Science.gov

Sample records for epidural blood patches

  1. Epidural blood patch and acute varicella.

    PubMed

    Martin, David P; Bergman, Bradley D; Berger, Ines H

    2004-12-01

    We present the case of a 38-yr-old woman who required an epidural blood patch in the context of acute varicella (chickenpox). The unique risks in this case include the possible triggering of central nervous system complications after the introduction of viremic blood into the epidural or intrathecal space. However, the risk was believed to be acceptable because the patient was receiving antiviral coverage. She enjoyed complete relief of her headache but experienced transient back and leg pain. Leptomeningeal irritation caused by acute varicella infection may put patients at increased risk for pain after epidural blood patch.

  2. Chronic adhesive arachnoiditis after repeat epidural blood patch.

    PubMed

    Carlswärd, C; Darvish, B; Tunelli, J; Irestedt, L

    2015-08-01

    Epidural blood patching is an effective treatment for postdural puncture headache but has potential risks. Arachnoiditis is a very rare disabling condition and few cases have been described following an epidural blood patch. We present a case of chronic adhesive arachnoiditis in a parturient treated with a repeat epidural blood patch. A healthy 29-year-old woman had an accidental dural puncture following epidural insertion during labour. Initial treatment of postdural puncture headache with an epidural blood patch was ineffective and was therefore repeated. She gradually developed severe neurological symptoms consistent with arachnoiditis confirmed with magnetic resonance imaging. Despite intensive multimodal treatment with analgesics and physiotherapy, her neurological condition remains unresolved two years later. This serious but rare complication should encourage caution when treating parturients with postdural puncture headache with a repeat epidural blood patch.

  3. Relief of postural post dural puncture headache by an epidural blood patch 12 months after dural puncture.

    PubMed

    Klepstad, P

    1999-10-01

    A 20-year-old previously healthy male presented at the pain clinic with chronic headache of about one year duration. Clinical examination revealed no pathological manifestations. During the consultation the patient was drinking Coca-Cola. On direct questioning he told that drinking Coca-Cola gave partial relief from the headache, and that the headache started after he had received two spinal anaesthetics for treatment of a lower leg fracture. Postural post dural puncture headache was now suspected and an epidural blood patch performed. Despite an interval of nearly 12 months since the dural punctures, a single epidural blood patch completely relieved the headache. This case history demonstrates that an epidural blood patch should be tried if a chronic post dural puncture headache is suspected.

  4. [Management of transient radicular pain after receiving an epidural blood patch for headaches due to spontaneous intracranial hypotension].

    PubMed

    Melo, M C; Revuelta, M E; Santeularia, T; Genové, M; Català, E

    2015-11-01

    Spontaneous intracranial hypotension headache is an uncommon disease that resolves spontaneously in most of the cases and in a short period of time. The initial treatment should be symptomatic. In some patients the symptomatology is extremely disabling, and in these cases both the diagnosis and treatment may be performed by an epidural blood patch. A 49-year-old Caucasian woman, with no previous record of epidural or intrathecal puncture, consulted in the Emergency Department complaining of a 9-day history of frontal headache and diplopia, along with nausea and vomiting. The patient was diagnosed with spontaneous intracranial hypotension headache. Considering the symptomatology and the uncontrolled pain, the Pain Unit of our hospital performed an epidural blood patch. In the first 24h the patient reported a remarkable relief of both headache and diplopia but developed a left lumbar radiculopathy that was treated successfully with supportive measures. Transient lumbar radiculopathy is a common and acceptable event secondary to the use of epidural blood patch as a treatment for spontaneous intracranial hypotension headache.

  5. Facial nerve paralysis and partial brachial plexopathy after epidural blood patch: a case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Shahien, Radi; Bowirrat, Abdalla

    2011-01-01

    We report a complication related to epidural analgesia for delivery in a 24- year-old woman who was admitted with mild pre-eclampsia and for induction of labor. At the first postpartum day she developed a postdural puncture headache, which was unresponsive to conservative measures. On the fifth day an epidural blood patch was done, and her headache subsided. Sixteen hours later she developed paralysis of the right facial nerve, which was treated with prednisone. Seven days later she complained of pain in the left arm and the posterior region of the shoulder. She was later admitted and diagnosed with partial brachial plexopathy. PMID:21386953

  6. Epidural Blood Patch Performed for Severe Intracranial Hypotension Following Lumbar Cerebrospinal Fluid Drainage for Intracranial Aneurysm Surgery. Retrospective Series and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Tanweer, Omar; Kalhorn, Stephen P.; Snell, Jamaal T.; Lieber, Bryan A.; Agarwal, Nitin; Huang, Paul P.; Sutin, Kenneth M.

    2015-01-01

    Intracranial hypotension (IH) can occur following lumbar drainage for clipping of an intracranial aneurysm. We observed 3 cases of IH, which were all successfully treated by epidural blood patch (EBP). Herein, the authors report our cases. PMID:27065093

  7. Predictors of the Treatment Response of Spontaneous Intracranial Hypotension to an Epidural Blood Patch.

    PubMed

    Karm, Myong-Hwan; Choi, Jae-Hyung; Kim, Doohwan; Park, Jun Young; Yun, Hye Joo; Suh, Jeong Hun

    2016-05-01

    Spontaneous intracranial hypotension (SIH) is characterized by postural headache because of low cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pressure. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and radioisotope (RI) cisternography can be used to identify the site of a CSF leakage. Although autologous epidural blood patch (EBP) is a very effective treatment modality, some patients require a repeat autologous EBP. We investigated whether autologous EBP responses correlate with surrogate markers of quantitative findings.All cases of autologous EBP for SIH from January 2006 to December 2014 were enrolled. The demographic variables, number of EBPs, pain scores, RI cisternography (early visualization of bladder activity), and MRI findings (subdural fluid collections, pachymeningeal enhancement, engorgement of venous structures, pituitary hyperemia, and sagging of the brain) were reviewed.Patients with early bladder activity on RI cisternography had a tendency to need a higher number of autologous EBPs. Only sagging of the brain and no other variables showed a statistically significant negative correlation with the number of autologous EBPs.The response to autologous EBP may be related to the radiologic findings of early bladder activity on RI cisternography and sagging of the brain on MRI.

  8. Predictors of the Treatment Response of Spontaneous Intracranial Hypotension to an Epidural Blood Patch

    PubMed Central

    Karm, Myong-Hwan; Choi, Jae-Hyung; Kim, Doohwan; Park, Jun Young; Yun, Hye Joo; Suh, Jeong Hun

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Spontaneous intracranial hypotension (SIH) is characterized by postural headache because of low cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pressure. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and radioisotope (RI) cisternography can be used to identify the site of a CSF leakage. Although autologous epidural blood patch (EBP) is a very effective treatment modality, some patients require a repeat autologous EBP. We investigated whether autologous EBP responses correlate with surrogate markers of quantitative findings. All cases of autologous EBP for SIH from January 2006 to December 2014 were enrolled. The demographic variables, number of EBPs, pain scores, RI cisternography (early visualization of bladder activity), and MRI findings (subdural fluid collections, pachymeningeal enhancement, engorgement of venous structures, pituitary hyperemia, and sagging of the brain) were reviewed. Patients with early bladder activity on RI cisternography had a tendency to need a higher number of autologous EBPs. Only sagging of the brain and no other variables showed a statistically significant negative correlation with the number of autologous EBPs. The response to autologous EBP may be related to the radiologic findings of early bladder activity on RI cisternography and sagging of the brain on MRI. PMID:27149484

  9. Cervical CT scan-guided epidural blood patches for spontaneous intracranial hypotension.

    PubMed

    Maingard, Julian; Giles, Lauren; Marriott, Mark; Phal, Pramit M

    2015-12-01

    We describe two patients with spontaneous intracranial hypotension (SIH), presenting with postural headache due to C1-C2 cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak. Both patients were refractory to lumbar epidural blood patching (EBP), and subsequently underwent successful CT scan-guided cervical EBP. SIH affects approximately 1 in 50,000 patients, with females more frequently affected. Its associated features are variable, and as such, misdiagnosis is common. Therefore, imaging plays an important role in the diagnostic workup of SIH and can include MRI of the brain and spine, CT myelogram, and radionuclide cisternography. In patients with an established diagnosis and confirmed CSF leak, symptoms will usually resolve with conservative management. However, in a select subgroup of patients, the symptoms are refractory to medical management and require more invasive therapies. In patients with cervical leaks, EBP in the cervical region is an effective management approach, either in close proximity to, or directly targeting a dural defect. CT scan-guided cervical EBP is an effective treatment approach in refractory SIH, and should be considered in those patients who are refractory to conservative management.

  10. Reversal of Progressive Conscious Disturbance with Epidural Blood Patch for Cerebrospinal Fluid Leakage at C2 Level.

    PubMed

    Lai, Yi-Chen; Chia, Yuan-Yi; Lien, Wei-Hung

    2017-03-01

    Intracranial hypotension syndrome (IHS) is generally caused by cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leakage. Complications include bilateral subdural hygroma or haematoma and herniation of the cerebellar tonsils. Epidural blood patch (EBP) therapy is indicated if conservative treatment is ineffective. We reported the case of a 46-year-old man with a history of postural headache and dizziness. The patient was treated with bed rest and daily hydration with 2000 mL of fluid for 2 weeks. However, dizziness and headache did not resolve, and he became drowsy and disoriented with incomprehensible speech. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated diffuse dural enhancement on the postcontrast study, sagging of the midbrain, and CSF leakage over right lateral posterior thecal sac at C2 level. We performed EBP at the level of T10-T11. We injected 14 mL of autologous blood slowly in the Trendelenburg position. Within 30 minutes, he became alert and oriented to people, place, and time. We chose thoracic EBP as first line treatment in consideration of the risk of cervical EBP such as spinal cord and nerve root compression or puncture, chemical meningitis. Also we put our patient in Trendelenburg position to make blood travel towards the site of the leak. Untreated IHS may delay the course of resolution and affect the patient's consciousness. Delivery of EBP via an epidural catheter inserted from the thoracic spine is familiar with most of anesthesiologists. It can be a safe and effective treatment for patients with IHS caused by CSF leak even at C2.Key words: Anaesthetic techniques, regional, thoracic; cerebrospinal fluid leakage; epidural blood patch; heavily T2-weighted magnetic resonance myelography; intracranial hypotension syndrome; Trendelenburg position.

  11. Efficacy of the epidural blood patch for the treatment of post lumbar puncture headache BLOPP: A randomised, observer-blind, controlled clinical trial [ISRCTN 71598245

    PubMed Central

    Oedit, R; van Kooten, F; Bakker, SLM; Dippel, DWJ

    2005-01-01

    Background Post dural punction headache (PDPH) occurs in 10% to 40% of the patients who had a lumbar puncture. Its symptoms can be severe and incapacitating. The epidural blood patch is widely accepted as the treatment of choice for postdural puncture headache. Uncontrolled studies report rapid recovery after patching in 90% to 100% of treated patients. However, sufficient evidence from randomised, controlled clinical trials is lacking. Methods BLOPP (blood patch for post dural puncture headache) is a randomised, single centre, observer-blind clinical trial. Patients with PDPH for at least 24 hours and at most 7 days after lumbar puncture will be randomised to treatment with an epidural blood patch (EDBP) or to conventional treatment, i.e. 24 hours bed rest and ample fluid intake. PDPH 24 hours after treatment, classified on a 4-point scale (no, mild, moderate, severe) is the primary outcome. The secondary outcome is the presence of PDPH 7 days after treatment. We estimated that a sample size of 2 × 20 patients would provide us with a power of 80% to detect a relative reduction in number of patients with persisting PDPH after 24 hours of 50% at the usual significance level α = 5%, taking into account that in approximately 10% of the patients the PDPH will have resolved spontaneously after one day. Discussion The EDBP is accepted as the treatment of choice for PDPH although randomised, controlled data is scarce. Our randomised, observer-blind clinical trial enables us to compare the efficacy of two clinically practiced methods of PDPH treatment; EDBP versus conventional treatment, as they are applied in clinical practise. PMID:15998467

  12. Treatment of Refractory Postdural Puncture Headache after Intrathecal Drug Delivery System Implantation with Epidural Blood Patch Procedures: A 20-Year Experience

    PubMed Central

    Moeschler, Susan M.; Qu, Wenchun; Hanley, Eugerie; Neuman, Stephanie A.; Eldrige, Jason S.; Hoelzer, Bryan C.

    2016-01-01

    A recent publication reported the incidence of postdural puncture headache (PDPH) in conjunction with intrathecal drug delivery system (IDDS) implantation to be nearly 23 percent. Many patients responded to conservative measures but a percentage needed invasive treatment with an epidural blood patch (EBP). There is limited data to describe the technical details, success rates, and complications associated with EBP in this population. This study aims to provide a retrospective report of EBP for patients suffering from PDPH related to IDDS implantation. A chart review established a cohort of patients that required EBP in relation to a PDPH after IDDS implantation. This cohort was evaluated for demographic data as well as details of the EBP including technical procedural data, success rates, and complications. All patients received a trial of conservative therapy. Standard sterile technique and skin preparation were utilized with no infectious complications. The EBP was placed below the level of the IDDS catheter in 94% of procedures. Fluoroscopy was utilized in each case. The mean EBP volume was 18.6 cc and median time of EBP was day 7 after implant. There were no complications associated with EBP. EBP appears to be an effective intervention in this subset of PDPH patients. PMID:27597897

  13. Lumbar blood patching for proximal CSF leaks: where does the blood go?

    PubMed Central

    Nesbitt, Cassie; Amukotuwa, Shalini; Chapman, Caron; Batchelor, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Epidural blood patching (EBP) is an important therapeutic approach in managing spontaneous cerebrospinal fluid leaks. The mechanism of action of blood patching is likely to be twofold; fluid replacement having an immediate tamponade effect and the proximal flow of blood products having a ‘plug’ effect. The negative pressure gradient within the epidural space may be important to the rostral flow of injected blood and is possibly increased in intracranial hypotension. PMID:25721827

  14. Lumbar blood patching for proximal CSF leaks: where does the blood go?

    PubMed

    Nesbitt, Cassie; Amukotuwa, Shalini; Chapman, Caron; Batchelor, Peter

    2015-02-26

    Epidural blood patching (EBP) is an important therapeutic approach in managing spontaneous cerebrospinal fluid leaks. The mechanism of action of blood patching is likely to be twofold; fluid replacement having an immediate tamponade effect and the proximal flow of blood products having a 'plug' effect. The negative pressure gradient within the epidural space may be important to the rostral flow of injected blood and is possibly increased in intracranial hypotension.

  15. In vivo images of the epidural space with two- and three-dimensional optical coherence tomography in a porcine model

    PubMed Central

    Tsou, Mei-Yung

    2017-01-01

    Background No reports exist concerning in vivo optical coherence tomography visualization of the epidural space and the blood patch process in the epidural space. In this study, we produced real-time two-dimensional and reconstructed three-dimensional images of the epidural space by using optical coherence tomography in a porcine model. We also aimed to produce three-dimensional optical coherence tomography images of the dura puncture and blood patch process. Methods Two-dimensional and three-dimensional optical coherence tomography images were obtained using a swept source optical coherence tomography (SSOCT) system. Four laboratory pigs were intubated and ventilated after the induction of general anesthesia. An 18-gauge Tuohy needle was used as a tunnel for the optical coherence tomography probe to the epidural space. Two-dimensional and three-dimensional reconstruction optical coherence tomography images of the epidural space were acquired in four stages. Results In stage 1, real-time two-dimensional and reconstructed three-dimensional optical coherence tomography of the lumbar and thoracic epidural space were successfully acquired. In stage 2, the epidural catheter in the epidural space was successfully traced in the 3D optical coherence tomography images. In stage 3, water injection and lumbar puncture were successfully monitored in all study animals. In stage 4, 10 mL of fresh blood was injected into the epidural space and two-dimensional and three-dimensional optical coherence tomography images were successfully acquired. Conclusions These animal experiments suggest the potential capability of using an optical coherence tomography-based imaging needle in the directed two-dimensional and three-dimensional visualization of the epidural space. More investigations involving humans are required before optical coherence tomography can be recommended for routine use. However, three-dimensional optical coherence tomography may provide a novel, minimally invasive

  16. Persistent post-dural-puncture headache treated with epidural infusion of dextran.

    PubMed

    Aldrete, J A

    1994-05-01

    A retrospective review was done on medical records of 13 patients with persistent post-dural-puncture headaches after one or more epidural blood patches. Headache occurred in nine patients with post-laminectomy syndrome after "wet taps" while performing epidural blocks. In two patients post-dural-puncture headache appeared after long term implanted intrathecal catheters were removed. In two other cases headache developed after spinal anesthesia. Treatment included bed rest, intravenous hydration and at least one epidural blood patch; three patients were given 60 milliliters of epidural saline, without success. Eight epidural catheters were inserted through the lumbar access and five through the caudal approach. Initially, a bolus of 20 milliliters of dextran-40 was given followed by an infusion of 3 mL/hr, until 12 hours after the head pain and any other related symptoms subsided. In all patients the headache disappeared within 20 hours after initiating therapy (9.55 mean hours, SD +/- 0.79). In five patients headache ceased in less than five hours. Nausea and photo-phobia subsided earlier. Patients with post-dural-puncture headache resistant to other treatments, including at least one epidural blood patch, were successfully treated by a bolus followed by continuous epidural infusion of dextran-40.

  17. Distribution in cerebrospinal fluid, blood, and lymph of epidurally injected morphine and inulin in dogs

    SciTech Connect

    Durant, P.A.; Yaksh, T.L.

    1986-06-01

    We describe procedures for catheterizing the epidural space, the azygos vein, and the thoracic lymph duct of dogs without using fluoroscopy. The success rates of the procedures were 100, 80, and 50%, respectively (n = 10). To assess the validity of the model, /sup 3/H-morphine and unlabeled morphine (2 mg) were injected epidurally in ten dogs. Lumbar cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), azygos venous blood, arterial blood, and lymph were sampled before and 5, 20, 60, 120, 180, 240, 300 and 360 min after injection. During the first 20 min, morphine levels in the azygos vein were about three and ten times greater than arterial and lymphatic levels, respectively (n = 3; P less than 0.01). Morphine levels were significantly greater in the azygos vein (n = 8) and the femoral artery (n = 10) during the first 20 and 60 min than they were later, respectively (P less than 0.05). In the lymph (n = 5), the levels of morphine at 60 min were statistically greater (P less than 0.05) than levels at 4, 5, and 6 hr. At no time were the concurrent arterial and lymph levels different from each other. In the lumbar CSF, the morphine peak concentration was reached 5-60 min after epidural injection and ranged between 5 and 93 micrograms/ml. In the CSF, the levels of morphine were significantly greater during the first 20 min than later (n = 7; P less than 0.05). The washout of the lumbar CSF curve for morphine appeared to be fitted by a two-compartment open model. The t1/2-alpha and t1/2-beta values were 14.7 +/- 7.2 min and 106 +/- 45 min, respectively (mean +/- SD). Cumulative percentages of the epidural dose of morphine passed into the azygos system within the first 5, 20, 60, and 120 min after injection were calculated to be 4.0 +/- 2.1, 23.5 +/- 14.6, 49.2 +/- 34.2, and 55.9 +/- 35.3, respectively (mean +/- SD; n = 8).

  18. Venoconstrictor agents mobilize blood from different sources and increase intrathoracic filling during epidural anesthesia in supine humans

    SciTech Connect

    Stanton-Hicks, M.; Hoeck, A.S.; Stuehmeier, K.D.A.; Arndt, J.O.

    1987-03-01

    The authors studied the effects of dihydroergotamine (DHE) and etilefrine hydrochloride (E) on the regional distribution of /sup 99m/Tc-marked erythrocytes during epidural anesthesia in eight supine men to determine if vasoactive agents with venoconstrictor action would enhance cardiac filling during epidural anesthesia. Radioactivity was recorded with a gamma camera, and its distribution determined in the thorax, abdomen, and limbs. Arterial and central venous pressure, heart rate, and calf volume by plethysmography were measured. During epidural anesthesia with a sensory block up to T4/5, DHE (7.5 micrograms/kg) reduced the radioactivity, i.e., blood volume, in both the innervated (-5.9 +/- 3.5%) and denervated muscle/skin (-16.9 +/- 7%) regions, and increased it in both the intrathoracic (+7.0 +/- 2.3%), and splanchnic vasculature (+4.2 +/- 3.2). In contrast, E (6 micrograms X kg-1 X min-1) decreased the blood volume most markedly in the splanchnic region (-5.4 +/- 0.7%) and increased it in the thorax (+2 +/- 0.6%). All these changes were statistically significant. The combined effects were estimated to be equivalent to a transfusion of nearly 1.01 of blood. Both drugs reversed the hypotensive action of epidural anesthesia. During epidural anesthesia, DHE preferentially constricted the capacitance vessels in skeletal muscle and skin irrespective of the state of innervation, whereas E preferentially constricted the splanchnic vasculature. In the doses used, the two agents replenished in an additive fashion the central circulation during epidural anesthesia.

  19. Trajectory of platelets in pregnancy - do low-risk women need an intrapartum full blood count prior to epidural?

    PubMed

    Duong, Christine; Kidson-Gerber, Giselle; Peters, Nancy; Listijono, Dave R; Henry, Amanda

    2015-10-01

    This study aimed to investigate whether pregnant women with a normal 28-week gestation platelet count and no high-risk conditions for thrombocytopenia require a pre-epidural platelet count. All 1844 included women (platelet count > 150 × 10(9) /L at 28 weeks' gestation, term singleton birth, no thrombocytopenia risk conditions) had a platelet count > 100 × 10(9) /L prebirth, suggesting low-risk pregnant women do not require pre-epidural full blood count solely to check platelet count.

  20. Epidural analgesia complicated by dural ectasia in the Marfan syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Chelsea; Hofkamp, Michael P.; Noonan, Patrick T.; McAllister, Russell K.; Pilkinton, Kimberly A.; Diao, Zhiying

    2016-01-01

    Patients with the Marfan syndrome are considered to be high risk during pregnancy and warrant a complete multidisciplinary evaluation. One goal is to minimize hemodynamic fluctuations during labor since hypertensive episodes may result in aortic dissection or rupture. Although they may prevent these complications, neuraxial techniques may be complicated by dural ectasia. The case of a parturient with the Marfan syndrome and mild dural ectasia is presented. During attempted labor epidural placement, unintentional dural puncture occurred. A spinal catheter was used for adequate labor analgesia, and a resultant postdural puncture headache was alleviated by an epidural blood patch under fluoroscopic guidance. PMID:27695168

  1. Cerebrospinal fluid cutaneous fistula following obstetric epidural analgaesia. Case report.

    PubMed

    Fedriani de Matos, J J; Quintero Salvago, A V; Gómez Cortés, M D

    2017-03-28

    Cutaneous fistula of cerebrospinal fluid is a rare complication of neuroaxial blockade. We report the case of a parturient in whom an epidural catheter was placed for labour analgesia and 12h after the catheter was removed, presented an abundant asymptomatic fluid leak from the puncture site, compatible in the cyto-chemical analysis with cerebrospinal fluid. She was treated with acetazolamide, compression of skin orifice of the fluid leakage, antibiotic prophylaxis, hydration and rest, and progressed satisfactorily without requiring blood patch.

  2. Epidural abscess

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001416.htm Epidural abscess To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. An epidural abscess is a collection of pus (infected material) between ...

  3. A new approach using high volume blood patch for prevention of post-dural puncture headache following intrathecal catheter pump exchange

    PubMed Central

    Abdulla, Susanne; Vielhaber, Stefan; Heinze, Hans-Jochen; Abdulla, Walied

    2015-01-01

    Background: In an observational study, complications of intrathecal catheter pumps necessitating surgical exchange were analyzed. Also the use of a high-volume prophylactic epidural blood patch (EBP) during surgery for preventing post-dural puncture headache (PDPH) with a follow-up for 1 year is described. Materials and Methods: In 22 patients with refractory chronic pain of cancer/noncancer origin or severe spasticity, who were receiving intrathecal morphine including adjuvants or baclofen for symptom relief, catheter exchange with or without pump was performed. In patients with documented symptoms of PDPH following initial intrathecal catheter implantation, a prophylactic EBP with a high blood volume was used for PDPH prevention during surgery. Catheters were replaced using 40 mL EBP before entering dural space at a speed of 5mL/min into the epidural space. Patients were asked to quantify pain experience and functional ability. Results: From a sample of 72 patients admitted for catheter exchange with or without pump, 22 patients (33%) (12 male, 10 female) had a history of PDPH following initial implantation. Diagnostic and therapeutic measures occurring with malfunction of intrathecal catheter pump systems were described. Twenty-one patients were successfully treated with prophylactic EBP, while one patient could not be properly evaluated because of intracranial bleeding as the underlying disease. Conclusions: A new approach using a high-volume prophylactic EBP for preventing PDPH following catheter exchange is presented. The efficacy and safety of this technique for 1 year follow-up have been evaluated and was found to be safe and potentially effective. PMID:26157652

  4. Novel Wearable Device for Blood Leakage Detection during Hemodialysis Using an Array Sensing Patch.

    PubMed

    Du, Yi-Chun; Lim, Bee-Yen; Ciou, Wei-Siang; Wu, Ming-Jui

    2016-06-09

    Hemodialysis (HD) is a clinical treatment that requires the puncturing of the body surface. However, needle dislodgement can cause a high risk of blood leakage and can be fatal to patients. Previous studies proposed several devices for blood leakage detection using optical or electrical techniques. Nonetheless, these methods used single-point detection and the design was not suitable for multi-bed monitoring. This study proposed a novel wearable device for blood leakage monitoring during HD using an array sensing patch. The array sensing patch combined with a mapping circuit and a wireless module could measure and transmit risk levels. The different risk levels could improve the working process of healthcare workers, and enhance their work efficiency and reduce inconvenience due to false alarms. Experimental results showed that each point of the sensing array could detect up to 0.1 mL of blood leakage and the array sensing patch supports a risk level monitoring system up to 8 h to alert healthcare personnel of pertinent danger to the patients.

  5. Novel Wearable Device for Blood Leakage Detection during Hemodialysis Using an Array Sensing Patch

    PubMed Central

    Du, Yi-Chun; Lim, Bee-Yen; Ciou, Wei-Siang; Wu, Ming-Jui

    2016-01-01

    Hemodialysis (HD) is a clinical treatment that requires the puncturing of the body surface. However, needle dislodgement can cause a high risk of blood leakage and can be fatal to patients. Previous studies proposed several devices for blood leakage detection using optical or electrical techniques. Nonetheless, these methods used single-point detection and the design was not suitable for multi-bed monitoring. This study proposed a novel wearable device for blood leakage monitoring during HD using an array sensing patch. The array sensing patch combined with a mapping circuit and a wireless module could measure and transmit risk levels. The different risk levels could improve the working process of healthcare workers, and enhance their work efficiency and reduce inconvenience due to false alarms. Experimental results showed that each point of the sensing array could detect up to 0.1 mL of blood leakage and the array sensing patch supports a risk level monitoring system up to 8 h to alert healthcare personnel of pertinent danger to the patients. PMID:27294927

  6. Massive Blood Transfusion during Revision Total Hip Arthroplasty under Combined Spinal Epidural Anaesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Kandemir, Tünay; Kandemir, Erbin; Aşkın, Tuğba; Dal, Tülay; Kılıç, Yeliz; Ünver, Süheyla

    2016-01-01

    Revision total hip arthroplasty (THA) is an orthopaedic surgery that is known to be associated with excessive bleeding. The rates of mortality and morbidity are high in patients with massive haemorrhage. The patient in this study was administered blood products with high fresh frozen plasma/red blood cell (RBC) suspension ratio and high platelet/RBC suspension ratio without waiting for haemostasis test results. This study suggests that this approach might prove beneficial in reducing the incidence of intra- and postoperative complications. this study presents our experience with a patient who underwent THA and required a transfusion that was three times her estimated total blood volume. The patient was successfully managed with close monitoring of haemorrhage and timely administration of blood and blood products before hypotension and loss of consciousness occurred. PMID:27366558

  7. Epidural Injections for Spinal Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Epidural Injections An epidural injection provides temporary or prolonged relief ... limitations of Epidural Injection? What is an Epidural Injection? An epidural injection is an injection of medication ...

  8. Epidural electrical stimulation in severe limb ischemia. Pain relief, increased blood flow, and a possible limb-saving effect.

    PubMed Central

    Augustinsson, L E; Carlsson, C A; Holm, J; Jivegård, L

    1985-01-01

    Peripheral vascular disease of the extremities causes ischemic pain and, at times, skin ulcerations and gangrene. It has been suggested that epidural spinal electrical stimulation (ESES) could improve peripheral circulation. Since 1978 we have used ESES in 34 patients with severe limb ischemia; all had resting pain and most had ischemic ulcers. Arterial surgery was technically impossible. Twenty-six patients had arteriosclerotic disease, one had Buerger's disease, and seven had severe vasospastic disorders. Ninety-four per cent of the patients experienced pain relief. ESES healed ulcers in 50% of those with preoperative nonhealing skin ulcerations. Seventy per cent of the patients showed improved skin temperature recordings. Only 38% of the stimulated arteriosclerotic patients underwent amputations during a mean followup period of 16 months, as compared to 90% of a comparable group of unstimulated patients. ESES is very promising in severe limb ischemia where reconstructive surgery is impossible or has failed. PMID:3874610

  9. Epidural Steroid Injections

    MedlinePlus

    ... slipped vertebrae’, also known as spondylolisthesis). The epidural space is a fat filled ‘sleeve’ that surrounds the ... spinal cord. Steroids (‘cortisone’) placed into the epidural space have a very potent anti-inflammatory action that ...

  10. Successful medical treatment of spinal epidural abscess.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Bo-Ren; Wang, Chih-Wei; Lin, Jung-Chung; Chang, Feng-Yee

    2008-04-01

    Spinal epidural abscess is a rare but potentially fatal disease. A 67-year-old female suffered fever and painful swelling of the right knee and lower leg for one week. Both synovial fluid and blood cultures yielded methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus. Low back pain developed and fever was sustained despite the administration of intravenous oxacillin. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the thoracolumbar spine revealed spinal epidural abscess from T12 to S1. Because of severe hypoalbuminemia and general anasarca and followed by exploratory laparotomy for massive duodenal bleeding, she did not receive surgical intervention for the spinal epidural abscess. After intravenous administration of oxacillin 2 g 4-hourly for 12 weeks, she recovered and follow-up MRI confirmed the efficacy of the medical treatment. She remained well at 1-year follow-up. In a patient with minimal neurological deficit or surgical contraindication, spinal epidural abscess can be successfully treated with a medical regimen.

  11. Controlled release ibuprofen-poloxamer gel for epidural use - A pharmacokinetic study using microdialysis in pigs.

    PubMed

    Paavola, Anne; Bernards, Christopher M; Rosenberg, Per H

    2016-11-01

    In order to avoid the risks of sideeffects of epidural local anesthetics and opioids, the use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) epidurally would be an interesting option of analgesic therapy. The fairly short duration of action of spinally administered NSAIDs, e.g., ibuprofen, may be prolonged by using controlled release poloxamer gel formulation. Using a microdialysis technique we studied the epidural and intrathecal pharmacokinetics of ibuprofen after its epidural administration as a poloxamer 407 formulation or a solution formulation. In addition, plasma ibuprofen concentrations were analyzed from central venous blood samples. Ibuprofen concentrations in the epidural space were significantly higher and longer lasting after the epidural gel injection compared with the epidural solution injection. The epidural AUC of ibuprofen was over threefold greater after epidural ibuprofen gel injection compared with the ibuprofen solution injection (p<0.001). The systemic absorption of ibuprofen from 25% poloxamer 407 gel was very low. The in situ forming poloxamer gel acted as a reservoir allowing targeted ibuprofen release at the epidural injection site and restricted ibuprofen molecules to a smaller spinal area. Ibuprofen diffusion from the epidural space to the intrathecal space was steady and prolonged. These results demonstrate that the use of epidurally injectable poloxamer gel can increase and prolong ibuprofen delivery from epidural space to the CSF enhancing thus ibuprofen entry into the central neuroaxis for spinal analgesia. Further toxicological and dose-finding studies are justified.

  12. Spinal epidural abscess and meningitis following short-term epidural catheterisation for postoperative analgaesia.

    PubMed

    van Rappard, Juliaan R M; Tolenaar, Jip L; Smits, Anke B; Go, Peter M N Y H

    2015-08-20

    We present a case of a patient with a spinal epidural abscess (SEA) and meningitis following short-term epidural catheterisation for postoperative pain relief after a laparoscopic sigmoid resection. On the fifth postoperative day, 2 days after removal of the epidural catheter, the patient developed high fever, leucocytosis and elevated C reactive protein. Blood cultures showed a methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus infection. A photon emission tomography scan revealed increased activity of the spinal canal, suggesting S. aureus meningitis. A gadolinium-enhanced MRI showed a SEA that was localised at the epidural catheter insertion site. Conservative management with intravenous flucloxacillin was initiated, as no neurological deficits were seen. At last follow-up, 8 weeks postoperatively, the patient showed complete recovery.

  13. Postinfarction Functional Recovery Driven by a Three-Dimensional Engineered Fibrin Patch Composed of Human Umbilical Cord Blood-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Roura, Santiago; Soler-Botija, Carolina; Bagó, Juli R.; Llucià-Valldeperas, Aida; Férnandez, Marco A.; Gálvez-Montón, Carolina; Prat-Vidal, Cristina; Perea-Gil, Isaac; Blanco, Jerónimo

    2015-01-01

    Considerable research has been dedicated to restoring myocardial cell slippage and limiting ventricular remodeling after myocardial infarction (MI). We examined the ability of a three-dimensional (3D) engineered fibrin patch filled with human umbilical cord blood-derived mesenchymal stem cells (UCBMSCs) to induce recovery of cardiac function after MI. The UCBMSCs were modified to coexpress luciferase and fluorescent protein reporters, mixed with fibrin, and applied as an adhesive, viable construct (fibrin-cell patch) over the infarcted myocardium in mice (MI-UCBMSC group). The patch adhered well to the heart. Noninvasive bioluminescence imaging demonstrated early proliferation and differentiation of UCBMSCs within the construct in the postinfarct mice in the MI-UCBMSC group. The implanted cells also participated in the formation of new, functional microvasculature that connected the fibrin-cell patch to both the subjacent myocardial tissue and the host circulatory system. As revealed by echocardiography, the left ventricular ejection fraction and fractional shortening at sacrifice were improved in MI-UCBMSC mice and were markedly reduced in mice treated with fibrin alone and untreated postinfarction controls. In conclusion, a 3D engineered fibrin patch composed of UCBMSCs attenuated infarct-derived cardiac dysfunction when transplanted locally over a myocardial wound. Significance Ischemic heart failure (HF) is the end stage of many cardiovascular diseases, including myocardial infarction. The only definitive treatment for HF is cardiac transplant, which is hampered by limited number of heart donors and graft rejection. In recent times, cellular cardiomyoplasty has been expected to repair infarcted myocardium by implantation of different sources of stem or progenitor cells. However, low cell survival and myocardial implantation rates have motivated the emergence of novel approaches with the objective of generating graftable cell-based implants. Here, the potential

  14. Simultaneous appearance of cerebral venous thrombosis and subdural hematomas as rare cause of headache in puerperium following epidural analgesia: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Župan, Željko; Sotošek Tokmadžić, Vlatka; Matanić-Manestar, Marinka; Šustić, Alan; Antončić, Igor; Dunatov, Siniša; Pavlović, Ivan; Antulov, Ronald

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study is to report the first case of simultaneous appearance of cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) and bilateral subdural hematomas (SDHs) following epidural analgesia for labor and delivery and to point out the difficulty of establishing such a diagnosis in the presence of postpartum headache. A 26-year old primigravida with a history of epilepsy received epidural analgesia for delivery. Three days after the uneventful spontaneous vaginal delivery she complained about the headache. Patient responded very well to the pain medication and oral hydration, and the headache was relieved. Ten days after the delivery, the headache reoccurred, and an epidural blood patch was performed that successfully relieved her symptom. Stronger progressive headache with nausea reappeared two days later and the parturient was readmitted to hospital. Urgent neuroimaging examinations detected CVT of right the transverse sinus, ipsilateral cortical veins, and partially occluded superior sagittal sinus, as well as bilateral subacute/chronic SDHs. The treatment of the patient with low molecular weight heparin and antiaggregation therapy was effective. In this case, the diagnosis was delayed because of atypical clinical presentation and potentially confounding events (epidural analgesia and assumption that it was a case of PDPH). It is important to carefully observe patients in such conditions and promptly conduct suitable diagnostic tests. Otherwise, unrecognized intracranial complications and delay of appropriate therapy could be life-threatening. PMID:22911532

  15. Peut-on réaliser une analgésie péridurale après un blood patch récent?

    PubMed Central

    Chkoura, Khalid; Kechna, Hicham; Loutid, Jaouad; Ouzad, Omar; Hachimi, Moulay Ahmed; Hannafi, Sidi Mohamed

    2015-01-01

    Le blood patch constitue le traitement de référence du syndrome post ponction lombaire. Son efficacité a été démontrée par plusieurs essais randomisés comparant le BPE aux mesures conservatrices et au placebo. Il consiste en l'injection d'une quantité de sang autologue dans l'espace péridurale afin d'obturer la brèche dure-mérienne. La réalisation d'une analgésie péridurale après antécédent de blood patch est possible, malgré la persistance de questions sur les délais de retour à la normal de l'espace péridurale. Nous rapportons un cas où une analgésie péridurale a été réalisée avec succès trois semaines après un blood patch. PMID:26600909

  16. Effect of ThermaCare HeatWraps and Icy Hot Cream/Patches on Skin and Quadriceps Muscle Temperature and Blood Flow

    PubMed Central

    Petrofsky, Jerrold Scott; Laymon, Michael; Berk, Lee; Bains, Gurinder

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of over-the-counter treatments—ThermaCare HeatWraps (chemical reaction to produce heat above the skin), Icy Hot Patch, and Icy Hot Cream (topically applied menthol)—on skin and deep tissue temperature. Methods This was a longitudinal crossover study. On each of 3 days, a ThermaCare HeatWrap, Icy Hot Cream, or Icy Hot Patch was applied randomly over the quadriceps muscle in 15 healthy volunteers with normal body mass. Skin and muscle temperature and blood flow were measured by laser flowmetry every 15 minutes for 2 hours. Results After 2 hours, mean temperature decreased by 2.1°C (7.0%; P = .02) in skin and 1.0°C (2.9%; P = .01) in muscle with Icy Hot Cream. Icy Hot Patch decreased skin and muscle temperature by 1.7°C (5.4%; P = .03) and 1.3°C (3.8%; P = .01), respectively. In contrast, ThermaCare raised skin and muscle temperature by 7.8°C (25.8%; P = .001) and 2.7°C (7.7%; P = .002), respectively; both were significantly warmer with ThermaCare vs either Icy Hot product (all P < .007). Icy Hot products produced a net decrease in skin blood flow (Cream: 56.7 flux [39.3%; P = .003]; Patch: 19.1 flux [16.7%; P = .045]). Muscle blood flow decreased with the Patch (6.7 flux [7.0%; P = .02]). After a period of fluctuations, Icy Hot Cream produced a net increase vs baseline of 7.0 flux (16.9%; P = .02). ThermaCare more than doubled blood flow in skin (83.3 flux [109.7%; P = .0003]) and muscle (25.1 flux [148.5%; P = .004]). Conclusions In this group of 15 healthy volunteers, ThermaCare HeatWraps provided the greatest degree of tissue warming and increase in tissue blood flow. PMID:27069427

  17. Spontaneous spinal epidural abscess.

    PubMed

    Ellanti, P; Morris, S

    2011-10-01

    Spinal epidural abscess is an uncommon entity, the frequency of which is increasing. They occur spontaneously or as a complication of intervention. The classical triad of fever, back pain and neurological symptoms are not always present. High index of suspicion is key to diagnosis. Any delay in diagnosis and treatment can have significant neurological consequences. We present the case of a previously well man with a one month history of back pain resulting from an epidural abscess.

  18. Patch tests*

    PubMed Central

    Lazzarini, Rosana; Duarte, Ida; Ferreira, Alessandra Lindmayer

    2013-01-01

    Patch tests were introduced as a diagnostic tool in the late nineteenth century. Since then, they have improved considerably becoming what they are today. Patch tests are used in the diagnostic investigation of contact dermatitis worldwide. Batteries or series previously studied and standardized should be used in patch testing. The methodology is simple, but it requires adequate training for the results to be correctly interpreted and used. Despite having been used for over a century, it needs improvement like all other diagnostic techniques in the medical field. PMID:24474094

  19. Spinal epidural abscess.

    PubMed

    Miftode, E; Luca, V; Mihalache, D; Leca, D; Stefanidis, E; Anuţa, C; Sabadis, L

    2001-01-01

    In a retrospective study, 68 patients with Spinal Epidural Abscess (SEA) were reviewed. Of these, 66% had different predisposing factors such as staphylococcal skin infections, surgical procedures, rachicentesis, trauma, spondilodiscitis. Abscess had a lumbar region location in 53% of cases. Staphylococcus aureus was the most frequent etiological agent (81%). The overall rate of mortality in SEA patients was 13.2%.

  20. [Vertebral osteomyelitis associated with epidural block].

    PubMed

    Carrillo Esper, R; Cruz-Bautista, I

    2001-01-01

    Infectious complications after epidural anesthesia are infrequent and the most common are epidural and subdural abscess. We report one rare case of vertebral osteomyelitus associated with an epidural catheter and review the literature.

  1. Myelopathy with syringomyelia following thoracic epidural anaesthesia.

    PubMed

    Aldrete, J A; Ferrari, H

    2004-02-01

    Under general anaesthesia and muscle relaxation, a thoracic epidural catheter was inserted at the T8-T9 level in a 7-year-old boy scheduled to have a Nissen fundoplication to provide postoperative analgesia. After 4 ml of lignocaine 1.5% was injected through the catheter, hypotension resulted. Fifty-five minutes later 5 ml of bupivacaine 0.25% produced the same effect. In the recovery room a similar injection resulted in lower blood pressure and temporary apnoea. Sensory and motor deficits were noted the next day and four days later magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated spinal cord syringomyelia extending from T5 to T10. Four years later, dysaesthesia from T6 to T10 weakness of the left lower extremity and bladder and bowel dysfunction persist. The risks of inserting thoracic epidural catheters in patients under general anaesthesia and muscle relaxation are discussed, emphasising the possibility of spinal cord injury with disastrous consequences.

  2. Aspergillus spinal epidural abscess

    SciTech Connect

    Byrd, B.F. III; Weiner, M.H.; McGee, Z.A.

    1982-12-17

    A spinal epidural abscess developed in a renal transplant recipient; results of a serum radioimmunoassay for Aspergillus antigen were positive. Laminectomy disclosed an abscess of the L4-5 interspace and L-5 vertebral body that contained hyphal forms and from which Aspergillus species was cultured. Serum Aspergillus antigen radioimmunoassay may be a valuable, specific early diagnostic test when systemic aspergillosis is a consideration in an immunosuppressed host.

  3. Medicolegal cases for spinal epidural hematoma and spinal epidural abscess.

    PubMed

    French, Keisha L; Daniels, Eldra W; Ahn, Uri M; Ahn, Nicholas U

    2013-01-01

    Spinal epidural hematoma and spinal epidural abscess are rare surgical emergencies resulting in significant neurologic deficits. Making the diagnosis for spinal epidural hematoma and spinal epidural abscess can be challenging; however, a delay in recognition and treatment can be devastating. The objective of this retrospective analysis study was to identify risk factors for an adverse outcome for the provider. The LexisNexis Academic legal search database was used to identify a total of 19 cases of spinal epidural hematoma and spinal epidural abscess filed against medical providers. Outcome data on trial verdicts, age, sex, initial site of injury, time to consultation, time to appropriate imaging studies, time to surgery, and whether a rectal examination was performed or not were recorded. The results demonstrated a significant association between time to surgery more than 48 hours and an unfavorable verdict for the provider. The degree of permanent neurologic impairment did not appear to affect the verdicts. Fifty-eight percent of the cases did not present with an initial deficit, including loss of bowel or bladder control. All medical professionals must maintain a high level of suspicion and act quickly. Physicians who are able to identify early clinical features, appropriately image, and treat within a 48 hour time frame have demonstrated a more favorable medicolegal outcome compared with their counterparts in filed lawsuits for spinal epidural hematoma and spinal epidural abscess cases.

  4. Peripheral blood lymphocyte typing as a useful tool to objectify the oral mucosa patch test in the diagnosis of allergic contact mucositis to nickel.

    PubMed

    Di Tola, Marco; Amodeo, Rachele; Marino, Mariacatia; Tabacco, Fabio; Casale, Rossella; Bove, Maurizio; Rossi, Alfredo; Cardelli, Patrizia; Picarelli, Antonio

    2014-06-01

    Nickel (Ni) exposure through the intestinal mucosa may cause a hypersensitivity reaction recently defined as allergic contact mucositis (ACM). This condition is identifiable by the oral mucosa patch test (omPT), a qualitative and subjective examination that requires clinical expertise. Our aim was to evaluate if a peripheral blood lymphocyte typing performed before and after the omPT for Ni may be able to objectify this examination for diagnostic purposes. Thirty patients with symptoms referable to the ingestion of Ni-rich foods were subjected to omPT for Ni. Before and after the omPT, each patient underwent blood sampling for the typing of total lymphocytes and their subsets (T, T helper or Th, T cytotoxic or Tc, B, natural killer or NK). Statistical analysis was performed by Student t test and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis. According to the omPT outcomes, 18 patients were defined as Ni-sensitive and the remaining 12 as controls. In Ni-sensitive patients, the number of total, T, Th, Tc, and B lymphocytes/μL whole blood increased after the omPT (p<0.0001 for the first three, p=0.0004 and p=0.0001 for the last two lymphocyte types). No omPT-dependent lymphocyte increase was observed in controls. The post/pre omPT cell ratio, especially if calculated for Th lymphocytes, appears to be an effective index for diagnostic purposes (sensitivity=100%, specificity=83.3%, Youden index=0.833, area under curve (AUC)=0.926, p<0.0001). In conclusion, the peripheral blood lymphocyte typing with calculation of post/pre omPT cell ratio has the potential to support the omPT in diagnosing ACM, with the advantage of providing quantitative and objective data.

  5. Paraplegia following cervical epidural catheterization using loss of resistance technique with air: a case report.

    PubMed

    Chae, Yun Jeong; Han, Kyung Ream; Park, Hyung Bae; Kim, Chan; Nam, Si Gweon

    2016-02-01

    We report a case of paraplegia without neurologic deficit of upper extremities following cervical epidural catheterization using air during the loss of resistance technique. A 41-year-old woman diagnosed with complex regional pain syndrome had upper and lower extremity pain. A thoracic epidural lead was inserted for a trial spinal cord stimulation for treating lower extremity pain and cervical epidural catheterization was performed for treating upper extremity pain. Rapidly progressive paraplegia developed six hours after cervical epidural catheterization. Spine CT revealed air entrapment in multiple thoracic intervertebral foraminal spaces and surrounding epidural space without obvious spinal cord compression before the decompressive operation, which disappeared one day after the decompressive operation. Her paraplegia symptoms were normalized immediately after the operation. The presumed cause of paraplegia was transient interruption of blood supply to the spinal cord through the segmental radiculomedullary arteries feeding the spinal cord at the thoracic level of the intervertebral foramen caused by the air.

  6. Spinal epidural abscess.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Katherine G

    2013-09-01

    Spinal epidural abscess is a rare bacterial infection located within the spinal canal. Early diagnosis and rapid treatment are important because of its potential to cause rapidly progressive spinal cord compression and irreversible paralysis. A staphylococcus bacterial infection is the cause in most cases. Treatment includes antibiotics and possible surgical drainage of the abscess. A favorable neurologic outcome correlates with the severity and duration of neurologic deficits before surgery and the timeliness of the chosen intervention. It is important for the critical care nurse to monitor the patient's neurologic status and provide appropriate interventions.

  7. EPIDURAL ANALGESIA IN LABOR - CONTROVERSIES.

    PubMed

    Bilić, Nada; Djaković, Ivka; Kličan-Jaić, Katarina; Rudman, Senka Sabolović; Ivanec, Željko

    2015-09-01

    Labor pain is one of the most severe pains. Labor is a complex and individual process with varying maternal requesting analgesia. Labor analgesia must be safe and accompanied by minimal amount of unwanted consequences for both the mother and the child, as well as for the delivery procedure. Epidural analgesia is the treatment that best meets these demands. According to the American Congress of Obstetrics and Gynecology and American Society of Anesthesiologists, mother's demand is a reason enough for the introduction of epidural analgesia in labor, providing that no contraindications exist. The application of analgesics should not cease at the end of the second stage of labor, but it is recommended that lower concentration analgesics be then applied. Based on the latest studies, it can be claimed that epidural analgesia can be applied during the major part of the first and second stage of labor. According to previous investigations, there is no definitive conclusion about the incidence of instrumental delivery, duration of second stage of labor, time of epidural analgesia initiation, and long term outcomes for the newborn. Cooperation of obstetric and anesthesiology personnel, as well as appropriate technical equipment significantly decrease the need of instrumental completion of a delivery, as well as other complications encountered in the application of epidural analgesia. Our hospital offers 24/7 epidural analgesia service. The majority of pregnant women in our hospital were aware of the advantages of epidural analgesia for labor, however, only a small proportion of them used it, mainly because of inadequate level of information.

  8. Severe hypotension related to high negative pressure suction drainage on a thoracic epidural drain during multilevel spinal fixation.

    PubMed

    Brahmbhatt, Anjalee; Hall, Nicholas D P; Bradley, William Pierre Litherland

    2013-11-15

    Hypotension or bradycardia or both related to intracranial hypotension after craniotomy has been reported in the literature. However, such reports are uncommon with thoracic epidural drains. We describe a case in which application of high negative pressure suction to a thoracic epidural drain caused a sudden decrease in arterial blood pressure.

  9. [Epidural emphysema complicating bronchial asthma].

    PubMed

    Rouetbi, N; Ben Saad, A; Joobeur, S; Skhiri, N; Cheikh Mhamed, S; Mribah, H; El Kamel, A

    2012-12-01

    Epidural emphysema is an exceptional complication of bronchial asthma, revealed by an incidental finding in chest tomography. We report a case of a 21-year-old man admitted with asthma attack complicated by subcutaneous and mediastinal emphysema. Chest tomography confirmed the mediastinal emphysema and also revealed the epidural emphysema within the vertebral canal. Neurological examination was negative. The patient showed complete recovery 10days after the onset of symptoms. The epidural emphysema is a rare complication during asthma attacks. The benignity of this complication should not require a systematic chest tomography.

  10. [Inadvertent epidural infusion of paracetamol].

    PubMed

    Charco Roca, L M; Ortiz Sánchez, V E; del Pino Moreno, A L

    2014-10-01

    A 45-year-old woman was accidentally administered an epidural infusion of paracetamol instead of levobupivacaine for postoperative pain therapy during the postoperative period of abdominal hysterectomy under general anesthesia combined with epidural analgesia. The patient had no neurological symptoms at any time, although a slight tendency to arterial hypotension that did not require treatment was observed. No rescue analgesia was necessary until 8h after the start of epidural infusion. The incidence of these types of errors is probably underestimated, although there are several cases reported with various drugs.

  11. Epidural injections for back pain

    MedlinePlus

    ESI; Spinal injection for back pain; Back pain injection; Steroid injection - epidural; Steroid injection - back ... pillow under your stomach. If this position causes pain, you either sit up or lie on your ...

  12. [Chronic epidural haematoma mimicking meningioma].

    PubMed

    Beculić, Hakija; Skomorac, Rasim; Jusić, Aldin; Mekić-Abazović, Alma; Bajtarević, Alma

    2011-02-01

    The study presents a rare case of organised chronic epidural haematoma that imitated a meningioma. A patient was admitted to the Department of Neurology of the Cantonal Hospital Zenica due to loss of consciousness and right hemiparesis. Non-contrast Computed Tomography (CT) scan had shown an expansive intracranial process in the left parietal region which was radiologically diagnosed as a meningioma. During the operation a linear skull fracture and organised chronic epidural haematoma were found.

  13. Antibacterial activity of epidural infusions.

    PubMed

    Coghlan, M W; Davies, M J; Hoyt, C; Joyce, L; Kilner, R; Waters, M J

    2009-01-01

    The incidence of epidural abscess following epidural catheterisation appears to be increasing, being recently reported as one in 1000 among surgical patients. This study was designed to investigate the antibacterial activity of various local anaesthetics and additives, used in epidural infusions, against a range of micro-organisms associated with epidural abscess. The aim was to determine which, if any, epidural infusion solution has the greatest antibacterial activity. Bupivacaine, ropivacaine and levobupivacaine crystals were dissolved and added to Mueller-Hinton Agar in concentrations of 0.06%, 0.125%, 0.2%, 0.25%, 0.5% and 1%. Fentanyl, adrenaline and clonidine were also mixed with agar in isolation and in combination with the local anaesthetics. Using a reference agar dilution method, the minimum inhibitory concentrations were determined for a range of bacteria. Bupivacaine showed antibacterial activity against Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus faecalis and Escherichia coli with minimum inhibitory concentrations between 0.125% and 0.25%. It did not inhibit the growth of Pseudomonas aeruginosa at any of the concentrations tested. Levobupivacaine and ropivacaine showed no activity against Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus faecalis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, even at the highest concentrations tested, and minimal activity against Escherichia coli (minimum inhibitory concentrations 0.5% and 1% respectively). The presence of fentanyl, adrenaline and clonidine had no additional effect on the antibacterial activity of any of the local anaesthetic agents. The low concentrations of local anaesthetic usually used in epidural infusions have minimal antibacterial activity. While the clinical implications of this in vitro study are not known, consideration should be given to increasing the concentration of bupivacaine in an epidural infusion or to administering a daily bolus of 0.25% bupivacaine to reduce the risk of epidural bacterial growth.

  14. Spinal epidural abscess.

    PubMed

    Krishnamohan, Prashanth; Berger, Joseph R

    2014-11-01

    Spinal epidural abscess (SEA) remains a relatively infrequent diagnosis. Staphylococcus aureus is the most common organism identified, and the infectious source in SEA emanates from skin and soft tissue infections in about 20 % of instances. The thoracic spine is most often involved followed by the lumbar spine. The classic triad of fever, spinal pain, and neurological deficit is present in but a minority of patients. The appearance of neurological deficits with SEA has a significant impact on the prognosis; therefore, early diagnosis is imperative. Magnetic resonance imaging has permitted earlier diagnosis, although significant delays in diagnosis are common due to the nonspecific symptoms that frequently attend the disorder. Due to the rarity of this condition, there have been few randomized controlled trials to evaluate new treatment strategies, and most recommendations regarding treatment are based on case series studies often derived from the experiences at a single center.

  15. Primary spinal epidural B-lymphoblastic lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Nambiar, Rakul K.; Prabhakaran, Pranab K.; Mathew, Sherin P.

    2017-01-01

    Extranodal lymphomas constitute 20% to 30% of all non-Hodgkin's lymphomas. The common sites involved are skin, stomach, brain, and small intestine. Epidural localization is a rare site for lymphomas, accounting for 10% of spinal epidural tumors. Lymphomas occurring primarily in the epidural space without other previously detected lymphomatous foci (i.e., primary spinal epidural lymphomas) represent an even rarer entity. We report a case of primary spinal epidural B-lymphoblastic lymphoma. The patient presented with paraparesis, and a spinal epidural lesion was diagnosed. Considering the rapidity of symptom onset, the possibility of epidural abscess was considered, and he underwent partial laminectomy with decompression of the lesion. Histopathology and immunohistochemistry were diagnostic of B-lymphoblastic lymphoma. The present case is the first report in the literature of B-lymphoblastic lymphoma presenting as a spinal epidural lesion. PMID:28127138

  16. Spinal epidural abscess following glossectomy and neck dissection: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Esther; Thorpe, Eric; Borrowdale, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Spinal epidural abscess is an uncommon but potentially life threatening entity that rarely occurs after otolaryngology procedures. Presentation of case We report a case of a diabetic patient who presented with a lumbar spinal epidural abscess eight days after head and neck oncologic surgery. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed an L4 spinal epidural abscess. Cultures from the spinal epidural abscess, blood, urine, and the previous neck incision grew Klebsiella pneumoniae. The patient recovered neurologic function after surgical decompression and drainage, long-term intravenous antibiotics, and physical therapy. Discussion The development of postoperative spinal epidural abscess is rare after otolaryngology procedures but has been reported in the cervical epidural space. To our knowledge, lumbar spinal epidural abscess has not yet been reported after head and neck oncologic surgery. Even more unique is the presence of the pathogen K. pneumoniae. Conclusion A high index of suspicion of this potential outcome is paramount as early recognition and intervention are keys to recovery of neurologic function. PMID:26799413

  17. Informed consent for epidural analgesia in labour: a survey of Irish practice.

    PubMed

    Hegarty, A; Omer, W; Harmon, D

    2014-06-01

    Currently, we do not have a national standard regarding epidural consent in Ireland. The aim of this survey was to assess practice in obstetric units in Ireland with regard to obtaining informed consent prior to epidural insertion, and whether the risks discussed with women are being documented. A postal survey of anaesthetists in Irish obstetric units was performed in January 2012 to assess practice regarding obtaining informed consent prior to epidural insertion, and documentation of the risks discussed. The response rate was 16/18 (88%). There was major variation both in which risks are discussed with women in labour and what risks are quoted. The most frequently quoted risks were headache--15/16 (93.8% of the respondents), partially/not working epidural--15/16 (93.8%), drop in blood pressure--14/16 (87.5%) and temporary backache/local tenderness--12/16 (75%). The more serious risks were not discussed as frequently: permanent nerve damage--8/16 (50%), paralysis--8/16 (50%), epidural abscess/haematoma--6/16 (37.5%), meningitis--3/16 (18.7%). The vast majority of respondents supported introduction of a national standardised information leaflet, detailing all the benefits and risks of epidural analgesia, to be shown to all women before consenting to epidural insertion.

  18. Granisetron Transdermal Patch

    MedlinePlus

    ... patch. Each patch is stuck onto a thin plastic liner and a separate rigid plastic film. Do not open the pouch in advance, ... cut the patch into pieces. Peel the thin plastic liner off of the printed side of the ...

  19. Cabbage Patch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This Sojourner rover image of the Cabbage Patch shows small rounded objects on the surface that are about 3-4 cm across. Some of these are within excavations, which are about 0.5 cm wide. Several questions arise about the pebbles: Why are they rounded? Where did they come from? What do they mean?

    Geologists use MULTIPLE WORKING HYPOTHESES when attempting to explain observations. Some hypotheses that could account for the pebbles are: They were rounded during transport by waters of catastrophic floods and deposited on the Ares Vallis floodplain They were rounded by wave action on an ancient Martian beach They were rounded during glacial transport They are glasses that were produced by melting during impact cratering. The glass was first ejected from the crater, then molded into spherical shapes or drops as it traveled through the atmosphere, and finally was deposited at the sites They are spatter from lava flows They are nodules brought up from the deep Martian interior by lava flows or pyroclastic eruptions. They are concretions formed in sedimentary rocks They came from ancient conglomerate rocks. The pebbles were rounded by water action and subsequently lithified into conglomerate rocks. Later, the waters of catastrophic floods transported the conglomerates and deposited them on the Ares floodplain. The pebbles were then freed from the rocks by weathering. A combination of the above

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech).

  20. Positive atopy patch test reaction to Malassezia furfur in atopic dermatitis correlates with a T helper 2-like peripheral blood mononuclear cells response.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Catharina; Eshaghi, Hojjat; Linder, Maria Tengvall; Jakobson, Eva; Scheynius, Annika

    2002-06-01

    The yeast Malassezia furfur belongs to the normal cutaneous flora, but is also a triggering allergen that can contribute to atopic dermatitis. To illuminate the effect of circulating allergen-specific T cells in atopic dermatitis, the peripheral mononuclear cell response was correlated with the in vivo skin prick test and atopy patch test reactivity to M. furfur. None of 16 healthy controls showed any positive in vivo reaction. The 40 atopic dermatitis patients, of whom 18 had serum IgE reactivity to M. furfur, were subdivided according to their in vivo reaction to M. furfur extract into three groups: skin prick test positive/atopy patch test positive (n = 12), skin prick test positive/atopy patch test negative (n = 12), and skin prick test negative/atopy patch test negative (n = 16). The skin prick test positive/atopy patch test positive and the skin prick test positive/atopy patch test negative groups had a significantly higher peripheral mononuclear cell stimulation index than the healthy controls. Interestingly, the stimulation index values in the skin prick test positive/atopy patch test positive group were significantly higher than in the skin prick test positive/atopy patch test negative group. In the M. furfur skin prick test positive atopic dermatitis patients (n = 24) a correlation was found between stimulation index and the M. furfur atopy patch test reactions, but not between stimulation index and M. furfur-specific serum IgE levels. Skin prick test positive and/or atopy patch test positive reactions to the recombinant M. furfur allergens rMal f 1, rMal f 5, and rMal f 6 were observed in 7, 14, and 16 of the 40 atopic dermatitis patients, respectively. Further, there was a correlation between production of the T helper 2-related cytokines interleukins 4, 5, and 13 and stimulation index to M. furfur extract, but not between the T helper 1-related interferon-gamma and stimulation index to M. furfur extract. Our data strongly suggest a relationship between

  1. Vertical Small-Needle Caudal Epidural Injection Technique

    PubMed Central

    Maniquis Smigel, Liza; Dean Reeves, Kenneth; Jeffrey Rosen, Howard; Patrick Rabago, David

    2016-01-01

    Background Anecdotal evidence suggests that a vertical small-needle injection method enters the caudal epidural space with comparable efficacy to cephalad-directed methods, with less intravascular injection. Objectives Assess the success rate of vertical caudal epidural injection using epidurography and the frequency of intravascular injection using a vertical small-needle approach. Patients and Methods Participants had chronic generalized non-surgical low back pain and either gluteal and/or leg pain and were enrolled in a simultaneous clinical trial assessing the analgesic effect of 5% dextrose epidural injection. A 25 gauge 3.7 cm hypodermic needle was placed at the sacral hiatus using a fingertip-guided vertical technique without imaging assistance, followed by fluoroscopic epidurography. Minimal needle redirection was allowed up to 10 degrees from the vertical plane if the initial epidurogram showed an extradural pattern, followed by repeat epidurography. Results First needle placement without imaging resulted in blood return in 1/199 participants and positive epidurography in 179/199 (90%). Minimal needle repositioning resulted in a positive epidurogram in the remaining 19 attempts. No intravascular injection patterns were observed. Conclusions This compares favorably to published success rates of fluoroscopically-guided technique and was well tolerated. Vertical caudal epidural injection may be suitable for combination with ultrasound-guided methods with Doppler flow monitoring. PMID:27826539

  2. Recent Advances in Epidural Analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Maria; George, John E.; Seif, John; Farag, Ehab

    2012-01-01

    Neuraxial anesthesia is a term that denotes all forms of central blocks, involving the spinal, epidural, and caudal spaces. Epidural anesthesia is a versatile technique widely used in anesthetic practice. Its potential to decrease postoperative morbidity and mortality has been demonstrated by numerous studies. To maximize its perioperative benefits while minimizing potential adverse outcomes, the knowledge of factors affecting successful block placement is essential. This paper will provide an overview of the pertinent anatomical, pharmacological, immunological, and technical aspects of epidural anesthesia in both adult and pediatric populations and will discuss the recent advances, the related rare but potentially devastating complications, and the current recommendations for the use of anticoagulants in the setting of neuraxial block placement. PMID:22174708

  3. [Case of spinal epidural abscess after continuous epidural block to manage the pain of herpes zoster].

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Tatsuhito; Nakatani, Toshihiko; Narai, Yasuhiro; Sakakibara, Manabu; Hashimoto, Tatsuya; Saito, Youji

    2014-03-01

    A woman in her 90's received continuous epidural block for the pain of herpes zoster. Four days after epidural catheterization, she was found with cellutitis. Fourteen days after epidural catheterization, spinal epidural abscess was pointed out on MRI. Since there were no neurological symptoms, we performed conservative medical management with antibiotics. She recovered without sequela When the symptoms of cellutitis appeared after epidural block (even if there are neither neurological symptoms nor infectious signs), there is a possibility of progressing into spinal epidural abscess.

  4. Maternal and foetal outcome after epidural labour analgesia in high-risk pregnancies

    PubMed Central

    Samanta, Sukhen; Jain, Kajal; Bhardwaj, Neerja; Jain, Vanita; Samanta, Sujay; Saha, Rini

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: Low concentration local anaesthetic improves uteroplacental blood flow in antenatal period and during labour in preeclampsia. We compared neonatal outcome after epidural ropivacaine plus fentanyl with intramuscular tramadol analgesia during labour in high-risk parturients with intrauterine growth restriction of mixed aetiology. Methods: Forty-eight parturients with sonographic evidence of foetal weight <1.5 kg were enrolled in this non-randomized, double-blinded prospective study. The epidural (E) group received 0.15% ropivacaine 10 ml with 30 μg fentanyl incremental bolus followed by 7–15 ml 0.1% ropivacaine with 2 μg/ml fentanyl in continuous infusion titrated until visual analogue scale was three. Tramadol (T) group received intramuscular tramadol 1 mg/kg as bolus as well as maintenance 4–6 hourly. Neonatal outcomes were measured with cord blood base deficit, pH, ionised calcium, sugar and Apgar score after delivery. Maternal satisfaction was also assessed by four point subjective score. Results: Baseline maternal demographics and neonatal birth weight were comparable. Neonatal cord blood pH, base deficit, sugar, and ionised calcium levels were significantly improved in the epidural group in comparison to the tramadol group. Maternal satisfaction (P = 0.0001) regarding labour analgesia in epidural group was expressed as excellent by 48%, good by 52% whereas it was fair in 75% and poor in 25% in the tramadol group. Better haemodynamic and pain scores were reported in the epidural group. Conclusion: Epidural labour analgesia with low concentration local anaesthetic is associated with less neonatal cord blood acidaemia, better sugar and ionised calcium levels. The analgesic efficacy and maternal satisfaction are also better with epidural labour analgesia. PMID:27013750

  5. In vitro adhesion of K88ac+ Escherichia coli to Peyer's patch and peripheral blood lymphocytes, buccal and rectal epithelial cells or intestinal epithelial brush borders of weaned pigs.

    PubMed

    Valpotić, I; Runnels, P L; Moon, H W

    1989-08-01

    Escherichia coli adhesion assays were conducted using isolated porcine peripheral blood lymphocytes, Peyer's patch lymphocytes, rectal epithelial cells or brush borders, buccal epithelial cells and brush borders from small intestinal epithelial cells. The cells and brush borders were tested for their ability to bind K88-piliated enterotoxigenic E. coli Strain M1823B (K88ac) and E. coli Strain 1476 (K-12, K88ac). Comparison of adhesive phenotypes of 37 weaned pigs as determined by the adhesion assay with small intestinal brush borders and the adherence of K88ac+ enterotoxigenic E. coli to peripheral blood lymphocytes, Peyer's patch lymphocytes and rectal epithelial cells or brush borders, revealed no correlation. In vitro adhesion of K88ac-bearing E. coli was always negative with buccal epithelial cells. K88ac strains varied in their ability to adhere to lymphocytes and rectal epithelial cells or brush borders, indicating that the mechanism of adherence is unrelated to K88-mediated adhesion observed in animals that had the receptors on small-intestinal epithelial-cell brush borders. The non-piliated control E. coli Strain 123 adhered to fresh peripheral blood lymphocytes, and less intensively to frozen-thawed peripheral blood lymphocytes or Peyer's patch lymphocytes. It was concluded that none of the cell types or brush borders, except small-intestinal epithelial-cell brush borders, could be used as targets for phenotyping pigs for the presence of the K88 receptors that have been associated with adhesion and colonization of K88+ enterotoxigenic E. coli in the porcine small intestine.

  6. [Hyperthermia after obstetrical epidural anesthesia].

    PubMed

    Mercier, F J; Benhamou, D

    1994-01-01

    Unlike epidural anaesthesia for general surgery or caesarean section, épidural analgesia for labour leads to maternal hyperthermia. Its recent demonstration is probably related to the multiple influencing factors: site of measurement, ambient temperature, previous labour duration and dilatation at the time of epidural puncture, and occurrence of shivering. During the first 2 to 5 hours of epidural analgesia, there is a weak--if any--thermic increase. Then, when labour is prolonged (mostly primiparae) a linear increase occurs with time, at a mean rate of 1 degree C per 7 hours. The pathophysiology remains hypothetical: heat loss (sweating and hyperventilation) would be reduced during epidural analgesia and therefore surpassed by the important labour-induced heat production. This hyperthermia has been correlated with foetal tachycardia but never with any infectious process. A potential deleterious effect is still debated and may lead to propose an active cooling for the mother. This hyperthermia must also be recognized to avoid an inadequate obstetrical attitude (antibiotics, extractions).

  7. Spinal epidural abscess: a rare complication of olecranon bursitis

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Rhys D.R.; Thaya, Moe; Chew, Ne Siang; Gibbons, Charles E.R.

    2009-01-01

    Spinal epidural abscess is a rare but potentially fatal condition if left untreated. We report the case of a 67-year old man who presented to the Accident and Emergency department complaining of acute onset of inter-scapular back pain, left leg weakness and loss of sensation in the left foot. On examination he was found to be pyrexial with long tract signs in the left lower leg. In addition he had a left sided olecranon bursitis of three weeks duration. Blood tests revealed raised inflammatory markers and a staphylococcal bacteremia. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) confirmed the diagnosis of spinal epidural abscess and he subsequently underwent a three level laminectomy with good resolution of his back pain and neurological symptoms. He has made a complete recovery with a prolonged course of intravenous antibiotics. PMID:21808663

  8. Spinal epidural abscess: a rare complication of olecranon bursitis.

    PubMed

    Evans, Rhys D R; Thaya, Moe; Chew, Ne Siang; Gibbons, Charles E R

    2009-06-30

    Spinal epidural abscess is a rare but potentially fatal condition if left untreated. We report the case of a 67-year old man who presented to the Accident and Emergency department complaining of acute onset of inter-scapular back pain, left leg weakness and loss of sensation in the left foot. On examination he was found to be pyrexial with long tract signs in the left lower leg. In addition he had a left sided olecranon bursitis of three weeks duration. Blood tests revealed raised inflammatory markers and a staphylococcal bacteremia. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) confirmed the diagnosis of spinal epidural abscess and he subsequently underwent a three level laminectomy with good resolution of his back pain and neurological symptoms. He has made a complete recovery with a prolonged course of intravenous antibiotics.

  9. Paraplegia After Thoracic Epidural Steroid Injection.

    PubMed

    Loomba, Vivek; Kaveeshvar, Hirsh; Dwivedi, Samvid

    2016-09-01

    Epidural steroid injections are a common procedure performed by pain physicians. The American Society of Regional Anesthesia along with several other groups recently provided guidelines for performing epidural injections in the setting of anticoagulants. We present a case of a patient who developed an epidural hematoma and subsequent paraplegia despite strict adherence to these guidelines. Although new guidelines serve to direct practice, risks of devastating neurologic complications remain as evidenced by our case.

  10. [Maintaining epidural anesthesia by the midwife].

    PubMed

    Dörfling, C; Nolte, A G

    1990-12-01

    Epidural anaesthesia as a method of pain relief during labour has lately become very popular. Statistics show that in some labour units up to 70 per cent of all patients undergo epidural anaesthesia. The popularity of this method can be attributed to its effectiveness in relieving pain during labour. The anaesthetist commences an epidural block by introducing an epidural catheter into the epidural space. The anaesthetist administers the test dose and the first therapeutic dose. Within a short duration of time (10 to 20 minutes) the patient can already experience the numbing effect of the anaesthetic. This anaesthetic loses its numbing effect within two to three hours and effective pain relief can only be achieved by administering a further dose of local anaesthetic via the epidural catheter. This procedure can be repeated between three to six times during the average duration of labour. Alternatively, a continuous epidural infusion procedure can be used. The last method, however, sometimes requires the administration of additional epidural "top-ups". There are some risks in administering additional "top-up" dosages. The possibility exists of the anaesthetic causing a spinal block as a result of being administered into the spinal fluid. The "top-up" can also cause convulsions if administered intravenously. In some units it is expected of the midwife to maintain epidural anaesthesia on prescription by the doctor. These side-effects can, however, also occur when the patient is being treated by medical personnel with ample experience and knowledge. It is expected of some midwives to maintain an epidural block on prescription by the anaesthetist. If the midwife lacks the necessary knowledge of epidural anaesthetic and its maintenance, she might unintentionally administer the local anaesthetic into the spinal fluid or intravascularly. This might cause a threat to the mother's and baby's lives. This research covers the maintenance of epidural anaesthesia as carried out by

  11. Scopolamine Transdermal Patch

    MedlinePlus

    ... patch from its protective pouch. To expose the adhesive surface of the patch, the clear plastic protective ... peeled off and discarded. Contact with the exposed adhesive layer should be avoided to prevent contamination of ...

  12. SafePatch

    SciTech Connect

    Kelley, M.; Elko, S.

    2000-10-01

    Authenticating and upgrading system software plays a critical role in information security, yet practical tools for assessing and installing software are lacking in today's marketplace. The SafePatch tool provides the mechanism of performing automated analysis, notification, distribution, and installation of security patches and related software to network-based computer systems in a vendor-independent fashion. SafePatch assists in the authentication of software by comparing the system's objects with the patch's objects. SafePatch will monitor vendor's sites to determine when new patches are released and will upgrade system software on target systems automatically. This paper describes the design of SafePatch, motivations behind the project and the advantages of SafePatch over existing tools.

  13. Metal Patch Antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamberlain, Neil F. (Inventor); Hodges, Richard E. (Inventor); Zawadzki, Mark S. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    Disclosed herein is a patch antenna comprises a planar conductive patch attached to a ground plane by a support member, and a probe connector in electrical communication with the conductive patch arranged to conduct electromagnetic energy to or from the conductive patch, wherein the conductive patch is disposed essentially parallel to the ground plane and is separated from the ground plane by a spacing distance; wherein the support member comprises a plurality of sides disposed about a central axis oriented perpendicular to the conductive patch and the ground plane; wherein the conductive patch is solely supported above the ground plane by the support member; and wherein the support member provides electrical communication between the planer conductive patch and the ground plane.

  14. Collection of analytes from microneedle patches.

    PubMed

    Romanyuk, Andrey V; Zvezdin, Vasiliy N; Samant, Pradnya; Grenader, Mark I; Zemlyanova, Marina; Prausnitz, Mark R

    2014-11-04

    Clinical medicine and public health would benefit from simplified acquisition of biological samples from patients that can be easily obtained at point of care, in the field, and by patients themselves. Microneedle patches are designed to serve this need by collecting dermal interstitial fluid containing biomarkers without the dangers, pain, or expertise needed to collect blood. This study presents novel methods to collect biomarker analytes from microneedle patches for analysis by integration into conventional analytical laboratory microtubes and microplates. Microneedle patches were made out of cross-linked hydrogel composed of poly(methyl vinyl ether-alt-maleic acid) and poly(ethylene glycol) prepared by micromolding. Microneedle patches were shown to swell with water up to 50-fold in volume, depending on degree of polymer cross-linking, and to collect interstitial fluid from the skin of rats. To collect analytes from microneedle patches, the patches were mounted within the cap of microcentrifuge tubes or formed the top of V-bottom multiwell microplates, and fluid was collected in the bottom of the tubes under gentle centrifugation. In another method, microneedle patches were attached to form the bottom of multiwell microplates, thereby enabling in situ analysis. The simplicity of biological sample acquisition using microneedle patches coupled with the simplicity of analyte collection from microneedles patches integrated into conventional analytical equipment could broaden the reach of future screening, diagnosis, and monitoring of biomarkers in healthcare and environmental/workplace settings.

  15. Birth Control Patch

    MedlinePlus

    ... Loss Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Birth Control Patch KidsHealth > For Teens > Birth Control Patch A A A What's in this article? ... Much Does It Cost? What Is It? The birth control patch is a thin, beige, 1¾-inch (4½- ...

  16. Birth Control Patch

    MedlinePlus

    ... Loss Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Birth Control Patch KidsHealth > For Teens > Birth Control Patch Print A A A What's in this ... Much Does It Cost? What Is It? The birth control patch is a thin, beige, 1¾-inch (4½- ...

  17. Epidural optogenetics for controlled analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Bonin, Robert P; Wang, Feng; Desrochers-Couture, Mireille; Ga¸secka, Alicja; Boulanger, Marie-Eve; Côté, Daniel C

    2016-01-01

    Background Optogenetic tools enable cell selective and temporally precise control of neuronal activity; yet, difficulties in delivering sufficient light to the spinal cord of freely behaving animals have hampered the use of spinal optogenetic approaches to produce analgesia. We describe an epidural optic fiber designed for chronic spinal optogenetics that enables the precise delivery of light at multiple wavelengths to the spinal cord dorsal horn and sensory afferents. Results The epidural delivery of light enabled the optogenetic modulation of nociceptive processes at the spinal level. The acute and repeated activation of channelrhodopsin-2 expressing nociceptive afferents produced robust nocifensive behavior and mechanical sensitization in freely behaving mice, respectively. The optogenetic inhibition of GABAergic interneurons in the spinal cord dorsal horn through the activation of archaerhodopsin also produced a transient, but selective induction of mechanical hypersensitivity. Finally, we demonstrate the capacity of optogenetics to produce analgesia in freely behaving mice through the inhibition of nociceptive afferents via archaerhodopsin. Conclusion Epidural optogenetics provides a robust and powerful solution for activation of both excitatory and inhibitory opsins in sensory processing pathways. Our results demonstrate the potential of spinal optogenetics to modulate sensory behavior and produce analgesia in freely behaving animals. PMID:27030718

  18. Cervical epidural hematoma after chiropractic spinal manipulation.

    PubMed

    Heiner, Jason D

    2009-10-01

    Spinal epidural hematoma is a rare but potentially devastating complication of spinal manipulation therapy. This is a case report of a healthy pregnant female who presented to the emergency department with a cervical epidural hematoma resulting from chiropractic spinal manipulation therapy that responded to conservative treatment rather than the more common route of surgical management.

  19. Postlumbar puncture arachnoiditis mimicking epidural abscess

    PubMed Central

    Gürbüz, Mehmet Sabri; Erdoğan, Barıs; Yüksel, Mehmet Onur; Somay, Hakan

    2013-01-01

    Lumbar spinal arachnoiditis occurring after diagnostic lumbar puncture is a very rare condition. Arachnoiditis may also present with fever and elevated infection markers and may mimic epidural abscess, which is one of the well known infectious complications of lumbar puncture. We report the case of a 56-year-old man with lumbar spinal arachnoiditis occurring after diagnostic lumbar puncture who was operated on under a misdiagnosis of epidural abscess. In the intraoperative and postoperative microbiological and histopathological examination, no epidural abscess was detected. To our knowledge, this is the first case of a patient with postlumbar puncture arachnoiditis operated on under a misdiagnosis of epidural abscess reported in the literature. The authors suggest that arachnoiditis may mimic epidural abscess due to its clinical and radiological features and should be considered in the differential diagnosis of complications of lumbar puncture. PMID:24197809

  20. Large, spontaneous spinal subdural–epidural hematoma after epidural anesthesia for caesarean section: Conservative management with excellent outcome

    PubMed Central

    Siasios, Ioannis D.; Vakharia, Kunal; Gibbons, Kevin J.; Dimopoulos, Vassilios G.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Iatrogenic or spontaneous spinal hematomas are rarely seen and present with multiple symptoms that can be difficult to localize. Most spontaneous spinal hematomas are multifactorial, and the pathophysiology is varied. Here, we present a case of a scattered, multicomponent, combined subdural and epidural spinal hematoma that was managed conservatively. Case Description: A 38-year-old woman came to the emergency department (ED) complaining of severe neck and back pain. She had undergone a caesarean section under epidural anesthesia 4 days prior to her arrival in the ED. She was placed on heparin and then warfarin to treat a pulmonary embolism that was diagnosed immediately postpartum. Her neurological examination at presentation demonstrated solely the existence of clonus in the lower extremities and localized cervical and low thoracic pain. In the ED, the patient's international normalized ratio was only mildly elevated. Spinal magnetic resonance imaging revealed a large thoracolumbar subdural hematoma with some epidural components in the upper thoracic spine levels. Spinal cord edema was also noted at the T6-T7 vertebral level. The patient was admitted to the neurosurgical intensive care unit for close surveillance and reversal of her coagulopathy. She was treated conservatively with pain medication, fresh frozen plasma, and vitamin K. She was discharged off of warfarin without any neurological deficit. Conclusions: Conservative management of spinal hematomas secondary to induced coagulopathies can be effective. This case suggests that, in the face of neuroimaging findings of significant edema and epidural blood, the clinical examination should dictate the management, especially in such complicated patients. PMID:27843682

  1. Long-Term Evaluation of Continuous Epidural Anesthesia in an Improved Canine Model

    PubMed Central

    Sasauchi, Kyoko; Sunada, Katsuhisa; Nakamura, Tatsuo

    2016-01-01

    Background Continuous epidural analgesia with catheterization is a useful technique, because it has a wide adaptation range and provides prolonged analgesia. Problems that may arise from long-term epidural analgesia are changes in the analgesic area, duration of analgesia and catheter-related problems. Few articles have evaluated gradual changes of long-term epidural analgesia. In the animal models used in those studies, the catheter was inserted by an invasive surgical procedure. In the present study, we evaluated changes in a canine model in which the catheter was inserted by a minimally invasive procedure. Objectives To evaluate long-term changes in the efficacy of epidural analgesia in an improved canine model in which the epidural catheter was inserted and fixed for 5 weeks using a minimally invasive procedure. Materials and Methods Six beagles underwent epidural catheterization under general anaesthesia. The catheter tip was located in the sixth lumbar region; the catheter peripheral end was passed subcutaneously through the neck. Physiological saline was continuously infused (1.0 mL/h) via the catheter throughout the study. The efficacy of epidural analgesia was assessed weekly with 2% lidocaine once a week in 5 weeks. Peripheral blood analysis including interleukin-6 (IL-6) level in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), histological evaluations and epidurography were performed to evaluate the mechanisms underlying the changes. Results No dog died and the catheters were kept in place. The efficacy of analgesia was well maintained until 4 weeks; at 5th week, the efficacy decreased by half. The spread of injected medium was not observed in the cranial direction at 5th week and the tip of catheter was capped with granulation tissue. Throughout the study period, white blood cell counts and C-reactive protein levels were slightly high for catheterization and the IL-6 level in CSF was below detectable limits. Conclusions This was the longest study period with continuous

  2. Spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma after abrupt sneezing with prompt recovery of severe paraparesis.

    PubMed

    Štětkářová, Ivana; Jelínková, Lenka; Janík, Vaclav; Peisker, Tomas

    2014-12-01

    Spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma (SSEH) is a rare neurologic condition with threatening consequences when spinal cord compression is present. The diagnosis must be performed quickly using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which shows collection of blood in the epidural space. With spinal cord compression, there is an indication for urgent surgical decompression. Here, we present a 64-year-old woman who developed sudden thoracic and lower back pain accompanied by severe paraparesis and urinary retention after sneezing abruptly. An MRI revealed a posterior thoracic epidural hematoma extending from the T6 to T11 vertebral level with spinal cord compression. Decompression was recommended, but the patient refused surgery, while neurologically improving with time. Complete neurologic recovery was observed within 24 hours after SSEH onset. A conservative therapeutic approach with careful observation may therefore be considered as a treatment of choice in some cases where surgery is refused, (due to high risk or other reasons) and neurologic recovery is early and sustained.

  3. Cervical Meningomyelitis After Lumbar Epidural Steroid Injection

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Joon-Sung; Kim, Ji Yeon

    2015-01-01

    Epidural steroid injections (ESI) are a common treatment for back pain management. ESI-related complications have increased with the growing number of procedures. We report a case of cervical meningomyelitis followed by multiple lumbar ESI. A 60-year-old male with diabetes mellitus presented to our hospital with severe neck pain. He had a history of multiple lumbar injections from a local pain clinic. After admission, high fever and elevated inflammatory values were detected. L-spine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed hematoma in the S1 epidural space. Antibiotic treatment began under the diagnosis of a lumbar epidural abscess. Despite the treatment, he started to complain of weakness in both lower extremities. Three days later, the weakness progressed to both upper extremities. C-spine MRI revealed cervical leptomeningeal enhancement in the medulla oblongata and cervical spinal cord. Removal of the epidural abscess was performed, but there was no neurological improvement. PMID:26161360

  4. Epidural Analgesia in the Postoperative Period

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-10-01

    an unwanted side effect of surgery, and is associated with many postoperative complications. This descriptive study was conducted to determine which...surgical patients experienced the most analgesia with the fewest side effects when receiving epidural analgesia in the postoperative period. A...hospital. A description of the patients age, gender, type of surgery, type of epidural medication, side effects , incidence of breakthrough pain, and

  5. Extensive spinal epidural abscess treated with "apical laminectomies" and irrigation of the epidural space: report of 2 cases.

    PubMed

    Abd-El-Barr, Muhammad M; Bi, Wenya Linda; Bahluyen, Biji; Rodriguez, Samuel T; Groff, Michael W; Chi, John H

    2015-03-01

    Spinal epidural abscess (SEA) is a rare but often devastating infection of the epidural space around the spinal cord. When an SEA is widespread, extensive decompression with laminectomy is often impossible, as it may subject the patient to very long operative times, extensive blood loss, and mechanical instability. A technique called "skip laminectomy" has been described in the literature, in which laminectomies are performed at the rostral and caudal ends of an abscess that spans 3-5 levels and a Fogarty catheter is used to mechanically drain the abscess, much like in an embolectomy. In this report of 2 patients, the authors present a modification of this technique, which they call "apical laminectomies" to allow for irrigation and drainage of an extensive SEA spanning the entire length of the vertebral column (C1-2 to L5-S1). Two patients presented with cervico-thoraco-lumbar SEA. Laminectomies were performed at the natural apices of the spine, namely, at the midcervical, midthoracic, and midlumbar spine levels. Next, a pediatric feeding tube was inserted in the epidural space from the thoracic laminectomies up toward the cervical laminectomy site and down toward the lumbar laminectomy site, and saline antibiotics were used to irrigate the SEA. Both patients underwent this procedure with no adverse effects. Their SEAs resolved both clinically and radiologically. Neither patient suffered from mechanical instability at 1 year after treatment. For patients who present with extensive SEAs, apical laminectomies seem to allow for surgical cure of the infectious burden and do not subject the patient to extended operating room time, an increased risk of blood loss, and the risk of mechanical instability.

  6. Spinal epidural abscess in brucellosis.

    PubMed

    Boyaci, Ahmet; Boyaci, Nurefsan; Tutoglu, Ahmet; Dokumaci, Dilek Sen

    2013-09-26

    Involvement of the skeletal system is a common complication of brucellosis. However, muscle involvement or paraspinal abscess formation are rare complications. Paraspinal abscess usually develops secondary to spondylitis. A case is reported here of a 33-year-old woman with symptoms of night sweats, fever and low back pain. Rose-Bengal test for brucellosis was positive and Brucella standard tube agglutination test was positive at a titre of 1/160. The diagnosis was made on MRI. The patient was treated with doxycycline and rifampin daily for 16 weeks. On day 14 of treatment, decline was observed in the patient's symptoms. In the presence of inflammatory lower back pain and fever, brucellosis should be considered particularly in the endemic areas. Furthermore, tuberculosis should be remembered in the differential diagnosis when a spinal epidural abscess is determined.

  7. Blood

    MedlinePlus

    ... The liquid part, called plasma, is made of water, salts, and protein. Over half of your blood is plasma. The solid part of your blood contains red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. Red ...

  8. Symptomatic Spinal Epidural Lipomatosis After a Single Local Epidural Steroid Injection

    SciTech Connect

    Tok, Chung Hong Kaur, Shaleen; Gangi, Afshin

    2011-02-15

    Spinal epidural lipomatosis is a rare disorder that can manifest with progressive neurological deficits. It is characterized by abnormal accumulation of unencapsulated epidural fat commonly associated with the administration of exogenous steroids associated with a variety of systemic diseases, endocrinopathies, and Cushing syndrome (Fogel et al. Spine J 5:202-211, 2005). Occasionally, spinal epidural lipomatosis may occur in patients not exposed to steroids or in patients with endocrinopathies, primarily in obese individuals (Fogel et al. Spine J 5:202-211, 2005). However, spinal lumbar epidural lipomatosis resulting from local steroid injection has rarely been reported. We report the case of a 45-year-old diabetic man with claudication that was probably due to symptomatic lumbar spinal lipomatosis resulting from a single local epidural steroid injection.

  9. Lidocaine Transdermal Patch

    MedlinePlus

    Lidocaine patches are used to relieve the pain of post-herpetic neuralgia (PHN; the burning, stabbing pains, ... for months or years after a shingles infection). Lidocaine is in a class of medications called local ...

  10. DyninstAPI Patches

    SciTech Connect

    LeGendre, M.

    2012-04-01

    We are seeking a code review of patches against DyninstAPI 8.0. DyninstAPI is an open source binary instrumentation library from the University of Wisconsin and University of Maryland. Our patches port DyninstAPI to the BlueGene/P and BlueGene/Q systems, as well as fix DyninstAPI bugs and implement minor new features in DyninstAPI.

  11. Idiopathic Spinal Epidural Lipomatosis in the Lumbar Spine.

    PubMed

    Al-Omari, Ali A; Phukan, Rishabh D; Leonard, Dana A; Herzog, Tyler L; Wood, Kirkham B; Bono, Christopher M

    2016-05-01

    Overgrowth of epidural fat, known as spinal epidural lipomatosis (SEL), can cause symptomatic compression of the spinal cord, conus medullaris, or cauda equina. Suggested predisposing factors such as obesity, steroid use, and diabetes mellitus have been based on a few reported cases, many of which were not surgically confirmed. There is a paucity of epidemiological data in surgically confirmed cases for this disorder. The purpose of this independently reviewed, retrospective, matched cohort analysis was to compare the demographics and incidence of comorbidities of patients who underwent lumbar decompression for SEL vs degenerative stenosis without SEL. Two surgeons' databases were reviewed to identify patients older than 18 years who underwent decompression surgery for magnetic resonance imaging-verified, symptomatic lumbar SEL. A matched control group comprised an equal number of patients with degenerative stenosis (n=14). Demographic data, body mass index, symptom type/duration, comorbidities, complications, treatment history, and associated pathology were collected from medical records. Previously suggested risk factors, such as obesity, endocrinopathy, and epidural steroid injections, were not significantly different between the SEL and control groups. Furthermore, there were no differences in operative times, complications, or blood loss. The only noted difference between the 2 groups was the preoperative duration of symptoms, on average double in patients with SEL. This series represents the largest of its kind reported to date. Because symptom duration was the only difference noted, it is postulated to be the result of lack of awareness of SEL. Future prospective study in a larger group of patients is warranted. [Orthopedics. 2016; 39(3):163-168.].

  12. Foetal heart rate deceleration with combined spinal-epidural analgesia during labour: a maternal haemodynamic cardiac study.

    PubMed

    Valensise, Herbert; Lo Presti, Damiano; Tiralongo, Grazia Maria; Pisani, Ilaria; Gagliardi, Giulia; Vasapollo, Barbara; Frigo, Maria Grazia

    2016-01-01

    To understand the mechanisms those are involved in the appearance of foetal heart rate decelerations (FHR) after the combined epidural analgesia in labour. Observational study done at University Hospital for 86-term singleton pregnant women with spontaneous labour. Serial bedside measurement of the main cardiac maternal parameters with USCOM technique; stroke volume (SV), heart rate (HR), cardiac output (CO) and total vascular resistances (TVR) inputting systolic and diastolic blood pressure before combined epidural analgesia and after 5', 10', 15' and 20 min. FHR was continuously recorded though cardiotocography before and after the procedure. Correlation between the appearance of foetal heart rate decelerations and the modification of maternal haemodynamic parameters. Fourteen out of 86 foetuses showed decelerations after the combined spino epidural procedure. No decelerations occurred in the women with low TVR (<1000 dyne/s/cm(-5)) at the basal evaluation. FHR abnormalities were concentrated in 39 women who presented elevated TVR values at the basal evaluation (>1200 dyne/s/cm(-5)). Soon after the epidural procedure, the absence of increase in SV and CO was observed in these women. No variations in systolic and diastolic blood pressure values were found. The level of TVR before combined epidural analgesia in labour may indicate the risk of FHR abnormalities after the procedure. Low TVR (<1000 dyne/s/cm(-5)) showed a reduced risk of FHR abnormalities. FHR decelerations seem to occur in women without the ability to upregulate SV and CO in response to the initial effects of analgesia.

  13. Difficulty in the removal of epidural catheter for labor analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Hajnour, Mohamed S.; Khokhar, Rashid Saeed; Ejaz, Abdul Aziz Ahmed; Al Zahrani, Tariq; Kanchi, Naveed Uddin

    2017-01-01

    For labor pain management epidural analgesia is a popular and an effective method. Difficult removal of epidural catheters occasionally occurs, and several maneuvers have been recommended. The purpose of this article is to raise awareness of the problem of retained epidural catheter fragments and identify the potential impact of complications. PMID:28217071

  14. Pneumococcal Vertebral Osteomyelitis after Epidural Injection: A Rare Event

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Tamara M; Chitturi, Chandrika; Lange, Michael; Suh, Jin S; Slim, Jihad

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae vertebral infections have rarely been reported. Herein, we report a case of pneumococcal vertebral osteomyelitis with paraspinal and epidural abscesses as well as concomitant bacteremia following epidural injection. This will be the second case in the literature reporting pneumococcal vertebral osteomyelitis related to epidural manipulation. PMID:27621563

  15. Unusual Spinal Epidural Lipomatosis and Lumbosacral Instability

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz Picazo, David; Ramírez Villaescusa, José

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Epidural lipomatosis is most frequently observed in patients on chronic steroid treatment. Only a few idiopathic epidural lipomatosis cases have been described. Material and Methods. 64-year-old male patient presented with low back pain and left leg pain. Later, the patient experienced neurogenic claudication and radicular pain in the left leg without urinary dysfunction. Plain radiography and magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated an abnormal fat tissue overgrowth in the epidural space with compression of the dural sac, degenerative disc disease at L4-L5 level, and instability at L5-S1. Endocrinopathic diseases and chronic steroid therapy were excluded. If conservative treatment failed, surgical treatment can be indicated. Results. After surgery, there was a gradual improvement in symptoms and signs, and six months later the patient returned to daily activities and was neurologically normal. Conclusion. In the absence of common causes of neurogenic claudication, epidural lipomatosis should be considered. The standard test for the diagnosis of epidural lipomatosis is magnetic resonance (MR). At first, conservative treatment must be considered; weight loss and the suspension of prior corticosteroid therapy are indicated. In the presence of neurological impairment, the operative treatment of wide surgical decompression must be performed soon after diagnosis. PMID:27069704

  16. Blood

    MedlinePlus

    ... that die or are lost from the body. White Blood Cells White blood cells (WBCs, and also ... of severe pain. previous continue Diseases of the White Blood Cells Neutropenia (pronounced: new-truh-PEE-nee- ...

  17. Sperm Patch-Clamp

    PubMed Central

    Lishko, Polina; Clapham, David E.; Navarro, Betsy; Kirichok, Yuriy

    2014-01-01

    Sperm intracellular pH and calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) are two central factors that control sperm activity within the female reproductive tract. As such, the ion channels of the sperm plasma membrane that alter intracellular sperm [Ca2+] and pH play important roles in sperm physiology and the process of fertilization. Indeed, sperm ion channels regulate sperm motility, control sperm chemotaxis toward the egg in some species, and may trigger the acrosome reaction. Until recently, our understanding of these important molecules was rudimentary due to the inability to patch-clamp spermatozoa and directly record the activity of these ion channels under voltage clamp. Recently, we overcame this technical barrier and developed a method for reproducible application of the patch-clamp technique to mouse and human spermatozoa. This chapter covers important aspects of application of the patch-clamp technique to spermatozoa, such as selection of the electrophysiological equipment, isolation of spermatozoa for patch-clamp experiments, formation of the gigaohm seal with spermatozoa, and transition into the whole-cell mode of recording. We also discuss potential pitfalls in application of the patch-clamp technique to flagellar ion channels. PMID:23522465

  18. Spontaneous epidural hematoma due to cervico-thoracic angiolipoma.

    PubMed

    Eap, C; Bannwarth, M; Jazeron, J-F; Kleber, J-C; Theret, É; Duntze, J; Litre, C-F

    2015-12-01

    Epidural angiolipomas are uncommon benign tumors of the spine. Their clinical presentation is usually a progressive spinal cord compression. We report the case of a 22-year-old patient who presented with an acute paraparesis and a spontaneous epidural hematoma, which revealed a epidural angiolipoma which extended from C7 to T3. The patient underwent a C7-T3 laminectomy, in emergency, with evacuation of the hematoma and extradural complete resection of a fibrous epidural tumor bleeding. The postoperative course was favorable with regression of neurological symptoms. Epidural angiolipomas can be revealed by spontaneous intratumoral hemorrhage without traumatism. The standard treatment is total removal by surgery.

  19. Experience with symptomatic spinal epidural cysts.

    PubMed

    Freidberg, S R; Fellows, T; Thomas, C B; Mancall, A C

    1994-06-01

    Epidural cysts, either synovial or ganglion, are an unusual cause of epidural compressive syndromes. We report a series of 26 patients with cysts, including 1 cervical, 2 thoracic, and 23 lumbar. Complaints at the time of admission and findings were similar to those associated with other epidural lesions at the same locations. The surgical technique is similar to that for other spinal lesions, with a wide exposure to enable a clear view of the cyst and surrounding structures, and is governed by imaging studies. Patients with cervical and thoracic lumbar cysts were free of symptoms and signs postoperatively. Of the 23 patients with lumbar cysts, 15 were free of symptoms after an operation, 7 had symptomatic improvement but had some pain and neurological findings, and 1 patient had no improvement. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging permit accurate preoperative evaluation.

  20. Lumbar Epidural Varix Mimicking Disc Herniation

    PubMed Central

    Bursalı, Adem; Guvenal, Ahmet Burak; Yaman, Onur

    2016-01-01

    Lumbar radiculopathy is generally caused by such well-recognized entity as lumbar disc herniation in neurosurgical practice; however rare pathologies such as thrombosed epidural varix may mimic them by causing radicular symptoms. In this case report, we present a 26-year-old man with the complaint of back and right leg pain who was operated for right L4–5 disc herniation. The lesion interpreted as an extruded disc herniation preoperatively was found to be a thrombosed epidural varix compressing the nerve root preoperatively. The nerve root was decompressed by shrinking the lesion with bipolar thermocoagulation and excision. The patient's complaints disappeared in the postoperative period. Thrombosed lumbar epidural varices may mimic lumbar disc herniations both radiologically and clinically. Therefore, must be kept in mind in the differential diagnosis of lumbar disc herniations. Microsurgical techniques are mandatory for the treatment of these pathologies and decompression with thermocoagulation and excision is an efficient method. PMID:27446525

  1. Solitary spinal epidural cavernous haemangiomas as a rare cause of myelopathy.

    PubMed

    Meng, Ying; Shamji, Mohammed F

    2015-09-25

    Cavernous haemangiomas rarely occur in the spinal epidural space. We report the case of a 27-year-old man who presented with myelopathy secondary to spinal cord compression from a purely epidural lesion. The imaging characteristics of cavernous haemangiomas are unique, reflecting a highly vascular lesion. Key differentiating features from intracranial or intramedullary lesions include the lack of a surrounding hemosiderin ring and popcorn appearance. An urgent referral to a neurosurgeon is recommended given the possibility of acute neurological deterioration from intralesional haemorrhage, and good recovery from early surgical resection. Preoperative planning with thorough patient counselling and availability of matched blood is important, and an en bloc resection approach should be taken to minimise blood loss. In this case, the patient experienced complete recovery after surgical resection. No recurrence after complete resection has been reported in the literature. This suggests a good long-term outcome for the patient and that no early adjuvant therapy is necessary.

  2. [Characteristics and distribution of normal human epidural fat].

    PubMed

    Reina, M A; Pulido, P; Castedo, J; Villanueva, M C; López, A; Sola, R G

    2006-01-01

    Epidural fat provides sufficient cushion for the pulsatile movements of the dural sac, protects nerve structures, facilitates the movement of the dural sac over the periosteum of the spinal column during flexion and extension, and forms a pharmacologic reservoir of lipophilic substances. We review epidural fat and related structures, including their development during the fetal period when the epidural space is filled by undifferentiated loose, areolar mesenchymal tissue that surrounds the dural sac. In the adult, epidural fat has a continuous distribution and follows a certain metameric pattern. It is located mainly on the dorsal side of the epidural space, where it is organized in triangular capsules joined to the midline of the ligamentum flavum by a vascular pedicle. We consider the distribution of epidural fat in the axial and sagittal planes; its presence in the anterior, lateral and posterior epidural space; its presence in the cervical, thoracic and lumbar portions of the spinal column; and its characteristics and variations according to differing body habits and sex. Finally, we speculate on the possible anesthetic implications of epidural fat in terms of the pharmacokinetics of drugs injected into the epidural space and the tasks of locating the epidural space and inserting an epidural catheter during anesthetic procedures.

  3. Obstetric epidurals and chronic adhesive arachnoiditis.

    PubMed

    Rice, I; Wee, M Y K; Thomson, K

    2004-01-01

    It has been suggested that obstetric epidurals lead to chronic adhesive arachnoiditis (CAA). CAA is a nebulous disease entity with much confusion over its symptomatology. This review outlines the pathological, clinical, and radiological features of the disease. The proposed diagnostic criteria for CAA are: back pain that increases on exertion, with or without leg pain; neurological abnormality on examination; and characteristic MRI findings. Using these criteria, there is evidence to show that epidural or subarachnoid placement of some contrast media, preservatives and possibly vasoconstrictors, may lead to CAA. No evidence was found that the preservative-free, low concentration bupivacaine with opioid mixtures or plain bupivacaine currently used in labour lead to CAA.

  4. Rapidly Progressive Spontaneous Spinal Epidural Abscess.

    PubMed

    Aycan, Abdurrahman; Aktas, Ozgür Yusuf; Guzey, Feyza Karagoz; Tufan, Azmi; Isler, Cihan; Aycan, Nur; Gulsen, İsmail; Arslan, Harun

    2016-01-01

    Spinal epidural abscess (SEA) is a rare disease which is often rapidly progressive. Delayed diagnosis of SEA may lead to serious complications and the clinical findings of SEA are generally nonspecific. Paraspinal abscess should be considered in the presence of local low back tenderness, redness, and pain with fever, particularly in children. In case of delayed diagnosis and treatment, SEA may spread to the epidural space and may cause neurological deficits. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) remains the method of choice in the diagnosis of SEA. Treatment of SEA often consists of both medical and surgical therapy including drainage with percutaneous entry, corpectomy, and instrumentation.

  5. Rapidly Progressive Spontaneous Spinal Epidural Abscess

    PubMed Central

    Aktas, Ozgür Yusuf; Guzey, Feyza Karagoz; Tufan, Azmi; Isler, Cihan; Aycan, Nur; Gulsen, İsmail

    2016-01-01

    Spinal epidural abscess (SEA) is a rare disease which is often rapidly progressive. Delayed diagnosis of SEA may lead to serious complications and the clinical findings of SEA are generally nonspecific. Paraspinal abscess should be considered in the presence of local low back tenderness, redness, and pain with fever, particularly in children. In case of delayed diagnosis and treatment, SEA may spread to the epidural space and may cause neurological deficits. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) remains the method of choice in the diagnosis of SEA. Treatment of SEA often consists of both medical and surgical therapy including drainage with percutaneous entry, corpectomy, and instrumentation. PMID:27688918

  6. Prediction by computerised tomography of distance from skin to epidural space during thoracic epidural insertion.

    PubMed

    Carnie, J; Boden, J; Gao Smith, F

    2002-07-01

    In this single group observational study on 29 patients, we describe a technique that predicts the depth of the epidural space, calculated from the routine pre-operative chest computerised tomography (CT) scan using Pythagorean triangle trigonometry. We also compared the CT-derived depth of the epidural space with the actual depth of needle insertion. The CT-derived and the actual depths of the epidural space were highly correlated (r = 0.88, R2 = 0.78, p < 0.0001). The mean (95% CI) difference between CT-derived and actual depths was 0.26 (0.03-0.49) cm. Thus, the CT-derived depth tends to be greater than the actual depth by between 0.03 and 0.49 cm. There were no associations between either the CT-derived or the actual depth of the epidural space and age, weight, height or body mass index.

  7. Measles vaccination using a microneedle patch.

    PubMed

    Edens, Chris; Collins, Marcus L; Ayers, Jessica; Rota, Paul A; Prausnitz, Mark R

    2013-07-25

    Measles vaccination programs would benefit from delivery methods that decrease cost, simplify logistics, and increase safety. Conventional subcutaneous injection is limited by the need for skilled healthcare professionals to reconstitute and administer injections, and by the need for safe needle handling and disposal to reduce the risk of disease transmission through needle re-use and needlestick injury. Microneedles are micron-scale, solid needles coated with a dry formulation of vaccine that dissolves in the skin within minutes after patch application. By avoiding the use of hypodermic needles, vaccination using a microneedle patch could be carried out by minimally trained personnel with reduced risk of blood-borne disease transmission. The goal of this study was to evaluate measles vaccination using a microneedle patch to address some of the limitations of subcutaneous injection. Viability of vaccine virus dried onto a microneedle patch was stabilized by incorporation of the sugar, trehalose, and loss of viral titer was less than 1 log10(TCID50) after storage for at least 30 days at room temperature. Microneedle patches were then used to immunize cotton rats with the Edmonston-Zagreb measles vaccine strain. Vaccination using microneedles at doses equaling the standard human dose or one-fifth the human dose generated neutralizing antibody levels equivalent to those of a subcutaneous immunization at the same dose. These results show that measles vaccine can be stabilized on microneedles and that vaccine efficiently reconstitutes in vivo to generate a neutralizing antibody response equivalent to that generated by subcutaneous injection.

  8. Combination of epidural anesthesia and general anesthesia attenuates stress response to renal transplantation surgery.

    PubMed

    Hadimioglu, N; Ulugol, H; Akbas, H; Coskunfirat, N; Ertug, Z; Dinckan, A

    2012-12-01

    Choice of the anesthestic technique can reduce or even eliminate stress responses to surgery and decrease the incidence of complications. Our aim was to compare a combination of epidural anesthesia+general anesthesia with general anesthesia alone as regards perioperative insulin resistance and inflammatory activation among renal transplant recipients. Forty-six nondiabetic patients undergoing renal transplantation were prospectively randomized to the epidural anesthesia + general anesthesia group (n = 21), or general anesthesia alone group (n = 25). Plasma levels of glucose, insulin, interleukin (IL)-6, tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α, resistin, and adiponectin were measured at baseline (T1), end of surgery (T2), postoperative first hour (T3), postoperative second hour (T4) and postoperative 24th hour (T5). Homeostasis model assessment-estimated insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) scores were calculated at every time point that the blood samples were collected. Glucose levels (P < .001) and insulin levels at the end of surgery (P = .048) and at postoperative first hour (P = .005) and HOMA-IR levels at the end of surgery (P = .012) and at postoperative first hour (P = .010) showed significantly higher values among the general anesthesia alone group when compared with the epidural+general anesthesia group. TNF-α levels at postoperative 2nd and at 24th hour (P = .005 and P = .004, respectively) and IL-6 levels at postoperative 1st and 2nd hours (P = .002 and P = .045, respectively) were significantly higher in the general anesthesia alone group when compared with the epidural+general anesthesia group. The TNF-α levels were significantly less at all time points when compared with baseline only in the epidural+general anesthesia group (T1, 33.36 vs 37.25; T2, 18.45 vs 76.52; T3, 15.18 vs 78.27; T4, 10.75 vs 66.64; T5, 2.98 vs 36.32) Hospital stays were significantly shorter among the epidural+general anesthesia group (P = .022). We showed partly attenuated surgical stress

  9. Pharmacokinetics of lidocaine delivered from a transmucosal patch in children.

    PubMed Central

    Leopold, Andrea; Wilson, Stephen; Weaver, Joel S.; Moursi, Amr M.

    2002-01-01

    The DentiPatch lidocaine transoral delivery system (Noven Pharmaceuticals) is indicated for mild topical anesthesia of mucosal membranes in the mouth. The DentiPatch is a mucoadhesive patch containing 46.1 mg of lidocaine (20% concentration). Current studies in adults report that DentiPatch application produces very low plasma concentrations of lidocaine. However, it is not known what plasma levels are obtained when the same dosage is used in children. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the plasma lidocaine concentrations generated by the DentiPatch are within a safe range for children. The sample in this study was 11 children aged 2-7 years requiring general anesthesia for comprehensive dental care. A lidocaine DentiPatch was placed on the buccal mucosa above the maxillary incisors for 5 minutes. Blood samples were drawn before placing the DentiPatch and at various time intervals after removing it. Blood samples were analyzed by fluorescence polarization immunoassay to determine the plasma concentrations of lidocaine and its major metabolite, monoethylglycinexylidide. The lidocaine and monoethylglycinexylidide absorbed from the DentiPatch did not reach toxic plasma levels in children. However, plasma concentrations were much higher than in adults and were high enough to require inclusion in the calculation of total lidocaine administered to a pediatric patient. Images Figure 1 PMID:15384296

  10. Epidural Analgesia in the Postoperative Period

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-10-01

    violations. VI ABSTRACT Postoperative pain is an unwanted side effect of surgery, and is associated with many postoperative complications...This descriptive study was conducted to determine which surgical patients experienced the most analgesia with the fewest side effects when...epidural medication, side effects , incidence of breakthrough pain, and treatments were recorded and cross-tabulated. The following surgical categories

  11. Use of platelet transfusions prior to lumbar punctures or epidural anaesthesia for the prevention of complications in people with thrombocytopenia

    PubMed Central

    Estcourt, Lise J; Ingram, Callum; Doree, Carolyn; Trivella, Marialena; Stanworth, Simon J

    2016-01-01

    Background People with a low platelet count (thrombocytopenia) often require lumbar punctures or an epidural anaesthetic. Lumbar punctures can be diagnostic (haematological malignancies, epidural haematoma, meningitis) or therapeutic (spinal anaesthetic, administration of chemotherapy). Epidural catheters are placed for administration of epidural anaesthetic. Current practice in many countries is to correct thrombocytopenia with platelet transfusions prior to lumbar punctures and epidural anaesthesia, in order to mitigate the risk of serious procedure-related bleeding. However, the platelet count threshold recommended prior to these procedures varies significantly from country to country. This indicates significant uncertainty among clinicians of the correct management of these patients. The risk of bleeding appears to be low but if bleeding occurs it can be very serious (spinal haematoma). Therefore, people may be exposed to the risks of a platelet transfusion without any obvious clinical benefit. Objectives To assess the effects of different platelet transfusion thresholds prior to a lumbar puncture or epidural anaesthesia in people with thrombocytopenia (low platelet count). Search methods We searched for randomised controlled trials (RCTs) in CENTRAL (The Cochrane Library 2016, Issue 3), MEDLINE (from 1946), EMBASE (from 1974), the Transfusion Evidence Library (from 1950) and ongoing trial databases to 3 March 2016. Selection criteria We included RCTs involving transfusions of platelet concentrates, prepared either from individual units of whole blood or by apheresis, and given to prevent bleeding in people of any age with thrombocytopenia requiring insertion of a lumbar puncture needle or epidural catheter. We only included RCTs published in English. Data collection and analysis We used standard methodological procedures expected by Cochrane. Main results We identified no completed or ongoing RCTs in English. We did not exclude any completed or ongoing RCTs

  12. Spin Glass Patch Planting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Wenlong; Mandra, Salvatore; Katzgraber, Helmut G.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a patch planting method for creating arbitrarily large spin glass instances with known ground states. The scaling of the computational complexity of these instances with various block numbers and sizes is investigated and compared with random instances using population annealing Monte Carlo and the quantum annealing DW2X machine. The method can be useful for benchmarking tests for future generation quantum annealing machines, classical and quantum mechanical optimization algorithms.

  13. Research and analysis of patch shape on microstrip patch antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Ai-guo; Wang, Peng

    2017-01-01

    The shape of the radiating patch in the microstrip patch antenna is one of the many factors that affect the performance of the microstrip antenna.In this paper, on the premise of center frequency of 2.45 GHz, rectangular, circular and triangular microstrip patch antennas are designed and simulated respectively.The simulation results of the three microstrip patch antenna are analyzed, such as feed point position, return loss and radiation patterns.The influence of the shape of the radiation patch on the impedance bandwidth, gain and directivity of microstrip antennas is discussed.The simulation results show that the comprehensive performance of rectangular microstrip patch antenna is better than the other two, the comprehensive performance of triangular microstrip patch antenna is poor.

  14. Patch Test Negative Generalized Dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Spiker, Alison; Mowad, Christen

    2016-01-01

    Allergic contact dermatitis is a common condition in dermatology. Patch testing is the criterion standard for diagnosis. However, dermatitis is not always caused by an allergen, and patch testing does not identify a culprit in every patient. Generalized dermatitis, defined as eczematous dermatitis affecting greater than 3 body sites, is often encountered in dermatology practice, especially patch test referral centers. Management for patients with generalized dermatitis who are patch test negative is challenging. The purpose of this article is to outline an approach to this challenging scenario and summarize the paucity of existing literature on patch test negative generalized dermatitis.

  15. Epidural Injections for Spinal Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... back or leg pain after spinal surgery) Other injuries to spinal nerves, vertebrae and surrounding tissues Bone ... Bleeding if a blood vessel is inadvertently damaged. Injury to the nerves at the injection site. Temporary ...

  16. Management and visualization of a kinked epidural catheter

    PubMed Central

    Aslanidis, T; Fileli, A; Pyrgos, P

    2010-01-01

    A lumbar epidural catheter inserted in a 29-year-old woman for labor analgesia. The catheter failed to provide adequate analgesia. Moreover, after labor, it proved difficult to be removed. After computer tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance impedance (MRI) examination the course of the catheter was visible, the entrapped catheter was dislodged intact, revealing a kinking near its distal tip. Kinking of an epidural catheter leading to entrapment is an unusual complication of epidural catheterization. PMID:21311644

  17. Imaging in spinal posterior epidural space lesions: A pictorial essay.

    PubMed

    Gala, Foram B; Aswani, Yashant

    2016-01-01

    Spinal epidural space is a real anatomic space located outside the dura mater and within the spinal canal extending from foramen magnum to sacrum. Important contents of this space are epidural fat, spinal nerves, epidural veins and arteries. Due to close proximity of posterior epidural space to spinal cord and spinal nerves, the lesions present with symptoms of radiculopathy and/or myelopathy. In this pictorial essay, detailed anatomy of the posterior epidural space, pathologies affecting it along with imaging pearls to accurately diagnose them are discussed. Various pathologies affecting the posterior epidural space either arising from the space itself or occurring secondary to vertebral/intervertebral disc pathologies. Primary spinal bone tumors affecting the posterior epidural space have been excluded. The etiological spectrum affecting the posterior epidural space ranges from degenerative, infective, neoplastic - benign or malignant to miscellaneous pathologies. MRI is the modality of choice in evaluation of these lesions with CT scan mainly helpful in detecting calcification. Due to its excellent soft tissue contrast, Magnetic Resonance Imaging is extremely useful in assessing the pathologies of posterior epidural space, to know their entire extent, characterize them and along with clinical history and laboratory data, arrive at a specific diagnosis and guide the referring clinician. It is important to diagnose these lesions early so as to prevent permanent neurological complication.

  18. Lab in a needle for epidural space identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carotenuto, B.; Micco, A.; Ricciardi, A.; Amorizzo, E.; Mercieri, M.; Cutolo, A.; Cusano, A.

    2016-05-01

    This work relies on the development of a sensorized medical needle with an all-optical guidance (Lab in a Needle) system for epidural space identification. The device is based on the judicious integration of a Fiber Bragg grating sensor inside the lumen of an epidural needle to discriminate between different types of tissue and thus providing continuous and real time measurements of the pressure experienced by the needle tip during its advancement. Experiments carried out on an epidural training phantom demonstrate the validity of our approach for the correct and effective identification of the epidural space.

  19. Serratia marcescens spinal epidural abscess formation following acupuncture.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chih-Wei; Hsu, Shun-Neng; Liu, Jhih-Syuan; Hueng, Dueng-Yuan

    2014-01-01

    The formation of spinal epidural abscess following acupuncture is very rare. We herein report the case of a 54-year-old woman who presented with progressive low back pain and fever with a root sign. She underwent surgical decompression, with an immediate improvement of the low back pain. A culture of the epidural abscess grew Serratia marcescens. One year postoperatively, magnetic resonance imaging revealed the almost complete eradication of the abscess. This case is the first case of Serratia marcescens-associated spinal epidural abscess formation secondary to acupuncture. The characteristics of spinal epidural abscess that develop after acupuncture and how to prevent such complications are also discussed.

  20. Imaging in spinal posterior epidural space lesions: A pictorial essay

    PubMed Central

    Gala, Foram B; Aswani, Yashant

    2016-01-01

    Spinal epidural space is a real anatomic space located outside the dura mater and within the spinal canal extending from foramen magnum to sacrum. Important contents of this space are epidural fat, spinal nerves, epidural veins and arteries. Due to close proximity of posterior epidural space to spinal cord and spinal nerves, the lesions present with symptoms of radiculopathy and/or myelopathy. In this pictorial essay, detailed anatomy of the posterior epidural space, pathologies affecting it along with imaging pearls to accurately diagnose them are discussed. Various pathologies affecting the posterior epidural space either arising from the space itself or occurring secondary to vertebral/intervertebral disc pathologies. Primary spinal bone tumors affecting the posterior epidural space have been excluded. The etiological spectrum affecting the posterior epidural space ranges from degenerative, infective, neoplastic - benign or malignant to miscellaneous pathologies. MRI is the modality of choice in evaluation of these lesions with CT scan mainly helpful in detecting calcification. Due to its excellent soft tissue contrast, Magnetic Resonance Imaging is extremely useful in assessing the pathologies of posterior epidural space, to know their entire extent, characterize them and along with clinical history and laboratory data, arrive at a specific diagnosis and guide the referring clinician. It is important to diagnose these lesions early so as to prevent permanent neurological complication. PMID:27857455

  1. Polar Cap Patch Dynamics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-04-25

    3 . Campaign periods for the 2010/2011 winter 3.1 Operation periods Ny-Ålesund 29 Nov - 13 Dec 2010 28 Dec - 10 Jan 2011 25 Jan - 8 Feb...dominated by a stable interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) B z < 0 and by an IMF B y > 0 situation. The aurora was characterized by a series of PMAFs...Svalbard Radar of two intense polar cap patch events on 6 February 2001. The interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) was dominated by a large positive By

  2. Patch antenna terahertz photodetectors

    SciTech Connect

    Palaferri, D.; Todorov, Y. Chen, Y. N.; Madeo, J.; Vasanelli, A.; Sirtori, C.; Li, L. H.; Davies, A. G.; Linfield, E. H.

    2015-04-20

    We report on the implementation of 5 THz quantum well photodetector exploiting a patch antenna cavity array. The benefit of our plasmonic architecture on the detector performance is assessed by comparing it with detectors made using the same quantum well absorbing region, but processed into a standard 45° polished facet mesa. Our results demonstrate a clear improvement in responsivity, polarization insensitivity, and background limited performance. Peak detectivities in excess of 5 × 10{sup 12} cmHz{sup 1/2}/W have been obtained, a value comparable with that of the best cryogenic cooled bolometers.

  3. Epidural Abscess Masquerading as Lateral Sinus Thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Brodner, David C.; Cutler, Jeff; Gianoli, Gerard J.; Amedee, Ronald G.

    2000-01-01

    Controversy regarding the use of anticoagulants, the evacuation of the sinus, or the use of medical treatment alone surrounds the treatment of lateral sinus thrombosis. Treatment of an epidural abscess associated with coalescent mastoiditis is much less controversial-drainage is usually recommended. The differing treatments of these complications mandate accurate diagnosis. The advent of more sophisticated radiological studies has facilitated diagnosis of these complications; however, tests are not infallible. We present three cases in which preoperative imaging demonstrates an epidural abscess mimicking lateral sinus thrombosis by compression of the vessel. A false-positive computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) study may lead to the wrong diagnosis and, consequently, improper treatment. In light of this possibility, we recommend surgical exploration in all such cases. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4 PMID:17171148

  4. Salmonella Typhi Vertebral Osteomyelitis and Epidural Abscess

    PubMed Central

    Chua, Ying Ying; Chen, John L. T.

    2016-01-01

    Salmonella vertebral osteomyelitis is an uncommon complication of Salmonella infection. We report a case of a 57-year-old transgender male who presented with lower back pain for a period of one month following a fall. Physical examination only revealed tenderness over the lower back with no neurological deficits. MRI of the thoracic and lumbar spine revealed a spondylodiscitis at T10-T11 and T12-L1 and right posterior epidural collection at the T9-T10 level. He underwent decompression laminectomy with segmental instrumentation and fusion of T8 to L3 vertebrae. Intraoperatively, he was found to have acute-on-chronic osteomyelitis in T10 and T11, epidural abscess, and discitis in T12-L1. Tissue and wound culture grew Salmonella Typhi and with antibiotics susceptibility guidance he was treated with intravenous ceftriaxone for a period of six weeks. He recovered well with no neurological deficits. PMID:27034871

  5. Hepatocellular carcinoma metastases to the epidural space.

    PubMed

    Somerset, Hilary; Witt, J Peter; Kleinschmidt-Demasters, Bette K

    2009-12-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is relatively uncommon in the United States, although hepatitis C, one of the known risk factors for disease, is currently showing burgeoning growth in the country. Hence, it is possible that the incidence of HCC also will increase. Clinicians and pathologists in the United States are relatively unfamiliar with the patterns of metastatic spread for HCC. We report 2 US-native patients with cirrhosis and HCC who developed epidural space metastasis, a pattern of disease spread seen infrequently, even in endemic areas. Diagnostic testing was delayed in both patients because of the lowered suspicion for metastasis and the fact that neither patient had recognized metastatic spread to more common sites, such as lung or lymph nodes. New-onset neck or back pain-especially with symptoms of paresthesia, radiculopathy, or cord compression-in the setting of HCC warrants prompt investigation for metastases to the spine and epidural space.

  6. Patched Conic Trajectory Code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Brooke Anderson; Wright, Henry

    2012-01-01

    PatCon code was developed to help mission designers run trade studies on launch and arrival times for any given planet. Initially developed in Fortran, the required inputs included launch date, arrival date, and other orbital parameters of the launch planet and arrival planets at the given dates. These parameters include the position of the planets, the eccentricity, semi-major axes, argument of periapsis, ascending node, and inclination of the planets. With these inputs, a patched conic approximation is used to determine the trajectory. The patched conic approximation divides the planetary mission into three parts: (1) the departure phase, in which the two relevant bodies are Earth and the spacecraft, and where the trajectory is a departure hyperbola with Earth at the focus; (2) the cruise phase, in which the two bodies are the Sun and the spacecraft, and where the trajectory is a transfer ellipse with the Sun at the focus; and (3) the arrival phase, in which the two bodies are the target planet and the spacecraft, where the trajectory is an arrival hyperbola with the planet as the focus.

  7. Statistics for Patch Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hingee, K. L.

    2016-06-01

    In the application of remote sensing it is common to investigate processes that generate patches of material. This is especially true when using categorical land cover or land use maps. Here we view some existing tools, landscape pattern indices (LPI), as non-parametric estimators of random closed sets (RACS). This RACS framework enables LPIs to be studied rigorously. A RACS is any random process that generates a closed set, which encompasses any processes that result in binary (two-class) land cover maps. RACS theory, and methods in the underlying field of stochastic geometry, are particularly well suited to high-resolution remote sensing where objects extend across tens of pixels, and the shapes and orientations of patches are symptomatic of underlying processes. For some LPI this field already contains variance information and border correction techniques. After introducing RACS theory we discuss the core area LPI in detail. It is closely related to the spherical contact distribution leading to conditional variants, a new version of contagion, variance information and multiple border-corrected estimators. We demonstrate some of these findings on high resolution tree canopy data.

  8. Epidural analgesia in cattle, buffalo, and camels

    PubMed Central

    Ismail, Zuhair Bani

    2016-01-01

    Epidural analgesia is commonly used in large animals. It is an easy, cheap, and effective technique used to prevent or control pain during surgeries involving the tail, anus, vulva, perineum, caudal udder, scrotum, and upper hind limbs. The objectives of this article were to comprehensively review and summarize all scientific data available in the literature on new techniques and drugs or drug combinations used for epidural anesthesia in cattle, camel, and buffalo. Only articles published between 2006 and 2016 were included in the review. The most common sites for epidural administration in cattle, camels, and buffalos were the sacrococcygeal intervertebral space (S5-Co1) and first intercoccygeal intervertebral space (Co1-Co2). The most frequently used drugs and dosages were lidocaine (0.22-0.5 mg/kg), bupivacaine (0.125 mg/kg), ropivacaine (0.11 mg/kg), xylazine (0.05 mg/kg), medetomidine (15 µg/kg), romifidine (30-50 µg/kg), ketamine (0.3-2.5 mg/kg), tramadol (1 mg/kg), and neostigmine (10 µg/kg), and the clinical applications, clinical effects, recommendations, and side effects were discussed. PMID:28096620

  9. Epidural analgesia in cattle, buffalo, and camels.

    PubMed

    Ismail, Zuhair Bani

    2016-12-01

    Epidural analgesia is commonly used in large animals. It is an easy, cheap, and effective technique used to prevent or control pain during surgeries involving the tail, anus, vulva, perineum, caudal udder, scrotum, and upper hind limbs. The objectives of this article were to comprehensively review and summarize all scientific data available in the literature on new techniques and drugs or drug combinations used for epidural anesthesia in cattle, camel, and buffalo. Only articles published between 2006 and 2016 were included in the review. The most common sites for epidural administration in cattle, camels, and buffalos were the sacrococcygeal intervertebral space (S5-Co1) and first intercoccygeal intervertebral space (Co1-Co2). The most frequently used drugs and dosages were lidocaine (0.22-0.5 mg/kg), bupivacaine (0.125 mg/kg), ropivacaine (0.11 mg/kg), xylazine (0.05 mg/kg), medetomidine (15 µg/kg), romifidine (30-50 µg/kg), ketamine (0.3-2.5 mg/kg), tramadol (1 mg/kg), and neostigmine (10 µg/kg), and the clinical applications, clinical effects, recommendations, and side effects were discussed.

  10. Epidural labour analgesia using Bupivacaine and Clonidine

    PubMed Central

    Syal, K; Dogra, RK; Ohri, A; Chauhan, G; Goel, A

    2011-01-01

    Background: To compare the effects of addition of Clonidine (60 μg) to Epidural Bupivacaine (0.125%) for labour analgesia, with regard to duration of analgesia, duration of labour, ambulation, incidence of instrumentation and caesarean section, foetal outcome, patient satisfaction and side effects. Patients & Methods: On demand, epidural labour analgesia was given to 50 nulliparous healthy term parturients (cephalic presentation), divided in two groups randomly. Group I received bupivacaine (0.125%) alone, whereas Group II received bupivacaine (0.125%) along with Clonidine (60 μg). 10 ml of 0.125% bupivacaine was injected as first dose and further doses titrated with patient relief (Numerical Rating Scale <3). Top ups were given whenever Numerical Rating Scale went above 5. Results: There was statistically significant prolongation of duration of analgesia in Group II, with no difference in duration of labour, ambulation, incidence of instrumentation and caesarean section or foetal outcome. Also clonidine gave dose sparing effect to bupivacaine and there was better patient satisfaction without any significant side effects in Group II. Conclusion: Clonidine is a useful adjunct to bupivacaine for epidural labour analgesia and can be considered as alternative to opioids. PMID:21804714

  11. Intravenous Remifentanil versus Epidural Ropivacaine with Sufentanil for Labour Analgesia: A Retrospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Zhendong; Su, Jing; Liu, Zhiqiang

    2014-01-01

    Remifentanil with appropriate pharmacological properties seems to be an ideal alternative to epidural analgesia during labour. A retrospective cohort study was undertaken to assess the efficacy and safety of remifentanil intravenous patient-controlled analgesia (IVPCA) compared with epidural analgesia. Medical records of 370 primiparas who received remifentanil IVPCA or epidural analgesia were reviewed. Pain and sedation scores, overall satisfaction, the extent of pain control, maternal side effects and neonatal outcome as primary observational indicators were collected. There was a significant decline of pain scores in both groups. Pain reduction was greater in the epidural group throughout the whole study period (0∼180 min) (P<0.0001), and pain scores in the remifentanil group showed an increasing trend one hour later. The remifentanil group had a lower SpO2 (P<0.0001) and a higher sedation score (P<0.0001) within 30 min after treatment. The epidural group had a higher overall satisfaction score (3.8±0.4 vs. 3.7±0.6, P = 0.007) and pain relief score (2.9±0.3 vs. 2.8±0.4, P<0.0001) compared with the remifentanil group. There was no significant difference on side effects between the two groups, except that a higher rate of dizziness (1% vs. 21.8%, P<0.0001) was observed during remifentanil analgesia. And logistic regression analysis demonstrated that nausea, vomiting were associated with oxytocin usage and instrumental delivery, and dizziness was associated to the type and duration of analgesia. Neonatal outcomes such as Apgar scores and umbilical-cord blood gas analysis were within the normal range, but umbilical pH and base excess of neonatus in the remifentanil group were significantly lower. Remifentanil IVPCA provides poorer efficacy on labor analgesia than epidural analgesia, with more sedation on parturients and a trend of newborn acidosis. Despite these adverse effects, remifentanil IVPCA can still be an alternative option for labor analgesia

  12. Improved Gain Microstrip Patch Antenna

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-08-06

    08-2015 Publication Improved Gain Microstrip Patch Antenna David A. Tonn Naval Under Warfare Center Division, Newport 1176 Howell St., Code 00L...Distribution A An antenna for mounting on a ground plane includes a dielectric substrate for mounting on the ground plane. A conductive patch...GAIN MICROSTRIP PATCH ANTENNA STATEMENT OF GOVERNMENT INTEREST [0001] The invention described herein may be manufactured and used by or for the

  13. Caudal Epidural Block: An Updated Review of Anatomy and Techniques

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Caudal epidural block is a commonly used technique for surgical anesthesia in children and chronic pain management in adults. It is performed by inserting a needle through the sacral hiatus to gain entrance into the sacral epidural space. Using conventional blind technique, the failure rate of caudal epidural block in adults is high even in experienced hands. This high failure rate could be attributed to anatomic variations that make locating sacral hiatus difficult. With the advent of fluoroscopy and ultrasound in guiding needle placement, the success rate of caudal epidural block has been markedly improved. Although fluoroscopy is still considered the gold standard when performing caudal epidural injection, ultrasonography has been demonstrated to be highly effective in accurately guiding the needle entering the caudal epidural space and produce comparative treatment outcome as fluoroscopy. Except intravascular and intrathecal injection, ultrasonography could be as effective as fluoroscopy in preventing complications during caudal epidural injection. The relevant anatomy and techniques in performing the caudal epidural block will be briefly reviewed in this article. PMID:28337460

  14. Minimally invasive treatment of multilevel spinal epidural abscess.

    PubMed

    Safavi-Abbasi, Sam; Maurer, Adrian J; Rabb, Craig H

    2013-01-01

    The use of minimally invasive tubular retractor microsurgery for treatment of multilevel spinal epidural abscess is described. This technique was used in 3 cases, and excellent results were achieved. The authors conclude that multilevel spinal epidural abscesses can be safely and effectively managed using microsurgery via a minimally invasive tubular retractor system.

  15. Extensive spinal epidural abscess as a complication of Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Smith, Chez; Kavar, Bhadrakant

    2010-01-01

    A spinal epidural abscess is a neurosurgical emergency. Successful treatment frequently requires decompression of the spinal canal in combination with intravenous antibiotics. We report a patient with Crohn's disease who developed an extensive spinal epidural abscess communicating with an intra-abdominal collection.

  16. Roseomonas spinal epidural abscess complicating instrumented posterior lumbar interbody fusion.

    PubMed

    Maraki, Sofia; Bantouna, Vasiliki; Lianoudakis, Efstratios; Stavrakakis, Ioannis; Scoulica, Efstathia

    2013-07-01

    The first case of a spinal epidural abscess caused by Roseomonas mucosa following instrumented posterior lumbar fusion is presented. Although rare, because of its highly resistant profile, Roseomonas species should be included in the differential diagnosis of epidural abscesses in both immunocompromised and immunocompetent hosts.

  17. The direction dependence of thermoregulatory vasoconstriction during isoflurane/epidural anesthesia in humans.

    PubMed

    Ozaki, M; Sessler, D I; McGuire, J; Blanchard, D; Schroeder, M; Moayeri, A

    1993-10-01

    We tested the hypothesis that once thermoregulatory vasoconstriction is triggered at a given core temperature during isoflurane anesthesia, redilation starts at a substantially higher core temperature. To avoid direct perception of cutaneous cooling and warming, we used epidural anesthesia and limited our thermal manipulations to the blocked area. Seven volunteers were anesthetized with isoflurane/epidural anesthesia (approximately T9 dermatomal level). Core hypothermia was induced by surface cooling restricted to the legs. Cooling was continued until fingertip blood flow suddenly decreased (vasoconstriction threshold). The core was then rewarmed by heating the legs until fingertip flow suddenly increased toward initial values (redilation threshold). The difference between the two thresholds defined the direction-dependent hysteresis. Vasoconstriction occurred at 35.2 +/- 0.6 degrees C and vasodilation at 36.2 +/- 0.5 degrees C (P < 0.01, paired t-test); consequently, the hysteresis was 1.0 +/- 0.6 degrees C. The observed hysteresis suggests that thermoregulatory responses during combined isoflurane/epidural anesthesia are not determined simply by instantaneous thermal input to central controllers, but may also depend on the direction of core temperature change.

  18. [Spontaneous epidural hematoma after open heart surgery: case report].

    PubMed

    Anegawa, S; Hayashi, T; Furukawa, Y; Nagashima, T; Kumate, M

    1999-11-01

    Acute epidural hematoma not associated with head injury is rarely encountered and is known as spontaneous epidural hematoma. To our knowledge, only five cases with epidural hematoma after open-heart surgery have been published. Pathogenesis and preventive measures have not yet been determined. We report a case of such spontaneous epidural hematoma and consider the possible pathogenesis. A 12-year-old female received a radical operation for severe subaortic stenosis. The intraoperative course was uneventful except for massive hemorrhage which was adequately controlled. Postoperatively, she was moved to the CCU still not having aroused from anesthesia. Eleven hours later, it was found that her pupils were fixed and dilated. CT scan demonstrated a huge bifrontal epidural hematoma with disappearance of the basal cistern. Even though immediate emergency evacuation was performed, the patient died of acute brain swelling four days after the operation.

  19. Citrobocter kasori spinal epidural abscess: a rare occurrence.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ashok; Jain, Pramod; Singh, Pritish; Divthane, Rupam; Badole, C M

    2013-01-01

    Pyogenic spinal epidural abscess Is an uncommon Infectious occurrence. Clinical prospects of pyogenic spinal epidural abscess are graver if not promptly diagnosed and treated appropriately. A case of spinal epidural abscess has been presented with sinus tract formation at L4-L5 level, of pyogenic aetiology that progressed to paraplegia over the course of the disease. MRI pointed towards an epidural abscess extending from T12 vertebral level to S1 vertebral level. Surgical decompression in the form of laminectomy and evacuation of pus was done and antibiotics were given according to culture and sensitivity. Histopathological analysis revealed the acute suppurative nature of the abscess. Citrobacter kasori was isolated on pus culture. Pyogenic epidural abscess with causative organism being Citrobacter kasori has least been documented.

  20. Spinal epidural abscess presenting as intra-abdominal pathology: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Bremer, Andrew A; Darouiche, Rabih O

    2004-01-01

    Spinal epidural abscess is a rare infectious disease. However, if left unrecognized and untreated, the clinical outcome of spinal epidural abscess can be devastating. Correctly diagnosing a spinal epidural abscess in a timely fashion is often difficult, particularly if the clinician does not actively consider the diagnosis. The most common presenting symptoms of spinal epidural abscess include backache, radicular pain, weakness, and sensory deficits. However, early in its course, spinal epidural abscess can also present with vague and nondescript manifestations. In this report, we describe a case of spinal epidural abscess presenting as abdominal pain, and review the literature describing other cases of spinal epidural abscess presenting as intra-abdominal pathology.

  1. Decrease in serum potassium concentration during epidural anaesthesia.

    PubMed

    Hahn, R G

    1987-11-01

    A mean decrease in the arterial serum potassium concentration (S-K) of 0.40 mmol/l (range 0-1.0) was found in 45 elderly men who were studied before and after induction of epidural anaesthesia (using mepivacaine 2% with adrenaline). The decrease was similar in patients who received acetated Ringer solution or dextran 40 in normal saline as intravenous fluid supplementation. No difference in S-K change was found between patients with a normal (less than 115 mumol/l) or elevated serum creatinine concentration. The decrease in S-K prevailed at the end of surgery except in patients with an elevated serum creatinine. Corrections of S-K for changes in arterial blood pH and rectal temperature during induction of anaesthesia did not explain the decrease in S-K. Correlations of clinical parameters such as the extension of anaesthesia, amount of intravenous fluid given and blood pressure changes gave conflicting results. A smaller decrease or no change in S-K was usually seen in arterial (n = 7) and venous (n = 7) samples when no intravenous fluid was given, as well as in venous samples when acetated Ringer solution was given (n = 6).

  2. Blood

    MedlinePlus

    ... increased red blood cell destruction can affect teens: G6PD deficiency. G6PD is an enzyme that helps to protect ... can cause red cells to hemolyze, or burst. G6PD deficiency is a common hereditary disease among people of ...

  3. Epidural analgesia during labor vs no analgesia: A comparative study

    PubMed Central

    Mousa, Wesam Farid; Al-Metwalli, Roshdi; Mostafa, Manal

    2012-01-01

    Background: Epidural analgesia is claimed to result in prolonged labor. Previous studies have assessed epidural analgesia vs systemic opioids rather than to parturients receiving no analgesia. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of epidural analgesia on labor duration compared with parturients devoid of analgesia. Methods: One hundred sixty nulliparous women in spontaneous labor at full term with a singleton vertex presentation were assigned to the study. Parturients who request epidural analgesia were allocated in the epidural group, whereas those not enthusiastic to labor analgesia were allocated in the control group. Epidural analgesia was provided with 20 mL bolus 0.5% epidural lidocaine plus fentanyl and maintained at 10 mL for 1 h. Duration of the first and second stages of labor, number of parturients receiving oxytocin, maximal oxytocin dose required for each parturient, numbers of instrumental vaginal, vacuum-assisted, and cesarean deliveries and neonatal Apgar score were recorded. Results: There was no statistical difference in the duration of the active-first and the second stages of labor, instrumental delivery, vacuum-assisted or cesarean delivery rates, the number of newborns with 1-min and 5-min Apgar scores less than 7 between both groups and number of parturients receiving oxytocin, however, the maximal oxytocin dose was significantly higher in the epidural group. Conclusion: Epidural analgesia by lidocaine (0.5%) and fentanyl does not prolong labor compared with parturients without analgesia; however, significant oxytocin augmentation is required during the epidural analgesia to keep up the aforementioned average labor duration. PMID:22412775

  4. Topical lidocaine patch 5% for acute postoperative pain control.

    PubMed

    Gilhooly, D; McGarvey, B; O'Mahony, H; O'Connor, T C

    2011-02-08

    A 39-year-old para 3 woman presented for elective caesarean section (lower segment caesarean section (LSCS)) for breech presentation. The patient had a strong history of atopy and anaphylaxis to paracetamol, codeine, penicillin and latex. The patient was asthmatic, triggered by aspirin. Epidural anaesthesia was unsuccessful and LSCS was carried out under spinal anaesthesia. Postoperatively the patient was unwilling to take analgesic medication due to fear of an allergic reaction. Three 5% lidocaine patches were applied to the wound for postoperative analgesia. This reduced the patient's visual analogue scale pain score from 10/10 to 5/10 at rest and 10/10 to 7/10 with movement. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation was added and this improved associated back pain, reducing the pain further to 2/10. This is the first description of lignocaine patch 5% for postoperative LSCS pain. It is suggested that this method of delivery of local anaesthetic, which is easy to apply and has minimal side effects, should be considered not as a sole agent but as part of a multimodal technique to address postoperative LSCS pain.

  5. Comparative evaluation of epidural bupivacaine – dexmedetomidine and bupivacaine –fentanyl on Doppler velocimetry of uterine and umbilical arteries during labor

    PubMed Central

    Selim, Mohamed Fouad; Elnabtity, Ali Mohamed Ali; Hasan, Ali Mohamed Ali

    2012-01-01

    Summary Objective uteroplacental blood flow is affected by myometrial contractions and hypotension. Epidural analgesia is frequently complicated by hypotension. The aim of the study was to compare the effect of bupivacaine-dexmedetomidine (BD) or bupivacaine – fentanyl (BF) on uterine artery pulsatitly index (UtA-PI) and umbilical artery pulsatitly index (UA-PI) during uterine contractions and relaxations. Methods this was a prospective controlled observational study performed in 130 healthy full term parturients divided into 3 groups [23 cases as control, 44 cases as (BD) epidural group and 43 cases as (BF) epidural group]. Over the study duration of 120 minutes; UtA-PI and UA-PI were measured at baseline, 30, 60, 120 minutes during uterine contractions and relaxations. Maternal hemodynamic, visual analogue scale (VAS), sedation score, side effects of epidural analgesia including nausea, vomiting, pruritis and respiratory depression were assessed. Results VAS significantly decreased after epidural compared with control group. BD group showed significant improvement in onset and duration of analgesia and sedation scores with lower incidence of nausea and pruritis compared with BF group. The BF and BD groups were associated with significant maternal hypotension and bradycadia that increase the UtA-PI during uterine contractions and relaxations compared with control group. UA-PI was increased with uterine contractions compared with during uterine relaxations in the three studied groups yet the effect of epidural and uterine contractions does significantly affect newborns apgar scores or umbilical cord pH. Conclusion bupivacaine-dexmedetomidine epidural analgesia showed better maternal satisfaction for labor pains control compared with bupivacaine – fentanyl without deleterious effect on utroplacental circulation and newborns outcome. PMID:23181173

  6. Ethinyl Estradiol and Norelgestromin Transdermal Patch

    MedlinePlus

    ... the skin. One patch is applied once a week for 3 weeks, followed by a patch-free week. Follow the directions on your prescription label carefully, ... new patch on the same day of the week (the Patch Change Day). Apply a new patch ...

  7. Congenital dilation of the cervical epidural venous plexus: neuroradiology and endovenous management.

    PubMed

    Rodiek, S O; Schmidhuber, H; Lumenta, C B

    1999-06-01

    We report a case of a 15-year-old girl suffering from cervicobrachialgia who was admitted to our service due to an enlarged neural foramen suspicious for a neurinoma. The cervical phlebography, however, revealed a space-occupying dilated epidural vein with increased blood supply from the suboccipital venous plexus. Lesions like this are absolutely rare, presumably of congenital origin and have not been described before. The lesion was treated by feeder occlusion applying platinum coils and enbucrilate via the internal jugular vein.

  8. Effect of different types of anesthesia on intraoperative blood glucose of diabetic patients

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xueqiong; Wang, Jinjing; Chen, Kang; Li, Yijun; Wang, Haibin; Mu, Yiming; Chen, Yaolong

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: Systematic review which analyzes the impact of different anesthesia on intraoperative blood glucose levels of diabetes patients. Methods: We searched Medline (via PubMed), Embase, Cochrane Library, Web of Science, Wangfang, CNKI, and CBM database through June 2016, included in randomized controlled trial (RCT), about different anesthesia on intraoperative blood glucose levels in patients with diabetes. Two researchers in 1 group independently screened literatures with eligibility criteria, extracted information, and used RevMan5.3 software to perform meta-analysis. Results: We included 11 trials and performed the meta-analysis with 10 trials. The meta-analysis results suggested that compared with general anesthesia, the combined general-epidural anesthesia has a better glycemic control in intraoperative blood glucose levels (WMD −1.26, 95% confidence interval [CI] −1.77 to 0.76), the epidural anesthesia had no significant effects compared with general anesthesia (WMD −0.74, 95% CI 4.41–2.92), and the combined spinal-epidural anesthesia had no significant effects compared with epidural anesthesia (WMD −0.28, 95% CI −1.02 to 0.46). One study suggested that compared with epidural anesthesia, the combined general-epidural anesthesia can lower blood glucose levels Conclusion: Existing evidence showed that compared with general anesthesia, the combined general-epidural anesthesia has a better glycemic control in intraoperative blood glucose levels. PMID:28353577

  9. Lower Back Tattoo: OK to Have an Epidural?

    MedlinePlus

    ... and delivery, postpartum care Could a lower back tattoo keep me from having an epidural during labor? ... Yvonne Butler Tobah, M.D. A lower back tattoo won't necessarily prevent you from having an ...

  10. Considering symptomatic spinal epidural lipomatosis in the differential diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, Adriana; Induru, Raghava; Lagman, Ruth

    2013-09-01

    Spinal epidural lipomatosis (SEL) is the abnormal accumulation of normal fat within the spinal canal. It is more frequent in those patients receiving chronic glucocorticoid therapy or in cases of endogenous hypercortisolism states. We report a case of SEL in a patient with metastatic prostate cancer with history of steroid treatment as part of his chemotherapy regimen, presenting with clinical manifestations of partial cord compression. Magnetic resonance imaging images of the lumbar spine revealed the presence of epidural tumor suspicious for metastatic disease. Operative findings were consistent with epidural lipomatosis. Spinal epidural lipomatosis is a rare condition that needs to be included in the differential diagnosis of patients with risk factors, presenting with symptomatic cord compression.

  11. Epidural analgesia for labour: maternal knowledge, preferences and informed consent.

    PubMed

    Fröhlich, S; Tan, T; Walsh, A; Carey, M

    2011-01-01

    Epidural analgesia has become increasingly popular as a form of labour analgesia in Ireland. However obtaining true inform consent has always been difficult. Our study recruited 100 parturients who had undergone epidural analgesia for labour, aimed to determine the information they received prior to regional analgesia, and to ascertain their preferences regarding informed consent. Only 65 (65%) of patients planned to have an epidural. Knowledge of potential complications was variable and inaccurate, with less than 30 (30%) of women aware of the most common complications. Most women 79 (79%) believed that discomfort during labour affected their ability to provide informed consent, and believe consent should be taken prior to onset of labour (96, 96%). The results of this study helps define the standards of consent Irish patients expect for epidural analgesia during labour.

  12. Epidural analgesia during labour - maternal understanding and experience - informed consent.

    PubMed

    Mahomed, K; Chin, D; Drew, A

    2015-01-01

    Women obtain information on epidural analgesia from various sources. For epidural for pain relief in labour this is provided by the anaesthetist as part of the consenting process. There is much discussion about the inadequacy of this consenting process; we report on women's knowledge, experience and recall of this process at a regional hospital with a 24-h epidural service. Fifty-four women were interviewed within 72 h of a vaginal birth. 91% of the women had acquired information from friends, relatives and antenatal classes. Lack of recall of benefits of epidural analgesia accounted for 26 (38%) and 25 (26%) of the responses, respectively. Similarly in terms of amount of pain relief they could expect, 13 (21%) could not remember and 13 (21%) thought that it may not work. We suggest use of varying methods of disseminating information and wider utilisation of anaesthetists in the antenatal educational programmes.

  13. [MRI appearance of lumbar epidural abscesses: report of three cases].

    PubMed

    Semlali, S; Fikri, M; Nassar, I; El Quessar, A; El Hassani, Mr; Chakir, N; Jiddane, M

    2004-03-01

    The authors report three cases of non-tuberculous epidural abscess. Presenting symptoms included lumbar back pain, muscle spasms, soft tIssue swelling, and neurological deficits in all three cases. MR imaging was helpful for diagnosis and showed involvement of perivertebral soft tissues and an epidural abscess of variable size. There was no significant involvement of intervertebral disks or vertebrae. Diagnosis was confirmed by bacteriologic exam. Clinical outcome was favourable with antibiotic treatment.

  14. Epidural Anesthesia Complicated by Subdural Hygromas and a Subdural Hematoma

    PubMed Central

    Marovic, Paul; Ingram, Brendan

    2016-01-01

    Inadvertent dural puncture during epidural anesthesia leads to intracranial hypotension, which if left unnoticed can cause life-threatening subdural hematomas or cerebellar tonsillar herniation. The highly variable presentation of intracranial hypotension hinders timely diagnosis and treatment. We present the case of a young laboring adult female, who developed subdural hygromas and a subdural hematoma following unintentional dural puncture during initiation of epidural anesthesia. PMID:27651956

  15. [Combined epidural and spinal anesthesia for cesarean section].

    PubMed

    Hody, J L

    1994-01-01

    Combined spinal epidural block has proven its efficacy in skilled hands. This technique allies advantages of spinal anaesthesia, regarding its speed of action and intensity of motor blockade and advantages of postoperative epidural analgesia. This block must be performed with great care and method to reach a success rate of almost 100%. Local anaesthetics and additives are reviewed and commented. The two main complications, hypotension and post dural puncture headache can be contained in very low limits.

  16. Unilateral anhidrosis: A rare complication of thoracic epidural analgesia.

    PubMed

    Gulbahar, Gultekin; Gundogdu, Ahmet Gokhan; Alkan, Güzide; Baysalman, Hatice Baran; Kaplan, Tevfik

    2016-02-01

    Management of pain following thoracotomy is an important issue for the control of early morbidity. We herein present the case of a patient who was referred to our hospital after a fall from a height. Right-sided multiple rib fractures, hemopneumothorax, and diaphragmatic rupture were detected. Thoracic epidural catheterization was performed for pain management just before thoracotomy. The patient developed unilateral anhidrosis postoperatively. We discuss this rare complication of thoracic epidural analgesia with a review of relevant literature.

  17. Spinal epidural arteriovenous hemangioma mimicking lumbar disc herniation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyung Hyun; Song, Sang Woo; Lee, Soo Eon; Lee, Sang Hyung

    2012-10-01

    A spinal epidural hemangioma is rare. In this case, a 51 year-old female patient had low back pain and right thigh numbness. She was initially misdiagnosed as having a ruptured disc with possible sequestration of granulation tissue formation due to the limited number of spinal epidural hemangiomas and little-known radiological findings. Because there are no effective diagnostic tools to verify the hemangioma, more effort should be put into preoperative imaging tests to avoid misdiagnosis and poor decisions).

  18. Is epidural steroid injection effective for degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis?

    PubMed

    Flores, Sebastián; Molina, Marcelo

    2015-11-16

    There are several nonsurgical alternatives to treat radicular pain in degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis. Epidural steroid injections have been used for several decades, but the different studies have shown variable effects. Searching in Epistemonikos database, which is maintained by screening 30 databases, we identified nine systematic reviews including seven pertinent randomized controlled trials. We concluded epidural steroid injection probably leads to little or no effect on reducing radicular pain of spinal stenosis.

  19. Thoracic epidural anesthesia decreases endotoxin-induced endothelial injury

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The sympathetic nervous system is considered to modulate the endotoxin-induced activation of immune cells. Here we investigate whether thoracic epidural anesthesia with its regional symapathetic blocking effect alters endotoxin-induced leukocyte-endothelium activation and interaction with subsequent endothelial injury. Methods Sprague Dawley rats were anesthetized, cannulated and hemodynamically monitored. E. coli lipopolysaccharide (Serotype 0127:B8, 1.5 mg x kg-1 x h-1) or isotonic saline (controls) was infused for 300 minutes. An epidural catheter was inserted for continuous application of lidocaine or normal saline in endotoxemic animals and saline in controls. After 300 minutes we measured catecholamine and cytokine plasma concentrations, adhesion molecule expression, leukocyte adhesion, and intestinal tissue edema. Results In endotoxemic animals with epidural saline, LPS significantly increased the interleukin-1β plasma concentration (48%), the expression of endothelial adhesion molecules E-selectin (34%) and ICAM-1 (42%), and the number of adherent leukocytes (40%) with an increase in intestinal myeloperoxidase activity (26%) and tissue edema (75%) when compared to healthy controls. In endotoxemic animals with epidural infusion of lidocaine the values were similar to those in control animals, while epinephrine plasma concentration was 32% lower compared to endotoxemic animals with epidural saline. Conclusions Thoracic epidural anesthesia attenuated the endotoxin-induced increase of IL-1β concentration, adhesion molecule expression and leukocyte-adhesion with subsequent endothelial injury. A potential mechanism is the reduction in the plasma concentration of epinephrine. PMID:24708631

  20. Epidural fibrosis after permanent catheter insertion and infusion.

    PubMed

    Aldrete, J A

    1995-11-01

    Forty-six permanent epidural catheters and life-port units were implanted in 43 patients with severe, recurrent low back pain who had been considered not to be candidates for surgical intervention and in whom other therapeutic modalities had failed. Eight cases developed epidural fibrosis (EF). For analgesia, patients received either infusions with preservative-free solutions of fentanyl and bupivacaine or daily boluses of morphine and bupivacaine. Catheters remained from 75 days to 433 days. Signs of EF appeared from 21 days to 320 days after implantation. Pain at injection or resistance to injection were initial manifestations of EF, followed by poor, and eventually, nil analgesic effect. The epidural catheters were made of either polyamide, silicone, or polyurethane. Epidurograms revealed encapsulation, narrowing, and loculation of epidural space with gradually reduced spread of the contrast material. The occurrence of EF limits the permanency of implanted epidural catheters. The infusate does not cause this complication, which appears to be a foreign body reaction due to the presence of the catheter in the epidural space.

  1. [Combined subarachnoid-epidural technique for obstetric analgesia].

    PubMed

    Fernández-Guisasola, J; García del Valle, S; Gómez-Arnau, J I

    2000-05-01

    Combined spinal-epidural blockade for labor pain has enjoyed increasing popularity in obstetric anesthesia. The usual procedure is to use a single space and a single needle for dural puncture, inserting a spinal needle through an epidural needle followed by insertion of a catheter. A small dose of one or several substances (usually a lipophilic opioid and a local anesthetic) is first injected in the intrathecal space to provide rapid, effective analgesia with minimal muscle blockade. The epidural catheter is used if labor lasts longer than the spinal block, if the spinal block is insufficient, or in case of cesarean section. Combined spinal-epidural blockade is a safe, valid alternative to conventional epidural analgesia and has become the main technique for providing obstetric analgesia in many hospitals. The most widely-recognized advantage of the technique is high maternal satisfaction with rapid and effective analgesia. Mobility of the lower extremities is preserved and the mother is often able to walk. Because opioids are injected into the intrathecal space and because the technique is more invasive than standard epidural analgesia, the potential risk to mother and fetus increases.

  2. Pneumocephalus during cervical transforaminal epidural steroid injections: a case report.

    PubMed

    Kim, Won-Joong; Park, Hae-Gyun; Park, Yong-Hee; Shin, Mee-Ran; Koo, Gill-Hoi; Shin, Hwa-Yong

    2015-01-01

    A cervical transforaminal epidural injection of anesthetic and corticosteroids (CTFESI) is a frequently used procedure for cervical radiculopathy. Most cases of pneumocephalus after an epidural block occur when using an interlaminar approach with the loss-of-resistance technique. The authors present the first case of pneumocephalus after cervical transforaminal epidural injection of anesthetic and corticosteroids. A 64-yr-old woman with left C7 radiculopathy was undergoing C6-7 transforaminal epidural injection of anesthetic and corticosteroids. The epidural spread of contrast was checked by fluoroscope, and 5 mg of dexamethasone in 4 ml of 0.1875% ropivacaine was injected. She lost consciousness 5 mins after the procedure and regained awareness after manual ventilation. She subsequently complained of nausea and headache, and a computed tomography brain scan revealed pneumocephalus. After carefully assessing the fluoroscopic images, the authors believe that the needle may have punctured the dura mater of the nerve root sleeve, allowing air to enter the subdural space. Thus, fluoroscopic images should be carefully examined to reduce dural puncture when performing cervical transforaminal epidural injection of anesthetic and corticosteroids, and air should be completely removed from the needle, extension tube, and syringe.

  3. Haematological and biochemical alterations caused by epidural and intramuscular administration of xylazine hydrochloride in dromedary camels (Camelus dromedarius).

    PubMed

    Azari, Omid; Molaei, Mohammad Mahdi; Emadi, Ladan; Sakhaee, Ehsanollah; Sharifi, Hamid; Mehdizadeh, Sara

    2012-01-01

    This study was conducted in 16 healthy immature dromedary camels weighing 120-150 kg to evaluate and compare the effects of epidural and intramuscular injections of xylazine administered at 0.1 mg/kg and 0.2 mg/kg. Haematological parameters included haemoglobin, packed cell volume, total erythrocyte count and total leukocyte count. Biochemical parameters included alkaline phosphates, alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, blood urea nitrogen, creatinine and glucose. Parameters were measured at different intervals before (baseline) and after the administration of drugs. Our study showed that the effect of xylazine on haematological and biochemical parameters is dose-dependant and is also related to the route of administration. The low dose of xylazine administered using both intramuscular and epidural methods showed minimal effects, whereas high doses of the drug, especially when injected intramuscularly, caused greater changes in haematological and biochemical parameters.

  4. Spinal epidural abscess treated with antibiotics alone.

    PubMed

    Pathak, Ashish; Singh, Poonam; Gehlot, Prateek; Dhaneria, Mamta

    2013-04-30

    Spinal epidural abscess (SEA) is a rare clinical condition among children. Most patients do not present with classical signs. A 13-year-old boy without any predisposing factors presented with paraparesis, bladder and bowel involvement. MRI spine demonstrated an SEA at the C7 and D1 levels on both sides of the midline with cord oedema at the C2-3 to C6 level with minimal marrow oedema in the C6 vertebral body. We treated the patient with antibiotics (ceftriaxone and vancomycin) alone. The patient showed excellent response with only minimal residual gait disturbance at the end of 6 weeks of antibiotic therapy. This is the first paediatric report of complete recovery of a patient at clinical stage 4 following antibiotic treatment alone from India. However, caution should be exercised to closely monitor the patient's recovery as any progression in the neurological state warrants surgery.

  5. Comparison of epidural oxycodone and epidural morphine for post-caesarean section analgesia: A randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Sng, Ban Leong; Kwok, Sarah Carol; Mathur, Deepak; Ithnin, Farida; Newton-Dunn, Clare; Assam, Pryseley Nkouibert; Sultana, Rehena; Sia, Alex Tiong Heng

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: Epidural morphine after caesarean section may cause moderate to severe pruritus in women. Epidural oxycodone has been shown in non-obstetric trials to reduce pruritus when compared to morphine. We hypothesised that epidural oxycodone may reduce pruritus after caesarean section. Methods: A randomised controlled trial was conducted in pregnant women at term who underwent caesarean section with combined spinal-epidural technique initiated with intrathecal fentanyl 15 μg. Women received either epidural morphine 3 mg or epidural oxycodone 3 mg via the epidural catheter after delivery. The primary outcome was the incidence of pruritus at 24 h after caesarean section. The secondary outcomes were the pruritus scores, treatment for post-operative nausea and vomiting (PONV), pain scores and maternal satisfaction. Results: One hundred women were randomised (group oxycodone O = 50, morphine M = 50). There was no difference between Group O and M in the incidence of pruritus (n [%] 28 [56%] vs. 31 [62%], P = 0.68) and the worst pruritus scores (mean [standard deviation] 2.6 (2.8) vs. 3.3 [3.1], P = 0.23), respectively. Both groups had similar pain scores at rest (2.7 [2.3] vs. 2.0 [2.7], P = 0.16) and sitting up (5.0 [2.3] vs. 4.6 [2.4], P = 0.38) at 24 h. Pruritus scores were lower at 4–8, 8–12 and 12–24 h with oxycodone, but pain scores were higher. Both groups had a similar need for treatment of PONV and maternal satisfaction with analgesia. Conclusion: There was no difference in the incidence of pruritus at 24 h between epidural oxycodone and morphine. However, pruritus scores were lower with oxycodone between 4 and 24 h after surgery with higher pain scores in the same period. PMID:27053782

  6. Single dose pharmacokinetics of the novel transdermal donepezil patch in healthy volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yo Han; Choi, Hee Youn; Lim, Hyeong-Seok; Lee, Shi Hyang; Jeon, Hae Sun; Hong, Donghyun; Kim, Seong Su; Choi, Young Kweon; Bae, Kyun-Seop

    2015-01-01

    Background Donepezil is an acetylcholinesterase inhibitor indicated for Alzheimer’s disease. The aim of this randomized, single-blind, placebo-controlled, single-dose, dose-escalation study was to investigate the safety, tolerability, and pharmacokinetics of the donepezil patch in healthy male subjects. Methods Each healthy male subject received a single transdermal donepezil patch (72 hours patch-on periods) of 43.75 mg/12.5 cm2, 87.5 mg/25 cm2, or 175 mg/50 cm2. Serial blood samples were collected up to 312 hours after patch application. The plasma concentrations of donepezil were determined by using a validated liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry method. Pharmacokinetic parameters were obtained by noncompartmental analysis. Tolerability of the patches and performance of the patches (adhesion, skin irritation, residual donepezil content in the patch) were assessed throughout the study. Results The study was completed by 36 healthy subjects. After patch application, the maximal plasma donepezil concentration (Cmax) and the area under the curve (AUC) increased in a dose-proportional manner. Median time to Cmax was ~74–76 hours (~2–4 hours after patch removal), and mean t1/2β was ~63.77–93.07 hours. The average donepezil residue in the patch after 72 hours was ~73.9%–86.7% of the loading dose. There were neither serious adverse events nor adverse events that lead to discontinuation. Skin adhesion of the patch was good in 97.2% of the subjects. All skin irritations after patch removal were mild and were resolved during the study period. Conclusion The donepezil patch appeared to be generally well tolerated and adhesive. Pharmacokinetic analysis of the donepezil patch demonstrated linear kinetics. PMID:25792802

  7. Microscopic epidural lesions in goats given repeated epidural injections of morphine: use of a modified autopsy procedure.

    PubMed

    Larsen, J J; Svendsen, O; Andersen, H B

    1986-01-01

    Epidural catheterization was performed in six goats. Five days later either saline or 20 mg (5 mg/ml) preservative free morphine was injected epidurally once daily for 8 days. The goats were sacrificed 4, 24 or 48 hours after the last injection. The lumbar part of columna was removed in toto for microscopic examination of the spinal cord and the entire epidural space after decalcification and transverse sectioning. After saline, minimal changes including a fibrous membrane surrounding the catheter, scattered fat cell necrosis, scattered small focal cell infiltrations and occasionally focal haemorrhages were seen. After morphine the changes were considerably more severe including diffuse cellular inflammatory reaction in the epidural space, fat cell necrosis, occasionally focal exudative inflammation and chronic inflammatory reaction in the vicinity of the fibrous membrane demarcating position of the catheter. It is concluded that the present modified autopsy procedure permits microscopic examination of the epidural space. It has been shown that repeated administration of morphine caused tissue damage in the epidural space of goats. The human predictability of the results obtained is unknown. However, the results are encouraging for investigations with similar procedure in humans.

  8. Estimating the Incidence of Suspected Epidural Hematoma and the Hidden Imaging Cost of Epidural Catheterization: A Retrospective Review of 43,200 Cases

    PubMed Central

    Henneman, Justin P.; Sandberg, Warren S.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Hematoma associated with epidural catheterization is rare, but the diagnosis might be suspected relatively frequently. We sought to estimate the incidence of suspected epidural hematoma after epidural catheterization, and to determine the associated cost of excluding or diagnosing an epidural hematoma through radiologic imaging. Methods We conducted an electronic retrospective chart review of 43,200 patient charts using 4 distinct search strategies and cost analysis, all from a single academic institution from 2001 through 2009. Charts were reviewed for use of radiological imaging studies to identify patients with suspected and confirmed epidural hematomas. Costs for imaging to exclude or confirm the diagnosis were related to the entire cohort. Results In our analysis, over a 9-year period that included 43,200 epidural catheterizations, 102 patients (1:430) underwent further imaging studies to exclude or confirm the presence of an epidural hematoma—revealing 6 confirmed cases and an overall incidence (per 10,000 epidural blocks) of epidural hematoma of 1.38 (95% CI 0, 0.002). Among our patients, 207 imaging studies, primarily lumbar spine MRI, were performed. Integrating Medicare cost expenditure data, the estimated additional cost over a 9-year period for imaging and hospital charges related to identifying epidural hematomas nets to approximately $232,000 or an additional $5.37 per epidural. Discussion About 1 in 430 epidural catheterization patients will be suspected to have an epidural hematoma. The cost of excluding the diagnosis, when suspected, is relatively low when allocated across all epidural catheterization patients. PMID:23924685

  9. Severe Scapular Pain Following Unintentional Cervical Epidural Air Injection.

    PubMed

    Henthorn, Randall W; Murray, Kerra

    2016-03-01

    This a unique case of severe scapular pain following unintentional epidural space air injection during epidural steroid injection.A 70-year-old woman presented for a fluoroscopically guided C7-T1 interlaminar epidural steroid injection. Three injection attempts were made using the loss of resistance with air technique. On the first attempt the epidural space was entered, but contrast injection showed that the needle was intravenous. On the second attempt an equivocal loss of resistance with air was perceived and 5 mL of air was lost from the syringe. The needle was withdrawn and redirected, and upon the third needle passage the contrast injection showed appropriate epidural space filling up to the C4-5 level. Injection of betamethasone mixed in lidocaine was initially uneventful.However, 20 minutes post-injection the patient experienced sudden sharp and continuous pain along the medial edge of the scapula. After failing to respond to multiple intravascular analgesics, the patient was transferred to the emergency room. Her pain subsided completely following an intravenous diazepam injection. Cervical spine computerized tomography showed obvious air in the posterior epidural space from C4-5 to C6-7 as well as outside the spinal canal from (C4-T2). Having recovered fully, she was discharged the following morning. In reviewing the procedure, the equivocal loss of resistance on the second passage was actually a true loss of resistance to epidural space and air was unintentionally injected. Surprisingly, severe scapular pain resulted in a delayed manner after the steroid solution was injected. The authors theorize that unintentional prefilling of the epidural space with air prior to the injection of the subsequent steroid mixture added sufficient pressure to the epidural space to cause right-sided C4 nerve root stretching/entrapment and ensuing radicular pain to the right scapular border. The subsequent intravenous diazepam provided cervical muscle relaxation and

  10. Circulatory collapse following epidural bolus for Caesarean section a profound vasovagal reaction? A case report

    PubMed Central

    Oddby, Eva; Hein, Anette; Jakobsson, Jan G.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Reduced blood pressure is commonly seen associated to spinal anaesthesia for Caesarean section and efforts to reduce its occurrence and its magnitude is common practice. Cardiovascular collapse requiring cardio-pulmonary resuscitation after putting the spinal/epidural block for Caesarean section is however a rare but most dramatic event. Presentation of case We describe a case with sudden short loss of circulation, circulatory collapse, short after start of emergency Caesarean section in top up epidural anaesthesia (3 + 12 ml ropivaciane 7.5 mg/ml), requiring CPR. The neonate was delivered during CPR with Apgar 1, 10, 10 at 1, 5 and 10 min. Circulation was restored following 60–90 s of CPR and administration of 0.5 mg adrenaline. No cardioversion was administered sinus rhythm was regained spontaneously. The mother and child had a further uncomplicated course. No signs of cardiac damage/anomaly, emboli, septicaemia, pereclampisa or local anaesthetic toxicity was found. The patient had prior to the decision about Caesarean section had fever and was subsequently relatively dehydrated. Discussion The patient had a fast return of sinus rhythm following birth of the child, without cardioversion. None of common causes for cardiac arrest was found and the patient an uncomplicated post Caesarean section course. The combination of epidural induced sympathetic block and reduced preload possibly triggered a Bezold-Jarisch reflex with a profound vasovagal reaction. Concluiosn A structured plan for the handling of cardiovascular crisis must be available wherever Caesarean section are performed. Adequate volume loading, left tilt and vigilant control of circulation following regional block performance is of outmost importance. PMID:27100952

  11. Continuous thoracic epidural anesthesia induces segmental sympathetic block in the awake rat.

    PubMed

    Freise, Hendrik; Anthonsen, Sören; Fischer, Lars G; Van Aken, Hugo K; Sielenkämper, Andreas W

    2005-01-01

    Thoracic epidural anesthesia (TEA) is used increasingly in critical care, especially for cardiac and intestinal sympathetic block. In this study we evaluated cardiorespiratory function and sympathetic activity in a new model of continuous TEA in awake rats. Thirteen rats received epidural saline control (CON) or bupivacaine 0.5% epidural infusion (EPI) at 15 microl/h for 2 h on day 1 and day 3. Mean arterial blood pressure, heart rate, respiration rate, arterial PCO2, and motor score were recorded at baseline and after 30, 60, 90, and 120 min. Skin temperature was measured at front paws, high-thoracic, mid-thoracic, and low-thoracic, hind paws, and the proximal and distal tail. Changes in sympathetic activity were assessed by skin temperature changes from baseline (DeltaT). In the EPI group, hemodynamics and respiration remained unchanged and only mild motor deficits occurred. DeltaT in thoracic segments was higher in the EPI than in the CON group (P <0.001 at all times at high-thoracic, mid-thoracic, and low-thoracic segments). Skin temperature decreased in the distal tail in the EPI group, e.g., after 90 min DeltaT=-0.86 +/- 0.25 degrees C (EPI) versus 0.4 +/- 0.12 degrees C (CON) (P <0.05 at 60, 90, and 120 min). DeltaT on day 3 was comparable to day 1. TEA induced stable segmental sympathetic block without cardiorespiratory and motor side effects in awake rats. This new technique may be applied in prolonged models of critical illness.

  12. Why Cannot Suction Drains Prevent Postoperative Spinal Epidural Hematoma?

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Dong Ki; Kim, Jin Woo; Yi, Seong Min

    2016-01-01

    Background Postoperative spinal epidural hematoma (POSEH) is different from spontaneous or post-spinal procedure hematoma because of the application of suction drains. However, it appeared that suction drains were not effective for prevention of POSEH in previous studies. The purpose of this study was to test our hypothesis that POSEH can be caused by hypercoagulability. Methods This was an experimental study. One hundred fifty milliliters of blood was donated from each of the 12 consecutive patients who underwent spine surgery and infused into 3 saline bags of 50 mL each. One of the 3 bags in each set contained 5,000 units of thrombin. All of them were connected to 120 ± 30 mmHg vacuum suctions: drainage was started 8 minutes after connection to the vacuum system for 12 normal blood bags (BV8) and 12 thrombin-containing blood bags (TBV8) and 15 minutes after connection for the remaining 12 normal blood bags (BV15). The amount of initial and remaining hematoma at 20 minutes, 120 minutes, and 24 hours after vacuum application were measured by their weight (g). The primary endpoint was the difference between BV8 and TBV8. The secondary end point was the difference between BV8 and BV15. Results The remaining hematoma in TBV8 was significantly greater than that in BV8 at all measurement points: 46.3 ± 12.4 vs. 17.0 ± 1.3 (p = 0.000) at 20 minutes; 33.0 ± 8.2 vs. 16.3 ± 1.2 (p = 0.000) at 120 minutes; and 26.1 ± 4.0 vs. 15.8 ± 1.6 (p = 0.000) at 24 hours after vacuum application. The remaining hematoma of BV15 was significantly greater than that of BV8 at all measurement points: 30.0 ± 12.0 vs. 17.0 ± 1.3 (p = 0.002) at 20 minutes; 24.2 ± 7.6 vs. 16.3 ± 1.2 at 120 minutes (p = 0.002); and 22.2 ± 6.6 vs. 15.8 ± 1.6 (p = 0.004) at 24 hours after vacuum application. Conclusions With a suction drain in place, the amount of remaining hematoma could be affected by coagulability. Thrombin-containing local hemostatics and the length of time elapsed before the

  13. Labor epidural anesthesia, obstetric factors and breastfeeding cessation.

    PubMed

    Dozier, Ann M; Howard, Cynthia R; Brownell, Elizabeth A; Wissler, Richard N; Glantz, J Christopher; Ternullo, Sharon R; Thevenet-Morrison, Kelly N; Childs, Cynthia K; Lawrence, Ruth A

    2013-05-01

    Breastfeeding benefits both infant and maternal health. Use of epidural anesthesia during labor is increasingly common and may interfere with breastfeeding. Studies analyzing epidural anesthesia's association with breastfeeding outcomes show mixed results; many have methodological flaws. We analyzed potential associations between epidural anesthesia and overall breast-feeding cessation within 30 days postpartum while adjusting for standard and novel covariates and uniquely accounting for labor induction. A pooled analysis using Kaplan-Meier curves and modified Cox Proportional Hazard models included 772 breastfeeding mothers from upstate New York who had vaginal term births of healthy singleton infants. Subjects were drawn from two cohort studies (recruited postpartum between 2005 and 2008) and included maternal self-report and maternal and infant medical record data. Analyses of potential associations between epidural anesthesia and overall breastfeeding cessation within 1 month included additional covariates and uniquely accounted for labor induction. After adjusting for standard demographics and intrapartum factors, epidural anesthesia significantly predicted breastfeeding cessation (hazard ratio 1.26 [95% confidence interval 1.10, 1.44], p < 0.01) as did hospital type, maternal age, income, education, planned breastfeeding goal, and breastfeeding confidence. In post hoc analyses stratified by Baby Friendly Hospital (BFH) status, epidural anesthesia significantly predicted breastfeeding cessation (BFH: 1.19 [1.01, 1.41], p < 0.04; non-BFH: 1.65 [1.31, 2.08], p < 0.01). A relationship between epidural anesthesia and breastfeeding was found but is complex and involves institutional, clinical, maternal and infant factors. These findings have implications for clinical care and hospital policies and point to the need for prospective studies.

  14. Labor Epidural Analgesia and Breastfeeding: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    French, Cynthia A; Cong, Xiaomei; Chung, Keun Sam

    2016-08-01

    Despite widespread use of epidural analgesia during labor, no consensus has been reached among obstetric and anesthesia providers regarding its effects on breastfeeding. The purpose of this review was to examine the relationship between labor epidural analgesia and breastfeeding in the immediate postpartum period. PubMed, Cochrane Library, and Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature were searched for articles published in 1990 or thereafter, using the search term breastfeeding combined with epidural, labor epidural analgesia, labor analgesia, or epidural analgesia Of 117 articles, 23 described empirical studies specific to labor epidural analgesia and measured a breastfeeding outcome. Results were conflicting: 12 studies showed negative associations between epidural analgesia and breastfeeding success, 10 studies showed no effect, and 1 study showed a positive association. Most studies were observational. Of 3 randomized controlled studies, randomization methods were inadequate in 2 and not evaluable in 1. Other limitations were related to small sample size or inadequate study power; variation and lack of information regarding type and dosage of analgesia or use of other intrapartum interventions; differences in timing, definition, and method of assessing breastfeeding success; or failure to consider factors such as mothers' intention to breastfeed, social support, siblings, or the mother's need to return to work or school. It is also unclear to what extent results are mediated through effects on infant neurobehavior, maternal fever, oxytocin release, duration of labor, and need for instrumental delivery. Clinician awareness of factors affecting breastfeeding can help identify women at risk for breastfeeding difficulties in order to target support and resources effectively.

  15. Cervical epidural steroid injections for the treatment of cervical spinal (neck) pain.

    PubMed

    Candido, Kenneth D; Knezevic, Nebojsa 'nick'

    2013-02-01

    Cervical epidural steroid injections (CESI) are an accepted treatment for neck pain with a radicular component, and may be accomplished by using either transforaminal (CTFESI) or interlaminar (CILESI) approaches. CESIs are routinely performed using real-time fluoroscopic-guidance in conjunction with the injection of water soluble, iodine-based contrast media to enhance visualization of intravascular injections. Digital subtraction angiography (DSA) imaging is an adjuvant to fluoroscopic methods for visualizing blood vessels while performing spinal injections. However, as with any neuraxial procedure, various complications associated with CESIs have been reported. Complications are directly associated with the technical procedures of CESIs. Particulate steroids may have a prolonged duration of action but non-particulate steroids are safer for CESIs. Blunt-beveled needles are less likely than sharp-beveled needles to penetrate blood vessels to cause bleeding complications during CTFESI procedures. Small doses of local anesthetics appear to be safe and assist in identifying intravascular injections previously overlooked by conventional techniques.

  16. Visible Evidence of Lumbar Epidural Catheter Misplacement–A Critical Incident Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Butala, Beena; Parikh, Geeta; Pargi, Rajesh

    2017-01-01

    One of the causes of failed epidurals is catheter misplacement. Though various techniques of epidural space identification have been developed, none of them is 100% successful. Here, we present a case of lumbar epidural catheter misplacement in a patient scheduled to undergo right sided open nephrectomy. Catheter was found in the surgical field coming out of psoas major muscle. PMID:28274024

  17. Smart patch piezoceramic actuator issues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffin, Steven F.; Denoyer, Keith K.; Yost, Brad

    1993-01-01

    The Phillips Laboratory is undertaking the challenge of finding new and innovative ways to integrate sensing, actuation, and the supporting control and power electronics into a compact self-contained unit to provide vibration suppression for a host structure. This self-contained unit is commonly referred to as a smart patch. The interfaces to the smart patch will be limited to standard spacecraft power and possibly a communications line. The effort to develop a smart patch involves both contractual and inhouse programs which are currently focused on miniaturization of the electronics associated with vibrational control using piezoceramic sensors and actuators. This paper is comprised of two distinct parts. The first part examines issues associated with bonding piezoceramic actuators to a host structure. Experimental data from several specimens with varying flexural stiffness are compared to predictions from two piezoelectric/substructure coupling models, the Blocked Force Model and the Uniform Strain Model with Perfect Bonding. The second part of the paper highlights a demonstration article smart patch created using the insights gained from inhouse efforts at the Phillips Laboratory. This demonstration article has self contained electronics on the same order of size as the actuator powered by a voltage differential of approximately 32 volts. This voltage is provided by four rechargeable 8 volt batteries.

  18. Pentoxifylline Inhibits Epidural Fibrosis in Post-Laminectomy Rats

    PubMed Central

    Kelten, Bilal; Erdogan, Hakan; Antar, Veysel; Sanel, Selim; Tuncdemir, Matem; Kutnu, Muge; Karaoglan, Alper; Orki, Tulay

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this experimental study was to investigate the effectiveness of intramuscular pentoxifylline in the prevention of postoperative fibrosis. Material/Methods We divided 16 adult Wistar albino rats into 2 equal groups: treatment and control. Both groups underwent L1 vertebral total laminectomy to expose the dura. The intramuscular treatment group received pentoxifylline. Four weeks later, epidural fibrosis was studied in both groups using electron microscopy, light microscopy, histology, biochemistry, and macroscopy. Results The evaluation of epidural fibrosis in the 2 groups according to macroscopic (p<0.01) assessment and light microscopy revealed that epidural scar tissue formation was lower in the treatment group compared to the control group (p<0.001) and the number of fibroblasts was also decreased significantly in the pentoxifylline-treated group (p<0.05). More immature fibers were demonstrated in the treatment group by electron microscopy in comparison with the control group. In biochemical analysis, a statistically significant decrease was detected in hydroxyproline, which indicates fibrosis and myeloperoxidase activity, and shows an inflammatory response (P<0.001). Conclusions Systemic pentoxifylline application prevents postoperative epidural fibrosis and adhesions with various mechanisms. Our study is the first to present evidence of experimental epidural fibrosis prevention with pentoxifylline. PMID:26974057

  19. Morphine and hydromorphone epidural analgesia. A prospective, randomized comparison.

    PubMed

    Chaplan, S R; Duncan, S R; Brodsky, J B; Brose, W G

    1992-12-01

    Because evidence from uncontrolled, unblinded studies suggested fewer side effects from epidural hydromorphone than from epidural morphine, we employed a randomized, blinded study design to compare the side effects of lumbar epidural morphine and hydromorphone in 55 adult, non-obstetric patients undergoing major surgical procedures. A bolus dose of epidural study drug was given at least 1 h prior to the conclusion of surgery, followed by a continuous infusion of the same drug for two postoperative days. Infusions were titrated to patient comfort. Visual analog scale (VAS) pain scores, VAS sedation scores, and subjective ratings of nausea and pruritus were assessed twice daily. The two treatments provided equivalent analgesia. Sedation scores and prevalence of nausea did not differ significantly between groups. Prevalence of pruritus, however, differed significantly on postoperative day 1, with moderate to severe pruritus reported by 44.4% of patients in the morphine group versus 11.5% in the hydromorphone group (P < .01). On post-operative day 2, reports of pruritus by patients receiving morphine remained higher than those among the hydromorphone-treated subjects, although this difference was no longer statistically significant (32% vs. 16.7%, P = .18). We conclude that lumbar epidural morphine and hydromorphone afford comparable analgesia, but the occurrence of moderate to severe pruritus on the first postoperative day is reduced by the use of hydromorphone.

  20. Diabetic foot complicated by vertebral osteomyelitis and epidural abscess

    PubMed Central

    Trombetta, Maddalena; Imbriaco, Chiara; Rigolon, Riccardo; Mingolla, Lucia; Zamboni, Federica; Dal Molin, Francesca; Cioccoloni, Dario; Sanga, Viola; Bruti, Massimiliano; Brocco, Enrico; Conti, Michela; Ravenna, Giorgio; Perrone, Fabrizia; Stoico, Vincenzo; Bonora, Enzo

    2016-01-01

    Summary Vertebral osteomyelitis (or spondylodiscitis) is steadily increasing in Western countries and often results from hematogenous seeding, direct inoculation during spinal surgery, or contiguous spread from an infection in the adjacent soft tissue. We present the case of a 67-year-old white patient with type 2 diabetes who went to Hospital for high fever, back pain, and worsening of known infected ulcers in the left foot. Despite intravenous antibiotic treatment and surgical debridement of the foot infection, high fever and lower back pain continued. Bone biopsy and two consecutive blood cultures were positive for Staphylococcus aureus. A spinal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed, revealing serious osteomyelitis in L4 and L5 complicated by an epidural abscess. Contiguous or other distant focuses of infection were not identified. In this case, diabetic foot could be considered as a primary distant focus for vertebral osteomyelitis. Clinicians should consider vertebral osteomyelitis as a ‘possible’ diagnosis in patients with type 2 diabetes complicated by foot infection that is associated with fever and lower back pain. Learning points Vertebral osteomyelitis is increasing in Western countries, especially in patients with type 2 diabetes. The primary focus of infection is the genitourinary tract followed by skin, soft tissue, endocarditis, bursitis, septic arthritis, and intravascular access. Diabetic foot could be a rare primary focus of infection for vertebral osteomyelitis, and, however, vertebral osteomyelitis could be a serious, albeit rare, complication of diabetic foot. Clinicians should keep in mind the many potential complications of diabetic foot ulcerations and consider vertebral osteomyelitis as a “possible” diagnosis in patients with type 2 diabetes and foot ulcers associated with nonspecific symptoms such as lower back pain. Early diagnosis and correct management of vertebral osteomyelitis are crucial to improve clinical outcomes

  1. A Double-Blind Randomized Controlled Trial Comparing Epidural Clonidine vs Bupivacaine for Pain Control During and After Lower Abdominal Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Abd-Elsayed, Alaa A.; Guirguis, Maged; DeWood, Mark S.; Zaky, Sherif S.

    2015-01-01

    Background Alpha-2 adrenergic agonists produce safe and effective analgesia, but most investigations studying the analgesic effect of alpha-2 adrenoceptor agonists postoperatively included previous or concomitant administration of other analgesics. Because clonidine potentiates the effect of these drugs, its own intrinsic analgesic effect has been difficult to establish. This study was designed to compare the intraoperative and postoperative effects of epidural clonidine vs bupivacaine for patients undergoing lower abdominal surgery. Methods This randomized controlled trial included 40 patients aged 18-50 who were scheduled for elective lower abdominal surgery. Patients were randomly divided into 2 groups. Group I (n=20) received epidural clonidine; Group II (n=20) received epidural bupivacaine. Intraoperative and postoperative hemodynamics, pain scores, and complications were monitored. Results Mean pain scores were significantly lower in Group I compared to Group II (1.5 ± 0.5 compared to 3.4 ± 1.0, respectively) in the first 12 hours after surgery. Sedation was more prominent in Group I until 9 hours after surgery. Opioid requirements were significantly lower in Group I. Respiratory rate was similar in the 2 groups. Group I had larger decreases from baseline in systolic blood pressure and diastolic blood pressure than Group II. Heart rate in Group I was reduced from baseline, while it was increased in Group II. Less postoperative nausea and vomiting, urinary retention, pruritus, and shivering were observed in Group I. Conclusion Compared to bupivacaine, epidural clonidine provided effective intraoperative and postoperative analgesia in selected patients, resulting in a decreased intravenous pain medication requirement and prolonged duration of analgesia after epidural infusion was discontinued. PMID:26130975

  2. A New Less Invasive Technique for Multiple-Level Spontaneous Spinal Epidural Hematomas: Wash-and-Go Technique.

    PubMed

    Tanriverdi, Osman; Gungor, Abuzer; Coban, Mustafa Kemal; Okay, Onder; Kamaci, Umit

    2017-03-01

    Aim Spinal epidural hematomas are rare entity in neurosurgery practice. Most of them are spontaneous due to anticoagulant therapy and called spontaneous spinal epidural hematomas (SSEHs). Laminectomy or hemilaminectomy for affected levels is still the first choice in the operative treatment of an SSEH. We describe a new less invasive surgical technique, performing single-level laminectomy and washing with 0.9% sodium chloride through a thin soft catheter for a 12-level thoracic-cervical SSEH in a patient under anticoagulant therapy. Patient and Operative Technique A 55-year-old woman was brought to the emergency department with a rapid onset of pain in her upper back and both legs with weakness of her lower extremities. An urgent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the whole spine showed a SEH. During the operation, after T2 laminectomy, a thin soft catheter was epidurally placed under the T1 lamina and gently pushed forward rostrally. Then continuous saline irrigation was utilized and aspiration made via the catheter to wash out the hematoma. Drainage of blood was observed. The procedure was performed for 15 minutes. Then the catheter was epidurally placed under the T3 lamina, and the procedure for the hematoma in the lower segment was repeated. Decompression of spinal cord and nerve roots was observed. Result Postoperative early MRI of the thoracic-cervical spine showed gross total evacuation of the SEH. Accordingly, the patient's muscle strength improved. Conclusion Although multiple laminectomy or hemilaminectomy for affected levels to evacuate the hematoma and decompress the spinal cord is the main choice of surgical treatment, single-level laminectomy and irrigation plus aspiration via a thin soft catheter can be performed successfully with good results in SSEH.

  3. Knotting of a Cervical Epidural Catheter in the Patient with Post-Herpetic Neuralgia: A Rare Complication

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jong Taek; Cho, Dong Woo; Lee, Young Bok

    2017-01-01

    Epidural block is achieved either by single injection of local anesthetic through an epidural needle or as a continuous block by infusion pump through an epidural catheter. Complications associated with epidural catheters include breakage, entrapment, and knotting. Knotting of epidural catheters is very rare, but knotting in lumbar epidural catheters has been reported in a number of studies, and most of these cases involved removal difficulty. We report a case in which we inserted a cervical epidural catheter in a patient who was experiencing severe post-herpetic neuralgia and then removed the knotted catheter without complications. PMID:28261560

  4. Postoperative analgesia in children: A comparison of three different doses of caudal epidural morphine

    PubMed Central

    Baduni, Neha; Sanwal, Manoj Kumar; Vajifdar, Homay; Agarwala, Radhika

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: Caudal epidural block is the most commonly used neuraxial block in children. Morphine has been used as a caudal additive for more than three decades. The aim of our study was to evaluate the efficacy and duration of analgesia of three different doses of caudal epidural morphine (CEM), and to find out the incidence of side effects. Material and Methods: This study was conducted on 75 patients of American Society of Anesthesiologists grades I and II, aged 2-12 years, undergoing lower abdominal and urogenital surgeries. Patients were randomly allocated to one of the three groups according to the dose of morphine. Group I received 30 μg/kg, group II 50 μg/kg, and group III 70 μg/kg. Heart rate, blood pressure, oxygen saturation, electrocardiogram, pain score, sedation score, duration of analgesia, and side-effects were noted. Results: The mean duration of analgesia was 8.63 h in group I, 13.36 h in group II and 19.19 h in group III. Respiratory depression was noted in three patients in group III. One patient in group I had itching. One patient each in groups I, II, and III had nausea/vomiting. Conclusion: CEM significantly prolongs the duration of analgesia, though with a higher dose the risk of respiratory depression should always be kept in mind. PMID:27275053

  5. Epidural infection: Is it really an abscess?

    PubMed Central

    Avilucea, Frank R.; Patel, Alpesh A.

    2012-01-01

    Background: We reviewed the literature regarding the pathogenesis, clinical presentation, diagnosis, and management of spinal epidural abscess (SEA). Methods: Utilizing PubMed, we performed a comprehensive review of the literature on SEAs. Results: SEA remains a difficult infectious process to diagnose. This is particularly true in the early stages, when patients remain neurologically intact, and before the classic triad of fever, back pain, and neurologic deficit develop. However, knowledge of risk factors, obtaining serologic markers, and employing magnetic resonance scans facilitate obtaining a prompt and accurate diagnosis. In patients without neurologic deficits, lone medical therapy may prove effective. Conclusions: More prevalent over the previous three decades, SEA remains a rare but deleterious infectious process requiring prompt identification and treatment. Historically, identification of SEA is often elusive, diagnosis is delayed, and clinicians contend that surgical debridement is the cornerstone of treatment. Early surgery leads to more favorable outcomes and preserves neurologic function, particularly in the early stages of disease when minimal or no neurologic deficits are present. The advent of improved imaging modalities, diagnostic techniques, and multidrug antimicrobial agents has enabled medical/spinal surgical consultants to more rapidly diagnose SEA and institute more effective early medical treatment (e.g., data suggest that lone medical therapy may prove effective in the early management of SEA). PMID:23248757

  6. Pathophysiology of intracranial epidural haematoma following birth.

    PubMed

    Hamlat, Abderrahmane; Heckly, Anne; Adn, Mahmoudreza; Poulain, Patrice

    2006-01-01

    Epidural haematoma in newborn infants is rare, and few specific obstetrical data related to its formation are available in the literature. The aim of this study is to discuss the pathophysiology of this condition. EDH is always a post traumatic lesion and it is only possible if the insult has produced a cleavage of the dura mater from bone. Therefore, EDH results from the mechanical forces exerted on the foetal head during birth, with or with no instrumental interference. Although it is still unclear whether the injury (and dura mater cleavage) was directly caused by the forceps or had already been inflicted by natural forces, or a combination of both however, in some patients (with neither dystocia nor skull fracture), there is no basis for explaining EDH formation, apart from propulsion of the fore coming head through the birth canal. Excessive moulding, whether or not associated with iatrogenic trauma, has been incriminated in most cases of EDH. As dystocia cannot always be anticipated, EDH will remain an ever-present cause of morbidity in the neonatal population, albeit a rare occurrence.

  7. Evaluation and management of spinal epidural abscess.

    PubMed

    DeFroda, Steven F; DePasse, J Mason; Eltorai, Adam E M; Daniels, Alan H; Palumbo, Mark A

    2016-02-01

    Spinal epidural abscess (SEA) is an uncommon and potentially catastrophic condition. SEA often presents a diagnostic challenge, as the "classic triad" of fever, spinal pain, and neurological deficit is evident in only a minority of patients. When diagnosis is delayed, irreversible neurological damage may ensue. To minimize morbidity, an appropriate level of suspicion and an understanding of the diagnostic evaluation are essential. Infection should be suspected in patients presenting with axial pain, fever, or elevated inflammatory markers. Although patients with no known risk factors can develop SEA, clinical concern should be heightened in the presence of diabetes, intravenous drug use, chronic renal failure, immunosuppressant therapy, or a recent invasive spine procedure. When the clinical profile is consistent with the diagnosis of SEA, gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of the spinal column should be obtained on an emergent basis to delineate the location and neural compressive effect of the abscess. Rapid diagnosis allows for efficient treatment, which optimizes the potential for a positive outcome.

  8. Computational modeling of epidural cortical stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wongsarnpigoon, Amorn; Grill, Warren M.

    2008-12-01

    Epidural cortical stimulation (ECS) is a developing therapy to treat neurological disorders. However, it is not clear how the cortical anatomy or the polarity and position of the electrode affects current flow and neural activation in the cortex. We developed a 3D computational model simulating ECS over the precentral gyrus. With the electrode placed directly above the gyrus, about half of the stimulus current flowed through the crown of the gyrus while current density was low along the banks deep in the sulci. Beneath the electrode, neurons oriented perpendicular to the cortical surface were depolarized by anodic stimulation, and neurons oriented parallel to the boundary were depolarized by cathodic stimulation. Activation was localized to the crown of the gyrus, and neurons on the banks deep in the sulci were not polarized. During regulated voltage stimulation, the magnitude of the activating function was inversely proportional to the thickness of the CSF and dura. During regulated current stimulation, the activating function was not sensitive to the thickness of the dura but was slightly more sensitive than during regulated voltage stimulation to the thickness of the CSF. Varying the width of the gyrus and the position of the electrode altered the distribution of the activating function due to changes in the orientation of the neurons beneath the electrode. Bipolar stimulation, although often used in clinical practice, reduced spatial selectivity as well as selectivity for neuron orientation.

  9. Comparison of lidocaine and saline for epidural top-up during combined spinal-epidural anesthesia in volunteers.

    PubMed

    Trautman, W J; Liu, S S; Kopacz, D J

    1997-03-01

    This study was designed to determine the efficacy of saline as an epidural top-up to prolong spinal anesthesia during combined spinal-epidural anesthesia (CSEA). Eight volunteers received three separate CSEAs with intrathecal lidocaine (50 mg). After two-segment regression, each subject received either a saline (10 mL), lidocaine 1.5% (10 mL), or control sham (0.5 mL saline) epidural injection in a randomized, double-blind, triple cross-over fashion. Sensory block was assessed by pinprick and tolerance to transcutaneous electrical stimulation (TES) equivalent to surgical stimulation at the knee and ankle. Motor strength was assessed with iso-metric force dynamometry. Data were analyzed with a repeated measures analysis of variance and a paired t-test. Sensory block to pinprick was prolonged in the thoracolumbar dermatomes only by lidocaine (P < 0.05). Neither lidocaine nor saline prolonged the duration of tolerance to TES at the tested sites. Instead, saline decreased the duration of tolerance to TES by 20 and 24 min at the knee and ankle (P < 0.05). Recovery from motor block at the quadriceps was prolonged by an epidural injection of lidocaine (P < 0.05). We conclude that when 10 mL of epidural saline is administered after two-segment regression, it is an ineffective top-up and may decrease the duration of spinal anesthesia during CSEA.

  10. Continuous Cervical Epidural Analgesia in Metastatic Spinal Cord Compression

    PubMed Central

    Menon, Mahesh; Taha, Nafisa; Purohit, Navita; Kothari, Vatsal; Singh, Shweta

    2016-01-01

    Metastatic spinal cord compression is a devastating complication of cancer. Patients may often require high doses of opioids that may cause side effects, myoclonus being one such. A 63-year-old male suffering from malignant spinal cord compression was admitted to our institution. The primary team managed him conservatively with pharmacotherapy with no relief of pain, and he experienced myoclonus and sedation as adverse effects. A continuous cervical epidural catheter with local anesthetic infusion was inserted for 5 days to control his pain. This relieved his pain, which was sustained even after we removed the epidural catheter on day 5, for up to 64 days until the time of his death. Continuous cervical epidural local anesthetic infusions may help with refractory pain by deafferentation of noxious stimuli. Central neuraxial blocks may be a valuable rescue in selected patients. PMID:27803576

  11. Acute lymphocytic leukemia recurring in the spinal epidural space.

    PubMed

    Higashida, Tetsuhiro; Kawasaki, Takashi; Sakata, Katsumi; Tanabe, Yutaka; Kanno, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Isao

    2007-08-01

    A 27-year-old man presented with a very rare spinal epidural mass associated with recurrence of acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) manifesting as acute progressive neurological deficits. The patient presented with shoulder pain and ambulatory difficulties 3 years after remission of ALL treated by bone marrow transplantation. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed an epidural mass extending from C-7 to T-3, which compressed the cord and extended to the intervertebral foramen along the roots. After decompression surgery, the symptoms dramatically improved. Histological examination showed clusters of immature lymphocytes consistent with recurrence of leukemia, so chemotherapy and radiation therapy were carried out. At 1 year after the operation, no local mass expansion or systemic progression of leukemia had occurred. Leukemic mass must be considered in the differential diagnosis of spinal epidural mass, even in patients with ALL.

  12. Tunable Patch Antennas Using Microelectromechanical Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-05-11

    Tunable Microstrip Patch Antena Using RF MEMS Technology, IEEE Transactions on Antennas and Propagations, Vol. 55, Issue 4, April 2007, pp. 1193...capacitors co-fabricated in the same process. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Microstrip antennas, patch antennas, radio frequency microelectromechanical systems...resonant mode. Keywords: Microstrip antennas, patch antennas, radio frequency microelectromechanical systems, tunable circuits and devices 2

  13. Rapidly Progressive Gas-containing Lumbar Spinal Epidural Abscess

    PubMed Central

    Bang, Jin Hyuk

    2015-01-01

    Gas-containing (emphysematous) infections of the abdomen, pelvis, and extremities are well-known disease entities, which can potentially be life-threatening. They require aggressive medical and often surgical treatment. In the neurosurgical field, some cases of gas-containing brain abscess and subdural empyema have been reported. Sometimes they progress rapidly and even can cause fatal outcome. However, gas-containing spinal epidural abscess has been rarely reported and clinical course is unknown. We report on a case of rapidly progressive gas-containing lumbar spinal epidural abscess due to Enterococcus faecalis in a 72-year-old male patient with diabetes mellitus. PMID:26512268

  14. Rapidly Progressive Gas-containing Lumbar Spinal Epidural Abscess.

    PubMed

    Bang, Jin Hyuk; Cho, Keun-Tae

    2015-09-01

    Gas-containing (emphysematous) infections of the abdomen, pelvis, and extremities are well-known disease entities, which can potentially be life-threatening. They require aggressive medical and often surgical treatment. In the neurosurgical field, some cases of gas-containing brain abscess and subdural empyema have been reported. Sometimes they progress rapidly and even can cause fatal outcome. However, gas-containing spinal epidural abscess has been rarely reported and clinical course is unknown. We report on a case of rapidly progressive gas-containing lumbar spinal epidural abscess due to Enterococcus faecalis in a 72-year-old male patient with diabetes mellitus.

  15. Epidural catheter design: history, innovations, and clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Toledano, Roulhac D; Tsen, Lawrence C

    2014-07-01

    Epidural catheters have evolved during the past several decades, as clinicians and manufacturers have sought to influence the quality of analgesia and anesthesia and reduce the incidence of catheter-related complications. This evolution has allowed a transformation from single-shot to continuous-infusion techniques and resulted in easier passage into the epidural space, more extensive medication distribution, and ultimately, improved patient satisfaction. Particular catheter features, including the materials used, tip design, and orifice number and arrangement, have been associated with specific outcomes and provide direction for future development.

  16. OpenSSO Project Patches

    SciTech Connect

    NEBERGALL, CHRISTOPHER

    2009-06-08

    These are patches to Sun Microsystems open source OpenSSO project to fix various bugs and incorporate changes for Sandia and NNSA to use the product including fixes to improve OpenSSO's authentication and authorization abilities. These fixes will then by incorporated by Sun into their Sun Access Manager product, which is used by various DOE/NNSA plants and labs. Having Sun maintain these changes will relieve SNL and DOE from the cost of maintaining the changes themselves.

  17. Multiple epidural steroid injections and body mass index linked with occurrence of epidural lipomatosis: a case series

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Epidural lipomatosis (EL) is an increase of adipose tissue, normally occurring in the epidural space, sufficient to distort the thecal sac and compress neural elements. There is a lack of knowledge of risk factors, impact on patient’s symptoms, and its possible association with epidural steroid injections. Methods History, physical examination, patient chart, and MRI were analyzed from 856 outpatients referred for epidural steroid injections. Seventy patients with signs of EL on MRI comprised the study group. Thirty-four randomly selected patients comprised the control group. The severity of EL was determined by the MRI assessment. The impact of EL was determined by the patient’s history and physical examination. Logistic regression was used to correlate the probability of developing EL with BMI and epidural steroid injections. Results EL was centered at L5 and S1 segments. The average BMI for patients with EL was significantly greater than that of control group (36.0 ± 0.9 vs. 29.2 ± 0.9, p <0.01). The probability of developing EL with increasing BMI was linear up to the BMI of 35 after which it plateaued. Triglycerides were significantly higher for the EL group as compared to controls (250 ± 30 vs. 186 ± 21 mg/dL p < 0.01). The odds of having EL were 60% after two epidural steroid injections, 90% after three epidural steroid injections and approached 100% with further injections, independent of BMI. Other risk factors considered included alcohol abuse, use of protease inhibitors, levels of stress, hypothyroidism and genetic predisposition. However there were insufficient quantities to determine statistical significance with a degree of confidence. The impact of EL on patient’s symptoms correlated with EL severity with Spearman correlation coefficient of 0.73 at p < 0.01 significance level. Conclusions The BMI and triglycerides levels were found to be significantly elevated for the EL group, pointing to an increased

  18. Cervical epidural steroid injection for cervicobrachialgia.

    PubMed

    Stav, A; Ovadia, L; Sternberg, A; Kaadan, M; Weksler, N

    1993-08-01

    Fifty patients with chronic resistant cervicobrachialgia were randomly divided into two groups. Twenty-five patients (group A) were treated with cervical epidural steroid/lidocaine injections and 17 patients (group B) were treated with steroid/lidocaine injections into the posterior neck muscles. Another eight patients from group B were excluded from the study because they had started the process of litigation of insurance claims and their subjective analysis of pain relief might therefore not be trustworthy. One to three injections were administered at 2-week intervals according to the clinical response. All patients continued their various pre-study treatments: non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, non-opioid analgesics and physiotherapy. Pain relief was evaluated by the visual analogue scale 1 week after the last injection and then 1 year later. One week after the last injection we rated pain relief as very good and good in 76% of the patients in group A, as compared to 35.5% of the patients in group B. One year after the treatment 68% of the group A patients still had very good and good pain relief, whereas only 11.8% of group B patients reported this degree of pain relief. These differences were statistically significant. We failed to achieve significant improvement of tendon reflexes or of sensory loss in both groups, but the increase in the range of motion, the fraction of patients who were able to decrease their daily dose of analgesics, and recovery of the capacity for work were significantly better in group A. We encountered no complications in either group of patients.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  19. Thoracic epidural catheter for postoperative pain control following an ineffective transversus abdominis plane block using liposome bupivacaine

    PubMed Central

    Terrien, Brian D; Espinoza, David; Stehman, Charles C; Rodriguez, Gabriel A; Connolly, Nicholas C

    2017-01-01

    A 24-year-old female with a history of ulcerative colitis underwent colectomy. The patient received an ineffective transversus abdominis plane (TAP) block with liposome bupivacaine (Exparel) intraoperatively and was started on a hydromorphone patient-controlled analgesia 5 hours after the TAP block, which did not relieve her pain. A continuous thoracic epidural (CTE) was then placed after blood levels of bupivacaine were drawn, and the patient immediately experienced significant pain relief. The combined use of liposome bupivacaine and bupivacaine CTE infusion in the postoperative management of this patient demonstrated no safety concerns, provided excellent analgesia and plasma concentrations of bupivacaine remained far below toxic levels. PMID:28144162

  20. "Patch"ing up our tumor signaling knowledge.

    PubMed

    Atwood, Scott X; Whitson, Ramon J; Oro, Anthony E

    2013-05-01

    The tumor suppressor Patched1 (Ptch1) possesses well-described roles in regulating sonic hedgehog (SHH) signaling in the skin and preventing the formation of basal cell carcinomas (BCCs). In this issue, Kang et al. extend their previous work to show that a naturally occurring allele of Ptch1 found in FVB mice promotes early squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) growth without aberrant activation of the SHH pathway. The study reveals new roles for Ptch1 that lie at the nexus between BCC and SCC formation.

  1. Patching. Restitching business portfolios in dynamic markets.

    PubMed

    Eisenhardt, K M; Brown, S L

    1999-01-01

    In turbulent markets, businesses and opportunities are constantly falling out of alignment. New technologies and emerging markets create fresh opportunities. Converging markets produce more. And of course, some markets fade. In this landscape of continuous flux, it's more important to build corporate-level strategic processes that enable dynamic repositioning than it is to build any particular defensible position. That's why smart corporate strategists use patching, a process of mapping and remapping business units to create a shifting mix of highly focused, tightly aligned businesses that can respond to changing market opportunities. Patching is not just another name for reorganizing; patchers have a distinctive mindset. Traditional managers see structure as stable; patching managers believe structure is inherently temporary. Traditional managers set corporate strategy first, but patching managers keep the organization focused on the right set of business opportunities and let strategy emerge from individual businesses. Although the focus of patching is flexibility, the process itself follows a pattern. Patching changes are usually small in scale and made frequently. Patching should be done quickly; the emphasis is on getting the patch about right and fixing problems later. Patches should have a test drive before they're formalized but then be tightly scripted after they've been announced. And patching won't work without the right infrastructure: modular business units, fine-grained and complete unit-level metrics, and companywide compensation parity. The authors illustrate how patching works and point out some common stumbling blocks.

  2. Analysis of Stub Loaded Microstrip Patch Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, M. C.; Deshpande, M. D.

    1997-01-01

    A microstrip patch antenna fed by a coaxial probe and reactively loaded by a open circuited microstrip line has been used previously to produce circular polarization[ l] and also as a building block for a series fed microstrip patch array [2]. Rectangular and circular patch antennas loaded with a microstrip stub were previously analyzed using the generalized Thevenin theorem [2,3]. In the Thevenin theorem approach, the mutual coupling between the patch current and the surface current on the stub was not taken into account. Also, the Thevenin theorem approach neglects continuity of current at the patch-stub junction. The approach in this present paper includes the coupling between the patch and stub currents as well as continuity at the patch-stub junction.

  3. Patch testing for noncontact dermatitis: the atopy patch test for food and inhalants.

    PubMed

    Wollenberg, Andreas; Vogel, Sandra

    2013-10-01

    The atopy patch test (APT) is defined as a patch test procedure to assess delayed type hypersensitivity reactions against those protein allergens known to elicit IgE-mediated type I reactions in atopic patients. This patch test procedure uses intact protein allergens instead of haptens in an optimized test setting and with a special reading key. It may be clinically useful especially for atopic dermatitis, as the currently available test procedures either target the wrong reaction type (type I and not type IV) or use the wrong allergens (haptens and not protein allergen). A positive APT reaction correlates with a positive lymphocyte transformation test and allergen-specific Th2 cells in the peripheral blood. As even small changes in the test procedure influence the sensitivity, specificity, and reproducibility of the APT, the European Task Force on Atopic Dermatitis (ETFAD) has developed a standardized APT technique: Intact protein allergens, purified in petrolatum, are applied in 12-mm-diameter Finn chambers mounted on Scanpor tape for 48 h to non-irritated, non-abraded, or tape-stripped skin of the upper back for 48 h; the evaluation of the test reaction is done after 48 and 72 h using the ETFAD reading key, assessing erythema as well as number and distribution pattern of the papules. The APT may reveal type IV sensitization in patients who are negative for the respective type I tests. Limited availability of the expensive test substances and limited reimbursement is among the factors restricting the routine use of the APT.

  4. Klebsiella pneumoniae Spinal Epidural Abscess treated conservatively: case report and review.

    PubMed

    Araújo, Filipe; Ribeiro, Célia; Silva, Inês; Nero, Patrícia; Branco, Jaime C

    2012-01-01

    Spinal infections are rare but potentially life-threatening disorders. A high level of clinical suspicion is necessary for rapid diagnosis and treatment initiation. The treatment combines both antibiotics and surgical intervention in the vast majority of cases. The authors report the case of a 84-year old female patient with a three week history of persistent lumbar back pain radiating to both thighs following a lower respiratory tract infection. She had lumbar spine tenderness but no neurological compromise. Her inflammatory markers were elevated and lumbar spine magnetic resonance imaging revealed L4-L5 spondylodiscitis with spinal epidural abscess. Blood cultures isolated Klebsiella pneumoniae and, since she was neurologically stable, conservative treatment with two-week intravenous gentamicin and eight-week intravenous ceftriaxone was initiated with positive inpatient and outpatient evolution.

  5. Comparative evaluation of general, epidural and spinal anaesthesia for extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy.

    PubMed Central

    Rickford, J. K.; Speedy, H. M.; Tytler, J. A.; Lim, M.

    1988-01-01

    The results of a prospective randomised evaluation of general anaesthesia (GA), epidural anaesthesia (EA) and spinal anaesthesia (SA) for extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy are presented. GA provided speed and reliability but resulted in a high incidence of postoperative nausea, vomiting and sore throat. Both regional techniques conferred the advantages of an awake, cooperative patient, but EA required a longer preparation time than SA and more supplementary treatment with fentanyl or midazolam. A major drawback associated with the use of SA was a 42% incidence of postspinal headache. All three techniques were associated with hypotension on placement in the hoisl; bath immersion resulted in significant rises in blood pressure in the EA and SA groups and a more variable (overall non-significant) response in the GA group. PMID:3044238

  6. Update on epidural analgesia during labor and delivery.

    PubMed

    Lurie, S; Priscu, V

    1993-05-01

    Properly administered epidural analgesia provides adequate pain relief during labor and delivery, shortens the first stage of labor, avoids adverse effects of narcotics, hypnotics, or inhalation drugs and it could be used as anesthesia in case a cesarean section is required. Epidural analgesia should be provided to all patients who need and ask for it with an exception of contraindications such as coagulation disorders, suspected infection or gross anatomic abnormality. The technique must be carried out with care if serious life-threatening complications, such as intravenous or intrathecal injection of local anesthetic, are to be avoided. The aim of many recent investigations has been to reduce the total dose of local anesthetic used. Supplementation of an opioid (mainly fentanyl) and introduction of the patient controlled epidural pump may not only serve this goal, but also reduce the demands on the time of obstetric anesthetists. We conclude that properly and skillfully administered epidural is the best form of pain relief during labor and delivery and we hope that more mothers could enjoy its benefits.

  7. Spinal epidural abscess in a patient with piriformis pyomyositis

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Gerald S.; Abou-Al-Shaar, Hussam; Arnone, Gregory D.; Barks, Ashley L.; Hage, Ziad A.; Neckrysh, Sergey

    2016-01-01

    Background: Spinal epidural abscess resulting from piriformis pyomyositis is extremely rare. Such condition can result in serious morbidity and mortality if not addressed in a timely manner. Case Description: The authors describe the case of a 19-year-old male presenting with a 2-week history of fever, low back pain, and nuchal rigidity. When found to have radiographic evidence of a right piriformis pyomyositis, he was transferred to our institution for further evaluation. Because he demonstrated rapid deterioration, cervical, thoracic, and lumbar magnetic resonance imaging scans were emergently performed. They revealed an extensive posterior spinal epidural abscess causing symptomatic spinal cord compression extending from C2 to the sacrum. He underwent emergent decompression and abscess evacuation through a dorsal midline approach. Postoperatively, he markedly improved. Upon discharge, the patient regained 5/5 strength in both upper and lower extremities. Cultures from the epidural abscess grew methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus warranting a 6-week course of intravenous nafcillin. Conclusion: A 19-year-old male presented with a holospinal epidural abscess (C2 to sacrum) originating from piriformis pyomyositis. The multilevel cord abscess was emergently decompressed, leading to a marked restoration of neurological function. PMID:28028447

  8. Upper Cervical Epidural Abscess in a Patient With Parkinson Disease

    PubMed Central

    Al-Hourani, Khalid; Frost, Chelsea

    2015-01-01

    To our knowledge, there are no reports in the literature of patients with Parkinson disease (PD) developing upper cervical spine infections. Our objective is to present a case of upper cervical epidural abscess in a patient with PD and to review upper cervical spine infection. We present the patient’s presentation, physical examination, imaging findings, and management as well a review of the literature. A 66-year-old male with PD presented to the emergency department (ED) following referral by a neurologist for a presumed C2 fracture. The preceding history was 1 week of severe neck pain requiring a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which was initially interpreted as a C2 fracture. On admission from the ED, further review of the MRI appeared to show anterior prevertebral abscess and an epidural abscess. The patient’s neurological examination was at baseline. In the span of 2 days, the patient developed significant motor weakness. A repeat MRI demonstrated expansion of the epidural collection and spinal cord compression. Surgical management consisting of C1 and C2 laminectomy, irrigation, and debridement from anterior and posterior approaches was performed. Postoperatively, the patient did not recover any motor strength and elected to withdraw care and died. Spinal epidural abscess requires a high index of suspicion and needs prompt recognition to prevent neurological impairment. Upper cervical spine infections are rare but can lead to lethal consequences. PMID:26623170

  9. Upper Cervical Epidural Abscess in Clinical Practice: Diagnosis and Management

    PubMed Central

    Al-Hourani, Khalid; Al-Aref, Rami; Mesfin, Addisu

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Narrative review. Objective Upper cervical epidural abscess (UCEA) is a rare surgical emergency. Despite increasing incidence, uncertainty remains as to how it should initially be managed. Risk factors for UCEA include immunocompromised hosts, diabetes mellitus, and intravenous drug use. Our objective is to provide a comprehensive overview of the literature including the history, clinical manifestations, diagnosis, and management of UCEA. Methods Using PubMed, studies published prior to 2015 were analyzed. We used the keywords “Upper cervical epidural abscess,” “C1 osteomyelitis,” “C2 osteomyelitis,” “C1 epidural abscess,” “C2 epidural abscess.” We excluded cases with tuberculosis. Results The review addresses epidemiology, etiology, imaging, microbiology, and diagnosis of this condition. We also address the nonoperative and operative management options and the relative indications for each as reviewed in the literature. Conclusion A high index of suspicion is required to diagnose this rare condition with magnetic resonance imaging being the imaging modality of choice. There has been a shift toward surgical management of this condition in recent times, with favorable outcomes. PMID:27190742

  10. Disseminated blastomycosis presenting as mastoiditis and epidural abscess.

    PubMed

    Makary, Chadia A; Roberts, Thomas D; Wetmore, Stephen J

    2014-01-01

    Blastomycosis is a systemic fungal infection that affects primarily the lungs. Head and neck involvement has been reported most commonly in the larynx as well as oral and nasal mucosa. Temporal bone involvement is extremely rare. We report a case of disseminated blastomycosis presenting as mastoiditis and epidural abscess. We discuss the importance of early diagnosis and prompt initiation of treatment for optimal outcome.

  11. Spinal epidural angiolipomas: Clinical characteristics, management and outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Bouali, Sofiene; Maatar, Nidhal; Bouhoula, Asma; Abderrahmen, Khansa; Said, Imed Ben; Boubaker, Adnen; Kallel, Jalel; Jemel, Hafedh

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The spinal epidural angiolipomas are rare expansive processes made of mature lipomatous and angiomatous elements. They often have a benign character. Their etiology, pathogenesis remains uncertain, and it is a cause of spinal cord compression. The magnetic resonance imaging is the most important neuroradiological examination. Histological examination is the only examination to confirm the diagnosis. Surgery is the treatment of choice. Methods: A retrospective study of all patients operated on for a spinal epidural angiolipoma at the Department of Neurosurgery at the National Institute of Neurology of Tunis between January 2000 and December 2014 (15 years) was performed. The aim of this study is to describe the clinical, radiological, histological characteristics and the treatment of this tumor. Results: A total of nine patients were operated from January 01, 2000 to November 30, 2014. The average age of our patients was 51 years with ages that ranged from 29 to 65 with a male predominance. The period between onset of symptoms and diagnosis ranged from 24 months with an average 12 months. Posterior localization of the tumor was seen in all patients. Surgical resection was performed for all cases. The postoperative course has been satisfactory, with a complete recovery of neurological functions in all patients. Conclusions: The spinal epidural angiolipomas is rare expansive process causing spinal cord compression. Treatment is exclusively surgical resection. The functional outcome of spinal epidural angiolipomas is particularly favorable with a complete neurological recovery is if the patient was quickly operated. PMID:27695535

  12. Epidural morphine analgesia in Guillain Barré syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Genis, D; Busquets, C; Manubens, E; Dávalos, A; Baró, J; Oterino, A

    1989-01-01

    Severe pain is a frequent symptom in the Guillain Barré syndrome and can be intense, long lasting and with no response to the usual analgesics, including parenteral opiates. Epidural analgesia using morphine chloride in low doses has satisfactorily relieved pain in this disease in nine patients. PMID:2795070

  13. [Iliopsoas abscess accompanied by epidural abscess--a case report].

    PubMed

    Fukushige, Tetsushi; Sano, Tomomi; Yamada, Sinichi; Ueda, Sawako; Kano, Tatsuhiko

    2003-09-01

    A 55-year-old man was admitted to a hospital with pain of the low back as well as the left leg, and fever. He was suspected of suffering from the lumbar disc herniation because of the presence of Lasegue's sign on the first physical examination. Abdominal computed tomography, however, revealed the swelling of the left iliopsoas muscle. Iliopsoas abscess accompanied epidural abscess was confirmed by subsequent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Antibiotic therapy was started for the successive 8 days. The fever resolved, but the pain persisted. The abscess extending from the iliopsoas muscle to the epidural space was still seen on the MRI 20 days after the completion of the antibiotic therapy, and he still complained of the pain of his low back and left leg. Therefore, we conducted epidural puncture under fluoroscopic guidance. Approximately 3 ml of pus was aspirated from the epidural space. Then, his complains decreased remarkably. Iliopsoas abscess should be taken into account in case of a patient with pain on the low back and leg and also inflammatory signs such as fever and leucocytosis.

  14. Epidural dexamethasone for post-operative analgesia in patients undergoing abdominal hysterectomy: A dose ranging and safety evaluation study

    PubMed Central

    Hefni, Amira Fathy; Mahmoud, Mohamed Sidky; Al Alim, Azza Atef Abd

    2014-01-01

    Aim: Number of studies revealed that epidural bupivacaine-dexamethasone has the same analgesic potency as bupivacaine-fentanyl with opioid sparing and antiemetic effects. Different doses of dexamethasone were used in different studies. This study was designed to evaluate the optimum dose of epidural dexamethasone for post-operative analgesia. Materials and Methods: In this double-blinded randomized controlled study, we evaluated the efficiency and safety of different doses of epidural dexamethasone for post-operative analgesia in 160 patients aged 45-60 years scheduled for total abdominal hysterectomy. Patient were randomly allocated into four groups to receive a total volume of 10 ml epidural plain bupivacaine 0.25% in the control group (Group D0) with either 4 mg dexamethasone in (Group D4) or 6 mg dexamethasone in (Group D6) or 8 mg dexamethasone in (Group D8). Patients then received general anesthesia. Sedation, satisfaction and visual analog pain scores (VAS) at rest and with effort were measured post-operatively. Meperidine was administered when VAS > or = 4. Intra-operative fentanyl dose, post-operative meperidine consumption and the time to first analgesic requirement were recorded by a blinded observer. Blood glucose was measured pre-operatively and at 4 h and 8 h after study drug administration. Wound healing and infection were assessed after 1 week. Results: Intraoperative fentanyl requirements were comparable among groups. The time to first analgesic requirement was significantly prolonged 5.5 times in D8 Group but only 1.5 times in D6 and D4 Groups more than the analgesic duration in the control Group D0, with a P < 0.01. There was a significant reduction in post-operative meperidine consumption during the first 24 h in the D8 (75%) in comparison with D6 and D4 Groups (50%), respectively, (P < 0.01) and the control Group D0 (0%) (P < 0.01). VAS scores were significantly lower and patient satisfaction score was significantly higher in the D8 and

  15. Limitations of the Use of Pressure Waves to Verify Correct Epidural Needle Position in Dogs

    PubMed Central

    Bergadano, Alessandra; Spadavecchia, Claudia

    2013-01-01

    The use of pressure waves to confirm the correct position of the epidural needle has been described in several domestic species and proposed as a valid alternative to standard methods, namely, control radiographic exam and fluoroscopy. The object of this retrospective clinical study was to evaluate the sensitivity of the epidural pressure waves as a test to verify the correct needle placement in the epidural space in dogs, in order to determine whether this technique could be useful not only in the clinical setting but also when certain knowledge of needle's tip position is required, for instance when performing clinical research focusing on epidural anaesthesia. Of the 54 client-owned dogs undergoing elective surgeries and enrolled in this retrospective study, only 45% showed epidural pressure waves before and after epidural injection. Twenty-six percent of the animals showed epidural pressure waves only after the injection, whereas 29% of the dogs showed epidural pressure waves neither before nor after injection and were defined as false negatives. Our results show that the epidural pressure wave technique to verify epidural needle position lacks sensitivity, resulting in many false negatives. As a consequence, the applicability of this technique is limited to situations in which precise, exact knowledge of the needle's tip position is not mandatory. PMID:23853736

  16. Pure spinal epidural cavernous hemangioma: A case series of seven cases

    PubMed Central

    Esene, Ignatius Ngene; Ashour, Ahmed M; Marvin, Eric; Nosseir, Mohamed; Fayed, Zeiad Y; Seoud, Khaled; El Bahy, Khaled

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Pure spinal epidural cavernous hemangiomas (PSECHs) are rare vascular lesions with about 100 cases reported. Herein, we present a case series of 7 PSECHs discussing their clinical presentation, radiological characteristics, surgical technique and intraoperative findings, pathological features, and functional outcome. Materials and Methods: We retrieved from the retrolective databases of the senior authors, patients with pathologically confirmed PSECH operated between January 2002 and November 2015. From their medical records, the patients’ sociodemographic, clinical, radiological, surgical, and histopathological data were retrieved and analyzed. Results: The mean age of the seven cases was 50.3 years. Four were females. All the five cases (71.4%) in the thoracic spine had myelopathy and the 2 (28.6%) lumbar cases had sciatica. Local pain was present in all the cases. All the lesions were isointense on T1-weighted images, hyperintense on T2-weighted images, and in five cases there was strong homogeneous enhancement. In six cases (85.7%), classical laminectomy was done; lesions resected in one piece in five cases. Total excision was achieved in all the cases. Lesions were thin-walled dilated blood vessels, lined with endothelium, and engorged with blood and with scanty loose fibrous stroma. The median follow-up was 12 months (range: 1–144 months). All patients gradually improved neurologically and achieved a good outcome with no recurrence at the last follow-up. Conclusion: PSECH although rare is increasing reported and ought to be included in the differential diagnosis of spinal epidural lesions. Early surgical treatment with total resection is recommended as would result in a good prognosis. PMID:27630480

  17. Patient-controlled epidural analgesia: interactions between nalbuphine and hydromorphone.

    PubMed

    Parker, R K; Holtmann, B; White, P F

    1997-04-01

    Epidural opioid analgesia can offer advantages over intravenous administration, however, opioid-related side effects are common after epidural administration. We studied the effect of adding nalbuphine (NB), an opioid agonist-antagonist, to hydromorphone (HM) for patient-controlled epidural analgesia (PCEA) in 78 healthy women after elective cesarean delivery. Patients were randomly assigned to one of four treatment groups. The control group received preservative-free HM (Dilaudid) alone, 0.075 mg/mL, while the three study groups received HM, 0.075 mg/mL, containing preservative-free NB (Nubain) 0.02, 0.04, or 0.08 mg/mL. Intraoperatively, all patients received epidural bupivacaine 0.5%. Postoperatively, a patient-controlled anesthesia (PCA) device was connected to the epidural catheter and programmed to deliver a 3-mL loading dose of the analgesic solution. Subsequently, patients could self-administer 2 mL bolus doses on demand with a 30-min lockout interval. Patients were encouraged to ambulate approximately 8 h after surgery, and PCEA therapy was discontinued when a clear liquid diet was tolerated. Visual analog scale scores were used to assess pain at 8-h intervals while using PCEA therapy. Although the overall incidences of nausea (19%-35%) and pruritus (32%-62%) were similar in all four groups, the addition of NB decreased the need for bladder catheterization. The highest NB concentration resulted in increased PCA demands during the 32-h study period. In conclusion, the combination of HM 0.075 mg/mL and NB 0.04 mg/mL resulted in lower nausea scores and a decreased incidence of urinary retention compared with HM alone, without increasing the opioid analgesic requirement.

  18. Efficacy of single dose epidural morphine versus intermittent low-dose epidural morphine along with bupivacaine for postcaesarean section analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Kiran; Agarwal, Navneet; Agrawal, V. K.; Agarwal, Ashok; Sharma, Mahender

    2012-01-01

    Background: Obstetric anesthesia presents a challenge to the anesthesiologist. The effective pain management allows the partu-rient adequate degree of comfort and promotes physical reco-very and a sense of well being. Materials and Methods: This randomized controlled study was designed to assess the analgesic efficacy and side effects of 1.20 mg single-dose epidural morphine (Group 1) versus intermittent 12 hourly epidural morphine (0.5 mg) with bupivacaine (Group2) for postoperative analgesia in lower segment caesarean section cases. Results: Each group consisted of 36 patients. Demographic characteristics of two groups were comparable and differences among them were not statistically significant. Mean duration of analgesia was significantly longer in group one patients (16.5±2.5h) in comparison to group two patients (11.5±1.5h). Mean highest visual analog scales (VAS scale) was significantly lower (3.2±0.9) in group one patients in comparison of group two (6.7±0.8) patients. Only 43% patient in group one required supplementary perenteral analgesic (Paracetamole/Diclofenac) and 71% required epidural morphine/bupivacaine in group two. Mean number of supplementary perenteral analgesic required in group one was 0.7 and it was 1.8 in group two. There was no significant difference in nausea, vomiting, itching, and pruritis in two groups of patients. Conclusion: Our study showed that the use of single dose epidural morphine is associated with lower pain scores at rest and movement when compared to intermittent epidural morphine with bupivacaine in postcaesarean section analgesia. PMID:25885497

  19. Adaptation of prey and predators between patches.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wendi; Takeuchi, Yasuhiro

    2009-06-21

    Mathematical models are proposed to simulate migrations of prey and predators between patches. In the absence of predators, it is shown that the adaptation of prey leads to an ideal spatial distribution in the sense that the maximal capacity of each patch is achieved. With the introduction of co-adaptation of predators, it is proved that both prey and predators achieve ideal spatial distributions when the adaptations are weak. Further, it is shown that the adaptation of prey and predators increases the survival probability of predators from the extinction in both patches to the persistence in one patch. It is also demonstrated that there exists a pattern that prey and predators cooperate well through adaptations such that predators are permanent in every patch in the case that predators become extinct in each patch in the absence of adaptations. For strong adaptations, it is proved that the model admits periodic cycles and multiple stability transitions.

  20. Modern approach to an old technique: Narrative revision of techniques used to locate the epidural space.

    PubMed

    Brogly, N; Guasch Arévalo, E; Kollmann Camaiora, A; Alsina Marcos, E; García García, C; Gilsanz Rodríguez, F

    2017-03-16

    Since the first description of the epidural technique during the 1920s, the continuous progress of knowledge of the anatomy and physiology of the epidural space has allowed the development of different techniques to locate this space while increasing both the safety and efficacy of the procedure. The most common techniques used today are based on the two main characteristics of the epidural space: the difference in distensibility between the ligamentum flavum and the epidural space, and the existence of negative pressure within the epidural space. However, over recent years, technological advances have allowed the development of new techniques to locate the epidural space based on other physical properties of tissues. Some are still in the experimental phase, but others, like ultrasound-location have reached a clinical phase and are being used increasingly in daily practice.

  1. Spontaneous Spinal Epidural Hematoma on the Ventral Portion of Whole Spinal Canal: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyun-Ho; Kim, Young; Ha, Young-Soo

    2015-01-01

    Spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma is an uncommon but disabling disease. This paper reports a case of spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma and treatment by surgical management. A 32-year-old male presented with a 30-minute history of sudden headache, back pain, chest pain, and progressive quadriplegia. Whole-spinal sagittal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed spinal epidural hematoma on the ventral portion of the spinal canal. Total laminectomy from T5 to T7 was performed, and hematoma located at the ventral portion of the spinal cord was evacuated. Epidural drainages were inserted in the upper and lower epidural spaces. The patient improved sufficiently to ambulate, and paresthesia was fully recovered. Spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma should be considered when patients present symptoms of spinal cord compression after sudden back pain or chest pain. To prevent permanent neurologic deficits, early and correct diagnosis with timely surgical management is necessary. PMID:26512277

  2. Foil Patches Seal Small Vacuum Leaks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spiegel, Kirk W.; Reed, David W.

    1995-01-01

    Report discloses technique to patch holes in nickel-alloy rocket-engine nozzle parts prior to vacuum brazing. Technique involves lightly spot-welding nickel foil 0.002 in. thick over hole patched, then spot-welding corrosion-resistant steel foil of same thickness over nickel foil. Once patches subject to pressure and temperature of vacuum brazing, nickel foil diffuses to bond with nickel-alloy nozzle, making vacuum-tight seal.

  3. Measurement and control of electrostatic patch potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrett, Joseph L.; Munday, Jeremy N.

    Electrostatic patch potentials hinder many precision measurements, particularly measurements of the Casimir force. Despite the improved force sensitivity achieved over the last decade, only recently have attempts been made to measure and quantify the effects of patch potentials. Here we present an analysis of patch potentials measured by Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) and discuss methods to control these potentials (e.g. humidity, material choice, etc).

  4. Multi-Mode Broadband Patch Antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Romanofsky, Robert R. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A multi-mode broad band patch antenna is provided that allows for the same aperture to be used at independent frequencies such as reception at 19 GHz and transmission at 29 GHz. Furthermore, the multi-mode broadband patch antenna provides a ferroelectric film that allows for tuning capability of the multi-mode broadband patch antenna over a relatively large tuning range. The alternative use of a semiconductor substrate permits reduced control voltages since the semiconductor functions as a counter electrode.

  5. RF MEMS reconfigurable triangular patch antenna.

    SciTech Connect

    Nordquist, Christopher Daniel; Christodoulou, Christos George; Feldner, Lucas Matthew

    2005-01-01

    A Ka-band RF MEMS enabled frequency reconfigurable triangular microstrip patch antenna has been designed for monolithic integration with RF MEMS phase shifters to demonstrate a low-cost monolithic passive electronically scanned array (PESA). This paper introduces our first prototype reconfigurable triangular patch antenna currently in fabrication. The aperture coupled patch antenna is fabricated on a dual-layer quartz/alumina substrate using surface micromachining techniques.

  6. RF MEMS reconfigurable triangular patch antenna.

    SciTech Connect

    Christodoulou, Christos George; Nordquist, Christopher Daniel; Feldner, Lucas Matthew

    2005-07-01

    A Ka-band RF MEMS enabled frequency reconfigurable triangular microstrip patch antenna has been designed for monolithic integration with RF MEMS phase shifters to demonstrate a low-cost monolithic passive electronically scanned array (PESA). This paper introduces our first prototype reconfigurable triangular patch antenna currently in fabrication. The aperture coupled patch antenna is fabricated on a dual-layer quartz/alumina substrate using surface micromachining techniques.

  7. Patch definition in metapopulation analysis: a graph theory approach to solve the mega-patch problem.

    PubMed

    Cavanaugh, Kyle C; Siegel, David A; Raimondi, Peter T; Alberto, Filipe

    2014-02-01

    The manner in which patches are delineated in spatially realistic metapopulation models will influence the size, connectivity, and extinction and recolonization dynamics of those patches. Most commonly used patch-definition methods focus on identifying discrete, contiguous patches of habitat from a single temporal observation of species occurrence or from a model of habitat suitability. However, these approaches are not suitable for many metapopulation systems where entire patches may not be fully colonized at a given time. For these metapopulation systems, a single large patch of habitat may actually support multiple, interacting subpopulations. The interactions among these subpopulations will be ignored if the patch is treated as a single unit, a situation we term the "mega-patch problem." Mega-patches are characterized by variable intra-patch synchrony, artificially low inter-patch connectivity, and low extinction rates. One way to detect this problem is by using time series data to calculate demographic synchrony within mega-patches. We present a framework for identifying subpopulations in mega-patches using a combination of spatial autocorrelation and graph theory analyses. We apply our approach to southern California giant kelp (Macrocystis pyrifera) forests using a new, long-term (27 years), satellite-based data set of giant kelp canopy biomass. We define metapopulation patches using our method as well as several other commonly used patch delineation methodologies and examine the colonization and extinction dynamics of the metapopulation under each approach. We find that the relationships between patch characteristics such as area and connectivity and the demographic processes of colonizations and extinctions vary among the different patch-definition methods. Our spatial-analysis/graph-theoretic framework produces results that match theoretical expectations better than the other methods. This approach can be used to identify subpopulations in metapopulations

  8. [Glossodynia--indication for patch testing?].

    PubMed

    Bäurle, G; Schönberger, A

    1986-08-15

    100 patients suffering from glossodynia without pathologic changes of the oral mucosa and 16 patients with suspected allergic contact stomatitis underwent patch testing using standard patch test and dental materials. The results were compared with those of patients in dental occupations suffering from hand eczema. As there is no clinical relevance of allergens in patients with glossodynia, patch testing seems to be unnecessary. On the other hand, patch test results of patients with stomatitis and dentures often suggest a causal allergy. In most of those cases, this was confirmed by complete healing after changing the denture bases, whereas in glossodynia such replacements never brought about a convincing improvement of the symptoms.

  9. The "edge effect" with patch test materials.

    PubMed

    Fyad, A; Masmoudi, M L; Lachapelle, J M

    1987-03-01

    A positive "edge effect", i.e., the accumulation on the skin of a chemical solution (such as fluorescein 0.01% in a 50/50 water-ethanol solution) at the periphery of the patch test sites has been demonstrated. It occurs with different test materials (Finn Chamber; Silver Patch Test; Patch Test Chamber). Practical implications are discussed: this observation could be important when discussing results of laboratory investigations. In clinical practice, it could explain the occurrence of "ring-shaped" positive allergic patch test reactions to chemicals used in solution, i.e., Kathon CG or hydrocortisone.

  10. Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Vertebral Osteomyelitis Following Epidural Catheterization: A Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Krishnakumar, R.; Renjitkumar, J.

    2012-01-01

    Indwelling epidural catheters are frequently used to manage postoperative pain. This report describes a patient who developed methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) vertebral osteomyelitis of the lumbar spine following epidural catheterization. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of MRSA vertebral osteomyelitis secondary to epidural catheter use in the English orthopedic literature. The patient and his family consented to publishing the data. PMID:24353973

  11. Cytokine expression in Peyer's patches following hemorrhage and resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Shenkar, R; Chang, Y H; Abraham, E

    1994-01-01

    Intestinal dysfunction commonly occurs following hemorrhage and injury and appears to contribute to the development of multiple organ system failure in this setting. In order to examine possible mechanisms leading to intestinal dysfunction following blood loss, we investigated mRNA levels for cytokines with proinflammatory and immunoregulatory properties (interleukin 1 beta (IL-1 beta), IL-6, IL-10, TNF-alpha, TGF-beta, IFN-gamma) as well as mRNA expression for inducible nitric oxide synthase (NOS) over the 3 days following hemorrhage and resuscitation. Significantly increased levels of mRNA for IL-1 beta, IL-10, and IFN-gamma were found among cells isolated from Peyer's patches 3 days following hemorrhage. Amounts of mRNA for inducible NOS were not significantly altered 24 or 72 h after blood loss. In addition to being increased 72 h following hemorrhage, levels of mRNA for IL-10 also were increased 1 and 4 h posthemorrhage. No alterations in cytokine or NOS expression were found 24 h following blood loss. These results demonstrate that significant increases in proinflammatory and immunoregulatory cytokine mRNA levels among cellular populations in Peyer's patches are present at late posthemorrhage time points. These alterations in cytokine expression may contribute to the morphologic, immunologic, and functional changes in the intestines which are present following blood loss and injury.

  12. Two Holes in 'Wooly Patch'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The rock abrasion tool on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit ground two holes in a relatively soft rock called 'Wooly Patch' near the base of the 'Columbia Hills' inside Gusev Crater on Mars. This approximately true-color image from the panoramic camera was taken on sol 200 (July 25, 2004) and generated using the camera's 600-, 530-, and 480-nanometer filters. It shows the natural red and reddish-brown color of the rock. Scientists speculate that this relatively soft rock (compared to others analyzed by Spirit) may have been modified by water. Small cracks in the surface outside the drill holes may be the result of interactions with water-rich fluids.

  13. Histopathological Alterations after Single Epidural Injection of Ropivacaine, Methylprednizolone Acetate, or Contrast Material in Swine

    SciTech Connect

    Kitsou, Maria-Chrysanthi; Kostopanagiotou, Georgia; Kalimeris, Konstantinos; Vlachodimitropoulos, Demetrios; Soultanis, Konstantinos; Batistaki, Chrysanthi; Kelekis, Alexis

    2011-12-15

    Purpose: The consequences from the injection of different types of drugs in the epidural space remains unknown. Increasing evidence suggests that localized inflammation, fibrosis, and arachnoiditis can complicate sequential epidural blockades, or even epidural contrast injection. We investigate the in vivo effect of epidural injections in the epidural space in an animal model. Materials and Methods: A group of ten male adult pigs, five punctures to each at distinct vertebral interspaces under general anesthesia, were examined, testing different drugs, used regularly in the epidural space (iopamidol, methylprednisolone acetate, ropivacaine). Each site was marked with a percutaneous hook wire marker. Histological analysis of the epidural space, the meninges, and the underlying spinal cord of the punctured sites along with staining for caspase-3 followed 20 days later. Results: The epidural space did not manifest adhesions or any other pathology, and the outer surface of the dura was not impaired in any specimen. The group that had the contrast media injection showed a higher inflammation response compared to the other groups (P = 0.001). Positive staining for caspase-3 was limited to <5% of neurons with all substances used. Conclusion: No proof of arachnoiditis and/or fibrosis was noted in the epidural space with the use of the above-described drugs. A higher inflammation rate was noted with the use of contrast media.

  14. Incidence of intradiscal injection during lumbar fluoroscopically guided transforaminal and interlaminar epidural steroid injections.

    PubMed

    Candido, Kenneth D; Katz, Jeffrey A; Chinthagada, Mariadas; McCarthy, Robert A; Knezevic, Nebojsa Nick

    2010-05-01

    Intradiscal injections during transforaminal epidural steroid injections and interlaminar lumbar epidural steroid injections have been reported rarely. In that regard, this retrospective observational report is the first attempt to quantify the overall rate of this complication. A retrospective analysis of 3 years of accrued data (2004-2007) showed that 2412 transforaminal epidural steroid injections were performed at the 2 training institutions (Loyola University Medical Center and Northwestern University/Feinberg School of Medicine). There were 6 intradiscal (annular) injections of contrast, for a rate of 1:402. Over the same interval, 4723 lumbar epidural steroid injections were performed, with 1 intradiscal injection, for a rate of 1:4723.

  15. Epidural analgesia during labor: continuous infusion or patient-controlled administration?

    PubMed

    Benhamou, D

    1995-05-01

    Patient-controlled epidural analgesia (PCEA) has several advantages over continuous epidural infusion of bupivacaine during labor: it produces a good analgesia with a limited sensory spread; generally, less bupivacaine is administered and maternal satisfaction with pain control is increased. However, the quality of analgesia is similar to that obtained with other forms of epidural administration. Moreover, PCEA is only a particular form of epidural and, as such, has the same safety requirements. PCEA does not appear to reduce the workload of the anesthetic team. The cost of the PCA pump will need to be included in future evaluation of the cost/benefit ratio.

  16. Epidural catheter misplaced into the thoracic cavity: Utilized to provide interpleural analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Sundary, M. Thiriloga

    2015-01-01

    Thoracic epidural analgesia is one of the most effective and time-tested modalities of providing postthoracotomy pain relief. It improves postoperative pulmonary outcome. Nevertheless, being a blind procedure several complications have been associated with the technique. Pleural puncture is one rare complication that might occur following thoracic epidural catheterization. We have discussed a patient who underwent a right thoracotomy for excision of emphysematous bulla of lung under general anesthesia with thoracic epidural. The epidural catheter was misplaced in the pleural cavity and was detected intraoperatively after thoracotomy. The catheter was left in situ and was successfully utilized to provide postoperative analgesia via the interpleural route. PMID:25886437

  17. HotPatch Web Gateway: Statistical Analysis of Unusual Patches on Protein Surfaces

    DOE Data Explorer

    Pettit, Frank K.; Bowie, James U. [DOE-Molecular Biology Institute

    HotPatch finds unusual patches on the surface of proteins, and computes just how unusual they are (patch rareness), and how likely each patch is to be of functional importance (functional confidence (FC).) The statistical analysis is done by comparing your protein's surface against the surfaces of a large set of proteins whose functional sites are known. Optionally, HotPatch can also write a script that will display the patches on the structure, when the script is loaded into some common molecular visualization programs. HotPatch generates complete statistics (functional confidence and patch rareness) on the most significant patches on your protein. For each property you choose to analyze, you'll receive an email to which will be attached a PDB-format file in which atomic B-factors (temp. factors) are replaced by patch indices; and the PDB file's Header Remarks will give statistical scores and a PDB-format file in which atomic B-factors are replaced by the raw values of the property used for patch analysis (for example, hydrophobicity instead of hydrophobic patches). [Copied with edits from http://hotpatch.mbi.ucla.edu/

  18. Effect of parecoxib combined with thoracic epidural analgesia on pain after thoracotomy

    PubMed Central

    Ling, Xiao-Min; Fang, Fang; Zhang, Xiao-Guang; Ding, Ming; Liu, Qiu-A-Xue

    2016-01-01

    Background Thoracotomy results in severe postoperative pain potentially leading to chronic pain. We investigated the potential benefits of intravenous parecoxib on postoperative analgesia combined with thoracic epidural analgesia (TEA). Methods Eighty-six patients undergoing thoracic surgery were randomized into two groups. Patient-controlled epidural analgesia (PCEA) was used until chest tubes were removed. Patients received parecoxib (group P) or placebo (group C) intravenously just 0.5 h before the operation and every 12 h after operation for 3 days. The intensity of pain was measured by using a visual analogue scale (VAS) and recorded at 2, 4, 8, 24, 48, 72 h after operation. The valid number of PCA, the side effects and the overall satisfaction to analgesic therapy in 72 h were recorded. Venous blood samples were taken before operation, the 1st and 3rd day after operation for plasma cortisol, adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), interleukin-6 and tumor necrosis factor-α level. The occurrence of residual pain was recorded using telephone questionnaire 2 and 12 months after surgery. Results Postoperative pain scores at rest and on coughing were significantly lower with the less valid count of PCA and greater patient satisfaction in group P (P<0.01). Adverse effect and the days fit for discharge were comparable between two groups. The cortisol levels in placebo group were higher than parecoxib group at T2. The level of ACTH both decreased in two groups after operation but it was significantly lower in group P than that in group C. There were no changes in plasma IL-6 and TNF-α levels before and after analgesia at T1 and T2 (P>0.05). The occurrence of residual pain were 25% and 51.2% separately in group P and C 3 months postoperatively (P<0.05). Conclusions Intravenous parecoxib in multimodal analgesia improves postoperative analgesia provided by TEA, relieves stress response after thoracotomy, and may restrain the development of chronic pain. PMID:27162662

  19. Lumbar spine osteomyelitis and epidural abscess formation secondary to acupuncture

    PubMed Central

    Godhania, Vinesh

    2016-01-01

    A 39-year-old male with no previous medical history presented with abdominal and low back pain. Based on clinical and radiological findings he was diagnosed with L1/L2 osteomyelitis and epidural abscess. Further history taking revealed recent use of acupuncture for treatment of mechanical back pain. The patient was treated conservatively with an extended course of antibiotics, monitored with repeat MRI scans and had a full recovery with no neurological deficit. This is the first reported case of epidural abscess formation and osteomyelitis after acupuncture in the UK. As acupuncture becomes more commonly used in western countries, it is important to be aware of this rare but serious complication. PMID:26976275

  20. Rosai-Dorfman Disease Isolated to the Thoracic Epidural Spine

    PubMed Central

    Kozak, Benjamin; Talbott, Jason; Uzelac, Alina; Rehani, Bhavya

    2015-01-01

    Rosai-Dorfman disease is a rare benign histiocytic disease that infrequently presents in the spine. We report a case of Rosai-Dorfman disease isolated to the epidural thoracic spine in a 26-year-old male. To our knowledge, this is the 15th reported case of isolated spinal disease and only the fourth case of isolated thoracic epidural disease. Given its rarity as well as non-specific symptoms and imaging findings, Rosai-Dorfman disease is often not considered and misdiagnosed on imaging studies. To help improve awareness of Rosai-Dorfman spinal disease, we review the literature and discuss the epidemiology, clinical presentation, imaging features, and treatment considerations for this condition. PMID:27252790

  1. Transdermal patches: history, development and pharmacology

    PubMed Central

    Pastore, Michael N; Kalia, Yogeshvar N; Horstmann, Michael; Roberts, Michael S

    2015-01-01

    Transdermal patches are now widely used as cosmetic, topical and transdermal delivery systems. These patches represent a key outcome from the growth in skin science, technology and expertise developed through trial and error, clinical observation and evidence-based studies that date back to the first existing human records. This review begins with the earliest topical therapies and traces topical delivery to the present-day transdermal patches, describing along the way the initial trials, devices and drug delivery systems that underpin current transdermal patches and their actives. This is followed by consideration of the evolution in the various patch designs and their limitations as well as requirements for actives to be used for transdermal delivery. The properties of and issues associated with the use of currently marketed products, such as variability, safety and regulatory aspects, are then described. The review concludes by examining future prospects for transdermal patches and drug delivery systems, such as the combination of active delivery systems with patches, minimally invasive microneedle patches and cutaneous solutions, including metered-dose systems. PMID:25560046

  2. Immunoisolation Patch System for Cellular Transplantation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Taylor G. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    An immunoisolation patch system, and particularly a patch system comprising multiple immunoisolation microcapsules, each encapsulating biological material such as cells for transplantation, which can be used in the prophylactic and therapeutic treatment of disease in large animals and humans without the need for immunosuppression.

  3. Formulation study of tea tree oil patches.

    PubMed

    Minghetti, Paola; Casiraghi, Antonella; Cilurzo, Francesco; Gambaro, Veniero; Montanari, Luisa

    2009-01-01

    The antimicrobial, antifungal and anti-inflammatory properties of tea tree oil (TTO), the essential oil of Melaleuca alternifolia are well documented. In order to optimize its therapeutic activity, TTO patches were designed. The aim of this work was the formulation of monolayer patches containing TTO. Moreover, the performance of oleic acid (OA) as a skin penetration enhancer in patches was evaluated. Terpinen-4-ol (T4OL), the main component of TTO, was the marker used to evaluate TTO skin permeability. The permeation study was performed through human epidermis by using Franz diffusion cells. Patches were prepared by using methacrylic copolymers, Eudragit E100 (EuE100) or Eudragit NE (EuNE), and a silicone resin, BioPSA7-4602 (Bio-PSA). TTO and OA contents were fixed at 10% w/w and 3% w/w, respectively. The patches were prepared by a casting method and characterised in terms of T4OL content and skin permeability. All the selected polymers were suitable as the main component of the patch matrix. Since the main critical issue in the use of TTO is related to its toxicity after absorption, the local administration of TTO can take advantage of the use of patches based on EuE100 because of the high retained amount and the low permeation of T4OL. In this matrix, OA slightly increased the T4OL retained amount, improving the efficacy and safety of TTO patches.

  4. Epidural injections of indomethacin for postlaminectomy syndrome: a preliminary report.

    PubMed

    Aldrete, J Antonio

    2003-02-01

    Since there have been side effects reported with the administration of corticosteroids epidurally, their application has been limited. Because some nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs have central and spinal antinociceptive actions, we have compared the effects of indomethacin (INM) given by the epidural route to methylprednisolone (MTP). This was a prospective, comparative study in an ambulatory pain care center. Two hundred six patients with recurrent low back pain (Visual Analog Scale >7) and radiculopathy after they had had 2 or more lumbar laminectomies with the diagnosis of "postlaminectomy syndrome" were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 groups. Group I (64 patients) was given 2 epidural injections of lyophilized INM 1 mg. Group II (60 patients) received 2 injections of 2 mg of INM at the same intervals. Group III (82 patients) was treated by 2 epidural injections of MTP 80 mg. In every case, the medication was diluted in 3 mL of 0.5% bupivacaine. Reductions of pain were assessed by changes in the Visual Analog Scale; physical activities, attitude, and medication intake were graded by the Pain Progress Score recorded before each treatment and 2 wk after the last. After each injection, all patients had pain relief to Visual Analog Scale <3. Increased analgesia (P < 0.05) was noted when a double dose of INM was used (Group II) or when 80 mg of MTP was given. The total average scores of the Pain Progress Score showed significant differences at the second injection in Groups II and III only. Physical activity, emotional attitudes, and medication intake were also improved but the changes were not statistically significant. In conclusion, in this group of patients, INM produced adequate analgesia in Groups I and II, with evidence suggesting that 2 mg of INM may produce a similar degree of pain relief as 80 mg of MTP after the second injection. Other nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs may be explored in the future for the same purpose.

  5. Hands-and-knees positioning during labor with epidural analgesia.

    PubMed

    Stremler, Robyn; Halpern, Stephen; Weston, Julie; Yee, Jennifer; Hodnett, Ellen

    2009-01-01

    Hands-and-knees position has shown promise as an intervention to improve labor and birth outcomes, but no reports exist that examine its use with women laboring with epidural analgesia. Concerns of safety, effects on analgesia, and acceptability of use may limit use of active positioning during labor with regional analgesia. This article presents a case study series of 13 women who used hands-and-knees position in the first stage of labor.

  6. Disseminated cat scratch disease with vertebral osteomyelitis and epidural abscess.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Haq, Nahed; Abuhammour, Walid; Al-Tatari, Hossam; Asmar, Basim

    2005-11-01

    A 5-year-old boy with cat scratch disease presented with fever of unknown origin and osteomyelitis of the thoracic spine and epidural abscess. He did not have localizing signs or symptoms. Computed tomography of the abdomen, which was initially negative, showed hepatosplenic disease. Cat scratch disease has variable systemic presentations and should be included in the differential diagnosis of fever of unknown origin if an epidemiologic risk factor is present.

  7. Does pregnancy increase the efficacy of lumbar epidural anesthesia?

    PubMed

    Arakawa, M

    2004-04-01

    Pregnancy has been reported to enhance the sensitivity of nerves to local anesthetics and to decrease anesthetic requirements during regional anesthesia. In this study, whether pregnancy increased the efficacy of lumbar epidural anesthesia was evaluated. Two populations (14 pregnant and 14 non-pregnant women) undergoing lumbar epidural anesthesia were studied and received 17 mL of 2% lidocaine-epinephrine (1: 200,000). The pain threshold response after repeated electrical stimulation was used to assess sensory blockade at the L2, S1 and S3 dermatomes. Motor blockade was evaluated using the Bromage score. Demographic data except for weight were comparable between the two groups. There was a significant difference in cephalad spread of anesthesia between the groups. No significant differences in pain threshold or onset of sensory blockade at the L2, S1 or S3 segments were found between the groups. The pain thresholds at the S1 and S3 dermatomes were significantly lower than that at L2 within each group. The mean onset times at the S1 and S3 dermatomes were significantly longer than that at L2 within each group. No differences in Bromage score were found between the groups. In pregnant women, cephalad spread of epidural anesthesia was facilitated but latency of blockade, density and motor blockade were not. It takes over 25 min to achieve satisfactory blockade at sacral segments. Those who perform lumbar epidural anesthesia alone for cesarean section should consider the use of additives (e.g. fentanyl, bicarbonate) to enhance the block, or a greater volume of local anesthetic.

  8. Diabetes mellitus and spinal epidural abscess: clinical or surgical treatment?

    PubMed

    Felício, João S; Martins, Carlliane Lins P; Liberman, Bernardo

    2011-12-01

    Spinal epidural abscess (SEA) is an uncommon condition and its most important predisposing factor is diabetes mellitus. Although the treatment of choice is prompt surgical abscess evacuation, followed by antibiotic therapy, successful conservative treatment of SEA has been reported in some cases. We describe a SEA case in a 23-year old white woman with diabetes for 14 years, who was successfully treated only with antibiotics, and achieved full recovery at the fourth month of follow-up.

  9. Epidural Catheter Migration in a Patient with Severe Spinal Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Ryan

    2016-01-01

    Establishment of appropriate neuraxial catheter positioning is typically a straightforward procedural undertaking. It can, however, lead to deception of even the most experienced clinician and occur despite the most meticulous attention to detail. Written and verbal consent were obtained from the patient to prepare, discuss, and publish this case report; we describe the occurrence of what we believe was the intraoperative migration of an epidural catheter in the setting of significant tissue changes resulting from a previous spinal fusion. PMID:28097025

  10. Care and management of intrathecal and epidural catheters.

    PubMed

    Du Pen, Anna

    2005-01-01

    Epidural and intrathecal catheters have increasingly become a part of acute and chronic pain management over the past 25 years. Externalized systems include temporary, permanent exteriorized, and permanent port systems for use over weeks to months of expected therapy. Implanted, completely internalized systems are available for conditions expected to require many months or years of therapy. Expert care includes routine management as well as advanced troubleshooting. Prevention of infection is a key priority for nurses managing these devices.

  11. The Neurological Safety of Epidural Pamidronate in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Pyung Bok; Kim, Yong Chul; Lee, Chul Joong; Shin, Hye Young; Lee, Seung Yun; Park, Jong Cook; Choi, Yun Suk; Kim, Chong Soo

    2010-01-01

    Background Pamidronate is a potent inhibitor of osteoclast-mediated bone resorption. Recently, the drug has been known to relieve bone pain. We hypothesized that direct epidural administration of pamidronate could have various advantages over oral administration with respect to dosage, side effects, and efficacy. Therefore, we evaluated the neuronal safety of epidurally-administered pamidronate. Methods Twenty-seven rats weighing 250-350 g were equally divided into 3 groups. Each group received an epidural administration with either 0.3 ml (3.75 mg) of pamidronate (group P), 0.3 ml of 40% alcohol (group A), or 0.3 ml of normal saline (group N). A Pinch-toe test, motor function evaluation, and histopathologic examination of the spinal cord to detect conditions such as chromatolysis, meningeal inflammation, and neuritis, were performed on the 2nd, 7th, and 21st day following administration of each drug. Results All rats in group A showed an abnormal response to the pinch-toe test and decreased motor function during the entire evaluation period. Abnormal histopathologic findings, including neuritis and meningeal inflammation were observed only in group A rats. Rats in group P, with the exception of 1, and group N showed no significant sensory/motor dysfunction over a 3-week observation period. No histopathologic changes were observed in groups P and N. Conclusions Direct epidural injection of pamidronate (about 12.5 mg/kg) showed no neurotoxic evidence in terms of sensory/motor function evaluation and histopathologic examination. PMID:20556213

  12. Management of acute spontaneous thoracic spinal epidural hematoma causing paraplegia.

    PubMed

    Alić, Fahrudin; Bečulić, Hakija; Jusić, Aldin; Skomorac, Rasim; Moranjkić, Mirza; Hrvat, Lejla; Tandir, Lejla

    2017-02-01

    Aim To emphasize the importance of early recognition, diagnostic processing and emergent surgical treatment of spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma (SSEH). Methods A 39-year-old female presented with sudden onset of severe pain between the shoulder blades followed by paraparesis and alerted sensibility in the lower extremities. An hour later she developed paraplegia with sensory deficits below ThIV level, absence of patellar reflex, ankle jerk reflex and sphincter dysfunction. Results Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) demonstrated acute extensive epidural mass of thoracic spinal segments (ThI-ThIII). The patient underwent emergent decompressive laminectomy ThI-ThIII with epidural hematoma evacuation within 24 hours of symptoms onset. After the surgical treatment, because of suspicion on spinal arteriovenous malformation, complete diagnostic evaluation with spinal angiography was done and no form of vascular malformation was found. Idiopathic SSEH was diagnosed. Two months later the patient reached complete neurological improvement. Conclusion The SSEH is a rare condition that should be kept in mind in patients presenting with neurological deficit and a sudden onset of back pain like it was in our case. For early diagnosis, immediate MRI is essential. Prompt surgical decompression such as laminectomy is an absolute surgical indication widely accepted for patients with progressive neurological deficit. The SSEH should be considered as one of the important differential diagnoses in patients who have developed acute myelopathy.

  13. Thoracic spinal epidural abscess caused by Salmonella typhi.

    PubMed

    Abdullah, Saad Hamdan; Ata, Osama Abu; El-Adwan, Nael

    2008-03-01

    A 56-year-old man presented with a rare spinal epidural abscess manifesting as attacks of back pain associated with fever, weight loss, generalized weakness and fatigability, and constipation. He had multiple skin pustules in the last 4 months treated with oral amoxicillin. He had suffered diabetes mellitus for the last 5 years and was insulin dependent. Physical examination found slight paraparesis with sensory loss around the nipple and sphincteric urgency, and diabetic retinopathy. Magnetic resonance imaging showed edematous T2, T3, and T4 vertebral bodies, and narrow enhanced T3-4 disk space with a soft tissue enhanced mass mostly anterior to the spinal cord and indenting the cord. T3-4 costotransversectomy was performed to remove the extradural mass and evacuate the intradiscal material. Histological examination of the bone found osteomyelitis, and culture of the soft tissue showed Salmonella typhi sensitive to ceftriaxone and ciprofloxacin. Intravenous ceftriaxone administration was started, and the patient was discharged after 6 days in good condition. The outcome of spinal epidural abscess is devastating unless recognized and treated early. The present case of spinal epidural abscess in the thoracic spine caused by Salmonella typhi infection illustrates the importance of cultures to assess the drug sensitivity of the specific strain detected and adjusting the treatment accordingly.

  14. Bupivacaine crystal deposits after long-term epidural infusion.

    PubMed

    Balga, I; Gerber, H; Schorno, X H; Aebersold Keller, F; Oehen, H-P

    2013-07-01

    The case of a 45-year-old male patient (body weight 52 kg, height 1.61 m) with a locally invasive gastric carcinoma infiltrating into the retroperitoneal space is reported. Because of severe cancer pain a tunnelled thoracic epidural catheter (EC) was placed at thoracic spinal level 7/8 and a local anesthetic (LA) mixture of bupivacaine 0.25 % and morphine 0.005 % was infused continuously at 6 ml h(-1). To optimize pain therapy the concentration was doubled (bupivacaine 0.5 %, morphine 0.01 %) 3 months later but the infusion rate was reduced to 3 ml h(-1) thus the total daily dose did not change. The patient died 6 months after initiation of the epidural analgesia from the underlying disease. The total amount of bupivacaine infused was 69 g and of morphine 1.37 g. The patient never reported any neurological complications. The autopsy revealed large white crystalline deposits in the thoracic epidural space which were identified as bupivacaine base by infrared spectrometry. Morphine could not be detected. A histological examination showed unreactive fatty tissue necrosis within the crystalline deposits but nerve tissue could not be identified. It is concluded that the bupivacaine crystalline deposits arose due to precipitation but the clinical significance with regard to sensory level and neuraxial tissue toxicity is unknown.

  15. [Spinal epidural lymphoma. A study using computed tomography].

    PubMed

    Ibarra, B; Romero, F J; Torrents, C; Rovira, M

    1990-02-01

    We have gone through the computerized tomographies (CT) of four cases of spinal epidural lymphomas (SEL) studied in our department. Paraparesis with a sensitive level was the beginning of the disease three times; sciatic pain with recurrent fever once. A myelography followed by CT was done in the three cases of paraparesis while a non-contrast CT and a contrast-enhanced study was done in the case of sciatic pain. An homogeneous intraspinal mass stretching at least along one vertebral segment was the most usual finding. This mass spread into paraspinal tissue effacing fat lines. The mass was hyperdense in relation to dural sack and was limited to intraspinal space in one occasion. We have revised bibliography about osseous lesions in SEL and have found out disagreement on it. We have found them only once in our study. Intrathecal contrast was useless in determining tumour nature but useful in delimiting intraspinal extent. We have searched for tomographic features in order to establish differential diagnosis with other spinal epidural diseases. We did not find any SEL-exclusive features but we found that an homogeneous intra-extraspinal mass, extended at least along one vertebral segment and either producing or not producing osseous lesions can make us think of the presence of spinal epidural lymphoma.

  16. Delayed Presentation of a Cervical Spinal Epidural Abscess of Dental Origin after a Fall in an Elderly Patient.

    PubMed

    Bodman, Alexa; Riordan, Margaret; Chin, Lawrence S

    2016-05-23

    Spinal epidural abscesses are an uncommon cause of spinal cord injury but, depending on the size and presence of neurological deficits, urgent neurosurgical intervention may be required. We present a unique case of a patient presenting with a spinal epidural collection several days after a fall. While a spinal epidural hematoma was suspected based on the patient's history and MRI findings, a spinal epidural abscess was found during surgery. The patient underwent laminectomy and instrumented fusion with successful treatment of her infection.

  17. Patch scales in coastal ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broitman, Bernardo R.

    Quantifying the spatial and temporal scales over which ecological processes are coupled to environmental variability is a major challenge for ecologists. Here, I assimilate patterns of oceanographic variability with ecological field studies in an attempt to quantify spatial and temporal scales of coupling. Using coastal time series of chlorophyll-a concentration from remote sensing, the first chapter examines the alongshore extent of coastal regions subject to similar temporal patterns of oceanographic variability in Western North America (WNA) and North-Central Chile (Chile). I found striking interhemispherical differences in the length of coastal sections under similar oceanographic regimes, with the Chile region showing longshore coherency over much smaller spatial scales (˜60 km) than on the coast of WNA (˜140 km). Through a spatial analysis of coastal orientation I suggest that the characteristic length scales may be traced to the geomorphologic character of the ocean margins. The second chapter examines spatial patterns of primary production through long-term means of coastal chlorophyll-a concentration and kelp (Macrocystis pyrifera) cover and explores their relationship with coastal geomorphology and sea surface temperature (SST). Spatial analyses showed a striking match in length scales around 180--250 km. Strong anticorrelations at small spatial lags and positive correlations at longer distances suggest little overlap between patches of kelp and coastal chlorophyll-a. In agreement with findings from the previous chapter, I found that coastal patches could be traced back to spatial patterns of coastal geomorphology. Through SST time series and long-term datasets of larval recruitment in Santa Cruz Island, California, the third chapter examines temporal patterns of oceanographic variability as determinants of ecological patterns. SST time series from sites experiencing low larval recruitment rates were dominated by strong temporal variability. These sites

  18. The use of combined spinal-epidural technique to compare intrathecal ziconotide and epidural opioids for trialing intrathecal drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Gulati, Amitabh; Loh, Jeffrey; Puttanniah, Vinay; Malhotra, Vivek

    2013-03-01

    SUMMARY Choosing the initial medications for intrathecal delivery is often confusing and not standardized. We describe a novel way for using a combined spinal-epidural technique to compare two first-line medications for intrathecal delivery; ziconotide and morphine (or hydromorphone). Five patients with intractable chronic or cancer pain were elected to have an intrathecal drug delivery system implanted for pain management. Each patient was given a 3-day inpatient trial with the combined spinal-epidural technique. The Visual Analog Scale, Numerical Rating Scale, short-term McGill questionnaire and opioid consumption were monitored daily. The results were used to develop a paradigm to describe how ziconotide can be used in practice.

  19. Image Quality Assessment Based on Inter-Patch and Intra-Patch Similarity

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Fei; Lu, Zongqing; Wang, Can; Sun, Wen; Xia, Shu-Tao; Liao, Qingmin

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a full-reference (FR) image quality assessment (IQA) scheme, which evaluates image fidelity from two aspects: the inter-patch similarity and the intra-patch similarity. The scheme is performed in a patch-wise fashion so that a quality map can be obtained. On one hand, we investigate the disparity between one image patch and its adjacent ones. This disparity is visually described by an inter-patch feature, where the hybrid effect of luminance masking and contrast masking is taken into account. The inter-patch similarity is further measured by modifying the normalized correlation coefficient (NCC). On the other hand, we also attach importance to the impact of image contents within one patch on the IQA problem. For the intra-patch feature, we consider image curvature as an important complement of image gradient. According to local image contents, the intra-patch similarity is measured by adaptively comparing image curvature and gradient. Besides, a nonlinear integration of the inter-patch and intra-patch similarity is presented to obtain an overall score of image quality. The experiments conducted on six publicly available image databases show that our scheme achieves better performance in comparison with several state-of-the-art schemes. PMID:25793282

  20. Mesenchymal stem cell-loaded cardiac patch promotes epicardial activation and repair of the infarcted myocardium.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qiang-Li; Wang, Hai-Jie; Li, Zhi-Hua; Wang, Yong-Li; Wu, Xue-Ping; Tan, Yu-Zhen

    2017-02-28

    Cardiac patch is considered a promising strategy for enhancing stem cell therapy of myocardial infarction (MI). However, the underlying mechanisms for cardiac patch repairing infarcted myocardium remain unclear. In this study, we investigated the mechanisms of PCL/gelatin patch loaded with MSCs on activating endogenous cardiac repair. PCL/gelatin patch was fabricated by electrospun. The patch enhanced the survival of the seeded MSCs and their HIF-1α, Tβ4, VEGF and SDF-1 expression and decreased CXCL14 expression in hypoxic and serum-deprived conditions. In murine MI models, the survival and distribution of the engrafted MSCs and the activation of the epicardium were examined, respectively. At 4 weeks after transplantation of the cell patch, the cardiac functions were significantly improved. The engrafted MSCs migrated across the epicardium and into the myocardium. Tendency of HIF-1α, Tβ4, VEGF, SDF-1 and CXCL14 expression in the infarcted myocardium was similar with expression in vitro. The epicardium was activated and epicardial-derived cells (EPDCs) migrated into deep tissue. The EPDCs differentiated into endothelial cells and smooth muscle cells, and some of EPDCs showed to have differentiated into cardiomyocytes. Density of blood and lymphatic capillaries increased significantly. More c-kit(+) cells were recruited into the infarcted myocardium after transplantation of the cell patch. The results suggest that epicardial transplantation of the cell patch promotes repair of the infarcted myocardium and improves cardiac functions by enhancing the survival of the transplanted cells, accelerating locality paracrine, and then activating the epicardium and recruiting endogenous c-kit(+) cells. Epicardial transplantation of the cell patch may be applied as a novel effective MI therapy.

  1. Patch shape, connectivity, and foraging by oldfield mice (Peromyscus polionotus).

    SciTech Connect

    Orrock, John, L.; Danielson, Brent J

    2005-06-01

    We examined how corridors and patch shape affect foraging by the oldfield mouse (Peromyscus polionotus) by deploying foraging trays and live traps in experimental landscapes with 3 different patch types: patches connected with a corridor, unconnected patches with projecting corridorlike portions (winged patches), and unconnected rectangular patches. Corridors did not lead to different levels of activity of P. polionotus among the 3 patch types. Rather, corridors influenced activity by changing patch shape: foraging in seed trays and total number of captures of P. polionotus tended to be greater at the patch center than at the patch edge, but only in connected and winged patches where corridors or wings increased the amount of patch edge relative to the amount of core habitat in the patch. P. polionotus avoided open microhabitats near the patch edge in winged and connected patches, but not open microhabitats near the patch interior, suggesting that predation risk caused shifts in foraging near edges in connected and winged patches. Foraging in corridors and wings was generally low, suggesting that both are high-risk habitats where predation risk is not ameliorated by proximity to vegetative cover. By changing patch shape, corridors caused changes in within-patch activity of P. polionotus, changing foraging patterns and potentially altering the dynamics of P. polionotus and the seeds they consume.

  2. A Case of Extensive Sacral Decubitus Ulcer Complicated by an Epidural Abscess

    PubMed Central

    Murata, Mai; Hiratsuka, Munehisa; Suzuki, Shigehiko

    2016-01-01

    Summary: We herein report a 62-year-old man with an extensive sacral decubitus ulcer complicated by an epidural abscess. An epidural abscess is a rare disease, but it should be considered in the differential diagnosis of a deep infection with decubitus. Moreover, the diagnosis may be late in such instances and should be carefully considered when a patient has paralysis. PMID:27536469

  3. [Epidural anesthesia and analgesia in the perioperative treatment of a patient with Kartagener syndrome].

    PubMed

    Errando, C L; Sifre, C; López-Alarcón, D

    1998-12-01

    Kartagener's syndrome is an inherited disease characterized by a triad of symptoms--bronchiectasis, situs inversus and sinusitis--and is classified as an immotile cilia syndrome. Patients may experience specific airway problems when undergoing anesthesia for surgical procedures. We report the case of a woman with Kartagener's syndrome who underwent surgery under epidural anesthesia with postoperative epidural analgesia, both techniques proving successful.

  4. [Comparative study of detection methods in epidural anesthesia: Episensor and loss of resistance].

    PubMed

    de Andrés, J A; Gomar, C; Calatrava, P; Nalda, M A

    1990-01-01

    The aim of the present study is to evaluate an electronic detector of negative pressure (Episensor, Palex, Spain) designed for the identification of epidural space. Ninety patients were randomly assigned to two groups: group 1 (n = 47) received epidural anesthesia as perioperative analgesic technique with Episensor method and group 2 (n = 43) received epidural anesthesia with the classic method of loss of resistance with gas mandrin. The following parameters were studied: a) demographic features, b) characteristics of epidural anesthesia, and c) complications occurring during space detection. There were no statistical differences in the analysis of demographic variables neither in the quality of the epidural anesthesia achieved in both groups. With respect to complications, group I presented the highest number of complications although only the lack of detection of epidural space achieved statistical significance (8.5%, p less than 0.05); the incidence was lower than that reported in the literature as physiologically possible in the lumbar epidural segment. We conclude that progressive knowledge of Episensor may decrease the initial incidence of complications with a success rate similar to that of classic techniques of identification of epidural space.

  5. Thoracic epidural anesthesia for laparoscopic cholecystectomy using either bupivacaine or a mixture of bupivacaine and clonidine: A comparative clinical study

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Malti; Verma, A. P.; Kang, L. S.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Traditionally laparoscopic cholecystectomy is done under general anesthesia. But recently there is a growing interest to get it conducted under central neuraxial blockade. We conducted a clinical study comprising bupivacaine alone or a combination of bupivacaine and clonidine (2 μg/kg) in thoracic epidural anesthesia for laparoscopic cholecystectomy (LC). The aim was to attenuate the undesirable hemodynamic changes due to pneumoperitoneum (PNO) and achieve a better qualitative blockade. Patients and Methods: After taking approval from Institutional Ethical Committee, 50 adult patients of ASA grade I and II were divided into two groups; group A where bupivacaine was given with 2 μg/kg of clonidine (Cloneon, Neon) and in group B bupivacaine (Anawin, Neon) was given with 1 ml of saline as placebo. Thoracic epidural was given at the T9-T10 or T10-T11 interspace to obtain a block of T4-L2 dermatome. Hemodynamic parameters like heart rate (HR), noninvasive blood pressure (NIBP), respiratory rate (RR), electrocardiogram (ECG), oxygen saturation (SpO2) and arterial pressure of carbon dioxide (PaCO2) were monitored and readings were recorded before and 10 minutes (min.) after the blockade and then at 5 min, 15 min and 30 min after PNO and 15 min after exsufflation. Results: All the parameters of the patients in group A remained stable but the patients of group B showed an increase in mean arterial pressure (MAP) and HR at 5, 15 and 30 min after PNO and 15 min after exsufflation as compared to Group A. PaCO2, SpO2 and RR values in both the groups were comparable. In group A, two patients complained of shoulder pain while in group B12 patients complained of shoulder pain. Conclusion: Thoracic epidural anesthesia for LC is a satisfactory alternative technique in selected cases. Addition of clonidine (2 μg/kg) to bupivacaine produces better qualitative anesthetic conditions. It prevents hemodynamic perturbations produced by pneumoperitoneum and also decreases

  6. Electrostatic patch potentials in Casimir force measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrett, Joseph; Somers, David; Munday, Jeremy

    2015-03-01

    Measurements of the Casimir force require the elimination of the electrostatic force between interacting surfaces. The force can be minimized by applying a potential to one of the two surfaces. However, electrostatic patch potentials remain and contribute an additional force which can obscure the Casimir force signal. We will discuss recent measurements of patch potentials made with Heterodyne Amplitude-Modulated Kelvin Probe Force Microscopy that suggest patches could be responsible for >1% of the signal in some Casimir force measurements, and thus make the distinction between different theoretical models of the Casimir force (e.g. a Drude-model or a plasma-model for the dielectric response) difficult to discern.

  7. Asymptomatic pneumomediastinum resulting from air in the epidural space -a case report-.

    PubMed

    Lim, Hyun Kyoung; Cha, Young Deog; Song, Jang Ho; Park, Ji Woong; Lee, Mi Hyeon

    2013-09-01

    There are no reports regarding pneumomediastinum caused by thoracic epidural block complications. We believe that it is possible to experience an occurrence of pneumomediastinum caused by air in the epidural space after performing a thoracic epidural block using the loss of resistance (LOR) technique with air. We report a witnessed case where pneumomediastinum appeared after a thoracic epidural block. Pneumorrrhachis, paravertebral muscle emphysema, and pneumomediastinum were diagnosed by Positron Emission Tomography-Computed Tomography. Although extremely rare, pneumomediastinum can be caused by an epidural block using LOR technique with air. In order to avoid the above danger, the use of saline or very minimal amount of air is required during a careful LOR technique.

  8. [Clinical Manifestations of Spinal Epidural Hematoma-Stroke Mimic and Pitfalls in Diagnosis].

    PubMed

    Kuriyama, Masaru

    2017-02-01

    Clinical manifestations of spinal epidural hematoma are presented, and the cases mimicking acute ischemic stroke have been reviewed from the literature. Many reports described the cases of spinal epidural hematoma with acute hemiparesis mimicking ischemic stroke in which intravenous thrombolytic treatment with recombinant tissue plasminogen activator was considered. A correct diagnosis of acute ischemic stroke must be made within 4.5 hours from the onset of symptoms, a relatively short window period. A spinal epidural hematoma is a potentially important stroke mimic in a wide variety of conditions that mimic a stroke. The literature review and discussion will emphasize allowing the distinction between these hemiparetic presentation of spinal epidural hematoma and acute ischemic stroke. A spinal epidural hematoma should be considered in the differential diagnosis of patients with acute onset of hemiparesis when associated with neck pain and signs of Horner's syndrome and Brown-Sēquard syndrome.

  9. Bilateral epidural extension of thoracic capillary vertebral (intraosseous) hemangioma mimicking spinal meningioma.

    PubMed

    Kan, C H; Saw, C B; Rozaini, R; Fauziah, K; Ng, C M; Saffari, M H

    2008-06-01

    We describe a rare case of vertebra (intraosseous) hemangioma with bilateral and symmetrical epidural extension causing cord compression in a 24-year-old woman. The epidural component was isointense to cord on both T1 and T2 sequences, and enhanced markedly and homogenously following gadolinium administration. The gradual in onset and progressive nature with the typical enhancing pattern lead the neurosurgeon to the more common diagnosis of spinal meningioma. Epidural extension of vertebral hemangiomas causing cord compression is rarely reported. Review of literatures reveal that cases that have been reported are of unilateral extension into epidural space and of cavernous type. This is the first case report of capillary vertebral (intraossous) hemangioma with bilateral extension through both intervetebral foramen into the epidural space causing myelopathy.

  10. Isolated oculomotor nerve palsy after lumbar epidural steroid injection in a diabetic patient

    PubMed Central

    Gozal, Yair M.; Atchley, Kristine; Curt, Bradford A.

    2016-01-01

    Background: In patients with diabetes mellitus, epidural steroid injections (ESI) have been noted to cause significant elevation of blood glucose levels, typically lasting 1–3 days. Here, we describe a previously unreported complication of a diabetic third nerve palsy associated with an ESI. Case Description: A 66-year-old man with a history of coronary artery disease, hypertension, and insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus presented with low back pain and left lower extremity radiculopathy. The lumbar magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed mild spondylosis, most severe at the L4-5 level, accompanied by a broad based disc protrusion resulting in mild central and moderate biforaminal stenosis. The patient underwent a left-sided L4-L5 transforaminal ESI resulting in transient elevation of his blood glucose levels. On post-procedure day 2, he developed a frontal headache and a complete right third nerve palsy with partial pupillary involvement. The MRI and MR angiography (MRA) of the brain revealed no compressive lesions or oculomotor abnormalities. Ophthalmoplegia and pupillary dysfunction resolved spontaneously over 4 months. Conclusions: Although rare, a history of a recent ESI should be considered as the etiology of an isolated oculomotor palsy in diabetic patients. PMID:28144494

  11. Scattering from arbitrarily shaped microstrip patch antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shively, David G.; Deshpande, Manohar D.; Cockrell, Capers R.

    1992-01-01

    The scattering properties of arbitrarily shaped microstrip patch antennas are examined. The electric field integral equation for a current element on a grounded dielectric slab is developed for a rectangular geometry based on Galerkin's technique with subdomain rooftop basis functions. A shape function is introduced that allows a rectangular grid approximation to the arbitrarily shaped patch. The incident field on the patch is expressed as a function of incidence angle theta(i), phi(i). The resulting system of equations is then solved for the unknown current modes on the patch, and the electromagnetic scattering is calculated for a given angle. Comparisons are made with other calculated results as well as with measurements.

  12. Can Stem Cell 'Patch' Help Heart Failure?

    MedlinePlus

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_164475.html Can Stem Cell 'Patch' Help Heart Failure? Small improvement seen over ... Scientists report another step in the use of stem cells to help treat people with debilitating heart failure. ...

  13. Management of prosthetic patch infection after CEA.

    PubMed

    Naylor, Ross

    2016-04-01

    It has been reported that 0.5-1% of patients undergoing carotid endarterectomy with prosthetic patch closure of the arteriotomy will develop patch infection. One third occur within the first 2 months after surgery, while two-thirds occur after >6 months have elapsed. Wound infection and abscess formation is the commonest mode of presentation in early cases, while chronic sinus discharge and false aneurysm formation are the commonest presentations in late cases. The commonest infecting organisms are Staphylococci/Streptococci (90%) and this should be borne in mind when planning antibiotic therapy before cultures are available. Most patch infections present (semi)-electively and patch rupture is relatively rare (10%), thereby enabling the surgeon to undertake careful evaluation of the patients overall clinical and anatomical status, whilst planning the optimal treatment strategy. If necessary, the patient should be transferred to a tertiary center for treatment. This is not an operation to be undertaken by an inexperienced surgeon. Operative planning should involve checking the original operation note (did the patient tolerate carotid clamping under locoregional anesthesia and therefore might tolerate carotid ligation), is there evidence of contralateral cranial nerve lesions (a contraindication to major open surgery) and has the surgeon planned for adequate distal exposure of the internal carotid artery. Patch excision and autologous reconstruction (usually vein) is the current 'gold standard' treatment, but highly selected patients can be successfully treated by less invasive surgery (including insertion of a covered stent). Patch excision and prosthetic reconstruction should be avoided.

  14. Patch-clamp amplifiers on a chip.

    PubMed

    Weerakoon, Pujitha; Culurciello, Eugenio; Yang, Youshan; Santos-Sacchi, Joseph; Kindlmann, Peter J; Sigworth, Fred J

    2010-10-15

    We present the first, fully integrated, two-channel implementation of a patch-clamp measurement system. With this "PatchChip" two simultaneous whole-cell recordings can be obtained with rms noise of 8pA in a 10kHz bandwidth. The capacitance and series-resistance of the electrode can be compensated up to 10pF and 100MΩ respectively under computer control. Recordings of hERG and Na(v) 1.7 currents demonstrate the system's capabilities, which are on par with large, commercial patch-clamp instrumentation. By reducing patch-clamp amplifiers to a millimeter size micro-chip, this work paves the way to the realization of massively parallel, high-throughput patch-clamp systems for drug screening and ion-channel research. The PatchChip is implemented in a 0.5μm silicon-on-sapphire process; its size is 3×3mm(2) and the power consumption is 5mW per channel with a 3.3V power supply.

  15. Epidural anesthesia improves pancreatic perfusion and decreases the severity of acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Sadowski, Samira M; Andres, Axel; Morel, Philippe; Schiffer, Eduardo; Frossard, Jean-Louis; Platon, Alexandra; Poletti, Pierre-Alexandre; Bühler, Leo

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To study the safety of epidural anesthesia (EA), its effect on pancreatic perfusion and the outcome of patients with acute pancreatitis (AP). METHODS: From 2005 to August 2010, patients with predicted severe AP [Ranson score ≥ 2, C-reactive protein > 100 or necrosis on computed tomography (CT)] were prospectively randomized to either a group receiving EA or a control group treated by patient controlled intravenous analgesia. Pain management was evaluated in the two groups every eight hours using the visual analog pain scale (VAS). Parameters for clinical severity such as length of hospital stay, use of antibiotics, admission to the intensive care unit, radiological/clinical complications and the need for surgical necrosectomy including biochemical data were recorded. A CT scan using a perfusion protocol was performed on admission and at 72 h to evaluate pancreatic blood flow. A significant variation in blood flow was defined as a 20% difference in pancreatic perfusion between admission and 72 h and was measured in the head, body and tail of the pancreas. RESULTS: We enrolled 35 patients. Thirteen were randomized to the EA group and 22 to the control group. There were no differences in demographic characteristics between the two groups. The Balthazar radiological severity score on admission was higher in the EA group than in the control group (mean score 4.15 ± 2.54 vs 3.38 ± 1.75, respectively, P = 0.347) and the median Ranson scores were 3.4 and 2.7 respectively (P = NS). The median duration of EA was 5.7 d, and no complications of the epidural procedure were reported. An improvement in perfusion of the pancreas was observed in 13/30 (43%) of measurements in the EA group vs 2/27 (7%) in the control group (P = 0.0025). Necrosectomy was performed in 1/13 patients in the EA group vs 4/22 patients in the control group (P = 0.63). The VAS improved during the first ten days in the EA group compared to the control group (0.2 vs 2.33, P = 0.034 at 10 d). Length

  16. Prediction of life expectancy in patients with spinal epidural metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Bartels, Ronald H.M.A.; de Ruiter, Godard; Feuth, Ton; Arts, Mark P.

    2016-01-01

    Background The treatment of spinal epidural metastasis is multidisciplinary and usually involves a team of medical oncologists, radiologists, radiotherapists, and spinal surgeons. Life expectancy is one of the factors considered when deciding whether surgery is warranted. Because expert estimates of life expectancy are generally not reliable, a prediction model is needed. Here, we temporally validated a model that was previously validated geographically. Methods The records of 110 consecutive patients who were referred with a spinal epidural metastasis were collected prospectively from 2009 to 2013 in order to validate the model, which was published in 2011. The actual and estimated life expectancies were represented graphically, and calibration and discrimination were determined. The calibration slope, Harrell's c-index, D, and RD2 were calculated. Hazard ratios in the derivation set of 2011 were compared with the validation set. Misspecification was determined using the joint test for β*. Results The calibration slope was 0.64 ± 0.15 (95% CI: 0.34–0.94), Harrell's c-index was 0.72, D was 1.08, and RD2 was 0.22, indicating slightly worse discrimination in the derivation set. The joint test for β* = 0 was statistically significant and indicated misspecification; however, this misspecification was attributed entirely to the surgical group. Conclusions We validated a prediction model for surgical decision making, showing that the model's overall performance is good. Based on these results, this model will help clinicians to decide whether to offer surgery to patients with spinal epidural metastasis. PMID:26254478

  17. Epidural application of ionomeric cement implants. Experimental and clinical results.

    PubMed

    Geyer, G; Baier, G; Helms, J

    1998-04-01

    During setting and hardening, the hybrid bone substitute ionomeric cement (Ionocem) achieves a stable and durable bond with the apatite of the adjacent bone without interpository soft tissue. Fluid contact during setting results in the release of aluminium ions which may reach critical levels as high as 3000 micrograms/l. On epidural application it is, therefore, essential to prevent cement constituents from gaining access to the intradural space. After the cement has hardened, the presence of aluminium is demonstrable in the adjacent bone to a maximum depth of 20 microns (EDX microanalysis). In rabbits, epidural placement of freshly mixed cement causes slight thickening of the dura. There is reason to believe that human dura, with a thickness 10 times greater, is impermeable to components of the cement. After epidural application of the freshly mixed cement in the frontobasal and laterobasal regions and at the skull cap and petrous apex, 76 patients in all have been followed for up to 6.5 years. During this period no complications have arisen and functional (and cosmetic) results are promising. The availability of preformed implants (Ionoroc, Ionocast) permitted the peridural placement of minimal quantities of freshly mixed cement. These implants were fixed to localized sites on the adjacent calvarial bone by use of Ionocem. Notwithstanding the stringent manufacturer guidelines, there have been reports in the literature that during the vulnerable stage of setting neurotoxic aluminium ions were released into the dural space with a fatal outcome in two cases. In view of potential intradural complications, such as may occur in case of dural leaks, it was considered that further application of the material adjacent to the dura was no longer warranted. The production of Ionocem was discontinued in May 1995.

  18. Effect of magnesium infusion on thoracic epidural analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Sampa Dutta; Mitra, Koel; Mukherjee, Maitreyee; Roy, Suddhadeb; Sarkar, Aniruddha; Kundu, Sudeshna; Goswami, Anupam; Sarkar, Uday Narayan; Sanki, Prakash; Mitra, Ritabrata

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Patients of lung volume reduction surgery (LVRS) having an ASA status III or more are likely to be further downgraded by surgery to critical levels of pulmonary function. Aim: To compare the efficacy of thoracic epidural block with (0.125%) bupivacaine, fentanyl combination and (0.125%) bupivacaine, fentanyl combination with adjunctive intravenous magnesium infusion for the relief of postoperative pain in patients undergoing LVRS. Methods: Patients were operated under general anesthesia. Thirty minutes before the anticipated completion of skin closure in both groups, (Group A and Group B) 7 ml of (0.125%) bupivacaine calculated as 1.5 ml/thoracic segment space for achieving analgesia in dermatomes of T4, T5, T6, T7, and T8 segments, along with fentanyl 50 μg (0.5 ml), was administered through the catheter, activating the epidural block, and the time was noted. Thereafter, in patients of Group A, magnesium sulfate injection 30 mg/kg i.v. bolus was followed by infusion of magnesium sulfate at 10 mg/kg/hr and continued up to 24 hours. Group B was treated as control. Results and Analysis: A significant increase in the mean and maximum duration of analgesia in Group A in comparison with Group B (P<0.05) was observed. Total epidural dose of fentanyl and bupivacaine required in Group A was significantly lower in comparison with Group B in 24 hours. Discussion: Requirement of total doses of local anesthetics along with opioids could be minimized by magnesium infusion; therefore, the further downgradation of patients of LVRS may be prevented. Conclusion: Intravenous magnesium can prolong opioid-induced analgesia while minimizing nausea, pruritus, and somnolence. PMID:21655018

  19. Design and in vivo evaluation of a patch system based on thiolated polymers.

    PubMed

    Hoyer, Herbert; Greindl, Melanie; Bernkop-Schnürch, Andreas

    2009-02-01

    A new oral patch delivery system has been designed to increase the overall oral bioavailability of drugs within the gastrointestinal tract. The patch system consists of four layered films: a mucoadhesive matrix layer, a water insoluble backing layer, a middle layer and an enteric surface layer. The separation layer between the two matrix layers contained lactose, starch and confectioners' sugar. The matrix layer, exhibiting a diameter of 2.5 mm and a weight of 5 mg, comprised Polycarbophil-cysteine conjugate (49%), fluoresceine isothiocyanate-dextran (26%), glutathione (5%), and mannitol (20%). A standard tablet formulation consisting of the same matrix served as control. Entire fluoresceine isothiocyanate-dextran (FD(4)) was released from the delivery system within 2 h. For in vivo studies patch systems were administered orally to male Sprague-Dawley rats. Maximum FD(4) concentration in blood of the patch system was 46.1 +/- 8.9 ng/mL and was reached 3 h after administration. In contrast c(max) of control tablets displayed 50.5 +/- 14.9 ng/mL after 2 h and the absorption of FD(4) after administration in oral solution was negligible. The absolute bioavailability of orally administered patch systems and control tablets was 0.54% and 0.32% respectively. Results of this study indicate that a prolonged and higher oral bioavailability of FD(4) is obtained with patches than with tablets.

  20. Short-term monocular patching boosts the patched eye’s response in visual cortex

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jiawei; Baker, Daniel H.; Simard, Mathieu; Saint-Amour, Dave; Hess, Robert F.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Purpose: Several recent studies have demonstrated that following short-term monocular deprivation in normal adults, the patched eye, rather than the unpatched eye, becomes stronger in subsequent binocular viewing. However, little is known about the site and nature of the underlying processes. In this study, we examine the underlying mechanisms by measuring steady-state visual evoked potentials (SSVEPs) as an index of the neural contrast response in early visual areas. Methods: The experiment consisted of three consecutive stages: a pre-patching EEG recording (14 minutes), a monocular patching stage (2.5 hours) and a post-patching EEG recording (14 minutes; started immediately after the removal of the patch). During the patching stage, a diffuser (transmits light but not pattern) was placed in front of one randomly selected eye. During the EEG recording stage, contrast response functions for each eye were measured. Results: The neural responses from the patched eye increased after the removal of the patch, whilst the responses from the unpatched eye remained the same. Such phenomena occurred under both monocular and dichoptic viewing conditions. Conclusions: We interpret this eye dominance plasticity in adult human visual cortex as homeostatic intrinsic plasticity regulated by an increase of contrast-gain in the patched eye. PMID:26410580

  1. Investigating Birth Control: Comparing Oestrogen Levels in Patients Using the Ortho Evra[R] Patch versus the Ortho-Cyclen[R] Pill

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laurent, Theresa A.

    2008-01-01

    Recent drug studies have investigated the incidence of blood clots among patients using the Ortho Evra[R] birth control patch. In this article, the author describes an investigation of oestrogen levels in the body resulting from the application of the Ortho Evra[R] birth control patch versus daily use of Ortho-Cyclen[R] birth control pills.…

  2. [medullar adhesive arachnoiditis: a late complication after obstetrical epidural analgesia].

    PubMed

    Ploteau, S; de Kersaint-Gilly, A; Boog, G

    2004-11-01

    A 30-year-old woman, G3P3, was progressively affected by spastic paraparesis with loss of sensitivity and urinary incontinence due to medullar adhesive arachnoiditis occurring five months after an epidural analgesia for repeat cesarean section. Magnetic resonance imaging showed a voluminous subarachnoid cyst and a septated syringomyelic cavitation attributed to metabisulfite, the preservative of epinephrine and to multiple lidocaine injections through the catheter in the postoperative period. Despite two decompressive neurosurgical operations, the neurological state of the patient continues to worsen.

  3. Lumbar adhesive arachnoiditis following attempted epidural anesthesia--case report.

    PubMed

    Haisa, T; Todo, T; Mitsui, I; Kondo, T

    1995-02-01

    A 30-year-old female experienced a sudden sharp pain radiating down to the left leg from the lower back at epidural intubation for anesthesia at childbirth. She continued to complain of pain in the left leg afterwards. Magnetic resonance images demonstrated a conglomeration of adherent nerve roots due to lumbar adhesive arachnoiditis. Microsurgical dissection of adherent nerve roots was performed. Her symptoms disappeared after surgery, but soon recurred, being less severe and responsive to anti-inflammatory agents. Lumbar adhesive arachnoiditis should be considered for differential diagnosis in patients presenting with back and leg pain syndrome.

  4. Inflammation and Epidural-Related Maternal Fever: Proposed Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Sultan, Pervez; David, Anna L; Fernando, Roshan; Ackland, Gareth L

    2016-05-01

    Intrapartum fever is associated with excessive maternal interventions as well as higher neonatal morbidity. Epidural-related maternal fever (ERMF) contributes to the development of intrapartum fever. The mechanism(s) for ERMF has remained elusive. Here, we consider how inflammatory mechanisms may be modulated by local anesthetic agents and their relevance to ERMF. We also critically reappraise the clinical data with regard to emerging concepts that explain how anesthetic drug-induced metabolic dysfunction, with or without activation of the inflammasome, might trigger the release of nonpathogenic, inflammatory molecules (danger-associated molecular patterns) likely to underlie ERMF.

  5. Remote Postoperative Epidural Hematoma after Brain Tumor Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Ho-Jung; Park, Jae-Sung; Jeun, Sin-Soo

    2015-01-01

    A postoperative epidural hematoma (EDH) is a serious and embarrassing complication, which usually occurs at the site of operation after intracranial surgery. However, remote EDH is relatively rare. We report three cases of remote EDH after brain tumor surgery. All three cases seemed to have different causes of remote postoperative EDH; however, all patients were managed promptly and showed excellent outcomes. Although the exact mechanism of remote postoperative EDH is unknown, surgeons should be cautious of the speed of lowering intracranial pressure and implement basic procedures to prevent this hazardous complication of brain tumor surgery. PMID:26605271

  6. Epidural Tube: A Useful Device in Sialendoscopy Operations.

    PubMed

    Li, Jin; Fang, Wei; Chen, Ju-feng; Long, Xing

    2016-03-01

    Salivary endoscopy, which was first described in 1991, is a safe technique with few complications. The sialendoscopy operation has been developed and successfully offered as a minimally invasive and gland-preserving approach for the treatment of chronic obstructive sialadenitis. For many surgeons, entering the duct lumen of the salivary gland is the most difficult and time-consuming step of the sialendoscopy operation. This report introduces a timesaving and straightforward method for entering the duct lumen using an epidural tube, which is a plastic tube with a blunt tip.

  7. Role of receptor patch geometry for cell adhesion in hydrodynamic flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korn, Christian; Schwarz, Ulrich

    2008-03-01

    Motivated by the physiological and biotechnological importance of cell adhesion under hydrodynamic flow, we theoretically investigate the efficiency of initial binding between a receptor-coated sphere and a ligand-coated wall in linear shear flow. Using a Langevin equation that accounts for both hydrodynamic interactions and Browian motion, we numerically calculate the mean first passage time (MFPT) for receptor-ligand encounter. We study how the MFPT is influenced by flow rate, receptor and ligand coverage, and receptor patch geometry. With increasing shear rate, the MFPT decreases monotonically. Above a threshold value of a few hundreds, binding efficiency is enhanced only weakly upon increasing the number of receptor patches. Increasing the height of the receptor patches increases binding efficiency much more strongly than increasing their lateral size. This strong dependance on out-off-plane geometry explains why white blood cells adhere to the vessel walls through receptor patches localized to the tips of microvilli, and why malaria-infected red blood cells form elevated receptor patches (knobs). [1] C. Korn and U. S. Schwarz, Phys. Rev. Lett. 97: 138103, 2006. [2] C. B. Korn and U. S. Schwarz. J. Chem. Phys. 126: 095103, 2007

  8. Use of intraoperative sodium tetradecyl sulfate for the treatment of a spinal epidural hemangioma. Technical note.

    PubMed

    Baig, Mirza N; Saquib, Syed; Christoforidis, Greg; Caragine, Louis P

    2007-08-01

    Spinal hemangiomas can be categorized into three different groups based on location. Vertebral body (VB) hemangiomas are frequent incidental findings on magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. There is a subdivision of these with spinal epidural extension that have been reported in the literature. Spinal hemangiomas can also be epidural without VB involvement; these are extremely rare with few reported cases in the thoracic epidural spinal column. The diagnosis and imaging characteristics as well as the surgical tools used in gross-total resection of spinal epidural hemangioma are not well understood. The authors present a detailed characterization of a spinal epidural hemangioma in a 30-year-old woman who presented with complaints of gradual onset of low-back pain that worsened over 1 year. The MR imaging findings indicated a large L2-S1 epidural spinal mass causing thecal sac compression. The patient underwent an L2-S1 laminectomy, and a vascular extradural mass was noted on the posterior aspect of the dura mater. Preoperative spinal angiography as well as intraoperative angiography was performed. Total resection of the tumor was achieved using intraoperative embolization with sodium tetradecyl sulfate and microscopic dissection. The postoperative MR imaging findings and clinical outcome were excellent. The findings and use of sodium tetradecyl sulfate in gross-total resection are discussed. The authors also review treatment modalities and demonstrate the utility and effectiveness of intraoperative sodium tetradecyl sulfate in grosstotal resection of large difficult spinal epidural hemangiomas.

  9. Individual colour patches as multicomponent signals.

    PubMed

    Grether, Gregory F; Kolluru, Gita R; Nersissian, Karen

    2004-08-01

    Colour patches are complex traits, the components of which may evolve independently through a variety of mechanisms. Although usually treated as simple, two-dimensional characters and classified as either structural or pigmentary, in reality colour patches are complicated, three-dimensional structures that often contain multiple pigment types and structural features. The basic dermal chromatophore unit of fishes, reptiles and amphibians consists of three contiguous cell layers. Xanthophores and erythrophores in the outermost layer contain carotenoid and pteridine pigments that absorb short-wave light; iridophores in the middle layer contain crystalline platelets that reflect light back through the xanthophores; and melanophores in the basal layer contain melanins that absorb light across the spectrum. Changes in any one component of a chromatophore unit can drastically alter the reflectance spectrum produced, and for any given adaptive outcome (e.g. an increase in visibility), there may be multiple biochemical or cellular routes that evolution could take, allowing for divergent responses by different populations or species to similar selection regimes. All of the mechanisms of signal evolution that previously have been applied to single ornaments (including whole colour patches) could potentially be applied to the individual components of colour patches. To reach a complete understanding of colour patch evolution, however, it may be necessary to take an explicitly multi-trait approach. Here, we review multiple trait evolution theory and the basic mechanisms of colour production in fishes, reptiles and amphibians, and use a combination of computer simulations and empirical examples to show how multiple trait evolution theory can be applied to the components of single colour patches. This integrative perspective on animal colouration opens up a host of new questions and hypotheses. We offer specific, testable functional hypotheses for the most common pigmentary

  10. Efficacy of Epidural Injections in the Treatment of Lumbar Central Spinal Stenosis: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Manchikanti, Laxmaiah; Kaye, Alan David; Manchikanti, Kavita; Boswell, Mark; Pampati, Vidyasagar; Hirsch, Joshua

    2015-01-01

    Context: Lumbar central spinal stenosis is common and often results in chronic persistent pain and disability, which can lead to multiple interventions. After the failure of conservative treatment, either surgical or nonsurgical modalities such as epidural injections are contemplated in the management of lumbar spinal stenosis. Evidence Acquisition: Recent randomized trials, systematic reviews and guidelines have reached varying conclusions about the efficacy of epidural injections in the management of central lumbar spinal stenosis. The aim of this systematic review was to determine the efficacy of all three anatomical epidural injection approaches (caudal, interlaminar, and transforaminal) in the treatment of lumbar central spinal stenosis. A systematic review was performed on randomized trials published from 1966 to July 2014 of all types of epidural injections used in the management of lumbar central spinal stenosis. Methodological quality assessment and grading of the evidence was performed. Results: The evidence in managing lumbar spinal stenosis is Level II for long-term improvement for caudal and lumbar interlaminar epidural injections. For transforaminal epidural injections, the evidence is Level III for short-term improvement only. The interlaminar approach appears to be superior to the caudal approach and the caudal approach appears to be superior to the transforaminal one. Conclusions: The available evidence suggests that epidural injections with local anesthetic alone or with local anesthetic with steroids offer short- and long-term relief of low back and lower extremity pain for patients with lumbar central spinal stenosis. However, the evidence is Level II for the long-term efficacy of caudal and interlaminar epidural injections, whereas it is Level III for short-term improvement only with transforaminal epidural injections. PMID:25789241

  11. Epidural hematomas after the implantation of thoracic paddle spinal cord stimulators.

    PubMed

    Moufarrij, Nazih A

    2016-10-01

    OBJECTIVE There is little information on the frequency of symptomatic epidural hematomas after the implantation of paddle spinal cord stimulators (SCSs) in the thoracic spine. The purpose of this paper is to provide this metric and compare it to the frequency of symptomatic epidural hematomas for all other thoracic laminectomies combined. METHODS This study involved retrospectively analyzing the experience of a single surgeon in a consecutive series of patients who underwent the implantation of a thoracic paddle SCS with respect to the occurrence of a symptomatic epidural hematoma. For comparison, the occurrence of a symptomatic epidural hematoma in non-SCS thoracic laminectomies done during the same period of time was determined. RESULTS One hundred fifty-four thoracic paddle SCSs were implanted between May 2002 and February 2015. Despite perfect hemostasis and no preoperative risk factors, 4 of 154 patients (2.60%) developed postoperative lower-extremity weakness caused by an epidural hematoma. There were no other causes of a neurological deficit. In 3 of the 4 patients, the symptoms were delayed. Over the same time period, only 1 of 119 patients (0.84%) developed a postoperative motor deficit from a symptomatic epidural hematoma after a non-SCS laminectomy. CONCLUSIONS The occurrence of epidural hematomas after thoracic paddle SCS implantation may be underreported. Suggestions are given to decrease its incidence. It seems paradoxical that an epidural hematoma occurred 3 times more often after small SCS thoracic laminectomies than after larger non-SCS thoracic laminectomies. If confirmed by future studies, this finding may suggest that the intrusion of instruments into a confined epidural sublaminar space or the presence of a paddle and a hematoma in this restricted space may account for this differential.

  12. Methods of Making and Using Shape Memory Polymer Composite Patches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hood, Patrick J.

    2011-01-01

    A method of repairing a composite component having a damaged area including: laying a composite patch over the damaged area: activating the shape memory polymer resin to easily and quickly mold said patch to said damaged area; deactivating said shape memory polymer so that said composite patch retains the molded shape; and bonding said composite patch to said damaged part.

  13. Tachyphylaxis associated with repeated epidural injections of lidocaine is not related to changes in distribution or the rate of elimination from the epidural space

    SciTech Connect

    Mogensen, T.; Simonsen, L.; Scott, N.B.; Henriksen, J.H.; Kehlet, H. )

    1989-08-01

    The relationship between tachyphylaxis (measured as a decrease in the rate of regression of sensory levels of analgesia) during repeated epidural injections of lidocaine and both the distribution of lidocaine within the epidural space (as measured by spread of simultaneous injection of the tracer technetium-99m diethylenetriaminepentaacetate (99mTc-DTPA)) and elimination of lidocaine from the epidural space (as measured by serum concentrations of lidocaine) was investigated in 18 patients undergoing minor surgery during lumbar epidural analgesia. Twelve patients received four injections of 20 mL of 2% lidocaine at 2-hr intervals. Epidural distribution was assessed by injection of 99mTc-DTPA diluted in saline on the preoperative day and diluted in an equal volume of 2% lidocaine on the morning before surgery and again after the fourth injection of lidocaine 6 hr later. The distribution of 99mTc-DTPA in the epidural space was unchanged during the three measurements despite significant tachyphylaxis in both sensory analgesia and motor blockade (11 of 12 patients had sensory analgesia 2 hr after the first injection in contrast to only 3 of 12 patients during the third injection). In another six patients 20 mL of 2% lidocaine were injected three times at 2-hr intervals before surgery, with measurements of serum concentrations of lidocaine after the first and last injections. Despite tachyphylaxis (no patient had sensory analgesia 2 hr after the third injection), there was no difference in the rate of disappearance of lidocaine from the epidural space as assessed by plasma lidocaine concentration curves during the first and third injection (0.5 +/- 0.1 and 0.3 +/- 0.04 microgram.mL-1.min-1, respectively).

  14. Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Adrenal Suppression and Iatrogenic Cushing's Syndrome as a Complication of Epidural Steroid Injections

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Epidural steroid injections are well accepted as a treatment for radicular back pain in appropriate candidates. While overall incidence of systemic side effects has not been well established, at least five biochemically proven cases of iatrogenic Cushing's Syndrome have been reported as complications of epidural steroid treatment. We present an additional case of iatrogenic Cushing's Syndrome and adrenal suppression in a middle-aged woman who received three epidural steroid injections over a four-month period. We review this case in the context of previous cases and discuss diagnostic and management issues. PMID:23991341

  15. Spontaneous spinal epidural abscess in a 21-month-old child.

    PubMed

    Harris, Tyler J; Seamon, Jason P

    2014-12-01

    Spontaneous epidural abscess formation is a rare finding in all populations and even more so in the pediatric population. Its rarity and varied presentations often lead to misdiagnosis. We present a pediatric case in which the diagnosis of spontaneous spinal epidural abscess was missed upon initial presentation and subsequently identified at a later visit to the emergency department. Literature suggests utilizing three simple physical exam findings that may improve the first visit diagnosis of spontaneous epidural abscesses in children. Findings of any two of the following signs should guide the clinician to consider SEA as a possibility prior to discharge: fever, back or neck pain, extremity weakness or inability to walk.

  16. Cervical spontaneous epidural hematoma as a complication of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Mastronardi, L; Carletti, S; Frondizi, D; Spera, C; Maira, G

    1996-01-01

    Epidural hematoma is a rare cause of spinal cord compression, which usually provokes severe neurological deficits. It is presumed to originate from venous or, more probably, arterial bleeding. Thrombocytopenia and other disorders of coagulation may precipitate the onset of epidural hematoma and facilitate the evolution of the disease. We report the case of a patient suffering from a non-Hodgkin's lymphoma with severe thrombocytopenia during a MACOP-B schedule, who presented with a spontaneous cervical epidural hematoma. We discuss the etiopathological aspects, diagnosis, and treatment of this rare cause of acute cervical spinal cord compression.

  17. Fracture of epidural catheter: A case report and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Reena; Vikram, A

    2017-01-01

    Epidural blocks are a very important part of the anesthetic armamentarium. Among some of the known complications, fracture of epidural catheter, though is extremely rare, is a well-established entity. When it happens, it leaves the anesthesiologist puzzled and worried. We describe the occurrence of such an event where epidural catheter broke during insertion since it will also add to such an under-reported complication of a very commonly performed procedure. A brief review is also done which will delineate the recommendations for the prevention and management of such an event. PMID:28217068

  18. Spinal Myoclonus Developed during Cervical Epidural Drug Infusion in Postherpetic Neuralgia Patient

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Younghoon; Baek, Sung Uk

    2011-01-01

    Postherpetic neuralgia is the most frequent complication of herpes zoster. Treatment of this neuropathic pain syndrome is difficult and often disappointing. Although postherpetic neuralgia is generally a self-limited condition, it can last indefinitely. Continuous epidural blockade for patients with acute zoster can shorten the duration of treatment. However, continuous epidural block has some complications such as infection, dural puncture, and total spinal and nerve damages. We report a case of myoclonus during continuous epidural block with ropivacaine, morphine, and ketamine in an acute zoster patient. PMID:21935497

  19. Spinal Myoclonus Developed during Cervical Epidural Drug Infusion in Postherpetic Neuralgia Patient.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Younghoon; Baek, Sung Uk; Yeo, Jin Seok

    2011-09-01

    Postherpetic neuralgia is the most frequent complication of herpes zoster. Treatment of this neuropathic pain syndrome is difficult and often disappointing. Although postherpetic neuralgia is generally a self-limited condition, it can last indefinitely. Continuous epidural blockade for patients with acute zoster can shorten the duration of treatment. However, continuous epidural block has some complications such as infection, dural puncture, and total spinal and nerve damages. We report a case of myoclonus during continuous epidural block with ropivacaine, morphine, and ketamine in an acute zoster patient.

  20. Horner's Syndrome Secondary to Epidural Anaesthesia Following Posterior Instrumented Scoliosis Correction

    PubMed Central

    Gunn, Lucinda; Madhavan, Pradeep

    2015-01-01

    An 11-year-old girl underwent T4 to L1 posterior instrumented scoliosis correction for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis. Postoperative clinical examination revealed left-sided Horner's syndrome which was preceded by left-sided C8 paraesthesia. The Horner's syndrome resolved after 14 hours following weaning and removal of the epidural catheter. Horner's syndrome following posterior instrumented scoliosis correction associated to epidural use is extremely rare. Surgeons must be aware of the risks of epidural placement and the need for close monitoring of associated complications. Alternative aetiology producing a Horner's syndrome must always be considered because of its devastating long term sequela if missed. PMID:25705345

  1. Paraplegia caused by aortic coarctation complicated with spinal epidural hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Yi-Da; Hsu, Chin-Wang; Hsu, Chia-Ching; Liao, Wen-I; Chen, Sy-Jou

    2016-03-01

    Aortic coarctation complicated with spinal artery aneurysm rupture is exceptionally rare and can be source of intraspinal hemorrhage with markedly poor prognosis. A 21-year-old man visited the emergency department because of chest and back pain along with immobility of bilateral lower limbs immediately after he woke up in the morning. Complete flaccid paraplegia and hypoesthesia in dermatome below bilateral T3 level and pain over axial region from neck to lumbar region were noted. A computed tomography excluded aortic dissection. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a fusiform lesion involving the anterior epidural space from C7 to T2 level suspected of epidural hemorrhage, causing compression of spinal cord. He started intravenous corticosteroid but refused operation concerning the surgical benefits. Severe chest pain occurred with newly onset right bundle branch block that developed the other day. Coronary artery angiography revealed myocardial bridge of left anterior descending coronary artery at middle third and coarctation of aorta. He underwent thoracic endovascular aortic repair uneventfully. The patient was hemodynamically stable but with slow improvement in neurologic recovery of lower limbs. Aortic coarcation can cause paralysis by ruptured vascular aneurysms with spinal hemorrhage and chest pain that mimics acute aortic dissection. A history of hypertension at young age and aortic regurgitated murmurs may serve as clues for further diagnostic studies. Cautious and prudent evaluation and cross disciplines cares are essential for diagnosis and successful management of the disease.

  2. An Active Learning Algorithm for Control of Epidural Electrostimulation.

    PubMed

    Desautels, Thomas A; Choe, Jaehoon; Gad, Parag; Nandra, Mandheerej S; Roy, Roland R; Zhong, Hui; Tai, Yu-Chong; Edgerton, V Reggie; Burdick, Joel W

    2015-10-01

    Epidural electrostimulation has shown promise for spinal cord injury therapy. However, finding effective stimuli on the multi-electrode stimulating arrays employed requires a laborious manual search of a vast space for each patient. Widespread clinical application of these techniques would be greatly facilitated by an autonomous, algorithmic system which choses stimuli to simultaneously deliver effective therapy and explore this space. We propose a method based on GP-BUCB, a Gaussian process bandit algorithm. In n = 4 spinally transected rats, we implant epidural electrode arrays and examine the algorithm's performance in selecting bipolar stimuli to elicit specified muscle responses. These responses are compared with temporally interleaved intra-animal stimulus selections by a human expert. GP-BUCB successfully controlled the spinal electrostimulation preparation in 37 testing sessions, selecting 670 stimuli. These sessions included sustained autonomous operations (ten-session duration). Delivered performance with respect to the specified metric was as good as or better than that of the human expert. Despite receiving no information as to anatomically likely locations of effective stimuli, GP-BUCB also consistently discovered such a pattern. Further, GP-BUCB was able to extrapolate from previous sessions' results to make predictions about performance in new testing sessions, while remaining sufficiently flexible to capture temporal variability. These results provide validation for applying automated stimulus selection methods to the problem of spinal cord injury therapy.

  3. An Active Learning Algorithm for Control of Epidural Electrostimulation

    PubMed Central

    Desautels, Thomas A.; Nandra, Mandheerej S.; Roy, Roland R.; Zhong, Hui; Tai, Yu-Chong; Edgerton, V. Reggie; Burdick, Joel W.

    2015-01-01

    Epidural electrostimulation has shown promise for spinal cord injury therapy. However, finding effective stimuli on the multi-electrode stimulating arrays employed requires a laborious manual search of a vast space for each patient. Widespread clinical application of these techniques would be greatly facilitated by an autonomous, algorithmic system which choses stimuli to simultaneously deliver effective therapy and explore this space. We propose a method based on GP-BUCB, a Gaussian process bandit algorithm. In n = 4 spinally transected rats, we implant epidural electrode arrays and examine the algorithm's performance in selecting bipolar stimuli to elicit specified muscle responses. These responses are compared with temporally interleaved, intra-animal stimulus selections by a human expert. GP-BUCB successfully controlled the spinal electrostimulation preparation in 37 testing sessions, selecting 670 stimuli. These sessions included sustained, autonomous operations (10 session duration). Delivered performance with respect to the specified metric was as good as or better than that of the human expert. Despite receiving no information as to anatomically likely locations of effective stimuli, GP-BUCB also consistently discovered such a pattern. Further, GP-BUCB was able to extrapolate from previous sessions’ results to make predictions about performance in new testing sessions, while remaining sufficiently flexible to capture temporal variability. These results provide validation for applying automated stimulus selection methods to the problem of spinal cord injury therapy. PMID:25974925

  4. Transdermal patch drug delivery interactions with exercise.

    PubMed

    Lenz, Thomas L; Gillespie, Nicole

    2011-03-01

    Transdermal drug delivery systems, such as the transdermal patch, continue to be a popular and convenient way to administer medications. There are currently several medications that use a transdermal patch drug delivery system. This article describes the potential untoward side effects of increased drug absorption through the use of a transdermal patch in individuals who exercise or participate in sporting events. Four studies have been reported that demonstrate a significant increase in the plasma concentration of nitroglycerin when individuals exercise compared with rest. Likewise, several case reports and two studies have been conducted that demonstrate nicotine toxicity and increased plasma nicotine while wearing a nicotine patch in individuals who exercise or participate in sporting events compared with rest. Healthcare providers, trainers and coaches should be aware of proper transdermal patch use, especially while exercising, in order to provide needed information to their respective patients and athletes to avoid potential untoward side effects. Particular caution should be given to individuals who participate in an extreme sporting event of long duration. Further research that includes more medications is needed in this area.

  5. Activated Membrane Patches Guide Chemotactic Cell Motility

    PubMed Central

    Hecht, Inbal; Skoge, Monica L.; Charest, Pascale G.; Ben-Jacob, Eshel; Firtel, Richard A.; Loomis, William F.; Levine, Herbert; Rappel, Wouter-Jan

    2011-01-01

    Many eukaryotic cells are able to crawl on surfaces and guide their motility based on environmental cues. These cues are interpreted by signaling systems which couple to cell mechanics; indeed membrane protrusions in crawling cells are often accompanied by activated membrane patches, which are localized areas of increased concentration of one or more signaling components. To determine how these patches are related to cell motion, we examine the spatial localization of RasGTP in chemotaxing Dictyostelium discoideum cells under conditions where the vertical extent of the cell was restricted. Quantitative analyses of the data reveal a high degree of spatial correlation between patches of activated Ras and membrane protrusions. Based on these findings, we formulate a model for amoeboid cell motion that consists of two coupled modules. The first module utilizes a recently developed two-component reaction diffusion model that generates transient and localized areas of elevated concentration of one of the components along the membrane. The activated patches determine the location of membrane protrusions (and overall cell motion) that are computed in the second module, which also takes into account the cortical tension and the availability of protrusion resources. We show that our model is able to produce realistic amoeboid-like motion and that our numerical results are consistent with experimentally observed pseudopod dynamics. Specifically, we show that the commonly observed splitting of pseudopods can result directly from the dynamics of the signaling patches. PMID:21738453

  6. Characterizing the morphology of protein binding patches.

    PubMed

    Malod-Dognin, Noël; Bansal, Achin; Cazals, Frédéric

    2012-12-01

    Let the patch of a partner in a protein complex be the collection of atoms accounting for the interaction. To improve our understanding of the structure-function relationship, we present a patch model decoupling the topological and geometric properties. While the geometry is classically encoded by the atomic positions, the topology is recorded in a graph encoding the relative position of concentric shells partitioning the interface atoms. The topological-geometric duality provides the basis of a generic dynamic programming-based algorithm comparing patches at the shell level, which may favor topological or geometric features. On the biological side, we address four questions, using 249 cocrystallized heterodimers organized in biological families. First, we dissect the morphology of binding patches and show that Nature enjoyed the topological and geometric degrees of freedom independently while retaining a finite set of qualitatively distinct topological signatures. Second, we argue that our shell-based comparison is effective to perform atomic-level comparisons and show that topological similarity is a less stringent than geometric similarity. We also use the topological versus geometric duality to exhibit topo-rigid patches, whose topology (but not geometry) remains stable upon docking. Third, we use our comparison algorithms to infer specificity-related information amidst a database of complexes. Finally, we exhibit a descriptor outperforming its contenders to predict the binding affinities of the affinity benchmark. The softwares developed with this article are availablefrom http://team.inria.fr/abs/vorpatch_compatch/.

  7. Microneedle patches for vaccination in developing countries.

    PubMed

    Arya, Jaya; Prausnitz, Mark R

    2016-10-28

    Millions of people die of infectious diseases each year, mostly in developing countries, which could largely be prevented by the use of vaccines. While immunization rates have risen since the introduction of the Expanded Program on Immunization (EPI), there remain major challenges to more effective vaccination in developing countries. As a possible solution, microneedle patches containing an array of micron-sized needles on an adhesive backing have been developed to be used for vaccine delivery to the skin. These microneedle patches can be easily and painlessly applied by pressing against the skin and, in some designs, do not leave behind sharps waste. The patches are single-dose, do not require reconstitution, are easy to administer, have reduced size to simplify storage, transportation and waste disposal, and offer the possibility of improved vaccine immunogenicity, dose sparing and thermostability. This review summarizes vaccination challenges in developing countries and discusses advantages that microneedle patches offer for vaccination to address these challenges. We conclude that microneedle patches offer a powerful new technology that can enable more effective vaccination in developing countries.

  8. Surface patterning of nanoparticles with polymer patches

    SciTech Connect

    Choueiri, Rachelle M.; Galati, Elizabeth; Thérien-Aubin, Héloïse; Klinkova, Anna; Larin, Egor M.; Querejeta-Fernández, Ana; Han, Lili; Xin, Huolin L.; Gang, Oleg; Zhulina, Ekaterina B.; Rubinstein, Michael; Kumacheva, Eugenia

    2016-08-24

    Patterning of colloidal particles with chemically or topographically distinct surface domains (patches) has attracted intense research interest. Surface-patterned particles act as colloidal analogues of atoms and molecules serve as model systems in studies of phase transitions in liquid systems, behave as ‘colloidal surfactants’ and function as templates for the synthesis of hybrid particles. The generation of micrometre- and submicrometre-sized patchy colloids is now efficient but surface patterning of inorganic colloidal nanoparticles with dimensions of the order of tens of nanometres is uncommon. Such nanoparticles exhibit size- and shape-dependent optical, electronic and magnetic properties, and their assemblies show new collective properties. At present, nanoparticle patterning is limited to the generation of two-patch nanoparticles and nanoparticles with surface ripples or a ‘raspberry’ surface morphology. We demonstrate nanoparticle surface patterning, which utilizes thermodynamically driven segregation of polymer ligands from a uniform polymer brush into surface-pinned micelles following a change in solvent quality. Patch formation is reversible but can be permanently preserved using a photocrosslinking step. The methodology offers the ability to control the dimensions of patches, their spatial distribution and the number of patches per nanoparticle, in agreement with a theoretical model. The versatility of the strategy is demonstrated by patterning nanoparticles with different dimensions, shapes and compositions, tethered with various types of polymers and subjected to different external stimuli. Furthermore, these patchy nanocolloids have potential applications in fundamental research, the self-assembly of nanomaterials, diagnostics, sensing and colloidal stabilization.

  9. Surface patterning of nanoparticles with polymer patches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choueiri, Rachelle M.; Galati, Elizabeth; Thérien-Aubin, Héloïse; Klinkova, Anna; Larin, Egor M.; Querejeta-Fernández, Ana; Han, Lili; Xin, Huolin L.; Gang, Oleg; Zhulina, Ekaterina B.; Rubinstein, Michael; Kumacheva, Eugenia

    2016-10-01

    Patterning of colloidal particles with chemically or topographically distinct surface domains (patches) has attracted intense research interest. Surface-patterned particles act as colloidal analogues of atoms and molecules, serve as model systems in studies of phase transitions in liquid systems, behave as ‘colloidal surfactants’ and function as templates for the synthesis of hybrid particles. The generation of micrometre- and submicrometre-sized patchy colloids is now efficient, but surface patterning of inorganic colloidal nanoparticles with dimensions of the order of tens of nanometres is uncommon. Such nanoparticles exhibit size- and shape-dependent optical, electronic and magnetic properties, and their assemblies show new collective properties. At present, nanoparticle patterning is limited to the generation of two-patch nanoparticles, and nanoparticles with surface ripples or a ‘raspberry’ surface morphology. Here we demonstrate nanoparticle surface patterning, which utilizes thermodynamically driven segregation of polymer ligands from a uniform polymer brush into surface-pinned micelles following a change in solvent quality. Patch formation is reversible but can be permanently preserved using a photocrosslinking step. The methodology offers the ability to control the dimensions of patches, their spatial distribution and the number of patches per nanoparticle, in agreement with a theoretical model. The versatility of the strategy is demonstrated by patterning nanoparticles with different dimensions, shapes and compositions, tethered with various types of polymers and subjected to different external stimuli. These patchy nanocolloids have potential applications in fundamental research, the self-assembly of nanomaterials, diagnostics, sensing and colloidal stabilization.

  10. The effect of epidural dexmedetomidine on oxygenation and shunt fraction in patients undergoing thoracotomy and one lung ventilation: A randomized controlled study

    PubMed Central

    Kar, Prachi; Durga, Padmaja; Gopinath, Ramachandran

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: Role of epidural dexmedetomidine in providing analgesia is well documented, but its effect on oxygenation and shunt fraction is not well established. We studied the hypothesis that epidural dexmedetomidine may improve oxygenation and shunt fraction during one-lung ventilation (OLV). Material and Methods: After taking Institutional Ethics Committee approval, sixty patients undergoing thoracotomy and OLV were randomized to receive epidural ropivacaine with saline (RS group) or epidural ropivacaine with dexmedetomidine (RD group). Group RS received 7 ml of ropivacaine 0.5% with 1.5 ml normal saline (NS) bolus while RD group received 7 ml of 0.5% ropivacaine with 1 mcg/kg dexmedetomidine reconstituted in 1.5 ml NS. This was followed by infusion of 5 ml/h of 0.5% ropivacaine in RS group and 5 ml/h of 0.5% ropivacaine containing 0.2 mcg/kg of dexmedetomidine in RD group. Arterial and central venous blood gas parameters were obtained 15 minutes after intubation during two lung ventilation (TLV15), 15 and 45 min after OLV (OLV15, OLV45) and 15 minutes after reinstitution of two lung ventilation (ReTLV). Results: RD group had better oxygenation (254.2 ± 72.3 mmHg, 240.60 ± 59.26 mmHg) as compared to RS group (215.2 ± 64.3 mmHg, 190.7 ± 61.48 mmHg) at OLV15 (P – 0.04) and OLV45 (P – 0.004) respectively. Shunt fraction in RD group was (30.31 ± 7.89%, 33.76 ± 8.89%) and (35.14 ± 7.58%, 39.57 ± 13.03%) in RS group at OLV15 and OLV45, respectively. The increase in the shunt fraction from TLV15 was significantly greater in RS group than RD group both at OLV15 (P – 0.03) and OLV45 (P – 0.03). The sevoflurane and fentanyl requirement was lower in RD group. Conclusion: Epidural dexmedetomidine improves oxygenation and reduces shunt fraction during OLV, in patients undergoing thoracotomy. It also reduces intraoperative anesthetic and analgesic requirement. PMID:28096575

  11. Timing and prognosis of surgery for spinal epidural abscess: A review

    PubMed Central

    Epstein, Nancy E.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The nonsurgical versus surgical management of spinal epidural abscesses (SEAs) remains controversial. Even with the best preoperative screening for multiple risk factors, high nonoperative failure rates are attended by considerable morbidity (e.g., irreversible paralysis) and mortality. Therefore, the focus remains on early surgery. Methods: Most papers promote early recognition of the clinical triad (e.g., fever [50%], spinal pain [92–100%], and neurological deficits [47%]) for SEA. They also identify SEA-related risk factors for choosing nonsurgical versus surgical approaches; advanced age (>65 or 80), diabetes (15–30%), cancer, intravenous drug abuse (25%), smoking (23%), elevated white blood cell count (>12.5), high C-reactive protein >115, positive blood cultures, magnetic resonance imaging/computed tomographic documented cord compression, and significant neurological deficits (e.g., 19–45%). Results: Surgical options include: decompressions, open versus minimally invasive biopsy/culture/irrigation, or fusions. Up to 75% of SEA involve the thoracolumbar spine, and 50% are located ventrally. Wound cultures are positive in up to 78.8% of cases and are often (60%) correlated with positive blood cultures. The most typical offending organism is methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus, followed by methicillin sensitive S. aureus. Unfortunately, the failure rates for nonoperative treatment of SEA remain high (e.g., 41–42.5%), contributing to significant morbidity (22% risk of permanent paralysis), and mortality (3–25%). Conclusion: The vast majority of studies advocated early surgery to achieve better outcomes for treating SEA; this avoids high failure rates (41–42.5%) for nonoperative therapy, and limits morbidity/mortality rates. PMID:26605109

  12. Comparison of loss of resistance technique between Epidrum® and conventional method for identifying the epidural space

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seon Wook; Kim, Young Mi; Kim, Soo Hwan; Chung, Mi Hwa; Choi, Young Ryong

    2012-01-01

    Background Epidrum® is a recently developed, air operated, loss of resistance (LOR) device for identifying the epidural space. We investigated the usefulness of Epidrum® by comparing it with the conventional LOR technique for identifying the epidural space. Methods One hundred eight American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) physical status I or II patients between the ages of 17 and 68 years old and who were scheduled for elective surgery under combined spinal-epidural anesthesia were enrolled in this study. The patients were randomized into two groups: one group received epidural anesthesia by the conventional LOR technique (C group) and the second group received epidural anesthesia using Epidrum® (ED group). While performing epidural anesthesia, the values of variables were recorded, including the number of failures, more than 2 attempts, the incidence of dural puncture, the time needed to locate the epidural space, the distance from the skin to the epidural space and ease of performance, and the satisfaction scores. Results The ED group showed a lower failure rate, fewer cases of more than 2 attempts, a lesser time to identify the epidural space, and better ease and satisfaction scores of procedure than the C group, with statistical significance. Conclusions Using Epidrum® compared to the conventional LOR technique is an easy, rapid, and reliable method for identifying the epidural space. PMID:22558497

  13. Thoracic epidural analgesia: a new approach for the treatment of acute pancreatitis?

    PubMed

    Windisch, Olivier; Heidegger, Claudia-Paula; Giraud, Raphaël; Morel, Philippe; Bühler, Léo

    2016-05-04

    This review article analyzes, through a nonsystematic approach, the pathophysiology of acute pancreatitis (AP) with a focus on the effects of thoracic epidural analgesia (TEA) on the disease. The benefit-risk balance is also discussed. AP has an overall mortality of 1 %, increasing to 30 % in its severe form. The systemic inflammation induces a strong activation of the sympathetic system, with a decrease in the blood flow supply to the gastrointestinal system that can lead to the development of pancreatic necrosis. The current treatment for severe AP is symptomatic and tries to correct the systemic inflammatory response syndrome or the multiorgan dysfunction. Besides the removal of gallstones in biliary pancreatitis, no satisfactory causal treatment exists. TEA is widely used, mainly for its analgesic effect. TEA also induces a targeted sympathectomy in the anesthetized region, which results in splanchnic vasodilatation and an improvement in local microcirculation. Increasing evidence shows benefits of TEA in animal AP: improved splanchnic and pancreatic perfusion, improved pancreatic microcirculation, reduced liver damage, and significantly reduced mortality. Until now, only few clinical studies have been performed on the use of TEA during AP with few available data regarding the effect of TEA on the splanchnic perfusion. Increasing evidence suggests that TEA is a safe procedure and could appear as a new treatment approach for human AP, based on the significant benefits observed in animal studies and safety of use for human. Further clinical studies are required to confirm the clinical benefits observed in animal studies.

  14. Pediatric spinal epidural abscess: a 9-year institutional review and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Hawkins, Melody; Bolton, Michael

    2013-12-01

    Spinal epidural abscess (SEA) is a rare condition that requires prompt diagnosis and initiation of treatment for optimal outcome. Treatment generally consists of surgical intervention and systemic antibiotics. We present 1 of the largest cohorts of nontuberculous pediatric SEA in the English literature, emphasizing the outcomes of conservative (ie, nonoperative) management. We retrospectively identified 9 pediatric patients (≤18 years of age) with SEAs at Our Lady of the Lake Children's Hospital from 2002 to 2011. Cases were reviewed for demographic, clinical, diagnostic, and treatment characteristics and outcomes. The diagnosis of SEA was made by MRI in all cases, and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) was the only identified pathogen, isolated via blood culture in 6 of 9 patients. Although every patient received systemic antibiotics, only 2 had neurosurgical intervention. Four of the 7 patients treated conservatively received computed tomography-guided needle drainage. All patients recovered without significant sequelae. SEA is a potentially fatal illness that necessitates a heightened clinical awareness for diagnosis and treatment. Although official recommendations regarding management in pediatrics are lacking, treatment has generally been surgical decompression and drainage in combination with antibiotics; recent reports have suggested that antibiotic therapy alone may be successful in select patient populations. Although the adult literature has suggested that such management can be trialed in specific situations, only a handful of cases in the pediatric literature have reported this nonoperative approach. We present one of the largest reviews in support of successfully treating SEA with nonsurgical therapy.

  15. [Optimal dose of midazolam as premedicant for combined spinal and epidural anesthesia with midazolam sedation].

    PubMed

    Tabuchi, Y

    1992-04-01

    Sixty patients who underwent simple total hysterectomy under combined spinal and epidural anesthesia with midazolam sedation, were the subjects of a randomized double-blind comparison of intramuscular midazolam 4, 4.5 and 5 mg, and a dose determined by body weight as premedicants. Similar changes in arterial pressure and heart rate were observed. Furthermore sedation and the value of pulse oximetry on arrival were the same. Besides half the patients were amnesic during the procedure of regional approach. However the dose of premedicant was inversely correlated with the maintenance dose. The reduction of pulse oximetry reading on the induction was smaller, while the requirement of vasopressor occurred earlier following the larger dose of premedicant. In spite of the slower induction, the fall of pulse oximetry reading did not decrease. One hour after incision, the reduction of PaO2 was not dose related. In addition count of leucocyte and the level of blood glucose were unchanged. Premedicant determined by body weight was not correlated with the induction dose and amnesic effect. Our findings suggest midazolam 5 mg intramuscularly is the more preferable dose, but careful attention on arterial pressure is required.

  16. Encapsulated acute subdural hematoma mimicking acute epidural hematoma on computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Miki, Shunichiro; Fujita, Keishi; Katayama, Wataru; Sato, Masayuki; Kamezaki, Takao; Matsumura, Akira; Sakashita, Shingo

    2012-01-01

    An 87-year-old woman presented with an atypical case of acute subdural hematoma (ASDH) manifesting as disturbance of consciousness and left hemiparesis. Computed tomography revealed a high density lentiform lesion in the right convexity, which was thought to be acute epidural hematoma preoperatively. Emergent decompressive craniotomy revealed an encapsulated solid fresh clot in the subdural space and a bleeding small cortical artery under the clot. The arachnoid membrane and the brain parenchyma were intact, and no other abnormal feature such as aneurysm or arteriovenous malformation was observed. The encapsulated ASDH was removed en bloc and the patient fully recovered. Histological examination confirmed that both the outer thicker and the inner membrane were fibrinous single structures without vasculature. The red blood cells constituting the clot in the capsule maintained their cell structure. The reported pathological mechanisms of lentiform ASDH are adhesion of the arachnoid membrane and the dura mater or intracapsular bleeding from sinusoidal vessels in the outer membrane of the chronic subdural hematoma. However, in our case, the arachnoid membrane had not adhered to the dura mater and the capsule was a fibrinous single structural membrane without vasculature, which probably resulted from a previous hematoma due to initial bleeding from the cortical artery. The possible mechanism in our case was that the re-bleeding dissected and flowed into the fibrinous single structural membrane, resulting in formation of the lentiform ASDH.

  17. Encapsulated Unresolved Subdural Hematoma Mimicking Acute Epidural Hematoma: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Park, Sang-Soo; Shin, Woo-Ram; Kim, Hyo-Joon; Kwon, Chang-Young

    2014-10-01

    Encapsulated acute subdural hematoma (ASDH) has been uncommonly reported. To our knowledge, a few cases of lentiform ASDH have been reported. The mechanism of encapsulated ASDH has been studied but not completely clarified. Encapsulated lentiform ASDH on a computed tomography (CT) scan mimics acute epidural hematoma (AEDH). Misinterpretation of biconvex-shaped ASDH on CT scan as AEDH often occurs and is usually identified by neurosurgical intervention. We report a case of an 85-year-old man presenting with a 2-day history of mental deterioration and right-sided weakness. CT scan revealed a biconvex-shaped hyperdense mass mixed with various densities of blood along the left temporoparietal cerebral convexity, which was misinterpreted as AEDH preoperatively. Emergency craniectomy was performed, but no AEDH was found beneath the skull. In the subdural space, encapsulated ASDH was located. En block resection of encapsulated ASDH was done. Emergency craniectomy confirmed that the preoperatively diagnosed AEDH was an encapsulated ASDH postoperatively. Radiologic studies of AEDH-like SDH allow us to establish an easy differential diagnosis between AEDH and ASDH by distinct features. More histological studies will provide us information on the mechanism underlying encapsulated ASDH.

  18. Deformation of Polar Cap Patches During Substorms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, S.; Ridley, A. J.; Nicolls, M. J.; Coster, A. J.; Thomas, E. G.; Ruohoniemi, J. M.; Hampton, D.

    2015-12-01

    Polar cap patches refer to the islands of high F-region plasma density within the polar cap. Their formation on the dayside and deformation on the nightside are not well understood. The F-layer ionosphere density is strongly influenced by electric field, thermospheric wind as well as soft particle precipitation. This study combines observations from multiple instruments, including Poker Flat incoherent scatter radar, GPS TEC and optical instruments, as well as the Global Ionosphere and Thermosphere Model (GITM), to investigate the effects of highly structured electric fields and winds on the deformation of polar cap patches during substorms. We will also discuss variations of the auroral emissions associated with the patch evolution.

  19. Tunable nano dispersed LC based patch antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karim, Afaque; Yadav, Harsh; Ahmad, Shakeb

    2015-06-01

    This paper presents Patch antenna based on pure and Nano dispersed liquid crystals (LCs) for earth and space applications. Patch antenna are one of the most attractive antennas designed for RF frequency. To fulfill the demand of modern antenna i.e. tunability, a design of LC based patch antenna with optimum frequency of 15 GHz is investigated. In this design, NLC and ZnO doped NLC were used as a dielectric substrate. Its dielectric permittivity was controlled by biasing voltage. The dielectric properties of the 4-Cyano-4' -pentylbiphenyl (5CB) nematic liquid crystal (NLC), and NLC doped with Zinc oxide (ZnO) Nanoparticles was studied at room temperature. The concentration of doping material was 0.5% by w.t. in ZnO. Results shows that dielectric parameters are strong function of frequency and applied bias voltage. Moreover, Using doped NLC as dielectric substrate one gets more tunability or shift in resonant frequency in the proposed geometry.

  20. Cell repair: Revisiting the patch hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Davenport, Nicholas R.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Plasma membrane damage elicits a complex and dynamic cellular response. A vital component of this response, membrane resealing, is thought to arise from fusion of intracellular membranous compartments to form a temporary, impermeant patch at the site of damage; however, this hypothesis has been difficult to confirm visually. By utilizing advanced microscopy technologies with high spatiotemporal resolution in wounded Xenopus laevis oocytes, we provide the first direct visualization of the membrane fusion events predicted by the patch hypothesis; we show the barrier formed by patching is capable of abating exchange of material across the plasma membrane within seconds. Profound changes also occur to the plasma membrane surrounding wounds; lipid remodeling is accompanied by membrane fusion events, both conventional (e.g., exocytosis) and novel (e.g., “explodosis”). Further, we reveal additional complexity in wound-induced subcellular patterning, supporting existing evidence that extensive interactions between lipid, protein, and ionic signaling pathways shape the cellular wound response. PMID:28042380

  1. Boolean Operations with Prism Algebraic Patches

    PubMed Central

    Bajaj, Chandrajit; Paoluzzi, Alberto; Portuesi, Simone; Lei, Na; Zhao, Wenqi

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we discuss a symbolic-numeric algorithm for Boolean operations, closed in the algebra of curved polyhedra whose boundary is triangulated with algebraic patches (A-patches). This approach uses a linear polyhedron as a first approximation of both the arguments and the result. On each triangle of a boundary representation of such linear approximation, a piecewise cubic algebraic interpolant is built, using a C1-continuous prism algebraic patch (prism A-patch) that interpolates the three triangle vertices, with given normal vectors. The boundary representation only stores the vertices of the initial triangulation and their external vertex normals. In order to represent also flat and/or sharp local features, the corresponding normal-per-face and/or normal-per-edge may be also given, respectively. The topology is described by storing, for each curved triangle, the two triples of pointers to incident vertices and to adjacent triangles. For each triangle, a scaffolding prism is built, produced by its extreme vertices and normals, which provides a containment volume for the curved interpolating A-patch. When looking for the result of a regularized Boolean operation, the 0-set of a tri-variate polynomial within each such prism is generated, and intersected with the analogous 0-sets of the other curved polyhedron, when two prisms have non-empty intersection. The intersection curves of the boundaries are traced and used to decompose each boundary into the 3 standard classes of subpatches, denoted in, out and on. While tracing the intersection curves, the locally refined triangulation of intersecting patches is produced, and added to the boundary representation. PMID:21516262

  2. Patch Clamping Protoplasts from Vascular Plants 1

    PubMed Central

    Elzenga, J. Theo M.; Keller, Christopher P.; Van Volkenburgh, Elizabeth

    1991-01-01

    A method is described for the isolation of protoplasts (Pisum sativum, Phaseolus vulgaris, Avena sativa, Arabidopsis thaliana) in preparation for ion flux studies using patch clamp electrophysiology. Protoplasts that have been exposed to hydrolytic, cell wall degrading, enzymes for as little as 5 minutes form gigaseals (seal resistance higher than 10 giga Ohm) with the patch pipette with success rates greater than 40%. Sealing of these protoplasts is fast, averaging less than 2 minutes. This method yields high rates of gigaseal formation in a variety of tissues from both monocots and dicots and will enhance data collection in ion flux studies of plasma membranes of vascular plants. PMID:16668586

  3. Lightweight Material Patches Allow for Quick Repairs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2010-01-01

    Cornerstone Research Group Inc., of Dayton, Ohio, has been the recipient of 16 Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contracts with NASA with a variety of different focuses, including projects like creating inflatable structures for radio frequency antennas and, most recently, healable polymer matrix composites for future space vehicles. One of its earlier SBIR contracts, with Kennedy Space Center, led to the development of a new type of structural patch for a variety of consumer uses: Rubbn Repair, for automotive uses; and Rec Repair for the outdoors and adventure market. Both are flexible, heat-activated structural patches.

  4. [Continuous epidural administration of droperidol to prevent postoperative nausea and vomiting].

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Kenji; Higuchi, Jun; Sakio, Hideaki; Tanaka, Yoshikazu; Onoda, Noboru

    2002-02-01

    This randomized double-blind trial was designed to evaluate the antiemetic effect of continuous epidural analgesia with droperidol mixed with bupivacaine and buprenorphine. We studied 78 patients for abdominal gynecological surgery under general-epidural anesthesia. After recovery from anesthesia, they received epidural administration of 0.25% bupivacaine 40 ml and buprenorphine 0.4 mg with or without droperidol 2.5-5.0 mg at a rate of 2 ml.h-1 for 24 hours. The addition of droperidol 5.0 mg led to serious undesirable effects. Droperidol 2.5 mg, however, showed not only significant antiemetic effect without any adverse action, but also the reduction of rescue analgesics. We conclude that the addition of a small dose of droperidol to epidural analgesics reduces the incidence of postoperative emesis and the requirement of rescue analgesics.

  5. Delayed neurological deficits induced by an epidural hematoma associated with a thoracic osteoporotic compression fracture.

    PubMed

    Kang, Min-Soo; Shin, Yong-Hwan; Lee, Choon-Dae; Lee, Sang-Ho

    2012-01-01

    A 79-year-old woman developed neurological deficits 6 weeks after the onset of a thoracic osteoporotic compression fracture. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of the thoracic spine revealed an epidural hematoma at the T10-L2 levels. Acute decompressive laminectomy and percutaneous vertebroplasty were performed. Following the surgery, the patient's neurologic deficits improved and follow-up MR imaging showed complete resolution of the hematoma. Spinal epidural hematomas are rare and associated delayed neurological deficits are extremely rare. Conservative treatment may be effective for epidural hematomas in neurologically intact patients, but epidural hematomas can be a cause of neural compression and symptomatic deterioration resulting in delayed neurological deficits during the follow-up period.

  6. Giving Birth With Epidural Analgesia: The Experience of First-Time Mothers

    PubMed Central

    Hidaka, Ryoko; Callister, Lynn Clark

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of our qualitative descriptive study was to describe the birth experiences of women using epidural analgesia for pain management. We interviewed nine primiparas who experienced vaginal births. Five themes emerged: (a) coping with pain, (b) finding epidural administration uneventful, (c) feeling relief having an epidural, (d) experiencing joy, and (e) having unsettled feelings of ambivalence. Although epidural analgesia was found to be effective for pain relief and may contribute to some women’s satisfaction with the birth experience, it does not guarantee a quality birth experience. In order to support and promote childbearing women’s decision making, we recommend improved education on the variety of available pain management options, including their risks and benefits. Fostering a sense of caring, connection, and control in women is a key factor to ensure positive birth experiences, regardless of pain management method. PMID:23277728

  7. Combined Spinal Epidural Anaesthesia for Caesarean Section and Hysterectomy in a Parturient with Placenta Accreta

    PubMed Central

    Seyhan, Tülay Özkan; Sungur, Mukadder Orhan; Edipoğlu, İpek; Baştu, Ercan

    2014-01-01

    Placenta accreta complicates the anaesthetic and surgical approach in caesarean section. In this report, a parturient with placenta accreta and multiple drug allergies who was managed using combined spinal epidural anaesthesia for caesarean hysterectomy is discussed. PMID:27366410

  8. Does epidural analgesia affect the rate of spontaneous obstetric lacerations in normal births?

    PubMed

    Albers, Leah L; Migliaccio, Laura; Bedrick, Edward J; Teaf, Dusty; Peralta, Patricia

    2007-01-01

    The precise relationship between epidural use and genital tract lacerations in normal childbirth is unclear. Data from a clinical trial on measures to lower genital tract trauma in vaginal birth were used for a secondary analysis. The goal was to assess whether epidurals affect the rate of spontaneous obstetric lacerations in normal vaginal births. Maternal characteristics and intrapartum variables were compared in women who did and did not use an epidural in labor, and also in those with and without any sutured lacerations following vaginal birth. Variables that were statistically different in both cases were entered into regression equations for simultaneous adjustment. Epidural use was not an independent predictor of sutured lacerations. Predictors of sutured lacerations included nulliparity, a prolonged second stage, being non-Hispanic white, and an infant birthweight greater than 4000 grams. Elements of midwifery management need further research.

  9. Adult Primary Spinal Epidural Extraosseous Ewing's Sarcoma: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Cheddhi; Modrek, Aram S.; Bayin, N. Sumru; Snuderl, Matija; Schiff, Peter B.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Extraosseous Ewing's sarcoma in the spinal epidural space is a rare malignancy, especially in adults. Case Presentation. A 40-year-old male presented with back pain and urinary hesitancy. MRI revealed a thoracic extradural mass with no osseous involvement. He underwent surgery for gross total resection of the mass, which was diagnosed as Ewing's sarcoma. He was subsequently treated with chemoradiotherapy. He remains disease-free 1 year after surgery. Review of the literature indicated only 45 previously reported cases of spinal epidural extraosseous Ewing's sarcoma in adults. Conclusions. Extraosseous Ewing's sarcoma in the spinal epidural space is a rare clinical entity that should be included in the differential for spinal epidural masses. Its treatment is multidisciplinary but frequently requires surgical intervention due to compressive neurologic symptoms. Gross total resection appears to correlate with improved outcomes. PMID:27610254

  10. Early removal of urinary catheters in patients with thoracic epidural catheters.

    PubMed

    Tripepi-Bova, Kathleen A; Sun, Zhiyuan; Mason, David; Albert, Nancy M

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether early removal of urinary catheters in patients with thoracic epidurals resulted in urinary retention (>500 mL by bladder scanner). Patients were given up to 8 hours to void before further intervention. Of 61 patients, only 4 (6.6%) required urinary catheter reinsertion due to urinary retention. Early removal of urinary catheters after thoracic surgery in patients with thoracic epidurals was safe, with minimal urinary retention.

  11. Posterior epidural migration of a sequestrated lumbar disk fragment: MR imaging findings.

    PubMed

    Chen, C Y; Chuang, Y L; Yao, M S; Chiu, W T; Chen, C L; Chan, W P

    2006-08-01

    We present a 75-year-old man who, for 2 weeks, had progressive pain in both of his thighs when standing straight. MR imaging showed a sequestrated disk fragment, which had a signal intensity similar to that of a herniated disk with a rim enhancement in the posterior epidural space and a ruptured outermost annulus of the intervertebral disk at L2-3. Awareness of these MR imaging findings can help in the diagnosis of posterior epidural disk migration.

  12. “Dry tap” during spinal anaesthesia turns out to be epidural abscess

    PubMed Central

    Sahu, Dinesh Kumar; Kaul, Vinca; Parampill, Reena

    2012-01-01

    We report a case of “dry tap” during spinal anaesthesia in a patient posted for incision and drainage of lower limb with cellulitis. When the patient was being given sub-arachnoid block (SAB) for regional anaesthesia, it turned out to be a case of pyogenic ilio-psoas abscess extended up to the paravertebral and epidural spaces. The causative organism was Staphylococcus aureus. This is probably the first case reported when epidural abscess is diagnosed during SAB. PMID:22923830

  13. [Continuous epidural blockade for frostbite of the lower extremities (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Schlarb, K

    1980-06-01

    We describe the case of a patient suffering from freezing of the lower extremities, for which continuous epidural-blockade, over a period of four days, was conducted. By this means it was possible to relieve the vessel-spasm caused by the freezing and the patient was spared bilateral upper-thigh amputation. As the lower extremities are concerned in many cases of freezing, a continuous epidural-blockade as described here, seems to be the therapy to choose.

  14. Patches for Carotid Artery Endarterectomy: Current Materials and Prospects

    PubMed Central

    Muto, Akihito; Nishibe, Toshiya; Dardik, Herbert; Dardik, Alan

    2009-01-01

    Patch angioplasty is commonly performed after carotid endarterectomy. Randomized prospective trials and meta-analyses have documented improved rates of perioperative and long-term stroke prevention as well as reduced rates of restenosis for patches compared to primary closure of the arteriotomy. Although use of vein patches is considered to be the “gold standard” for patch closure, newer generations of synthetic and biological materials rival outcomes associated with vein patches. Future bioengineered patches are likely to optimize patch performance, both by achieving minimal stroke risk and long-term rates of restenosis, as well as by minimizing the risk of unusual complications of prosthetic patches such as infection and pseudoaneurysm formation; in addition, lessons from bioengineered patches will likely enable construction of bioengineered and tissue-engineered bypass grafts. PMID:19563972

  15. Critical patch sizes for food-web modules.

    PubMed

    Martinson, Holly M; Fagan, William F; Denno, Robert F

    2012-08-01

    Because patch size and connectivity may strongly impact the assemblage of species that occur on a patch, the types of food-web interactions that occur among those species may also depend on spatial structure. Here, we identify whether food-web interactions among salt-marsh-inhabiting arthropods vary with patch size and connectivity, and how such changes in trophic structure might feed back to influence the spatial distribution of prey. In a multiyear survey, patch-restricted predators exhibited steeper occupancy-patch-size relationships than herbivores, and species' critical patch sizes were correlated with overall rarity. As a result, the presence of food-web modules depended strongly on patch size: large and well-connected patches supported complex food-web modules, but only the simplest modules involving the most abundant species were found on small patches. Habitat-generalist spiders dominated on small patches, and predation pressure from such species may contribute to the observed lower densities of mesopredators on small patches. Overall, patch size and connectivity influenced the types of modules present on a patch through differential loss of rare, patch-restricted predators, but predation by generalist predators may be a key mechanism influencing the spatial structure of certain prey species.

  16. Dispersal, patch leaving, and distribution of Homalodisca vitripennis (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae).

    PubMed

    Northfield, Tobin D; Mizell, Russell F; Paini, Dean R; Andersen, Peter C; Brodbeck, Brent V; Riddle, T Charles; Hunter, Wayne B

    2009-02-01

    Homalodisca vitripennis (Germar) and related species have caused millions of dollars in damage to southern California vineyards in recent years through the vectoring of Pierce's disease. However, the effects of surrounding vegetation on the dispersal and distribution of H. vitripennis are poorly understood. Therefore, the relationship between dispersal rates and patch quality was tested, as well as the basic predictions of the marginal value theorem. Additional experiments were conducted to compare the H. vitripennis distribution in an isolated crape myrtle (Lagerstroemia indica) patch and a L. indica patch bordering two alternative host patches. In mark-release-recapture tests, H. vitripennis dispersed farther from the release point in a patch of low-quality host plants (Prunus persica) than in patches of high-quality host plants (L. indica). In addition, H. vitripennis remained in L. indica patches longer than in P. persica patches and adjusted patch residence times in P. persica in correlation with known changes in plant physiology. These data suggest that H. vitripennis follows the basic predictions of marginal value theorem. In distribution tests, H. vitripennis were more abundant in the patch center than patch edges in the isolated L. indica patch, but in a patch bordering cottonwood (Populus sp.) and peach (P. persica), H. vitripennis numbers were generally higher along the edges of the patch. These data suggest that alternate hosts bordering cropping systems may be important to the spatial dynamics of H. vitripennis. Implications of these spatial observations on the biology of H. vitripennis and potential control methods are discussed.

  17. A hospital cost analysis of a fibrin sealant patch in soft tissue and hepatic surgical bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Corral, Mitra; Ferko, Nicole; Hogan, Andrew; Hollmann, Sarah S; Gangoli, Gaurav; Jamous, Nadine; Batiller, Jonathan; Kocharian, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Background Despite hemostat use, uncontrolled surgical bleeding is prevalent. Drawbacks of current hemostats include limitations with efficacy on first attempt and suboptimal ease-of-use. Evarrest® is a novel fibrin sealant patch that has demonstrated high hemostatic efficacy compared with standard of care across bleeding severities. The objective of this study was to conduct a hospital cost analysis of the fibrin sealant patch versus standard of care in soft tissue and hepatic surgical bleeding. Methods The analysis quantified the 30-day costs of each comparator from a hospital perspective. Published US unit costs were applied to resource use (ie, initial treatment, retreatment, operating time, hospitalization, transfusion, and ventilator) reported in four trials. A “surgical” analysis included resources clinically related to the hemostatic benefit of the fibrin sealant patch, whereas a “hospital” analysis included all resources reported in the trials. An exploratory subgroup analysis focused solely on coagulopathic patients defined by abnormal blood test results. Results The surgical analysis predicted cost savings of $54 per patient with the fibrin sealant patch compared with standard of care (net cost impact: −$54 per patient; sensitivity range: −$1,320 to $1,213). The hospital analysis predicted further cost savings with the fibrin sealant patch (net cost impact of −$2,846 per patient; sensitivity range: −$1,483 to −$5,575). Subgroup analyses suggest that the fibrin sealant patch may provide dramatic cost savings in the coagulopathic subgroup of $3,233 (surgical) and $9,287 (hospital) per patient. Results were most sensitive to operating time and product units. Conclusion In soft tissue and hepatic problematic surgical bleeding, the fibrin sealant patch may result in important hospital cost savings. PMID:27703386

  18. Caudal epidural analgesia using lidocaine alone or in combination with ketamine in dromedary camels Camelus dromedarius.

    PubMed

    Azari, Omid; Molaei, Mohammad M; Ehsani, Amir H

    2014-02-27

    This study was performed to investigate the analgesic effect of lidocaine and a combination of lidocaine and ketamine following epidural administration in dromedary camels. Ten 12-18-month-old camels were randomly divided into two equal groups. In group L, the animals received 2% lidocaine (0.22 mg/kg) and in group LK the animals received a mixture of 10% ketamine (1 mg/kg) and 2% lidocaine (0.22 mg/kg) administered into the first intercoccygeal (Co1-Co2) epidural space while standing. Onset time and duration of caudal analgesia, sedation level and ataxia were recorded after drug administration. Data were analysed by U Mann-Whitney tests and significance was taken as p < 0.05. The results showed that epidural lidocaine and co-administration of lidocaine and ketamine produced complete analgesia in the tail, anus and perineum. Epidural administration of the lidocaine-ketamine mixture resulted in mild to moderate sedation, whilst the animals that received epidural lidocaine alone were alert and nervous during the study. Ataxia was observed in all test subjects and was slightly more severe in camels that received the lidocaine-ketamine mixture. It was concluded that epidural administration of lidocaine plus ketamine resulted in longer caudal analgesia in standing conscious dromedary camels compared with the effect of administering lidocaine alone.

  19. The Effect of Epidural Analgesia on the Delivery Outcome of Induced Labour: A Retrospective Case Series

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To investigate whether the use of epidural analgesia during induced labour was a risk factor for instrumental vaginal delivery and caesarean section (CS) delivery. Study Design. This was a retrospective case series of primigravidae women being induced at term for all indications with a normal body mass index (BMI) at booking and under the age of 40 years. Results. We identified 1,046 women who fulfilled the inclusion criteria of which 31.2% had an epidural analgesia. Those with an epidural analgesia had significantly greater maternal age, higher BMI, greater percentage of oxytocin usage, and a longer first and second stage of labour. Women with an epidural analgesia had a higher instrumental delivery (37.9% versus 16.4%; p < 0.001) and CS delivery rate (26% versus 10.1%; p < 0.001). Multivariable analysis indicated that the use of an epidural was not a risk factor for a CS delivery but was a risk factor for an instrument-assisted delivery (adjusted OR = 3.63; 95% CI: 2.51–5.24; p < 0.001). Conclusion. Our study supports the literature evidence that the use of an epidural increases the instrumental delivery rates. It has also added that there is no effect on CS delivery and the observed increase is due to the presence of confounding factors. PMID:27990163

  20. Antinociceptive effects of low dose lumbosacral epidural ropivacaine in healthy ponies.

    PubMed

    van Loon, Johannes P A M; Menke, Eveline S; Doornenbal, Arie; Back, Willem; Hellebrekers, Ludo J

    2012-07-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the safety and efficacy of low dose lumbosacral epidural ropivacaine in ponies. Antinociceptive effects of epidural ropivacaine were evaluated by means of mechanical nociceptive thresholds (MNTs) at several spinal levels in conscious ponies. The effects of ropivacaine on nociceptive afferent transmission to the spinal cord were also assessed by measuring spinal cord somatosensory evoked potentials (SSEPs) in anaesthetised ponies. Ataxia scores were determined in conscious ponies to assess the effects on motor function. A randomised, placebo controlled, double blind cross-over design was used. Low dose lumbosacral epidural ropivacaine led to increases in MNTs at various anatomical locations with a maximum effect at the lumbosacral and sacrococcygeal regions, both with respect to increase in threshold and duration of effect. Analysis of SSEPs showed that epidural ropivacaine influenced both Aβ- and Aδ-mediated afferent transmission to the spinal cord at the level of the lumbosacral junction. Ponies showed mild ataxia after low dose lumbosacral epidural ropivacaine, but all ponies remained standing. Application of low dose lumbosacral epidural ropivacaine provided safe and efficacious antinociceptive effects in conscious and anaesthetised ponies, and could therefore be a valuable addition to multimodal analgesic protocols in Equidae.

  1. Bacterial Infection in Deep Paraspinal Muscles in a Parturient Following Epidural Analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Xuhong; Song, Jiefu; Liang, Qingyuan; Qin, Jibin

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Bacterial infection related to epidural catheterizations could occur. In general, the incidence of postoperative infection at the insertion site is very low. Paucity literatures are reported for paraspinal muscle infection after epidural analgesia in parturient. We report a case of paraspinal muscle infection shortly after epidural analgesia in a parturient, who was subjected to because of threatened preterm labor. Epidural morphine was administered for 2 days for childbirth pain control. She began to have constant low-back pain and fever on postpartum Day 2. Magnetic resonance image revealed a broad area of subcutaneous edema with a continuum along the catheter trajectory deep to the paraspinal muscles. A catheter-related bacterial infection was suspected. The surgical debridement and drainage was required combined with intravenous antibiotics on postpartum Day 3. She was soon cured uncomplicatedly. Epidural analgesia is effective to control labor pain and, in general, it is safe. However, the sequelae of complicated infection may be underestimated. A literature search yielded 7 other cases of catheter-related epidural abscess or soft tissue infection. Vigilance for these infections, especially in postpartum patients with backache, is needed. Moreover, early detection and proper treatment of infectious signs at postanesthetic visit are very important. PMID:26683923

  2. Pure spinal epidural cavernous hemangioma with intralesional hemorrhage: a rare cause of thoracic myelopathy.

    PubMed

    Jang, Donghwan; Kim, Choonghyo; Lee, Seung Jin; Ryu, Young-Joon; Kim, Jiha

    2014-06-01

    Although cavernous hemangiomas occur frequently in the intracranial structures, they are rare in the spine. Most of spinal hemangiomas are vertebral origin and "pure" epidural hemangiomas not originating from the vertebral bone are very rare. Our spinal hemangioma case is extremely rare because of its "pure" epidural involvement and intralesional hemorrhage. A 64-year-old man presented with progressive paraparesis from two months ago. His motor weakness was rated as grade 4/5 in bilateral lower extremities. He also complained of decreased sensation below the T4 sensory dermatome, which continuously progressed to the higher dermatome level. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated thoracic spinal tumor at T3-T4 level. The tumor was located epidural space compressing thoracic spinal cord ventrally. The tumor was not involved with the thoracic vertebral bone. We performed T3-5 laminectomy and removed the tumor completely. The tumor was not infiltrating into intradural space or vertebral bone. The histopathologic study confirmed the epidural tumor as cavernous hemangioma. Postoperatively, his weakness improved gradually. Four months later, his paraparesis recovered completely. Here, we present a case of pure spinal epidural cavernous hemangioma, which has intralesional hemorrhage. We believe cavernous hemangioma should be included in the differential diagnosis of the spinal epidural tumors.

  3. Anaesthetists' experiences with the early labour epidural recommendation for obese parturients: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Eley, V A; Callaway, L K; van Zundert, A A J; Lipman, J; Gallois, C

    2016-09-01

    Caring for obese pregnant women presents challenges for all medical professionals. Despite a lack of supporting evidence, expert opinion and international guidelines suggest early labour epidural insertion for obese women. Anecdotally this is not supported by all anaesthetists. This qualitative study explored the experiences of anaesthetists regarding early epidural analgesia in obese parturients, to answer the research question: Are anaesthetists consistent in how they apply early epidural analgesia in obese parturients? Personal in-depth interviews with 42 specialist anaesthetists working in south-east Queensland, Australia, were completed between February and April, 2015. Leximancer™ text analysis software applied a validated algorithm to the data to identify themes and concepts. The major themes were explored by the first author to answer the research question. Three major themes were identified: the demands associated with caring for obese women; concern regarding the anaesthetic technique used in obese women; and the importance of communication with obstetric staff. Disagreement regarding interpretation and application of early epidural analgesia was identified within this group of anaesthetists. These anaesthetists were inconsistent in how they interpreted and applied early epidural analgesia for obese parturients, with some questioning the validity of the practice. The combination of uncertainty, urgency and technical difficulty presented by obese parturients provoked anxiety in these clinicians, particularly the anticipation of unplanned general anaesthesia. Consistent anaesthetic practice could improve the implementation of early epidural analgesia in obese parturients.

  4. Multimode Broad-Band Patch Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Romanofsky, Robert R.

    2003-01-01

    Microstrip patch antennas of a proposed type would be tunable over broad wavelength ranges. These antennas would be attractive for use in a variety of microwave communication systems in which there are requirements for transmission and/or reception at multiple, widely separated frequencies. Prior efforts to construct tunable microstrip patch antennas have involved integration of microstrip circuitry with, variously, ferrite films with magneticfield tuning, solid-state electronic tuning devices, or piezoelectric tuning actuators. Those efforts have been somewhat successful, but have yielded tuning ranges of 20 percent and smaller much smaller than needed in typical practical cases. Like prior microstrip patch antennas (both tunable and non-tunable), the proposed antennas would have instantaneous bandwidths of about 1 percent of their nominal or resonance frequencies. However, these would be tunable over much broader frequency ranges as much as several octaves, depending on specific designs. They could be fabricated relatively simply and inexpensively by use of conventional photolithography, and without need for integration with solid-state electronic or piezoelectric control devices. An antenna as proposed (see figure) would include a microstrip patch radiating element on a thin ferroelectric film on a semiconductor substrate with a ground-plane conductor on the underside of the substrate. The ferroelectric film could be, for example, SrTiO3 with a thickness of the order of 1 or 2 micrometers.

  5. Juno Microwave Radiometer Patch Array Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamberlain, N.; Chen, J.; Focardi, P.; Hodges, R.; Hughes, R.; Jakoboski, J.; Venkatesan, J.; Zawadzki, M.

    2009-01-01

    Juno is a mission in the NASA New Frontiers Program with the goal of significantly improving our understanding of the formation and structure of Jupiter. This paper discusses the modeling and measurement of the two patch array antennas. An overview of the antenna architecture, design and development at JPL is provided, along with estimates of performance and the results of measurements.

  6. Soil, Seeds, and the Pumpkin Patch!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, Marianne; Vowell, Julie

    2013-01-01

    "Soil, Seeds, and the Pumpkin Patch!" is an integrated unit designed to provide elementary school teachers with ideas for using hands-on activities, fostering inquiry and valuable discussion, and using technology as a learning tool. This unit integrates science with language arts, mathematics, literature, and technology. During this unit, students…

  7. Analgesic Microneedle Patch for Neuropathic Pain Therapy.

    PubMed

    Xie, Xi; Pascual, Conrado; Lieu, Christopher; Oh, Seajin; Wang, Ji; Zou, Bende; Xie, Julian; Li, Zhaohui; Xie, James; Yeomans, David C; Wu, Mei X; Xie, Xinmin Simon

    2017-01-24

    Neuropathic pain caused by nerve injury is debilitating and difficult to treat. Current systemic pharmacological therapeutics for neuropathic pain produce limited pain relief and have undesirable side effects, while current local anesthetics tend to nonspecifically block both sensory and motor functions. Calcitonin gene related peptide (CGRP), a neuropeptide released from sensory nerve endings, appears to play a significant role in chronic neuropathic pain. In this study, an analgesic microneedle (AMN) patch was developed using dissolvable microneedles to transdermally deliver selective CGRP antagonist peptide in a painless manner for the treatment of localized neuropathic pain. Local analgesic effects were evaluated in rats by testing behavioral pain sensitivity in response to thermal and mechanical stimuli using neuropathic pain models such as spared-nerve injury and diabetic neuropathy pain, as well as neurogenic inflammatory pain model induced by ultraviolet B (UVB) radiation. Unlike several conventional therapies, the AMN patches produced effective analgesia on neuropathic pain without disturbing the normal nociception and motor function of the rat, resulting from the high specificity of the delivered peptide against CGRP receptors. The AMN patches did not cause skin irritation or systemic side effects. These results demonstrate that dissolvable microneedle patches delivering CGRP antagonist peptide provide an effective, safe, and simple approach to mitigate neuropathic pain with significant advantages over current treatments.

  8. A Practical Guide to Patch Testing.

    PubMed

    Fonacier, Luz

    2015-01-01

    Contact dermatitis is a common disease seen by allergists, dermatologists, and primary care physicians. The gold standard for diagnosing allergic contact dermatitis (ACD) is patch testing and is indicated in any patient with a chronic, pruritic, eczematous, or lichenified dermatitis if underlying or secondary ACD is suspected. Patients with acute generalized dermatitis who have extensive eczema on the back, are on immunosuppressant medications, and have applied topical corticosteroids, topical calcineurin inhibitors, or ultraviolet radiation to the patch test (PT) site may have suppressed PT reactions. The procedure of patch testing is not a difficult one to perform, but the interpretation of the PT needs some critical components, including having an appropriate level of suspicion for the diagnosis of ACD, testing the relevant allergens in their proper vehicle and concentration, and the necessary experience to properly interpret the results. Careful history and physical examination must be correlated with the result of the PT to establish clinical relevance. Once the PT is completed, allergens are identified, and relevance has been established, educating the patient about the avoidance of exposure is critical. The Joint Task Force of the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology and American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology has developed updated practice parameters for contact dermatitis and patch testing, and their recommendations will be discussed (Fonacier LF, Bernstein DI, Pacheco K, Holness DL. Contact dermatitis: a practice parameter update 2015. J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2015; 3(3S):S1-S40.).

  9. Formulation Design and Development of a Unani Transdermal Patch for Antiemetic Therapy and Its Pharmaceutical Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Idris, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    The Transdermal Drug Delivery System (TDDS) is one of the novel routes for systemic delivery of drugs through intact skin. A transdermal patch (TP) is a medicated patch that is placed on skin for delivery of medication through skin into the blood stream. The aim of present study was to formulate and evaluate a Unani transdermal patch that could be used for antiemetic therapy. The incorporation of Unani ingredients, namely, Khardal (Brassica nigra), Zanjabeel (Zingiber officinale), Podina (Mentha arvensis), and Sirka (Vinegar) were envisaged. The TP was prepared by solvent evaporation technique and was evaluated for organoleptic characteristics and other physicochemical properties, such as thickness, weight uniformity, folding endurance, moisture content, drug content, and tolerability and acceptability of patch. The in vitro permeation study of the patch was carried out through Franz diffusion cell using egg shell membrane as barrier membrane. Phosphate buffer pH 7.4 was used as dissolution medium and the temperature was maintained at 37 ± 1°C. The in vitro permeation study of the prepared TP indicated a time dependent increase in drug release throughout the study. The percentage of cumulative drug release was found to be 77.38% in 24 hours. The study shows a new approach to work in Unani pharmaceutics. PMID:27403377

  10. Essential oil based polymeric patch development and evaluating its repellent activity against mosquitoes.

    PubMed

    Chattopadhyay, Pronobesh; Dhiman, Sunil; Borah, Somi; Rabha, Bipul; Chaurasia, Aashwin Kumar; Veer, Vijay

    2015-07-01

    Essential oil based insect repellents are environment friendly and provide dependable personal protection against the bites of mosquitoes and other blood-sucking insects. In the present study, optimized mixture of three essential oils was embedded into the ethylcellulose (EC) and polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP K-30) polymers to develop essential oils based patch type mosquito repellent formulation. The developed formulation was characterized for various physico-chemical properties, oil release efficiency and essential oil-polymer interaction. Repellent activity of the formulation was evaluated against Ae. (S) albopictus mosquitoes and compared with commercially available synthetic insecticide based mosquito repellent cream Odomos(®) in the laboratory. The developed patches were 100% flat and there was no interaction between oil components and the excipients. Patches were smooth, homogenous and provided excellent mosquito repellent activity comparable to Odomos(®) under laboratory condition. Morphological and physico-chemical characterization indicated that the formulation was stable and suitable with the polymeric combination. The patch formulation did not show any inhalation toxicity in experimental Wistar rat. The repellent patches developed and evaluated currently, may provide a suitable, eco-friendly, acceptable and safe alternative to the existing synthetic repellent formulations for achieving protection against mosquitoes.

  11. The Role of Fibrinogen Spacing and Patch Size on Platelet Adhesion Under Flow

    PubMed Central

    de Walle, Aurore Van; Fontenot, Jeffrey; Spain, Travis G.; Brunski, Daniel B.; Sanchez, Ernest S.; Keay, Joel C.; Curtis, Mark; Johnson, Matthew B.; Snyder, Trevor; Schmidtke, David W.

    2012-01-01

    Platelet adhesion to the vessel wall during vascular injury is mediated by platelet glycoproteins binding to their respective ligands on the vascular wall. In this study we investigated the roles that ligand patch spacing and size play in regulating platelet interactions with fibrinogen under hemodynamic flow conditions. To regulate the size and distance between patches of fibrinogen we developed a photolithography based technique to fabricate patterns of proteins surrounded by a protein repellant layer of poly(ethylene glycol). We demonstrate that when mepacrine labeled whole blood is perfused at a shear rate of 100 s−1 over substrates patterned with micron-sized wide lines of fibrinogen, platelets selectively adhere to the areas of patterned fibrinogen. Using fluorescent and scanning electron microscopy we demonstrate that the degree of platelet coverage (3% – 35%) and the ability of platelet aggregates to grow laterally was dependent upon the distance (6 – 30 μm) between parallel lines of fibrinogen. We also report on the effects of fibrinogen patch size on platelet adhesion by varying the size of the protein patch (2 – 20 μm) available for adhesion, demonstrating that the downstream length of the ligand patch is a critical parameter in platelet adhesion under flow. We expect that these results and protein patterning surfaces to be useful in understanding the spatial and temporal dynamics of platelet adhesion under physiologic flow, and in the development of novel platelet adhesion assays. PMID:22820307

  12. [A Case of Spinal Epidural Hematoma Presenting with Transient Hemiplegia].

    PubMed

    Komai, Takanori; Nakashima, Kazuya; Tominaga, Takashi; Nogaki, Hidekazu

    2016-04-01

    We report a rare case of a patient with spinal epidural hematoma who presented with transient hemiplegia. A 90-year-old man awakened from sleep due to sudden neck pain. Fifteen minutes later, the man experienced progressively worsening weakness in his left hand, and was transported in an ambulance to our hospital. At the hospital, he presented with hemiplegia, and we suspected intracranial disease. Therefore, we performed magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which revealed no intracranial lesions. Shortly after the MRI, the patient showed no signs of hemiplegia. However, since the severe neck pain persisted, we performed cervical MRI, which showed a high-intensity area at the C2-C5 level, predominantly on the left side. Despite recovery from hemiplegia, we performed a laminectomy of C3-C5 with evacuation of a hematoma at the C2-C6 level. After the surgery, the patient had no neck pain.

  13. Cat scratch disease with epidural extension while on antimicrobial treatment.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Sabiha; Rathore, Mobeen H

    2007-01-01

    We report the first case of a child with an epidural abscess caused by Bartonella henselae. This case is unique in that the diagnosis was confirmed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) of the abscess fluid. A 3-year-old male was admitted with a 1-week history of fever and lower back pain. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the lumbar spine revealed a paraspinal soft tissue abnormality extending from the T(12) to the L(4) level, and a computed tomography (CT) scan of the lumbar spine showed osteomyelitis at the T(12) level with soft tissue changes. B. henselae serology showed an IgG titer of 1:256 and IgM of <1:16.

  14. Spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma presenting as paraplegia after cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Kin, Hajime; Mukaida, Masayuki; Koizumi, Junichi; Kamada, Takeshi; Mitsunaga, Yoshino; Iwase, Tomoyuki; Ikai, Akio; Okabayashi, Hitoshi

    2016-03-01

    An 86-year-old woman was scheduled to undergo aortic valve replacement and coronary artery bypass graft. On postoperative day 3, she developed sudden-onset neck pain followed by weakness in the right arm. Her symptoms worsened with time, and she developed paraplegia. At 60 h after the first complaint, spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma (SSEH) from C2 to C6 with spinal cord compression was diagnosed from a magnetic resonance image of the cervical region. We decided on conservative therapy because operative recovery was impossible. Delayed diagnosis led to grievous results in the present case. When neurological abnormalities follow neck or back pain after open heart surgery, SSEH must be considered in the differential diagnosis. Further, if it is suspected, early cervical computed tomography/magnetic resonance imaging and surgery should be considered.

  15. Spinal epidural abscess in a young girl without risk factors.

    PubMed

    Mantadakis, Elpis; Birbilis, Theodosios; Michailidis, Lambros; Souftas, Vasileios; Chatzimichael, Athanassios

    2011-07-01

    Spinal epidural abscess (SEA) is a rare infection associated with well-established risk factors mainly in adults. We describe an 11-year-old girl without any known risk factors who presented with fever and localized spinal tenderness in the lumbar area and was diagnosed with spinal MRI as suffering from a posterior SEA extending between T11 and L4. She was successfully managed with sequential intravenous and oral antibiotics along with minimally invasive surgery without laminectomy. Methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus was the responsible pathogen isolated at surgery. Immediate institution of antibiotics, spinal MRI, and well-timed neurosurgical consultation are mandatory for a favorable outcome in cases of SEA in children.

  16. Holocord spinal epidural abscess: Case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Xiang, H; Ma, X; Shen, N; Yue, B; Zhang, G; Chen, B

    2016-10-01

    Holocord spinal epidural abscess (SEA) is a rare condition. To our knowledge, five cases of SEA have been reported so far, and no consensus has been made on the treatment yet. In this article, we report a case of holocord SEA and review literature to further understanding of SEA. The advent of antibiotic treatment and the recognition of surgical debridement have been important in searching for alternatives to recovery, so the patient was treated surgically together with systemic antibiotics. The patient remained neurologically stable and continued to be clinically in good condition without any low back pain after 1 year. Surgical drainage, together with systemic antibiotics, is the main treatment choice for extensive SEAs. Although treatment should be considered that highlights the importance of examining the factors related to the health and condition of the patients and the anatomy and extent of the abscess, early surgical treatment associated with prolonged antibiotic treatment is necessary.

  17. [Observations on epidural anesthesia in cats from the anatomical viewpoint].

    PubMed

    Maierl, J; Reindl, S; Knospe, C

    1997-05-01

    The topographic-anatomical situation of the conus medullaris and the cauda equina in cats is shown: in about two thirds of the cases the conus medullaris at least reaches the level of the first sacral vertebra. As far as the site of the epidural injection is concerned the sacrococcygeal space or the first intercoccygeal space are proposed in order to avoid damage to the spinal cord. When seeking the site of injection it is advantageous to orientate oneself by following the sacral processus spinosi in caudal direction beginning with the lumbosacral space. In case of adipose animals the first intercoccygeal space can be palpated by moving the tail up and down. Both sites are equivalent. The volume to be injected varies between 0.3 and 0.9 ml solution per cat depending on the needs.

  18. Fluoroscopy guided transforaminal epidural anesthesia in ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Channabasappa, S M; Dharmappa, S; Pandurangi, R

    2016-01-01

    A 48-year-old male patient with a long-standing history of ankylosing spondylitis (AS) presented for ureteroscopic stone removal. On preoperative assessment, tracheal intubation was likely to be difficult due to decreased cervical spine mobility. Traditional neuraxial block was impossible due to the fusion of vertebral bodies. AS patients present the most serious array of intubation, which is secondary to decrease in cervical spine mobility and possible temporomandibular joint disease. Management of a case of AS can be very challenging when the airway and the central neuraxial blockade, both are difficult. Fluoroscopic assisted central neuraxial blockade may lead to predictable success in AS. We present a case report with severe AS where conventional techniques failed and C-arm assisted helped in successful epidural anesthesia for ureteroscopic stone removal.

  19. Inserting epidural patient controlled analgesia into a peripheral venous line.

    PubMed

    2016-01-01

    A case is reported from the Safety Reporting System in Anaesthesia and Resuscitation database. The event occurred in a patient undergoing abdominal surgery in whom an epidural catheter was inserted for analgesia. After the intervention, the patient was transferred to the recovery unit where the patient controlled analgesia (PCA) is programmed. Due to an error, the PCA was connected to a peripheral venous line, which was detected early without harm to the patient. Communication and analysis of this incident served to introduce a new drug delivery protocol through PCA pumps, including the obligation to prescribe the PCA in the electronic system, a dual computerised check immediately before connecting PCA, labelling the medication bag as well as the proximal and distal lines, standardisation of daily visits to patients, and monthly monitoring of results.

  20. A prospective cohort study of intrathecal versus epidural analgesia for patients undergoing hepatic resection

    PubMed Central

    Kasivisvanathan, Ramanathan; Abbassi-Ghadi, Nima; Prout, Jeremy; Clevenger, Ben; Fusai, Giuseppe K; Mallett, Susan V

    2014-01-01

    Background The aim of this prospective observational study was to compare peri/post-operative outcomes of thoracic epidural analgesia (TEA) versus intrathecal morphine and fentanyl patient-controlled analgesia (ITM+fPCA) for patients undergoing a hepatic resection (HR). Method Patients undergoing elective, one-stage, open HR for benign and malignant liver lesions, receiving central neuraxial block as part of the anaesthetic, in a high-volume hepato-pancreato-biliary unit, were included in the study. The primary outcome measure was post-operative length of stay (LoS). Results A total of 73 patients (36 TEA and 37 ITM+fPCA) were included in the study. The median (IQR) post-operative LoS was 13 (11–15) and 11 (9–13) days in the TEA and ITM+fPCA groups, respectively (P = 0.011). There was significantly lower median intra-operative central venous pressure (P < 0.001) and blood loss (P = 0.017) in the TEA group, and a significant reduction in the time until mobilization (P < 0.001), post-operative intra-venous fluid/vasopressor requirement (P < 0.001/P = 0.004) in the ITM+fPCA group. Pain scores were lower at a clinically significant level 12 h post-operatively in the TEA group (P < 0.001); otherwise there were no differences out to day five. There were no differences in quality of recovery or postoperative morbidity/mortality between the two groups. Conclusion ITM+fPCA provides acceptable post-operative outcomes for HR, but may also increase the incidence of intra-operative blood loss in comparison to TEA. PMID:24467320

  1. What are we waiting for? An argument for early surgery for spinal epidural abscesses

    PubMed Central

    Epstein, Nancy E.

    2015-01-01

    Background: In the article: Timing and prognosis of surgery for spinal epidural abscess (SEA): A review, Epstein raises one major point; it is imperative that spinal surgeons “take back decision-making” from our medical cohorts and reinstitute early surgery (<24 h) to better treat SEAs. Methods: Spine surgeons recognize the clinical triad (e.g., fever [50%], spinal pain [92–100%], and neurological deficits [47%]) for establishing the diagnosis of an SEA. We also appreciate the multiple major risk factors for developing SEA; diabetes (15–30%), elevated white blood cell count (>12.5), high C-reactive protein (>115), positive blood cultures, radiographic cord compression, and significant neurological deficits (e.g., 19–45%). Results: Recognizing these risk factors should prompt early open surgery (<24 h from the onset of a neurological deficit). Open surgery better defines the correct/multiple organisms present, and immediately provides adequate/thorough neurological decompression (with fusion if unstable). Although minimally invasive surgery may suffice in select cases, too often it provides insufficient biopsy/culture/irrigation/decompression. Most critically, nonsurgical options result in unacceptably high failure rates (e.g., 41-42.5-75% requiring delayed surgery), while risking permanent paralysis (up to 22%), and death (up to 25%). Conclusion: As spine surgeons, we need to “take back decision-making” from our medical cohorts and advocate for early surgery to achieve better outcomes for our patients. Why should anyone accept the >41-42.5 to up to the 75% failure rate that accompanies the nonsurgical treatment of SEA, much less the >25% mortality rate? PMID:26605113

  2. Whole-GUV patch-clamping.

    PubMed

    Garten, Matthias; Mosgaard, Lars D; Bornschlögl, Thomas; Dieudonné, Stéphane; Bassereau, Patricia; Toombes, Gilman E S

    2017-01-10

    Studying how the membrane modulates ion channel and transporter activity is challenging because cells actively regulate membrane properties, whereas existing in vitro systems have limitations, such as residual solvent and unphysiologically high membrane tension. Cell-sized giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) would be ideal for in vitro electrophysiology, but efforts to measure the membrane current of intact GUVs have been unsuccessful. In this work, two challenges for obtaining the "whole-GUV" patch-clamp configuration were identified and resolved. First, unless the patch pipette and GUV pressures are precisely matched in the GUV-attached configuration, breaking the patch membrane also ruptures the GUV. Second, GUVs shrink irreversibly because the membrane/glass adhesion creating the high-resistance seal (>1 GΩ) continuously pulls membrane into the pipette. In contrast, for cell-derived giant plasma membrane vesicles (GPMVs), breaking the patch membrane allows the GPMV contents to passivate the pipette surface, thereby dynamically blocking membrane spreading in the whole-GMPV mode. To mimic this dynamic passivation mechanism, beta-casein was encapsulated into GUVs, yielding a stable, high-resistance, whole-GUV configuration for a range of membrane compositions. Specific membrane capacitance measurements confirmed that the membranes were truly solvent-free and that membrane tension could be controlled over a physiological range. Finally, the potential for ion transport studies was tested using the model ion channel, gramicidin, and voltage-clamp fluorometry measurements were performed with a voltage-dependent fluorophore/quencher pair. Whole-GUV patch-clamping allows ion transport and other voltage-dependent processes to be studied while controlling membrane composition, tension, and shape.

  3. Surface patterning of nanoparticles with polymer patches

    DOE PAGES

    Choueiri, Rachelle M.; Galati, Elizabeth; Thérien-Aubin, Héloïse; ...

    2016-08-24

    Patterning of colloidal particles with chemically or topographically distinct surface domains (patches) has attracted intense research interest. Surface-patterned particles act as colloidal analogues of atoms and molecules serve as model systems in studies of phase transitions in liquid systems, behave as ‘colloidal surfactants’ and function as templates for the synthesis of hybrid particles. The generation of micrometre- and submicrometre-sized patchy colloids is now efficient but surface patterning of inorganic colloidal nanoparticles with dimensions of the order of tens of nanometres is uncommon. Such nanoparticles exhibit size- and shape-dependent optical, electronic and magnetic properties, and their assemblies show new collective properties.more » At present, nanoparticle patterning is limited to the generation of two-patch nanoparticles and nanoparticles with surface ripples or a ‘raspberry’ surface morphology. We demonstrate nanoparticle surface patterning, which utilizes thermodynamically driven segregation of polymer ligands from a uniform polymer brush into surface-pinned micelles following a change in solvent quality. Patch formation is reversible but can be permanently preserved using a photocrosslinking step. The methodology offers the ability to control the dimensions of patches, their spatial distribution and the number of patches per nanoparticle, in agreement with a theoretical model. The versatility of the strategy is demonstrated by patterning nanoparticles with different dimensions, shapes and compositions, tethered with various types of polymers and subjected to different external stimuli. Furthermore, these patchy nanocolloids have potential applications in fundamental research, the self-assembly of nanomaterials, diagnostics, sensing and colloidal stabilization.« less

  4. Surface patterning of nanoparticles with polymer patches

    PubMed Central

    Choueiri, Rachelle M.; Galati, Elizabeth; Thérien-Aubin, Héloïse; Klinkova, Anna; Larin, Egor M.; Querejeta-Fernández, Ana; Han, Lili; Xin, Huolin L.; Gang, Oleg; Zhulina, Ekaterina B.; Rubinstein, Michael; Kumacheva, Eugenia

    2016-01-01

    Patterning of colloidal particles with chemically or topographically distinct surface domains (patches) has attracted intense research interest1–3. Surface-patterned particles act as colloidal analogues of atoms and molecules4,5, serve as model systems in studies of phase transitions in liquid systems6, behave as ‘colloidal surfactants’7 and function as templates for the synthesis of hybrid particles8. The generation of micrometre- and submicrometre-sized patchy colloids is now efficient9–11, but surface patterning of inorganic colloidal nanoparticles with dimensions of the order of tens of nanometres is uncommon. Such nanoparticles exhibit size- and shape-dependent optical, electronic and magnetic properties, and their assemblies show new collective properties12. At present, nanoparticle patterning is limited to the generation of two-patch nanoparticles13–15, and nanoparticles with surface ripples16 or a ‘raspberry’ surface morphology17. Here we demonstrate nanoparticle surface patterning, which utilizes thermodynamically driven segregation of polymer ligands from a uniform polymer brush into surface-pinned micelles following a change in solvent quality. Patch formation is reversible but can be permanently preserved using a photocrosslinking step. The methodology offers the ability to control the dimensions of patches, their spatial distribution and the number of patches per nanoparticle, in agreement with a theoretical model. The versatility of the strategy is demonstrated by patterning nanoparticles with different dimensions, shapes and compositions, tethered with various types of polymers and subjected to different external stimuli. These patchy nanocolloids have potential applications in fundamental research, the self-assembly of nanomaterials, diagnostics, sensing and colloidal stabilization. PMID:27556943

  5. The potential contributing effect of ketorolac and fluoxetine to a spinal epidural hematoma following a cervical interlaminar epidural steroid injection: a case report and narrative review.

    PubMed

    Chien, George C Chang; McCormick, Zack; Araujo, Marco; Candido, Kenneth D

    2014-01-01

    Cervical interlaminar epidural steroid injections (ESIs) are commonly performed as one part of a multi-modal analgesic regimen in the management of upper extremity radicular pain. Spinal epidural hematoma (SEH) is a rare complication with a reported incidence ranging from 1.38 in 10,000 to 1 in 190,000 epidurals. Current American Society of Regional Anesthesia (ASRA), American Society of Interventional Pain Physicians (ASIPP), and the International Spine Intervention Society (ISIS) recommendations are that non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) do not need to be withheld prior to epidural anesthesia. We report a case wherein intramuscular ketorolac and oral fluoxetine contributed to a SEH and tetraplegia following a cervical interlaminar (ESI). A 66 year-old woman with chronic renal insufficiency and neck pain radiating into her right upper extremity presented for evaluation and was deemed an appropriate CESI candidate. Cervical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed multi-level neuroforaminal stenosis and degenerative intervertebral discs. Utilizing a loss of resistance to saline technique, an 18-gauge Tuohy-type needle entered the epidural space at C6-7. After negative aspiration, 4 mL of saline with 80 mg of methyl-prednisolone was injected. Immediately thereafter, the patient reported significant spasmodic-type localized neck pain with no neurologic status changes. A decision was made to administer 30 mg intramuscular ketorolac as treatment for the spasmodic-type pain. En route home, she developed a sudden onset of acute tetraplegia. She was brought to the emergency department for evaluation including platelet and coagulation studies which were normal. MRI demonstrated an epidural hematoma extending from C5 to T7. She underwent a bilateral C5-T6 laminectomy with epidural hematoma evacuation and was discharged to an acute inpatient rehabilitation hospital. Chronic renal insufficiency, spinal stenosis, female gender, and increasing age have been

  6. Delayed Presentation of a Cervical Spinal Epidural Abscess of Dental Origin after a Fall in an Elderly Patient

    PubMed Central

    Riordan, Margaret; Chin, Lawrence S.

    2016-01-01

    Spinal epidural abscesses are an uncommon cause of spinal cord injury but, depending on the size and presence of neurological deficits, urgent neurosurgical intervention may be required. We present a unique case of a patient presenting with a spinal epidural collection several days after a fall. While a spinal epidural hematoma was suspected based on the patient’s history and MRI findings, a spinal epidural abscess was found during surgery. The patient underwent laminectomy and instrumented fusion with successful treatment of her infection. PMID:27382529

  7. Understanding patch departure rules for large carnivores: lion movements support a patch-disturbance hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Valeix, Marion; Chamaillé-Jammes, Simon; Loveridge, Andrew J; Davidson, Zeke; Hunt, Jane E; Madzikanda, Hillary; Macdonald, David W

    2011-08-01

    We test two hypotheses that could account for patch departure by large mammalian carnivores. One hypothesis is the unsuccessful-hunt hypothesis, where carnivores leave an area after an unsuccessful hunt but continue hunting in the same area after a successful hunt. The second hypothesis is the patch-disturbance hypothesis, where carnivores depart the area after a successful hunt because of behavioral responses of prey to predator presence. We used global positioning system collars to monitor the movements of African lions (Panthera leo) and identified their kill sites to distinguish between these two hypotheses. Lions moved to a different area (≥ 5 km away) after 87% of the kills, which supports the patch-disturbance hypothesis for patch-departure behavior of large mammalian carnivores.

  8. Blood sugar test - blood

    MedlinePlus

    ... sugar; Blood sugar level; Fasting blood sugar; Glucose test; Diabetic screening - blood sugar test; Diabetes - blood sugar test ... The test may be done in the following ways: After you have not eaten anything for at least 8 ...

  9. Obstetric analgesia and fetal aortic blood flow during labour.

    PubMed

    Lindblad, A; Bernow, J; Marsál, K

    1987-04-01

    Fetal aortic blood flow was studied in 50 women during labour, using a method combining real-time ultrasonography and a pulsed Doppler technique. Eleven women had no analgesia, 24 women received 75-100 mg pethidine intramuscularly, 12 epidural analgesia with 0.25% bupivacaine and three paracervical block with 0.125% bupivacaine. Fetal aortic blood flow increased during labour from 200 to 245 ml/min/kg in the group without analgesia (P less than 0.05) and from 211 to 236 ml/min/kg in the group with epidural analgesia (P less than 0.05) but decreased insignificantly from 216 to 204 ml/min/kg after pethidine. After paracervical block the aortic blood flow fell in two out of three fetuses. Not only is epidural analgesia the most effective means of pain relief during labour, it is also the type of obstetric analgesia that interferes least with the physiological response to labour in terms of its effect on the fetal blood flow.

  10. A Novel Miniaturization Technique of a Microstrip Patch Antenna using Patch Resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakita, Katsutoshi; Morita, Norihiko; Horii, Yasushi

    Microstrip patch antennas have been widely used in mobile and satellite communication systems due to their great advantages of low cost, low profile, lightweight and easy fabrication. However, the dimensions of a classical patch antenna are on the order of half a wavelength. This paper proposes a new approach to reduce the size of the antenna by embedding several patch resonators in an antenna substrate. Periodically installed resonators are expected to exhibit slow-wave effects. First of all, a microstrip delay line having a train of patch resonators in its substrate is demonstrated theoretically by the conventional FDTD method, and the slow-wave effect is discussed. Next, a 2-dimentional patch resonator array is applied to a microstrip patch antenna, and the effectiveness of the proposed structure is evaluated in the respect of antenna dimensions. Also, several experiments have been carried out to confirm the theoretical predictions. Using a prototype model fabricated on an LTCC substrate, the size reduction of more the 50% is attained.

  11. Development of Epidural and Paraspinal Abscesses after Insufficient Evaluation and Treatment of Acute Pyelonephritis Caused by Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Koo, Hyang Mo; Lee, Woo Joo; Choi, Jin Hwan; Choi, Mi Nyong; Park, Sang Young; Kim, Woo Jung; Son, Seung Yeon

    2016-01-01

    Diagnoses of pyelonephritis caused by Staphylococcus aureus should be accompanied by investigations of concomitant bladder obstruction and metastatic infections, especially to the spine or heart. Complicated pyelonephritis due to S. aureus requires more than 2 weeks of antibiotics, which is the typically recommended treatment duration for pyelonephritis. We describe a patient who was diagnosed with complicated epidural and paraspinal abscesses after insufficient evaluation and treatment of acute pyelonephritis due to S. aureus. A 62-year-old man with type 2 diabetes was admitted with fever, increased urinary frequency, and left flank pain. He was diagnosed with acute pyelonephritis caused by S. aureus. His fever and flank pain subsided after 3 days of intravenous antibiotics. Evaluation of bladder obstruction and metastatic infection were not performed, as he declined further evaluation. The patient was discharged with oral antibiotics and was requested to attend weekly appointments but was lost to follow-up. One month later, the patient presented at the outpatient clinic with similar symptoms. Computed tomography showed recurrent pyelonephritis and a distended bladder. His flank pain persisted despite administration of an opioid agent. Therefore, magnetic resonance imaging was performed, revealing epidural and paraspinal abscesses. Ultrasound-guided aspiration of the paraspinal muscle layer was performed, and blood and percutaneous aspirated fluid cultures revealed S. aureus growth. The pattern of antimicrobial sensitivity was identical to that at his first admission. Following more than 4 weeks of antibiotics, magnetic resonance imaging showed the abscesses had decreased in size. The patient was discharged without neurologic sequelae and was provided with oral antibiotics. PMID:27688864

  12. NORTHWEST OBLIQUE AERIAL VIEW OF FORT DELAWARE AND PEA PATCH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    NORTHWEST OBLIQUE AERIAL VIEW OF FORT DELAWARE AND PEA PATCH ISLAND. REMAINS OF SEA WALL VISIBLE IN FOREGROUND AND RIGHT OF IMAGE - Fort Delaware, Pea Patch Island, Delaware City, New Castle County, DE

  13. Performance Analysis of Coaxial Fed Stacked Patch Antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Satish K.; Jain, Shobha

    2014-01-01

    A performance analysis of coaxial fed stacked dual patch electromagnetic-coupled microstrip antenna useful for satellite communication working in X/Ku band is presented. A simplified structure of stacked dual patch antenna is proposed with adjustable foam-gap between patches. Few important geometrical parameters were chosen on which the performance of stacked dual patch antenna mainly depends. Dimension of lower square patch, upper square patch and height of foam-gap between two patches are the parameters, which were varied one by one keeping other parameters constant. The performance was observed through the reflection coefficient (dB) and smith chart impedance plot, obtained from the numerical simulator (IE3D) for the dual resonance frequency and bandwidth. Proposed geometry of stacked dual patch antenna was also analyzed with cavity model and artificial neural network modeling technique. Dual resonance frequencies and associated bandwidth were calculated through them and results were cross checked in the laboratory with a few experimental findings.

  14. [Responses of Caragana seed pests to host plant patch quality and patch pattern in desert regions of Ningxia, Northwest China].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Da-zhi; He, Da-han

    2011-07-01

    Taking the desert landscape in mid-eastern Ningxia of Northeast China as the background, eighteen patches of Caragana shrub lands (natural or manned) with the habitat types of manually-fixed sandy land, mobile sandy land, and silty-loam downland were selected as study sites to investigate the responses of three Caragana seed pest species (Kytorhinus immixtus, Etiella zinckenella, and Bruchophagus neocaraganae) to the host plant patch quality, patch area, and patch spatial pattern. The damaged rate of host plant by the pests had close relations to the patch quality, patch pattern, and the transferring capability of the pests. The responses of the pests to patch quality were affected by patch scale, and among the three habitat types, manually-fixed sandy land had the highest damaged rate, followed by mobile sandy land, and silty-loam downland, with significant differences among them (P<0.05). In small scale patch pattern, there existed definite correlations between the pest number and the patch area and its fragmentation degree. The decrease of patch area and the increase of the fragmentation degree reduced the damage rate of high transferring capability Etiella zinckenella (r = 0.365), but had less effects on low transferring capability K. immixtus (r = 0.160) and B. neocaraganae (r = 0.193). The strength of patch edge effect and the mutual complement of the resources around patches had positive effects on the population density of the pests.

  15. Corridor Length and Patch Colonization by a Butterfly, Junonia coenia

    SciTech Connect

    Haddad, N.

    1999-01-22

    Study hypothesized that corridors increase patch colonization by Junonia coenia regardless of insects initial distance from patch, as the butterfly is known to move between patches preferentially through corridors. Neither corridor nor distance had significant effect on patch colonization, but significant interaction between presence or absence of corridors and distance. One critical factor is interpatch distance which may determine the relative effectiveness of corridors and other landscape configurations.

  16. The success rate and complications of awake caudal epidural bupivacaine alone or in combination with intravenous midazolam and ketamine in pre-term infants

    PubMed Central

    Seyedhejazi, Mahin; Mashhoori, Majed; Azarfarin, Rasoul; Shekhzadeh, Daryoush; Taghizadieh, Nasrin

    2015-01-01

    Background: The aim of the present study is to compare the success rate and complications of caudal epidural bupivacaine alone or in combination with intravenous (IV) midazolam and ketamine in awake infants undergoing lower abdominal surgery. Materials and Methods: In this double-blind, clinical trial study, 90 infants (aged below 3 months and weight below 5 kg) with American Society of Anaesthesiologists I-II, were divided into three groups of each 30: Group 1 received bupivacaine 0.25%, 1 mL/kg for caudal epidural block; Groups 2 and 3 received caudal block with same dose bupivacaine along with IV pre-treatment with midazolam 0.1 mg/kg or IV midazolam 0.1 mg/kg and ketamine 0.3 mg/kg, respectively. Results: The success rates in Groups 2 and 3 were 93.3% and 93.1%, respectively, compared with a caudal block with bupivacaine alone 80%; P = 0.015). There was no significant difference among the three groups in terms of mean systolic and diastolic blood pressures and mean heart rate at intervals of 0, 20, 40 and 60 min (P < 0.05). There were no significant differences in the pain scores >3 on the Neonatal Infant Pain Scale at three intervals (30, 60 and 120 min) after surgery among the three groups. The complications such as apnoea or desaturation were not found in any of the studied groups. Conclusions: Adding IV ketamine and/or midazolam to bupivacaine caudal epidural block in the conscious infants can positively affect block success rate. PMID:26712287

  17. [Localization of lumbar epidural space by loss of resistance and using the Episensor: a comparative study].

    PubMed

    de Andrés, J; Gomar, C; Calatrava, P; Gutiérrez, M H; Rojas, R; Nalda, M A

    1990-01-01

    Since the existence of negative pressure in the epidural space was reported, its technique of localization has undergone changes directed to improve objectivity, reliability and safety. The aim of the present study was to evaluate a new electronic divide to localize the epidural space, i.e. the Episensor (Palex, Spain). To this end, 71 patients, both males and females, undergoing elective urological surgery and in whom catheterization of the lumbar epidural space had been planned, were prospectively evaluated and randomly assigned to two homogeneous groups. In group I (n = 35) the epidural space was localized by the classical technique of loss of resistance, while in group II the Episensor was used. In both groups several technical parameters, the qualification of the operator and the complications of the procedure were evaluated. There were no significant differences between both groups regarding the quality of epidural blockade or the subjective technical difficulty of the operator. The incidence of complications of the technique of puncture was significantly higher in group II (p less than 0.05); the most common were dura mater puncture in 13 group II patients and in one group I patient (p less than 0.001). There was no correlation between the qualification of the operator and the development of complications. It was concluded that the use of Episensor to localize lumbar epidural space did not improve the effectiveness of blockade but increased the iatrogenic effects of the puncture. Our lack of experience with this new technique and the low negative pressure of lumbar epidural space might have been the causes of the poor results, that we consider as initial in the evaluation of this new method.

  18. Novel Metamaterials for Patch Antennas Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zervos, Theodore; Lazarakis, Fotis; Alexandridis, Antonis; Dangakis, Kostas; Stamopoulos, Dimosthenis; Pissas, Michalis

    In this paper we introduce the incorporation of magneto-electric materials into antenna design and the potential of controlling the behavior of the antenna by means of an external magnetic field. After an intensive study of magneto-electric material properties, a ferrimagnetic compound called Yttrium Iron Garnet (YIG) was found to be the best candidate for the novel antenna design. We provide a metamaterial patch antenna design where a part of the substrate is replaced by the YIG compound. After several design modifications the final model includes a circular-shaped YIG substrate just under the metallic patch and offers sufficient performance in terms of resonance, bandwidth and radiation efficiency. Additionally, in the presence of an external magnetic field the polarization becomes elliptical and the sense of the polarization (left or right) can be controlled through the direction of the magnetic field. That latter characteristic confirms the metamaterial-nature of the antenna.

  19. Mesh saliency with adaptive local patches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nouri, Anass; Charrier, Christophe; Lézoray, Olivier

    2015-03-01

    3D object shapes (represented by meshes) include both areas that attract the visual attention of human observers and others less or not attractive at all. This visual attention depends on the degree of saliency exposed by these areas. In this paper, we propose a technique for detecting salient regions in meshes. To do so, we define a local surface descriptor based on local patches of adaptive size and filled with a local height field. The saliency of mesh vertices is then defined as its degree measure with edges weights computed from adaptive patch similarities. Our approach is compared to the state-of-the-art and presents competitive results. A study evaluating the influence of the parameters establishing this approach is also carried out. The strength and the stability of our approach with respect to noise and simplification are also studied.

  20. Corridor Length and Patch Colonization by a Butterfly Junonia coenia

    SciTech Connect

    Nick Haddad

    2000-06-01

    Habitat corridors have been proposed to reduce patch isolation and increase population persistence in fragmented landscapes. This study tested whether patch colonization was increased by the presence and various length corridors. The specific butterfly species tested has been shown to use corridors, however, the results indicate that neither the distance between patches or the presence of a corridor influenced colonization.

  1. Patch Finder Plus (PFplus): a web server for extracting and displaying positive electrostatic patches on protein surfaces.

    PubMed

    Shazman, Shula; Celniker, Gershon; Haber, Omer; Glaser, Fabian; Mandel-Gutfreund, Yael

    2007-07-01

    Positively charged electrostatic patches on protein surfaces are usually indicative of nucleic acid binding interfaces. Interestingly, many proteins which are not involved in nucleic acid binding possess large positive patches on their surface as well. In some cases, the positive patches on the protein are related to other functional properties of the protein family. PatchFinderPlus (PFplus) http://pfp.technion.ac.il is a web-based tool for extracting and displaying continuous electrostatic positive patches on protein surfaces. The input required for PFplus is either a four letter PDB code or a protein coordinate file in PDB format, provided by the user. PFplus computes the continuum electrostatics potential and extracts the largest positive patch for each protein chain in the PDB file. The server provides an output file in PDB format including a list of the patch residues. In addition, the largest positive patch is displayed on the server by a graphical viewer (Jmol), using a simple color coding.

  2. Optimal patch code design via device characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Wencheng; Dalal, Edul N.

    2012-01-01

    In many color measurement applications, such as those for color calibration and profiling, "patch code" has been used successfully for job identification and automation to reduce operator errors. A patch code is similar to a barcode, but is intended primarily for use in measurement devices that cannot read barcodes due to limited spatial resolution, such as spectrophotometers. There is an inherent tradeoff between decoding robustness and the number of code levels available for encoding. Previous methods have attempted to address this tradeoff, but those solutions have been sub-optimal. In this paper, we propose a method to design optimal patch codes via device characterization. The tradeoff between decoding robustness and the number of available code levels is optimized in terms of printing and measurement efforts, and decoding robustness against noises from the printing and measurement devices. Effort is drastically reduced relative to previous methods because print-and-measure is minimized through modeling and the use of existing printer profiles. Decoding robustness is improved by distributing the code levels in CIE Lab space rather than in CMYK space.

  3. Nanowired three-dimensional cardiac patches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dvir, Tal; Timko, Brian P.; Brigham, Mark D.; Naik, Shreesh R.; Karajanagi, Sandeep S.; Levy, Oren; Jin, Hongwei; Parker, Kevin K.; Langer, Robert; Kohane, Daniel S.

    2011-11-01

    Engineered cardiac patches for treating damaged heart tissues after a heart attack are normally produced by seeding heart cells within three-dimensional porous biomaterial scaffolds. These biomaterials, which are usually made of either biological polymers such as alginate or synthetic polymers such as poly(lactic acid) (PLA), help cells organize into functioning tissues, but poor conductivity of these materials limits the ability of the patch to contract strongly as a unit. Here, we show that incorporating gold nanowires within alginate scaffolds can bridge the electrically resistant pore walls of alginate and improve electrical communication between adjacent cardiac cells. Tissues grown on these composite matrices were thicker and better aligned than those grown on pristine alginate and when electrically stimulated, the cells in these tissues contracted synchronously. Furthermore, higher levels of the proteins involved in muscle contraction and electrical coupling are detected in the composite matrices. It is expected that the integration of conducting nanowires within three-dimensional scaffolds may improve the therapeutic value of current cardiac patches.

  4. Modular assembly of thick multifunctional cardiac patches

    PubMed Central

    Fleischer, Sharon; Shapira, Assaf; Feiner, Ron; Dvir, Tal

    2017-01-01

    In cardiac tissue engineering cells are seeded within porous biomaterial scaffolds to create functional cardiac patches. Here, we report on a bottom-up approach to assemble a modular tissue consisting of multiple layers with distinct structures and functions. Albumin electrospun fiber scaffolds were laser-patterned to create microgrooves for engineering aligned cardiac tissues exhibiting anisotropic electrical signal propagation. Microchannels were patterned within the scaffolds and seeded with endothelial cells to form closed lumens. Moreover, cage-like structures were patterned within the scaffolds and accommodated poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) microparticulate systems that controlled the release of VEGF, which promotes vascularization, or dexamethasone, an anti-inflammatory agent. The structure, morphology, and function of each layer were characterized, and the tissue layers were grown separately in their optimal conditions. Before transplantation the tissue and microparticulate layers were integrated by an ECM-based biological glue to form thick 3D cardiac patches. Finally, the patches were transplanted in rats, and their vascularization was assessed. Because of the simple modularity of this approach, we believe that it could be used in the future to assemble other multicellular, thick, 3D, functional tissues. PMID:28167795

  5. Blood typing

    MedlinePlus

    ... ABO blood typing; Blood group; Anemia - immune hemolytic blood type; ABO blood type; A blood type; AB blood type; O blood type ... The 2 steps above can accurately determine your blood type. Rh typing uses a method similar to ABO ...

  6. The Effects of Rifampin, Povidone-Iodine and Hydrogen Peroxide on the Formation of Epidural Fibrosis in the Experimental Epidural Fibrosis Model.

    PubMed

    Kizilay, Zahir; Cetin, Nesibe Kahraman; İsmailoglu, Özgur; Yılmaz, Ali; Omurlu, İmran Kurt; Coskun, Mehmet Erdal; Aktaş, Serdar

    2016-08-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the effect of direct application of rifampin, povidone-iodine, and hydrogen peroxide on the formation of epidural fibrosis in rats. Forty-eight adult male Wistar albino rats were equally and randomly divided into four groups (laminectomy, topical rifampin, topical povidone-iodine, and topical hydrogen peroxide). Laminectomy was performed at the T12 level in all rats. Four weeks later, the extent of epidural fibrosis was assessed both macroscopically and histopathologically. ANOVA test was used for the evaluation of dural thickness. Kruskal-Wallis test was used for the pathology and macroscopic evaluation. Chi-square test was used for evaluation of the arachnoid involvement. p value <0.05 was accepted as statistically significant. Our data revealed that topical application of both povidone-iodine and hydrogen peroxide were effective in reducing epidural fibrosis formation. The results of our study provide the experimental evidence of the preventive effects of topical application of povidone-iodine and hydrogen peroxide over epidural fibrosis.

  7. Saline as the Sole Contrast Agent for Successful MRI-guided Epidural Injections

    SciTech Connect

    Deli, Martin; Mateiescu, Serban Busch, Martin; Becker, Jan Garmer, Marietta Groenemeyer, Dietrich

    2013-06-15

    Purpose. To assess the performance of sterile saline solution as the sole contrast agent for percutaneous magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided epidural injections at 1.5 T. Methods. A retrospective analysis of two different techniques of MRI-guided epidural injections was performed with either gadolinium-enhanced saline solution or sterile saline solution for documentation of the epidural location of the needle tip. T1-weighted spoiled gradient echo (FLASH) images or T2-weighted single-shot turbo spin echo (HASTE) images visualized the test injectants. Methods were compared by technical success rate, image quality, table time, and rate of complications. Results. 105 MRI-guided epidural injections (12 of 105 with gadolinium-enhanced saline solution and 93 of 105 with sterile saline solution) were performed successfully and without complications. Visualization of sterile saline solution and gadolinium-enhanced saline solution was sufficient, good, or excellent in all 105 interventions. For either test injectant, quantitative image analysis demonstrated comparable high contrast-to-noise ratios of test injectants to adjacent body substances with reliable statistical significance levels (p < 0.001). The mean table time was 22 {+-} 9 min in the gadolinium-enhanced saline solution group and 22 {+-} 8 min in the saline solution group (p = 0.75). Conclusion. Sterile saline is suitable as the sole contrast agent for successful and safe percutaneous MRI-guided epidural drug delivery at 1.5 T.

  8. Portable Optical Epidural Needle-A CMOS-Based System Solution and Its Circuit Design

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Cihun-Siyong Alex; Lin, Shih-Pin; Mandell, M. Susan; Tsou, Mei-Yung; Chang, Yin; Ting, Chien-Kun

    2014-01-01

    Epidural anesthesia is a common anesthesia method yet up to 10% of procedures fail to provide adequate analgesia. This is usually due to misinterpreting the tactile information derived from the advancing needle through the complex tissue planes. Incorrect placement also can cause dural puncture and neural injury. We developed an optic system capable of reliably identifying tissue planes surrounding the epidural space. However the new technology was too large and cumbersome for practical clinical use. We present a miniaturized version of our optic system using chip technology (first generation CMOS-based system) for logic functions. The new system was connected to an alarm that was triggered once the optic properties of the epidural were identified. The aims of this study were to test our miniaturized system in a porcine model and describe the technology to build this new clinical tool. Our system was tested in a porcine model and identified the epidural space in the lumbar, low and high thoracic regions of the spine. The new technology identified the epidural space in all but 1 of 46 attempts. Experimental results from our fabricated integrated circuit and animal study show the new tool has future clinical potential. PMID:25162150

  9. Efficacy of epidural local anesthetic and dexamethasone in providing postoperative analgesia: A meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Jebaraj, B; Khanna, P; Baidya, DK; Maitra, S

    2016-01-01

    Background: Dexamethasone is a potent anti-inflammatory, analgesic, and antiemetic drug. Individual randomized controlled trials found a possible benefit of epidural dexamethasone. The purpose of this meta-analysis is to estimate the benefit of epidural dexamethasone on postoperative pain and opioid consumption and to formulate a recommendation for evidence-based practice. Materials and Methods: Prospective, randomized controlled trials comparing the analgesic efficacy of epidural local anesthetic and dexamethasone combination, with local anesthetic alone for postoperative pain management after abdominal surgery, were planned to be included in this meta-analysis. PubMed, PubMed Central, Scopus, and Central Register of Clinical Trials of the Cochrane Collaboration (CENTRAL) databases were searched for eligible controlled trials using the following search words: “Epidural”, “dexamethasone”, and “postoperative pain”, until February 20, 2015. Results: Data from five randomized control trials have been included in this meta-analysis. Epidural dexamethasone significantly decreased postoperative morphine consumption (mean difference −7.89 mg; 95% confidence interval [CI]: −11.66 to −3.71) and number of patients required postoperative rescue analgesic boluses (risk ratio: 0.51; 95% CI: 0.41-0.63). Conclusion: The present data shows that the addition of dexamethasone to local anesthetic in epidural is beneficial for postoperative pain management. PMID:27375389

  10. A pure epidural spinal cavernous hemangioma - with an innocuous face but a perilous behaviour!!

    PubMed

    A L, Hemalatha; T, Ravikumar; Chamarthy, Neelima P; Puri, Kunal

    2013-07-01

    Cavernous hemangiomas occur frequently in the intracranial structures but they are rare in the spine, with an incidence of 0.22 cases/million/year, which account for 5 - 12% of the spinal vascular lesions, 51% of which are extradural. Most of the epidural hemangiomas are secondary extensions from the vertebral lesions. The spinal cavernous hemangiomas which do not involve the vertebrae are referred to as "pure" types. The pure epidural hemangiomas are rare, which account for only 4% of all the epidural lesions. A case of a Pure spinal epidural cavernous hemangioma in a 50 year old male, with the clinical picture of a slowly progressive compressive myelopathy, has been presented here. The imaging studies showed a well-defined, enhancing epidural lesion at the T7 - T8 level, with dorsal cordedema and myelomalacic changes. A radiological diagnosis of a meningioma was considered. Histopathologically, the lesion was diagnosed as a hemangioma. The patient improved dramatically after the excision of the lesion.

  11. Thoracic epidural anesthesia: Effects on splanchnic circulation and implications in Anesthesia and Intensive care

    PubMed Central

    Siniscalchi, Antonio; Gamberini, Lorenzo; Laici, Cristiana; Bardi, Tommaso; Faenza, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the currently available evidence on thoracic epidural anesthesia effects on splanchnic macro and microcirculation, in physiologic and pathologic conditions. METHODS: A PubMed search was conducted using the MeSH database. Anesthesia, Epidural was always the first MeSH heading and was combined by boolean operator AND with the following headings: Circulation, Splanchnic; Intestines; Pancreas and Pancreatitis; Liver Function Tests. EMBASE, Cochrane library, ClinicalTrials.gov and clinicaltrialsregister.eu were also searched using the same terms. RESULTS: Twenty-seven relevant studies and four ongoing trials were found. The data regarding the effects of epidural anesthesia on splanchnic perfusion are conflicting. The studies focusing on regional macro-hemodynamics in healthy animals and humans undergoing elective surgery, demonstrated no influence or worsening of regional perfusion in patients receiving thoracic epidural anesthesia (TEA). On the other hand most of the studies focusing on micro-hemodynamics, especially in pathologic low flow conditions, suggested that TEA could foster microcirculation. CONCLUSION: The available studies in this field are heterogeneous and the results conflicting, thus it is difficult to draw decisive conclusions. However there is increasing evidence deriving from animal studies, that thoracic epidural blockade could have an important role in modifying tissue microperfusion and protecting microcirculatory weak units from ischemic damage, regardless of the effects on macro-hemodynamics. PMID:25685727

  12. Factors for Predicting Favorable Outcome of Percutaneous Epidural Adhesiolysis for Lumbar Disc Herniation

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Sang Ho; Lee, Jae Il; Cho, Hyun Seok; Shin, Jin Woo

    2017-01-01

    Background. Lower back pain is a common reason for disability and the most common cause is lumbar disc herniation. Percutaneous epidural adhesiolysis has been applied to relieve pain and increase the functional capacity of patients who present this condition. Objectives. In this study, we retrospectively evaluated the factors which predict the outcome of percutaneous epidural adhesiolysis in patients who were diagnosed with lumbar disc herniation. Methods. Electronic medical records of patients diagnosed with lumbar disc herniation who have received percutaneous epidural adhesiolysis treatment were reviewed. The primary outcome was the factors that were associated with substantial response of ≥4 points or ≥50% of pain relief in the numerical rating scale pain score 12 months after the treatment. Results. Multivariate logistic regression analysis demonstrated that the presence of high-intensity zone (HIZ) at magnetic resonance imaging was a predictor of substantial response to percutaneous epidural adhesiolysis for 12 months (P = 0.007). The presence of a condition involving the vertebral foramen was a predictor for unsuccessful response after 12 months (P = 0.02). Discussion and Conclusion. The presence of HIZ was a predictor of favorable long-term outcome after percutaneous epidural adhesiolysis for the treatment of lower back pain with radicular pain caused by lumbar disc herniation. PMID:28246488

  13. Epidural needle with embedded optical fibers for spectroscopic differentiation of tissue: ex vivo feasibility study

    PubMed Central

    Desjardins, Adrien E.; Hendriks, Benno H.W.; van der Voort, Marjolein; Nachabé, Rami; Bierhoff, Walter; Braun, Guus; Babic, Drazenko; Rathmell, James P.; Holmin, Staffan; Söderman, Michael; Holmström, Björn

    2011-01-01

    Epidural injection is commonly used to provide intraoperative anesthesia, postoperative and obstetric analgesia, and to treat acute radicular pain. Identification of the epidural space is typically carried out using the loss of resistance (LOR) technique, but the usefulness of this technique is limited by false LOR and the inability to reliably detect intravascular or subarachnoid needle placement. In this study, we present a novel epidural needle that allows for the acquisition of optical reflectance spectra from tissue close to the beveled surface. This needle has optical fibers embedded in the cannula that deliver and receive light. With two spectrometers, light received from tissue is resolved across the wavelength range of 500 to 1600 nm. To determine the feasibility of optical tissue differentiation, spectra were acquired from porcine tissues during a post mortem laminectomy. The spectra were processed with an algorithm that derives estimates of the hemoglobin and lipid concentrations. The results of this study suggest that the optical epidural needle has the potential to improve the accuracy of epidural space identification. PMID:21698009

  14. Micro devices using shape memory polymer patches for mated connections

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Abraham P.; Fitch, Joseph P.

    2000-01-01

    A method and micro device for repositioning or retrieving miniature devices located in inaccessible areas, such as medical devices (e.g., stents, embolic coils, etc.) located in a blood vessel. The micro repositioning or retrieving device and method uses shape memory polymer (SMP) patches formed into mating geometries (e.g., a hoop and a hook) for re-attachment of the deposited medical device to a catheter or guidewire. For example, SMP or other material hoops are formed on the medical device to be deposited in a blood vessel, and SMP hooks are formed on the micro device attached to a guidewire, whereby the hooks on the micro device attach to the hoops on the medical device, or vice versa, enabling deposition, movement, re-deposit, or retrieval of the medical device. By changing the temperature of the SMP hooks, the hooks can be attached to or released from the hoops located on the medical device. An exemplary method for forming the hooks and hoops involves depositing a sacrificial thin film on a substrate, patterning and processing the thin film to form openings therethrough, depositing or bonding SMP materials in the openings so as to be attached to the substrate, and removing the sacrificial thin film.

  15. A Latent Source Model for Patch-Based Image Segmentation.

    PubMed

    Chen, George H; Shah, Devavrat; Golland, Polina

    2015-10-01

    Despite the popularity and empirical success of patch-based nearest-neighbor and weighted majority voting approaches to medical image segmentation, there has been no theoretical development on when, why, and how well these nonparametric methods work. We bridge this gap by providing a theoretical performance guarantee for nearest-neighbor and weighted majority voting segmentation under a new probabilistic model for patch-based image segmentation. Our analysis relies on a new local property for how similar nearby patches are, and fuses existing lines of work on modeling natural imagery patches and theory for nonparametric classification. We use the model to derive a new patch-based segmentation algorithm that iterates between inferring local label patches and merging these local segmentations to produce a globally consistent image segmentation. Many existing patch-based algorithms arise as special cases of the new algorithm.

  16. Movement of patches during thermoforming: Experiment and simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schell, J. S. U.; Amory, L.; Guillon, D.

    2016-10-01

    The application of local reinforcement like uni-directional patches can locally increase the strength of composite parts without adding much weight. During design through structural analysis, shape and position of local reinforcement can easily be determined. In the thermoforming process, patches can be integrated into the ply-stack by preassembling. During forming, these patches can move and change their position reducing the structural effect of the patch. The movement of patches has been investigated experimentally. Key factors that influence this movement are orientation, size, position in the pile and slope of the mold. The forming process is simulated using HYPERFORM. The results show that this complex process needs special models which can be computationally intensive. In this work, we model the movement of patches and compare with experiments. The final goal is to have a reasonable predictive capability for movement of patches and design the process to minimize it.

  17. Development and evaluation of a tampering resistant transdermal fentanyl patch.

    PubMed

    Cai, Bing; Engqvist, Håkan; Bredenberg, Susanne

    2015-07-05

    With the increasing number of misuse and abuse of opioids, the resistance to tampering becomes an important attribute for transdermal opioid patches. In this study, drug-containing geopolymer granules were integrated into an adhesive matrix to improve the resistance of fast drug release against some common abuse techniques. Bench testing showed that fentanyl loaded geopolymer granules had better resistance to tampering compared to a commercial fentanyl patch. Moreover, in a pilot in vivo study on a few rats, the granules showed potential to give similar drug plasma concentrations as the commercial fentanyl patch. After integrating geopolymer granules into an adhesive matrix, the new patch showed a better resistance against the investigated tampering tests compared with the commercially available patch. In this study, we showed that incorporating drug loaded geopolymer granules into a patch adhesive has potential to improve the resistance of the fentanyl patch against tampering without compromising the drug release.

  18. A MULTI-PATCH MALARIA MODEL WITH LOGISTIC GROWTH POPULATIONS*

    PubMed Central

    GAO, DAOZHOU; RUAN, SHIGUI

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a multi-patch model to study the effects of population dispersal on the spatial spread of malaria between patches. The basic reproduction number R0 is derived and it is shown that the disease-free equilibrium is locally asymptotically stable if R0<1 and unstable if R0>1. Bounds on the disease-free equilibrium and R0 are given. A sufficient condition for the existence of an endemic equilibrium when R0>1 is obtained. For the two-patch submodel, the dependence of R0 on the movement of exposed, infectious, and recovered humans between the two patches is investigated. Numerical simulations indicate that travel can help the disease to become endemic in both patches, even though the disease dies out in each isolated patch. However, if travel rates are continuously increased, the disease may die out again in both patches. PMID:23723531

  19. Doppler sonographic examination of uterine and placental perfusion in cows in the last month of gestation and effects of epidural anesthesia and isoxsuprine.

    PubMed

    Kim-Egloff, C; Hässig, M; Bruckmaier, R; Bleul, U

    2016-03-15

    The massive increase in size of the fetus and uterus in the last trimester is accompanied by an increasing demand for nutrients and oxygen, and it is assumed that this demand is met by increasing uterine and fetal perfusion. The goals of this study were to measure the perfusion of the uterine arteries and the placentomes in the last month of gestation and to investigate the effect of epidural anesthesia and isoxsuprine on perfusion. During the last month of gestation, eight Braunvieh cows underwent nine color Doppler sonographic examinations of the uterine arteries to determine diameter (DM), pulse rate (PR), resistance index, time-averaged maximum blood flow velocity (TAMV), and blood flow volume (BFV), and power-mode Doppler sonography was used to determine perfusion of placentomes. The PR increased (P < 0.001), and the BFV and TAMV of the ipsilateral uterine artery decreased between 4.5 and 0.5 weeks prepartum (BFV, 236.8 ± 65.80 and 208 ± 41.52 cm(3)/s, P < 0.01; TAMV, 140.0 ± 26.53 cm/s and 125.2 ± 18.46 cm/s, P < 0.05). After sonographic examination, the cows received epidural administration of local anesthetic (100-mg lidocaine) in the sacrococcygeal space or isoxsuprine (200 mg/cow, iv), and the sonographic measurements were repeated 30 minutes later. After epidural anesthesia, the TAMV and BFV of the contralateral uterine artery increased by 5.4% (P < 0.05) and 7.9% (P < 0.01). In the placentomes of the gravid uterine horn, the relative placentome perfusion and the color pixel grading (Cp) increased by 10.1% (P < 0.05) and 11.5% (P < 0.01) after epidural anesthesia. After isoxsuprine, the DM, PR, and BFV increased by 4.7%, 49.3%, and 16.9% in the ipsilateral uterine artery and by 10.8%, 48.7%, and 22.8%, respectively in the contralateral uterine artery. The TAMV of the ipsilateral uterine artery increased by 7.1% (P < 0.01), and the resistance index decreased in both uterine arteries (ipsilateral 24.2%, contralateral 14.9%, both P < 0

  20. Chemosensitive epidural spinal cord disease in non-Hodgkins lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Wong, E T; Portlock, C S; O'Brien, J P; DeAngelis, L M

    1996-06-01

    Epidural spinal cord disease (ESCD), an infrequent complication of systemic non-Hodgkins lymphoma (NHL), can occur at diagnosis or at relapse, and is usually treated with radiotherapy, or infrequently surgical decompression. We retrospectively analyzed 140 patients with intermediate-grade NHL (IG-NHL) who were treated on a dose-intense protocol using doxorubicin, vincristine, and high-dose cyclophosphamide (NHL-15). There were seven episodes of ESCD in six (4.3%) patients. Five episodes were asymptomatic at presentation; one patient had back pain, leg numbness, and tingling; and one had radicular pain and mild leg weakness. None had malignant cells in the CSF. One patient received high-dose dexamethasone after laminectomy for diagnostic biopsy; otherwise, dexamethasone was used only as an anti-emetic prior to chemotherapy. Patients who developed ESCD at diagnosis received the planned course of NHL-15 chemotherapy as treatment for ESCD, and those treated with NHL-15 who developed ESCD at relapse were given a regimen containing ifosfamide, carboplatin, and etoposide (ICE). After chemotherapy alone, five of seven episodes showed radiographic resolution of ESCD and improvement of neurologic deficits. One patient received consolidation radiotherapy (2,700 cGy) to the spine after ICE for relapsed ESCD and had a complete response. One patient had progression of systemic lymphoma and ESCD despite chemotherapy. These data suggest that chemotherapy may be effective as initial treatment of ESCD in IG-NHL and may reduce the potential complications of spinal surgery and radiotherapy.

  1. Principles of therapeutic use of transcranial and epidural cortical stimulation.

    PubMed

    Lefaucheur, Jean-Pascal

    2008-10-01

    Among the alternatives to drugs in the treatment of neurological and psychiatric disorders, neuromodulation techniques, including brain stimulation, have been used increasingly this past decade. Cortical targets are especially appealing, because they are easily accessible by noninvasive or invasive methods. Applicable techniques include repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS), transcranial electrical stimulation using pulsed or direct current, and epidural cortical stimulation (ECS) with surgically implanted electrodes. In contrast to deep brain stimulation in movement disorders or electroconvulsive therapy in depression, the efficacy of cortical stimulation to treat neurological or psychiatric disorders has not been yet clearly demonstrated. However, encouraging results have been reported in neuropathic pain (for ECS) and depression (for rTMS). In this review, we will consider some principles and mechanisms of action of these methods. First, it must be noted that fibers of intracortical or cortico-subcortical networks are more prone to be activated by the stimulation than cell bodies of local cortical neurons. Hence, the site(s) of action may be distant from the site of stimulation. In addition, various parameters of stimulation (such as stimulation frequency, intensity, or electrode polarity) and the configuration of the induced electrical field greatly influence the nature of the recruited circuits, and therefore, the overall efficacy. Finally, clinical changes may be delayed and prolonged beyond the time of stimulation, complicating programming algorithms in the case of implanted stimulation device. All these features need to be taken into account when considering cortical stimulation as a method of treatment.

  2. Thoracic spinal epidural abscess caused by fishbone perforation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jian-Min; Wang, Zhi-Yong; Ni, Guo-Xin

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: Ingestion of a fishbone is a common cause of esophageal injury, but spinal epidural abscess (SEA) is a rare condition due to the esophageal penetration by a swallowed fishbone. Prompt diagnosis can be seldom made owing to incomplete patient history taking and difficulties in imaging evidence identification. Patient concerns: We describe the case of a 62-year-old woman who was stuck in her throat by a fishbone, and complained of back pain, paresis of the lower limbs and fever, successively. To our knowledge, this is the first case report that we know of thoracic SEA caused by fishbone perforation. Diagnoses: About 20 days after the onset of severe back pain, she was diagnosed with SEA based on the clinical presentation and imaging findings. Interventions: Antibiotic therapy and rehabilitation therapy were carried out afterwards. However, due to exacerbation of her condition, surgical intervention had to be taken eventually. Outcomes: It is quite unfortunate for this patient to have a poor prognosis due to a delayed diagnosis and an improper management. Lessons: A number of lessons can be learnt from this case. PMID:27930507

  3. Transient Glaucoma after an Epidural Steroid Injection: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Manjiani, Deepak; Said, Salam; Kaye, Alan David

    2015-01-01

    Background Steroids are recognized as a beneficial treatment for various medical conditions, yet clinically relevant side effects of steroids are common and problematic, ranging from a minor case of acne to a potentially life-threatening Addisonian crisis. In anesthetic medicine, the use of epidural steroid injections (ESIs) for chronic low back pain and other radicular pain-related conditions has become standard practice in interventional pain management. Case Report We report the case of a patient who experienced sudden bilateral blurred vision after receiving an ESI and required urgent ophthalmic interventions and follow-up care. The main clinical findings from this case showed that the patient had high intraocular pressure (IOP) that caused unexpected short-term vision loss. The symptom resolved after 3½ months without ophthalmic treatment. Conclusion Clinicians should inform patients about the possibility of visual complications associated with pain procedures involving steroids. Among the high-risk groups with predisposing factors, such as uncontrolled hypertension and diabetes mellitus, routine eye tests that include measuring IOP prior to ESI should be recommended as a preventive measure. Alternative pain management therapies should be considered if possible. Comprehensive planning of patient care will also ensure safety and prevent unwanted outcomes, particularly with high-risk patients receiving steroids for pain procedures. PMID:25829885

  4. Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy Reirradiation for Recurrent Epidural Spinal Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Mahadevan, Anand; Floyd, Scott; Wong, Eric; Jeyapalan, Suriya; Groff, Michael; Kasper, Ekkehard

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: When patients show progression after conventional fractionated radiation for spine metastasis, further radiation and surgery may not be options. Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) has been successfully used in treatment of the spine and may be applicable in these cases. We report the use of SBRT for 60 consecutive patients (81 lesions) who had radiological progressive spine metastasis with epidural involvement after previous radiation for spine metastasis. Methods and Materials: SBRT was used with fiducial and vertebral anatomy-based targeting. The radiation dose was prescribed based on the extent of spinal canal involvement; the dose was 8 Gy Multiplication-Sign 3 = 24 Gy when the tumor did not touch the spinal cord and 5 to 6 Gy x 5 = 25 to 30 Gy when the tumor abutted the cord. The cord surface received up to the prescription dose with no hot spots in the cord. Results: The median overall survival was 11 months, and the median progression-free survival was 9 months. Overall, 93% of patients had stable or improved disease while 7% of patients showed disease progression; 65% of patients had pain relief. There was no significant toxicity other than fatigue. Conclusions: SBRT is feasible and appears to be an effective treatment modality for reirradiation after conventional palliative radiation fails for spine metastasis patients.

  5. Metabolic and clinical markers of prognosis in the era of CT imaging in children with acute epidural hematomas.

    PubMed

    Ben Abraham, R; Lahat, E; Sheinman, G; Feldman, Z; Barzilai, A; Harel, R; Barzilay, Z; Paret, G

    2000-08-01

    Acute epidural hematoma (AEH), a relatively common complication of head injury in children, persists in bearing high morbidity and mortality. Early establishment of prognosis could guide optimal patient allocation, and early identification of predictive signs could assist in choosing appropriate therapeutic interventions. This study aimed to delineate expeditiously obtainable prognostic markers for determining outcome in a subset of children with AEH. We reviewed our 11-year experience with 61 consecutive children <16 years old with head trauma and isolated AEH. Treatment followed a standard advanced trauma life support protocol. A medical history was obtained, and all patients underwent neurosurgical and physical evaluations. CT scans were performed, as were laboratory tests which included arterial blood gases, glucose, electrolytes (K(+), Na(+)), hemoglobin and coagulation studies. Evaluation of the data collected on cause of injury, interval between trauma occurrence and presentation, clinical symptoms, Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) scores, vital signs, laboratory test results, physical findings and surgical versus conservative management revealed that the best single predictors of outcome following AEH were the GCS and focal neurological deficits. Of all laboratory data obtained on admission, the blood potassium, pH and glucose test results correlated significantly with prognosis. Prognosis can be adequately and expeditiously estimated by selected markers within a comprehensive evaluation of children with AEH.

  6. Fluoroscopically guided extraforaminal cervical nerve root blocks: analysis of epidural flow of the injectate with respect to needle tip position.

    PubMed

    Shipley, Kyle; Riew, K Daniel; Gilula, Louis A

    2014-02-01

    Study Design Retrospective evaluation of consecutively performed fluoroscopically guided cervical nerve root blocks. Objective To describe the incidence of injectate central epidural flow with respect to needle tip position during fluoroscopically guided extraforaminal cervical nerve root blocks (ECNRBs). Methods Between February 19, 2003 and June 11, 2003, 132 consecutive fluoroscopically guided ECNRBs performed with contrast media in the final injected material (injectate) were reviewed on 95 patients with average of 1.3 injections per patient. Fluoroscopic spot images documenting the procedure were obtained as part of standard quality assurance. An independent observer not directly involved in the procedures retrospectively reviewed the images, and the data were placed into a database. Image review was performed to determine optimal needle tip positioning for injectate epidural flow. Results Central epidural injectate flow was obtained in only 28.9% of injections with the needle tip lateral to midline of the lateral mass (zone 2). 83.8% of injectate went into epidural space when the needle tip was medial to midline of the lateral mass (zone 3). 100% of injectate flowed epidurally when the needle tip was medial to or at the medial cortex of the lateral mass (zone 4). There was no statistically significant difference with regards to central epidural flow and the needle tip position on lateral view. Conclusion To ensure central epidural flow with ECNRBs one must be prepared to pass the needle tip medial to midplane of the lateral mass or to medial cortex of the lateral mass. Approximately 16% of ECNRBs with needle tip medial to midline of the lateral mass did not flow into epidural space. One cannot claim a nerve block is an epidural block unless epidural flow of injectate is observed.

  7. Donating Blood

    MedlinePlus

    ... blood transfusion. Blood donors — especially donors with certain blood types — are always in demand. Who Can Donate Blood? ... Natural Disasters: How to Help Blood Blood Transfusions Blood Types Contact Us Print Resources Send to a Friend ...

  8. Combined Spinal-Epidural for Vaginal Delivery in a Parturient With Takayasu’s Arteritis

    PubMed Central

    Clifford, Sean Patrick; Mick, Paul Brian; Derhake, Brian Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Takayasu’s arteritis is a rare, progressive panendarteritis involving all layers of the arterial wall. This disease includes variable involvement of the aorta and its major branches. The most common complication with this condition is severe, uncontrolled hypertension, often leading to end organ dysfunction. We describe the management of a 27-year-old woman diagnosed with Takayasu’s arteritis that presented in labor with intense pain and underwent a combined spinal-epidural for anesthetic management. Per literature review, a combined spinal-epidural technique for planned vaginal delivery has not been described for a laboring Takayasu patient. Our technique, utilizing intrathecal opioids and a low-dose local anesthetic-opioid epidural infusion, provided adequate analgesia while maintaining hemodynamic stability throughout labor augmentation and successful vaginal delivery. PMID:28210635

  9. Reversal of tetraplegia in a patient with haematogenous cervical epidural abscess.

    PubMed

    Katonis, Pavlos; Souvatzis, Xenia; Tsavalas, Nikolaos; Alpantaki, Kalliopi

    2011-08-01

    Pyogenic haematogenous cervical epidural abscess complicated by tetraplegia is an uncommon entity, but its clinical importance overshadows its rarity. Predisposing risk factors for spinal epidural abscess include diabetes, intravenous drug abuse, liver disease, renal failure, malignancy, HIV, infection elsewhere, rheumatoid conditions, trauma and a number of spinal interventions. Lack of recovery and death are much more frequent when complete paralysis exists since more than 24 to 48 hours. Most authors combine decompressive laminectomy and antibiotics. Anterior decompression and needle aspiration are rarely used, the former more specifically in case of anterior abscess formation. A high index of suspicion along with reliance on gadolinium-enhanced MRI is essential to diagnose the pathology and institute appropriate treatment on an individual basis. The authors report on a diabetic male patient who developed a cervical epidural abscess with tetraplegia after dental extraction. He was treated within six hours by one stage anterior/posterior decompression and fusion, with complete recovery.

  10. Ryszard Rodzinski-A Forgotten Polish Inventor and Pioneer of Combined Spinal-Epidural Anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Daszkiewicz, Andrzej R; Copik, Maja M; Misiolek, Hanna D; Reiss, Wojciech Z

    2016-10-01

    Dr. Ryszard Rodzinski was a Polish surgeon who, in spite of his short life, had a productive career. His most important discovery was a safer method of performing regional anesthesia for abdominal surgery. The first description of combined spinal epidural anesthesia is generally attributed to Soresi in 1937. In the early 20th century, Rodzinski invented a novel technique, "combined lumbosacral anesthesia," which combined lumbar spinal anesthesia and sacral epidural anesthesia. During the 19th Meeting of Polish Surgeons in July 1922 in Warsaw, Rodzinski presented an article entitled "On Combined Lumbosacral Anaesthesia," in which he described this technique used in surgical clinic in Lwów since October 1921. Given this presentation, Rodzinski could be considered to have made the first known presentation of the combined spinal and epidural anesthesia.

  11. Cervical Spondylitis and Epidural Abscess Caused by Brucellosis: a Case Report and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Reşorlu, Hatice; Saçar, Suzan; Inceer, Beşir Şahin; Akbal, Ayla; Gökmen, Ferhat; Zateri, Coskun; Savaş, Yilmaz

    2016-12-01

    Brucellosis is a zoonotic disease widely seen in endemic regions and that can lead to systemic involvement. The musculoskeletal system is frequently affected, and the disease can exhibit clinical involvements such as arthritis, spondylitis, spondylodiscitis, osteomyelitis, tenosynovitis and bursitis. Spondylitis and spondylodiscitis, common complications of brucellosis, predominantly affect the lumbar and thoracic vertebrae. Epidural abscess may occur as a rare complication of spondylitis. Spinal brucellosis and development of epidural abscess in the cervical region are rare. Development of epidural abscess affects the duration and success of treatment. Spinal brucellosis should be considered in patients presenting with fever and lower back-neck pain in endemic regions, and treatment must be initiated with early diagnosis in order to prevent potential complications.

  12. Treatment of holocord spinal epidural abscess via alternating side unilateral approach for bilateral laminectomy.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Roy; Yung, Brian H; Sedney, Cara; Miele, Vincent J

    2015-01-01

    To date, this is the first reported case of the surgical management of a holocord epidural abscess done through level-skipping laminectomies. It is also the first reported case of these laminectomies being performed via an alternating side unilateral approach for this condition. A 51-year-old patient presenting with progressive lower extremity weakness secondary to a spinal epidural abscess extending from C4 to S1. A minimally disruptive method of relieving the spinal cord compression via evacuation of the abscess was employed successfully. This report demonstrates the efficacy of level skipping laminectomies via a unilateral approach for holocord epidural abscesses (extending 20 vertebral levels). Performing the laminectomies via a unilateral approach as well as alternating the side of the approach minimized iatrogenic instability risk. Both strategies were designed to minimize incision size, tissue disruption, and the amount of muscular weakness/imbalance postoperatively.

  13. Emergency surgery for epidural abcess secondary to sacral fistula after laparoscopic proctectomy

    PubMed Central

    Zeitoun, Jeremie; Menahem, Benjamin; Fohlen, Audrey; Lebreton, Gil; Lubrano, Jean; Alves, Arnaud

    2016-01-01

    A 61-year-old man presented via the emergency department with a few days history of abdominal and colic occlusion symptoms. He presented signs of sepsis, midline lumbar spine tenderness and reduced hip flexion. Computer tomography of the abdomen and pelvis showed a presacral collection contiguous with the posterior part of the colo-rectal anastomosis, and MRI lumbar spine revealed abscess invation into the epidural space. He underwent a laparotomy with washout of the presacral abscess and a colostomy with a prolonged course of intravenous antibiotic therapy. At 3 weeks after initial presentation he had made a full clinical recovery with progressive radiological resolution of the epidural abscess. The objective of the case report is to highlight a unique and clinically significant complication of a rare post-operative complication after rectal surgery and to briefly discuss other intra-abdominal sources of epidural abscess. PMID:27421299

  14. [Prolonged epidural analgesia induced by clopheline in combination with lidocaine in obstetric analgesia].

    PubMed

    Semenikhin, A A; En Din Kim; Kurbanov, S D

    1998-01-01

    The study was carried out in 178 women without grave obstetrical or extragenital diseases. In group 1 labor pain was relieved by prolonged epidural anesthesia with 2% lidocaine solution (2-2.5 mg/kg), in group 2 prolonged epidural anesthesia with 1% lidocaine solution (1 mg/kg) and 0.01% clofelin (1 microgram/kg) was administered. Central hemodynamics, heart rhythm, external respiration function, uterine contractility, and fetal intrauterine status were assessed. The findings indicate that none of the methods had a negative impact on the vital parameters of women and newborns at any stage of anesthesia. However, a combination of epidural clofelin (1 microgram/kg) with lidocaine permits an appreciable decrease in the doses of both drugs without decreasing the efficacy of anesthesia. This method has a favorable effect on the course of labor: the mouth of the womb opens sooner at a lower uterine activity and there are no negative effects on the fetus and newborn.

  15. Cervical Epidural Abscess in Haemodialysis Patients by Catheter Related Infection: Report of Two Cases

    PubMed Central

    Gezici, Ali Riza

    2010-01-01

    Despite advances in neuroimaging and neurosurgical treatment modalities, spinal epidural abscess remains a challenging problem. Early diagnosis is often difficult and treatment is always delayed. Spinal epidural abscess usually develops in patients with predisposing factors such as IV drug abuse, senillity, diabetes mellitus, spinal attempts, alcoholism, immunosuppression, liver diseases and catheterizations. It is rarely seen in cervical region. A successful treatment is only possible with early diagnosis and accurate surgical and medical treatment. Optimal management is unclear and morbidity and mortality are significant. We present two adult haemodialysis patients with end-stage renal insufficiency who developed cervical epidural abscess following central venous catheter placement. Early surgical intervention is mandatory in cases those have progressive neurological deficit and spinal deformity, and this is also increases the success rate of medical therapy. PMID:20052368

  16. Informed consent for epidural analgesia in labour: a survey of UK practice.

    PubMed

    Middle, J V; Wee, M Y K

    2009-02-01

    Anaesthetists are legally obliged to obtain informed consent before performing regional analgesia in labour. A postal survey of consultant-led UK anaesthetic units was performed in September 2007 to assess practice regarding obtaining informed consent before inserting an epidural, and documentation of the risks discussed. The response rate was 72% (161/223). There was great variation between units regarding which risks women were informed about and the likely incidence of that risk. One hundred and twenty-three respondents out of 157 providing an epidural service (78%) supported a national standardised information card endorsed by the Obstetric Anaesthetists' Association, with all the benefits and risks stated, to be shown to all women before consenting to an epidural in labour.

  17. Conservative management of recurrent lumbar disk herniation with epidural fibrosis: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Welk, Aaron B.; Werdehausen, Destiny N.; Kettner, Norman W.

    2012-01-01

    Objective A retrospective case report of a 24-year-old man with recurrent lumbar disk herniation and epidural fibrosis is presented. Recurrent lumbar disk herniation and epidural fibrosis are common complications following lumbar diskectomy. Clinical Features A 24-year-old patient had a history of lumbar diskectomy and new onset of low back pain and radiculopathy. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed recurrent herniation at L5/S1, left nerve root displacement, and epidural fibrosis. Intervention and Outcomes The patient received a course of chiropractic care including lumbar spinal manipulation and rehabilitation exercises with documented subjective and objective functional and symptomatic improvement. Conclusion This case report describes chiropractic management including spinal manipulative therapy and rehabilitation exercises and subsequent objective and subjective functional and symptomatic improvement. PMID:23843756

  18. [Epidural anesthesia and local administration of high-dose prostaglandin in obstetrics. A dangerous combination].

    PubMed

    Veeckman, L; Müller, E; Van Aken, H

    1989-07-01

    The use of high epidural anesthesia for cesarean section has generally been accepted as a safe and comfortable means of intra- and post-operative pain relief in recent years. However, the accompanying vasomotor blockade of the lower body and the sometimes impaired cardiac reflex activity restrict the use of concomitant--even local--medication. Described are the deleterious side effects on hemodynamic stability and patient comfort of an intramyometrically administered synthetic prostaglandin E (PGE2)-compound (dinoprostone) given to three female patients under high epidural anesthesia during cesarean section. Differentiation of the various symptoms is made in relation to their epidural or PGE origin or to a combination of the two. A striking therapeutic resistance of the hypotension of a sufficiently volume-expanded patient to even large doses of ephedrine is discussed as representing possible PGE-mediated suppression of peripheral norepinephrine release.

  19. Technique of fiber optics used to localize epidural space in piglets.

    PubMed

    Ting, Chien-Kun; Chang, Yin

    2010-05-24

    Technique of loss-of-resistance in epidural block is commonly used for epidural anesthesia in humans with approximately 90% successful rate. However, it may be one of the most difficult procedures to learn for anesthesia residents in hospital. A two-wavelength (650 nm and 532 nm) fiber-optical method has been developed according to the characteristic reflectance spectra of ex-vivo porcine tissues, which are associated with the needle insertion to localize the epidural space (ES). In an in-vivo study in piglets showed that the reflected lights from ES and its surrounding tissue ligamentum flavum (LF) are highly distinguishable. This indicates that this technique has potential to localize the ES on the spot without the help of additional guiding assistance.

  20. Wideband Patch Antenna for Land based Vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gangwar, R. P. S.; Dutt, Sanjay

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, an irregular pentagon shaped patch antenna has been presented. The proposed antenna operates over a wide band in frequency range from 12 to 26 GHz with VSWR < 2. It has a partial ground plane with two-inverted L and one I shaped slots in the radiation patch to attain wide bandwidth. The antenna consists of FR4 epoxy as a dielectric substrate with dielectric constant 4.4 and loss tangent 0.002. The size of the antenna is 30 × 30 × 1.57 mm3 and is fed by the microstrip line. The size of the fabricated proposed antenna is smaller than that of the antenna under reference (elliptical radiating patch with defected ground plane). The simulation has been done using high frequency structure simulator (HFSS) which is a finite element method (FEM) based tool. The proposed antenna exhibits the return loss of 21.85, 28.03 and 29.14 dB and gain of 6.6, 5.67 and 7.0 dB at resonant frequencies 16.7, 19.00 and 21.4 GHz, respectively. The bandwidth of the antenna is 10 GHz with normalized radiation efficiencies of 65, 69 and 70 % at corresponding resonant frequencies. The measured results of the fabricated proposed antenna have been compared with the simulated results and there has been a close agreement between both the results. Also the simulated results of the proposed antenna have been compared with the antenna under reference and it is found that the performance of the proposed antenna is far better. The proposed antenna can be used for land based vehicles in both Ku-band (12-18 GHz) and K-band (18-26 GHz).

  1. Robust Nonnegative Patch Alignment for Dimensionality Reduction.

    PubMed

    You, Xinge; Ou, Weihua; Chen, Chun Lung Philip; Li, Qiang; Zhu, Ziqi; Tang, Yuanyan

    2015-11-01

    Dimensionality reduction is an important method to analyze high-dimensional data and has many applications in pattern recognition and computer vision. In this paper, we propose a robust nonnegative patch alignment for dimensionality reduction, which includes a reconstruction error term and a whole alignment term. We use correntropy-induced metric to measure the reconstruction error, in which the weight is learned adaptively for each entry. For the whole alignment, we propose locality-preserving robust nonnegative patch alignment (LP-RNA) and sparsity-preserviing robust nonnegative patch alignment (SP-RNA), which are unsupervised and supervised, respectively. In the LP-RNA, we propose a locally sparse graph to encode the local geometric structure of the manifold embedded in high-dimensional space. In particular, we select large p -nearest neighbors for each sample, then obtain the sparse representation with respect to these neighbors. The sparse representation is used to build a graph, which simultaneously enjoys locality, sparseness, and robustness. In the SP-RNA, we simultaneously use local geometric structure and discriminative information, in which the sparse reconstruction coefficient is used to characterize the local geometric structure and weighted distance is used to measure the separability of different classes. For the induced nonconvex objective function, we formulate it into a weighted nonnegative matrix factorization based on half-quadratic optimization. We propose a multiplicative update rule to solve this function and show that the objective function converges to a local optimum. Several experimental results on synthetic and real data sets demonstrate that the learned representation is more discriminative and robust than most existing dimensionality reduction methods.

  2. ATRIS Seafloor Images – West Turtle Shoal Patch Reef, Rawa Patch Reef, Dustan Rocks Patch Reef, and Thor Patch Reef, Florida, 2011

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zawada, David G.; Ruzicka, Rob; Colella, Michael A.; Resnick, Jessica

    2016-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey St. Petersburg Coastal and Marine Science Center developed the Along-Track Reef Imaging System (ATRIS) in order to capture high-resolution, geo-located images of the seafloor. The images in this data release were collected September 29-30, 2011 at West Turtle Shoal, Rawa, Dustan Rocks, and Thor patch reefs near Marathon, Florida. The transects below show the path of image collection.For further information regarding data collection methods, refer to DOI: 10.1016/j.jembe.2015.02.017.

  3. Negligible Effect of Perioperative Epidural Analgesia Among Patients Undergoing Elective Gastric and Pancreatic Resections

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Dhruvil R.; Brown, Erin; Russo, Jack E.; Li, Chin-Shang; Martinez, Steve R.; Coates, Jodi M.; Bold, Richard J.; Canter, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    Background There are conflicting data regarding improvements in postoperative outcomes with perioperative epidural analgesia. We sought to examine the effect of perioperative epidural analgesia versus intravenous narcotic analgesia on perioperative outcomes including pain control, morbidity, and mortality in patients undergoing gastric and pancreatic resections. Methods We evaluated 169 patients from 2007 to 2011 who underwent open gastric and pancreatic resections for malignancy at a university medical center. Emergency, traumatic, pediatric, enucleations, and disseminated cancer cases were excluded. Clinicopathologic data were reviewed among epidural (E) and non-epidural (NE) patients for their association with perioperative endpoints. Results 120 patients (71%) received an epidural, and 49 (29%) did not. There were no significant differences (P > 0.05) in mean pain scores at each of the four days (days 0-3) among E ( 3.2 ± 2.7, 3.2 ± 2.3, 2.3 ± 1.9, and 2.1 ± 1.9, respectively) and NE patients ( 3.7 ± 2.7, 3.4 ± 1.9, 2.9 ± 2.1, and 2.4 ± 1.9, respectively). Within each of the E and NE patient groups, there were significant differences (P < 0.0001) in mean pain scores from day 0 to day 3 (P < 0.0001). 69% of E patients also received intravenous patient-controlled analgesia (PCA). Ileus (13% E vs. 8% NE), pneumonia (12% E vs. 8% NE), venous thromboembolism (6% E vs. 4% NE), length of stay [ 11.0±12.1(8,4-107) E vs. 12.2±10.7(7,3-54) NE], overall morbidity (36% E vs. 39% NE), and mortality (4% E vs. 2% NE) were not significantly different. Conclusions Routine use of epidurals in this group of patients does not appear to be superior to PCA. PMID:23345053

  4. Effects of Systemic and Local Interferon Beta-1a on Epidural Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Işık, Semra; Doğan, Şeref; Özgün, Gonca; Ocakoğlu, Gökhan; Uğraş, Nesrin

    2016-01-01

    Study Design Level 1 randomized controlled study. Purpose To investigate the effects of systemic and local interferon-beta-1a (IFN-β-1a) on prevention of epidural fibrosis using histopathological parameters. Overview of Literature Epidural fibrosis involves fibroblastic invasion of nerve roots into the epidural space. Formation of dense fibrous tissue causes lumbar and radicular pain. Many surgical techniques and several materials have been proposed in the literature, but no study has assessed the effect of IFN-β-1a on prevention of epidural fibrosis. Methods Forty-eight adult female Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into six groups of eight: sham group, control group, systemic 44 μg IFN-β-1a group and 22 μg IFN-β-1a group (after laminectomy and discectomy, 0.28 mL and 0.14 mL IFN-β-1a applied subcutaneously three times for a week, respectively), local 44 μg IFN-β-1a group (laminectomy and discectomy, followed by 0.28 mL IFN-β-1a on the surgical area), and local 22 μg IFN-β-1a group (laminectomy and discectomy, followed by 0.14 mL IFN-β-1a on the surgical area). All rats were sacrificed after 4 weeks and groups were evaluated histopathologically. Results Compared with sham and control groups, significantly less epidural fibrosis, dural adhesion, and fibroblast cell density were observed in the local and systemic 44 μg IFN-β-1a groups. No other differences were evident between the local and systemic groups. Conclusions IFN-β-1a is effective in preventing epidural fibrosis with systemic and local application. PMID:27340517

  5. Preprocedural ultrasound examination versus manual palpation for thoracic epidural catheter insertion

    PubMed Central

    Hasanin, Ahmed M.; Mokhtar, Ali M.; Amin, Shereen M.; Sayed, Ahmed A.

    2017-01-01

    Background and Aims: Ultrasound imaging before neuraxial blocks was reported to improve the ease of insertion and minimize the traumatic trials. However, the data about the use of ultrasound in thoracic epidural block are scanty. In this study, pre-insertion ultrasound scanning was compared to traditional manual palpation technique for insertion of the thoracic epidural catheter in abdominal operations. Subjects and Methods: Forty-eight patients scheduled to midline laparotomy under combined general anesthesia with thoracic epidural analgesia were included in the study. Patients were divided into two groups with regard to technique of epidural catheter insertion; ultrasound group (done ultrasound screening to determine the needle insertion point, angle of insertion, and depth of epidural space) and manual palpation group (used the traditional manual palpation technique). Number of puncture attempts, number of puncture levels, and number of needle redirection attempts were reported. Time of catheter insertion and complications were also reported in both groups. Results: Ultrasound group showed lower number of puncture attempts (1 [1, 1.25] vs. 1.5 [1, 2.75], P = 0.008), puncture levels (1 (1, 1) vs. 1 [1, 2], P = 0.002), and needle redirection attempts (0 [0, 2.25] vs. 3.5 [2, 5], P = 0.00). Ultrasound-guided group showed shorter time for catheter insertion compared to manual palpation group (140 ± 24 s vs. 213 ± 71 s P = 0.00). Conclusion: Preprocedural ultrasound imaging increased the incidence of first pass success in thoracic epidural catheter insertion and reduced the catheter insertion time compared to manual palpation method. PMID:28217056

  6. Effects of combined epidural and general anesthesia on intraoperative hemodynamic responses, postoperative cellular immunity, and prognosis in patients with gallbladder cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Jun; Zhang, Xue-Rong; Yang, Hu

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: This study is supposed to investigate the effects of combined epidural and general anesthesia on intraoperative hemodynamic responses, postoperative cellular immunity, and prognosis in patients with gallbladder cancer (GBC). Methods: One hundred forty-four GBC patients were selected and randomly divided into the general anesthesia (GA) group and the combined epidural-general anesthesia (CEGA) group. Before anesthesia induction (t0), at intubation (t1), at the beginning of surgery (t2), 5 minutes after pneumoperitoneum (t3), at the end of surgery (t4), after recovery of spontaneous breathing (t5), after regaining consciousness (t6), and after extubation (t7), the heart rate (HR), systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP), and the depth of anesthesia (bispectral index [BIS]) were detected. Blood samples were separately collected 30 minutes before anesthesia induction (T1), 2 hours after the beginning of surgery (T2), at the end of surgery (T3), 1 day after surgery (T4), 3 days after surgery (T5). The survival rates of T cell subsets (CD3+, CD4+, CD8+, CD4+/CD8+) and natural killer (NK) cells were determined by flow cytometry. Postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV), visual analog scale (VAS), and sedation-agitation scale (SAS) were performed to assess postoperative adverse reactions. A 3-year follow-up was conducted. Results: Compared with the GA group, the CEGA group had significant lower SBP values at t5 and t6, lower DBP values at t1, t3, t4, and t5, lower HR values at t1 and t5, and higher BIS values at t4, t5, t6, and t7. No PONV was observed in the CEGA group. In comparison to the GA group, the VAS was markedly increased and survival rates of CD3+, CD4+, and CD4+/CD8+ cells were increased at T2, T3, T4, and T5 in the CEGA group. The 1-year, 2-year, and 3-year survival rates were not evidently different between the CEGA group and the GA group. Conclusion: Our study provides evidence that the combined epidural

  7. Spinal Epidural Varices, a great Mimic of Intervertebral Disc Prolapse - A Case Series

    PubMed Central

    V, Raghavendra; Haridas, Papanaik; Kumar, Anand; K, Ajith

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Epidural venous plexus enlargement, presenting with low back pain and radiculopathy, is an uncommon cause of nerve roots impingement. This condition commonly mimics a herniated nucleus pulposus radiologically. The radiological diagnosis is often missed and the diagnosis is made during the surgery. We are hereby presenting 2 such cases of epidural varices mimicking intervertebral disc prolapse with lumbar radiculopathy. Case Report: Case 1: 43 yr old female presented with acute exacerbation of low back ache and significant right L5–S1 radiculopathy without neurological deficit. MRI reported as L5-S1 disc prolapse. Intra-operatively engorged dilated epidural vein seen compressing S1 nerve root. Associated Disc bulge removed and Coagulative ablation of the dilated epidural vein was performed Case 2: 45 year old male manual labourer presented with backache with left sided sciatica since 8 months, increased in severity since past 1month associated with sensory blunting in L5 and S1 dermatomes. Neurologic examination revealed normal muscle power in his lower extremities. Sensations was blunted in L5 and S1 dermatomes. MRI was reported as L5-S1 disc prolapsed compressing left S1 nerve root. Decompression of the L5–S1 intervertebral space was performed through a left –sidelaminotomy. Large, engorged serpentine epidural veins was found in the axilla of S1 nerve root, compressing it. Coagulative ablation of the dilated epidural vein was performed. Retrospectively, features of epidural varices were noted in the preoperative magnetic resonance imaging scans. Both patients had significant improvement in radiculopathy immediate postoperatively, and sensory symptoms resolved over the next 6 weeks in second case. At recent follow up, both patients had significant relief of symptoms and no recurrent radicular symptoms. Conclusion: An abnormal dilated epidural venous plexus that mimics a herniated lumbar disc is a rare entity. This pathology should be always kept

  8. Effect of maternal ambulation on labour with low-dose combined spinal-epidural analgesia.

    PubMed

    Collis, R E; Harding, S A; Morgan, B M

    1999-06-01

    Two hundred and twenty-nine nulliparous women who requested regional analgesia during labour were given a combined spinal-epidural block. They were randomly allocated to stay in bed or spend at least 20 min of every hour out of bed. There was no significant difference in duration of labour, analgesia requirements, mode of delivery or condition of the baby between the groups. Ambulation appeared to be safe for the mother and baby. Maternal satisfaction with the low-dose combined spinal-epidural was high in both groups.

  9. Effect of epidural analgesia on labor and delivery: a retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Gerli, Sandro; Favilli, Alessandro; Acanfora, Marta M; Bini, Vittorio; Giorgini, Carla; Di Renzo, Gian Carlo

    2011-03-01

    Two groups of women have been retrospectively compared: 155 women who received analgesia and 1355 women who delivered without analgesia. The duration of the first stage, second stage, and total duration of labor was longer in epidural group, however epidural analgesia was not demonstrated as an independent risk factor for a prolonged labor. The variable most influencing the total duration of labor and the duration of the first stage was nulliparity; the variables most influencing the duration of the second stage were the older age, a reduced body mass index, a high newborn weight and nulliparity.

  10. Doxorubicin-induced dilated cardiomyopathy for modified radical mastectomy: A case managed under cervical epidural anaesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Anuj; Kishore, Kamal

    2013-01-01

    Doxorubicin (Dox) is an antineoplastic agent used in a wide variety of malignancies. Its use is limited because of a cumulative, dose-dependent irreversible cardiomyopathy. We report a case of Dox induced cardiomyopathy, posted for modified radical mastectomy. The patient had poor LV function along with moderate pulmonary hypertension. Regional anaesthesia was planned as the risk associated with general anaesthesia was more. A cervical epidural was placed and a block adequate for surgery could be achived. The haemodynamic parameters as measured by esophageal doppler showed a stable trend. The surgery could be managed well under cervical epidural and also provided a good postoperative pain relief. PMID:23825820

  11. Epidural analgesia, fetal monitoring and the condition of the baby at birth with breech presentation.

    PubMed

    Donnai, P; Nicholas, A D

    1975-05-01

    Between December 1970 and March 1973, 138 patients with a singleton fetus presenting by the breech after 36 weeks of pregnancy were deemed suitable for vaginal delivery under epidural analgesia; 130 were delivered vaginally, 10 of them by breech extraction. There was one stillbirth and no neonatal deaths. Epidural analgesia for vaginal breech delivery seemed beneficial. In 65 cases it was possible to compare the umbilical vein pH with the Apgar score at one minute. In 35 patients a continuous recording of the fetal heart rate was used to predict the Apgar score at one minute and the results are discussed.

  12. Adolescence spinal epidural abscess with neurological symptoms: case report, a lesson to be re-learnt.

    PubMed

    Sales, Jafar Ganjpour; Tabrizi, Ali; Elmi, Asghar; Soleimanpour, Jafar; Gavidel, Ehsan

    2013-02-01

    Epidural abscess of the spinal column is a rare condition that can be fatal if left untreated. It promptly progresses and can cause neurologic paralysis, urinary retention or cauda equina syndrome. Compromised immune system that occurs in patients with diabetes mellitus, AIDS, chronic renal failure, alcoholism, or cancer is a predisposing factor. It mostly occurs in adults. Here we would like to report a case of spontaneous pyogenic lumbar epidural abscess with neurological deficit diagnosed in a 15 year old boy. We treated this case successfully with surgical microscopic decompression and drainage.

  13. The Epidural Ligaments (of Hofmann): A Comprehensive Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Tardieu, Gabrielle G; Loukas, Marios; Moisi, Marc; Chapman, Jens; Oskouian, Rod J; Tubbs, R. Shane

    2016-01-01

    The epidural space contains the internal vertebral venous plexus, adipose, and other connective tissues. In the anatomical literature, there are nonspecific descriptions of varying fibrous connective tissue bands in the epidural space, mainly mentioned in the lumbar region, that tether the dural sac to the posterior longitudinal ligament, the vertebral canal, and the ligamentum flavum. These ligaments have been termed as Hofmann’s ligaments. This review expands on the anatomy and function of Hofmann’s ligaments, increasing the awareness of their presence and serves as an impetus for further study of their histology, innervation, and function.  PMID:27752405

  14. High-flow Paraspinal Osseous Epidural Arteriovenous Fistula. A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Iizuka, Yuo; Suzuki, Mitimasa; Suzuki, Kazuhiro; Shimoji, Keigo; Komura, Shinji

    2008-06-03

    We report the clinical and neuroradiological imaging findings of a 26-year-old man who presented with lumbago related to high flow paraspinal osseous epidural arteriovenous fistulas in the thoracic spine. This case was of particular interest because of his exclusive epidural and paraspinal venous drainage and the presence of a prominent dilated venous pouch in the spinal canal. Angiography demonstrated multiple high flow arteriovenous fistulas with an osseous nidus. Transarterial glue embolization was performed by multistage sessions. Clinical symptoms improved dramatically. The unusual features of this case have important implications for therapeutic management.

  15. Interpatch movement of the red milkweed beetle, Tetraopes tetraophthalmus: individual responses to patch size and isolation.

    PubMed

    Matter, Stephen F

    1996-03-01

    Individual movement patterns and the effects of host plant patch size and isolation on patch occupancy were examined for red milkweed beetles, Tetraopes tetraophthalmus, residing in a heterogeneous landscape. Male beetles were found to move both more often and farther between host plant patches than female beetles, and this difference affected the patterns of patch occupancy observed. Overall, unoccupied milkweed patches were smaller and more isolated than patches occupied by beetles. Patches uninhabited by females tended to be more isolated, but not necessarily smaller, than patches with female beetles, indicating that females may be affected more by patch isolation than patch size. Presence of male beetles on patches showed a stronger response to patch size than to patch isolation. Differences in movement between males and females illustrate the need for demographically based dispersal data. Comparisons of Tetraopes interpatch movement patterns between landscapes composed of patches of different size revealed that landscapes with overall smaller patches may have greater rates of interpatch movement.

  16. Patch forest: a hybrid framework of random forest and patch-based segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Zhongliu; Gillies, Duncan

    2016-03-01

    The development of an accurate, robust and fast segmentation algorithm has long been a research focus in medical computer vision. State-of-the-art practices often involve non-rigidly registering a target image with a set of training atlases for label propagation over the target space to perform segmentation, a.k.a. multi-atlas label propagation (MALP). In recent years, the patch-based segmentation (PBS) framework has gained wide attention due to its advantage of relaxing the strict voxel-to-voxel correspondence to a series of pair-wise patch comparisons for contextual pattern matching. Despite a high accuracy reported in many scenarios, computational efficiency has consistently been a major obstacle for both approaches. Inspired by recent work on random forest, in this paper we propose a patch forest approach, which by equipping the conventional PBS with a fast patch search engine, is able to boost segmentation speed significantly while retaining an equal level of accuracy. In addition, a fast forest training mechanism is also proposed, with the use of a dynamic grid framework to efficiently approximate data compactness computation and a 3D integral image technique for fast box feature retrieval.

  17. Laser-assisted patch clamping: a methodology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henriksen, G. H.; Assmann, S. M.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1997-01-01

    Laser microsurgery can be used to perform both cell biological manipulations, such as targeted cell ablation, and molecular genetic manipulations, such as genetic transformation and chromosome dissection. In this report, we describe a laser microsurgical method that can be used either to ablate single cells or to ablate a small area (1-3 microns diameter) of the extracellular matrix. In plants and microorganisms, the extracellular matrix consists of the cell wall. While conventional patch clamping of these cells, as well as of many animal cells, requires enzymatic digestion of the extracellular matrix, we illustrate that laser microsurgery of a portion of the wall enables patch clamp access to the plasma membrane of higher plant cells remaining situated in their tissue environment. What follows is a detailed description of the construction and use of an economical laser microsurgery system, including procedures for single cell and targeted cell wall ablation. This methodology will be of interest to scientists wishing to perform cellular or subcellular ablation with a high degree of accuracy, or wishing to study how the extracellular matrix affects ion channel function.

  18. Geometry of the infalling causal patch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freivogel, Ben; Jefferson, Robert A.; Kabir, Laurens; Yang, I.-Sheng

    2015-02-01

    The firewall paradox states that an observer falling into an old black hole must see a violation of unitarity, locality, or the equivalence principle. Motivated by this remarkable conflict, we analyze the causal structure of black hole spacetimes in order to determine whether all the necessary ingredients for the paradox fit within a single observer's causal patch. We particularly focus on the question of whether the interior partner modes of the outgoing Hawking quanta can, in principle, be measured by an infalling observer. Since the relevant modes are spread over the entire sphere, we answer a simple geometrical question: can any observer see an entire sphere behind the horizon? We find that for all static black holes in 3 +1 and higher dimensions, with any value of the cosmological constant, no single observer can see both the early Hawking radiation and the interior modes with low angular momentum. We present a detailed description of the causal patch geometry of the Schwarzschild black hole in 3 +1 dimensions, where an infalling observer comes closest to being able to measure the relevant modes.

  19. Effects of smoking on the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of a nicotine patch.

    PubMed

    Yun, Hwi-yeol; Seo, Jeong-won; Choi, Ji-eun; Baek, In-hwan; Kang, Wonku; Kwon, Kwang-il

    2008-12-01

    The effect of smoking on the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of a nicotine transdermal delivery system, administered as a single dose or multiple doses, was examined in smokers (n=12) and nonsmokers (n=12). The study was a two-period, parallel trial. In the first period, a single dose of the Nicotinell TTS 20 patch was administered, followed by a 1-week washout period. Then, in the second period, multiple doses of the Nicotinell TTS 20 patch were administered over 4 days. Regarding the pharmacokinetics of nicotine, the AUC(36 h) and AUC(tau) of smokers were about 20% and 40% greater, respectively, than those of nonsmokers. Significant differences in heart rate were observed between smokers and nonsmokers at 10, 12, 16 and 24 h, and significant differences in systolic blood pressure were seen between smokers and nonsmokers at 12, 30 and 36 h in the single-dose study. With multiple doses, significant differences in systolic and diastolic blood pressures were detected between smokers and nonsmokers only at 72.5 and 82 h. Here, it is demonstrated for the first time that the pharmacokinetic and hemodynamic effects of a nicotine patch are significantly different between smokers and nonsmokers.

  20. Patch size has no effect on insect visitation rate per unit area in garden-scale flower patches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garbuzov, Mihail; Madsen, Andy; Ratnieks, Francis L. W.

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies investigating the effect of flower patch size on insect flower visitation rate have compared relatively large patches (10-1000s m2) and have generally found a negative relationship per unit area or per flower. Here, we investigate the effects of patch size on insect visitation in patches of smaller area (range c. 0.1-3.1 m2), which are of particular relevance to ornamental flower beds in parks and gardens. We studied two common garden plant species in full bloom with 6 patch sizes each: borage (Borago officinalis) and lavender (Lavandula × intermedia 'Grosso'). We quantified flower visitation by insects by making repeated counts of the insects foraging at each patch. On borage, all insects were honey bees (Apis mellifera, n = 5506 counts). On lavender, insects (n = 737 counts) were bumble bees (Bombus spp., 76.9%), flies (Diptera, 22.4%), and butterflies (Lepidoptera, 0.7%). On both plant species we found positive linear effects of patch size on insect numbers. However, there was no effect of patch size on the number of insects per unit area or per flower and, on lavender, for all insects combined or only bumble bees. The results show that it is possible to make unbiased comparisons of the attractiveness of plant species or varieties to flower-visiting insects using patches of different size within the small scale range studied and make possible projects aimed at comparing ornamental plant varieties using existing garden flower patches of variable area.

  1. Influence of habitat quality, population size, patch size, and connectivity on patch-occupancy dynamics of the middle spotted woodpecker.

    PubMed

    Robles, Hugo; Ciudad, Carlos

    2012-04-01

    Despite extensive research on the effects of habitat fragmentation, the ecological mechanisms underlying colonization and extinction processes are poorly known, but knowledge of these mechanisms is essential to understanding the distribution and persistence of populations in fragmented habitats. We examined these mechanisms through multiseason occupancy models that elucidated patch-occupancy dynamics of Middle Spotted Woodpeckers (Dendrocopos medius) in northwestern Spain. The number of occupied patches was relatively stable from 2000 to 2010 (15-24% of 101 patches occupied every year) because extinction was balanced by recolonization. Larger and higher quality patches (i.e., higher density of oaks >37 cm dbh [diameter at breast height]) were more likely to be occupied. Habitat quality (i.e., density of large oaks) explained more variation in patch colonization and extinction than did patch size and connectivity, which were both weakly associated with probabilities of turnover. Patches of higher quality were more likely to be colonized than patches of lower quality. Populations in high-quality patches were less likely to become extinct. In addition, extinction in a patch was strongly associated with local population size but not with patch size, which means the latter may not be a good surrogate of population size in assessments of extinction probability. Our results suggest that habitat quality may be a primary driver of patch-occupancy dynamics and may increase the accuracy of models of population survival. We encourage comparisons of competing models that assess occupancy, colonization, and extinction probabilities in a single analytical framework (e.g., dynamic occupancy models) so as to shed light on the association of habitat quality and patch geometry with colonization and extinction processes in different settings and species.

  2. Studying mechanosensitive ion channels with an automated patch clamp.

    PubMed

    Barthmes, Maria; Jose, Mac Donald F; Birkner, Jan Peter; Brüggemann, Andrea; Wahl-Schott, Christian; Koçer, Armağan

    2014-03-01

    Patch clamp electrophysiology is the main technique to study mechanosensitive ion channels (MSCs), however, conventional patch clamping is laborious and success and output depends on the skills of the operator. Even though automated patch systems solve these problems for other ion channels, they could not be applied to MSCs. Here, we report on activation and single channel analysis of a bacterial mechanosensitive ion channel using an automated patch clamp system. With the automated system, we could patch not only giant unilamellar liposomes but also giant Escherichia coli (E. coli) spheroplasts. The tension sensitivity and channel kinetics data obtained in the automated system were in good agreement with that obtained from the conventional patch clamp. The findings will pave the way to high throughput fundamental and drug screening studies on mechanosensitive ion channels.

  3. Single Image Super-resolution using Deformable Patches

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yu; Zhang, Yanning; Yuille, Alan L.

    2014-01-01

    We proposed a deformable patches based method for single image super-resolution. By the concept of deformation, a patch is not regarded as a fixed vector but a flexible deformation flow. Via deformable patches, the dictionary can cover more patterns that do not appear, thus becoming more expressive. We present the energy function with slow, smooth and flexible prior for deformation model. During example-based super-resolution, we develop the deformation similarity based on the minimized energy function for basic patch matching. For robustness, we utilize multiple deformed patches combination for the final reconstruction. Experiments evaluate the deformation effectiveness and super-resolution performance, showing that the deformable patches help improve the representation accuracy and perform better than the state-of-art methods. PMID:25473254

  4. The lucid interval associated with epidural bleeding: evolving understanding.

    PubMed

    Ganz, Jeremy C

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this paper was to elucidate the evolution of our understanding of the term "lucid interval." A number of texts were reviewed to assess their suitability for analysis. The primary requirement was that the text contain detailed descriptions of a series of patients. Details of the clinical course, the findings and timing of surgery, and, when relevant, the time of death and postmortem findings were required. Books written by Henri-François Le Dran, Percival Pott, and James Hill fulfilled these criteria. Surgical findings included the presence and type of fractures, changes in the bone, separation of periosteum, malodorous or purulent material, tense brain, and hematoma. Postmortem findings supplemented and/or complemented the surgical findings. The courses of the patients were then tabulated, and the correlation between different clinical and operative findings was thereby determined. Our understanding of a lucid interval began in the early 18th century with the work of Henri-François Le Dran and Percival Pott in London. They did not, however, demonstrate an interval without symptoms between trauma and deterioration in patients with epidural hematomas (EDHs). The interval they described was longer than usually expected with EDHs and occurred exclusively in patients who had a posttraumatic infection. In 1751, James Hill, from Dumfries, Scotland, described the first hematoma-related lucid interval in a patient with a subdural hematoma. The first case of a lucid interval associated with an EDH was described by John Abernethy. In the 19th century, Jonathan Hutchinson and Walter Jacobson described the interval as it is known today, in cases of EDH. The most recent work on the topic came from studies in Cincinnati and Oslo, where it was demonstrated that bleeding can separate dura mater and that hemorrhage into the epidural space can be shunted out via the veins. This shunting could delay the accumulation of a hematoma and thus the rise in intracranial pressure

  5. Ethnic differences in the use of intrapartum epidural analgesia

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Obstetric epidural analgesia (EA) is widely applied, but studies have reported that its use may be less extensive among immigrant women or those from minority ethnic groups. Our aim was to examine whether this was the case in our geographic area, which contains an important immigrant population, and if so, to describe the different components of this phenomenon. Methods Cross-sectional observational study. Setting: general acute care hospital, located in Marbella, southern Spain. Analysis of computer records of deliveries performed from 2004 to 2010. Comparison of characteristics of deliveries according to the mothers’ geographic origins and of vaginal deliveries noting whether EA was received, using univariate and bivariate statistical analysis and multiple logistic regression (MLR). Results A total of 21,034 deliveries were recorded, and 37.4% of these corresponded to immigrant women. EA was provided to 61.1% of the Spanish women and to 51.5% of the immigrants, with important variations according to geographic origin: over 52% of women from other European countries and South America received EA, compared with around 45% of the African women and 37% of the Asian women. These differences persisted in the MLR model after adjusting for the mother's age, type of labor initiation, the weight of the neonate and for single or multiple gestation. With the Spanish patients as the reference category, all the other countries of origin presented lower probabilities of EA use. This was particularly apparent for the patients from Asia (OR 0.38; 95%CI 0.31-0.46), Morocco (OR 0.49; 95%CI 0.43-0.54) and other Africa (OR 0.55; 95%CI 0.37-0.81). Conclusions We observed a different use of EA in vaginal deliveries, according to the geographic origin of the women. The explanation for this involves a complex set of factors, depending both on the patient and on the healthcare staff. PMID:22818255

  6. Effect of Eye Patching in Rehabilitation of Hemispatial Neglect

    PubMed Central

    Smania, Nicola; Fonte, Cristina; Picelli, Alessandro; Gandolfi, Marialuisa; Varalta, Valentina

    2013-01-01

    Eye patching (EP; monocular or right hemifield) has been proposed to improve visuospatial attention to the ignored field in patients with hemispatial neglect. The aim of this paper is to review the literature on the effects of EP in hemispatial neglect after stroke in order to convey evidence-based recommendations to clinicians in stroke rehabilitation. Thirteen intervention studies were selected from the Medline, EMBASE, Scopus, Cochrane Library, CINAHL, PsychINFO, EBRSR, and Health Star databases. Methodological quality was defined according to the Physiotherapy Evidence Database. Overall, seven studies used monocular EP, five used right hemifield patching, and one compared right monocular with right hemifield patching. Seven studies compared normal viewing to monocular or hemifield patching conditions. Six studies included a period of treatment. As to the monocular EP, four studies reported positive effects of right monocular patching. One study showed an improvement in hemispatial neglect with left monocular patching. Two studies found no superiority of right vs. left monocular patching. One study found no effects of right monocular patching. As to the right hemifield EP, one study showed improvements in neglect after right hemifield patching. Three studies found that right hemifield patching combined with another rehabilitation technique was more effective than that treatment alone. One study found no differences between right hemifield patching combined with another treatment and that treatment alone. One study found the same effect between right hemifield patching alone and another rehabilitation technique. Our results globally tend to support the usefulness of right hemifield EP in clinical practice. In order to define a level of evidence with the standard rehabilitation evidence rating tools, further properly powered randomized controlled trials or meta-analysis are needed. PMID:24032011

  7. The Hedgehog Receptor Patched Is Involved in Cholesterol Transport

    PubMed Central

    Bidet, Michel; Joubert, Olivier; Lacombe, Benoit; Ciantar, Marine; Nehmé, Rony; Mollat, Patrick; Brétillon, Lionel; Faure, Hélène; Bittman, Robert; Ruat, Martial; Mus-Veteau, Isabelle

    2011-01-01

    Background Sonic hedgehog (Shh) signaling plays a crucial role in growth and patterning during embryonic development, and also in stem cell maintenance and tissue regeneration in adults. Aberrant Shh pathway activation is involved in the development of many tumors, and one of the most affected Shh signaling steps found in these tumors is the regulation of the signaling receptor Smoothened by the Shh receptor Patched. In the present work, we investigated Patched activity and the mechanism by which Patched inhibits Smoothened. Methodology/Principal Findings Using the well-known Shh-responding cell line of mouse fibroblasts NIH 3T3, we first observed that enhancement of the intracellular cholesterol concentration induces Smoothened enrichment in the plasma membrane, which is a crucial step for the signaling activation. We found that binding of Shh protein to its receptor Patched, which involves Patched internalization, increases the intracellular concentration of cholesterol and decreases the efflux of a fluorescent cholesterol derivative (BODIPY-cholesterol) from these cells. Treatment of fibroblasts with cyclopamine, an antagonist of Shh signaling, inhibits Patched expression and reduces BODIPY-cholesterol efflux, while treatment with the Shh pathway agonist SAG enhances Patched protein expression and BODIPY-cholesterol efflux. We also show that over-expression of human Patched in the yeast S. cerevisiae results in a significant boost of BODIPY-cholesterol efflux. Furthermore, we demonstrate that purified Patched binds to cholesterol, and that the interaction of Shh with Patched inhibits the binding of Patched to cholesterol. Conclusion/Significance Our results suggest that Patched may contribute to cholesterol efflux from cells, and to modulation of the intracellular cholesterol concentration. This activity is likely responsible for the inhibition of the enrichment of Smoothened in the plasma membrane, which is an important step in Shh pathway activation. PMID

  8. An Optimal Cell Detection Technique for Automated Patch Clamping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McDowell, Mark; Gray, Elizabeth

    2004-01-01

    While there are several hardware techniques for the automated patch clamping of cells that describe the equipment apparatus used for patch clamping, very few explain the science behind the actual technique of locating the ideal cell for a patch clamping procedure. We present a machine vision approach to patch clamping cell selection by developing an intelligent algorithm technique that gives the user the ability to determine the good cell to patch clamp in an image within one second. This technique will aid the user in determining the best candidates for patch clamping and will ultimately save time, increase efficiency and reduce cost. The ultimate goal is to combine intelligent processing with instrumentation and controls in order to produce a complete turnkey automated patch clamping system capable of accurately and reliably patch clamping cells with a minimum amount of human intervention. We present a unique technique that identifies good patch clamping cell candidates based on feature metrics of a cell's (x, y) position, major axis length, minor axis length, area, elongation, roundness, smoothness, angle of orientation, thinness and whether or not the cell is only particularly in the field of view. A patent is pending for this research.

  9. Facile route to morphologically tailored silver patches on colloidal particles.

    PubMed

    Klupp Taylor, Robin N; Bao, Huixin; Tian, Chenting; Vasylyev, Serhiy; Peukert, Wolfgang

    2010-08-17

    Here we demonstrate, for the first time, the heterogeneous nucleation and growth of silver patches on submicrometer silica spheres. While patches can be grown directly onto native silica particles, it is shown that a higher patch yield can be obtained by first treating the silica with a mixture of an alkanolamine and silver nitrate. Variation of the pretreatment and subsequent coating reactions allowed the patch yield, number, size, thickness, and shape to be adjusted. The patchy particles were shown to possess plasmon modes extending from the visible into the near-IR region, making these structures highly interesting for both their asymmetric morphological and functional properties.

  10. Comparative study of patches for liquid cooled garments.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shitzer, A.; Chambers, A. B.

    1973-01-01

    Tests were performed on 12 cooling patches of various designs to establish criteria for the evaluation of their performance in liquid-cooled suits in industrial, military and aerospace applications. The thermal effectiveness value was 0.088 for patch designs with a double spiral flow pattern, and 0.075 for patch designs with a parallel flow pattern. The ratio of thermal energy transfer rate to cooling-medium pumping power requirement is indicated as the prime performance characteristic to be considered in the selection and rating of cooling patches.

  11. Acute Reversible Charles Bonnet Syndrome Following Eye Patch Placement.

    PubMed

    Nan, Lian; Yanbin, Hou; Jingping, Zhao

    2013-01-01

    Charles Bonnet syndrome (CBS) is characterised by recurrent vivid visual hallucinations in the presence of normal cognition. We present a case of CBS secondary to eye patching following Pars Plana Vitrectomy with an unusually acute onset in a 48-year-old woman. She presented with formed visual hallucinations that started less than 30 min after patching of her left eye. The patch was removed after 2 d, and these hallucinations persisted 2 d following eye patch removal. It is important that the ophthalmic surgeon be aware of the potential for development of CBS and offer appropriate referral and reassurance should it occur.

  12. Epidural tramadol via intraoperatively placed catheter as a standalone analgesic after spinal fusion procedure: An analysis of efficacy and cost

    PubMed Central

    Ilangovan, Vijaysundar; Vivakaran, Thanga Tirupathi Rajan; Gunasekaran, D.; Devikala, D.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: This was a prospective analysis of epidural tramadol as a single analgesic agent delivered through intraoperatively placed epidural catheter for postoperative pain relief after spinal fusion procedures in terms of efficacy and cost. Materials and Methods: Twenty patients who underwent spinal fusion procedures were included in the study. After completion of the procedure, an epidural catheter was placed at the highest level of exposed dura and brought out through a separate tract. Postoperatively, tramadol was infused into the epidural space via the catheter at a dose of 1 mg/kg diluted in 10 ml of saline. The dosage frequency was arbitrarily fixed at every 6 h during the first 2 days and thereafter reduced to every 8 h after the first 2 days till day 5. Conventional intravenous analgesics were used only if additional analgesia was required as assessed by visual analog scale (VAS). Results: Patients’ VAS score was assessed every 4 h from the day of surgery. Patients with a VAS score of 6 or more were given additional analgesia in the form of intravenous paracetamol. Of the twenty patients, eight patients needed additional analgesia during the first 24 h and none required additional analgesia after the first 24 h. The median VAS score was 7 within the first 24 h and progressively declined thereafter. Epidural tramadol was noted to be many times cheaper than conventional parenteral analgesics. Conclusion: Epidural tramadol infusion is safe and effective as a standalone analgesic after open spinal fusion surgery, especially after the 1st postoperative day. Intraoperative placement of the epidural catheter is a simple way of delivering tramadol to the epidural space. The cost of analgesia after spinal fusion surgery can be reduced significantly using epidural tramadol alone. PMID:28149082

  13. Role of epidural anesthesia in a fast track liver resection protocol for cirrhotic patients - results after three years of practice

    PubMed Central

    Siniscalchi, Antonio; Gamberini, Lorenzo; Bardi, Tommaso; Laici, Cristiana; Gamberini, Elisa; Francorsi, Letizia; Faenza, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the potential benefits and risks of the use of epidural anaesthesia within an enhanced recovery protocol in this specific subpopulation. METHODS A retrospective review was conducted, including all cirrhotic patients who underwent open liver resection between January 2013 and December 2015 at Bologna University Hospital. Patients with an abnormal coagulation profile contraindicating the placement of an epidural catheter were excluded from the analysis. The control group was composed by patients refusing epidural anaesthesia. RESULTS Of the 183 cirrhotic patients undergoing open liver resections, 57 had contraindications to the placement of an epidural catheter; of the remaining 126, 86 patients received general anaesthesia and 40 combined anaesthesia. The two groups presented homogeneous characteristics. Intraoperatively the metabolic data did not differ between the two groups, whilst the epidural group had a lower mean arterial pressure (P = 0.041) and received more colloid infusions (P = 0.007). Postoperative liver and kidney function did not differ significantly. Length of mechanical ventilation (P = 0.003) and hospital stay (P = 0.032) were significantly lower in the epidural group. No complications related to the epidural catheter placement or removal was recorded. CONCLUSION The use of Epidural Anaesthesia within a fast track protocol for cirrhotic patients undergoing liver resections had a positive impact on the patient’s outcomes and comfort as demonstrated by a significantly lower length of mechanical ventilation and hospital stay in the epidural group. The technique appears to be safely manageable in this fragile population even though these results need confirmation in larger studies. PMID:27660677

  14. Cephalad distribution of three differing volumes of new methylene blue injected into the epidural space in adult goats.

    PubMed

    Johnson, R A; Lopez, M J; Hendrickson, D A; Kruse-Elliott, K T

    1996-01-01

    Epidural anesthesia and analgesia are popular regional anesthetic techniques in many animal species. However, we have not found any reports of studies in animals that have investigated the extent of cephalad migration and level of sensory blockade achieved based only on the volume of drug injected into the epidural space. The purpose of this study was to determine if there is a relationship between the volume (mL/kg) of an injectate injected epidurally and the extent of its cephalad migration within the epidural space. Twelve adult goats were randomly assigned to three treatment groups based on the volume of 0.12% New Methylene Blue (NMB), 0.1, 0.2, or 0.3 mL/kg, injected into the epidural space. The site and speed of injection, animal position, and direction of needle bevel were held constant. All injections were performed at the lumbo-sacral space immediately following euthanasia. At necropsy, the vertebral columns were transected longitudinally. The extent of cephalad migration of dye within the epidural space was easily determined by staining of the dura. Measurements were rounded to the nearest intervertebral space to which the dye had migrated. The individual making assessments was blinded to all treatments. In goats treated with 0.1, 0.2, or 0.3 mL/kg NMB, the number of stained spinal segments was 3.5 +/- 0.6, 6.5 +/- 0.9, and 8.8 +/- 0.6, (mean +/- SEM), respectively. Linear regression performed on the data was significant (P < .05) with R2 = 0.86. There was a strong linear relationship between volume (mL/kg) of epidurally injected NMB and cranial migration, with the larger volumes producing more cephalad spread within the epidural space. These results provide evidence for the volume of epidural injectate needed to produce a desired level of sensory blockade in adult goats.

  15. Two Holes in 'Wooly Patch' (False Color)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The rock abrasion tool on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit ground two holes in a relatively soft rock called 'Wooly Patch' near the base of the 'Columbia Hills' inside Gusev Crater on Mars. This false-color image from the panoramic camera was taken on sol 200 (July 25, 2004) and generated using the camera's 750-, 530-, and 430-nanometer filters. It highlights the material ground up by the rock abrasion tool, grayish-blue in appearance in this image. The color of the material excavated suggests the interior of the rock contains iron minerals that are less oxidized than the dust or possibly weathered coating on the exterior of the rock. Scientists speculate that this relatively soft rock (compared to others analyzed by Spirit) may have been modified by water. Small cracks in the surface outside the drill holes may be the result of interactions with water-rich fluids.

  16. Arachnoiditis Following Caudal Epidural Injections for the Lumbo-Sacral Radicular Pain

    PubMed Central

    Nanjayan, Shashi Kumar; Yallappa, Sachin; Bommireddy, Rajendra

    2013-01-01

    Caudal epidural steroid injection is a very common intervention in treatment of low back pain and sciatica symptoms. Although extensively used, it is not devoid of complications. A few reports of chemical and infective arachnoiditis exist following lumbar epidural anaesthesia, but none following a caudal epidural steroid injection.We report a case of arachnoiditis following caudal epidural steroid injections for lumbar radiculopathy. The patient presented with contralateral sciatica, worsening low back pain and urinary retention few days following the injection, followed by worsening motor functions in L4/L5/S1 myotomes with resultant dense foot drop. Gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging suggested infective arachnoiditis with diffuse enhancement and clumping of the nerve roots within the lumbar and sacral thecal sac. As the number of injections in the management of back pain and lumbo-sacral radicular pain is increasing annually, it is imperative to have a thorough understanding of this potentially dangerous complication and educate the patients appropriately. PMID:24353855

  17. The comparative study of epidural levobupivacaine and bupivacaine in major abdominal surgeries

    PubMed Central

    Uzuner, Ali; Saracoglu, Kemal Tolga; Saracoglu, Ayten; Erdemli, Ozcan

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Opioid and local anesthetic infusion by an epidural catheter is widely used as a postoperative pain management method after major abdominal surgeries. There are several agents nowadays to provide sufficient analgesia. The agents which cause less side effects but better quality of analgesia are more valuable. We aimed to postoperatively compare the analgesic, hemodynamic and arrhythmogenic effects of epidural levobupivacaine-fentanyl and bupivacaine-fentanyl solutions. METHODS: Fifty patients were scheduled to undergo major abdominal surgery in this clinical trial. The parameters were recorded pre- and post-operatively. In Group I (n=25), bupivacaine with fentanyl solution and in Group II (n=25), levobupivacaine with fentanyl solution was infused via epidural patient-controlled analgesia (PCA). According to the preoperative and postoperative holter recording reports, the arrhythmogenic effects were examined in four catagories: ventricular arrhythmia (VA), supraventricular arrhythmia (SVA), atrioventricular conduction abnormalities and pauses longer than two seconds. RESULTS: Mean visual analog scale (VAS) values of groups did not differ at all time. They were 6 at the end of the surgery (0. Min, p = 0.622). The scores were 5 in Group I and 4 in Group II in 30. min (p = 0.301). The frequency of SVA was higher in bupivacaine group. CONCLUSIONS: The results of our study suggest that same concentration of epidural levobupivacaine and bupivacaine with fentanyl provide stable postoperative analgesia and both were found safe for the patients undergoing major abdominal surgery. PMID:22973384

  18. Thoracic osteomyelitis and epidural abscess formation due to cat scratch disease: case report.

    PubMed

    Dornbos, David; Morin, Jocelyn; Watson, Joshua R; Pindrik, Jonathan

    2016-12-01

    Osteomyelitis of the spine with associated spinal epidural abscess represents an uncommon entity in the pediatric population, requiring prompt evaluation and diagnosis to prevent neurological compromise. Cat scratch disease, caused by the pathogen Bartonella henselae, encompasses a wide spectrum of clinical presentations; however, an association with osteomyelitis and epidural abscess has been reported in only 4 other instances in the literature. The authors report a rare case of multifocal thoracic osteomyelitis with an epidural abscess in a patient with a biopsy-proven pathogen of cat scratch disease. A 5-year-old girl, who initially presented with vague constitutional symptoms, was diagnosed with cat scratch disease following biopsy of an inguinal lymph node. Despite appropriate antibiotics, she presented several weeks later with recurrent symptoms and back pain. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed 2 foci of osteomyelitis at T-8 and T-11 with an associated anterior epidural abscess from T-9 to T-12. Percutaneous image-guided vertebral biopsy revealed B. henselae by polymerase chain reaction analysis, and she was treated conservatively with doxycycline and rifampin with favorable clinical outcome.

  19. Evidence for using air or fluid when identifying the epidural space.

    PubMed

    Sanford, Curtis L; Rodriguez, Ricardo E; Schmidt, James; Austin, Paul N

    2013-02-01

    Lumbar epidural analgesia is frequently employed to provide pain relief for women during labor. Anesthesia providers use various methods to identify the epidural space. Some providers use air, some use fluid, and others use a combination of air and fluid during the loss of resistance technique. Loss of resistance to air has been speculated to result in a lesser quality of analgesia compared with loss of resistance to only fluid. A search strategy focusing on preappraised sources was used to locate evidence from interventional and observational studies. Four evidence sources were located, including a systematic review with meta-analysis of 4 older studies. The evidence reviewed was inconclusive in determining whether a difference in analgesia quality results from the use of air or fluid during the loss of resistance technique. Future studies should include an adequate number of subjects and address other problems such as operator experience, observer blinding, equivalence of subject characteristics, outcomes definition and measurement, and composition of epidural solution. Providers should consider other factors when selecting loss of resistance medium, such as the reported complications of large amounts of air injected into the epidural space and surrounding structures.

  20. Spontaneous spinal epidural abscess presenting in a previously healthy young adult man.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Andrew M; Rollins, Jason L

    2013-01-01

    We report a case of spontaneous spinal epidural abscess (SEA) with initial chief complaint of shoulder pain and no appreciable neurologic symptoms. Since outcomes of SEA appear to be related to the degree of neurologic deficit at the time of intervention, we explore opportunities for earlier diagnosis.

  1. Spinal epidural abscess as a result of dissemination from gluteal abscess secondary to intramuscular analgesic injection.

    PubMed

    Sasani, Mehdi; Aydin, Ozlem; Aydin, Ahmet Levent; Oktenoglu, Tunc; Ozer, Ali Fahir; Ercelen, Omur

    2009-01-01

    Spinal epidural abscess is a collection of suppurative material that forms between the dura mater and the ligamentum flavum. If not recognized early and treated correctly, it can lead to life-threatening sepsis. Here we report the case of a female patient, 51 years of age, with difficulty walking and bilateral leg pain after having had degenerative discogenic pain for many years. The patient had occasionally received intramuscular non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug injections. The current report is that of an unusual case of epidural abscess that formed following multiple dose of intramuscular non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug over a 1-year period. Hematogenous or direct dissemination is the suspected cause. To prevent serious morbidity and mortality, early diagnosis is essential. Patients with localized back pain who are at risk for developing such epidural spinal abscesses should receive a magnetic resonance imaging scan with contrast enhancement without delay. The existence of predisposing factors such as intramuscular injections should be considered in the assessment of suspected spinal epidural abscess.

  2. Nonoperative Management of a Multi-Regional Epidural Abscess with Neurological Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez, Miguel; Berg, Andrew; Bhatia, Chandra

    2015-01-01

    Spinal epidural abscesses are uncommon, but their incidence is increasing. They represent a collection of purulent material in the epidural space and most commonly occur in the lumbar spine, where they remain localised. Abscesses that affect all three spinal levels (holospinal or multiregional abscesses) are extremely rare, with only a few cases published in the literature. Epidural abscesses are particularly high risk infections as progressive neurological dysfunction can occur rapidly; early diagnosis and treatment is therefore essential to avoid long term neurological complications and reduce potential mortality. Given the uncommon nature of this condition, the treatment remains controversial with no definitive guidance on conservative versus surgical management. The literature mostly recommends surgical decompression along with intravenous antibiotics in patients with neurological abnormalities. We describe a case of a 77-year-old patient presenting with a delayed diagnosis of a multi-regional epidural abscess with associated upper motor neurone signs. The patient was successfully treated nonoperatively with a course of antibiotics resulting in complete radiological resolution of the abscess and full neurological recovery. PMID:26512341

  3. Percutaneous tapping for the treatment of sinusitis-related intracranial epidural abscess in children

    PubMed Central

    Miyabe, Rumi; Niida, Mami; Obonai, Toshio; Aoki, Nobuhiko; Okada, Takaharu

    2014-01-01

    A 13-year-old boy with medically intractable sinusitis-related intracranial epidural abscess in the frontal region was treated using percutaneous tapping. Drainage of pus measuring 7 ml yielded excellent postoperative course without cosmetic disadvantage on the forehead. Percutaneous tapping is considered to be the ideal treatment because of minimal invasiveness and cosmetic aspects of the wound. PMID:25624941

  4. [Combined spinal epidural anesthesia during endoprosthetic surgeries for bone tumors in old-age children].

    PubMed

    Matinian, N V; Saltanov, A I

    2005-01-01

    Thirty-five patients (ASA II-III) aged 12 to 17 years, diagnosed as having osteogenic sarcoma and Ewing's sarcoma localizing in the femur and tibia, were examined. Surgery was performed as sectoral resection of the affected bone along with knee joint endoprosthesis. Surgical intervention was made under combined spinal and epidural anesthesia (CSEA) with sedation, by using the methods for exact dosing of propofol (6-4 mg/kg x h). During intervention, a child's respiration remains is kept spontaneous with oxygen insufflation through a nasal catheter. CSEA was performed in two-segmental fashion. The epidural space was first catheterized. After administration of a test dose, 0.5% marcaine spinal was injected into dermatomas below the subarachnoidal space, depending on body weight (3.0-4.0 ml). Sensory blockade developed following 3-5 min and lasted 90-120 min, thereafter a local anesthetic (bupivacaine) or its mixture plus promedole was epidurally administered. ??Anesthesia was effective in all cases, motor blockade. During surgery, there was a moderate arterial hypotension that did not require the use of vasopressors. The acid-alkali balance suggested the adequacy of spontaneous respiration. The only significant complication we observed was atony of the bladder that requires its catheterization till the following day. An epidural catheter makes it possible to effect adequate postoperative analgesia.

  5. Side effects of spiramycin masquerading as local anesthetic toxicity during labor epidural analgesia.

    PubMed

    Julliac, B; Théophile, H; Begorre, M; Richez, B; Haramburu, F

    2010-07-01

    Significant fetal bradycardia occurred when a parturient receiving labor epidural analgesia experienced generalized numbness and tingling, a metallic taste and hot flushes. An emergent cesarean delivery under general anesthesia was performed with favorable outcomes for the mother and baby. The most likely source of the maternal symptoms was spiramycin, which was being administered for treatment of toxoplasmosis.

  6. Eisenmenger's syndrome in pregnancy: Use of epidural anesthesia and analgesia for elective cesarean section

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Lipi; Pani, Nibedita; Samantaray, Ramesh; Nayak, Kalyani

    2014-01-01

    We describe a case of a pregnant patient with a large ventricular septal defect (VSD) and pulmonary artery hypertension, presented to the hospital and underwent elective cesarean section under epidural anesthesia and postoperative analgesia. The procedure was uneventful till the patient was discharged on 10th day. PMID:25190960

  7. A Highly Rare Cause of Lumbar Spondylodiscitis with Epidural Abscess: Actinomyces israelii

    PubMed Central

    Kapmaz, Mahir; Gülşen, İsmail; Kış, Naciye; Başaran, Seniha; Öksüz, Lütfiye; Gürler, Nezahat

    2014-01-01

    Actinomyces species may lead to slowly progressive infection of almost any site once mucosal breakdown exists; hence, it has the name “great pretender.” Its diagnosis may be unthinkable unless proper cultures/histologies are taken. We describe a patient with lumbar spondylodiscitis and epidural abscess. This is an exceptional another disease by actinomycosis. PMID:25024855

  8. Intrathecal morphine overdose during combined spinal-epidural block for Caesarean delivery.

    PubMed

    Cannesson, M; Nargues, N; Bryssine, B; Debon, R; Boselli, E; Chassard, D

    2002-12-01

    We describe a 25 mg intrathecal morphine overdose during a combined spinal-epidural block for a Caesarean delivery. Naloxone infusion (5.24 mg over 24 h) was started prior to the patient becoming symptomatic and almost immediately after the overdose. Invasive therapeutics such as mechanical ventilation were avoided.

  9. [Suspicious case of epidural hematoma due to coagulopathy caused by vitamin K deficiency associated with antibiotics].

    PubMed

    Hirata, Naoyuki; Kanaya, Noriaki; Shimizu, Hitoshi; Watanabe, Masanori; Namiki, Akiyoshi

    2007-02-01

    We experienced a case of epidural hematoma caused by coagulopathy 3 days after surgery. A 72-year-old man, who had undergone a total gastrectomy, suffered from nausea and vomiting by ileus. He underwent repair of ileus under general anesthesia with thoracic epidural anesthesia. Three days after surgery, abnormal bleeding followed by disorder of prothrombin activity (PT) and activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) and paralysis due to thoracic epidural hematoma developed. It was suspected that these coagulopathies were the results of vitamin K deficiency. Vitamin K deficiency in this patient was considered to have been caused by cephem antibiotics containing N-methyl-thiotetrazole (NMTT) side chain and no oral intake of food for a few days preoperatively. The patient was treated with fresh frozen plasma and intravenous menatetrenon, which improved abnormal bleeding and disorder of PT and aPTT within 24hr. After a discussion with orthopedic consultants, we selected a conservative therapy rather than surgical removal of the hematoma. Thoracic epidural hematoma disappeared two months after surgery, but motor paralysis requiring rehabilitation remained. In conclusion, when patients have not eaten anything for a few days and antibiotics with an NMTT sidechain has been administered, care must be taken to prevent vitamin K deficiency and coagulopathy.

  10. Therapeutic effect of epidural hyaluronic acid in a rat model of foraminal stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Nahm, Francis Sahngun; Lee, Pyung Bok; Choe, Ghee Young; Lim, Young Jin; Kim, Yong Chul

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Since receiving a warning from the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) about injection of corticosteroids into the epidural space having serious adverse events, we have sought alternative medications for injection at this site. Hyaluronic acid (HA) has anti-adhesive, anti-inflammatory, and lubricating properties, so could potentially be useful for spinal pain. The exact mechanism by which spinal stenosis develops is not fully understood, but is likely to involve inflammation. Therefore, we hypothesized that HA could have a therapeutic effect in spinal stenosis. This study evaluated the effects of epidural administration of HA on alleviation of pain in a rat model of foraminal stenosis. Materials and methods After creating the animal model, HA (HA group) or saline solution (S group) was administered via an epidural catheter. The paw-withdrawal threshold to mechanical stimulation and motor dysfunction were monitored for up to 21 days. Tissue was collected to evaluate the degree of adhesion, inflammation in the perineural area, and chromatolysis in the dorsal root ganglion (DRG). Results The mechanical withdrawal threshold was restored in the HA group but not in the S group (P < 0.001). The HA group also showed less fibrosis (P = 0.026) and less chromatolysis (P = 0.002) than the S group. Conclusion HA administered epidurally had a therapeutic effect on the allodynia and hyperalgesia induced by chronic compression of the DRG. PMID:28182130

  11. Spinal Epidural Hematoma Following Cupping Glass Treatment in an Infant With Hemophilia A.

    PubMed

    Fruchtman, Yariv; Dardik, Rima; Barg, Assaf Arie; Livnat, Tami; Feldman, Zeev; Rubinstein, Marina; Grinberg, Gahl; Rosenberg, Nurit; Kenet, Gili

    2016-06-01

    A 6 months old infant, diagnosed with a rare mutation causing severe hemophilia A, presented with spinal epidural hematoma. Parents later admitted the infant had glass cupping therapy performed within 2 weeks of the onset of symptoms. The rare mutation, rare bleeding complication, and the eventual course of therapy applied in this case will be discussed in our case report.

  12. Comparison of epidural morphine, hydromorphone and fentanyl for postoperative pain control in children undergoing orthopaedic surgery.

    PubMed

    Goodarzi, M

    1999-01-01

    The safety and side-effects profile of epidural administration of a hydrophilic (morphine), highly lipophilic (fentanyl) and a drug with intermediate hydrophilic and lipophilic activity (hydromorphone) were compared in 90 children undergoing orthopaedic procedures. Ninety patients were randomly assigned (30 in each group) to receive epidural morphine, hydromorphone, or fentanyl for postoperative analgesia. Respiratory effects, nausea, somnolence, urinary retention, pruritus and visual pain scales were evaluated and compared during a 30-h period following surgery. In the morphine group, 25% showed respiratory depression with oxygen saturation below 90% but there was no incidence of respiratory depression in the fentanyl or hydromorphone groups. Somnolence was prominent in some of the patients in all the groups, but was more prolonged in the morphine group. Statistically, there was no significant difference in nausea between the groups, but pruritus was more severe and frequent in the morphine group. The incidence of urinary retention in the morphine group was higher compared with the fentanyl and hydromorphone groups. In conclusion, epidural hydromorphone, demonstrating less side-effects, is preferable to morphine and fentanyl for epidural analgesia in children.

  13. Epidural hydromorphone with and without epinephrine for post-operative analgesia after cesarean delivery.

    PubMed

    Dougherty, T B; Baysinger, C L; Henenberger, J C; Gooding, D J

    1989-03-01

    The efficacy of epidural hydromorphone alone or in combination with epinephrine for postoperative analgesia was evaluated in 30 healthy women who underwent cesarean delivery with epidural anesthesia. They were assigned randomly to receive either 1.5 mg hydromorphone alone (N = 15) or 1.5 mg hydromorphone with 1/200,000 epinephrine (N = 15). Duration of analgesia (mean +/- SD) was 24.3 +/- 9.4 hours after the epidural injection of hydromorphone plus epinephrine. This was significantly greater (p less than 0.01) than the duration of 18.2 +/- 5.9 hours after the same dose of plain hydromorphone. Analgesia was more rapid in onset and significantly better at the 0.5, 1, 3, and 12 hours postoperatively in the hydromorphone-epinephrine group. Side effects including pruritus (73%), nausea (20%), and vomiting (15%) were of similar frequency with and without epinephrine. Although mean venous PCO2 (PvCO2) levels three and six hours after the hydromorphone-epinephrine dose were elevated significantly over the pre-drug PvCO2 levels, no respiratory depression was detected by an apnea monitor to which all patients were connected. The addition of epinephrine to epidural hydromorphone hastened onset and prolonged the duration of analgesia after cesarean section.

  14. [Spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma after stillbirth in hepatosis of pregnancy (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Panitz, K; Neundörfer, B; Taglieber, U; Susemihl, D

    1975-02-28

    The case history of a 26-year-old woman with spinal epidural hematoma after the expulsion of a fetus dead in utero and with a slight hepatosis of pregnancy. The case is discussed in the light of the previously known literature.

  15. A comparative study of magnesium sulfate vs dexmedetomidine as an adjunct to epidural bupivacaine

    PubMed Central

    Shahi, Vaibhav; Verma, Anil Kumar; Agarwal, Apurva; Singh, Chandra Shekhar

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims: This prospective, randomized, double-blind study was undertaken to establish the effect of addition of magnesium or dexmedetomidine, as an adjuvant, to epidural bupivacaine in lower limb surgeries. Materials and Methods: One hundred and twenty ASA (American Society of Anesthesiologists) class I and II patients undergoing lower limb surgeries were enrolled to receive either magnesium sulfate (Group M) or dexmedetomidine (Group D) along with epidural bupivacaine for surgical anesthesia. All the study subjects received an epidural anesthesia with 14 ml of 0.5% bupivacaine along with either MgSO4 50 mg (Group M) or dexmedetomidine 0.5 μg/kg (Group D) or saline (Group C). The onset of motor and sensory block, duration of block, hemodynamic parameters, and any adverse events were monitored. Results: Analgesia in the postoperative period was better in Group D, duration of sensory and motor blockade was significantly prolonged in Group D and incidence of sedation was more in Group D. Conclusion: Hence, addition of dexemedetomidine to epidural bupivacaine can be advantageous with respect to increased duration of motor and sensory blockade and arousable sedation. PMID:25425781

  16. Potentiation of epidural lidocaine by co-administering tramadol by either intramuscular or epidural route in cats.

    PubMed

    Hermeto, Larissa C; DeRossi, Rafael; Marques, Beatriz C; Jardim, Paulo H A

    2015-07-01

    This study investigated the analgesic and systemic effects of intramuscular (IM) versus epidural (EP) administration of tramadol as an adjunct to EP injection of lidocaine in cats. Six healthy, domestic, shorthair female cats underwent general anesthesia. A prospective, randomized, crossover trial was then conducted with each cat receiving the following 3 treatments: EP injection of 2% lidocaine [LEP; 3.0 mg/kg body weight (BW)]; EP injection of a combination of lidocaine and 5% tramadol (LTEP; 3.0 and 2.0 mg/kg BW, respectively); or EP injection of lidocaine and IM injection of tramadol (LEPTIM; 3.0 and 2.0 mg/kg BW, respectively). Systemic effects, spread and duration of analgesia, behavior, and motor blockade were determined before treatment and at predetermined intervals afterwards. The duration of analgesia was 120 ± 31 min for LTEP, 71 ± 17 min for LEPTIM, and 53 ± 6 min for LEP (P < 0.05; mean ± SD). The cranial spread of analgesia obtained with LTEP was similar to that with LEP or LEPTIM, extending to dermatomic region T13-L1. Complete motor blockade was similar for the 3 treatments. It was concluded that tramadol produces similar side effects in cats after either EP or IM administration. Our findings indicate that EP and IM tramadol (2 mg/kg BW) with EP lidocaine produce satisfactory analgesia in cats. As an adjunct to lidocaine, EP tramadol provides a longer duration of analgesia than IM administration. The adverse effects produced by EP and IM administration of tramadol were not different. Further studies are needed to determine whether EP administration of tramadol could play a role in managing postoperative pain in cats when co-administered with lidocaine after painful surgical procedures.

  17. Potentiation of epidural lidocaine by co-administering tramadol by either intramuscular or epidural route in cats

    PubMed Central

    Hermeto, Larissa C.; DeRossi, Rafael; Marques, Beatriz C.; Jardim, Paulo H.A.

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the analgesic and systemic effects of intramuscular (IM) versus epidural (EP) administration of tramadol as an adjunct to EP injection of lidocaine in cats. Six healthy, domestic, shorthair female cats underwent general anesthesia. A prospective, randomized, crossover trial was then conducted with each cat receiving the following 3 treatments: EP injection of 2% lidocaine [LEP; 3.0 mg/kg body weight (BW)]; EP injection of a combination of lidocaine and 5% tramadol (LTEP; 3.0 and 2.0 mg/kg BW, respectively); or EP injection of lidocaine and IM injection of tramadol (LEPTIM; 3.0 and 2.0 mg/kg BW, respectively). Systemic effects, spread and duration of analgesia, behavior, and motor blockade were determined before treatment and at predetermined intervals afterwards. The duration of analgesia was 120 ± 31 min for LTEP, 71 ± 17 min for LEPTIM, and 53 ± 6 min for LEP (P < 0.05; mean ± SD). The cranial spread of analgesia obtained with LTEP was similar to that with LEP or LEPTIM, extending to dermatomic region T13–L1. Complete motor blockade was similar for the 3 treatments. It was concluded that tramadol produces similar side effects in cats after either EP or IM administration. Our findings indicate that EP and IM tramadol (2 mg/kg BW) with EP lidocaine produce satisfactory analgesia in cats. As an adjunct to lidocaine, EP tramadol provides a longer duration of analgesia than IM administration. The adverse effects produced by EP and IM administration of tramadol were not different. Further studies are needed to determine whether EP administration of tramadol could play a role in managing postoperative pain in cats when co-administered with lidocaine after painful surgical procedures. PMID:26130854

  18. Remifentanil patient controlled analgesia versus epidural analgesia in labour. A multicentre randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Pain relief during labour is a topic of major interest in the Netherlands. Epidural analgesia is considered to be the most effective method of pain relief and recommended as first choice. However its uptake by pregnant women is limited compared to other western countries, partly as a result of non-availability due to logistic problems. Remifentanil, a synthetic opioid, is very suitable for patient controlled analgesia. Recent studies show that epidural analgesia is superior to remifentanil patient controlled analgesia in terms of pain intensity score; however there was no difference in satisfaction with pain relief between both treatments. Methods/design The proposed study is a multicentre randomized controlled study that assesses the cost-effectiveness of remifentanil patient controlled analgesia compared to epidural analgesia. We hypothesize that remifentanil patient controlled analgesia is as effective in improving pain appreciation scores as epidural analgesia, with lower costs and easier achievement of 24 hours availability of pain relief for women in labour and efficient pain relief for those with a contraindication for epidural analgesia. Eligible women will be informed about the study and randomized before active labour has started. Women will be randomly allocated to a strategy based on epidural analgesia or on remifentanil patient controlled analgesia when they request pain relief during labour. Primary outcome is the pain appreciation score, i.e. satisfaction with pain relief. Secondary outcome parameters are costs, patient satisfaction, pain scores (pain-intensity), mode of delivery and maternal and neonatal side effects. The economic analysis will be performed from a short-term healthcare perspective. For both strategies the cost of perinatal care for mother and child, starting at the onset of labour and ending ten days after delivery, will be registered and compared. Discussion This study, considering cost effectiveness of remifentanil as

  19. Histological and molecular-biological analyses of poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) (PHB) patches for enhancement of bone regeneration.

    PubMed

    Gredes, Tomasz; Gedrange, Tomasz; Hinüber, Claudia; Gelinsky, Michael; Kunert-Keil, Christiane

    2015-05-01

    Tissue engineered cell-seeded constructs with poly(3)hydroxybutyrate (PHB) induced ectopic bone formation after implantation into the back muscle of rats. The objective of our in vivo study was to evaluate the osteogenic potential of pure PHB patches in surgically created cranial defects. For this, PHB patches were analyzed after implantation in surgically created defects on the cranium of adult male rats. After healing periods of 4, 8 and 12 weeks, the bone tissue specimens containing PHB patches were processed and analyzed histologically as well as molecular-biologically. After 4 weeks, the PHB patches were completely embedded in connective tissue. Eight weeks after PHB insertion, bone regeneration proceeding from bearing bone was found in 50% of all treated animals, whereas all PHB treated cavities showed both bone formation and embedding of the patches in bone 12 weeks after surgery. Furthermore, all slices showed pronounced development of blood vessels. Histomorphometric analysis presented a regenerated bone mean value between 46.4 ± 16.1% and 54.2 ± 19.3% after 4-12 weeks of healing. Caveolin-1 staining in capillary-like structures showed a 1.16-1.38 fold increased expression in PHB treated defects compared to controls. Real-time RT-PCR analyses showed significantly lower expressions of Alpl, Col1a1 and VEGFA in cranium defects after treatment with PHB patches compared to untreated bony defects of the same cranium. Within the limits of the presented animal investigation, it could conclude that the tested PHB patches featured a good biocompatibility and an osteoconductive character.

  20. Smart patches: self-monitoring composite patches for the repair of aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crossley, Samuel D.; Marioli-Riga, Zaira; Tsamasphyros, George; Kanderakis, George; Furnarakis, Nikos; Ikiades, Aris; Konstantaki, Mary

    2004-03-01

    Conventional aircraft repair techniques employ bolted or riveted metallic reinforcements, which frequently introduce additional stress concentrations leading to further cracking and creating areas difficult or impossible to inspect. Bonded composite repairs ("patches") result in the elimination of stress concentrations caused by additional fastener holes, improved strength to weight ratio and present a sealed interface. This reduces even further the danger of corrosion and fretting under the repair, gives greater flexibility in design and lessens application time while lengthening fatigue life. Embedding optical fibres and sensors into the patch, and combining this with advanced data collection and processing systems, creating a so-called "smart patch", will enable the real-time assessment of aircraft structural integrity resulting in reliable prediction of maintenance requirements for repaired structures. This paper describes the current state of the art in smart patch technology, and includes a detailed description of the measurement problem and of the work being undertaken to solve it, at both the component and system level. An analysis of typical crack behaviour, based on FE modelling is presented and this demonstrates the need for optical strain sensors having a very short gauge length. The paper discusses the advantages and limitations of very short Fibre Bragg Gratings (FBGs) in this context and also provides early experimental data from 1mm and 2mm gratings which have been fabricated for this purpose. The paper also describes the impact of the measurement and environmental constraints on the design of the FBG interrogation system and presents the results of initial trials. The work is being undertaken in the framework of a collaborative project (ACIDS) which is co-funded by the European Commission.

  1. Decoding continuous limb movements from high-density epidural electrode arrays using custom spatial filters

    PubMed Central

    Marathe, A R.; Taylor, D M

    2013-01-01

    Objective Our goal was to identify spatial filtering methods that would improve decoding of continuous arm movements from epidural field potentials as well as demonstrate the use of the epidural signals in a closed-loop brain-machine interface (BMI) system in monkeys. Approach Eleven spatial filtering options were compared offline using field potentials collected from 64-channel high-density epidural arrays in monkeys. Arrays were placed over arm/hand motor cortex in which intracortical microelectrodes had previously been implanted and removed leaving focal cortical damage but no lasting motor deficits. Spatial filters tested included: no filtering, common average referencing (CAR), principle component analysis (PCA), and eight novel modifications of the common spatial pattern (CSP) algorithm. The spatial filtering method and decoder combination that performed the best offline was then used online where monkeys controlled cursor velocity using continuous wrist position decoded from epidural field potentials in real time. Main results Optimized CSP methods improved continuous wrist position decoding accuracy by 69% over CAR and by 80% compared to no filtering. Kalman decoders performed better than linear regression decoders and benefitted from including more spatially-filtered signals but not from pre-smoothing the calculated power spectra. Conversely, linear regression decoders required fewer spatially-filtered signals and were improved by pre-smoothing the power values. The ‘position-to-velocity’ transformation used during online control enabled the animals to generate smooth closed-loop movement trajectories using the somewhat limited position information available in the epidural signals. The monkeys’ online performance significantly improved across days of closed-loop training. Significance Most published BMI studies that use electrocortographic signals to decode continuous limb movements either use no spatial filtering or CAR. This study suggests a

  2. The Impact of Epidural Steroid Injections on the Outcomes of Patients Treated for Lumbar Disc Herniation

    PubMed Central

    Radcliff, Kristen; Hilibrand, Alan; Lurie, Jon D.; Tosteson, Tor D.; Delasotta, Lawrence; Rihn, Jeffrey; Zhao, Wenyan; Vaccaro, Alexander; Albert, Todd J.; Weinstein, James N.

    2012-01-01

    Background: The Spine Patient Outcomes Research Trial (SPORT) is a prospective, multicenter study of operative versus nonoperative treatment of lumbar intervertebral disc herniation. It has been suggested that epidural steroid injections may help improve patient outcomes and lower the rate of crossover to surgical treatment. Methods: One hundred and fifty-four patients included in the intervertebral disc herniation arm of the SPORT who had received an epidural steroid injection during the first three months of the study and no injection prior to the study (the ESI group) were compared with 453 patients who had not received an injection during the first three months of the study or prior to the study (the No-ESI group). Results: There was a significant difference in the preference for surgery between groups (19% in the ESI group compared with 56% in the No-ESI group, p < 0.001). There was no difference in primary or secondary outcome measures at four years between the groups. A higher percentage of patients changed from surgical to nonsurgical treatment in the ESI group (41% versus 12% in the No-ESI, p < 0.001). Conclusions: Patients with lumbar disc herniation treated with epidural steroid injection had no improvement in short or long-term outcomes compared with patients who were not treated with epidural steroid injection. There was a higher prevalence of crossover to nonsurgical treatment among surgically assigned ESI-group patients, although this was confounded by the increased baseline desire to avoid surgery among patients in the ESI group. Given these data, we concluded that more studies are necessary to establish the value of epidural steroid injection for symptomatic lumbar intervertebral disc herniation. Level of Evidence: Therapeutic Level II. See Instructions for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence. PMID:22739998

  3. Facilitation of Stepping with Epidural Stimulation in Spinal Rats: Role of Sensory Input

    PubMed Central

    Lavrov, Igor; Courtine, Grégoire; Dy, Christine J.; van den Brand, Rubia; Fong, Andy J.; Gerasimenko, Yuri; Zhong, Hui; Roy, Roland R.; Edgerton, V. Reggie

    2010-01-01

    We investigated the role of afferent information during recovery of coordinated rhythmic activity of the hindlimbs in rats with a complete spinal cord section (~T8) and unilateral deafferentation (T12-S2) to answer the following questions: 1) Can bilateral stepping be generated with only afferent projections intact on one side? 2) Can the sensory input from the non-deafferented side compensate for the loss of the afferent input from the deafferented side through the crossed connections within the lumbosacral spinal cord? 3) Which afferent projections to the spinal cord from the non-deafferented side predominantly mediate the effect of epidural stimulation to facilitate stepping? Recovery of stepping ability was tested under the facilitating influence of epidural stimulation at the S1 spinal segment or epidural stimulation plus quipazine, a 5-HT agonist. All chronic spinal rats were able to generate stepping-like patterns on a moving treadmill on the non-deafferented, but not deafferented, side 3–7 weeks after surgery when facilitated by epidural stimulation. Adaptation to the loss of unilateral afferent input was evident at 7 weeks after surgery, when some movements occurred on the deafferented side. Spinal cord evoked potentials were observed on both sides, although middle (monosynaptic) and late (long-latency) responses were more prominent on the non-deafferented side. The afferent information arising from the non-deafferented side, however, eventually could mediate limited restoration of hindlimb movements on the deafferented side. These data suggest that facilitation of stepping with epidural stimulation is mediated primarily through ipsilateral afferents that project to the locomotor networks. PMID:18667609

  4. Postoperative analgesic efficacy of epidural tramadol as adjutant to ropivacaine in adult upper abdominal surgeries

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Anil P.; Singh, Dharmraj; Singh, Yashpal; Jain, Gaurav

    2015-01-01

    Background: Postoperative pain control after major abdominal surgery is the prime concern of anesthesiologist. Among various methodologies, epidural analgesia is the most preferred technique because of the excellent quality of analgesia with minimum side-effects. Aim: The present study was designated to compare postoperative analgesic efficacy and safety of epidural tramadol as adjuvant to ropivacaine (0.2%) in adult upper abdominal surgery. Settings and Design: Prospective, randomized-controlled, double-blinded trial. Materials and Methods: Ninety patients planned for upper abdominal surgery under general anesthesia were randomized into three equal groups to receive epidural drug via epidural catheter at start of incisional wound closure: Group R to receive ropivacaine (0.2%); Group RT1 to receive tramadol 1 mg/kg with ropivacaine (0.2%); and RT2 to receive tramadol 2 mg/kg with ropivacaine (0.2%). Duration and quality of analgesia (visual analog scale [VAS] score), hemodynamic parameters, and adverse event were recorded and statistically analyzed. Statistical Analysis: One-way analysis of variance test, Fisher's exact test/Chi-square test, whichever appropriate. A P < 0.05 was considered significant. Results: Mean duration of analgesia after epidural bolus drug was significantly higher in Group RT2 (584 ± 58 min) when compared with RT1 (394 ± 46 min) or R Group (283 ± 35 min). VAS score was always lower in RT2 Group in comparison to other group during the study. Hemodynamic parameter remained stable in all three groups. Conclusion: We conclude that tramadol 2 mg/kg with ropivacaine (0.2%) provides more effective and longer-duration analgesia than tramadol 1 mg/kg with ropivacaine (0.2%). PMID:26712976

  5. Epidural analgesia with morphine or buprenorphine in ponies with lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced carpal synovitis.

    PubMed

    Freitas, Gabrielle C; Carregaro, Adriano B; Gehrcke, Martielo I; De La Côrte, Flávio D; Lara, Valéria M; Pozzobon, Ricardo; Brass, Karin E

    2011-04-01

    This study evaluated the analgesia effects of the epidural administration of 0.1 mg/kg bodyweight (BW) of morphine or 5 μg/kg BW of buprenorphine in ponies with radiocarpal joint synovitis. Six ponies were submitted to 3 epidural treatments: the control group (C) received 0.15 mL/kg BW of a 0.9% sodium chloride (NaCl) solution; group M was administered 0.1 mg/kg BW of morphine; and group B was administered 5 μg/kg BW of buprenorphine, both diluted in 0.9% NaCl to a total volume of 0.15 mL/kg BW administered epidurally at 10 s/mL. The synovitis model was induced by injecting 0.5 ng of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in the left or right radiocarpal joint. An epidural catheter was later introduced in the lumbosacral space and advanced up to the thoracolumbar level. The treatment started 6 h after synovitis induction. Lameness, maximum angle of carpal flexion, heart rate, systolic arterial pressure, respiratory rate, temperature, and intestinal motility were evaluated before LPS injection (baseline), 6 h after LPS injection (time 0), and 0.5, 1, 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12, 16, 20, and 24 h after treatments. Although the model of synovitis produced clear clinical signs of inflammation, the lameness scores in group C were different from the baseline for only up to 12 h. Both morphine and buprenorphine showed a reduction in the degree of lameness starting at 0.5 and 6 h, respectively. Reduced intestinal motility was observed at 0.5 h in group M and at 0.5 to 1 h in group B. Epidural morphine was a more effective analgesic that lasted for more than 12 h and without side effects. It was concluded that morphine would be a valuable analgesic option to alleviate joint pain in the thoracic limbs in ponies.

  6. Estimation of the depth of the thoracic epidural space in children using magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Wani, Tariq M; Rafiq, Mahmood; Nazir, Arif; Azzam, Hatem A; Al Zuraigi, Usama; Tobias, Joseph D

    2017-01-01

    Background The estimation of the distance from the skin to the thoracic epidural space or skin to epidural depth (SED) may increase the success rate and decrease the incidence of complications during placement of a thoracic epidural catheter. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the most comprehensive imaging modality of the spine, allowing for the accurate determination of tissue spaces and distances. The present study uses MRI-derived measurements to measure the SED and define the ratio between the straight and inclined SEDs at two thoracic levels (T6–7 and T9–10) in children. Methods The T2-weighed sagittal MRI images of 109 children, ranging in age from 1 month to 8 years, undergoing radiological evaluation unrelated to spine pathology were assessed. The SEDs (inclined and straight) were determined, and a comparison between the SEDs at two thoracic levels (T6–7 and T9–10) was made. Univariate and multivariate linear regression models were used to assess the relationship of the inclined thoracic T6–7 and T9–10 SED measurements with age, height, and weight. Results Body weight demonstrated a stronger association with the SED than did the age or height with R2 values of 0.6 for T6–7 and 0.5 for T9–10. The formulae describing the relationship between the weight and the inclined SED were T6–7 inclined (mm) = 7 + 0.9 × kg and T9–10 inclined (mm) = 7 + 0.8 × kg. Conclusion The depth of the pediatric thoracic epidural space shows a stronger correlation with weight than with age or height. Based on the MRI data, the predictive weight-based formulas can serve as guide to clinicians for placement of thoracic epidural catheters.

  7. Efficacy of the methoxyflurane as bridging analgesia during epidural placement in laboring parturient

    PubMed Central

    Anwari, Jamil S.; Khalil, Laith; Terkawi, Abdullah S.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Establishing an epidural in an agitated laboring woman can be challenging. The ideal pain control technique in such a situation should be effective, fast acting, and short lived. We assessed the efficacy of inhalational methoxyflurane (Penthrox™) analgesia as bridging analgesia for epidural placement. Materials and Methods: Sixty-four laboring women who requested epidural analgesia with pain score of ≥7 enrolled in an observational study, 56 of which completed the study. The parturients were instructed to use the device prior to the onset of uterine contraction pain and to stop at the peak of uterine contraction, repeatedly until epidural has been successfully placed. After each (methoxyflurane inhalation-uterine contraction) cycle, pain, Richmond Agitation Sedation Scale (RASS), nausea and vomiting were evaluated. Maternal and fetal hemodynamics and parturient satisfaction were recorded. Results: The mean baseline pain score was 8.2 ± 1.5 which was reduced to 6.2 ± 2.0 after the first inhalation with a mean difference of 2.0 ± 1.1 (95% confidence interval 1.7-2.3, P < 0.0001), and continued to decrease significantly over the study period (P < 0.0001). The RASS scores continuously improved after each cycle (P < 0.0001). Only 1 parturient from the cohort became lightly sedated (RASS = −1). Two parturients vomited, and no significant changes in maternal hemodynamics or fetal heart rate changes were identified during treatment. 67% of the parturients reported very good or excellent satisfaction with treatment. Conclusion: Penthrox™ provides rapid, robust, and satisfactory therapy to control pain and restlessness during epidural placement in laboring parturient. PMID:26543451

  8. Comparative study of epidural application of morphine versus gelfoam soaked in morphine for lumbar laminectomy

    PubMed Central

    Kundra, Sandeep; Gupta, Vishnu; Bansal, Hanish; Grewal, Anju; Katyal, Sunil; Choudhary, Ashwini Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Background: Epidural application of morphine has been used for postoperative analgesia following spine surgery but short duration of action of single application limits its widespread use. Materials and Methods: One hundred and fifty patients undergoing lumbar laminectomy were randomly allocated to two groups of 75 patients each. Anesthetic technique was standardized in both the groups. In Group I, at the completion of laminectomy, a 5 × 1-cm strip of gelfoam soaked in 5 mg morphine (1 mg/ml) was contoured to be placed in the epidural space whereas, in group II, gelfoam soaked in saline was placed in the epidural space and 5 mg morphine (1mg/ml) was instilled over the intact epidural space. Analgesic consumption for 48 hours, time-of first analgesic request, time of ambulation, time of discharge from post anesthesia care unit (PACU) and hospital and adverse effects were recorded. The data was analyzed using appropriate statistical tests. Results: Mean analgesic consumption in 48 hours was significantly less in group I (8.47 ± 3.674 mg) as compared to group II (24.80 ± 6.009 mg). Supplemental analgesia was requested at 30.03 ± 6.796 hours in Group I, vs 10.25 ± 2.243 in group II (P < 0.001). Group I patients were discharged earlier from PACU as compared to group II (P < 0.001) though time of discharge from hospital was similar in both the groups. There were no major adverse effects except pruritis, which was observed in 30.6% patients in group I and 37.3% in group II (statistically insignificant (P > 0.01)). Conclusion: Epidural application of morphine soaked in gelfoam is an effective method for prolonging the postoperative analgesia after spine surgery. PMID:24574593

  9. Epidural analgesia with morphine or buprenorphine in ponies with lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced carpal synovitis

    PubMed Central

    Freitas, Gabrielle C.; Carregaro, Adriano B.; Gehrcke, Martielo I.; De La Côrte, Flávio D.; Lara, Valéria M.; Pozzobon, Ricardo; Brass, Karin E.

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluated the analgesia effects of the epidural administration of 0.1 mg/kg bodyweight (BW) of morphine or 5 μg/kg BW of buprenorphine in ponies with radiocarpal joint synovitis. Six ponies were submitted to 3 epidural treatments: the control group (C) received 0.15 mL/kg BW of a 0.9% sodium chloride (NaCl) solution; group M was administered 0.1 mg/kg BW of morphine; and group B was administered 5 μg/kg BW of buprenorphine, both diluted in 0.9% NaCl to a total volume of 0.15 mL/kg BW administered epidurally at 10 s/mL. The synovitis model was induced by injecting 0.5 ng of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in the left or right radiocarpal joint. An epidural catheter was later introduced in the lumbosacral space and advanced up to the thoracolumbar level. The treatment started 6 h after synovitis induction. Lameness, maximum angle of carpal flexion, heart rate, systolic arterial pressure, respiratory rate, temperature, and intestinal motility were evaluated before LPS injection (baseline), 6 h after LPS injection (time 0), and 0.5, 1, 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12, 16, 20, and 24 h after treatments. Although the model of synovitis produced clear clinical signs of inflammation, the lameness scores in group C were different from the baseline for only up to 12 h. Both morphine and buprenorphine showed a reduction in the degree of lameness starting at 0.5 and 6 h, respectively. Reduced intestinal motility was observed at 0.5 h in group M and at 0.5 to 1 h in group B. Epidural morphine was a more effective analgesic that lasted for more than 12 h and without side effects. It was concluded that morphine would be a valuable analgesic option to alleviate joint pain in the thoracic limbs in ponies. PMID:21731186

  10. Decoding continuous limb movements from high-density epidural electrode arrays using custom spatial filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marathe, A. R.; Taylor, D. M.

    2013-06-01

    Objective. Our goal was to identify spatial filtering methods that would improve decoding of continuous arm movements from epidural field potentials as well as demonstrate the use of the epidural signals in a closed-loop brain-machine interface (BMI) system in monkeys. Approach. Eleven spatial filtering options were compared offline using field potentials collected from 64-channel high-density epidural arrays in monkeys. Arrays were placed over arm/hand motor cortex in which intracortical microelectrodes had previously been implanted and removed leaving focal cortical damage but no lasting motor deficits. Spatial filters tested included: no filtering, common average referencing (CAR), principle component analysis, and eight novel modifications of the common spatial pattern (CSP) algorithm. The spatial filtering method and decoder combination that performed the best offline was then used online where monkeys controlled cursor velocity using continuous wrist position decoded from epidural field potentials in real time. Main results. Optimized CSP methods improved continuous wrist position decoding accuracy by 69% over CAR and by 80% compared to no filtering. Kalman decoders performed better than linear regression decoders and benefitted from including more spatially-filtered signals but not from pre-smoothing the calculated power spectra. Conversely, linear regression decoders required fewer spatially-filtered signals and were improved by pre-smoothing the power values. The ‘position-to-velocity’ transformation used during online control enabled the animals to generate smooth closed-loop movement trajectories using the somewhat limited position information available in the epidural signals. The monkeys’ online performance significantly improved across days of closed-loop training. Significance. Most published BMI studies that use electrocorticographic signals to decode continuous limb movements either use no spatial filtering or CAR. This study suggests a

  11. Treatment of inoperable coronary disease and refractory angina: spinal stimulators, epidurals, gene therapy, transmyocardial laser, and counterpulsation.

    PubMed

    Svorkdal, Nelson

    2004-03-01

    Intractable angina from refractory coronary disease is a severe form of myocardial ischemia for which revascularization provides no prognostic benefit. Inoperable coronary disease is also accompanied by a "vicious cycle" of myocardial dystrophy from a chronic alteration of the cardiac sympathetic tone and sensitization of damaged cardiac tissues. Several adjunctive treatments have demonstrated efficacy when revascularization is either unsuccessful or contraindicated. Spinal cord stimulation modifies the neurologic input and output of the heart by delivering a very low dose of electrical current to the dorsal columns of the high thoracic spinal cord. Neural fibers then release CGRP and other endogenous peptides to the coronary circulation reducing myocardial oxygen demand and enhancing vasodilation of collaterals to improve the myocardial blood flow of the most diseased regions of the heart. Randomized study has shown the survival data at five years is comparable to bypass for high-risk patients. Transmyocardial laser revascularization creates small channels into ischemic myocardium in an effort to enhance flow though studies have shown no improvement in prognosis over medical therapy alone. Enhanced external counterpulsation uses noninvasive pneumatic compression of the legs to improve diastolic filling of the coronary vessels and promote development of collateral flow. The compressor regimen requires thirty-five hours of therapy over a seven-week treatment period. Therapeutic angiogenesis requires injection of cytokines to promote neovascularization and improve myocardial perfusion into the regions affected by chronic ischemia. Phase 3 trials are pending. High thoracic epidural blockade produces a rapid and potent sympatholysis, coronary vasodilation and reduced myocardial oxygen demand in refractory coronary disease. This technique can be used as an adjunct to bypass surgery or medical therapy in chronic or acute unstable angina. Epidurals are easy to perform and

  12. FDTD Analysis of U-Slot Rectangular Patch Antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luk, K. M.; Tong, K. F.; Shum, S. M.; Lee, K. F.; Lee, R. Q.

    1997-01-01

    The U-slot rectangular patch antenna (Figure I) has been found experimentally to provide impedance and gain bandwidths of about 300 without the need of stacked or coplanar parasitic elements [1,2]. In this paper, simulation results of the U-slot patch using FDTD analysis are presented. Comparison with measured results are given.

  13. Intrinsic modes of radiation in ferrite patch antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    How, Hoton; Fang, Ta-Ming; Vittoria, Carmine

    1994-06-01

    We have found two types of radiation modes for patch antennas loaded with ferrite materials. Each mode of radiation is a linear combination of normal modes of propagation in parallel plate waveguide separated by a slab of ferrite material. We have introduced new boundary conditions in which only TE modes of oscillation in the patch antenna cavity result.

  14. Rabies vaccination in dogs using a dissolving microneedle patch.

    PubMed

    Arya, Jaya M; Dewitt, Kristopher; Scott-Garrard, Maya; Chiang, Yu-Wei; Prausnitz, Mark R

    2016-10-10

    Because humans get rabies primarily through dog bites, stray dog population control and mass or mandatory vaccination of domestic dogs and other animals has virtually eliminated human rabies in industrialized countries. However, thousands of people in developing countries die of rabies each year due to the inability to control dog populations and implement mass vaccination because of financial, logistical and other challenges. The availability of an easier-to-administer and more cost-effective vaccine may help to address some of these issues. Here, we propose the use of dissolving microneedle patches for simple and potentially cost-effective rabies vaccination, and assess the safety and immunogenicity of microneedle patch vaccination using a rabies DNA vaccine in dogs. The vaccine was stable upon formulation and storage for at least 3weeks at 4°C in a microneedle patch. For vaccination, the patches were applied to the inner ear by hand without an applicator. Microneedle patches were well tolerated in the skin, with mild erythema, minimal wheal formation and complete resolution of skin reactions within 7days, and generated no systemic adverse events. Microneedle patches were at least as immunogenic as intramuscular injection at the same dose, as demonstrated by similar serum neutralizing antibody titers. A ten-fold lower vaccine dose administered by microneedle patch generated a weaker immune response compared to full-dose intramuscular vaccination. We conclude that dissolving microneedle patches may provide an innovative approach to mass vaccination of dogs.

  15. 270. OFFICERS' QUARTERS (FORMER SUMMER COTTAGES) AT DOG PATCH BEACH, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    270. OFFICERS' QUARTERS (FORMER SUMMER COTTAGES) AT DOG PATCH BEACH, C. 1939. VIEW NORTH DOWN GREENWICH ROAD TOWARD FORMER SUMMER COTTAGES, CONVERTED TO OFFICER'S QUARTERS, OVER-LOOKING DOG PATCH BEACH. - Quonset Point Naval Air Station, Roger Williams Way, North Kingstown, Washington County, RI

  16. Reduction of Rhizoctonia bare patch win wheat with barley rotations.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rhizoctonia bare patch caused by Rhizoctonia solani AG-8 is a major fungal root disease in no-till cropping systems. In an 8-year experiment comparing various dryland no-till cropping systems near Ritzville, Washington, Rhizoctonia bare patch first appeared in year 3 and continued through year 8. ...

  17. Cell-Detection Technique for Automated Patch Clamping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McDowell, Mark; Gray, Elizabeth

    2008-01-01

    A unique and customizable machinevision and image-data-processing technique has been developed for use in automated identification of cells that are optimal for patch clamping. [Patch clamping (in which patch electrodes are pressed against cell membranes) is an electrophysiological technique widely applied for the study of ion channels, and of membrane proteins that regulate the flow of ions across the membranes. Patch clamping is used in many biological research fields such as neurobiology, pharmacology, and molecular biology.] While there exist several hardware techniques for automated patch clamping of cells, very few of those techniques incorporate machine vision for locating cells that are ideal subjects for patch clamping. In contrast, the present technique is embodied in a machine-vision algorithm that, in practical application, enables the user to identify good and bad cells for patch clamping in an image captured by a charge-coupled-device (CCD) camera attached to a microscope, within a processing time of one second. Hence, the present technique can save time, thereby increasing efficiency and reducing cost. The present technique involves the utilization of cell-feature metrics to accurately make decisions on the degree to which individual cells are "good" or "bad" candidates for patch clamping. These metrics include position coordinates (x,y) in the image plane, major-axis length, minor-axis length, area, elongation, roundness, smoothness, angle of orientation, and degree of inclusion in the field of view. The present technique does not require any special hardware beyond commercially available, off-the-shelf patch-clamping hardware: A standard patchclamping microscope system with an attached CCD camera, a personal computer with an imagedata- processing board, and some experience in utilizing imagedata- processing software are all that are needed. A cell image is first captured by the microscope CCD camera and image-data-processing board, then the image

  18. Recent and relict topography of Boo Bee patch reef, Belize

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Halley, R.B.; Shinn, E.A.; Hudson, J.H.; Lidz, B.; Taylor, D.L.

    1977-01-01

    Five core borings were taken on and around Boo Bee Patch Reef to better understand the origin of such shelf lagoon reefs. The cores reveal 4 stages of development: (1) subaerial exposure of a Pleistocene "high" having about 8 meters of relief, possibly a Pleistocene patch reef; (2) deposition of peat and impermeable terrigenous clay 3 meters thick around the high; (3) initiation of carbonate sediment production by corals and algae on the remaining 5 meters of hard Pleistocene topography and carbonate mud on the surrounding terrigenous clay; and (4) accelerated organic accumulation on the patch reef. Estimates of patch reef sedimentation rates (1.6 m/1000 years) are 3 to 4 times greater than off-reef sedimentation rates (0.4-0.5 m/1000 years). During periods of Pleistocene sedimentation on the Belize shelf, lagoon patch reefs may have grown above one another, stacking up to form reef accumulation of considerable thickness.

  19. Suspended Patch Antenna Array With Electromagnetically Coupled Inverted Microstrip Feed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simons, Rainee N.

    2000-01-01

    The paper demonstrates a four-element suspended patch antenna array, with a parasitic patch layer and an electromagnetically coupled inverted microstrip feed, for linear polarization at K-Band frequencies. This antenna has the following advantages over conventional microstrip antennas: First, the inverted microstrip has lower attenuation than conventional microstrip; hence, conductor loss associated with the antenna corporate feed is lower resulting in higher gain and efficiency. Second, conventional proximity coupled patch antennas require a substrate for the feed and a superstrate for the patch. However, the inverted microstrip fed patch antenna makes use of a single substrate, and hence, is lightweight and low cost. Third, electromagnetic coupling results in wider bandwidth. Details regarding the design and fabrication will be presented as well as measured results including return loss, radiation patterns and cross-polarization levels.

  20. Patch Exploitation by female Red Flour Beetles, Tribolium castaneum

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, J. F.; Runnion, C.

    2003-01-01

    The red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum (Herbst) (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae) has had a long association with human stored food and can be a major pest in anthropogenic structures used for the processing and storage of grain-based products. Anthropogenic structures are fragmented landscapes characterized by spatially and temporally patchy resources. Here we investigate the ability of female T. castaneum to evaluate the quality of small patches of food and to adjust the number of eggs they lay per patch (i.e., clutch size) to maximize fitness gains. In multiple choice, paired choice and no choice experiments females tended to lay more eggs in larger amounts of flour. The number of eggs that they lay in a patch of flour was consistent with that predicted to optimize production of adults from that patch (i.e., the ‘Lack’ clutch size). Progeny size was only significantly impacted in the smallest patch sizes. PMID:15841236