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Sample records for epidermal permeability barrier

  1. Testosterone perturbs epidermal permeability barrier homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Kao, J S; Garg, A; Mao-Qiang, M; Crumrine, D; Ghadially, R; Feingold, K R; Elias, P M

    2001-03-01

    Although there are no known gender-related differences in permeability barrier function in adults, estrogens accelerate whereas testosterone retards barrier development in fetal skin, and male fetuses demonstrate slower barrier development than female littermates. Moreover, prenatal administration of the androgen receptor antagonist, flutamide, equalizes developmental rates in male and female fetuses. Therefore, we evaluated the effects of changes in testosterone on barrier homeostasis in adult murine and human skin. Hypogonadal mice (whether by castration or by treatment with systemic flutamide) displayed significantly faster barrier recovery at 3, 6, and 12 h than did controls, and testosterone replacement slowed barrier recovery in castrated mice. Moreover, testosterone directly effects the skin, as topical flutamide also accelerated barrier recovery in normal male mice. These findings appear to be of physiologic significance, since prepubertal male mice (age 5 wk) displayed accelerated barrier recovery in comparison with adult postpubertal (11 wk) males. These studies also appear to be relevant for humans, as a hypopituitary human subject demonstrated repeated changes in barrier recovery in parallel with peaks and nadirs in serum testosterone levels during intermittent testosterone replacement. Mechanistic studies showed that differences in epidermal lipid synthesis do not account for the testosterone-induced functional alterations. Instead, epidermal lamellar body (LB) formation and secretion both decrease, resulting in decreased extracellular lamellar bilayers in testosterone-replete animals. These studies demonstrate that fluctuations in testosterone modulate barrier function, and that testosterone repletion can have negative consequences for permeability barrier homeostasis.

  2. Effects of skin surface temperature on epidermal permeability barrier homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Denda, Mitsuhiro; Sokabe, Takaaki; Fukumi-Tominaga, Tomoko; Tominaga, Makoto

    2007-03-01

    Members of the transient receptor potential (TRP) family are temperature sensors, and TRPV1, V3, and V4 are expressed in epidermal keratinocytes. To evaluate the influence of these receptors on epidermal permeability barrier homeostasis, we kept both hairless mouse skin and human skin at various temperatures immediately after tape stripping. At temperatures from 36 to 40 degrees C, barrier recovery was accelerated in both cases compared with the area at 34 degrees C. At 34 or 42 degrees C, barrier recovery was delayed compared with the un-occluded area. 4Alpha-phorbol 12,13-didecanone, an activator of TRPV4, accelerated barrier recovery, whereas ruthenium red, a blocker of TRPV4, delayed barrier recovery. Capsaicin, an activator of TRPV1, delayed barrier recovery, whereas capsazepin, an antagonist of TRPV1, blocked this delay. 2-Aminoethoxydiphenyl borate and camphor, TRPV3 activators, did not affect the barrier recovery rate. As TRPV4 is activated at about 35 degrees C and above, whereas TRPV1 is activated at about 42 degrees C and above, these results suggest that both TRPV1 and TRPV4 play important roles in skin permeability barrier homeostasis. Previous reports suggest the existence of a water flux sensor in the epidermis, and as TRPV4 is known to be activated by osmotic pressure, our results indicate that it might be this sensor.

  3. Epidermal Permeability Barrier (EPB) measurement in mammalian skin

    PubMed Central

    Indra, Arup Kumar; Leid, Mark

    2012-01-01

    A defective skin epidermal permeability barrier (EPB) is responsible for a high mortality rate in premature infants, and is an important risk factor in inflammatory skin diseases such as eczema. We report here fast and accurate methods for measurement of EPB in animal models or in human patients using simple techniques that monitor diffusion of dyes (X-Gal or Lucifer Yellow) through the upper epidermis and measure transepidermal water loss (TEWL) resulting from a defective skin barrier. Accurate diagnosis and early detection of EPB defects in human patients are critical for effective treatment of certain classes of inflammatory skin diseases. PMID:21874444

  4. Epidermal Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Production Is Required for Permeability Barrier Homeostasis, Dermal Angiogenesis, and the Development of Epidermal Hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Elias, Peter M.; Arbiser, Jack; Brown, Barbara E.; Rossiter, Heidemarie; Man, Mao-Qiang; Cerimele, Francesca; Crumrine, Debra; Gunathilake, Roshan; Choi, Eung Ho; Uchida, Yoshikazu; Tschachler, Erwin; Feingold, Kenneth R.

    2008-01-01

    Primary abnormalities in permeability barrier function appear to underlie atopic dermatitis and epidermal trauma; a concomitant barrier dysfunction could also drive other inflammatory dermatoses, including psoriasis. Central to this outside-inside view of disease pathogenesis is the epidermal generation of cytokines/growth factors, which in turn signal downstream epidermal repair mechanisms. Yet, this cascade, if sustained, signals downstream epidermal hyperplasia and inflammation. We found here that acute barrier disruption rapidly stimulates mRNA and protein expression of epidermal vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF-A) in normal hairless mice, a specific response to permeability barrier requirements because up-regulation is blocked by application of a vapor-impermeable membrane. Moreover, epidermal vegf−/− mice display abnormal permeability barrier homeostasis, attributable to decreased VEGF signaling of epidermal lamellar body production; a paucity of dermal capillaries with reduced vascular permeability; and neither angiogenesis nor epidermal hyperplasia in response to repeated tape stripping (a model of psoriasiform hyperplasia). These results support a central role for epidermal VEGF in the maintenance of epidermal permeability barrier homeostasis and a link between epidermal VEGF production and both dermal angiogenesis and the development of epidermal hyperplasia. Because psoriasis is commonly induced by external trauma [isomorphic (Koebner) phenomenon] and is associated with a prominent permeability barrier abnormality, excess VEGF production, prominent angiogenesis, and epidermal hyperplasia, these results could provide a potential outside-inside mechanistic basis for the development of psoriasis. PMID:18688025

  5. Epidermal Permeability Barrier Defects and Barrier Repair Therapy in Atopic Dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hae-Jin

    2014-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a multifactorial inflammatory skin disease perpetuated by gene-environmental interactions and which is characterized by genetic barrier defects and allergic inflammation. Recent studies demonstrate an important role for the epidermal permeability barrier in AD that is closely related to chronic immune activation in the skin during systemic allergic reactions. Moreover, acquired stressors (e.g., Staphylococcus aureus infection) to the skin barrier may also initiate inflammation in AD. Many studies involving patients with AD revealed that defective skin barriers combined with abnormal immune responses might contribute to the pathophysiology of AD, supporting the outside-inside hypothesis. In this review, we discuss the recent advances in human and animal models, focusing on the defects of the epidermal permeability barrier, its immunologic role and barrier repair therapy in AD. PMID:24991450

  6. Topical apigenin improves epidermal permeability barrier homoeostasis in normal murine skin by divergent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Hou, Maihua; Sun, Richard; Hupe, Melanie; Kim, Peggy L; Park, Kyungho; Crumrine, Debra; Lin, Tzu-Kai; Santiago, Juan Luis; Mauro, Theodora M; Elias, Peter M; Man, Mao-Qiang

    2013-03-01

    The beneficial effects of certain herbal medicines on cutaneous function have been appreciated for centuries. Among these agents, chrysanthemum extract, apigenin, has been used for skin care, particularly in China, for millennia. However, the underlying mechanisms by which apigenin benefits the skin are not known. In this study, we first determined whether topical apigenin positively influences permeability barrier homoeostasis, and then the basis thereof. Hairless mice were treated topically with either 0.1% apigenin or vehicle alone twice daily for 9 days. At the end of the treatments, permeability barrier function was assessed with either an electrolytic water analyzer or a Tewameter. Our results show that topical apigenin significantly enhanced permeability barrier homoeostasis after tape stripping, although basal permeability barrier function remained unchanged. Improved barrier function correlated with enhanced filaggrin expression and lamellar body production, which was paralleled by elevated mRNA levels for the epidermal ABCA12. The mRNA levels for key lipid synthetic enzymes also were upregulated by apigenin. Finally, both cathelicidin-related peptide and mouse beta-defensin 3 immunostaining were increased by apigenin. We conclude that topical apigenin improves epidermal permeability barrier function by stimulating epidermal differentiation, lipid synthesis and secretion, as well as cutaneous antimicrobial peptide production. Apigenin could be useful for the prevention and treatment of skin disorders characterized by permeability barrier dysfunction, associated with reduced filaggrin levels and impaired antimicrobial defenses, such as atopic dermatitis. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  7. Epidermal vascular endothelial growth factor production is required for permeability barrier homeostasis, dermal angiogenesis, and the development of epidermal hyperplasia: implications for the pathogenesis of psoriasis.

    PubMed

    Elias, Peter M; Arbiser, Jack; Brown, Barbara E; Rossiter, Heidemarie; Man, Mao-Qiang; Cerimele, Francesca; Crumrine, Debra; Gunathilake, Roshan; Choi, Eung Ho; Uchida, Yoshikazu; Tschachler, Erwin; Feingold, Kenneth R

    2008-09-01

    Primary abnormalities in permeability barrier function appear to underlie atopic dermatitis and epidermal trauma; a concomitant barrier dysfunction could also drive other inflammatory dermatoses, including psoriasis. Central to this outside-inside view of disease pathogenesis is the epidermal generation of cytokines/growth factors, which in turn signal downstream epidermal repair mechanisms. Yet, this cascade, if sustained, signals downstream epidermal hyperplasia and inflammation. We found here that acute barrier disruption rapidly stimulates mRNA and protein expression of epidermal vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF-A) in normal hairless mice, a specific response to permeability barrier requirements because up-regulation is blocked by application of a vapor-impermeable membrane. Moreover, epidermal vegf(-/-) mice display abnormal permeability barrier homeostasis, attributable to decreased VEGF signaling of epidermal lamellar body production; a paucity of dermal capillaries with reduced vascular permeability; and neither angiogenesis nor epidermal hyperplasia in response to repeated tape stripping (a model of psoriasiform hyperplasia). These results support a central role for epidermal VEGF in the maintenance of epidermal permeability barrier homeostasis and a link between epidermal VEGF production and both dermal angiogenesis and the development of epidermal hyperplasia. Because psoriasis is commonly induced by external trauma [isomorphic (Koebner) phenomenon] and is associated with a prominent permeability barrier abnormality, excess VEGF production, prominent angiogenesis, and epidermal hyperplasia, these results could provide a potential outside-inside mechanistic basis for the development of psoriasis.

  8. The important role of epidermal triacylglycerol metabolism for maintenance of the skin permeability barrier function.

    PubMed

    Radner, Franz P W; Fischer, Judith

    2014-03-01

    Survival in a terrestrial, dry environment necessitates a permeability barrier for regulated permeation of water and electrolytes in the cornified layer of the skin (the stratum corneum) to minimize desiccation of the body. This barrier is formed during cornification and involves a cross-linking of corneocyte proteins as well as an extensive remodeling of lipids. The cleavage of precursor lipids from lamellar bodies by various hydrolytic enzymes generates ceramides, cholesterol, and non-esterified fatty acids for the extracellular lipid lamellae in the stratum corneum. However, the important role of epidermal triacylglycerol (TAG) metabolism during formation of a functional permeability barrier in the skin was only recently discovered. Humans with mutations in the ABHD5/CGI-58 (α/β hydrolase domain containing protein 5, also known as comparative gene identification-58, CGI-58) gene suffer from a defect in TAG catabolism that causes neutral lipid storage disease with ichthyosis. In addition, mice with deficiencies in genes involved in TAG catabolism (Abhd5/Cgi-58 knock-out mice) or TAG synthesis (acyl-CoA:diacylglycerol acyltransferase-2, Dgat2 knock-out mice) also develop severe skin permeability barrier dysfunctions and die soon after birth due to increased dehydration. As a result of these defects in epidermal TAG metabolism, humans and mice lack ω-(O)-acylceramides, which leads to malformation of the cornified lipid envelope of the skin. In healthy skin, this epidermal structure provides an interface for the linkage of lamellar membranes with corneocyte proteins to maintain permeability barrier homeostasis. This review focuses on recent advances in the understanding of biochemical mechanisms involved in epidermal neutral lipid metabolism and the generation of a functional skin permeability barrier. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled The Important Role of Lipids in the Epidermis and their Role in the Formation and Maintenance of the Cutaneous

  9. Epidermal Barriers

    PubMed Central

    Natsuga, Ken

    2014-01-01

    The epidermis functions as a physical barrier to the external environment and works to prevent loss of water from the skin. Numerous factors have been implicated in the formation of epidermal barriers, such as cornified envelopes, corneocytes, lipids, junctional proteins, proteases, protease inhibitors, antimicrobial peptides, and transcription factors. This review illustrates human diseases (ichthyoses) and animal models in which the epidermal barrier is disrupted or dysfunctional at steady state owing to ablation of one or more of the above factors. These diseases and animal models help us to understand the complicated mechanisms of epidermal barrier formation and give further insights on epidermal development. PMID:24692192

  10. Topical application of TRPM8 agonists accelerates skin permeability barrier recovery and reduces epidermal proliferation induced by barrier insult: role of cold-sensitive TRP receptors in epidermal permeability barrier homoeostasis.

    PubMed

    Denda, Mitsuhiro; Tsutsumi, Moe; Denda, Sumiko

    2010-09-01

    TRPA1 and TRPM8 receptors are activated at low temperature (A1: below 17 degrees C and M8: below 22 degrees C). Recently, we observed that low temperature (below 22 degrees C) induced elevation of intracellular calcium in keratinocytes. Moreover, we demonstrated that topical application of TRPA1 agonists accelerated the recovery of epidermal permeability barrier function after disruption. In this study, we examined the effect of topical application of TRPM8 modulators on epidermal permeability barrier homoeostasis. Immunohistochemical study and RT-PCR confirmed the expression of TRPM8 or TRPM8-like protein in epidermal keratinocytes. Topical application of TRPM8 agonists, menthol and WS 12 accelerated barrier recovery after tape stripping. The effect of WS12 was blocked by a non-selective TRP antagonist, Ruthenium Red, and a TRPM8-specific antagonist, BTCT. Topical application of WS12 also reduced epidermal proliferation associated with barrier disruption under low humidity, and this effect was blocked by BTCT. Our results indicate that TRPM8 or a closely related protein in epidermal keratinocytes plays a role in epidermal permeability barrier homoeostasis and epidermal proliferation after barrier insult.

  11. Epidermal Permeability Barrier Recovery Is Delayed in Vitiligo-Involved Sites

    PubMed Central

    Liu, J.; Man, W.Y.; Lv, C.Z.; Song, S.P.; Shi, Y.J.; Elias, P.M.; Man, M.Q.

    2010-01-01

    Background/Objectives Prior studies have demonstrated that both the skin surface pH and epidermal permeability barrier function vary with skin pigmentation types. Although melanin deficiency is the main feature of vitiligo, alterations in cutaneous biophysical properties in vitiligo have not yet been well defined. In the present study, stratum corneum (SC) hydration, the skin surface pH and epidermal permeability barrier function in vitiligo were evaluated. Methods A total of 30 volunteers with vitiligo comprising 19 males and 11 females aged 13–51 years (mean age: 27.91 ± 2.06 years) were enrolled in this study. The skin surface pH, SC hydration, melanin/erythema index and transepidermal water loss (TEWL) were measured by respective probes connected to a Courage-Khazaka MPA5. SC integrity was determined by measuring the TEWL following each D-Squame application. The barrier recovery rate was assessed at 5 h following barrier disruption by repeated tape stripping. Results In addition to SC hydration, both melanin and erythema index were significantly lower in vitiligo lesions than in contralateral, nonlesional sites, while no difference in skin surface pH between vitiligo-involved and uninvolved areas was observed. In addition, neither the basal TEWL nor SC integrity in the involved areas differed significantly from that in the uninvolved areas. However, barrier recovery in vitiligo-involved sites was significantly delayed in comparison with uninvolved sites (40.83 ± 5.39% vs. 58.30 ± 4.71%; t = 2.441; p < 0.02). Conclusion Barrier recovery following tape stripping of the SC is delayed in vitiligo. Therefore, improvement in epidermal permeability barrier function may be an important unrecognized factor to be considered in treating patients with vitiligo. PMID:20185976

  12. ABCA12 maintains the epidermal lipid permeability barrier by facilitating formation of ceramide linoleic esters.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Ying; Zhuang, Debbie Z; Han, Rong; Isaac, Giorgis; Tobin, Jennifer J; McKee, Mary; Welti, Ruth; Brissette, Janice L; Fitzgerald, Michael L; Freeman, Mason W

    2008-12-26

    Harlequin ichthyosis is a congenital scaling syndrome of the skin in which affected infants have epidermal hyperkeratosis and a defective permeability barrier. Mutations in the gene encoding a member of the ABCA transporter family, ABCA12, have been linked to harlequin ichthyosis, but the molecular function of the protein is unknown. To investigate the activity of ABCA12, we generated Abca12 null mice and analyzed the impact on skin function and lipid content. Abca12-/- mice are born with a thickened epidermis and die shortly after birth, as water rapidly evaporates from their skin. In vivo skin proliferation measurements suggest a lack of desquamation of the skin cells, rather than enhanced proliferation of basal layer keratinocytes, accounts for the 5-fold thickening of the Abca12-/- stratum corneum. Electron microscopy revealed a loss of the lamellar permeability barrier in Abca12-/- skin. This was associated with a profound reduction in skin linoleic esters of long-chain omega-hydroxyceramides and a corresponding increase in their glucosyl ceramide precursors. Because omega-hydroxyceramides are required for the barrier function of the skin, these results establish that ABCA12 activity is required for the generation of long-chain ceramide esters that are essential for the development of normal skin structure and function.

  13. New treatments for restoring impaired epidermal barrier permeability: skin barrier repair creams.

    PubMed

    Draelos, Zoe Diana

    2012-01-01

    Skin health depends on an intact barrier composed of protein-rich corneocytes surrounded by the lamellar intercellular lipids. This barrier provides waterproof protection for the body, preventing infection, regulating electrolyte balance, maintaining body temperature, and providing a mechanism for sensation. Damage to the skin barrier results in skin disease that can be treated by a variety of externally applied substances, such as ceramides, hyaluronic acid, licorice extracts, dimethicone, petrolatum, and paraffin wax. These substances are found in moisturizers that are sold as cosmetics and in prescriptions as 510(k) devices. This contribution examines the formulation and effect of skin barrier creams.

  14. Ryanodine receptors are expressed in epidermal keratinocytes and associated with keratinocyte differentiation and epidermal permeability barrier homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Denda, Sumiko; Kumamoto, Junichi; Takei, Kentaro; Tsutsumi, Moe; Aoki, Hirofumi; Denda, Mitsuhiro

    2012-01-01

    Ryanodine receptors (RyRs) have an important role as calcium channels in the regulation of intracellular calcium levels in the nervous system and muscle. In the present study, we investigated the expression of RyR in human epidermis. Immunohistochemical studies and reverse transcription-PCR indicated the expression of RyR type 1, 2, and 3 proteins in epidermal keratinocytes. The expression level of each RyR subtype was higher in differentiating keratinocytes than in proliferative cells. We also demonstrated the functional expression of RyR by calcium imaging. In cultured human keratinocytes, application of the RyR agonist 4-chloro-m-cresol (CMC) induced elevation of the intracellular calcium concentration, and co-application of the RyR antagonist 1,1'-diheptyl-4,4'-bipyridinium dibromide (DHBP) blocked the elevation. Application of CMC accelerated keratinocyte differentiation in vitro. On the other hand, topical application of CMC after tape-stripping of hairless mouse skin delayed barrier recovery, whereas application of an RyR antagonist, dantrolene or DHBP, accelerated the barrier recovery. These results suggest that RyR expressed in epidermal keratinocytes is associated with both differentiation of keratinocytes and epidermal barrier homeostasis.

  15. Cellular responses to disruption of the permeability barrier in a three-dimensional organotypic epidermal model

    SciTech Connect

    Ajani, Gati; Sato, Nobuyuki; Mack, Judith A.; Maytin, Edward V. . E-mail: maytine@ccf.org

    2007-08-15

    Repeated injury to the stratum corneum of mammalian skin (caused by friction, soaps, or organic solvents) elicits hyperkeratosis and epidermal thickening. Functionally, these changes serve to restore the cutaneous barrier and protect the organism. To better understand the molecular and cellular basis of this response, we have engineered an in vitro model of acetone-induced injury using organotypic epidermal cultures. Rat epidermal keratinocytes (REKs), grown on a collagen raft in the absence of any feeder fibroblasts, developed all the hallmarks of a true epidermis including a well-formed cornified layer. To induce barrier injury, REK cultures were treated with intermittent 30-s exposures to acetone then were fixed and paraffin-sectioned. After two exposures, increased proliferation (Ki67 and BrdU staining) was observed in basal and suprabasal layers. After three exposures, proliferation became confined to localized buds in the basal layer and increased terminal differentiation was observed (compact hyperkeratosis of the stratum corneum, elevated levels of K10 and filaggrin, and heightened transglutaminase activity). Thus, barrier disruption causes epidermal hyperplasia and/or enhances differentiation, depending upon the extent and duration of injury. Given that no fibroblasts are present in the model, the ability to mount a hyperplastic response to barrier injury is an inherent property of keratinocytes.

  16. Cellular responses to disruption of the permeability barrier in a three-dimensional organotypic epidermal model.

    PubMed

    Ajani, Gati; Sato, Nobuyuki; Mack, Judith A; Maytin, Edward V

    2007-08-15

    Repeated injury to the stratum corneum of mammalian skin (caused by friction, soaps, or organic solvents) elicits hyperkeratosis and epidermal thickening. Functionally, these changes serve to restore the cutaneous barrier and protect the organism. To better understand the molecular and cellular basis of this response, we have engineered an in vitro model of acetone-induced injury using organotypic epidermal cultures. Rat epidermal keratinocytes (REKs), grown on a collagen raft in the absence of any feeder fibroblasts, developed all the hallmarks of a true epidermis including a well-formed cornified layer. To induce barrier injury, REK cultures were treated with intermittent 30-s exposures to acetone then were fixed and paraffin-sectioned. After two exposures, increased proliferation (Ki67 and BrdU staining) was observed in basal and suprabasal layers. After three exposures, proliferation became confined to localized buds in the basal layer and increased terminal differentiation was observed (compact hyperkeratosis of the stratum corneum, elevated levels of K10 and filaggrin, and heightened transglutaminase activity). Thus, barrier disruption causes epidermal hyperplasia and/or enhances differentiation, depending upon the extent and duration of injury. Given that no fibroblasts are present in the model, the ability to mount a hyperplastic response to barrier injury is an inherent property of keratinocytes.

  17. Effect of ingested concentrate and components of sake on epidermal permeability barrier disruption by UVB irradiation.

    PubMed

    Hirotsune, Masato; Haratake, Akinori; Komiya, Aya; Sugita, Jun; Tachihara, Toru; Komai, Tsuyoshi; Hizume, Kazuhisa; Ozeki, Kenji; Ikemoto, Takeshi

    2005-02-23

    Daily topical applications of the concentrate of sake (CS) have been shown to reduce epidermal barrier disruption in murine skin caused by ultraviolet B (UVB) radiation, while one of the components of sake, ethyl alpha-D-glucoside (alpha-EG), also reduces barrier disruption. We confirmed the effect of oral ingestion of various doses of CS on epidermal barrier disruption caused by UVB irradiation in hairless mice. Then, to identify the effective components, we quantitatively analyzed alpha-EG, organic acids, and glycerol, the main components of CS, and examined the effect of various concentration of each on barrier disruption. alpha-EG and organic acids showed comparable results to CS itself, and transepidermal water loss levels in murine skin were significantly decreased as compared with the control. Furthermore, an investigation of the dose dependency of these agents was performed and the results showed the significant effectiveness of alpha-EG. In addition, red wine concentrate (WC) and beer concentrate (BC) were examined in order to confirm the unique effects of CS. Similar effects were not found with WC and BC.

  18. Acute Modulations in Stratum Corneum Permeability Barrier Function Affect Claudin Expression and Epidermal Tight Junction Function via Changes of Epidermal Calcium Gradient

    PubMed Central

    Baek, Ji Hwoon; Lee, Sang Eun; Choi, Ki Ju; Choi, Eung Ho

    2013-01-01

    Tight junction (TJ) is recognized as a second barrier of the skin. Altered expression of TJ proteins in various skin diseases characterized by the abnormal permeability barrier such as psoriasis suggests that TJ could be affected by stratum corneum (SC) barrier status. However, the physiological relationship between SC and TJ barrier remains to be investigated. Therefore, we examined the effect of SC barrier disruption on the expression of TJ proteins, claudin (Cldn)-1 and Cldn-4, and TJ barrier function in hairless mouse skin. We also investigated whether the alterations in epidermal Ca2+ affected TJ proteins expression in vivo. Repeated tape-stripping induced a sequential change of the expression and function of TJ. As early as 15-30 minutes after tape-stripping, downregulation of Cldn-1 and Cldn-4 immunoreactivity and protein level without change in mRNA level was found. This was accompanied by the abnormal leakage of lanthanum. However, by 1 hour Cldn-1 and Cldn-4 immunolocalization recovered along with normalized lanthanum permeation pattern. Moreover, the mRNA and protein levels of Cldn-1 and Cldn-4 were increased by 1 to 6 hours after tape-stripping. Inhibition of calcium loss by immersion of barrier-disrupted skin into a high Ca2+ solution prevented the dislocation of Cldn-1 and Cldn-4. Occlusion of barrier-disrupted skin delayed the restoration of Cldn-1 and Cldn-4. Our results suggest that the alteration of epidermal Ca2+ gradient caused by SC barrier perturbation affects the TJ structure and function and the faster recovery of TJ as compared to the SC barrier may imply the protective homeostatic mechanism of skin barrier. PMID:23364991

  19. The effect of obesity on skin disease and epidermal permeability barrier status in children.

    PubMed

    Nino, Massimiliano; Franzese, Adriana; Ruggiero Perrino, Nunzia; Balato, Nicola

    2012-01-01

    Obese adult patients have many dermatoses, such as skin tags, candida infection, cellulite, and intertrigo, but only limited data have been published on obese children and the barrier function of their skin. Sixty-five overweight and obese children (n = 40, BMI 85th-95th percentile; n = 25, BMI > 95th percentile) (aged 8-15; mean age 11.6) and 30 normal-weight controls (aged 7-15; mean age 11.1) underwent a clinical evaluation and calculation of transepidermal water loss (TEWL). Higher weight percentile was associated with a higher incidence of some dermatoses. Skin tags were found in 40% of subjects in the 95th percentile and 2.5% of those in the 85th percentile. Striae distensae were observed in 32% of patients in the 95th percentile and 22.5% of those in the 85th percentile. Plantar hyperkeratosis was observed only in 20% of the 95th percentile subjects and was not observed in the other groups. TEWL values at the forearm site were significantly higher (p < 0.05) in obese children than in the control group, but no significant differences in TEWL values according to BMI level were found between the two groups of obese children. Degree of obesity influences the incidence of some associated dermatoses; skin tags, striae distensae, and plantar hyperkeratosis were more frequent in children in the 95th percentile of BMI. Obesity increases the TEWL rate, suggesting that obese children might become more easily overheated as weight increases, with more profuse sweating because of the thick layers of subcutaneous fat.

  20. Comparison of the Efficacy of Atopalm(®) Multi-Lamellar Emulsion Cream and Physiogel(®) Intensive Cream in Improving Epidermal Permeability Barrier in Sensitive Skin.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Sekyoo; Lee, Sin Hee; Park, Byeong Deog; Wu, Yan; Man, George; Man, Mao-Qiang

    2016-03-01

    The management of sensitive skin, which affects over 60% of the general population, has been a long-standing challenge for both patients and clinicians. Because defective epidermal permeability barrier is one of the clinical features of sensitive skin, barrier-enhancing products could be an optimal regimen for sensitive skin. In the present study, we evaluated the efficacy and safety of two barrier-enhancing products, i.e., Atopalm (®) Multi-Lamellar Emulsion (MLE) Cream and Physiogel (®) Intensive Cream for sensitive skin. 60 patients with sensitive skin, aged 22-40 years old, were randomly assigned to one group treated with Atopalm MLE Cream, and another group treated with Physiogel Intensive Cream twice daily for 4 weeks. Lactic acid stinging test scores (LASTS), stratum hydration (SC) and transepidermal water loss (TEWL) were assessed before, 2 and 4 weeks after the treatment. Atopalm MLE Cream significantly lowered TEWL after 2 and 4 weeks of treatment (p < 0.01). In contrast, Physiogel Intensive Cream significantly increased TEWL after 2 weeks of treatment (p < 0.05) while TEWL significantly decreased after 4-week treatments. Moreover, both Atopalm MLE Cream and Physiogel Intensive Cream significantly increased SC hydration, and improved LASTS after 4 weeks of treatment. Both barrier-enhancing products are effective and safe for improving epidermal functions, including permeability barrier, SC hydration and LASTS, in sensitive skin. These products could be a valuable alternative for management of sensitive skin. Veterans Affairs Medical Center, San Francisco, California, USA, and NeoPharm Co., Ltd., Daejeon, Korea.

  1. CHOLINERGIC REGULATION OF KERATINOCYTE INNATE IMMUNITY AND PERMEABILITY BARRIER INTEGRITY: NEW PERSPECTIVES IN EPIDERMAL IMMUNITY AND DISEASE

    PubMed Central

    Curtis, Brenda J.; Radek, Katherine A.

    2015-01-01

    Several cutaneous inflammatory diseases and their clinical phenotypes are recapitulated in animal models of skin disease. However, the identification of shared pathways for disease progression is limited by the ability to delineate the complex biochemical processes fundamental for development of the disease. Identifying common signaling pathways that contribute to cutaneous inflammation and immune function will facilitate better scientific and therapeutic strategies to span a variety of inflammatory skin diseases. Aberrant antimicrobial peptide (AMP) expression and activity is one mechanism behind the development and severity of several inflammatory skin diseases and directly influences the susceptibility of skin to microbial infections. Our studies have recently exposed a newly identified pathway for negative regulation of AMPs in the skin by the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway via acetylcholine (ACh). The role of ACh in AMP regulation of immune and permeability barrier function in keratinocytes is reviewed, and the importance for a better comprehension of cutaneous disease progression by cholinergic signaling is discussed. PMID:21918536

  2. PNPLA1 defects in patients with autosomal recessive congenital ichthyosis and KO mice sustain PNPLA1 irreplaceable function in epidermal omega-O-acylceramide synthesis and skin permeability barrier.

    PubMed

    Pichery, Mélanie; Huchenq, Anne; Sandhoff, Roger; Severino-Freire, Maella; Zaafouri, Sarra; Opálka, Lukáš; Levade, Thierry; Soldan, Vanessa; Bertrand-Michel, Justine; Lhuillier, Emeline; Serre, Guy; Maruani, Annabel; Mazereeuw-Hautier, Juliette; Jonca, Nathalie

    2017-05-15

    Autosomal recessive congenital ichthyosis (ARCI) is a heterogeneous group of monogenic genodermatoses that encompasses non-syndromic disorders of keratinization. The pathophysiology of ARCI has been linked to a disturbance in epidermal lipid metabolism that impaired the stratum corneum function, leading to permeability barrier defects. Functional characterization of some genes involved in ARCI contributed to the identification of molecular actors involved in epidermal lipid synthesis, transport or processing. Recently, PNPLA1 has been identified as a gene causing ARCI. While other members of PNPLA family are key elements in lipid metabolism, the function of PNPLA1 remained unclear. We identified 5 novel PNPLA1 mutations in ARCI patients, mainly localized in the putative active enzymatic domain of PNPLA1. To investigate Pnpla1 biological role, we analysed Pnpla1-deficient mice. KO mice died soon after birth from severe epidermal permeability defects. Pnpla1-deficient skin presented an important impairment in the composition and organization of the epidermal lipids. Quantification of epidermal ceramide species highlighted a blockade in the production of ω-O-acylceramides with a concomitant accumulation of their precursors in the KO. The virtually loss of ω-O-acylceramides in the stratum corneum was linked to a defective lipid coverage of the resistant pericellular shell encapsulating corneocytes, the so-called cornified envelope, and most probably disorganized the extracellular lipid matrix. Finally, these defects in ω-O-acylceramides synthesis and cornified envelope formation were also evidenced in the stratum corneum from PNPLA1-mutated patients. Overall, our data support that PNPLA1/Pnpla1 is a key player in the formation of ω-O-acylceramide, a crucial process for the epidermal permeability barrier function. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Effects of in Utero Exposure of C57BL/6J Mice to 2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin on Epidermal Permeability Barrier Development and Function

    PubMed Central

    Muenyi, Clarisse S.; Carrion, Sandra Leon; Jones, Lynn A.; Kennedy, Lawrence H.; Slominski, Andrzej T.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Development of the epidermal permeability barrier (EPB) is essential for neonatal life. Defects in this barrier are found in many skin diseases such as atopic dermatitis. Objective: We investigated the effects of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) on the development and function of the EPB. Methods: Timed-pregnant C57BL/6J mice were gavaged with corn oil or TCDD (10 μg/kg body weight) on gestation day 12. Embryos were harvested on embryonic day (E) 15, E16, E17, and postnatal day (PND) 1. Results: A skin permeability assay showed that TCDD accelerated the development of the EPB, beginning at E15. This was accompanied by a significant decrease in transepidermal water loss (TEWL), enhanced stratification, and formation of the stratum corneum (SC). The levels of several ceramides were significantly increased at E15 and E16. PND1 histology revealed TCDD-induced acanthosis and epidermal hyperkeratosis. This was accompanied by disrupted epidermal tight junction (TJ) function, with increased dye leakage at the terminal claudin-1–staining TJs of the stratum granulosum. Because the animals did not have enhanced rates of TEWL, a commonly observed phenotype in animals with TJ defects, we performed tape-stripping. Removal of most of the SC resulted in a significant increase in TEWL in TCDD-exposed PND1 pups compared with their control group. Conclusions: These findings demonstrate that in utero exposure to TCDD accelerates the formation of an abnormal EPB with leaky TJs, warranting further study of environmental exposures, epithelial TJ integrity, and atopic disease. Citation: Muenyi CS, Leon Carrion S, Jones LA, Kennedy LH, Slominski AT, Sutter CH, Sutter TR. 2014. Effects of in utero exposure of C57BL/6J mice to 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin on epidermal permeability barrier development and function. Environ Health Perspect 122:1052–1058; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/ehp.1308045 PMID:24904982

  4. Effects of in utero exposure of C57BL/6J mice to 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin on epidermal permeability barrier development and function.

    PubMed

    Muenyi, Clarisse S; Carrion, Sandra Leon; Jones, Lynn A; Kennedy, Lawrence H; Slominski, Andrzej T; Sutter, Carrie H; Sutter, Thomas R

    2014-10-01

    Development of the epidermal permeability barrier (EPB) is essential for neonatal life. Defects in this barrier are found in many skin diseases such as atopic dermatitis. We investigated the effects of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) on the development and function of the EPB. Timed-pregnant C57BL/6J mice were gavaged with corn oil or TCDD (10 μg/kg body weight) on gestation day 12. Embryos were harvested on embryonic day (E) 15, E16, E17, and postnatal day (PND) 1. A skin permeability assay showed that TCDD accelerated the development of the EPB, beginning at E15. This was accompanied by a significant decrease in transepidermal water loss (TEWL), enhanced stratification, and formation of the stratum corneum (SC). The levels of several ceramides were significantly increased at E15 and E16. PND1 histology revealed TCDD-induced acanthosis and epidermal hyperkeratosis. This was accompanied by disrupted epidermal tight junction (TJ) function, with increased dye leakage at the terminal claudin-1-staining TJs of the stratum granulosum. Because the animals did not have enhanced rates of TEWL, a commonly observed phenotype in animals with TJ defects, we performed tape-stripping. Removal of most of the SC resulted in a significant increase in TEWL in TCDD-exposed PND1 pups compared with their control group. These findings demonstrate that in utero exposure to TCDD accelerates the formation of an abnormal EPB with leaky TJs, warranting further study of environmental exposures, epithelial TJ integrity, and atopic disease.

  5. Epidermal barrier dysfunction in atopic dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Cork, Michael J; Danby, Simon G; Vasilopoulos, Yiannis; Hadgraft, Jonathan; Lane, Majella E; Moustafa, Manar; Guy, Richard H; Macgowan, Alice L; Tazi-Ahnini, Rachid; Ward, Simon J

    2009-08-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a multifactorial, heterogenous disease that arises as a result of the interaction between both environmental and genetic factors. Changes in at least three groups of genes encoding structural proteins, epidermal proteases, and protease inhibitors predispose to a defective epidermal barrier and increase the risk of developing AD. Loss-of-function mutations found within the FLG gene encoding the structural protein, filaggrin, represent the most significant genetic factor predisposing to AD identified to date. Enhanced protease activity and decreased synthesis of the lipid lamellae lead to exacerbated breakdown of the epidermal barrier. Environmental factors, including the use of soap and detergents, exacerbate epidermal barrier breakdown, attributed to the elevation of stratum corneum pH. A sustained increase in pH enhances the activity of degradatory proteases and decreases the activity of the lipid synthesis enzymes. The strong association between both genetic barrier defects and environmental insults to the barrier with AD suggests that epidermal barrier dysfunction is a primary event in the development of this disease. Our understanding of gene-environment interactions should lead to a better use of some topical products, avoidance of others, and the increased use and development of products that can repair the skin barrier.

  6. Epidermal Growth Factor and Intestinal Barrier Function

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hu; Yang, Shufen; Li, Zuohua; Zhong, Jinfeng

    2016-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF) is a 53-amino acid peptide that plays an important role in regulating cell growth, survival, migration, apoptosis, proliferation, and differentiation. In addition, EGF has been established to be an effective intestinal regulator helping to protect intestinal barrier integrity, which was essential for the absorption of nutrients and health in humans and animals. Several researches have demonstrated that EGF via binding to the EGF receptor and subsequent activation of Ras/MAPK, PI3K/AKT, PLC-γ/PKC, and STATS signal pathways regulates intestinal barrier function. In this review, the relationship between epidermal growth factor and intestinal development and intestinal barrier is described, to provide a better understanding of the effects of EGF on intestine development and health. PMID:27524860

  7. Nrf2 links epidermal barrier function with antioxidant defense

    PubMed Central

    Schäfer, Matthias; Farwanah, Hany; Willrodt, Ann-Helen; Huebner, Aaron J; Sandhoff, Konrad; Roop, Dennis; Hohl, Daniel; Bloch, Wilhelm; Werner, Sabine

    2012-01-01

    The skin provides an efficient permeability barrier and protects from microbial invasion and oxidative stress. Here, we show that these essential functions are linked through the Nrf2 transcription factor. To test the hypothesis that activation of Nrf2 provides skin protection under stress conditions, we determined the consequences of pharmacological or genetic activation of Nrf2 in keratinocytes. Surprisingly, mice with enhanced Nrf2 activity in keratinocytes developed epidermal thickening, hyperkeratosis and inflammation resembling lamellar ichthyosis. This resulted from upregulation of the cornified envelope proteins small proline-rich proteins (Sprr) 2d and 2h and of secretory leukocyte peptidase inhibitor (Slpi), which we identified as novel Nrf2 targets in keratinocytes. Since Sprrs are potent scavengers of reactive oxygen species and since Slpi has antimicrobial activities, their upregulation contributes to Nrf2's protective function. However, it also caused corneocyte fragility and impaired desquamation, followed by alterations in the epidermal lipid barrier, inflammation and overexpression of mitogens that induced keratinocyte hyperproliferation. These results identify an unexpected role of Nrf2 in epidermal barrier function, which needs to be considered for pharmacological use of Nrf2 activators. PMID:22383093

  8. Claudin-1 Binder Enhances Epidermal Permeability in a Human Keratinocyte Model.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Misaki; Nagase, Shotaro; Iida, Manami; Takeda, Shuji; Yamashita, Mayo; Watari, Akihiro; Shirasago, Yoshitaka; Fukasawa, Masayoshi; Takeda, Hiroyuki; Sawasaki, Tatsuya; Yagi, Kiyohito; Kondoh, Masuo

    2015-09-01

    Tight junctions (TJs) are complex biochemical structures that seal the intercellular space and prevent the free movement of solutes across epithelial cell sheets. Modulating the TJ seal is a promising option for increasing the transdermal absorption of drugs. Within TJs, the binding of the claudin (CLDN) family of tetratransmembrane proteins through cis- and trans-interactions is an integral part of seal formation. Because epidermal TJs contain CLDN-1 and CLDN-4, a binder for these CLDNs may be a useful modulator of the permeability of the epidermal barrier. Here, we investigated whether m19, which can bind to CLDN-1/-4 (also CLDN-2/-5), modulates the integrity of epidermal TJs and the permeability of cell sheets to solutes. Treatment of normal human epidermal keratinocytes (NHEKs) with the CLDN binder reduced the integrity of TJs. A CLDN-1-specific binder (a monoclonal antibody, clone 7A5) also weakened the TJ seal in NHEKs. Although m19 attenuated the TJ barrier in human intestinal epithelial cells (Caco-2), 7A5 did not. Treatment of NHEKs with 7A5 enhanced permeation of a paracellular permeation marker. These findings indicate that CLDN-1 is a potential target for modulating the permeability of the epidermis, and that our CLDN-1 binder is a promising candidate molecule for development as a dermal absorption enhancer.

  9. Permeability Barrier Generation in the Martian Lithosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schools, Joe; Montési, Laurent

    2015-11-01

    Permeability barriers develop when a magma produced in the interior of a planet rises into the cooler lithosphere and crystallizes more rapidly than the lithosphere can deform (Sparks and Parmentier, 1991). Crystallization products may then clog the porous network in which melt is propagating, reducing the permeability to almost zero, i.e., forming a permeability barrier. Subsequent melts cannot cross the barrier. Permeability barriers have been useful to explain variations in crustal thickness at mid-ocean ridges on Earth (Magde et al., 1997; Hebert and Montési, 2011; Montési et al., 2011). We explore here under what conditions permeability barriers may form on Mars.We use the MELTS thermodynamic calculator (Ghiorso and Sack, 1995; Ghiorso et al., 2002; Asimow et al., 2004) in conjunction with estimated Martian mantle compositions (Morgan and Anders, 1979; Wänke and Dreibus, 1994; Lodders and Fegley, 1997; Sanloup et al., 1999; Taylor 2013) to model the formation of permeability barriers in the lithosphere of Mars. In order to represent potential past and present conditions of Mars, we vary the lithospheric thickness, mantle potential temperature (heat flux), oxygen fugacity, and water content.Our results show that permeability layers can develop in the thermal boundary layer of the simulated Martian lithosphere if the mantle potential temperature is higher than ~1500°C. The various Martian mantle compositions yield barriers in the same locations, under matching variable conditions. There is no significant difference in barrier location over the range of accepted Martian oxygen fugacity values. Water content is the most significant influence on barrier development as it reduces the temperature of crystallization, allowing melt to rise further into the lithosphere. Our lower temperature and thicker lithosphere model runs, which are likely the most similar to modern Mars, show no permeability barrier generation. Losing the possibility of having a permeability

  10. Bricks and mortar of the epidermal barrier.

    PubMed

    Nemes, Z; Steinert, P M

    1999-03-31

    A specialized tissue type, the keratinizing epithelium, protects terrestrial mammals from water loss and noxious physical, chemical and mechanical insults. This barrier between the body and the environment is constantly maintained by reproduction of inner living epidermal keratinocytes which undergo a process of terminal differentiation and then migrate to the surface as interlocking layers of dead stratum corneum cells. These cells provide the bulwark of mechanical and chemical protection, and together with their intercellular lipid surroundings, confer water-impermeability. Much of this barrier function is provided by the cornified cell envelope (CE), an extremely tough protein/lipid polymer structure formed just below the cytoplasmic membrane and subsequently resides on the exterior of the dead cornified cells. It consists of two parts: a protein envelope and a lipid envelope. The protein envelope is thought to contribute to the biomechanical properties of the CE as a result of cross-linking of specialized CE structural proteins by both disulfide bonds and N(epsilon)-(gamma-glutamyl)lysine isopeptide bonds formed by transglutaminases. Some of the structural proteins involved include involucrin, loricrin, small proline rich proteins, keratin intermediate filaments, elafin, cystatin A, and desmosomal proteins. The lipid envelope is located on the exterior of and covalently attached by ester bonds to the protein envelope and consists of a monomolecular layer of omega-hydroxyceramides. These not only serve of provide a Teflon-like coating to the cell, but also interdigitate with the intercellular lipid lamellae perhaps in a Velcro-like fashion. In fact the CE is a common feature of all stratified squamous epithelia, although its precise composition, structure and barrier function requirements vary widely between epithelia. Recent work has shown that a number of diseases which display defective epidermal barrier function, generically known as ichthyoses, are the

  11. PERMEABLE REACTIVE BARRIERS FOR GROUNDWATER REMEDIATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Permeable reactive barriers (PRB's) are an emerging, alternative in-situ approach for remediating groundwater contamination that combine subsurface fluid flow management with a passive chemical treatment zone. Removal of contaminants from the groundwater plume is achieved by alt...

  12. PERMEABLE REACTIVE BARRIERS FOR GROUND WATER REMEDIATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Permeable reactive barriers (PRB's) are an emerging, alternative in-situ approach for remediating groundwater contamination that combine subsurface fluid flow management with a passive chemical treatment zone. Removal of contaminants from the groundwater plume is achieved by alt...

  13. Barrier Requirements as the Evolutionary “Driver” of Epidermal Pigmentation in Humans

    PubMed Central

    ELIAS, PETER M.; MENON, GOPINATHAN; WETZEL, BRUCE K.; WILLIAMS, JOHN (JACK) W.

    2011-01-01

    Current explanations for the development of epidermal pigmentation during human evolution are not tenable as stand-alone hypotheses. Accordingly, we assessed instead whether xeric- and UV-B-induced stress to the epidermal permeability barrier, critical to survival in a terrestrial environment, could have “driven” the development of epidermal pigmentation. (1) Megadroughts prevailed in central Africa when hominids expanded into open savannahs [≈1.5–0.8 million years ago], resulting in sustained exposure to both extreme aridity and erythemogenic UV-B, correlating with genetic evidence that pigment developed ≈1.2 million years ago. (2) Pigmented skin is endowed with enhanced permeability barrier function, stratum corneum integrity/cohesion, and a reduced susceptibility to infections. The enhanced function of pigmented skin can be attributed to the lower pH of the outer epidermis, likely due to the persistence of (more-acidic) melanosomes into the outer epidermis, as well as the conservation of genes associated with eumelanin synthesis and melanosome acidification (e.g., TYR, OCA2 [p protein], SLC24A5, SLC45A2, MATP) in pigmented populations. Five keratinocyte-derived signals (stem cell factor⇒KIT; FOXn1⇒FGF2; IL-1α, NGF, and p53) are potential candidates to have stimulated the sequential development of epidermal pigmentation in response to stress to the barrier. We summarize evidence here that epidermal interfollicular pigmentation in early hominids likely evolved in response to stress to the permeability barrier. PMID:20209486

  14. Studies on the relationship between epidermal cell turnover kinetics and permeability of hairless mouse skin

    SciTech Connect

    Han, S.R.

    1988-01-01

    The primary aim of this study was to develop non-invasive, physical means to quantitatively assess the epidermal turnover kinetics and barrier properties of the skin and relate these to the cutaneous irritation which results from ultraviolet light irradiation and mold thermal burns. After systematically injecting radiolabeled glycine, the appearance of radioactivity at the skin's surface indicated the transit time of radiolabeled cells through the skin. By plotting the data as the cumulative specific activity against time and then fitting them with a third order polynomial equation, it is possible to estimate the turnover time of the stratum corneum. The skin turnover was coordinated with non-invasive transepidermal water loss (TEWL) studies determined with an evaporimeter. In vitro diffusion studies of the permeability of hydrocortisone through UVB irradiated and thermally burned skin were also performed. The studies indicated that irritated skin offers a relatively low diffusional resistance to hydrocortisone. Depending on the severity of the trauma, the increases in hydrocortisone's permeability coefficient through irritated skin ranged from a low of about 2 times normal to a high of about 210 times normal. Trauma-induced changes in hydrocortisone permeability parallel changes in TEWL, proving that the barrier deficient state resulting from rapid epidermal turnover is a general phenomenon.

  15. Sphingolipids are required for mammalian epidermal barrier function. Inhibition of sphingolipid synthesis delays barrier recovery after acute perturbation.

    PubMed Central

    Holleran, W M; Man, M Q; Gao, W N; Menon, G K; Elias, P M; Feingold, K R

    1991-01-01

    Stratum corneum lipids comprise an approximately equimolar mixture of sphingolipids, cholesterol, and free fatty acids, arranged as intercellular membrane bilayers that are presumed to mediate the epidermal permeability barrier. Prior studies have shown that alterations in epidermal barrier function lead to a rapid increase in cholesterol and fatty acid synthesis which parallels the early stages of the repair process. Despite an abundance of indirect evidence for their role in the barrier, the importance of sphingolipids has yet to be demonstrated directly. Whereas sphingolipid synthesis also increases during barrier repair, this response is delayed in comparison to cholesterol and fatty acid synthesis (Holleran, W.M., et al. 1991. J. Lipid Res. 32:1151-1158). To further delineate the role of sphingolipids in barrier homeostasis, we assessed the impact of inhibition of sphingolipid synthesis on epidermal barrier recovery. A single topical application of beta-chloro-L-alanine (beta-CA), an irreversible inhibitor of serine-palmitoyl transferase (SPT), applied to acetone-treated skin of hairless mice resulted in: (a) greater than 75% inhibition of SPT activity at 30 min (P less than 0.001); (b) a global decrease in sphingolipid synthesis between 1 and 3 h (P less than 0.02); (c) reduction of epidermal sphingolipid content at 18 h (P less than 0.01); (d) delayed reaccumulation of histochemical staining for sphingolipids in the stratum corneum; and (e) reduced numbers and contents of lamellar bodies in the stratum granulosum. Finally, despite its immediate, marked diminution of sphingolipid synthesis, beta-CA slowed barrier recovery only at late time points (greater than 6 h) after acetone treatment. This inhibition was overridden by coapplications of ceramides (the distal SPT product), indicating that the delay in repair was not due to non-specific toxicity. These studies demonstrate a distinctive role for epidermal sphingolipids in permeability barrier homeostasis

  16. Epidermal barrier dysfunction and cutaneous sensitization in atopic diseases.

    PubMed

    Kubo, Akiharu; Nagao, Keisuke; Amagai, Masayuki

    2012-02-01

    Classic atopic dermatitis is complicated by asthma, allergic rhinitis, and food allergies, cumulatively referred to as atopic diseases. Recent discoveries of mutations in the filaggrin gene as predisposing factors for atopic diseases have refocused investigators' attention on epidermal barrier dysfunction as a causative mechanism. The skin's barrier function has three elements: the stratum corneum (air-liquid barrier), tight junctions (liquid-liquid barrier), and the Langerhans cell network (immunological barrier). Clarification of the molecular events underpinning epidermal barrier function and dysfunction should lead to a better understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms of atopic diseases.

  17. Expressions of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are directly influenced by permeability barrier abrogation and inflammatory cytokines and depressed PPARα modulates expressions of chemokines and epidermal differentiation-related molecules in keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Adachi, Yasuko; Hatano, Yutaka; Sakai, Takashi; Fujiwara, Sakuhei

    2013-09-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that the activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) not only has positive effects on permeability barrier homoeostasis but also has anti-inflammatory effects by an as yet unknown mechanism. Reduced expression of PPARα in lesion of human atopic dermatitis (AD) and in epidermis of murine AD-like dermatitis has been demonstrated. This study revealed that expression of PPARα alone among PPARs (α, β/δ and γ) was suppressed by both permeability barrier abrogation and additional existence of Th2 cytokine in cultured normal human keratinocytes. In addition, expressions of transglutaminase 1 and loricrin and those of thymus and activation-related chemokine and regulated on activation normal T-cell expressed in cultured human keratinocytes were reduced and enhanced, respectively, by transfection with siRNA for PPARα. In conclusion, depressed PPARα in keratinocytes might be involved in a relationship between permeability barrier abrogation and allergic inflammation and could be a therapeutic target which accounts for both the aspects in AD. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Borosilicate films as permeability barriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Applegate, J. R.; Steinmetz, C. E.; Hettinger, J. D.; Carroll, J. F.; Krchnavek, R.

    2009-03-01

    Borosilicate films have been deposited using rf-sputtering techniques from a composite target at room temperature onto polypropylene (PP), high density polyethylene(HDPE), low density polyethylene(LDPE), and polyethylene terephthalate (PETG) substrates. Films were found to be smooth, flexible, with excellent adhesion to the substrates. Repeated rolling the coated substrates on a radius of 0.5mm resulted in no discernable damage for films less than 200nm in thickness. Creasing the substrates did result in local damage. However excellent adhesion did not allow the fractured glass to come off the substrate. Heat generated during deposition only influenced the films grown on LDPE where the thermal expansion mismatch between the film and substrate induced strains caused fractures in thick films. Modifications to processing parameters allowed thick films to be grown without fractures. Permeability measurements of nitrogen resulted in significant improvements in comparison to uncoated substrates.

  19. Heavy Cigarette Smokers in a Chinese Population Display a Compromised Permeability Barrier

    PubMed Central

    Xin, Shujun; Ye, Li; Lv, Chengzhi; Elias, Peter M.

    2016-01-01

    Cigarette smoking is associated with various cutaneous disorders with defective permeability. Yet, whether cigarette smoking influences epidermal permeability barrier function is largely unknown. Here, we measured skin biophysical properties, including permeability barrier homeostasis, stratum corneum (SC) integrity, SC hydration, skin surface pH, and skin melanin/erythema index, in cigarette smokers. A total of 99 male volunteers were enrolled in this study. Smokers were categorized as light-to-moderate (<20 cigarettes/day) or heavy smokers (≥20 cigarettes/day). An MPA5 was used to measure SC hydration and skin melanin/erythema index on the dorsal hand, forehead, and cheek. Basal transepidermal water loss (TEWL) and barrier recovery rates were assessed on the forearm. A Skin-pH-Meter pH900 was used to measure skin surface pH. Our results showed that heavy cigarette smokers exhibited delayed barrier recovery after acute abrogation (1.02% ± 13.06 versus 16.48% ± 6.07), and barrier recovery rates correlated negatively with the number of daily cigarettes consumption (p = 0.0087). Changes in biophysical parameters in cigarette smokers varied with body sites. In conclusion, heavy cigarette smokers display compromised permeability barrier homeostasis, which could contribute, in part, to the increased prevalence of certain cutaneous disorders characterized by defective permeability. Thus, improving epidermal permeability barrier should be considered for heavy cigarette smokers. PMID:27437403

  20. EVALUATION OF PERMEABLE REACTIVE BARRIER PERFORMANCE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The permeable reactive barrier (PRB) technology represents a passive option for long-term treatment of ground-water contamination. PRBs are a potentially more cost-effective treatment option for a variety of dissolved contaminants, such as certain types of chlorinated solvents, ...

  1. EVALUATION OF PERMEABLE REACTIVE BARRIER PERFORMANCE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The permeable reactive barrier (PRB) technology represents a passive option for long-term treatment of ground-water contamination. PRBs are a potentially more cost-effective treatment option for a variety of dissolved contaminants, such as certain types of chlorinated solvents, ...

  2. Clamshell excavation of a permeable reactive barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molfetta, Antonio Di; Sethi, Rajandrea

    2006-06-01

    Nowadays, permeable reactive barriers (PRB) are one of the most widespread techniques for the remediation of contaminated aquifers. Over the past 10 years, the use of iron-based PRBs has evolved from innovative to accepted standard practice for the treatment of a variety of groundwater contaminants (ITRC in: Permeable reactive barriers: lessons learned/new directions. The Interstate Technology and Regulatory Council, Permeable Reactive Barriers Team 2005). Although, a variety of excavation methods have been developed, backhoe excavators are often used for the construction of PRBs. The aim of this study is to describe the emplacement of a full-scale PRB and the benefits deriving from the use of a crawler crane equipped with a hydraulic grab (also known as clamshell excavator) in the excavation phases. The studied PRB was designed to remediate a chlorinated hydrocarbons plume at an old industrial landfill site, in Avigliana, near the city of Torino, in Italy. The continuous reactive barrier was designed to be 120 m long, 13 m deep, and 0.6 m thick. The installation of the barrier was accomplished using a clamshell for the excavation of the trench and a guar-gum slurry to support the walls. The performance of this technique was outstanding and allowed the installation of the PRB in 7 days. The degree of precision of the excavation was very high because of the intrinsic characteristics of this excavation tool and of the use of a concrete curb to guide the hydraulic grab. Moreover, the adopted technique permitted a saving of bioslurry thus minimizing the amount of biocide required.

  3. Urea uptake enhances barrier function and antimicrobial defense in humans by regulating epidermal gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Grether-Beck, Susanne; Felsner, Ingo; Brenden, Heidi; Kohne, Zippora; Majora, Marc; Marini, Alessandra; Jaenicke, Thomas; Rodriguez-Martin, Marina; Trullas, Carles; Hupe, Melanie; Elias, Peter M.; Krutmann, Jean

    2012-01-01

    Urea is an endogenous metabolite, known to enhance stratum corneum hydration. Yet, topical urea anecdotally also improves permeability barrier function, and it appears to exhibit antimicrobial activity. Hence, we hypothesized that urea is not merely a passive metabolite, but a small-molecule regulator of epidermal structure and function. In 21 human volunteers, topical urea improved barrier function in parallel with enhanced antimicrobial peptide (LL-37 and β-defensin-2) expression. Urea both stimulates expression of, and is transported into keratinocytes by two urea transporters, UT-A1 and UT-A2, and by aquaporin 3, 7 and 9. Inhibitors of these urea transporters block the downstream biological effects of urea, which include increased mRNA and protein levels for: (i) transglutaminase-1, involucrin, loricrin and filaggrin; (ii) epidermal lipid synthetic enzymes, and (iii) cathelicidin/LL-37 and β-defensin-2. Finally, we explored the potential clinical utility of urea, showing that topical urea applications normalized both barrier function and antimicrobial peptide expression in a murine model of atopic dermatitis (AD). Together, these results show that urea is a small-molecule regulator of epidermal permeability barrier function and antimicrobial peptide expression after transporter uptake, followed by gene regulatory activity in normal epidermis, with potential therapeutic applications in diseased skin. PMID:22418868

  4. Prolactin and blood-brain barrier permeability.

    PubMed

    Rosas-Hernandez, Hector; Cuevas, Elvis; Lantz, Susan M; Hamilton, W Ryan; Ramirez-Lee, Manuel A; Ali, Syed F; Gonzalez, Carmen

    2013-11-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) consists in part of a highly specialized set of cells which separates the brain from the vascular system. The BBB controls the entry and exit of substances from the brain tissue through tight junctions (TJs) between endothelial cells. It is known that the hormone prolactin (PRL) is able to regulate endothelial-dependent processes, like the balance between proliferation and apoptosis and the mammary epithelial permeability. However, the effects of PRL and the role it plays in the BBB permeability are still not well understood. A primary culture of bovine brain microvessel endothelial cells was used as in vitro model of BBB. Cells were treated with PRL (0.1, 1, 10 and 100 nM) for 24 hours. PRL significantly increased cellular proliferation at 10 and 100 nM, but did not modify basal apoptosis. These effects were dependent on the production of the mitogenic factor nitric oxide (NO). PRL significantly decreased the permeability and promoted an increase in trans-endothelial electrical resistance in a NO-independent way. PRL also increased the expression of the TJs proteins claudin-5 and occludin. The short form of the PRL receptor was detected in these cells but its expression was not modified by PRL. Together, these results suggest that PRL has the ability to increase cellular proliferation associated with a decrease on BBB permeability by increasing the expression of TJs proteins.

  5. EPA/ITRC-RTDF permeable reactive barrier short course. Permeable reactive barriers: Application and deployment

    SciTech Connect

    1999-11-01

    This report focuses on the following: Permeable Reactive Barriers: Application and Deployment; Introduction to Permeable Reactive Barriers (PRBs) for Remediating and Managing Contaminated Groundwater in Situ; Collection and Interpretation of Design Data 1: Site Characterization for PRBs; Reactive Materials: Zero-Valent Iron; Collection and Interpretation of Design Data 2: Laboratory and Pilot Scale Tests; Design Calculations; Compliance Monitoring, Performance Monitoring and Long-Term Maintenance for PRBs; PRB Emplacement Techniques; PRB Permitting and Implementation; Treatment of Metals; Non-Metallic Reactive Materials; Economic Considerations for PRB Deployment; and Bibliography.

  6. EPA/ITRC-RTDF permeable reactive barrier short course. Permeable reactive barriers: Application and deployment

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1999-01-01

    This report focuses on the following: Permeable Reactive Barriers: Application and Deployment; Introduction to Permeable Reactive Barriers (PRBs) for Remediating and Managing Contaminated Groundwater in Situ; Collection and Interpretation of Design Data 1: Site Characterization for PRBs; Reactive Materials: Zero-Valent Iron; Collection and Interpretation of Design Data 2: Laboratory and Pilot Scale Tests; Design Calculations; Compliance Monitoring, Performance Monitoring and Long-Term Maintenance for PRBs; PRB Emplacement Techniques; PRB Permitting and Implementation; Treatment of Metals; Non-Metallic Reactive Materials; Economic Considerations for PRB Deployment; and Bibliography.

  7. Using FLIM in the study of permeability barrier function of aged and young skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, P.; Choi, E. H.; Man, M. Q.; Crumrine, D.; Mauro, T.; Elias, P.

    2006-02-01

    Aged skin commonly is afflicted by inflammatory skin diseases or xerosis/eczema that can be triggered or exacerbated by impaired epidermal permeability barrier homeostasis. It has been previously described a permeability barrier defect in humans of advanced age (> 75 years), which in a murine analog >18 mos, could be attributed to reduced lipid synthesis synthesis. However, the functional abnormality in moderately aged mice is due not to decreased lipid synthesis, but rather to a specific defect in stratum corneum (SC) acidification causing impaired lipid processing processing. Endogenous Na +/H + antiporter (NHE1) level was found declined in moderately aged mouse epidermis. This acidification defect leads to perturbed permeability barrier homeostasis through more than one pathways, we addressed suboptimal activation of the essential, lipid-processing enzyme, β-glucocerebrosidase (BGC) is linked to elevated SC pH. Finally, the importance of the epidermis acidity is shown by the normalization of barrier function after exogenous acidification of moderately aged skin.

  8. TMEM45A Is Dispensable for Epidermal Morphogenesis, Keratinization and Barrier Formation

    PubMed Central

    Malaisse, Jérémy; Balau, Benoit; Sterpin, Christiane; Achouri, Younes; Lambert De Rouvroit, Catherine; Poumay, Yves; Michiels, Carine; De Backer, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    TMEM45A gene encodes an initially uncharacterized predicted transmembrane protein. We previously showed that this gene is highly expressed in keratinocytes where its expression correlates with keratinization, suggesting a role in normal epidermal physiology. To test this hypothesis, we generated TMEM45A knockout mice and found that these mice develop without any evident phenotype. The morphology of the epidermis assessed by histology and by labelling differentiation markers in immunofluorescence was not altered. Toluidine blue permeability assay showed that the epidermal barrier develops normally during embryonic development. We also showed that depletion of TMEM45A in human keratinocytes does not alter their potential to form in vitro 3D-reconstructed epidermis. Indeed, epidermis with normal morphogenesis were generated from TMEM45A-silenced keratinocytes. Their expression of differentiation markers quantified by RT-qPCR and evidenced by immunofluorescence labelling as well as their barrier function estimated by Lucifer yellow permeability were similar to the control epidermis. In summary, TMEM45A gene expression is dispensable for epidermal morphogenesis, keratinization and barrier formation. If this protein plays a role in the epidermis, its experimental depletion can possibly be compensated by other proteins in the two experimental models analyzed in this study. PMID:26785122

  9. Specific binding of Clostridium perfringens enterotoxin fragment to Claudin-b and modulation of zebrafish epidermal barrier.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jingjing; Ni, Chen; Yang, Zhenguo; Piontek, Anna; Chen, Huapu; Wang, Sijie; Fan, Yiming; Qin, Zhihai; Piontek, Joerg

    2015-08-01

    Claudins (Cldn) are the major components of tight junctions (TJs) sealing the paracellular cleft in tissue barriers of various organs. Zebrafish Cldnb, the homolog of mammalian Cldn4, is expressed at epithelial cell-cell contacts and is important for regulating epidermal permeability. The bacterial toxin Clostridium perfringens enterotoxin (CPE) has been shown to bind to a subset of mammalian Cldns. In this study, we used the Cldn-binding C-terminal domain of CPE (194-319 amino acids, cCPE 194-319 ) to investigate its functional role in modulating zebrafish larval epidermal barriers. In vitro analyses show that cCPE 194-319 removed Cldn4 from epithelial cells and disrupted the monolayer tightness, which could be rescued by the removal of cCPE 194-319. Incubation of zebrafish larvae with cCPE 194-319 removed Cldnb specifically from the epidermal cell membrane. Dye diffusion analysis with 4-kDa fluorescent dextran indicated that the permeability of the epidermal barrier increased due to cCPE 194-319 incubation. Electron microscopic investigation revealed reversible loss of TJ integrity by Cldnb removal. Collectively, these results suggest that cCPE 194-319 could be used as a Cldnb modulator to transiently open the epidermal barrier in zebrafish. In addition, zebrafish might be used as an in vivo system to investigate the capability of cCPE to enhance drug delivery across tissue barriers.

  10. Improvement of epidermal barrier properties in cultured skin substitutes after grafting onto athymic mice.

    PubMed

    Barai, Namrata D; Supp, Andrew P; Kasting, Gerald B; Visscher, Marty O; Boyce, Steven T

    2007-01-01

    Barrier function in cultured skin substitutes (CSS) prepared from human cell sources was measured by noninvasive (surface hydration, transepidermal water loss) and invasive methods (water permeation, niacinamide flux) before and after grafting onto athymic mice. In vitro measurements were made on days 7 and 14. Although three of the four measures of barrier function improved markedly from day 7 to 14, the values obtained were still far from those obtained with native human skin controls. Additional CSS were grafted onto athymic mice on day 14, and skin was harvested 2 and 6 weeks after grafting. Grafting brought about a substantial decrease in all measurements by 2 weeks and almost complete normalization of barrier function after 6 weeks. The most sensitive measure of this recovery was niacinamide permeability, which decreased from (280 +/- 40) x 10(-4) cm/h in vitro to (17 +/- 30) x 10(-4) cm/h 2 weeks after grafting and (5 +/- 2) x 10(-4) cm/h 6 weeks after grafting, versus control values of (2 +/- 2) x 10(-4) cm/h in human cadaver skin and (0.6 +/- 0.4) x 10(-4) cm/h in human epidermal membrane prepared from freshly excised breast skin. These results demonstrate the reformation of epidermal barrier function after transplantation and provide insights for the development of a functional epidermal barrier in CSS in vitro.

  11. pH-Regulated Mechanisms Account for Pigment-Type Differences in Epidermal Barrier Function

    PubMed Central

    Gunathilake, Roshan; Schurer, Nanna Y.; Shoo, Brenda A.; Celli, Anna; Hachem, Jean-Pierre; Crumrine, Debra; Sirimanna, Ganga; Feingold, Kenneth R.; Mauro, Theodora M.; Elias, Peter M.

    2009-01-01

    To determine whether pigment type determines differences in epidermal function, we studied stratum corneum (SC) pH, permeability barrier homeostasis, and SC integrity in three geographically disparate populations with pigment type I–II versus IV–V skin (Fitzpatrick I–VI scale). Type IV–V subjects showed: (i) lower surface pH (≈0.5 U); (ii) enhanced SC integrity (transepidermal water loss change with sequential tape strippings); and (iii) more rapid barrier recovery than type I–II subjects. Enhanced barrier function could be ascribed to increased epidermal lipid content, increased lamellar body production, and reduced acidity, leading to enhanced lipid processing. Compromised SC integrity in type I–II subjects could be ascribed to increased serine protease activity, resulting in accelerated desmoglein-1 (DSG-1)/corneodesmosome degradation. In contrast, DSG-1-positive CDs persisted in type IV–V subjects, but due to enhanced cathepsin-D activity, SC thickness did not increase. Adjustment of pH of type I–II SC to type IV–V levels improved epidermal function. Finally, dendrites from type IV–V melanocytes were more acidic than those from type I–II subjects, and they transfer more melanosomes to the SC, suggesting that melanosome secretion could contribute to the more acidic pH of type IV–V skin. These studies show marked pigment-type differences in epidermal structure and function that are pH driven. PMID:19177137

  12. Epidermal barrier in hereditary ichthyoses, atopic dermatitis, and psoriasis.

    PubMed

    Schmuth, Matthias; Blunder, Stefan; Dubrac, Sandrine; Gruber, Robert; Moosbrugger-Martinz, Verena

    2015-11-01

    Several skin disorders are associated with impaired skin barrier function. Primary dysfunction is caused by monogenic defects in key components of the epidermis (for example ichthyoses). Secondary barrier impairment occurs in inflammatory dermatoses marked by disturbed epidermal homeostasis (eczema, psoriasis, etc.). In these disorders, inflammation impedes the synthesis or maintenance of skin barrier components. Recent evidence suggests a combination of primary and secondary barrier dysfunction in atopic dermatitis and, to a lesser extent, also in psoriasis. In the future, subtypes of atopic dermatitis may likely be defined, in which one or the other is prevalent.

  13. sPLA2 and the epidermal barrier

    PubMed Central

    Ilic, Dusko; Bollinger, James M.; Gelb, Michael; Mauro, Theodora M.

    2015-01-01

    The mammalian epidermis provides both an interface and a protective barrier between the organism and its environment. Lipid, processed into water-impermeable bilayers between the outermost layers of the epidermal cells, forms the major barrier that prevents water from exiting the organism, and also prevents toxins and infectious agents from entering. The secretory phospholipase 2 (sPLA2) enzymes control important processes in skin and other organs, including inflammation and differentiation. sPLA2 activity contributes to epidermal barrier formation and homeostasis by generating free fatty acids, which are required both for formation of lamellar membranes and also for acidification of the stratum corneum (SC). sPLA2 is especially important in controlling SC acidification and establishment of an optimum epidermal barrier during the first postnatal week. Several sPLA2 isoforms are present in the epidermis. We find that two of these isoforms, sPLA2 IIA and sPLA2 IIF, localize to the upper stratum granulosum and increase in response to experimental barrier perturbation. sPLA2F−/− mice also demonstrate a more neutral SC pH than do their normal littermates, and their initial recovery from barrier perturbation is delayed. These findings confirm that sPLA2 enzymes perform important roles in epidermal development, and suggest that the sPLA2IIF isoform may be central to SC acidification and barrier function. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled The Important Role of Lipids in the Epidermis and their Role in the Formation and Maintenance of the Cutaneous Barrier. Guest Editors: Kenneth R. Feingold and Peter Elias. PMID:24269828

  14. Effect of moisturizers on epidermal barrier function.

    PubMed

    Lodén, Marie

    2012-01-01

    A daily moisturizing routine is a vital part of the management of patients with atopic dermatitis and other dry skin conditions. The composition of the moisturizer determines whether the treatment strengthens or deteriorates the skin barrier function, which may have consequences for the outcome of the dermatitis. One might expect that a patient's impaired skin barrier function should improve in association with a reduction in the clinical signs of dryness. Despite visible relief of the dryness symptoms, however, the abnormal transepidermal water loss has been reported to remain high, or even to increase under certain regimens, whereas other moisturizers improve skin barrier function. Differing outcomes have also been reported in healthy skin: some moisturizers produce deterioration in skin barrier function and others improve the skin. Possible targets for barrier-influencing moisturizing creams include the intercellular lipid bilayers, where the fraction of lipids forming a fluid phase might be changed due to compositional or organizational changes. Other targets are the projected size of the corneocytes or the thickness of the stratum corneum. Moisturizers with barrier-improving properties may delay relapse of dermatitis in patients with atopic dermatitis. In a worst-case scenario, treatment with moisturizing creams could increase the risks of dermatitis and asthma. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Postnatal ecdysis establishes the permeability barrier in snake skin: new insights into barrier lipid structures.

    PubMed

    Tu, M C; Lillywhite, H B; Menon, J G; Menon, G K

    2002-10-01

    A competent barrier to transepidermal water loss (TEWL) is essential for terrestrial life. In various vertebrates, epidermal water barriers composed of lipids prevent excessive TEWL, which varies inversely with habitat aridity. Little is known, however, about the mechanisms and regulation of permeability relative to natal transition from the 'aqueous' environments of gestation to the 'aerial' environments of terrestrial neonates. We investigated newly hatched California king snakes Lampropeltis getula to test the hypothesis that the first ecdysis is important for establishing the barrier to TEWL. We found that skin resistance to TEWL increases twofold following the first postnatal ecdysis, corresponding with a roughly twofold increase in thickness and deposition of lamellar lipids in the mesos layer, the site of the skin permeability barrier in snakes. In addition, novel observations on lipid inclusions within the alpha layer of epidermis suggest that this layer has functional similarities with avian epidermis. It appears that emergence of the integument from embryonic fluids, and its subsequent pan-body replacement following contact with air, are essential for completion of barrier competence in the newborn. These conditions provide a potentially useful model for investigations on the mechanism of barrier formation. We also found that hatchling snakes are transiently endothermic, with skin temperatures elevated by approximately 0.6 degrees C above ambient air temperature during the period of barrier formation. Behaviourally, hatchlings showed a higher tendency to seek humid microenvironments before the first ecdysis than after. The degree of water movement across the integument might explain the switch from reclusive to dispersive behaviours associated with postnatal ecdysis in snakes.

  16. Topical Corticosteroid Application and the Structural and Functional Integrity of the Epidermal Barrier

    PubMed Central

    Cash, Kimberly

    2013-01-01

    Topical corticosteroids are a very important part of the treatment of many skin disorders, especially eczematous dermatoses. When utilized properly and judiciously these agents often achieve excellent results in clearing or markedly improving many dermatological disorders. As some studies have shown, topical corticosteroids, despite their ability to decrease inflammation through several mechanisms, induce abnormalities in lipid synthesis and intercellular bilayer structure in the stratum corneum, which appear to prolong epidermal barrier recovery. These adverse effects may contribute to eariier eczematous flaring if measures to provide barrier repair are not undertaken. In addition, although topical corticosteroids are applied only to sites affected by the skin eruption, the incorporation of “barrier friendly” excipients into the vehicle that improve stratum corneum permeability barrier function and integrity is very rational. PMID:24307921

  17. Dimethyl sulfoxide could be a useful probe to evaluate unusual skin angioneurotic reaction and epidermal permeability.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shuang Y; Wang, Xue M; Liu, Yan Q; Gao, Yan R; Liu, Xiao P; Li, Shu Y; Dong, Ya Q

    2014-03-01

    Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) has been suggested as a traditional chemical probe for assessing skin susceptibility and barrier function. The purpose of this study was to determine the role of DMSO test for the evaluation of unusual skin angioneurotic reaction and epidermal permeability. Thirty healthy volunteers were exposed to 98% DMSO on the flexor forearm skin for three exposure durations (5 min, 10 min and 15 min). Clinical visual score and biological physical parameters were obtained. The volunteers were divided into two groups according to the clinical visual scoring. The skin parameters were subsequently analyzed. There was a significant correlation between clinical visual score and biological physical parameters. The skin color parameters (a*, oxyhemoglobin, erythema and melanin index) and blood flow values were significant between two groups regardless of duration of DMSO exposure, and a significant difference between density values could also be detected if we regrouped the volunteers according to the sting-producing score. Our results also suggested there was no correlation between questionnaire score and clinical visual score or other parameters. Application of 98% DMSO for 10 min combined with a* (at 30 min) and blood flow (at 10 min) values could help us to identify persons with a hyper-angionerotic reaction to chemical stimulus. The penetrative activity of DMSO correlated with the thickness of the individual's skin.

  18. REGULATORY ASPECTS AND IMPLEMENTATION FOR PERMEABLE REACTIVE BARRIERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Permeable reactive barriers (PRB's) are an emerging, alternative in-situ approach for remediating groundwater contamination that combine subsurface fluid flow management with a passive chemical treatment zone. Removal of contaminants from the groundwater plume is achieved by alt...

  19. INTRODUCTION TO PERMEABLE REACTIVE BARRIERS FOR GROUND WATER REMEDIATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Permeable reactive barriers (PRB's) are an emerging, alternative in-situ approach for remediating groundwater contamination that combine subsurface fluid flow management with a passive chemical treatment zone. Removal of contaminants from the groundwater plume is achieved by alt...

  20. PERMEABLE REACTIVE BARRIERS FOR REMEDIATION OF CONTAMINATED GROUND WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Permeable reactive barriers (PRB's) are an emerging, alternative in-situ approach for remediating groundwater contamination that combine subsurface fluid flow management with a passive chemical treatment zone. Removal of contaminants from the groundwater plume is achieved by alt...

  1. TREATMENT OF INORGANIC CONTAMINANTS USING PERMEABLE REACTIVE BARRIERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Permeable reactive barriers are an emerging alternative to traditional pump and treat systems for groundwater remediation. This technique has progressed rapidly over the past decade from laboratory bench-scale studies to full-scale implementation. Laboratory studies indicate the ...

  2. TREATMENT OF INORGANIC CONTAMINANTS USING PERMEABLE REACTIVE BARRIERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Permeable reactive barriers are an emerging alternative to traditional pump and treat systems for groundwater remediation. This technique has progressed rapidly over the past decade from laboratory bench-scale studies to full-scale implementation. Laboratory studies indicate the ...

  3. Cell Adhesion in Epidermal Development and Barrier Formation

    PubMed Central

    Sumigray, Kaelyn D.; Lechler, Terry

    2015-01-01

    Cell–cell adhesions are necessary for structural integrity and barrier formation of the epidermis. Here, we discuss insights from genetic and cell biological studies into the roles of individual cell–cell junctions and their composite proteins in regulating epidermal development and function. In addition to individual adhesive functions, we will discuss emerging ideas on mechanosensation/transduction of junctions in the epidermis, noncanonical roles for adhesion proteins, and crosstalk/interdependencies between the junctional systems. These studies have revealed that cell adhesion proteins are connected to many aspects of tissue physiology including growth control, differentiation, and inflammation. PMID:25733147

  4. Field Applications of In Situ Remediation Technologies: Permeable Reactive Barriers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-01-01

    Field Applications of In Situ Remediation Technologies: Permeable Reactive Barriers United States Environmental Protection Agency PRB Remediated... Applications of In Situ Remediation Technologies: Permeable Reactive Barriers 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6...unclassified c. THIS PAGE unclassified Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std Z39-18 Field Applications of In Situ Remediation Technologies

  5. PERMEABLE REACTIVE BARRIER TECHNOLOGIES FOR CONTAMINANT REMEDIATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Environmental scientists are generally familiar with the concept of barriers for restricting the movement of contaminant plumes in ground water. Such barriers are typically constructed of highly impermeable emplacements of materials such as grouts, slurries, or sheet pilings to ...

  6. PERMEABLE REACTIVE BARRIER TECHNOLOGIES FOR CONTAMINANT REMEDIATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Environmental scientists are generally familiar with the concept of barriers for restricting the movement of contaminant plumes in ground water. Such barriers are typically constructed of highly impermeable emplacements of materials such as grouts, slurries, or sheet pilings to ...

  7. Review of potential subsurface permeable barrier emplacement and monitoring technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Riggsbee, W.H.; Treat, R.L.; Stansfield, H.J.; Schwarz, R.M.; Cantrell, K.J.; Phillips, S.J.

    1994-02-01

    This report focuses on subsurface permeable barrier technologies potentially applicable to existing waste disposal sites. This report describes candidate subsurface permeable barriers, methods for emplacing these barriers, and methods used to monitor the barrier performance. Two types of subsurface barrier systems are described: those that apply to contamination.in the unsaturated zone, and those that apply to groundwater and to mobile contamination near the groundwater table. These barriers may be emplaced either horizontally or vertically depending on waste and site characteristics. Materials for creating permeable subsurface barriers are emplaced using one of three basic methods: injection, in situ mechanical mixing, or excavation-insertion. Injection is the emplacement of dissolved reagents or colloidal suspensions into the soil at elevated pressures. In situ mechanical mixing is the physical blending of the soil and the barrier material underground. Excavation-insertion is the removal of a soil volume and adding barrier materials to the space created. Major vertical barrier emplacement technologies include trenching-backfilling; slurry trenching; and vertical drilling and injection, including boring (earth augering), cable tool drilling, rotary drilling, sonic drilling, jetting methods, injection-mixing in drilled holes, and deep soil mixing. Major horizontal barrier emplacement technologies include horizontal drilling, microtunneling, compaction boring, horizontal emplacement, longwall mining, hydraulic fracturing, and jetting methods.

  8. Controlling ferrofluid permeability across the blood-brain barrier model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Di; Sun, Linlin; Mi, Gujie; Sheikh, Lubna; Bhattacharya, Soumya; Nayar, Suprabha; Webster, Thomas J.

    2014-02-01

    In the present study, an in vitro blood-brain barrier model was developed using murine brain endothelioma cells (b.End3 cells). Confirmation of the blood-brain barrier model was completed by examining the permeability of FITC-Dextran at increasing exposure times up to 96 h in serum-free medium and comparing such values with values from the literature. After such confirmation, the permeability of five novel ferrofluid (FF) nanoparticle samples, GGB (ferrofluids synthesized using glycine, glutamic acid and BSA), GGC (glycine, glutamic acid and collagen), GGP (glycine, glutamic acid and PVA), BPC (BSA, PEG and collagen) and CPB (collagen, PVA and BSA), was determined using this blood-brain barrier model. All of the five FF samples were characterized by zeta potential to determine their charge as well as TEM and dynamic light scattering for determining their hydrodynamic diameter. Results showed that FF coated with collagen passed more easily through the blood-brain barrier than FF coated with glycine and glutamic acid based on an increase of 4.5% in permeability. Through such experiments, diverse magnetic nanomaterials (such as FF) were identified for: (1) MRI use since they were less permeable to penetrate the blood-brain barrier to avoid neural tissue toxicity (e.g. GGB) or (2) brain drug delivery since they were more permeable to the blood-brain barrier (e.g. CPB).

  9. Controlling ferrofluid permeability across the blood–brain barrier model.

    PubMed

    Shi, Di; Sun, Linlin; Mi, Gujie; Sheikh, Lubna; Bhattacharya, Soumya; Nayar, Suprabha; Webster, Thomas J

    2014-02-21

    In the present study, an in vitro blood–brain barrier model was developed using murine brain endothelioma cells (b.End3 cells). Confirmation of the blood–brain barrier model was completed by examining the permeability of FITCDextran at increasing exposure times up to 96 h in serum-free medium and comparing such values with values from the literature. After such confirmation, the permeability of five novel ferrofluid (FF) nanoparticle samples, GGB (ferrofluids synthesized using glycine, glutamic acid and BSA), GGC (glycine, glutamic acid and collagen), GGP (glycine, glutamic acid and PVA), BPC (BSA, PEG and collagen) and CPB (collagen, PVA and BSA), was determined using this blood–brain barrier model. All of the five FF samples were characterized by zeta potential to determine their charge as well as TEM and dynamic light scattering for determining their hydrodynamic diameter. Results showed that FF coated with collagen passed more easily through the blood–brain barrier than FF coated with glycine and glutamic acid based on an increase of 4.5% in permeability. Through such experiments, diverse magnetic nanomaterials (such as FF) were identified for: (1) MRI use since they were less permeable to penetrate the blood–brain barrier to avoid neural tissue toxicity (e.g. GGB) or (2) brain drug delivery since they were more permeable to the blood–brain barrier (e.g. CPB).

  10. Test device for measuring permeability of a barrier material

    DOEpatents

    Reese, Matthew; Dameron, Arrelaine; Kempe, Michael

    2014-03-04

    A test device for measuring permeability of a barrier material. An exemplary device comprises a test card having a thin-film conductor-pattern formed thereon and an edge seal which seals the test card to the barrier material. Another exemplary embodiment is an electrical calcium test device comprising: a test card an impermeable spacer, an edge seal which seals the test card to the spacer and an edge seal which seals the spacer to the barrier material.

  11. Permeability of microcracked fiber-reinforced containment barriers

    SciTech Connect

    Allan, M.L.; Kukacka, L.E.

    1995-11-01

    Cement-based containment barriers for waste landfills are at risk of cracking, thereby reducing effectiveness. Improved resistance to formation of permeable cracks will enhance the performance of cementitous hydraulic barriers exposed to excessive drying or to wet-dry cycles. Addition of fiber reinforcement was investigated as a potential means of improving crack resistance. Grout and soil cements with and without polypropylene fibers were subjected to different curing and exposure conditions and tested for initial and final permeability. Permeabilities under saturated flow conditions were compared to determine whether fibers could control permeable microcracking of subsurface containment barriers. Fibrillated polypropylene fibers reduced the relative change in permeability for grout and soil cement cured in water and subjected to wet-dry cycles, but did not show significant benefit for materials cured in soil and allowed to dry. Addition of monofilament fibers to barrier materials caused an increase in post-cracking permeability compared with unreinforced materials. This was attributed to increased flow paths created at failed fiber/matrix interfaces.

  12. Taurine improves epidermal barrier properties stressed by surfactants-a role for osmolytes in barrier homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Anderheggen, Bernd; Jassoy, Claudia; Waldmann-Laue, Marianne; Förster, Thomas; Wadle, Armin; Doering, Thomas

    2006-01-01

    Epidermal barrier function to water loss is maintained by lipid membrane domains located in the interstices of the stratum corneum. Exposure of the epidermis to a dry environment or UV irradiation stimulates barrier lipid synthesis and accumulation of the organic osmolyte taurine in the outermost granular keratinocyte layer. In this work we studied a possible relationship between these two different epidermal responses to environmental challenges. As a model system we selected anionic surfactant-induced barrier perturbation. Incubation of reconstructed epidermis with taurine inhibited cytotoxic and proinflammatory effects induced by sodium dodecyl sulfate including (i) a decrease in interleukin-1 alpha and prostaglandin E2 release, (ii) stabilization of keratinocyte membrane integrity, and (iii) improvement of keratinocyte viability. Repeated exposure of human skin to sodium dodecyl sulfate induced an increase in transepidermal water loss, inflammation, and hyperplasia. Topical application of taurine significantly decreased transepidermal water loss after repeated exposure to sodium dodecyl sulfate. Moreover, taurine significantly stimulated the synthesis of all three classes of barrier lipids (ceramides, cholesterol, and fatty acids) in reconstructed epidermis. In conclusion, our data suggest a role for taurine in preventing surfactant-induced dry and scaly skin by modulating the proinflammatory response and stimulating epidermal lipid synthesis.

  13. Evolutionary origin and diversification of epidermal barrier proteins in amniotes.

    PubMed

    Strasser, Bettina; Mlitz, Veronika; Hermann, Marcela; Rice, Robert H; Eigenheer, Richard A; Alibardi, Lorenzo; Tschachler, Erwin; Eckhart, Leopold

    2014-12-01

    The evolution of amniotes has involved major molecular innovations in the epidermis. In particular, distinct structural proteins that undergo covalent cross-linking during cornification of keratinocytes facilitate the formation of mechanically resilient superficial cell layers and help to limit water loss to the environment. Special modes of cornification generate amniote-specific skin appendages such as claws, feathers, and hair. In mammals, many protein substrates of cornification are encoded by a cluster of genes, termed the epidermal differentiation complex (EDC). To provide a basis for hypotheses about the evolution of cornification proteins, we screened for homologs of the EDC in non-mammalian vertebrates. By comparative genomics, de novo gene prediction and gene expression analyses, we show that, in contrast to fish and amphibians, the chicken and the green anole lizard have EDC homologs comprising genes that are specifically expressed in the epidermis and in skin appendages. Our data suggest that an important component of the cornified protein envelope of mammalian keratinocytes, that is, loricrin, has originated in a common ancestor of modern amniotes, perhaps during the acquisition of a fully terrestrial lifestyle. Moreover, we provide evidence that the sauropsid-specific beta-keratins have evolved as a subclass of EDC genes. Based on the comprehensive characterization of the arrangement, exon-intron structures and conserved sequence elements of EDC genes, we propose new scenarios for the evolutionary origin of epidermal barrier proteins via fusion of neighboring S100A and peptidoglycan recognition protein genes, subsequent loss of exons and highly divergent sequence evolution.

  14. Groundwater protection from cadmium contamination by permeable reactive barriers.

    PubMed

    Di Natale, F; Di Natale, M; Greco, R; Lancia, A; Laudante, C; Musmarra, D

    2008-12-30

    This work studies the reliability of an activated carbon permeable reactive barrier in removing cadmium from a contaminated shallow aquifer. Laboratory tests have been performed to characterize the equilibrium and kinetic adsorption properties of the activated carbon in cadmium-containing aqueous solutions. A 2D numerical model has been used to describe pollutant transport within a groundwater and the pollutant adsorption on the permeable adsorbing barrier (PRB). In particular, it has been considered the case of a permeable adsorbing barrier (PAB) used to protect a river from a Cd(II) contaminated groundwater. Numerical results show that the PAB can achieve a long-term efficiency by preventing river pollution for several months.

  15. Calmodulin 4 is dispensable for epidermal barrier formation and wound healing in mice

    PubMed Central

    Lessard, Juliane C.; Kalinin, Alexandr; Bible, Paul; Morasso, Maria I.

    2014-01-01

    Calcium-mediated signals play important roles in epidermal barrier formation, skin homeostasis, and wound repair. Calmodulin 4 (Calm4) is a small, Ca2+ binding protein with strong expression in suprabasal keratinocytes. In mice, Calm4 first appears in the skin at the time of barrier formation and its expression increases in response to epidermal barrier challenges. In this study, we report the generation of Calm4 knockout mice and provide evidence that Calm4 is dispensable for epidermal barrier formation, maintenance, and repair. PMID:25316000

  16. Structural and biophysical characteristics of human skin in maintaining proper epidermal barrier function.

    PubMed

    Boer, Magdalena; Duchnik, Ewa; Maleszka, Romuald; Marchlewicz, Mariola

    2016-02-01

    The complex structure of human skin and its physicochemical properties turn it into an efficient outermost defence line against exogenous factors, and help maintain homeostasis of the human body. This role is played by the epidermal barrier with its major part - stratum corneum. The condition of the epidermal barrier depends on individual and environmental factors. The most important biophysical parameters characterizing the status of this barrier are the skin pH, epidermal hydration, transepidermal water loss and sebum excretion. The knowledge of biophysical skin processes may be useful for the implementation of prophylactic actions whose aim is to restore the barrier function.

  17. Structural and biophysical characteristics of human skin in maintaining proper epidermal barrier function

    PubMed Central

    Duchnik, Ewa; Maleszka, Romuald; Marchlewicz, Mariola

    2016-01-01

    The complex structure of human skin and its physicochemical properties turn it into an efficient outermost defence line against exogenous factors, and help maintain homeostasis of the human body. This role is played by the epidermal barrier with its major part – stratum corneum. The condition of the epidermal barrier depends on individual and environmental factors. The most important biophysical parameters characterizing the status of this barrier are the skin pH, epidermal hydration, transepidermal water loss and sebum excretion. The knowledge of biophysical skin processes may be useful for the implementation of prophylactic actions whose aim is to restore the barrier function. PMID:26985171

  18. Advances in Permeable Reactive Barrier Technologies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-08-01

    technical methods, such as jetting and hydraulic fracturing , has improved the ability to access deeper aquifers. Table 1 describes the established and...34, Cape Canaveral Air Station, FL. Hydraulic Fracturing 120 A series of wells are installed along the length of the PRB. A vertical fracture is...especially helpful with deep instal- lation methods, such as hydraulic fracturing , where the barrier installed is just a few inches thick. A second, new type

  19. Nifedipine prevents sodium caprate-induced barrier dysfunction in human epidermal keratinocyte cultures.

    PubMed

    Uchino, Yoshihiro; Matsumoto, Junichi; Watanabe, Takuya; Hamabashiri, Masato; Tsuchiya, Takashi; Kimura, Ikuya; Yamauchi, Atsushi; Kataoka, Yasufumi

    2015-01-01

    Tight junctions (TJs) of the epidermis play an important role in maintaining the epidermal barrier. TJ breakdown is associated with skin problems, such as wrinkles and transepidermal water loss (TEWL). Clinical studies have reported that topical nifedipine is effective in reducing the depth of wrinkles and improving TEWL. However, it remains unknown whether nifedipine influences the TJ function in the epidermis. In the present study, we investigated the effect of nifedipine on epidermal barrier dysfunction in normal human epidermal keratinocytes (NHEKs) treated with sodium caprate (C10), a TJ inhibitor. Nifedipine reversed the C10-decreased transepithelial electrical resistance values as a measure of disruption of the epidermal barrier. Immunocytochemical observations revealed that nifedipine improved the C10-induced irregular arrangement of claudin-1, a key protein in TJs. Taken together, these findings suggest that nifedipine prevents epidermal barrier dysfunction, at least in part, by reconstituting the irregular claudin-1 localization at TJs in C10-treated NHEKs.

  20. Epidermal tight junction barrier function is altered by skin inflammation, but not by filaggrin-deficient stratum corneum.

    PubMed

    Yokouchi, Mariko; Kubo, Akiharu; Kawasaki, Hiroshi; Yoshida, Kazue; Ishii, Ken; Furuse, Mikio; Amagai, Masayuki

    2015-01-01

    The tight junction (TJ) barrier is located in the granular layer of the epidermis. Filaggrin deficiency predisposes patients to atopic dermatitis (AD) by impairing stratum corneum (SC) barrier function. Altered TJ barrier function has been observed in the skin of patients with AD; however, it remains unclear whether TJ function is influenced by filaggrin deficiency directly or secondarily via skin inflammation. To investigate the in vivo effects of filaggrin deficiency and skin inflammation on epidermal TJ function. Morphological changes in the TJ were investigated in filaggrin knockout mice and mice with hapten-induced dermatitis using en face visualization of epidermal sheets, and functional changes in the TJ were assessed with an in vivo permeation assay using tracers of various sizes. In filaggrin knockout mice, there was no apparent change in the honeycomb morphology of the TJ, TJ component mRNA expression, or TJ barrier function in neonates and adults, indicating that filaggrin-deficiency had no direct effects on the TJ. By contrast, in mice with hapten-induced dermatitis, the mRNA expression of TJ components was decreased markedly and the TJ barrier function was size-dependently impaired: the TJ leaked small tracers (<5 kDa), but not large tracers (>30 kDa). Filaggrin deficiency did not affect the epidermal TJ barrier directly, but once dermatitis occurred, the skin inflammation induced TJ dysfunction. Since TJ dysfunction induces the SC barrier impairment, skin inflammation will enhance skin permeability to external antigens and result in a vicious cycle of barrier dysfunction and skin inflammation. Copyright © 2014 Japanese Society for Investigative Dermatology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. MICROBIAL CHARACTERIZATION OF MANURE BASED PERMEABLE REACTIVE BARRIER

    EPA Science Inventory

    The implementation of permeable reactive barriers (PRB) provides a viable option for the remediation of contaminants of environmental significance such as dissolved metals (i.e., chromium), chlorinated solvents, and nitrate/ammonia. The designs of PRBs are usually based on the a...

  2. PERMEABLE REACTIVE BARRIERS FOR REMEDIATION OF INORGANIC CONTAMINANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The permeable reactive barrier (PRB) technology is an in-situ approach for groundwater remediation that couples subsurface flow management with a passive chemical or biochemical treatment zone. The development and application of the PRB technology has progressed over the last de...

  3. MICROBIAL CHARACTERIZATION OF MANURE BASED PERMEABLE REACTIVE BARRIER

    EPA Science Inventory

    The implementation of permeable reactive barriers (PRB) provides a viable option for the remediation of contaminants of environmental significance such as dissolved metals (i.e., chromium), chlorinated solvents, and nitrate/ammonia. The designs of PRBs are usually based on the a...

  4. COLLECTION OF DESIGN DATA: SITE CHARACTERIZATION FOR PERMEABLE REACTIVE BARRIERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Permeable reactive barriers (PRBs) for the restoration of contaminated ground water are no longer innovative. PRBs have evolved from innovative to accepted, standard practice, for the containment and treatment of a variety of contaminants in ground water. Like any remedial tech...

  5. LONG-TERM PERFORMANCE OF PERMEABLE REACTIVE BARRIERS: LESSONS LEARNED

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation will provide an overview of research efforts at EPA on the application, monitoring, and performance of Permeable Reactive Barriers (PRBs) for groundwater restoration. Over the past 10 years, research projects conducted by research staff at EPA's National Risk M...

  6. Permeable Reactive Barriers for Treatment of Cr6

    EPA Science Inventory

    Several options are available for treatment of hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) in groundwater using the permeable reactive barrier (PRB) approach. They include conventional trench-and-fill systems, chemical redox curtains, and organic carbon redox curtains. Each of these PRB syste...

  7. COLLECTION OF DESIGN DATA: SITE CHARACTERIZATION FOR PERMEABLE REACTIVE BARRIERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Permeable reactive barriers (PRBs) for the restoration of contaminated ground water are no longer innovative. PRBs have evolved from innovative to accepted, standard practice, for the containment and treatment of a variety of contaminants in ground water. Like any remedial tech...

  8. PERMEABLE REACTIVE BARRIERS FOR REMEDIATION OF INORGANIC CONTAMINANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The permeable reactive barrier (PRB) technology is an in-situ approach for groundwater remediation that couples subsurface flow management with a passive chemical or biochemical treatment zone. The development and application of the PRB technology has progressed over the last de...

  9. Permeable Reactive Barriers for Treatment of Cr6

    EPA Science Inventory

    Several options are available for treatment of hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) in groundwater using the permeable reactive barrier (PRB) approach. They include conventional trench-and-fill systems, chemical redox curtains, and organic carbon redox curtains. Each of these PRB syste...

  10. Improved epidermal barrier formation in human skin models by chitosan modulated dermal matrices

    PubMed Central

    Mieremet, Arnout; Rietveld, Marion; Absalah, Samira; van Smeden, Jeroen

    2017-01-01

    Full thickness human skin models (FTMs) contain an epidermal and a dermal equivalent. The latter is composed of a collagen dermal matrix which harbours fibroblasts. Current epidermal barrier properties of FTMs do not fully resemble that of native human skin (NHS), which makes these human skin models less suitable for barrier related studies. To further enhance the resemblance of NHS for epidermal morphogenesis and barrier formation, we modulated the collagen dermal matrix with the biocompatible polymer chitosan. Herein, we report that these collagen-chitosan FTMs (CC-FTMs) possess a well-organized epidermis and maintain both the early and late differentiation programs as in FTMs. Distinctively, the epidermal cell activation is reduced in CC-FTMs to levels observed in NHS. Dermal-epidermal interactions are functional in both FTM types, based on the formation of the basement membrane. Evaluation of the barrier structure by the organization of the extracellular lipid matrix of the stratum corneum revealed an elongated repeat distance of the long periodicity phase. The ceramide composition exhibited a higher resemblance of the NHS, based on the carbon chain-length distribution and subclass profile. The inside-out barrier functionality indicated by the transepidermal water loss is significantly improved in the CC-FTMs. The expression of epidermal barrier lipid processing enzymes is marginally affected, although more restricted to a single granular layer. The novel CC-FTM resembles the NHS more closely, which makes them a promising tool for epidermal barrier related studies. PMID:28333992

  11. Improved epidermal barrier formation in human skin models by chitosan modulated dermal matrices.

    PubMed

    Mieremet, Arnout; Rietveld, Marion; Absalah, Samira; van Smeden, Jeroen; Bouwstra, Joke A; El Ghalbzouri, Abdoelwaheb

    2017-01-01

    Full thickness human skin models (FTMs) contain an epidermal and a dermal equivalent. The latter is composed of a collagen dermal matrix which harbours fibroblasts. Current epidermal barrier properties of FTMs do not fully resemble that of native human skin (NHS), which makes these human skin models less suitable for barrier related studies. To further enhance the resemblance of NHS for epidermal morphogenesis and barrier formation, we modulated the collagen dermal matrix with the biocompatible polymer chitosan. Herein, we report that these collagen-chitosan FTMs (CC-FTMs) possess a well-organized epidermis and maintain both the early and late differentiation programs as in FTMs. Distinctively, the epidermal cell activation is reduced in CC-FTMs to levels observed in NHS. Dermal-epidermal interactions are functional in both FTM types, based on the formation of the basement membrane. Evaluation of the barrier structure by the organization of the extracellular lipid matrix of the stratum corneum revealed an elongated repeat distance of the long periodicity phase. The ceramide composition exhibited a higher resemblance of the NHS, based on the carbon chain-length distribution and subclass profile. The inside-out barrier functionality indicated by the transepidermal water loss is significantly improved in the CC-FTMs. The expression of epidermal barrier lipid processing enzymes is marginally affected, although more restricted to a single granular layer. The novel CC-FTM resembles the NHS more closely, which makes them a promising tool for epidermal barrier related studies.

  12. E-cadherin is essential for in vivo epidermal barrier function by regulating tight junctions

    PubMed Central

    Tunggal, Judith A; Helfrich, Iris; Schmitz, Annika; Schwarz, Heinz; Günzel, Dorothee; Fromm, Michael; Kemler, Rolf; Krieg, Thomas; Niessen, Carien M

    2005-01-01

    Cadherin adhesion molecules are key determinants of morphogenesis and tissue architecture. Nevertheless, the molecular mechanisms responsible for the morphogenetic contributions of cadherins remain poorly understood in vivo. Besides supporting cell–cell adhesion, cadherins can affect a wide range of cellular functions that include activation of cell signalling pathways, regulation of the cytoskeleton and control of cell polarity. To determine the role of E-cadherin in stratified epithelium of the epidermis, we have conditionally inactivated its gene in mice. Here we show that loss of E-cadherin in the epidermis in vivo results in perinatal death of mice due to the inability to retain a functional epidermal water barrier. Absence of E-cadherin leads to improper localization of key tight junctional proteins, resulting in permeable tight junctions and thus altered epidermal resistance. In addition, both Rac and activated atypical PKC, crucial for tight junction formation, are mislocalized. Surprisingly, our results indicate that E-cadherin is specifically required for tight junction, but not desmosome, formation and this appears to involve signalling rather than cell contact formation. PMID:15775979

  13. Endocannabinoids modulate human blood-brain barrier permeability in vitro.

    PubMed

    Hind, William H; Tufarelli, Cristina; Neophytou, Maria; Anderson, Susan I; England, Timothy J; O'Sullivan, Saoirse E

    2015-06-01

    Endocannabinoids alter permeability at various epithelial barriers, and cannabinoid receptors and endocannabinoid levels are elevated by stroke, with potential neuroprotective effects. We therefore explored the role of endocannabinoids in modulating blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability in normal conditions and in an ischaemia/reperfusion model. Human brain microvascular endothelial cell and astrocyte co-cultures modelled the BBB. Ischaemia was modelled by oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) and permeability was measured by transepithelial electrical resistance. Endocannabinoids or endocannabinoid-like compounds were assessed for their ability to modulate baseline permeability or OGD-induced hyperpermeability. Target sites of action were investigated using receptor antagonists and subsequently identified with real-time PCR. Anandamide (10 μM) and oleoylethanolamide (OEA, 10 μM) decreased BBB permeability (i.e. increased resistance). This was mediated by cannabinoid CB2 receptors, transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) channels, calcitonin gene-regulated peptide (CGRP) receptor (anandamide only) and PPARα (OEA only). Application of OEA, palmitoylethanolamide (both PPARα mediated) or virodhamine (all 10 μM) decreased the OGD-induced increase in permeability during reperfusion. 2-Arachidonoyl glycerol, noladin ether and oleamide did not affect BBB permeability in normal or OGD conditions. N-arachidonoyl-dopamine increased permeability through a cytotoxic mechanism. PPARα and γ, CB1 receptors, TRPV1 channels and CGRP receptors were expressed in both cell types, but mRNA for CB2 receptors was only present in astrocytes. The endocannabinoids may play an important modulatory role in normal BBB physiology, and also afford protection to the BBB during ischaemic stroke, through a number of target sites. © 2015 The Authors. British Journal of Pharmacology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of The British Pharmacological Society.

  14. Monitoring of Zero-Valent Iron Permeable Reactive Barriers: Electrical Properties and Barrier Aging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labrecque, D. J.; Adkins, P. L.; Slater, L. D.; Versteeg, R.; Sharpe, R.

    2007-12-01

    An innovative method of groundwater remediation invented in the 1990"s, Permeable Reactive Barriers, use sand-sized grains of scrap iron placed in trenches or injected under pressure to remediate a number of organic and inorganic contaminants. Monitoring the aging of these barriers becomes increasingly important as many of these barriers approach their predicted life spans. In-situ resistivity and induced polarization studies have been conducted at six barriers at four different sites: Monticello, Utah; the Denver Federal Center; Kansas City, Missouri; and East Helena, Montana. As some barriers tend to age dramatically faster than others, for this study we consider low permeability barriers as of greater age, as "old" barriers tend to loose permeability rather than exhaust reactive materials. One complicating factor is that two of the barriers studied appear to have issues related to installation. One site, the former Asarco Smelter Site near East Helena, Montana, has been instrumented with an autonomous monitoring system allowing continuous monitoring of the evolution of a relatively new (less than three years old) barrier. The barrier showed surprisingly rapid evolution over the first year of monitoring with changes in both resistivity and chargeability of tens of percent per month. In general, the electrical properties of all of the barriers studied follow a pattern. New barriers are fairly resistive with in-situ conductivity only a few times background (outside the barrier) values. Older barriers get increasingly conductive, with failed barriers showing values of over 100 S/m. The induced polarization response is more complicated. Chargeability values increase over time for young barriers, are largest for healthy barriers in the middle of their lifespan, and decrease as the barrier ages.

  15. Simulation of solute transport across low-permeability barrier walls

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harte, P.T.; Konikow, L.F.; Hornberger, G.Z.

    2006-01-01

    Low-permeability, non-reactive barrier walls are often used to contain contaminants in an aquifer. Rates of solute transport through such barriers are typically many orders of magnitude slower than rates through the aquifer. Nevertheless, the success of remedial actions may be sensitive to these low rates of transport. Two numerical simulation methods for representing low-permeability barriers in a finite-difference groundwater-flow and transport model were tested. In the first method, the hydraulic properties of the barrier were represented directly on grid cells and in the second method, the intercell hydraulic-conductance values were adjusted to approximate the reduction in horizontal flow, allowing use of a coarser and computationally efficient grid. The alternative methods were tested and evaluated on the basis of hypothetical test problems and a field case involving tetrachloroethylene (PCE) contamination at a Superfund site in New Hampshire. For all cases, advective transport across the barrier was negligible, but preexisting numerical approaches to calculate dispersion yielded dispersive fluxes that were greater than expected. A transport model (MODFLOW-GWT) was modified to (1) allow different dispersive and diffusive properties to be assigned to the barrier than the adjacent aquifer and (2) more accurately calculate dispersion from concentration gradients and solute fluxes near barriers. The new approach yields reasonable and accurate concentrations for the test cases. ?? 2006.

  16. Simulation of solute transport across low-permeability barrier walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harte, Philip T.; Konikow, Leonard F.; Hornberger, George Z.

    2006-05-01

    Low-permeability, non-reactive barrier walls are often used to contain contaminants in an aquifer. Rates of solute transport through such barriers are typically many orders of magnitude slower than rates through the aquifer. Nevertheless, the success of remedial actions may be sensitive to these low rates of transport. Two numerical simulation methods for representing low-permeability barriers in a finite-difference groundwater-flow and transport model were tested. In the first method, the hydraulic properties of the barrier were represented directly on grid cells and in the second method, the intercell hydraulic-conductance values were adjusted to approximate the reduction in horizontal flow, allowing use of a coarser and computationally efficient grid. The alternative methods were tested and evaluated on the basis of hypothetical test problems and a field case involving tetrachloroethylene (PCE) contamination at a Superfund site in New Hampshire. For all cases, advective transport across the barrier was negligible, but preexisting numerical approaches to calculate dispersion yielded dispersive fluxes that were greater than expected. A transport model (MODFLOW-GWT) was modified to (1) allow different dispersive and diffusive properties to be assigned to the barrier than the adjacent aquifer and (2) more accurately calculate dispersion from concentration gradients and solute fluxes near barriers. The new approach yields reasonable and accurate concentrations for the test cases.

  17. The selective permeability barrier in the nuclear pore complex

    PubMed Central

    Li, Christina; Goryaynov, Alexander; Yang, Weidong

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The nuclear pore complex (NPC) mediates the shuttle transport of macromolecules between the nucleus and cytoplasm in eukaryotic cells. The permeability barrier formed by intrinsically disordered phenylalanine-glycine-rich nucleoporins (FG-Nups) in the NPC functions as the critical selective control for nucleocytoplasmic transport. Signal-independent small molecules (< 40 kDa) passively diffuse through the pore, but passage of large cargo molecules is inhibited unless they are chaperoned by nuclear transport receptors (NTRs). NTRs are capable of interacting with FG-Nups and guide the cargos to cross the barrier by facilitated diffusion. The native conformation of the FG-Nups permeability barrier and the competition among multiple NTRs interacting with this barrier in the native NPCs are the 2 core questions still being highly debated in the field. Recently, we applied high-speed super-resolution fluorescence microscopy to map out the natural structure of the FG-Nups barrier and determined the competition among multiple NTRs as they interact with the barrier in the native NPCs. In this extra-view article, we will review the current understanding in the configuration and function of FG-Nups barrier and highlight the new evidence obtained recently to answer the core questions in nucleocytoplasmic transport. PMID:27673359

  18. Blood-brain barrier permeability imaging using perfusion computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Avsenik, Jernej; Bisdas, Sotirios; Popovic, Katarina Surlan

    2015-01-01

    Background. The blood-brain barrier represents the selective diffusion barrier at the level of the cerebral microvascular endothelium. Other functions of blood-brain barrier include transport, signaling and osmoregulation. Endothelial cells interact with surrounding astrocytes, pericytes and neurons. These interactions are crucial to the development, structural integrity and function of the cerebral microvascular endothelium. Dysfunctional blood-brain barrier has been associated with pathologies such as acute stroke, tumors, inflammatory and neurodegenerative diseases. Conclusions. Blood-brain barrier permeability can be evaluated in vivo by perfusion computed tomography - an efficient diagnostic method that involves the sequential acquisition of tomographic images during the intravenous administration of iodinated contrast material. The major clinical applications of perfusion computed tomography are in acute stroke and in brain tumor imaging. PMID:26029020

  19. Protection of the membrane permeability barrier by annexins.

    PubMed

    Creutz, Carl E; Hira, Jaspreet K; Gee, Virginia E; Eaton, James M

    2012-12-18

    Biological membranes are exposed to a number of chemical and physical stresses that may alter the structure of the lipid bilayer in such a way that the permeability barrier to hydrophilic molecules and ions is degraded. These stresses include amphiphilic molecules involved in metabolism and signaling, highly charged polyamines, membrane-permeating peptides, and mechanical and osmotic stresses. As annexins are known to bind to lipid headgroups in the presence of calcium and increase the order of the bilayer lipids, this study addressed whether this activity of annexins provides a potential benefit to the membrane by protecting the bilayer against disruptions of this nature or can promote restoration of the permeability barrier after damage by such agents. The release of carboxyfluorescein from large unilamellar vesicles composed of lipids characteristically present in the inner leaflet of cell membranes (phosphatidylserine, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylcholine, and cholesterol) was used to measure membrane permeability. It was determined that in the presence of calcium, annexin A5 reduced the level of baseline leakage from vesicles and reduced or reversed damage due to arachidonic acid, lysophosphatidic acid, lysophosphatidylcholine, diacylglycerol, monoacylglycerol, spermidine, amyloid-β, amylin, and osmotic shock. Annexin A6 was also able to provide membrane protection in many but not all of these cases. In a cell, it is likely annexins would move to sites of breakdown of the permeability barrier because of the calcium-dependent promotion of the binding of annexins to membranes at sites of calcium entry. Because of the fundamental importance to life of maintaining the permeability barrier of the cell membrane, it is proposed here that this property of annexins may represent a critical, primordial activity that explains their great evolutionary conservation and abundant expression in most cells.

  20. Melt Focusing Along Permeability Barriers in Various Tectonic Settings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montesi, L. G.; Hebert, L. B.

    2012-12-01

    The lithosphere, cold and rigid, acts as a barrier to the migration of melt from sources in the convecting mantle to the surface. In mid-ocean ridge settings in particular, the contrast between the width of the melt production zone at depths, reaching tens to hundreds of kilometer from the ridge axis, and the zone of crustal accretion, only one or two kilometers wide, points to the presence of an efficient focusing mechanism. The development of a zone impermeable to melt, or permeability barrier, at the base of the thermal boundary layer, and transport of melt in a high porosity channel at the base of this barrier provides a reasonable explanation for this focusing. Applied to various segmented and non-segmented mid-ocean ridges like the ultraslow Southwest Indian Ridge and the ultrafast East Pacific Rise at the Siqueiros transform, this process predicts along-strike variations in crustal thickness that compare favorably with observations. Although the concept of permeability barriers has been discussed mainly in the context of mid-ocean ridges, it may apply to other locations where melting in the upper mantle occurs. Permeability barriers form when ascending melt cools and crystallizes as it enters the thermal boundary layer at the base of the lithosphere. Such a setup is present at subduction zones as melts ascending from the mantle wedge interact with the overriding plate. Convection in the wedge introduces thermal gradients that may focus melt roughly to a point above the transition from a coupled to decoupled slab interface. This location is close to where volcanic arcs are observed. Above mantle plumes, a permeability barrier may develop coincident with the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary, allowing low-degree melts to stall and form a low-velocity layer that has been observed seismically. To date, the hypothesis of a permeability barrier has been thoroughly tested only in the context of mid-ocean ridges. Whether crystallization would be rapid enough in

  1. Striatal blood-brain barrier permeability in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Gray, Madison T; Woulfe, John M

    2015-05-01

    In vivo studies have shown that blood-brain barrier (BBB) dysfunction is involved in the course of Parkinson's disease (PD). However, these have lacked either anatomic definition or the ability to recognize minute changes in BBB integrity. Here, using histologic markers of serum protein, iron, and erythrocyte extravasation, we have shown significantly increased permeability of the BBB in the postcommissural putamen of PD patients. The dense innervation of the striatum by PD-affected regions allows for exploitation of this permeability for therapeutic goals. These results are also discussed in the context of the retrograde trans-synaptic hypothesis of PD spread.

  2. Selective permeability barrier to urea in shark rectal gland.

    PubMed

    Zeidel, Joshua D; Mathai, John C; Campbell, John D; Ruiz, Wily G; Apodaca, Gerard L; Riordan, John; Zeidel, Mark L

    2005-07-01

    Elasmobranchs such as the dogfish shark Squalus acanthius achieve osmotic homeostasis by maintaining urea concentrations in the 300- to 400-mM range, thus offsetting to some degree ambient marine osmolalities of 900-1,000 mosmol/kgH(2)O. These creatures also maintain salt balance without losing urea by secreting a NaCl-rich (500 mM) and urea-poor (18 mM) fluid from the rectal gland that is isotonic with the plasma. The composition of the rectal gland fluid suggests that its epithelial cells are permeable to water and not to urea. Because previous work showed that lipid bilayers that permit water flux do not block flux of urea, we reasoned that the plasma membranes of rectal gland epithelial cells must either have aquaporin water channels or must have some selective barrier to urea flux. We therefore isolated apical and basolateral membranes from shark rectal glands and determined their permeabilities to water and urea. Apical membrane fractions were markedly enriched for Na-K-2Cl cotransporter, whereas basolateral membrane fractions were enriched for Na-K-ATPase. Basolateral membrane osmotic water permeability (P(f)) averaged 4.3 +/- 1.3 x 10(-3) cm/s, whereas urea permeability averaged 4.2 +/- 0.8 x 10(-7) cm/s. The activation energy for water flow averaged 16.4 kcal/mol. Apical membrane P(f) averaged 7.5 +/- 1.6 x 10(-4) cm/s, and urea permeability averaged 2.2 +/- 0.4 x 10(-7) cm/s, with an average activation energy for water flow of 18.6 kcal/mol. The relatively low water permeabilities and high activation energies argue strongly against water flux via aquaporins. Comparison of membrane water and urea permeabilities with those of artificial liposomes and other isolated biological membranes indicates that the basolateral membrane urea permeability is fivefold lower than would be anticipated for its water permeability. These results indicate that the rectal gland maintains a selective barrier to urea in its basolateral membranes.

  3. Control of BTEX migration using a biologically enhanced permeable barrier

    SciTech Connect

    Borden, R.C.; Goin, R.T.; Kao, C.M.

    1997-06-01

    A permeable barrier system, consisting of a line of closely spaced wells, was installed perpendicular to ground water flow to control the migration of a dissolved hydrocarbon plume. The wells were charged with concrete briquets that release oxygen and nitrate at a controlled rate, enhancing aerobic biodegradation in the downgradient aquifer. Laboratory batch reactor experiments were conducted to identify concrete mixtures that slowly released oxygen over an extended time period. A full-scale permeable barrier system using ORC was constructed at a gasoline-spill site. During the first 242 days of operation, total BTEX decreased from 17 to 3.4 mg/L and dissolved oxygen increased from 0.4 to 1.8 mg/L during transport through the barrier. Over time, BTEX treatment efficiencies declined, indicating the barrier system had become less effective in releasing oxygen and nutrients to the highly contaminated portion of the aquifer. Point dilution tests and sediment analyses performed at the conclusion of the project indicated that the aquifer in the vicinity of the remediation wells had been clogged by precipitation with iron minerals.

  4. Epidermal ADAM17 maintains the skin barrier by regulating EGFR ligand–dependent terminal keratinocyte differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Cobzaru, Cristina; Triantafyllopoulou, Antigoni; Löffek, Stefanie; Horiuchi, Keisuke; Threadgill, David W.; Kurz, Thomas; van Rooijen, Nico; Bruckner-Tuderman, Leena

    2012-01-01

    ADAM17 (a disintegrin and metalloproteinase 17) is ubiquitously expressed and cleaves membrane proteins, such as epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) ligands, l-selectin, and TNF, from the cell surface, thus regulating responses to tissue injury and inflammation. However, little is currently known about its role in skin homeostasis. We show that mice lacking ADAM17 in keratinocytes (A17ΔKC) have a normal epidermal barrier and skin architecture at birth but develop pronounced defects in epidermal barrier integrity soon after birth and develop chronic dermatitis as adults. The dysregulated expression of epidermal differentiation proteins becomes evident 2 d after birth, followed by reduced transglutaminase (TGM) activity, transepidermal water loss, up-regulation of the proinflammatory cytokine IL-36α, and inflammatory immune cell infiltration. Activation of the EGFR was strongly reduced in A17ΔKC skin, and topical treatment of A17ΔKC mice with recombinant TGF-α significantly improved TGM activity and decreased skin inflammation. Finally, we show that mice lacking the EGFR in keratinocytes (EgfrΔKC) closely resembled A17ΔKC mice. Collectively, these results identify a previously unappreciated critical role of the ADAM17–EGFR signaling axis in maintaining the homeostasis of the postnatal epidermal barrier and suggest that this pathway could represent a good target for treatment of epidermal barrier defects. PMID:22565824

  5. Blood-brain barrier tight junction permeability and ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Sandoval, Karin E; Witt, Ken A

    2008-11-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is formed by the endothelial cells of cerebral microvessels, providing a dynamic interface between the peripheral circulation and the central nervous system. The tight junctions (TJs) between the endothelial cells serve to restrict blood-borne substances from entering the brain. Under ischemic stroke conditions decreased BBB TJ integrity results in increased paracellular permeability, directly contributing to cerebral vasogenic edema, hemorrhagic transformation, and increased mortality. This loss of TJ integrity occurs in a phasic manner, which is contingent on several interdependent mechanisms (ionic dysregulation, inflammation, oxidative and nitrosative stress, enzymatic activity, and angiogenesis). Understanding the inter-relation of these mechanisms is critical for the development of new therapies. This review focuses on those aspects of ischemic stroke impacting BBB TJ integrity and the principle regulatory pathways, respective to the phases of paracellular permeability.

  6. New perspectives on epidermal barrier dysfunction in atopic dermatitis: gene-environment interactions.

    PubMed

    Cork, Michael J; Robinson, Darren A; Vasilopoulos, Yiannis; Ferguson, Adam; Moustafa, Manar; MacGowan, Alice; Duff, Gordon W; Ward, Simon J; Tazi-Ahnini, Rachid

    2006-07-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a multifactorial, chronic inflammatory skin disorder in which genetic mutations and cutaneous hyperreactivity to environmental stimuli play a causative role. Genetic mutations alone might not be enough to cause clinical manifestations of AD, and this review will propose a new perspective on the importance of epidermal barrier dysfunction in genetically predisposed individuals, predisposing them to the harmful effects of environmental agents. The skin barrier is known to be damaged in patients with AD, both in acute eczematous lesions and also in clinically unaffected skin. Skin barrier function can be impaired first by a genetic predisposition to produce increased levels of stratum corneum chymotryptic enzyme. This protease enzyme causes premature breakdown of corneodesmosomes, leading to impairment of the epidermal barrier. The addition of environmental interactions, such as washing with soap and detergents, or long-term application of topical corticosteroids can further increase production of stratum corneum chymotryptic enzyme and impair epidermal barrier function. The epidermal barrier can also be damaged by exogenous proteases from house dust mites and Staphylococcus aureus. One or more of these factors in combination might lead to a defective barrier, thereby increasing the risk of allergen penetration and succeeding inflammatory reaction, thus contributing to exacerbations of this disease.

  7. Basis for the gain and subsequent dilution of epidermal pigmentation during human evolution: The barrier and metabolic conservation hypotheses revisited.

    PubMed

    Elias, Peter M; Williams, Mary L

    2016-10-01

    The evolution of human skin pigmentation must address both the initial evolution of intense epidermal pigmentation in hominins, and its subsequent dilution in modern humans. While many authorities believe that epidermal pigmentation evolved to protect against either ultraviolet B (UV-B) irradiation-induced mutagenesis or folic acid photolysis, we hypothesize that pigmentation augmented the epidermal barriers by shifting the UV-B dose-response curve from toxic to beneficial. Whereas erythemogenic UV-B doses produce apoptosis and cell death, suberythemogenic doses benefit permeability and antimicrobial function. Heavily melanized melanocytes acidify the outer epidermis and emit paracrine signals that augment barrier competence. Modern humans, residing in the cooler, wetter climes of south-central Europe and Asia, initially retained substantial pigmentation. While their outdoor lifestyles still permitted sufficient cutaneous vitamin D3 (VD3) synthesis, their marginal nutritional status, coupled with cold-induced caloric needs, selected for moderate pigment reductions that diverted limited nutritional resources towards more urgent priorities (=metabolic conservation). The further pigment-dilution that evolved as humans reached north-central Europe (i.e., northern France, Germany), likely facilitated cutaneous VD3 synthesis, while also supporting ongoing, nutritional requirements. But at still higher European latitudes where little UV-B breaches the atmosphere (i.e., present-day UK, Scandinavia, Baltic States), pigment dilution alone could not suffice. There, other nonpigment-related mutations evolved to facilitate VD3 production; for example, in the epidermal protein, filaggrin, resulting in reduced levels of its distal metabolite, trans-urocanic acid, a potent UV-B chromophore. Thus, changes in human pigmentation reflect a complex interplay between latitude, climate, diet, lifestyle, and shifting metabolic priorities.

  8. Automated Impedance Tomography for Monitoring Permeable Reactive Barrier Health

    SciTech Connect

    LaBrecque, D J; Adkins, P L

    2009-07-02

    The objective of this research was the development of an autonomous, automated electrical geophysical monitoring system which allows for near real-time assessment of Permeable Reactive Barrier (PRB) health and aging and which provides this assessment through a web-based interface to site operators, owners and regulatory agencies. Field studies were performed at four existing PRB sites; (1) a uranium tailing site near Monticello, Utah, (2) the DOE complex at Kansas City, Missouri, (3) the Denver Federal Center in Denver, Colorado and (4) the Asarco Smelter site in East Helena, Montana. Preliminary surface data over the PRB sites were collected (in December, 2005). After the initial round of data collection, the plan was modified to include studies inside the barriers in order to better understand barrier aging processes. In September 2006 an autonomous data collection system was designed and installed at the EPA PRB and the electrode setups in the barrier were revised and three new vertical electrode arrays were placed in dedicated boreholes which were in direct contact with the PRB material. Final data were collected at the Kansas City, Denver and Monticello, Utah PRB sites in the fall of 2007. At the Asarco Smelter site in East Helena, Montana, nearly continuous data was collected by the autonomous monitoring system from June 2006 to November 2007. This data provided us with a picture of the evolution of the barrier, enabling us to examine barrier changes more precisely and determine whether these changes are due to installation issues or are normal barrier aging. Two rounds of laboratory experiments were carried out during the project. We conducted column experiments to investigate the effect of mineralogy on the electrical signatures resulting from iron corrosion and mineral precipitation in zero valent iron (ZVI) columns. In the second round of laboratory experiments we observed the electrical response from simulation of actual field PRBs at two sites: the

  9. Barrier function, epidermal differentiation, and human beta-defensin 2 expression in tinea corporis.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Jens-Michael; Pfeiffer, Stephan; Akaki, Tatsuya; Schröder, Jens-Michael; Kleine, Michael; Neumann, Claudia; Proksch, Ehrhardt; Brasch, Jochen

    2007-07-01

    Tinea corporis is a superficial mycotic infection resulting in substantial epidermal changes. We determined skin barrier function, epidermal differentiation, and human-beta-defensin 2 (hBD-2) protein expression in 10 patients with tinea corporis caused by Trichophyton rubrum (T. rubrum). We found disturbed skin barrier function as shown by a significant increase in transepidermal water loss (TEWL) and specific ultrastructural changes including disturbed formation of extracellular lipid bilayers, lamellar body extrusion, and deposit of clotted material at the stratum granulosum/stratum corneum interface. Epidermal proliferation in tinea increased several fold and accordingly, proliferation and inflammation-associated keratins K6, K16, and K17 were expressed. Expression of basal keratins K5 and K14 increased, whereas differentiation-associated K10 was reduced. Reduction of the cornified envelope proteins involucrin, loricrin, and the S100 protein filaggrin was also seen. Reduced filaggrin expression correlated with reduced skin hydration; protein breakdown products of filaggrin have been shown to be important for water binding. Surprisingly, we found pronounced epidermal protein expression of hBD-2, which may be related to disturbed epidermal differentiation and inflammation. hBD-2 showed a weak, although significant, antifungal activity against T. rubrum in the turbidimetric assay and the immunohistological staining was somewhat less pronounced in areas directly underneath fungal hyphae in the stratum corneum. Together, we describe profound changes in skin barrier structure and function, epidermal proliferation, and differentiation including pronounced protein expression of hBD-2 in tinea corporis.

  10. Long-Term Monitoring of Permeable Reactive Barriers - Progress Report

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, L.

    2001-04-12

    The purpose of this project is to conduct collaborative research to evaluate and maximize the effectiveness of permeable reactive barriers (PRBs) with a broad-based working group including representatives from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), U.S. Department of Defense (DoD), and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The Naval Facilities Engineering Service Center (NFESC) and its project partner, Battelle, are leading the DoD effort with funding from DoD's Environmental Security Technology Certification Program (ESTCP) and Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program (SERDP). Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is coordinating the DOE effort with support from Subsurface Contaminant Focus Area (SCFA), a research program under DOEs Office of Science and Technology. The National Risk Management Research Laboratory's Subsurface Protection and Remediation Division is leading EPA's effort. The combined effort of these three agencies allows the evaluation of a large number of sites. Documents generated by this joint project will be reviewed by the participating agencies' principal investigators, the Permeable Barriers Group of the Remediation Technologies Development Forum (RTDF), and the Interstate Technology and Regulatory Cooperation (ITRC). The technical objectives of this project are to collect and review existing field data at selected PRB sites, identify data gaps, conduct additional measurements, and provide recommendations to DOE users on suitable long-term monitoring strategies. The specific objectives are to (1) evaluate geochemical and hydraulic performance of PRBs, (2) develop guidelines for hydraulic and geochemical characterization/monitoring, and (3) devise and implement long-term monitoring strategies through the use of hydrological and geochemical models. Accomplishing these objectives will provide valuable information regarding the optimum configuration and lifetime of barriers at specific sites. It will also permit

  11. Treatment of inorganic contaminants using permeable reactive barriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blowes, David W.; Ptacek, Carol J.; Benner, Shawn G.; McRae, Che W. T.; Bennett, Timothy A.; Puls, Robert W.

    2000-09-01

    Permeable reactive barriers are an emerging alternative to traditional pump and treat systems for groundwater remediation. This technique has progressed rapidly over the past decade from laboratory bench-scale studies to full-scale implementation. Laboratory studies indicate the potential for treatment of a large number of inorganic contaminants, including As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Hg, Fe, Mn, Mo, Ni, Pb, Se, Tc, U, V, NO 3, PO 4 and SO 4. Small-scale field studies have demonstrated treatment of Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe, Ni, Pb, NO 3, PO 4 and SO 4. Permeable reactive barriers composed of zero-valent iron have been used in full-scale installations for the treatment of Cr, U, and Tc. Solid-phase organic carbon in the form of municipal compost has been used to remove dissolved constituents associated with acid-mine drainage, including SO 4, Fe, Ni, Co and Zn. Dissolved nutrients, including NO 3 and PO 4, have been removed from domestic septic-system effluent and agricultural drainage.

  12. Activated Protein C Enhances Human Keratinocyte Barrier Integrity via Sequential Activation of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor and Tie2*

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Meilang; Chow, Shu-Oi; Dervish, Suat; Chan, Yee-Ka Agnes; Julovi, Sohel M.; Jackson, Christopher J.

    2011-01-01

    Keratinocytes play a critical role in maintaining epidermal barrier function. Activated protein C (APC), a natural anticoagulant with anti-inflammatory and endothelial barrier protective properties, significantly increased the barrier impedance of keratinocyte monolayers, measured by electric cell substrate impedance sensing and FITC-dextran flux. In response to APC, Tie2, a tyrosine kinase receptor, was rapidly activated within 30 min, and relocated to cell-cell contacts. APC also increased junction proteins zona occludens, claudin-1 and VE-cadherin. Inhibition of Tie2 by its peptide inhibitor or small interfering RNA abolished the barrier protective effect of APC. Interestingly, APC did not activate Tie2 through its major ligand, angiopoietin-1, but instead acted by binding to endothelial protein C receptor, cleaving protease-activated receptor-1 and transactivating EGF receptor. Furthermore, when activation of Akt, but not ERK, was inhibited, the barrier protective effect of APC on keratinocytes was abolished. Thus, APC activates Tie2, via a mechanism requiring, in sequential order, the receptors, endothelial protein C receptor, protease-activated receptor-1, and EGF receptor, which selectively enhances the PI3K/Akt signaling to enhance junctional complexes and reduce keratinocyte permeability. PMID:21173154

  13. An epidermal barrier wound repair pathway in Drosophila is mediated by grainy head.

    PubMed

    Mace, Kimberly A; Pearson, Joseph C; McGinnis, William

    2005-04-15

    We used wounded Drosophila embryos to define an evolutionarily conserved pathway for repairing the epidermal surface barrier. This pathway includes a wound response enhancer from the Ddc gene that requires grainy head (grh) function and binding sites for the Grh transcription factor. At the signaling level, tyrosine kinase and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) activities are induced in epidermal cells near wounds, and activated ERK is required for a robust wound response. The conservation of this Grh-dependent pathway suggests that the repair of insect cuticle and mammal skin is controlled by an ancient, shared control system for constructing and healing the animal body surface barrier.

  14. Characterisation of the passive permeability barrier of nuclear pore complexes

    PubMed Central

    Mohr, Dagmar; Frey, Steffen; Fischer, Torsten; Güttler, Thomas; Görlich, Dirk

    2009-01-01

    Nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) restrict uncontrolled nucleocytoplasmic fluxes of inert macromolecules but permit facilitated translocation of nuclear transport receptors and their cargo complexes. We probed the passive barrier of NPCs and observed sieve-like properties with a dominating mesh or channel radius of 2.6 nm, which is narrower than proposed earlier. A small fraction of diffusion channels has a wider opening, explaining the very slow passage of larger molecules. The observed dominant passive diameter approximates the distance of adjacent hydrophobic clusters of FG repeats, supporting the model that the barrier is made of FG repeat domains cross-linked with a spacing of an FG repeat unit length. Wheat germ agglutinin and the dominant-negative importin β45-462 fragment were previously regarded as selective inhibitors of facilitated NPC passage. We now observed that they do not distinguish between the passive and the facilitated mode. Instead, their inhibitory effect correlates with the size of the NPC-passing molecule. They have little effect on small species, inhibit the passage of green fluorescent protein-sized objects >10-fold and virtually block the translocation of larger ones. This suggests that passive and facilitated NPC passage proceed through one and the same permeability barrier. PMID:19680228

  15. Local burn injury impairs epithelial permeability and antimicrobial peptide barrier function in distal unburned skin.

    PubMed

    Plichta, Jennifer K; Droho, Steve; Curtis, Brenda J; Patel, Parita; Gamelli, Richard L; Radek, Katherine A

    2014-06-01

    Our objective was to characterize the mechanisms by which local burn injury compromises epithelial barrier function in burn margin, containing the elements necessary for healing of the burn site, and in distal unburned skin, which serves as potential donor tissue. Experimental mouse scald burn injury. University Research Laboratory. C57/Bl6 Male mice, 8-12 weeks old. To confirm that dehydration was not contributing to our observed barrier defects, in some experiments mice received 1 mL of saline fluid immediately after burn, while a subgroup received an additional 0.5 mL at 4 hours and 1 mL at 24 hours following burn. We then assessed skin pH and transepidermal water loss every 12 hours on the burn wounds for 72 hours postburn. Burn margin exhibited increased epidermal barrier permeability indicated by higher pH, greater transepidermal water loss, and reduced lipid synthesis enzyme expression and structural protein production up to 96 hours postburn. By contrast, antimicrobial peptide production and protease activity were elevated in burn margin. Skin extracts from burn margin did not exhibit changes in the ability to inhibit bacterial growth. However, distal unburned skin from burned mice also demonstrated an impaired response to barrier disruption, indicated by elevated transepidermal water loss and reduced lipid synthesis enzyme and structural protein expression up to 96 hours postburn. Furthermore, skin extracts from distal unburned skin exhibited greater protease activity and a reduced capacity to inhibit bacterial growth of several skin pathogens. Finally, we established that antimicrobial peptide levels were also altered in the lung and bladder, which are common sites of secondary infection in burn-injured patients. These findings reveal several undefined deficiencies in epithelial barrier function at the burn margin, potential donor skin sites, and organs susceptible to secondary infection. These functional and biochemical data provide novel insights into

  16. Visualizing Molecular Diffusion through Passive Permeability Barriers in Cells: Conventional and Novel Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yu-Chun; Phua, Siew Cheng; Lin, Benjamin; Inoue, Takanari

    2013-01-01

    Diffusion barriers are universal solutions for cells to achieve distinct organizations, compositions, and activities within a limited space. The influence of diffusion barriers on the spatiotemporal dynamics of signaling molecules often determines cellular physiology and functions. Over the years, the passive permeability barriers in various subcellular locales have been characterized using elaborate analytical techniques. In this review, we will summarize the current state of knowledge on the various passive permeability barriers present in mammalian cells. We will conclude with a description of several conventional techniques and one new approach based on chemically-inducible diffusion trap (C-IDT) for probing permeable barriers. PMID:23731778

  17. The protein phosphatase 2A regulatory subunit Ppp2r2a is required for Connexin-43 dephosphorlyation during epidermal barrier acquisition.

    PubMed

    Gerner, Lisa; Youssef, Gehad; O'Shaughnessy, Ryan F L

    2013-11-01

    Epidermal barrier acquisition during late mammalian development is a prerequisite for terrestrial existence. Over a 24-h period, the epidermis goes from being a barrier-deficient, dye permeable epithelium to a barrier-competent epithelium. We have previously shown that Akt signalling is necessary for barrier acquisition in the mouse and that the protein phosphatase 2A regulatory subunit Ppp2r2a causes barrier acquisition by dephosphorylation of cJun. Here, we demonstrate that there is transient interaction between the gap junction protein Connexin 43 (Cx43) and Zonula occludins-1 (Zo-1) during epidermal barrier acquisition. Ppp2r2a knockdown prevented plasma membrane co-localisation and interaction between the two proteins. Ppp2r2a knockdown also increased phosphorylation at Serine 368 of Connexin 43. Cx43 phosphorlyation at Serine368 occurred just prior to the interaction between Connexin 43 and Zo-1. We therefore propose a model in which Ppp2r2a is required both for the initial interaction between Zo-1 and Cx43 and the consequent dephosphorylation of Connexin 43, preventing interaction of Zo-1 and allowing Zo-1 to initiate tight junction formation and barrier acquisition. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Wave scattering by a permeable barrier over undulating bed topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhary, A.; Martha, S. C.

    2016-06-01

    The scattering of surface water waves by bottom undulation in the presence of a permeable vertical barrier is investigated for its solution. A mixed boundary value problem (BVP) arises here in a natural way while examining this physical problem. Regular perturbation analysis is employed to determine the solution of the BVP. By utilizing this analysis the given BVP reduces to two different BVPs up to first order. The solution of the zeroth order BVP is obtained with the aid of eigenfunction expansion method in conjunction with least-squares approximation. The first order BVP is solved with the help of the Green's integral theorem and the physical quantities, namely the reflection and transmission coefficients, are obtained in the form of integrals which involve the bottom undulation and the solution of the zeroth order BVP. A particular form of the bottom undulation which closely resembles to some obstacles made by nature due to sedimentation and ripple growth of sand, is considered to evaluate these integrals. The variation of these coefficients is examined for different values of the porous effect parameter, barrier length, number of ripples and ripple amplitude.

  19. Directed site exploration for permeable reactive barrier design

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, J.; Graettinger, A.J.; Moylan, J.; Reeves, H.W.

    2009-01-01

    Permeable reactive barriers (PRBs) are being employed for in situ site remediation of groundwater that is typically flowing under natural gradients. Site characterization is of critical importance to the success of a PRB. A design-specific site exploration approach called quantitatively directed exploration (QDE) is presented. The QDE approach employs three spatially related matrices: (1) covariance of input parameters, (2) sensitivity of model outputs, and (3) covariance of model outputs to identify the most important location to explore based on a specific design. Sampling at the location that most reduces overall site uncertainty produces a higher probability of success of a particular design. The QDE approach is demonstrated on the Kansas City Plant, Kansas City, MO, a case study where a PRB was installed and failed. It is shown that additional quantitatively directed site exploration during the design phase could have prevented the remedial failure that was caused by missing a geologic body having high hydraulic conductivity at the south end of the barrier. The most contributing input parameter approach using head uncertainty clearly indicated where the next sampling should be made toward the high hydraulic conductivity zone. This case study demonstrates the need to include the specific design as well as site characterization uncertainty when choosing the sampling locations. ?? 2008 Elsevier B.V.

  20. ECONOMICS ANALYSIS OF THE IMPLEMENTATION OF PERMEABLE REACTIVE BARRIERS FOR REMEDIATION OF CONTAMINATED GROUND WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report presents an analysis of the cost of using permeable reactive barriers to remediate contaminated ground water. When possible, these costs are compared with the cost of pump-and-treat technology for similar situations. Permeable reactive barriers are no longer perceiv...

  1. Surface altered zeolites as permeable barriers for in situ treatment of contaminated groundwater

    SciTech Connect

    1996-11-01

    The authors characterized surfactant-modified zeolite (SMZ) for its ability to sorb organic and inorganic contaminants from water. The ultimate objective is to use SMZ as a permeable barrier to prevent migration of contaminants in groundwater. This report summarizes results under Phase 1 of a three-phase project leading to a full-scale field demonstration of SMZ permeable- barrier technology.

  2. ECONOMICS ANALYSIS OF THE IMPLEMENTATION OF PERMEABLE REACTIVE BARRIERS FOR REMEDIATION OF CONTAMINATED GROUND WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report presents an analysis of the cost of using permeable reactive barriers to remediate contaminated ground water. When possible, these costs are compared with the cost of pump-and-treat technology for similar situations. Permeable reactive barriers are no longer perceiv...

  3. SURFACE-ALTERED ZEOLITES AS PERMEABLE BARRIERS FOR IN SITU TREATMENT OF CONTAMINATED GROUNDWATER

    SciTech Connect

    Robert S. Bowman; Zhaohui Li; Stephen J. Roy; Todd Burt; Timothy L. Johnson; Richard L. Johnson

    1999-08-30

    The overall objective of this effort is to develop and test a zeolite-based permeable barrier system for containing and remediating contaminated groundwater. The projected product is an engineered and tested permeable barrier system that can be adopted by the commercial sector.

  4. Expression of the C-C chemokine MIP-3 alpha/CCL20 in human epidermis with impaired permeability barrier function.

    PubMed

    Schmuth, M; Neyer, S; Rainer, C; Grassegger, A; Fritsch, P; Romani, N; Heufler, C

    2002-04-01

    External assault to the skin is followed by an epidermal response including synthesis of DNA, lipids, cytokines and migration of antigen presenting cells. MIP-3 alpha (CCL20, LARC, Exodus-1, Scya20) is a recently described C-C chemokine, predominantly expressed in extralymphoid tissue, which is known to direct migration of dendritic cell precursors and memory lymphocytes to sites of antigen invasion. We assessed the expression of MIP-3 alpha in human skin using semi-quantitative polymerase chain reaction. In vivo, MIP-3 alpha mRNA was constitutively expressed at low levels in untreated human epidermis. After acute disruption of the epidermal permeability barrier MIP-3 alpha mRNA was upregulated in the epidermal fraction, whereas dermal MIP-3 alpha mRNA levels remained unchanged. In vitro, MIP-3 alpha was increased in cultured keratinocytes treated with IL-1 alpha and TNF-alpha and was present in immature and mature dendritic cells, THP-1 monocytic cells and activated T cells. Finally, skin biopsies from patients with psoriasis, contact dermatitis and mycosis fungoides showed abundant expression. In biopsies from atopic dermatitis and graft vs. host disease a weak signal was present, whereas no expression was found in scleroderma and toxic epidermal necrolysis. We conclude that regulation of MIP-3 alpha mRNA is part of the epidermal response to external assault. Its upregulation may represent a danger signal for increased immunosurveillance in barrier disrupted skin and inflammatory skin conditions with impaired barrier function to counteract potential antigen invasion.

  5. Zeolite in horizontal permeable reactive barriers for artificial groundwater recharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leal, María; Martínez-Hernández, Virtudes; Lillo, Javier; Meffe, Raffaella; de Bustamante, Irene

    2013-04-01

    The Spanish Water Reuse Royal Decree 1620/2007 considers groundwater recharge as a feasible use of reclaimed water. To achieve the water quality established in the above-mentioned legislation, a tertiary wastewater treatment is required. In this context, the infiltration of effluents generated by secondary wastewater treatments through a Horizontal Permeable Reactive Barrier (HPRB) may represent a suitable regeneration technology. Some nutrients (phosphate and ammonium) and some Pharmaceutical and Personal Care Products (PPCPs) are not fully removed in conventional wastewater treatment plants. To avoid groundwater contamination when effluents of wastewater treatments plants are used in artificial recharge activities, these contaminants have to be removed. Due to its sorption capacities, zeolite is among the most used reactive materials in Permeable Reactive Barrier (PRB). Therefore, the main goal of this study is to evaluate the zeolite retention effectiveness of nutrients and PPCPs occurring in treated wastewater. Batch sorption experiments using synthetic wastewater (SWW) and zeolite were performed. A 1:4 zeolite/SWW ratio was selected due to the high sorption capacity of the reactive material.The assays were carried out by triplicate. All the bottles containing the SWW-zeolite mixture were placed on a mechanical shaker during 24 hours at 140 rpm and 25 °C. Ammonium and phosphate, as main nutrients, and a group of PPCPs were selected as compounds to be tested during the experiments. Nutrients were analyzed by ion chromatography. For PPCPs determination, Solid Phase Extraction (SPE) was applied before their analysis by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry time of flight (LC-MS/ TOF). The experimental data were fitted to linearized Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm equations to obtain sorption parameters. In general, Freundlich model shows a greater capability of reproducing experimental data. To our knowledge, sorption of the investigated compounds on zeolite

  6. Compromised epidermal barrier stimulates Harderian gland activity and hypertrophy in ACBP−/− mice[S

    PubMed Central

    Bek, Signe; Neess, Ditte; Dixen, Karen; Bloksgaard, Maria; Marcher, Ann-Britt; Chemnitz, John; Færgeman, Nils J.; Mandrup, Susanne

    2015-01-01

    Acyl-CoA binding protein (ACBP) is a small, ubiquitously expressed intracellular protein that binds C14-C22 acyl-CoA esters with very high affinity and specificity. We have recently shown that targeted disruption of the Acbp gene leads to a compromised epidermal barrier and that this causes delayed adaptation to weaning, including the induction of the hepatic lipogenic and cholesterogenic gene programs. Here we show that ACBP is highly expressed in the Harderian gland, a gland that is located behind the eyeball of rodents and involved in the production of fur lipids and lipids used for lubrication of the eye lid. We show that disruption of the Acbp gene leads to a significant enlargement of this gland with hypertrophy of the acinar cells and increased de novo synthesis of monoalkyl diacylglycerol, the main lipid species produced by the gland. Mice with conditional targeting of the Acbp gene in the epidermis recapitulate this phenotype, whereas generation of an artificial epidermal barrier during gland development reverses the phenotype. Our findings indicate that the Harderian gland is activated by the compromised epidermal barrier as an adaptive and protective mechanism to overcome the barrier defect. PMID:26142722

  7. Compromised epidermal barrier stimulates Harderian gland activity and hypertrophy in ACBP-/- mice.

    PubMed

    Bek, Signe; Neess, Ditte; Dixen, Karen; Bloksgaard, Maria; Marcher, Ann-Britt; Chemnitz, John; Færgeman, Nils J; Mandrup, Susanne

    2015-09-01

    Acyl-CoA binding protein (ACBP) is a small, ubiquitously expressed intracellular protein that binds C14-C22 acyl-CoA esters with very high affinity and specificity. We have recently shown that targeted disruption of the Acbp gene leads to a compromised epidermal barrier and that this causes delayed adaptation to weaning, including the induction of the hepatic lipogenic and cholesterogenic gene programs. Here we show that ACBP is highly expressed in the Harderian gland, a gland that is located behind the eyeball of rodents and involved in the production of fur lipids and lipids used for lubrication of the eye lid. We show that disruption of the Acbp gene leads to a significant enlargement of this gland with hypertrophy of the acinar cells and increased de novo synthesis of monoalkyl diacylglycerol, the main lipid species produced by the gland. Mice with conditional targeting of the Acbp gene in the epidermis recapitulate this phenotype, whereas generation of an artificial epidermal barrier during gland development reverses the phenotype. Our findings indicate that the Harderian gland is activated by the compromised epidermal barrier as an adaptive and protective mechanism to overcome the barrier defect. Copyright © 2015 by the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  8. [Removal of nitrate from groundwater using permeable reactive barrier].

    PubMed

    Li, Xiu-Li; Yang, Jun-Jun; Lu, Xiao-Xia; Zhang, Shu; Hou, Zhen

    2013-03-01

    To provide a cost-effective method for the remediation of nitrate-polluted groundwater, column experiments were performed to study the removal of nitrate by permeable reactive barrier filled with fermented mulch and sand (biowall), and the mechanisms and influence factors were explored. The experimental results showed that the environmental condition in the simulated biowall became highly reduced after three days of operation (oxidation-reduction potential was below - 100 mV), which was favorable for the reduction of nitrate. During the 15 days of operation, the removal rate of nitrate nitrogen (NO3(-) -N) by the simulated biowall was 80%-90% (NO3(-)-N was reduced from 20 mg x L(-1) in the inlet water to 1.6 mg x L(-1) in the outlet water); the concentration of nitrite nitrogen (NO2(-) -N) in the outlet water was below 2.5 mg x L(-1); the concentration of ammonium nitrogen (NH4(+) -N) was low in the first two days but increased to about 12 mg x L(-1) since day three. The major mechanisms involved in the removal of nitrate nitrogen were adsorption and biodegradation. When increasing the water flow velocity in the simulated biowall, the removal rate of NO3(-) -N was reduced and the concentration of NH4(+) -N in the outlet water was significantly reduced. A simulated zeolite wall was set up following the simulated biowall and 98% of the NH4(+) -N could be removed from the water.

  9. Clathrin inhibitor Pitstop-2 disrupts the nuclear pore complex permeability barrier

    PubMed Central

    Liashkovich, Ivan; Pasrednik, Dzmitry; Prystopiuk, Valeria; Rosso, Gonzalo; Oberleithner, Hans; Shahin, Victor

    2015-01-01

    Existence of a selective nucleocytoplasmic permeability barrier is attributed to Phenylalanine-Glycine rich proteins (FG-nups) within the central channel of the nuclear pore complex (NPC). Limited understanding of the FG-nup structural arrangement hinders development of strategies directed at disrupting the NPC permeability barrier. In this report we explore an alternative approach to enhancing the NPC permeability for exogenous macromolecules. We demonstrate that the recently discovered inhibitor of clathrin coat assembly Pitstop-2 compromises the NPC permeability barrier in a rapid and effective manner. Treatment with Pitstop-2 causes a collapse of the NPC permeability barrier and a reduction of Importin β binding accompanied by alteration of the NPC ultrastructure. Interestingly, the effects are induced by the same chemical agent that is capable of inhibiting clathrin-mediated endocytosis. To our knowledge, this is the first functional indication of the previously postulated evolutionary relation between clathrin and NPC scaffold proteins. PMID:25944393

  10. A somatic permeability barrier around the germline is essential for Drosophila spermatogenesis.

    PubMed

    Fairchild, Michael J; Smendziuk, Christopher M; Tanentzapf, Guy

    2015-01-15

    Interactions between the soma and germline are essential for gametogenesis. In the Drosophila testis, differentiating germ cells are encapsulated by two somatic cells that surround the germline throughout spermatogenesis. chickadee (chic), the fly ortholog of Profilin, mediates soma-germline interactions. Knockdown of Chic in the soma results in sterility and severely disrupted spermatogenesis due to defective encapsulation. To study this defect further, we developed a permeability assay to analyze whether the germline is isolated from the surrounding environment by the soma. We find that germline encapsulation by the soma is, by itself, insufficient for the formation of a permeability barrier, but that such a barrier gradually develops during early spermatogenesis. Thus, germline stem cells, gonialblasts and early spermatogonia are not isolated from the outside environment. By late spermatocyte stages, however, a permeability barrier is formed by the soma. Furthermore, we find that, concomitant with formation of the permeability barrier, septate junction markers are expressed in the soma and localize to junctional sites connecting the two somatic cells that surround the germline. Importantly, knockdown of septate junction components also disrupts the permeability barrier. Finally, we show that germline differentiation is delayed when the permeability barrier is compromised. We propose that the permeability barrier around the germline serves an important regulatory function during spermatogenesis by shaping the signaling events that take place between the soma and the germline.

  11. Stress does not increase blood–brain barrier permeability in mice

    PubMed Central

    Roszkowski, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Several studies have reported that exposure to acute psychophysiological stressors can lead to an increase in blood–brain barrier permeability, but these findings remain controversial and disputed. We thoroughly examined this issue by assessing the effect of several well-established paradigms of acute stress and chronic stress on blood–brain barrier permeability in several brain areas of adult mice. Using cerebral extraction ratio for the small molecule tracer sodium fluorescein (NaF, 376 Da) as a sensitive measure of blood–brain barrier permeability, we find that neither acute swim nor restraint stress lead to increased cerebral extraction ratio. Daily 6-h restraint stress for 21 days, a model for the severe detrimental impact of chronic stress on brain function, also does not alter cerebral extraction ratio. In contrast, we find that cold forced swim and cold restraint stress both lead to a transient, pronounced decrease of cerebral extraction ratio in hippocampus and cortex, suggesting that body temperature can be an important confounding factor in studies of blood–brain barrier permeability. To additionally assess if stress could change blood–brain barrier permeability for macromolecules, we measured cerebral extraction ratio for fluorescein isothiocyanate-dextran (70 kDa). We find that neither acute restraint nor cold swim stress affected blood–brain barrier permeability for macromolecules, thus corroborating our findings that various stressors do not increase blood–brain barrier permeability. PMID:27146513

  12. Construction of low permeability soil-bentonite barrier caps and liners for landfills

    SciTech Connect

    Webber, T.; Williams, M.

    1995-12-31

    A low permeability soil barrier layer is the usual regulatory requirement for both caps and liner systems on modern municipal, industrial, and hazardous waste landfills. This soil layer is either used as the sole barrier or as the soil component of a composite liner system. This paper presents construction experience for blending on site soils with sodium bentonite to produce a thick, low permeability soil barrier layer. The paper begins with a description of the components and construction of the barrier layer and discusses how soil-bentonite barrier layers meet or exceed the regulatory performance criteria for both State and Federal agencies.

  13. Local Burn Injury Impairs Epithelial Permeability and Antimicrobial Peptide Barrier Function in Distal Unburned Skin*

    PubMed Central

    Plichta, Jennifer K.; Droho, Steve; Curtis, Brenda J.; Patel, Parita; Gamelli, Richard L.; Radek, Katherine A.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Our objective was to characterize the mechanisms by which local burn injury compromises epithelial barrier function in burn margin, containing the elements necessary for healing of the burn site, and in distal unburned skin, which serves as potential donor tissue. Design Experimental mouse scald burn injury. Setting University Research Laboratory. Subjects C57/Bl6 Male mice, 8–12 weeks old. Interventions To confirm that dehydration was not contributing to our observed barrier defects, in some experiments mice received 1 mL of saline fluid immediately after burn, while a subgroup received an additional 0.5 mL at 4 hours and 1 mL at 24 hours following burn. We then assessed skin pH and transepidermal water loss every 12 hours on the burn wounds for 72 hours postburn. Measurements and Main Results Burn margin exhibited increased epidermal barrier permeability indicated by higher pH, greater transepidermal water loss, and reduced lipid synthesis enzyme expression and structural protein production up to 96 hours postburn. By contrast, antimicrobial peptide production and protease activity were elevated in burn margin. Skin extracts from burn margin did not exhibit changes in the ability to inhibit bacterial growth. However, distal unburned skin from burned mice also demonstrated an impaired response to barrier disruption, indicated by elevated transepidermal water loss and reduced lipid synthesis enzyme and structural protein expression up to 96 hours postburn. Furthermore, skin extracts from distal unburned skin exhibited greater protease activity and a reduced capacity to inhibit bacterial growth of several skin pathogens. Finally, we established that antimicrobial peptide levels were also altered in the lung and bladder, which are common sites of secondary infection in burn-injured patients. Conclusions These findings reveal several undefined deficiencies in epithelial barrier function at the burn margin, potential donor skin sites, and organs

  14. mTORC1 and mTORC2 regulate skin morphogenesis and epidermal barrier formation

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Xiaolei; Bloch, Wilhelm; Iden, Sandra; Rüegg, Markus A.; Hall, Michael N.; Leptin, Maria; Partridge, Linda; Eming, Sabine A.

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), a regulator of growth in many tissues, mediates its activity through two multiprotein complexes, mTORC1 or mTORC2. The role of mTOR signalling in skin morphogenesis and epidermal development is unknown. Here we identify mTOR as an essential regulator in skin morphogenesis by epidermis-specific deletion of Mtor in mice (mTOREKO). mTOREKO mutants are viable, but die shortly after birth due to deficits primarily during the early epidermal differentiation programme and lack of a protective barrier development. Epidermis-specific loss of Raptor, which encodes an essential component of mTORC1, confers the same skin phenotype as seen in mTOREKO mutants. In contrast, newborns with an epidermal deficiency of Rictor, an essential component of mTORC2, survive despite a hypoplastic epidermis and disruption in late stage terminal differentiation. These findings highlight a fundamental role for mTOR in epidermal morphogenesis that is regulated by distinct functions for mTORC1 and mTORC2. PMID:27807348

  15. Iron Hydroxy Carbonate Formation in Zerovalent Iron Permeable Reactive Barriers: Characterization and Evaluation of Phase Stability

    EPA Science Inventory

    Predicting the long-term potential of permeable reactive barriers for treating contaminated groundwater relies on understanding the endpoints of biogeochemical reactions between influent groundwater and the reactive medium. Iron hydroxy carbonate (chukanovite) is frequently obs...

  16. Performance Assessment of a Permeable Reactive Barrier for Ground Water Remediation Fifteen Years After Installation

    EPA Science Inventory

    The fifteen-year performance of a granular iron, permeable reactive barrier (PRB; Elizabeth City, North Carolina) is reviewed with respect to contaminanttreatment (hexavalent chromium and trichloroethylene) and hydraulic performance. Due to in-situ treatment of the chromium sourc...

  17. COST ANALYSIS OF PERMEABLE REACTIVE BARRIERS FOR REMEDIATION OF GROUND WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    ABSTRACT

    Permeable reactive barriers (PRB's) are an emerging, alternative in-situ approach for remediating contaminated groundwater that combine subsurface fluid flow management with a passive chemical treatment zone. PRB's are a potentially more cost effective treatment...

  18. PERFORMANCE OF PERMEABLE REACTIVE BARRIER AT U.S. COAST GUARD SITE, ELIZABETH CITY, NC

    EPA Science Inventory

    Permeable reactive barriers are innovative and cost-effective remedial technologies and are becoming more desirable methods for in-situ passive remediation of ground water contaminated with chlorinated hydrocarbons and redox-sensitive metals. As contaminated water passes through ...

  19. Performance Assessment of a Permeable Reactive Barrier for Ground Water Remediation Fifteen Years After Installation

    EPA Science Inventory

    The fifteen-year performance of a granular iron, permeable reactive barrier (PRB; Elizabeth City, North Carolina) is reviewed with respect to contaminanttreatment (hexavalent chromium and trichloroethylene) and hydraulic performance. Due to in-situ treatment of the chromium sourc...

  20. PERMEABLE REACTIVE BARRIERS FOR IN-SITU TREATMENT OF ARSENIC-CONTAMINATED GROUNDWATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Laboratory and field research has shown that permeable reactive barriers (PRBs) containing a variety of materials can treat arsenic (As) contaminated groundwater. Sites where these PRBs are located include a mine tailings facility, fertilizer and chemical manufacturing sites, a...

  1. BIFUNCTIONAL ALUMINUN: A PERMEABLE BARRIER MATERIAL FOR THE DEGRADATION OF MTBE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bifunctional aluminum is an innovative remedial material for the treatment of gasoline oxygenates in permeable reactive barriers (PRBs). PRBs represent a promising environmental technology for remediation of groundwater contamination. Although zero-valent metals (ZVM) have been...

  2. COST ANALYSIS OF PERMEABLE REACTIVE BARRIERS FOR REMEDIATION OF GROUND WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    ABSTRACT

    Permeable reactive barriers (PRB's) are an emerging, alternative in-situ approach for remediating contaminated groundwater that combine subsurface fluid flow management with a passive chemical treatment zone. PRB's are a potentially more cost effective treatment...

  3. PERFORMANCE OF PERMEABLE REACTIVE BARRIER AT U.S. COAST GUARD SITE, ELIZABETH CITY, NC

    EPA Science Inventory

    Permeable reactive barriers are innovative and cost-effective remedial technologies and are becoming more desirable methods for in-situ passive remediation of ground water contaminated with chlorinated hydrocarbons and redox-sensitive metals. As contaminated water passes through ...

  4. PERFORMANCE MONITORING OF PERMEABLE REACTIVE BARRIERS TO REMEDIATE CONTAMINATED GROUND WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Permeable reactive barriers (PRB's) are an emerging, alternative in-situ approach for remediating groundwater contamination that combine subsurface fluid flow management with a passive chemical treatment zone. Removal of contaminants from the groundwater plume is achieved by alt...

  5. LONG-TERM PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT OF PERMEABLE REACTIVE BARRIERS TO REMEDIATE CONTAMINATED GROUND WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Permeable reactive barriers (PRBs) are an emerging, alternative in-situ approach for remediating groundwater contamination that combine subsurface fluid flow management with a passive chemical treatment zone. The few pilot and commercial installations which have been implemented ...

  6. PERMEABLE REACTIVE BARRIERS FOR IN-SITU TREATMENT OF ARSENIC-CONTAMINATED GROUNDWATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Laboratory and field research has shown that permeable reactive barriers (PRBs) containing a variety of materials can treat arsenic (As) contaminated groundwater. Sites where these PRBs are located include a mine tailings facility, fertilizer and chemical manufacturing sites, a...

  7. BIFUNCTIONAL ALUMINUN: A PERMEABLE BARRIER MATERIAL FOR THE DEGRADATION OF MTBE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bifunctional aluminum is an innovative remedial material for the treatment of gasoline oxygenates in permeable reactive barriers (PRBs). PRBs represent a promising environmental technology for remediation of groundwater contamination. Although zero-valent metals (ZVM) have been...

  8. Iron Hydroxy Carbonate Formation in Zerovalent Iron Permeable Reactive Barriers: Characterization and Evaluation of Phase Stability

    EPA Science Inventory

    Predicting the long-term potential of permeable reactive barriers for treating contaminated groundwater relies on understanding the endpoints of biogeochemical reactions between influent groundwater and the reactive medium. Iron hydroxy carbonate (chukanovite) is frequently obs...

  9. LONG-TERM PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT OF PERMEABLE REACTIVE BARRIERS TO REMEDIATE CONTAMINATED GROUND WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Permeable reactive barriers (PRBs) are an emerging, alternative in-situ approach for remediating groundwater contamination that combine subsurface fluid flow management with a passive chemical treatment zone. The few pilot and commercial installations which have been implemented ...

  10. Permeable Barrier Materials for Strontium Immobilization: - UFA Determination of Hydraulic Conductivity. - Column Sorption Experiments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-01-01

    Meadows clinoptilolite was also tested since it is currently being considered for use as a permeable barrier at N-Springs. 14. SUBJECT TERMS 15. NUMBER OF...permeability of reactive barrier); Soda Springs phosphate rock; and fish debris. Ash Meadows Clinoptilolite was also tested since it is currently being...follows: bone char > quartz sand > NC apatite >> fish debris:sand = Ash Meadows clinoptilolite:sand >> clinoptilolite >> hydroxyapatite > Soda Springs

  11. Epidermal barrier defects link atopic dermatitis with altered skin cancer susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Cipolat, Sara; Hoste, Esther; Natsuga, Ken; Quist, Sven R; Watt, Fiona M

    2014-05-05

    Atopic dermatitis can result from loss of structural proteins in the outermost epidermal layers, leading to a defective epidermal barrier. To test whether this influences tumour formation, we chemically induced tumours in EPI-/- mice, which lack three barrier proteins-Envoplakin, Periplakin, and Involucrin. EPI-/- mice were highly resistant to developing benign tumours when treated with 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA) and 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA). The DMBA response was normal, but EPI-/- skin exhibited an exaggerated atopic response to TPA, characterised by abnormal epidermal differentiation, a complex immune infiltrate and elevated serum thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP). The exacerbated TPA response could be normalised by blocking TSLP or the immunoreceptor NKG2D but not CD4+ T cells. We conclude that atopy is protective against skin cancer in our experimental model and that the mechanism involves keratinocytes communicating with cells of the immune system via signalling elements that normally protect against environmental assaults.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01888.001. Copyright © 2014, Cipolat et al.

  12. Comparison study of ferrofluid and powder iron oxide nanoparticle permeability across the blood–brain barrier

    PubMed Central

    Hoff, Dan; Sheikh, Lubna; Bhattacharya, Soumya; Nayar, Suprabha; Webster, Thomas J

    2013-01-01

    In the present study, the permeability of 11 different iron oxide nanoparticle (IONP) samples (eight fluids and three powders) was determined using an in vitro blood–brain barrier model. Importantly, the results showed that the ferrofluid formulations were statistically more permeable than the IONP powder formulations at the blood–brain barrier, suggesting a role for the presently studied in situ synthesized ferrofluid formulations using poly(vinyl) alcohol, bovine serum albumin, collagen, glutamic acid, graphene, and their combinations as materials which can cross the blood–brain barrier to deliver drugs or have other neurological therapeutic efficacy. Conversely, the results showed the least permeability across the blood–brain barrier for the IONP with collagen formulation, suggesting a role as a magnetic resonance imaging contrast agent but limiting IONP passage across the blood–brain barrier. Further analysis of the data yielded several trends of note, with little correlation between permeability and fluid zeta potential, but a larger correlation between permeability and fluid particle size (with the smaller particle sizes having larger permeability). Such results lay the foundation for simple modification of iron oxide nanoparticle formulations to either promote or inhibit passage across the blood–brain barrier, and deserve further investigation for a wide range of applications. PMID:23426527

  13. Comparison study of ferrofluid and powder iron oxide nanoparticle permeability across the blood-brain barrier.

    PubMed

    Hoff, Dan; Sheikh, Lubna; Bhattacharya, Soumya; Nayar, Suprabha; Webster, Thomas J

    2013-01-01

    In the present study, the permeability of 11 different iron oxide nanoparticle (IONP) samples (eight fluids and three powders) was determined using an in vitro blood-brain barrier model. Importantly, the results showed that the ferrofluid formulations were statistically more permeable than the IONP powder formulations at the blood-brain barrier, suggesting a role for the presently studied in situ synthesized ferrofluid formulations using poly(vinyl) alcohol, bovine serum albumin, collagen, glutamic acid, graphene, and their combinations as materials which can cross the blood-brain barrier to deliver drugs or have other neurological therapeutic efficacy. Conversely, the results showed the least permeability across the blood-brain barrier for the IONP with collagen formulation, suggesting a role as a magnetic resonance imaging contrast agent but limiting IONP passage across the blood-brain barrier. Further analysis of the data yielded several trends of note, with little correlation between permeability and fluid zeta potential, but a larger correlation between permeability and fluid particle size (with the smaller particle sizes having larger permeability). Such results lay the foundation for simple modification of iron oxide nanoparticle formulations to either promote or inhibit passage across the blood-brain barrier, and deserve further investigation for a wide range of applications.

  14. Commonly Employed African Neonatal Skin Care Products Compromise Epidermal Function in Mice.

    PubMed

    Man, Mao-Qiang; Sun, Richard; Man, George; Lee, Dale; Hill, Zelee; Elias, Peter M

    2016-09-01

    Neonatal mortality is much higher in the developing world than in developed countries. Infections are a major cause of neonatal death, particularly in preterm infants, in whom defective epidermal permeability barrier function facilitates transcutaneous pathogen invasion. The objective was to determine whether neonatal skin care products commonly used in Africa benefit or compromise epidermal functions in murine skin. After twice-daily treatment of 6- to 8-week-old hairless mice with each skin care product for 3 days, epidermal permeability barrier function, skin surface pH, stratum corneum hydration, and barrier recovery were measured using a multiprobe adapter system physiology monitor. For products showing some benefits in these initial tests, the epidermal permeability barrier homeostasis was assessed 1 and 5 hours after a single application to acutely disrupted skin. All of the skin care products compromised basal permeability barrier function and barrier repair kinetics. Moreover, after 3 days of treatment, most of the products also reduced stratum corneum hydration while elevating skin surface pH to abnormal levels. Some neonatal skin care products that are widely used in Africa perturb important epidermal functions, including permeability barrier homeostasis in mice. Should these products have similar effects on newborn human skin, they could cause a defective epidermal permeability barrier, which can increase body fluid loss, impair thermoregulation, and contribute to the high rates of neonatal morbidity and mortality seen in Africa. Accordingly, alternative products that enhance permeability barrier function should be identified, particularly for use in preterm infants. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. External antigen uptake by Langerhans cells with reorganization of epidermal tight junction barriers.

    PubMed

    Kubo, Akiharu; Nagao, Keisuke; Yokouchi, Mariko; Sasaki, Hiroyuki; Amagai, Masayuki

    2009-12-21

    Outermost barriers are critical for terrestrial animals to avoid desiccation and to protect their bodies from foreign insults. Mammalian skin consists of two sets of barriers: stratum corneum (SC) and tight junctions (TJs). How acquisition of external antigens (Ags) by epidermal Langerhans cells (LCs) occur despite these barriers has remained unknown. We show that activation-induced LCs elongate their dendrites to penetrate keratinocyte (KC) TJs and survey the extra-TJ environment located outside of the TJ barrier, just beneath the SC. Penetrated dendrites uptake Ags from the tip where Ags colocalize with langerin/Birbeck granules. TJs at KC-KC contacts allow penetration of LC dendrites by dynamically forming new claudin-dependent bicellular- and tricellulin-dependent tricellular TJs at LC-KC contacts, thereby maintaining TJ integrity during Ag uptake. Thus, covertly under keratinized SC barriers, LCs and KCs demonstrate remarkable cooperation that enables LCs to gain access to external Ags that have violated the SC barrier while concomitantly retaining TJ barriers to protect intra-TJ environment.

  16. Effects of High-Intensity Endurance Exercise on Epidermal Barriers against Microbial Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Eda, Nobuhiko; Shimizu, Kazuhiro; Suzuki, Satomi; Lee, Eunjae; Akama, Takao

    2013-01-01

    For athletes, preventing infectious disease on skin is important. Examination measurement of epidermal barriers could provide valuable information on the risk of skin infections. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of high-intensity endurance exercise on epidermal barriers. Six healthy adult males (age; 22.3 ± 1.6 years) performed bicycle exercise at 75%HRmax for 60 min from 18:30 to 19:30. Skin surface samples were measured 18:30 (pre), 19:30 (post), 20:30 (60 min), and 21:30 (120 min). Secretory immunoglobulin A (SIgA) and human β-defensin 2 (HBD-2) concentrations were measured using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). SIgA concentration at pre was significantly higher than at post, 60 min and 120 min (p < 0.05). HBD-2 concentration at post and 120 min was significantly higher than at pre (p < 0. 05). Moisture content of the stratum corneum was significantly higher at post than at pre, 60 min, and 120 min (p < 0.05). On the chest, moisture content of the stratum corneum was significantly lower at 120 min than at pre (p < 0.05). The number of staphylococci was significantly higher at post than at pre (p < 0.05), and tended to be higher at 60 min than at pre on the chest (p = 0. 08). High-intensity endurance exercise might depress the immune barrier and physical barrier and enhance the risk of skin infection. On the other hand, the biochemical barrier increases after exercise, and our findings suggest that this barrier might supplement the compromised function of other skin barriers. Key points The immune barrier and physical barrier might be depressed and the risk of skin infection might be enhanced by high-intensity endurance exercise. The biochemical barrier increases after high-intensity endurance exercise and might supplement the compromised function of other skin barriers. We recommend that athletes maintain their skin surface in good condition, for example, by showering immediately after sports activities and using moisturizers

  17. A synthetic C16 omega-hydroxyphytoceramide improves skin barrier functions from diversely perturbed epidermal conditions.

    PubMed

    Oh, Myoung Jin; Nam, Jin Ju; Lee, Eun Ok; Kim, Jin Wook; Park, Chang Seo

    2016-10-01

    Omega-hydroxyceramides (ω-OH-Cer) play a crucial role in maintaining the integrity of skin barrier. ω-OH-Cer are the primary lipid constituents of the corneocyte lipid envelope (CLE) covalently attached to the outer surface of the cornified envelope linked to involucrin to become bound form lipids in stratum corneum (SC). CLE becomes a hydrophobic impermeable layer of matured corneocyte preventing loss of natural moisturizing factor inside the corneocytes. More importantly, CLE may also play an important role in the formation of proper orientation of intercellular lipid lamellar structure by interdigitating with the intercellular lipids in a comb-like fashion. Abnormal barrier conditions associated with atopic dermatitis but also UVB-irradiated skins are known to have lowered level of bound lipids, especially ω-OH-Cer, which indicate that ω-OH-Cer play an important role in maintaining the integrity of skin barrier. In this study, protective effects of a novel synthetic C16 omega-hydroxyphytoceramides (ω-OH-phytoceramide) on skin barrier function were investigated. Epidermal barrier disruption was induced by UVB irradiation, tape-stripping in hairless mouse and human skin. Protective effect of damaged epidermis was evaluated using the measurement of transepidermal water loss and cohesion of SC. Increased keratinocyte differentiation was verified using cultured keratinocyte through western blot. Results clearly demonstrated that a synthetic C16 ω-OH-phytoceramide enhanced the integrity of SC and accelerated the recovery of damaged skin barrier function by stimulating differentiation process. In a conclusion, a synthetic C16 ω-OH-phytoceramide treatment improved epidermal homeostasis in several disrupted conditions.

  18. Staphylococcus aureus exploits epidermal barrier defects in atopic dermatitis to trigger cytokine expression

    PubMed Central

    Nakatsuji, Teruaki; Chen, Tiffany H.; Two, Aimee M.; Chun, Kimberly A.; Narala, Saisindhu; Geha, Raif S.; Hata, Tissa R.; Gallo, Richard L.

    2016-01-01

    Patients with atopic dermatitis (AD) have an abnormal skin barrier and are frequently colonized by S. aureus. In this study we investigated if S. aureus penetrates the epidermal barrier of subjects with AD and sought to understand the mechanism and functional significance of this entry. S. aureus was observed to be more abundant in the dermis of lesional skin from AD patients. Bacterial entry past the epidermis was observed in cultured human skin equivalents and in mice, but found to be increased in the skin of cathelicidin knockout (Camp−/−) and ovalbumin-sensitized filaggrin mutant (FLGft/ft) mice. S. aureus penetration through the epidermis was dependent on bacterial viability and protease activity as killed bacteria or a protease-null mutant strain of S. aureus was unable to penetrate. Entry of S. aureus directly correlated with increased expression of IL4, IL13, IL22, TSLP and other cytokines associated with AD, and with decreased expression of cathelicidin. These data illustrate how abnormalities of the epidermal barrier in AD can alter the balance of S. aureus entry into the dermis and provides an explanation for how such dermal dysbiosis results in increased inflammatory cytokines and exacerbation of disease. PMID:27381887

  19. Mice lacking desmocollin 1 show epidermal fragility accompanied by barrier defects and abnormal differentiation.

    PubMed

    Chidgey, M; Brakebusch, C; Gustafsson, E; Cruchley, A; Hail, C; Kirk, S; Merritt, A; North, A; Tselepis, C; Hewitt, J; Byrne, C; Fassler, R; Garrod, D

    2001-11-26

    The desmosomal cadherin desmocollin (Dsc)1 is expressed in upper epidermis where strong adhesion is required. To investigate its role in vivo, we have genetically engineered mice with a targeted disruption in the Dsc1 gene. Soon after birth, null mice exhibit flaky skin and a striking punctate epidermal barrier defect. The epidermis is fragile, and acantholysis in the granular layer generates localized lesions, compromising skin barrier function. Neutrophils accumulate in the lesions and further degrade the tissue, causing sloughing (flaking) of lesional epidermis, but rapid wound healing prevents the formation of overt lesions. Null epidermis is hyperproliferative and overexpresses keratins 6 and 16, indicating abnormal differentiation. From 6 wk, null mice develop ulcerating lesions resembling chronic dermatitis. We speculate that ulceration occurs after acantholysis in the fragile epidermis because environmental insults are more stringent and wound healing is less rapid than in neonatal mice. This dermatitis is accompanied by localized hair loss associated with formation of utriculi and dermal cysts, denoting hair follicle degeneration. Possible resemblance of the lesions to human blistering diseases is discussed. These results show that Dsc1 is required for strong adhesion and barrier maintenance in epidermis and contributes to epidermal differentiation.

  20. Mice lacking desmocollin 1 show epidermal fragility accompanied by barrier defects and abnormal differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Chidgey, Martyn; Brakebusch, Cord; Gustafsson, Erika; Cruchley, Alan; Hail, Chris; Kirk, Sarah; Merritt, Anita; North, Alison; Tselepis, Chris; Hewitt, Jane; Byrne, Carolyn; Fassler, Reinhard; Garrod, David

    2001-01-01

    The desmosomal cadherin desmocollin (Dsc)1 is expressed in upper epidermis where strong adhesion is required. To investigate its role in vivo, we have genetically engineered mice with a targeted disruption in the Dsc1 gene. Soon after birth, null mice exhibit flaky skin and a striking punctate epidermal barrier defect. The epidermis is fragile, and acantholysis in the granular layer generates localized lesions, compromising skin barrier function. Neutrophils accumulate in the lesions and further degrade the tissue, causing sloughing (flaking) of lesional epidermis, but rapid wound healing prevents the formation of overt lesions. Null epidermis is hyperproliferative and overexpresses keratins 6 and 16, indicating abnormal differentiation. From 6 wk, null mice develop ulcerating lesions resembling chronic dermatitis. We speculate that ulceration occurs after acantholysis in the fragile epidermis because environmental insults are more stringent and wound healing is less rapid than in neonatal mice. This dermatitis is accompanied by localized hair loss associated with formation of utriculi and dermal cysts, denoting hair follicle degeneration. Possible resemblance of the lesions to human blistering diseases is discussed. These results show that Dsc1 is required for strong adhesion and barrier maintenance in epidermis and contributes to epidermal differentiation. PMID:11714727

  1. Clinical characteristics and epidermal barrier function of papulopustular rosacea: A comparison study with acne vulgaris

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Maosong; Xie, Hongfu; Cheng, Lin; Li, Ji

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the clinical characteristics and epidermal barrier function of papulopustular rosacea by comparing with acne vulgaris. Methods: Four hundred and sixty-three papulopustular rosacea patients and four hundred and twelve acne vulgaris patients were selected for the study in Xiangya Hospital of Central South University from March 2015 to May 2016. They were analyzed for major facial lesions, self-conscious symptoms and epidermal barrier function. Results: Erythema, burning, dryness and itching presented in papulopustular rosacea patients were significantly higher than that in acne vulgaris patients (P<0.001). The clinical scores of erythema, burning, dryness and itching in papulopustular rosacea patients were significantly higher than those in acne vulgaris patients (P<0.001). The water content of the stratum cornuem and skin surface lipid level were both significantly lower in papulopustular rosacea patients than that of the acne vulgaris patients (P<0.001) and healthy subjects (P<0.001); Water content of the stratum cornuem and skin surface lipid level were higher in acne vulgaris patients in comparison with that of healthy subjects (P>0.05, P<0.001; respectively). Transepidermal water loss was significantly higher in papulopustular rosacea patients than that of acne vulgaris patients and healthy subjects (P<0.001); transepidermal water loss was lower in skin of acne vulgaris patients than that of healthy subjects (P<0.001). Conclusion: Erythema, burning, dryness and itching are the characteristics of papulopustular rosacea, which makes it different from acne vulgaris. The epidermal barrier function was damaged in papulopustular rosacea patients while not impaired in that of acne vulgaris patients. PMID:28083023

  2. Clinical characteristics and epidermal barrier function of papulopustular rosacea: A comparison study with acne vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Maosong; Xie, Hongfu; Cheng, Lin; Li, Ji

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the clinical characteristics and epidermal barrier function of papulopustular rosacea by comparing with acne vulgaris. Four hundred and sixty-three papulopustular rosacea patients and four hundred and twelve acne vulgaris patients were selected for the study in Xiangya Hospital of Central South University from March 2015 to May 2016. They were analyzed for major facial lesions, self-conscious symptoms and epidermal barrier function. Erythema, burning, dryness and itching presented in papulopustular rosacea patients were significantly higher than that in acne vulgaris patients (P<0.001). The clinical scores of erythema, burning, dryness and itching in papulopustular rosacea patients were significantly higher than those in acne vulgaris patients (P<0.001). The water content of the stratum cornuem and skin surface lipid level were both significantly lower in papulopustular rosacea patients than that of the acne vulgaris patients (P<0.001) and healthy subjects (P<0.001); Water content of the stratum cornuem and skin surface lipid level were higher in acne vulgaris patients in comparison with that of healthy subjects (P>0.05, P<0.001; respectively). Transepidermal water loss was significantly higher in papulopustular rosacea patients than that of acne vulgaris patients and healthy subjects (P<0.001); transepidermal water loss was lower in skin of acne vulgaris patients than that of healthy subjects (P<0.001). Erythema, burning, dryness and itching are the characteristics of papulopustular rosacea, which makes it different from acne vulgaris. The epidermal barrier function was damaged in papulopustular rosacea patients while not impaired in that of acne vulgaris patients.

  3. REMEDIATION OF TCE-CONTAMINATED GROUNDWATER BY A PERMEABLE REACTIVE BARRIER FILLED WITH PLANT MULCH (BIOWALL)

    EPA Science Inventory

    A pilot-scale permeable reactive barrier filled with plant mulch was installed at Altus Air Force Base (in Oklahoma, USA) to treat trichloroethylene (TCE) contamination in ground water emanating from a landfill. The barrier was constructed in June 2002. It was 139 meters long, 7 ...

  4. REMEDIATION OF TCE-CONTAMINATED GROUNDWATER BY A PERMEABLE REACTIVE BARRIER FILLED WITH PLANT MULCH (BIOWALL)

    EPA Science Inventory

    A pilot-scale permeable reactive barrier filled with plant mulch was installed at Altus Air Force Base (in Oklahoma, USA) to treat trichloroethylene (TCE) contamination in ground water emanating from a landfill. The barrier was constructed in June 2002. It was 139 meters long, 7 ...

  5. Current evidence of epidermal barrier dysfunction and thymic stromal lymphopoietin in the atopic march.

    PubMed

    Li, Mei

    2014-09-01

    It has long been observed that the development of asthma, allergic rhinitis and food allergy are frequently preceded by atopic dermatitis, a phenomenon known as the "atopic march". Clinical, genetic and experimental studies have supported the fact that atopic dermatitis could be the initial step of the atopic march, leading to the subsequent development of other atopic diseases. This brief review will focus on the current evidence showing that epidermal barrier dysfunction and the keratinocyte-derived cytokine thymic stromal lymphopoietin play critical roles in the onset of the atopic march. ©ERS 2014.

  6. NMDA- and endothelin-1-induced increases in blood-brain barrier permeability quantitated with Lucifer yellow.

    PubMed

    Miller, R D; Monsul, N T; Vender, J R; Lehmann, J C

    1996-03-01

    At 48 h following intrastriatal injection of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA; 100 nmol/microliter) or endothelin-1 (ET-1; 143 pmol/microliter), significant increases in brain penetration of the highly polar, fluorescent tracer Lucifer yellow were observed. The competitive NMDA receptor antagonist selfotel (CGS-19755; 30 nmol/microliter, i.c.) significantly reduced the NMDA-induced increases in blood-brain barrier permeability, but not those induced by ET-1. These results suggest that NMDA receptors can mediate increases in blood-brain barrier permeability but do not primarily mediate increases in blood-brain barrier permeability caused by ET-1. This is the first study to our knowledge investigating the relationship between excitotoxicity and disruption of the blood-brain barrier, a major pathophysiological event in stroke and traumatic brain injury.

  7. Mast Cells Regulate Epidermal Barrier Function and the Development of Allergic Skin Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Sehra, Sarita; Serezani, Ana P M; Ocaña, Jesus A; Travers, Jeffrey B; Kaplan, Mark H

    2016-07-01

    Atopic dermatitis is a chronic inflammatory skin disease characterized by infiltration of eosinophils, T helper cells, and mast cells. The role of mast cells in atopic dermatitis is not completely understood. To define the effects of mast cells on skin biology, we observed that mast cells regulate the homeostatic expression of epidermal differentiation complex and other skin genes. Decreased epidermal differentiation complex gene expression in mice that genetically lack mast cells (Kit(W-sh/W-sh) mice) is associated with increased uptake of protein antigens painted on the skin by dendritic cells (DCs) compared with similarly treated wild-type mice, suggesting a protective role for mast cells in exposure to nominal environmental allergens. To test this further, we crossed Kit(W-sh/W-sh) mice with signal transducer and activator of transcription 6 (i.e., Stat6) VT transgenic mice that develop spontaneous atopic dermatitis-like disease that is dependent on T helper cell 2 cytokines and is associated with high serum concentrations of IgE. We observed that Stat6VT × Kit(W-sh/W-sh) mice developed more frequent and more severe allergic skin inflammation than Stat6VT transgenic mice that had mast cells. Together, these studies suggest that mast cells regulate epidermal barrier function and have a potential protective role in the development of atopic dermatitis-like disease.

  8. Epidermal lipids.

    PubMed

    Wertz, P W

    1992-06-01

    Epidermal lipids play important roles in cell structure, in control of growth and differentiation, in determining cohesion and desquamation, and in formation and function of a permeability barrier. Knowledge of the structures and composition of the epidermal lipids is important for understanding these functions. The lipids present in epidermis include phospholipids, monohexosylceramides, ceramides, cholesterol, cholesterol esters, cholesterol sulfate, triglycerides, and fatty acids. The phospholipids are major structural components of the plasma membranes and membranous organelles in the viable and differentiating keratinocytes. In addition, phospholipids serve in several transmembranal signaling processes and as a reservoir for arachidonic acid, the precursor of the eicosanoids. Monohexosylceramides are thought to function in the assembly of lamellar bodies, and in the final stage of differentiation are converted to a structurally heterogenous mixture of ceramides in the intercellular space of the stratum corneum and to a unique ceramide covalently attached to the corneocyte surface. The mixture of lipids in the stratum corneum, composed principally of ceramides, cholesterol, cholesterol esters, and fatty acids, prevents desiccation and limits the penetration of a variety of noxious environmental agents. The stratum corneum lipids represent a major product of epidermal differentiation, and free sphingosine liberated from ceramides in this terminally differentiated compartment may provide a feedback mechanism for the regulation of the differentiation process.

  9. Characterization of a major permeability barrier in the zebrafish embryo.

    PubMed

    Hagedorn, M; Kleinhans, F W; Artemov, D; Pilatus, U

    1998-11-01

    Fish embryos represent a class of multicompartmental biological systems that have not been successfully cryopreserved, primarily because of the lack of understanding of how water and cryoprotectants permeate the compartments. We are using the zebrafish embryo as a model to understand these kinetics. Zebrafish embryos have two major compartments, the blastoderm and the yolk, which is surrounded by the multinucleated yolk syncytial layer (YSL). We determined the water and cryoprotectant permeability in these compartments using two methods. First, we measured shrink/swell dynamics in optical volumetric experiments. Zebrafish embryos shrank over time and did not re-expand while immersed in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) or propylene glycol. Second, we measured DMSO uptake with diffusion-weighted nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. DMSO uptake was rapid during the first few minutes, then gradual thereafter. We used one- and two-compartment models to analyze the data and to determine the permeability parameters. We found that the two-compartment model provided a better fit to the data. On the basis of this model and in the presence of DMSO, the yolk and blastoderm had very similar water permeabilities (i.e., 0.01 and 0. 005 micron x min-1atm-1, respectively), but they had different DMSO permeabilities separated by three orders of magnitude (i.e., permeability of the yolk predicted that the yolk/YSL compartment should be more susceptible to cryodamage. To test this, the yolk, blastoderm, and YSL were examined at the ultrastructural level after vitrification. Only the YSL incurred significant damage after freezing and thawing (p

  10. A permeability barrier surrounds taste buds in lingual epithelia.

    PubMed

    Dando, Robin; Pereira, Elizabeth; Kurian, Mani; Barro-Soria, Rene; Chaudhari, Nirupa; Roper, Stephen D

    2015-01-01

    Epithelial tissues are characterized by specialized cell-cell junctions, typically localized to the apical regions of cells. These junctions are formed by interacting membrane proteins and by cytoskeletal and extracellular matrix components. Within the lingual epithelium, tight junctions join the apical tips of the gustatory sensory cells in taste buds. These junctions constitute a selective barrier that limits penetration of chemosensory stimuli into taste buds (Michlig et al. J Comp Neurol 502: 1003-1011, 2007). We tested the ability of chemical compounds to permeate into sensory end organs in the lingual epithelium. Our findings reveal a robust barrier that surrounds the entire body of taste buds, not limited to the apical tight junctions. This barrier prevents penetration of many, but not all, compounds, whether they are applied topically, injected into the parenchyma of the tongue, or circulating in the blood supply, into taste buds. Enzymatic treatments indicate that this barrier likely includes glycosaminoglycans, as it was disrupted by chondroitinase but, less effectively, by proteases. The barrier surrounding taste buds could also be disrupted by brief treatment of lingual tissue samples with DMSO. Brief exposure of lingual slices to DMSO did not affect the ability of taste buds within the slice to respond to chemical stimulation. The existence of a highly impermeable barrier surrounding taste buds and methods to break through this barrier may be relevant to basic research and to clinical treatments of taste.

  11. A permeability barrier surrounds taste buds in lingual epithelia

    PubMed Central

    Dando, Robin; Pereira, Elizabeth; Kurian, Mani; Barro-Soria, Rene; Chaudhari, Nirupa

    2014-01-01

    Epithelial tissues are characterized by specialized cell-cell junctions, typically localized to the apical regions of cells. These junctions are formed by interacting membrane proteins and by cytoskeletal and extracellular matrix components. Within the lingual epithelium, tight junctions join the apical tips of the gustatory sensory cells in taste buds. These junctions constitute a selective barrier that limits penetration of chemosensory stimuli into taste buds (Michlig et al. J Comp Neurol 502: 1003–1011, 2007). We tested the ability of chemical compounds to permeate into sensory end organs in the lingual epithelium. Our findings reveal a robust barrier that surrounds the entire body of taste buds, not limited to the apical tight junctions. This barrier prevents penetration of many, but not all, compounds, whether they are applied topically, injected into the parenchyma of the tongue, or circulating in the blood supply, into taste buds. Enzymatic treatments indicate that this barrier likely includes glycosaminoglycans, as it was disrupted by chondroitinase but, less effectively, by proteases. The barrier surrounding taste buds could also be disrupted by brief treatment of lingual tissue samples with DMSO. Brief exposure of lingual slices to DMSO did not affect the ability of taste buds within the slice to respond to chemical stimulation. The existence of a highly impermeable barrier surrounding taste buds and methods to break through this barrier may be relevant to basic research and to clinical treatments of taste. PMID:25209263

  12. Application of Blood-Brain Barrier Permeability Imaging in Global Cerebral Edema.

    PubMed

    Ivanidze, J; Kallas, O N; Gupta, A; Weidman, E; Baradaran, H; Mir, D; Giambrone, A; Segal, A Z; Claassen, J; Sanelli, P C

    2016-09-01

    Blood-brain barrier permeability is not routinely evaluated in the clinical setting. Global cerebral edema occurs after SAH and is associated with BBB disruption. Detection of global cerebral edema using current imaging techniques is challenging. Our purpose was to apply blood-brain barrier permeability imaging in patients with global cerebral edema by using extended CT perfusion. Patients with SAH underwent CTP in the early phase after aneurysmal rupture (days 0-3) and were classified as having global cerebral edema or nonglobal cerebral edema using established noncontrast CT criteria. CTP data were postprocessed into blood-brain barrier permeability quantitative maps of PS (permeability surface-area product), K(trans) (volume transfer constant from blood plasma to extravascular extracellular space), Kep (washout rate constant of the contrast agent from extravascular extracellular space to intravascular space), VE (extravascular extracellular space volume per unit of tissue volume), VP (plasmatic volume per unit of tissue volume), and F (plasma flow) by using Olea Sphere software. Mean values were compared using t tests. Twenty-two patients were included in the analysis. Kep (1.32 versus 1.52, P < .0001), K(trans) (0.15 versus 0.19, P < .0001), VP (0.51 versus 0.57, P = .0007), and F (1176 versus 1329, P = .0001) were decreased in global cerebral edema compared with nonglobal cerebral edema while VE (0.81 versus 0.39, P < .0001) was increased. Extended CTP was used to evaluate blood-brain barrier permeability in patients with SAH with and without global cerebral edema. Kep is an important indicator of altered blood-brain barrier permeability in patients with decreased blood flow, as Kep is flow-independent. Further study of blood-brain barrier permeability is needed to improve diagnosis and monitoring of global cerebral edema. © 2016 by American Journal of Neuroradiology.

  13. Activation of TRPV4 strengthens the tight-junction barrier in human epidermal keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Akazawa, Y; Yuki, T; Yoshida, H; Sugiyama, Y; Inoue, S

    2013-01-01

    The transient receptor potential cation channel, subfamily V (TRPV), is expressed in the epidermis and considered to be a sensor of extrinsic stimuli such as temperature and other physical or chemical factors. In this study, we examined whether or not the activation of TRPVs by their agonists alters the epidermal tight junction (TJ) function in cultured human epidermal keratinocytes. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analyses showed that mRNA for TRPV1, 3 and 4 were expressed in differentiated keratinocytes in which TJs had formed. Stimulation of the keratinocytes with a TRPV4 agonist (4α-phorbol 12, 13-didecanoate, 4α-PDD) strengthened the TJ-associated barrier, analyzed by means of transepithelial electric resistance measurements and flux measurements of the paracellular tracer. Stimulation with TRPV1 and TRPV3 agonists did not have the same result. Simultaneously, the 4α-PDD-stimulated keratinocytes showed an upregulation of TJ structural proteins, occludin and claudin-4, and TJ regulatory factors, phospho-atypical PKCζ/ι. It was also observed that the amounts of occludin and phospho-atypical PKCζ/ι complex were higher in 4α-PDD stimulated keratinocytes. In conclusion, we demonstrated that the activation of TRPV4 strengthened the TJ-associated barrier of epidermal cells. It was also suggested that the upregulation of TJ structural proteins and/or the posttranslational modification of TJ structural proteins by phospho-atypical PKCζ/ι are responsible for the enhancement of TJ function. Our study supports the hypothesis that TJs change their function in response to a change in the external environment sensed through TRPVs. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  14. Optical clearing of skin using flash lamp-induced enhancement of epidermal permeability.

    PubMed

    Tuchin, V V; Altshuler, G B; Gavrilova, A A; Pravdin, A B; Tabatadze, D; Childs, J; Yaroslavsky, I V

    2006-10-01

    Strong light scattering in skin prevents precise targeting of optical energy in therapeutic and diagnostic applications. Optical immersion based on matching refractive index of scattering centers with that of surrounding matter through introduction of an exogenous index-matching agent can alleviate the problem. However, slow diffusion of the index-matching agent through skin barrier makes practical implementation of this approach difficult. We propose a method of accelerating penetration of the index-matching compounds by enhancing skin permeability through creating a lattice of micro-zones (islets) of limited thermal damage in the stratum corneum (SC). A flash lamp (intense pulsed light) system and an island mask with a pattern of absorbing centers (center size approximately 75-120 microm, lattice pitch approximately 450-500 microm) were used to create the lattice of islets of damage (LID). Index-matching agents, such as glucose solution, propylene glycol solution, and glycerol solution, were applied. Experimental results of optical clearing ex vivo rat and pig skin, and ex vivo and in vivo human skin are presented. Optical transmission spectra of the skin samples with LID were measured during some 2 hours after application of index-matching chemical agents. In order to assess and compare the clearing rate under different treatment and clearing agents we calculated the quantity that we call "relative transmittance": T(rel) = I(t)(lambda)/I(0)(lambda), were I(t)(lambda) is the intensity measured at elapsed time t. The dynamics of relative transmittance of skin samples at 470 and 650 nm shows that the implementation of limited thermal damage technique leads to a 3-10-fold increase of optical clearing (rise of transmittance) rate compared to the results obtained when the samples were treated with high-intensity light pulses but without the use of island damage mask (IDM). It was observed from the plotted spectra of relative transmittance that the maximum increase of

  15. SURFACE-ALTERED ZEOLITES AS PERMEABLE BARRIERS FOR IN SITU TREATMENT OF CONTAMINATED GROUNDWATER

    SciTech Connect

    Robert S. Bowman; Pengfei Zhang; Xian Tao

    2002-03-01

    This report summarizes experiments to develop and test surfactant-modified zeolite/zero-valent iron (SMZ/ZVI) pellets for permeable reactive barriers to treat groundwater contamination. Coating a glass foam core with a mixture of hexadecyltrimethylammonium surfactant, zeolite, and ZVI produced a high hydraulic conductivity, mechanically stable pellet. Laboratory experiments showed that the pellets completely removed soluble chromate from aqueous solution, and reduced perchloroethylene (PCE) concentrations more than pellets that lacked surfactant. Based upon the laboratory results, they predicted a 1-m-wide SMZ/ZVI barrier that would reduce PCE concentrations by four orders of magnitude. Thirteen cubic meters (470 cubic feet) of SMZ/ZVI pellets were manufactured and emplaced in a permeable barrier test facility. A controlled plume of chromate and PCE was allowed to contact the barrier for four weeks. The entire plume was captured by the barrier. No chromate was detected downgradient of the barrier. The PCE broke through the barrier after four weeks, and downgradient concentrations ultimately exceeded 10% of the influent PCE. The less-than-expected PCE reduction was attributed to insufficient surfactant content, the large size, and pH-altering characteristics of the bulk-produced pellets. The pellets developed here can be improved to yield a performance- and cost-competitive permeable barrier material.

  16. Permeability of the blood-brain barrier predicts conversion from optic neuritis to multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Cramer, Stig P; Modvig, Signe; Simonsen, Helle J; Frederiksen, Jette L; Larsson, Henrik B W

    2015-09-01

    Optic neuritis is an acute inflammatory condition that is highly associated with multiple sclerosis. Currently, the best predictor of future development of multiple sclerosis is the number of T2 lesions visualized by magnetic resonance imaging. Previous research has found abnormalities in the permeability of the blood-brain barrier in normal-appearing white matter of patients with multiple sclerosis and here, for the first time, we present a study on the capability of blood-brain barrier permeability in predicting conversion from optic neuritis to multiple sclerosis and a direct comparison with cerebrospinal fluid markers of inflammation, cellular trafficking and blood-brain barrier breakdown. To this end, we applied dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging at 3 T to measure blood-brain barrier permeability in 39 patients with monosymptomatic optic neuritis, all referred for imaging as part of the diagnostic work-up at time of diagnosis. Eighteen healthy controls were included for comparison. Patients had magnetic resonance imaging and lumbar puncture performed within 4 weeks of onset of optic neuritis. Information on multiple sclerosis conversion was acquired from hospital records 2 years after optic neuritis onset. Logistic regression analysis showed that baseline permeability in normal-appearing white matter significantly improved prediction of multiple sclerosis conversion (according to the 2010 revised McDonald diagnostic criteria) within 2 years compared to T2 lesion count alone. There was no correlation between permeability and T2 lesion count. An increase in permeability in normal-appearing white matter of 0.1 ml/100 g/min increased the risk of multiple sclerosis 8.5 times whereas having more than nine T2 lesions increased the risk 52.6 times. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis of permeability in normal-appearing white matter gave a cut-off of 0.13 ml/100 g/min, which predicted conversion to multiple sclerosis with a sensitivity of

  17. Permeability of the blood–brain barrier predicts conversion from optic neuritis to multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Modvig, Signe; Simonsen, Helle J.; Frederiksen, Jette L.; Larsson, Henrik B. W.

    2015-01-01

    Optic neuritis is an acute inflammatory condition that is highly associated with multiple sclerosis. Currently, the best predictor of future development of multiple sclerosis is the number of T2 lesions visualized by magnetic resonance imaging. Previous research has found abnormalities in the permeability of the blood–brain barrier in normal-appearing white matter of patients with multiple sclerosis and here, for the first time, we present a study on the capability of blood–brain barrier permeability in predicting conversion from optic neuritis to multiple sclerosis and a direct comparison with cerebrospinal fluid markers of inflammation, cellular trafficking and blood–brain barrier breakdown. To this end, we applied dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging at 3 T to measure blood–brain barrier permeability in 39 patients with monosymptomatic optic neuritis, all referred for imaging as part of the diagnostic work-up at time of diagnosis. Eighteen healthy controls were included for comparison. Patients had magnetic resonance imaging and lumbar puncture performed within 4 weeks of onset of optic neuritis. Information on multiple sclerosis conversion was acquired from hospital records 2 years after optic neuritis onset. Logistic regression analysis showed that baseline permeability in normal-appearing white matter significantly improved prediction of multiple sclerosis conversion (according to the 2010 revised McDonald diagnostic criteria) within 2 years compared to T2 lesion count alone. There was no correlation between permeability and T2 lesion count. An increase in permeability in normal-appearing white matter of 0.1 ml/100 g/min increased the risk of multiple sclerosis 8.5 times whereas having more than nine T2 lesions increased the risk 52.6 times. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis of permeability in normal-appearing white matter gave a cut-off of 0.13 ml/100 g/min, which predicted conversion to multiple sclerosis with a

  18. 'You shall not pass!': quantifying barrier permeability and proximity avoidance by animals.

    PubMed

    Beyer, Hawthorne L; Gurarie, Eliezer; Börger, Luca; Panzacchi, Manuela; Basille, Mathieu; Herfindal, Ivar; Van Moorter, Bram; R Lele, Subhash; Matthiopoulos, Jason

    2016-01-01

    Impediments to animal movement are ubiquitous and vary widely in both scale and permeability. It is essential to understand how impediments alter ecological dynamics via their influence on animal behavioural strategies governing space use and, for anthropogenic features such as roads and fences, how to mitigate these effects to effectively manage species and landscapes. Here, we focused primarily on barriers to movement, which we define as features that cannot be circumnavigated but may be crossed. Responses to barriers will be influenced by the movement capabilities of the animal, its proximity to the barriers, and habitat preference. We developed a mechanistic modelling framework for simultaneously quantifying the permeability and proximity effects of barriers on habitat preference and movement. We used simulations based on our model to demonstrate how parameters on movement, habitat preference and barrier permeability can be estimated statistically. We then applied the model to a case study of road effects on wild mountain reindeer summer movements. This framework provided unbiased and precise parameter estimates across a range of strengths of preferences and barrier permeabilities. The quality of permeability estimates, however, was correlated with the number of times the barrier is crossed and the number of locations in proximity to barriers. In the case study we found that reindeer avoided areas near roads and that roads are semi-permeable barriers to movement. There was strong avoidance of roads extending up to c. 1 km for four of five animals, and having to cross roads reduced the probability of movement by 68·6% (range 3·5-99·5%). Human infrastructure has embedded within it the idea of networks: nodes connected by linear features such as roads, rail tracks, pipelines, fences and cables, many of which divide the landscape and limit animal movement. The unintended but potentially profound consequences of infrastructure on animals remain poorly understood

  19. The roles of ABCA12 in epidermal lipid barrier formation and keratinocyte differentiation.

    PubMed

    Akiyama, Masashi

    2014-03-01

    ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters form a large superfamily of transporters that bind and hydrolyze ATP to transport various molecules across limiting membranes or into vesicles. The ABCA subfamily members are thought to transport lipid materials. ABCA12 is a keratinocyte transmembrane lipid transporter protein associated with the transport of lipids via lamellar granules. ABCA12 is considered to transport lipids including ceramides to form extracellular lipid layers in the stratum corneum of the epidermis, which is essential for skin barrier function. ABCA12 mutations are known to underlie the three major types of autosomal recessive congenital ichthyoses: harlequin ichthyosis, lamellar ichthyosis and congenital ichthyosiform erythroderma. ABCA12 mutations result in defective lipid transport via lamellar granules in the keratinocytes, leading to ichthyosis phenotypes from malformation of the stratum corneum lipid barrier. Studies on ABCA12-deficient bioengineered models have revealed that lipid transport by ABCA12 is required for keratinocyte differentiation and epidermal morphogenesis. Defective lipid transport due to loss of ABCA12 function leads to the accumulation of intracellular lipids, including glucosylceramides and gangliosides, in the epidermal keratinocytes. The accumulation of gangliosides seems to result in the apoptosis of Abca12(-/-) keratinocytes. It was reported that AKT activation occurs in Abca12(-/-) granular-layer keratinocytes, which suggests that AKT activation serves to prevent the cell death of Abca12(-/-) keratinocytes. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled The Important Role of Lipids in the Epidermis and their Role in the Formation and Maintenance of the Cutaneous Barrier. Guest Editors: Kenneth R. Feingold and Peter Elias. © 2013.

  20. Large-scale identification of human genes implicated in epidermal barrier function

    PubMed Central

    Toulza, Eve; Mattiuzzo, Nicolas R; Galliano, Marie-Florence; Jonca, Nathalie; Dossat, Carole; Jacob, Daniel; de Daruvar, Antoine; Wincker, Patrick; Serre, Guy; Guerrin, Marina

    2007-01-01

    Background During epidermal differentiation, keratinocytes progressing through the suprabasal layers undergo complex and tightly regulated biochemical modifications leading to cornification and desquamation. The last living cells, the granular keratinocytes (GKs), produce almost all of the proteins and lipids required for the protective barrier function before their programmed cell death gives rise to corneocytes. We present here the first analysis of the transcriptome of human GKs, purified from healthy epidermis by an original approach. Results Using the ORESTES method, 22,585 expressed sequence tags (ESTs) were produced that matched 3,387 genes. Despite normalization provided by this method (mean 4.6 ORESTES per gene), some highly transcribed genes, including that encoding dermokine, were overrepresented. About 330 expressed genes displayed less than 100 ESTs in UniGene clusters and are most likely to be specific for GKs and potentially involved in barrier function. This hypothesis was tested by comparing the relative expression of 73 genes in the basal and granular layers of epidermis by quantitative RT-PCR. Among these, 33 were identified as new, highly specific markers of GKs, including those encoding a protease, protease inhibitors and proteins involved in lipid metabolism and transport. We identified filaggrin 2 (also called ifapsoriasin), a poorly characterized member of the epidermal differentiation complex, as well as three new lipase genes clustered with paralogous genes on chromosome 10q23.31. A new gene of unknown function, C1orf81, is specifically disrupted in the human genome by a frameshift mutation. Conclusion These data increase the present knowledge of genes responsible for the formation of the skin barrier and suggest new candidates for genodermatoses of unknown origin. PMID:17562024

  1. Assessment of permeability barriers to macromolecules in the rodent endometrium at the onset of implantation.

    PubMed

    Bany, Brent M; Hamilton, G Scot

    2011-01-01

    In rodents, embryo implantation is an invasive process, which begins with its attachment to the uterine wall and culminates in the formation of the definitive placenta several days later. It is critical that the endometrium provide a supportive environment for the implanting embryo during this process, as the placenta is not yet established. The concept of changing permeability barriers to macromolecules between different extracellular compartments in the rodent uterus at the onset of implantation has been established. This chapter provides protocols that can be used to assess this changing permeability barrier and the associated redistribution of macromolecules during the early phases of implantation in rodents. An increased permeability of the endometrial vasculature to plasma proteins occurs in areas adjacent to the implanting blastocyst. In addition, alterations in the extracellular matrix enhance the accumulation of fluid and extravasated macromolecules. We describe several protocols proven to be effective in studying and quantifying early vascular and extravascular responses to natural and artificial "implantation stimuli." The first three protocols represent qualitative and quantitative methods to assess the early endometrial "vascular permeability" response. On the contrary, the fourth protocol addresses the onset of decidualization and the arising permeability barrier, which restricts the movement of macromolecules through the extracellular space. This barrier is believed to provide transient protection for the implanting embryo against potentially harmful maternal serum proteins. This protocol describes assessment of resistance of the primary decidual zone to the movement of macromolecules across the compartments of the extracellular space.

  2. Effect of anticholinesterase compound phosalone on blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability.

    PubMed

    Bharavi, K; Reddy, K S

    2005-01-01

    To elucidate the role of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) enzyme in BBB function, phosalone, an organophosphorous compound, was studied using rat brain micro vessels in vitro. Phosalone at 100 mg/kg b. wt. induced convulsions and caused a significant inhibition of AChE resulting in increased permeability as assessed by volume distribution. The anaesthetized phosalone treated group also increased permeability as compared to the control but the values were significantly (P<0.05) lower than phosalone alone treated group. The inhibition of AChE enzyme has altered the barrier function at the dose level at which it caused convulsion and had an added effect on permeability of BBB.

  3. Rapid and reversible enhancement of blood–brain barrier permeability using lysophosphatidic acid

    PubMed Central

    On, Ngoc H; Savant, Sanjot; Toews, Myron; Miller, Donald W

    2013-01-01

    The present study characterizes the effects of lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) on blood–brain barrier (BBB) permeability focusing specifically on the time of onset, duration, and magnitude of LPA-induced changes in cerebrovascular permeability in the mouse using both magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and near infrared fluorescence imaging (NIFR). Furthermore, potential application of LPA for enhanced drug delivery to the brain was also examined by measuring the brain accumulation of radiolabeled methotrexate. Exposure of primary cultured brain microvessel endothelial cells (BMECs) to LPA produced concentration-dependent increases in permeability that were completely abolished by clostridium toxin B. Administration of LPA disrupted BBB integrity and enhanced the permeability of small molecular weight marker gadolinium diethylenetriaminepentaacetate (Gd-DTPA) contrast agent, the large molecular weight permeability marker, IRdye800cwPEG, and the P-glycoprotein efflux transporter probe, Rhodamine 800 (R800). The increase in BBB permeability occurred within 3 minutes after LPA injection and barrier integrity was restored within 20 minutes. A decreased response to LPA on large macromolecule BBB permeability was observed after repeated administration. The administration of LPA also resulted in 20-fold enhancement of radiolabeled methotrexate in the brain. These studies indicate that administration of LPA in combination with therapeutic agents may increase drug delivery to the brain. PMID:24045401

  4. Modulation of blood-brain barrier permeability in mice using synthetic E-cadherin peptide.

    PubMed

    On, Ngoc H; Kiptoo, Paul; Siahaan, Teruna J; Miller, Donald W

    2014-03-03

    The present work characterizes the effects of synthetic E-cadherin peptide (HAV) on blood-brain barrier (BBB) integrity using various techniques including magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and near-infrared fluorescent imaging (NIRF). The permeability of small molecular weight permeability marker gadolinium diethylenetriaminepentaacetate (Gd-DTPA) contrast agent, the large molecular weight permeability marker, IRDye 800CW PEG, and the P-glycoprotein (P-gp) efflux transporter contrast agent, rhodamine 800 (R800), were examined in the presence and absence of HAV peptide. The results consistently demonstrated that systemic iv administration of HAV peptide resulted in a reversible disruption of BBB integrity and enhanced the accumulation of all the dyes examined. The magnitude of increase ranged from 2-fold to 5-fold depending on the size and the properties of the permeability markers. The time frame for BBB disruption with HAV peptide was rapid, occurring within 3-6 min following injection of the peptide. Furthermore, modulation of BBB permeability was reversible with the barrier integrity being restored within 60 min of the injection. The increased BBB permeability observed following HAV peptide administration was not attributable to changes in cerebral blood flow. These studies support the potential use of cadherin peptides to rapidly and reversibly modulate BBB permeability of a variety of therapeutic agents.

  5. The role of the trans double bond in skin barrier sphingolipids: permeability and infrared spectroscopic study of model ceramide and dihydroceramide membranes.

    PubMed

    Skolová, Barbora; Jandovská, Kateřina; Pullmannová, Petra; Tesař, Ondřej; Roh, Jaroslav; Hrabálek, Alexandr; Vávrová, Kateřina

    2014-05-20

    Dihydroceramides (dCer) are members of the sphingolipid family that lack the C4 trans double bond in their sphingoid backbone. In addition to being precursors of ceramides (Cer) and phytoceramides, dCer have also been found in the extracellular lipid membranes of the epidermal barrier, the stratum corneum. However, their role in barrier homeostasis is not known. We studied how the lack of the trans double bond in dCer compared to Cer influences the permeability, lipid chain order, and packing of multilamellar membranes composed of the major skin barrier lipids: (d)Cer, fatty acids, cholesterol, and cholesteryl sulfate. The permeability of the membranes with long-chain dCer was measured using various markers and was either comparable to or only slightly greater than (by up to 35%, not significant) that of the Cer membranes. The dCer were less sensitive to acyl chain shortening than Cer (the short dCer membranes were up to 6-fold less permeable that the corresponding short Cer membranes). Infrared spectroscopy showed that long dCer mixed less with fatty acids but formed more thermally stable ordered domains than Cer. The key parameter explaining the differences in permeability in the short dCer and Cer was the proportion of the orthorhombic phase. Our results suggest that the presence of the trans double bond in Cer is not crucial for the permeability of skin lipid membranes and that dCer may be underappreciated members of the stratum corneum lipid barrier that increase its heterogeneity.

  6. Bacillus cereus-induced permeability of the blood-ocular barrier during experimental endophthalmitis.

    PubMed

    Moyer, Andrea L; Ramadan, Raniyah T; Novosad, Billy D; Astley, Roger; Callegan, Michelle C

    2009-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine to what extent blood-retinal barrier (BRB) permeability occurred during experimental Bacillus cereus endophthalmitis and whether tight junction alterations were involved in permeability. Mice were intravitreally injected with 100 colony-forming units of B. cereus, and eyes were analyzed at specific times after infection for permeability to fibrin and albumin, quantitation of intraocular plasma constituent leakage, production of inflammatory cytokines, and alterations in tight junction protein localization and expression at the level of the retinal pigment epithelium. B. cereus induced the leakage of albumin and fibrin into the aqueous and vitreous humor by 8 hours after infection. BRB permeability occurred as early as 4 hours and increased 13.30-fold compared with uninfected controls by 8 hours. Production of proinflammatory cytokines IL-6, MIP-1alpha, IL-1beta, and KC increased over the course of infection. In the retina, ZO-1 disruption began by 4 hours and was followed by decreasing occludin and ZO-1 expression at 4 and 8 hours, respectively. Tubulin condensation and RPE65 degradation occurred by 12 hours. A quorum-sensing mutant B. cereus strain caused BRB permeability comparable to that of wild-type B. cereus. Wild-type and mutant B. cereus sterile supernatants induced blood-ocular barrier permeability similarly to that of wild-type infection. These results indicate that BRB permeability occurs during the early stages of experimental B. cereus endophthalmitis, beginning as early as 4 hours after infection. Disruption of tight junctions at the level of the retinal pigment epithelium may contribute to barrier breakdown. Quorum-sensing dependent factors may not significantly contribute to BRB permeability.

  7. Mast Cells Regulate Epidermal Barrier Function and the Development of Allergic Skin Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Sehra, Sarita; Serezani, Ana PM; Ocaña, Jesus A.; Travers, Jeffrey B.; Kaplan, Mark H.

    2016-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a chronic inflammatory skin disease characterized by infiltration of eosinophils, T helper cells and mast cells. The role of mast cells in AD is not completely understood. To define the effects of mast cells on skin biology, we observed that mast cells regulate the homeostatic expression of Epidermal Differentiation Complex (EDC) and other skin genes. Decreased EDC gene expression in mice that genetically lack mast cells (KitW-sh/W-sh mice) is associated with increased uptake of protein antigens painted on the skin by dendritic cells, compared to similarly treated wild-type mice, suggesting a protective role for mast cells in exposure to nominal environmental allergens. To test this further, we crossed KitW-sh/W-sh mice with Stat6VT transgenic mice that develop spontaneous AD-like disease that is dependent on Th2 cytokines and associated with high serum concentrations of IgE. We observed that Stat6VT x KitW-sh/W-sh mice developed more frequent and more severe allergic skin inflammation than Stat6VT transgenic mice that had mast cells. Together, these studies suggest that mast cells regulate epidermal barrier function and have a potential protective role in the development of AD-like disease. PMID:27021404

  8. Potential performance of pillared inorgano- organo bentonite for soil mix technology permeable reactive barrier (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abunada, Z. M.; Al-Tabbaa, A.

    2013-12-01

    Modified bentonite has gained more interest for their effect in contaminant removal and environmental protection. This study is investigating the use of three different modified inorgano-organo bentonite (IOB) in soil mixing permeable reactive barrier. IOB were prepared using pillaring agents and quaternary ammonium cations (QAC) with different loading ratios. The permeabilities of compacted specimens containing IOB with two different soil types (sandy and gravelly soil) were measured for site contaminated groundwater, pure water and TEX compounds to study the potential of soil mix permeable reactive barrier (PRB). The soil permeability decreased by 1-2 order of magnitude once mixed with IOB. It also decreased by about 100 in case of TEX compound and site groundwater. The IOB was tested to remove Toluene, Ethyl-benzene, and o-Xylene (TEX) compound from model contaminated water in both batch and column test. Physical characteristics such as pore volume, porosity and specific structure in addition to level of surfactant loading were determined. Materials removal efficiency varied due to the surfactant loading, soil type and contaminant molecular weight. Sorption isotherm showed that the adsorbates preference increased in the order of T>E>X in all IOB types. Maximum TEX compound sorptive capacity varied also due to soil type with the highest was 86.89% 93.19% and 90.2% for T,E,X respectively on sandy soil. Key words: Inorgano-organo bentonite, permeability, reactive barrier, soil mix, sorption

  9. Effect of topically applied dexpanthenol on epidermal barrier function and stratum corneum hydration. Results of a human in vivo study.

    PubMed

    Gehring, W; Gloor, M

    2000-07-01

    In a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study the effect of topical dexpanthenol (CAS 81-13-0) formulated in two different lipophilic vehicles on epidermal barrier function in vivo was carried out. Seven days' treatment with dexpanthenol improved stratum corneum hydration and reduced transepidermal water loss. Active treatment was statistically different from the vehicle control on both measures. Our results suggest that topical dexpanthenol formulated in either lipophilic vehicle stabilizes the skin barrier function.

  10. A framework for understanding semi-permeable barrier effects on migratory ungulates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sawyer, Hall; Kauffman, Matthew J.; Middleton, Arthur D.; Morrison, Thomas A.; Nielson, Ryan M.; Wyckoff, Teal B.

    2013-01-01

    1. Impermeable barriers to migration can greatly constrain the set of possible routes and ranges used by migrating animals. For ungulates, however, many forms of development are semi-permeable, and making informed management decisions about their potential impacts to the persistence of migration routes is difficult because our knowledge of how semi-permeable barriers affect migratory behaviour and function is limited. 2. Here, we propose a general framework to advance the understanding of barrier effects on ungulate migration by emphasizing the need to (i) quantify potential barriers in terms that allow behavioural thresholds to be considered, (ii) identify and measure behavioural responses to semi-permeable barriers and (iii) consider the functional attributes of the migratory landscape (e.g. stopovers) and how the benefits of migration might be reduced by behavioural changes. 3. We used global position system (GPS) data collected from two subpopulations of mule deer Odocoileus hemionus to evaluate how different levels of gas development influenced migratory behaviour, including movement rates and stopover use at the individual level, and intensity of use and width of migration route at the population level. We then characterized the functional landscape of migration routes as either stopover habitat or movement corridors and examined how the observed behavioural changes affected the functionality of the migration route in terms of stopover use. 4. We found migratory behaviour to vary with development intensity. Our results suggest that mule deer can migrate through moderate levels of development without any noticeable effects on migratory behaviour. However, in areas with more intensive development, animals often detoured from established routes, increased their rate of movement and reduced stopover use, while the overall use and width of migration routes decreased. 5. Synthesis and applications. In contrast to impermeable barriers that impede animal movement

  11. LONG-TERM PERFORMANCE OF PERMEABLE REACTIVE BARRIERS TO REMEDIATE CONTAMINATED GROUND WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    This research brief presents findings over the past four years at two sites where detailed investigations by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) have focused on the long-term performance of PRBs under a Tri-Agency Permeable Reactive Barrier Initiative (TRI). This ...

  12. EVALUATION OF PERMEABLE REACTIVE BARRIER PERFORMANCE: A TRI-AGENCY INITIATIVE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The permeable reactive barrier (PRB) technology represents a passive option for long-term treatment of ground-water contamination. PRBs are a potentially more cost-effective treatment option for a variety of dissolved contaminants, such as certain types of chlorinated solvents, ...

  13. Blood-Brain Barrier Permeability and Monocyte Infiltration in Experimental Allergic Encephalomyelitis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Floris, S.; Blezer, E. L. A.; Schreibelt, G.; Dopp, E.; van der Pol, S. M. A.; Schadee-Eestermans, I. L.; Nicolay, K.; Dijkstra, C. D.; de Vries, H. E.

    2004-01-01

    Enhanced cerebrovascular permeability and cellular infiltration mark the onset of early multiple sclerosis lesions. So far, the precise sequence of these events and their role in lesion formation and disease progression remain unknown. Here we provide quantitative evidence that blood-brain barrier leakage is an early event and precedes massive…

  14. ACCUMULATION RATE OF MICROBIAL BIOMASS AT TWO PERMEABLE REACTIVE BARRIER SITES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Accumulation of mineral precipitates and microbial biomass are key factors that impact the long-term performance of in-situ Permeable Reactive Barriers for treating contaminated groundwater. Both processes can impact remedial performance by decreasing zero-valent iron reactivity...

  15. CHROMIUM REMOVAL PROCESSES DURING GROUNDWATER REMEDIATION BY A ZEROVALENT IRON PERMEABLE REACTIVE BARRIER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Solid-phase associations of chromium were examined in core materials collected from a full-scale, zerovalent iron, permeable reactive barrier (PRB) at the U.S. Coast Guard Support Center located near Elizabeth City (NC). The PRB was installed in 1996 to treat groundwater contami...

  16. SPATIAL DISTRIBUTION OF CARBON AND SULFUR PRECIPITATING WITHIN PERMEABLE REACTIVE BARRIERS: DEVELOPMENT OF ANALYTICAL METHODS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A permeable reactive barrier (PRB) is a wall of porous reactive material placed in the path of a dissolved contaminant plume for the purpose of removing contaminants from ground water. Chemical processes within these reactive materials remove both inorganic and organic contamina...

  17. AMELIORATION OF ACID MINE DRAINAGE USING REACTIVE MIXTURES IN PERMEABLE REACTIVE BARRIERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The generation and release of acidic drainage from mine wastes is an environmental problem of international scale. The use of zero-valent iron and/or iron mixtures in subsurface Permeable Reactive Barriers (PRB) presents a possible passive alternative for remediating acidic grou...

  18. A Tracer Test to Characterize Treatment of TCE in a Permeable Reactive Barrier

    EPA Science Inventory

    A tracer test was conducted to characterize the flow of ground water surrounding a permeable reactive barrier constructed with plant mulch (a biowall) at the OU-1 site on Altus Air Force Base, Oklahoma. This biowall is intended to intercept and treat ground water contaminated by ...

  19. Nanosized iron based permeable reactive barriers for nitrate removal - Systematic review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araújo, Rui; Castro, Ana C. Meira; Santos Baptista, João; Fiúza, António

    2016-08-01

    It is unquestionable that an effective decision concerning the usage of a certain environmental clean-up technology should be conveniently supported. Significant amount of scientific work focussing on the reduction of nitrate concentration in drinking water by both metallic iron and nanomaterials and their usage in permeable reactive barriers has been worldwide published over the last two decades. This work aims to present in a systematic review of the most relevant research done on the removal of nitrate from groundwater using nanosized iron based permeable reactive barriers. The research was based on scientific papers published between 2004 and June 2014. It was performed using 16 combinations of keywords in 34 databases, according to PRISMA statement guidelines. Independent reviewers validated the selection criteria. From the 4161 records filtered, 45 met the selection criteria and were selected to be included in this review. This study's outcomes show that the permeable reactive barriers are, indeed, a suitable technology for denitrification and with good performance record but the long-term impact of the use of nanosized zero valent iron in this remediation process, in both on the environment and on the human health, is far to be conveniently known. As a consequence, further work is required on this matter, so that nanosized iron based permeable reactive barriers for the removal of nitrate from drinking water can be genuinely considered an eco-efficient technology.

  20. CHROMIUM REMOVAL PROCESSES DURING GROUNDWATER REMEDIATION BY A ZEROVALENT IRON PERMEABLE REACTIVE BARRIER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Solid-phase associations of chromium were examined in core materials collected from a full-scale, zerovalent iron, permeable reactive barrier (PRB) at the U.S. Coast Guard Support Center located near Elizabeth City (NC). The PRB was installed in 1996 to treat groundwater contami...

  1. ACCUMULATION RATE OF MICROBIAL BIOMASS AT TWO PERMEABLE REACTIVE BARRIER SITES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Accumulation of mineral precipitates and microbial biomass are key factors that impact the long-term performance of in-situ Permeable Reactive Barriers for treating contaminated groundwater. Both processes can impact remedial performance by decreasing zero-valent iron reactivity...

  2. A Tracer Test to Characterize Treatment of TCE in a Permeable Reactive Barrier

    EPA Science Inventory

    A tracer test was conducted to characterize the flow of ground water surrounding a permeable reactive barrier constructed with plant mulch (a biowall) at the OU-1 site on Altus Air Force Base, Oklahoma. This biowall is intended to intercept and treat ground water contaminated by ...

  3. LONG-TERM PERFORMANCE OF PERMEABLE REACTIVE BARRIERS: LESSONS LEARNED, FUTURE DIRECTIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recently, a synthesis of research findings by EPA has been prepared and presented in an EPA report titled Capstone Report on the Application, Monitoring, and Performance of Permeable Reactive Barriers for Ground-Water Remediation (EPA/600/R-03/045 a,b). Another report has also be...

  4. GROUND WATER REMEDIATION RESEARCH: PERMEABLE REACTIVE BARRIERS AND SOURCE ZONE REMEDIATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    An overview of ground water remediation research conducted at the Subsurface Protection and Remediation Division is provided. The focus of the overview is on Permeable Reactive Barriers for treatment of organic and inorganic contaminants and remediation of DNAPL source zones.

  5. EVALUATION OF PERMEABLE REACTIVE BARRIER PERFORMANCE: A TRI-AGENCY INITIATIVE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The permeable reactive barrier (PRB) technology represents a passive option for long-term treatment of ground-water contamination. PRBs are a potentially more cost-effective treatment option for a variety of dissolved contaminants, such as certain types of chlorinated solvents, ...

  6. LONG-TERM PERFORMANCE OF PERMEABLE REACTIVE BARRIERS TO REMEDIATE CONTAMINATED GROUND WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    This research brief presents findings over the past four years at two sites where detailed investigations by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) have focused on the long-term performance of PRBs under a Tri-Agency Permeable Reactive Barrier Initiative (TRI). This ...

  7. SPATIAL DISTRIBUTION OF CARBON AND SULFUR PRECIPITATING WITHIN PERMEABLE REACTIVE BARRIERS: DEVELOPMENT OF ANALYTICAL METHODS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A permeable reactive barrier (PRB) is a wall of porous reactive material placed in the path of a dissolved contaminant plume for the purpose of removing contaminants from ground water. Chemical processes within these reactive materials remove both inorganic and organic contamina...

  8. LONG-TERM PERFORMANCE OF PERMEABLE REACTIVE BARRIERS: LESSONS LEARNED, FUTURE DIRECTIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recently, a synthesis of research findings by EPA has been prepared and presented in an EPA report titled Capstone Report on the Application, Monitoring, and Performance of Permeable Reactive Barriers for Ground-Water Remediation (EPA/600/R-03/045 a,b). Another report has also be...

  9. LONG-TERM PERFORMANCE MONITORING OF PERMEABLE REACTIVE BARRIERS TO REMEDIATE CONTAMINATED GROUND WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Permeable reactive barriers (PRB's) are an alternative in-situ approach for remediating contaminated groundwater that combine subsurface fluid flow management with a passive chemical treatment zone. PRB's are being selected with increased frequency at waste sites (more than 40 f...

  10. Glomerular permeability barrier in the rat. Functional assessment by in vitro methods.

    PubMed Central

    Daniels, B S; Deen, W M; Mayer, G; Meyer, T; Hostetter, T H

    1993-01-01

    The formation of glomerular ultrafiltrate is dependent on the prevailing hemodynamic forces within the glomerular microcirculation and the intrinsic properties of the filtration barrier. However, direct assessment of the permeability barrier is difficult with most available techniques. We used confocal microscopy to image 1-micron thick optical cross-sections of isolated intact glomeruli and glomeruli denuded of cells and quantitated dextran (70,000 mol wt) diffusion from the capillary lumen. Dextran permeance was 11 times greater for the acellular filtration barrier than the intact peripheral capillary. Consideration of the basement membrane and cells as series resistors demonstrated that cells of the filtration barrier contribute 90% of the total resistance to macromolecular permeance. Using a different approach, dextran sieving coefficients for acellular glomeruli consolidated as a multilayer sheet in a filtration cell were similar to those for intact glomeruli in vivo at radii 30-36 A and approximately 50 times greater at a dextran radius of 60 A. The presence of cells significantly reduced hydraulic permeability determined on consolidated intact or acellular glomeruli in an ultrafiltration cell with 50 mmHg applied pressure. The glomerular basement membrane does restrict macromolecular permeability but cells are important determinants of the overall macromolecular and hydraulic permeability of the glomerulus. Images PMID:7688767

  11. GROUND WATER REMEDIATION RESEARCH: PERMEABLE REACTIVE BARRIERS AND SOURCE ZONE REMEDIATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    An overview of ground water remediation research conducted at the Subsurface Protection and Remediation Division is provided. The focus of the overview is on Permeable Reactive Barriers for treatment of organic and inorganic contaminants and remediation of DNAPL source zones.

  12. A clay permeable reactive barrier to remove Cs-137 from groundwater: Column experiments.

    PubMed

    De Pourcq, K; Ayora, C; García-Gutiérrez, M; Missana, T; Carrera, J

    2015-11-01

    Clay minerals are reputed sorbents for Cs-137 and can be used as a low-permeability material to prevent groundwater flow. Therefore, clay barriers are employed to seal Cs-137 polluted areas and nuclear waste repositories. This work is motivated by cases where groundwater flow cannot be impeded. A permeable and reactive barrier to retain Cs-137 was tested. The trapping mechanism is based on the sorption of cesium on illite-containing clay. The permeability of the reactive material is provided by mixing clay on a matrix of wood shavings. Column tests combined with reactive transport modeling were performed to check both reactivity and permeability. Hydraulic conductivity of the mixture (10(-4) m/s) was sufficient to ensure an adequate hydraulic performance of an eventual barrier excavated in most aquifers. A number of column experiments confirmed Cs retention under different flow rates and inflow solutions. A 1D reactive transport model based on a cation-exchange mechanism was built. It was calibrated with batch experiments for high concentrations of NH4+ and K+ (the main competitors of Cs in the exchange positions). The model predicted satisfactorily the results of the column experiments. Once validated, it was used to investigate the performance and duration of a 2 m thick barrier under different scenarios (flow, clay content, Cs-137 and K concentration).

  13. AMELIORATION OF ACID MINE DRAINAGE USING REACTIVE MIXTURES IN PERMEABLE REACTIVE BARRIERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The generation and release of acidic drainage from mine wastes is an environmental problem of international scale. The use of zero-valent iron and/or iron mixtures in subsurface Permeable Reactive Barriers (PRB) presents a possible passive alternative for remediating acidic grou...

  14. COST ANALYSIS OF PERMEABLE REACTIVE BARRIERS FOR REMEDIATION OF GROUND WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U. S. Environmental Protection Agency's Office of Research and Development and its contractor have evaluated cost data from 22 sites where permeable reactive barriers (PRBs) have been utilized to remediate contaminated ground water resources. Most of the sites evaluated wer...

  15. COST ANALYSIS OF PERMEABLE REACTIVE BARRIERS FOR REMEDIATION OF GROUND WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U. S. Environmental Protection Agency's Office of Research and Development and its contractor have evaluated cost data from 22 sites where permeable reactive barriers (PRBs) have been utilized to remediate contaminated ground water resources. Most of the sites evaluated wer...

  16. Blood-Brain Barrier Permeability and Monocyte Infiltration in Experimental Allergic Encephalomyelitis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Floris, S.; Blezer, E. L. A.; Schreibelt, G.; Dopp, E.; van der Pol, S. M. A.; Schadee-Eestermans, I. L.; Nicolay, K.; Dijkstra, C. D.; de Vries, H. E.

    2004-01-01

    Enhanced cerebrovascular permeability and cellular infiltration mark the onset of early multiple sclerosis lesions. So far, the precise sequence of these events and their role in lesion formation and disease progression remain unknown. Here we provide quantitative evidence that blood-brain barrier leakage is an early event and precedes massive…

  17. The gut microbiota influences blood-brain barrier permeability in mice.

    PubMed

    Braniste, Viorica; Al-Asmakh, Maha; Kowal, Czeslawa; Anuar, Farhana; Abbaspour, Afrouz; Tóth, Miklós; Korecka, Agata; Bakocevic, Nadja; Ng, Lai Guan; Guan, Ng Lai; Kundu, Parag; Gulyás, Balázs; Halldin, Christer; Hultenby, Kjell; Nilsson, Harriet; Hebert, Hans; Volpe, Bruce T; Diamond, Betty; Pettersson, Sven

    2014-11-19

    Pivotal to brain development and function is an intact blood-brain barrier (BBB), which acts as a gatekeeper to control the passage and exchange of molecules and nutrients between the circulatory system and the brain parenchyma. The BBB also ensures homeostasis of the central nervous system (CNS). We report that germ-free mice, beginning with intrauterine life, displayed increased BBB permeability compared to pathogen-free mice with a normal gut flora. The increased BBB permeability was maintained in germ-free mice after birth and during adulthood and was associated with reduced expression of the tight junction proteins occludin and claudin-5, which are known to regulate barrier function in endothelial tissues. Exposure of germ-free adult mice to a pathogen-free gut microbiota decreased BBB permeability and up-regulated the expression of tight junction proteins. Our results suggest that gut microbiota-BBB communication is initiated during gestation and propagated throughout life.

  18. Increased blood-brain barrier permeability on perfusion CT might predict malignant middle cerebral artery infarction.

    PubMed

    Bektas, Hesna; Wu, Tzu-Ching; Kasam, Mallikarjunarao; Harun, Nusrat; Sitton, Clark W; Grotta, James C; Savitz, Sean I

    2010-11-01

    Perfusion CT has been used to assess the extent of blood-brain barrier breakdown. The purpose of this study was to determine the predictive value of blood-brain barrier permeability measured using perfusion CT for development of malignant middle cerebral artery infarction requiring hemicraniectomy (HC). We retrospectively identified patients from our stroke registry who had middle cerebral artery infarction and were evaluated with admission perfusion CT. Blood-brain barrier permeability and cerebral blood volume maps were generated and infarct volumes calculated. Clinical and radiographic characteristics were compared between those who underwent HC versus those who did not undergo HC. One hundred twenty-two patients (12 HC, 110 no HC) were identified. Twelve patients who underwent HC had developed edema, midline shift, or infarct expansion. Infarct permeability area, infarct cerebral blood volume area, and infarct volumes were significantly different (P < 0.018, P < 0.0211, P < 0.0001, P < 0.0014) between HC and no HC groups. Age (P = 0.03) and admission National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (P = 0.0029) were found to be independent predictors for HC. Using logistic regression modeling, there was an association between increased infarct permeability area and HC. The OR for HC based on a 5-, 10-, 15-, or 20-cm² increase in infarct permeability area were 1.179, 1.390, 1.638, or 1.932, respectively (95% CI, 1.035 to 1.343, 1.071 to 1.804, 1.108 to 2.423, 1.146 to 3.255, respectively). Increased infarct permeability area is associated with an increased likelihood for undergoing HC. Because early HC for malignant middle cerebral artery infarction has been associated with better outcomes, the infarct permeability area on admission perfusion CT might be a useful tool to predict malignant middle cerebral artery infarction and need for HC.

  19. The gut-blood barrier permeability - A new marker in cardiovascular and metabolic diseases?

    PubMed

    Ufnal, Marcin; Pham, Kinga

    2017-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that blood-borne metabolites of gut microbiota, such as trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO) are involved in the aetiology of cardiovascular diseases and may serve as markers of cardiovascular risk. To enter the bloodstream the microbiota-derived molecules need to pass the gut-blood barrier (GBB). The GBB plays an important role in maintaining organism homeostasis. It is a complex multi-layer system which determines the absorption of nutrients, water and many other substances. The integrity and permeability of the GBB may be impaired in numerous diseases including gastrointestinal, metabolic and cardiovascular diseases. Here, we propose that the evaluation of the GBB permeability may have a significant diagnostic potential in cardiovascular and metabolic diseases. Second, we suggest that the GBB permeability is a variable that confounds diagnostic value of new gut microbiota-derived biomarkers such as TMAO. Therefore, cardiovascular risk assessment requires the evaluation of both TMAO and the GBB permeability.

  20. The effects of hypoglycemic and alcoholic coma on the blood-brain barrier permeability

    PubMed Central

    Yorulmaz, Hatice; Seker, Fatma Burcu; Oztas, Baria

    2011-01-01

    In this investigation, the effects of hypoglycemic coma and alcoholic coma on the blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability have been compared. Female adult Wistar albino rats weighing 180-230 g were divided into three groups: Control group (n=8), Alcoholic Coma Group (n=18), and Hypoglycemic Coma group (n=12). The animals went into coma approximately 3-4 hours after insulin administration and 3-5 minutes after alcohol administration. Evans blue (4mL/kg) was injected intravenously as BBB tracer. It was observed that the alcoholic coma did not significantly increase the BBB permeability in any of the brain regions when compared to control group. Changes in BBB permeability were significantly increased by the hypoglycemic coma in comparison to the control group values (p<0.01). Our findings suggest that hypoglycemic and alcoholic coma have different effects on the BBB permeability depending on the energy metabolism. PMID:21619558

  1. Histamine suppresses epidermal keratinocyte differentiation and impairs skin barrier function in a human skin model

    PubMed Central

    Gschwandtner, M; Mildner, M; Mlitz, V; Gruber, F; Eckhart, L; Werfel, T; Gutzmer, R; Elias, P M; Tschachler, E

    2013-01-01

    Background Defects in keratinocyte differentiation and skin barrier are important features of inflammatory skin diseases like atopic dermatitis. Mast cells and their main mediator histamine are abundant in inflamed skin and thus may contribute to disease pathogenesis. Methods Human primary keratinocytes were cultured under differentiation-promoting conditions in the presence and absence of histamine, histamine receptor agonists and antagonists. The expression of differentiation-associated genes and epidermal junction proteins was quantified by real-time PCR, Western blot, and immunofluorescence labeling. The barrier function of human skin models was tested by the application of biotin as tracer molecule. Results The addition of histamine to human keratinocyte cultures and organotypic skin models reduced the expression of the differentiation-associated proteins keratin 1/10, filaggrin, and loricrin by 80–95%. Moreover, the addition of histamine to skin models resulted in the loss of the granular layer and thinning of the epidermis and stratum corneum by 50%. The histamine receptor H1R agonist, 2-pyridylethylamine, suppressed keratinocyte differentiation to the same extent as did histamine. Correspondingly, cetirizine, an antagonist of H1R, virtually abrogated the effect of histamine. The expression of tight junction proteins zona occludens-1, occludin, claudin-1, and claudin-4, as well as that of desmosomal junction proteins corneodesmosin and desmoglein-1, was down-regulated by histamine. The tracer molecule biotin readily penetrated the tight junction barrier of skin cultures grown in the presence of histamine, while their diffusion was completely blocked in nontreated controls. Conclusions Our findings suggest a new mechanism by which mast cell activation and histamine release contribute to skin barrier defects in inflammatory skin diseases. PMID:23157658

  2. Redox-active media for permeable reactive barriers

    SciTech Connect

    Sivavec, T.M.; Mackenzie, P.D.; Horney, D.P.; Baghel, S.S.

    1997-12-31

    In this paper, three classes of redox-active media are described and evaluated in terms of their long-term effectiveness in treating TCE-contaminated groundwater in permeable reactive zones. Zero-valent iron, in the form of recycled cast iron filings, the first class, has received considerable attention as a reactive media and has been used in about a dozen pilot- and full-scale subsurface wall installations. Criteria used in selecting commercial sources of granular iron, will be discussed. Two other classes of redox-active media that have not yet seen wide use in pilot- or full-scale installations will also be described: Fe(II) minerals and bimetallic systems. Fe(II) minerals, including magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}), and ferrous sulfide (troilite, FeS), are redox-active and afford TCE reduction rates and product distributions that suggest that they react via a reductive mechanism similar to that which operates in the FeO system. Fe(II) species within the passive oxide layer coating the iron metal may act as electron transfer mediators, with FeO serving as the bulk reductant. Bimetallic systems, the third class of redox-active media, are commonly prepared by plating a second metal onto zero-valent iron (e.g., Ni/Fe and Pd/Fe) and have been shown to accelerate solvent degradation rates relative to untreated iron metal. The long-term effectiveness of this approach, however, has not yet been determined in groundwater treatability tests. The results of a Ni-plated iron column study using site groundwater indicate that a change in reduction mechanism (to catalytic dehydrohalogenation/hydrogenation) accounts for the observed rate enhancement. A significant loss in media reactivity was observed over time, attributable to Ni catalyst deactivation or poisoning. Zero-valent iron systems have not shown similar losses in reactivity in long-term laboratory, pilot or field investigations.

  3. Direct visualization of the arterial wall water permeability barrier using CARS microscopy.

    PubMed

    Lucotte, Bertrand M; Powell, Chloe; Knutson, Jay R; Combs, Christian A; Malide, Daniela; Yu, Zu-Xi; Knepper, Mark; Patel, Keval D; Pielach, Anna; Johnson, Errin; Borysova, Lyudmyla; Dora, Kim A; Balaban, Robert S

    2017-05-02

    The artery wall is equipped with a water permeation barrier that allows blood to flow at high pressure without significant water leak. The precise location of this barrier is unknown despite its importance in vascular function and its contribution to many vascular complications when it is compromised. Herein we map the water permeability in intact arteries, using coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy and isotopic perfusion experiments. Generation of the CARS signal is optimized for water imaging with broadband excitation. We identify the water permeation barrier as the endothelial basolateral membrane and show that the apical membrane is highly permeable. This is confirmed by the distribution of the AQP1 water channel within endothelial membranes. These results indicate that arterial pressure equilibrates within the endothelium and is transmitted to the supporting basement membrane and internal elastic lamina macromolecules with minimal deformation of the sensitive endothelial cell. Disruption of this pressure transmission could contribute to endothelial cell dysfunction in various pathologies.

  4. Intracellular ascorbate tightens the endothelial permeability barrier through Epac1 and the tubulin cytoskeleton.

    PubMed

    Parker, William H; Rhea, Elizabeth Meredith; Qu, Zhi-Chao; Hecker, Morgan R; May, James M

    2016-10-01

    Vitamin C, or ascorbic acid, both tightens the endothelial permeability barrier in basal cells and also prevents barrier leak induced by inflammatory agents. Barrier tightening by ascorbate in basal endothelial cells requires nitric oxide derived from activation of nitric oxide synthase. Although ascorbate did not affect cyclic AMP levels in our previous study, there remains a question of whether it might activate downstream cyclic AMP-dependent pathways. In this work, we found in both primary and immortalized cultured endothelial cells that ascorbate tightened the endothelial permeability barrier by ∼30%. In human umbilical vein endothelial cells, this occurred at what are likely physiologic intracellular ascorbate concentrations. In so doing, ascorbate decreased measures of oxidative stress and also flattened the cells to increase cell-to-cell contact. Inhibition of downstream cyclic AMP-dependent proteins via protein kinase A did not prevent ascorbate from tightening the endothelial permeability barrier, whereas inhibition of Epac1 did block the ascorbate effect. Although Epac1 was required, its mediator Rap1 was not activated. Furthermore, ascorbate acutely stabilized microtubules during depolymerization induced by colchicine and nocodazole. Over several days in culture, ascorbate also increased the amount of stable acetylated α-tubulin. Microtubule stabilization was further suggested by the finding that ascorbate increased the amount of Epac1 bound to α-tubulin. These results suggest that physiologic ascorbate concentrations tighten the endothelial permeability barrier in unstimulated cells by stabilizing microtubules in a manner downstream of cyclic AMP that might be due both to increasing nitric oxide availability and to scavenging of reactive oxygen or nitrogen species.

  5. Phosphorylation of Grainy head by ERK is essential for wound-dependent regeneration but not for development of an epidermal barrier.

    PubMed

    Kim, Myungjin; McGinnis, William

    2011-01-11

    Grainy head (GRH) is a key transcription factor responsible for epidermal barrier formation and repair, whose function is highly conserved across diverse animal species. However, it is not known how GRH function is reactivated to repair differentiated epidermal barriers after wounding. Here, we show that GRH is directly regulated by extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) phosphorylation, which is required for wound-dependent expression of GRH target genes in epidermal cells. Serine 91 is the principal residue in GRH that is phosphorylated by ERK. Although mutations of the ERK phosphorylation sites in GRH do not impair its DNA binding function, the ERK sites in GRH are required to activate Dopa decarboxylase (Ddc) and misshapen (msn) epidermal wound enhancers as well as functional regeneration of an epidermal barrier upon wounding. This result indicates that the phosphorylation sites are essential for damaged epidermal barrier repair. However, GRH with mutant ERK phosphorylation sites can still promote barrier formation during embryonic epidermal development, suggesting that ERK sites are dispensable for the GRH function in establishing epidermal barrier integrity. These results provide mechanistic insight into how tissue repair can be initiated by posttranslational modification of a key transcription factor that normally mediates the developmental generation of that tissue.

  6. Use of jet grouting to create a low permeability horizontal barrier below an incinerator ash landfill

    SciTech Connect

    Furth, A.J.; Burke, G.K.; Deutsch, W.L. Jr.

    1997-12-31

    The City of Philadelphia`s Division of Aviation (DOA) has begun construction of a new commuter runway, designated as Runway 8-26, at the Philadelphia International Airport. A portion of this runway will be constructed over a former Superfund site known as the Enterprise Avenue Landfill, which for many years was used to dispose of solid waste incinerator ash and other hazardous materials. The site was clay capped in the 1980`s, but in order for the DOA to use the site, additional remediation was needed to meet US EPA final closure requirements. One component of the closure plan included installation of a low permeability horizontal barrier above a very thin (approximately 0.61 to 0.91 meters) natural clay stratum which underlies an approximately 1020 m{sup 2} area of the landfill footprint so as to insure that a minimum 1.52 meter thick low permeability barrier exists beneath the entire 150,000 m{sup 2} landfill. The new barrier was constructed using jet grouting techniques to achieve remote excavation and replacement of the bottom 0.91 meters of the waste mass with a low permeability grout. The grout was formulated to meet the low permeability, low elastic modulus and compressive strength requirements of the project design. This paper will discuss the advantages of using jet grouting for the work and details the development of the grout mixture, modeling of the grout zone under load, field construction techniques, performance monitoring and verification testing.

  7. Counterregulation between thymic stromal lymphopoietin- and IL-23-driven immune axes shapes skin inflammation in mice with epidermal barrier defects.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiagui; Leyva-Castillo, Juan Manuel; Hener, Pierre; Eisenmann, Aurelie; Zaafouri, Sarra; Jonca, Nathalie; Serre, Guy; Birling, Marie-Christine; Li, Mei

    2016-07-01

    Epidermal barrier dysfunction has been recognized as a critical factor in the initiation and exacerbation of skin inflammation, particularly in patients with atopic dermatitis (AD) and AD-like congenital disorders, including peeling skin syndrome type B. However, inflammatory responses developed in barrier-defective skin, as well as the underlying mechanisms, remained incompletely understood. We aimed to decipher inflammatory axes and the cytokine network in mouse skin on breakdown of epidermal stratum corneum barrier. We generated Cdsn(iep-/-) mice with corneodesmosin ablation in keratinocytes selectively in an inducible manner. We characterized inflammatory responses and cytokine expression by using histology, immunohistochemistry, ELISA, and quantitative PCR. We combined mouse genetic tools, antibody-mediated neutralization, signal-blocking reagents, and topical antibiotic treatment to explore the inflammatory axes. We show that on breakdown of the epidermal stratum corneum barrier, type 2 and type 17 inflammatory responses are developed simultaneously, driven by thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) and IL-23, respectively. Importantly, we reveal a counterregulation between these 2 inflammatory axes. Furthermore, we show that protease-activated receptor 2 signaling is involved in mediating the TSLP/type 2 axis, whereas skin bacteria are engaged in induction of the IL-23/type 17 axis. Moreover, we find that IL-1β is induced in skin of Cdsn(iep-/-) mice and that blockade of IL-1 signaling suppresses both TSLP and IL-23 expression and ameliorates skin inflammation. The inflammatory phenotype in barrier-defective skin is shaped by counterregulation between the TSLP/type 2 and IL-23/type 17 axes. Targeting IL-1 signaling could be a promising therapeutic option for controlling skin inflammation in patients with peeling skin syndrome type B and other diseases related to epidermal barrier dysfunction, including AD. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma

  8. Permeability of the blood-brain barrier to a rhenacarborane.

    PubMed

    Hawkins, Patrick M; Jelliss, Paul A; Nonaka, Naoko; Shi, Xiaoming; Banks, William A

    2009-05-01

    The treatment of brain malignancies with boron neutron capture therapy depends on their ability to cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB). An especially promising class of boron-containing compounds is the rhenacarboranes that, if able to cross the BBB, could act as delivery vehicles as well as a source of boron. Here, we examined the ability of the 3-NO-3,3-kappa(2)-(2,2'-N(2)C(10)H(6)(Me)[(CH(2))(7)(131)I]-4,4')-closo-3,1,2-ReC(2)B(9)H(11) (rhenacarborane) labeled with iodine-131 to be taken up into the bloodstream after subcutaneous administration and to cross the BBB. The (131)I-rhenacarborane was quickly absorbed from the injection site and reached a steady state in arterial serum of 2.59%/ml of the administered dose. Between 73 and 95% of the radioactivity in serum 6 h after administration represented intact (131)I-rhenacarborane. Its octanol/buffer partition coefficient was 1.74, showing it to be lipophilic. Tissue/serum ratios for brain, lung, and liver showed classic patterns for a lipid-soluble substance with high levels immediately achieved and rapid redistribution. For brain, a steady state of approximately 0.107% of the administered dose/gram-brain was rapidly reached, and 71% of the radioactivity in brain 6 h after subcutaneous administration represented intact (131)I-rhenacarborane. Steady-state values were 1.53 and 0.89% of the injected dose per gram for lung and liver, respectively. (131)I-Rhenacarborane was quickly effluxed from brain by a nonsaturable system after its injection into the lateral ventricle of the brain. In conclusion, these results show that a rhenacarborane was enzymatically resistant and able to cross the BBB by transmembrane diffusion and accumulate in brain in substantial amounts. This supports their use as therapeutic agents for targeting the central nervous system.

  9. Alcohol-induced premature permeability in mouse placenta-yolk sac barriers in vivo.

    PubMed

    Haghighi Poodeh, S; Salonurmi, T; Nagy, I; Koivunen, P; Vuoristo, J; Räsänen, J; Sormunen, R; Vainio, S; Savolainen, M J

    2012-10-01

    Acute alcohol exposure induces malformation and malfunction of placenta-yolk sac tissues in rodents, reducing the labyrinth zone in the placenta and altering the permeability and fluidity of the cell membrane. During normal mouse placentation the cells line up in an optimal way to form a hemotrichorial placenta where layers II and III are connected through gap junctions. These act as molecular sieves that limit the passage of large molecules. PlGF is a developmentally regulated protein that controls the passage of molecules in the vasculosyncytial membranes and media of large blood vessels in the placental villi. In addition to the chorioallontoic placenta, rodents also have another type of placenta that consists of Reichert's membrane within the trophoblast cell layer on the maternal side and the parietal endodermal cells on the embryonic site. This forms a separate materno-fetal transport system. We study here whether alcohol affects these two placental barriers, leading to placental malfunction that in turn diminishes the nutrient supply to the embryo. CD-1 mice received two intraperitoneal injections of 3 g/kg ethanol at 4 h intervals at 8.75 days post coitum (dpc). The placentas were collected on 9.5, 11.5 and 14.5 dpc and used for histopathological protein studies. Hemotrichorial cell layer structure interactions through connective tissue and gap junction were analyzed by electron microscopy. The permeability of the feto-maternal barrier was visualized with Evans Blue. VEGF, a permeability inducer, was found to be up-regulated in the mouse placenta after acute alcohol exposure, and permeability was also affected by altered structures in the barriers that separate the feto-maternal blood circulation which destroyed the gap junctions in the hemotrichorial cell layer, reduced the thickness of Reichert's membrane and interfered with with Reichert's trophoblast/Reichert's parietal interaction. These defects together could have caused the permeability malfunction

  10. Induced phytoextraction/soil washing of lead using biodegradable chelate and permeable barriers.

    PubMed

    Kos, Bostjan; Lestan, Domen

    2003-02-01

    Chelate-induced remediation has been proposed as an effective tool for the extraction of lead (Pb) from contaminated soils by plants. However, side-effects, mainly mobilization and leaching of Pb, raise environmental concerns. Biodegradable, synthetic organic chelate ethylenediaminedisuccinic acid (EDDS), and commonly used ethylenedimanetetraacetic acid (EDTA) were used for induced phytoextraction with a test plant Brassica rapa and in situ washing of soil contaminated with 1350 mg/kg of Pb. Horizontal permeable barriers were placed 20 cm deep in soil columns and tested for their ability to prevent leaching of Pb. The reactive materials in the barriers were nutrient enriched vermiculite, peat or agricultural hydrogel, and apatite. EDTA and EDDS addition increased Pb concentrations in the test plant by 158 and 89 times compared to the control, to 817 and 464 mg/kg, respectively. In EDTA treatments, approximately 25% or more of total initial soil Pb was leached in single cycle of chelate addition. In EDDS treatments, 20% of the initial Pb was leached from columns with no barrier, while barriers with vermiculite or hydrogel and apatite decreased leaching by more than 60 times, to 0.35%. 11.6% of total initial Pb was washed from the soil above the barrier with vermiculite and apatite, where almost all leached Pb was accumulated. Results indicate that use of biodegradable chelate EDDS and permeable barriers may lead to environmentally safe induced Pb phytoextraction and in situ washing of Pb.

  11. Nitric Oxide and Airway Epithelial Barrier Function: Regulation of Tight Junction Proteins and Epithelial Permeability

    PubMed Central

    Olson, Nels; Greul, Anne-Katrin; Hristova, Milena; Bove, Peter F.; Kasahara, David I.; van der Vliet, Albert

    2008-01-01

    Acute airway inflammation is associated with enhanced production of nitric oxide (NO•) and altered airway epithelial barrier function, suggesting a role of NO• or its metabolites in epithelial permeability. While high concentrations of S-nitrosothiols disrupted transepithelial resistance (TER) and increased permeability in 16HBE14o- cells, no significant barrier disruption was observed by NONOates, in spite of altered distribution and expression of some TJ proteins. Barrier disruption of mouse tracheal epithelial (MTE) cell monolayers in response to inflammatory cytokines was independent of NOS2, based on similar effects in MTE cells from NOS2-/- mice and a lack of effect of the NOS2-inhibitor 1400W. Cell pre-incubation with LPS protected MTE cells from TER loss and increased permeability by H2O2, which was independent of NOS2. However, NOS2 was found to contribute to epithelial wound repair and TER recovery after mechanical injury. Overall, our results demonstrate that epithelial NOS2 is not responsible for epithelial barrier dysfunction during inflammation, but may contribute to restoration of epithelial integrity. PMID:19100237

  12. Potential Retinal Benefits of Dietary Polyphenols Based on Their Permeability across the Blood-Retinal Barrier.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yixiang; Liu, Guang-Ming; Cao, Min-Jie; Chen, Qingchou; Sun, Lechang; Ji, Baoping

    2017-04-19

    Whether all dietary polyphenols nourish the eyes via oral supplementation is controversial. Given that passage of dietary polyphenols across the blood-retina barrier (BRB) is the precondition for polyphenols to exhibit ocular benefits, the BRB permeability of polyphenols was assessed in this study. Being common dietary polyphenols in fruits and vegetables, nonanthocyanin flavonoids, anthocyanins, and phenolic acids were investigated. BRB was simulated in vitro by using a differentiated retinal pigment epithelial cell monolayer cultivated on a Transwell culture system. Penetration rate was calculated by quantitatively analyzing the polyphenols in basolateral media. The BRB permeability of different polyphenols obviously (p < 0.05) differed, as follows: phenolic acids > nonanthocyanin flavonoids > anthocyanins. Glycosylation and methylation improved the BRB permeability of nonanthocyanin flavonoids and anthocyanins. However, instability and carbonylation at the C-4 position severely suppressed the BRB permeability of anthocyanins and nonanthocyanin flavonoids. Moreover, a new metabolite was discovered during penetration of anthocyanins into the BRB. However, hydrophilic phenolic acids exhibited better BRB permeability than hydrophobic ones. Data demonstrate that BRB permeability of polyphenols was determined based on structural characteristics, hydrophilicity, stability, and metabolic changes.

  13. Novel RpoS-Dependent Mechanisms Strengthen the Envelope Permeability Barrier during Stationary Phase.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Angela M; Wang, Wei; Silhavy, Thomas J

    2017-01-15

    Gram-negative bacteria have effective methods of excluding toxic compounds, including a largely impermeable outer membrane (OM) and a range of efflux pumps. Furthermore, when cells become nutrient limited, RpoS enacts a global expression change providing cross-protection against many stresses. Here, we utilized sensitivity to an anionic detergent (sodium dodecyl sulfate [SDS]) to probe changes occurring to the cell's permeability barrier during nutrient limitation. Escherichia coli is resistant to SDS whether cells are actively growing, carbon limited, or nitrogen limited. In actively growing cells, this resistance depends on the AcrAB-TolC efflux pump; however, this pump is not necessary for protection under either carbon-limiting or nitrogen-limiting conditions, suggesting an alternative mechanism(s) of SDS resistance. In carbon-limited cells, RpoS-dependent pathways lessen the permeability of the OM, preventing the necessity for efflux. In nitrogen-limited but not carbon-limited cells, the loss of rpoS can be completely compensated for by the AcrAB-TolC efflux pump. We suggest that this difference simply reflects the fact that nitrogen-limited cells have access to a metabolizable energy (carbon) source that can efficiently power the efflux pump. Using a transposon mutant pool sequencing (Tn-Seq) approach, we identified three genes, sanA, dacA, and yhdP, that are necessary for RpoS-dependent SDS resistance in carbon-limited stationary phase. Using genetic analysis, we determined that these genes are involved in two different envelope-strengthening pathways. These genes have not previously been implicated in stationary-phase stress responses. A third novel RpoS-dependent pathway appears to strengthen the cell's permeability barrier in nitrogen-limited cells. Thus, though cells remain phenotypically SDS resistant, SDS resistance mechanisms differ significantly between growth states. Gram-negative bacteria are intrinsically resistant to detergents and many

  14. Novel RpoS-Dependent Mechanisms Strengthen the Envelope Permeability Barrier during Stationary Phase

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Gram-negative bacteria have effective methods of excluding toxic compounds, including a largely impermeable outer membrane (OM) and a range of efflux pumps. Furthermore, when cells become nutrient limited, RpoS enacts a global expression change providing cross-protection against many stresses. Here, we utilized sensitivity to an anionic detergent (sodium dodecyl sulfate [SDS]) to probe changes occurring to the cell's permeability barrier during nutrient limitation. Escherichia coli is resistant to SDS whether cells are actively growing, carbon limited, or nitrogen limited. In actively growing cells, this resistance depends on the AcrAB-TolC efflux pump; however, this pump is not necessary for protection under either carbon-limiting or nitrogen-limiting conditions, suggesting an alternative mechanism(s) of SDS resistance. In carbon-limited cells, RpoS-dependent pathways lessen the permeability of the OM, preventing the necessity for efflux. In nitrogen-limited but not carbon-limited cells, the loss of rpoS can be completely compensated for by the AcrAB-TolC efflux pump. We suggest that this difference simply reflects the fact that nitrogen-limited cells have access to a metabolizable energy (carbon) source that can efficiently power the efflux pump. Using a transposon mutant pool sequencing (Tn-Seq) approach, we identified three genes, sanA, dacA, and yhdP, that are necessary for RpoS-dependent SDS resistance in carbon-limited stationary phase. Using genetic analysis, we determined that these genes are involved in two different envelope-strengthening pathways. These genes have not previously been implicated in stationary-phase stress responses. A third novel RpoS-dependent pathway appears to strengthen the cell's permeability barrier in nitrogen-limited cells. Thus, though cells remain phenotypically SDS resistant, SDS resistance mechanisms differ significantly between growth states. IMPORTANCE Gram-negative bacteria are intrinsically resistant to

  15. Chronic sleep restriction disrupts interendothelial junctions in the hippocampus and increases blood-brain barrier permeability.

    PubMed

    Hurtado-Alvarado, G; Velázquez-Moctezuma, J; Gómez-González, B

    2017-10-01

    Chronic sleep loss in the rat increases blood-brain barrier permeability to Evans blue and FITC-dextrans in almost the whole brain and sleep recovery during short periods restores normal blood-brain barrier permeability. Sleep loss increases vesicle density in hippocampal endothelial cells and decreases tight junction protein expression. However, at the ultrastructural level the effect of chronic sleep loss on interendothelial junctions is unknown. In this study we characterised the ultrastructure of interendothelial junctions in the hippocampus, the expression of tight junction proteins, and quantified blood-brain barrier permeability to fluorescein-sodium after chronic sleep restriction. Male Wistar rats were sleep restricted using the modified multiple platform method during 10 days, with a daily schedule of 20-h sleep deprivation plus 4-h sleep recovery at their home-cages. At the 10th day hippocampal samples were obtained immediately at the end of the 20-h sleep deprivation period, and after 40 and 120 min of sleep recovery. Samples were processed for transmission electron microscopy and western blot. Chronic sleep restriction increased blood-brain barrier permeability to fluorescein-sodium, and decreased interendothelial junction complexity by increasing the frequency of less mature end-to-end and simply overlap junctions, even after sleep recovery, as compared to intact controls. Chronic sleep loss also induced the formation of clefts between narrow zones of adjacent endothelial cell membranes in the hippocampus. The expression of claudin-5 and actin decreased after chronic sleep loss as compared to intact animals. Therefore, it seems that chronic sleep loss disrupts interendothelial junctions that leads to blood-brain barrier hyperpermeability in the hippocampus. © 2017 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2017 Royal Microscopical Society.

  16. Magnesium sulphate treatment decreases blood-brain barrier permeability during acute hypertension in pregnant rats.

    PubMed

    Euser, Anna G; Bullinger, Lisa; Cipolla, Marilyn J

    2008-02-01

    Eclampsia is associated with increased blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability and formation of cerebral oedema. Magnesium sulphate is used to treat eclampsia despite an unclear mechanism of action. This study was to determine the effect of magnesium sulphate on in vivo BBB permeability and formation of cerebral oedema during acute hypertension and on brain aquaporin-4 (AQP4) protein expression. An in vivo model of hypertensive encephalopathy was used in late-pregnant (LP) rats following magnesium sulphate treatment, 270 mg kg(-1) i.p. injection every 4 h for 24 h. Permeability of the BBB was determined by in situ brain perfusion of Evan's Blue (EB) and sodium fluorescein (NaFl), and dye clearance determined by fluorescence spectrophotometry. Cerebral oedema was determined following acute hypertension by measuring brain water content. The effect of magnesium treatment on AQP4 expression was determined by Western blot analysis. Acute hypertension with autoregulatory breakthrough increased BBB permeability to EB in both brain regions studied (P < 0.05). Magnesium attenuated BBB permeability to EB during acute hypertension by 41% in the posterior cerebrum (P < 0.05) but had no effect in the anterior cerebrum (P > 0.05). Treatment with magnesium did not change NaFl permeability, cerebral oedema formation or AQP4 expression. In summary, BBB permeability to Evan's Blue was increased by acute hypertension in LP rats, and this was attenuated by treatment with magnesium sulphate. The greatest effect on BBB permeability to EB was in the posterior cerebrum, an area particularly susceptible to oedema formation during eclampsia.

  17. Detection of blood-nerve barrier permeability by magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Wessig, Carsten

    2011-01-01

    The blood-nerve barrier (BNB) separates the endoneurium from the endovascular space and the epineurial connective tissue. An intact BNB is very important for integrity and functions of the nerve fibers within the endoneurial space. Disruption of the BNB which leads to functional and structural impairment of the peripheral nerve plays an important role in many disorders of the peripheral nerve like Wallerian degeneration, inflammatory nerve disorders, and demyelination. So far, this increased BNB permeability can only be assessed ex vivo. Assessing BNB disruption in vivo would be of great value for studying disorders of the peripheral nervous system. Gadofluorine M (Gf), a new amphiphilic contrast agent for MRI, accumulates in rat nerves with increased permeability of the BNB. After application of Gf, T1-weighted MR images show contrast enhancement of nerves with a disrupted BNB. This new tool of assessing BNB permeability in vivo is described.

  18. Surfactant-modified zeolites as permeable barriers to organic and inorganic groundwater contaminants

    SciTech Connect

    Bowman, R.S.; Sullivan, E.J.

    1995-10-01

    We have shown in laboratory experiments that natural zeolites treated with hexadecyltrimethylammonium (HDTMA) are effective sorbents for nonpolar organics, inorganic cations, and inorganic anions. Due to their low cost ({approximately}$0.75/kg) and granular nature, HDTMA-zeolites appear ideal candidates for reactive, permeable subsurface barriers. The HDTMA-zeolites are stable over a wide range of pH (3-13), ionic strength (1 M Cs{sup +} or Ca{sup 2+}), and in organic solvents. Surfactant-modified zeolites sorb nonpolar organics (benzene, toluene, xylene, chlorinated aliphatics) via a partitioning mechanism, inorganic cations (Pb{sup 2+}) via ion exchange and surface complexation, and inorganic anions (CrO{sub 4}{sup 2-}, SeO{sub 4}{sup 2-}, SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}) via surface precipitation.The goal of this work is to demonstrate the use of surfactant-modified zeolite as a permeable barrier to ground water contaminants.

  19. Fluorescein Isothiocyanate (FITC)-Dextran Extravasation as a Measure of Blood-Brain Barrier Permeability.

    PubMed

    Natarajan, Reka; Northrop, Nicole; Yamamoto, Bryan

    2017-04-10

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is formed in part by vascular endothelial cells that constitute the capillaries and microvessels of the brain. The function of this barrier is to maintain homeostasis within the brain microenvironment and buffer the brain from changes in the periphery. A dysfunction of the BBB would permit circulating molecules and pathogens typically restricted to the periphery to enter the brain and interfere with normal brain function. As increased permeability of the BBB is associated with several neuropathologies, it is important to have a reliable and sensitive method that determines BBB permeability and the degree of BBB disruption. A detailed protocol is presented for assessing the integrity of the BBB by transcardial perfusion of a 10,000 Da FITC-labeled dextran molecule and its visualization to determine the degree of extravasation from brain microvessels. © 2017 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  20. Oxidation of trichloroethylene, toluene, and ethanol vapors by a partially saturated permeable reactive barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmoodlu, Mojtaba G.; Hassanizadeh, S. Majid; Hartog, Niels; Raoof, Amir

    2014-08-01

    The mitigation of volatile organic compound (VOC) vapors in the unsaturated zone largely relies on the active removal of vapor by ventilation. In this study we considered an alternative method involving the use of solid potassium permanganate to create a horizontal permeable reactive barrier for oxidizing VOC vapors. Column experiments were carried out to investigate the oxidation of trichloroethylene (TCE), toluene, and ethanol vapors using a partially saturated mixture of potassium permanganate and sand grains. Results showed a significant removal of VOC vapors due to the oxidation. We found that water saturation has a major effect on the removal capacity of the permeable reactive layer. We observed a high removal efficiency and reactivity of potassium permanganate for all target compounds at the highest water saturation (Sw = 0.6). A change in pH within the reactive layer reduced oxidation rate of VOCs. The use of carbonate minerals increased the reactivity of potassium permanganate during the oxidation of TCE vapor by buffering the pH. Reactive transport of VOC vapors diffusing through the permeable reactive layer was modeled, including the pH effect on the oxidation rates. The model accurately described the observed breakthrough curve of TCE and toluene vapors in the headspace of the column. However, miscibility of ethanol in water in combination with produced water during oxidation made the modeling results less accurate for ethanol. A linear relationship was found between total oxidized mass of VOC vapors per unit volume of permeable reactive layer and initial water saturation. This behavior indicates that pH changes control the overall reactivity and longevity of the permeable reactive layer during oxidation of VOCs. The results suggest that field application of a horizontal permeable reactive barrier can be a viable technology against upward migration of VOC vapors through the unsaturated zone.

  1. Permeability barrier of Gram-negative cell envelopes and approaches to bypass it

    SciTech Connect

    Zgurskaya, Helen I.; López, Cesar A.; Gnanakaran, Sandrasegaram

    2015-09-18

    Gram-negative bacteria are intrinsically resistant to many antibiotics. Species that have acquired multidrug resistance and cause infections that are effectively untreatable present a serious threat to public health. The problem is broadly recognized and tackled at both the fundamental and applied levels. This article summarizes current advances in understanding the molecular bases of the low permeability barrier of Gram-negative pathogens, which is the major obstacle in discovery and development of antibiotics effective against such pathogens. Gaps in knowledge and specific strategies to break this barrier and to achieve potent activities against difficult Gram-negative bacteria are also discussed.

  2. Bacillus cereus induces permeability of an in vitro blood-retina barrier.

    PubMed

    Moyer, A L; Ramadan, R T; Thurman, J; Burroughs, A; Callegan, M C

    2008-04-01

    Most Bacillus cereus toxin production is controlled by the quorum-sensing-dependent, pleiotropic global regulator plcR, which contributes to the organism's virulence in the eye. The purpose of this study was to analyze the effects of B. cereus infection and plcR-regulated toxins on the barrier function of retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells, the primary cells of the blood-retina barrier. Human ARPE-19 cells were apically inoculated with wild-type or quorum-sensing-deficient B. cereus, and cytotoxicity was analyzed. plcR-regulated toxins were not required for B. cereus-induced RPE cytotoxicity, but these toxins did increase the rate of cell death, primarily by necrosis. B. cereus infection of polarized RPE cell monolayers resulted in increased barrier permeability, independent of plcR-regulated toxins. Loss of both occludin and ZO-1 expression occurred by 8 h postinfection, but alterations in tight junctions appeared to precede cytotoxicity. Of the several proinflammatory cytokines analyzed, only interleukin-6 was produced in response to B. cereus infection. These results demonstrate the deleterious effects of B. cereus infection on RPE barrier function and suggest that plcR-regulated toxins may not contribute significantly to RPE barrier permeability during infection.

  3. A novel dual-flow bioreactor simulates increased fluorescein permeability in epithelial tissue barriers.

    PubMed

    Giusti, Serena; Sbrana, Tommaso; La Marca, Margherita; Di Patria, Valentina; Martinucci, Valentina; Tirella, Annalisa; Domenici, Claudio; Ahluwalia, Arti

    2014-09-01

    Permeability studies across epithelial barriers are of primary importance in drug delivery as well as in toxicology. However, traditional in vitro models do not adequately mimic the dynamic environment of physiological barriers. Here, we describe a novel two-chamber modular bioreactor for dynamic in vitro studies of epithelial cells. The fluid dynamic environment of the bioreactor was characterized using computational fluid dynamic models and measurements of pressure gradients for different combinations of flow rates in the apical and basal chambers. Cell culture experiments were then performed with fully differentiated Caco-2 cells as a model of the intestinal epithelium, comparing the effect of media flow applied in the bioreactor with traditional static transwells. The flow increases barrier integrity and tight junction expression of Caco-2 cells with respect to the static controls. Fluorescein permeability increased threefold in the dynamic system, indicating that the stimulus induced by flow increases transport across the barrier, closely mimicking the in vivo situation. The results are of interest for studying the influence of mechanical stimuli on cells, and underline the importance of developing more physiologically relevant in vitro tissue models. The bioreactor can be used to study drug delivery, chemical, or nanomaterial toxicity and to engineer barrier tissues.

  4. Hydraulic performance of a permeable reactive barrier at Casey Station, Antarctica.

    PubMed

    Mumford, K A; Rayner, J L; Snape, I; Stevens, G W

    2014-12-01

    A permeable bio-reactive barrier (PRB) was installed at Casey Station, Antarctica in 2005/06 to intercept, capture and degrade petroleum hydrocarbons from a decade old fuel spill. A funnel and gate configuration was selected and implemented. The reactive gate was split into five separate cells to enable the testing of five different treatment combinations. Although different treatment materials were used in each cell, each treatment combination contained the following reactive zones: a zone for the controlled release of nutrients to enhance degradation, a zone for hydrocarbon capture and enhanced degradation, and a zone to capture excess nutrients. The materials selected for each of these zones had other requirements, these included; not having any adverse impact on the environment, being permeable enough to capture the entire catchment flow, and having sufficient residence time to fully capture migrating hydrocarbons. Over a five year period the performance of the PRB was extensively monitored and evaluated for nutrient concentration, fuel retention and permeability. At the end of the five year test period the material located within the reactive gate was excavated, total petroleum hydrocarbon concentrations present on the material determined and particle size analysis conducted. This work found that although maintaining media reactivity is obviously important, the most critical aspect of PRB performance is preserving the permeability of the barrier itself, in this case by maintaining appropriate particle size distribution. This is particularly important when PRBs are installed in regions that are subject to freeze thaw processes that may result in particle disintegration over time.

  5. Applications of permeable barrier technology to ground water contamination at the Shiprock, NM, UMTRA site

    SciTech Connect

    Thomson, B.M.; Henry, E.J.; Thombre, M.S.

    1996-12-31

    The Shiprock uranium mill tailings pile in far northwestern New Mexico consists of approximately 1.5 million tons of uranium mill tailings from an acid leach mill which operated from 1954 to 1968. Located on land owned by the Navajo Nation, it was one of the first tailings piles stabilized under the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) project. Stabilization activities were completed in 1986 and consisted principally of consolidating the tailings, contouring the pile to achieve good drainage, and covering the pile with a multi-layer cap to control infiltration of water, radon emanation, and surface erosion. No ground water protection or remediation measures were implemented other than limiting infiltration of water through the pile, although a significant ground water contamination plume exists in the flood plain adjacent to the San Juan River. The major contaminants at the Shiprock site include high concentrations of sulfate, nitrate, arsenic, and uranium. One alternative for remediation may be the use of a permeable barrier in the flood plain aquifer. As proposed for the Shiprock site, the permeable barrier would be a trench constructed in the flood plain that would be backfilled with a media that is permeable to ground water, but would intercept or degrade the pollutants. Work to date has focused on use of a mixed microbial population of sulfate and nitrate reducing organisms. These organisms would produce strongly reducing conditions which would result in precipitation of the metal contaminants (i.e., Se(IV) and U(IV)) in the barrier. One of the first considerations in designing a permeable barrier is developing an understanding of ground water flow at the site. Accordingly, a steady state numerical model of the ground water flow at the site was developed using the MODFLOW code.

  6. [Changes in the permeability of the blood-brain barrier to oxythiamine].

    PubMed

    Ostrovskiĭ, Iu M; Zimatkina, T I; Oparin, D A

    1985-01-01

    Activity of transketolase was distinctly inhibited in mice brain after simultaneous administration of hydroxythiamine and 3,3-dimethyl-l-phenyl-l-phthalyl acetic acid. The rate of the enzyme inhibition correlated with an increase of the acid concentration in the mixture studied. The data obtained suggest that permeability of blood-brain barrier for hydroxythiamine was altered in simultaneous administration of the vitamin with some biologically active preparations.

  7. Sebaceous gland, hair shaft, and epidermal barrier abnormalities in keratosis pilaris with and without filaggrin deficiency.

    PubMed

    Gruber, Robert; Sugarman, Jeffrey L; Crumrine, Debra; Hupe, Melanie; Mauro, Theodora M; Mauldin, Elizabeth A; Thyssen, Jacob P; Brandner, Johanna M; Hennies, Hans-Christian; Schmuth, Matthias; Elias, Peter M

    2015-04-01

    Although keratosis pilaris (KP) is common, its etiopathogenesis remains unknown. KP is associated clinically with ichthyosis vulgaris and atopic dermatitis and molecular genetically with filaggrin-null mutations. In 20 KP patients and 20 matched controls, we assessed the filaggrin and claudin 1 genotypes, the phenotypes by dermatoscopy, and the morphology by light and transmission electron microscopy. Thirty-five percent of KP patients displayed filaggrin mutations, demonstrating that filaggrin mutations only partially account for the KP phenotype. Major histologic and dermatoscopic findings of KP were hyperkeratosis, hypergranulosis, mild T helper cell type 1-dominant lymphocytic inflammation, plugging of follicular orifices, striking absence of sebaceous glands, and hair shaft abnormalities in KP lesions but not in unaffected skin sites. Changes in barrier function and abnormal paracellular permeability were found in both interfollicular and follicular stratum corneum of lesional KP, which correlated ultrastructurally with impaired extracellular lamellar bilayer maturation and organization. All these features were independent of filaggrin genotype. Moreover, ultrastructure of corneodesmosomes and tight junctions appeared normal, immunohistochemistry for claudin 1 showed no reduction in protein amounts, and molecular analysis of claudin 1 was unremarkable. Our findings suggest that absence of sebaceous glands is an early step in KP pathogenesis, resulting in downstream hair shaft and epithelial barrier abnormalities.

  8. Sebaceous Gland, Hair Shaft, and Epidermal Barrier Abnormalities in Keratosis Pilaris with and without Filaggrin Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Gruber, Robert; Sugarman, Jeffrey L.; Crumrine, Debra; Hupe, Melanie; Mauro, Theodora M.; Mauldin, Elizabeth A.; Thyssen, Jacob P.; Brandner, Johanna M.; Hennies, Hans-Christian; Schmuth, Matthias; Elias, Peter M.

    2016-01-01

    Although keratosis pilaris (KP) is common, its etiopathogenesis remains unknown. KP is associated clinically with ichthyosis vulgaris and atopic dermatitis and molecular genetically with filaggrin-null mutations. In 20 KP patients and 20 matched controls, we assessed the filaggrin and claudin 1 genotypes, the phenotypes by dermatoscopy, and the morphology by light and transmission electron microscopy. Thirty-five percent of KP patients displayed filaggrin mutations, demonstrating that filaggrin mutations only partially account for the KP phenotype. Major histologic and dermatoscopic findings of KP were hyperkeratosis, hypergranulosis, mild T helper cell type 1-dominant lymphocytic inflammation, plugging of follicular orifices, striking absence of sebaceous glands, and hair shaft abnormalities in KP lesions but not in unaffected skin sites. Changes in barrier function and abnormal paracellular permeability were found in both interfollicular and follicular stratum corneum of lesional KP, which correlated ultrastructurally with impaired extracellular lamellar bilayer maturation and organization. All these features were independent of filaggrin genotype. Moreover, ultrastructure of corneodesmosomes and tight junctions appeared normal, immunohistochemistry for claudin 1 showed no reduction in protein amounts, and molecular analysis of claudin 1 was unremarkable. Our findings suggest that absence of sebaceous glands is an early step in KP pathogenesis, resulting in downstream hair shaft and epithelial barrier abnormalities. PMID:25660180

  9. Hypomyelination, memory impairment, and blood-brain barrier permeability in a model of sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Kim, Lenise Jihe; Martinez, Denis; Fiori, Cintia Zappe; Baronio, Diego; Kretzmann, Nélson Alexandre; Barros, Helena Maria Tannhauser

    2015-02-09

    We investigated the effect of intermittent hypoxia, mimicking sleep apnea, on axonal integrity, blood-brain barrier permeability, and cognitive function of mice. Forty-seven C57BL mice were exposed to intermittent or sham hypoxia, alternating 30s of progressive hypoxia and 30s of reoxigenation, during 8h/day. The axonal integrity in cerebellum was evaluated by transmission electron microscopy. Short- and long-term memories were assessed by novel object recognition test. The levels of endothelin-1 were measured by ELISA. Blood-brain barrier permeability was quantified by Evans Blue dye. After 14 days, animals exposed to intermittent hypoxia showed hypomyelination in cerebellum white matter and higher serum levels of endothelin-1. The short and long-term memories in novel object recognition test was impaired in the group exposed to intermittent hypoxia as compared to controls. Blood-brain barrier permeability was similar between the groups. These results indicated that hypomyelination and impairment of short- and long-term working memories occurred in C57BL mice after 14 days of intermittent hypoxia mimicking sleep apnea.

  10. The mechanisms and quantification of the selective permeability in transport across biological barriers: the example of kyotorphin.

    PubMed

    Serrano, Isa D; Freire, Joao M; Carvalho, Miguel V; Neves, Mafalda; Melo, Manuel N; Castanho, Miguel A R B

    2014-02-01

    This paper addresses the mechanisms behind selective endothelial permeability and their regulations. The singular properties of each of the seven blood-tissues barriers. Then, it further revisits the physical, quantitative meaning of permeability, and the way it should be measured based on sound physical chemistry reasoning and methodologies. Despite the relevance of permeability studies one often comes across inaccurate determinations, mostly from oversimplified data analyses. To worsen matters, the exact meaning of permeability is being lost along with this loss of accuracy. The importance of proper permeability calculation is illustrated with a family of derivatives of kyotorphin, an analgesic dipeptide.

  11. Electromagnetic interference in the permeability of saquinavir across the blood-brain barrier using nanoparticulate carriers.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Yung-Chih; Kuo, Chan-Ying

    2008-03-03

    Transport of antiretroviral agents across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) is of key importance to the treatment for the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). In this study, impact of exposure to electromagnetic field (EMF) on the permeability of saquinavir (SQV) across BBB was investigated. The in vitro BBB model was based on human brain-microvascular endothelial cells (HBMEC), and the concentration of SQV in receiver chamber of the transport system was evaluated. Polybutylcyanoacrylate (PBCA), methylmethacrylate-sulfopropylmethacrylate (MMA-SPM), and solid lipid nanoparticle (SLN) were employed as carriers for the delivery systems. Cytotoxicity of SLN decreased as content of cacao butter increased. Power of 5mV was apposite for the study on HBMEC without obvious apoptosis. Square wave produced greater permeability than sine and triangle waves. The carrier order on permeability of SQV across HBMEC monolayer under exposure to EMF was SLN>PBCA>MMA-SPM. Also, a larger frequency, modulation or depth of amplitude modulation (AM), or modulation or deviation of frequency modulation (FM) yielded a greater permeability. Besides, enhancement of permeability by AM wave was more significant than that by FM wave. Transport behavior of SQV across BBB was strongly influenced by the combination of nanoparticulate PBCA, MMA-SPM, and SLN with EMF exposure. This combination would be beneficial to the clinical application to the therapy of AIDS and other brain-related diseases.

  12. Plasma from patients with HELLP syndrome increases blood-brain barrier permeability.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Kedra; Tremble, Sarah M; Owens, Michelle Y; Morris, Rachael; Cipolla, Marilyn J

    2015-03-01

    Circulating inflammatory factors and endothelial dysfunction have been proposed to contribute to the pathophysiology of hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes, and low platelet count (HELLP) syndrome. To date, the occurrence of neurological complications in these women has been reported, but few studies have examined whether impairment in blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability or cerebrovascular reactivity is present in women having HELLP syndrome. We hypothesized that plasma from women with HELLP syndrome causes increased BBB permeability and cerebrovascular dysfunction. Posterior cerebral arteries from female nonpregnant rats were perfused with 20% serum from women with normal pregnancies (n = 5) or women with HELLP syndrome (n = 5), and BBB permeability and vascular reactivity were compared. Plasma from women with HELLP syndrome increased BBB permeability while not changing myogenic tone and reactivity to pressure. Addition of the nitric oxide (NO) synthase inhibitor N(ω)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester caused constriction of arteries that was not different with the different plasmas nor was dilation to the NO donor sodium nitroprusside different between the 2 groups. However, dilation to the small- and intermediate-conductance, calcium-activated potassium channel activator NS309 was decreased in vessels exposed to HELLP plasma. Thus, increased BBB permeability in response to HELLP plasma was associated with selective endothelial dysfunction.

  13. Iron Sulfide as a Sustainable Reactive Material for Permeable Reactive Barriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderson, A. D.; Demond, A. H.

    2012-12-01

    Permeable reactive barriers (PRBs) are gaining acceptance for groundwater remediation, as they operate in situ and do not require continuous energy input. The majority of PRBs use zero-valent iron (ZVI). However, some ZVI PRBs have hydraulically failed [1,2], due to the fact that ZVI may reduce not only contaminants but also water and non-contaminant solutes. These reactions may form precipitates or gas phases that reduce permeability. Therefore, there is a need to assess the hydraulic suitability of possible alternatives, such as iron sulfide (FeS). The capability of FeS to remove both metals and halogenated organics from aqueous systems has been demonstrated previously [3,4], and FeS formed in situ within a ZVI PRB has been linked to contaminant removal [5]. These results suggest possible applications in groundwater remediation as a permeable reactive barrier (PRB) material. However, the propensity of FeS for permeability loss, due to solids and gas production, must be evaluated in order to address its suitability for PRBs. The reduction in permeability for FeS-coated sands under the anoxic conditions often encountered at contaminated groundwater sites was examined through column experiments and geochemical modeling under conditions of high calcium and nitrate, which have been previously shown to cause significant permeability reduction in zero-valent iron (ZVI) systems [6]. The column experiments showed negligible production of both solids and gases. The geochemical model was used to estimate solid and gas volumes generated under conditions of varying FeS concentration. Then, the Kozeny-Carman equation and a power-law relationship was used to predict permeability reduction, with a maximum reduction in permeability of 1% due to solids and about 30% due to gas formation under conditions for which a complete loss of permeability was predicted for ZVI systems. This difference in permeability reduction is driven by the differences in thermodynamic stability of ZVI

  14. Evaluating blood-brain barrier permeability in delayed cerebral infarction after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Ivanidze, J; Kesavabhotla, K; Kallas, O N; Mir, D; Baradaran, H; Gupta, A; Segal, A Z; Claassen, J; Sanelli, P C

    2015-05-01

    Patients with SAH are at increased risk of delayed infarction. Early detection and treatment of delayed infarction remain challenging. We assessed blood-brain barrier permeability, measured as permeability surface area product, by using CTP in patients with SAH with delayed infarction. We performed a retrospective study of patients with SAH with delayed infarction on follow-up NCCT. CTP was performed before the development of delayed infarction. CTP data were postprocessed into permeability surface area product, CBF, and MTT maps. Coregistration was performed to align the infarcted region on the follow-up NCCT with the corresponding location on the CTP maps obtained before infarction. Permeability surface area product, CBF, and MTT values were then obtained in the location of the subsequent infarction. The contralateral noninfarcted region was compared with the affected side in each patient. Wilcoxon signed rank tests were performed to determine statistical significance. Clinical data were collected at the time of CTP and at the time of follow-up NCCT. Twenty-one patients with SAH were included in the study. There was a statistically significant increase in permeability surface area product in the regions of subsequent infarction compared with the contralateral control regions (P < .0001). However, CBF and MTT values were not significantly different in these 2 regions. Subsequent follow-up NCCT demonstrated new delayed infarction in all 21 patients, at which time 38% of patients had new focal neurologic deficits. Our study reveals a statistically significant increase in permeability surface area product preceding delayed infarction in patients with SAH. Further investigation of early permeability changes in SAH may provide new insights into the prediction of delayed infarction. © 2015 by American Journal of Neuroradiology.

  15. Assessment of the Blood-Brain Barrier Permeability of Potential Neuroprotective Aurones in Parallel Artificial Membrane Permeability Assay and Porcine Brain Endothelial Cell Models.

    PubMed

    Liew, Kok-Fui; Hanapi, Nur Aziah; Chan, Kit-Lam; Yusof, Siti R; Lee, Chong-Yew

    2017-02-01

    Previously, several aurone derivatives were identified with promising neuroprotective activities. In developing these compounds to target the central nervous system (CNS), an assessment of their blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability was performed using in vitro BBB models: parallel artificial membrane permeability assay-BBB which measures passive permeability and primary porcine brain endothelial cell model which enables determination of the involvement of active transport mechanism. Parallel artificial membrane permeability assay-BBB identified most compounds with high passive permeability, with 3 aurones having exceptional Pe values highlighting the importance of basic amine moieties and optimal lipophilicity for good passive permeability. Bidirectional permeability assays with porcine brain endothelial cell showed a significant net influx permeation of the aurones indicating a facilitated uptake mechanism in contrast to donepezil, a CNS drug included in the evaluation which only displayed passive permeation. From pH-dependent permeability assay coupled with data analysis using pCEL-X software, intrinsic transcellular permeability (Po) of a representative aurone 4-3 was determined, considering factors such as the aqueous boundary layer that may hinder accurate in vitro to in vivo correlation. The Po value determined supported the in vivo feasibility of the aurone as a CNS-active compound. Copyright © 2017 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Comparison between TEWL and laser scanning microscopy measurements for the in vivo characterization of the human epidermal barrier.

    PubMed

    Vergou, Theognosia; Schanzer, Sabine; Richter, Heike; Pels, Ragna; Thiede, Gisela; Patzelt, Alexa; Meinke, Martina C; Sterry, Wolfram; Fluhr, Joachim W; Lademann, Jürgen

    2012-02-01

    The analysis of the skin barrier properties is important in various fields of medical treatment and cosmetology. The development and improvement of topically applied substances require an objective analysis of the skin barrier characteristics. Transepidermal water loss (TEWL) measurement is the standard method to characterize epidermal barrier function. The most important disadvantage of this method though, is that it can be affected by different exogenous and endogenous factors, e.g. water content of the applied formulation and room temperature. In the present study, TEWL measurements are compared to laser scanning microscopic (LSM) measurements, concerning the use of these two methods for the non-invasive in vivo characterization of the epidermal barrier function. The investigations were performed prior and subsequent to treatment of dry skin with a gel mixture, developed for skin treatment after radiotherapy for cancer. The present results indicate that in vivo laser scanning microscopy is an appropriate method for the characterization of the skin barrier structure without interference by external factors. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Organo-montmorillonite Barrier Layers Formed by Combustion: Nanostructure and Permeability

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, James B; Ambuken, Preejith V.; Stretz, Holly A; Meisner, Roberta Ann; Payzant, E Andrew

    2010-01-01

    Self-assembly of nanoparticles into barrier layers has been the most cited theoretical explanation for the significant reduction in flammability often noted for nanocomposites formed from polymers and montmorillonite organoclays. Both mass and heat transport reductions have been credited for such improvements, and in most cases a coupled mechanism is expected. To provide validation for early models, new model barrier layers were produced from organoclays, and these barrier layers subjected to novel permeability analysis to obtain a flux. The effects of surfactant, temperature and pressure on barrier layer structure were examined. XRD versus TGA results suggest that chemical degradation of four different organoclays and physical collapse on heating are not correlated. Addition of pressure as low as 7kPa also altered the structure produced. Permeability of Ar through the ash was found to be sensitive to structural change/self assembly of high aspect ratio MMT nanoparticles. Actual fluxes ranged from 0.139 to 0.151 mol(m2.sec)-1, values which will provide useful limits in verifying models for the coupled contribution of mass and heat transfer to flammability parameters such as peak heat release rate.

  18. Permeable bio-reactive barriers to address petroleum hydrocarbon contamination at subantarctic Macquarie Island.

    PubMed

    Freidman, Benjamin L; Terry, Deborah; Wilkins, Dan; Spedding, Tim; Gras, Sally L; Snape, Ian; Stevens, Geoffrey W; Mumford, Kathryn A

    2017-05-01

    A reliance on diesel generated power and a history of imperfect fuel management have created a legacy of petroleum hydrocarbon contamination at subantarctic Macquarie Island. Increasing environmental awareness and advances in contaminant characterisation and remediation technology have fostered an impetus to reduce the environmental risk associated with legacy sites. A funnel and gate permeable bio-reactive barrier (PRB) was installed in 2014 to address the migration of Special Antarctic Blend diesel from a spill that occurred in 2002, as well as older spills and residual contaminants in the soil at the Main Power House. The PRB gate comprised of granular activated carbon and natural clinoptilolite zeolite. Petroleum hydrocarbons migrating in the soil water were successfully captured on the reactive materials, with concentrations at the outflow of the barrier recorded as being below reporting limits. The nutrient and iron concentrations delivered to the barrier demonstrated high temporal variability with significant iron precipitation observed across the bed. The surface of the granular activated carbon was largely free from cell attachment while natural zeolite demonstrated patchy biofilm formation after 15 months following PRB installation. This study illustrates the importance of informed material selection at field scale to ensure that adsorption and biodegradation processes are utilised to manage the environmental risk associated with petroleum hydrocarbon spills. This study reports the first installation of a permeable bio-reactive barrier in the subantarctic. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Role of lipids in the formation and maintenance of the cutaneous permeability barrier.

    PubMed

    Feingold, Kenneth R; Elias, Peter M

    2014-03-01

    The major function of the skin is to form a barrier between the internal milieu and the hostile external environment. A permeability barrier that prevents the loss of water and electrolytes is essential for life on land. The permeability barrier is mediated primarily by lipid enriched lamellar membranes that are localized to the extracellular spaces of the stratum corneum. These lipid enriched membranes have a unique structure and contain approximately 50% ceramides, 25% cholesterol, and 15% free fatty acids with very little phospholipid. Lamellar bodies, which are formed during the differentiation of keratinocytes, play a key role in delivering the lipids from the stratum granulosum cells into the extracellular spaces of the stratum corneum. Lamellar bodies contain predominantly glucosylceramides, phospholipids, and cholesterol and following the exocytosis of lamellar lipids into the extracellular space of the stratum corneum these precursor lipids are converted by beta glucocerebrosidase and phospholipases into the ceramides and fatty acids, which comprise the lamellar membranes. The lipids required for lamellar body formation are derived from de novo synthesis by keratinocytes and from extra-cutaneous sources. The lipid synthetic pathways and the regulation of these pathways are described in this review. In addition, the pathways for the uptake of extra-cutaneous lipids into keratinocytes are discussed. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled The Important Role of Lipids in the Epidermis and their Role in the Formation and Maintenance of the Cutaneous Barrier. Guest Editors: Kenneth R. Feingold and Peter Elias.

  20. A calcite permeable reactive barrier for the remediation of Fluoride from spent potliner (SPL) contaminated groundwater.

    PubMed

    Turner, Brett D; Binning, Philip J; Sloan, Scott W

    2008-01-28

    The use of calcite (CaCO3) as a substrate for a permeable reactive barrier (PRB) for removing fluoride from contaminated groundwater is proposed and is illustrated by application to groundwater contaminated by spent potliner leachate (SPL), a waste derived from the aluminium smelting process. The paper focuses on two issues in the implementation of calcite permeable reactive barriers for remediating fluoride contaminated water: the impact of the groundwater chemical matrix and CO2 addition on fluoride removal. Column tests comparing pure NaF solutions, synthetic SPL solutions, and actual SPL leachate indicate that the complex chemical matrix of the SPL leachate can impact fluoride removal significantly. For SPL contaminant mixtures, fluoride removal is initially less than expected from idealized, pure, solutions. However, with time, the effect of other contaminants on fluoride removal diminishes. Column tests also show that pH control is important for optimizing fluoride removal with the mass removed increasing with decreasing pH. Barrier pH can be regulated by CO2 addition with the point of injection being critical for optimising the remediation performance. Experimental and model results show that approximately 99% of 2300 mg/L fluoride can be removed when CO2 is injected directly into the barrier. This can be compared to approximately 30-50% removal when the influent solution is equilibrated with atmospheric CO2 before contact with calcite.

  1. CARBON AND SULFUR ACCUMULATION AND IRON MINERAL TRANSFORMATION IN PERMEABLE REACTIVE BARRIERS CONTAINING ZERO-VALENT IRON

    EPA Science Inventory

    Permeable reactive barrier technology is an in-situ approach for remediating groundwater contamination that combines subsurface fluid flow management with passive chemical treatment. Factors such as the buildup of mineral precipitates, buildup of microbial biomass (bio-fouling...

  2. Interim Report: Field Demonstration Of Permeable Reactive Barriers To Remove Dissolved Uranium From Groundwater, Fry Canyon, Utah

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Fry Canyon site in southeastern Utah was selected in 1996 as a long-term field demonstration site to assess the performance of selected permeable reactive barriers for the removal of uranium (U) from groundwater.

  3. CARBON AND SULFUR ACCUMULATION AND IRON MINERAL TRANSFORMATION IN PERMEABLE REACTIVE BARRIERS CONTAINING ZERO-VALENT IRON

    EPA Science Inventory

    Permeable reactive barrier technology is an in-situ approach for remediating groundwater contamination that combines subsurface fluid flow management with passive chemical treatment. Factors such as the buildup of mineral precipitates, buildup of microbial biomass (bio-fouling...

  4. Effect of some drugs on ethanol-induced changes in blood brain barrier permeability for /sup 14/C-tyrosine

    SciTech Connect

    Borisenko, S.A.; Burov, Yu.V.

    1987-06-01

    This investigation seeks to compare the effects of membrane stabilizers chlorpromazine and alpha-tocopherol, and also the dopaminergic antagonist haloperidol, in changes in permeability of the blood-brain barrier for carbon 14-labelled tyrosine.

  5. LONG-TERM PERFORMANCE OF IN-SITU PERMEABLE REACTIVE BARRIERS FOR REMEDIATION OF CONTAMINATED GROUND WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Permeable reactive barriers (PRB's) are an emerging, alternative in-situ approach for remediating groundwater contamination that combine subsurface fluid flow management with a passive chemical treatment zone. The few pilot and commercial installations which have been implemented...

  6. LONG-TERM PERFORMANCE OF PERMEABLE REACTIVE BARRIERS: AN UPDATE ON A U.S. MULTI-AGENCY INITIATIVE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Permeable reactive barriers (PRB's) are an emerging, alternative in-situ approach for remediating contaminated groundwater that combine subsurface fluid flow management with a passive chemical treatment zone. PRB's are a potentially more cost effective treatment option at seve...

  7. Long-Term Groundwater Monitoring Optimization, Clare Water Supply Superfund Site, Permeable Reactive Barrier and Soil Remedy Areas, Clare, Michigan

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This report contains a review of the long-term groundwater monitoring network for the Permeable Reactive Barrier (PRB) and Soil Remedy Areas at the Clare Water Supply Superfund Site in Clare, Michigan.

  8. Magnesium sulfate attenuates increased blood-brain barrier permeability during insulin-induced hypoglycemia in rats.

    PubMed

    Kaya, M; Küçük, M; Kalayci, R B; Cimen, V; Gürses, C; Elmas, I; Arican, N

    2001-09-01

    Magnesium probably protects brain tissue against the effects of cerebral ischemia, brain injury and stroke through its actions as a calcium antagonist and inhibitor of excitatory amino acids. The effects of magnesium sulfate on cerebrovascular permeability to a dye, Evans blue, were studied during insulin-induced hypoglycemia with hypothermia in rats. Hypoglycemia was induced by an intramuscular injection of insulin. After giving insulin, each animal received MgSO4 (270 mg/kg) ip, followed by a 27 mg/kg dose every 20 min for 2.5 h. Plasma glucose and Mg2+ levels of animals were measured. Magnesium concentrations increased in the serum following MgSO4 administration (6.05+/-0.57 vs. 2.58+/-0.14 mg/dL in the Mg2+ group, and 7.14+/-0.42 vs. 2.78+/-0.06 mg/dL in the insulin + Mg2+ group, P < 0.01). Plasma glucose levels decreased following hypoglycemia (4+/-0.66 vs. 118+/-2.23 mg/dL in the insulin group, and 7+/-1.59 vs. 118+/-4.84 mg/dL in the insulin + Mg2+ group, P < 0.01). Blood-brain barrier permeability to Evans blue considerably increased in hypoglycemic rats (P < 0.01). In contrast, blood-brain barrier permeability to Evans blue was significantly reduced in treatment of hypoglycemic rats with MgSO4 (P < 0.01). These results indicate that Mg2+ greatly reduced the passage of exogenous vascular tracer bound to albumin into the brain during hypoglycemia with hypothermia. Mg2+ could have protective effects on blood-brain barrier permeability against insulin-induced hypoglycemia.

  9. A Synthetic Peptide Corresponding to the Extracellular Domain of Occludin Perturbs the Tight Junction Permeability Barrier

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Vivian; Gumbiner, Barry M.

    1997-01-01

    Occludin, the putative tight junction integral membrane protein, is an attractive candidate for a protein that forms the actual sealing element of the tight junction. To study the role of occludin in the formation of the tight junction seal, synthetic peptides (OCC1 and OCC2) corresponding to the two putative extracellular domains of occludin were assayed for their ability to alter tight junctions in Xenopus kidney epithelial cell line A6. Transepithelial electrical resistance and paracellular tracer flux measurements indicated that the second extracellular domain peptide (OCC2) reversibly disrupted the transepithelial permeability barrier at concentrations of < 5 μM. Despite the increased paracellular permeability, there were no changes in gross epithelial cell morphology as determined by scanning EM. The OCC2 peptide decreased the amount of occludin present at the tight junction, as assessed by indirect immunofluorescence, as well as decreased total cellular content of occludin, as assessed by Western blot analysis. Pulse-labeling and metabolic chase analysis suggested that this decrease in occludin level could be attributed to an increase in turnover of cellular occludin rather than a decrease in occludin synthesis. The effect on occludin was specific because other tight junction components, ZO-1, ZO-2, cingulin, and the adherens junction protein E-cadherin, were unaltered by OCC2 treatment. Therefore, the peptide corresponding to the second extracellular domain of occludin perturbs the tight junction permeability barrier in a very specific manner. The correlation between a decrease in occludin levels and the perturbation of the tight junction permeability barrier provides evidence for a role of occludin in the formation of the tight junction seal. PMID:9015310

  10. Major translocation of calcium upon epidermal barrier insult: imaging and quantification via FLIM/Fourier vector analysis

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez, Susana; Barry, Nicholas P.; Kirschner, Nina; Meyer, Wilfried; Mauro, Theodora M.; Moll, Ingrid; Gratton, Enrico

    2015-01-01

    Calcium controls an array of key events in keratinocytes and epidermis: localized changes in Ca2+ concentrations and their regulation are therefore especially important to assess when observing epidermal barrier homeostasis and repair, neonatal barrier establishment, in differentiation, signaling, cell adhesion, and in various pathological states. Yet, tissue- and cellular Ca2+ concentrations in physiologic and diseased states are only partially known, and difficult to measure. Prior observations on the Ca2+ distribution in skin were based on Ca2+ precipitation followed by electron microscopy, or proton-induced X-ray emission. Neither cellular and/or subcellular localization could be determined through these approaches. In cells in vitro, fluorescent dyes have been used extensively for ratiometric measurements of static and dynamic Ca2+ concentrations, also assessing organelle Ca2+ concentrations. For lack of better methods, these findings together build the basis for the current view of the role of Ca2+ in epidermis, their limitations notwithstanding. Here we report a method using Calcium Green 5N as the calcium sensor and the phasor-plot approach to separate raw lifetime components. Thus, fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) enables us to quantitatively assess and visualize dynamic changes of Ca2+ at light-microscopic resolution in ex vivo biopsies of unfixed epidermis, in close to in vivo conditions. Comparing undisturbed epidermis with epidermis following a barrier insult revealed major shifts, and more importantly, a mobilization of high amounts of Ca2+ shortly following barrier disruption, from intracellular stores. These results partially contradict the conventional view, where barrier insults abrogate a Ca2+ gradient towards the stratum granulosum. Ca2+ FLIM overcomes prior limitations in the observation of epidermal Ca2+ dynamics, and will allow further insights into basic epidermal physiology. PMID:21193994

  11. Heterogeneous Blood-Tumor Barrier Permeability Determines Drug Efficacy in Experimental Brain Metastases of Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lockman, Paul R.; Mittapalli, Rajendar K.; Taskar, Kunal S.; Rudraraju, Vinay; Gril, Brunilde; Bohn, Kaci A.; Adkins, Chris E.; Roberts, Amanda; Thorsheim, Helen R.; Gaasch, Julie A.; Huang, Suyun; Palmieri, Diane; Steeg, Patricia S.; Smith, Quentin R.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Brain metastases of breast cancer appear to be increasing in incidence, confer significant morbidity, and threaten to compromise gains made in systemic chemotherapy. The blood-tumor barrier (BTB) is compromised in many brain metastases, however, the extent to which this influences chemotherapeutic delivery and efficacy is unknown. Herein, we answer this question by measuring BTB passive integrity, chemotherapeutic drug uptake, and anticancer efficacy in vivo in two breast cancer models that metastasize preferentially to brain. Experimental Design Experimental brain metastasis drug uptake and BTB permeability were simultaneously measured using novel fluorescent and phosphorescent imaging techniques in immune compromised mice. Drug-induced apoptosis and vascular characteristics were assessed using immunofluorescent microscopy. Results Analysis of >2000 brain metastases from two models (human 231-BR-Her2 and murine 4T1-BR5) demonstrated partial BTB permeability compromise in >89% lesions, varying in magnitude within and between metastases. Brain metastasis uptake of 14C- paclitaxel and 14C- doxorubicin was generally greater than normal brain but <15% of that of other tissues or peripheral metastases, and only reached cytotoxic concentrations in a small subset (~10%) of the most permeable metastases. Neither drug significantly decreased the experimental brain metastatic ability of 231-BR-Her2 tumor cells. BTB permeability was associated with vascular remodeling and correlated with over expression of the pericyte protein, desmin. Conclusions This work demonstrates that the BTB remains a significant impediment to standard chemotherapeutic delivery and efficacy in experimental brain metastases of breast cancer. New brain permeable drugs will be needed. Evidence is presented for vascular remodeling in BTB permeability alterations. PMID:20829328

  12. Washing of Pb contaminated soil using [S,S] ethylenediamine disuccinate and horizontal permeable barriers.

    PubMed

    Finzgar, N; Kos, B; Lestan, D

    2004-11-01

    The feasibility of in situ washing of soil contaminated with Pb (6.83 mmol kg(-1)) using biodegradable chelator, [S,S] stereoisomere of ethylenediamine disuccinate ([S,S]-EDDS) and horizontal permeable barriers was examined in soil columns. After 4-cycles of 10 mmol kg(-1) soil [S,S]-EDDS applications, followed by irrigation, 24.7% of total initial Pb was washed from the contaminated soil and accumulated into the barrier. Sequential extractions indicated that washing removed most of the Pb from the organic soil fraction. Barriers were positioned 20 cm deep in the soil and consisted of a 2 cm layer of nutrient enriched vermiculite. Barriers reduced leaching of Pb in the first cycle of [S,S]-EDDS addition by more than 500-times compared to columns with no barrier. After four cycles of chelator addition, a total of 0.24% of the initial Pb was leached from the columns with barriers. Four cycles of in situ soil washing in soil columns were less effective than simulated ex situ soil washing with 40 mmol kg(-1) [S,S]-EDDS, where 51.0% of the Pb was removed after 48-h extraction. Ex situ soil washing with 10 mmol kg(-1) [S,S]-EDDS was equally effective as the first cycle of in situ soil washing (15.5% and 14.5% of removed Pb, respectively).

  13. Tricellulin Forms a Barrier to Macromolecules in Tricellular Tight Junctions without Affecting Ion Permeability

    PubMed Central

    Krug, Susanne M.; Amasheh, Salah; Richter, Jan F.; Milatz, Susanne; Günzel, Dorothee; Westphal, Julie K.; Huber, Otmar; Schulzke, Jörg D.

    2009-01-01

    Tricellulin is a tight junction protein localized in tricellular tight junctions (tTJs), the meeting points of three cells, but also in bicellular tight junctions (bTJs). To investigate its specific barrier functions in bTJs and tTJs, TRIC-a was expressed in low-level tricellulin–expressing cells, and MDCK II, either in all TJs or only in tTJs. When expressed in all TJs, tricellulin increased paracellular electrical resistance and decreased permeability to ions and larger solutes, which are associated with enhanced ultrastructural integrity of bTJs toward enhanced strand linearity. In tTJs in contrast, ultrastructure was unchanged and tricellulin minimized permeability to macromolecules but not to ions. This paradox is explained by properties of the tTJ central tube which is wide enough for passage of macromolecules, but too rare to contribute significantly to ion permeability. In conclusion, at low tricellulin expression the tTJ central tube forms a pathway for macromolecules. At higher expression, tricellulin forms a barrier in tTJs effective only for macromolecules and in bTJs for solutes of all sizes. PMID:19535456

  14. Stress Induces Endotoxemia and Low-Grade Inflammation by Increasing Barrier Permeability

    PubMed Central

    de Punder, Karin; Pruimboom, Leo

    2015-01-01

    Chronic non-communicable diseases (NCDs) are the leading causes of work absence, disability, and mortality worldwide. Most of these diseases are associated with low-grade inflammation. Here, we hypothesize that stresses (defined as homeostatic disturbances) can induce low-grade inflammation by increasing the availability of water, sodium, and energy-rich substances to meet the increased metabolic demand induced by the stressor. One way of triggering low-grade inflammation is by increasing intestinal barrier permeability through activation of various components of the stress system. Although beneficial to meet the demands necessary during stress, increased intestinal barrier permeability also raises the possibility of the translocation of bacteria and their toxins across the intestinal lumen into the blood circulation. In combination with modern life-style factors, the increase in bacteria/bacterial toxin translocation arising from a more permeable intestinal wall causes a low-grade inflammatory state. We support this hypothesis with numerous studies finding associations with NCDs and markers of endotoxemia, suggesting that this process plays a pivotal and perhaps even a causal role in the development of low-grade inflammation and its related diseases. PMID:26029209

  15. Computational prediction of blood-brain barrier permeability using decision tree induction.

    PubMed

    Suenderhauf, Claudia; Hammann, Felix; Huwyler, Jörg

    2012-08-31

    Predicting blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability is essential to drug development, as a molecule cannot exhibit pharmacological activity within the brain parenchyma without first transiting this barrier. Understanding the process of permeation, however, is complicated by a combination of both limited passive diffusion and active transport. Our aim here was to establish predictive models for BBB drug permeation that include both active and passive transport. A database of 153 compounds was compiled using in vivo surface permeability product (logPS) values in rats as a quantitative parameter for BBB permeability. The open source Chemical Development Kit (CDK) was used to calculate physico-chemical properties and descriptors. Predictive computational models were implemented by machine learning paradigms (decision tree induction) on both descriptor sets. Models with a corrected classification rate (CCR) of 90% were established. Mechanistic insight into BBB transport was provided by an Ant Colony Optimization (ACO)-based binary classifier analysis to identify the most predictive chemical substructures. Decision trees revealed descriptors of lipophilicity (aLogP) and charge (polar surface area), which were also previously described in models of passive diffusion. However, measures of molecular geometry and connectivity were found to be related to an active drug transport component.

  16. The Effect of Ovariectomy and Estrogen on Penetrating Brain Arterioles and Blood-brain Barrier Permeability

    PubMed Central

    Cipolla, Marilyn J.; Godfrey, Julie A.; Wiegman, Marchien J.

    2009-01-01

    Objective We investigated the effect of estrogen replacement on the structure and function of penetrating brain arterioles (PA) and blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability. Methods Female ovariectomized Sprague Dawley rats were replaced with estradiol (E2) and estriol (E3) (OVX+E; N=13) and compared to ovariectomized animals without replacement (OVX; N=14) and intact controls (CTL, proestrous; N=13). Passive and active diameters, percent tone and passive distensibility of pressurized PA were compared. In addition, BBB permeability to Lucifer Yellow, a marker of transcellular transport, was compared in cerebral arteries. Results Ovariectomy increased myogenic tone in PA compared to CTL that was not ameliorated by estrogen treatment. Percent tone at 75 mmHg for CTL vs. OVX and OVX+E was 44 ± 3% vs. 51 ± 1% and 54 ± 3% (p<0.01 vs. CTL for both). No differences were found in passive diameters or distensibility between the groups. BBB permeability increased 500% in OVX vs. CTL animals, however, estrogen replacement restored barrier properties: flux of Lucifer Yellow for CTL, OVX and OVX+E was (ng/mL): 3.4 ± 1.2, 20.2 ± 5.3 (p<0.01 vs. CTL) and 6.15 ± 1.2 (n.s.). Conclusions These results suggest that estrogen replacement may not be beneficial for small vessel disease in the brain, but may limit BBB disruption and edema under conditions that cause it. PMID:19905968

  17. MicroRNA-143 inhibits IL-13-induced dysregulation of the epidermal barrier-related proteins in skin keratinocytes via targeting to IL-13Rα1.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Yue-Ping; Nguyen, Giang Huong; Jin, Hong-Zhong

    2016-05-01

    Atopic dermatitis is a chronic inflammatory skin disease characterized by the dysregulation of the epidermal barrier and the immune system. Interleukin (IL)-13, a key T helper 2 cytokine, has been shown to impair the epidermal barrier function via downregulating epidermal barrier proteins. MicroRNAs are small noncoding RNAs of approximately 22 nucleotides that act as negative regulators of gene expression at posttranscriptional levels. MicroRNA-143 is known to be a tumor suppressor in various tumors; however, its role in the regulation of allergic diseases including atopic dermatitis remains elusive. In this study, we investigated whether IL-13Rα1 was a microRNA-143 target to regulate the effects of IL-13 on epidermal barrier function. After the stimulation of IL-13 in human epidermal keratinocytes, the level of microRNA-143 was decreased. The luciferase activity of the vector containing 3'UTR of IL-13Rα1 was decreased in keratinocytes transfected with microRNA-143 mimic compared to those of the corresponding controls. The forced expression of microRNA-143 mimic blocked the IL-13-induced downregulation of filaggrin, loricrin, and involucrin in epidermal keratinocytes. Collectively, these data suggest that microRNA-143 suppresses IL-13 activity and inflammation through targeting of IL-13Rα1 in epidermal keratinocytes. MicroRNA-143 may serve as a potential preventive and therapeutic target in atopic dermatitis.

  18. von-Willebrand factor influences blood brain barrier permeability and brain inflammation in experimental allergic encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Noubade, Rajkumar; del Rio, Roxana; McElvany, Benjamin; Zachary, James F; Millward, Jason M; Wagner, Denisa D; Offner, Halina; Blankenhorn, Elizabeth P; Teuscher, Cory

    2008-09-01

    Weibel-Palade bodies within endothelial cells are secretory granules known to release von Willebrand Factor (VWF), P-selectin, chemokines, and other stored molecules following histamine exposure. Mice with a disrupted VWF gene (VWFKO) have endothelial cells that are deficient in Weibel-Palade bodies. These mice were used to evaluate the role of VWF and/or Weibel-Palade bodies in Bordetella pertussis toxin-induced hypersensitivity to histamine, a subphenotype of experimental allergic encephalomyelitis, the principal autoimmune model of multiple sclerosis. No significant differences in susceptibility to histamine between wild-type and VWFKO mice were detected after 3 days; however, histamine sensitivity persisted significantly longer in VWFKO mice. Correspondingly, encephalomyelitis onset was earlier, disease was more severe, and blood brain barrier (BBB) permeability was significantly increased in VWFKO mice, as compared with wild-type mice. Moreover, inflammation was selectively increased in the brains, but not spinal cords, of VWFKO mice as compared with wild-type mice. Early increases in BBB permeability in VWFKO mice were not due to increased encephalitogenic T-cell activity since BBB permeability did not differ in adjuvant-treated VWFKO mice as compared with littermates immunized with encephalitogenic peptide plus adjuvant. Taken together, these data indicate that VWF and/or Weibel-Palade bodies negatively regulate BBB permeability changes and autoimmune inflammatory lesion formation within the brain elicited by peripheral inflammatory stimuli.

  19. Standardized diaper care regimen: a prospective, randomized pilot study on skin barrier function and epidermal IL-1α in newborns.

    PubMed

    Garcia Bartels, Natalie; Massoudy, Lida; Scheufele, Ramona; Dietz, Ekkehart; Proquitté, Hans; Wauer, Roland; Bertin, Christiane; Serrano, José; Blume-Peytavi, Ulrike

    2012-01-01

    Adaptation of skin barrier function and interleukin-1α (IL-1α) content in diapered and nondiapered skin are poorly characterized in newborns receiving standard skin care. In a monocentric, prospective pilot study 44 healthy, full-term neonates were randomly assigned to skin care with baby wipes (n = 21) or water-moistened washcloth (n = 23) at each diaper change. Transepidermal water loss (TEWL), skin hydration, skin-pH, IL-1α, and epidermal desquamation were measured on days 2, 14, and 28 postpartum. Microbiological colonization was evaluated at baseline and on day 28. Significantly lower TEWL was found on the buttock in the group using baby wipes compared to water. IL-1α and skin hydration significantly increased and pH decreased independent of skin care regimen. IL-1α was significantly higher in diapered skin compared to nondiapered skin. Although skin care with wipes seems to stabilize TEWL better than using water, the skin condition and microbiological colonization were comparable using both cleansing procedures. Increase of epidermal IL-1α may reflect postnatal skin barrier maturation. These data suggest that neither of the two cleansing procedures harms skin barrier maturation within the first four weeks postpartum. Longer observations on larger populations could provide more insight into postnatal skin barrier maturation.

  20. Breaking down the barriers: the gut microbiome, intestinal permeability and stress-related psychiatric disorders.

    PubMed

    Kelly, John R; Kennedy, Paul J; Cryan, John F; Dinan, Timothy G; Clarke, Gerard; Hyland, Niall P

    2015-01-01

    The emerging links between our gut microbiome and the central nervous system (CNS) are regarded as a paradigm shift in neuroscience with possible implications for not only understanding the pathophysiology of stress-related psychiatric disorders, but also their treatment. Thus the gut microbiome and its influence on host barrier function is positioned to be a critical node within the brain-gut axis. Mounting preclinical evidence broadly suggests that the gut microbiota can modulate brain development, function and behavior by immune, endocrine and neural pathways of the brain-gut-microbiota axis. Detailed mechanistic insights explaining these specific interactions are currently underdeveloped. However, the concept that a "leaky gut" may facilitate communication between the microbiota and these key signaling pathways has gained traction. Deficits in intestinal permeability may underpin the chronic low-grade inflammation observed in disorders such as depression and the gut microbiome plays a critical role in regulating intestinal permeability. In this review we will discuss the possible role played by the gut microbiota in maintaining intestinal barrier function and the CNS consequences when it becomes disrupted. We will draw on both clinical and preclinical evidence to support this concept as well as the key features of the gut microbiota which are necessary for normal intestinal barrier function.

  1. Breaking down the barriers: the gut microbiome, intestinal permeability and stress-related psychiatric disorders

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, John R.; Kennedy, Paul J.; Cryan, John F.; Dinan, Timothy G.; Clarke, Gerard; Hyland, Niall P.

    2015-01-01

    The emerging links between our gut microbiome and the central nervous system (CNS) are regarded as a paradigm shift in neuroscience with possible implications for not only understanding the pathophysiology of stress-related psychiatric disorders, but also their treatment. Thus the gut microbiome and its influence on host barrier function is positioned to be a critical node within the brain-gut axis. Mounting preclinical evidence broadly suggests that the gut microbiota can modulate brain development, function and behavior by immune, endocrine and neural pathways of the brain-gut-microbiota axis. Detailed mechanistic insights explaining these specific interactions are currently underdeveloped. However, the concept that a “leaky gut” may facilitate communication between the microbiota and these key signaling pathways has gained traction. Deficits in intestinal permeability may underpin the chronic low-grade inflammation observed in disorders such as depression and the gut microbiome plays a critical role in regulating intestinal permeability. In this review we will discuss the possible role played by the gut microbiota in maintaining intestinal barrier function and the CNS consequences when it becomes disrupted. We will draw on both clinical and preclinical evidence to support this concept as well as the key features of the gut microbiota which are necessary for normal intestinal barrier function. PMID:26528128

  2. The food contaminant deoxynivalenol, decreases intestinal barrier permeability and reduces claudin expression

    SciTech Connect

    Pinton, Philippe; Nougayrede, Jean-Philippe; Del Rio, Juan-Carlos; Moreno, Carolina; Marin, Daniela E.; Ferrier, Laurent; Bracarense, Ana-Paula; Kolf-Clauw, Martine; Oswald, Isabelle P.

    2009-05-15

    'The gastrointestinal tract represents the first barrier against food contaminants as well as the first target for these toxicants. Deoxynivalenol (DON) is a mycotoxin that commonly contaminates cereals and causes various toxicological effects. Through consumption of contaminated cereals and cereal products, human and pigs are exposed to this mycotoxin. Using in vitro, ex vivo and in vivo approaches, we investigated the effects of DON on the intestinal epithelium. We demonstrated that, in intestinal epithelial cell lines from porcine (IPEC-1) or human (Caco-2) origin, DON decreases trans-epithelial electrical resistance (TEER) and increases in a time and dose-dependent manner the paracellular permeability to 4 kDa dextran and to pathogenic Escherichia coli across intestinal cell monolayers. In pig explants treated with DON, we also observed an increased permeability of intestinal tissue. These alterations of barrier function were associated with a specific reduction in the expression of claudins, which was also seen in vivo in the jejunum of piglets exposed to DON-contaminated feed. In conclusion, DON alters claudin expression and decreases the barrier function of the intestinal epithelium. Considering that high levels of DON may be present in food or feed, consumption of DON-contaminated food/feed may induce intestinal damage and has consequences for human and animal health.

  3. Direct visualization of the arterial wall water permeability barrier using CARS microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Lucotte, Bertrand M.; Powell, Chloe; Knutson, Jay R.; Combs, Christian A.; Malide, Daniela; Yu, Zu-Xi; Knepper, Mark; Patel, Keval D.; Pielach, Anna; Johnson, Errin; Borysova, Lyudmyla; Balaban, Robert S.

    2017-01-01

    The artery wall is equipped with a water permeation barrier that allows blood to flow at high pressure without significant water leak. The precise location of this barrier is unknown despite its importance in vascular function and its contribution to many vascular complications when it is compromised. Herein we map the water permeability in intact arteries, using coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy and isotopic perfusion experiments. Generation of the CARS signal is optimized for water imaging with broadband excitation. We identify the water permeation barrier as the endothelial basolateral membrane and show that the apical membrane is highly permeable. This is confirmed by the distribution of the AQP1 water channel within endothelial membranes. These results indicate that arterial pressure equilibrates within the endothelium and is transmitted to the supporting basement membrane and internal elastic lamina macromolecules with minimal deformation of the sensitive endothelial cell. Disruption of this pressure transmission could contribute to endothelial cell dysfunction in various pathologies. PMID:28373558

  4. LONG-TERM GEOCHEMICAL BEHAVIOR OF A ZEROVALENT IRON PERMEABLE REACTIVE BARRIER FOR THE TREATMENT OF HEXAVALENT CHROMIUM IN GROUNDWATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Passive, in-situ reactive barriers have proven to be viable, cost-effective systems for the remediation of Cr-contaminated groundwater at some sites. Permeable reactive barriers (PRBs) are installed in the flow-path of groundwater, most typically as vertical treatment walls. Re...

  5. LONG-TERM GEOCHEMICAL BEHAVIOR OF A ZEROVALENT IRON PERMEABLE REACTIVE BARRIER FOR THE TREATMENT OF HEXAVALENT CHROMIUM IN GROUNDWATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Passive, in-situ reactive barriers have proven to be viable, cost-effective systems for the remediation of Cr-contaminated groundwater at some sites. Permeable reactive barriers (PRBs) are installed in the flow-path of groundwater, most typically as vertical treatment walls. Re...

  6. Long-Term Blood-Brain Barrier Permeability Changes in Binswanger’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Huisa, Branko N; Caprihan, Arvind; Thompson, Jeffrey; Prestopnik, Jillian; Qualls, Clifford R; Rosenberg, Gary A

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose The blood brain-barrier (BBB) is disrupted in small vessel disease (SVD) patients with lacunes and white matter hyperintensities (WMHs). The relationship of WMHs and regional BBB permeability changes has not been studied. We hypothesized that BBB disruption occurs in normal appearing WM (NAWM) and regions near the WMHs. To test the hypothesis, we repeated BBB permeability measurements in patients with extensive WMHs related to Binswanger’s disease (BD). Methods We selected a subset of 22 BD subjects from a well-characterized larger prospective vascular cognitive impairment cohort. We used 16 age-matched controls for comparison. The abnormal WM permeability (WMP) was measured twice over several years using dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCEMRI). WMP maps were constructed from voxels above a predetermined threshold. Scans from first and second visits were co-registered. WM was divided into 3 regions: NAWM, WMH ring and WMH core. The ring was defined as 2mm on each side of the WMH border. WMP was calculated in each of the three specific regions. We used paired t-test, ANOVA and Fisher’s exact test to compare individual changes. Results WMP was significantly higher in subjects than controls (p<0.001). There was no correlation between WMH load and WMP. High permeability regions had minimal overlap between first and second scans. Nine percent of WMP was within the WMHs, 49% within the NAWM, and 52% within the WMH ring (p<0.001; ANOVA). Conclusions Increased BBB permeability in NAWM and close to the WMH borders supports a relationship between BBB disruption and development of WMHs. PMID:26205374

  7. Sirt1-Sirt3 axis regulates human blood-brain barrier permeability in response to ischemia.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tao; Dai, Shu-Hui; Li, Xia; Luo, Peng; Zhu, Jie; Wang, Yu-Hai; Fei, Zhou; Jiang, Xiao-Fan

    2017-09-22

    Sirtuin1 (Sirt1) and Sirtuin3 (Sirt3) are two well-characterized members of the silent information regulator 2 (Sir2) family of proteins. Both Sirt1 and Sirt3 have been shown to play vital roles in resistance to cellular stress, but the interaction between these two sirtuins has not been fully determined. In this study, we investigated the role of Sirt1-Sirt3 axis in blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability after ischemia in vitro. Human brain microvascular endothelial cells and astrocytes were co-cultured to model the BBB in vitro and oxygen and glucose deprivation (OGD) was performed to mimic ischemia. The results of transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) showed that suppression of Sirt1 via siRNA or salermide significantly decreased BBB permeability, whereas Sirt3 knockdown increased BBB permeability. In addition, Sirt1 was shown to regulate Sirt3 expression after OGD through inhibiting the AMPK-PGC1 pathway. Application of the AMPK inhibitor compound C partially prevented the effects of Sirt1-Sirt3 axis on BBB permeability after OGD. The results of flow cytometry and cytochrome c release demonstrated that Sirt1 and Sirt3 exert opposite effects on OGD-induced apoptosis. Furthermore, suppression of Sirt1 was shown to attenuate mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, which contribute to the Sirt1-Sirt3 axis-induced regulation of BBB permeability and cell damage. In summary, these findings demonstrate that the Sirt1-Sirt3 axis might act as an important modulator in BBB physiology, and could be a therapeutic target for ischemic stroke via regulating mitochondrial ROS generation. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. Adenosine receptor signaling modulates permeability of the blood-brain barrier.

    PubMed

    Carman, Aaron J; Mills, Jeffrey H; Krenz, Antje; Kim, Do-Geun; Bynoe, Margaret S

    2011-09-14

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is comprised of specialized endothelial cells that form the capillary microvasculature of the CNS and is essential for brain function. It also poses the greatest impediment in the treatment of many CNS diseases because it commonly blocks entry of therapeutic compounds. Here we report that adenosine receptor (AR) signaling modulates BBB permeability in vivo. A(1) and A(2A) AR activation facilitated the entry of intravenously administered macromolecules, including large dextrans and antibodies to β-amyloid, into murine brains. Additionally, treatment with an FDA-approved selective A(2A) agonist, Lexiscan, also increased BBB permeability in murine models. These changes in BBB permeability are dose-dependent and temporally discrete. Transgenic mice lacking A(1) or A(2A) ARs showed diminished dextran entry into the brain after AR agonism. Following treatment with a broad-spectrum AR agonist, intravenously administered anti-β-amyloid antibody was observed to enter the CNS and bind β-amyloid plaques in a transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Selective AR activation resulted in cellular changes in vitro including decreased transendothelial electrical resistance, increased actinomyosin stress fiber formation, and alterations in tight junction molecules. These results suggest that AR signaling can be used to modulate BBB permeability in vivo to facilitate the entry of potentially therapeutic compounds into the CNS. AR signaling at brain endothelial cells represents a novel endogenous mechanism of modulating BBB permeability. We anticipate these results will aid in drug design, drug delivery and treatment options for neurological diseases such as AD, Parkinson's disease, multiple sclerosis and cancers of the CNS.

  9. Detrimental effect of electromagnetic pulse exposure on permeability of in vitro blood-brain-barrier model.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jia Xing; Ding, Gui Rong; Zhang, Jie; Zhou, Yong Chun; Zhang, Yan Jun; Guo, Guo Zhen

    2013-02-01

    To study the effect of electromagnetic pulse (EMP) exposure on permeability of in vitro blood-brain-barrier (BBB) model. An in vitro BBB model, established by co-culturing brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMVEC) and astroglial cells (AC) isolated from rat brain, was exposed to EMP at 100 kV/m and 400 kV/m, respectively. Permeability of the model was assayed by measuring the transendothelial electrical resistance (TEER) and the horseradish peroxidase (HRP) transmission at different time points. Levels of BBB tight junction-related proteins were measured at 0, 1, 2, 4, 8, 12, 16, 20, 24 h after EMP exposure by Western blotting. The TEER level was lower in BBB model group than in control group at 12 h after EMP, exposure which returned to its normal level at 24 h. The 24 h recovery process was triphasic and biphasic respectively after EMP exposure at 100 kV/m and 400 kV/m. Following exposure to 400 kV/m EMP, the HRP permeability increased at 1-12 h and returned to its normal level at 24 h. Western blotting showed that the claudin-5 and ZO-1 protein levels were changed after EMP exposure. EMP exposure at 100 kV/m and 400 kV/m can increase the permeability of in vitro BBB model and BBB tight junction-related proteins such as ZO-1 and claudin-5 may change EMP-induced BBB permeability. Copyright © 2013 The Editorial Board of Biomedical and Environmental Sciences. Published by China CDC. All rights reserved.

  10. Superficial wounding model for epidermal barrier repair studies: comparison of Erbium:YAG laser and the suction blister method.

    PubMed

    Ferraq, Younes; Black, David R; Theunis, Jennifer; Mordon, Serge

    2012-09-01

    Wound-healing studies use mainly mechanical methods for wound induction, which are laborious and difficult to standardize. Objective of this study was to evaluate the Erbium:Yttrium-Aluminium-Garnet (Er:YAG) laser method as a model of epidermis ablation on human skin in vivo and to compare the quality and healing rates of Er:YAG laser and suction blister (SB) wounds. Er:YAG laser and SB wounds were made on the forearms of 10 healthy volunteers. Post-wounding measurements including wound surface area (WSA) from photographs, wound depth from 3D volume analysis, trans-epidermal water loss (TEWL), laser doppler blood flow (LDBF), and optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging were made daily over 7 days. Biopsies were taken on Days 4 and 7. 3D analysis showed laser wounds to be shallower and more uniform in depth than SB: 54 ± 14 µm versus 140 ± 102 µm, respectively, with histology demonstrating complete epidermal removal using SB. SB wounds were more variable in size with a WSA of 0.47 ± 0.24 cm(2) compared to 1.17 ± 0.14 cm(2) for laser wounds. Healing rates were similar in both groups, as measured by TEWL, LDBF, and WSA. OCT imaging on Days 3-4 revealed new epidermis below the fibrin clot, similar to histology, and a visible stratum corneum on Day 7, but no apparent epidermal hyperplasia in contrast to histology. Compared to the SB model, Er:YAG laser achieved rapid standardized epidermal ablation, which despite morphological differences, was similar in terms of epidermal regeneration/barrier formation. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Early blood-brain barrier permeability in cerebella of PLSJL mice immunized with myelin basic protein.

    PubMed

    Spitsin, Sergei; Portocarrero, Carla; Phares, Timothy W; Kean, Rhonda B; Brimer, Christine M; Koprowski, Hilary; Hooper, D Craig

    2008-05-30

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is dramatically but transiently compromised in the cerebella of myelin basic protein immunized mice at least 1 week prior to the development of the paralytic phase of experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE). Treatment of mice with the peroxynitrite-dependent radical scavenger uric acid (UA) during the first week after immunization blocks the early increase in cerebellar BBB permeability and the subsequent development of clinical signs of EAE. These results indicate that the early loss of BBB integrity in the cerebellum is likely to be a necessary step in the development of paralytic EAE.

  12. Early blood-brain barrier permeability in cerebella of PLSJL mice immunized with myelin basic protein

    PubMed Central

    Spitsin, Sergei; Portocarrero, Carla; Phares, Timothy W.; Kean, Rhonda B.; Brimer, Christine M.; Koprowski, Hilary; Hooper, D.Craig

    2008-01-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is dramatically but transiently compromised in the cerebella of myelin basic protein immunized mice at least one week prior to the development of the paralytic phase of experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE). Treatment of mice with the peroxynitrite-dependent radical scavenger uric acid (UA) during the first week after immunization blocks the early increase in cerebellar BBB permeability and the subsequent development of clinical signs of EAE. These results indicate that the early loss of BBB integrity in the cerebellum is likely to be a necessary step in the development of paralytic EAE. PMID:18406473

  13. Emerging Roles for Anionic Non-Bilayer Phospholipids in Fortifying the Outer Membrane Permeability Barrier

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Lately, researchers have been actively investigating Escherichia coli lptD mutants, which exhibit reduced transport of lipopolysaccharide to the cell surface. In this issue of the Journal of Bacteriology, Sutterlin et al. (H. A. Sutterlin, S. Zhang, and T. J. Silhavy, J. Bacteriol. 196:3214–3220, 2014) now reveal an important functional role for phosphatidic acid in fortifying the outer membrane permeability barrier in certain lptD mutant backgrounds. These findings come on the heels of the first reports of two LptD crystal structures, which now provide a structural framework for interpreting lptD genetics. PMID:25022852

  14. Heavy metals removal and hydraulic performance in zero-valent iron/pumice permeable reactive barriers.

    PubMed

    Moraci, Nicola; Calabrò, Paolo S

    2010-11-01

    Long-term behaviour is a major issue related to the use of zero-valent iron (ZVI) in permeable reactive barriers for groundwater remediation; in fact, in several published cases the hydraulic conductivity and removal efficiency were progressively reduced during operation, potentially compromising the functionality of the barrier. To solve this problem, the use of granular mixtures of ZVI and natural pumice has recently been proposed. This paper reports the results of column tests using aqueous nickel and copper solutions of various concentrations. Three configurations of reactive material (ZVI only, granular mixture of ZVI and pumice, and pumice and ZVI in series) are discussed. The results clearly demonstrate that iron-pumice granular mixtures perform well both in terms of contaminant removal and in maintaining the long-term hydraulic conductivity. Comparison with previous reports concerning copper removal by ZVI/sand mixtures reveals higher performance in the case of ZVI/pumice. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Permeability and demarcation in the psychoanalytic process. Functions of the contact-barrier.

    PubMed

    Teising, Martin

    2005-12-01

    Introjection, identification and projection are concepts that designate processes in which something is being put into or taken out of something else. These processes presuppose the overcoming of some form of separation between two entities. The permeability or impermeability of a fictive boundary between the representations of subject and object set the emotional tone of their coexistence. There are moments of complete diffusion, in which subject and object can no longer be differentiated, and moments of autistic enclosure in which the individual can no longer be reached at all. Permeability and demarcation result from the processing of stimuli carried out by the 'contact-barrier', as an ego function. Stimuli of internal, libidinal or aggressive origin, as well as 'impressions' of external origin, are classified and processed with the aid of various kinds of factors arising from coagulated object-relational experiences. Whereas for Freud the contact-barrier regulates the quantity of energy and found a topographical structure, Bion understands the contact-barrier as a psychic function that simultaneously regulates boundary demarcation and making contact. In the psychoanalytic process, the contact-barrier created by patient and analyst regulates the events in the transference and countertransference. An awareness of the struggle for contact and demarcation at the dynamic boundary representations that are constantly being recreated by both partners in the analytic process may be helpful in our clinical work. The author presents an examination of the ways in which patient and analyst make contact and demarcate the boundaries, which provides a better understanding of the dynamics of transference processes. He demonstrates this in relation to clinical material.

  16. A look at epidermal barrier function in atopic dermatitis: physiologic lipid replacement and the role of ceramides.

    PubMed

    Sajić, D; Asiniwasis, R; Skotnicki-Grant, S

    2012-07-01

    This review summarizes and discusses the role and efficacy of moisturizers, particularly the more recently introduced ceramide-based formulations, in the skin care regimen of patients with both active and quiescent atopic dermatitis (AD). It is now well established that a complex interplay of environmental and genetic factors are responsible for disease onset and chronicity. Indeed, several novel genetic mechanisms have been recently discovered to be associated with AD pathogenesis. Moreover, it is increasingly recognized that the epidermal barrier plays a critical role in the initiation, perpetuation, and exacerbation of AD. The skin of patients with AD harbors several defects in epidermal barrier function, including filaggrin and ceramides. An improved understanding of these etiopathogenic factors has led to the development of topical ceramide-dominant moisturizers to replace the deficient molecules and re-establish the integrity of barrier defenses. Some of these products have demonstrated efficacy in the treatment of adult and childhood AD that are similar to mid-potency topical steroids. More importantly, they have been shown to be safe with very few associated side-effects. We recommend the addition of such new agents as both the first step of treatment and in the maintenance of clinically quiescent skin of patients with AD.

  17. Gyroxin increases blood-brain barrier permeability to Evans blue dye in mice.

    PubMed

    Alves da Silva, J A; Oliveira, K C; Camillo, M A P

    2011-01-01

    Gyroxin is a serine protease enzyme component of the South American rattlesnake (Crotalus durissus terrificus) venom. This toxin displays several activities, including the induction of blood coagulation (fibrinogenolytic activity), vasodilation and neurotoxicity, resulting in an effect called barrel rotation. The mechanisms involved in this neurotoxic activity are not well known. Because gyroxin is a member of a potentially therapeutic family of enzymes, including thrombin, ancrod, batroxobin, trypsin and kallicrein, the identification of the mechanism of gyroxin's action is extremely important. In this study, gyroxin was isolated from crude venom by affinity and molecular exclusion chromatography. Analysis of the isolated gyroxin via sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) revealed a single protein band with a molecular weight of approximately 28 kDa, confirming the identity of the molecule. Furthermore, intravenous administration of purified gyroxin (0.25 μg/g of body weight) to mice resulted in symptoms compatible with barrel rotation syndrome, confirming the neurotoxic activity of the toxin. Mice treated with gyroxin showed an increase in the concentration of albumin-Evans blue in brain extracts, indicating an increase in the blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability. This gyroxin-induced increase in BBB permeability was time-dependent, reaching a peak within 15 min after exposure, similar to the time span in which the neurotoxic syndrome (barrel rotation) occurs. This work provides the first evidence of gyroxin's capacity to temporarily alter the permeability of the BBB.

  18. Influence of silver and titanium dioxide nanoparticles on in vitro blood-brain barrier permeability.

    PubMed

    Chen, I-Chieh; Hsiao, I-Lun; Lin, Ho-Chen; Wu, Chien-Hou; Chuang, Chun-Yu; Huang, Yuh-Jeen

    2016-10-01

    An in vitro blood-brain barrier (BBB) model being composed of co-culture with endothelial (bEnd.3) and astrocyte-like (ALT) cells was established to evaluate the toxicity and permeability of Ag nanoparticles (AgNPs; 8nm) and TiO2 nanoparticles (TiO2NPs; 6nm and 35nm) in normal and inflammatory central nervous system. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) was pre-treated to simulate the inflammatory responses. Both AgNPs and Ag ions can decrease transendothelial electrical resistance (TEER) value, and cause discontinuous tight junction proteins (claudin-5 and zonula occludens-1) of BBB. However, only the Ag ions induced inflammatory cytokines to release, and had less cell-to-cell permeability than AgNPs, which indicated that the toxicity of AgNPs was distinct from Ag ions. LPS itself disrupted BBB, while co-treatment with AgNPs and LPS dramatically enhanced the disruption and permeability coefficient. On the other hand, TiO2NPs exposure increased BBB penetration by size, and disrupted tight junction proteins without size dependence, and many of TiO2NPs accumulated in the endothelial cells were observed. This study provided the new insight of toxic potency of AgNPs and TiO2NPs in BBB.

  19. Higher blood-brain barrier permeability is associated with higher white matter hyperintensities burden.

    PubMed

    Li, Yue; Li, Man; Zhang, Xiaoyu; Shi, Qinglei; Yang, Shuna; Fan, Huimin; Qin, Wei; Yang, Lei; Yuan, Junliang; Jiang, Tao; Hu, Wenli

    2017-07-01

    The pathogenesis of white matter hyperintensities (WMH) is incompletely understood but blood-brain barrier (BBB) dysfunction may play a key role. This study aimed to investigate the relationship between BBB permeability and the severity of WMH burden. Consecutive participants without symptomatic stroke history presented for physical examination were recruited in this cross-sectional study and divided into three WMH burden groups according to total Fazekas scores. They received dynamic contrast-enhanced-magnetic resonance imaging to measure BBB permeability, and received Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) and Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA). A total of 102 participants aged 49-90 years (mean age of 69.82 years) were enrolled (36 with low WMH burden, 35 with medium WMH burden, and 31 with high WMH burden). Multivariable linear regression analyses revealed that participants with higher WMH burden had significantly higher BBB leakage rate and area under the leakage curve in normal-appearing white matter, WMH, cortical gray matter, and deep gray matter (DGM) after adjustment for age, sex, and vascular risk factors. Scores on MMSE and MoCA decreased with increasing leakage rate in WMH and DGM after adjustment for age, sex, WMH burden, and education years. We found that higher BBB permeability is associated with higher WMH burden and cognitive decline. The compromised BBB integrity may be a critical contributor to the pathogenesis of WMH and part of a series of pathological processes that finally lead to cognitive impairment.

  20. Aging and sex influence the permeability of the blood-brain barrier in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Saija, A.; Princi, P.; D'Amico, N.; De Pasquale, R.; Costa, G.

    1990-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the existence of aging- and sex-related alterations in the permeability of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) in the rat, by calculating a unidirectional blood-to-brain transfer constant (Ki) for the circulating tracer ({sup 14}C)-{alpha}-aminoisobutyric acid. The authors observed that: (a) the permeability of the BBB significantly increased within the frontal and temporo-parietal cortex, hypothalamus and cerebellum in 28-30 week old rats, in comparison with younger animals; (b) in several brain areas of female intact rats higher Ki values (even though not significantly different) were calculated at oestrus than at proestrus; (c) in 1-week ovariectomized rats there was a marked increase of Ki values at the level of the frontal, temporo-parietal and occipital cortex, cerebellum and brain-stem. One can speculate that aging and sex-related alterations in thee permeability of the BBB reflect respectively changes in brain neurochemical system activity and in plasma steroid hormone levels.

  1. Low Dosage of Chitosan Supplementation Improves Intestinal Permeability and Impairs Barrier Function in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Hanhui; Li, Guanya

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore relationships between low dose dietary supplementation with chitosan (COS) and body weight, feed intake, intestinal barrier function, and permeability in mice. Twenty mice were randomly assigned to receive an unadulterated control diet (control group) or a dietary supplementation with 30 mg/kg dose of chitosan (COS group) for two weeks. Whilst no significant differences were found between the conditions for body weight or food and water intake, mice in the COS group had an increased serum D-lactate content (P < 0.05) and a decreased jejunal diamine oxidase (DAO) activity (P < 0.05). Furthermore, mice in COS group displayed a reduced expression of occludin and ZO-1 (P < 0.05) and a reduced expression of occludin in the ileum (P < 0.05). The conclusion drawn from these findings showed that although 30 mg/kg COS-supplemented diet had no effect on body weight or feed intake in mice, this dosage may compromise intestinal barrier function and permeability. This research will contribute to the guidance on COS supplements. PMID:27610376

  2. Heavy metal uptake and leaching from polluted soil using permeable barrier in DTPA-assisted phytoextraction.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Shulan; Shen, Zhiping; Duo, Lian

    2015-04-01

    Application of sewage sludge (SS) in agriculture is an alternative technique of disposing this waste. But unreasonable application of SS leads to excessive accumulation of heavy metals in soils. A column experiment was conducted to test the availability of heavy metals to Lolium perenne grown in SS-treated soils following diethylene triamine penta acetic acid (DTPA) application at rates of 0, 10 and 20 mmol kg(-1) soil. In order to prevent metal leaching in DTPA-assisted phytoextraction process, a horizontal permeable barrier was placed below the treated soil, and its effectiveness was also assessed. Results showed that DTPA addition significantly increased metal uptake by L. perenne shoots and metal leaching. Permeable barriers increased metal concentrations in plant shoots and effectively decreased metal leaching from the treated soil. Heavy metals in SS-treated soils could be gradually removed by harvesting L. perenne many times in 1 year and adding low dosage of DTPA days before each harvest.

  3. A2A adenosine receptor regulates the human blood brain barrier permeability

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Do-Geun; Bynoe, Margaret S.

    2015-01-01

    The blood brain barrier (BBB) symbolically represents the gateway to the central nervous system. It is a single layer of specialized endothelial cells that coats the central nervous system (CNS) vasculature and physically separates the brain environment from the blood constituents, to maintain the homeostasis of the CNS. However, this protective measure is a hindrance to the delivery of therapeutics to treat neurological diseases. Here, we show that activation of A2A adenosine receptor (AR) with an FDA-approved agonist potently permeabilizes an in vitro primary human brain endothelial barrier (hBBB) to the passage of chemotherapeutic drugs and T cells. T cell migration under AR signaling occurs primarily by paracellular transendothelial route. Permeabilization of the hBBB is rapid, time-dependent and reversible and is mediated by morphological changes in actin-cytoskeletal reorganization induced by RhoA signaling and a potent down-regulation of Claudin-5 and VE-Cadherin. Moreover, the kinetics of BBB permeability in mice closely overlaps with the permeability kinetics of the hBBB. These data suggest that activation of A2A AR is an endogenous mechanism that may be used for CNS drug delivery in human. PMID:25262373

  4. Development of permeable reactive barriers to prevent radionuclide migration from the nuclear waste repositories

    SciTech Connect

    Zakharova, E.; Kalmykov, S.; Batuk, O.; Kazakovskaya, T.; Shapovalov, V.; Haire, M.J.

    2007-07-01

    This paper is focused on three possible materials for permeable reactive barriers (PRB): 1) depleted uranium oxide that is accumulated as a residual product of the natural uranium enrichment process, 2) zero-valent iron and, 3) the composite material based on montmorillonite clay modified with different anion exchangers. The main aim of permeable reactive barriers is to prevent release of radionuclides emerging from a repository waste package containing spent nuclear fuel to outside the control area of the nuclear waste repository sites. The most experimentally developed material is depleted uranium oxide. It can be used both as a component of radiation shielding and as an absorbent for migrating long-lived radionuclides (especially {sup 237}Np and {sup 99}Tc). Experiments demonstrate the high sorption properties of depleted uranium oxide towards Np and Tc both from deionized water and from solution that simulates Yucca Mountain. Zero-valent iron, and the composite based on montmorillonite clay, also seem to be very promising to use in a PRB. Nano-particles of zero-valent iron with high surface will reduce high valency Np and Tc to the tetravalent state and thus immobilize them due to the extremely low solubility of corresponding hydroxides. The composite based on montmorillonite clay modified with different anion exchangers will possess high sorption affinity towards anionic and cationic species. (authors)

  5. Fungal permeable reactive barrier to remediate groundwater in an artificial aquifer.

    PubMed

    Folch, Albert; Vilaplana, Marcel; Amado, Leila; Vicent, Teresa; Caminal, Glòria

    2013-11-15

    Biobarriers, as permeable reactive barriers (PRBs), are a common technology that mainly uses bacteria to remediate groundwater in polluted aquifers. In this study, we propose to use Trametes versicolor, a white-rot fungus, as the reactive element because of its capacity to degrade a wide variety of highly recalcitrant and xenobiotic compounds. A laboratory-scale artificial aquifer was constructed to simulate groundwater flow under real conditions in shallow aquifers. Orange G dye was chosen as a contaminant to visually monitor the hydrodynamic behaviour of the system and any degradation of the dye by the fungus. Batch experiments at different pH values (6 and 7) and several temperatures (15 °C, 18 °C, 20 °C and 25 °C) were performed to select the appropriate residence time and glucose consumption rate required for continuous treatment. The maximum Orange G degradation was 97%. Continuous degradation over 85% was achieved for more than 8 days. Experimental results indicate for the first time that this fungus can potentially be used as a permeable reactive barrier in real aquifers.

  6. An overview of permeable reactive barriers for in situ sustainable groundwater remediation.

    PubMed

    Obiri-Nyarko, Franklin; Grajales-Mesa, S Johana; Malina, Grzegorz

    2014-09-01

    Permeable reactive barriers (PRBs) are one of the innovative technologies widely accepted as an alternative to the 'pump and treat' (P&T) for sustainable in situ remediation of contaminated groundwater. The concept of the technology involves the emplacement of a permeable barrier containing reactive materials across the flow path of the contaminated groundwater to intercept and treat the contaminants as the plume flows through it under the influence of the natural hydraulic gradient. Since the invention of PRBs in the early 1990s, a variety of materials has been employed to remove contaminants including heavy metals, chlorinated solvents, aromatic hydrocarbons, and pesticides. Contaminant removal is usually accomplished via processes such as adsorption, precipitation, denitrification and biodegradation. Despite wide acknowledgment, there are still unresolved issues about long term-performance of PRBs, which have somewhat affected their acceptability and full-scale implementation. The current paper presents an overview of the PRB technology, which includes the state of art, the merits and limitations, the reactive media used so far, and the mechanisms employed to transform or immobilize contaminants. The paper also looks at the design, construction and the long-term performance of PRBs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. The effect of 2,5-hexanedione on permeability of blood-nerve barrier in rats.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qingjun; Duan, Huawei; Dai, Yufei; Niu, Yong; Chen, Hong; Liu, Qing; Bin, Ping; Zheng, Yuxin

    2010-06-01

    To explore the effect of 2,5-hexanedione on permeability of blood-nerve barrier, adult Wistar rats were administered with 400 mg x kg(-1) x d(- 1) 2,5-hexanedione to establish animal model of 2,5-hexnedione neuropathy. Evans blue was injected through left femoral vein of the rats after the model had been established. The distribution of fluorescence in sciatic-tibial nerve was observed and assessed. For the transverse sections of sciatic-tibial nerves, the average fluorescence intensity of proximal section was stronger (p < .01) than those of intermediate and distal sections and the average fluorescence intensity of intermediate section was stronger (p < .01) than that of distal section in the intoxicated group. In the control, the weak fluorescence was shown, and average fluorescence intensity of distal section was stronger (p < .05) than that of proximal section. The average fluorescence intensity of proximal, intermediate and distal sections in the intoxicated group was stronger (p < .01) than those of the corresponding sections in the control. For the longitudinal sections of sciatic-tibial nerves, fluorescence was observed in both proximal and distal sections in the intoxicated group. The fluorescence intensity of distal section in the control was weak and almost no fluorescence was shown in the proximal section. The permeability of blood-nerve barrier could be increased by 2,5-hexanedione.

  8. a Study of Blood-Brain Barrier Permeability Variations in Vivo Using Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neuder, Michelle Sandy

    We have measured non-invasively the transcapillary transport of water and an extracellular marker, gadolinium diethylenetriamine pentaacetate (Gd-DTPA) in the living brain using conventional and rapid NMR imaging strategies. Detection of water exchange post-contrast and of Gd-DTPA leakage across an intact and hyperosmotically-disrupted blood-brain barrier (BBB) were investigated in animal models. The development of high speed magnetic resonance imaging methods provides a tool for measuring short-term variations in BBB permeability in vivo over relatively short experimental time periods, and for determining the influence of these permeability changes on other physiologic parameters. The overall aims of this thesis have been to exploit the high temporal resolution available with a fast scanning technique, echo-planar imaging, to (1) quantitate the permeability of the BBB to water before and after altering the exchange capacity of the capillary bed, (2) use these measurements to model small, reversible changes in permeability to Gd-DTPA in terms of the post -contrast relaxation characteristics of the blood and tissue spaces during the first- and multiple-pass phases of transport, and (3) explore the influence of an increased permeability on the first-pass kinetic behavior. We initially present the theory of two-site water exchange, a modification of the Bloch equations used to examine time-dependent changes in the nuclear spin magnetization with time. The solutions of these equations for our particular imaging experiment were initially validated in a well-characterized dialysis chamber in order to demonstrate the sensitivity of the experiment to detecting biexponential signal decay. Upon validating the theory, we measured water exchange times in vivo in rodent and canine brain. A biexponential model of NMR signal decay was used to determine both the intravascular blood volume and intravascular water lifetime. Mannitol, a hyperosmotic solution, which can increase BBB

  9. Effect of fatty acids on the permeability barrier of model and biological membranes.

    PubMed

    Arouri, Ahmad; Lauritsen, Kira E; Nielsen, Henriette L; Mouritsen, Ole G

    2016-10-01

    Because of the amphipathicity and conical molecular shape of fatty acids, they can efficiently incorporate into lipid membranes and disturb membrane integrity, chain packing, and lateral pressure profile. These phenomena affect both model membranes as well as biological membranes. We investigated the feasibility of exploiting fatty acids as permeability enhancers in drug delivery systems for enhancing drug release from liposomal carriers and drug uptake by target cells. Saturated fatty acids, with acyl chain length from C8 to C20, were tested using model drug delivery liposomes of 1,2- dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC) and the breast cancer MCF-7 cell line as a model cell. A calcein release assay demonstrated reduction in the membrane permeability barrier of the DPPC liposomes, proportionally to the length of the fatty acid. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and dynamic light scattering (DLS) experiments revealed that C12 to C20 fatty acids can stabilize DPPC liposomal bilayers and induce the formation of large structures, probably due to liposome aggregation and bilayer morphological changes. On the other hand, the short fatty acids C8 and C10 tend to destabilize the bilayers and only moderately cause the formation of large structures. The effect of fatty acids on DPPC liposomes was not completely transferrable to the MCF-7 cell line. Using cytotoxicity assays, the cells were found to be relatively insensitive to the fatty acids at apoptotic sub-millimolar concentrations. Increasing the fatty acid concentration to few millimolar substantially reduced the viability of the cells, most likely via the induction of necrosis and cell lysis. A bioluminescence living-cell-based luciferase assay showed that saturated fatty acids in sub-cytotoxic concentrations cannot reduce the permeability barrier of cell membranes. Our results confirm that the membrane perturbing effect of fatty acids on model membranes cannot simply be carried over to biological

  10. Image-Guided Synthesis Reveals Potent Blood-Brain Barrier Permeable Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies have revealed that several histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors, which are used to study/treat brain diseases, show low blood-brain barrier (BBB) penetration. In addition to low HDAC potency and selectivity observed, poor brain penetrance may account for the high doses needed to achieve therapeutic efficacy. Here we report the development and evaluation of highly potent and blood-brain barrier permeable HDAC inhibitors for CNS applications based on an image-guided approach involving the parallel synthesis and radiolabeling of a series of compounds based on the benzamide HDAC inhibitor, MS-275 as a template. BBB penetration was optimized by rapid carbon-11 labeling and PET imaging in the baboon model and using the imaging derived data on BBB penetration from each compound to feed back into the design process. A total of 17 compounds were evaluated, revealing molecules with both high binding affinity and BBB permeability. A key element conferring BBB penetration in this benzamide series was a basic benzylic amine. These derivatives exhibited 1–100 nM inhibitory activity against recombinant human HDAC1 and HDAC2. Three of the carbon-11 labeled aminomethyl benzamide derivatives showed high BBB penetration (∼0.015%ID/cc) and regional binding heterogeneity in the brain (high in thalamus and cerebellum). Taken together this approach has afforded a strategy and a predictive model for developing highly potent and BBB permeable HDAC inhibitors for CNS applications and for the discovery of novel candidate molecules for small molecule probes and drugs. PMID:24780082

  11. Heterogeneous vascular permeability and alternative diffusion barrier in sensory circumventricular organs of adult mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Morita, Shoko; Furube, Eriko; Mannari, Tetsuya; Okuda, Hiroaki; Tatsumi, Kouko; Wanaka, Akio; Miyata, Seiji

    2016-02-01

    Fenestrated capillaries of the sensory circumventricular organs (CVOs), including the organum vasculosum of the lamina terminalis, the subfornical organ and the area postrema, lack completeness of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) to sense a variety of blood-derived molecules and to convey the information into other brain regions. We examine the vascular permeability of blood-derived molecules and the expression of tight-junction proteins in sensory CVOs. The present tracer assays revealed that blood-derived dextran 10 k (Dex10k) having a molecular weight (MW) of 10,000 remained in the perivascular space between the inner and outer basement membranes, but fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC; MW: 389) and Dex3k (MW: 3000) diffused into the parenchyma. The vascular permeability of FITC was higher at central subdivisions than at distal subdivisions. Neither FITC nor Dex3k diffused beyond the dense network of glial fibrillar acidic protein (GFAP)-positive astrocytes/tanycytes. The expression of tight-junction proteins such as occludin, claudin-5 and zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1) was undetectable at the central subdivisions of the sensory CVOs but some was expressed at the distal subdivisions. Electron microscopic observation showed that capillaries were surrounded with numerous layers of astrocyte processes and dendrites. The expression of occludin and ZO-1 was also observed as puncta on GFAP-positive astrocytes/tanycytes of the sensory CVOs. Our study thus demonstrates the heterogeneity of vascular permeability and expression of tight-junction proteins and indicates that the outer basement membrane and dense astrocyte/tanycyte connection are possible alternative mechanisms for a diffusion barrier of blood-derived molecules, instead of the BBB.

  12. Iontophoresis and sonophoresis stimulate epidermal cytokine expression at energies that do not provoke a barrier abnormality: lamellar body secretion and cytokine expression are linked to altered epidermal calcium levels.

    PubMed

    Choi, Eung Ho; Kim, Min Jung; Yeh, Byung-Il; Ahn, Sung Ku; Lee, Seung Hun

    2003-11-01

    We performed this study to identify whether the expression of epidermal cytokines is altered by changes in epidermal calcium content, independent of skin barrier disruption. Iontophoresis and sonophoresis with the energies that do not disrupt the skin barrier, but induce changes in the epidermal calcium gradient, were applied to the skin of hairless mice. Immediately after iontophoresis and sonophoresis, immersion in a solution containing calcium was carried out, and iontophoresis in either high- or low-calcium solutions was performed. The biopsy specimens were taken for real-time quantitative RT-PCR to detect changes in mRNA level of interleukin-1alpha (IL-1alpha), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), and transforming growth factor-beta in the epidermis and for immunohistochemical stain with primary antibodies to IL-1alpha and TNF-alpha. The expression of each cytokine mRNA increased in the epidermis treated with iontophoresis and sonophoresis compared to a nontreated control as well as in tape-stripped skin used as a positive control and was lower after immersion in a high-calcium solution than in low-calcium solution. IL-1alpha and TNF-alpha immunohistochemical protein staining increased with iontophoresis at low calcium. These studies suggest that changes in epidermal calcium can directly signal expression of epidermal cytokines in vivo, independent of changes in barrier function.

  13. Matriptase/MT-SP1 is required for postnatal survival, epidermal barrier function, hair follicle development, and thymic homeostasis.

    PubMed

    List, Karin; Haudenschild, Christian C; Szabo, Roman; Chen, WanJun; Wahl, Sharon M; Swaim, William; Engelholm, Lars H; Behrendt, Niels; Bugge, Thomas H

    2002-05-23

    Matriptase/MT-SP1 is a novel tumor-associated type II transmembrane serine protease that is highly expressed in the epidermis, thymic stroma, and other epithelia. A null mutation was introduced into the Matriptase/MT-SP1 gene of mice to determine the role of Matriptase/MT-SP1 in epidermal development and neoplasia. Matriptase/MT-SP1-deficient mice developed to term but uniformly died within 48 h of birth. All epidermal surfaces of newborn mice were grossly abnormal with a dry, red, shiny, and wrinkled appearance. Matriptase/MT-SP1-deficiency caused striking malformations of the stratum corneum, characterized by dysmorphic and pleomorphic corneocytes and the absence of vesicular bodies in transitional layer cells. This aberrant skin development seriously compromised both inward and outward epidermal barrier function, leading to the rapid and fatal dehydration of Matriptase/MT-SP1-deficient pups. Loss of Matriptase/MT-SP1 also seriously affected hair follicle development resulting in generalized follicular hypoplasia, absence of erupted vibrissae, lack of vibrissal hair canal formation, ingrown vibrissae, and wholesale abortion of vibrissal follicles. Furthermore, Matriptase/MT-SP1-deficiency resulted in dramatically increased thymocyte apoptosis, and depletion of thymocytes. This study demonstrates that Matriptase/MT-SP1 has pleiotropic functions in the development of the epidermis, hair follicles, and cellular immune system.

  14. Effects of radiofrequency radiation exposure on blood-brain barrier permeability in male and female rats.

    PubMed

    Sirav, Bahriye; Seyhan, Nesrin

    2011-12-01

    During the last several decades, numerous studies have been performed aiming at the question of whether or not exposure to radiofrequency radiation (RFR) influences the permeability of the blood-brain barrier (BBB). The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of RFR on the permeability of BBB in male and female Wistar albino rats. Right brain, left brain, cerebellum, and total brain were analyzed separately in the study. Rats were exposed to 0.9 and 1.8 GHz continuous-wave (CW) RFR for 20 min (at SARs of 4.26 mW/kg and 1.46 mW/kg, respectively) while under anesthesia. Control rats were sham-exposed. Disruption of BBB integrity was detected spectrophotometrically using the Evans-blue dye, which has been used as a BBB tracer and is known to be bound to serum albumin. Right brain, left brain, cerebellum, and total brain were evaluated for BBB permeability. In female rats, no albumin extravasation was found in in the brain after RFR exposure. A significant increase in albumin was found in the brains of the RF-exposed male rats when compared to sham-exposed male brains. These results suggest that exposure to 0.9 and 1.8 GHz CW RFR at levels below the international limits can affect the vascular permeability in the brain of male rats. The possible risk of RFR exposure in humans is a major concern for the society. Thus, this topic should be investigated more thoroughly in the future.

  15. Effects of soybean agglutinin on intestinal barrier permeability and tight junction protein expression in weaned piglets.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yuan; Qin, Guixin; Sun, Zewei; Che, Dongsheng; Bao, Nan; Zhang, Xiaodong

    2011-01-01

    This study was developed to provide further information on the intestinal barrier permeability and the tight junction protein expression in weaned piglets fed with different levels of soybean agglutinin (SBA). Twenty-five weaned crossbred barrows (Duroc × Landrace × Yorkshire) were selected and randomly allotted to five groups, each group with five replicates. The piglets in the control group were not fed with leguminous products. 0.05, 0.1, 0.15 and 0.2% SBA was added to the control diet to form four experimental diets, respectively. After the experimental period of 7 days (for each group), all the piglets were anesthetized with excess procaine and slaughtered. The d-lactic acid in plasma and the Ileal mucosa diamine oxidase (DAO) was analyzed to observe the change in the intestinal permeability. The tight junction proteins occludin and ZO-1 in the jejunum tissue distribution and relative expression were detected by immunohistochemistry and Western Blot. The results illustrated that a high dose of SBA (0.1-0.2%) could increase the intestinal permeability and reduce piglet intestinal epithelial tight junction protein occludin or ZO-1 expression, while low dose of SBA (0.05% of total diet) had no significant affects. The contents of DAO, d-lactic acid, occludin or ZO-1, had a linear relationship with the SBA levels (0-0.2%) in diets. The high dose SBA (0.1-0.2%) could increase the intestinal permeability and reduce piglet intestinal epithelial tight junction protein occludin or ZO-1 expression, while low dose of SBA (0.05% of total diet) had no affects.

  16. Tracer kinetic modelling for DCE-MRI quantification of subtle blood–brain barrier permeability

    PubMed Central

    Heye, Anna K.; Thrippleton, Michael J.; Armitage, Paul A.; Valdés Hernández, Maria del C.; Makin, Stephen D.; Glatz, Andreas; Sakka, Eleni; Wardlaw, Joanna M.

    2016-01-01

    There is evidence that subtle breakdown of the blood–brain barrier (BBB) is a pathophysiological component of several diseases, including cerebral small vessel disease and some dementias. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) combined with tracer kinetic modelling is widely used for assessing permeability and perfusion in brain tumours and body tissues where contrast agents readily accumulate in the extracellular space. However, in diseases where leakage is subtle, the optimal approach for measuring BBB integrity is likely to differ since the magnitude and rate of enhancement caused by leakage are extremely low; several methods have been reported in the literature, yielding a wide range of parameters even in healthy subjects. We hypothesised that the Patlak model is a suitable approach for measuring low-level BBB permeability with low temporal resolution and high spatial resolution and brain coverage, and that normal levels of scanner instability would influence permeability measurements. DCE-MRI was performed in a cohort of mild stroke patients (n = 201) with a range of cerebral small vessel disease severity. We fitted these data to a set of nested tracer kinetic models, ranking their performance according to the Akaike information criterion. To assess the influence of scanner drift, we scanned 15 healthy volunteers that underwent a “sham” DCE-MRI procedure without administration of contrast agent. Numerical simulations were performed to investigate model validity and the effect of scanner drift. The Patlak model was found to be most appropriate for fitting low-permeability data, and the simulations showed vp and KTrans estimates to be reasonably robust to the model assumptions. However, signal drift (measured at approximately 0.1% per minute and comparable to literature reports in other settings) led to systematic errors in calculated tracer kinetic parameters, particularly at low permeabilities. Our findings justify the growing use of the Patlak model

  17. On the effects of preferential or barrier flow features on solute plumes in permeable porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sebben, Megan L.; Werner, Adrian D.

    2016-12-01

    Despite that discrete flow features (DFFs, e.g. fractures and faults) are common features in the subsurface, few studies have explored the influence of DFFs on solute plumes in otherwise permeable rocks (e.g. sandstone, limestone), compared to low-permeability rock settings (e.g. granite and basalt). DFFs can provide preferential flow pathways (i.e. 'preferential flow features'; PFFs), or can act to impede flow (i.e. 'barrier flow features'; BFFs). This research uses a simple analytical expression and numerical modelling to explore how a single DFF influences the steady-state distributions of solute plumes in permeable aquifers. The analysis quantifies the displacement and widening (or narrowing) of a steady-state solute plume as it crosses a DFF in idealised, 1 × 1 m moderately permeable rock aquifers. Previous research is extended by accounting for DFFs as 2D flow features, and including BFF situations. A range of matrix-DFF permeability ratios (0.01 to 100) and DFF apertures (0.25 mm to 2 cm), typical of sedimentary aquifers containing medium-to-large fractures, are considered. The results indicate that for the conceptual models considered here, PFFs typically have a more significant influence on plume distributions than BFFs, and the impact of DFFs on solute plumes generally increases with increasing aperture. For example, displacement of peak solute concentration caused by DFFs exceeds 20 cm in some PFF cases, compared to a maximum of 0.64 cm in BFF cases. PFFs widen plumes up to 9.7 times, compared to a maximum plume widening of 2.0 times in BFF cases. Plumes crossing a PFF are less symmetrical, and peak solute concentrations beneath PFFs are up to two orders of magnitude lower than plumes in BFF cases. This study extends current knowledge of the attenuating influence of DFFs in otherwise permeable rocks on solute plume characteristics, through evaluation of 2D flow effects in DFFs for a variety of DFF apertures, and by considering BFF situations.

  18. Tracer kinetic modelling for DCE-MRI quantification of subtle blood-brain barrier permeability.

    PubMed

    Heye, Anna K; Thrippleton, Michael J; Armitage, Paul A; Valdés Hernández, Maria del C; Makin, Stephen D; Glatz, Andreas; Sakka, Eleni; Wardlaw, Joanna M

    2016-01-15

    There is evidence that subtle breakdown of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) is a pathophysiological component of several diseases, including cerebral small vessel disease and some dementias. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) combined with tracer kinetic modelling is widely used for assessing permeability and perfusion in brain tumours and body tissues where contrast agents readily accumulate in the extracellular space. However, in diseases where leakage is subtle, the optimal approach for measuring BBB integrity is likely to differ since the magnitude and rate of enhancement caused by leakage are extremely low; several methods have been reported in the literature, yielding a wide range of parameters even in healthy subjects. We hypothesised that the Patlak model is a suitable approach for measuring low-level BBB permeability with low temporal resolution and high spatial resolution and brain coverage, and that normal levels of scanner instability would influence permeability measurements. DCE-MRI was performed in a cohort of mild stroke patients (n=201) with a range of cerebral small vessel disease severity. We fitted these data to a set of nested tracer kinetic models, ranking their performance according to the Akaike information criterion. To assess the influence of scanner drift, we scanned 15 healthy volunteers that underwent a "sham" DCE-MRI procedure without administration of contrast agent. Numerical simulations were performed to investigate model validity and the effect of scanner drift. The Patlak model was found to be most appropriate for fitting low-permeability data, and the simulations showed vp and K(Trans) estimates to be reasonably robust to the model assumptions. However, signal drift (measured at approximately 0.1% per minute and comparable to literature reports in other settings) led to systematic errors in calculated tracer kinetic parameters, particularly at low permeabilities. Our findings justify the growing use of the Patlak model in low-permeability

  19. An Injectable Apatite Permeable Reactive Barrier for In Situ 90Sr Immobilization

    SciTech Connect

    Vermeul, Vincent R.; Szecsody, James E.; Fritz, Brad G.; Williams, Mark D.; Moore, Robert C.; Fruchter, Jonathan S.

    2014-04-16

    An injectable permeable reactive barrier (PRB) technology was developed to sequester 90Sr in groundwater through the in situ formation of calcium-phosphate mineral phases, specifically apatite that incorporates 90Sr into the chemical structure. An integrated, multi-scale development and testing approach was used that included laboratory bench-scale experiments, an initial pilot-scale field test, and the emplacement and evaluation of a 300-ft-long treatability-test-scale PRB. Standard groundwater wells were used for emplacement of the treatment zone, allowing treatment of contaminants too deep below ground surface for trench-and-fill type PRB technologies. The apatite amendment formulation uses two separate precursor solutions, one containing a Ca-citrate complex and the other a Na-phosphate solution, to form apatite precipitate in situ. Citrate is needed to keep calcium in solution long enough to achieve a more uniform and areally extensive distribution of precipitate formation. In the summer of 2008, the apatite PRB technology was applied as a 91-m (300-ft) -long permeable reactive barrier on the downgradient edge of a 90Sr plume beneath the Hanford Site in Washington State. The technology was deployed to reduce 90Sr flux discharging to the Columbia River. Performance assessment monitoring data collected to date indicate the barrier is meeting performance objectives. The average reduction in 90Sr concentrations at four downgradient compliance monitoring locations was 95% relative to the high end of the baseline range approximately 1 year after treatment, and continues to meet remedial objectives more than 4 years after treatment.

  20. FG/FxFG as well as GLFG repeats form a selective permeability barrier with self-healing properties.

    PubMed

    Frey, Steffen; Görlich, Dirk

    2009-09-02

    The permeability barrier of nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) controls all nucleo-cytoplasmic exchange. It is freely permeable for small molecules. Objects larger than approximately 30 kDa can efficiently cross this barrier only when bound to nuclear transport receptors (NTRs) that confer translocation-promoting properties. We had shown earlier that the permeability barrier can be reconstituted in the form of a saturated FG/FxFG repeat hydrogel. We now show that GLFG repeats, the other major FG repeat type, can also form highly selective hydrogels. While supporting massive, reversible importin-mediated cargo influx, FG/FxFG, GLFG or mixed hydrogels remained firm barriers towards inert objects that lacked nuclear transport signals. This indicates that FG hydrogels immediately reseal behind a translocating species and thus possess 'self-healing' properties. NTRs not only left the barrier intact, they even tightened it against passive influx, pointing to a role for NTRs in establishing and maintaining the permeability barrier of NPCs.

  1. Epidermal barrier abnormalities in exfoliative ichthyosis with a novel homozygous loss-of-function mutation in CSTA.

    PubMed

    Moosbrugger-Martinz, V; Jalili, A; Schossig, A S; Jahn-Bassler, K; Zschocke, J; Schmuth, M; Stingl, G; Eckl, K M; Hennies, H C; Gruber, R

    2015-06-01

    Autosomal recessive exfoliative ichthyosis (AREI) results from mutations in CSTA, encoding cysteine protease inhibitor A (cystatin A). We present a 25-year-old man from Iran with consanguineous parents, who presented with congenital erythroderma, hyperhidrosis and diffuse hyperkeratosis with coarse palmoplantar peeling of the skin, aggravated by exposure to water and by occlusion. Candidate gene analysis revealed a previously unknown homozygous loss-of-function mutation c.172C>T (p.Arg58Ter) in CSTA, and immunostaining showed absence of epidermal cystatin A, confirming the diagnosis of AREI. Ultrastructural analysis by transmission electron microscopy showed normal degradation of corneodesmosomes, mild intercellular oedema in the spinous layer but not in the basal layer, normal-appearing desmosomes, and prominent keratin filaments within basal keratinocytes. Thickness of cornified envelopes was reduced, lamellar lipid bilayers were disturbed, lamellar body secretion occurred prematurely and processing of secreted lamellar body contents was delayed. These barrier abnormalities were reminiscent of (albeit less severe than in) Netherton syndrome, which results from a deficiency of the serine protease inhibitor LEKTI. This work describes ultrastructural findings with evidence of epidermal barrier abnormalities in AREI.

  2. Remediation of TCE-contaminated groundwater by a permeable reactive barrier filled with plant mulch (Biowall).

    PubMed

    Lu, Xiaoxia; Wilson, John T; Shen, Hai; Henry, Bruce M; Kampbell, Donald H

    2008-01-01

    A pilot-scale permeable reactive barrier filled with plant mulch was installed at Altus Air Force Base in Oklahoma, USA to treat trichloroethylene (TCE) contamination in groundwater emanating from a landfill. The barrier was constructed in June 2002. It was 139 meters long, 7 meters deep, and 0.5 meters wide. The barrier is also called a Biowall because one of the mechanisms for removal of TCE is anaerobic biodegradation. This study aimed at evaluating the performance of the pilot-scale Biowall after its installation. Data from over four years' monitoring indicated that the Biowall greatly changed geochemistry in the study area and stimulated TCE removal. The concentration of TCE in the Biowall and downgradient of the Biowall was greatly reduced as compared to that in ground water upgradient of the Biowall, while the concentration of cis-DCE in the Biowall and downgradient of the Biowall was much higher than that observed upgradient of the Biowall. Over time, the concentration of vinyl chloride in the Biowall and downgradient of the Biowall increased. Dehalococcoides DNA was detected within and downgradient of the Biowall, corresponding to the observation that vinyl chloride was produced at these locations. Results from a tracer study indicated that the regional groundwater flow pattern ultimately determined the flow direction in the area around the Biowall. The natural groundwater velocity was estimated at an average of 0.060 +/- 0.015 m/d.

  3. Influence of antioxidants on blood-brain barrier permeability during adrenaline-induced hypertension.

    PubMed

    Oztaş, B; Erkin, E; Dural, E; Isbir, T

    2000-11-01

    We have examined the effect of antioxidants (vitamin E, and selenium) on the blood-brain barrier permeability during adreneline-induced acute hypertension in the female rats. The rats supplemented with nontoxic doses of sodium selenite in drinking water for three months or vitamin E was given intraperitoneally before adrenaline-induced acute hypertension. Evans-blue was used as a blood-brain barrier tracer. Mean values for Evans-blue dye were found to be 0.28 +/- 0.04 microg/g tissue in control animals and 1.0 +/- 0.2 microg tissue after adrenaline-induced acute hypertension (p < .01). Rats pretreated with selenium or vitamin E also showed macroscopic leakage of Evans-blue albumin after adrenaline injection i.e., there was no significant difference in protein extravasation between untreated and treated animals (p > .5). The mean value for Evans-blue dye was found to be 1.0 +/- 0.2 microg/g tissue in acute hypertension group, 0.9 +/- 0.2 microg/g tissue in selenium pretreated animals and 1.0 +/- 0.2 micrg/g tissue vitamin E injected animals after acute hypertension. The results show that antioxidants did not influence the blood-brain barrier breakdown during adrenaline-induced acute hypertension.

  4. Impromidine-induced changes in the permeability of the blood-brain barrier of normotensive and spontaneously hypertensive rats

    SciTech Connect

    Boertje, S.B.; Le Beau, D.; Ward, S. )

    1990-08-01

    Previous studies suggested histamine receptors mediate changes in the cerebrovascular permeability of rats. To test this, we investigated the effects of impromidine, a specific agonist at the histamine H2-receptor, on blood pressure and permeability of the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Impromidine produced dose-dependent hypotension in Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) and spontaneously hypertensive (SHR) rats. Two higher doses of impromidine increased BBB permeability to 99mTc-sodium pertechnetate in WKY rats; however, two lower doses decreased permeability in SHR rats. All doses of impromidine increased cerebrovascular permeability to 131I-labeled serum albumin in both species. Doses of the drug were 100 times greater than those required to produce similar alterations using histamine.

  5. Hierarchical assembly of the eggshell and permeability barrier in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Olson, Sara K.; Greenan, Garrett; Desai, Arshad; Müller-Reichert, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    In metazoans, fertilization triggers the assembly of an extracellular coat that constitutes the interface between the embryo and its environment. In nematodes, this coat is the eggshell, which provides mechanical rigidity, prevents polyspermy, and is impermeable to small molecules. Using immunoelectron microscopy, we found that the Caenorhabditis elegans eggshell was composed of an outer vitelline layer, a middle chitin layer, and an inner layer containing chondroitin proteoglycans. The switch between the chitin and proteoglycan layers was achieved by internalization of chitin synthase coincident with exocytosis of proteoglycan-containing cortical granules. Inner layer assembly did not make the zygote impermeable as previously proposed. Instead, correlative light and electron microscopy demonstrated that the permeability barrier was a distinct envelope that formed in a separate step that required fatty acid synthesis, the sugar-modifying enzyme PERM-1, and the acyl chain transfer enzyme DGTR-1. These findings delineate the hierarchy of eggshell assembly and define key molecular mechanisms at each step. PMID:22908315

  6. Organic/inorganic nanocomposites, methods of making, and uses as a permeable reactive barrier

    DOEpatents

    Harrup, Mason K.; Stewart, Frederick F.

    2007-05-15

    Nanocomposite materials having a composition including an inorganic constituent, a preformed organic polymer constituent, and a metal ion sequestration constituent are disclosed. The nanocomposites are characterized by being single phase, substantially homogeneous materials wherein the preformed polymer constituent and the inorganic constituent form an interpenetrating network with each other. The inorganic constituent may be an inorganic oxide, such as silicon dioxide, formed by the in situ catalyzed condensation of an inorganic precursor in the presence of the solvated polymer and metal ion sequestration constituent. The polymer constituent may be any hydrophilic polymer capable of forming a type I nanocomposite such as, polyacrylonitrile (PAN), polyethyleneoxide (PEO), polyethylene glycol (PEG), polyvinyl acetate (PVAc), polyvinyl alcohol (PVA), and combinations thereof. Nanocomposite materials of the present invention may be used as permeable reactive barriers (PRBs) to remediate contaminated groundwater. Methods for making nanocomposite materials, PRB systems, and methods of treating groundwater are also disclosed.

  7. Ground water remediation of chromium using zero-valent iron in a permeable reactive barrier

    SciTech Connect

    Puls, R.W.; Powell, R.M.; Paul, C.J.; Blowes, D.

    1998-09-01

    A series of laboratory experiments were performed to elucidate the chromium transformation and precipitation reactions caused by the corrosion of zero-valent iron in water-based systems. Reaction rates were determined for chromate reduction in the presence of different types of iron and in systems with iron mixed with aquifer materials. Various geochemical parameters were measured to confirm the proposed reactions. Laboratory experiments were scaled up to pilot and full-scale field demonstrations. Intensive geochemical sampling in the field tests corroborate laboratory results and successfully demonstrate the effectiveness of this innovative in situ approach to remediate chromate-contaminated ground water using a permeable reactive barrier composed of zero-valent iron.

  8. AN IN-SITU PERMEABLE REACTIVE BARRIER FOR THE TREATMENT OF HEXAVALENT CHROMIUM AND TRICHLOROETHYLENE IN GROUNDWATER: VOLUME 3 MULTICOMPONENT REACTIVE TRANSPORT MODELING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Reactive transport modeling has been conducted to describe the performance of the permeable reactive barrier at the Coast Guard Support Center near Elizabeth City, NC. The reactive barrier was installed to treat groundwater contaminated by hexavalent chromium and chlorinated org...

  9. AN IN-SITU PERMEABLE REACTIVE BARRIER FOR THE TREATMENT OF HEXAVALENT CHROMIUM AND TRICHLOROETHYLENE IN GROUNDWATER: VOLUME 3 MULTICOMPONENT REACTIVE TRANSPORT MODELING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Reactive transport modeling has been conducted to describe the performance of the permeable reactive barrier at the Coast Guard Support Center near Elizabeth City, NC. The reactive barrier was installed to treat groundwater contaminated by hexavalent chromium and chlorinated org...

  10. Blood-aqueous barrier permeability determination in HLA B27-positive acute anterior uveitis patients.

    PubMed

    Benitez del Castillo, J M; Toledano, N; Bañares, A; Hernandez, C; Arjona, M; Díaz Valle, D; Garcia Sanchez, J

    The blood-aqueous barrier (BAB) permeability was studied by fluorophotometry in 17 healthy control subjects and in 27 eyes from 27 patients with HLA-B27-positive acute anterior uveitis (HLA-B27 AAU). Twenty of these patients had an associated spondyloarthropathy. BAB permeability was studied during the ocular inflammatory crisis and in the disease-free periods in the same patients. Anterior chamber fluorophotometric scans were performed before and 30 minutes after the intravenous injection of 14 mg/kg of sodium fluorescein. The diffusion coefficient (Kd) was obtained from the ratio between the fluorescein concentration in the anterior chamber and the NPBF. Data were analyzed using the Student's t test and analysis of variance. A statistically significant difference (P < 0.001) was found between the Kd of active HLA-B27 AAU (61.4 +/- 16.8 x 10(-4) min-1) and the Kd of inactive HLA-B27 AAU (4.8 +/- 1.6 x 10(-4) min-1). No statistically significant differences were found between the Kd of inactive HLA-B27 AAU and the Kd of the control subjects (4.3 +/- 1.0 x 10(-4) min-1). We also failed to detect significant differences between patients with and without spondyloarthropathy either during the acute attack or during the disease-free period. On the basis of these results we conclude that the permeability of the BAB remains intact in inactive HLA-B27-positive AAU. The parallel fluorophotometric behaviour of HLA-B27-positive AAU with spondyloarthropathy and without spondyloarthropathy suggests that both share a common pathogenetic mechanism.

  11. Edaravone-Encapsulated Agonistic Micelles Rescue Ischemic Brain Tissue by Tuning Blood-Brain Barrier Permeability

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Qu; Cai, Yu; Li, Sihan; Liu, Haoran; Zhou, Xingyu; Lu, Chunqiang; Gao, Xihui; Qian, Jun; Zhang, Jun; Ju, Shenghong; Li, Cong

    2017-01-01

    Thrombolysis has been a standard treatment for ischemic stroke. However, only 2-7% patients benefit from it because the thrombolytic agent has to be injected within 4.5 h after the onset of symptoms to avoid the increasing risk of intracerebral hemorrhage. As the only clinically approved neuroprotective drug, edaravone (EDV) rescues ischemic brain tissues by eradicating over-produced reactive oxygen species (ROS) without the limitation of therapeutic time-window. However, EDV's short circulation half-life and inadequate cerebral uptake attenuate its therapeutic efficacy. Here we developed an EDV-encapsulated agonistic micelle (EDV-AM) to specifically deliver EDV into brain ischemia by actively tuning blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability. The EDV-AM actively up-regulated endothelial monolayer permeability in vitro. HPLC studies showed that EDV-AM delivered more EDV into brain ischemia than free EDV after intravenous injection. Magnetic resonance imaging also demonstrated that EDV-AM more rapidly salvaged ischemic tissue than free EDV. Diffusion tensor imaging indicated the highest efficiency of EDV-AM in accelerating axonal remodeling in the ipsilesional white matter and improving functional behaviors of ischemic stroke models. The agonistic micelle holds promise to improve the therapeutic efficiency of ischemic stroke patients who miss the thrombolytic treatment. PMID:28382161

  12. Blood-brain barrier permeability mechanisms in view of quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSAR).

    PubMed

    Bujak, Renata; Struck-Lewicka, Wiktoria; Kaliszan, Michał; Kaliszan, Roman; Markuszewski, Michał J

    2015-04-10

    The goal of the present paper was to develop a quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) method using a simple statistical approach, such as multiple linear regression (MLR) for predicting the blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability of chemical compounds. The "best" MLR models, comprised logP and either molecular mass (M) or isolated atomic energy (E(isol)), tested on a structurally diverse set of 66 compounds, is characterized the by correlation coefficients (R) around 0.8. The obtained models were validated using leave-one-out (LOO) cross-validation technique and the correlation coefficient of leave-one-out- R(LOO)(2) (Q(2)) was at least 0.6. Analysis of a case from legal medicine demonstrated informative value of our QSAR model. To best authors' knowledge the present study is a first application of the developed QSAR models of BBB permeability to case from the legal medicine. Our data indicate that molecular energy-related descriptors, in combination with the well-known descriptors of lipophilicity may have a supportive value in predicting blood-brain distribution, which is of utmost importance in drug development and toxicological studies.

  13. Destruction of the outer membrane permeability barrier of Escherichia coli by heat treatment.

    PubMed

    Tsuchido, T; Katsui, N; Takeuchi, A; Takano, M; Shibasaki, I

    1985-08-01

    Heat treatment of a wild-type Escherichia coli strain at 55 degrees C in 50 mM Tris-hydrochloride buffer with or without 10 mM magnesium sulfate or HEPES (N-2-hydroxyethylpiperazine-N'-2-ethanesulfonic acid) buffer at pH 8.0 caused an increase in cell surface hydrophobicity. By determining the location of n-hexadecane droplets attached to cells by phase-contrast microscopy, the septal and polar regions of heated cells appeared to become the most frequently hydrophobic. Some of the lipopolysaccharide molecules in the outer membrane were released from heated cells, and the cells became susceptible to the hydrolytic action of added phospholipase C. Heat-treated cells also became permeable to the hydrophobic dye crystal violet, which was added externally. The release of part of the outer membrane by heat treatment appeared to bring about the disorganization of the outer membrane structure and, as a consequence, to result in the partial disruption of the permeability barrier function of the outer membrane. Tris was found to enhance damage to the outer membrane by heat.

  14. Observation of permeability of blood-labyrinth barrier during cytomegalovirus-induced hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Li, Xuanyi; Shi, Xi; Qiao, Yuehua; Xu, Kailin; Zeng, Lingyu; Wang, Caiji; Xu, Zhou; Niu, Haichen

    2014-07-01

    Congenital cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection is the most common infectious cause of sensorineural hearing loss in children. This study aims to investigate the pathogenesis CMV-induced hearing loss from the view of integrity of blood-labyrinth-barrier (BLB). Newborn BALB/c mice were randomly divided into three groups (n=22, respectively): CMV group, control group and normal group. The CMV group and control group were intracerebrally injected with equal volume (15 μl) of murine CMV (MCMV; 10(4)IU/0.1 ml) and PBS, respectively, and normal group did not receive any treatment. After three weeks, auditory-evoked brainstem response was assessed, and permeability of BLB was evaluated by Evans blue method. Means between groups were compared using t-test. We observed that mice injected with MCMV had a hearing loss and it was connected with the permeability changes of BLB. Besides, using hematoxylin-eosin staining, we noticed hyperaemia in stria vascularis and spiral ligament and bleeding in scala vestibule and scala tympani in CMV group. All these data indicated the possible association between CMV-induced hearing loss and BLB dysfunction with the characteristics of inflammation. Our data provide a possible path to investigate the mechanism of CMV-induced hearing damage. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Hyperglycemia Induces Skin Barrier Dysfunctions with Impairment of Epidermal Integrity in Non-Wounded Skin of Type 1 Diabetic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Okano, Junko; Kojima, Hideto; Katagi, Miwako; Nakagawa, Takahiko; Nakae, Yuki; Terashima, Tomoya; Kurakane, Takeshi; Kubota, Mamoru; Maegawa, Hiroshi; Udagawa, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes causes skin complications, including xerosis and foot ulcers. Ulcers complicated by infections exacerbate skin conditions, and in severe cases, limb/toe amputations are required to prevent the development of sepsis. Here, we hypothesize that hyperglycemia induces skin barrier dysfunction with alterations of epidermal integrity. The effects of hyperglycemia on the epidermis were examined in streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice with/without insulin therapy. The results showed that dye leakages were prominent, and transepidermal water loss after tape stripping was exacerbated in diabetic mice. These data indicate that hyperglycemia impaired skin barrier functions. Additionally, the distribution of the protein associated with the tight junction structure, tight junction protein-1 (ZO-1), was characterized by diffuse and significantly wider expression in the diabetic mice compared to that in the control mice. In turn, epidermal cell number was significantly reduced and basal cells were irregularly aligned with ultrastructural alterations in diabetic mice. In contrast, the number of corneocytes, namely, denucleated and terminally differentiated keratinocytes significantly increased, while their sensitivity to mechanical stress was enhanced in the diabetic mice. We found that cell proliferation was significantly decreased, while apoptotic cells were comparable in the skin of diabetic mice, compared to those in the control mice. In the epidermis, Keratin 5 and keratin 14 expressions were reduced, while keratin 10 and loricrin were ectopically induced in diabetic mice. These data suggest that hyperglycemia altered keratinocyte proliferation/differentiation. Finally, these phenotypes observed in diabetic mice were mitigated by insulin treatment. Reduction in basal cell number and perturbation of the proliferation/differentiation process could be the underlying mechanisms for impaired skin barrier functions in diabetic mice. PMID:27846299

  16. Hyperglycemia Induces Skin Barrier Dysfunctions with Impairment of Epidermal Integrity in Non-Wounded Skin of Type 1 Diabetic Mice.

    PubMed

    Okano, Junko; Kojima, Hideto; Katagi, Miwako; Nakagawa, Takahiko; Nakae, Yuki; Terashima, Tomoya; Kurakane, Takeshi; Kubota, Mamoru; Maegawa, Hiroshi; Udagawa, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes causes skin complications, including xerosis and foot ulcers. Ulcers complicated by infections exacerbate skin conditions, and in severe cases, limb/toe amputations are required to prevent the development of sepsis. Here, we hypothesize that hyperglycemia induces skin barrier dysfunction with alterations of epidermal integrity. The effects of hyperglycemia on the epidermis were examined in streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice with/without insulin therapy. The results showed that dye leakages were prominent, and transepidermal water loss after tape stripping was exacerbated in diabetic mice. These data indicate that hyperglycemia impaired skin barrier functions. Additionally, the distribution of the protein associated with the tight junction structure, tight junction protein-1 (ZO-1), was characterized by diffuse and significantly wider expression in the diabetic mice compared to that in the control mice. In turn, epidermal cell number was significantly reduced and basal cells were irregularly aligned with ultrastructural alterations in diabetic mice. In contrast, the number of corneocytes, namely, denucleated and terminally differentiated keratinocytes significantly increased, while their sensitivity to mechanical stress was enhanced in the diabetic mice. We found that cell proliferation was significantly decreased, while apoptotic cells were comparable in the skin of diabetic mice, compared to those in the control mice. In the epidermis, Keratin 5 and keratin 14 expressions were reduced, while keratin 10 and loricrin were ectopically induced in diabetic mice. These data suggest that hyperglycemia altered keratinocyte proliferation/differentiation. Finally, these phenotypes observed in diabetic mice were mitigated by insulin treatment. Reduction in basal cell number and perturbation of the proliferation/differentiation process could be the underlying mechanisms for impaired skin barrier functions in diabetic mice.

  17. iRHOM2-dependent regulation of ADAM17 in cutaneous disease and epidermal barrier function.

    PubMed

    Brooke, Matthew A; Etheridge, Sarah L; Kaplan, Nihal; Simpson, Charlotte; O'Toole, Edel A; Ishida-Yamamoto, Akemi; Marches, Olivier; Getsios, Spiro; Kelsell, David P

    2014-08-01

    iRHOM2 is a highly conserved, catalytically inactive member of the Rhomboid family, which has recently been shown to regulate the maturation of the multi-substrate ectodomain sheddase enzyme ADAM17 (TACE) in macrophages. Dominant iRHOM2 mutations are the cause of the inherited cutaneous and oesophageal cancer-susceptibility syndrome tylosis with oesophageal cancer (TOC), suggesting a role for this protein in epithelial cells. Here, using tissues derived from TOC patients, we demonstrate that TOC-associated mutations in iRHOM2 cause an increase in the maturation and activity of ADAM17 in epidermal keratinocytes, resulting in significantly upregulated shedding of ADAM17 substrates, including EGF-family growth factors and pro-inflammatory cytokines. This activity is accompanied by increased EGFR activity, increased desmosome processing and the presence of immature epidermal desmosomes, upregulated epidermal transglutaminase activity and heightened resistance to Staphylococcal infection in TOC keratinocytes. Many of these features are consistent with the presence of a constitutive wound-healing-like phenotype in TOC epidermis, which may shed light on a novel pathway in skin repair, regeneration and inflammation.

  18. iRHOM2-dependent regulation of ADAM17 in cutaneous disease and epidermal barrier function

    PubMed Central

    Brooke, Matthew A.; Etheridge, Sarah L.; Kaplan, Nihal; Simpson, Charlotte; O'Toole, Edel A.; Ishida-Yamamoto, Akemi; Marches, Olivier; Getsios, Spiro; Kelsell, David P.

    2014-01-01

    iRHOM2 is a highly conserved, catalytically inactive member of the Rhomboid family, which has recently been shown to regulate the maturation of the multi-substrate ectodomain sheddase enzyme ADAM17 (TACE) in macrophages. Dominant iRHOM2 mutations are the cause of the inherited cutaneous and oesophageal cancer-susceptibility syndrome tylosis with oesophageal cancer (TOC), suggesting a role for this protein in epithelial cells. Here, using tissues derived from TOC patients, we demonstrate that TOC-associated mutations in iRHOM2 cause an increase in the maturation and activity of ADAM17 in epidermal keratinocytes, resulting in significantly upregulated shedding of ADAM17 substrates, including EGF-family growth factors and pro-inflammatory cytokines. This activity is accompanied by increased EGFR activity, increased desmosome processing and the presence of immature epidermal desmosomes, upregulated epidermal transglutaminase activity and heightened resistance to Staphylococcal infection in TOC keratinocytes. Many of these features are consistent with the presence of a constitutive wound-healing-like phenotype in TOC epidermis, which may shed light on a novel pathway in skin repair, regeneration and inflammation. PMID:24643277

  19. Influence of 50 Hz frequency sinusoidal magnetic field on the blood-brain barrier permeability of diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Oztaş, Baria; Kalkan, Tunaya; Tuncel, Handan

    2004-07-01

    The combined effects of diabetes and a 50 Hz, 5 mT RMS flux density sinusoidal magnetic field for 8 h a day, for 21 consecutive days on the permeation of Evans-blue dye through the blood-brain barrier were studied in male Wistar albino rats. Our results suggest that magnetic field has no effect on the blood-brain barrier permeability in normoglycemic animals, but that diabetic rats are vulnerable to magnetic fields.

  20. Potentiation of neurotoxicity of Lathyrus sativus by manganese: alterations in blood-brain barrier permeability.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Geeta; Shukla, Rakesh; Hasan, Mahdi; Khanna, Subhash K; Das, Mukul

    2009-05-01

    Environmental factors have been speculated to play an important role in potentiating the neurotoxicity of Lathyrus sativus (LS). Hence, blood-brain barrier permeability and neurotoxicity studies were carried out in manganese- and LS-exposed animals. Dietary feeding of LS (80%) plus Mn (0.4 mg/100 g diet) for 90 days to guinea pigs showed significant (p < 0.05) decrease in brain nucleotidase and ATPase activities when compared to control or LS alone treated groups. Combined treatment of LS and Mn showed a significant (p < 0.05) decrease in neuronal aryl hydrocarbon hydroxylase (36-40%), ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase (40-45%), glutathione-S-transferase (27-31%), and quinone reductase (24-25%) activities when compared to control and LS alone treated animals. Lipid peroxidation, a marker for membrane damage, was found to be relatively more enhanced (58-141%) along with significant (p < 0.05) depletion of GSH levels in LS+Mn-treated animals when compared to control, Mn alone, and LS alone treated groups. The neuronal catalase activity of lathyrus plus Mn-treated animals showed a pronounced decrease (37-49%) when compared to control, Mn, and lathyrus alone treated groups. On the contrary, glutathione peroxidase in brain of Mn and lathyrus alone treated animals indicated a respective increase (p < 0.05) of 18% and 20%, while the combined effect of lathyrus plus Mn exhibited an increase of almost 50% when compared to control guinea pigs. Single parenteral administration of Mn (15 mg/kg b.wt) to guinea pigs followed by single oral intubation of beta-N-oxalyl-L-alpha, beta-diamino propionic acid (ODAP, 75 mg/guinea pig) resulted in a significant increase (143%) in neuronal ODAP content. ODAP (50 mg/kg,iv) treatment to mice pretreated with MnCl2 (10 mg/kg b.wt for 3 days or 40 mg/kg b.wt for 1 day), caused an enhancement in blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability (129-196%), while ODAP and Mn alone showed relatively less enhancement (66-87%). The lumbar region of LS+Mn showed a

  1. Blood-brain barrier permeability of bioactive withanamides present in Withania somnifera fruit extract.

    PubMed

    Vareed, Shaiju K; Bauer, Alison K; Nair, Kavitha M; Liu, Yunbao; Jayaprakasam, Bolleddula; Nair, Muraleedharan G

    2014-08-01

    The neuroprotective effect of Withania somnifera L. Dunal fruit extract, in rodent models, is known. Withanamides, the primary active constituents in W.somnifera fruit extract exhibited neuroprotective effects against β-amyloid-induced cytotoxicity in neuronal cell culture studies. Therefore, we investigated the blood-brain barrier permeability of withanamides in W.somnifera fruit extract in mice using HPLC coupled with high resolution quadrupole time of flight mass spectrometer (Q-TOF/MS) detection. Mice were administered with 250 mg/kg of W.somnifera extract by intraperitoneal injection, and the blood and brain samples analyzed by Q-TOF/MS detection. Four major withanamides were detected in brain and blood of mice administered with W.somnifera extract. The results suggested that the withanamides crossed the blood-brain barrier. These results may help to develop W.somnifera fruit extract as a preventive or therapeutic botanical drug for stress-induced neurological disorders. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Iron hydroxy carbonate formation in zerovalent iron permeable reactive barriers: characterization and evaluation of phase stability.

    PubMed

    Lee, Tony R; Wilkin, Richard T

    2010-07-30

    Predicting the long-term potential of permeable reactive barriers for treating contaminated groundwater relies on understanding the endpoints of biogeochemical reactions between influent groundwater and the reactive medium. Iron hydroxy carbonate (chukanovite) is frequently observed as a secondary mineral precipitate in granular iron PRBs. Mineralogical characterization was carried out using X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, and X-ray absorption spectroscopy on materials collected from three field-based PRBs in the US (East Helena, MT; Elizabeth City, NC; Denver Federal Center, CO). These PRBs were installed to treat a range of contaminants, including chlorinated organics, hexavalent chromium, and arsenic. Results obtained indicate that chukanovite is a prevalent secondary precipitate in the PRBs. Laboratory experiments on high-purity chukanovite separates were carried out to constrain the room-temperature solubility for this mineral. An estimated Gibbs energy of formation (Delta(f)G degrees) for chukanovite is -1174.4 +/- 6 kJ/mol. A mineral stability diagram is consistent with observations from the field. Water chemistry from the three reactive barriers falls inside the predicted stability field for chukanovite, at inorganic carbon concentrations intermediate to the stability fields of siderite and ferrous hydroxide. These new data will aid in developing better predictive models of mineral accumulation in zerovalent iron PRBs. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. Iron hydroxy carbonate formation in zerovalent iron permeable reactive barriers: Characterization and evaluation of phase stability

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkin, Richard T.; Lee, T.R.

    2010-10-22

    Predicting the long-term potential of permeable reactive barriers for treating contaminated groundwater relies on understanding the endpoints of biogeochemical reactions between influent groundwater and the reactive medium. Iron hydroxy carbonate (chukanovite) is frequently observed as a secondary mineral precipitate in granular iron PRBs. Mineralogical characterization was carried out using X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, and X-ray absorption spectroscopy on materials collected from three field-based PRBs in the US (East Helena, MT; Elizabeth City, NC; Denver Federal Center, CO). These PRBs were installed to treat a range of contaminants, including chlorinated organics, hexavalent chromium, and arsenic. Results obtained indicate that chukanovite is a prevalent secondary precipitate in the PRBs. Laboratory experiments on high-purity chukanovite separates were carried out to constrain the room-temperature solubility for this mineral. An estimated Gibbs energy of formation ({Delta}{sub f}G{sup o}) for chukanovite is - 1174.4 {+-} 6 kJ/mol. A mineral stability diagram is consistent with observations from the field. Water chemistry from the three reactive barriers falls inside the predicted stability field for chukanovite, at inorganic carbon concentrations intermediate to the stability fields of siderite and ferrous hydroxide. These new data will aid in developing better predictive models of mineral accumulation in zerovalent iron PRBs.

  4. Gold Nanoparticles Increase Endothelial Paracellular Permeability by Altering Components of Endothelial Tight Junctions, and Increase Blood-Brain Barrier Permeability in Mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Ching-Hao; Shyu, Ming-Kwang; Jhan, Cheng; Cheng, Yu-Wen; Tsai, Chi-Hao; Liu, Chen-Wei; Lee, Chen-Chen; Chen, Ruei-Ming; Kang, Jaw-Jou

    2015-11-01

    Gold nanoparticles (Au-NPs) are being increasingly used as constituents in cosmetics, biosensors, bioimaging, photothermal therapy, and targeted drug delivery. This elevated exposure to Au-NPs poses systemic risks in humans, particularly risks associated with the biodistribution of Au-NPs and their potent interaction with biological barriers. We treated human umbilical vein endothelial cells with Au-NPs and comprehensively examined the expression levels of tight junction (TJ) proteins such as occludin, claudin-5, junctional adhesion molecules, and zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1), as well as endothelial paracellular permeability and the intracellular signaling required for TJ organization. Moreover, we validated the effects of Au-NPs on the integrity of TJs in mouse brain microvascular endothelial cells in vitro and obtained direct evidence of their influence on blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability in vivo. Treatment with Au-NPs caused a pronounced reduction of PKCζ-dependent threonine phosphorylation of occludin and ZO-1, which resulted in the instability of endothelial TJs and led to proteasome-mediated degradation of TJ components. This impairment in the assembly of TJs between endothelial cells increased the permeability of the transendothelial paracellular passage and the BBB. Au-NPs increased endothelial paracellular permeability in vitro and elevated BBB permeability in vivo. Future studies must investigate the direct and indirect toxicity caused by Au-NP-induced endothelial TJ opening and thereby address the double-edged-sword effect of Au-NPs. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Toxicology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. The Transmembrane Serine Protease HAT-like 4 Is Important for Epidermal Barrier Function to Prevent Body Fluid Loss

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhiwei; Hu, Yae; Yan, Ruhong; Dong, Liang; Jiang, Yizhi; Zhou, Zhichao; Liu, Meng; Zhou, Tiantian; Dong, Ningzheng; Wu, Qingyu

    2017-01-01

    Membrane-bound proteases are essential for epidermal integrity. Human airway trypsin-like protease 4 (HAT-L4) is a type II transmembrane serine protease. Currently, its biochemical property, cellular distribution and physiological function remain unknown. Here we examined HAT-L4 expression and function in vitro and in vivo. In Western analysis, HAT-L4 expressed in transfected CHO cells appeared as a 48-kDa protein. Flow cytometry confirmed HAT-L4 expression on the cell surface with the expected membrane topology. RT-PCR and immunostaining experiments indicated that HAT-L4 was expressed in epithelial cells and exocrine glands in tissues including skin, esophagus, trachea, tongue, eye, bladder, testis and uterus. In the skin, HAT-L4 expression was abundant in keratinocytes and sebaceous glands. We generated HAT-L4 knockout mice by disrupting the Tmprss11f gene encoding HAT-L4. HAT-L4 knockout mice were viable and fertile. No defects were found in HAT-L4 knockout mice in hair growth, wound healing, water repulsion and body temperature regulation. Compared with wild-type controls, HAT-L4-deficient newborn mice had greater body fluid loss and higher mortality in a trans-epidermal body fluid loss test. In metabolic studies, HAT-L4-deficient adult mice drank water more frequently than wild-type controls did. These results indicate that HAT-L4 is important in epidermal barrier function to prevent body fluid loss. PMID:28338078

  6. Validation of in vivo magnetic resonance imaging blood-brain barrier permeability measurements by comparison with gold standard histology.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Angelika; Bredno, Jörg; Wendland, Michael F; Derugin, Nikita; Hom, Jason; Schuster, Tibor; Su, Hua; Ohara, Peter T; Young, William L; Wintermark, Max

    2011-07-01

    We sought to validate the blood-brain barrier permeability measurements extracted from perfusion-weighted MRI through a relatively simple and frequently applied model, the Patlak model, by comparison with gold standard histology in a rat model of ischemic stroke. Eleven spontaneously hypertensive rats and 11 Wistar rats with unilateral 2-hour filament occlusion of the right middle cerebral artery underwent imaging during occlusion at 4 hours and 24 hours after reperfusion. Blood-brain barrier permeability was imaged by gradient echo imaging after the first pass of the contrast agent bolus and quantified by a Patlak analysis. Blood-brain barrier permeability was shown on histology by the extravasation of Evans blue on fluorescence microscopy sections matching location and orientation of MR images. Cresyl-violet staining was used to detect and characterize hemorrhage. Landmark-based elastic image registration allowed a region-by-region comparison of permeability imaging at 24 hours with Evans blue extravasation and hemorrhage as detected on histological slides obtained immediately after the 24-hour image set. Permeability values in the nonischemic tissue (marginal mean ± SE: 0.15 ± 0.019 mL/min 100 g) were significantly lower compared to all permeability values in regions of Evans blue extravasation or hemorrhage. Permeability values in regions of weak Evans blue extravasation (0.23 ± 0.016 mL/min 100 g) were significantly lower compared to permeability values of in regions of strong Evans blue extravasation (0.29 ± 0.020 mL/min 100 g) and macroscopic hemorrhage (0.35 ± 0.049 mL/min 100 g). Permeability values in regions of microscopic hemorrhage (0.26 ± 0.024 mL/min 100 g) only differed significantly from values in regions of nonischemic tissue (0.15 ± 0.019 mL/min 100 g). Areas of increased permeability measured in vivo by imaging coincide with blood-brain barrier disruption and hemorrhage observed on gold standard histology.

  7. Fifteen-year Assessment of a Permeable Reactive Barrier for Treatment of Chromate and Trichloroethylene in Groundwater

    EPA Science Inventory

    The fifteen-year performance of a granular iron, permeable reactive barrier (PRB; Elizabeth City, North Carolina) is reviewed with respect to contaminant treatment (hexavalent chromium and trichloroethylene) and hydraulic performance. Due to in-situ treatment of the chromium sou...

  8. SCANNING ELECTRON ANALYSIS OF IRON FILINGS FROM A ZERO-VALENT IRON PERMEABLE BARRIER USED FOR GROUND WATER RESTORATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Permeable iron reactive barriers have become a popular way to remediate contaminated ground water. Although this technology has been in use for about a decade, there is still little knowledge about long-term performance issues (l). One of the biggest concerns is the corrosion of ...

  9. TREATMENT OF METALS IN GROUND WATER USING AN ORGANIC-BASED SULFATE-REDUCING PERMEABLE REACTIVE BARRIER

    EPA Science Inventory

    A pilot permeable reactive barrier (PRB) consisting of a mixture of leaf compost, zero-valent iron (ZVI) filings, limestone and pea gravel was evaluated at a former phosphate fertilizer manufacturing facility in Charleston, S.C. The PRB is designed to treat arsenic and heavy met...

  10. SCANNING ELECTRON ANALYSIS OF IRON FILINGS FROM A ZERO-VALENT IRON PERMEABLE BARRIER USED FOR GROUND WATER RESTORATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Permeable iron reactive barriers have become a popular way to remediate contaminated ground water. Although this technology has been in use for about a decade, there is still little knowledge about long-term performance issues (l). One of the biggest concerns is the corrosion of ...

  11. Transformation of Reactive Iron Minerals in a Permeable Reactive Barrier (Biowall) Used to Treat TCE in Groundwater

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract: Iron and sulfur reducing conditions are generally created in permeable reactive barrier (PRB) systems constructed for groundwater treatment, which usually leads to formation of iron sulfide phases. Iron sulfides have been shown to play an important role in degrading ch...

  12. Fifteen-year Assessment of a Permeable Reactive Barrier for Treatment of Chromate and Trichloroethylene in Groundwater

    EPA Science Inventory

    The fifteen-year performance of a granular iron, permeable reactive barrier (PRB; Elizabeth City, North Carolina) is reviewed with respect to contaminant treatment (hexavalent chromium and trichloroethylene) and hydraulic performance. Due to in-situ treatment of the chromium sou...

  13. Transformation of Reactive Iron Minerals in a Permeable Reactive Barrier (Biowall) Used to Treat TCE in Groundwater

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract: Iron and sulfur reducing conditions are generally created in permeable reactive barrier (PRB) systems constructed for groundwater treatment, which usually leads to formation of iron sulfide phases. Iron sulfides have been shown to play an important role in degrading ch...

  14. LONG-TERM PERFORMANCE OF PERMEABLE REACTIVE BARRIERS USING ZERO-VALENT IRON: GEOCHEMICAL AND MICROBIOLOGICAL EFFECTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Geochemical and microbiological factors that control long-term performance of subsurface permeable reactive barriers were evaluated at the Elizabeth City, NC and the Denver Federal Center, CO sites. These ground water treatment systems use zero-valent iron filings (Peerless Meta...

  15. TREATMENT OF METALS IN GROUND WATER USING AN ORGANIC-BASED SULFATE-REDUCING PERMEABLE REACTIVE BARRIER

    EPA Science Inventory

    A pilot permeable reactive barrier (PRB) consisting of a mixture of leaf compost, zero-valent iron (ZVI) filings, limestone and pea gravel was evaluated at a former phosphate fertilizer manufacturing facility in Charleston, S.C. The PRB is designed to treat arsenic and heavy met...

  16. LONG-TERM PERFORMANCE OF PERMEABLE REACTIVE BARRIERS USING ZERO-VALENT IRON: GEOCHEMICAL AND MICROBIOLOGICAL EFFECTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Geochemical and microbiological factors that control long-term performance of subsurface permeable reactive barriers were evaluated at the Elizabeth City, NC and the Denver Federal Center, CO sites. These ground water treatment systems use zero-valent iron filings (Peerless Meta...

  17. Effect of ethanol on lipid metabolism and epithelial permeability barrier of skin and oral mucosa in the rat.

    PubMed

    Squier, Christopher A; Kremer, Mary J; Wertz, Philip W

    2003-11-01

    Ethanol consumption induces changes in lipid metabolism. This might be reflected locally as an alteration in the epithelial lipid barrier. Rats were fed with an isocaloric liquid diet with, or without, ethanol (6.7%) and were sacrificed at 60 or 120 days. Plasma and liver triglycerides, gamma-glutamyl-transferase (GGTP) levels, and permeability (Kp) of skin and buccal mucosa to tritiated water and the tobacco carcinogen, nitrosonornicotine, were determined. Significant elevation of GGTP at 120 days and triglycerides at both 60 and 120 days was observed for rats fed with ethanol diet. For this diet, Kp values to both penetrants increased significantly for skin in rats after 120 days compared to all other groups. The parallel between changes in lipid metabolism and permeability suggests that one effect of ingested alcohol is to alter the lipid-containing permeability barrier of stratified squamous epithelium.

  18. Connexin channels provide a target to manipulate brain endothelial calcium dynamics and blood–brain barrier permeability

    PubMed Central

    De Bock, Marijke; Culot, Maxime; Wang, Nan; Bol, Mélissa; Decrock, Elke; De Vuyst, Elke; da Costa, Anaelle; Dauwe, Ine; Vinken, Mathieu; Simon, Alexander M; Rogiers, Vera; De Ley, Gaspard; Evans, William Howard; Bultynck, Geert; Dupont, Geneviève; Cecchelli, Romeo; Leybaert, Luc

    2011-01-01

    The cytoplasmic Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) is an important factor determining the functional state of blood–brain barrier (BBB) endothelial cells but little is known on the effect of dynamic [Ca2+]i changes on BBB function. We applied different agonists that trigger [Ca2+]i oscillations and determined the involvement of connexin channels and subsequent effects on endothelial permeability in immortalized and primary brain endothelial cells. The inflammatory peptide bradykinin (BK) triggered [Ca2+]i oscillations and increased endothelial permeability. The latter was prevented by buffering [Ca2+]i with BAPTA, indicating that [Ca2+]i oscillations are crucial in the permeability changes. Bradykinin-triggered [Ca2+]i oscillations were inhibited by interfering with connexin channels, making use of carbenoxolone, Gap27, a peptide blocker of connexin channels, and Cx37/43 knockdown. Gap27 inhibition of the oscillations was rapid (within minutes) and work with connexin hemichannel-permeable dyes indicated hemichannel opening and purinergic signaling in response to stimulation with BK. Moreover, Gap27 inhibited the BK-triggered endothelial permeability increase in in vitro and in vivo experiments. By contrast, [Ca2+]i oscillations provoked by exposure to adenosine 5′ triphosphate (ATP) were not affected by carbenoxolone or Gap27 and ATP did not disturb endothelial permeability. We conclude that interfering with endothelial connexin hemichannels is a novel approach to limiting BBB-permeability alterations. PMID:21654699

  19. Iontophoresis itself on hairless mouse skin induces the loss of the epidermal calcium gradient without skin barrier impairment.

    PubMed

    Lee, S H; Choi, E H; Feingold, K R; Jiang, S; Ahn, S K

    1998-07-01

    Iontophoresis increases the delivery of drugs across the stratum corneum, but the pathway by which ionized drugs transit the stratum corneum is unknown. In this study we examined the effect of iontophoresis on the skin barrier and the epidermal calcium gradient. Hairless mice were subjected to iontophoresis for 5-120 min and skin specimens were prepared for electron microscopy. Neither positive nor negative iontophoresis affected transepidermal water loss. Lacunar dilatation and partial distention of the intercellular layers of the stratum corneum were observed in rough proportion to applied time in iontophoresis skin as well as control skin. Additionally, using calcium capture cytochemistry, we demonstrated that both positive and negative iontophoresis caused the disappearance of the epidermal calcium gradient with marked decrease in calcium content in the upper epidermis. Positive iontophoresis was associated with increased calcium in the stratum basale and dermis, whereas negative iontophoresis increased calcium in the stratum corneum. Moreover, as previously shown after barrier disruption and sonophoresis, the decrease in calcium content in the upper epidermis was associated with an increase in lamellar body secretion and the build up of lamellar material at the stratum corneum-stratum granulosum interface. In conclusion, iontophoresis on the skin of hairless mice may induce the change of ionized molecules in the epidermis, as the loss of the calcium gradient, which causes the decrease of skin impedence, gives charged drugs the ability to cross the skin more easily. Also, the structural changes, such as lacunar dilatation, whether they result from hydration or occlusion, may help the transport of charged drugs across the stratum corneum.

  20. Application of Blood-Brain Barrier Permeability Imaging in Global Cerebral Edema

    PubMed Central

    Ivanidze, Jana; Kallas, Omar N.; Gupta, Ajay; Weidman, Elizabeth; Baradaran, Hediyeh; Mir, Danial; Giambrone, Ashley; Segal, Alan Z.; Claassen, Jan; Sanelli, Pina C.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose Blood brain barrier permeability (BBBP) is not presently routinely evaluated in the clinical setting. Global cerebral edema (GCE) occurs after SAH and is associated with BBB disruption. Detection of GCE is challenging using current imaging techniques. Our purpose was to apply BBBP imaging in patients with GCE using extended pass CT Perfusion (CTP). Methods SAH patients underwent CTP in the early phase after aneurysmal rupture (days 0-3) and were classified as GCE or non-GCE using established non-contrast CT criteria. CTP were post-processed into BBBP quantitative maps of PS (permeability surface area product), K-trans (volume transfer constant from blood plasma to extravascular extracellular space, EES), Kep (washout rate constant of the contrast agent from EES to intravascular space), VE (EES volume per unit of tissue volume), VP (plasmatic volume per unit of tissue volume) and F (plasma flow) using Olea Sphere software. Mean values were compared using t-tests. Results 22 patients were included in the analysis. Kep (1.32 versus 1.52, p < 0.0001), K-trans (0.15 versus 0.19, p < 0.0001), VP (0.51 versus 0.57, p = 0.0007) and F (1176 versus 1329, p = 0.0001) were decreased in GCE compared to non-GCE while VE (0.81 versus 0.39, p < 0.0001) was increased. Conclusion Extended CTP was utilized to evaluate BBBP in SAH patients with and without GCE. Kep is an important indicator of altered BBBP in patients with decreased blood flow, as Kep is flow-independent. Further study of BBBP is needed to improve diagnosis and monitoring of GCE. PMID:27127002

  1. Application Of Immobilized Sulfate Reducing Bacteria For Permeable Reactive Barriers In Abandoned Coal Mines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, K.; Hur, W.; Choi, S.; Min, K.; Baek, H.

    2006-05-01

    The decline of the Korean coal industry has been drastic in production and consumption. This has been resulted mainly from the environmental concern and the collapse of commercial viability, which has eventually necessitated the government to implement the coal industry rationalization policies to reduce coal production and close down uneconomical mines. The overall drainage rates from abandoned coal mines reaches up to 80,000 ton/day. As a measure of controlling the acid mine drainage from abandoned coal mines, reactive materials in the pathways of drainage, designed to intercept and to transform the contaminants into environmentally acceptable forms can be applied at mines with small drainage rates. The main objective of this study is to design a permeable reactive barrier(PRB) to treat low flow and/or low contaminant loads of acid mine drainage. The PRB is comprised of immobilized sulfate reducing bacteria in hard beads and limestone to remove heavy metals and to raise the pH of AMD. A laboratory reactor was used to prepare a mixed culture of sulfate reducing bacteria. The microbes were separated and mixed with biodegradable matrix to form spherical beads. In order to maintain the viability of micro-organisms for a prolonged period, substrates such as saw dust, polysaccharide or glycerol was supplemented for the beads preparation. The strength of beads fortified by powered limestone to control the permeability of PRB. Different mixtures of limestone and the immobilized beads were tested to determine hydraulic conductivity and AMD treatment capacities. The characteristics of the spherical beads at various pH of AMD was investigated.

  2. Remediation of RDX- and HMX-contaminated groundwater using organic mulch permeable reactive barriers.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Farrukh; Schnitker, Stephen P; Newell, Charles J

    2007-02-20

    Organic mulch is a complex organic material that is typically populated with its own consortium of microorganisms. The organisms in mulch breakdown complex organics to soluble carbon, which can then be used by these and other microorganisms as an electron donor for treating RDX and HMX via reductive pathways. A bench-scale treatability study with organic mulch was conducted for the treatment of RDX- and HMX-contaminated groundwater obtained from a plume at the Pueblo Chemical Depot (PCD) in Pueblo, Colorado. The site-specific cleanup criteria of 0.55 ppb RDX and 602 ppb HMX were used as the logical goals of the study. Column flow-through tests were run to steady-state at the average site seepage velocity, using a 70%:30% (vol.:vol.) mulch:pea gravel packing to approach the formation's permeability. Significant results included: (1) Complete removal of 90 ppb influent RDX and 8 ppb influent HMX in steady-state mulch column effluent; (2) pseudo-first-order steady-state kinetic rate constant, k, of 0.20 to 0.27 h(-1) based on RDX data, using triplicate parallel column runs; (3) accumulation of reduced RDX intermediates in the steady-state column effluent at less than 2% of the influent RDX mass; (4) no binding of RDX to the column fill material; and (5) no leaching of RDX, HMX or reduction intermediates from the column fill material. The results of the bench-scale study will be used to design and implement a pilot-scale organic mulch/pea gravel permeable reactive barrier (PRB) at the site.

  3. Transcranial direct current stimulation transiently increases the blood-brain barrier solute permeability in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Da Wi; Khadka, Niranjan; Fan, Jie; Bikson, Marom; Fu, Bingmei M.

    2016-03-01

    Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS) is a non-invasive electrical stimulation technique investigated for a broad range of medical and performance indications. Whereas prior studies have focused exclusively on direct neuron polarization, our hypothesis is that tDCS directly modulates endothelial cells leading to transient changes in blood-brain-barrier (BBB) permeability (P) that are highly meaningful for neuronal activity. For this, we developed state-of-the-art imaging and animal models to quantify P to various sized solutes after tDCS treatment. tDCS was administered using a constant current stimulator to deliver a 1mA current to the right frontal cortex of rat (approximately 2 mm posterior to bregma and 2 mm right to sagittal suture) to obtain similar physiological outcome as that in the human tDCS application studies. Sodium fluorescein (MW=376), or FITC-dextrans (20K and 70K), in 1% BSA mammalian Ringer was injected into the rat (SD, 250-300g) cerebral circulation via the ipsilateral carotid artery by a syringe pump at a constant rate of ~3 ml/min. To determine P, multiphoton microscopy with 800-850 nm wavelength laser was applied to take the images from the region of interest (ROI) with proper microvessels, which are 100-200 micron below the pia mater. It shows that the relative increase in P is about 8-fold for small solute, sodium fluorescein, ~35-fold for both intermediate sized (Dex-20k) and large (Dex-70k) solutes, 10 min after 20 min tDCS pretreatment. All of the increased permeability returns to the control after 20 min post treatment. The results confirmed our hypothesis.

  4. Activation of epidermal toll-like receptor 2 enhances tight junction function – Implications for atopic dermatitis and skin barrier repair

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, I-Hsin; Carpenter-Mendini, Amanda; Yoshida, Takeshi; McGirt, Laura Y.; Ivanov, Andrei I.; Barnes, Kathleen C.; Gallo, Richard L.; Borkowski, Andrew W.; Yamasaki, Kenshi; Leung, Donald Y.; Georas, Steve N.; De Benedetto, Anna; Beck, Lisa A.

    2012-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is characterized by epidermal tight junction (TJ) defects and a propensity for Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) skin infections. S. aureus is sensed by many pattern recognition receptors including toll-like receptor (TLR) 2. We hypothesized that an effective innate immune response will include skin barrier repair and that this response is impaired in AD subjects. S. aureus-derived peptidoglycan (PGN) and synthetic TLR2 agonists enhanced TJ barrier and increased expression of TJ proteins, CLDN1, CLDN23, occludin and ZO-1 in primary human keratinocytes. A TLR2 agonist enhanced skin barrier recovery in human epidermis wounded by tape-stripping. Tlr2−/− mice had a delayed and incomplete barrier recovery following tape-stripping. AD subjects had reduced epidermal TLR2 expression as compared to nonatopic (NA) subjects, which inversely correlated (r= 0.654, P= 0.0004) with transepidermal water loss (TEWL). These observations indicate that TLR2 activation enhances skin barrier in murine and human skin and is an important part of a wound repair response. Reduced epidermal TLR2 expression observed in AD patients may play a role in their incompetent skin barrier. PMID:23223142

  5. Evaluation of a permeable reactive barrier technology for use at Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS)

    SciTech Connect

    DWYER,BRIAN P.

    2000-01-01

    Three reactive materials were evaluated at laboratory scale to identify the optimum treatment reagent for use in a Permeable Reactive Barrier Treatment System at Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS). The contaminants of concern (COCS) are uranium, TCE, PCE, carbon tetrachloride, americium, and vinyl chloride. The three reactive media evaluated included high carbon steel iron filings, an iron-silica alloy in the form of a foam aggregate, and a peculiar humic acid based sorbent (Humasorb from Arctech) mixed with sand. Each material was tested in the laboratory at column scale using simulated site water. All three materials showed promise for the 903 Mound Site however, the iron filings were determined to be the least expensive media. In order to validate the laboratory results, the iron filings were further tested at a pilot scale (field columns) using actual site water. Pilot test results were similar to laboratory results; consequently, the iron filings were chosen for the fill-scale demonstration of the reactive barrier technology. Additional design parameters including saturated hydraulic conductivity, treatment residence time, and head loss across the media were also determined and provided to the design team in support of the final design. The final design was completed by the Corps of Engineers in 1997 and the system was constructed in the summer of 1998. The treatment system began fill operation in December, 1998 and despite a few problems has been operational since. Results to date are consistent with the lab and pilot scale findings, i.e., complete removal of the contaminants of concern (COCs) prior to discharge to meet RFETS cleanup requirements. Furthermore, it is fair to say at this point in time that laboratory developed design parameters for the reactive barrier technology are sufficient for fuel scale design; however,the treatment system longevity and the long-term fate of the contaminants are questions that remain unanswered. This

  6. Monitoring Performance of a Dual Wall Permeable Reactive Barrier for Treating Perchlorate and TCE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dowman, C. E.; Hashimoto, Y.; Warner, S.; Bennett, P.; Gandhi, D.; Szerdy, F.; Neville, S.; Fennessy, C.; Scow, K. M.

    2008-12-01

    AMEC Geomatrix, through collaboration with Aerojet General Corporation and the University of California, Davis (UCD), has performed work leading to the installation of a dual wall permeable reactive barrier (PRB) system capable of treating perchlorate and chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbon compounds (CAHs), including trichloroethylene (TCE), at Aerojet's Area 40 site in Sacramento, California. This unique system consisted of an upgradient zero-valent iron (ZVI) permeable reactive barrier (PRB) that is intended to not only degrade CAHs, but also, provide hydrogen generated from the ZVI corrosion process, to a downgradient bio-effective PRB (carbohydrate solution circulated through a gravel-packed trench) for destroying perchlorate. The subsurface was characterized during a site investigation, and numerous logistical and site-specific challenges of installation were addressed. The site-specific challenges included installation of a passive remediation system in a remote location with no access to electricity. The selected remediation system was keyed into the undulating bedrock 20 to 25 feet below the ground surface without the use of shoring. Under a collaborative effort, UCD provided initial bench testing. AMEC Geomatrix designed and installed the dual wall system consisting of two approximately parallel 50-foot long by 2-foot thick by 25-foot deep PRB segments which are separated by about 8 feet perpendicular to the approximate direction of groundwater flow. AMEC Geomatrix performed the installation of performance monitoring network, which consisted of 21 wells, and monitored these points for a 6-month period. Monitoring and sampling techniques were designed to measure water levels and water quality parameters in the subsurface during sampling events, to better assess the hydrologic and chemical processes. The monitoring results indicate that the upgradient ZVI PRB effectively treats groundwater with TCE concentrations approaching 60 mg/L, and in addition, may

  7. Permeable Reactive Barriers Designed To Mitigate Eutrophication Alter Bacterial Community Composition and Aquifer Redox Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Hiller, Kenly A.; Foreman, Kenneth H.; Weisman, David

    2015-01-01

    Permeable reactive barriers (PRBs) consist of a labile carbon source that is positioned to intercept nitrate-laden groundwater to prevent eutrophication. Decomposition of carbon in the PRB drives groundwater anoxic, fostering microbial denitrification. Such PRBs are an ideal habitat to examine microbial community structure under high-nitrate, carbon-replete conditions in coastal aquifers. We examined a PRB installed at the Waquoit Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve in Falmouth, MA. Groundwater within and below the PRB was depleted in oxygen compared to groundwater at sites upgradient and at adjacent reference sites. Nitrate concentrations declined from a high of 25 μM upgradient and adjacent to the barrier to <0.1 μM within the PRB. We analyzed the total and active bacterial communities filtered from groundwater flowing through the PRB using amplicons of 16S rRNA and of the 16S rRNA genes. Analysis of the 16S rRNA genes collected from the PRB showed that the total bacterial community had high relative abundances of bacteria thought to have alternative metabolisms, such as fermentation, including candidate phyla OD1, OP3, TM7, and GN02. In contrast, the active bacteria had lower abundances of many of these bacteria, suggesting that the bacterial taxa that differentiate the PRB groundwater community were not actively growing. Among the environmental variables analyzed, dissolved oxygen concentration explained the largest proportion of total community structure. There was, however, no significant correlation between measured environmental parameters and the active microbial community, suggesting that controls on the active portion may differ from the community as a whole. PMID:26231655

  8. Permeable Reactive Barriers Designed To Mitigate Eutrophication Alter Bacterial Community Composition and Aquifer Redox Conditions.

    PubMed

    Hiller, Kenly A; Foreman, Kenneth H; Weisman, David; Bowen, Jennifer L

    2015-10-01

    Permeable reactive barriers (PRBs) consist of a labile carbon source that is positioned to intercept nitrate-laden groundwater to prevent eutrophication. Decomposition of carbon in the PRB drives groundwater anoxic, fostering microbial denitrification. Such PRBs are an ideal habitat to examine microbial community structure under high-nitrate, carbon-replete conditions in coastal aquifers. We examined a PRB installed at the Waquoit Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve in Falmouth, MA. Groundwater within and below the PRB was depleted in oxygen compared to groundwater at sites upgradient and at adjacent reference sites. Nitrate concentrations declined from a high of 25 μM upgradient and adjacent to the barrier to <0.1 μM within the PRB. We analyzed the total and active bacterial communities filtered from groundwater flowing through the PRB using amplicons of 16S rRNA and of the 16S rRNA genes. Analysis of the 16S rRNA genes collected from the PRB showed that the total bacterial community had high relative abundances of bacteria thought to have alternative metabolisms, such as fermentation, including candidate phyla OD1, OP3, TM7, and GN02. In contrast, the active bacteria had lower abundances of many of these bacteria, suggesting that the bacterial taxa that differentiate the PRB groundwater community were not actively growing. Among the environmental variables analyzed, dissolved oxygen concentration explained the largest proportion of total community structure. There was, however, no significant correlation between measured environmental parameters and the active microbial community, suggesting that controls on the active portion may differ from the community as a whole.

  9. Effects of ionizing radiation on the blood brain barrier permeability to pharmacologically active substances

    SciTech Connect

    Trnovec, T.; Kallay, Z.; Bezek, S. )

    1990-12-01

    Ionizing radiation can impair the integrity of the blood brain barrier (BBB). Data on early and late damage after brain irradiation are usually reported separately, yet a gradual transition between these two types has become evident. Signs appearing within 3 weeks after irradiation are considered to be early manifestations. The mechanism of radiation-effected integrity impairment of the BBB is discussed in relation to changes in morphological structures forming the BBB, the endothelium of intracerebral vessels, and in the surrounding astrocytes. Alterations in the function of the BBB are manifested in the endothelium by changes in the ultrastructural location of the activity of phosphatases and by the activation of pinocytotic vesicular transport, and in astrocyte cytoplasm by glycogen deposition. The changes in ultrastructure were critically surveyed with regard to increasing doses of radiation to the brain in the range of 5 Gy to 960 Gy. The qualitative as well as the semiquantitative and quantitative observations on the passage of substances across the damaged BBB were treated separately. Qualitative changes are based mainly on findings of extravasation of vital stains and of labelled proteins. The quantitative studies established differences in radiation-induced changes in the permeability of the BBB depending on the structure and physico-chemical properties of the barrier penetrating tracers. Indirect evaluation of radiation-induced BBB changes is based on studies of pharmacological effects of substances acting on the CNS. In conclusion, radiation impairs significantly the integrity of the BBB following single irradiation of the brain with a dose exceeding 10-15 Gy. The response of the BBB to ionizing radiation is dependent both on the dose to which the brain is exposed and on specific properties of the tracer. 68 references.

  10. Evaluation of the increase in permeability of the blood-brain barrier during tumor progression after pulsed focused ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Yang, Feng-Yi; Wang, Hsin-Ell; Lin, Guan-Liang; Lin, Hui-Hsien; Wong, Tai-Tong

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the permeability of the blood-brain barrier after sonication by pulsed high-intensity focused ultrasound and to determine if such an approach increases the tumor:ipsilateral brain permeability ratio. F98 glioma-bearing Fischer 344 rats were injected intravenously with Evans blue with or without blood-tumor barrier disruption induced by transcranial pulsed high-intensity focused ultrasound. Sonication was applied at a frequency of 1 MHz with a 5% duty cycle and a repetition frequency of 1 Hz. The permeability of the blood-brain barrier was assessed by the extravasation of Evans blue. Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance images were used to monitor the gadolinium deposition path associated with transcranial pulsed high-intensity focused ultrasound, and the influencing size and location was also investigated. In addition, whole brain histological analysis was performed. The results were compared by two-tailed unpaired t-test. The accumulation of Evans blue in brains and the tumor:ipsilateral brain permeability ratio of Evans blue were significantly increased after pulsed high-intensity focused ultrasound exposure. Evans blue injection followed by sonication showed an increase in the tumor:ipsilateral brain ratio of the target tumors (9.14:1) of about 2.23-fold compared with the control tumors (x4.09) on day 6 after tumor implantation. Magnetic resonance images showed that pulsed high-intensity focused ultrasound locally enhances the permeability of the blood-tumor barrier in the glioma-bearing rats. This method could allow enhanced synergistic effects with respect to other brain tumor treatment regimens.

  11. Differential permeability of the blood-brain barrier in experimental brain metastases produced by human neoplasms implanted into nude mice.

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, R. D.; Price, J. E.; Fujimaki, T.; Bucana, C. D.; Fidler, I. J.

    1992-01-01

    This study clarified whether and when the blood-brain barrier in experimental brain metastases is impaired by using hydrosoluble sodium fluorescein (MW 376) as a blood-brain barrier function indicator. Cells from eight human tumor lines (four melanomas, two breast carcinomas, one colon carcinoma, and one renal carcinoma) were inoculated into the internal carotid artery of nude mice. Brain metastases at different stages of development were sampled and the permeability of the blood-brain barrier around the metastases determined. Histologic examination showed two patterns of tumor growth. In the first, tumor cells formed isolated, well-defined nodules in the parenchyma of the brain. In lesions smaller than 0.2 mm2, the blood-brain barrier was intact. In the second, small diffuse nests of tumor cells were distributed throughout the brain parenchyma. The blood-brain barrier was intact until the small tumor cell colonies coalesced to form large tumor masses. These results suggest that the permeability of the blood-brain barrier varies among different experimental brain metastases and that its function is related to the growth pattern and size of the lesions. Images Figure 1 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:1443046

  12. Assessment of a Hydroxyapatite Permeable Reactive Barrier to Remediate Uranium at the Old Rifle Site Colorado.

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, Robert C.; Szecsody, James; Rigali, Mark J.; Vermuel, Vince; Leullen, Jon

    2016-02-01

    We have performed an initial evaluation and testing program to assess the effectiveness of a hydroxyapatite (Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2) permeable reactive barrier and source area treatment to decrease uranium mobility at the Department of Energy (DOE) former Old Rifle uranium mill processing site in Rifle, western Colorado. Uranium ore was processed at the site from the 1940s to the 1970s. The mill facilities at the site as well as the uranium mill tailings previously stored there have all been removed. Groundwater in the alluvial aquifer beneath the site still contains elevated concentrations of uranium, and is currently used for field tests to study uranium behavior in groundwater and investigate potential uranium remediation technologies. The technology investigated in this work is based on in situ formation of apatite in sediment to create a subsurface apatite PRB and also for source area treatment. The process is based on injecting a solution containing calcium citrate and sodium into the subsurface for constructing the PRB within the uranium plume. As the indigenous sediment micro-organisms biodegrade the injected citrate, the calcium is released and reacts with the phosphate to form hydroxyapatite (precipitate). This paper reports on proof-of-principle column tests with Old Rifle sediment and synthetic groundwater.

  13. Efficient Enhancement of Blood-Brain Barrier Permeability Using Acoustic Cluster Therapy (ACT)

    PubMed Central

    Åslund, Andreas K.O.; Snipstad, Sofie; Healey, Andrew; Kvåle, Svein; Torp, Sverre H.; Sontum, Per C.; Davies, Catharina de Lange; van Wamel, Annemieke

    2017-01-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is a major obstacle in drug delivery for diseases of the brain, and today there is no standardized route to surpass it. One technique to locally and transiently disrupt the BBB, is focused ultrasound in combination with gas-filled microbubbles. However, the microbubbles used are typically developed for ultrasound imaging, not BBB disruption. Here we describe efficient opening of the BBB using the promising novel Acoustic Cluster Therapy (ACT), that recently has been used in combination with Abraxane® to successfully treat subcutaneous tumors of human prostate adenocarcinoma in mice. ACT is based on the conjugation of microbubbles to liquid oil microdroplets through electrostatic interactions. Upon activation in an ultrasound field, the microdroplet phase transfers to form a larger bubble that transiently lodges in the microvasculature. Further insonation induces volume oscillations of the activated bubble, which in turn induce biomechanical effects that increase the permeability of the BBB. ACT was able to safely and temporarily permeabilize the BBB, using an acoustic power 5-10 times lower than applied for conventional microbubbles, and successfully deliver small and large molecules into the brain. PMID:28042313

  14. The mechanisms of arsenic removal from soil by electrokinetic process coupled with iron permeable reaction barrier.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Ching; Chiang, Tzu-Shing

    2007-04-01

    An innovative remediation system of electrokinetic process coupled with permeable reaction barrier (PRB) was proposed for arsenic removal in soil matrix. Batch tests with PRB media of Fe(0) and FeOOH under potential gradient of 2 V cm(-1) for 5d duration were conducted to evaluate the removal mechanisms of arsenic. Arsenic enhancement of 1.6-2.2 times was achieved when a PRB system was installed in an electrokinetic system. A best performance was found in system with FeOOH layer located in the middle of elctrokinetic cell. This was largely because of higher surface area of FeOOH and the moving of HAsO(4)(2-) to the anode side by electromigration effect was inhibited by the electroosmosis flow. The surface characteristics of PRB media, which were qualified by SEM coupled with energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), were clearly confirmed that arsenic was found on the passive layer surface. Results indicated that the removal of As in EK/PRB systems was much more contributed by surface adsorption/precipitation on PRB media than by EK process. Furthermore among the electrical removal mechanisms, electromigration was predominant than electrosmotic flow. Surface adsorption and precipitation were respectively the principal removal mechanism under acid environment, e.g. near anode side, and under basic environment, e.g. near cathode side. The results reported in the present work will be beneficial to optimizing design of batch EK/PRB system and enlarging to the field scale system.

  15. Benzene and toluene biodegradation down gradient of a zero-valent iron permeable reactive barrier.

    PubMed

    Chen, Liang; Liu, Fei; Liu, Yulong; Dong, Hongzhong; Colberg, Patricia J S

    2011-04-15

    This study simulated benzene and toluene biodegradation down gradient of a zero-valent iron permeable reactive barrier (ZVI PRB) that reduces trichloroethylene (TCE). The effects of elevated pH (10.5) and the presence of a common TCE dechlorination by product [cis-1,2-dichloroethene (cis-1,2-DCE)] on benzene and toluene biodegradation were evaluated in batch experiments. The data suggest that alkaline pH (pH 10.5), often observed down gradient of ZVI PRBs, inhibits Fe(III)-mediated biotransformation of both benzene and toluene. Removal was reduced by 43% for benzene and 26% for toluene as compared to the controls. The effect of the addition of cis-1,2-DCE on benzene and toluene biodegradation was positive and resulted in removal that was greater than or equal to the controls. These results suggest that, at least for cis-1,2-DCE, its formation may not be toxic to iron-reducing benzene and toluene degrading bacteria; however, for microbial benzene and toluene removal down gradient of a ZVI PRB, it may be necessary to provide pH control, especially in the case of a biological PRB that is downstream from a ZVI PRB.

  16. Solid phase studies and geochemical modelling of low-cost permeable reactive barriers.

    PubMed

    Bartzas, Georgios; Komnitsas, Kostas

    2010-11-15

    A continuous column experiment was carried out under dynamic flow conditions in order to study the efficiency of low-cost permeable reactive barriers (PRBs) to remove several inorganic contaminants from acidic solutions. A 50:50 w/w waste iron/sand mixture was used as candidate reactive media in order to activate precipitation and promote sorption and reduction-oxidation mechanisms. Solid phase studies of the exhausted reactive products after column shutdown, using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and X-ray diffraction (XRD), confirmed that the principal Fe corrosion products identified in the reactive zone are amorphous iron (hydr)oxides (maghemite/magnetite and goethite), intermediate products (sulfate green rust), and amorphous metal sulfides such as amFeS and/or mackinawite. Geochemical modelling of the metal removal processes, including interactions between reactive media, heavy metal ions and sulfates, and interpretation of the ionic profiles was also carried out by using the speciation/mass transfer computer code PHREEQC-2 and the WATEQ4F database. Mineralogical characterization studies as well as geochemical modelling calculations also indicate that the effect of sulfate and silica sand on the efficiency of the reactive zone should be considered carefully during design and operation of low-cost field PRBs.

  17. The Use of Permeable Barriers to Inhibit Virus Migration in the Subsurface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulze-Makuch, D.; Guan, H.; Totten, J.; Couroux, E.; Endley, S.; Hielscher, F.; Emmert, S.; Pillai, S. D.

    2001-12-01

    Ground water is susceptible to fecal contamination due to leaking sewer lines, faulty septic tanks and careless disposal of septic wastes; a problem especially common in low-income areas with no public sewage system. Under these conditions, viral and bacterial infection rates have been shown to increase. However, potential for viral infections can be reduced if the viruses are prevented from reaching the drinking water wells. Laboratory and field studies were conducted to determine whether iron-coated sand (ICS), pure zeolite (PZ) and surfactant modified zeolites (SMZ) could be used to retard virus migration in soils. In the laboratory, using a model aquifer and MS2 bacteriophage (as an enteric virus indicator) we showed that ICS and especially SMZ was able to remove more than 90 % of the injected viruses under various conditions. The removal efficiency of viruses was also tested under field conditions using septic effluent and a constructed submerged wetland. The performance of the wetland was greatly enhanced when using SMZ as filter pack for a pumping well that withdrew water at a downstream location from the wetland. Our results suggest that submerged wetlands, particularly if combined with a pumping well that has a filter pack consisting of surfactant modified zeolite (rather than the usual sand and gravel pack), are efficient in removing viruses from septic effluent. The permeable barrier materials tested here are economical and could significantly reduce the potential for viral contamination of drinking water wells. >http://www.geo.utep.edu/pub/dirksm/geobiowater/geobiowater.htm

  18. Mechanisms involved in the blood-testis barrier increased permeability induced by EMP.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao-Wu; Ding, Gui-Rong; Shi, Chang-Hong; Zeng, Li-Hua; Liu, Jun-Ye; Li, Jing; Zhao, Tao; Chen, Yong-Bin; Guo, Guo-Zhen

    2010-09-30

    The blood-testis barrier (BTB) plays an important role in male reproductive system. Lots of environmental stimulations can increase the permeability of BTB and then result in antisperm antibody (AsAb) generation, which is a key step in male immune infertility. Here we reported the results of male mice exposed to electromagnetic pulse (EMP) by measuring the expression of tight-junction-associated proteins (ZO-1 and Occludin), vimentin microfilaments, and transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta3) as well as AsAb level in serum. Male BALB/c mice were sham exposed or exposed to EMP at two different intensities (200kV/m and 400kV/m) for 200 pulses. The testes were collected at different time points after EMP exposure. Immunofluorescence histocytochemistry, western blotting, laser confocal microscopy and RT-PCR were used in this study. Compared with sham group, the expression of ZO-1 and TGF-beta3 significantly decreased accompanied with unevenly stained vimentin microfilaments and increased serum AsAb levels in EMP-exposed mice. These results suggest a potential BTB injury and immune infertility in male mice exposed to a certain intensity of EMP. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Mineral Precipitation Upgradient from a Zero-Valent Iron Permeable Reactive Barrier

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, R. L.; Thoms, R. B.; Johnson, R. O.; Nurmi, J. T.; Tratnyek, Paul G.

    2008-07-01

    Core samples taken from a zero-valent iron permeable reactive barrier (ZVI PRB) at Cornhusker Army Ammunition Plant, Nebraska, were analyzed for physical and chemical characteristics. Precipitates containing iron and sulfide were present at much higher concentrations in native aquifer materials just upgradient of the PRB than in the PRB itself. Sulfur mass balance on core solids coupled with trends in ground water sulfate concentrations indicates that the average ground water flow after 20 months of PRB operation was approximately twenty fold less than the regional ground water velocity. Transport and reaction modeling of the aquifer PRB interface suggests that, at the calculated velocity, both iron and hydrogen could diffuse upgradient against ground water flow and thereby contribute to precipitation in the native aquifer materials. The initial hydraulic conductivity (K) of the native materials is less than that of the PRB and, given the observed precipitation in the upgradient native materials, it is likely that K reduction occurred upgradient to rather than within the PRB. Although not directly implicated, guar gum used during installation of the PRB is believed to have played a role in the precipitation and flow reduction processes by enhancing microbial activity.

  20. Life-cycle case study comparison of permeable reactive barrier versus pump-and-treat remediation.

    PubMed

    Higgins, Monica R; Olson, Terese M

    2009-12-15

    A permeable reactive barrier (PRB) is a passive remediation technology, which over decades of use, may reduce lifetime environmental impacts when compared with a conventional pump-and-treat system (PTS). Greater material production requirements to install PRBs may offset the expected reductions in operational phase impacts and the trade-offs can be investigated in a life-cycle assessment (LCA). The life-cycle environmental impacts of a zerovalent iron (ZVI) containing PRB with a funnel and gate configuration and a PTS were compared in a case study. Potential impacts of the model PRB are driven by the ZVI reactive medium and the energy usage during construction, while for the PTS they are driven by the operational energy demand. Medium longevity governed the magnitude of the potential PRB impacts and the extent to which it was optimal relative to the PTS. Even at conservatively low estimates of longevity, the PRB offers significant environmental advantages in impact categories of human health and ozone depletion. The minimum ZVI longevity for PRB benefit over the PTS system in all impact categories was 10 years. Suggested PRB design innovations to reduce environmental impacts include the development of alternative reactive media and construction methods.

  1. Ammonium removal from groundwater using a zeolite permeable reactive barrier: a pilot-scale demonstration.

    PubMed

    Li, Shengpin; Huang, Guoxin; Kong, Xiangke; Yang, Yingzhao; Liu, Fei; Hou, Guohua; Chen, Honghan

    2014-01-01

    In situ remediation of ammonium-contaminated groundwater is possible through a zeolite permeable reactive barrier (PRB); however, zeolite's finite sorption capacity limits the long-term field application of PRBs. In this paper, a pilot-scale PRB was designed to achieve sustainable use of zeolite in removing ammonium (NH(4)(+)-N) through sequential nitrification, adsorption, and denitrification. An oxygen-releasing compound was added to ensure aerobic conditions in the upper layers of the PRB where NH(4)(+)-N was microbially oxidized to nitrate. Any remaining NH(4)(+)-N was removed abiotically in the zeolite layer. Under lower redox conditions, nitrate formed during nitrification was removed by denitrifying bacteria colonizing the zeolite. During the long-term operation (328 days), more than 90% of NH(4)(+)-N was consistently removed, and approximately 40% of the influent NH(4)(+)-N was oxidized to nitrate. As much as 60% of the nitrate formed in the PRB was reduced in the zeolite layer after 300 days of operation. Removal of NH(4)(+)-N from groundwater using a zeolite PRB through bacterial nitrification and abiotic adsorption is a promising approach. The zeolite PRB has the advantage of achieving sustainable use of zeolite and immediate NH(4)(+)-N removal.

  2. Effects of GSM modulated radio-frequency electromagnetic radiation on permeability of blood-brain barrier in male & female rats.

    PubMed

    Sırav, Bahriye; Seyhan, Nesrin

    2016-09-01

    With the increased use of mobile phones, their biological and health effects have become more important. Usage of mobile phones near the head increases the possibility of effects on brain tissue. This study was designed to investigate the possible effects of pulse modulated 900MHz and 1800MHz radio-frequency radiation on the permeability of blood-brain barrier of rats. Study was performed with 6 groups of young adult male and female wistar albino rats. The permeability of blood-brain barrier to intravenously injected evans blue dye was quantitatively examined for both control and radio-frequency radiarion exposed groups. For male groups; Evans blue content in the whole brain was found to be 0.08±0.01mg% in the control, 0.13±0.03mg% in 900MHz exposed and 0.26±0.05mg% in 1800MHz exposed animals. In both male radio-frequency radiation exposed groups, the permeability of blood-brain barrier found to be increased with respect to the controls (p<0.01). 1800MHz pulse modulated radio-frequency radiation exposure was found more effective on the male animals (p<0.01). For female groups; dye contents in the whole brains were 0.14±0.01mg% in the control, 0.24±0.03mg% in 900MHz exposed and 0.14±0.02mg% in 1800MHz exposed animals. No statistical variance found between the control and 1800MHz exposed animals (p>0.01). However 900MHz pulse modulated radio-frequency exposure was found effective on the permeability of blood-brain barrier of female animals. Results have shown that 20min pulse modulated radio-frequency radiation exposure of 900MHz and 1800MHz induces an effect and increases the permeability of blood-brain barrier of male rats. For females, 900MHz was found effective and it could be concluded that this result may due to the physiological differences between female and male animals. The results of this study suggest that mobile phone radation could lead to increase the permeability of blood-brain barrier under non-thermal exposure levels. More studies are needed

  3. A keratin scaffold regulates epidermal barrier formation, mitochondrial lipid composition, and activity

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Vinod; Bouameur, Jamal-Eddine; Bär, Janina; Rice, Robert H.; Hornig-Do, Hue-Tran; Roop, Dennis R.; Schwarz, Nicole; Brodesser, Susanne; Thiering, Sören; Leube, Rudolf E.; Wiesner, Rudolf J.; Vijayaraj, Preethi; Brazel, Christina B.; Heller, Sandra; Binder, Hans; Löffler-Wirth, Henry; Seibel, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Keratin intermediate filaments (KIFs) protect the epidermis against mechanical force, support strong adhesion, help barrier formation, and regulate growth. The mechanisms by which type I and II keratins contribute to these functions remain incompletely understood. Here, we report that mice lacking all type I or type II keratins display severe barrier defects and fragile skin, leading to perinatal mortality with full penetrance. Comparative proteomics of cornified envelopes (CEs) from prenatal KtyI−/− and KtyII−/−K8 mice demonstrates that absence of KIF causes dysregulation of many CE constituents, including downregulation of desmoglein 1. Despite persistence of loricrin expression and upregulation of many Nrf2 targets, including CE components Sprr2d and Sprr2h, extensive barrier defects persist, identifying keratins as essential CE scaffolds. Furthermore, we show that KIFs control mitochondrial lipid composition and activity in a cell-intrinsic manner. Therefore, our study explains the complexity of keratinopathies accompanied by barrier disorders by linking keratin scaffolds to mitochondria, adhesion, and CE formation. PMID:26644517

  4. ZEB2-transgene expression in the epidermis compromises the integrity of the epidermal barrier through the repression of different tight junction proteins.

    PubMed

    Tatari, Marianthi N; De Craene, Bram; Soen, Bieke; Taminau, Joachim; Vermassen, Petra; Goossens, Steven; Haigh, Katharina; Cazzola, Silvia; Lambert, Jo; Huylebroeck, Danny; Haigh, Jody J; Berx, Geert

    2014-09-01

    Epithelial homeostasis within the epidermis is maintained by means of multiple cell-cell adhesion complexes such as adherens junctions, tight junctions, gap junctions, and desmosomes. These complexes co-operate in the formation and the regulation of the epidermal barrier. Disruption of the epidermal barrier through the deregulation of the above complexes is the cause behind a number of skin disorders such as psoriasis, dermatitis, keratosis, and others. During epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT), epithelial cells lose their adhesive capacities and gain mesenchymal properties. ZEB transcription factors are key inducers of EMT. In order to gain a better understanding of the functional role of ZEB2 in epidermal homeostasis, we generated a mouse model with conditional overexpression of Zeb2 in the epidermis. Our analysis revealed that Zeb2 expression in the epidermis leads to hyperproliferation due to the combined downregulation of different tight junction proteins compromising the epidermal barrier. Using two epidermis-specific in vivo models and in vitro promoter assays, we identified occludin as a new Zeb2 target gene. Immunohistological analysis performed on human skin biopsies covering various pathogeneses revealed ZEB2 expression in the epidermis of pemphigus vulgaris. Collectively, our data support the notion for a potential role of ZEB2 in intracellular signaling of this disease.

  5. Reevaluation of the non-lesional dry skin in atopic dermatitis by acute barrier disruption: an abnormal permeability barrier homeostasis with defective processing to generate ceramide.

    PubMed

    Sugiura, Ayumi; Nomura, Tsuyoshi; Mizuno, Atsuko; Imokawa, Genji

    2014-07-01

    Atopic dermatitis is characterized by disruption of the cutaneous barrier due to reduced ceramide levels even in non-lesional dry skin. Following further acute barrier disruption by repeated tape strippings, we re-characterized the non-lesional dry skin of subjects with atopic dermatitis, which shows significantly reduced levels of barrier function and ceramide but not of beta-glucocerebrosidase activity. For the first time, we report an abnormal trans-epidermal water loss homeostasis in which delayed recovery kinetics of trans-epidermal water loss occurred on the first day during the 4 days after acute barrier disruption compared with healthy control skin. Interestingly, whereas the higher ceramide level in the stratum corneum of healthy control skin was further significantly up-regulated at 4 days post-tape stripping, the lower ceramide level in the stratum corneum of subjects with atopic dermatitis was not significantly changed. In a parallel study, whereas beta-glucocerebrosidase activity at 4 days post-tape stripping was significantly up-regulated in healthy control skin compared with before tape stripping, the level of that activity remained substantially unchanged in atopic dermatitis. These findings indicate that subjects with atopic dermatitis have a defect in sphingolipid-metabolic processing that generates ceramide in the interface between the stratum corneum and the epidermis. The results also support the notion that the continued disruption of barrier function in atopic dermatitis non-lesional skin is associated with the impaired homeostasis of a ceramide-generating process, which underscores an atopy-specific inflammation-triggered ceramide deficiency that is distinct from other types of dermatitis.

  6. Quantification of transient increase of the blood-brain barrier permeability to macromolecules by optimized focused ultrasound combined with microbubbles.

    PubMed

    Shi, Lingyan; Palacio-Mancheno, Paolo; Badami, Joseph; Shin, Da Wi; Zeng, Min; Cardoso, Luis; Tu, Raymond; Fu, Bingmei M

    2014-01-01

    Radioimmunotherapy using a radiolabeled monoclonal antibody that targets tumor cells has been shown to be efficient for the treatment of many malignant cancers, with reduced side effects. However, the blood-brain barrier (BBB) inhibits the transport of intravenous antibodies to tumors in the brain. Recent studies have demonstrated that focused ultrasound (FUS) combined with microbubbles (MBs) is a promising method to transiently disrupt the BBB for the drug delivery to the central nervous system. To find the optimal FUS and MBs that can induce reversible increase in the BBB permeability, we employed minimally invasive multiphoton microscopy to quantify the BBB permeability to dextran-155 kDa with similar molecular weight to an antibody by applying different doses of FUS in the presence of MBs with an optimal size and concentration. The cerebral microcirculation was observed through a section of frontoparietal bone thinned with a micro-grinder. About 5 minutes after applying the FUS on the thinned skull in the presence of MBs for 1 minute, TRITC (tetramethylrhodamine isothiocyanate)-dextran-155 kDa in 1% bovine serum albumin in mammalian Ringer's solution was injected into the cerebral circulation via the ipsilateral carotid artery by a syringe pump. Simultaneously, the temporal images were collected from the brain parenchyma ~100-200 μm below the pia mater. Permeability was determined from the rate of tissue solute accumulation around individual microvessels. After several trials, we found the optimal dose of FUS. At the optimal dose, permeability increased by ~14-fold after 5 minutes post-FUS, and permeability returned to the control level after 25 minutes. FUS without MBs or MBs injected without FUS did not change the permeability. Our method provides an accurate in vivo assessment for the transient BBB permeability change under the treatment of FUS. The optimal FUS dose found for the reversible BBB permeability increase without BBB disruption is reliable and

  7. Design, installation, and performance of a multi-layered permeable reactive barrier, Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Kaszuba, J. P.; Longmire, P. A.; Strietelmeier, E. A.; Taylor, T. P.; Den-Baars, P. S.

    2004-01-01

    A multi-layered permeable reactive barrier (PRB) has been installed in Mortandad Canyon, on the Pajarito Plateau in the north-central part of LANL, to demonstrate in-situ treatment of a suite of contaminants with dissimilar geochemical properties. The PRB will also mitigate possible vulnerabilities from downgradient contaminant movement within alluvial and deeper perched groundwater. Mortandad Canyon was selected as the location for this demonstration project because the flow of alluvial groundwater is constrained by the geology of the canyon, a large network of monitoring wells already were installed along the canyon reach, and the hydrochemistry and contaminant history of the canyon is well-documented. The PRB uses a funnel-and-gate system with a series of four reactive media cells to immobilize or destroy contaminants present in alluvial groundwater, including strontium-90, plutonium-238,239,240, americium-241, perchlorate, and nitrate. The four cells, ordered by sequence of contact with the groundwater, consist of gravel-sized scoria (for colloid removal); phosphate rock containing apatite (for metals and radionuclides); pecan shells and cotton seed admixed with gravel (bio-barrier, to deplete dissolved oxygen and destroy potential RCRA organic compounds, nitrate and perchlorate); and limestone (pH buffering and anion adsorption). Design elements of the PRB are based on laboratory-scale treatability studies and on a field investigation of hydrologic, geochemical, and geotechnical parameters. The PRB was designed with the following criteria: 1-day residence time within the biobarrier, 10-year lifetime, minimization of surface water infiltration and erosion, optimization of hydraulic capture, and minimization of excavated material requiring disposal. Each layer has been equipped with monitoring wells or ports to allow sampling of groundwater and reactive media, and monitor wells are located immediately adjacent to the up- and down-gradient perimeter of the

  8. Tight junction regulates epidermal calcium ion gradient and differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Kurasawa, Masumi; Maeda, Tetsuo; Oba, Ai; Yamamoto, Takuya; Sasaki, Hiroyuki

    2011-03-25

    Research highlights: {yields} We disrupted epidermal tight junction barrier in reconstructed epidermis. {yields} It altered Ca{sup 2+} distribution and consequentially differentiation state as well. {yields} Tight junction should affect epidermal homeostasis by maintaining Ca{sup 2+} gradient. -- Abstract: It is well known that calcium ions (Ca{sup 2+}) induce keratinocyte differentiation. Ca{sup 2+} distributes to form a vertical gradient that peaks at the stratum granulosum. It is thought that the stratum corneum (SC) forms the Ca{sup 2+} gradient since it is considered the only permeability barrier in the skin. However, the epidermal tight junction (TJ) in the granulosum has recently been suggested to restrict molecular movement to assist the SC as a secondary barrier. The objective of this study was to clarify the contribution of the TJ to Ca{sup 2+} gradient and epidermal differentiation in reconstructed human epidermis. When the epidermal TJ barrier was disrupted by sodium caprate treatment, Ca{sup 2+} flux increased and the gradient changed in ion-capture cytochemistry images. Alterations of ultrastructures and proliferation/differentiation markers revealed that both hyperproliferation and precocious differentiation occurred regionally in the epidermis. These results suggest that the TJ plays a crucial role in maintaining epidermal homeostasis by controlling the Ca{sup 2+} gradient.

  9. Brain pericytes from stress-susceptible pigs increase blood-brain barrier permeability in vitro

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The function of pericytes remains questionable but with improved cultured technique and the use of genetically modified animals, it has become increasingly clear that pericytes are an integral part of blood–brain barrier (BBB) function, and the involvement of pericyte dysfunction in certain cerebrovascular diseases is now emerging. The porcine stress syndrome (PSS) is the only confirmed, homologous model of malignant hyperthermia (MH) in veterinary medicine. Affected animals can experience upon slaughter a range of symptoms, including skeletal muscle rigidity, metabolic acidosis, tachycardia and fever, similar to the human syndrome. Symptoms are due to an enhanced calcium release from intracellular stores. These conditions are associated with a point mutation in ryr1/hal gene, encoding the ryanodine receptor, a calcium channel. Important blood vessel wall muscle modifications have been described in PSS, but potential brain vessel changes have never been documented in this syndrome. Methods In the present work, histological and ultrastructural analyses of brain capillaries from wild type and ryr1 mutated pigs were conducted to investigate the potential impairment of pericytes, in this pathology. In addition, brain pericytes were isolated from the three porcine genotypes (wild-type NN pigs; Nn and nn pigs, bearing one or two (n) mutant ryr1/hal alleles, respectively), and tested in vitro for their influence on the permeability of BBB endothelial monolayers. Results Enlarged perivascular spaces were observed in ryr1-mutant samples, corresponding to a partial or total detachment of the astrocytic endfeet. These spaces were electron lucent and sometimes filled with lipid deposits and swollen astrocytic feet. At the ultrastructural level, brain pericytes did not seem to be affected because they showed regular morphology and characteristics, so we aimed to check their ability to maintain BBB properties in vitro. Our results indicated that pericytes from the

  10. Evaluation of Geochemical Processes Affecting Uranium Sequestration and Longevity of Permeable Reactive Barriers for Groundwater Remediation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuller, C. C.; Webb, S.; Bargar, J.; Naftz, D. L.

    2009-12-01

    Development of effective remediation techniques for protecting existing drinking water supplies and for mitigating existing contamination problems requires evaluating both the contaminant sequestration processes and the secondary reactions affecting the long term stability of contaminant attenuation. Permeable reactive barriers (PRB) provide a means for passive remediation of dissolved groundwater contaminants and may be an effective strategy for remediation of uranium (U) groundwater contamination provided that long term stability of the sequestered U can be achieved for the geochemical conditions of the aquifer expected subsequent to remediation. Understanding the chemical reaction mechanisms resulting in U uptake and PRB performance are critical to evaluating the potential for release of sequestered U and for improved design of remediation devices. We are using synchrotron X-ray techniques to investigate U sequestration reaction mechanisms and biogeochemical processes in PRB materials recovered from a 9-year field demonstration of zero-valent iron (ZVI) and bone char apatite PRBs in a U contaminated aquifer near Fry Canyon, Utah. X-ray microprobe mapping of iron phases shows that extensive secondary precipitation of mackinawite, siderite and aragonite in the ZVI PRB has resulted from ZVI corrosion coupled with microbial sulfate reduction. Bulk U-EXAFS measurements and micron-scale U-oxidation state mapping indicates that U removal occurs largely by reduction and precipitation of a UO2-like U(IV) phase on the ZVI surfaces, and that the sequestered U is often buried by the secondary Fe precipitates. These findings are significant to the efficacy of ZVI PRBs for remediation of U and other contaminants in that the ongoing secondary phase precipitation cements grains and fills internal porosity resulting in the observed decreased PRB permeability and limits subsequent U removal, but likely limits oxidative remobilization of U. In the bone char apatite PRB, elevated

  11. [The permeability of the hemato-encephalic barrier for superoxide dismutase following the unilateral intracarotid hyperperfusion of the cerebral vessels].

    PubMed

    Aleksandrova, L A; Sorokoumova, V A; Shabunevich, L V; Pugacheva, E L

    1993-06-01

    On the model of acute blood-brain barrier injury in rats after a short-term hyperperfusion of one brain hemisphere with blood, the injection of exogenic superoxide dismutase (SOD) was accompanied by pronounced increase in the activity of SOD in the damaged brain tissue. This fact and other data of the authors on this model confirm the penetration of SOD over the microvessel endothelium into the extracellular space of the same damaged brain areas that are permeable for plasma albumin.

  12. Bifidobacterium animalis ssp. lactis CNCM-I2494 Restores Gut Barrier Permeability in Chronically Low-Grade Inflamed Mice.

    PubMed

    Martín, Rebeca; Laval, Laure; Chain, Florian; Miquel, Sylvie; Natividad, Jane; Cherbuy, Claire; Sokol, Harry; Verdu, Elena F; van Hylckama Vlieg, Johan; Bermudez-Humaran, Luis G; Smokvina, Tamara; Langella, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Growing evidence supports the efficacy of many probiotic strains in the management of gastrointestinal disorders associated with deregulated intestinal barrier function and/or structure. In particular, bifidobacteria have been studied for their efficacy to both prevent and treat a broad spectrum of animal and/or human gut disorders. The aim of the current work was thus to evaluate effects on intestinal barrier function of Bifidobacterium animalis ssp. lactis CNCM-I2494, a strain used in fermented dairy products. A chronic dinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (DNBS)-induced low-grade inflammation model causing gut dysfunction in mice was used in order to study markers of inflammation, intestinal permeability, and immune function in the presence of the bacterial strain. In this chronic low-grade inflammation mice model several parameters pointed out the absence of an over active inflammation process. However, gut permeability, lymphocyte populations, and colonic cytokines were found to be altered. B. animalis ssp. lactis CNCM-I2494 was able to protect barrier functions by restoring intestinal permeability, colonic goblet cell populations, and cytokine levels. Furthermore, tight junction (TJ) proteins levels were also measured by qRT-PCR showing the ability of this strain to specifically normalize the level of several TJ proteins, in particular for claudin-4. Finally, B. lactis strain counterbalanced CD4(+) lymphocyte alterations in both spleen and mesenteric lymphoid nodes. It restores the Th1/Th2 ratio altered by the DNBS challenge (which locally augments CD4(+) Th1 cells) by increasing the Th2 response as measured by the increase in the production of major representative Th2 cytokines (IL-4, IL-5, and IL-10). Altogether, these data suggest that B. animalis ssp. lactis CNCM-I2494 may efficiently prevent disorders associated with increased barrier permeability.

  13. Bifidobacterium animalis ssp. lactis CNCM-I2494 Restores Gut Barrier Permeability in Chronically Low-Grade Inflamed Mice

    PubMed Central

    Martín, Rebeca; Laval, Laure; Chain, Florian; Miquel, Sylvie; Natividad, Jane; Cherbuy, Claire; Sokol, Harry; Verdu, Elena F.; van Hylckama Vlieg, Johan; Bermudez-Humaran, Luis G.; Smokvina, Tamara; Langella, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Growing evidence supports the efficacy of many probiotic strains in the management of gastrointestinal disorders associated with deregulated intestinal barrier function and/or structure. In particular, bifidobacteria have been studied for their efficacy to both prevent and treat a broad spectrum of animal and/or human gut disorders. The aim of the current work was thus to evaluate effects on intestinal barrier function of Bifidobacterium animalis ssp. lactis CNCM-I2494, a strain used in fermented dairy products. A chronic dinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (DNBS)-induced low-grade inflammation model causing gut dysfunction in mice was used in order to study markers of inflammation, intestinal permeability, and immune function in the presence of the bacterial strain. In this chronic low-grade inflammation mice model several parameters pointed out the absence of an over active inflammation process. However, gut permeability, lymphocyte populations, and colonic cytokines were found to be altered. B. animalis ssp. lactis CNCM-I2494 was able to protect barrier functions by restoring intestinal permeability, colonic goblet cell populations, and cytokine levels. Furthermore, tight junction (TJ) proteins levels were also measured by qRT-PCR showing the ability of this strain to specifically normalize the level of several TJ proteins, in particular for claudin-4. Finally, B. lactis strain counterbalanced CD4+ lymphocyte alterations in both spleen and mesenteric lymphoid nodes. It restores the Th1/Th2 ratio altered by the DNBS challenge (which locally augments CD4+ Th1 cells) by increasing the Th2 response as measured by the increase in the production of major representative Th2 cytokines (IL-4, IL-5, and IL-10). Altogether, these data suggest that B. animalis ssp. lactis CNCM-I2494 may efficiently prevent disorders associated with increased barrier permeability. PMID:27199937

  14. Comparing the Effect of a Twice-weekly Tacrolimus and Betamethasone Valerate Dose on the Subclinical Epidermal Barrier Defect in Atopic Dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Chittock, John; Brown, Kirsty; Cork, Michael J; Danby, Simon G

    2015-07-01

    The proactive use of topical anti-inflammatory (TAI) therapy to address subclinical inflammation is an effective, contemporary clinical strategy for the management of atopic dermatitis (AD). The interaction of a proactive TAI dose with the subclinical epidermal barrier defect in AD is yet to be determined. A randomised, observer-blind, functional mechanistic study in 17 subjects with quiescent AD was performed to compare the effect of a twice-weekly dose of betamethasone valerate (0.1%) cream (BMVc), against tacrolimus (0.1%) ointment (TACo) on the biophysical and biological properties of the epidermal barrier. Application of BMVc preserved epidermal barrier function and stratum corneum (SC) integrity, but significantly elevated skin-surface pH with concomitant loss of SC cohesion. By contrast, TACo improved SC integrity, exerted an overall hydrating action, and significantly reduced caseinolytic and trypsin-like protease activity. The differential effects reported support the proactive use of TACo to promote reparation of the subclinical barrier defect in AD.

  15. Chromium-Removal Processes during Groundwater Remediation by a Zerovalent Iron Permeable Reactive Barrier

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkin, Richard T.; Su, Chunming; Ford, Robert G.; Paul, Cynthia J.

    2008-06-09

    Solid-phase associations of chromium were examined in core materials collected from a full-scale, zerovalent iron permeable reactive barrier (PRB) at the U.S. Coast Guard Support Center located near Elizabeth City, NC. The PRB was installed in 1996 to treat groundwater contaminated with hexavalent chromium. After eight years of operation, the PRB remains effective at reducing concentrations of Cr from average values >1500 {micro}g L{sup -1} in groundwater hydraulically upgradient of the PRB to values <1 {micro}g L{sup -1} in groundwater within and hydraulically downgradient of the PRB. Chromium removal from groundwater occurs at the leading edge of the PRB and also within the aquifer immediately upgradient of the PRB. These regions also witness the greatest amount of secondary mineral formation due to steep geochemical gradients that result from the corrosion of zerovalent iron. X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy indicated that chromium is predominantly in the trivalent oxidation state, confirming that reductive processes are responsible for Cr sequestration. XANES spectra and microscopy results suggest that Cr is, in part, associated with iron sulfide grains formed as a consequence of microbially mediated sulfate reduction in and around the PRB. Results of this study provide evidence that secondary iron-bearing mineral products may enhance the capacity of zerovalent iron systems to remediate Cr in groundwater, either through redox reactions at the mineral-water interface or by the release of Fe(II) to solution via mineral dissolution and/or metal corrosion.

  16. Monitoring trichloroethene remediation at an iron permeable reactive barrier using stable carbon isotopic analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    VanStone, Nancy; Przepiora, Andrzej; Vogan, John; Lacrampe-Couloume, Georges; Powers, Brian; Perez, Ernesto; Mabury, Scott; Sherwood Lollar, Barbara

    2005-08-01

    Stable carbon isotopic analysis, in combination with compositional analysis, was used to evaluate the performance of an iron permeable reactive barrier (PRB) for the remediation of ground water contaminated with trichloroethene (TCE) at Spill Site 7 (SS7), F.E. Warren Air Force Base, Wyoming. Compositional data indicated that although the PRB appeared to be reducing TCE to concentrations below treatment goals within and immediately downgradient of the PRB, concentrations remained higher than expected at wells further downgradient (i.e. > 9 m) of the PRB. At two wells downgradient of the PRB, TCE concentrations were comparable to upgradient values, and δ13C values of TCE at these wells were not significantly different than upgradient values. Since the process of sorption/desorption does not significantly fractionate carbon isotope values, this suggests that the TCE observed at these wells is desorbing from local aquifer materials and was present before the PRB was installed. In contrast, three other downgradient wells show significantly more enriched δ13C values compared to the upgradient mean. In addition, δ13C values for the degradation products of TCE, cis-dichloroethene and vinyl chloride, show fractionation patterns expected for the products of the reductive dechlorination of TCE. Since concentrations of both TCE and degradation products drop to below detection limit in wells within the PRB and directly below it, these downgradient chlorinated hydrocarbon concentrations are attributed to desorption from local aquifer material. The carbon isotope values indicate that this dissolved contaminant is subject to local degradation, likely due to in situ microbial activity.

  17. Statins reduce human blood-brain barrier permeability and restrict leukocyte migration: relevance to multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Ifergan, Igal; Wosik, Karolina; Cayrol, Romain; Kébir, Hania; Auger, Chantale; Bernard, Monique; Bouthillier, Alain; Moumdjian, Robert; Duquette, Pierre; Prat, Alexandre

    2006-07-01

    Dysregulation of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and transendothelial migration of immune cells are among the earliest central nervous system changes partaking in lesion formation in both multiple sclerosis (MS) and its early clinical form, the clinically isolated syndrome. Evidence for the anti-inflammatory effects of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors within the central nervous system arose from studies demonstrating that statins improve clinical signs in the animal model of MS and reduce the number of gadolinium-enhancing lesions in MS. We sought to describe the impact of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitor treatment on the physiology and immunology of human BBB-derived endothelial cells (ECs). We demonstrate that lovastatin and simvastatin induce a 50 to 60% reduction in the diffusion rates of bovine serum albumin and [(14)C]-sucrose across human BBB-ECs in vitro through abrogation of isoprenylation processes, but independent of the expression of the tight junction molecules occludin, VE-cadherin, JAM-1, zonula occluden-1, and zonula occluden-2. Simvastatin and lovastatin were equipotent in reducing BBB permeability in vitro, with median effective concentration (EC(50)) of 9.5 x 10(-8) and 1.0 x 10(-7)M, respectively. We further demonstrate that lovastatin and simvastatin treatment of BBB-ECs significantly restricts the migration of clinically isolated syndrome-derived and MS-derived monocytes and lymphocytes across the human BBB in vitro, through a specific reduction in the secretion of the chemokines monocyte chemotactic protein-1/CCL2 and interferon-gamma-inducible protein-10/CXCL10 by BBB-ECs. Our data parallel the previously reported magnetic resonance imaging-based radiological findings and suggest an effect of statins that could be beneficial in early MS, restricting the diffusion of molecular tracers and the migration of immune cells across the human BBB.

  18. Predicting longevity of iron permeable reactive barriers using multiple iron deactivation models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carniato, L.; Schoups, G.; Seuntjens, P.; Van Nooten, T.; Simons, Q.; Bastiaens, L.

    2012-11-01

    In this study we investigate the model uncertainties involved in predicting long-term permeable reactive barrier (PRB) remediation efficiency based on a lab-scale column experiment under accelerated flow conditions. A PRB consisting of 20% iron and 80% sand was simulated in a laboratory-scale column and contaminated groundwater was pumped into the column for approximately 1 year at an average groundwater velocity of 3.7E - 1 m d- 1. Dissolved contaminants (PCE, TCE, cis-DCE, trans-DCE and VC) and inorganic (Ca2 +, Fe2 +, TIC and pH) concentrations were measured in groundwater sampled at different times and at eight different distances along the column. These measurements were used to calibrate a multi-component reactive transport model, which subsequently provided predictions of long-term PRB efficiency under reduced flow conditions (i.e., groundwater velocity of 1.4E - 3 m d- 1), representative of a field site of interest in this study. Iron reactive surface reduction due to mineral precipitation and iron dissolution was simulated using four different models. All models were able to reasonably well reproduce the column experiment measurements, whereas the extrapolated long-term efficiency under different flow rates was significantly different between the different models. These results highlight significant model uncertainties associated with extrapolating long-term PRB performance based on lab-scale column experiments. These uncertainties should be accounted for at the PRB design phase, and may be reduced by independent experiments and field observations aimed at a better understanding of reactive surface deactivation mechanisms in iron PRBs.

  19. Simulation of Two Strategies to Limit the Impact of Fouling in Permeable Reactive Barriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, L.; Benson, C.

    2008-12-01

    Ground water flow (MODFLOW) and geochemical reactive transport models (RT3D) were used to assess the effectiveness of two strategies in limiting mineral fouling and its impact on hydraulic behavior of continuous- wall permeable reactive barriers (PRBs) employing granular zero valent iron (ZVI). A geochemical algorithm including kinetic expressions of oxidation-reduction and mineral precipitation-dissolution was developed for RT3D. The two strategies that were evaluated are (i) adding pea gravel equalization zones upgradient and down gradient of the reactive zone and (ii) placement of sacrificial pretreatment zones upgradient of the reactive zone. The PRB locates at a three-dimensional heterogeneous sandy aquifer. The sacrificial pretreatment zone contains mixtures of pea gravel and ZVI. Results of simulations show that installation of pea gravel zones provides a more conductive path for ground water flow through the ZVI, which enhances preferential flow and causes greater porosity reductions and shorter residence time in the PRB. After installation of pea gravel zones, the residence time decreases which is caused by short travel distances in the ZVI due to short circuit of preferential flow. Sacrificial pretreatment zones can be used to elevate the ground water pH and consume many of the mineral forming ions to form secondary minerals in before the reactive zone is reached. The remaining mineral forming ions that pass into the reactive zone cause less mineral fouling. However, mineral fouling by Fe(OH)2 still occurs, and this mineral is formed regardless of the influent mineral forming ions. Addition of the sacrificial pretreatment zone slightly decreases the initial median residence time. However, the pretreatment zone retains higher residence time after 30 yrs due to less mineral fouling in the pure ZVI zone.

  20. Simulation of Two Strategies to Enhance Permeable Reactive Barriers in Heterogeneous Aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, L.; Benson, C.

    2007-12-01

    Ground water flow (MODFLOW) and geochemical reactive transport models (RT3D) were used to assess the effectiveness of two strategies in limiting mineral fouling and its impact on hydraulic behavior of continuous-wall permeable reactive barriers (PRBs) employing granular zero valent iron (ZVI). A geochemical algorithm including kinetic expressions of oxidation-reduction and mineral precipitation-dissolution was developed for RT3D. The two strategies that were evaluated are (i) adding pea gravel equalization zones upgradient and down gradient of the reactive zone and (ii) placement of sacrificial pretreatment zones upgradient of the reactive zone. The PRB locates at a three-dimensional heterogeneous sandy aquifer. The sacrificial pretreatment zone contains mixtures of pea gravel and ZVI. Results of simulations show that installation of pea gravel zones provides a more conductive path for ground water flow through the ZVI, which enhances preferential flow and causes greater porosity reductions and shorter residence time in the PRB. After installation of pea gravel zones, the esidence time decreases which is caused by short travel distances in the ZVI due to short circuit of preferential flow. Sacrificial pretreatment zones can be used to elevate the ground water pH and consume many of the mineral forming ions to form secondary minerals in before the reactive zone is reached. The remaining mineral forming ions that pass into the reactive zone cause less mineral fouling. However, mineral fouling by Fe(OH)2 still occurs, and this mineral is formed regardless of the influent mineral forming ions. Addition of the sacrificial pretreatment zone slightly decreases the initial median residence time. However, the pretreatment zone retains higher residence time after 30 yrs due to less mineral fouling in the pure ZVI zone.

  1. An evaluation of the influence of aquifer heterogeneity on permeable reactive barrier design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemsi, Paulo S.; Shackelford, Charles D.

    2006-03-01

    The influence of heterogeneity in aquifer hydraulic conductivity (K) on contaminant plume patterns and the required thickness and length of permeable reactive barriers (PRBs) used for in situ remediation is evaluated using stochastic modeling. The results provide a quantitative means for evaluating the effects of (1) the level of aquifer heterogeneity as reflected by the standard deviation of the logarithm of K, σlnK, (2) the aquifer correlation structure anisotropy represented by the ratio of correlation lengths, λx/λy, and (3) DPRB representing the distance from the contaminant source zone to the PRB. In terms of PRB thickness, a probabilistic factor of safety related to uncertainty in influent groundwater seepage velocities (FS1,90) at the location of the PRB is quantified. In terms of PRB length, a probabilistic factor of safety related to uncertainty in the length of a PRB required to capture the contaminant plume, defined as the capture length ratio (CLR), is quantified. The mean and standard deviation of FS1,90 significantly increase as σlnK increases from 0.2 to 1.6, and slightly increase as λx/λy increases from 1.0 to 3.0 and DPRB increases from 15 to 45 m. The values for the factor of safety for PRB thickness versus σlnK compare favorably with previously published values based on a different methodology. The mean and standard deviation of CLR increase with increasing σlnK and with increasing DPRB, and decrease slightly with increasing λx/λy. Finally, the ranges in CLR are correlated with strongly divergent and strongly convergent plume patterns.

  2. Novel Nrf2 activators from microbial transformation products inhibit blood–retinal barrier permeability in rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Nakagami, Yasuhiro; Masuda, Kayoko; Hatano, Emiko; Inoue, Tatsuya; Matsuyama, Takuya; Iizuka, Mayumi; Ono, Yasunori; Ohnuki, Takashi; Murakami, Yoko; Iwasaki, Masaru; Yoshida, Kazuhiro; Kasuya, Yuji; Komoriya, Satoshi

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) is a redox-sensitive transcription factor that binds to antioxidant response elements located in the promoter region of genes encoding many antioxidant enzymes and phase II detoxifying enzymes. Activation of the Nrf2 pathway seems protective for many organs, and although a well-known Nrf2 activator, bardoxolone methyl, was evaluated clinically for treating chronic kidney disease, it was found to induce adverse events. Many bardoxolone methyl derivatives, mostly derived by chemical modifications, have already been studied. However, we adopted a biotransformation technique to obtain a novel Nrf2 activator. Experimental Approach The potent novel Nrf2 activator, RS9, was obtained from microbial transformation products. Its Nrf2 activity was evaluated by determining NADPH:quinone oxidoreductase-1 induction activity in Hepa1c1c7 cells. We also investigated the effects of RS9 on oxygen-induced retinopathy in rats and glycated albumin-induced blood–retinal barrier permeability in rabbits because many ocular diseases are associated with oxidative stress and inflammation. Key Results Bardoxolone methyl doubled the specific activity of Nrf2 in Hepa1c1c7 cells at a much higher concentration than RS9. Moreover, the induction of Nrf2-targeted genes was observed at a one-tenth lower concentration of RS9. Interestingly, the cytotoxicity of RS9 was substantially reduced compared with bardoxolone methyl. Oral and intravitreal administration of RS9 ameliorated the pathological scores and leakage in the models of retinopathy in rats and ocular inflammation in rabbits respectively. Conclusion and Implications Nrf2 activators are applicable for treating ocular diseases and novel Nrf2 activators have potential as a unique method for prevention and treatment of retinovascular disease. PMID:25363737

  3. Permeability assessment of the focused ultrasound-induced blood-brain barrier opening using dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlachos, F.; Tung, Y.-S.; Konofagou, E. E.

    2010-09-01

    Focused ultrasound (FUS) in conjunction with microbubbles has been shown to successfully open the blood-brain barrier (BBB) in the mouse brain. In this study, we compute the BBB permeability after opening in vivo. The spatial permeability of the BBB-opened region was assessed using dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI). The DCE-MR images were post-processed using the general kinetic model (GKM) and the reference region model (RRM). Permeability maps were generated and the Ktrans values were calculated for a predefined volume of interest in the sonicated and the control area for each mouse. The results demonstrated that Ktrans in the BBB-opened region (0.02 ± 0.0123 for GKM and 0.03 ± 0.0167 min-1 for RRM) was at least two orders of magnitude higher when compared to the contra-lateral (control) side (0 and 8.5 × 10-4 ± 12 × 10-4 min-1, respectively). The permeability values obtained with the two models showed statistically significant agreement and excellent correlation (R2 = 0.97). At histological examination, it was concluded that no macroscopic damage was induced. This study thus constitutes the first permeability assessment of FUS-induced BBB opening using DCE-MRI, supporting the fact that the aforementioned technique may constitute a safe, non-invasive and efficacious drug delivery method.

  4. Transendothelial permeability changes induced by free radicals in an in vitro model of the blood-brain barrier.

    PubMed

    Lagrange, P; Romero, I A; Minn, A; Revest, P A

    1999-09-01

    In the present study, we investigated the changes in blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability following brain endothelial cell exposure to different xenobiotics able to promote free radical generation during their metabolism. Our in vitro BBB model consisted of confluent monolayers of immortalized rat brain capillary endothelial cells (RBE4) grown on collagen-coated filters in the presence of C6 glioma cells grown in the lower compartment. We have recently shown that a range of xenobiotics, including menadione, nitrofurazone, and methylviologen (paraquat) may undergo monoelectronic redox cycling in isolated brain capillaries, giving rise to reactive oxygen species. In this study, addition of 100 microM menadione to the culture medium for 30 min significantly increased the permeability of endothelial cell monolayers to radiolabeled sucrose. The effect on endothelial permeability induced by menadione was dose-dependent and reversible. These permeability changes preceded the onset of cell death, as assessed by the Trypan blue exclusion method. Pre-incubation with superoxide dismutase and catalase blocked changes in sucrose permeability to control levels in a dose-dependent manner, suggesting the involvement of reactive oxygen species in menadione-induced BBB opening.

  5. Roundabout 4 regulates blood-tumor barrier permeability through the modulation of ZO-1, Occludin, and Claudin-5 expression.

    PubMed

    Cai, Heng; Liu, Wenjing; Xue, Yixue; Shang, Xiuli; Liu, Jing; Li, Zhen; Wang, Ping; Liu, Libo; Hu, Yi; Liu, Yunhui

    2015-01-01

    The blood-tumor barrier (BTB) restricts the delivery of chemotherapeutic drug molecules to tumor tissues. We found that the endothelial cell (EC) receptor molecule Roundabout 4 (Robo4) is endogenously expressed in human brain microvascular ECs and that it is upregulated in a BTB model of glioma cocultured ECs. Knockdown of Robo4 in this BTB model increased permeability; short hairpin RNA targeting Robo4 (shRobo4) led to decreased transendothelial electric resistance values, increased BTB permeability, and downregulated expression of the EC tight junction proteins ZO-1, occludin, and claudin-5. Roundabout 4 influenced BTB permeability via binding with its ligand, Slit2. Short hairpin RNA targeting Robo4 also increased matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) activity and expression in glioma cocultured ECs; pretreatment with the MMP inhibitor GM6001 partially blocked the effects of shRobo4 on the transendothelial electric resistance values and ZO-1 and occludin expression. Short hairpin RNA targeting Robo4 also upregulated the phosphorylation of Src and Erk1/2; the Src inhibitor PP2 and the Erk1/2 inhibitor PD98059 blocked shRobo4-mediated alteration in ZO-1 and occludin expression. Together, our results indicate that knockdown of Robo4 increased BTB permeability by reducing EC tight junction protein expression, and that the Src-Erk1/2-MMP-9 signal pathways are involved in this process. Thus, Robo4 may represent a useful future therapeutic target for enhancing BTB permeability.

  6. Effects of Exposure to Blast Overpressure on Intracranial Pressure and Blood-Brain Barrier Permeability in a Rat Model.

    PubMed

    Kawoos, Usmah; Gu, Ming; Lankasky, Jason; McCarron, Richard M; Chavko, Mikulas

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to blast overpressure (BOP) activates a cascade of pathological processes including changes in intracranial pressure (ICP) and blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability resulting in traumatic brain injury (TBI). In this study the effect of single and multiple exposures at two intensities of BOP on changes in ICP and BBB permeability in Sprague-Dawley rats was evaluated. Animals were exposed to a single or three repetitive (separated by 0.5 h) BOPs at 72 kPa or 110 kPa. ICP was monitored continuously via telemetry for 6 days after exposure to BOP. The alteration in the permeability of BBB was determined by extravasation of Evans Blue (EB) into brain parenchyma. A significant increase in ICP was observed in all groups except the single 72 kPa BOP group. At the same time a marked increase in BBB permeability was also seen in various parts of the brain. The extent of ICP increase as well as BBB permeability change was dependent on intensity and frequency of blast.

  7. Effects of Exposure to Blast Overpressure on Intracranial Pressure and Blood-Brain Barrier Permeability in a Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Kawoos, Usmah; Gu, Ming; Lankasky, Jason; McCarron, Richard M.; Chavko, Mikulas

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to blast overpressure (BOP) activates a cascade of pathological processes including changes in intracranial pressure (ICP) and blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability resulting in traumatic brain injury (TBI). In this study the effect of single and multiple exposures at two intensities of BOP on changes in ICP and BBB permeability in Sprague-Dawley rats was evaluated. Animals were exposed to a single or three repetitive (separated by 0.5 h) BOPs at 72 kPa or 110 kPa. ICP was monitored continuously via telemetry for 6 days after exposure to BOP. The alteration in the permeability of BBB was determined by extravasation of Evans Blue (EB) into brain parenchyma. A significant increase in ICP was observed in all groups except the single 72 kPa BOP group. At the same time a marked increase in BBB permeability was also seen in various parts of the brain. The extent of ICP increase as well as BBB permeability change was dependent on intensity and frequency of blast. PMID:27907158

  8. The long noncoding RNA TUG1 regulates blood-tumor barrier permeability by targeting miR-144

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Heng; Xue, Yixue; Wang, Ping; Wang, Zhenhua; Li, Zhen; Hu, Yi; Li, Zhiqing; Shang, Xiuli; Liu, Yunhui

    2015-01-01

    Blood-tumor barrier (BTB) limits the delivery of chemotherapeutic agent to brain tumor tissues. Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) have been shown to play critical regulatory roles in various biologic processes of tumors. However, the role of lncRNAs in BTB permeability is unclear. LncRNA TUG1 (taurine upregulated gene 1) was highly expressed in glioma vascular endothelial cells from glioma tissues. It also upregulated in glioma co-cultured endothelial cells (GEC) from BTB model in vitro. Knockdown of TUG1 increased BTB permeability, and meanwhile down-regulated the expression of the tight junction proteins ZO-1, occludin, and claudin-5. Both bioinformatics and luciferase reporter assays demonstrated that TUG1 influenced BTB permeability via binding to miR-144. Furthermore, Knockdown of TUG1 also down-regulated Heat shock transcription factor 2 (HSF2), a transcription factor of the heat shock transcription factor family, which was defined as a direct and functional downstream target of miR-144. HSF2 up-regulated the promoter activities and interacted with the promoters of ZO-1, occludin, and claudin-5 in GECs. In conclusion, our results indicate that knockdown of TUG1 increased BTB permeability via binding to miR-144 and then reducing EC tight junction protein expression by targeting HSF2. Thus, TUG1 may represent a useful future therapeutic target for enhancing BTB permeability. PMID:26078353

  9. Evolution of blood-brain-barrier permeability after acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Merali, Zamir; Huang, Kun; Mikulis, David; Silver, Frank; Kassner, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    The dynamics of BBB permeability after AIS in humans are not well understood. In the present study we measured the evolution of BBB permeability after AIS in humans using MRI. Patients presenting to our institution with a diagnosis of AIS underwent a single dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) sequence to measure BBB permeability during their initial workup. Forty-two patients were included in the final analysis. The patient sample underwent DCE-MRI at a mean time of 23.8hrs after the onset of AIS symptoms (range: 1.3-90.7hrs). At all time-points the BBB permeability within the infarct region of the brain as defined on DWI/ADC was higher compared to the homologous region of the contralateral hemisphere (p<0.005). BBB permeability, expressed as a ratio of infarct permeability to contralateral permeability, was greatest at 6-48hrs after the onset of AIS. Although the data was not acquired longitudinally, these findings suggest that the permeability of the BBB is continually elevated following AIS, which contradicts previous assertions that BBB permeability after AIS follows a biphasic course. Knowledge of BBB dynamics following AIS may provide insight into future treatments for AIS, especially BBB stabilizing agents.

  10. Evolution of blood-brain-barrier permeability after acute ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    The dynamics of BBB permeability after AIS in humans are not well understood. In the present study we measured the evolution of BBB permeability after AIS in humans using MRI. Patients presenting to our institution with a diagnosis of AIS underwent a single dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) sequence to measure BBB permeability during their initial workup. Forty-two patients were included in the final analysis. The patient sample underwent DCE-MRI at a mean time of 23.8hrs after the onset of AIS symptoms (range: 1.3–90.7hrs). At all time-points the BBB permeability within the infarct region of the brain as defined on DWI/ADC was higher compared to the homologous region of the contralateral hemisphere (p<0.005). BBB permeability, expressed as a ratio of infarct permeability to contralateral permeability, was greatest at 6-48hrs after the onset of AIS. Although the data was not acquired longitudinally, these findings suggest that the permeability of the BBB is continually elevated following AIS, which contradicts previous assertions that BBB permeability after AIS follows a biphasic course. Knowledge of BBB dynamics following AIS may provide insight into future treatments for AIS, especially BBB stabilizing agents. PMID:28207745

  11. Mixed-species Biofilm Compromises Wound Healing by Disrupting Epidermal Barrier Function

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, Mithun; Ganesh, Kasturi; Chaney, Sarah; Mann, Ethan; Miller, Christina; Khanna, Savita; Bergdall, Valerie K.; Powell, Heather M.; Cook, Charles H.; Gordillo, Gayle M.; Wozniak, Daniel J.; Sen, Chandan K.

    2015-01-01

    In chronic wounds, biofilm infects host tissue for extended periods of time. This work establishes the first chronic pre-clinical model of wound biofilm infection aimed at addressing long-term host response. Although biofilm infected wounds did not show marked differences in wound closure, the repaired skin demonstrated compromised barrier function. This observation is clinically significant because it leads to the notion that even if a biofilm infected wound is closed as observed visually, it may be complicated by the presence of failed skin which is likely to be infected and or further complicated post-closure. Study of underlying mechanisms recognized for the first time biofilm-inducible miR-146a and miR-106b in the host skin wound-edge tissue. These miRs silenced ZO-1 and ZO-2 to compromise tight junction function resulting in leaky skin as measured by transepidermal water loss. Intervention strategies aimed at inhibiting biofilm-inducible miRNAs may be productive in restoring barrier function of host skin. PMID:24771509

  12. Monitoring the removal of phosphate from ground water discharging through a pond-bottom permeable reactive barrier

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCobb, T.D.; LeBlanc, D.R.; Massey, A.J.

    2009-01-01

    Installation of a permeable reactive barrier to intercept a phosphate (PO4) plume where it discharges to a pond provided an opportunity to develop and test methods for monitoring the barrier's performance in the shallow pond-bottom sediments. The barrier is composed of zero-valent-iron mixed with the native sediments to a 0.6-m depth over a 1100-m2 area. Permanent suction, diffusion, and seepage samplers were installed to monitor PO 4 and other chemical species along vertical transects through the barrier and horizontal transects below and near the top of the barrier. Analysis of pore water sampled at about 3-cm vertical intervals by using multilevel diffusion and suction samplers indicated steep decreases in PO4 concentrations in ground water flowing upward through the barrier. Samples from vertically aligned pairs of horizontal multiport suction samplers also indicated substantial decreases in PO4 concentrations and lateral shifts in the plume's discharge area as a result of varying pond stage. Measurements from Lee-style seepage meters indicated substantially decreased PO4 concentrations in discharging ground water in the treated area; temporal trends in water flux were related to pond stage. The advantages and limitations of each sampling device are described. Preliminary analysis of the first 2 years of data indicates that the barrier reduced PO4 flux by as much as 95%. ?? 2009 National Ground Water Association.

  13. The role of the skin barrier in modulating the effects of common skin microbial species on the inflammation, differentiation and proliferation status of epidermal keratinocytes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Skin resident microbial species are often thought of either as pathogenic or commensal. However, little is known about the role of the skin barrier in modulating their potential for causing disease. To investigate this question we measured the effects of three microbial species commonly found on the skin (Staphylococcus epidermidis, Staphylococcus aureus, and Propionibacterium acnes) on a reconstructed human epidermal model by either applying the bacteria on the model surface (intact barrier) or adding them to the culture medium (simulating barrier breach). Results When added to the medium, all of the tested species induced inflammatory responses and keratinocyte cell death with species-specific potency. P. acnes and S. epidermidis induced specific alterations in the expression of keratinocyte differentiation and proliferation markers, suggesting a barrier reparation response. S. aureus induced complete keratinocyte cell death. On the contrary, topically applied S. epidermidis and P. acnes caused no inflammatory response even when tested at high concentrations, while topical S. aureus induced a weak reaction. None of the tested species were able to alter the expression of keratinocyte differentiation or expression markers, when applied topically. Conclusions We show that the skin barrier prevents the effects of common skin bacteria on epidermal keratinocyte inflammation, differentiation and proliferation and highlight the importance of skin barrier in defending against the pathogenic effects of common skin bacteria. PMID:24245826

  14. The acyl-CoA binding protein is required for normal epidermal barrier function in mice[S

    PubMed Central

    Bloksgaard, Maria; Bek, Signe; Marcher, Ann-Britt; Neess, Ditte; Brewer, Jonathan; Hannibal-Bach, Hans Kristian; Helledie, Torben; Fenger, Christina; Due, Marianne; Berzina, Zane; Neubert, Reinhard; Chemnitz, John; Finsen, Bente; Clemmensen, Anders; Wilbertz, Johannes; Saxtorph, Henrik; Knudsen, Jens; Bagatolli, Luis; Mandrup, Susanne

    2012-01-01

    The acyl-CoA binding protein (ACBP) is a 10 kDa intracellular protein expressed in all eukaryotic species. Mice with targeted disruption of Acbp (ACBP−/− mice) are viable and fertile but present a visible skin and fur phenotype characterized by greasy fur and development of alopecia and scaling with age. Morphology and development of skin and appendages are normal in ACBP−/− mice; however, the stratum corneum display altered biophysical properties with reduced proton activity and decreased water content. Mass spectrometry analyses of lipids from epidermis and stratum corneum of ACBP+/+ and ACBP−/− mice showed very similar composition, except for a significant and specific decrease in the very long chain free fatty acids (VLC-FFA) in stratum corneum of ACBP−/− mice. This finding indicates that ACBP is critically involved in the processes that lead to production of stratum corneum VLC-FFAs via complex phospholipids in the lamellar bodies. Importantly, we show that ACBP−/− mice display a ∼50% increased transepidermal water loss compared with ACBP+/+ mice. Furthermore, skin and fur sebum monoalkyl diacylglycerol (MADAG) levels are significantly increased, suggesting that ACBP limits MADAG synthesis in sebaceous glands. In summary, our study shows that ACBP is required for production of VLC-FFA for stratum corneum and for maintaining normal epidermal barrier function. PMID:22829653

  15. Permeability to lanthanum of blood testis barrier in human germinal aplasia.

    PubMed

    Camatini, M; Franchi, E; Decurtis, I

    1981-07-01

    The permeability of Sertoli tight junctions to lanthanum administrated during fixation is demonstrated in biopsies of patients with partial germinal aplasia. In freeze-fracture replicas the number of fibrils is not significantly different from the data obtained in normal testis. Thus, in these pathological conditions junctional permeability is not related solely to the complexity of the network revealed by freeze-fracture.

  16. Zero-Valent Iron Permeable Reactive Barriers: A Review of Performance

    SciTech Connect

    Korte, NE

    2001-06-11

    This report briefly reviews issues regarding the implementation of the zero-valent iron permeable reactive barrier (PRB) technology at sites managed by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Initially, the PRB technology, using zero-valent iron for the reactive media, was received with great enthusiasm, and DOE invested millions of dollars testing and implementing PRBs. Recently, a negative perception of the technology has been building. This perception is based on the failure of some deployments to satisfy goals for treatment and operating expenses. The purpose of this report, therefore, is to suggest reasons for the problems that have been encountered and to recommend whether DOE should invest in additional research and deployments. The principal conclusion of this review is that the most significant problems have been the result of insufficient characterization, which resulted in poor engineering implementation. Although there are legitimate concerns regarding the longevity of the reactive media, the ability of zero-valent iron to reduce certain chlorinated hydrocarbons and to immobilize certain metals and radionuclides is well documented. The primary problem encountered at some DOE full-scale deployments has been an inadequate assessment of site hydrology, which resulted in misapplication of the technology. The result is PRBs with higher than expected flow velocities and/or incomplete plume capture. A review of the literature reveals that cautions regarding subsurface heterogeneity were published several years prior to the full-scale implementations. Nevertheless, design and construction have typically been undertaken as if the subsurface was homogeneous. More recently published literature has demonstrated that hydraulic heterogeneity can cause so much uncertainty in performance that use of a passive PRB is precluded. Thus, the primary conclusion of this review is that more attention must be given to site-specific issues. Indeed, the use of a passive PRB requires

  17. Assessment of permeability in barrier type of endothelium in brain using tracers: Evans blue, sodium fluorescein, and horseradish peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Kaya, Mehmet; Ahishali, Bulent

    2011-01-01

    Blood-brain barrier (BBB) constituted primarily by the capillary endothelial cells functions to maintain a constant environment for the brain, by preventing or slowing down the passage of a variety of blood-borne substances, such as serum proteins, chemical compounds, ions, and hormones from the circulation into the brain parenchyma. Various diseases such as brain tumors, epilepsy, and sepsis disturb the BBB integrity leading to enhanced permeability of brain microvessels. In animal models, a variety of experimental insults targeted to the BBB integrity have been shown to increase BBB permeability causing enhanced passage of molecules into the brain paranchyma by transcellular and/or paracellular pathways. This alteration can be demonstrated by intravascular infusion of exogenous tracers and subsequent detection of extravasated molecules in the brain tissue. A number of exogenous BBB tracers are available, and they can be used for functional and structural analysis of BBB permeability. In this chapter, we aimed to highlight the basic knowledge on the use of three most commonly performed tracers, namely Evans blue dye, sodium fluorescein, and horseradish peroxidase. The experimental methodologies that we use in our laboratory for the detection of these tracers by macroscopy, spectrophotometry, spectrophotofluorometry, and electron microscopy are also discussed. While tracing studies at the morphological level are mainly aimed at the identification and characterization of the tracers both in the barrier related cells and brain parenchyma, spectrophotometric and spectrophotofluorometric assays enable quantification of BBB permeability. The results of our studies that we performed using the mentioned tracers indicate that barrier type of endothelial cells in brain play an important role in paracellular and/or transcytoplasmic trafficking of macromolecules across BBB under various experimental settings, which may provide new insights in both designing approaches for the

  18. Adult human dental pulp stem cells promote blood-brain barrier permeability through vascular endothelial growth factor-a expression.

    PubMed

    Winderlich, Joshua N; Kremer, Karlea L; Koblar, Simon A

    2016-06-01

    Stem cell therapy is a promising new treatment option for stroke. Intravascular administration of stem cells is a valid approach as stem cells have been shown to transmigrate the blood-brain barrier. The mechanism that causes this effect has not yet been elucidated. We hypothesized that stem cells would mediate localized discontinuities in the blood-brain barrier, which would allow passage into the brain parenchyma. Here, we demonstrate that adult human dental pulp stem cells express a soluble factor that increases permeability across an in vitro model of the blood-brain barrier. This effect was shown to be the result of vascular endothelial growth factor-a. The effect could be amplified by exposing dental pulp stem cell to stromal-derived factor 1, which stimulates vascular endothelial growth factor-a expression. These findings support the use of dental pulp stem cell in therapy for stroke. © The Author(s) 2015.

  19. Documentation of impaired epidermal barrier in mild and moderate diaper dermatitis in vivo using noninvasive methods.

    PubMed

    Stamatas, Georgios N; Zerweck, Charles; Grove, Gary; Martin, Katharine M

    2011-01-01

    The presence of irritants from feces and urine with the concurrent mechanical friction and occlusion creates an environment in the diapered area that renders the skin prone to diaper dermatitis. Besides being a source of discomfort to the infant, these skin irritations pose a risk of secondary infections. In this study, we used noninvasive in vivo techniques to define measurable parameters that correlate with diaper dermatitis pathophysiology. In 35 infants (16 with mild or moderate and 19 without diaper dermatitis) we compared skin of diapered areas afflicted with diaper dermatitis to lesion-free diapered sites and to skin outside the diapered area (thigh). Our findings show significantly elevated cutaneous erythema, pH, and hydration, with significantly compromised water barrier function in involved areas compared to nonlesional sites both within and outside the diapered area. Furthermore, skin pH in nonlesional diapered skin for the diaper dermatitis cohort was significantly higher compared to the nondiapered sites. These observations are consistent with the current understanding of pathological skin changes in diaper dermatitis. In this study, we demonstrate that noninvasive methods can document relevant parameters to diaper dermatitis in vivo.

  20. Experimental and Theoretical Assessment of the Lifetime of a Gaseous-Reduced Vadose Zone Permeable Reactive Barrier

    SciTech Connect

    Thornton, Edward C.; Zhong, Lirong; Oostrom, Mart; Deng, Baolin

    2007-11-20

    The feasibility of using gaseous reduction to establish a vadose zone permeable reactive barrier was evaluated through a combination of laboratory testing activities and consideration of fundamental vadose zone transport concepts. For the experimental evaluation, a series of laboratory column tests were conducted in which sediment was first treated with diluted hydrogen sulfide. Water containing dissolved oxygen was then pumped through the columns at different flow rates to determine the reoxidation rate and the reductive capacity of the treated sediment. The results indicated that the treated sediment has a significant reductive capacity consistent with the basic reactions associated with the treatment and reoxidation processes. The observed reductive capacity was found to be dependent on the flow rate of water during the reoxidation phase of the tests. At lower flow rates, the reductive capacity approached the maximum value predicted on the basis of the treatment reaction. Thus, laboratory treatment tests should reliably predict the reductive capacity of the barrier under field conditions. A theoretical approach was undertaken to estimate the lifetime of the vadose zone barrier. An initial model assumed that the barrier lifetime is determined by the reoxidation of the barrier owing to the transport of oxygen through a vadose zone interval in which all sediment is unsaturated. The results of this evaluation suggest that barrier reoxidation is primarily related to diffusion of oxygen through the gas-filled portion of the sediment pore space. If so, the barrier lifetime could be fairly short (several years). However, the presence of finer grained strata with higher moisture content could potentially increase the barrier lifetime to 100 years or more owing to a decrease in the effective diffusion coefficient for oxygen. Thus, detailed stratagraphic characterization and modeling is needed to provide an accurate assessment of barrier lifetime at specific sites.

  1. The emerging role of peptides and lipids as antimicrobial epidermal barriers and modulators of local inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Brogden, N.K.; Mehalick, L.; Fischer, C.L.; Wertz, P.W.; Brogden, K.A.

    2012-01-01

    Skin is complex and comprised of distinct layers, each layer with unique architecture and immunologic functions. Cells within these layers produce differing amounts of antimicrobial peptides and lipids (sphingoid bases and sebaceous fatty acids) that limit colonization of commensal and opportunistic microorganisms. Furthermore, antimicrobial peptides and lipids have distinct, concentration-dependent ancillary innate and adaptive immune functions. At 0.1-2.0 μM, antimicrobial peptides induce cell migration and adaptive immune responses to co-administered antigens. At 2.0-6.0 μM, they induce cell proliferation and enhance wound healing. At 6.0-12.0 μM, antimicrobial peptides can regulate chemokine and cytokine production and at their highest concentrations of 15.0-30.0 μM, antimicrobial peptides can be cytotoxic. At 1-100 nM, lipids enhance cell migration induced by chemokines, suppress apoptosis, and optimize T cell cytotoxicity and at 0.3-1.0 μM, they inhibit cell migration and attenuate chemokine and pro-inflammatory cytokine responses. Recently many antimicrobial peptides and lipids at 0.1-2.0 μM have been found to attenuate the production of chemokines and pro-inflammatory cytokines to microbial antigens. Together, both the antimicrobial and the anti-inflammatory activities of these peptides and lipids may serve to create a strong, overlapping immunologic barrier that not only controls the concentrations of cutaneous commensal flora but also the extent to which they induce a localized inflammatory response. PMID:22538862

  2. Blood-Brain Barrier Permeability of Normal Appearing White Matter in Relapsing-Remitting Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Lund, Henrik; Krakauer, Martin; Skimminge, Arnold; Sellebjerg, Finn; Garde, Ellen; Siebner, Hartwig R.; Paulson, Olaf B.; Hesse, Dan; Hanson, Lars G.

    2013-01-01

    Background Multiple sclerosis (MS) affects the integrity of the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Contrast-enhanced T1 weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is widely used to characterize location and extent of BBB disruptions in focal MS lesions. We employed quantitative T1 measurements before and after the intravenous injection of a paramagnetic contrast agent to assess BBB permeability in the normal appearing white matter (NAWM) in patients with relapsing-remitting MS (RR-MS). Methodology/Principal Findings Fifty-nine patients (38 females) with RR-MS undergoing immunomodulatory treatment and nine healthy controls (4 females) underwent quantitative T1 measurements at 3 tesla before and after injection of a paramagnetic contrast agent (0.2 mmol/kg Gd-DTPA). Mean T1 values were calculated for NAWM in patients and total cerebral white matter in healthy subjects for the T1 measurements before and after injection of Gd-DTPA. The pre-injection baseline T1 of NAWM (945±55 [SD] ms) was prolonged in RR-MS relative to healthy controls (903±23 ms, p = 0.028). Gd-DTPA injection shortened T1 to a similar extent in both groups. Mean T1 of NAWM was 866±47 ms in the NAWM of RR-MS patients and 824±13 ms in the white matter of healthy controls. The regional variability of T1 values expressed as the coefficient of variation (CV) was comparable between the two groups at baseline, but not after injection of the contrast agent. After intravenous Gd-DTPA injection, T1 values in NAWM were more variable in RR-MS patients (CV = 0.198±0.046) compared to cerebral white matter of healthy controls (CV = 0.166±0.018, p = 0.046). Conclusions/Significance We found no evidence of a global BBB disruption within the NAWM of RR-MS patients undergoing immunomodulatory treatment. However, the increased variation of T1 values in NAWM after intravenous Gd-DTPA injection points to an increased regional inhomogeneity of BBB function in NAWM in relapsing-remitting MS. PMID:23441184

  3. Overview on backfill materials and permeable reactive barriers for nuclear waste disposal facilities.

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, Robert Charles; Hasan, Ahmed Ali Mohamed; Holt, Kathleen Caroline; Hasan, Mahmoud A. (Egyptian Atomic Energy Authority, Cairo, Egypt)

    2003-10-01

    A great deal of money and effort has been spent on environmental restoration during the past several decades. Significant progress has been made on improving air quality, cleaning up and preventing leaching from dumps and landfills, and improving surface water quality. However, significant challenges still exist in all of these areas. Among the more difficult and expensive environmental problems, and often the primary factor limiting closure of contaminated sites following surface restoration, is contamination of ground water. The most common technology used for remediating ground water is surface treatment where the water is pumped to the surface, treated and pumped back into the ground or released at a nearby river or lake. Although still useful for certain remediation scenarios, the limitations of pump-and-treat technologies have recently been recognized, along with the need for innovative solutions to ground-water contamination. Even with the current challenges we face there is a strong need to create geological repository systems for dispose of radioactive wastes containing long-lived radionuclides. The potential contamination of groundwater is a major factor in selection of a radioactive waste disposal site, design of the facility, future scenarios such as human intrusion into the repository and possible need for retrieving the radioactive material, and the use of backfills designed to keep the radionuclides immobile. One of the most promising technologies for remediation of contaminated sites and design of radioactive waste repositories is the use of permeable reactive barriers (PRBs). PRBs are constructed of reactive material(s) to intercept and remove the radionuclides from the water and decontaminate the plumes in situ. The concept of PRBs is relatively simple. The reactive material(s) is placed in the subsurface between the waste or contaminated area and the groundwater. Reactive materials used thus far in practice and research include zero valent iron

  4. High Staphylococcus epidermidis Colonization and Impaired Permeability Barrier in Facial Seborrheic Dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    An, Qian; Sun, Meng; Qi, Rui-Qun; Zhang, Li; Zhai, Jin-Long; Hong, Yu-Xiao; Song, Bing; Chen, Hong-Duo; Gao, Xing-Hua

    2017-01-01

    .619, P = 0.011, respectively). Topical tacrolimus and fusidic acid were significantly associated with decreased SDASI as compared with moisturizer (95% CI: 0.03–0.432, P = 0.025 and 95% CI: 0.033–0.44, P = 0.024, respectively). Conclusions: High colonization with Staphylococcus epidermidis, along with impaired skin permeability barrier function, contributes to the occurrence of SD. PMID:28685715

  5. Qualitative and quantitative structure-activity relationship modelling for predicting blood-brain barrier permeability of structurally diverse chemicals.

    PubMed

    Gupta, S; Basant, N; Singh, K P

    2015-01-01

    In this study, structure-activity relationship (SAR) models have been established for qualitative and quantitative prediction of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability of chemicals. The structural diversity of the chemicals and nonlinear structure in the data were tested. The predictive and generalization ability of the developed SAR models were tested through internal and external validation procedures. In complete data, the QSAR models rendered ternary classification accuracy of >98.15%, while the quantitative SAR models yielded correlation (r(2)) of >0.926 between the measured and the predicted BBB permeability values with the mean squared error (MSE) <0.045. The proposed models were also applied to an external new in vitro data and yielded classification accuracy of >82.7% and r(2) > 0.905 (MSE < 0.019). The sensitivity analysis revealed that topological polar surface area (TPSA) has the highest effect in qualitative and quantitative models for predicting the BBB permeability of chemicals. Moreover, these models showed predictive performance superior to those reported earlier in the literature. This demonstrates the appropriateness of the developed SAR models to reliably predict the BBB permeability of new chemicals, which can be used for initial screening of the molecules in the drug development process.

  6. In vivo assessment of the permeability of the blood-brain barrier and blood-retinal barrier to fluorescent indoline derivatives in zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Successful delivery of compounds to the brain and retina is a challenge in the development of therapeutic drugs and imaging agents. This challenge arises because internalization of compounds into the brain and retina is restricted by the blood–brain barrier (BBB) and blood-retinal barrier (BRB), respectively. Simple and reliable in vivo assays are necessary to identify compounds that can easily cross the BBB and BRB. Methods We developed six fluorescent indoline derivatives (IDs) and examined their ability to cross the BBB and BRB in zebrafish by in vivo fluorescence imaging. These fluorescent IDs were administered to live zebrafish by immersing the zebrafish larvae at 7-8 days post fertilization in medium containing the ID, or by intracardiac injection. We also examined the effect of multidrug resistance proteins (MRPs) on the permeability of the BBB and BRB to the ID using MK571, a selective inhibitor of MRPs. Results The permeability of these barriers to fluorescent IDs administered by simple immersion was comparable to when administered by intracardiac injection. Thus, this finding supports the validity of drug administration by simple immersion for the assessment of BBB and BRB permeability to fluorescent IDs. Using this zebrafish model, we demonstrated that the length of the methylene chain in these fluorescent IDs significantly affected their ability to cross the BBB and BRB via MRPs. Conclusions We demonstrated that in vivo assessment of the permeability of the BBB and BRB to fluorescent IDs could be simply and reliably performed using zebrafish. The structure of fluorescent IDs can be flexibly modified and, thus, the permeability of the BBB and BRB to a large number of IDs can be assessed using this zebrafish-based assay. The large amount of data acquired might be useful for in silico analysis to elucidate the precise mechanisms underlying the interactions between chemical structure and the efflux transporters at the BBB and BRB. In turn

  7. Permeability of ergot alkaloids across the blood-brain barrier in vitro and influence on the barrier integrity

    PubMed Central

    Mulac, Dennis; Hüwel, Sabine; Galla, Hans-Joachim; Humpf, Hans-Ulrich

    2012-01-01

    Scope Ergot alkaloids are secondary metabolites of Claviceps spp. and they have been in the focus of research for many years. Experiments focusing on ergotamine as a former migraine drug referring to the ability to reach the brain revealed controversial results. The question to which extent ergot alkaloids are able to cross the blood-brain barrier is still not answered. Methods and results In order to answer this question we have studied the ability of ergot alkaloids to penetrate the blood-brain barrier in a well established in vitro model system using primary porcine brain endothelial cells. It could clearly be demonstrated that ergot alkaloids are able to cross the blood-brain barrier in high quantities in only a few hours. We could further identify an active transport for ergometrine as a substrate for the BCRP/ABCG2 transporter. Investigations concerning barrier integrity properties have identified ergocristinine as a potent substance to accumulate in these cells ultimately leading to a weakened barrier function. Conclusion For the first time we could show that the so far as biologically inactive described 8-(S) isomers of ergot alkaloids seem to have an influence on barrier integrity underlining the necessity for a risk assessment of ergot alkaloids in food and feed. PMID:22147614

  8. In vivo two-photon imaging measuring the blood-brain barrier permeability during early postnatal brain development in rodent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Lingyan; Rodríguez-Contreras, Adrián.

    2016-03-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is a unique structure between the cerebral blood circulation and the delicate neural environment that is important in regulating the movement of molecules and ions involved in brain development and function. However, little is known about the physiological permeability of molecules and ions across the BBB during brain development. In this study we applied an innovative approach to examine the development of BBB properties quantitatively. Two-photon microscopy was employed to measure BBB permeability in real time in vivo. Vascular growth and specific interactions between astrocyte end feet and microvessels were studied by using a combination of IB4 histochemistry, immunohistochemistry, confocal microscopy and 3D analysis.

  9. Contributions of altered permeability of intestinal barrier and defecation behavior to toxicity formation from graphene oxide in nematode Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qiuli; Yin, Li; Li, Xing; Tang, Meng; Zhang, Tao; Wang, Dayong

    2013-10-21

    Graphene oxide (GO) has been extensively studied for potential biomedical applications. Meanwhile, potential GO toxicity arises in both biomedical applications and non-biomedical products where environmental exposures may occur. In the present study, we examined the potential adverse effects of GO and the underlying mechanism using nematode Caenorhabditis elegans as the assay system. We compared the in vivo effects of GO between acute exposure and prolonged exposure, and found that prolonged exposure to 0.5-100 mg L(-1) of GO caused damage on functions of both primary (intestine) and secondary (neuron and reproductive organ) targeted organs. In the intestine, ROS production was significantly correlated with the formation of adverse effects on functions of both primary and secondary targeted organs. GO could be translocated into intestinal cells with loss of microvilli, and distributed to be adjacent to or surrounding mitochondria. Prolonged exposure to GO resulted in a hyper-permeable state of the intestinal barrier, an increase in mean defecation cycle length, and alteration of genes required for intestinal development and defecation behavior. Thus, our data suggest that prolonged exposure to GO may cause potential risk to environmental organisms after release into the environment. GO toxicity may be due to the combinational effects of oxidative stress in the intestinal barrier, enhanced permeability of the biological barrier, and suppressed defecation behavior in C. elegans.

  10. A Method to Predict Blood-Brain Barrier Permeability of Drug-Like Compounds Using Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Carpenter, Timothy S.; Kirshner, Daniel A.; Lau, Edmond Y.; Wong, Sergio E.; Nilmeier, Jerome P.; Lightstone, Felice C.

    2014-01-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is formed by specialized tight junctions between endothelial cells that line brain capillaries to create a highly selective barrier between the brain and the rest of the body. A major problem to overcome in drug design is the ability of the compound in question to cross the BBB. Neuroactive drugs are required to cross the BBB to function. Conversely, drugs that target other parts of the body ideally should not cross the BBB to avoid possible psychotropic side effects. Thus, the task of predicting the BBB permeability of new compounds is of great importance. Two gold-standard experimental measures of BBB permeability are logBB (the concentration of drug in the brain divided by concentration in the blood) and logPS (permeability surface-area product). Both methods are time-consuming and expensive, and although logPS is considered the more informative measure, it is lower throughput and more resource intensive. With continual increases in computer power and improvements in molecular simulations, in silico methods may provide viable alternatives. Computational predictions of these two parameters for a sample of 12 small molecule compounds were performed. The potential of mean force for each compound through a 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine bilayer is determined by molecular dynamics simulations. This system setup is often used as a simple BBB mimetic. Additionally, one-dimensional position-dependent diffusion coefficients are calculated from the molecular dynamics trajectories. The diffusion coefficient is combined with the free energy landscape to calculate the effective permeability (Peff) for each sample compound. The relative values of these permeabilities are compared to experimentally determined logBB and logPS values. Our computational predictions correlate remarkably well with both logBB (R2 = 0.94) and logPS (R2 = 0.90). Thus, we have demonstrated that this approach may have the potential to provide reliable

  11. Developing Enhanced Blood–Brain Barrier Permeability Models: Integrating External Bio-Assay Data in QSAR Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wenyi; Kim, Marlene T.; Sedykh, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Experimental Blood–Brain Barrier (BBB) permeability models for drug molecules are expensive and time-consuming. As alternative methods, several traditional Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationship (QSAR) models have been developed previously. In this study, we aimed to improve the predictivity of traditional QSAR BBB permeability models by employing relevant public bio-assay data in the modeling process. Methods We compiled a BBB permeability database consisting of 439 unique compounds from various resources. The database was split into a modeling set of 341 compounds and a validation set of 98 compounds. Consensus QSAR modeling workflow was employed on the modeling set to develop various QSAR models. A five-fold cross-validation approach was used to validate the developed models, and the resulting models were used to predict the external validation set compounds. Furthermore, we used previously published membrane transporter models to generate relevant transporter profiles for target compounds. The transporter profiles were used as additional biological descriptors to develop hybrid QSAR BBB models. Results The consensus QSAR models have R2=0.638 for fivefold cross-validation and R2=0.504 for external validation. The consensus model developed by pooling chemical and transporter descriptors showed better predictivity (R2=0.646 for five-fold cross-validation and R2=0.526 for external validation). Moreover, several external bio-assays that correlate with BBB permeability were identified using our automatic profiling tool. Conclusions The BBB permeability models developed in this study can be useful for early evaluation of new compounds (e.g., new drug candidates). The combination of chemical and biological descriptors shows a promising direction to improve the current traditional QSAR models. PMID:25862462

  12. Characterization of passive permeability at the blood-tumor barrier in five preclinical models of brain metastases of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Adkins, Chris E.; Mohammad, Afroz S.; Terrell-Hall, Tori; Dolan, Emma L.; Shah, Neal; Sechrest, Emily; Griffith, Jessica; Lockman, Paul R.

    2016-01-01

    The blood brain barrier (BBB) is compromised in brain metastases, allowing for enhanced drug permeation into brain. The extent and heterogeneity of BBB permeability in metastatic lesions is important when considering the administration of chemotherapeutics. Since permeability characteristics have been described in limited experimental models of brain metastases, we sought to define these changes in five brain-tropic breast cancer cell lines: MDA-MB-231BR (triple negative), MDA-MB-231BR-HER2, JIMT-1-BR3, 4T1-BR5 (murine), and SUM190 (inflammatory HER2 expressing). Permeability was assessed using quantitative autoradiography and fluorescence microscopy by co-administration of the tracers 14C-aminoisobutyric acid (AIB) and Texas Red conjugated dextran (TRD) prior to euthanasia. Each experimental brain metastases model produced variably increased permeability to both tracers; additionally, the magnitude of heterogeneity was different among each model with the highest ranges observed in the SUM190 (up to 45-fold increase in AIB) and MDA-MB-231BR-HER2 (up to 33-fold in AIB) models while the lowest range was observed in the JIMT-1-BR3 (up to 5.5-fold in AIB) model. There was no strong correlation observed between lesion size and permeability in any of these preclinical models of brain metastases. Interestingly, the experimental models resulting in smaller mean metastases size resulted in shorter median survival while models producing larger lesions had longer median survival. These findings strengthen the evidence of heterogeneity in brain metastases of breast cancer by utilizing five unique experimental models and simultaneously emphasize the challenges of chemotherapeutic approaches to treat brain metastases. PMID:26944053

  13. Excess soluble CD40L contributes to blood brain barrier permeability in vivo: implications for HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Donna C; Hirschman, Michael P; Sun, Anita; Singh, Meera V; Kasischke, Karl; Maggirwar, Sanjay B

    2012-01-01

    Despite the use of anti-retroviral therapies, a majority of HIV-infected individuals still develop HIV-Associated Neurocognitive Disorders (HAND), indicating that host inflammatory mediators, in addition to viral proteins, may be contributing to these disorders. Consistently, we have previously shown that levels of the inflammatory mediator soluble CD40L (sCD40L) are elevated in the circulation of HIV-infected, cognitively impaired individuals as compared to their infected, non-impaired counterparts. Recent studies from our group suggest a role for the CD40/CD40L dyad in blood brain barrier (BBB) permeability and interestingly, sCD40L is thought to regulate BBB permeability in other inflammatory disorders of the CNS. Using complementary multiphoton microscopy and quantitative analyses in wild-type and CD40L deficient mice, we now reveal that the HIV transactivator of transcription (Tat) can induce BBB permeability in a CD40L-dependent manner. This permeability of the BBB was found to be the result of aberrant platelet activation induced by Tat, since depletion of platelets prior to treatment reversed Tat-induced BBB permeability. Furthermore, Tat treatment led to an increase in granulocyte antigen 1 (Gr1) positive monocytes, indicating an expansion of the inflammatory subset of cells in these mice, which were found to adhere more readily to the brain microvasculature in Tat treated animals. Exploring the mechanisms by which the BBB becomes compromised during HIV infection has the potential to reveal novel therapeutic targets, thereby aiding in the development of adjunct therapies for the management of HAND, which are currently lacking.

  14. Excess Soluble CD40L Contributes to Blood Brain Barrier Permeability In Vivo: Implications for HIV-Associated Neurocognitive Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Davidson, Donna C.; Hirschman, Michael P.; Sun, Anita; Singh, Meera V.; Kasischke, Karl; Maggirwar, Sanjay B.

    2012-01-01

    Despite the use of anti-retroviral therapies, a majority of HIV-infected individuals still develop HIV-Associated Neurocognitive Disorders (HAND), indicating that host inflammatory mediators, in addition to viral proteins, may be contributing to these disorders. Consistently, we have previously shown that levels of the inflammatory mediator soluble CD40L (sCD40L) are elevated in the circulation of HIV-infected, cognitively impaired individuals as compared to their infected, non-impaired counterparts. Recent studies from our group suggest a role for the CD40/CD40L dyad in blood brain barrier (BBB) permeability and interestingly, sCD40L is thought to regulate BBB permeability in other inflammatory disorders of the CNS. Using complementary multiphoton microscopy and quantitative analyses in wild-type and CD40L deficient mice, we now reveal that the HIV transactivator of transcription (Tat) can induce BBB permeability in a CD40L-dependent manner. This permeability of the BBB was found to be the result of aberrant platelet activation induced by Tat, since depletion of platelets prior to treatment reversed Tat-induced BBB permeability. Furthermore, Tat treatment led to an increase in granulocyte antigen 1 (Gr1) positive monocytes, indicating an expansion of the inflammatory subset of cells in these mice, which were found to adhere more readily to the brain microvasculature in Tat treated animals. Exploring the mechanisms by which the BBB becomes compromised during HIV infection has the potential to reveal novel therapeutic targets, thereby aiding in the development of adjunct therapies for the management of HAND, which are currently lacking. PMID:23251626

  15. Characterization of passive permeability at the blood-tumor barrier in five preclinical models of brain metastases of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Adkins, Chris E; Mohammad, Afroz S; Terrell-Hall, Tori B; Dolan, Emma L; Shah, Neal; Sechrest, Emily; Griffith, Jessica; Lockman, Paul R

    2016-04-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is compromised in brain metastases, allowing for enhanced drug permeation into brain. The extent and heterogeneity of BBB permeability in metastatic lesions is important when considering the administration of chemotherapeutics. Since permeability characteristics have been described in limited experimental models of brain metastases, we sought to define these changes in five brain-tropic breast cancer cell lines: MDA-MB-231BR (triple negative), MDA-MB-231BR-HER2, JIMT-1-BR3, 4T1-BR5 (murine), and SUM190 (inflammatory HER2 expressing). Permeability was assessed using quantitative autoradiography and fluorescence microscopy by co-administration of the tracers (14)C-aminoisobutyric acid (AIB) and Texas red conjugated dextran prior to euthanasia. Each experimental brain metastases model produced variably increased permeability to both tracers; additionally, the magnitude of heterogeneity was different among each model with the highest ranges observed in the SUM190 (up to 45-fold increase in AIB) and MDA-MB-231BR-HER2 (up to 33-fold in AIB) models while the lowest range was observed in the JIMT-1-BR3 (up to 5.5-fold in AIB) model. There was no strong correlation observed between lesion size and permeability in any of these preclinical models of brain metastases. Interestingly, the experimental models resulting in smaller mean metastases size resulted in shorter median survival while models producing larger lesions had longer median survival. These findings strengthen the evidence of heterogeneity in brain metastases of breast cancer by utilizing five unique experimental models and simultaneously emphasize the challenges of chemotherapeutic approaches to treat brain metastases.

  16. The effects of zinc treatment on the blood-brain barrier permeability and brain element levels during convulsions.

    PubMed

    Yorulmaz, Hatice; Seker, Fatma Burcu; Demir, Göksel; Yalçın, Ibrahim Ertuğrul; Oztaş, Baria

    2013-02-01

    We evaluated the effect of zinc treatment on the blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability and the levels of zinc (Zn), natrium (Na), magnesium (Mg), and copper (Cu) in the brain tissue during epileptic seizures. The Wistar albino rats were divided into four groups, each as follows: (1) control group, (2) pentylenetetrazole (PTZ) group: rats treated with PTZ to induce seizures, (3) Zn group: rats treated with ZnCl(2) added to drinking water for 2 months, and (4) Zn + PTZ group. The brains were divided into left, right hemispheres, and cerebellum + brain stem regions. Evans blue was used as BBB tracer. Element concentrations were analyzed by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy. The BBB permeability has been found to be increased in all experimental groups (p < 0.05). Zn concentrations in all brain regions in Zn-supplemented groups (p < 0.05) showed an increase. BBB permeability and Zn level in cerebellum + brain stem region were significantly high compared to cerebral hemispheres (p < 0.05). In all experimental groups, Cu concentration decreased, whereas Na concentrations showed an increase (p < 0.05). Mg content in all the brain regions decreased in the Zn group and Zn + PTZ groups compared to other groups (p < 0.001). We also found that all elements' levels showed hemispheric differences in all groups. During convulsions, Zn treatment did not show any protective effect on BBB permeability. Chronic Zn treatment decreased Mg and Cu concentration and increased Na levels in the brain tissue. Our results indicated that Zn treatment showed proconvulsant activity and increased BBB permeability, possibly changing prooxidant/antioxidant balance and neuronal excitability during seizures.

  17. Features of interaction of an axisymmetric gas jet with a barrier of high-permeability material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baev, V. K.; Bazhaikin, A. N.

    2017-03-01

    Complex diagnostics (shadow shooting, smoke imaging, gas analysis) has shown the formation of flows at inleakage of a carbon-dioxide gas jet onto a porous barrier on its surface, inside it, and behind it, as well as the flow circulating between the nozzle and the barrier. The spatial distribution of CO2 concentrations and the scheme of flows at jet interaction with a barrier are presented.

  18. [The permeability of the hemato-encephalic barrier and the proteolytic potential of the cerebrospinal fluid in severe craniocerebral trauma].

    PubMed

    Churliaev, Iu A; Nikiforova, N V; Lutsik, A A; Kuksinskiĭ, V A; Lykova, O F; Martynenkov, V Ia; Karpenko, V S

    1999-01-01

    To study blood-brain barrier permeability and proteolytic changes in in patients with severe brain injury and to evaluate their impact on its course and outcome, the concentrations of albumin, plasminogen (plasmin), alpha 2-macroglobulin, alpha 2-antiplasmin, and alpha 1-antitrypsin were examined in 58 victims by enzyme immunoassay. The control group comprised 20 patients examined for lumbar discal hernia. The studies indicate that early severe brain injury showed blood-brain barrier dysfunction whose severity can be detected by the spinal fluid levels of albumin, plasminogen, and alpha 2-macroglobulin. Proteolytic changes in spinal fluid are determined by its albumin, plasminogen (plasmin), alpha 2-macroglobulin, alpha 2-antiplasmin, and alpha 1-antitrypsin concentrations and affect the development of secondary brain lesion and they are of practical value.

  19. Selected hydrologic data for the field demonstration of three permeable reactive barriers near Fry Canyon, Utah, 1996-2000

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilkowske, Chris D.; Rowland, Ryan C.; Naftz, David L.

    2001-01-01

    Three permeable reactive barriers (PRBs) were installed near Fry Canyon, Utah, in August 1997 to demonstrate the use of PRBs to control the migration of uranium in ground water. Reactive material included (1) bone-char phosphate, (2) zero-valent iron pellets, and (3) amorphous ferric oxyhydroxide coated gravel. An extensive monitoring network was installed in and around each PRB for collection of water samples, analysis of selected water-quality parameters, and monitoring of water levels. Water temperature, specific conductance, pH, Eh (oxidation-reduction potential), and dissolved oxygen were measured continuously within three different barrier materials, and in two monitoring wells. Water temperature and water level below land surface were electronically recorded every hour with pressure transducers. Data were collected from ground-water monitoring wells installed in and around the PRBs during 1996-98 and from surface-water sites in Fry Creek.

  20. Inhibition of prolactin with bromocriptine for 28days increases blood-brain barrier permeability in the rat.

    PubMed

    Rosas-Hernandez, H; Ramirez, M; Ramirez-Lee, M A; Ali, S F; Gonzalez, C

    2015-08-20

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is necessary for the proper function of the brain. Its maintenance is regulated by endogenous factors. Recent evidences suggest prolactin (PRL) regulates the BBB properties in vitro, nevertheless no evidence of these effects have been reported in vivo. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of PRL in the maintenance of the BBB in the rat. Male Wistar rats were treated with Bromocriptine (Bromo) to inhibit PRL production for 28days in the absence or presence of lipopolysaccharide (LPS). BBB permeability was evaluated through the Evans Blue dye and fluorescein-dextran extravasation as well as through edema formation. The expression of claudin-5, occludin, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and the PRL receptor (PRLR) was evaluated through western blot. Bromo reduced the physiological levels of PRL at 28days. At the same time, Bromo increased BBB permeability and edema formation associated with a decrement in claudin-5 and occludin and potentiated the increase in BBB permeability induced by LPS. However, no neuroinflammation was detected, since the expression of GFAP was unchanged, as well as the expression of the PRLR. These data provide the first evidence that inhibition of PRL with Bromo affects the maintenance of the BBB through modulating the expression of tight junction proteins in vivo. Copyright © 2015 IBRO. All rights reserved.

  1. MiR-181a regulates blood-tumor barrier permeability by targeting Krüppel-like factor 6

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jun; Yao, Yilong; Wang, Ping; Liu, Yunhui; Zhao, Lini; Li, Zhen; Li, Zhiqing; Xue, Yixue

    2014-01-01

    Blood–tumor barrier (BTB) constitutes an efficient organization of tight junctions that impairs the delivery of therapeutic drugs. However, the methods and molecular mechanisms underlying the BTB opening remain elusive. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have recently emerged as key regulators of various biologic processes and therapeutic targets. In this study, we have identified microRNA-181a (miR-181a) as a critical miRNA in opening BTB. MicroRNA-181a expression was upregulated in glioma endothelial cells (GECs), which were obtained by coculturing endothelial cells (ECs) with glioma cells. Overexpression of miR-181a resulted in an impaired and permeability increased BTB, and meanwhile reduced the expression of zonula occluden (ZO)-1, occludin, and claudin-5. Kruppel-like factor 6 (KLF6), a transcription factor of the zinc-finger family, was downregulated in GECs. Mechanistic investigations defined it as a direct and functional downstream target of miR-181a, which was involved in the regulation of BTB permeability and the expression of ZO-1, occludin, and claudin-5. Furthermore, luciferase assays and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays showed that KLF6 upregulated the promoter activities and interacted with the promoters of ZO-1, occludin, and claudin-5 in GECs. Collectively, we showed the possibility that overexpression of miR-181a contributes to the increased permeability of BTB by targeting KLF6, thereby revealing potential therapeutic targets for the treatment of brain gliomas. PMID:25182666

  2. No Dynamic Changes in Blood-brain Barrier Permeability Occur in Developing Rats During Local Cortex Exposure to Microwaves.

    PubMed

    Masuda, Hiroshi; Hirota, Shogo; Ushiyama, Akira; Hirata, Akimasa; Arima, Takuji; Kawai, Hiroki; Wake, Kanako; Watanabe, Soichi; Taki, Masao; Nagai, Akiko; Ohkubo, Chiyoji

    2015-01-01

    Little information is available about the effects of exposure to radiofrequency electromagnetic fields (RF) on cerebral microcirculation during rat developmental stages. We investigated whether the permeability of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) in juvenile and young adult rats was modified during local cortex exposure to RF under non-thermal conditions. The cortex tissue targeted was locally exposed to 1457 MHz RF at an average specific absorption rate of 2.0 W/kg in the target area for 50 min and permeability changes in the BBB of the pia mater were measured directly, using intravital fluorescence microscopy. There was no significant difference in extravasation of intravenously-injected dye between exposed and sham-exposed groups of either category of rats. No histological evidence of albumin leakage was found in any of the brains just after exposure, indicating that no traces of BBB disruption remained. These findings suggest that no dynamic changes occurred in BBB permeability of the rats at either of these developmental stages, even during local RF exposure at non-thermal levels.

  3. Unexpected effects of peripherally administered kynurenic acid on cortical spreading depression and related blood–brain barrier permeability

    PubMed Central

    Oláh, Gáspár; Herédi, Judit; Menyhárt, Ákos; Czinege, Zsolt; Nagy, Dávid; Fuzik, János; Kocsis, Kitti; Knapp, Levente; Krucsó, Erika; Gellért, Levente; Kis, Zsolt; Farkas, Tamás; Fülöp, Ferenc; Párdutz, Árpád; Tajti, János; Vécsei, László; Toldi, József

    2013-01-01

    Cortical spreading depression (CSD) involves a slowly-propagating depolarization wave in the cortex, which can appear in numerous pathophysiological conditions, such as migraine with aura, stroke, and traumatic brain injury. Neurons and glial cells are also depolarized transiently during the phenomena. CSD is followed by a massive increase in glutamate release and by changes in the brain microcirculation. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of two N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonists, endogenous kynurenic acid (KYNA) and dizocilpine, on CSD and the related blood–brain barrier (BBB) permeability in rats. In intact animals, KYNA hardly crosses the BBB but has some positive features as compared with its precursor L-Kynurenine, which is frequently used in animal studies (KYNA cannot be metabolized to excitotoxic agents such as 3-hydroxy-L-kynurenine and quinolinic acid). We therefore investigated the possible effects of peripherally administered KYNA. Repetitive CSD waves were elicited by the application of 1 M KCl solution to the cortex. Direct current-electrocorticograms were measured for 1 hour. Four parameters of the waves were compared. Evans blue dye and fluorescent microscopy were used to study the possible changes in the permeability of the BBB. The results demonstrated that N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonists can reduce the number of CSD waves and decrease the permeability of the BBB during CSD. These results suggest that KYNA itself or its derivatives may offer a new approach in the therapy of migraines. PMID:24068867

  4. Placental ischemia in pregnant rats impairs cerebral blood flow autoregulation and increases blood–brain barrier permeability

    PubMed Central

    Warrington, Junie P.; Fan, Fan; Murphy, Sydney R.; Roman, Richard J.; Drummond, Heather A.; Granger, Joey P.; Ryan, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Cerebrovascular events contribute to ~40% of preeclampsia/eclampsia‐related deaths, and neurological symptoms are common among preeclamptic patients. We previously reported that placental ischemia, induced by reducing utero‐placental perfusion pressure, leads to impaired myogenic reactivity and cerebral edema in the pregnant rat. Whether the impaired myogenic reactivity is associated with altered cerebral blood flow (CBF) autoregulation and the edema is due to altered blood–brain barrier (BBB) permeability remains unclear. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that placental ischemia leads to impaired CBF autoregulation and a disruption of the BBB. CBF autoregulation, measured in vivo by laser Doppler flowmetry, was significantly impaired in placental ischemic rats. Brain water content was increased in the anterior cerebrum of placental ischemic rats and BBB permeability, assayed using the Evans blue extravasation method, was increased in the anterior cerebrum. The expression of the tight junction proteins: claudin‐1 was increased in the posterior cerebrum, while zonula occludens‐1, and occludin, were not significantly altered in either the anterior or posterior cerebrum. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that placental ischemia mediates anterior cerebral edema through impaired CBF autoregulation and associated increased transmission of pressure to small vessels that increases BBB permeability leading to cerebral edema. PMID:25168877

  5. The effects of polar excipients transcutol and dexpanthenol on molecular mobility, permeability, and electrical impedance of the skin barrier.

    PubMed

    Björklund, Sebastian; Pham, Quoc Dat; Jensen, Louise Bastholm; Knudsen, Nina Østergaard; Nielsen, Lars Dencker; Ekelund, Katarina; Ruzgas, Tautgirdas; Engblom, Johan; Sparr, Emma

    2016-10-01

    In the development of transdermal and topical products it is important to understand how formulation ingredients interact with the molecular components of the upper layer of the skin, the stratum corneum (SC), and thereby influence its macroscopic barrier properties. The aim here was to investigate the effect of two commonly used excipients, transcutol and dexpanthenol, on the molecular as well as the macroscopic properties of the skin membrane. Polarization transfer solid-state NMR methods were combined with steady-state flux and impedance spectroscopy measurements to investigate how these common excipients influence the molecular components of SC and its barrier function at strictly controlled hydration conditions in vitro with excised porcine skin. The NMR results provide completely new molecular insight into how transcutol and dexpanthenol affect specific molecular segments of both SC lipids and proteins. The presence of transcutol or dexpanthenol in the formulation at fixed water activity results in increased effective skin permeability of the model drug metronidazole. Finally, impedance spectroscopy data show clear changes of the effective skin capacitance after treatment with transcutol or dexpanthenol. Based on the complementary data, we are able to draw direct links between effects on the molecular properties and on the macroscopic barrier function of the skin barrier under treatment with formulations containing transcutol or dexpanthenol. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Activation of Alpha 7 Cholinergic Nicotinic Receptors Reduce Blood–Brain Barrier Permeability following Experimental Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jing; Kobori, Nobuhide; Redell, John B.; Hylin, Michael J.; Hood, Kimberly N.; Moore, Anthony N.

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a major human health concern that has the greatest impact on young men and women. The breakdown of the blood–brain barrier (BBB) is an important pathological consequence of TBI that initiates secondary processes, including infiltration of inflammatory cells, which can exacerbate brain inflammation and contribute to poor outcome. While the role of inflammation within the injured brain has been examined in some detail, the contribution of peripheral/systemic inflammation to TBI pathophysiology is largely unknown. Recent studies have implicated vagus nerve regulation of splenic cholinergic nicotinic acetylcholine receptor α7 (nAChRa7) signaling in the regulation of systemic inflammation. However, it is not known whether this mechanism plays a role in TBI-triggered inflammation and BBB breakdown. Following TBI, we observed that plasma TNF-α and IL-1β levels, as well as BBB permeability, were significantly increased in nAChRa7 null mice (Chrna7−/−) relative to wild-type mice. The administration of exogenous IL-1β and TNF-α to brain-injured animals worsened Evans Blue dye extravasation, suggesting that systemic inflammation contributes to TBI-triggered BBB permeability. Systemic administration of the nAChRa7 agonist PNU-282987 or the positive allosteric modulator PNU-120596 significantly attenuated TBI-triggered BBB compromise. Supporting a role for splenic nAChRa7 receptors, we demonstrate that splenic injection of the nicotinic receptor blocker α-bungarotoxin increased BBB permeability in brain-injured rats, while PNU-282987 injection decreased such permeability. These effects were not seen when α-bungarotoxin or PNU-282987 were administered to splenectomized, brain-injured rats. Together, these findings support the short-term use of nAChRa7-activating agents as a strategy to reduce TBI-triggered BBB permeability. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Breakdown of the blood–brain barrier (BBB) in response to traumatic brain injury (TBI

  7. Increased blood-brain barrier permeability is associated with dementia and diabetes but not amyloid pathology or APOE genotype.

    PubMed

    Janelidze, Shorena; Hertze, Joakim; Nägga, Katarina; Nilsson, Karin; Nilsson, Christer; Wennström, Malin; van Westen, Danielle; Blennow, Kaj; Zetterberg, Henrik; Hansson, Oskar

    2017-03-01

    Blood-brain barrier (BBB) dysfunction might be an important component of many neurodegenerative disorders. In this study, we investigated its role in dementia using large clinical cohorts. The cerebrospinal fluid (CSF)/plasma albumin ratio (Qalb), an indicator of BBB (and blood-CSF barrier) permeability, was measured in a total of 1015 individuals. The ratio was increased in patients with Alzheimer's disease, dementia with Lewy bodies or Parkinson's disease dementia, subcortical vascular dementia, and frontotemporal dementia compared with controls. However, this measure was not changed during preclinical or prodromal Alzheimer's disease and was not associated with amyloid positron emission tomography or APOE genotype. The Qalb was increased in diabetes mellitus and correlated positively with CSF biomarkers of angiogenesis and endothelial dysfunction (vascular endothelial growth factor, intracellular adhesion molecule 1, and vascular cell adhesion molecule 1). In healthy elderly, high body mass index and waist-hip ratio predicted increased Qalb 20 years later. In summary, BBB permeability is increased in major dementia disorders but does not relate to amyloid pathology or APOE genotype. Instead, BBB impairment may be associated with diabetes and brain microvascular damage.

  8. Evaluation of a horizontal permeable reactive barrier for preventing upward diffusion of volatile organic compounds through the unsaturated zone.

    PubMed

    Mahmoodlu, Mojtaba G; Hassanizadeh, S Majid; Hartog, Niels; Raoof, Amir; van Genuchten, Martinus Th

    2015-11-01

    Permeable reactive barriers are commonly used to treat contaminant plumes in the saturated zone. However, no known applications of horizontal permeable reactive barriers (HPRBs) exist for oxidizing volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the unsaturated zone. In this study, laboratory column experiments were carried out to investigate the ability of a HPRB containing solid potassium permanganate, to oxidize the vapors of trichloroethylene (TCE), toluene, and ethanol migrating upward from a contaminated saturated zone. Results revealed that an increase in initial water saturation and HPRB thickness strongly affected the removal efficiency of the HPRB. Installing the HPRB relatively close to the water table was more effective due to the high background water content and enhanced diffusion of protons and/or hydroxides away from the HPRB. Inserting the HPRB far above the water table caused rapid changes in pH within the HPRB, leading to lower oxidation rates. The pH effects were included in a reactive transport model, which successfully simulated the TCE and toluene experimental observations. Simulations for ethanol were not affected by pH due to condensation of water during ethanol oxidation, which caused some dilution in the HRPB.

  9. Krüppel-like factor 4 regulates blood-tumor barrier permeability via ZO-1, occludin and claudin-5.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jun; Wang, Ping; Liu, Yunhui; Zhao, Lini; Li, Zhen; Xue, Yixue

    2014-07-01

    Blood-tumor barrier (BTB) constitutes an efficient organization of tight junctions which significantly reduce permeability for chemotherapy drugs. Krüppel-like factor 4 (KLF4), a member of the Krüppel-like family, has been documented in endothelial cells and may serve as an essential regulator of endothelial barrier function. However, our knowledge about the expression and function of KLF4 in the endothelial cells of BTB still remains unclear. In this study, we sought to investigate the role of KLF4 in regulation of BTB function as well as the potential molecular mechanisms. Quantitative RT-PCR, Western blot, and immunofluorescence assays demonstrated that KLF4 was down-regulated in the glioma endothelial cells (GECs) which were obtained through endothelial cells co-cultured with glioma cells. Short hairpin RNA targeting KLF4 impaired the integrity of BTB detected by trans-endothelial electric resistance assay, and meanwhile reduced the expression of ZO-1, occludin and claudin-5, demonstrated by quantitative RT-PCR, Western blot, and immunofluorescence assays. Depletion of KLF4 increased BTB permeability to small molecules detected by permeability assays. Furthermore, luciferase assays and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays showed that KLF4 up-regulated the promoter activities and interacted with "CACCC" DNA sequence presented in the promoters of ZO-1, occludin, and claudin-5. GATA-1, GATA-6, Sp1, and Sp3 factors participated in KLF4 regulation of promoter activities through binding to the promoters of tight junctions related proteins. Collectively, our results indicated that KLF4 is a key transcriptional regulator of BTB function by regulating expressions of tight junction related proteins, which would draw growing attention to KLF4 as a potential target for glioma therapy.

  10. Permeability dependence study of the focused ultrasound-induced blood-brain barrier opening at distinct pressures and microbubble diameters using DCE-MRI.

    PubMed

    Vlachos, Fotios; Tung, Yao-Sheng; Konofagou, Elisa

    2011-09-01

    Blood-brain barrier opening using focused ultrasound and microbubbles has been experimentally established as a noninvasive and localized brain drug delivery technique. In this study, the permeability of the opening is assessed in the murine hippocampus after the application of focused ultrasound at three different acoustic pressures and microbubble sizes. Using dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI, the transfer rates were estimated, yielding permeability maps and quantitative K(trans) values for a predefined region of interest. The volume of blood-brain barrier opening according to the K(trans) maps was proportional to both the pressure and the microbubble diameter. A K(trans) plateau of ∼0.05 min(-1) was reached at higher pressures (0.45 and 0.60 MPa) for the larger sized bubbles (4-5 and 6-8 μm), which was on the same order as the K(trans) of the epicranial muscle (no barrier). Smaller bubbles (1-2 μm) yielded significantly lower permeability values. A small percentage (7.5%) of mice showed signs of damage under histological examination, but no correlation with permeability was established. The assessment of the blood-brain barrier permeability properties and their dependence on both the pressure and the microbubble diameter suggests that K(trans) maps may constitute an in vivo tool for the quantification of the efficacy of the focused ultrasound-induced blood-brain barrier opening.

  11. Utilizing Ultrasound to Transiently Increase Blood-Brain Barrier Permeability, Modulate of the Tight Junction Proteins, and Alter Cytoskeletal Structure.

    PubMed

    Bae, Mi Jung; Lee, Young Mi; Kim, Yeoun Hee; Han, Hyung Soo; Lee, Hak Jong

    2015-01-01

    The central nervous system is protected by the blood-brain barrier (BBB). The tight junction (TJ) proteins claudin-5 and zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1) as well as the cytoskeletal component F-actin play key roles in maintaining homeostasis of the BBB. Increases in BBB permeability may be beneficial for the delivery of pharmacological substances into the brain. Therefore, here, we assessed the use of ultrasound to induce transient enhancement of BBB permeability. We used fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-dextran 40 to detect changes in the membrane permeability of bEnd.3 cells during ultrasound treatment. Ultrasound increased FITC-dextran 40 uptake into bEnd.3 cells for 2-6 h after treatment; however, normal levels returned after 24 h. An insignificant increase in lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) leakage also occurred 3 and 6 h after ultrasound treatment, whereas at 24 h, LDH leakage was indistinguishable between the control and treatment groups. Expression of claudin-5, ZO-1, and F-actin at the messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein levels was assessed with real-time polymerase chain reaction and western blotting. Ultrasound induced a transient decrease in claudin-5 mRNA and protein expression within 2 h of treatment; however, no significant changes in ZO-1 and F-actin expression were observed. Claudin-5, ZO-1, and F-actin immunofluorescence demonstrated that the cellular structures incorporating these proteins were transiently impaired by ultrasound. In conclusion, our ultrasound technique can temporarily increase BBB permeability without cytotoxicity to exposed cells, and the method can be exploited in the delivery of drugs to the brain with minimal damage.

  12. Noninvasive penetration of 5 nm hyaluronic acid molecules across the epidermal barrier (in vitro) and its interaction with human skin cells.

    PubMed

    Nashchekina, Yu A; Raydan, M

    2017-08-21

    Hyaluronic acid represents one of the major components of the extracellular environment. The main challenge remains in the ability to deliver these molecules noninvasively across the skin barrier, which can be overcome by the reduction in size to an extent that allows these molecules to pass across the skin barrier. The aim of this study was to measure the penetration and bioavailability of low molecular weight hyaluronic acid to cross an epidermal barrier model. Determining the quantity of hyaluronic acid in the test solutions was carried with method of photocolorimetry analysis. Investigation of the interaction of cells with LMWHA was studied with a confocal microscope. The study showed that LMWHA is able to cross the epidermis. Most effective penetration level is during the first 6 hours reaching 75%, and then the concentration started to decline and reached the equilibrium state within the following 2 hours. Confocal laser microscopy demonstrated different distribution and behavior of these molecules among the keratinocytes and fibroblasts. Reducing the size of hyaluronic acid to 5 nm enhance their transport across the epidermal layer. The concentration of hyaluronic acid molecules was higher on the fibroblast surface in comparison to their extracellular environment. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Altered composition of epidermal lipids correlates with Staphylococcus aureus colonization status in Atopic Dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Li, S; Villarreal, M; Stewart, S; Choi, J; Indra, G; Babineau, D C; Philpot, C; David, G; Yoshida, T; Boguniewicz, M; Hanifin, J; Beck, L A; Leung, D; Simpson, E; Indra, A K

    2017-02-28

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a chronic inflammatory skin disease characterized by disrupted epidermal barrier functions.(1) Stratum corneum (SC) consists of corneocytes and a lipid-rich extracellular matrix, which plays a key role in epidermal permeability barrier (EPB) functions.(2,3) Major lipid constituents of the SC are ceramides (CERs), free fatty acids (FFAs), cholesterol and triglycerides (TGs).(2,3) Staphylococcus aureus (S.aureus) colonization is an important trigger of AD.(4) Comprehensive profiling of SC lipids using S.aureus colonization status, and association between S.aureus colonization and skin lipid composition, has never been documented. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  14. Evaluating the Longevity and Hydraulic Performance of Permeable Reactive Barriers at Department of Defense Sites

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-04-24

    gauge, 6-inch-long stainless steel needle inserted into each sampling port. The samples were drawn using a 40-mL glass syringe . The sample then was...was attached to the syringe so that water could be removed from the center of the column which would be representative of the bulk flow. This...the groundwater through a semi-permeable 42- mm diameter sampler that is prefilled with deionized water. After sufficient time has elapsed, the

  15. Transcriptional profiling of epidermal differentiation.

    PubMed

    Radoja, Nada; Gazel, Alix; Banno, Tomohiro; Yano, Shoichiro; Blumenberg, Miroslav

    2006-10-03

    In epidermal differentiation basal keratinocytes detach from the basement membrane, stop proliferating, and express a new set of structural proteins and enzymes, which results in an impermeable protein/lipid barrier that protects us. To define the transcriptional changes essential for this process, we purified large quantities of basal and suprabasal cells from human epidermis, using the expression of beta4 integrin as the discriminating factor. The expected expression differences in cytoskeletal, cell cycle, and adhesion genes confirmed the effective separation of the cell populations. Using DNA microarray chips, we comprehensively identify the differences in genes expressed in basal and differentiating layers of the epidermis, including the ECM components produced by the basal cells, the proteases in both the basal and suprabasal cells, and the lipid and steroid metabolism enzymes in suprabasal cells responsible for the permeability barrier. We identified the signaling pathways specific for the two populations and found two previously unknown paracrine and one juxtacrine signaling pathway operatin