, differences between model output and fossil flora are greatest at high latitudes.

  1. Highly-seasonal monsoons controlled by Central Asian Eocene epicontinental sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bougeois, Laurie; Tindall, Julia; de Rafélis, Marc; Reichart, Gert-Jan; de Nooijer, Lennart; Dupont-Nivet, Guillaume

    2015-04-01

    Modern Asian climate is mainly controlled by seasonal reverse winds driven by continent-ocean thermal contrast. This yields monsoon pattern characterized by a strong seasonality in terms of precipitation and temperature and a duality between humidity along southern and eastern Asia and aridity in Central Asia. According to climate models, Asian Monsoons and aridification have been governed by Tibetan plateau uplift, global climate changes and the retreat of a vast epicontinental sea (the Proto-Paratethys sea) that used to cover Eurasia in Eocene times (55 to 34 Myr ago). Evidence for Asian aridification and monsoons a old as Eocene, are emerging from proxy and model data, however, the role of the Proto-Paratethys sea remains to be established by proxy data. By applying a novel infra-annual geochemical multi-proxy methodology on Eocene oyster shells of the Proto-Paratethys sea and comparing results to climate simulations, we show that the Central Asian region was generally arid with high seasonality from hot and arid summers to wetter winters. This high seasonality in Central Asia supports a monsoonal circulation was already established although the climate pattern was significantly different than today. During winter months, a strong influence of the Proto-Paratethys moisture is indicated by enhanced precipitations significantly higher than today. Precipitation probably dwindled because of the subsequent sea retreat as well as the uplift of the Tibetan and Pamir mountains shielding the westerlies. During Eocene summers, the local climate was hotter and more arid than today despite the presence of the Proto Paratethys. This may be explained by warmer Eocene global conditions with a strong anticyclonic Hadley cell descending at Central Asian latitudes (25 to 45 N). urthermore, the Tibetan plateau emerging at this time to the south must have already contributed a stronger Foehn effect during summer months bringing warm and dry air into Central Asia. Proto

  2. Climate Optimum rejuvenates the Mediterranean marine world.

    PubMed

    Por, Francis D

    2010-06-01

    The Mediterranean, a sea with an already eventful history, is again undergoing an extreme change. A combination of general warming of the Mediterranean Sea and contact with the Indopacific world through the Suez Canal has set the stage for massive changes in the biota that inhabit this sea. For over a century, tropical species of all taxa have been migrating back into the Mediterranean, suggesting a duplication or restoration of a mid-Pliocene Piacenzian or late Miocene Tortonian situation. Test cases are presented in three major taxa. It is not a serial invasion by individual rogue exotic and damaging species, as often wrongly assumed and asserted. Despite its unique biogeographic magnitude being recognized, an opportunity to study the progress of this phenomenon is being missed. This is because of the changed priorities in research, the acute taxonomic impediment and to the geopolitical difficulties in cooperation. Nonetheless, the limitations of the restoration process are defined and a careful future outlook is presented.

  3. Marine Sediment Records of Paleocene-Eocene Boundary Wildfire Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, E. A.; Kurtz, A. C.

    2006-12-01

    We have produced two records of black carbon (BC) accumulation in marine sediments spanning the Paleocene-Eocene boundary interval, a period that may have been characterized by massive wildfires. BC was isolated using a published thermo-chemical extraction, and measured by combustion in an elemental analyzer. An open-ocean record from Western Pacific carbonate-dominated sediments (ODP 1210B) shows a dramatic peak in black carbon concentration (maximum 0.9 ppm) that coincides with the onset of the Paleocene-Eocene carbon isotopic excursion. In contrast, a continental shelf site from eastern North America (Bass River, ODP leg 174AX) shows no such peak but contains black carbon concentrations uniformly higher (55-220 ppm) than the open ocean site (1210B). We suggest that the pattern observed at Site 1210B reflects a global increase in wildfire that accompanies the onset of the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM). The timing of the increase in BC relative to the carbon isotope excursion suggests that the increase in burning was not a response to PETM climate change, but instead was a forcing. The BC concentration peak is not a lag deposit brought on by carbonate dissolution at the boundary, but is instead a true increase in BC mass accumulation rate. Burning of Paleocene peat deposits may have released significant amounts of CO2 into the atmosphere. The pattern of BC accumulation at Site 1210B records particulate smoke fallout over the open ocean distal from wildfire sources. The Bass River core records a greatly expanded PETM section (10 meters vs. 0.5 meters at site 1210B), dominated by terrestrial sedimentation. In this site the background flux of BC to continental shelf sediments from local fires apparently swamps any potential global signal of increased fire frequency in desiccated Paleocene peat deposits.

  4. Find optimum pipe size

    SciTech Connect

    Fastenakels, M.; Campana, H.

    1984-09-01

    For decades, chemical engineers have used various rules of thumb for selecting the size of pipe in continuousprocess plants. Often these methods result in sizes that are not the correct selection for the operating conditions. This causes the plant to be less efficient to operate or more costly to erect. The optimum size is controlled by one of three modes of selection: the least annual cost (energy external source), the pressure drop available or the velocity allowable (often is two-phase flow)./sup 3/ Pressure drop available applies when a pressure loss may be (or must be) absorbed by the pipe. The optimum size then becomes the smallest and the least expensive that permits the flow to take place with no undesirable side effects. Except for very special cases, this would not be used in conjunction with a pumped or compressed fluid. This mode requires at least an approximation of the length of the pipe and the quantity and nature of the fittings in the system before the selection can be made. It can also apply under some conditions to the suction piping for pumps or compressors, to the lines conducting steam to and from reciprocating pumps and to heating equipment.

  5. On the possibility of ice on Greenland during the Eocene-Oligocene transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langebroek, Petra M.; Nisancioglu, Kerim H.; Lunt, Daniel J.; Kathrine Pedersen, Vivi; Nele Meckler, A.; Gasson, Edward

    2017-04-01

    The Eocene-Oligocene transition ( 34 Ma) is one of the major climate transitions of the Cenozoic era. Atmospheric CO2 decreased from the high levels of the Greenhouse world (>1000 ppm) to values of about 600-700 ppm in the early Oligocene. High latitude temperatures dropped by several degrees, causing a large-scale expansion of the Antarctic ice sheet. Concurrently, in the Northern Hemisphere, the inception of ice caps on Greenland is suggested by indirect evidence from ice-rafted debris and changes in erosional regime. However, ice sheet models have not been able to simulate extensive ice on Greenland under the warm climate of the Eocene-Oligocene transition. We show that elevated bedrock topography is key in solving this inconsistency. During the late Eocene / early Oligocene, East Greenland bedrock elevations were likely higher than today due to tectonic and deep-Earth processes related to the break-up of the North Atlantic and the position of the Icelandic plume. When allowing for higher initial bedrock topography, we do simulate a large ice cap on Greenland under the still relatively warm climate of the early Oligocene. Ice inception takes place at high elevations in the colder regions of North and Northeast Greenland; with the size of the ice cap being strongly dependent on the climate forcing and the bedrock topography applied.

  6. Geochemistry and depositional environments of Paleocene-Eocene phosphorites: Metlaoui Group, Tunisia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garnit, Hechmi; Bouhlel, Salah; Jarvis, Ian

    2017-10-01

    The Late Paleocene-Early Eocene phosphorites of the Metlaoui Group in Tunisia are a world-class phosphate resource. We review the characteristics of phosphorites deposited in three areas: the Northern Basins; Eastern Basins; and Gafsa-Metlaoui Basin. Comprehensive new bulk rock elemental data are presented, together with complementary mineralogical and mineral chemical results. Carbonate fluorapatite (francolite) constitutes the dominant mineral phase in the deposits. Phosphorite samples are enriched in Cd, Sr, U, rare-earth elements and Y, together with environmentally diagnostic trace elements that provide detrital (Cr, Zr), productivity (Cu, Ni, Zn) and redox (Mo, V) proxies. Suboxic bottom-water conditions predominated, with suboxic to anoxic porewaters accompanying francolite precipitation. Phosphorite deposition occurred under increasingly arid climate conditions, accompanying global Paleocene-Eocene warming. The Northern Basins show the strongest Tethys Ocean influence, with surface seawater rare-earth element signatures consistently developed in the phosphorites. Bed-scale compositional variation indicates relatively unstable environmental conditions and episodes of sediment redeposition, with varying detrital supply and a relatively wet local climate. Glauconitic facies in the Northern Basins and the more isolated evaporite-associated phosphorites in the dryer Eastern Basins display the greatest diagenetic influences. The phosphorite - organic-rich marl - diatom-bearing porcelanite facies association in the Gafsa-Metlaoui Basin represents the classic coastal upwelling trinity. Modified Tethyan waters occurred within the Basin during phosphorite deposition, with decreasing marine productivity from NW to SE evidenced by systematically falling enrichment factors for Cu, Ni, Cd and Zn in the phosphorites. Productivity declined in concert with increasing basin isolation during the deposition of the commercial phosphorite beds in the latest Paleocene to earliest

  7. Events at the turn of the Eocene and Oligocene in the Central Eurasia Region (middle latitudes)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhmetiev, M. A.; Gavrilov, Yu. O.; Zaporozhets, N. I.

    2017-03-01

    The Eocene and Oligocene transition sections (Priabonian-Rupelian) of the Aral-Turgai, West Siberian, Volga-Don, and Crimea-Caucasus regions have been studied in detail [1], and the global biospheric crisis events have been estimated at the turn of the Eocene and Oligocene. In spite of the idea of the gradual regression in the Priabonian with drainage of the inner sea basins, it has been established that shallowing of the sea was preceded by repeated transgression that continued for 1 Ma with warming up and humidification of the climate. The final regressive phase (130-200 ka) was accompanied by frequent eustatic and climatic fluctuations, reconstruction of the isotopic and geochemical background, and also the recurrence at the boundary between layers in certain continuous sections.

  8. Radiative forcing and feedback by forests in warm climates - a sensitivity study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Port, U.; Claussen, M.; Brovkin, V.

    2015-12-01

    The biogeophysical effect of forests in a climate with permanent high-latitude ice cover has already been investigated. We extend this analysis to warm, basically ice-free climates, and we choose the early Eocene, some 54 to 52 million years ago, as paradigm for such type of climate. We use the Max Planck Institute for Meteorology Earth System Model to evaluate the radiative forcing of forests and the feedbacks triggered by forests in early Eocene and pre-industrial climate, respectively. To isolate first-order effects, we compare idealised simulations in which all continents are covered either by dense forests or by deserts with either bright or dark soil. In comparison with desert continents covered by bright soil, forested continents warm the planet in the early Eocene climate and in the pre-industrial climate. The warming can be attributed to different feedback processes, though. The lapse-rate - water-vapour feedback is stronger in early Eocene climate than in pre-industrial climate, but strong and negative cloud-related feedbacks nearly outweigh the positive lapse-rate - water-vapour feedback in the early Eocene climate. Subsequently, global mean warming by forests is weaker in the early Eocene climate than in the pre-industrial climate. Sea-ice related feedbacks are weak in the almost ice-free climate of the early Eocene, thereby leading to a weaker high-latitude warming by forests than in the pre-industrial climate. When the land is covered with dark soils, forests cool the early Eocene climate stronger than the pre-industrial climate because the lapse-rate and water-vapour feedbacks are stronger in the early Eocene climate. Cloud-related feedbacks are equally strong in both climates. We conclude that radiative forcing by forests varies little with the climate state, while most subsequent feedbacks depend on the climate state.

  9. Strong Central Asian seasonality from Eocene oysters indicates early monsoons and aridification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bougeois, Laurie; de Rafélis, Marc; Tindall, Julia; Proust, Jean-Noël; Reichart, Gert-Jan; de Nooijer, Lennart; Guo, ZhaoJie; Ormukov, Cholponbek; Dupont-Nivet, Guillaume

    2017-04-01

    Climate models suggest that the onset of Asian monsoons and aridification have been governed by Tibetan plateau uplift, global climate changes and the retreat to the west of the vast epicontinental Proto-Paratethys sea during the warm Eocene greenhouse period (55-34 million years ago). However, the role of the Proto-Paratethys sea on climate remains to be quantified by accurate and precise reconstructions. By applying a novel intra-annual geochemical multi-proxy methodology on Eocene oyster shells of the Proto-Paratethys sea and comparing results to climate simulations and sedimentology analyses, we show that the Central Asian region was generally arid with a high seasonal contrast characterized by hot and arid summers and wetter winters. Hotter and more arid summers despite the presence of the Proto-Paratethys may be explained by warmer Eocene global conditions with a strong anticyclonic Hadley cell descending at Central Asian latitudes and a stronger Foehn effect from the emerging Tibetan Plateau to the south. This implies that the shallow sea did not have a strong dampening thermal effect on the monsoonal circulation in contrast to previous circulation models results but in agreement with recent evidence for Eocene summer monsoons. Enhanced winter precipitations, relative to modern, is linked to a westerly moisture source coming from the Proto-Paratethys sea at that time. Additional bulk sediment stable isotope data from marine limestones and pedogenic carbonates suggest a gradual decrease in this westerly moisture source, which is in line with the retreat of the Proto-Paratethys followed by the Oligo-Miocene orogeny of the Central Asian ranges (Tian Shan and Pamir) shielding the westerlies.

  10. The first Late Eocene continental faunal assemblage from tropical North America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiménez-Hidalgo, Eduardo; Smith, Krister T.; Guerrero-Arenas, Rosalia; Alvarado-Ortega, Jesus

    2015-01-01

    To date, the terrestrial faunal record of the North American late Eocene has been recovered from its subtropical and temperate regions. We report the first late Eocene continental faunal assemblage from tropical North America, in southern Mexico. Fossil specimens were collected from mudstones that crop out in the Municipality of Santiago Yolomécatl, in northwestern Oaxaca. Previously published K-Ar ages of 32.9 ± 0.9 and 35.7 ± 1.0 Ma in overlain nearby volcanic rocks and biostratigraphy of these new localities suggests a Chadronian mammal age for this new local fauna. The assemblage is composed by two turtle taxa, Rhineura, two caniform taxa, a sciurid, a jimomyid rodent, a geomyine rodent, Gregorymys, Leptochoerus, Perchoerus probus, Merycoidodon, a protoceratid, Poebrotherium, Nanotragulus, Miohippus assinoboiensis, a chalicotherid, a tapiroid, cf. Amynodontopsis, Trigonias and the hymenopteran ichnofossils Celliforma curvata and Fictovichnus sciuttoi. The records of these taxa in northwestern Oaxaca greatly expand southerly their former geographic distribution in North America. The records of the geomorph rodents and Nanotragulus extend their former known biochronological range to the late Eocene. The hymenopteran ichnofossils in the localities suggest the presence of a bare soil after periodic waterlogging, under a sub-humid to sub-arid climate. This new local fauna represents the first glimpse of Eocene vertebrate and invertebrate terrestrial life from tropical North America.

  11. Relative sea level variations in the Chukchi region - Arctic Ocean - since the late Eocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hegewald, Anne; Jokat, Wilfried

    2013-03-01

    Relative sea level (RSL) variations are a result of tectonic activity, changing of the water volume in ocean basins (e.g. due to increasing/decreasing of ice volume, evaporation) and variations in regional to global climate, which influence erosional processes and material transport. We present multi-channel seismic data combined with dated sediment horizons from the Chukchi Shelf, Arctic Ocean. Based on a series of prograding sequences in the upper 4 km of sediments and the method of seismic sequence stratigraphy, we introduce the first RSL curve for the Chukchi region, beginning in the late Eocene (40 Ma). The comparison of the Chukchi RSL curve with the global RSL curve shows that RSL lowering events in the Chukchi region do not correlate with global events for the Eocene/Oligocene - early Miocene. Between the Eocene/Oligocene and the late Oligocene, the Chukchi RSL variations were small (< 100 m). Since the late Oligocene the Chukchi RSL increased until the opening of the Fram Strait in the early Miocene. We show that the Chukchi RSL variations are representative for the Arctic Ocean, and conclude that the Arctic Ocean was an isolated basin for the Eocene/Oligocene - early Miocene.

  12. Eocene oceanic responses to orbital forcing on precessional time scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sloan, L. Cirbus; Huber, Matthew

    2001-02-01

    The goal of our study was to gain an estimate of the variability of ocean-related climate processes driven by insolation forcing over a realistic precessional cycle in an Eocene greenhouse world. Between endmembers of a precessional cycle mean annual sea surface temperatures (SSTs) vary by up to 5°C at high northern latitudes, with minimal tropical SST response. Extratropical regions of the Pacific, Atlantic, and Tethys Oceans show up to a two-fold variation in upwelling strength, while oceanic regions adjacent to northwestern Africa, India, and South America exhibit little oceanic upweliing variability. The response of ocean surface moisture balance to the forcing is greatest in the tropics, varying by as much as 60%. Continental runoff varies by up to a factor of two in some regions. These results may be useful in identifying locations with maximum likelihood of future recovery of orbital cyclicity in deep-sea sediments.

  13. Tibetan plateau aridification linked to global cooling at the Eocene-Oligocene transition.

    PubMed

    Dupont-Nivet, Guillaume; Krijgsman, Wout; Langereis, Cor G; Abels, Hemmo A; Dai, Shuang; Fang, Xiaomin

    2007-02-08

    Continental aridification and the intensification of the monsoons in Asia are generally attributed to uplift of the Tibetan plateau and to the land-sea redistributions associated with the continental collision of India and Asia, whereas some studies suggest that past changes in Asian environments are mainly governed by global climate. The most dramatic climate event since the onset of the collision of India and Asia is the Eocene-Oligocene transition, an abrupt cooling step associated with the onset of glaciation in Antarctica 34 million years ago. However, the influence of this global event on Asian environments is poorly understood. Here we use magnetostratigraphy and cyclostratigraphy to show that aridification, which is indicated by the disappearance of playa lake deposits in the northeastern Tibetan plateau, occurred precisely at the time of the Eocene-Oligocene transition. Our findings suggest that this global transition is linked to significant aridification and cooling in continental Asia recorded by palaeontological and palaeoenvironmental changes, and thus support the idea that global cooling is associated with the Eocene-Oligocene transition. We show that, with sufficient age control on the sedimentary records, global climate can be distinguished from tectonism and recognized as a major contributor to continental Asian environments.

  14. The role of fire during the Eocene-Oligocene transition in southern South America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strömberg, C. A. E.; Selkin, P. A.; Boyle, J.; Carlini, A. A.; Davies-Vollum, K. S.; Dunn, R. E.; Kohn, M. J.; Madden, R. H.

    2014-12-01

    The geological record of wildfire, particularly across climate transitions, can help elucidate the complex relationships between climate, vegetation, and fire at long temporal scales. Across Eocene-Oligocene Transition (EOT), previous workers have proposed climate changes (drying and changes in seasonality) contemporaneous with the growth of the Antarctic ice sheet that would have changed the likelihood of wildfires in terrestrial ecosystems. We document short-lived changes in fire regime and plant community in Patagonia near the time of the EOT. Specifically, the concentration of magnetic oxide minerals in Eocene-Oligocene loessites from the Sarmiento Formation correlates with the fraction of burnt palm phytoliths as well as with the fraction of non-palm phytoliths. We interpret the magnetic mineral assemblage magnetite + maghemite ± hematite as pyrogenic, forming in reducing conditions at temperatures between 300 and 600°C. The disappearance of fire-related characteristics near the EOT is possible if seasonal drought was suppressed due to a northward shift in the westerlies - a process consistent with changes in modal particle sizes in the Vera Member. Although the transitory nature of the changes in fire regime remains a puzzle, these results imply a more important role for fire in structuring Eocene-Oligocene landscapes than previously thought.

  15. Eocene bipolar glaciation associated with global carbon cycle changes.

    PubMed

    Tripati, Aradhna; Backman, Jan; Elderfield, Henry; Ferretti, Patrizia

    2005-07-21

    The transition from the extreme global warmth of the early Eocene 'greenhouse' climate approximately 55 million years ago to the present glaciated state is one of the most prominent changes in Earth's climatic evolution. It is widely accepted that large ice sheets first appeared on Antarctica approximately 34 million years ago, coincident with decreasing atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations and a deepening of the calcite compensation depth in the world's oceans, and that glaciation in the Northern Hemisphere began much later, between 10 and 6 million years ago. Here we present records of sediment and foraminiferal geochemistry covering the greenhouse-icehouse climate transition. We report evidence for synchronous deepening and subsequent oscillations in the calcite compensation depth in the tropical Pacific and South Atlantic oceans from approximately 42 million years ago, with a permanent deepening 34 million years ago. The most prominent variations in the calcite compensation depth coincide with changes in seawater oxygen isotope ratios of up to 1.5 per mil, suggesting a lowering of global sea level through significant storage of ice in both hemispheres by at least 100 to 125 metres. Variations in benthic carbon isotope ratios of up to approximately 1.4 per mil occurred at the same time, indicating large changes in carbon cycling. We suggest that the greenhouse-icehouse transition was closely coupled to the evolution of atmospheric carbon dioxide, and that negative carbon cycle feedbacks may have prevented the permanent establishment of large ice sheets earlier than 34 million years ago.

  16. Descent toward the Icehouse: Eocene sea surface cooling inferred from GDGT distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inglis, Gordon N.; Farnsworth, Alexander; Lunt, Daniel; Foster, Gavin L.; Hollis, Christopher J.; Pagani, Mark; Jardine, Phillip E.; Pearson, Paul N.; Markwick, Paul; Galsworthy, Amanda M. J.; Raynham, Lauren; Taylor, Kyle. W. R.; Pancost, Richard D.

    2015-07-01

    The TEX86 proxy, based on the distribution of marine isoprenoidal glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraether lipids (GDGTs), is increasingly used to reconstruct sea surface temperature (SST) during the Eocene epoch (56.0-33.9 Ma). Here we compile published TEX86 records, critically reevaluate them in light of new understandings in TEX86 palaeothermometry, and supplement them with new data in order to evaluate long-term temperature trends in the Eocene. We investigate the effect of archaea other than marine Thaumarchaeota upon TEX86 values using the branched-to-isoprenoid tetraether index (BIT), the abundance of GDGT-0 relative to crenarchaeol (%GDGT-0), and the Methane Index (MI). We also introduce a new ratio, %GDGTRS, which may help identify Red Sea-type GDGT distributions in the geological record. Using the offset between TEX86H and TEX86L (ΔH-L) and the ratio between GDGT-2 and GDGT-3 ([2]/[3]), we evaluate different TEX86 calibrations and present the first integrated SST compilation for the Eocene (55 to 34 Ma). Although the available data are still sparse some geographic trends can now be resolved. In the high latitudes (>55°), there was substantial cooling during the Eocene (~6°C). Our compiled record also indicates tropical cooling of ~2.5°C during the same interval. Using an ensemble of climate model simulations that span the Eocene, our results indicate that only a small percentage (~10%) of the reconstructed temperature change can be ascribed to ocean gateway reorganization or paleogeographic change. Collectively, this indicates that atmospheric carbon dioxide (pCO2) was the likely driver of surface water cooling during the descent toward the icehouse.

  17. Diachronous seawater retreat from the southwestern margin of the Tarim Basin in the late Eocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jimin; Windley, Brian F.; Zhang, Zhiliang; Fu, Bihong; Li, Shihu

    2016-02-01

    In contrast to the present hyper-arid inland basin surrounded by the high mountains of Central Asia, the western Tarim Basin was once connected with the Tajik Basin at least in the late Eocene, when an epicontinental sea extended from the western Tarim Basin to Europe. Western Tarim is a key site for studying the retreat of seawater, which was likely caused by the northward indentation of the Pamir arc and facilitated by the climatic cooling and eustatic sea level change in the Cenozoic. Here we present a new magnetostratigraphic record from the Tarim Basin that provides evidence of diachronous seawater retreat from its southwestern margin. We studied about 1360 m of well-exposed Eocene-Oligocene strata at Keliyang in the folded foreland of the West Kunlun orogen. Until now, the age of the strata has only been minimally constrained by the presence of late mid-Eocene marine fossils. Our biostratigraphic and magnetostratigraphic results demonstrate that the age of the sedimentary sequence ranges from ∼46 Ma to ∼26 Ma (mid-Eocene to late-Oligocene) and the seawater retreat at Keliyang took place at ∼40 Ma. Considering the stepwise northward indentation and uplift of the Pamir orogen, together with the other previous results, we propose that seawater retreat from the southwestern margin of the Tarim Basin was diachronous in the late Eocene ranging from 47 Ma to 40 Ma. The regional indentation, uplift and erosion of the Pamir orogen played the dominant and important role in controlling the seawater retreat from the southwestern margin of the Tarim Basin.

  18. Greenland ice sheet initiation and Arctic sea ice coincide with Eocene and Oligocene CO2 changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripati, Aradhna; Darby, Dennis

    2016-04-01

    Earth's modern ocean-climate system is largely defined by the presence of glacial ice on landmasses in both hemispheres. Northern Hemisphere ice was previously thought to have formed no earlier than the Miocene or Oligocene, about 20-30 million years after the widespread onset of Antarctic glaciation at the Eocene-Oligocene boundary. Controversially, the episodic presence of seasonal Arctic sea ice and glacial ice in the Northern Hemisphere beginning in the early Oligocene to Middle Eocene has been inferred from multiple observations. Here we use precise source determinations based on geochemical measurements of ice-rafted debris (IRD) from an ODP core in the Greenland Sea (75° N) to constrain glacial ice and sea ice-rafting in the Northern Hemisphere during the middle Eocene through early Oligocene. The chemical fingerprint of 2,334 detrital Fe oxide grains indicates most of these grains are from Greenland with >98% certainty. Thus the coarse IRD in the Greenland Sea originates from widespread areas of east Greenland as far south as the Denmark Strait area (~68° N), with additional IRD sources from the circum-Arctic Ocean. This is the first definitive evidence that mid-Eocene IRD in the Greenland Sea is from Greenland. Episodic glaciation of different source regions on Greenland is synchronous with times of ice-rafting in the western Arctic and ephemeral perennial Arctic ice cover. Intervals of bipolar glacial ice storage in the middle Eocene through early Oligocene coincide with evidence for periods of reduced CO2, associated with carbon cycle perturbations.

  19. Refinement of Eocene lapse rates, fossil-leaf altimetry, and North American Cordilleran surface elevation estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Ran; Poulsen, Christopher J.

    2016-02-01

    Estimates of continental paleoelevation using proxy methods are essential for understanding the geodynamic, climatic, and geomorphoric evolution of ancient orogens. Fossil-leaf paleoaltimetry, one of the few quantitative proxy approaches, uses fossil-leaf traits to quantify differences in temperature or moist enthalpy between coeval coastal and inland sites along latitudes. These environmental differences are converted to elevation differences using their rates of change with elevation (lapse rate). Here, we evaluate the uncertainty associated with this method using the Eocene North American Cordillera as a case study. To do so, we develop a series of paleoclimate simulations for the Early (∼55-49 Ma) and Middle Eocene (49-40 Ma) period using a range of elevation scenarios for the western North American Cordillera. Simulated Eocene lapse rates over western North America are ∼5 °C/km and 9.8 kJ/km, close to moist adiabatic rates but significantly different from modern rates. Further, using linear lapse rates underestimates high-altitude (>3 km) temperature variability and loss of moist enthalpy induced by non-linear circulation changes in response to increasing surface elevation. Ignoring these changes leads to kilometer-scale biases in elevation estimates. In addition to these biases, we demonstrate that previous elevation estimates of the western Cordillera are affected by local climate variability at coastal fossil-leaf sites of up to ∼8 °C in temperature and ∼20 kJ in moist enthalpy, a factor which further contributes to elevation overestimates of ∼1 km for Early Eocene floras located in the Laramide foreland basins and underestimates of ∼1 km for late Middle Eocene floras in the southern Cordillera. We suggest a new approach for estimating past elevations by comparing proxy reconstructions directly with simulated distributions of temperature and moist enthalpy under a range of elevation scenarios. Using this method, we estimate mean elevations for

  20. Fossil Atherospermataceae from lower Eocene sediments of Austria: Laurelia Juss. from the EECO section at Krappfeld in Carinthia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, Christa-Ch.; Egger, Hans

    2015-04-01

    Laurelia Juss. (Atherospermataceae R. Br.) today is a disjunct genus in the southern hemisphere that inhabit temperate moist forests of South America and New Zealand. Unequivocal Atherospermataceae fossils are still rare and are known since the Upper Cretaceous from the southern hemisphere. Here, we present the first findings of Laurelia pollen in the northern hemisphere, preserved in EECO (Early Eocene Climate Optimum) sediments in southern Austria. The sediments of the Paleogene Holzer Formation rest with an erosional unconformity on Campanian rocks, is 8 m-thick and composed of soft red and green claystone, and coaly lenses rich in terrestrial palynomorphs. The pollen and spores were examined with LM and SEM and assigned to botanical families and genera. Overall, three different palynomorph-rich facies were identified: The first, at the base of the Holzer Formation, is characterized by abundant and diverse fern spores, various Arecaceae, Myricaceae, and Juglandaceae. The second is from the black transgressive shale and characterized by the co-occurrence of marine dinoflagellates and Normapolles, Nypa, palm pollen, and Avicennia. The third facies is dominated by wind pollinated triporate taxa (e.g., Normapolles, Myricaceae, Juglandaceae), monosulcate palm taxa and numerous fern spores. The Atherospermataceae pollen, which resembles most closely the genus Laurelia Juss., were encountered in low numbers in all three facies of the Holzer Formation, but previously misidentified. The reason lies in the aperture type: Atherospermataceae pollen are composed of two hemispherical halves that are separated by a complete ring-like aperture or an incomplete a ring-like aperture that acts as a zone of weakness so that the deposited fossil pollen, tend to fall apart. Most fossil Laurelia pollen in the Krappfeld are preserved as rolled up individual halves and look like boat-shaped sulcate pollen grains of monocots or basal angiosperms; preservation of complete grains is rare

  1. Occurrence and distribution of bacterial tetraether lipids in the Eocene Canadian Arctic paleosols: paleoclimate implications (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehay, S.; Jahren, A.; Schubert, B.; Eberle, J. J.; Summons, R. E.

    2010-12-01

    The Early to Middle Eocene (~56-45 Ma) was a “greenhouse” interval with average global temperatures warmer than any other time in the Cenozoic. This period was characterized by warm climates at high latitude leading to lush forests and the arrival of new mammal groups north of the Arctic Circle (>73°N). Glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraethers (GDGTs) are membrane-spanning lipids characteristic of certain archaea and bacteria and it has been demonstrated that branched and cyclic GDGTs derived from soil bacteria vary in structure as a function of environmental factors. Proxies based on the relative abundances of methyl branched and cyclopentyl bacterial tetraethers are hypothesized to correlate with mean annual air temperature and soil pH. Here we present the occurrence and distribution of GDGTs in a range of paleosol and sediment samples from Axel Heiberg Island and Ellesmere Island, Nunavut (eastern Canadian Arctic) and Banks Island in the Northwest Territories (western Canadian Arctic). Preliminary results on 11 paleosol samples from the middle Eocene-aged Geodetic Hills Fossil Forest on Axel Heiberg Island indicate a mean annual air temperature of about 9°C. Earlier paleotemperature estimates for Axel Heiberg Island led to values ranging from 9°C to 15°C for the Middle Eocene. Recent temperature prediction for Ellesmere Island (Early Eocene) based upon oxygen isotope ratios of biogenic phosphate from mammal and fish fossils led to ~8°C. In contrast, GDGTs from a marine sedimentary sequence from Lomonosov Ridge in the central Arctic Ocean led to much higher Early Eocene temperature. Thus, the evaluation of the paleotemperature for the Early to Middle Eocene is still a subject of controversy. Ongoing GDGTs analysis of samples from Ellesmere and Banks Islands should give a more comprehensive paleoenvironmental description of the Eocene Arctic. Differences observed between the various paleotemperature estimates will also be discussed. GDGTs distributions are

  2. Equable climates during Earth history

    SciTech Connect

    Barron, E.J.; Cirbus Sloan, L. )

    1990-06-01

    Eocene and Cretaceous climate-model experiments demonstrate that regardless of conditions of warm polar oceans, differences in pole-to-equator surface-temperature gradient, or topography, above-freezing surface temperatures in winter for continental interiors at middle to high latitudes cannot be maintained. Continental interiors will have cold winter temperatures, even during globally warm periods, unless currently unrecognized forcing factors influenced past climates. If model simulations of Eocene and Cretaceous climates are accurate, the term equable, as it applies to paleoclimate, should be reconsidered.

  3. Calcareous phytoplankton perturbations through the Eocene/Oligocene Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bown, P. R.; Dunkley Jones, T.; Expedition 320/321 Shipboard Party

    2010-12-01

    The Eocene-Oligocene transition (E/OT) witnessed the most significant climatic change in the Cenozoic with a fundamental reordering of the planet’s oceanic and atmospheric circulation, the cooling of deep and high-latitude waters and the formation of continental scale ice sheets on Antarctica. Records from the equatorial Pacific show rapid and highly correlated increases in deep-ocean oxygen and carbon isotopes and a drop in the Calcium Carbonate Compensation Depth (CCD) of over a kilometre (Coxall et al. 2005). The role of surface ocean productivity changes, especially at low latitudes, within this carbon cycle perturbation remains open to question. Detailed micropalaeontological analyses from shelf-slope sections of Tanzania, which host exceptionally well preserved calcareous microfossils, indicate a significant reorganization of planktonic niches coincident with the E/OT (Pearson et al. 2008). These include major assemblage shifts within the calcareous phytoplankton closely coupled to the isotopic excursions (Dunkley Jones et al. 2008). Here, we integrate the Tanzanian records with patterns of calcareous nannofossil turnover observed in historic DSDP Site 242 (Davie Ridge, Indian Ocean), the US Gulf Coast and preliminary data from new E/OT successions recovered during the recent IODP Expedition 320 in the eastern equatorial Pacific and discuss their implications for nutrient cycling and surface ocean productivity across the E/OT. Coxall, H. K., Wilson, P. A., Palike, H., Lear, C. H. & Backman, J. 2005. Rapid stepwise onset of Antarctic glaciation and deeper calcite compensation in the Pacific Ocean. Nature 433: 53-57. Dunkley Jones, T., Bown, P. R., Pearson, P. N., Wade, B. S., Coxall, H. K. & Lear, C. H. 2008. Major shifts in calcareous phytoplankton assemblages through the Eocene-Oligocene transition of Tanzania and their implications for low-latitude primary production, Paleoceanography, 23, PA4204, doi:10.1029/2008PA001640. Pearson, P.N, McMillan, I. K

  4. Climates

    Treesearch

    John R. Jones; Norbert V. DeByle

    1985-01-01

    The broad range of aspen in North America is evidence of its equally broad tolerance of wide variations in climate (Fowells 1965). Given open space for establishment and not too severe competition from other plants, aspen can survive from timberline on the tundra's edge to very warm temperate climates, and from the wet maritime climates of the coasts to very...

  5. A model-model and data-model comparison for the early Eocene hydrological cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carmichael, Matthew J.; Lunt, Daniel J.; Huber, Matthew; Heinemann, Malte; Kiehl, Jeffrey; LeGrande, Allegra; Loptson, Claire A.; Roberts, Chris D.; Sagoo, Navjit; Shields, Christine; Valdes, Paul J.; Winguth, Arne; Winguth, Cornelia; Pancost, Richard D.

    2016-02-01

    A range of proxy observations have recently provided constraints on how Earth's hydrological cycle responded to early Eocene climatic changes. However, comparisons of proxy data to general circulation model (GCM) simulated hydrology are limited and inter-model variability remains poorly characterised. In this work, we undertake an intercomparison of GCM-derived precipitation and P - E distributions within the extended EoMIP ensemble (Eocene Modelling Intercomparison Project; Lunt et al., 2012), which includes previously published early Eocene simulations performed using five GCMs differing in boundary conditions, model structure, and precipitation-relevant parameterisation schemes. We show that an intensified hydrological cycle, manifested in enhanced global precipitation and evaporation rates, is simulated for all Eocene simulations relative to the preindustrial conditions. This is primarily due to elevated atmospheric paleo-CO2, resulting in elevated temperatures, although the effects of differences in paleogeography and ice sheets are also important in some models. For a given CO2 level, globally averaged precipitation rates vary widely between models, largely arising from different simulated surface air temperatures. Models with a similar global sensitivity of precipitation rate to temperature (dP/dT) display different regional precipitation responses for a given temperature change. Regions that are particularly sensitive to model choice include the South Pacific, tropical Africa, and the Peri-Tethys, which may represent targets for future proxy acquisition. A comparison of early and middle Eocene leaf-fossil-derived precipitation estimates with the GCM output illustrates that GCMs generally underestimate precipitation rates at high latitudes, although a possible seasonal bias of the proxies cannot be excluded. Models which warm these regions, either via elevated CO2 or by varying poorly constrained model parameter values, are most successful in simulating a

  6. A Model-Model and Data-Model Comparison for the Early Eocene Hydrological Cycle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carmichael, Matthew J.; Lunt, Daniel J.; Huber, Matthew; Heinemann, Malte; Kiehl, Jeffrey; LeGrande, Allegra; Loptson, Claire A.; Roberts, Chris D.; Sagoo, Navjit; Shields, Christine

    2016-01-01

    A range of proxy observations have recently provided constraints on how Earth's hydrological cycle responded to early Eocene climatic changes. However, comparisons of proxy data to general circulation model (GCM) simulated hydrology are limited and inter-model variability remains poorly characterised. In this work, we undertake an intercomparison of GCM-derived precipitation and P - E distributions within the extended EoMIP ensemble (Eocene Modelling Intercomparison Project; Lunt et al., 2012), which includes previously published early Eocene simulations performed using five GCMs differing in boundary conditions, model structure, and precipitation-relevant parameterisation schemes. We show that an intensified hydrological cycle, manifested in enhanced global precipitation and evaporation rates, is simulated for all Eocene simulations relative to the preindustrial conditions. This is primarily due to elevated atmospheric paleo-CO2, resulting in elevated temperatures, although the effects of differences in paleogeography and ice sheets are also important in some models. For a given CO2 level, globally averaged precipitation rates vary widely between models, largely arising from different simulated surface air temperatures. Models with a similar global sensitivity of precipitation rate to temperature (dP=dT ) display different regional precipitation responses for a given temperature change. Regions that are particularly sensitive to model choice include the South Pacific, tropical Africa, and the Peri-Tethys, which may represent targets for future proxy acquisition. A comparison of early and middle Eocene leaf-fossil-derived precipitation estimates with the GCM output illustrates that GCMs generally underestimate precipitation rates at high latitudes, although a possible seasonal bias of the proxies cannot be excluded. Models which warm these regions, either via elevated CO2 or by varying poorly constrained model parameter values, are most successful in simulating a

  7. A Model-Model and Data-Model Comparison for the Early Eocene Hydrological Cycle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carmichael, Matthew J.; Lunt, Daniel J.; Huber, Matthew; Heinemann, Malte; Kiehl, Jeffrey; LeGrande, Allegra; Loptson, Claire A.; Roberts, Chris D.; Sagoo, Navjit; Shields, Christine

    2016-01-01

    A range of proxy observations have recently provided constraints on how Earth's hydrological cycle responded to early Eocene climatic changes. However, comparisons of proxy data to general circulation model (GCM) simulated hydrology are limited and inter-model variability remains poorly characterised. In this work, we undertake an intercomparison of GCM-derived precipitation and P - E distributions within the extended EoMIP ensemble (Eocene Modelling Intercomparison Project; Lunt et al., 2012), which includes previously published early Eocene simulations performed using five GCMs differing in boundary conditions, model structure, and precipitation-relevant parameterisation schemes. We show that an intensified hydrological cycle, manifested in enhanced global precipitation and evaporation rates, is simulated for all Eocene simulations relative to the preindustrial conditions. This is primarily due to elevated atmospheric paleo-CO2, resulting in elevated temperatures, although the effects of differences in paleogeography and ice sheets are also important in some models. For a given CO2 level, globally averaged precipitation rates vary widely between models, largely arising from different simulated surface air temperatures. Models with a similar global sensitivity of precipitation rate to temperature (dP=dT ) display different regional precipitation responses for a given temperature change. Regions that are particularly sensitive to model choice include the South Pacific, tropical Africa, and the Peri-Tethys, which may represent targets for future proxy acquisition. A comparison of early and middle Eocene leaf-fossil-derived precipitation estimates with the GCM output illustrates that GCMs generally underestimate precipitation rates at high latitudes, although a possible seasonal bias of the proxies cannot be excluded. Models which warm these regions, either via elevated CO2 or by varying poorly constrained model parameter values, are most successful in simulating a

  8. The organic geochemistry of the Eocene-Oligocene black shales from the Lunpola Basin, central Tibet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Tao; Wang, Chengshan; Duan, Yi; Li, Yalin; Hu, Bin

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports on the depositional paleoenvironment and the potential hydrocarbons of the Eocene-Oligocene black shales from the Dingqinghu and Niubao Formations in the Lunpola Basin, central Tibet. Nineteen samples from two outcrop profiles were analysed. The contents of the total organic carbon (TOC) and sulphur were measured; other analyses included Rock-Eval pyrolysis, solvent extraction and gas chromatography-mass spectrometer (GC-MS). The results indicated that the shales from the Dingqinghu and Niubao Formations are thermally immature. The pyrolysis data show that the shales contain Type I organic matter and that lacustrine algal are the main organic matter sources. The low pristane to phytane ratios and the high gammacerane indices indicate that the shales were deposited in a reducing, stratified, and hypersaline palaeo-lake, which is consistent with the climate information provided by the development history of palaeo-lakes from the Eocene to the Oligocene epochs.

  9. Geochronology of Early Eocene strata, Baja California

    SciTech Connect

    Flynn, J.J.; Cipolletti, R.M.

    1985-01-01

    Recent discoveries clearly indicate a Wasatchian (Early Eocene) land mammal age for fossil vertebrates from the Punta Prieta area, Baja California North, Mexico. This fauna provides a rare test for discriminating the temporal significance of mammalian faunas over a broad geographic area. The authors sampled intertonguing, fossiliferous terrestrial and marine strata for paleomagnetic and biostratigraphic analyses to provide an independent age determination for the Punta Prieta area mammal fauna. The marine macroinvertebrate assemblage is most likely upper Meganos to lower Capay West Coast Molluscan Stage based on the temporal ranges of all the taxa; also, none of the taxa occur in pre-Meganos stages. Two genera of planktonic forams indicate a probably Eocene age. They sampled seventeen paleomagnetic sites over 50 meters in the terrestrial mammal-bearing section, and thirteen sites over 25 meters in the marine section. The entire terrestrial sequence is reversely magnetized; initial results indicate the marine sequence probably also is reversely magnetized. Based on all the available biochronologic evidence this reversed sequence most likely should be correlated with the long reversed polarity Chron C24R. Clarkforkian to Early Wasatchian faunas in Wyoming also are associated with Chron C24R. All the available biostratigraphic and magnetostratigraphic evidence strongly supports an Early Eocene age for the Punta Prieta mammalian fauna and temporal equivalence of the Punta Prieta Wasatchian fauna with Wasatchian faunas from the Western United States. Land mammal ages are synchronous and applicable across broad geographic areas.

  10. Possible methane-induced polar warming in the early Eocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sloan, L. C.; Walker, James C. G.; Moore, T. C., Jr.; Rea, David K.; Zachos, James C.

    1992-05-01

    Estimates of Eocene wetland areas are considered and it is suggested that the flux of methane may have been substantially greater during the Eocene than at present. Elevated methane concentrations would have enhanced early Eocene global warming and also might have prevented severe winter cooling of polar regions because of the potential of atmospheric methane to promote the formation of optically thick polar stratospheric ice clouds.

  11. Evidence for middle Eocene Arctic sea ice from diatoms and ice-rafted debris.

    PubMed

    Stickley, Catherine E; St John, Kristen; Koç, Nalân; Jordan, Richard W; Passchier, Sandra; Pearce, Richard B; Kearns, Lance E

    2009-07-16

    Oceanic sediments from long cores drilled on the Lomonosov ridge, in the central Arctic, contain ice-rafted debris (IRD) back to the middle Eocene epoch, prompting recent suggestions that ice appeared in the Arctic about 46 million years (Myr) ago. However, because IRD can be transported by icebergs (derived from land-based ice) and also by sea ice, IRD records are restricted to providing a history of general ice-rafting only. It is critical to differentiate sea ice from glacial (land-based) ice as climate feedback mechanisms vary and global impacts differ between these systems: sea ice directly affects ocean-atmosphere exchanges, whereas land-based ice affects sea level and consequently ocean acidity. An earlier report assumed that sea ice was prevalent in the middle Eocene Arctic on the basis of IRD, and although somewhat preliminary supportive evidence exists, these data are neither comprehensive nor quantified. Here we show the presence of middle Eocene Arctic sea ice from an extraordinary abundance of a group of sea-ice-dependent fossil diatoms (Synedropsis spp.). Analysis of quartz grain textural characteristics further supports sea ice as the dominant transporter of IRD at this time. Together with new information on cosmopolitan diatoms and existing IRD records, our data strongly suggest a two-phase establishment of sea ice: initial episodic formation in marginal shelf areas approximately 47.5 Myr ago, followed approximately 0.5 Myr later by the onset of seasonally paced sea-ice formation in offshore areas of the central Arctic. Our data establish a 2-Myr record of sea ice, documenting the transition from a warm, ice-free environment to one dominated by winter sea ice at the start of the middle Eocene climatic cooling phase.

  12. Eocene-Oligocene aridification and uplift of the Tibetan Plateau, insight from chronostratigraphic and pollen analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoorn, C.; Dupont-Nivet, G.; Konert, M.; Krijgsman, W.; Langereis, C.; Abels, H.; Dai, S.; Fang, X.

    2007-12-01

    Continental aridification and the intensification of the monsoons in Asia are generally attributed to uplift of the Tibetan plateau and to the land-sea redistributions associated with the continental collision of India and Asia, whereas some studies suggest that past changes in Asian environments are mainly governed by global climate. The most dramatic climate event since the onset of the collision of India and Asia is the Eocene-Oligocene transition, an abrupt cooling step associated with the onset of glaciation in Antarctica 34 million years ago. However, the influence of this global event on Asian environments is poorly understood. Using magnetostratigraphy and cyclostratigraphy, we showed that aridification, which is indicated by the disappearance of playa lake deposits in the northeastern Tibetan plateau, occurred precisely at the time of the Eocene-Oligocene transition (Dupont-Nivet et al., 2007, Nature vol. 445, p. 637-638). This result suggest that this global transition is linked to significant aridification and cooling in continental Asia recorded by palaeontological and palaeoenvironmental changes, and thus support the idea that global cooling is associated with the Eocene-Oligocene transition. New insight is provided by preliminary pollen data recovered from gypsiferous beds of the playa deposits. The sudden and regional appearances of representatives of the Pinaceae family -and in particular that of Picea- which dominate the palynological record is interpreted to indicate a change to cooler and/or higher altitude conditions in surrounding paleoenvironments. This change occurring at ca. 38 Ma, predates by 4 My the major Eocene-Oligocene aridification but is in close correspondence to increasing sediment accumulation rates and tectonic rotations (see Dai et al., this meeting, Session GP12) and may thus be related to regional Tibetan uplift.

  13. Tibetan uplift prior to the Eocene-Oligocene transition, insight from chronostratigraphic and palynologic analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Straathof, J.; Abels, H. A.; Dupont-Nivet, G.; Hoorn, C.; Krijgsman, W.

    2009-04-01

    To unravel the interplay between Tibetan uplift and global climate, proxy records of Asian paleoenvironments constrained by accurate age models are needed for the Paleogene period. Uplift of the Tibetan Plateau and the Himalayas since the onset of the Indo-Asia collision is held responsible for Asian aridification and monsoon intensification, but may also have gradually cooled global climate, leading to the 34 Ma Eocene-Oligocene transition, an abrupt cooling step associated with the onset of glaciation in Antarctica. New insight is provided by integrated chronostratigraphic and pollen analyses of an exceptional Paleogene record from playa lake deposits of the Northeastern Tibetan Plateau (Xining Basin) constituted of red bed / gypsum alternations. Aridification is indicated by the disappearance of gypsum deposits occurring precisely at the time of the Eocene-Oligocene transition (Dupont-Nivet et al., 2007, Nature vol. 445, p. 637-638). In addition, regional orographic uplift is indicated by the sudden appearance of representatives of the Pinaceae family - and in particular that of Picea (Dupont-Nivet et al., 2008, Geology, vol. 36, p. 987-990). Cyclostratigraphic analysis indicates that the conifer appearance coincides with a change in the dominant orbital cycle forcing the paleoenvironment (see Abels et al., this session). These results suggest that threshold conditions for the vegetation change were reached after the long-term combined effects of regional uplift and gradual global cooling. Regional uplift at least 4 m.y. before the Eocene-Oligocene transition is consistent with the idea that the associated increase in rock weathering and erosion contributed to the Eocene-Oligocene transition

  14. Before the freeze: otoliths from the Eocene of Seymour Island, Antarctica, reveal dominance of gadiform fishes (Teleostei)

    PubMed Central

    Schwarzhans, Werner; Mörs, Thomas; Engelbrecht, Andrea; Reguero, Marcelo; Kriwet, Jürgen

    2017-01-01

    The first record of fossil teleostean otoliths from Antarctica is reported. The fossils were obtained from late Early Eocene shell beds of the La Meseta Formation, Seymour Island that represent the last temperate marine climate phase in Antarctica prior to the onset of cooling and subsequent glaciation during the late Eocene. A total of 17 otolith-based teleost taxa are recognized, with 10 being identifiable to species level containing nine new species and one new genus: Argentina antarctica sp. nov., Diaphus? marambionis sp. nov., Macruronus eastmani sp. nov., Coelorinchus balushkini sp. nov., Coelorinchus nordenskjoeldi sp. nov., Palimphemus seymourensis sp. nov., Hoplobrotula? antipoda sp. nov., Notoberyx cionei gen. et sp. nov. and Cepola anderssoni sp. nov. Macruronus eastmani sp. nov. is also known from the late Eocene of Southern Australia, and Tripterophycis immutatus Schwarzhans, widespread in the southern oceans during the Eocene, has been recorded from New Zealand, southern Australia, and now Antarctica. The otolith assemblage shows a typical composition of temperate fishes dominated by gadiforms, very similar at genus and family levels to associations known from middle Eocene strata of New Zealand and the late Eocene of southern Australia, but also to the temperate Northern Hemisphere associations from the Paleocene of Denmark. The Seymour Island fauna bridges a gap in the record of global temperate marine teleost faunas during the early Eocene climate maximum. The dominant gadiforms are interpreted as the main temperate faunal component, as in the Paleocene of Denmark. Here they are represented by the families Moridae, Merlucciidae (Macruroninae), Macrouridae and Gadidae. Nowadays Gadidae are a chiefly Northern Hemisphere temperate family. Moridae, Macruroninae and Macrouridae live today on the lower shelf to deep-water or mesopelagically with Macruroninae being restricted to the Southern Ocean. The extant endemic Antarctic gadiform family

  15. Before the freeze: otoliths from the Eocene of Seymour Island, Antarctica, reveal dominance of gadiform fishes (Teleostei).

    PubMed

    Schwarzhans, Werner; Mörs, Thomas; Engelbrecht, Andrea; Reguero, Marcelo; Kriwet, Jürgen

    2017-01-01

    The first record of fossil teleostean otoliths from Antarctica is reported. The fossils were obtained from late Early Eocene shell beds of the La Meseta Formation, Seymour Island that represent the last temperate marine climate phase in Antarctica prior to the onset of cooling and subsequent glaciation during the late Eocene. A total of 17 otolith-based teleost taxa are recognized, with 10 being identifiable to species level containing nine new species and one new genus: Argentina antarctica sp. nov., Diaphus? marambionis sp. nov., Macruronus eastmani sp. nov., Coelorinchus balushkini sp. nov., Coelorinchus nordenskjoeldi sp. nov., Palimphemus seymourensis sp. nov., Hoplobrotula? antipoda sp. nov., Notoberyx cionei gen. et sp. nov. and Cepola anderssoni sp. nov. Macruronus eastmani sp. nov. is also known from the late Eocene of Southern Australia, and Tripterophycis immutatus Schwarzhans, widespread in the southern oceans during the Eocene, has been recorded from New Zealand, southern Australia, and now Antarctica. The otolith assemblage shows a typical composition of temperate fishes dominated by gadiforms, very similar at genus and family levels to associations known from middle Eocene strata of New Zealand and the late Eocene of southern Australia, but also to the temperate Northern Hemisphere associations from the Paleocene of Denmark. The Seymour Island fauna bridges a gap in the record of global temperate marine teleost faunas during the early Eocene climate maximum. The dominant gadiforms are interpreted as the main temperate faunal component, as in the Paleocene of Denmark. Here they are represented by the families Moridae, Merlucciidae (Macruroninae), Macrouridae and Gadidae. Nowadays Gadidae are a chiefly Northern Hemisphere temperate family. Moridae, Macruroninae and Macrouridae live today on the lower shelf to deep-water or mesopelagically with Macruroninae being restricted to the Southern Ocean. The extant endemic Antarctic gadiform family

  16. Logic circuit exhibits optimum performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Husson, C.

    1965-01-01

    Performance of circuits are compared to determine the optimum circuit configuration for implementation into microelectronic functions. Comparison is made in terms of power drain, propagation time, and component variations with temperature and load.

  17. Seawater calcium isotopic ratios across the Eocene-Oligocene Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffith, E. M.; Paytan, A.

    2009-12-01

    We reconstructed the evolution of the seawater calcium (Ca) isotopic ratio from marine (pelagic) barite and bulk calcium carbonate over the Eocene-Oligocene Transition (EOT), a period of extreme and rapid change in the global calcite compensation depth (CCD) (Lyle et al., 2008). The CCD is controlled by the balance between calcium carbonate deposition and dissolution in deep sea sediments. Large fluctuations in the CCD may cause changes in the concentration of dissolved Ca in seawater and its isotopic composition if accompanied by imbalances in marine Ca sources and sinks (De La Rocha and DePaolo, 2000). Our results show that the permanent deepening of the CCD during the EOT, which coincided with the major Cenozoic glaciation around 34 million years ago (Zachos et al., 2001), was not accompanied by a significant long-term change in the isotopic ratio of Ca in seawater or its sink (calcium carbonate). A simple isotopic mass balance model is constructed to compare predicted and observed isotopic fluctuations. References: Lyle, M. et al. Pacific Ocean and Cenozoic evolution of climate. Rev. Geophys. 46, 1-47 (2008). De La Rocha, C. L. & DePaolo, D. J. Isotopic evidence for variations in the marine calcium cycle over the Cenozoic. Science 289, 1176-1178 (2000). Zachos, J., Pagani, M., Sloan, L., Thomas, E. & Billups, K. Trends, rhythms, and aberrations in global climate 65 ma to present. Science 292, 686-693 (2001).

  18. Seawater calcium isotope ratios across the Eocene-Oligocene transition

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Griffith, E.M.; Paytan, A.; Eisenhauer, A.; Bullen, T.D.; Thomas, E.

    2011-01-01

    During the Eocene-Oligocene transition (EOT, ca. 34 Ma), Earth's climate cooled significantly from a greenhouse to an icehouse climate, while the calcite (CaCO3) compensation depth (CCD) in the Pacific Ocean increased rapidly. Fluctuations in the CCD could result from various processes that create an imbalance between calcium (Ca) sources to, and sinks from, the ocean (e.g., weathering and CaCO3 deposition), with different effects on the isotopic composition of dissolved Ca in the oceans due to differences in the Ca isotopic composition of various inputs and outputs. We used Ca isotope ratios (??44/40Ca) of coeval pelagic marine barite and bulk carbonate to evaluate changes in the marine Ca cycle across the EOT. We show that the permanent deepening of the CCD was not accompanied by a pronounced change in seawater ??44/40Ca, whereas time intervals in the Neogene with smaller carbonate depositional changes are characterized by seawater ??44/40Ca shifts. This suggests that the response of seawater ??44/40Ca to changes in weathering fluxes and to imbalances in the oceanic alkalinity budget depends on the chemical composition of seawater. A minor and transient fluctuation in the Ca isotope ratio of bulk carbonate may reflect a change in isotopic fractionation associated with CaCO3 precipitation from seawater due to a combination of factors, including changes in temperature and/or in the assemblages of calcifying organisms. ?? 2011 Geological Society of America.

  19. ''Optimum productivity'': a geneticist's view

    SciTech Connect

    Libby, W.J.

    1980-01-01

    Both ''optimum'' and ''productivity'' are explored in a social context with a long time dimension. Renewability, flexibility, and diversity are important concepts in long-term planning to achieve optimum productivity. Various possible genetic contributions, including complementary clones, quantitative genetic engineering, resistant trees and plantations, elimination of inbreeding, single-gene genetic engineering, and agri-forestry, are suggested for long-term sustained or increased productivity.

  20. Radiative forcing and feedback by forests in warm climates - a sensitivity study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Port, Ulrike; Claussen, Martin; Brovkin, Victor

    2016-07-01

    We evaluate the radiative forcing of forests and the feedbacks triggered by forests in a warm, basically ice-free climate and in a cool climate with permanent high-latitude ice cover using the Max Planck Institute for Meteorology Earth System Model. As a paradigm for a warm climate, we choose the early Eocene, some 54 to 52 million years ago, and for the cool climate, the pre-industrial climate, respectively. To isolate first-order effects, we compare idealised simulations in which all continents are covered either by dense forests or by deserts with either bright or dark soil. In comparison with desert continents covered by bright soil, forested continents warm the planet for the early Eocene climate and for pre-industrial conditions. The warming can be attributed to different feedback processes, though. The lapse-rate and water-vapour feedback is stronger for the early Eocene climate than for the pre-industrial climate, but strong and negative cloud-related feedbacks nearly outweigh the positive lapse-rate and water-vapour feedback for the early Eocene climate. Subsequently, global mean warming by forests is weaker for the early Eocene climate than for pre-industrial conditions. Sea-ice related feedbacks are weak for the almost ice-free climate of the early Eocene, thereby leading to a weaker high-latitude warming by forests than for pre-industrial conditions. When the land is covered with dark soils, and hence, albedo differences between forests and soil are small, forests cool the early Eocene climate more than the pre-industrial climate because the lapse-rate and water-vapour feedbacks are stronger for the early Eocene climate. Cloud-related feedbacks are equally strong in both climates. We conclude that radiative forcing by forests varies little with the climate state, while most subsequent feedbacks depend on the climate state.

  1. Major perturbations in the global carbon cycle and photosymbiont-bearing planktic foraminifera during the early Eocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luciani, Valeria; Dickens, Gerald R.; Backman, Jan; Fornaciari, Eliana; Giusberti, Luca; Agnini, Claudia; D'Onofrio, Roberta

    2016-04-01

    A marked switch in the abundance of the planktic foraminiferal genera Morozovella and Acarinina occurred at low-latitude sites near the start of the Early Eocene Climatic Optimum (EECO), a multi-million-year interval when Earth surface temperatures reached their Cenozoic maximum. Stable carbon and oxygen isotope data of bulk sediment are presented from across the EECO at two locations: Possagno in northeast Italy and Deep Sea Drilling Project (DSDP) Site 577 in the northwest Pacific. Relative abundances of planktic foraminifera are presented from these two locations, as well as from Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Site 1051 in the northwest Atlantic. All three sections have good stratigraphic markers, and the δ13C records at each section can be correlated amongst each other and to δ13C records at other locations across the globe. These records show that a series of negative carbon isotope excursions (CIEs) occurred before, during and across the EECO, which is defined here as the interval between the J event and the base of Discoaster sublodoensis. Significant though ephemeral modifications in planktic foraminiferal assemblages coincide with some of the short-term CIEs, which were marked by increases in the relative abundance of Acarinina, similar to what happened across established hyperthermal events in Tethyan settings prior to the EECO. Most crucially, a temporal link exists between the onset of the EECO, carbon cycle changes during this time and the decline in Morozovella. Possible causes are manifold and may include temperature effects on photosymbiont-bearing planktic foraminifera and changes in ocean chemistry.

  2. Astronomically paced middle Eocene deepwater circulation in the western North Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vahlenkamp, Maximilian; Niezgodzki, Igor; De Vleeschouwer, David; Bickert, Torsten; Harper, Dustin; Lohmann, Gerrit; Pälike, Heiko; Zachos, James C.

    2017-04-01

    The role of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) as a key player for abrupt climatic changes (e.g. Heinrich Stadials) during the Pleistocene is relatively well constrained. However, the timing of the onset of a „modern" North Atlantic Deepwater (NADW) formation are still debated: Recent estimates range from the middle Miocene to the Early Eocene [Davies et al., 2001, Stoker et al., 2005, Hohbein et al., 2012] and are mainly based on the seismic interpretation contourite drifts. Another understudied aspect of the AMOC is its behavior during climatic variations on orbital time scales and under different climatic boundary conditions (icehouse vs hothouse). IODP Expedition 342 drilled carbonate-rich sequences from sediment drifts offshore Newfoundland that cover the middle Eocene with high sedimentation rates ( 3 cm/ kyr). We present a 2 Myr long stable carbon and oxygen isotope record of benthic foraminifera nuttalides truempyi spanning magnetochron C20r in unprecedented resolution (< 2 kyr/sample), sufficient to resolve dominant Milankovic frequencies. Data from Site U1410 (3400m water depth) indicate an active overturning in the North Atlantic during the middle Eocene, sensitively responding to variations in Earth's axial tilt (obliquity). Experiments in a GCM (ECHAM5 - MPIOM, OASIS 3 coupled) indicate that temperatures in the Norwegian and Labrador Sea could have allowed for sea ice during winter in a minimal obliquity setting (22.1°), whereas temperatures are too high to allow sea ice formation under maximum obliquity (24.5°) winter conditions depending on Eocene boundary conditions (atmospheric CO2 concentration). We hypothesize that the combined effect of low temperatures in the sinking areas, an increased latitudinal SST gradient seasonal, and the potential formation of sea ice during obliquity minima results in an initial shallow NADW formation during the middle Eocene. This hypothesis is in accordance with the astronomical imprint

  3. Atmospheric and oceanic impacts of Antarctic glaciation across the Eocene-Oligocene transition.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, A T; Farnsworth, A; Lunt, D J; Lear, C H; Markwick, P J

    2015-11-13

    The glaciation of Antarctica at the Eocene-Oligocene transition (approx. 34 million years ago) was a major shift in the Earth's climate system, but the mechanisms that caused the glaciation, and its effects, remain highly debated. A number of recent studies have used coupled atmosphere-ocean climate models to assess the climatic effects of Antarctic glacial inception, with often contrasting results. Here, using the HadCM3L model, we show that the global atmosphere and ocean response to growth of the Antarctic ice sheet is sensitive to subtle variations in palaeogeography, using two reconstructions representing Eocene and Oligocene geological stages. The earlier stage (Eocene; Priabonian), which has a relatively constricted Tasman Seaway, shows a major increase in sea surface temperature over the Pacific sector of the Southern Ocean in response to the ice sheet. This response does not occur for the later stage (Oligocene; Rupelian), which has a more open Tasman Seaway. This difference in temperature response is attributed to reorganization of ocean currents between the stages. Following ice sheet expansion in the earlier stage, the large Ross Sea gyre circulation decreases in size. Stronger zonal flow through the Tasman Seaway allows salinities to increase in the Ross Sea, deep-water formation initiates and multiple feedbacks then occur amplifying the temperature response. This is potentially a model-dependent result, but it highlights the sensitive nature of model simulations to subtle variations in palaeogeography, and highlights the need for coupled ice sheet-climate simulations to properly represent and investigate feedback processes acting on these time scales.

  4. Late Eocene sea surface cooling of the western North Atlantic (ODP Site 647A)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sliwinska, Kasia K.; Coxall, Helen K.; Schouten, Stefan

    2016-04-01

    The initial shift out of the early Cenozoic greenhouse and into a glacial icehouse climate occurred during the middle to late Eocene and culminated in the abrupt growth of a continental-scale ice cap on Antarctica, during an episode known as the Oligocene Isotope Event 1 (Oi-1) ˜33.7 Ma. Documenting the patterns of global and regional cooling prior to Oi-1 is crucial for understanding the driving force and feedback behind the switch in climate mode. Well-dated high-resolution temperature records, however, remain sparse and the climatic response in some of the most climatically sensitive regions of the Earth, including the high latitude North Atlantic (NA), where today large amounts of ocean heat are exchanged, are poorly known. Here we present a sea surface palaeotemperature record from the late Eocene to the early Oligocene (32.5 Ma to 35 Ma) of ODP Hole 647A based on archaeal tetraether lipids (TEX86H). The site is located in the western North Atlantic (Southern Labrador Sea) and is the most northerly located (53° N) open ocean site with a complete Eocene-Oligocene sequence which yields both calcareous and organic microfossils suitable for detailed proxy reconstructions. Our record agrees with the magnitude of temperature decrease (˜3 ° C sea surface cooling) recorded by alkenones and pollen data from the Greenland Sea, but our higher resolution study reveals that the high latitude NA cooling step occurred about 500 kyrs prior to the Oi-1 Antarctic glaciation, at around ˜34.4 Ma. This cooling can be explained by regional effects related to local NA tectonics including ocean gateways, known to have changed at the time, with potential to effect NA overturning circulation due to adjustments in the thermohaline density balance. Alternatively, the cooling itself may be due to changes in NA circulation, suggesting that global ocean circulation played a role in pre-conditioning the Earth for Antarctic glaciation.

  5. Prolonged high relief in the northern Cordilleran orogenic front during middle and late Eocene extension based on stable isotope paleoaltimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Majie; Constenius, Kurt N.; Dettman, David L.

    2017-01-01

    The paleoelevation and size of the North America Cordilleran orogen during the late Cretaceous-Paleogene contractional and subsequent extensional tectonics remain enigmatic. We present new estimates of paleorelief of the northern Cordilleran orogenic front during the middle and late Eocene using oxygen isotope compositions of unaltered molluscan fossils and paleosol carbonates in the Kishenehn basin. Bounded by several mountains ranges to the east, the Kishenehn basin was a half graben developed during middle Eocene to early Miocene collapse of the Cordilleran orogen. These mollusk taxa include three sympatric groups with affinities to wet tropical, semi-arid subtropical, and temperate environments. Our reconstructed surface water δ18O values vary between -19.8‰ and -6.3‰ (VSMOW) during the middle and late Eocene. The large differences in paleoenvironments and surface water δ18O values suggest that the catchment of the Kishenehn basin was at variable elevation. The estimated paleorelief between the basin and the surrounding mountains, based on both Rayleigh condensation model and predictions of Eocene precipitation isotope values using an isotope-enabled global climate model, is ∼4 km, and the basin floor was <1.5 km high. This high topography and high relief paleogeography suggest that the Cordilleran orogenic front reached an elevation of at least 4 km, and the crust thickness may have reached more than 55 km before Eocene gravitational collapse. We attribute the maintenance of high Eocene topography to the combination of an inherited thick crust, thermal uplift caused by mantle upwelling, and isostatic uplift caused by removing lower lithosphere or oceanic slab.

  6. Flat meridional temperature gradient in the early Eocene in the subsurface rather than surface ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Sze Ling; Laepple, Thomas

    2016-08-01

    The early Eocene (49-55 million years ago) is a time interval characterized by elevated surface temperatures and atmospheric CO2 (refs ,), and a flatter-than-present latitudinal surface temperature gradient. The multi-proxy-derived flat temperature gradient has been a challenge to reproduce in model simulations, especially the subtropical warmth at the high-latitude surface oceans, inferred from the archaeal lipid-based palaeothermometry, . Here we revisit the interpretation by analysing a global collection of multi-proxy temperature estimates from sediment cores spanning millennia to millions of years. Comparing the variability between proxy types, we demonstrate that the present interpretation overestimates the magnitude of past climate changes on all timescales. We attribute this to an inappropriate calibration, which reflects subsurface ocean but is calibrated to the sea surface, where the latitudinal temperature gradient is steeper. Recalibrating the proxy to the temperatures of subsurface ocean, where the signal is probably formed, yields colder -temperatures and latitudinal gradient consistent with standard climate model simulations of the Eocene climate, invalidating the apparent, extremely warm polar sea surface temperatures. We conclude that there is a need to reinterpret -inferred marine temperature records in the literature, especially for reconstructions of past warm climates that rely heavily on this proxy as reflecting subsurface ocean.

  7. Eocene Topography of the Northern Sierra Nevada: Direct Paleoelevation Evidence from Hydrogen Isotopes in Kaolinite of Paleostream Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulch, A.; Graham, S. A.; Chamberlain, C. P.

    2005-12-01

    The links and feedbacks among topography, tectonics, and climate remain a poorly understood yet important problem in Earth Sciences. Large mountains and high-elevation plateaux exert a strong control on global climate and it is, therefore, critical to understand their topographic history. Despite its importance to global climate change relatively little is known of the Cenozoic topographic development of the western North America. For example, there is considerable debate as to when the Sierra Nevada developed as a mountain range, with one view that the bulk of elevation gain took place in the last 3-5 Ma and the other that it already existed as a major topographic feature throughout much of the Cenozoic. To address this debate we examined the hydrogen isotope composition of kaolinite from weathered Eocene fluvial sediments. These sediments, well known because of past gold mining, occur within Eocene river channels cut into the western flank of the northern Sierra Nevada and are found from paleo-sea level upstream into the modern range. Our results show that the deltaD of kaolinite along paleoslopes decreases systematically by up to 25 per mil within different paleodrainage systems from a high of -80 per mil in sediments deposited at the current base of the Sierra to -106 per mil about 60 km eastward on the flank of the Sierra Nevada. The observed isotopic difference between downstream and upstream samples suggests that the highest altitude samples, collected at ca. 1600 m current elevation, were deposited at Eocene elevations of 1100 m to 1300 m. Thus, Eocene topographic gradients may have been lower than todays, but still reflect mountainous topography, consistent with pebble- to cobble-sized clasts that dominate the Eocene fluvial deposits. Viewed in context of other isotopic and geomorphic studies, we therefore suggest that mountainous topography characterized the Eocene northern Sierra Nevada whose western flank was occupied by high discharge river systems

  8. Early evidence of xeromorphy in angiosperms: stomatal encryption in a new eocene species of Banksia (Proteaceae) from Western Australia.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, Raymond J; McLoughlin, Stephen; Hill, Robert S; McNamara, Kenneth J; Jordan, Gregory John

    2014-09-01

    • Globally, the origins of xeromorphic traits in modern angiosperm lineages are obscure but are thought to be linked to the early Neogene onset of seasonally arid climates. Stomatal encryption is a xeromorphic trait that is prominent in Banksia, an archetypal genus centered in one of the world's most diverse ecosystems, the ancient infertile landscape of Mediterranean-climate southwestern Australia.• We describe Banksia paleocrypta, a sclerophyllous species with encrypted stomata from silcretes of the Walebing and Kojonup regions of southwestern Australia dated as Late Eocene.• Banksia paleocrypta shows evidence of foliar xeromorphy ∼20 Ma before the widely accepted timing for the onset of aridity in Australia. Species of Banksia subgenus Banksia with very similar leaves are extant in southwestern Australia. The conditions required for silcrete formation infer fluctuating water tables and climatic seasonality in southwestern Australia in the Eocene, and seasonality is supported by the paucity of angiosperm closed-forest elements among the fossil taxa preserved with B. paleocrypta. However, climates in the region during the Eocene are unlikely to have experienced seasons as hot and dry as present-day summers.• The presence of B. paleocrypta within the center of diversity of subgenus Banksia in edaphically ancient southwestern Australia is consistent with the continuous presence of this lineage in the region for ≥40 Ma, a testament to the success of increasingly xeromorphic traits in Banksia over an interval in which numerous other lineages became extinct. © 2014 Botanical Society of America, Inc.

  9. A "tropical" Early Eocene marine environment on the Antarctic margin: TEX86 results from IODP expedition 318

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bendle, J. A.; Bijl, P.; Toney, J. L.; Pross, J.; Contreras, L.; Schouten, S.; Roehl, U.; Tauxe, L.; Huber, M.; Brinkhuis, H.; Scientific Team of IODP Drilling Leg 318

    2011-12-01

    The early Eocene was characterised by high pCO2 (ca.1,000 to more than 2,000ppm) and mean global temperatures that reached a long-term maximum. Relative to the present day, meridional temperature gradients were unusually low, with warmer equatorial regions and much warmer subtropical Arctic and mid-latitude climates. Yet global climatic conditions during this pre-glacial interval have remained poorly constrained, as only a few temperature records are available portraying the Cenozoic climatic evolution of the high southern latitudes. Here we present dinoflagellate cyst assemblages and organic geochemical tetraether based sea-surface temperature estimates from IODP expedition 318, extracted from bio- and magnetostratigraphically dated, late early to early middle Eocene sediments recovered at Site U1356. For the first time, we reconstruct marine temperatures and ecological conditions from the Eocene Greenhouse world in direct proximity to the Antarctic continent. Early Eocene dinocyst assemblages are dominated by tropical dinocyst genus Apectodinium, whilst TEX86 results indicate persistent and remarkable warmth, with the magnitude of the reconstructed SSTs dependent on the applied calibration: TEX86-L = 20 - 26°C (Av. 23°C); TEX86-H = 27 - 33°C (Av. 32°C). Our marine based proxies are just several strands from multiple independent lines of evidence emerging from the Early Eocene of the Wilkes Land Antarctic margin, including: pollen, terrestrial biomarkers (e.g. MBT/CBT-MAT estimates of 22 - 27°C , Av. 26°C), compound specific plant wax D/H measurements and clay minerals. Taken together, this evidence of very high temperatures, thermophilic fauna, an invigorated hydrological cycle, chemically weathered soils and well developed wetlands gives a very compelling picture of environmental conditions comparable to the modern tropics. These results confirm that exceptionally warm polar-regions are a feature common to reconstructed Greenhouse periods. Such

  10. Palaeoclimate reconstruction within the upper Eocene in central Germany using fossil plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moraweck, Karolin; Kunzmann, Lutz; Uhl, Dieter; Kleber, Arno

    2013-04-01

    The Eocene has been commonly called "The world`s last greenhouse period" covering the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM) as well as the Eocene-Oligocene turnover. In the mid-latitudes of Europe this turnover was characterized by pronounced climatic changes from subtropical towards temperate conditions that were accompanied by significant vegetational changes on land. Fossil plants are regarded as excellent palaeoenvironmental proxies, because leaf physiognomy often reflects climate conditions. The study site, the Paleogene Weißelster basin in central Germany, including fluvial, estuarine and lacustrine deposits, provides several excellently preserved megafloras for reconstructions of terrestrial palaeoclimate. For our case study we used material from different stratigraphic horizons within the late Eocene Zeitz megafloral assemblage recovered from the open-cast mines of Profen and Schleenhain. These horizons cover a time interval of ca. 3 Ma. The Zeitz megafloral assemblage ("Florenkomplex") was characterized by mainly evergreen, notophyllous vegetation, consisting of warm-temperate to subtropical elements. Tropical species are present but very rare. To infer the regional climatic conditions and putative climate changes from these fossil plants we compare proxy data obtained by the application of standard methods for quantitative reconstruction of palaeoclimate data: the coexistence approach (CA), leaf margin analysis (LMA) and Climate Leaf Analysis Multivariate Program (CLAMP).Before the CA was applied to the material the list of putative nearest living relative species (NLR) was carefully revisited and partly revised. In case of the LMA approach information of so-called "silent taxa" (fossil species preserved by diaspores, leaf margin state is inferred from NLR data) were partly included in the data set. The four floras from the Zeitz megafloral assemblage show slightly different floral compositions caused by various taphonomic processes. An aim of the

  11. Studies in neotropical paleobotany. XIV. A palynoflora from the middle Eocene Saramaguacan formation of Cuba

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Graham, A.; Cozadd, D.; Areces-Mallea, A.; Frederiksen, N.O.

    2000-01-01

    An assemblage of 46 fossil pollen and spore types is described from a core drilled through the middle Eocene Saramaguacan Formation, Camaguey Province, eastern Cuba. Many of the specimens represent unidentified or extinct taxa but several can be identified to family (Palmae, Bombacaceae, Gramineae, Moraceae, Myrtaceae) and some to genus (Pteris, Crudia, Lymingtonia?). The paleo-climate was warm-temperate to subtropical which is consistent with other floras in the region of comparable age and with the global paleotemperature curve. Older plate tectonic models show a variety of locations for proto-Cuba during Late Cretaceous and later times, including along the norther coast of South America. More recent models depict western and central Cuba as two separate parts until the Eocene, and eastern Cuba (joined to northern Hispaniola) docking to central Cuba also in the Eocene. All fragments are part of the North American Plate and none were directly connected with northern South America in late Mesozoic or Cenozoic time. The Saramaguacan flora supports this model because the assemblage is distinctly North American in affinities, with only one type (Retimonocolpites type 1) found elsewhere only in South America.

  12. Intercontinental dispersal of giant thermophilic ants across the Arctic during early Eocene hyperthermals

    PubMed Central

    Archibald, S. Bruce; Johnson, Kirk R.; Mathewes, Rolf W.; Greenwood, David R.

    2011-01-01

    Early Eocene land bridges allowed numerous plant and animal species to cross between Europe and North America via the Arctic. While many species suited to prevailing cool Arctic climates would have been able to cross throughout much of this period, others would have found dispersal opportunities only during limited intervals when their requirements for higher temperatures were met. Here, we present Titanomyrma lubei gen. et sp. nov. from Wyoming, USA, a new giant (greater than 5 cm long) formiciine ant from the early Eocene (approx. 49.5 Ma) Green River Formation. We show that the extinct ant subfamily Formiciinae is only known from localities with an estimated mean annual temperature of about 20°C or greater, consistent with the tropical ranges of almost all of the largest living ant species. This is, to our knowledge, the first known formiciine of gigantic size in the Western Hemisphere and the first reported cross-Arctic dispersal by a thermophilic insect group. This implies intercontinental migration during one or more brief high-temperature episodes (hyperthermals) sometime between the latest Palaeocene establishment of intercontinental land connections and the presence of giant formiciines in Europe and North America by the early middle Eocene. PMID:21543354

  13. Erosion and reworking of Pacific sediments near the Eocene-Oligocene boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Ted C.

    2013-06-01

    The Eocene-Oligocene (E/O) boundary interval marks one of the largest and most rapid changes in climate during the last 50 Myr. Because of a very shallow calcium carbonate compensation depth in the Eocene, as well as the reworking of sediments and hiatuses in the boundary zone, it has also been one of the most difficult stratigraphic boundaries to study in deep water marine sections, especially in the Pacific Ocean. Recently, three drill sites have recovered complete sections of the E/O boundary interval in the tropical Pacific. A detailed study of these sections shows a series of pulses of reworked older radiolarians in the upper Eocene and lowermost Oligocene. The two largest pulses are coincident with the two sharp steps in carbon and oxygen isotope values that bracket the E/O boundary. Several smaller peaks in reworked material precede these two maxima. It is proposed that immixing of the older radiolarian species results from erosion and redeposition, possibly linked to pulses of new bottom water formation and the formation of a deep pycnocline.

  14. Crown Group Lejeuneaceae and Pleurocarpous Mosses in Early Eocene (Ypresian) Indian Amber.

    PubMed

    Heinrichs, Jochen; Scheben, Armin; Bechteler, Julia; Lee, Gaik Ee; Schäfer-Verwimp, Alfons; Hedenäs, Lars; Singh, Hukam; Pócs, Tamás; Nascimbene, Paul C; Peralta, Denilson F; Renner, Matt; Schmidt, Alexander R

    2016-01-01

    Cambay amber originates from the warmest period of the Eocene, which is also well known for the appearance of early angiosperm-dominated megathermal forests. The humid climate of these forests may have triggered the evolution of epiphytic lineages of bryophytes; however, early Eocene fossils of bryophytes are rare. Here, we present evidence for lejeuneoid liverworts and pleurocarpous mosses in Cambay amber. The preserved morphology of the moss fossil is inconclusive for a detailed taxonomic treatment. The liverwort fossil is, however, distinctive; its zig-zagged stems, suberect complicate-bilobed leaves, large leaf lobules, and small, deeply bifid underleaves suggest a member of Lejeuneaceae subtribe Lejeuneinae (Harpalejeunea, Lejeunea, Microlejeunea). We tested alternative classification possibilities by conducting divergence time estimates based on DNA sequence variation of Lejeuneinae using the age of the fossil for corresponding age constraints. Consideration of the fossil as a stem group member of Microlejeunea or Lejeunea resulted in an Eocene to Late Cretaceous age of the Lejeuneinae crown group. This reconstruction is in good accordance with published divergence time estimates generated without the newly presented fossil evidence. Balancing available evidence, we describe the liverwort fossil as the extinct species Microlejeunea nyiahae, representing the oldest crown group fossil of Lejeuneaceae.

  15. Crown Group Lejeuneaceae and Pleurocarpous Mosses in Early Eocene (Ypresian) Indian Amber

    PubMed Central

    Heinrichs, Jochen; Scheben, Armin; Bechteler, Julia; Lee, Gaik Ee; Schäfer-Verwimp, Alfons; Hedenäs, Lars; Singh, Hukam; Pócs, Tamás; Nascimbene, Paul C.; Peralta, Denilson F.; Renner, Matt; Schmidt, Alexander R.

    2016-01-01

    Cambay amber originates from the warmest period of the Eocene, which is also well known for the appearance of early angiosperm-dominated megathermal forests. The humid climate of these forests may have triggered the evolution of epiphytic lineages of bryophytes; however, early Eocene fossils of bryophytes are rare. Here, we present evidence for lejeuneoid liverworts and pleurocarpous mosses in Cambay amber. The preserved morphology of the moss fossil is inconclusive for a detailed taxonomic treatment. The liverwort fossil is, however, distinctive; its zig-zagged stems, suberect complicate-bilobed leaves, large leaf lobules, and small, deeply bifid underleaves suggest a member of Lejeuneaceae subtribe Lejeuneinae (Harpalejeunea, Lejeunea, Microlejeunea). We tested alternative classification possibilities by conducting divergence time estimates based on DNA sequence variation of Lejeuneinae using the age of the fossil for corresponding age constraints. Consideration of the fossil as a stem group member of Microlejeunea or Lejeunea resulted in an Eocene to Late Cretaceous age of the Lejeuneinae crown group. This reconstruction is in good accordance with published divergence time estimates generated without the newly presented fossil evidence. Balancing available evidence, we describe the liverwort fossil as the extinct species Microlejeunea nyiahae, representing the oldest crown group fossil of Lejeuneaceae. PMID:27244582

  16. Palaeocene-Eocene evolution of a specific group of extinct deep-sea benthic foraminifera.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Kerckhoven, L.; Hayward, B. W.

    2009-04-01

    To increase the understanding of global evolution and extinction drivers in the deep sea, we study the enigmatic extinction of a distinctive group of cosmopolitan deep-sea benthic foraminifera during the late Pliocene-Middle Pleistocene "Last Global Extinction" (LGE) (3 - 0.12 Ma). The LGE was coeval with the pulsed expansion of the northern hemisphere ice cap, rendering deep-sea conditions colder and more oxygenated during increasingly severe glacials. The so-called "Extinction Group", comprising nearly 100 species (c. 25% of deep-sea foraminiferal diversity at that time), all shared a similar morphology of elongate, cylindrical and uniserial tests with small, specialised apertures. To elucidate the factors driving their evolution and ultimate extinction, we extend the studies back in time. During the Cenozoic, the deep-sea benthic foraminiferal community was stirred up by three more intervals of increased turnover (late Palaeocene-early Eocene, Late Eocene-earliest Oligocene and middle Miocene) all of which seem to have coincided with intervals of major climatic change. In a first stage of the research, we performed a low-resolution study of ODP Sites 689 and 1211 to obtain a record of the occurrence and abundance of the "Extinction Group" species throughout the Cenozoic. In a second phase, here presented, the research focuses on a high-resolution study of the "Extinction Group" species in ODP Sites 689 and 690 (Southern Ocean) through the Palaeocene-Eocene warm event, during which 30 to 50 % of benthic foraminiferal species went extinct. Focus on the Palaeocene-Eocene warm period, and investigation of whether this warm event had any impact on the "Extinction Group" species, indicates whether only the cold related events caused the loss of "Extinction Group" taxa and helps us to understand the extent to which the LGE was stress-related or temperature-related.

  17. Eocene global warming events driven by ventilation of oceanic dissolved organic carbon.

    PubMed

    Sexton, Philip F; Norris, Richard D; Wilson, Paul A; Pälike, Heiko; Westerhold, Thomas; Röhl, Ursula; Bolton, Clara T; Gibbs, Samantha

    2011-03-17

    'Hyperthermals' are intervals of rapid, pronounced global warming known from six episodes within the Palaeocene and Eocene epochs (∼65-34 million years (Myr) ago). The most extreme hyperthermal was the ∼170 thousand year (kyr) interval of 5-7 °C global warming during the Palaeocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM, 56 Myr ago). The PETM is widely attributed to massive release of greenhouse gases from buried sedimentary carbon reservoirs, and other, comparatively modest, hyperthermals have also been linked to the release of sedimentary carbon. Here we show, using new 2.4-Myr-long Eocene deep ocean records, that the comparatively modest hyperthermals are much more numerous than previously documented, paced by the eccentricity of Earth's orbit and have shorter durations (∼40 kyr) and more rapid recovery phases than the PETM. These findings point to the operation of fundamentally different forcing and feedback mechanisms than for the PETM, involving redistribution of carbon among Earth's readily exchangeable surface reservoirs rather than carbon exhumation from, and subsequent burial back into, the sedimentary reservoir. Specifically, we interpret our records to indicate repeated, large-scale releases of dissolved organic carbon (at least 1,600 gigatonnes) from the ocean by ventilation (strengthened oxidation) of the ocean interior. The rapid recovery of the carbon cycle following each Eocene hyperthermal strongly suggests that carbon was re-sequestered by the ocean, rather than the much slower process of silicate rock weathering proposed for the PETM. Our findings suggest that these pronounced climate warming events were driven not by repeated releases of carbon from buried sedimentary sources, but, rather, by patterns of surficial carbon redistribution familiar from younger intervals of Earth history.

  18. Declining moisture availability in late Eocene Antarctica as deduced from Nothofagus sporopollenin δ13C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griener, K. W.; Nelson, D. M.; Warny, S.

    2012-12-01

    Palynological data demonstrate that significant changes in vegetation and climate occurred at the Eocene-Oligocene (E-O) Boundary on the Antarctic Peninsula. These changes include decreases in terrestrial palynomorph abundance and diversity as well as dinoflagellate assemblages that reflect colder sea surface temperatures and increased glaciation (Warny and Askin, 2011). Understanding the factors controlling these changes in climate and vegetation is a topic of great interest. One area of remaining uncertainty is how the hydrologic regime varied during Antarctica's shift from greenhouse to icehouse conditions. For example, estimates of Antarctic precipitation from around the E-O boundary based on plant leaf margins (e.g. Francis et al., 2008), clay mineralogy (e.g. Christian and Kennett, 1997), and models (Thorn and DeConto 2006) are vastly different. We used a moving-wire device interfaced with an isotope-ratio mass spectrometer (Sessions et al., 2005; Nelson et al., 2008) to analyze δ13C of small quantities of Nothofagus sporopollenin extracted from Antarctic Eocene SHALDRIL cores from ~35.9 Mya, just prior to the E-O Boundary (Bohaty et al., 2011). We also analyzed δ13C of modern Nothofagus sporopollenin from herbaria specimens and related these results to historical climate data. Our modern data show that carbon isotope discrimination (Δ) of Nothofagus sporopollenin is positively correlated with mean annual and growing-season precipitation, consistent with prior studies that demonstrate a strong relationship between Δ and water availability in C3 plants. Eocene Nothofagus Δ values progressively decreased through time, implying a decline in moisture availability. There is a close correlation between Nothofagus palynomorph abundance (Warny and Askin, 2011) and Δ, indicating that Nothofagus abundance declined in response to decreasing moisture availability. We consider changes in sea surface temperatures as well as increased glaciation as possible causes

  19. Atmospheric circulation and hydroclimate impacts of alternative warming scenarios for the Eocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlson, Henrik; Caballero, Rodrigo

    2017-08-01

    Recent work in modelling the warm climates of the early Eocene shows that it is possible to obtain a reasonable global match between model surface temperature and proxy reconstructions, but only by using extremely high atmospheric CO2 concentrations or more modest CO2 levels complemented by a reduction in global cloud albedo. Understanding the mix of radiative forcing that gave rise to Eocene warmth has important implications for constraining Earth's climate sensitivity, but progress in this direction is hampered by the lack of direct proxy constraints on cloud properties. Here, we explore the potential for distinguishing among different radiative forcing scenarios via their impact on regional climate changes. We do this by comparing climate model simulations of two end-member scenarios: one in which the climate is warmed entirely by CO2 (which we refer to as the greenhouse gas (GHG) scenario) and another in which it is warmed entirely by reduced cloud albedo (which we refer to as the low CO2-thin clouds or LCTC scenario) . The two simulations have an almost identical global-mean surface temperature and equator-to-pole temperature difference, but the LCTC scenario has ˜ 11 % greater global-mean precipitation than the GHG scenario. The LCTC scenario also has cooler midlatitude continents and warmer oceans than the GHG scenario and a tropical climate which is significantly more El Niño-like. Extremely high warm-season temperatures in the subtropics are mitigated in the LCTC scenario, while cool-season temperatures are lower at all latitudes. These changes appear large enough to motivate further, more detailed study using other climate models and a more realistic set of modelling assumptions.

  20. Cranial remains of an Eocene tarsier

    PubMed Central

    Rossie, James B.; Ni, Xijun; Beard, K. Christopher

    2006-01-01

    The phylogenetic position of tarsiers relative to anthropoids and Paleogene omomyids remains a subject of lively debate that lies at the center of research into anthropoid origins. Omomyids have long been regarded as the nearest relatives of tarsiers, but a sister group relationship between anthropoids and tarsiers has also been proposed. These conflicting phylogenetic reconstructions rely heavily on comparisons of cranial anatomy, but until now, the fossil record of tarsiers has been limited to a single jaw and several isolated teeth. In this article, we describe cranial material of a fossil tarsiid from the middle-Eocene Shanghuang fissure-fillings in southern Jiangsu Province, China. This facial fragment, which is allocated to Tarsius eocaenus, is virtually identical to the corresponding anatomy in living tarsiers and differs substantially from that of early anthropoids such as Bahinia, Phenacopithecus, and Parapithecus. This new specimen indicates that tarsiers already possessed greatly enlarged orbits and a haplorhine oronasal configuration by the time they are first documented in the fossil record during the middle Eocene. PMID:16537385

  1. Climatic influences on the Paleogene evolution of alkenones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brassell, Simon C.

    2014-03-01

    Application of the alkenone paleotemperature proxy (UK'37) for marine sediments is typically constrained by three factors: (i) an absence of alkatrienones in sediments deposited where ocean temperatures exceed 28°C, (ii) loss of alkenones in thermally altered sediments, and (iii) poor preservation of alkenone signals due to oxidative degradation. In addition, there appears to be a temporal limit on the occurrence of alkatrienones, which are conspicuously absent in all alkenone-containing sediments from the early Aptian to the immediate aftermath of the Early Eocene Climatic Optimum (EECO) when they first appeared in Arctic Ocean sediments. Compilation of reported and previously unpublished alkenone distributions for the Paleogene coupled with assessment of co-occurring calcareous nannoplankton genera within the Noelaerhabdaceae provide evidence that evolutionary developments in alkenone occurrences include biosynthetic responses likely triggered by climate change. The timing of emergence of alkatrienones post-EECO and their subsequent appearance at all latitudes during the middle Eocene accompanies expansion of the calcareous nannoplankton genus Reticulofenestra coincident with significant climate-driven changes in oceanic conditions, including (i) modification of trophic structure associated with weakened thermal stratification, (ii) higher productivity facilitated by enhanced nutrient influx, and (iii) changes in seasonality, initially at high latitudes, related to greater latitudinal temperature gradients. Collectively, these changes would serve to favor eurythermal/eurytrophic algae, like Reticulofenestra, with a biomechanism to store energy through production of lipid bodies rich in alkenones during episodes of higher nutrient availability. This ability likely enhanced the viability of this marine haptophyte when nutrients were limiting, ultimately ensuring its evolutionary success.

  2. Stable isotope paleoclimatology of the earliest Eocene using kimberlite-hosted mummified wood from the Canadian Subarctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hook, B. A.; Halfar, J.; Gedalof, Z.; Bollmann, J.; Schulze, D.

    2014-11-01

    The recent discovery of well-preserved mummified wood buried within a subarctic kimberlite diamond mine prompted a paleoclimatic study of the early Eocene "hothouse" (ca. 53.3 Ma). At the time of kimberlite eruption, the Subarctic and Artic were warm and humid producing a temperate rainforest biome well north of the Arctic Circle. Previous studies have estimated mean annual temperatures in this region were 4-20 °C in the early Eocene, using a variety of proxies including leaf margin analysis, and stable isotopes (δ18O) of fossil cellulose. Here, we examine stable isotopes of tree-ring cellulose at subannual to annual scale resolution, using the oldest viable cellulose found to date. We use mechanistic models and transfer functions to estimate earliest Eocene temperatures using mummified cellulose, which was well preserved in the kimberlite. Multiple samples of Piceoxylon wood within the kimberlite were crossdated by tree-ring width. Multiple proxies are used in combination to tease apart likely environmental factors influencing the tree physiology and growth in the unique extinct ecosystem of the Polar rainforest. Calculations of interannual variation in temperature over a multidecadal time-slice in the early Eocene are presented, with a mean temperature estimate of 11.4 °C (1σ = 1.8 °C) based on δ18O. Dual-isotope spectral analysis suggests that multidecadal climate cycles similar to the modern Pacific Decadal Oscillation likely drove temperature and cloudiness trends on 20-30 year timescales.

  3. Ecological Turnover of Shallow Water Carbonate Producers Following the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, A.; Martindale, R. C.

    2015-12-01

    Modern coral reef ecosystems are under threat from global climate change (and associated, synergistic stresses) and local environmental degradation. Therefore, it is important for ecologists to understand how ecosystems adapt and recover from climate change. The fossil record provides excellent case studies of similar events, such as the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM). Although Paleocene and Eocene shallow water carbonates have not received the same degree of attention as the deep-water record, the PETM provides an opportunity to study the role of alternative stable states in maintaining the health and diversity of shallow water carbonate environments. It is generally accepted that during the PETM there is a transition from reef systems to foraminiferal shoals as the dominant shallow water carbonate producers. In fact, previous work has documented this interval as one of the major metazoan reef collapses of the Phanerozoic. This study fills an important gap in the shallow-water PETM record by quantitatively measuring the changes in carbonate production and ecology of 15 localities as they shift from coral reefs to foraminiferal shoal. The quantitative and semi-quantitative analysis is accomplished by using data from the PaleoReefs database and a simple carbonate production calculation to estimate the productivity of the shallow water system. Ecological data are gathered through a literature review of the localities. The results of this study will enable a better understanding of how modern reefs may react to global climate and environmental change.

  4. Continental warming preceding the Palaeocene-Eocene thermal maximum.

    PubMed

    Secord, Ross; Gingerich, Philip D; Lohmann, Kyger C; Macleod, Kenneth G

    2010-10-21

    Marine and continental records show an abrupt negative shift in carbon isotope values at ∼55.8 Myr ago. This carbon isotope excursion (CIE) is consistent with the release of a massive amount of isotopically light carbon into the atmosphere and was associated with a dramatic rise in global temperatures termed the Palaeocene-Eocene thermal maximum (PETM). Greenhouse gases released during the CIE, probably including methane, have often been considered the main cause of PETM warming. However, some evidence from the marine record suggests that warming directly preceded the CIE, raising the possibility that the CIE and PETM may have been linked to earlier warming with different origins. Yet pre-CIE warming is still uncertain. Disentangling the sequence of events before and during the CIE and PETM is important for understanding the causes of, and Earth system responses to, abrupt climate change. Here we show that continental warming of about 5 °C preceded the CIE in the Bighorn Basin, Wyoming. Our evidence, based on oxygen isotopes in mammal teeth (which reflect temperature-sensitive fractionation processes) and other proxies, reveals a marked temperature increase directly below the CIE, and again in the CIE. Pre-CIE warming is also supported by a negative amplification of δ(13)C values in soil carbonates below the CIE. Our results suggest that at least two sources of warming-the earlier of which is unlikely to have been methane-contributed to the PETM.

  5. Eocene hydromorphic paleosols: Significance for interpreting ancient floodplain processes

    SciTech Connect

    Kraus, M.J.; Aslan, A. )

    1993-05-01

    Pervasive mottling, iron-oxide nodules, and slickensides indicate that alluvial paleosols of the lower Eocene Willwood Formation in the Elk Creek area of the Bighorn Basin, Wyoming were hydromorphic. Two basic groups of hydromorphic paleosols are present: cumulative, which show evidence for concurrent deposition and pedogenesis, and simple (non-cumulative), which show evidence for a single episode of deposition and pedogenesis. Lithologic packages consisting of vertically stacked simple paleosols and crevasse-splay sandstones alternate with cumulative paleosols. The simple paleosols are weakly developed, indicating rapid deposition with relatively little time for pedogenesis. Cumulative paleosols show greater pedogenic development, indicating significantly longer periods of paleogenic modification and slower, more episodic sediment accumulation. Differences between the simple and cumulative paleosols reflect differences in the deposition of their parent materials. The packages of simple paleosols are similar to avulsion-belt deposits described from the Saskatchewan River, and suggest that avulsion was significant in floodplain construction. The upper parts of cumulative paleosols were formed on true overbank deposits, which accumulated gradually after avulsion and establishment of a new channel. The lower parts of many cumulative paleosols resulted from a prior episode of avulsion deposition and simple soil formation. Because hydromorphy is associated with texture, these different depositional processes influenced lateral variations in hydromorphy of the cumulative paleosols. Paleosols in the Elk Creek area provide a simple means of identifying avulsions. Sediment accumulation rates suggest that avulsions occurred with a regular period of about 20,000 years and may have been induced by climatic cycles.

  6. Paleoecology of Early eocene strata near Buffalo, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Durkin, T.V.; Rich, F.J.

    1986-08-01

    Palynological investigation has helped illustrate the paleoecology of a vertical section of strata from the Wasatch Formation between the Healy and Walters coal burns near Buffalo, Wyoming. Numerous silicified logs and stumps of cypress and sequoia have been preserved at the site and drew initial attention to it. Flood-basin deposits enclose the trees and include sandstones, siltstones, shale, and coal beds that accumulated as channel, levee, crevasse-splay, and swamp/marsh sediments. Detrital sediments were probably derived from the Bighorn Mountains and accumulated as they were carried into the Powder River basin fluvial system. One hundred five polynomorph taxa have been distinguished, as well as 10 types of fungal spores. Platycarya, Tilia, Sparganium, and Platanus pollen indicate an early Eocene age for the strata. Other pollen, as well as the genera of trees and megafossil remains from a clinker bed several miles from the study area, reinforce the interpretation of a warm-temperature or subtropical climate at the time of deposition. The megafossil assemblage includes pinnae of the aquatic fern Marsilea, never before described from the fossil record. Variations in the species composition of the polynomorph assemblages show that several plant communities existed in succession at the site. These varied from pond or marsh types to mature forests.

  7. Tectonic control of Eocene arkosic sediment deposition, Oregon and Washington

    SciTech Connect

    Armentrout, J.M.; Ulrich, A.R.

    1983-03-01

    Chronostratigraphic and geographic studies of Eocene arkosic sandstones suggest deposition during a volcanically quiet interval resulting from the westward jump of the Farallon-Kula plate subduction zone in Oregon and Washington. The Eocene arkosic sandstones were deposited as part of a broad fluvial plain-coastal plain-shelf margin basin complex extending throughout Oregon and Washington between uplands of Mesozoic rocks. Feldspathic-quartzose sediments were transported from the east by river systems draining granitic terrains perhaps as far away as the Idaho Batholith. Chronostratigraphic correlations suggest that the arkosic sandstones were deposited along the margins of the depositional system during the early Eocene, prograded westward during the middle Eocene, and then regressed during the latest Eocene and Oligocene simultaneously with the influx of abundant pyroclastic debris. During the early Eocene, a northwest-southeast seamount chain was extruded on the Farallon and Kula plates west of an eastward-dipping subduction zone. Subduction of the oceanic plates moved the seamount chain obliquely toward the subduction zone. In middle Eocene time-49 to 40 m.y.b.p-the seamount chain reached the subduction zone creating instability in the subduction system and resulting in the westward jump of the underthrust boundary between the Farallon-Kula and North American plates. Coincident with and continuing after the subduction zone jump and seamount accretion, eastwardly derived arkosic sediments prograded across Oregon and Washington spilling into the new fore-arc basin and enveloping the seamounts.

  8. Humidity estimate for the middle Eocene Arctic rain forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jahren, A. Hope; Silveira Lobo Sternberg, Leonel

    2003-05-01

    The exquisite preservation of fossilized Metasequoia trees that grew near 80°N latitude during the middle Eocene (ca. 45 Ma) in Nunavut, Canada, allowed for δD and δ18O analyses of cellulose, techniques previously restricted to wood <30,000 yr old. From the isotopic results, we determined that the middle Eocene Arctic atmosphere contained ˜2× the water found in the region's atmosphere today. This water vapor contributed to a middle Eocene greenhouse effect that insulated the polar region during dark polar winters.

  9. Arctic Ocean circulation during the anoxic Eocene Azolla event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Speelman, Eveline; Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap; März, Christian; Brumsack, Hans; Reichart, Gert-Jan

    2010-05-01

    through seawater inflow). Excess vanadium accumulation during the Azolla event (80 ppm), basin volume and surface area, average vanadium sea (1.8 ppb) and river water (1.0 ppb) concentrations, together indicate that an inflow of Nordic Sea water of 0.2 Sv is needed to sustain vanadium levels. The same calculation using molybdenum gives an inflow of only 0.02 Sv. These low inflow rates imply Arctic Ocean (deep) water residence times of 2000 - 20000 years, respectively. Based on climate modeling we calculated a summed net amount of precipitation for the Eocene Arctic Basin (Precipitation - Evaporation + Runoff) of 0.46 Sv. Together these notions indicate that a compensating inflow of saline North Atlantic water occurred, accompanied by an outflow of more fresh waters, resulting in a bi-directional, two-layer flow through the (proto-) Fram Strait. Consequently, the limited exchange of water through the Fram Strait implies that a relatively low export productivity would have been sufficient to render Arctic bottom waters anoxic. Jakobsson, M., Backman, J., Rudels, B., Nycander, J., Frank, M., Mayer, L., Jokat, W., Sangiorgi, F., O'Regan, M., Brinkhuis, H., King, J., Moran, K. (2007). The early Miocene onset of a ventilated circulation regimen in the Arctic Ocean. Nature 447, 986-990.

  10. The Arctic Forest of the Middle Eocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jahren, A. Hope

    2007-05-01

    Lush forests, dominated by deciduous conifers, existed well north of the Arctic Circle during the middle Eocene (45 Ma). The Fossil Forest site, located on Axel Heiberg Island, Canada, has yielded a particularly rich assemblage of plant macro- and microfossils, as well as paleosols -- all exquisitely preserved. Methods ranging from classical paleobotany, to stable-isotope geochemistry, have been applied to materials excavated from the Fossil Forest and have revealed layers of diverse conifer forests with a rich angiosperm understory that successfully endured three months of continuous light and three months of continuous darkness. Paleoenvironmental reconstructions suggest a warm, ice-free environment, with high growing-season-relative humidity, and high rates of soil methanogenesis. Methods to evaluate intraseasonal variability highlight the switchover from stored to actively fixed carbon during the short annual growing season.

  11. Local response to warm Antarctic terrestrial temperatures in the Eocene: evidence from terrestrial biomarkers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toney, J. L.; Bendle, J. A.; Inglis, G.; Bijl, P.; Pross, J.; Contreras, L.; van de Flierdt, T.; Huck, C. E.; Jamieson, S.; Huber, M.; Schouten, S.; Roehl, U.; Bohaty, S. M.; Brinkhuis, H.

    2011-12-01

    The early Eocene (~55 to 49 Ma) was characterized by long-term, high global temperatures and elevated atmospheric pCO2 levels (ca. 1000 ppm to more than 2000 ppm). Superimposed on top of this long-term warmth were a series of abrupt high pCO2 (>2000 ppm) and high temperature events. This greenhouse world may be used as an analogue for the future response of the biosphere and global carbon cycle to recent anthropogenic, atmospheric CO2 emissions. A major uncertainty, however, is the response of high polar latitudes to these climate conditions. Here we show evidence of early Eocene warmth measured from terrestrial, bacteria-derived tetraethers at IODP Site U1356, situated along the Wilkes Land margin in East Antarctica. The presence of soil bacteria-derived hopanes and higher plant n-alkanes in drillcores obtained from this site are also used to help understand the terrestrial Antarctic climate evolution in a warmer world. Methyl-branched and cyclised tetraether compounds are derived from terrestrial, soil bacteria. The number of branches and cycles are related directly to the environmental temperature and pH. These compounds indicate that temperatures on Eastern Antarctica likely exceeded 22°C during the Eocene. These temperatures reflect locally sourced terrestrial material input from a variety of elevations along the coastal plain and from the hinterland. A local source region is supported by the palynological and neodymium isotope records and by the presence of hopanes that suggest input from terrigenous soil and/or wetland environments. In particular, the existence of the C31 (17α,21β) homohopane within a relatively immature hopane assemblage is reported at Site U1356 and suggests the presence of methane-producing, wetland environments on Antarctica. Compound-specific carbon isotopes analyzed on the bacterial derived hopanes are used to characterize changes in wetland carbon cycling and methanogenesis. Local adiabatic lapse rate and precipitation amount

  12. Globally optimum multiple object tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sebe, Ismail O.; You, Suya; Neumann, Ulrich

    2005-05-01

    Robust and accurate tracking of multiple objects is a key challenge in video surveillance. Tracking algorithms generally suffer from either one or more of the following problems, excluding detection errors. First, objects can be incorrectly interpreted as one of the other objects in the scene. Second, interactions between objects, such as occlusions, may cause tracking errors. Third, globally-optimum tracking is hard to achieve since the combinatorial assignment problem is NP-Complete. We present a modified Multiple-Hypothesis Tracking algorithm, MHT, for globally optimum tracking of moving objects. The system defines five states for tracked objects: appear, disappear, track, split, and merge, and these states cover all the interactions of object pairs. After the detection of objects in the current frame, a resemblance matrix is computed for every object pair. We convert the two-dimensional resemblance matrix into a three-dimensional state-likelihood structure and use a MHT technique to solve the state-assignment problem in 3D. This prevents incorrect assignments due to local minima in the assignment process. Moreover, the method models occlusion cases with the split and merge states. Finally, this method approximates a globally optimum state assignment in polynomial time complexity.

  13. Climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lunine, J.; Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Earth's climate may be defined as the global physical condition, averaged over some period of time (typically decades or longer), of the EARTH'S ATMOSPHERE, OCEAN and ice sheets. It is the presence of a relatively dense atmosphere—third among the solid bodies of the solar system—that makes Earth habitable. Without the blanketing of infrared energy radiated from Earth's surface and lower atmospher...

  14. Molecular composition and paleobotanical origin of Eocene resin from northeast India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudra, Arka; Dutta, Suryendu; Raju, Srinivasan V.

    2014-06-01

    The molecular composition of fossil resins from early to middle Eocene coal from northeast India, has been analyzed for the first time to infer their paleobotanical source. The soluble component of fossil resin was analyzed using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The resin extracts are composed of cadalene-based C15 sesquiterpenoids and diagenetically altered triterpenoids. The macromolecular composition was investigated using pyrolysis gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (Py-GC-MS) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. The major pyrolysis products are C15 bicyclic sesquiterpenoids, alkylated naphthalenes, benzenes and a series of C17-C34 n-alkene- n-alkane pairs. Spectroscopic analysis revealed the dominance of aliphatic components. The presence of cadalene-based sequiterpenoids confirms the resin to be Class II or dammar resin, derived from angiosperms of Dipterocarpaceae family. These sesquiterpenoids are often detected in many SE Asian fluvio-deltaic oils. Dipterocarpaceae are characteristic of warm tropical climate suggesting the prevalence of such climate during early Eocene in northeast India.

  15. Release of methane from a volcanic basin as a mechanism for initial Eocene global warming.

    PubMed

    Svensen, Henrik; Planke, Sverre; Malthe-Sørenssen, Anders; Jamtveit, Bjørn; Myklebust, Reidun; Rasmussen Eidem, Torfinn; Rey, Sebastian S

    2004-06-03

    A 200,000-yr interval of extreme global warming marked the start of the Eocene epoch about 55 million years ago. Negative carbon- and oxygen-isotope excursions in marine and terrestrial sediments show that this event was linked to a massive and rapid (approximately 10,000 yr) input of isotopically depleted carbon. It has been suggested previously that extensive melting of gas hydrates buried in marine sediments may represent the carbon source and has caused the global climate change. Large-scale hydrate melting, however, requires a hitherto unknown triggering mechanism. Here we present evidence for the presence of thousands of hydrothermal vent complexes identified on seismic reflection profiles from the Vøring and Møre basins in the Norwegian Sea. We propose that intrusion of voluminous mantle-derived melts in carbon-rich sedimentary strata in the northeast Atlantic may have caused an explosive release of methane--transported to the ocean or atmosphere through the vent complexes--close to the Palaeocene/Eocene boundary. Similar volcanic and metamorphic processes may explain climate events associated with other large igneous provinces such as the Siberian Traps (approximately 250 million years ago) and the Karoo Igneous Province (approximately 183 million years ago).

  16. Evidence for a rapid release of carbon at the Paleocene-Eocene thermal maximum.

    PubMed

    Wright, James D; Schaller, Morgan F

    2013-10-01

    The Paleocene/Eocene thermal maximum (PETM) and associated carbon isotope excursion (CIE) are often touted as the best geologic analog for the current anthropogenic rise in pCO2. However, a causal mechanism for the PETM CIE remains unidentified because of large uncertainties in the duration of the CIE's onset. Here, we report on a sequence of rhythmic sedimentary couplets comprising the Paleocene/Eocene Marlboro Clay (Salisbury Embayment). These couplets have corresponding δ(18)O cycles that imply a climatic origin. Seasonal insolation is the only regular climate cycle that can plausibly account for δ(18)O amplitudes and layer counts. High-resolution stable isotope records show 3.5‰ δ(13)C decrease over 13 couplets defining the CIE onset, which requires a large, instantaneous release of (13)C-depleted carbon. During the CIE, a clear δ(13)C gradient developed on the shelf with the largest excursions in shallowest waters, indicating atmospheric δ(13)C decreased by ~20‰. Our observations and revised release rate are consistent with an atmospheric perturbation of 3,000-gigatons of carbon (GtC).

  17. Eocene/Oligocene ocean de-acidification linked to Antarctic glaciation by sea-level fall.

    PubMed

    Merico, Agostino; Tyrrell, Toby; Wilson, Paul A

    2008-04-24

    One of the most dramatic perturbations to the Earth system during the past 100 million years was the rapid onset of Antarctic glaciation near the Eocene/Oligocene epoch boundary (approximately 34 million years ago). This climate transition was accompanied by a deepening of the calcite compensation depth--the ocean depth at which the rate of calcium carbonate input from surface waters equals the rate of dissolution. Changes in the global carbon cycle, rather than changes in continental configuration, have recently been proposed as the most likely root cause of Antarctic glaciation, but the mechanism linking glaciation to the deepening of calcite compensation depth remains unclear. Here we use a global biogeochemical box model to test competing hypotheses put forward to explain the Eocene/Oligocene transition. We find that, of the candidate hypotheses, only shelf to deep sea carbonate partitioning is capable of explaining the observed changes in both carbon isotope composition and calcium carbonate accumulation at the sea floor. In our simulations, glacioeustatic sea-level fall associated with the growth of Antarctic ice sheets permanently reduces global calcium carbonate accumulation on the continental shelves, leading to an increase in pelagic burial via permanent deepening of the calcite compensation depth. At the same time, fresh limestones are exposed to erosion, thus temporarily increasing global river inputs of dissolved carbonate and increasing seawater delta13C. Our work sheds new light on the mechanisms linking glaciation and ocean acidity change across arguably the most important climate transition of the Cenozoic era.

  18. Evidence for a rapid release of carbon at the Paleocene-Eocene thermal maximum

    PubMed Central

    Wright, James D.; Schaller, Morgan F.

    2013-01-01

    The Paleocene/Eocene thermal maximum (PETM) and associated carbon isotope excursion (CIE) are often touted as the best geologic analog for the current anthropogenic rise in pCO2. However, a causal mechanism for the PETM CIE remains unidentified because of large uncertainties in the duration of the CIE’s onset. Here, we report on a sequence of rhythmic sedimentary couplets comprising the Paleocene/Eocene Marlboro Clay (Salisbury Embayment). These couplets have corresponding δ18O cycles that imply a climatic origin. Seasonal insolation is the only regular climate cycle that can plausibly account for δ18O amplitudes and layer counts. High-resolution stable isotope records show 3.5‰ δ13C decrease over 13 couplets defining the CIE onset, which requires a large, instantaneous release of 13C-depleted carbon. During the CIE, a clear δ13C gradient developed on the shelf with the largest excursions in shallowest waters, indicating atmospheric δ13C decreased by ∼20‰. Our observations and revised release rate are consistent with an atmospheric perturbation of 3,000-gigatons of carbon (GtC). PMID:24043840

  19. Palaeoclimatic evolution during Eocene and its influence on oil shale mineralisation, Fushun basin, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Qingtao; Liu, Zhaojun; Bruch, Angela A.; Liu, Rong; Hu, Fei

    2012-02-01

    The Fushun basin is a small, explored, coal and oil shale-bearing, Cenozoic fault basin in the Liaoning Province, northeast China. The basin mainly consists of Eocene swamp to lacustrine deposits of the Guchengzi to Xilutian Formation, and contains the biggest opencast oil shale mine in Asia. This mine has provided an ideal opportunity to undertake palaeoclimate reconstruction in this basin based on a single geological profile and the analyses of 93 samples, using various approaches, namely field geological observation, clay mineralogical and geochemical (Sr/Ba, Sr/Cu, stable C and O isotope) analyses, all of which were compared with palaeobotanical data. The Eocene climate of Fushun basin evolved from warm temperate to north subtropical, and generally changed from warm humid to subhumid-semiarid. Paleoclimatic and geochemical parameters shows that the very warm and humid climate during Jijuntun Formation increased the initial productivity of lake water, and caused a steady stratification of the lake water, then caused oxygen lack in the bottom of water. Productivity of the lake provides the mean origin of organic matters for oil shale formation, and steady anoxic environment is beneficial for the conservation of organic matters.

  20. Paleoenvironmental changes across the Eocene-Oligocene boundary: insights from the Central-Carpathian Paleogene Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soták, Ján

    2010-10-01

    The sedimentary sequence of the Central-Carpathian Paleogene Basin provides proxy records of climatic changes related to cooling events at the Eocene/Oligocene boundary (TEE). In this basin, climatic deterioration is inferred from the demise of the carbonate platform and oligotrophic benthic biota in the SBZ19 and from the last species of warm-water planktonic foraminifers in the E14 Zone. Upper Eocene formations already indicate warm-temperate to cool-temperate productivity and nutrient-enriched conditions (Bryozoan Marls, Globigerina Marls). Rapid cooling during the earliest Oligocene (Oi-1 event) led to a temperature drop (~11 °C), humidity, fresh water influx and continental runoff, water mass stratification, bottom water anoxia, eutrofication, estuarine circulation and upwelling, carbonate depletion, sapropelitic and biosiliceous deposition, H2S intoxication and mass faunal mortality, and also other characteristics of Black Sea-type basins. Tectonoeustatic events with the interference of TA 4.4 sea-level fall and the Pyrenean phase caused basin isolation at the beginning of the Paratethys. The Early Oligocene stage of Paratethyan isolation is indicated by a stagnant regime, low tide influence, endemic fauna development, widespread anoxia and precipitation of manganese deposits. The episodic rise in the sea-level, less humid conditions and renewed circulation is marked by calcareous productivity, nannoplankton blooms and the appearance of planktic pteropods and re-oxygenation. Paleogeographic differentiation of the Carpatho-Pannonian Paleogene basins resulted from plate-tectonic reorganization during the Alpine orogenesis.

  1. Linked Paleosol and Model-based Reconstructions of Paleoprecipitation During Episodes of Extreme Global Warmth: Early Eocene and Middle Cretaceous Greenhouse States Compared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, T. S.; Pollard, D.

    2004-12-01

    The late Paleocene-early Eocene Earth has been characterized as having ice-free poles inhabited by mammals, reptiles and deciduous forests, with globally averaged surface temperatures 2-4ºC greater than today. This episode is considered to have been the warmest of the Cenozoic and is perhaps second only to the middle Cretaceous greenhouse as a period of extreme global warmth during the past 100 million years. This study focuses on an oxygen isotopic record of paleoprecipitation derived from early Eocene paleosol siderite spherules obtained along a paleolatitudinal transect from Texas to Alaska, though data obtained from coeval deposits in France, Spain and Australia are considered. The data are used to benchmark a stable isotope tracer version of the GENESIS v. 2 general circulation model and are compared to similar paleosol-model results for the middle Cretaceous Earth. The early Eocene oxygen isotope profile displays a pronounced south to north depletion, an observation that is very similar to a transect of middle Cretaceous paleosols; both profiles are depleted relative to similar modern latitudinal distributions. These results indicate that early Eocene paleotemperatures may have been as warm as those reconstructed for the middle Cretaceous and provide evidence for an amplified atmospheric hydrologic cycle during these episodes of extreme warmth. Our modeling results support these conclusions and indicate that early Eocene and middle Cretaceous Precipitation minus Evaporation (P-E) profiles were substantially altered compared to modern profiles: in tropical and middle latitude regions, P-E values are 2-3X greater than today, whereas in the subtropics, P-E values are up to 3X less than today. Some worst-case climate model scenarios predict future temperatures similar to those hind cast for the middle Cretaceous greenhouse state. However, most researchers conclude that middle Cretaceous climate reconstructions are irrelevant to considerations of near

  2. Antarctic Cenozoic climate history from sedimentary records: ANDRILL and beyond.

    PubMed

    McKay, R M; Barrett, P J; Levy, R S; Naish, T R; Golledge, N R; Pyne, A

    2016-01-28

    Mounting evidence from models and geological data implies that the Antarctic Ice Sheet may behave in an unstable manner and retreat rapidly in response to a warming climate, which is a key factor motivating efforts to improve estimates of Antarctic ice volume contributions to future sea-level rise. Here, we review Antarctic cooling history since peak temperatures of the Middle Eocene Climatic Optimum (approx. 50 Ma) to provide a framework for future initiatives to recover sediment cores from subglacial lakes and sedimentary basins in Antarctica's continental interior. While the existing inventory of cores has yielded important insights into the biotic and climatic evolution of Antarctica, strata have numerous and often lengthy time breaks, providing a framework of 'snapshots' through time. Further cores, and more work on existing cores, are needed to reconcile Antarctic records with the more continuous 'far-field' records documenting the evolution of global ice volume and deep-sea temperature. To achieve this, we argue for an integrated portfolio of drilling and coring missions that encompasses existing methodologies using ship- and sea-ice-/ice-shelf-based drilling platforms as well as recently developed seafloor-based drilling and subglacial access systems. We conclude by reviewing key technological issues that will need to be overcome.

  3. Sources of Carbon during the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sluijs, A.; Frieling, J.; Svensen, H.; Planke, S.; Cramwinckel, M.; Selnes, H.

    2016-12-01

    The Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM; 56 Ma ago) was a 170 kyr period of global warming associated with rapid and massive injections of 13C-depleted carbon into the ocean-atmosphere system, reflected in sedimentary components as a negative carbon isotope excursion (CIE). Carbon cycle modeling has indicated that the shape and magnitude of this CIE are generally explained by a large and rapid initial pulse, followed by 50 kyr of 13C-depleted carbon injection. Suggested sources include submarine methane hydrates, terrigenous organic matter, and thermogenic methane from hydrothermal vent complexes. Previous and new analyses suggest that the initiation of warming started prior to the injection of 13C-depleted carbon. This implies a climatic trigger for massive carbon release representing a positive feedback scenario (Frieling et al. AGU 2016 Session ID# 13189, Abstract ID: 121074), which likely excludes volcanic or extraterrestrial carbon sourcing for the onset of the CIE. Here, we test for the contribution of carbon release associated with volcanic intrusions in the North Atlantic Igneous Province. We use dinoflagellate cyst and stable carbon isotope stratigraphy to date the active phase of a hydrothermal vent system and find it to post-date massive carbon release at the onset of the PETM. Crucially, however, it correlates to the period within the PETM of longer-term 13C-depleted carbon release. This finding represents the first actual proof of PETM carbon release from a particular reservoir. Based on carbon cycle box model (LOSCAR) experiments, we show that 4-12 pulses of carbon input from vent systems over 60 kyr with a total mass of 1500 Pg of C, consistent with the vent-literature, match the shape of the CIE and pattern of deep ocean carbonate dissolution as recorded in sediment records. We therefore conclude that CH4 from the Norwegian Sea vent complexes was likely the main source of carbon during the PETM, following its onset.

  4. Eocene lizard from Germany reveals amphisbaenian origins.

    PubMed

    Müller, Johannes; Hipsley, Christy A; Head, Jason J; Kardjilov, Nikolay; Hilger, André; Wuttke, Michael; Reisz, Robert R

    2011-05-19

    Amphisbaenia is a speciose clade of fossorial lizards characterized by a snake-like body and a strongly reinforced skull adapted for head-first burrowing. The evolutionary origins of amphisbaenians are controversial, with molecular data uniting them with lacertids, a clade of Old World terrestrial lizards, whereas morphology supports a grouping with snakes and other limbless squamates. Reports of fossil stem amphisbaenians have been falsified, and no fossils have previously tested these competing phylogenetic hypotheses or shed light on ancestral amphisbaenian ecology. Here we report the discovery of a new lacertid-like lizard from the Eocene Messel locality of Germany that provides the first morphological evidence for lacertid-amphisbaenian monophyly on the basis of a reinforced, akinetic skull roof and braincase, supporting the view that body elongation and limblessness in amphisbaenians and snakes evolved independently. Morphometric analysis of body shape and ecology in squamates indicates that the postcranial anatomy of the new taxon is most consistent with opportunistically burrowing habits, which in combination with cranial reinforcement indicates that head-first burrowing evolved before body elongation and may have been a crucial first step in the evolution of amphisbaenian fossoriality.

  5. Optimum Designs for Superpressure Balloons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, M.; Rainwater, E.

    Natural shape balloons have been employed for minimum stress envelope design in zero pressure scientific balloons since the 1940's. Superpressure balloons, on the other hand, have traditionally been spheres with tangential load attachment points. Application of natural shape design principles to superpressure balloons is relatively new. The resulting natural shape superpressure balloon shape generally fits Euler's Elastica. There are numerous examples of superpressure cylinder balloons which take on the elastica shape when pressurized. Techniques tried for reducing circumferential stresses in the NASA ULDB natural shape superpressure balloons have revealed new challenges both for design and manufacture. This paper will present a thorough background in the development of the current design concept as well as a review of the current challenges associated with manufacturing these envelopes. Approaches for achieving an optimum design will be presented along with ground and flight test data.

  6. Optimum constrained image restoration filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riemer, T. E.; Mcgillem, C. D.

    1974-01-01

    The filter was developed in Hilbert space by minimizing the radius of gyration of the overall or composite system point-spread function subject to constraints on the radius of gyration of the restoration filter point-spread function, the total noise power in the restored image, and the shape of the composite system frequency spectrum. An iterative technique is introduced which alters the shape of the optimum composite system point-spread function, producing a suboptimal restoration filter which suppresses undesirable secondary oscillations. Finally this technique is applied to multispectral scanner data obtained from the Earth Resources Technology Satellite to provide resolution enhancement. An experimental approach to the problems involving estimation of the effective scanner aperture and matching the ERTS data to available restoration functions is presented.

  7. Swarms: Optimum aggregations of spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayer, H. L.

    1980-01-01

    Swarms are aggregations of spacecraft or elements of a space system which are cooperative in function, but physically isolated or only loosely connected. For some missions the swarm configuration may be optimum compared to a group of completely independent spacecraft or a complex rigidly integrated spacecraft or space platform. General features of swarms are induced by considering an ensemble of 26 swarms, examples ranging from Earth centered swarms for commercial application to swarms for exploring minor planets. A concept for a low altitude swarm as a substitute for a space platform is proposed and a preliminary design studied. The salient design feature is the web of tethers holding the 30 km swarm in a rigid two dimensional array in the orbital plane. A mathematical discussion and tutorial in tether technology and in some aspects of the distribution of services (mass, energy, and information to swarm elements) are included.

  8. Stable isotope paleoclimatology of the earliest Eocene using kimberlite-hosted mummified wood from the Canadian Subarctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hook, B. A.; Halfar, J.; Gedalof, Z.; Bollmann, J.; Schulze, D. J.

    2015-10-01

    The recent discovery of well-preserved mummified wood buried within a subarctic kimberlite diamond mine prompted a paleoclimatic study of the early Eocene "hothouse" (ca. 53.3 Ma). At the time of kimberlite eruption, the Subarctic was warm and humid producing a temperate rainforest biome well north of the Arctic Circle. Previous studies have estimated that mean annual temperatures in this region were 4-20 °C in the early Eocene, using a variety of proxies including leaf margin analysis and stable isotopes (δ13C and δ18O) of fossil cellulose. Here, we examine stable isotopes of tree-ring cellulose at subannual- to annual-scale resolution, using the oldest viable cellulose found to date. We use mechanistic models and transfer functions to estimate earliest Eocene temperatures using mummified cellulose, which was well preserved in the kimberlite. Multiple samples of Piceoxylon wood within the kimberlite were crossdated by tree-ring width. Multiple proxies are used in combination to tease apart likely environmental factors influencing the tree physiology and growth in the unique extinct ecosystem of the Polar rainforest. Calculations of interannual variation in temperature over a multidecadal time-slice in the early Eocene are presented, with a mean annual temperature (MAT) estimate of 11.4 °C (1 σ = 1.8 °C) based on δ18O, which is 16 °C warmer than the current MAT of the area (-4.6 °C). Early Eocene atmospheric δ13C (δ13Catm) estimates were -5.5 (±0.7) ‰. Isotopic discrimination (Δ) and leaf intercellular pCO2 ratio (ci/ca) were similar to modern values (Δ = 18.7 ± 0.8 ‰; ci/ca = 0.63 ± 0.03 %), but intrinsic water use efficiency (Early Eocene iWUE = 211 ± 20 μmol mol-1) was over twice the level found in modern high-latitude trees. Dual-isotope spectral analysis suggests that multidecadal climate cycles somewhat similar to the modern Pacific Decadal Oscillation likely drove temperature and cloudiness trends on 20-30-year timescales, influencing

  9. Carbon sources during the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frieling, Joost; Peterse, Francien; Lunt, Daniel; Bohaty, Steven; Sinninghe Damste, Jaap; Reichart, Gert-Jan; Sluijs, Appy

    2017-04-01

    likely explanation. Recent findings directly connected hydrothermal vent activity in the Voring and More Basins to the PETM CIE, explaining its' exceptionally long duration (Frieling et al., 2016 PNAS) and Storey et al. (2007 Science) already showed based on absolute dating that the most active phase of North Atlantic Igneous Province (NAIP) roughly coincides with the PETM. We speculate the NAIP played a central role in Paleocene-Eocene climate change and, in addition to the thermogenic methane, also supplied the CO2 that drove the initial warming, which lead to massive methane hydrate dissociation during the PETM.

  10. Abrupt reversal in ocean overturning during the Palaeocene/Eocene warm period.

    PubMed

    Nunes, Flavia; Norris, Richard D

    2006-01-05

    An exceptional analogue for the study of the causes and consequences of global warming occurs at the Palaeocene/Eocene Thermal Maximum, 55 million years ago. A rapid rise of global temperatures during this event accompanied turnovers in both marine and terrestrial biota, as well as significant changes in ocean chemistry and circulation. Here we present evidence for an abrupt shift in deep-ocean circulation using carbon isotope records from fourteen sites. These records indicate that deep-ocean circulation patterns changed from Southern Hemisphere overturning to Northern Hemisphere overturning at the start of the Palaeocene/Eocene Thermal Maximum. This shift in the location of deep-water formation persisted for at least 40,000 years, but eventually recovered to original circulation patterns. These results corroborate climate model inferences that a shift in deep-ocean circulation would deliver relatively warmer waters to the deep sea, thus producing further warming. Greenhouse conditions can thus initiate abrupt deep-ocean circulation changes in less than a few thousand years, but may have lasting effects; in this case taking 100,000 years to revert to background conditions.

  11. Environmental precursors to rapid light carbon injection at the Palaeocene/Eocene boundary.

    PubMed

    Sluijs, Appy; Brinkhuis, Henk; Schouten, Stefan; Bohaty, Steven M; John, Cédric M; Zachos, James C; Reichart, Gert-Jan; Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S; Crouch, Erica M; Dickens, Gerald R

    2007-12-20

    The start of the Palaeocene/Eocene thermal maximum--a period of exceptional global warming about 55 million years ago--is marked by a prominent negative carbon isotope excursion that reflects a massive input of 13C-depleted ('light') carbon to the ocean-atmosphere system. It is often assumed that this carbon injection initiated the rapid increase in global surface temperatures and environmental change that characterize the climate perturbation, but the exact sequence of events remains uncertain. Here we present chemical and biotic records of environmental change across the Palaeocene/Eocene boundary from two sediment sections in New Jersey that have high sediment accumulation rates. We show that the onsets of environmental change (as recorded by the abundant occurrence ('acme') of the dinoflagellate cyst Apectodinium) and of surface-ocean warming (as evidenced by the palaeothermometer TEX86) preceded the light carbon injection by several thousand years. The onset of the Apectodinium acme also precedes the carbon isotope excursion in sections from the southwest Pacific Ocean and the North Sea, indicating that the early onset of environmental change was not confined to the New Jersey shelf. The lag of approximately 3,000 years between the onset of warming in New Jersey shelf waters and the carbon isotope excursion is consistent with the hypothesis that bottom water warming caused the injection of 13C-depleted carbon by triggering the dissociation of submarine methane hydrates, but the cause of the early warming remains uncertain.

  12. Subtropical Arctic Ocean temperatures during the Palaeocene/Eocene thermal maximum

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sluijs, A.; Schouten, S.; Pagani, M.; Woltering, M.; Brinkhuis, H.; Damste, J.S.S.; Dickens, G.R.; Huber, M.; Reichart, G.-J.; Stein, R.; Matthiessen, J.; Lourens, L.J.; Pedentchouk, N.; Backman, J.; Moran, K.; Clemens, S.; Cronin, T.; Eynaud, F.; Gattacceca, J.; Jakobsson, M.; Jordan, R.; Kaminski, M.; King, J.; Koc, N.; Martinez, N.C.; McInroy, D.; Moore, T.C.; O'Regan, M.; Onodera, J.; Palike, H.; Rea, B.; Rio, D.; Sakamoto, T.; Smith, D.C.; St John, K.E.K.; Suto, I.; Suzuki, N.; Takahashi, K.; Watanabe, M. E.; Yamamoto, M.

    2006-01-01

    The Palaeocene/Eocene thermal maximum, ???55 million years ago, was a brief period of widespread, extreme climatic warming, that was associated with massive atmospheric greenhouse gas input. Although aspects of the resulting environmental changes are well documented at low latitudes, no data were available to quantify simultaneous changes in the Arctic region. Here we identify the Palaeocene/Eocene thermal maximum in a marine sedimentary sequence obtained during the Arctic Coring Expedition. We show that sea surface temperatures near the North Pole increased from ???18??C to over 23??C during this event. Such warm values imply the absence of ice and thus exclude the influence of ice-albedo feedbacks on this Arctic warming. At the same time, sea level rose while anoxic and euxinic conditions developed in the ocean's bottom waters and photic zone, respectively. Increasing temperature and sea level match expectations based on palaeoclimate model simulations, but the absolute polar temperatures that we derive before, during and after the event are more than 10??C warmer than those model-predicted. This suggests that higher-than-modern greenhouse gas concentrations must have operated in conjunction with other feedback mechanisms-perhaps polar stratospheric clouds or hurricane-induced ocean mixing-to amplify early Palaeogene polar temperatures. ?? 2006 Nature Publishing Group.

  13. Subtropical Arctic Ocean temperatures during the Palaeocene/Eocene thermal maximum.

    PubMed

    Sluijs, Appy; Schouten, Stefan; Pagani, Mark; Woltering, Martijn; Brinkhuis, Henk; Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S; Dickens, Gerald R; Huber, Matthew; Reichart, Gert-Jan; Stein, Ruediger; Matthiessen, Jens; Lourens, Lucas J; Pedentchouk, Nikolai; Backman, Jan; Moran, Kathryn

    2006-06-01

    The Palaeocene/Eocene thermal maximum, approximately 55 million years ago, was a brief period of widespread, extreme climatic warming, that was associated with massive atmospheric greenhouse gas input. Although aspects of the resulting environmental changes are well documented at low latitudes, no data were available to quantify simultaneous changes in the Arctic region. Here we identify the Palaeocene/Eocene thermal maximum in a marine sedimentary sequence obtained during the Arctic Coring Expedition. We show that sea surface temperatures near the North Pole increased from 18 degrees C to over 23 degrees C during this event. Such warm values imply the absence of ice and thus exclude the influence of ice-albedo feedbacks on this Arctic warming. At the same time, sea level rose while anoxic and euxinic conditions developed in the ocean's bottom waters and photic zone, respectively. Increasing temperature and sea level match expectations based on palaeoclimate model simulations, but the absolute polar temperatures that we derive before, during and after the event are more than 10 degrees C warmer than those model-predicted. This suggests that higher-than-modern greenhouse gas concentrations must have operated in conjunction with other feedback mechanisms--perhaps polar stratospheric clouds or hurricane-induced ocean mixing--to amplify early Palaeogene polar temperatures.

  14. Provenance of marine detrital fractions during rapid ice growth at the Eocene-Oligocene Transition (EOT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basak, C.; Martin, E. E.

    2011-12-01

    The initiation of Antarctic glaciation at the end of the Eocene is one of the most dramatic climate change events in the Cenozoic. Although ephemeral glaciers have been documented during the late Eocene, continental-scale glaciers did not develop until the Eocene-Oligocene (E/O) boundary ~34 Ma ago. Ice modeling at the E/O boundary indicates early stages of ice development on Antarctica were characterized by relatively small, isolated ice caps at high elevations as a result of higher winter snowfall. A gradual decrease in atmospheric CO2 below a threshold value contributed to the development of a continental-scale ice sheet on East Antarctica. The models predict geographic locations of nucleation points for ice sheet growth and expansion. The goal of this project is to use radiogenic isotopes of detrital sediments as physical evidence to constrain the location and extent of ice sheet evolution across the E/O boundary. Specifically, we analyzed Nd isotopes and model ages of silicate fractions from circum-Antarctic marine sediments from Ocean Drilling Program Site 689 (Maud Rise) and Site 738 (Kerguelen Plateau) to track the provenance of material eroded by the glaciers. Our data illustrate that pre-EOT (34-34.5 Ma) sediments at these two sites located in the Atlantic and Indian sectors of the Southern Ocean were similar and probably represented highly homogenized pre-existing regolith and soil that developed during the Eocene warmth. With gradual glacial development this regolith was removed during the early EOT and denudation of basal silicate rocks began, as reflected by the gradual shift in Nd isotopes and model ages of the detrital sediment fraction. The shift at the EOT (33.7-34 Ma) at Site 689 introduces a component with the composition of material from the Weddell Sea sector followed by material from Maud Land (Roy et al., 2007), suggesting early ice development in these regions. There is more variability in Nd isotopic values at Site 738, but again the data

  15. The optimum hypersonic wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trimmer, L. L.; Cary, A., Jr.; Voisinet, R. L. P.

    1986-01-01

    The capabilities of existing hypersonic wind tunnels in the U.S. are assessed to form a basis for recommendations for a new, costly facility which would provide data for modeling the hypervelocity aerodynamics envisioned for the new generation of aerospace vehicles now undergoing early studies. Attention is given to the regimes, both entry and aerodynamic, which the new vehicles will encounter, and the shortcomings of data generated for the Orbiter before flight are discussed. The features of foreign-gas, impulse, aeroballistic range, arc-heated and combustion-heated facilities are examined, noting that in any hypersonic wind tunnel the flow must be preheated to prevent liquefaction upon expansion in the test channel. The limitations of the existing facilities and the identification of the regimes which must be studied lead to a description of the characteristics of an optimum hypersonic wind tunnel, including the operations and productivity, the instrumentation, the nozzle design and the flow quality. Three different design approaches are described, each costing at least $100 million to achieve workability.

  16. The optimum hypersonic wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trimmer, L. L.; Cary, A., Jr.; Voisinet, R. L. P.

    1986-01-01

    The capabilities of existing hypersonic wind tunnels in the U.S. are assessed to form a basis for recommendations for a new, costly facility which would provide data for modeling the hypervelocity aerodynamics envisioned for the new generation of aerospace vehicles now undergoing early studies. Attention is given to the regimes, both entry and aerodynamic, which the new vehicles will encounter, and the shortcomings of data generated for the Orbiter before flight are discussed. The features of foreign-gas, impulse, aeroballistic range, arc-heated and combustion-heated facilities are examined, noting that in any hypersonic wind tunnel the flow must be preheated to prevent liquefaction upon expansion in the test channel. The limitations of the existing facilities and the identification of the regimes which must be studied lead to a description of the characteristics of an optimum hypersonic wind tunnel, including the operations and productivity, the instrumentation, the nozzle design and the flow quality. Three different design approaches are described, each costing at least $100 million to achieve workability.

  17. NICMOS Optimum Coronagraphic Focus Determinaton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Glenn

    1997-07-01

    This test will ascertain the optimum position of the PAM for maximizing the local contrast ratios in coronagraphic images. Because of the forward motion of the NICMOS optical bench and dewar, the nominal operational position for the PAM is set {for each camera} to achieve diffraction limited focus at the image plane formed at the detector. As a result of the forward motion of the camera 2 detector, hard images are no longer formed coincidentally at the field divider mirror surface {where the coronagraphic hole is located} and at the detector. This will lead to an increase in the diffracted energy in the wings of a PSF from a target placed inside of the coronagraphic hole as the image plane will fall behind the surface of the FDA mirror. The contrast in a coronagraphic image might be enhanced by placing the focus to form an image at either image planes {FDA or detector} or at a place in-between. This is highly dependent on scattering and must be ascertained by direct measurement.

  18. Microfossil evidence for trophic changes during the Eocene-Oligocene transition in the South Atlantic (ODP Site 1263, Walvis Ridge)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bordiga, M.; Henderiks, J.; Tori, F.; Monechi, S.; Fenero, R.; Legarda-Lisarri, A.; Thomas, E.

    2015-09-01

    The biotic response of calcareous nannoplankton to environmental and climatic changes during the Eocene-Oligocene transition was investigated at a high resolution at Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Site 1263 (Walvis Ridge, southeast Atlantic Ocean) and compared with a lower-resolution benthic foraminiferal record. During this time interval, global climate, which had been warm under high levels of atmospheric CO2 (pCO2) during the Eocene, transitioned into the cooler climate of the Oligocene, at overall lower pCO2. At Site 1263, the absolute nannofossil abundance (coccoliths per gram of sediment; N g-1) and the mean coccolith size decreased distinctly after the E-O boundary (EOB; 33.89 Ma), mainly due to a sharp decline in abundance of large-sized Reticulofenestra and Dictyococcites, occurring within a time span of ~ 47 kyr. Carbonate dissolution did not vary much across the EOB; thus, the decrease in abundance and size of nannofossils may reflect an overall decrease in their export production, which could have led to variations in the food availability for benthic foraminifers. The benthic foraminiferal assemblage data are consistent with a global decline in abundance of rectilinear species with complex apertures in the latest Eocene (~ 34.5 Ma), potentially reflecting changes in the food source, i.e., phytoplankton. This was followed by a transient increased abundance of species indicative of seasonal delivery of food to the sea floor (Epistominella spp.; ~ 33.9-33.4 Ma), with a short peak in overall food delivery at the EOB (buliminid taxa; ~ 33.8 Ma). Increased abundance of Nuttallides umbonifera (at ~ 33.3 Ma) indicates the presence of more corrosive bottom waters and possibly the combined arrival of less food at the sea floor after the second step of cooling (Step 2). The most important changes in the calcareous nannofossil and benthic communities occurred ~ 120 kyr after the EOB. There was no major change in nannofossil abundance or assemblage composition at

  19. Radiolarian biostratigraphy of siliceous Eocene deposits in central California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blueford, J.

    1988-01-01

    Abundant Eocene siliceous deposits in California are located in the San Joaquin and Sacramento valleys. The white shales to buff mudstones are characterized by radiolarians, diatoms, and silicoflagellates. Taxonomic descriptions and abundance data of key radiolarian species in existing monographs have limited biostratigraphic and paleoenvironmental interpretation. The California fauna is similar to faunas from the Norwegian Sea, Russian Platform, and southern oceans of Antarctica. Eocene faunas from the equatorial Pacific Ocean and Caribbean Sea differ considerably in diversity. In this study, the taxonomy and biostratigraphic information of species comprising more than 2% of the population are evaluated. Two radiolarian zones are erected for the middle Eocene of California, the Podocyrtis fasciata and Calocyclas semipolita Zones. Paleoenvironmental information suggests that some differences in the fauna may be environmentally controlled due to deposition in submarine canyons. -Authors

  20. Middle Eocene echinoids from Gebel Qarara, Maghagh, Eastern Desert, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Mohamed Said M.

    2017-09-01

    The Middle Eocene echinoid fauna of Gebel Qarara is large and diverse. Twenty four species in seventeen genera are identified and described. Three species of them are new: Echinocyamus belali, Antillaster farisi and Metalia lindaae. The Caribbean genus Antillaster which is recorded for the first time from the Mediterranean region, suggests an east - west migration from the Tethys and Paratethys to the Caribbean region during the Eocene time by crossing the Atlantic Ocean in a westerly direction. The paleoecology and the paleogeography of the echinoid fauna are discussed. The paleoecological study appears to revel that the Middle Eocene rocks of that area were deposited in a shallow marine water conditions. Paleogeographically, 33.3% of the total echinoids are endemic to Egypt, 66.7% species are similar to that of the taxa of the adjacent countries.

  1. Elevated Eocene atmospheric CO2 and its subsequent decline.

    PubMed

    Lowenstein, Tim K; Demicco, Robert V

    2006-09-29

    Quantification of the atmospheric concentration of CO2 ([CO2]atm) during warm periods of Earth's history is important because burning of fossil fuels may produce future [CO2]atm approaching 1000 parts per million by volume (ppm). The early Eocene (~56 to 49 million years ago) had the highest prolonged global temperatures of the past 65 million years. High Eocene [CO2]atm is established from sodium carbonate minerals formed in saline lakes and preserved in the Green River Formation, western United States. Coprecipitation of nahcolite (NaHCO3) and halite (NaCl) from surface waters in contact with the atmosphere indicates [CO2]atm > 1125 ppm (four times preindustrial concentrations), which confirms that high [CO2]atm coincided with Eocene warmth.

  2. Eocene high-latitude temperature gradients over time and space based on d18O values of fossil shark teeth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeichner, S. S.; Kim, S.; Colman, A. S.

    2015-12-01

    Early-Mid Eocene (56.0-33.9Mya) is characterized by a temperate Antarctic climate and shallower latitudinal temperature gradients than those in present day. The warmer waters off the coast of the Antarctic Peninsula provided suitable habitats for taxa (i.e., sharks) that live today at lower latitudes. Stable isotope analysis of Eocene shark teeth provides a proxy to understand high latitude temperature gradients. However, shark ecology, in particular migration and occupation of tidal versus pelagic habitats, must be considered in the interpretation of stable isotope data. In this study, we analyze d18OPO4 values from the enameloid of Striatolamia (synonymized with Carcharias) shark teeth from the La Meseta formation (Seymour Island, Antarctica) to estimate paleotemperature in Early-Mid Eocene Antarctica, and assess the impact of ecology versus environmental signals on d18OPO4 values. We compare the ranges and offsets between our measured shark tooth d18OPO4 and published bivalve d18OCO3 values to test whether shark teeth record signals of migration across latitudinal temperature gradients, or instead reflect seasonal and long-term temporal variation across La Meseta stratigraphic units.

  3. The respective role of atmospheric carbon dioxide and orbital parameters on ice sheet evolution at the Eocene-Oligocene transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ladant, Jean-Baptiste; Donnadieu, Yannick; Lefebvre, Vincent; Dumas, Christophe

    2014-08-01

    The continental scale initiation of the Antarctic ice sheet at the Eocene-Oligocene boundary (Eocene-Oligocene transition (EOT), 34 Ma) is associated with a global reorganization of the climate. If data studies have assessed the precise timing and magnitudes of the ice steps, modeling studies have been unable to reproduce a transient ice evolution during the Eocene-Oligocene transition in agreement with the data. Here we simulate this transition using general circulation models coupled to an ice sheet model. Our simulations reveal a threshold for continental scale glaciation of 900 ppm, 100 to 150 ppm higher than previous studies. This result supports the existence of ephemeral ice sheets during the middle Eocene, as similar CO2 levels (900-1000 ppm) have been reached episodically during this period. Transient runs show that the ice growth is accurately timed with EOT-1 and Oi-1, the two δ18O excursions occurring during the transition. We show that CO2 and orbital variations are crucial in initiating these steps, with EOT-1 corresponding to the occurrence of low summer insolation, whereas Oi-1 is controlled by a major CO2 drop. The two δ18O steps record both ice growth and temperature, representing some 10-30 m eustatic sea level fall and 2-4°C cooling at EOT-1 and 70 ± 20 m and 0-2°C for Oi-1. The simulated magnitude of the ice steps (10 m for EOT-1 and 63 m for Oi-1) and the overall cooling at various locations show a good agreement with the data, which supports our results concerning this critical transition.

  4. Large Variations in Ice Volume During the Middle Eocene "Doubthouse"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawber, C. F.; Tripati, A. K.

    2008-12-01

    The onset of glacial conditions in the Cenozoic is widely held to have begun ~34 million years ago, coincident with the Eocene-Oligocene boundary1. Warm and high pCO2 'greenhouse' intervals such as the Eocene are generally thought to be ice-free2. Yet the sequence stratigraphic record supports the occurrence of high-frequency sea-level change of tens of meters in the Middle and Late Eocene3, and large calcite and seawater δ18O excursions (~0.5-1.0 permil) have been reported in foraminifera from open ocean sediments4. As a result, the Middle Eocene is often considered the intermediary "doubthouse". The extent of continental ice during the 'doubthouse' is controversial, with estimates of glacioeustatic sea level fall ranging from 30 to 125m2,3,5. We present a new δ18Osw reconstruction for Ocean Drilling Project (ODP) Site 1209 in the tropical Pacific Ocean. It is the first continuous high-resolution record for an open-ocean site that is not directly influenced by changes in the carbonate compensation depth, which enables us to circumvent many of the limitations of existing records. Our record shows increases of 0.8 ± 0.2 (1 s.e) permil and 1.1 ± 0.2 permil at ~44-45 and ~42-41 Ma respectively, which suggests glacioeustatic sea level variations of ~90 m during the Middle Eocene. Modelling studies have shown that fully glaciating Antarctica during the Eocene should drive a change in seawater (δ18Osw) of 0.45 permil, and lower sea level by ~55 m6. Our results therefore support significant ice storage in both the Northern and Southern Hemisphere during the Middle Eocene 'doubthouse'. 1.Miller, Kenneth G. et al., 1990, Eocene-Oligocene sea-level changes in the New Jersey coastal plain linked to the deep-sea record. Geological Society of America Bulletin 102, 331-339 2.Pagani, M. et al., 2005, Marked decline in atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations during the Paleogene. Science 309 (5734), 600-603. 3.Browning, J., Miller, K., and Pak, D., 1996, Global implications

  5. Concepts for generating optimum vertical flight profiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sorensen, J. A.

    1979-01-01

    Algorithms for generating optimum vertical profiles are derived and examined. These algorithms form the basis for the design of onboard flight management concepts. The variations in the optimum vertical profiles (resulting from these concepts) due to variations in wind, takeoff weight, and range-to-destination are presented. Further considerations for mechanizing two different onboard methods of computing near-optimum flight profiles are then outlined. Finally, the results are summarized, and recommendations are made for further work. Technical details of optimum trajectory design, steering requirements for following these trajectories, and off-line computer programs for testing the concepts are included.

  6. Time-stratigraphic reconstruction and integration of paleopedologic, sedimentologic, and biotic events (Willwood Formation, Lower Eocene, northwest Wyoming, USA)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bown, T.M.; Kraus, M.J.

    1993-01-01

    An empirically-based model is advanced using paleosol maturities to estimate the relative geologic time separating any stratigraphic levels within the lower Eocene Willwood Formation. The reviewed Willwood time stratigraphy from this analysis helps evaluate the nature, tempo, and possible causes of three major episodes of mammalian appearance and disappearance. These faunal events are directly correlated with certain apects of paleosol evolution in the Willwood Formation. That evolution is tied directly to climatic changes and to varying sediment accumulation rates in response to tectonism. -from Authors

  7. Multi Proxy Reconstruction (δ98/95Mo, δ238/235U) of Global Ocean Oxygenation during the Early Eocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagard, M. L.; Davies, M. K.; Dickson, A.; Cohen, A. S.

    2014-12-01

    Early Eocene climate is characterised by extreme and persistent warmth punctuated by abrupt global warming events ('hyperthermals'), such as the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM, ~56 Ma ago), when global temperatures became even warmer. These hyperthermals were associated with perturbations to the global carbon cycle that would have had a profound effect on the distribution of O2in the oceans. However, the timing and extent of any fluctuations in global ocean oxygenation during these events are still poorly constrained. In this study, we investigate how seawater oxygen levels responded to environmental changes in the early Eocene by determining the Mo and U stable isotope compositions of anoxic sediments from the Arctic Ocean obtained by the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Expedition 302. It has previously been shown that these two isotope systems each respond to changes in seawater oxygen levels and that they may be used to reconstruct the extent of global marine anoxia in Earth's past. Furthermore, since Mo and U have different residence times in the oceans and their isotope fractionations display different sensitivities to dissolved oxygen concentrations, the use of both proxies enables us to estimate past changes in seawater oxygenation with greater confidence. By combining the information provided by these two isotope systems, we are able to better constrain the onset and the severity of the episodes of seawater anoxia during the Eocene, thereby allowing us to better understand the Earth processes that control ocean oxygenation levels.

  8. Sharply increased insect herbivory during the Paleocene–Eocene Thermal Maximum

    PubMed Central

    Currano, Ellen D.; Wilf, Peter; Wing, Scott L.; Labandeira, Conrad C.; Lovelock, Elizabeth C.; Royer, Dana L.

    2008-01-01

    The Paleocene–Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM, 55.8 Ma), an abrupt global warming event linked to a transient increase in pCO2, was comparable in rate and magnitude to modern anthropogenic climate change. Here we use plant fossils from the Bighorn Basin of Wyoming to document the combined effects of temperature and pCO2 on insect herbivory. We examined 5,062 fossil leaves from five sites positioned before, during, and after the PETM (59–55.2 Ma). The amount and diversity of insect damage on angiosperm leaves, as well as the relative abundance of specialized damage, correlate with rising and falling temperature. All reach distinct maxima during the PETM, and every PETM plant species is extensively damaged and colonized by specialized herbivores. Our study suggests that increased insect herbivory is likely to be a net long-term effect of anthropogenic pCO2 increase and warming temperatures. PMID:18268338

  9. Impact of Tibetan Plateau on Meridional Overturning Circulation (MOC) since Eocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Baohuang; Jiang, Dabang; Zhang, Ran; Sepulchre, Pierre; Ramstein, Gilles

    2017-04-01

    In the past, several studies have pinpointed the role of mountains uplift on the large-scale of ocean dynamics, for instance, the uplift of the African rift on Benguela upwelling system, Andes on the Humboldt Current, ENSO, and the Rockies on the Gulf Stream at the end of the Cenozoic. Here we show that the Tibetan Plateau (TP) uplift has major consequences on the pacific Meridional Overturning Circulation (PMOC) and the Atlantic one (AMOC).In this study, we first perform a long-term integration of a coarse resolution version coupled climate model CESM from NCAR, which features reasonably realistic circulation in the North Pacific and Atlantic. Branching off the control simulation, we then flatten the TP topography. Within a few decades after the TP removal, the MOC begin to appear in the North Pacific, and the Atlantic MOC is reduced. This feature may contribute to explain the drastic modification of ocean circulation that occurred since Eocene.

  10. Groundwater pollution risk mapping for the Eocene aquifer of the Oum Er-Rabia basin, Morocco

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ettazarini, Said

    2006-11-01

    Sustainable development requires the management and preservation of water resources indispensable for all human activities. When groundwater constitutes the main water resource, vulnerability maps therefore are an important tool for identifying zones of high pollution risk and taking preventive measures in potential pollution sites. The vulnerability assessment for the Eocene aquifer in the Moroccan basin of Oum Er-Rabia is based on the DRASTIC method that uses seven parameters summarizing climatic, geological, and hydrogeological conditions controlling the seepage of pollutant substances to groundwater. Vulnerability maps were produced by using GIS techniques and applying the “generic” and “agricultural” models according to the DRASTIC charter. Resulting maps revealed that the aquifer is highly vulnerable in the western part of the basin and areas being under high contamination risk are more extensive when the “agricultural” model was applied.

  11. Paleokarst processes in the Eocene limestones of the Pyramids Plateau, Giza, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Aref, M. M.; Refai, E.

    The Eocene limestones of the Pyramids plateau are characterized by landforms of stepped terraced escarpment and karst ridges with isolated hills. The carbonate country rocks are also dominated by minor surface, surface to subsurface and subsurface solution features associated with karst products. The systematic field observations eludicate the denudation trend of the minor solution features and suggest the origin of the regional landscapes. The lithologic and structural characters of the limestone country rocks comprise the main factors controlling the surface and subsurface karst evolution. The development of the karst features and the associated sediments in the study area provides information on the paleohydrolic, chemical and climatic environments involved in the origin of the karstification.

  12. Multi-proxy Paleoclimate and CO2 Reconstruction from the Latest Middle Eocene Sedimentary Fill of a Subarctic Kimberlitic Maar Crater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reyes, A. V.; Wolfe, A. P.; Royer, D. L.; Greenwood, D. R.; Tierney, J. E.; Doria, G.; Gagen, M. H.; Siver, P.; Westgate, J.

    2016-12-01

    Eocene paleoclimate reconstructions are rarely accompanied by parallel estimates of CO2, complicating assessment of the equilibrium climate responses to CO2. We reconstruct temperature, precipitation, and CO2 from latest middle Eocene ( 38 Myrs ago) peats in subarctic Canada, preserved in sediments that record infilling of a kimberlite pipe maar crater. Mutual climatic range analyses of pollen, together with oxygen isotope analyses of a-cellulose from unpermineralized wood and inferenecs from branched glycerol diakyl glycerol tetraethers (GDGTs), reveal a high-latitude humid-temperate forest ecosystem with mean annual temperatures (MATs) >17 °C warmer than present, mean coldest month temperatures above 0 °C, and mean annual precipitation 4x present. Metasequoia stomatal indices and gas-exchange modeling produce median CO2 concentrations of 634 and 432 ppm, respectively, with a consensus median estimate of 494 ppm. Reconstructed MATs are >6 °C warmer than those produced by Eocene climate models forced at 560 ppm CO2, underscoring the capacity for exceptional polar amplification of warming and hydrological intensification under relatively modest CO2 concentrations, once both fast and slow feedbacks become expressed.

  13. Changes in Nannoplankton Assemblages during the recovery of the Paleocene Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grey, J. A.; Bralower, T. J.; Self-Trail, J. M.

    2016-12-01

    The recovery interval of the Paleocene Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM) presents an opportunity to examine how organisms adapt to environmental change after a rapid global warming event. Calcareous nannoplankton survived the PETM, but we lack an understanding of how long it took for assemblages to adapt to a changing climate and the millennial-scale changes in their ecology. Here, we present the first high-resolution record of nannoplankton community change during the PETM recovery using a global data set (United States Geological Survey (USGS) Wilson Lake core, USGS Cam-Dor core, Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Sites 690, 1265, and 1209) to assess millennial-scale assemblage change across space and time. Preliminary multivariate analyses on assemblage changes at Wilson Lake demonstrate that within 20,000 years after the onset, the structure of nannoplankton communities shifts from an assemblage dominated by warm eutrophic specialists to one dominated by eutrophic low salinity specialists. In the late recovery, ubiquitous taxa dominate assemblages, suggesting that the shelf environment became favorable for generalists. The latest part of the recovery is marked by a slight increase in oligotrophic specialists, indicating that the shelf became less eutrophic into the early Eocene. Overall, these analyses suggest that assemblages changed rapidly in response to cooling and changing ocean circulation during the early recovery of the PETM. Future analyses will build on these data by comparing assemblage change from other PETM coastal and open ocean sites. These analyses will help us better understand the spatial and temporal changes of nannoplankton communities on a global scale, lessons that can inform how nannoplankton will respond to future climate change.

  14. Environmental forcing of terrestrial carbon isotope excursion amplification across five Eocene hyperthermals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowen, G. J.; Abels, H.

    2015-12-01

    Abrupt changes in the isotope composition of exogenic carbon pools accompany many major episodes of global change in the geologic record. The global expression of this change in substrates that reflect multiple carbon pools provides important evidence that many events reflect persistent, global redistribution of carbon between reduced and oxidized stocks. As the diversity of records documenting any event grows, however, discrepancies in the expression of carbon isotope change among substrates are almost always revealed. These differences in magnitude, pace, and pattern of change can complicate interpretations of global carbon redistribution, but under ideal circumstances can also provide additional information on changes in specific environmental and biogeochemical systems that accompanied the global events. Here we evaluate possible environmental influences on new terrestrial records of the negative carbon isotope excursions (CIEs) associated with multiple hyperthermals of the Early Eocene, which show a common pattern of amplified carbon isotope change in terrestrial paleosol carbonate records relative to that recorded in marine substrates. Scaling relationships between climate and carbon-cycle proxies suggest that that the climatic (temperature) impact of each event scaled proportionally with the magnitude of its marine CIE, likely implying that all events involved release of reduced carbon with a similar isotopic composition. Amplification of the terrestrial CIEs, however, does not scale with event magnitude, being proportionally less for the first, largest event (the PETM). We conduct a sensitivity test of a coupled plant-soil carbon isotope model to identify conditions that could account for the observed CIE scaling. At least two possibilities consistent with independent lines of evidence emerge: first, varying effects of pCO2 change on photosynthetic carbon isotope discrimination under changing background pCO2, and second, contrasting changes in regional

  15. A new Late Eocene anthropoid primate from Thailand.

    PubMed

    Chaimanee, Y; Suteethorn, V; Jaeger, J J; Ducrocq, S

    1997-01-30

    The fossil record of anthropoid primates from the Middle Eocene of South Asia is so far restricted to two genera (Pondaungia cotteri Pilgrim, 1937 and Amphipithecus mogaungensis Colbert, 1937 from the Eocene Pondaung deposits of Burma) whose anthropoid status and phylogenetic position have long been under debate because they represent the oldest highly derived fossil primates of anthropoid grade. Moreover, several new African taxa, some of which are even older, have been recently included in the suborder Anthropoidea, suggesting an African origin for this group. Conversely, new fossil primates recently discovered in China (Eosimias) have been related to the most primitive representatives of Anthropoidea, alternatively suggesting an Asian origin and a probable Asian radiation centre. We report here the discovery of a new anthropoid from the Thai Late Eocene locality of Krabi, which displays several additional anthropoid characters with regard to those of the Eocene Burmese genera. This species, which is about the size of the Fayum Aegyptopithecus, can be related to the Burmese forms, and it further provides strong additional evidence for a southeast Asian evolutionary centre for anthropoids.

  16. High bat (Chiroptera) diversity in the Early Eocene of India.

    PubMed

    Smith, Thierry; Rana, Rajendra S; Missiaen, Pieter; Rose, Kenneth D; Sahni, Ashok; Singh, Hukam; Singh, Lachham

    2007-12-01

    The geographic origin of bats is still unknown, and fossils of earliest bats are rare and poorly diversified, with, maybe, the exception of Europe. The earliest bats are recorded from the Early Eocene of North America, Europe, North Africa and Australia where they seem to appear suddenly and simultaneously. Until now, the oldest record in Asia was from the Middle Eocene. In this paper, we report the discovery of the oldest bat fauna of Asia dating from the Early Eocene of the Cambay Formation at Vastan Lignite Mine in Western India. The fossil taxa are described on the basis of well-preserved fragments of dentaries and lower teeth. The fauna is highly diversified and is represented by seven species belonging to seven genera and at least four families. Two genera and five species are new. Three species exhibit very primitive dental characters, whereas four others indicate more advanced states. Unexpectedly, this fauna presents strong affinities with the European faunas from the French Paris Basin and the German Messel locality. This could result from the limited fossil record of bats in Asia, but could also suggest new palaeobiogeographic scenarios involving the relative position of India during the Early Eocene.

  17. Lower Eocene carbonate facies of Egypt: paleogeographic and tectonic implications

    SciTech Connect

    Garrison, R.E.

    1983-03-01

    The northern Arabo-Nubian craton witnessed a major Late Cretaceous-early Tertiary marine transgression that culminated in the deposition of widespread shelf-sea carbonates during Early Eocene (Ypresian) time. Outer shelf facies characterize exposures in central Egypt (Assiut, Luxor, Kharga), and are composed primarily of rhythmically interbedded chalk and micritic limestone with minor intercalated marine hardgrounds. To the south (Kurkur-Dungul), these fine-grained lithologies give way to inner shelf foraminiferal wackestones and grainstones, typical Tethyan Nummulitic facies. Missing in southern Egypt is the restricted dolomitic evaporitic facies predicted by the Irwin model and observed in the lower Eocene of the Sirte basin to the west and the Arabian Platform to the east. Comparing the areal distribution of these lower Eocene carbonates to coeval facies developed across the remained of northern Africa and Arabia reveals the presence of a broad marine embayment which extended through central and eastern Egypt into northern Sudan during Ypresian time. The widespread subsidence that resulted in the development of this features may have been an effect of regional crustal attenuation preceding the rifting of the Red Sea. Concomitant with this regional subsidence were localized uplift and extensional block faulting in the vicinity of the incipient Red Sea rift (the Safaga-Quseir coastal plain). Here, lower Eocene carbonate facies are indicative of shallow water platforms developed on horst blocks, and deeper water, turbidite-fed basins in intervening grabens.

  18. Arctic plant diversity in the Early Eocene greenhouse

    PubMed Central

    Harrington, Guy J.; Eberle, Jaelyn; Le-Page, Ben A.; Dawson, Mary; Hutchison, J. Howard

    2012-01-01

    For the majority of the Early Caenozoic, a remarkable expanse of humid, mesothermal to temperate forests spread across Northern Polar regions that now contain specialized plant and animal communities adapted to life in extreme environments. Little is known on the taxonomic diversity of Arctic floras during greenhouse periods of the Caenozoic. We show for the first time that plant richness in the globally warm Early Eocene (approx. 55–52 Myr) in the Canadian High Arctic (76° N) is comparable with that approximately 3500 km further south at mid-latitudes in the US western interior (44–47° N). Arctic Eocene pollen floras are most comparable in richness with today's forests in the southeastern United States, some 5000 km further south of the Arctic. Nearly half of the Eocene, Arctic plant taxa are endemic and the richness of pollen floras implies significant patchiness to the vegetation type and clear regional richness of angiosperms. The reduced latitudinal diversity gradient in Early Eocene North American plant species demonstrates that extreme photoperiod in the Arctic did not limit taxonomic diversity of plants. PMID:22072610

  19. Implementation of optimum solar electricity generating system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Balbir Singh Mahinder; Sivapalan, Subarna; Najib, Nurul Syafiqah Mohd; Menon, Pradeep; Karim, Samsul Ariffin A.

    2014-10-01

    Under the 10th Malaysian Plan, the government is expecting the renewable energy to contribute approximately 5.5% to the total electricity generation by the year 2015, which amounts to 98MW. One of the initiatives to ensure that the target is achievable was to establish the Sustainable Energy Development Authority of Malaysia. SEDA is given the authority to administer and manage the implementation of the feed-in tariff (FiT) mechanism which is mandated under the Renewable Energy Act 2011. The move to establish SEDA is commendable and the FiT seems to be attractive but there is a need to create awareness on the implementation of the solar electricity generating system (SEGS). In Malaysia, harnessing technologies related to solar energy resources have great potential for implementation. However, the main issue that plagues the implementation of SEGS is the intermittent nature of this source of energy. The availability of sunlight is during the day time, and there is a need for electrical energy storage system, so that there is electricity available during the night time as well. The meteorological condition such as clouds, haze and pollution affects the SEGS as well. The PV based SEGS is seems to be promising electricity generating system that can contribute towards achieving the 5.5% target and will be able to minimize the negative effects of utilizing fossil fuels for electricity generation on the environment. Malaysia is committed to Kyoto Protocol, which emphasizes on fighting global warming by achieving stabilization of greenhouse gas concentrations in the atmosphere at a level that would prevent dangerous anthropogenic interference with the climate system. In this paper, the technical aspects of the implementation of optimum SEGS is discussed, especially pertaining to the positioning of the PV panels.

  20. Implementation of optimum solar electricity generating system

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Balbir Singh Mahinder Karim, Samsul Ariffin A.; Sivapalan, Subarna; Najib, Nurul Syafiqah Mohd; Menon, Pradeep

    2014-10-24

    Under the 10{sup th} Malaysian Plan, the government is expecting the renewable energy to contribute approximately 5.5% to the total electricity generation by the year 2015, which amounts to 98MW. One of the initiatives to ensure that the target is achievable was to establish the Sustainable Energy Development Authority of Malaysia. SEDA is given the authority to administer and manage the implementation of the feed-in tariff (FiT) mechanism which is mandated under the Renewable Energy Act 2011. The move to establish SEDA is commendable and the FiT seems to be attractive but there is a need to create awareness on the implementation of the solar electricity generating system (SEGS). In Malaysia, harnessing technologies related to solar energy resources have great potential for implementation. However, the main issue that plagues the implementation of SEGS is the intermittent nature of this source of energy. The availability of sunlight is during the day time, and there is a need for electrical energy storage system, so that there is electricity available during the night time as well. The meteorological condition such as clouds, haze and pollution affects the SEGS as well. The PV based SEGS is seems to be promising electricity generating system that can contribute towards achieving the 5.5% target and will be able to minimize the negative effects of utilizing fossil fuels for electricity generation on the environment. Malaysia is committed to Kyoto Protocol, which emphasizes on fighting global warming by achieving stabilization of greenhouse gas concentrations in the atmosphere at a level that would prevent dangerous anthropogenic interference with the climate system. In this paper, the technical aspects of the implementation of optimum SEGS is discussed, especially pertaining to the positioning of the PV panels.

  1. Late Eocene sea retreat from the Tarim Basin (West China) linked to Asian aridification and Mediterranean Tethys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosboom, Roderic; Houben, Sander; Dupont-Nivet, Guillaume; Brinkhuis, Henk; Villa, Giuliana; Mandic, Oleg; Stoica, Marius; Krijgsman, Wout; Zhaojie, Guo; Chuanxin, Li

    2010-05-01

    The Paleogene sediments of the southwest Tarim Basin along the West Kunlun Shan in western China include the latest remnants of the easternmost extent of an epicontinental sea. It has been suggested that this sea used to extend across the Paleogene Eurasian continent and may have been linked to the Mediterranean Tethys before it separated as the Paratethys. However, the cause and paleoenvironmental impacts of this sea retreat remain elusive because of its still loosely constrained age. The regression has been associated to regional tectonics of the Indo-Asia collision or to global eustatic lowering during the initiation of Antarctic glaciation at the Eocene-Oligocene transition (EOT) 34 million years ago. Also, paleoenvironmental data is lacking to test climate model suggesting that the contribution of the sea retreat to aridification of Asian continental interiors and monsoon intensification is potentially as important as Tibetan plateau uplift. In this study, bio- and magnetostratigraphic results from two sections recording the final marine regression out of the Tarim Basin are presented, providing a framework to reconstruct the role of the sea retreat with respect to global and regional climate. The regression is expressed by a transition from marine greenish clastic limestones to continental alluvial red beds. A rich biostratigraphic assemblage is recovered from the marine sediments including calcareous nannofossils, bivalves, dinoflagellate cysts, benthic foraminifera and ostracods. The microfossil associations indicate a shallow, saline, eutrophic and proximal depositional environment near a strongly arid continental catchment area. The last marine sediments are not younger than mid-Priabonian, whereas polarity pattern recognition in the directly overlying continental red-beds indicate a late Priabonian to Rupelian correlation. Chronostratigraphic synthesis of the bio- and magnetostratigraphic results thus reveal a major hiatus and indicate the long

  2. Fire and ecosystem change in the Arctic across the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denis, E. H.; Pedentchouk, N.; Schouten, S.; Pagani, M.; Freeman, K. H.

    2016-12-01

    Fire, an important component of ecosystems at a range of spatial and temporal scales, affects vegetation distribution, the carbon cycle, and climate. In turn, climate influences fuel composition (e.g., amount and type of vegetation), fuel availability (e.g., vegetation that can burn based on precipitation and temperature), and ignition sources (e.g., lightning). Climate studies predict increased wildfire activity in future decades, but mechanisms that control the relationship between climate and fire are complex. Reconstructing environmental conditions during past warming events (e.g., the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM)) will help elucidate climate-vegetation-fire relationships that are expressed over long durations (1,000 - 10,000 yrs). The abrupt global warming during the PETM dramatically altered vegetation and hydrologic patterns, and, possibly, fire occurrence. To investigate coincident changes in climate, vegetation, and fire occurrence, we studied biomarkers, including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), terpenoids, and alkanes from the PETM interval at IODP site 302 (the Lomonosov Ridge) in the Arctic Ocean. Both pollen and biomarker records indicate angiosperms abundance increased during the PETM relative to gymnosperms, reflecting a significant ecological shift to angiosperm-dominated vegetation. PAH abundances increased relative to plant biomarkers throughout the PETM, which suggests PAH production increased relative to plant productivity. Increased PAH production associated with the angiosperm vegetation shift indicates a greater prevalence of more fire-prone species. A time lag between increased moisture transport (based on published δD of n-alkanes data) to the Arctic and increased angiosperms and PAH production suggests wetter conditions, followed by increased air temperatures, favored angiosperms and combined to enhance fire occurrence.

  3. Fire and ecosystem change in the Arctic across the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denis, Elizabeth H.; Pedentchouk, Nikolai; Schouten, Stefan; Pagani, Mark; Freeman, Katherine H.

    2017-06-01

    Fire has been an important component of ecosystems on a range of spatial and temporal scales. Fire can affect vegetation distribution, the carbon cycle, and climate. The relationship between climate and fire is complex, in large part because of a key role of vegetation type. Here, we evaluate regional scale fire-climate relationships during a past global warming event, the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM), in order to understand how vegetation influenced the links between climate and fire occurrence in the Arctic region. To document concurrent changes in climate, vegetation, and fire occurrence, we evaluated biomarkers, including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), terpenoids, and alkanes, from the PETM interval at a marine depositional site (IODP site 302, the Lomonosov Ridge) in the Arctic Ocean. Biomarker, fossil, and isotope evidence from site 302 indicates that terrestrial vegetation changed during the PETM. The abundance of the C29n-alkanes, pollen, and the ratio of leaf-wax n-alkanes relative to diterpenoids all indicate that proportional contributions from angiosperm vegetation increased relative to that from gymnosperms. These changes accompanied increased moisture transport to the Arctic and higher temperatures, as recorded by previously published proxy records. We find that PAH abundances were elevated relative to total plant biomarkers throughout the PETM, and suggest that fire occurrence increased relative to plant productivity. The fact that fire frequency or prevalence may have increased during wetter Arctic conditions suggests that changes in fire occurrence were not a simple function of aridity, as is commonly conceived. Instead, we suggest that the climate-driven ecological shift to angiosperm-dominated vegetation was what led to increased fire occurrence. Potential increases in terrestrial plant biomass that arose from warm, wet, and high CO2 conditions were possibly attenuated by biomass burning associated with compositional changes

  4. Fish like it Hot? The response of ichthyolith accumulation to changing climates of the Paleogene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sibert, E. C.; Zill, M. E.; Bryant, R. M.; Graves, L. G.; Norris, R. D.

    2014-12-01

    It has been hypothesized that the production of fish in the water column is related to the amount of primary production in the surface waters. Most future Earth scenarios suggest that as the climate warms, increased surface ocean stratification will decrease nutrient availability and therefore net primary productivity and fish production. Here we calculate accumulation rates of ichthyoliths (microfossil fish teeth and shark dermal scales) throughout the Paleogene and find that ichthyolith accumulation is inversely related to hypothesized changes in primary productivity, but is positively related to ocean temperature. At DSDP Site 596 in the South Pacific, and ODP Site 1258 from the equatorial Atlantic, accumulation of fish fossils increase 6-10 fold from the relatively cool Paleocene into the warm Early Eocene Climate Optimum. In contrast, cooling and increased biosilica deposition at the Eocene/Oligocene (E/O) Boundary suggests that the marine ecosystem switched to a highly productive diatom-dominated ocean, which should favor short, efficient food chains and increased fish production. However, we find that at both Pacific DSDP Site 596 and Atlantic DSDP Site 522, fish accumulation drops by about 50% across the E/O. Indeed, this relation between ichthyolith accumulation and δ18O-estimated paleotemperature is also seen in the Oligocene, at North Pacific ODP Site 886, where warming in the middle Oligocene is mirrored by an increase in ichthyolith accumulation. It appears that ichthyolith accumulation rate may not be purely an effect of total primary production in the water column but rather, may reflect a fundamental response in fish physiology or ecosystem efficiency to warmer water. It has been documented that respiration is faster and more efficient in warm waters, and this may help generate more efficient food web links that compensate for any decrease in primary productivity caused by global warming. Indeed, it appears that fish seem to thrive as the

  5. Linking tephras and paleocene-eocene paleoclimate of denmark to flood and plinian volcanism of east greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bird, D. K.; Heister, L. E.; Brooks, C. K.; Tegner, C.

    2003-04-01

    Widespread tephras are key to absolute radiometric age determination of sedimentary sequences. In the Northeast Atlantic region, the Paleocene Eocene section includes hundreds of tephras related to flood volcanism and continental breakup between Europe and Greenland. New age and petrological data are described for phonolitic tephras occurring immediately above the Paleocene/Eocene boundary in Denmarks Mo-clay. These tephras contain: 1) the diagnostic alkaline minerals perovskite, Ti-aegirine, katophorite, and sodian sanidine; 2) melt inclusions with 14 wt.% Na_2O + K_2O and 55 wt.% SiO_2; and 3) light rare earth element enriched bulk compositions reaching 600 times chondrite for La. A new 40Ar/39Ar age for tephra -17 is 54.96 ± 0.16 Ma. The diagnostic mineralogy of the Danish tephras can be correlated not only with contemporaneous tephras in East Greenland, the North Sea, and the Atlantic Ocean but also with the subvolcanic Gardiner Complex of East Greenland. New 40Ar/39Ar ages presented here for the Gardiner Complex range constrains its active lifespan from 56.1 to 54.3 Ma. We conclude that the phonolitic tephras formed from enormous plinian eruptions from the Gardiner volcano and are key time markers linking breakup related flood volcanism to the sedimentary and climatic record. This correlation between the East Greenland and Danish stratigraphy further indicates that East Greenland could not have been the source for the >170 basaltic tephras in the Mo-Clay deposit in Denmark. The alkaline tephras of the Gardiner volcano postdate the Paleocene Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM) by a few hundred thousand years, but the volcano was active during the PETM. This central volcano activity and the volumetrically significant pyroclastic and effusive continental flood volcanism in the Greenland Faeroes region could have been significant climate forcing mechanisms during the PETM.

  6. Increased precipitation and weathering across the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum in central China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zuoling; Ding, Zhongli; Yang, Shiling; Zhang, Chunxia; Wang, Xu

    2016-06-01

    Global warming during the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM) ˜55.5 million years ago (Ma) was associated with a massive release of carbon to the ocean-atmosphere system, as evidenced by a prominent negative carbon isotope excursion (CIE) and widespread dissolution of marine carbonates. The paleohydrologic response to the PETM warming has been studied worldwide; however, relevant records of environmental perturbation in Asia are lacking so far. Here we extend the record of this event in central China, a subtropical paleosetting, through geochemical and mineralogical analyses of lacustrine sediments. Geochemical indicators of authigenic carbonates—including molar Mg/Ca and Sr/Ca ratios—suggest an overall increased precipitation across the PETM, compatible with the disappearance of authigenic dolomite and the appearance of kaolinite in the strata. The relatively humid conditions persisted long after the carbon-cycle perturbation had stopped, implying that the transient hyper-greenhouse warming might have forced the regional climate system into a new climate state that was not easily reversed. Additionally, a gradual increase in chemical index of alteration (CIA) and the appearance of kaolinite are associated with the PETM, indicating an intensified silicate weathering and pedogenesis in the watershed in response to warmer and more humid climate. Our results corroborate the theory that an accelerated continental chemical weathering served as a negative feedback to sequester carbon and lower the atmospheric greenhouse-gas levels during the PETM.

  7. Warm tropical sea surface temperatures in the Late Cretaceous and Eocene epochs.

    PubMed

    Pearson, P N; Ditchfield, P W; Singano, J; Harcourt-Brown, K G; Nicholas, C J; Olsson, R K; Shackleton, N J; Hall, M A

    2001-10-04

    Climate models with increased levels of carbon dioxide predict that global warming causes heating in the tropics, but investigations of ancient climates based on palaeodata have generally indicated cool tropical temperatures during supposed greenhouse episodes. For example, in the Late Cretaceous and Eocene epochs there is abundant geological evidence for warm, mostly ice-free poles, but tropical sea surface temperatures are generally estimated to be only 15-23 degrees C, based on oxygen isotope palaeothermometry of surface-dwelling planktonic foraminifer shells. Here we question the validity of most such data on the grounds of poor preservation and diagenetic alteration. We present new data from exceptionally well preserved foraminifer shells extracted from impermeable clay-rich sediments, which indicate that for the intervals studied, tropical sea surface temperatures were at least 28-32 degrees C. These warm temperatures are more in line with our understanding of the geographical distributions of temperature-sensitive fossil organisms and the results of climate models with increased CO2 levels.

  8. Palaeocommunities, diversity and sea-level change from middle Eocene shell beds of the Paris Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dominici, Stefano; Zuschin, Martin

    2016-04-01

    The middle Eocene, a time of global transition from greenhouse to icehouse climate, was approached through high-resolution stratigraphy at a few classic localities of the Paris Basin. Quantitative data on the distribution of molluscan species abundance, collected at 12 different shell beds representative of the middle Lutetian and the lower Bartonian, formed the basis for a palaeoecological study. The succession can be subdivided into a hierarchy of depositional sequences, interpreted as the product of relative sea-level change. Abundance distributions are better correlated with 5th-order depositional sequences than geographic locality, suggesting that sea-level played an important role in the distribution of palaeocommunities. Rarefied diversities were measured and compared with analogous data from modern tropical and warm-temperate intertidal and subtidal communities. The palaeoecological analysis shows that sea-level variation is responsible for a major change in the upper part of the middle Lutetian, leading from high-diversity subtidal to low-diversity intertidal and shallow subtidal palaeocommunities. The study did not confirm that the stage-level drop in species richness documented in this basin is related to the global climatic deterioration. Instead, the global climatic signal might be obscured in the Paris Basin by facies control.

  9. Enhanced weathering and CO2 drawdown caused by latest Eocene strengthening of the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elsworth, Geneviève; Galbraith, Eric; Halverson, Galen; Yang, Simon

    2017-01-01

    On timescales significantly greater than 105 years, atmospheric pCO2 is controlled by the rate of mantle outgassing relative to the set-point of the silicate weathering feedback. The weathering set-point has been shown to depend on the distribution and characteristics of rocks exposed at the Earth's surface, vegetation types and topography. Here we argue that large-scale climate impacts caused by changes in ocean circulation can also modify the weathering set-point and show evidence suggesting that this played a role in the establishment of the Antarctic ice sheet at the Eocene-Oligocene boundary. In our simulations, tectonic deepening of the Drake Passage causes freshening and stratification of the Southern Ocean, strengthening the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation and consequently raising temperatures and intensifying rainfall over land. These simulated changes are consistent with late Eocene tectonic reconstructions that show Drake Passage deepening, and with sediment records that reveal Southern Ocean stratification, the emergence of North Atlantic Deep Water, and a hemispherically asymmetric temperature change. These factors would have driven intensified silicate weathering and can thereby explain the drawdown of carbon dioxide that has been linked with Antarctic ice sheet growth. We suggest that this mechanism illustrates another way in which ocean-atmosphere climate dynamics can introduce nonlinear threshold behaviour through interaction with the geologic carbon cycle.

  10. Eocene sea retreat out of Asia: paleogeography, controlling mechanisms and environmental impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dupont-Nivet, Guillaume; Bosboom, Roderic; Proust, Jean-Noël; Mandic, Oleg; Villa, Giuliana; Grothe, Arjan; Stoica, Marius; Guo, Zhaojie; Krijgsman, Wout; Yang, Wei; Bougeois, Laurie; Aminov, Jovid; Ormukov, Cholponbec; Huang, Wentao

    2014-05-01

    western side in the Afghan-Tajik Basin. The stepwise sea retreat and disconformity are concurrent with the documented aridification steps in the Notheastern Tibetan Plateau (Xining Basin) at ~41 Ma (C19n-C18r), ~37.1 Ma (top C17.1n) and the EOT at ~33.9 Ma (top C13r), suggesting that the sea retreat and aridification in Asia were indirectly paced by global climate deterioration in the Eocene through eustatic level changes affecting the Proto-Paratethys sea. In line with climate modelling results, the sea retreat may have amplified the aridification of the Asian interior. Hence, future studies of Asian paleoenvironmental change during Eocene times also have to be interpreted in terms of fluctuations in moisture supply by the changing paleogeography of the proto-Paratethys Sea in Central Asia.

  11. Understanding long-term carbon cycle trends: The late Paleocene through the early Eocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komar, N.; Zeebe, R. E.; Dickens, G. R.

    2013-12-01

    The late Paleocene to the early Eocene (˜58-52 Ma) was marked by significant changes in global climate and carbon cycling. The evidence for these changes includes stable isotope records that reveal prominent decreases in δ18O and δ13C, suggesting a rise in Earth's surface temperature (˜4°C) and a drop in net carbon output from the ocean and atmosphere. Concurrently, deep-sea carbonate records at several sites indicate a deepening of the calcite compensation depth (CCD). Here we investigate possible causes (e.g., increased volcanic degassing or decreased net organic burial) for these observations, but from a new perspective. The basic model employed is a modified version of GEOCARB III. However, we have coupled this well-known geochemical model to LOSCAR (Long-term Ocean-atmosphere Sediment CArbon cycle Reservoir model), which enables simulation of seawater carbonate chemistry, the CCD, and ocean δ13C. We have also added a capacitor, in this case represented by gas hydrates, that can store and release13C-depleted carbon to and from the shallow geosphere over millions of years. We further consider accurate input data (e.g., δ13C of carbonate) on a currently accepted timescale that spans an interval much longer than the perturbation. Several different scenarios are investigated with the goal of consistency amongst inferred changes in temperature, the CCD, and surface ocean and deep ocean δ13C. The results strongly suggest that a decrease in net organic carbon burial drove carbon cycle changes during the late Paleocene and early Eocene, although an increase in volcanic activity might have contributed. Importantly, a drop in net organic carbon burial may represent increased oxidation of previously deposited organic carbon, such as stored in peat or gas hydrates. The model successfully recreates trends in Earth surface warming, as inferred from δ18O records, the CCD, and δ13C. At the moment, however, our coupled modeling effort cannot reproduce the magnitude of

  12. Environmental perturbations at the early Eocene ETM2, H2, and I1 events as inferred by Tethyan calcareous plankton (Terche section, northeastern Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Onofrio, Roberta; Luciani, Valeria; Fornaciari, Eliana; Giusberti, Luca; Boscolo Galazzo, Flavia; Dallanave, Edoardo; Westerhold, Thomas; Sprovieri, Mario; Telch, Sonia

    2016-09-01

    Several early Eocene hyperthermals have been recently investigated and characterized in terms of temperature anomalies and oceanographic changes. The effects of these climatic perturbations on biotic communities are much less constrained. Here we present new records from the Terche section (northeastern Italy) that, for the first time, integrates data on planktic foraminifera and calcareous nannofossils across three post-Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum negative carbon isotope excursions (CIEs). The biomagnetostratigraphic framework generated at Terche allows us to confidently relate such CIEs to the Eocene Thermal Maximum 2 (ETM2), H2, and I1 events. Each of these events coincides with lithological anomalies characterized by significantly lower calcium carbonate content (marly units, MUs). We interpret these MUs as mainly linked to an effect of increased terrigenous dilution, as dissolution proxies do not display significant variations. Calcareous plankton assemblages change significantly across these events and radiolarians increase. Observed changes suggest that transient warming and environmental perturbations, though more intense during ETM2, occurred during each of the three investigated perturbations. Variations among calcareous plankton suggest increase in surface-water eutrophication with respect to the pre-event conditions, coupled with a weakening of the upper water-column thermal stratification. Higher nutrient discharge was related to intensification of the hydrological cycle as a consequence of the warmer climate. These conditions persisted during the early CIE recovery, implying slower recovery rates for the environment and biota than for the carbon cycle.

  13. Equator-to-Pole Gradients in Marine Phytoplankton Size across the Eocene-Oligocene Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderiks, J.; Pagani, M.; Bohaty, S. M.

    2011-12-01

    Ongoing global climate change has already shown to have profound impacts on both terrestrial and marine ecosystems, most notably in polar regions. Still, we lack basic knowledge about the response of marine primary producers and their ability to adapt to future climate scenarios. Some taxa will be more susceptible to environmental perturbations than others, while the plastic responses of modern species as reported from short-term experiments may not translate into longer-term climatic adaptation. Phytoplankton cell size (or, volume) directly impacts biogeochemical and biological processes on both ecological and evolutionary timescales. Cell size strongly determines the physiology of unicellular algae, including growth rates and rates of biomineralisation. Hence, reconstructions of algal cell geometry from fossil assemblages may serve as a proxy for longer-term adaptive strategies of ancient marine phytoplankton during major climatic perturbations and shifts of the Cenozoic. Deep-sea sediments from the equatorial Atlantic and Southern Ocean reveal strong latitudinal gradients in calcareous nannoplankton composition and cell size during the Eocene-Oligocene Transition (EOT, ~34 Ma) - a critical interval in Cenozoic climate evolution characterized by global cooling and Antarctic glaciation. Our data confirm a decrease in mean cell size across the EOT coinciding with a steep decline in atmospheric pCO2, which is mainly an expression of the replacement of large-celled taxa by smaller morphospecies. Intriguingly, distinct latitudinal contrasts in size and species composition correlate to offsets in alkenone-based paleo-pCO2 proxies from the two regions, with seemingly higher dissolved CO2 in surface waters of the high-southern latitudes. However, part of this pattern may also relate to regional differences in past nutrient availability and temperature.

  14. Cretaceous and Eocene lignite deposits, Jackson Purchase, Kentucky

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hower, J.C.; Rich, F.J.; Williams, D.A.; Bland, A.E.; Fiene, F.L.

    1990-01-01

    Lignites occur in the Cretaceous McNairy Formation and the Eocene Claiborne Formation in the Jackson Purchase region of western Kentucky. The lone Cretaceous lignite sample has over 18 percent inertodetrinite and 32 percent humodetrinite which, along with the abundant mineral matter, suggests a possible allochthonous origin for the deposit. The Claiborne Formation lignites have higher humic maceral contents than the Cretaceous lignites. Palynology suggests that there was considerable variation in the plant communities responsible for the Claiborne deposits. Differences in the preservation of the various plants is also seen in the variations between the humic types, particularly in the ulminite and humodetrinite contents. Potter and Dilcher (1980) suggested that the Claiborne lignites in the Jackson Purchase and west Tennessee developed in the abandoned oxbows of Eocene rivers. Significant short-distance changes in the peat thickness, flora, and other depositional elements should be expected in such an environment and could easily account for the observed variations in composition. ?? 1990.

  15. The Middle Eocene flora of Csordakút (N Hungary)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erdei, Boglárka; Rákosi, László

    2009-02-01

    The Middle Eocene fossil plant assemblage from Csordakút (N Hungary) comprises plant remains preserved exclusively as impressions. Algae are represented by abundant remains of Characeae, including both vegetative fragments and gyrogonites. Remains of angiosperms comprise Lauraceae (Daphnogene sp.), Fagaceae (cf. Eotrigonobalanus furcinervis), Ulmaceae (Cedrelospermum div. sp.), Myricaceae (Myrica sp., Comptonia div. sp.), Leguminosae (leaves and fruit), Rhamnaceae (?Zizyphus zizyphoides), Elaeocarpaceae (Sloanea nimrodi, Sloanea sp. fruit), Smilacaceae (Smilax div. sp.). The absence of gymnosperms is indicative of a floristic similarity to the coeval floras of Tatabánya (N Hungary) and Girbou in Romania. Sloanea nimrodi (Ettingshausen) Kvaček & Hably, a new element for the Hungarian fossil record indicates a floristic relation to the Late Eocene flora of Kučlin (Bohemia).

  16. Taxonomic description of in situ bee pollen from the middle Eocene of Germany

    PubMed Central

    Grímsson, FriĐgeir; Zetter, Reinhard; Labandeira, Conrad C.; Engel, Michael S.; Wappler, Torsten

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The middle Eocene Messel and Eckfeld localities are renowned for their excellently preserved faunas and diverse floras. Here we describe for the first time pollen from insect-pollinated plants found in situ on well-preserved ancient bees using light and scanning electron microscopy. There have been 140 pollen types reported from Messel and 162 pollen types from Eckfeld. Here we document 23 pollen types, six from Messel and 18 from Eckfeld (one is shared). The taxa reported here are all pollinated by insects and mostly not recovered in the previously studied dispersed fossil pollen records. Typically, a single or two pollen types are found on each fossil bee specimen, the maximum number of distinct pollen types on a single individual is five. Only five of the 23 pollen types obtained are angiosperms of unknown affinity, the remainder cover a broad taxonomic range of angiosperm trees and include members of several major clades: monocots (1 pollen type), fabids (7), malvids (4), asterids (5) and other core eudicots (1). Seven types each can be assigned to individual genera or infrafamilial clades. Since bees visit only flowers in the relative vicinity of their habitat, the recovered pollen provides a unique insight into the autochthonous palaeo-flora. The coexistence of taxa such as Decodon, Elaeocarpus, Mortoniodendron and other Tilioideae, Mastixoideae, Olax, Pouteria and Nyssa confirms current views that diverse, thermophilic forests thrived at the Messel and Eckfeld localities, probably under a warm subtropical, fully humid climate. Our study calls for increased attention to pollen found in situ on pollen-harvesting insects such as bees, which can provide new insights on insect-pollinated plants and complement even detailed palaeo-palynological knowledge obtained mostly from pollen of wind-pollinated plants in the dispersed pollen record of sediments. In the case of Elaeocarpus, Mortoniodendron, Olax and Pouteria the pollen collected by the middle Eocene

  17. Taxonomic description of in situ bee pollen from the middle Eocene of Germany.

    PubMed

    Grímsson, FriĐgeir; Zetter, Reinhard; Labandeira, Conrad C; Engel, Michael S; Wappler, Torsten

    2017-01-02

    The middle Eocene Messel and Eckfeld localities are renowned for their excellently preserved faunas and diverse floras. Here we describe for the first time pollen from insect-pollinated plants found in situ on well-preserved ancient bees using light and scanning electron microscopy. There have been 140 pollen types reported from Messel and 162 pollen types from Eckfeld. Here we document 23 pollen types, six from Messel and 18 from Eckfeld (one is shared). The taxa reported here are all pollinated by insects and mostly not recovered in the previously studied dispersed fossil pollen records. Typically, a single or two pollen types are found on each fossil bee specimen, the maximum number of distinct pollen types on a single individual is five. Only five of the 23 pollen types obtained are angiosperms of unknown affinity, the remainder cover a broad taxonomic range of angiosperm trees and include members of several major clades: monocots (1 pollen type), fabids (7), malvids (4), asterids (5) and other core eudicots (1). Seven types each can be assigned to individual genera or infrafamilial clades. Since bees visit only flowers in the relative vicinity of their habitat, the recovered pollen provides a unique insight into the autochthonous palaeo-flora. The coexistence of taxa such as Decodon, Elaeocarpus, Mortoniodendron and other Tilioideae, Mastixoideae, Olax, Pouteria and Nyssa confirms current views that diverse, thermophilic forests thrived at the Messel and Eckfeld localities, probably under a warm subtropical, fully humid climate. Our study calls for increased attention to pollen found in situ on pollen-harvesting insects such as bees, which can provide new insights on insect-pollinated plants and complement even detailed palaeo-palynological knowledge obtained mostly from pollen of wind-pollinated plants in the dispersed pollen record of sediments. In the case of Elaeocarpus, Mortoniodendron, Olax and Pouteria the pollen collected by the middle Eocene bees

  18. Decreased Temperate but not Polar Fish Productivity Across the Eocene-Oligocene Transition: Insights from Ichthyoliths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zill, M.; Sibert, E. C.; Norris, R. D.

    2015-12-01

    The Eocene-Oligocene Transition (EOT, 38-28 Ma) was a period of global cooling and increased nutrient delivery to the ocean. It is associated with the onset of permanent ice sheet on Antarctica, and the beginning of a highly productive polar ecosystem, dominated by diatoms and favoring short, efficient food chains. In a highly efficient, large phytoplankton-dominated ecosystem, we would expect to see higher abundances of consumers, as fewer trophic steps means more carbon available to upper trophic level groups. Here we use the accumulation rate of ichthyoliths (fish teeth and dermal scales) to measure the relative export production of fish through this time period of changing climate. Records from the South Atlantic gyre (DSDP Site 522) the South Pacific Gyre (DSDP Site 596) and the Southern Ocean (DSDP Site 689) show a 50% reduction in ichthyolith accumulation rate in the vicinity the Eocene Oligocene boundary. However, this drop in fish production occurs just after the E/O in the Atlantic, 4 million years before the E/O in the Pacific and 6 million years prior to the E/O in the Southern Ocean. Since the EOT is generally associated with an increase in productivity and diatom blooms in the Southern Ocean and tropical Pacific, we would expect that the abundance of fish would increase across the transition. Our results are surprisingly the inverse of this expectation, and suggest that the transition from greenhouse to icehouse did not produce increase in forage fish or even a response of any kind during the climatological transition into the icehouse world. Indeed, it seems that ichthyolith accumulation rate and primary productivity are not perfectly linked, and it may be that ichthyolith accumulation is responding more to another factor, such as ocean temperature or prey availability that is not linked to the increased diatom production during the EOT.

  19. Geochemistry of East Antarctic Margin Sediments Spanning the Eocene Oligocene Transition.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Light, J. J.; Passchier, S.

    2016-12-01

    The Eocene Oligocene Transition (EOT) 34 million years ago (Ma), marked the global climate change from greenhouse to icehouse, and the full establishment of the East Antarctic Ice Sheet (EAIS). The initiation of the EAIS during the EOT is believed to have been a step-wise transition; however, data resolution is low and merits the need for further study. The purpose of this study is to expand upon existing knowledge of EAIS dynamics spanning the EOT by creating a higher resolution geochemical record of cores taken from continental shelf sites 1166 in Prydz Bay and U1360 from the Wilkes Land margin. We used Inductively Coupled Plasma Optical Emission Spectrometry and Mass Spectrometry (ICP-OES/ ICP-MS) to determine the bulk chemical composition of samples. Results were used to calculate the Chemical Index of Alteration (CIA), Al2O3/TiO2 ratios, and trace elemental variation down core. CIA values for the early Oligocene in Site U1360 indicate an arid colder environment less likely to be chemically weathered. In contrast, Hole 1166A shows values similar to average shales that increase up core and abruptly decrease at the overlying Neogene diamict, suggesting a warmer more humid environment at Prydz Bay during the late Eocene. Al2O3/TiO2 ratios were used to evaluate mud provenance changes at each site. At site 1166 redox sensitive elements (Cr, Ni, and V) show similar down core distributions to one another. The changes in elemental intensities are likely being controlled by factors such as sediment provenance, changes in redox conditions and surficial weathering. We expect the outcomes of this study to allow us to interpret regional depositional environments at a higher resolution, as well as to shed light on the EAIS's step-wise initiation.

  20. Webspinners in Early Eocene amber from western India (Insecta, Embiodea)

    PubMed Central

    Engel, Michael S.; Grimaldi, David A.; Singh, Hukam; Nascimbene, Paul C.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract The family Scelembiidae (Neoembiodea: Embiomorpha: Archembioidea) is recorded from Asia for the first time, based on two individuals preserved in Early Eocene amber from the Cambay Basin, western India. Kumarembia hurleyi Engel & Grimaldi, gen. n. et sp. n., is described, figured, and distinguished from other archembioid genera. The genus shares male genitalic features with scelembiids, otherwise known from South America and Africa. PMID:22287898

  1. A New Eocene Casquehead Lizard (Reptilia, Corytophanidae) from North America.

    PubMed

    Conrad, Jack L

    2015-01-01

    A new fossil showing affinities with extant Laemanctus offers the first clear evidence for a casquehead lizard (Corytophanidae) from the Eocene of North America. Along with Geiseltaliellus from roughly coeval rocks in central Europe, the new find further documents the tropical fauna present during greenhouse conditions in the northern mid-latitudes approximately 50 million years ago (Ma). Modern Corytophanidae is a neotropical clade of iguanian lizards ranging from southern Mexico to northern South America.

  2. A New Eocene Casquehead Lizard (Reptilia, Corytophanidae) from North America

    PubMed Central

    Conrad, Jack L.

    2015-01-01

    A new fossil showing affinities with extant Laemanctus offers the first clear evidence for a casquehead lizard (Corytophanidae) from the Eocene of North America. Along with Geiseltaliellus from roughly coeval rocks in central Europe, the new find further documents the tropical fauna present during greenhouse conditions in the northern mid-latitudes approximately 50 million years ago (Ma). Modern Corytophanidae is a neotropical clade of iguanian lizards ranging from southern Mexico to northern South America. PMID:26131767

  3. Living on the edge: The oxygen isotope record of Eocene Basins at the margin of the Cenozoic North American plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Methner, Katharina; Mulch, Andreas; Chamberlain, Page

    2013-04-01

    Topography has a strong impact on atmospheric circulation and precipitation patterns and is a key element in reconstructing the dynamics of mountain building processes. The topographic evolution of the world's major orogens remains one of the most important questions when discussing the interactions among tectonics, climate, and Earth surface processes. Here, we focus on the spatial and temporal development of topography and relief in the western North American Cordillera and how changes in the topography may have affected precipitation patterns and vice versa. In this context, we sampled more than 20 sections in Eocene to Oligocene terrestrial (intermontane?) basins (Chumstick, Swauk, and Chuckanut) in western and central Washington (USA) to the W and E of the modern Cascades. Oxygen isotope analysis of pedogenic carbonate in these sections allows us to reconstruct the isotopic composition of ancient soilwater or groundwater, and ultimately precipitation. Oxygen isotope measurements of pedogenic concretions and calcic horizons interestingly yield uniformly low δ18O values of 10 to 13‰ SMOW despite the proximity of all sections to the Pacific moisture source. These extremely low oxygen isotope values can result from (1) highly 18O-depleted meteoric waters (soil- or groundwater), (2) burial diagenesis at moderate temperatures and interaction with 18O-depleted (ground)water, and (3) high burial temperatures and and exchange with basins brines. Vitrinite reflectance data and preservation of primary soil structures such as rootlets, root casts, burrows, or even preserved wood fragments clearly show that some of the low-d18O sections were not affected by high degrees of burial diagenesis. Thus, we believe that the primary isotopic signal of ancient soil- or groundwater is preserved at least in parts (if not in all) of these basins. Low δ18O values of pedogenic carbonate require highly 18O-depleted meteoric water, which in turn, would require high elevation either at

  4. Changes in Sediment Provenance to the Southeast Newfoundland Ridge from the late Eocene to the Early Oligocene; Northern Hemisphere Glaciation or Deep Water Circulation?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scher, H. D.; Romans, B.; Moffett, Z. J.; Buckley, W. P.; Gibson, K.

    2013-12-01

    continents. There is not a long term trend nor prominent inflections in the fossil fish tooth ɛNd record that are associated with terrigenous ɛNd values so it does not appear likely that changes in sediment provenance were accompanied by a reorganization of deep water masses. Thus the preliminary results are cautiously interpreted as reflecting a sedimentological response to an overall increase in weathering/erosion of ancient continental crust, possibly on Greenland, over the investigated interval. In this context these results may reflect the emplacement of northern hemisphere ice sheets in the latest Eocene, preceded by prominent short-lived glacial events in the Eocene. The first short-lived event falls within polarity chron C17n.1n, which corresponds with the timing of a known Eocene glaciation on Antarctica and suggests that the greenhouse climate in the late Eocene supported a bipolar glacial event. We are currently generating a record of relative paleo-bottom current intensity from U1411 using the sortable silt proxy to further evaluate the role of bottom currents in terrigenous sediment provenance on the SENR.

  5. Eocene diversification of crown group rails (Aves: Gruiformes: Rallidae).

    PubMed

    García-R, Juan C; Gibb, Gillian C; Trewick, Steve A

    2014-01-01

    Central to our understanding of the timing of bird evolution is debate about an apparent conflict between fossil and molecular data. A deep age for higher level taxa within Neoaves is evident from molecular analyses but much remains to be learned about the age of diversification in modern bird families and their evolutionary ecology. In order to better understand the timing and pattern of diversification within the family Rallidae we used a relaxed molecular clock, fossil calibrations, and complete mitochondrial genomes from a range of rallid species analysed in a Bayesian framework. The estimated time of origin of Rallidae is Eocene, about 40.5 Mya, with evidence of intrafamiliar diversification from the Late Eocene to the Miocene. This timing is older than previously suggested for crown group Rallidae, but fossil calibrations, extent of taxon sampling and substantial sequence data give it credence. We note that fossils of Eocene age tentatively assigned to Rallidae are consistent with our findings. Compared to available studies of other bird lineages, the rail clade is old and supports an inference of deep ancestry of ground-dwelling habits among Neoaves.

  6. Late Eocene white pines (Pinus subgenus Strobus) from southern China

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Qingqing; Zhou, Wenjun; Kodrul, Tatiana M.; Naugolnykh, Serge V.; Jin, Jianhua

    2015-01-01

    Fossil records indicate that the genus Pinus L. split into two subgenera by the Late Cretaceous, although subgenus Strobus (D. Don) Lemmon is less well documented than subgenus Pinus L., especially in eastern Asia. In this paper, Pinus maomingensis sp. nov. is established based on a compressed seed cone from the upper Eocene of the Maoming Basin of southern China. This species is attributed to genus Pinus, subgenus Strobus, section Quinquefoliae Duhamel, subsection Strobus Loudon based on the combination of morphological characters obtained from the cone scales, specifically from the terminal umbo, rhombic apophysis, and cuticle structure. Associated fascicles of needle leaves with deciduous sheaths and bulbous bases are recognized as Pinus sp. and also represent Pinus subgenus Strobus. This new discovery from the Maoming Basin constitutes the first megafossil record of subgenus Strobus from southern China and implies that the members of this subgenus arrived in the southern region of China by the late Eocene. The extant species of subgenus Strobus are mainly distributed in northern temperate and tropical to subtropical mountainous regions. We propose that the Maoming Basin was adjacent to a mountainous region during the late Eocene. PMID:26548658

  7. Tectonic model for Eocene Formation of the Columbia basin

    SciTech Connect

    Fisk, L.H. ); Fritts, S.G. )

    1990-05-01

    Evidence suggests that a major sedimentary basin underlies the Columbia plateau in Oregon and Washington; however, the Miocene Columbia River Basalts conceal critical structural relationships between adjacent exotic terranes. To date, no interpretations have been published that adequately address the three related questions of the architecture, age, and mechanism of formation of the Columbia basin. The authors interpret residual gravity and aerial photographic data to show, within the basin, a pattern of deep fault architecture consistent with northwest-southeast-oriented rifting. Paleotectonic reconstructions for the Pacific Northwest suggest that rifting may have begun during the Cretaceous, as interpreted previously, but stratigraphic, geophysical and well data point to an early Eocene age for initiation of dramatic rifting and basin subsidence resulting from oblique subduction of the Farallon plate. Their tectonic model for Eocene formation of rift basins underlying the Columbia River Basalt addresses important, previously unanswered questions regarding the tectonics of the Pacific Northwest and rationally relates tectonics and sedimentation over the full extent of the basin from north-central Washington to north-central Oregon. The rifting event(s) they propose explain that the formation of the Columbia basin is consistent in timing and geometry with tectonic events in areas adjacent to the Columbia basin, and thus is but a part of a much larger picture of dramatic extension affecting the entire Pacific Northwest in the Eocene.

  8. Late Eocene impact events recorded in deep-sea sediments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glass, B. P.

    1988-01-01

    Raup and Sepkoski proposed that mass extinctions have occurred every 26 Myr during the last 250 Myr. In order to explain this 26 Myr periodicity, it was proposed that the mass extinctions were caused by periodic increases in cometary impacts. One method to test this hypothesis is to determine if there were periodic increases in impact events (based on crater ages) that correlate with mass extinctions. A way to test the hypothesis that mass extinctions were caused by periodic increases in impact cratering is to look for evidence of impact events in deep-sea deposits. This method allows direct observation of the temporal relationship between impact events and extinctions as recorded in the sedimentary record. There is evidence in the deep-sea record for two (possibly three) impact events in the late Eocene. The younger event, represented by the North American microtektite layer, is not associated with an Ir anomaly. The older event, defined by the cpx spherule layer, is associated with an Ir anomaly. However, neither of the two impact events recorded in late Eocene deposits appears to be associated with an unusual number of extinctions. Thus there is little evidence in the deep-sea record for an impact-related mass extinction in the late Eocene.

  9. Eocene tidal deposits, northern San Diego County, California

    SciTech Connect

    Eisenberg, L.I.; Abbott, P.L.

    1985-02-01

    A transgressive-regressive sedimentation sequence is recorded in a band of middle Eocene strata a few miles wide. An abundance of primary sedimentary structures, along with interfingering relationships and paleontology, define 12 lithofacies representing depositional environments including nearshore shelf, outer and inner barrier island, tidal flats and channels, lagoon and lagoonal delta. Tide-influenced sedimentary features are well defined and include meandering and abandoned tidal channels, oppositely inclined superimposed cross-strata, interlaminated mud and sand along the basal and lateral accretion surfaces of migrating tidal channels, flaser and wavy bedding, and storm-deposited strata. The first sedimentary half cycle was transgressive and documents the compression of dominantly tidal-flat and lagoonal environments against a steep, hilly coastline by the overall rising sea level of early and medial middle Eocene time. The inboard tidal-flat and lagoonal mudstones (Delmar and Friars Formations) and outboard tidal flat, channel and bar sandstones (Torrey Sandstone and Scripps Formation) interfinger in a landward-climbing, 3-dimensional sedimentary mass that parallels and meets the basement with a pronounced unconformity. The second half cycle was regressive and occurred in the medial and late middle Eocene. It formed due to the influx of coarser, more angular sediment from the adjacent basement into the narrowed paralic zone. This westward (seaward) progradation of lagoonal delta and inner tidal-flat sandy sediments occurred despite the still-rising sea level.

  10. Testing the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum Magnetofossil Spike Hypothesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tikoo, S. M.; Kopp, R. E.; Smirnov, A. V.; Raub, T. D.; Schumann, D.; Vali, H.; Kirschvink, J. L.

    2007-12-01

    Ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) spectroscopy detected a magnetofossil spike in Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM) kaolinitic siltstone of New Jersey's Atlantic Coastal Plain, confirmed by two independent TEM studies and consistent with (but not required by) data from conventional rock magnetic analyses [1,2]. Applying first-order reversal curve (FORC) analysis to the same sediments demonstrates for the first time that ancient magnetofossils bear a FORC signature similar to that of both cultured and environmental magnetotactic bacteria. In order to test whether the observed PETM magnetofossil enrichment was a local or global phenomenon, we compare multi-proxy enviromagnetic profiles through the Atlantic Coastal Plain clay and present new FMR and rock-magnetic stratigraphies through other Paleocene-Eocene boundary sections. Our analyses of samples from the Paleocene-Eocene GSSP at Dababiya, Egypt, indicate the presence of a positive anisotropic, medium- to-high coercivity ferromagnetic component with FMR signatures similar to transitional signatures immediately preceding and following the magnetofossil spike in New Jersey. References: [1] R. E. Kopp,T. D. Raub, D. Schumann, H. Vali, A. V. Smirnov, and J. L. Kirschvink, 2007. Paleoceanography (in press). [2] P. C. Lippert and J. C. Zachos, 2007. Paleoceanography (in press).

  11. Eocene Diversification of Crown Group Rails (Aves: Gruiformes: Rallidae)

    PubMed Central

    García–R, Juan C.; Gibb, Gillian C.; Trewick, Steve A.

    2014-01-01

    Central to our understanding of the timing of bird evolution is debate about an apparent conflict between fossil and molecular data. A deep age for higher level taxa within Neoaves is evident from molecular analyses but much remains to be learned about the age of diversification in modern bird families and their evolutionary ecology. In order to better understand the timing and pattern of diversification within the family Rallidae we used a relaxed molecular clock, fossil calibrations, and complete mitochondrial genomes from a range of rallid species analysed in a Bayesian framework. The estimated time of origin of Rallidae is Eocene, about 40.5 Mya, with evidence of intrafamiliar diversification from the Late Eocene to the Miocene. This timing is older than previously suggested for crown group Rallidae, but fossil calibrations, extent of taxon sampling and substantial sequence data give it credence. We note that fossils of Eocene age tentatively assigned to Rallidae are consistent with our findings. Compared to available studies of other bird lineages, the rail clade is old and supports an inference of deep ancestry of ground-dwelling habits among Neoaves. PMID:25291147

  12. Hydrocarbon potential of Middle Eocene carbonates, Sirt Basin, Libya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swei, Giuma H.; Tucker, Maurice E.

    2015-11-01

    Deposition of Middle Eocene carbonates in the Sirt Basin in Libya has been the subject of considerable study in recent years because of the importance of sediments of this age as hydrocarbon reservoirs. The Gialo Formation is an important gas-producing reservoir in the Assumood, Sahl and other nearby fields. The gas which is generated from the gas-prone Sirt Shale source rock of the northern Ajdabiya Trough probably migrated in to the Assumood Ridge from the northeast through late Cretaceous, Paleocene and early Eocene carbonates, before being trapped beneath the Augila Shale (Upper Eocene) which is the principal regional seal in the area. This integrated study has enhanced our understanding of reservoir heterogeneity and hydrocarbon potential of the Gialo carbonates and should lead to improved exploration in the future. Reservoir quality in the Gialo Formation is a function of grain types, pore types, grain size, sorting, cementation and compaction, and predicting areas of high reservoir quality has proved difficult; exploration should be oriented to positioning wells into the main trend of the mid-ramp, nummulite accumulation. Different nummulite facies can be reservoirs depending on their diagenetic history. A diagenetic reduction in porosity must be distinguished from a lack of porosity resulting from an unfavourable depositional environment, so that exploration alternatives can be assessed. This integrated study has demonstrated the presence of suitable reservoir rocks, hydrocarbon traps and the close proximity of potential source rocks. These features should encourage further hydrocarbon exploration in the area.

  13. Late Eocene white pines (Pinus subgenus Strobus) from southern China.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qingqing; Zhou, Wenjun; Kodrul, Tatiana M; Naugolnykh, Serge V; Jin, Jianhua

    2015-11-09

    Fossil records indicate that the genus Pinus L. split into two subgenera by the Late Cretaceous, although subgenus Strobus (D. Don) Lemmon is less well documented than subgenus Pinus L., especially in eastern Asia. In this paper, Pinus maomingensis sp. nov. is established based on a compressed seed cone from the upper Eocene of the Maoming Basin of southern China. This species is attributed to genus Pinus, subgenus Strobus, section Quinquefoliae Duhamel, subsection Strobus Loudon based on the combination of morphological characters obtained from the cone scales, specifically from the terminal umbo, rhombic apophysis, and cuticle structure. Associated fascicles of needle leaves with deciduous sheaths and bulbous bases are recognized as Pinus sp. and also represent Pinus subgenus Strobus. This new discovery from the Maoming Basin constitutes the first megafossil record of subgenus Strobus from southern China and implies that the members of this subgenus arrived in the southern region of China by the late Eocene. The extant species of subgenus Strobus are mainly distributed in northern temperate and tropical to subtropical mountainous regions. We propose that the Maoming Basin was adjacent to a mountainous region during the late Eocene.

  14. Cocos sahnii Kaul: a Cocos nucifera L.-like fruit from the Early Eocene rainforest of Rajasthan, western India.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Anumeha; Mehrotra, Rakesh C; Guleria, Jaswant S

    2012-09-01

    Cocos sahnii Kaul, a fossil palm fruit, is validated and described from the Fuller's earth deposits of Kapurdi village of Rajasthan considered as Early Eocene in age. The fossil best resembles the genus Cocos, particularly Cocos nucifera L., which is now a common coastal element thriving in highly moist conditions. The recovery of this coconut-like fruit, along with earlier described evergreen taxa from the same formation, suggests the existence of typical tropical, warm and humid coastal conditions during the depositional period. The present arid to semi-arid climatic conditions occurring in Rajasthan indicate drastic climate change in the region during the Cenozoic. The possible time for the onset of aridity in the region which caused the total eradication of semi-evergreen to evergreen forests is discussed, as well as the palaeobiogeography of coconuts.

  15. Occurrence of gigantic biogenic magnetite during the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schumann, D.; Raub, T. D.; Kopp, R. E.; Guerquin-Kern, J. L.; Wu, T. D.; Rouiller, I.; Smirnov, A. V.; Sears, S. K.; Lücken, U.; Tikoo, S. M.; Hesse, R.; Kirschvink, J. L.; Vali, H.

    2009-04-01

    The Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM) is one of the most severe climatic events of the Cenozoic Era. A massive injection of light carbon into the oceans and atmosphere over a few thousand of years triggered drastic perturbation of Earth's climate resulting in abrupt global warming of ~5-9oC [Sluijs et al., 2007] that persisted for ~180,000 years. This episode is marked by the diversification and radiation of terrestrial plants and mammals while in the marine realm numerous deep-sea benthic foraminifera species disappeared and new forms evolved. Sediments deposited during the PETM are clay-rich and contain distinct evidence of these climatic changes. Kopp et al., (2007) and Lippert & Zachos (2007) report an extraordinary magnetofossil ‘Lagerstätte' in lowermost Eocene kaolinite-rich clay sediments deposited at subtropical paleolatitude in the Atlantic Coastal Plain of New Jersey, USA. Magnetofossils are magnetic particles produced most abundantly by magnetotactic bacteria. Kopp et al. (2007) and Lippert & Zachos (2007) used ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) spectroscopy, other rock magnetic methods, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) of magnetic separates to characterize sediments from boreholes at Ancora (ODP Leg 174AX) and Wilson Lake, NJ, respectively. These sediments contain abundant ~40- to 300-nm cuboidal, elongate-prismatic and bullet-shaped magnetofossils, sometimes arranged in short chains, resembling crystals in living magnetotactic bacteria. Despite the scarcity of intact magnetofossil chains, the asymmetry ratios of the FMR spectra reflects a profusion of elongate single domain (SD) crystals and/or chains. Here we address both conundrums by reporting the discovery from these same sediments of exceptionally large and novel biogenic magnetite crystals unlike any previously reported from living organisms or from sediments. Aside from abundant bacterial magnetofossils, electron microscopy reveals novel spearhead-like and spindle-like magnetite

  16. Apatite fission-track evidence for regional exhumation in the subtropical Eocene, block faulting, and localized fluid flow in east-central Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dusel-Bacon, Cynthia; Bacon, Charles R.; O'Sullivan, Paul B.; Day, Warren C.

    2016-01-01

    The origin and antiquity of the subdued topography of the Yukon–Tanana Upland (YTU), the physiographic province between the Denali and Tintina faults, are unresolved questions in the geologic history of interior Alaska and adjacent Yukon. We present apatite fission-track (AFT) results for 33 samples from the 2300 km2 western Fortymile district in the YTU in Alaska and propose an exhumation model that is consistent with preservation of volcanic rocks in valleys that requires base level stability of several drainages since latest Cretaceous–Paleocene time. AFT thermochronology indicates widespread cooling below ∼110 °C at ∼56–47 Ma (early Eocene) and ∼44–36 Ma (middle Eocene). Samples with ∼33–27, ∼19, and ∼10 Ma AFT ages, obtained near a major northeast-trending fault zone, apparently reflect hydrothermal fluid flow. Uplift and erosion following ∼107 Ma magmatism exposed plutonic rocks to different extents in various crustal blocks by latest Cretaceous time. We interpret the Eocene AFT ages to suggest that higher elevations were eroded during the Paleogene subtropical climate of the subarctic, while base level remained essentially stable. Tertiary basins outboard of the YTU contain sediment that may account for the required >2 km of removed overburden that was not carried to the sea by the ancestral Yukon River system. We consider a climate driven explanation for the Eocene AFT ages to be most consistent with geologic constraints in concert with block faulting related to translation on the Denali and Tintina faults resulting from oblique subduction along the southern margin of Alaska.

  17. Hydrological cycle during the early Eocene: What can we learn from leaf waxes?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnan, S.; Pagani, M.; Huber, M.

    2012-12-01

    Understanding how rapid warming modified global precipitation patterns during periods of global warming is essential to forecasting the impact of future climate change. The early Eocene (~55-52 Ma) represents a period of peak warmth for the past 65 million years with global temperatures ~10 degrees C warmer than present. This period is also known for at least three, greenhouse gas-induced episodes of rapid global warming (hyperthermals: PETM; ~55 Ma, ETM-2; ~53.7 Ma and ETM-3; 52.8 Ma), often considered extreme analogues to modern climate change. Hyperthermals are also characterized by negative carbon isotope excursions (CIE), which reflect the input of isotopically light carbon responsible for observed temperature increases. A novel proxy used for hydrological reconstructions uses the hydrogen isotopic composition of compound-specific biomarkers preserved in the sedimentary record. For terrestrial leaf-wax lipids (e.g., n-alkanes), the hydrogen isotopic composition primarily reflects the isotopic composition of meteoric waters, which is dependent on distance of vapor transport, number of rainout events, precipitation amount, and evapotranspiration. Isotopic compositions of PETM n-alkanes (δDalkanes) recovered from the Arctic Ocean show a substantial deuterium (D)-enrichment at the onset of the CIE which was argued to potentially reflect reduced rainout in the mid-latitudes, resulting in increased precipitation in the Arctic (Pagani et al., 2006). D-depleted values of n-alkanes during peak warmth of the PETM suggest either modification of local precipitation or a global change in the fraction of rainout. In this study, we evaluate the veracity of previous conclusions by compiling existing δDalkanes records (including from Mar-2X, Venezuela; Tawanui, New Zealand; Wilkes Land, Antarctica; and the Lomonsov Ridge, Arctic) with new records from the Pacific and Atlantic oceans and marginal marine sections (including Cicogna, Italy; Giraffe Core, Canadian High Arctic

  18. Iridium and Spherules in Late Eocene Impact Deposits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kyte, F. T.; Liu, S.

    2002-01-01

    We have been independently examining the Ir (FTK) and spherule (SL) contents of recently discovered late Eocene impact deposits from the south Atlantic and western Indian oceans. These include ODP Sites 1090 [14,15], 709 [lo], and 699 [Liu in prep.]. Iridium abundances at these sites are within the typical range reported for late Eocene deposits, with peak concentrations between 100 and 1000 pg/g. In Table 1 we present estimated net Ir fluences (in ng Ir/cm ) for these and nine other sites. Although there are fewer sites than the K/T boundary, the average of 9 ng Ir/cm2 is probably a good estimate of the late Eocene global flux. This is enough Ir for a 6 km comet (assuming 250 ng/g Ir, p=1.5), is sufficient to produce the Popigai or Chesapeake Bay structures, and is 16% of the flux estimated for the K/T boundary (55 ng/cm2 [ 161). Figure 1 shows the relative abundances of Ir, glassy microtektites and cpx-bearing spherules in sediments from Sites 699 and 1090, which are separated by only 3100 km. Although these two sites have similar Ir anomalies, the abundances of spherules are quite different. Site 1090 has well-defined peaks for both types of spherules, with a peak of 562 cpx spheruledg, while Site 699 contains only a few glassy microtektites and no cpx spherules. While the different abundances of spherules may reflect a heterogeneous distribution of spherules on the Earth s surface, an equally likely cause of this difference may be differential preservation of spherules in the sediment. recovered are only a trace residue of the initial impact deposit. Earlier work found 0.22 ng/g Ir in glassy microtektites from Site 689 [17], an insufficient concentration to support 0.16 ng/g in the bulk sediment at this site. We measured 15 ng/g Ir in a group of 95 cpx spherules from Site 1090 with sizes from 63 to -200 pm, a set typical of the size distribution at this site. Although this is a significant concentration it also cannot support the Ir peak. We presently lack

  19. Iridium and Spherules in Late Eocene Impact Deposits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kyte, F. T.; Liu, S.

    2002-01-01

    We have been independently examining the Ir (FTK) and spherule (SL) contents of recently discovered late Eocene impact deposits from the south Atlantic and western Indian oceans. These include ODP Sites 1090 [14,15], 709 [lo], and 699 [Liu in prep.]. Iridium abundances at these sites are within the typical range reported for late Eocene deposits, with peak concentrations between 100 and 1000 pg/g. In Table 1 we present estimated net Ir fluences (in ng Ir/cm ) for these and nine other sites. Although there are fewer sites than the K/T boundary, the average of 9 ng Ir/cm2 is probably a good estimate of the late Eocene global flux. This is enough Ir for a 6 km comet (assuming 250 ng/g Ir, p=1.5), is sufficient to produce the Popigai or Chesapeake Bay structures, and is 16% of the flux estimated for the K/T boundary (55 ng/cm2 [ 161). Figure 1 shows the relative abundances of Ir, glassy microtektites and cpx-bearing spherules in sediments from Sites 699 and 1090, which are separated by only 3100 km. Although these two sites have similar Ir anomalies, the abundances of spherules are quite different. Site 1090 has well-defined peaks for both types of spherules, with a peak of 562 cpx spheruledg, while Site 699 contains only a few glassy microtektites and no cpx spherules. While the different abundances of spherules may reflect a heterogeneous distribution of spherules on the Earth s surface, an equally likely cause of this difference may be differential preservation of spherules in the sediment. recovered are only a trace residue of the initial impact deposit. Earlier work found 0.22 ng/g Ir in glassy microtektites from Site 689 [17], an insufficient concentration to support 0.16 ng/g in the bulk sediment at this site. We measured 15 ng/g Ir in a group of 95 cpx spherules from Site 1090 with sizes from 63 to -200 pm, a set typical of the size distribution at this site. Although this is a significant concentration it also cannot support the Ir peak. We presently lack

  20. Eocene to Miocene biostratigraphy of New Jersey core ACGS #4; implications for regional stratigraphy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Poore, Richard Z.; Bybell, Laurel M.

    1988-01-01

    A time versus depth plot controlled primarily by nannofossil zone boundaries shows that sediment accumulation rates during the early and middle Eocene were in the range of 6 to 15 feet per million years. During the late Eocene, accumulation rates were much higher, perhaps exceeding 70 feet per million years. The only clear hiatus detected in the Paleogene part of ACGS #4 on the basis of microfossils is between the early and (?)late Oligocene. However, hiatuses are suspected at the early-middle Eocene boundary and within the late Eocene. Occurrences of calcareous nannofossils and planktic foraminifers are documented, and a number of key taxa are illustrated.