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Sample records for ephemeral fever

  1. Epidemiological Investigation of Bovine Ephemeral Fever Outbreaks in Israel

    PubMed Central

    Yeruham, Israel; Van Ham, Michael; Stram, Yehuda; Friedgut, Orly; Yadin, Hagai; Mumcuoglu, Kosta Y.; Braverman, Yehuda

    2010-01-01

    Outbreaks of bovine ephemeral fever (BEF) occurred in Israel in 1990, 1999, and 2004. The main patterns of BEF spread were similar in the 1990 and in 1999 epidemics, and the BEF virus was probably carried in vectors transported by air streams across the Rift Valley and the Red Sea. In the 2004 outbreak, the primary focus of the disease was the southern Mediterranean coastal plain and the disease agent was apparently brought by infected mosquitoes carried from their breeding site in the Nile Delta by the south-western winds. The disease broke out under optimal ecological conditions, among a vulnerable cattle population and spread rapidly; it showed essentially a spring-summer herd incidence and terminated soon after the night average ambient temperature fell below 16°C in late autumn. The herd incidence of the disease reached 78.4%, 97.7%, and 100% in 1990, 1999, and 2004, respectively. The highest herd incidence, morbidity, and case fatality rates were noted in dairy cattle herds in the Jordan Valley, with morbidity of 20%, 38.6%, and 22.2%, and case fatality rate among affected animals of 2%, 8.6%, and 5.4% in 1990, 1999, and 2004, respectively. The average sero-positivity to BEF in 1999 was 39.5%, which matched the morbidity rate. Comparison among the various age groups showed that the lowest morbidity rates were observed in the youngest age group, that is, heifers up to 1 year, with 3.2%, 3.6%, and 4.2% in 1990, 1999, and 2004, respectively. In heifers from 1 year to calving, the morbidity rates were 13.8%, 14.9%, and 28%, respectively, in first calvers 30.8%, 31.6%, and 28.3%, respectively, and in cows 34.3%, 35.7%, and 27.2%, respectively. All affected cattle were over the age of 3 months. It is hypothesized that mosquitoes and not Culicoides spp. are the vectors of the BEF virus in Israel. PMID:20814543

  2. Experimental infection with bovine ephemeral fever virus and analysis of its antibody response cattle.

    PubMed

    Zheng, F Y; Chen, Q W; Li, Z; Gong, X W; Wang, J D; Yin, H

    2016-02-01

    Bovine ephemeral fever (BEF) is an arthropod-borne viral disease that occurs throughout mainland China. LS11 obtained in the 2011 BEF epidemic was a wild strain, and its virulence and antibody response have never been studied in China. Therefore, the issues were investigated in this work. Experimental cattle were intravenously infected with different doses of BEF virus, and some non-infected cattle were simultaneously monitored. Blood and serum samples were collected from all animals over the course of our study. Infected cattle were challenged for a second time with BEF virus to determine protective period of the antibodies. BEF virus was detected in blood samples from infected cattle, but not in monitored cattle. The neutralizing antibodies (nAbs) against BEFV were easier to be detected and persisted for longer periods in cattle infected with higher doses of BEFV than in those infected with lower doses. When the titer of nAbs was equal to 5 or 6, re-infected cattle still could mount a challenge against BEFV. However, after 3 or 6months, when nAbs were no longer apparent, re-infected cattle displayed typical symptoms of BEF. Our findings indicated that vaccination should be performed once the titer of nAb decreased to 5 or 6.

  3. Safety, Immunogenicity and Duration of Immunity Elicited by an Inactivated Bovine Ephemeral Fever Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Aziz-Boaron, Orly; Leibovitz, Keren; Gelman, Boris; Kedmi, Maor; Klement, Eyal

    2013-01-01

    Bovine ephemeral fever (BEF) is an economically important viral vector-borne cattle disease. Several live-attenuated, inactivated and recombinant vaccines have been tested, demonstrating varying efficacy. However, to the best of our knowledge, duration of immunity conferred by an inactivated vaccine has never been reported. In the last decade, Israel has faced an increasing number of BEF outbreaks. The need for an effective vaccine compatible with strains circulating in the Middle East region led to the development of a MONTANIDE™ ISA 206 VG (water-in-oil-in-water), inactivated vaccine based on a local strain. We tested the safety, immunogenicity and duration of immunity conferred by this vaccine. The induced neutralizing antibody (NA) response was followed for 493 days in 40 cows vaccinated by different protocols. The vaccine did not cause adverse reactions or a decrease in milk production. All cows [except 2 (6.7%) which did not respond to vaccination] showed a significant rise in NA titer of up to 1:256 following the second, third or fourth booster vaccination. Neutralizing antibody levels declined gradually to 1:16 up to 120 days post vaccination. This decline continued in cows vaccinated only twice, whereas cows vaccinated 3 or 4 times showed stable titers of approximately 1:16 for up to 267 days post vaccination. At least three vaccinations with the inactivated BEF vaccine were needed to confer long-lasting immunity. These results may have significant implications for the choice of vaccination protocol with inactivated BEF vaccines. Complementary challenge data should however be added to the above results in order to determine what is the minimal NA response conferring protection from clinical disease. PMID:24349225

  4. Occurrence of bovine ephemeral fever in Okinawa Prefecture, Japan, in 2012 and development of a reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction assay to detect bovine ephemeral fever virus gene.

    PubMed

    Niwa, Tsuyoshi; Shirafuji, Hiroaki; Ikemiyagi, Kazufumi; Nitta, Yoshiki; Suzuki, Moemi; Kato, Tomoko; Yanase, Tohru

    2015-04-01

    In September 2012, several cows and a calf showed decreased activity, anorexia and fever on Ishigaki Island, Okinawa Prefecture, Japan, and the cases were diagnosed as bovine ephemeral fever (BEF). We isolated BEF virus (BEFV) from one of the affected cows and then determined the complete genome sequence of the G gene, which encodes a class I transmembrane glycoprotein of BEFV. The BEFV isolate in this case, ON-3/E/12, was sorted into the same cluster as other BEFV isolates in Japan, Taiwan and China obtained in 1996-2004 and was most closely related to a 2002 Chinese isolate, JT02L, according to the phylogenetic analysis of the complete G gene. Since inactivated vaccines for BEF available in Japan are considered effective against the ON-3/E/12 isolate as well as other isolates in East Asia from 1996-2004, annual vaccination should be conducted to prevent BEF in Okinawa. Additionally, in this study, we developed an RT-PCR assay to detect the BEFV gene in Japan and neighboring countries. Our assay was able to amplify target sequences in all of the tested BEFV isolates, including 18 isolates in Japan and another isolate in Australia. The assay was found to be useful also for testing RNA samples extracted from bovine peripheral blood mononuclear cells, and the detection limit of the assay was 10 copies per tube. We believe that our assay would be an important tool for the screening of BEFV infection and the diagnosis of BEF.

  5. Occurrence of bovine ephemeral fever in Okinawa Prefecture, Japan, in 2012 and development of a reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction assay to detect bovine ephemeral fever virus gene

    PubMed Central

    NIWA, Tsuyoshi; SHIRAFUJI, Hiroaki; IKEMIYAGI, Kazufumi; NITTA, Yoshiki; SUZUKI, Moemi; KATO, Tomoko; YANASE, Tohru

    2014-01-01

    In September 2012, several cows and a calf showed decreased activity, anorexia and fever on Ishigaki Island, Okinawa Prefecture, Japan, and the cases were diagnosed as bovine ephemeral fever (BEF). We isolated BEF virus (BEFV) from one of the affected cows and then determined the complete genome sequence of the G gene, which encodes a class I transmembrane glycoprotein of BEFV. The BEFV isolate in this case, ON-3/E/12, was sorted into the same cluster as other BEFV isolates in Japan, Taiwan and China obtained in 1996−2004 and was most closely related to a 2002 Chinese isolate, JT02L, according to the phylogenetic analysis of the complete G gene. Since inactivated vaccines for BEF available in Japan are considered effective against the ON-3/E/12 isolate as well as other isolates in East Asia from 1996−2004, annual vaccination should be conducted to prevent BEF in Okinawa. Additionally, in this study, we developed an RT-PCR assay to detect the BEFV gene in Japan and neighboring countries. Our assay was able to amplify target sequences in all of the tested BEFV isolates, including 18 isolates in Japan and another isolate in Australia. The assay was found to be useful also for testing RNA samples extracted from bovine peripheral blood mononuclear cells, and the detection limit of the assay was 10 copies per tube. We believe that our assay would be an important tool for the screening of BEFV infection and the diagnosis of BEF. PMID:25648276

  6. High-resolution melting (HRM) for genotyping bovine ephemeral fever virus (BEFV).

    PubMed

    Erster, Oran; Stram, Rotem; Menasherow, Shopia; Rubistein-Giuni, Marisol; Sharir, Binyamin; Kchinich, Evgeni; Stram, Yehuda

    2017-02-02

    In recent years there have been several major outbreaks of bovine ephemeral disease in the Middle East, including Israel. Such occurrences raise the need for quick identification of the viruses responsible for the outbreaks, in order to rapidly identify the entry of viruses that do not belong to the Middle-East BEFV lineage. This challenge was met by the development of a high-resolution melt (HRM) assay. The assay is based on the viral G gene sequence and generation of an algorithm that calculates and evaluates the GC content of various fragments. The algorithm was designed to scan 50- to 200-base-long segments in a sliding-window manner, compare and rank them using an Order of Technique of Preference by Similarity to Ideal Solution (TOPSIS) the technique for order preference by similarity to ideal solution technique, according to the differences in GC content of homologous fragments. Two fragments were selected, based on a match to the analysis criteria, in terms of size and GC content. These fragments were successfully used in the analysis to differentiate between different virus lineages, thus facilitating assignment of the viruses' geographical origins. Moreover, the assay could be used for differentiating infected from vaccinated animales (DIVA). The new algorithm may therefore be useful for development of improved genotyping studies for other viruses and possibly other microorganisms.

  7. Circulation of bovine ephemeral fever in the Middle East--strong evidence for transmission by winds and animal transport.

    PubMed

    Aziz-Boaron, Orly; Klausner, Ziv; Hasoksuz, Mustafa; Shenkar, Jenny; Gafni, Ohad; Gelman, Boris; David, Dan; Klement, Eyal

    2012-08-17

    Bovine ephemeral fever virus (BEFV) is an economically important arbovirus of cattle. The main routes of its transmission between countries and continents are not completely elucidated. This study aimed to explore BEFV transmission in the Middle-East. A phylogenetic analysis was performed on the gene encoding the G protein of BEFV isolates from Israel from 2000 and 2008 with isolates from Turkey (2008), Egypt (2005), Australia (1968-1998) and East Asia (1966-2004). Calf sera collected during the years 2006-2007 were tested by serum neutralization in order to explore for recent exposure to BEFV before 2008. These were followed by a meteorological analysis, aimed to reveal movement of air parcels into Israel in the two weeks preceding the first case of BEF in Israel in 2008. The 2008 Israeli and Turkish isolates showed 99% identity and formed a new cluster with the 2000 Israeli isolate. The serological survey showed no new exposure to BEFV during 2006 and 2007. These results coincided with the meteorological analysis, which revealed that air parcels originating in Southern Turkey had reached the location of outbreak onset in Israel nine days before the discovery of the index case. The Egyptian isolate clustered phylogenetically with the Taiwanese isolates, coinciding with data on importation of cattle from China to the Middle East in the year preceding the isolation of the Egyptian isolates. These results suggest that both winds and animal transport may have an important role in trans-boundary transmission of BEFV.

  8. Risk analysis and seroprevalence of bovine ephemeral fever virus in cattle in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Zaghawa, Ahmed; Housawi, Fadhel Mohamed Taher; Al-Naeem, Abdulmohsen; Al-Nakhly, Hassan; Kamr, Ahmed; Toribio, Ramiro

    2016-03-01

    Bovine ephemeral fever virus (BEFV) is an arthropod-borne rhabdovirus that causes disabling clinical signs and major economic losses in cattle and water buffalo. The disease is well documented in Asia, Africa, and the Middle East; however, the seroprevalence of BEFV in different regions and bovine breeds in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA) is unknown. The aim of this study was to analyze risk factors which affect the prevalence of antibodies against BEFV in small herds of cattle in four geographical regions of KSA. A total of 1480 serum samples from non-BEFV vaccinated small herds of cattle were collected from the Eastern, Jizan, Qasim, and Riyadh regions (370 samples per region) during the summer of 2010. Serum neutralization test was used to detect antibodies against BEFV. There was a significant effect of region, breed, sex, and age on the seroprevalence of BEFV. Seropositive ratios were 18, 18, 26, and 12 % for the Eastern, Jizan, Qasim, and Riyadh regions, respectively (P = 0.00002); 23.2 % for dairy and 13.7 % for non-dairy breeds (P = 0.00004); 24.4 % for males and 14.6 % for females (P = 0.00004); and 15.4, 29.1, and 11.4 % for animals <1 year, 1-3 years, and >3 years, respectively (P < 0.001). Risk analysis showed a significant effect of different regions of KSA on the seroprevalence of BEFV. Host risk factors (age, sex, and breed) showed also a significant effect on the seroprevalence of BEFV. This indicates active circulation of this virus in small herds of cattle. Insect control strategies and BEFV vaccination programs during the spring are recommended to reduce the spread of BEFV and minimize subsequent economic losses as this is adopted in many enzootic countries.

  9. A Report on Bovine Ephemeral Fever Virus in Turkey: Antigenic Variations of Different Strains of EFV in the 1985 and 2012 Outbreaks Using Partial Glycoprotein Gene Sequences.

    PubMed

    Oğuzoğlu, T Ç; Ertürk, A; Çizmeci, Ş G; Koç, B T; Akça, Y

    2015-10-01

    We described the aetiological agents of outbreaks of bovine ephemeral fever (BEF) that occurred in 1985 and 2012 in Turkey, and identify mutations in the viruses from both outbreaks. Outbreaks have emerged periodically every 4-5 years in the same regions in Turkey. Because these regions are located in a subtropical climatic zone, good conditions for vector populations exist. The results of this study show that the BEFVs from outbreaks in Turkey vary significantly. Effective prevention will require a vaccine that contains BEFVs from different genetic clusters. © 2013 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  10. Phylogenetic relationships of the glycoprotein gene of bovine ephemeral fever virus isolated from mainland China, Taiwan, Japan, Turkey, Israel and Australia

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The glycoprotein (G) gene sequences of bovine ephemeral fever virus (BEFV) strains derived from mainland China have not been compared with those of the isolates from other countries or areas. Therefore, the G genes of four BEFV isolates obtained from mainland China were amplified and sequenced. A phylogenetic tree was constructed in order to compare and analyze the genetic relationships of the BEFV isolates derived from mainland China and different countries and areas. Results The complete BEFV G gene was successfully amplified and sequenced from four isolates that originated from mainland China. A total of fifty-one BEFV strains were analyzed based on the G gene sequence and were found to be highly conserved. A phylogenetic tree showed that the isolates were grouped into three distinct lineages depending on their source of origin. The antigenic sites of G1, G2 and G3 are conserved among the isolates, except for several substitutions in a few strains. Conclusions The phylogenetic relationships of the BEFV isolates that originated from mainland China, Taiwan, Japan, Turkey, Israel and Australia were closely related to their source of origin, while the antigenic sites G1, G2 and G3 are conserved among the BEFV isolates used in this work. PMID:23150932

  11. The geographical distribution and first molecular analysis of Culicoides Latreille (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) species in the Southern and Southeastern Turkey during the 2012 outbreak of bovine ephemeral fever.

    PubMed

    Dik, B; Muz, D; Muz, M N; Uslu, U

    2014-11-01

    This study investigated the geographical distribution and molecular analysis of Culicoides species in the Southern and Southeastern Turkey during the 2012 outbreak of bovine ephemeral fever (BEF). The midge specimens caught by Onderstepoort-type light traps from livestock farms were tested for molecular evidence of existence of viral genome. Blood specimens were collected from clinically BEF-suspected acute febrile cattle. Total nucleic acid samples obtained from field specimens were checked against the BEF virus G gene and Culicoides internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS-1) gene. A total of 20,845 Culicoides specimens (20,569 ♀♀, 276 ♂♂) comprising 11 species (Culicoides badooshensis, Culicoides circumscriptus, Culicoides gejgelensis, Culicoides imicola, Culicoides kibunensis, Culicoides longipennis, Culicoides newsteadi, Culicoides nubeculosus, Culicoides odiatus, Culicoides punctatus, Culicoides schultzei, Culicoides spp.) were collected. C. schultzei (18,032) was found as the dominant species and followed by C. imicola (1,857), C. nubeculosus complex (545), and C. circumscriptus (259), respectively. C. kibunensis was identified as new species for this region. PCR positivity of BEF was found 37.14% (13/35) in blood samples whereas no viral genome was obtained from Culicoides specimens. Culicoides spp. ITS-1 gene sequences were analyzed phylogenetically with GenBank ITS-1 sequences. Molecular homology of Culicoides ITS-1 gene was ranged between 62.74 and 71.39%. The results described first molecular detection and phylogenetic analysis of Culicoides ITS-1 gene with reference to the 2012 BEF outbreak in Turkey.

  12. Seroprevalence of bovine ephemeral fever virus in domesticated and wildlife species during epidemic and inter-epidemic periods (2000-2009) in Israel.

    PubMed

    Aziz-Boaron, O; Brettschneider, S; King, R; Gelman, B; Klement, E

    2015-04-01

    Bovine ephemeral fever (BEF) is an economically important vector-borne viral disease of cattle and buffalo. It has been reported from most of the world's tropical and subtropical regions. In the last few decades, outbreaks of BEF have occurred in Israel almost every other year. Several serological studies have demonstrated a wide range of wild animal species that are positive for BEF virus (BEFV) antibodies. However, the question of whether wild animals and domesticated species other than cattle also play an important role in the maintenance and transmission of BEFV in Israel remains. Here, we examined the prevalence of anti-BEFV antibodies in 942 samples collected from various wild, semi-captive and domesticated animal species during the years 2000-2009 using the serum neutralization (SN) method. SN test revealed the presence of BEFV-neutralizing antibodies in nine samples (0.96%), from three species: Bubalus bubalis (4/29, 13.79%), Gazella g. gazella (3/68, 4.44%) and Dama d. mesopotamica (2/296, 0.68%). All positive samples were collected in areas of earlier outbreaks. The low prevalence of positive animals and the solid correlation with prior outbreaks indicate that the tested species probably do not serve as virus reservoirs and may play only a minor role in the maintenance of BEFV in the Middle East.

  13. Kinetics of pro-inflammatory cytokines, interleukin-10, and virus neutralising antibodies during acute ephemeral fever virus infections in Brahman cattle.

    PubMed

    Barigye, R; Melville, L F; Davis, S; Walsh, S; Hunt, N; Hunt, R; Elliot, N

    2015-12-15

    While fever and inflammation are hallmark features of bovine ephemeral fever (BEF), the cytokine networks that underlie the acute phase of the disease have not been empirically defined in cattle. This study characterised the plasma kinetics of proinflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-α) and IL-10 during acute BEF and elucidated on the relationship between the onset of the virus neutralizing antibody response and resolution of viraemia in natural BEF virus (BEFV) infections in cattle. Plasma from three BEFV-infected and three uninfected cattle was tested for the study cytokines by a cELISA, viraemia monitored by qRT-PCR, and virus neutralizing antibody titres determined using a standard protocol. Unlike the negative controls, plasma concentrations of IL-1β, TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-10 were consistently increased in the three virus-infected animals. Two of the infected heifers were recumbent and pyrexic on the first day of monitoring and increased cytokine production was already in progress by the time viraemia was detected in all the three infected animals. In all the virus-infected heifers, IL-1β was the most strongly expressed cytokine, IL-6 and IL-10 manifested intermediate plasma concentrations while TNF-α was the least expressed and demonstrated bi-phasic peaks three and five days after the onset of pyrexia. In two of the BEFV-infected heifers, viraemia resolved on the day of seroconversion while in the other infected animal, viral RNA was detectable up to three days after seroconversion. The present data document variable increase in plasma IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-α, and IL-10 during natural BEFV infections and the fact that upregulation of all but TNF-α precedes seroconversion. In addition to virus neutralising antibodies, it is likely that cytokine-mediated cellular mechanisms may be required for resolution of viraemia in BEF. Considering the anti-inflammatory properties of IL-10, its upregulation may potentially antagonise the fever response in BEFV

  14. Kinetics of selected plasma cytokines during innate-adaptive immune response transition in adult cattle infected with the bovine ephemeral fever virus.

    PubMed

    Barigye, R; Melville, L F; Davis, S; Walsh, S; Hunt, N; Hunt, R

    2016-04-15

    While virus neutralizing antibodies are known to be variably protective against bovine ephemeral fever (BEF) virus (BEFV) infections, the cytokine events that mediate the nascent adaptive immune response have not been defined in cattle. This study determined the plasma kinetics of IL-2, IFN-γ, IL-6, and IL-10 during the period of innate-immune response transition and evaluated the relationship between the virus neutralizing antibody response and viraemia in BEFV-infected cattle. Plasma from four virus-infected and uninfected negative control animals was tested by cytokine-specific immunoenzymatic assays, viraemia monitored by qRT-PCR, and virus neutralizing antibody titres determined using a standard protocol. Unlike the negative controls, plasma IL-6 and IL-10 were increased in all the virus-infected animals starting several days prior to initiation of viraemia. In one animal, plasma IL-2 and IFN-γ were consistently higher than in the other three virus-infected animals and the negative control mean. The animal with the strongest IL-2 and IFN-γ responses had the shortest viraemia while the heifer with the lowest IL-2/IFN-γ indices demonstrated the longest viraemia. Evidently, increase in plasma IL-6 and IL-10 precedes seroconversion during BEFV infections in cattle suggesting the two cytokines may influence immunological events that pave way to B-cell activation and seroconversion. While there is remarkable variability in IL-2 and IFN-γ expression amongst BEFV-infected animals, increased plasma levels of the two cytokines appear to be associated with a shorter viraemia. Ongoing studies will help define the precise role of T cells in anti-BEFV adaptive immune responses. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. Fever

    MedlinePlus

    ... MoreBMI Calculator FeverA fever is defined as a temperature 1° or more above the normal 98.6°. Minor infections may cause mild or short-term temperature elevations. Temperatures of 103° and above are considered ...

  16. Fever

    MedlinePlus

    A fever is a body temperature that is higher than normal. It is not an illness. It is part of your body's defense against infection. Most bacteria ... cause infections do well at the body's normal temperature (98.6 F). A slight fever can make ...

  17. Discontinuous ephemeral streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bull, William B.

    1997-07-01

    Many ephemeral streams in western North America flowed over smooth valley floors before transformation from shallow discontinuous channels into deep arroyos. These inherently unstable streams of semiarid regions are sensitive to short-term climatic changes, and to human impacts, because hillslopes supply abundant sediment to infrequent large streamflow events. Discontinuous ephemeral streams appear to be constantly changing as they alternate between two primary modes of operation; either aggradation or degradation may become dominant. Attainment of equilibrium conditions is brief. Disequilibrium is promoted by channel entrenchment that causes the fall of local base level, and by deposition of channel fans that causes the rise of local base level. These opposing base-level processes in adjacent reaches are maintained by self-enhancing feedback mechanisms. The threshold between erosion and deposition is crossed when aggradational or degradational reaches shift upstream or downstream. Extension of entrenched reaches into channel fans tends to create continuous arroyos. Upvalley migration of fan apexes tends to create depositional valley floors with few stream channels. Less than 100 years is required for arroyo cutting, but more than 500 years is required for complete aggradation of entrenched stream channels and valley floors. Discontinuous ephemeral streams have a repetitive sequence of streamflow characteristics that is as distinctive as sequences of meander bends or braided gravel bars in perennial rivers. The sequence changes from degradation to aggradation — headcuts concentrate sheetflow, a single trunk channel conveys flow to the apex of a channel fan, braided distributary channels end in an area of diverging sheetflow, and converging sheetflow drains to headcuts. The sequence is repeated at intervals ranging from 15 m for small streams to more than 10 km for large streams. Lithologic controls on the response of discontinuous ephemeral streams include: (1

  18. Community disassembly in ephemeral ecosystems.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, Brian J

    2016-12-01

    Community disassembly is the non-random process of progressive species declines and losses. This process is usually studied to determine how various forces extirpate species, such as catastrophic disturbance, species invasions, habitat fragmentation, or unnatural/anthropogenic stressors. However, in ephemeral ecosystems, community disassembly is a natural and repeatable process. While many ephemeral ecosystems are aquatic (vernal pools, playa lakes, rock pools, saline lakes, phytotelmata, etc.), some disassembly patterns are applicable to other ecosystem types, including terrestrial ecosystems. As ephemeral waterbodies near the end of their hydroperiod, certain aspects fundamentally change. These fundamental changes or mechanisms cause visible patterns of community disassembly. Decreasing habitat size eliminates microhabitats and increases encounter rates between organisms, possibly increasing predation and competition. A harshening habitat eliminates low-tolerance species, changes the proportions of specialists/generalists, and forces organisms to acclimate, emigrate, or die. Additionally, ultraviolet light affects more of the water column, eliminating unprotected species. Furthermore, the entire metacommunity is often in similar stages of disassembly and collapses. Many of these mechanisms drive disassembly of terrestrial ephemeral habitats, such as animal carcasses, dung pads, or fungal fruiting bodies. Organisms obligate to ephemeral habitats have evolved to optimize their life history for a rapid life cycle with specific adaptations for themselves or their offspring to survive through the inactive period of the ecosystem. While some disassembly may occur too fast for biotic interactions or compensatory dynamics to be important, organisms undergoing natural disassembly should "expect" it. Thus, predictions of disassembly based on internal or biotic patterns may be more common in natural disassembly scenarios than in human-induced disassembly of permanent

  19. Digital Discover of Ephemeral Ponds

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-08-01

    ER D C/ CE RL T R - 12 -2 1 Center Directed Research Program Digital Discover of Ephemeral Ponds En gi ne er R es ea rc h an d D ev el...r.mapcalc formula : r.terraflow lidar_elev filled=elev_filled \\ accum=elev_accum memory=2000 \\ dir=elev_dir swater=elev_sink tci =elev_tci...J. D., M. Shapiro, W. D. Goran, and D. P. Gerdes. 1992. Geographic Resources Analysis Support System (GRASS) Version 4.0 User’s Reference Manual . N

  20. Ephemeral gully: soil control factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ollobarren, Paul; Giménez, Rafael; Ángel Campo, Miguel; Casalí, Javier

    2014-05-01

    Soil erosion on hillslopes has been divided traditionally into sheet, rill, and (ephemeral) gully erosion. In sheet erosion, a relatively shallow overland flow acts on a hillslope and removes sediment particles uniformly from the land surface. Usually, rill erosion occur in uncertain points within sloping surfaces, whereas gullies occur in more specific places in the landscapes, i.e., within topographic swales or hollows. So that, current models for prediction of (ephemeral) gully initiation and development rely mainly on topographic factors while soil conditions are almost neglected. However, the assessment of the erodibility of soil materials is essential for analyzing and properly modeling gully erosion. But, despite the wealth of studies to characterize soil vulnerability to (gully) erosion, a universal approach is still lacking. This is due to the complexity of soil conditions and erosion phenomenon and their interactions. A useful and feasible soil characterization for gully erosion prediction at large scale should be based on simple, quick, repeatable and relatively inexpensive tests to perform. This work proposes a methodology for conducting simple tests in the field and laboratory to detect soil conditions prone to gully initiation. This approach for assessing soil erodibility includes the use of vane shear apparatus, penetrometers and a mini-rain simulator as well as some current (modified) laboratory tests for assessing soil crustability and erodibility. A pool of simple soil variables to assess soils prone to gully development is proposed. Among the main variables we have the granulometric composition of the top soil (textural fractions and gravel), organic matter content, soil cohesiveness and relative sensitivity of topsoils for crusting. Our finding may be particularly useful for erosion modelling when gully initiation and development do not largely rely on topographic features but in soil conditions.

  1. Cell entry of bovine ephemeral fever virus requires activation of Src-JNK-AP1 and PI3K-Akt-NF-κB pathways as well as Cox-2-mediated PGE2 /EP receptor signalling to enhance clathrin-mediated virus endocytosis.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Ching-Yuan; Huang, Wei-Ru; Chi, Pei-I; Chiu, Hung-Chuan; Liu, Hung-Jen

    2015-07-01

    Although we have previously demonstrated that cell entry of bovine ephemeral fever virus (BEFV) follows a clathrin-mediated and dynamin 2-dependent endocytosis pathway, the cellular mechanism mediating virus entry remains unknown. Here, we report that BEFV triggers simultaneously Src-JNK-AP1 and PI3K-Akt-NF-κB signalling pathways in the stage of virus binding to induce clathrin and dynamin 2 expressions, while vesicular stomatitis virus only activates Src-JNK signalling to enhance its entry. Activation of these pathways by ultraviolet-inactivated BEFV suggests a role for virus binding but not viral internalization and gene expression. By blocking these signalling pathways with specific inhibitors, BEFV-induced expressions of clathrin and dynamin 2 were significantly diminished. By labelling BEFV with 3,3'-dilinoleyloxacarbocyanine perchlorate to track viral entry, we found that virus entry was hindered by both Src and Akt inhibitors, suggesting that these signalling pathways are crucial for efficient virus entry. In addition, BEFV also triggers Cox-2-catalysed prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) synthesis and induces expressions of G-protein-coupled E-prostanoid (EP) receptors 2 and 4, leading to amplify signal cascades of Src-JNK-AP1 and PI3K-Akt-NF-κB, which elevates both clathrin and dynamin 2 expressions. Furthermore, pretreatment of cells with adenylate cyclase (cAMP) inhibitor SQ22536 reduced BEFV-induced Src phosphorylation as well as clathrin and dynamin 2 expressions. Our findings reveal for the first time that BEFV activates the Cox-2-mediated PGE2/EP receptor signalling pathways, further enhancing Src-JNK-AP1 in a cAMP-dependent manner and PI3K-Akt-NF-κB in a cAMP-independent manner. Accordingly, BEFV stimulates PGE2/EP receptor signalling amplifying Src-JNK-AP1 and PI3K-Akt-NF-κB pathways in an autocrine or paracrine fashion to enhance virus entry. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Desert potholes: Ephemeral aquatic microsystems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chan, M.A.; Moser, K.; Davis, J.M.; Southam, G.; Hughes, K.; Graham, T.

    2005-01-01

    An enigma of the Colorado Plateau high desert is the "pothole", which ranges from shallow ephemeral puddles to deeply carved pools. The existence of prokaryotic to eukaryotic organisms within these pools is largely controlled by the presence of collected rainwater. Multivariate statistical analysis of physical and chemical limnologic data variables measured from potholes indicates spatial and temporal variations, particularly in water depth, manganese, iron, nitrate and sulfate concentrations and salinity. Variation in water depth and salinity are likely related to the amount of time since the last precipitation, whereas the other variables may be related to redox potential. The spatial and temporal variations in water chemistry affect the distribution of organisms, which must adapt to daily and seasonal extremes of fluctuating temperature (0-60 ??C), pH changes of as much as 5 units over 12 days, and desiccation. For example, many species become dormant when potholes dry, in order to endure intense heat, UV radiation, desiccation and freezing, only to flourish again upon rehydration. But the pothole organisms also have a profound impact on the potholes. Through photosynthesis and respiration, pothole organisms affect redox potential, and indirectly alter the water chemistry. Laboratory examination of dried biofilm from the potholes revealed that within 2 weeks of hydration, the surface of the desiccated, black biofilm became green from cyanobacterial growth, which supported significant growth in heterotrophic bacterial populations. This complex biofilm is persumably responsible for dissolving the cement between the sandstone grains, allowing the potholes to enlarge, and for sealing the potholes, enabling them to retain water longer than the surrounding sandstone. Despite the remarkable ability of life in potholes to persist, desert potholes may be extremely sensitive to anthropogenic effects. The unique limnology and ecology of Utah potholes holds great scientific

  3. Intermittent ephemeral river-breaching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reniers, A. J.; MacMahan, J. H.; Gallagher, E. L.; Shanks, A.; Morgan, S.; Jarvis, M.; Thornton, E. B.; Brown, J.; Fujimura, A.

    2012-12-01

    In the summer of 2011 we performed a field experiment in Carmel River State Beach, CA, at a time when the intermittent natural breaching of the ephemeral Carmel River occurred due to an unusually rainy period prior to the experiment associated with El Nino. At this time the river would fill the lagoon over the period of a number of days after which a breach would occur. This allowed us to document a number of breaches with unique pre- and post-breach topographic surveys, accompanying ocean and lagoon water elevations as well as extremely high flow (4m/s) velocities in the river mouth during the breaching event. The topographic surveys were obtained with a GPS-equipped backpack mounted on a walking human and show the evolution of the river breaching with a gradually widening and deepening river channel that cuts through the pre-existing beach and berm. The beach face is qualified as a steep with an average beach slope of 1:10 with significant reflection of the incident waves (MacMahan et al., 2012). The wave directions are generally shore normal as the waves refract over the deep canyon that is located offshore of the beach. The tide is mixed semi-diurnal with a range on the order of one meter. Breaching typically occurred during the low-low tide. Grain size is highly variable along the beach with layers of alternating fine and coarse material that could clearly be observed as the river exit channel was cutting through the beach. Large rocky outcroppings buried under the beach sand are also present along certain stretches of the beach controlling the depth of the breaching channel. The changes in the water level measured within the lagoon and the ocean side allows for an estimate of the volume flux associated with the breach as function of morphology, tidal elevation and wave conditions as well as an assessment of the conditions and mechanisms of breach closure, which occurred on the time scale of O(0.5 days). Exploratory model simulations will be presented at the

  4. Flooding in ephemeral streams: incorporating transmission losses

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Stream flow in semiarid lands commonly occurs as a form of flash floods in dry ephemeral stream beds. The goal of this research is to couple hydrological and hydraulic models treats channel transmission losses and test the methodology in the USDA-ARS Walnut Gulch Experimental Watershed (WGEW). For h...

  5. Tools for Ephemeral Gully Erosion Process Research

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Techniques to quantify ephemeral gully erosion have been identified by USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) as one of gaps in current erosion assessment tools. One reason that may have contributed to this technology gap is the difficulty to quantify changes in channel geometry to asses...

  6. Typhoid Fever

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-01-01

    In addition to the usual causes of fever, the EP must consider less common diseases in the differential diagnosis. We present a case of typhoid fever , one of the most common causes of fever in the international traveler.

  7. 37 CFR 384.3 - Royalty fees for ephemeral recordings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... CONGRESS RATES AND TERMS FOR STATUTORY LICENSES RATES AND TERMS FOR THE MAKING OF EPHEMERAL RECORDINGS BY BUSINESS ESTABLISHMENT SERVICES § 384.3 Royalty fees for ephemeral recordings. (a) Basic royalty rate. For... (but not any subsequent calendar year). (c) Other royalty rates and terms. This part 384 does not...

  8. Saturn ring particles as dynamic ephemeral bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, D. R.; Weidenschilling, S. J.; Chapman, C. R.; Greenberg, R.

    1984-01-01

    Although Saturn's rings are within the Roche zone, the accretion of centimeter-sized particles into large aggregates many meters in diameter occurs readily, on a time scale of weeks. These aggregates are disrupted when tidal stresses exceed their very low strengths; thus most of the mass of the ring system is continually processed through a population of large 'dynamic ephemeral bodies', which are continually forming and disintegrating. These large aggregates are not at all like the idealized ice spheres often used in modeling Saturn's ring dynamics. Their coefficient of restitution is low, hence they form a monolayer in the ring plane. The optically observable characteristics of the rings are dominated by the swarm of centimeter-sized particles.

  9. Hemorrhagic Fevers

    MedlinePlus

    ... by four families of viruses. These include the Ebola and Marburg, Lassa fever, and yellow fever viruses. ... Some VHFs cause mild disease, but some, like Ebola or Marburg, cause severe disease and death. VHFs ...

  10. Yellow Fever

    MedlinePlus

    ... Search Form Controls Cancel Submit Search The CDC Yellow Fever Note: Javascript is disabled or is not supported ... CDC.gov . Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Yellow fever virus is found in tropical and subtropical areas ...

  11. Dengue Fever

    MedlinePlus

    ... away from areas that have a dengue fever epidemic, the risk of contracting dengue fever is small for international travelers./p> Reviewed by: Elana ... Transfusions Cholera West Nile Virus First Aid: Vomiting Are Insect ...

  12. [Q fever].

    PubMed

    Frangoulidis, Dimitrios; Fischer, Silke F

    2015-08-01

    The article summarizes some important recently identified findings about the Coxiella burnetii disease, Q fever. Beside new diagnostic parameters for follow-up issues, the importance of a timely identification of chronic Q fever and the peculiarities of the post Q fever fatigue syndrome are depicted. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  13. Rats' acquisition of the ephemeral reward task.

    PubMed

    Zentall, Thomas R; Case, Jacob P; Berry, Jonathon R

    2016-12-17

    The ephemeral reward task provides a subject with a choice between two alternatives A and B. If it chooses alternative A, reinforcement follows and the trial is over. If it chooses alternative B, reinforcement follows but the subject can also respond to alternative A which is followed by a second reinforcement. Thus, it would be optimal to choose alternative B. Surprisingly, Salwiczek et al. (PLoS One 7:e49068, 2012. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.00490682012 ) reported that adult fish (cleaner wrasse) mastered this task within 100 trials, whereas monkeys and apes had great difficulty with it. The authors attributed the species differences to ecological differences in the species foraging experiences. However, Pepperberg and Hartsfield (J Comp Psychol 128:298-306, 2014) found that parrots too learned this task easily. We have found that with a similar task pigeons are not able to learn to choose optimally within 400 trials (Zentall et al. in J Comp Psychol 130:138-144, 2016). In Experiment 1 of the present study, we found that rats did not learn to choose optimally in 840 trials; however, in Experiment 2 we added a prior commitment to the initial choice by increasing delay to reinforcement for the choice response from a single lever press to the first lever press after 20 s (FI20 s). In a comparable amount of training to Experiment 1, the rats learned to choose optimally. Although the use of a prior commitment increases the delay to reinforcement, it appears to reduce impulsive responding which in turn leads to optimal choice.

  14. Towards reliable seasonal ensemble streamflow forecasts for ephemeral rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, James; Wang, Qj; Li, Ming; Robertson, David

    2016-04-01

    Despite their inherently variable nature, ephemeral rivers are an important water resource in many dry regions. Water managers are likely benefit considerably from even mildly skilful ensemble forecasts of streamflow in ephemeral rivers. As with any ensemble forecast, forecast uncertainty - i.e., the spread of the ensemble - must be reliably quantified to allow users of the forecasts to make well-founded decisions. Correctly quantifying uncertainty in ephemeral rivers is particularly challenging because of the high incidence of zero flows, which are difficult to handle with conventional statistical techniques. Here we apply a seasonal streamflow forecasting system, the model for generating Forecast Guided Stochastic Scenarios (FoGSS), to 26 Australian ephemeral rivers. FoGSS uses post-processed ensemble rainfall forecasts from a coupled ocean-atmosphere prediction system to force an initialised monthly rainfall runoff model, and then applies a staged hydrological error model to describe and propagate hydrological uncertainty in the forecast. FoGSS produces 12-month streamflow forecasts; as forecast skill declines with lead time, the forecasts are designed to transit seamlessly to stochastic scenarios. The ensemble rainfall forecasts used in FoGSS are known to be unbiased and reliable, and we concentrate here on the hydrological error model. The FoGSS error model has several features that make it well suited to forecasting ephemeral rivers. First, FoGSS models the error after data is transformed with a log-sinh transformation. The log-sinh transformation is able to normalise even highly skewed data and homogenise its variance, allowing us to assume that errors are Gaussian. Second, FoGSS handles zero values using data censoring. Data censoring allows streamflow in ephemeral rivers to be treated as a continuous variable, rather than having to model the occurrence of non-zero values and the distribution of non-zero values separately. This greatly simplifies parameter

  15. Dengue fever.

    PubMed

    Skinner, Anita

    Dengue fever is a notifiable infectious disease in England because of its geographic expansion and the increase in the number of epidemics. The article highlighted the importance of informing overseas travellers of the risk of acquiring dengue fever and advising them on personal protective measures.

  16. Elementary bipoles of active regions and ephemeral active regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Sara F.

    1990-01-01

    The general properties of elementary bipoles (EBs), the class of moving magnetic features identified by Frazier (1972) as building blocks of new solar active regions, are described, and variations in their characteristics are illustrated with extensive videomagnetograms obtained at Big Bear Solar Observatory during 1984-1989. Consideration is given to ephemeral active regions consisting of EBs with only one positive and one negative pole, multiple-pole ephemeral regions, reversed-polarity EBs, interactions among EBs and adjacent magnetic features, and the EBs of small and medium active regions. The detection of EBs prior to the appearance of arch filaments confirms the relationship found by Frazier.

  17. Particulate organic matter dynamics in ephemeral tributaries of a Central Appalachian stream

    EPA Science Inventory

    Headwater ephemeral tributaries are external interfaces between uplands and downstream waters. Terrestrial particulate organic matter (POM) is important in fueling aquatic ecosystems, however the extent to which ephemeral tributaries are functionally connected to downstream water...

  18. [A group fever: safari's fever].

    PubMed

    Cantiniaux, S; Serratrice, J; De Roux-Serratrice, C; Disdier, P; Perez, L; Bricaire, F; Caumes, E; Mary, C; Weiller, P J

    2004-12-01

    Acute schistosomiasis, called safari's fever in Africa and Katayama fever in Japan, is an immunoallergic reaction due to transcutaneous penetration of infective cercaria. We report the collective case of seven young adults spending holidays in Mali. An eighteen years-old girl presents fever, headache, diarrhoea and abdominal pains at return from Dogon country (south of Mali). After turned down malaria and with the notion of bathing in fresh water followed by pruritus, we think to safari's fever. So we alarm all other members of the group. All can be treated to avoid chronic schistosomiasis. These observations recall that acute schistosomiasis is a real danger for tourists when bathing in fresh water in endemic areas of Africa. Education of travellers is necessary. Occurrence of safari's fever should alert physicians to prevent chronic schistosomiasis.

  19. LOW-ALTITUDE DIGITAL PHOTOGRAMMETRY TECHNIQUE TO ASSESS EPHEMERAL GULLY EROSION

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Ephemeral gully erosion is the main source of sediment from the agricultural landscape, unfortunately, it has been overlooked in traditional soil erosion assessment. Since an ephemeral gully can be easily alleviated or filled by normal tillage, the difficulty in making the ephemeral gully erosion a...

  20. Floristics of ephemeral ponds in east-central Texas

    Treesearch

    Barbara R. MacRoberts; Michael H. MacRoberts; D. Craig Rudolph; David W. Peterson

    2014-01-01

    Beginning in 2009, we surveyed the vegetation of ephemeral ponds in Sabine and Nacogdoches counties in east-central Texas. These ponds are shallow and flat-bottomed, with a small but distinct flora dominated by grasses (Poaceae) and sedges (Cyperaceae). The floras of these ponds are most similar to those of flatwoods ponds located on the lower coastal plain. Once more...

  1. Spatially distributed sheet, rill, and ephemeral gully erosion

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Ephemeral gully erosion can be a serious contributor to soil degradation in agricultural fields, but few conservation planning tools account for and predict this form of erosion. To address this deficiency, a new modelling system was developed and applied to a 6.3 ha research watershed near Treynor,...

  2. Governance, legislation and protection of intermittent rivers and ephemeral streams

    EPA Science Inventory

    Institutions and processes governing the conveyance and control of water have a long history. In this chapter, we discuss the extent to which water governance systems consider the management of intermittent rivers and ephemeral streams (IRES) and identify where research could inf...

  3. Ephemeral gully channel width and erosion simulation technology

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Concentrated runoff increases erosion and transfers fine sediment and associated agrichemicals from upland areas to stream channels. Ephemeral gully erosion on cropland in the U.S. may contribute up to 40% or more of the sediment delivered to the edge of the field. Typically, conservation practices ...

  4. Yellow fever.

    PubMed

    Monath, Thomas P; Vasconcelos, Pedro F C

    2015-03-01

    Yellow fever, a mosquito-borne flavivirus disease occurs in tropical areas of South America and Africa. It is a disease of major historical importance, but remains a threat to travelers to and residents of endemic areas despite the availability of an effective vaccine for nearly 70 years. An important aspect is the receptivity of many non-endemic areas to introduction and spread of yellow fever. This paper reviews the clinical aspects, pathogenesis, and epidemiology of yellow fever, with an emphasis on recent changes in the distribution and incidence of the disease. Recent knowledge about yellow fever 17D vaccine mechanism of action and safety are discussed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Typhoid fever

    MedlinePlus

    ... most commonly caused due to a bacteria called Salmonella typhi ( S typhi ). Causes S typhi is spread through contaminated ... as food handlers. Alternative Names Enteric fever Images Salmonella typhi organism Fly Digestive system organs References Harris ...

  6. Valley fever

    MedlinePlus

    ... southwestern United States, and in Central and South America. You get it by breathing in the fungus ... that causes Valley fever) Chest x-ray Sputum culture Sputum smear (KOH test) Tests done for more ...

  7. Q Fever

    MedlinePlus

    ... infects some animals, such as goats, sheep and cattle. C. burnetii bacteria are found in the birth ... your physician... Diagnosis and Testing Recommended tests… Treatment Antibiotics to treat Q fever... Prevention Avoid getting infected... ...

  8. Yellow fever

    MedlinePlus

    ... liver, and kidney. Bleeding disorders, seizures, coma, and delirium may also occur. Symptoms may include: Fever, headache, ... tongue Yellow skin and eyes (jaundice) Decreased urination Delirium Irregular heartbeats (arrhythmias) Bleeding (may progress to hemorrhage) ...

  9. Enteric Fever.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Praveen; Kumar, Ruchika

    2017-03-01

    Enteric fever is an important public-health problem in India. The clinical presentation of typhoid fever is very variable, ranging from fever with little other morbidities to marked toxemia and associated multisystem complications. Fever is present in majority of patients (>90 %) irrespective of their age group. Mortality is higher in younger children. Blood culture remains gold standard for diagnosis. Widal test has low sensitivity and specificity but may be used in second week to support the diagnosis. Emerging resistance to several antibiotics should be kept in mind when selecting antibiotics or revising the treatment. The key preventive strategies are safe water, safe food, personal hygiene, and appropriate sanitation. Vaccination is an additional effective tool for prevention.

  10. Hay Fever

    MedlinePlus

    ... and throat. This can trigger a type of allergy called hay fever. Symptoms can include Sneezing, often ... to use distilled or sterilized water with saline. Allergy shots can help make you less sensitive to ...

  11. Lassa Fever

    MedlinePlus

    ... an acute viral illness that occurs in west Africa. The illness was discovered in 1969 when two ... Lassa fever is endemic in parts of west Africa including Sierra Leone, Liberia, Guinea and Nigeria; however, ...

  12. Q Fever

    PubMed Central

    Maurin, M.; Raoult, D.

    1999-01-01

    Q fever is a zoonosis with a worldwide distribution with the exception of New Zealand. The disease is caused by Coxiella burnetii, a strictly intracellular, gram-negative bacterium. Many species of mammals, birds, and ticks are reservoirs of C. burnetii in nature. C. burnetii infection is most often latent in animals, with persistent shedding of bacteria into the environment. However, in females intermittent high-level shedding occurs at the time of parturition, with millions of bacteria being released per gram of placenta. Humans are usually infected by contaminated aerosols from domestic animals, particularly after contact with parturient females and their birth products. Although often asymptomatic, Q fever may manifest in humans as an acute disease (mainly as a self-limited febrile illness, pneumonia, or hepatitis) or as a chronic disease (mainly endocarditis), especially in patients with previous valvulopathy and to a lesser extent in immunocompromised hosts and in pregnant women. Specific diagnosis of Q fever remains based upon serology. Immunoglobulin M (IgM) and IgG antiphase II antibodies are detected 2 to 3 weeks after infection with C. burnetii, whereas the presence of IgG antiphase I C. burnetii antibodies at titers of ≥1:800 by microimmunofluorescence is indicative of chronic Q fever. The tetracyclines are still considered the mainstay of antibiotic therapy of acute Q fever, whereas antibiotic combinations administered over prolonged periods are necessary to prevent relapses in Q fever endocarditis patients. Although the protective role of Q fever vaccination with whole-cell extracts has been established, the population which should be primarily vaccinated remains to be clearly identified. Vaccination should probably be considered in the population at high risk for Q fever endocarditis. PMID:10515901

  13. Runoff generation through ephemeral streams in south-east Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doglioni, A.; Simeone, V.; Giustolisi, O.

    2012-04-01

    Ephemeral streams are morphological elements, typical of karst areas, characterized by relatively large and flat bottom transects (Camarasa & Tilford, 2002). These occasionally drain runoff generated by extreme rainfall events, characterized by high return periods. The activation of these streams was investigated by several authors for the Mediterranean regions, and in particular for south Spain and north Africa (Camarasa & Segura, 2001; De Vera, 1984). However, there are few analyses for karst areas of south-east of Italy (Cotecchia, 2006; Polemio, 2010). South-east of Italy, in particular the central part of Apulia, is characterized by a karst morphology, with a moderately elevated plateau, namely Murgia, which is drained by a network of ephemeral streams. These are normally dry, relatively short-length and straights, and their main outlets are on the coast. They normally drain water after extraordinary rainfall events, which can generate very high discharges, which can potentially flood the areas close to the streams. For this reason, the definition of an activation threshold for ephemeral streams is a paramount problem, even if this constitutes a complex problem, since the dynamics of the catchment drained by these streams in highly non-linear and biased by multiple variables (e.g. urbanization, land use, etc.). The main problem affecting the analysis and prediction of flood events in karst semi-arid regions is the almost complete absence of discharge time-series, measured at the outlets of the ephemeral streams. This prevents from the identification of accurate statistics of flood events and on the determination of rainfall events, which may potentially generate floods. Indeed, floods and in general flash floods are relatively rare events for semi-arid karst regions, however they can be really severe and disruptive, causing serious damages to people and infrastructures. This work presents an analysis of the ephemeral stream activation in karst semi-arid areas

  14. Childhood fever.

    PubMed

    Chong, C Y; Allen, D M

    1996-02-01

    Childhood fever is a common symptom, reflective of multiple causes. As the child is often unable to express himself, the physician must rely on parents' observations and the physical examination. The majority of febrile children have non-bacterial upper respiratory tract infection and indiscriminate use of antibiotics is inappropriate, ineffective and leads to drug-resistance such as the emergence of Penicillin-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae. In this article, we attempt to identify the possible causes of fever by a simple approach using the presence or absence of associated or localising symptoms. Infants less than 3 months constitute a unique group as the fever may be related to perinatal events and as serious bacterial infections can still occur despite unremarkable physical findings. Management of fever needs to take into account the toxicity, immune status and age of the patients as well as the source of the infection. Zealous overprescription of antipyretics needs to be avoided with attention directed to the cause of the fever, the child's capacity to cope with the illness and parental education.

  15. [Zika fever].

    PubMed

    Eftekhari-Hassanlouie, S; Le Guern, A; Oehler, E

    2017-02-08

    Zika virus infection is an emerging arboviral disease which presented as a mild flu-like or algo-eruptive syndrome with fever, arthralgia, myalgia and a maculopapulous eruption. Severe neurological and fetal complications have recently been highlighted. Diagnosis is established by detection of viral RNA by Reverse Transcriptase-Polymerase Chain Reaction (RT-PCR). Many publications report on the progress of knowledge on zika and its complications. Treatment is symptomatic, mainly with analgesics. Prevention is essential through individual and collective vector control. Faced with this emerging arbovirus, health authorities of many countries have implemented significant resources to accelerate research efforts including on diagnostic tests and on the development of vaccines. In Europe, the presence of Aedes albopictus, a mosquito vector of the virus zika, runs the risk of autochthonous cases as well as autochthonous dengue or chikungunya fever. Hence, autochthonous zika fever is not excluded to appear during the warmest months in metropolitan French departments colonized by A. albopictus.

  16. Yellow Fever Vaccine

    MedlinePlus

    What is yellow fever?Yellow fever is a serious disease caused by the yellow fever virus. It is found in certain parts of Africa and South America. Yellow fever is spread through the bite of an infected ...

  17. Dengue Fever Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... linkedin Dengue Fever Treatment Dengue Fever Dengue Fever Biology and Transmission Prevention Diagnosis Treatment Featured Research NIAID- ... last reviewed on February 8, 2011 Dengue Fever Biology and Transmission Prevention Diagnosis Treatment Featured Research ^ Return ...

  18. Dengue fever (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Dengue fever, or West Nile fever, is a mild viral illness transmitted by mosquitoes which causes fever, ... second exposure to the virus can result in Dengue hemorrhagic fever, a life-threatening illness.

  19. Quantifying the Complex Hydrologic Response of a Desert Ephemeral Wash

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-04-19

    ephemeral wash 6 intermediate terrace surfaces than soil moisture resulting from summer convective storms. § Hypothesis 4: Convective storms... Intermediate terrace surfaces. § Hypothesis 5: Parkinsonia microphylla and Olneya tesota growing in young alluvial washes are less hydrologically...responsive to seasonal precipitation (measured as sapflux) than in the same species growing on intermediate relict terraces. § Hypothesis 6: Sapflux in

  20. Ephemeral channel recharge and near-channel evapotranspiration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodrich, D.; Williams, D.; Scott, R.; Unkrich, C.; Hultine, K.

    2003-04-01

    Ephemeral channel transmission losses play an important role in ground water/surface water dynamics in arid and semi-arid basins in the Southwest. However, identification of the processes driving these dynamics is difficult. Specifically, data on the proportion of runoff transmission losses that escape from near-channel evapotranspiration (ET) and wetted channel evaporation to become deep ground water recharge are difficult to obtain. Quantifying recharge with greater certainty is a critical need required to manage basins whose primary source of water supply is derived from groundwater. This paper addresses two principal objectives: 1) Assess the magnitude and seasonality of ephemeral channel recharge to the regional aquifer and a perched aquifer occluded from the regional aquifer; and, 2) Monitor the dynamics of ET and water movement between Flume 6, Flume 2, and Flume 1 of the USDA-ARS Walnut Gulch Experimental Watershed (WGEW). Groundwater, surface water, chemical, isotopic, tree sap flux and micrometeorological techniques were used to independently estimate ephemeral channel recharge. It was found that during the 1999 and 2000 monsoon seasons a substantial amount of water recharged into the regional aquifer in the 7 km reach between flume 2 and flume 1 of the WGEW. In 2001 and 2002 no recharge was detected.

  1. Orchid Fever

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oliver, Phillip

    2004-01-01

    Exotic, captivating, and seductive, orchids have long fascinated plant lovers. They first attracted the attention of Westerners in the 17th century, when explorers brought back samples from South America and Asia. By the mid-1800s, orchid collecting had reached a fever pitch, not unlike that of the Dutch tulip craze of the 1630s, with rich (and…

  2. Relapsing fever

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Sudan. Famine, war, and the movement of refugee groups often results in LBRF epidemics. ... Contact your health care provider right away if you develop a fever after returning from a trip. Possible infections need to be investigated in a timely manner.

  3. Orchid Fever

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oliver, Phillip

    2004-01-01

    Exotic, captivating, and seductive, orchids have long fascinated plant lovers. They first attracted the attention of Westerners in the 17th century, when explorers brought back samples from South America and Asia. By the mid-1800s, orchid collecting had reached a fever pitch, not unlike that of the Dutch tulip craze of the 1630s, with rich (and…

  4. Q fever.

    PubMed Central

    Reimer, L G

    1993-01-01

    Q fever is an acute febrile illness first described in 1935 and now seen in many parts of the world. Human infection follows exposure to animals, especially domestic livestock. Recent outbreaks in metropolitan areas have implicated cats as the carrier of disease to humans. The etiologic agent, Coxiella burnetti, belongs to the family Rickettsiaceae, although it has distinct genetic characteristics and modes of transmission. Most recent attention has been focused on a number of large outbreaks of Q fever associated with medical research involving pregnant sheep. Although most infections are self-limited, some patients require prolonged treatment. Recent vaccines have had encouraging success in the prevention of disease in individuals at high risk of exposure. PMID:8358703

  5. Typhoid fever.

    PubMed

    Wain, John; Hendriksen, Rene S; Mikoleit, Matthew L; Keddy, Karen H; Ochiai, R Leon

    2015-03-21

    Control of typhoid fever relies on clinical information, diagnosis, and an understanding for the epidemiology of the disease. Despite the breadth of work done so far, much is not known about the biology of this human-adapted bacterial pathogen and the complexity of the disease in endemic areas, especially those in Africa. The main barriers to control are vaccines that are not immunogenic in very young children and the development of multidrug resistance, which threatens efficacy of antimicrobial chemotherapy. Clinicians, microbiologists, and epidemiologists worldwide need to be familiar with shifting trends in enteric fever. This knowledge is crucial, both to control the disease and to manage cases. Additionally, salmonella serovars that cause human infection can change over time and location. In areas of Asia, multidrug-resistant Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi (S Typhi) has been the main cause of enteric fever, but now S Typhi is being displaced by infections with drug-resistant S enterica serovar Paratyphi A. New conjugate vaccines are imminent and new treatments have been promised, but the engagement of local medical and public health institutions in endemic areas is needed to allow surveillance and to implement control measures. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Suspended sediment transport in an ephemeral stream following wildfire

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Malmon, D.V.; Reneau, S.L.; Katzman, D.; Lavine, A.; Lyman, J.

    2007-01-01

    We examine the impacts of a stand-clearing wildfire on the characteristics and magnitude of suspended sediment transport in ephemeral streams draining the burn area. We report the results of a monitoring program that includes 2 years of data prior to the Cerro Grande fire in New Mexico, and 3 years of postfire data. Suspended sediment concentration (SSC) increased by about 2 orders of magnitude following the fire, and the proportion of silt and clay increased from 50% to 80%. For a given flow event, SSC is highest at the flood bore and decreases monotonically with time, a pattern evident in every flood sampled both before and after the fire. We propose that the accumulation of flow and wash load at the flow front is an inherent characteristic of ephemeral stream flows, due to amplified momentum losses at the flood bore. We present a new model for computing suspended sediment transport in ephemeral streams (in the presence or absence of wildfire) by relating SSC to the time following the arrival of the flood bore, rather than to instantaneous discharge. Using this model and a rainfall history, we estimate that in the 3 years following the fire, floods transported in suspension a mass equivalent to about 3 mm of landscape lowering across the burn area, 20% of this following a single rainstorm. We test the model by computing fine sediment delivery to a small reservoir in an adjacent watershed, where we have a detailed record of postfire sedimentation based on repeat surveys. Systematic discrepancies between modeled and measured sedimentation rates in the reservoir suggest rapid reductions in suspended sediment delivery in the first several years after the fire.

  7. Flash floods in Mediterranean ephemeral streams in Valencia Region (Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camarasa-Belmonte, Ana M.

    2016-10-01

    Ephemeral streams are typical Mediterranean fluvial systems with high risk of flash flooding, and few data are available about these systems in most locales. However, the SAIH network (Automatic Hydrological Information Systems) of the Jucar River Water Authority has been providing detailed information about ephemeral streams in Spain every 5 min since 1988. Using these data, we evaluated the processes of rainfall-runoff conversion and flood generation in five Mediterranean ephemeral streams ranging in size from 25 to 450 km2. To provide a general framework for hydrological analysis, the study included 142 flash flood events registered between 1989 and 2007. A more detailed analysis was conducted for the Carraixet Basin under the dry antecedent moisture condition (AMC I) to evaluate the influence of rainfall on the basin's response. A simple index called Momentum of Maximum Intensity (MMI) was developed to describe the influence of rainfall intensity on hydrograph. Correlations between the main indicators of precipitation and flow also were assessed. Results showed that flash floods were generally generated by average accumulated rainfall of around 100 mm at high intensities that could exceed 300 mm/h. Initial abstractions and average water losses during the rainfall-runoff conversion processes were very important (runoff coefficients of 6% and runoff thresholds of 62 mm). No correlation was found between initial abstractions (Ia) calculated from the basin characteristics and runoff thresholds (P0) empirically obtained, which create some doubts about the validity of Ia method for predicting floods in ephemeral streams. Accumulated rainfall was very important for flood volume, peak flow and water balance indicators, whereas intensity indicators were more related to the response times of the basins. Rainfall intensity variables influenced lag time. Accumulated rainfall, in combination with high reduced mean intensity and low persistence, were a good predictor for

  8. Arid ephemeral stream classification using channel geometry and basin characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutfin, N. A.; Wohl, E. E.; Shaw, J.

    2011-12-01

    Because understanding of ephemeral stream characteristics is limited and many stream classifications do not adequately describe them, it is necessary to develop a better understanding of these dryland fluvial systems and develop more precise terminology to discuss their physical attributes. In addition to development of a geomorphic classification system, we examine relationships between basin characteristics and channel geometry that will indicate where these ephemeral stream types might occur. Our conceptual model includes five geomorphic ephemeral stream types; 1) braided washes, 2) incised alluvium, 3) bedrock with alluvium, 4) bedrock, and 5) piedmont headwater channels. Preliminary watershed classification and cluster analysis of the U.S. Sonoran Desert was conducted using NHD 10-digit Hydrologic Unit Boundaries, PRISM precipitation data, state geologic survey lithology, and data derived from 30m DEMs. A total of 85 reaches were surveyed on the U.S. Army Yuma Proving Ground in southwestern Arizona representing the five stream types within three watershed categories. Following delineation of small-scale watershed characteristics using 10m DEMs for each reach location, statistical analysis will be performed to examine correlations and significant relationships among stream type, basin and channel characteristics. We hope to identify physical drivers resulting in the development of distinct geomorphic stream types and predict where the relative abundance of those stream types are likely to exist in arid environments of the southwestern U.S. We posit that locations and relative distributions of the five stream types will correlate significantly to local basin characteristics. Initial findings verify that composition of confining material dictates the level of confinement and largely influences occurrence of the five channel types. Additionally, we expect to see significant differences in width/depth ratios, grain size, stream gradient, basin hillslope gradient

  9. Metapopulation dynamics of amphibians using isolated, ephemeral ponds in longleaf pine uplands of Florida

    Treesearch

    Cathryn H. Greenberg

    1998-01-01

    Several species of southeastern amphibians completely or facultatively depend upon small, ephemeral isolated ponds for reproduction, and inhabit surrounding uplands for much of their adult lives. However, spatio-temporal dynamics of pond use is little known. Since 1994, eight ephemeral ponds embedded within frequently (n=4) or infrequently (n=4) burned longleaf pine...

  10. A Comparison of Vegetation Within and Outside Riparian Areas Bordering Ephemeral Streams in the Ouachita Mountains

    Treesearch

    David K. Radabaugh; Hal O. Liechty; James M. Guldin

    2004-01-01

    Abstract - Ephemeral streams frequently occur in shortleaf pine (Pinus echinata Mill.) hardwood stands that grow on the upper and mid-slopes of the Ouachita Mountains in Arkansas. Stream management zones are established around these ephemeral streams in the Ouachita National Forest to minimize impacts of adjacent forest management...

  11. Mechanisms of ephemeral gully erosion caused by constant flow through a continuous soil-pipe

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Ephemeral gully erosion is considered to driven be convergent surface flow while the role of subsurface flow through soil pipes is often overlooked. This study sought to characterize the processes and quantify the soil erosion properties associated with ephemeral gully erosion by pipe flow. A 1 cm d...

  12. Understanding soil-pipeflow and its role in ephemeral gully erosion

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The role of soil pipeflow in ephemeral gully erosion is not well understood. Experiments were conducted on continuous soil pipes to better understand the role of internal erosion of soil pipes and its relation to ephemeral gully development. Soil beds of 140 cm length, 100 cm width and 20 cm depth ...

  13. Comparing SessionStateReveal and EphemeralKeyReveal for Diffie-Hellman Protocols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ustaoglu, Berkant

    Both the "eCK" model, by LaMacchia, Lauter and Mityagin, and the "CK01" model, by Canetti and Krawczyk, address the effect of leaking session specific ephemeral data on the security of key establishment schemes. The CK01-adversary is given a SessionStateReveal query to learn session-specific private data defined by the protocol specification, whereas the eCK-adversary is equipped with an EphemeralKeyReveal query to access all ephemeral private input required to carry session computations. SessionStateReveal cannot be issued against the test session; by contrast EphemeralKeyReveal can be used against the test session under certain conditions. On the other hand, it is not obvious how EphemeralKeyReveal compares to SessionStateReveal. Thus it is natural to ask which model is more useful and practically relevant.

  14. Psychogenic fever, functional fever, or psychogenic hyperthermia?

    PubMed

    Olivier, Berend

    2015-01-01

    Psychogenic fever reflects a phenomenon where core body temperature is high (up to 41°C) or low-grade high (37-38°C) during either acute or chronic stress. Underlying mechanisms are distinct from infection-induced fever and involve the central and sympathetic nervous systems. Psychogenic fever appears a complex psychological, physiological and endocrinological phenomenon.

  15. 37 CFR 261.3 - Royalty fees for public performances of sound recordings and for ephemeral recordings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... performances of sound recordings and for ephemeral recordings. 261.3 Section 261.3 Patents, Trademarks, and... § 261.3 Royalty fees for public performances of sound recordings and for ephemeral recordings. (a) For... transmissions of sound recordings made pursuant to 17 U.S.C. 114(d)(2), and the making of ephemeral...

  16. 37 CFR 261.3 - Royalty fees for public performances of sound recordings and for ephemeral recordings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... performances of sound recordings and for ephemeral recordings. 261.3 Section 261.3 Patents, Trademarks, and... § 261.3 Royalty fees for public performances of sound recordings and for ephemeral recordings. (a) For... transmissions of sound recordings made pursuant to 17 U.S.C. 114(d)(2), and the making of ephemeral...

  17. Remote sensing of ephemeral water bodies in western Niger

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Verdin, J.P.

    1996-01-01

    Research was undertaken to evaluate the feasibility of monitoring the small ephemeral water bodies of the Sahel with the 1.1 km resolution data of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR). Twenty-one lakes of western Niger with good ground observation records were selected for examination. Thematic Mapper images from 1988 were first analysed to determine surface areas and temperature differences between water and adjacent land. Six AVHRR scenes from the 1988-89 dry season were then studied. It was found that a lake can be monitored until its surface area drops below 10 ha, in most cases. Furthermore, with prior knowledge of the location and shape of a water body, its surface area can be estimated from AVHRR band 5 data to within about 10 ha. These results are explained by the sharp temperature contrast between water and land, on the order of 13?? C.

  18. Ephemeral ecological speciation and the latitudinal biodiversity gradient.

    PubMed

    Cutter, Asher D; Gray, Jeremy C

    2016-10-01

    The richness of biodiversity in the tropics compared to high-latitude parts of the world forms one of the most globally conspicuous patterns in biology, and yet few hypotheses aim to explain this phenomenon in terms of explicit microevolutionary mechanisms of speciation and extinction. We link population genetic processes of selection and adaptation to speciation and extinction by way of their interaction with environmental factors to drive global scale macroecological patterns. High-latitude regions are both cradle and grave with respect to species diversification. In particular, we point to a conceptual equivalence of "environmental harshness" and "hard selection" as eco-evolutionary drivers of local adaptation and ecological speciation. By describing how ecological speciation likely occurs more readily at high latitudes, with such nascent species especially prone to extinction by fusion, we derive the ephemeral ecological speciation hypothesis as an integrative mechanistic explanation for latitudinal gradients in species turnover and the net accumulation of biodiversity.

  19. Ephemeral penalty functions for contact-impact dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    De La Fuente, Horacio M.; Felippa, Carlos A.

    1991-01-01

    The use of penalty functions to treat a class of structural contact-impact problems is investigated, with emphasis on ones in which the impact phenomena are primarily nondestructive in nature and in which only the gross characterization of the response is required. The dynamic equations of motion are integrated by the difference method. The penalty is represented as an ephemeral fictitious nonlinear spring that is inserted on anticipation of contact. The magnitude and variation of the penalty force is determined through energy balancing considerations. The 'bell shape' of the penalty force function for positive gap was found to be satisfactory, as it depends on only two parameters that can be directly assigned the physical meaning of force and distance. The determination of force law parameters by energy balance worked well. The incorporation of restitution coefficients by the area balancing method yielded excellent results, and no substantial modifications are anticipated. Extensional penalty springs are obviously sufficient for the simple examples treated.

  20. Resource allocation patterns of two California-Sonoran desert ephemerals.

    PubMed

    Clark, D D; Burk, J H

    1980-07-01

    The patterns of allocation of structural and nonstructural carbon were followed in the co-occurring desert ephemerals Plantago insularis and Camissonia boothii. Patterns of biomass distribution were determined from material harvested at biweekly intervals as were levels of nonstructural sugar and starch. Seasonal patterns of growth and reproduction differed markedly with Plantago allocating significantly more structural and nonstructural carbon to reproduction early in the season. Plantago completed its life cycle in less than 60 days but Camissonia continued both vegetative and reproductive growth to over 100 days. The longer growing season of Camissonia was possible because more energy was allocated to vegetative tissues and storage presumably as investment toward longer life and higher levels of reproduction.

  1. Environmental controls on drainage behavior of an ephemeral stream

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blasch, K.W.; Ferre, T. P. A.; Vrugt, J.A.

    2010-01-01

    Streambed drainage was measured at the cessation of 26 ephemeral streamflow events in Rillito Creek, Tucson, Arizona from August 2000 to June 2002 using buried time domain reflectometry (TDR) probes. An unusual drainage response was identified, which was characterized by sharp drainage from saturation to near field capacity at each depth with an increased delay between depths. We simulated the drainage response using a variably saturated numerical flow model representing a two-layer system with a high permeability layer overlying a lower permeability layer. Both the observed data and the numerical simulation show a strong correlation between the drainage velocity and the temperature of the stream water. A linear combination of temperature and the no-flow period preceding flow explained about 90% of the measured variations in drainage velocity. Evaluation of this correlative relationship with the one-dimensional numerical flow model showed that the observed temperature fluctuations could not reproduce the magnitude of variation in the observed drainage velocity. Instead, the model results indicated that flow duration exerts the most control on drainage velocity, with the drainage velocity decreasing nonlinearly with increasing flow duration. These findings suggest flow duration is a primary control of water availability for plant uptake in near surface sediments of an ephemeral stream, an important finding for estimating the ecological risk of natural or engineered changes to streamflow patterns. Correlative analyses of soil moisture data, although easy and widely used, can result in erroneous conclusions of hydrologic cause—effect relationships, and demonstrating the need for joint physically-based numerical modeling and data synthesis for hypothesis testing to support quantitative risk analysis.

  2. Fever during anaesthesia.

    PubMed

    Negishi, Chiharu; Lenhardt, Rainer

    2003-12-01

    Fever occurs when pyrogenic stimulation activates thermal control centres. Fever is common during the perioperative period, but rare during anaesthesia. Although only a limited number of studies are available to explain how anaesthesia affects fever, general anaesthesia seems to inhibit fever by decreasing the thermoregulatory-response thresholds to cold. Opioids also inhibit fever; however, the effect is slightly less than that of general anaesthesia. In contrast, epidural anaesthesia does not affect fever. This suggests that hyperthermia, which is often associated with epidural infusions during labour or in the post-operative period, may be a true fever caused by inflammatory activation. Accordingly, this fever might be diminished in patients who receive opioids for pain treatment. Post-operative fever is a normal thermoregulatory response usually of non-infectious aetiology. Fever may be important in the host defence mechanisms and should not be routinely treated lest the associated risks exceed the benefits.

  3. [Viral hemorrhagic fever].

    PubMed

    Kager, P A

    1998-02-28

    Viral haemorrhagic fevers, such as Lassa fever and yellow fever, cause tens of thousands of deaths annually outside the Netherlands. The viruses are mostly transmitted by mosquitoes, ticks or via excreta of rodents. Important to travellers are yellow fever, dengue and Lassa and Ebola fever. For yellow fever there is an efficacious vaccine. Dengue is frequently observed in travellers; prevention consists in avoiding mosquito bites, the treatment is symptomatic. Lassa and Ebola fever are extremely rare among travellers; a management protocol can be obtained from the Netherlands Ministry of Health, Welfare and Sports. Diagnostics of a patient from the tropics with fever and haemorrhagic diathesis should be aimed at treatable disorders such as malaria, typhoid fever, rickettsiosis or bacterial sepsis, because the probability of such a disease is much higher than that of Lassa or Ebola fever.

  4. Rheumatic Fever.

    PubMed

    Visvanathan; Manjarez; Zabriskie

    1999-10-01

    There have been numerous reports stating that treatment of acute rheumatic fever with either aspirin or corticosteroids does not alter the long-term outcome of rheumatic heart disease. Yet, it should be emphasized that most of these studies were carried out with the first generic corticosteroids before the advent of the more active and more potent corticosteroid agents. In spite of this caveat, there is no question that all the clinical and laboratory parameters of inflammation (erythrocyte sedimentation rate, C-reactive protein) return to normal much more rapidly with corticosteroids than with aspirin alone. It is therefore our belief that steroids should be used when clinical and laboratory evidence of carditis exists, and aspirin should be reserved for cases of acute rheumatic arthritis with no evidence of carditis. The incidence of long-term valvular disease in active carditis may be decreased with steroid therapy. For example, the number of valve replacements differs markedly in centers that do use steroids and in those that do not. In Capetown, South Africa, where steroids are routinely used for carditis, valve replacement is quite rare. In contrast, in Johannesburg, where steroids are rarely used, the rate of valve replacement is quite high. The racial backgrounds of both groups of patients are similar, thus eliminating the question of racial differences. Concerning secondary prophylaxis, there is also controversy concerning the best second-line therapy. It is now well known that monthly intramuscular injections of benzathine penicillin are really effective for only 20 days. Thus, there is a window in which penicillin coverage is not adequate. To circumvent this problem, some investigators give benzathine penicillin every 3 weeks. These injections are quite painful, however, and it has been our "rule" that compliance with this treatment is inversely proportional to the ratio of the size of the child to the mother. In our own experience over 30 years with the

  5. [Rheumatic fever].

    PubMed

    Cherkashin, D V; Kumchin, A N; Shchulenin, S N; Svistov, A S

    2013-01-01

    This lecture-style paper highlights all major problems pertinent to rheumatic fever Definition of acute RF and chronic rheumatic heart disease is proposed and desirability of the use of these terms in clinical practice is explained. Present-day epidemiology of RF is described with reference to marked differences in its prevalence in developed and developing countries. Modern classification of acute RF is described as adopted by the Russian Association of Rheumatologists and recommended for the use in Russian medical facilities. Discussion of etiological issues is focused on such virulence factors as beta-hemolytic streptococcus A and genetic predisposition confirming hereditary nature of RE Its clinical features are described along with laboratory and instrumental methods applied for its diagnostics. Large and small diagnostic criteria of RF are considered. Special attention is given to the treatment of RF and its complications (antibiotic, pathogenetic, and drug therapy). Its primary and secondary prophylaxis is discussed in detail, preparations for the purpose are listed (with doses and duration of application). In conclusion, criteria for the efficacy of therapy are presented along with indications for hospitalization and emergency treatment.

  6. Long term characterization of ephemeral gully erosion from orthophotographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chahor, Youssef; Casalí, Javier; Giménez, Rafael; Ángel Campo-Bescós, Miguel

    2017-04-01

    For a knowledge of the importance and characteristics of ephemeral gully (EG) erosion to be adequate, continuous observations and measurements for long periods of time are required. Despite recent methodological advances, such as the availability of drones or photo-reconstruction, the data obtained from orthophotos taken on approximately the same dates for several years in the same places can supply information of great interest. This study aims to explore the applicability of orthophotos taken during 8 years to make a semi-detailed characterization of erosion due to ephemeral gullies over an extensive area. Thus, a homogeneous area as regards soil type, use and management, of around 570 hectares, was selected in the municipality of Pitillas, Navarra, frequently affected by EGs to carry out a long-term monitoring of it. From 8 orthophotos (≈1:5000) taken in 2003 (17 Apr-20 Sep), 2006 (28 May), 2008 (19 Jun), 2010 (5-21 Jun), 2011 (25 Sep), 2012 (23 Jun), 2013 (24 Jul) and 2014 (17 Aug), the position of small channels was digitized, identifying their ends downstream and upstream, georeferencing them, and determining their length. All the photos were taken in approximately the same season, usually in the summer. Since the area was cultivated with winter cereal or was lying fallow, its gullies have remained on the land since their formation, generally at the start of the winter, up to their elimination. This probably occurs due to tilling during the preparation tasks of the following sowing time, generally after the flight period. If we also consider that the EGs in the area remain almost unalterable after the winter, protected by the dense cereal vegetation, it can be affirmed that the flight dates supply adequate information on their final state. The authors' knowledge of the land simplified the identification of the gullies on the orthophotos. In the study area, 58 small watersheds were identified as being affected by EG erosion at least once during the study

  7. Hydrologic landscape regions for predicting and generalizing the refuge function of intermittent and ephemeral streams

    EPA Science Inventory

    Intermittent and ephemeral (IE) streams can provide important functions within stream networks. Understanding the relative benefit provided to downstream waters is needed to better inform watershed management. Although the potential functions of IE streams are relatively well kn...

  8. Hydrologic landscape regions for predicting and generalizing the refuge function of intermittent and ephemeral streams

    EPA Science Inventory

    Intermittent and ephemeral (IE) streams can provide important functions within stream networks. Understanding the relative benefit provided to downstream waters is needed to better inform watershed management. Although the potential functions of IE streams are relatively well kn...

  9. Fever of unknown origin.

    PubMed

    Miller, M L; Szer, I; Yogev, R; Bernstein, B

    1995-10-01

    The causes of fever in a child can vary from minor brief illnesses to life-threatening infectious, malignant, or autoimmune diseases. The physician often has to evaluate children with fevers of as yet undiagnosed cause lasting fewer than 2 weeks, in whom it is important to determine whether localizing findings are present. Fever without localizing signs and fevers complicating chronic disease and resulting from specific localized infection are considered in the sections concerning infectious causes, immunodeficiency diseases, and rheumatic diseases. The diagnostic and therapeutic approaches to the child with both prolonged fever and fever of unknown origin are then discussed, with emphasis on rheumatic diseases.

  10. Spring Ephemerals Adapt to Extremely High Light Conditions via an Unusual Stabilization of Photosystem II

    PubMed Central

    Tu, Wenfeng; Li, Yang; Liu, Wu; Wu, Lishuan; Xie, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Yuanming; Wilhelm, Christian; Yang, Chunhong

    2016-01-01

    Ephemerals, widely distributed in the Gobi desert, have developed significant characteristics to sustain high photosynthetic efficiency under high light (HL) conditions. Since the light reaction is the basis for photosynthetic conversion of solar energy to chemical energy, the photosynthetic performances in thylakoid membrane of the spring ephemerals in response to HL were studied. Three plant species, namely two C3 spring ephemeral species of Cruciferae: Arabidopsis pumila (A. pumila) and Sisymbrium altissimum (S. altissimum), and the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana (A. thaliana) were chosen for the study. The ephemeral A. pumila, which is genetically close to A. thaliana and ecologically in the same habitat as S. altissimum, was used to avoid complications arising from the superficial differences resulted from comparing plants from two extremely contrasting ecological groups. The findings manifested that the ephemerals showed significantly enhanced activities of photosystem (PS) II under HL conditions, while the activities of PSII in A. thaliana were markedly decreased under the same conditions. Detailed analyses of the electron transport processes revealed that the increased plastoquinone pool oxidization, together with the enhanced PSI activities, ensured a lowered excitation pressure to PSII of both ephemerals, and thus facilitated the photosynthetic control to avoid photodamage to PSII. The analysis of the reaction centers of the PSs, both in terms of D1 protein turnover kinetics and the long-term adaptation, revealed that the unusually stable PSs structure provided the basis for the ephemerals to carry out high photosynthetic performances. It is proposed that the characteristic photosynthetic performances of ephemerals were resulted from effects of the long-term adaptation to the harsh environments. PMID:26779223

  11. Agricultural intensification and drought frequency increases may have landscape-level consequences for ephemeral ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Dalu, Tatenda; Wasserman, Ryan J; Dalu, Mwazvita T B

    2017-03-01

    Ephemeral wetlands in arid regions are often degraded or destroyed through poor land-use practice long before they are ever studied or prioritized for conservation. Climate change will likely also have implications for these ecosystems given forecast changes in rainfall patterns in many arid environments. Here, we present a conceptual diagram showing typical and modified ephemeral wetlands in agricultural landscapes and how modification impacts on species diversity and composition.

  12. Ephemerality of discrete methane vents in lake sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scandella, Benjamin P.; Pillsbury, Liam; Weber, Thomas; Ruppel, Carolyn; Hemond, Harold F.; Juanes, Ruben

    2016-05-01

    Methane is a potent greenhouse gas whose emission from sediments in inland waters and shallow oceans may both contribute to global warming and be exacerbated by it. The fraction of methane emitted by sediments that bypasses dissolution in the water column and reaches the atmosphere as bubbles depends on the mode and spatiotemporal characteristics of venting from the sediments. Earlier studies have concluded that hot spots—persistent, high-flux vents—dominate the regional ebullitive flux from submerged sediments. Here the spatial structure, persistence, and variability in the intensity of methane venting are analyzed using a high-resolution multibeam sonar record acquired at the bottom of a lake during multiple deployments over a 9 month period. We confirm that ebullition is strongly episodic, with distinct regimes of high flux and low flux largely controlled by changes in hydrostatic pressure. Our analysis shows that the spatial pattern of ebullition becomes homogeneous at the sonar's resolution over time scales of hours (for high-flux periods) or days (for low-flux periods), demonstrating that vents are ephemeral rather than persistent, and suggesting that long-term, lake-wide ebullition dynamics may be modeled without resolving the fine-scale spatial structure of venting.

  13. Ephemerality of discrete methane vents in lake sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scandella, Benjamin P.; Pillsbury, Liam; Weber, Thomas; Ruppel, Carolyn D.; Hemond, Harold F.; Juanes, Ruben

    2016-01-01

    Methane is a potent greenhouse gas whose emission from sediments in inland waters and shallow oceans may both contribute to global warming and be exacerbated by it. The fraction of methane emitted by sediments that bypasses dissolution in the water column and reaches the atmosphere as bubbles depends on the mode and spatiotemporal characteristics of venting from the sediments. Earlier studies have concluded that hot spots—persistent, high-flux vents—dominate the regional ebullitive flux from submerged sediments. Here the spatial structure, persistence, and variability in the intensity of methane venting are analyzed using a high-resolution multibeam sonar record acquired at the bottom of a lake during multiple deployments over a 9 month period. We confirm that ebullition is strongly episodic, with distinct regimes of high flux and low flux largely controlled by changes in hydrostatic pressure. Our analysis shows that the spatial pattern of ebullition becomes homogeneous at the sonar's resolution over time scales of hours (for high-flux periods) or days (for low-flux periods), demonstrating that vents are ephemeral rather than persistent, and suggesting that long-term, lake-wide ebullition dynamics may be modeled without resolving the fine-scale spatial structure of venting.

  14. On handling ephemeral resource constraints in evolutionary search.

    PubMed

    Allmendinger, Richard; Knowles, Joshua

    2013-01-01

    We consider optimization problems where the set of solutions available for evaluation at any given time t during optimization is some subset of the feasible space. This model is appropriate to describe many closed-loop optimization settings (i.e., where physical processes or experiments are used to evaluate solutions) where, due to resource limitations, it may be impossible to evaluate particular solutions at particular times (despite the solutions being part of the feasible space). We call the constraints determining which solutions are non-evaluable ephemeral resource constraints (ERCs). In this paper, we investigate two specific types of ERC: one encodes periodic resource availabilities, the other models commitment constraints that make the evaluable part of the space a function of earlier evaluations conducted. In an experimental study, both types of constraint are seen to impact the performance of an evolutionary algorithm significantly. To deal with the effects of the ERCs, we propose and test five different constraint-handling policies (adapted from those used to handle standard constraints), using a number of different test functions including a fitness landscape from a real closed-loop problem. We show that knowing information about the type of resource constraint in advance may be sufficient to select an effective policy for dealing with it, even when advance knowledge of the fitness landscape is limited.

  15. Annual flow duration curves assessment in ephemeral small basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pumo, D.; Viola, F.; La Loggia, G.; Noto, L. V.

    2014-11-01

    Flow duration curve (FDC) represents a comprehensive signature of temporal runoff variability often used to synthesize catchment rainfall-runoff responses. A new model, the ModABa (MODel for Annual flow duration curves assessment in ephemeral small BAsins), is here introduced. It can be thought as a wide mosaic whose tesserae are frameworks, models or conceptual schemes separately developed in different studies and harmoniously interconnected with the final aim of reproducing the annual FDC in intermittent small catchments. Two separated seasons within the hydrological year are distinguished: a dry season, characterized by absence of streamflow, and a non-zero season. Streamflow is disaggregated into a subsurface component and a surface component that, in turn, is considered formed by two different contributions: impervious runoff and surface runoff from permeable areas induced by heavy rains. The FDCs of the two streamflow components are first separately and differently computed, and then combined to obtain the non-zero FDC. This last, together with the estimated probability of null streamflow, allows the annual FDC assessment through the theory of total probability. The ModABa is here tested on a small Italian catchment and the results show how the model, once calibrated, is able to accurately reproduce the empirical FDC for the analyzed case, starting from easily derivable parameters and commonly available climatic data. In this sense, the model reveals itself as a valid tool, potentially suitable for predictions at ungauged basins in a regionalization framework.

  16. Size differences in migrant sandpiper flocks: ghosts in ephemeral guilds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eldridge, J.L.; Johnson, D.H.

    1988-01-01

    Scolopacid sandpipers were studied from 1980 until 1984 during spring migration in North Dakota. Common species foraging together in mixed-species flocks differed in bill length most often by 20 to 30 percent (ratios from 1.2:1 to 1.3:1). Observed flocks were compared to computer generated flocks drawn from three source pools of Arctic-nesting sandpipers. The source pools included 51 migrant species from a global pool, 33 migrant species from a Western Hemisphere pool, and 13 species that migrated through North Dakota. The observed flocks formed randomly from the available species that used the North Dakota migration corridor but the North Dakota species were not a random selection from the Western Hemisphere and global pools of Arctic-nesting scolopacid sandpipers. In short, the ephemeral, mixed-species foraging flocks that we observed in North Dakota were random mixes from a non-random pool. The size-ratio distributions were consistent with the interpretation that use of this migration corridor by sandpipers has been influenced by some form of size-related selection such as competition.

  17. Haemorrhagic Fevers, Viral

    MedlinePlus

    ... fever, dengue, Omsk haemorrhagic fever, Kyasanur forest disease). Ebola virus disease outbreak in West Africa in 2014-2015 All information on Ebola virus disease Ebola features map Dashboard - Progress update ...

  18. Hemorrhagic Fevers - Multiple Languages

    MedlinePlus

    ... dialect) (简体中文) Expand Section Vaccine Information Statement (VIS) -- Yellow Fever Vaccine: What You Need to Know - English Vaccine Information Statement (VIS) -- Yellow Fever Vaccine: What You Need to Know - 简体中文 (Chinese, ...

  19. Viral Hemorrhagic Fevers

    MedlinePlus

    ... The CDC Cancel Submit Search The CDC Viral Hemorrhagic Fevers (VHFs) Note: Javascript is disabled or is not ... please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Viral Hemorrhagic Fevers (VHFs) Virus Families Arenaviruses Old World/New World ...

  20. Rocky Mountain spotted fever

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000654.htm Rocky Mountain spotted fever To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Rocky Mountain spotted fever is a disease caused by a ...

  1. [Acute rheumatic fever].

    PubMed

    Maier, Alexander; Kommer, Vera

    2016-03-01

    We report on a young women with acute rheumatic fever. Acute rheumatic fever has become a rare disease in Germany, especially in adults. This carries the risk that it can be missed in the differential diagnostic considerations of acute rheumatic disorders and febrile status. If rheumatic fever is not diagnosed and treated correctly, there is a considerable risk for rheumatic valvular heart disease. In this article diagnosis, differential diagnosis and therapy of rheumatic fever are discussed extensively.

  2. Lassa Fever Immune Plasma.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-08-01

    cases. Other clinical discharge diagnosis of LF patients, made before the results of specific laboratory tests were at hand, were typhoid fever in...diagnosis of 46 LF and Presumptive LF patients treated at CLH April 1983 - March 1984. Clinical diagnosis No. Lassa fever 38 Typhoid fever 3 Sickle cell

  3. Properties of solar ephemeral regions at the emergence stage

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Shuhong; Zhang, Jun E-mail: zjun@nao.cas.cn

    2014-01-20

    For the first time, we statistically study the properties of ephemeral regions (ERs) and quantitatively determine their parameters at the emergence stage based on a sample of 2988 ERs observed by the Solar Dynamics Observatory. During the emergence process, there are three kinds of kinematic performances, i.e., separation of dipolar patches, shift of the ER's magnetic centroid, and rotation of the ER's axis. The average emergence duration, flux emergence rate, separation velocity, shift velocity, and angular speed are 49.3 minutes, 2.6 × 10{sup 15} Mx s{sup –1}, 1.1 km s{sup –1}, 0.9 km s{sup –1}, and 0.°6 minute{sup –1}, respectively. At the end of emergence, the mean magnetic flux, separation distance, shift distance, and rotation angle are 9.3 × 10{sup 18} Mx, 4.7 Mm, 1.1 Mm, and 12.°9, respectively. We also find that the higher the ER magnetic flux is, (1) the longer the emergence lasts, (2) the higher the flux emergence rate is, (3) the further the two polarities separate, (4) the lower the separation velocity is, (5) the larger the shift distance is, (6) the slower the ER shifts, and (7) the lower the rotation speed is. However, the rotation angle seems not to depend on the magnetic flux. Not only at the start time, but also at the end time, the ERs are randomly oriented in both the northern and the southern hemispheres. Finally, neither the anti-clockwise-rotated ERs nor the clockwise rotated ones dominate the northern or the southern hemisphere.

  4. Bacterial succession within an ephemeral hypereutrophic mojave desert playa lake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Navarro, J.B.; Moser, D.P.; Flores, A.; Ross, C.; Rosen, Michael R.; Dong, H.; Zhang, G.; Hedlund, B.P.

    2009-01-01

    Ephemerally wet playas are conspicuous features of arid landscapes worldwide; however, they have not been well studied as habitats for microorganisms. We tracked the geochemistry and microbial community in Silver Lake playa, California, over one flooding/desiccation cycle following the unusually wet winter of 2004-2005. Over the course of the study, total dissolved solids increased by 10-fold and pH increased by nearly one unit. As the lake contracted and temperatures increased over the summer, a moderately dense planktonic population of 1 ?????106 cells ml-1 of culturable heterotrophs was replaced by a dense population of more than 1????????109 cells ml-1, which appears to be the highest concentration of culturable planktonic heterotrophs reported in any natural aquatic ecosystem. This correlated with a dramatic depletion of nitrate as well as changes in the microbial community, as assessed by small subunit ribosomal RNA gene sequencing of bacterial isolates and uncultivated clones. Isolates from the early-phase flooded playa were primarily Actinobacteria, Firmicutes, and Bacteroidetes, yet clone libraries were dominated by Betaproteobacteria and yet uncultivated Actinobacteria. Isolates from the late-flooded phase ecosystem were predominantly Proteobacteria, particularly alkalitolerant isolates of Rhodobaca, Porphyrobacter, Hydrogenophaga, Alishwenella, and relatives of Thauera; however, clone libraries were composed almost entirely of Synechococcus (Cyanobacteria). A sample taken after the playa surface was completely desiccated contained diverse culturable Actinobacteria typically isolated from soils. In total, 205 isolates and 166 clones represented 82 and 44 species-level groups, respectively, including a wide diversity of Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Actinobacteria, Firmicutes, Gemmatimonadetes, Acidobacteria, and Cyanobacteria. ?? 2008 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.

  5. Fever: is it beneficial?

    PubMed Central

    Blatteis, C. M.

    1986-01-01

    Data obtained in lizards infected with live bacteria suggest that fever may be beneficial to their survival. An adaptive value of fever has also been inferred in mammals, but the results are equivocal. Findings that certain leukocyte functions are enhanced in vitro at high temperatures have provided a possible explanation for the alleged benefits of fever. However, serious questions exist as to whether results from experiments in ectotherms and in vitro can properly be extrapolated to in vivo endothermic conditions. Indeed, various studies have yielded results inconsistent with the survival benefits attributed to fever, and fever is not an obligatory feature of all infections under all conditions. Certainly, the widespread use of antipyretics, without apparent adverse effects on the course of disease, argues against fever having great benefit to the host. In sum, although fever is a cardinal manifestation of infection, conclusive evidence that it has survival value in mammals is still lacking. PMID:3090790

  6. Quantifying the Functionality of Ephemeral Streams at the Watershed Scale for Land Management Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Connor, B. L.; Hamada, Y.; Bowen, E. E.; Wuthrich, K. K.; Grippo, M. A.

    2013-12-01

    Land development and associated disturbances in arid environments can adversely affect the ecological functionality of ephemeral stream channels. Land use managers have limited methodologies available for assessing low-impact development plans, or for monitoring changes in stream functionality as land use changes are implemented. The development of utility-scale solar energy facilities is underway in the southwestern United States. Federal and state agencies have developed plans to concentrate facilities in specific regions to minimize transmission limitations (e.g., the Bureau of Land Management's Solar Energy Zones cover 1,100 km2). However, multiple facility footprints in a single desert valley have the potential to drastically alter the natural pattern of ephemeral stream networks. This study focuses on quantifying the sensitivity of ephemeral streams with respect to land disturbance impacts on flow and sediment conveyance, groundwater recharge, and the loss of soil and vegetative habitats. An initial assessment used publicly-available geospatial data (typically 10- to 30-m resolution) on topography, surficial geology, and soil characteristics, as well as data on historical peak discharges and aerial photographs. These datasets were used to inform a professional judgment, score-based ranking of potential land disturbance impacts on the functionality of ephemeral streams. The results were limited to mapped stream channels in the National Hydrography Dataset, but suggested that hydrological and geomorphic impacts were a greater concern in valley piedmont regions, and that habitat concerns were greater in the valley regions where vegetation is sparsely distributed. Current efforts are focused on using a remote sensing approach to obtain high-resolution information on topography, soil, and vegetation in order to map detailed ephemeral stream networks, measure channel bathymetry characteristics, and use spectral indices of soil and vegetation to develop surrogate

  7. Analysis of streambed temperatures in ephemeral channels to determine streamflow frequency and duration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Constantz, J.; Stonestrom, D.; Stewart, A.E.; Niswonger, R.; Smith, T.R.

    2001-01-01

    Spatial and temporal patterns in streamflow are rarely monitored for ephemeral streams. Flashy, erosive streamflows common in ephemeral channels create a series of operational and maintenance problems, which makes it impractical to deploy a series of gaging stations along ephemeral channels. Streambed temperature is a robust and inexpensive parameter to monitor remotely, leading to the possibility of analyzing temperature patterns to estimate streamflow frequency and duration along ephemeral channels. A simulation model was utilized to examine various atmospheric and hydrological upper boundary conditions compared with a series of hypothetical temperature-monitoring depths within the streambed. Simulation results indicate that streamflow events were distinguished from changing atmospheric conditions with greater certainty using temperatures at shallow depths (e.g., 10-20 cm) as opposed to the streambed surface. Three ephemeral streams in the American Southwest were instrumented to monitor streambed temperature for determining the accuracy of using this approach to ascertain the long-term temporal and spatial extent of streamflow along each stream channel. Streambed temperature data were collected at the surface or at shallow depth along each stream channel, using thermistors encased in waterproof, single-channel data loggers tethered to anchors in the channel. On the basis of comparisons with site information, such as direct field observations and upstream flow records, diurnal temperature variations successfully detected the presence and duration of streamflow for all sites.

  8. Carbon and nutrient cycling in ephemeral streams in the American Southwest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lohse, K. A.; Meixner, T.

    2012-12-01

    Ephemeral streams are an important but little studied resource in the American Southwest. Ephemeral streams receive a subsidy of organic matter and nutrients in addition to water from their surrounding upland ecosystems. Given the hydrologic variability and additional water present in ephemeral stream systems, the upland subsidy to these systems might either lead to elevated organic matter and nutrient concentrations or more rapid processing and thus lower organic matter and nutrient states than surrounding uplands. Here we examine how carbon and nutrient pools and process rates vary across a range of ephemeral, intermittent to perennial streams in Arizona. We compare soil pools and process rates in the ephemeral wash relative to riparian and upland position along three lateral transects at each of the stream reaches (n=13 sites) prior to and post-monsoon rains. We also compared rates of litter decomposition at all sites with two types of litter, oak and sycamore. Nitrogen pools and process rates varied with position and season. Phosphorus availability was high across sites and relatively invariable. Resin exchange bags showed high availability of ammonium, nitrate, and phosphorus with the onset of the monsoon season. Rates of decomposition were higher in washes than riparian and upland positions and slower for oak compared to sycamore leaves. Eighty-six of the oak compared to seventy four percent of the sycamore mass was remaining after 180 days. Our findings suggest that upland subsidies lead to more rapid processing and lower organic matter in washes than surrounding uplands.

  9. Ecohydrologic function and disturbance of desert ephemeral stream channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bedford, D.; Macias, M.; Miller, D. M.; Newlander, A.; Perkins, K. S.; Sandquist, D. R.; Schwinning, S.

    2011-12-01

    In response to rare high-intensity or long duration rainstorms, runoff in desert ephemeral channels can redistribute water through landscapes and potentially serve as a resource subsidy. We are using transect studies, mapping, monitoring and manipulation experiments to investigate the ecohydrologic relations of these pervasive features with vegetation in the eastern Mojave Desert, USA. We focus on a gently sloping piedmont transected by a ~100 year old railroad that alters natural channel flow by diverting it through staggered culverts to areas downslope of the railroad. This creates three distinct ecohydrologic zones: 1) relatively undisturbed areas above the railroad, 2) areas below the railroad that receive enhanced flow where water is diverted through culverts (enhanced zones), and 3) areas below the railroad where water flow from upslope has been blocked (deprived zones). In all areas we found that vegetation cover and density are higher adjacent to stream channels and decrease with distance from the channels. Relative to the undisturbed areas, vegetation cover is higher in the enhanced areas, and lower in the deprived. Species-specific vegetation changes included higher cover of the drought deciduous sub-shrub Ambrosia dumosa in deprived zones and higher cover of the evergreen drought-tolerant shrub Larrea tridentata in enhanced zones. Using simulated channel runoff experiments, we found that most Larrea within 3 m, and Ambrosia within 1.5 m of an undisturbed stream channel physiologically responded to a water pulse and the responses persisted for over a month. Less pronounced responses were seen adjacent to channels in the deprived zones, and did not persist as long. Electrical resistance imaging of the watering experiments shows that water infiltrates vertically in channels and spreads laterally at depth; vegetation use of channel water in the deprived zones appears to be reduced. While we have no information on the pace of vegetation change due to channel

  10. Lassa Fever Immune Plasma.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-08-01

    Lassa fever , a new virus disease of man from West Africa . Clinical... Lassa fever in missionaries stationed in West Africa . Bull. W.H.O. 52: 593-598 (1975). 5. Clayton, A.J. Lassa immune serum. Bull. W.H.O. 55: 435-439...1977). 6. Leifer, E., Gocke, D.J., & Bourne, H. Lassa fever , a new virus disease of man from West Africa . II. Report of a laboratory acquired

  11. Lassa Fever Immune Plasma.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-05-01

    the period 246 Lassa Fever Immune Plasma (LFIP) units were obtained by plasmapheresis , 106 were forwarded to USAMRIID. During the whole life of the...Fever in Plasmapheresis #20 - the inception of the Contract LV has been isolated from 139 of 213 LF patients and another 71 presumptive LF cases have...During the year plasmapheresis at Curran Lutheran Hospital (CLH) and Phebe Hospital (PH) resulted in the collection of 246 units of Lassa Fever

  12. Mapping ephemeral stream networks in desert environments using very-high-spatial-resolution multispectral remote sensing

    DOE PAGES

    Hamada, Yuki; O'Connor, Ben L.; Orr, Andrew B.; ...

    2016-03-26

    In this paper, understanding the spatial patterns of ephemeral streams is crucial for understanding how hydrologic processes influence the abundance and distribution of wildlife habitats in desert regions. Available methods for mapping ephemeral streams at the watershed scale typically underestimate the size of channel networks. Although remote sensing is an effective means of collecting data and obtaining information on large, inaccessible areas, conventional techniques for extracting channel features are not sufficient in regions that have small topographic gradients and subtle target-background spectral contrast. By using very high resolution multispectral imagery, we developed a new algorithm that applies landscape information tomore » map ephemeral channels in desert regions of the Southwestern United States where utility-scale solar energy development is occurring. Knowledge about landscape features and structures was integrated into the algorithm using a series of spectral transformation and spatial statistical operations to integrate information about landscape features and structures. The algorithm extracted ephemeral stream channels at a local scale, with the result that approximately 900% more ephemeral streams was identified than what were identified by using the U.S. Geological Survey’s National Hydrography Dataset. The accuracy of the algorithm in detecting channel areas was as high as 92%, and its accuracy in delineating channel center lines was 91% when compared to a subset of channel networks that were digitized by using the very high resolution imagery. Although the algorithm captured stream channels in desert landscapes across various channel sizes and forms, it often underestimated stream headwaters and channels obscured by bright soils and sparse vegetation. While further improvement is warranted, the algorithm provides an effective means of obtaining detailed information about ephemeral streams, and it could make a significant contribution

  13. Mapping ephemeral stream networks in desert environments using very-high-spatial-resolution multispectral remote sensing

    SciTech Connect

    Hamada, Yuki; O'Connor, Ben L.; Orr, Andrew B.; Wuthrich, Kelsey K.

    2016-03-26

    In this paper, understanding the spatial patterns of ephemeral streams is crucial for understanding how hydrologic processes influence the abundance and distribution of wildlife habitats in desert regions. Available methods for mapping ephemeral streams at the watershed scale typically underestimate the size of channel networks. Although remote sensing is an effective means of collecting data and obtaining information on large, inaccessible areas, conventional techniques for extracting channel features are not sufficient in regions that have small topographic gradients and subtle target-background spectral contrast. By using very high resolution multispectral imagery, we developed a new algorithm that applies landscape information to map ephemeral channels in desert regions of the Southwestern United States where utility-scale solar energy development is occurring. Knowledge about landscape features and structures was integrated into the algorithm using a series of spectral transformation and spatial statistical operations to integrate information about landscape features and structures. The algorithm extracted ephemeral stream channels at a local scale, with the result that approximately 900% more ephemeral streams was identified than what were identified by using the U.S. Geological Survey’s National Hydrography Dataset. The accuracy of the algorithm in detecting channel areas was as high as 92%, and its accuracy in delineating channel center lines was 91% when compared to a subset of channel networks that were digitized by using the very high resolution imagery. Although the algorithm captured stream channels in desert landscapes across various channel sizes and forms, it often underestimated stream headwaters and channels obscured by bright soils and sparse vegetation. While further improvement is warranted, the algorithm provides an effective means of obtaining detailed information about ephemeral streams, and it could make a significant contribution toward

  14. Analysis of temperature profiles for investigating stream losses beneath ephemeral channels

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Constantz, J.; Stewart, A.E.; Niswonger, R.; Sarma, L.

    2002-01-01

    Continuous estimates of streamflow are challenging in ephemeral channels. The extremely transient nature of ephemeral streamflows results in shifting channel geometry and degradation in the calibration of streamflow stations. Earlier work suggests that analysis of streambed temperature profiles is a promising technique for estimating streamflow patterns in ephemeral channels. The present work provides a detailed examination of the basis for using heat as a tracer of stream/groundwater exchanges, followed by a description of an appropriate heat and water transport simulation code for ephemeral channels, as well as discussion of several types of temperature analysis techniques to determine streambed percolation rates. Temperature-based percolation rates for three ephemeral stream sites are compared with available surface water estimates of channel loss for these sites. These results are combined with published results to develop conclusions regarding the accuracy of using vertical temperature profiles in estimating channel losses. Comparisons of temperature-based streambed percolation rates with surface water-based channel losses indicate that percolation rates represented 30% to 50% of the total channel loss. The difference is reasonable since channel losses include both vertical and nonvertical component of channel loss as well as potential evapotranspiration losses. The most significant advantage of the use of sediment-temperature profiles is their robust and continuous nature, leading to a long-term record of the timing and duration of channel losses and continuous estimates of streambed percolation. The primary disadvantage is that temperature profiles represent the continuous percolation rate at a single point in an ephemeral channel rather than an average seepage loss from the entire channel.

  15. Iron and nutrient content of wind-erodible sediment in the ephemeral river valleys of Namibia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dansie, A. P.; Wiggs, G. F. S.; Thomas, D. S. G.

    2017-08-01

    Research concerning the global distribution of aeolian dust sources has principally focussed on salt/clay pan and desiccated lacustrine emission areas. In southern Africa such sources are identified as Etosha Pan in northern Namibia and Makgadikgadi Pans in northern Botswana. Dust emitting from ephemeral river valleys, however, has been largely overlooked. Rivers are known nutrient transport pathways and the flooding regimes of ephemeral river valleys frequently replenish stores of fine sediment which, on drying, can become susceptible to aeolian erosion. Such airborne sediment may be nutrient rich and thus be significant for the fertilisation of marine waters once deposited. This study investigates the dust source sediments from three ephemeral river valleys in Namibia in terms of their particle size distribution and their concentrations of bioavailable N, P and Fe. We compare the nutrient content of these sediments from the ephemeral river valleys to those collected from Etosha and Makgadikgadi Pans and consider their relative ocean fertilising potential. Our results show that the ephemeral river valleys contain fine grained sediment similar in physical character to Etosha and Makgadikgadi Pans yet they have up to 43 times greater concentrations of bioavailable iron and enriched N and P macronutrients that are each important for ocean fertilisation. The known dust-emitting river valleys of Namibia may therefore be contributing a greater fertilisation role in the adjacent marine system than previously considered, and not-yet investigated. Given this finding a re-assessment of the potential role of ephemeral river valleys in providing nutrient-rich sediment into the aeolian and marine systems in other dryland areas is necessary.

  16. The Need for Regular Monitoring and Prediction of Ephemeral Water Bodies in SERVIR Regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Eric

    2017-01-01

    With remote sensing and modeling techniques available today it is possible to regularly identify and monitor the presence of surface water globally, for a wide range of applications. Many of the available datasets and tools, however, do not adequately resolve small or ephemeral water bodies in a timely enough fashion to make local and subnational decisions about water resources management in developing regions. This presentation introduces a specific need focused on a basin in Senegal to develop a capability to identify and disseminate timely information on small and ephemeral water bodies, and we seek feedback on methods proposed to address this need.

  17. 37 CFR 380.12 - Royalty fees for the public performance of sound recordings and for ephemeral recordings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Royalty fees for the public performance of sound recordings and for ephemeral recordings. 380.12 Section 380.12 Patents, Trademarks, and....0017; (2) 2012: $0.0020; (3) 2013: $0.0022; (4) 2014: $0.0023; (5) 2015: $0.0025. (b) Ephemeral royalty...

  18. 37 CFR 261.3 - Royalty fees for public performances of sound recordings and for ephemeral recordings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... performances of sound recordings and for ephemeral recordings. 261.3 Section 261.3 Patents, Trademarks, and... REPRODUCTIONS § 261.3 Royalty fees for public performances of sound recordings and for ephemeral recordings. (a... digital transmissions of sound recordings made pursuant to 17 U.S.C. 114(d)(2), and the making...

  19. 37 CFR 382.12 - Royalty fees for the public performance of sound recordings and the making of ephemeral recordings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... performance of sound recordings and the making of ephemeral recordings. 382.12 Section 382.12 Patents... LICENSES RATES AND TERMS FOR DIGITAL TRANSMISSIONS OF SOUND RECORDINGS AND THE REPRODUCTION OF EPHEMERAL... Preexisting Satellite Digital Audio Radio Services § 382.12 Royalty fees for the public performance of...

  20. 37 CFR 262.3 - Royalty fees for public performances of sound recordings and for ephemeral recordings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... performances of sound recordings and for ephemeral recordings. 262.3 Section 262.3 Patents, Trademarks, and... THE MAKING OF EPHEMERAL REPRODUCTIONS § 262.3 Royalty fees for public performances of sound recordings... transmission of directly licensed sound recordings (if applicable). For any given payment period, the fee due...

  1. 37 CFR 261.3 - Royalty fees for public performances of sound recordings and for ephemeral recordings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... performances of sound recordings and for ephemeral recordings. 261.3 Section 261.3 Patents, Trademarks, and... § 261.3 Royalty fees for public performances of sound recordings and for ephemeral recordings. (a) For... pursuant to 17 U.S.C. 112(e) shall be as follows: (1) Webcaster and Commercial Broadcaster Performance...

  2. Hydroregime prediction models for ephemeral groundwater-driven sinkhole wetlands: a planning tool for climate change and amphibian conservation

    Treesearch

    C. H. Greenberg; S. Goodrick; J. D. Austin; B. R. Parresol

    2015-01-01

    Hydroregimes of ephemeral wetlands affect reproductive success of many amphibian species and are sensitive to altered weather patterns associated with climate change.We used 17 years of weekly temperature, precipitation, and waterdepth measurements for eight small, ephemeral, groundwaterdriven sinkhole wetlands in Florida sandhills to develop a hydroregime predictive...

  3. 37 CFR 260.2 - Royalty fees for the digital performance of sound recordings and the making of ephemeral...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Royalty fees for the digital... SERVICES' DIGITAL TRANSMISSIONS OF SOUND RECORDINGS AND MAKING OF EPHEMERAL PHONORECORDS § 260.2 Royalty fees for the digital performance of sound recordings and the making of ephemeral phonorecords...

  4. 37 CFR 260.2 - Royalty fees for the digital performance of sound recordings and the making of ephemeral...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Royalty fees for the digital... SERVICES' DIGITAL TRANSMISSIONS OF SOUND RECORDINGS AND MAKING OF EPHEMERAL PHONORECORDS § 260.2 Royalty fees for the digital performance of sound recordings and the making of ephemeral phonorecords...

  5. 37 CFR 260.2 - Royalty fees for the digital performance of sound recordings and the making of ephemeral...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Royalty fees for the digital... SERVICES' DIGITAL TRANSMISSIONS OF SOUND RECORDINGS AND MAKING OF EPHEMERAL PHONORECORDS § 260.2 Royalty fees for the digital performance of sound recordings and the making of ephemeral phonorecords...

  6. 37 CFR 260.2 - Royalty fees for the digital performance of sound recordings and the making of ephemeral...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Royalty fees for the digital... SERVICES' DIGITAL TRANSMISSIONS OF SOUND RECORDINGS AND MAKING OF EPHEMERAL PHONORECORDS § 260.2 Royalty fees for the digital performance of sound recordings and the making of ephemeral phonorecords...

  7. 37 CFR 260.2 - Royalty fees for the digital performance of sound recordings and the making of ephemeral...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Royalty fees for the digital... SERVICES' DIGITAL TRANSMISSIONS OF SOUND RECORDINGS AND MAKING OF EPHEMERAL PHONORECORDS § 260.2 Royalty fees for the digital performance of sound recordings and the making of ephemeral phonorecords...

  8. Flows and hypoxic blackwater events in managed ephemeral river channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hladyz, Sally; Watkins, Susanne C.; Whitworth, Kerry L.; Baldwin, Darren S.

    2011-04-01

    Edward-Wakool system - thus, initial inundation of these channels at a low flow rate during summer (or when water temperature is equal to or greater than 20 °C) is highly likely to trigger a hypoxic blackwater event. In addition, one month of litterfall in summer was calculated to be sufficient to deliver enough carbon to dry channels to create a hypoxic blackwater event. These findings suggest that to reduce the likelihood of a hypoxic blackwater event occurring as a result of managed flows in ephemeral systems; (1) the principal source(s) of DOC as well as the pathway and timing of accumulation in dry channels should be identified, and (2) the timing of the re-instatement of flows in a dry channel should be considered in light of the timing of maximum rates of accumulation of the principal source(s) of DOC.

  9. Rift Valley Fever Virus

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) is a mosquito-transmitted virus or arbovirus that is endemic in sub-Saharan Africa. In the last decade, Rift Valley fever (RVF) outbreaks have resulted in loss of human and animal life, as well as had significant economic impact. The disease in livestock is primarily a...

  10. Malignant Mediterranean spotted fever.

    PubMed

    Lunge, Snehal Balvant; Patil, Vaibhav; Ambar, Sameer; Naik, Vishwas

    2015-12-01

    Fever with rash is one of the most common causes of referral to a dermatologist. A plethora of conditions need to be considered in the differential diagnosis. They may be broadly classified into infectious causes, drug reactions, and autoimmune disorders. Here we present a rare case of rickettsial fever with cardiac involvement in an elderly male patient with no comorbidities.

  11. Malignant Mediterranean spotted fever

    PubMed Central

    Lunge, Snehal Balvant; Patil, Vaibhav; Ambar, Sameer; Naik, Vishwas

    2015-01-01

    Fever with rash is one of the most common causes of referral to a dermatologist. A plethora of conditions need to be considered in the differential diagnosis. They may be broadly classified into infectious causes, drug reactions, and autoimmune disorders. Here we present a rare case of rickettsial fever with cardiac involvement in an elderly male patient with no comorbidities. PMID:26904440

  12. Q Fever in Greenland

    PubMed Central

    Svendsen, Claus Bo; Christensen, Jens Jørgen; Bundgaard, Henning; Vindfeld, Lars; Christiansen, Claus Bohn; Kemp, Michael; Villumsen, Steen

    2010-01-01

    We report a patient with Q fever endocarditis in a settlement in eastern Greenland (Isortoq, Ammassalik area). Likely animal sources include sled dogs and seals. Q fever may be underdiagnosed in Arctic areas but may also represent an emerging infection. PMID:20202433

  13. Venezuelan haemorrhagic fever.

    PubMed

    Salas, R; de Manzione, N; Tesh, R B; Rico-Hesse, R; Shope, R E; Betancourt, A; Godoy, O; Bruzual, R; Pacheco, M E; Ramos, B

    1991-10-26

    An outbreak of severe haemorrhagic illness began in the municipality of Guanarito, Portuguesa State, Venezuela, in September, 1989. Subsequent detailed study of 15 cases confirmed the presence of a new viral disease, designated Venezuelan haemorrhagic fever. Characteristic features are fever, toxicity, headache, arthralgia, diarrhoea, conjunctivitis, pharyngitis, leucopenia, thrombocytopenia, and haemorrhagic manifestations. Other features include facial oedema, cervical lymphadenopathy, nausea/vomiting, cough, chest or abdominal pain, and convulsions. The patients ranged in age from 6 to 54 years; all were residents of rural areas in central Venezuela, and 9 died. Infection with Guanarito virus, a newly recognised arenavirus, was shown by direct culture or by serological confirmation in all cases. Epidemiological studies suggest that the disease is endemic in some rural areas of central Venezuela and that it is rodent-borne. Venezuelan haemorrhagic fever has many similarities to Lassa fever and to the arenavirus haemorrhagic fevers that occur in Argentina and Bolivia.

  14. SIMULATING SUB-DECADAL CHANNEL MORPHOLOGIC CHANGE IN EPHEMERAL STREAM NETWORKS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A distributed watershed model was modified to simulate cumulative channel morphologic
    change from multiple runoff events in ephemeral stream networks. The model incorporates the general design of the event-based Kinematic Runoff and" Erosion Model (KINEROS), which describes t...

  15. The impact of urbanization on water and sediment chemistry of ephemeral forest pools

    Treesearch

    Robert T. Brooks; Suzanne D. Miller; John Newsted

    2002-01-01

    We compared the water and sediment composition of two ephemeral pools located in forested settings in a developed suburban area with two similar pools located in extensive forest in Massachusetts. We also compared the macroinvertebrate communities. The sediments of the forest pools were 100% organic material, while those of the urban pools were predominantly silt. The...

  16. 75 FR 6097 - Digital Performance Right in Sound Recordings and Ephemeral Recordings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-08

    ... Copyright Royalty Board 37 CFR Part 380 Digital Performance Right in Sound Recordings and Ephemeral... Commercial Webcasters under two statutory licenses, permitting certain digital performances of sound... period 2006 through 2010 for a digital public performance of sound recordings by means of...

  17. 75 FR 14074 - Digital Performance Right in Sound Recordings and Ephemeral Recordings for a New Subscription...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-24

    ... Copyright Royalty Board 37 CFR Part 383 Digital Performance Right in Sound Recordings and Ephemeral... terms for the use of sound recordings in transmissions made by new subscription services and for the... eligible nonsubscription service or a new subscription service on which sound recordings are performed...

  18. Dry and Drier: Ecological Implications of Hydrologic and Geomorphic Differences among Perennial, Intermittent, and Ephemeral Streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wohl, E. E.

    2011-12-01

    Research in dryland streams on several continents indicates great diversity of form and process. Although features common to many dryland streams exist, very few of these features are unique to dryland environments. Differences in the flow regime of dryland streams compared to wetter environments are more likely to create distinctive physical disturbance regimes that strongly influence riverine biota. The spatial and temporal flow variability of intermittent and ephemeral streams in particular creates challenges and opportunities for riverine biota. A conceptual framework based on spatial and temporal variability of flow, as reflected in hydrologic connectivity and a flashiness index, is used to examine differences in habitat and resource distribution and stability among perennial, intermittent, and ephemeral streams. The intermediate disturbance hypothesis suggests that some types of perennial streams support greater biotic diversity than intermittent and ephemeral streams. The limited connectivity and stability associated with spatially and temporally fluctuating flows can result in high levels of endemism in intermittent and ephemeral streams. Effective management and conservation of these dryland streams requires understanding of the drivers of flow regime (climate, substrate, topography), the spatial and temporal patterns of flow and the associated patterns of hydraulics, sediment dynamics, and water chemistry, and the potential bottlenecks for species or community persistence if these patterns are altered by human resource use.

  19. Evidence for autogenic cyclicity in ephemeral stream cut-fill dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tucker, G. E.; Arnold, L.; Stokes, S.

    2004-12-01

    Cut-fill sequences in ephemeral channels are often attributed to climate forcing. Yet it has been proposed that these sequences can also arise from internal dynamics, without the need for an external trigger. This raises the following question: under what conditions, and by what mechanisms, can such autogenic cycles occur? Intrinsic geomorphic thresholds have been cited as important controls of cut-fill cycle initiation in ephemeral streams across the American southwest, but the types of controlling geomorphic thresholds involved, and the mechanisms leading to the threshold-crossing events, are not clear. Here we use a numerical model to identify necessary and sufficient conditions for autocyclic behavior in ephemeral-channel networks. Model simulations of a hypothetical semi-arid drainage basin demonstrate the existence of alternating steady-state epicycles of aggradation and erosion without any prior changes in independent external variables. The two key intrinsic control mechanisms responsible are (1) threshold channel slope angles, and (2) upstream signal propagation following threshold-crossing events. Analysis of the process-response relationships occurring within the catchment reveals the important environmental and basin conditions that promote autocyclic behaviour, and the sorts of channel-hillslope interactions and feedbacks that are an integral part of this dynamic behavior. The results provide process-based evidence for the existence and importance of intrinsic controls on cut-fill epicycles in ephemeral systems. The implications of these findings are discussed in the context of the arroyo problem and the interpretation of field records.

  20. Defining perennial, intermittent and ephemeral channels in eastern Kentucky: application to forestry best management practices

    Treesearch

    J. R. Svec; R. K. Kolka; J. W. Stringer

    2003-01-01

    In Kentucky stream classification is used to determine which forestry best management practice (BMP) to apply in riparian zones. Kentucky defines stream classes as follows (Stringer and others 1998): a) perennial streams that hold water throughout the year, b) intermittent streams that hold water during wet portions of the year, and c) ephemeral channels that hold...

  1. Analysis of topographic attributes for identification of ephemeral gully channel initiation in agricultural watersheds

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Watershed-scale modeling tools, such as USDA’s watershed management planning tool AnnAGNPS, already have been developed with components necessary for evaluation of the effect of ephemeral gullies on farming and conservation practices; however, the identification of potential downstream gully channel...

  2. Depth-area-volume and hydroperiod relationships of ephemeral (vernal) forest pools in southern New England

    Treesearch

    Robert T. Brooks; Masaki Hayashi

    2002-01-01

    Ephemeral or "vernal" pools occur commonly throughout the forests of the northeastern United States and adjacent eastern Canada. These pools are critical breeding habitat for a number of amphibian species and support a diverse invertebrate community. The hydroperiod or duration of surface water of vernal pools affects faunal composition and reproduction. We...

  3. 75 FR 3666 - Digital Performance Right in Sound Recordings and Ephemeral Recordings for a New Subscription...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-22

    ... Copyright Royalty Board 37 CFR Part 383 Digital Performance Right in Sound Recordings and Ephemeral... facilitating certain digital audio transmissions, including those made by new subscription services. 17 U.S.C... subscription service that ``performs sound recordings on digital audio channels programmed by the licensee...

  4. Evaluating ephemeral gully erosion impact on Zea mays L. yield and economics using AnnAGNPS

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Ephemeral gully erosion causes serious water quality and economic problems in the Midwest United States. A critical barrier to soil conservation practice adoption is often the implementation cost, although it is recognized that erosion reduces farm income. Yet few, if any, understand the relationshi...

  5. SIMULATING SUB-DECADAL CHANNEL MORPHOLOGIC CHANGE IN EPHEMERAL STREAM NETWORKS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A distributed watershed model was modified to simulate cumulative channel morphologic
    change from multiple runoff events in ephemeral stream networks. The model incorporates the general design of the event-based Kinematic Runoff and" Erosion Model (KINEROS), which describes t...

  6. Rainfall Threshold For Ephemeral Gully Erosion In Foothill Cultivated Lands (Wiśnicz Foothills, Poland)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Święchowicz, Jolanta

    2016-04-01

    The paper presents the results of ephemeral gullies studies carried out in hydrological years 1998-2009 on the Jagiellonian University's farm, which is located in the village of Łazy (Southern Poland). The farm covers an area of 103 ha. The dominant relief type is low hills. Soil erosion hardly ever occurs on the whole area of slopes in the catchment, and transport of eroded material is irregular and not simultaneous. The formation of ephemeral gullies happens once a year or once in a few years. The events are occasional and happen locally. Ephemeral gullies most frequently form and develop on cultivated slopes in natural drainage lines or they are associated with man-made agricultural activities like field borders, furrows, tractor traces and cart roads. The research carried out in Wiśnicz Foothills shows that the development of ephemeral gullies was limited both by extrinsic (erosivity of rain) and intrinsic thresholds (the length of slope, the presence (or lack of) Bt horizon, soil moisture, type and calendar of crops and farming activities). Ephemeral gullies usually form and develop during single rain or several subsequent rains of high erosivity (of several hundred MJmmha-1h-1) on long cultivated slopes, particularly at the beginning of vegetation period, when most slopes are devoid of vegetation cover or plants are in the initial stage of growth. The process of enlarging and deepening of ephemeral gullies slows down when the incision of a gully reaches Bt horizon. Then the effectiveness of even high erosivity rainfall is much smaller. Similarly, very high erosivity of rainfall in the middle of the vegetation season is not able to cause such serious effect and the intensity of deepening of ephemeral gullies is much smaller. The process of intensified linear water erosion is more significant on commercial farms with a large acreage of crops. As a result all the mapped erosion forms were disposed of by farmers (e.g. by ploughing or filling up). If these forms

  7. Identifying Critical Ephemeral Streams and Reducing Impacts Associated with Utility-Scale Solar Energy Development in the Southwest United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Connor, B. L.; Carr, A.; Patton, T.; Hamada, Y.

    2011-12-01

    The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) and the Department of Energy are preparing a joint programmatic environmental impact statement (PEIS) assessing the potential impacts of utility-scale solar energy development on BLM-administered lands in six southwestern states. One of the alternatives considered in the PEIS involves development within identified solar energy zones (SEZs) that individually cover approximately 10 to 1,000 km2, located primarily in desert valleys of the Basin and Range physiographic region. Land-disturbing activities in these alluvium-filled valleys have the potential to adversely affect ephemeral streams with respect to their hydrologic, geomorphic, and ecologic functions. Regulation and management of ephemeral streams typically falls under the spectrum of federal, state, and local programs, but scientifically based guidelines for protecting ephemeral streams with respect to land-development activities are largely nonexistent. The PEIS analysis attempts to identify critical ephemeral streams by evaluating the integral functions of flood conveyance, sediment transport, groundwater recharge, and supporting ecological habitats. The initial approach to classifying critical ephemeral streams involved identifying large, erosional features using available flood hazards mapping, historical peak discharges, and aerial photographs. This approach identified ephemeral features not suitable for development (based primarily on the likelihood of damaging floods and debris flows) to address flood conveyance and sediment transport functions of ephemeral streams. Groundwater recharge and the maintenance of riparian vegetation and wildlife habitats are other functions of ephemeral streams. These functions are typically associated with headwater reaches rather than large-scale erosional features. Recognizing that integral functions of ephemeral streams occur over a range of spatial scales and are driven by varying climatic-hydrologic events, the PEIS analysis

  8. A geomorphic classification of ephemeral channels in a mountainous, arid region, southwestern Arizona, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutfin, Nicholas A.; Shaw, Jeremy; Wohl, Ellen E.; Cooper, David

    2014-09-01

    Despite the global abundance of arid-region ephemeral streams, hydrologic and geomorphic data for these systems are limited compared to their perennial counterparts. High spatial and temporal variability in flow makes hydrologic and geomorphic aspects of dryland ephemeral channels difficult to characterize. Perennial stream classifications have been extended to dryland ephemeral streams but do not adequately describe observed differences in channel geometry and characteristics of ephemeral channels in desert environments. We present a geomorphic classification for ephemeral streams in mountainous regions based on planform, degree of confinement, and composition of confining material. Five stream types were identified in the Sonoran desert of southwestern Arizona: (1) piedmont headwater, (2) bedrock, (3) bedrock with alluvium, (4) incised alluvium, and (5) braided channels. Nonparametric permutational multivariate analysis of variance for 101 surveyed reaches indicated differences (p < 0.001) in channel geometry and hydraulics among the five stream types. Nonmetric multidimensional scaling ordination identified the strongest channel geometry and hydraulic variables capable of distinguishing the five channel types, and a classification tree determined relative importance of these variables in the following order: width-to-depth ratio (W/D), stream gradient (S), stream power (Ω), and shear stress (τ). A classification tree and discriminant analysis used W/D, S, Ω, and τ for 86 study reaches on the U.S. Army Yuma Proving Ground (77% and 77% internal validation hit rate, respectively) to predict stream type of 15 separate study reaches on Barry Goldwater Air Force Range with 67% and 73% external validation hit rates, respectively. Differences in channel geometry among the five stream types reflect likely differences in hydrology, hydraulics, and sediment transport with implications for disturbance regime, channel adjustment to disturbance, and ecological sensitivity.

  9. Tropical fevers: Management guidelines.

    PubMed

    Singhi, Sunit; Chaudhary, Dhruva; Varghese, George M; Bhalla, Ashish; Karthi, N; Kalantri, S; Peter, J V; Mishra, Rajesh; Bhagchandani, Rajesh; Munjal, M; Chugh, T D; Rungta, Narendra

    2014-02-01

    Tropical fevers were defined as infections that are prevalent in, or are unique to tropical and subtropical regions. Some of these occur throughout the year and some especially in rainy and post-rainy season. Concerned about high prevalence and morbidity and mortality caused by these infections, and overlapping clinical presentations, difficulties in arriving at specific diagnoses and need for early empiric treatment, Indian Society of Critical Care Medicine (ISCCM) constituted an expert committee to develop a consensus statement and guidelines for management of these diseases in the emergency and critical care. The committee decided to focus on most common infections on the basis of available epidemiologic data from India and overall experience of the group. These included dengue hemorrhagic fever, rickettsial infections/scrub typhus, malaria (usually falciparum), typhoid, and leptospira bacterial sepsis and common viral infections like influenza. The committee recommends a 'syndromic approach' to diagnosis and treatment of critical tropical infections and has identified five major clinical syndromes: undifferentiated fever, fever with rash / thrombocytopenia, fever with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), fever with encephalopathy and fever with multi organ dysfunction syndrome. Evidence based algorithms are presented to guide critical care specialists to choose reliable rapid diagnostic modalities and early empiric therapy based on clinical syndromes.

  10. Rift Valley fever vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Ikegami, Tetsuro; Makino, Shinji

    2009-01-01

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV), which belongs to the genus Phlebovirus, family Bunyaviridae, is a negative-stranded RNA virus carrying a tripartite RNA genome. RVFV is transmitted by mosquitoes and causes large outbreaks among ruminants and humans in Africa and the Arabian Peninsula. Human patients develop an acute febrile illness, followed by a fatal hemorrhagic fever, encephalitis or ocular diseases, whereas ruminants experience abortions during outbreak. Effective vaccination of both humans and ruminants is the best approach to control Rift Valley fever. This article summarizes the development of inactivated RVFV vaccine, live attenuated vaccine, and other new generation vaccines. PMID:19837291

  11. Lassa Fever Immune Plasma.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-08-01

    1974. 5. Frame, J. D. Surveillance of Lassa Fever amohg missionaries stationed in West Africa . Bull. WVHO 52: 593-59a, 1975 6. Monath, T.- P. Lassa ...A883 049 COLUMBIA UNIV NEW YORK DIV OF TROPIAL MEDIC.NE F/S 6/5 LASSA FEVER IMMUNE PLASMA U) AUG 79 J D FRAME DAMD17-79-C-9024 UNCLASSIFIED...NL’mmmEmmEmmEE.inuuuuwi LLVIL j~~AD’ LEVEL REPORT NO. 1I 0) LASSA FEVER IMMUNE PLASMA Annual Summary Report John 0. Frame, M.D. i Division of Tropical

  12. Lassa Fever Immune Plasma.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-08-01

    extension. *References 1. Frame, J.D., Baldwin, J.M., Jr., Gocke, J. and Troup, J.M. Lassa * fever , a new virus disease of man from West Africa . 1...missionaries stationed In West Africa . Bull. WHO 52: 593-598, 1975. 6. Monath, T.P. Lassa fever : review of epidemiology. Bull. WHO S2: 577-592, 1975. 7...A .2~ .!. . .~ *~ - ~ ~-~**~ 7 -7 - M~L - . Statement of the Problem: Investigations of Lassa fever , a recently discovered viral disease of West

  13. [Rocky Mountain spotted fever].

    PubMed

    Reinauer, K M; Jaschonek, K; Kusch, G; Heizmann, W R; Döller, P C; Jenss, H

    1990-01-12

    After returning from a holiday in the USA a 24-year-old man fell ill with diarrhoea, high fever and marked rash including the palms of the hands and soles of the feet. When a history of a tick bite in the USA was elicited, a rickettsial infection was suspected. Treatment with doxycycline, 100 mg twice daily, was instituted finally and the fever slowly resolved. The patient became completely well again within four weeks. Serological tests confirmed the diagnosis of Rocky Mountain spotted fever.

  14. Is fever beneficial?

    PubMed Central

    Kluger, M. J.

    1986-01-01

    Fever, the regulation of body temperature at an elevated level, is a common response to infection throughout the vertebrates, as well as in many species of invertebrate animals. It is probable that fever evolved as an adaptive response to infection hundreds of millions of years ago. Many components of the nonspecific and specific host response to infection are enhanced by small elevations in temperature. Perhaps more important, studies of bacterial- and viral-infected animals have shown that, in general, moderate fevers decrease morbidity and increase survival rate. PMID:3488621

  15. Hemorrhagic fever viruses.

    PubMed

    Pigott, David C

    2005-10-01

    This article reviews the epidemiology, pathophysiology, and clinical management of patients with suspected or confirmed viral hemorrhagic fever infection. The focus is on clinical management based on case series from naturally occuring outbreaks of viral hemorrhagic fever infection as well as imported cases of viral hemorrhagic fever encountered in industrialized nations. The potential risk of bioterrorism involving these agents is discussed as well as emergency department and critical care management of isolated cases or larger outbreaks. Important aspects of management, including recognition of infected patients, isolation and decontamination procedures, as well as available vaccines and therapies are emphasized.

  16. Familial Mediterranean Fever.

    PubMed

    Kucuk, Adem; Gezer, Ilknur Albayrak; Ucar, Ramazan; Karahan, Ali Yavuz

    2014-01-01

    Familial Mediterranean Fever is an autosomal recessive inherited disease with a course of autoinflammation, which is characterized by the episodes of fever and serositis. It affects the populations from Mediterranean basin. Genetic mutation of the disease is on MEFV gene located on short arm of Chromosome 16. The disease is diagnosed based on clinical evaluation. Amyloidosis is the most important complication. The only agent that decreases the development of amyloidosis and the frequency and severity of the episodes is colchicine, which has been used for about 40 years. In this review, we aimed to discuss especially the most recent advances about Familial Mediterranean Fever which is commonly seen in our population.

  17. Scarlet Fever (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... the throat may be covered with a whitish coating, or appear red, swollen, and dotted with whitish ... the tongue may have a whitish or yellowish coating. A child with scarlet fever also may have ...

  18. Simian hemorrhagic fever virus

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This book chapter describes the taxonomic classification of Simian hemorrhagic fever virus (SHFV). Included are: host, genome, classification, morphology, physicochemical and physical properties, nucleic acid, proteins, lipids, carbohydrates, geographic range, phylogenetic properties, biological pro...

  19. Familial Mediterranean Fever

    MedlinePlus

    ... don't use genetic tests as the sole method of diagnosing familial Mediterranean fever. There's no cure ... may be options, though these treatments are considered experimental. Other medications include rilonacept (Arcalyst) and anakinra (Kineret). ...

  20. Rocky Mountain spotted fever.

    PubMed

    Lacz, N L; Schwartz, R A; Kapila, R

    2006-04-01

    Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF) is an unusual but important dermatological condition to identify without hesitation. The classic triad of headache, fever, and a rash that begins on the extremities and travels proximally to involve the trunk is found in a majority of patients. The cutaneous centripetal pattern is a result of cell to cell migration by the causative organism Rickettsia rickettsii. Such individuals should receive prompt antimicrobial therapy and supportive care to avoid serious and potentially fatal complications.

  1. Hay fever in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Wiseberg, Max

    2014-05-01

    Spring and summer can bring misery to millions who suffer from allergic reactions to pollen. Hay fever can cause runny noses, streaming eyes and sore throats. Sadly, many treatments for this distressing condition are not recommended during pregnancy because of fears surrounding the effect on the unborn child. This article presents the causes and treatments of hay fever and explores the alternatives for use during pregnancy which may be able to relieve or minimise the unpleasant symptoms without harming the baby.

  2. Effects of ephemeral gully erosion on soil degradation in a cultivated area in Sicily

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La Spada, Carmelo; Capra, Antonina; Gelsomino, Antonio; Ollobarren del Barrio, Paul

    2015-04-01

    Water erosion is the main cause of soil degradation on cultivated lands under Mediterranean climate. In this conditions, gully erosion is a major contributor to loss of soil productivity due to the big amounts of soil removed from the most productive top-layer. However, only few studies on the effects of gully erosion and artificial controlling measures on soil degradation are available. The study analyzes the effects of the ephemeral gully erosion and infilling by tillage operations on several physical-chemical soil properties influencing the soil productivity. The study area is located in the center of Sicily, in an agricultural context characterized by ephemeral gully erosion. Five fields with different crops and soil characteristics affected by this type of erosion were selected. Currently, local farmers adopt the artificial measure to gully filling activities to control gully erosion and continue the same agricultural management practice. Therefore, the studied ephemeral gullies show a cyclic behavior. They appear during the rainy season, are erased from July to October by soil infill from areas adjacent to the channel using ordinary tillage equipment, and, in most years, they reappear in the same position during the following rainy season. For each situation, 20 samples were taken, located on 5 transects in the direction perpendicular to the ephemeral gully, in specific positions: 2 outside the erosive channel (one in the valley-deposit area and one upstream of the basin in the undisturbed area), and 3 along the same. For each transect, the samples were collected in 4 different positions: one inside the ephemeral gully, the other 3 in external points spaced to represent the areas affected by the annual process of erosion and infilling of the gully. For each sample, a set of the main chemical and physical soil characteristics which influence the soil fertility were determined: particle size, pH, electrical conductivity, total content of carbonates, nitrates

  3. Typhoid fever in Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Beyene, Getenet; Asrat, Daniel; Mengistu, Yohannes; Aseffa, Abrham; Wain, John

    2008-12-01

    This review focuses on the reports of salmonellosis by investigators in different parts of Ethiopia, in particular focusing on the levels of typhoid fever. Many of the reports are published in local journals that are not available online. There have been seven studies which diagnosed typhoid fever by laboratory culture and there is no coordinated epidemiological surveillance. All conducted research and reports from different health institutions in Ethiopia indicate that typhoid fever was still a common problem up to the most recent study in 2000 and that the extensive use of first-line drugs has led to the development of multiple drug resistance. In the sites covered by this review, the total number of published cases of typhoid fever dropped over time reflecting the decline in research capacity in the country. Data on the proportion of patients infected by different serovars of Salmonella suggest that the non-Typhi serovars of Salmonella are increasing. The published evidence suggests that typhoid fever is a current public health problem in Ethiopia although population based surveys, based on good microbiological diagnosis, are urgently needed. Only then can the true burden of enteric fever be estimated and the benefit of public health control measures, such as health education, safe water provision, improved food hygienic practices and eventually vaccination, be properly assessed.

  4. Emergence of Q fever

    PubMed Central

    Angelakis, E; Raoult, D

    2011-01-01

    Q fever is a worldwide zoonosis with many acute and chronic manifestations caused by the pathogen Coxiella burnetii. Farm animals and pets are the main reservoirs of infection, and transmission to human beings is mainly accomplished through inhalation of contaminated aerosols. Persons at greatest risk are those in contact with farm animals and include farmers, abattoir workers, and veterinarians. The organs most commonly affected during Q fever are the heart, the arteries, the bones and the liver. The most common clinical presentation is an influenza-like illness with varying degrees of pneumonia and hepatitis. Although acute disease is usually self-limiting, people do occasionally die from this condition. Endocarditis is the most serious and most frequent clinical presentation of chronic Q fever. Vascular infection is the second most frequent presentation of Q fever. The diagnosis of Q fever is based on a significant increase in serum antibody titers. The treatment is effective and well tolerated, but must be adapted to the acute or chronic pattern with the tetracyclines to be considered the mainstay of antibiotic therapy. For the treatment of Q fever during pregnancy the use of long-term cotrimoxazole therapy is proposed. PMID:23113081

  5. Paracetamol and fever management.

    PubMed

    Warwick, C

    2008-11-01

    Paracetamol is one of the most commonly used legal drugs in the western world. Its availability is good, cost is low, and its uses include 'over-the-counter' (OTC) distribution, primary care prescribed therapy, secondary care 'post-operative' application and emergency treatment. Stated benefits of paracetamol include: the drug's analgesic effects, preference to aspirin in avoidance of Reye's syndrome, good patient tolerance, and iatrogenic complications are infrequent and minor. Stated cautions include hepatotoxic effect following minor doses and short duration use and users may incur compromised immune integrity. This paper is concerned with paracetamol's role in fever management. Public concern regarding, in particular, childhood fever and febrile convulsions is largely unwarranted. Despite paracetamol's reputation as a popular fever-reducing agent the drug is poorly effective in the control of febrility and febrile convulsions showing no important advantage compared with placebo. Paracetamol is probably grossly over-prescribed for fever management and its value more perceived than real. Greater efforts are needed to inform patients of the natural benefits of the biological strategy of fever and of the highly limited and in some cases contraindicated use of paracetamol in fever management.

  6. 37 CFR 380.12 - Royalty fees for the public performance of sound recordings and for ephemeral recordings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... EPHEMERAL REPRODUCTIONS Broadcasters § 380.12 Royalty fees for the public performance of sound recordings.... The royalty payable under 17 U.S.C. 112(e) for any reproduction of a phonorecord made by a...

  7. AnnAGNPS GIS-based tool for watershed-scale identification and mapping of cropland potential ephemeral gullies

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The formation of ephemeral gullies in agricultural fields has been recognized as an important source of sediment contributing to environmental degradation and compromising crop productivity. Methodologies are being developed for assessing gully formation and gully sediment yield. The Annualized Agri...

  8. The Length Scale of 3-Space Knots, Ephemeral Knots, and Slipknots in Random Walks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millett, K. C.

    The probability that a random walk or polygon in the 3-space or in the simple cubic lattice contains a small knot, an ephemeral knot, or a slipknot goes to one as the length goes to infinity. The probability that a polygon or walk contains a ``global'' knot also goes to one as the length goes to infinity. What immerges is a highly complex picture of the length scale of knotting in polygons and walks. Here we study the average scale of knots, ephemeral knots, and slipknots in 3-space random walks, paying special attention to the probability of their occurance and to the growth of their average sizes as a function of the length of the walk.

  9. Impact of precipitation and runoff on ephemeral gully development in cultivated croplands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karimov, V.; Sheshukov, A.; Barnes, P.

    2015-03-01

    The goal of this study was to estimate the impacts of precipitation and runoff on ephemeral gully development. A field experiment was conducted during the summer of 2013 on an agricultural field near the city of McPherson in central Kansas, USA. Precipitation data were collected, and the gully headcut was measured every three to four weeks. The rainfall excess was calculated with the WEPP model, whereas headcut soil losses were estimated based on measurements. Headcut measurements showed that there was no gully development during rainfall events of short duration of high or low intensity. However, headcut propagation was clearly detected under saturated soil conditions for a three-day storm. This field study provides data to model the mechanics of ephemeral gully development. Further measurements of precipi-tation and gully morphology are needed for statistical analysis of gully erosion and the associated soil losses.

  10. Persistent fever in the ICU.

    PubMed

    Rehman, Tayyab; deBoisblanc, Bennett P

    2014-01-01

    Disorders of elevated body temperature may be classified as either fever or hyperthermia. Fever is caused by a pyrogen-mediated upward adjustment of the hypothalamic thermostat; hyperthermia results from a loss of physiologic control of temperature regulation. Fever in the ICU can be due to infectious or noninfectious causes. The initial approach to a febrile, critically ill patient should involve a thoughtful review of the clinical data to elicit the likely source of fever prior to the ordering of cultures, imaging studies, and broad-spectrum antibiotics. Both high fever and prolonged fever have been associated with increased mortality; however, a causal role for fever as a mediator of adverse outcomes during non-neurologic critical illness has not been established. Outside the realm of acute brain injury, the practice of treating fever remains controversial. To generate high-quality, evidence-based guidelines for the management of fever, large, prospective, multicenter trials are needed.

  11. The Influence of Ephemeral Beaches on Alongshore Variability of Hard-rock Cliff Erosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vann Jones, E. C.; Rosser, N. J.; Brain, M.; Varley, S. J.

    2015-12-01

    The role of abrasion of rock cliffs is typically considered in the long-term presence of a beach. During monthly monitoring of hard rock cliff erosion along the North Yorkshire coast, UK, we have observed a number of small ephemeral beaches of highly variable duration and extent. The erosive significance of the temporary presence of sediment at the cliffs is unknown and we set out to examine whether observed alongshore variability in erosion can be linked to the presence of ephemeral beaches. We explore the temporal and spatial variability in sediment deposition and transport along a low-sediment rock coast foreshore, the controlling marine conditions and the effects on cliff erosion. We focus on a 500 m wide embayment set into 70 m high hard rock cliffs consisting of horizontally bedded Jurassic mudstone, shale, siltstone and sandstone. The bay has a wide, shallow gradient foreshore up to 300 m wide with highly variable topography. With the exception of an ephemeral beach (of widths up to approximately 150 m alongshore and 10 m cross-shore) the rock foreshore is typically sand-free, with failed material from the cliffs quickly removed from the cliff toe by the sea leaving only boulders. The high tidal range (6 m) and storm wave environment of the North Sea result in variable marine conditions at the site. We use magnetic sand tracers and a grid of foreshore and cliff face magnets to examine the sand transport across the foreshore and to identify the vertical extent of cliff face impacted by sand. We monitor the driving marine conditions on the foreshore using a network of current meters and wave pressure sensors. Erosion of the cliff face across the whole bay is monitored at high-resolution using terrestrial laser scanning to examine the spatial distribution of abrasion and the influence of the ephemeral beach.

  12. Light acclimation strategies change from summer green to spring ephemeral as wild-leek plants age.

    PubMed

    Dion, Pierre-Paul; Brisson, Jacques; Fontaine, Bastien; Lapointe, Line

    2016-05-01

    Spring-ephemeral forest-herbs emerge early to take advantage of the high-light conditions preceding canopy closure; they complete their life cycle in a few weeks, then senesce as the tree canopy closes. Summer greens acclimate their leaves to shade and thus manage to maintain a net carbon gain throughout summer. Differences in phenology among life stages within a species have been reported in tree saplings, whose leaf activity may extend beyond the period of shade conditions caused by mature trees. Similar phenological acclimation has seldom been studied in forest herbs. We compared wild-leek bulb growth and leaf phenology among plants from seedling to maturity and from under 4 to 60% natural light availability. We also compared leaf chlorophyll content and chl a/b ratio among seedlings and adult plants in a natural population as an indicator of photosynthetic capacity and acclimation to light environment. Overall, younger plants senesced later than mature ones. Increasing light availability delayed senescence in mature plants, while hastening seedling senescence. In natural populations, only seedlings acclimated to the natural reduction in light availability through time. Wild-leek seedlings exhibit a summer-green phenology, whereas mature plants behave as true spring ephemerals. Growth appears to be more source-limited in seedlings than in mature plants. This modulation of phenological strategy, if confirmed in other species, would require a review of the current classification of species as either spring ephemerals, summer greens, wintergreens, or evergreens. © 2016 Botanical Society of America.

  13. Behavior and identification of ephemeral sand dunes at the backshore zone using video images.

    PubMed

    Guimarães, Pedro V; Pereira, Pedro S; Calliari, Lauro J; Ellis, Jean T

    2016-09-01

    The backshore zone is transitional environment strongly affected by ocean, air and sand movements. On dissipative beaches, the formation of ephemeral dunes over the backshore zone plays significant contribution in the beach morphodynamics and sediment budget. The aim of this work is to describe a novel method to identify ephemeral dunes in the backshore region and to discuss their morphodynamic behavior. The beach morphology is identified using Argus video imagery, which reveals the behavior of morphologies at Cassino Beach, Rio Grande do Sul, Brasil. Daily images from 2005 to 2007, topographic profiles, meteorological data, and sedimentological parameters were used to determine the frequency and pervasiveness of these features on the backshore. Results indicated that coastline orientation relative to the dominant NE and E winds and the dissipative morphological beach state favored aeolian sand transport towards the backshore. Prevailing NE winds increase sand transportation to the backshore, resulting in the formation of barchans, transverse, and barchanoid-linguiod dunes. Precipitation inhibits aeolian transport and ephemeral dune formation and maintains the existing morphologies during strong SE and SW winds, provided the storm surge is not too high.

  14. Comparison of Methods to Estimate Ephemeral Channel Recharge, Walnut Gulch, San Pedro River Basin, Arizona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodrich, D. C.; Williams, D. G.; Unkrich, C. L.; Hogan, J. F.; Scott, R. L.; Hultine, K. R.; Pool, D. R.; Coes, A. L.; Miller, S. N.

    2004-12-01

    Ephemeral channel transmission loss represents an important groundwater-surface water exchange in arid and semiarid regions and is potentially a significant source of recharge at the basin scale. However, identification of the processes and dynamics that control this exchange is a challenging problem. Specifically, data on the proportion of runoff transmission losses that escape from near-channel transpiration and wetted channel evaporation to become deep groundwater recharge are difficult to obtain. This issue was addressed through coordinated field research and modeling within the USDA-ARS Walnut Gulch Experimental Watershed (WGEW) located in the San Pedro River Basin of southeastern Arizona. Recharge was estimated using several independent methods which included a reach water balance approach, with near-channel ET estimated using sap flux and micrometeorological measurements; geochemical methods such as chloride mass balance; modeling of changes in groundwater level or microgravity measurements; and vadose zone water and temperature transport modeling. It was found that during the relatively wet 1999 and average 2000 monsoon seasons, the range of ephemeral channel recharge estimated from these methods differed by a factor of less than three. A rough scaling to the entire San Pedro Basin indicates that ephemeral channel recharge constitutes between approximately 15 percent and 40 percent of total annual recharge to the regional aquifer as estimated from a calibrated groundwater model. In contrast, during the weak monsoon seasons of 2001 and 2002 limited runoff and stream channel infiltration did occur but no discernable deep aquifer recharge was detected.

  15. Hydrologic influences on soil properties along ephemeral rivers in the Namib Desert

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jacobson, P.J.; Jacobson, K.M.; Angermeier, P.L.; Cherry, D.S.

    2000-01-01

    Soils were examined along three ephemeral rivers in the Namib Desert to assess the influence of their hydrologic characteristics on soil properties. Soils consisted of layers of fluvially deposited, organic-rich silts, interstratified with fluvial and aeolian sands. The most significant influence of the ephemeral hydrologic regime upon soils was related to the downstream alluviation associated with hydrologic decay. This alluviation increased the silt proportion of soils in the lower reaches of the rivers. Organic carbon, nitrogen and phosphorous were correlated with silt content, and silt deposition patterns influenced patterns of moisture availability and plant rooting, creating and maintaining micro-habitats for various organisms. Localized salinization occurred in association with wetland sites and soluble salt content tended to increase downstream. Because of the covariance between silt and macronutrients, and the influence of silt upon moisture availability and habitat suitability, alluviation patterns associated with the hydrologic regime strongly influence the structure, productivity, and spatial distribution of biotic communities in ephemeral river ecosystems. (C) 2000 Academic Press.

  16. Experimentally Isolating the Contributions of a Disturbed Ephemeral Drainage to a Headwater Stream in the Southern Appalachians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gannon, J. P.; Lord, M.; Kinner, D. A.

    2015-12-01

    A growing body of evidence suggests contributions to runoff from ephemeral channels during events can exhibit significant control over water quality in higher order streams. Furthermore, field observations from a steep Appalachian catchment influenced by human activity suggest these disturbed ephemeral drainages exhibit significant control over turbidity, water temperature, and conductivity levels downstream. High turbidity during stormflow is a water quality problem in many areas of the Southern Appalachians. However, upland ephemeral channels are not included in the jurisdiction of the Clean Water Act. This offers little recourse if their contributions degrade the water quality of larger-scale streams and highlights the need for robust evidence of the potential impacts of ephemeral drainages. The aim of this research is to isolate the contribution of a disturbed ephemeral drainage by diverting its flow from the study stream network. Spatially and temporally distributed stream water samples taken during storms, when the channel is diverted or allowed to flow normally, will allow us to assess its contribution. In this poster, we present initial spatial and temporal streamwater chemistry and turbidity data as well as a detailed description of the stream network, study design, and diversion construction. We anticipate the findings of this study will be relevant to describing the environmental impact of disturbed ephemeral channels and to describing their potential influence on other water chemistry parameters downstream.

  17. Behavioral fever in ectothermic vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Rakus, Krzysztof; Ronsmans, Maygane; Vanderplasschen, Alain

    2017-01-01

    Fever is an evolutionary conserved defense mechanism which is present in both endothermic and ectothermic vertebrates. Ectotherms in response to infection can increase their body temperature by moving to warmer places. This process is known as behavioral fever. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge on the mechanisms of induction of fever in mammals. We further discuss the evolutionary conserved mechanisms existing between fever of mammals and behavioral fever of ectothermic vertebrates. Finally, the experimental evidences supporting an adaptive value of behavioral fever expressed by ectothermic vertebrates are summarized. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Recurrent Fever in Children

    PubMed Central

    Torreggiani, Sofia; Filocamo, Giovanni; Esposito, Susanna

    2016-01-01

    Children presenting with recurrent fever may represent a diagnostic challenge. After excluding the most common etiologies, which include the consecutive occurrence of independent uncomplicated infections, a wide range of possible causes are considered. This article summarizes infectious and noninfectious causes of recurrent fever in pediatric patients. We highlight that, when investigating recurrent fever, it is important to consider age at onset, family history, duration of febrile episodes, length of interval between episodes, associated symptoms and response to treatment. Additionally, information regarding travel history and exposure to animals is helpful, especially with regard to infections. With the exclusion of repeated independent uncomplicated infections, many infective causes of recurrent fever are relatively rare in Western countries; therefore, clinicians should be attuned to suggestive case history data. It is important to rule out the possibility of an infectious process or a malignancy, in particular, if steroid therapy is being considered. After excluding an infectious or neoplastic etiology, immune-mediated and autoinflammatory diseases should be taken into consideration. Together with case history data, a careful physical exam during and between febrile episodes may give useful clues and guide laboratory investigations. However, despite a thorough evaluation, a recurrent fever may remain unexplained. A watchful follow-up is thus mandatory because new signs and symptoms may appear over time. PMID:27023528

  19. Recurrent Fever in Children.

    PubMed

    Torreggiani, Sofia; Filocamo, Giovanni; Esposito, Susanna

    2016-03-25

    Children presenting with recurrent fever may represent a diagnostic challenge. After excluding the most common etiologies, which include the consecutive occurrence of independent uncomplicated infections, a wide range of possible causes are considered. This article summarizes infectious and noninfectious causes of recurrent fever in pediatric patients. We highlight that, when investigating recurrent fever, it is important to consider age at onset, family history, duration of febrile episodes, length of interval between episodes, associated symptoms and response to treatment. Additionally, information regarding travel history and exposure to animals is helpful, especially with regard to infections. With the exclusion of repeated independent uncomplicated infections, many infective causes of recurrent fever are relatively rare in Western countries; therefore, clinicians should be attuned to suggestive case history data. It is important to rule out the possibility of an infectious process or a malignancy, in particular, if steroid therapy is being considered. After excluding an infectious or neoplastic etiology, immune-mediated and autoinflammatory diseases should be taken into consideration. Together with case history data, a careful physical exam during and between febrile episodes may give useful clues and guide laboratory investigations. However, despite a thorough evaluation, a recurrent fever may remain unexplained. A watchful follow-up is thus mandatory because new signs and symptoms may appear over time.

  20. Vegetation Structure and Function along Ephemeral Streams in the Sonoran Desert

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stromberg, J. C.; Katz, G.

    2011-12-01

    Despite being the most prevalent stream type in the American Southwest, far less is known about riparian ecosystems associated with ephemeral streams than with perennial streams. Patterns of plant composition and structure reflect complex environmental gradients, including water availability and flood intensity, which in turn are related to position in the stream network. A survey of washes in the Sonoran Desert near Tucson, Arizona showed species composition of small ephemeral washes to be comprised largely of upland species, including large seeded shrubs such as Acacia spp. and Larrea tridentata. Small seeded disturbance adapted xerophytic shrubs, such as Baccharis sarothroides, Hymenoclea monogyra and Isocoma tenuisecta, were common lower in the stream network on the larger streams that have greater scouring forces. Because ephemeral streams have multiple water sources, including deep (sometimes perched) water tables and seasonally variable rain and flood pulses, multiple plant functional types co-exist within a stream segment. Deep-rooted phreatophytes, including Tamarix and nitrogen-fixing Prosopis, are common on many washes. Such plants are able to access not only water, but also pools of nutrients, several meters below ground thereby affecting nutrient levels and soil moisture content in various soil strata. In addition to the perennial plants, many opportunistic and shallow-rooted annual species establish during the bimodal wet seasons. Collectively, wash vegetation serves to stabilize channel substrates and promote accumulation of fine sediments and organic matter. In addition to the many streams that are ephemeral over their length, ephemeral reaches also occupy extensive sections of interrupted perennial rivers. The differences in hydrologic conditions that occur over the length of interrupted perennial rivers influence plant species diversity and variability through time. In one study of three interrupted perennial rivers, patterns of herbaceous species

  1. Vaccines against typhoid fever.

    PubMed

    Guzman, Carlos A; Borsutzky, Stefan; Griot-Wenk, Monika; Metcalfe, Ian C; Pearman, Jon; Collioud, Andre; Favre, Didier; Dietrich, Guido

    2006-05-01

    Because of high infectivity and significant disease burden, typhoid fever constitutes a major global health problem. Implementation of adequate food handling practices and establishment of safe water supplies are the cornerstone for the development of an effective prevention program. However, vaccination against typhoid fever remains an essential tool for the effective management of this disease. Currently, there are two well tolerated and effective licensed vaccines. One is based on defined subunit virulence (Vi) polysaccharide antigen and can be administered either intramuscularly or subcutaneously and the other is based on the use of live attenuated bacteria for oral administration. The advantages and disadvantages of the various approaches taken in the development of a vaccine against typhoid fever are discussed, along with the potential for future vaccine candidates.

  2. [Fever after travel return].

    PubMed

    Schedel, I

    2004-06-01

    Between 20 and 70 percent of the 50 million people who travel from the industrialized world to the developing world each year report some illness associated with their travel. Approximately 3 percent of people traveling internationally for short periods (<2 weeks) report fever even after travel. Careful assessment of the travel history, likely incubation period, exposure history, associated signs and symptoms, duration of fever, immunization status use or nonuse of antimalarial chemoprophylaxis, and degree of compliance with a chemoprophylactic regimen, if used, helps to establish the diagnosis. Determining an approximate incubation period can be particular helpful in ruling out possible causes of fever. Specific examinations targeting the individual infection, assumed to be responsible for the development of febrile disease may ascertain diagnosis and lead to effective treatment.

  3. Pathogenesis of Lassa fever.

    PubMed

    Yun, Nadezhda E; Walker, David H

    2012-10-09

    Lassa virus, an Old World arenavirus (family Arenaviridae), is the etiological agent of Lassa fever, a severe human disease that is reported in more than 100,000 patients annually in the endemic regions of West Africa with mortality rates for hospitalized patients varying between 5-10%. Currently, there are no approved vaccines against Lassa fever for use in humans. Here, we review the published literature on the life cycle of Lassa virus with the specific focus put on Lassa fever pathogenesis in humans and relevant animal models. Advancing knowledge significantly improves our understanding of Lassa virus biology, as well as of the mechanisms that allow the virus to evade the host's immune system. However, further investigations are required in order to design improved diagnostic tools, an effective vaccine, and therapeutic agents.

  4. Pathogenesis of Lassa Fever

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Nadezhda E.; Walker, David H.

    2012-01-01

    Lassa virus, an Old World arenavirus (family Arenaviridae), is the etiological agent of Lassa fever, a severe human disease that is reported in more than 100,000 patients annually in the endemic regions of West Africa with mortality rates for hospitalized patients varying between 5-10%. Currently, there are no approved vaccines against Lassa fever for use in humans. Here, we review the published literature on the life cycle of Lassa virus with the specific focus put on Lassa fever pathogenesis in humans and relevant animal models. Advancing knowledge significantly improves our understanding of Lassa virus biology, as well as of the mechanisms that allow the virus to evade the host’s immune system. However, further investigations are required in order to design improved diagnostic tools, an effective vaccine, and therapeutic agents. PMID:23202452

  5. [Fever of unknown origin].

    PubMed

    Salzberger, B; Müller-Schilling, M; Fleck, M

    2013-04-01

    Fever of unknown origin (FUO) is defined as sustained unexplained fever despite intensive diagnostic evaluation and represents a particular diagnostic challenge. It can be classified into different categories, e.g. classical, nosocomial, neutropenic and HIV-associated FUO, which is based on the patient-specific clinical and immunological situation. Infections, malignant diseases and non-infectious inflammatory diseases have to be considered as the most important causes of FUO; however, no definitive diagnosis can be established in a substantial number of FUO patients despite an extensive diagnostic work-up. The present review focuses on the important diagnostic aspects as well as therapeutic options in FUO patients.

  6. Fever in honeybee colonies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starks, P. T.; Blackie, Caroline A.; Seeley, Thomas D.

    Honeybees, Apis spp., maintain elevated temperatures inside their nests to accelerate brood development and to facilitate defense against predators. We present an additional defensive function of elevating nest temperature: honeybees generate a brood-comb fever in response to colonial infection by the heat-sensitive pathogen Ascosphaera apis. This response occurs before larvae are killed, suggesting that either honeybee workers detect the infection before symptoms are visible, or that larvae communicate the ingestion of the pathogen. This response is a striking example of convergent evolution between this "superorganism" and other fever-producing animals.

  7. Chikungunya fever from Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Kouta; Matumoto, Kentaro; Lim, Chang-Kweng; Moi, Meng Ling; Kotaki, Akira; Takasaki, Tomohiko

    2010-01-01

    An adult Malaysian woman returned to Japan from Kuala Lumpur and had onset of dengue fever-like symptoms including high fever, malaise and arthritis in early January 2009. Serum obtained on the following day was tested at the National Institute of Infectious Diseases in Tokyo, where it was determined to be positive for chikungunya virus (CHIKV) RNA. IgM antibody against CHIKV was negative on January 6 and sero-converted to be positive on January 14, confirming a recent CHIKV infection. Except for arthralgia, all her symptoms resolved uneventfully within 10 days.

  8. Korean Hemorrhagic Fever.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-03-01

    AD-A<m 761 KOREA UNIV SEOUL COLL OF MEDICINE KOREAN HEM0RRHA6IC FEVER.(U) MAR 80 H W LEE UNCLASSIFIED ICFI F/6 6/5 DAM017-79-6-9<*55 NL...I» > I,,iu. •Uli ••-. SUMMARY There were 364 hospitalized cases of Korean hemorrhagic fever (KHF) in 1979 in Korea . Lee et al...STANDARDS-1963-A ?H "LEVEtf® AD <o KOREAN HEMORRHAGIC F EVER A D A 09 47 Final Report HO WANG LEE, M. D. March 1980 i MIL. IIB«I . Mm k iw

  9. Marburg Hemorrhagic Fever (Marburg HF)

    MedlinePlus

    ... The CDC Cancel Submit Search The CDC Marburg hemorrhagic fever (Marburg HF) Note: Javascript is disabled or is ... was first recognized in 1967, when outbreaks of hemorrhagic fever occurred simultaneously in laboratories in Marburg and Frankfurt, ...

  10. Q Fever: Statistics and Epidemiology

    MedlinePlus

    ... Statistics Reporting and In-Depth Information Other Ricketssial Zoonosis Diseases Anaplasmosis Ehrlichiosis Other Spotted Fever Rocky Mountain ... 60–64 years. Top of Page Other Ricketssial Zoonosis Diseases Anaplasmosis Ehrlichiosis Other Spotted Fever Rocky Mountain ...

  11. Typhus fever: an overlooked diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Mazumder, Ramendra N; Pietroni, Mark A C; Mosabbir, Nadira; Salam, M A

    2009-06-01

    A case of typhus fever is presented. On admission, the clinical diagnosis was typhoid fever. Forty-eight hours after admission, the presence of subconjunctival haemorrhage, malena, and jaundice raised the possibility of a different aetiology, the two most likely differentials being dengue and typhus. Finally, a co-infection of typhoid and typhus was discovered. This uncommon clinical scenario should be taken into account in the management of patients with high fever on admission being treated as a case of typhoid fever.

  12. Fever in acute pulmonary embolism.

    PubMed

    Stein, P D; Afzal, A; Henry, J W; Villareal, C G

    2000-01-01

    Although fever has been reported in several case series of acute pulmonary embolism (PE), the extent to which fever may be caused by PE, and not associated disease, has not been adequately sorted out. Clarification of the frequency and severity of fever in acute PE may assist in achieving an accurate clinical impression, and perhaps avoid an inadvertent exclusion of the diagnosis. The purpose of this investigation is to evaluate the extent to which fever is caused by acute PE. Patients participated in the Prospective Investigation of Pulmonary Embolism Diagnosis (PIOPED). Temperature was evaluated among patients with angiographically proven PE. A determination of whether other causes of fever were present was based on a retrospective analysis of discharge summaries, PIOPED summaries, and a computerized list of all discharge diagnoses. Among patients with PE and no other source of fever, fever was present in 43 of 311 patients (14%). Fever in patients with pulmonary hemorrhage or infarction was not more frequent than among those with no pulmonary hemorrhage or infarction, 39 of 267 patients (15%) vs 4 of 44 patients (9%; not significant). Clinical evidence of deep venous thrombosis was often present in patients with PE and otherwise unexplained fever. Low-grade fever is not uncommon in PE, and high fever, although rare, may occur. Fever need not be accompanied by pulmonary hemorrhage or infarction.

  13. Korean Hemorrhagic Fever (Hemorrhagic Fever with Renal Syndrome (HFRS)).

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-08-01

    RD-RI55 255 KOREAN HEMORRHAGIC FEVER (HEMORRHAGIC FEVER WITH RENAL 11 SYNDROME (HFRS))(U) KOREA UNIV SEOUL DEPT OF MICROBIOLOGY H U LEE RUG 83 DRMDi...the first time in Korea (4,13). WHO has recently adapted to call Korean hemorrhagic fever and clinically similar diseases with a different name, HFRS...AD_______ I •. KOREAN HEMORRHAGIC FEVER • (HEMORRHAGIC FEVER WITH RENAL SYNDROME (HFRS)) I Final Report 0 In HO WANG LEE, M.D. August 1983 Supported by U.S

  14. Mild typhoid fever.

    PubMed Central

    Topley, J M

    1986-01-01

    A series of 100 Zimbabwean children aged between 5 months and 13 years with culture positive typhoid fever is presented. The disease was found to be fairly mild with a low prevalence of complications, and no patient in the series died. Possible explanations for the relative mildness of typhoid in this paediatric population are discussed. PMID:3954441

  15. Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Jennan

    2017-01-01

    The tick-borne disease Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF) can have deadly outcomes unless treated appropriately, yet nonspecific flu-like symptoms complicate diagnosis. Occupational health nurses must have a high index of suspicion with symptomatic workers and recognize that recent recreational or occupational activities with potential tick exposure may suggest RMSF.

  16. Good and bad fever.

    PubMed

    Cavaillon, Jean-Marc

    2012-12-12

    Fever is considered a key actor of innate immunity aimed to fight infection. A new investigation reports an association of the use of antipyretic drugs with poorer outcome among patients with sepsis. In contrast, high temperature in non-infectious intensive care patients is associated with higher mortality.

  17. Fever of unknown origin.

    PubMed

    Gartner, J C

    1992-01-01

    FUO is an uncommon problem in pediatric patients if one uses a strict definition of at least 2 weeks of fever. Perhaps the best definition, as suggested by Lorin and Feigin, is more than 1 week of fever and a negative initial evaluation, including examination and preliminary laboratory results. Most patients, especially younger ones, will spontaneously improve or have common disorders, usually respiratory-related infections. Most patients will have uncommon manifestations of more commonly recognized disorders. Mortality rates, even in those series that include a week in the hospital without a diagnosis, are 15% to 20% at maximum--half that seen in most series of adult patients. Common mistakes are failure to document fever, failure to perform a complete history or physical examination, a shotgun approach that uses the laboratory to make diagnoses, and overuse or inappropriate use of newer imaging techniques in an undirected fashion. Patience, persistence, repeated histories and physical examinations, and continued observation offer the best chance of making a diagnosis in difficult cases. In the current decade, we continue to learn about new manifestations of old disorders--cat-scratch disease, Kawasaki disease, neonatal syphilis, and Epstein-Barr virus infection are examples. The use of older and well-established methods (history and physical examination) and the addition of newer techniques (ultrasound, CT, MRI, etc.) to pursue suggested diagnoses offer the best current approaches to the patient with prolonged and unexplained fever.

  18. Three-day fever.

    PubMed

    Akakpo, A J

    2015-08-01

    Three-day fever is a viral disease caused by an Ephemerovirus of the family Rhabdoviridae, transmitted by arthropod vectors. It is common in tropical and sub-tropical regions, where it affects mainly domestic cattle and buffaloes, especially in intensive dairy or fattening production systems. It is of economic importance because it reduces milk production and fertility and causes abortion. The disease is generally benign. It manifests in several susceptible subjects simultaneously, with a sudden episode of fever accompanied by muscle involvement with arthritis, stiffness of the limbs, and lameness, followed by rapid recovery. The presence of a serofibrinous exudate in the joints is indicative of the disease. Clinical diagnosis is often difficult in the absence of pathognomonic signs. Epidemiological factors (proliferation of arthropod vectors), associated with a short-lived fever and the presence of many immature neutrophils, point strongly to three-day fever. In the absence of any specific treatment, the symptoms are treated with antibiotics and anti-inflammatories. Medical prophylaxis currently uses live attenuated vaccines, pending the development of recombinant vaccines, which are giving promising results.

  19. Rift Valley Fever Review

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Rift Valley fever (RVF) is a disease of animals and humans that occurs in Africa and the Arabian Peninsula. A Phlebovirus in the family Bunyaviridae causes the disease that is transmitted by mosquitoes. Epidemics occur during years of unusually heavy rainfall that assessment models are being develo...

  20. Colorado tick fever

    MedlinePlus

    ... Search Search MedlinePlus GO GO About MedlinePlus Site Map FAQs Customer Support Health Topics Drugs & Supplements Videos & Tools Español You Are Here: Home → Medical Encyclopedia → Colorado tick fever URL of this page: //medlineplus.gov/ ...

  1. Korean Hemorrhagic Fever.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Korean hemorrhagic fever (KHF) occurred for the first time in Korea , 1951, although it had previously been known to both the Japanese and Russians...After Korean war, the disease has been fixed in the areas of DMZ as an endemic one, and from 100 to 400 cases have been being reportee every year

  2. [Fever without focus and fever of unknown origin in childhood].

    PubMed

    Ritz, Nicole

    2013-01-30

    Fever is one of the most common presenting symptoms in children. In the majority of cases the underlying cause is easily diagnosed and if necessary a treatment initiated. In case of absent localising symptoms and signs (fever without a focus) investigations rapidly need to be undertaken in particular in newborns and infants. Persisting daily fever for more than two weeks are called fever of unknown origin. Diagnosis of etiology of fever of unknown origin is challenging. In approximately half of the cases an infectious cause is found; inflammatory and mailgnant diseases account for 5 to 10% of the cases. Despite a systematic and interdisciplinary approach the etiology remains unknown in up to a quarter of cases. This review discusses differential diagnoses, suggested investigations and treatment for fever without a focus and fever of unknown origin.

  3. Rocky Mountain spotted fever.

    PubMed

    Kamper, C A; Chessman, K H; Phelps, S J

    1988-02-01

    The epidemiology, pathogenesis, clinical features, and treatment of Rocky Mountain spotted fever are reviewed. Rocky Mountain spotted fever is a severe infection caused by Rickettsia rickettsii transmitted to man by various species of ticks. High-incidence areas exist in the southeast and south central United States. Only 60-70% of patients with the disease report a history of tick bite or exposure to tick-infested areas. The disease is initially characterized by fever, headache, gastrointestinal complaints, myalgia, and a generalized rash. In several days generalized vasculitis may lead to periorbital edema and nonpitting edema of the face and extremities. Central nervous system involvement is common. Because signs and symptoms associated with the disease are nonspecific, the diagnosis is often delayed or missed. Traditionally diagnostic confirmation relied on serologic testing, but an indirect fluorescent antibody assay will soon be commercially available. Rocky Mountain spotted fever is usually treated with the rickettsiostatic agents chloramphenicol or tetracycline, but few comparative data on these agents in patients with the disease are available. For patients who cannot tolerate oral medications, intravenous chloramphenicol sodium succinate is the preferred treatment; chloramphenicol is also the drug of choice for children less than eight years of age. Otherwise, oral tetracycline hydrochloride is the drug of choice. Antibiotic therapy should be continued for 7-10 days or until the patient is afebrile for two to five days. All cases of Rocky Mountain spotted fever must be reported to the Centers for Disease Control. The best ways to decrease the morbidity and mortality of the disease are to increase awareness of its signs and symptoms and to prevent exposure to ticks.

  4. Monitoring Physicochemical and Nutrient Dynamics Along a Development Gradient in Maine Ephemeral Wetlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podzikowski, L. Y.; Capps, K. A.; Calhoun, A.

    2014-12-01

    Vernal pools are ephemeral wetlands in forested landscapes that fill with snowmelt, precipitation, and/or groundwater in the spring, and characteristically dry down through the summer months. Typically, vernal pool research has focused on the population and community ecology of pool-breeding organisms (amphibians and macroinvertebrates) conducted during their relatively short breeding season. Yet, little is known about the temporal variability of biogeochemical processes within and among vernal pools in urbanizing landscapes. In this study, we monitored physicochemical characteristics and nutrient dynamics in 22 vernal pools in central Maine post thaw in 2014. Four pristine pools were sampled weekly in five locations within the pool for ambient nutrient concentrations (SRP, NH4, NOx) and at three locations for physicochemical characteristics (DO, pH, temperature, conductivity). In the remaining 18 pools, we sampled one location for nutrients and three locations for physicochemical characteristics at least monthly to estimate the influence of increasing urbanization on the physical and chemical environment. Our data suggest most pools found in urbanizing areas have higher conductivity (developed sites ranging 18.52 - 1238 μS cm-1 compared to pristine between 14.08 - 58.4 μS cm-1). Previous work suggests forested pools exhibit dystrophic conditions with high coloration from DOC limiting primary production due to increased light attenuation in pools. However, both pristine and urban pools experienced spikes in DO (>100% saturation) throughout the day, suggesting that high productivity is not a reliable indicator of the effects of urbanization on vernal pools. We argue that continued monitoring of vernal pools along a gradient of urbanization could give insight into the role of ephemeral wetlands as potential biogeochemical hotspots and may also indicate how human development may alter biogeochemical cycling in ephemeral wetlands.

  5. How Direct Flux Measurements Can Improve Infiltration Estimates in Ephemeral Streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batlle-Aguilar, J.; Xie, Y.; Cook, P. G.

    2015-12-01

    In arid and semi-arid areas replenishment of groundwater resources is strongly dependent on surface water infiltration from ephemeral streams and creeks. An accurate estimation of water infiltration and aquifer recharge from these surface water features is paramount, but this task is subject to physical (streambed heterogeneity) and transient (flow variability) challenges of these watercourses. Although several methods are available to estimate stream infiltration, only a handful of them are suitable for ephemeral streams, all of which are indirect methods. In this study we performed an infiltration experiment at the transect scale in an ephemeral stream at the time it was dry, thereby obtaining direct estimates of stream infiltration. Groundwater heads measured in a transect of piezometers orthogonal to the stream identified the development of a groundwater mound laterally displaced several meters into the streambank. The experiment was modelled using the two-dimensional integrated surface-subsurface model HydroGeosphere® and calibrated with PEST using different combinations of groundwater heads and infiltration volume data. Although the model can be calibrated to produce a good match to measured groundwater heads, accurate predictions of stream infiltration can be made only if the heads used for model calibration capture the groundwater mound. The use of infiltration flux or volume during model calibration, instead, provides the best calibration results, and does not require knowledge of the position of the groundwater mound. Given that heterogeneity of streambed and streambank sediments leads to the possibility that the groundwater mound developed during flow events will be poorly characterised or perhaps missed altogether, we demonstrate that incorporating infiltration flux or volume data into the model calibration increases the ability of a model to simulate accurate estimates of stream infiltration during natural flow events.

  6. Channel dynamics and geomorphic resilience in an ephemeral Mediterranean river affected by gravel mining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calle, Mikel; Alho, Petteri; Benito, Gerardo

    2017-05-01

    Gravel mining has been a widespread activity in ephemeral rivers worldwide whose long-lasting hydrogeomorphological impacts preclude effective implementation of water and environmental policies. This paper presents a GIS-based method for temporal assessment of morphosedimentary changes in relation to in-channel gravel mining in a typical ephemeral Mediterranean stream, namely the Rambla de la Viuda (eastern Spain). The aims of this work were to identify morphosedimentary changes and responses to human activities and floods, quantify river degradations and analyze factors favoring fluvial recovery for further applications in other rivers. Aerial photographs and LiDAR topography data were studied to analyze geomorphic evolution over the past 70 years along a 7.5-km reach of an ephemeral gravel stream that has been mined intensively since the 1970s. To evaluate changes in the riverbed, we mapped comparable units applying morphological, hydraulic, and stability (based on vegetation density and elevation) criteria to 13 sets of aerial photographs taken from 1946 to 2012. A detailed spatiotemporal analysis of comparable units revealed a 50% reduction in the active section and a 20% increase in stable areas, compared to the conditions observed prior to gravel mining. Instream mining was first observed in 1976 aerial photograph covering already up to 50% of the 1956 riverbed area. River degradation since then was quantified by means of a LiDAR DTM and RTK-GPS measurements, which revealed a 3.5-m incision that had started simultaneously with gravel mining. Climate and land use changes were present but the effects were completely masked by changes produced by instream gravel mining. Therefore, river incision/degradation was triggered by scarcity of sediment and lack of longitudinal sedimentary connection, creating an unbalanced river system that is still adjusting to the present hydrosedimentary conditions.

  7. Variation in material transport and water chemistry along a large ephemeral river in the Namib Desert

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jacobson, P.J.; Jacobson, K.M.; Angermeier, P.L.; Cherry, D.S.

    2000-01-01

    1. The chemical characteristics of floodwaters in ephemeral rivers are little known, particularly with regard to their organic loads. These rivers typically exhibit a pronounced downstream hydrological decay but few studies have documented its effect on chemical characteristics and material transport. To develop a better understanding of the dynamics of floods and associated material transport in large ephemeral rivers, floods of the ephemeral Kuiseb River in south-western Africa were tracked and repeatedly sampled at multiple points along the river's lower 220 km. 2. We quantified the composition and transport of solute and sediment loads in relation to longitudinal hydrological patterns associated with downstream hydrological decay. Source and sink areas for transported materials were identified, and the composition and transport dynamics of the organic matter load were compared to those described from more mesic systems. 3. Concentrations of sediments and solutes transported by floods in the Kuiseb River tended to increase downstream in association with pronounced hydrological decay. The contribution of particulate organic matter to total organic load is among the highest recorded, despite our observation of unusually high levels of dissolved organic matter. Hydrological decay resulted in deposition of all transported material within the lower Kuiseb River, with no discharge of water or materials to the Atlantic Ocean. 4. Our results suggest that longitudinal variation in surface flow and associated patterns of material transport renders the lower Kuiseb River a sink for materials transported from upstream. The downstream transport and deposition of large amounts of labile organic matter provides an important carbon supplement to heterotrophic communities within the river's lower reaches.

  8. A Comparison of Satellite-Derived Snow Maps with a Focus on Ephemeral Snow in North Carolina

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Dorothy K.; Fuhrmann, Christopher M.; Perry, L. Baker; Riggs, George A.; Robinson, David A.; Foster, James L.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we focus on the attributes and limitations of four commonly-used daily snowcover products with respect to their ability to map ephemeral snow in central and eastern North Carolina. We show that the Moderate-Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) fractional snow-cover maps can delineate the snow-covered area very well through the use of a fully-automated algorithm, but suffer from the limitation that cloud cover precludes mapping some ephemeral snow. The semi-automated Interactive Multi-sensor Snow and ice mapping system (IMS) and Rutgers Global Snow Lab (GSL) snow maps are often able to capture ephemeral snow cover because ground-station data are employed to develop the snow maps, The Rutgers GSL maps are based on the IMS maps. Finally, the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer for EOS (AMSR-E) provides some good detail of snow-water equivalent especially in deeper snow, but may miss ephemeral snow cover because it is often very thin or wet; the AMSR-E maps also suffer from coarse spatial resolution. We conclude that the southeastern United States represents a good test region for validating the ability of satellite snow-cover maps to capture ephemeral snow cover,

  9. The Allure of Privacy or the Desire for Self-Expression? Identifying Users' Gratifications for Ephemeral, Photograph-Based Communication.

    PubMed

    Waddell, T Franklin

    2016-07-01

    Temporary messaging programs continue to rise in popularity, due in large part to the perceived privacy that they afford. However, recent controversies have revealed that messages shared on ephemeral messaging services are persistent and potentially retrieval, thus undermining the privacy they are assumed to provide. Given this paradox, why are temporary messaging services so popular? Does the allure of privacy still motivate the use of temporary messaging programs? Or, if privacy is no longer afforded by ephemeral messaging, what other psychological gratifications do these applications fulfill that might account for their continued use? Informed by the Modality-Agency-Interactivity-Navigability (MAIN) model and the uses and gratifications tradition, the current study conducted qualitative interviews to identify the gratifications that individuals derive from the popular ephemeral messaging application, Snapchat. Study results show that the visual affordances of ephemeral messaging have legitimized photographic communication, providing self-expression and relational gratifications that are unfulfilled by text-based applications. By comparison, users report low levels of trust in the privacy affordances of ephemeral messaging, and instead projecting negative effects of temporary messaging on other users rather than self. Theoretical and practical implications of these results are discussed.

  10. A new approach to the application of electrical resistance sensors to measuring the onset of ephemeral streamflow in wetland environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goulsbra, C. S.; Lindsay, J. B.; Evans, M. G.

    2009-09-01

    Ephemeral streamflow events in headwater catchments are significant in terms of the flux of sediments, solutes, and discharge out of a catchment. Existing attempts to monitor these events, however, have traditionally been restricted to a limited series of manual observations or the use of temperature sensors which demand a great deal of data interpretation and often introduce significant timing errors. The use of electrical resistance sensors has been found to be one potential alternative, but this method has not yet been fully explored. This paper builds upon this method, presenting a new low-cost ephemeral streamflow (ES) sensor which is able to detect the onset and cessation of ephemeral streamflow events at high spatial and temporal resolutions. Furthermore, the data collected by the ES sensor needs only minimal interpretation. Laboratory testing reveals that the sensors are able to clearly distinguish between the presence and absence of water. Field testing in a small peatland headwater catchment in the South Pennines, United Kingdom, confirmed that the sensors were robust enough to withstand field conditions. Careful site selection enabled the production of a high-quality data set, showing the timings of multiple ephemeral streamflow events at numerous locations within the catchment. The low cost, good performance, and minimal data interpretation requirements of the ES sensors permit unprecedented high-resolution monitoring of ephemeral streamflows.

  11. Tuffaceous ephemeral lake deposits on an alluvial plain, Middle Tertiary of central California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bartow, J.A.

    1994-01-01

    The Oligocene and Miocene Valley Springs Formation represents a large fluvial depositional system that extended westward from sediment-filled palaeovalleys in the high Sierra Nevada to a piedmont alluvial plain under the present Central Valley. The Valley Springs Formation consists largely of tuffaceous mudrocks, tuffaceous sandstone, polymict conglomerate and rhyodacitic tuff. The tuffaceous mudrock lithofacies probably represents a complex of ephemeral lake and marsh environments on a low gradient alluvial plain. The inferred abundance of shallow lakes, ponds and marshes implies a climate that was wetter than the semi-arid climate of the region today. -from Author

  12. Ebola haemorrhagic fever

    PubMed Central

    Feldmann, Heinz; Geisbert, Thomas W

    2012-01-01

    Ebola viruses are the causative agents of a severe form of viral haemorrhagic fever in man, designated Ebola haemorrhagic fever, and are endemic in regions of central Africa. The exception is the species Reston Ebola virus, which has not been associated with human disease and is found in the Philippines. Ebola virus constitutes an important local public health threat in Africa, with a worldwide effect through imported infections and through the fear of misuse for biological terrorism. Ebola virus is thought to also have a detrimental effect on the great ape population in Africa. Case-fatality rates of the African species in man are as high as 90%, with no prophylaxis or treatment available. Ebola virus infections are characterised by immune suppression and a systemic inflammatory response that causes impairment of the vascular, coagulation, and immune systems, leading to multiorgan failure and shock, and thus, in some ways, resembling septic shock. PMID:21084112

  13. Fever of unknown origin.

    PubMed

    Mulders-Manders, Catharina; Simon, Anna; Bleeker-Rovers, Chantal

    2015-06-01

    More than 50 years after the first definition of fever of unknown origin (FUO), it still remains a diagnostic challenge. Evaluation starts with the identification of potential diagnostic clues (PDCs), which should guide further investigations. In the absence of PDCs a standardised diagnostic protocol should be followed with PET-CT as the imaging technique of first choice. Even with a standardised protocol, in a large proportion of patients from western countries the cause for FUO cannot be identified. The treatment of FUO is guided by the final diagnosis, but when no cause is found, antipyretic drugs can be prescribed. Corticosteroids should be avoided in the absence of a diagnosis, especially at an early stage. The prognosis of FUO is determined by the underlying cause. The majority of patients with unexplained FUO will eventually show spontaneous remission of fever. We describe the definition, diagnostic workup, causes and treatment of FUO. © Royal College of Physicians 2015. All rights reserved.

  14. Classical swine fever.

    PubMed

    Moennig, V; Becher, P; Beer, M

    2013-01-01

    Classical swine fever is a serious and economically important transboundary disease threatening pig production globally. The infection may occur in backyard pigs, feral pig populations and domestic pigs. Whereas there are proven control strategies for the latter pig population, control in backyard pigs with poor biosecurity settings or in wild boar populations of high density still poses a problem in some parts of the world. Laboratory diagnostic methods, efficacious vaccines and contingency plans are in place in most industrialised countries. So far modified live vaccines (MLV) are still the first choice for rapid and reliable immune protection. Since antibodies elicited by conventional MLV cannot be distinguished from antibodies after natural infection, considerable efforts are put into the development of a live marker vaccine accompanied by a serological test. Nevertheless, some remaining gaps with respect to the diagnosis of and vaccination against classical swine fever have been identified.

  15. Fever therapy revisited

    PubMed Central

    Hobohm, U

    2005-01-01

    The phenomenon of spontaneous regression and remission from cancer has been observed by many physicians and was described in hundreds of publications. However, suggestive clues on cause or trigger are sparse and not substantiated by much experimental evidence. In this review, literature is surveyed and summarised and possible causes are discussed. At least in a larger fraction of cases a hefty feverish infection is linked with spontaneous regression in time and is investigated as putative trigger. Epidemiological and immunological evidence is put into perspective. An online forum to discuss the possible application of fever therapy in the future can be accessed at http://bioinfo.tg.fh-giessen.de/fever-and-cancer. PMID:15700041

  16. Relapsing fever in Jordan

    PubMed Central

    Babudieri, B.

    1957-01-01

    The author reports on a survey carried out by him in 1954 on relapsing fever in Jordan. In that country the disease is largely tick-borne, the main vector being Ornithodoros tholozani. Some of the frequent cases in the town of Nablus and the village of Marda in West Jordan may, however, be caused by O. coniceps. The centres of infection are some of the numerous caves scattered throughout the hilly areas and certain houses in which chickens are kept. It is believed that the vector ticks could be successfully exterminated by the use of insecticides and by the adoption of certain procedures outlined by the author. Arsenobenzol compounds and penicillin have been shown not to be very effective for the treatment of relapsing fever, but good results have been obtained with Aureomycin and Terramycin. ImagesFIG. 1FIG. 4 PMID:13472437

  17. Ephemeral Presence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levitt, Nina

    2007-01-01

    For the past seven years, the author has been researching the representations of women who were engaged in a range of espionage activities during World War II. It seems much of people's knowledge about women spies is formed by popular representations, which are often, and intriguingly, full of stereotypes and half-truths. The skilled and heroic…

  18. Ebola hemorrhagic Fever.

    PubMed

    Burnett, Mark W

    2014-01-01

    Ebola hemorrhagic fever is an often-fatal disease caused by a virus of the Filoviridae family, genus Ebolavirus. Initial signs and symptoms of the disease are nonspecific, often progressing on to a severe hemorrhagic illness. Special Operations Forces Medical Providers should be aware of this disease, which occurs in sporadic outbreaks throughout Africa. Treatment at the present time is mainly supportive. Special care should be taken to prevent contact with bodily fluids of those infected, which can transmit the virus to caregivers.

  19. [Rift valley fever].

    PubMed

    Markin, V A; Pantiukhov, V B; Markov, V I; Bondarev, V P

    2012-01-01

    In the last quarter of century virus of Rift valley fever (RVF) sharply extended its distribution by moving from Africa to Asia and evolving from low- to high pathogenic for humans causing severe hemorrhagic disease, practically equaling in this respect with some members ofa group of extremely dangerous pathogens. Morbidity and epidemics of RVF are analyzed. Evolution of epidemic development of the infection is examined. Necessity of development of means and methods for diagnostics, prophylaxis and therapy of RVF is underlined.

  20. [Fever and hyperthermia].

    PubMed

    Irigoyen Aristorena, Ma Isabel; Marín Fernández, Blanca

    2010-09-01

    The knowledge of the physiological mechanisms for controlling body temperature, and the etiology and pathophysiology of fever and hyperthermia nursing care enable these interdisciplinary problems, allowing early detection to prevent its progression. It also allows the nurse the implementation of quality care through the adoption of specific measures to lower the temperature, the administration of medical therapy, hemodynamic monitoring, respiratory and metabolic control and water.

  1. Understanding rheumatic fever.

    PubMed

    Azevedo, Pedro Ming; Pereira, Rosa Rodrigues; Guilherme, Luiza

    2012-05-01

    Through a comprehensive review of the recent findings on rheumatic fever, we intend to propose a new physiopathologic model for this disease. A Medline search was performed for all articles containing the terms rheumatic fever or rheumatic heart disease in title or abstract from 1970 to 2011. Best evidence qualitative technique was used to select the most relevant. The scientific interest on rheumatic fever has notably diminished throughout the twentieth century as evidenced by the comparison of the proportion of articles in which RF was a subject in 1950 (0.26%) and today (0.03%) [Pubmed]. However, RF remains a major medical and social problem in the developing world and in the so-called hotspots, where it still causes around 500.000 deaths each year, not too different from the pre-antibiotic era. The role of genetic factors in RF susceptibility is discussed. Familiar aggregation, similarity of disease patterns between siblings, identical twin, and HLA correlation studies are evidence for a genetic influence on RF susceptibility. The suspect-involved genes fall mainly into those capable of immunologic mediation. Molecular mimicry explains the triggering of RF, but an intense and sustained inflammation is needed to cause sequels. Also, RF patients vary greatly in terms of symptoms. It is likely that a genetic background directing immune response towards a predominantly Th1 or Th2 pattern contributes to these features. The recent findings on rheumatic fever provide important insight on its physiopathology that helps understanding this prototype post-infectious autoimmune disease giving insights on other autoimmune conditions.

  2. Lassa Fever Immune Plasma.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-06-01

    to perform the indirect fluorescent antibody test. He is also able to conduct surveys, and to supervise plasmapheresis . Recently a Clinical...Miscellaneous 44 Total 3,902 2. Plasmapheresis The primary objective of the program was the collection of units of plasma from convalescents from...Lassa fever. Details regarding the criteria means and results of plasmapheresis are given in Chapter 2. One hundred twenty two plasma units were collected

  3. Lassa Fever Immune Plasma

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-07-31

    E. Yalley-Ogunro, was engaged in visits to the field stations at CLH and PH for plasmapheresis , in testing patients for indirect fluorescent... Plasmapheresis yielded 358 plasma units, of which 180 were forwarded to USAMRIID. They are to be tested there for the concentratrion of neutralizing...Activities 5 Plasmapheresis 6 Lassa fever cases 6 Passive immunotherapy 7 Conclusion 8 References 9 Map - Northern Liberia 10 Appendix - Tables 1. Lassa

  4. Lassa Fever Immune Plasma.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-07-31

    both plasmapheresis and serodiagnosis were limited. 153Plasmapheresis at the Curran Lutheran Hospital (CLH) and Phebe Hospital (PH) yielded 153 plasma...Page Summary 1 Foreward 2 Narrative 4 Introduction 4 Activities 5 Plasmapheresis 6 Lassa fever cases 6 Passive immunotherapy 7 Conclusion 8 References 8...education of the Field Investigator, Mr. J.E. Yalley- Ogunro, in diagnostic techniques which will be used in therapeutic investigations, continued

  5. Korean Hemorrhagic Fever.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-05-01

    Medicine Seoul, Korea * S 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 SUM ARY Urban rats captured in Seoul and four nearby Korean cities were found to have...rattus, urban Korean cities, 1980. . . . 15 Table 2. Isolation of Hantaan virus from antigen-positive wild house rats, Korea , 1980 .... ........... .. 16...Figures Figure 1. Map of Seoul City, South Korea and metropolitan area showing locations of urban Korean hemorrhagic fever cases, andRattu s positive

  6. Treatment of enteric fever.

    PubMed

    Arjyal, Amit; Pandit, Anil

    2008-12-01

    Enteric fever is systemic illness caused by Salmonella Typhi and Salmonella Paratyphi A, B and C. It is believed to be a readily treatable illness by many clinicians in the developing world where it is endemic; however, with the emergence of drug resistance to fluoroquinolones, treatment is becoming increasingly difficult. While drugs such as cefixime, previously believed to be effective, have been proven otherwise, new agents such as gatifloxacin and azithromycin have proven to be promising. Re-emergence of chloramphenicol sensitive strains in previously resistant areas points towards the concept of antibiotic recycling, preserving the use of older antibiotics. Antibiotic recycling has been used successfully in hospital settings. However, its usefulness in community settings, where the main burden of enteric fever resides, is challenging to manage due to logistics and a lack of infrastructure. Nalidixic acid resistance used to be a marker for clinical response to flouroquinolones; however, recent studies highlight the importance of decreased ciprofloxacin susceptibility as a better marker. Enteric fever, as a public health problem, has been tackled by protection of food and water supplies in the industrialised countries of the world. Nonetheless, that goal seems too far-fetched in the developing world where there are hundreds of villages, towns and cities without adequate infrastructures. Perhaps the key to solving this problem is combining point-of-use-purification of water (by chlorination) with the treatment of illness in the community. Treatment of chronic carriers is also necessary in order to halt the cycles of transmission.

  7. [Rift Valley fever].

    PubMed

    Pépin, M

    2011-06-01

    Rift Valley Fever (RVF) is a zoonotic arbovirosis. Among animals, it mainly affects ruminants, causing abortions in gravid females and mortality among young animals. In humans, RVF virus infection is usually asymptomatic or characterized by a moderate fever. However, in 1 to 3% of cases, more severe forms of the disease (hepatitis, encephalitis, retinitis, hemorrhagic fever) can lead to the death of infected individuals or to major sequels. The RVF virus (Bunyaviridae, genus Phlebovirus) was identified for the first time in the 1930s in Kenya. It then spread over almost all African countries, sometimes causing major epizootics/epidemics. In 2000, the virus was carried out of Africa, in the Middle East Arabian Peninsula. In 2007-2008, Eastern-African countries, including Madagascar, reported significant episodes of RVF virus, this was also the case for the Comoros archipelago and the French island of Mayotte. This ability to spread associated with many vectors, including in Europe, and high viral loads in infected animals led the health authorities worldwide to warn about the potential emergence of RVF virus in areas with a temperate climate. The awareness has increased in recent years with climate changes, which may possibly modify the vector distribution and competence, and prompted many RVF virus-free countries to better prepare for a potential implantation of RVF. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. Comparison of long-term evolutionary trajectories of two ephemeral channels after channel-forming extraordinary floods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lotsari, Eliisa; House, Kyle; Alho, Petteri; Baker, Victor

    2017-04-01

    Analyses of the evolutionary trajectories of braided ephemeral channels enable identification of trends, magnitudes and periodicity of the processes that affect the channels. In addition to infrequent great floods, relatively frequent, small discharge events have been shown to be important for the evolution of ephemeral channels. However, evolutionary trajectories have rarely been studied in small ephemeral rivers, that predominantly transport gravel, cobles and boulders. Ephemeral tributary channels typify the Colorado River basin (USA), and two examples are Bronco Creek and Eldorado Canyon. These streams experienced extraordinary great floods in 1971 and 1974 respectively, and they are comparable to each other in both basin size, and climatic conditions. Annual precipitation is less than 50 cm, and the average temperature of each month is above 7°C. More importantly, earlier studies have shown similarities in the hydraulics and geomorphic characteristics of the extraordinary floods, which removed the pre-flood bar and braiding structure from the channels. Thus, these two channels are ideal for comparisons of their evolutionary trajecties. Moreover, the availability of high-resolutions aerial photographs for both channels since 1954 allowed for decadal analyses. Our research has analyzed and compared the long-term evolutionary trajectories of the two ephemeral channels within Colorado River Basin based on series of aerial photos and digital elevation models. (1) We detected the development and adjustment of braiding since the extraordinary floods. The detected parameters include the braiding index, bar area and number, channel area and width, confluence number and density, and the proportion of inactive and active areas. (2) We also analyzed the time required for the ephemeral river system to evolve back to its prior state before the high magnitude floods. Finally, (3) we analyzed whether these temporal changes in channel evolution can reveal new insights as to

  9. Hemorrhagic Fever with Renal Syndrome (Korean Hemorrhagic Fever)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-06-30

    53 INTRODUCTION During the Korean War more than 3,200 United Nations troops in Korea devel6ped a rare hemorrhagic fever which attracted...patients in the Republic of Korea . Year Korean Korean US Total civilian soldiers soldiers 1951 ...... 627 827 1952 .... 833 833 1953 ... ... 455 455...0 RI m HEMORRHAGIC FEVER WITH RENAL SYNDROME ( KOREAN HEMORRHAGIC FEVER) ANNUAL SUMMARY REPORT HO WANG LEE, M.D. June 30, 1988 Door., Supported by U.S

  10. Relative contributions of transient and steady state infiltration during ephemeral streamflow

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blasch, K.W.; Ferre, T. P. A.; Hoffmann, J.P.; Fleming, J.B.

    2006-01-01

    Simulations of infiltration during three ephemeral streamflow events in a coarse-grained alluvial channel overlying a less permeable basin-fill layer were conducted to determine the relative contribution of transient infiltration at the onset of streamflow to cumulative infiltration for the event. Water content, temperature, and piezometric measurements from 2.5-m vertical profiles within the alluvial sediments were used to constrain a variably saturated water flow and heat transport model. Simulated and measured transient infiltration rates at the onset of streamflow were about two to three orders of magnitude greater than steady state infiltration rates. The duration of simulated transient infiltration ranged from 1.8 to 20 hours, compared with steady state flow periods of 231 to 307 hours. Cumulative infiltration during the transient period represented 10 to 26% of the total cumulative infiltration, with an average contribution of approximately 18%. Cumulative infiltration error for the simulated streamflow events ranged from 9 to 25%. Cumulative infiltration error for typical streamflow events of about 8 hours in duration in is about 90%. This analysis indicates that when estimating total cumulative infiltration in coarse-grained ephemeral stream channels, consideration of the transient infiltration at the onset of streamflow will improve predictions of the total volume of infiltration that may become groundwater recharge. Copyright 2006 by the American Geophysical Union.

  11. Ephemeral Fe(II)/Fe(III) layered double hydroxides in hydromorphic soils: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vodyanitskii, Yu. N.; Shoba, S. A.

    2015-03-01

    Ephemeral green rust is formed seasonally in some hydromorphic soils. It consists of Fe(II)/Fe(III) layered double hydroxides with different types of interlayer anions and different oxidation degrees of iron ( x). In synthetized stoichiometric green rust, x = 0.25-0.33; in soil fougerite, it may reach 0.50-0.66. The mineral stability is provided by the partial substitution of Mg2+ for Fe2+. The ephemeral properties of the green rust are manifested in the high sensitivity to the varying redox regime in hydromorphic soils. Green rust disappears during oxidation stages, which complicates its diagnostics in soils. For green rust formation, excessively moist mineral soil needs organic matter as a source of energy for the vital activity of iron-reducing bacteria. In a gleyed Cambisol France, where fougerite is formed in the winter, the index of hydrogen partial pressure rH2 is 7.0-8.2, which corresponds to highly reducing conditions; upon the development of oxidation, fougerite is transformed into lepidocrocite. In the mineral siderite horizon of peatbogs in Belarus, where green rust is formed in the summer, rH2 is 11-14, which corresponds to the lower boundary of reducing conditions ( rH2 = 10-18); magnetite is formed in these soils in the winter season upon dehydration of the soil mass.

  12. Productivity of ephemeral headwater riparian forests impacted by sedimentation in the southeastern United States coastal plain.

    PubMed

    Jolley, Rachel L; Lockaby, B Graeme; Cavalcanti, Guadalupe G

    2009-01-01

    Riparian forests serve an essential function in improving water quality through the filtering of sediments and nutrients from surface runoff. However, little is known about the impact of sediment deposition on productivity of riparian forests. Sediment inputs may act as a subsidy to forest productivity by providing additional nutrients for plant uptake or may act as a stress by creating anoxic soil conditions. This study determined how sediment deposition affected riparian forests along ephemeral headwater streams at Ft. Benning, Georgia, USA. Above- and belowground productivity, leaf-area index (LAI), and standing crop biomass for fine roots, shrubs, and trees were compared along a gradient of present sedimentation rates in 17 riparian forests. Annual litterfall production was determined from monthly collections using 0.25- m(2) traps; woody biomass was determined from annual diameter at breast height (DBH) measurements using species-specific allometric equations; fine root productivity was determined using sequential coring; LAI was measured by expanding specific leaf area by annual litterfall production; and shrub biomass was determined using species-specific biomass equations based on height and root collar diameter. Significant declines in litterfall, woody biomass production, fine root production, LAI, and shrub biomass were found with as little as 0.1 to 0.4 cm yr(-2) sedimentation. We conclude that the levels of sedimentation in this study do not subsidize growth in ephemeral headwater riparian forests but instead create a stress similar to that found under flooded conditions.

  13. Classification of ephemeral, intermittent, and perennial stream reaches using a TOPMODEL-based approach

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williamson, Tanja N.; Agouridis, Carmen T.; Barton, Christopher D.; Villines, Jonathan A.; Lant, Jeremiah G.

    2015-01-01

    Whether a waterway is temporary or permanent influences regulatory protection guidelines, however, classification can be subjective due to a combination of factors, including time of year, antecedent moisture conditions, and previous experience of the field investigator. Our objective was to develop a standardized protocol using publically available spatial information to classify ephemeral, intermittent, and perennial streams. Our hypothesis was that field observations of flow along the stream channel could be compared to results from a hydrologic model, providing an objective method of how these stream reaches can be identified. Flow-state sensors were placed at ephemeral, intermittent, and perennial stream reaches from May to December 2011 in the Appalachian coal basin of eastern Kentucky. This observed flow record was then used to calibrate the simulated saturation deficit in each channel reach based on the topographic wetness index used by TOPMODEL. Saturation deficit values were categorized as flow or no-flow days, and the simulated record of streamflow was compared to the observed record. The hydrologic model was more accurate for simulating flow during the spring and fall seasons. However, the model effectively identified stream reaches as intermittent and perennial in each of the two basins.

  14. Arbuscular mycorrhizal status of spring ephemerals in the desert ecosystem of Junggar Basin, China.

    PubMed

    Shi, Z Y; Feng, G; Christie, P; Li, X L

    2006-06-01

    A survey was made of the arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) status of 73 spring ephemeral plant species that grow in the desert ecosystem of Junggar Basin, northwest China. The proportion of AM colonization ranged from 7 to 73% with a mean value of 30%. A total of 65 plant species studied were AM with coils/arbuscules or vesicles and the remaining eight species were possibly AM with no coils/arbuscules or vesicles but with fungal mycelia in the root cortex. AM fungal spores were isolated from rhizosphere samples of all 73 plant species and identified. The mean spore density was 22 per 20 ml of air-dried soil, ranging from 0 to 120. Colonization and spore density of perennials were slightly higher than of annuals and varied among different plant families. A total of 603 AM fungal spore (or sporocarp) specimens were isolated belonging to six genera, Acaulospora, Archaeopora, Entrophospora, Glomus, Paraglomus, and Scutellospora; Glomus was the dominant genus. We conclude that spring ephemerals may be highly dependent on AM associations for survival in the very infertile and arid soils of this desert ecosystem.

  15. Ephemeral clonal integration in Calathea marantifolia (Marantaceae): Evidence of diminished integration over time.

    PubMed

    Matlaga, David P; da S L Sternberg, Leonel

    2009-02-01

    A major advantage of clonal growth forms is the intergenerational transfer of resources through vascular connections (clonal integration). Connections linking ramets can be persistent or ephemeral. For species with ephemeral connections, whether the extent of clonal integration changes over time is unclear. To address this issue, we tracked water movement using an isotopic label and assessed the demographic performance of parent and offspring ramets over time in a severing experiment. Our study system was the understory herb Calathea marantifolia, which has parent ramets that produce vegetative bulbils (clonal offspring) that pass through distinct pre- and post-rooting stages. Little water was transported between parents and offspring, and the direction of movement was primarily from parent to pre-rooting offspring. Anatomical observations of inter-ramet connections showed that vascular bundles were twice as abundant in parent stems compared to inter-ramet connections. Severing inter-ramet connections reduced the growth of offspring ramets but not parents. Survival of pre-rooting offspring was reduced by 10% due to severing, but post-rooting offspring were not affected. Our results suggest that offspring ramets of C. marantifolia are weaned from their parent as they progress from pre- to post-rooting stages.

  16. Quantifying the sensitivity of ephemeral streams to land disturbance activities in arid ecosystems at the watershed scale

    SciTech Connect

    O'Connor, Ben L.; Hamada, Yuki; Bowen, Esther E.; Grippo, Mark A.; Hartmann, Heidi M.; Patton, Terri L.; Van Lonkhuyzen, Robert A.; Carr, Adrianne E.

    2014-11-01

    Large areas of public lands administered by the Bureau of Land Management and located in arid regions of the southwestern United States are being considered for the development of utility-scale solar energy facilities. Land-disturbing activities in these desert, alluvium-filled valleys have the potential to adversely affect the hydrologic and ecologic functions of ephemeral streams. Regulation and management of ephemeral streams typically falls under a spectrum of federal, state, and local programs, but scientifically based guidelines for protecting ephemeral streams with respect to land-development activities are largely nonexistent. This study developed an assessment approach for quantifying the sensitivity to land disturbance of ephemeral stream reaches located in proposed solar energy zones (SEZs). The ephemeral stream assessment approach used publicly-available geospatial data on hydrology, topography, surficial geology, and soil characteristics, as well as highresolution aerial imagery. These datasets were used to inform a professional judgment-based score index of potential land disturbance impacts on selected critical functions of ephemeral streams, including flow and sediment conveyance, ecological habitat value, and groundwater recharge. The total sensitivity scores (sum of scores for the critical stream functions of flow and sediment conveyance, ecological habitats, and groundwater recharge) were used to identify highly sensitive stream reaches to inform decisions on developable areas in SEZs. Total sensitivity scores typically reflected the scores of the individual stream functions; some exceptions pertain to groundwater recharge and ecological habitats. The primary limitations of this assessment approach were the lack of high-resolution identification of ephemeral stream channels in the existing National Hydrography Dataset, and the lack of mechanistic processes describing potential impacts on ephemeral stream functions at the watershed scale

  17. Quantifying the sensitivity of ephemeral streams to land disturbance activities in arid ecosystems at the watershed scale.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Ben L; Hamada, Yuki; Bowen, Esther E; Grippo, Mark A; Hartmann, Heidi M; Patton, Terri L; Van Lonkhuyzen, Robert A; Carr, Adrianne E

    2014-11-01

    Large areas of public lands administered by the Bureau of Land Management and located in arid regions of the southwestern United States are being considered for the development of utility-scale solar energy facilities. Land-disturbing activities in these desert, alluvium-filled valleys have the potential to adversely affect the hydrologic and ecologic functions of ephemeral streams. Regulation and management of ephemeral streams typically falls under a spectrum of federal, state, and local programs, but scientifically based guidelines for protecting ephemeral streams with respect to land-development activities are largely nonexistent. This study developed an assessment approach for quantifying the sensitivity to land disturbance of ephemeral stream reaches located in proposed solar energy zones (SEZs). The ephemeral stream assessment approach used publicly-available geospatial data on hydrology, topography, surficial geology, and soil characteristics, as well as high-resolution aerial imagery. These datasets were used to inform a professional judgment-based score index of potential land disturbance impacts on selected critical functions of ephemeral streams, including flow and sediment conveyance, ecological habitat value, and groundwater recharge. The total sensitivity scores (sum of scores for the critical stream functions of flow and sediment conveyance, ecological habitats, and groundwater recharge) were used to identify highly sensitive stream reaches to inform decisions on developable areas in SEZs. Total sensitivity scores typically reflected the scores of the individual stream functions; some exceptions pertain to groundwater recharge and ecological habitats. The primary limitations of this assessment approach were the lack of high-resolution identification of ephemeral stream channels in the existing National Hydrography Dataset, and the lack of mechanistic processes describing potential impacts on ephemeral stream functions at the watershed scale. The

  18. Geochemical signature of permanent and ephemeral thermal springs in Val di Cornia, Central Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierotti, Lisa; Pennisi, Maddalena; Muti, Antonio; Gherardi, Fabrizio

    2014-05-01

    In the Val di Cornia area, several permanent thermal springs outflow. They belong to the hydrothermal system of Campiglia Marittima and have been exploited since longtime for the therapeutic properties of the discharged waters. With an average outflow of 250 L/sec, Calidario (36.3±0.2° C) is the most important permanent spring of the area. Periodically, i.e. about every 10 years, a number of ephemeral thermo-mineral springs in Bagnarello (46±0.2° C) and Monte Peloso (42.2±0.3° C) area, spontaneously reactivate over short time periods (several weeks to few months), with a maximum discharge of 150±20 L/sec. This phenomenon is generally induced by intensive rainfall events. In this contribution, we present new geochemical analyses of waters discharged from Calidario and the ephemeral springs reactivated at the beginning of 2001 and at the end of 2010. These new data are then compared to previous analyses to investigate geochemical variations over a 30-years period. Both ephemeral and permanent thermal springs have Ca-SO4 geochemical signature, typical of groundwaters circulating through the carbonate-evaporitic complexes of the Tuscan Nappe (Mesozoic age). Clear salinity trends are identified, with TDS increasing from Calidario to Monte Peloso and Bagnarello springs, up to a maximum of about 3000 ppm. Chemical speciation indicates that most of the thermal waters are close to saturation with respect to fluorite and gypsum/anhydrite, with solute geothermometers indicating possible equilibrium temperature of 50-55° C for Monte Peloso and Bagnarello waters, respectively. Higher temperatures, up to 75° C, were inferred by assuming equilibrium at depth with the aluminosilicates of the regional Basement (phyllitic formations of Paleozoic age), below the evaporites of the Tuscan Nappe (Triassic age). With δ18O and δ2H values of -6.4 (±0.2)o and -38.9 (±2.9)o respectively, the ephemeral springs have a steady stable isotope composition, comparable to permanent

  19. Q fever — a review

    PubMed Central

    Marrie, Thomas J.

    1990-01-01

    Q or “query” fever is a zoonosis caused by the organism Coxiella burnetii. Cattle, sheep and goats are the most common reservoirs of this organism. The placenta of infected animals contains high numbers (up to 109/g) of C. burnetii. Aerosols occur at the time of parturition and man becomes infected following inhalation of the microorganism. The spectrum of illness in man is wide and consists of acute and chronic forms. Acute Q fever is most often a self-limited flu-like illness but may include pneumonia, hepatitis, or meningoencephalitis. Chronic Q fever almost always means endocarditis and rarely osteomyelitis. Chronic Q fever is not known to occur in animals other than man. An increased abortion and stillbirth rate are seen in infected domestic ungulates. Four provinces (Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, Ontario and Alberta) reported cases of Q fever in 1989. A vaccine for Q fever has recently been licensed in Australia. ImagesFigure 1. PMID:17423643

  20. Chikungunya fever presenting with protracted severe pruritus.

    PubMed

    Cunha, Burke A; Leonichev, Victoria B; Raza, Muhammad

    2016-01-01

    Travelers returning from the tropics often present with rash/fever. Those with rash/fever and myalgias/arthralgias are most likely due to chikungunya fever, dengue fever, or Zika virus. In these arthropod viral transmitted infections, the rash may be pruritic. The case presented here is that of chikungunya fever remarkable for the intensity and duration of her pruritis.

  1. Typhoid Fever, Below the Belt

    PubMed Central

    Raveendran, Kamakshi Mahadevan

    2016-01-01

    Genital ulcers occur due to infective, inflammatory, malignant and drug-related causes. In tropical countries such as India, such ulcers are due to parasitic, tubercular, rickettsial and bacterial (sexually transmitted infections) aetiologies. Typhoid fever is endemic in the tropics. Except “rose spots”, skin manifestations in typhoid fever are unusual, and they are missed due to pigmented skin. Patients do not often complain of genital ulcers due to shame or fear. Genital examination is not routinely performed in typhoid fever. We describe scrotal ulcers as the presenting symptom of typhoid fever, which subsided with appropriate therapy. PMID:26894114

  2. Dengue and Dengue Hemorrhagic Fever

    PubMed Central

    Gubler, Duane J.

    1998-01-01

    Dengue fever, a very old disease, has reemerged in the past 20 years with an expanded geographic distribution of both the viruses and the mosquito vectors, increased epidemic activity, the development of hyperendemicity (the cocirculation of multiple serotypes), and the emergence of dengue hemorrhagic fever in new geographic regions. In 1998 this mosquito-borne disease is the most important tropical infectious disease after malaria, with an estimated 100 million cases of dengue fever, 500,000 cases of dengue hemorrhagic fever, and 25,000 deaths annually. The reasons for this resurgence and emergence of dengue hemorrhagic fever in the waning years of the 20th century are complex and not fully understood, but demographic, societal, and public health infrastructure changes in the past 30 years have contributed greatly. This paper reviews the changing epidemiology of dengue and dengue hemorrhagic fever by geographic region, the natural history and transmission cycles, clinical diagnosis of both dengue fever and dengue hemorrhagic fever, serologic and virologic laboratory diagnoses, pathogenesis, surveillance, prevention, and control. A major challenge for public health officials in all tropical areas of the world is to devleop and implement sustainable prevention and control programs that will reverse the trend of emergent dengue hemorrhagic fever. PMID:9665979

  3. Fever in the pediatric patient.

    PubMed

    Wing, Robyn; Dor, Maya R; McQuilkin, Patricia A

    2013-11-01

    Fever is the most common reason that children and infants are brought to emergency departments. Emergency physicians face the challenge of quickly distinguishing benign from life-threatening conditions. The management of fever in children is guided by the patient's age, immunization status, and immune status as well as the results of a careful physical examination and appropriate laboratory tests and radiographic views. In this article, the evaluation and treatment of children with fevers of known and unknown origin are described. Causes of common and dangerous conditions that include fever in their manifestation are also discussed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. [Marseille fever imported from Spain].

    PubMed

    Freibergerová, Michaela; Parízková, Radana; Husa, Petr; Burget, Ivo; Chalupa, Pavel

    2004-08-01

    The authors are presenting a case of young female with Marseille fever contracted in Spain. The clinical manifestation of the illness was characterized by fevers, exanthema, headache and a typical skin rash ("the black spot") and prompted the authors to strongly consider the diagnosis of Marseille fever and to initiate appropriate antibiotic therapy. The diagnosis was confirmed later by serology. The article introduces new taxonomy of Rickettsial species and presents an overview and epidemiological aspects of specific diseases caused by them. The clinical manifestation, diagnosis and treatment of Marseille fever are discussed in greater detail.

  5. Typhoid Fever, Below the Belt.

    PubMed

    Raveendran, Kamakshi Mahadevan; Viswanathan, Stalin

    2016-01-01

    Genital ulcers occur due to infective, inflammatory, malignant and drug-related causes. In tropical countries such as India, such ulcers are due to parasitic, tubercular, rickettsial and bacterial (sexually transmitted infections) aetiologies. Typhoid fever is endemic in the tropics. Except "rose spots", skin manifestations in typhoid fever are unusual, and they are missed due to pigmented skin. Patients do not often complain of genital ulcers due to shame or fear. Genital examination is not routinely performed in typhoid fever. We describe scrotal ulcers as the presenting symptom of typhoid fever, which subsided with appropriate therapy.

  6. Familial Mediterranean Fever

    PubMed Central

    Migita, Kiyoshi; Agematsu, Kazunaga; Yazaki, Masahide; Nonaka, Fumiaki; Nakamura, Akinori; Toma, Tomoko; Kishida, Dai; Uehara, Ritei; Nakamura, Yoshikazu; Jiuchi, Yuka; Masumoto, Junya; Furukawa, Hiroshi; Ida, Hiroaki; Terai, Chihiro; Nakashima, Yoshikazu; Kawakami, Atsushi; Nakamura, Tadashi; Eguchi, Katsumi; Yasunami, Michio; Yachie, Akihiro

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) is an autoinflammatory disease caused by MEditerranean FeVer gene (MEFV) mutations. In Japan, patients with FMF have been previously reported, including a mild or incomplete form. Several factors are presumed to contribute to the variable penetrance and to the phenotypic variability of FMF. We conducted the current study to investigate the correlation of variable clinical presentations and MEFV genotypic distributions in Japanese FMF patients. We analyzed demographic, clinical, and genetic data for 311 FMF patients enrolled in the study. Clinically, we classified FMF into 2 phenotypes: 1) the “typical” form of FMF, and 2) the “atypical” form of FMF according to the Tel Hashomer criteria. Patients with the typical FMF phenotype had a higher frequency of febrile episodes, a shorter duration of febrile attacks, more frequent thoracic pain, abdominal pain, a family history of FMF, and MEFV exon 10 mutations. Conversely, patients with the atypical FMF phenotype had a lower frequency of fever episodes and more frequent arthritis in atypical distribution, myalgia, and MEFV exon 3 mutations. Multivariate analysis showed that the variable associated with typical FMF presentation was the presence of MEFV exon 10 mutations. Typical FMF phenotype frequencies were decreased in patients carrying 2 or a single low-penetrance mutations compared with those carrying 2 or a single high-penetrance mutations (M694I), with an opposite trend for the atypical FMF phenotype. In addition, patients having more than 2 MEFV mutations had a younger disease onset and a higher prevalence of thoracic pain than those carrying a single or no mutations. Thus, MEFV exon 10 mutations are associated with the more typical FMF phenotype. In contrast, more than half of the Japanese FMF patients without MEFV exon 10 mutations presented with an atypical FMF phenotype, indicating that Japanese FMF patients tend to be divided into 2 phenotypes by a variation

  7. [Fever in Cancer Patients].

    PubMed

    Cornely, Oliver Andreas; Mellinghoff, Sibylle Christiane

    2017-07-01

    Fever in cancer patients is a medical emergency until a severe infection has been ruled out. In case of neutropenia prompt diagnostic work-up should be paralleled by empiric antibiotic treatment. Underlying malignancy as well as treatments may impair immune response and thus pave the way for less virulent pathogens. So the spectrum of infections comprises both pathogens that cause disease in immunocompetent patients and a variety of rarer organisms. After collecting two pairs of blood cultures, broad-spectrum antibiotic treatment should commence within one to two hours. Depending on the individual patient's risk antimicrobial prophylaxis should be considered. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  8. Treatment of hay fever.

    PubMed Central

    Wood, S F

    1989-01-01

    The range of treatments for hay fever available to the general practitioner has changed considerably in recent years. New antihistamines have addressed the problem of sedation and moved towards one daily dose; nasally applied corticosteroids avoid the need for systemic steroid therapy and its potential adverse effect; and regulatory decisions have set a trend away from immunotherapy in general practice. However, knowledge about the mechanism of action of immunotherapy is increasing and new developments with improved safety profiles include allergen polymers, allergoids, oral immunotherapy and nasal immunotherapy. Choice of treatment depends, as always, on the individual circumstances of the patient and his or her disease. PMID:2556545

  9. Lassa Fever Immune Plasma.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-07-31

    10606 Lassa fever nfi 1 6 1 1 Lassa virus I9.AU TRACT (C *ont~u 0’mYO er~~~n of aeguM*# 4wvv &I muinw) Plasmapheresis was conducted at Curran Lutheran...Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases (USAMRTID), and ultimately, therapeutic trials of the plasma and comparison of its...effectiveness with ribavirin, an antiviral agent. Plasmapheresis was conducted at Curran Lutheran Hospital (CLH), and increasingly at Phebe Hospital (PH) with 255

  10. Physical treatment of fever

    PubMed Central

    Purssell, E.

    2000-01-01

    Fever is a common symptom of childhood illness, and much time and effort is spent in the pursuit of reducing high temperature. Although antipyretic drugs are the main form of treatment, this report considers the part that physical treatments might play in reducing the temperature of febrile children. Such treatments include tepid sponging, removing clothing, and cooling the environment. Of these treatments, tepid sponging has been studied most extensively, as an addition to paracetamol, but seems to offer little advantage over paracetamol alone. It is likely that other methods might be equally ineffective because they all rely on similar methods of heat loss.

 PMID:10685930

  11. Korean Hemorrhagic Fever.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Korean hemorrhagic fever (KHF) occurred for the first time in Korea , 1951, although it had previously been known to both the Japanese and Russians...After Korean war, the disease has been fixed in the areas of DMZ as an endemic one, and from 100 to 300 cases have been reported every year. The aims...but in 1971 affected the middle districts and in 1972 invaded the southern parts of South Korea . The number of patients and the areas of KHF in 1972

  12. Transport, retention, and ecological significance of woody debris within a large ephemeral river

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jacobson, P.J.; Jacobson, K.M.; Angermeier, P.L.; Cherry, D.S.

    1999-01-01

    The spatiotemporal patterns and ecological significance of the retention of coarse particulate organic matter and large woody debris have been intensively studied in perennial rivers and streams but are virtually unknown in ephemeral systems. We examined the influence of 2 features characteristic of ephemeral systems, downstream hydrologic decay and in-channel tree growth, on the distribution, transport, and retention of woody debris following a flood having a ~2.6-y recurrence interval in the ephemeral Kuiseb River in southwestern Africa. A total of 2105 pieces of wood were painted at 8 sites along the river channel to measure retention patterns. The flood had a peak discharge of 159 m3/s at the upper end of the study area, decaying to <1 m3/s by 200 km downstream. Downstream export of wood from marking sites totaled 59.5% (n = 1253). Transport distances ranged from 1 to 124 km, and 34.8% (n = 436) of the exported wood was recovered. Marked wood retained within marking sites was significantly longer than exported wood (p < 0.001, t-test). Once in transport, there was little correlation between wood length and distance traveled (r = 0.11, correlation analysis, n = 369). Length influenced the site of retention; material retained on debris piles was significantly longer than that stranded on channel sediments (p < 0.001, t-test). In-channel growth of Faidherbia trees significantly influenced wood retention; 83.7% of marked wood not moved by the flood was associated with debris piles on Faidherbia trees. Similarly, 65% of the exported wood retained within downstream debris piles was associated with Faidherbia trees. In contrast to many perennial systems, we observed a general increase in wood retention downstream, peaking in the river's lower reaches in response to hydrologic decay. Debris piles induced sediment deposition and the formation of in-channel islands. Following flood recession, debris piles and their associated sediments provided moist, organic

  13. Distinctive channel geometry and riparian vegetation: A geomorphic classification for arid ephemeral streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutfin, N.; Shaw, J. R.; Wohl, E. E.; Cooper, D.

    2012-12-01

    Interactions between hydrology, channel form, and riparian vegetation along arid ephemeral streams are not thoroughly understood and current stream classifications do not adequately represent variability in channel geometry and associated riparian communities. Relatively infrequent hydrologic disturbances in dryland environments are responsible for creation and maintenance of channel form that supports riparian communities. To investigate the influence of channel characteristics on riparian vegetation in the arid southwestern United States, we develop a geomorphic classification for arid ephemeral streams based on the degree of confinement and the composition of confining material that provide constraints on available moisture. Our conceptual model includes five stream types: 1) bedrock channels entirely confined by exposed bedrock and devoid of persistent alluvium; 2) bedrock with alluvium channels at least partially confined by bedrock but containing enough alluvium to create bedforms that persist through time; 3) incised alluvium channels bound only by unconsolidated alluvial material into which they are incised; 4) braided washes that exhibit multi-thread, braided characteristics regardless of the composition of confining material; and 5) piedmont headwater 0-2nd order streams (Strahler) confined only by unconsolidated alluvium and which initiate as secondary channels on piedmont surfaces. Eighty-six study reaches representing the five stream types were surveyed on the U.S. Army Yuma Proving Ground in the Sonoran Desert of southwestern Arizona. Non-parametric multivariate analysis of variance (PERMANOVA) indicates significant differences between the five stream types with regards to channel geometry (i.e., stream gradient, width-to-depth ratio, the ratio between valley width and channel width (Wv/Wc), shear stress, and unit stream power) and riparian vegetation (i.e., presence and canopy coverage by species, canopy stratum, and life form). Discriminant analysis

  14. A concept of ephemeral wetlands as water-transmitting landscape units in Canada's Western Boreal Plain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurley, Alexander; Kettridge, Nicholas; Devito, Kevin; Hokanson, Kelly; Krause, Stefan

    2017-04-01

    Hydrologic connectivity in the sub-humid Western Boreal Plain is largely controlled by storage-threshold dynamics where deep and coarse glacial deposits with high infiltration and storage capacities are prevalent. Here, vertical fluxes generally dominate over surface runoff, which has return periods of several years. Within this landscape, small, ephemeral wetlands with shallow peat soils are embedded in a matrix of other landscape units. They are typically gently-sloped and found in low-lying areas within forests or along margins of other wetlands. These ephemeral wetlands frequently saturate, and thus promote lateral water transfer as surface runoff or subsurface flows to adjacent and downstream systems. In the Western Boreal Plain, the importance of such water transmitting units (WTUs) is exacerbated by regional, multi-year water deficits resulting from inter-annual precipitation variability, and high evapotranspirative (ET) demand coinciding with most of the annual precipitation. Hence, the occurrence of WTUs may be key to maintaining the ecohydrological functioning of systems with temporary or missing connections to ground- or surface water. We present a conceptual model of these shallow, ephemeral wetlands based on our current understanding of dominant, ecohydrological processes promoting water transmission and highlight current knowledge gaps. Ongoing research focuses on quantifying individual water balance components, identifying potential feedback mechanisms between vegetation, soil properties and layering, and how climate modulates them. Key questions are: (1) What are dominant water balance components and their seasonal and internal dynamics? (2) Do vegetation structure and community composition decrease ET losses from the soil surface and wetland vegetation by shading and sheltering (i.e. decoupling from turbulent atmospheric exchange)? (3) Do adjacent upland and wetland systems depend on water transmission to maintain their functioning and productivity

  15. Ephemeral conditions for life at the South Polar Region of Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szathmáry, E.; Bérczi, Sz.; Pócs, T.; Horváth, A.; Gánti, T.; Kereszturi, A.; Sik, A.

    2007-08-01

    Several new pieces of information from the last years strengthen the possibility that suitable conditions for possible living organisms may be present ephemerally at the Southern Polar region of Mars. We summarize these results in the lecture, as well as our new model that fits to these results. Among the new information it is proven that the seasonal frost on the polar dunes is layered with water ice at the bottom and carbon-dioxide ice at the top. Some slope structures hint at melting and seepage of the lower water ice layer in springtime/summer. New information was also released on the radiation tolerance of extremophiles, and many possible analogous organisms were analyzed on the Earth. Authors improved their original DDS-MSO hypothesis to a new synthetic model that incorporates the gas geyser and the liquid seepage models. In this synthetic approach the important stages of events are the following: 1. In autumn with decreasing temperature first H2O, then later CO2 freezes onto the surface (above all onto dark dunes) forming a layered structure. 2. In springtime the sunshine causes the outburst of CO2 gas jets (forming the diffuse fans), and the thinning or disappearance of the upper CO2 layer there (forming dark spots). 3. As spring advances the stronger insolation absorbed by the dune surfaces warms up the dune grains at the localities where earlier the gas jets formed a hole in the CO2 ice. In this stage a very thin ephemeral water layer may form on the dune grain surfaces, below the water ice, and between the liquid water and the solid ice roof a layer of water vapor layer may also appear. During this period the liquid layer itself, or the lubricated grains may seep down, or even the front of the phase change may move downwards - forming the slope structures. 4. By the end of spring the surface ice disappears, but among the grains ice or liquid water may still be present in some mm depth for a very brief period of time. 5. In the last phase all the near

  16. Assessment of the Compound Topographic Index CTI to predict Potential Ephemeral Gullies in Navarre (Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chahor, Y.; Casalí, J.; Giménez, R.

    2012-04-01

    Ephemeral gullies are relatively small (susceptible of being obliterated by conventional tillage operation) eroded channels that are able to generate however important in-site and off-site damages (removal of top soil and nutrients, degradation of drinking water quality, contamination of aquatic ecosystems, siltation, etc.). Gully initiation and development in a watershed is greatly driven by topographic factors. Precisely, several topographic indexes have been used to identify areas with risk of gully erosion. Among them, the Compound Topographic Index (CTI= A.S.PLANC; A: upstream drainage area, S: local slope, PLANC: planform curvature) is an approach recently implemented in the AnnAGNPS (Annualized Agricultural Nonpoint Source Pollution) model. It allows defining the location of potential ephemeral gullies (PEG). The aim of this work was to assess the capability of CTI for predicting PEG mouths (potential headcut) location in an agricultural field of Navarre (Spain) through AnnAGNPS. The study was carried out in a 450 ha area cultivated with wheat and located in Pitillas (southern Navarre). The climate is continental Mediterranean with a mean temperature of 13°C and annual rainfall of 500 mm. Top soil textures are mostly loamy and silt-loam. The 3 topographic components of the CTI were computed by TOPAZ program implemented in AnnAGNPS 5.10 using a digital elevation model of 5-m resolution. The CTI is computed for each raster grid. Then all the values are arranged from the smallest to the largest and then percentiles are calculated (for example, the 95th percentile is the threshold CTI value below which 95% of the CTI values may be found). Grid cells whose values correspond to a percentile lower than 90% are discarded by the model by default. On the other hand, 31 ephemeral gullies located within the studied agricultural field were selected from orthophotos (1:5,000). Natural drainage channels located in abandoned, steep pieces of terrain were not considered in

  17. Lessons learned from integrated hydrological modeling of ephemeral catchments with different land uses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camporese, Matteo; Dean, Joshua; Daly, Edoardo

    2016-04-01

    Land use, in particular tree cover, has a strong influence on evapotranspiration (ET) and thus a large effect on the water budget of ephemeral catchments in arid and semi-arid climates. Unfortunately, the dearth of medium to long-term experimental observations in such areas limits the understanding of the interplay between catchment geology, land use, and climate in driving catchment water balance. Here we use four years (2011-2014) of rainfall, streamflow, and groundwater level measurements to estimate the water balance components in two small, adjacent, ephemeral catchments in a semi-arid region of south-eastern Australia; one catchment was predominantly covered with a eucalypt plantation established in July 2008 and the other was dedicated to grazing pasture. The integrated hydrological model CATHY (CATchment HYdrology) was calibrated against the data in the two catchments using streamflow and groundwater level observations in 2011; the data in the following years (2012-2014) were used for the model validation. The model was able to adequately reproduce the periods of flow in both catchments in all years, although streamflow and groundwater levels were better reproduced in the pasture than in the plantation. This can partly be attributed to the root growth of the trees, which is difficult to estimate; the declining water storage in the eucalypt catchment could only be obtained when including a simple model of root growth dynamics. Other sources of uncertainty could be due to an imperfect description of the surface topography and bedrock geology, which prevent us from accurately reproducing the effects of the tree furrows and subsurface wetness connectivity. The water balances estimated from both data and model showed a significant increase in ET in the eucalypt plantation catchment at the expense of groundwater storage: ET accounted for 95-104% of rainfall in the pasture catchment and 104-119% in the eucalypt catchment across the four years studied. However, the

  18. 37 CFR 262.3 - Royalty fees for public performances of sound recordings and for ephemeral recordings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... MAKING OF EPHEMERAL REPRODUCTIONS § 262.3 Royalty fees for public performances of sound recordings and... Recordings. The royalty payable under 17 U.S.C. 112(e) for any reproduction of a phonorecord made by a... royalty payable under 17 U.S.C. 112(e) for the reproduction of phonorecords by a Business...

  19. 37 CFR 262.3 - Royalty fees for public performances of sound recordings and for ephemeral recordings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... MAKING OF EPHEMERAL REPRODUCTIONS § 262.3 Royalty fees for public performances of sound recordings and... Recordings. The royalty payable under 17 U.S.C. 112(e) for any reproduction of a phonorecord made by a... royalty payable under 17 U.S.C. 112(e) for the reproduction of phonorecords by a Business...

  20. 37 CFR 262.3 - Royalty fees for public performances of sound recordings and for ephemeral recordings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... MAKING OF EPHEMERAL REPRODUCTIONS § 262.3 Royalty fees for public performances of sound recordings and... Recordings. The royalty payable under 17 U.S.C. 112(e) for any reproduction of a phonorecord made by a... royalty payable under 17 U.S.C. 112(e) for the reproduction of phonorecords by a Business...

  1. 37 CFR 382.12 - Royalty fees for the public performance of sound recordings and the making of ephemeral recordings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Royalty fees for the public performance of sound recordings and the making of ephemeral recordings. 382.12 Section 382.12 Patents... be a percentage of monthly Gross Revenues as follows: for 2013, 9.0%; for 2014, 9.5%; for 2015, 10.0...

  2. 37 CFR 380.22 - Royalty fees for the public performance of sound recordings and for ephemeral recordings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Royalty fees for the public performance of sound recordings and for ephemeral recordings. 380.22 Section 380.22 Patents, Trademarks, and....0017; (2) 2012: $0.0020; (3) 2013: $0.0022; (4) 2014: $0.0023; (5) 2015: $0.0025. (6) For a...

  3. 37 CFR 383.3 - Royalty fees for public performances of sound recordings and the making of ephemeral recordings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Royalty fees for public... recordings. (a) * * * (1) * * * (ii) * * * (F) 2011: $0.0155 (G) 2012: $0.0159 (H) 2013: $0.0164 (I) 2014: $0... (I) 2014: $0.0281 (J) 2015: $0.0290 (c) Ephemeral recordings. The royalty payable under 17 U.S.C. 112...

  4. 37 CFR 380.22 - Royalty fees for the public performance of sound recordings and for ephemeral recordings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Royalty fees for the public... EPHEMERAL REPRODUCTIONS Noncommercial Educational Webcasters § 380.22 Royalty fees for the public... § 380.23(g)(1), shall pay a $100 annual fee (the “Proxy Fee”) to the Collective. (b) Additional usage...

  5. 37 CFR 380.12 - Royalty fees for the public performance of sound recordings and for ephemeral recordings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Royalty fees for the public... EPHEMERAL REPRODUCTIONS Broadcasters § 380.12 Royalty fees for the public performance of sound recordings... Broadcaster also shall pay a $100 annual fee (the “Proxy Fee”) to the Collective for the reporting waiver...

  6. 37 CFR 380.22 - Royalty fees for the public performance of sound recordings and for ephemeral recordings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Royalty fees for the public... EPHEMERAL REPRODUCTIONS Noncommercial Educational Webcasters § 380.22 Royalty fees for the public... § 380.23(g)(1), shall pay a $100 annual fee (the “Proxy Fee”) to the Collective. (b) Additional usage...

  7. Degradation of soil physicochemical quality by ephemeral gully erosion on sloping cropland of the hilly Loess Plateau, China

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Ephemeral gully erosion (EGE) is a common type of shallow linear erosion that exerts a major threat to the productivity and sustainability of agricultural systems. The objective was to evaluate the impact of EGE on soil physicochemical properties that determine soil quality. It was hypothesized that...

  8. Identifying ephemeral and perennial stream reaches using apparent thermal inertia for an ungauged basin: The Rio Salado, Central New Mexico

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Night and day temperature images from Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) remote sensing images are used to identify ephemeral and perennial stream reaches for use in the calibration of an integrated hydrologic model of an ungauged basin. The concept is based on a...

  9. THE ECOLOGICAL AND HYDROLOGICAL SIGNIFICANCE OF EPHEMERAL AND INTERMITTENT STREAMS IN THE ARID AND SEMI-ARID AMERICAN SOUTHWEST

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report represents a state-of-the-art synthesis of current knowledge of the ecology and hydrology of ephemeral (dry washes) and intermittent streams in the American Southwest, and may have important bearing on establishing nexus to traditional navigable waters (TNW) and defin...

  10. Structure and Function of Ephemeral Streams in the Arid and Semiarid Southwest: Implications for Conservation and Management

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-07-24

    were collected on stream hydrology, litter decomposition, nutrients, vegetation , seed banks, and ground-dwelling soil arthropods. Relationships...Infiltration Potential of Streams in Southwestern USA................24 Chapter 5. Variation in Ephemeral Stream Vegetation Along an Aridity Gradient...Table 6.1. Relationships between riparian zone plant species richness and physical variables....60 Table 6.2. Relationships between vegetation

  11. THE ECOLOGICAL AND HYDROLOGICAL SIGNIFICANCE OF EPHEMERAL AND INTERMITTENT STREAMS IN THE ARID AND SEMI-ARID AMERICAN SOUTHWEST

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report represents a state-of-the-art synthesis of current knowledge of the ecology and hydrology of ephemeral (dry washes) and intermittent streams in the American Southwest, and may have important bearing on establishing nexus to traditional navigable waters (TNW) and defin...

  12. 37 CFR 382.12 - Royalty fees for the public performance of sound recordings and the making of ephemeral recordings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... LICENSES RATES AND TERMS FOR DIGITAL TRANSMISSIONS OF SOUND RECORDINGS AND THE REPRODUCTION OF EPHEMERAL RECORDINGS BY PREEXISTING SUBSCRIPTION SERVICES AND PREEXISTING SATELLITE DIGITAL AUDIO RADIO SERVICES Preexisting Satellite Digital Audio Radio Services § 382.12 Royalty fees for the public performance of...

  13. 37 CFR 382.12 - Royalty fees for the public performance of sound recordings and the making of ephemeral recordings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... LICENSES RATES AND TERMS FOR DIGITAL TRANSMISSIONS OF SOUND RECORDINGS AND THE REPRODUCTION OF EPHEMERAL RECORDINGS BY PREEXISTING SUBSCRIPTION SERVICES AND PREEXISTING SATELLITE DIGITAL AUDIO RADIO SERVICES Preexisting Satellite Digital Audio Radio Services § 382.12 Royalty fees for the public performance of...

  14. Evaluating Best Management Practices for ephemeral channel protection following forest harvest in the Cumberland Plateau - preliminary findings

    Treesearch

    Emma L. Witt; Christopher D. Barton; Jeffrey W. Stringer; Daniel W. Bowker; Randall K. Kolka

    2011-01-01

    Most states in the United States have established forestry best management practices to protect water quality and maintain aquatic habitat in streams. However, guidelines are generally focused on minimizing impacts to perennial streams. Ephemeral channels (or streams), which function as important delivery systems for carbon, nutrients, and sediment to perennial streams...

  15. A stochastic population model for Lepidium papilliferum (Brassicaceae), a rare desert ephemeral with a persistent seed bank

    Treesearch

    Susan E. Meyer; Dana Quinney; Jay Weaver

    2006-01-01

    Population viability analysis (PVA) is a valuable tool for rare plant conservation, but PVA for plants with persistent seed banks is difficult without reliable information on seed bank processes. We modeled the population dynamics of the Snake River Plains ephemeral Lepidium papilliferum using data from an 11-yr artificial seed bank experiment to estimate age-specific...

  16. Fever of unknown origin.

    PubMed

    Bleeker-Rovers, Chantal P; van der Meer, Jos W M; Oyen, Wim J G

    2009-03-01

    Fever of unknown origin (FUO) often is defined as a fever greater than 38.3 degrees C on several occasions during at least 3 weeks with uncertain diagnosis after a number of obligatory tests. In general, infection accounts for approximately one-fourth of cases of FUO, followed by neoplasm and noninfectious inflammatory diseases. No diagnosis is reached in up to 50% of cases. Scintigraphic methods, such as (67)Ga-citrate, labeled leukocytes, and (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET), are often used in the diagnosis of FUO. In FUO, FDG-PET appears to be of great advantage because malignancy, inflammation, and infection can be detected. FDG-PET does not seem to contribute to a final diagnosis in patients with normal erythrocyte sedimentation rate and C-reactive protein. Image fusion combining PET and computed tomography facilitates anatomical localization of increased FDG uptake and better guiding for further diagnostic tests to achieve a final diagnosis. In conclusion, the body of evidence on the utility of FDG-PET in patients with FUO is growing and FDG-PET will probably become the preferred diagnostic procedure, especially when a definite diagnosis cannot easily be achieved. Because of favorable characteristics of FDG-PET, conventional scintigraphic techniques may be replaced by FDG-PET in institutions in which PET is available.

  17. [A mild blackwater fever].

    PubMed

    Bouldouyre, M-A; Dia, D; Carmoi, T; Fall, K Ba; Chevalier, B; Debonne, J-M

    2006-06-01

    We report a highly probable case of moderately severe blackwater fever. A French woman, living in Guinea Bissau, was used to taking self-medication halofantrine for malaria. On this occasion, she felt unusual chills and pyrexia after a non documented bout of malaria, followed by nausea, then jaundice with dark-red urines despite another treatment with halofantrine. A sepsis was eliminated by two negatives thick peripheral blood drop examinations. Hemolysis was noted with 8.1 g/dl of hemoglobin, Coombs positive, and LDH at 1,452 IU/l, associated to renal failure with 34 ml per minute of clearance. The outcome was favourable with rehydration. Blackwater fever has been described with the three aminoalcohols, but mainly in severe presentations. Clinicians are not familiar with this disease, even though it has major therapeutic implications: quinine, halofantrine, and mefloquine become strictly contra-indicated. Moderate forms may be unknown, and this observation should be taken into account to prevent mistreatment in future patients.

  18. Argentine hemorrhagic fever vaccines.

    PubMed

    Ambrosio, Ana; Saavedra, Maria; Mariani, Mauricio; Gamboa, Graciela; Maiza, Andrea

    2011-06-01

    Argentine hemorrhagic fever (AHF), an acute disease caused by Junin virus (JUNV, Arenaviridae), has been an important issue to public health in Argentina since the early 1950s. The field rodent Calomys musculinus is JUNV natural reservoir and human disease is a consequence of contact with infected rodents. A steady extention of AHF endemic area is being observed since the first reports of the disease. Important achievements have been made in: (a) improvement of methods for the etiological diagnosis; (b) implementation and validation of therapeutical measures; (c) development of vaccines to protect against AHF. Reference is made to different research strategies used to obtain anti-AHF vaccines in the past and anti-arenaviral diseases in the present. Information is updated on features and field performance of Candid #1 vaccine, a live attenuted vaccine currently used to prevent AHF. This vaccine was developed through a joint international effort that envisioned it as an orphan drug. With transferred technology, Argentine government was committed to be Candid #1 manufacturer and to register this vaccine as a novel medical product under the Argentine regulatory authority. Candid #1 vaccine is the first one used to control an arenaviral hemorrhagic fever, the first live viral vaccine to be manufactured and registered in Argentina, reaching its target population through governmental effort.

  19. Mayaro Fever Virus, Brazilian Amazon

    PubMed Central

    Azevedo, Raimunda S.S.; Silva, Eliana V.P.; Carvalho, Valéria L.; Rodrigues, Sueli G.; Neto, Joaquim P. Nunes; Monteiro, Hamilton A.O.; Peixoto, Victor S.; Chiang, Jannifer O.; Nunes, Márcio R.T.

    2009-01-01

    In February 2008, a Mayaro fever virus (MAYV) outbreak occurred in a settlement in Santa Barbara municipality, northern Brazil. Patients had rash, fever, and severe arthralgia lasting up to 7 days. Immunoglobulin M against MAYV was detected by ELISA in 36 persons; 3 MAYV isolates sequenced were characterized as genotype D. PMID:19891877

  20. Rocky Mountain spotted fever, Colombia.

    PubMed

    Hidalgo, Marylin; Orejuela, Leonora; Fuya, Patricia; Carrillo, Pilar; Hernandez, Jorge; Parra, Edgar; Keng, Colette; Small, Melissa; Olano, Juan P; Bouyer, Donald; Castaneda, Elizabeth; Walker, David; Valbuena, Gustavo

    2007-07-01

    We investigated 2 fatal cases of Rocky Mountain spotted fever that occurred in 2003 and 2004 near the same locality in Colombia where the disease was first reported in the 1930s. A retrospective serosurvey of febrile patients showed that > 21% of the serum samples had antibodies aaainst spotted fever group rickettsiae.

  1. Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever, Colombia

    PubMed Central

    Hidalgo, Marylin; Orejuela, Leonora; Fuya, Patricia; Carrillo, Pilar; Hernandez, Jorge; Parra, Edgar; Keng, Colette; Small, Melissa; Olano, Juan P.; Bouyer, Donald; Castaneda, Elizabeth; Walker, David

    2007-01-01

    We investigated 2 fatal cases of Rocky Mountain spotted fever that occurred in 2003 and 2004 near the same locality in Colombia where the disease was first reported in the 1930s. A retrospective serosurvey of febrile patients showed that >21% of the serum samples had antibodies against spotted fever group rickettsiae. PMID:18214179

  2. Mayaro fever virus, Brazilian Amazon.

    PubMed

    Azevedo, Raimunda S S; Silva, Eliana V P; Carvalho, Valéria L; Rodrigues, Sueli G; Nunes-Neto, Joaquim P; Monteiro, Hamilton; Peixoto, Victor S; Chiang, Jannifer O; Nunes, Márcio R T; Vasconcelos, Pedro F C

    2009-11-01

    In February 2008, a Mayaro fever virus (MAYV) outbreak occurred in a settlement in Santa Barbara municipality, northern Brazil. Patients had rash, fever, and severe arthralgia lasting up to 7 days. Immunoglobulin M against MAYV was detected by ELISA in 36 persons; 3 MAYV isolates sequenced were characterized as genotype D.

  3. Method for estimating spatially variable seepage loss and hydraulic conductivity in intermittent and ephemeral streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Niswonger, R.G.; Prudic, D.E.; Fogg, G.E.; Stonestrom, D.A.; Buckland, E.M.

    2008-01-01

    A method is presented for estimating seepage loss and streambed hydraulic conductivity along intermittent and ephemeral streams using streamflow front velocities in initially dry channels. The method uses the kinematic wave equation for routing streamflow in channels coupled to Philip's equation for infiltration. The coupled model considers variations in seepage loss both across and along the channel. Water redistribution in the unsaturated zone is also represented in the model. Sensitivity of the streamflow front velocity to parameters used for calculating seepage loss and for routing streamflow shows that the streambed hydraulic conductivity has the greatest sensitivity for moderate to large seepage loss rates. Channel roughness, geometry, and slope are most important for low seepage loss rates; however, streambed hydraulic conductivity is still important for values greater than 0.008 m/d. Two example applications are presented to demonstrate the utility of the method. Copyright 2008 by the American Geophysical Union.

  4. Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Machine: Protecting Privacy with Ephemeral Channels

    PubMed Central

    Dunn, Alan M.; Lee, Michael Z.; Jana, Suman; Kim, Sangman; Silberstein, Mark; Xu, Yuanzhong; Shmatikov, Vitaly; Witchel, Emmett

    2014-01-01

    Modern systems keep long memories. As we show in this paper, an adversary who gains access to a Linux system, even one that implements secure deallocation, can recover the contents of applications’ windows, audio buffers, and data remaining in device drivers—long after the applications have terminated. We design and implement Lacuna, a system that allows users to run programs in “private sessions.” After the session is over, all memories of its execution are erased. The key abstraction in Lacuna is an ephemeral channel, which allows the protected program to talk to peripheral devices while making it possible to delete the memories of this communication from the host. Lacuna can run unmodified applications that use graphics, sound, USB input devices, and the network, with only 20 percentage points of additional CPU utilization. PMID:24755709

  5. Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Machine: Protecting Privacy with Ephemeral Channels.

    PubMed

    Dunn, Alan M; Lee, Michael Z; Jana, Suman; Kim, Sangman; Silberstein, Mark; Xu, Yuanzhong; Shmatikov, Vitaly; Witchel, Emmett

    2012-01-01

    Modern systems keep long memories. As we show in this paper, an adversary who gains access to a Linux system, even one that implements secure deallocation, can recover the contents of applications' windows, audio buffers, and data remaining in device drivers-long after the applications have terminated. We design and implement Lacuna, a system that allows users to run programs in "private sessions." After the session is over, all memories of its execution are erased. The key abstraction in Lacuna is an ephemeral channel, which allows the protected program to talk to peripheral devices while making it possible to delete the memories of this communication from the host. Lacuna can run unmodified applications that use graphics, sound, USB input devices, and the network, with only 20 percentage points of additional CPU utilization.

  6. A LANDSAT study of ephemeral and perennial rangeland vegetation and soils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bentley, R. G., Jr. (Principal Investigator); Salmon-Drexler, B. C.; Bonner, W. J.; Vincent, R. K.

    1976-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Several methods of computer processing were applied to LANDSAT data for mapping vegetation characteristics of perennial rangeland in Montana and ephemeral rangeland in Arizona. The choice of optimal processing technique was dependent on prescribed mapping and site condition. Single channel level slicing and ratioing of channels were used for simple enhancement. Predictive models for mapping percent vegetation cover based on data from field spectra and LANDSAT data were generated by multiple linear regression of six unique LANDSAT spectral ratios. Ratio gating logic and maximum likelihood classification were applied successfully to recognize plant communities in Montana. Maximum likelihood classification did little to improve recognition of terrain features when compared to a single channel density slice in sparsely vegetated Arizona. LANDSAT was found to be more sensitive to differences between plant communities based on percentages of vigorous vegetation than to actual physical or spectral differences among plant species.

  7. Evidence for a Noachian-Aged Ephemeral Lake in Gusev Crater, Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruff, S. W.; Niles, P. B.; Alfano, F.; Clarke, A. B.

    2014-01-01

    Gusev crater was selected as the landing site for the Spirit rover because of the likelihood that it contained an ancient lake. Although outcrops rich in Mg-Fe carbonate dubbed Comanche were discovered in the Noachian-aged Columbia Hills, they were inferred to result from volcanic hydrothermal activity. Spirit encountered other mineral and chemical indicators of aqueous activity, but none was recognized as definitive evidence for a former lake in part because none was associated with obvious lacustrine sedimentary deposits. However, water discharge into Martian crater basins like Gusev may have been episodic, producing only small amounts of sediment and shallow ephemeral lakes. Evaporative precipitation from such water bodies has been suggested as a way of producing the Mg- and Fe-rich carbonates found in ALH84001 and carbonates and salts in some nakhlites a hypothesis we examine for the Comanche carbonate.

  8. Travelers' Health: Typhoid and Paratyphoid Fever

    MedlinePlus

    ... for Yellow Fever Vaccine Course Travel Medicine References: Books, Journals, Articles & Websites Resources for the Travel Industry Yellow Book Contents Chapter 3 (81) Typhoid & Paratyphoid Fever more ...

  9. Recent human impacts and change in dynamics and morphology of ephemeral rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortega, J. A.; Razola, L.; Garzón, G.

    2014-03-01

    Ephemeral streams induce flash-flood events, which cause dramatic morphological changes and impacts on population, mainly because they are intermittent and less predictable. Human pressures on the basin modify load and discharge relationships, inducing dormant instability on the fluvial system that will manifest abruptly during flood events. The flash-flood response of two ephemeral streams affected by load supply modification due to land use changes is discussed in a combination of geomorphic and hydraulic approaches. During the Rivillas flash flood, intensive clearing on the basin led to high rates of sediment flowing into an artificially straightened and inefficient channel. The stream evolved from a sinuous single channel into a shallow braiding occupying the entire width of the valley floor. Misfits and unsteady channel conditions increased velocity, stream power and sediment entrainment capacity and considerably magnified flood damage. Resulting morphosedimentary features revealed a close relationship with the valley floor post-flood hydraulic model, and pre-event awareness would have made it possible to predict risk-sensitive areas. In the second case, the Azohía stream, modelling of current pre-flood channel conditions make it possible to determine channel narrowing and entrenchment in the lower alluvial fan stretch. Abandonment of intensive agriculture, basin reforestation and urbanization diminish load contribution and trigger channel incision. This induces an increase in slope and velocity in the bankfull channel, producing renewed erosive energy and thus activating upstream propagation of incision and bank undermining. The absence of water-spreading dynamics on the alluvial fan in favour of confinement in a single channel produces an unstable dynamic in the system, also offering a false sense of stability, as long as no large magnitude floods occur. When modelling flood-prone areas and analysing hydraulic variables, it is important to detect possible

  10. Quantifying geomorphic change at ephemeral stream restoration sites using a coupled-model approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norman, Laura M.; Sankey, Joel B.; Dean, David; Caster, Joshua; DeLong, Stephen; DeLong, Whitney; Pelletier, Jon D.

    2017-04-01

    Rock-detention structures are used as restoration treatments to engineer ephemeral stream channels of southeast Arizona, USA, to reduce streamflow velocity, limit erosion, retain sediment, and promote surface-water infiltration. Structures are intended to aggrade incised stream channels, yet little quantified evidence of efficacy is available. The goal of this 3-year study was to characterize the geomorphic impacts of rock-detention structures used as a restoration strategy and develop a methodology to predict the associated changes. We studied reaches of two ephemeral streams with different watershed management histories: one where thousands of loose-rock check dams were installed 30 years prior to our study, and one with structures constructed at the beginning of our study. The methods used included runoff, sediment transport, and geomorphic modelling and repeat terrestrial laser scanner (TLS) surveys to map landscape change. Where discharge data were not available, event-based runoff was estimated using KINEROS2, a one-dimensional kinematic-wave runoff and erosion model. Discharge measurements and estimates were used as input to a two-dimensional unsteady flow-and-sedimentation model (Nays2DH) that combined a gridded flow, transport, and bed and bank simulation with geomorphic change. Through comparison of consecutive DEMs, the potential to substitute uncalibrated models to analyze stream restoration is introduced. We demonstrate a new approach to assess hydraulics and associated patterns of aggradation and degradation resulting from the construction of check-dams and other transverse structures. Notably, we find that stream restoration using rock-detention structures is effective across vastly different timescales.

  11. Ephemeral-streamflow Induced Focused Recharge in the Desert Southwest (US)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Constantz, J. E.; Stonestrom, D. A.

    2015-12-01

    Multiyear studies examined meteorologic and hydrogeologic controls on ephemeral streamflow and focused groundwater recharge at 8 sites across arid and semiarid southwestern regions of the US. Intensive data collection targeted the Great Basin, Mojave Desert, Sonoran Desert, Rio Grande Rift, and Colorado Plateau physiographic areas (USGS Prof. Pap. 1703-C). During the study period (1997-2002), the region went from wetter than normal conditions associated with a strong El Niño climatic pattern (1997-1998) to drier than normal conditions associated with a La Niña climatic pattern. The 1997-1998 El Niño, the strongest in the modern instrumental record, roughly doubled precipitation at the Great Basin, Mojave Desert, and Colorado Plateau study sites. Precipitation at all sites thereafter trended sharply lower, producing moderate- to severe-drought conditions by the end of the study. Streamflow in regional rivers indicated diminishing groundwater recharge, with annual-flow volumes declining to levels of only 10-46% of their respective long-term averages by 2002. Local streamflows showed higher variability, reflecting smaller scales of integration (in time and space) within study-site watersheds. Toward the end of study, extended periods (9-15 months) of zero or negligible flow were observed at half the sites. Summer monsoonal rains generated the majority of streamflow and associated recharge in the Sonoran Desert sites and the more southerly Rio Grande Rift site, whereas winter storms and spring snowmelt dominated the northern and westernmost sites. Proximity to moisture sources and meteorologic fluctuations, in concert with orography, largely control the generation of focused groundwater recharge from ephemeral streamflow, although other aspects (geology, soil, and vegetation) were also identified as factors. Estimates of annual focused infiltration for the research sites ranged from about 105-107 cubic meters from contributing areas that ranged from 26-2,260 square

  12. Rain and channel flow supplements to subsurface water beneath hyper-arid ephemeral stream channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kampf, Stephanie K.; Faulconer, Joshua; Shaw, Jeremy R.; Sutfin, Nicholas A.; Cooper, David J.

    2016-05-01

    In hyper-arid regions, ephemeral stream channels are important sources of subsurface recharge and water supply for riparian vegetation, but few studies have documented the subsurface water content dynamics of these systems. This study examines ephemeral channels in the hyper-arid western Sonoran Desert, USA to determine how frequently water recharges the alluvial fill and identify variables that affect the depth and persistence of recharge. Precipitation, stream stage, and subsurface water content measurements were collected over a three-year study at six channels with varying contributing areas and thicknesses of alluvial fill. All channels contain coarse alluvium composed primarily of sands and gravels, and some locations also have localized layers of fine sediment at 2-3 m depth. Rain alone contributed 300-400 mm of water input to these channels over three years, but water content responses were only detected for 36% of the rain events at 10 cm depth, indicating that much of the rain water was either quickly evaporated or taken up by plants. Pulses of water from rain events were detected only in the top meter of alluvium. The sites each experienced ⩽5 brief flow events, which caused transient saturation that usually lasted only a few hours longer than flow. These events were the only apparent source of water to depths >1 m, and water from flow events quickly percolated past the deepest measurement depths (0.5-3 m). Sustained saturation in the shallow subsurface only developed where there was a near-surface layer of finer consolidated sediments that impeded deep percolation.

  13. The non-layering of gravel streambeds under ephemeral flood regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laronne, Jonathan B.; Reid, Ian; Yitshak, Yitshak; Frostick, Lynne E.

    1994-07-01

    The two-layer format common to perennial streambeds, in which a relatively coarse armour overlies a finer subarmour, develops as a function of both the ingress and subsequent near-surface winnowing of interstitial material and the selective non-entrainment or slower transport velocity of coarse clasts. Ephemeral streams appear to lack such vertical layering or are characterized by weak layer development. Some of this may be due to the degree of mixing associated with the scour-and-fill process. However, continuous monitoring of bedload discharge in the Nahal Yatir in the northern Negev Desert reveals that sediment transport rates are extremely high so that the chance of armour layer development through selective non-entrainment is much reduced. Indeed, a comparison of the bedload and bed material size-distributions confirms a high degree of similarity and hints at equal mobility regardless of clast size. The monitoring programme also indicates that the bed becomes highly mobile at comparatively modest fluid shear, so that practically all floods are associated with high transport rates. Consequently, the winnowing that might be brought about by low transport-rate events does not occur. Even within a single event, winnowing is precluded by the rapid nature of flow recession that is so characteristic of flash-floods. The high degree of bed material mobility is attributable, in part, to the lack of strength that would otherwise be a corollary of armour development. However, it also highlights the divergent nature of the feedback loops that govern the relationship between flow and channel deposit in ephemeral and perennial systems.

  14. The influence of climate, topography and land-use on the hydrology of ephemeral upland catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daly, E.; Webb, J.; Dresel, E.

    2016-12-01

    We report on an on-going project aimed at determining the effects of climate variability and land use change on water resources in ephemeral productive catchments. Meteorological data (including rainfall, solar radiation, air temperature, humidity and wind speed), streamflow and groundwater levels were collected continuously for over five years in seven ephemeral catchments in southeastern Australia. The catchments, dominated by either pasture for grazing (four) or Eucalyptus globulus (blue gum) plantations of different ages (three), were located in three different geological settings. Rainfall varied from higher than the long-term average of this area for the initial years of the study period to much drier than the long-term average for the last two years. Groundwater levels in the farm sites remained stable or slightly increased through the study period, while levels declined in all the plantation catchments, where evapotranspiration rates were greater than rainfall. The trees intercept groundwater recharge and in some areas of the catchments directly access groundwater. Streamflow occurred mainly during winter, with short-term flows in summer caused by sporadic large rainfall events. Despite the large annual rainfall variability, flow rates in each year were similar in most catchments, with the duration of flow being important in determining the annual flow. The frequency rather than the amount of rainfall events determines the generation of streamflow in the two catchments with steeper slopes. The effect of the tree plantations on streamflow varied from a substantial reduction in one catchment to no effect in another, where the tree rows are oriented predominantly downslope, allowing greater runoff. In the third plantation catchment, geology is the main driver of runoff due to capture into underlying karst conduits.

  15. Variations in climate and ephemeral channel recharge in southeastern Arizona, United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pool, D.R.

    2005-01-01

    [1] Significant variations in interannual and decadal recharge rates are likely in alluvial basins of the semiarid southwestern United States on the basis of decadal variations in climate and precipitation and correlation of El Nin??o with high rates of winter precipitation and streamflow. A better understanding of the magnitude of recharge variations in semiarid and arid regions would reduce water budget uncertainty. Variability of ephemeral channel recharge with climate in southeastern Arizona was investigated through analysis of hydrologic monitoring near three ephemeral streams in southeastern Arizona during the middle to late 1990s and by relating the results to long-term hydrologic and climatic trends. The analysis used precipitation, streamflow, water levels in wells, estimates of groundwater storage change from repeat gravity surveys, and two climatic indicators of El Nin??o-Southern Oscillation (ENSO), Southern Oscillation index, and Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO). Results indicate that variations in winter recharge are related to ENSO. El Nin??o conditions correspond with a greater probability of high rates of winter precipitation, streamflow, and recharge. La Nin??a conditions are almost exclusively associated with below-average recharge. Rates of recharge along Rillito Creek near Tucson during 1977-1998, a period of frequent El Nin??o conditions and positive PDO values, were 3 times recharge rates during 1941-1957, a period dominated by La Nin??a conditions and low PDO values. Quantification of recharge variability with decadal climate cycles should improve estimates of rates of aquifer drainage and replenishment in the region. Similar methods are applicable to other regions where thick unsaturated zones can accept significant periodic recharge.

  16. Quantifying geomorphic change at ephemeral stream restoration sites using a coupled-model approach

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Norman, Laura M.; Sankey, Joel B.; Dean, David; Caster, Joshua J.; DeLong, Stephen B.; Henderson-DeLong, Whitney; Pelletier, Jon D.

    2017-01-01

    Rock-detention structures are used as restoration treatments to engineer ephemeral stream channels of southeast Arizona, USA, to reduce streamflow velocity, limit erosion, retain sediment, and promote surface-water infiltration. Structures are intended to aggrade incised stream channels, yet little quantified evidence of efficacy is available. The goal of this 3-year study was to characterize the geomorphic impacts of rock-detention structures used as a restoration strategy and develop a methodology to predict the associated changes. We studied reaches of two ephemeral streams with different watershed management histories: one where thousands of loose-rock check dams were installed 30 years prior to our study, and one with structures constructed at the beginning of our study. The methods used included runoff, sediment transport, and geomorphic modelling and repeat terrestrial laser scanner (TLS) surveys to map landscape change. Where discharge data were not available, event-based runoff was estimated using KINEROS2, a one-dimensional kinematic-wave runoff and erosion model. Discharge measurements and estimates were used as input to a two-dimensional unsteady flow-and-sedimentation model (Nays2DH) that combined a gridded flow, transport, and bed and bank simulation with geomorphic change. Through comparison of consecutive DEMs, the potential to substitute uncalibrated models to analyze stream restoration is introduced. We demonstrate a new approach to assess hydraulics and associated patterns of aggradation and degradation resulting from the construction of check-dams and other transverse structures. Notably, we find that stream restoration using rock-detention structures is effective across vastly different timescales.

  17. Possibilities for Relapsing Fever Reemergence

    PubMed Central

    2006-01-01

    Relapsing fever Borrelia infections have attracted little attention in recent years; however, where endemic, these infections still result in considerable illness and death. Despite the marked antimicrobial drug susceptibility of these organisms, therapy is often delayed through lack of clinical suspicion. With increasing travel, infections may be imported, through exotic relapsing fever infection or through resurgence of infected disease vectors. Although louseborne relapsing fever is now geographically limited, it was once of global importance. The possibility for reemergence was recently highlighted by the probable reemergence of louseborne relapsing fever in homeless persons from France. Host limitations enforced through louseborne transmission are less applicable for the tickborne forms of relapsing fever. Although the latter have reduced potential for epidemic spread, they have the ability to infect diverse hosts, thus establishing reservoirs of infection and presenting greater challenges for their control. PMID:16704771

  18. Yellow Fever Vaccine: What You Need to Know

    MedlinePlus

    ... www. immunize. org/ vis 1 What is yellow fever? Yellow fever is a serious disease caused by the ... serious cases) 2 How can I prevent yellow fever? Yellow fever vaccine Yellow fever vaccine can prevent yellow ...

  19. Akhawayni and the first fever curve.

    PubMed

    Sajadi, Mohammad M; Bonabi, Reza; Sajadi, Mohamad-Reza M; Mackowiak, Philip A

    2012-10-01

    By the time of Hippocrates the typical paroxysmal fever patterns of tertian (every 48 hours) and quartan (every 72 hours) fevers caused by malaria were known. Through the ensuing centuries, ancient Greek, Roman, and Persian physicians made additional contributions to the understanding of fevers. By the end of that era, there was a working definition of what constitutes a fever, the distinction between fever as a symptom and fever as a disease, an elaborate classification scheme for multiple types of fever, hypotheses as to the causes of fever, and methods for diagnosing and treating fevers. Based on the definition of fever at that time, the 10th century ce Persian physician Akhawaynī created fever curves hundreds of years before they were routinely used in the clinical setting. In Hidāyat al-Muta'allimīn fī al-Tibb, Akhawaynī describes a system for fever curves and draws fever curves for tertian and quartan Fevers, as well as the double tertian, double quartan, and triple quartan fevers. In this work we examine the history of fevers in the ancient world and the first description of the fever curve.

  20. Korean Hemorrhagic Fever (Hemorrhagic Fever with Renal Syndrome (HFRS)).

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-07-01

    AD-Ai55 228 KOREAN HEMORRHAGIC FEVER (HEMORRHAGIC FEVER WITH RENAL in. SYNDROME (HFRS))(U) KOREA UNIV SEOUL DEPT OF MICROBIOLOGY H W LEE JUL 84...INTRODUCTION During the Korean War, more than 2,400 United Nations troops stationed in the 38th Parallel in Korea developed a rare disease which had not... Korean hemorrhagic fever patients in urban areas of Seoul. Korean J. Virol. 10: 1-6, 1980. 8. Lee, H. W. New epidemiological findings of HFRS in Korea . J

  1. Rocky Mountain spotted fever.

    PubMed

    Dantas-Torres, Filipe

    2007-11-01

    Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF) is a life-threatening disease caused by Rickettsia rickettsii, an obligately intracellular bacterium that is spread to human beings by ticks. More than a century after its first clinical description, this disease is still among the most virulent human infections identified, being potentially fatal even in previously healthy young people. The diagnosis of RMSF is based on the patient's history and a physical examination, and often presents a dilemma for clinicians because of the non-specific presentation of the disease in its early course. Early empirical treatment is essential to prevent severe complications or a fatal outcome, and treatment should be initiated even in unconfirmed cases. Because there is no vaccine available against RMSF, avoidance of tick-infested areas is still the best way to prevent the infection.

  2. [West Nile fever].

    PubMed

    Takasaki, Tomohiko

    2005-12-01

    West Nile virus was first detected in North America in 1999 and has spread throughout the United States and Canada and into Mexico and the Caribbean. The cases of encephalitis in New York were diagnosed as Saint Louis encephalitis which was endemic in the North America. However, dead crows and dead flamingo were found around the same time in New York. American birds seldom die by Saint Louis encephalitis virus infection. According to viral isolation and sequencing of the genome, the causative agent of unknown encephalitis was West Nile virus which was a member of Flaviviridae which cause fever, meningitis and encephalitis. West Nile virus is still active in North America in summer season, 1999 -2005. CDC enlightens people how to protect themselves and their community from West Nile virus. There are some reports that West Nile viral infections were occurred by blood transfusion, biologic products from blood and organ transfusion.

  3. Viral Hemorrhagic Fever Diagnostics

    PubMed Central

    Racsa, Lori D.; Kraft, Colleen S.; Olinger, Gene G.; Hensley, Lisa E.

    2016-01-01

    There are 4 families of viruses that cause viral hemorrhagic fever (VHF), including Filoviridae. Ebola virus is one virus within the family Filoviridae and the cause of the current outbreak of VHF in West Africa. VHF-endemic areas are found throughout the world, yet traditional diagnosis of VHF has been performed in large reference laboratories centered in Europe and the United States. The large amount of capital needed, as well as highly trained and skilled personnel, has limited the availability of diagnostics in endemic areas except in conjunction with governmental and nongovernmental entities. However, rapid diagnosis of VHF is essential to efforts that will limit outbreaks. In addition, increased global travel suggests VHF diagnoses may be made outside of the endemic areas. Thus, understanding how to diagnose VHF is imperative for laboratories worldwide. This article reviews traditional and current diagnostic modalities for VHF. PMID:26354968

  4. Familial Mediterranean fever.

    PubMed

    Padeh, Shai; Berkun, Yackov

    2016-09-01

    Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) is the oldest and most common of the hereditary autoinflammatory diseases (AIDs). A large body of information has been accumulated over recent years on the pathophysiology, diagnosis and treatment of these diseases. The purpose of this review is to bring an up-to-date summary of the clinic manifestations, diagnostic criteria and treatment of FMF. An overview of the pathophysiologic basis of FMF as part of the AID is discussed. Over the last year, attempts to establish new criteria for childhood FMF, new guidelines for treatment and follow-up of disease and novel treatment for FMF were made. A comparison of the different disease severity scores for research purposes suggests that a new score is needed. New evidence for antiinterleukin-1 blockade as a new treatment modality is described. New diagnostic criteria, disease severity score, treatment and follow-up guidelines have been proposed, and need validation in the next several years.

  5. Lassa Fever Immune Plasma

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-10-31

    Discharged P-1414 Ad F DaMu 4/15/88 6/16/88 6/16 - Improved P-1426 Ad F KoKo 6/15/88 7/12/88 7/12 - Imp. p. in- JaDa 6/15/88 7/12/88 fusion.Died 7...1/90 Fever 2 d. HaFa 1/11/90 2/1/90 p. plasma. P-1814 Ad N JaDa 2/7/90 2/10/90 Afebrile in ZiHo 1/18/90 2/10/90 24 hours. P-1815 AD M JaGa 2/7/90 2

  6. Lassa fever vaccine.

    PubMed

    Fisher-Hoch, Susan P; McCormick, Joseph B

    2004-04-01

    Lassa fever remains a serious challenge to public health in West Africa threatening both local residents in rural areas and those who serve them, particularly medical care providers. Given the ecology of the rodent host and conditions in the endemic area, a vaccine is mandatory for control. The challenge is to overcome the scientific, political and economic obstacles to producing a human use vaccine candidate. There are some scientific issues to resolve. It is known that the G-protein confers protection but we do not know its duration. If the N-protein is also included there may be a better duration of protection but it is unclear whether the N-protein as a vaccine may possibly enhance the infection. The original vaccinia vector must be replaced by new vectors, chimeras or by delivering DNA in some format. A live vaccine is attractive because it can confer protection in a single shot. A killed vaccine is more stable, particularly for distribution in the tropics but usually requires repeated shots. For practical reasons a live vaccine format should probably be pursued, which could then be combined with a yellow fever vaccine, using the same cold chains, since this disease occupies the same endemic areas in West Africa. Lassa vaccine initiatives have suffered from a lack of funding in the past but bioterrorism has brought new resources to Lassa virus science. Adequate funding and applications of new vaccine technologies give hope that we may soon see a vaccine in clinical trials. However, the difficulty of conducting trials in endemic areas and lack of political stability remain serious problems.

  7. Rift Valley fever.

    PubMed

    Paweska, J T

    2015-08-01

    Rift Valley fever (RVF) is a mosquito-borne zoonotic viral disease affecting domestic and wild ruminants, camels and humans. The causative agent of RVF, the RVF virus (RVFV), has the capacity to cause large and severe outbreaks in animal and human populations and to cross significant natural geographic barriers. Rift Valley fever is usually inapparent in non-pregnant adult animals, but pregnant animals and newborns can be severely affected; outbreaks are characterised by a sudden onset of abortions and high neonatal mortality. The majority of human infections are subclinical or associated with moderate to severe, non-fatal, febrile illness, but some patients may develop a haemorrhagic syndrome and/or ocular and neurological lesions. In both animals and humans, the primary site of RVFV replication and tissue pathology is the liver. Outbreaks of RVF are associated with persistent high rainfalls leading to massive flooding and the emergence of large numbers of competent mosquito vectors that transmit the virus to a wide range of susceptible vertebrate species. Outbreaks of RVF have devastating economic effects on countries for which animal trade constitutes the main source of national revenue. The propensity of the virus to spread into new territories and re-emerge in traditionally endemic regions, where it causes large outbreaks in human and animal populations, presents a formidable challenge for public and veterinary health authorities. The presence of competent mosquito vectors in RVF-free countries, the wide range of mammals susceptible to the virus, altering land use, the global changes in climate, and increased animal trade and travel are some of the factors which might contribute to international spread of RVF.

  8. ETIOLOGY OF YELLOW FEVER

    PubMed Central

    Noguchi, Hideyo

    1922-01-01

    Analysis of the records of instances in which non-immune persons contracted yellow fever notwithstanding vaccination shows that the onset of disease occurs soon after vaccination, the longest period being 13 days. Since the average incubation period in yellow fever is 6 days, it seems that infection must have taken place in some instances during the period while protection was developing. These instances led to a study of the possibility of immediate protection by means of the anti-icteroides serum. It had already been shown that the immune serum protects at once against experimental Leptospira icteroides infection, but it remained to determine how long the protection would last. Guinea pigs were given different quantities of the immune serum and subsequently injected, at various intervals, with a virulent strain of Leptospira icteroides. Complete protection enduring 5 days was obtained with as minute a quantity of serum as 0.002 cc. per 1,000 gm. of body weight. After 5 days, however, the immune substance rapidly diminished, and to keep the animal protected for as long as 10 days it was necessary to give 100 times as much, or 0.2 cc. For a man weighing 80 kilos, 0.16 cc. (0.002 x 80) would theoretically be sufficient to protect for at least 5 days, 1.6 cc. for 7 days, and 16 cc. for 10 days. This temporary protection may be a valuable antecedent to that furnished by vaccination, since the final effect of the latter cannot be expected until at least 9 to 10 days have passed. PMID:19868677

  9. STUDIES ON TUBERCULIN FEVER

    PubMed Central

    Moses, John M.; Atkins, Elisha

    1961-01-01

    Certain characteristics of tolerance which develops to the pyrogenic effects of old tuberculin (OT) in BCG-vaccinated rabbits have been described. Rabbits made tolerant by several injections of OT lost their ability to produce detectable amounts of endogenous pyrogen (EP) in response to the specific agent (OT) but mobilized normal amounts of EP when given a small unrelated stimulus. On the other hand, when this stimulus followed shortly after an initial tuberculin fever of sufficient magnitude, release of additional EP was suppressed, presumably due to an inhibitory effect of the EP previously mobilized by tuberculin. Similarly, a single large dose of endotoxin almost completely suppressed the response of sensitized rabbits to OT given several hours later. Since several spaced injections of the same dosage were ineffective, this phenomenon does not appear to be attributable to the known mechanisms by which endotoxins promote non-specific resistance to toxicity and infection. Tolerance to tuberculin could not be definitely shown following an injection of Newcastle disease virus which also produces a circulating EP, and it has been inferred that endotoxin blocks the pyrogenic action of antigen on host tissues directly rather than through mobilizing EP. On the basis of these observations, the relationship of specific to non-specific tolerance to tuberculin fever has been compared in terms of the ability of such tolerant animals to mobilize EP to heterologous stimuli and it is concluded that the two forms of tolerance are different. Furthermore, the fact that a number of unrelated agents produce tolerance non-specifically supports the concept that there may be a common source of EP released by a number of stimuli, including endotoxins and myxoviruses, as well as antigen in specifically sensitized hosts. PMID:14476462

  10. Rhombencephalitis associated with Dengue fever.

    PubMed

    Verma, Rajesh; Bharti, Kavita; Mehta, Mannan; Bansod, Amrit

    2016-05-01

    Dengue infection is gradually disseminating throughout the world in alarming proportions. It is a arbovirus infection,transmitted by aedes mosquitoes. It is a multi-systemic disorder associated with varied neurological complications. There is increased trend of development of neurological complications in dengue fever. The neurological complications arising due to dengue infection can be categorized into central and neuromuscular complications. The central nervous system disorders reported with dengue fever are encephalopathy,encephalitis and myelitis.Here we report a case of rhombencephalitis associated with dengue fever. The literature does not mention rhombencephalitis occurring with dengue illness. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. A critical discussion on the applicability of Compound Topographic Index (CTI) for predicting ephemeral gully erosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casalí, Javier; Chahor, Youssef; Giménez, Rafael; Campo-Bescós, Miguel

    2016-04-01

    The so-called Compound Topographic Index (CTI) can be calculated for each grid cell in a DEM and be used to identify potential locations for ephemeral gullies (e. g.) based on land topography (CTI = A.S.PLANC, where A is upstream drainage area, S is local slope and PLANC is planform curvature, a measure of the landscape convergence) (Parker et al., 2007). It can be shown that CTI represents stream power per unit bed area and it considers the major parameters controlling the pattern and intensity of concentrated surface runoff in the field (Parker et al., 2007). However, other key variables controlling e.g. erosion (e. g. e.) such as soil characteristics, land-use and management, are not had into consideration. The critical CTI value (CTIc) "represents the intensity of concentrated overland flow necessary to initiate erosion and channelised flow under a given set of circumstances" (Parker et al., 2007). AnnAGNPS (Annualized Agriculture Non-Point Source) pollution model is an important management tool developed by (USDA) and uses CTI to locate potential ephemeral gullies. Then, and depending on rainfall characteristics of the period simulated by AnnAGNPS, potential e. g. can become "actual", and be simulated by the model accordingly. This paper presents preliminary results and a number of considerations after evaluating the CTI tool in Navarre. CTIc values found are similar to those cited by other authors, and the e. g. networks that on average occur in the area have been located reasonably well. After our experience we believe that it is necessary to distinguish between the CTIc corresponding to the location of headcuts whose migrations originate the e. g. (CTIc1); and the CTIc necessary to represent the location of the gully networks in the watershed (CTIc2), where gully headcuts are located in the upstream end of the gullies. Most scientists only consider one CTIc value, although, from our point of view, the two situations are different. CTIc1 would represent the

  12. Geophysical Constraints on the Evolution of an Ephemeral Channel at the Sand Creek Massacre National Historic Site, Colorado, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheth, Nishank Mihir

    A geophysical survey was conducted on an ephemeral channel, Sand Creek, at Sand Creek Massacre National Historic Site to test three hypothesized migration and depositional models of ephemeral streams. A key motivation for the study is to identify the historical location of Sand Creek, which is critical to establishing the location of the 1864 Sand Creek Massacre. Hammer seismic refraction data were collected on 7 valley-wide lines oriented perpendicular to the channel, and ground penetrating radar data (200 MHz antenna) was collected on a grid overlying the channel and the channel banks. An additional GPR line (100 MHz) was collected on a line spanning the valley bottom. The refraction data show 4 layers: an eolian cap that is 1 - 3 m thick with a velocity of 0.3 km/s; a gradational alluvium layer consisting of ephemeral deposits which is 2 - 3 m thick with velocities ranging from 0.5 - 1 km/s; a gradational alluvium layer consisting of perennial fluvial deposits which is 2 - 7 m thick with velocities ranging from 1.2 - 2.9 km/s; and a homogeneous layer with a velocity of 2.4 km/s which is interpreted to be the Pierre Shale Formation. The radar data located buried channel boundaries and revealed a change in bedforms at 3 - 4 m deep. The change in bedforms is interpreted to indicate a flow regime change from an older perennial to a more recent ephemeral flow. The channel bedforms within the ephemeral flow regime deposits suggest that the channel has not migrated across the modern valley since the ephemeral flow regime was established, but punctuated changes in morphology within the channel have occurred in association with major floods. The results iii indicate that the channel has not changed position in historical times. This suggests that the modern stream is the proper geographic context for historical accounts that reference the location of Sand Creek when describing events that occurred during the 1864 massacre.

  13. Hemorrhagic Fever with Renal Syndrome (Korean Hemorrhagic Fever)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-07-31

    36 DISTRIBUTION LIST. .................... 40 INTRODUCTION During the Korean War more than 3,200 United Nations troops in Korea developed a rare...hemorrhagic fever, a situa- tion that attracted worldwide attention (1). Since then it has been known as Korean hemorrhagic fever (KHF) in Korea . This...Kyunggido and Kangwondo, northern parts of South Korea . All of the 97 HFRS patients among Korean soldiers occurred in Kyunggido, Kangwondo and Seoul

  14. Monitoring Potential Transport of Radioactive Contaminants in Shallow Ephemeral Channels: FY 2012

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Julianne J.; Mizell, Steve A.; McCurdy, Greg; Campbell, Scott A.

    2012-09-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), Nevada Site Office (NSO), Environmental Management’s Soils Activity has authorized the Desert Research Institute (DRI) to conduct field assessments of potential sediment transport of contaminated soil from Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 550, Smoky Contamination Area (CA), during precipitation runoff events. CAU 550 includes Corrective Action Sites (CASs) 08-23-03, 08-23-04, 08-23-06, and 08-23-07; these CASs are associated with tests designated Ceres, Smoky, Oberon, and Titania, respectively. Field measurements at the T-4 Atmospheric Test Site, CAU 370, suggest that radioactive material may have migrated along a shallow ephemeral drainage that traverses the site (NNSA/NSO, 2009). (It is not entirely clear how contaminated soils got into their present location at the T-4 Site, but flow to the channel has been redirected and the contamination does not appear to be migrating at present.) Although DRI initially looked at the CAU 370 site, given that it could not be confirmed that migration of contamination into the channel was natural, an alternate study site was selected at CAU 550. Aerial surveys in selected portions of the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) also suggest that radioactivity may be migrating along ephemeral channels in Areas 3, 8, 11, 18, and 25 (Colton, 1999). Figure 1 shows the results of a low-elevation aerial survey (Colton, 1999) in Area 8. The numbered markers in Figure 1 identify ground zero for three safety experiments conducted in 1958 [Oberon (number 1), Ceres (number 2), and Titania (number 4)] and a weapons effects test conducted in 1964, Mudpack (number 3). This survey suggests contaminants may be migrating down the ephemeral channels that traverse CAU 550. Note particularly the lobe of higher concentration extending southeastward at the south end of the high concentration area marked as number 3 in Figure 1. CAU 550 in Area 8 of the NNSS was selected for

  15. ModABa Model: Annual Flow Duration Curves Assessment in Ephemeral Basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pumo, Dario; Viola, Francesco; Noto, Leonardo V.

    2013-04-01

    A representation of the streamflow regime for a river basin is required for a variety of hydrological analyses and engineering applications, from the water resource allocation and utilization to the environmental flow management. The flow duration curve (FDC) represents a comprehensive signature of temporal runoff variability often used to synthesize catchment rainfall-runoff responses. Several models aimed to the theoretical reconstruction of the FDC have been recently developed under different approaches, and a relevant scientific knowledge specific to this topic has been already acquired. In this work, a new model for the probabilistic characterization of the daily streamflows in perennial and ephemeral catchments is introduced. The ModABa model (MODel for Annual flow duration curves assessment in intermittent BAsins) can be thought as a wide mosaic whose tesserae are frameworks, models or conceptual schemes separately developed in different recent studies. Such tesserae are harmoniously placed and interconnected, concurring together towards a unique final aim that is the reproduction of the FDC of daily streamflows in a river basin. Two separated periods within the year are firstly identified: a non-zero period, typically characterized by significant streamflows, and a dry period, that, in the cases of ephemeral basins, is the period typically characterized by absence of streamflow. The proportion of time the river is dry, providing an estimation of the probability of zero flow occurring, is empirically estimated. Then, an analysis concerning the non-zero period is performed, considering the streamflow disaggregated into a slow subsuperficial component and a fast superficial component. A recent analytical model is adopted to derive the non zero FDC relative to the subsuperficial component; this last is considered to be generated by the soil water excess over the field capacity in the permeable portion of the basin. The non zero FDC relative to the fast

  16. Childhood Fever: parental beliefs and management.

    PubMed

    Stephenson, M J; Rosencrantz, A; Kneller, P

    1988-01-01

    Childhood fever is often seen in family-practice. Clinical experience has shown the authors that parental anxiety often initiates early, aggressive treatment of fever with antipyretics. The authors studied parents' beliefs and practices relating to fever control in their children, and who or what their information sources were. The findings indicate that parents are commonly misinformed about the nature of childhood fever and its management, and that physicians need to learn more about conveying information on fever to patients.

  17. Satellite time series analysis to study the ephemeral nature of archaeological marks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, Chris

    2014-05-01

    Archaeological structures buried beneath the ground often leave traces at the surface. These traces can be in the form of differences in soil moisture and composition, or vegetation growth caused for example by increased soil water retention over a buried ditch, or by insufficient soil depth over a buried wall for vegetation to place deep roots. Buried structures also often leave subtle topographic traces at the surface. Analyses is carried out on the ephemeral characteristics of buried archaeological crop and soil marks over a number of sites around the city of Rome using satellite data from both optical and SAR (Synthetic Aperture Radar) sensors, including Kompsat-2, ALOS PRISM and COSMO SkyMed. The sensitivity of topographic satellite data, obtained by optical photogrammetry and interferometric SAR, is also analysed over the same sites, as well as other sites in Egypt. The analysis includes a study of the interferometric coherence of successive pairs of a time series of SAR data over sites containing buried structuresto better understand the nature of the vegetated or bare soil surface. To understand the ephemeral nature of archaeological crop and soil marks, the spectral reflectance characteristics of areas where such marks sometimes appear are extracted from a time series of optical multispectral and panchromatic imagery, and their backscatter characteristics extracted from a time series of SAR backscatter amplitude data. The results of this analysis is then compared with the results of the coherence analysis to see if any link can be established between the appearance of archaeological structures and the nature of ground cover. Results show that archaeological marks in the study areas are more present in SAR backscatter data over vegetated surfaces, rather than bare soil surfaces, but sometimes appear also in bare soil conditions. In the study areas, crop marks appear more distinctly in optical data after long periods without rainfall. The topographic

  18. Humidifier fever 1

    PubMed Central

    1977-01-01

    MRC Symposium (1977).Thorax, 32, 653-663. Humidifier fever. In enclosed environments, it may be necessary to regulate temperature, ventilation, and humidity to maintain comfortable working conditions. Several systems can be used although in terms of installation and running costs a simple radiator system is far more economical than air conditioning with complete temperature and humidity control. Humidity control requires the introduction of water into a moving current of air, and in such a system baffle plates are often used to eliminate large droplets; also any unused water is usually recirculated. Organic dust drawn into the system and settling on the baffle plates and in the mixing chamber may be utilised by micro-organisms introduced from the atmosphere and from the water supply, and a biomass builds up. Microbial material is then voided into the working atmosphere by the ventilation system. Under appropriate exposure conditions susceptible individuals may succumb to an episode of humidifier fever, an influenza-like illness with pyrexia and malaise as the main symptoms, but cough, chest tightness, dyspnoea and weight loss may also be seen. The episodes usually occur after absence from work for a few days and have been termed `Monday sickness'. Individuals are often able to return to work the next day and appear refractory to further exposure. The disease is of the winter months probably due to the larger amount (up to 90%) of fresh air drawn into the humidifier during the summer. In the blood of exposed subjects precipitins are usually present to extracts of baffle plate material and recirculating water although they are not necessarily indicative of disease. Skin tests may be positive and inhalation challenge has reproduced the disease in susceptible individuals. Many organisms may be isolated from baffle plates and recirculating water but only amoeba extracts have produced consistently positive reactions with sera from affected individuals. Remedial actions

  19. Imported chikungunya fever in Madrid.

    PubMed

    Richi Alberti, Patricia; Steiner, Martina; Illera Martín, Óscar; Alcocer Amores, Patricia; Cobo Ibáñez, Tatiana; Muñoz Fernández, Santiago

    2016-01-01

    Chikungunya Fever is a mosquito-transmitted viral disease that causes fever, rash and musculoskeletal complaints. The latest may persist for several months, or even years or developed a relapsing course, that deserve an adequate treatment. Due to the large outbreak declared in the Caribbean in 2013, imported cases of Chikungunya as well as the risk of autochthonous transmission in case of available vectors have increased in non-endemic countries, like Spain. We described four cases of Chikungunya treated in our clinic.

  20. Using reduction and inversion tools for THEMIS-MTR data: chromospheric reversals of a moving magnetic feature and an ephemeral region .

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sainz Dalda, A.; López Ariste, A.

    New tools have been developed for THEMIS spectropolarimetric data. In this paper we present how these tools work and can be used in order to understand two interesting observed phenomena: a moving magnetic feature and an ephemeral region.

  1. The ephemeral and the enduring: Trajectories of disappearance for the scientific objects of American Cold War nuclear weapons testing

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, Todd

    2016-07-01

    Here, the historical material culture produced by American Cold War nuclear weapons testing includes objects of scientific inquiry that can be generally categorized as being either ephemeral or enduring. Objects deemed to be ephemeral were of a less substantial nature, being impermanent and expendable in a nuclear test, while enduring objects were by nature more durable and long-lasting. Although all of these objects were ultimately subject to disappearance, the processes by which they were transformed, degraded, or destroyed prior to their disappearing differ. Drawing principally upon archaeological theory, this paper proposes a functional dichotomy for categorizing and studying the historical trajectories of nuclear weapons testing technoscience artifacts. In examining the transformation patterns of steel towers and concrete blockhouses in particular, it explores an associated loss of scientific method that accompanies a science object's disappearance.

  2. The ephemeral and the enduring: Trajectories of disappearance for the scientific objects of American Cold War nuclear weapons testing

    DOE PAGES

    Hanson, Todd

    2016-07-01

    Here, the historical material culture produced by American Cold War nuclear weapons testing includes objects of scientific inquiry that can be generally categorized as being either ephemeral or enduring. Objects deemed to be ephemeral were of a less substantial nature, being impermanent and expendable in a nuclear test, while enduring objects were by nature more durable and long-lasting. Although all of these objects were ultimately subject to disappearance, the processes by which they were transformed, degraded, or destroyed prior to their disappearing differ. Drawing principally upon archaeological theory, this paper proposes a functional dichotomy for categorizing and studying the historicalmore » trajectories of nuclear weapons testing technoscience artifacts. In examining the transformation patterns of steel towers and concrete blockhouses in particular, it explores an associated loss of scientific method that accompanies a science object's disappearance.« less

  3. [The fever of international travel].

    PubMed

    Hristea, Adriana; Luka, A I; Aramă, Victoria; Moroti, Ruxandra

    2008-01-01

    Between 20 and 70 percent of the 50 million people who travel from the industrialized world to the developing world each year report some illness associated with their travel. Although most illness reported by travellers are mild, 20-70% of travellers become ill enough to seek medical attention, either during or immediately after travel. The full spectrum of health complaints is unknown. Nevertheless the usual presentation of a returned traveller is a particular syndrome-fever, respiratory infection, diarrhoea, eosinophilia, or skin and soft tissue infection- or screening for asymptomatic infection. The most common diseases diagnosed in returning travellers are more often of cosmopolitan than exotic origin. However, fever in returned travelers always should raise suspicion for a severe or potentially life-threatening tropical infection. Therefore, fever in a returned traveller requires prompt investigation focused on infections that are life-threatening, treatable or transmissible. Careful assessment of the travel history, likely incubation period, exposure history, associated signs and symptoms, duration of fever, immunization status, use or non-use of antimalarial chemoprophylaxis and degree of compliance with the prescribed regimen, if used, helps to establish the diagnosis. Determining an approximate incubation period can be particularly helpful in ruling out possible causes of fever. Malaria is the most important cause of fever in the returned traveller. While most travel-related infections present within 6 months of return, some infections with long latent periods or potential for lifetime persistence might be seen in those who have lived abroad.

  4. Hindcasting Historical Breeding Conditions for an Endangered Salamander in Ephemeral Wetlands of the Southeastern USA: Implications of Climate Change

    PubMed Central

    Chandler, Houston C.; Rypel, Andrew L.; Jiao, Yan; Haas, Carola A.; Gorman, Thomas A.

    2016-01-01

    The hydroperiod of ephemeral wetlands is often the most important characteristic determining amphibian breeding success, especially for species with long development times. In mesic and wet pine flatwoods of the southeastern United States, ephemeral wetlands were a common landscape feature. Reticulated flatwoods salamanders (Ambystoma bishopi), a federally endangered species, depend exclusively on ephemeral wetlands and require at least 11 weeks to successfully metamorphose into terrestrial adults. We empirically modeled hydroperiod of 17 A. bishopi breeding wetlands by combining downscaled historical climate-model data with a recent 9-year record (2006–2014) of observed water levels. Empirical models were subsequently used to reconstruct wetland hydrologic conditions from 1896–2014 using the downscaled historical climate datasets. Reconstructed hydroperiods for the 17 wetlands were highly variable through time but were frequently unfavorable for A. bishopi reproduction (e.g., only 61% of years, using a conservative estimate of development time [12 weeks], were conducive to larval development and metamorphosis). Using change-point analysis, we identified significant shifts in average hydroperiod over the last century in all 17 wetlands. Mean hydroperiods were shorter in recent years than at any other point since 1896, and thus less suitable for A. bishopi reproduction. We suggest that climate change will continue to impact the reproductive success of flatwoods salamanders and other ephemeral wetland breeders by reducing the number of years these wetlands have suitable hydroperiods. Consequently, we emphasize the importance of conservation and management for mitigating other forms of habitat degradation, especially maintenance of high quality breeding sites where reproduction can occur during appropriate environmental conditions. PMID:26910245

  5. Spatial heterogeneity of soil detachment capacity by overland flow at a hillslope with ephemeral gullies on the Loess Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhen-wei; Zhang, Guang-hui; Geng, Ren; Wang, Hao

    2015-11-01

    Ephemeral gullies are typical erosional landforms and widespread on the Chinese Loess Plateau. To better understand the spatial variability in soil detachment capacity (DC) by overland flow and its influence at a hillslope with an ephemeral gully, this study investigates a hillslope on the Loess Plateau using classical statistics, geostatistical analysis, and principal component analysis. Undisturbed soil samples were collected from 202 sites along nine 90 m transects in two completely developed ephemeral gullies, and were scoured in a laboratory flume under consistent hydraulic conditions. The results indicate that DC varied widely from 0.0004 to 1.25 kg m- 2 s- 1 with a mean of 0.22 kg m- 2 s- 1. The coefficient of variation also shows a high variability in DC. The ephemeral gullies were divided into four sections (uppermost, upper, middle and lower slopes) and DC differed significantly among the four sections. A semivariogram of DC indicated a moderate spatial dependence. The sampling interval significantly affects the spatial pattern of DC. When the sampling interval decreased from 10 to 2 m, the nugget variance decreased, whereas structured variance, spatial dependence, and range increased. Distribution maps of DC, derived from kriging interpolation, showed that samples in the lower slope position have greater DC than the other positions. DC significantly correlates with clay content, sand content, median soil grain size, bulk density, cohesion, water stable aggregate, and litter mass density. Principal component analysis (PCA) and a minimum data set (MDS) method identified that the median soil grain size, bulk density, and litter mass density were the major factors affecting the spatial variability in DC.

  6. Hindcasting Historical Breeding Conditions for an Endangered Salamander in Ephemeral Wetlands of the Southeastern USA: Implications of Climate Change.

    PubMed

    Chandler, Houston C; Rypel, Andrew L; Jiao, Yan; Haas, Carola A; Gorman, Thomas A

    2016-01-01

    The hydroperiod of ephemeral wetlands is often the most important characteristic determining amphibian breeding success, especially for species with long development times. In mesic and wet pine flatwoods of the southeastern United States, ephemeral wetlands were a common landscape feature. Reticulated flatwoods salamanders (Ambystoma bishopi), a federally endangered species, depend exclusively on ephemeral wetlands and require at least 11 weeks to successfully metamorphose into terrestrial adults. We empirically modeled hydroperiod of 17 A. bishopi breeding wetlands by combining downscaled historical climate-model data with a recent 9-year record (2006-2014) of observed water levels. Empirical models were subsequently used to reconstruct wetland hydrologic conditions from 1896-2014 using the downscaled historical climate datasets. Reconstructed hydroperiods for the 17 wetlands were highly variable through time but were frequently unfavorable for A. bishopi reproduction (e.g., only 61% of years, using a conservative estimate of development time [12 weeks], were conducive to larval development and metamorphosis). Using change-point analysis, we identified significant shifts in average hydroperiod over the last century in all 17 wetlands. Mean hydroperiods were shorter in recent years than at any other point since 1896, and thus less suitable for A. bishopi reproduction. We suggest that climate change will continue to impact the reproductive success of flatwoods salamanders and other ephemeral wetland breeders by reducing the number of years these wetlands have suitable hydroperiods. Consequently, we emphasize the importance of conservation and management for mitigating other forms of habitat degradation, especially maintenance of high quality breeding sites where reproduction can occur during appropriate environmental conditions.

  7. The evolution of an ephemeral river during the rising and receding phases of medium and low magnitude discharge events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lotsari, E. S.; Calle, M.; Benito-Ferrandez, G.; Kaartinen, H.; Kukko, A.; Hyyppä, J.; Hyyppä, H.; Alho, P.

    2015-12-01

    In addition to great flash floods, medium and low magnitude discharge events can also cause great morphological changes in ephemeral river channels. Despite the advances in measurement techniques, such as laser scanning, and simulation approaches, the channel evolution during the different phases of discharge events is still not well known in gravelly ephemeral rivers, such as Rambla de la Viuda (Spain). The aim is to detect the temporal evolution of the ephemeral river channel during consecutive medium (March 2013) and low (May 2013) magnitude discharge events. The study is based on both accurate topographical measurements (laser scanning) and morphodynamic simulations (Delft 2D). Before the final analysis, the model's performance was tested with different parameterizations. When compared to the observed channel changes, the transport equation had crucial role in simulation results. Engelund-Hansen equation succeeded the best. It was important to use spatially varying grain sizes. Erosion and deposition (m3) were the greatest during the first hours of the rising phase of the discharge events. After this, erosion and deposition amounts, which were detected hourly, started declining. Thus, this occurred before the peak discharge, and erosion slowed down more than deposition. After the discharge peak, changes in deposition and erosion amounts were slightly more gradual than changes in discharge. The deposition during the receding phase was due to the advancing bar lobe frontier. River bed changes followed temporally the changes in discharges during the receding phase. This was different to the rising phase, when temporal differences occurred between changes in discharges and changes in deposition and erosion. This study shows that both rising and receding phases of discharge events are important for bar movement and channel evolution of the gravelly ephemeral river.

  8. Maintenance of Ecosystem Nitrogen Limitation by Ephemeral Forest Disturbance: An Assessment using MODIS, Hyperion, and Landsat ETM+

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McNeil, Brenden E.; deBeurs, Kirsten M.; Eshleman, Keith N.; Foster, Jane R.; Townsend, Philip A.

    2007-01-01

    Ephemeral disturbances, such as non-lethal insect defoliations and crown damage from meteorological events, can significantly affect the delivery of ecosystem services by helping maintain nitrogen (N) limitation in temperate forest ecosystems. However, the impacts of these disturbances are difficult to observe across the broad-scales at which they affect ecosystem function. Using remotely sensed measures and field data, we find support for the hypothesis that ephemeral disturbances help maintain landscape-wide ecosystem N limitation. Specifically, a phenology-based defoliation index derived from daily MODIS satellite imagery predicts three ecosystem responses from oak-dominated forested watersheds: elevated stream water N export (R(exp 2) = 0.48), decreased foliar N (R(exp 2) = 0.69, assessed with Hyperion imagery), and reduced vegetation growth vigor (R(exp 2) = 0.49, assessed with Landsat ETM+ imagery). The results indicate that ephemeral disturbances and other forest stressors may sustain N limitation by reducing the ability of trees to compete for--and retain--soil available N.

  9. Maintenance of ecosystem nitrogen limitation by ephemeral forest disturbance: An assessment using MODIS, Hyperion, and Landsat ETM+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNeil, Brenden E.; de Beurs, Kirsten M.; Eshleman, Keith N.; Foster, Jane R.; Townsend, Philip A.

    2007-10-01

    Ephemeral disturbances, such as non-lethal insect defoliations and crown damage from meteorological events, can significantly affect the delivery of ecosystem services by helping maintain nitrogen (N) limitation in temperate forest ecosystems. However, the impacts of these disturbances are difficult to observe across the broad-scales at which they affect ecosystem function. Using remotely sensed measures and field data, we find support for the hypothesis that ephemeral disturbances help maintain landscape-wide ecosystem N limitation. Specifically, a phenology-based defoliation index derived from daily MODIS satellite imagery predicts three ecosystem responses from oak-dominated forested watersheds: elevated stream water N export (R2 = 0.48), decreased foliar N (R2 = 0.69, assessed with Hyperion imagery), and reduced vegetation growth vigor (R2 = 0.49, assessed with Landsat ETM+ imagery). The results indicate that ephemeral disturbances and other forest stressors may sustain N limitation by reducing the ability of trees to compete for -and retain- soil available N.

  10. Maintenance of Ecosystem Nitrogen Limitation by Ephemeral Forest Disturbance: An Assessment using MODIS, Hyperion, and Landsat ETM+

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McNeil, Brenden E.; deBeurs, Kirsten M.; Eshleman, Keith N.; Foster, Jane R.; Townsend, Philip A.

    2007-01-01

    Ephemeral disturbances, such as non-lethal insect defoliations and crown damage from meteorological events, can significantly affect the delivery of ecosystem services by helping maintain nitrogen (N) limitation in temperate forest ecosystems. However, the impacts of these disturbances are difficult to observe across the broad-scales at which they affect ecosystem function. Using remotely sensed measures and field data, we find support for the hypothesis that ephemeral disturbances help maintain landscape-wide ecosystem N limitation. Specifically, a phenology-based defoliation index derived from daily MODIS satellite imagery predicts three ecosystem responses from oak-dominated forested watersheds: elevated stream water N export (R(exp 2) = 0.48), decreased foliar N (R(exp 2) = 0.69, assessed with Hyperion imagery), and reduced vegetation growth vigor (R(exp 2) = 0.49, assessed with Landsat ETM+ imagery). The results indicate that ephemeral disturbances and other forest stressors may sustain N limitation by reducing the ability of trees to compete for--and retain--soil available N.

  11. Maintenance of Ecosystem Nitrogen Limitation by Ephemeral Forest Disturbance: An Assessment using MODIS, Hyperion, and Landsat ETM+

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McNeil, Brenden E.; deBeurs, Kirsten M.; Eshleman, Keith N.; Foster, Jane R.; Townsend, Philip A.

    2007-01-01

    Ephemeral disturbances, such as non-lethal insect defoliations and crown damage from meteorological events, can significantly affect the delivery of ecosystem services by helping maintain nitrogen (N) limitation in temperate forest ecosystems. However, the impacts of these disturbances are difficult to observe across the broad-scales at which they affect ecosystem function. Using remotely sensed measures and field data, we find support for the hypothesis that ephemeral disturbances help maintain landscape-wide ecosystem N limitation. Specifically, a phenology-based defoliation index derived from daily MODIS satellite imagery predicts three ecosystem responses from oak-dominated forested watersheds: elevated stream water N export (R(exp 2) = 0.48), decreased foliar N (R(exp 2) = 0.69, assessed with Hyperion imagery), and reduced vegetation growth vigor (R(exp 2) = 0.49, assessed with Landsat ETM+ imagery). The results indicate that ephemeral disturbances and other forest stressors may sustain N limitation by reducing the ability of trees to compete for--and retain--soil available N.

  12. Temperature effects on life history traits of two sympatric branchiopods from an ephemeral wetland

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Wan-Ping

    2017-01-01

    Temperature effects on organisms are of multiple scientific interests, such as for their life history performance and for the study of evolutionary strategies. We have cultured two sympatric branchiopod species from an ephemeral pond in northern Taiwan, Branchinella kugenumaensis and Eulimnadia braueriana, and compared their hatching rate, maturation time, sex ratio, growth of body length, survivorship, clutch size, net reproductive rate R0, generation time TG, and intrinsic rate of natural increase r in relation to temperature (15, 20, 25 and 30°C). We found that E. braueriana had a significantly higher temperature-dependent fecundity and intrinsic population growth pattern (R0 and r). In contrast, B. kugenumaensis reproduced much slower than E. braueriana with much lower R0 (90–100 folds less) and r (about 10 folds less) at 15, 20 and 25°C and with a double as long TG at 20 and 25°C. In addition, E. braueriana increased its chance of hermaphroditic sexual reproductive mode at higher temperature because of a significantly delayed maturation of males from hermaphrodites. In contrast, B. kugenumaensis showed no significant change in reproductive mode with temperature. This is the first study indicating a significant differentiation in life history parameters of two sympatric branchiopods mediated by temperature. PMID:28654929

  13. Porphyrins produce uniquely ephemeral animal colouration: a possible signal of virginity.

    PubMed

    Galván, Ismael; Camarero, Pablo R; Mateo, Rafael; Negro, Juan J

    2016-12-15

    Colours that underlie animal pigmentation can either be permanent or renewable in the short term. Here we describe the discovery of a conspicuous salmon-pink colouration in the base of bustard feathers and down that has never been reported because of its extraordinarily brief expression. HPLC analyses indicated that its constituent pigments are coproporphyrin III and protoporphyrin IX, which are prone to photodegradation. Accordingly, an experimental exposure of feathers of three bustard species to sunlight produced a rapid disappearance of the salmon-pink colouration, together with a marked decrease in reflectance around 670 nm coinciding with the absorption of porphyrin photoproducts. The disappearance of the salmon-pink colouration can occur in a period as short as 12 min, likely making it the most ephemeral colour phenotype in any extant bird. The presence of this colour trait in males performing sexual displays may thus indicate to females a high probability that the males were performing their first displays and would engage in their first copulations in the breeding season. In dominant males, sperm quality decreases over successive copulations, thus porphyrin-based colouration may evolve as a signal of virginity that allows females to maximize their fitness in lek mating systems.

  14. Porphyrins produce uniquely ephemeral animal colouration: a possible signal of virginity

    PubMed Central

    Galván, Ismael; Camarero, Pablo R.; Mateo, Rafael; Negro, Juan J.

    2016-01-01

    Colours that underlie animal pigmentation can either be permanent or renewable in the short term. Here we describe the discovery of a conspicuous salmon-pink colouration in the base of bustard feathers and down that has never been reported because of its extraordinarily brief expression. HPLC analyses indicated that its constituent pigments are coproporphyrin III and protoporphyrin IX, which are prone to photodegradation. Accordingly, an experimental exposure of feathers of three bustard species to sunlight produced a rapid disappearance of the salmon-pink colouration, together with a marked decrease in reflectance around 670 nm coinciding with the absorption of porphyrin photoproducts. The disappearance of the salmon-pink colouration can occur in a period as short as 12 min, likely making it the most ephemeral colour phenotype in any extant bird. The presence of this colour trait in males performing sexual displays may thus indicate to females a high probability that the males were performing their first displays and would engage in their first copulations in the breeding season. In dominant males, sperm quality decreases over successive copulations, thus porphyrin-based colouration may evolve as a signal of virginity that allows females to maximize their fitness in lek mating systems. PMID:27976701

  15. Quantifying uncertainty in high-resolution remotely sensed topographic surveys for ephemeral gully channel monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wells, Robert R.; Momm, Henrique G.; Castillo, Carlos

    2017-07-01

    Spatio-temporal measurements of landform evolution provide the basis for process-based theory formulation and validation. Over time, field measurements of landforms have increased significantly worldwide, driven primarily by the availability of new surveying technologies. However, there is no standardized or coordinated effort within the scientific community to collect morphological data in a dependable and reproducible manner, specifically when performing long-term small-scale process investigation studies. Measurements of the same site using identical methods and equipment, but performed at different time periods, may lead to incorrect estimates of landform change as a result of three-dimensional registration errors. This work evaluated measurements of an ephemeral gully channel located on agricultural land using multiple independent survey techniques for locational accuracy and their applicability in generating information for model development and validation. Terrestrial and unmanned aerial vehicle photogrammetry platforms were compared to terrestrial lidar, defined herein as the reference dataset. Given the small scale of the measured landform, the alignment and ensemble equivalence between data sources was addressed through postprocessing. The utilization of ground control points was a prerequisite to three-dimensional registration between datasets and improved the confidence in the morphology information generated. None of the methods were without limitation; however, careful attention to project preplanning and data nature will ultimately guide the temporal efficacy and practicality of management decisions.

  16. Porphyrins produce uniquely ephemeral animal colouration: a possible signal of virginity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galván, Ismael; Camarero, Pablo R.; Mateo, Rafael; Negro, Juan J.

    2016-12-01

    Colours that underlie animal pigmentation can either be permanent or renewable in the short term. Here we describe the discovery of a conspicuous salmon-pink colouration in the base of bustard feathers and down that has never been reported because of its extraordinarily brief expression. HPLC analyses indicated that its constituent pigments are coproporphyrin III and protoporphyrin IX, which are prone to photodegradation. Accordingly, an experimental exposure of feathers of three bustard species to sunlight produced a rapid disappearance of the salmon-pink colouration, together with a marked decrease in reflectance around 670 nm coinciding with the absorption of porphyrin photoproducts. The disappearance of the salmon-pink colouration can occur in a period as short as 12 min, likely making it the most ephemeral colour phenotype in any extant bird. The presence of this colour trait in males performing sexual displays may thus indicate to females a high probability that the males were performing their first displays and would engage in their first copulations in the breeding season. In dominant males, sperm quality decreases over successive copulations, thus porphyrin-based colouration may evolve as a signal of virginity that allows females to maximize their fitness in lek mating systems.

  17. Estimating seepage flux from ephemeral stream channels using surface water and groundwater level data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noorduijn, Saskia L.; Shanafield, Margaret; Trigg, Mark A.; Harrington, Glenn A.; Cook, Peter G.; Peeters, L.

    2014-02-01

    Seepage flux from ephemeral streams can be an important component of the water balance in arid and semiarid regions. An emerging technique for quantifying this flux involves the measurement and simulation of a flood wave as it moves along an initially dry channel. This study investigates the usefulness of including surface water and groundwater data to improve model calibration when using this technique. We trialed this approach using a controlled flow event along a 1387 m reach of artificial stream channel. Observations were then simulated using a numerical model that combines the diffusion-wave approximation of the Saint-Vénant equations for streamflow routing, with Philip's infiltration equation and the groundwater flow equation. Model estimates of seepage flux for the upstream segments of the study reach, where streambed hydraulic conductivities were approximately 101 m d-1, were on the order of 10-4 m3 d-1 m-2. In the downstream segments, streambed hydraulic conductivities were generally much lower but highly variable (˜10-3 to 10-7 m d-1). A Latin Hypercube Monte Carlo sensitivity analysis showed that the flood front timing, surface water stage, groundwater heads, and the predicted streamflow seepage were most influenced by specific yield. Furthermore, inclusion of groundwater data resulted in a higher estimate of total seepage estimates than if the flood front timing were used alone.

  18. Life cycle assessment of wood wastes: A case study of ephemeral architecture.

    PubMed

    Rivela, Beatriz; Moreira, María Teresa; Muñoz, Iván; Rieradevall, Joan; Feijoo, Gumersindo

    2006-03-15

    One of the most commonly used elements in ephemeral architecture is a particleboard panel. These types of wood products are produced from wood wastes and they are used in temporary constructions such as trade fairs. Once the event is over, they are usually disposed into landfills. This paper intends to assess the environmental effects related to the use of these wood wastes in the end-of-life stage. The Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) of two scenarios was performed, considering the recycling of wood waste for particleboard manufacture and energy generation from non-renewable resources (Scenario 1) versus the production of energy from the combustion of wood waste and particleboard manufacture with conventional wooden resources (Scenario 2). A sensitive analysis was carried out taking into account the influence of the percentage of recycled material and the emissions data from wood combustion. According to Ecoindicator 99 methodology, Damage to Human Health and Ecosystem Quality are more significant in Scenario 2 whereas Scenario 1 presents the largest contribution to Damage to Resources. Between the two proposed alternatives, the recycling of wood waste for particleboard manufacture seems to be more favorable under an environmental perspective.

  19. Mixed-Valent Fe Films ('Schwimmeisen') on the Surface of Reduced Ephemeral Pools

    SciTech Connect

    Grathoff, Georg H.; Baham, John E.; Easterly, Heather R.; Gassman, Paul L.; Hugo, Rick C.

    2007-12-01

    Floating, mixed-valent Fe films have been observed worldwide in wetlands, ferrous iron rich seeps, and in seasonally reduced soils, but are usually misidentified as oil or biofilms. Little characterization or explanation to their formation has taken place. Along the Oregon coast such films were found on ephemeral pools where Fe(II) rich groundwater (~ 100 μM Fe) discharged at the base of Pleistocene sand dunes. Fe(II) oxidized to Fe(III) at the air-water interface to form ~ 100 to 300nm thick films. Analyses indicated that the films contained both Fe(III) and Fe(II) in a ratio of 3:1. Si was the other main cation, OH was the main anion and some C was identified as well. The film morphology was flat, under optical and electron microscopy with some attached floccules having a stringlike morphology. Energy filtered electron diffraction patterns (EFED) showed three diffraction rings at 4.5, 2.6, and 1.4 Å in some places and 2 rings (2.6 and 1.4 Å) in others. Upon further oxidation the films became 2-line ferrihydrite. We are proposing the name „Schwimmeisen“ for the floating, mixed-valent Fe film.

  20. Life associated with a 2.76 Ga ephemeral pond?: evidence from Mount Roe #2 paleosol

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rye, R.; Holland, H. D.

    2000-01-01

    Dark sericitic material at and near the top of the 2.765 +/- 0.01 Ga Mount Roe #2 paleosol in Western Australia contains 0.05-0.10 wt% organic carbon with delta 13C values between -33% and -51% PDB (Peedee belemnite). Such negative isotopic values strongly indicate that methanotrophs once inhabited this material. The textures and the chemical composition of the dark sericitic material indicate that the methanotrophs lived in or at the edges of ephemeral ponds, that these ponds became desiccated, and that heavy rains transported the material to its present sites. The discovery of methanotrophs associated with the Mount Roe #2 paleosol may extend their geologic record on land by at least 1.5 b.y. Methanotrophy in this setting is consistent with the notion that atmospheric methane levels were > or = 20 (mu)atm during the Late Archean. The radiative forcing due to such high atmospheric methane levels could have compensated for the faint younger sun and helped to prevent massive glaciation during the Late Archean.

  1. Coral settlement onto Halimeda opuntia: a fatal attraction to an ephemeral substrate?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nugues, Maggy M.; Szmant, Alina M.

    2006-11-01

    Degraded reefs with a high abundance of macroalgae usually also have low densities of coral recruits. Few studies, however, have examined whether these algae affect coral larval settlement. This study demonstrates, experimentally, that larvae of the Caribbean coral Favia fragrum can settle on the green alga Halimeda opuntia even when another substrate more suitable for settlement is present. Larval settlement onto experimental substrates was quantified under three treatments: rubble only, rubble plus plastic algal mimic, and rubble plus live H. opuntia. Similar total larval settlement was observed in all treatments. No larvae settled on the algal mimic, but total settlement was similar on the rubble in the first two treatments, showing that the rubble alone offered sufficient substrate for high settlement success. About half the larvae in the live algal treatment settled on H. opuntia instead of on the rubble, showing that larvae did not reject this substrate as they did the algal mimic. This result raises the possibility that corals will settle on some macroalgae when their abundance is high. Most macroalgae, including H. opuntia, are ephemeral substrates unsuitable for post-settlement survival. Such unexpected settlement may therefore have significant consequences for coral recruitment success on algal-dominated reefs.

  2. Ephemeral-stream processes: Implications for studies of quaternary valley fills

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patton, Peter C.; Schumm, Stanley A.

    1981-01-01

    Three unstable ephemeral-stream channels (arroyos), which drain source areas that have high sediment yields ranging from predominantly sand (Arroyo Calabasas) to a mixture of sand, silt, and clay (Sand Creek) to largely silt and clay (Sage Creek), were resurveyed to provide data on the rates and mechanics of erosion and sedimentation processes during periods ranging from 14 to 22 yr. Channel morphology changed significantly. Erosion occurred through nickpoint recession and bank collapse, but erosional reaches are separated by aggrading or stable-channel reaches. In general, sediment that is eroded, as the nickpoint recedes upstream, is trapped in the widened channel downstream. In this manner sediment is transported episodically out of these basins during a series of cut-and-fill cycles. The manner by which the channels aggrade and the morphology of the aggraded stable channels are controlled by the sediment type. The wide and shallow channel of Arroyo Calabasas is filled by vertical accretion of sand-size sediment. The narrow and deep channels of Sage Creek and Sand Creek are created by the lateral accretion of cohesive fine-grained sediment. The channel modification and the cut-and-fill episodes are dependent on high sediment yields, and therefore they are independent of subtle climatic shifts. Cut-and-fill deposits that have been created in this manner should not be equivalent in age from basin to basin, and therefore channel trenching and filling in the semiarid western United States during the Holocene need not be synchronous.

  3. Downstream hydraulic geometry and channel adjustment during a flood along an ephemeral, arid-region drainage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merritt, David M.; Wohl, Ellen E.

    2003-06-01

    In September 1997, a dissipating tropical storm caused a flood with an estimated maximum discharge of 240 m 3/s along Yuma Wash, an ephemeral braided system draining 186 km 2 in southwest Arizona. Older high-water marks that record a flood peak of 1280 m 3/s provide a reasonable estimate for the probable maximum flood along the wash. Detailed channel cross-sectional surveys during 1995 and again in 1998, <6 months after the 1997 flood, facilitated examination of downstream hydraulic geometry and channel adjustment during the flood. Channel width increased substantially downstream (exponent of 0.78), presumably because of low bank resistance, whereas hydraulic depth and velocity had modest downstream increases (0.15 and 0.14, respectively). Channel aggradation generally occurred along wider, braided reaches; moreover, degradation occurred in narrow reaches with fewer channels. Aggradation and degradation also appeared to be governed by a threshold relationship between flow depth and vegetated bars. Degradation occurred where flow was confined within a channel or subchannel. At discharges sufficiently high to overtop vegetated bars, greater roughness facilitated sediment deposition and channels aggraded. A discriminant function correctly classified nearly 90% of the cross-sections as scoured or filled using a single hydraulic variable, maximum depth of flow during the dissipating tropical storm.

  4. Species traits predict assemblage dynamics at ephemeral resource patches created by carrion.

    PubMed

    Barton, Philip S; Cunningham, Saul A; Macdonald, Ben C T; McIntyre, Sue; Lindenmayer, David B; Manning, Adrian D

    2013-01-01

    Carrion is an ephemeral and spatially patchy resource that supports a diverse subset of species linked to nutrient cycling and the decomposition process. A number of studies have separately documented changes in the diversity of plants, arthropods and vertebrates at individual carcasses, but there are few studies that have examined how functional traits of different groups of organisms underpin their responses to carrion patches. We used a carrion addition experiment to compare changes in composition and functional traits of insect and plant assemblages at carcasses compared with control sites. We found that significant changes in insect assemblage evenness and heterogeneity was associated with species' dispersal traits, and that plant assemblage responses to subsequent soil nitrogen changes was most apparent among graminoids and exotic species. Beetles at carcasses were twice as large as their counterparts at control sites during the first week of carrion decomposition, and also had higher wing loadings. Plants with high specific leaf area responded faster to the carcass addition, and twice as many species recolonised the centre of carcasses in exotic-dominated grassland compared with carcasses in native-dominated grassland. These results provide an example of how traits of opportunist species enable them to exploit patchy and dynamic resources. This increases our understanding of how carcasses can drive biodiversity dynamics, and has implications for the way carrion might be managed in ecosystems, such as appropriate consideration of spatial and temporal continuity in carrion resources to promote heterogeneity in nutrient cycling and species diversity within landscapes.

  5. Species Traits Predict Assemblage Dynamics at Ephemeral Resource Patches Created by Carrion

    PubMed Central

    Barton, Philip S.; Cunningham, Saul A.; Macdonald, Ben C. T.; McIntyre, Sue; Lindenmayer, David B.; Manning, Adrian D.

    2013-01-01

    Carrion is an ephemeral and spatially patchy resource that supports a diverse subset of species linked to nutrient cycling and the decomposition process. A number of studies have separately documented changes in the diversity of plants, arthropods and vertebrates at individual carcasses, but there are few studies that have examined how functional traits of different groups of organisms underpin their responses to carrion patches. We used a carrion addition experiment to compare changes in composition and functional traits of insect and plant assemblages at carcasses compared with control sites. We found that significant changes in insect assemblage evenness and heterogeneity was associated with species’ dispersal traits, and that plant assemblage responses to subsequent soil nitrogen changes was most apparent among graminoids and exotic species. Beetles at carcasses were twice as large as their counterparts at control sites during the first week of carrion decomposition, and also had higher wing loadings. Plants with high specific leaf area responded faster to the carcass addition, and twice as many species recolonised the centre of carcasses in exotic-dominated grassland compared with carcasses in native-dominated grassland. These results provide an example of how traits of opportunist species enable them to exploit patchy and dynamic resources. This increases our understanding of how carcasses can drive biodiversity dynamics, and has implications for the way carrion might be managed in ecosystems, such as appropriate consideration of spatial and temporal continuity in carrion resources to promote heterogeneity in nutrient cycling and species diversity within landscapes. PMID:23326549

  6. Evidence of flash floods in Precambrian gravel dominated ephemeral river deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Darrel G. F.

    2017-01-01

    Fluvial strata at the base of the Whyte Inlet Formation on Baffin Island, to the west of Sikosak Bay, are predominantly boulder and cobble bearing large pebble conglomerates of braided fluvial origin. Local development of narrow sinuous channels, possibly within the thalwegs of an initially braided bedrock confined system, is indicated by the presence of lateral accretion surfaces, some of which host isolated sub-vertically oriented boulders. These larger boulders were probably emplaced during exceptional flood events involving either hyper-concentrated flows or dilute debris flows, with velocities in the order of 2.2 m/s. Isolated ridges of boulders and cobbles are perched on the upper parts of lateral accretion surfaces in mixed sandy-gravelly fluvial intervals. These boulder berms developed down stream from channel bends or bedrock constrictions in response to flow expansion during flash floods, with estimated peak discharge of about 1.4 m/s. Associated sandstones on lateral accretion surfaces show evidence of deposition under both upper and lower flow conditions. Similar boulder and cobble berms of this type are known from modern ephemeral and highly seasonal fluvial systems in a wide range of climatic settings, and are a clear indication that highly variable to catastrophic discharge events affected the rivers responsible for deposition of these conglomerates.

  7. Life associated with a 2.76 Ga ephemeral pond?: evidence from Mount Roe #2 paleosol

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rye, R.; Holland, H. D.

    2000-01-01

    Dark sericitic material at and near the top of the 2.765 +/- 0.01 Ga Mount Roe #2 paleosol in Western Australia contains 0.05-0.10 wt% organic carbon with delta 13C values between -33% and -51% PDB (Peedee belemnite). Such negative isotopic values strongly indicate that methanotrophs once inhabited this material. The textures and the chemical composition of the dark sericitic material indicate that the methanotrophs lived in or at the edges of ephemeral ponds, that these ponds became desiccated, and that heavy rains transported the material to its present sites. The discovery of methanotrophs associated with the Mount Roe #2 paleosol may extend their geologic record on land by at least 1.5 b.y. Methanotrophy in this setting is consistent with the notion that atmospheric methane levels were > or = 20 (mu)atm during the Late Archean. The radiative forcing due to such high atmospheric methane levels could have compensated for the faint younger sun and helped to prevent massive glaciation during the Late Archean.

  8. Arroyo channel head evolution in a flash-flood-dominated discontinuous ephemeral stream system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    DeLong, Stephen B.; Johnson, Joel P.L.; Whipple, Kelin X.

    2014-01-01

    We study whether arroyo channel head retreat in dryland discontinuous ephemeral streams is driven by surface runoff, seepage erosion, mass wasting, or some combination of these hydrogeomorphic processes. We monitored precipitation, overland flow, soil moisture, and headcut migration over several seasonal cycles at two adjacent rangeland channel heads in southern Arizona. Erosion occurred by headward retreat of vertical to overhanging faces, driven dominantly by surface runoff. No evidence exists for erosion caused by shallow-groundwater–related processes, even though similar theater-headed morphologies are sometimes attributed to seepage erosion by emerging groundwater. At our field site, vertical variation in soil shear strength influenced the persistence of the characteristic theater-head form. The dominant processes of erosion included removal of grains and soil aggregates during even very shallow (1–3 cm) overland flow events by runoff on vertical to overhanging channel headwalls, plunge-pool erosion during higher-discharge runoff events, immediate postrunoff wet mass wasting, and minor intra-event dry mass wasting on soil tension fractures developing subparallel to the headwall. Multiple stepwise linear regression indicates that the migration rate is most strongly correlated with flow duration and total precipitation and is poorly correlated with peak flow depth or time-integrated flow depth. The studied channel heads migrated upslope with a self-similar morphologic form under a wide range of hydrological conditions, and the most powerful flash floods were not always responsible for the largest changes in landscape form in this environment. 

  9. Recent human impacts and change in dynamics and morphology of ephemeral rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortega, J. A.; Razola, L.; Garzón, G.

    2013-04-01

    Ephemeral streams induce flash-flood events which cause dramatic morphological changes and impacts on population, due the intermittent activity of these fluvial systems. Human pressure changes the fluvial environment and so enhances the effects of natural dynamics. Local human-induced modifications can be latent over long periods of time. These changes can be studied after the flood event, to quantify their effects and detect which are most harmful. In this paper we study flash-flood effects at two sites in Spain and compare the results before and after a~flood event. Erosion is associated with areas where there have been more anthropogenic changes in floodplains and channels. Deposition is related to erosional processes in the watershed and to the tributaries. Disruption of river channel patterns changes connectivity and scouring appears due to energy excess. This excess tends to concentrate at weak points downstream produced by anthropic disturbances. Riparian vegetation is an energy sink and reaches with more cover show less erosion than those with deforestation. Infrastructures perpendicular to the direction of flow increase stream power, but peaks of erosion on the floodplain appear displaced downstream. It is important to detect human changes by analysis of hydraulic variables before the occurrence of an extraordinary event in order to anticipate catastrophic consequences resulting from inappropriate fluvial management.

  10. Ephemeral active regions and coronal bright points: A solar maximum Mission 2 guest investigator study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harvey, K. L.; Tang, F. Y. C.; Gaizauskas, V.; Poland, A. I.

    1986-01-01

    A dominate association of coronal bright points (as seen in He wavelength 10830) was confirmed with the approach and subsequent disappearance of opposite polarity magnetic network. While coronal bright points do occur with ephemeral regions, this association is a factor of 2 to 4 less than with sites of disappearing magnetic flux. The intensity variations seen in He I wavelength 10830 are intermittent and often rapid, varying over the 3 minute time resolution of the data; their bright point counterparts in the C IV wavelength 1548 and 20 cm wavelength show similar, though not always coincident time variations. Ejecta are associated with about 1/3 of the dark points and are evident in the C IV and H alpha data. These results support the idea that the anti-correlation of X-ray bright points with the solar cycle can be explained by the correlation of these coronal emission structures with sites of cancelling flux, indicating that, in some cases, the process of magnetic flux removal results in the release of energy. That the intensity variations are rapid and variable suggests that this process works intermittently.

  11. Fever in Children and Fever of Unknown Origin.

    PubMed

    Dayal, Rajeshwar; Agarwal, Dipti

    2016-01-01

    Fever is the most common symptom in children and can be classified as fever with or without focus. Fever without focus can be less than 7 d and is subclassified as fever without localizing signs and fever of unknown origin (FUO). FUO is defined as a temperature greater than 38.3 °C, for more than 3 wk or failure to reach a diagnosis after 1 wk of inpatient investigations. The most common causes of FUO in children are infections, connective tissue disorders and neoplasms. Infectious diseases most commonly implicated in children with FUO are salmonellosis, tuberculosis, malaria and rickettsial diseases. Juvenile rheumatic arthritis is the connective tissue disease frequently associated with FUO. Malignancy is the third largest group responsible for FUO in children. Diagnostic approach of FUO includes detailed history and examination supported with investigations. Age, history of contact, exposure to wild animals and medications should be noted. Examination should include, apart from general appearance, presence of sweating, rashes, tonsillitis, sinusitis and lymph node enlargement. Other signs such as abdominal tenderness and hepatosplenomegly should be looked for. The muscles and bones should be carefully examined for connective tissue disorders. Complete blood count, blood smear examination and level of acute phase reactants should be part of initial investigations. Radiological imaging is useful aid in diagnosing FUO. Trials of antimicrobial agents should not be given as they can obscure the diagnosis of the disease in FUO.

  12. Hematologic dysfunction in Lassa fever.

    PubMed

    Fisher-Hoch, S; McCormick, J B; Sasso, D; Craven, R B

    1988-10-01

    Lassa fever is widespread in West Africa, where the case fatality is about 16% in hospitalized adult patients. The clinical course is highly variable, with a few patients developing severe disease with bleeding, adult respiratory distress syndrome, encephalopathy and hypovolemic shock. We studied 70 patients admitted with suspected Lassa fever to a hospital in Sierra Leone, West Africa. Fourteen patients classified as having severe Lassa fever on the basis of serum aspartate amino transferase (AST) greater than 150 IU/L or viremia of greater than 10(3.6) tissue culture infective dose (TCID) 50/ml were found to have statistically significantly depressed lymphocyte counts when compared with patients with mild Lassa fever (AST less than 150 IU/L or viremia, less than 10(3.6)TCID50/ml), (P less than 0.0001) and with febrile control patients, in whom Lassa infection had been excluded by laboratory criteria (P less than 0.0008). Maximum depression occurred a mean of 10.9 days post onset. Patients with severe Lassa fever also had moderate thrombocytopenia, which was statistically significant when compared with febrile control patients (P less than 0.0003) and this occurred a mean of 10.8 days postonset. The most significant changes were in platelet function, which was markedly depressed in patients with severe Lassa fever (P less than 0.0035 in response to ADP and P = 0.0081 for collagen) when compared with patients with mild Lassa fever, and when compared with febrile controls, (P = 0.0013 for ADP and P less than 0.00001 for collagen). This abnormality was usually maximal on admission to hospital, and probably is an early event, preceding hospitalization in these patients.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  13. Typhoid fever vaccination strategies.

    PubMed

    Date, Kashmira A; Bentsi-Enchill, Adwoa; Marks, Florian; Fox, Kimberley

    2015-06-19

    Typhoid vaccination is an important component of typhoid fever prevention and control, and is recommended for public health programmatic use in both endemic and outbreak settings. We reviewed experiences with various vaccination strategies using the currently available typhoid vaccines (injectable Vi polysaccharide vaccine [ViPS], oral Ty21a vaccine, and injectable typhoid conjugate vaccine [TCV]). We assessed the rationale, acceptability, effectiveness, impact and implementation lessons of these strategies to inform effective typhoid vaccination strategies for the future. Vaccination strategies were categorized by vaccine disease control strategy (preemptive use for endemic disease or to prevent an outbreak, and reactive use for outbreak control) and vaccine delivery strategy (community-based routine, community-based campaign and school-based). Almost all public health typhoid vaccination programs used ViPS vaccine and have been in countries of Asia, with one example in the Pacific and one experience using the Ty21a vaccine in South America. All vaccination strategies were found to be acceptable, feasible and effective in the settings evaluated; evidence of impact, where available, was strongest in endemic settings and in the short- to medium-term. Vaccination was cost-effective in high-incidence but not low-incidence settings. Experience in disaster and outbreak settings remains limited. TCVs have recently become available and none are WHO-prequalified yet; no program experience with TCVs was found in published literature. Despite the demonstrated success of several typhoid vaccination strategies, typhoid vaccines remain underused. Implementation lessons should be applied to design optimal vaccination strategies using TCVs which have several anticipated advantages, such as potential for use in infant immunization programs and longer duration of protection, over the ViPS and Ty21a vaccines for typhoid prevention and control. Copyright © 2015. Published by

  14. [Fever of unknown cause and autoinflammatory disease].

    PubMed

    Hara, Toshiro

    2011-09-01

    Autoinflammatory diseases are often associated with various kinds of febrile episodes such as fever of unknown origin, periodic fever and recurrent fever. Therefore, in the differential diagnosis of fever of unknown cause, autoinflammatory diseases should be considered after exclusion of infections, malignancy and autoimmune diseases. As autoinflammatory diseases now include TRAPS (TNF receptor-associated periodic syndrome), CAPS (cryopyrin -associated periodic syndromes), FMF(familial Mediterranean fever), MAPS (mevalonate kinase-associated periodic fever syndrome, hyper-IgD syndrome) and many others, and show symptoms and signs of wide variations, we need to make an accurate diagnosis of them to prevent possible complications such as amyloidosis.

  15. Cotton Fever: Does the Patient Know Best?

    PubMed

    Xie, Yingda; Pope, Bailey A; Hunter, Alan J

    2016-04-01

    Fever and leukocytosis have many possible etiologies in injection drug users. We present a case of a 22-year-old woman with fever and leukocytosis that were presumed secondary to cotton fever, a rarely recognized complication of injection drug use, after an extensive workup. Cotton fever is a benign, self-limited febrile syndrome characterized by fevers, leukocytosis, myalgias, nausea and vomiting, occurring in injection drug users who filter their drug suspensions through cotton balls. While this syndrome is commonly recognized amongst the injection drug user population, there is a paucity of data in the medical literature. We review the case presentation and available literature related to cotton fever.

  16. 17DD yellow fever vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Martins, Reinaldo M.; Maia, Maria de Lourdes S.; Farias, Roberto Henrique G.; Camacho, Luiz Antonio B.; Freire, Marcos S.; Galler, Ricardo; Yamamura, Anna Maya Yoshida; Almeida, Luiz Fernando C.; Lima, Sheila Maria B.; Nogueira, Rita Maria R.; Sá, Gloria Regina S.; Hokama, Darcy A.; de Carvalho, Ricardo; Freire, Ricardo Aguiar V.; Filho, Edson Pereira; Leal, Maria da Luz Fernandes; Homma, Akira

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To verify if the Bio-Manguinhos 17DD yellow fever vaccine (17DD-YFV) used in lower doses is as immunogenic and safe as the current formulation. Results: Doses from 27,476 IU to 587 IU induced similar seroconversion rates and neutralizing antibodies geometric mean titers (GMTs). Immunity of those who seroconverted to YF was maintained for 10 mo. Reactogenicity was low for all groups. Methods: Young and healthy adult males (n = 900) were recruited and randomized into 6 groups, to receive de-escalating doses of 17DD-YFV, from 27,476 IU to 31 IU. Blood samples were collected before vaccination (for neutralization tests to yellow fever, serology for dengue and clinical chemistry), 3 to 7 d after vaccination (for viremia and clinical chemistry) and 30 d after vaccination (for new yellow fever serology and clinical chemistry). Adverse events diaries were filled out by volunteers during 10 d after vaccination. Volunteers were retested for yellow fever and dengue antibodies 10 mo later. Seropositivity for dengue was found in 87.6% of volunteers before vaccination, but this had no significant influence on conclusions. Conclusion: In young healthy adults Bio-Manguinhos/Fiocruz yellow fever vaccine can be used in much lower doses than usual. International Register ISRCTN 38082350. PMID:23364472

  17. Historical aspects of rheumatic fever.

    PubMed

    Steer, Andrew C

    2015-01-01

    Few diseases have experienced such a remarkable change in their epidemiology over the past century, without the influence of a vaccine, than rheumatic fever. Rheumatic fever has all but disappeared from industrialised countries after being a frequent problem in the 1940s and 1950s. That the disease still occurs at high incidence in resource limited settings and in Indigenous populations in industrialised countries, particularly in Australia and New Zealand, is an indication of the profound effect of socio-economic factors on the disease. Although there have been major changes in the epidemiology of rheumatic fever, diagnosis remains reliant on careful clinical judgement and management is remarkably similar to that 50 years ago. Over the past decade, increasing attention has been given to rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease as public health issues, including in Australia and particularly in New Zealand, as well as in selected low and middle income countries. Perhaps the greatest hope for public health control of rheumatic fever is the development of a vaccine against Streptococcus pyogenes, and there are encouraging initiatives in this area. However, an effective vaccine is some time away and in the meantime public health efforts need to focus on effective translation of the known evidence around primary and secondary prophylaxis into policy and practice.

  18. [Autoinflammatory syndromes/fever syndromes].

    PubMed

    Schedel, J; Bach, B; Kümmerle-Deschner, J B; Kötter, I

    2011-05-01

    Hereditary periodic (fever) syndromes, also called autoinflammatory syndromes, are characterized by relapsing fever and additional manifestations such as skin rashes, mucosal manifestations, or joint symptoms. Some of these disorders present with organ involvement and serological signs of inflammation without fever. There is a strong serological inflammatory response with an elevation of serum amyloid A (SAA), resulting in an increased risk of secondary amyloidosis. There are monogenic disorders (familial mediterranean fever (FMF), hyper-IgD-syndrome (HIDS), cryopyrin-associated periodic syndromes (CAPS), "pyogenic arthritis, acne, pyoderma gangrenosum" (PAPA), and "pediatric granulomatous arthritis (PGA) where mutations in genes have been described, which in part by influencing the function of the inflammasome, in part by other means, lead to the induction of the production of IL-1β. In "early-onset of enterocolitis (IBD)", a functional IL-10 receptor is lacking. Therapeutically, above all, the IL-1 receptor antagonist anakinra is used. In case of TRAPS and PGA, TNF-antagonists (etanercept) may also be used; in FMF colchicine is first choice. As additional possible autoinflammatory syndromes, PFAPA syndrome (periodic fever with aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis and adenitis), Schnitzler syndrome, Still's disease of adult and pediatric onset, Behçet disease, gout, chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis (CRMO) and Crohn's disease also are mentioned.

  19. Managing Rocky Mountain spotted fever.

    PubMed

    Minniear, Timothy D; Buckingham, Steven C

    2009-11-01

    Rocky Mountain spotted fever is caused by the tick-borne bacterium Rickettsia rickettsii. Symptoms range from moderate illness to severe illness, including cardiovascular compromise, coma and death. The disease is prevalent in most of the USA, especially during warmer months. The trademark presentation is fever and rash with a history of tick bite, although tick exposure is unappreciated in over a third of cases. Other signature symptoms include headache and abdominal pain. The antibiotic therapy of choice for R. rickettsii infection is doxycycline. Preventive measures for Rocky Mountain spotted fever and other tick-borne diseases include: wearing long-sleeved, light colored clothing; checking for tick attachment and removing attached ticks promptly; applying topical insect repellent; and treating clothing with permethrin.

  20. Fulminant hepatitis in typhoid fever.

    PubMed

    Husain, Entesar H

    2011-08-01

    To report a patient with typhoid fever who presented with fulminant hepatitis and was found to have a co-infection with hepatitis A. An 11-year-old girl presented with fever and jaundice after arrival from India. Her blood culture was positive for Salmonella typhi. While on treatment with ceftriaxone, she had worsening of her jaundice with abrupt elevation of liver transaminases associated with coagulopathy. She was found to have an associated hepatitis A infection. Liver enzymes all reverted back to normal upon follow up. The association of typhoid fever with hepatitis A can result in fulminant hepatitis but in this case, is associated with complete recovery. Copyright © 2011 King Saud Bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Relapsing Fever Borreliae in Africa

    PubMed Central

    Elbir, Haitham; Raoult, Didier; Drancourt, Michel

    2013-01-01

    The study of relapsing fever borreliae in Africa has long suffered from the use of non-specific laboratory tools for the direct detection of these spirochetes in clinical and vector specimens. Accordingly, Borrelia hispanica, Borrelia crocidurae, Borrelia duttonii, and Borrelia recurrentis have traditionally been distinguished on the basis of geography and vector and the unproven hypothesis that each species was exclusive to one vector. The recent sequencing of three relapsing fever Borrelia genomes in our laboratory prompted the development of more specific tools and a reappraisal of the epidemiology in Africa. Five additional potential species still need to be cultured from clinical and vector sources in East Africa to further assess their uniqueness. Here, we review the molecular evidence of relapsing fever borreliae in hosts and ectoparasites in Africa and explore the diversity, geographical distribution, and vector association of these pathogens for Africans and travelers to Africa. PMID:23926141

  2. Sadfly fever: two case reports

    PubMed Central

    Özkale, Yasemin; Özkale, Murat; Kiper, Pinar; Çetinkaya, Bilin; Erol, İlknur

    2016-01-01

    Sandfly fever, also known as ‘three-day fever’ or ‘pappataci fever’ or ‘Phlebotomus fever’ is a viral infection that causes self-limited influenza-like symptoms and characterized by a rapid onset. The disease occurs commonly in endemic areas in summer months and especially in August during which sandflies are active. In this article, two siblings who presented with high fever, redness in the eyes, headache, weakness, malaise and inability to walk, who were found to have increased liver function tests and creatine kinase levels and who were diagnosed with sadfly fever with positive sadfly IgM and IgG antibodies are reported because of the rarity of this disease. PMID:27489469

  3. Rheumatic Fever Programme in Samoa.

    PubMed

    Viali, Satupaitea; Saena, Puleiala; Futi, Vailogoua

    2011-02-11

    Rheumatic fever is very common in Samoa. The following paper describes the Rheumatic Fever Programme in Samoa and looks at the incidence of acute rheumatic fever (ARF) and rheumatic heart disease (RHD). The incidence of ARF has decreased to 30 per 100,000 in 2005, 12.8 per 100,000 in 2007, 7.3 per 100,000 in 2008, and 9.5 per 100,000 in 2009. The incidence of RHD has decreased to 40.2 per 100,000 in 2007, 34 per 100,000 in 2008, and 31.8 per 100,000 in 2009. Cardiac surgery in New Zealand is expensive, but is cheaper to perform in Samoa. RHD screening with echocardiogram at schools may be the best way to reduce the burden and suffering from RHD.

  4. Current trends in typhoid Fever.

    PubMed

    Crum, Nancy F

    2003-08-01

    Typhoid fever, a systemic infection caused by Salmonella enterica serotype typhi, remains an important worldwide cause of morbidity and mortality. Endemic cases in the United States are unusual, with most following foreign travel to the Indian subcontinent, Africa, Asia, or Latin America. The classic findings of typhoid fever include rose spots, relative bradycardia, and stepwise fevers, but unfortunately these signs are frequently absent. Gastrointestinal manifestations may include diffuse abdominal pain, bleeding, perforation, cholecystitis, and cholangitis. The diagnosis should be suspected after collection of the appropriate clinical and travel history with confirmation by blood or bone marrow culture. Novel methods are in development to establish the diagnosis when cultures are negative or unavailable. Multidrug resistance has increased worldwide, and decisions on antimicrobial therapy must take such resistance into account. The empiric treatment of choice is a fluoroquinolone drug; ceftriaxone and azithromycin are alternatives. Preventive strategies include good sanitation and food handling practices along with vaccination of selected groups.

  5. Management of acute childhood fevers.

    PubMed

    Teuten, Polly; Paul, Siba Prosad; Heaton, Paul Anthony

    2015-01-01

    Feverish illnesses commonly affect children and are the second most frequent reason for a child to be admitted to hospital. Most cases are viral in origin, usually with a good prognosis. Fever can be caused by severe and rapidly progressive illness which needs urgent referral to hospital for potentially life-saving treatment, and community practitioners must be able to identify such cases showing 'red flag'features. The fear of serious disease among parents and carers may result in 'fever phobia' leading to minor illnesses being managed inappropriately. Community practitioners are well placed to reassure and support families, and to provide education regarding the facts about fever, the appropriate use of antipyretic medication, how to avoid dehydration, and the beneficial role of immunisation in preventing infection.

  6. A new automated method for the determination of cross-section limits in ephemeral gullies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castillo, Carlos; Ángel Campo-Bescós, Miguel; Casalí, Javier; Giménez, Rafael

    2017-04-01

    The assessment of gully erosion relies on the estimation of the soil volume enclosed by cross sections limits. Both 3D and 2D methods require the application of a methodology for the determination of the cross-section limits what has been traditionally carried out in two ways: a) by visual inspection of the cross-section by a certain expert operator; b) by the automated identification of thresholds for different geometrical variables such as elevation, slope or plan curvature obtained from the cross-section profile. However, for these last methods, typically, the thresholds are not of general application because they depend on absolute values valid only for the local gully conditions where they were derived. In this communication we evaluate an automated method for cross-section delimitation of ephemeral gullies and compare its performance with the visual assessment provided by five scientists experienced in gully erosion assessment, defining gully width, depth and area for a total of 60 ephemeral gullies cross-sections obtained from field surveys conducted on agricultural plots in Navarra (Spain). The automated method only depends on the calculation of a simple geometrical measurement, which is the bank trapezoid area for every point of each gully bank. This rectangle trapezoid (right-angled trapezoid) is defined by the elevation of a given point, the minimum elevation and the extremes of the cross-section. The gully limit for each bank is determined by the point in the bank with the maximum trapezoid area. The comparison of the estimates among the different expert operators showed large variation coefficients (up to 70%) in a number of cross-sections, larger for cross sections width and area and smaller for cross sections depth. The automated method produced comparable results to those obtained by the experts and was the procedure with the highest average correlation with the rest of the methods for the three dimensional parameters. The errors of the automated

  7. Vertical Stability of Ephemeral Step-Pool Streams Largely Controlled By Tree Roots, Central Kentucky, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macmannis, K. R.; Hawley, R. J.

    2013-12-01

    The mechanisms controlling stability on small streams in steep settings are not well documented but have many implications related to stream integrity and water quality. For example, channel instability on first and second order streams is a potential source of sediment in regulated areas with Total Maximum Daily Loads (TMDLs) on water bodies that are impaired for sedimentation, such as the Chesapeake Bay. Management strategies that preserve stream integrity and protect channel stability are critical to communities that may otherwise require large capital investments to meet TMDLs and other water quality criteria. To contribute to an improved understanding of ephemeral step-pool systems, we collected detailed hydrogeomorphic data on 4 steep (0.06 - 0.12 meter/meter) headwater streams draining to lower relief alluvial valleys in Spencer County, Kentucky, USA. The step-pool streams (mean step height of 0.47 meter, mean step spacing of 4 meters) drained small undeveloped catchments dominated by early successional forest. Data collection for each of the 4 streams included 2 to 3 cross section surveys, bed material particle counts at cross section locations, and profile surveys ranging from approximately 125 to 225 meters in length. All survey data was systematically processed to understand geometric parameters such as cross sectional area, depth, and top width; bed material gradations; and detailed profile measurements such as slope, pool and riffle lengths, pool spacing, pool depth, step height, and step length. We documented the location, frequency, and type of step-forming materials (i.e., large woody debris (LWD), rock, and tree roots), compiling a database of approximately 130 total steps. Lastly, we recorded a detailed tree assessment of all trees located within 2 meters of the top of bank, detailing the species of tree, trunk diameter, and approximate distance from the top of bank. Analysis of geometric parameters illustrated correlations between channel

  8. Epidemiology and Epizootiological Investigations of Haemorrhagic Fever Viruses in Kenya.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    INFECTIOUS DISEASES, KENYA, LABORATORIES, MORTALITY RATES, PUBLIC HEALTH, RATS, RIFT VALLEY FEVER , SURVIVAL(PERSONNEL), THREATS, VETERINARY MEDICINE, WEST AFRICA , YEASTS, YELLOW FEVER , ZAIRE...EPIDEMIOLOGY, *VIRUSES, *VIRUS DISEASES, AFRICA , CONVALESCENCE, DISEASES, ECOLOGY, EQUATORIAL REGIONS, FEVERS , HEMORRHAGIC FEVERS , HUMANS, ILLNESS

  9. Bacterial community structure along moisture gradients in the parafluvial sediments of two ephemeral desert streams.

    PubMed

    Zeglin, Lydia H; Dahm, Clifford N; Barrett, John E; Gooseff, Michael N; Fitpatrick, Shannon K; Takacs-Vesbach, Cristina D

    2011-04-01

    Microorganisms inhabiting stream sediments mediate biogeochemical processes of importance to both aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems. In deserts, the lateral margins of ephemeral stream channels (parafluvial sediments) are dried and rewetted, creating periodically wet conditions that typically enhance microbial activity. However, the influence of water content on microbial community composition and diversity in desert stream sediments is unclear. We sampled stream margins along gradients of wet to dry sediments, measuring geochemistry and bacterial 16S rRNA gene composition, at streams in both a cold (McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica) and hot (Chihuahuan Desert, New Mexico, USA) desert. Across the gradients, sediment water content spanned a wide range (1.6-37.9% w/w), and conductivity was highly variable (12.3-1,380 μS cm(-2)). Bacterial diversity (at 97% sequence similarity) was high and variable, but did not differ significantly between the hot and cold desert and was not correlated with sediment water content. Instead, conductivity was most strongly related to diversity. Water content was strongly related to bacterial 16S rRNA gene community composition, though samples were distributed in wet and dry clusters rather than as assemblages shifting along a gradient. Phylogenetic analyses showed that many taxa from wet sediments at the hot and cold desert site were related to, respectively, halotolerant Gammaproteobacteria, and one family within the Sphingobacteriales (Bacteroidetes), while dry sediments at both sites contained a high proportion of taxa related to the Acidobacteria. These results suggest that bacterial diversity and composition in desert stream sediments is more strongly affected by hydrology and conductivity than temperature.

  10. Evaluation of fine sediment settling velocity in an ephemeral stream on Jeju Island, South Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chon, C.; Kim, K.; Kim, Y.

    2009-12-01

    Jeju Island is a volcanic island of South Korea. Groundwater is a major water source for Jeju, where most streams are intermittent or originate from springs near the coast. To secure sustainable water resources, artificial recharge technology to capture ephemeral stream water has been developed on the island. However, during Typhoon Nari in 2007, severe turbidity led to stream bed disturbance. Understanding the characteristics of fine sediment suspension and settling velocity is important for the success of artificial recharge technology. This study estimated the physicochemical properties of sediments, including their size distribution, organic content, and mineralogical composition. In addition, settling velocity was quantitatively estimated by an experimental settling test using a 2-m-tall settling column. In comparison with soil samples taken near the stream, streambed sediments had lower organic contents and finer size fractions such as clay and silt. A numerical method based on a one-dimensional mass conservation equation governing the vertical settling of mass was used to calculate settling velocity for different concentrations at each elevation and time. Settling velocity is controlled primarily by the water viscosity, the size and shape of particles, and the concentration of suspended material. Most of the suspended sediment concentration was located in part of the flocculation settling range (0.1 < C < 6.53 g/L) with a settling velocity of 0.001 to 0.588 mm/s. Increasing sediment concentration led to increasing inter-particle collisions and consequently enhanced aggregation within the range. There was no distinct difference in the calculated settling velocity curves among the sampling sites. Our results and analysis provide information necessary for evaluating artificial recharge systems affected by turbid water. More detailed study of the hindered settling range with a high suspension concentration is required.

  11. Optimal placement of off-stream water sources for ephemeral stream recovery

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rigge, Matthew B.; Smart, Alexander; Wylie, Bruce

    2013-01-01

    Uneven and/or inefficient livestock distribution is often a product of an inadequate number and distribution of watering points. Placement of off-stream water practices (OSWP) in pastures is a key consideration in rangeland management plans and is critical to achieving riparian recovery by improving grazing evenness, while improving livestock performance. Effective OSWP placement also minimizes the impacts of livestock use radiating from OSWP, known as the “piosphere.” The objective of this study was to provide land managers with recommendations for the optimum placement of OSWP. Specifically, we aimed to provide minimum offset distances of OSWP to streams and assess the effective range of OSWP using Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) values, an indicator of live standing crop. NDVI values were determined from a time-series of Satellite Pour l'Observation de la Terre (SPOT) 20-m images of western South Dakota mixed-grass prairie. The NDVI values in ephemeral stream channels (in-channel) and uplands were extracted from pre- and post-OSWP images taken in 1989 and 2010, respectively. NDVI values were normalized to a reference imagine and subsequently by ecological site to produce nNDVI. Our results demonstrate a significant (P 2 = 0.49, P = 0.05) and increased with average distance to OSWP in a pasture (R2 = 0.43, P = 0.07). Piospheric reduction in nNDVI was observed within 200 m of OSWP, occasionally overlapping in-channel areas. The findings of this study suggest placement of OSWP 200 to 1 250 m from streams to achieve optimal results. These results can be used to increase grazing efficiency by effectively placing OSWP and insure that piospheres do not overlap ecologically important in-channel areas.

  12. Sorted bedforms developed on sandy lobes fed by small ephemeral streams (Catalan continental shelf)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durán, R.; Guillén, J.; Muñoz, A.; Guerrero, Q.

    2016-12-01

    The morphology and sedimentological characteristics of sorted bedforms identified in the Catalan continental shelf (NW Mediterranean Sea) have been characterized using multibeam echosounder data and sediment samples collected in 2013 within the FORMED project. Bathymetric data was compared with previous data gathered in 2004 within the ESPACE project to assess the decadal stability of these bedforms. The sorted bedforms were observed on the inner shelf at water depths from 10 to 40 m, along a coastal stretch of more than 3 km. They are associated with elongated patches of low backscatter, corresponding to fine sand. The fine-grained sediment patches are located off small bays fed by short, intermittent streams, extending down to 40 m water depth. The sorted bedforms exhibit elongated shapes with subtle relief (up to 1 m) and are oriented nearly perpendicular to the shoreline. In cross-section, the sorted bedforms display lateral symmetry in bathymetric relief and backscatter, with high backscatter corresponding to poorly sorted coarse sand (median size of 0.55-0.96 mm) centered on the bathymetric depression, and low backscatter consisting of well-sorted fine to medium sand (median sized of 0.22-0.35 mm) on the crest. The local input of well-sorted fine sand supplied by ephemeral streams over the coarse sand domain of the infralittoral prograding wedge contributes to the bed sediment heterogeneity (mixture of sediment), which is further reorganized into sorted bedforms. The sorted bedforms are better developed in deeper waters (20-40 m) than near the shoreline, probably due to stronger wave forcing in the shallower shelf that prevents the maintenance of these morphologies. At a decadal time scale, the morphological evolution of these bedforms indicates that they are persistent features, showing small changes in their boundaries, which is in agreement with previous observations and numerical simulations that highlighted the persistence and long-term stability of

  13. Hyperspectral Mapping of Iron-bearing Minerals Associated with Dry and Ephemeral Lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrand, W. H.; Bowen, B. B.

    2014-12-01

    This research project is utilizing data from the Hyperspectral Imager for the Coastal Ocean (HICO) on the International Space Station (ISS) to examine a set of playas and ephemeral lakes in Australia and in the southwestern United States. HICO collects hyperspectral data from 0.35 to 1.08 μm thus excluding the SWIR vibrational overtone region of clays and carbonates. We are assessing the utility of HICO for detecting iron-bearing minerals and materials associated with playas and mapping their fractional abundance outside of the playa boundaries. Sites being investigated include the clastics-dominated Railroad Valley and Lunar Lake playas of Nevada, the evaporite-dominated Bonneville Salt Flats, and the acid-saline Lake Tyrrell of northwest Victoria, Australia. HICO, and supporting airborne hyperspectral datasets (AVIRIS and HyMap), are being converted from at-sensor radiance to surface reflectance using the FLAASH radiance transfer-based atmospheric correction software. Fe-bearing minerals and materials are determined through a standardized endmember detection approach using the commercial ENVI software and mapped using a variety of approaches including linear spectral mixture analysis, constrained energy minimization, and spectral feature fitting. Interpretations of remote data are guided by field-based observations and mapping. We are using the remote sensing data to assess the surface state of the playa (wet vs. dry, soft vs. hard). These factors have bearing in that dusts stripped from playa surfaces can affect nearby human communities and agricultural fields. Playas are also used for recreation and sometimes as transportation corridors and their physical state has important bearing for those functions. Assessing the types of minerals present has relevance for their impact as wind-entrained particulates that could have adverse effects on the health of humans, crops, or livestock.

  14. Specialist pollinators deplete pollen in the spring ephemeral wildflower Claytonia virginica.

    PubMed

    Parker, Alison J; Williams, Neal M; Thomson, James D

    2016-08-01

    Pollinators that collect pollen - and specifically, pollen-specialist bees - are often considered to be the best pollinators of a (host) plant. Although pollen collectors and pollen specialists often benefit host plants, especially in the pollen that they deliver (their pollination "effectiveness"), they can also exact substantial costs because they are motivated to collect as much pollen as possible, reducing the proportion of pollen removed that is subsequently delivered to stigmas (their pollination "efficiency"). From the plant perspective, pollen grains that do not pollinate conspecific stigmas are "wasted", and potentially costly. We measured costs and benefits of nectar-collecting, pollen-collecting, and pollen-specialist pollinator visitation to the spring ephemeral Claytonia virginica. Visits by the pollen-specialist bee Andrena erigeniae depleted pollen quickly and thoroughly. Although all pollinators delivered roughly the same number of grains, the pollen specialist contributed most to C. virginica pollen delivery because of high visitation rates. However, the pollen specialist also removed a large number of grains; this removal may be especially costly because it resulted in the depletion of pollen grains in C. virginica populations. While C. virginica appears to rely on pollen transfer by the pollen specialist in these populations, nectar-collecting visitors could provide the same benefit at a lower cost if their visitation rates increased. Pollen depletion affects a pollinator's value to plants, but is frequently overlooked. If they lower the effectiveness of future floral visitors, visits by A. erigeniae females to C. virginica may be more detrimental than beneficial compared to other pollinators and may, in some circumstances, reduce plant fitness rather than increase it. Therefore, A. erigeniae and C. virginica may vary in their degree of mutualism depending on the ecological context.

  15. Autoinflammatory Diseases with Periodic Fevers.

    PubMed

    Sag, Erdal; Bilginer, Yelda; Ozen, Seza

    2017-07-01

    One purpose of this review was to raise awareness for the new autoinflammatory syndromes. These diseases are increasingly recognized and are in the differential diagnosis of many disease states. We also aimed to review the latest recommendations for the diagnosis, management, and treatment of these patients. Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF), cryopyrin-associated periodic syndrome (CAPS), tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated periodic fever syndrome (TRAPS), and hyperimmunoglobulinemia D and periodic fever syndrome/mevalonate kinase deficiency (HIDS/MVKD) are the more common autoinflammatory diseases that are characterized by periodic fevers and attacks of inflammation. Recently much collaborative work has been done to understand the characteristics of these patients and to develop recommendations to guide the physicians in the care of these patients. These recent recommendations will be summarized for all four diseases. FMF is the most common periodic fever disease. We need to further understand the pathogenesis and the role of single mutations in the disease. Recently, the management and treatment of the disease have been nicely reviewed. CAPS is another interesting disease associated with severe complications. Anti-interleukin-1 (anti-IL-1) treatment provides cure for these patients. TRAPS is characterized by the longest delay in diagnosis; thus, both pediatricians and internists should be aware of the characteristic features and the follow-up of these patients. HIDS/MVKD is another autoinflammatory diseases characterized with fever attacks. The spectrum of disease manifestation is rather large in this disease, and we need further research on biomarkers for the optimal management of these patients.

  16. [Periodic fever syndrome in children].

    PubMed

    Øymar, Knut; Kristoffersen, Einar Klaeboe

    2007-06-14

    In children with recurrent episodes of fever, the cause may be the periodic fever syndrome (PFAPA-syndrome). The condition is not uncommon, and awareness of the syndrome is important for avoiding unnecessary investigations and treatment. The article presents an overview of the PFAPA-syndrome. The overview was based on Pubmed and Medline searches and data from 22 children with PFAPA-syndrome diagnosed at Stavanger University Hospital. In children with PFAPA-syndrome the fever occurs regularly, appears abruptly and lasts for three to five days. Typical symptoms are cervical adenitis, tonsillitis/pharyngitis or aphthous stomatitis, often accompanied by headache, abdominal pain, nausea and reduced general condition. Of the 22 children, 17 were boys. The median age of debut was 12 months, median duration of fever four days, and median time between episodes 25 days. The most common symptoms were cervical adenitis (n = 18) and tonsillitis/pharyngitis (n = 16). During episodes, all children had high fever, reduced general condition, no proved infection but typical high levels of C-reactive protein. More than half of the children had been given antibiotics on at least five occasions before the diagnosis of PFAPA-syndrome. With a typical history and clinical investigation, the need for further investigations is limited. The diagnosis must be considered in children younger than five years of age with periodic fever without signs of airway infection. When PFAPA-syndrome is suspected, the child should be referred to a paediatrician. There is no evidence-based treatment for PFAPA-syndrome, but tonsillectomy is considered to have an effect.

  17. Differential diagnosis of fever of unknown origin in children.

    PubMed

    Majeed, H A

    2000-09-01

    Fever of unknown origin in children follows two main clinical patterns, namely fever of unknown origin and chronic episodic fever of unknown origin. Fever of unknown origin is characterized by daily fever persisting for more than 3 weeks. The main causes are infectious, rheumatologic disorders, and malignancy. Chronic episodic fever of unknown origin is characterized by fever lasting for a few days to a few weeks, followed by a fever-free interval and a sense of well-being. The main causes are familial Mediterranean fever, the hyper-immunoglobulin D syndrome, familial Hibernian fever, Behcet disease, the syndrome of periodic fever, aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis and adenitis, and cyclic neutropenia.

  18. Ebola and marburg hemorrhagic fever.

    PubMed

    Hartman, Amy L; Towner, Jonathan S; Nichol, Stuart T

    2010-03-01

    Ebola and Marburg viruses cause a severe viral hemorrhagic fever disease mainly in Sub-Saharan Africa. Although outbreaks are sporadic, there is the potential for filoviruses to spread to other continents unintentionally because of air travel or intentionally because of bioterrorism. This article discusses the natural history, epidemiology, and clinical presentation of patients infected with Ebola and Marburg viruses. Clinicians in the United States should be aware of the symptoms of these viral infections in humans and know the appropriate procedures for contacting local, state, and national reference laboratories in the event of a suspected case of filoviral hemorrhagic fever.

  19. Cutaneous manifestations of chikungunya fever.

    PubMed

    Seetharam, K A; Sridevi, K; Vidyasagar, P

    2012-01-01

    Chikungunya fever, a re-emerging RNA viral infection produces different cutaneous manifestations in children compared to adults. 52 children with chikungunya fever, confirmed by positive IgM antibody test were seen during 2009-2010. Pigmentary lesions were common (27/52) followed by vesiculobullous lesions (16/52) and maculopapular lesions (14/52). Vesiculobullous lesions were most common in infants, although rarely reported in adults. Psoriasis was exacerbated in 4 children resulting in more severe forms. In 2 children, guttate psoriasis was observed for the first time.

  20. Crimean-Congo Hemorrhagic Fever (CCHF)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Congo Hemorrhagic Fever (CCHF) [PDF – 2 pages] Virus Ecology Viral Hemorrhagic Fever (VHF) Information for Specific Groups ... Diagnosis Treatment Prevention Outbreak Distribution Map Resources Virus Ecology File Formats Help: How do I view different ...

  1. Scarlet Fever: A Group A Streptococcal Infection

    MedlinePlus

    ... SSI file Error processing SSI file Scarlet Fever: A Group A Streptococcal Infection Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on ... Tweet Share Compartir Scarlet fever results from group A strep infection. If your child has a sore ...

  2. Overview of Classical Swine Fever (Hog Cholera, Classical Swine fever)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Classical swine fever is a contagious often fatal disease of pigs clinically characterized by high body temperature, lethargy, yellowish diarrhea, vomits and purple skin discoloration of ears, lower abdomen and legs. It was first described in the early 19th century in the USA. Later, a condition i...

  3. Localizing chronic Q fever: a challenging query

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Chronic Q fever usually presents as endocarditis or endovascular infection. We investigated whether 18F-FDG PET/CT and echocardiography were able to detect the localization of infection. Also, the utility of the modified Duke criteria was assessed. Methods Fifty-two patients, who had an IgG titre of ≥ 1024 against C. burnetii phase I ≥ 3 months after primary infection or a positive PCR ≥ 1 month after primary infection, were retrospectively included. Data on serology, the results of all imaging studies, possible risk factors for developing proven chronic Q fever and clinical outcome were recorded. Results According to the Dutch consensus on Q fever diagnostics, 18 patients had proven chronic Q fever, 14 probable chronic Q fever, and 20 possible chronic Q fever. Of the patients with proven chronic Q fever, 22% were diagnosed with endocarditis, 17% with an infected vascular prosthesis, and 39% with a mycotic aneurysm. 56% of patients with proven chronic Q fever did not recall an episode of acute Q fever. Ten out of 13 18F-FDG PET/CT-scans in patients with proven chronic Q fever localized the infection. TTE and TEE were helpful in only 6% and 50% of patients, respectively. Conclusions If chronic Q fever is diagnosed, 18F-FDG PET/CT is a helpful imaging technique for localization of vascular infections due to chronic Q fever. Patients with proven chronic Q fever were diagnosed significantly more often with mycotic aneurysms than in previous case series. Definite endocarditis due to chronic Q fever was less frequently diagnosed in the current study. Chronic Q fever often occurs in patients without a known episode of acute Q fever, so clinical suspicion should remain high, especially in endemic regions. PMID:24004470

  4. A Case of Olanzapine-Induced Fever

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Cho-Hsiang; Chen, Ying-Yeh

    2017-01-01

    Olanzapine, a frequently used second-generation antipsychotic, has rarely been implicated as a cause of drug-induced fever in the absence of neuroleptic malignant syndrome. We describe a patient who developed isolated fever following olanzapine monotherapy, which subsided after discontinuation of olanzapine. Blockade of dopaminergic receptors and elevated cytokines concentration are possible mechanisms of fever development during treatment with olanzapine. This case calls for attention to olanzapine-induced fever in clinical practice. PMID:28138204

  5. A timely reminder--rheumatic fever.

    PubMed

    Lilic, Nikola; Kumar, Priyanka

    2013-04-19

    Rheumatic fever is a disease diagnosed using the Jones criteria. The Jones criteria were designed using data from areas with a low prevalence of rheumatic fever. In New Zealand there is a high prevalence of rheumatic fever amongst Maori and Pacific peoples. A case is presented where a child of Samoan ethnicity is diagnosed and treated for rheumatic fever without fulfilling the Jones criteria. Evidence supporting the broadening of the diagnostic criteria in high prevalence areas is highlighted.

  6. Yellow Fever Outbreak, Southern Sudan, 2003

    PubMed Central

    Onyango, Clayton O.; Grobbelaar, Antoinette A.; Gibson, Georgina V.F.; Sang, Rosemary C.; Sow, Abdourahmane; Swanepoel, Robert

    2004-01-01

    In May 2003, an outbreak of fatal hemorrhagic fever, caused by yellow fever virus, occurred in southern Sudan. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the virus belonged to the East African genotype, which supports the contention that yellow fever is endemic in East Africa with the potential to cause large outbreaks in humans. PMID:15498174

  7. Behavioral fever in newborn rabbits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Satinoff, E.; Mcewen, G. N., Jr.; Williams, B. A.

    1976-01-01

    New Zealand white rabbit pups aged 12 to 72 hr were divided into three groups and given an intraperitoneal injection of Pseudomonas polysaccharide, a saline vehicle alone, and no treatment, respectively. The animals injected with pyrogen and maintained at an ambient temperature of 32 C for 2 hr did not develop fever. When placed in a thermally graded alleyway, the animals injected with pyrogen selected gradient positions that represented significantly higher temperatures than controls injected with saline. Further stay at selected positions for 5 min caused a considerable increase in the rectal temperature of the pyrogen-injected pups but not that of controls. The results support the hypothesis that newborn rabbits will develop a fever by behavioral means after a single injection of an exogenous pyrogen if the opportunity for thermoregulatory behavior is present. No fever develops if the pups must rely solely on internal thermoregulatory mechanisms. The behavioral system for producing a fever is mature at birth, but an adequate system of internal reflexes does not appear to develop for some days.

  8. Rocky Mountain spotted fever, Panama.

    PubMed

    Estripeaut, Dora; Aramburú, María Gabriela; Sáez-Llorens, Xavier; Thompson, Herbert A; Dasch, Gregory A; Paddock, Christopher D; Zaki, Sherif; Eremeeva, Marina E

    2007-11-01

    We describe a fatal pediatric case of Rocky Mountain spotted fever in Panama, the first, to our knowledge, since the 1950s. Diagnosis was established by immunohistochemistry, PCR, and isolation of Rickettsia rickettsii from postmortem tissues. Molecular typing demonstrated strong relatedness of the isolate to strains of R. rickettsii from Central and South America.

  9. THE TRANSMISSION OF YELLOW FEVER

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Nelson C.

    1930-01-01

    1. Saimiri sciureus has been infected with yellow fever virus, both by the inoculation of infectious blood and by the bites of infective mosquitoes. Some of the monkeys have died, showing lesions, including hepatic necrosis, suggesting yellow fever as seen in human beings and in rhesus monkeys. Virus has been transferred back to M. rhesus from infected Saimiri both by blood inoculation and by mosquito bites. The virus undoubtedly has been maintained through four direct passages in Saimiri. Reinoculations of infectious material into recovered monkeys have not given rise to invasion of the blood stream by virus. Sera from recovered animals have protected M. rhesus against the inoculation of virus. 2. It has been possible to pass the virus to and from Ateleus ater by the injection of blood or liver and by the bites of mosquitoes. The livers from two infected animals have shown no necrosis. The serum from one recovered monkey proved to be protective for M. rhesus. 3. Only three out of twelve Lagothrix lagotricha have reacted to yellow fever virus by a rise in temperature. Probably none have died as a result of the infection. In only one instance has the virus been transferred back to M. rhesus. The sera of recovered animals have had a protective action against yellow fever virus. PMID:19869721

  10. [Sacroiliitis in familial Mediterranean fever].

    PubMed

    Connemann, B J; Steinhoff, J; Benstein, R; Sack, K

    1991-11-22

    A 15-year-old girl of Turkish descent had for one year complained of severe recurrent fever-associated deep back pains. Since she was three years of age she had suffered from repeated attacks of fever and severe abdominal pain which ceased spontaneously in 1-3 days. On physical examination the sacrum and iliosacral joints were very painful to percussion, and she limped. Radiography revealed symmetric destructive sacroiliitis. Despite the unusual location of the arthritis, the triad of fever, abdominal pain and arthritis, as well as her belonging to an ethnic "at risk" group, pointed to the diagnosis of familial mediterranean fever (FML) or recurrent hereditary polyserositis. This diagnosis was confirmed by a positive metaraminol provocation test in that infusion of metaraminol reproduced the typical pains. Collagen diseases, rheumatic disease, acute porphyria and chronic infectious processes were excluded. The sacroiliitis quickly responded to long-term administration of colchicine, 0.5 mg twice daily. The patient also has Hageman factor deficiency whose significance remains unclear.

  11. Cardiac Manifestation in Dengue Fever.

    PubMed

    Arora, Mohit; Patil, Rekha S

    2016-07-01

    To study the cardiac manifestations of the dengue fever. This one year descriptive study was undertaken at KLES Dr. Prabhakar Kore Hospital and Medical Research Centre, Belgaum under the Department of Medicine. A total of 120 patients with either dengue IgM or IgM and IgG were studied. The assessment of cardiac manifestations was done based on electrocardiogram, 2D echocardiography and cardiac enzymes. Of the 120 patients, 85 (70.83%) were males and the male to female ratio was 2.4:1. The mean age of the patients was 33.02 ± 12.71 years. The commonest clinical presentation was myalgia (97.5%) followed by fever (92.5%). On clinical examination 33.33% of the patients had petecheia and only 9 patients having active bleeding manifestation at the time of presentation. A raised CK-MB and Troponin I was observed in 33.3% and 26.7% patients ECG findings revealed normal rhythm among 95% with 15.8% of them having an abnormal heart rate. Rhythm disturbance was noted in 5% of the patients with AV block being the most common (66.67%). Cardiac manifestation in the form of myocarditis was observed in 37.50% of the patients with a positive correlation with the severity of the dengue fever defined as by W.H.O. criteria. Patients with dengue fever are at high risk of developing myocarditis and rhythm disturbance and therefore require a close cardiac monitoring.

  12. Behavioral fever in newborn rabbits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Satinoff, E.; Mcewen, G. N., Jr.; Williams, B. A.

    1976-01-01

    New Zealand white rabbit pups aged 12 to 72 hr were divided into three groups and given an intraperitoneal injection of Pseudomonas polysaccharide, a saline vehicle alone, and no treatment, respectively. The animals injected with pyrogen and maintained at an ambient temperature of 32 C for 2 hr did not develop fever. When placed in a thermally graded alleyway, the animals injected with pyrogen selected gradient positions that represented significantly higher temperatures than controls injected with saline. Further stay at selected positions for 5 min caused a considerable increase in the rectal temperature of the pyrogen-injected pups but not that of controls. The results support the hypothesis that newborn rabbits will develop a fever by behavioral means after a single injection of an exogenous pyrogen if the opportunity for thermoregulatory behavior is present. No fever develops if the pups must rely solely on internal thermoregulatory mechanisms. The behavioral system for producing a fever is mature at birth, but an adequate system of internal reflexes does not appear to develop for some days.

  13. Sandfly Fever Sicilian Virus, Algeria

    PubMed Central

    Izri, Arezki; Temmam, Sarah; Moureau, Grégory; Hamrioui, Boussad; de Lamballerie, Xavier

    2008-01-01

    To determine whether sandfly fever Sicilian virus (SFSV) is present in Algeria, we tested sandflies for phlebovirus RNA. A sequence closely related to that of SFSV was detected in a Phlebotomus ariasi sandfly. Of 60 human serum samples, 3 contained immunoglobulin G against SFSV. These data suggest SFSV is present in Algeria. PMID:18439364

  14. Monoacylglycerol Lipase Regulates Fever Response.

    PubMed

    Sanchez-Alavez, Manuel; Nguyen, William; Mori, Simone; Moroncini, Gianluca; Viader, Andreu; Nomura, Daniel K; Cravatt, Benjamin F; Conti, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    Cyclooxygenase inhibitors such as ibuprofen have been used for decades to control fever through reducing the levels of the pyrogenic lipid transmitter prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). Historically, phospholipases have been considered to be the primary generator of the arachidonic acid (AA) precursor pool for generating PGE2 and other eicosanoids. However, recent studies have demonstrated that monoacyglycerol lipase (MAGL), through hydrolysis of the endocannabinoid 2-arachidonoylglycerol, provides a major source of AA for PGE2 synthesis in the mammalian brain under basal and neuroinflammatory states. We show here that either genetic or pharmacological ablation of MAGL leads to significantly reduced fever responses in both centrally or peripherally-administered lipopolysaccharide or interleukin-1β-induced fever models in mice. We also show that a cannabinoid CB1 receptor antagonist does not attenuate these anti-pyrogenic effects of MAGL inhibitors. Thus, much like traditional nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, MAGL inhibitors can control fever, but appear to do so through restricted control over prostaglandin production in the nervous system.

  15. Q fever in maritime Canada.

    PubMed Central

    Marrie, T. J.; Haldane, E. V.; Noble, M. A.; Faulkner, R. S.; Lee, S. H.; Gough, D.; Meyers, S.; Stewart, J.

    1982-01-01

    Only nine cases of Q fever were recorded in Canada in the 20 years prior to 1978. In the 18 months from August 1979 to January 1981 the disease was diagnosed serologically in six patients from the Maritime provinces. All were epidemiologically unrelated and none had been exposed to animals. Five had pneumonia and one had chronic Q fever with probable prosthetic valve endocarditis. Three of the five pneumonia patients presented with signs and symptoms of an acute lower respiratory tract infection and were indistinguishable clinically from other patients with atypical pneumonias. The other two with pneumonia presented with nonresolving pulmonary infiltrates and complained of decreased energy. Four of the five pneumonia patients responded well to treatment with erythromycin; the fifth required two courses of tetracycline. The patient with chronic Q fever had a large amount of cryoglobulins in his serum and evidence of immune complex disease. These cases indicate that Q fever should be considered as a possible cause of atypical pneumonia in Canada. Images FIG. 1 FIG. 2 FIG. 3 PMID:7074457

  16. Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever, Panama

    PubMed Central

    Estripeaut, Dora; Aramburú, María Gabriela; Sáez-Llorens, Xavier; Thompson, Herbert A.; Dasch, Gregory A.; Paddock, Christopher D.; Zaki, Sherif

    2007-01-01

    We describe a fatal pediatric case of Rocky Mountain spotted fever in Panama, the first, to our knowledge, since the 1950s. Diagnosis was established by immunohistochemistry, PCR, and isolation of Rickettsia rickettsii from postmortem tissues. Molecular typing demonstrated strong relatedness of the isolate to strains of R. rickettsii from Central and South America. PMID:18217566

  17. The evolution of an annual life cycle in killifish: adaptation to ephemeral aquatic environments through embryonic diapause.

    PubMed

    Furness, Andrew I

    2016-08-01

    An annual life cycle is characterized by growth, maturity, and reproduction condensed into a single, short season favourable to development, with production of embryos (seeds, cysts, or eggs) capable of surviving harsh conditions which juveniles or adults cannot tolerate. More typically associated with plants in desert environments, or temperate-zone insects exposed to freezing winters, the evolution of an annual life cycle in vertebrates is fairly novel. Killifish, small sexually dimorphic fishes in the Order Cyprinodontiformes, have adapted to seasonally ephemeral water bodies across much of Africa and South America through the independent evolution of an annual life history. These annual killifish produce hardy desiccation-resistant eggs that undergo diapause (developmental arrest) and remain buried in the soil for long periods when fish have perished due to the drying of their habitat. Killifish are found in aquatic habitats that span a continuum from permanent and stable to seasonal and variable, thus providing a useful system in which to piece together the evolutionary history of this life cycle using natural comparative variation. I first review adaptations for life in ephemeral aquatic environments in killifish, with particular emphasis on the evolution of embryonic diapause. I then bring together available evidence from a variety of approaches and provide a scenario for how this annual life cycle evolved. There are a number of features within Aplocheiloidei killifish including their inhabitation of marginal or edge aquatic habitat, their small size and rapid attainment of maturity, and egg properties that make them particularly well suited to the colonization of ephemeral waters.

  18. Water balance complexities in ephemeral catchments with different land uses: Insights from monitoring and distributed hydrologic modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dean, J. F.; Camporese, M.; Webb, J. A.; Grover, S. P.; Dresel, P. E.; Daly, E.

    2016-06-01

    Although ephemeral catchments are widespread in arid and semiarid climates, the relationship of their water balance with climate, geology, topography, and land cover is poorly known. Here we use 4 years (2011-2014) of rainfall, streamflow, and groundwater level measurements to estimate the water balance components in two adjacent ephemeral catchments in south-eastern Australia, with one catchment planted with young eucalypts and the other dedicated to grazing pasture. To corroborate the interpretation of the observations, the physically based hydrological model CATHY was calibrated and validated against the data in the two catchments. The estimated water balances showed that despite a significant decline in groundwater level and greater evapotranspiration in the eucalypt catchment (104-119% of rainfall) compared with the pasture catchment (95-104% of rainfall), streamflow consistently accounted for 1-4% of rainfall in both catchments for the entire study period. Streamflow in the two catchments was mostly driven by the rainfall regime, particularly rainfall frequency (i.e., the number of rain days per year), while the downslope orientation of the plantation furrows also promoted runoff. With minimum calibration, the model was able to adequately reproduce the periods of flow in both catchments in all years. Although streamflow and groundwater levels were better reproduced in the pasture than in the plantation, model-computed water balance terms confirmed the estimates from the observations in both catchments. Overall, the interplay of climate, topography, and geology seems to overshadow the effect of land use in the study catchments, indicating that the management of ephemeral catchments remains highly challenging.

  19. Widespread dieback of riparian trees on a dammed ephemeral river and evidence of local mitigation by tributary flows

    PubMed Central

    Mulligan, Mark; Harrison, Xavier A.; Henschel, Joh R.; Pettorelli, Nathalie; Cowlishaw, Guy

    2016-01-01

    Ephemeral rivers act as linear oases in drylands providing key resources to people and wildlife. However, not much is known about these rivers’ sensitivities to human activities. We investigated the landscape-level determinants of riparian tree dieback along the Swakop River, a dammed ephemeral river in Namibia, focusing on the native ana tree (Faidherbia albida) and the invasive mesquite (Prosopis spp.). We surveyed over 1,900 individual trees distributed across 24 sites along a 250 km stretch of the river. General linear mixed models were used to test five hypotheses relating to three anthropogenic threats: river flow disruption from damming, human settlement and invasive species. We found widespread dieback in both tree populations: 51% mortality in ana tree, with surviving trees exhibiting 18% canopy death (median); and 26% mortality in mesquite, with surviving trees exhibiting 10% canopy death. Dieback in the ana tree was most severe where trees grew on drier stretches of the river, where tributary flow was absent and where mesquite grew more abundantly. Dieback in the mesquite, a more drought-tolerant taxon, did not show any such patterns. Our findings suggest that dieback in the ana tree is primarily driven by changes in river flow resulting from upstream dam creation and that tributary flows provide a local buffer against this loss of main channel flow. The hypothesis that the invasive mesquite may contribute to ana tree dieback was also supported. Our findings suggest that large dams along the main channels of ephemeral rivers have the ability to cause widespread mortality in downstream riparian trees. To mitigate such impacts, management might focus on the maintenance of natural tributary flows to buffer local tree populations from the disruption to main channel flow. PMID:27812420

  20. Widespread dieback of riparian trees on a dammed ephemeral river and evidence of local mitigation by tributary flows.

    PubMed

    Douglas, Caitlin M S; Mulligan, Mark; Harrison, Xavier A; Henschel, Joh R; Pettorelli, Nathalie; Cowlishaw, Guy

    2016-01-01

    Ephemeral rivers act as linear oases in drylands providing key resources to people and wildlife. However, not much is known about these rivers' sensitivities to human activities. We investigated the landscape-level determinants of riparian tree dieback along the Swakop River, a dammed ephemeral river in Namibia, focusing on the native ana tree (Faidherbia albida) and the invasive mesquite (Prosopis spp.). We surveyed over 1,900 individual trees distributed across 24 sites along a 250 km stretch of the river. General linear mixed models were used to test five hypotheses relating to three anthropogenic threats: river flow disruption from damming, human settlement and invasive species. We found widespread dieback in both tree populations: 51% mortality in ana tree, with surviving trees exhibiting 18% canopy death (median); and 26% mortality in mesquite, with surviving trees exhibiting 10% canopy death. Dieback in the ana tree was most severe where trees grew on drier stretches of the river, where tributary flow was absent and where mesquite grew more abundantly. Dieback in the mesquite, a more drought-tolerant taxon, did not show any such patterns. Our findings suggest that dieback in the ana tree is primarily driven by changes in river flow resulting from upstream dam creation and that tributary flows provide a local buffer against this loss of main channel flow. The hypothesis that the invasive mesquite may contribute to ana tree dieback was also supported. Our findings suggest that large dams along the main channels of ephemeral rivers have the ability to cause widespread mortality in downstream riparian trees. To mitigate such impacts, management might focus on the maintenance of natural tributary flows to buffer local tree populations from the disruption to main channel flow.

  1. Adult-onset acute rheumatic fever.

    PubMed

    Nakashima, Dainari; Ueda, Kohei; Tsukuda, Kyozo; Utsu, Noriaki; Kohki, Shimazu; Fushimi, Hiroaki; Miyakoshi, Kazuho

    2012-01-01

    A 62-year-old man was hospitalized for acute rheumatic fever. He had previously suffered from rheumatic fever at 15 years of age. The rheumatic fever was complicated by carditis, which caused valve disease that required surgical treatment. The incidence of rheumatic fever has decreased in most developed countries with improvements in sanitary conditions. The low incidence of this disease makes a timely and accurate diagnosis difficult. Due to the fact that both the first occurrence and recurrence of acute rheumatic fever can occur in the elderly and adults, this potential disease should not be overlooked when making a differential diagnosis.

  2. Fever of unknown origin: a clinical approach.

    PubMed

    Cunha, Burke A; Lortholary, Olivier; Cunha, Cheston B

    2015-10-01

    Fevers of unknown origin remain one of the most difficult diagnostic challenges in medicine. Because fever of unknown origin may be caused by over 200 malignant/neoplastic, infectious, rheumatic/inflammatory, and miscellaneous disorders, clinicians often order non-clue-based imaging and specific testing early in the fever of unknown origin work-up, which may be inefficient/misleading. Unlike most other fever-of-unknown-origin reviews, this article presents a clinical approach. Characteristic history and physical examination findings together with key nonspecific test abnormalities are the basis for a focused clue-directed fever of unknown origin work-up.

  3. Supply-limited horizontal sand drift at an ephemerally crusted, unvegetated saline playa

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gillette, Dale A.; Niemeyer, T.C.; Helm, P.J.

    2001-01-01

    A site at Owens Dry Lake was observed for more than 4 years. The site was a vegetation-free saline playa where the surface formed "ephemeral crusts," crusts that form after rainfall. Sometimes these crusts were destroyed and often a layer of particles on the crust would engage in vigorous aeolian activity. Three "phases" of active sand drifting are defined as almost no movement (extreme supply limitation), loose particles on crust with some degree of sand drift (moderate supply limitation), and unlimited source movement corresponding to a destroyed surface crust (unlimited supply). These "phases" occurred 45, 49, and 6% of the time, respectively. The accumulation of loose particles on the crust was mostly the result of in situ formation. Crusted sediments with loose particles on top can exhibit mass flux rates about the same as for noncrusted sediments. Crusted sediments limit or eliminate sand drift in two conditions: for rough crusts that effect a sufficiently high threshold friction velocity (above the wind friction velocity) and for limited amounts of loose particles on the crust where particle supply is less than would be transported in normal saltation for a thick sandy surface. These "supply-limited" cases are similar to wind erosion of limited spilled material on a hard concrete surface. We quantified "supply limitation" by defining a "potential" or "supply unlimited" sand drift function Q = AG where A represents supply limitation that decreases as the particle source is depleted. Here Q is the mass of sand transported through a surface perpendicular to the ground and to the wind and having unit width during time period t, and G = ??? u*(u*2 - u*t2) dt for u* > u*t. G is integrated for the same time period t as for Q, u* is the friction velocity of the wind, and u*t is the threshold friction velocity of the wind. Hard crusts (usually formed in the summer) tended to show almost no change of threshold friction velocity with time and often gave total

  4. Hydrology and Channel Head Erosion in a Semiarid Discontinuous Ephemeral Stream Network near Oracle, Arizona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delong, S. B.; Johnson, J. P.; Whipple, K. X.; Post, D. F.; Malmon, D.; Chu, D.; Hellerstein, J.; Klues, K.; Levis, P.; Rossi, M. W.; Martin, R.

    2008-12-01

    We present results from monitoring of hydrology and erosion at channel heads in a discontinuous ephemeral stream system in southeastern Arizona rangelands. At this field site, alluvial headwalls ~1 m high mark the transition from unchannelized valleys to actively incising arroyos. The headwalls are vertical to overhanging in cross-section and amphitheater-shaped in planform. The local landscape is made up of well- consolidated clay-rich soil and sediment. Possible processes involved in headwall retreat include groundwater sapping, plunge-pool erosion, and soil tension-fracturing. To evaluate the relative efficacy of such processes and to test and refine models of incision and headcut migration rate, we deployed 40+ sensors at and immediately upstream and downstream of channel headwalls. Wired sensors and a datalogger recorded precipitation, overland flow, channel discharge, and soil moisture at a one minute interval. Additionally, a custom wireless sensor network with cellular telemetry was developed and deployed to measure shallow overland flow. At our field site, overland flow can occur from less than one centimeter of precipitation. We tracked landscape erosion through a combination of time-lapse photography, repeat RTK GPS and terrestrial LiDAR surveys. Over the monitoring period, headwalls retreated 10s of cm during several flow events. When the sediment becomes saturated (e.g., from flow down headwall faces and standing water in plunge pools), it has an order-of-magnitude lower shear strength than when dry. Erosion and retreat of channel heads appear to occur by a combination of erosive flow down saturated channel headwalls, plunge-pool erosion at high flows, and mass wasting along vertical tension cracks between runoff events. The amphitheater form is largely due to plunge-pool undercutting and vertical differences in soil material properties, particularly clay content. Though shallow groundwater sapping is widely thought to lead to amphitheater

  5. Geophysical Imaging of Near Surface Hydrostratigraphy in Arid Ephemeral Stream Systems Near Yuma, AZ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harry, D. L.; Sutfin, N. A.; Shaw, J. R.; Faulconer, J.; Genco, A. J.; Wohl, E.; Kampf, S. K.; Cooper, D. J.

    2014-12-01

    Ground penetrating radar and DC electrical resistivity profiles image the upper 4 m of the subsurface beneath ephemeral streams in Yuma and Mohave Washes in the Sonoran Desert, 30 km northeast of Yuma, Arizona. The geophysical data are tied to trenches to establish a lithostratigraphic interpretation. Archie's Law, calibrated to resistivity measurements on soil samples from each site, is used to estimate in-situ soil pore saturation. Three different stream types are surveyed. Increasing in stream order, these are incised bedrock with alluvium fill, incised alluvium, and braided streams. Three radar facies are identified on the basis of reflection amplitude, continuity, and dip. Near the surface, RF1 (0.5-1.5 m thick) contains laterally continuous sheetlike deposits interpreted to be active channel gravel, sand, and cobble deposits reworked during floods. Below, RF2 contains moderately continuous downlapping and onlapping reflections interpreted to be partially lithified Pleistocene gravel and cobble valley fill deposits. The underlying facies RF3 is nearly reflection free, but at the larger washes contains weak reflection similar in character to RF2. In the smaller washes, RF3 contains abundant diffractions. Two electrofacies are identified. The shallowest, EF1, extends from the surface to ~2.5 m deep. EF1 encompasses radar facies RF1 and RF2, with resistivity ranging from 250-1500 ohm-m. Estimated soil moisture in this facies ranges from 2-40%, and varies up to 20% laterally over 2-5 m distances in the smallest washes. Facies EF2 coincides with radar facies RF3, with resistivity ranging from 10-300 ohm-m and estimated pore saturation is estimated to exceed 70%. Electrofacies EF1 is inferred to represent a relatively dry surficial layer that includes the modern channel deposits and the upper ~1 m of the Pleistocene strata. At the larger washes, EF2 is interpreted to be Pleistocene valley fill, distinguishable from the overlying lithologically equivalent Pleistocene

  6. Recharge of shallow aquifers through two ephemeral-stream channels in northeastern Wyoming, 1982-1983

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lenfest, L.W.

    1987-01-01

    Quantifying the recharge from ephemeral streams to alluvial and bedrock aquifers will help evaluate the effects of surface mining on alluvial valley floors in Wyoming. Two stream reaches were chosen for study in the Powder River basin. One reach was located along the North Fork Dry Fork Cheyenne River near Glenrock, Wyoming, and the other reach was located along Black Thunder Creek near Hampshire, Wyoming. The reach along the North Fork Dry Fork Cheyenne River was instrumented with 3 gaging stations to measure streamflow and with 6 observation wells to measure groundwater level fluctuations in alluvial and bedrock aquifers in response to streamflow. The 3 streamflow gaging stations were located within the 2.5-mi study reach to measure the approximate gain or loss of discharge along the reach. Computed streamflow losses ranged from 0.43 acre-ft/mi on July 9 , 1982, to 1.44 acre-ft/mi on August 9, 1982. The observation wells completed only in the alluvial aquifer were dry during flow in the North Fork Dry Fork Cheyenne River, whereas water levels in half of the observation wells completed in the bedrock aquifers or the alluvial and bedrock aquifers rose in response to flow in the North Fork Dry Fork Cheyenne River. Groundwater recharge on August 9, 1982, was calculated using a convolution technique using groundwater levels at the upstream site and was estimated to be 26.5 acre-ft/mi. The reach along Black Thunder Creek was instrumented with one gaging station to measure streamflow and with 4 observation wells to measure water level response in alluvial and bedrock aquifers to streamflow. Recharge to the alluvial aquifer from flow in Black Thunder Creek ranged from 3.56 to 12.4 acre-ft/mi. The recharge was estimated using the convolution technique using water level measurements in the observation wells completed in the alluvial aquifer. Water level measurements in the observation wells indicated water level rises in the alluvial and bedrock aquifers in response to

  7. On the ecohydrologic function and disturbance effects of ephemeral desert stream channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bedford, David; Schwinning, Susan; Newlander, April; Miller, David; Sandquist, Darren

    2010-05-01

    Ephemeral stream channels are widespread features throughout desert landscapes, particularly on alluvial fans. These channels range in width from a few tens of centimeters to many meters. Runoff in these channels can redistribute water from upper portions of the landscape in response to rare high-intensity or long duration rainstorms. Visual observations suggest that shrubland vegetation is often clustered at higher cover alongside these channels. We are using transect studies, mapping, monitoring and manipulation experiments to investigate the hydrologic relations of these features to vegetation in the eastern Mojave Desert of the USA. We use a piedmont that is perpendicularly transected by a ~100 year old railroad that alters natural flow by diverting it through staggered culverts to areas below the railroad. This creates an opportunity to study: 1) relatively undisturbed areas above the railroad, 2) areas below the railroad that receive enhanced flow where water is diverted through culverts (enhanced) and, 3) areas below the railroad where water flow from upslope has been blocked (deprived). In all areas we found that vegetation cover and density is higher alongside stream channels and decreases with distance from the channels. In all but the deprived areas, vegetation is nearly absent in the stream channels. Relative to the upper undisturbed areas, vegetation cover is higher in the enhanced areas, and lower in the deprived areas; however, when diversion is not considered cover above and below the road is equal overall. Furthermore, species-specific differences were present. The drought deciduous sub-shrub Ambrosia dumosa shows increased cover in deprived areas and in all areas peaked closer to the channel margin than the evergreen drought-tolerant shrub Larrea tridentata, we believe due to differences in root morphology. In a simulated channel runoff event, we found that vegetation within 3 meters of the stream channel physiologically responded (elevated water

  8. [Fever of unknown origin in malignancies].

    PubMed

    Rieger, C T; Peterson, L; Ostermann, H

    2009-06-01

    Fever is a common symptom in patients with malignancies. On the one hand it may be an (initial) symptom of cancer, on the other hand it may occur as a side effect of chemotherapy. Often a precise cause of fever can not be established and in these cases febrile temperatures >38.3 degrees C without proof of infection or relapse/progress of tumor is defined as fever of unknown origin. Especially hematologic neoplasias are accompanied by fever. Here, neoplastic fever must be distinguished from fever following immunosuppressive chemotherapy. In the latter severe infections due to neutropenia induced by cytoreductive chemotherapy is often identified as the cause of fever. These patients display a high morbidity and mortality, especially if an empiric anti-infectious treatment is not administered in time. A meticulous diagnostic work-up is therefore necessary, and until proven otherwise, an infectious cause must be considered and empiric antibiotic treatment initiated.

  9. [Clinical aspects of viral hemorrhagic fever].

    PubMed

    Saijo, Masayuki

    2005-12-01

    Viral hemorrhagic fever (VHF) is defined as virus infections that usually cause pyrexia and hemorrhagic symptoms with multiple organ failure. VHF includes following viral infections: Ebola hemorrhagic fever (EHF), Marburg hemorrhagic fever (MHF), Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever (CCHF) and Lassa fever. In particular, the causative agents of EHF, MHF, CCHF, and Lassa fever are Ebola, Marburg, CCHF, Lassa viruses, respectively, and regarded as biosafety level-4 pathogens because of their high virulence to humans. Recently, relatively large outbreaks of EHF and MHF have occurred in Africa, and areas of EHF- and MHF-outbreaks seem to be expanding. Although outbreaks of VHF have not been reported in Japan, there is a possibility that the deadly hemorrhagic fever viruses would be introduced to Japan in future. Therefore, preparedness for possible future outbreaks of VHF is necessary in areas without VHF outbreaks.

  10. Ephemeral-Stream Channel and Basin-Floor Infiltration and Recharge in the Sierra Vista Subwatershed of the Upper San Pedro Basin, Southeastern Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coes, A.L.; Pool, D.R.

    2007-01-01

    The timing and location of streamflow in the San Pedro River are partially dependent on the aerial distribution of recharge in the Sierra Vista subwatershed. Previous investigators have assumed that recharge in the subwatershed occurs only along the mountain fronts by way of stream-channel infiltration near the contact between low-permeability rocks of the mountains and the basin fill. Recent studies in other alluvial basins of the Southwestern United States, however, have shown that significant recharge can occur through the sediments of ephemeral stream channels at locations several kilometers distant from the mountains. The purpose of this study was to characterize the spatial distribution of infiltration and subsequent recharge through the ephemeral channels in the Sierra Vista subwatershed. Infiltration fluxes in ephemeral channels and through the basin floor of the subwatershed were estimated by using several methods. Data collected during the drilling and coring of 16 boreholes included physical, thermal, and hydraulic properties of sediments; chloride concentrations of sediments; and pore-water stable-isotope values and tritium activity. Surface and subsurface sediment temperatures were continuously measured at each borehole. Twelve boreholes were drilled in five ephemeral stream channels to estimate infiltration within ephemeral channels. Active infiltration was verified to at least 20 meters at 11 of the 12 borehole sites on the basis of low sediment-chloride concentrations, high soil-water contents, and pore-water tritium activity similar to present-day precipitation. Consolidated sediments at the twelfth site prevented core recovery and estimation of infiltration. Analytical and numerical methods were applied to determine the surface infiltration flux required to produce the observed sediment-temperature fluctuations at six sites. Infiltration fluxes were determined for summer ephemeral flow events only because no winter flows were recorded at the sites

  11. Predicting enteric fever without bacteriological culture results.

    PubMed

    Ross, I N; Abraham, T

    1987-01-01

    We used Bayes' theorem to calculate the probability of enteric fever in 260 patients presenting with undiagnosed fever, without recourse to blood or stool culture results. These individuals were divided into 110 patients with enteric fever (63 culture positive, 47 culture negative) and 150 patients with other causes of fever. Comparison of the frequencies of occurrence of 19 clinical and laboratory events, said to be helpful in the diagnosis of enteric fever, in the two groups revealed that only 8 events were significantly more frequent in enteric fever. These were: a positive Widal test at a screening dilution of 1:40; a peak temperature greater than = 39 degrees C; previous treatment for the fever; a white blood cell count less than 9 X 10(6)/litre; a polymorphonuclear leucocyte count less than 3.5 X 10(6)/litre; splenomegaly; fever duration greater than 7 d; and hepatomegaly. When the probability of enteric fever was determined prospectively in 110 patients, using only 6 of these discriminating events, the probability of patients with a positive prediction having enteric fever (diagnostic specificity) was 0.80 (95% confidence interval: 0.68 to 0.91) and the probability of those with a negative prediction not having enteric fever (diagnostic sensitivity) was 0.92 (0.85 to 0.99). Using all 19 events did not alter the diagnostic specificity or diagnostic sensitivity. This study shows that a small number of clinical and laboratory features can objectively discriminate enteric fever from other causes of fever in the majority of patients. Calculating the probability of enteric fever can aid in diagnosis, when culturing for salmonella is either unavailable or is negative.

  12. Hemorrhagic Fever With Renal Syndrome (Korean Hemorrhagic Fever).

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-04-30

    serologically in 1990 and 1991 were 1,043 and 956, respectively and large outbreaks of scrub typhus, murine typhus, leptospirosis and spotted fever...and leptospirosis occured during epidemic season of HFRS in 1986 and nos. of confirmed patients serologically at our laboratory were 215 and 64, respn...ctive’ly. It ,"’s demonstrated that fieia mice and wild rats are reservoir hosts of HFRS, scrub typhus and leptospirosis in Korea. Global distribution

  13. Hemorrhagic Fever with Renal Syndrome (Korean Hemorrhagic Fever)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-06-29

    patients in districts of Seoul city in 1989 ...... ............ .. 15 Table 6. Age and sex distribution of HFRS, murine typhus, scrub typhus, spotted...patients by sex in Korea, 1989 .... .................... 21 Table 11. Number of HFRS, scrub typhus, murine typhus and spotted fever diagnosed...C.H. Calisher, porn . comm., 1990) but it is too preliminary to determine the status of this virus. The monoclonal intibodies produced with Hantaen

  14. Hemorrhagic Fever with Renal Syndrome (Korean Hemorrhagic Fever).

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-07-23

    13 Table 5. Monthly incidence of HFRS among Korean in the Republic of Korea , 1966-1985 . . . . . . . 14 A Table 6. Incidence of HFRS by...GRANT SUPPORT .. ........ 57.... 5 INTRODUCTION During the Korean War more than 3,000 United Nations .00 troops in Korea developed a rare hemorrhagic...8217;.-.* * S.’ . " 10 ... Table 1. Hospitalized cases of Hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome patients in the Republic of Korea Year US Korean Korean

  15. Fever of unknown origin (FUO) in a renal transplant recipient due to drug fever from sirolimus.

    PubMed

    Sharif, Sairah; Kong, May W; Drakakis, James; Cunha, Burke A

    2016-08-01

    A variety of medications may cause drug fever. Drug fevers may persist for days to weeks until diagnosis is considered. The diagnosis of drug fever is confirmed when there is resolution of fever within 3 days after the medication is discontinued. Only rarely do undiagnosed drug fevers persist for over 3 weeks to meet fever of unknown origin (FUO) criteria. FUOs due to drug fever are uncommon, and drug fevers due to immunosuppressive drugs are very rare. This is a case of a 58-year-old female renal transplant recipient who presented with FUO that remained undiagnosed for over 8 weeks. We believe this is the first reported case of an FUO due to drug fever from sirolimus in a renal transplant recipient.

  16. Freshwater seepages and ephemeral macroalgae proliferation in an intertidal bay: I Effect on benthic community structure and food web

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouisse, Vincent; Riera, Pascal; Migné, Aline; Leroux, Cédric; Davoult, Dominique

    2011-01-01

    Freshwater seepages and ephemeral Enteromorpha spp. proliferation create heterogeneity at small spatial scale in intertidal sediment. Macrobenthic community diversity was compared between these two disturbances and their respective control points throughout the year 2007 at the Roscoff Aber Bay (Western English Channel, France). In March and September 2007, trophic community pathways of characteristic species were additionally studied using stable isotope ratios of carbon and nitrogen. The low salinity recorded at the freshwater seepage induced the exclusion of the main bioturbator and the presence of omnivores which modified the community composition by biotic pressure. Moreover, food web analyses clearly highlighted a separation at small spatial scale between the two trophic pathways of the impacted area and its control. On the contrary, little differences were observed owning to the ephemeral Enteromorpha spp. proliferation. This suggested a progressive and diffusive disturbance which was applied from the algal mat to the nearby area. However, seasonal changes were observed. First, the algal expansion phase increased the macrofauna diversity and foraminifers' abundance (meiofauna) and then acted as a physical barrier decreasing sediment and water column exchanges and decreasing the fauna diversity. This study highlights the need to take into account small spatial heterogeneity to avoid misinterpretations in intertidal ecology studies.

  17. Crustacean communities in coastal ephemeral pools in the Araucanía region (38° S, Chile).

    PubMed

    De Los Ríos-Escalante, P; Acevedo, P

    2016-01-01

    The fauna communities of ephemeral pools in southern Chile are characterized by heterogeneity of crustacean taxa; nevertheless, no detailed studies exist of their community structure. The aim of the present study was to analyze the crustacean community structure in two groups of ephemeral pools (Puaucho and Nigue pools) in the coastal zone of the Araucanía region. A correlation matrix was made by species abundance against temperature, conductivity, pH and total dissolved solids. In a second step, a null model for species co-occurrence was applied to the total data and to each group. The results for total data revealed a significant direct relation between the abundance of H. costera, C. dubia and Mesocyclops. For the Puaucho pools, the same results were found together with direct associations with total dissolved solids, conductivity and pH. Finally, different results were found for the Nigue pools, with no clear significant associations, either direct or indirect, between the abundance of different crustacean taxa and abiotic parameters. These results were supported by the co-occurrence null model analysis, which revealed the presence of regulator factors for the total data, and for each of the two groups. Ecological topics are discussed with emphasis on meta-community dynamics.

  18. The impact of sexually abstaining groups on persistence of sexually transmitted infections in populations with ephemeral pair bonds.

    PubMed

    Maxin, D; Berec, L; Covello, M; Jessee, J; Zimmer, M

    2012-01-07

    Individuals often stop reproducing some time before they die. In this paper we compose and analyze a logistic two-sex population model in which individuals form pairs just to mate (i.e. pair bonds are ephemeral) and later move on to sexually abstaining groups. Using this model, we study the impact of sexually abstaining groups on persistence of a benign sexually transmitted infection (STI) in populations with such ephemeral pair bonds. We observe that the presence of sexually abstaining groups cannot prevent an STI from invasion or eliminate it when already present if the transition rates to the sexually abstaining groups are independent of the infection status of individuals (susceptible or infected). On the other hand, if they depend on that status, the presence of sexually abstaining groups can prevent an STI from invasion or eliminate it when present. Specifically, in the simple case of sex-independent vital parameters, this happens if the transition rate of the infected individuals to the sexually abstaining group is higher than the transition rate of the susceptible ones. These results contrast the earlier results based on assuming long-term, stable pair bonds, in which case one is capable of preventing or eliminating the disease with the same isolation rate for the susceptible and infected individuals.

  19. The use of Streambed Temperature to Characterize the Spatial and Temporal Patterns of Ephemeral Streamflow in the Southwest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, A. E.; Stewart, A. E.; Stonestrom, D.; Constantz, J.; Freyberg, D.

    2001-12-01

    Estimates of streamflow patterns in ephemeral channels are important in predicting the upper limits of potential recharge throughout the American Southwest. Quantitative information on the frequency and duration of ephemeral stream flows is often prohibitively difficult to obtain. Conventional streamgaging techniques and analysis tools are frequently unsuccessful in these stream channels, due to the flashy nature of the streamflows. In contrast, temperature has proven to be an inexpensive, robust parameter to measure in the field. The presence or absence of streamflow within the channel may be identified by studying the diurnal signal recorded at both the streambed surface and at depth because the presence of streamflow significantly alters these diurnal temperature patterns. Longitudinal arrays of single channel recording thermistors were installed in three dry streambed channels in the American Southwest; Abo Arroyo and Isleta Arroyo, New Mexico, and the Amargosa River, Nevada, to determine the utility of the technique. Results show that a variety of analysis methods are necessary to interpret the thermal records. A suite of techniques have been developed to better understand the data and to determine the presence or absence of streamflow at given locations within the arroyos. The most promising techniques include time series analysis of multiple thermal records, and comparisons of short term thermal variance to average variances.

  20. Microbial source tracking to identify human and ruminant sources of faecal pollution in an ephemeral Florida river.

    PubMed

    Chase, E; Hunting, J; Staley, C; Harwood, V J

    2012-12-01

    Levels and sources of faecal indicator bacteria (FIB) in an ephemeral Florida river were assessed under different rainfall/flow patterns to explore the effects of rainfall on water quality. Quantitative PCR for sewage markers [human-associated Bacteroides HF183 and human polyomaviruses (HPyVs)] and PCR for ruminant faecal markers were used to explore contamination sources. Escherichia coli, faecal coliform and enterococci levels consistently exceeded recreational water quality criteria, and sediment FIB levels were about 100-fold higher compared with water. HPyVs detections cooccurred with HF183, which was frequently detected near septic systems. Ruminant markers were detected only in livestock-grazing areas. Significantly greater faecal coliform and E. coli concentrations were observed under no-flow conditions and the levels of faecal coliforms in water column and sediments were negatively correlated with duration since last rain event. Septic systems and cattle grazing in this watershed contributed to the formation of FIB reservoirs in sediments, which were persistent following prolonged rainfall. Ephemeral water bodies that flow only under the direct influence of recent rainfall are rarely studied. FIB levels in the New River in Florida were greater during dry weather than wet weather, which contrasts with most observations and may be attributed to bacterial reservoirs formed in still pool, sediments and water-saturated soils in this subtropical environment. © 2012 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  1. Longitudinal tests of competing factor structures for the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale: traits, ephemeral artifacts, and stable response styles.

    PubMed

    Marsh, Herbert W; Scalas, L Francesca; Nagengast, Benjamin

    2010-06-01

    Self-esteem, typically measured by the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (RSE), is one of the most widely studied constructs in psychology. Nevertheless, there is broad agreement that a simple unidimensional factor model, consistent with the original design and typical application in applied research, does not provide an adequate explanation of RSE responses. However, there is no clear agreement about what alternative model is most appropriate-or even a clear rationale for how to test competing interpretations. Three alternative interpretations exist: (a) 2 substantively important trait factors (positive and negative self-esteem), (b) 1 trait factor and ephemeral method artifacts associated with positively or negatively worded items, or (c) 1 trait factor and stable response-style method factors associated with item wording. We have posited 8 alternative models and structural equation model tests based on longitudinal data (4 waves of data across 8 years with a large, representative sample of adolescents). Longitudinal models provide no support for the unidimensional model, undermine support for the 2-factor model, and clearly refute claims that wording effects are ephemeral, but they provide good support for models positing 1 substantive (self-esteem) factor and response-style method factors that are stable over time. This longitudinal methodological approach has not only resolved these long-standing issues in self-esteem research but also has broad applicability to most psychological assessments based on self-reports with a mix of positively and negatively worded items.

  2. How do sink and source activities influence the reproduction and vegetative growth of spring ephemeral herbs under different light conditions?

    PubMed

    Sunmonu, Ninuola; Kudo, Gaku

    2014-07-01

    Spring ephemeral herbs inhabiting deciduous forests commonly complete reproduction and vegetative growth before canopy closure in early summer. Effects of shading by early canopy closure on reproductive output and vegetative growth, however, may vary depending on the seasonal allocation patterns of photosynthetic products between current reproduction and storage for future growth in each species. To clarify the effects of sink-source balance on seed production and bulb growth in a spring ephemeral herb, Gagea lutea, we performed a bract removal treatment (source reduction) and a floral-bud removal treatment (sink reduction) under canopy and open conditions. Leaf carbon fixations did not differ between the forest and open sites and among treatments. Bract carbon fixations were also similar between sites but tended to decrease when floral buds were removed. Seed production was higher under open condition but decreased by the bract-removal treatment under both light conditions. In contrast, bulb growth was independent of light conditions and the bract-removal treatment but increased greatly by the bud-removal treatment. Therefore, leaves and bracts acted as specialized source organs for vegetative and reproductive functions, respectively, but photosynthetic products by bracts were flexibly used for bulb growth when plants failed to set fruits. Extension of bright period was advantageous for seed production (i.e., source limited) but not for vegetative growth (i.e., sink limited) in this species.

  3. Fever, febrile seizures and epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Dubé, Céline M; Brewster, Amy L; Richichi, Cristina; Zha, Qinqin; Baram, Tallie Z

    2007-10-01

    Seizures induced by fever (febrile seizures) are the most common type of pathological brain activity in infants and children. These febrile seizures and their potential contribution to the mechanisms of limbic (temporal lobe) epilepsy have been a topic of major clinical and scientific interest. Key questions include the mechanisms by which fever generates seizures, the effects of long febrile seizures on neuronal function and the potential contribution of these seizures to epilepsy. This review builds on recent advances derived from animal models and summarizes our current knowledge of the mechanisms underlying febrile seizures and of changes in neuronal gene expression and function that facilitate the enduring effects of prolonged febrile seizures on neuronal and network excitability. The review also discusses the relevance of these findings to the general mechanisms of epileptogenesis during development and points out gaps in our knowledge, including the relationship of animal models to human febrile seizures and epilepsy.

  4. Fever, febrile seizures and epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Dubé, Céline M.; Brewster, Amy L.; Richichi, Cristina; Zha, Qinqin; Baram, Tallie Z.

    2009-01-01

    Seizures induced by fever (febrile seizures) are the most common type of pathological brain activity in infants and children. These febrile seizures and their potential contribution to the mechanisms of limbic (temporal lobe) epilepsy have been a topic of major clinical and scientific interest. Key questions include the mechanisms by which fever generates seizures, the effects of long febrile seizures on neuronal function and the potential contribution of these seizures to epilepsy. This review builds on recent advances derived from animal models and summarizes our current knowledge of the mechanisms underlying febrile seizures and of changes in neuronal gene expression and function that facilitate the enduring effects of prolonged febrile seizures on neuronal and network excitability. The review also discusses the relevance of these findings to the general mechanisms of epileptogenesis during development and points out gaps in our knowledge, including the relationship of animal models to human febrile seizures and epilepsy. PMID:17897728

  5. Familial Mediterranean Fever and Hypercoagulability

    PubMed Central

    Tayer-Shifman, Oshrat E.; Ben-Chetrit, Eldad

    2011-01-01

    Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) is an autosomal recessive hereditary disease which is characterized by recurrent attacks of fever and peritonitis, pleuritis, arthritis, or erysipelas-like skin disease. As such, FMF is a prototype of autoinflammatory diseases where genetic changes lead to acute inflammatory episodes. Systemic inflammation – in general - may increase procoagulant factors, and decrease natural anticoagulants and fibrinolytic activity. Therefore, it is anticipated to see more thrombotic events among FMF patients compared with healthy subjects. However, reviewing the current available literature and based upon our personal experience, thrombotic events related purely to FMF are very rare. Possible explanation for this discrepancy is that along with the procoagulant activity during FMF acute attacks, anticoagulant and fibrinolytic changes are also taking place. Colchicine which is the treatment of choice in FMF may also play a role in reducing inflammation thereby decreasing hypercoagulability. PMID:21713077

  6. Yellow Fever: A Reemerging Threat

    PubMed Central

    Gardner, Christina L.; Ryman, Kate D.

    2014-01-01

    Yellow fever (YF) is a viral disease, endemic to tropical regions of Africa and the Americas. YF principally affects humans and nonhuman primates, and is transmitted via the bite of infected mosquitoes. The agent of YF, yellow fever virus (YFV), can cause devastating epidemics of potentially fatal, hemorrhagic disease. We rely on mass vaccination campaigns to prevent and control these outbreaks. However, the risk of major YF epidemics, especially in densely populated, poor urban settings, both in Africa and South America, has greatly increased due to: (1) reinvasion of urban settings by the mosquito vector of YF, Aedes aegypti; (2) rapid urbanization, particularly in parts of Africa, with populations shifting from rural to predominantly urban; and (3) waning immunization coverage. Consequently, YF is considered an emerging, or reemerging disease of considerable importance. PMID:20513550

  7. SEROLOGICAL STUDIES IN RHEUMATIC FEVER

    PubMed Central

    Fischel, Edward E.; Pauli, Ruth H.

    1949-01-01

    1. An attempt was made to repeat and extend various tests which have been presumed to demonstrate specific antigens and antibodies in rheumatic fever. 2. The "phase reaction" appears to be an inconstant phenomenon probably related to a colloidal abnormality of the serum, rather than to a specific antigen-antibody system. 3. No specific autoantibodies to human tissue extracts were demonstrable by complement fixation or by the collodion particle technique. Variable results were noted with the same test sera on different occasions, and positive reactions with control tissues and control sera were observed. 4. The possibility should be considered that autoantibodies are not necessarily specific for rheumatic fever but may be manifestations of the occurrence of a type of reaction similar to a biologically false positive Wassermann reaction. PMID:18129865

  8. Crimean-Congo Hemorrhagic Fever.

    PubMed

    Shayan, Sara; Bokaean, Mohammad; Shahrivar, Mona Ranjvar; Chinikar, Sadegh

    2015-01-01

    Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus (CCHFV) is a member of the Bunyaviridae family and Nairovirus genus. The viral genome consists of 3 RNA segments of 12 kb (L), 6.8 kb (M), and 3 kb (S). Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever (CCHF) is the most widespread tickborne viral infection worldwide: it has been reported in many regions of Africa, the Middle East, and Asia. The geographical distribution of CCHFV corresponds most closely with the distribution of members of the tick genera, and Hyalomma ticks are the principal source of human infection. In contrast to human infection, CCHFV infection is asymptomatic in all species. Treatment options for CCHF are limited; immunotherapy and ribavirin are effective in the treatment of CCHF; the efficacy of ribavirin in the treatment of CCHF has not yet been proven. This article reviews the history, epidemiology, clinical symptoms, pathogenesis, diagnosis, and treatment of CCHFV, as well as the development of a vaccine against it.

  9. Bilateral retinitis following typhoid fever.

    PubMed

    Prabhushanker, M; Topiwalla, Tasneem T; Ganesan, Geetha; Appandaraj, Sripal

    2017-01-01

    Post typhoid fever immune related reactions affecting the eye is a rare finding which can have various presentations in which typhoid retinopathy is not a well recognized sequelae. Here we present a case of 59 year old male who presented with right eye sudden painless loss of vision 4 weeks after typhoid fever which was diagnosed and treated successfully. His BCVA was 2/60 in right eye and 6/6 in left eye. Fundus examination showed retinitis along with macular serous detachment in right eye and retinitis in left eye. Significant improvement in BCVA in right eye was observed after treatment with oral steroid with resolving retinitis lesions. Diagnosis of post typhoid immune mediated retinitis was made with good resolution following treatment. Immune mediated retinitis is a rare sequelae to typhoid infection which can be successfully treated with systemic steroids with good resolution of the lesions.

  10. Experimental therapies for yellow fever

    PubMed Central

    Julander, Justin G.

    2013-01-01

    A number of viruses in the family Flaviviridae are the focus of efforts to develop effective antiviral therapies. Success has been achieved with inhibitors for the treatment of hepatitis C, and there is interest in clinical trials of drugs against dengue fever. Antiviral therapies have also been evaluated in patients with Japanese encephalitis and West Nile encephalitis. However, no treatment has been developed against the prototype flavivirus, yellow fever virus (YFV). Despite the availability of the live, attenuated 17D vaccine, thousands of cases of YF continue to occur each year in Africa and South America, with a significant mortality rate. In addition, a small number of vaccinees develop severe systemic infections with the 17D virus. This paper reviews current efforts to develop antiviral therapies, either directly targeting the virus or blocking detrimental host responses to infection. PMID:23237991

  11. Pathogenesis of arenavirus hemorrhagic fevers.

    PubMed

    Moraz, Marie-Laurence; Kunz, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    Viral hemorrhagic fevers (VHFs) caused by arenaviruses belong to the most devastating emerging human diseases and represent serious public health problems. Arenavirus VHFs in humans are acute diseases characterized by fever and, in severe cases, different degrees of hemorrhages associated with a shock syndrome in the terminal stage. Over the past years, much has been learned about the pathogenesis of arenaviruses at the cellular level, in particular their ability to subvert the host cell's innate antiviral defenses. Clinical studies and novel animal models have provided important new information about the interaction of hemorrhagic arenaviruses with the host's adaptive immune system, in particular virus-induced immunosuppression, and have provided the first hints towards an understanding of the terminal hemorrhagic shock syndrome. The scope of this article is to review our current knowledge on arenavirus VHF pathogenesis with an emphasis on recent developments.

  12. MUCOCUTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF CHIKUNGUNYA FEVER

    PubMed Central

    Bandyopadhyay, Debabrata; Ghosh, Sudip Kumar

    2010-01-01

    Chikungunya fever (CF) is an arboviral acute febrile illness transmitted by the bite of infected Aedes mosquitoes. After a quiescence of more than three decades, CF has recently re-emerged as a major public health problem of global scale. CF is characterized by an acute onset of high fever associated with a severe disabling arthritis often accompanied by prominent mucocutaneous manifestations. The disease is usually self-limiting, but the joint symptoms and some of the cutaneous features may persist after the defervescence. A wide range of mucocutaneous changes has been described to occur in association with CF during the current epidemic. Besides a morbilliform erythema, hyperpigmentation, xerosis, excoriated papules, aphthous-like ulcers, vesiculobullous and lichenoid eruptions, and exacerbation of pre-existing or quiescent dermatoses had been observed frequently. These unusual features may help in the clinical differential diagnosis of acute viral exanthems mimicking CF. PMID:20418982

  13. Inhalation challenge in humidifier fever.

    PubMed

    Edwards, J H; Cockcroft, A

    1981-05-01

    When exposed to an amount of contaminated humidifier water roughly equivalent to that inhaled over an 8-hour period at their work place, four out of six subjects developed symptoms of humidifier fever. Two non-exposed subjects failed to react to the same challenge. Characteristic lung function, temperature and leucocyte changes were recorded; however, a fall in gas transfer previously reported was not seen. That the reaction was immunologically mediated and not due to endotoxin activity was shown by a negative pyrogen response in rabbits inoculated intravenously with concentrated humidifier water. The nature of the immune response has not as yet been evaluated but it does not reside with the ability of humidifier fever antigens to activate complement. Skin testing produced an immediate weal and flare in the four subjects with precipitins and may reflect the presence of short-term anaphylactic IgG antibody.

  14. Yellow fever in the Americas.

    PubMed

    Bryan, Charles S; Moss, Sandra W; Kahn, Richard J

    2004-06-01

    Dutch slave traders brought yellow fever to the Americas from Africa during the mid-seventeenth century. For the next two and a half centuries, the disease terrorized seaports throughout the Americas. Proof of the mosquito hypothesis was delayed because of two aspects of the disease: patients are viremic only during the first several days of clinical illness, and most mosquitoes require about 2 weeks of viral incubation before becoming infectious. Control of Aedes aegypti in urban centers failed to eliminate the disease because of its transmission by tree-hole-breeding mosquitoes that spend their winged lives mainly in forest canopies. Yellow fever continues to be a significant public health problem in parts of South America and Africa.

  15. Unusual Presentation of Dengue Fever

    PubMed Central

    Aslam, Moaz; Aleem, Numra A.; Zahid, Mohammad F.; Rahman, Arshalooz J.

    2016-01-01

    Dengue fever (DF) is an acute febrile illness that follows a self-limiting course. However, some patients suffer from complications, including myocarditis, due to the involvement of other organs. A child presented at the Aga Khan University Hospital in Karachi, Pakistan, in June 2013 with a high-grade fever, malaise and epigastric pain radiating to the chest. Positive DF antigen and immunoglobulin M assays confirmed the diagnosis of DF. Persistent bradycardia with low blood pressure led to further cardiac investigations which showed a decreased ejection fraction and raised serum cardiac enzymes, indicating myocardial damage. With supportive care and use of inotropes, the spontaneous normalisation of cardiac enzyme levels and ejection fraction was observed. The child was discharged five days after admission. This case highlights the importance of identifying myocarditis in DF patients suffering from cardiac symptoms that are not explained by other potential aetiologies. Awareness, early suspicion and supportive care are essential to ensure favourable outcomes. PMID:26909198

  16. Familial Mediterranean fever: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Sönmez, Hafize Emine; Batu, Ezgi Deniz; Özen, Seza

    2016-01-01

    Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) is the most frequent monogenic autoinflammatory disease, and it is characterized by recurrent attacks of fever and polyserositis. The disease is associated with mutations in the MEFV gene encoding pyrin, which causes exaggerated inflammatory response through uncontrolled production of interleukin 1. The major long-term complication of FMF is amyloidosis. Colchicine remains the principle therapy, and the aim of treatment is to prevent acute attacks and the consequences of chronic inflammation. With the evolution in the concepts about the etiopathogenesis and genetics of the disease, we have understood that FMF is more complicated than an ordinary autosomal recessive monogenic disorder. Recently, recommendation sets have been generated for interpretation of genetic testing and genetic diagnosis of FMF. Here, we have reviewed the current perspectives in FMF in light of recent recommendations. PMID:27051312

  17. Crimean-Congo Hemorrhagic Fever.

    PubMed

    Burnett, Mark W

    2015-01-01

    In mid-September 2009, a 22-year-old critically ill Soldier was medically evacuated from a treatment facility in southern Afghanistan to Landstuhl Regional Medical Center in Germany. Despite the efforts of the team at Landstuhl, this patient died and became the US military's first known victim of Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever (CCHF). CCHF is caused by a virus, which bears the same name. Because a vaccine is lacking, as well as an effective antiviral treatment, prevention is key.

  18. Behavioural fever in zebrafish larvae.

    PubMed

    Rey, Sonia; Moiche, Visila; Boltaña, Sebastian; Teles, Mariana; MacKenzie, Simon

    2017-02-01

    Behavioural fever has been reported in different species of mobile ectotherms including the zebrafish, Danio rerio, in response to exogenous pyrogens. In this study we report, to our knowledge for the first time, upon the ontogenic onset of behavioural fever in zebrafish (Danio rerio) larvae. For this, zebrafish larvae (from first feeding to juveniles) were placed in a continuous thermal gradient providing the opportunity to select their preferred temperature. The novel thermal preference aquarium was based upon a continuous vertical column system and allows for non-invasive observation of larvae vertical distribution under isothermal (TR at 28 °C) and thermal gradient conditions (TCH: 28-32 °C). Larval thermal preference was assessed under both conditions with or without an immersion challenge, in order to detect the onset of the behavioural fever response. Our results defined the onset of the dsRNA induced behavioural fever at 18-20 days post fertilization (dpf). Significant differences were observed in dsRNA challenged larvae, which prefer higher temperatures (1-4 °C increase) throughout the experimental period as compared to non-challenged larvae. In parallel we measured the abundance of antiviral transcripts; viperin, gig2, irf7, trim25 and Mxb mRNAs in dsRNA challenged larvae under both thermal regimes: TR and TCh. Significant increases in the abundance of all measured transcripts were recorded under thermal choice conditions signifying that thermo-coupling and the resultant enhancement of the immune response to dsRNA challenge occurs from 18 dpf onwards in the zebrafish. The results are of importance as they identify a key developmental stage where the neuro-immune interface matures in the zebrafish likely providing increased resistance to viral infection.

  19. Azathioprine-induced fever in autoimmune hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Khoury, Tawfik; Ollech, Jacob E; Chen, Shmuel; Mizrahi, Meir; Shalit, Meir

    2013-01-01

    Underdiagnosis of drug-induced fever leads to extensive investigation and prolongation of hospitalization, and may lead to multiple unnecessary invasive procedures and a wrong diagnosis. Azathioprine is a widely used immunosuppressive drug. We report a case of a 53-year-old female patient diagnosed with autoimmune hepatitis treated with azathioprine, who presented to the emergency room with a 6-wk history of fever and chills without other associated symptoms. Since the patient’s fever was of unknown origin, she was hospitalized. All treatment was stopped and an extensive workup to explore the source of fever and chills was performed. Results of chest X-ray, viral, urine, and blood cultures, autoimmune serology, transthoracic and transesophageal echocardiography, and abdominal ultrasound revealed no source of infection. A rechallenge test of azathioprine was performed and the fever and chills returned within a few hours. Azathioprine was established as the definite cause following rechallenge. Fever as an adverse drug reaction is often unrecognized. Azathioprine has been reported to cause drug-induced fever in patients with inflammatory bowel disease, rheumatoid arthritis, and sarcoidosis. To the best of our knowledge there have been no previous reports documenting azathioprine-induced fever in patients with autoimmune hepatitis. The occurrence of fever following the readministration of azathioprine suggests the diagnosis of drug-induced fever, particularly after the exclusion of other causes. A careful rechallenge is recommended to confirm the diagnosis. PMID:23840156

  20. [West Nile fever/encephalitis].

    PubMed

    Takasaki, Tomohiko

    2007-12-01

    West Nile virus (WNV), a member of the family Flaviviridae (genus Flavivirus), is a mosquito-borne virus first isolated in 1937 in the West Nile district of Uganda. The disease in humans is characterized by a dengue-like illness with fever, and a more severe form is characterized by central nervous system involvement, including encephalitis, meningitis, and myelitis. WN encephalitis was first reported in the Western Hemisphere in the summer of 1999, there was an outbreak in New York City. Epidemic WNV strains in North America are severely pathogenic, however, attenuated WNV strains were found in Texas and Mexico in 2003. The principal vectors of WNV transmission in North America are Culex. pipiens, Cx. Quinquefasciatus, Cx. restuans, Cx salinarius and Cx talsalis. The number of WN fever case has exceeded 27,000 since 1999 in the United States and 4,600 since 2002 in Canada. The first imported case of West Nile fever in Japan was confirmed in September, 2005. The patient had returned to Japan from the United States and developed symptoms the next day. There is currently no WN vaccine for use in humans. An inactivated WNV vaccine for use in horses has been available since 2001. A DNA vaccine, a chimeric live attenuated vaccine, and a recombinant vaccine have also been licensed for use in horses.

  1. [Amyloidosis and familial Mediterranean fever].

    PubMed

    Pras, M

    1986-01-01

    Familial Mediterranean Fever (F. M. F.) is an autosomal recessive disorder occurring most commonly in Sepharadi Jews and Armenians. Two phenotypic features characterize the disease: brief episodic febrile attacks of peritonitis, pleuritis or synovitis recurring from childhood or adolescence and the development of systemic amyloidosis. Attacks are accompanied by striking elevations of acute phase proteins, including serum amyloid A protein. The amyloidosis of Familial Mediterranean Fever is of the AA type, and manifest clinically as a nephropathy that passes through proteinuria, nephrotic and uremic stages to renal death. Although there is ethnic variation in the incidence of amyloidosis of F. M. F. in our patient population--predominantly Sepharadi Jews of North African extraction--an amyloidotic death at an early age is their genetic destiny. Since the introduction in 1972 of colchicine to prevent the febrile attacks, the drug has been proven and become the main stay of therapy. Today, colchicine has been shown to be effective in preventing amyloidosis as well as the febrile attacks in Familial Mediterranean Fever. End stage renal disease is not the end of the road for patients with F.M.F. because of improving outlook for dialysis and renal transplantation in these patients.

  2. [Combatting fever, phlegm and cough].

    PubMed

    Solar Silva, M A

    1991-03-01

    only ones that should be treated. Fever it probably the defense mechanism that has elicited the greatest treatment efforts. Lowering the fever through medication does nothing to fight the virus but makes children feel well enough to resume playing outside, thereby increasing the risk of secondary bacterial infection. Children with fevers should be kept hydrated. Only in the case of pain should medication be given to lower the fever. Aspirin should be avoided in children. An untreated fever provides information on the course of the disease: spontaneous decline followed by a rise may indicate bacterial infection.

  3. Rocky Mountain spotted fever in Argentina.

    PubMed

    Paddock, Christopher D; Fernandez, Susana; Echenique, Gustavo A; Sumner, John W; Reeves, Will K; Zaki, Sherif R; Remondegui, Carlos E

    2008-04-01

    We describe the first molecular confirmation of Rickettsia rickettsii, the cause of Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF), from a tick vector, Amblyomma cajennense, and from a cluster of fatal spotted fever cases in Argentina. Questing A. cajennense ticks were collected at or near sites of presumed or confirmed cases of spotted fever rickettsiosis in Jujuy Province and evaluated by polymerase chain reaction assays for spotted fever group rickettsiae. DNA of R. rickettsii was amplified from a pool of A. cajennense ticks and from tissues of one of four patients who died during 2003-2004 after illnesses characterized by high fever, severe headache, myalgias, and petechial rash. The diagnosis of spotted fever rickettsiosis was confirmed in the other patients by indirect immunofluorescence antibody and immunohistochemical staining techniques. These findings show the existence of RMSF in Argentina and emphasize the need for clinicians throughout the Americas to consider RMSF in patients with febrile rash illnesses.

  4. Fever of unknown origin in returning travellers.

    PubMed

    Korzeniewski, Krzysztof; Gaweł, Bartłomiej; Krankowska, Dagny; Wasilczuk, Katarzyna

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the article is to discuss issues associated with the occurrence of febrile illnesses in leisure and business travellers, with a particular emphasis on fevers of unknown origin (FUO). FUO, apart from diarrhoeas, respiratory tract infections and skin lesions, are one of the most common health problems in travellers to tropical and subtropical countries. FUO are manifestations of various diseases, typically of infectious or invasive aetiology. In one out of 3 cases, the cause of a fever in travellers returning from the hot climate zone is malaria, and therefore diagnostic tests should first aim at ruling out this specific disease entity. Other illnesses with persistent fever include dengue, enteric fever, viral hepatitis A, bacterial diarrhoeas and rickettsioses. Fever may also occur in travellers suffering from diseases of non-tropical origin, e.g. cosmopolitan respiratory tract or urinary tract infections, also, fever may coexist with other illnesses or injuries (skin rashes, bites, burns).

  5. Typhoid fever: case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Sanhueza Palma, Natalia Carolina; Farías Molina, Solange; Calzadilla Riveras, Jeannette; Hermoso, Amalia

    2016-06-21

    Typhoid fever remains a major health problem worldwide, in contrast to Chile, where this disease is an isolated finding. Clinical presentation is varied, mainly presenting with fever, malaise, abdominal discomfort, and nonspecific symptoms often confused with other causes of febrile syndrome. We report a six-year-old, male patient presenting with fever of two weeks associated with gastrointestinal symptoms, malaise, hepatomegaly and elevated liver enzymes. Differential diagnoses were considered and a Widal reaction and two blood cultures were requested; both came back positive, confirming the diagnosis of typhoid fever caused by Salmonella typhi. Prior to diagnosis confirmation, empirical treatment was initiated with ceftriaxone and metronidazole, with partial response; then drug therapy was adjusted according to ciprofloxacin susceptibility testing with a favorable clinical response. We discuss diagnostic methods and treatment of enteric fever with special emphasis on typhoid fever.

  6. Fever without apparent source on clinical examination.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, Paul L

    2003-02-01

    This section focuses on issues in infectious disease that are commonly encountered in pediatric office practices. Dr. McCarthy discusses recent literature regarding the evaluation and management of acute fevers without apparent source on clinical examination in infants and children and the evaluation of children with prolonged fevers of unknown origin. Drs. Klig and Chen (pp 121-126) review recent literature about lower respiratory infection in children. This section focuses on febrile children in whom a source of fever is not readily apparent on clinical examination. This issue is discussed in several contexts: recent developments concerning the epidemiology, pathophysiology, diagnostic approach, and therapy of febrile illnesses; children from 3 to 36 months of age with fever; infants younger than 90 days of age with fever; and children of any age with prolonged fever, usually lasting more than 7 to 10 days, for whom a diagnosis has not been established.

  7. Prevention of lassa Fever in Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Inegbenebor, Ute; Okosun, John; Inegbenebor, Josephine

    2010-01-01

    Although specific treatment is available for Lassa fever, early diagnosis is still difficult in most Nigerian primary and secondary health centers. This study was carried out to compare the case-fatality rates of Lassa fever and other medical diseases commonly seen in adult medical wards, to determine the community habits that make Lassa fever endemic in Edo Central District of Nigeria, with the aim of prescribing preventive measures for its control in Nigeria. The records of 908 inpatients in the adult medical wards of Irrua Specialist Teaching Hospital, Irrua and responses from respondents interviewed by trained interviewers on their knowledge, attitudes and practices pertaining to Lassa fever were used for this study. The case-fatality rate of Lassa fever in this center was 28%. Cultural factors and habits were found to favor endemicity of Lassa fever in Edo Central District of Nigeria. Preventive measures were prescribed for families and communities.

  8. Simian Hemorrhagic Fever (SHF) Virus. Phase 3

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-07-31

    tlll AD111 CONTRACT NO: DAMDI7-91-C-1006 TITLE: SIMIAN HEMORRHAGIC FEVER (SHF) VIRUS PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Margo A. Brinton, Ph.D. CONTRACTING...SUBTITLE S. FUNDING NUMBERS Simian Hemorrhagic Fever (SHF) Virus DAMD17-91-C-1006 6. AUTHOR(S) Margo A. Brinton, Ph.D. 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION...simian hemorrhagic fever (SHF) virus -specific hybridoma cultures, expand two clones from each clone as well as 50 ml of supernatant fluid from

  9. Advanced heart block in acute rheumatic fever.

    PubMed

    Hubail, Zakariya; Ebrahim, Ishaq M

    2016-04-01

    First degree heart block is considered a minor criterion for the diagnosis of this condition. The cases presented here demonstrate that higher degrees of heart block do occur in rheumatic fever. Children presenting with acquired heart block should be worked-up for rheumatic fever. Likewise, it is imperative to serially follow the electrocardiogram in patients already diagnosed with acute rheumatic fever, as the conduction abnormalities can change during the course of the disease.

  10. [Postoperative fever in orthopedic and urologic surgery].

    PubMed

    Saavedra, Federico; Myburg, Cristina; Lanfranconi, Marisa B; Urtasun, Martin; De Oca, Luis Montes; Silberman, Andres; Lambierto, Alberto; Gnocchi, Cesar A

    2008-01-01

    Post-operative fever incidence varies widely. In clean and clean-contaminated surgery the non-infectious fever is more frequent than the infectious fever. We performed a prospective study including 303 patients who underwent orthopedic and urologic elective surgery. The aims of our study were to investigate the incidence of post-operative fever, its etiology, the relationship between time of onset and the etiology, and the usefulness of extensive fever work-up to determine post-operative infection. The incidence of post-operative fever was 14% (42/303) of which 81% (34/42) was noninfectious and 19% (8/42) was infectious. The etiology of the fever in the first 48 hours after surgery was always non-infectious (p < 0.001). An extensive fever work-up was performed in patients who presented fever only after the initial 48 hours of surgery with normal physical examination (n = 19) consisting of chest x-ray, blood (2) and urine cultures. The chest x-ray was normal in all the patients, the urine cultures were positive in four cases (21%, IC 95%: 6-45) and the blood cultures in only one case (5%, IC 95%: 0.1-26). Seven patients had post-operative infections without fever as a clinical sign. The most frequently observed etiology of post-operative fever was non-infectious, related to the normal inflammatory host response to surgery. Based on the present results, the extensive fever work-up performed to investigate post-operative infection does not seem to be a useful tool. The diagnosis of post-operative infection was based on clinical follow up and the correct interpretation of the patient's symptoms and signs.

  11. Managing hay fever during the exam period.

    PubMed

    Pearce, Linda

    Hay-fever symptoms are common and debilitating and can have a detrimental effect on students' examination results. It is important to provide effective treatment using medication that optimises symptom control while ensuring drug side-effects are minimised. Research has confirmed that uncontrolled hay fever or medication side-effects can have a detrimental outcome on exam results. Ideally treatment should commence shortly before the start of the hay-fever season.

  12. [Hemorrhagic dengue fever after trip to Malaysia].

    PubMed

    Hafner, C; Koellner, K; Vogt, T; Landthaler, M; Szeimies, R-M

    2006-08-01

    A 39-year-old patient developed a disseminated rash with scattered petechiae, fever, malaise and arthralgia after a trip to Malaysia. The patient displayed increasing dengue IgG titers and borderline dengue IgM titers. Dengue fever with a hemorrhagic course is a rare condition in adult patients. Patients who have previously had dengue fever and retained non-neutralizing heterotypic antibodies are more likely to develop this complication via the phenomenon of antibody-dependent enhancement.

  13. Fertilisation of the Southern Atlantic: Ephemeral River Valleys as a replenishing source of nutrient-enriched mineral aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dansie, Andrew; Wiggs, Giles; Thomas, David

    2016-04-01

    Oceanic dust deposition provides biologically important iron and macronutrients (Phosphorus (P) and Nitrogen-based (N) compounds) that contribute to phytoplankton growth, marine productivity and oceanic atmospheric CO2 uptake. Research on dust emission sources to date has largely focused on the northern hemisphere and on ephemeral lakes and pans. Our work considers the ephemeral river valleys of the west coast of Namibia as an important yet overlooked source of ocean-fertilizing dust. Dust plumes are frequently emitted from the river valleys by strong easterly winds during the Southern Hemisphere winter, when the upwelling of the Benguela Current is at its weakest. We present field data from dust emission source areas along the main river channels near the coastal termini of the Huab, Kuiseb and Tsauchab river valleys. Collected data include erodible surface sediment, wind-blown flux, and associated meteorological data. Extensive surface sediment sampling was also undertaken throughout the combined 34,250 km2 extent of each river valley catchment with samples collected from within the main river channels, the main branches of each river system, selected tributaries, and into the upper watersheds. Geochemical data show valley sediment and wind-blown flux material have high concentrations of bioavailable Fe, P and N, exceeding that measured at the major dry lake basin dust sources in southern Africa. The contribution of fertilising deposition material is enhanced by both the spatial proximity of the source areas to the ocean and enrichment of source material by ephemeral fluvial accumulation and desiccation. Results show that geographical factors within each watershed play a key role in the nutrient composition of the emitting fluvial deposits in the river valleys. Analysis explores potential relationships between land use, geology, climate and precipitation in the upper watersheds and their influence on bioavailability of Fe, P and N compounds in wind

  14. Use of the Continuous Slope-Area Method to Estimate Runoff Through Ephemeral Stream Channels in SE Arizona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, A. M.; Callegary, J. B.; Smith, C. F.; Wiele, S. M.; Cordova, J. T.; Fritzinger, R. A.; Gupta, H. V.

    2008-12-01

    Quantifying discharge and associated ground-water recharge from ephemeral flow events in the desert southwest USA is of increasing importance because of mandates to achieve sustainability of water resources; however, low-cost techniques for accurate and continuous monitoring of ephemeral flows are not established. The continuous-slope area (CSA) method extends the well-known slope area method (used to develop peak-flow hydrographs) to permit complete-event discharge hydrographs to be developed. The method was tested by installing 11 CSA gaging sites within three sand-bedded ephemeral tributaries to the San Pedro River near Sierra Vista and Fort Huachuca, Arizona. CSA gages were located in reaches with 1) slowly varying flow paths, 2) total channel length at least nine times the channel width, 3) nearly constant cross-widths along the reach, and, 4) accessibility. A single CSA gage required three pressure transducers to be installed along the selected reach, separated by flow-path lengths about five times the channel width. Perforated pipes were driven 1 to 1.5 meters into bed sediments at a downstream angle of 45 degrees. Transducers were set in pipes with sensors located five to 10 centimeters below the channel bed. Channel cross-sections, cutting through each transducer location, were surveyed after installation and after significant flow events. For an independent check of stage/discharge, one gage was installed upstream of a broad-crested weir; this gage was fitted with a staff-plate to allow confirmatory observations. The USGS slope-area-computation program was modified to compute continuous discharge hydrographs, using survey data, stage time series, and estimates of channel roughness. The highest stage measured was 1.3 meters above the bed with an associated peak discharge of 34 cubic meters per second, and with a sustained flow of 28 cubic meters per second for 10 minutes. Runoff and ground-water recharge from flow events will be estimated using

  15. a Landscape Perspective of Ephemeral Erosion: Topographic Parameters Associated with Soil Property, Soil Productivity, and Precipitation Patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lentz, Rodrick David

    The pattern of ephemeral gully erosion and crop productivity was investigated in three different southeastern Minnesota soilscapes during 1988 and 1989. In addition, the role that local or regional landscape configuration has in controlling distribution of precipitation in agricultural landscapes was investigated. A full-scale model of a small hill was instrumented to measure rainfall intensity across its surface. The model was employed to test for wind-terrain interactions and to determine if these effects conform to the drift theory. Another study sought to identify local and topographic parameters associated with deposition and redistribution of snow in agricultural landscapes having complex relief. In 1989 soil lost from ephemeral gullies ranged from 0.8 to 1.6 Mg/ha at the study sites. Soil loss at the Mower county site ranged from 0.8 to 9.8 Mg/ha during '86, '87, and '89 seasons. Crop yield of gullied areas was not significantly different (a = 0.05) than that of adjacent non-gullied areas during the two relatively dry years, 1988 and 1989. Mid-channel reaches were most sensitive to effects of erosion. Topographically sensitive controls of ephemeral erosion, such as surface saturation and stream transport capacity, played different roles in channel formation at each site. Hydrologic rainfall varied by as much as 36% across hill model surfaces. A wind-terrain interaction occurred at all summit elevations tested (0.9, 2.1, and 2.7 m), and over a range of incident wind speeds (1 to 11 m s ^{-1}) and meteorological rainfall rates (1 to 100 mm hr^{-1}). Rainfall vector analysis indicated that a drifting process was partially responsible for the observed rainfall pattern. The drift theory did not explain decreasing rainfall incidence observed from lower to upper windward slopes. Snowfall deposition was nonuniform at mean event wind speeds above 1.2 m s^{-1} . Greatest variation in snow depth, typically about 400%, was observed when mean event wind speeds exceeded 3

  16. JOINT SYMPOSIUM ON TYPHOID FEVER. HELD AT ABBASSIA FEVER HOSPITAL ON 13-15 JANUARY 1970

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Contents include: Typhoid fever as an endemic disease of importance in the Middle East; Statistics and epidemiology of typhoid fever in U.A.R.; The...pathology of salmonelloses; Enterica of childhood; Surgical complications of typhoid; Diagnosis of typhoid fever by haemagglutination; Phage typing of...the typhoid bacillus; Relation of schistosomiasis to typhoid fever ; Antimicrobial therapy of salmonella infections; Round table discussion on public

  17. Vaccines for preventing typhoid fever.

    PubMed

    Anwar, Elspeth; Goldberg, Elad; Fraser, Abigail; Acosta, Camilo J; Paul, Mical; Leibovici, Leonard

    2014-01-02

    Typhoid fever and paratyphoid fever continue to be important causes of illness and death, particularly among children and adolescents in south-central and southeast Asia. Two typhoid vaccines are commercially available, Ty21a (oral) and Vi polysaccharide (parenteral), but neither is used routinely. Other vaccines, such as a new, modified, conjugated Vi vaccine called Vi-rEPA, are in development. To evaluate the efficacy and adverse effects of vaccines used to prevent typhoid fever. In June 2013, we searched the Cochrane Infectious Diseases Group Specialized Register, CENTRAL, MEDLINE, EMBASE, LILACS, and mRCT. We also searched relevant conference proceedings up to 2013 and scanned the reference lists of all included trials. Randomized and quasi-randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing typhoid fever vaccines with other typhoid fever vaccines or with an inactive agent (placebo or vaccine for a different disease). Two review authors independently applied inclusion criteria and extracted data. We computed vaccine efficacy per year of follow-up and cumulative three-year efficacy, stratifying for vaccine type and dose. The outcome addressed was typhoid fever, defined as isolation of Salmonella typhi in blood. We calculated risk ratios (RRs) and efficacy (1-RR as a percentage) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). In total, 18 RCTs were included in this review; 12 evaluated efficacy (Ty21a: five trials; Vi polysaccharide: six trials; Vi-rEPA: one trial), and 11 reported on adverse events. Ty21a vaccine (oral vaccine, three doses) A three-dose schedule of Ty21a vaccine prevents around one-third to one-half of typhoid cases in the first two years after vaccination (Year 1: 35%, 95% CI 8% to 54%; Year 2: 58%, 95% CI 40% to 71%; one trial, 20,543 participants; moderate quality evidence; data taken from a single trial conducted in Indonesia in the 1980s). No benefit was detected in the third year after vaccination. Four additional cluster-RCTs have been conducted, but the

  18. Fever of unknown origin due to rickettsioses.

    PubMed

    Botelho-Nevers, Elisabeth; Raoult, Didier

    2007-12-01

    Most common rickettsioses do not fill the criteria for fever of unknown origin, with fever often inferior to lasting less than 1 week. Q fever, scrub typhus, murine typhus, human monocytic ehrlichiosis, and Bartonellosis could fill these criteria, however, notably in uncommon presentations. Moreover, in patients returning from tropical areas or from geographic endemic areas for rickettsiosis, or in patients in contact with animals or ticks, theses etiologies should be kept in mind by physicians challenged to diagnose cause of fever. In this context, even without confirmation of diagnosis, treatment with doxycycline should be used.

  19. [Differential diagnosis in fever of unknown origin].

    PubMed

    Huppertz, H-I

    2006-11-01

    Fever is one of the most frequent and important symptoms in pediatrics. Most cases are caused by self-limiting viral or easily treatable bacterial infections. If after 5-7 days no cause of the ongoing fever has been found, the condition is termed fever of unknown origin, a working diagnosis which often poses a diagnostic challenge. The ultimate cause may be an infectious disease, a chronic inflammatory disorder, a malignancy, or another rare disease. The cause may also remain obscure or the fever can finally disappear. Here we elaborate the diagnostic work-up and symptomatic treatment.

  20. THE EXPERIMENTAL TRANSMISSION OF COLORADO TICK FEVER.

    PubMed

    Florio, L; Stewart, M O; Mugrage, E R

    1944-09-01

    1. The symptoms, history of tick bite, characteristic fever curve, and white blood cell picture should enable the physician to make a diagnosis of Colorado tick fever in nearly every case. 2. The typical white blood cell picture is a depression of the total leucocytes with a shift to the left of the granulocytes. Basophilic cytoplasmic bodies appear occasionally in lymphocytes 3 to 4 days after clinical recovery. 3. The disease can be transmitted serially in human beings by parenteral injection of blood or serum. Such transfers have not resulted in decreased or increased virulence. 4. The naturally acquired and experimental cases of Colorado tick fever are identical in their manifestations. 5. An attack of Colorado tick fever confers a degree of definite immunity to the disease. 6. Colorado tick fever is not a mild form of Rocky Mountain spotted fever since individuals immunized with ground tick vaccine against Rocky Mountain spotted fever are still susceptible to Colorado tick fever. 7. Adult Dermacentor andersoni ticks allowed to feed on typical cases, then carried through to a new generation and fed on susceptible adults, failed to transmit the disease. 8. Colorado tick fever has been successfully transmitted to an experimental animal, the golden hamster.

  1. Mothers' perceptions of fever in children.

    PubMed

    Al-Nouri, Luay; Basheer, Khalid

    2006-04-01

    The fever is one of the commonest symptoms of disease in childhood. A mother's knowledge and conception of fever may determine the degree of her anxiety and fear, and reflect on the way the fever is managed at home. Our understanding of mothers' attitudes may help to improve the home management of fever by correcting unrealistic beliefs. Mothers of 100 children were randomly selected and interviewed to answer a questionnaire about fever. Sixty mothers thought that fever could lead to death, others thought that it might lead to paralysis, mental retardation or brain damage. This may explain their undue anxiety and fear when having a child with fever. Cold exposure, teething, exposure to sunlight and having a warm drink were considered as causes. A minority reduced the child's clothes during fever. Tap water sprinkling and occasionally alcohol were used. Ninety-four mothers used antipyretics, all used paracetamol and 23 per cent used aspirin. Sixty two used antibiotics indiscriminately. Improved health education is required to allay mothers fear and anxiety and promote a more appropriate fever management at home.

  2. Potential impacts of global climate change on the hydrology and ecology of ephemeral freshwater systems of the forests of the northeastern United States

    Treesearch

    Robert T. Brooks

    2009-01-01

    Global, national, and regional assessments of the potential effects of Global Climate Change (GCC) have been recently released, but not one of these assessments has specifically addressed the critical issue of the potential impacts of GCC on ephemeral freshwater systems (EFS). I suggest that this is a major oversight as EFS occur in various forms across the globe. In...

  3. Modeling the Contribution of Ephemeral Gully Erosion Under Different Soil Management in An Olive Orchard Microcatchment Using AnnAGNPS Model

    EPA Science Inventory

    In Spain, few studies have been carried out to explore the erosion caused by processes other than interrill and rill erosion, such as gully and ephemeral gully erosion, especially because most of the available studies have evaluated the erosion at plot scale. A study about the en...

  4. Modeling the contribution of ephemeral gully erosion under different soil managements: A case study in an olive orchard microcatchment using the AnnAGNPS model

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In Spain, few studies have been carried out to explore the erosion caused by processes other than interril and rill erosion, such as gully and ephemeral gully erosion, especially because most of the available studies have evaluated the erosion at plot scale. A study about the environmental and econo...

  5. Modeling the Contribution of Ephemeral Gully Erosion Under Different Soil Management in An Olive Orchard Microcatchment Using AnnAGNPS Model

    EPA Science Inventory

    In Spain, few studies have been carried out to explore the erosion caused by processes other than interrill and rill erosion, such as gully and ephemeral gully erosion, especially because most of the available studies have evaluated the erosion at plot scale. A study about the en...

  6. Changes in subtidal assemblages in a scenario of warming: proliferations of ephemeral benthic algae in the Canary Islands (eastern Atlantic Ocean).

    PubMed

    Sangil, Carlos; Sansón, Marta; Afonso-Carrillo, Julio; Herrera, Rogelio; Rodríguez, Adriana; Martín-García, Laura; Díaz-Villa, Tania

    2012-06-01

    The present work analysed the main changes in subtidal algal assemblages in the last decade in an oceanic archipelago (Canary Islands--eastern Atlantic Ocean). Changes result from increases in cover of ephemeral benthic algae, such as the non-native chlorophyte Pseudotetraspora marina and the native cyanophytes Blennothrix lyngbyacea, Schizothrix calcicola and Schizothrix mexicana. Ephemeral algae overgrow subtidal assemblages which are extensively dominated by Lobophora variegata, but competitively do not exclude other species. Increases in the abundance of species coincided with a warming of about 2 °C in surface seawater temperature (SST) linked to the weakening of the Cold Canary Current and the Northwestern African upwelling. Shifts in the distribution and cover of ephemeral species follow the SST gradient from warmer waters in the western islands to colder waters in the eastern ones. While in the warmest western islands, species have spread quickly colonizing all type of substrates in just a few years (2005-2008), the occurrence of ephemerals towards the coldest eastern islands is yet inconspicuous. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Severe Fever with Thrombocytopenia Syndrome Complicated by Co-infection with Spotted Fever Group Rickettsiae, China

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Qing-Bin; Li, Hao; Zhang, Pan-He; Cui, Ning; Yang, Zhen-Dong; Fan, Ya-Di; Cui, Xiao-Ming; Hu, Jian-Gong; Guo, Chen-Tao; Zhang, Xiao-Ai; Cao, Wu-Chun

    2016-01-01

    During 2013–2015 in central China, co-infection with spotted fever group rickettsiae was identified in 77 of 823 patients infected with severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome virus. Co-infection resulted in delayed recovery and increased risk for death, prompting clinical practices in the region to consider co-infection in patients with severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome. PMID:27767921

  8. Severe Fever with Thrombocytopenia Syndrome Complicated by Co-infection with Spotted Fever Group Rickettsiae, China.

    PubMed

    Lu, Qing-Bin; Li, Hao; Zhang, Pan-He; Cui, Ning; Yang, Zhen-Dong; Fan, Ya-Di; Cui, Xiao-Ming; Hu, Jian-Gong; Guo, Chen-Tao; Zhang, Xiao-Ai; Liu, Wei; Cao, Wu-Chun

    2016-11-01

    During 2013-2015 in central China, co-infection with spotted fever group rickettsiae was identified in 77 of 823 patients infected with severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome virus. Co-infection resulted in delayed recovery and increased risk for death, prompting clinical practices in the region to consider co-infection in patients with severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome.

  9. [Fever with chemotherapy induced neutropenia].

    PubMed

    Conen, Katrin

    2014-01-01

    Cancer patients under chemotherapy are at high risk for neutropenia. If fever occurs in this situation an oncologic emergency is underway. Patient should receive immediate basic diagnostic procedures and broad-spectrum antibiotics have to be initiated. Definition of febrile neutropenia (FN) encloses oral temperature of > 38.3 °C or two consecutive readings of > 38.0 °C one hour apart and an absolute neutrophil count of < 0.5 × 109/l. FN management requires immediate action and therefore needs patient education and standard operating procedures in the clinical setting. Treatment strategies depend on risk factors and symptoms of the patient. Instruments, mainly the Multinational Association for Supportive Care (MASCC), can predict low and high risk situations and are useful tools in clinical practice. Low-risk patients can either be treated by oral or short term intravenous antibacterial therapy with an early change to an oral protocol (oral treatment recommendation: Quinolone with amoxicillin/clavulanic acid). Hospital admission is recommended in low-risk patients but outpatient management has become increasingly appealing in selected cases due to costs, reduction in nosocomial infections and patient's convenience. High-risk patients should always be admitted to the hospital and broad-spectrum intravenous antibiotics should be commenced promptly (intravenous treatment recommendation: anti-pseudomonas cephalosporin. Local epidemiologic bacterial isolate and resistance patterns are important since MRSA or other resistances should be covered). Duration of treatment depends on neutrophil count, patient's symptoms and fever. Evaluation should be done on a daily basis. If fever continues after 48 - 72 hours, antibiotic rotation and/or antifungal therapy may be needed.

  10. Describing the Breakbone Fever: IDODEN, an Ontology for Dengue Fever

    PubMed Central

    Mitraka, Elvira; Topalis, Pantelis; Dritsou, Vicky; Dialynas, Emmanuel; Louis, Christos

    2015-01-01

    Background Ontologies represent powerful tools in information technology because they enhance interoperability and facilitate, among other things, the construction of optimized search engines. To address the need to expand the toolbox available for the control and prevention of vector-borne diseases we embarked on the construction of specific ontologies. We present here IDODEN, an ontology that describes dengue fever, one of the globally most important diseases that are transmitted by mosquitoes. Methodology/Principal Findings We constructed IDODEN using open source software, and modeled it on IDOMAL, the malaria ontology developed previously. IDODEN covers all aspects of dengue fever, such as disease biology, epidemiology and clinical features. Moreover, it covers all facets of dengue entomology. IDODEN, which is freely available, can now be used for the annotation of dengue-related data and, in addition to its use for modeling, it can be utilized for the construction of other dedicated IT tools such as decision support systems. Conclusions/Significance The availability of the dengue ontology will enable databases hosting dengue-associated data and decision-support systems for that disease to perform most efficiently and to link their own data to those stored in other independent repositories, in an architecture- and software-independent manner. PMID:25646954

  11. Dengue fever and dengue haemorrhagic fever in adolescents and adults.

    PubMed

    Tantawichien, Terapong

    2012-05-01

    Dengue fever (DF) is endemic in tropical and subtropical zones and the prevalence is increasing across South-east Asia, Africa, the Western Pacific and the Americas. In recent years, the spread of unplanned urbanisation, with associated substandard housing, overcrowding and deterioration in water, sewage and waste management systems, has created ideal conditions for increased transmission of the dengue virus in tropical urban centres. While dengue infection has traditionally been considered a paediatric disease, the age distribution of dengue has been rising and more cases have been observed in adolescents and adults. Furthermore, the development of tourism in the tropics has led to an increase in the number of tourists who become infected, most of whom are adults. Symptoms and risk factors for dengue haemorrhagic fever (DHF) and severe dengue differ between children and adults, with co-morbidities and incidence in more elderly patients associated with greater risk of mortality. Treatment options for DF and DHF in adults, as for children, centre round fluid replacement (either orally or intravenously, depending on severity) and antipyretics. Further data are needed on the optimal treatment of adult patients.

  12. Use of the continuous slope-area method to estimate runoff in a network of ephemeral channels, southeast Arizona, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stewart, Anne M.; Callegary, James B.; Smith, Christopher F.; Gupta, Hoshin V.; Leenhouts, James M.; Fritzinger, Robert A.

    2012-01-01

    The continuous slope-area (CSA) method is an innovative gaging method for indirect computation of complete-event discharge hydrographs that can be applied when direct measurement methods are unsafe, impractical, or impossible to apply. This paper reports on use of the method to produce event-specific discharge hydrographs in a network of sand-bedded ephemeral stream channels in southeast Arizona, USA, for water year 2008. The method provided satisfactory discharge estimates for flows that span channel banks, and for moderate to large flows, with about 10–16% uncertainty, respectively for total flow volume and peak flow, as compared to results obtained with an alternate method. Our results also suggest that the CSA method may be useful for estimating runoff of small flows, and during recessions, but with increased uncertainty.

  13. Fever-Induced Brugada Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Dahal, Binaya Raman; Gitler, Bernard

    2015-01-01

    Brugada syndrome is increasingly recognized as a cause of sudden cardiac death. Many of these patients do not get diagnosed due its dynamic and often hidden nature. We have come a long way in understanding the disease process, and its electrophysiology appears to be intimately linked with sodium channel mutations or disorders. The cardiac rhythm in these patients can deteriorate into fatal ventricular arrhythmias. This makes it important for the clinician to be aware of the conditions in which arrhythmogenicity of Brugada syndrome is revealed or even potentiated. We present such an instance where our patient’s Brugada syndrome was unmasked by fever. PMID:26425637

  14. High pH microbial ecosystems in a newly discovered, ephemeral, serpentinizing fluid seep at Yanartaş (Chimera), Turkey

    PubMed Central

    Meyer-Dombard, D'Arcy R.; Woycheese, Kristin M.; Yargıçoğlu, Erin N.; Cardace, Dawn; Shock, Everett L.; Güleçal-Pektas, Yasemin; Temel, Mustafa

    2015-01-01

    Gas seeps emanating from Yanartaş (Chimera), Turkey, have been documented for thousands of years. Active serpentinization produces hydrogen and a range of carbon gases that may provide fuel for life. Here we report a newly discovered, ephemeral fluid seep emanating from a small gas vent at Yanartaş. Fluids and biofilms were sampled at the source and points downstream. We describe site conditions, and provide microbiological data in the form of enrichment cultures, Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), carbon and nitrogen isotopic composition of solids, and PCR screens of nitrogen cycle genes. Source fluids are pH 11.95, with a Ca:Mg of ~200, and sediments under the ignited gas seep measure 60°C. Collectively, these data suggest the fluid is the product of active serpentinization at depth. Source sediments are primarily calcite and alteration products (chlorite and montmorillonite). Downstream, biofilms are mixed with montmorillonite. SEM shows biofilms distributed homogeneously with carbonates. Organic carbon accounts for 60% of the total carbon at the source, decreasing downstream to <15% as inorganic carbon precipitates. δ13C ratios of the organic carbon fraction of solids are depleted (−25 to −28‰) relative to the carbonates (−11 to −20‰). We conclude that heterotrophic processes are dominant throughout the surface ecosystem, and carbon fixation may be key down channel. δ15N ratios ~3‰, and absence of nifH in extracted DNA suggest that nitrogen fixation is not occurring in sediments. However, the presence of narG and nirS at most locations and in enrichments indicates genomic potential for nitrate and nitrite reduction. This small seep with shallow run-off is likely ephemeral, but abundant preserved microterracettes in the outflow and the surrounding area suggest it has been present for some time. This site and others like it present an opportunity for investigations of preserved deep biosphere signatures, and subsurface-surface interactions

  15. Rapid estimation of recharge potential in ephemeral-stream channels using electromagnetic methods, and measurements of channel and vegetation characteristics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Callegary, J.B.; Leenhouts, J.M.; Paretti, N.V.; Jones, C.A.

    2007-01-01

    To classify recharge potential (RCP) in ephemeral-stream channels, a method was developed that incorporates information about channel geometry, vegetation characteristics, and bed-sediment apparent electrical conductivity (??a). Recharge potential is not independently measurable, but is instead formulated as a site-specific, qualitative parameter. We used data from 259 transects across two ephemeral-stream channels near Sierra Vista, Arizona, a location with a semiarid climate. Seven data types were collected: ??a averaged over two depth intervals (0-3 m, and 0-6 m), channel incision depth and width, diameter-at-breast-height of the largest tree, woody-plant and grass density. A two-tiered system was used to classify a transect's RCP. In the first tier, transects were categorized by estimates of near-surface-sediment hydraulic permeability as low, moderate, or high using measurements of 0-3 m-depth ??a. Each of these categories was subdivided into low, medium, or high RCP classes using the remaining six data types, thus yielding a total of nine RCP designations. Six sites in the study area were used to compare RCP and ??a with previously measured surrogates for hydraulic permeability. Borehole-averaged percent fines showed a moderate correlation with both shallow and deep ??a measurements, however, correlation of point measurements of saturated hydraulic conductivity, percent fines, and cylinder infiltrometer measurements with ??a and RCP was generally poor. The poor correlation was probably caused by the relatively large measurement volume and spatial averaging of ??a compared with the spatially-limited point measurements. Because of the comparatively large spatial extent of measurement transects and variety of data types collected, RCP estimates can give a more complete picture of the major factors affecting recharge at a site than is possible through point or borehole-averaged estimates of hydraulic permeability alone. ?? 2007 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Rapid estimation of recharge potential in ephemeral-stream channels using electromagnetic methods, and measurements of channel and vegetation characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Callegary, James B.; Leenhouts, James M.; Paretti, Nicholas V.; Jones, Christopher A.

    2007-09-01

    SummaryTo classify recharge potential (RCP) in ephemeral-stream channels, a method was developed that incorporates information about channel geometry, vegetation characteristics, and bed-sediment apparent electrical conductivity ( σa). Recharge potential is not independently measurable, but is instead formulated as a site-specific, qualitative parameter. We used data from 259 transects across two ephemeral-stream channels near Sierra Vista, Arizona, a location with a semiarid climate. Seven data types were collected: σa averaged over two depth intervals (0-3 m, and 0-6 m), channel incision depth and width, diameter-at-breast-height of the largest tree, woody-plant and grass density. A two-tiered system was used to classify a transect's RCP. In the first tier, transects were categorized by estimates of near-surface-sediment hydraulic permeability as low, moderate, or high using measurements of 0-3 m-depth σa. Each of these categories was subdivided into low, medium, or high RCP classes using the remaining six data types, thus yielding a total of nine RCP designations. Six sites in the study area were used to compare RCP and σa with previously measured surrogates for hydraulic permeability. Borehole-averaged percent fines showed a moderate correlation with both shallow and deep σa measurements, however, correlation of point measurements of saturated hydraulic conductivity, percent fines, and cylinder infiltrometer measurements with σa and RCP was generally poor. The poor correlation was probably caused by the relatively large measurement volume and spatial averaging of σa compared with the spatially-limited point measurements. Because of the comparatively large spatial extent of measurement transects and variety of data types collected, RCP estimates can give a more complete picture of the major factors affecting recharge at a site than is possible through point or borehole-averaged estimates of hydraulic permeability alone.

  17. Comparative orbital evolution of transient Uranian co-orbitals: exploring the role of ephemeral multibody mean motion resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de la Fuente Marcos, C.; de la Fuente Marcos, R.

    2014-07-01

    Uranus has three known co-orbitals: 83982 Crantor (2002 GO9), 2010 EU65 and 2011 QF99. All of them were captured in their current resonant state relatively recently. Here, we perform a comparative analysis of the orbital evolution of these transient co-orbitals to understand better how they got captured in the first place and what makes them dynamically unstable. We also look for additional temporary Uranian co-orbital candidates among known objects. Our N-body simulations show that the long-term stability of 2011 QF99 is controlled by Jupiter and Neptune; it briefly enters the 1:7 mean motion resonance with Jupiter and the 2:1 with Neptune before becoming a Trojan and prior to leaving its tadpole orbit. During these ephemeral two-body mean motion resonance episodes, apsidal corotation resonances are also observed. For known co-orbitals, Saturn is the current source of the main destabilizing force but this is not enough to eject a minor body from the 1:1 commensurability with Uranus. These objects must enter mean motion resonances with Jupiter and Neptune in order to be captured or become passing Centaurs. Asteroid 2010 EU65, a probable visitor from the Oort cloud, may have been stable for several Myr due to its comparatively low eccentricity. Additionally, we propose 2002 VG131 as the first transient quasi-satellite candidate of Uranus. Asteroid 1999 HD12 may signal the edge of Uranus' co-orbital region. Transient Uranian co-orbitals are often submitted to complex multibody ephemeral mean motion resonances that trigger the switching between resonant co-orbital states, making them dynamically unstable. In addition, we show that the orbital properties and discovery circumstances of known objects can be used to outline a practical strategy by which additional Uranus' co-orbitals may be found.

  18. Assessing the regional and temporal variability of the topographic threshold for ephemeral gully initiation using quantile regression in Wallonia (Belgium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maugnard, A.; Van Dyck, S.; Bielders, C. L.

    2014-02-01

    Ephemeral gully erosion is responsible for large losses of soil on cropland and causes serious off-site damages. Understanding and predicting the occurrence of ephemeral gully erosion are therefore major concerns for land users, decision makers or alike. In order to explain and predict the initiation of gully erosion, numerous studies have focused on the concept of topographic threshold which relies on the slope and contributing area at the gully head. Different approaches have been used so far for defining this threshold. However, these approaches may be questioned because they are partly subjective, not always statistically-based or based on the statistical weight of all data points rather than on the data points at the threshold. To cope with these deficiencies, quantile regression is proposed as an alternative for determining the threshold line. It is applied to assess the regional and temporal variability of gully initiation in Wallonia (Belgium) and compared to previous thresholding approaches. A database of gullies was created from aerial photographs for three agro-pedological areas. The areas differed considerably in terms of number (102-282), mean length (84-151 m) and type of gullies. Most gullies were located on land with summer crops and more than 70% were restricted to a single plot. Significant differences in the topographical threshold were observed across areas, but these regional differences were not consistent across the various thresholding methods. Only 12-18% of gullies were recurrent over time, yet the topographic threshold determined by quantile regression seemed to be stable in spite of annual differences in land use and climate. The results reveal the need for greater standardization of thresholding methods. Quantile regression should be preferred over other previous approaches as it is more consistent with the concept of threshold and appears more robust.

  19. [Q fever: a cause of fever of unknown origin in Switzerland].

    PubMed

    Fischer, L; Garin, N; Péter, O; Praz, G

    2012-10-10

    We describe two cases of Q fever in previously healthy women presenting with fever of unknown origin. The diagnosis was made after several days of investigations. Symptoms and signs of acute or chronic Coxiella burnetii infection are protean and non-specific. Q fever should be included in the differential diagnosis of fever of unknown origin and appropriate serologic studies should be done. We review the clinical presentation of Q fever. Use of serology for the diagnosis and the follow-up is discussed.

  20. Fever

    MedlinePlus

    ... by 1 degree or more. Physical activity, strong emotion, eating, heavy clothing, medicines, high room temperature, and ... and smiling at you Has a normal skin color Looks well when their temperature comes down Take ...

  1. Fever

    MedlinePlus

    ... before eating, after using the toilet, after spending time in a crowd or around someone who's sick, after petting animals, and during travel on public transportation. Show your children how to ...

  2. Fever

    MedlinePlus

    ... before eating, after using the toilet, after spending time in a crowd or around someone who's sick, after petting animals, and during travel on public transportation. Show your children how to ...

  3. Fever

    MedlinePlus

    ... 38.9 C) taken rectally Give your child acetaminophen (Tylenol, others). If your child is age 6 ... If your child seems uncomfortable, give your child acetaminophen (Tylenol, others) or ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin, others). Read ...

  4. [Yellow fever epidemiology in Brazil].

    PubMed

    Mondet, B

    2001-08-01

    We have carried out a meticulous time-space-analysis of the incidence of yellow fever in humans in Brazil from 1954 to 1972 and especially from 1973 to 1999. This study has added to our knowledge of the epidemiology of yellow fever and enabled us to redefine epidemiological zones and determine their geographical limits. The endemic area is located within the Amazon basin; here cases are scattered and generally limited in number. However, there are also "foci of endemic emergence" within this area, where cases are less rare, although occurrence remains irregular. The epidemic area is for the most part situated outside the Amazon basin, to the north east and particularly to the south. It has been divided into two parts according to whether the occurrence of yellow fever is cyclic or sporadic. The epidemics, which are all sylvatic, follow either a circular path (in the forest area) or a linear path (in forest-galleries of the savannah area). The study of the development of the 3 main epidemics (1972-74; 1979-82; 1986-92) in the cyclic emergence area showed that, on each occasion, the yellow fever virus appeared at a particularly active outbreak site located in the "serra dos Carajás", and from there, it followed the courses of the Tocantins and Araguaia rivers upstream, moving southwards during the "pre-epidemic phase" which may be visible due to the occurrence of a few cases, or may remain invisible. Subsequently the virus reached the emergence area, where it appeared in the form of epidemics. In this zone, it also followed privileged south-western pathways, moving from one hydraulic basin to another along the upstream courses of the rivers. Almost exactly the same pathways have been identified for each of the 3 epidemics studied. The distances travelled by the virus over a period of one year--when it goes rapidly--can reach several hundred kilometers. On the other hand, it may be stationary for a period of one or two consecutive years, occasionally three, remaining

  5. Rheumatic fever in New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Webb, Rachel; Wilson, Nigel

    2013-03-01

    Acute rheumatic fever and its sequel rheumatic heart disease remain major unsolved problems in New Zealand, causing significant morbidity and premature death. The disease burden affects predominantly indigenous Māori and Pacific Island children and young adults. In the past decade these ethnic disparities are even widening. Secondary prophylaxis using 28-day intramuscular penicillin has been the mainstay of disease control. In the greater Auckland region, audit shows community nurse-led penicillin delivery rates of 95% and recurrence rates of less than 5%. The true penicillin failure rate of 0.07 per 100 patient years supports 4 weekly penicillin rather than more frequent dose regimens. Landmark primary prevention research has been undertaken supporting sore throat primary prevention programmes in regions with very high rheumatic fever rates. Echocardiographic screening found 2.4% previously undiagnosed rheumatic heart disease in socially disadvantaged children. Combined with secondary prevention, echocardiography screening has the potential to reduce the prevalence of severe rheumatic heart disease.

  6. Leptospirosis presenting as honeymoon fever.

    PubMed

    de Sainte Marie, B; Delord, M; Dubourg, G; Gautret, P; Parola, P; Brouqui, P; Lagier, J C

    2015-05-01

    An increasing number of travelers from western countries visit tropical regions, questioning western physicians on the prophylaxis, the diagnosis and the therapeutic management of patients with travel-associated infection. In July 2014, a French couple stayed for an adventure-travel in Columbia without malaria prophylaxis. A week after their return the woman presented with fever, myalgia, and retro-orbital pain. Three days later, her husband presented similar symptoms. In both patients, testing for malaria, arboviruses and blood cultures remained negative. An empirical treatment with doxycycline and ceftriaxone was initiated for both patients. Serum collected from the female patient yielded positive IgM for leptospirosis but was negative for her husband. Positive Real-Time PCR were observed in blood and urine from both patients, confirming leptospirosis. Three lessons are noteworthy from this case report. First, after exclusion of malaria, as enteric fever, leptospirosis and rickettsial infection are the most prevalent travel-associated infections, empirical treatment with doxycycline and third generation cephalosporin should be considered. In addition, the diagnosis of leptospirosis requires both serology and PCR performed in both urine and blood samples. Finally, prophylaxis using doxycycline, also effective against leptospirosis, rickettsial infections or travellers' diarrhea should be recommended for adventure travelers in malaria endemic areas.

  7. Rocky Mountain spotted fever in Argentina

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Cases of epidemic typhus have been documented in Argentina since 1919; however, no confirmed reports of spotted fever rickettsiosis were described in this country until 1999. We describe the first molecular confirmation of Rickettsia rickettsii, the etiologic agent of Rocky Mountain spotted fever (R...

  8. Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever in Argentina

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    We describe the first molecular confirmation of Rickettsia rickettsii, the cause of Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF), from a tick vector, Amblyomma cajennense, and from a cluster of fatal spotted fever cases in Argentina. Questing A. cajennense ticks were collected at or near sites of presumed or...

  9. Rift Valley fever outbreak, southern Mauritania, 2012.

    PubMed

    Sow, Abdourahmane; Faye, Ousmane; Ba, Yamar; Ba, Hampathé; Diallo, Diawo; Faye, Oumar; Loucoubar, Cheikh; Boushab, Mohamed; Barry, Yahya; Diallo, Mawlouth; Sall, Amadou Alpha

    2014-02-01

    After a period of heavy rainfall, an outbreak of Rift Valley fever occurred in southern Mauritania during September-November 2012. A total of 41 human cases were confirmed, including 13 deaths, and 12 Rift Valley fever virus strains were isolated. Moudjeria and Temchecket Departments were the most affected areas.

  10. Rift Valley fever in Namibia, 2010.

    PubMed

    Monaco, Federica; Pinoni, Chiara; Cosseddu, Gian Mario; Khaiseb, Siegfried; Calistri, Paolo; Molini, Umberto; Bishi, Alec; Conte, Annamaria; Scacchia, Massimo; Lelli, Rossella

    2013-12-01

    During May-July 2010 in Namibia, outbreaks of Rift Valley fever were reported to the National Veterinary Service. Analysis of animal specimens confirmed virus circulation on 7 farms. Molecular characterization showed that all outbreaks were caused by a strain of Rift Valley fever virus closely related to virus strains responsible for outbreaks in South Africa during 2009-2010.

  11. Rift Valley Fever Outbreak, Southern Mauritania, 2012

    PubMed Central

    Sow, Abdourahmane; Faye, Ousmane; Ba, Yamar; Ba, Hampathé; Diallo, Diawo; Faye, Oumar; Loucoubar, Cheikh; Boushab, Mohamed; Barry, Yahya; Diallo, Mawlouth

    2014-01-01

    After a period of heavy rainfall, an outbreak of Rift Valley fever occurred in southern Mauritania during September–November 2012. A total of 41 human cases were confirmed, including 13 deaths, and 12 Rift Valley fever virus strains were isolated. Moudjeria and Temchecket Departments were the most affected areas. PMID:24447334

  12. Q Fever Chronic Osteomyelitis in Two Children.

    PubMed

    Costa, Beatriz; Morais, Andreia; Santos, Ana Sofia; Tavares, Delfin; Seves, Graça; Gouveia, Catarina

    2015-11-01

    We report 2 cases of chronic Q fever osteomyelitis in 10- and 5-year-old girls who presented with distal right femoral and left parasternal granulomatous osteomyelitis, respectively. Both were treated with ciprofloxacin and rifampin with good response. Q fever osteomyelitis is a challenging diagnosis in children, and the choice of antimicrobial treatment is difficult because of limited available data.

  13. Rift Valley Fever in Namibia, 2010

    PubMed Central

    Monaco, Federica; Pinoni, Chiara; Khaiseb, Siegfried; Calistri, Paolo; Molini, Umberto; Bishi, Alec; Conte, Annamaria; Scacchia, Massimo; Lelli, Rossella

    2013-01-01

    During May–July 2010 in Namibia, outbreaks of Rift Valley fever were reported to the National Veterinary Service. Analysis of animal specimens confirmed virus circulation on 7 farms. Molecular characterization showed that all outbreaks were caused by a strain of Rift Valley fever virus closely related to virus strains responsible for outbreaks in South Africa during 2009–2010. PMID:24274469

  14. Ask Dr. Sue: "Children and Fevers."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aronson, Susan S.

    1989-01-01

    Considers aspects of children's fevers. Answers questions concerning: (1) the temperature at which a fever is infectious; (2) the point at which a feverish child in care should be sent home; (3) the length of time a parent should wait before returning the child to day care; and (4) the way to take a child's temperature. (RJC)

  15. Detection and Response for Rift Valley fever

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Rift Valley fever is a viral disease that impacts domestic livestock and humans in Africa and the Middle East, and poses a threat to military operations in these areas. We describe a Rift Valley fever Risk Monitoring website, and its ability to predict risk of disease temporally and spatially. We al...

  16. Rocky Mountain spotted fever in children.

    PubMed

    Woods, Charles R

    2013-04-01

    Rocky Mountain spotted fever is typically undifferentiated from many other infections in the first few days of illness. Treatment should not be delayed pending confirmation of infection when Rocky Mountain spotted fever is suspected. Doxycycline is the drug of choice even for infants and children less than 8 years old. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Educational Fever and South Korean Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Jeong-Kyu

    2006-01-01

    This paper examines the influence of educational fever on the development of the Republic of Korea education and economy in the context of the cultural history of this country. In order to examine this study, the author explains the concept of educational fever and discusses the relation between Confucianism and education zeal. Educational fever…

  18. The geographical distribution of Q fever

    PubMed Central

    Kaplan, Martin M.; Bertagna, P.

    1955-01-01

    The results of a WHO-assisted survey of the distribution of Q fever in 32 countries and an analysis of reports published to date indicate that Q fever exists in 51 countries on five continents. Q-fever infection was most often reported in man and the domestic ruminants, such as cattle, sheep, and goats. The disease was found to exist in most countries where investigations were carried out. Notable exceptions were Ireland, the Netherlands, New Zealand, Poland, and the Scandinavian countries. With the exception of Poland, where the results were inconclusive, all these countries import relatively few domestic ruminants—the most important animal reservoirs of human Q-fever infection. It seems, therefore, that the traffic of infected ruminants may be one of the most important, if not the most important, means for the geographical spread of Q fever. The importance, if any, of ticks associated with such traffic needs to be defined. PMID:13284560

  19. Imported Lassa fever--New Jersey, 2004.

    PubMed

    2004-10-01

    Lassa fever is an acute viral illness caused by Lassa virus, which is hosted by rodents in the Mastomys natalensis species complex and rarely imported to countries outside of those areas in Africa where the disease is endemic. Lassa fever is characterized by fever, muscle aches, sore throat, nausea, vomiting, and chest and abdominal pain. Approximately 15%-20% of patients hospitalized for Lassa fever die from the illness; however, approximately 80% of human infections with Lassa virus are mild or asymptomatic, and 1% of infections overall result in death. On August 28, 2004, a man aged 38 years residing in New Jersey died from Lassa fever after returning from travel to West Africa. This report summarizes the clinical and epidemiologic investigations conducted by federal, state, and local public health agencies. The findings illustrate the need for clinicians and public health officials to remain alert to emerging infectious diseases and to institute appropriate measures to promptly identify and limit spread of unusual pathogens.

  20. Rat Bite Fever Resembling Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Akter, Ripa; Boland, Paul; Daley, Peter; Rahman, Proton; Al Ghanim, Nayef

    2016-01-01

    Rat bite fever is rare in Western countries. It can be very difficult to diagnose as blood cultures are typically negative and a history of rodent exposure is often missed. Unless a high index of suspicion is maintained, the associated polyarthritis can be mistaken for rheumatoid arthritis. We report a case of culture-positive rat bite fever in a 46-year-old female presenting with fever and polyarthritis. The clinical presentation mimicked rheumatoid arthritis. Infection was complicated by discitis, a rare manifestation. We discuss the diagnosis and management of this rare zoonotic infection. We also review nine reported cases of rat bite fever, all of which had an initial presumptive diagnosis of a rheumatological disorder. Rat bite fever is a potentially curable infection but can have a lethal course if left untreated. PMID:27366177