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Sample records for epidermal langerhans cell

  1. Effect of glucocorticosteroids on epidermal Langerhans cells

    PubMed Central

    1982-01-01

    The effects of topical and systemic administration of various glucocorticoids on the density of epidermal Langerhans cells (LC) were studied in guinea pigs. Glucocorticoids, such as betamethasone dipropionate and valerate, caused a marked decrease in LC demonstrable by staining for cell membrane ATPase activity and Ia antigens. By electronmicroscopy, LC also showed morphologic alterations. The observed decrements in LC density correlated with the concentration and known vasoconstrictive potency of the glucocorticoids administered. The anti-inflammatory action of glucocorticoids in skin disorders may, at least in part, be through their ability to alter epidermal LC, thus interfering with the antigen-presenting functions of these cells. PMID:6459400

  2. Cyclosporin A inhibits DNA synthesis by epidermal Langerhans cells.

    PubMed

    Haftek, M; Urabe, A; Kanitakis, J; Dusserre, N; Thivolet, J

    Cyclosporin A, a potent immunosuppressive drug currently used in organ transplant recipients, has been shown to exert in vitro a direct antiproliferative effect on a number of cell types present in the skin, including keratinocytes, fibroblasts, and endothelial cells. Although in vitro studies suggest that cyclosporin A may interfere with the functional capacities of epidermal Langerhans cells, there is no evidence that the treatment influences the distribution or number of Langerhans cells in vivo. We used a model of normal human skin graft to "nude" mice, which is free of the human systemic control mechanisms, for studies on the DNA synthesis of human Langerhans cells under the influence of cyclosporin A. The grafted animals were given daily subcutaneous (50 mg/kg) or intraperitoneal (5, 12.5, and 25 mg/kg) drug injections during three weeks, which resulted in mean blood levels comparable to those observed in treated patients with organ transplants or psoriasis, respectively. BrdU administered during the last week of the experiment was incorporated by all cells synthesizing DNA, including those passing through S-phase. Langerhans cells were detected on deparaffinized or frozen tissue sections of xenografts with anti-CD1a and anti-HLA DR monoclonal antibodies, and the number of BrdU-positive cells was determined by double labeling. Our results indicate that the Langerhans cell DNA synthesis is impaired by therapeutic levels of cyclosporin A.

  3. OSMIUM ZINC IODIDE REACTIVE SITES IN THE EPIDERMAL LANGERHANS CELL

    PubMed Central

    Niebauer, Gustav; Krawczyk, Walter S.; Kidd, Richard L.; Wilgram, George F.

    1969-01-01

    Fixation of epidermis with a mixture of osmium tetroxide and zinc iodide (OsO4-ZnI2) for 24 hr renders the central periodic lamella of the Langerhans cell granule (LCG), the Golgi region, and the nuclear envelope of epidermal Langerhans cells preferentially visible. The use of this technique on Langerhans cells in normal epidermis and in epidermis of patients with histiocytosis (Letterer-Siwe disease) allows a broader visualization of the LCG's than was heretofore possible with routine glutaraldehyde-osmium tetroxide fixation and uranyl acetate-lead staining. The identical staining of Golgi apparatus and LCG favors the view that there is close relation between the Golgi area and the LCG's. Different staining characteristics of the LCG's near the Golgi region and at the cell periphery, respectively, may suggest that the LCG undergoes changes on its way from the Golgi area towards the extracellular space. The hypothesis is advanced that the material which is heavily impregnated with metal after fixation with OsO4-ZnI2 might be a lipid. PMID:4186413

  4. Epidermal Viral Immunity Induced by CD8α+ Dendritic Cells But Not by Langerhans Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allan, Rhys S.; Smith, Chris M.; Belz, Gabrielle T.; van Lint, Allison L.; Wakim, Linda M.; Heath, William R.; Carbone, Francis R.

    2003-09-01

    The classical paradigm for dendritic cell function derives from the study of Langerhans cells, which predominate within skin epidermis. After an encounter with foreign agents, Langerhans cells are thought to migrate to draining lymph nodes, where they initiate T cell priming. Contrary to this, we show here that infection of murine epidermis by herpes simplex virus did not result in the priming of virus-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes by Langerhans cells. Rather, the priming response required a distinct CD8α+ dendritic cell subset. Thus, the traditional view of Langerhans cells in epidermal immunity needs to be revisited to accommodate a requirement for other dendritic cells in this response.

  5. Depletion of Epidermal Langerhans Cells in the Skin Lesions of Pellagra Patients.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Sayaka; Miyagi, Takuya; Sogabe, Yoko; Yasuda, Masahito; Kanazawa, Nobuo; Utani, Atsushi; Izaki, Seiichi; Uezato, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Kenzo

    2017-02-28

    Pellagra is a nutrient deficiency disease caused by insufficient niacin levels. Recent studies have shown that numbers of epidermal Langerhans cells decreased in other diseases caused by nutritional deficiencies, including necrolytic migratory erythema and acrodermatitis enteropathica. Epidermal Langerhans cells are capable of modulating or even halting the inflammatory reaction. The aim of this study was to examine changes in the number of Langerhans cells and other dendritic cells, and maturation of epidermal Langerhans cells in the lesional and adjacent non-lesional skin in pellagra patients. Seven pellagra patients and 10 healthy individuals who served as controls were included. The number and distribution of dendritic cells and other cutaneous cells were examined by immunohistochemistry. Epidermal Langerhans cells decreased considerably in the skin lesions of pellagra patients, whereas other dendritic cells did not change. The decrease in the number of Langerhans cells was positively correlated with the histological severity of skin lesions. As the number of Langerhans cells was not reduced in the undisturbed neighboring skin, the depletion of epidermal Langerhans cells did not precede skin damage but was a cause of prolonged severe inflammation.

  6. Langerhans Cells Facilitate UVB-induced Epidermal Carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Julia M.; Bürgler, Christina D.; Freudzon, Marianna; Golubets, Kseniya; Gibson, Juliet F.; Filler, Renata B.; Girardi, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Ultraviolet B (UVB) light is considered the major environmental inducer of human keratinocyte DNA mutations, including within the tumor-suppressor gene p53, and chronic exposure is associated with cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) formation. Langerhans cells (LC) comprise a dendritic network within the suprabasilar epidermis, yet the role of LC in UVB-induced carcinogenesis is largely unknown. Herein, we show that LC-intact epidermis develops UVB-induced tumors more readily than LC-deficient epidermis. While levels of epidermal cyclopyrimidine dimers (CPD) following acute UVB exposure are equivalent in the presence or absence of LC, chronic UVB-induced p53 mutant clonal islands expand more readily in association with LC which remain largely intact and are preferentially found in proximity to the expanding mutant keratinocyte populations. The observed LC facilitation of mutant p53 clonal expansion is completely αβ and γδ T-cell independent, and is associated with increased intraepidermal expression of interleukin (IL)-22 and the presence of group 3 innate lymphoid cells (ILC3). These data demonstrate that LC play a key role in UVB-induced cutaneous carcinogenesis, and suggest that LC locally stimulate keratinocyte proliferation and innate immune cells that provoke tumor outgrowth. PMID:26053049

  7. Ontogeny and function of murine epidermal Langerhans cells.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Daniel H

    2017-09-19

    Langerhans cells (LCs) are epidermis-resident antigen-presenting cells that share a common ontogeny with macrophages but function as dendritic cells (DCs). Their development, recruitment and retention in the epidermis is orchestrated by interactions with keratinocytes through multiple mechanisms. LC and dermal DC subsets often show functional redundancy, but LCs are required for specific types of adaptive immune responses when antigen is concentrated in the epidermis. This Review will focus on those developmental and functional properties that are unique to LCs.

  8. Human Epidermal Langerhans Cells Maintain Immune Homeostasis in Skin by Activating Skin Resident Regulatory T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Seneschal, Julien; Clark, Rachael A.; Gehad, Ahmed; Baecher-Allan, Clare M.; Kupper, Thomas S.

    2013-01-01

    Recent discoveries indicate that the skin of a normal individual contains 10-20 billion resident memory T cells ( which include various T helper, T cytotoxic, and T regulatory subsets, that are poised to respond to environmental antigens. Using only autologous human tissues, we report that both in vitro and in vivo, resting epidermal Langerhan cells (LC) selectively and specifically induced the activation and proliferation of skin resident regulatory T cells (Treg), a minor subset of skin resident memory T cells. In the presence of foreign pathogen, however, the same LC activated and induced proliferation of effector memory T (Tem) cells and limited Treg cells activation. These underappreciated properties of LC: namely maintenance of tolerance in normal skin, and activation of protective skin resident memory T cells upon infectious challenge, help clarify the role of LC in skin. PMID:22560445

  9. Topical photodynamic therapy significantly reduces epidermal Langerhans cells during clinical treatment of basal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Evangelou, G; Farrar, M D; Cotterell, L; Andrew, S; Tosca, A D; Watson, R E B; Rhodes, L E

    2012-05-01

    Topical photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a widely applied treatment for basal cell carcinoma (BCC). PDT-induced immunosuppression leading to reduced antitumour immune responses may be a factor in treatment failure. To examine the impact of topical PDT on leucocyte trafficking following clinical treatment of BCC. Superficial BCCs in eight white caucasian patients were treated with methyl aminolaevulinate (MAL)-PDT. Biopsies for immunohistochemical assessment were taken from BCCs pre-PDT, 1 h and 24 h post-PDT and from untreated healthy skin. Treatment of BCC with MAL-PDT produced a rapid neutrophil infiltration, commencing by 1 h and significantly increased at 24 h post-PDT (P < 0·05 compared with baseline). An associated increase in the number of blood vessels expressing E-selectin was observed at 1 h and 24 h post-PDT (both P < 0·05 compared with baseline). In contrast, the number of epidermal Langerhans cells fell sharply by 1 h post-PDT, and remained significantly reduced at 24 h post-PDT (both P < 0·05 compared with baseline). Reduction of Langerhans cells during clinical treatment of BCC might potentially impact negatively on antitumour responses through reduced activation of tumour-specific effector cells. Investigation of modified PDT protocols with the aim to minimize immunosuppressive effects while maintaining antitumour efficacy is warranted. © 2012 The Authors. BJD © 2012 British Association of Dermatologists.

  10. Proteins deposited in the dermis are rapidly captured and presented by epidermal Langerhans cells

    PubMed Central

    Flacher, Vincent; Tripp, Christoph H.; Stoitzner, Patrizia; Haid, Bernhard; Ebner, Susanne; Koch, Franz; Park, Chae Gyu; Steinman, Ralph M.; Idoyaga, Juliana; Romani, Nikolaus

    2010-01-01

    Antigen-presenting cells can capture antigens that are deposited in the skin, including vaccines given subcutaneously. These include different dendritic cells (DC) such as epidermal Langerhans cells (LC), dermal DC and dermal langerin+ DC. To evaluate access of dermal antigens to skin DC, we used mAb to two C-type lectin endocytic receptors, DEC-205/CD205 and langerin/CD207. When applied to murine and human skin explant cultures, these mAb were efficiently taken up by epidermal LC. Additionally, anti-DEC-205 targeted langerin+ CD103+ and langerin− CD103− mouse dermal DC. Unexpectedly, intradermal injection of either mAb, but not isotype control, resulted in strong and rapid labelling of LC in situ, implying that large molecules can diffuse through the basement membrane into the epidermis. Epidermal LC targeted in vivo by ovalbumin-coupled anti-DEC-205 potently presented antigen to CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. Thus, epidermal LC play a major role in uptake of lectin-binding ligands under standard vaccination conditions. PMID:19890348

  11. Subsets of epidermal Langerhans cells as defined by lectin binding profiles.

    PubMed

    Schuler, G; Romani, N; Linert, J; Shevach, E M; Stingl, G

    1983-11-01

    In this study we characterize the cell surface glycoconjugate moieties of strain 2 guinea pig epidermal Langerhans cells (LC) in single cell suspension by using a battery of 17 fluorescent lectins. All LC displayed binding sites for concanavalin A, succinylated concanavalin A, Lens culinaris agglutinin, Pisum sativum agglutinin, wheat germ agglutinin, succinylated wheat germ agglutinin, Griffonia simplicifolia agglutinin I, Ricinus communis agglutinin I, Phaseolus vulgaris E agglutinin, and Phaseolus vulgaris L agglutinin, but failed to bind Sophora japonica agglutinin (SJA), Dolichos biflorus agglutinin (DBA), and Ulex europaeus agglutinin I (UEA I). Neuraminidase pretreatment rendered LC reactive for SJA, but not for DBA and UEA I. The binding profiles of certain lectins point to the existence of LC subpopulations in that Griffonia simplicifolia I-B4 isolectin, peanut agglutinin (PNA), Helix pomatia agglutinin, and soybean agglutinin bound to only 80% (range 70-90%) of Ia-positive epidermal cells; binding sites for these lectins on primarily unreactive Ia-positive cells were unmasked when epidermal cells were treated with neuraminidase prior to lectin labeling. Ultrastructural PNA labeling studies revealed that the vast majority of Birbeck granule-containing LC displayed PNA binding sites, whereas indeterminate cells were consistently PNA-negative. Identification of carbohydrate configurations expressed on LC surfaces by lectin binding may provide a clue for the elucidation of the mechanisms of established LC functions and possibly the discovery of as yet unknown properties of this cell type.

  12. Effects of topical pimecrolimus 1% on high-dose ultraviolet B-irradiated epidermal Langerhans cells.

    PubMed

    Yin, ZhiQiang; Xu, JiaLi; Zhang, ZhiHong; Luo, Dan

    2012-12-01

    Some studies reported no changes in the number of epidermal Langerhans cells (LC) that were observed in mice treated with pimecrolimus, and low-dose stimulated solar radiation (once)-induced changers in LC are minimally affected by pimecrolimus. This study is to investigate the effects of topical pimecrolimus 1% on high-dose ultraviolet B (UVB)-irradiated epidermal LC. Forty human foreskin tissues were randomly divided into 4 groups of 10 tissues each: Group A, control; Group B, pimecrolimus 1% (once)-only; Group C, 180 mJ/cm(2) UVB (once)-only; Group D, UVB+pimecrolimus. Each tissue was cut into 4 pieces corresponding to 4 time points. All the tissues were cultured at 37 °C. After being treated, the tissues were collected respectively and processed for immunohistochemical staining and immunofluorescence staining. For UVB-only group, epidermal CD1a(+) LC number at 18h decreased from 39.6 ± 8.30 to 22.3 ± 2.26/5 high magnification, compared to CD1a(+) LC number at 0 h (P<0.01). The CD1a(+) LC number of UVB-only group was significantly less than other groups at 18 h, 24h and 48 h (P<0.05, respectively). Similar results were obtained with immunofluorescence staining for CD 1a and immunohistochemical staining for Langerin. The numbers of epidermal HLA-DR(+) LC had no significant differences among all groups at different time points. Our study found a single 180 mJ/cm(2) UVB irradiation significantly reduced epidermal LC numbers at 18 h, 24h and 48 h, however, topical pimecrolimus could reverse these changes. UVB plus pimecrolimus treatment did not affect human LC maturation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Langerhans Cells in Vitiligo.

    PubMed

    Narayanan, R B; Lavania, R K; Girdhar, B K

    1986-01-01

    Langerhans cells (LC) were defined by indirect immunofluore-scence using OKT6 monoclonal antibody in the early lesions of 10 untreated vitiligo patients. The distribution and the numbers of OKT6 + epidermal LC in the lesions was similar to that observed in the normal skin. In the dermal infiltrates of some of the lesion, T6 '+ cells were visualized.

  14. External antigen uptake by Langerhans cells with reorganization of epidermal tight junction barriers.

    PubMed

    Kubo, Akiharu; Nagao, Keisuke; Yokouchi, Mariko; Sasaki, Hiroyuki; Amagai, Masayuki

    2009-12-21

    Outermost barriers are critical for terrestrial animals to avoid desiccation and to protect their bodies from foreign insults. Mammalian skin consists of two sets of barriers: stratum corneum (SC) and tight junctions (TJs). How acquisition of external antigens (Ags) by epidermal Langerhans cells (LCs) occur despite these barriers has remained unknown. We show that activation-induced LCs elongate their dendrites to penetrate keratinocyte (KC) TJs and survey the extra-TJ environment located outside of the TJ barrier, just beneath the SC. Penetrated dendrites uptake Ags from the tip where Ags colocalize with langerin/Birbeck granules. TJs at KC-KC contacts allow penetration of LC dendrites by dynamically forming new claudin-dependent bicellular- and tricellulin-dependent tricellular TJs at LC-KC contacts, thereby maintaining TJ integrity during Ag uptake. Thus, covertly under keratinized SC barriers, LCs and KCs demonstrate remarkable cooperation that enables LCs to gain access to external Ags that have violated the SC barrier while concomitantly retaining TJ barriers to protect intra-TJ environment.

  15. Birbeck Granules Are Subdomains of Endosomal Recycling Compartment in Human Epidermal Langerhans Cells, Which Form Where Langerin Accumulates

    PubMed Central

    Mc Dermott, Ray; Ziylan, Umit; Spehner, Danièle; Bausinger, Huguette; Lipsker, Dan; Mommaas, Mieke; Cazenave, Jean-Pierre; Raposo, Graça; Goud, Bruno; de la Salle, Henri; Salamero, Jean; Hanau, Daniel

    2002-01-01

    Birbeck granules are unusual rod-shaped structures specific to epidermal Langerhans cells, whose origin and function remain undetermined. We investigated the intracellular location and fate of Langerin, a protein implicated in Birbeck granule biogenesis, in human epidermal Langerhans cells. In the steady state, Langerin is predominantly found in the endosomal recycling compartment and in Birbeck granules. Langerin internalizes by classical receptor-mediated endocytosis and the first Birbeck granules accessible to endocytosed Langerin are those connected to recycling endosomes in the pericentriolar area, where Langerin accumulates. Drug-induced inhibition of endocytosis results in the appearance of abundant open-ended Birbeck granule-like structures appended to the plasma membrane, whereas inhibition of recycling induces Birbeck granules to merge with a tubular endosomal network. In mature Langerhans cells, Langerin traffic is abolished and the loss of internal Langerin is associated with a concomitant depletion of Birbeck granules. Our results demonstrate an exchange of Langerin between early endosomal compartments and the plasma membrane, with dynamic retention in the endosomal recycling compartment. They show that Birbeck granules are not endocytotic structures, rather they are subdomains of the endosomal recycling compartment that form where Langerin accumulates. Finally, our results implicate ADP-ribosylation factor proteins in Langerin trafficking and the exchange between Birbeck granules and other endosomal membranes. PMID:11809842

  16. CD34+-derived Langerhans cell-like cells are different from epidermal Langerhans cells in their response to thymic stromal lymphopoietin

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Van Anh; Dubrac, Sandrine; Forstner, Markus; Huter, Otto; Del Frari, Barbara; Romani, Nikolaus; Ebner, Susanne

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) endows human blood-derived CD11c+ dendritic cells (DCs) and Langerhans cells (LCs) obtained from human epidermis with the capacity to induce pro-allergic T cells. In this study, we investigated the effect of TSLP on umbilical cord blood CD34+-derived LC-like cells. These cells are often used as model cells for LCs obtained from epidermis. Under the influence of TSLP, both cell types differed in several ways. As defined by CD83, CD80 and CD86, TSLP did not increase maturation of LC-like cells when compared with freshly isolated LCs and epidermal émigrés. Differences were also found in the production of chemokine (C-C motif) ligand (CCL)17. LCs made this chemokine only when primed by TSLP and further stimulated by CD40 ligation. In contrast, LC-like cells released CCL17 in response to CD40 ligation, irrespective of a prior treatment with TSLP. Moreover, the CCL17 levels secreted by LC-like cells were at least five times higher than those from migratory LCs. After maturation with a cytokine cocktail consisting of tumour necrosis factor-α, interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6 and prostaglandin (PG)E2 LC-like cells released IL-12p70 in response to CD40 ligation. Most importantly and in contrast to LC, TSLP-treated LC-like cells did not induce a pro-allergic cytokine pattern in helper T cells. Due to their different cytokine secretion and the different cytokine production they induce in naïve T cells, we conclude that one has to be cautious to take LC-like cells as a paradigm for ‘real’ LCs from the epidermis. PMID:21054781

  17. CD34+ -derived Langerhans cell-like cells are different from epidermal Langerhans cells in their response to thymic stromal lymphopoietin.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Van Anh; Dubrac, Sandrine; Forstner, Markus; Huter, Otto; Del Frari, Barbara; Romani, Nikolaus; Ebner, Susanne

    2011-09-01

    Thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) endows human blood-derived CD11c(+) dendritic cells (DCs) and Langerhans cells (LCs) obtained from human epidermis with the capacity to induce pro-allergic T cells. In this study, we investigated the effect of TSLP on umbilical cord blood CD34(+) -derived LC-like cells. These cells are often used as model cells for LCs obtained from epidermis. Under the influence of TSLP, both cell types differed in several ways. As defined by CD83, CD80 and CD86, TSLP did not increase maturation of LC-like cells when compared with freshly isolated LCs and epidermal émigrés. Differences were also found in the production of chemokine (C-C motif) ligand (CCL)17. LCs made this chemokine only when primed by TSLP and further stimulated by CD40 ligation. In contrast, LC-like cells released CCL17 in response to CD40 ligation, irrespective of a prior treatment with TSLP. Moreover, the CCL17 levels secreted by LC-like cells were at least five times higher than those from migratory LCs. After maturation with a cytokine cocktail consisting of tumour necrosis factor-α, interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6 and prostaglandin (PG)E(2) LC-like cells released IL-12p70 in response to CD40 ligation. Most importantly and in contrast to LC, TSLP-treated LC-like cells did not induce a pro-allergic cytokine pattern in helper T cells. Due to their different cytokine secretion and the different cytokine production they induce in naïve T cells, we conclude that one has to be cautious to take LC-like cells as a paradigm for 'real' LCs from the epidermis.

  18. Mediated exodus of L-dopa from human epidermal Langerhans cells.

    PubMed

    Falck, B; Bendsoe, N; Ronquist, G

    2004-03-01

    L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-dopa) is not metabolized within human epidermal Langerhans cells (LC); yet they can take up substantial amounts of this amino acid which subsequently can be released into the extracellular space. We recently reported that human epidermal energy metabolism is predominantly anaerobic and that the influx mechanism is a unidirectional L-dopa/proton counter-transport system and now we describe conditions for the mediated transport of L-dopa out of the LC. It is demonstrated that certain amino acids and one dipeptide can effectively trigger the efflux of L-dopa taken up by the LC.Thus, alpha-methyl-dopa (alpha-m-dopa), D-dopa and the dipeptide, met-ala at the outside of the plasma membrane stimulated the efflux of L-dopa from L-dopa loaded LC. Similar effects were achieved by a variety of other amino acids in the extracellular fluid while some other amino acids were inactive. The time required for 50% D-methionine-induced exodus of L-dopa from L-dopa loaded LC was in the range of 5-7 min and a complete exodus of L-dopa was attained at about 20 min of incubation. This dislocation of L-dopa to the extracellular fluid is interpreted as an expression of trans-stimulation. In the case of alpha-m-dopa, D-dopa and met-ala, which admittedly were not able to penetrate the plasma membrane of LC, the concept of trans-stimulation was given a new purport, since none of them were able to participate in an exchange reaction. Finally, it could be concluded that L-dopa escaped by a route different from the one responsible for L-dopa uptake in LC.Thus, while the influx of L-dopa supports extrusion of protons deriving from anaerobic glycolysis in the LC, L-dopa efflux can provide the cells with useful amino acids in an energy-saving way, altogether a remarkable biological process. From this follows that L-dopa has a biological function of its own, besides being a precursor in the catecholamine and pigment syntheses.

  19. An Essential Role for CD44 Variant Isoforms in Epidermal Langerhans Cell and Blood Dendritic Cell Function

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Johannes M.; Sleeman, Jonathan; Renkl, Andreas C.; Dittmar, Henning; Termeer, Christian C.; Taxis, Sabine; Howells, Norma; Hofmann, Martin; Köhler, Gabriele; Schöpf, Erwin; Ponta, Helmut; Herrlich, Peter; Simon, Jan C.

    1997-01-01

    Upon antigen contact, epidermal Langerhans cells (LC) and dendritic cells (DC) leave peripheral organs and home to lymph nodes via the afferent lymphatic vessels and then assemble in the paracortical T cell zone and present antigen to T lymphocytes. Since splice variants of CD44 promote metastasis of certain tumors to lymph nodes, we explored the expression of CD44 proteins on migrating LC and DC. We show that upon antigen contact, LC and DC upregulate pan CD44 epitopes and epitopes encoded by variant exons v4, v5, v6, and v9. Antibodies against CD44 epitopes inhibit the emigration of LC from the epidermis, prevent binding of activated LC and DC to the T cell zones of lymph nodes, and severely inhibit their capacity to induce a delayed type hypersensitivity reaction to a skin hapten in vivo. Our results demonstrate that CD44 splice variant expression is obligatory for the migration and function of LC and DC. PMID:9166413

  20. Distribution of ICAM-3-bearing cells in normal human tissues. Expression of a novel counter-receptor for LFA-1 in epidermal Langerhans cells.

    PubMed Central

    Acevedo, A.; del Pozo, M. A.; Arroyo, A. G.; Sánchez-Mateos, P.; González-Amaro, R.; Sánchez-Madrid, F.

    1993-01-01

    The LFA-1 integrin mediates its function in leukocyte intercellular interactions by recognition of at least one of its three identified counter-receptors, intercellular adhesion molecules 1 (ICAM-1), 2, and 3. The ICAM-1 molecule is expressed in an inducible-dependent manner by endothelial and epithelial cells, as well as by other cell types, including leukocytes. On the other hand, ICAM-2 is constitutively expressed mainly by endothelial cells. We have studied the tissue distribution of the ICAM-3 molecule by immunohistochemical staining of lymphoid and nonlymphoid organs. Only cells from the leukocyte lineage were found bearing the ICAM-3 antigen, showing a pattern of expression clearly distinct from those of ICAM-1 and ICAM-2. Interestingly, we have found that ICAM-3 is expressed by epidermal dendritic Langerhans cells as assessed by double immunostaining with antibodies specific for CD1. In contrast, staining of skin sections with anti-ICAM-1 and ICAM-2 antibodies showed an undetectable expression of these two molecules on Langerhans cells. However, CD1+ Langerhans cells localized in the paracortical area of dermatopathic lymph nodes expressed both ICAM-1 and ICAM-3 antigens. Our results indicate that ICAM-3 is the main LFA-1 counter-receptor in human resident epidermal Langerhans cells. ICAM-3 may have an important role in T-cell antigen stimulation driven by Langerhans cells during skin immune reactions. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:8362976

  1. Examination of tetrachlorosalicylanilide (TCSA) photoallergy using in vitro photohapten-modified Langerhans cell-enriched epidermal cells

    SciTech Connect

    Gerberick, G.F.; Ryan, C.A.; Von Bargen, E.C.; Stuard, S.B.; Ridder, G.M. )

    1991-08-01

    Lymphocytes from BALB/c mice photosensitized in vivo to tetrachlorosalicylanilide (TCSA) were investigated to determine whether they could be stimulated to proliferate when cultured with Langerhans cell-enriched cultured epidermal cells (LC-EC) photohapten-modified in vitro with TCSA + UVA radiation. Cultured LC-EC were photohapten-modified in vitro by irradiation in TCSA-containing medium using a 1000-watt solar simulator equipped with filters to deliver primarily UVA radiation (320-400 nm). Lymphocytes from TCSA-photosensitized mice were incubated with LC-EC that had been treated in vitro with 0.1 mM TCSA and 2 J/cm2 UVA radiation (TCSA + UVA). Responder lymphocytes demonstrated a significant increase in their blastogenesis response compared to lymphocytes that were incubated with LC-EC irradiated with UVA prior to treatment with TCSA (UVA/TCSA) or with LC-EC that had received no treatment. Lymphocytes from naive mice or mice photosensitized with musk ambrette (MA) demonstrated a significantly lower response to LC-EC modified with TCSA + UVA, indicating the specificity of the response. Maximum blastogenesis response was achieved when LC-EC were treated with 0.1 mM TCSA and a UVA radiation dose of at least 0.5 J/cm2. Epidermal cells depleted of LC by treatment with anti-Ia antibody plus complement or by an adherence procedure were unable to stimulate this blastogenesis response. Epidermal cells treated in vitro with TCSA + UVA demonstrated enhanced fluorescence compared to control cells. The fluorescence observed was not restricted to any specific epidermal cell type; however, fluorescence microscopy studies revealed that dendritic Ia-positive cells, presumably LC, were also TCSA fluorescent.

  2. Langerhans-like cells in amphibian epidermis.

    PubMed

    Carrillo-Farga, J; Castell, A; Pérez, A; Rondán, A

    1990-10-01

    Langerhans cells have been described in epidermis and other stratified epithelia of mammals. In other vertebrates equivalent cells have not been found. Amphibians show skin graft rejection, so it is possible that these animals have epidermal cells homologous to Langerhans cells. In this work we demonstrate the existence of ATPase-positive dendritic cells in frog epidermis that are similar ultrastructurally to mammalian Langerhans cells, except for the absence of Birbeck granules.

  3. Human epidermal Langerhans cells differ from monocyte-derived Langerhans cells in CD80 expression and in secretion of IL-12 after CD40 cross-linking.

    PubMed

    Peiser, Matthias; Wanner, Reinhard; Kolde, Gerhard

    2004-09-01

    Langerhans cells (LCs) represent an immature population of myeloid dendritic cells (DCs). As a result of their unique Birbeck granules (BGs), langerin expression, and heterogeneous maturation process, they differ from other immature DCs. Monocyte-derived LCs (MoLCs) mimic epidermal LCs. MoLCs with characteristic BGs are generated by culturing blood-derived monocytes with granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor, interleukin (IL)-4, and transforming growth factor-beta1. Here, we compare maturation-induced antigen expression and cytokine release of LCs with MoLCs. To achieve comparable cell populations, LCs and MoLCs were isolated by CD1c cell sorting, resulting in high purity. In unstimulated cells, CD40 was expressed at equal levels. After stimulation with CD40 ligand (CD40L), LCs and MoLCs acquired CD83 and increased CD86. High CD80 expression was exclusively detected in CD1c-sorted MoLCs. Human leukocyte antigen-DR and CD54 expression was found in all cell populations, however, at different intensities. CD40 triggering increased the potency of LCs and MoLCs to stimulate CD4+ T cell proliferation. Activated MoLCs released IL-12p70 and simultaneously, anti-inflammatory IL-10. The application of the Toll-like receptor ligands peptidoglycan, flagellin, and in particular, lipopolysaccharide (LPS) increased the corelease of these cytokines. LCs secreted IL-10 at a comparable level with MoLCs but failed to produce high amounts of IL-12p70 after application of danger signals. These data indicate that MoLCs as well as LCs display no maturation arrest concerning CD83 and CD86 expression. In difference to MoLCs, LCs resisted activation by CD40L and LPS in terms of IL-12 production. This shows that natural and generated LCs share similar features but differ in relevant functions.

  4. Human epidermal Langerhans cells cointernalize by receptor-mediated endocytosis "nonclassical" major histocompatibility complex class I molecules (T6 antigens) and class II molecules (HLA-DR antigens).

    PubMed Central

    Hanau, D; Fabre, M; Schmitt, D A; Garaud, J C; Pauly, G; Tongio, M M; Mayer, S; Cazenave, J P

    1987-01-01

    HLA-DR and T6 surface antigens are expressed only by Langerhans cells and indeterminate cells in normal human epidermis. We have previously demonstrated that T6 antigens are internalized in Langerhans cells and indeterminate cells by receptor-mediated endocytosis. This process is induced by the binding of BL6, a monoclonal antibody directed against T6 antigens. In the present study, using a monoclonal antibody directed against HLA-DR antigens, on human epidermal cells in suspension, we show that the surface HLA-DR antigens are also internalized by receptor-mediated endocytosis in Langerhans and indeterminate cells. Moreover, using immunogold double labeling, we demonstrate that T6 and HLA-DR antigens are internalized through common coated regions of the membrane of Langerhans or indeterminate cells. The receptor-mediated endocytosis that is induced involves coated pits and vesicles, receptosomes, lysosomes, and also, in Langerhans cells, the Birbeck granules. Thus, T6 antigens, which are considered to be "unusual" or "nonclassical" major histocompatibility complex class I molecules, and the major histocompatibility complex class II molecules, HLA-DR, are internalized in Langerhans and indeterminate cells through common receptor-mediated endocytosis organelles. Images PMID:3106979

  5. Aging affects epidermal Langerhans cell development and function and alters their miRNA gene expression profile.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ying-Ping; Qi, Rui-Qun; Chen, Wenbin; Shi, Yuling; Cui, Zhi-Zhong; Gao, Xing-Hua; Chen, Hong-Duo; Zhou, Li; Mi, Qing-Sheng

    2012-11-01

    Immunosenescence is a result of progressive decline in immune system function with advancing age. Epidermal Langerhans cells (LCs), belonging to the dendritic cell (DC) family, act as sentinels to play key roles in the skin immune responses. However, it has not been fully elucidated how aging affects development and function of LCs. Here, we systemically analyzed LC development and function during the aging process in C57BL/6J mice, and performed global microRNA (miRNA) gene expression profiles in aged and young LCs. We found that the frequency and maturation of epidermal LCs were significantly reduced in aged mice starting at 12 months of age, while the Langerin expression and ability to phagocytose Dextran in aged LCs were increased compared to LCs from < 6 month old mice. The migration of LCs to draining lymph nodes was comparable between aged and young mice. Functionally, aged LCs were impaired in their capacity to induce OVA-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cell proliferation. Furthermore, the expression of miRNAs in aged epidermal LCs showed a distinct profile compared to young LCs. Most interestingly, aging-regulated miRNAs potentially target TGF-β-dependent and non- TGF-β-dependent signal pathways related to LCs. Overall, our data suggests that aging affects LCs development and function, and that age-regulated miRNAs may contribute to the LC developmental and functional changes in aging.

  6. A role for TGFbeta1 in langerhans cell biology. Further characterization of the epidermal Langerhans cell defect in TGFbeta1 null mice.

    PubMed Central

    Borkowski, T A; Letterio, J J; Mackall, C L; Saitoh, A; Wang, X J; Roop, D R; Gress, R E; Udey, M C

    1997-01-01

    Previous studies of TGFbeta1 null (-/-) mice indicated that the epidermis was devoid of Langerhans cells (LC) and that the LC deficiency was not secondary to the inflammation that is the dominant feature of the -/- phenotype (Borkowski, T.A., J.J. Letterio, A.G. Farr, and M.C. Udey. 1996. J. Exp. Med. 184:2417-2422). Herein, we demonstrate that dendritic cells could be expanded from the bone marrow of -/- mice and littermate controls. Bone marrow from -/- mice also gave rise to LC after transfer into lethally irradiated recipients. Thus, the LC defect in TGFbeta1 null mice does not result from an absolute deficiency in bone marrow precursors, and paracrine TGFbeta1 production is sufficient for LC development. Several approaches were used to assess the suitability of -/- skin for LC localization. A survey revealed that although a number of cytokine mRNAs were expressed de novo, mRNAs encoding proinflammatory cytokines known to mobilize LC from epidermis (IL-1 and TNFalpha) were not strikingly overrepresented in -/- skin. In addition, bone marrow-derived LC populated full-thickness TGFbeta1 null skin after engraftment onto BALB/c nu/nu recipients. Finally, the skin of transgenic mice expressing a truncated loricrin promoter-driven dominant-negative TGFbeta type II receptor contained normal numbers of LC. Because TGFbeta1 signaling in these mice is disrupted only in keratinocytes and the keratinocyte hyperproliferative component of the TGFbeta1 -/- phenotype is reproduced, these results strongly suggest that the LC defect in TGFbeta1 null mice is not due to an epidermal abnormality but reflects a requirement of murine LC (or their precursors) for TGFbeta1. PMID:9239404

  7. Distinct behavior of human Langerhans cells and inflammatory dendritic epidermal cells at tight junctions in patients with atopic dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Kazue; Kubo, Akiharu; Fujita, Harumi; Yokouchi, Mariko; Ishii, Ken; Kawasaki, Hiroshi; Nomura, Toshifumi; Shimizu, Hiroshi; Kouyama, Keisuke; Ebihara, Tamotsu; Nagao, Keisuke; Amagai, Masayuki

    2014-10-01

    The stratum corneum and tight junctions (TJs) form physical barriers in the epidermis. Dendrites of activated Langerhans cells (LCs) extend beyond the TJs to capture external antigens in mice. LCs and inflammatory dendritic epidermal cells (IDECs) are observed in the skin of patients with atopic dermatitis (AD). We sought to investigate the characteristics of LCs and IDECs and the distribution of their antigen capture receptors in relation to TJs in normal and AD skin. We characterized the interactions of LCs and IDECs with TJs and the expression patterns of langerin and FcεRI by using whole-mount epidermal sheets from healthy subjects and patients with AD, ichthyosis vulgaris, and psoriasis vulgaris. As in mouse skin, activated LCs penetrate TJs in human skin. The number of LCs with TJ penetration increased approximately 5-fold in erythematous lesional skin of patients with AD but not in nonlesional skin of patients with AD or lesions of patients with ichthyosis vulgaris or psoriasis. In contrast, IDECs localized in the lower part of the epidermis, and their dendrites extended horizontally without penetration through TJs. Although langerin accumulated on the tips of dendrites of activated LCs, FcεRI was expressed diffusely on the cell surfaces on LCs and IDECs in lesional skin from patients with AD. These findings highlight interesting differences between LCs and IDECs in epidermis of patients with AD, where LCs, but not IDECs, extend dendrites through the TJs, likely to capture antigens from outside the TJ barrier with a polarized distribution of langerin but not FcεRI. These behavioral differences between skin dendritic cells might reflect an important pathophysiology of AD. Copyright © 2014 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. A Role for Endogenous Transforming Growth Factor β1 in Langerhans Cell Biology:  The Skin of   Transforming Growth Factor β1 Null Mice Is Devoid of  Epidermal Langerhans Cells

    PubMed Central

    Borkowski, Teresa A.; Letterio, John J.; Farr, Andrew G.; Udey, Mark C.

    1996-01-01

    Transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1) regulates leukocytes and epithelial cells. To determine whether the pleiotropic effects of TGF-β1, a cytokine that is produced by both keratinocytes and Langerhans cells (LC), extend to epidermal leukocytes, we characterized LC (the epidermal contingent of the dendritic cell [DC] lineage) and dendritic epidermal T cells (DETC) in TGF-β1 null (TGF-β1 −/−) mice. I-A+ LC were not detected in epidermal cell suspensions or epidermal sheets prepared from TGF-β1 −/− mice, and epidermal cell suspensions were devoid of allostimulatory activity. In contrast, TCR-γδ+ DETC were normal in number and appearance in TGF-β1 −/− mice and, importantly, DETC represented the only leukocytes in the epidermis. Immunolocalization studies revealed CD11c+ DC in lymph nodes from TGF-β1 −/− mice, although gp40+ DC were absent. Treatment of TGF-β1 −/− mice with rapamycin abrogated the characteristic inflammatory wasting syndrome and prolonged survival indefinitely, but did not result in population of the epidermis with LC. Thus, the LC abnormality in TGF-β1 −/− mice is not a consequence of inflammation in skin or other organs, and LC development is not simply delayed in these animals. We conclude that endogenous TGF-β1 is essential for normal murine LC development or epidermal localization. PMID:8976197

  9. Topical grape seed proanthocyandin extract reduces sunburn cells and mutant p53 positive epidermal cell formation, and prevents depletion of Langerhans cells in an acute sunburn model.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Xiao-Ying; Liu, Wei; Hao, Jian-Chun; Gu, Wei-Jie; Zhao, Yan-Shuang

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether grape seed proanthocyanidin extract (GSPE) can provide photoprotection against ultraviolet (UV) irradiation. Study has shown that GSPE is a natural oxidant, and is used in many fields such as ischemia-reperfusion injury, chronic pancreatitis, and even cancer. However, the effect of GSPE on UV irradiation is as yet unknown. Cutaneous areas on the backs of normal volunteers were untreated or treated with GSPE solutions or vehicles 30 min before exposure to two minimal erythema doses (MED) of solar simulated radiation. Cutaneous areas at different sites were examined histologically for the number of sunburn cells, or immunohistochemically for Langerhans cells and mutant p53 epidermal cells. On histological and immunohistochemical examination, skin treated with GSPE before UV radiation showed fewer sunburn cells and mutant p53-positive epidermal cells and more Langerhans cells compared with skin treated with 2-MED UV radiation only (p<0.001, p<0.001, and p<0.01, respectively). GSPE may be a possible preventive agent for photoprotection.

  10. Identification of Axl as a downstream effector of TGF-β1 during Langerhans cell differentiation and epidermal homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Thomas; Zagórska, Anna; Jurkin, Jennifer; Yasmin, Nighat; Köffel, René; Richter, Susanne; Gesslbauer, Bernhard; Lemke, Greg

    2012-01-01

    Transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) is a fundamental regulator of immune cell development and function. In this study, we investigated the effects of TGF-β1 on the differentiation of human Langerhans cells (LCs) and identified Axl as a key TGF-β1 effector. Axl belongs to the TAM (Tyro3, Axl, and Mer) receptor tyrosine kinase family, whose members function as inhibitors of innate inflammatory responses in dendritic cells and are essential to the prevention of lupus-like autoimmunity. We found that Axl expression is induced by TGF-β1 during LC differentiation and that LC precursors acquire Axl early during differentiation. We also describe prominent steady-state expression as well as inflammation-induced activation of Axl in human epidermal keratinocytes and LCs. TGF-β1–induced Axl enhances apoptotic cell (AC) uptake and blocks proinflammatory cytokine production. The antiinflammatory role of Axl in the skin is reflected in a marked impairment of the LC network preceding spontaneous skin inflammation in mutant mice that lack all three TAM receptors. Our findings highlight the importance of constitutive Axl expression to tolerogenic barrier immunity in the epidermis and define a mechanism by which TGF-β1 enables silent homeostatic clearing of ACs to maintain long-term self-tolerance. PMID:23071254

  11. Identification of bone morphogenetic protein 7 (BMP7) as an instructive factor for human epidermal Langerhans cell differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Yasmin, Nighat; Bauer, Thomas; Modak, Madhura; Wagner, Karin; Schuster, Christopher; Köffel, Rene; Seyerl, Maria; Stöckl, Johannes; Elbe-Bürger, Adelheid; Graf, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Human Langerhans cell (LC) precursors populate the epidermis early during prenatal development and thereafter undergo massive proliferation. The prototypic antiproliferative cytokine TGF-β1 is required for LC differentiation from human CD34+ hematopoietic progenitor cells and blood monocytes in vitro. Similarly, TGF-β1 deficiency results in LC loss in vivo. However, immunohistology studies revealed that human LC niches in early prenatal epidermis and adult basal (germinal) keratinocyte layers lack detectable TGF-β1. Here we demonstrated that these LC niches express high levels of bone morphogenetic protein 7 (BMP7) and that Bmp7-deficient mice exhibit substantially diminished LC numbers, with the remaining cells appearing less dendritic. BMP7 induces LC differentiation and proliferation by activating the BMP type-I receptor ALK3 in the absence of canonical TGF-β1–ALK5 signaling. Conversely, TGF-β1–induced in vitro LC differentiation is mediated via ALK3; however, co-induction of ALK5 diminished TGF-β1–driven LC generation. Therefore, selective ALK3 signaling by BMP7 promotes high LC yields. Within epidermis, BMP7 shows an inverse expression pattern relative to TGF-β1, the latter induced in suprabasal layers and up-regulated in outer layers. We observed that TGF-β1 inhibits microbial activation of BMP7-generated LCs. Therefore, TGF-β1 in suprabasal/outer epidermal layers might inhibit LC activation, resulting in LC network maintenance. PMID:24190429

  12. Identification of bone morphogenetic protein 7 (BMP7) as an instructive factor for human epidermal Langerhans cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Yasmin, Nighat; Bauer, Thomas; Modak, Madhura; Wagner, Karin; Schuster, Christopher; Köffel, Rene; Seyerl, Maria; Stöckl, Johannes; Elbe-Bürger, Adelheid; Graf, Daniel; Strobl, Herbert

    2013-11-18

    Human Langerhans cell (LC) precursors populate the epidermis early during prenatal development and thereafter undergo massive proliferation. The prototypic antiproliferative cytokine TGF-β1 is required for LC differentiation from human CD34(+) hematopoietic progenitor cells and blood monocytes in vitro. Similarly, TGF-β1 deficiency results in LC loss in vivo. However, immunohistology studies revealed that human LC niches in early prenatal epidermis and adult basal (germinal) keratinocyte layers lack detectable TGF-β1. Here we demonstrated that these LC niches express high levels of bone morphogenetic protein 7 (BMP7) and that Bmp7-deficient mice exhibit substantially diminished LC numbers, with the remaining cells appearing less dendritic. BMP7 induces LC differentiation and proliferation by activating the BMP type-I receptor ALK3 in the absence of canonical TGF-β1-ALK5 signaling. Conversely, TGF-β1-induced in vitro LC differentiation is mediated via ALK3; however, co-induction of ALK5 diminished TGF-β1-driven LC generation. Therefore, selective ALK3 signaling by BMP7 promotes high LC yields. Within epidermis, BMP7 shows an inverse expression pattern relative to TGF-β1, the latter induced in suprabasal layers and up-regulated in outer layers. We observed that TGF-β1 inhibits microbial activation of BMP7-generated LCs. Therefore, TGF-β1 in suprabasal/outer epidermal layers might inhibit LC activation, resulting in LC network maintenance.

  13. Langerhans-like cells in amphibian epidermis.

    PubMed Central

    Carrillo-Farga, J; Castell, A; Pérez, A; Rondán, A

    1990-01-01

    Langerhans cells have been described in epidermis and other stratified epithelia of mammals. In other vertebrates equivalent cells have not been found. Amphibians show skin graft rejection, so it is possible that these animals have epidermal cells homologous to Langerhans cells. In this work we demonstrate the existence of ATPase-positive dendritic cells in frog epidermis that are similar ultrastructurally to mammalian Langerhans cells, except for the absence of Birbeck granules. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 PMID:2148747

  14. [Pulmonary Langerhans cell histiocytosis].

    PubMed

    Popper, H H

    2015-09-01

    Pulmonary Langerhans cell histiocytosis is regarded as a reactive proliferation of the dendritic Langerhans cell population stimulated by chronic tobacco-derived plant proteins due to incomplete combustion but can also occur in childhood as a tumor-like systemic disease. Currently, both these forms cannot be morphologically distinguished. In the lungs a nodular proliferation of Langerhans cells occurs in the bronchial mucosa and also peripherally in the alveolar septa with an accompanying infiltration by eosinophilic granulocytes and destruction of the bronchial wall. Langerhans cells can be selectively detected with antibodies against CD1a and langerin. In the reactive isolated pulmonary form, abstinence from tobacco smoking in most patients leads to regression of infiltration and improvement of symptoms. In high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) the small star-like scars can still be detected even after complete cessation of tobacco smoking.

  15. Topical pimecrolimus inhibits high-dose UVB irradiation-induced epidermal Langerhans cell migration, via regulation of TNF-α and E-cadherin.

    PubMed

    Yin, ZhiQiang; Xu, JiaLi; Zhou, BingRong; Wu, Di; Xu, Yang; Zhang, JiaAn; Luo, Dan

    2014-01-01

    Topical pimecrolimus has been shown to reverse epidermal CD1a(+) Langerhans cell reduction induced by high-dose ultraviolet (UV)B irradiation, but the mechanism is still unclear. This study aimed to investigate the possible mechanism of the effect of pimecrolimus on high-dose UVB-irradiated epidermal Langerhans cells. FORTY HUMAN FORESKIN TISSUES WERE DIVIDED INTO FOUR GROUPS: control; pimecrolimus-only; UVB-only; and UVB + pimecrolimus. All tissues were cultured, and each tissue was cut into four pieces, corresponding to four time points (0 hours, 18 hours, 24 hours, and 48 hours). We collected the tissues and culture medium at each time point. The percentage of CD1a(+) cells in medium was detected by flow cytometry. The tissues were detected for messenger (m)RNA and protein expression of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-1β, and E-cadherin, by reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and Western blot. At 18 hours, 24 hours, and 48 hours, the CD1a(+) cells in the culture medium of the UVB-only group and the UVB + pimecrolimus group were significantly more than in the control group, while the CD1a(+) cells of the UVB + pimecrolimus group was less than of the UVB-only group. For both the UVB-only group and UVB + pimecrolimus group, TNF-α expression (by both reverse-transcription PCR and Western blot) of the tissues was clearly higher and E-cadherin expression was significantly lower compared with the control group, at 18 hours, 24 hours, and 48 hours. For the UVB + pimecrolimus group, TNF-α was clearly lower and E-cadherin was significantly higher compared with the UVB-only group. Topical pimecrolimus inhibited epidermal Langerhans cell migration induced by high-dose UVB irradiation, via regulation of TNF-α and E-cadherin.

  16. Topical pimecrolimus inhibits high-dose UVB irradiation-induced epidermal Langerhans cell migration, via regulation of TNF-α and E-cadherin

    PubMed Central

    Yin, ZhiQiang; Xu, JiaLi; Zhou, BingRong; Wu, Di; Xu, Yang; Zhang, JiaAn; Luo, Dan

    2014-01-01

    Background Topical pimecrolimus has been shown to reverse epidermal CD1a+ Langerhans cell reduction induced by high-dose ultraviolet (UV)B irradiation, but the mechanism is still unclear. This study aimed to investigate the possible mechanism of the effect of pimecrolimus on high-dose UVB-irradiated epidermal Langerhans cells. Methods Forty human foreskin tissues were divided into four groups: control; pimecrolimus-only; UVB-only; and UVB + pimecrolimus. All tissues were cultured, and each tissue was cut into four pieces, corresponding to four time points (0 hours, 18 hours, 24 hours, and 48 hours). We collected the tissues and culture medium at each time point. The percentage of CD1a+ cells in medium was detected by flow cytometry. The tissues were detected for messenger (m)RNA and protein expression of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-1β, and E-cadherin, by reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and Western blot. Results At 18 hours, 24 hours, and 48 hours, the CD1a+ cells in the culture medium of the UVB-only group and the UVB + pimecrolimus group were significantly more than in the control group, while the CD1a+ cells of the UVB + pimecrolimus group was less than of the UVB-only group. For both the UVB-only group and UVB + pimecrolimus group, TNF-α expression (by both reverse-transcription PCR and Western blot) of the tissues was clearly higher and E-cadherin expression was significantly lower compared with the control group, at 18 hours, 24 hours, and 48 hours. For the UVB + pimecrolimus group, TNF-α was clearly lower and E-cadherin was significantly higher compared with the UVB-only group. Conclusion Topical pimecrolimus inhibited epidermal Langerhans cell migration induced by high-dose UVB irradiation, via regulation of TNF-α and E-cadherin. PMID:25336924

  17. Effect of X-irradiation on epidermal immune function: decreased density and alloantigen-presenting capacity of Ia+ Langerhans cells and impaired production of epidermal cell-derived thymocyte activating factor (ETAF)

    SciTech Connect

    Breathnach, S.M.; Katz, S.I.

    1985-12-01

    The mechanisms involved in the modulation of cutaneous immune responses by x-irradiation on epidermal immune function. We therefore investigated the effect of x-irradiation of mice on: (a) the density of epidermal Ia+ Langerhans cells (LC) in immunofluorescence studies, (b) epidermal cell (EC) allostimulatory capacity in the allogeneic EC-lymphocyte reaction (ELR), and (c) production of epidermal cell-derived thymocyte activating factor (ETAF). C3H/He and BALB/c mice were irradiated with 900, 1800, 2700, or 3600 rad from a /sup 137/Cs source, and sacrificed 10 h or 3 days later. X-irradiation of mice 10 h previously only slightly decreased the density of epidermal Ia+ LC and did not affect the capacity of their EC to stimulate allogeneic responder lymphocytes in the ELR. X-irradiation of mice 3 days previously, however, resulted in a dose-dependent decrease in the density of Ia+ LC. This decrease was accompanied by a substantial reduction in EC allostimulatory capacity in the ELR at all doses of x-irradiation. ETAF production by cultured EC from mice x-irradiated 3 days previously was also found to be diminished at all doses of x-irradiation. Trypan blue exclusion studies demonstrated that the observed decreases in EC allostimulatory capacity and ETAF production were not the result of a generalized lethal effect of x-irradiation on EC. The reduction in EC allostimulatory capacity following in vivo x-irradiation could not be reversed by addition of exogenous ETAF or interleukin-1 in the ELR. Taken together, these results indicate that x-irradiation decreases the density of Ia+ LC, impairs LC alloantigen-presenting function, and reduces ETAF production. Thus cutaneous x-irradiation may affect inflammatory and neoplastic processes not only by its antimitotic activity, but also by a direct effect on EC which subserve immunologic functions.

  18. Topical pimecrolimus 1% reverses long-term suberythemal ultraviolet B-induced epidermal Langerhans cell reduction and morphologic changes in mice.

    PubMed

    Yin, ZhiQiang; Xu, JiaLi; Lu, Yan; Luo, Dan

    2012-09-01

    Some literature reported that topical calcineurin inhibitors (TCIs) did not accelerate photocarcinogenesis in hairless mice after long-term simulated solar radiation. In this work, we investigate the effects of topical pimecrolimus 1% on long-term suberythemal ultraviolet B (UVB) irradiated epidermal Langerhans cells (LCs) in mice. Thirty female mice were randomly divided into two groups, including four subgroups: (1A) control, (1B) pimecrolimus 1% only, (2A) 25 mJ/cm2 UVB only, (2B) UVB plus pimecrolimus. After being treated for 60 days, the dorsal skin was collected and given immunohistochemical staining of active caspase 3, and immunofluorescence staining for cluster of differentiation 1a (CD1a). Our results show that, compared with the control subgroup, the CD1a+ LC number in the epidermal sheet of the UVB-only subgroup decreased substantially from 578.6 per mm2 to 227 per mm2 (P<.001). Compared with the UVB-only subgroup, the UVB plus pimecrolimus subgroup significantly restored the LC number from 227 per mm2 to 475.7 per mm2 (P<.001). Compared with other subgroups, the LC morphology of the UVB-only subgroup became rounder, and the LC dendrites became shorter. There were no significant active caspase 3-positive cells in the epidermis in any of the four subgroups. Our results show that topical pimecrolimus 1% reverses long-term UVB-induced epidermal LC reduction and morphologic changes in mice, where the exact mechanism is likely not related to apoptosis.

  19. Langerhans Cells Regulate Cutaneous Innervation Density and Mechanical Sensitivity in Mouse Footpad

    PubMed Central

    Doss, Argenia L. N.; Smith, Peter G.

    2014-01-01

    Langerhans cells are epidermal dendritic cells responsible for antigen presentation during an immune response. Langerhans cells associate intimately with epidermal sensory axons. While there is evidence that Langerhans cells may produce neurotrophic factors, a role in regulating cutaneous innervation has not been established. We used genetically engineered mice in which the diphtheria toxin (DT) receptor is targeted to Langerhans cells (Lang-DTR mice) to assess sensory axon-dendritic cell interactions. Diphtheria toxin administration to wild type mice did not affect epidermal structure, Langerhans cell content, or innervation density. A DT administration regimen supramaximal for completely ablating epidermal Langerhans cells in Lang-DTR mice reduced PGP 9.5–immunoreactive total innervation and calcitonin gene related peptide–immunoreactive peptidergic nociceptor innervation. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction showed that epidermal gene expression of brain derived neurotrophic factor was unchanged, but nerve growth factor and glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor mRNAs were reduced. Behavioral testing showed that, while thermal sensitivity was unaffected, mice depleted of Langerhans cells displayed mechanical hypersensitivity. These findings provide evidence that Langerhans cells play an important role in determining cutaneous sensory innervation density and mechanical sensitivity. This may involve alterations in neurotrophin production by Langerhans or other epidermal cells, which in turn may affect mechanical sensitivity directly or as a result of neuropathic changes. PMID:24970748

  20. Allergen presentation by epidermal Langerhans' cells from patients with atopic dermatitis is mediated by IgE.

    PubMed Central

    Mudde, G C; Van Reijsen, F C; Boland, G J; de Gast, G C; Bruijnzeel, P L; Bruijnzeel-Koomen, C A

    1990-01-01

    To investigate the role of IgE-bearing Langerhans' cells (LC) from atopic dermatitis (AD) patients in antigen presentation, IgE+LC and non-IgE bearing LC (IgE-LC) from AD patients were investigated for their antigen-presenting capacity and compared to antigen-presenting cells (APC) from peripheral blood. The T-cell response to Candida albicans, using IgE+LC from AD patients as APC, was in the same range as with IgE-LC. Also, the T-cell response to Candida with autologous APC from peripheral blood did not significantly differ between these groups. In contrast to this finding, the T-cell response to house dust allergen (HDA) was dependent on the type of APC used. If non-T cells from peripheral blood were used as APC, both AD patients and controls responded to HDA. However, when LC were used as APC, a T-cell response to HDA was only observed in the presence of IgE+LC. IgE-LC from AD patients or LC from normal controls were unable to present HDA. Preincubation of IgE+LC with anti-IgE or anti-kappa/lambda antibodies inhibited HDA-induced T-cell proliferation, whereas the response to Candida was not affected. These in vitro results, which demonstrate the necessity of cell-bound IgE on LC for the presentation of aero-allergens, strongly correlate with the in vivo presence of a positive delayed patch reaction to the same antigens. When the LC of a patient appeared to be IgE-, the in vitro proliferative response as well as, in most cases, the in vivo patch test reaction to the same antigens was negative. In conclusion, these experiments demonstrate that there are at least two different mechanisms by which LC capture antigens for antigen presentation. In one of them cell-bound IgE, as can be demonstrated on LC from AD patients, plays a crucial role. The binding and presentation of HDA by APC from peripheral blood can take place independently of cell-bound IgE. Candida can be presented by both types of APC in the absence of IgE. PMID:2179131

  1. Effects of TNF-alpha inhibitors on the number of epidermal Langerhans cells in uninvolved skin of psoriatic patients: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Piaserico, Stefano; Zattra, Edoardo; Michelotto, Anna; Alaibac, Mauro

    2013-09-01

    Only limited data are available on the effects of TNF-alpha inhibitors on dendritic cells. However, TNF-alpha plays a central role in the biology of dendritic cells, both with regard to their maturity process and mobilization to secondary lymphoid organs. In particular, the effects of TNF-alpha inhibitors on Langerhans cells in healthy skin have never been investigated. In this pilot study, we aimed to assess the change of the density of Langerhans cells within the normal, not photo-exposed, skin of 17 psoriatic patients, before and after 16 weeks of treatment with TNF-alpha inhibitors. Most of the patients (88%) showed an increase or a similar density of Langerhans cells after 16 weeks of therapy with TNF-alpha inhibitors compared with baseline values. Only 2 patients (12%) showed a reduction of these cells following therapy with TNF-alpha inhibitors.

  2. [Adult Langerhans cell histiocytosis].

    PubMed

    de Menthon, Mathilde; Meignin, Véronique; Mahr, Alfred; Tazi, Abdellatif

    2017-01-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) is a rare disease affecting both genders and can occur at any age. It often evolves through successive flares, and its severity varies from benign forms that don't require treatment to life threatening disease. Some patients have important functional impairment with psychological and social consequences and prolonged disability. LCH may affect only one organ, with uni- or multifocal involvement or be multisystem disease involving multiple organs. The organs most frequently involved are bones, lung, skin and the endocrinal system. Pulmonary LCH is strongly related to smoking. Some patients have mixed histocytosis combining LCH and other histiocytic disorders. The diagnosis relies on the histological study of tissues samples, and shows tissue infiltration with large cell with pale cytoplasm and reniform nucleus, staining for CD1a and Langerin (CD207) on immunohistochemistry. The BRAF(V600E) mutation is observed in tissue samples in approximately half of patients and the activation of the RAS-RAF-MEK-ERK pathway has been shown to be constantly activated in LCH lesions, regardless the BRAF status. These findings represent an important forward step in the understanding of the physiopathology of the disease. Treatment must be adapted to the severity of the disease and goes from conservative observation to systemic chemotherapy. Therapies targeting the RAS-RAF-MEK-ERK pathway are promising treatments for progressive disease.

  3. Adenosine triphosphatase-positive Langerhans-like cells in the epidermis of the chicken (Gallus gallus).

    PubMed

    Carrillo-Farga, J; Pérez Torres, A; Castell Rodríguez, A; Antuna Bizarro, S

    1991-06-01

    In mammalian epidermis a population of ATPase-positive dendritic cells, identified as Langerhans cells, has been found. Such cells are bone marrow-derived and participate in the immunological functions of the skin. We demonstrate the existence of ATPase-positive dendritic cells in separated epidermal sheets of chicken skin, by means of light and electron microscopy. They have a mean distribution of 688 +/- 265 cells/mm2 and showed several features in common with Langerhans cells. Since chickens can develop contact dermatitis, the finding is taken as the first formal demonstration of the presence of Langerhans cells in this group of vertebrates.

  4. Genetics Home Reference: Langerhans cell histiocytosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... cell histiocytosis affects the lungs, liver, or blood-forming (hematopoietic) system; damage to these organs and tissues ... occurs when the Langerhans cells crowd out blood-forming cells in the bone marrow, leads to a ...

  5. Langerhans cell histiocytosis followed by Hodgkin's lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Park, Ik Soo; Park, In Keun; Kim, Eun Kyoung; Kim, Shin; Jeon, Sang Ryong; Huh, Joo Ryung; Suh, Cheol Won

    2012-12-01

    A 22-year-old man was referred to our institution due to lower back pain and was diagnosed with Langerhans cell histiocytosis of the thoracic and lumbar spine. The patient achieved complete remission with radiotherapy and chemotherapy. One year later, right cervical lymphadenopathy was observed and Hodgkin's lymphoma was confirmed on biopsy. The patient was treated with chemotherapy and autologous stem cell transplantation, and experienced no further symptoms. Further, no evidence of recurrence was observed on follow-up imaging. This report discusses the association between Langerhans cell histiocytosis and Hodgkin's lymphoma.

  6. Immunophenotypic characterization of feline Langerhans cells.

    PubMed

    Saint-André Marchal, I; Dezutter-Dambuyant, C; Willett, B J; Woo, J C; Moore, P F; Magnol, J P; Schmitt, D; Marchal, T

    1997-08-01

    To carry out the characterization of feline Langerhans cells (LC), first described in 1994, we used a panel of monoclonal antibodies (MAb) known to react with human, canine and feline leukocyte membrane antigens (Ag). The immunolabeling was performed, at light microscope level, on frozen sections of feline skin and labial mucosa using an avidin-biotin-peroxidase technique, and at electron microscope level on epidermal cell suspensions using an immunogold technique. Out of the 52 MAb tested, six labeled basal or suprabasal DC cells in the frozen sections, either in epidermis or lip epithelium: MHM23 (anti-human CD18), CVS20 and vpg3 (respectively anti-canine and feline-major histocompatibility complex class II molecules), vpg5 (anti-feline leukocytes), vpg39 (anti-feline CD4) and Fel5F4 (anti-feline CD1a). These six MAb were used on suspensions, and labeled cells which showed no desmosomes or melanosomes, but contained 'zipper-like' structures similar to Birbeck granules (BG) in their cytoplasm, revealing they were LC. Consequently, feline LC are CD18-positive (CD18+), major histocompatibility complex class II-positive (Class II+), CD1a-positive (CD1a+), vpg5-positive (vg5+) and CD4-positive (CD4+). This immunophenotypic and ultrastructural characterization demonstrates that feline LC share many characteristics with their human counterparts, a fact that will allow us to study the role of feline LC in certain feline diseases such as Feline Immunodeficiency Virus (FIV) infection, since it has been shown that human LC cells are HIV-permissive, and to establish an animal model for human AIDS.

  7. Thymic Langerhans cell histiocytosis mimicking lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Yağci, Begül; Varan, Ali; Uner, Aysegül; Akyüz, Canan; Büyükpamukçu, Münevver

    2008-12-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) is a rare disorder characterized by clonal expansion of antigen presenting Langerhans cells. Different clinical features can be seen according to the involved organs and systems. Multisystem disease with organ dysfunction is more common in infants, whereas single system disease is usually observed in older children. The disease can affect any system or organ throughout the body. Thymus is a rarely involvement site reported in LCH and usually is accompanied by skin, bone or lung disease. Here we report a 12-year-old male with thymic involvement by LCH clinically mimicking lymphoma.

  8. [Pulmonary manifestations of Langerhans cell histiocytosis].

    PubMed

    Obert, J; Tazi, A

    2015-10-01

    Pulmonary Langerhans cell histiocytosis is a rare diffuse cystic interstitial pneumonia of unknown etiology that occurs selectively in young smokers of both genders. The multicenter studies conducted by the reference center have better defined the short and medium terms natural history of the disease and the clinical management of patients. A substantial proportion of patients experience a dramatic decline in their lung function soon after diagnosis. Importantly, smoking cessation is associated with a decreased risk of subsequent deterioration. Cladribine, a purine analogue, chemotherapy may dramatically improve lung function in patients with progressive pulmonary Langerhans cell histiocytosis, but this treatment should be used only in the setting of clinical research. Specific pulmonary hypertension therapies (anti-endothelin receptors, inhibitors of phosphodiesterases) may be used with caution in specialized centres for patients with severe pulmonary hypertension, and seem to be well tolerated. The recent identification of the V600E mutation of the BRAF oncogene in approximately half of the Langerhans cell histiocytosis lesions, including pulmonary granulomas, represents an important step forward in the understanding of the pathogenesis of Langerhans cell histiocytosis. Potentially it opens the way to targeted therapies. Copyright © 2015 SPLF. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. Phenotypic and Functional Properties of Human Steady State CD14+ and CD1a+ Antigen Presenting Cells and Epidermal Langerhans Cells

    PubMed Central

    Fehres, Cynthia. M.; Bruijns, Sven C. M.; Sotthewes, Brigit N.; Kalay, Hakan; Schaffer, Lana; Head, Steven R.; de Gruijl, Tanja D.; Garcia-Vallejo, Juan J.; van Kooyk, Yvette

    2015-01-01

    Cutaneous antigen presenting cells (APCs) are critical for the induction and regulation of skin immune responses. The human skin contains phenotypically and functionally distinct APCs subsets that are present at two separated locations. While CD1ahigh LCs form a dense network in the epidermis, the CD14+ and CD1a+ APCs reside in the dermal compartment. A better understanding of the biology of human skin APC subsets is necessary for the improvement of vaccine strategies that use the skin as administration route. In particular, progress in the characterization of uptake and activatory receptors will certainly improve APC-targeting strategies in vaccination. Here we performed a detailed analysis of the expression and function of glycan-binding and pattern-recognition receptors in skin APC subsets. The results demonstrate that under steady state conditions human CD1a+ dermal dendritic cells (DCs) were phenotypically most mature as measured by the expression of CD83 and CD86, whereas the CD14+ cells showed a higher expression of the CLRs DC-SIGN, mannose receptor and DCIR and had potent antigen uptake capacity. Furthermore, steady state LCs showed superior antigen cross-presentation as compared to the dermal APC subsets. Our results also demonstrate that the TLR3 ligand polyribosinic-polyribocytidylic acid (pI:C) was the most potent stimulator of cytokine production by both LCs and dDCs. These studies warrant further exploration of human CD1a+ dDCs and LCs as target cells for cancer vaccination to induce anti-tumor immune responses. PMID:26605924

  10. Adenosine triphosphatase-positive Langerhans-like cells in the epidermis of the chicken (Gallus gallus).

    PubMed Central

    Carrillo-Farga, J; Pérez Torres, A; Castell Rodríguez, A; Antuna Bizarro, S

    1991-01-01

    In mammalian epidermis a population of ATPase-positive dendritic cells, identified as Langerhans cells, has been found. Such cells are bone marrow-derived and participate in the immunological functions of the skin. We demonstrate the existence of ATPase-positive dendritic cells in separated epidermal sheets of chicken skin, by means of light and electron microscopy. They have a mean distribution of 688 +/- 265 cells/mm2 and showed several features in common with Langerhans cells. Since chickens can develop contact dermatitis, the finding is taken as the first formal demonstration of the presence of Langerhans cells in this group of vertebrates. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 PMID:1717417

  11. Comparative study of Langerhans cells in normal and pathological human scars. I. Atrophic scars.

    PubMed

    Cracco, C; Stella, M; Teich Alasia, S; Filogamo, G

    1992-01-01

    In the present study, we investigated Langerhans cells (LCs) in the epidermal component of human atrophic scars, comparing them with those in control skin and normotrophic scars. A preliminary analysis of the histological features was first carried out on vertical serial sections, stained with hematoxylin and eosin. The total epidermal thickness and the thickness of the single epidermal layers were then measured, by means of a digitizing tablet and a morphometric program run on an Apple IIe computer. These parameters were found to be significantly lower (40%) in atrophic scars, if compared to control skin and normotrophic scars (p less than 0.05). CDla-positive and HLA-DR-positive LCs were marked by indirect immunofluorescence. Their position among the epidermal layers, their dimensions, their density and their morphology were examined. In atrophic scars, LCs were densely and evenly distributed in all the epidermal layers. Their density was increased (about 1200 cells/mm2 of epidermal area), if compared to control skin and normotrophic scars (both 300-400 cells/mm2 of epidermal area; p less than 0.001). The CDla-positive definite cell bodies, exhibiting an unstained nucleus, were as large as those evidentiated in the normotrophic scars and twice as much the control skin values (p less than 0.001). The present results provide morphological data that distinguish atrophic scars from control skin and normotrophic scars, and suggest an involvement of the Langerhans cells in this particular case of pathological scarring.

  12. Giant cytoplasmic granules in Langerhans cells of Chediak-Higashi syndrome.

    PubMed

    Carrillo-Farga, J; Gutiérrez-Palomera, G; Ruiz-Maldonado, R; Rondán, A; Antuna, S

    1990-02-01

    Giant membrane-bound cytoplasmic granules were found in the epidermal Langerhans cells of a patient with the Chediak-Higashi syndrome. These cells also contained normal-appearing Birbeck granules. The giant granules had a granular or sometimes globular internal structure; they are believed to derive from fusion of lysosomes or some portion of Birbeck granules. It is unclear whether this morphologic change in Langerhans cell interferes with their antigen-presenting function; it may be, in part, responsible for the frequent infections seen in patients with Chediak-Higashi syndrome that are otherwise more clearly related to the abnormalities in neutrophils and lymphocytes. The Langerhans cell is another cellular type in Chediak-Higashi syndrome in which giant cytoplasmic granules are found.

  13. Human embryonic epidermis contains a diverse Langerhans cell precursor pool.

    PubMed

    Schuster, Christopher; Mildner, Michael; Mairhofer, Mario; Bauer, Wolfgang; Fiala, Christian; Prior, Marion; Eppel, Wolfgang; Kolbus, Andrea; Tschachler, Erwin; Stingl, Georg; Elbe-Bürger, Adelheid

    2014-02-01

    Despite intense efforts, the exact phenotype of the epidermal Langerhans cell (LC) precursors during human ontogeny has not been determined yet. These elusive precursors are believed to migrate into the embryonic skin and to express primitive surface markers, including CD36, but not typical LC markers such as CD1a, CD1c and CD207. The aim of this study was to further characterize the phenotype of LC precursors in human embryonic epidermis and to compare it with that of LCs in healthy adult skin. We found that epidermal leukocytes in first trimester human skin are negative for CD34 and heterogeneous with regard to the expression of CD1c, CD14 and CD36, thus contrasting the phenotypic uniformity of epidermal LCs in adult skin. These data indicate that LC precursors colonize the developing epidermis in an undifferentiated state, where they acquire the definitive LC marker profile with time. Using a human three-dimensional full-thickness skin model to mimic in vivo LC development, we found that FACS-sorted, CD207(-) cord blood-derived haematopoietic precursor cells resembling foetal LC precursors but not CD14(+)CD16(-) blood monocytes integrate into skin equivalents, and without additional exogenous cytokines give rise to cells that morphologically and phenotypically resemble LCs. Overall, it appears that CD14(-) haematopoietic precursors possess a much higher differentiation potential than CD14(+) precursor cells.

  14. E-cadherin interactions are required for Langerhans cell differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Mayumi, Nobuko; Watanabe, Eri; Norose, Yoshihiko; Watari, Eiji; Kawana, Seiji; Geijtenbeek, Teunis B H; Takahashi, Hidemi

    2013-01-01

    Human skin contains the following two distinct DC subsets: (i) Langerhans cells (LCs), expressing Langerin but not DC-specific intercellular adhesion molecule-3-grabbing nonintegrin (DC-SIGN), are predominantly localized in the epidermis; and (ii) dermal DCs, expressing DC-SIGN but not Langerin, are observed mainly in the dermis. It is not known whether localization in the epidermis provides cues for LC differentiation. Here, we show that E-cadherin expressed by epidermal keratinocytes (KCs) is crucial for differentiation of LCs. Monocytes differentiated into LC-like cells in presence of IL-4, GM-CSF, and TGF-β1. However, these LC-like cells expressed not only Langerin but also DC-SIGN. Notably, co-culturing of these LC-like cells with KCs expressing E-cadherin or recombinant E-cadherin strongly decreased expression of DC-SIGN and further induced a phenotype similar to purified epidermal LCs. Moreover, pretreatment of LC-like cells with anti-E-cadherin-specific antibody completely abolished their Langerin expression, indicating the requirement of E-cadherin–E-cadherin interactions for the differentiation into Langerin+ cells. These findings suggest that E-cadherin expressed by KCs provide environmental cues that induce differentiation of LCs in the epidermis. PMID:23135957

  15. Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis of the Clavicle

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shaowu; Zhang, Weisheng; Na, Shengbo; Zhang, Lina; Lang, Zhijin

    2014-01-01

    Abstract We report a rare case of solitary Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) involving the clavicle of an adult female. The patient was a 32-year-old female presenting with 1 month history of progressive pain, swelling, and tenderness in the region near the left sternoclavicular joint. Radiograph, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging showed an osteolytic lesion in the clavicle with tumor extension and soft tissue edema. Surgical curettage of the lesion was performed, and the histopathologic diagnosis was LCH. Because of its rarity and possibly variable presentation, LCH should be included and considered in the differential diagnosis when we encounter a clavicle lesion. PMID:25365405

  16. Liver involvement in Langerhans cell histiocytosis.

    PubMed

    Wong, Adelaine; Ortiz-Neira, Clara L; Reslan, Walid Abou; Sharon, Raphael; Pinto-Rojas, Alfredo; Kaura, Deepak; Anderson, Ronald

    2006-10-01

    Liver involvement in Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) typically presents with hepatomegaly and other signs of liver dysfunction. We present an 11-month-old child having only minimally elevated liver enzymes as an indication of liver involvement. Using sonography as the initial diagnostic tool followed by MRI, LCH of the liver was revealed. A review of sonographic, CT, MRI and MR cholangiopancreatography findings in liver LCH is presented. We recommend that physicians consider sonography and MRI screening for liver involvement in patients with newly diagnosed LCH, as periportal involvement may be present with little or no liver function abnormality present, as in this patient.

  17. Langerhans cells and dermal dendritic cells capture protein antigens in the skin: Possible targets for vaccination through the skin

    PubMed Central

    Sparber, Florian; Tripp, Christoph H.; Hermann, Martin; Romani, Nikolaus; Stoitzner, Patrizia

    2010-01-01

    Dendritic cells capture and process antigen and present it to T lymphocytes in the lymphoid organs. Dendritic cells of the skin, including epidermal Langerhans cells, langerin+ and langerinnegative dermal dendritic cells are ideally positioned to take up pathogens that enter the body through the skin or vaccines that are administered into (intradermal) or onto (epicutaneous) the skin. The antigen uptake properties of skin dendritic cells have not thoroughly been studied yet. We therefore investigated the uptake of the fluorochrome-conjugated model antigen ovalbumin (OVA) by skin dendritic cells in the mouse. OVA was readily taken up by immature Langerhans cells both in situ and in cell suspensions. When offered to Langerhans cells in situ either by “bathing” skin explants in OVA-containing culture medium or by intradermal injection they retained the captured OVA for at least 2–3 days when migrating into the culture medium and, importantly, into the draining lymph nodes. Also langerin+ and – to a larger extent – langerinnegative skin dendritic cells took up and transported OVA to the lymph nodes. Interestingly, mature Langerhans cells were still capable of ingesting substantial amounts of OVA, indicating that predominantly receptor-mediated endocytosis is operative in these cells. Unlike macropinocytosis, this pathway of endocytosis is not shut down upon dendritic cell maturation. These observations indicate that in intradermal vaccination schemes, Langerhans cells from the epidermis are prominently involved. They were recently shown to possess the capacity to induce functional cytotoxic T lymphocytes. Furthermore, the potential to markedly enhance antigen uptake and processing by targeting antigen to c-type lectin receptors on Langerhans cells was also recently demonstrated. Our data provide a rationale and an incentive to explore in more detail antigen targeting to Langerhans cells with the aim of harnessing it for immunotherapy. PMID:20599290

  18. Ultraviolet radiation-induced damage to human Langerhans cells in vivo is not reversed by ultraviolet A or visible light.

    PubMed

    Alcalay, J; Goldberg, L H; Wolf, J E; Kripke, M L

    1990-08-01

    Exposure of human skin in vivo to UVB radiation induces pyrimidine dimers in DNA and alters the morphology and function of epidermal Langerhans cells. Cells in human skin have been reported to contain a photoreactivation repair mechanism that, following exposure to UVA or visible light, repairs UVB-induced pyrimidine dimers. The purpose of this study was to determine whether exposure to photoreactivating light would also reverse the UVB-induced morphologic alterations in human Langerhans cells. The skin of eight healthy volunteers was exposed to a low dose of UVB radiation (between 0.75 and 1.5 times the minimal erythema dose), and immediately thereafter exposed to photoreactivating light from either BLB fluorescent lamps (UVA radiation) or incandescent bulbs (visible light). After exposure to UVB radiation, the number of ATPase+ epidermal Langerhans cells was reduced in all subjects to between 21% and 65% of that in unirradiated skin, and the majority of the remaining cells exhibited morphologic alterations. Exposure of the UVB-irradiated skin to photoreactivating light did not reverse or reduce these effects. We conclude that UVB-induced morphologic alterations of human Langerhans cells are not subject to photoreactivation. These results imply either that pyrimidine dimers are not involved in these effects of UVB irradiation, or that photoreactivation does not occur in human Langerhans cells in situ.

  19. Liver involvement in Langerhans' cell histiocytosis. Case report.

    PubMed

    Dina, Ion; Copaescu, Catalin; Herlea, Vlad; Wrba, Fritz; Iacobescu, Claudia

    2006-03-01

    Langerhans'cell histiocytosis (Histiocytosis X) is a rare disease of unknown cause characterized by oligoclonal proliferation of Langerhans cells. It occurs mostly in children and young adults and involves one or more body systems such as bone, hypothalamus, posterior pituitary gland, lymph nodes, liver or various soft tissues. The diagnosis is always made by a histological approach. We report a case of Langerhans'cell histiocytosis in a young patient with clinical signs of diabetes insipidus and hepatic involvement in whom the immunohistochemical analysis of the liver tissue led to the definitive diagnosis.

  20. Characterization of chicken epidermal dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    Igyártó, Botond-Zoltán; Lackó, Erzsébet; Oláh, Imre; Magyar, Attila

    2006-01-01

    It has been known for 15 years that the chicken epidermis contains ATPase+ and major histocompatibility complex class II-positive (MHCII+) dendritic cells. These cells were designated as Langerhans cells but neither their detailed phenotype nor their function was further investigated. In the present paper we demonstrate a complete overlapping of ATPase, CD45 and vimentin staining in all dendritic cells of the chicken epidermis. The CD45+ ATPase+ vimentin+ dendritic cells could be divided into three subpopulations: an MHCII+ CD3– KUL01+ and 68.1+ (monocyte-macrophage subpopulation markers) subpopulation, an MHCII– CD3– KUL01– and 68.1– subpopulation and an MHCII– CD3+ KUL01– and 68.1– subpopulation. The first population could be designated as chicken Langerhans cells. The last population represents CD4– CD8– T-cell receptor-αβ– and -γδ– natural killer cells with cytoplasmic CD3 positivity. The epidermal dendritic cells have a low proliferation rate as assessed by bromodeoxyuridine incorporation. Both in vivo and in vitro experiments showed that dendritic cells could be mobilized from the epidermis. Hapten treatment of epidermis resulted in the decrease of the frequency of epidermal dendritic cells and hapten-loaded dendritic cells appeared in the dermis or in in vitro culture of isolated epidermis. Hapten-positive cells were also found in the so-called dermal lymphoid nodules. We suggest that these dermal nodules are responsible for some regional immunological functions similar to the mammalian lymph nodes. PMID:16889640

  1. How I treat Langerhans cell histiocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Carl E.; Ladisch, Stephan

    2015-01-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis” (LCH) describes a spectrum of clinical presentations ranging from a single bone lesion or trivial skin rash to an explosive disseminated disease. Regardless of clinical severity, LCH lesions share the common histology of CD1a+/CD207+ dendritic cells with characteristic morphology among an inflammatory infiltrate. Despite historical uncertainty defining LCH as inflammatory vs neoplastic and incomplete understanding of mechanisms of pathogenesis, clinical outcomes have improved markedly over the past decades through cooperative randomized clinical trials based on empiric therapeutic strategies. Significant advances include recognition of high- and low-risk clinical groups defined by hematopoietic and/or hepatic involvement, and of the importance of optimal intensity and of duration of chemotherapy. Nevertheless, mortality of high-risk patients, disease recurrence, lack of robustly tested salvage strategies, and significant disease morbidity of both high- and low-risk patients remain challenges. Recent discovery of recurrent somatic mutations in mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway genes at critical stages of myeloid hematopoietic differentiation in LCH patients supports redefinition of the disease as a myeloproliferative disorder and provides opportunities to develop novel approaches to diagnosis and therapy. PMID:25827831

  2. Pineal gland abnormalities in Langerhans cell histiocytosis.

    PubMed

    Grois, N; Prosch, H; Waldhauser, F; Minkov, M; Strasser, G; Steiner, M; Unger, E; Prayer, D

    2004-09-01

    The most common types of central nervous system (CNS) disease in Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) comprise involvement of the hypothalamic-pituitary region (HPR) and neurodegenerative changes in the cerebellum, basal ganglia or pons. In the review process of magnetic resonance images (MRI) from 129 LCH patients a high frequency of cysts within or large pineal glands was noted by chance. To prove whether this observation was specific for LCH or not, we compared MRI findings of the HPR in LCH patients with a control group of 55 non-LCH patients with the same age and sex distribution. In LCH patients, the pineal gland was significantly larger and also the number of pineal cysts was significantly higher as compared to the control group. No difference was found regarding the size or frequency of cystic changes between patients who had received chemotherapy prior to the MRI and untreated patients. In the LCH patients, we further found a significant correlation of pineal gland enlargement with involvement of the HPR, but not with neurodegenerative changes. Analysis of melatonin (the principal hormone of the pineal gland) levels in 24 hr urine in 14 LCH patients did not reveal a melatonin deficiency or overproduction in the LCH group as compared to 6 normal controls. The pineal gland is another site of possible CNS involvement in LCH. LCH CNS patients did not show an overt disturbance in melatonin levels. The role of the pineal gland in CNS LCH remains to be defined. Copyright 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  3. [Langerhans cell histiocytosis in children under one year].

    PubMed

    Larralde, Margarita; Abad, María E; Gomar, Begoña

    2008-06-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis is characterized by a clonal proliferation of activated Langerhans cells that infiltrate various organs of the body. Occurs at any age, from newborn until adulthood, with an incidence peak at 1-4 years. To describe the morphologyc characteristics of skin lesions and clinical course of 15 patients with Langerhans cell histiocytosis. A retrospective review of the medical records of patients with Langerhans cell histiocytosis from Ramos Mejia Hospital and Aleman Hospital, between 1999-2007. Review of medical records from 15 patients, 6 females and 9 males. Skin lesions were congenital in 8 cases and appeared between 2-12 months of age in 7 cases. The patients with congenital presentation only had a cutaneous manifestation; one patient who developed a systemic compromise (lung, liver and spleen) is currently under treatment. Three patients with presentation after birth only had cutaneous lesions, the others had a systemic disease. One of this patients died during treatment. Histopathology showed a histiocytic infiltrate in the papillary dermis with epidermotrophism; inmunomarking with S100 and CD1a was positive. Both clinical manifestation (congenital and after birth) represent different ends of a spectrum of the same condition, with the potencial to develop into disseminated Langerhans cell histiocytosis.

  4. [Langerhans cell histiocytosis with atypical and early neonatal debut].

    PubMed

    García-Rodríguez, Esther; Bernabeu-Wittel, José; Calderón-López, Gemma; Pavón-Delgado, Antonio

    2016-04-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis is a systemic disease associated with the proliferation of this type of cells in tissues. Its prevalence is estimated at 1-9/100 000. Bone is the most frequently affected organ, followed by the skin, lymph nodes, haematopoietic system, pituitary gland, lungs and liver. In the majority of cases, onset occurs during childhood, with peak between one and three years of age, and poor prognosis before two years of age. The haematological forms (pancytopenia) are usually aggressive in infants. We report a case of Langerhans cell histiocytosis with neonatal onset and complex diagnosis: maintained and significant leukocytosis was the predominant data for the first two months of life, so some type of leukemia was considered. However, the most common blood disorder in Langerhans cell histiocytosis is pancytopenia rather than leukocytosis, so that the diagnosis was delayed.

  5. Viruses and Langerhans cell histiocytosis: is there a link?

    PubMed Central

    McClain, K.; Weiss, R. A.

    1994-01-01

    As a rare, sporadic disease Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) presents a difficult problem in defining a likely etiology. Epidemiological data would not a priori lead one to choose a viral etiology. However, there are rare tumours which occur as sequelae of common infections from Epstein-Barr virus or human papilloma viruses. Likewise some viruses can cause cells to elaborate cytokines which could ultimately stimulate Langerhans cell growth. There is only a small amount of experimental data testing the hypothesis that viruses might be associated with LCH. The theoretical constructs surrounding this question and new data refuting the association are summarised. PMID:8075003

  6. Langerhans cell histiocytosis: Current concepts in dentistry and case report

    PubMed Central

    Ramos-Gutiérrez, Efraín; Alejo-González, Francisco; Ruiz-Rodríguez, Socorro; Garrocho-Rangel, José-Arturo

    2016-01-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH), which is a rare granulomatous pediatric disease of unknown etiology, is characterized by the idiopathic proliferation and accumulation of abnormal and clonal Langerhans cells or their marrow precursors, resulting in localized, solitary or multiple destructive lesions. These lesions are most commonly eosinophilic granuloma, which are found in craniofacial bone structures such as the skull and mandible, skin and other organs. In children, the disease has a variable initial presentation, and the clinical course, prognosis and survival are unpredictable. The aims of this report were to present an LCH case in a girl aged 2 years, 8 months and her clinicopathological features, to describe the bucodental management provided, and to discuss special dental considerations of this disease. Key words:Children, dental management, histiocytosis, Langerhans cells. PMID:26855698

  7. Does radiation-induced abrogation of skin Langerhans cell functions lead to enhanced incidence of skin tumors in patients with genetic disorders of DNA repair

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, Y.

    1987-01-01

    A hypothesis is presented which states that persons with the genetic disorders xeroderma pigmentosum and ataxia-telangiectasia, manifested by a deficiency of DNA repair, develop cutaneous tumors due to the elimination of reticuloendothelial system cells (Langerhans cells) in the skin, and the subsequent loss of control of epidermal cellular elements. 84 references.

  8. Langerhans cells utilize CD1a and langerin to efficiently present nonpeptide antigens to T cells

    PubMed Central

    Hunger, Robert E.; Sieling, Peter A.; Ochoa, Maria Teresa; Sugaya, Makoto; Burdick, Anne E.; Rea, Thomas H.; Brennan, Patrick J.; Belisle, John T.; Blauvelt, Andrew; Porcelli, Steven A.; Modlin, Robert L.

    2004-01-01

    Langerhans cells (LCs) constitute a subset of DCs that initiate immune responses in skin. Using leprosy as a model, we investigated whether expression of CD1a and langerin, an LC-specific C-type lectin, imparts a specific functional role to LCs. LC-like DCs and freshly isolated epidermal LCs presented nonpeptide antigens of Mycobacterium leprae to T cell clones derived from a leprosy patient in a CD1a-restricted and langerin-dependent manner. LC-like DCs were more efficient at CD1a-restricted antigen presentation than monocyte-derived DCs. LCs in leprosy lesions coexpress CD1a and langerin, placing LCs in position to efficiently present a subset of antigens to T cells as part of the host response to human infectious disease. PMID:14991068

  9. A case of Langerhans' cell histiocytosis following Hodgkin's disease

    PubMed Central

    LI, XIN; DENG, QI; LI, YU-MING

    2016-01-01

    Langerhans' cell histiocytosis (LCH) is a group of disorders in various tissues characterized by the proliferation of Langerhans cells. It is rarely observed in adults. Langerhans cells are dendritic cells that express cluster of differentiation 1a (CD1a) and S100 protein, and contain Birbeck granules. Its etiopathogenesis remains to be elucidated. One possible etiological cause is a reactive proliferation of Langerhans cells following chemotherapy or radiotherapy for Hodgkin's disease (HD). A number of cases of LCH associated with malignant lymphoma have been reported previously. It may follow after the malignant lymphoma, or occur with it. However, fewer cases have been reported where the LCH followed after HD. In the present case report, a patient was diagnosed with HD following chemotherapy for LCH. As LCH was diagnosed, the patient was treated with a combination of various chemotherapeutic agents in two cycles of cyclophosphamide, vincristine, and prednisolone (COP), and eight cycles of cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisolone (CHOP). The patient went into a successful clinical remission. One year later, computed tomographic (CT) scans of the thorax and abdomen revealed augmentation of the tumor mass in the mediastinum. An excisional biopsy of the right inguinal lymph node was performed. The patient was diagnosed with nodular sclerosing Hodgkin's disease. Following four cycles of doxorubicin (Adriamycin), bleomycin, vinblastine and dacarbazine (ABVD) chemotherapy, a whole-body positron emission tomographic CT scan revealed a decrease in tumor mass in the mediastinum. At present, the patient remains in treatment, and the prognosis has yet to be fully determined. PMID:27330759

  10. Periodontal disease associated with Langerhans' cell histiocytosis: case report.

    PubMed

    Rapp, G E; Motta, A C

    2000-01-01

    A clinical case of Langerhans' cell histiocytosis, type eosinophilic granuloma, in a young adult patient is presented. Because of the occurrence of oral manifestations in initial stages of the disease, there is a need for a differential diagnosis, especially with the early-onset periodontitis.

  11. Pulmonary Langerhans' cell histiocytosis: radiologic resolution following smoking cessation.

    PubMed

    Mogulkoc, N; Veral, A; Bishop, P W; Bayindir, U; Pickering, C A; Egan, J J

    1999-05-01

    We describe two patients with histologically proven pulmonary Langerhans' cell histiocytosis in whom radiologic improvement occurred following smoking cessation. The patients had 23- and 25-pack-year smoking histories, respectively. High-resolution CT revealed multiple small nodules, located predominantly in the upper and middle lung fields. There was a close temporal relationship between smoking cessation and radiologic improvement.

  12. Demonstration of Birbeck (Langerhans cells) granules in the normal chicken epidermis

    PubMed Central

    PÉREZ-TORRES, ARMANDO; USTARROZ-CANO, MARTHA

    2001-01-01

    Mammalian Langerhans cells (LC) are epidermal dendritic cells which originate in bone marrow and migrate toward the T cell area of lymph nodes, where they act as professional antigen-presenting cells. A variety of cell surface markers, such as the ectoenzyme adenosine triphosphatase (ATPase), Ia and CD1a antigens, have been used extensively to identify LC. Ultrastructural identification of this cell type in the mammalian epidermis is made by the demonstration of a typical and unique cytoplasmic organelle, the Birbeck granule (BG). Although we had earlier demonstrated the coexpression of ATPase and Ia antigens on epidermal dendritic cells of the chicken epidermis, the presence of the BG has not previously been documented. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether chicken epidermal LC-like cells possess an organelle similar to the BG, and thus to complete their identification. Our findings are the first demonstration of characteristic rod-shaped, racket-shaped and disc-shaped intracytoplasmic organelles, morphologically similar to the mammalian BG, in avian LC. PMID:11693310

  13. Langerhans cell histiocytosis followed by hodgkin lymphoma: a case report.

    PubMed

    Safaei, Akbar; Bagheri, Mandana; Shahryari, Jahanbanoo; Noori, Sadat; Esmailzade, Elmira

    2015-05-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) is a rare neoplasm defined as the proliferation of bone marrow langerhans cells, which is a kind of dendritic cells. The major pathological features of LCH are expression of CD1a and S100 as well as Birbeck granules. Its presentation can differ from a mild bone lesion to a multi-systemic evolved malignant neoplasm; however, the latter outcome is almost rare. Thus, LCH is mostly known as a benign neoplasm. In this study, we present a case of LCH followed by Hodgkin lymphoma (HL). Accompaniment of this disease with malignant lymphoma is rare and considered as case report. Several cases in which malignant lymphoma occurred prior to LCH are reported; however, few cases can be found with LCH followed by malignant lymphomas.

  14. Ultrastructural identification of Langerhans cells in normal swine epidermis.

    PubMed Central

    Romano, J; Balaguer, L

    1991-01-01

    Langerhans cells of the epidermis of 6-month-old white crossbred farm pigs were identified by electron microscopy. Ultrastructurally they were similar to those described in other mammals. They were present in basal and suprabasal layers and were characterised by a lobulated nucleus and an electrolucent cytoplasm with occasional dendritic processes, and the absence of tonofilaments and specialised unions with surrounding keratinocytes. They were specifically identified by the presence of characteristic rod or racquet-shaped intracytoplasmic granules. Intraepidermal clear cells without specific granules were present, although no melanocytes were observed. This is the first report of the presence of Birbeck granules in porcine Langerhans cells. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:1817140

  15. Brugia malayi infective larvae fail to activate Langerhans cells and dermal dendritic cells in human skin.

    PubMed

    Cotton, R N; McDonald-Fleming, R; Boyd, A; Spates, K; Nutman, T B; Tolouei Semnani, R

    2015-02-01

    Filarial infection in humans is initiated when a mosquito deposits third-stage parasite larvae (L3) in the skin. Langerhans cells (LCs) and dermal dendritic cells (DDCs) are the first cells that the parasite encounters, and L3s must evade these highly effective antigen-presenting cells to establish infection. To assess LC and DDC responses to L3 in human skin, we employed three models of increasing physiologic relevance: in vitro-generated LCs, epidermal blister explants and full-thickness human skin sections. In vitro-generated LCs expressed TLR1-10 and robustly produced IL-6 and TNF-α in response to PolyI:C, but pre-exposure to L3s did not alter inflammatory cytokine production or TLR expression. L3s did not modulate expression of LC markers CDH1, CD207, or CD1a, or the regulatory products TSLP or IDO in epidermal explants or in vitro-generated LC. LC, CD14+ DDC, CD1c+ DC and CD141+ DC from human skin sections were analysed by flow cytometry. While PolyI:C potently induced CCL22 production in LC, CD1c+ DC, and CD141+ DC, and IL-10 production in LC, L3s did not modulate the numbers of or cytokine production by any skin DC subset. L3s broadly failed to activate or modulate LCs or DDCs, suggesting filarial larvae expertly evade APC detection in human skin.

  16. New insights in lymphangioleiomyomatosis and pulmonary Langerhans cell histiocytosis.

    PubMed

    Torre, Olga; Elia, Davide; Caminati, Antonella; Harari, Sergio

    2017-09-30

    Lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM) and pulmonary Langerhans cell histiocytosis (PLCH) are rare diseases that lead to progressive cystic destruction of the lungs. Despite their distinctive characteristics, these diseases share several features. Patients affected by LAM or PLCH have similar radiological cystic patterns, a similar age of onset, and the possibility of extrapulmonary involvement. In this review, the recent advances in the understanding of the molecular pathogenesis, as well as the current and most promising biomarkers and therapeutic approaches, are described. Copyright ©ERS 2017.

  17. Langerhans cell histiocytosis of the atlas in an adult.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Wo Quan; Jiang, Liang; Ma, Qing Jun; Liu, Zhong Jun; Liu, Xiao Guang; Wei, Feng; Yuan, Hui Shu; Dang, Geng Ting

    2010-01-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH), formerly known as histiocytosis X, is a rare disorder (approximately 1:1,500,000 inhabitants) characterized by clonal proliferation and excess accumulation of pathologic Langerhans cells causing local or systemic effects. The exact etiology of LCH is still unknown. LCH could affect patients of any age, although most present when they are children. The most frequent sites of the bony lesions are the skull, femur, mandible, pelvis and spine. A variety of treatment modalities has been reported, but there was no evidence suggesting that any one treatment was more advantageous than another. We present an adult with LCH of the atlas. A 26-year-old young man presented with a 2-month history of neck pain and stiffness. CT revealed osteolytic lesion in the left lateral mass of atlas with compression fracture. Histopathological diagnosis was Langerhans cell histiocytosis by percutaneous needle biopsy under CT guidance. The patient underwent conservative treatment, including Halo-vest immobilization and radiotherapy. At 7-year follow-up, the patient was asymptomatic except for mild motion restriction of the neck. CT revealed a significant reconstruction of the C1 lateral mass.

  18. In vitro effect of UV radiation on immune function and membrane markers of human Langerhans cells

    SciTech Connect

    Czernielewski, J.; Vaigot, P.; Asselineau, D.; Prunieras, M.

    1984-07-01

    Human Langerhans cells (LC) are located in the epidermal tissue which is naturally accessible to UV irradiation. They may be the first immunocompetent cells exposed to its effect. In the present study, the epidermal tissue was dissociated with trypsin, and epidermal cell (EC) suspensions, which contain keratinocytes, melanocytes, and LC were irradiated with UVB (10 or 20 mJ/cm2). After irradiation LC retained their surface determinants: T-6 and HLA-Dr. In addition, their number did not decrease during 3 days of culture following UVB exposure as compared with nonirradiated EC cultured in parallel. On the contrary, UV irradiation of EC resulted in decreased lymphocyte-stimulating ability in a mixed skin cell-lymphocyte culture reaction (MSLR). EC used directly after irradiation in MSLR induced about half the lymphocyte response compared to nonirradiated EC. After 24-h culture, the irradiated EC did not produce any lymphocyte response, whereas the 48-h cultures showed a slight lymphocyte stimulation. At 72 h the cultures from irradiated and nonirradiated EC showed similar responses in MSLR. The doses of UV radiation which decreased MSLR responses did not affect EC viability and did not significantly reduce their DNA content. It is suggested that under the experimental conditions used in this study the defect induced by UV irradiation was essentially functional and was the result of the transient inhibition of the antigen processing function of LC rather than of an alteration in membrane antigen expression (T-6 and HLA-Dr).

  19. Herpes simplex virus infects skin gamma delta T cells before Langerhans cells and impedes migration of infected Langerhans cells by inducing apoptosis and blocking E-cadherin downregulation.

    PubMed

    Puttur, Franz K; Fernandez, Marian A; White, Rose; Roediger, Ben; Cunningham, Anthony L; Weninger, Wolfgang; Jones, Cheryl A

    2010-07-01

    The role individual skin dendritic cell (DC) subsets play in the immune response to HSV remains unclear. We investigated the effect of HSV on DC virus uptake, viability, and migration after cutaneous infection in vitro and in vivo. HSV increased the emigration of skin DCs from whole skin explants over 3 d postinfection (p.i.) compared with mock controls, but the kinetics of emigration was influenced by the skin DC subset. Uninfected (bystander) Langerhans cells (LCs) were the major emigrant DC subset at 24 h p.i., but thereafter, large increases in infected CD103(+)langerin(+) dermal DC (dDC) and uninfected langerin(-) dDC emigration were also observed. LC infection was confirmed by the presence of HSV glycoprotein D (gD) and was associated with impaired migration from cultured skin. Langerin(+) dDC also expressed HSV gD, but infection did not impede migration. We then followed the virus in live MacGreen mice in which LCs express GFP using a fluorescent HSV-1 strain by time-lapse confocal microscopy. We observed a sequential infection of epidermal cells, first in keratinocytes and epidermal gammadelta T cells at 6 h p.i., followed by the occurrence of HSVgD(+) LCs at 24 h p.i. HSV induced CCR7 upregulation on all langerin(+) DC, including infected LCs, and increased production of skin TNF-alpha and IL-1beta. However, a large proportion of infected LCs that remained within the skin was apoptotic and failed to downregulate E-cadherin compared with bystander LCs or mock controls. Thus, HSV infection of LCs is preceded by infection of gammadelta T cells and delays migration.

  20. Langerhans cells regulate cutaneous injury by licensing CD8 effector cells recruited to the skin

    PubMed Central

    Fallah-Arani, Farnaz; Conlan, Thomas; Trouillet, Celine; Goold, Hugh; Chorro, Laurent; Flutter, Barry; Means, Terry K.; Geissmann, Frédéric; Chakraverty, Ronjon

    2011-01-01

    Langerhans cells (LCs) are a distinct population of dendritic cells that form a contiguous network in the epidermis of the skin. Although LCs possess many of the properties of highly proficient dendritic cells, recent studies have indicated that they are not necessary to initiate cutaneous immunity. In this study, we used a tractable model of cutaneous GVHD, induced by topical application of a Toll-like receptor agonist, to explore the role of LCs in the development of tissue injury. By adapting this model to permit inducible and selective depletion of host LCs, we found that GVHD was significantly reduced when LCs were absent. However, LCs were not required either for CD8 T-cell activation within the draining lymph node or subsequent homing of effector cells to the epidermis. Instead, we found that LCs were necessary for inducing transcription of IFN-γ and other key effector molecules by donor CD8 cells in the epidermis, indicating that they license CD8 cells to induce epithelial injury. These data demonstrate a novel regulatory role for epidermal LCs during the effector phase of an inflammatory immune response in the skin. PMID:21566096

  1. Langerhans cell histiocytosis presenting as hypothyroid goitre: a unique presentation.

    PubMed

    Marupudi, Krishna Chaitanya; Karanth, Suman S; Thomas, Joseph

    2014-12-02

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) is a disease involving the antigen presenting cells, which can range from a single system involvement with an indolent course to a multisystem disease with increased morbidity. We present a rare case of LCH presenting as hypothyroid goitre that was successfully treated as per the LCH III trial protocol with a combination of vinblastine and oral prednisolone. We highlight the need for awareness of this rare presentation of LCH as a painless goitre which is often misdiagnosed as poorly differentiated thyroid carcinoma or overlooked as a benign disease.

  2. CD1c+ blood dendritic cells have Langerhans cell potential.

    PubMed

    Milne, Paul; Bigley, Venetia; Gunawan, Merry; Haniffa, Muzlifah; Collin, Matthew

    2015-01-15

    Langerhans cells (LCs) are self-renewing in the steady state but repopulated by myeloid precursors after injury. Human monocytes give rise to langerin-positive cells in vitro, suggesting a potential precursor role. However, differentiation experiments with human lineage-negative cells and CD34(+) progenitors suggest that there is an alternative monocyte-independent pathway of LC differentiation. Recent data in mice also show long-term repopulation of the LC compartment with alternative myeloid precursors. Here we show that, although monocytes are able to express langerin, when cultured with soluble ligands granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), transforming growth factor β (TGFβ), and bone morphogenetic protein 7 (BMP7), CD1c(+) dendritic cells (DCs) become much more LC-like with high langerin, Birbeck granules, EpCAM, and E-cadherin expression under the same conditions. These data highlight a new potential precursor function of CD1c(+) DCs and demonstrate an alternative pathway of LC differentiation that may have relevance in vivo.

  3. Smoking-related interstitial pneumonias and pulmonary Langerhans cell histiocytosis.

    PubMed

    Caminati, Antonella; Harari, Sergio

    2006-06-01

    The relationship between cigarette smoke and interstitial lung diseases (ILDs) is not clear. Respiratory bronchiolitis (RB), usually found as an incidental histologic abnormality in otherwise asymptomatic smokers, is characterized by the accumulation of cytoplasmic golden-brown-pigmented macrophages within respiratory bronchioles. A small proportion of smokers have a more exaggerated response that, in addition to the bronchiole-centered lesions, provokes interstitial and air space inflammation and fibrosis extending to the nearby alveoli. This set of histologic changes is called RB-ILD, and results in clinical symptoms. Desquamative interstitial pneumonia (DIP) is characterized by panlobular involvement, diffuse mild-to-moderate interstitial fibrosis, and massive alveolar filling with macrophages. It is well known that the histopathologic patterns of RB-ILD and DIP may overlap, and that the key features for differentiating these disorders are the distribution and the extent of the lesions: bronchiolocentric in RB-ILD and diffuse in DIP. It has been proposed that RB, RB-ILD, and DIP may be different components of the same histopathologic disease spectrum, representing various degrees of severity of the same process caused by chronic smoking, although this is still controversial. Pulmonary Langerhans' cell histiocytosis is also strongly related to cigarette smoking and is characterized by the proliferation of specific histiocytes, known as Langerhans' cells, and their infiltration of organ systems. Although RB, RB-ILD, DIP, and Pulmonary Langerhans' cell histiocytosis are considered as discrete entities of smokers, it is not infrequent to find a mixture of pathologic features rendering the histopathologic diagnosis difficult.

  4. The presence of cytokines in Langerhans' cell histiocytosis.

    PubMed

    de Graaf, J H; Tamminga, R Y; Dam-Meiring, A; Kamps, W A; Timens, W

    1996-12-01

    Langerhans' cell histiocytosis (LCH) is characterized by an accumulation and/or proliferation of cells with a Langerhans' cell (LC) phenotype. The aetiology and pathogenesis of LCH are unknown; it is suggested that LCH is caused by an immunological dysregulation. Production of cytokines is a central feature of immunological regulation. LCH lesions and normal LCs were studied for the presence of cytokines known to influence the functioning of LCs: IL-1 alpha, IL-1 beta, IL-4, GM-CSF, IFN-gamma, TGF-alpha, TGF-beta, bFGF, and TNF-alpha. Cytokines were abundantly present within LCH lesions; LCH cells stained for IL-1 alpha, IL-1 beta, IL-4, GM-CSF, TGF-alpha, TGF-beta, TNF-alpha, and IFN-gamma. Macrophages, lymphocytes, eosinophil granulocytes, and, surprisingly, multinucleated giant cells were also sources of cytokines. These results suggest that cytokines play a prominent role in the pathogenesis of LCH and may explain phenomena that often occur in LCH, such as osteolysis and fibrosis and the recruitment of typical inflammatory infiltrates. The results also suggest that a 'down-regulatory' signal is lacking in LCH, resulting in an accumulation and/or proliferation of abnormal LCs.

  5. Grafting of burns with widely meshed autograft split skin and Langerhans cell-depressed allograft split skin overlay

    SciTech Connect

    Alsbjoern, B.F.S.; Sorensen, B.

    1986-12-01

    Extensively burned patients suffer from lack of sufficient autologous donor skin. Meshing and wide expansion of the obtained split skin has met the requirement to a large degree. However, the wider the expansion, the less chance of a proper take. By covering widely expanded autografts with viable cadaver split skin, the take has been improved. If the epidermal Langerhans cells in the cadaver split skin are depressed by ultraviolet B light and glucocorticosteroids before grafting, a prolonged allograft take can be achieved and the healing of the underlying autografts is ensured for an extended period. Grafting results in 6 patients with extensive burns are reported.

  6. Langerhans cell histiocytosis: clinical experience with 124 patients.

    PubMed

    Rivera-Luna, R; Martinez-Guerra, G; Altamirano-Alvarez, E; Martinez-Avalos, A; Cardenas-Cardoz, R; Ayon-Cardenas, A; Ruiz-Maldonado, R; Lopez-Corella, E

    1988-08-01

    We cared for 124 pediatric patients with a histologic diagnosis of Langerhans' cell histiocytosis (histiocytosis X) over a period of 14 years. Clinical, laboratory, and radiographic findings were analyzed. The most frequent manifestations were bone lesions, lymph node involvement, and skin infiltration. Liver disease was noted in 50% of patients and lung disease in 23%; hematologic changes were also frequent. Dysfunction and involvement of these three organ systems, plus age of onset, distinguished the group of patients with the highest mortality. All patients with generalized disease or organ dysfunction were treated with systemic chemotherapy. The actuarial survival curve at 10 years was 63%.

  7. Ultrasonographic features of Langerhans cell histiocytosis of the thyroid

    PubMed Central

    Chen, En-Dong; Cheng, Pu; Cai, Ye-Feng; Xiang, Ying-Ying; Zheng, Hua-Min; Xing, Hai-Xia; Li, Quan

    2014-01-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) is a rare disease, especially when it involves the thyroid gland. Awareness of ultrasonic features will be helpful for a clinician who should consider this disease in the differential diagnosis from other more common thyroid disorders, especially prior to surgery. Here, we report two patients who have histologically confirmed LCH of the thyroid and summarize the reported cases with ultrasonographic scans from the last 10 years (n=10). Ultrasonograms showed isolated or multiple hypoechoic nodules in unilateral or bilateral thyroid gland. Internal acoustic features of most nodules was heterogeneous (n=5) or hypoechoic (n=2). PMID:24696742

  8. ESHAP therapy effective in a patient with Langerhans cell sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Yoshimi, Akihide; Kumano, Keiki; Motokura, Toru; Takazawa, Yutaka; Oota, Satoshi; Chiba, Shigeru; Takahashi, Tsuyoshi; Fukayama, Masashi; Kurokawa, Mineo

    2008-06-01

    We describe the rare case of a 53-year-old woman with systemic involvement of Langerhans cell sarcoma (LCS) who had undergone living-related liver transplantation. We chose the CHOP regimen as first-line chemotherapy, and clinical improvement of LCS was obtained. Intensive care was necessary due to the systemic involvement of LCS and severe infectious diseases. After the third cycle of CHOP therapy, however, disease progression was observed, and we administrated a modified ESHAP regimen (etoposide, carboplatin, cytarabine, methylprednisolone) as second-line therapy. A marked response was obtained after four cycles of this combination chemotherapy. Modified ESHAP may be a very effective combination chemotherapy regimen for LCS.

  9. Functional HIV CXCR4 coreceptor on human epithelial Langerhans cells and infection by HIV strain X4.

    PubMed

    Tchou, I; Misery, L; Sabido, O; Dezutter-Dambuyant, C; Bourlet, T; Moja, P; Hamzeh, H; Peguet-Navarro, J; Schmitt, D; Genin, C

    2001-08-01

    HIV can cross the intact epithelium of genital mucosae via Langerhans cells. Fresh Langerhans cells are known to express CD4 and CCR5. The presence of CXCR4 on the surface of cultured but not freshly isolated Langerhans cells has been described. In the present study, we demonstrate that CXCR4 was expressed by fresh Langerhans cells isolated and purified from epidermis. However, the percentage of Langerhans cells expressing CXCR4 or CCR5 increased during maturation of the cells in culture, especially in the presence of exogenous granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor. To determine whether CXCR4 was functional, freshly isolated Langerhans cells were infected with HIV LAI, a T-cell-tropic strain, and p24 protein production was measured in culture supernatants. p24 production was observed when infected Langerhans cells were cocultured with SupT1 cells. However, the presence of HIV provirus DNA was evidenced within the infected Langerhans cells by nested PCR. Ultrastructural studies confirmed the formation of syncytia when Langerhans cells were cocultured with SupT1 cells. Preincubation of Langerhans cells with azidothymidine or SDF-1-alpha, a natural ligand for CXCR4, prevented infection. These data demonstrated that CXCR4 is present on the surface of Langerhans cells freshly isolated from human skin epidermis and that this expression is functional.

  10. Langerhans cell precursors acquire RANK/CD265 in prenatal human skin

    PubMed Central

    Schöppl, Alice; Botta, Albert; Prior, Marion; Akgün, Johnnie; Schuster, Christopher; Elbe-Bürger, Adelheid

    2015-01-01

    The skin is the first barrier against foreign pathogens and the prenatal formation of a strong network of various innate and adaptive cells is required to protect the newborn from perinatal infections. While many studies about the immune system in healthy and diseased adult human skin exist, our knowledge about the cutaneous prenatal/developing immune system and especially about the phenotype and function of antigen-presenting cells such as epidermal Langerhans cells (LCs) in human skin is still scarce. It has been shown previously that LCs in healthy adult human skin express receptor activator of NF-κB (RANK), an important molecule prolonging their survival. In this study, we investigated at which developmental stage LCs acquire this important molecule. Immunofluorescence double-labeling of cryostat sections revealed that LC precursors in prenatal human skin either do not yet [10–11 weeks of estimated gestational age (EGA)] or only faintly (13–15 weeks EGA) express RANK. LCs express RANK at levels comparable to adult LCs by the end of the second trimester. Comparable with adult skin, dermal antigen-presenting cells at no gestational age express this marker. These findings indicate that epidermal leukocytes gradually acquire RANK during gestation – a phenomenon previously observed also for other markers on LCs in prenatal human skin. PMID:25722033

  11. Langerhans cell precursors acquire RANK/CD265 in prenatal human skin.

    PubMed

    Schöppl, Alice; Botta, Albert; Prior, Marion; Akgün, Johnnie; Schuster, Christopher; Elbe-Bürger, Adelheid

    2015-01-01

    The skin is the first barrier against foreign pathogens and the prenatal formation of a strong network of various innate and adaptive cells is required to protect the newborn from perinatal infections. While many studies about the immune system in healthy and diseased adult human skin exist, our knowledge about the cutaneous prenatal/developing immune system and especially about the phenotype and function of antigen-presenting cells such as epidermal Langerhans cells (LCs) in human skin is still scarce. It has been shown previously that LCs in healthy adult human skin express receptor activator of NF-κB (RANK), an important molecule prolonging their survival. In this study, we investigated at which developmental stage LCs acquire this important molecule. Immunofluorescence double-labeling of cryostat sections revealed that LC precursors in prenatal human skin either do not yet [10-11 weeks of estimated gestational age (EGA)] or only faintly (13-15 weeks EGA) express RANK. LCs express RANK at levels comparable to adult LCs by the end of the second trimester. Comparable with adult skin, dermal antigen-presenting cells at no gestational age express this marker. These findings indicate that epidermal leukocytes gradually acquire RANK during gestation - a phenomenon previously observed also for other markers on LCs in prenatal human skin.

  12. Langerhans Cells Orchestrate TFH-Dependent Humoral Immunity.

    PubMed

    Vardam, Trupti; Anandasabapathy, Niroshana

    2017-09-01

    T follicular helper cells contribute to the development of long-lasting humoral immunity by germinal center formation. Somatic hypermutation and affinity maturation take place in germinal centers leading to the generation of memory B cells and plasma cells. As such, T follicular helper cells impact immunodeficiencies, autoimmunity, and cancer. This necessitates further understanding of how T follicular helper cells are regulated in health and disease. The current study by Levin et al. builds on prior work to further substantiate a critical role for skin migratory dendritic cells and in particular Langerhans cells at governing T follicular helper and germinal center formation after intradermal immunization with HIV p24-coated polylactic acid nanoparticles. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Feline atopic dermatitis. A model for Langerhans cell participation in disease pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Roosje, P J; Whitaker-Menezes, D; Goldschmidt, M H; Moore, P F; Willemse, T; Murphy, G F

    1997-10-01

    Atopic dermatitis is a disorder characterized by cutaneous exanthemata as a consequence of exaggerated eczematous reactions to topical and systemic allergens. Langerhans cells, expressing CD1a and HLA-DR, and dermal dendritic cells, expressing HLA-DR, are known to be potent antigen-presenting cells and are thought to play an important role in the pathogenesis of atopic dermatitis. The immunophenotype of lesional skin in atopic dermatitis in humans involves increased numbers of CD1a+/MHC class II+ dendritic cells in addition to activated T cells, mast cells, and macrophages. To establish feline skin as a model for the study of human atopic dermatitis, and to elucidate the role of dendritic cells in feline atopic dermatitis, we investigated the presence of CD1a+ cells and MHC class II+ cells in the epidermis and dermis of lesional feline skin and in skin of healthy control animals. Immunohistochemistry revealed that MHC class II+ epidermal dendritic cells were CD1a+ in normal feline skin and significantly increased numbers of CD1a+ cells and MHC class II+ cells were present in the epidermis and dermis of lesional skin. These data provide the first correlative documentation of CD1a expression by feline dendritic cells containing Birbeck granules, and indicate the utility of feline skin in the study of human cutaneous atopy.

  14. Acute myeloid leukaemia-derived Langerhans-like cells enhance Th1 polarization upon TLR2 engagement.

    PubMed

    Bock, Stephanie; Murgueitio, Manuela S; Wolber, Gerhard; Weindl, Günther

    2016-03-01

    Langerhans cells (LCs) represent a highly specialized subset of epidermal dendritic cells (DCs), yet not fully understood in their function of balancing skin immunity. Here, we investigated in vitro generated Langerhans-like cells obtained from the human acute myeloid leukaemia cell line MUTZ-3 (MUTZ-LCs) to study TLR- and cytokine-dependent activation of epidermal DCs. MUTZ-LCs revealed high TLR2 expression and responded robustly to TLR2 engagement, confirmed by increased CD83, CD86, PD-L1 and IDO expression, upregulated IL-6, IL-12p40 and IL-23p19 mRNA levels IL-8 release. TLR2 activation reduced CCR6 and elevated CCR7 mRNA expression and induced migration of MUTZ-LCs towards CCL21. Similar results were obtained by stimulation with pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-α and IL-1β whereas ligands of TLR3 and TLR4 failed to induce a fully mature phenotype. Despite limited cytokine gene expression and production for TLR2-activated MUTZ-LCs, co-culture with naive CD4(+) T cells led to significantly increased IFN-γ and IL-22 levels indicating Th1 differentiation independent of IL-12. TLR2-mediated effects were blocked by the putative TLR2/1 antagonist CU-CPT22, however, no selectivity for either TLR2/1 or TLR2/6 was observed. Computer-aided docking studies confirmed non-selective binding of the TLR2 antagonist. Taken together, our results indicate a critical role for TLR2 signalling in MUTZ-LCs considering the leukemic origin of the generated Langerhans-like cells. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Histopathology and immune histochemistry of red tattoo reactions. Interface dermatitis is the lead pathology, with increase in T-lymphocytes and Langerhans cells suggesting an allergic pathomechanism.

    PubMed

    Høgsberg, T; Thomsen, B M; Serup, J

    2015-11-01

    The majority of tattoo reactions are affiliated to red pigmented areas and often suspected to be allergic in nature. A sizeable series of biopsies of such reactions has not previously been performed. The aim of this study was to type and grade epidermal and dermal changes in tattoo reactions to red/red nuances by microscopy and immunochemistry relevant for the assessment of a possible allergic pathomechanism. Skin biopsies were taken from red tattoo reactions, graded by conventional microscopy and stained for T and B-lymphocytes, Langerhans cells, macrophages and tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α. The study included 19 biopsies from 19 patients. The culprit colours were red/pink (n = 15) and purple/bordeaux (n = 4). Interface dermatitis was clearly the lead pathology found in 78% of samples, overlapped with granulomatous (in 32%) and pseudolymphomatous reaction patterns (in 32%). Epidermal hyperkeratosis (in 89%) was common as was leakage of red pigment across the dermo-epidermal junction, with transepidermal elimination (in 28%). The dermal cellular infiltration was dominated by T-lymphocytes (in 100%), Langerhans cells (in 95%) and macrophages (in 100%). TNF-α was common. The predominant histological pattern of chronic tattoo reactions in red/red nuances is interface dermatitis. T-lymphocytes and Langerhans cells are increased suggesting an allergic pathomechanism. TNF-α may contribute to reactions. In many cases, overlapping reactive patterns were identified. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. General Information about Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis (LCH)

    MedlinePlus

    ... grow into (and restore) the body's blood cells. Observation Observation is closely monitoring a patient's condition without giving ... histiocytosis (LCH) skin lesions may include the following: Observation . When severe rashes, pain, ulceration , or bleeding occur, ...

  17. Regional development of Langerhans cells and formation of Birbeck granules in human embryonic and fetal skin.

    PubMed

    Fujita, M; Furukawa, F; Horiguchi, Y; Ueda, M; Kashihara-Sawami, M; Imamura, S

    1991-07-01

    The regional development of Langerhans cells (LC) and the formation of Birbeck granules (BG) were examined in human embryonic and fetal skin. Samples were obtained from multiple anatomic sites and stained with anti-CD36, anti-CD1a, and anti-HLA-DR antibody as well as Lag antibody specifically reactive to BG and some vacuoles of human LC. In the first trimester, CD36+ dendritic epidermal cells were identified before the appearance of CD1a+ cells and Lag+ cells. Some of the former co-expressed HLA-DR antigens but not CD1a antigens. In the second trimester, regional variations in LC development were observed. Epidermal LC of palms and soles reached a peak in number in the first trimester but were rarely detected after 18 weeks estimated gestation age (EGA), whereas, in other regions, their number increased with age. In the second trimester, CD1a+ cells and Lag+ cells were also identified in the epidermis, although Lag+ cells appeared later than CD1a+ cells. The Lag+ cells until 17 weeks EGA showed a variety of staining intensities and immunoelectron microscopy revealed that they contained various amounts of Lag-reactive BG. Flow cytometric analysis showed that relative amounts of Lag antigens in LC increased during the second trimester and that fetal LC of 18 weeks EGA expressed the same amounts of HLA-DR, CD1a, and Lag antigens as did adult human LC. In the dermis, in the second trimester, numerous CD36+ cells and HLA-DR+ cells were found, whereas CD1a+ cells and Lag+ cells were rarely detected. Taken together, it is suggested that HLA-DR+ dendritic cells acquire CD1a+ antigens first and then form BG after migration to the epidermis and that fetal LC are phenotypically mature in the second trimester.

  18. A Retrospective Analysis of Oral Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis in an Iranian Population: a 20-year Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Atarbashi Moghadam, Saede; Lotfi, Ali; Piroozhashemi, Batool; Mokhtari, Sepideh

    2015-01-01

    Statement of the Problem Langerhans cell histiocytosis is a rare disease with unknown pathogenesis and is characterized by local or disseminated proliferation of Langerhans cells. There is no previous investigation on prevalence of oral Langerhans cell histiocytosis in Iranian population. Purpose The purpose of this study was to assess the relative frequency of oral Langerhans cell histiocytosis in an Iranian population and to compare the data with previous reports. Materials and Method Pathology files of Oral and Maxillofacial Pathology Department of Dental School of Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences from 1992 to 2012 were searched for cases recorded as oral Langerhans cell histiocytosis. A total number of 20 cases were found and the clinical information of patients was recorded. Results The relative frequency of oral Langerhans cell histiocytosis was 0.34% and the most common location was the posterior mandible. In addition, the mean age of patients was 27 years and there was a definite male predominance. Most lesions were localized and tooth mobility was the most common oral presentation. Conclusion In Iranian population as in many other countries, the relative frequency of oral Langerhans cell histiocytosis is low. Moreover, tooth mobility and periodontal lesions are the frequent early signs of disease. Therefore, in patients with periodontal problems, good oral health, and no response to the treatment; Langerhans cell histiocytosis must be considered. Additionally, although most cases of oral Langerhans cell histiocytosis are localized, systemic involvement must also be considered and dental professionals have an important role in early detection of the disease. PMID:26535408

  19. [Langerhans cell histiocytosis presenting as isolated adenitis in an infant: case report].

    PubMed

    Soriano-Ramos, María; Salcedo Lobato, Enrique; Baro Fernández, María; Blázquez-Gamero, Daniel

    2016-08-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis in infants is a rare condition, and presentation as an isolated cervical adenitis is exceptional at this age. We describe the case of a 3-month-old female infant presenting with a neck mass in the right mandibular angle with poor response to antibiotic treatment. Fine needle aspiration was performed and confirmed the diagnosis of Langerhans cell histiocytosis with complementary tests showing no features of systemic involvement. Langerhans cell histiocytosis should be considered in the differential diagnosis of subacute neck masses with poor outcome in infants and physicians should consider performing a fine needle aspiration to establish the diagnosis.

  20. Increased Number of Langerhans Cells in the Epidermis of Diabetic Foot Ulcers Correlates with Healing Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Stojadinovic, Olivera; Yin, Natalie; Lehmann, Janin; Pastar, Irena; Kirsner, Robert S.; Tomic-Canic, Marjana

    2015-01-01

    Langerhans cells (LCs) are a specialized subset of epidermal dendritic cells. They represent one of the first cells of immunological barrier and play an important role during the inflammatory phase of acute wound healing. Despite considerable progress in our understanding of the immunopathology of diabetes mellitus and its associated co-morbidities such as diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs), considerable gaps in our knowledge exist. In this study, we utilized the human ex vivo wound model and confirmed the increased epidermal LCs at wound edges during early phases of wound healing. Next, we aimed to determine differences in quantity of LCs between normal human and diabetic foot skin and to learn if the presence of LCs correlates with the healing outcome in DFUs. We utilized immunofluorescence to detect CD207+ LCs in specimens from normal and diabetic foot skin and DFU wound edges. Specimens from DFUs were collected at the initial visit and 4 weeks at the time when the healing outcome was determined. DFUs that decreased in size by >50% were considered to be healing, while DFUs with a size reduction of <50% were considered non-healing. Quantitative assessment of LCs showed a higher number of LCs in healing when compared to non–healing DFU’s. Our findings provide evidence that LCs are present in higher number in diabetic feet than normal foot skin. Healing DFUs show a higher number of LCs compared to non-healing DFUs. These findings indicate that the epidermal immune barrier plays an important role in the DFU healing outcome and may offer new therapeutic avenues targeting LC in non-healing DFUs. PMID:24277309

  1. Solitary Extragnathic Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis – A Rare Case

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Eppalapally Sharath Kumar; Bhavani, Sangala Naga; A, Krishna; Sekhar, Mane Srinivas Muni

    2015-01-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH), mainly affects the skull, vertebrae, ribs and mandible in children and the long bones of adults. Symptoms range from none to pain, swelling and tenderness over the site of the lesion. This disease presents oral manifestations which can sometimes be the first expression of the condition. It occurs in three forms namely eosinophilic granuloma in which isolated or multiple bones are involved, But has a good prognosis whereas other variants Hand-Shuller-Christian disease (chronic dessiminated variant) and Letterer-Siwe disease (acute dessiminated form) have poor prognosis. Occasionally only soft tissues are affected without bony involvement. Males are more commonly affected than females. This article describes a rare variant of eosinophilic granuloma of labial mucosa without bony involvement. PMID:25954715

  2. Pulmonary langerhans cell histiocytosis case with diabetes insipidus and tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Ugurlu, E; Altinisik, G; Aydogmus, U; Bir, F

    2017-04-01

    A 19-year-old male patient was observed due to having central diabetes insipidus (DI) for five years. He had a history of smoking 5-10 cigarettes a day for two years, but stopped smoking from the last month. The computerized tomography revealed thin-walled cystic lesions in different sizes more dominantly in the upper lobes and consolidated areas in the left upper and lower lobes. The wedge resection from the right lower lobe revealed pulmonary langerhans cell histiocytosis. Follow-up acid-fast bacteria (AFB) examinations revealed (+++) and antituberculous treatment was started. On the 40th day of the anti-tuberculosis treatment, the patient applied once again due to fever and chest pain. Although infiltrations persisted in the left upper and middle zones in the postero-anterior lung rontgenogram, right-sided pneumothorax was detected. The case is considered tuberculosis and the patient continued to receive anti-TB treatment under the close supervision.

  3. Thyroid Langerhans cell histiocytosis and papillary thyroid carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Algarni, Mohammed; Alhakami, Hadi; AlSubayea, Haia; Alfattani, Naif; Guler, Mohammet; Satti, Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    A 27-year-old female, married with two children, presented to our clinic with a 1-year history of thyroid swelling and pressure symptoms on lying backward and bilateral cervical lymphadenopathy. The patient was a known case of panhypopituitarism for 5 years. Comprehensive patient evaluation including FNAC with papillary thyroid cancer result then she underwent total thyroidectomy and bilateral neck dissection and final histologic examination confirmed papillary thyroid carcinoma in the background of lymphocytic thyroiditis, associated with Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH). The draining cervical lymph nodes were also involved by LCH and metastatic papillary thyroid carcinoma. Although the association of LCH with papillary thyroid carcinoma in the thyroid has been reported, their co-existence with LCH in the draining lymph nodes is very uncommon. PMID:27867869

  4. Langerhans cell histiocytosis in children under 2 years of age.

    PubMed

    Rivera-Luna, R; Alter-Molchadsky, N; Cardenas-Cardos, R; Martínez-Guerra, G

    1996-05-01

    This is a retrospective study of 55 children under the age of 2 years diagnosed with Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH). They were classified according to age and organ function and dysfunction following Lahey's criteria. The studied population was divided into four groups by age of diagnosis (0-6, 7-12, 13-18, and 19-24 months). Statistical analysis showed no significant difference in outcome between age groups, although the population under 6 months had a 81.3% fatality rate. The presence of organ dysfunction was a major cause of death in all age groups, being statistically significant in outcome (P > 0.005) compared with patients without organ dysfunction. The presence of thrombocytopenia and/or respiratory dysfunction was also highly associated with a fatal outcome. In the surviving population, no second malignancies have been reported. The late secondary effects of therapy include endocrine, orofacial, and osseous pathologies.

  5. Solitary extragnathic langerhans cell histiocytosis - a rare case.

    PubMed

    V, Yashoda; E, Sharath Kumar Reddy; S N, Bhavani; A, Krishna; Sekhar, M S Muni

    2015-03-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH), mainly affects the skull, vertebrae, ribs and mandible in children and the long bones of adults. Symptoms range from none to pain, swelling and tenderness over the site of the lesion. This disease presents oral manifestations which can sometimes be the first expression of the condition. It occurs in three forms namely eosinophilic granuloma in which isolated or multiple bones are involved, But has a good prognosis whereas other variants Hand-Shuller-Christian disease (chronic dessiminated variant) and Letterer-Siwe disease (acute dessiminated form) have poor prognosis. Occasionally only soft tissues are affected without bony involvement. Males are more commonly affected than females. This article describes a rare variant of eosinophilic granuloma of labial mucosa without bony involvement.

  6. The clash of Langerhans cell homeostasis in skin: Should I stay or should I go?

    PubMed

    Hieronymus, Thomas; Zenke, Martin; Baek, Jea-Hyun; Seré, Kristin

    2015-05-01

    Langerhans cells (LC), the skin epidermal contingent of dendritic cells (DC), possess an exceptional life cycle and developmental origin. LC, like all mature blood cells, develop from haematopoietic stem cells (HSC) through successive steps of lineage commitment and differentiation. However, LC development is different to that of other DC subsets and not yet fully understood. Haematopoietic cell fate decisions are instructed by specific growth factors and cytokines produced in specialized microenvironments or niches. Upon ligand binding the cognate surface receptors on HSC and further restricted progenitor cells regulate the signalling pathways that eventually leads to the execution of lineage-determining genetic programs. In this review we focus on a specific set of surface receptor kinases that have been identified as critical regulators of LC development using genetically modified mice. Recent studies suggest for some of these kinases to impact on LC/LC progenitor interaction with the local niche by regulating adhesion and/or migration. During embryonic development, in wound healing and aberrantly in tumour invasion the same kinase receptors control a genetic program known as epithelial-to-mesenchymal-transition (EMT). We will discuss how EMT and its reverse program of mesenchymal-to-epithelial-transition (MET) can serve as universal concepts operating also in LC development. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  7. Redefining Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis as a Myeloid Dysplasia and Identifying B | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    DESCRIPTION (provided by applicant): Redefining Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis as a Myeloid Dysplasia and Identifying Biomarkers for Early Detection and Risk Assessment. This application addresses Program Announcement PA-09-197: Biomarkers for Early Detection of Hematopoietic Malignancies (R01). The overall aim of this project is to identify novel biomarkers that may be used to diagnose and treat patients with Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis (LCH). LCH occurs with similar frequency as other rare malignancies including Hodgkin's lymphoma and AML. |

  8. Interleukin-1 loop model for pathogenesis of Langerhans cell histiocytosis.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Ichiro; Matsushita, Michiko; Iwasaki, Takeshi; Kuwamoto, Satoshi; Kato, Masako; Nagata, Keiko; Horie, Yasushi; Hayashi, Kazuhiko; Imamura, Toshihiko; Morimoto, Akira; Imashuku, Shinsaku; Gogusev, Jean; Jaubert, Francis; Takata, Katsuyoshi; Oka, Takashi; Yoshino, Tadashi

    2015-02-22

    We propose Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) is an inflammatory process that is prolonged by mutations. We hypothesize that Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV) infection triggers an interleukin-1 (IL-1) activation loop that underlies the pathogenesis of LCH. Langerhans cells (LCs) are antigen presenting cells in the skin. When LCs encounter exogenous antigens, they migrate from the epidermis into draining lymphoid tissues to initiate T-cell activity. It has been proposed that LC migration-related factors, including E-cadherin, matrix metalloproteinase, and Notch ligand induce LCH activity. We found that the tyrosine phosphatase SHP-1, which binds IL-1 receptor-associated kinase 1, is expressed at a significantly higher level in LCH affecting multiple organ systems (MS-LCH) than in LCH affecting a single organ system (SS-LCH). IL-1 stimulates T helper 17 cells and their signature cytokine IL-17 had been a matter of controversy. We detected higher levels of IL-17A receptor expression in MS-LCH than in SS-LCH and proposed an IL-17 endocrine model that could settle the controversy. IL-1 is the first cytokine secreted in response to sensitizers and promotes LC migration from sentinel tissues. Myeloid differentiation primary response 88 (MyD88), downstream of the IL-1 receptor, has functions in both RAS signaling and inflammation, leading to human cell transformation. In 2010, an activating mutation in the B-rapidly accelerated fibrosarcoma gene (BRAF) V600E was found in LCH. This BRAF mutation induces phosphorylation of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) that may play an important role with MyD88 in LCH pathogenesis. However, phosphorylated ERK (pERK) is rapidly dephosphorylated by dual specificity phosphatase 6 (DUSP6), and limited proliferation is predicted in BRAF mutant cells. MyD88 binds pERK via its D-domain, thereby preventing pERK-DUSP6 interaction and maintaining ERK in an active, phosphorylated state. We detected MCPyV-DNA in the peripheral blood

  9. Enhanced antigen-presenting capacity of cultured Langerhans' cells is associated with markedly increased expression of Ia antigen

    SciTech Connect

    Shimada, S.; Caughman, S.W.; Sharrow, S.O.; Stephany, D.; Katz, S.I.

    1987-10-15

    Recent studies indicate that when epidermal Langerhans' cells (LC) are cultured for 2 to 3 days they, in comparison to freshly prepared LC, exhibit markedly enhanced ability to stimulate T cell proliferative responses in oxidative mitogenesis and in the mixed epidermal-leukocyte reaction. In this study, we determined whether cultured LC enhance antigen-specific T cell responses, and whether such enhanced stimulatory capacity correlates with the level of Ia antigen expressed on LC. We used C3H/He (Iak) epidermal cells as stimulators and, as responder cells, both the trinitrophenyl-specific clones D8 and SE4, which were assayed for (/sup 3/H)dThd incorporation, and the pigeon cytochrome c specific hybridoma 2C2, which was assayed for interleukin 2 production. Cultured LC induced 10 to 100 times greater proliferation or interleukin 2 production by responder cells than did freshly prepared LC. The intensity of I-Ak and I-Ek, expressed on cultured LC as assessed by immunofluorescence and flow cytometry, was found to be 10 to 36 times greater on a per cell basis than that on freshly prepared LC. Depletion of LC from fresh epidermal cell suspensions by anti-Iak and complement or treatment with 50 mJ/cm/sup 2/ medium range ultraviolet light or cycloheximide before culture abrogated both the increase in Ia expression and antigen-specific clonal proliferation. The results suggest that when LC are removed from their usual epidermal milieu, they express increased amounts of Ia and become more potent stimulators of T cell responses.

  10. LATE-ONSET SELF-HEALING LANGERHANS CELL HISTIOCYTOSIS: REPORT OF A VERY RARE ENTITY

    PubMed Central

    Afsar, Fatma Sule; Ergin, Malik; Ozek, Gulcihan; Vergin, Canan; Karakuzu, Ali; Seremet, Sila

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To report a case of late-onset self-healing Langerhans cell histiocytosis. Case description: A 4½-month-old female patient presenting with an eythematopurpuric eruption underwent a skin biopsy for histopathology and was first diagnosed with isolated cutaneous Langerhans cell histiocytosis. Her lesions regressed within a few months and she was retrospectively diagnosed with late-onset self-healing Langerhans cell histiocytosis after being without skin or systemic involvement in a follow-up four years later. Comments: Self-healing Langerhans cell histiocytosis, which is characterized by clonal proliferation of Langerhans cells and presents with cutaneous lesions, is a rare self-limited variant of histiocytosis and can only be diagnosed retrospectively, after the patient remains free from systemic involvement for several years. Although it presents at birth or during the neonatal period, only a few cases of its late-onset type regarding the age of onset have been reported. Purpuric lesions that appear after the neonatal period serve as a clue for late-onset self-healing Langerhans cell histiocytosis and the patients should be monitored regularly for systemic involvement if the diagnosis is confirmed by a cutaneous biopsy.

  11. Composite cutaneous atypical vascular lesion and Langerhans cell histiocytosis after radiation for breast carcinoma: can radiation induce Langerhans cell histiocytosis?

    PubMed

    Pan, Zenggang; Bland, Kirby I; Wei, Shi

    2011-12-15

    Atypical vascular lesions (AVLs) refer to small vascular proliferations in radiated skin that may progress to angiosarcoma and typically develop after breast-conserving therapy for breast carcinoma. We present a case of composite AVL and Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) in a 57-year-old woman who received surgery and radiation therapy for ductal carcinoma of the breast. The patient developed AVLs 4 years after radiation. Biopsies of multiple erythematous nodules at the same site one year later revealed intermixed AVL and LCH, some of which coexisted within the same lesion. To our knowledge, LCH has not been recorded at the site of radiation in the English language literature. Our case not only highlights the importance of close cutaneous surveillance and a low threshold for biopsy in patients with breast-conserving surgery and radiation therapy, but also raises the possibility of radiation as the inducement of cutaneous LCH.

  12. CX-659S, a diaminouracil derivative, indirectly inhibits the function of Langerhans cells by blocking the MEK1/2-Erk1/2 pathway in keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Uchi, Hiroshi; Koga, Tetsuya; Urabe, Kazunori; Moroi, Yoichi; Furue, Masutaka

    2003-06-01

    Keratinocytes are an important component of the skin immune system, and keratinocyte-derived cytokines control the function of Langerhans cells. We previously showed that CX-659S, a novel diaminouracil derivative, had an inhibitory effect on hapten-induced contact hypersensitivity reaction in mice. In this study, we investigated the mechanism by which CX-659S elicits its inhibitory effect. CX-659S inhibited the expressions of CD80 and CD86, but not that of CD54, on Langerhans cells in epidermal cell suspensions. Exogenous granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor restored the CX-659S-induced inhibition of CD80 and CD86 expressions of Langerhans cells. The production of interleukin-2 from allogeneic T cells was also inhibited when the cells were stimulated with CX-659S-treated epidermal cells, and this inhibition was suppressed by the addition of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor during CX-659S treatment. As CX-659S significantly inhibited production of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor from keratinocytes, CX-659S was thought to indirectly affect Langerhans cells by inhibiting the function of keratinocytes. These effects of CX-659S were preceded by blockade of the phosphorylation of extracellular-signal-regulated kinase 1/2 and their direct activators, mitogen-activated protein kinase/extracellular-signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (MEK1/2), but not p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase or inhibitory nuclear factor kappaBalpha, in keratinocytes. Furthermore, a specific MEK1/2 inhibitor, U0126, mimicked the effect of CX-659S. CX-659S, a keratinocyte-response modifier, would be an effective therapeutic compound to inhibit contact hypersensitivity reaction, its action mechanism being different from those of other immunosuppressive agents such as glucocorticosteroids or cyclosporine A.

  13. DNA damage, apoptosis and langerhans cells--Activators of UV-induced immune tolerance.

    PubMed

    Timares, Laura; Katiyar, Santosh K; Elmets, Craig A

    2008-01-01

    Solar UVR is highly mutagenic but is only partially absorbed by the outer stratum corneum of the epidermis. UVR can penetrate into the deeper layers of the epidermis, depending on melanin content, where it induces DNA damage and apoptosis in epidermal cells, including those in the germinative basal layer. The cellular decision to initiate either cellular repair or undergo apoptosis has evolved to balance the acute need to maintain skin barrier function with the long-term risk of retaining precancerous cells. Langerhans cells (LCs) are positioned suprabasally, where they may sense UV damage directly, or indirectly through recognition of apoptotic vesicles and soluble mediators derived from surrounding keratinocytes. Apoptotic vesicles will contain UV-induced altered proteins that may be presented to the immune system as foreign. The observation that UVR induces immune tolerance to skin-associated antigens suggests that this photodamage response has evolved to preserve the skin barrier by protecting it from autoimmune attack. LC involvement in this process is not clear and controversial. We will highlight some basic concepts of photobiology and review recent advances pertaining to UV-induced DNA damage, apoptosis regulation, novel immunomodulatory mechanisms and the role of LCs in generating antigen-specific regulatory T cells.

  14. The PDK1–Rsk Signaling Pathway Controls Langerhans Cell Proliferation and Patterning

    PubMed Central

    Zaru, Rossana; Matthews, Stephen P.; Edgar, Alexander J.; Prescott, Alan R.; Gomez-Nicola, Diego; Hanauer, André

    2015-01-01

    Langerhans cells (LC), the dendritic cells of the epidermis, are distributed in a distinctive regularly spaced array. In the mouse, the LC array is established in the first few days of life from proliferating local precursors, but the regulating signaling pathways are not fully understood. We found that mice lacking the kinase phosphoinositide-dependent kinase 1 selectively lack LC. Deletion of the phosphoinositide-dependent kinase 1 target kinases, ribosomal S6 kinase 1 (Rsk1) and Rsk2, produced a striking perturbation in the LC network: LC density was reduced 2-fold, but LC size was increased by the same magnitude. Reduced LC numbers in Rsk1/2−/− mice was not due to accelerated emigration from the skin but rather to reduced proliferation at least in adults. Rsk1/2 were required for normal LC patterning in neonates, but not when LC were ablated in adults and replaced by bone marrow–derived cells. Increased LC size was an intrinsic response to reduced LC numbers, reversible on LC emigration, and could be observed in wild type epidermis where LC size also correlated inversely with LC density. Our results identify a key signaling pathway needed to establish a normal LC network and suggest that LC might maintain epidermal surveillance by increasing their “footprint” when their numbers are limited. PMID:26401001

  15. Mechanotransduction in epidermal Merkel cells.

    PubMed

    Nakatani, Masashi; Maksimovic, Srdjan; Baba, Yoshichika; Lumpkin, Ellen A

    2015-01-01

    The cellular and molecular basis of vertebrate touch reception remains least understood among the traditional five senses. Somatosensory afferents that innervate the skin encode distinct tactile qualities, such as flutter, slip, and pressure. Gentle touch is thought to be transduced by somatosensory afferents whose tactile end organs selectively filter mechanical stimuli. These tactile end organs comprise afferent terminals in association with non-neuronal cell types such as Merkel cells, keratinocytes, and Schwann cells. An open question is whether these non-neuronal cells serve primarily as passive mechanical filters or whether they actively participate in mechanosensory transduction. This question has been most extensively studied in Merkel cells, which are epidermal cells that complex with sensory afferents in regions of high tactile acuity such as fingertips, whisker follicles, and touch domes. Merkel cell-neurite complexes mediate slowly adapting type I (SAI) responses, which encode sustained pressure and represent object features with high fidelity. How Merkel cells contribute to unique SAI firing patterns has been debated for decades; however, three recent studies in rodent models provide some direct answers. First, whole-cell recordings demonstrate that Merkel cells are touch-sensitive cells with fast, mechanically activated currents that require Piezo2. Second, optogenetics and intact recordings show that Merkel cells mediate sustained SAI firing. Finally, loss-of-function studies in transgenic mouse models reveal that SAI afferents are also touch sensitive. Together, these studies identify molecular mechanisms of mechanotransduction in Merkel cells, reveal unexpected functions for these cells in touch, and support a revised, two-receptor site model of mechanosensory transduction.

  16. Mechanotransduction in epidermal Merkel cells

    PubMed Central

    Nakatani, Masashi; Maksimovic, Srdjan; Baba, Yoshichika; Lumpkin, Ellen A.

    2014-01-01

    The cellular and molecular basis of vertebrate touch reception remains least understood among the traditional five senses. Somatosensory afferents that innervate the skin encode distinct tactile qualities, such as flutter, slip and pressure. Gentle touch is thought to be transduced by somatosensory afferents whose tactile end organs selectively filter mechanical stimuli. These tactile end organs comprise afferent terminals in association with non-neuronal cell types such as Merkel cells, keratinocytes and Schwann cells. An open question is whether these non-neuronal cells serve primarily as passive mechanical filters or whether they actively participate in mechanosensory transduction. This question has been most extensively studied in Merkel cells, which are epidermal cells that complex with sensory afferents in regions of high tactile acuity such as fingertips, whisker follicles, and touch domes. Merkel cell-neurite complexes mediate slowly adapting type I (SAI) responses, which encode sustained pressure and represent object features with high fidelity. How Merkel cells contribute to unique SAI firing patterns has been debated for decades; however, three recent studies in rodent models provide some direct answers. First, whole-cell recordings demonstrate that Merkel cells are touch-sensitive cells with fast, mechanically activated currents that require Piezo2. Second, optogenetics and intact recordings show that Merkel cells mediate sustained SAI firing. Finally, loss-of-function studies in transgenic mouse models reveal that SAI afferents are also touch sensitive. Together, these studies identify molecular mechanisms of mechanotransduction in Merkel cells, reveal unexpected functions for these cells in touch and support a revised, two-receptor site model of mechanosensory transduction. PMID:25053537

  17. TIM-4 is differentially expressed in the distinct subsets of dendritic cells in skin and skin-draining lymph nodes and controls skin Langerhans cell homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xilin; Liu, Queping; Wang, Jie; Li, Guihua; Weiland, Matthew; Yu, Fu-Shin; Mi, Qing-Sheng; Gu, Jun; Zhou, Li

    2016-01-01

    T cell immunoglobulin and mucin-4 (TIM-4), mainly expressed on dendritic cells (DC) and macrophages, plays an essential role in regulating immune responses. Langerhans cells (LC), which are the sole DC subpopulation residing at the epidermis, are potent mediators of immune surveillance and tolerance. However, the significance of TIM-4 on epidermal LCs, along with other cutaneous DCs, remains totally unexplored. For the first time, we discovered that epidermal LCs expressed TIM-4 and displayed an increased level of TIM-4 expression upon migration. We also found that dermal CD207+ DCs and lymph node (LN) resident CD207−CD4+ DCs highly expressed TIM-4, while dermal CD207− DCs and LN CD207−CD4− DCs had limited TIM-4 expressions. Using TIM-4-deficient mice, we further demonstrated that loss of TIM-4 significantly upregulated the frequencies of epidermal LCs and LN resident CD207−CD4+ DCs. In spite of this, the epidermal LCs of TIM-4-deficient mice displayed normal phagocytic and migratory abilities, comparable maturation status upon the stimulation as well as normal repopulation under the inflamed state. Moreover, lack of TIM-4 did not affect dinitrofluorobenzene-induced contact hypersensitivity response. In conclusion, our results indicated that TIM-4 was differentially expressed in the distinct subsets of DCs in skin and skin-draining LNs, and specifically regulated epidermal LC and LN CD207−CD4+ DC homeostasis. PMID:27224924

  18. TIM-4 is differentially expressed in the distinct subsets of dendritic cells in skin and skin-draining lymph nodes and controls skin Langerhans cell homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xilin; Liu, Queping; Wang, Jie; Li, Guihua; Weiland, Matthew; Yu, Fu-Shin; Mi, Qing-Sheng; Gu, Jun; Zhou, Li

    2016-06-21

    T cell immunoglobulin and mucin-4 (TIM-4), mainly expressed on dendritic cells (DC) and macrophages, plays an essential role in regulating immune responses. Langerhans cells (LC), which are the sole DC subpopulation residing at the epidermis, are potent mediators of immune surveillance and tolerance. However, the significance of TIM-4 on epidermal LCs, along with other cutaneous DCs, remains totally unexplored. For the first time, we discovered that epidermal LCs expressed TIM-4 and displayed an increased level of TIM-4 expression upon migration. We also found that dermal CD207+ DCs and lymph node (LN) resident CD207-CD4+ DCs highly expressed TIM-4, while dermal CD207- DCs and LN CD207-CD4- DCs had limited TIM-4 expressions. Using TIM-4-deficient mice, we further demonstrated that loss of TIM-4 significantly upregulated the frequencies of epidermal LCs and LN resident CD207-CD4+ DCs. In spite of this, the epidermal LCs of TIM-4-deficient mice displayed normal phagocytic and migratory abilities, comparable maturation status upon the stimulation as well as normal repopulation under the inflamed state. Moreover, lack of TIM-4 did not affect dinitrofluorobenzene-induced contact hypersensitivity response. In conclusion, our results indicated that TIM-4 was differentially expressed in the distinct subsets of DCs in skin and skin-draining LNs, and specifically regulated epidermal LC and LN CD207-CD4+ DC homeostasis.

  19. Bronchoscopic diagnosis of Langerhans cell histiocytosis and lymphangioleiomyomatosis.

    PubMed

    Harari, Sergio; Torre, Olga; Cassandro, Roberto; Taveira-DaSilva, Angelo M; Moss, Joel

    2012-09-01

    Limited data are available regarding the role of bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) and transbronchial lung biopsy (TBB) as diagnostic tools in pulmonary Langerhans' Cell Histiocytosis (LCH) and lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM). The aim of this study was to review our experience regarding the value of these two techniques in the diagnosis of these cystic lung diseases. Records of 452 patients with the presumptive diagnosis of interstitial lung disease were reviewed; 67 had a clinical-radiological diagnosis of either LCH (n = 27) or LAM (n = 40). Of 16 patients with LCH who underwent BAL, four specimens (25%) contained cells which had positive immunoreactivity for CD1a. Of three patients with negative BAL fluid who had TBB, only one had a positive tissue diagnosis. Ten LCH patients were diagnosed by surgical lung biopsy of which five had negative BAL fluid. The remaining 12 patients were diagnosed by clinical and radiologic features. Standard examination of BAL fluid was of no diagnostic value in LAM. TBB was performed in seven patients and was diagnostic in six, not resulting in complications. All 13 patients who underwent surgical lung biopsies had a positive histopathologic diagnosis The remaining 21 patients were diagnosed by clinical and radiologic features. We suggest that BAL may assist in the diagnosis of LCH whereas TBB may be useful in the diagnosis of LAM, thus avoiding the need for surgical biopsy. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  20. In situ visualization of intracellular morphology of epidermal cells using stimulated Raman scattering microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egawa, Mariko; Tokunaga, Kyoya; Hosoi, Junichi; Iwanaga, Shinya; Ozeki, Yasuyuki

    2016-08-01

    Visualization of epidermal cells is important because the differentiation patterns of keratinocytes (KCs) are considered to be related to the functions and condition of skin. Optical microscopy has been widely used to investigate epidermal cells, but its applicability is still limited because of the need for sample fixation and staining. Here, we report our staining-free observation of epidermal cells in both tissue and culture by stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) microscopy that provides molecular vibrational contrast. SRS allowed us to observe a variety of cellular morphologies in skin tissue, including ladder-like structures in the spinous layer, enucleation of KCs in the granular layer, and three-dimensional cell column structures in the stratum corneum. We noticed that some cells in the spinous layer had a brighter signal in the cytoplasm than KCs. To examine the relevance of the observation of epidermal layers, we also observed cultured epidermal cells, including KCs at various differentiation stages, melanocytes, and Langerhans cell-like cells. Their SRS images also demonstrated various morphologies, suggesting that the morphological differences observed in tissue corresponded to the cell lineage. These results indicate the possible application of SRS microscopy to dermatological investigation of cell lineages and types in the epidermis by cellular-level analysis.

  1. In situ visualization of intracellular morphology of epidermal cells using stimulated Raman scattering microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Egawa, Mariko; Tokunaga, Kyoya; Hosoi, Junichi; Iwanaga, Shinya; Ozeki, Yasuyuki

    2016-01-01

    Abstract. Visualization of epidermal cells is important because the differentiation patterns of keratinocytes (KCs) are considered to be related to the functions and condition of skin. Optical microscopy has been widely used to investigate epidermal cells, but its applicability is still limited because of the need for sample fixation and staining. Here, we report our staining-free observation of epidermal cells in both tissue and culture by stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) microscopy that provides molecular vibrational contrast. SRS allowed us to observe a variety of cellular morphologies in skin tissue, including ladder-like structures in the spinous layer, enucleation of KCs in the granular layer, and three-dimensional cell column structures in the stratum corneum. We noticed that some cells in the spinous layer had a brighter signal in the cytoplasm than KCs. To examine the relevance of the observation of epidermal layers, we also observed cultured epidermal cells, including KCs at various differentiation stages, melanocytes, and Langerhans cell-like cells. Their SRS images also demonstrated various morphologies, suggesting that the morphological differences observed in tissue corresponded to the cell lineage. These results indicate the possible application of SRS microscopy to dermatological investigation of cell lineages and types in the epidermis by cellular-level analysis. PMID:27580366

  2. Epidermal I-J-bearing cells are responsible for transferable suppressor cell generation after immunization of mice with ultraviolet radiation-treated epidermal cells

    SciTech Connect

    Granstein, R.D.

    1985-03-01

    Subcutaneous immunization of mice with hapten-coupled, ultraviolet radiation (UVR)-treated epidermal cells (EC) results in a hyporesponsive delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) response associated with the appearance of afferent-acting, hapten-specific T suppressor (Ts) cells. Depletion of I-J-bearing cells from the EC population prior to UVR-exposure and hapten coupling prevents the appearance of these Ts cells. However, non-UVR-treated EC depleted of I-J-bearing cells and hapten-coupled are capable of immunizing mice for a DTH response. Therefore, the set of I-J-bearing EC appears to be distinct from classic Langerhans cells. A novel set of I-J-bearing EC appears to be responsible for Ts activation after subcutaneous immunization with hapten-coupled UVR-treated EC.

  3. Langerhans cell histiocytosis arising from a BCC: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Patel, Payal; Talpur, Rakhshandra; Duvic, Madeleine

    2010-06-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) is a rare disease characterized by a proliferation of Langerhans cells. Several organs may be involved, including the skin, bone, and central nervous system. Adult onset of LCH and solely localized cutaneous involvement are quite uncommon. Langerhans cell histiocytosis has been found in combination with other skin lesions and systemic conditions, but no definitive conclusion exists for this phenomenon. We present a case report of a 63-year-old woman who initially presented with 3 pink papules on her forehead that had developed sequentially within 1 month, all diagnosed by biopsy as basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and appropriately treated. Concurrent with the appearance of the third BCC, the patient began developing crusted ulcerative nodules on her scalp. Biopsy of 1 scalp nodule revealed a BCC, but a repeat biopsy of the same nodule weeks later revealed LCH. Langerhans cell histiocytosis arising from a BCC is extremely rare. No absolute explanation exists regarding the transformation of a BCC into LCH, but understanding the behavior of Langerhans cells may give us better insight into how this process could occur.

  4. Effects of pimecrolimus versus triamcinolone on Langerhans cells after UV exposure.

    PubMed

    Martires, Kathryn J; Domingo, Diana S; Hsia, Andrew; Fu, Pingfu; Cooper, Kevin D; Baron, Elma D

    2011-03-01

    Pimecrolimus is a topical immunomodulator for atopic dermatitis. Concerns regarding malignancy risk resulted in its black box warning in 2006. The purpose of this study is to determine the effects of pimecrolimus on Langerhans cells (LC), mediators of the cutaneous immunity UV-irradiated skin. A RCT was conducted investigating pimecrolimus 1% cream vs triamcinolone 0.1% cream on UV-irradiated epidermal LC on 20 healthy volunteers. Punch biopsies were stained with antibodies to CD1a, HLADR and CD83. Triamcinolone caused more depletion in UV-irradiated CD1a(+) epidermis relative to pimecrolimus treatment. (P=0.030). Using HLA-DR as a pan-marker for APCs, pimecrolimus caused marginally less depletion than triamcinolone (P=0.013). Using anti-CD83 as a maturation marker, UV-irradiated skin treated with pimecrolimus showed more mature LC than skin treated with triamcinolone (P=0.00090). UV-induced changes in LC are minimally affected by pimecrolimus, compared with triamcinolone. © 2010 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  5. Bisphosphonates in Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis: An International Retrospective Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Chellapandian, Deepak; Makras, Polyzois; Kaltsas, Gregory; van den Bos, Cor; Naccache, Lamia; Rampal, Raajit; Carret, Anne-Sophie; Weitzman, Sheila; Egeler, R. Maarten; Abla, Oussama

    2016-01-01

    Background Bone is the most common organ of involvement in patients with Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH), which is often painful and associated with significant morbidity from pathological fractures. Current first-line treatments include chemotherapy and steroids that are effective but often associated with adverse effects, whereas the disease may reactivate despite an initial response to first-line agents. Bisphosphonates are osteoclast inhibitors that have shown to be helpful in treating bone lesions of LCH. To date, there are no large international studies to describe their role in treating bone lesions of LCH. Method We conducted a multicenter retrospective review of 13 patients with histologically proven LCH, who had received bisphosphonates either at diagnosis or at disease reactivation. Results Ten patients (77%) had a single system bone disease, and 3 (23%) had bone lesions as part of multisystem disease. Median follow-up time post-bisphosphonate therapy was 4.6 years (range, 0.8 to 8.2 years). Treatment with bisphosphonates was associated with significant pain relief in almost all patients. Twelve (92%) achieved resolution of active bone lesions, and 10 out of them had no active disease for a median of 3.5 years (range, 0.8 to 5 years). One patient did not respond. No major adverse effects were reported in this series. Conclusion Bisphosphonates are well-tolerated drugs that can significantly improve bone pain and induce remission in active bone LCH. Future prospective studies evaluating the role of bisphosphonates in LCH are warranted. PMID:27413525

  6. [Frequency of hearing disorders in children with langerhans' cell histiocytosis].

    PubMed

    Kürten, T; Groeger, M; Angerstein, W

    2008-02-01

    The aims of the study were to find out the frequency of hearing disorders in children with Langerhans' cell histiocytosis (LCH) and to find out possible risk factors for hearing disorders due to the disease itself and the therapy. 30 patients with LCH were examined audiologically by using standard audiometric procedures. In cases of central nervous system (CNS) lesions, brainstem evoked response audiometry (BERA) was done additionally. A significant hearing disorder was defined as a hearing impairment affecting speech, thus being characterized by the following features: Both ears should present either conductive and/or sensorineural hearing loss of at least moderate degree. The frequencies important for speech development (1 - 4 kHz) had to be affected. Also, prolongation of BERA interpeak latencies was regarded as a significant hearing impairment, because those children had an increased risk for a central auditory and speech processing disorder. In our study 3 patients had a significant hearing disorder according to our definition. The prevalence of a significant hearing disorder is increased in patients with LCH compared to the prevalence of permanent hearing disorders in German children. We found the following risk factors for the development of a significant hearing disorder: LCH of the temporal bone, CNS lesions. We recommend periodical audiological follow up examinations for LCH patients with lesions of the temporal bone and/or the brain. BERA is indicated in cases with CNS lesions, because central auditory and speech processing disorders are possible in those patients.

  7. Central nervous system disease in Langerhans cell histiocytosis.

    PubMed Central

    Grois, N.; Tsunematsu, Y.; Barkovich, A. J.; Favara, B. E.

    1994-01-01

    Diabetes insipidus and anterior pituitary dysfunction, are familiar central nervous system (CNS) complications of Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) but the pathophysiology and biological behaviour of other forms of CNS involvement in LCH are poorly understood. In an attempt to improve our understanding of these rare complications, we studied 23 patients with LCH in whom neuroradiological abnormalities, with or without neurological dysfunction other than diabetes insipidus, developed during the course of disease. Neuroradiological abnormalities were of three basic types (a) poorly-defined changes in white matter, (b) well-defined changes in white and grey matter and (c) extra-parenchymal "tumoural" masses. There was a profusion of associated neurological signs and symptoms in most cases but some patients were asymptomatic. The neuropathological features were complex but infiltration of the CNS by histiocytes with xanthomatous change, particularly prominent in mass lesions, was common in the 13 cases in which biopsies were done. Patients with lytic lesions of the skull and diabetes insipidus are evidently most at risk of developing these rare manifestations of LCH. Therapeutic questions could not be answered from this study because no standard treatment had been given and outcome varied widely. Images Figure 7 Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:8075002

  8. Langerhans cell histiocytosis case with dense metaphyseal band sign.

    PubMed

    Kikkawa, Ichiro; Aihara, Toshinori; Morimoto, Akira; Watanabe, Hideaki; Furukawa, Rieko

    2013-02-01

    Eosinophilic granuloma, a type of Langerhans cell histiocytosis, exhibits a classic vertebral collapse, which is called vertebra plana (Calve's disease) and it manifests as a solitary bony lesion. Vertebra plana can cause severe pain in patients. Bisphosphonates (clodronate, pamidronate and zoledronic acid) have been recently used to treat osteolytic bone lesions of LCH. Zoledronic acid has 100 times relative potency that of pamidronate. We report a case of a 10-year-old girl who had zoledronic acid treatment for severe back pain due to vertebra plana. X-ray photographs of the patient's body showed dense metaphyseal band sign, which can be found in lead poisoning, treated leukemia, healing rickets, recovery from scurvy, vitamin D hypervitaminosis, congenital hypothyroidism and hypoparathyroidism. Increased biological potent zoledronic acid deprived her of severe back pain due to vertebra plana and might cause dense metaphyseal band sign of her skeleton. Conclusion; We have cured the severe back pain of a 10-year-old girl case of eosinophilic granuloma with zoledronic acid. After that treatment, X-ray photographs of the patient's body showed dense metaphyseal band sign. There have been few such cases reported until now.

  9. Differentiating skin-limited and multisystem Langerhans cell histiocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Simko, Stephen J.; Garmezy, Benjamin; Abhyankar, Harshal; Lupo, Philip J.; Chakraborty, Rikhia; Lim, Karen Phaik Har; Shih, Albert; Hicks, M. John; Wright, Teresa S.; Levy, Moise L.; McClain, Kenneth L.; Allen, Carl E.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To identify features associated with multisystem involvement and therapeutic failure in patients with skin Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH). Study design We reviewed medical records of 71 consecutive LCH patients with skin involvement evaluated at Texas Children’s Hospital and analyzed clinical features, laboratory results, and presence of circulating cells with the BRAF-V600E mutation, with respect to initial staging and clinical outcomes. Results Skin disease in patients older than 18 months at diagnosis was associated with presence of multisystem disease (OR 9.65, 95% CI 1.17–79.4). Forty percent of patients referred for presumed skin-limited LCH had underlying multisystem involvement, half of these with risk-organ involvement. Patients with skin-limited LCH had 3-year progression-free survival (PFS) of 89% after initial therapy, and none developed multisystem disease. Patients with skin/multisystem involvement had 3 year PFS of 44% with vinblastine/prednisone therapy, and risk-organ involvement did not correlate with failure to achieve non-active disease. Circulating cells with BRAF-V600E were detected at higher frequency in multisystem patients (8/11 skin/multisystem, 1/13 skin-limited, P=0.002). Conclusions Skin-limited LCH requires infrequent therapeutic intervention and has lower risk of progression relative to skin plus multisystem LCH. The less aggressive clinical course and lack of circulating cells with BRAF-V600E mutation in skin-limited LCH suggest a different mechanism of disease origin compared with multisystem or risk-organ disease. PMID:25441388

  10. Prevention of ultraviolet radiation-induced suppression of accessory cell function of Langerhans cells by Aloe vera gel components.

    PubMed

    Lee, C K; Han, S S; Mo, Y K; Kim, R S; Chung, M H; Park, Y I; Lee, S K; Kim, Y S

    1997-10-01

    The active components of Aloe vera gel that can prevent ultraviolet B (UVB)-induced suppression of accessory cell function of Langerhans cells (LC) were purified by activity-guided sequential fractionation followed by in vitro functional assay. The functional assay was based on the fact that exposure of freshly isolated murine epidermal cells (EC) to UVB radiation resulted in impairment of accessory cell function of LC, as measured by their ability to support anti-CD3 monoclonal antibody (mAb)-primed T-cell mitogenesis. This UVB-suppressed LC accessory cell function was prevented by addition of partially purified Aloe gel components to cultures of UVB-irradiated EC. The Aloe gel components appeared to prevent events occurring within the first 24 h after UVB irradiation that lead to the impairment of accessory cell function. The Aloe gel components did not cause proliferation of anti-CD3 mAb-primed T-cells, nor did induce proliferation of normal EC. The activity-guided final purification of Aloe gel components resulted in the isolation of two components. Both of the components were small molecular weight (MW) substances with an apparent MW of less than 1,000 Da but different from each other in net charge characteristics at pH 7.4. These results suggest that Aloe vera gel contains at least two small molecular weight immunomodulators that may prevent UVB-induced immune suppression in the skin.

  11. Cutaneous Langerhans cell sarcoma: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Bohn, Olga L; Ruiz-Argüelles, Guillermo; Navarro, Leticia; Saldivar, Jesus; Sanchez-Sosa, Sergio

    2007-02-01

    Langerhans cell sarcoma (LCS) is a neoplastic proliferation of Langerhans cells that occurs in lymph nodes, liver, skin, spleen, lung, and bone. We report a case of LCS in a 47-year-old man with a 6-month history of scalp mass and cervical lymphadenopathy. Clinical and pathologic data were available. A histologic examination demonstrated a proliferation of cells with malignant cytologic features. Because of its poorly differentiated morphologic features, hematologic and nonhematologic entities were ruled out by immunohistochemical screening with a broad panel of antibodies. Ultrastructural studies demonstrating Birbeck granules and consistent expression of CD1a, S-100 protein, and langerin by immunohistochemistry were helpful in identifying the Langerhans cell origin.

  12. [Neuroimaging of Langerhans cell histiocytosis in the central nervous system of children].

    PubMed

    De La Hoz Polo, M; Rebollo Polo, M; Fons Estupiña, C; Muchart López, J; Cruz Martinez, O

    2015-01-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) is a rare disease characterized by the accumulation within tissues of anomalous dendritic cells similar to Langerhans cells. The clinical presentation varies, ranging from the appearance of a single bone lesion to multisystemic involvement. Central nervous system (CNS) involvement, manifesting as diabetes insipidus secondary to pituitary involvement, has been known since the original description of the disease. Two types of CNS lesions are currently differentiated. The first, pseudotumoral lesions with infiltration by Langerhans cells, most commonly manifests as pituitary infiltration. The second, described more recently, consists of neurodegenerative lesions of the CNS associated with neurologic deterioration. This second type of lesion constitutes a complication of the disease; however, there is no consensus about the cause of this complication. Our objective was to describe the radiologic manifestations of LCH in the CNS in pediatric patients. Copyright © 2013 SERAM. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  13. Current understanding and management of pulmonary Langerhans cell histiocytosis.

    PubMed

    Vassallo, Robert; Harari, Sergio; Tazi, Abdellatif

    2017-10-01

    Pulmonary Langerhans cell histiocytosis (PLCH) is a diffuse lung disease that usually affects young adult smokers. PLCH affects different lung compartments; bronchiolar, interstitial and pulmonary vascular dysfunction may coexist to varying extents, resulting in diverse phenotypes. Analyses of PLCH tissues have identified activating mutations of specific mitogen-activated protein kinases (BRAF(V600E) and others). The current consensus is that PLCH represents a myeloid neoplasm with inflammatory properties: the myeloid tumour cells exhibit surface CD1a expression and up to 50% of the cells harbour activating BRAF or other MAPK mutations. PLCH may be associated with multisystem disease. The detection of disease outside of the thorax is facilitated by whole body positron emission tomography. The natural history of PLCH is unpredictable. In some patients, disease may remit or stabilise following smoking cessation. Others develop progressive lung disease, often associated with evidence of airflow limitation and pulmonary vascular dysfunction. Due to the inability to accurately predict the natural history, it is important that all patients undergo longitudinal follow-up at least twice a year for the first few years following diagnosis. The treatment of PLCH is challenging and should be individualised. While there is no general consensus regarding the role of immunosuppression or chemotherapy in management, selected patients may experience improvement in lung function with therapy. Determination of BRAF(V600E) or other mutations may assist with the development of an individualised approach to therapy. Patients with progressive disease should be referred to specialised centres and considered for a trial of pharmacotherapy or evaluated for transplantation. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  14. A gluteal mass of langerhans cell histiocytosis mimicking malignancy in a two-year-old boy: a case report.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Zainal Abidin; Lung, Wong Siong; Long, Pan Kok

    2009-01-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis is a disease primarily affects the bone. More than 50 percent of the disease occurs between the age of 1 and 15. We reported a case of a 2 year old boy who presented with a gluteal mass. Radiographic imaging showed an osteolytic lesion suspicious of malignancy. However, the histological diagnosis was Langerhans cell histiocytosis.

  15. Low dose ultraviolet B-irradiated Langerhans cells preferentially activate CD4+ cells of the T helper 2 subset

    SciTech Connect

    Simon, J.C.; Cruz, P.D. Jr.; Bergstresser, P.R.; Tigelaar, R.E. )

    1990-10-01

    UVB radiation distorts the Ag-presenting function of epidermal Langerhans cells (LC); this has been shown for the presentation of soluble Ag to primed T cells in vitro and for the initiation of delayed-type hypersensitivity in vivo, such as contact hypersensitivity (CH). Previous work has also demonstrated UVB-induced suppression of CH to be mediated ultimately by T cells. Two subsets of CD4+ Th cells, Th1 and Th2, have been identified, based on their cytokine production and functional activities. In particular, Th1 mediate delayed-type hypersensitivity, whereas Th2 do not. To investigate whether the perturbation of LC function induced by UVB radiation leads to a differential activation of these subsets of CD4+ cells, we examined the capacity of unirradiated and irradiated (200 J/m2) APC from adult BALB/c mice to present keyhole limpet hemocyanin to Ag-specific, H2d-restricted Th1 and Th2 cell lines. Four sources of APC were utilized: epidermal cells (EC), flow microfluorometry-purified Ia+ EC (LC), flow microfluorometry-purified Ia- EC, and splenic adherent cells (SAC). Unirradiated EC, LC, and SAC, but not Ia-EC, presented keyhole limpet hemocyanin to both Th1 and Th2. Irradiated EC and LC lost their ability to stimulate Th1, but retained fully their capacity to stimulate Th2. On the other hand, irradiated SAC were unable to induce proliferation of either Th1 or Th2. These findings indicate that suppression of CH mediated by UVB-irradiated LC may result from an alteration of the ratio and/or activity of Th1 and Th2 cells normally generated during the induction of such responses.

  16. [Role of Langerhans cells in the physiopathology of atopic dermatitis].

    PubMed

    Bieber, T

    1995-12-01

    The demonstration of IgE receptors on the surface of epidermal dendritic cells and on other antigen presenting cells is a crucial element in the understanding of the pathophysiological role of these cells in the genesis of atopic disease, and especially the atopic dermatitis (AD). The sensibilisation phase to an aeroallergen at the level of nasal or bronchial mucosa and even at the skin may be mediated by dendritic cells expressing Fc epsilon RI. Distinct forms of AD may then represent the equivalent of the ellicitation phase of the classical allergic contact dermatitis. Fc epsilon RI would lead, via specific IgE, to an efficient antigen capture, to the activation of the dendritic cells and finally to an antigen presentation. Thus, AD may represent the paradigma of an IgE-mediated type IV reaction.

  17. Betamethasone, but Not Tacrolimus, Suppresses the Development of Th2 Cells Mediated by Langerhans Cell-Like Dendritic Cells.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Katsuhiko; Tamai, Saki; Ikeda, Reiko

    2016-01-01

    It is well known that Langerhans cells (LCs) work as the primary orchestrators in the polarization of the immune milieu towards a T helper type 1 (Th1) or T helper type 2 (Th2) response. In this study, we investigated the effects of tacrolimus and betamethasone, each used as topical applications in atopic dermatitis (AD), on Th2 cell development mediated by LCs. LC-like dendritic cells (LDCs) were generated from mouse bone marrow cells and used as substitutes for LCs. Mice were primed with ovalbumin (OVA) peptide-pulsed LDCs, which had been treated with tacrolimus or betamethasone, via the hind footpad. After 5 d, the cytokine response in the popliteal lymph nodes was investigated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The expression of cell surface molecules on LDCs was investigated via reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. Administration of OVA peptide-pulsed LDCs, which had been treated with betamethasone, inhibited Th2 cell development, as represented by the down-regulation of interleukin-4 production, and also inhibited Th1 cell development, represented by the down-regulation of interferon-γ production. However, tacrolimus-treated LDCs did not induce such inhibition of the development of Th1 and Th2 cells. The inhibition of Th1 and Th2 cell development was associated with the suppression of CD40 and T-cell immunoglobulin, and mucin domain-containing protein (TIM)-4 expression, respectively, in LDCs. These results suggest that the topical application of betamethasone to skin lesions of patients with AD acts on epidermal LCs, and may inhibit the development of Th2 cells, thus being of benefit for the control of AD.

  18. [Pulmonary Langerhans' cell histiocytosis (PLCH) revealed by pneumothorax: about a case].

    PubMed

    Sajiai, Hafsa; Rachidi, Mariam; Serhane, Hind; Aitbatahar, Salma; Amro, Lamyae

    2016-01-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis is a rare disease of unknown etiology characterized by the infiltration of Langerhans cells in one or more organs. It has a polymorphic clinical presentation. We report the case of Mr R.Y, age 22, with 8 pack year history of smoking, admitted to hospital with complete spontaneous right-sided pneumothorax. Chest drainage was performed with good evolution. Control chest CT scan showed multiple diffuse cyst formations, predominant in the upper lobes. Lab and imaging tests were performed in order to detect systemic histiocytosis with negative results. Patient's evolution was marked by pneumothorax recurrence; pleurodesis and lung biopsy were performed which confirmed the diagnosis. The diagnosis of Langerhans cell histiocytosis should be evoked in front of pneumothorax associated with lung cystic. The diagnosis is easy in front of a suggestive clinical and radiological picture. Nevertheless, therapeutic options are limited and pneumothorax recurrence is common.

  19. A case of bilateral sensorineural hearing loss from Langerhans cell histiocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, Arthur Harry; Khan, Akbar Ali; Good, Catriona; Baer, Simon T

    2015-01-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis is a rare disorder, with resultant bilateral sensorineural hearing loss unreported in adults. A 42-year-old man presented with 4 months of right-sided tinnitus and hearing loss treated initially as otitis media with effusion. He re-presented 5 months later with progressive bilateral hearing loss—sensorineural (>100 dB) on pure tone audiogram. CT showed bilateral petrous temporal bone and calvarial lesions. Biopsy confirmed diagnosis of Langerhans cell histiocytosis and chemotherapy was started. Though uncommon, Langerhans cell histiocytosis should be considered among the differentials of persistent otological symptoms, as its progressive nature can cause bilateral irreversible sensorineural hearing loss. PMID:26341162

  20. Epidermal stem cells and their epigenetic regulation.

    PubMed

    Shen, Qi; Jin, Hongchuan; Wang, Xian

    2013-08-30

    Stem cells play an essential role in embryonic development, cell differentiation and tissue regeneration. Tissue homeostasis in adults is maintained by adult stem cells resident in the niches of different tissues. As one kind of adult stem cell, epidermal stem cells have the potential to generate diversified types of progeny cells in the skin. Although its biology is still largely unclarified, epidermal stem cells are widely used in stem cell research and regenerative medicine given its easy accessibility and pluripotency. Despite the same genome, cells within an organism have different fates due to the epigenetic regulation of gene expression. In this review, we will briefly discuss the current understanding of epigenetic modulation in epidermal stem cells.

  1. The cognitive spectrum in neurodegenerative Langerhans cell histiocytosis.

    PubMed

    Le Guennec, Loïc; Decaix, Caroline; Donadieu, Jean; Santiago-Ribeiro, Maria; Martin-Duverneuil, Nadine; Levy, Richard; Delgadillo, Daniel; Kas, Aurélie; Drier, Aurélie; Magy, Laurent; Bayen, Eleonore; Hoang-Xuan, Khe; Idbaih, Ahmed

    2014-08-01

    Clinical spectrum of cognitive troubles complicating neurodegenerative Langerhans cell histiocytosis (ND-LCH) is poorly known. The aim of this study is to evaluate cognitive functions in ND-LCH. The cognitive functions of a series of eight adult patients (7 males and 1 female; mean age 26 years IQ 25-75; range 20-33) suffering from clinical and/or radiological ND-LCH were evaluated using the following tests: (1) forward/backward digit and spatial span tasks of the WAIS-R scale and the Corsi block task, (2) the French version of the free and cued selective reminding test, (3) verbal fluency tests, (4) the Frontal Assessment Battery (FAB), (5) backward measurement of the verbal and visuospatial memories of the WAIS-R scale, (6) the Rey complex figure test, (7) the trail making tests A and B, (8) digit symbol and symbol search of the WAIS-IV scale, and (9) the Stroop test. Episodic (i.e. autobiographical or personal) memory free recall, categorical verbal fluency, phonological verbal fluency, visuospatial processing skills, attention, speed of processing, and sensitivity to interference were impaired in ND-LCH patients. In contrast, verbal and visuospatial short-term memories (i.e. immediate memories or forward span tasks) were preserved in all patients. Adult ND-LCH patients suffer from a severe but dissociated dysexecutive syndrome, mostly affecting executive strategies and relatively sparing short-term memory. Our study supports the need of assessing executive functions using comprehensive cognitive evaluation in ND-LCH patients for early diagnosis.

  2. A case of thymic Langerhans cell histiocytosis with diabetes insipidus as the first presentation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaoyan; Huang, Xiaochun; Qiu, Yuan; Chen, Hanzhang; Fu, Yingyu; Li, Xinchun

    2013-03-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) is an idiopathic group of reactive proliferative diseases linked to aberrant immunity, pathologically characterized by clonal proliferation of Langerhans cells. LCH rarely involves the thymus. We report a case of thymic LCH with diabetes insipidus as the first presentation, without evidence of myasthenia gravis and without evidenced involvement of the skin, liver, spleen, bones, lungs and superficial lymph nodes. This present case may have important clinical implications. In screening for LCH lesions, attention should be attached to rarely involved sites in addition to commonly involved organs. Follow-up and imageological examination are very important to a final diagnosis.

  3. Rare case of unifocal Langerhans cell histiocytosis in four-month-old child.

    PubMed

    Martins, Marco Antonio T; Gheno, José Luis N; Sant'Ana Filho, Manoel; Pinto, Décio S; Tenis, Carlos Alberto; Martins, Manoela D

    2011-07-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) comprises a group of disorders, the common feature of which is Langerhans cell proliferation. The clinical presentation is highly varied. The severity and prognosis of the disease are dependent on the type and extent of organ involvement. This paper reports a rare case of a four-month-old white male with unifocal LCH limited exclusively to the mandible, discussing the diagnosis, radiographic and immunohistochemical aspects, treatment and monitoring multidisciplinary of the case. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Dry Eye and Corneal Langerhans Cells in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Resch, Miklós D.; Marsovszky, László; Németh, János; Bocskai, Márta; Kovács, László

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. Investigation of dry eye and corneal Langerhans cells (LCs) in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Methods. Prospective consecutive case series of 27 SLE patients and 27 control subjects. Dry eye was evaluated by lid-parallel conjunctival folds (LIPCOF), Schirmer test, tear break-up time (TBUT), and ocular surface disease index (OSDI) questionnaire. In vivo investigation of corneal LCs density and morphology (LCM) was performed with confocal corneal microscopy (Heidelberg Retina Tomograph with Rostock Cornea Module). Results. Tear production and stability were pathological in SLE subjects compared to control (Schirmer: 8.45 ± 9.82 mm/5 min versus 11.67 ± 3.21 mm/5 min; TBUT: 6.86 ± 3.53 s versus 11.09 ± 3.37 s). OSDI was significantly greater in SLE patients (25.95 ± 17.92) than in controls (11.06 ± 7.18). Central LC density was greater in SLE patients (43.08 ± 48.67 cell/mm2) than in controls (20.57 ± 21.04 cell/mm2). There was no difference in the peripheral LC density (124.78 ± 165.39 versus 78.00 ± 39.51 cell/mm2). LCM was higher in SLE patients in the centre (1.43 ± 0.79) and in the periphery (2.89 ± 0.42) compared to controls (centre: 1.00 ± 0.69, periphery: 2.35 ± 0.54). Conclusions. Significant changes in dry eye parameters and marked increase of central LCs could be demonstrated in SLE patients. SLE alters not only the LC density but also the morphology, modifies corneal homeostasis, and might contribute to the development of dry eye. PMID:25893112

  5. Dry eye and corneal langerhans cells in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Resch, Miklós D; Marsovszky, László; Németh, János; Bocskai, Márta; Kovács, László; Balog, Attila

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. Investigation of dry eye and corneal Langerhans cells (LCs) in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Methods. Prospective consecutive case series of 27 SLE patients and 27 control subjects. Dry eye was evaluated by lid-parallel conjunctival folds (LIPCOF), Schirmer test, tear break-up time (TBUT), and ocular surface disease index (OSDI) questionnaire. In vivo investigation of corneal LCs density and morphology (LCM) was performed with confocal corneal microscopy (Heidelberg Retina Tomograph with Rostock Cornea Module). Results. Tear production and stability were pathological in SLE subjects compared to control (Schirmer: 8.45 ± 9.82 mm/5 min versus 11.67 ± 3.21 mm/5 min; TBUT: 6.86 ± 3.53 s versus 11.09 ± 3.37 s). OSDI was significantly greater in SLE patients (25.95 ± 17.92) than in controls (11.06 ± 7.18). Central LC density was greater in SLE patients (43.08 ± 48.67 cell/mm(2)) than in controls (20.57 ± 21.04 cell/mm(2)). There was no difference in the peripheral LC density (124.78 ± 165.39 versus 78.00 ± 39.51 cell/mm(2)). LCM was higher in SLE patients in the centre (1.43 ± 0.79) and in the periphery (2.89 ± 0.42) compared to controls (centre: 1.00 ± 0.69, periphery: 2.35 ± 0.54). Conclusions. Significant changes in dry eye parameters and marked increase of central LCs could be demonstrated in SLE patients. SLE alters not only the LC density but also the morphology, modifies corneal homeostasis, and might contribute to the development of dry eye.

  6. Langerhans cells that migrate to skin after intravenous infusion regulate the induction of contact hypersensitivity

    SciTech Connect

    Cruz, P.D. Jr.; Tigelaar, R.E.; Bergstresser, P.R. )

    1990-04-01

    Intravenous infusion of hapten-derivatized epidermal cells (EC) in syngeneic mice leads to two competing signals for contact hypersensitivity (CH), a dominant effector signal attributable to Langerhans cells (LC) and a suppressor signal from Thy-1+ EC. In vitro exposure of LC to low dose ultraviolet B (UVB) radiation before hapten-derivatization and infusion not only results in the abrogation of their effector signal but also causes the down-regulation of subsequent CH responses. To delineate the relevance of i.v. immunization to the study of CH and of LC as the immunologic targets of low dose UVB radiation, we examined the migratory and immunogenic properties of EC after i.v. infusion. Unsorted EC migrated from blood to skin and lymphoid tissues, reaching steady state distributions at 16 h after infusion. No significant differences were observed between the trafficking of EC in syngeneic and allogeneic transfers. LC localized preferentially to skin, whereas Thy-1+ EC trafficked to skin, the thymus, mesenteric lymph nodes, and spleen. The pattern of trafficking of unirradiated and low dose UVB-irradiated LC were identical, suggesting that low dose UVB radiation had little effect on LC migration. Finally, skin graft experiments demonstrated i.v. infused, hapten-derivatized LC that migrate to skin to retain their capacity to induce CH, a property that was converted by in vitro pretreatment with low dose UVB radiation into down-regulation. These findings confirm the relevance and utility of the i.v. immunization model in the study of CH and the influence of low dose UVB on this immune response. Our data also provide a basis for investigating the role of disparate trafficking patterns in generating effector and suppressor signals when hapten-derivatized EC are employed for CH.

  7. Characterization of murine lung dendritic cells: similarities to Langerhans cells and thymic dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are potent accessory cells (AC) for the initiation of primary immune responses. Although murine lymphoid DC and Langerhans cells have been extensively characterized, DC from murine lung have been incompletely described. We isolated cells from enzyme-digested murine lungs and bronchoalveolar lavages that were potent stimulators of a primary mixed lymphocyte response (MLR). The AC had a low buoyant density, were loosely adherent and nonphagocytic. AC function was unaffected by depletion of cells expressing the splenic DC marker, 33D1. In addition, antibody and complement depletion of cells bearing the macrophage marker F4/80, or removal of phagocytic cells with silica also failed to decrease AC activity. In contrast, AC function was decreased by depletion of cells expressing the markers J11d and the low affinity interleukin 2 receptor (IL-2R), both present on thymic and skin DC. AC function was approximately equal in FcR+ and FcR- subpopulations, indicating there was heterogeneity within the AC population. Consistent with the functional data, a combined two-color immunofluorescence and latex bead uptake technique revealed that lung cells high in AC activity were enriched in brightly Ia+ dendritic- shaped cells that (a) were nonphagocytic, (b) lacked specific T and B lymphocyte markers and the macrophage marker F4/80, but (c) frequently expressed C3biR, low affinity IL-2R, FcRII, and the markers NLDC-145 and J11d. Taken together, the functional and phenotypic data suggest the lung cells that stimulate resting T cells in an MLR and that might be important in local pulmonary immune responses are DC that bear functional and phenotypic similarity to other tissues DC, such as Langerhans cells and thymic DC. PMID:2162904

  8. Pulmonary Langerhans cell histiocytosis and diabetes insipidus in pregnant women: our experience.

    PubMed

    Fuks, Leonardo; Kramer, Mordechai R; Shitrit, David; Raviv, Yael

    2014-04-01

    Pulmonary Langerhans cell histiocytosis (PLCH) occurs predominantly in young adult smokers. Diabetes insipidus occurs in up to 15 % patients with PLCH. Information on PLCH in pregnancy is sparse, especially associated with diabetes insipidus. We report three patients with these conditions and describe the disease history and pregnancy outcomes.

  9. Langerhans cell histiocytosis: recurrent lesions affecting mandible in a 10-year-old patient.

    PubMed

    Loducca, S V; Mantesso, A; Araújo, N S; Magalhães, M H

    2001-01-01

    Hand-Schuller-Christian disease is a multifocal variant of eosinophilic granuloma, characterised by the classical triad of bony lesions, exophthalmos and diabetes insipidus. This case relates recurrent Langerhans' cell histiocytosis lesions presented as destruction of periodontal support associated with diabetes in a 10-year-old patient. Medical history suggests that the case represents a case of Hand-Schuller Christian disease.

  10. Topical steroid therapy induces pro-tolerogenic changes in Langerhans cells in human skin

    PubMed Central

    Alhadj Ali, Mohammad; Thrower, Sally L; Hanna, Stephanie J; Coulman, Sion A; Birchall, James C; Wong, F Susan; Dayan, Colin Mark; Tatovic, Danijela

    2015-01-01

    We have investigated the efficacy of conditioning skin Langerhans cells (LCs) with agents to promote tolerance and reduce inflammation, with the goal of improving the outcomes of antigen-specific immunotherapy. Topical treatments were assessed ex vivo, using excised human breast skin maintained in organ bath cultures, and in vivo in healthy volunteers by analysing skin biopsies and epidermal blister roof samples. Following topical treatment with a corticosteroid, tumour necrosis factor-α levels were reduced in skin biopsy studies and blister fluid samples. Blister fluid concentrations of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, macrophage inflammatory proteins -1α and 1β and interferon-γ inducible protein-10 were also reduced, while preserving levels of interleukin-1α (IL-1α), IL-6, IL-8 and IL-10. Steroid pre-treatment of the skin reduced the ability of LCs to induce proliferation, while supernatants showed an increase in the IL-10/interferon-γ ratio. Phenotypic changes following topical steroid treatment were also observed, including reduced expression of CD83 and CD86 in blister-derived LCs, but preservation of the tolerogenic signalling molecules immunoglobulin-like transcript 3 and programmed death-1. Reduced expression of HLA-DR, CD80 and CD86 were also apparent in LCs derived from excised human skin. Topical therapy with a vitamin D analogue (calcipotriol) and steroid, calcipotriol alone or vitamin A elicited no significant changes in the parameters studied. These experiments suggest that pre-conditioning the skin with topical corticosteroid can modulate LCs by blunting their pro-inflammatory signals and potentially enhancing tolerance. We suggest that such modulation before antigen-specific immunotherapy might provide an inexpensive and safe adjunct to current approaches to treat autoimmune diseases. PMID:26293297

  11. SEROLOGICALLY DEMONSTRABLE ALLOANTIGENS OF MOUSE EPIDERMAL CELLS

    PubMed Central

    Scheid, Margrit; Boyse, Edward A.; Carswell, Elizabeth A.; Old, Lloyd J.

    1972-01-01

    Single cells were prepared from mouse tail epidermis by a method which gives high viability counts and so permits their use in cytotoxicity tests. According to tests with standard alloantisera, the antigen phenotype of mouse epidermal cells is H-2+θ+Sk+H-Y+TL-Ly-A-Ly-B,C-PC-. The skin differentiation alloantigen Sk, which is responsible for homograft reactions directed selectively against skin, is expressed also on brain, but not on other cell types; it is present on the transplanted neuroblastoma C1300. Cytotoxicity tests with epidermal cells of H-2 congenic mouse stocks confirm that the Sk locus is not closely linked to H-2. The lymphoid cell differentiation antigen θ also is present on both epidermal cells and brain. Mice frequently retain θ-incompatible or Sk-incompatible skin grafts although they have formed substantial titers of θ or Sk antibody in response to grafting. Male (H-Y) antigen is demonstrable on epidermal cells by cytotoxicity tests with H-Y antibody, as it is also on one other type of cell, spermatozoa. PMID:4553016

  12. Quantitative study of Langerhans cells in basal cell carcinoma with higher or lower potential of local aggressiveness.

    PubMed

    Santos, Itamar; Mello, Roberto José Vieira de; Santos, Itamar Belo dos; Santos, Reginaldo Alves dos

    2010-01-01

    Basal cell carcinoma affects areas of the body that have been exposed to the sun, and this disorder has different clinical and histopathologic presentations. Some of these forms have a higher potential of local aggressiveness, while others have a lower potential. Langerhans cells actively participate in the skin immune system. To quantitatively evaluate the number of Langerhans cells on the epidermis of basal cell carcinoma with lower and higher potential of local aggressiveness and on adjacent normal epidermis. The authors divided the sample into two groups with 14 histological slides each: one with basal cell carcinoma with lower potential of local aggressiveness and the other with basal cell carcinoma with higher potential of local aggressiveness. Immunohistochemistry with S-100 protein was used in the identification of Langerhans Cells. Langerhans cells present in 7 microscopic fields were counted using optical microscopy (400X magnification) and Weibel's morphometric grade. The mean for each lamina was obtained. Wilcoxon's statistical test was employed. In the group with lower potential of local aggressiveness, there was a significant increase in the number of Langerhans cells in the adjacent normal epidermis, as compared with the number of cells in the epidermis superposed to the basal cell carcinoma (pd 0.05). There was no significant statistical difference in the group with higher potential of local aggressiveness (p >0.05). The higher number of Langerhans cells in the normal epidermis adjacent to the tumoral lesion with lower potential of local aggressiveness could indicate greater immunological resistance of the epidermis, thus limiting the aggressiveness of the neoplasm.

  13. Immunohistochemical staining of Langerhans cells in HPV-positive and HPV-negative cases of oral squamous cells carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    PEREIRA, Karuza Maria Alves; SOARES, Rosilene Calazans; OLIVEIRA, Márcio Campos; PINTO, Leão Pereira; COSTA, Antônio de Lisboa Lopes

    2011-01-01

    The Human Papillomavirus (HPV) has been strongly implicated in development of some cases of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). However, the immunological system somehow reacts against the presence of this virus. Among the cells involved in such mechanism of defense Langerhans cells (LC) stand out, which are responsible for processing and presenting antigens. Objectives The purposes of this study were to investigate the presence of HPV DNA and to evaluate the immunohistochemical reactivity for Langerhans cells between HPV-positive and HPV-negative OSCC. Twenty-seven cases of OSSC were evaluated. Material and Methods DNA was extracted from paraffin-embedded tissue samples and amplified by Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) for the detection of HPV DNA. Viral typing was performed by dot blot hybridization. Immunohistochemistry was performed by the Streptavidin-biotin technique. Results From the 27 cases, 9 (33.3%) were HPV-positive and 18 (66.0%) HPV-negative. HPV 18 was the most prevalent viral type (100% cases) and infection with HPV-16 (co-infection) was detected in only 1 case. In the OSCC specimens examined, immunoreactivity to S-100 antibody was detected in all cases, with a mean number of 49.48±30.89 Langerhans cells positive for immunostaining. The mean number of immunostained Langerhans cells was smaller in the HPV-positive cases (38 cells/case) than in the HPV-negative cases (42.5 cells/case), but this difference was not significant (p=0.38). Conclusions The low frequency of detection of HPV DNA in OSCC indicates a possible participation of the virus in the development and progression of only a subgroup of these tumors. There was no association between the immunohistochemical labeling for Langerhans cells (S-100+) and HPV infection of in OSSC. These findings suggest that the presence of HPV in such OSCC cases could not alter the immunological system, particularly the Langerhans cells. PMID:21710097

  14. Langerhans cell sarcoma in a patient with hairy cell leukemia: common clonal origin indicated by identical immunoglobulin gene rearrangements.

    PubMed

    Furmanczyk, Paul S; Lisle, Allison E; Caldwell, Russell B; Kraemer, Kenneth G; Mercer, Stephen E; George, Evan; Argenyi, Zsolt B

    2012-06-01

    Histiocytic/dendritic cell sarcomas are rare tumors, a few of which have been reported in association with B-cell lymphoma/leukemia. Isolated reports have documented identical immunoglobulin gene rearrangements suggesting a common clonal origin for both the sarcoma and the B-cell neoplasm from individual patients. We report a case of a 75-year-old male with hairy cell leukemia who subsequently developed Langerhans cell sarcoma 1 year after his primary diagnosis of leukemia. The bone marrow biopsy containing hairy cell leukemia and skin biopsies of Langerhans cell sarcoma were evaluated by routine histology, immunohistochemistry, flow cytometric immunophenotyping and PCR-based gene rearrangement studies of the immunoglobulin heavy chain and kappa genes. The hairy cell leukemia showed characteristic morphologic, immunohistochemical and flow cytometric features. The Langerhans cell sarcoma showed pleomorphic cytology, a high mitotic rate and characteristic immunohistochemical staining for Langerin, S100 and CD1a. There was no evidence of B-cell differentiation or a background B-cell infiltrate based on the absence of immunoreactivity with antibodies to multiple B-cell markers. Identical immunoglobulin gene rearrangements were identified in both the hairy cell leukemia and Langerhans cell sarcoma specimens. Despite the phenotypic dissimilarity of the two neoplasms, identical immunoglobulin gene rearrangements indicate a common origin. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  15. Epidermal stem cell diversity and quiescence

    PubMed Central

    Watt, Fiona M; Jensen, Kim B

    2009-01-01

    Mammalian epidermis is maintained by self-renewal of stem cells and terminal differentiation of their progeny. New data reveal a diversity amongst stem cells that was previously unrecognized. Different stem cell populations have different locations and differ in whether they are quiescent or actively cycling. During normal epidermal homeostasis, each stem cell population feeds a restricted number of differentiated lineages. However, in response to injury or genetic manipulation the different pools of stem cells demonstrate multi-lineage differentiation ability. While it is well established that Wnt signalling promotes hair follicle (HF) differentiation, new observations suggest a role for EGF receptor signalling in promoting differentiation of interfollicular epidermis. NFATc1 maintains quiescence in the HF, while Lrig1 exerts the same function in the junctional zone. The stage is now set for exploring the relationship between the different epidermal stem cell populations and between quiescence and lineage selection. PMID:20049729

  16. Epidermal stem cell diversity and quiescence.

    PubMed

    Watt, Fiona M; Jensen, Kim B

    2009-08-01

    Mammalian epidermis is maintained by self-renewal of stem cells and terminal differentiation of their progeny. New data reveal a diversity amongst stem cells that was previously unrecognized. Different stem cell populations have different locations and differ in whether they are quiescent or actively cycling. During normal epidermal homeostasis, each stem cell population feeds a restricted number of differentiated lineages. However, in response to injury or genetic manipulation the different pools of stem cells demonstrate multi-lineage differentiation ability. While it is well established that Wnt signalling promotes hair follicle (HF) differentiation, new observations suggest a role for EGF receptor signalling in promoting differentiation of interfollicular epidermis. NFATc1 maintains quiescence in the HF, while Lrig1 exerts the same function in the junctional zone. The stage is now set for exploring the relationship between the different epidermal stem cell populations and between quiescence and lineage selection.

  17. Monocyte-derived inflammatory Langerhans cells and dermal dendritic cells mediate psoriasis-like inflammation.

    PubMed

    Singh, Tej Pratap; Zhang, Howard H; Borek, Izabela; Wolf, Peter; Hedrick, Michael N; Singh, Satya P; Kelsall, Brian L; Clausen, Bjorn E; Farber, Joshua M

    2016-12-16

    Dendritic cells (DCs) have been implicated in the pathogenesis of psoriasis but the roles for specific DC subsets are not well defined. Here we show that DCs are required for psoriasis-like changes in mouse skin induced by the local injection of IL-23. However, Flt3L-dependent DCs and resident Langerhans cells are dispensable for the inflammation. In epidermis and dermis, the critical DCs are TNF-producing and IL-1β-producing monocyte-derived DCs, including a population of inflammatory Langerhans cells. Depleting Ly6C(hi) blood monocytes reduces DC accumulation and the skin changes induced either by injecting IL-23 or by application of the TLR7 agonist imiquimod. Moreover, we find that IL-23-induced inflammation requires expression of CCR6 by DCs or their precursors, and that CCR6 mediates monocyte trafficking into inflamed skin. Collectively, our results imply that monocyte-derived cells are critical contributors to psoriasis through production of inflammatory cytokines that augment the activation of skin T cells.

  18. Monocyte-derived inflammatory Langerhans cells and dermal dendritic cells mediate psoriasis-like inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Tej Pratap; Zhang, Howard H.; Borek, Izabela; Wolf, Peter; Hedrick, Michael N.; Singh, Satya P.; Kelsall, Brian L.; Clausen, Bjorn E.; Farber, Joshua M.

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) have been implicated in the pathogenesis of psoriasis but the roles for specific DC subsets are not well defined. Here we show that DCs are required for psoriasis-like changes in mouse skin induced by the local injection of IL-23. However, Flt3L-dependent DCs and resident Langerhans cells are dispensable for the inflammation. In epidermis and dermis, the critical DCs are TNF-producing and IL-1β-producing monocyte-derived DCs, including a population of inflammatory Langerhans cells. Depleting Ly6Chi blood monocytes reduces DC accumulation and the skin changes induced either by injecting IL-23 or by application of the TLR7 agonist imiquimod. Moreover, we find that IL-23-induced inflammation requires expression of CCR6 by DCs or their precursors, and that CCR6 mediates monocyte trafficking into inflamed skin. Collectively, our results imply that monocyte-derived cells are critical contributors to psoriasis through production of inflammatory cytokines that augment the activation of skin T cells. PMID:27982014

  19. Canine cutaneous histiocytoma is an epidermotropic Langerhans cell histiocytosis that expresses CD1 and specific beta 2-integrin molecules.

    PubMed Central

    Moore, P. F.; Schrenzel, M. D.; Affolter, V. K.; Olivry, T.; Naydan, D.

    1996-01-01

    Canine cutaneous histiocytoma (CCH) is a common, benign neoplasm of the dog. Histiocytomas most commonly occur as solitary lesions that undergo spontaneous regression. The age-specific incidence rate for histiocytomas drops precipitously after 3 years, although histiocytomas occur in dogs of all ages. Langerhans cells (LCs) in humans and dogs express abundant major histocompatibility complex class II molecules and a variety of leukocyte antigens characteristic of dendritic cell differentiation including CD1a, CD1b, CD1c, and CD11c. The immunophenotype of CCH resembled that of cutaneous LCs by virtue of the expression of CD1 molecules (CD1a, -b, and -c), CD11c, and major histocompatibility complex class II. Furthermore, histiocytoma cells had a tropism for epidermis, which was also consistent with an epidermal LC lineage. The expression of adhesion molecules such as CD11b (variable), CD44, CD54 (ICAM-1), and CD49d (VLA-4) in CCH indicated that the infiltrating cells had some of the characteristics of activated LCs, as these molecules are not expressed by normal, resting canine epidermal LCs. CCH did not express Thy-1 or CD4. Thy-1 expression is a characteristic of human and canine dermal dendrocytes, which are perivascular dendritic antigen-presenting cells closely related to epidermal LCs. CD4 expression is prevalent in human LC histiocytosis, and in this respect CCH differed from human LC histiocytosis. Here we demonstrate that CCH is a localized form of self-limiting LC histiocytosis, which predominantly expresses an epidermal LC phenotype. CCH occurs as solitary or, less commonly, as multiple cutaneous nodules or plaques, which rarely may extend beyond the skin to local lymph nodes. Regression of CCH occurs spontaneously in the vast majority of cases in primary and secondary sites, and is mediated by CD8+ alpha beta T cells. The high frequency of CCH within the general canine population offers the potential that the dog may provide an interesting model system to

  20. Langerhans cell function dictates induction of contact hypersensitivity or unresponsiveness to DNFB in Syrian hamsters

    SciTech Connect

    Streilein, J.W.; Bergstresser, P.R.

    1981-09-01

    The relationship between distribution and function of Langerhans cells within the epidermis and the capacity of cutaneous surfaces to promote the induction of contact hypersensitivity to DNFB have been examined in inbred Syrian hamsters. In a manner very similar to previous findings in mice, the results indicate that hamster cutaneous surfaces deficient in normally functioning Langerhans cells, naturally (cheek pouch epithelium) or artificially (after perturbation with ultraviolet light), are inefficient at promoting DNFB sensitization. Instead, DNFB applied to these regions of skin results in the induction of a state of specific unresponsiveness. Viable lymphoid cells from unresponsive hamsters can transfer the unresponsiveness to naive hamsters suggesting that active suppression is at least partly responsible, probably mediated by T lymphocytes.

  1. Leukemoid reaction in epidermal squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kiyosawa, T; Hirano, S; Nakamura, J; Murata, S; Demitsu, T; Kato, H; Yaoita, H

    1996-08-01

    There have been no previous concrete reports of leukemoid reactions associated with squamous cell carcinoma originating in cutaneous tissue. Here we report a case of epidermal squamous cell carcinoma of the sacral region and an associated leukemoid reaction. The tumor invaded deeply and destroyed both the sacrum and coccyx. The white blood cell count was greater than 20,000/mm3. After resection of the tumor, white blood cells transiently decreased, but did not fall under 10,000/mm3. Post-operative infection by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and Bacteroides caccae caused sepsis and further elevation of the leukocytes to greater than 50,000/mm3. The leukemoid reaction in the case appeared to have been caused initially by direct invasion of bone by epidermal squamous cell carcinoma and later by severe infection.

  2. Trophic effects of adipose derived stem cells on Langerhans islets viability--Review.

    PubMed

    Dietrich, Isa; Crescenzi, Alessandra; Chaib, Elezar; D'Albuquerque, Luiz Augusto Carneiro

    2015-07-01

    Langerhans islets transplantation has been proposed to provide an endogenous source of insulin in Type I diabetes. However, the hypoxic stress and the receptor's immune reaction suffered by the implants cause them to fail in sustaining the insulin production along the time. Experimental studies have shown that adipose derived stem cells (ADSCs) can secrete cytokines that activate free radical scavengers, antioxidants and chaperone heat/shock proteins leading to reduction of apoptosis in damaged tissues. Therefore, using the PubMed database, we reviewed the experimental studies that investigated the trophic effects of ADSCs on Langerhans islets viability, in vitro and in vivo, from 2009 to 2014. We excluded articles that investigated the effects of other types of mesenchymal stem cells on β-cell survival as well articles that worked in the differentiation of ADSCs into insulin producing cells. The analysis of the experiments revealed that exposure of islets to ADSCs in vitro, even for a short period of time, can enhance islet cell viability and function. In vivo studies also corroborated the trophic effects of ADSCs leading to the improvement of islet function and reduction of the number of the islets required for controlling the receptor's glucose levels. This review can contribute to guide future experiments looking for a long term diabetes treatment employing ADSC trophic effects for the enhancement of transplanted Langerhans islet viability and functioning. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Clinical Significance of Langerhans Cells in Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx

    PubMed Central

    Esteban, Francisco; Ruiz-Cabello, Francisco; Gonzalez-Moles, Miguel Angel; Lopez-Gonzalez, Miguel Angel; Funez, Rafael; Redondo, Maximino

    2012-01-01

    Langerhans cells (LCs) may be involved in the immunosurveillance against tumors as antigen-presenting cells. Our objective has been to determine the relevance of LC in progression of larynx squamous cell carcinomas and their relationship with different subpopulations of tumor-infiltrating cells. LCs were investigated by immunohistochemical methods using anti-CD1 antibody. LCs were detected in most of the primary tumors studied (44 out of 50) and also in metastases (6 out of 10) and recurrences (2 out of 3), but we did not find any statistical association between number of LCs and clinical-pathological parameters or survival. However, the number of LCs was increased in patients with evident infiltration of lymphocytes, mainly cytotoxic T cells. We can conclude that although LCs did not show clinical utility as prognostic marker, they may play a role in releasing an active immune response in larynx carcinomas, according to their ability to present antigens to sensitized T cells. PMID:22481933

  4. Epidermal cell death in frogs with chytridiomycosis

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Alexandra A.; Skerratt, Lee F.; Berger, Lee

    2017-01-01

    Background Amphibians are declining at an alarming rate, and one of the major causes of decline is the infectious disease chytridiomycosis. Parasitic fungal sporangia occur within epidermal cells causing epidermal disruption, but these changes have not been well characterised. Apoptosis (planned cell death) can be a damaging response to the host but may alternatively be a mechanism of pathogen removal for some intracellular infections. Methods In this study we experimentally infected two endangered amphibian species Pseudophryne corroboree and Litoria verreauxii alpina with the causal agent of chytridiomycosis. We quantified cell death in the epidermis through two assays: terminal transferase-mediated dUTP nick end-labelling (TUNEL) and caspase 3/7. Results Cell death was positively associated with infection load and morbidity of clinically infected animals. In infected amphibians, TUNEL positive cells were concentrated in epidermal layers, correlating to the localisation of infection within the skin. Caspase activity was stable and low in early infection, where pathogen loads were light but increasing. In animals that recovered from infection, caspase activity gradually returned to normal as the infection cleared. Whereas, in amphibians that did not recover, caspase activity increased dramatically when infection loads peaked. Discussion Increased cell death may be a pathology of the fungal parasite, likely contributing to loss of skin homeostatic functions, but it is also possible that apoptosis suppression may be used initially by the pathogen to help establish infection. Further research should explore the specific mechanisms of cell death and more specifically apoptosis regulation during fungal infection. PMID:28168107

  5. False-positive PET/CT for lymphoma recurrence secondary to Langerhans cell histiocytosis.

    PubMed

    Fotos, Joseph S; Flemming, Donald J; Tulchinsky, Mark

    2011-08-01

    A 28-year-old man with a history of Hodgkin lymphoma that was intensely [F-18]fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose-avid at diagnosis had achieved complete remission following appropriate therapy. On surveillance positron emission tomography/computed tomography (CT), new, intensely [F-18]fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose-avid lesions (lytic on CT) were seen within the vertebral body of C7, left scapula, and right glenoid. The findings of a biopsy revealed these lesions to be Langerhans cell histiocytosis. Langerhans cell histiocytosis arising in the context of lymphoma is a well-documented phenomenon, and its appearance on positron emission tomography/CT cannot be conclusively distinguished from lymphoma recurrence. This manuscript emphasizes the necessity of biopsy to ensure correct diagnosis and subsequent correct therapy.

  6. [Intraorbital extraocular Langerhans' cell granuloma: primary surgical approach. Why? - case report].

    PubMed

    Valentim Neto, João Guilherme; Schaurich, Cristina Góes

    2009-01-01

    We present a case in which a patient with intraorbital Langerhans' cell granuloma, with anatomical and functional skills compromised by intraorbital hypertension, which was treated with urgency orbitotomy by cranial approach. Male, two years-old, presented conjuntival proptosis, red eye, complete ophthalmoplegy, exophthalmos, with non-fotoreactive mydriasis and blepharoptosis of the right eye. Fundoscopy presented venous enlargement with optic disc edema. A cranial approach with orbitotomy was carried out, removed the lesion with total remission of clinical presentation and anatomic appearance as well. The handling of Langerhans' cell granuloma can vary from primary surgical approach as corticotherapy to chemotherapy and radiotherapy. In this case, the surgery was the first option due to the imminent risk of loss of visual function.

  7. Langerhans cell sarcoma originating from left knee subcutaneous tissue: A case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yaonan; Qu, Zongyang; Fang, Fang

    2016-01-01

    Langerhans cell sarcoma (LCS) is a neoplastic proliferation of Langerhans cells with notably malignant cytological features. Reports of LCS are sparsely available in English literature; to the best of our knowledge, only 55 cases have been reported. The present study reports a case of LCS originating from subcutaneous tissue of the left knee in a 75-year-old man. The diagnosis of LCS was supported by the results of magnetic resonance imaging, histological and immunohistochemical studies. The tumor began to metastasize to inguinal lymph nodes and eventually involved multiple organs. Chemotherapy and radiotherapy were administered but were ineffective, and the patient died within 2 years of diagnosis. The present case should aid in expanding the currently available knowledge concerning LCS. PMID:27900055

  8. Squamous cell carcinoma arising in a multiple verrucous epidermal nevus*

    PubMed Central

    Yarak, Samira; Machado, Taila Yuri Siqueira; Ogawa, Marilia Marufuji; Almeida, Mirian Luzia da Silva; Enokihara, Milvia Maria Simões e Silva; Porro, Adriana Maria

    2016-01-01

    Verrucous epidermal nevi are hamartomatous lesions of the epidermis that, unlike other epidermal nevi (such as sebaceous nevus or nevus comedonicus), are rarely associated with malignant neoplasms. The majority of squamous cell carcinoma develop in linear or multiple epidermal nevus and rarely in solitary epidermal nevus. In general, the prognosis is favorable. We report a case of well-differentiated invasive squamous cell carcinoma arising from a multiple verrucous epidermal nevus. Although there is no consensus on prophylactic removal of epidermal nevus, its removal and biopsy should be considered if changes occur. PMID:28300931

  9. Laryngeal Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis Presenting with Neck Mass in an Adult Woman

    PubMed Central

    Jahandideh, Hesam; Nasoori, Yasser; Rostami, Sara; Safdarian, Mahdi

    2016-01-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) is a very rare condition that commonly affects the head and neck region. There are very few cases of isolated laryngeal involvement by LCH, mostly reported in pediatric patients. Here, we report a case of laryngeal LCH in a 62-year-old woman presenting with a neck mass several weeks ago. The clinical and histopathological findings are reported with a brief discussion about the disease. PMID:27127670

  10. Immunohistochemical detection of the apoptosis-related proteins FADD, FLICE, and FLIP in Langerhans cell histiocytosis.

    PubMed

    Bank, Micha I; Gudbrand, Charlotte; Rengtved, Pia; Carstensen, Henrik; Fadeel, Bengt; Henter, Jan-Inge; Petersen, Bodil Laub

    2005-06-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) is characterized by an accumulation of dendritic Langerhans cells in granulomatous lesions in various organs. The etiology of LCH remains enigmatic. Fas/APO-1/CD95 belongs to the "death receptor" family of apoptosis regulators and has been implicated in the downregulation of immune responses. The authors examined the expression of three proteins that are engaged in the Fas signaling cascade-FADD/Fas-associated death domain-containing protein, FLICE/FADD-like interleukin-1beta-converting enzyme (both pro-apoptotic), and FLIP/FLICE-inhibitory protein (anti-apoptotic)-in lesions from LCH patients. Immunohistochemistry was performed on paraffin-embedded tissue specimens from 43 children with LCH. The infiltrates were scored according to the amount of positive pathologic Langerhans cells (pLCs). In all investigated specimens, the majority of the pLCs expressed FADD, active FLICE, and FLIP. The clinical outcome of the disease could not be correlated to the expression of the investigated proteins. This study shows a high expression of the apoptosis-related proteins FADD, active FLICE, and FLIP in pLCs. The authors previously showed that pLCs express Fas and Fas ligand. Taken together, these findings suggest that the Fas signaling pathway may be involved in the pathogenesis of LCH.

  11. Isolated Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis of the Thyroid in an Adult Female: One-Year Followup

    PubMed Central

    Vilallonga, Ramon; Ciudin, Andrea; Fort, José Manuel; Baena, Juan Antonio; Gonzalez, Oscar; Armengol, Manuel; Mesa, Jordi; Ruiz Marcellán, Mari Carmen

    2011-01-01

    Thyroid gland involvement as the unique presentation of Langerhans cell histiocytosis is a rare phenomenon that can result in misdiagnosis. We report a case of Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) presenting as a thyroid mass. It is a 52-year-old woman who presented an enlarged, diffusely firm, nontender, nonmobile, and not particularly nodular thyroid gland with mild compressive symptoms. Ultrasound and fine-needle aspiration showed a unique right node with benign signs. Patient was referred to our Ambulatory Surgery Department, where a hemithyroidectomy was performed. Histologic evaluation of the right thyroid gland revealed an involvement by LCH, confirmed by immunohistochemical analysis showing Langerhans cells that were positive for CD1a. LCH was a completely incidental occult finding apparent only after surgical resection and examination of the gland. Patient was evaluated, and no evidence of systemic affectation was found. LCH can rarely involve the thyroid gland in adults. Few cases have been reported in the literature. Most patients had evidence of LCH involving other anatomic sites. PMID:21461403

  12. Cell motion predicts human epidermal stemness

    PubMed Central

    Toki, Fujio; Tate, Sota; Imai, Matome; Matsushita, Natsuki; Shiraishi, Ken; Sayama, Koji; Toki, Hiroshi; Higashiyama, Shigeki

    2015-01-01

    Image-based identification of cultured stem cells and noninvasive evaluation of their proliferative capacity advance cell therapy and stem cell research. Here we demonstrate that human keratinocyte stem cells can be identified in situ by analyzing cell motion during their cultivation. Modeling experiments suggested that the clonal type of cultured human clonogenic keratinocytes can be efficiently determined by analysis of early cell movement. Image analysis experiments demonstrated that keratinocyte stem cells indeed display a unique rotational movement that can be identified as early as the two-cell stage colony. We also demonstrate that α6 integrin is required for both rotational and collective cell motion. Our experiments provide, for the first time, strong evidence that cell motion and epidermal stemness are linked. We conclude that early identification of human keratinocyte stem cells by image analysis of cell movement is a valid parameter for quality control of cultured keratinocytes for transplantation. PMID:25897083

  13. Epidermal stem cells: an update.

    PubMed

    Watt, Fiona M; Lo Celso, Cristina; Silva-Vargas, Violeta

    2006-10-01

    The mammalian epidermis is a highly accessible tissue in which to study the properties of adult stem cells. Global gene expression profiling has revealed new markers and regulators of the stem cell compartment. Although stem cells have the potential to differentiate into multiple lineages, their progeny follow a more restricted number of lineages in undamaged epidermis as a result of local microenvironmental cues. The response of the epidermis to a particular signal depends on signal strength and duration. Recent advances in the field have led to elucidation of the mechanisms by which stem cells are maintained and the pathways that interact with Wnt signalling to specify lineage choice as cells leave the stem cell compartment. This work has also yielded new insights into skin tumour development.

  14. CCL5 and CCL20 mediate immigration of Langerhans cells into the epidermis of full thickness human skin equivalents.

    PubMed

    Ouwehand, Krista; Spiekstra, Sander W; Waaijman, Taco; Breetveld, Melanie; Scheper, Rik J; de Gruijl, Tanja D; Gibbs, Susan

    2012-10-01

    Epidermal Langerhans cells (LC) play a key role in initiation and regulation of immune responses. Whereas LC migration out of the epidermis upon environmental assault is extensively studied, the mechanisms involved in the (re)population of the epidermis with LC are poorly understood. Here, we investigated the immigration of LC derived from the human MUTZ-3 cell line (MUTZ-LC) into the epidermis of a full thickness skin equivalent, comprising a fully differentiated epidermis on a fibroblast-populated dermis. MUTZ-LC were used to determine which epidermis-derived chemokines play a role in mediating LC trans-dermal migration into the epidermis. We found evidence for a role of keratinocyte-derived CCL5 and CCL20 in the chemo-attraction of MUTZ-LC. Neutralizing antibodies against CCL5 and CCL20 blocked LC migration towards keratinocytes. Secretion of these two chemokines was associated with incorporation of MUTZ-LC into the epidermis of full thickness skin equivalents. In conclusion, our findings suggest that epidermis derived CCL5 and CCL20 are pivotal mediators in recruitment of LC into the epidermis.

  15. Human epidermal T cells predominantly belong to the lineage expressing alpha/beta T cell receptor

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    The epidermis of clinically normal-appearing human skin harbors a phenotypically heterogeneous population of T lymphocytes (TCs), the majority of which are CD2+/CD3+/CD5+ "memory" cells, but in an unactivated state, and express the TCR-alpha/beta. In contrast to murine skin, only a very minor subpopulation of CD3+ cells in the human epidermis bears the TCR-gamma/delta. Epidermal TCs primarily are distributed along the rete ridges in the basal keratinocyte layer and are often in close apposition to Langerhans cells (LCs). These TCs were propagated from epidermal cell suspensions after stimulation with TC activating agents (Con A, rIL-1, rIL-2), then evaluated for phenotypic features and TCR diversity. Similar to the in situ situation, most were CD4-/CD8+/TCR-alpha/beta+. In addition, two cultures contained TCR- gamma/delta+ cells; one of these determined to be an adherent CD4-/CD8+ population. Epidermal TCs were significantly (p less than 0.0001) more abundant in the sole than in the other body regions examined (i.e., 40 vs. 7 CD3+ cells/linear centimeter of epidermis) and seemed to have a particular affinity for the acrosyringial epithelium of eccrine sweat ducts. Moreover, the sole usually contained a greater number of CD8+ relative to CD4+ TCs, whereas the epidermal CD4/CD8 ratio in the trunk and extremities was quite variable, although the trend also was towards a slightly larger percentage of CD8+ cells. Collectively, our data suggest that the volar epidermis has a unique microenvironment which is responsible for both the higher density of TCs, preferentially CD8+, and lower number of LCs. This study has not only provided evidence for significant regional variability in the human epidermal TC population of normal skin, but also strengthens the concept for skin-associated lymphoid tissues (SALT), whereby memory TCs recirculate back to the epidermis and interact with resident antigen-presenting cells (i.e., LC). PMID:2182763

  16. Use of human epidermal cells in the study of carcinogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Kuroki, T.; Chida, K.; Hosomi, J.; Kondo, S. )

    1989-05-01

    Because of the importance of human cells, particularly human epithelial cells, in cancer research, we have studied certain phases or events of carcinogenesis using human epidermal cells in primary culture. (1) We found that human epidermal cells are capable of metabolizing benzo(a)pyrene. Large inter-individual variations are found in the basal and induced arylhydrocarbon-hydroxylase activities. (2) UV-induced unscheduled DNA synthesis was demonstrated in human epidermal cells on autoradiographs. We also found that DNA repair is defective in epidermal cells isolated from xeroderma pigmentosum by a new explant-outgrowth culture. (3) Human epidermal cells are unique in that there is a large number of binding sites to phorbol esters compared with mouse epidermal cells, but there is no down-regulation. Further, human epidermal cells show essentially negative responses to tumor promoters, i.e., no stimulation of DNA synthesis, sugar uptake, and no induction of ornithine decarboxylase activity. (4) Human epidermal cells contain 1.5 x 10(5) binding sites per cell for epidermal growth factor (EGF), whereas squamous cell carcinomas of skin and oral cavity have larger amounts of EGF receptors in the order of 10(6) per cell. (5) Based on the above results, we attempted to transform human epidermal cells by the treatment with chemical carcinogens, but until now no transformation was obtained. 16 references.

  17. [Cutaneous non-Langerhans cells histiocytoses as cause of central diabetes insipidus].

    PubMed

    Miranda, Paulo A C; Miranda, Silvana M C; Bittencourt, Flávia V; Machado, Lucas J C; Castro, Lucia P F de; Leite, Virginia H R; Lauria, Márcio W; Braga, Walter R C; Oliveira, Antônio Ribeiro de

    2007-08-01

    The histiocytoses are rare diseases caused by alterations in the monocyte-histiocytic series with several clinical findings. Among the cutaneous syndromes of non-Langerhans cells, xanthoma disseminatum is the only disease of this group that has been classically associated to the central diabetes insipidus (CDI). The case reported describes a 30-year-old man that two years after presenting with CDI developed non confluent disseminated cutaneous brown papular lesions throughout the body. The histopathology, immunohistochemistry, and electronic microscopy were compatible with the diagnosis of non-Langerhans histiocytoses, suggesting the diagnosis of juvenile xanthogranuloma. The endocrine-metabolic evaluation did not show other alterations besides CDI in a 10-year follow up. The magnetic resonance of hypophysis showed absence of the pituitary hyperintense sign (bright spot). The radiologic and scinthigraphic evaluation of the bones did not show the presence of osteolytic lesions. This case prints out the importance of skin examination in cases of CDI and its association with cutaneous non-Langerhans histiocytoses in a broader spectrum, rather then restricted to the cases of xanthoma disseminatum.

  18. Lineage Analysis of Epidermal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Alcolea, Maria P.; Jones, Philip H.

    2014-01-01

    Lineage tracing involves labeling cells to track their subsequent behavior within the normal tissue environment. The advent of genetic lineage tracing and cell proliferation assays, together with high resolution three-dimensional (3D) imaging and quantitative methods to infer cell behavior from lineage-tracing data, has transformed our understanding of murine epidermal stem and progenitor cells. Here, we review recent insights that reveal how a progenitor cell population maintains interfollicular epidermis, whereas stem cells, quiescent under homeostatic conditions, are mobilized in response to wounding. We discuss progress in understanding how the various stem cell populations of the hair follicle sustain this complex and highly dynamic structure, and recent analysis of stem cells in sweat and sebaceous glands. The extent to which insights from mouse studies can be applied to human epidermis is also considered. PMID:24384814

  19. [Adulthood Langerhans cell histiocytosis: experience of two Portuguese hospitals].

    PubMed

    de Brito, Margarida Dantas; Martins, Éngelo; Andrade, Joaquim; Guimarães, José; Mariz, José

    2014-01-01

    IntroduçÉo: A histiocitose de células de Langerhans é uma doença heterogénea e mais frequente em crianças. Entre 1/2001 e 12/2013 admitimos 20 doentes com HCL nas duas instituições. O objectivo deste trabalho foi caracterizar esta populaçÉo, avaliando as formas de apresentaçÉo, o estadiamento e tratamento.Material e Métodos: Estudo retrospectivo; consulta do processo clínico.Resultados: Dos 16 doentes analisáveis verificamos uma mediana de idade 34 anos (15-48), 10 mulheres e 6 homens. Os motivos que determinaram a referenciaçÉo dos doentes foram: queixas respiratórias em 37,5%; alterações ósseas em 37,5%; queixas dentárias em 25%; sintomas constitucionais em 19%; lesões mucocut'neas em 6% e outro foi um achado histológico inesperado após tiroidectomia. O diagnóstico histológico foi obtido em: osso em 50%; pulmÉo em 37,5%; fígado, mucosa vulvar e peça de tiroidectomia em 6%, respectivamente. O estadiamento assumido na prática clínica foi: envolvimento de órgÉo único (uni/multifocal) em 69% e doença multissistémica em 31%. A mediana de seguimento foi cinco anos (dois meses-11 anos) e a sobrevivência global 92%. Actualmente: 19% estÉo vivos sem doença; 44% estÉo vivos com doença; 25% estÉo em tratamento e 12% morreram.DiscussÉo: Estes resultados estÉo de acordo com a literatura. No entanto, segundo as recomendações actuais consideramos que 56% doentes efectuaram estudo complementar incompleto condicionando subestadiamento e provavelmente subtratamento. Verifica-se heterogeneidade de procedimentos no estadiamento e tratamento.ConclusÉo: Frequentemente há dificuldades e atraso no diagnóstico desta entidade clínica. SÉo importantes estudos prospectivos internacionais na populaçÉo adulta.

  20. Recognition and treatment of concurrent active and neurodegenerative langerhans cell histiocytosis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Ehrhardt, Matthew J; Karst, Jeffrey; Donohoue, Patricia A; Maheshwari, Mohit; McClain, Kenneth L; Bingen, Kristin; Kelly, Michael E

    2015-01-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) is a disorder of dendritic cell proliferation with subsequent tissue damage often requiring chemotherapy. Neurodegenerative LCH presents with neuromuscular, cognitive, and behavioral alterations typically occurring years after diagnosis of active LCH. We present a male child with a 4-year history of growth arrest, polyuria, polydipsia, recurrent otitis media, and seborrheic dermatitis. Cutaneous biopsies confirmed LCH and chemotherapy was initiated. During treatment for active LCH he developed neuropsychiatric decline. White matter changes on brain MRI were consistent with neurodegenerative LCH. Treatment was changed to cytarabine and intravenous immunoglobulin. After 1 year of therapy the patient experienced neuropsychological improvement.

  1. [Biology of epidermal stem cells: impact on medicine].

    PubMed

    Pikuła, Michał; Trzonkowski, Piotr

    2009-10-15

    The epidermis is a self-renewing tissue which regenerates constantly. It consists mainly of keratinocytes of various degree of differentiation, from the proliferative basal layer to the terminally differentiated horny layer. Keratinocytes are specialized cells responsible for cohesion, barrier functions, and immunological reactions. The maintenance of homeostasis in the epidermis is possible via the self-renewing ability of the epidermal stem-cell population, which gives rise to differentiated keratinocytes. It is believed that epidermal stem cells play an important role in cellular regeneration, wound healing, and the pathogenesis of skin cancers. Epidermal stem cells reside in the basal layer of the epidermis, the bulge region of the hair follicle, and the germinal hair follicle matrix. Epidermal stem cells are relatively quiescent, slow-cycling cells defined by their great proliferative potential and unlimited capacity for self-renewal. Adult human epidermal stem cells can be activated and expanded in vitro under appropriate conditions. Cultured human keratinocytes and epidermal stem cells may be then transplanted as a biological dressing in burn injuries, chronic wounds, and various skin diseases. Additionally, epidermal stem cells have become a target for gene therapy and drug testing. In this review the fundamental characteristics of epidermal stem cells and the signaling pathways involved in the regulation of their proliferation and differentiation are discussed. The possibilities of using epidermal stem cells in medicine are also presented.

  2. Improved conditions for murine epidermal cell culture.

    PubMed

    Fischer, S M; Viaje, A; Harris, K L; Miller, D R; Bohrman, J S; Slaga, T J

    1980-02-01

    An improved method for cultivating newborn mouse epidermal cells has been developed that increases the longevity, epithelial nature and efficiency of cell-line establishment. The use of Super Medium, an enriched Waymouth's formulation, increased proliferation for long periods of time, as did incubation at 31 degrees C rather than 37 degrees C. The fetal bovine serum requirement was found to be reduced at the lower temperature. An increase in labeling indices was seen when epidermal growth factor (EGF) or the cyclic nucleotides were added and the presence of EGF receptors was determined. Of the prostaglandins (PG) examined, PGE1 and PGE2 produced the greatest increase in DNA synthesis. The PG precursors, arachidonic and 8,11,14-eicosatrienoic acid, were also greatly stimulatory. The use of a lethally irradiated 3T3 feeder layer at 31 degrees C proved superior in maintenance of an epithelial morphology. Subculturable cell lines were established much more readily and reproducibly in carcinogen-treated cultures grown under the improved conditions.

  3. Langerhans cells and NK cells cooperate in the inhibition of chemical skin carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Tripp, Christoph H.; Komenda, Kerstin; Hermann, Martin

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Tissue immunosurveillance is an important mechanism to prevent cancer. Skin treatment with the carcinogen 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA), followed by the tumor promoter 12-O-tetra-decanoyl-phorbol-13-acetate (TPA), is an established murine model for squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). However, the innate immunological events occurring during the initiation of chemical carcinogenesis with DMBA remain elusive. Here, we discovered that natural killer (NK) cells and Langerhans cells (LC) cooperate to impair this oncogenic process in murine skin. The depletion of NK cells or LC caused an accumulation of DNA-damaged, natural killer group 2D-ligand (NKG2D-L) expressing keratinocytes and accelerated tumor growth. Notably, the secretion of TNFα mainly by LC promoted the recruitment of NK cells into the epidermis. Indeed, the TNFα-induced chemokines CCL2 and CXCL10 directed NK cells to DMBA-treated epidermis. Our findings reveal a novel mechanism how innate immune cells cooperate in the inhibition of cutaneous chemical carcinogenesis.

  4. Primary Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis of the Vulva: Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Zudaire, Tamara; Guarch, Rosa; Valcayo, Ana; García, Kelly; Resano, Miguel Ángel; Requena, Diego; Rodríguez, Mercedes

    2017-03-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) of the vulva is rare and even moreso in postmenopausal women. Twenty-six cases of primary vulvar LCH have been described in the current literature, and only 8 cases are in postmenopausal women. We report an additional case of primary vulvar LCH in a 59-yr-old woman with subsequent multiorgan involvement. In this article, we briefly describe the clinical presentation, histopathological findings, and immunohistochemistry results of vulvar LCH. We want to emphasize the importance of recognizing this entity in a woman with vulvar lesions both for the clinician and the pathologist.

  5. Diabetes insipidus and Langerhans cell histiocytosis: a case report of reversibility with 2-chlorodeoxyadenosine.

    PubMed

    Ottaviano, Fabio; Finlay, Jonathan L

    2003-07-01

    Diabetes insipidus (DI) is the most common manifestation of central nervous system involvement in Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH). Patients with LCH involving the head and neck region are reported to have about a 40% lifetime chance of developing DI. The clinical and biochemical diagnosis of DI is sometimes supported by the absence of the posterior pituitary bright signal on magnetic resonance images. Cladribine (2-chlorodeoxyadenosine, 2-CDA) has been reported as an active drug in children and adults with relapsed or refractory LCH. The authors report the successful reversal of DI in a 3-year-old child with established LCH using 2-CDA.

  6. Tc 99m bone scan and fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography in evaluation of disseminated langerhans cell histiocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Sager, Sait; Yilmaz, Sabire; Sager, Gunes; Halac, Metin

    2010-01-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) is a rare histiocytic disorder in which pathological langerhans cells accumulate in a variety of organs. Manifestations may include lung infiltrates, lymph node involvements, bone lesions, hepatic, hematopoietic and endocrine dysfunctions. In this case report we present fluorine-18 positron emission tomography (F-18 PET/CT) and bone scintigraphy findings of a 18-year-old male patient with disseminated LCH, mimicking multiple hypermetabolic metastatic lesions. Clinicians should be aware that LCH infiltrations can be seen as intense uptake and to differentiate infiltrations from other metastatic intense uptake with fluorodeoxyglucose PET/CT and bone scintigraphy, clinical and laboratory findings should be kept in mind. PMID:21713226

  7. Langerhans cells in anaplastic Kaposi sarcoma with a paucivascular phenotype: a potential diagnostic pitfall.

    PubMed

    Ramdial, Pratistadevi K; Sing, Yetish; Naicker, Shaun; Calonje, Eduardo; Sewram, Vikash; Singh, Bhugwan

    2011-04-01

    Anaplastic Kaposi sarcoma (AKS), a rare variant of Kaposi sarcoma, has a poorly recognized histomorphologic spectrum, including a paucivascular phenotype, that mimics a range of undifferentiated malignancies. This study, that highlights the hitherto undocumented phenomenon of S100-protein-positive Langerhans cells (SLCs) as a potential diagnostic pitfall in paucivascular AKS, involved review of nine such AKS that required diagnostic immunohistochemical (IHC) work-up. All biopsies had a predominant or exclusive spindle or epithelioid cell infiltrate. The first three tumors were diagnosed as malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor (2) and metastatic melanoma (1), based on S100-protein immunopositivity. Biopsy of a co-existent pigmented sole lesion (patient 3) demonstrated nodular KS. Subsequent IHC investigation of these three tumors demonstrated an endothelial phenotype and HHV8 immunopositivity, confirming AKS. CD1a and langerin staining of the S100-protein-positive cells confirmed Langerhans cells as the cause of the diagnostic pitfall. Subsequently, six further paucivascular AKS with intratumoral SLCs were recognized on histomorphological and IHC appraisal. In conclusion, heightened awareness of the histomorphologic spectrum, appropriate IHC investigation, and informed appraisal thereof, are critical to the diagnosis of AKS with an undifferentiated phenotype, and the avoidance of IHC pitfalls, such as those caused by under-recognition and misinterpretation of bystander SLCs in AKS.

  8. Hypopituitarism and goitre as endocrine manifestation of Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH). Case Report.

    PubMed

    Skowronska-Jozwiak, Elzbieta; Sporny, Stanislaw; Szymanska-Duda, Joanna; Baranska, Dobromila; Lewinski, Andrzej

    2016-07-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) in adults is a rare disorder of unknown etiology characterized by monoclonal proliferation of Langerhans cells. It belongs to dendritic cell disorders and occurs in 1-2 adults per million. The most common endocrine manifestation of classical LCH is associated with the posterior pituitary, with clinical symptoms of diabetes insipidus. Less than 80 reported cases of LCH involving the thyroid gland have been published so far. We present the case of a 39 years old woman with 10 years history of diabetes insipidus and secondary amenorrhoea, which appeared after second delivery. She was suspected for lymphocytic inflammation of pituitary and she was administered steroid treatment. She was also treated symptomatically with desmopressin, L-thyroxine, estrogen and progestagen replacement therapy due to diabetes insipidus, secondary hypothyroidism and hypogonadotropic hypogonadism. In September 2014, she noticed a painless, firm tumour of the neck. Ultrasound (US) examination demonstrated bilateral, solid, hypoechogenic thyroid nodules. The result of fine-needle aspiration biopsy (FNAB) was not diagnostic. Due to rapid progression and US image of the tumour, she was referred for surgery. In postoperative histopathology tumour cells were positive for CD1a and S-100 protein, therefore diagnosis of LCH was established. Postoperatively, the results of thoracic computed tomography scan, abdominal US and bone scintigraphy revealed no evidence of multifocal disease. We have not observed any disease recurrence in the patient after a year of follow-up in postoperative course. This case illustrates diagnostic and therapeutic difficulties in patient with LCH.

  9. Progressive spinocerebellar degeneration "plus" associated with Langerhans cell histiocytosis: a new paraneoplastic syndrome?

    PubMed Central

    Goldberg-Stern, H; Weitz, R; Zaizov, R; Gornish, M; Gadoth, N

    1995-01-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH), formerly known as histiocytosis-X, manifests by granulomatous lesions consisting of mixed histiocytic and eosinophilic cells. The hallmark of LCH invasion into the CNS is diabetes insipidus, reflecting local infiltration of Langerhans cells into the posterior pituitary or hypothalumus. In five patients who had early onset LCH with no evidence of direct invasion into the CNS, slowly progressive spinocerebellar degeneration accompanied in some by pseudobulbar palsy and intellectual decline was seen. Neurological impairment started 2.5 to seven years after the detection of LCH. No correlation was found between the clinical syndrome and location of LCH or its mode of treatment. An extensive search for metabolic, toxic, neoplastic, and hereditary aetiologies for progressive cerebellar degeneration was negative. It seems that the clinical entity described here may be considered a new paraneoplastic syndrome related to LCH. It may be induced by the eosinophil derived neurotoxin, which was shown to cause damage to Purkinje cells and pyramidal neurons. Images PMID:7876848

  10. Epidermal stem cells: interactions in developmental environments.

    PubMed

    Bickenbach, Jackie R; Grinnell, Katie L

    2004-10-01

    Homeostasis of continuously renewing adult tissues, such as the epidermis of the skin, is maintained by epidermal stem cells (EpiSC), which are a small population of undifferentiated, self-renewing basal keratinocyte cells that produce daughter transit amplifying (TA) cells to make up the majority of the proliferative basal cell population in the epidermis. We have isolated EpiSC from neonatal and adult skin, and shown that these cells can regenerate an epidermis that lasts long term in vitro and in vivo, and that permanently expresses a recombinant gene in the regenerated tissue (Bickenbach and Dunnwald, 2000; Dunnwald et al., 2001). When we injected murine EpiSC into the developing blastocyst environment of the mouse, we found that both neonatal and adult EpiSC retained some ability to participate in the formation of tissues from all three germ layers (Liang and Bickenbach, 2002; Bickenbach and Chinnathambi, 2004; Liang et al., 2004). Although it appears evident that EpiSC act as pluripotent stem cells, how this reprogramming takes place is not understood. EpiSC might directly transdifferentiate into other cell types or they might first dedifferentiate into a more primitive cell type, and then proceed to develop along a cell lineage pathway. To begin to unravel this, we co-cultured EpiSC with embryonic stem (ES) cells, and found that EpiSC could alter their cell lineage protein expression to that of a more primitive cell type. We also placed EpiSC in a wounded environment and found that EpiSC interacted with the mesenchymal cells repopulating the wound bed. Our findings indicate that the population of cells that we isolate as EpiSC has a pluripotent capability. This has led us to postulate a paradigm shift for somatic stem cells. We propose that tissues maintain a sequestered population of uncommitted stem cells that retain a regenerative response which is enhanced when the cells are exposed to developmental or stress influences.

  11. Langerhans cells and lymph node dendritic cells express the tight junction component claudin-1.

    PubMed

    Zimmerli, Simone C; Hauser, Conrad

    2007-10-01

    Claudin-1 is a critical structural component of tight junctions that have an important role in adhesive properties, barrier function, and paracellular transport of epithelia and other nonhematopoietic tissues. We found claudin-1 in murine CD207+ Langerhans cells (LC) residing in epidermis. Claudin-1 was not detected in other skin dendritic cells (DC). LC expressed claudin-1 in steady state and inflamed skin. Claudin-1 was demonstrated further in lymph node LC under steady state and inflammatory conditions, including after direct tracking with tetramethylrhodamine-isothiocyanate (TRITC). All subsets of skin draining lymph node DC defined by CD205, CD11b, CD11c, and CD8, including a presumably blood-borne lymph node resident CD8+CD207+ LC population, were claudin-1+. TRITC tracking demonstrated claudin-1 in CD207- skin migrant DC in the lymph node, suggesting upregulation of this molecule during migration or once arrived in the lymph node. Claudin-1 expression in CD207+ cells was confirmed at the protein and mRNA levels. Transforming growth factor-beta, a factor critical for the induction of LC in vitro and in vivo, stimulated the accumulation of claudin-1 mRNA and protein when added to bone marrow cells cultured with GM-CSF and IL-4. Claudin-1 may thus have an important function in adhesion and/or migration of LC.

  12. Cell growth and differentiation in Arabidopsis epidermal cells.

    PubMed

    Guimil, Sonia; Dunand, Christophe

    2007-01-01

    Plant epidermal cells are morphologically diverse, differing in size, shape, and function. Their unique morphologies reflect the integral function each cell performs in the organ to which it belongs. Cell morphogenesis involves multiple cellular processes acting in concert to create specialized shapes. The Arabidopsis epidermis contains numerous cell types greatly differing in shape, size, and function. Work on three types of epidermal cells, namely trichomes, root hairs, and pavement cells, has made significant progress towards understanding how plant cells reach their final morphology. These three cell types have highly distinct morphologies and each has become a model cell for the study of morphological processes. A growing body of knowledge is creating a picture of how endoreduplication, cytoskeletal dynamics, vesicle transport, and small GTPase signalling, work in concert to create specialized shapes. Similar mechanisms that determine cell shape and polarity are shared between these cell types, while certain mechanisms remain specific to each.

  13. Immunohistochemical analyses point to epidermal origin of human Merkel cells.

    PubMed

    Tilling, Thomas; Wladykowski, Ewa; Failla, Antonio Virgilio; Houdek, Pia; Brandner, Johanna M; Moll, Ingrid

    2014-04-01

    Merkel cells, the neurosecretory cells of skin, are essential for light-touch responses and may probably fulfill additional functions. Whether these cells derive from an epidermal or a neural lineage has been a matter of dispute for a long time. In mice, recent studies have clearly demonstrated an epidermal origin of Merkel cells. Given the differences in Merkel cell distribution between human and murine skin, it is, however, unclear whether the same holds true for human Merkel cells. We therefore attempted to gain insight into the human Merkel cell lineage by co-immunodetection of the Merkel cell marker protein cytokeratin 20 (CK20) with various proteins known to be expressed either in epidermal or in neural stem cells of the skin. Neither Sox10 nor Pax3, both established markers of the neural crest lineage, exhibited any cell co-labeling with CK20. By contrast, β1 integrin, known to be enriched in epidermal stem cells, was found in nearly 70 % of interfollicular epidermal and 25 % of follicular Merkel cells. Moreover, LRIG1, also enriched in epidermal stem cells, displayed significant co-immunolabeling with CK20 as well (approximately 20 % in the interfollicular epidermis and 7 % in the hair follicle, respectively). Further epidermal markers were detected in sporadic Merkel cells. Cells co-expressing CK20 with epidermal markers may represent a transitory state between stem cells and differentiated cells. β1 integrin is probably also synthesized by a large subset of mature Merkel cells. Summarizing, our data suggest that human Merkel cells may originate from epidermal rather than neural progenitors.

  14. Isolated Langerhans cell histiocytosis of the sublingual gland in an adult.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shaodong; Chen, Xinming; Zhang, Jiali; Fang, Qiong

    2015-01-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) is a rare disorder characterized by the proliferation of pathologic Langerhans cells. Its clinical presentation is highly variable, that range from single-system, limited disease to severe, multi-organ disease with high mortality. LCH usually affects children and young adults. The most frequent sites for LCH are the bone, skin, lung, pituitary gland, and lymph nodes. Salivary gland involvement by LCH is extremely rare, and only a few cases of LHC involving the parotid glands have been reported in the English literature. To our knowledge, the involvement of the sublingual gland as a part of single or multisystem LCH has not been previously described. Herein we reported the first case of primary LCH of the sublingual gland. A 40-year-old woman presented with a 2-month history of a painless mass on the right sublingual area. Excision of the lesion including the right sublingual gland was performed. Histopathological diagnosis of LCH was rendered. The patient remains free of symptoms 17 months after surgery.

  15. Isolated Langerhans cell histiocytosis of the sublingual gland in an adult

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Shaodong; Chen, Xinming; Zhang, Jiali; Fang, Qiong

    2015-01-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) is a rare disorder characterized by the proliferation of pathologic Langerhans cells. Its clinical presentation is highly variable, that range from single-system, limited disease to severe, multi-organ disease with high mortality. LCH usually affects children and young adults. The most frequent sites for LCH are the bone, skin, lung, pituitary gland, and lymph nodes. Salivary gland involvement by LCH is extremely rare, and only a few cases of LHC involving the parotid glands have been reported in the English literature. To our knowledge, the involvement of the sublingual gland as a part of single or multisystem LCH has not been previously described. Herein we reported the first case of primary LCH of the sublingual gland. A 40-year-old woman presented with a 2-month history of a painless mass on the right sublingual area. Excision of the lesion including the right sublingual gland was performed. Histopathological diagnosis of LCH was rendered. The patient remains free of symptoms 17 months after surgery. PMID:26722591

  16. Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis Mimicking Periapical Pathology in a 39-Year-Old Man.

    PubMed

    Peters, Scott M; Pastagia, Julie; Yoon, Angela J; Philipone, Elizabeth M

    2017-08-29

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) is a clonal neoplastic proliferation of Langerhans-type dendritic cells, with more than 50% of cases of LCH seen in children younger than 15 years of age. The most common clinical presentation of LCH is solitary or multiple bony lesions. The jaws are affected in approximately 10%-20% of cases, with a strong predilection for the mandible. The maxilla is involved in only 1% of head and neck cases. When the jaws are involved, lesions of LCH may mimic periapical pathology as seen in patients requiring endodontic therapy or bone loss as seen in periodontal disease. We report the case of a 39-year-old man with LCH involving the posterior maxilla. This is a rare presentation of LCH with respect to both location and patient age. Clinicians should consider LCH when developing a differential diagnosis of an apical radiolucency of vital teeth or teeth that fail to respond to endodontic therapy and be aware of its clinical and radiographic mimics. Copyright © 2017 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Molecular analysis of BRAF V600E mutation in multiple nodules of pulmonary Langerhans cell histiocytosis.

    PubMed

    Dimmler, Arno; Geddert, Helene; Werner, Martin; Faller, Gerhard

    2017-02-20

    Pulmonary Langerhans cell histiocytosis (PLCH) is a rare, smoking-related histiocytic disorder with variable clinical symptoms. Like in other non-pulmonary Langerhans cell proliferations, PLCH has recently been shown to harbour BRAF V600E mutations in a significant subset of cases, thus challenging the concept of PLCH being a reactive disorder. Here, we analysed 38 formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded PLCH nodules of nine patients for BRAF mutation using two different molecular methods. Using pyrosequencing and allele-specific quantitative PCR (AS-PCR), BRAF V600E mutations were found in 16/38 (42%) and 31/37 (84%) nodules, respectively. Analysing different nodules of the same patients with pyrosequencing 3/6 patients showed a concordant BRAF mutation status. When allele-specific quantitative PCR was used, condordant results were found in 5/6 patients. Our findings clearly indicate that (a) the sensitivity of the method used is crucial in analysing BRAF mutation status, (b) AS-PCR is more sensitive in detecting BRAF V600E mutations than pyrosequencing,

  18. Langerhans cell histiocytosis: literature review and descriptive analysis of oral manifestations.

    PubMed

    Madrigal-Martínez-Pereda, Cristina; Guerrero-Rodríguez, Vanesa; Guisado-Moya, Blanca; Meniz-García, Cristina

    2009-05-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) is a rare disease, of unknown pathogenesis, characterized by intense and abnormal proliferation of bone marrow-derived histiocytes (Langerhans cells). It can present both local and systemic manifestations involving bone, skin and mucosal tissue, and internal organs. Three basic clinical forms develop: Letterer-Siwe disease (subacute or acute disseminated form), Hand-Schüller-Christian disease (disseminated chronic form) and eosinophilic granuloma (localized chronic form). LCH may manifest orally with single or multiple lesions of the alveolar or basal bone, ulcerated mucosal lesions accompanied by adenopathies and/or periodontal lesions, presenting gingival inflammation, bleeding, recession, necrosis, odontalgia, dental hypermobility and premature loss of teeth. The principal differential diagnoses include advanced periodontal disease or a periapical process of dental or periodontal origin. The odontologist plays a vital role in the diagnosis and multidisciplinary treatment of such patients, by performing routine examinations for periodic follow-up of the disease and its possible oral manifestations, bearing in mind that these may be the first or only signs of LCH.

  19. Treatment of Langerhans cell histiocytosis bone lesions with zoledronic acid: a case series.

    PubMed

    Sivendran, Shanthi; Harvey, Harold; Lipton, Allan; Drabick, Joseph

    2011-06-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) is a rare disease caused by a clonal proliferation of specialized dendritic (Langerhans) cells. Although uncommon, it is potentially fatal and carries significant morbidity. Bone involvement is particularly destructive and to date, no standard of care exists for management of both the disease and the significant bone pain as many of these patients experience. In the literature, 12 patients who had previously been heavily pretreated for their disease had their bone pain treated with a bisphosphonate as extrapolated from the cancer literature. Interestingly, these patients had a complete or near complete resolution of their pain, return of functional status and in 75% of cases radiographic evidence of reduction or regression of disease. Only 6 of these patients were treated with a newer generation bisphosphonate, zoledronic acid. In this paper, we report a case series of 2 patients with LCH bone involvement who received 4 mg of intravenous zoledronic acid monthly for 1 year with complete resolution in their bone pain. In addition, both patients demonstrated reduction in tumor burden after bisphosphonate treatment. Uniquely, our first case is the only reported case in the literature using a bisphosphonate as first line therapy in the treatment of LCH. This case demonstrates the potential role of zoledronic acid therapy in the first line setting for disease stabilization and symptomatic control in patients unable to receive conventional therapy.

  20. Induction of epidermal cell fate in Arabidopsis shoots.

    PubMed

    Takada, Shinobu; Takada, Nozomi; Yoshida, Ayaka

    2013-11-01

    Land plants have evolved a cuticle-bearing epidermis to protect themselves from environmental stress and pathogen attack. Despite its important role, little is known about the molecular mechanisms regulating shoot epidermal cell identity. In a recent study, we found that the Arabidopsis thaliana ATML1 gene is possibly a master regulator of shoot epidermal cell fate. We revealed that ATML1 has the ability to confer shoot epidermis-related traits to non-epidermal cells of the seedlings. These data are consistent with the previous loss-of-function mutant analyses, which implied a positive role of ATML1 in epidermal cell differentiation. Importantly, ectopic epidermal cells induced in ATML1-overexpressing lines provide a novel tool to assess the intrinsic properties of epidermal cells and to study epistatic interactions among genes involved in epidermal/mesophyll differentiation. Using this system, we obtained data revealing that ATML1 negatively influenced mesophyll cell fate. In addition, we provided a working model of how division planes in epidermal cells are determined.

  1. Epidermal cells adhere preferentially to type IV (basement membrane) collagen

    PubMed Central

    1979-01-01

    Epidermal cells from adult guinea pig skin attach and differentiate preferentially on substrates of type IV (basement membrane) collagen, compared to those of types I--III collagen. In contrast, guinea pig dermal fibroblasts attach equally well to all four collagen substrates. Fibronectin mediates the attachment of fibroblasts but not of epidermal cells to collagen. PMID:422650

  2. 'Giving and taking': endothelial and beta-cells in the islets of Langerhans.

    PubMed

    Eberhard, Daniel; Kragl, Martin; Lammert, Eckhard

    2010-08-01

    The beta-cells of the islets of Langerhans are embedded in a dense capillary network. The blood vessels supply the islet cells with nutrients and oxygen, and in turn take up the secreted islet hormones to deliver them to target tissues. In addition, vessels provide a basement membrane, which optimizes islet function. In this review we focus on the dynamic interactions between blood vessels and beta-cells, which are pivotal for enhancing insulin expression and beta-cell proliferation in response to increased insulin demand during body growth, pregnancy, and virtually all conditions associated with insulin resistance. Importantly, a failure in this adaptive response might contribute to the onset of type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  3. CT-guided biopsy for Langerhans cell histiocytosis of the atlas: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Yang, Biao; Zhan, Rui-Yu; Guo, Wen-Hao; Liao, Zheng-Yin

    2016-07-14

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) is a rare disease, and involvement of the atlas is extremely uncommon. Biopsy of atlas lesions is difficult and risky. In this case report, we describe the performance of percutaneous computed tomography-guided biopsy of an atlantal LCH in a patient with no complication.

  4. Langerhans cells and more: langerin-expressing dendritic cell subsets in the skin

    PubMed Central

    Romani, Nikolaus; Clausen, Björn E.; Stoitzner, Patrizia

    2010-01-01

    Summary Langerhans cells (LCs) are antigen-presenting dendritic cells (DCs) that reside in epithelia. The best studied example is the LC of the epidermis. By electron microscopy, their identifying feature is the unique rod- or tennis racket-shaped Birbeck granule. The phenotypic hallmark is their expression of the C-type lectin receptor langerin/CD207. Langerin, however, is also expressed on a recently discovered population of DC in the dermis and other tissues of the body. These ‘dermal langerin+ dendritic cells’ are unrelated to LCs. The complex field of langerin-negative dermal DCs is not dealt with here. In this article, we briefly review the history, ontogeny, and homeostasis of LCs. More emphasis is laid on the discussion of functional properties in vivo. Novel models using genetically engineered mice are contributing tremendously to our understanding of the role of LCs in eliciting adaptive immune responses against pathogens or tumors and in inducing and maintaining tolerance against self antigens and innocuous substances in vivo. Also, innate effector functions are increasingly being recognized. Current activities in this area are reviewed, and possibilities for future exploitation of LC in medicine, e.g. for the improvement of vaccines, are contemplated. PMID:20193016

  5. HIV-1 Efficient Entry in Inner Foreskin Is Mediated by Elevated CCL5/RANTES that Recruits T Cells and Fuels Conjugate Formation with Langerhans Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Zhicheng; Barry de Longchamps, Nicolas; Schmitt, Alain; Zerbib, Marc; Vacher-Lavenu, Marie-Cécile; Bomsel, Morgane; Ganor, Yonatan

    2011-01-01

    Male circumcision reduces acquisition of HIV-1 by 60%. Hence, the foreskin is an HIV-1 entry portal during sexual transmission. We recently reported that efficient HIV-1 transmission occurs following 1 h of polarized exposure of the inner, but not outer, foreskin to HIV-1-infected cells, but not to cell-free virus. At this early time point, Langerhans cells (LCs) and T-cells within the inner foreskin epidermis are the first cells targeted by the virus. To gain in-depth insight into the molecular mechanisms governing inner foreskin HIV-1 entry, foreskin explants were inoculated with HIV-1-infeceted cells for 4 h. The chemokine/cytokine milieu secreted by the foreskin tissue, and resulting modifications in density and spatial distribution of T-cells and LCs, were then investigated. Our studies show that in the inner foreskin, inoculation with HIV-1-infected cells induces increased CCL5/RANTES (1.63-fold) and decreased CCL20/MIP-3-alpha (0.62-fold) secretion. Elevated CCL5/RANTES mediates recruitment of T-cells from the dermis into the epidermis, which is blocked by a neutralizing CCL5/RANTES Ab. In parallel, HIV-1-infected cells mediate a bi-phasic modification in the spatial distribution of epidermal LCs: attraction to the apical surface at 1 h, followed by migration back towards the basement membrane later on at 4 h, in correlation with reduced CCL20/MIP-3-alpha at this time point. T-cell recruitment fuels the continuous formation of LC-T-cell conjugates, permitting the transfer of HIV-1 captured by LCs. Together, these results reveal that HIV-1 induces a dynamic process of immune cells relocation in the inner foreskin that is associated with specific chemokines secretion, which favors efficient HIV-1 entry at this site. PMID:21738469

  6. HIV-1 efficient entry in inner foreskin is mediated by elevated CCL5/RANTES that recruits T cells and fuels conjugate formation with Langerhans cells.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhicheng; Barry de Longchamps, Nicolas; Schmitt, Alain; Zerbib, Marc; Vacher-Lavenu, Marie-Cécile; Bomsel, Morgane; Ganor, Yonatan

    2011-06-01

    Male circumcision reduces acquisition of HIV-1 by 60%. Hence, the foreskin is an HIV-1 entry portal during sexual transmission. We recently reported that efficient HIV-1 transmission occurs following 1 h of polarized exposure of the inner, but not outer, foreskin to HIV-1-infected cells, but not to cell-free virus. At this early time point, Langerhans cells (LCs) and T-cells within the inner foreskin epidermis are the first cells targeted by the virus. To gain in-depth insight into the molecular mechanisms governing inner foreskin HIV-1 entry, foreskin explants were inoculated with HIV-1-infeceted cells for 4 h. The chemokine/cytokine milieu secreted by the foreskin tissue, and resulting modifications in density and spatial distribution of T-cells and LCs, were then investigated. Our studies show that in the inner foreskin, inoculation with HIV-1-infected cells induces increased CCL5/RANTES (1.63-fold) and decreased CCL20/MIP-3-alpha (0.62-fold) secretion. Elevated CCL5/RANTES mediates recruitment of T-cells from the dermis into the epidermis, which is blocked by a neutralizing CCL5/RANTES Ab. In parallel, HIV-1-infected cells mediate a bi-phasic modification in the spatial distribution of epidermal LCs: attraction to the apical surface at 1 h, followed by migration back towards the basement membrane later on at 4 h, in correlation with reduced CCL20/MIP-3-alpha at this time point. T-cell recruitment fuels the continuous formation of LC-T-cell conjugates, permitting the transfer of HIV-1 captured by LCs. Together, these results reveal that HIV-1 induces a dynamic process of immune cells relocation in the inner foreskin that is associated with specific chemokines secretion, which favors efficient HIV-1 entry at this site.

  7. Arsenic mobilizes Langerhans cell migration and induces Th1 response in epicutaneous protein sensitization via CCL21: a plausible cause of decreased Langerhans cells in arsenic-induced intraepithelial carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chih-Hung; Hong, Chien-Hui; Yu, Chia-Li; Wang, Li-Fang; Clausen, Björn E; Liao, Wei-Ting; Huang, Shau-Ku; Chen, Gwo-Shing; Yu, Hsin-Su

    2012-05-01

    Arsenic, still a significant environmental threat in several regions in the world, induces various cancers, including lungs, skin, and bladder. Arsenic-induced Bowen's disease (As-BD) is generally an indolent cutaneous intraepithelial carcinoma in susceptible people. Patients with As-BD have been found to have attenuated contact hypersensitivity. Skin samples collected from these patients have reduced numbers of Langerhans cells (LCs), the major epidermal antigen presenting cells expressing Langerins. This study uses an epicutaneous protein sensitization model to investigate the mechanism through which LCs are decreased in As-BD. It further investigates the possibility that arsenic alters LC migration and polarizes Th responses. To do this, we patch-sensitized Balb/c mice or DT-treated Langerin-DTR mice (conditional depletion of Langerin(+) cells) with OVA or PBS, and fed them water containing 300 ppb arsenic or regular water for 200 μl for five days. Ninety-six hours after OVA sensitization, Langerin(+)EpCAM(+) cells in arsenic-treated WT mice were significantly increased in draining lymph nodes and decreased in epidermis without changes in the dermis. Lymph node cells from arsenic-treated WT mice were found to proliferate more than lymph node cells from control PBS-treated mice after OVA challenge in vitro. They also secreted more IFN-γ and IL-12, but not IL-4, IL-13, or IL-17. However, cell proliferation and the induction of IFN-γ by arsenic were found to be abolished in DT-treated Langerin-DTR mice. The expressions of CCL21 and CXCL12 were also increased in lymph nodes from arsenic-treated WT mice. The administration of a neutralizing antibody against CCL21, but not CXCL12, abolished the increase of LCs in lymph nodes in vivo. The results of this study, the first to study oral arsenic polarization of Th1 responses in epicutaneous protein sensitization through CCL21-mediated LC migration, suggest the chronicity of As-BD without invasion might result from

  8. Solitary Langerhans cell histiocytosis of the hard palate: a diagnostic pitfall

    PubMed Central

    Varsha, Dalal; Kaur, Manveen; Chaudhary, Neena; Siraj, Fouzia

    2016-01-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) is a relatively rare and unique disease characterized by an abnormal proliferation of immature dendritic cells. It is predominantly seen in children with adults showing less than ten times the incidence compared to childhood. The clinical presentation and organ involvement is highly variable. Oral manifestations generally consist of mucosal ulceration associated with lesions of the underlying bone. Lesions limited to the oral mucosa are rare. We present a case of a 45-year-old male who presented with an ulcer on the hard palate showing histopathologic features of LCH. The present case is a reminder of the possibility of occurrence of this unusual entity in the oral cavity. Appropriate use of immunohistochemistry is advocated to avoid diagnostic pitfalls. PMID:27703428

  9. MUTZ-3 Langerhans cell maturation and CXCL12 independent migration in reconstructed human gingiva.

    PubMed

    Kosten, Ilona J; Spiekstra, Sander W; de Gruijl, Tanja D; Gibbs, Susan

    2016-01-01

    Here we describe a reconstructed full thickness human oral mucosa (gingiva) equivalent with integrated Langerhans Cells (GE-LC) and use it to compare LC activation and migration from oral versus skin epithelium. The physiologically representative models consist of differentiated reconstructed epithelium (keratinocytes and Langerhans-like cells derived from the MUTZ-3 cell line) on a fibroblast-populated collagen hydrogel which serves as a lamina propria for gingiva and dermis for skin. Topical exposure of GE-LC and the skin equivalent (SE-LC) to sub-toxic concentrations of the allergens cinnamaldehyde, resorcinol and nickel sulphate, resulted in LC migration out of the epithelia. Neutralizing antibody to CXCL12 blocked allergen-induced LC migration in SE-LC but not in GE-LC. Also, gingival fibroblasts secreted very low amounts of CXCL12 compared to skin fibroblasts even when stimulated with rhTNFα or rhIL-1α. Surprisingly, cinnamaldehyde exposure of GE-LC resulted in an increase in MUTZ-3 LC and CD83 mRNA in the hydrogel but did not result in an increase in CD1a+ cells in the collagen hydrogel (as was observed for SE-LC. These results indicate that in gingiva, upon allergen exposure, MUTZ-3 LC migrate in a CXCL12 independent manner from epithelium-to-lamina propria and in doing so mature become CD1a- and increase CD83+ mRNA. These physiologically relevant in vitro models which not only are human but which also resemble specific tissues, may aid in the identification of factors regulating immune stimulation which in turn will aid the development of therapeutic interventions for allergy and inflammation, anti-cancer vaccines as well as improving diagnostics for skin and oral allergy.

  10. Expression of natural antimicrobial peptide beta-defensin-2 and Langerhans cell accumulation in epidermis from human non-healing leg ulcers.

    PubMed

    Galkowska, Hanna; Olszewski, Waldemar L; Wojewodzka, Urszula

    2005-01-01

    Chronic wounds like venous calf and diabetic foot ulcers are frequently contaminated and colonized by bacteria and it remains unclear whether there is sufficient expression of defensins and recruitment of epidermal Langerhans cells in the margin of ulcer compared to normal skin. The aim of this study was to examine immunohistochemically the expression of beta-defensin-2 (hBD2), GM-CSF, VEGF growth factors and accumulation of CD1a+ Langerhans cells (LC) in epidermis from chronic skin ulcers and to compare it to normal skin from the corresponding areas. Studies were carried out in 10 patients with diabetic foot, 10 patients with varicous ulcers of the calf and 10 patients undergoing orthopedic surgery (normal skin for control). Biopsy specimens were immunostained using specific primary antibodies, LSAB+ kit based on biotin-avidin-peroxidase complex technique and DAB chromogen. Results were expressed as a mean staining intensity. Statistical analysis of staining showed significantly higher staining of hBD2 in both normal and ulcerated epidermis from foot sole skin compared to calf skin (normal and ulcerated, p < 0.05). Chronic ulcers showed the same expression of hBD2 as normal skin. There was significantly lower accumulation of CD1a+ LC in normal epidermis from foot sole skin compared to normal calf skin (p<0.05). Accumulation of CD1a+ LC and GM-CSF upregulation at the border area of diabetic foot ulcer and reduction of LC concentration at the margin of venous calf ulcer compared to normal skin were observed. It seems that normal calf and sole epidermis is, unlike in the mechanisms of innate immunity, influenced by the different keratinocyte turnover and bacterial flora colonizing these regions. Insufficient upregulation of hBD2 in both diabetic foot and venous calf ulcers may suggest the pathological role of this protein in the chronicity of ulcers.

  11. Langerhans cell histiocytosis masquerading as acute appendicitis: Case report and review

    PubMed Central

    Karimzada, Mohammad M; Matthews, Michele N; French, Samuel W; DeUgarte, Daniel; Kim, Dennis Y

    2017-01-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) is a rare syndrome characterized by unifocal, multifocal unisystem, or disseminated/multi-system disease that commonly involves the bone, skin, lymph nodes, pituitary, or sometimes lung (almost exclusively in smokers) causing a variety of symptoms from rashes and bone lesions to diabetes insipidus or pulmonary infiltrates. We present a previously unreported case of gastrointestinal LCH as well as a novel characteristic lesion affecting the colon of a young woman who presented with signs and symptoms mimicking acute on chronic appendicitis. Immunohistochemical analysis of appendectomy specimen and nodular specimens on colonoscopy demonstrated S-100, CD1a, and langerin reactivity. The patient underwent systemic chemotherapy with cytarabine and demonstrated excellent response to therapy. PMID:28360976

  12. Maxillofacial manifestations of Langerhans cell histiocytosis: a clinical and therapeutic analysis of 10 patients.

    PubMed

    Eckardt, A; Schultze, A

    2003-10-01

    The definition of Langerhans cell histiocytosis (formerly known as histiocytosis X) includes the clinical syndromes Hand-Schueller-Christian syndrome, Abt-Letterer-Siwe syndrome, and eosinophilic granuloma. The paper gives an overview of current diagnostic and treatment strategies of LCH. Furthermore, records and clinical data of 10 patients with LCH were evaluated retrospectively. Patients' age ranged from 13 years to 42 years. The mandible was more frequently involved than the maxilla. Three patients (30%) had systemic manifestations of LCH in addition to their oral lesions. The longest follow-up period was 12 years. During follow-up six patients (60%) developed recurrent LCH and received adjuvant chemo- or radiation therapy. For solitary bone lesions, surgical curettage is the recommended treatment. Those patients with multi-organ involvement or recurrent LCH should be included into clinical trials initiated by the Histiocyte Society.

  13. Langerhans cell histiocytosis as a possible differential diagnosis of painful scoliosis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Kuo-Yuan; Lin, Ruey-Mo; Yan, Jing-Jou; Lin, Chii-Jeng

    2007-07-01

    We report on a 5-year 8-month-old boy suffering from spinal Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH), who had initial symptoms of back and abdominal pain, as well as tilting of the shoulder that mimicked hemivertebra of T10 with scoliosis, as revealed by radiography. The LCH-involved vertebra did not demonstrate the classic radiographic picture of vertebra plana until the vertebral body symmetrically collapsed about 6 months later, when the patient's scoliosis disappeared. The delayed diagnosis of LCH was confirmed by biopsy after another 6 months. Polyostotic lesions affecting C6, T5, T9-12, and L2 were found. This case represented an unusual presentation of LCH as an early disease entity, which resulted in a misdiagnosis of painful scoliosis. We believe we are the first to report LCH as a differential diagnosis of painful scoliosis.

  14. Atlanto-axial langerhans cell histiocytosis in a child presented as torticollis

    PubMed Central

    Tfifha, Miniar; Gaha, Mehdi; Mama, Nadia; Yacoubi, Mohamed Taher; Abroug, Saoussen; Jemni, Hela

    2017-01-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) is a rare condition mostly seen in children and adolescents. Eosinophilic granuloma (EG) is one of its three clinical entities and is considered as a benign osteolytic lesion. Many reports of patients with spine histiocytosis are well documented in the literature but it is not the case of atlantoaxial localization. We report here a new observation of atlantoaxial LCH in a 4-year-old boy revealed by persistent torticollis. He was successfully treated with systemic chemotherapy and surgery. Inter-body fusion packed by autologous iliac bone was performed with resolution of his symptoms. It is known that conservative treatment is usually sufficient and surgery should be reserved for major neurologic defects in spine EG. In atlantoaxial lesion, surgical treatment should be frequently considered. PMID:28868307

  15. Isolated thymic Langerhans cell histiocytosis discovered on F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (F-18 FDG PET/CT).

    PubMed

    Turpin, Sophie; Carret, Anne-Sophie; Dubois, Josée; Buteau, Chantal; Patey, Natalie

    2015-11-01

    The thymic infiltration in young patients with multisystemic Langerhans cell histiocytosis and its radiologic features are well known. However, isolated thymic disease has seldom been reported in the literature. We report the case of a 10-month-old child admitted for fever of unknown origin. Whole-body F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (F-18 FDG PET/CT) was performed to identify a focus of infection. It demonstrated an unusual aspect of the thymus, which led to further investigation and revealed isolated infiltration of the thymus by Langerhans cell histiocytosis. The patient was treated accordingly and is now disease free. As evaluation of Langerhans cell histiocytosis patients with F-18 FDG PET/CT is becoming more frequent, it is important to be aware of the scintigraphical characteristics of thymic Langerhans cell histiocytosis.

  16. Physiologic Determinants of Exercise Capacity in Pulmonary Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis: A Multidimensional Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Fry, Stephanie; Giovannelli, Jonathan; Langlois, Carole; Bricout, Nicolas; Aguilaniu, Bernard; Bellocq, Agnes; Le Rouzic, Olivier; Dominique, Stephane; Delobbe, Alain; François, Geraldine; Tazi, Abdellatif; Wallaert, Benoit; Chenivesse, Cecile

    2017-01-01

    Background Reduced exercise capacity severely impacts quality of life in pulmonary Langerhans cell histiocytosis. Ascertaining mechanisms that impair exercise capacity is necessary to identify targets for symptomatic treatments. Methods Dyspnea, pulmonary function tests and cardiopulmonary exercise test were analysed in 62 study participants. Data were compared between subjects with impaired and normal aerobic capacity (V’O2 peak less than 84% versus 84% predicted or more). Data were reduced using a principal component analysis. Multivariate analysis included V’O2 peak as the dependent variable and principal components as covariates. Results V’O2 peak was reduced in 44 subjects (71%). Subjects with impaired aerobic capacity presented: (i) decreased FEV1, FVC, FEV1/FVC, DLCO and DLCO/VA and increased AaDO2, (ii) increased ventilatory equivalents at ventilatory threshold, VD/VT peak, AaDO2 peak and PaCO2 peak and decreased ventilatory reserve and PaO2 peak. There was no difference between groups in dyspnea scores. Principal component analysis extracted 4 principal components interpreted as follows: PC1: gas exchange; PC2: “pseudorestriction”; PC3: exercise-induced hyperpnea; PC4: air trapping. Multivariate analysis explained 65% of V’O2 peak. The 4 principal components were independently associated with V’O2 peak (βcoefficients: PC1: 9.3 [4.6; 14], PC2: 7.5 [3; 11.9], PC3: -5.3 [-9.6;-1.], PC4: -9.8 [-14,9;-4.7]). Conclusion Impaired exercise capacity is frequent in pulmonary Langerhans cell histiocytosis. It is mainly caused by pulmonary changes but is not associated with increased dyspnea intensity. Therefore, treating the lung represents a relevant approach for improving exercise capacity, even in patients experiencing mild dyspnea. PMID:28072848

  17. Autologous epidermal cell suspension: A promising treatment for chronic wounds.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hongliang; Chen, Yan; Zhang, Cuiping; Fu, Xiaobing

    2016-02-01

    Chronic wounds have become an increasing medical and economic problem of aging societies because they are difficult to manage. Skin grafting is an important treatment method for chronic wounds, which are refractory to conservative therapy. The technique involving epidermal cell suspensions was invented to enable the possibility of treating larger wounds with only a small piece of donor skin. Both uncultured and cultured autologous epidermal cell suspensions can be prepared and survive permanently on the wound bed. A systematic search was conducted of EMBASE, Cochrane Library, PubMed and web of science by using Boolean search terms, from the establishment of the database until May 31, 2014. The bibliographies of all retrieved articles in English were searched. The search terms were: (epithelial cell suspension OR keratinocyte suspension) and chronic and wound. From the included, 6 studies are descriptive interventions and discussed the use of autologous keratinocyte suspension to treat 61 patients' chronic wound. The various methods of preparation of epidermal cell suspension are described. The advantages and shortcomings of different carriers for epidermal cell suspensions are also summarised. Both uncultured and cultured autologous epidermal cell suspensions have been used to treat chronic wounds. Although the limitations of these studies include the small number of patient populations with chronic wounds and many important problems that remain to be solved, autologous epidermal cell suspension is a promising treatment for chronic wounds. Copyright © 2015 Tissue Viability Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Interkeukin-34, a cytokine crucial for the differentiation and maintenance of tissue resident macrophages and Langerhans cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yaming; Colonna, Marco

    2014-01-01

    IL-34 is a recently discovered cytokine that acts on tissue resident macrophages and Langerhans cells upon binding the receptor for CSF-1, CSF-1R. The existence of two ligands for CSF-1R, IL-34, and CSF-1, raises several intriguing questions. Are IL-34 and CSF-1 redundant or does each perform temporally and spatially distinct functions? Is IL-34 involved in human pathology? Would therapeutic strategies based on selective inhibition or administration of either IL-34 or CSF-1 be advantageous for preventing human pathology? Recent in vivo studies indicate that IL-34 promotes the development, survival, and function of microglia and Langerhans cells; therefore, this cytokine may predominately function in brain and skin biology. Here, we review the evidence for IL-34 as a key cytokine in the development and function of these two diverse cell types and discuss its potential role in pathological conditions. PMID:24737461

  19. Interkeukin-34, a cytokine crucial for the differentiation and maintenance of tissue resident macrophages and Langerhans cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yaming; Colonna, Marco

    2014-06-01

    IL-34 is a recently discovered cytokine that acts on tissue resident macrophages and Langerhans cells upon binding the receptor for CSF-1, CSF-1R. The existence of two ligands for CSF-1R, IL-34, and CSF-1, raises several intriguing questions. Are IL-34 and CSF-1 redundant or does each perform temporally and spatially distinct functions? Is IL-34 involved in human pathology? Would therapeutic strategies based on selective inhibition or administration of either IL-34 or CSF-1 be advantageous for preventing human pathology? Recent in vivo studies indicate that IL-34 promotes the development, survival, and function of microglia and Langerhans cells; therefore, this cytokine may predominately function in brain and skin biology. Here, we review the evidence for IL-34 as a key cytokine in the development and function of these two diverse cell types and discuss its potential role in pathological conditions.

  20. A multicentre retrospective survey of Langerhans' cell histiocytosis: 348 cases observed between 1983 and 1993. The French Langerhans' Cell Histiocytosis Study Group.

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    In a retrospective study involving 32 haematology/oncology departments in France, 348 cases of Langerhans' cell histiocytosis diagnosed between 1983 and 1993 were collated. The percentage of males was 56.4%. Median age at diagnosis was 30.2 months. The median follow up was 35.5 months. Initially, 108 patients (31%) had isolated unifocal or bifocal bone involvement, 67 (19%) had isolated multifocal bone involvement, 136 (39%) had soft tissue involvement without organ dysfunction, and 37 (11%) had organ dysfunction. Two thirds of the sites of involvement diagnosed throughout the course of the disease were present at diagnosis, while the remaining one third appeared during a relapse. Treatment was tailored to the individual patient and was extremely varied, hampering any comparison of regimens. Vinblastine with or without steroids was the most common regimen when systemic chemotherapy was used for the first episode (246/348). Twenty four of the 216 patients received VP 16 as first line treatment. Two patients with progressive multiorgan relapse, despite the use of several drugs, underwent bone marrow transplantation and are alive and disease free 60 and 22 months later. Altogether 21.9% of patients had sequelae, including diabetes insipidus in 17.5% of cases. The overall survival rate is 91.7% (confidence interval 90.7 to 95%) three years after diagnosis. In the univariate analysis, age less than 1 year, ear, nose, and throat, cutaneous, lymph node, liver, spleen, lung, marrow and intestinal involvement, male sex, progressive episodes, the absence of response, and partial responses, were associated with a poor vital prognosis. In a multivariate analysis of prognostic factors, poor early outcome emerged as the most important parameter, closely linked to other poor outcome features such as young age and organ dysfunction. It identified a small number of patients with a poor initial response to treatment, for whom intensive treatment should be assessed in a phase II

  1. Improved outcome in the treatment of pediatric multifocal Langerhans cell histiocytosis: Results from the Japan Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis Study Group-96 protocol study.

    PubMed

    Morimoto, Akira; Ikushima, Satoshi; Kinugawa, Naoko; Ishii, Eiichi; Kohdera, Urara; Sako, Masahiro; Fujimoto, Junichiro; Bessho, Fumio; Horibe, Keizo; Tsunematsu, Yukiko; Imashuku, Shinsaku

    2006-08-01

    The treatment outcome of multifocal childhood Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) has not been satisfactory and has resulted in poor therapeutic responses with high mortality and a high incidence of reactivation with late sequelae. To overcome these issues, the Japan LCH Study Group-96 (JLSG-96) protocol was conducted prospectively from 1996 to 2001 in Japan. Newly diagnosed children with multifocal LCH were classified into 2 groups: a single-system multisite (SS-m) group and a multisystem (MS) group. All patients initially were treated on Protocol A, which consisted of 6 weeks of induction therapy with combined cytosine arabinoside, vincristine (VCR), and prednisolone (PSL) followed by 6 months of maintenance therapy. Patients who had a poor response to the induction of Protocol A were switched to a salvage regimen (Protocol B), which consisted of an intensive combination of doxorubicin, cyclophosphamide, VCR, and PSL. In total, 91 patients were treated, including 32 patients in the SS-m group and 59 patients in the MS group. At the median 5-year follow-up, 96.9% of patients in the SS-m group and 78.0% of patients in the MS group had good response status. Diabetes insipidus developed in 3.1% of patients in the SS-m group and in 8.9% of patients in the MS group. The overall survival rate at 5 years for the SS-m and MS groups was 100% and 94.4% +/- 3.2%, respectively. The JLSG-96 protocol attained very low mortality for pediatric patients with multifocal LCH. Copyright 2006 American Cancer Society.

  2. Langerin, the "Catcher in the Rye": an important receptor for pathogens on Langerhans cells.

    PubMed

    Stoitzner, Patrizia; Romani, Nikolaus

    2011-09-01

    Langerhans cells (LCs) are a distinct subset of DCs that resides in the epidermis and other epithelia. They are potent antigen-presenting cells and strong inducers of T-cell responses. Like other DC types, LCs express C-type lectins that serve as antigen/pathogen uptake receptors, with Langerin/CD207 being the characteristic LC C-type lectin. In this issue of the European Journal of Immunology, Geijtenbeek and colleagues [Eur. J. Immunol. 2011. 41: 2619-2631] assign a role to Langerin on human LCs for binding and capturing measles virus. Interestingly, however, this function does not correlate with productive infection or with cross-presentation of measles virus. These authors show that measles virus does not infect the LCs via Langerin, and that LCs cannot cross-present the virus to CD8(+) T cells; however, presentation of this virus to CD4(+) T cells occurs and is dependent on virus capture by Langerin. Thus, cross-presentation of measles virus may be left to skin DCs other than LCs. This highlights the complexity of anti-viral T-cell responses that originate in the skin and also emphasizes the need for intensified investigations into human skin DCs in order to be able to ultimately harness their potential for immunotherapy. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Langerin, the “Catcher in the Rye”: An important receptor for pathogens on Langerhans cells

    PubMed Central

    Stoitzner, Patrizia; Romani, Nikolaus

    2014-01-01

    Langerhans cells (LCs) are a distinct subset of DCs that resides in the epidermis and other epithelia. They are potent antigen-presenting cells and strong inducers of T-cell responses. Like other DC types, LCs express C-type lectins that serve as antigen/pathogen uptake receptors, with Langerin/CD207 being the characteristic LC C-type lectin. In this issue of the European Journal of Immunology, Geijtenbeek and colleagues [Eur. J. Immunol. 2011. 41: 2619–2631] assign a role to Langerin on human LCs for binding and capturing measles virus. Interestingly, however, this function does not correlate with productive infection or with cross-presentation of measles virus. These authors show that measles virus does not infect the LCs via Langerin, and that LCs cannot cross-present the virus to CD8+ T cells; however, presentation of this virus to CD4+ T cells occurs and is dependent on virus capture by Langerin. Thus, cross-presentation of measles virus may be left to skin DCs other than LCs. This highlights the complexity of anti-viral T-cell responses that originate in the skin and also emphasizes the need for intensified investigations into human skin DCs in order to be able to ultimately harness their potential for immunotherapy. PMID:21952811

  4. Long-term effects of local ionizing radiation treatment on Langerhans cells in mouse footpad epidermis

    SciTech Connect

    Cole, S.

    1986-11-01

    Langerhans cells (LC) were studied with ADPase histochemistry in sheets of hind footpad epidermis from groups of CBA/H mice. Single, local 20-Gy doses of 250-kV x-rays were administered to the right hind feet of the mice when they were 3-4 months old, and LC were counted at intervals ranging from 2 to 24 months later. In unirradiated mice, aged 5-19 months, the mean density of LC in footpad was 1521-1617 cells/mm2. It dropped to 1137 +/- 86 cells/mm2 (mean +/- SE) in untreated 28-month-old mice. At times from 2-15 months after irradiation, normal mean densities of LC were present in footpad epidermis. On average, LC numbers were subsequently reduced to 1078 +/- 65/mm2 by 19 months after irradiation (71% of the cells in age-matched controls) and to 789 +/- 53/mm2 by 24 months (59% of the cells in age-matched controls). Loss of cells was focal. Chronic radiation-induced fibrosis and damage to circulatory function in skin may have contributed to impaired replacement of LC from bone marrow precursors. The possibility that late radiation-related depletion of the LC population permits development of skin tumors as a delayed consequence of exposure to ionizing radiation is discussed.

  5. ATML1 promotes epidermal cell differentiation in Arabidopsis shoots.

    PubMed

    Takada, Shinobu; Takada, Nozomi; Yoshida, Ayaka

    2013-05-01

    Molecular mechanisms that generate distinct tissue layers in plant shoots are not well understood. ATML1, an Arabidopsis homeobox gene, is expressed in the outermost cell layer, beginning at an early stage of development. The promoters of many epidermis-specific genes, including ATML1, contain an ATML1-binding site called an L1 box, suggesting that ATML1 regulates epidermal cell fate. Here, we show that overexpression of ATML1 was sufficient to activate the expression of epidermal genes and to induce epidermis-related traits such as the formation of stomatal guard cells and trichome-like cells in non-epidermal seedling tissues. Detailed observation of the division planes of these ectopic stomatal cells suggested that a near-surface position, as well as epidermal cell identity, were required for regular anticlinal cell division, as seen in wild-type epidermis. Moreover, analyses of a loss-of-function mutant and overexpressors implied that differentiation of epidermal cells was associated with repression of mesophyll cell fate. Collectively, our studies contribute new information about the molecular basis of cell fate determination in different layers of plant aerial organs.

  6. Langerhans' cell histiocytosis involving posterior elements of the dorsal spine: An unusual cause of extradural spinal mass in an adult.

    PubMed

    Tyagi, Devendra K; Balasubramaniam, Srikant; Savant, Hemant V

    2011-07-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) is a clonal proliferation of Langerhans cells occurring as an isolated lesion or as part of a systemic proliferation. It is commoner in children younger than 10 years of age with sparing of the posterior elements in more than 95% of cases. We describe a case of LCH in an adult female presenting with paraplegia. MRI revealed a well-defined extradural contrast enhancing mass at D2-D4 vertebral level involving the posterior elements of spine. D2-5 laminectomy with excision of lesion was performed which lead to marked improvement of patients neurological status. Histopathology was suggestive of eosinophilic granuloma. We describe the case, discuss its uniqueness and review the literature on this rare tumor presentation.

  7. A case of adult Langerhans cell histiocytosis showing successfully regenerated osseous tissue of the skull after chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Takahiro; Izutsu, Koji; Kako, Shinichi; Ohta, Satoshi; Hangaishi, Akira; Kanda, Yoshinobu; Motokura, Toru; Chiba, Shigeru; Kurokawa, Mineo

    2008-04-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) is a proliferative disorder of Langerhans cells and extremely rare in adults. Adult LCH is often associated with osteolytic bone lesions, but large bone-defective lesions have been rarely reported. We report an adult case of LCH accompanied by large osteolytic lesions in the skull that successfully responded to chemotherapy. A 47-year-old woman with LCH who had multiple, large osteolytic areas of more than 3 cm in diameter in the skull was admitted to our hospital. She was treated with systemic chemotherapy consisting of prednisolone, vinblastine, and 6-mercaptopurine. Twelve months later, when she completed the treatment, osteolytic areas were covered with hard osseous tissue, and X-ray examination confirmed regeneration of the bone. This case indicates that chemotherapy can be effective even for the treatment of large osteolytic lesions in adult LCH patients.

  8. Modification of peripheral blood T-lymphocyte surface receptors and Langerhans cell numbers in hereditary angioedema.

    PubMed

    Cillari, E; Misiano, G; Aricò, M; La Rocca, E; Lio, D; di Leonardo, S; Brai, M

    1986-03-01

    Hereditary angioedema (HAE) is a disease related to a complement disorder, namely a deficiency of C1 esterase inhibitor. Complement-split products are implicated in the regulation of the immune response, and we have compared some immunologic parameters between HAE and normal individuals. T-lymphocytes with receptors for IgG were increased in HAE, but no difference in T-cell suppressor activity for B-cells was detected. Furthermore, increased IgG receptor expression was not accompanied by any significant changes in the ratios of OKT4- and OKT8-defined antigens. Numbers of peripheral mononuclear cells (MNC) detected by alpha-naphthyl acetate esterase (ANAE) staining positivity were not significantly modified in HAE patients, although there was a trend toward higher absolute numbers of them showing paranuclear localization of ANAE. HAE patients had significantly reduced numbers of Langerhans cells (LC) showing different morphology and localization patterns. These observations are discussed in terms of differential membrane arrangements related to particular stages of cell activation, possibly attributable to continual complement activation resulting from a lack of control by C1 esterase inhibitor.

  9. Severe periodontal disease manifested in chronic disseminated type of langerhans cell histiocytosis in a 3-year old child.

    PubMed

    Bansal, Monika; Srivastava, Vinay Kumar; Bansal, Rajesh; Gupta, Vineeta; Bansal, Manish; Patne, Shashikant

    2014-01-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH), previously known as histio-cytosis X, is a rare idiopathic disorder of reticulo-endothelial system with abnormal proliferation of bone marrow derived Langerhans cells along with a variable number of leukocytes, such as eosinophils, neutrophils, lymphocytes and plasma cells. Three years old male child presented with multifocal osteolytic lesions and papulosquamous skin lesions. Clinical and radio-graphic features, such as severe alveolar bone loss, mobility of teeth, precocious eruption of teeth, foating appearance of teeth in orthopantomogram (OPG), osteolytic lesion in skull and cutaneous lesions were highly suggestive of LCH disease. Skin biopsy confirmed a diagnosis of LCH. Induction chemotherapy with oral prednisolone and intravenous vinblastine was started. Child responded well to chemotherapy. The clinical significance of the presented case is to diagnose the case of LCH on the basis of the manifestation of severe periodontal disease as this can be first or only manifestation of LCH. A dentist plays a major role in the multidisciplinary treatment of LCH through routine examination and periodic follow-up. How to cite this article: Bansal M, Srivastava VK, Bansal R, Gupta V, Bansal M, Patne S. Severe Periodontal Disease Manifested in Chronic Disseminated Type of Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis in a 3-Year Old Child. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2014;7(3):217-219.

  10. Severe Periodontal Disease Manifested in Chronic Disseminated Type of Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis in a 3-Year Old Child

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Vinay Kumar; Bansal, Rajesh; Gupta, Vineeta; Bansal, Manish; Patne, Shashikant

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT% Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH), previously known as histio-cytosis X, is a rare idiopathic disorder of reticulo-endothelial system with abnormal proliferation of bone marrow derived Langerhans cells along with a variable number of leukocytes, such as eosinophils, neutrophils, lymphocytes and plasma cells. Three years old male child presented with multifocal osteolytic lesions and papulosquamous skin lesions. Clinical and radio-graphic features, such as severe alveolar bone loss, mobility of teeth, precocious eruption of teeth, foating appearance of teeth in orthopantomogram (OPG), osteolytic lesion in skull and cutaneous lesions were highly suggestive of LCH disease. Skin biopsy confirmed a diagnosis of LCH. Induction chemotherapy with oral prednisolone and intravenous vinblastine was started. Child responded well to chemotherapy. The clinical significance of the presented case is to diagnose the case of LCH on the basis of the manifestation of severe periodontal disease as this can be first or only manifestation of LCH. A dentist plays a major role in the multidisciplinary treatment of LCH through routine examination and periodic follow-up. How to cite this article: Bansal M, Srivastava VK, Bansal R, Gupta V, Bansal M, Patne S. Severe Periodontal Disease Manifested in Chronic Disseminated Type of Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis in a 3-Year Old Child. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2014;7(3):217-219. PMID:25709306

  11. Diagnosis of Langerhans cell histiocytosis on fine needle aspiration cytology: a case report and review of the cytology literature.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Neeta; Sayed, Shahin; Vinayak, Sudhir

    2011-01-20

    A case of multifocal Langerhans cell histiocytosis in a two-year-old child is presented where fine needle aspiration was helpful in achieving a rapid and accurate diagnosis in an appropriate clinical and radiological setting. This can avoid unnecessary biopsy and guide the management especially where access to histopathology is limited. The highly characteristic common and rare cytological features are highlighted with focus on differential diagnoses and causes of pitfalls.

  12. Diagnosis and Intralesional Corticotherapy in Oral Ulcers Occurring as the Sole Manifestation of Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis. A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Gambirazi, Liane; Libório, Tatiana; Nunes, Fábio; Sugaya, Norberto; Migliari, Dante

    2016-01-01

    This article reports a case of oral mucosa lesions as the sole manifestation in Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH). This is a very uncommon manifestation of LCH since this disease preferably affects the bones with frequent involvement of the jaws. LCH may also involve other organs, particularly the lungs, liver, lymph nodes, and skin. The highlights of this report are the differential diagnosis, immunohistochemical analysis and, mostly, the therapeutic approach. PMID:27398106

  13. Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis of the Clavicle in an Adult: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Udaka, Toru; Susa, Michiro; Kikuta, Kazutaka; Nishimoto, Kazumasa; Horiuchi, Keisuke; Sasaki, Aya; Kameyama, Kaori; Nakamura, Masaya; Matsumoto, Morio; Chiba, Kazuhiro; Morioka, Hideo

    2015-01-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) usually occurs in children under the age of 10 years with a predilection for the skull, spine, rib and humerus. Solitary LCH occurring in an adult clavicle is uncommon with limited reports to date. The lesion in our patient was curetted with the intent to make a diagnosis, which subsequently lead to the remission of the symptom and the disease. At the final follow-up after 1 year, no local recurrence or metastasis is observed. PMID:26600774

  14. An 'eruptive' variant of juvenile xanthogranuloma associated with langerhans cell histiocytosis.

    PubMed

    Tran, Don T; Wolgamot, Gregory M; Olerud, John; Hurst, Stan; Argenyi, Zsolt

    2008-10-01

    The development of juvenile xanthogranuloma (JXG) as a sequel to langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) treated with chemotherapy is rare and the hypothesis is intriguing. This is a case of a 19-year-old woman who presented with progressive development of tan-red papules on the axilla and eyelids over a 1.5-year time span. A biopsy of an axillary lesion showed a prominent dermal infiltrate of foamy histiocytoid cells with occasional Touton-type multinucleate giant cells, consistent with JXG. Three years later, the patient presented with additional similar papules on the axilla and vulva as well as a painful mass in the pelvic bone and diabetes insipidus with an associated pituitary mass. An iliac crest bone biopsy showed an eosinophil-rich infiltrate admixed with histiocytoid cells with reniform nuclei, which expressed S100 and CD1a, consistent with a diagnosis of LCH. Nonetheless, an additional axillary papule was once again consistent with JXG, with negative reaction for S100 and CD1a with no Birbeck granules by electron microscopy. This case is unique by the co-existing presentation of multiple cutaneous JXG lesions and internally confined LCH lesions without an apparently associated chemotherapy, corroborating the concept that JXG and LCH may share a common histogenesis.

  15. The role of vascular endothelial growth factor in Langerhans cell histiocytosis.

    PubMed

    Dina, Attias; Zahava, Vadasz; Iness, Miselevich

    2005-02-01

    In angiogenesis, new blood vessels are generated from pre-existing ones. It plays a major role in tumor growth and metastasis. The main pro-angiogenic factor is the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). VEGF displays high specificity for vascular endothelial cells and also elicits a pronounced angiogenic response in a variety of in vivo models. VEGF withdrawal has been shown to result in regression of vasculature in tumors. The pathogenic and the angiogenic processes of Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) are not yet clear. The purpose of this study was to investigate the extent of the angiogenic response in LCH tumors. The authors examined tissue sections from LCH patients with single lesion (5 patients) or multisystem disease (5 patients). The preparations were examined by using monoclonal anti-VEGF antibody, CD34, and factor VIII-like antigen. VEGF was expressed in 70% of the cases examined. All the multisystem lesions were positive, as were two of the five single-lesion tumors. LCH cells expressed VEGF. The blood vessel density was significantly higher within the lesion than in normal margins. The findings that VEGF was expressed in LCH cells and that all multisystem lesions were VEGF producers raise the possibility of using anti-angiogenic drugs to treat these patients. Further studies to explore the role of angiogenesis in LCH are warranted.

  16. Pulmonary Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis in an Adult Male Presenting with Central Diabetes Insipidus and Diabetes Mellitus: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Choi, Yeun Seoung; Lim, Jung Soo; Kwon, Woocheol; Jung, Soon-Hee; Park, Il Hwan; Lee, Myoung Kyu; Lee, Won Yeon; Yong, Suk Joong; Lee, Seok Jeong; Jung, Ye-Ryung; Choi, Jiwon; Choi, Ji Sun; Jeong, Joon Taek; Yoo, Jin Sae; Kim, Sang-Ha

    2015-10-01

    Pulmonary Langerhans cell histiocytosis is an uncommon diffuse cystic lung disease in adults. In rare cases, it can involve extrapulmonary organs and lead to endocrine abnormalities such as central diabetes insipidus. A 42-year-old man presented with polyphagia and polydipsia, as well as a dry cough and dyspnea on exertion. Magnetic resonance imaging of the hypothalamic-pituitary system failed to show the posterior pituitary, which is a typical finding in patients with central diabetes insipidus. This condition was confirmed by a water deprivation test, and the patient was also found to have type 2 diabetes mellitus. Computed tomographic scanning of the lungs revealed multiple, irregularly shaped cystic lesions and small nodules bilaterally, with sparing of the costophrenic angles. Lung biopsy through video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery revealed pulmonary Langerhans cell histiocytosis. On a follow-up visit, only 1 year after the patient had quit smoking, clinical and radiological improvement was significant. Here, we report an uncommon case of pulmonary Langerhans cell histiocytosis that simultaneously presented with diabetes insipidus and diabetes mellitus.

  17. Pulmonary Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis in an Adult Male Presenting with Central Diabetes Insipidus and Diabetes Mellitus: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Yeun Seoung; Lim, Jung Soo; Kwon, Woocheol; Jung, Soon-Hee; Park, Il Hwan; Lee, Myoung Kyu; Lee, Won Yeon; Yong, Suk Joong; Lee, Seok Jeong; Jung, Ye-Ryung; Choi, Jiwon; Choi, Ji Sun; Jeong, Joon Taek; Yoo, Jin Sae

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary Langerhans cell histiocytosis is an uncommon diffuse cystic lung disease in adults. In rare cases, it can involve extrapulmonary organs and lead to endocrine abnormalities such as central diabetes insipidus. A 42-year-old man presented with polyphagia and polydipsia, as well as a dry cough and dyspnea on exertion. Magnetic resonance imaging of the hypothalamic-pituitary system failed to show the posterior pituitary, which is a typical finding in patients with central diabetes insipidus. This condition was confirmed by a water deprivation test, and the patient was also found to have type 2 diabetes mellitus. Computed tomographic scanning of the lungs revealed multiple, irregularly shaped cystic lesions and small nodules bilaterally, with sparing of the costophrenic angles. Lung biopsy through video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery revealed pulmonary Langerhans cell histiocytosis. On a follow-up visit, only 1 year after the patient had quit smoking, clinical and radiological improvement was significant. Here, we report an uncommon case of pulmonary Langerhans cell histiocytosis that simultaneously presented with diabetes insipidus and diabetes mellitus. PMID:26508947

  18. [Erdheim-Chester disease: a non-Langerhans cell histiocytosis. A clinical-case and review of the literature].

    PubMed

    Valentini, D; Cappelli, C; Mizzoni, F; Noto, C; Toscano, D; Foco, M; Trasimeni, G

    2004-05-01

    We make a retrospective evaluation of clinical and radiologic features, treatment, and outcome of Erdheim-Chester disease, a rare non-Langerhans cell histiocytosis. We report a case of Erdheim-Chester disease and review 60 cases from the literature. These cases are consider to have Erdheim-Chester disease when they have either typical bone radiographs (symmetrical long bones osteosclerosis) and/or histologic criteria disclosing histiocytic infiltration with distinctive immunohistochemical phenotype of the non-Langerhans cell histiocytes with positive staining for CD68 and negative staining for S-100 protein and CD1a. Our patient undergoes chemiotherapy according to the LCH-II stratification and therapy plan (Vinblastine, Etoposide and Prednisone) and thereafter receives Carboplatin and Etoposide, and Somatostatin. She is alive and clinically well 33 months after onset of symptoms and the lesions don't appear to progress at imaging examinations. In conclusion, Erdheim-Chester disease may be confused with Langerhans cell histiocytosis as it sometimes shares the same clinical (exophthalmos, diabetes insipidus) or radiologic (osteolytic lesions) findings. However, the characteristics radiological pattern of Erdheim-Chester disease together the immunohistochemical phenotype of hystiocytic infiltration supports the theory that Erdheim-Chester disease is a unique disease entity distinct.

  19. DOR-1, A novel CD10+ stromal cell line derived from progressive Langerhans cell histiocytosis of bone.

    PubMed

    Gogusev, Jean; Telvi, Louise; Murakami, Ichiro; Lepelletier, Yves; Nezelof, Christian; Stojkoski, Alexandre; Glorion, Christophe; Jaubert, Francis

    2005-02-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) is granulomatous proliferative disorder characterized by the presence of activated Langerhans cells admixed with macrophages, lymphocytes, and eosinophils. In an effort to obtain an LCH ex vivo model, we succeeded in establishing the DOR-1 cell line from an LCH lesion of bone in a 3-year-old girl. The DOR-1 cell line was established from a CD1a immunoreactive LCH lesion of bone maintained in long-term cell culture. The phenotypic characteristics were assessed by immuno-cytochemistry and fluorescence activated cell sorter (FACS) analysis. Cytogenetic analysis was performed by RHG-banding that was supplemented by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). The DOR-1 cells grew in vitro as a poorly differentiated mesenchymal-like cells with a doubling time between 72 and 96 hr. The cells exhibited pleomorphism and consistent immuno-reactivity for CD10 (50%), CD13 (55%), CD68 (65%), and CD117 (70%) while CD1a, Langerin and HLA-DR were not detected. By RHG-banding, several aberrant chromosomes were detected including the t (9; 17) (p23; p13) translocation and a pair of long dicentric marker chromosomes indicating clonal abnormality. Functionally, exposure to 33 nM 12-O-tetradecanoyl phorbol mirystate-13-acetate (TPA) induced DOR-1 cell differentiation with appearance of cytoplasmic extensions. The DOR-1 cell line exhibits distinct immuno-cytochemical features and carries the t (9; 17) (p23; p13) translocation suggesting involvement of stromal-like cell lineage in LCH initiation and progression.

  20. Caveolin-1 mediated uptake via langerin restricts HIV-1 infection in human Langerhans cells.

    PubMed

    van den Berg, Linda M; Ribeiro, Carla M S; Zijlstra-Willems, Esther M; de Witte, Lot; Fluitsma, Donna; Tigchelaar, Wikky; Everts, Vincent; Geijtenbeek, Teunis B H

    2014-12-31

    Human Langerhans cells (LCs) reside in foreskin and vaginal mucosa and are the first immune cells to interact with HIV-1 during sexual transmission. LCs capture HIV-1 through the C-type lectin receptor langerin, which routes the virus into Birbeck granules (BGs), thereby preventing HIV-1 infection. BGs are langerin-positive organelles exclusively present in LCs, however, their origin and function are unknown. Here, we not only show that langerin and caveolin-1 co-localize at the cell membrane and in vesicles but also that BGs are langerin/caveolin-1-positive vesicles are linked to the lysosomal degradation pathway in LCs. Moreover, inhibition of caveolar endocytosis in primary LCs abrogated HIV-1 sequestering into langerin(+) caveolar structures. Notably, both inhibition of caveolar uptake and silencing of caveolar structure protein caveolin-1 resulted in increased HIV-1 integration and subsequent infection. In contrast, inhibition of clathrin-mediated endocytosis did not affect HIV-1 integration, even though HIV-1 uptake was decreased, suggesting that clathrin-mediated endocytosis is not involved in HIV-1 restriction in LCs. Thus, our data strongly indicate that BGs belong to the caveolar endocytosis pathway and that caveolin-1 mediated HIV-1 uptake is an intrinsic restriction mechanism present in human LCs that prevents HIV-1 infection. Harnessing this particular internalization pathway has the potential to facilitate strategies to combat HIV-1 transmission.

  1. Langerhans cell counts in oral epithelial dysplasia and their correlation to clinicopathological parameters.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi-Ping; Chen, I-Chang; Wu, Yu-Hsueh; Wu, Yang-Che; Chen, Hsin-Ming; Yu-Fong Chang, Julia

    2017-06-01

    Langerhans cells (LCs) are antigen presenting cells. This study assessed the LC counts in oral epithelial dysplasia (OED) and their correlation to clinicopathological parameters. This study examined the LC counts in the epithelia and subepithelial connective tissues of 58 patients with OED (21 mild, 18 moderate, and 19 severe OED lesions) and 10 specimens of normal oral mucosa (NOM) by anti-S-100 protein immunostaining. We found that the mean LC counts in the epithelia or subepithelial connective tissues increased significantly from NOM samples through mild and moderate OED to severe OED samples. In addition, a significant correlation was found between higher mean LC counts in the dysplastic epithelia of OED samples and OED lesions with thicker epithelial layers (p<0.001) or wider inflammatory zones (p<0.001), and between higher mean LC counts in the subepithelial connective tissues of OED samples and OED lesions with wider inflammatory zones (p<0.001). Moreover, the nine OED lesions with malignant transformation had a significantly lower mean LC count than the 49 OED lesions without malignant transformation. The significant and gradual elevation in LC count from NOM through mild and moderate OED to severe OED lesions suggests an upregulation of immunosurveillance ability in OED patients during the early oral carcinogenesis process. A low LC count in OED lesions may suggest the partial loss of immunosurveillance ability against dysplastic cells; this in turn favors the malignant transformation of an OED lesion into oral cancer. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  2. Using pancreas tissue slices for in situ studies of islet of Langerhans and acinar cell biology.

    PubMed

    Marciniak, Anja; Cohrs, Christian M; Tsata, Vasiliki; Chouinard, Julie A; Selck, Claudia; Stertmann, Julia; Reichelt, Saskia; Rose, Tobias; Ehehalt, Florian; Weitz, Jürgen; Solimena, Michele; Slak Rupnik, Marjan; Speier, Stephan

    2014-12-01

    Studies on the cellular function of the pancreas are typically performed in vitro on its isolated functional units, the endocrine islets of Langerhans and the exocrine acini. However, these approaches are hampered by preparation-induced changes of cell physiology and the lack of an intact surrounding. We present here a detailed protocol for the preparation of pancreas tissue slices. This procedure is less damaging to the tissue and faster than alternative approaches, and it enables the in situ study of pancreatic endocrine and exocrine cell physiology in a conserved environment. Pancreas tissue slices facilitate the investigation of cellular mechanisms underlying the function, pathology and interaction of the endocrine and exocrine components of the pancreas. We provide examples for several experimental applications of pancreas tissue slices to study various aspects of pancreas cell biology. Furthermore, we describe the preparation of human and porcine pancreas tissue slices for the validation and translation of research findings obtained in the mouse model. Preparation of pancreas tissue slices according to the protocol described here takes less than 45 min from tissue preparation to receipt of the first slices.

  3. Deterioration of the Langerhans cell network of the human gingival epithelium with aging.

    PubMed

    Zavala, Walther David; Cavicchia, Juan Carlos

    2006-12-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are the professional antigen-presenting cells responsible for initiating of the immune response. Langerhans cells (LCs) are a type of DC that is a permanent resident of the oral epithelium. LCs are organized conforming a network in such a way as to maximize their surface area for efficient apprehension of antigens. To detect age-related changes in the LCs network, fragments of gingival epithelium spontaneously accompanying dental removals were processed by immunohistochemistry. Monoclonal antibody CD1a followed by biotinized immunoglobulin-streptoavidin peroxidase were used to identify the LCs with the light microscope. LC density and LC types were analyzed according to their morphology and intraepithelial distribution. In the older age group (61-74 years) the density was significantly lower than in the younger age groups. Morphologically, LCs showed fewer dendritic-branching processes and had a rounded shape in the older age group. Present observations indicate that the LC network changes markedly with aging. These results suggest that immunological defense of the oral tissue might be compromised in old age.

  4. Murine Langerin+ dermal dendritic cells prime CD8+ T cells while Langerhans cells induce cross-tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Flacher, Vincent; Tripp, Christoph H; Mairhofer, David G; Steinman, Ralph M; Stoitzner, Patrizia; Idoyaga, Juliana; Romani, Nikolaus

    2014-01-01

    Skin dendritic cells (DCs) control the immunogenicity of cutaneously administered vaccines. Antigens targeted to DCs via the C-type lectin Langerin/CD207 are cross-presented to CD8+ T cells in vivo. We investigated the relative roles of Langerhans cells (LCs) and Langerin+ dermal DCs (dDCs) in different vaccination settings. Poly(I:C) and anti-CD40 agonist antibody promoted cytotoxic responses upon intradermal immunization with ovalbumin (OVA)-coupled anti-Langerin antibodies (Langerin/OVA). This correlated with CD70 upregulation in Langerin+ dDCs, but not LCs. In chimeric mice where Langerin targeting was restricted to dDCs, CD8+ T-cell memory was enhanced. Conversely, providing Langerin/OVA exclusively to LCs failed to prime cytotoxicity, despite initial antigen cross-presentation to CD8+ T cells. Langerin/OVA combined with imiquimod could not prime CD8+ T cells and resulted in poor cytotoxicity in subsequent responses. This tolerance induction required targeting and maturation of LCs. Altogether, Langerin+ dDCs prime long-lasting cytotoxic responses, while cross-presentation by LCs negatively influences CD8+ T-cell priming. Moreover, this highlights that DCs exposed to TLR agonists can still induce tolerance and supports the existence of qualitatively different DC maturation programs. PMID:25085878

  5. Langerhans cells are generated by two distinct PU.1-dependent transcriptional networks.

    PubMed

    Chopin, Michaël; Seillet, Cyril; Chevrier, Stéphane; Wu, Li; Wang, Hongsheng; Morse, Herbert C; Belz, Gabrielle T; Nutt, Stephen L

    2013-12-16

    Langerhans cells (LCs) are the unique dendritic cells found in the epidermis. While a great deal of attention has focused on defining the developmental origins of LCs, reports addressing the transcriptional network ruling their differentiation remain sparse. We addressed the function of a group of key DC transcription factors-PU.1, ID2, IRF4, and IRF8-in the establishment of the LC network. We show that although steady-state LC homeostasis depends on PU.1 and ID2, the latter is dispensable for bone marrow-derived LCs. PU.1 controls LC differentiation by regulating the expression of the critical TGF-β responsive transcription factor RUNX3. PU.1 directly binds to the Runx3 regulatory elements in a TGF-β-dependent manner, whereas ectopic expression of RUNX3 rescued LC differentiation in the absence of PU.1 and promoted LC differentiation from PU.1-sufficient progenitors. These findings highlight the dual molecular network underlying LC differentiation, and show the central role of PU.1 in these processes.

  6. Human cytomegalovirus alters localization of MHC class II and dendrite morphology in mature Langerhans cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Andrew W; Hertel, Laura; Louie, Ryan K; Burster, Timo; Lacaille, Vashti; Pashine, Achal; Abate, Davide A; Mocarski, Edward S; Mellins, Elizabeth D

    2006-09-15

    Hemopoietic stem cell-derived mature Langerhans-type dendritic cells (LC) are susceptible to productive infection by human CMV (HCMV). To investigate the impact of infection on this cell type, we examined HLA-DR biosynthesis and trafficking in mature LC cultures exposed to HCMV. We found decreased surface HLA-DR levels in viral Ag-positive as well as in Ag-negative mature LC. Inhibition of HLA-DR was independent of expression of unique short US2-US11 region gene products by HCMV. Indeed, exposure to UV-inactivated virus, but not to conditioned medium from infected cells, was sufficient to reduce HLA-DR on mature LC, implicating particle binding/penetration in this effect. Reduced surface levels reflected an altered distribution of HLA-DR because total cellular HLA-DR was not diminished. Accumulation of HLA-DR was not explained by altered cathepsin S activity. Mature, peptide-loaded HLA-DR molecules were retained within cells, as assessed by the proportion of SDS-stable HLA-DR dimers. A block in egress was implicated, as endocytosis of surface HLA-DR was not increased. Immunofluorescence microscopy corroborated the intracellular retention of HLA-DR and revealed markedly fewer HLA-DR-positive dendritic projections in infected mature LC. Unexpectedly, light microscopic analyses showed a dramatic loss of the dendrites themselves and immunofluorescence revealed that cytoskeletal elements crucial for the formation and maintenance of dendrites are disrupted in viral Ag-positive cells. Consistent with these dendrite effects, HCMV-infected mature LC exhibit markedly reduced chemotaxis in response to lymphoid chemokines. Thus, HCMV impedes MHC class II molecule trafficking, dendritic projections, and migration of mature LC. These changes likely contribute to the reduced activation of CD4+ T cells by HCMV-infected mature LC.

  7. Langerhans Cells Maintain Local Tissue Tolerance in a Model of Systemic Autoimmune Disease1

    PubMed Central

    King, Jennifer K.; Philips, Rachael L.; Eriksson, Anna U.; Kim, Peter J.; Halder, Ramesh C.; Lee, Delphine J.; Singh, Ram Raj

    2015-01-01

    Systemic autoimmune diseases such as lupus affect multiple organs, usually in a diverse fashion where only certain organs are affected in individual patients. It is unclear whether the ‘local’ immune cells play a role in regulating tissue specificity in relation to disease heterogeneity in systemic autoimmune diseases. Here, we used skin as a model to determine the role of tissue-resident dendritic cells in local and systemic involvement within a systemic lupus disease model. Skin-resident dendritic cells, namely Langerhans cells (LC), have been implicated in regulating tolerance or autoimmunity using elegant transgenic models, however, their role in local versus systemic immune regulation is unknown. We demonstrate that while lymphocytes from skin-draining lymph nodes of autoimmune-prone MRL/MpJ-Faslpr/lpr mice react spontaneously to a physiological skin self-Ag desmoglein-3, epicutaneous applications of desmoglein-3 induced tolerance that is dependent on LCs. Inducible ablation of LCs in adult, preclinical MRL/MpJ-Faslpr/lpr and MRL/MpJ-Fas+/+ mice resulted in increased autoantibodies against skin Ags and markedly accelerated lupus dermatitis with increased local macrophage infiltration, but had no effect on systemic autoantibodies such as anti-dsDNA Abs or disease in other organs such as kidneys, lung, and liver. Furthermore, skin-draining lymph nodes of LC-ablated MRL/MpJ-Faslpr/lpr mice had significantly fewer CD4+ T-cells producing anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 than LC-intact controls. These results indicate that a skin-resident dendritic cell population regulates local tolerance in systemic lupus and emphasize the importance of the local immune milieu in preventing tissue-specific autoimmunity yet have no effect on systemic autoimmunity. PMID:26071559

  8. Aryl hydrocarbon receptor activation inhibits in vitro differentiation of human monocytes and Langerhans dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Platzer, Barbara; Richter, Susanne; Kneidinger, Doris; Waltenberger, Darina; Woisetschläger, Maximilian; Strobl, Herbert

    2009-07-01

    The transcription factor aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) represents a promising therapeutic target in allergy and autoimmunity. AhR signaling induced by the newly described ligand VAF347 inhibits allergic lung inflammation as well as suppresses pancreatic islet allograft rejection. These effects are likely mediated via alterations in dendritic cell (DC) function. Moreover, VAF347 induces tolerogenic DCs. Langerhans cells (LCs) are immediate targets of exogenous AhR ligands at epithelial surfaces; how they respond to AhR ligands remained undefined. We studied AhR expression and function in human LCs and myelopoietic cell subsets using a lineage differentiation and gene transduction model of human CD34(+) hematopoietic progenitors. We found that AhR is highly regulated during myeloid subset differentiation. LCs expressed highest AhR levels followed by monocytes. Conversely, neutrophil granulocytes lacked AhR expression. AhR ligands including VAF347 arrested the differentiation of monocytes and LCs at an early precursor cell stage, whereas progenitor cell expansion or granulopoiesis remained unimpaired. AhR expression was coregulated with the transcription factor PU.1 during myeloid subset differentiation. VAF347 inhibited PU.1 induction during initial monocytic differentiation, and ectopic PU.1 restored monocyte and LC generation in the presence of this compound. AhR ligands failed to interfere with cytokine receptor signaling during LC differentiation and failed to impair LC activation/maturation. VAF347-mediated antiproliferative effect on precursors undergoing LC lineage differentiation occurred in a clinically applicable serum-free culture model and was not accompanied by apoptosis induction. In conclusion, AhR agonist signaling interferes with transcriptional processes leading to monocyte/DC lineage commitment of human myeloid progenitor cells.

  9. Circulating and in situ lymphocyte subsets and Langerhans cells in patients with compositae oleoresin dermatitis and increased ultraviolet A sensitivity during treatment with azathioprine

    SciTech Connect

    Baadsgaard, O.

    1986-04-01

    Circulating and in situ lymphocyte subsets and Langerhans cells in four patients with compositae oleoresin dermatitis and increased ultraviolet A sensitivity before and during treatment with azathioprine were estimated. It was found that the number of Leu 6+ Langerhans cells decreased during therapy. This decrease was accompanied by a reduction in the number of Leu 2a+, Leu 3a+, Leu 4+, DR+, and Leu M2+ cells in the blood and a reduction in the number of Leu 2a+, Leu 3a+, Leu 4+, and DR+ cells in the skin. Concomitantly with the changes in the number of immunocompetent cells, the eczema cleared.

  10. Occult Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis Presenting with Papillary Thyroid Carcinoma, a Thickened Pituitary Stalk and Diabetes Insipidus.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Michael S; Gordon, Murray B

    2016-01-01

    Etiologies of a thickened stalk include inflammatory, neoplastic, and idiopathic origins, and the underlying diagnosis may remain occult. We report a patient with a thickened pituitary stalk (TPS) and papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) whose diagnosis remained obscure until a skin lesion appeared. The patient presented with PTC, status postthyroidectomy, and I(131) therapy. PTC molecular testing revealed BRAF mutant (V600E, GTC>GAG). She had a 5-year history of polyuria/polydipsia. Overnight dehydration study confirmed diabetes insipidus (DI). MRI revealed TPS with loss of the posterior pituitary bright spot. Evaluation showed hypogonadotropic hypogonadism and low IGF-1. Chest X-ray and ACE levels were normal. Radiographs to evaluate for extrapituitary sites of Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis (LCH) were unremarkable. Germinoma studies were negative: normal serum and CSF beta-hCG, alpha-fetoprotein, and CEA. Three years later, the patient developed vulvar labial lesions followed by inguinal region skin lesions, biopsy of which revealed LCH. Reanalysis of thyroid pathology was consistent with concurrent LCH, PTC, and Hashimoto's thyroiditis within the thyroid. This case illustrates that one must be vigilant for extrapituitary manifestations of systemic diseases to diagnose the etiology of TPS. An activating mutation of the protooncogene BRAF is a potential unifying etiology of both PTC and LCH.

  11. Severe sclerosing cholangitis after Langerhans cell histiocytosis treated by liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Yunhua; Zhang, Zhiheng; Chen, Maogen; Ju, Weiqiang; Wang, Dongping; Ji, Fei; Ren, Qingqi; Guo, Zhiyong; He, Xiaoshun

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) is a rare hematopoietic disorder of unknown pathogenesis. LCH diseases may occur in a single organ or multisystem organ. The patients with multisystem involvement usually have a poor prognosis. Liver involvement in multisystem LCH results in severe complications, such as obvious sclerosing cholangitis (SC) with jaundice. Methods: We reported a 31-year-old man developed severe SC due to multisystem LCH and was successfully treated by liver transplantation (LT). In addition, we firstly used tacrolimus and mycofenolate mofetil as immunosuppressants to treat LCH after LT. Results: We performed the immunosuppressants to deal with the LCH after LT, now the patient is currently well with normal liver function and no evidence of recurrence of LCH for 4 and a half years follow-up. Conclusion: LT should be recommended as an effective treatment for these adults with severe SC due to multisystem LCH. Finally, using tacrolimus and mycofenolate mofetil as immunosuppressants to treat LCH might be favorable to prevent LCH recurrence. PMID:28248858

  12. Adult multisystem langerhans cell histiocytosis presenting with central diabetes insipidus successfully treated with chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jung-Eun; Lee, Hae Ri; Ohn, Jung Hun; Moon, Min Kyong; Park, Juri; Lee, Seong Jin; Choi, Moon-Gi; Yoo, Hyung Joon; Kim, Jung Han; Hong, Eun-Gyoung

    2014-09-01

    We report the rare case of an adult who was diagnosed with recurrent multisystem Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) involving the pituitary stalk and lung who present with central diabetes insipidus and was successfully treated with systemic steroids and chemotherapy. A 49-year-old man visited our hospital due to symptoms of polydipsia and polyuria that started 1 month prior. Two years prior to presentation, he underwent excision of right 6th and 7th rib lesions for the osteolytic lesion and chest pain, which were later confirmed to be LCH on pathology. After admission, the water deprivation test was done and the result indicated that he had central diabetes insipidus. Sella magnetic resonance imaging showed a mass on the pituitary stalk with loss of normal bright spot at the posterior lobe of the pituitary. Multiple patchy infiltrations were detected in both lung fields by computed tomography (CT). He was diagnosed with recurrent LCH and was subsequently treated with inhaled desmopressin, systemic steroids, vinblastine, and mercaptopurine. The pituitary mass disappeared after two months and both lungs were clear on chest CT after 11 months. Although clinical remission in multisystem LCH in adults is reportedly rare, our case of adult-onset multisystem LCH was treated successfully with systemic chemotherapy using prednisolone, vinblastine, and 6-mercaptopurine, which was well tolerated.

  13. New clinical score for disease activity at diagnosis in Langerhans cell histiocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Won-ik; Jeong, You Cheol; Kim, Sun Young; Kim, So Dam; Pribis, John Paul; Kim, Hee-Jin; Koh, Kyung-Nam; Im, Ho-Joon; Lee, Young-Ho

    2011-01-01

    Background The clinical presentation and course of Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) are variable, ranging from an isolated, spontaneously remitting bone lesion to multisystem disease with risk organ involvement. Treatment of LCH ranges from a wait-and-see attitude to intensive multidrug therapy and, in some cases, bone marrow transplantation. It is necessary to develop an objective score for assessing disease activity in patients with LCH. We propose a new clinical scoring system to evaluate disease activity at diagnosis that can predict the clinical outcomes of LCH and correlate it with clinical courses. Methods Clinical data, obtained from children diagnosed with LCH at Asan Medical Center and Hanyang University Hospital between March 1998 and February 2009, were studied retrospectively. The scoring system was developed according to the basic biological data, radiological findings, and physical findings and applied to a database containing information on 133 patients. Results The median age of the 133 patients (74 male, 59 female) was 52 months (range, 0.6-178 months), and LCH was diagnosed based on CD1a positivity. At diagnosis, the score distributions were highly asymmetrical: the score was between 1 and 2 in 75.9% of cases, 3-6 in 15.8%, and greater than 6 in 8.3%. Initial scores above 6 were highly predictive of reactivation and late complications. Conclusion This new LCH disease activity score provides an objective tool for assessing disease severity, both at diagnosis and during follow-up. PMID:22065974

  14. A confusing case report of pulmonary langerhans cell histiocytosis and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Zhen, Wang; Costable, Ulrich; Jun, Xu; Zhe, Ren; YuPing, Mao

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Pulmonary Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis (PLCH) is a rare disease. From the insidious onset and nonspecific manifestations, it is difficult to diagnose PLCH. To help improve the diagnosis and therapy options of adult PLCH, we present this case report and literature review about a confusing case of PLCH. In this report, we present a 37-year-old male PLCH case that was negative for CD1a and S100 expression. Smoking cessation and use of prescribed Spiriva appeared to improve the patient’s symptoms. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of PLCH in which improved symptoms were seen with the use of Spiriva alone.The mechanism is not clear, but potentially has some relationship with dilating the airway, decreasing the mucous hypersecretion and promoting anti-inflammatory pathways. From this patient’s case, we may be able to find more cases to then find other first line therapies for PLCH patients. PMID:28352790

  15. Langerhans cell histiocytosis with multifocal bone lesions: comparative clinical features between single and multi-systems.

    PubMed

    Imashuku, Shinsaku; Kinugawa, Naoko; Matsuzaki, Akinobu; Kitoh, Toshiyuki; Ohki, Kentaro; Shioda, Yoko; Tsunematsu, Yukiko; Imamura, Toshihiko; Morimoto, Akira

    2009-11-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) can be a single system or multi-system disease. Both disease types can be associated with multi-focal bone lesions, but their bone involvement patterns have not been compared systematically. Of the new pediatric LCH cases enrolled into the JLSG-02 study during 2002-2007, 67 cases of single system multifocal bone (SMFB) LCH and 97 cases of multi-system bone (MSB) LCH were analyzed to determine if the bone involvement patterns differ in these two types, and whether these differences correlate with outcome. Statistical analysis was performed with Mann-Whitney U test, Fisher's exact test, and other measures. Onset ages were higher for SMFB (P < 0.001), but the two types did not differ in the number of bone lesions per patient. The skull was most frequently affected in both types, followed by the spine. Lesions in the temporal bone (P = 0.002), ear-petrous bone (P < 0.001), orbita (P = 0.003), and zygomatic bone (P = 0.016) were significantly more common in MSB. The two types did not differ in response to treatment, but MSB was associated with a significantly higher incidence of diabetes insipidus (DI) (P < 0.001). Novel measures are required in preventing the development of DI in MSB-type LCH patients with "risk" bone lesions.

  16. Central precocious puberty in multisystem Langerhans cell histiocytosis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Municchi, G; Marconcini, S; D'Ambrosio, A; Berardi, R; Acquaviva, A

    2002-06-01

    The authors describe a girl with multisystem Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) who developed central precocious puberty (CPP). At the age of 19 months she presented with otorrhea and polypoid formations in the ear canal; polyps were removed and LCH suspected. She subsequently developed diabetes insipidus with a documented lesion of the pituitary stalk; she received chemotherapy and began therapy with l-desamino-8-D-argininevasopressin. Growth hormone deficiency was diagnosed at the age of 4.4 years and GH replacement therapy started. The patient has been off therapy for LCH since the age of 6. Signs of pubertal development appeared at 7.5 years (bone age 8 years) and gonadotropin-releasing hormone analog (GnRHa) treatment was started. During the observation period she developed central hypothyroidism. Development of CPP during LCH is extremely rare; to the authors 'knowledge, no patient has been described so far. The authors believe that CPP was secondary to LCH and did not represent a casual finding, even in the absence of hypothalamic-pituitary axis involvement. The presence of preceding lesions producing excessive cytokine levels, with damage on the neurosecretory apparatus that inhibits the GnRH pulse generator, represents the most intriguing hypothesis. The possibility of CPP development should be considered during the follow-up of these patients.

  17. HLA-DQA2 and HLA-DQB2 genes are specifically expressed in human Langerhans cells and encode a new HLA class II molecule.

    PubMed

    Lenormand, Cedric; Bausinger, Huguette; Gross, Florence; Signorino-Gelo, Francois; Koch, Susanne; Peressin, Maryse; Fricker, Dominique; Cazenave, Jean-Pierre; Bieber, Thomas; Hanau, Daniel; de la Salle, Henri; Tourne, Sylvie

    2012-04-15

    The precise role of human epidermal Langerhans cells (LCs) in immune response is highly controversial. While studying the gene expression profile of these cells, we were intrigued to identify the HLA-DQB2 gene as potentially expressed in LCs. Despite a strong evolutionary conservation of their sequences, the concomitant expression of the poorly polymorphic HLA-DQA2/HLA-DQB2 genes, paralogous to the HLA-DQA1/HLA-DQB1 genes, has never been detected in any cell type. We confirmed by RT-PCR that the HLA-DQA2 and -DQB2 genes are both expressed in LCs, but not in monocyte-derived dendritic cells, or in blood CD1c(+) or plasmacytoid dendritic cells. The presence of the HLA-DQβ2 chain in LCs could be demonstrated by Western blotting, whereas immunofluorescence revealed its localization in early endosomes. As in the case of other HLA class II molecules, the HLA-DQα2 and -DQβ2 chains formed heterodimers that had to associate with the invariant chain to reach endosomal compartments. HLA-DQα2/β2 heterodimers were expressed at the cell surface, where they could mediate staphylococcal superantigen stimulation of T cells. Interestingly, HLA-DQα2 and HLA-DQβ1 chains formed mixed heterodimers which efficiently left the endoplasmic reticulum. These observations strongly suggest that the poorly polymorphic HLA-DQA2 and -DQB2 genes should be considered to be of immunological importance. The HLA-DQα2/β2 molecules could influence the complexity of the repertoire of Ags presented by LCs.

  18. Quiescent Innate Response to Infective Filariae by Human Langerhans Cells Suggests a Strategy of Immune Evasion

    PubMed Central

    Boyd, Alexis; Bennuru, Sasisekhar; Wang, Yuanyuan; Sanprasert, Vivornpun; Law, Melissa; Chaussabel, Damien; Nutman, Thomas B.

    2013-01-01

    Filarial infection is initiated by mosquito-derived third-stage larvae (L3) deposited on the skin that transit through the epidermis, which contains Langerhans cells (LC) and keratinocytes (KC), among other cells. This earliest interaction between L3 and the LC likely conditions the priming of the immune system to the parasite. To determine the nature of this interaction, human LC (langerin+ E-cadherin+ CD1a+) were generated in vitro and exposed to live L3. LC exposed to live L3 for 48 h showed no alterations in the cell surface markers CD14, CD86, CD83, CD207, E-cadherin, CD80, CD40, and HLA-DR or in mRNA expression of inflammation-associated genes, such as those for interleukin 18 (IL-18), IL-18BP, and caspase 1. In contrast to L3, live tachyzoites of Toxoplasma gondii, an intracellular parasite, induced production of CXCL9, IP-10, and IL-6 in LC. Furthermore, preexposure of LC to L3 did not alter Toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3)- or TLR4-mediated expression of the proinflammatory cytokines IL-1β, gamma interferon (IFN-γ), IL-6, or IL-10. Interestingly, cocultures of KC and LC produced significantly more IL-18, IL-1α, and IL-8 than did cultures of LC alone, although exposure of the cocultures to live L3 did not result in altered cytokine production. Microarray examination of ex vivo LC from skin blisters that were exposed to live L3 also showed few significant changes in gene expression compared with unexposed blisters, further underscoring the relatively muted response of LC to L3. Our data suggest that failure by LC to initiate an inflammatory response to the invasive stage of filarial parasites may be a strategy for immune evasion by the filarial parasite. PMID:23429540

  19. Insights into the pathogenesis of Langerhans cell histiocytosis: the development of targeted therapies

    PubMed Central

    Hutter, Caroline; Minkov, Milen

    2016-01-01

    More than a century after its first description, Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) still remains an intriguing disease. Considerable progress in understanding its biology has been achieved recently. Description of the V600E BRAF mutation in samples of LCH tissue in 2010 was followed by description of additional mutations, all leading to constitutive ERK activation. Current experimental data suggest that LCH is a myeloid neoplasia with inflammatory properties, yet the exact pathophysiology remains poorly understood. Disease management paradigms have changed over time, closely reflecting the evolving view of the nature of the disease. The international Histiocyte Society have conducted three prospective clinical studies on multisystem LCH since the early 1990s. The standard frontline therapy for patients with multisystem LCH based on the cumulative knowledge of those trials consists of 6–12 weeks of initial therapy (daily oral steroids and weekly vinblastine injections), followed by pulses of prednisolone/vinblastine every 3 weeks, for a total treatment duration of 12 months. A currently ongoing study (LCH-IV) with a complex design (five interventional and two observational strata) targets further reduction of mortality and morbidity by tailoring treatment intensity depending on expected risk, as well as by exploring treatment regimens for special locations. Current knowledge on LCH pathobiology opens opportunities for improvement in the patient outcome. The activating BRAF and MAP2K1 mutations collectively accounting for about 75% of the LCH population as well as the resulting constitutive activation of downstream ERK offer an opportunity for targeted treatment. Related issues (eg, finding most effective and less toxic drugs or combinations, appropriate dosage, and optimal treatment duration) must be addressed in controlled prospective trials. Additional mechanisms, such as the interactions of the mutated dendritic cell clone with other inflammatory cells and

  20. From idiopathic diabetes insipidus to neurodegenerative Langerhans cell histiocytosis--an unusual presentation and progression of disease.

    PubMed

    Hayward, Rachel M; Nicolin, Gary; Kennedy, Charles; Joy, Harriet; Davies, Justin H

    2011-01-01

    Diabetes insipidus (DI) is rare in childhood and has a wide-ranging aetiology including the involvement of uncontrolled proliferation of dendritic cells in the hypothalamic-pituitary axis, characteristic of Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH). DI may manifest as a sequela of multisystem LCH disease involving skin, bone, liver, spleen and lymph nodes. In very rare cases patients diagnosed with LCH exhibit neurodegenerative changes, such as severe ataxia, tremor, dysarthria and intellectual impairment. We report a 2 1/2-year-old boy who presented initially with apparent idiopathic DI, developed anterior pituitary hormone deficiency and progressive neurological deterioration secondary to neurodegenerative LCH.

  1. Pulmonary Langerhans cell histiocytosis: a comprehensive analysis of 40 patients and literature review.

    PubMed

    Elia, Davide; Torre, Olga; Cassandro, Roberto; Caminati, Antonella; Harari, Sergio

    2015-06-01

    Pulmonary Langerhans cell histiocytosis (PLCH) is a rare interstitial disease affecting primarily young adult smokers. In order to highlight the clinical features of the disease, we conducted a retrospective analysis on clinical data of PLCH patients followed at our center; moreover, we reviewed the current literature on PLCH. Between January 2004 and July 2014, 40 patients with PLCH were evaluated at our Division. The average patients' age was 40 (± 14) years, and 22 of them were females. Diagnosis was based on search of CD1a+ cells in the bronchoalveolar lavage (10 patients), lung biopsy (8 patients), or cystic bone lesion's biopsy (2 patients); in 12 patients, diagnosis was achieved on the basis of the clinical-radiological data. The principal manifestation of PLCH was the presence of cysts involving upper lung zones with costophrenic sparing on chest CT scan (in 25 patients); micronodular pattern in the middle-upper zone and combination of the two radiological patterns were less frequently observed (in 9 and 6 patients, respectively). Pulmonary hypertension was found in 4 patients. Extra pulmonary manifestations were diabetes insipidus, bone lesions, and skin involvement (in 5, 7, and 1 patient, respectively). For 25 patients, smoking cessation was the only required therapy. Treatments with low dose of prednisolone, vinblastine and prednisolone, or 6-mercaptopurin were reserved for patients with major pulmonary or extra-pulmonary involvement (for 11, 4, and 5 patients, respectively). In conclusion, PLCH is a rare, multi-systemic disease; early diagnosis, accurate staging and smoking cessation are considered critical in PLCH management. Copyright © 2015 European Federation of Internal Medicine. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Markers of Epidermal Stem Cell Subpopulations in Adult Mammalian Skin

    PubMed Central

    Kretzschmar, Kai; Watt, Fiona M.

    2014-01-01

    The epidermis is the outermost layer of mammalian skin and comprises a multilayered epithelium, the interfollicular epidermis, with associated hair follicles, sebaceous glands, and eccrine sweat glands. As in other epithelia, adult stem cells within the epidermis maintain tissue homeostasis and contribute to repair of tissue damage. The bulge of hair follicles, where DNA-label-retaining cells reside, was traditionally regarded as the sole epidermal stem cell compartment. However, in recent years multiple stem cell populations have been identified. In this review, we discuss the different stem cell compartments of adult murine and human epidermis, the markers that they express, and the assays that are used to characterize epidermal stem cell properties. PMID:24993676

  3. Familial papular epidermal nevus with "skyline" basal cell layer.

    PubMed

    Brena, Michela; Besagni, Francesca; Boneschi, Vinicio; Tadini, Gianluca

    2014-01-01

    Papular epidermal nevus with "skyline" basal cell layer (PENS), a novel keratinocytic nevus, has recently been described as a mosaic condition with varying presentations. We herein describe typical PENS lesions, which usually occur sporadically, affecting two members of the same family. The concept of paradominant inheritance is proposed to explain the paradox of occasional transmission of normally sporadically occurring traits.

  4. CD1c-Related DCs that Express CD207/Langerin, but Are Distinguishable from Langerhans Cells, Are Consistently Present in Human Tonsils

    PubMed Central

    De Monte, Anne; Olivieri, Charles-Vivien; Vitale, Sébastien; Bailleux, Sonanda; Castillo, Laurent; Giordanengo, Valérie; Maryanski, Janet L.; Segura, Elodie; Doglio, Alain

    2016-01-01

    Several subsets of dendritic cells (DCs) are present in the oropharyngeal tonsillar tissues and are thought to behave as major actors in development and regulation of immunity by acting as a first line of recognition for airborne and alimentary antigens. We previously discovered in human adult tonsils infected with Epstein–Barr virus (EBV), a subset of DCs that expressed langerin/CD207, a lectin usually recognized as a hallmark of epidermal Langerhans cells (LCs). In the present study, we analyzed the content of several child and adult tonsils in order to characterize in more detail the phenotype of these tonsillar CD207-expressing DCs (tCD207 DCs) and to compare it with that of other human DC subsets. We showed that all the human tonsils studied (n = 12) contained significant proportions of tCD207 DCs among tonsillar cells expressing HLA-DR. Moreover, the presence of tCD207 DCs in tonsils from young children free of EBV infection indicated that these cells could be established early in the tonsil independently of EBV infection. We also showed that tCD207 DCs, that were found mainly located within the tonsillar lymphoid stroma, were distinguishable from LCs by the level of expression of CD1a and EpCAM, and also from human inflammatory DCs by the lack of CD1a, CD206, and CD14 expression. Detailed analysis of cell surface DC markers showed that tCD207 DCs were unrelated to CD141+ DCs or macrophages, but defined a subtype of tonsillar DCs closely related to myeloid resident CD1c DCs. Since it was established that blood CD1c myeloid DCs exhibit plasticity and are capable of expressing CD207 notably in the presence of inflammatory cytokines, it is tempting to speculate that CD207+ CD1c+ DCs may play a specific immune role. PMID:27252701

  5. CD1c-Related DCs that Express CD207/Langerin, but Are Distinguishable from Langerhans Cells, Are Consistently Present in Human Tonsils.

    PubMed

    De Monte, Anne; Olivieri, Charles-Vivien; Vitale, Sébastien; Bailleux, Sonanda; Castillo, Laurent; Giordanengo, Valérie; Maryanski, Janet L; Segura, Elodie; Doglio, Alain

    2016-01-01

    Several subsets of dendritic cells (DCs) are present in the oropharyngeal tonsillar tissues and are thought to behave as major actors in development and regulation of immunity by acting as a first line of recognition for airborne and alimentary antigens. We previously discovered in human adult tonsils infected with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), a subset of DCs that expressed langerin/CD207, a lectin usually recognized as a hallmark of epidermal Langerhans cells (LCs). In the present study, we analyzed the content of several child and adult tonsils in order to characterize in more detail the phenotype of these tonsillar CD207-expressing DCs (tCD207 DCs) and to compare it with that of other human DC subsets. We showed that all the human tonsils studied (n = 12) contained significant proportions of tCD207 DCs among tonsillar cells expressing HLA-DR. Moreover, the presence of tCD207 DCs in tonsils from young children free of EBV infection indicated that these cells could be established early in the tonsil independently of EBV infection. We also showed that tCD207 DCs, that were found mainly located within the tonsillar lymphoid stroma, were distinguishable from LCs by the level of expression of CD1a and EpCAM, and also from human inflammatory DCs by the lack of CD1a, CD206, and CD14 expression. Detailed analysis of cell surface DC markers showed that tCD207 DCs were unrelated to CD141(+) DCs or macrophages, but defined a subtype of tonsillar DCs closely related to myeloid resident CD1c DCs. Since it was established that blood CD1c myeloid DCs exhibit plasticity and are capable of expressing CD207 notably in the presence of inflammatory cytokines, it is tempting to speculate that CD207(+) CD1c(+) DCs may play a specific immune role.

  6. Benzo(a)pyrene metabolism in primary cultures of mouse epidermal cells and untransformed and transformed epidermal cell lines.

    PubMed

    DiGiovanni, J; Miller, D R; Singer, J M; Viaje, A; Slaga, T J

    1982-07-01

    The metabolism of [3H]benzo(a)pyrene [B(a)P] by cultures of primary mouse epidermal cells and untransformed and transformed epidermal cell lines was investigated. All three cell types effectively metabolized [3H]B(a)P. The major organic solvent-extractable metabolites found intracellularly in primary cultures were trans-7,8-dihydro-7,8-dihydroxybenzo(a)pyrene and 3-hydroxybenzo(a)pyrene, although quantities of 9-hydroxybenzo(a)pyrene, trans-9,10-dihydro-9,10-dihydroxybenzo(a)pyrene, and quinones also were present. The major organic solvent-soluble metabolites found in the extracellular medium were trans-9,10-dihydro-9,10-dihydroxybenzo(a)pyrene and trans-7,8-dihydro-7,8-dihydroxybenzo(a)pyrene, with smaller quantities of unconjugated phenols and quinones. The major water-soluble metabolites found in the extracellular medium were conjugated with glucuronic acid [primarily 3-hydroxybenzo(a)pyrene and several quinones]. No sulfate conjugates of [3H]B(a)P metabolites were detected. [3H]B(a)P metabolism was similar in cultures of untransformed and transformed epidermal cell lines but differed from the primary cultures. The major intracellular and extracellular organic solvent-soluble metabolites were diols. Little or no unconjugated phenols were detected. Both the untransformed and transformed epidermal cell lines converted [3H]B(a)P to water-soluble metabolites, primarily glucuronide conjugates. In contrast to the primary cells, a major pathway of trans-7,8-dihydro-7,8-dihydroxybenzo(a)pyrene metabolism in the untransformed and transformed cell lines was a glucuronide conjugate. Primary mouse epidermal cells provide an important model system for studying factors affecting the activation and detoxification of hydrocarbon carcinogens.

  7. The Beta Cell in Its Cluster: Stochastic Graphs of Beta Cell Connectivity in the Islets of Langerhans.

    PubMed

    Striegel, Deborah A; Hara, Manami; Periwal, Vipul

    2015-08-01

    Pancreatic islets of Langerhans consist of endocrine cells, primarily α, β and δ cells, which secrete glucagon, insulin, and somatostatin, respectively, to regulate plasma glucose. β cells form irregular locally connected clusters within islets that act in concert to secrete insulin upon glucose stimulation. Due to the central functional significance of this local connectivity in the placement of β cells in an islet, it is important to characterize it quantitatively. However, quantification of the seemingly stochastic cytoarchitecture of β cells in an islet requires mathematical methods that can capture topological connectivity in the entire β-cell population in an islet. Graph theory provides such a framework. Using large-scale imaging data for thousands of islets containing hundreds of thousands of cells in human organ donor pancreata, we show that quantitative graph characteristics differ between control and type 2 diabetic islets. Further insight into the processes that shape and maintain this architecture is obtained by formulating a stochastic theory of β-cell rearrangement in whole islets, just as the normal equilibrium distribution of the Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process can be viewed as the result of the interplay between a random walk and a linear restoring force. Requiring that rearrangements maintain the observed quantitative topological graph characteristics strongly constrained possible processes. Our results suggest that β-cell rearrangement is dependent on its connectivity in order to maintain an optimal cluster size in both normal and T2D islets.

  8. Central nervous system imaging in childhood Langerhans cell histiocytosis – a reference center analysis

    PubMed Central

    Porto, Luciana; Schöning, Stefan; Hattingen, Elke; Sörensen, Jan; Jurcoane, Alina; Lehrnbecher, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Background The aim of our study was (1) to describe central nervous system (CNS) manifestations in children with Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) based on images sent to a reference center and meeting minimum requirements and (2) to assess the inter-rater agreement of CNS-MRI results, which represents the overall reproducibility of this investigation. Methods We retrospectively reviewed brain MRI examinations in children with LCH, for which MRI minimum requirements were met. Abnormalities were rated by two experienced neuroradiologists, and the inter-rater agreement was assessed. Results Out of a total of 94 imaging studies, only 31 MRIs met the minimum criteria, which included T2w, FLAIR, T1w images before/after contrast in at least two different section planes, and thin post contrast sagittal slices T1w through the sella. The most common changes were osseous abnormalities, followed by solid enlargement of the pineal gland, thickened enhancing stalk and signal changes of the dentate nucleus. Whereas inter-rater agreement in assessing most of the CNS lesions was relatively high (κ > 0.61), the application of minimum criteria often did not allow to evaluate the posterior pituitary. Conclusions The diversity of radiological protocols from different institutions leads to difficulties in the diagnosis of CNS abnormalities in children with LCH. Although the inter-rater agreement between neuroradiologists was high, not all the LCH manifestations could be completely ruled out when using the minimum criteria. Brain MRIs should therefore follow LCH guideline protocols and include T1 pre-gadolinium sagittal images, and be centrally reviewed in order to improve the comparison of clinical trials. PMID:26401129

  9. Role of (18)F-FDG PET/CT in patients affected by Langerhans cell histiocytosis.

    PubMed

    Albano, Domenico; Bosio, Giovanni; Giubbini, Raffaele; Bertagna, Francesco

    2017-07-26

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) is a rare hematological disorder for which the utility of(18)F-FDG PET/CT is unclear. Our aim was to explore the metabolic features of LCH and the possible role of(18)F-FDG PET/CT in LCH evaluation. We found 17 patients with histologically proven LCH who underwent 17(18)F-FDG PET/CT scans for staging and 42 scans for restaging/follow-up purposes. PET/CT results were compared with those obtained from other conventional imaging modalities (bone scintigraphy, plain radiogram, computed tomography, magnetic resonance). (18)F-FDG PET/CT was positive in 15/17 patients, and it detected 36/37 lesions; all bone and extraskeletal lesions, except for a cecal lesion, were(18)F-FDG-avid. Only 1/4 of the patients with lung LCH had hypermetabolic lesions. The average SUVmax of the FDG-avid lesions was 7.3 ± 6.7, the average lesion-to-liver SUVmax ratio was 3.4 ± 2.5, and the average lesion-to-blood pool SUVmax ratio was 4 ± 3.2. In comparison to other imaging methods,(18)F-FDG PET/CT detected additional lesions or was able to evaluate treatment response earlier in 33/74 cases; it was confirmatory in 38/74 and detected fewer lesions in 3/74 (all three with lung LCH). (18)F-FDG PET/CT seems to be useful for evaluating LCH when compared to conventional imaging, except in pulmonary cases. It can be used both for staging and restaging purposes.

  10. Late-Onset Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis with Cerebellar Ataxia as an Initial Symptom

    PubMed Central

    Pyun, Jung-Min; Park, Hyeyoung; Moon, Kyung Chul; Jeon, Beomseok

    2016-01-01

    Late-onset progressive cerebellar ataxia is a diagnostic challenge because of a poor correlation between genotype and phenotype, and a broad range of secondary causes that extend beyond the neurological field. We report the case of a 45-year-old woman admitted after 2 years of slowly progressing cerebellar ataxia, dysarthria, and emotional instability. Notably, she was diagnosed with diabetes insipidus at the age of 35. As ‘idiopathic cerebellar ataxia’ was suspected, diagnostic tests, including genetic testing as well as serum and cerebrospinal fluid analyses, and brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were performed. All results were normal except those of MRI, performed 9 months prior to admission, which showed multiple dot-like white matter lesions with unclear cause. On a repeated brain MRI, a new lesion presenting as a 1.5-cm-sized highly enhancing mass attached to the right frontal skull was found. A sharply marginated lytic skull defect was also evident on skull X-ray, which corresponded to the lesion mass. Given these new radiological findings, a systemic review of the patient's medical history for rare secondary causes of cerebellar ataxia was performed, with particular attention to her past ‘diabetes insipidus’. The mass, lytic lesion of the skull, white matter lesion, diabetes insipidus, and cerebellar ataxia all suggested a final diagnosis of Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH), which was confirmed histopathologically. This is a rare case of late-onset LCH with an unusual initial symptom which underlines the importance of carefully reviewing the patient's medical history and broadening the search for etiologies beyond the nervous system. PMID:27920713

  11. Clinical outcomes of radiation therapy in the management of Langerhans cell histiocytosis.

    PubMed

    Kotecha, Rupesh; Venkatramani, Rajkumar; Jubran, Rima F; Arkader, Alexandre; Olch, Arthur J; Wong, Kenneth

    2014-12-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) is a rare disease with variable clinical presentation. In the present study, we report on the effectiveness and clinical complications of radiation therapy in children with LCH. We retrospectively reviewed all patients with LCH treated with radiation therapy over a 6-decade period at a single institution. Radiotherapy data, clinical features, radiographic data, and vital status were analyzed. The mean age at diagnosis for 69 patients was 5.3 years (3 mo to 37 y) and the median duration of follow-up was 6 years (7 d to 32 y). Radiation therapy was performed for 169 sites, primarily bone lesions. The median radiotherapy dose was 10 Gy (2.5 to 45 Gy). Radiographic follow-up data were available for 139 of the sites treated and clinical follow-up was available for 156 of sites treated. The radiographic local control was 91.4%, and 13% of lesions showed complete sclerosis or reconstitution of bone. A total of 90.4% of patients reported stabilization or improvement in lesion-related symptoms, most often pain. Twelve patients had diabetes insipidus at diagnosis or during follow-up. Eight of these patients received radiation treatment to the pituitary and none experienced a reduction in desmopressin dosage posttreatment. Radiation complications were few, including femoral neck fracture in 1 patient and facial asymmetry in 3 patients. No secondary malignancies were observed. Radiotherapy for LCH has high rates of local control and symptomatic improvement. Importantly, however, there is evidence of short-term and long-term morbidity when children are treated with low-dose irradiation.

  12. Ectopic micronodular thymoma with lymphoid stroma in the cervical region: a rare case associated with Langerhans cells proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Min; Meng, Yuan; Xu, Bin; Zhao, Lin; Zhang, Qingfu

    2016-01-01

    Micronodular thymoma (MNT) with lymphoid stroma is a rare thymic epithelial neoplasm with the characteristics of multiple nodules separated by abundant lymphoid stroma. MNTs mainly arise in the anterior mediastinum and thymus, while ectopic MNTs are extremely rarely seen. Here, we report an ectopic MNT that occurred in the neck of a 62-year-old woman. There were also scattered eosinophilic granulocytes and S100+/CD1a+ Langerhans cells within the tumor. This case provides a better understanding of such rare, poorly understood cases. PMID:27486334

  13. A case of Langerhans' cell histiocytosis associated with Hodgkin's lymphoma: Fine-needle aspiration cytologic and histopathological features.

    PubMed

    Das, Dilip K; Sheikh, Zafar A; Alansary, Taiba A; Amir, Thasneem; Al-Rabiy, Fatma N; Junaid, Thamradeen A

    2016-02-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) can be associated with a variety of malignant neoplasms, the most common being malignant lymphoma, especially Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL). In this report, we describe the fine needle aspiration (FNA) cytologic features of a case with concurrent LCH and HL in a lymph node. A 20-year-old man presented with an enlarged left upper cervical lymph node. FNA smears from the swelling revealed numerous CD1a+ and S-100+ Langerhans-type cells (LCs) along with many eosinophils, neutrophils, and lymphocytes; there were also large atypical cells with enlarged nuclei having prominent nucleoli. The cytodiagnosis was LCH and the possibility of association with or trans-differentiation into a lymphoma was suggested. The histopathological diagnosis of the excised left cervical lymph node was classical HL-nodular sclerosis type (CHL-NS) with LCH. The lacunar type Reed-Sternberg (RS) cells were positive for CD30 and CD15, and the LCs were positive for CD1a and S-100 protein. PET/CT imaging demonstrated hypermetabolic lymph nodes in neck, abdomen, thorax and pelvis as well as pulmonary nodules and a splenic mass. The patient received 13 courses of chemotherapy and two years later, the enhanced CT revealed regressive course of the disease.

  14. Role of abnormal Langerhans cells in oral epithelial dysplasia and oral squamous cell carcinoma: A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Rani, Shyamsundar Vidya; Aravindha, Babu; Leena, Sankari; Balachander, Nandagopal; Malathi, Letchumana Kumar; Masthan, Mahaboob Kadar

    2015-08-01

    The oral epithelial dysplasia (OED) and oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC), although initiated by tobacco carcinogens, their progression is due to inability of Langerhans cells (LCs) to detect these abnormal cells and promote lymphocytes to destroy these cells. We assessed and quantified the tumor associated LCs and inflammation in OED and OSCC to understand their role. Fifty-five microscopic sections were assessed (27 OED and 28 OSCC). The LCs were detected using S-100 immunohistochemical marker. The number of tumor associated LCs were counted. The presence of abnormal appearing large cells and its relation to histopathologic grade and inflammation was assessed. Significant increase in the LC count was observed in OSCC when compared to dysplasia. Large, abnormal appearing cells were observed in dysplasia and carcinomas however, these were more pronounced in moderate dysplasia and poorly-differentiated carcinomas. The presence of these abnormal appearing cells was associated with decrease in lymphocytic infiltrate. The present study indicates more LC are recruited into the carcinoma. These accumulated nonfunctional LC in the tumor tissue are indicative of aggressive tumor with potential malignant transformation.

  15. Estimating the Size of Onion Epidermal Cells from Diffraction Patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groff, Jeffrey R.

    2012-10-01

    Bioscience and premedical profession students are a major demographic served by introductory physics courses at many colleges and universities. Exposing these students to biological applications of physical principles will help them to appreciate physics as a useful tool for their future professions. Here I describe an experiment suitable for introductory physics where principles of wave optics are applied to probe the size of onion epidermal cells. The epidermis tissue is composed of cells of relatively uniform size and shape (Fig. 1) so the tissue acts like a one-dimensional transmission diffraction grating. The diffraction patterns generated when a laser beam passes through the tissue (Fig. 2) are analyzed and an estimate of the average width of individual onion epidermal cells is calculated. The results are compared to direct measurements taken using a light microscope. The use of microscopes and plant-cell tissue slides creates opportunities for cross-discipline collaboration between physics and biology instructors.

  16. In vivo/ex vivo targeting of Langerhans cells after topical application of the immune response modifier TMX-202: confocal Raman microscopy and histology analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darvin, Maxim E.; Thiede, Gisela; Ascencio, Saul Mujica; Schanzer, Sabine; Richter, Heike; Vinzón, Sabrina E.; Hasche, Daniel; Rösl, Frank; May, Roberto; Hazot, Yohan; Tamarkin, Dov; Lademann, Juergen

    2016-05-01

    The increased ability of TMX-202 (derivative of imiquimod) to penetrate the intact stratum corneum (SC) and the follicular orifices of porcine ear skin was shown ex vivo using confocal Raman microscopy and laser scanning microscopy. Moreover, to assess whether TMX-202 is able to reach the immune cells, Langerhans cells extracted from pretreated human skin were investigated ex vivo using confocal Raman microscopy combined with multivariate statistical methods. Tracking the Raman peak of dimethyl sulfoxide centered at 690 cm-1, the absorption of TMX-202 containing formulation by Langerhans cells was shown. To answer the question whether the TMX-202 active ingredient is able to reach Langerhans cells, the attraction of immune cells to TMX-202 containing formulation treated skin was measured in the in vivo rodent model Mastomys coucha. The results show that TMX-202 active ingredient is able to reach Langerhans cells after penetrating through the intact skin and subsequently attract immune cells. Both the intercellular/transcellular as well as the follicular pathways allow the penetration through the intact barrier of the SC.

  17. Cholesteatoma as a complication of Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis of the temporal bone: A nationwide cross-sectional analysis.

    PubMed

    Simmonds, Jonathan C; Vecchiotti, Mark

    2017-09-01

    To determine if patients with Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis (LCH) of the temporal bone have a higher risk of developing cholesteatoma. Review of literature and cross-sectional weighted analysis of patients under 19 with a diagnosis of LCH from the National Inpatient Sample (NIS) and Kids' Inpatient Database (KID) from 2000 to 2013. ICD-9 codes and demographics were analyzed; pairwise comparisons and multivariate analyses were performed. Only seven cases of cholesteatoma after the treatment for LCH of the temporal bone have been documented in the literature. No significant association between cholesteatoma and LCH was seen (OR 0.747 [0.149-3.751]). Patients with LCH did have a higher incidence of chronic otitis media, chronic otitis externa, chronic sinusitis, hearing loss, and otitis media with effusion. Our results show that patients with Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis do not appear to have a higher risk of developing cholesteatoma. However they are more likely to be diagnosed with chronic otitis externa which should be differentiated from cholesteatoma or recurrence of LCH. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Human blood BDCA-1 dendritic cells differentiate into Langerhans-like cells with thymic stromal lymphopoietin and TGF-β.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Cingolani, Carolina; Grandclaudon, Maximilien; Jeanmougin, Marine; Jouve, Mabel; Zollinger, Raphaël; Soumelis, Vassili

    2014-10-09

    The ontogeny of human Langerhans cells (LCs) remains poorly characterized, in particular the nature of LC precursors and the factors that may drive LC differentiation. Here we report that thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP), a keratinocyte-derived cytokine involved in epithelial inflammation, cooperates with transforming growth factor (TGF)-β for the generation of LCs. We show that primary human blood BDCA-1(+), but not BDCA-3(+), dendritic cells (DCs) stimulated with TSLP and TGF-β harbor a typical CD1a(+)Langerin(+) LC phenotype. Electron microscopy established the presence of Birbeck granules, an intracellular organelle specific to LCs. LC differentiation was not observed from tonsil BDCA-1(+) and BDCA-3(+) subsets. TSLP + TGF-β LCs had a mature phenotype with high surface levels of CD80, CD86, and CD40. They induced a potent CD4(+) T-helper (Th) cell expansion and differentiation into Th2 cells with increased production of tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-6 compared with CD34-derived LCs. Our findings establish a novel LC differentiation pathway from BDCA-1(+) blood DCs with potential implications in epithelial inflammation. Therapeutic targeting of TSLP may interfere with tissue LC repopulation from circulating precursors.

  19. Protein composition of cornified cell envelopes of epidermal keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Steven, A C; Steinert, P M

    1994-02-01

    Terminally differentiated mammalian epidermal cells are lined with a 15 nm thick layer of proteins cross-linked by isodipeptide and disulfide bonds, called the cornified cell envelope (CE). A number of proteins, including involucrin, loricrin, cystatin A, filaggrin, a cysteine-rich protein (CRP) and the 'small proline-rich' proteins (SPRRs) have been reported to be components of this complex, but little information has been obtained as to their relative abundances because the acute insolubility of the CEs has precluded direct methods of analysis. To address this question, we have determined the amino acid compositions of isolated CEs, and then modelled them in terms of linear combinations of the candidate proteins. The results show that stratum corneum CEs have a loricrin content of 65-70% (w/w) in human, and 80-85% in mouse. In human epidermal CEs, the secondary contributors are filaggrin and CRP (each approximately 10%), with smaller amounts of involucrin, SPRR and cystatin A (2-5% each) also present. Mouse epidermal CEs have about the same amount of filaggrin and somewhat more SPRR, but only trace amounts of the other proteins. In marked contrast, the major constituents of the CEs of cultured keratinocytes induced to terminal differentiation in vitro are cystatin A, involucrin and CRP (each approximately 30%). No significant amount of loricrin was detected except in sloughed mouse cells, which represent a more advanced state of terminal differentiation than attached cells.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  20. Reprogramming of root epidermal cells in response to nutrient deficiency.

    PubMed

    Perry, P; Linke, B; Schmidt, W

    2007-02-01

    Post-embryonic development of the root system is highly plastic to environmental cues, compensating for the sessile lifestyle of plants. The fate of epidermal cells of Arabidopsis roots is particularly responsive to nutritional signals, leading to an increase in the root's surface area in the absence of the essential but immobile minerals iron, phosphate and manganese. The resulting phenotype is characteristic of the respective condition. Growth under nutrient starvation affects the expression of genes involved in cell specification, indicating that environmental signals are perceived at an early stage of cell development. Cell fate decisions are controlled at different levels, probably integrated at the level of chromatin organization.

  1. Cell Adhesion in Epidermal Development and Barrier Formation

    PubMed Central

    Sumigray, Kaelyn D.; Lechler, Terry

    2015-01-01

    Cell–cell adhesions are necessary for structural integrity and barrier formation of the epidermis. Here, we discuss insights from genetic and cell biological studies into the roles of individual cell–cell junctions and their composite proteins in regulating epidermal development and function. In addition to individual adhesive functions, we will discuss emerging ideas on mechanosensation/transduction of junctions in the epidermis, noncanonical roles for adhesion proteins, and crosstalk/interdependencies between the junctional systems. These studies have revealed that cell adhesion proteins are connected to many aspects of tissue physiology including growth control, differentiation, and inflammation. PMID:25733147

  2. The pituitary gland in patients with Langerhans cell histiocytosis: a clinical and radiological evaluation.

    PubMed

    Kurtulmus, Neslihan; Mert, Meral; Tanakol, Refik; Yarman, Sema

    2015-04-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) is a rare disease in which the most common endocrine manifestation is diabetes insipidus (DI). Data on anterior pituitary function in patients with LCH are limited. Thus, the present study investigated anterior pituitary function in LCH patients with DI via the evaluation of clinical and radiological findings at disease onset and during follow-up. The present study retrospectively evaluated nine patients with LCH (five males and four females). All diagnoses of LCH were made following histological and/or immunophenotypic analyses of tissue biopsies, bronchoalveolar lavage, or cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Basal and, if necessary, dynamic pituitary function tests were used to assess anterior pituitary function, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans were used to image the pituitary. The LCH treatment modality was based on organ involvement. The mean age at onset of DI was 27.6 years (range 15-60 years). One patient (11%) exhibited single organ involvement, while eight patients (89%) displayed multisystem organ involvement. On admittance, one patient had hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, one patient exhibited panhypopituitarism [hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, central hypothyroidism, hypocortisolism, and growth hormone (GH) deficiency], and four patients (44%) displayed hyperprolactinemia. The MRI data revealed infundibular enlargement in seven patients (78%), a thalamic mass in one patient (11%), and the absence of the bright spot in all patients. A single patient (11%) showed a mass in the pons that had a partially empty sella. The patients were treated with radiation therapy (RT), chemotherapy (CT), or a combination of both (RT+CT) and were followed up for a median of 91.8 months (range 2-318 months). Seven patients were assessed during the follow-up period, of whom four patients (57.1%) developed anterior pituitary hormone deficiency, three (43%) were diagnosed with GH deficiency, and one (14%) exhibited gonadotropin deficiency

  3. MUTZ-3 derived Langerhans cells in human skin equivalents show differential migration and phenotypic plasticity after allergen or irritant exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Kosten, Ilona J.; Spiekstra, Sander W.; Gruijl, Tanja D. de; Gibbs, Susan

    2015-08-15

    After allergen or irritant exposure, Langerhans cells (LC) undergo phenotypic changes and exit the epidermis. In this study we describe the unique ability of MUTZ-3 derived Langerhans cells (MUTZ-LC) to display similar phenotypic plasticity as their primary counterparts when incorporated into a physiologically relevant full-thickness skin equivalent model (SE-LC). We describe differences and similarities in the mechanisms regulating LC migration and plasticity upon allergen or irritant exposure. The skin equivalent consisted of a reconstructed epidermis containing primary differentiated keratinocytes and CD1a{sup +} MUTZ-LC on a primary fibroblast-populated dermis. Skin equivalents were exposed to a panel of allergens and irritants. Topical exposure to sub-toxic concentrations of allergens (nickel sulfate, resorcinol, cinnamaldehyde) and irritants (Triton X-100, SDS, Tween 80) resulted in LC migration out of the epidermis and into the dermis. Neutralizing antibody to CXCL12 blocked allergen-induced migration, whereas anti-CCL5 blocked irritant-induced migration. In contrast to allergen exposure, irritant exposure resulted in cells within the dermis becoming CD1a{sup −}/CD14{sup +}/CD68{sup +} which is characteristic of a phenotypic switch of MUTZ-LC to a macrophage-like cell in the dermis. This phenotypic switch was blocked with anti-IL-10. Mechanisms previously identified as being involved in LC activation and migration in native human skin could thus be reproduced in the in vitro constructed skin equivalent model containing functional LC. This model therefore provides a unique and relevant research tool to study human LC biology in situ under controlled in vitro conditions, and will provide a powerful tool for hazard identification, testing novel therapeutics and identifying new drug targets. - Highlights: • MUTZ-3 derived Langerhans cells integrated into skin equivalents are fully functional. • Anti-CXCL12 blocks allergen-induced MUTZ-LC migration.

  4. Heterogeneity and plasticity of epidermal stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Schepeler, Troels; Page, Mahalia E.; Jensen, Kim B.

    2014-01-01

    The epidermis is an integral part of our largest organ, the skin, and protects us against the hostile environment. It is a highly dynamic tissue that, during normal steady-state conditions, undergoes constant turnover. Multiple stem cell populations residing in autonomously maintained compartments facilitate this task. In this Review, we discuss stem cell behaviour during normal tissue homeostasis, regeneration and disease within the pilosebaceous unit, an integral structure of the epidermis that is responsible for hair growth and lubrication of the epithelium. We provide an up-to-date view of the pilosebaceous unit, encompassing the heterogeneity and plasticity of multiple discrete stem cell populations that are strongly influenced by external cues to maintain their identity and function. PMID:24961797

  5. Oral mucosa: an alternative epidermic cell source to develop autologous dermal-epidermal substitutes from diabetic subjects

    PubMed Central

    GUZMÁN-URIBE, Daniela; ALVARADO-ESTRADA, Keila Neri; PIERDANT-PÉREZ, Mauricio; TORRES-ÁLVAREZ, Bertha; SÁNCHEZ-AGUILAR, Jesus Martin; ROSALES-IBÁÑEZ, Raúl

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Oral mucosa has been highlighted as a suitable source of epidermal cells due to its intrinsic characteristics such as its higher proliferation rate and its obtainability. Diabetic ulcers have a worldwide prevalence that is variable (1%-11%), meanwhile treatment of this has been proven ineffective. Tissue-engineered skin plays an important role in wound care focusing on strategies such autologous dermal-epidermal substitutes. Objective The aim of this study was to obtain autologous dermal-epidermal skin substitutes from oral mucosa from diabetic subjects as a first step towards a possible clinical application for cases of diabetic foot. Material and Methods Oral mucosa was obtained from diabetic and healthy subjects (n=20 per group). Epidermal cells were isolated and cultured using autologous fibrin to develop dermal-epidermal in vitro substitutes by the air-liquid technique with autologous human serum as a supplement media. Substitutes were immunocharacterized with collagen IV and cytokeratin 5-14 as specific markers. A Student´s t- test was performed to assess the differences between both groups. Results It was possible to isolate epidermal cells from the oral mucosa of diabetic and healthy subjects and develop autologous dermal-epidermal skin substitutes using autologous serum as a supplement. Differences in the expression of specific markers were observed and the cytokeratin 5-14 expression was lower in the diabetic substitutes, and the collagen IV expression was higher in the diabetic substitutes when compared with the healthy group, showing a significant difference. Conclusion Cells from oral mucosa could be an alternative and less invasive source for skin substitutes and wound healing. A difference in collagen production of diabetic cells suggests diabetic substitutes could improve diabetic wound healing. More research is needed to determine the crosstalk between components of these skin substitutes and damaged tissues. PMID:28403359

  6. Role of pili in the adherence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to mouse epidermal cells.

    PubMed Central

    Sato, H; Okinaga, K

    1987-01-01

    Pili have been demonstrated to be the adhesins of Pseudomonas aeruginosa for mouse epidermal cells. The mechanisms of adhesion of P. aeruginosa to mouse epidermal cells was studied by using four mutants derived from a single strain: flagellated and piliated (F+P+), flagellated and nonpiliated (F+P-), nonflagellated and piliated (F-P+), and nonflagellated and nonpiliated (F-P-) mutants. F+P+ and F-P+ bacteria efficiently adhered to mouse epidermal cells, while F+P- and F-P- bacteria hardly adhered to mouse epidermal cells. The number of F+P+ bacteria that adhered to mouse epidermal cells was almost the same as that of F-P+ bacteria. The number of F+P- bacteria that adhered to mouse epidermal cells was almost the same as that of F-P- bacteria. The adhesion of P+ (F+P+ and F-P+) bacteria was inhibited by antipilus serum, while that of P- (F+P- and F-P-) bacteria was not inhibited by antipilus serum. There were no significant differences between the number of bacteria adhering to mouse epidermal cells isolated from normal skin and those adhering to cells isolated from burned skin. Heating of the mouse epidermal cell suspension had no effect on the adhesion of P. aeruginosa. These results suggest that pili mediate the adhesion of P. aeruginosa to mouse epidermal cells and that P. aeruginosa adheres efficiently to mouse epidermal cells despite the loss of cell viability caused by burning. PMID:2886430

  7. Psoralens and coumarins for receptor targeting on epidermal cells

    SciTech Connect

    Jetter, M.M.

    1989-01-01

    Specific binding sites have been identified for the psoralens, discrete from DNA, in different epidermal cell lines. These receptors are saturable and are alkylated by the action of psoralens + UVA light. A psoralen receptor has been partially purified and established to be a protein of approximately 20,000 daltons. Inhibition of the binding of epidermal growth factor to its receptor and inhibition of the tyrosine kinase activity of the EGF receptor has been associated with PUVA treatment. These findings conflict with the general assumption that the biological effects of psoralens as photoactive compounds are associated with their ability to covalently bind to and crosslink DNA. In collaboration with Laskin's,laboratory, several classes of psoralen agonists were synthesized. These compounds include coumarins, furocoumarin and benzodipyran-2-one derivatives. The methods of preparation were varied and include variants of the Claisen rearrangement, acid and base-catalyzed condensations. The synthesized compounds were tested for their potential inhibition of {sup 125}I-EGF receptor binding. It was discovered that many of these agents showed potent inhibition activity similar to the psoralens. This data offers the possibility that sites of action, other than DNA, are involved in the mechanism by which photoactivated psoralens modulate epidermal cell lines.

  8. Chemokine Receptor Requirements for Epidermal T-Cell Trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Tubo, Noah J.; McLachlan, James B.; Campbell, James J.

    2011-01-01

    Inflamed skin contains CD4 T-cell subsets that express chemokine receptors CCR4, CCR6, and/or CCR10. Prior attempts to reveal the distinct role(s) of each receptor in T-cell trafficking to skin have not produced a coherent story. Different conclusions drawn by separate research groups are difficult to reconcile because of the disparate inflammation models used. Here we directly compare CD4 T cells from wild-type, CCR4−/−, CCR6−/−, and CCR10−/− mice in parallel assays of trafficking to skin. Our models require direct competition between wild-type and receptor-deficient populations for access to inflamed cutaneous sites. Major histocompatibility complex-peptide tetramers allowed us to identify antigen-specific endogenous long-term memory CD4 T cells within skin after multiple topical immunizations. We separately analyzed cells from the dermal and epidermal layers, allowing us to assess the involvement of each receptor in trafficking between dermis and epidermis. We found that CCR4 deficiency reduces accumulation of memory CD4 T cells in skin by approximately 20-fold, but neither CCR6 nor CCR10 deficiency yielded any detectable effects. Strikingly, no differences in dermal versus epidermal localization were observed for cells lacking any of these three receptors. Our findings raise the possibility that CCR6 and CCR10 play (as yet) unknown roles in cutaneous T-cell immunology, unrelated to skin-specific trafficking. PMID:21641376

  9. Ex vivo generation of interstitial and Langerhans cell-like dendritic cell subset-based vaccines for hematological malignancies.

    PubMed

    Hutten, Tim; Thordardottir, Soley; Hobo, Willemijn; Hübel, Jessica; van der Waart, Anniek B; Cany, Jeannette; Dolstra, Harry; Hangalapura, Basav N

    2014-06-01

    Autologous, patient-specific, monocyte-derived dendritic cell (MoDC) vaccines have been successfully applied in the clinical studies so far. However, the routine application of this strategy has been hampered by the difficulties in generating sufficient numbers of DC and the poor DC vaccine quality because of pathology or prior treatment received by the patients. The immunotherapeutic potential of other subsets of DC has not been thoroughly investigated because of their rarity in tissues and difficulties associated with their ex vivo generation. The high expansion and differentiation potential of CD34 hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPC), isolated from umbilical cord blood (UCB), into different DC subsets make them an attractive alternative DC source for cancer immunotherapy. Therefore, the aim of this study was to generate a large number of different DC subsets from CD34 HPC and evaluate their functionality in comparison with MoDC. Our culture protocol generated a clinically relevant number of mature CD1a myeloid DC and CD207 Langerhans cells (LC)-like DC subsets from CD34 HPC with >95% purity. Both DC subsets exhibited a cytokine profile that favors cytotoxic T-cell responses. Furthermore, UCB-DC and UCB-LC demonstrated superior induction of proliferation of both allogeneic as well as viral antigen-specific CD8 T cells, both in vitro and in vivo. Additional studies revealed that UCC-DC and UCB-LC can efficiently expand minor histocompatibility antigen (MiHA) HA-1-specific cytotoxic T cells in the peripheral blood of leukemia patients and prime MiHA HA-1-specific and HA-2-specific cytotoxic T cells in vitro. These preclinical findings support the pharmaceutical development of the described culture protocol for clinical evaluation.

  10. Green autofluorescence in human epidermal cells.

    PubMed

    Fellner, M J

    1976-05-01

    A characteristic and natural autofluorescence that appears brilliant green in frozen sections of untreated skin when viewed under the fluorescent microscope is demonstrated. Study with various barrier filters and exciter filters indicates that the optimum absorption for visualization of this is 300 to 330 nm, and the optimum fluorescence is between 500 and 530 nm under the conditions used. Clinical study of skin from 52 patients including black, white, Puerto Rican, and Chinese indicates a relationship between skin color and intensity of autofluorescence. In addition, the cellular localization of autofluorescence corresponds to sites of melanin. Cells in the basal layer are involved most conspicuously and nuclei are spared.

  11. The adverse prognostic hallmarks in identical twins with Langerhans cell histiocytosis: a clinical report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Chai, Damin; Tao, Yisheng; Bao, Zhengqi; Yang, Li; Feng, Zhenzhong; Ma, Li; Liang, Limei; Zhou, Xinwen

    2013-01-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) is characterized by uncontrolled proliferation of Langerhans cells accompanying eosinophils. It often attacks children under 10 years of age. LCH in identical twins is very rare and its prognosis is different. Here we report identical-twin sisters with LCH. Computed tomography (CT) revealed osteolytic change in each twin's skull, and the elder exhibited poor eyesight. There were massive histiocyte-like cells surrounded by eosinophils in pathologic specimen of the abnormal lesions, which is typical pathologic finding in LCH. These pathologic cells were positive for S-100 and the cell surface protein CD1 antigen (CD1α), the known markers of LCH. After treating them with surgery, no symptoms were seen in the younger until now. While the older was found another soft mass (about 2.0 cm in diameter) in the left temporal area 18 months later. The same treatment was given to the older after admission, and she is healthy to date. To explore the relationship between hallmarks and the prognosis of identical-twin patients with LCH, we retrieved the 16 literatures (16 identical-twin pairs, 31 patients) listed in PubMed during the past 60 years. The data revealed all those patients who have disseminated to the bone marrow, spleen and liver with symptoms of fever and hepatosplenomegaly exhibited worse prognosis (9 out of the 31 patients). The other identical-twin subjects without infiltration of those organs recovered well. In conclusion, this study reveals the adverse hallmarks of prognosis in identical-twin patients with LCH by reviewing relevant literatures.

  12. Epidermal barrier dysfunction and cutaneous sensitization in atopic diseases.

    PubMed

    Kubo, Akiharu; Nagao, Keisuke; Amagai, Masayuki

    2012-02-01

    Classic atopic dermatitis is complicated by asthma, allergic rhinitis, and food allergies, cumulatively referred to as atopic diseases. Recent discoveries of mutations in the filaggrin gene as predisposing factors for atopic diseases have refocused investigators' attention on epidermal barrier dysfunction as a causative mechanism. The skin's barrier function has three elements: the stratum corneum (air-liquid barrier), tight junctions (liquid-liquid barrier), and the Langerhans cell network (immunological barrier). Clarification of the molecular events underpinning epidermal barrier function and dysfunction should lead to a better understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms of atopic diseases.

  13. Oral mucosa: an alternative epidermic cell source to develop autologous dermal-epidermal substitutes from diabetic subjects.

    PubMed

    Guzmán-Uribe, Daniela; Alvarado-Estrada, Keila Neri; Pierdant-Pérez, Mauricio; Torres-Álvarez, Bertha; Sánchez-Aguilar, Jesus Martin; Rosales-Ibáñez, Raúl

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to obtain autologous dermal-epidermal skin substitutes from oral mucosa from diabetic subjects as a first step towards a possible clinical application for cases of diabetic foot. Oral mucosa was obtained from diabetic and healthy subjects (n=20 per group). Epidermal cells were isolated and cultured using autologous fibrin to develop dermal-epidermal in vitro substitutes by the air-liquid technique with autologous human serum as a supplement media. Substitutes were immunocharacterized with collagen IV and cytokeratin 5-14 as specific markers. A Student´s t- test was performed to assess the differences between both groups. It was possible to isolate epidermal cells from the oral mucosa of diabetic and healthy subjects and develop autologous dermal-epidermal skin substitutes using autologous serum as a supplement. Differences in the expression of specific markers were observed and the cytokeratin 5-14 expression was lower in the diabetic substitutes, and the collagen IV expression was higher in the diabetic substitutes when compared with the healthy group, showing a significant difference. Cells from oral mucosa could be an alternative and less invasive source for skin substitutes and wound healing. A difference in collagen production of diabetic cells suggests diabetic substitutes could improve diabetic wound healing. More research is needed to determine the crosstalk between components of these skin substitutes and damaged tissues.

  14. Langerhans cell tropism of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 subtype A through F isolates derived from different transmission groups.

    PubMed Central

    Dittmar, M T; Simmons, G; Hibbitts, S; O'Hare, M; Louisirirotchanakul, S; Beddows, S; Weber, J; Clapham, P R; Weiss, R A

    1997-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that some subtypes of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), especially subtype E, are more likely to infect mature Langerhans cells (mLC), we titrated a panel of 26 primary HIV-1 isolates of subtypes A through F on peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and mLC. The majority of HIV-1 isolates from heterosexually infected patients did not show a preferred tropism for mLC compared to homosexually transmitted HIV-1 isolates. Only 6 of 26 isolates, 2 from patients infected by homosexual contact and 4 from patients infected by heterosexual contact, showed a higher infectivity for mLC than for PBMC. Both syncytium-inducing and non-syncytium-inducing isolates were able to infect mLC which express mRNA for the chemokine receptors CCR3, CCR5, and CXCR4. PMID:9311896

  15. Skin Treatment with Pulsed Monochromatic UVA1 355 Device and Computerized Morphometric Analysis of Histochemically Identified Langerhans Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zerbinati, Nicola; Riva, Federica; Paulli, Marco; Parodi, Pier Camillo

    2016-01-01

    Fluorescent or metal halide lamps are widely used in therapeutic applications in dermatological diseases, with broadband or narrow band emission UVA/UVA1 (320–400 nm) obtained with suitable passive filters. Recently, it has been possible for us to use a new machine provided with solid state source emitting pulsed monochromatic UVA1 355 nm. In order to evaluate the effects of this emission on immunocells of the skin, human skin samples were irradiated with monochromatic 355 nm UVA1 with different energetic fluences and after irradiation Langerhans cells were labeled with CD1a antibodies. The immunohistochemical identification of these cells permitted evaluating their modifications in terms of density into the skin. Obtained results are promising for therapeutical applications, also considering that a monochromatic radiation minimizes thermic load and DNA damage in the skin tissues. PMID:27525266

  16. [Langerhans cell histiocytosis with vertebral involvement and soft tissue extension: clinical case].

    PubMed

    Luong, Tai C; Scrigni, Adriana; Paglia, Marcela; Garavaglia, Mariano; Aisenberg, Nuria; Rowensztein, Hernán; Sampor, Claudia

    2016-08-01

    La histiocitosis de células de Langerhans es una enfermedad heterogénea de etiología desconocida, que se caracteriza por la proliferación no controlada de histiocitos. Es poco frecuente y, si bien el compromiso óseo es común, la afectación vertebral es rara. Se presenta una niña de 4 años que consultó por dolor abdominal difuso de un mes de evolución, al que se agregó constipación y, posteriormente, debilidad en los miembros inferiores. El examen físico mostraba clonus e hiperreflexia en los miembros inferiores y la marcha era inestable. Se realizó una resonancia magnética, que mostró la vértebra dorsal 9 (D9) plana con tejido blando patológico en el espacio epidural y laterovertebral. Se realizó una cirugía descompresiva, artrodesis para fijar la columna y toma de biopsia, que confirmó el diagnóstico de histiocitosis de células de Langerhans. Recibió 6 meses de tratamiento con metilprednisona y vinblastina, de acuerdo con el protocolo LCH III, con excelente evolución y remisión completa. Conclusión: frente a una imagen radiológica de vértebra plana o colapso vertebral, debe pensarse en histiocitosis de células de Langerhans como diagnóstico diferencial.

  17. MUTZ-3 derived Langerhans cells in human skin equivalents show differential migration and phenotypic plasticity after allergen or irritant exposure.

    PubMed

    Kosten, Ilona J; Spiekstra, Sander W; de Gruijl, Tanja D; Gibbs, Susan

    2015-08-15

    After allergen or irritant exposure, Langerhans cells (LC) undergo phenotypic changes and exit the epidermis. In this study we describe the unique ability of MUTZ-3 derived Langerhans cells (MUTZ-LC) to display similar phenotypic plasticity as their primary counterparts when incorporated into a physiologically relevant full-thickness skin equivalent model (SE-LC). We describe differences and similarities in the mechanisms regulating LC migration and plasticity upon allergen or irritant exposure. The skin equivalent consisted of a reconstructed epidermis containing primary differentiated keratinocytes and CD1a(+) MUTZ-LC on a primary fibroblast-populated dermis. Skin equivalents were exposed to a panel of allergens and irritants. Topical exposure to sub-toxic concentrations of allergens (nickel sulfate, resorcinol, cinnamaldehyde) and irritants (Triton X-100, SDS, Tween 80) resulted in LC migration out of the epidermis and into the dermis. Neutralizing antibody to CXCL12 blocked allergen-induced migration, whereas anti-CCL5 blocked irritant-induced migration. In contrast to allergen exposure, irritant exposure resulted in cells within the dermis becoming CD1a(-)/CD14(+)/CD68(+) which is characteristic of a phenotypic switch of MUTZ-LC to a macrophage-like cell in the dermis. This phenotypic switch was blocked with anti-IL-10. Mechanisms previously identified as being involved in LC activation and migration in native human skin could thus be reproduced in the in vitro constructed skin equivalent model containing functional LC. This model therefore provides a unique and relevant research tool to study human LC biology in situ under controlled in vitro conditions, and will provide a powerful tool for hazard identification, testing novel therapeutics and identifying new drug targets.

  18. IL-17A receptor expression differs between subclasses of Langerhans cell histiocytosis, which might settle the IL-17A controversy.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Ichiro; Morimoto, Akira; Oka, Takashi; Kuwamoto, Satoshi; Kato, Masako; Horie, Yasushi; Hayashi, Kazuhiko; Gogusev, Jean; Jaubert, Francis; Imashuku, Shinsaku; Al-Kadar, Lamia Abd; Takata, Katsuyoshi; Yoshino, Tadashi

    2013-02-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) is a lymphoproliferative disorder consisting of abnormal Langerhans cell-like cells and other lymphoid cells. LCH presents as either a multisystem LCH (LCH-MS) or a single-system LCH (LCH-SS). Currently, neither the pathogeneses nor the factors that define these disease subclasses have been elucidated. The interleukin (IL)-17A autocrine LCH model and IL-17A-targeted therapies have been proposed and have engendered much controversy. Those authors showed high serum IL-17A levels in LCH and argued that serum IL-17A-dependent fusion activities in vitro, rather than serum IL-17A levels, correlated with LCH severity (i.e. the IL-17A paradox). In contrast, others could not confirm the IL-17A autocrine model. So began the controversy on IL-17A, which still continues. We approached the IL-17A controversy and the IL-17A paradox from a new perspective in considering the expression levels of IL-17A receptor (IL-17RA). We detected higher levels of IL-17RA protein expression in LCH-MS (n = 10) as compared to LCH-SS (n = 9) (P = 0.041) by immunofluorescence. We reconfirmed these data by re-analyzing GSE16395 mRNA data. We found that serum levels of IL-17A were higher in LCH (n = 38) as compared to controls (n = 20) (P = 0.005) with no significant difference between LCH subclasses. We propose an IL-17A endocrine model and stress that changes in IL-17RA expression levels are important for defining LCH subclasses. We hypothesize that these IL-17RA data could clarify the IL-17A controversy and the IL-17A paradox. As a potential treatment of LCH-MS, we indicate the possibility of an IL-17RA-targeted therapy.

  19. PD-1 on Immature and PD-1 Ligands on Migratory Human Langerhans Cells Regulate Antigen-Presenting Cell Activity

    PubMed Central

    Peña-Cruz, Victor; McDonough, Sean M.; Diaz-Griffero, Felipe; Crum, Christopher P.; Carrasco, Ruben D.; Freeman, Gordon J.

    2010-01-01

    Langerhans cells (LCs) are known as “sentinels” of the immune system that function as professional antigen-presenting cells (APCs) after migration to draining lymph node. LCs are proposed to have a role in tolerance and the resolution of cutaneous immune responses. The Programmed Death-1 (PD-1) receptor and its ligands, PD-L1 and PD-L2, are a co-inhibitory pathway that contributes to the negative regulation of T-lymphocyte activation and peripheral tolerance. Surprisingly, we found PD-1 to be expressed on immature LCs (iLCs) in situ. PD-1 engagement on iLCs reduced IL-6 and macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-1α cytokine production in response to TLR2 signals but had no effect on LC maturation. PD-L1 and PD-L2 were expressed at very low levels on iLCs. Maturation of LCs upon migration from epidermis led to loss of PD-l expression and gain of high expression of PD-L1 and PD-L2 as well as co-stimulatory molecules. Blockade of PD-L1 and/or PD-L2 on migratory LCs (mLCs) and DDCs enhanced T-cell activation, as has been reported for other APCs. Thus the PD-1 pathway is active in iLCs and inhibits iLC activities, but expression of receptor and ligands reverses upon maturation and PD-L1 and PD-L2 on mLC function to inhibit T-cell responses. PMID:20445553

  20. Morphoproteomics provides support for TGF-β pathway signaling in the osteoclastogenesis and immune dysregulation of osteolytic Langerhans cell histiocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Alexandrescu, Sanda; Tatevian, Nina; Czerniak, Bogdan A; Covinsky, Michael H; Burns, Nadja K; Brown, Robert E

    2012-01-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) has a challenging and still unclear pathogenesis. A body of literature points to impaired maturation of the lesional dendritic cells, and to immune dysregulation in the form of increased FoxP3 cells. Various cytokine abnormalities such as expression of transforming growth factor (TGF)-β have been reported, as well as abnormalities in lipid content in LCH cells. Morphoproteomic techniques were applied to identify the signal transduction pathways that could influence histogenesis and immune regulation in osteolytic LCH. Five pediatric cases of osteolytic LCH were examined, using antibodies against CD1a, S100, CD68, CD8, FoxP3, phosphorylated (p)-STAT3 (Tyr705), protein kinase C (PKC)-α, phospholipase (PL)D1, fatty acid synthase (FASN), and zinc finger protein, Gli2. Positive and negative controls were performed. A FoxP3(+)/CD8(+) cell ratio was calculated by counting the FoxP3+ and CD8+ cells in 10 high power fields for each case. There is induction of sonic hedgehog (SHH) mediators consistent with TGF-β signaling pathway through Smad3-dependent activation of Gli2, findings supported by the plasmalemmal and cytoplasmic expression of PKC-α and PLD1, and nuclear expression of Gli2, in lesional cells. The FoxP3+/CD8+ cell ratio is increased, ranging from 1.7-7.94. There is moderate cytoplasmic expression of FASN in most of the Langerhans cells, a finding that supports previously published phospholipid abnormalities in LCH and is consistent with PKC-α/PLD1/TGF-β signaling. With our study, we strongly suggest that the TGF-β cell signaling pathway is a major player in the pathogenesis of LCH, leading to non-canonical induction of nuclear Gli2 expression, thereby contributing to osteoclastogenesis in LCH histiocytes. It could also cause a state of immune frustration in LCH, by inducing the transformation of CD4(+)CD25(-) cells into CD4(+)/FoxP3(+) cells. This coincides with the clinical evidence of a response to thalidomide in

  1. Central diabetes insipidus as a very late relapse limited to the pituitary stalk in Langerhans cell histiocytosis.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Shunsuke; Shinkoda, Yuichi; Hazeki, Daisuke; Imamura, Mari; Okamoto, Yasuhiro; Kawakami, Kiyoshi; Kawano, Yoshifumi

    2016-07-01

    Central diabetes insipidus (CDI) and relapse are frequently seen in multifocal Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH). We present two females with multifocal LCH who developed CDI 9 and 5 years after the initial diagnosis, respectively, as a relapse limited to the pituitary stalk. Combination chemotherapy with cytarabine reduced the mass in the pituitary stalk. Although CDI did not improve, there has been no anterior pituitary hormone deficiency (APHD), neurodegenerative disease in the central nervous system (ND-CNS) or additional relapse for 2 years after therapy. It was difficult to predict the development of CDI in these cases. CDI might develop very late in patients with multifocal LCH, and therefore strict follow-up is necessary, especially with regard to symptoms of CDI such as polydipsia and polyuria. For new-onset CDI with LCH, chemotherapy with cytarabine might be useful for preventing APHD and ND-CNS.

  2. Strategies for the Prevention of Central Nervous System Complications in Patients with Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis: The Problem of Neurodegenerative Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Imashuku, Shinsaku; Arceci, Robert J

    2015-10-01

    Diseases of the central nervous system (CNS) are common in patients with Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH). Besides active LCH lesions, neurodegenerative (ND) lesions of the cerebellum and/or basal ganglia may occur as late sequelae of LCH. While the etiology of this ND disease remains unclear, biomarkers in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) may reflect the activity of CNS disease in these patients. However, no well-planned CSF studies have yet been performed in patients at high risk for ND-CNS-LCH. Potential parallels with other neuroinflammatory/neurodegenerative disease suggest the utility of examining these other disorders in establishing strategies for the prevention and/or treatment of ND-CNS-LCH.

  3. Growth of melanocytes in human epidermal cell cultures

    SciTech Connect

    Staiano-Coico, L.; Hefton, J.M.; Amadeo, C.; Pagan-Charry, I.; Madden, M.R.; Cardon-Cardo, C. )

    1990-08-01

    Epidermal cell cultures were grown in keratinocyte-conditioned medium for use as burn wound grafts; the melanocyte composition of the grafts was studied under a variety of conditions. Melanocytes were identified by immunohistochemistry based on a monoclonal antibody (MEL-5) that has previously been shown to react specifically with melanocytes. During the first 7 days of growth in primary culture, the total number of melanocytes in the epidermal cultures decreased to 10% of the number present in normal skin. Beginning on day 2 of culture, bipolar melanocytes were present at a mean cell density of 116 +/- 2/mm2; the keratinocyte to melanocyte ratio was preserved during further primary culture and through three subpassages. Moreover, exposure of cultures to mild UVB irradiation stimulated the melanocytes to proliferate, suggesting that the melanocytes growing in culture maintained their responsiveness to external stimuli. When the sheets of cultured cells were enzymatically detached from the plastic culture flasks before grafting, melanocytes remained in the basal layer of cells as part of the graft applied to the patient.

  4. Measurement of relative phase distribution of onion epidermal cells by using the polarization microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, In Hee; Lee, Ji Yong; Lee, Seungrag; Lee, Dong Ju; Kim, Dug Young

    2007-02-01

    Bio-cells and tissues have intrinsic polarization characteristics, which are changed by external stimulus and internal metamorphosis in cells and tissues and some of the bio-cells and tissues have intrinsic birefringence characteristics, which are also changed by external stimulus and internal metamorphosis in cells and tissues. In this paper, we have developed the polarization microscope for measurement of relative phase which results from birefringence characteristics of materials with improved linear polarizing method and have measured relative phase distribution of onion epidermal cells. From the measurement of the relative phase distribution of onion epidermal cells, decrease of relative phase distribution of onion epidermal cells was investigated as the elapse of time. In decrease of relative phase distribution, relative phase of cell membrane in onion epidermal cells decreased radically as compared with that of cytoplasm because decline of function in cell membrane that takes charge of matter transfer in onion epidermal cells has occurred.

  5. Immunostimulatory Activity of the Cytokine-Based Biologic, IRX-2, on Human Papillomavirus-Exposed Langerhans Cells

    PubMed Central

    Da Silva, Diane M.; Woodham, Andrew W.; Naylor, Paul H.; Egan, James E.; Berinstein, Neil L.

    2016-01-01

    Langerhans cells (LCs) are the antigen-presenting cells of the epithelial layer and are responsible for initiating immune responses against skin and mucosa-invading viruses. Human papillomavirus (HPV)-mediated suppression of LC function is a crucial mechanism of HPV immune evasion, which can lead to persistent infection and development of several human cancers, including cervical, anal, and head and neck cancers. The cell-derived cytokine-based biologic, IRX-2, consists of multiple well-defined cytokines and is broadly active on various immune cell subsets. In this study, we investigated primary human LC activation after exposure to HPV16, followed by treatment with IRX-2 in vitro, and evaluated their subsequent ability to induce HPV16-specific T cells. In contrast to its activity on dendritic cells, HPV16 alone is not sufficient to induce phenotypic and functional activation of LCs. However, IRX-2 induces a significant upregulation of antigen presentation and costimulatory molecules, T helper 1 (Th1)-associated cytokine release, and chemokine-directed migration of LCs pre-exposed to HPV16. Furthermore, LCs treated with IRX-2 after HPV16 exposure induced CD8+ T-cell responses against specific HLA-A*0201-binding HPV16 T-cell epitopes. The present study suggests that IRX-2 is an attractive immunomodulator for assisting the immune response in eradication of HPV-infected cells, thereby potentially preventing HPV-induced cancers. PMID:26653678

  6. Langerhans cell histiocytosis misdiagnosed as liver cancer and pituitary tumor in an adult: A case report and brief review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    MA, JING; JIANG, YONGFANG; CHEN, XIANGYU; GONG, GUOZHONG

    2014-01-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) is a rare proliferative disorder in which pathological Langerhans cells accumulate in a variety of organs. LCH usually affects the bone, skin and lymph nodes of children; however, LCH occasionally affects vital organs, including the liver, spleen and pituitary gland. The present study reports a case of an adult LCH patient with marked liver damage, splenomegaly and pituitary damage treated using a new therapeutic strategy. This case was misdiagnosed as liver cancer and pituitary tumor on the basis of abdominal ultrasound, abdominal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and head MRI. The final diagnosis was established by identifying the proliferation of cluster of differentiation 1a-positive LCs in liver tissues. A new regimen of combined 12-week therapy of prednisolone/desmopressin/vincristine and 10 months of maintenance therapy of prednisolone/vinblastine/6-mercaptopurine improved symptoms, liver function and blood cell tests. PMID:24765185

  7. Variation in Langerhans cell number and morphology between the upper and lower regions of the human esophageal epithelium.

    PubMed

    Zavala, Walther D; De Simone, Dino Sanchez; Sacerdote, Fabio L; Cavicchia, Juan C

    2002-12-01

    Langerhans cells (LCs) are dendritic components of stratified epithelia, presenting antigens to other cells of the immune system that play a crucial role in local defense. The paucity of information about their significance in the esophageal mucosa was addressed by studying their distribution and morphology in this particular location. LCs were identified by immunohistochemical detection of CD1a, a cell-specific marker, using a monoclonal antibody, as well as by electron microscopic identification of characteristic Birbeck granules, among other typical morphological features. Cell counts carried out at 25 and 35 cm distal to the dental arch demonstrated significant differences in number and size between the two locations. The upper region contained 10.4 +/- 0.8 cells (mean +/- SEM) vs. 18.4 +/- 1.4 cells in the lower region. Also, cells in the lower region were larger and appeared to have longer dendritic processes. To our knowledge this is the first report of regional differences in number and morphology of LCs in human esophageal mucosa. Copyright 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  8. "HIV-peplotion vaccine"--a novel approach to protection against AIDS by transepithelial transport of viral peptides to Langerhans cells for long-term antiviral CTL response. (A review).

    PubMed

    Becker, Y

    1996-01-01

    Viral vaccines which stimulate the humoral immune response in humans have been successful in preventing most of the known virus diseases except dengue fever, respiratory syncytial virus infections and HIV-1-related AIDS. Burke [1] raised a concern that anti-HIV-1 antibodies may add a risk factor to immunized individuals infected with HIV-1. An approach to develop HIV-1 vaccines capable of stimulating anti-HIV-1 cytotoxic T cells requires an understanding of the importance of epidermal and epithelial Langerhans cells (LC). These cells are professional antigen-presenting cells which express HLA class I and class II molecules. Epithelial LC are present in a specific layer in the skin, genitalia and gut and may be accessible to viral antigens by local application in a vehicle for transepithelial transport of viral proteins/peptides (designated "HIV-1 Peplotion vaccine"). This approach is supported by the reports that HIV-1 gp160 in ISCOM induced MHC class I CTL response [2], mixing of cationic lipids with viral proteins formed complexes which were delivered to cell cytoplasm and the degraded peptides stimulated CTLs by HLA class I mechanism [3] and viral proteins encapsulated in pH-sensitive liposomes administered to LC induced primary antiviral CTLs [4]. Current studies in our laboratory deal with (a) selection of the vehicle for transepidermal transport of peptides and the conditions for selective uptake by epidermal LC [5]; (b) computer analysis of HIV-1 proteins to detect the putative proteolytic cleavage peptides with amino acid motifs which allow association with different known HLA class I haplotype molecules on LCs and synthetic peptide uptake from "without" by LC. The "HIV-1 Peplotion vaccine", when developed, will be useful for continual stimulation of antiviral CTLs in uninfected individuals and HIV-1 carriers by repetitive application to skin, genitalia and gut. The "Peplotion vaccine" will be applied by vaccinees, will be affordable for all human

  9. TLR7-expressing cells comprise an interfollicular epidermal stem cell population in murine epidermis

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Chaoran; Zhang, Ting; Qiao, Liangjun; Du, Jia; Li, Shuang; Zhao, Hengguang; Wang, Fangfang; Huang, Qiaorong; Meng, Wentong; Zhu, Hongyan; Bu, Hong; Li, Hui; Xu, Hong; Mo, Xianming

    2014-01-01

    Normal interfollicular epidermis (IFE) homeostasis is maintained throughout the entire life by its own stem cells that self-renew and generate progeny that undergo terminal differentiation. However, the fine markers of the stem cells in interfollicular epidermis are not well defined yet. Here we found that TLR7 identified the existence of progenitors and interfollicular epidermal stem cells in murine skin. In vitro, TLR7-expressing cells comprised of two subpopulations that were competent to proliferate and exhibited distinct differentiation potentials. Three-dimensional (3D) organotypic culture and skin reconstitution assays showed that TLR7-expressing cells were able to reconstruct the interfollicular epidermis. Finally, TLR7-expressing cells maintained the intact interfollicular epidermal structures revealed in serial transplantation assays in vivo in mice. Taken together, our results suggest that TLR7-expressing cells comprise an interfollicular epidermal stem cell population. PMID:25060222

  10. TLR7-expressing cells comprise an interfollicular epidermal stem cell population in murine epidermis.

    PubMed

    Yin, Chaoran; Zhang, Ting; Qiao, Liangjun; Du, Jia; Li, Shuang; Zhao, Hengguang; Wang, Fangfang; Huang, Qiaorong; Meng, Wentong; Zhu, Hongyan; Bu, Hong; Li, Hui; Xu, Hong; Mo, Xianming

    2014-07-25

    Normal interfollicular epidermis (IFE) homeostasis is maintained throughout the entire life by its own stem cells that self-renew and generate progeny that undergo terminal differentiation. However, the fine markers of the stem cells in interfollicular epidermis are not well defined yet. Here we found that TLR7 identified the existence of progenitors and interfollicular epidermal stem cells in murine skin. In vitro, TLR7-expressing cells comprised of two subpopulations that were competent to proliferate and exhibited distinct differentiation potentials. Three-dimensional (3D) organotypic culture and skin reconstitution assays showed that TLR7-expressing cells were able to reconstruct the interfollicular epidermis. Finally, TLR7-expressing cells maintained the intact interfollicular epidermal structures revealed in serial transplantation assays in vivo in mice. Taken together, our results suggest that TLR7-expressing cells comprise an interfollicular epidermal stem cell population.

  11. Cell and molecular biology of epidermal growth factor receptor.

    PubMed

    Ceresa, Brian P; Peterson, Joanne L

    2014-01-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) has been one of the most intensely studied cell surface receptors due to its well-established roles in developmental biology, tissue homeostasis, and cancer biology. The EGFR has been critical for creating paradigms for numerous aspects of cell biology, such as ligand binding, signal transduction, and membrane trafficking. Despite this history of discovery, there is a continual stream of evidence that only the surface has been scratched. New ways of receptor regulation continue to be identified, each of which is a potential molecular target for manipulating EGFR signaling and the resultant changes in cell and tissue biology. This chapter is an update on EGFR-mediated signaling, and describes some recent developments in the regulation of receptor biology.

  12. A Historical Perspective on the Identification of Cell Types in Pancreatic Islets of Langerhans by Staining and Histochemical Techniques

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Before the middle of the previous century, cell types of the pancreatic islets of Langerhans were identified primarily on the basis of their color reactions with histological dyes. At that time, the chemical basis for the staining properties of islet cells in relation to the identity, chemistry and structure of their hormones was not fully understood. Nevertheless, the definitive islet cell types that secrete glucagon, insulin, and somatostatin (A, B, and D cells, respectively) could reliably be differentiated from each other with staining protocols that involved variations of one or more tinctorial techniques, such as the Mallory-Heidenhain azan trichrome, chromium hematoxylin and phloxine, aldehyde fuchsin, and silver impregnation methods, which were popularly used until supplanted by immunohistochemical techniques. Before antibody-based staining methods, the most bona fide histochemical techniques for the identification of islet B cells were based on the detection of sulfhydryl and disulfide groups of insulin. The application of the classical islet tinctorial staining methods for pathophysiological studies and physiological experiments was fundamental to our understanding of islet architecture and the physiological roles of A and B cells in glucose regulation and diabetes. PMID:26216133

  13. Programmed Cell Death Progresses Differentially in Epidermal and Mesophyll Cells of Lily Petals

    PubMed Central

    Mochizuki-Kawai, Hiroko; Niki, Tomoko; Shibuya, Kenichi; Ichimura, Kazuo

    2015-01-01

    In the petals of some species of flowers, programmed cell death (PCD) begins earlier in mesophyll cells than in epidermal cells. However, PCD progression in each cell type has not been characterized in detail. We separately constructed a time course of biochemical signs and expression patterns of PCD-associated genes in epidermal and mesophyll cells in Lilium cv. Yelloween petals. Before visible signs of senescence could be observed, we found signs of PCD, including DNA degradation and decreased protein content in mesophyll cells only. In these cells, the total proteinase activity increased on the day after anthesis. Within 3 days after anthesis, the protein content decreased by 61.8%, and 22.8% of mesophyll cells was lost. A second peak of proteinase activity was observed on day 6, and the number of mesophyll cells decreased again from days 4 to 7. These biochemical and morphological results suggest that PCD progressed in steps during flower life in the mesophyll cells. PCD began in epidermal cells on day 5, in temporal synchrony with the time course of visible senescence. In the mesophyll cells, the KDEL-tailed cysteine proteinase (LoCYP) and S1/P1 nuclease (LoNUC) genes were upregulated before petal wilting, earlier than in epidermal cells. In contrast, relative to that in the mesophyll cells, the expression of the SAG12 cysteine proteinase homolog (LoSAG12) drastically increased in epidermal cells in the final stage of senescence. These results suggest that multiple PCD-associated genes differentially contribute to the time lag of PCD progression between epidermal and mesophyll cells of lily petals. PMID:26605547

  14. Programmed Cell Death Progresses Differentially in Epidermal and Mesophyll Cells of Lily Petals.

    PubMed

    Mochizuki-Kawai, Hiroko; Niki, Tomoko; Shibuya, Kenichi; Ichimura, Kazuo

    2015-01-01

    In the petals of some species of flowers, programmed cell death (PCD) begins earlier in mesophyll cells than in epidermal cells. However, PCD progression in each cell type has not been characterized in detail. We separately constructed a time course of biochemical signs and expression patterns of PCD-associated genes in epidermal and mesophyll cells in Lilium cv. Yelloween petals. Before visible signs of senescence could be observed, we found signs of PCD, including DNA degradation and decreased protein content in mesophyll cells only. In these cells, the total proteinase activity increased on the day after anthesis. Within 3 days after anthesis, the protein content decreased by 61.8%, and 22.8% of mesophyll cells was lost. A second peak of proteinase activity was observed on day 6, and the number of mesophyll cells decreased again from days 4 to 7. These biochemical and morphological results suggest that PCD progressed in steps during flower life in the mesophyll cells. PCD began in epidermal cells on day 5, in temporal synchrony with the time course of visible senescence. In the mesophyll cells, the KDEL-tailed cysteine proteinase (LoCYP) and S1/P1 nuclease (LoNUC) genes were upregulated before petal wilting, earlier than in epidermal cells. In contrast, relative to that in the mesophyll cells, the expression of the SAG12 cysteine proteinase homolog (LoSAG12) drastically increased in epidermal cells in the final stage of senescence. These results suggest that multiple PCD-associated genes differentially contribute to the time lag of PCD progression between epidermal and mesophyll cells of lily petals.

  15. Host cell reactivation studies with epidermal cells of mice sensitive and resistant to carcinogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Strickland, J.E.; Strickland, A.G.

    1984-03-01

    Primary epidermal cells from AKR, BALB/c, CD-1, and SENCAR mice, listed in order of least to most sensitive to epidermal carcinogenesis by initiation and promotion protocols, were found to be equally competent to ''reactivate'' herpes simplex virus type 1 irradiated by germicidal ultraviolet radiation. Nontumorigenic BALB/c epidermal cell lines selected in vitro for resistance to terminal differentiation after in vivo or in vitro treatment with initiating doses of carcinogens showed virus survival curves similar to those of primary cells. Similarly, primary cultures which were allowed to grow to confluency following a single treatment with the tumor promoter 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (100 ng/ml) retained normal host cell reactivation. Host cell reactivation studies with mouse dermal fibroblasts could not be done because of the failure of the herpes simplex virus to infect these cells and produce plaques. These results demonstrate that survival of ultraviolet light-damaged virus in primary epidermal cells in culture is unrelated to whether the cells are derived from mice sensitive or resistant to epidermal carcinogenesis. Furthermore, virus survival is not changed by tumor promoter treatment or by treatment with initiating doses of carcinogens which results in differentiation-resistant cells.

  16. Langerhans cell histiocytosis or tuberculosis on a medieval child (Oppidum de la Granède, Millau, France - 10th-11th centuries AD).

    PubMed

    Colombo, Antony; Saint-Pierre, Christophe; Naji, Stephan; Panuel, Michel; Coqueugniot, Hélène; Dutour, Olivier

    2015-06-01

    In 2008, a skeleton of a 1 - 2.5-year-old child radiocarbon dated from the 10th - 11th century AD was discovered on the oppidum of La Granède (Millau, France). It presents multiple cranial osteolytic lesions having punched-out or geographical map-like aspects associated with sequestrum and costal osteitis. A multi 3D digital approach (CT, μCT and virtual reconstruction) enabled us to refine the description and identify the diploic origin of the lytic process. Furthermore, precise observation of the extent of the lesions and associated reorganization of the skeletal micro-structure were possible. From these convergent pieces of evidence, the differential diagnosis led to three possibilities: Langerhans cell histiocytosis, tuberculosis, or Langerhans cell histiocytosis and tuberculosis.

  17. [A case of pulmonary Langerhans cell histiocytosis discovered by CT mass screening and followed by bronchoalveolar lavage].

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Hiroshi; Maemondo, Makoto; Okouchi, Shinya; Suzuki, Takuji; Kikuchi, Toshiaki; Tazawa, Ryushi; Ebina, Masahito; Saijo, Yasuo; Hoshikawa, Yasushi; Nukiwa, Toshihiro

    2006-11-01

    A 42-year-old woman who had a cigarette index of 420 had many cavitary lesions predominantly in the upper areas of both lungs. The lesions were detected on a health examination using CT. Analysis with bronchofiberscopy showed increased CD1a positive cells in bronchoalveolar fluid (BALF). Histological examination by video-associated lung biopsy demonstrated that both S-100 and vimentin-positive cells were present in the peribronchial fibrotic lesions. From these data, this disease was diagnosed as pulmonary Langerhans cell histiocytosis (PLCH). Three months after the cessation of smoking, the cavity lesions disappeared. As the image findings improved, CD1a positive cells in BALF decreased (4.9% --> 1.8%) and the CD4/CD8 ratio in BALF increased (1.66 --> 6.16). So far, there is no report describing the time course of both CD1a positive cells and CD4/CD8 ratio in BALF after cessation of smoking in PLCH. These findings attract our interest on the PLCH.

  18. Langerhans cell homeostasis and activation is altered in hyperplastic human papillomavirus type 16 E7 expressing epidermis.

    PubMed

    Abd Warif, Nor Malia; Stoitzner, Patrizia; Leggatt, Graham R; Mattarollo, Stephen R; Frazer, Ian H; Hibma, Merilyn H

    2015-01-01

    It has previously been shown that expression of human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV) E7 in epidermis causes hyperplasia and chronic inflammation, characteristics of pre-malignant lesions. Importantly, E7-expressing epidermis is strongly immune suppressed and is not rejected when transplanted onto immune competent mice. Professional antigen presenting cells are considered essential for initiation of the adaptive immune response that results in graft rejection. Langerhans cells (LC) are the only antigen presenting cells located in normal epidermis and altered phenotype and function of these cells may contribute to the immune suppressive microenvironment. Here, we show that LC are atypically activated as a direct result of E7 expression in the epidermis, and independent of the presence of lymphocytes. The number of LC was significantly increased and the LC are functionally impaired, both in migration and in antigen uptake. However when the LC were extracted from K14E7 skin and matured in vitro they were functionally competent to present and cross-present antigen, and to activate T cells. The ability of the LC to present and cross-present antigen following maturation supports retention of full functional capacity when removed from the hyperplastic skin microenvironment. As such, opportunities are afforded for the development of therapies to restore normal LC function in hyperplastic skin.

  19. Growth activity of epidermal cells from different parts of human body.

    PubMed

    Chai, Jia-ke; Sheng, Zhi-yong; Ma, Zhong-feng; Yang, Hong-ming; Liu, Qiang; Liang, Li-ming

    2007-08-20

    Most epidermal cells used in skin tissue engineering are obtained from the skins of fetuses or prepuces, which can not be widely used in culturing and transplanting autologous epidermis for patients with extensive burn wounds. To solve the problem, in this study, we cultured epidermal cells from different parts of human body in vitro, and detected their growth activity. Normal epidermal cells obtained from the prepuce, scalp, and axilla of male patients, were cultured and passaged. Their growth characteristics including adherent rate and growth activity were compared. Data were analyzed by homogeneity test of variance. In primary culture, the growth of epidermal cells from the prepuce was significantly faster than that of the epidermal cells from the scalp and axilla. In the cells obtained from the prepuce, 80% confluence was achieved on day 12, while on day 16 and day 20 in the cells from the scalp and axilla, respectively. However, no significant difference was detected in their growth and proliferation in the second passage. Although the growth of epidermal cells obtained from the scalp and axilla is slower than that from the prepuce in primary culture, stable cell line can be established and used in preparation of auto-epidermal grafts for patients with extensive burn wounds. Therefore, the scalp and axillary skin should be considered as important sources of epidermal cells other than the prepuce.

  20. Developmental patterning of the sub-epidermal integument cell layer in Arabidopsis seeds.

    PubMed

    Coen, Olivier; Fiume, Elisa; Xu, Wenjia; De Vos, Delphine; Lu, Jing; Pechoux, Christine; Lepiniec, Loïc; Magnani, Enrico

    2017-04-15

    Angiosperm seed development is a paradigm of tissue cross-talk. Proper seed formation requires spatial and temporal coordination of the fertilization products - embryo and endosperm - and the surrounding seed coat maternal tissue. In early Arabidopsis seed development, all seed integuments were thought to respond homogenously to endosperm growth. Here, we show that the sub-epidermal integument cell layer has a unique developmental program. We characterized the cell patterning of the sub-epidermal integument cell layer, which initiates a previously uncharacterized extra cell layer, and identified TRANSPARENT TESTA 16 and SEEDSTICK MADS box transcription factors as master regulators of its polar development and cell architecture. Our data indicate that the differentiation of the sub-epidermal integument cell layer is insensitive to endosperm growth alone and to the repressive mechanism established by FERTILIZATION INDEPENDENT ENDOSPERM and MULTICOPY SUPPRESSOR OF IRA1 Polycomb group proteins. This work demonstrates the different responses of epidermal and sub-epidermal integument cell layers to fertilization.

  1. Epidermal Development in Mammals: Key Regulators, Signals from Beneath, and Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shuang; Zhang, Huishan; Duan, Enkui

    2013-01-01

    Epidermis is one of the best-studied tissues in mammals that contain types of stem cells. Outstanding works in recent years have shed great light on behaviors of different epidermal stem cell populations in the homeostasis and regeneration of the epidermis as well as hair follicles. Also, the molecular mechanisms governing these stem cells are being elucidated, from genetic to epigenetic levels. Compared with the explicit knowledge about adult skin, embryonic development of the epidermis, especially the early period, still needs exploration. Furthermore, stem cells in the embryonic epidermis are largely unstudied or ambiguously depicted. In this review, we will summarize and discuss the process of embryonic epidermal development, with focuses on some key molecular regulators and the role of the sub-epidermal mesenchyme. We will also try to trace adult epidermal stem cell populations back to embryonic development. In addition, we will comment on in vitro derivation of epidermal lineages from ES cells and iPS cells. PMID:23708093

  2. Insufficiency of bone scintigraphy in vertebral lesions of langerhans cell histiocytosis compared to f-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography and diagnostic computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Koç, Zehra Pınar; Şimşek, Selçuk; Akarsu, Saadet; Balcı, Tansel Ansal; Onur, Mehmet Ruhi; Kepenek, Ferat

    2015-02-05

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) is a benign disorder related to the histiocytes which can infiltrate bone tissue. The most effective method for demonstrating severity of this disease is PET/CT and bone scintigraphy might show bone lesions. We present a seventeen year old male patient with disseminated LCH presented with exophtalmos and having multiple vertebral lesions which were identified by F-18 FDG PET/CT scan and diagnostic CT but not in the bone scintigraphy.

  3. Activation of Langerhans-Type Dendritic Cells Alters Human Cytomegalovirus Infection and Reactivation in a Stimulus-Dependent Manner

    PubMed Central

    Coronel, Roxanne; Jesus, Desyree M.; Dalle Ore, Lucia; Mymryk, Joe S.; Hertel, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Oral mucosal Langerhans cells (LC) are likely to play important roles in host defense against infection by human cytomegalovirus (CMV). We previously showed that in vitro-differentiated immature LC (iLC) populations contain smaller amounts of infected cells but produce higher yields than mature LC (mLC) cultures, obtained by iLC stimulation with fetal bovine serum (FBS), CD40 ligand (CD40L) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Here, we sought to determine if exposure to select stimuli can improve LC permissiveness to infection, if specific components of the mLC cocktail are responsible for lowering viral yields, if this is due to defects in progeny production or release, and if these restrictions are also effective against reactivated virus. None of the stimuli tested extended the proportion of infected cells to 100%, suggesting that the block to infection onset cannot be fully removed. While CD40L and FBS exerted positive effects on viral progeny production per cell, stimulation with LPS alone or in combination with CD40L was detrimental. Reductions in viral titers were not due to defects in progeny release, and the permissive or restrictive intracellular environment established upon exposure to each stimulus appeared to act in a somewhat similar way toward lytic and latent infections. PMID:27683575

  4. Macrophage- and Neutrophil-Derived TNF-α Instructs Skin Langerhans Cells to Prime Antiviral Immune Responses

    PubMed Central

    Epaulard, Olivier; Adam, Lucille; Poux, Candice; Zurawski, Gerard; Salabert, Nina; Rosenbaum, Pierre; Dereuddre-Bosquet, Nathalie; Zurawski, Sandra; Flamar, Anne-Laure; Oh, Sangkon; Romain, Gabrielle; Chapon, Catherine; Banchereau, Jacques; Lévy, Yves; Le Grand, Roger; Martinon, Frédéric

    2014-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are major antigen presenting cells that can efficiently prime immune responses. However, the roles of skin resident Langerhans cells (LCs) in eliciting immune responses have not been fully understood. We here demonstrate for the first time that LCs in cynomolgus macaque skin are capable of inducing antiviral-specific immune responses in vivo. Targeting HIV-Gag or influenza hemagglutinin antigens to skin LCs using recombinant fusion proteins of anti-Langerin antibody and antigens resulted in the induction of the viral antigen-specific responses. We further demonstrated that such antigen-specific immune responses elicited by skin LCs were greatly enhanced by TLR ligands (TLR-Ls), polyriboinosinic polyribocytidylic acid (poly(I:C)) and R848. These enhancements were not due to the direct actions of TLR-Ls on LCs, but mainly dependent on TNF-α secreted from macrophages and neutrophils recruited to local tissues. Skin LC activation and migration out of the epidermis are associated with macrophage and neutrophil infiltration into the tissues. More importantly, blocking TNF-α abrogated the activation and migration of skin LCs. This study highlights that the cross-talk between innate immune cells in local tissues is an important component for the establishment of adaptive immunity. Understanding the importance of local immune networks will help us to design new and effective vaccines against microbial pathogens. PMID:25057007

  5. Cell shape controls terminal differentiation of human epidermal keratinocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Watt, F M; Jordan, P W; O'Neill, C H

    1988-01-01

    Cultures of human epidermal keratinocytes provide a useful experimental model with which to study the factors that regulate cell proliferation and terminal differentiation. One situation that is known to trigger premature terminal differentiation is suspension culture, when keratinocytes are deprived of substratum and intercellular contact. We have now investigated whether area of substratum contact, and hence cell shape, can regulate terminal differentiation. Keratinocytes were grown on circular adhesive islands that prevented cell-cell contact. By varying island area we could vary cell shape from fully spread to almost spherical. We found that when substratum contact was restricted, DNA synthesis was inhibited and expression of involucrin, a marker of terminal differentiation, was stimulated. Inhibition of proliferation was not a sufficient stimulus for involucrin synthesis in fully spread cells. When DNA synthesis and involucrin expression were plotted against contact area, classic dose-response curves were obtained. Thus cell shape acts as a signal for the terminal differentiation of keratinocytes in culture. Images PMID:2456572

  6. Disruption of the langerin/CD207 Gene Abolishes Birbeck Granules without a Marked Loss of Langerhans Cell Function

    PubMed Central

    Kissenpfennig, Adrien; Aït-Yahia, Smina; Clair-Moninot, Valérie; Stössel, Hella; Badell, Edgar; Bordat, Yann; Pooley, Joanne L.; Lang, Thierry; Prina, Eric; Coste, Isabelle; Gresser, Olivia; Renno, Toufic; Winter, Nathalie; Milon, Geneviève; Shortman, Ken; Romani, Nikolaus; Lebecque, Serge; Malissen, Bernard; Saeland, Sem; Douillard, Patrice

    2005-01-01

    Langerin is a C-type lectin expressed by a subset of dendritic leukocytes, the Langerhans cells (LC). Langerin is a cell surface receptor that induces the formation of an LC-specific organelle, the Birbeck granule (BG). We generated a langerin−/− mouse on a C57BL/6 background which did not display any macroscopic aberrant development. In the absence of langerin, LC were detected in normal numbers in the epidermis but the cells lacked BG. LC of langerin−/− mice did not present other phenotypic alterations compared to wild-type littermates. Functionally, the langerin−/− LC were able to capture antigen, to migrate towards skin draining lymph nodes, and to undergo phenotypic maturation. In addition, langerin−/− mice were not impaired in their capacity to process native OVA protein for I-Ab-restricted presentation to CD4+ T lymphocytes or for H-2Kb-restricted cross-presentation to CD8+ T lymphocytes. langerin−/− mice inoculated with mannosylated or skin-tropic microorganisms did not display an altered pathogen susceptibility. Finally, chemical mutagenesis resulted in a similar rate of skin tumor development in langerin−/− and wild-type mice. Overall, our data indicate that langerin and BG are dispensable for a number of LC functions. The langerin−/− C57BL/6 mouse should be a valuable model for further functional exploration of langerin and the role of BG. PMID:15601833

  7. Fast surface acoustic wave-matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry of cell response from islets of Langerhans.

    PubMed

    Bllaci, Loreta; Kjellström, Sven; Eliasson, Lena; Friend, James R; Yeo, Leslie Y; Nilsson, Staffan

    2013-03-05

    A desire for higher speed and performance in molecular profiling analysis at a reduced cost is driving a trend in miniaturization and simplification of procedures. Here we report the use of a surface acoustic wave (SAW) atomizer for fast sample handling in matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI MS) peptide and protein profiling of Islets of Langerhans, for future type 2 diabetes (T2D) studies. Here the SAW atomizer was used for ultrasound (acoustic) extraction of insulin and other peptide hormones released from freshly prepared islets, stimulated directly on a membrane. A high energy propagating SAW atomizes the membrane-bound liquid into approximately 2 μm diameter droplets, rich in cell-released molecules. Besides acting as a sample carrier, the membrane provides a purification step by entrapping cell clusters and other impurities within its fibers. A new SAW-based sample-matrix deposition method for MALDI MS was developed and characterized by a strong insulin signal, and a limit of detection (LOD) lower than 100 amol was achieved. Our results support previous work reporting the SAW atomizer as a fast and inexpensive tool for ultrasound, membrane-based sample extraction. When interfaced with MALDI MS, the SAW atomizer constitutes a valuable tool for rapid cell studies. Other biomedical applications of SAW-MALDI MS are currently being developed, aiming at fast profiling of biofluids. The membrane sampling is a simplistic and noninvasive collection method of limited volume biofluids such as the gingival fluid and the tearfilm.

  8. Papular epidermal nevus with "skyline" basal cell layer (PENS) with extracutaneous findings.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Díaz, Eloy; Gonzalvo, Pablo; Colmenero, Isabel; Requena, Luis; Hernández-Martín, Angela; Torrelo, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Papular epidermal nevus with "skyline" basal cell layer (PENS), a variant of epidermal nevus, was recently described in otherwise normal children. We describe herein a patient with multiple, typical PENS lesions associated with peculiar facies, bilateral Achilles tendon shortening, and mild psychomotor delay. The association of PENS with extracutaneous manifestations suggests the possibility of a new type of epidermal nevus syndrome, for which we propose the term PENS syndrome.

  9. Effects of Wnt3a on proliferation and differentiation of human epidermal stem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Jia Liwei; Zhou Jiaxi; Peng Sha; Li Juxue; Cao Yujing; Duan Enkui

    2008-04-11

    Epidermal stem cells maintain development and homeostasis of mammalian epidermis throughout life. However, the molecular mechanisms involved in the proliferation and differentiation of epidermal stem cells are far from clear. In this study, we investigated the effects of Wnt3a and Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling on proliferation and differentiation of human fetal epidermal stem cells. We found both Wnt3a and active {beta}-catenin, two key members of the Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling, were expressed in human fetal epidermis and epidermal stem cells. In addition, Wnt3a protein can promote proliferation and inhibit differentiation of epidermal stem cells in vitro culture. Our results suggest that Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling plays important roles in human fetal skin development and homeostasis, which also provide new insights on the molecular mechanisms of oncogenesis in human epidermis.

  10. Kinetics of epidermal cell proliferation in experimental skin carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Evensen, Arne

    1963-01-01

    It is well known that there exists a daily rhythm in the mitotic count in the epidermis of the mouse. It has also been emphasized that the mitotic rate cannot be estimated correctly from the mitotic count unless the mitotic duration is constant. In this paper it is shown that applications of 3-methylcholanthrene to the skin cause great variations in the mitotic duration of the epidermal cells. The Colcemid technique is used to study the mitotic duration in the untreated epidermis of hairless mice during a 24-hour interval, and it is shown that the diurnal and nocturnal variations in the mitotic count are the effect mainly of variations in the mitotic duration and not of variations in the mitotic rate. PMID:20604149

  11. Dendritic epidermal T cells facilitate wound healing in diabetic mice

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhongyang; Xu, Yingbin; Chen, Lei; Xie, Julin; Tang, Jinming; Zhao, Jingling; Shu, Bin; Qi, Shaohai; Chen, Jian; Liang, Guangping; Luo, Gaoxing; Wu, Jun; He, Weifeng; Liu, Xusheng

    2016-01-01

    The impairment of skin repair in diabetic patients can lead to increased morbidity and mortality. Proper proliferation, apoptosis and migration in keratinocytes are vital for skin repair, but in diabetic patients, hyperglycemia impairs this process. Dendritic epidermal T cells (DETCs) are an important part of the resident cutaneous immunosurveillance program. We observed a reduction in the number of DETCs in a streptozotocin-induced diabetic mouse model. This reduction in DETCs resulted in decreased IGF-1 and KGF production in the epidermis, which is closely associated with diabetic delayed wound closure. DETCs ameliorated the poor wound-healing conditions in diabetic mice by increasing keratinocyte migration and proliferation and decreasing keratinocyte apoptosis in diabetes-like microenvironments. Our results elucidate a new mechanism for diabetic delayed wound closure and point to a new strategy for the treatment of wounds in diabetic patients. PMID:27347345

  12. Fine-needle aspiration of primary Langerhans cell histiocytosis of the thyroid gland, a potential mimic of papillary thyroid carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Pusztaszeri, Marc P; Sauder, Kenan J; Cibas, Edmund S; Faquin, William C

    2013-01-01

    The clinical presentation of Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) as a primary solitary nodule in the thyroid gland is rare. As a result, there are few reports of its cytologic features in thyroid aspirates where it can pose a diagnostic pitfall. CASE AND CONCLUSION: To foster familiarity with its cytomorphology, we report the fine-needle aspiration biopsy (FNAB) findings of 3 specimens from 2 patients with LCH presenting as a solitary thyroid nodule. All aspirates contained numerous dispersed cells with prominent nuclear grooves, and the background showed a mixed pattern of chronic inflammation including scattered eosinophils. The aspirate from patient 1 raised a differential diagnosis that included chronic lymphocytic thyroiditis and a thyroglossal duct cyst, while the aspirate from patient 2 was interpreted as 'suspicious for papillary thyroid carcinoma'. The diagnosis of LCH was confirmed in both patients after lobectomy and immunohistochemical studies that revealed positive reactivity for CD1a and S-100. LCH of the thyroid gland is rare and can pose significant diagnostic challenges, but increased familiarity with its characteristic cytomorphology can help in avoiding diagnostic pitfalls. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  13. Management of adult patients with Langerhans cell histiocytosis: recommendations from an expert panel on behalf of Euro-Histio-Net

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis (LCH) is an orphan disease of clonal dendritic cells which may affect any organ of the body. Most of the knowledge about the diagnosis and therapy is based on pedriatic studies. Adult LCH patients are often evaluated by physicians who focus on only the most obviously affected organ without sufficient evaluation of other systems, resulting in patients being underdiagnosed and/or incompletely staged. Furthermore they may be treated with pediatric-based therapies which are less effective and sometimes more toxic for adults. The published literature on adult LCH cases lacks a comprehensive discussion on the differences between pediatric and adult patients and there are no recommendations for evaluation and comparative therapies. In order to fill this void, a number of experts in this field cooperated to develop the first recommendations for management of adult patients with LCH. Key questions were selected according to the clinical relevance focusing on diagnostic work up, therapy, and follow up. Based on the available literature up to December 2012, recommendations were established, drafts were commented by the entire group, and redrafted by the executive editor. The quality of evidence of the recommendations is predominantly attributed to the level of expert opinion. Final agreement was by consensus. PMID:23672541

  14. Intensified and prolonged therapy comprising cytarabine, vincristine and prednisolone improves outcome in patients with multisystem Langerhans cell histiocytosis: results of the Japan Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis Study Group-02 Protocol Study.

    PubMed

    Morimoto, Akira; Shioda, Yoko; Imamura, Toshihiko; Kudo, Kazuko; Kawaguchi, Hiroshi; Sakashita, Kazuo; Yasui, Masahiro; Koga, Yuhki; Kobayashi, Ryoji; Ishii, Eiichi; Fujimoto, Junichiro; Horibe, Keizo; Bessho, Fumio; Tsunematsu, Yukiko; Imashuku, Shinsaku

    2016-07-01

    The JLSG-96 study reported very low mortality rates for children newly diagnosed with multifocal Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH). The JLSG-02 study was performed to further improve the prognosis from 2002 to 2009. The present study compared the therapeutic results of these two studies in terms of multisystem disease. All patients were treated with 6 weeks of the Induction A regimen, comprising cytarabine, vincristine and prednisolone, followed by maintenance therapy. Poor responders to Induction A were switched to Induction B. JLSG-02 has been revised from JLSG-96 in the following respects: prednisolone dosage during Induction A increased; duration of maintenance therapy extended from 24 to 48 weeks; cyclosporine introduced to Induction B for progressive disease. One hundred forty-seven children with multisystem LCH were evaluated. Of these, 84 were positive for risk of organ involvement (RO) and 63 were RO-negative. At the 6-week point, 76.2 % of RO+ and 93.7 % of RO- patients responded to Induction A. Five-year event-free survival (EFS) was 46.2 % [95 % confidence (CI), 35.5-56.9] for RO+ and 69.7 % (58.4-81.1) for RO-, which was significantly superior to that in JLSG-96 [26.8 % (13.3-40.4) and 38.9 % (16.4-61.4), respectively]. The intensified induction and prolonged maintenance regimens in JLSG-02 improved EFS in patients with multisystem LCH.

  15. The Langerhans islet cells of female rabbits are differentially affected by hypothyroidism depending on the islet size.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Castelán, J; Nicolás, L; Morimoto, S; Cuevas, E

    2015-04-01

    Effects of hypothyroidism on the glucose and insulin levels are controversial, and its impact on the Langerhans islet morphology of adult subjects has been poorly addressed. In spite of hypothyroidism and diabetes mellitus are more frequent in females than in males, most studies using animal models have been done in males. The effect of hypothyroidism on the immunolabeling of thyroid hormone receptors (TRs) and thyrotropin receptor (TSHR) of islet cells is unknown. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of hypothyroidism on the glucose and insulin concentrations, morphometry of islets, and immunostaining of TRs α1-2 and β1 and TSHR of islet cells in female rabbits. Control and hypothyroid (0.02% of methimazole for 30 days) animals were used to quantify blood levels of glucose and insulin, density of islets, cross-sectional area (CSA) of islets, number of cells per islet, cell proliferation, and the immunolabeling of TRs α1-2, TRβ1, and TSHR. Student's t or Mann-Whitney-U tests, two-way ANOVAs, and Fischer's tests were applied. Concentrations of glucose and insulin, as well as the insulin resistance were similar between groups. Hypothyroidism did not affect the density or the CSA of islets. The analysis of islets by size showed that hypothyroidism reduced the cell number in large and medium islets, but not in small ones. In small islets, cell proliferation was increased. The immunoreactivity of TRα1-2, TRβ1, and TSHR was increased by hypothyroidism in all islet sizes. Our results show that hypothyroidism affects differentially the islet cells depending on the size of islets.

  16. Retinoid-mediated transcriptional regulaton of keratin genes in human epidermal and squamous cell carcinoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Stellmach, V.; Leask, A.; Fuchs, E. )

    1991-06-01

    Vitamin A and other retinoids profoundly inhibit morphological and biochemical heatures of epidermal differentiation in vivo and in vitro. To elucidate the molecular mechanisms underlying the differential expression of epidermal keratins and their regulation by retinoids, the authors retinoid-mediated changes in total protein expression, protein synthesis, mRNA expression, and transcription in cultured human keratinocytes and in squamous cell carcinoma (SCC-13) cells of epidermal origin. The studies revealed that the epidermal keratins, K5, K6, K14, and K16, their mRNAs, and their transcripts were diminished relative to actin as a consequence of retinoic acid (RA) treatment. The effects were most pronounced in SCC-13 and were detected as early as 6 hr post-RA treatment, with enhancement over an additional 24-48 hr. Repression was also observed when 5{prime} upstream sequences of K14 or K5 genes were used to drive expression of a chloramphenicol acetyltransferase reporter gene in SCC-13 keratinocytes. Both cell types were found to express mRNAs for the RA receptors {alpha} and {gamma}, which may be involved in the RA-mediated transcriptional changes in these cells. The rapid transcriptional changes in epidermal keratin genes were in striking contrast to the previously reported slow transcriptional changes in simple epithelial keratin genes.

  17. Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Cell Proliferation Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Wee, Ping; Wang, Zhixiang

    2017-01-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is a receptor tyrosine kinase that is commonly upregulated in cancers such as in non-small-cell lung cancer, metastatic colorectal cancer, glioblastoma, head and neck cancer, pancreatic cancer, and breast cancer. Various mechanisms mediate the upregulation of EGFR activity, including common mutations and truncations to its extracellular domain, such as in the EGFRvIII truncations, as well as to its kinase domain, such as the L858R and T790M mutations, or the exon 19 truncation. These EGFR aberrations over-activate downstream pro-oncogenic signaling pathways, including the RAS-RAF-MEK-ERK MAPK and AKT-PI3K-mTOR pathways. These pathways then activate many biological outputs that are beneficial to cancer cell proliferation, including their chronic initiation and progression through the cell cycle. Here, we review the molecular mechanisms that regulate EGFR signal transduction, including the EGFR structure and its mutations, ligand binding and EGFR dimerization, as well as the signaling pathways that lead to G1 cell cycle progression. We focus on the induction of CYCLIN D expression, CDK4/6 activation, and the repression of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor proteins (CDKi) by EGFR signaling pathways. We also discuss the successes and challenges of EGFR-targeted therapies, and the potential for their use in combination with CDK4/6 inhibitors. PMID:28513565

  18. Arsenite maintains germinative state in cultured human epidermal cells

    SciTech Connect

    Patterson, Timothy J.; Reznikova, Tatiana V.; Phillips, Marjorie A.; Rice, Robert H. . E-mail: rhrice@ucdavis.edu

    2005-08-22

    Arsenic is a well-known carcinogen for human skin, but its mechanism of action and proximal macromolecular targets remain to be elucidated. In the present study, low micromolar concentrations of sodium arsenite maintained the proliferative potential of epidermal keratinocytes, decreasing their exit from the germinative compartment under conditions that promote differentiation of untreated cells. This effect was observed in suspension and in post-confluent surface cultures as measured by colony-forming ability and by proportion of rapidly adhering colony-forming cells. Arsenite-treated cultures exhibited elevated levels of {beta}1-integrin and {beta}-catenin, two proteins enriched in cells with high proliferative potential. Levels of phosphorylated (inactive) glycogen synthase kinase 3{beta} were higher in the treated cultures, likely accounting for the increased levels of transcriptionally available {beta}-catenin. These findings suggest that arsenic could have co-carcinogenic and tumor co-promoting activities in the epidermis as a result of increasing the population and persistence of germinative cells targeted by tumor initiators and promoters. These findings also identify a critical signal transduction pathway meriting further exploration in pursuit of this phenomenon.

  19. Planarian Epidermal Stem Cells Respond to Positional Cues to Promote Cell-Type Diversity.

    PubMed

    Wurtzel, Omri; Oderberg, Isaac M; Reddien, Peter W

    2017-03-13

    Successful regeneration requires that progenitors of different lineages form the appropriate missing cell types. However, simply generating lineages is not enough. Cells produced by a particular lineage often have distinct functions depending on their position within the organism. How this occurs in regeneration is largely unexplored. In planarian regeneration, new cells arise from a proliferative cell population (neoblasts). We used the planarian epidermal lineage to study how the location of adult progenitor cells results in their acquisition of distinct functional identities. Single-cell RNA sequencing of epidermal progenitors revealed the emergence of distinct spatial identities as early in the lineage as the epidermal neoblasts, with further pre-patterning occurring in their post-mitotic migratory progeny. Establishment of dorsal-ventral epidermal identities and functions, in response to BMP signaling, required neoblasts. Our work identified positional signals that activate regionalized transcriptional programs in the stem cell population and subsequently promote cell-type diversity in the epidermis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Localized Langerhans cell histiocytosis masquerading as Brodie's abscess in a 2-year-old child: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Wei-Fang; Hsu, Yi-Chih; Wu, Yi-Der; Kuo, Chun-Lang; Huang, Guo-Shu

    2016-01-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH), formerly known as histiocytosis X, refers to a spectrum of diseases characterized by idiopathic proliferation of histiocytes that produce either focal (localized LCH) or systemic manifestations (Hand-Schüller-Christian disease and Letterer-Siwe disease). Localized LCH accounts for approximately 60-70 % of all LCH cases. Osseous involvement is the most common manifestation and typically involves the flat bones, along with lesions of the skull, pelvis, and ribs. Localized LCH in bone shows a wide spectrum of clinical manifestations and radiologic features that may mimic those of infections as well as benign and malignant tumors. The diagnostic imaging findings of localized LCH are also diverse and challenging. The penumbra sign is a common and characteristic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) feature of Brodie's abscess, but is rarely seen in localized LCH. In this report, we describe a case of localized LCH misdiagnosed as Brodie's abscess in a 2-year-old child based on clinical symptoms, laboratory findings, and pre-diagnostic MRI findings (penumbra sign). Therefore, the penumbra sign is not sufficient to clearly establish the diagnosis of Brodie's abscess, and the differential diagnosis of localized LCH should be considered when a child with an osteolytic lesion presents with a penumbra sign. PMID:27065773

  1. Human cytomegalovirus decreases constitutive transcription of MHC class II genes in mature Langerhans cells by reducing CIITA transcript levels.

    PubMed

    Lee, Andrew W; Wang, Nan; Hornell, Tara M C; Harding, James J; Deshpande, Chetan; Hertel, Laura; Lacaille, Vashti; Pashine, Achal; Macaubas, Claudia; Mocarski, Edward S; Mellins, Elizabeth D

    2011-05-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) productively infects CD34(+) progenitor-derived, mature Langerhans-type dendritic cells (matLC) and reduces surface expression of MHC class II complexes (MHC II) by increasing intracellular retention of these molecules. To determine whether HCMV also inhibits MHC II expression by other mechanisms, we assessed mRNA levels of the class II transcriptional regulator, CIITA, and several of its target genes in infected matLC. Levels of CIITA, HLA-DRA (DRA) and DRB transcripts, and new DR protein synthesis were compared in mock-infected and HCMV-infected cells by quantitative PCR and pulse-chase immunoprecipitation analyses, respectively. CIITA mRNA levels were significantly lower in HCMV-infected matLC as compared to mock-infected cells. When assessed in the presence of Actinomycin D, the stability of CIITA transcripts was not diminished by HCMV. Analysis of promoter-specific CIITA isoforms revealed that types I, III and IV all were decreased by HCMV, a result that differs from changes after incubation of these cells with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Exposure to UV-inactivated virus failed to reduce CIITA mRNA levels, implicating de novo viral gene expression in this effect. HCMV-infected matLC also expressed lower levels of DR transcripts and reduced DR protein synthesis rates compared to mock-infected matLC. In summary, we demonstrate that HCMV infection of a human dendritic cell subset inhibits constitutive CIITA expression, most likely at the transcriptional level, resulting in reduced MHC II biosynthesis. We suggest this represents a new mechanism of modulation of mature LC by HCMV.

  2. R5 HIV productively infects Langerhans cells, and infection levels are regulated by compound CCR5 polymorphisms.

    PubMed

    Kawamura, Tatsuyoshi; Gulden, Forrest O; Sugaya, Makoto; McNamara, David T; Borris, Debra L; Lederman, Michael M; Orenstein, Jan M; Zimmerman, Peter A; Blauvelt, Andrew

    2003-07-08

    Langerhans cells (LCs) are suspected to be initial targets for HIV after sexual exposure (by becoming infected or by capturing virus). Here, productive R5 HIV infection of LC ex vivo and LC-mediated transmission of virus to CD4+ T cells were both found to depend on CCR5. By contrast, infection of monocyte-derived dendritic cells and transfer of infection from monocyte-derived dendritic cells to CD4+ T cells were mediated by CCR5-dependent as well as DC-specific ICAM-3-grabbing nonintegrin-dependent pathways. Furthermore, in 62 healthy individuals, R5 HIV infection levels in LCs ex vivo were associated with CCR5 genotype. Specifically, genotyping for ORF Delta 32 revealed that LCs isolated from ORF Delta 32/wt individuals were significantly less susceptible to HIV when compared with LCs isolated from ORFwt/wt individuals (P = 0.016). Strikingly, further genetic analyses of the A-2459G CCR5 promoter polymorphism in ORF Delta 32/wt heterozygous individuals revealed that LCs isolated from -2459A/G + ORF Delta 32/wt individuals were markedly less susceptible to HIV than were LCs from -2459A/A + ORF Delta 32/wt individuals (P = 0.012). Interestingly, these genetic susceptibility data in LCs parallel those of genetic susceptibility studies performed in cohorts of HIV-infected individuals. Thus, we suggest that CCR5-mediated infection of LCs, and not capture of virus by LCs, provides a biologic basis for understanding certain aspects of host genetic susceptibility to initial HIV infection.

  3. Human cytomegalovirus decreases constitutive transcription of MHC class II genes in mature Langerhans cells by reducing CIITA transcript levels

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Andrew W.; Wang, Nan; Hornell, Tara M.C.; Harding, James J.; Deshpande, Chetan; Hertel, Laura; Lacaille, Vashti; Pashine, Achal; Macaubas, Claudia; Mocarski, Edward S.; Mellins, Elizabeth D.

    2011-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) productively infects CD34+ progenitor-derived, mature Langerhans-type dendritic cells (matLC) and reduces surface expression of MHC class II complexes (MHC II) by increasing intracellular retention of these molecules. To determine whether HCMV also inhibits MHC II expression by other mechanisms, we assessed mRNA levels of the class II transcriptional regulator, CIITA, and several of its target genes in infected matLC. Levels of CIITA, HLA-DRA (DRA) and DRB transcripts, and new DR protein synthesis were compared in mock-infected and HCMV-infected cells by quantitative PCR and pulse-chase immunoprecipitation analyses, respectively. CIITA mRNA levels were significantly lower in HCMV-infected matLC as compared to mock-infected cells. When assessed in the presence of Actinomycin D, the stability of CIITA transcripts was not diminished by HCMV. Analysis of promoter-specific CIITA isoforms revealed that types I, III and IV all were decreased by HCMV, a result that differs from changes after incubation of these cells with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Exposure to UV-inactivated virus failed to reduce CIITA mRNA levels, implicating de novo viral gene expression in this effect. HCMV-infected matLC also expressed lower levels of DR transcripts and reduced DR protein synthesis rates compared to mock-infected matLC. In summary, we demonstrate that HCMV infection of a human dendritic cell subset inhibits constitutive CIITA expression, most likely at the transcriptional level, resulting in reduced MHC II biosynthesis. We suggest this represents a new mechanism of modulation of mature LC by HCMV. PMID:21458073

  4. Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Cell Survival Signaling Requires Phosphatidylcholine Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Crook, Matt; Upadhyay, Awani; Ido, Liyana J.; Hanna-Rose, Wendy

    2016-01-01

    Identification of pro-cell survival signaling pathways has implications for cancer, cardiovascular, and neurodegenerative disease. We show that the Caenorhabditis elegans epidermal growth factor receptor LET-23 (LET-23 EGFR) has a prosurvival function in counteracting excitotoxicity, and we identify novel molecular players required for this prosurvival signaling. uv1 sensory cells in the C. elegans uterus undergo excitotoxic death in response to activation of the OSM-9/OCR-4 TRPV channel by the endogenous agonist nicotinamide. Activation of LET-23 EGFR can effectively prevent this excitotoxic death. We investigate the roles of signaling pathways known to act downstream of LET-23 EGFR in C. elegans and find that the LET-60 Ras/MAPK pathway, but not the IP3 receptor pathway, is required for efficient LET-23 EGFR activity in its prosurvival function. However, activation of LET-60 Ras/MAPK pathway does not appear to be sufficient to fully mimic LET-23 EGFR activity. We screen for genes that are required for EGFR prosurvival function and uncover a role for phosphatidylcholine biosynthetic enzymes in EGFR prosurvival function. Finally, we show that exogenous application of phosphatidylcholine is sufficient to prevent some deaths in this excitotoxicity model. Our work implicates regulation of lipid synthesis downstream of EGFR in cell survival and death decisions. PMID:27605519

  5. Emerging roots alter epidermal cell fate through mechanical and reactive oxygen species signaling.

    PubMed

    Steffens, Bianka; Kovalev, Alexander; Gorb, Stanislav N; Sauter, Margret

    2012-08-01

    A central question in biology is how spatial information is conveyed to locally establish a developmental program. Rice (Oryza sativa) can survive flash floods by the emergence of adventitious roots from the stem. Epidermal cells that overlie adventitious root primordia undergo cell death to facilitate root emergence. Root growth and epidermal cell death are both controlled by ethylene. This study aimed to identify the signal responsible for the spatial control of cell death. Epidermal cell death correlated with the proximity to root primordia in wild-type and ADVENTITIOUS ROOTLESS1 plants, indicating that the root emits a spatial signal. Ethylene-induced root growth generated a mechanical force of ~18 millinewtons within 1 h. Force application to epidermal cells above root primordia caused cell death in a dose-dependent manner and was inhibited by 1-methylcyclopropene or diphenylene iodonium, an inhibitor of NADPH oxidase. Exposure of epidermal cells not overlying a root to either force and ethylene or force and the catalase inhibitor aminotriazole induced ectopic cell death. Genetic downregulation of the reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenger METALLOTHIONEIN2b likewise promoted force-induced ectopic cell death. Hence, reprogramming of epidermal cell fate by the volatile plant hormone ethylene requires two signals: mechanosensing for spatial resolution and ROS for cell death signaling.

  6. CD133 Is a Marker For Long-Term Repopulating Murine Epidermal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Charruyer, A; Strachan, LR; Yue, L; Toth, AS; Mancianti, ML; Ghadially, R

    2012-01-01

    Maintenance, repair and renewal of the epidermis are thought to depend on a pool of dedicated epidermal stem cells. Like for many somatic tissues, isolation of a nearly pure population of stem cells is a primary goal in cutaneous biology. We used a quantitative transplantation assay, using injection of keratinocytes into subcutis combined with limiting dilution analysis, to assess the long-term repopulating ability of putative murine epidermal stem populations. Putative epidermal stem cell populations were isolated by FACS sorting. The CD133+ population and the subpopulation of CD133+ cells that exhibits high mitochondrial membrane potential (DΨmhi), were enriched for long-term repopulating epidermal stem cells vs. unfractionated cells (3.9 and 5.2-fold, respectively). Evidence for self-renewal capacity was obtained by serial transplantation of long-term epidermal repopulating units derived from CD133+ and CD133+ΔΨmhi keratinocytes. CD133+ keratinocytes were multipotent and produced significantly more hair follicles than CD133− cells. CD133+ cells were a subset of the previously described integrin α6+CD34+ bulge cell population and 28.9±8.6% were label retaining cells. Thus, murine keratinocytes within the CD133+ and CD133+ΔΨmhi populations contain epidermal stem cells that regenerate epidermis for the long-term, are self-renewing, multipotent, and label-retaining cells. PMID:22763787

  7. Gloss, colour and grip: multifunctional epidermal cell shapes in bee- and bird-pollinated flowers.

    PubMed

    Papiorek, Sarah; Junker, Robert R; Lunau, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    Flowers bear the function of filters supporting the attraction of pollinators as well as the deterrence of floral antagonists. The effect of epidermal cell shape on the visual display and tactile properties of flowers has been evaluated only recently. In this study we quantitatively measured epidermal cell shape, gloss and spectral reflectance of flowers pollinated by either bees or birds testing three hypotheses: The first two hypotheses imply that bee-pollinated flowers might benefit from rough surfaces on visually-active parts produced by conical epidermal cells, as they may enhance the colour signal of flowers as well as the grip on flowers for bees. In contrast, bird-pollinated flowers might benefit from flat surfaces produced by flat epidermal cells, by avoiding frequent visitation from non-pollinating bees due to a reduced colour signal, as birds do not rely on specific colour parameters while foraging. Moreover, flat petal surfaces in bird-pollinated flowers may hamper grip for bees that do not touch anthers and stigmas while consuming nectar and thus, are considered as nectar thieves. Beside this, the third hypothesis implies that those flower parts which are vulnerable to nectar robbing of bee- as well as bird-pollinated flowers benefit from flat epidermal cells, hampering grip for nectar robbing bees. Our comparative data show in fact that conical epidermal cells are restricted to visually-active parts of bee-pollinated flowers, whereas robbing-sensitive parts of bee-pollinated as well as the entire floral surface of bird-pollinated flowers possess on average flat epidermal cells. However, direct correlations between epidermal cell shape and colour parameters have not been found. Our results together with published experimental studies show that epidermal cell shape as a largely neglected flower trait might act as an important feature in pollinator attraction and avoidance of antagonists, and thus may contribute to the partitioning of flower-visitors.

  8. Gloss, Colour and Grip: Multifunctional Epidermal Cell Shapes in Bee- and Bird-Pollinated Flowers

    PubMed Central

    Papiorek, Sarah; Junker, Robert R.; Lunau, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    Flowers bear the function of filters supporting the attraction of pollinators as well as the deterrence of floral antagonists. The effect of epidermal cell shape on the visual display and tactile properties of flowers has been evaluated only recently. In this study we quantitatively measured epidermal cell shape, gloss and spectral reflectance of flowers pollinated by either bees or birds testing three hypotheses: The first two hypotheses imply that bee-pollinated flowers might benefit from rough surfaces on visually-active parts produced by conical epidermal cells, as they may enhance the colour signal of flowers as well as the grip on flowers for bees. In contrast, bird-pollinated flowers might benefit from flat surfaces produced by flat epidermal cells, by avoiding frequent visitation from non-pollinating bees due to a reduced colour signal, as birds do not rely on specific colour parameters while foraging. Moreover, flat petal surfaces in bird-pollinated flowers may hamper grip for bees that do not touch anthers and stigmas while consuming nectar and thus, are considered as nectar thieves. Beside this, the third hypothesis implies that those flower parts which are vulnerable to nectar robbing of bee- as well as bird-pollinated flowers benefit from flat epidermal cells, hampering grip for nectar robbing bees. Our comparative data show in fact that conical epidermal cells are restricted to visually-active parts of bee-pollinated flowers, whereas robbing-sensitive parts of bee-pollinated as well as the entire floral surface of bird-pollinated flowers possess on average flat epidermal cells. However, direct correlations between epidermal cell shape and colour parameters have not been found. Our results together with published experimental studies show that epidermal cell shape as a largely neglected flower trait might act as an important feature in pollinator attraction and avoidance of antagonists, and thus may contribute to the partitioning of flower

  9. Epidermal Merkel cells are mechanosensory cells that tune mammalian touch receptors.

    PubMed

    Maksimovic, Srdjan; Nakatani, Masashi; Baba, Yoshichika; Nelson, Aislyn M; Marshall, Kara L; Wellnitz, Scott A; Firozi, Pervez; Woo, Seung-Hyun; Ranade, Sanjeev; Patapoutian, Ardem; Lumpkin, Ellen A

    2014-05-29

    Touch submodalities, such as flutter and pressure, are mediated by somatosensory afferents whose terminal specializations extract tactile features and encode them as action potential trains with unique activity patterns. Whether non-neuronal cells tune touch receptors through active or passive mechanisms is debated. Terminal specializations are thought to function as passive mechanical filters analogous to the cochlea's basilar membrane, which deconstructs complex sounds into tones that are transduced by mechanosensory hair cells. The model that cutaneous specializations are merely passive has been recently challenged because epidermal cells express sensory ion channels and neurotransmitters; however, direct evidence that epidermal cells excite tactile afferents is lacking. Epidermal Merkel cells display features of sensory receptor cells and make 'synapse-like' contacts with slowly adapting type I (SAI) afferents. These complexes, which encode spatial features such as edges and texture, localize to skin regions with high tactile acuity, including whisker follicles, fingertips and touch domes. Here we show that Merkel cells actively participate in touch reception in mice. Merkel cells display fast, touch-evoked mechanotransduction currents. Optogenetic approaches in intact skin show that Merkel cells are both necessary and sufficient for sustained action-potential firing in tactile afferents. Recordings from touch-dome afferents lacking Merkel cells demonstrate that Merkel cells confer high-frequency responses to dynamic stimuli and enable sustained firing. These data are the first, to our knowledge, to directly demonstrate a functional, excitatory connection between epidermal cells and sensory neurons. Together, these findings indicate that Merkel cells actively tune mechanosensory responses to facilitate high spatio-temporal acuity. Moreover, our results indicate a division of labour in the Merkel cell-neurite complex: Merkel cells signal static stimuli, such as

  10. Basal Cell Carcinoma Arising on a Verrucous Epidermal Nevus: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Viana, Analia; Aguinaga, Felipe; Marinho, Flauberto; Rodrigues, Rosangela; Cuzzi, Tullia; Ramos-e-Silva, Marcia

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of basal cell carcinoma that appeared from an epidermal verrucous nevus in a 61-year-old patient. The onset of basal cell carcinoma in sebaceous nevi, basal cell nevi and dysplastic nevi is relatively common, but it is rarely associated with epidermal verrucous nevi. There is no consensus on whether the two lesions have a common cellular origin or whether they merely represent a collision of two distinct tumors. Since this association – as with other malignant tumors – is rare, there is no need for prophylactic removal of epidermal verrucous nevi. PMID:25848348

  11. Basal cell carcinoma arising on a verrucous epidermal nevus: a case report.

    PubMed

    Viana, Analia; Aguinaga, Felipe; Marinho, Flauberto; Rodrigues, Rosangela; Cuzzi, Tullia; Ramos-E-Silva, Marcia

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of basal cell carcinoma that appeared from an epidermal verrucous nevus in a 61-year-old patient. The onset of basal cell carcinoma in sebaceous nevi, basal cell nevi and dysplastic nevi is relatively common, but it is rarely associated with epidermal verrucous nevi. There is no consensus on whether the two lesions have a common cellular origin or whether they merely represent a collision of two distinct tumors. Since this association - as with other malignant tumors - is rare, there is no need for prophylactic removal of epidermal verrucous nevi.

  12. Quantification of oral palatine Langerhans cells in HIV/AIDS associated oral Kaposi sarcoma with and without oral candidiasis.

    PubMed

    Jivan, Vibha; Meer, Shabnum

    2016-01-01

    Langerhans cells (LCs) are effective antigen-presenting cells that function as "custodians" of mucosa, modifying the immune system to pathogen entry, and tolerance to self-antigen and commensal microbes. A reduction in number of LCs in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive individuals may predispose to local mucosal infections. To quantitatively determine the number of oral mucosal LCs in HIV/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome HIV/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) associated oral Kaposi sarcoma (KS) with/without oral candidiasis (OC) and to define in situ interrelationships between the cells, OC, and HIV infection. Thirty-two periodic acid-Schiff. (PAS) stained histologic sections of palatal HIV/AIDS associated KS with intact oral epithelium were examined for Candida and divided into two groups: . (1) KS coinfected with Candida and. (2) KS noninfected with Candida. Sections were immunohistochemically stained with CD1a. The standard length of surface epithelium was measured and number of positively stained LCs counted per unit length. Control cases included non-Candida infected palatal mucosa overlying pleomorphic adenoma. (PA) and oral mucosa infected with Candida in otherwise healthy individuals. LC number per unit length of surface epithelium was statistically significantly greatest in uninfected PA mucosa and lowest in KS coinfected with Candida (P = 0.0001). A statistically significant difference was also noted between uninfected PA mucosa and non-Candida infected KS (P = 0.0014), in KS coinfected with Candida and non-infected KS (P = 0.0035), between OC and PA (P = 0.0001), and OC and KS coinfected with Candida (P = 0.0247). LC numbers are significantly reduced in oral tissues of HIV/AIDS infected patients by Candida infection when compared to oral tissues without.

  13. Relationship between Endopolyploidy and Cell Size in Epidermal Tissue of Arabidopsis.

    PubMed Central

    Melaragno, JE; Mehrotra, B; Coleman, AW

    1993-01-01

    Relative quantities of DNA in individual nuclei of stem and leaf epidermal cells of Arabidopsis were measured microspectrofluorometrically using epidermal peels. The relative ploidy level in each nucleus was assessed by comparison to root tip mitotic nuclei. A clear pattern of regular endopolyploidy is evident in epidermal cells. Guard cell nuclei contain levels of DNA comparable to dividing root cells, the 2C level (i.e., one unreplicated copy of the nuclear DNA). Leaf trichome nuclei had elevated ploidy levels of 4C, 8C, 16C, 32C, and 64C, and their cytology suggested that the polyploidy represents a form of polyteny. The nuclei of epidermal pavement cells were 2C, 4C, and 8C in stem epidermis, and 2C, 4C, 8C, and 16C in leaf epidermis. Morphometry of epidermal pavement cells revealed a direct proportionality between nuclear DNA level and cell size. A consideration of the development process suggests that the cells of highest ploidy level are developmentally oldest; consequently, the developmental pattern of epidermal tissues can be read from the ploidy pattern of the cells. This observation is relevant to theories of stomate spacing and offers opportunities for genetic analysis of the endopolyploidy/polyteny phenomenon. PMID:12271050

  14. Confocal microscopy of epithelial and langerhans cells of the cornea in patients using travoprost drops containing two different preservatives.

    PubMed

    Marsovszky, László; Resch, Miklós D; Visontai, Zsuzsanna; Németh, János

    2014-07-01

    The recently developed confocal cornea microscopy offers the opportunity to examine pathologies of the cornea and to gain insight into the activity of innate immunity. We aimed to investigate the corneal epithelial and Langerhans cell (LC) densities along with dry eye parameters in primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG) subjects, treated with either of two commercially available travoprost 0.004 % topical medications containing different preservatives. (1: benzalkonium chloride 0.015 % (TravBAK) and 2: polyquaternium-1 (PQ) 0.001 % (TravPQ). Consecutive case series of nineteen POAG patients on TravBAK (mean age: 64.8 ± 13.6 years), nineteen POAG patients on TravPQ (mean age: 66.8 ± 11.3 years) and nineteen age-matched healthy control subjects (63.8 ± 8.2 years). Ocular surface disease index (OSDI), lid parallel conjunctival folds (LIPCOF), Schirmer test (ST) and tear break up time (TBUT) were assessed, and then corneal epithelial and LC densities were investigated with confocal microscopy. Tear production was significantly reduced in both glaucoma patient groups compared to healthy individuals (p < 0.05). TBUT was significantly reduced and epithelial cell densities were significantly greater in patients treated with TravBAK compared to healthy individuals (p < 0.05 for all). LC densities were greater in both glaucoma groups compared to control subjects (p < 0.05 for all). Travoprost therapy may compromise ocular surface. The limited alertness of the corneal immune system found in patients with TravPQ can be considered as indicators of a less disturbed ocular surface and better controlled corneal homeostasis.

  15. Micromorphology and development of the epicuticular structure on the epidermal cell of ginseng leaves

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kyounghwan; Nah, Seung-Yeol; Kim, Eun-Soo

    2014-01-01

    Background A leaf cuticle has different structures and functions as a barrier to water loss and as protection from various environmental stressors. Methods Leaves of Panax ginseng were examined by scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy to investigate the characteristics and development of the epicuticular structure. Results Along the epidermal wall surface, the uniformly protuberant fine structure was on the adaxial surface of the cuticle. This epicuticular structure was highly wrinkled and radially extended to the marginal region of epidermal cells. The cuticle at the protuberant positions maintained the same thickness. The density of the wall matrix under the structures was also similar to that of the other wall region. By contrast, none of this structure was distributed on the abaxial surface, except in the region of the stoma. During the early developmental phase of the epicuticular structure, small vesicles appeared on wall–cuticle interface in the peripheral wall of epidermal cells. Some electron-opaque vesicles adjacent to the cuticle were fused and formed the cuticle layer, whereas electron-translucent vesicles contacted each other and progressively increased in size within the epidermal wall. Conclusion The outwardly projected cuticle and epidermal cell wall (i.e., an epicuticular wrinkle) acts as a major barrier to block out sunlight in ginseng leaves. The small vesicles in the peripheral region of epidermal cells may suppress the cuticle and parts of epidermal wall, push it upward, and consequently contribute to the formation of the epicuticular structure. PMID:26045686

  16. Human Papillomavirus Type 8 Interferes with a Novel C/EBPβ-Mediated Mechanism of Keratinocyte CCL20 Chemokine Expression and Langerhans Cell Migration

    PubMed Central

    Walch-Rückheim, Barbara; Wickenhauser, Claudia; Doorbar, John; Pfister, Herbert; Malejczyk, Magdalena; Majewski, Sławomir; Keates, Andrew C.; Smola, Sigrun

    2012-01-01

    Infection with genus beta human papillomaviruses (HPV) is implicated in the development of non-melanoma skin cancer. This was first evidenced for HPV5 and 8 in patients with epidermodysplasia verruciformis (EV), a genetic skin disease. So far, it has been unknown how these viruses overcome cutaneous immune control allowing their persistence in lesional epidermis of these patients. Here we demonstrate that Langerhans cells, essential for skin immunosurveillance, are strongly reduced in HPV8-positive lesional epidermis from EV patients. Interestingly, the same lesions were largely devoid of the important Langerhans cells chemoattractant protein CCL20. Applying bioinformatic tools, chromatin immunoprecipitation assays and functional studies we identified the differentiation-associated transcription factor CCAAT/enhancer binding protein β (C/EBPβ) as a critical regulator of CCL20 gene expression in normal human keratinocytes. The physiological relevance of this finding is supported by our in vivo studies showing that the expression patterns of CCL20 and nuclear C/EBPβ converge spatially in the most differentiated layers of human epidermis. Our analyses further identified C/EBPβ as a novel target of the HPV8 E7 oncoprotein, which co-localizes with C/EBPβ in the nucleus, co-precipitates with it and interferes with its binding to the CCL20 promoter in vivo. As a consequence, the HPV8 E7 but not E6 oncoprotein suppressed C/EBPβ-inducible and constitutive CCL20 gene expression as well as Langerhans cell migration. In conclusion, our study unraveled a novel molecular mechanism central to cutaneous host defense. Interference of the HPV8 E7 oncoprotein with this regulatory pathway allows the virus to disrupt the immune barrier, a major prerequisite for its epithelial persistence and procarcinogenic activity. PMID:22911498

  17. BRAF Mutation Correlates With High-Risk Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis and Increased Resistance to First-Line Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Emile, Jean-François; Barkaoui, Mohamed-Aziz; Thomas, Caroline; Fraitag, Sylvie; Boudjemaa, Sabah; Renaud, Florence; Moreau, Anne; Peuchmaur, Michel; Chassagne-Clément, Catherine; Dijoud, Frédérique; Rigau, Valérie; Moshous, Despina; Lambilliotte, Anne; Mazingue, Françoise; Kebaili, Kamila; Miron, Jean; Jeziorski, Eric; Plat, Geneviève; Aladjidi, Nathalie; Ferster, Alina; Pacquement, Hélène; Galambrun, Claire; Brugières, Laurence; Leverger, Guy; Mansuy, Ludovic; Paillard, Catherine; Deville, Anne; Armari-Alla, Corinne; Lutun, Anne; Gillibert-Yvert, Marion; Stephan, Jean-Louis; Cohen-Aubart, Fleur; Haroche, Julien; Pellier, Isabelle; Millot, Frédéric; Lescoeur, Brigitte; Gandemer, Virginie; Bodemer, Christine; Lacave, Roger; Hélias-Rodzewicz, Zofia; Taly, Valérie; Geissmann, Frédéric; Donadieu, Jean

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) is an inflammatory myeloid neoplasia with a broad spectrum of clinical manifestations and outcomes in children. The somatic BRAFV600E mutation occurs frequently, but clinical significance remains to be determined. Patients and Methods BRAFV600E mutation was investigated in a French LCH cohort. We analyzed associations between mutation status and clinical presentation, extent of disease, reactivation rate, response to therapy, and long-term permanent sequelae. Results Among 315 patients with successfully determined BRAF status, 173 (54.6%) carried a BRAFV600E mutation. Patients with BRAFV600E manifested more severe disease than did those with wild-type BRAF. Patients with BRAFV600E comprised 87.8% of patients (43 of 49) with multisystem LCH with risk organ involvement (liver, spleen, hematology), 68.6% of patients (35 of 51) with multisystem LCH without risk organ involvement, 43.9% of patients (86 of 196) with single-system LCH, and 42.1% of patients (8 of 19) with lung-involved LCH (P < .001). BRAFV600E mutation was also associated with organ involvement that could lead to permanent, irreversible damage, such as neurologic (75%) and pituitary (72.9%) injuries. Compared with patients with wild-type BRAF, patients with BRAFV600E more commonly displayed resistance to combined vinblastine and corticosteroid therapy (21.9% v 3.3%; P = .001), showed a higher reactivation rate (5-year reactivation rate, 42.8% v 28.1%; P = .006), and had more permanent, long-term consequences from disease or treatment (27.9% v 12.6%; P = .001). Conclusion In children with LCH, BRAFV600E mutation was associated with high-risk features, permanent injury, and poor short-term response to chemotherapy. Further population-based studies should be undertaken to confirm our observations and to assess the impact of BRAF inhibitors for this subgroup of patients who may benefit from targeted therapy. PMID:27382093

  18. Evaluation of effect during cell isolation process in alkaline comet assay using epidermal skin cells.

    PubMed

    Toyoizumi, Tomoyasu; Watanabe, Mika; Sui, Hajime; Nakagawa, Yuzuki; Ohta, Ryo; Yamakage, Kohji

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of the cell isolation process in the alkaline comet assay using epidermal skin cells. When we explored the cell isolation method for the alkaline comet assay using the 3-dimensional (3D) human epidermal skin model, we found that DNA damage and cytotoxicity were induced during the cell isolation process. In particular, trypsin 5 min treatment with ethylene diamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA) showed about 5 times %DNA in the tail value compared to without EDTA treatment. In general, EDTA is commonly used for cell isolation, but it is known to induce genotoxicity due to secondary effects. We therefore evaluated the effect of EDTA and pH in the alkaline comet assay on a monolayer culture of rat keratinocytes. As a result, there was a significant increase of %DNA in tail values by treatment with 0.1 w/v% EDTA for 60 min; however, there was no difference in the %DNA in tail values between 0.1 w/v% EDTA/PBS(-) (pH 6.8) and 0.1 w/v% EDTA/PBS(-) (pH 7.4). These data imply that there is a need to control the EDTA conditions for cell isolation in the epidermal skin cells.

  19. Mechanosensory calcium-selective cation channels in epidermal cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ding, J. P.; Pickard, B. G.

    1993-01-01

    This paper explores the properties and likely functions of an epidermal Ca(2+)-selective cation channel complex activated by tension. As many as eight or nine linked or linkable equivalent conductance units or co-channels can open together. Open time for co-channel quadruplets and quintuplets tends to be relatively long with millimolar Mg2+ (but not millimolar Ca2+) at the cytosolic face of excised plasma membrane. Sensitivity to tension is regulated by transmembrane voltage and temperature. Under some circumstances channel activity is sychronized in rhythmic pulses. Certain lanthanides and a cytoskeleton-disturbing herbicide that inhibit gravitropic reception act on the channel system at low concentrations. Specifically, ethyl-N-phenylcarbamate promotes tension-dependent activity at micromolar levels. With moderate suction, Gd3+ provided at about 0.5 micromole at the extracellular face of the membrane promotes for several seconds but may then become inhibitory. Provision at 1-2 micromoles promotes and subsequently inhibits more vigorously (often abruptly and totally), and at high levels inhibits immediately. La3+, a poor gravitropic inhibitor, acts similarly but much more gradually and only at much higher concentrations. These properties, particularly these susceptibilities to modulation, indicate that in vivo the mechanosensitive channel must be mechanosensory and mechanoregulatory. It could serve to transduce the shear forces generated in the integrated wall-membrane-cytoskeleton system during turgor changes and cell expansion as well as transducing the stresses induced by gravity, touch and flexure. In so far as such transduction is modulated by voltage and temperature, the channels would also be sensors for these modalities as long as the wall-membrane-cytoskeleton system experiences mechanical stress.

  20. Mechanosensory calcium-selective cation channels in epidermal cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ding, J. P.; Pickard, B. G.

    1993-01-01

    This paper explores the properties and likely functions of an epidermal Ca(2+)-selective cation channel complex activated by tension. As many as eight or nine linked or linkable equivalent conductance units or co-channels can open together. Open time for co-channel quadruplets and quintuplets tends to be relatively long with millimolar Mg2+ (but not millimolar Ca2+) at the cytosolic face of excised plasma membrane. Sensitivity to tension is regulated by transmembrane voltage and temperature. Under some circumstances channel activity is sychronized in rhythmic pulses. Certain lanthanides and a cytoskeleton-disturbing herbicide that inhibit gravitropic reception act on the channel system at low concentrations. Specifically, ethyl-N-phenylcarbamate promotes tension-dependent activity at micromolar levels. With moderate suction, Gd3+ provided at about 0.5 micromole at the extracellular face of the membrane promotes for several seconds but may then become inhibitory. Provision at 1-2 micromoles promotes and subsequently inhibits more vigorously (often abruptly and totally), and at high levels inhibits immediately. La3+, a poor gravitropic inhibitor, acts similarly but much more gradually and only at much higher concentrations. These properties, particularly these susceptibilities to modulation, indicate that in vivo the mechanosensitive channel must be mechanosensory and mechanoregulatory. It could serve to transduce the shear forces generated in the integrated wall-membrane-cytoskeleton system during turgor changes and cell expansion as well as transducing the stresses induced by gravity, touch and flexure. In so far as such transduction is modulated by voltage and temperature, the channels would also be sensors for these modalities as long as the wall-membrane-cytoskeleton system experiences mechanical stress.

  1. [Pulmonary Langerhans histiocytosis and Hodgkin's lymphoma].

    PubMed

    Paris, A; Dib, M; Rousselet, M-C; Urban, T; Tazi, A; Gagnadoux, F

    2011-09-01

    Pulmonary Langerhans histiocytosis (PLH) is a rare disease due to the accumulation of Langerhans cells at the level of the bronchioles. These dendritic immunocytes form granulomata and destroy the wall of the airway. We report a case of PLH developing at the same time as Hodgkin's lymphoma in a young woman who smoked tobacco and cannabis. We observed a complete remission of the PLH lesions parallel to the remission of the Hodgkin's lymphoma after chemotherapy, in the absence of any change in the consumption of tobacco and cannabis. This observation leads us to discuss the potential relationships between PLH on one hand, and smoking, the lymphoma and its treatment on the other.

  2. Role of Pin1 in UVA-induced cell proliferation and malignant transformation in epidermal cells

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Chang Yeob; Hien, Tran Thi; Lim, Sung Chul; Kang, Keon Wook

    2011-06-24

    Highlights: {yields} Pin1 expression is enhanced by low energy UVA irradiation in both skin tissues of hairless mice and JB6 C141 epidermal cells. {yields} UVA irradiation increases activator protein-1 activity and cyclin D1 in a Pin1-dependent manner. {yields} UVA potentiates EGF-inducible, anchorage-independent growth of epidermal cells, and this is suppressed by Pin1 inhibition or by anti-oxidant. -- Abstract: Ultraviolet A (UVA) radiation ({lambda} = 320-400 nm) is considered a major cause of human skin cancer. Pin1, a peptidyl prolyl isomerase, is overexpressed in most types of cancer tissues and plays an important role in cell proliferation and transformation. Here, we demonstrated that Pin1 expression was enhanced by low energy UVA (300-900 mJ/cm{sup 2}) irradiation in both skin tissues of hairless mice and JB6 C141 epidermal cells. Exposure of epidermal cells to UVA radiation increased cell proliferation and cyclin D1 expression, and these changes were blocked by Pin1 inhibition. UVA irradiation also increased activator protein-1 (AP-1) minimal reporter activity and nuclear levels of c-Jun, but not c-Fos, in a Pin1-dependent manner. The increases in Pin1 expression and in AP-1 reporter activity in response to UVA were abolished by N-acetylcysteine (NAC) treatment. Finally, we found that pre-exposure of JB6 C141 cells to UVA potentiated EGF-inducible, anchorage-independent growth, and this effect was significantly suppressed by Pin1inhibition or by NAC.

  3. Ultrastructure of the Epidermal Cell Wall and Cuticle of Tomato Fruit (Solanum lycopersicum L.) during Development.

    PubMed

    Segado, Patricia; Domínguez, Eva; Heredia, Antonio

    2016-02-01

    The epidermis plays a pivotal role in plant development and interaction with the environment. However, it is still poorly understood, especially its outer epidermal wall: a singular wall covered by a cuticle. Changes in the cuticle and cell wall structures are important to fully understand their functions. In this work, an ultrastructure and immunocytochemical approach was taken to identify changes in the cuticle and the main components of the epidermal cell wall during tomato fruit development. A thin and uniform procuticle was already present before fruit set. During cell division, the inner side of the procuticle showed a globular structure with vesicle-like particles in the cell wall close to the cuticle. Transition between cell division and elongation was accompanied by a dramatic increase in cuticle thickness, which represented more than half of the outer epidermal wall, and the lamellate arrangement of the non-cutinized cell wall. Changes in this non-cutinized outer wall during development showed specific features not shared with other cell walls. The coordinated nature of the changes observed in the cuticle and the epidermal cell wall indicate a deep interaction between these two supramolecular structures. Hence, the cuticle should be interpreted within the context of the outer epidermal wall.

  4. Suppression of the CD8 T cell response by human papillomavirus type 16 E7 occurs in Langerhans cell-depleted mice

    PubMed Central

    Jemon, K.; Leong, C.-M.; Ly, K.; Young, S. L.; McLellan, A. D.; Hibma, M. H.

    2016-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is an epitheliotropic virus that is the primary causal agent for cervical cancer. Langerhans cells (LC) are skin antigen presenting cells that are reduced in number in HPV-infected skin. The aim of this study was to understand the immune-modulatory effects of HPV16 E7 on LC and on the CD8 T cell response to a skin-expressed antigen. To test this, HPV16 E7 was expressed in mouse skin keratinocytes with the model antigen ovalbumin (Ova). Similar to what is observed in HPV-infected human skin, LC numbers were significantly reduced in E7-expressing mouse skin. This shows that expression of the E7 protein alone is sufficient to mediate LC depletion. Expression of E7 with Ova in keratinocytes strongly suppressed the Ova-specific CD8+ T cell response in the skin draining lymph node. When tested in LC-ablated mice, the CD8 T cell response to skin-expressed Ova in control mice was not affected, nor was the T cell response to Ova restored in E7-expressing skin. These data indicate a role for E7 in regulation of LC homeostasis in the skin and in suppression of antigen specific CD8 T cell expansion, but suggest that these two effects occur independent of each other. PMID:27708419

  5. IL-34 is a tissue-restricted ligand of CSF1R required for the development of Langerhans cells and microglia.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yaming; Szretter, Kristy J; Vermi, William; Gilfillan, Susan; Rossini, Cristina; Cella, Marina; Barrow, Alexander D; Diamond, Michael S; Colonna, Marco

    2012-06-24

    The differentiation of bone marrow-derived progenitor cells into monocytes, tissue macrophages and some dendritic cell (DC) subtypes requires the growth factor CSF1 and its receptor, CSF1R. Langerhans cells (LCs) and microglia develop from embryonic myeloid precursor cells that populate the epidermis and central nervous system (CNS) before birth. Notably, LCs and microglia are present in CSF1-deficient mice but absent from CSF1R-deficient mice. Here we investigated whether an alternative CSF1R ligand, interleukin 34 (IL-34), is responsible for this discrepancy. Through the use of IL-34-deficient (Il34(LacZ/LacZ)) reporter mice, we found that keratinocytes and neurons were the main sources of IL-34. Il34(LacZ/LacZ) mice selectively lacked LCs and microglia and responded poorly to skin antigens and viral infection of the CNS. Thus, IL-34 specifically directs the differentiation of myeloid cells in the skin epidermis and CNS.

  6. In situ localization of epidermal stem cells using a novel multi epitope ligand cartography approach.

    PubMed

    Ruetze, Martin; Gallinat, Stefan; Wenck, Horst; Deppert, Wolfgang; Knott, Anja

    2010-06-01

    Precise knowledge of the frequency and localization of epidermal stem cells within skin tissue would further our understanding of their role in maintaining skin homeostasis. As a novel approach we used the recently developed method of multi epitope ligand cartography, applying a set of described putative epidermal stem cell markers. Bioinformatic evaluation of the data led to the identification of several discrete basal keratinocyte populations, but none of them displayed the complete stem cell marker set. The distribution of the keratinocyte populations within the tissue was remarkably heterogeneous, but determination of distance relationships revealed a population of quiescent cells highly expressing p63 and the integrins alpha(6)/beta(1) that represent origins of a gradual differentiation lineage. This population comprises about 6% of all basal cells, shows a scattered distribution pattern and could also be found in keratinocyte holoclone colonies. The data suggest that this population identifies interfollicular epidermal stem cells.

  7. Congenital "self-healing" Langerhans cell histiocytosis (Hashimoto-Pritzker disease): a report of two cases with the same cutaneous manifestations but different clinical course.

    PubMed

    Mandel, Victor Desmond; Ferrari, Chiara; Cesinaro, Anna Maria; Pellacani, Giovanni; Del Forno, Corrado

    2014-12-01

    Congenital self-healing Langerhans cell histiocytosis or Hashimoto-Pritzker disease is a rare condition present at birth or in the neonatal period characterized by small reddish-brown crusted papulonodular lesions. In most cases these lesions are not accompanied by systemic findings and tend to involute spontaneously within weeks or months, but in other cases there may be extracutaneous involvement and/or recurrence of the disease. This emphasizes that the clinical course is variable and a long-term follow-up is mandatory in order to reveal possible systemic involvement. We describe two cases of congenital self-healing Langerhans cell histiocytosis with widespread and very similar cutaneous manifestations but different clinical course. The first patient had multisystemic disease (with lymph nodes, bones, liver and lungs affected) that required systemic therapy. The second patient had cutaneous and bony lesions that resolved spontaneously. We think that the adjective "self-healing" is misleading and should be abandoned. We stress the importance of a complete systemic evaluation and the necessity of a long-term follow-up. © 2014 Japanese Dermatological Association.

  8. Bone Langerhans cell histiocytosis with pulmonary involvement in an adult non-smoker: A case report and brief review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Jie; Feng, Shicheng

    2017-01-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) is a rare disease of unknown cause, which encompasses a set of disorders of multiple organs with various clinical presentations that share the common characteristic of sizeable Langerhans cell infiltration. The clinical spectrum of LCH ranges from solitary bone lesions to involvement of other organs. lung involvement in LCH may be part of a multisystem disease, which almost exclusively occurs in adult smokers, while it is overlooked or misdiagnosed in the majority of non-smokers. High-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) of the chest is crucial for diagnosis; however, the treatment and prognosis of this disease have not been clearly determined. We herein present the case of a non-smoking adult patient who presented with lower limb pain and was diagnosed via biopsy with lch with multisystem involvement, including the bone and lungs. Lytic lesions in the corpus of the sacroiliac joint, sacrum, acetabulum and femoral head by a soft tissue mass were observed on diagnostic CT. In addition, chest HRCT revealed multiple cysts in the bilateral lungs, predominantly in the upper lobes. The final diagnosis of LCH was confirmed by histopathological examination and immunohistochemical staining for CD1a and S-100. Corticosteroid treatment alleviated lower limb pain and improved the patient's quality of life; thus, corticosteroids may be considered as a potential treatment option for patients with LCH. PMID:28123731

  9. c-Rel in Epidermal Homeostasis: A Spotlight on c-Rel in Cell Cycle Regulation.

    PubMed

    Lorenz, Verena N; Schön, Michael P; Seitz, Cornelia S

    2016-06-01

    To maintain proper skin barrier function, epidermal homeostasis requires a subtly governed balance of proliferating and differentiating keratinocytes. While differentiation takes place in the suprabasal layers, proliferation, including mitosis, is usually restricted to the basal layer. Only recently identified as an important regulator of epidermal homeostasis, c-Rel, an NF-κB transcription factor subunit, affects the viability and proliferation of epidermal keratinocytes. In human keratinocytes, decreased expression of c-Rel causes a plethora of dysregulated cellular functions including impaired cell viability, increased apoptosis, and abnormalities during mitosis and cell cycle regulation. On the other hand, c-Rel shows aberrant expression in many epidermal tumors. Here, in the context of its role in different cell types and compared with other NF-κB subunits, we discuss the putative function of c-Rel as a regulator of epidermal homeostasis and mitotic progression. In addition, implications for disease pathophysiology with perturbed c-Rel function and abnormal homeostasis, such as epidermal carcinogenesis, will be discussed. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Reduced trisialoganglioside synthesis in chemically but not mos-transformed mouse epidermal cells

    SciTech Connect

    Srinivas, L.; Colburn, N.H.

    1984-04-01

    A specific decrease in the net de novo synthesis ((1-14C)-glucosamine incorporation) of cell surface trisialoganglioside (GT) occurs in preneoplastic mouse JB6 epidermal cells in response to tumor-promoting phorbol esters, mezerein, or epidermal growth factor, all of which promote neoplastic transformation in JB6 cells, but not in response to the bladder promoter sodium cyclamate, a nonpromoter in JB6 cells. The ganglioside showing elevated synthesis after mezerein or epidermal growth factor exposure is monosialoganglioside 1, whereas disialoganglioside 1b synthesis is elevated after phorbol ester exposure. Primary mouse epidermal cells and putatively initiated epidermal cell lines selected for their resistance to induction of terminal differentiation by high calcium are resistant to promotion of anchorage-independent transformation by 2-week exposure to 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate. In both cell types, little or no decrease in GT synthesis occurs in response to short-term 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate exposure, thus extending further our previous observation that this GT response is restricted to promotable cells. A decreased synthesis of GT also occurs consistently in cell lines transformed by 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate or N-methyl-N-nitro-nitrosoguanidine as compared with their nontransformed counterparts but not in cell lines transformed by a cloned integrated murine sarcoma provirus containing the oncogenic sequence v-mos. Thus, reduced cell surface GT synthesis may be important both in the induction and in the maintenance of the chemically transformed but not viral oncogene mos-transformed phenotype in mouse epidermal cells.

  11. In Vivo Confocal Microscopic Evaluation of Corneal Langerhans Cells in Dry Eye Patients§

    PubMed Central

    Machetta, Federica; Fea, Antonio M; Actis, Alessandro G; de Sanctis, Ugo; Dalmasso, Paola; Grignolo, Federico M

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. To assess inflammatory involvement of cornea in dry eye by means of confocal microscopy, evaluating the presence and distribution of Langherans cells (LCs). Methods: 98 eyes of 49 subjects were enrolled: 18 subjects affected by Sjögren Syndrome Dry Eye (SSDE), 17 with Non-Sjögren Syndrome Dry Eye (NSSDE), 14 healthy volunteeers. Dry eye symptoms, tear film, ocular surface damage and corneal confocal microscopy were analized. Results: A significant increase of LCs density was observed at sub-basal nerve plexus (SSDE = 79 cells/mm2 andNDE = 22 cells/mm2; p = 0,0031) and sub-epithelial nerve plexus (SSDE = 38 cells/mm2 and NDE = 3 cells/mm2; p = 0,0169) in central cornea of SSDE group. An increased number of LCs from the center to the periphery of the cornea was observed, significant only in healthy volunteers group. In dry eye patients there was an increase in LCs density in both peripheral and central cornea with a significant difference between NDE (14,66 cells/mm2) and SSDE (56,66 cells/mm2) only in central cornea (p = 0,0028). In SSDE group, mean density of LCs in central cornea results also superior to NSSDE group (29,33 cells/mm2). There was no correlation between LCs density and dry eye symptoms, tear film deficiency and ocular surface damage. Conclusion: This study demonstrates the activation of an inflammatory and immunological reaction in cornea of NSSDE and SSDE patients. Confocal microscopy can be an important diagnostic tool in evaluation and follow-up of dry eye disease. PMID:25317216

  12. Epidermal Th22 and Tc17 cells form a localized disease memory in clinically healed psoriasis.

    PubMed

    Cheuk, Stanley; Wikén, Maria; Blomqvist, Lennart; Nylén, Susanne; Talme, Toomas; Ståhle, Mona; Eidsmo, Liv

    2014-04-01

    Psoriasis is a common and chronic inflammatory skin disease in which T cells play a key role. Effective treatment heals the skin without scarring, but typically psoriasis recurs in previously affected areas. A pathogenic memory within the skin has been proposed, but the nature of such site-specific disease memory is unknown. Tissue-resident memory T (TRM) cells have been ascribed a role in immunity after resolved viral skin infections. Because of their localization in the epidermal compartment of the skin, TRM may contribute to tissue pathology during psoriasis. In this study, we investigated whether resolved psoriasis lesions contain TRM cells with the ability to maintain and potentially drive recurrent disease. Three common and effective therapies, narrowband-UVB treatment and long-term biologic treatment systemically inhibiting TNF-α or IL-12/23 signaling were studied. Epidermal T cells were highly activated in psoriasis and a high proportion of CD8 T cells expressed TRM markers. In resolved psoriasis, a population of cutaneous lymphocyte-associated Ag, CCR6, CD103, and IL-23R expressing epidermal CD8 T cells was highly enriched. Epidermal CD8 T cells expressing the TRM marker CD103 responded to ex vivo stimulation with IL-17A production and epidermal CD4 T cells responded with IL-22 production after as long as 6 y of TNF-α inhibition. Our data suggest that epidermal TRM cells are retained in resolved psoriasis and that these cells are capable of producing cytokines with a critical role in psoriasis pathogenesis. We provide a potential mechanism for a site-specific T cell-driven disease memory in psoriasis.

  13. A minor subset of Batf3-dependent antigen-presenting cells in islets of Langerhans is essential for the development of autoimmune diabetes.

    PubMed

    Ferris, Stephen T; Carrero, Javier A; Mohan, James F; Calderon, Boris; Murphy, Kenneth M; Unanue, Emil R

    2014-10-16

    Autoimmune diabetes is characterized by inflammatory infiltration; however, the initiating events are poorly understood. We found that the islets of Langerhans in young nonobese diabetic (NOD) mice contained two antigen-presenting cell (APC) populations: a major macrophage and a minor CD103(+) dendritic cell (DC) population. By 4 weeks of age, CD4(+) T cells entered islets coincident with an increase in CD103(+) DCs. In order to examine the role of the CD103(+) DCs in diabetes, we examined Batf3-deficient NOD mice that lacked the CD103(+) DCs in islets and pancreatic lymph nodes. This led to a lack of autoreactive T cells in islets and, importantly, no incidence of diabetes. Additional examination revealed that presentation of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I epitopes in the pancreatic lymph nodes was absent with a partial impairment of MHC class II presentation. Altogether, this study reveals that CD103(+) DCs are essential for autoimmune diabetes development.

  14. A minor subset of Batf3-dependent antigen presenting cells in islets of Langerhans is essential for the development of autoimmune diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Ferris, Stephen T.; Carrero, Javier A.; Mohan, James F.; Calderon, Boris; Murphy, Kenneth M.; Unanue, Emil R.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Autoimmune diabetes is characterized by inflammatory infiltration; however the initiating events are poorly understood. We found that the islets of Langerhans in young non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice contained two antigen presenting cell (APC) populations: a major macrophage and a minor CD103+ dendritic cell (DC) population. By four weeks of age, CD4+ T cells entered islets coincident with an increase of CD103+ DCs. In order to examine the role of the CD103+ DCs in diabetes, we examined Batf3-deficient NOD mice that lacked the CD103+ DCs in islets and pancreatic lymph nodes. This led to a lack of autoreactive T cells in islets and, importantly, no incidence of diabetes. Additional examination revealed that presentation of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I epitopes in the pancreatic lymph nodes was absent with a partial impairment of MHC class II presentation. Altogether, this study reveals that CD103+ DCs were essential for autoimmune diabetes development. PMID:25367577

  15. Epidermal Th22 and Tc17 Cells Form a Localized Disease Memory in Clinically Healed Psoriasis

    PubMed Central

    Cheuk, Stanley; Wikén, Maria; Blomqvist, Lennart; Nylén, Susanne; Talme, Toomas; Ståhle, Mona

    2014-01-01

    Psoriasis is a common and chronic inflammatory skin disease in which T cells play a key role. Effective treatment heals the skin without scarring, but typically psoriasis recurs in previously affected areas. A pathogenic memory within the skin has been proposed, but the nature of such site-specific disease memory is unknown. Tissue-resident memory T (TRM) cells have been ascribed a role in immunity after resolved viral skin infections. Because of their localization in the epidermal compartment of the skin, TRM may contribute to tissue pathology during psoriasis. In this study, we investigated whether resolved psoriasis lesions contain TRM cells with the ability to maintain and potentially drive recurrent disease. Three common and effective therapies, narrowband-UVB treatment and long-term biologic treatment systemically inhibiting TNF-α or IL-12/23 signaling were studied. Epidermal T cells were highly activated in psoriasis and a high proportion of CD8 T cells expressed TRM markers. In resolved psoriasis, a population of cutaneous lymphocyte–associated Ag, CCR6, CD103, and IL-23R expressing epidermal CD8 T cells was highly enriched. Epidermal CD8 T cells expressing the TRM marker CD103 responded to ex vivo stimulation with IL-17A production and epidermal CD4 T cells responded with IL-22 production after as long as 6 y of TNF-α inhibition. Our data suggest that epidermal TRM cells are retained in resolved psoriasis and that these cells are capable of producing cytokines with a critical role in psoriasis pathogenesis. We provide a potential mechanism for a site-specific T cell–driven disease memory in psoriasis. PMID:24610014

  16. Technical advance: Langerhans cells derived from a human cell line in a full-thickness skin equivalent undergo allergen-induced maturation and migration.

    PubMed

    Ouwehand, Krista; Spiekstra, Sander W; Waaijman, Taco; Scheper, Rik J; de Gruijl, Tanja D; Gibbs, Susan

    2011-11-01

    In this report, the construction of a functional, immunocompetent, full-thickness skin equivalent (SE) is described, consisting of an epidermal compartment containing keratinocytes, melanocytes, and human LCs derived from the MUTZ-3 cell line (MUTZ-LC) and a fibroblast-populated dermal compartment. The CD1a(+)Langerin(+)HLA-DR(+) MUTZ-LCs populate the entire epidermis at a similar density to that found in native skin. Exposure of the SE to subtoxic concentrations of the allergens NiSO(4) and resorcinol resulted in LC migration out of the epidermis toward the fibroblast-populated dermal compartment. A significant dose-dependent up-regulation of the DC maturation-related CCR7 and IL-1β transcripts and of CD83 at the protein level upon epidermal exposure to both allergens was observed, indicative of maturation and migration of the epidermally incorporated LC. We have thus successfully developed a reproducible and functional full-thickness SE model containing epidermal MUTZ-LC. This model offers an alternative to animal testing for identifying potential chemical sensitizers and for skin-based vaccination strategies and provides a unique research tool to study human LC biology in situ under controlled in vitro conditions.

  17. Epidermal cell proliferation and promoting ability of phorbol esters.

    PubMed

    Slaga, T J; Scribner, J D; Viaje, A

    1976-11-01

    Dose-response relationships on the abilities of several phorbol ester tumor promoters to promote skin tumors after 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene initiation and to bring about edema, inflammation, and epidermal hyperplasia were determined in female Charles River CD-1 mice. The promoting ability of the potent synthetic promoter, phorbol-12,13-dioctanoate (PdiC8), was determined over a dose range of 0.1-10 mug/application. Administration of PdiC8 two times weekly at dosages of 4, 6, 8, and 10 mug gave little variation in tumor response. A dose-dependent tumor response occurred at doses of 1-4 mug PdiC8. Only 1 papilloma was observed when PdiC8 was given twice weekly at a dose of 0.1 or 0.5 mug. A similar dose-response relation was observed for the ability of PdiC8 to stimulate epidermal hyperplasia. Investigations of other phorbol esters revealed an excellent correlation between their promoting ability and their ability to induce epidermal hyperplasia; however, that was not the case for compounds outside the phorbol ester series (i.e., acetic acid, cantharidin, and ethylphenylpropiolate).

  18. The effect of ghrelin on Kiss-1 and KissR gene transcription and insulin secretion in rat islets of Langerhans and CRI-D2 cell line

    PubMed Central

    Sagheb, Mandana Mahmoodzaeh; Azarpira, Negar; Mokhtary, Mokhtar

    2017-01-01

    Objective(s): Ghrelin is a peptide hormone that has been shown to have numerous central and peripheral effects. The central effects including GH secretion, food intake, and energy homeostasis are partly mediated by Kiss1- KissR signaling pathway. Ghrelin and its receptor are also expressed in the pancreatic islets. Ghrelin is one of the key metabolic factors controlling insulin secretion from the islets of Langerhans. We hypothesize that the inhibitory effect of ghrelin on KiSS-1 and KissR in the islet cells may be similar to the same inhibitory effect of ghrelin in the hypothalamus. Materials and Methods: To investigate the effect of ghrelin, we isolated the islets from adult male rats by collagenase and cultured CRI-D2 cell lines. Then, we incubated them with different concentrations of ghrelin for 24 hr. After RNA extraction and cDNA synthesis from both islets and CRI-D2 cells, the relative expression of KiSS-1 and KissR was evaluated by means of real-time PCR. Furthermore, we measured the amount of insulin secreted by the islets after incubation in different concentrations of ghrelin and glucose after 1 hr. Besides, we checked the viability of the cells after 24 hr cultivation. Results: Ghrelin significantly decreased the KiSS-1 and KissR mRNA transcription in rat islets and CRI-D2 cells. Besides, Ghrelin suppressed insulin secretion from pancreatic beta cells and CRI-D2 cells. Conclusion: These findings indicate the possibility that KiSS-1 and KissR mRNA expression is mediator of ghrelin function in the islets of Langerhans. PMID:28133522

  19. Regenerative and reparative effects of human chorion-derived stem cell conditioned medium on photo-aged epidermal cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Qiankun; Chen, Yan; Ma, Kui; Zhao, Along; Zhang, Cuiping; Fu, Xiaobing

    2016-01-01

    Epidermal cells are an important regenerative source for skin wound healing. Aged epidermal cells have a low ability to renew themselves and repair skin injury. Ultraviolet (UV) radiation, particularly UVB, can cause photo-aging of the skin by suppressing the viability of human epidermal cells. A chorion-derived stem cell conditioned medium (CDSC-CNM) is thought to have regenerative properties. This study aimed to determine the regenerative effects of CDSC-CNM on UVB-induced photo-aged epidermal cells. Epidermal cells were passaged four times and irradiated with quantitative UVB, and non-irradiated cells served as a control group. Cells were then treated with different concentrations of CDSC-CNM. Compared to the non-irradiated group, the proliferation rates and migration rates of UVB-induced photo-aged epidermal cells significantly decreased (p < 0.05) with increasing intracellular radical oxygen species (ROS) generation and DNA damage. After treatment with CDSC-CNM, photo-aged epidermal cells significantly improved their viability, and their ROS generation and DNA damage decreased. The secretory factors in CDSC-CNM, including epidermal growth factor (EGF), transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β), interleukin (IL)-6, and IL-8 and the related signaling pathway protein levels, increased compared to the control medium (CM). The potential regenerative and reparative effects of CDSC-CNM indicate that it may be a candidate material for the treatment of prematurely aged skin. The functions of the secretory factors and the mechanisms of CDSC-CNM therapy deserve further attention.

  20. Abscisic acid induces ectopic outgrowth in epidermal cells through cortical microtubule reorganization in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Takatani, Shogo; Hirayama, Takashi; Hashimoto, Takashi; Takahashi, Taku; Motose, Hiroyasu

    2015-01-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) regulates seed maturation, germination and various stress responses in plants. The roles of ABA in cellular growth and morphogenesis, however, remain to be explored. Here, we report that ABA induces the ectopic outgrowth of epidermal cells in Arabidopsis thaliana. Seedlings of A. thaliana germinated and grown in the presence of ABA developed ectopic protrusions in the epidermal cells of hypocotyls, petioles and cotyledons. One protrusion was formed in the middle of each epidermal cell. In the hypocotyl epidermis, two types of cell files are arranged alternately into non-stoma cell files and stoma cell files, ectopic protrusions being restricted to the non-stoma cell files. This suggests the presence of a difference in the degree of sensitivity to ABA or in the capacity of cells to form protrusions between the two cell files. The ectopic outgrowth was suppressed in ABA insensitive mutants, whereas it was enhanced in ABA hypersensitive mutants. Interestingly, ABA-induced ectopic outgrowth was also suppressed in mutants in which microtubule organization was compromised. Furthermore, cortical microtubules were disorganized and depolymerized by the ABA treatment. These results suggest that ABA signaling induces ectopic outgrowth in epidermal cells through microtubule reorganization. PMID:26068445

  1. Adipose-derived stem cells inhibit epidermal melanocytes through an interleukin-6-mediated mechanism.

    PubMed

    Kim, Deok-Woo; Jeon, Byung-Joon; Hwang, Na-Hyun; Kim, Min-Sook; Park, Seung-Ha; Dhong, Eun-Sang; Yoon, Eul-Sik; Lee, Byung-Il

    2014-09-01

    Several investigators have postulated that human adipose-derived stem cells can be used for skin rejuvenation, but there have been few reports about their direct effects on human epidermal melanocytes. The authors studied the effects on melanocytes, and the causative agent of those effects was further investigated in this study. Human epidermal melanocytes were divided into three groups and cultured in adipose-derived stem cell-conditioned medium, human dermal fibroblast-conditioned medium, or control medium. Concentrations of melanogenic cytokines in these media were measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kits. After 3 and 7 days of incubation, cell proliferation, melanin content, tyrosinase activity, and melanogenic gene expression were measured. Interleukin-6-neutralizing antibodies were mixed with adipose-derived stem cell-conditioned medium in which human epidermal melanocytes were cultured, and melanocyte growth and melanogenesis were measured again. Interleukin-6 concentrations in adipose-derived stem cell- and human epidermal melanocyte-conditioned media were 1373 and 495 pg/ml, respectively. Both types of medium suppressed melanocyte proliferation and melanin synthesis (p < 0.05), but adipose-derived stem cell-conditioned medium was more effective than human dermal fibroblast-conditioned medium in inhibition of human epidermal melanocyte proliferation, melanin synthesis, and tyrosinase activity (p < 0.05). Interleukin-6-neutralizing antibody sufficiently reversed the antimelanogenic effects of adipose-derived stem cell-conditioned medium such that human epidermal melanocyte proliferation, melanin content, tyrosinase activity, and tyrosinase mRNA levels were restored (p < 0.05). Adipose-derived stem cell-conditioned medium inhibited melanocyte proliferation and melanin synthesis by down-regulating melanogenic enzymes. Interleukin-6 plays a pivotal role in inhibition of melanocytes.

  2. Single-cell gene expression profiling reveals functional heterogeneity of undifferentiated human epidermal cells

    PubMed Central

    Tan, David W. M.; Jensen, Kim B.; Trotter, Matthew W. B.; Connelly, John T.; Broad, Simon; Watt, Fiona M.

    2013-01-01

    Human epidermal stem cells express high levels of β1 integrins, delta-like 1 (DLL1) and the EGFR antagonist LRIG1. However, there is cell-to-cell variation in the relative abundance of DLL1 and LRIG1 mRNA transcripts. Single-cell global gene expression profiling showed that undifferentiated cells fell into two clusters delineated by expression of DLL1 and its binding partner syntenin. The DLL1+ cluster had elevated expression of genes associated with endocytosis, integrin-mediated adhesion and receptor tyrosine kinase signalling. Differentially expressed genes were not independently regulated, as overexpression of DLL1 alone or together with LRIG1 led to the upregulation of other genes in the DLL1+ cluster. Overexpression of DLL1 and LRIG1 resulted in enhanced extracellular matrix adhesion and increased caveolin-dependent EGFR endocytosis. Further characterisation of CD46, one of the genes upregulated in the DLL1+ cluster, revealed it to be a novel cell surface marker of human epidermal stem cells. Cells with high endogenous levels of CD46 expressed high levels of β1 integrin and DLL1 and were highly adhesive and clonogenic. Knockdown of CD46 decreased proliferative potential and β1 integrin-mediated adhesion. Thus, the previously unknown heterogeneity revealed by our studies results in differences in the interaction of undifferentiated basal keratinocytes with their environment. PMID:23482486

  3. Evolution of the clonogenic potential of human epidermal stem/progenitor cells with age.

    PubMed

    Zobiri, Olivia; Deshayes, Nathalie; Rathman-Josserand, Michelle

    2012-01-01

    A number of clinical observations have indicated that the regenerative potential and overall function of the epidermis is modified with age. The epidermis becomes thinner, repairs itself less efficiently after wounding, and presents modified barrier function recovery. In addition, the dermal papillae fatten out with increasing age, suggesting a modification in the interaction between epidermal and dermal compartments. As the epidermal regenerative capacity is dependent upon stem and progenitor cell function, it is naturally of interest to identify and understand age-related changes in these particular keratinocyte populations. Previous studies have indicated that the number of stem cells does not decrease with age in mouse models but little solid evidence is currently available concerning human skin. The objective of this study was to evaluate the clonogenic potential of keratinocyte populations isolated from the epidermis of over 50 human donors ranging from 18 to 71 years old. The data indicate that the number of epidermal cells presenting high regenerative potential does not dramatically decline with age in human skin. The authors believe that changes in the microenvironment controlling epidermal basal cell activity are more likely to explain the differences in epidermal function observed with increasing age.

  4. Persistence of skin-resident memory T cells within an epidermal niche

    PubMed Central

    Zaid, Ali; Mackay, Laura K.; Rahimpour, Azad; Braun, Asolina; Veldhoen, Marc; Carbone, Francis R.; Manton, Jonathan H.; Heath, William R.; Mueller, Scott N.

    2014-01-01

    Barrier tissues such as the skin contain various populations of immune cells that contribute to protection from infections. These include recently identified tissue-resident memory T cells (TRM). In the skin, these memory CD8+ T cells reside in the epidermis after being recruited to this site by infection or inflammation. In this study, we demonstrate prolonged persistence of epidermal TRM preferentially at the site of prior infection despite sustained migration. Computational simulation of TRM migration within the skin over long periods revealed that the slow rate of random migration effectively constrains these memory cells within the region of skin in which they form. Notably, formation of TRM involved a concomitant local reduction in dendritic epidermal γδ T-cell numbers in the epidermis, indicating that these populations persist in mutual exclusion and may compete for local survival signals. Accordingly, we show that expression of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor, a transcription factor important for dendritic epidermal γδ T-cell maintenance in skin, also contributes to the persistence of skin TRM. Together, these data suggest that skin tissue-resident memory T cells persist within a tightly regulated epidermal T-cell niche. PMID:24706879

  5. The presence of CXCR4+ CD1a+ cells at onset of Langerhans cell histiocytosis is associated with a less favorable outcome

    PubMed Central

    Quispel, Willemijn T.; Stegehuis-Kamp, Janine A.; Blijleven, Laura; Santos, Susy J.; Lourda, Magda; van den Bos, Cor; van Halteren, Astrid G.S.; Egeler, R. Maarten

    2016-01-01

    abstract Purpose: Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis (LCH) is a neoplastic disorder characterized by tissue accumulating CD1a+ histiocytes which frequently carry somatic mutations. Irrespective of mutation status, these LCH-cells display constitutively active kinases belonging to the MAPK pathway. We evaluated, in retrospect, the contribution of individual components of the MAPK-activating and chemotaxis-promoting TNF-CXCR4-CXCL12 axis to LCH manifestation and outcome. Experimental design: CXCR4, CXCL12 and TNF protein expression was immunohistochemically analyzed in 70 LCH-affected biopsies. The presence of CXCR4+CD1a+ cells in peripheral blood (PB) and/or bone marrow (BM) samples was evaluated by flowcytometry in 13 therapy-naive LCH-patients. Results: CXCL12 was detected in 68/70 (97%) biopsies. CXCR4+LCH-cells were present in 50/70 (71%) biopsies; their presence was associated with higher levels of intralesional TNF. Circulating CD1a+CXCR4+ cells were detected in 4/13 (31%) therapy-naïve LCH-patients which displayed BRAFV600E (2/4), MAP2K1 (1/4) or no (1/4) mutations in their tissues. These CD11c co-expressing CD1a+CXCR4+cells migrated to CXCL12 in chemotaxis assays. Lesional CXCR4+LCH-cells were detected in 18/20 cases who presented with LCH manifestation at multiple sites and in 5/23 (22%) patients who developed additional lesions after initially presenting with a single lesion. The CXCR4 status at onset proved to be an independent risk factor for LCH reactivation in multivariate analysis (odds ratio 10.4, p = 0.034). Conclusions: This study provides the first evidence that CXCR4 is involved in the homing and retention of LCH-cells in CXCL12-expressing tissues and qualifies CXCR4 as a candidate prognostic marker for less favorable disease outcome. PMID:28255525

  6. Conical epidermal cells allow bees to grip flowers and increase foraging efficiency.

    PubMed

    Whitney, Heather M; Chittka, Lars; Bruce, Toby J A; Glover, Beverley J

    2009-06-09

    The plant surface is by default flat, and development away from this default is thought to have some function of evolutionary advantage. Although the functions of many plant epidermal cells have been described, the function of conical epidermal cells, a defining feature of petals in the majority of insect-pollinated flowers, has not. The location and frequency of conical cells have led to speculation that they play a role in attracting animal pollinators. Snapdragon (Antirrhinum) mutants lacking conical cells have been shown to be discriminated against by foraging bumblebees. Here we investigated the extent to which a difference in petal surface structure influences pollinator behavior through touch-based discrimination. To isolate touch-based responses, we used both biomimetic replicas of petal surfaces and isogenic Antirrhinum lines differing only in petal epidermal cell shape. We show that foraging bumblebees are able to discriminate between different surfaces via tactile cues alone. We find that bumblebees use color cues to discriminate against flowers that lack conical cells--but only when flower surfaces are presented at steep angles, making them difficult to manipulate. This facilitation of physical handling is a likely explanation for the prevalence of conical epidermal petal cells in most flowering plants.

  7. Syntenin mediates Delta1-induced cohesiveness of epidermal stem cells in culture

    PubMed Central

    Estrach, Soline; Legg, James; Watt, Fiona M.

    2007-01-01

    SUMMARY In human interfollicular epidermis, stem cell clusters express high levels of the Notch ligand Delta1. Delta1 stimulates neighbouring cells to differentiate and also promotes stem cell clustering. While Notch signalling is known to stimulate epidermal differentiation, little is known about the mechanism by which Delta1 promotes epidermal cell cohesiveness. This is an important issue, because the location of stem cells determines the local microenvironmental signals they receive. We now show that mutation of the Delta1 PDZ binding domain abolishes Delta1-mediated keratinocyte cohesiveness, stimulates Notch transcriptional activity and promotes epidermal differentiation. A yeast two-hybrid screen revealed that Delta1 binds to the adaptor protein syntenin, an interaction dependent on the Delta1 PDZ binding domain. Syntenin, like Delta1, is upregulated in the stem cell clusters of human interfollicular epidermis. Knock down of syntenin in cells overexpressing full length Delta1 had the same effects on Notch signalling, epidermal differentiation and adhesion as overexpressing Delta1 with a mutated PDZ binding domain. Syntenin has previously been reported to regulate membrane traffic, and mutation of the Delta1 PDZ binding domain or knockdown of syntenin led to rapid internalisation of Delta1. We propose that syntenin binding to Delta1 plays a dual role in promoting intercellular adhesion and regulating Notch signalling. PMID:17666427

  8. [Effects of transfection of human epidermal growth factor gene with adenovirus vector on biological characteristics of human epidermal cells].

    PubMed

    Yin, Kai; Ma, Li; Shen, Chuan'an; Shang, Yuru; Li, Dawei; Li, Longzhu; Zhao, Dongxu; Cheng, Wenfeng

    2016-05-01

    To investigate the suitable transfection condition of human epidermal cells (hECs) with human epidermal growth factor (EGF) gene by adenovirus vector (Ad-hEGF) and its effects on the biological characteristics of hECs. hECs were isolated from deprecated human fresh prepuce tissue of circumcision by enzyme digestion method and then sub-cultured. hECs of the third passage were used in the following experiments. (1) Cells were divided into non-transfection group and 5, 20, 50, 100, 150, and 200 fold transfection groups according to the random number table (the same grouping method below), with 3 wells in each group. Cells in non-transfection group were not transfected with Ad-hEGF gene, while cells in the latter six groups were transfected with Ad-hEGF gene in multiplicities of infection (MOI) of 5, 20, 50, 100, 150, and 200 respectively. The morphology of the cells was observed with inverted phase contrast microscope, and expression of green fluorescent protein of the cells was observed with inverted fluorescence microscope at transfection hour (TH) 24, 48, and 72. (2) Another three batches of cells were collected, grouped, and treated as above, respectively. Then the transfection rate of Ad-hEGF gene was detected by flow cytometer (n=3), the mass concentration of EGF in culture supernatant of cells was detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (n=6), and the proliferation activity of cells was detected by cell counting kit 8 (CCK8) and microplate reader (n=6) at TH 24, 48, and 72, respectively. (3) Cells were collected and divided into non-transfection group and transfection group, with 6 wells in each group. Cells in non-transfection group were cultured with culture supernatant of cells without transfection, while cells in transfection group were cultured with culture supernatant of cells which were transfected with Ad-hEGF gene in the optimum MOI (50). CCK8 and microplate reader were used to measure the biological activity of EGF secreted by cells on culture

  9. Epidermal cell proliferation in guinea pigs with experimental dermatophytosis

    SciTech Connect

    Tagami, H.

    1985-08-01

    To elucidate the mechanisms underlying the self-healing process of experimental dermatophytosis produced in guinea pigs by an occlusive method with Trichophyton mentagrophytes, epidermal proliferative activity was evaluated by the in vivo tritiated thymidine-labeling technique performed at various intervals after the first and second infections. Determination of labeling indices disclosed that an increased epidermal proliferation correlated well with the severity of inflammatory changes, i.e., a peak activity was noted after 10 days in primary infection and at 2 days in reinfection, respectively, and was followed by subsequent spontaneous lesion clearance after 10 days. Application of a heat-killed spore suspension produced inflammatory changes with enhanced epidermopoiesis, similar to those induced by reinoculation of living spores, only in immune animals. The present results indicate that the dermatitic changes occurring in experimental dermatophytosis increase epidermopoiesis which facilitates elimination of the fungus from the stratum corneum and that host immune activity, particularly contact sensitivity to fungal antigen, exerts a crucial role to induce these changes.

  10. Dermal-epidermal membrane systems by using human keratinocytes and mesenchymal stem cells isolated from dermis.

    PubMed

    Salerno, Simona; Messina, Antonietta; Giordano, Francesca; Bader, Augustinus; Drioli, Enrico; De Bartolo, Loredana

    2017-02-01

    Dermal-epidermal membrane systems were developed by co-culturing human keratinocytes with Skin derived Stem Cells (SSCs), which are Mesenchymal Stem Cells (MSCs) isolated from dermis, on biodegradable membranes of chitosan (CHT), polycaprolactone (PCL) and a polymeric blend of CHT and PCL. The membranes display physico-chemical, morphological, mechanical and biodegradation properties that could satisfy and fulfil specific requirements in skin tissue engineering. CHT membrane exhibits an optimal biodegradation rate for acute wounds; CHT-PCL for the chronic ones. On the other hand, PCL membrane in spite of its very slow biodegradation rate exhibits mechanical properties similar to in vivo dermis, a lower hydrophilic character, and a surface roughness, all properties that make it able to sustain cell adhesion and proliferation for in vitro skin models. Both CHT-PCL and PCL membranes guided epidermal and dermal differentiation of SSCs as pointed out by the expression of cytokeratins and the deposition of the ECM protein fibronectin, respectively. In the dermal-epidermal membrane systems, a more suitable microenvironment for the SSCs differentiation was promoted by the interactions and the mutual interplay with keratinocytes. Being skin tissue-biased stem cells committed to their specific final dermal and/or epidermal cell differentiation, SSCs are more suitable for skin tissue engineering than other adult MSCs with different origin. For this reason, they represent a useful autologous cell source for engineering skin substitutes for both in vivo and in vitro applications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. ELT-1, a GATA-like transcription factor, is required for epidermal cell fates in Caenorhabditis elegans embryos.

    PubMed

    Page, B D; Zhang, W; Steward, K; Blumenthal, T; Priess, J R

    1997-07-01

    Epidermal cells are generated during Caenorhabditis elegans embryogenesis by several distinct lineage patterns. These patterns are controlled by maternal genes that determine the identities of early embryonic blastomeres. We show that the embryonically expressed gene elt-1, which was shown previously to encode a GATA-like transcription factor, is required for the production of epidermal cells by each of these lineages. Depending on their lineage history, cells that become epidermal in wild-type embryos become either neurons or muscle cells in elt-1 mutant embryos. The ELT-1 protein is expressed in epidermal cells and in their precursors. We propose that elt-1 functions at an early step in the specification of epidermal cell fates.

  12. Islets of Langerhans from prohormone convertase-2 knockout mice show α-cell hyperplasia and tumorigenesis with elevated α-cell neogenesis.

    PubMed

    Jones, Huw B; Reens, Jaimini; Brocklehurst, Simon R; Betts, Catherine J; Bickerton, Sue; Bigley, Alison L; Jenkins, Richard P; Whalley, Nicky M; Morgan, Derrick; Smith, David M

    2014-02-01

    Antagonism of the effects of glucagon as an adjunct therapy with other glucose-lowering drugs in the chronic treatment of diabetes has been suggested to aggressively control blood glucose levels. Antagonism of glucagon effects, by targeting glucagon secretion or disabling the glucagon receptor, is associated with α-cell hyperplasia. We evaluated the influence of total glucagon withdrawal on islets of Langerhans using prohormone convertase-2 knockout mice (PC2-ko), in which α-cell hyperplasia is present from a young age and persists throughout life, in order to understand whether or not sustained glucagon deficit would lead to islet tumorigenesis. PC2-ko and wild-type (WT) mice were maintained drug-free, and cohorts of these groups sampled at 3, 12 and 18 months for plasma biochemical and morphological (histological, immunohistochemical, electron microscopical and image analytical) assessments. WT mice showed no islet tumours up to termination of the study, but PC2-ko animals displayed marked changes in islet morphology from α-cell hypertrophy/hyperplasia/atypical hyperplasia, to adenomas and carcinomas, these latter being first encountered at 6-8 months. Islet hyperplasias and tumours primarily consisted of α-cells associated to varying degrees with other islet endocrine cell types. In addition to substantial increases in islet neoplasia, increased α-cell neogenesis associated primarily with pancreatic duct(ule)s was present. We conclude that absolute blockade of the glucagon signal results in tumorigenesis and that the PC2-ko mouse represents a valuable model for investigation of islet tumours and pancreatic ductal neogenesis.

  13. Proliferative lesions of intra-epidermal cytokeratin CAM5.2-positive cells in canine nipples.

    PubMed

    Yasuno, K; Nishiyama, S; Kobayashi, R; Yoshimura, H; Takahashi, K; Omachi, T; Kamiie, J; Shirota, K

    2014-01-01

    Non-keratinocyte cells with clear or vacuolated cytoplasm are frequently observed in the epidermis of canine nipples. Most of these cells express cytokeratin (CK) CAM5.2, a marker of luminal epithelial cells. The morphological and immunohistochemical characteristics of these clear cells were investigated. Nipple tissue from 36 dogs of both sexes was collected and labelled immunohistochemically for CAM5.2, CK7, CK14, CK18, CK20, α-smooth muscle actin, p63, melan-A, E-cadherin, epidermal growth factor receptor and oestrogen receptor (OR). The intra-epidermal CAM5.2(+) clear cells were present singly or as small clusters, mostly within the basal layer, in 22 dogs (61%). These cells also expressed CK7, CK18, E-cadherin and OR. Electron microscopy revealed that some of these cells had surface microvilli. Multifocal proliferative lesions consisting of these cells were observed in the nipples of four dogs. In these lesions, proliferating cells formed bilayered tubules with CAM5.2(+) inner and CK14/p63(+) outer cells. This is the first report describing intra-epidermal CAM5.2(+) clear cells, distinct from melanocytes and Merkel cells in dog nipples. These cells might arise from the luminal epithelium of the papillary duct.

  14. Effective BRAF inhibitor vemurafenib therapy in a 2-year-old patient with sequentially diagnosed Langerhans cell histiocytosis and Erdheim–Chester disease

    PubMed Central

    Váradi, Zsófia; Bánusz, Rita; Csomor, Judit; Kállay, Krisztián; Varga, Edit; Kertész, Gabriella; Csóka, Monika

    2017-01-01

    Erdheim–Chester disease (ECD) is a rare histiocytic disorder, characterized by the xanthomatous infiltration of tissues by CD68-positive and CD1a-/CD100-negative foamy histiocytes. In childhood, ECD is exceptionally rare, and only a dozen cases have been published so far. The cooccurence of Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) and ECD is even rarer. Here, we report a 2-year-old boy, the youngest patient in the literature so far, who was diagnosed with concomitant BRAF mutation-positive LCH and ECD. In his case, conventional LCH treatment proved to be ineffective, but he is the youngest patient who was successfully treated with the BRAF inhibitor vemurafenib. PMID:28182116

  15. Wdr1-mediated cell shape dynamics and cortical tension are essential for epidermal planar cell polarity

    PubMed Central

    Pasolli, H. Amalia; Chai, Sophia; Nikolova, Maria; Stokes, Nicole; Fuchs, Elaine

    2015-01-01

    During mouse development, core planar cell polarity (PCP) proteins become polarized in the epidermal plane to guide angling/morphogenesis of hair follicles. How PCP is established is poorly understood. Here, we identify a key role for Wdr1 (also known as Aip1), an F-actin-binding protein that enhances cofilin/destrin-mediated F-actin disassembly. We show that cofilin and destrin function redundantly in developing epidermis, but their combined depletion perturbs cell adhesion, cytokinesis, apicobasal polarity and PCP. Although Wdr1 depletion accentuates single-loss-of-cofilin/destrin phenotypes, alone it resembles core PCP mutations. Seeking a mechanism, we find that Wdr1 and cofilin/destrin-mediated actomyosin remodelling are essential for generating or maintaining cortical tension within the developing epidermal sheet and driving the cell shape and planar orientation changes that accompany establishment of PCP in mammalian epidermis. Our findings suggest intriguing evolutionary parallels but mechanistic modifications to the distal wing hinge-mediated mechanical forces that drive cell shape change and orient PCP in the Drosophila wing disc. PMID:25915128

  16. Cell Fate Determination and the Switch from Diffuse Growth to Planar Polarity in Arabidopsis Root Epidermal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Balcerowicz, Daria; Schoenaers, Sébastjen; Vissenberg, Kris

    2015-01-01

    Plant roots fulfill important functions as they serve in water and nutrient uptake, provide anchorage of the plant body in the soil and in some species form the site of symbiotic interactions with soil-living biota. Root hairs, tubular-shaped outgrowths of specific epidermal cells, significantly increase the root’s surface area and aid in these processes. In this review we focus on the molecular mechanisms that determine the hair and non-hair cell fate of epidermal cells and that define the site on the epidermal cell where the root hair will be initiated (=planar polarity determination). In the model plant Arabidopsis, trichoblast and atrichoblast cell fate results from intra- and intercellular position-dependent signaling and from complex feedback loops that ultimately regulate GL2 expressing and non-expressing cells. When epidermal cells reach the end of the root expansion zone, root hair promoting transcription factors dictate the establishment of polarity within epidermal cells followed by the selection of the root hair initiation site at the more basal part of the trichoblast. Molecular players in the abovementioned processes as well as the role of phytohormones are discussed, and open areas for future experiments are identified. PMID:26779192

  17. Langerin+ Dermal DC, but not Langerhans cells, are required for effective CD8 mediated immune responses after skin scarification with Vaccinia Virus (VACV)

    PubMed Central

    Seneschal, Julien; Jiang, Xiaodong; Kupper, Thomas S.

    2013-01-01

    Skin scarification (s.s.) with Vaccinia virus (VACV) is essential for generation of an optimal protective T cell memory immune response. Dendritic Cells (DC), which are professional antigen presenting cells, are required for naïve T cell priming and activation. At least three subsets of skin resident DC have been identified: Langerhans Cells (LC), Dermal Langerin+ DC (Lang+dDC) and Dermal Langerin− DC (Lang−dDC). Using Langerin-diphtheria toxin receptor mice and established mouse model of VACV delivered by s.s., we demonstrated that Lang+dDC, but not LC, are absolutely required for the induction of a rapid and robust antigen-specific CD8+ T cell response after s.s. with VACV. The depletion of Lang+dDC led to a significant delay in the priming and proliferation of antigen-specific CD8+ T cells. Moreover CD8+ T cells generated after VACV s.s. in the absence of Lang+dDC lacked effector cytotoxic functions both in vitro and in vivo. While s.s.-immunized WT and LC depleted mice controlled the progression of OVA257–264 expressing T cell lymphoma EG7 (injected intradermally), the depletion of Lang+dDC led to rapid lymphoma progression and mortality. These data indicate that of all skin DC subsets, Lang+dDC the most critical for the generation of robust CD8+ T cell immunity after s.s. with VACV. PMID:24126845

  18. Successful treatment with cladribine of Erdheim-Chester disease with orbital and central nervous system involvement developing after treatment of Langerhans cell histiocytosis.

    PubMed

    Perić, Predrag; Antić, Branislav; Knezević-Usaj, Slavica; Radić-Tasić, Olga; Radovinović-Tasić, Sanja; Vasić-Vilić, Jasenka; Sekulović, Leposava; Tarabar, Olivera; Tukić, Ljiljana; Jovandić, Stevo; Magić, Zvonko

    2016-01-01

    Erdheim-Chester disease (ECD) is a rare, systemic form of non-Langerhans cell histiocytosis of the juvenile xanthogranuloma family with characteristic bilateral symmetrical long bone osteosclerosis, associated with xanthogranulomatous extra skeletal organ involvement. In ECD, central nervous system (CNS) and orbital lesions are frequent, and more than half of ECD pa tients carry the V600E mutation of the protooncogene BRAF. The synchronous or metachronous development of ECD and Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) in the same patients is rare, and the possible connection between them is still obscure. Cladribine is a purine substrate analogue that is toxic to lymphocytes and monocytes with good hematoencephalic penetration. We presented a 23-year-old man successfully treated with cladribine due to BRAF V600E-mutation-negative ECD with bilateral orbital and CNS involvement ECD developed metachronously, 6 years after chemotherapy for multisystem LCH with complete disease remission and remaining central diabetes insipidus. During ECD treatment, the patient received 5 single-agent chemotherapy courses of cladribine (5 mg/m2 for 5 consecutive days every 4 weeks), with a reduction in dose to 4 mg/m2 in a fifth course, delayed due to severe neutropenia and thoracic dermatomal herpes zoster infection following the fourth course. Radiologic signs of systemic and CNS disease started to resolve 3 months after the end of chemotherapy, and CNS lesions completely resolved within 2 years after the treatment After 12-year follow-up, there was no recurrence or appearance of new systemic or CNS xanthogranulomatous lesions or second malignancies. In accordance with our findings and recommendations provided by other authors, cladribine can be considered an effective alternative treatment for ECD, especially with CNS involvement and BRAF V600E-mutation-negative status, when interferon-alpha as the first-line therapy fails.

  19. Mast Cells Regulate Epidermal Barrier Function and the Development of Allergic Skin Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Sehra, Sarita; Serezani, Ana P M; Ocaña, Jesus A; Travers, Jeffrey B; Kaplan, Mark H

    2016-07-01

    Atopic dermatitis is a chronic inflammatory skin disease characterized by infiltration of eosinophils, T helper cells, and mast cells. The role of mast cells in atopic dermatitis is not completely understood. To define the effects of mast cells on skin biology, we observed that mast cells regulate the homeostatic expression of epidermal differentiation complex and other skin genes. Decreased epidermal differentiation complex gene expression in mice that genetically lack mast cells (Kit(W-sh/W-sh) mice) is associated with increased uptake of protein antigens painted on the skin by dendritic cells (DCs) compared with similarly treated wild-type mice, suggesting a protective role for mast cells in exposure to nominal environmental allergens. To test this further, we crossed Kit(W-sh/W-sh) mice with signal transducer and activator of transcription 6 (i.e., Stat6) VT transgenic mice that develop spontaneous atopic dermatitis-like disease that is dependent on T helper cell 2 cytokines and is associated with high serum concentrations of IgE. We observed that Stat6VT × Kit(W-sh/W-sh) mice developed more frequent and more severe allergic skin inflammation than Stat6VT transgenic mice that had mast cells. Together, these studies suggest that mast cells regulate epidermal barrier function and have a potential protective role in the development of atopic dermatitis-like disease.

  20. A Theoretical Model of Jigsaw-Puzzle Pattern Formation by Plant Leaf Epidermal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Higaki, Takumi; Kutsuna, Natsumaro; Akita, Kae; Takigawa-Imamura, Hisako; Yoshimura, Kenji; Miura, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Plant leaf epidermal cells exhibit a jigsaw puzzle–like pattern that is generated by interdigitation of the cell wall during leaf development. The contribution of two ROP GTPases, ROP2 and ROP6, to the cytoskeletal dynamics that regulate epidermal cell wall interdigitation has already been examined; however, how interactions between these molecules result in pattern formation remains to be elucidated. Here, we propose a simple interface equation model that incorporates both the cell wall remodeling activity of ROP GTPases and the diffusible signaling molecules by which they are regulated. This model successfully reproduces pattern formation observed in vivo, and explains the counterintuitive experimental results of decreased cellulose production and increased thickness. Our model also reproduces the dynamics of three-way cell wall junctions. Therefore, this model provides a possible mechanism for cell wall interdigitation formation in vivo. PMID:27054467

  1. Epidermal differentiation of stem cells on poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyvalerate) (PHBV) nanofibers.

    PubMed

    Sundaramurthi, Dhakshinamoorthy; Krishnan, Uma Maheswari; Sethuraman, Swaminathan

    2014-12-01

    Nanomaterials with stem cells have evolved as a promising therapeutic strategy to regenerate various tissues. Tissue engineered grafts with bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs) can offer a cell-based therapeutic strategy for deep wounds like burns and traumatic ulcers. In this study, we have fabricated poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyvalerate (PHBV) nanofibers through electrospinning. The adhesion, proliferation and epidermal differentiation of BM-MSCs on PHBV nanofibers were investigated. Epidermal differentiation media containing epidermal growth factor (EGF), insulin, 3,3',5-triiodo-L-thyronine (T3), Hydrocortisone and 1α, 25-dihydroxyvitamin (D3) were used to trigger differentiation of BM-MSCs on PHBV. The proliferation of BM-MSCs on PHBV was significantly higher than the tissue culture polystyrene (TCPS) control (p < 0.05). Live/dead staining of BM-MSCs on PHBV nanofibers confirmed the change in morphology of BM-MSCs from spindle to polygonal shape indicating their differentiation into keratinocytes. The expression levels of the genes keratin (early), filaggrin (intermediate) and involucrin (late) that are involved in epidermal differentiation were upregulated in a stage-specific manner. Our results demonstrate the potential of PHBV nanofibers in promoting adhesion and differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells. This novel cellular nanofiber construct can be a better alternative to the existing therapies for skin tissue engineering.

  2. Beneficial Effects of the Genus Aloe on Wound Healing, Cell Proliferation, and Differentiation of Epidermal Keratinocytes

    PubMed Central

    Uda, Junki; Kubo, Hirokazu; Nakajima, Yuka; Goto, Arisa; Akaki, Junji; Yoshida, Ikuyo; Matsuoka, Nobuya; Hayakawa, Takao

    2016-01-01

    Aloe has been used as a folk medicine because it has several important therapeutic properties. These include wound and burn healing, and Aloe is now used in a variety of commercially available topical medications for wound healing and skin care. However, its effects on epidermal keratinocytes remain largely unclear. Our data indicated that both Aloe vera gel (AVG) and Cape aloe extract (CAE) significantly improved wound healing in human primary epidermal keratinocytes (HPEKs) and a human skin equivalent model. In addition, flow cytometry analysis revealed that cell surface expressions of β1-, α6-, β4-integrin, and E-cadherin increased in HPEKs treated with AVG and CAE. These increases may contribute to cell migration and wound healing. Treatment with Aloe also resulted in significant changes in cell-cycle progression and in increases in cell number. Aloe increased gene expression of differentiation markers in HPEKs, suggesting roles for AVG and CAE in the improvement of keratinocyte function. Furthermore, human skin epidermal equivalents developed from HPEKs with medium containing Aloe were thicker than control equivalents, indicating the effectiveness of Aloe on enhancing epidermal development. Based on these results, both AVG and CAE have benefits in wound healing and in treatment of rough skin. PMID:27736988

  3. Intradermally administered TLR4 agonist GLA-SE enhances the capacity of human skin DCs to activate T cells and promotes emigration of Langerhans cells.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Laura P; Schoonderwoerd, Antoinet J; Moutaftsi, Magdalini; Howard, Randall F; Reed, Steven G; de Jong, Esther C; Teunissen, Marcel B M

    2012-06-13

    The natural TLR4 agonist lipopolysaccharide (LPS) has notable adjuvant activity. However, it is not useful as a vaccine adjuvant due to its toxicity. Glucopyranosyl lipid A (GLA) is a synthetic derivative of the lipid A tail of LPS with limited cytotoxicity, but strong potential to induce immune responses in mice, guinea pigs, non-human primates, and humans. In this study we determined how this synthetic TLR4 agonist affects the function of different subsets of human skin dendritic cells (DCs). The effect of GLA in an aqueous formulation (GLA-AF) or in an oil-in-water emulsion (GLA-SE) was compared to that of LPS and TLR3 agonist poly(I:C) using a human skin explant model with intradermal injections for the administration of the agonists. Intradermal injection of GLA-SE or LPS, but not GLA-AF, enhanced the emigration of CD1a(high)/langerin(+) Langerhans cells (LCs), but not dermal DCs (DDCs). LCs and CD14(-) DDCs exhibited an enhanced mature phenotype following intradermal administration of either of the two GLA formulations tested, similar to DCs that emigrated from LPS-injected skin. However, only injection of GLA-SE resulted in a significant increase in the production of the wide range of cytokines that is observed with LPS. Moreover, DCs that emigrated from GLA-SE-injected skin induced stronger CD4(+) T-cell activation, as indicated by a more pronounced T-cell proliferation, than DCs from skin injected with GLA-AF or LPS. Altogether, our data show that GLA-SE has a notable potency to stimulate the function of skin DCs, indicating that GLA-SE may be a good candidate as adjuvant for vaccines administered via the intradermal route. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Homologs of SCAR/WAVE complex components are required for epidermal cell morphogenesis in rice

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Wenqi; Wang, Yuchuan; Wu, Zhongliang; Luo, Liang; Liu, Ping; Yan, Longfeng; Hou, Suiwen

    2016-01-01

    Filamentous actins (F-actins) play a vital role in epidermal cell morphogenesis. However, a limited number of studies have examined actin-dependent leaf epidermal cell morphogenesis events in rice. In this study, two recessive mutants were isolated: less pronounced lobe epidermal cell2-1 (lpl2-1) and lpl3-1, whose leaf and stem epidermis developed a smooth surface, with fewer serrated pavement cell (PC) lobes, and decreased papillae. The lpl2-1 also exhibited irregular stomata patterns, reduced plant height, and short panicles and roots. Molecular genetic studies demonstrated that LPL2 and LPL3 encode the PIROGI/Specifically Rac1-associated protein 1 (PIR/SRA1)-like and NCK-associated protein 1 (NAP1)-like proteins, respectively, two components of the suppressor of cAMP receptor/Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein-family verprolin-homologous protein (SCAR/WAVE) regulatory complex involved in actin nucleation and function. Epidermal cells exhibited abnormal arrangement of F-actins in both lpl2 and lpl3 expanding leaves. Moreover, the distorted trichomes of Arabidopsis pir could be partially restored by an overexpression of LPL2. A yeast two-hybrid assay revealed that LPL2 can directly interact with LPL3 in vitro. Collectively, the results indicate that LPL2 and LPL3 are two functionally conserved homologs of the SCAR/WAVE complex components, and that they play an important role in controlling epidermal cell morphogenesis in rice by organising F-actin. PMID:27252469

  5. Identification of Candidate Transcriptional Regulators of Epidermal Transfer Cell Development in Vicia faba Cotyledons

    PubMed Central

    Arun-Chinnappa, Kiruba S.; McCurdy, David W.

    2016-01-01

    Transfer cells (TCs) are anatomically-specialized cells formed at apoplasmic-symplasmic bottlenecks in nutrient transport pathways in plants. TCs form invaginated wall ingrowths which provide a scaffold to amplify plasma membrane surface area and thus increase the density of nutrient transporters required to achieve enhanced nutrient flow across these bottlenecks. Despite their importance to nutrient transport in plants, little is known of the transcriptional regulation of wall ingrowth formation. Here, we used RNA-Seq to identify transcription factors putatively involved in regulating epidermal TC development in cotyledons of Vicia faba. Comparing cotyledons cultured for 0, 3, 9, and 24 h to induce trans-differentiation of epidermal TCs identified 43 transcription factors that showed either epidermal-specific or epidermal–enhanced expression, and 10 that showed epidermal-specific down regulation. Members of the WRKY and ethylene-responsive families were prominent in the cohort of transcription factors showing epidermal-specific or epidermal–enhanced expression, consistent with the initiation of TC development often representing a response to stress. Members of the MYB family were also prominent in these categories, including orthologs of MYB genes involved in localized secondary wall deposition in Arabidopsis thaliana. Among the group of transcription factors showing down regulation were various homeobox genes and members of the MADs-box and zinc-finger families of poorly defined functions. Collectively, this study identified several transcription factors showing expression characteristics and orthologous functions that indicate likely participation in transcriptional regulation of epidermal TC development in V. faba cotyledons. PMID:27252730

  6. Short communication: Initial evidence supporting existence of potential rumen epidermal stem and progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Yohe, T T; Tucker, H L M; Parsons, C L M; Geiger, A J; Akers, R M; Daniels, K M

    2016-09-01

    The bovine rumen epidermis is a keratinized multilayered tissue that experiences persistent cell turnover. Because of this constant cell turnover, epidermal stem cells and their slightly more differentiated daughter cells, epidermal progenitor cells, must exist in the stratum basale of rumen epidermis. To date, these 2 epidermal cell populations and any unique cellular markers they may possess remain completely uncharacterized in the bovine rumen. An important first step in this new research area is the demonstration of the relative abundance and existence of markers for these cells in rumen tissue. A related second step is to document rumen epidermal proliferative responses to an extrinsic signal such as nutrient concentration within the rumen. The objectives of this experiment were to evaluate the extrinsic effect of diet on (1) gene expression of 6 potential rumen epidermal stem or progenitor cell markers and (2) rumen epidermal cell proliferation within the stratum basale. Twelve preweaned Holstein heifers were fed either a restricted diet (R) or an enhanced diet (EH). Animals on R received a milk replacer (MR) diet fed at 0.44kg of powder dry matter (DM)/d (20.9% crude protein, 29.8% fat, DM basis) and EH received MR at 1.08kg of powder dry matter/d (28.9% crude protein, 26.2% fat, DM basis). All calves had access to a 20% crude protein starter and were weaned during wk 7 of the experiment. Lifetime DM intake was 0.73kg of DM/calf per day for R (5.88 Mcal of net energy/calf per day) and 1.26kg of DM/calf per day for EH (10.68 Mcal of net energy/calf per day). Twenty-four hours before slaughter heifers received an intravenous dose of 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine to label proliferating cells. Heifers were slaughtered at 8 wk of age, and rumen samples from the ventral sac region were obtained and stored in RNA preservative and processed for routine histology. Quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase PCR was used to analyze relative abundance of genes. Candidate

  7. The effect of ruby laser light on cellular proliferation of epidermal cells.

    PubMed

    Liew, S H; Grobbelaar, A O; Gault, D T; Green, C J; Linge, C

    1999-11-01

    In ruby laser-assisted hair removal, microscopic damage is often seen in the basal epidermal cells, where melanosomes are concentrated. It is not known whether this treatment leads to cellular hyperproliferation. It was the aim of this study to investigate this. Ten white patients were treated with the Chromos 694-nm Depilation Ruby Laser, and biopsies taken before and after treatments to assess the presence of cell hyperproliferation, which normally accompanies epidermal damage, with immunohistochemical staining of keratin 16 and Ki67. No evidence of cell hyperproliferation was seen in all specimens examined after ruby laser irradiation. The authors conclude that despite the possible microscopic damages seen in the basal epidermis after laser hair removal, there is no evidence of cellular hyperproliferation. This is in contrast to ultraviolet-irradiated cell damage, in which increased basal cell turnover is seen.

  8. THE STRUCTURE OF THE PRIMARY EPIDERMAL CELL WALL OF AVENA COLEOPTILES

    PubMed Central

    Bayley, S. T.; Colvin, J. R.; Cooper, F. P.; Martin-Smith, Cecily A.

    1957-01-01

    The primary walls of epidermal cells in Avena coleoptiles ranging in length from 2 to 40 mm. have been studied in the electron and polarizing microscopes and by the low-angle scattering of x-rays. The outer walls of these cells are composed of multiple layers of cellulose microfibrils oriented longitudinally; initially the number of layers is between 10 and 15 but this increases to about 25 in older tissue. Where epidermal cells touch, these multiple layers fuse gradually into a primary wall of the normal type between cells. In these radial walls, the microfibrils are oriented transversely. Possible mechanisms for the growth of the multilayered outer wall during cell elongation are discussed. PMID:13438900

  9. Spindle checkpoint deficiency is tolerated by murine epidermal cells but not hair follicle stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Foijer, Floris; DiTommaso, Tia; Donati, Giacomo; Hautaviita, Katta; Xie, Stephanie Z.; Heath, Emma; Smyth, Ian; Watt, Fiona M.; Sorger, Peter K.; Bradley, Allan

    2013-01-01

    The spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) ensures correct chromosome segregation during mitosis by preventing aneuploidy, an event that is detrimental to the fitness and survival of normal cells but oncogenic in tumor cells. Deletion of SAC genes is incompatible with early mouse development, and RNAi-mediated depletion of SAC components in cultured cells results in rapid death. Here we describe the use of a conditional KO of mouse Mad2, an essential component of the SAC signaling cascade, as a means to selectively induce chromosome instability and aneuploidy in the epidermis of the skin. We observe that SAC inactivation is tolerated by interfollicular epidermal cells but results in depletion of hair follicle bulge stem cells. Eventually, a histologically normal epidermis develops within ∼1 mo after birth, albeit without any hair. Mad2-deficient cells in this epidermis exhibited abnormal transcription of metabolic genes, consistent with aneuploid cell state. Hair follicle bulge stem cells were completely absent, despite the continued presence of rudimentary hair follicles. These data demonstrate that different cell lineages within a single tissue respond differently to chromosome instability: some proliferating cell lineages can survive, but stem cells are highly sensitive. PMID:23382243

  10. Characterisation of the insulinotropic activity of an aqueous extract of Gymnema sylvestre in mouse beta-cells and human islets of Langerhans.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bo; Asare-Anane, Henry; Al-Romaiyan, Altaf; Huang, Guocai; Amiel, Stephanie A; Jones, Peter M; Persaud, Shanta J

    2009-01-01

    Leaves of the Gymnema sylvestre (GS) plant have been used to treat diabetes mellitus for millennia, but the previously documented insulin secretagogue effects of GS extracts in vitro may be non-physiological through damage to the beta-cells. We have now examined the effects of a novel GS extract (termed OSA) on insulin secretion from the MIN6 beta-cell line and isolated human islets of Langerhans. Insulin secretion from MIN6 cells was stimulated by OSA in a concentration-dependent manner, with low concentrations (0.06-0.25 mg/ml) having no deleterious effects on MIN6 cell viability, while higher concentrations (> or = 0.5 mg/ml) caused increased Trypan blue uptake. OSA increased beta-cell Ca2+ levels, an effect that was mediated by Ca2+ influx through voltage-operated calcium channels. OSA also reversibly stimulated insulin secretion from isolated human islets and its insulin secretagogue effects in MIN6 cells and human islets were partially dependent on the presence of extracellular Ca2+. These data indicate that low concentrations of the GS isolate OSA stimulate insulin secretion in vitro, at least in part as a consequence of Ca2+ influx, without compromising beta-cell viability. Identification of the component of the OSA extract that stimulates regulated insulin exocytosis, and further investigation of its mode(s) of action, may provide promising lead targets for Type 2 diabetes therapy.

  11. Effects of Telomerase and Telomere Length on Epidermal Stem Cell Behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores, Ignacio; Cayuela, María L.; Blasco, María A.

    2005-08-01

    A key process in organ homeostasis is the mobilization of stem cells out of their niches. We show through analysis of mouse models that telomere length, as well as the catalytic component of telomerase, Tert, are critical determinants in the mobilization of epidermal stem cells. Telomere shortening inhibited mobilization of stem cells out of their niche, impaired hair growth, and resulted in suppression of stem cell proliferative capacity in vitro. In contrast, Tert overexpression in the absence of changes in telomere length promoted stem cell mobilization, hair growth, and stem cell proliferation in vitro. The effects of telomeres and telomerase on stem cell biology anticipate their role in cancer and aging.

  12. HIV-1 Replication in Langerhans and Interstitial Dendritic Cells Is Inhibited by Neutralizing and Fc-Mediated Inhibitory Antibodies ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Peressin, M.; Holl, V.; Schmidt, S.; Decoville, T.; Mirisky, D.; Lederle, A.; Delaporte, M.; Xu, K.; Aubertin, A. M.; Moog, C.

    2011-01-01

    Langerhans cells (LCs) and interstitial dendritic cells (IDCs) may be among the first human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) targets after sexual transmission. We generated cells of these types by differentiation of purified CD34+ cord blood cells. After in vitro infection with R5-tropic strains, we obtained similar percentages of infected cells for both dendritic cell (DC) subsets. Moreover, LC infection was not increased by blockage of langerin by antilangerin. These results indicate that, under our experimental conditions, there was no evidence of any preference of HIV replication in LCs versus IDCs. The inhibitory activity of HIV-1-specific IgAs and IgGs against HIV-1 replication in LCs and IDCs was analyzed. We found that neutralizing antibodies inhibit HIV-1 infection of both DC subsets. Interestingly, HIV-1 was inhibited more efficiently by the IgGs than the corresponding IgA, due to an Fcγ receptor-dependent mechanism. Moreover, nonneutralizing inhibitory IgGs were able to inhibit infection of both LCs and IDCs. These results underline the importance of HIV-1 inhibition by the binding of the Fc part of IgGs to Fcγ receptors and suggest that the induction of neutralizing and nonneutralizing inhibitory IgGs in addition to neutralizing IgAs at mucosal sites may contribute to protection against sexual transmission of HIV-1. PMID:21084491

  13. Single cell-type comparative metabolomics of epidermal bladder cells from the halophyte Mesembryanthemum crystallinum

    PubMed Central

    Barkla, Bronwyn J.; Vera-Estrella, Rosario

    2015-01-01

    One of the remarkable adaptive features of the halophyte Mesembryanthemum crystallinum are the specialized modified trichomes called epidermal bladder cells (EBC) which cover the leaves, stems, and peduncle of the plant. They are present from an early developmental stage but upon salt stress rapidly expand due to the accumulation of water and sodium. This particular plant feature makes it an attractive system for single cell type studies, with recent proteomics and transcriptomics studies of the EBC establishing that these cells are metabolically active and have roles other than sodium sequestration. To continue our investigation into the function of these unusual cells we carried out a comprehensive global analysis of the metabolites present in the EBC extract by gas chromatography Time-of-Flight mass spectrometry (GC-TOF) and identified 194 known and 722 total molecular features. Statistical analysis of the metabolic changes between control and salt-treated samples identified 352 significantly differing metabolites (268 after correction for FDR). Principal components analysis provided an unbiased evaluation of the data variance structure. Biochemical pathway enrichment analysis suggested significant perturbations in 13 biochemical pathways as defined in KEGG. More than 50% of the metabolites that show significant changes in the EBC, can be classified as compatible solutes and include sugars, sugar alcohols, protein and non-protein amino acids, and organic acids, highlighting the need to maintain osmotic homeostasis to balance the accumulation of Na+ and Cl− ions. Overall, the comparison of metabolic changes in salt treated relative to control samples suggests large alterations in M. crystallinum epidermal bladder cells. PMID:26113856

  14. Epidermal identity is maintained by cell-cell communication via a universally active feedback loop in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    San-Bento, Rita; Farcot, Etienne; Galletti, Roberta; Creff, Audrey; Ingram, Gwyneth

    2014-01-01

    The transcription factors ARABIDOPSIS THALIANA MERISTEM L1 (ATML1) and PROTODERMAL FACTOR2 (PDF2) are indispensable for epidermal cell-fate specification in Arabidopsis embryos. However, the mechanisms of regulation of these genes, particularly their relationship with cell-cell signalling pathways, although the subject of considerable speculation, remain unclear. Here we demonstrate that the receptor kinase ARABIDOPSIS CRINKLY4 (ACR4) positively affects the expression of ATML1 and PDF2 in seedlings. In contrast, ATML1- and PDF2-containing complexes directly and negatively affect both their own expression and that of ACR4. By modelling the resulting feedback loop, we demonstrate a network structure that is capable of maintaining robust epidermal cell identity post-germination. We show that a second seed-specific signalling pathway involving the subtilase ABNORMAL LEAFSHAPE1 (ALE1) and the receptor kinases GASSHO1 (GSO1) and GASSHO2 (GSO2) acts in parallel to the epidermal loop to control embryonic surface formation via an ATML1/PDF2-independent pathway. Genetic interactions between components of this linear pathway and the epidermal loop suggest that an intact embryo surface is necessary for initiation and/or stabilization of the epidermal loop, specifically during early embryogenesis.

  15. Genetically Induced Cell Death in Bulge Stem Cells Reveals Their Redundancy for Hair and Epidermal Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Driskell, Iwona; Oeztuerk-Winder, Feride; Humphreys, Peter; Frye, Michaela

    2015-01-01

    Adult mammalian epidermis contains multiple stem cell populations in which quiescent and more proliferative stem and progenitor populations coexist. However, the precise interrelation of these populations in homeostasis remains unclear. Here, we blocked the contribution of quiescent keratin 19 (K19)-expressing bulge stem cells to hair follicle formation through genetic ablation of the essential histone methyltransferase Setd8 that is required for the maintenance of adult skin. Deletion of Setd8 eliminated the contribution of bulge cells to hair follicle regeneration through inhibition of cell division and induction of cell death, but the growth and morphology of hair follicles were unaffected. Furthermore, ablation of Setd8 in the hair follicle bulge blocked the contribution of K19-postive stem cells to wounded epidermis, but the wound healing process was unaltered. Our data indicate that quiescent bulge stem cells are dispensable for hair follicle regeneration and epidermal injury in the short term and support the hypothesis that quiescent and cycling stem cell populations are equipotent. Stem Cells 2015;33:988–998 PMID:25447755

  16. Patterning as a signature of human epidermal stem cell regulation

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Allon M.; Nikolaidou-Neokosmidou, Varvara; Doupé, David P.; Jones, Philip H.; Simons, Benjamin D.

    2011-01-01

    Understanding how stem cells are regulated in adult tissues is a major challenge in cell biology. In the basal layer of human epidermis, clusters of almost quiescent stem cells are interspersed with proliferating and differentiating cells. Previous studies have shown that the proliferating cells follow a pattern of balanced stochastic cell fate. This behaviour enables them to maintain homeostasis, while stem cells remain confined to their quiescent clusters. Intriguingly, these clusters reappear spontaneously in culture, suggesting that they may play a functional role in stem cell auto-regulation. We propose a model of pattern formation that explains how clustering could regulate stem cell activity in homeostatic tissue through contact inhibition and stem cell aggregation. PMID:21632613

  17. Binding of live conidia of Aspergillus fumigatus activates in vitro-generated human Langerhans cells via a lectin of galactomannan specificity

    PubMed Central

    PERSAT, F; NOIREY, N; DIANA, J; GARIAZZO, M-J; SCHMITT, D; PICOT, S; VINCENT, C

    2003-01-01

    Aspergillus fumigatus is the most common aetiological fungus responsible for human pulmonary aspergilloses. This study investigated the primary contact between Langerhans cells (LC), corresponding to dendritic cells present in pulmonary mucosa and live conidia of A. fumigatus. LC play a key role in antigen presentation for initiation of the primary T cell response. In vitro-generated LC (iLC) were differentiated from cultured human cord blood CD34+ cells and incubated at 4°C or 37°C with fluorescein-isothiocyanate (FITC)-stained conidia or control latex beads. In vitro, conidia were shown by microscopy and cytometry to adhere to iLC in a dose- and time-dependent manner. This adhesion was not limited to iLC because interstitial dendritic and other cells also fluoresced in the presence of conidia-FITC. A lectin other than mannose receptor-type lectin was demonstrated to be responsible of conidial binding. Inhibition of binding was observed with heterologous galactomannan and EDTA, indicating a C-lectin-like receptor with galactomannan structure specificity. After binding only a few conidia were internalized in acidic vesicles, as indicated by the cessation of conidial fluorescence. Conidial binding was followed by activation and maturation of iLC, suggesting that LC present in the lung may play a role in cellular host defence against aspergilloses. PMID:12930363

  18. Within 1 h, HIV-1 uses viral synapses to enter efficiently the inner, but not outer, foreskin mucosa and engages Langerhans-T cell conjugates.

    PubMed

    Ganor, Y; Zhou, Z; Tudor, D; Schmitt, A; Vacher-Lavenu, M-C; Gibault, L; Thiounn, N; Tomasini, J; Wolf, J-P; Bomsel, M

    2010-09-01

    Although circumcision reduces male acquisition of human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) by 60%, the initial mechanisms of HIV-1 transmission at the foreskin remain elusive. We have established two novel and complementary models of the human adult foreskin epithelium, namely, ex vivo foreskin explants and in vitro reconstructed immunocompetent foreskins. In these models, efficient HIV-1 transmission occurs after 1 h of polarized exposure of the inner, but not outer, foreskin to mononuclear cells highly infected with HIV-1, but not to cell-free virus. HIV-1-infected cells form viral synapses with apical foreskin keratinocytes, leading to polarized budding of HIV-1, which is rapidly internalized by Langerhans cells (LCs) in the inner foreskin. In turn, LCs migrate toward the epidermis-dermis interface to form conjugates with T cells, thereby transferring HIV-1. Seminal plasma mixed with cervicovaginal secretions inhibits HIV-1 translocation. This set of results rationalizes at the cellular level the apparent protective outcome of circumcision against HIV-1 acquisition by men.

  19. New melanogenesis and photobiological processes in activation and proliferation of precursor melanocytes after UV-exposure: ultrastructural differentiation of precursor melanocytes from Langerhans cells

    SciTech Connect

    Jimbow, K.; Uesugi, T.

    1982-02-01

    Photobiological processes involving new melanogenesis after exposure to ultraviolet (UV) light were experimentally studied in C57 black adult mice by histochemistry, cytochemistry, and autoradiography. The trunk and the plantar region of the foot, where no functioning melanocytes were present before exposure, were exposed to UV-A for 14 consecutive days. Both regions revealed a basically similar pattern for new melanogenesis which involved an activation of precursor melanocytes. Essentially all of ''indeterminate'' cells appeared to be precursor melanocytes, the fine structure of which could be differentiated even from poorly developed Langerhans cells. New melanogenesis was manifested by 4 stages of cellular and subcellular reactions of these cells as indicated by histochemistry of dihydroxyphenylalanine (dopa) and autoradiography of thymidine incorporation: (a) an initial lag in the activation of precursor melanocytes with development of Golgi cisternae and rough endoplasmic reticulum followed by formation of unmelanized melanosomes (day 0 to 2); (b) synthesis of active tyrosinase accumulated in Golgi cisternae and vesicles with subsequent formation of melanized melanosomes in these cells (day 3 to 5); (c) mitotic proliferation of many of these activated cells, followed by an exponential increase of new melanocytes (day 6 to 7); and (d) melanosome transfer with differentiation of 10 nm filaments and arborization of dendrites, but without any significant change in the melanocyte population (day 8 to 14). The melanosome transfer was, however, not obvious until after 7 days of exposure. The size of newly synthesized melanosomes was similar to that of tail skin where native melanocytes were present before exposure.

  20. Defective epidermal innate immunity and resultant superficial dermatophytosis in adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Sawada, Yu; Nakamura, Motonobu; Kabashima-Kubo, Rieko; Shimauchi, Takatoshi; Kobayashi, Miwa; Tokura, Yoshiki

    2012-07-15

    Superficial dermatophytosis is quite commonly seen in patients with adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL), as approximately 50% of the patients develop cutaneous mycotic infections. Because superficially infected fungi in the stratum corneum of the epidermis cannot directly contact with T cells infiltrating in the upper dermis, some perturbation of epidermal innate immunity has been postulated. Interleukin (IL)-17-producing helper T cells (Th17) can induce the keratinocyte production of antimicrobial peptides such as human β defensin (HBD)-2 and LL-37, which play an essential role in cutaneous innate immunity. We investigated the frequency of circulating Th17 cells, serum levels of cytokines, and epidermal expression of HBD-1, 2, 3, and LL-37 in ATLL patients with or without superficial dermatophytosis. The frequency of peripheral Th17 cells and the serum level of IL-17 was significantly decreased in ATLL patients, whereas the serum IL-10 and TGF-β1 levels were increased as compared with healthy controls. Furthermore, ATLL patients with dermatophytosis had higher IL-10 and TGF-β1 levels and lower IL-17 levels than did those without dermatophytosis. Immunohistochemical study revealed that the epidermal expression of both HBD-2 and LL-37 were significantly lower in ATLL patients with dermatophytosis than in non-ATLL patients with dermatophytosis. Taken together, these results suggest that the keratinocyte production of antimicrobial peptides promoted by Th17 cells is reduced in ATLL patients, leading to the perturbed innate immunity and the frequent occurrence of superficial dermatophytosis.

  1. Proliferative and toxic effects of ultraviolet light and inflammation on epidermal pigment cells

    SciTech Connect

    Nordlund, J.J.; Ackles, A.E.; Traynor, F.F.

    1981-10-01

    The ear of the mouse is useful for studying the effects of ultraviolet light on epidermal pigment cells. The quantity of light penetrating into the skin causing an inflammatory response can be assessed easily by measuring with an engineering calipers the swelling of the ear. The inflammatory response of the ear exhibits a linear relationship to the dose of light delivered. We observed that doses of shortwave ultraviolet light which are noninflammatory when repeated at daily intervals induce moderate to severe inflammation. Small doses of psoralen and prolonged exposure to UVA (PUVA) were more inflammatory than larger amounts of psoralen and short exposure to light. Doses of shortwave ultraviolet light and PUVA which produce only a minimal inflammation of the skin stimulate the proliferation of epidermal melanocytes. In contrast, PUVA in doses sufficiently large to cause a marked inflammatory reaction in the skin seems injurious to pigment cells and kills them or causes only a minimal proliferative response. The inflammatory reaction itself does not seem to stimulate or inhibit the proliferation of melanocytes. Prostaglandins A, E, and F2 alpha have no effect on the proliferation of epidermal pigment cells. In contrast, dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) and allergic contact dermatitis increase the numerical density of pigment cells. Steroids may block the function of the enzyme tyrosinase. Our experiments indicate that pigment cells, like many other varieties of cells, are susceptible to injury and can be killed at least by large doses of PUVA.

  2. Epidermal Stem Cells in Homeostasis and Wound Repair of the Skin.

    PubMed

    Senoo, Makoto

    2013-07-01

    The skin interfollicular epidermis (IFE) is an organism's first line of defense against a harmful environment and physical damage. During homeostasis and wound repair, the IFE is rejuvenated constantly by IFE stem cells (SCs) that are capable of both proliferation and differentiation. However, the identity and behavior of IFE SCs remain controversial. Two opposing theories exist regarding homeostasis of the IFE. On the basis of morphological and proliferative characteristics, one posits that the IFE is composed of a discrete epidermal proliferative unit comprised of ∼10 transit-amplifying (TA) cells and a centrally located SC in the basal layer. The other suggests that homeostasis of the IFE is maintained by a single progenitor population in the basal layer. A recent study has challenged these two apparently distinct models and demonstrated that the basal layer of the IFE contains both SCs and TA cells, which make distinct contributions to tissue homeostasis and repair. Moreover, phosphorylation levels of the transcription factor p63, the master regulator of the proliferative potential of epidermal SCs, can be used to distinguish self-renewing SCs from TA cells with more limited proliferative potential. As technologies advance, IFE SCs can be identified at a single-cell level. Refinements of their identification and characterization are critical, not only for SC biology but also for the development of novel clinical applications. Understanding the signaling pathways that control self-renewal and differentiation of IFE SCs will aid in developing novel cell-based therapeutics targeting degenerative epidermal diseases and wound repair.

  3. Human epidermal stem cells: Role in adverse skin reactions and carcinogenesis from radiation.

    PubMed

    Martin, Michèle T; Vulin, Adeline; Hendry, Jolyon H

    In human skin, keratinopoiesis is based on a functional hierarchy among keratinocytes, with rare slow-cycling stem cells responsible for the long-term maintenance of the tissue through their self-renewal potential, and more differentiated daughter progenitor cells actively cycling to permit epidermal renewal and turn-over every month. Skin is a radio-responsive tissue, developing all types of radiation damage and pathologies, including early tissue reactions such as dysplasia and denudation in epidermis, and later fibrosis in the dermis and acanthosis in epidermis, with the TGF-beta 1 pathway as a known master switch. Also there is a risk of basal cell carcinoma, which arises from epidermal keratinocytes, notably after oncogenic events in PTCH1 or TP53 genes. This review will cover the mechanisms of adverse human skin reactions and carcinogenesis after various types of exposures to ionizing radiation, with comparison with animal data when necessary, and will discuss the possible role of stem cells and their progeny in the development of these disorders. The main endpoints presented are basal cell intrinsic radiosensitivity, genomic stability, individual factors of risk, dose specific responses, major molecular pathways involved and the cellular origin of skin reactions and cancer. Although major advances have been obtained in recent years, the precise implications of epidermal stem cells and their progeny in these processes are not yet fully characterized. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Genetically induced cell death in bulge stem cells reveals their redundancy for hair and epidermal regeneration.

    PubMed

    Driskell, Iwona; Oeztuerk-Winder, Feride; Humphreys, Peter; Frye, Michaela

    2015-03-01

    Adult mammalian epidermis contains multiple stem cell populations in which quiescent and more proliferative stem and progenitor populations coexist. However, the precise interrelation of these populations in homeostasis remains unclear. Here, we blocked the contribution of quiescent keratin 19 (K19)-expressing bulge stem cells to hair follicle formation through genetic ablation of the essential histone methyltransferase Setd8 that is required for the maintenance of adult skin. Deletion of Setd8 eliminated the contribution of bulge cells to hair follicle regeneration through inhibition of cell division and induction of cell death, but the growth and morphology of hair follicles were unaffected. Furthermore, ablation of Setd8 in the hair follicle bulge blocked the contribution of K19-postive stem cells to wounded epidermis, but the wound healing process was unaltered. Our data indicate that quiescent bulge stem cells are dispensable for hair follicle regeneration and epidermal injury in the short term and support the hypothesis that quiescent and cycling stem cell populations are equipotent.

  5. The Androgen Receptor Antagonizes Wnt/β-Catenin Signaling in Epidermal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kretzschmar, Kai; Cottle, Denny L; Schweiger, Pawel J; Watt, Fiona M

    2015-01-01

    Activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling in adult mouse epidermis leads to expansion of the stem cell compartment and redirects keratinocytes in the interfollicular epidermis and sebaceous glands (SGs) to differentiate along the hair follicle (HF) lineages. Here we demonstrate that during epidermal development and homeostasis there is reciprocal activation of the androgen receptor (AR) and β-catenin in cells of the HF bulb. AR activation reduced β-catenin-dependent transcription, blocked β-catenin-induced induction of HF growth, and prevented β-catenin-mediated conversion of SGs into HFs. Conversely, AR inhibition enhanced the effects of β-catenin activation, promoting HF proliferation and differentiation, culminating in the formation of benign HF tumors and a complete loss of SG identity. We conclude that AR signaling has a key role in epidermal stem cell fate selection by modulating responses to β-catenin in adult mouse skin. PMID:26121213

  6. Human epidermal neural crest stem cells as a source of Schwann cells

    PubMed Central

    Sakaue, Motoharu; Sieber-Blum, Maya

    2015-01-01

    We show that highly pure populations of human Schwann cells can be derived rapidly and in a straightforward way, without the need for genetic manipulation, from human epidermal neural crest stem cells [hEPI-NCSC(s)] present in the bulge of hair follicles. These human Schwann cells promise to be a useful tool for cell-based therapies, disease modelling and drug discovery. Schwann cells are glia that support axons of peripheral nerves and are direct descendants of the embryonic neural crest. Peripheral nerves are damaged in various conditions, including through trauma or tumour-related surgery, and Schwann cells are required for their repair and regeneration. Schwann cells also promise to be useful for treating spinal cord injuries. Ex vivo expansion of hEPI-NCSC isolated from hair bulge explants, manipulating the WNT, sonic hedgehog and TGFβ signalling pathways, and exposure of the cells to pertinent growth factors led to the expression of the Schwann cell markers SOX10, KROX20 (EGR2), p75NTR (NGFR), MBP and S100B by day 4 in virtually all cells, and maturation was completed by 2 weeks of differentiation. Gene expression profiling demonstrated expression of transcripts for neurotrophic and angiogenic factors, as well as JUN, all of which are essential for nerve regeneration. Co-culture of hEPI-NCSC-derived human Schwann cells with rodent dorsal root ganglia showed interaction of the Schwann cells with axons, providing evidence of Schwann cell functionality. We conclude that hEPI-NCSCs are a biologically relevant source for generating large and highly pure populations of human Schwann cells. PMID:26251357

  7. Differentiating intratumoral melanocytes from Langerhans cells in nonmelanocytic pigmented skin tumors in vivo by label-free third-harmonic generation microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weng, Wei-Hung; Liao, Yi-Hua; Tsai, Ming-Rung; Wei, Ming-Liang; Huang, Hsin-Yi; Sun, Chi-Kuang

    2016-07-01

    Morphology and distribution of melanocytes are critical imaging information for the diagnosis of melanocytic lesions. However, how to image intratumoral melanocytes noninvasively in pigmented skin tumors is seldom investigated. Third-harmonic generation (THG) is shown to be enhanced by melanin, whereas high accuracy has been demonstrated using THG microscopy for in vivo differential diagnosis of nonmelanocytic pigmented skin tumors. It is thus desirable to investigate if label-free THG microscopy was capable to in vivo identify intratumoral melanocytes. In this study, histopathological correlations of label-free THG images with the immunohistochemical images stained with human melanoma black (HMB)-45 and cluster of differentiation 1a (CD1a) were made. The correlation results indicated that the intratumoral THG-bright dendritic-cell-like signals were endogenously derived from melanocytes rather than Langerhans cells (LCs). The consistency between THG-bright dendritic-cell-like signals and HMB-45 melanocyte staining showed a kappa coefficient of 0.807, 84.6% sensitivity, and 95% specificity. In contrast, a kappa coefficient of -0.37, 21.7% sensitivity, and 30% specificity were noted between the THG-bright dendritic-cell-like signals and CD1a staining for LCs. Our study indicates the capability of noninvasive label-free THG microscopy to differentiate intratumoral melanocytes from LCs, which is not feasible in previous in vivo label-free clinical-imaging modalities.

  8. C-type lectin Langerin is a beta-glucan receptor on human Langerhans cells that recognizes opportunistic and pathogenic fungi.

    PubMed

    de Jong, Marein A W P; Vriend, Lianne E M; Theelen, Bart; Taylor, Maureen E; Fluitsma, Donna; Boekhout, Teun; Geijtenbeek, Teunis B H

    2010-03-01

    Langerhans cells (LCs) lining the stratified epithelia and mucosal tissues are the first antigen presenting cells to encounter invading pathogens, such as viruses, bacteria and fungi. Fungal infections form a health threat especially in immuno-compromised individuals. LCs express C-type lectin Langerin that has specificity for mannose, fucose and GlcNAc structures. Little is known about the role of human Langerin in fungal infections. Our data show that Langerin interacts with both mannan and beta-glucan structures, common cell-wall carbohydrate structures of fungi. We have screened a large panel of fungi for recognition by human Langerin and, strikingly, we observed strong binding of Langerin to a variety of Candida and Saccharomyces species and Malassezia furfur, but very weak binding was observed to Cryptococcus gattii and Cryptococcus neoformans. Notably, Langerin is the primary fungal receptor on LCs, since the interaction of LCs with the different fungi was blocked by antibodies against Langerin. Langerin recognizes both mannose and beta-glucans present on fungal cell walls and our data demonstrate that Langerin is the major fungal pathogen receptor on human LCs that recognizes pathogenic and commensal fungi. Together these data may provide more insight in the role of LCs in fungal infections. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Neuropilin 1 expression correlates with differentiation status of epidermal cells and cutaneous squamous cell carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Shahrabi-Farahani, Shokoufeh; Wang, Lili; Zwaans, Bernadette M M; Santana, Jeans M; Shimizu, Akio; Takashima, Seiji; Kreuter, Michael; Coultas, Leigh; D'Amore, Patricia A; Arbeit, Jeffrey M; Akslen, Lars A; Bielenberg, Diane R

    2014-07-01

    Neuropilins (NRPs) are cell surface receptors for vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and SEMA3 (class 3 semaphorin) family members. The role of NRPs in neurons and endothelial cells has been investigated, but the expression and role of NRPs in epithelial cells is much less clear. Herein, the expression and localization of NRP1 was investigated in human and mouse skin and squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs). Results indicated that NRP1 mRNA and protein was expressed in the suprabasal epithelial layers of the skin sections. NRP1 staining did not overlap with that of keratin 14 (K14) or proliferating cell nuclear antigen, but did co-localize with staining for keratin 1, indicating that differentiated keratinocytes express NRP1. Similar to the expression of NRP1, VEGF-A was expressed in suprabasal epithelial cells, whereas Nrp2 and VEGFR2 were not detectable in the epidermis. The expression of NRP1 correlated with a high degree of differentiation in human SCC specimens, human SCC xenografts, and mouse K14-HPV16 transgenic SCC. UVB irradiation of mouse skin induced Nrp1 upregulation. In vitro, Nrp1 was upregulated in primary keratinocytes in response to differentiating media or epidermal growth factor-family growth factors. In conclusion, the expression of NRP1 is regulated in the skin and is selectively produced in differentiated epithelial cells. NRP1 may function as a reservoir to sequester VEGF ligand within the epithelial compartment, thereby modulating its bioactivity.

  10. Epidermal Notch1 recruits RORγ+ group 3 innate lymphoid cells to orchestrate normal skin repair

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhi; Hodgkinson, Tom; Gothard, Elizabeth J.; Boroumand, Soulmaz; Lamb, Rebecca; Cummins, Ian; Narang, Priyanka; Sawtell, Amy; Coles, Jenny; Leonov, German; Reboldi, Andrea; Buckley, Christopher D.; Cupedo, Tom; Siebel, Christian; Bayat, Ardeshir; Coles, Mark C.; Ambler, Carrie A.

    2016-01-01

    Notch has a well-defined role in controlling cell fate decisions in the embryo and the adult epidermis and immune systems, yet emerging evidence suggests Notch also directs non-cell-autonomous signalling in adult tissues. Here, we show that Notch1 works as a damage response signal. Epidermal Notch induces recruitment of immune cell subsets including RORγ+ ILC3s into wounded dermis; RORγ+ ILC3s are potent sources of IL17F in wounds and control immunological and epidermal cell responses. Mice deficient for RORγ+ ILC3s heal wounds poorly resulting from delayed epidermal proliferation and macrophage recruitment in a CCL3-dependent process. Notch1 upregulates TNFα and the ILC3 recruitment chemokines CCL20 and CXCL13. TNFα, as a Notch1 effector, directs ILC3 localization and rates of wound healing. Altogether these findings suggest that Notch is a key stress/injury signal in skin epithelium driving innate immune cell recruitment and normal skin tissue repair. PMID:27099134

  11. Ethylene Induces Epidermal Cell Death at the Site of Adventitious Root Emergence in Rice1

    PubMed Central

    Mergemann, Heidi; Sauter, Margret

    2000-01-01

    In deepwater rice (Oryza sativa), adventitious root primordia initiate at the nodes as part of normal development. Emergence of the roots is dependent on flooding of the plant and is mediated by ethylene action. Root growth was preceded by the induced death of epidermal cells of the node external to the tip of the root primordium. Cell death proceeded until the epidermis split open. Through this crack the root eventually emerged. Induced death was confined to nodal epidermal cells covering the tip of the primordia. Our results suggest that this process facilitates adventitious root emergence and prevents injury to the growing root. Cell death was inducible not only by submergence but also by application of 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid, the natural precursor of ethylene and it was suppressed in the presence of 2,5-norbornadiene (bicyclo[2.2.1]hepta-2,5-diene), an inhibitor of ethylene action. Adventitious root growth and epidermal cell death are therefore linked to the ethylene signaling pathway, which is activated in response to low oxygen stress. PMID:11027711

  12. Influence of High Aspect Ratio Vessel Cell Culture on TNF-Alpha, Insulin Secretion and Glucose Homeostasis in Pancreatic Islets of Langerhans from Wistar Furth Rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tobin, Brian W.a; Leeper-Woodford, Sandra K.

    1999-01-01

    The present studies were carried out to determine the influence of a ground based microgravity paradigm, utilizing the High Aspect Ratio Vessel (HARV) cell culture upon lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulated tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) production of pancreatic islets of Langerhans. An additional aim was to elucidate alterations in insulin secretion and glucose utilization using the HARV low shear, gravity averaged vector, cell culture technique. Islets were isolated (1726 +/- 117, 150 micron islet equivalent units) from Wistar Furth rats and assigned to four treatment groups: 1) HARV, 2) HARV plus LPS, 3) static culture, 4) static culture plus LPS. Following 48 hours of culture, insulin concentration was increased in both HARV and static cultures (p<0.05). Islet medium from HARV and static cultures were assayed for TNF-alpha (L929 cytotoxicity assay) and was measured at selected time points for 48 hours. TNF-alpha was significantly increased in LPS-induced HARV and static cultures, yet the increase was more pronounced in the static culture group (p<0.05). This is a novel observation and indicates that TNF producing cells are present in islets and that LPS stimulates TNF secretion in isolated islets. A decrease in insulin concentration was demonstrated in the islet medium of the LPS stimulated HARV culture (p<0.05). That TNF-alpha is associated with a decreased insulin secretion is intriguing, both as it relates to in-flight investigations, and as it may provide insight into the pathophysiology of Type I and Type 11 diabetes. Glucose concentration in islet medium was lesser throughout the experiment in static cultures, suggesting a decreased reliance upon glucose as a metabolic substrate in the islets cultured in HARVS. In conclusion, the present studies demonstrate alterations in LPS induced TNF-alpha production of pancreatic islets of Langerhans, favoring a lesser TNF production in the microgravity HARV paradigm. Additionally, alterations in fuel

  13. Influence of High Aspect Ratio Vessel Cell Culture on TNF-Alpha, Insulin Secretion and Glucose Homeostasis in Pancreatic Islets of Langerhans from Wistar Furth Rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tobin, Brian W.a; Leeper-Woodford, Sandra K.

    1999-01-01

    The present studies were carried out to determine the influence of a ground based microgravity paradigm, utilizing the High Aspect Ratio Vessel (HARV) cell culture upon lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulated tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) production of pancreatic islets of Langerhans. An additional aim was to elucidate alterations in insulin secretion and glucose utilization using the HARV low shear, gravity averaged vector, cell culture technique. Islets were isolated (1726 +/- 117, 150 micron islet equivalent units) from Wistar Furth rats and assigned to four treatment groups: 1) HARV, 2) HARV plus LPS, 3) static culture, 4) static culture plus LPS. Following 48 hours of culture, insulin concentration was increased in both HARV and static cultures (p<0.05). Islet medium from HARV and static cultures were assayed for TNF-alpha (L929 cytotoxicity assay) and was measured at selected time points for 48 hours. TNF-alpha was significantly increased in LPS-induced HARV and static cultures, yet the increase was more pronounced in the static culture group (p<0.05). This is a novel observation and indicates that TNF producing cells are present in islets and that LPS stimulates TNF secretion in isolated islets. A decrease in insulin concentration was demonstrated in the islet medium of the LPS stimulated HARV culture (p<0.05). That TNF-alpha is associated with a decreased insulin secretion is intriguing, both as it relates to in-flight investigations, and as it may provide insight into the pathophysiology of Type I and Type 11 diabetes. Glucose concentration in islet medium was lesser throughout the experiment in static cultures, suggesting a decreased reliance upon glucose as a metabolic substrate in the islets cultured in HARVS. In conclusion, the present studies demonstrate alterations in LPS induced TNF-alpha production of pancreatic islets of Langerhans, favoring a lesser TNF production in the microgravity HARV paradigm. Additionally, alterations in fuel

  14. Langerin+ dermal DC, but not Langerhans cells, are required for effective CD8-mediated immune responses after skin scarification with vaccinia virus.

    PubMed

    Seneschal, Julien; Jiang, Xiaodong; Kupper, Thomas S

    2014-03-01

    Skin scarification (s.s.) with vaccinia virus (VACV) is essential for generation of an optimal protective T-cell memory immune response. Dendritic cells (DCs), which are professional antigen-presenting cells, are required for naive T-cell priming and activation. At least three subsets of skin-resident DC have been identified: Langerhans cells (LCs), dermal Langerin+ DC (Lang+ dDC), and dermal Langerin- DC (Lang- dDC). Using Langerin-diphtheria toxin receptor mice and established mouse model of VACV delivered by s.s., we demonstrated that Lang+ dDC, but not LC, are absolutely required for the induction of a rapid and robust antigen-specific CD8+ T-cell response after s.s. with VACV. The depletion of Lang+ dDC led to a significant delay in the priming and proliferation of antigen-specific CD8+ T cells. Moreover, CD8+ T cells generated after VACV s.s. in the absence of Lang+ dDC lacked effector cytotoxic functions both in vitro and in vivo. While s.s.-immunized wild-type and LC-depleted mice controlled the progression of OVA257-264 expressing T-cell lymphoma EG7 (injected intradermally), the depletion of Lang+ dDC led to rapid lymphoma progression and mortality. These data indicate that of all skin DC subsets, Lang+ dDC is the most critical for the generation of robust CD8+ T-cell immunity after s.s. with VACV.

  15. Langerhans Cell Sarcoma Arising from Chronic Lymphocytic Lymphoma/Small Lymphocytic Leukemia: Lineage Analysis and BRAF V600E Mutation Study

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Weiwei; Jaffe, Ronald; Zhang, Linsheng; Hill, Charlie; Block, Anne Marie; Sait, Sheila; Song, Boer; Liu, Yunguang; Cai, Donghong

    2013-01-01

    Background: the phenomenon that histiocytic/dendritic cell sarcomas may be transformed from lymphoproliferative diseases is dubbed ‘transdifferentiation’. Langerhans cell sarcoma (LCS) transdifferentiated from chronic lymphocytic leukemia/small cell lymphoma (CLL/SLL) is extremely rare. The underlying mechanisms of LCS tumorogenesis and its transdifferentiation from CLL/SLL are largely unknown. Aims: the authors strive to further characterize LCS, to understand the potential molecular changes in LCS and the underlying mechanisms of CLL/SLL transformation to LCS. Materials and Methods: a progressively enlarging right inguinal lymph node from a 68-year-old female patient with a history of CLL was biopsied and submitted for flow cytometry analysis, routine hematoxylin, and eosin (H and E) stain and immunohistochemical study. Furthermore, clonality study (fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis with a CLL panel probes) and BRAF V600E mutation study (pyrosequencing and immunostain) were performed. Results: two different neoplasms, LCS and CLL/SLL, were discovered to occur simultaneously in the same lymph node. These two entities were shown to be clonally related. More importantly, for the first time, BRAF V600E mutation was detected in LCS. Conclusions: LCS can be transdifferentiated from CLL/SLL and BRAF V600E mutation may provide the foundation for alternative therapy of LCS. PMID:23923114

  16. Pulmonary Langerhans cell histiocytosis with cervical lymph node involvement, and coexistence with pulmonary tuberculosis and right pneumothorax: a case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Gao, Limin; Li, Huifang; Li, Gandi; Liu, Weiping; Li, Jinnan; Zhang, Wenyan

    2015-01-01

    We report an uncommon 22-year-old male Pulmonary Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis (PLCH) case which co-existed with pulmonary tuberculosis (TB). Unlike the common PLCH cases, this PLCH case has cervical lymph node involvement and right pneumothorax. The diagnosis was established by the imaging of lung and the biopsies of the lung and left neck lymph node. Imaging of the chest showed characteristic small nodules and thin-walled cysts and right pneumothorax. The LCH cells in the lung and left neck lymph node were characterized by large convoluted nuclei with cerebriform indentations of the nuclear envelope and longitudinal grooves. The nuclei contained small eosinophilic nucleoli and moderate amount cytoplasm. Immunohistochemically, the histiocytoid cells were positive for Langerin, CD1a and S-100. Acid-fast bacilli were found in sputum and lung biopsy tissue. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of PLCH with cervical lymph node involvement, and coexisted with pulmonary tuberculosis, right pneumothorax. A contribution of this case and review three of the five cases of PLCH with extrapulmonary involvement to lymph nodes resolved spontaneously after smoking cessation constitute a novel addition that it is inappropriate to regard pulmonary/nodal LCH as multi-organ or disseminated disease, and the treatment methods are the same whether the PLCH patient with lymph node involvement or not.

  17. CD95 death receptor and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) in liver cell apoptosis and regeneration.

    PubMed

    Reinehr, Roland; Häussinger, Dieter

    2012-02-01

    Recent evidence suggests that signaling pathways towards cell proliferation and cell death are much more interconnected than previously thought. Whereas not only death receptors such as CD95 (Fas, APO-1) can couple to both, cell death and proliferation, also growth factor receptors such as the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) are involved in these opposing kinds of cell fate. EGFR is briefly discussed as a growth factor receptor involved in liver cell proliferation during liver regeneration. Then the role of EGFR in activating CD95 death receptor in liver parenchymal cells (PC) and hepatic stellate cells (HSC), which represent a liver stem/progenitor cell compartment, is described summarizing different ways of CD95- and EGFR-dependent signaling in the liver. Here, depending on the hepatic cell type (PC vs. HSC) and the respective signaling context (sustained vs. transient JNK activation) CD95-/EGFR-mediated signaling ends up in either liver cell apoptosis or cell proliferation.

  18. Rac1/RhoA antagonism defines cell-to-cell heterogeneity during epidermal morphogenesis in nematodes

    PubMed Central

    Ouellette, Marie-Hélène

    2016-01-01

    The antagonism between the GTPases Rac1 and RhoA controls cell-to-cell heterogeneity in isogenic populations of cells in vitro and epithelial morphogenesis in vivo. Its involvement in the regulation of cell-to-cell heterogeneity during epidermal morphogenesis has, however, never been addressed. We used a quantitative cell imaging approach to characterize epidermal morphogenesis at a single-cell level during early elongation of Caenorhabditis elegans embryos. This study reveals that a Rac1-like pathway, involving the Rac/Cdc42 guanine-exchange factor β-PIX/PIX-1 and effector PAK1/PAK-1, and a RhoA-like pathway, involving ROCK/LET-502, control the remodeling of apical junctions and the formation of basolateral protrusions in distinct subsets of hypodermal cells. In these contexts, protrusions adopt lamellipodia or an amoeboid morphology. We propose that lamella formation may reduce tension building at cell–cell junctions during morphogenesis. Cell-autonomous antagonism between these pathways enables cells to switch between Rac1- and RhoA-like morphogenetic programs. This study identifies the first case of cell-to-cell heterogeneity controlled by Rac1/RhoA antagonism during epidermal morphogenesis. PMID:27821782

  19. Epidermal cells are the primary phagocytes in the fragmentation and clearance of degenerating dendrites in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Hui; Wang, Denan; Franc, Nathalie C.; Jan, Lily Yeh; Jan, Yuh-Nung

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY During developmental remodeling, neurites destined for pruning often degenerate on-site. Physical injury also induces degeneration of neurites distal to the injury site. Prompt clearance of degenerating neurites is important for maintaining tissue homeostasis and preventing inflammatory responses. Here we show that in both dendrite pruning and dendrite injury of Drosophila sensory neurons, epidermal cells rather than hemocytes are the primary phagocytes in clearing degenerating dendrites. Epidermal cells act via Draper-mediated recognition to facilitate dendrite degeneration and to engulf and degrade degenerating dendrites. Using multiple dendritic membrane markers to trace phagocytosis, we show that two members of the CD36 family, croquemort (crq) and debris buster (dsb), act at distinct stages of phagosome maturation for dendrite clearance. Our finding reveals the physiological importance of coordination between neurons and their surrounding epidermis, for both dendrite fragmentation and clearance. PMID:24412417

  20. Blood Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Hematologic Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-06-05

    Adult Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis; Childhood Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis; Leukemia; Lymphoma; Multiple Myeloma and Plasma Cell Neoplasm; Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasms

  1. ELT-5 and ELT-6 are required continuously to regulate epidermal seam cell differentiation and cell fusion in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Koh, K; Rothman, J H

    2001-08-01

    The C. elegans epidermis is a simple epithelium comprised of three major cell types, the seam, syncytial and P cells. While specification of all major epidermal cells is known to require the ELT-1 GATA transcription factor, little is known about how the individual epidermal cell types are specified. We report that elt-5 and -6, adjacent genes encoding GATA factors, are essential for the development of the lateral epidermal cells, the seam cells. Inhibition of elt-5 and -6 function by RNA-mediated interference results in penetrant late embryonic and early larval lethality. Seam cells in affected animals do not differentiate properly: the alae, seam-specific cuticular structures, are generally absent and expression of several seam-specific markers is blocked. In addition, elt-3, which encodes another GATA factor normally expressed in non-seam epidermis, is often ectopically expressed in the seam cells of affected animals, demonstrating that ELT-5 and -6 repress elt-3 expression in wild-type seam cells. Seam cells in affected animals often undergo inappropriate fusion with the epidermal syncytia. Interference of elt-5 and -6 function during larval development can cause fusion of all seam cells with the surrounding syncytia and pronounced defects in molting. elt-5 and -6 are both expressed in seam cells and many other cells, and are apparently functionally interchangeable. Their expression is controlled by separable tissue-specific regulatory elements and the apportionment of monocistronic versus dicistronic transcription of both genes appears to be subject to cell-type-specific regulation. Collectively, these findings indicate that elt-5 and -6 function continuously throughout C. elegans development to regulate seam cell differentiation and cell fusion.

  2. [Proliferation of beta cells after syngeneic transplantation of isolated Langerhans cells into the spleens of diabetic rats].

    PubMed

    Wohlrab, F; Schmidt, S; Kloeting, I; Wilke, B; Cossel, L

    1990-01-01

    Syngeneic transplantation of cultured and functionally characterized neonatal islet into the spleen of streptozotocin diabetic Lewis rats resulted in long time survival up to 200 days and in plasma glucose levels lower than 9 mmol/l. The daily plasma glucose profile of transplanted rats had shown significantly above that of non diabetic control rats. 200 days after transplantation morphologically intact, insulin containing beta-cells were demonstrable in the spleen, thus demonstrating the long-term survival of functioning islet cells. Proliferation of beta-cells was shown in the transplanted islets. In addition, beta-cell clusters were found which derived from pancreatic ductules transplanted together with the isolated islets into the spleen. Mitose were visible within ductular epithelial cells. The proliferative response of islets after intrasplenic transplantation is probably the result of a long-term stimulation by slightly enhanced plasma glucose values of the transplanted acceptors compared to control animals.

  3. Morphological and functional studies on the epidermal cells of amphioxus ( Branchiostoma belcheri tsingtauense) at different developmental stages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Bing-Yu; Sun, Xiao-Yang; Zhang, Hong-Wei; Zhang, Shi-Cui; Wu, Xian-Han

    1997-09-01

    Epidermal cells of amphioxus at different developmental stages were investigated by electron microscopy and colloidal carbon tracing experiments. Amphioxus epidermal cells showed different ultrastructural characteristics at larval and adult stages. The epidermal cells at all larval stages studied (24 96 h) had numerous vesicles containing electron dense materials in their apical cytoplasm. In tracing experiments, carbon particles were found in apical vesicles and interoellular spaces. Under scanning electron microscope, many crater-like protrusions were observed on the surface of the cells. These results indicated that amphioxus larval epidermal cells may be capable of endocytosis. The epidermal cells of 3-month and adult amphioxus were obviously secretory ones characterized by well-developed peripheral filaments, a prominent Golgi apparatus and abundant apical secretory vesicles. This study also showed that adult amphioxus body surface mucus contained lectin that could agglutinate human red blood cells. The authors propose that the epidermal cells of amphioxus larva and adult may contribute to the immune defense of the amimal by different means.

  4. Skin Stem Cells: At the Frontier Between the Laboratory and Clinical Practice. Part 1: Epidermal Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Pastushenko, I; Prieto-Torres, L; Gilaberte, Y; Blanpain, C

    2015-11-01

    Stem cells are characterized by their ability to self-renew and differentiate into the different cell lineages of their tissue of origin. The discovery of stem cells in adult tissues, together with the description of specific markers for their isolation, has opened up new lines of investigation, expanding the horizons of biomedical research and raising new hope in the treatment of many diseases. In this article, we review in detail the main characteristics of the stem cells that produce the specialized cells of the skin (epidermal, mesenchymal, and melanocyte stem cells) and their potential implications and applications in diseases affecting the skin. Part I deals with the principal characteristics and potential applications of epidermal stem cells in dermatology. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and AEDV. All rights reserved.

  5. Mast Cells Regulate Epidermal Barrier Function and the Development of Allergic Skin Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Sehra, Sarita; Serezani, Ana PM; Ocaña, Jesus A.; Travers, Jeffrey B.; Kaplan, Mark H.

    2016-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a chronic inflammatory skin disease characterized by infiltration of eosinophils, T helper cells and mast cells. The role of mast cells in AD is not completely understood. To define the effects of mast cells on skin biology, we observed that mast cells regulate the homeostatic expression of Epidermal Differentiation Complex (EDC) and other skin genes. Decreased EDC gene expression in mice that genetically lack mast cells (KitW-sh/W-sh mice) is associated with increased uptake of protein antigens painted on the skin by dendritic cells, compared to similarly treated wild-type mice, suggesting a protective role for mast cells in exposure to nominal environmental allergens. To test this further, we crossed KitW-sh/W-sh mice with Stat6VT transgenic mice that develop spontaneous AD-like disease that is dependent on Th2 cytokines and associated with high serum concentrations of IgE. We observed that Stat6VT x KitW-sh/W-sh mice developed more frequent and more severe allergic skin inflammation than Stat6VT transgenic mice that had mast cells. Together, these studies suggest that mast cells regulate epidermal barrier function and have a potential protective role in the development of AD-like disease. PMID:27021404

  6. Regeneration of beta cells in islets of Langerhans of pancreas of alloxan diabetic rats by acetone extract of Momordica charantia (Linn.) (bitter gourd) fruits.

    PubMed

    Singh, Neera; Gupta, Manushma

    2007-12-01

    Acetone extract of whole fruit powder of M. charantia (bitter gourd) in doses 25, 50 and 75 mg/100 g body weight lowered the blood glucose from 13.30 to 50% after 8 to 30 days treatment in alloxan diabetic albino rats, confirming antihyperglycemic effect of this plant in diabetic animals and humans. Histological observations with acetone extract showed different phases of recovery of beta cells of the islets of Langerhans of pancreas, which in the untreated diabetic rats were less in number and showed varied degree of atrophy. The most important finding of the present study was observation of the presence of small scattered islets among the acinar tissue in some experimental animals, which may reflect neoformation of islets from pre-existing islet cells. The liver of alloxan diabetic rats showed hydropic degeneration, fatty change and necrosis at some places but liver of extract treated animals was normal. Glycogen localization in liver of diabetic rats was faint but after 30 days treatment with different doses of extract, normal to heavy glycogen localization was observed.

  7. Continuous UV-B irradiation induces endoreduplication and peroxidase activity in epidermal cells surrounding trichomes on cucumber cotyledons.

    PubMed

    Yamasaki, Seiji; Shimada, Eri; Kuwano, Tomoe; Kawano, Tae; Noguchi, Naoto

    2010-01-01

    Most trichomes on the surface of cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) cotyledons consist of three cells. We previously showed that continuous UV-B (290-320 nm) irradiation induces rapid cellular expansion and the accumulation of polyphenolic compounds, possibly stress lignin, in epidermal cells around these trichomes.(1)) To examine the mechanism of the UV-B-induced cellular expansion and to determine which step is stimulated by UV-B irradiation in the lignin synthesis pathway, we investigated relative DNA contents in epidermal cells, including trichomes, and enzyme activity and gene expression in the phenylpropanoid pathway. UV-B irradiation increased the ploidy level over 15 days, specifically in the epidermal cells surrounding trichomes, but not in the other epidermal cells or trichomes. In epidermal cells surrounding trichomes, UV-B irradiation induced peroxidase (POX) activity from days 7 to 15. In cotyledons, UV-B exposure induced CS-POX1 and CS-POX3 gene expression within 2 days, and it also induced two other enzymes in the phenylpropanoid pathway, sinapyl alcohol dehydrogenase and coniferyl alcohol dehydrogenase, from days 9 to 11. Thus, exposure to UV-B induces expansion, endoreduplication, POX activity, and the accumulation of polyphenolic compounds in epidermal cells surrounding the trichomes of cucumber cotyledons. Because polyphenolic compounds such as lignin absorb UV-B, our data indicate a physiological protective mechanism against UV-B irradiation in cucumber.

  8. Melanoma cells influence the differentiation pattern of human epidermal keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Kodet, Ondřej; Lacina, Lukáš; Krejčí, Eliška; Dvořánková, Barbora; Grim, Miloš; Štork, Jiří; Kodetová, Daniela; Vlček, Čestmír; Šáchová, Jana; Kolář, Michal; Strnad, Hynek; Smetana, Karel

    2015-01-05

    Nodular melanoma is one of the most life threatening tumors with still poor therapeutic outcome. Similarly to other tumors, permissive microenvironment is essential for melanoma progression. Features of this microenvironment are arising from molecular crosstalk between the melanoma cells (MC) and the surrounding cell populations in the context of skin tissue. Here, we study the effect of melanoma cells on human primary keratinocytes (HPK). Presence of MC is as an important modulator of the tumor microenvironment and we compare it to the effect of nonmalignant lowly differentiated cells also originating from neural crest (NCSC). Comparative morphometrical and immunohistochemical analysis of epidermis surrounding nodular melanoma (n = 100) was performed. Data were compared to results of transcriptome profiling of in vitro models, in which HPK were co-cultured with MC, normal human melanocytes, and NCSC, respectively. Differentially expressed candidate genes were verified by RT-qPCR. Biological activity of candidate proteins was assessed on cultured HPK. Epidermis surrounding nodular melanoma exhibits hyperplastic features in 90% of cases. This hyperplastic region exhibits aberrant suprabasal expression of keratin 14 accompanied by loss of keratin 10. We observe that MC and NCSC are able to increase expression of keratins 8, 14, 19, and vimentin in the co-cultured HPK. This in vitro finding partially correlates with pseudoepitheliomatous hyperplasia observed in melanoma biopsies. We provide evidence of FGF-2, CXCL-1, IL-8, and VEGF-A participation in the activity of melanoma cells on keratinocytes. We conclude that the MC are able to influence locally the differentiation pattern of keratinocytes in vivo as well as in vitro. This interaction further highlights the role of intercellular interactions in melanoma. The reciprocal role of activated keratinocytes on biology of melanoma cells shall be verified in the future.

  9. Biotransformation of 7,12-dimethylbenz[alanthracene by mouse epidermal cells in culture.

    PubMed

    DiGiovanni, J; Viaje, A; Fischer, S; Slaga, T J; Boutwell, R K

    1980-01-01

    The formation of cell- and medium-associated metabolites of 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA) by primary mouse epidermal cells was examined using high-pressure liquid chromatography. Cells were cultured in the presence of 14C DMBA for various time periods prior to harvesting. Ethyl acetate/acetone (2:1) extractable metabolites found associated with cells cochromatographed with 7-hydroxymethyl-12-methylbenz[a]anthracene (7-OHM-12-MBA), 12-hydroxymethyl-7-methylbenz[a]anthracene (12-OHM-7-MBA), (+/-)-trans-3,4-dihydro-3,4-dihydroxy-7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene ((+/-)-trans-DMBA-3,4-diol) and phenols. The major metabolite(s) found within cells cochromatographed with DMBA-phenol(s). Ethyl acetate/acetone extractable metabolites found in the medium cochromatographed with 7-OHM-12-MBA, 12-OHM-7-MBA, (+/-)-trans-DMBA-3,4-diol, (+/-)-trans-8,9-dihydro-8,9-dihydroxy-7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene ((+/-) -trans-DMBA-8,9-diol) and phenols. The major ethyl acetate/acetone soluble metabolite found in the medium cochromatographed with (+/-)-trans-DMBA-8,9-diol. This metabolite is rapidly excreted unchanged from the cells into the medium. In addition, primary epidermal cells rapidly converted 14C DMBA to water soluble metabolites that could not be extracted from the medium with ethyl acetate/acetone. Approximately 50% of these water soluble metabolites were extractable with organic solvent upon treatment of the medium with beta-glucuronidase. Phenolic metabolite(s) represented 75-85% of the total beta-glucuronidase releasable material. The results indicated that primary mouse epidermal cells in culture rapdly converted DMBA to a variety of hydroxylated products some of which were conjugated with glucuronic acid. In addition, the formation of (+/-)-trans-DMBA-3,4-diol and its retention within the cells provides additional support for an important role for this metabolite in carcinogenesis by DMBA.

  10. Th22 cells represent a distinct human T cell subset involved in epidermal immunity and remodeling.

    PubMed

    Eyerich, Stefanie; Eyerich, Kilian; Pennino, Davide; Carbone, Teresa; Nasorri, Francesca; Pallotta, Sabatino; Cianfarani, Francesca; Odorisio, Teresa; Traidl-Hoffmann, Claudia; Behrendt, Heidrun; Durham, Stephen R; Schmidt-Weber, Carsten B; Cavani, Andrea

    2009-12-01

    Th subsets are defined according to their production of lineage-indicating cytokines and functions. In this study, we have identified a subset of human Th cells that infiltrates the epidermis in individuals with inflammatory skin disorders and is characterized by the secretion of IL-22 and TNF-alpha, but not IFN-gamma, IL-4, or IL-17. In analogy to the Th17 subset, cells with this cytokine profile have been named the Th22 subset. Th22 clones derived from patients with psoriasis were stable in culture and exhibited a transcriptome profile clearly separate from those of Th1, Th2, and Th17 cells; it included genes encoding proteins involved in tissue remodeling, such as FGFs, and chemokines involved in angiogenesis and fibrosis. Primary human keratinocytes exposed to Th22 supernatants expressed a transcriptome response profile that included genes involved in innate immune pathways and the induction and modulation of adaptive immunity. These proinflammatory Th22 responses were synergistically dependent on IL-22 and TNF-alpha. Furthermore, Th22 supernatants enhanced wound healing in an in vitro injury model, which was exclusively dependent on IL-22. In conclusion, the human Th22 subset may represent a separate T cell subset with a distinct identity with respect to gene expression and function, present within the epidermal layer in inflammatory skin diseases. Future strategies directed against the Th22 subset may be of value in chronic inflammatory skin disorders.

  11. Effects of epidermal growth factor on neural crest cells in tissue culture

    SciTech Connect

    Erickson, C.A.; Turley, E.A.

    1987-04-01

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF) stimulates the release of hyaluronic acid (HA) and chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan (CSPG) from quail trunk neural crest cultures in a dose-dependent fashion. It also promotes the expression of cell-associated heparan sulfate proteoglycan (HSPG) as detected by immunofluorescence and immunoprecipitation of the /sup 3/H-labeled proteoglycan. Furthermore, EGF stimulates (/sup 3/H)thymidine incorporation into total cell DNA. These results raise the possibility that EGF or an analogous growth factor is involved in regulation of neural crest cell morphogenesis.

  12. Identifying subcellular protein localization with fluorescent protein fusions after transient expression in onion epidermal cells.

    PubMed

    Nebenführ, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Most biochemical functions of plant cells are carried out by proteins which act at very specific places within these cells, for example, within different organelles. Identifying the subcellular localization of proteins is therefore a useful tool to narrow down the possible functions that a novel or unknown protein may carry out. The discovery of genetically encoded fluorescent markers has made it possible to tag specific proteins and visualize them in vivo under a variety of conditions. This chapter describes a simple method to use transient expression of such fluorescently tagged proteins in onion epidermal cells to determine their subcellular localization relative to known markers.

  13. Epidermal cell junctions and their regulation by p63 in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Ferone, Giustina; Mollo, Maria Rosaria; Missero, Caterina

    2015-06-01

    As the outermost tissue of the body, the epidermis is the first physical barrier for any pressure, stress or trauma. Several specialized cell-matrix and cell-cell adhesion structures, together with an intracellular network of dedicated intermediate filaments, are required to confer critical resilience to mechanical stress. The transcription factor p63 is a master regulator of gene expression in the epidermis and in other stratified epithelia. It has been extensively demonstrated that p63 positively controls a large number of tissue-specific genes, including those encoding a large fraction of tissue-restricted cell adhesion molecules. Consistent with p63 functions in cell adhesion and in epidermal differentiation, heterozygous mutations clustered mainly in the p63 C-terminus are causative of AEC syndrome, an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by cleft palate, ankyloblepharon and ectodermal dysplasia associated with severe skin erosions, bleeding and infections. The molecular basis of skin erosions in AEC patients is not fully understood, although defects in desmosomes and in other cell junctions are likely to be involved. Here, we provide an extensive review of the different epidermal cell junctions that cooperate to withstand mechanical stress and on the mechanisms by which p63 regulates gene expression of their components in healthy skin and in AEC syndrome. Collectively, advancement in understanding the molecular mechanisms by which epidermal cell junctions precisely exert their functions and how p63 orchestrates their coordinated expression, will ultimately lead to insight into developing future strategies for the treatment of AEC syndrome and more in generally for diseases that share an overlapping phenotype.

  14. Specific binding of phorbol ester tumor promoters to intact primary epidermal cells from Sencar mice

    SciTech Connect

    Solanki, V.; Slaga, T.J.

    1981-04-01

    The binding of (20-/sup 3/H)phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate ((/sup 3/H)PDB) to intact living epidermal cells in monolayer culture was characterized. At 37/sup 0/C, the maximum specific (/sup 3/H)PDB binding (binding displaceable by 30 ..mu..M unlabeled PDB) was attained in 15 to 20 min and was followed by a rapid decrease (down regulation) of radioactivity bound to the cells. The activity lost by the cells during this decrease was found in the incubation medium. Prior exposure of cells to phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA; 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate) but not to phorbol for 2 h at 37/sup 0/C caused approx. 55% reduction in the number of measurable binding sites for (/sup 3/H)PDB. The down regulation was temperature sensitive; there was no loss of radioactivity after 1 h at 4/sup 0/C. The specific binding of (/sup 3/H)PDB at 4/sup 0/C reached equilibrium in 15 to 20 min and was saturable and freely reversible. At equilibrium, epidermal cells contained 1.2 x 10/sup 5/ binding sites per cell, and binding sites had a K/sub D/ of 10 nM. Specificity of binding was shown by the observation that the biologically active phorbol esters PMA and 12-deoxyphorbol 13-decanoate inhibited the binding, whereas the inactive parent compound phorbol and the nonphorbol tumor promoter anthralin did not have any effect. The a